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Sample records for somatostatin receptor family

  1. Somatostatin receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Lars Neisig; Stidsen, Carsten Enggaard; Hartmann, Bolette

    2003-01-01

    functional units, receptors co-operate. The total receptor apparatus of individual cell types is composed of different-ligand receptors (e.g. SRIF and non-SRIF receptors) and co-expressed receptor subtypes (e.g. sst(2) and sst(5) receptors) in characteristic proportions. In other words, levels of individual......-peptides, receptor agonists and antagonists. Relatively long half lives, as compared to those of the endogenous ligands, have been paramount from the outset. Motivated by theoretical puzzles or the shortcomings of present-day diagnostics and therapy, investigators have also aimed to produce subtype...

  2. Evolutionary history of the somatostatin and somatostatin receptors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Somatostatin and its receptors have a critical role in mammalian growth through their control pattern of secretion of growth hormone, but the evolutionary history of somatostatin and somatostatin receptors are ill defined. We used comparative whole genome analysis of Danio rerio, Carassius auratus, Xenopus tropicalis, ...

  3. Studies on mRNA expression of the somatostatin receptor family in lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jing; Deng Jinglan; Wu Shengxi; Qiao Hongqing

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the characteristics of expression and distribution of 5 subtypes of somatostatin receptors (SSTR1∼5) in lung cancer. Methods: With [α- 35 S]dATP labelled oligonucleotides of the 5 SSTR subtypes as probes, using in situ hybridization, patterns of mRNA expression were detected in lung cancer tissue sections of 21 cases which fell in varied pathologic types. Additionally, Leica Q-500 image analyzing device was employed to semi-quantitatively analyze density of the expression. Results: Patterns of SSTR1∼5 expression in lung cancer were as follows: SSTR2 expression was dominant in small cell lung cancer (SCLC) while in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) such as adenous and squamous, SSTR1 expression was stronger than that of the other 4 subtypes, In density of SSTR1∼5 expression in lung cancer, NSCLC was higher than SCLC (P<0.01). Conclusions: even though patterns and density of expression of SSTR subtypes in the lung cancer showed heterogeneity in different histopathologic types, as in SCLC and in NSCLC. Therefore, it has positive prospects for somatostatin analog-oriented agents to be used in treatment of both types of the lung cancers

  4. Expression of the somatostatin receptor family mRNAs in lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jing; Wang Liangang; Deng Jinglan; Wu Shengxi

    2000-01-01

    To investigate the characteristics of expression and distribution of 5 subtypes of somatostatin receptors (SSTR1-5) in lung cancer, in situ hybridization was used to examine the expression patterns of SSTR mRNAs in 21 cases of different pathologic types of lung cancer tissues with [α- 35 S]dATP labelled oligonucleotides of the 5 SSTR subtypes as probes. Additionally, Leica Q-500 image analysis processing system was employed for the semi-quantitatively analysis of the hybridization signals. Patterns of SSTR1-5 expression in lung cancer tissues were found as follows. SSTR2 was prominent in small cell lung cancer (SCLC), whereas in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) including the adenous cancer (Ad) and the squamous cancer (Sq), the expression of SSTR1 mRNA was stronger than that of the other 4 types. the expression density of SSTR1-5 in the NSCLC was higher that the SCLC (p < 0.01). The expression patterns and densities of the SSTR subtypes showed heterogeneity in different pathologic types of lung cancer. The expressions of the SSTR mRNAs in both SCLC and NSCLC indicated the positive prospects for somatostatin analog (SSA)-oriented agents in the treatment of both types of the lung cancer

  5. Kidney protection during peptide receptor radionuclide therapy with somatostatin analogues.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rolleman, E.J.; Melis, M.; Valkema, R.; Boerman, O.C.; Krenning, E.P.; Jong, M. de

    2010-01-01

    This review focuses on the present status of kidney protection during peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) using radiolabelled somatostatin analogues. This treatment modality for somatostatin receptor-positive tumours is limited by renal reabsorption and retention of radiolabelled peptides

  6. Functional somatostatin receptors on a rat pancreatic acinar cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viguerie, N.; Tahiri-Jouti, N.; Esteve, J.P.; Clerc, P.; Logsdon, C.; Svoboda, M.; Susini, C.; Vaysse, N.; Ribet, A.

    1988-01-01

    Somatostatin receptors from a rat pancreatic acinar cell line, AR4-2J, were characterized biochemically, structurally, and functionally. Binding of 125 I-[Tyr 11 ]Somatostatin to AR4-2J cells was saturable, exhibiting a single class of high-affinity binding sites with a maximal binding capacity of 258 ± 20 fmol/10 6 cells. Somatostatin receptor structure was analyzed by covalently cross-linking 125 I-[Tyr 11 ]somatostatin to its plasma membrane receptors. Gel electrophoresis and autoradiography of cross-linked proteins revealed a peptide containing the somatostatin receptor. Somatostatin inhibited vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP)-stimulated adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) formation in a dose-dependent manner. The concentration of somatostatin that caused half-maximal inhibition of cAMP formation was close to the receptor affinity for somatostatin. Pertussis toxin pretreatment of AR4-2J cells prevented somatostatin inhibition of VIP-stimulated cAMP formation as well as somatostatin binding. The authors conclude that AR4-2J cells exhibit functional somatostatin receptors that retain both specificity and affinity of the pancreatic acinar cell somatostatin receptors and act via the pertussis toxin-sensitive guanine nucleotide-binding protein N i to inhibit adenylate cyclase

  7. Purification of a putative brain somatostatin receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Haitao; Johnson, K.; Thermos, K.; Reisine, T.

    1989-01-01

    The brain somatostatin receptor was purified by affinity chromatographic techniques. A protein of 60 kDa could be purified from rat brain. The protein was eluted from a [D-Trp 8 ]SRIF affinity column with either sodium acetate (pH 5.5) or free [D-Trp 8 ]SRIF. The binding of the protein to the affinity column was prevented by free [D-Trp 8 ]SRIF or the stable SRIF analogue SMS 201-996 but not by the inactive somatostatin 28-(1-14). The purified receptor could be covalently labeled by the 125 I-labeled SRIF analogue CGP 23996. Excess [D-Trp 8 ]SRIF blocked the binding of 125 I-labeled CGP 23996 to the purified receptor, but somatostatin 28-(1-14) did not affect the binding. A 60-kDa protein was also purified from the anterior pituitary cell line AtT-20, which has a high expression of SRIF receptors. In contrast, no 60-kDa protein could be purified from CHO cells, which have no detectable SRIF receptors. These findings present evidence for the purification of the SRIF receptor

  8. Somatostatin receptors in gastroentero-pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.W. de Herder (Wouter); L.J. Hofland (Leo); A-J. van der Lely (Aart-Jan); S.W.J. Lamberts (Steven)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractFive somatostatin receptor (sst) subtype genes, sst(1), sst(2), sst(3), sst(4) and sst(5), have been cloned and characterised. The five sst subtypes all bind natural somatostatin-14 and somatostatin-28 with high affinity. Endocrine pancreatic and endocrine digestive

  9. Evolutionary history of the somatostatin and somatostatin receptors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Table 1. The identified somatostations. Somatostatin (SST1). Name. Scientific name. Length. High ID (to). Low ID (to) Chromosome. GS. Drs. Danio rerio. 324. 48.1 mms ...... ancestral source. References. Baranowska B., Chmielowska M., Wolinska-Witort E., Bik W.,. Baranowska-Bik A. and Martynska L. 2006 Direct effect of.

  10. Somatostatin receptor imaging in intracranial tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, M.; Scheidhauer, K.; Voth, E.; Schicha, H.; Luyken, C.; Hildebrandt, G.; Klug, N.

    1998-01-01

    The somatostatin analogue [ 111 In-DTPA-d-Phe 1 ]-octreotide ( 111 In-octreotide) allows scintigraphic visualization of somatostatin receptor-expressing tissue. While it is well known that a large variety of tissues express somatostatin receptors and 111 In-octreotide scintigraphy has a clearly defined role in various neuroendocrine diseases, the clinical value of 111 In-octreotide scintigraphy in brain tumours is still under clinical investigation. In 124 patients with 141 brain lesions (63 meningiomas, 24 pituitary adenomas, 10 gliomas WHO class I and II, 12 gliomas WHO class III and IV, 11 neurinomas and 2 neurofibromas, 7 metastases and 12 other varieties: three non-Hodgkin B-cell lymphomas, two epidermoids, one abscess, one angioleiomyoma, one chordoma, one haemangiopericytoma, one osteosarcoma, one plasmacytoma and one pseudocyst), 111 In-octreotide scintigraphy was performed 4-6 and 24 h after i.v. injection of 110-220 MBq 111 In-octreotide. Planar images of the head in four views with a 128 x 128 matrix and single-photon emission tomographic images (64 x 64 matrix) were acquired, and lesions were graded according to qualitative tracer uptake. Fifty-nine of the 63 meningiomas showed moderate to intense tracer uptake. Nine of 24 pituitary adenomas were visible; the remaining 15 did not show any tracer uptake. None of the class I and II gliomas with an intact blood-brain barrier were detected whereas 11/12 class III and IV gliomas showed 111 In-octreotide uptake. None of the neurinomas or neurofibromas were positive. Five of seven metastases were classified as positive, as were the osteosarcoma, two of three non-Hodgkin B-cell lymphomas, one abscess, one angioleiomyoma, one chordoma and one haemangiopericytoma. The other varieties (one non-Hodgkin B-cell lymphoma, two epidermoids, one plasmacytoma and one pseudocyst) did not show 111 In-octreotide uptake. The results demonstrate that a large variety of intracranial lesions express somatostatin receptors and

  11. Somatostatin receptor imaging in intracranial tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, M.; Scheidhauer, K.; Voth, E.; Schicha, H. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Koeln (Germany); Luyken, C.; Hildebrandt, G.; Klug, N. [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Kolen (Germany)

    1998-07-01

    The somatostatin analogue [{sup 111}In-DTPA-d-Phe{sup 1}]-octreotide ({sup 111}In-octreotide) allows scintigraphic visualization of somatostatin receptor-expressing tissue. While it is well known that a large variety of tissues express somatostatin receptors and {sup 111}In-octreotide scintigraphy has a clearly defined role in various neuroendocrine diseases, the clinical value of {sup 111}In-octreotide scintigraphy in brain tumours is still under clinical investigation. In 124 patients with 141 brain lesions (63 meningiomas, 24 pituitary adenomas, 10 gliomas WHO class I and II, 12 gliomas WHO class III and IV, 11 neurinomas and 2 neurofibromas, 7 metastases and 12 other varieties: three non-Hodgkin B-cell lymphomas, two epidermoids, one abscess, one angioleiomyoma, one chordoma, one haemangiopericytoma, one osteosarcoma, one plasmacytoma and one pseudocyst), {sup 111}In-octreotide scintigraphy was performed 4-6 and 24 h after i.v. injection of 110-220 MBq {sup 111}In-octreotide. Planar images of the head in four views with a 128 x 128 matrix and single-photon emission tomographic images (64 x 64 matrix) were acquired, and lesions were graded according to qualitative tracer uptake. Fifty-nine of the 63 meningiomas showed moderate to intense tracer uptake. Nine of 24 pituitary adenomas were visible; the remaining 15 did not show any tracer uptake. None of the class I and II gliomas with an intact blood-brain barrier were detected whereas 11/12 class III and IV gliomas showed {sup 111}In-octreotide uptake. None of the neurinomas or neurofibromas were positive. Five of seven metastases were classified as positive, as were the osteosarcoma, two of three non-Hodgkin B-cell lymphomas, one abscess, one angioleiomyoma, one chordoma and one haemangiopericytoma. The other varieties (one non-Hodgkin B-cell lymphoma, two epidermoids, one plasmacytoma and one pseudocyst) did not show {sup 111}In-octreotide uptake. The results demonstrate that a large variety of intracranial

  12. Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy on thyroid carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Weimin; Tan Tianzhi

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: To study the diagnostic value and clinical method of somatostatin receptor scintigraphy on thyroid carcinoma using 99 Tc m -RC-160 labeled with direct method as scintigraphy reagent; Methods: Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS) were performed on 25 patients with thyroid carcinoma, using 99 Tc m -RC-160 labeled with direct method as scintigraphy reagent, controlling with 131 I- whole- body- imaging(1312 -WBI). Results: Of 4 patients with MTC (medullary thyroid carcinoma), positive metastasis and primary tumour were detected on 3 patients by SRS, negative results were obtained by 131 I-WBI, the positive detective rate by SRS is 3/4; of 12 patients with PTC (papillary thyroid carcinoma), positive metastasis and primary tumour were detected on 2 patients by SRS or 131 I-WBI,1 of which only by SRS, while negative results were obtained by 131 I- WBI, the positive detective rate by SRS is 3/12; of 8 patients with FTC(follicular thyroid carcinoma), positive metastasis and primary tumour were detected on 1 patients by SRS or 131 I-WBI, and 2 positive results were obtained only by SRS, while negative by 131 I-WBI, the positive detective rate by SRS is 3/8; of 1 patients with HCC (hurthle cell carcinoma ), positive metastasis and primary tumour were detected by SRS, while negative by 131 I-WBI; Conclusions: SRS using 99 Tc m -RC-160 labeled with direct method as scintigraphy reagent has high diagnostic value on thyroid carcinoma, especially on MTC and HCC. (authors)

  13. Novel Somatostatin Receptor Ligands Therapies for Acromegaly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Maria Paragliola

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Surgery is considered the treatment of choice in acromegaly, but patients with persistent disease after surgery or in whom surgery cannot be considered require medical therapy. Somatostatin receptor ligands (SRLs octreotide (OCT, lanreotide, and the more recently approved pasireotide, characterized by a broader receptor ligand binding profile, are considered the mainstay in the medical management of acromegaly. However, in the attempt to offer a more efficacious and better tolerated medical approach, recent research has been aimed to override some limitations related to the use of currently approved drugs and novel SRLs therapies, with potential attractive features, have been proposed. These include both new formulation of older molecules and new molecules. Novel OCT formulations are aimed in particular to improve patients’ compliance and to reduce injection discomfort. They include an investigational ready-to-use subcutaneous depot OCT formulation (CAM2029, delivered via prefilled syringes and oral OCT that uses a “transient permeability enhancer” technology, which allows for OCT oral absorption. Another new delivery system is a long-lasting OCT implant (VP-003, which provide stable doses of OCT throughout a period of several months. Finally, a new SRL DG3173 (somatoprim seems to be more selective for GH secretion, suggesting possible advantages in the presence of hyperglycemia or diabetes. How much these innovations will actually be beneficial to acromegaly patients in real clinical practice remains to be seen.

  14. Immunohistochemical detection of somatostatin receptor subtypes sst1 and sst2A in human somatostatin receptor positive tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.J. Hofland (Leo); Q. Liu; P.M. van Koetsveld (Peter); J. Zuijderwijk; F. van der Ham (Frieda); R.R. de Krijger (Ronald); A. Schonbrunn; S.W.J. Lamberts (Steven)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractAlthough in situ hybridization has been used to examine the distribution of messenger RNA for somatostatin receptor subtypes (sst) in human tumors, the cellular localization of sst1 and sst2A receptors has not been reported. In this study, we describe the

  15. Clinical value of somatostatin receptor imaging in patients with suspected head and neck paragangliomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, Matthias; Dietlein, Markus; Weber, Kerstin; Moka, Detlef; Schicha, Harald [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Universitaet zu Koeln, Joseph-Stelzmann-Strasse 9, 50924 Koeln (Germany); Fischer, Eva; Michel, Olaf; Stennert, Eberhard [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Hals-, Nasen- und Ohrenheilkunde, Universitaet zu Koeln, Koeln (Germany)

    2002-12-01

    Paragangliomas or glomus tumours of the head and neck region are rare somatostatin receptor-expressing neuroendocrine tumours. Precise preoperative diagnosis is of special importance in order to adequately weigh the potential benefit of the operation against the inherent risks of the procedure. In this study, the clinical value of somatostatin receptor imaging was assessed in 19 patients who underwent somatostatin receptor scintigraphy because of known or suspected paraganglioma of the head and neck region. The results were compared with the results of computed tomography and/or magnetic resonance imaging, histology and clinical follow-up. [{sup 111}In-DTPA-D-Phe{sup 1}]-octreotide scintigraphy was performed 4-6 and 24 h after i.v. injection of 140-220 MBq {sup 111}In-octreotide. Whole-body and planar images as well as single-photon emission tomography images were acquired and lesions were graded according to qualitative tracer uptake. Somatostatin receptor imaging was positive in nine patients, identifying paragangliomas for the first time in three patients and recurrent disease in six patients. In one patient, a second, previously unknown paraganglioma site was identified. Negative results were obtained in ten patients. These patients included one suffering from chronic hyperplastic otitis externa, one with granuloma tissue and an organised haematoma, one with an acoustic neuroma, one with an asymmetric internal carotid artery, two with ectasia of the bulbus venae jugularis and one with a jugular vein thrombosis. In two patients with a strong family history of paraganglioma, individual involvement could be excluded. In only one patient did somatostatin receptor imaging and magnetic resonance imaging yield false negative results in respect of recurrent paraganglioma tissue. It is concluded that somatostatin receptor scintigraphy provides important information in patients with suspected paragangliomas of the head and neck region and has a strong impact on further

  16. Development of 99mTc labelled somatostatin analogues with high affinity for somatostatin receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maina, T.; Nock, B.; Nicolopoulou, A.; Tsipra, C.; Poppe, M.; Chiotellis, E.

    2001-01-01

    A recent development in oncology involves the use of metabolically stabilized peptide hormone analogues labelled with metallic radionuclides for the diagnosis or therapy of malignant disease. This approach was successfully applied for the first time in the visualization of somatostatin positive tumours and their metastases with 111 In DTPA-octreotide. In an effort to obtain a 99m Tc somatostatin receptor affine radioligand we describe herein the synthesis, radiochemistry and preliminary biological evaluation of two novel 99m Tc labelled somatostatin analogues, N 4 -TOC and N 4 -RC-160. In these compounds a tetraamine bifunctional unit was covalently attached to the N-terminal (D)Phe 1 of the peptide chain using Boc-protection strategies. The peptide conjugates were purified by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and characterized by UV/Vis and ES-MS spectroscopies. As revealed by HPLC, 99m Tc labelling was quantitative under mild conditions, leading to a single 99m Tc species in high specific activities. Affinity of 99m Tc N 4 -TOC for the somatostatin receptor, as determined by in vitro binding assays in rat brain cortex membranes, was found unaffected by the presence of the bulky metal chelate. The binding properties of 99m Tc N 4 -RC-160 could not be determined by this assay due to an extremely high non-specific binding of this radioligand, and will be shortly investigated by other methods. Tissue distribution in healthy mice revealed that 99m Tc N 4 -TOC is clearing mainly through the kidneys and the urinary tract whereas 99m Tc N 4 -RC-160 shows a high accumulation in the liver as a result of its lipophilicity. Analysis of urine samples by HPLC showed that 99m Tc N 4 -TOC is excreted integer from the body of mice, while 99m Tc N 4 -RC-160 is totally transformed to an unidentified hydrophilic metabolite in vivo. The location of this metabolism is currently investigated. In vivo blocking experiments using animals pre-treated with 50 μg octreotide

  17. Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy in patients with cat-scratch disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krause, R.; Schnedl, W.J.; Hoier, S.; Piswanger-Soelkner, C.; Lipp, R.W.; Daxboeck, F.; Reisinger, E.C.

    2006-01-01

    Aim: somatostatin receptor scintigraphy images various neoplastic, granulomatous, and auto-immun diseases. Cat-scratch disease in an infectious granulomatous disease usually affecting the lymphnodes. It is not known whether cat-scratch disease provides positive somatostatin receptor scintigrams. Patients, methods: twelve patients with lymphadenitis and suspected cat-scratch disease were investigated by immunofluorescence antibody testing and somatostatin receptor scintigraphy. Suppurated lymphnodes were extracted or drained and Bartonella henselae specific PCR was then performed. Results: eleven of 12 patients showed IgG antibodies against B. henselea. SRS showed positive scintigraphic results in 6 of 11 patients with CSD. B. henselae DNA was detected in tissue of lymphnodes from 4 of 5 patients with lymphnode extraction or lymphnode drainage. SRS demonstrated positive scintigrams in all patients with a positive PCR. In one patient with suspected CSD SRS was negative as well as antibody testing. Conclusion: somatostatin receptor scintigraphy correlated with positive Bartonella henselae specific PCR tests and positive Bartonella henselae specific antibody tests in patients with CSD. (orig.)

  18. Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy in patients with cat-scratch disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krause, R.; Schnedl, W.J.; Hoier, S. [Div. of Infectious Diseases, Dept. of Internal Medicine, Univ. Graz (Austria); Piswanger-Soelkner, C.; Lipp, R.W. [Div. of Nuclear Medicine, Dept. of Internal Medicine, Univ. Graz (Austria); Daxboeck, F. [Clinical Inst. for Hygiene and Medical Microbiology, Div. of Hospital Hygiene, Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Reisinger, E.C. [Div. of Infectious Diseases and Tropical Medicine, Dept. of Internal Medicine, Univ. Rostock (Germany)

    2006-07-01

    Aim: somatostatin receptor scintigraphy images various neoplastic, granulomatous, and auto-immun diseases. Cat-scratch disease in an infectious granulomatous disease usually affecting the lymphnodes. It is not known whether cat-scratch disease provides positive somatostatin receptor scintigrams. Patients, methods: twelve patients with lymphadenitis and suspected cat-scratch disease were investigated by immunofluorescence antibody testing and somatostatin receptor scintigraphy. Suppurated lymphnodes were extracted or drained and Bartonella henselae specific PCR was then performed. Results: eleven of 12 patients showed IgG antibodies against B. henselea. SRS showed positive scintigraphic results in 6 of 11 patients with CSD. B. henselae DNA was detected in tissue of lymphnodes from 4 of 5 patients with lymphnode extraction or lymphnode drainage. SRS demonstrated positive scintigrams in all patients with a positive PCR. In one patient with suspected CSD SRS was negative as well as antibody testing. Conclusion: somatostatin receptor scintigraphy correlated with positive Bartonella henselae specific PCR tests and positive Bartonella henselae specific antibody tests in patients with CSD. (orig.)

  19. Somatostatin receptor-mediated imaging and therapy: basic science, current knowledge, limitations and future perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breeman, W.A.P.; Jong, M. de; Kwekkeboom, D.J.; Valkema, R.; Bakker, W.H.; Kooij, P.P.M. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Erasmus Medical Centre Rotterdam (Netherlands); Visser, T.J. [Dept. of Internal Medicine, Erasmus Medical Centre Rotterdam (Netherlands); Krenning, E.P. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Erasmus Medical Centre Rotterdam (Netherlands); Dept. of Internal Medicine, Erasmus Medical Centre Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2001-09-01

    In vivo somatostatin receptor-mediated scintigraphy has proven to be a valuable method for the visualisation of neuroendocrine tumours and their metastases. A new application is the use of radiolabelled analogues for somatostatin receptor-mediated therapy. This paper presents a review on the basic science, historical background and current knowledge of somatostatin receptor subtypes and their expression in neuroendocrine tumours. New somatostatin analogues, new chelators, ''new'' radionuclides and combinations thereof are also discussed. Due attention is given to limitations and future perspectives of somatostatin receptor-mediated imaging and therapy. (orig.)

  20. Somatostatin receptor-mediated imaging and therapy: basic science, current knowledge, limitations and future perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breeman, W.A.P.; Jong, M. de; Kwekkeboom, D.J.; Valkema, R.; Bakker, W.H.; Kooij, P.P.M.; Visser, T.J.; Krenning, E.P.

    2001-01-01

    In vivo somatostatin receptor-mediated scintigraphy has proven to be a valuable method for the visualisation of neuroendocrine tumours and their metastases. A new application is the use of radiolabelled analogues for somatostatin receptor-mediated therapy. This paper presents a review on the basic science, historical background and current knowledge of somatostatin receptor subtypes and their expression in neuroendocrine tumours. New somatostatin analogues, new chelators, ''new'' radionuclides and combinations thereof are also discussed. Due attention is given to limitations and future perspectives of somatostatin receptor-mediated imaging and therapy. (orig.)

  1. Kidney protection during peptide receptor radionuclide therapy with somatostatin analogues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rolleman, Edgar J.; Melis, Marleen; Valkema, Roelf; Krenning, Eric P.; Jong, Marion de [Erasmus MC, Department of Nuclear Medicine, V 220, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Boerman, Otto C. [Radboud University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2010-05-15

    This review focuses on the present status of kidney protection during peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) using radiolabelled somatostatin analogues. This treatment modality for somatostatin receptor-positive tumours is limited by renal reabsorption and retention of radiolabelled peptides resulting in dose-limiting high kidney radiation doses. Radiation nephropathy has been described in several patients. Studies on the mechanism and localization demonstrate that renal uptake of radiolabelled somatostatin analogues largely depends on the megalin/cubulin system in the proximal tubule cells. Thus methods are needed that interfere with this reabsorption pathway to achieve kidney protection. Such methods include coadministration of basic amino acids, the bovine gelatin-containing solution Gelofusine or albumin fragments. Amino acids are already commonly used in the clinical setting during PRRT. Other compounds that interfere with renal reabsorption capacity (maleic acid and colchicine) are not suitable for clinical use because of potential toxicity. The safe limit for the renal radiation dose during PRRT is not exactly known. Dosimetry studies applying the principle of the biological equivalent dose (correcting for the effect of dose fractionation) suggest that a dose of about 37 Gy is the threshold for development of kidney toxicity. This threshold is lower when risk factors for development of renal damage exist: age over 60 years, hypertension, diabetes mellitus and previous chemotherapy. A still experimental pathway for kidney protection is mitigation of radiation effects, possibly achievable by cotreatment with amifostine (Ethylol), a radiation protector, or with blockers of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. Future perspectives on improving kidney protection during PRRT include combinations of agents to reduce renal retention of radiolabelled peptides, eventually together with mitigating medicines. Moreover, new somatostatin analogues with lower

  2. Kidney protection during peptide receptor radionuclide therapy with somatostatin analogues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rolleman, Edgar J.; Melis, Marleen; Valkema, Roelf; Krenning, Eric P.; Jong, Marion de; Boerman, Otto C.

    2010-01-01

    This review focuses on the present status of kidney protection during peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) using radiolabelled somatostatin analogues. This treatment modality for somatostatin receptor-positive tumours is limited by renal reabsorption and retention of radiolabelled peptides resulting in dose-limiting high kidney radiation doses. Radiation nephropathy has been described in several patients. Studies on the mechanism and localization demonstrate that renal uptake of radiolabelled somatostatin analogues largely depends on the megalin/cubulin system in the proximal tubule cells. Thus methods are needed that interfere with this reabsorption pathway to achieve kidney protection. Such methods include coadministration of basic amino acids, the bovine gelatin-containing solution Gelofusine or albumin fragments. Amino acids are already commonly used in the clinical setting during PRRT. Other compounds that interfere with renal reabsorption capacity (maleic acid and colchicine) are not suitable for clinical use because of potential toxicity. The safe limit for the renal radiation dose during PRRT is not exactly known. Dosimetry studies applying the principle of the biological equivalent dose (correcting for the effect of dose fractionation) suggest that a dose of about 37 Gy is the threshold for development of kidney toxicity. This threshold is lower when risk factors for development of renal damage exist: age over 60 years, hypertension, diabetes mellitus and previous chemotherapy. A still experimental pathway for kidney protection is mitigation of radiation effects, possibly achievable by cotreatment with amifostine (Ethylol), a radiation protector, or with blockers of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. Future perspectives on improving kidney protection during PRRT include combinations of agents to reduce renal retention of radiolabelled peptides, eventually together with mitigating medicines. Moreover, new somatostatin analogues with lower

  3. Reduced Numbers of Somatostatin Receptors in the Cerebral Cortex in Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flint Beal, M.; Mazurek, Michael F.; Tran, Vinh T.; Chattha, Geetinder; Bird, Edward D.; Martin, Joseph B.

    1985-07-01

    Somatostatin receptor concentrations were measured in patients with Alzheimer's disease and controls. In the frontal cortex (Brodmann areas 6, 9, and 10) and temporal cortex (Brodmann area 21), the concentrations of somatostatin in receptors in the patients were reduced to approximately 50 percent of control values. A 40 percent reduction was seen in the hippocampus, while no significant changes were found in the cingulate cortex, postcentral gyrus, temporal pole, and superior temporal gyrus. Scatchard analysis showed a reduction in receptor number rather than a change in affinity. Somatostatin-like immunoreactivity was significantly reduced in both the frontal and temporal cortex. Somatostatin-like immunoreactivity was linearly related to somatostatin-receptor binding in the cortices of Alzheimer's patients. These findings may reflect degeneration of postsynaptic neurons or cortical afferents in the patients' cerebral cortices. Alternatively, decreased somatostatinlike immunoreactivity in Alzheimer's disease might indicate increased release of somatostatin and down regulation of postsynaptic receptors.

  4. Ga-68 Somatostatin Receptor PET/CT in von Hippel-Lindau Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Jong-Ryool; Min, Jung-Joon [Chonnam National Univ. Hwasun Hospital, Hwasun (Korea, Republic of); Kulkarui, Harshad; Carreras, Cecilia; Schalch, Georg; Baum, Richard P. [Nuclear Medicine and Center for PET/CT, Zentralk Bad Berka, Bad Verka (Germany)

    2012-06-15

    Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease is a dominantly inherited familial cancer syndrome with a variety of benign and malignant tumors such as retinal and central nervous system hemangioblastomas, endolymphatic sac tumors, renalcysts and tumors, pancreatic cysts and tumors, pheochromo-cytomas, and epididymal cystadenomas. Cross-sectional mo-dalities (computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging) as well as ultrasound play a major role in the initial evaluation and follow-up of the various manifestations of VHL disease. Ga-68-labeled somatostatin receptor analogs already have a significant role in the diagnosis, staging, and therapy management of neuroendocrine neoplasms and neural crest tumors. Herein, we report a case presenting a variety of malignancies in VHL and showing the usefulness of Ga-68 somatostatin receptor PET/CT as a one-stop-shop imaging modality in the management of VHL disease.

  5. Ga-68 Somatostatin Receptor PET/CT in von Hippel-Lindau Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Jong-Ryool; Min, Jung-Joon; Kulkarui, Harshad; Carreras, Cecilia; Schalch, Georg; Baum, Richard P.

    2012-01-01

    Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease is a dominantly inherited familial cancer syndrome with a variety of benign and malignant tumors such as retinal and central nervous system hemangioblastomas, endolymphatic sac tumors, renalcysts and tumors, pancreatic cysts and tumors, pheochromo-cytomas, and epididymal cystadenomas. Cross-sectional mo-dalities (computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging) as well as ultrasound play a major role in the initial evaluation and follow-up of the various manifestations of VHL disease. Ga-68-labeled somatostatin receptor analogs already have a significant role in the diagnosis, staging, and therapy management of neuroendocrine neoplasms and neural crest tumors. Herein, we report a case presenting a variety of malignancies in VHL and showing the usefulness of Ga-68 somatostatin receptor PET/CT as a one-stop-shop imaging modality in the management of VHL disease

  6. Somatostatin-receptor imaging in the localization of endocrine tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamberts, S.W.; Bakker, W.H.; Reubi, J.C.; Krenning, E.P.

    1990-01-01

    A number of different tumors have receptors for somatostatin. We evaluated the efficacy of scanning with 123 I-labeled Tyr3-octreotide, a somatostatin analogue, for tumor localization in 42 patients with carcinoid tumors, pancreatic endocrine tumors, or paragangliomas. We then evaluated the response to octreotide therapy in some of these patients. Primary tumors or metastases, often previously unrecognized, were visualized in 12 of 13 patients with carcinoid tumors and in 7 of 9 patients with pancreatic endocrine tumors. The endocrine symptoms of these patients responded well to therapy with octreotide. Among 20 patients with paragangliomas, 8 of whom had more than one tumor, 10 temporal (tympanic or jugular), 9 carotid, and 10 vagal tumors could be visualized. One small tympanic tumor and one small carotid tumor were not seen on the scan. The 123 I-labeled Tyr3-octreotide scanning technique is a rapid and safe procedure for the visualization of some tumors with somatostatin receptors. A positive scan may predict the ability of octreotide therapy to control symptoms of hormonal hypersecretion

  7. Activation of somatostatin 2 receptors in the brain and the periphery induces opposite changes in circulating ghrelin levels: functional implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas eStengel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Somatostatin is an important modulator of neurotransmission in the central nervous system and acts as a potent inhibitor of hormone and exocrine secretion and regulator of cell proliferation in the periphery. These pleiotropic actions occur through interaction with five G-protein coupled somatostatin receptor subtypes (sst1-5 that are widely expressed in the brain and peripheral organs. The characterization of somatostatin’s effects can be investigated by pharmacological or genetic approaches using newly developed selective sst agonists and antagonists and mice lacking specific sst subtypes. Recent evidence points towards a divergent action of somatostatin in the brain and in the periphery to regulate circulating levels of ghrelin, an orexigenic hormone produced by the endocrine X/A-like cells in the gastric mucosa. Somatostatin interacts with the sst2 in the brain to induce an increase in basal ghrelin plasma levels and counteracts the visceral stress-related decrease in circulating ghrelin in rats. By contrast, stimulation of peripheral somatostatin-sst2 signaling results in the inhibition of basal ghrelin release and mediates the postoperative decrease in circulating ghrelin in rats. The peripheral sst2-mediated reduction of plasma ghrelin is likely to involve a paracrine action of D-cell derived somatostatin acting on sst2 bearing X/A-like ghrelin cells in the gastric mucosa. The other member of the somatostatin family, named cortistatin, in addition to binding to sst1-5 also directly interacts with the ghrelin receptor and therefore may simultaneously modulate ghrelin release and actions at target sites bearing ghrelin receptors representing a link between the ghrelin and somatostatin systems.

  8. Somatostatin receptor subtype expression in human thyroid tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klagge, A; Krause, K; Schierle, K; Steinert, F; Dralle, H; Fuhrer, D

    2010-04-01

    Somatostatin receptors (SSTR) are expressed in various endocrine tumours. The expression of SSTR at the tumour cell surface confers the possibility for diagnostic imaging and therapy of tumours using radiolabeled somatostatin analogues. The majority of currently available somatostatin analogues show a higher binding affinity for the SSTR2 subtype. To date, the precise expression pattern of the SSTR subtypes 1-5 in thyroid epithelial tumours remains to be determined. We investigated the mRNA expression of SSTR1-5 in benign and malignant epithelial thyroid tumours [20 cold thyroid nodules (CTNs), 20 toxic thyroid nodules (TTNs), 20 papillary, 20 follicular, and 5 anaplastic carcinomas (PTCs, FTCs, ATCs, respectively)] and compared them to normal surrounding thyroid tissues. Four out of five SSTR subtypes were detected in malignant thyroid tumours, benign neoplasia, and normal surrounding tissue with a predominant expression of SSTR2 and SSTR5, and a weak expression of SSTR1 and SSTR3. Weak SSTR4 mRNA expression was detected in some PTCs. Compared to normal thyroid tissue, SSTR2 was significantly upregulated in PTC and ATC. In addition significant upregulation of SSTR3 was found in PTC. SSTR5 mRNA expression was increased in PTC and FTC and significantly decreased in CTN and TTN compared to normal thyroid tissue. SSTR2 is the predominant subtype in thyroid epithelial tumours with a high expression pattern, in particular, in PTC . Perspectively, the expression of distinct SSTR in thyroid epithelial tumours might represent a promising avenue for diagnostics and therapy of advanced thyroid cancer with somatostatin analogues. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart New York.

  9. Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy in endocrine ophthalmopathy; Somatostatin-Rezeptor-Szintigraphie bei endokriner Orbitopathie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz, M. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Univ. Mainz (Germany); Kahaly, G. [3. Medizinische Klinik und Poliklinik, Innere Medizin - Endokrinologie, Univ. Mainz (Germany); Muehlbach, A. [3. Medizinische Klinik und Poliklinik, Innere Medizin - Endokrinologie, Univ. Mainz (Germany); Bockisch, A. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Univ. Mainz (Germany); Beyer, J. [3. Medizinische Klinik und Poliklinik, Innere Medizin - Endokrinologie, Univ. Mainz (Germany); Hahn, K. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Univ. Mainz (Germany)

    1994-12-01

    Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy with {sup 111}In-labeled octreotide proves to be a very sensitive diagnostic tool for evaluation of inflammative activity in endocrine ophthalmopathy (EO). The results of somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS) in 40 patients with EO show a high orbital accumulation of {sup 111}In-octreotide in clinically active EO (4h-median/orbit-brain-ratio: 12.6; controls 4h-median: 5.8) Patients with clinically inactive EO (4h-median: 7.1) show a similar orbital accumulation of radioactivity compared to controls. 5 patients with active orbital myositis also revealed an even higher orbital accumulation of radioactivity (4h-median: 42.3). The diagnostic value of SRS lies in its ability to act as a measure of inflammation and an be useful as an activity parameter when planning therapeutic procedure as well as for EO follow-up. The results in patients with orbital myositis nevertheless do not permit a differential diagnosis with this method. The therapeutic value of {sup 111}In-octreotide in Graves` disease has yet to be established. (orig.) [Deutsch] Die Somatostatin-Rezeptor-Szintigraphie (SRS) mit dem {sup 111}Indium-markierten Somatostatinanalogon Octreotid stellt ein sensitives Verfahren zur Einschaetzung der entzuendlichen Aktivitaet bei endokriner Orbitopathie (EO) dar. Die Untersuchungen an 40 Patienten mit EO ergaben eine im Vergleich zur Kontrollgruppe signifikant hoehere orbitale Octreotidanreicherung bei klinisch aktiver Erkrankung (4h-Median/Orbita-Hirn-Quotient: 12,6; Kontrollgruppe 4h-Median: 5,8; p=0,0032). Patienten mit klinisch nicht aktiver Erkrankung (4h-Median: 7,1) unterschieden sich bezueglich der orbitalen Octreotidanreicherung nicht wesentlich von der Kontrollgruppe. Auch 5 Patienten mit florider orbitaler Myositis zeigten eine deutlich gesteigerte orbitale Aktivitaetsanreicherung (4h-Median: 42,3). Der diagnostische Nutzen der SRS liegt somit in ihrer Eigenschaft als Aktivitaets- und Entzuendungsparameter und kann mit

  10. Development of antibodies against the rat brain somatostatin receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theveniau, M; Rens-Domiano, S; Law, S F; Rougon, G; Reisine, T

    1992-05-15

    Somatostatin (SRIF) is a neurotransmitter in the brain involved in the regulation of motor activity and cognition. It induces its physiological actions by interacting with receptors. We have developed antibodies against the receptor to investigate its structural properties. Rabbit polyclonal antibodies were generated against the rat brain SRIF receptor. These antibodies (F4) were able to immunoprecipitate solubilized SRIF receptors from rat brain and the cell line AtT-20. The specificity of the interaction of these antibodies with SRIF receptors was further demonstrated by immunoblotting. F4 detected SRIF receptors of 60 kDa from rat brain and adrenal cortex and the cell lines AtT-20, GH3, and NG-108, which express high densities of SRIF receptors. They did not detect immunoreactive material from rat liver or COS-1, HEPG, or CRL cells, which do not express functional SRIF receptors. In rat brain, 60-kDa immunoreactivity was detected by F4 in the hippocampus, cerebral cortex, and striatum, which have high densities of SRIF receptors. However, F4 did not interact with proteins from cerebellum and brain stem, which express few SRIF receptors. Immunoreactive material cannot be detected in rat pancreas or pituitary, which have been reported to express a 90-kDa SRIF receptor subtype. The selective detection of 60-kDa SRIF receptors by F4 indicates that the 60- and 90-kDa SRIF receptor subtypes are immunologically distinct. The availability of antibodies that selectively detect native and denatured brain SRIF receptors provides us with a feasible approach to clone the brain SRIF receptor gene(s).

  11. Physiologic basics and clinical experience with somatostatin-receptor-scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henze, E.; Eberhardt, J.U.; Bohuslavizki, K.H.

    1994-01-01

    The introduction of radiolabelled octreotide, an analogon to the receptor binding hormone Somatostatin, has markedly increased the ability to detect structures and tumours carrying somatostatin receptors by nuclear medicine imaging with high sensitivity and specificity. It has been shown that in vitro receptor density and in vivo scintigraphic results correlate well in particular in tumours of neuroendocrine origin of the GI tract such as insulinomas, gastrinomas, glucagonomas, carcionoids, but also in paragangliomas, small cell lung cancer and meningiomas. As receptors were also shown to be present on so called activated leucocytes granulomas, lymphomas and autoimmune disease have been imaged with octreotide successfully. The specific tracer (In-111-DTPA-D-PHE-Octreotide, Octreoscan R ) is rapidly cleared from the blood pool by the kidneys and, partially, via the liver providing a high target to background ratio. Physiologic uptake is usually observed in the pituitary and thyroid glands, in spleen and liver. Optimum tracer accumulation for tumour scintigraphy is seen on the 24-h-images with the best target to background ratios. Additional SPECT-imaging is recommended in particular in the abdominal regions. The sensitivity in imaging the above named tumours ranges from 70 up to 100%. In-111 octreotide imaging is of diagnostic impact both for the primary diagnostic evaluation as well as for detecting or excluding secondary manifestations in known tumour sites. Of specific value is the information on relative receptor density in the tumour to be treated as may be obtained by quantitative In-111 octreotide imaging for decision making whether or not to use cold octreotide (Sandostatin R ) as a receptor blocking drug for therapy as well as for treatment follow-up studies. (author)

  12. Honey Bee Allatostatins Target Galanin/Somatostatin-Like Receptors and Modulate Learning: A Conserved Function?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elodie Urlacher

    Full Text Available Sequencing of the honeybee genome revealed many neuropeptides and putative neuropeptide receptors, yet functional characterization of these peptidic systems is scarce. In this study, we focus on allatostatins, which were first identified as inhibitors of juvenile hormone synthesis, but whose role in the adult honey bee (Apis mellifera brain remains to be determined. We characterize the bee allatostatin system, represented by two families: allatostatin A (Apime-ASTA and its receptor (Apime-ASTA-R; and C-type allatostatins (Apime-ASTC and Apime-ASTCC and their common receptor (Apime-ASTC-R. Apime-ASTA-R and Apime-ASTC-R are the receptors in bees most closely related to vertebrate galanin and somatostatin receptors, respectively. We examine the functional properties of the two honeybee receptors and show that they are transcriptionally expressed in the adult brain, including in brain centers known to be important for learning and memory processes. Thus we investigated the effects of exogenously applied allatostatins on appetitive olfactory learning in the bee. Our results show that allatostatins modulate learning in this insect, and provide important insights into the evolution of somatostatin/allatostatin signaling.

  13. Somatostatin receptors in rat hippocampus: localization to intrinsic neurons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palacios, J.M.; Reubi, J.C.; Maurer, R.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of neurotoxic chemical and electrolytical lesions on somatostatin (SS) receptor binding in the septo-hippocampal afferents, pyramidal and granule cells of the rat hippocampus was examined by autoradiography using the stable SS analogue 125 I-204-090 as radioligand. Electrolytical lesions of the septum did not result in modification of SS binding in the hippocampus. In contrast, both granule cell lesion with colchicine and pyramidal or pyramidal and granule cell lesions with increasing kainic acid doses did result in a specific decrease of binding in the dentate gyrus and hippocampus (CA 1 and CA 3 ). These results suggest that SS receptors in the hippocampus are probably associated with elements from intrinsic neurons. (Author)

  14. Validation of somatostatin receptor scintigraphy in the localization of neuroendocrine tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamberts, S.W.J.; Reubi, J.C.; Krenning, E.P.

    1993-01-01

    Somatostatin analogs are used in the control of hormonal hypersecretion and tumor growth of patients with acromegaly, islet cell carcinomas and carcinoids. Recently we showed that somatostatin receptor positive tumors can be visualized in vivo after the administration of radionuclide-labeled somatostatin analogs. Receptor imaging was positive in 18/21 islet cell tumors, 32/37 carcinoids, 26/28 paragangliomas, 9/14 medullary thyroid carcinomas, and 5/7 small cell lung cancers. Somatostatin receptor imaging is an easy, harmless and painless diagnostic method. It localizes multiple and/or metastatic tumors, predicts the successful control of hormonal hypersecretion by octreotide and seems to be of prognostic value in certain types of cancer. This scintigraphic method might help in patient selection for clinical trials with somatostatin analogs in the treatment of neuroendocrine cancers. (orig.)

  15. Validation of somatostatin receptor scintigraphy in the localization of neuroendocrine tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamberts, S.W.J. (Depts. of Medicine and Nuclear Medicine, Erasmus Univ., Rotterdam (Netherlands) Div. of Cell Biology and Experimental Cancer Research, Institution of Pathology, Bern Univ. (Switzerland)); Reubi, J.C. (Depts. of Medicine and Nuclear Medicine, Erasmus Univ., Rotterdam (Netherlands) Div. of Cell Biology and Experimental Cancer Research, Institution of Pathology, Bern Univ. (Switzerland)); Krenning, E.P. (Depts. of Medicine and Nuclear Medicine, Erasmus Univ., Rotterdam (Netherlands) Div. of Cell Biology and Experimental Cancer Research, Institution of Pathology, Bern Univ. (Switzerland))

    1993-01-01

    Somatostatin analogs are used in the control of hormonal hypersecretion and tumor growth of patients with acromegaly, islet cell carcinomas and carcinoids. Recently we showed that somatostatin receptor positive tumors can be visualized in vivo after the administration of radionuclide-labeled somatostatin analogs. Receptor imaging was positive in 18/21 islet cell tumors, 32/37 carcinoids, 26/28 paragangliomas, 9/14 medullary thyroid carcinomas, and 5/7 small cell lung cancers. Somatostatin receptor imaging is an easy, harmless and painless diagnostic method. It localizes multiple and/or metastatic tumors, predicts the successful control of hormonal hypersecretion by octreotide and seems to be of prognostic value in certain types of cancer. This scintigraphic method might help in patient selection for clinical trials with somatostatin analogs in the treatment of neuroendocrine cancers. (orig.).

  16. Truncated somatostatin receptor 5 may modulate therapy response to somatostatin analogues--Observations in two patients with acromegaly and severe headache

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marina, Djordje; Burman, Pia; Klose, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Somatotropinomas have unique "fingerprints" of somatostatin receptor (sst) expression, which are targets in treatment of acromegaly with somatostatin analogues (SSAs). However, a significant expression of sst is not always related to the biochemical response to SSAs. Headache is a com...

  17. Coupling of guanine nucleotide inhibitory protein to somatostatin receptors on pancreatic acinar membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamoto, C.; Matozaki, T.; Nagao, M.; Baba, S.

    1987-01-01

    Guanine nucleotides and pertussis toxin were used to investigate whether somatostatin receptors interact with the guanine nucleotide inhibitory protein (NI) on pancreatic acinar membranes in the rat. Guanine nucleotides reduced 125 I-[Tyr 1 ]somatostatin binding to acinar membranes up to 80%, with rank order of potency being 5'-guanylyl imidodiphosphate [Gpp(NH)p]>GTP>TDP>GMP. Scatchard analysis revealed that the decrease in somatostatin binding caused by Gpp(NH)p was due to the decrease in the maximum binding capacity without a significant change in the binding affinity. The inhibitory effect of Gpp(NH)p was partially abolished in the absence of Mg 2+ . When pancreatic acini were treated with 1 μg/ml pertussis toxin for 4 h, subsequent 125 I-[Tyr 1 ]somatostatin binding to acinar membranes was reduced. Pertussis toxin treatment also abolished the inhibitory effect of somatostatin on vasoactive intestinal peptide-stimulated increase in cellular content of adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) in the acini. The present results suggest that 1) somatostatin probably functions in the pancreas to regulate adenylate cyclase enzyme system via Ni, 2) the extent of modification of Ni is correlated with the ability of somatostatin to inhibit cAMP accumulation in acini, and 3) guanine nucleotides also inhibit somatostatin binding to its receptor

  18. Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy using (99m)Tc-EDDA/HYNIC-TOC in patients with medullary thyroid carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Czepczynski, Rafal; Parisella, Maria Gemma; Kosowicz, Jerzy; Mikolajczak, Renata; Ziemnicka, Katarzyna; Gryczynska, Maria; Sowinski, Jerzy; Signore, Alberto

    2007-01-01

    Purpose Several new somatostatin analogues have been developed for the diagnosis and therapy of different tumours. Since somatostatin receptors are often over-expressed in medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC), the aim of our study was to evaluate the utility of scintigraphy with the somatostatin

  19. Somatostatin receptor 2 knockout/lacZ knockin mice show impaired motor coordination and reveal sites of somatostatin action within the striatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Jeremy P; Hathway, Gareth J; Clarke, Neil J; Jowett, Mike I; Topps, Stephanie; Kendrick, Keith M; Humphrey, Patrick P A; Wilkinson, Lawrence S; Emson, Piers C

    2003-05-01

    The peptide somatostatin can modulate the functional output of the basal ganglia. The exact sites and mechanisms of this action, however, are poorly understood, and the physiological context in which somatostatin acts is unknown. Somatostatin acts as a neuromodulator via a family of five 7-transmembrane G protein-coupled receptors, SSTR1-5, one of which, SSTR2, is known to be functional in the striatum. We have investigated the role of SSTR2 in basal ganglia function using mice in which Sstr2 has been inactivated and replaced by the lacZ reporter gene. Analysis of Sstr2lacZ expression in the brain by beta-galactosidase histochemistry demonstrated a widespread pattern of expression. By comparison to previously published in situ hybridization and immunohistochemical data, Sstr2lacZ expression was shown to accurately recapitulate that of Sstr2 and thus provided a highly sensitive model to investigate cell-type-specific expression of Sstr2. In the striatum, Sstr2 expression was identified in medium spiny projection neurons restricted to the matrix compartment and in cholinergic interneurons. Sstr2 expression was not detected in any other nuclei of the basal ganglia except for a sparse number of nondopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. Microdialysis in the striatum showed Sstr2-null mice were selectively refractory to somatostatin-induced dopamine and glutamate release. In behavioural tests, Sstr2-null mice showed normal levels of locomotor activity and normal coordination in undemanding tasks. However, in beam-walking, a test of fine motor control, Sstr2-null mice were severely impaired. Together these data implicate an important neuromodulatory role for SSTR2 in the striatum.

  20. Novel, potent, and radio-iodinatable somatostatin receptor 1 (sst1) selective analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erchegyi, Judit; Cescato, Renzo; Grace, Christy Rani R; Waser, Beatrice; Piccand, Véronique; Hoyer, Daniel; Riek, Roland; Rivier, Jean E; Reubi, Jean Claude

    2009-05-14

    The proposed sst(1) pharmacophore (J. Med. Chem. 2005, 48, 523-533) derived from the NMR structures of a family of mono- and dicyclic undecamers was used to design octa-, hepta-, and hexamers with high affinity and selectivity for the somatostatin sst(1) receptor. These compounds were tested for their in vitro binding properties to all five somatostatin (SRIF) receptors using receptor autoradiography; those with high SRIF receptor subtype 1 (sst(1)) affinity and selectivity were shown to be agonists when tested functionally in a luciferase reporter gene assay. Des-AA(1,4-6,10,12,13)-[DTyr(2),DAgl(NMe,2naphthoyl)(8),IAmp(9)]-SRIF-Thr-NH(2) (25) was radio-iodinated ((125)I-25) and specifically labeled sst(1)-expressing cells and tissues. 3D NMR structures were calculated for des-AA(1,4-6,10,12,13)-[DPhe(2),DTrp(8),IAmp(9)]-SRIF-Thr-NH(2) (16), des-AA(1,2,4-6,10,12,13)-[DAgl(NMe,2naphthoyl)(8),IAmp(9)]-SRIF-Thr-NH(2) (23), and des-AA(1,2,4-6,10,12,13)-[DAgl(NMe,2naphthoyl)(8),IAmp(9),Tyr(11)]-SRIF-NH(2) (27) in DMSO. Though the analogues have the sst(1) pharmacophore residues at the previously determined distances from each other, the positioning of the aromatic residues in 16, 23, and 27 is different from that described earlier, suggesting an induced fit mechanism for sst(1) binding of these novel, less constrained sst(1)-selective family members.

  1. Activation of Brain Somatostatin Signaling Suppresses CRF Receptor-Mediated Stress Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Stengel

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF is the hallmark brain peptide triggering the response to stress and mediates—in addition to the stimulation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis—other hormonal, behavioral, autonomic and visceral components. Earlier reports indicate that somatostatin-28 injected intracerebroventricularly counteracts the acute stress-induced ACTH and catecholamine release. Mounting evidence now supports that activation of brain somatostatin signaling exerts a broader anti-stress effect by blunting the endocrine, autonomic, behavioral (with a focus on food intake and visceral gastrointestinal motor responses through the involvement of distinct somatostatin receptor subtypes.

  2. Activation of Brain Somatostatin Signaling Suppresses CRF Receptor-Mediated Stress Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stengel, Andreas; Taché, Yvette F

    2017-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) is the hallmark brain peptide triggering the response to stress and mediates-in addition to the stimulation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis-other hormonal, behavioral, autonomic and visceral components. Earlier reports indicate that somatostatin-28 injected intracerebroventricularly counteracts the acute stress-induced ACTH and catecholamine release. Mounting evidence now supports that activation of brain somatostatin signaling exerts a broader anti-stress effect by blunting the endocrine, autonomic, behavioral (with a focus on food intake) and visceral gastrointestinal motor responses through the involvement of distinct somatostatin receptor subtypes.

  3. Somatostatin Receptor Scintigraphy Findings in a Patient with Metastatic Gastrinoma and MEN 1 Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gözde Mütevelizade

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Liver metastases from neuroendocrine tumours frequently occur and significantly worsen their prognosis. Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS is a valuable method for the detection of somatostatin receptor-positive lesions like gastrinoma. In this case report, the importance of SRS to localize the primary tumor and the spread of disease is emphasized in a patient with neuroendocrine liver metastases. A 45-year-old man was admitted to hospital with multiple liver metastasis of neuroendocrine carcinoma. Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy showed multiple intense radiotracer uptakes in the liver and a focal tracer uptake at the right side of the upper abdominal region corresponding to duodenum or pancreas. Elevated serum gastrin levels confirmed the gastrinoma diagnosis. (MRT 2011;20:117-120

  4. Experimental peptide receptor radionuclide therapy in radioiodine negative somatostatin receptor positive thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilica, B.; Kroiss, A.; Putzer, D.; Uprimmy, C.; Warwitz, B.; Kendler, D.; Waitz, D.; Virgolini, I.

    2015-01-01

    Full text of publication follows. Purpose: This retrospective analysis evaluated the time to progression (TTP), progression free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) in patients with radioiodine negative thyroid cancer who had undergone peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) with 177 Lu-DOTA-TATE, 177 Lu-DOTA-LAN, 90 Y-DOTA-TOC or 90 Y-DOTA-LAN after tumor progression. Methods: Data derived from twenty patients with either differentiated (n=15), anaplastic (n=1) or medullary (n=4) somatostatin receptor positive thyroid cancer who had received treatment with PRRT after tumor progression. TTP, PFS and OS were defined according to the clinical trial endpoints suggested by the FDA (Food and Drug Administration). Progressive disease was defined by sonography, FDG-PET, Ga-DOTA-TOC-PET, or CT (RECIST Criteria). Results: In 17 patients the median overall survival time after the first PRRT was 17.3 (range: 0.1 - 109.7) months. Three patients still alive are actually showing stable disease. The median of PFS in 20 Patients (6 with more than one PRRT-cycle or PRRT-substance) has been 10.9 (range: 0.1 - 44.0) months. The median TTP was 15.6 (range 4.4 to 29.2) months. Conclusion: PRRT appears to be useful in patients with somatostatin receptor positive but radioiodine negative thyroid cancer as a complementary palliative cytotoxic therapy. (authors)

  5. Carboxyl-terminal multi-site phosphorylation regulates internalization and desensitization of the human sst2 somatostatin receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Andreas; Kliewer, Andrea; Schütz, Dagmar; Nagel, Falko; Stumm, Ralf; Schulz, Stefan

    2014-04-25

    The somatostatin receptor 2 (sst2) is the pharmacological target of somatostatin analogs that are widely used in the diagnosis and treatment of human neuroendocrine tumors. We have recently shown that the stable somatostatin analogs octreotide and pasireotide (SOM230) stimulate distinct patterns of sst2 receptor phosphorylation and internalization. Like somatostatin, octreotide promotes the phosphorylation of at least six carboxyl-terminal serine and threonine residues namely S341, S343, T353, T354, T356 and T359, which in turn leads to a robust receptor endocytosis. Unlike somatostatin, pasireotide stimulates a selective phosphorylation of S341 and S343 of the human sst2 receptor followed by a partial receptor internalization. Here, we show that exchange of S341 and S343 by alanine is sufficient to block pasireotide-driven internalization, whereas mutation of T353, T354, T356 and T359 to alanine is required to strongly inhibited both octreotide- and somatostatin-induced internalization. Yet, combined mutation of T353, T354, T356 and T359 is not sufficient to prevent somatostatin-driven β-arrestin mobilization and receptor desensitization. Replacement of all fourteen carboxyl-terminal serine and threonine residues by alanine completely abrogates sst2 receptor internalization and β-arrestin mobilization in HEK293 cells. Together, our findings demonstrate for the first time that agonist-selective sst2 receptor internalization is regulated by multi-site phosphorylation of its carboxyl-terminal tail. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. 99m Tc- la bed somatostatin analogs for imaging somatostatin-receptor-positive tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gandomkar, M.; Najafi, R.; Shafiei, A.; Sadat Ebrahimi, E.; Babaie, M.H.; Rabani, M.

    2002-01-01

    Over the least few years, 111 In-DTPA- Octreotide has found widespread clinical applicability, especially in oncology. However limitation, especially concerning availability, imaging properties, and costs, remain and have stimulated research on radiolabeling with many alternative radionuclides. The purpose of this investigation was to labeling somatostatin analogs with 99 m Tc and evaluate their suitability as an agents for in vivo use. Octreotide and Tyr-3-Octreotide were labeled by 99 mTc with direct and indirect methods. Sodium ascorbate and sodium dithionite were used for reduction of cystine bridge and HYNIC was used as bifunctional agents and different co ligands used for labeling by 99 mTc. Yield of labeling, purity, stability, internalisation, binding affinity and biodistribution of peptide conjugates were studied. Direct labeling of octreotide was simple, rapid, efficient and yield was good (%60). K d for binding affinity as high (10 -9 ) but stability was low. Labeling for HYNIC-Tyr-Octreotide had a high yield (>%90), good stability, internalisation and biodistribution. with more experimental work and some improve this peptide-based radiopharmaceuticals can be employed in all nuclear medicine centers as a useful agent for imaging of tumors

  7. Receptor binding of somatostatin-14 and somatostatin-28 in rat brain: differential modulation by nucleotides and ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srikant, C B; Dahan, A; Craig, C

    1990-02-04

    The tissue-selective binding of the two principal bioactive forms of somatostatin, somatostatin-14 (SS-14) and somatostatin-28 (SS-28), their ability to modulate cAMP-dependent and -independent regulation of post-receptor events to different degrees and the documentation of specific labelling of SS receptor subtypes with SS-28 but not SS-14 in discrete regions of rat brain suggest the existence of distinct SS-14 and SS-28 binding sites. Receptor binding of SS-14 ligands has been shown to be modulated by nucleotides and ions, but the effect of these agents on SS-28 binding has not been studied. In the present study we investigated the effects of adenine and guanine nucleotides as well as monovalent and divalent cations on rat brain SS receptors quantitated with radioiodinated analogs of SS-14 ([125I-Tyr11]SS14, referred to in this paper as SS-14) and SS-28 ([Leu8, D-Trp22, 125I-Tyr25] SS-28, referred to as LTT* SS-28) in order to determine if distinct receptor sites for SS-14 and SS-28 could be distinguished on the basis of their modulation by nucleotides and ions. GTP as well as ATP exerted a dose-dependent inhibition (over a concentration range of 10(-7)-10(-3) M) of the binding of the two radioligands. The nucleotide inhibition of binding resulted in a decrease the Bmax of the SS receptors, the binding affinity remaining unaltered. GTP (10(-4) M) decreased the Bmax of LTT* SS-28 binding sites to a greater extent than ATP (145 +/- 10 and 228 +/- 16 respectively, compared to control value of 320 +/- 20 pmol mg-1). Under identical conditions GTP was less effective than ATP in reducing the number of T* SS-14 binding sites (Bmax = 227 +/- 8 and 182 +/- 15, respectively, compared to 340 +/- 15 pmol mg-1 in the absence of nucleotides). Monovalent cations inhibited the binding of both radioligands, Li+ and Na+ inhibited the binding of T* SS-14 to a greater extent than K+. The effect of divalent cations on the other hand was varied. At low concentration (2 mM) Mg2+, Ba2

  8. Critical role of somatostatin receptor 2 in the vulnerability of the central noradrenergic system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ádori, Csaba; Glück, Laura; Barde, Swapnali

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease and other age-related neurodegenerative disorders are associated with deterioration of the noradrenergic locus coeruleus (LC), a probable trigger for mood and memory dysfunction. LC noradrenergic neurons exhibit particularly high levels of somatostatin binding sites. This is n......Alzheimer’s disease and other age-related neurodegenerative disorders are associated with deterioration of the noradrenergic locus coeruleus (LC), a probable trigger for mood and memory dysfunction. LC noradrenergic neurons exhibit particularly high levels of somatostatin binding sites...... morphometry and mRNA profiling in a cohort of Alzheimer’s and age-matched control brains in combination with genetic models of somatostatin receptor deficiency to establish causality between defunct somatostatin signalling and noradrenergic neurodegeneration. In Alzheimer’s disease, we found significantly....../IV and onwards, i.e., a process preceding advanced Alzheimer’s pathology. The loss of SSTR2 transcripts in the LC neurons appeared selective, since tyrosine hydroxylase, dopamine β-hydroxylase, galanin or galanin receptor 3 mRNAs remained unchanged. We modeled these pathogenic changes in Sstr2 −/− mice and...

  9. High sensitivity of the in vivo detection of somatostatin receptors by 111Indium (DTPA-Octreotide)-scintigraphy in meningioma patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hildebrandt, G.; Luyken, C.; Klug, N.; Scheidhauer, K.; Schicha, H.; Dahms, P.; Krisch, B.

    1994-01-01

    The recent availability of isotope-labelled somatostatin analogues has allowed one to detect somatostatin receptors in normal tissue as well as in endocrine or non-endocrine cranial tumours. The purpose of the present study was to establish the value of somatostatin receptor scintigraphy using an 111 indium-labelled somatostatin analogue, octreotide, in the diagnostic work-up of meningioma patients. Twenty-two patients (16 women, 6 men, aged from 19-70 years) with newly diagnosed, residual or recurrent cranial meningiomas were examined. 111 indium-labelled DTPA-octreotide was injected i.v.. Planar and tomographic images were obtained with a gamma camera 4-6, and 24 hours after injection. In all of the meningiomas studies a high density of somatostatin receptor was detected by scintigraphy. No false negative test result was found. Due to this, a 100% predictive value of a negative test was calculated. However, when the tumours were taken in culture differing staining intensity could be seen in the light- and electron microscopic level even on individual cells of a single culture when silver intensified somatostatin-gold was used as ligand. We conclude, that in vivo somatostatin receptor scintigraphy may aid in the pre-operative differential diagnosis of skull base tumours

  10. Diagnostic value of somatostatin receptor scintigraphy in patients with intracranial tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luyken, C.; Hildebrandt, G.; Scheidhauer, K.; Kirsch, B.

    1993-01-01

    The aim of the study was to detect the SR binding sites in intracranial tumours and to evaluate the benefit of SRS in pre- and postoperative diagnostics. 86 patients with 94 intracranial tumours (39 meningiomas, 18 pituitary adenomas, 11 gliomas grade 3 or 4, 8 gliomas grade 2, 5 neurinomas, 5 intracranial metastases, 4 tumours of the orbit, 2 neurofibromas, 1 brain abscess and 1 cystic lesion) were examined. 111 In-octreotide was injected i.v. as 10 μg or 20 μg bolus, corresponding to 110 or 220 MBq (3 or 6 mCi). Gamma-camera images and SPECT were obtained 3-6 h and 24 h post injection. The scintigraphic evaluation was performed without knowledge of CT and MRI results. The histological classification corresponded to the WHO grading system. Somatostatin binding sites were detected in vito using somatostatin-gold conjugates. All patients with meningiomas showed a high focal tracer uptake corresponding to SR binding sites in vitro, whereas only in 50% of the pituitary adenomas SRS was positive. Neurinomas did not show any tracer uptake. In patients with gliomas with disturbed blood-brain-barrier positive tracer uptake was detected, while none of the gliomas with intact blood-brain-barrier could be visualized by SRS but showed somatostatin binding sites in vitro. In intracranial metastases a local tracer uptake was detected in vivo. In vitro 3 of 4 cases showed somatostatin binding sites. In 2 cases extracranial tracer uptake showed the primary tumour and metastases of the lymphnodes. Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy can help to detect or to exclude meningiomas especially in the cerebellopontine angle or in the orbit. In intracranial metastases SRS may point to the primary tumour or other metastases. In all other intracranial tumours receptor scintigraphy provides no clinical relevant information. (orig./MG) [de

  11. Role of somatostatin receptor-2 in gentamicin-induced auditory hair cell loss in the Mammalian inner ear.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yves Brand

    Full Text Available Hair cells and spiral ganglion neurons of the mammalian auditory system do not regenerate, and their loss leads to irreversible hearing loss. Aminoglycosides induce auditory hair cell death in vitro, and evidence suggests that phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase/Akt signaling opposes gentamicin toxicity via its downstream target, the protein kinase Akt. We previously demonstrated that somatostatin-a peptide with hormone/neurotransmitter properties-can protect hair cells from gentamicin-induced hair cell death in vitro, and that somatostatin receptors are expressed in the mammalian inner ear. However, it remains unknown how this protective effect is mediated. In the present study, we show a highly significant protective effect of octreotide (a drug that mimics and is more potent than somatostatin on gentamicin-induced hair cell death, and increased Akt phosphorylation in octreotide-treated organ of Corti explants in vitro. Moreover, we demonstrate that somatostatin receptor-1 knockout mice overexpress somatostatin receptor-2 in the organ of Corti, and are less susceptible to gentamicin-induced hair cell loss than wild-type or somatostatin-1/somatostatin-2 double-knockout mice. Finally, we show that octreotide affects auditory hair cells, enhances spiral ganglion neurite number, and decreases spiral ganglion neurite length.

  12. The potential value of somatostatin receptor scintigraphy in medullary thyroid carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doerr, U.; Bihl, H.; Frank-Raue, K.; Raue, F.; Sautter-Bihl, M.L.; Buhr, H.J.; Guzman, G.; Inst. de Neurocirugia, Investigationes Cerebrales 'Dr Asenjo' Santiago

    1993-01-01

    In a prospective study, ten patients with recurrent medullary thyroid carcinoma (markedly elevated calcitonin levels) were investigated by means of somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS) with 111 In-pentetreotide. Scintigraphically, 30 sites of pathological uptake were found, mostly located in the neck and upper mediastinum. So far, 18 suspected tumour sites underwent histological examination and 14 of them could be verified as metastases of medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC). The remaining four putative tumour lesions turned out to be false positive scintigraphic findings caused by chronic inflammation and somatostatin receptor positive tumours other than MTC. We conclude that SRS is a promising imaging modality for localization of MTC recurrence and may thus make a contribution to better management of this patient group. (Author)

  13. The potential value of somatostatin receptor scintigraphy in medullary thyroid carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerr, U.; Bihl, H. (Katharinenhospital, Stuttgart (Germany). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine); Frank-Raue, K.; Raue, F. (Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Internal Medicine); Sautter-Bihl, M.L.; Buhr, H.J. (Staedt. Klinikum, Karlsruhe (Germany). Dept. of Radiooncology and Nuclear Medicine); Guzman, G. (Katherinenhospital, Stuttgart (Germany). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine Inst. de Neurocirugia, Investigationes Cerebrales ' Dr Asenjo' Santiago (Chile). Dept. de Medicina Nuclear)

    1993-06-01

    In a prospective study, ten patients with recurrent medullary thyroid carcinoma (markedly elevated calcitonin levels) were investigated by means of somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS) with [sup 111]In-pentetreotide. Scintigraphically, 30 sites of pathological uptake were found, mostly located in the neck and upper mediastinum. So far, 18 suspected tumour sites underwent histological examination and 14 of them could be verified as metastases of medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC). The remaining four putative tumour lesions turned out to be false positive scintigraphic findings caused by chronic inflammation and somatostatin receptor positive tumours other than MTC. We conclude that SRS is a promising imaging modality for localization of MTC recurrence and may thus make a contribution to better management of this patient group. (Author).

  14. Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy - a case report and review of the literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaga, Lilian Yuri Itaya; Belfer, Aron J.; Segal, Amisa

    1997-01-01

    The authors report a case of carcinoid tumor, diagnosed in a 75-year-old male patient, confirmed by laparotomy and anatomo-pathological study. The patient was examined by somatostatin receptor scintigraphy with In-pentetreotide, and correlation was performed with I-MIBG and CT scan. A review of current literature about this new tracer for detection of carcinoid tumor is presented. (author)

  15. Molecular imaging of neuroendocrine tumors using 68Ga-labeled peptides (Somatostatin receptor PET/CT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baum, R.P.; Prasad, V.; Hoersch, D.

    2009-01-01

    Receptor PET/CT using 68 Ga-labeled somatostatin analogues (DOTA-NOC, DOTA-TOC or DOTA-TATE) enables the highly sensitive molecular imaging of neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) based on the expression of somatostatin receptors and even the detection of receptor subtypes. Our experience after more than 3000 studies shows that receptor PET/CT has a significantly higher tumor detection rate than conventional scintigraphy (even in SPECT/CT technique), and that tumor lesions can be very accurately localized. By calculating standardized uptake values (SUV) - which are reproducible and investigator-independent - patients can be selected for peptide receptor radiotherapy and also the course after therapy can be controlled. Receptor-PET/CT is the most sensitive imaging modality for the detection of unknown primary tumors (CUP syndrome), which is especially true for the detection of neuroendocrine tumors of the pancreas and small bowel; whole-body staging (''one stop shop'') as well as restaging and selection of patients for peptide receptor radiotherapy can be performed using a patient-friendly procedure (examination finished within one hour) exposing the patient to less radiation than whole-body CT scanning. The 68 Ge/ 68 Ga generator has proved very reliable over the years - even in a hospital environment. The effective costs for 68 Ga labeled somatostatin analogues might be less than for scintigraphic agents, provided a certain number of studies per year are performed. The development of new tumor-specific peptides as well as of other DOTA- or NOTA-coupled radiopharmaceuticals opens a new avenue into the future: finally, the 68 Ga generator could play a similar important role for PET/CT as did the 99m Tc-Generator for conventional gamma camera imaging over the last decades. (orig.)

  16. Somatostatin Receptor Scintigraphy (SRS) with 99m-Tc HYNIC-TOC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zarlenga, A.C.; Parma, P.; Arashiro, J.; Castiglia, S.; Obenaus, E.

    2002-01-01

    Background: This compound is a synthetic analogue of somatostatin by conjugating the Hydrazinocotinamide (Hynic) to Tyr 3 -Octreotide (Toc) radiolabeling via quelation with 99m Tc. Purpose: We have analyzed the feasibility in detecting neuroendocrine tumors (NET) by somatostatin receptor with 99m Tc Hynic-Toc. Methods: After comparative studies between 99m Tc Hynic-Toc and 111 In (pentetreotide) with excellent correlation, we have performed 48 scintigrams with 99m Tc Hynic-Toc. 35 patients with suspicions of NET were included (19 women, 16 men. Age range 22-75 y). We have performed planar images at 1,2,24 hs and tomographic images at 150 min after intravenous injection of 740 MBq 99m Tc Hynic-Toc. We compare the results with other diagnosis modalities and /or the histopathological findings after biopsy or surgery. Results: True Positive:17; True Negative:11; False Positive: 4; False Negative:3. Specificity=73.3%; Sensitivity=85%; Accuracy=80%; Not adverse effects were observed. Conclusions: 99m Tc Hynic-Toc is not limited availability of the isotope. It is a suitable radiopharmaceutical for in vivo evaluation to define tumor receptor status, staging, and for identification of patients who may benefit from therapy with somatostatin. The tumor uptake at 24 hs allows a better visualization of abdominal tumor sites. Tc Hynic-Toc is an alternative to 111 In-pentetreotide for imaging somatostatin receptor positive tumors. The study was offered to patients whom the scintigraphy with 111 In-pentetreotide offers a diagnosis alternative with high specificity and accessible cost

  17. Diagnostic value of somatostatin receptor scintigraphy in patients with intracranial tumours. Diagnostische Wertigkeit der Somatostatin-Rezeptor-Szintigraphie bei Patienten mit intrakraniellen Raumforderungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luyken, C. (Klinik fuer Neurochirurgie, Koeln Univ. (Germany)); Hildebrandt, G. (Klinik fuer Neurochirurgie, Koeln Univ. (Germany)); Scheidhauer, K. (Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Koeln Univ. (Germany)); Kirsch, B. (Anatomisches Inst., Kiel Univ. (Germany))

    1993-12-01

    The aim of the study was to detect the SR binding sites in intracranial tumours and to evaluate the benefit of SRS in pre- and postoperative diagnostics. 86 patients with 94 intracranial tumours (39 meningiomas, 18 pituitary adenomas, 11 gliomas grade 3 or 4, 8 gliomas grade 2, 5 neurinomas, 5 intracranial metastases, 4 tumours of the orbit, 2 neurofibromas, 1 brain abscess and 1 cystic lesion) were examined. [sup 111]In-octreotide was injected i.v. as 10 [mu]g or 20 [mu]g bolus, corresponding to 110 or 220 MBq (3 or 6 mCi). Gamma-camera images and SPECT were obtained 3-6 h and 24 h post injection. The scintigraphic evaluation was performed without knowledge of CT and MRI results. The histological classification corresponded to the WHO grading system. Somatostatin binding sites were detected in vito using somatostatin-gold conjugates. All patients with meningiomas showed a high focal tracer uptake corresponding to SR binding sites in vitro, whereas only in 50% of the pituitary adenomas SRS was positive. Neurinomas did not show any tracer uptake. In patients with gliomas with disturbed blood-brain-barrier positive tracer uptake was detected, while none of the gliomas with intact blood-brain-barrier could be visualized by SRS but showed somatostatin binding sites in vitro. In intracranial metastases a local tracer uptake was detected in vivo. In vitro 3 of 4 cases showed somatostatin binding sites. In 2 cases extracranial tracer uptake showed the primary tumour and metastases of the lymphnodes. Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy can help to detect or to exclude meningiomas especially in the cerebellopontine angle or in the orbit. In intracranial metastases SRS may point to the primary tumour or other metastases. In all other intracranial tumours receptor scintigraphy provides no clinical relevant information. (orig./MG)

  18. 99mTc-EDDA/HYNIC-TOC somatostatin receptor scintigraphy in daily clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrapko, Beata Ewa; Nocuń, Anna; Gołebiewska, Renata; Stefaniak, Bogusław; Korobowicz, Elzbieta; Czekajska-Chehab, Elzbieta; Sawicki, Marek; Polkowski, Wojciech Piotr

    2010-04-01

    This study aimed to assess the impact of 99mTc-EDDA/HYNIC-TOC (99mTc-TOC) somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS) in clinical practice. One hundred seventeen patients were divided into 6 groups: 1, initial detection and localization of suspected neuroendocrine tumor (NET); 2, tumor staging before therapy; 3, staging of NET of unknown origin, 4, restaging after surgery of primary tumor; 5, diagnosis of solitary pulmonary nodules (SPNs), and 6, follow-up after "cold" somatostatin analogues treatment. In group 1, clinical suspicions were not confirmed in any of the patients; in group 2, most of the primary lesions showed overexpression of somatostatin receptors (SSRT); in group 3, the primary tumor was not identified in any of the patients; in group 4, recurrences were depicted in 7 out of 47 patients; in group 5, only 1 malignant SPN was detected, and in group 6, regression of primary mass and metastases were seen on follow-up SRS in 1 patient. 99mTc-TOC SRS is useful in staging of SSRT-overexpressing tumors of known and unknown primary origin, as well as in restaging after primary tumor surgery. This method is less effective in detecting suspected NET and assessing SPNs. Further investigation is necessary to evaluate the usefulness of SRS in monitoring patients after biological treatment.

  19. Somatostatin receptor 1 and 5 double knockout mice mimic neurochemical changes of Huntington's disease transgenic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padmesh S Rajput

    Full Text Available Selective degeneration of medium spiny neurons and preservation of medium sized aspiny interneurons in striatum has been implicated in excitotoxicity and pathophysiology of Huntington's disease (HD. However, the molecular mechanism for the selective sparing of medium sized aspiny neurons and vulnerability of projection neurons is still elusive. The pathological characteristic of HD is an extensive reduction of the striatal mass, affecting caudate putamen. Somatostatin (SST positive neurons are selectively spared in HD and Quinolinic acid/N-methyl-D-aspartic acid induced excitotoxicity, mimic the model of HD. SST plays neuroprotective role in excitotoxicity and the biological effects of SST are mediated by five somatostatin receptor subtypes (SSTR1-5.To delineate subtype selective biological responses we have here investigated changes in SSTR1 and 5 double knockout mice brain and compared with HD transgenic mouse model (R6/2. Our study revealed significant loss of dopamine and cAMP regulated phosphoprotein of 32 kDa (DARPP-32 and comparable changes in SST, N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptors subtypes, calbindin and brain nitric oxide synthase expression as well as in key signaling proteins including calpain, phospho-extracellular-signal-regulated kinases1/2, synapsin-IIa, protein kinase C-α and calcineurin in SSTR1/5(-/- and R6/2 mice. Conversely, the expression of somatostatin receptor subtypes, enkephalin and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases were strain specific. SSTR1/5 appears to be important in regulating NMDARs, DARPP-32 and signaling molecules in similar fashion as seen in HD transgenic mice.This is the first comprehensive description of disease related changes upon ablation of G- protein coupled receptor gene. Our results indicate that SST and SSTRs might play an important role in regulation of neurodegeneration and targeting this pathway can provide a novel insight in understanding the pathophysiology of Huntington's disease.

  20. Somatostatin receptor gene therapy combined with targeted therapy with radiolabeled octreotide: a new treatment for liver metastases.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Mearadji (Amir); W.A.P. Breeman (Wouter); L.J. Hofland (Leo); R.L. Marquet (Richard); J. Jeekel (Hans); E.P. Krenning (Eric); C.H.J. van Eijck (Casper); P.M. van Koetsveld (Peter)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) on somatostatin receptor (SSR)-transfected colon carcinoma cells in a rat liver metastases model.SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Previously the authors have shown highly effective therapy with

  1. DOTA-derivatives of octreotide dicarba-analogues with high affinity for somatostatin sst2,5 receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratesi, Alessandro; Ginanneschi, Mauro; Lumini, Marco; Papini, Anna M.; Novellino, Ettore; Brancaccio, Diego; Carotenuto, Alfonso

    2017-02-01

    In vivo somatostatin receptor scintigraphy is a valuable method for the visualization of human endocrine tumours and their metastases. In fact, peptide ligands of somatostatin receptors (sst’s) conjugated with chelating agents are in clinical use. We have recently developed octreotide dicarba-analogues, which show interesting binding profiles at sst’s. In this context, it was mandatory to explore the possibility that our analogues could maintain their activity also upon conjugation with DOTA. In this paper, we report and discuss the synthesis, binding affinity and conformational preferences of three DOTA-conjugated dicarba-analogues of octreotide. Interestingly, two conjugated analogues exhibited nanomolar affinities on sst2 and sst5 somatostatin receptor subtypes.

  2. Development and preclinical evaluation of radiolabelled somatostatin receptor agonists and αvβ3-integrin antagonists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoecklin, G.; Wester, H.J.; Haubner, R.; Schottelius, M.

    2002-01-01

    Tumours express specific receptors for peptide ligands. This can be exploited for tumour targeting. New bioactive peptides are available, in particular new somatostatin analogs and RGD-Peptides for targeting the α V β 3 -integrin. The design and optimization of radiolabelled peptides with respect to their receptor affinity, tumour uptake, biodistribution, pharmacokinetics and stability may provide better tracers for tumour imaging and therapy. Based on two basic structures, new radioiodinated and carbohydrated somatostatin analogs and cyclic RGD-peptides were developed and evaluated. (author)

  3. Correlation of Somatostatin Receptor-2 Expression with Gallium-68-DOTA-TATE Uptake in Neuroblastoma Xenograft Models

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Libo; Vines, Douglass C.; Scollard, Deborah A.; McKee, Trevor; Komal, Teesha; Ganguly, Milan; Do, Trevor; Wu, Bing; Alexander, Natasha; Vali, Reza; Shammas, Amer; Besanger, Travis; Baruchel, Sylvain

    2017-01-01

    Peptide-receptor imaging and therapy with radiolabeled somatostatin analogs such as 68Ga-DOTA-TATE and 177Lu-DOTA-TATE have become an effective treatment option for SSTR-positive neuroendocrine tumors. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the correlation of somatostatin receptor-2 (SSTR2) expression with 68Ga-DOTA-TATE uptake and 177Lu-DOTA-TATE therapy in neuroblastoma (NB) xenograft models. We demonstrated variable SSTR2 expression profiles in eight NB cell lines. From micro-PET imagin...

  4. Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy in sarcoidosis: relation to selected clinical and laboratory markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piotrowski, Wojciech J; Bieńkiewicz, Małgorzata; Frieske, Izabella; Marczak, Jerzy; Antczak, Adam; Górski, Paweł; Kuśmierek, Jacek; Płachcińska, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Discriminating between active and inactive sarcoidosis may be problematic in everyday clinical practice. There are numerous biochemical markers used in the diagnosis and monitoring of sarcoidosis. Somatostatin receptor (SR) scintigraphy with the use of 99mTc-octreotide may be used to estimate disease activity. The aim of the paper was to assess the value of traditional biomarkers (serum angiotensin-converting enzyme [SACE], C-reactive protein, markers of calcium metabolism, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid [BALF] lymphocytes) and a novel biomarker, 8-isoprostane (8-IP) in exhaled breath condensate (EBC), in the assessment of sarcoidosis activity in relation to somatostatin receptor scintigraphy. The study included 32 patients with sarcoidosis. Scintigraphy was performed using somatostatin analogue, 99mTc-HYNIC-TOC; planar and SPECT/CT images were recorded. The study group was divided into a subgroup with positive radiotracer uptake (n = 20) and without a visible uptake (n = 12). 8-IP levels were measured in EBC by an immunoenzymatic assay. RESULTS We observed a significantly higher EBC 8-IP levels in the subgroup with positive uptake compared with those with negative uptake (19.1 ± 19.8 vs. 5.4 ± 3.5 pg/ml, P = 0.02). The levels of SACE and the percentage of BALF lymphocytes were also nonsignificantly elevated. In the group of patients with positive scintigraphy results, a positive correlation was observed between the uptake ratio and SACE (r = 0.44, P = 0.041). The results indicate low value of biochemical markers in the assessment of disease activity. SR scintigraphy may have practical usefulness in the monitoring of sarcoidosis.

  5. Evaluation of somatostatin receptors in large cell pulmonary neuroendocrine carcinoma with 99mTc-EDDA/HYNIC-TOC scintigraphy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nocuń, Anna; Chrapko, Beata; Gołębiewska, Renata; Stefaniak, Bogusław; Czekajska-Chehab, Elżbieta

    2011-06-01

    Large cell pulmonary neuroendocrine carcinoma (LCNEC) is a poorly differentiated and high-grade neoplasm. It is positioned between an atypical carcinoid and small cell neuroendocrine carcinoma of the lung in a distinct family of pulmonary neuroendocrine tumors. The aim of our study was to detect somatostatin receptors in this uncommon malignancy and to evaluate the sensitivity of somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS) in LCNEC staging. We analyzed data of 26 patients (mean age: 61.5±7.9 years) with histologically confirmed diagnosis of LCNEC, including 18 cases not treated surgically and eight patients after the resection of the primary tumor. SRS was carried out with technetium-99m ethylene diamine-diacetic acid/hydrazinonicotinyl-Tyr3-octreotide (Tc-TOC). A visual analysis of scintigraphic images was done with reference to conventional imaging modalities (computed tomography and bone sicintigraphy). SRS sensitivity for the detection of primary lesions, supradiaphragmatic metastases, and infradiaphragmatic metastases was 100, 83.3%, and 0%, respectively. Five out of 13 metastases to the liver appeared on SRS as photopenic foci, visible on the background of physiological hepatic activity. Only one of the nine metastases to the skeletal system was found by SRS with sensitivity as low as 11.1%. The overall SRS sensitivity for the detection of secondary lesions and of all lesions was 54.8 and 62.2%, respectively. Within a rather large series of LCNEC, the primary tumor showed an uptake of Tc-TOC in all cases, whereas some metastases did show Tc-TOC uptake and some others did not.

  6. Synthesis of a Fluorescently Labeled 68Ga-DOTA-TOC Analog for Somatostatin Receptor Targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Sukhen C; Hernandez Vargas, Servando; Rodriguez, Melissa; Kossatz, Susanne; Voss, Julie; Carmon, Kendra S; Reiner, Thomas; Schonbrunn, Agnes; Azhdarinia, Ali

    2017-07-13

    Fluorescently labeled imaging agents can identify surgical margins in real-time to help achieve complete resections and minimize the likelihood of local recurrence. However, photon attenuation limits fluorescence-based imaging to superficial lesions or lesions that are a few millimeters beneath the tissue surface. Contrast agents that are dual-labeled with a radionuclide and fluorescent dye can overcome this limitation and combine quantitative, whole-body nuclear imaging with intraoperative fluorescence imaging. Using a multimodality chelation (MMC) scaffold, IRDye 800CW was conjugated to the clinically used somatostatin analog, 68 Ga-DOTA-TOC, to produce the dual-labeled analog, 68 Ga-MMC(IRDye 800CW)-TOC, with high yield and specific activity. In vitro pharmacological assays demonstrated retention of receptor-targeting properties for the dual-labeled compound with robust internalization that was somatostatin receptor (SSTR) 2-mediated. Biodistribution studies in mice identified the kidneys as the primary excretion route for 68 Ga-MMC(IRDye 800CW)-TOC, along with clearance via the reticuloendothelial system. Higher uptake was observed in most tissues compared to 68 Ga-DOTA-TOC but decreased as a function of time. The combination of excellent specificity for SSTR2-expressing cells and suitable biodistribution indicate potential application of 68 Ga-MMC(IRDye 800CW)-TOC for intraoperative detection of SSTR2-expressing tumors.

  7. δ-opioid receptor and somatostatin receptor-4 heterodimerization: possible implications in modulation of pain associated signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rishi K Somvanshi

    Full Text Available Pain relief is the principal action of opioids. Somatostatin (SST, a growth hormone inhibitory peptide is also known to alleviate pain even in cases when opioids fail. Recent studies have shown that mice are prone to sustained pain and devoid of analgesic effect in the absence of somatostatin receptor 4 (SSTR4. In the present study, using brain slices, cultured neurons and HEK-293 cells, we showed that SSTR4 and δ-Opioid receptor (δOR exist in a heteromeric complex and function in synergistic manner. SSTR4 and δOR co-expressed in cortical/striatal brain regions and spinal cord. Using cultured neuronal cells, we describe the heterogeneous complex formation of SSTR4 and δOR at neuronal cell body and processes. Cotransfected cells display inhibition of cAMP/PKA and co-activation of SSTR4 and δOR oppose receptor trafficking induced by individual receptor activation. Furthermore, downstream signaling pathways either associated with withdrawal or pain relief are modulated synergistically with a predominant role of SSTR4. Inhibition of cAMP/PKA and activation of ERK1/2 are the possible cellular adaptations to prevent withdrawal induced by chronic morphine use. Our results reveal direct intra-membrane interaction between SSTR4 and δOR and provide insights for the molecular mechanism for the anti-nociceptive property of SST in combination with opioids as a potential therapeutic approach to avoid undesirable withdrawal symptoms.

  8. Synthesis and evaluation of ligand targeting the somatostatin receptor for drug delivery to tumor cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, So Young; Hong, Young Don; Jung, Sung Hee; Choi, Sun Ju [Radioisotope Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    Most of targeted therapies block the action of certain enzymes, proteins, or other molecules involved in the growth and spread of cancer cells to produce its cytotoxic effect. Either small molecule drugs or monoclonal antibodies are mostly used in targeted therapies. Unfortunately, targeted therapy has a certain degree of unwanted side effect like other cytotoxicity inducing chemotherapies. To overcome and to reduce unwanted side effects during a cancer therapy, recently radiopeptide therapies has got the worlds' attraction for the tumor targeting modalities due to its beneficial effect on less side effect compared to cytotoxic chemotherapies. Among radiopeptide therapies, {sup 177}Lu-DOTATATE is a major modality as an effective one invented so far in treating neuroendocrine tumor (NET) and it has been in clinical trials at least one decade. Although it does have rather effective therapeutic effect on NET, it has less effective in rather large solid tumor. There are many ways to improve or increase therapeutic effect of radiopeptide are a finding the potent small molecules to target the tumor site selectively, or a labeling with radioisotope of emitting high energy, or an improving its biological half-life by introducing different moieties to increase lipophilicity. Present study was focus to increase a biological halflife of radio somatostatin which will target the somatostatin receptor by altering the bifunctional chelator (BFCA) by introducing lipophilic moiety to the somatostatin, which would make the labeled peptide stay longer in the tumor site and thus it can intensify the therapeutic effect on tumor cell itself and around tissues.

  9. Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy in advanced renal cell carcinoma. Results of a phase II-trial of somatostatine analogue therapy in patients with advanced RCC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freudenberg, L.S.; Goerges, R.; Stergar, H.; Bockisch, A.; Gauler, T.; Bauer, S.; Antoch, G.; Schuette, J.

    2008-01-01

    Aims: objective of this prospective study was to evaluate the role of somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS) in advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC) with respect to potential therapy with somatostatin analogue (SST-A) and to assess the response rate under therapy with SST-A. Patients, methods: 16 patients with documented progression of histologically confirmed advanced RCC were included. Planar whole-body SRS was performed 4, 24 and 48h post i.v. injection of 175-200 MBq 111 In-pentetreoide. 5 and 25 h p.i. SPECT of thorax and abdomen were performed. Documentation of somatostatin receptor expression via SRS in > 50% of known tumour lesions was the criteria for treatment start with SST-A (Sandostatin LAR registered -Depot 30mg i.m. every four weeks). Results: in 9/16 of the patients SRS showed at least one metastasis with moderate (n = 5) or intense (n = 4) tracer uptake. Lesion-based SRS evaluation showed only 12.1% (20/165) of all metastases. Most false-negative lesions were located in the lungs. In too patients, the majority of the known metastases was SRS positive and these patients received SST-A therapy. The first radiographic evaluation after a two-month interval showed progressive disease in both patients. Conclusions: we conclude that SRS is of limited value in staging of advanced RCC. In our patients SST-A did not result in a growth control of RCC. Consequently, the use of SST-A in advanced RCC seems to be no relevant therapeutic option. (orig.)

  10. Molecular imaging with 68Ga-SSTR PET/CT and correlation to immunohistochemistry of somatostatin receptors in neuroendocrine tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaemmerer, Daniel; Haugvik, Sven-Petter; Hommann, Merten; Peter, Luisa; Lupp, Amelie; Schulz, Stefan; Saenger, Joerg; Prasad, Vikas; Kulkarni, Harshad; Baum, Richard Paul

    2011-01-01

    Somatostatin receptors (SSTR) are known for an overexpression in gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumours (GEP-NET). The aim of the present study was to find out if the receptor density predicted by the semi-quantitative parameters generated from the static positron emission tomography (PET/CT) correlated with the in vitro immunohistochemistry using a novel rabbit monoclonal anti-SSTR2A antibody (clone UMB-1) for specific SSTR2A immunohistochemistry and polyclonal antibodies for SSTR1 and 3-5. Overall 14 surgical specimens generated from 34 histologically documented GEP-NET patients were correlated with the preoperative 68 Ga-DOTA-NOC PET/CT. Quantitative assessment of the receptor density was done using the immunoreactive score (IRS) of Remmele and Stegner; the additional 4-point IRS classification for immunohistochemistry and standardized uptake values (SUV max and SUV mean ) were used for PET/CT. The IRS for SSTR2A and SSTR5 correlated highly significant with the SUV max on the PET/CT (p mean (p max on the 68 Ga-DOTA-NOC PET/CT scans is concordant with the affinity profile of 68 Ga-DOTA-NOC to the SSTR subtypes and demonstrates the excellent qualification of somatostatin analogues in the diagnostics of NET. This study correlating somatostatin receptor imaging using 68 Ga-DOTA-NOC PET/CT with immunohistochemically analysed SSTR also underlines the approval of therapy using somatostatin analogues, follow-up imaging as well as radionuclide therapy. (orig.)

  11. Analysis of transmission of novel polymorphisms in the somatostatin receptor 5 (SSTR5) gene in patients with autism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritsen, Marlene B; Nyegaard, Mette; Betancur, Catalina

    2003-01-01

    growth hormone response has been reported in some individuals with autism. Moreover, the somatostatinergic system interacts with the dopaminergic system, which has been hypothesized to be involved in the etiology of autism; in particular, somatostatin secretion is regulated by dopamine, and the dopamine......Infantile autism is a pervasive developmental disorder with a strong genetic component. The mode of inheritance appears to be complex and no specific susceptibility genes have yet been identified. Chromosome 16p13.3 may contain a susceptibility gene based on findings from genome scans and reports...... of chromosome abnormalities in individuals with autism. The somatostatin receptor 5 (SSTR5) gene is located on chromosome 16p13.3 and is thus a positional candidate gene for autism. SSTR5 may also be a functional candidate gene for autism because somatostatin inhibits growth hormone secretion, and increased...

  12. Detecting somatostatin receptor in breast tumor tissue and its clinical significance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yongjian; Yu Xian; Lin Wei; Ding Xuan; Huang Shizhang; Lu Guangming

    2002-01-01

    The authors observe the difference of somatostatin receptor (SSR) between benign and malignant breast tumor and the relation between SSR and estrogen receptor (ER) or progesterone receptor (PR) in breast tumor tissue, and to predict the clinical value of detecting breast tumor by SSR receptor imaging. These tissues excised from operation in breast tumor were divided into 4 groups: breast malignant tumor group (BMTG) and its control group (C1G), breast benign tumor group (BBTG) and its control group (C2G). SSR was detected by radioligand binding assay (RBA) and ER, PR by LsAB method in these groups. Results is: (1) The SSR express quantity is 108.6 +- 67.3 fmol/mg pr, 37.2 +- 9.6 fmol/mg pr, 43.4 +- 12.6 fmol/mg pr 33.9 +- 10.2 fmol/mg pr respectively in BMTG, C1G, BBTG, C2G. The SSR of BMTG is the most among these groups, the difference is obvious, P 0.05); (2) The correlation coefficient of SSR and ER is 0.859, SSR and PR is 0.750. Most breast tumor tissues express high density SSR, the authors suppose that malignant tumor can been distinguished from benign tumor preliminarily by SSR receptor imaging. There is a good correlation between SSR and ER, PR, detecting SSR may predict the quality of tumor and the prognosis of the patient

  13. Pathophysiology of GPCR Homo- and Heterodimerization: Special Emphasis on Somatostatin Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rishi K. Somvanshi

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs are cell surface proteins responsible for translating >80% of extracellular reception to intracellular signals. The extracellular information in the form of neurotransmitters, peptides, ions, odorants etc is converted to intracellular signals via a wide variety of effector molecules activating distinct downstream signaling pathways. All GPCRs share common structural features including an extracellular N-terminal, seven-transmembrane domains (TMs linked by extracellular/intracellular loops and the C-terminal tail. Recent studies have shown that most GPCRs function as dimers (homo- and/or heterodimers or even higher order of oligomers. Protein-protein interaction among GPCRs and other receptor proteins play a critical role in the modulation of receptor pharmacology and functions. Although ~50% of the current drugs available in the market target GPCRs, still many GPCRs remain unexplored as potential therapeutic targets, opening immense possibility to discover the role of GPCRs in pathophysiological conditions. This review explores the existing information and future possibilities of GPCRs as tools in clinical pharmacology and is specifically focused for the role of somatostatin receptors (SSTRs in pathophysiology of diseases and as the potential candidate for drug discovery.

  14. Pertussis toxin modifies the characteristics of both the inhibitory GTP binding proteins and the somatostatin receptor in anterior pituitary tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahy, N.; Woolkalis, M.; Thermos, K.; Carlson, K.; Manning, D.; Reisine, T.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of pertussis toxin treatment on the characteristics of somatostatin receptors in the anterior pituitary tumor cell line AtT-20 were examined. Pertussis toxin selectively catalyzed the ADP ribosylation of the alpha subunits of the inhibitory GTP binding proteins in AtT-20 cells. Toxin treatment abolished somatostatin inhibition of forskolin-stimulated adenylyl cyclase activity and somatostatin stimulation of GTPase activity. To examine the effects of pertussis toxin treatment on the characteristics of the somatostatin receptor, the receptor was labeled by the somatostatin analog [125I]CGP 23996. [125I]CGP 23996 binding to AtT-20 cell membranes was saturable and within a limited concentration range was to a single high affinity site. Pertussis toxin treatment reduced the apparent density of the high affinity [125I]CGP 23996 binding sites in AtT-20 cell membranes. Inhibition of [125I]CGP 23996 binding by a wide concentration range of CGP 23996 revealed the presence of two binding sites. GTP predominantly reduced the level of high affinity sites in control membranes. Pertussis toxin treatment also diminished the amount of high affinity sites. GTP did not affect [125I]CGP 23996 binding in the pertussis toxin-treated membranes. The high affinity somatostatin receptors were covalently labeled with [125I] CGP 23996 and the photoactivated crosslinking agent n-hydroxysuccinimidyl-4-azidobenzoate. No high affinity somatostatin receptors, covalently bound to [125I]CGP 23996, were detected in the pertussis toxin-treated membranes. These results are most consistent with pertussis toxin uncoupling the inhibitory G proteins from the somatostatin receptor thereby converting the receptor from a mixed population of high and low affinity sites to only low affinity receptors

  15. Immunohistochemical Detection and Localization of Somatostatin Receptor Subtypes in Prostate Tissue from Patients with Bladder Outlet Obstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodolfo Montironi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim of the Study: Scant information on the cellular distribution of the five somatostatin receptor (SSTR subtypes in the normal prostate and in neoplasms of the prostate has been reported in very few studies in which techniques, such as in situ hybridization histochemistry, autoradiography, and more recently immunohistochemistry, have been applied. The aim of the study was to examine immunohistochemically the distribution and localization of these 5 subtypes in the various tissue components in normal prostate.

  16. Evaluation of somatostatin and nucleolin receptors for therapeutic delivery in non-small cell lung cancer stem cells applying the somatostatin-analog DOTATATE and the nucleolin-targeting aptamer AS1411.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sif Holmboe

    Full Text Available Cancer stem cells represent the putative tumor-driving subpopulation thought to account for drug resistance, relapse, and metastatic spread of epithelial and other cancer types. Accordingly, cell surface markers for therapeutic delivery to cancer stem cells are subject of intense research. Somatostatin receptor 2 and nucleolin are known to be overexpressed by various cancer types, which have elicited comprehensive efforts to explore their therapeutic utilization. Here, we evaluated somatostatin receptor 2 targeting and nucleolin targeting for therapeutic delivery to cancer stem cells from lung cancer. Nucleolin is expressed highly but not selectively, while somatostatin receptor 2 is expressed selectively but not highly by cancer cells. The non-small cell lung cancer cell lines A549 and H1299, displayed average levels of both surface molecules as judged based on analysis of a larger cell line panel. H1299 compared to A549 cells showed significantly elevated sphere-forming capacity, indicating higher cancer stem cell content, thus qualifying as suitable test system. Nucleolin-targeting 57Co-DOTA-AS1411 aptamer showed efficient internalization by cancer cells and, remarkably, at even higher efficiency by cancer stem cells. In contrast, somatostatin receptor 2 expression levels were not sufficiently high in H1299 cells to confer efficient uptake by either non-cancer stem cells or cancer stem cells. The data provides indication that the nucleolin-targeting AS1411 aptamer might be used for therapeutic delivery to non-small cell lung cancer stem cells.

  17. Morphological Imaging in the Localization of Neuroendocrine Gastroenteropancreatic Tumors Found by Somatostatin Receptor Scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saga, T.; Doi, R.; Endo, K.; Shimatsu, A.; Koizumi, K.; Ichikawa, T.; Yamamoto, K.; Noguchi, S.; Ishibashi, M.; Machinami, R.; Nakamura, K.; Sakahara, H.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the necessity of morphological images (MI) in reading somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS) in patients with suspected neuroendocrine gastroenteropancreatic (GEP) tumors. Material and Methods: A Japanese multicenter clinical trial of SRS was conducted in 40 patients with suspected GEP tumors. Three experienced radiologists interpreted the images in three separate sessions in a blinded manner (1: SRS images alone, 2: MI alone, 3: SRS and MI analyzed simultaneously), and the reading results of each session were compared. In addition, the diagnostic abilities of SRS, MI and SRS alone and simultaneous SRS and MI readings were compared for patients where final diagnosis was obtained. Results: SRS detected more suspected lesions (positive or inconclusive uptake) than morphological images did (51 vs 27 lesions), but included many physiological uptakes detected as positive or inconclusive uptakes. Combined reading of SRS and morphological images helped to correctly recognize these physiological uptakes, and also helped in determining the anatomical localization of the abnormal uptakes. Combined reading of SRS and morphological images gave the highest diagnostic impact. Conclusion: The sensitivity of SRS with regard to GEP is high. However the specificity is very low. Morphologic imaging is necessary for the exclusion of physiological uptake and correct anatomic location of an abnormal tracer uptake. The combined reading of SRS and morphologic imaging studies gives the highest diagnostic impact

  18. Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy to predict the clinical evolution and therapeutic response of thyroid-associated ophthalmopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nocaudie, M.; Bailliez, A.; Itti, E.; Marchandise, X.

    1999-01-01

    Management of thyroid-associated ophthalmopathy remains a topic of controversy. Immunosuppressive treatments have to be applied at peak disease activity and before criteria of severity develop. Expression of somatostatin receptors on activated lymphocytes allows scintigraphic imaging with indium-111 pentetreotide. We conducted a prospective study with 17 patients who presented severe ophthalmopathy (11 Graves' disease, four Hashimoto's thyroiditis, two isolated in appearance: Means' syndrome). Each patient underwent hormonal (free T 3 and TSH) and immunological (TBII) assessment, an orbital computed tomography scan or magnetic resonance imaging, a visual functional examination and 111 In-pentetreotide orbital scintigraphy before undergoing treatment by steroids and/or radiotherapy, independently of scintigraphic results. At 4 and 24 h after the intravenous injection of 111 MBq of 111 In-pentetreotide, planar imaging centred on the head and neck (anterior and both lateral views) was carried out. Retrobulbar uptake was assessed by visual semi-quantitative analysis (score given by two independent trained observers) and by quantitative analyses (regions of interest, orbit/brain uptake indices). Patients were ophthalmologically followed up for 6 months and then classified as improved or not. Visual semi-quantitative analysis of 4-h/24-h planar images was correlated with the ophthalmological evolution (χ 2 test, P 111 In-pentetreotide scintigraphy requires further developments, including quantitative single-photon emission tomographic acquisition, if its role as a guide to therapeutic strategy in thyroid-associated ophthalmopathy is to be confirmed. (orig.)

  19. Ectopic ACTH secretion due to a bronchopulmonary carcinoid localized by somatostatin receptor scintigraphy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iser, G; Pfohl, M; Dörr, U; Weiss, E M; Seif, F J

    1994-11-01

    We present the case of a 65-year-old woman with an adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) secreting bronchopulmonary carcinoid. This patient showed the typical long history of Cushing's syndrome, including hypokaliemia, impaired glucose tolerance, high levels of ACTH and beta-endorphin, and coproduction of other peptides. At the onset of clinical symptoms in 1979 an adrenal adenoma was suspected, and left-sided adrenalectomy was performed. The symptoms soon recurred, and the diagnosis of ACTH-dependent Cushing's syndrome was made. As no ACTH-secreting tumor was found, the right adrenal was resected, and the patient was followed up regularly. Fourteen years later chest roentgenography and computed tomography revealed a para-aortic pulmonary lesion, which was suspicious for a bronchopulmonary carcinoid. ACTH and beta-endorphin were excessively, pancreatic polypeptide slightly elevated at that time. The final diagnosis was made using somatostatin receptor scintigraphy which confirmed the hormonal activity of the suspicious lesion; no additional focus was found. This method turned out to be not only a useful additional localization technique but also a promising tool for characterization and staging of a suspected ACTH-producing carcinoid. The tumor was resected curatively, and the diagnosis was confirmed histologically.

  20. Pattern of somatostatin receptors expression in normal and bladder cancer tissue samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karavitakis, Markos; Msaouel, Pavlos; Michalopoulos, Vassilis; Koutsilieris, Michael

    2014-06-01

    Known risks factors for bladder cancer progression and recurrence are limited regarding their prognostic ability. Therefore identification of molecular determinants of disease progression could provide with more specific prognostic information and could be translated into new approaches for biomarker development. In the present study we evaluated, the expression patterns of somatostatin receptors 1-5 (SSTRs) in normal and tumor bladder tissues. The expression of SSTR1-5 was characterized in 45 normal and bladder cancer tissue samples using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). SSTR1 was expressed in 24 samples, SSTR2 in 15, SSTR3 in 23, SSTR4 in 16 and SSTR5 in all but one sample. Bladder cancer tissue samples expressed lower levels of SSTR3. Co-expression of SSTRs was associated with superficial disease. Our results demonstrate, for the first time, that there is expression of SSTR in normal and bladder cancer urothelium. Further studies are required to evaluate the prognostic and therapeutic significance of these findings. Copyright© 2014 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  1. Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy and magnetic resonance imaging in recurrent medullary thyroid carcinoma: A comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doerr, U.; Wuerstlin, S.; Frank-Raue, K.; Raue, F.; Hehrmann, R.; Iser, G.; Scholz, M.; Guhl, L.; Buhr, H.J.; Bihl, H.

    1993-01-01

    In a prospective study, 18 patients with recurrent medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the neck and mediastinum and somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS) with 111 In-labeled pentetreotide. In nine patients with macroscopic MTC, 17 corresponding lesions were found on MRI and SRS; in addition, 13 suspicious lesions were seen on SRS only. Histological confirmation was available for 19 metastatic lesions, showing MRI to be true positive in 13 metastases, SRS in 18. In minimal residual disease (n=10), MRI and SRS were compared with the histological findings in three patients and with selective venous catheterization (SVC) in seven patients. Corresponding findings on MRI and SVC were seen in one of seven, whereas SRS and SVC showed concordant localization of tumor recurrence in five of seven. Histological examination demonstrated MTC tissue in one of three cases; MRI and SRS were false positive in one of three cases, while in the others the interpretation remained uncertain. In conclusion, SRS is a promising imaging modality for localization of MTC recurrence. MRI provides better spatial resolution and thus facilitates the planning of surgery for macroscopic metastases. In minimal residual disease, SRS turned out to be superior in detecting occult MTC recurrence, confirming SVC findings. (orig.)

  2. Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy and intraoperative gamma probe detection in the localisation and treatment of pancreatic insulinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loh, Nelson K.; Macdonald, William B.; Dunne, Marina L.; Rao, Sudhakar

    2009-01-01

    Full text: Aims: We report a case of insulinoma that was successfully enucleated under radio-guidance after an initial unsuccessful laparotomy. This case highlights the utility of Somatostatin Receptor Scintigraphy (SRS) and gamma probe in the localisation and treatment of neuroendocrine tumours. Methods: The patient presented with recurrent hypoglycaemia. An abdominal CT scan identified a lesion in the uncinate process of the pancreas, however, laparotomy with use of intraoperative ultrasound failed to localise the lesion. SRS with SPECTICT was then requested by the surgical team with a view to radio-guided surgery. Results: SRS demonstrated an octreotide-avid tumour in the posterior uncinate process of the pancreas, and confirmed suitability for radio-guided surgery. At re-exploration, the surgeon was again unable to palpate the lesion or localise it with intraoperative ultrasound, however, the lesion was successfully detected and removed with the use of a gamma probe. A postoperative SRS confirmed complete excision and histopathology was diagnostic of insulinoma. Conclusion: This case highlights the utility of SRS in the intraoperative localisation and surgical excision of neuroendocrine tumours. The lesion was unable to be localised clinically or with intraoperative ultrasound but was successfully detected with scintigraphic techniques. The surgical team acknowledge that the use of a gamma probe enabled enucleation of the insulinoma, which obviated the need for an invasive Whipple's procedure.

  3. Somatostatin receptor expression in Merkel cell carcinoma as target for molecular imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buder, Kristina; Becker, Jürgen C; Lapa, Constantin; Kreissl, Michael C; Schirbel, Andreas; Herrmann, Ken; Schnack, Alexander; Bröcker, Eva-Bettina; Goebeler, Matthias; Buck, Andreas K

    2014-01-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a rare cutaneous neoplasm with increasing incidence, aggressive behavior and poor prognosis. Somatostatin receptors (SSTR) are expressed in MCC and represent a potential target for both imaging and treatment. To non-invasively assess SSTR expression in MCC using PET and the radiotracers [ 68 Ga]DOTA-D-Phe 1 -Tyr 3 -octreotide (DOTATOC) or -octreotate (DOTATATE) as surrogate for tumor burden. In 24 patients with histologically proven MCC SSTR-PET was performed and compared to results of computed tomography (CT). SSTR-PET detected primary and metastatic MCC lesions. On a patient-based analysis, sensitivity of SSTR-PET was 73% for nodal metastases, 100% for bone, and 67% for soft-tissue metastases, respectively. Notably, brain metastases were initially detected by SSTR-PET in 2 patients, whereas liver and lung metastases were diagnosed exclusively by CT. SSTR-PET showed concordance to CT results in 20 out of 24 patients. Four patients (17%) were up-staged due to SSTR-PET and patient management was changed in 3 patients (13%). SSTR-PET showed high sensitivity for imaging bone, soft tissue and brain metastases, and particularly in combination with CT had a significant impact on clinical stage and patient management

  4. Somatostatin and opioid receptors do not regulate proliferation or apoptosis of the human multiple myeloma U266 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allouche Stéphane

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background opioid and somatostatin receptors (SSTRs that can assemble as heterodimer were individually reported to modulate malignant cell proliferation and to favour apoptosis. Materials and methods: SSTRs and opioid receptors expression were examined by RT-PCR, western-blot and binding assays, cell proliferation was studied by XTT assay and propidium iodide (PI staining and apoptosis by annexin V-PI labelling. Results almost all human malignant haematological cell lines studied here expressed the five SSTRs. Further experiments were conducted on the human U266 multiple myeloma cells, which express also μ-opioid receptors (MOP-R. XTT assays and cell cycle studies provide no evidence for a significant effect upon opioid or somatostatin receptors stimulation. Furthermore, neither direct effect nor potentiation of the Fas-receptor pathway was detected on apoptosis after these treatments. Conclusion these data suggest that SSTRs or opioid receptors expression is not a guaranty for an anti-tumoral action in U266 cell line.

  5. In vivo detection of somatostatin receptors in patients with functionless pituitary adenomas by means of a radioiodinated analog of somatostatin ((123I)SDZ 204-090)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faglia, G.; Bazzoni, N.; Spada, A.; Arosio, M.; Ambrosi, B.; Spinelli, F.; Sara, R.; Bonino, C.; Lunghi, F. (Institute of Endocrine Sciences, University of Milan, Ospedale Maggiore IRCCS (Italy))

    1991-10-01

    The recent availability of a Tyr3-substituted octreotide (SDZ 204-090) for radioiodination has allowed somatostatin (SRIH) receptor binding to be studied in vivo, and receptor-positive tumors of different origins to be visualized with a gamma-camera. This prompted us to investigate whether this compound could be used for external imaging of functionless pituitary adenomas displaying SRIH receptors. Eight patients with functionless pituitary adenomas, three patients with acromegaly, and three with macroprolactinoma were injected iv with 123I-labeled Tyr3-octreotide and then scanned with a gamma-camera. Positive scans were obtained in the three acromegalics and in two of the eight patients with functionless pituitary tumors. The patients with macroprolactinoma had negative scans. The diagnosis of functionless pituitary adenomas was confirmed by light and electron microscopic examination as well as immunocytochemical studies. In vitro binding of (125I)Tyr11-SRIH to cell membranes was evaluated in four functionless and three GH-secreting adenomas removed from seven of the patients. All of the GH-secreting as well as one of the four functionless adenomas had high affinity SRIH-binding sites, without differences in number or affinity, whereas SRIH-binding sites were not detected in the others. Positive scans were observed only in patients bearing tumors with high affinity SRIH-binding sites. In conclusion, (123I)Tyr3-octreotide appears to be a promising tool for singling out, in vivo, patients with functionless pituitary tumors displaying SRIH receptors who might potentially benefit from octreotide treatment.

  6. Somatostatin receptor 2A expression in choroidal neovascularization secondary to age-related macular degeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.C. Lambooij (Antoinette); R.W.A.M. Kuijpers (Robert); E.G. van Lichtenauer-Kaligis; M. Kliffen (Mike); G.S. Baarsma (Seerp); P.M. van Hagen (Martin); C.M. Mooy (Cornelia)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractPURPOSE: The growth of ocular neovascularization is regulated by a balance between stimulating and inhibiting growth factors. Somatostatin affects angiogenesis by inhibiting the growth hormone-insulin-like growth factor axis and also has a direct

  7. Inverse expression of somatostatin and CXCR4 chemokine receptors in gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms of different malignancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaemmerer, Daniel; Träger, Tina; Hoffmeister, Maike; Sipos, Bence; Hommann, Merten; Sänger, Järg; Schulz, Stefan; Lupp, Amelie

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Somatostatin receptors (SSTR) are widely distributed in well-differentiated neuroendocrine neoplasms (NEN) and serve as primary targets for diagnostics and treatment. An overexpression of the chemokine receptor CXCR4, in contrast, is considered to be present mainly in highly proliferative and advanced tumors. Comparative data are still lacking, however, for neuroendocrine carcinomas (NEC). Methods SSTR subtype (1, 2A, 3, 5) and CXCR4 expression was evaluated in G1 (n = 31), G2 (n = 47), and low (G3a; Ki-67: 21–49%; n = 21) and highly proliferative (G3b; Ki-67: >50%, n = 22) G3 (total n = 43) gastroenteropancreatic NEN samples by performing immunohistochemistry with monoclonal rabbit anti-human anti-SSTR and anti-CXCR4 antibodies, respectively, and was correlated with clinical data. Results Both CXCR4 and SSTR were widely expressed in all tumors investigated. CXCR4 expression differed significantly between the G1 and G3 specimens and within the G3 group (G3a to G3b), and was positively correlated with Ki-67 expression. SSTR2A, in contrast, exhibited an inverse association with Ki-67. SSTR2A was highly expressed in G1 and G2 tumors, but was significantly less abundant in G3 carcinomas. Additionally, SSTR1 expression was higher in G3a than in G3b tumors. Conclusion We observed an elevation in CXCR4 and a decrease in SSTR2A expression with increasing malignancy. Interestingly, 23% of the G3 specimens had strong SSTR2A expression. Because CXCR4 was strongly expressed in highly proliferative G3 carcinomas, it is an interesting new target and needs to be validated in larger studies. PMID:26259237

  8. Iodine-131 labelled octreotide: not an option for somatostatin receptor therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakker, W.H.; Breeman, W.A.P.; Pluijm, M.E. van der; Jong, M. de; Visser, T.J.; Krenning, E.P.

    1996-01-01

    This study deals with the radioiodination of very small amounts of peptide on a therapeutic scale, the required purification procedures after radioiodination, and the influence of high beta fluxes from 131 I on a peptide during radioiodination and purification. Based on the regularly used therapeutic doses of 131 I in cancer treatment and out previous experience with [ 111 In-DTPA-D-Phe 1 ]-octreotide, it was assumed that a minimal effective therapeutic dose of 3.7 GBq 131 I has to be coupled to a maximum of ∼100 μg peptide, representing only a slight excess of peptide over 131 I. This contrasts with non-peptide radiopharmaceuticals in which high compound to radionuclide ratios are usually used. Labelling at low peptide to radionuclide ratios (low labelling yields) results in the formation of di-iodinated compounds, whereas at high peptide to radionuclide ratios mono-iodinated products of low specific activity are formed. Thus, after radioiodination the desired mono-iodinated peptide has to be separated form unreacted iodide, and from di-iodinated and unreacted peptide, as both compounds compete for the receptors. Possible radiolysis of the peptide during labelling and separation steps were investigated by irradiating 30 μg unlabelled peptide with 370 MBq 131 I in a small volume. The peptide composition of the incubation mixtures was investigated by high-performance liquid chromatography after irradiation for 30 min to 24 h. The results showed that the peptide was degraded with a half-life of less than 1 h. During the preparation of a real therapeutic dose (at much higher β-flux) the peptide will be degraded even faster during the various steps required. In conclusion, intact mono-iodinated 131 I-labelled somatostatin analogues for peptide receptor therapy will be difficult to obtain. (orig./VHE)

  9. Activation of Brain Somatostatin Signaling Suppresses CRF Receptor-Mediated Stress Response

    OpenAIRE

    Andreas Stengel; Yvette F. Taché; Yvette F. Taché

    2017-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) is the hallmark brain peptide triggering the response to stress and mediates—in addition to the stimulation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis—other hormonal, behavioral, autonomic and visceral components. Earlier reports indicate that somatostatin-28 injected intracerebroventricularly counteracts the acute stress-induced ACTH and catecholamine release. Mounting evidence now supports that activation of brain somatostatin signaling exerts a br...

  10. Preparation, formulation and quality control of one step kit 99m Tc - EDDA/HYNIC-Tyr3-Octreotide as a peptide radiopharmaceutical for imaging somatostatin receptor positive tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gandomkar, M.; Najafi, R.; Sadat-Ebrahimi, E.; Babaei, M.H.

    2004-01-01

    The high expression of somatostatin receptors in many tumours, have made receptor scintigraphy with 11I n-DTPA-Octreotide a widely used procedure in nuclear medicine. Despite its clinical success, some limitation and drawbacks of radiolabelling with 11I n remain, especially those concerned with the cost, availability and physical decay properties of this radionuclide. 99m Tc - EDDA/HYNIC-Tyr 3 -Octreotide was studied as a new agent with the potential to replace octreoscan in somatostatin receptor scintigraphy. This hydrazino nicotinic acid derivatized somatostatin complex contains ethylenediamine N, N diacetic acid as a co-ligand resulting in a high in vitro and in vivo stability. High labeling yields (>90%) were achieved at high specific activities. Characterization via HPLC, biodistribution and receptor binding of the resulting complex are described. The formulation developed enables rapid and simple labeling of 99m Tc - EDDA/HYNIC-TOC in a manner suitable for clinical setting

  11. Multiparametric PET imaging in thyroid malignancy characterizing tumour heterogeneity: somatostatin receptors and glucose metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Traub-Weidinger, Tatjana [Medical University of Vienna, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Medical University of Innsbruck, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Innsbruck (Austria); Putzer, Daniel; Bale, Reto [Medical University of Innsbruck, Department of Radiology, Innsbruck (Austria); Guggenberg, Elisabeth von; Dobrozemsky, Georg; Nilica, Bernhard; Kendler, Dorota; Virgolini, Irene Johanna [Medical University of Innsbruck, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Innsbruck (Austria)

    2015-12-15

    Radiolabelled somatostatin (SST) analogues have proven useful in diagnosing tumours positive for SST receptor (SSTR). As different subtypes of SSTR are expressed on the tumour cell surface, the choice of appropriate therapeutic SST analogue is crucial. We evaluated the SSTR status of thyroid cancer patients who had signs of progressive disease comparing different SSTR ligands for PET imaging to evaluate possible further therapeutic options. PET with {sup 68}Ga-radiolabelled SSTR ligands DOTA lanreotide (DOTA-LAN), DOTA-Tyr{sup 3} octreotide (DOTA-TOC) and {sup 18}F-FDG was performed in 31 patients with thyroid cancer (TC). These 31 patients comprised 18 with radioiodine non-avid differentiated TC (DTC) including 6 papillary TC (PTC), 8 follicular TC (FTC) and 4 oxyphilic TC (oxyTC), 5 with anaplastic TC (ATC), and 8 with medullary TC (MTC). The PET results were compared in a region-based evaluation. All patients underwent a PET study with {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-LAN, 28 patients with {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-TOC and 28 patients with {sup 18}F-FDG. A lack of SSTR expression was found in 13 of the 31 patients (42 %) with negative results with both SSTR tracers in 12 patients. Ambiguous results with both SSTR tracers were observed in one patient. High tracer uptake in SSTR PET images was seen in seven DTC patients (39 %; two PTC, three FTC, two oxyTC), in four ATC patients (80 %) and in six MTC patients (75 %). Lesions showing aerobic glycolysis on {sup 18}F-FDG PET were found in 24 of 28 patients (86 %) with corresponding positive results with {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-LAN in 35 % and with {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-TOC in 29 %. The heterogeneous SSTR profile of TC tumour lesions needs to be evaluated using different SSTR PET tracers to characterize more closely the SSTR subtype affinities in patients with progressive TC in order to further stratify therapy with SSTR therapeutics. (orig.)

  12. Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy to predict the clinical evolution and therapeutic response of thyroid-associated ophthalmopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nocaudie, M.; Bailliez, A.; Itti, E. [Centre Hospitalier Regional et Universitaire, Lille (France). Service Central de Medecine Nucleaire et Imagerie Fonctionnelle; Bauters, C.; Wemeau, J.L. [Clinique d`Endocrinologie, Centre Hospitalier Regional et Universitaire de Lille (France); Marchandise, X.

    1999-05-01

    Management of thyroid-associated ophthalmopathy remains a topic of controversy. Immunosuppressive treatments have to be applied at peak disease activity and before criteria of severity develop. Expression of somatostatin receptors on activated lymphocytes allows scintigraphic imaging with indium-111 pentetreotide. We conducted a prospective study with 17 patients who presented severe ophthalmopathy (11 Graves` disease, four Hashimoto`s thyroiditis, two isolated in appearance: Means` syndrome). Each patient underwent hormonal (free T{sub 3} and TSH) and immunological (TBII) assessment, an orbital computed tomography scan or magnetic resonance imaging, a visual functional examination and {sup 111}In-pentetreotide orbital scintigraphy before undergoing treatment by steroids and/or radiotherapy, independently of scintigraphic results. At 4 and 24 h after the intravenous injection of 111 MBq of {sup 111}In-pentetreotide, planar imaging centred on the head and neck (anterior and both lateral views) was carried out. Retrobulbar uptake was assessed by visual semi-quantitative analysis (score given by two independent trained observers) and by quantitative analyses (regions of interest, orbit/brain uptake indices). Patients were ophthalmologically followed up for 6 months and then classified as improved or not. Visual semi-quantitative analysis of 4-h/24-h planar images was correlated with the ophthalmological evolution ({chi}{sup 2} test, P<0.01). All ten patients in whom scintigraphy was considered positive were clinically improved at 6 months, and of the seven patients in whom scintigraphy was negative, six were not improved. Nevertheless, objective quantitative analysis did not succeed in confirming these results. We conclude that {sup 111}In-pentetreotide scintigraphy requires further developments, including quantitative single-photon emission tomographic acquisition, if its role as a guide to therapeutic strategy in thyroid-associated ophthalmopathy is to be confirmed

  13. Tumor-associated macrophages in glioblastoma multiforme-a suitable target for somatostatin receptor-based imaging and therapy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantin Lapa

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is the most common primary brain tumor in adults. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAM have been shown to promote malignant growth and to correlate with poor prognosis. [1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-NN',N″,N'″-tetraacetic acid]-d-Phe1,Tyr3-octreotate (DOTATATE labeled with Gallium-68 selectively binds to somatostatin receptor 2A (SSTR2A which is specifically expressed and up-regulated in activated macrophages. On the other hand, the role of SSTR2A expression on the cell surface of glioma cells has not been fully elucidated yet. The aim of this study was to non-invasively assess SSTR2A expression of both glioma cells as well as macrophages in GBM.15 samples of patient-derived GBM were stained immunohistochemically for macrophage infiltration (CD68, proliferative activity (Ki67 as well as expression of SSTR2A. Anti-CD45 staining was performed to distinguish between resident microglia and tumor-infiltrating macrophages. In a subcohort, positron emission tomography (PET imaging using 68Ga-DOTATATE was performed and the semiquantitatively evaluated tracer uptake was compared to the results of immunohistochemistry.The amount of microglia/macrophages ranged from 50% in the tumor samples with the vast majority being resident microglial cells. A strong SSTR2A immunostaining was observed in endothelial cells of proliferating vessels, in neurons and neuropile. Only faint immunostaining was identified on isolated microglial and tumor cells. Somatostatin receptor imaging revealed areas of increased tracer accumulation in every patient. However, retention of the tracer did not correlate with immunohistochemical staining patterns.SSTR2A seems not to be overexpressed in GBM samples tested, neither on the cell surface of resident microglia or infiltrating macrophages, nor on the surface of tumor cells. These data suggest that somatostatin receptor directed imaging and treatment strategies are less promising in GBM.

  14. 99mTc-EDDA/HYNIC-TOC in management of patients with head and neck somatostatin receptor positive tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trogrlic, Mate; Tezak, Stanko

    2016-01-01

    Aim of this study was to determine the value of technetium-99m-hydrazinonicotinyl-Tyr3-octreotide (99mTc-ED-DA/HYNIC-TOC) in patients with somatostatin receptor (SSR) positive tumors of head and neck region. A total number of 16 patients were enrolled in this study. Planar whole body (WB) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images were acquired at 2 and 4 hours after the injection of approximately 670 MBq of 99mTc-EDDA/HYNIC-TOC. Additional single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) images of the head and neck region were acquired at 4h post tracer injection. Clinical and imaging follow up were taken as the reference standard. There were 10 female and 6 male patients of age 57.7 ± 12.9 years (58.5; 32-78) years. 99mTc-EDDA/HYNIC-TOC somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS) was TP in 13 patients, TN in two and FP in one. Follow up period for SRS was 31.1 ± 19.4 (29; 2-63) months. 99mTc-EDDA/HYNIC-TOC scintigraphy provided additional information in 50% of patients, with impact on patient management in the same percentage of patients. Distant metastases were found in nine out of 16 patients (56%). 99mTc-EDDA/HYNIC-TOC SRS had sensitivity of 100% (75.3-100%), specificity of 66.7% (9.4-99.2%), accuracy of 93.7%, positive predictive value of 92.9% (66.1-99.8%), and negative predictive value of 100% (15.8-100%). Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy using 99mTc-EDDA/HYNIC-TOC is very useful imaging method in the evalu-ation of patients with SSR positive tumors of head and neck region.

  15. Somatostatin receptor positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) in the evaluation of opsoclonus-myoclonus ataxia syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, Prathamesh; Lele, Vikram

    2013-01-01

    Opsoclonus-myoclonus ataxia (OMA) syndrome is the most common paraneoplastic neurological syndrome of childhood, associated with occult neuroblastoma in 20%-50% of all cases. OMA is the initial presentation of neuroblastoma in 1%-3% of children. Conventional radiological imaging approaches include chest radiography and abdominal computed tomography (CT). Nuclear medicine techniques, in form of 123 I/ 131 I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) scintigraphy have been incorporated in various diagnostic algorithms for evaluation of OMA. We describe use of somatostatin receptor PET/CT with 68 Gallium- DOTA-DPhe 1 , Tyr 3 -octreotate (DOTATATE) in diagnosis of neuroblastoma in two cases of OMA

  16. Somatostatin receptor positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) in the evaluation of opsoclonus-myoclonus ataxia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Prathamesh; Lele, Vikram

    2013-04-01

    Opsoclonus-myoclonus ataxia (OMA) syndrome is the most common paraneoplastic neurological syndrome of childhood, associated with occult neuroblastoma in 20%-50% of all cases. OMA is the initial presentation of neuroblastoma in 1%-3% of children. Conventional radiological imaging approaches include chest radiography and abdominal computed tomography (CT). Nuclear medicine techniques, in form of (123)I/(131)I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) scintigraphy have been incorporated in various diagnostic algorithms for evaluation of OMA. We describe use of somatostatin receptor PET/CT with (68)Gallium- DOTA-DPhe(1), Tyr(3)-octreotate (DOTATATE) in diagnosis of neuroblastoma in two cases of OMA.

  17. NMDAR hypofunction and somatostatin-expressing GABAergic interneurons and receptors: A newly identified correlation and its effects in schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemah Alherz

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This review investigates the association between N-methyl-d-Aspartate receptor (NMDAR hypofunction and somatostatin-expressing GABAergic interneurons (SST+ and how it contributes to the cognitive deficits observed in schizophrenia (SZ. This is based on evidence that NMDAR antagonists caused symptoms resembling SZ in healthy individuals. NMDAR hypofunction in GABAergic interneurons results in the modulation of the cortical network oscillation, particularly in the gamma range (30–80 Hz. These gamma-band oscillation (GBO abnormalities were found to lead to the cognitive deficits observed in the disorder. Postmortem mRNA studies have shown that SST decreased more significantly than any other biomarker in schizophrenic subjects. The functional role of Somatostatin (SST in the aetiology of SZ can be studied through its receptors. Genetic knockout studies in animal models in Huntington's disease (HD have shown that a specific SST receptor, SSTR2, is increased along with the increased NMDAR activity, with opposing patterns observed in SZ. A direct correlation between SSTR and NMDAR is hence inferred in this review with the hope of finding a potential new therapeutic target for the treatment of SZ and related neurological conditions.

  18. SSTR-Mediated Imaging in Breast Cancer: Is There a Role for Radiolabeled Somatostatin Receptor Antagonists?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalm, Simone U; Haeck, Joost; Doeswijk, Gabriela N; de Blois, Erik; de Jong, Marion; van Deurzen, Carolien H M

    2017-10-01

    Recent studies have shown enhanced tumor targeting by novel somatostatin receptor (SSTR) antagonists compared with clinically widely used agonists. However, these results have been obtained mostly in neuroendocrine tumors, and only limited data are available for cancer types with lower SSTR expression, including breast cancer (BC). To date, two studies have reported higher binding of the antagonist than the agonist in BC, but in both studies only a limited number of cases were evaluated. In this preclinical study, we further investigated whether the application of an SSTR antagonist can improve SSTR-mediated BC imaging in a large panel of BC specimens. We also generated an in vivo BC mouse model and performed SPECT/MRI and biodistribution studies. Methods: Binding of 111 In-DOTA-Tyr 3 -octreotate (SSTR agonist) and 111 In-DOTA-JR11 (SSTR antagonist) to 40 human BC specimens was compared using in vitro autoradiography. SSTR2 immunostaining was performed to confirm SSTR2 expression of the tumor cells. Furthermore, binding of the radiolabeled SSTR agonist and antagonist was analyzed in tissue material from 6 patient-derived xenografts. One patient-derived xenograft, the estrogen receptor-positive model T126, was chosen to generate in vivo mouse models containing orthotopic breast tumors for in vivo SPECT/MRI and biodistribution studies after injection with 177 Lu-DOTA-Tyr 3 -octreotate or 177 Lu-DOTA-JR11. Results: 111 In-DOTA-JR11 binding to human BC tissue was significantly higher than 111 In-DOTA-Tyr 3 -octreotate binding ( P < 0.001). The median ratio of antagonist binding versus agonist binding was 3.39 (interquartile range, 2-5). SSTR2 immunostaining confirmed SSTR2 expression on the tumor cells. SPECT/MRI of the mouse model found better tumor visualization with the antagonist. This result was in line with the significantly higher tumor uptake of the radiolabeled antagonist than of the agonist as measured in biodistribution studies 285 min after radiotracer

  19. Somatostatin: a metabolic regulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dileepan, K.N.; Wagle, S.R.

    1985-01-01

    Somatostatin, the hypothalamic release-inhibiting factor, has been found to stimulate gluconeogenesis in rat kidney cortical slices. Stimulation by somatostatin was linear and dose-dependent. Other bioactive peptides such as cholecystokinin, gastro-intestinal peptide, secretin, neurotensin, vasoactive intestinal peptide, pancreatic polypeptide, beta endorphin and substance P did not affect the renal gluconeogenic activity. Somatostatin-induced gluconeogenesis was blocked by phentolamine (alpha adrenergic antagonist) and prazosin (alpha 1 adrenergic antagonist) but not by propranolol (beta adrenergic antagonist) and yohimbine (alpha 2 adrenergic antagonist) suggesting that the effect is via alpha 1 adrenergic stimuli. Studies on the involvement of Ca 2+ revealed that tissue depletion and omission of Ca 2+ from the reaction mixture would abolish the stimulatory effect of somatostatin. Furthermore, somatostatin enhanced the uptake of 45 calcium in renal cortical slices which could be blocked by lanthanum, an inhibitor of Ca 2+ influx. It is proposed that the stimulatory effect of somatostatin on renal gluconeogenesis is mediated by alpha 1 adrenergic receptors, or those which functionally resemble the alpha 1 receptors and that the increased influx of Ca 2+ may be the causative factor for carrying out the stimulus. 88 references

  20. Somatostatin: a metabolic regulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dileepan, K.N.; Wagle, S.R.

    1985-12-23

    Somatostatin, the hypothalamic release-inhibiting factor, has been found to stimulate gluconeogenesis in rat kidney cortical slices. Stimulation by somatostatin was linear and dose-dependent. Other bioactive peptides such as cholecystokinin, gastro-intestinal peptide, secretin, neurotensin, vasoactive intestinal peptide, pancreatic polypeptide, beta endorphin and substance P did not affect the renal gluconeogenic activity. Somatostatin-induced gluconeogenesis was blocked by phentolamine (alpha adrenergic antagonist) and prazosin (alpha/sub 1/ adrenergic antagonist) but not by propranolol (beta adrenergic antagonist) and yohimbine (alpha/sub 2/ adrenergic antagonist) suggesting that the effect is via alpha/sub 1/ adrenergic stimuli. Studies on the involvement of Ca/sup 2 +/ revealed that tissue depletion and omission of Ca/sup 2 +/ from the reaction mixture would abolish the stimulatory effect of somatostatin. Furthermore, somatostatin enhanced the uptake of /sup 45/calcium in renal cortical slices which could be blocked by lanthanum, an inhibitor of Ca/sup 2 +/ influx. It is proposed that the stimulatory effect of somatostatin on renal gluconeogenesis is mediated by alpha/sub 1/ adrenergic receptors, or those which functionally resemble the alpha/sub 1/ receptors and that the increased influx of Ca/sup 2 +/ may be the causative factor for carrying out the stimulus. 88 references.

  1. Characterization of somatostatin receptors and associated signaling pathways in pancreas of R6/2 transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somvanshi, Rishi K; Jhajj, Amrit; Heer, Michael; Kumar, Ujendra

    2018-02-01

    The present study describes the status of somatostatin receptors (SSTRs) and their colocalization with insulin (β), glucagon (α) and somatostatin (δ) producing cells in the pancreatic islets of 11weeks old R6/2 Huntington's Disease transgenic (HD tg) and age-matched wild type (wt) mice. We also determined expression of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) and presynaptic marker synaptophysin (SYP) in addition to signal transduction pathways associated with diabetes. In R6/2 mice, islets are relatively smaller in size, exhibit enhanced expression and nuclear inclusion of mHtt along with the loss of insulin, glucagon and somatostatin expression. In comparison to wt, R6/2 mice display enhanced mRNA for all SSTRs except SSTR2. In the pancreatic lysate, SSTR1, 4 and 5 immunoreactivity decreases whereas SSTR3 immunoreactivity increases with no discernible changes in SSTR2 immunoreactivity. Furthermore, at the cellular level, R6/2 mice exhibit a receptor specific distributional pattern of SSTRs like immunoreactivity and colocalization with β, α and δ cells. While GAD expression is increased, TH and SYP immunoreactivity was decreased in R6/2 mice, anticipating a cross-talk between the CNS and pancreas in diabetes pathophysiology. We also dissected out the changes in signaling pathway and found decreased activation and expression of PKA, AKT, ERK1/2 and STAT3 in R6/2 mice pancreas. These findings suggest that the impaired organization of SSTRs within islets may lead to perturbed hormonal regulation and signaling. These interconnected complex events might shed new light on the pathogenesis of diabetes in neurodegenerative diseases and the role of SSTRs in potential therapeutic intervention. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Ga-66 labeled somatostatin analogue DOTA-DPhe1-Tyr3-octreotide as a potential agent for positron emission tomography imaging and receptor mediated internal radiotherapy of somatostatin receptor positive tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ugur, Oemer; Kothari, Paresh J.; Finn, Ronald D.; Zanzonico, Pat; Ruan, Shutian; Guenther, Ilonka; Maecke, Helmut R.; Larson, Steven M.

    2002-01-01

    Radionuclide labeled somatostatin analogues selectively target somatostatin receptor (SSTR)-expressing tumors as a basis for diagnosis and treatment of these tumors. Recently, a DOTA-functionalized somatostatin analogue, DOTATOC (DOTA-DPhe 1 -Tyr 3 -octreotide) has been developed. This compound has been shown to be superior to the other somatostatin analogues as indicated by its uniquely high tumor-to-non-target tissue ratio. DOTATOC can be labeled with a variety of radiometals including gallium radioisotopes. Gallium-66 is a positron emitting radionuclide (T 1/2 =9.5 hr; β + =56%), that can be produced in carrier free form by a low-beam energy cyclotron. In this study we investigated SSTR targeting characteristics of 66 Ga-DOTATOC in AR42J rat pancreas tumor implanted nude mice as a potential agent for diagnosis and receptor-mediated internal radiotherapy of SSTR-expressing tumors. We compared our results with 67 Ga- and 68 Ga- labeled DOTATOC. The radiolabeling procedure gave labeling yield ranged from 85-95% and radiochemical and chemical purity was >95%. In-vitro competitive binding curves and in-vivo competitive displacement studies with an excess of unlabeled peptide indicates that there is specific binding of the radioligand to SSTR. Animal biodistribution data and serial microPET TM images demonstrated rapid tumor uptake and rapid clearance from the blood and all tissues except kidney. Maximum % ID/g values for tumor were 10.0±0.7, 13.2±2.1 and 9.8±1.5 for 66 Ga-, 67 Ga-, and 68 Ga-DOTATOC, respectively. Calculated tumor, kidney and bone marrow doses for 66 Ga-DOTATOC based on biodistribution data were 178, 109 and 1.2 cGy/MBq, respectively. We conclude that 66 Ga labeled DOTATOC can be used for PET diagnosis and quantitative imaging-based dosimetry of SSTR positive tumors. 66 Ga-DOTATOC may also be used in higher doses for ablation of these tumors. However, kidney is the critical organ for toxicity (tumor/kidney ratio 1.64), and high kidney uptake must

  3. Ga-66 labeled somatostatin analogue DOTA-DPhe{sup 1}-Tyr{sup 3}-octreotide as a potential agent for positron emission tomography imaging and receptor mediated internal radiotherapy of somatostatin receptor positive tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ugur, Oemer E-mail: ougur@hacettepe.edu.tr; Kothari, Paresh J.; Finn, Ronald D.; Zanzonico, Pat; Ruan, Shutian; Guenther, Ilonka; Maecke, Helmut R.; Larson, Steven M

    2002-02-01

    Radionuclide labeled somatostatin analogues selectively target somatostatin receptor (SSTR)-expressing tumors as a basis for diagnosis and treatment of these tumors. Recently, a DOTA-functionalized somatostatin analogue, DOTATOC (DOTA-DPhe{sup 1}-Tyr{sup 3}-octreotide) has been developed. This compound has been shown to be superior to the other somatostatin analogues as indicated by its uniquely high tumor-to-non-target tissue ratio. DOTATOC can be labeled with a variety of radiometals including gallium radioisotopes. Gallium-66 is a positron emitting radionuclide (T{sub 1/2} =9.5 hr; {beta}{sup +}=56%), that can be produced in carrier free form by a low-beam energy cyclotron. In this study we investigated SSTR targeting characteristics of {sup 66}Ga-DOTATOC in AR42J rat pancreas tumor implanted nude mice as a potential agent for diagnosis and receptor-mediated internal radiotherapy of SSTR-expressing tumors. We compared our results with {sup 67}Ga- and {sup 68}Ga- labeled DOTATOC. The radiolabeling procedure gave labeling yield ranged from 85-95% and radiochemical and chemical purity was >95%. In-vitro competitive binding curves and in-vivo competitive displacement studies with an excess of unlabeled peptide indicates that there is specific binding of the radioligand to SSTR. Animal biodistribution data and serial microPET{sup TM} images demonstrated rapid tumor uptake and rapid clearance from the blood and all tissues except kidney. Maximum % ID/g values for tumor were 10.0{+-}0.7, 13.2{+-}2.1 and 9.8{+-}1.5 for {sup 66}Ga-, {sup 67}Ga-, and {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC, respectively. Calculated tumor, kidney and bone marrow doses for {sup 66}Ga-DOTATOC based on biodistribution data were 178, 109 and 1.2 cGy/MBq, respectively. We conclude that {sup 66}Ga labeled DOTATOC can be used for PET diagnosis and quantitative imaging-based dosimetry of SSTR positive tumors. {sup 66}Ga-DOTATOC may also be used in higher doses for ablation of these tumors. However, kidney is the

  4. Transcriptional and Functional Characterization of the G Protein-Coupled Receptor Repertoire of Gastric Somatostatin Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egerod, Kristoffer L; Engelstoft, Maja S; Lund, Mari L

    2015-01-01

    In the stomach, somatostatin (SST) acts as a general paracrine negative regulator of exocrine secretion of gastric acid and pepsinogen and endocrine secretion of gastrin, ghrelin, and histamine. Using reporter mice expressing red fluorescent protein (RFP) under control of the SST promotor, we hav...

  5. Impact of the scintigraphy of somatostatin receptors upon the therapeutic strategy in patients bearing digestive endocrine tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebtahi, R.; Cadiot, G.; Genin, R.; Delahaye, N.; Faraggi, M.; Daou, D.; Peker, C.; Migon, M.; Le Guludec, D.

    1997-01-01

    The scintigraphy of somatostatin receptors (SSR) is a sensible method for detecting the gastroenteric-pancreatic endocrine tumors and their metastases. The aim of this study is to evaluate the clinical impact of the results of SSR in taking patients in therapeutic charge. A hundred and sixty patients bearing biologically and/or histologically proved digestive endocrine tumors were prospectively studied. The patients were classified in 3 groups: group I - 90 patients with no known metastases; group II - 59 patients with liver metastases and group III - 11 patients with known extra-hepatic metastases. The results of the scintigraphy were compared with those of conventional imaging. The following results were obtained: in group 1 (90 patients) the conventional imaging has allowed detecting 53 primitive tumors in 44 patients. The SSR visualized 68% of these sites and has detected 26 supplementary primitive sites in 20 patients and 29 metastatic sites in 25 patients. In group II the scintigraphy has detected 95% of hepatic metastases and revealed 23 new metastasis sites and 18/59 patients. In group III the scintigraphy has detected 11 new sites in 7 patients. The results of scintigraphy modified the patient's classification in 38 cases (24%). The therapeutic strategy was modified for 40 patients (25%). In conclusion, the scintigraphy of somatostatin receptors is able to detect a significant number of digestive endocrine tumors what has important implications for therapeutical planning of the treatment of patients. It must be carried out during pre-therapeutic extension examination of these tumors

  6. Normal uptake of 68Ga-DOTA-TOC by the pancreas uncinate process mimicking malignancy at somatostatin receptor PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsson, Hans; Larsson, Patricia; Jonsson, Cathrine; Jussing, Emma; Grybäck, Per

    2012-04-01

    To characterize a commonly occurring increased uptake by the uncinate process of the pancreas at PET/CT using 68Ga-DOTA-d-Phe1-Tyr3-octreotide (68Ga-DOTA-TOC). This tracer has replaced In pentetreotide (OctreoScan®) for somatostatin receptor scintigraphy at our laboratory. Fifty of our first 74 PET/CT examinations with 68Ga-DOTA-TOC could be evaluated in retrospect. None of these patients had surgery or showed any pathology in the pancreas head at the concomitant CT. Thirty-five of the 50 examinations (70%) showed an uptake by the uncinate process sufficiently intense to be interpreted as pathologic and simulating a tumor. Mean SUVmax was 9.2. Mean SUVmean using an isoactivity cut-off of >75% and >50% was 7.8 and 6.0, respectively. Volume calculations of the uncinate process activity using these definitions gave 0.9 mL and 4.2 mL, respectively. There is a frequent physiological uptake of 68Ga-DOTA-TOC by the pancreas uncinate process. This may be caused by an accumulation of pancreatic polypeptide-containing cells expressing somatostatin receptors. If there is a normal finding at concomitant diagnostic CT, this uptake should be regarded as physiological.

  7. The influence of somatostatin receptor scintigraphy during preoperative staging of non-functioning pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jilesen, A.P.J.; Hoefnagel, S.J.M.; Busch, O.R.C.; Bennink, R.J.; Gouma, D.J.; Nieveen van Dijkum, E.J.M.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To determine whether somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS) influences the preoperative staging and clinical management of non-functioning pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours (NF-pNETs). Materials and methods: All SRS examinations performed between 2002–2013 were selected. Patients with NF-pNET were included if both computed tomography (CT) and SRS was performed during preoperative staging. The diagnostic accuracy of CT and SRS for detecting NF-pNET metastases was analysed. Altered TNM classification and changed clinical management were calculated. Changed management was defined as a change from surgical resection into systemic treatment or vice versa. NF-pNETs were defined as tumours without clinical symptoms of hormonal hypersecretion. Results: Overall, 62 patients with NF-pNET were included with a mean age of 57 years (SD: 12.4) 2 . In 28 patients (45%), CT and SRS were correct and in agreement in the detection of primary tumour/metastases. In 34 patients (55%), one of the techniques was incorrect and therefore, there was no agreement. SRS altered the TNM classification in 14 patients (23%) and clinical management in nine patients (15%). In patients without metastases on CT, SRS detected lymph node metastases in one patient. The sensitivity to detect the primary tumour with CT was 95% and with SRS was 73%. In detecting metastases, the sensitivity and specificity were both 85% for CT versus 80% and 90% for SRS. Conclusion: Overall, CT and SRS were in agreement in the detection of NF-pNET. In NF-pNET without suspicious metastatic lesions on CT, SRS has limited value. SRS may be indicated to confirm lesions suspicious for neuroendocrine tumours metastases. - Highlights: • In 28 patients (45%), CT and SRS were correct and in agreement in the detection of primary tumor/metastases. • In 34 patients (55%) one of the modalities was incorrect and therefore, there was no agreement. • Sensitivity to detect the primary tumor with CT and SRS were 95% versus 73

  8. Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy using 99mTc-EDDA/HYNIC-TOC in patients with medullary thyroid carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czepczyński, Rafał; Parisella, Maria Gemma; Kosowicz, Jerzy; Mikołajczak, Renata; Ziemnicka, Katarzyna; Gryczyńska, Maria; Sowiński, Jerzy; Signore, Alberto

    2007-10-01

    Several new somatostatin analogues have been developed for the diagnosis and therapy of different tumours. Since somatostatin receptors are often over-expressed in medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC), the aim of our study was to evaluate the utility of scintigraphy with the somatostatin analogue (99m)Tc-EDDA/HYNIC-TOC in MTC in comparison with other diagnostic techniques. Forty-five patients with MTC, aged 14-83 years, were investigated. Scintigraphy using (99m)Tc-EDDA/HYNIC-TOC (Tektrotyd) was performed 2 and 4 h post injection of 740 MBq (20 mCi) of the tracer. Other imaging techniques were also applied and analysed in individual cases (ultrasonography, computed tomography, (99m)Tc(V)-DMSA, (131)I-MIBG, (99m)Tc-MDP, (111)In-DTPA-octreotide and (18)F-FDG-PET) and compared with (99m)Tc-EDDA/HYNIC-TOC. In group 1 (eight patients before thyroidectomy), uptake of the tracer was found in the primary tumours. In group 2 (six patients with remission), a false positive result was found in one patient; in the remaining five patients, no pathological foci were visualised. In group 3 (31 patients with post-surgical hypercalcitoninaemia), scintigraphy was true positive in 23 patients (74.2%): uptake in the thyroid bed was found in five patients, in the lymph nodes in 18 and in bone metastases in four. Using (99m)Tc-EDDA/HYNIC-TOC scintigraphy, the overall sensitivity was 79.5%, specificity 83.3%, accuracy 80.0%, positive predictive value 96.9% and negative predictive value 38.5%. (99m)Tc-EDDA/HYNIC-TOC is clinically useful for scintigraphy in the follow-up of patients with MTC. It can be used in clinical practice for preoperative evaluation, for localisation of local recurrence or distant metastases and particularly for therapy decision making.

  9. Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy using 99mTc-EDDA/HYNIC-TOC in patients with medullary thyroid carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czepczynski, Rafal; Kosowicz, Jerzy; Ziemnicka, Katarzyna; Gryczynska, Maria; Sowinski, Jerzy; Parisella, Maria G.; Mikolajczak, Renata; Signore, Alberto

    2007-01-01

    Several new somatostatin analogues have been developed for the diagnosis and therapy of different tumours. Since somatostatin receptors are often over-expressed in medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC), the aim of our study was to evaluate the utility of scintigraphy with the somatostatin analogue 99m Tc-EDDA/HYNIC-TOC in MTC in comparison with other diagnostic techniques. Forty-five patients with MTC, aged 14-83 years, were investigated. Scintigraphy using 99m Tc-EDDA/HYNIC-TOC (Tektrotyd) was performed 2 and 4 h post injection of 740 MBq (20 mCi) of the tracer. Other imaging techniques were also applied and analysed in individual cases (ultrasonography, computed tomography, 99m Tc(V)-DMSA, 131 I-MIBG, 99m Tc-MDP, 111 In-DTPA-octreotide and 18 F-FDG-PET) and compared with 99m Tc-EDDA/HYNIC-TOC. In group 1 (eight patients before thyroidectomy), uptake of the tracer was found in the primary tumours. In group 2 (six patients with remission), a false positive result was found in one patient; in the remaining five patients, no pathological foci were visualised. In group 3 (31 patients with post-surgical hypercalcitoninaemia), scintigraphy was true positive in 23 patients (74.2%): uptake in the thyroid bed was found in five patients, in the lymph nodes in 18 and in bone metastases in four. Using 99m Tc-EDDA/HYNIC-TOC scintigraphy, the overall sensitivity was 79.5%, specificity 83.3%, accuracy 80.0%, positive predictive value 96.9% and negative predictive value 38.5%. 99m Tc-EDDA/HYNIC-TOC is clinically useful for scintigraphy in the follow-up of patients with MTC. It can be used in clinical practice for preoperative evaluation, for localisation of local recurrence or distant metastases and particularly for therapy decision making. (orig.)

  10. Induction of Human Somatostatin Receptor Subtype 2 on Breast Tumors with an Adenoviral Vector for Their Treatment and Detection with a Radiolabeled Peptide

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rogers, Buck

    2002-01-01

    .... An adenoviral vector encoding the human somatostatin receptor subtype 2 (AdSSTr2) has been produced. The MDA- MB-468 and BT-474 human breast cancer cells were infected with AdSSTr2 and harvested 48 h later for membrane preparations...

  11. The somatostatin receptor-targeted radiotherapeutic [90Y-DOTA-dPhe1,Tyr3]octreotide (90Y-SMT 487) eradicates experimental rat pancreatic CA 20948 tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stolz, B.; Weckbecker, G.; Smith-Jones, P.M.; Albert, R.; Raulf, F.; Bruns, C.

    1998-01-01

    Somatostatin receptor-expressing tumours are potential targets for therapy with radiolabelled somatostatin analogues. We have synthesized a number of such analogues in the past and identified [DOTA-dPhe 1 , Tyr 3 ]octreotide (SMT 487) as the most promising candidate molecule because of its advantageous properties in cellular and in vivo tumour models. In the current paper we describe the radiotherapeutic effect of yttrium-90 labelled SMT 487 in Lewis rats bearing the somatostatin receptor-positive rat pancreatic tumour CA 20948. SMT 487 binds with nanomolar affinity to both the human and the rat somatostatin receptor subtype 2 (sst 2 ) (human sst 2 IC 50 =0.9 nM, rat sst 2 IC 50 =0.5 nM). In vivo, 90 Y-SMT 487 distributed rapidly to the sst 2 expressing CA 20948 rat pancreatic tumour, with a tumour-to-blood ratio of 49.15 at 24 h post injection. A single intravenous administration of 10 mCi/kg 90 Y-SMT 487 resulted in a complete remission of the tumours in five out of seven CA 20948 tumour-bearing Lewis rats. No regrowth of the tumours occurred 8 months post injection. Control animals that were treated with 30 μg/kg of unlabelled SMT 487 had to be sacrificed 10 days post injection due to excessive growth or necrotic areas on the tumour surface. Upon re-inoculation of tumour cells into those rats that had shown complete remission, the tumours disappeared after 3-4 weeks of moderate growth without any further treatment. The present study shows for the first time the curative potential of 90 Y-SMT 487-based radiotherapy for somatostatin receptor-expressing tumours. Clinical phase I studies with yttrium-labelled SMT 487 have started in September 1997. (orig.)

  12. Expression of somatostatin receptors subtype 2 and 5 in extraocular muscle tissue of hypothyroidism animal induced by 131I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Fangdu; Chu Qiaomei; Xu Peikang; Yao Xiaohong; Shen Jiangfan

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To observe the expression and distribution of somatostatin receptors 2 and 5 (SSTR2, 5) in extraocular muscle in hypothyroidism and thyroid associated ophthalmopathy (TAO) Wister rats induced by 131 I. Methods: 20 Wister rats were randomly divided into experimental group and normal group(group D). According to 131 I doses of intraperitoneal injection, the experimental groups were divided into low (group A), middle (group B) and high dose group (group C). After 8 weeks, all rats were sacrificed and orbital tissue sections were applied to HE staining and Immunohistochemistry for the analysis of rat orbital tissue changes and SSTR2 and 5 distribution in extraocular muscle. Results: The serum FT 4 levels in group A (16.98±2.92 pmol / L), group B (1.84±0.44 pmol / L) and group C (1.35 ±0.37 pmol /L) eight weeks after 131 I injection were decreased, and had significant difference compared with group D (P 4 levels in group B and C were significantly lower than that in group A (P 0.05). Orbital tissue in experimental group showed mucoid degeneration and edema, the extent was about 25% in group A, 50% in group B, 70% in group C. The rats in group B and group C appeared obvious proliferation of fibrous and adipose tissue, muscle fibers degeneration fracture, even extraocular muscles in group C have vacuole formation. Immunohistochemical analysis displayed highest SSTR5 distribution and strongest expression was in extraocular muscle of group C, second in A B combination group (A and B groups)and weakest in group D. There were significant differences between A B combination group,group C and group D (P 0.05). Conclusion: This study observed the distribution and expression of SSTR2 and SSTR5 in extraocular muscle on the established hypothyroidism animal model. It is some significance for understanding the mechanism of somatostatin receptors in occurrence and development of TAO, similar to provide a reference for the use of somatostatin analogue orbital imaging

  13. Correlation of Somatostatin Receptor-2 Expression with Gallium-68-DOTA-TATE Uptake in Neuroblastoma Xenograft Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Libo; Vines, Douglass C; Scollard, Deborah A; McKee, Trevor; Komal, Teesha; Ganguly, Milan; Do, Trevor; Wu, Bing; Alexander, Natasha; Vali, Reza; Shammas, Amer; Besanger, Travis; Baruchel, Sylvain

    2017-01-01

    Peptide-receptor imaging and therapy with radiolabeled somatostatin analogs such as 68 Ga-DOTA-TATE and 177 Lu-DOTA-TATE have become an effective treatment option for SSTR-positive neuroendocrine tumors. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the correlation of somatostatin receptor-2 (SSTR2) expression with 68 Ga-DOTA-TATE uptake and 177 Lu-DOTA-TATE therapy in neuroblastoma (NB) xenograft models. We demonstrated variable SSTR2 expression profiles in eight NB cell lines. From micro-PET imaging and autoradiography, a higher uptake of 68 Ga-DOTA-TATE was observed in SSTR2 high-expressing NB xenografts (CHLA-15) compared to SSTR2 low-expressing NB xenografts (SK-N-BE(2)). Combined autoradiography-immunohistochemistry revealed histological colocalization of SSTR2 and 68 Ga-DOTA-TATE uptake in CHLA-15 tumors. With a low dose of 177 Lu-DOTA-TATE (20 MBq/animal), tumor growth inhibition was achieved in the CHLA-15 high SSTR2 expressing xenograft model. Although, in vitro , NB cells showed variable expression levels of norepinephrine transporter (NET), a molecular target for 131 I-MIBG therapy, low 123 I-MIBG uptake was observed in all selected NB xenografts. In conclusion, SSTR2 expression levels are associated with 68 Ga-DOTA-TATE uptake and antitumor efficacy of 177 Lu-DOTA-TATE. 68 Ga-DOTA-TATE PET is superior to 123 I-MIBG SPECT imaging in detecting NB tumors in our model. Radiolabeled DOTA-TATE can be used as an agent for NB tumor imaging to potentially discriminate tumors eligible for 177 Lu-DOTA-TATE therapy.

  14. Correlation of Somatostatin Receptor-2 Expression with Gallium-68-DOTA-TATE Uptake in Neuroblastoma Xenograft Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Libo Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Peptide-receptor imaging and therapy with radiolabeled somatostatin analogs such as 68Ga-DOTA-TATE and 177Lu-DOTA-TATE have become an effective treatment option for SSTR-positive neuroendocrine tumors. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the correlation of somatostatin receptor-2 (SSTR2 expression with 68Ga-DOTA-TATE uptake and 177Lu-DOTA-TATE therapy in neuroblastoma (NB xenograft models. We demonstrated variable SSTR2 expression profiles in eight NB cell lines. From micro-PET imaging and autoradiography, a higher uptake of 68Ga-DOTA-TATE was observed in SSTR2 high-expressing NB xenografts (CHLA-15 compared to SSTR2 low-expressing NB xenografts (SK-N-BE(2. Combined autoradiography-immunohistochemistry revealed histological colocalization of SSTR2 and 68Ga-DOTA-TATE uptake in CHLA-15 tumors. With a low dose of 177Lu-DOTA-TATE (20 MBq/animal, tumor growth inhibition was achieved in the CHLA-15 high SSTR2 expressing xenograft model. Although, in vitro, NB cells showed variable expression levels of norepinephrine transporter (NET, a molecular target for 131I-MIBG therapy, low 123I-MIBG uptake was observed in all selected NB xenografts. In conclusion, SSTR2 expression levels are associated with 68Ga-DOTA-TATE uptake and antitumor efficacy of 177Lu-DOTA-TATE. 68Ga-DOTA-TATE PET is superior to 123I-MIBG SPECT imaging in detecting NB tumors in our model. Radiolabeled DOTA-TATE can be used as an agent for NB tumor imaging to potentially discriminate tumors eligible for 177Lu-DOTA-TATE therapy.

  15. Effect of Peptide Receptor Radionuclide Therapy on Somatostatin Receptor Status and Glucose Metabolism in Neuroendocrine Tumors: Intraindividual Comparison of Ga-68 DOTANOC PET/CT and F-18 FDG PET/CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Sowon; Prasad, Vikas; Lee, Dong Soo; Baum, R. P.

    2011-01-01

    The heterogeneous nature of the neuroendocrine tumors (NET) makes it challenging to find one uniformly applicable management protocol which is especially true for diagnosis. The discovery of the overexpression of somatostatin receptors (SMS-R) on neuroendocrine tumor cells lead to the generalized and rapid acceptance of radiolabeled somatostatin receptor analogs for staging and restaging of NET as well as for Peptide Receptor Radionuclide Therapy (PRRNT) using Y-90 and Lu-177 DOTATATE/DOTATOC. In this present work we tried to look in to the effect of PRRNT on the glucose metabolism assessed by F-18 FDG PET/CT and SMS-R density assessed by Ga-68 DOTANOC PET/CT. We observed a complex relationship between the somatostatin receptor expression and glucose metabolism with only 56% (77/138) of the lesions showing match, while the others show mismatch between the receptor status and metabolism. The match between receptor expression and glucose metabolism increases with the grade of NET. In grade 3 NET, there is a concurrence between the changes in glucose metabolism and somatostatin receptor expression. PRRNT was found to be more effective in lesions with higher receptor expression. PMID:22121482

  16. The Inhibitory Effect of Somatostatin Receptor Activation on Bee Venom-Evoked Nociceptive Behavior and pCREB Expression in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study examined nociceptive behaviors and the expression of phosphorylated cAMP response element-binding protein (pCREB in the dorsal horn of the lumbar spinal cord and the dorsal root ganglion (DRG evoked by bee venom (BV. The effect of intraplantar preapplication of the somatostatin analog octreotide on nociceptive behaviors and pCREB expression was also examined. Subcutaneous injection of BV into the rat unilateral hindpaw pad induced significant spontaneous nociceptive behaviors, primary mechanical allodynia, primary thermal hyperalgesia, and mirror-thermal hyperalgesia, as well as an increase in pCREB expression in the lumbar spinal dorsal horn and DRG. Octreotide pretreatment significantly attenuated the BV-induced lifting/licking response and mechanical allodynia. Local injection of octreotide also significantly reduced pCREB expression in the lumbar spinal dorsal horn and DRG. Furthermore, pretreatment with cyclosomatostatin, a somatostatin receptor antagonist, reversed the octreotide-induced inhibition of the lifting/licking response, mechanical allodynia, and the expression of pCREB. These results suggest that BV can induce nociceptive responses and somatostatin receptors are involved in mediating the antinociception, which provides new evidence for peripheral analgesic action of somatostatin in an inflammatory pain state.

  17. In vitro comparison of renal handling and uptake of two somatostatin receptor-specific peptides labeled with indium-111

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trejtnar, F.; Novy, Z.; Petrik, M.; Laznickova, A.; Melicharova, L.; Vankova, M.; Laznicek, M.

    2008-01-01

    Radiolabeled receptor-specific somatostatin analogs labeled with gamma- or beta-emitting radionuclides are useful for scintigraphic imaging and/or therapy of selected neuroendocrine tumors. However, significant renal uptake may result in radiotoxicological injury of the kidney and can limit clinical application of the agents. The aim of the study was to analyze renal handling, rate, and mechanism of renal accumulation of two somatostatin receptor-targeted peptides, [DOTA 0 , Tyr 3 , Thr 8 ]-octreotide (DOTA-TATE) and [DOTA 0 , 1-Nal 3 ]-octreotide (DOTA-NOC), labeled with indium-111 using in vitro methods. The perfused rat kidney and freshly isolated rat renal cells were used as experimental models. The perfusion was performed in a recirculation regimen at constant pressure with solution containing bovine albumin, erythrocytes, and a mixture of essential substrates. The renal cells were isolated from rat kidneys using two-phase collagenase perfusion. Accumulation studies were used to evaluate the renal uptake of the peptides and to compare their accumulation with that of passively or actively transported model drugs. The influence of selected inhibitors of receptor-mediated endocytosis and the inhibition of energy-dependent transport processes on the uptake were also investigated using isolated renal cells. The renal clearance of 111 In-DOTA-NOC in the perfused rat kidney was significantly lower than that of 111 In-DOTA-TATE. Reverse situation was found in the case of renal retention. Pretreatment of the perfused kidney with maleate markedly decreased the renal retention. 111 In-DOTA-NOC was accumulated in the isolated renal cells at a higher rate than 111 In-DOTA-TATE (ratio 3:1). The uptake of the radiopeptides in renal cells was higher than the uptake of not only the passively transported sucrose but also actively transported and accumulated methylglucose. The rank order of potency to inhibit the uptake by active endocytosis was approximately aprotinin

  18. Somatostatin Receptor SPECT/CT using 99mTc Labeled HYNIC-TOC Aids in Diagnosis of Primary Optic Nerve Sheath Meningioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Piyush; Purandare, Nilendu; Shah, Sneha; Agrawal, Archi; Rangarajan, Venkatesh

    2017-01-01

    Primary optic nerve sheath meningiomas (ONSM) are rare, benign and slow growing tumor involving the intra-orbital/intra-canalicular segment of the optic nerve. Untreated, they can potentially lead to visual deterioration. Magnetic resonance (MR) is the gold standard imaging modality for diagnosing the entity. Often, a clinical dilemma exists to narrow the differential diagnosis of an enhancing intra-orbital mass on MR. Molecular imaging provides a high degree of precision in diagnosing meningioma in view of relatively high levels of somatostatin receptor expression by these tumors. The following case demonstrates the potential clinical utility of somatostatin receptor SPECT using 99m Tc- labeled HYNIC-TOC in clinical diagnosis of ONSM.

  19. PET/CT imaging of human somatostatin receptor 2 (hsstr2) as reporter gene for gene therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, M.; Gazdhar, A.; Weitzel, T.; Schmid, R.; Krause, T.

    2006-01-01

    Localized information on region-selective gene expression in small animals is widely obtained by use of reporter genes inducing light emission. Using these reporter genes for imaging deep inside the human body fluorescent probes are hindered by attenuation, scattering and possible fluorescence quenching. This can be overcome by use of radio-peptide receptors as reporter genes. Therefore, the feasibility of the somatostatin receptor 2 expression vector system for expression imaging was checked against a control vector containing luciferase gene. For in vivo transduction of vector DNA into the rat forelimb muscles the in vivo electroporation technique was chosen because of its high regio-selectivity. The gene expression was imaged by high-sensitive CCD camera (luciferase activity) and by PET/CT using a Ga-68-DOTATOC as radio peptide probe. The relative sstr2 expression was enhanced by gene transduction at maximum to a factor of 15. The PET/CT images could be fully quantified. The above demonstrated feasibility of radio-peptide PET/CT reporter gene imaging may serve in the future as a tool for full quantitative understanding of regional gene expression, especially in large animals and humans

  20. PET/CT imaging of human somatostatin receptor 2 (hsstr2) as reporter gene for gene therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofmann, M. [Molecular Imaging and Therapy Group (MIT-Bern), Clinic of Nuclear Medicine, Inselspital, Medical School Bern (Switzerland)]. E-mail: Michael.Hofmann@insel.ch; Gazdhar, A. [Division of Pulmonary Medicine, University Hospital Bern (Switzerland); Weitzel, T. [Molecular Imaging and Therapy Group (MIT-Bern), Clinic of Nuclear Medicine, Inselspital, Medical School Bern (Switzerland); Schmid, R. [Division of Thoracic Surgery, University Hospital Bern (Switzerland); Krause, T. [Molecular Imaging and Therapy Group (MIT-Bern), Clinic of Nuclear Medicine, Inselspital, Medical School Bern (Switzerland)

    2006-12-20

    Localized information on region-selective gene expression in small animals is widely obtained by use of reporter genes inducing light emission. Using these reporter genes for imaging deep inside the human body fluorescent probes are hindered by attenuation, scattering and possible fluorescence quenching. This can be overcome by use of radio-peptide receptors as reporter genes. Therefore, the feasibility of the somatostatin receptor 2 expression vector system for expression imaging was checked against a control vector containing luciferase gene. For in vivo transduction of vector DNA into the rat forelimb muscles the in vivo electroporation technique was chosen because of its high regio-selectivity. The gene expression was imaged by high-sensitive CCD camera (luciferase activity) and by PET/CT using a Ga-68-DOTATOC as radio peptide probe. The relative sstr2 expression was enhanced by gene transduction at maximum to a factor of 15. The PET/CT images could be fully quantified. The above demonstrated feasibility of radio-peptide PET/CT reporter gene imaging may serve in the future as a tool for full quantitative understanding of regional gene expression, especially in large animals and human000.

  1. Molecular imaging with {sup 68}Ga-SSTR PET/CT and correlation to immunohistochemistry of somatostatin receptors in neuroendocrine tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaemmerer, Daniel; Haugvik, Sven-Petter; Hommann, Merten [Zentralklinik Bad Berka GmbH, Department of General and Visceral Surgery, Bad Berka (Germany); Peter, Luisa; Lupp, Amelie; Schulz, Stefan [University of Jena, Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Jena (Germany); Saenger, Joerg [Laboratory of Pathology and Cytology, Bad Berka (Germany); Prasad, Vikas; Kulkarni, Harshad; Baum, Richard Paul [Zentralklinik Bad Berka, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Center for PET, Bad Berka (Germany)

    2011-09-15

    Somatostatin receptors (SSTR) are known for an overexpression in gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumours (GEP-NET). The aim of the present study was to find out if the receptor density predicted by the semi-quantitative parameters generated from the static positron emission tomography (PET/CT) correlated with the in vitro immunohistochemistry using a novel rabbit monoclonal anti-SSTR2A antibody (clone UMB-1) for specific SSTR2A immunohistochemistry and polyclonal antibodies for SSTR1 and 3-5. Overall 14 surgical specimens generated from 34 histologically documented GEP-NET patients were correlated with the preoperative {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-NOC PET/CT. Quantitative assessment of the receptor density was done using the immunoreactive score (IRS) of Remmele and Stegner; the additional 4-point IRS classification for immunohistochemistry and standardized uptake values (SUV{sub max} and SUV{sub mean}) were used for PET/CT. The IRS for SSTR2A and SSTR5 correlated highly significant with the SUV{sub max} on the PET/CT (p < 0.001; p < 0.05) and the IRS for SSTR2A with the SUV{sub mean} (p < 0.013). The level of SSTR2A score correlated significantly with chromogranin A staining and indirectly to the tumour grading. The highly significant correlation between SSTR2A and SSTR5 and the SUV{sub max} on the {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-NOC PET/CT scans is concordant with the affinity profile of {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-NOC to the SSTR subtypes and demonstrates the excellent qualification of somatostatin analogues in the diagnostics of NET. This study correlating somatostatin receptor imaging using {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-NOC PET/CT with immunohistochemically analysed SSTR also underlines the approval of therapy using somatostatin analogues, follow-up imaging as well as radionuclide therapy. (orig.)

  2. Selective central activation of somatostatin receptor 2 increases food intake, grooming behavior and rectal temperature in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stengel, A; Goebel, M; Wang, L; Rivier, J; Kobelt, P; Monnikes, H; Tache, Y

    2010-08-01

    The consequences of selective activation of brain somatostatin receptor-2 (sst2) were assessed using the sst2 agonist, des-AA(1,4-6,11-13)-[DPhe(2),Aph7(Cbm),DTrp(8)]-Cbm-SST-Thr-NH2. Food intake (FI) was monitored in ad libitum fed rats chronically implanted with an intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) cannula. The sst(2) agonist injected i.c.v. at 0.1 and 1 microg/rat dose-dependently increased light phase FI from 2 to 6 hours post injection (2.3+/-0.5 and 7.5+/-1.2 respectively vs. vehicle: 0.2+/-0.2 g/300 g bw, P<0.001). Peptide action was reversed by i.c.v. injection of the sst2 antagonist, des-AA(1,4-6,11-13)-[pNO(2)-Phe(2),DCys(3),Tyr(7),DAph(Cbm)8]-SST-2Nal-NH(2) and not reproduced by intraperitoneal injection (30 microg/rat). The sst(2) antagonist alone i.c.v. significantly decreased the cumulative 14-hours dark phase FI by 29.5%. Other behaviors, namely grooming, drinking and locomotor activity were also increased by the sst(2) agonist (1 microg/rat, i.c.v.) as monitored during the 2(nd) hour post injection while gastric emptying of solid food was unaltered. Rectal temperature rose 1 hour after the sst(2) agonist (1 microg/rat, i.c.v.) with a maximal response maintained from 1 to 4 hours post injection. These data show that selective activation of the brain sst(2) receptor induces a feeding response in the light phase not associated with changes in gastric emptying. The food intake reduction following sst(2) receptor blockade suggests a role of this receptor in the orexigenic drive during the dark phase.

  3. 99Tcm labelling and in vitro binding of dextran-somatostatin conjugate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui Haiping; China Inst. of Atomic Energy, Beijing; Zhai Shizhen; Du Jin; Beijing Univ., Beijing

    2006-01-01

    Natural somatostatin and dextran-20 are used to synthesis somatostatin-dextran (SMS-Dx 20 ). The in vitro somatostatin receptor competition binding study of somatostatin-dextran is carried out by using rate brain cortex membranes (express somatostatin receptor type 2) and 125 I-Tyr 3 -Octreotide as a radioligand. The somatostatin-dextran conjugate is then labelled with 99 Tc m using SnCl 2 as reduce agent and tested for its in vitro binding properties. The somatostatin-dextran conjugate shows high somatostatin receptor binding affinity, i.e. in the same IC 50 value as the reference ligand Octreotide (IC 50 ∼5.95 nmol/L). The labelling efficiency is more than 85%. The specific binding of 99 Tc m labeled somatostatin-dextran conjugate is 25%-40%. The somatostatin-dextran conjugate is worthy of further investigation for 99 Tc m radiolabeling with diagnostic possibilities for somatostatin receptor positive tumors. (authors)

  4. Preparation and biological evaluation of [(99m)Tc/EDDA/Tricine/HYNIC(0), BzThi(3)]-octreotide for somatostatin receptor-positive tumor imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erfani, Mostafa; Shafiei, Mohammad; Mazidi, Mohammad; Goudarzi, Mostafa

    2013-04-01

    Somatostatin-derived analogues play an important role in the diagnosis and treatment of neuroendocrine tumors. The aim of this study was to evaluate a new somatostatin analogue designed for labeling with (99m)Tc: [6-hydrazinopyridine-3-carboxylic acid (HYNIC(0)), β-(3-benzothienyl)-Ala (BzThi(3))]-octreotide ([HYNIC]-BOC), using ethylenediamine-N,N'-diacetic acid (EDDA) and tricine as coligands. Synthesis was performed on a solid phase using a standard Fmoc strategy. The HYNIC-peptide conjugate was radiolabeled with (99m)Tc and characterized by ITLC and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). In vitro studies were carried out in sstr2 expressing AR4-2J cell lines. In vivo distribution studies were performed in rats bearing the AR4-2J tumor. The radiolabeled complex could be prepared at high-specific activities and >95% radiochemical yield as determined by HPLC. The peptide conjugate showed high-affinity binding for sstr2. The radioligand showed high and specific internalization into AR4-2J cells (18.19%±0.21% at 4 hours). In vivo distribution studies in rats bearing tumor have shown a receptor-specific uptake of radioactivity in somatostatin receptor-positive organs. After 4 hours, uptake in the AR4-2J tumor was 1.71%±0.36% injected dose per gram tissue (%ID/g). These data show that [(99m)Tc/EDDA/Tricine/HYNIC(0), BzThi(3)]-octreotide is a specific radioligand for the somatostatin receptor-positive tumors and is a suitable candidate for clinical studies.

  5. Single photon emission computed tomography procedure improves accuracy of somatostatin receptor scintigraphy in endocrine gastro-entero-pancreatic tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebtahi, R.; Genin, R.; Rouzet, F.; Bleicner-Perez, S.; Lievre, A.; Scigliano, S.; Vialle, C.; Le Guludec, D.; Cadiot, G.; Sobhani, I.; Mignon, M.

    2005-01-01

    Somatostatin receptors scintigraphy (SRS) is a sensitive method for the detection of endocrine gastro-entero-pancreatic tumors. The aim of this study was to evaluate the sensitivity of anterior and posterior planar associated to single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) compared to anterior and posterior planar associated to additional lateral and oblique views in the detection of abdominal endocrine tumors. One hundred and sixty four patients with endocrine gastro-entero-pancreatic tumors were included in this study. Scintigraphic images were performed after injection of 189 ± 23 MBq of 111 In-Pentetreotide. Abdominal planar images were performed 4 h and 24 hours after injection. Abdominal SPECT was performed at 24 hours. The combination of anterior and posterior abdominal planar images with SPECT using iterative reconstruction detected significantly more tumoral sites compared to multiple planar images (298 versus 280 for the liver, p = 0.01 and 90 versus 88 for coeliac area). In particular liver lesions were better delineated on tomographic slices. The combination of 111 In-Pentetreotide SPECT with anterior and posterior planar images is more sensitive than multiple planar images to detect abdominal endocrine tumors. (author)

  6. “In-house” preparation of 99mTc-EDDA/HYNIC-TOC, a specific targeting agent for somatostatin receptor scintigraphy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonja Kuzmanovska

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of radiolabeled peptide ligands as diagnostics and therapeutics in nuclear oncology has increased recently. One of the most frequently used radiopharmaceutical is 99mTc-EDDA/HYNIC-TOC, a somatostatin analog with affinity for certain types of somatostatin receptors, overexpressed in tumors of neuroendocrine origin. The radiopharmaceutical is not readily available; therefore we introduced its “in house” preparation within project activities supported by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA. We optimized the radiolabeling protocol, prepared a small batch of frozen kits, performed ITLC quality control and animal biodistribution during the preclinical evaluation procedures. The co-ligand exchange labeling procedure was carried out at 100°C during 10 min, resulting in radiochemical purity >90%. The biodistribution scintigrams in normal Wistar rats showed rapid blood clearance after 15 min and predominant kidney accumulation after 4 h, in accordance with the data reported by other authors. Storage stability of the formulated small batch frozen kit (-20°C was evaluated within 6 months, with radiolabeling yield ranging between 94,3% and 96,9%. We conclude that frozen kit can be a safe alternative to the freeze-dried for small batch in house production, and after the satisfactory preclinical evaluation, the “in house” prepared 99mTc-EDDA/ HYNIC-TOC can be introduced in clinical practice as specific targeting agent for somatostatin receptor scintigraphy.

  7. Positron emission tomography study on pancreatic somatostatin receptors in normal and diabetic rats with 68Ga-DOTA-octreotide: a potential PET tracer for beta cell mass measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sako, Takeo; Hasegawa, Koki; Nishimura, Mie; Kanayama, Yousuke; Wada, Yasuhiro; Hayashinaka, Emi; Cui, Yilong; Kataoka, Yosky; Senda, Michio; Watanabe, Yasuyoshi

    2013-12-06

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a metabolic disorder characterized by hyperglycemia, and the loss or dysfunction of pancreatic beta cells has been reported before the appearance of clinical symptoms and hyperglycemia. To evaluate beta cell mass (BCM) for improving the detection and treatment of DM at earlier stages, we focused on somatostatin receptors that are highly expressed in the pancreatic beta cells, and developed a positron emission tomography (PET) probe derived from octreotide, a metabolically stable somatostatin analog. Octreotide was conjugated with 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA), a chelating agent, and labeled with (68)Gallium ((68)Ga). After intravenous injection of (68)Ga-DOTA-octreotide, a 90-min emission scan of the abdomen was performed in normal and DM model rats. The PET studies showed that (68)Ga-DOTA-octreotide radioactivity was highly accumulated in the pancreas of normal rats and that the pancreatic accumulation was significantly reduced in the rats administered with an excess amount of unlabeled octreotide or after treatment with streptozotocin, which was used for the chemical induction of DM in rats. These results were in good agreement with the ex vivo biodistribution data. These results indicated that the pancreatic accumulation of (68)Ga-DOTA-octreotide represented specific binding to the somatostatin receptors and reflected BCM. Therefore, PET imaging with (68)Ga-DOTA-octreotide could be a potential tool for evaluating BCM. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Preliminary clinical evaluation of Somatostatin Receptor Scintigraphy (SRS) with 99mTc-EDDA/HYNIC-TATE in comparison to 111In-Octreoscan and 131 I MIBG scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubalewska, A.; Fross, K.; Staszczak, A.; Huszno, B.; Mikolajczak, R.; Gorska, A.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Over expression of somatostatin receptors in various neuroendocrine tumours prompted development of somatostatin analogues, which after radioactive labelling, could be used in oncological diagnostics. Somatostatin Receptor Positive Tumour (Spt) imaging with 111In-DTPA-DPhe1- octreotide (111In-Octreoscan) has become a widely used diagnostic procedure in clinical nuclear medicine. However 111In as a radiolabel has several drawbacks, including limited availability, sub optimal gamma energy and high radiation burden to the patient. Technetium (99mTc) labelling of somatostatin analogues is especially attractive due to the ready availability of 99mTc from generators and its well recognised favourable imaging characteristics. HYNIC conjugated Tyr 3 -Octreotate (HYNIC-TATE) prepared in our laboratory in a dry kit form was labelled with technetium-99mTc, with tricine and EDDA used as coligands. Tyr3-octreotate differs from octreotide (OC) by more hydrophilic tyrosine in the third position and the terminal threonine, which replaced threoninol present in OC. In vitro studies using cell lines transfected with somatostatin receptors (SSTR) revealed that octreotate shows 14- 17 times better binding affinity for SSTR type 2 than does OC. It is expected to clear more rapidly from non-target tissues as a result of the carboxylic group at the C-terminal of the peptide. HYNIC has been used as bifunctional chelator in 99mTc-HYNIC-Tyr3-octreotide (TOC) by Maecke and Behe, who reported on its favourable preclinical characteristics when EDDA was used as a co-ligand. These pre-clinical data were confirmed by Decristoforo and Mather and their early clinical studies appeared recently. The new radiopharmaceutical - 99mTc-DDA/HYNICTATE was evaluated in-vitro and in-vivo in an animal model and its potential for SSTR scintigraphy was documented. In the current patient study the diagnostic usefulness of the new radiopharmaceutical was tested for detection of tumours expressing SSTR

  9. Scintigraphy with labelled analogues of the somatostatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duet, M.; Ajzenberg, C.; Warnet, A.; Mundler, O.

    1998-01-01

    The receptors of the somatostatin have been localized in a big number of tumors, whom a great number are neuro-endocrine tumors. However, some tumors that have not this differentiation (breast cancer, lymphomas, cerebral tumors) possess them as well. Analogues of somatostatin, labelled with isotopes having a gamma emission, allow from now their detection in vivo. (N.C.)

  10. Enhanced bilateral somatostatin receptor expression in mediastinal lymph nodes (''chimney sign'') in occult metastatic medullary thyroid cancer: a typical site of tumour manifestation?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behr, T.M.; Gratz, S.; Markus, P.M.; Dunn, R.M.; Huefner, M.; Becker, H.; Becker, W.

    1997-01-01

    In medullary thyroid cancer (MTC), post-surgically elevated plasma calcitonin and/or carcinoembryonic antigen levels frequently indicate persisting metastatic disease, although conventional diagnostic procedures fail to localize the responsible lesions (occult disease). Somatostatin analogues have been used successfully in disease localization, but recently concerns have been raised that increased thoracic uptake of indium-111 pentetreotide in patients with previous external beam irradiation may represent a false-positive finding, caused by post-irradiation pulmonary fibrosis. We recently examined seven patients with metastatic MTC by somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (six with occult and one with established disease). In four patients, all of whom had stable or slowly rising tumour marker levels over several years, a chimney-like bilateral mediastinal uptake of indium-111 pentetreotide was found. In two patients with persisting hypercalcitonaemia immediately after primary surgery, supraclavicular lymph node metastases were identified as the responsible lesions. None of these seven patients had prior external beam radiation therapy. In two cases, histological confirmation was obtained. In one patient, disease progression could be shown during follow-up. These data suggest that bilateral mediastinal lymph node involvement is a typical site of disease in slowly progressing occult metastatic MTC; the ''chimney sign'' may represent a typical finding with somatostatin analogues in such cases. Therefore, we believe that even in the case of prior external beam irradiation, mediastinal uptake of octreotide might represent metastatic MTC rather than radiation fibrosis. (orig.). With 2 figs., 1 tab

  11. The clinical impact of a combined gamma camera/CT imaging system on somatostatin receptor imaging of neuroendocrine tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hillel, P.G.; Beek, E.J.R. van; Taylor, C.; Lorenz, E.; Bax, N.D.S.; Prakash, V.; Tindale, W.B.

    2006-01-01

    AIM: With a combined gamma camera/CT imaging system, CT images are obtained which are inherently registered to the emission images and can be used for the attenuation correction of SPECT and for mapping the functional information from these nuclear medicine tomograms onto anatomy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical impact of SPECT/CT using such a system for somatostatin receptor imaging (SRI) of neuroendocrine tumours. MATERIALS AND METHODS: SPECT/CT imaging with 111 In-Pentetreotide was performed on 29 consecutive patients, the majority of whom had carcinoid disease. All SPECT images were first reported in isolation and then re-reported with the addition of the CT images for functional anatomical mapping (FAM). RESULTS: Fifteen of the 29 SPECT images were reported as abnormal, and in 11 of these abnormal images (73%) FAM was found to either establish a previously unknown location (7/11) or change the location (4/11) of at least one lesion. The revised location could be independently confirmed in 64% of these cases. Confirmation of location was not possible in the other patients due to either a lack of other relevant investigations, or the fact that lesions seen in the SPECT images were not apparent in the other investigations. FAM affected patient management in 64% of the cases where the additional anatomical information caused a change in the reported location of lesions. CONCLUSION: These results imply that FAM can improve the reporting accuracy for SPECT SRI with significant impact on patient management

  12. Contribution of scintigraphy for somatostatin receptors in case of non-iodine-fixating metastases of thyroid epithelioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Couty, H.; Andrieu, J.M.; Baudet, L.; Faurous, P.; Artus, J.C.; Jaffiol, C.

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this work was to evaluate the sensitivity and importance of scintigraphy of somatostatin receptors (SSR) in the detection of non iodine-fixating metastases of thyroid epithelioma. We have studied retrospectively 7 patients with a detectable thyroglobulin under hormonal hindrance, amounting after cessation of treatment up to 72 - 1500 μ g/l and a normal post-irradiation therapy (3.7 GBq of 131 I) scintigraphy. These patients (4 F / 3 M), aged from 27 to 74 years (average age, 54 years), were treated by total and ganglionic curettage for papillary cancer of thyroid. Their evolutive surveillance extended from 1 to 24 years (on average, 8.4 years) and they received curative cumulated 131 I activities of 13 to 26 GBq. Each of them benefited by an osseous scintigraphy, of a cervico-thoraco-abdominal TDM and of a 111 In Pentetreotide SSR. The SSR was positive for 4/7 patients showing cervico-mediastinal fixations, the localizations being not detected by TDM. The osseous scintigraphy revealed once to be positive showing a costal lesion already detected by SSR. Cervical non-palpable adenopathies were detected by TDM for one patient. The anatomical-pathological analysis confirmed their thyroid origin. For other two patients the TDM showed suspect pulmonary nodules. These cervical and pulmonary localization were not detected by SSR. The SSR + TDM couple was positive for 6/7 patients. In conclusion, in this series the sensitivity of SSR was estimated to be 57%. Besides, the results obtained showed a net complementarity between the detection performances of SSR and TDM

  13. Receptor PET/CT for determining the somatostatin receptor status of neuroendocrine tumors before and after peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT): Clinical experience after 1,500 studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baum, R.P.; Prasad, V.; Leonhardi, J.; Kroeger, R.; Wortmann, R.; Mueller, D.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: The octapeptide [DOTA]-1-Nal3-octreotide (DOTA-NOC) has 3 to 4 times higher binding affinity to sstr2 than DOTATOC (Wild 2003). We labeled this peptide with the Ga-68 (t1/2 68 min) and used it in pts with metastatic NET before/after PRRT for evaluating the sstr status by semiquantitative PET/CT imaging. Methods: Ga-68 was eluted from a Ge-68/Ga-68 generator using 0.1 M HCl. Following purifications, Ga-68 was eluted into a labeling vial containing 0.05 mg DOTA-NOC. Radiolabeling yields of >80% were achieved within 15 min at >95C. After purification (C18 cartridge) and a final elution, 370-700 MBq of Ga-68 DOTA-NOC were obtained with 100% radiochemical purity within 20 min (about 70% yield). Results: 1,500 PET/CT studies were performed in pts with histologically proven NET and progressive metastases before and after PRRT. Acquisition was started 20-270 min after injection of a mean of 100 MBq (46-260 MBq) Ga-68 DOTA-NOC using an LSO-based PET/CT (biograph DUO, Siemens). SUV were determined for all tumor lesions and normal tissues. SUV in metastases was as high as 152 whereas normal tissue was in the range of 0.4 (lung) to 33 (spleen). Outstanding PET/CT images of all known tumor lesions and in addition very small lymph node and bone metastases (<5 mm) were easily visualized as early as 20 min p.i. Clearly more lesions were detected as compared to Tc-99m EDDA-HYNIC-TOC or In-111 DOTA-NOC SPECT or as seen on CT or MRI images (especially regarding lymph node metastases, bone lesions and unknown primaries). Conclusions: Molecular receptor PET/CT imaging using the Ga-68-labeled somatostatin analogue DOTA-NOC detects neuroendocrine tumor metastases with very high diagnostic sensitivity and specificity. Semiquantitative uptake measurements (SUV) allow predicting the tumor uptake of Y-90 or Lu-177- labeled peptides before PRRT and are highly useful for therapy control to determine the 'molecular tumor response' which can precede the morphologic responses by months

  14. Somatostatin and dopamine receptors as molecular targets for the medical treatment of Cushing’s disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. de Bruin (Christiaan)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractHarvey Williams Cushing (1869-1939) was born as the 10th child of a well-educated, puritanical medical family in Cleveland (figure 1). He attended Yale University, graduated cum laude from Harvard Medical School and was trained as a general surgeon at Johns Hopkins under the famous

  15. Unicentric Castleman's Disease Revealed by 18F-FDG PET/CT and Somatostatin Receptor Scintigraphy With 99mTc-HYNIC-TOC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yaping; Wang, Ling; Pan, Qingqing; Ma, Yanru; Li, Fang

    2018-07-01

    A 51-year-old woman with a history of hypertension and abdominal pain was found with a retroperitoneal mass. The mass had intense enhancement in contrast-enhanced CT, and it showed a moderate degree of increased FDG uptake in PET/CT. The mass was also positive in somatostatin receptor scintigraphy with Tc-HYNIC-TOC, but it was negative in I-MIBG scan. The histopathological result after surgical resection of the mass confirmed the diagnosis of Castleman's disease, the hyaline vascular variant.

  16. Current knowledge on the sensitivity of the 68Ga-somatostatin receptor positron emission tomography and the SUVmax reference range for management of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours

    OpenAIRE

    Virgolini, Irene; Gabriel, Michael; Kroiss, Alexander; von Guggenberg, Elisabeth; Prommegger, Rupert; Warwitz, Boris; Nilica, Bernhard; Roig, llanos Geraldo; Rodrigues, Margarida; Uprimny, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Physiologically increased pancreatic uptake at the head/uncinate process is observed in more than one-third of patients after injection of one of the three 68Ga-labelled octreotide-based peptides used for somatostatin (sst) receptor (r) imaging. There are minor differences between these 68Ga-sstr-binding peptides in the imaging setting. On 68Ga-sstr-imaging the physiological uptake can be diffuse or focal and usually remains stable over time. Differences in the maximal standardised uptake val...

  17. Guideline for PET/CT imaging of neuroendocrine neoplasms withGa-DOTA-conjugated somatostatin receptor targeting peptides andF-DOPA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bozkurt, Murat Fani; Virgolini, Irene; Balogova, Sona

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE & METHODS: Neuroendocrine neoplasms are a heterogenous group of tumours, for which nuclear medicine plays an important role in the diagnostic work-up as well as in the targeted therapeutic options. This guideline is aimed to assist nuclear medicine physicians in recommending, performing......, reporting and interpreting the results of somatostatin receptor (SSTR) PET/CT imaging using68Ga-DOTA-conjugated peptides, as well as18F-DOPA imaging for various neuroendocrine neoplasms. RESULTS & CONCLUSION: The previous procedural guideline by EANM regarding the use PET/CT tumour imaging with68Ga...

  18. Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy of Merkel cell carcinoma using 177lutetium-labeled somatostatin analogs in combination with radiosensitizing chemotherapy. A potential novel treatment based on molecular pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salavati, A.; Prasad, V.; Baum, R.P.; Schneider, C.P.; Herbst, R.

    2012-01-01

    Few studies have been published on the safety and feasibility of synchronous use of peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRNT), as source of internal radiation therapy, in combination with chemotherapy. In this study we reported a 53-year-old man with stage IV Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC), who underwent synchronous internal radiation therapy and chemotherapy. Based on presumable poor prognosis with chemotherapy only, functional similarities of MCC with other neuroendocrine tumors and available evidence of effectiveness and safety of synchronous use of external beam radiation therapy and chemotherapy in treatment of high-risk MCC patients, our interdisciplinary neuroendocrine tumor board recommended him to add PRRNT to his ongoing chemotherapy. He received 2 courses of 177 Lu-DOTATATE(1, 4, 7, 10-Tetraazacyclododecane-1, 4, 7, 10-tetraacetic acid-1-D-Phe1-Tyr3-Thr8-octreotide) in combination with ongoing 8 cycles of liposomal doxorubicin based on standard protocols. Response to therapy was evaluated by 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose ( 18 F-FDG) and 68 gallium-somatostatin-receptor PET/CT. There was an impressive improvement of the clinical symptoms. However, follow-up positron emission tomography (PET)/CT studies showed mixed pattern of response. Synchronous use of PRRNT and radiosensitizing chemotherapy seems safe and feasible in high risk MCC patients, however, further prospective studies and clinical trials are warranted to provide reliable evidence of possible pitfalls and effectiveness of PRRNT and 68 Ga-somatostatin-receptor PET/CT in the management of MCC. (author)

  19. Role of Transient Receptor Potential Ankyrin 1 Ion Channel and Somatostatin sst4 Receptor in the Antinociceptive and Anti-inflammatory Effects of Sodium Polysulfide and Dimethyl Trisulfide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    István Z. Bátai

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1 non-selective ligand-gated cation channels are mostly expressed in primary sensory neurons. Polysulfides (POLYs are Janus-faced substances interacting with numerous target proteins and associated with both protective and detrimental processes. Activation of TRPA1 in sensory neurons, consequent somatostatin (SOM liberation and action on sst4 receptors have recently emerged as mediators of the antinociceptive effect of organic trisulfide dimethyl trisulfide (DMTS. In the frame of the present study, we set out to compare the participation of this mechanism in antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects of inorganic sodium POLY and DMTS in carrageenan-evoked hind-paw inflammation. Inflammation of murine hind paws was induced by intraplantar injection of carrageenan (3% in 30 µL saline. Animals were treated intraperitoneally with POLY (17 µmol/kg or DMTS (250 µmol/kg or their respective vehicles 30 min prior paw challenge and six times afterward every 60 min. Mechanical pain threshold and swelling of the paws were measured by dynamic plantar aesthesiometry and plethysmometry at 2, 4, and 6 h after initiation of inflammation. Myeloperoxidase (MPO activity in the hind paws were detected 6 h after challenge by luminescent imaging. Mice genetically lacking TRPA1 ion channels, sst4 receptors and their wild-type counterparts were used to examine the participation of these proteins in POLY and DMTS effects. POLY counteracted carrageenan-evoked mechanical hyperalgesia in a TRPA1 and sst4 receptor-dependent manner. POLY did not influence paw swelling and MPO activity. DMTS ameliorated all examined inflammatory parameters. Mitigation of mechanical hyperalgesia and paw swelling by DMTS were mediated through sst4 receptors. These effects were present in TRPA1 knockout animals, too. DMTS inhibited MPO activity with no participation of the sensory neuron–SOM axis. While antinociceptive effects of

  20. Role of 68Ga somatostatin receptor PET/CT in the detection of endogenous hyperinsulinaemic focus: an explorative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, Vikas; Sainz-Esteban, Aurora; Arsenic, Ruza; Ploeckinger, Ursula; Denecke, Timm; Pape, Ulrich-Frank; Pavel, Marianne; Pascher, Andreas; Kuehnen, Peter; Blankenstein, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    To explore the role of 68 Ga-DOTATATE/DOTATOC PET/CT (SR PET/CT) in patients with suspicion of or histopathologically proven pancreatogenic hyperinsulinaemic hypoglycaemia. We included 13 patients with histopathologically proven or a high clinical suspicion of pancreatogenic hyperinsulinaemia. All the patients underwent a SR PET/CT scan. The results were correlated with histopathological findings. Normalization of blood glucose levels after resection of the pancreatic lesion, as well as a cytological and/or pathological diagnosis of insulinoma, was considered the diagnostic gold standard for insulinoma. The diagnosis of nesidioblastosis was based on exclusion of an insulinoma and conclusive pathological examination of a segment of the pancreas. Malignant insulinoma was defined as the presence of locoregional or distant metastases. Based on histopathology, 13 patients were found to have pancreatic hyperinsulinaemia: two patients had malignant insulinoma, eight had nonmetastasized insulinoma, and three had nesidioblastosis. SR PET was positive in 11 of the 13 patients (84.6 %) with a final diagnosis of endogenous pancreatic hypoglycaemia. Histopathological staining confirmed 16 foci of hyperinsulinism (insulin positivity). SR PET detected 14 of the 16 lesions, resulting in a sensitivity of 87 %. One intrapancreatic spleen was falsely diagnosed as insulinoma focus on SR PET, resulting in positive predictive value of 93.3 %. Immunohistochemical staining of somatostatin receptor (SSR) subtype 2a was available in ten specimens: two nesidioblastosis, and seven benign and one malignant insulinoma. Eight out of the ten specimens (80 %) stained strongly to moderately positive. Seven of the eight SSR2a-positive lesions were picked up on SR PET. Based on the results of SR PET/CT, nine patients achieved complete remission of the hypoglycaemic events during follow-up. This explorative study suggests that SR PET in combination with CT may play a significant role in the detection

  1. In vivo binding of [68Ga]-DOTATOC to somatostatin receptors in neuroendocrine tumours - impact of peptide mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velikyan, Irina; Sundin, Anders; Eriksson, Barbro; Lundqvist, Hans; Soerensen, Jens; Bergstroem, Mats; Langstroem, Bengt

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this pilot study was to explore the impact of peptide mass on binding of [ 68 Ga]-DOTATOC to neuroendocrine tumour somatostatin receptors in vivo using a tracer of variable specific radioactivity (SRA) and to show the logistic feasibility of sequential PET scans in the same patient. Material and Methods: Nine patients with gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumours were included. Six of them underwent three sequential PET-CT examinations with intravenous injections of [ 68 Ga]-DOTATOC proceeded by 0, 50 and 250 or 500 μg of octreotide, administered 10 min before the tracer. Three patients were examined by dynamic and static PET/CT for pharmacokinetic and dosimetric calculations. The [ 68 Ga]-DOTATOC synthesis included preconcentration and purification of the generator eluate and microwave heating in a semi-automated in-house procedure. Results: [ 68 Ga]-DOTATOC synthesis and quality control were accomplished within 30 min and radiochemical purity was >95%. The tracer accumulation in the tumours varied and depended on the total amount of the administered peptide. In five of six patients, the highest tumour-to-normal tissue ratio was found when 50 μg of octreotide was preadministered. One patient showed a continuously increasing tumour uptake. Dosimetrically, a large variation in organ doses was found (kidney: 0.086-0.168 mSv/MBq; liver: 0.026-0.096 mSv/MBq; spleen: 0.046-0.226 mSv/MBq). The effective dose (0.015, 0.0067 and 0.0042 mSv/MBq) was correlated to the total amount of decays. Discussion: Three sequential PET-CT examinations using 68 Ga-based tracer was carried out in 1 day. The use of high SRA [ 68 Ga]-DOTATOC and unlabelled octreotide indicates an optimal mass leading to better image contrast. [ 68 Ga]-DOTATOC-PET-CT employing variable SRA may be utilised for accurate quantification of tumour uptake with subsequent dosimetry for personalized therapy management.

  2. In vivo binding of [{sup 68}Ga]-DOTATOC to somatostatin receptors in neuroendocrine tumours - impact of peptide mass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velikyan, Irina [Department of Biochemistry and Organic Chemistry, BMC, Uppsala University, Box 599, SE-751 24 Uppsala (Sweden); Uppsala Applied Science Lab, GEMS PET Systems, GE Healthcare, SE-752 28 Uppsala (Sweden); Sundin, Anders [Department of Radiology, Karolinska University Hospital, SE-171 76 Stockholm (Sweden); Eriksson, Barbro [Department of Endocrine Oncology, Uppsala University Hospital, SE-751 85 Uppsala (Sweden); Lundqvist, Hans [Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Uppsala University, SE-751 85 Uppsala (Sweden); Soerensen, Jens [Department of Medicinal Sciences, Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, Uppsala University Hospital, SE-751 85 Uppsala (Sweden); Bergstroem, Mats [Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences, Uppsala Biomedical Centre, Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden); Langstroem, Bengt [Department of Biochemistry and Organic Chemistry, BMC, Uppsala University, Box 599, SE-751 24 Uppsala (Sweden)], E-mail: langstrom@biorg.uu.se

    2010-04-15

    Objectives: The aim of this pilot study was to explore the impact of peptide mass on binding of [{sup 68}Ga]-DOTATOC to neuroendocrine tumour somatostatin receptors in vivo using a tracer of variable specific radioactivity (SRA) and to show the logistic feasibility of sequential PET scans in the same patient. Material and Methods: Nine patients with gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumours were included. Six of them underwent three sequential PET-CT examinations with intravenous injections of [{sup 68}Ga]-DOTATOC proceeded by 0, 50 and 250 or 500 {mu}g of octreotide, administered 10 min before the tracer. Three patients were examined by dynamic and static PET/CT for pharmacokinetic and dosimetric calculations. The [{sup 68}Ga]-DOTATOC synthesis included preconcentration and purification of the generator eluate and microwave heating in a semi-automated in-house procedure. Results: [{sup 68}Ga]-DOTATOC synthesis and quality control were accomplished within 30 min and radiochemical purity was >95%. The tracer accumulation in the tumours varied and depended on the total amount of the administered peptide. In five of six patients, the highest tumour-to-normal tissue ratio was found when 50 {mu}g of octreotide was preadministered. One patient showed a continuously increasing tumour uptake. Dosimetrically, a large variation in organ doses was found (kidney: 0.086-0.168 mSv/MBq; liver: 0.026-0.096 mSv/MBq; spleen: 0.046-0.226 mSv/MBq). The effective dose (0.015, 0.0067 and 0.0042 mSv/MBq) was correlated to the total amount of decays. Discussion: Three sequential PET-CT examinations using {sup 68}Ga-based tracer was carried out in 1 day. The use of high SRA [{sup 68}Ga]-DOTATOC and unlabelled octreotide indicates an optimal mass leading to better image contrast. [{sup 68}Ga]-DOTATOC-PET-CT employing variable SRA may be utilised for accurate quantification of tumour uptake with subsequent dosimetry for personalized therapy management.

  3. Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and secondary Sjögren's syndrome treated with Infliximab: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anzola-Fuentes, L K; Chianelli, M; Galli, F; Glaudemans, A W J M; Martin Martin, L; Todino, V; Migliore, A; Signore, A

    2016-12-01

    Human T lymphocytes infiltrating tissues in autoimmune diseases are known to express somatostatin receptors amongst other activation markers. In this study, we evaluated whether somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS) using a radiolabelled somatostatin analogue ((99m)Tc-EDDA/tricine-HYNIC-tyr(3)-octreotide ((99m)Tc-EDDA/HYNIC-TOC)) is able to detect the presence of immune-mediated processes in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and secondary Sjögren's syndrome. We also aimed to evaluate whether positivity to SRS was predictive of therapeutic response and if SRS could be used for monitoring the efficacy of immunomodulatory treatment. Eighteen patients with rheumatoid arthritis and secondary Sjögren's syndrome not responding to conventional treatment were recruited for treatment with infliximab, a monoclonal antibody against TNF-α. All patients had complete blood cell count, renal and liver function tests, measurements of ESR, CRP, ANA, ENA, and anti-dsDNA antibodies, functional salivary gland scintigraphy, labial biopsy, and ophthalmologic assessment with Schirmer's test and tear film break-up time (BUT). Diagnosis was made according to the revised criteria of the American-European Consensus Group. All patients underwent SRS at baseline and after 3-6 months of therapy with infliximab. Eleven out of 18 had repeat SRS images. Images of the salivary glands and major joints were acquired 3 h after injection of 370 MBq of (99m)Tc-EDDA/HYNIC-TOC. Image analysis was performed semi-quantitatively. All patients showed uptake of (99m)Tc-EDDA/HYNIC-TOC in the joints. Salivary glands also showed variable radiopharmaceutical uptake in 12 out of 18 patients, but all patients showed presence of lymphocytic infiltration at labial salivary gland biopsy. All patients, who repeated the study after treatment, showed significant reduction of somatostatin uptake in the joints but not in the salivary glands. SRS using (99m)Tc-EDDA/HYNIC-TOC may be a useful imaging tool to assess

  4. Examination of the somatostatin receptor status in non-medullary thyroid cancer; Untersuchungen zum Somatostatinrezeptor-Status bei nicht-medullaeren Schilddruesenkarzinomen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goerges, R.; Brandt-Mainz, K.; Bockisch, A. [Essen Univ. (Gesamthochschule) (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Kahaly, G. [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Medizin - Endokrinologie und Stoffwechselerkrankungen; Mueller-Brand, J.; Maecke, H. [Kantonsspital Basel (Switzerland). Inst. fuer Nuklearmedizin; Walgenbach, S. [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Allgemein- und Abdominalchirurgie; Bruns, C. [Praeklinische Forschung Novartis, Basel (Switzerland); Andreas, J. [Universitaetsklinik Mainz (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin

    1999-06-01

    Aim: Recent in-vitro and in-vivo studies demonstrated a somatostatin receptor expression in some non-medullary thyroid carcinomas. In this study we investigated the somatostatin receptor status for this particular tumor entity in a larger patient group. Subject and methods: We compared 131-iodine with 111-In-pentetreotide scans in 24 patients with metastasizing, non-medullary thyroid cancer. The findings were correlated with other imaging modalities. Additionally, we performed receptor autoradiography in one patient, octreotide therapy in another patient and administration of 90-Y- and 111-In-DOTATOC in 2 consecutive patients. Results: In the 15 patients with papillary or follicular carcinoma, 111-In-pentetreotide was inferior to 131-I in 8/15, equal in 1/15, and superior in 6/15 patients. In 8/9 of the patients with Huerthle cell cacinoma, metastases showed a 111-In-pentetreotide accumulation of various intensity, while 131-iodine scans were negative except for one patient. 111-In-pentetreotide was equal or superior compared to 201-Tl or 99m-Tc-sestamibi, but for the most part inferior in comparison with 18-F-FDG-PET. The findings of 111-In-pentetreotide scintigraphy correlated well with the receptor autoradiography and the accumulation of DOTATOC, but not with the therapeutic effect of `cold` octreotide on the thyroid cancer metastases. Conclusions: Several metastases of papillary and follicular carcinoma, and the majority of Huerthle cell cancer metastases can express somatostatin receptors. 111-In-pentetreotide scintigraphy is a promising tool for localization of metastases especially in Huerthle cell cancer or if PET is not available, and may be useful for selection of possible candidates, if therapeutic effective {beta}-emitting somatostatin analogues will be available for routine application. (orig.) [Deutsch] Ziel: in aktuellen In-vitro und In-vivo-Untersuchungen wurde eine Somatostatinrezeptor-Expression bei einigen nicht

  5. DOTA-NOC, a high-affinity ligand of somatostatin receptor subtypes 2, 3 and 5 for labelling with various radiometals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wild, Damian; Schmitt, Joerg S.; Ginj, Mihaela; Maecke, Helmut R.; Bernard, Bert F.; Krenning, Eric; Jong, Marion de; Wenger, Sandra; Reubi, Jean-Claude

    2003-01-01

    Earlier studies have shown that modification of the octapeptide octreotide in positions 3 and 8 may result in compounds with increased somatostatin receptor affinity that, if radiolabelled, display improved uptake in somatostatin receptor-positive tumours. The aim of a recent research study in our laboratory was to employ the parallel peptide synthesis approach by further exchanging the amino acid in position 3 of octreotide and coupling the macrocyclic chelator DOTA(1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid) to these peptides for labelling with radiometals like gallium-67 or -68, indium-111, yttrium-90 and lutetium-177. The purpose was to find radiopeptides with an improved somatostatin receptor binding profile in order to extend the spectrum of targeted tumours. A first peptide, [ 111 In, 90 Y-DOTA]-1-Nal 3 -octreotide ( 111 In, 90 Y-DOTA-NOC), was isolated which showed an improved profile. In III -DOTA-NOC exhibited the following IC 50 values (nM) when studied in competition with [ 125 I][Leu 8 , d-Trp 22 , Tyr 25 ]somatostatin-28 (values for Y III -DOTA-NOC are shown in parentheses): sstr2, 2.9±0.1 (3.3±0.2); sstr3, 8±2 (26±1.9); sstr5, 11.2±3.5 (10.4±1.6). Affinity towards sstr1 and 4 was very low or absent. In III -DOTA-NOC is superior to all somatostatin-based radiopeptides having this particular type of binding profile, including DOTA-lanreotide, and has three to four times higher binding affinity to sstr2 than In III ,Y III -DOTA-Tyr 3 -octreotide (In III ,Y III -DOTA-TOC). In addition, [ 111 In]DOTA-NOC showed a specific and high rate of internalization into AR4-2J rat pancreatic tumour cells which, after 4 h, was about two times higher than that of [ 111 In]DOTA-TOC and three times higher than that of [ 111 In]DOTA-octreotide ([ 111 In]DOTA-OC). The internalized radiopeptides were externalized intact upon 2 h of internalization followed by an acid wash. After 2-3 h of externalization a plateau is reached, indicating a steady

  6. Influence of PET/CT 68Ga somatostatin receptor imaging on proceeding with patients, who were previously diagnosed with 99mTc-EDDA/HYNIC-TOC SPECT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madrzak, Dorota; Mikołajczak, Renata; Kamiński, Grzegorz

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was the assessment of utility of somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS) by SPECT imaging using 99mTc-EDDA/HYNIC-Tyr3-octreotide (99mTc-EDDA/HYNIC-TOC) in patients with neuroendocrine neoplasm (NEN) or suspected NEN, referred to Nuclear Medicine Dept. of Voivodship Specialty Center in Rzeszow. The selected group of patients was referred also to 68Ga PET/CT. The posed question was the ratio of patients for whom PET/CT with 68Ga would change their management. The distribution of somatostatin receptors was imaged using 99mTc-EDDA/HYNIC-TOC in 61 planar and SPECT studies between 13/05/2010 and 04/02/2013 in Nuclear Medicine Dept. of Voivodship Specialty Center in Rzeszow. The patient age was within a range of 17-80, with the average age of 57.6. The average age of women (65% of patients over-all) was 55.6 and the average age of men (35% of patients overall) was 61.4. In 46 participants (75% of the study group), that underwent SRS, NEN was documented using pathology tests. Selected patients were referred to PET/CT with 68Ga labeled somatostatin analogs, DOTATATE or DOTANOC. This study group consisted of 14 female and 10 male participants with age range of 35-77 and average age of 55.5 years. Patients were classified into 3 groups, as follows: detection - referral due to clinical symptoms and/or biochemical markers (CgA-Chromogranin A, IAA-indoleacetic acid) with the aim of primary diagnosis, staging - referral with the aim of assessment of tumor spread, and follow-up - assessment of the therapy. Out of 61 patients, 24 underwent both 99mTc-EDDA/HYNIC-Tyr3-octreotide SPECT and 68Ga PET/CT. The result of PET/CT was used as a basis for further evaluation. Therefore, the patients were divided into groups; true positive TP (confirmed presence of tissue somatostatin receptors with 68Ga PET/CT) and TN (68Ga PET/CT did not detect any changes and the results were comparable and had the same influence on treatment protocol). In case of SPECT, the results

  7. New octreotide derivatives for in vivo targeting of somatostatin receptor-positive tumors for Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) and Positron Emission Tomography (PET)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maecke, H.R.; Smith-Jones, P.; Maina, T.; Stolz, B.; Albert, R.; Bruns, C.; Reist, H.

    1993-01-01

    Two new modifications of the somatostatin analog octreotide, designed to hold the gallium isotopes 67 Ga and 68 Ga (DFO-SMS) and 99m Tc (PnAO-SMS) have been synthesized and evaluated in vitro and in vivo in tumor bearing rats. DFO-SMS can be labeled with 67 Ga 3+ and 68 Ga 3+ with high specific activity within less than 30 minutes in a ''cold kit'' type formulation. The labeled conjugate is stable under physiologgical conditions. Moreover the binding affinity to somatostatin receptors on rat brain cortex membranes was shown to be retained. In vivo fast tumor localization was demonstrated and the pharmacokinetics proved to be favourable as the main excretion route was via the kidneys. First PET studies with [ 68 Ga]-DFO-SMS showed a rapid accumulation in the tumor and a residence half-life at the tumor site of about 6 hours. PnAO-SMS can be labeled with 99m Tc with high radiochemical purity. In vivo the radiotracer accumulates well in the tumor but due to its high lipohilicity, its main excretion route is via the hepatobiliary system. (orig.)

  8. Union of 99m Tc-HYNIC-TOC at the somatostatin receptors in cells of pancreas cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez C, J.; Ramirez I, M.T.; Ferro F, G.; Pedraza L, M.

    2005-01-01

    The radiation toxic effects have been used in therapy however much 50 years. The absorbed radiation dose can be determined at cellular level using cancerous cell cultures. If the deposited In vitro radiation dose coming from similar activities of several therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals it can compare it will be possible to choose the therapeutic radiopharmaceutical that it offers better dosimetric characteristics for the patient. The objective of this original investigation was to determine the union percentage of the octreotide 99m Tc-HYNlC-TOC to the somatostatin receivers in cells of cancer pancreas as well as the internalization, externalization and cellular viability. It was used the octapeptide, (octreotide, TOC) labelled with 99m Tc by means of the HYNIC chelating agent (6-hydrazine pyridine-3-carboxylic acid) and 3 cellular lines of murine pancreas cancer (AR42J), of cancer of human pancreas (CAPAN) and of one negative cellular line for somatostatin receivers (WRL-68). The 99m Tc-HYNIC-TOC was compared against two negative proofs for somatostatin receivers: the peptide 99m Tc-UBI and the 99m TcO 4 . The cellular lines were conserved in the synthetic media Dulbecco-Eagle. After 2, 4 and 24 h of exhibition to the radiation, the cells are picked up and its are determined the viability by count in a Neubauer camera using tripan blue. In the same times it was calculated the union percentage of the radiopharmaceutical to the cells and the internalization (union to the cytoplasm) and the externalization (union to membrane receivers). With those figures it was calculated the absorbed radiation dose at cellular level. Results: At 4 hours the union percentage of the 99m Tc-HYNlC-TOC to the AR42-J cells was 6.83 times greater than for the WRL-68 control cells of human papilloma, (without receivers of the somatostatin) and for the CAPAN them 4 times greater than for the same cells used as negative control, for the case of the 99m Tc-UBI and the 99m TcO 4 one doesn

  9. Evaluation of (64)Cu-labeled DOTA-D-Phe(1)-Tyr (3)-octreotide ((64)Cu-DOTA-TOC) for imaging somatostatin receptor-expressing tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanaoka, Hirofumi; Tominaga, Hideyuki; Yamada, Keiich; Paudyal, Pramila; Iida, Yasuhiko; Watanabe, Shigeki; Paudyal, Bishnuhari; Higuchi, Tetsuya; Oriuchi, Noboru; Endo, Keigo

    2009-08-01

    In-111 ((111)In)-labeled octreotide has been clinically used for imaging somatostatin receptor-positive tumors, and radiolabeled octreotide analogs for positron emission tomography (PET) have been developed. Cu-64 ((64)Cu; half-life, 12.7 h) is an attractive radionuclide for PET imaging and is produced with high specific activity using a small biomedical cyclotron. The aim of this study is to produce and fundamentally examine a (64)Cu-labeled octreotide analog, (64)Cu-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid-D: -Phe(1)-Tyr(3)-octreotide ((64)Cu-DOTA-TOC). (64)Cu produced using a biomedical cyclotron was reacted with DOTA-TOC for 30 min at 45 degrees C. The stability of (64)Cu-DOTA-TOC was evaluated in vitro (incubated with serum) and in vivo (blood collected after administration) by HPLC analysis. Biodistribution studies were performed in normal mice by administration of mixed solution of (64)Cu-DOTA-TOC and (111)In-DOTA-TOC and somatostatin receptor-positive U87MG tumor-bearing mice by administration of (64)Cu-DOTA-TOC or (64)Cu-1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane-1,4,8,11-tetraacetic acid-octreotide ((64)Cu-TETA-OC). The tumor was imaged using (64)Cu-DOTA-TOC, (64)Cu-TETA-OC, and FDG with an animal PET scanner. (64)Cu-DOTA-TOC can be produced in amounts sufficient for clinical study with high radiochemical yield. (64)Cu-DOTA-TOC was stable in vitro, but time-dependent transchelation to protein was observed after injection into mice. In biodistribution studies, the radioactivity of (64)Cu was higher than that of (111)In in all organs except kidney. In tumor-bearing mice, (64)Cu-DOTA-TOC showed a high accumulation in the tumor, and the tumor-to-blood ratio reached as high as 8.81 +/- 1.17 at 6 h after administration. (64)Cu-DOTA-TOC showed significantly higher accumulation in the tumor than (64)Cu-TETA-OC. (64)Cu-DOTA-TOC PET showed a very clear image of the tumor, which was comparable to that of (18)F-FDG PET and very similar to that of (64)Cu

  10. Evaluation of 64Cu-labeled DOTA-D-Phe1-Tyr3-octreotide (64Cu-DOTA-TOC) for imaging somatostatin receptor-expressing tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanaoka, Hirofumi; Tominaga, Hideyuki; Yamada, Keiich

    2009-01-01

    In-111 ( 111 In)-labeled octreotide has been clinically used for imaging somatostatin receptor-positive tumors, and radiolabeled octreotide analogs for positron emission tomography (PET) have been developed. Cu-64 ( 64 Cu; half-life, 12.7 h) is an attractive radionuclide for PET imaging and is produced with high specific activity using a small biomedical cyclotron. The aim of this study is to produce and fundamentally examine a 64 Cu-labeled octreotide analog, 64 Cu-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid-D-Phe 1 -Tyr 3 -octreotide ( 64 Cu-DOTA-TOC). 64 Cu produced using a biomedical cyclotron was reacted with DOTA-TOC for 30 min at 45 deg C. The stability of 64 Cu-DOTA-TOC was evaluated in vitro (incubated with serum) and in vivo (blood collected after administration) by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis. Biodistribution studies were performed in normal mice by administration of mixed solution of 64 Cu-DOTA-TOC and 111 In-DOTA-TOC and somatostatin receptor-positive U87MG tumor-bearing mice by administration of 64 Cu-DOTA-TOC or 64 Cu-1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane-1,4,8,11-tetraacetic acid-octreotide ( 64 Cu-TETA-OC). The tumor was imaged using 64 Cu-DOTA-TOC, 64 Cu-TETA-OC, and fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) with an animal PET scanner. 64 Cu-DOTA-TOC can be produced in amounts sufficient for clinical study with high radiochemical yield. 64 Cu-DOTA-TOC was stable in vitro, but time-dependent transchelation to protein was observed after injection into mice. In biodistribution studies, the radioactivity of 64 Cu was higher than that of 111 In in all organs except kidney. In tumor-bearing mice, 64 Cu-DOTA-TOC showed a high accumulation in the tumor, and the tumor-to-blood ratio reached as high as 8.81±1.17 at 6 h after administration. 64 Cu-DOTA-TOC showed significantly higher accumulation in the tumor than 64 Cu-TETA-OC. 64 Cu-DOTA-TOC PET showed a very clear image of the tumor, which was comparable to that of 18 F-FDG PET and

  11. A new family of insect tyramine receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cazzamali, Giuseppe; Klærke, Dan Arne; Grimmelikhuijzen, Cornelis J P

    2005-01-01

    in the genomic databases from the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae and the honeybee Apis mellifera. These four tyramine or tyramine-like receptors constitute a new receptor family that is phylogenetically distinct from the previously identified insect octopamine/tyramine receptors. The Drosophila tyramine...

  12. IMMUNOHISTOCHEMICAL DETERMINATION OF EXPRESSION OF SOMATOSTATIN RECEPTORS TYPES 1, 2A, 3 AND 5 IN NEUROENDOCRINE TUMORS OF VARIOUS LOCALIZATION AND GRADE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. E. Gurevich

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Prediction of clinical benefits of somatostatin analogues in patients with neuroendocrine tumors (NET is very important prior to their administration. Data on immunohistochemical assessment of the expression of somatostatin receptors (SSR of various types, obtained from large samples of NET with various localization, functional activity and degree of malignancy, are scarce; therefore, the study was aimed at assessment of the latter.Materials and methods: We performed an immunohistochemical study with antibodies to SSR1, 2A, 3 and 5  types on tissue samples obtained during diagnostic and intra-operative biopsies from 399 NETs: 168 from pancreas, 120 from gastrointestinal tract (stomach, 48, from small intestine, 39, 14 of which being from duodenum; appendix, 6, colon and the rectum, 15 and 12, respectively, 84 from lung, 6 from thymus/mediastinum, and 21 from NET metastases of unknown primary localization.Results: Very high levels expression of receptors SSR2A preferentially binding to somatostatin analogues, which are currently used in clinical practice, were detected in the small intestine NETs (22/25, 88%, appendix (5/6, 83.3%, colon (10/15, 66.7%, thymus (4/6, 66.7%, atypical carcinoids of the lung (10/15, 66.7%, stomach (27/41, 65.8% and pancreas (105/165, 63.6%. The lowest expression was found in rectal NETs (5/12, 41.7% and small and large cell neuroendocrine lung carcinomas (20, 11.1%. Among functioning NETs, the highest level of SSR2A was found in gastrinomas (18/19, 94.7%, glucagonomas (15/16, 93.8%, small intestine carcinoids (31/35, 88.6%, and somatostatinomas (2/3, 66.7%. The lowest expression was detected in ACTH secreting tumors with Cushing's syndrome (11/12, 50%, and in insulinomas (34/69, 49.3%. SSR2A expression in functionally inactive pancreatic NETs was significantly higher than in insulinomas (57/82, 34/69 vs 69.5 and 49.3%, respectively. SSR2A expression was associated with the degree of malignancy and is

  13. Guideline for PET/CT imaging of neuroendocrine neoplasms with {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-conjugated somatostatin receptor targeting peptides and {sup 18}F-DOPA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bozkurt, Murat Fani [Hacettepe University Faculty of Medicine Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ankara (Turkey); Virgolini, Irene; Decristoforo, Clemens [Medical University Innsbruck, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Innsbruck (Austria); Balogova, Sona [Comenius University and St. Elisabeth Oncology Institute, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Bratislava (Slovakia); Tenon Hospital AP-HP and Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Paris (France); Beheshti, Mohsen [St. Vincent' s Hospital, PET-CT Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Endocrinology, Linz (Austria); Paracelsus Medical University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Salzburg (Austria); Rubello, Domenico [Santa Maria della Misericordia Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, PET Center and Medical Physics and Radiology, Rovigo (Italy); Ambrosini, Valentina; Fanti, Stefano [University of Bologna, Department of Experimental, Diagnostic and Specialty Medicine-DIMES, Bologna (Italy); Kjaer, Andreas [National University Hospital and University of Copenhagen, Department of Clinical Physiology, Nuclear Medicine and PET, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Delgado-Bolton, Roberto [San Pedro Hospital and Centre for Biomedical Research of La Rioja (CIBIR), Department of Diagnostic Imaging (Radiology) and Nuclear Medicine, Logrono (Spain); Kunikowska, Jolanta [Medical University of Warsaw, Nuclear Medicine, Warsaw (Poland); Oyen, Wim J.G. [Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Chiti, Arturo [Humanitas University, Nuclear Medicine Department, Rozzano, MI (Italy); Giammarile, Francesco [University of Lyon, Nuclear Medicine, Lyon (France)

    2017-08-15

    Neuroendocrine neoplasms are a heterogenous group of tumours, for which nuclear medicine plays an important role in the diagnostic work-up as well as in the targeted therapeutic options. This guideline is aimed to assist nuclear medicine physicians in recommending, performing, reporting and interpreting the results of somatostatin receptor (SSTR) PET/CT imaging using {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-conjugated peptides, as well as {sup 18}F-DOPA imaging for various neuroendocrine neoplasms. The previous procedural guideline by EANM regarding the use PET/CT tumour imaging with {sup 68}Ga-conjugated peptides has been revised and updated with the relevant and recent literature in the field with contribution of distinguished experts. (orig.)

  14. Studies in rats on octreotide labelled with Ga-67: A potential radiopharmaceutical agent for the treatment of somatostatin receptor-positive tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazniekova, A.; Laznieek, M.; Trejtnar, F.; Maecke, H.R.

    2001-01-01

    The paper presents the preparation, biodistribution and analysis of elimination mechanisms of 67 Ga-[DFO]-octreotide in rats. For labelling of the ligand with 67 Ga, desferrioxamine B (DFO) coupled to octreotide via the succinyl linker has been shown to form a stable chelating agent for binding of 67 Ga. The radiopharmaceutical was prepared by direct chelating of 67 Ga 3+ with [DFO]-octreotide in a slightly acidic reaction medium with high radiochemical purity. Pharmacokinetics of 67 Ga-[DFO]-octreotide of radioactivity in rats has shown relatively rapid elimination of the compound from the body with a long-term retention in the kidney and organs with high somatostatin receptor density. The agent was eliminated mostly by urine predominantly by the mechanism of glomerular filtration. (author)

  15. Preclinical evaluation of [99mTc/EDDA/tricine/HYNIC0, 1-Nal3, Thr8]-octreotide as a new analogue in the detection of somatostatin-receptor-positive tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandomkar, Mostafa; Najafi, Reza; Shafiei, Mohammad; Mazidi, Mohammad; Ebrahimi, Sayed Esmaeil Sadat

    2007-08-01

    Radiolabeled somatostatin analogues are important tools for the in vivo localization and targeted radionuclide therapy of somatostatin-receptor-positive tumors. The aim of this study was to evaluate a new somatostatin analogue designed for the labeling with (99m)Tc: [6-hydrazinopyridine-3-carboxylic acid (HYNIC(0)), 1-Nal(3), Thr(8)]-octreotide ([HYNIC]-NATE), using ethylenediamine-N,N'-diacetic acid (EDDA) and tricine as coligands. Synthesis was preformed on a solid phase using a standard Fmoc strategy. Labeling with (99m)Tc was performed at 100 degrees C for 10 min using SnCl(2) as a reductant. Radiochemical analysis involved ITLC and high-performance liquid chromatography methods. Peptide conjugate affinity was determined in AR4-2J cell membranes. The internalization and externalization rates were studied in sstr(2)-expressing AR4-2J cells. Biodistribution of radiopeptide was studied in rats bearing the AR4-2J tumor. Radiolabeling was performed at high specific activities, and radiochemical purity was >95%. Peptide conjugate showed high affinity binding for sstr(2). The radioligand showed a moderate and specific internalization into AR4-2J cells (14.13+/-0.61% at 4 h). In animal biodistribution studies, a receptor-specific uptake of radioactivity was observed in somatostatin-receptor-positive organs. After 4 h, uptake in the AR4-2J tumor was 1.33+/-0.23%ID/g (percentage of injected dose per gram of tissue). These data show that [(99m)Tc/EDDA/tricine/HYNIC]-NATE is a specific radioligand for the somatostatin-receptor-positive tumors and is a suitable candidate for clinical studies.

  16. Preclinical evaluation of [99mTc/EDDA/tricine/HYNIC0, 1-Nal3, Thr8]-octreotide as a new analogue in the detection of somatostatin-receptor-positive tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gandomkar, Mostafa; Najafi, Reza; Shafiei, Mohammad; Mazidi, Mohammad; Ebrahimi, Sayed Esmaeil Sadat

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Radiolabeled somatostatin analogues are important tools for the in vivo localization and targeted radionuclide therapy of somatostatin-receptor-positive tumors. The aim of this study was to evaluate a new somatostatin analogue designed for the labeling with 99m Tc: [6-hydrazinopyridine-3-carboxylic acid (HYNIC 0 ), 1-Nal 3 , Thr 8 ]-octreotide ([HYNIC]-NATE), using ethylenediamine-N,N'-diacetic acid (EDDA) and tricine as coligands. Methods: Synthesis was preformed on a solid phase using a standard Fmoc strategy. Labeling with 99m Tc was performed at 100 o C for 10 min using SnCl 2 as a reductant. Radiochemical analysis involved ITLC and high-performance liquid chromatography methods. Peptide conjugate affinity was determined in AR4-2J cell membranes. The internalization and externalization rates were studied in sstr 2 -expressing AR4-2J cells. Biodistribution of radiopeptide was studied in rats bearing the AR4-2J tumor. Results: Radiolabeling was performed at high specific activities, and radiochemical purity was >95%. Peptide conjugate showed high affinity binding for sstr 2 . The radioligand showed a moderate and specific internalization into AR4-2J cells (14.13±0.61% at 4 h). In animal biodistribution studies, a receptor-specific uptake of radioactivity was observed in somatostatin-receptor-positive organs. After 4 h, uptake in the AR4-2J tumor was 1.33±0.23%ID/g (percentage of injected dose per gram of tissue). Conclusion: These data show that [ 99m Tc/EDDA/tricine/HYNIC]-NATE is a specific radioligand for the somatostatin-receptor-positive tumors and is a suitable candidate for clinical studies

  17. Ectopic Expression of α6 and δ GABAA Receptor Subunits in Hilar Somatostatin Neurons Increases Tonic Inhibition and Alters Network Activity in the Dentate Gyrus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Xiaoping; Peng, Zechun; Zhang, Nianhui; Cetina, Yliana; Huang, Christine S.; Wallner, Martin; Otis, Thomas S.

    2015-01-01

    The role of GABAA receptor (GABAAR)-mediated tonic inhibition in interneurons remains unclear and may vary among subgroups. Somatostatin (SOM) interneurons in the hilus of the dentate gyrus show negligible expression of nonsynaptic GABAAR subunits and very low tonic inhibition. To determine the effects of ectopic expression of tonic GABAAR subtypes in these neurons, Cre-dependent viral vectors were used to express GFP-tagged GABAAR subunits (α6 and δ) selectively in hilar SOM neurons in SOM-Cre mice. In single-transfected animals, immunohistochemistry demonstrated strong expression of either the α6 or δ subunit; in cotransfected animals, both subunits were consistently expressed in the same neurons. Electrophysiology revealed a robust increase of tonic current, with progressively larger increases following transfection of δ, α6, and α6/δ subunits, respectively, indicating formation of functional receptors in all conditions and likely coassembly of the subunits in the same receptor following cotransfection. An in vitro model of repetitive bursting was used to determine the effects of increased tonic inhibition in hilar SOM interneurons on circuit activity in the dentate gyrus. Upon cotransfection, the frequency of GABAAR-mediated bursting in granule cells was reduced, consistent with a reduction in synchronous firing among hilar SOM interneurons. Moreover, in vivo studies of Fos expression demonstrated reduced activation of α6/δ-cotransfected neurons following acute seizure induction by pentylenetetrazole. The findings demonstrate that increasing tonic inhibition in hilar SOM interneurons can alter dentate gyrus circuit activity during strong stimulation and suggest that tonic inhibition of interneurons could play a role in regulating excessive synchrony within the network. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT In contrast to many hippocampal interneurons, somatostatin (SOM) neurons in the hilus of the dentate gyrus have very low levels of nonsynaptic GABAARs and exhibit

  18. Recurrent LDL-receptor mutation causes familial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1995-05-05

    May 5, 1995 ... 3. eaudet . New. Recurrent LDL-receptor mutation causes familial hypercholesterolaemia in ... amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS)" and single- strand conformation .... Location. Afrikaner. Mixed race. ApaLl.

  19. Acute up-regulation of the rat brain somatostatin receptor-effector system by leptin is related to activation of insulin signaling and may counteract central leptin actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perianes-Cachero, A; Burgos-Ramos, E; Puebla-Jiménez, L; Canelles, S; Frago, L M; Hervás-Aguilar, A; de Frutos, S; Toledo-Lobo, M V; Mela, V; Viveros, M P; Argente, J; Chowen, J A; Arilla-Ferreiro, E; Barrios, V

    2013-11-12

    Leptin and somatostatin (SRIF) have opposite effects on food seeking and ingestive behaviors, functions partially regulated by the frontoparietal cortex and hippocampus. Although it is known that the acute suppression of food intake mediated by leptin decreases with time, the counter-regulatory mechanisms remain unclear. Our aims were to analyze the effect of acute central leptin infusion on the SRIF receptor-effector system in these areas and the implication of related intracellular signaling mechanisms in this response. We studied 20 adult male Wister rats including controls and those treated intracerebroventricularly with a single dose of 5 μg of leptin and sacrificed 1 or 6h later. Density of SRIF receptors was unchanged at 1h, whereas leptin increased the density of SRIF receptors at 6h, which was correlated with an elevated capacity of SRIF to inhibit forskolin-stimulated adenylyl cyclase activity in both areas. The functional capacity of SRIF receptors was unaltered as cell membrane levels of αi1 and αi2 subunits of G inhibitory proteins were unaffected in both brain areas. The increased density of SRIF receptors was due to enhanced SRIF receptor subtype 2 (sst2) protein levels that correlated with higher mRNA levels for this receptor. These changes in sst2 mRNA levels were concomitant with increased activation of the insulin signaling, c-Jun and cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (CREB); however, activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 was reduced in the cortex and unchanged in the hippocampus and suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 remained unchanged in these areas. In addition, the leptin antagonist L39A/D40A/F41A blocked the leptin-induced changes in SRIF receptors, leptin signaling and CREB activation. In conclusion, increased activation of insulin signaling after leptin infusion is related to acute up-regulation of the SRIF receptor-effector system that may antagonize short-term leptin actions in the rat brain

  20. Additional lesions detected in therapeutic scans with 177Lu-DOTATATE reflect higher affinity of 177Lu-DOTATATE for somatostatin receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzaei, Siroos; Bastati, Brigitte; Lipp, Rainer W; Knoll, Peter; Zojer, Niklas; Ludwig, Heinz

    2011-01-01

    Peptide receptor-targeted radionuclide therapy (PRRT) of somatostatin receptor (SR)-expressing neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) has become an established therapeutic option in patients with advanced NETs. The aim of this study was to compare the lesion detection rate of (99m)Tc-EDDA/HYNIC-TOC, a newly developed tracer for NET imaging, with (177)Lu-DOTATATE used for PRRT. 8 patients (4 women, 4 men, age range 46-76 years) with histologically proven NETs, who showed high SR loads by (99m)Tc-EDDA/HYNIC-TOC scintigraphy, were treated with (177)Lu-DOTATATE. After treatment, all patients were subjected to whole-body scintigraphy with additional low-dose single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT-CT) of the chest and abdomen. All patients demonstrated (177)Lu-DOTATATE accumulation in all lesions previously detected by (99m)Tc- EDDA/HYNIC-TOC scintigraphy. Three patients showed additional lesions in the liver and lungs. SPECT-CT after (177)Lu-DOTATATE therapy may be helpful in detecting additional lesions not seen using (99m)Tc-EDDA/HYNIC-TOC. This could reflect the broader affinity of (177)Lu-DOTATATE for SRs compared with (99m)Tc-EDDA/HYNIC-TOC. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Radioautographic localization of somatostatin-14 and somatostatin-28 binding sites in the rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leroux, P.; Pelletier, G.

    1984-01-01

    Somatostatin-14 (S14) and its precursor, somatostatin-28 (S28), are widely distributed throughout the rat brain, suggesting that they could act as neurotransmitter or neuromodulator in the central nervous system. The present study was undertaken to study the localization of S14 and S28 receptors in the rat brain determined by ''in vitro'' radioautography. The study performed on slide mounted frozen brain section with iodinated S14 and S28 analogs revealed an identical distribution of binding sites for the two forms of somatostatin. A good correlation could be observed between receptor distribution and immunohistologically localized neuropeptides except for striatum and hypothalamus. However, receptors were not detectable in the hypothalamus and were found in low concentration in the caudate-putamen nucleus, two regions containing high amounts of S28 and S14, suggesting a high occupancy of receptors in these areas by endogenous peptides or an inverse correlation between receptor and peptide concentrations

  2. 99mTc-N4-[Tyr3]Octreotate Versus 99mTc-EDDA/HYNIC-[Tyr3]Octreotide: an intrapatient comparison of two novel Technetium-99m labeled tracers for somatostatin receptor scintigraphy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel, Michael; Decristoforo, Clemens; Maina, Theodosia; Nock, Berthold; vonGuggenberg, Elisabeth; Cordopatis, Paul; Moncayo, Roy

    2004-02-01

    Tetraamine-[Tyr3]octreotate (Demotate) is a somatostatin (SST) analogue that can be easily labeled with 99mTc at high specific activities and showed promising preclinical properties for SST receptor scintigraphy. This study reports on the first intra-patient comparison of 99mTc-Demotate and another 99mTc-labeled SST analogue, 99mTc-EDDA/HYNIC-TOC (HYNIC-TOC). Five patients with carcinoid tumors (n = 2) and endocrine pancreatic tumors (n = 3) were investigated with both radiopharmaceuticals. 99mTc-Demotate rapidly visualized somatostatin receptor positive tumors as early as 15 minutes post-injection (p.i.) with maximum tumor uptake and tumor/organ ratios already 1 hour p.i. Organs of predominant physiological uptake were the spleen and the kidneys with no intestinal excretion detectable up to 24 hours. 99mTc-Demotate exhibited faster pharmacokinetic properties compared to HYNIC-TOC. Tumor/organ ratios at equivalent time points were higher or comparable for 99mTc-Demotate in three patients with a matching scan result. Equivocal findings were observed in two patients, i.e. comparable uptake behavior in larger lesions with differences in smaller ones. 99mTc-Demotate is a promising agent for somatostatin receptor scintigraphy providing images of excellent quality as early as 1 hour after injection.

  3. Molecular imaging of neuroendocrine tumors using {sup 68}Ga-labeled peptides (Somatostatin receptor PET/CT); Molekulare Bildgebung neuroendokriner Tumoren mit {sup 68}Ga-markierten Peptiden (Somatostatinrezeptor-PET/CT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baum, R.P.; Prasad, V. [Zentralklinik Bad Berka GmbH (Germany). Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin/PET-Zentrum; Hoersch, D. [Zentralklinik Bad Berka GmbH (Germany). Klinik fuer Innere Medizin, Gastroenterologie, Onkologie, Endokrionologie

    2009-06-15

    Receptor PET/CT using {sup 68}Ga-labeled somatostatin analogues (DOTA-NOC, DOTA-TOC or DOTA-TATE) enables the highly sensitive molecular imaging of neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) based on the expression of somatostatin receptors and even the detection of receptor subtypes. Our experience after more than 3000 studies shows that receptor PET/CT has a significantly higher tumor detection rate than conventional scintigraphy (even in SPECT/CT technique), and that tumor lesions can be very accurately localized. By calculating standardized uptake values (SUV) - which are reproducible and investigator-independent - patients can be selected for peptide receptor radiotherapy and also the course after therapy can be controlled. Receptor-PET/CT is the most sensitive imaging modality for the detection of unknown primary tumors (CUP syndrome), which is especially true for the detection of neuroendocrine tumors of the pancreas and small bowel; whole-body staging (''one stop shop'') as well as restaging and selection of patients for peptide receptor radiotherapy can be performed using a patient-friendly procedure (examination finished within one hour) exposing the patient to less radiation than whole-body CT scanning. The {sup 68}Ge/{sup 68}Ga generator has proved very reliable over the years - even in a hospital environment. The effective costs for {sup 68}Ga labeled somatostatin analogues might be less than for scintigraphic agents, provided a certain number of studies per year are performed. The development of new tumor-specific peptides as well as of other DOTA- or NOTA-coupled radiopharmaceuticals opens a new avenue into the future: finally, the {sup 68}Ga generator could play a similar important role for PET/CT as did the {sup 99m}Tc-Generator for conventional gamma camera imaging over the last decades. (orig.)

  4. Positron emission tomography study on pancreatic somatostatin receptors in normal and diabetic rats with {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-octreotide: A potential PET tracer for beta cell mass measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sako, Takeo [Division of Bio-function Dynamics Imaging, RIKEN Center for Life Science Technologies, 6-7-3 Minatojima-minamimachi, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0047 (Japan); Division of Molecular Imaging, Institute of Biomedical Research and Innovation, 2-2 Minatojima-minamimachi, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0047 (Japan); Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-1 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0017 (Japan); Hasegawa, Koki; Nishimura, Mie; Kanayama, Yousuke; Wada, Yasuhiro; Hayashinaka, Emi; Cui, Yilong; Kataoka, Yosky [Division of Bio-function Dynamics Imaging, RIKEN Center for Life Science Technologies, 6-7-3 Minatojima-minamimachi, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0047 (Japan); Senda, Michio [Division of Bio-function Dynamics Imaging, RIKEN Center for Life Science Technologies, 6-7-3 Minatojima-minamimachi, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0047 (Japan); Division of Molecular Imaging, Institute of Biomedical Research and Innovation, 2-2 Minatojima-minamimachi, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0047 (Japan); Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-1 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0017 (Japan); Watanabe, Yasuyoshi, E-mail: yywata@riken.jp [Division of Bio-function Dynamics Imaging, RIKEN Center for Life Science Technologies, 6-7-3 Minatojima-minamimachi, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0047 (Japan)

    2013-12-06

    Highlights: •PET images showed high uptake of {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-octreotide in the normal pancreas. •{sup 68}Ga-DOTA-octreotide specifically binds to somatostatin receptors in the pancreas. •The pancreatic uptake of {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-octreotide was decreased in the diabetic rats. •{sup 68}Ga-DOTA-octreotide could be a candidate PET probe to measure the beta cell mass. -- Abstract: Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a metabolic disorder characterized by hyperglycemia, and the loss or dysfunction of pancreatic beta cells has been reported before the appearance of clinical symptoms and hyperglycemia. To evaluate beta cell mass (BCM) for improving the detection and treatment of DM at earlier stages, we focused on somatostatin receptors that are highly expressed in the pancreatic beta cells, and developed a positron emission tomography (PET) probe derived from octreotide, a metabolically stable somatostatin analog. Octreotide was conjugated with 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA), a chelating agent, and labeled with {sup 68}Gallium ({sup 68}Ga). After intravenous injection of {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-octreotide, a 90-min emission scan of the abdomen was performed in normal and DM model rats. The PET studies showed that {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-octreotide radioactivity was highly accumulated in the pancreas of normal rats and that the pancreatic accumulation was significantly reduced in the rats administered with an excess amount of unlabeled octreotide or after treatment with streptozotocin, which was used for the chemical induction of DM in rats. These results were in good agreement with the ex vivo biodistribution data. These results indicated that the pancreatic accumulation of {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-octreotide represented specific binding to the somatostatin receptors and reflected BCM. Therefore, PET imaging with {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-octreotide could be a potential tool for evaluating BCM.

  5. Quantitative Assessment of 99mTc-Depreotide Uptake in Oesophageal Cancer and Precursor Conditions and Its Reflection in Immunohistochemically Detected Somatostatin Receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herlin, G.; Aspelin, P.; Axelsson, R.; Herlin, G.; Aspelin, P.; Axelsson, R.; Lundell, L.; Ost, A.; Svensson, L.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Somatostatin receptors (SSTRs) are over-expressed in several tumors making it possible for imaging with labelled SSTR. A previous study showed feasibility to image oesophageal cancer with SSTR analogue 99m Tc-depreotide. Purpose. (1) To investigate expression of the SSTRs in different types of esophageal carcinoma and (2) to correlate such an expression with 99m Tc-depreotide uptake in these lesions. Material and Methods. Total 28 patients (17 with esophageal cancer and 11 with Barrett’s esophagus) were examined with 99m Tc-depreotide scintigraphy. The SSTR2A, SSTR2B, SSTR3, and SSTR5 were analyzed immunohistochemically in the lesion samples. Results. Among the patients with adenocarcinoma 10/11 expressed different amounts of SSTRs, while SSTRs were absent in 5/6 patients with Squamous cell carcinoma (Sqcc). There was no correlation neither between the 99m Tc-depreotide uptake and the amount of SSTRs nor between the amount of SSTRs and differentiation grade of the tumor. Conclusions. (1) SSTRs are expressed in esophageal carcinoma and more abundantly so in adenocancer specimens; (2) in vivo 99m Tc-depreotide uptake does not obviously correlate with the immunohistochemically detection of SSTRs of different subtypes in esophageal carcinoma.

  6. Quantitative Assessment of 99mTc-Depreotide Uptake in Oesophageal Cancer and Precursor Conditions and Its Reflection in Immunohistochemically Detected Somatostatin Receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herlin, Gunnar; Lundell, Lars; Öst, Åke; Aspelin, Peter; Svensson, Leif; Axelsson, Rimma

    2012-01-01

    Background. Somatostatin receptors (SSTRs) are over-expressed in several tumors making it possible for imaging with labelled SSTR. A previous study showed feasibility to image oesophageal cancer with SSTR analogue 99m Tc-depreotide. Purpose. (1) To investigate expression of the SSTRs in different types of esophageal carcinoma and (2) to correlate such an expression with 99m Tc-depreotide uptake in these lesions. Material and Methods. Total 28 patients (17 with esophageal cancer and 11 with Barrett's esophagus) were examined with 99m Tc-depreotide scintigraphy. The SSTR2A, SSTR2B, SSTR3, and SSTR5 were analyzed immunohistochemically in the lesion samples. Results. Among the patients with adenocarcinoma 10/11 expressed different amounts of SSTRs, while SSTRs were absent in 5/6 patients with Squamous cell carcinoma (Sqcc). There was no correlation neither between the 99m Tc-depreotide uptake and the amount of SSTRs nor between the amount of SSTRs and differentiation grade of the tumor. Conclusions. (1) SSTRs are expressed in esophageal carcinoma and more abundantly so in adenocancer specimens; (2) in vivo 99m Tc-depreotide uptake does not obviously correlate with the immunohistochemically detection of SSTRs of different subtypes in esophageal carcinoma

  7. Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) of neuroendocrine tumors: First comparative results using the somatostatin analogues Lu-177 DOTA-NOC and Lu-177 DOTA-TATE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wehrmann, C.; Senftleben, S.; Baum, R.P.

    2005-01-01

    Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) is used in our department since 5 years (approx. 400 applications) for the treatment of patients with metastatic neuroendocrine tumors. Of all known peptides, the somatostatin analogue DOTA-NOC shows in vitro the highest affinity to somatostatin receptors (sstr) 3 and 5 and a very high affinity to sstr 2. We studied the in vivo behaviour of the two peptides DOTA-NOC and DOTA-TATE (highest affinity to sstr 2) by the use of different parameters like tumor and organ uptake, effective half-lifes (kinetics) and mean absorbed organ and tumor doses. We studied 27 patients with metastatic neuroendocrine tumors with high somatostatin expression, as verified prior to treatment by Ga-68 DOTA-NOC receptor PET/CT or somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (Tc-99m EDDA-Hynic TOC or In-111 OctreoScan, planar and SPECT). 22 patients (8M and 14F; aged 619 years) were treated with 2500 6790 MBq Lu-177 DOTA-TATE. Another 5 patients (1M and 4F, aged 6310 years) were treated with 4000 7400 MBq Lu-177 DOTA-NOC. Labelling efficiency and radiochemical purity using Lutetium-177 chloride (obtained from PerkinElmer Life Sciences, USA) were constantly over 99.5%. Whole-body scans (anterior/posterior) were performed at 0.5h, 3h, 24h, 48h, 72h and 96h p.i. ROIs were drawn over the whole-body, organs, and different metastases (mainly in the liver). Blood samples were obtained in 12 patients after therapy with Lu-177 DOTA-TATE over 5 days for calculating the kinetics in blood. The ROI results were used to determine the uptake and effective half-life in different organs (kidney, spleen, liver, bone etc.) and the tumor residence times. By means of geometric mean, and after background correction, the ROI results were also used to calculate the estimated absorbed organ and tumor doses using the OLINDA software. Compared to Lu-177 DOTA-TATE (=100%), the uptake of Lu-177 DOTA-NOC was higher for the whole-body (45%) and for normal tissues (28%), and also in the

  8. [111In-DOTA]LTT-SS28, a first pansomatostatin radioligand for in vivo targeting of somatostatin receptor-positive tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maina, Theodosia; Cescato, Renzo; Waser, Beatrice; Tatsi, Aikaterini; Kaloudi, Aikaterini; Krenning, Eric P; de Jong, Marion; Nock, Berthold A; Reubi, Jean Claude

    2014-08-14

    Radiolabeled pansomatostatin-like analogues are expected to enhance the diagnostic sensitivity and to expand the clinical indications of currently applied sst2-specific radioligands. In this study, we present the somatostatin mimic [DOTA]LTT-SS28 {[(DOTA)Ser1,Leu8,D-Trp22,Tyr25]SS28} and its 111In radioligand. [DOTA]LTT-SS28 exhibited a pansomatostatin-like profile binding with high affinity to all five hsst1-hsst5 subtypes (IC50 values in the lower nanomolar range). Furthermore, [DOTA]LTT-SS28 behaved as an agonist at hsst2, hsst3, and hsst5, efficiently stimulating internalization of the three receptor subtypes. Radioligand [111In-DOTA]LTT-SS28 showed good stability in the mouse bloodstream. It displayed strong and specific uptake in AR42J tumors 4 h postinjection (9.3±1.6% ID/g vs 0.3±0.0% ID/g during sst2 blockade) in mice. Significant and specific uptake was also observed in HEK293-hsst2-, HEK293-hsst3-, and HEK293-hsst5-expressing tumors (4.43±1.5, 4.88±1.1, and DOTA]LTT-SS28 specifically localizes in sst2-, sst3-, and sst5-expressing xenografts in mice showing promise for multi-sst1-sst5 targeted tumor imaging.

  9. Altered Expression of Somatostatin Receptors in Pancreatic Islets from NOD Mice Cultured at Different Glucose Concentrations In Vitro and in Islets Transplanted to Diabetic NOD Mice In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Ludvigsen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Somatostatin acts via five receptors (sst1-5. We investigated if the changes in pancreatic islet sst expression in diabetic NOD mice compared to normoglycemic mice are a consequence of hyperglycemia or the ongoing immune reaction in the pancreas. Pancreatic islets were isolated from NOD mice precultured for 5 days and further cultured for 3 days at high or low glucose before examined. Islets were also isolated from NOD mice and transplanted to normal or diabetic mice in a number not sufficient to cure hyperglycemia. After three days, the transplants were removed and stained for sst1-5 and islet hormones. Overall, changes in sst islet cell expression were more common in islets cultured in high glucose concentration in vitro as compared to the islet transplantation in vivo to diabetic mice. The beta and PP cells exhibited more frequent changes in sst expression, while the alpha and delta cells were relatively unaffected by the high glucose condition. Our findings suggest that the glucose level may alter sst expressed in islets cells; however, immune mechanisms may counteract such changes in islet sst expression.

  10. An intrapatient comparison of 99mTc-EDDA/HYNIC-TOC with 111In-DTPA-octreotide for diagnosis of somatostatin receptor-expressing tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel, Michael; Decristoforo, Clemens; Donnemiller, Eveline; Ulmer, Hanno; Watfah Rychlinski, Christine; Mather, Stephen J; Moncayo, Roy

    2003-05-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the imaging abilities of the recently developed somatostatin analog, (99m)Tc-hydrazinonicotinyl-Tyr(3)-octreotide ((99m)Tc-HYNIC-TOC [(99m)Tc-TOC]), with (111)In-diethylenediaminepentaacetic acid-D-Phe(1)-octreotide ((111)In-OCT [Octreoscan]) in patients undergoing routine somatostatin receptor (SSTR) scintigraphy. Forty-one patients (20 men, 21 women; age range, 29-75 y; mean age, 56.7 y) with either histologically proven or biologically and clinically suspected endocrine tumors were enrolled in the study. Four groups were distinguished: (a) patients being evaluated for the detection and localization of neuroendocrine tumors (n = 6), (b) tumor staging (n = 19), (c) patients being investigated to determine the SSTR status of tumor lesions (n = 11), and (d) patient follow-up studies (n = 5). Each patient received a mean activity of 150 MBq (111)In-OCT and 350-400 MBq (99m)Tc-TOC. Scintigraphy with (99m)Tc-TOC was performed 4 h after injection and scintigraphy with (111)In-OCT was performed 4 and 24 h after injection. SPECT studies of areas of interest were performed 4 h after injection for both tracers as well as at 24 h after injection for (111)In-OCT. The time interval between the studies using each tracer ranged from 2 to 22 d (mean interval, 9.3 d). (111)In-OCT and (99m)Tc-TOC showed an equivalent scan result in 32 patients (78%), 9 cases showed discrepancies (22%), false-negative results with (111)In-OCT were seen in 6 cases (14.6%), whereas (99m)Tc-TOC was false-positive in 2 cases (4.9%). (111)In-OCT was true-negative in both cases. The false-positive findings of the (99m)Tc-TOC studies were caused by nonspecific uptake in the bowel. In 1 case, (99m)Tc-TOC correctly identified a metastasis in the lumbar spine but both scan results were false-positive because of an inflammatory process. In 21 patients with SSTR-expressing tumors, the semiquantitative region-of-interest analysis showed that (99m)Tc-TOC achieved higher tumor

  11. Design, Synthesis, and Biological Evaluation of 68Ga-DOTA-PA1 for Lung Cancer: A Novel PET Tracer for Multiple Somatostatin Receptor Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fei; Liu, Teli; Xu, Xiaoxia; Guo, Xiaoyi; Li, Nan; Xiong, Chiyi; Li, Chun; Zhu, Hua; Yang, Zhi

    2018-02-05

    Most of the radiolabeled somatostatin analogues (SSAs) are specific for subtype somatostatin receptor 2 (SSTR 2 ). Lack of ligands targeting other subtypes of SSTRs, especially SSTR 1, SSTR 3 , and SSTR 5 , limited their applications in tumors of low SSTR 2 expression, including lung tumor. In this study, we aimed to design and synthesize a positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracer targeting multi-subtypes of SSTRs for PET imaging. PA1 peptide and its conjugate with 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) chelator or fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) at the N-terminal of the lysine position were synthesized. 68 Ga was chelated to DOTA-PA1 to obtain 68 Ga-DOTA-PA1 radiotracer. The stability, lipophilicity, binding affinity, and binding specificity of 68 Ga-DOTA-PA1 and FITC-PA1 were evaluated by various in vitro experiments. Micro-PET imaging of 68 Ga-DOTA-PA1 was performed in nude mice bearing A549 lung adenocarcinoma, as compared with 68 Ga-DOTA-(Tyr3)-octreotate ( 68 Ga-DOTA-TATE). Histological analysis of SSTR expression in A549 tumor tissues and human tumor tissues was conducted using immunofluorescence staining and immunohistochemical assay. 68 Ga-DOTA-PA1 had high radiochemical yield and radiochemical purity of over 95% and 99%, respectively. The radiotracer was stable in vitro in different buffers over a 2 h incubation period. Cell uptake of 68 Ga-DOTA-PA1 was 1.31-, 1.33-, and 1.90-fold that of 68 Ga-DOTA-TATE, which has high binding affinity only for SSTR 2 , after 2 h incubation in H520, PG, and A549 lung cancer cell lines, respectively. Micro-PET images of 68 Ga-DOTA-PA1 showed that the PET imaging signal correlated with the total expression of SSTRs, instead of SSTR 2 only, which was measured by Western blotting and immunofluorescence analysis in mice bearing A549 tumors. In summary, a novel PET radiotracer, 68 Ga-DOTA-PA1, targeting multi-subtypes of SSTRs, was successfully synthesized and was confirmed to be useful for PET

  12. The somatostatin receptor-targeted radiotherapeutic [{sup 90}Y-DOTA-dPhe{sup 1},Tyr{sup 3}]octreotide ({sup 90}Y-SMT 487) eradicates experimental rat pancreatic CA 20948 tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stolz, B.; Weckbecker, G.; Smith-Jones, P.M.; Albert, R.; Raulf, F.; Bruns, C. [Novartis Pharma AG, Basel (Switzerland)

    1998-07-01

    Somatostatin receptor-expressing tumours are potential targets for therapy with radiolabelled somatostatin analogues. We have synthesized a number of such analogues in the past and identified [DOTA-dPhe{sup 1}, Tyr{sup 3}]octreotide (SMT 487) as the most promising candidate molecule because of its advantageous properties in cellular and in vivo tumour models. In the current paper we describe the radiotherapeutic effect of yttrium-90 labelled SMT 487 in Lewis rats bearing the somatostatin receptor-positive rat pancreatic tumour CA 20948. SMT 487 binds with nanomolar affinity to both the human and the rat somatostatin receptor subtype 2 (sst{sub 2}) (human sst{sub 2} IC{sub 50}=0.9 nM, rat sst{sub 2} IC{sub 50}=0.5 nM). In vivo, {sup 90}Y-SMT 487 distributed rapidly to the sst{sub 2} expressing CA 20948 rat pancreatic tumour, with a tumour-to-blood ratio of 49.15 at 24 h post injection. A single intravenous administration of 10 mCi/kg {sup 90}Y-SMT 487 resulted in a complete remission of the tumours in five out of seven CA 20948 tumour-bearing Lewis rats. No regrowth of the tumours occurred 8 months post injection. Control animals that were treated with 30 {mu}g/kg of unlabelled SMT 487 had to be sacrificed 10 days post injection due to excessive growth or necrotic areas on the tumour surface. Upon re-inoculation of tumour cells into those rats that had shown complete remission, the tumours disappeared after 3-4 weeks of moderate growth without any further treatment. The present study shows for the first time the curative potential of {sup 90}Y-SMT 487-based radiotherapy for somatostatin receptor-expressing tumours. Clinical phase I studies with yttrium-labelled SMT 487 have started in September 1997. (orig.) With 4 figs., 2 tabs., 29 refs.

  13. Clinical Validation of a Pixon-Based Reconstruction Method Allowing a Twofold Reduction in Planar Images Time of 111In-Pentetreotide Somatostatin Receptor Scintigraphy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Thuillier

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveThe objective of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic efficacy of Pixon-based reconstruction method on planar somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS.MethodsAll patients with neuroendocrine tumors (NETs disease who were referred for SRS to our department during 1-year period from January to December 2015 were consecutively included. Three nuclear physicians independently reviewed all the data sets of images which included conventional images (CI; 15 min/view and processed images (PI obtained by reconstructing the first 450 s extracted data using Oncoflash® software package. Image analysis using a 3-point rating scale for abnormal uptake of 111 Indium-DTPA-Phe-octreotide in any lesion or organ was interpreted as positive, uncertain, or negative for the evidence of NET disease. A maximum grade uptake of the radiotracer in the lesion was assessed by the Krenning scale method. The results of image interpretation by the two methods were considered significantly discordant when the difference in organ involvement assessment was negative vs. positive or in lesion uptake was ≥2 grades. Agreement between the results of two methods and by different scan observers was evaluated using Cohen κ coefficients.ResultsThere was no significant (p = 0.403 correlation between data acquisition protocol and quality image. The rates of significant discrepancies for exam interpretation and organs involvement assessment were 2.8 and 2.6%, respectively. Mean κ values revealed a good agreement for concordance between CI and PI interpretation without difference of agreement for inter/intra-observer analysis.ConclusionOur results suggest the feasibility to use a Pixon-based reconstruction method for SRS planar images allowing a twofold reduction of acquisition time and without significant alteration of image quality or on image interpretation.

  14. Concordance between results of somatostatin receptor scintigraphy with 111In-DOTA-DPhe1-Tyr3-octreotide and chromogranin A assay in patients with neuroendocrine tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, Margarida; Gabriel, Michael; Heute, Dirk; Putzer, Daniel; Virgolini, Irene; Griesmacher, Andrea

    2008-01-01

    Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS) and chromogranin A (CgA) assay have successfully been implemented in the clinical work-up and management of neuroendocrine tumour (NET) patients. However, there is still a lack of studies comparing results in these patients. Our aim was to compare directly in NET patients SRS and CgA assay results with special regard to tumour features such as grade of malignancy, primary origin, disease extent and function. One hundred twenty consecutive patients with histological confirmed NETs were investigated with 111 In-DOTA-DPhe 1 -Tyr 3 -octreotide ( 111 In-DOTA-TOC) SRS and CgA immunoradiometric assay. Tumours were classified by cell characteristics [well-differentiated NETs, well-differentiated neuroendocrine carcinomas, poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinomas (PDNECs)], primary origin (foregut, midgut, hindgut, undetermined), disease extent (limited disease, metastases, primary tumour and metastases) and functionality (secretory, nonsecretory). SRS was positive in 107 (89%) patients; CgA levels were increased in 95 (79%) patients. Overall, concordance between SRS and CgA results was found in 84 patients. Positive SRS but normal CgA level were found in 24 patients, with higher prevalence (p 111 In-DOTA-TOC SRS proved to be more sensitive than CgA in NETs patients. Tumour differentiation, disease extent and presence of liver metastases impact both SRS and CgA results, whereas nonsecretory activity is a negative predictor of only CgA increase. PDNECs and hindgut origin of tumours predispose to discrepancies with negative SRS but increased CgA levels. (orig.)

  15. Concordance between results of somatostatin receptor scintigraphy with 111In-DOTA-DPhe 1-Tyr 3-octreotide and chromogranin A assay in patients with neuroendocrine tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Margarida; Gabriel, Michael; Heute, Dirk; Putzer, Daniel; Griesmacher, Andrea; Virgolini, Irene

    2008-10-01

    Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS) and chromogranin A (CgA) assay have successfully been implemented in the clinical work-up and management of neuroendocrine tumour (NET) patients. However, there is still a lack of studies comparing results in these patients. Our aim was to compare directly in NET patients SRS and CgA assay results with special regard to tumour features such as grade of malignancy, primary origin, disease extent and function. One hundred twenty consecutive patients with histological confirmed NETs were investigated with (111)In-DOTA-DPhe(1)-Tyr(3)-octreotide ((111)In-DOTA-TOC) SRS and CgA immunoradiometric assay. Tumours were classified by cell characteristics [well-differentiated NETs, well-differentiated neuroendocrine carcinomas, poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinomas (PDNECs)], primary origin (foregut, midgut, hindgut, undetermined), disease extent (limited disease, metastases, primary tumour and metastases) and functionality (secretory, nonsecretory). SRS was positive in 107 (89%) patients; CgA levels were increased in 95 (79%) patients. Overall, concordance between SRS and CgA results was found in 84 patients. Positive SRS but normal CgA level were found in 24 patients, with higher prevalence (p<0.05) in patients with nonsecretory tumours. Conversely, negative SRS but CgA level increased were seen in 12 patients, with higher proportion (p<0.05) in patients with PDNECs and tumours of hindgut origin. Overall, (111)In-DOTA-TOC SRS proved to be more sensitive than CgA in NETs patients. Tumour differentiation, disease extent and presence of liver metastases impact both SRS and CgA results, whereas nonsecretory activity is a negative predictor of only CgA increase. PDNECs and hindgut origin of tumours predispose to discrepancies with negative SRS but increased CgA levels.

  16. Gastroenteropancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors: Standardizing Therapy Monitoring with 68Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT Using the Example of Somatostatin Receptor Radionuclide Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang Luboldt

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to standardize therapy monitoring of hepatic metastases from gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NETs during the course of somatostatin receptor radionuclide therapy (SRRT. In 21 consecutive patients with nonresectable hepatic metastases of GEP-NETs, chromogranin A (CgA and 68Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT were compared before and after the last SRRT. On 68Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT, the maximum standard uptake values (SUVmax of normal liver and hepatic metastases were calculated. In addition, the volumes of hepatic metastases (volume of interest [VOI] were measured using four cut-offs to separate normal liver tissue from metastases (SUVmax of the normal liver plus 10% [VOIliver+10%], 20% [VOIliver+20%], 30% [VOIliver+30%] and SUV = 10 [VOI10SUV]. The SUVmaxof the normal liver was below 10 (7.2 ± 1.3 in all patients and without significant changes. Overall therapy changes (Δ per patient (mean [95% CI] were statistically significant with p < .01 for ΔCgA = −43 (−69 to −17, ΔSUVmax = −22 (−29 to −14, and ΔVOI10SUV = −53 (−68 to −38% and significant with p < .05 for ΔVOIliver+10% = −29 (−55 to −3%, ΔVOIliver+20% = −32 (−62 to −2 and ΔVOIliver+30% = −37 (−66 to −8. Correlations were found only between ΔCgA and ΔVOI10SUV (r = .595; p < .01, ΔSUVmax and ΔVOI10SUV (0.629, p < .01, and SUVmax and ΔSUVmax (r = .446; p < .05. 68Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT allows volumetric therapy monitoring via an SUV-based cut-off separating hepatic metastases from normal liver tissue (10 SUV recommended.

  17. Somatostatin-receptor-targeted α-emitting 213Bi is therapeutically more effective than β--emitting 177Lu in human pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nayak, Tapan K.; Norenberg, Jeffrey P.; Anderson, Tamara L.; Prossnitz, Eric R.; Stabin, Michael G.; Atcher, Robert W.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: Advance clinical cancer therapy studies of patients treated with somatostatin receptor (sstr)-targeted [DOTA 0 -Tyr 3 ]octreotide (DOTATOC) labeled with low-linear-energy-transfer (LET) β - -emitters have shown overall response rates in the range of 15-33%. In order to improve outcomes, we sought to compare the therapeutic effectiveness of sstr-targeted high-LET α-emitting 213 Bi to that of low-LET β - -emitting 177 Lu by determining relative biological effectiveness (RBE) using the external γ-beam of 137 Cs as reference radiation. Methods: Sstr-expressing human pancreatic adenocarcinoma Capan-2 cells and A549 control cells were used for this study. The effects of different radiation doses of 213 Bi and 177 Lu labeled to 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid and sstr-targeted DOTATOC were investigated with a clonogenic cell survival assay. Apoptosis was measured using the Cell Death Detection ELISA PLUS 10x kit. Results: Using equimolar DOTATOC treatment with concurrent irradiation with a 137 Cs source as reference radiation, the calculated RBE of [ 213 Bi]DOTATOC was 3.4, as compared to 1.0 for [ 177 Lu]DOTATOC. As measured in terms of absorbance units, [ 213 Bi]DOTATOC caused a 2.3-fold-greater release of apoptosis-specific mononucleosomes and oligonucleosomes than [ 177 Lu]DOTATOC at the final treatment time of 96 h (P 213 Bi]DOTATOC is therapeutically more effective in decreasing survival than is [ 177 Lu]DOTATOC in human pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells due to its comparatively higher RBE

  18. Familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia and calcium sensing receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mrgan, Monija; Nielsen, Sanne; Brixen, Kim

    2014-01-01

    Familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia (FHH) is a lifelong, benign autosomal dominant disease characterized by hypercalcemia, normal to increased parathyroid hormone level, and a relatively low renal calcium excretion. Inactivation of the calcium-sensing receptor in heterozygous patients results...... in FHH, while in homozygous patients as well as in compound heterozygous or dominant negative heterozygous patients, it may result in neonatal severe hyperparathyroidism (NSHPT). Parathyroid surgery is not indicated in FHH and does not lower plasma calcium unless total parathyroidectomy is performed...

  19. Receptor-interacting protein (RIP) kinase family

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Duanwu; Lin, Juan; Han, Jiahuai

    2010-01-01

    Receptor-interacting protein (RIP) kinases are a group of threonine/serine protein kinases with a relatively conserved kinase domain but distinct non-kinase regions. A number of different domain structures, such as death and caspase activation and recruitment domain (CARD) domains, were found in different RIP family members, and these domains should be keys in determining the specific function of each RIP kinase. It is known that RIP kinases participate in different biological processes, incl...

  20. MIA PaCa-2 and PANC-1 - pancreas ductal adenocarcinoma cell lines with neuroendocrine differentiation and somatostatin receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gradiz, Rui; Silva, Henriqueta C; Carvalho, Lina; Botelho, Maria Filomena; Mota-Pinto, Anabela

    2016-02-17

    Studies using cell lines should always characterize these cells to ensure that the results are not distorted by unexpected morphological or genetic changes possibly due to culture time or passage number. Thus, the aim of this study was to describe those MIA PaCa-2 and PANC-1 cell line phenotype and genotype characteristics that may play a crucial role in pancreatic cancer therapeutic assays, namely neuroendocrine chemotherapy and peptide receptor radionuclide therapy. Epithelial, mesenchymal, endocrine and stem cell marker characterization was performed by immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry, and genotyping by PCR, gene sequencing and capillary electrophoresis. MIA PaCa-2 (polymorphism) expresses CK5.6, AE1/AE3, E-cadherin, vimentin, chromogranin A, synaptophysin, SSTR2 and NTR1 but not CD56. PANC-1 (pleomorphism) expresses CK5.6, MNF-116, vimentin, chromogranin A, CD56 and SSTR2 but not E-cadherin, synaptophysin or NTR1. MIA PaCA-1 is CD24(-), CD44(+/++), CD326(-/+) and CD133/1(-), while PANC-1 is CD24(-/+), CD44(+), CD326(-/+) and CD133/1(-). Both cell lines have KRAS and TP53 mutations and homozygous deletions including the first 3 exons of CDKN2A/p16(INK4A), but no SMAD4/DPC4 mutations or microsatellite instability. Both have neuroendocrine differentiation and SSTR2 receptors, precisely the features making them suitable for the therapies we propose to assay in future studies.

  1. Somatostatin receptor expression in the human spleen - Answer to an enigma by ex-vivo and in-vitro autoradiography after 177Lu-DOTA-octreotate administration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melis, M.; Swart, J. de; Groen, H.C.; Konijnenberg, M.W.; Van der Graaf, L.M.; Kaemmerer, D.; Kulkami, H.R.; Baum, R.P.; Lupp, A.; Saenger, J.; Jong, M. de

    2015-01-01

    Full text of publication follows. Aim: radiolabelled somatostatin analogues are being used for diagnostic and therapeutic (PRRT) purposes in patients with somatostatin receptor (SSTR) expressing tumours. During PRRT a significant spleen uptake may lead to radiation doses of > 20 Gy. Yet, the threshold dose for spleen radiation induced toxicity is currently unknown. Based on previous 68 Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT studies, demonstrating higher uptake in spleen than in splenosis, white pulp (WP) localization of radioactivity was suggested. This hypothesis was investigated in the current pilot study using the longer lived 177 Lu-DOTA-octreotate. Methods: a patient diagnosed with neuroendocrine neoplasm of the pancreatic tail (SUV max on 68 Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT 100.4) with liver metastasis (SUV 47.3, normal liver SUV 12.5) and uptake in the spleen (SUV 41.0) received 1 GBq 177 Lu-DOTA-octreotate. 2 h after administration whole-body planar scintigraphy and SPECT/CT of the upper abdomen was performed, followed by laparoscopic resection of the pancreatic tumour and splenectomy the next day. After spleen transport from Bad Berka to Rotterdam ex-vivo micro-SPECT of the removed spleen was acquired for 73 min using 2.5 mm diameter pinholes. Spleen fragments (∼10 * 10 * 5 mm) were either snap-frozen in liquid nitrogen or fixed in 10% formalin and paraffin embedded. Ex-vivo autoradiography of 10 μm cryo-sections was performed and serial sections were used for 111 In-DOTA-octreotate in-vitro autoradiography after decay of 177 Lu. FFPE sections were used for HE- and immunostaining for SSTR2A and cell subsets CD4 (Th-cell), CD8 (Ts-cell), CD20 (B-cell) and CD68 (macrophage). Results: 177 Lu-DOTA-octreotate scintigraphy and SPECT/CT demonstrated high uptake in the pancreatic tumor, hepatic metastasis and homogeneously in the normal spleen. High resolution micro-SPECT imaging of the isolated spleen also revealed a relatively homogeneous uptake (calculated rest activity 60 MBq 177 Lu). The

  2. Somatostatin receptor PET in neuroendocrine tumours: 68Ga-DOTA0,Tyr3-octreotide versus 68Ga-DOTA0-lanreotide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Putzer, Daniel; Kroiss, Alexander; Waitz, Dietmar; Gabriel, Michael; Uprimny, Christian; Guggenberg, Elisabeth von; Decristoforo, Clemens; Warwitz, Boris; Virgolini, Irene Johanna; Traub-Weidinger, Tatjana; Widmann, Gerlig

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of 68 Ga-labelled DOTA 0 -lanreotide ( 68 Ga-DOTA-LAN) on the diagnostic assessment of neuroendocrine tumour (NET) patients with low to moderate uptake on planar somatostatin receptor (SSTR) scintigraphy or 68 Ga-labelled DOTA 0 ,Tyr 3 -octreotide ( 68 Ga-DOTA-TOC) positron emission tomography (PET). Fifty-three patients with histologically confirmed NET and clinical signs of progressive disease, who had not qualified for peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) on planar SSTR scintigraphy or 68 Ga-DOTA-TOC PET (n = 38) due to lack of tracer uptake, underwent 68 Ga-DOTA-LAN PET to evaluate a treatment option with 90 Y-labelled lanreotide according to the MAURITIUS trial. The included patients received 150 ± 30 MBq of each radiopharmaceutical intravenously. PET scans were acquired 60-90 min after intravenous bolus injection. Image results from both PET scans were compared head to head, focusing on the intensity of tracer uptake in terms of treatment decision. CT was used for morphologic correlation of tumour lesions. To further evaluate the binding affinities of each tracer, quantitative and qualitative values were calculated for target lesions. 68 Ga-DOTA-LAN and 68 Ga-DOTA-TOC both showed equivalent findings in 24/38 patients when fused PET/CT images were interpreted. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of 68 Ga-DOTA-LAN in comparison to CT were 0.63, 0.5 and 0.62 (n = 53; p 68 Ga-DOTA-TOC in comparison to CT 0.78, 0.5 and 0.76 (n = 38; p 68 Ga-DOTA-TOC showed a significantly higher maximum standardized uptake value (SUV max ) regarding the primary tumour in 25 patients (p 68 Ga-DOTA-LAN. Corresponding values of both PET scans for tumour and liver did not show any significant correlation. 68 Ga-DOTA-TOC revealed more tumour sites than 68 Ga-DOTA-LAN (106 vs 53). The tumour to background ratios for tumour and liver calculated from SUV max measurements were significantly higher for 68 Ga-DOTA-TOC than 68 Ga

  3. OctreoScan 111 for imaging of a somatostatin receptor-positive islet cell tumor in rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruns, C.; Stolz, B.; Albert, R.; Marbach, P.; Pless, J.

    1993-01-01

    We report here the in vitro characterization of SDZ 215-811 and the in vivo imaging of a islet cell tumor gown in rats using [ 111 In]SDZ 215-811. In vitro autoradiographies revelaed a high density of SRIF receptors on the pancreatic tumor tissue. As early as 5 min after intravenous injection of [ 111 In]SDZ 215-811 into tumour-bearing rats, the tumors were clearly localized by gamma-camera scintigraphy. Even 24 h post injection, the islet cell tumor was still detectable. The radioligand was mainly cleared from the circulation via the Kidneys, with a rapid α-phase (t 1/2 =5.6 min) and a slow elimination phase (t 1/2 =7.3 h). Biodistribution studies revealed a relatively high accumulation of radioactivity in the kidneys, but low uptake into the liver and the intestine. High uptake of [ 111 In]SDZ 215-811 was observed for the tumor tissue (0.92±0.07% ID/g; 1 h post injection). Interestingly, a tumor load of 0.14±0.01% ID/g was still measured after 24 h. The tumor/blood ratio was 4.93 after 24 h, indicating specific accumulation of radioactivity in the islet cell tumour. [ 111 In]SDZ 215-811 appears to be sensitive and specific ligand for SRIF receptorpositive tumors and offers an easy procedure for scintigraphic imaging of such tumors in man. (orig.)

  4. Therapy with radiolabelled somatostatin analogs in neuroendocrine tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunikowska, J.; Krolicki, L.

    2007-01-01

    In the 80's the discovery of somatostatin receptors expression on NET cells enabled the application of somatostatin analogues in diagnosis and therapy. Initially, 'cold' somatostatin analogs were used for therapeutical purpose, with overall good clinical response, but with minimal anti-proliferation effect. Furthermore, radiolabelled receptor-binding peptides have been shown to be an important class of radiopharmaceuticals for tumor diagnosis and therapy with minimal side-effects. Specific binding between receptor on tumor cell and peptide with beta emitting radionuclide act not only on tumor related symptoms but also on tumor cell via radiotoxic effect of beta radiation. Discoveries of next receptor combinations, allow the work over synthesis and applications of next receptors' analogs both in diagnosis and in therapy. Due to complex characteristics of NET's, the use therapeutic 'cocktail' containing the variety analogs may be of great importance. (author)

  5. Technetium-99m labeled somatostatin and analogs: synthesis, characterization and in vivo evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amartey, J.K.

    1993-01-01

    Technetium-99m complexes of somatostatin and analogs were synthesized following the introduction of sulfhydryl groups with 2-iminothiolane (Traut's Reagent). In rats the complex was taken up by the liver, kidneys, adrenals, lungs and the pancreas. Analysis of urine samples of treated rats showed that the radiochemicals have reasonably good in vivo stability. This implies that the complexes may be potentially useful for biochemical characterization of somatostatin receptors and also in scintigraphic detection of somatostatin receptor positive tumors, especially for metastatic deposits in patients on somatostatin therapy. (Author)

  6. 68Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT and somatostatin receptor (sst1-sst5) expression in normal human tissue: correlation of sst2 mRNA and SUVmax

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boy, Christian; Poeppel, Thorsten D.; Jentzen, Walter; Brandau, Wolfgang; Bockisch, Andreas; Heusner, Till A.; Antoch, Gerald; Redmann-Bischofs, Anja; Unger, Nicole; Mann, Klaus; Petersenn, Stephan

    2011-01-01

    By targeting somatostatin receptors (sst) radiopeptides have been established for both diagnosis and therapy. For physiologically normal human tissues the study provides a normative database of maximum standardized uptake value (SUV max ) and sst mRNA. A total of 120 patients were subjected to diagnostic 68 Ga-DOTATOC positron emission tomography (PET)/CT (age range 19-83 years). SUV max values were measured in physiologically normal tissues defined by normal morphology, absence of surgical intervention and absence of metastatic spread during clinical follow-up. Expression of sst subtypes (sst1-sst5) was measured independently in pooled adult normal human tissue by real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). SUV max revealed a region-specific pattern (e.g., mean ± SD, spleen 31.1 ± 10.9, kidney 16.9 ± 5.3, liver 12.8 ± 3.6, stomach 7.0 ± 3.1, head of pancreas 6.2 ± 2.3, small bowel 4.8 ± 1.8, thyroid 4.7 ± 2.2, bone 3.9 ± 1.3, large bowel 2.9 ± 0.8, muscle 2.1 ± 0.5, parotid gland 1.9 ± 0.6, axillary lymph node 0.8 ± 0.3 and lung 0.7 ± 0.3). SUV max was age independent. Gender differences were evident within the thyroid (female/male: 3.7 ± 1.6/5.5 ± 2.4, p max values exclusively correlated with sst2 expression (r = 0.846, p max with the expression of the other four subtypes. In normal human tissues 68 Ga-DOTATOC imaging has been related to the expression of sst2 at the level of mRNA. The novel normative database may improve diagnostics, monitoring and therapy of sst-expressing tumours or inflammation on a molecular basis. (orig.)

  7. Current knowledge on the sensitivity of the 68Ga-somatostatin receptor positron emission tomography and the SUVmax reference range for management of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Virgolini, Irene; Gabriel, Michael; Kroiss, Alexander; Guggenberg, Elisabeth von; Prommegger, Rupert; Warwitz, Boris; Nilica, Bernhard; Roig, Ilanos Geraldo; Rodrigues, Margarida; Uprimny, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Physiologically increased pancreatic uptake at the head/uncinate process is observed in more than one-third of patients after injection of one of the three 68 Ga-labelled octreotide-based peptides used for somatostatin (sst) receptor (r) imaging. There are minor differences between these 68 Ga-sstr-binding peptides in the imaging setting. On 68 Ga-sstr-imaging the physiological uptake can be diffuse or focal and usually remains stable over time. Differences in the maximal standardised uptake values (SUV max ) reported for the normal pancreas as well as for pancreatic neuroendocrine tumour (PNET) lesions may be related to several factors, including (a) differences in the peptide binding affinities as well as differences in sstr subtype expression of pancreatic α- and β-cells, and heterogeneity / density of tumour cells, (b) differences in scanner resolution, image reconstruction techniques and acquisition protocols, (c) mostly retrospective study designs, (d) mixed patient populations, or (e) interference with medications such as treatment with long-acting sst analogues. The major limitation in most of the studies lies in the lack of histopathological confirmation of abnormal findings. There is a significant overlap between the calculated SUV max -values for physiological pancreas and PNET-lesions of the head/uncinate process that do not favour the use of quantitative parameters in the clinical setting. Anecdotal long-term follow-up studies have even indicated that increased uptake in the head/uncinate process still can turn out to be malignant over years of follow up. SUV max -data for the pancreatic body and tail are limited. Therefore, any visible focal tracer uptake in the pancreas must be considered as suspicious for malignancy irrespective of quantitative parameters. In general, sstr-PET/CT has significant implications for the management of NET patients leading to a change in treatment decision in about one-third of patients. Therefore, follow-up with 68 Ga

  8. Current knowledge on the sensitivity of the (68)Ga-somatostatin receptor positron emission tomography and the SUVmax reference range for management of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virgolini, Irene; Gabriel, Michael; Kroiss, Alexander; von Guggenberg, Elisabeth; Prommegger, Rupert; Warwitz, Boris; Nilica, Bernhard; Roig, Llanos Geraldo; Rodrigues, Margarida; Uprimny, Christian

    2016-10-01

    Physiologically increased pancreatic uptake at the head/uncinate process is observed in more than one-third of patients after injection of one of the three (68)Ga-labelled octreotide-based peptides used for somatostatin (sst) receptor (r) imaging. There are minor differences between these (68)Ga-sstr-binding peptides in the imaging setting. On (68)Ga-sstr-imaging the physiological uptake can be diffuse or focal and usually remains stable over time. Differences in the maximal standardised uptake values (SUVmax) reported for the normal pancreas as well as for pancreatic neuroendocrine tumour (PNET) lesions may be related to several factors, including (a) differences in the peptide binding affinities as well as differences in sstr subtype expression of pancreatic α- and β-cells, and heterogeneity / density of tumour cells, (b) differences in scanner resolution, image reconstruction techniques and acquisition protocols, (c) mostly retrospective study designs, (d) mixed patient populations, or (e) interference with medications such as treatment with long-acting sst analogues. The major limitation in most of the studies lies in the lack of histopathological confirmation of abnormal findings. There is a significant overlap between the calculated SUVmax-values for physiological pancreas and PNET-lesions of the head/uncinate process that do not favour the use of quantitative parameters in the clinical setting. Anecdotal long-term follow-up studies have even indicated that increased uptake in the head/uncinate process still can turn out to be malignant over years of follow up. SUVmax-data for the pancreatic body and tail are limited. Therefore, any visible focal tracer uptake in the pancreas must be considered as suspicious for malignancy irrespective of quantitative parameters. In general, sstr-PET/CT has significant implications for the management of NET patients leading to a change in treatment decision in about one-third of patients. Therefore, follow-up with (68)Ga

  9. Decision-tree model for health economic comparison of two long-acting somatostatin receptor ligand devices in France, Germany, and the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marty, Rémi; Roze, Stéphane; Kurth, Hannah

    2012-01-01

    Long-acting somatostatin receptor ligands (SRL) with product-specific formulation and means of administration are injected periodically in patients with acromegaly and neuroendocrine tumors. A simple decision-tree model aimed at comparing cost savings with ready-to-use Somatuline Autogel(®) (lanreotide) and Sandostatin LAR(®) (octreotide) for the UK, France, and Germany. The drivers of cost savings studied were the reduction of time to administer as well as a reduced baseline risk of clogging during product administration reported for Somatuline Autogel(®). The decision-tree model assumed two settings for SRL administration, ie, by either hospital-based or community-based nurses. In the case of clogging, the first dose was assumed to be lost and a second injection performed. Successful injection depended on the probability of clogging. Direct medical costs were included. A set of scenarios were run, varying the cost drivers, such as the baseline risk of clogging, SRL administration time, and percentage of patients injected during a hospital stay. Costs per successful injection were less for Somatuline Autogel(®)/Depot, ranging from Euros (EUR) 13-45, EUR 52-108, and EUR 127-151, respectively, for France, Germany, and the UK. The prices for both long-acting SRL were the same in France, and cost savings came to 100% from differences other than drug prices. For Germany and the UK, the proportion of savings due to less clogging and shorter administration time was estimated to be around 32% and 20%, respectively. Based on low and high country-specific patient cohort size estimations of individuals eligible for SRL treatment among the patient population with acromegaly and neuroendocrine tumors, annual savings were estimated to be up to EUR 2,000,000 for France, EUR 6,000,000 for Germany, and EUR 7,000,000 for the UK. This model suggests that increasing usage of the Somatuline device for injection of SRL might lead to substantial savings for health care providers

  10. Receptor-interacting protein (RIP) kinase family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Duanwu; Lin, Juan; Han, Jiahuai

    2010-01-01

    Receptor-interacting protein (RIP) kinases are a group of threonine/serine protein kinases with a relatively conserved kinase domain but distinct non-kinase regions. A number of different domain structures, such as death and caspase activation and recruitment domain (CARD) domains, were found in different RIP family members, and these domains should be keys in determining the specific function of each RIP kinase. It is known that RIP kinases participate in different biological processes, including those in innate immunity, but their downstream substrates are largely unknown. This review will give an overview of the structures and functions of RIP family members, and an update of recent progress in RIP kinase research. PMID:20383176

  11. Somatostatin receptor PET in neuroendocrine tumours: 68Ga-DOTA0,Tyr3-octreotide versus 68Ga-DOTA0-lanreotide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putzer, Daniel; Kroiss, Alexander; Waitz, Dietmar; Gabriel, Michael; Traub-Weidinger, Tatjana; Uprimny, Christian; von Guggenberg, Elisabeth; Decristoforo, Clemens; Warwitz, Boris; Widmann, Gerlig; Virgolini, Irene Johanna

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of (68)Ga-labelled DOTA(0)-lanreotide ((68)Ga-DOTA-LAN) on the diagnostic assessment of neuroendocrine tumour (NET) patients with low to moderate uptake on planar somatostatin receptor (SSTR) scintigraphy or (68)Ga-labelled DOTA(0),Tyr(3)-octreotide ((68)Ga-DOTA-TOC) positron emission tomography (PET). Fifty-three patients with histologically confirmed NET and clinical signs of progressive disease, who had not qualified for peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) on planar SSTR scintigraphy or (68)Ga-DOTA-TOC PET (n = 38) due to lack of tracer uptake, underwent (68)Ga-DOTA-LAN PET to evaluate a treatment option with (90)Y-labelled lanreotide according to the MAURITIUS trial. The included patients received 150 ± 30 MBq of each radiopharmaceutical intravenously. PET scans were acquired 60-90 min after intravenous bolus injection. Image results from both PET scans were compared head to head, focusing on the intensity of tracer uptake in terms of treatment decision. CT was used for morphologic correlation of tumour lesions. To further evaluate the binding affinities of each tracer, quantitative and qualitative values were calculated for target lesions. (68)Ga-DOTA-LAN and (68)Ga-DOTA-TOC both showed equivalent findings in 24/38 patients when fused PET/CT images were interpreted. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of (68)Ga-DOTA-LAN in comparison to CT were 0.63, 0.5 and 0.62 (n = 53; p < 0.0001) and for (68)Ga-DOTA-TOC in comparison to CT 0.78, 0.5 and 0.76 (n = 38; p < 0.013), respectively. (68)Ga-DOTA-TOC showed a significantly higher maximum standardized uptake value (SUV(max)) regarding the primary tumour in 25 patients (p < 0.003) and regarding the liver in 30 patients (p < 0.009) compared to (68)Ga-DOTA-LAN. Corresponding values of both PET scans for tumour and liver did not show any significant correlation. (68)Ga-DOTA-TOC revealed more tumour sites than (68)Ga

  12. Somatostatin receptor PET in neuroendocrine tumours: {sup 68}Ga-DOTA{sup 0},Tyr{sup 3}-octreotide versus {sup 68}Ga-DOTA{sup 0}-lanreotide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Putzer, Daniel; Kroiss, Alexander; Waitz, Dietmar; Gabriel, Michael; Uprimny, Christian; Guggenberg, Elisabeth von; Decristoforo, Clemens; Warwitz, Boris; Virgolini, Irene Johanna [Innsbruck Medical University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Innsbruck (Austria); Traub-Weidinger, Tatjana [Vienna Medical University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Vienna (Austria); Widmann, Gerlig [Innsbruck Medical University, Department of Radiology, Innsbruck (Austria)

    2013-03-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of {sup 68}Ga-labelled DOTA{sup 0}-lanreotide ({sup 68}Ga-DOTA-LAN) on the diagnostic assessment of neuroendocrine tumour (NET) patients with low to moderate uptake on planar somatostatin receptor (SSTR) scintigraphy or {sup 68}Ga-labelled DOTA{sup 0},Tyr{sup 3}-octreotide ({sup 68}Ga-DOTA-TOC) positron emission tomography (PET). Fifty-three patients with histologically confirmed NET and clinical signs of progressive disease, who had not qualified for peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) on planar SSTR scintigraphy or {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-TOC PET (n = 38) due to lack of tracer uptake, underwent {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-LAN PET to evaluate a treatment option with {sup 90}Y-labelled lanreotide according to the MAURITIUS trial. The included patients received 150 {+-} 30 MBq of each radiopharmaceutical intravenously. PET scans were acquired 60-90 min after intravenous bolus injection. Image results from both PET scans were compared head to head, focusing on the intensity of tracer uptake in terms of treatment decision. CT was used for morphologic correlation of tumour lesions. To further evaluate the binding affinities of each tracer, quantitative and qualitative values were calculated for target lesions. {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-LAN and {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-TOC both showed equivalent findings in 24/38 patients when fused PET/CT images were interpreted. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-LAN in comparison to CT were 0.63, 0.5 and 0.62 (n = 53; p < 0.0001) and for {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-TOC in comparison to CT 0.78, 0.5 and 0.76 (n = 38; p < 0.013), respectively. {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-TOC showed a significantly higher maximum standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}) regarding the primary tumour in 25 patients (p < 0.003) and regarding the liver in 30 patients (p < 0.009) compared to {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-LAN. Corresponding values of both PET scans for tumour and liver did not show any significant correlation. {sup 68}Ga

  13. The somatostatin receptor 2 antagonist 64Cu-NODAGA-JR11 outperforms 64Cu-DOTA-TATE in a mouse xenograft model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rylova, Svetlana N.; Stoykow, Christian; Del Pozzo, Luigi; Abiraj, Keelara; Tamma, Maria Luisa; Kiefer, Yvonne; Fani, Melpomeni; Maecke, Helmut R.

    2018-01-01

    Copper-64 is an attractive radionuclide for PET imaging and is frequently used in clinical applications. The aim of this study was to perform a side-by-side comparison of the in vitro and in vivo performance of 64Cu-NODAGA-JR11 (NODAGA = 1,4,7-triazacyclononane,1-glutaric acid,4,7-acetic acid, JR11 = p-Cl-Phe-cyclo(D-Cys-Aph(Hor)-D-Aph(cbm)-Lys-Thr-Cys)D-Tyr-NH2), a somatostatin receptor 2 antagonist, with the clinically used sst2 agonist 64Cu-DOTA-TATE ((TATE = D-Phe-cyclo(Cys-Tyr-D-Trp-Lys-Thr-Cys)Thr). In vitro studies demonstrated Kd values of 5.7±0.95 nM (Bmax = 4.1±0.18 nM) for the antagonist 64/natCu-NODAGA-JR11 and 20.1±4.4. nM (Bmax = 0.48±0.18 nM) for the agonist 64/natCu-DOTA-TATE. Cell uptake studies showed the expected differences between agonists and antagonists. Whereas 64Cu-DOTA-TATE (the agonist) showed very effective internalization in the cell culture assay (with 50% internalized at 4 hours post-peptide addition under the given experimental conditions), 64Cu-NODAGA-JR11 (the antagonist) showed little internalization but strong receptor-mediated uptake at the cell membrane. Biodistribution studies of 64Cu-NODAGA-JR11 showed rapid blood clearance and tumor uptake with increasing tumor-to-relevant organ ratios within the first 4 hours and in some cases, 24 hours, respectively. The tumor washout was slow or non-existent in the first 4 hours, whereas the kidney washout was very efficient, leading to high and increasing tumor-to-kidney ratios over time. Specificity of tumor uptake was proven by co-injection of high excess of non-radiolabeled peptide, which led to >80% tumor blocking. 64Cu-DOTA-TATE showed less favorable pharmacokinetics, with the exception of lower kidney uptake. Blood clearance was distinctly slower and persistent higher blood values were found at 24 hours. Uptake in the liver and lung was relatively high and also persistent. The tumor uptake was specific and similar to that of 64Cu-NODAGA-JR11 at 1 h, but release from the tumor

  14. Family C 7TM receptor dimerization and activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Marie Mi; Sheikh, Søren P; Hansen, Jakob Lerche

    2006-01-01

    The family C seven transmembrane (7TM) receptors constitutes a small and especially well characterized subfamily of the large 7TM receptor superfamily. Approximately 50% of current prescription drugs target 7TM receptors, this biologically important family represents the largest class of drug...... to be fully defined. This review presents the biochemical support for family C 7TM receptor dimerization and discusses its importance for receptor biosynthesis, surface expression, ligand binding and activation, since lessons learnt here may well be applicable to the whole superfamily of 7TM receptors.......-targets today. It is well established that family C 7TM receptors form homo- or hetero-dimers on the cell surface of living cells. The large extra-cellular domains (ECD) have been crystallized as a dimer in the presence and absence of agonist. Upon agonist binding, the dimeric ECD undergoes large conformational...

  15. 99mTc-EDDA/HYNIC-TOC: a new 99mTc-labelled radiopharmaceutical for imaging somatostatin receptor-positive tumours: first clinical results and intra-patient comparison with 111In-labelled octreotide derivatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decristoforo, C.; Cholewinski, W.; Donnemiller, E.; Riccabona, G.; Moncayo, R.

    2000-01-01

    [ 111 In-diethylene triamine penta-acetic acid-d-Phe 1 ]-octreotide (DTPA-octreotide) scintigraphy has gained widespread acceptance as a diagnostic clinical procedure in oncology for imaging somatostatin receptor-positive tumours. However, indium-111 as a radiolabel has several drawbacks, including limited availability, suboptimal gamma energy and high radiation burden to the patient. We have recently reported on the preclinical development of 99m Tc-EDDA/HYNIC-TOC, a new octreotide derivative which showed promising results both in vitro and in vivo. We now report our initial clinical experiences with this new radiopharmaceutical in ten oncological patients. The clinical diagnoses were: carcinoid syndrome (n=5), thyroid cancer (n=3), pancreatic cancer (n=1) and pituitary tumour (n=1). The biodistribution and kinetics of 99m Tc-EDDA/HYNIC-TOC were compared with those of 111 In-DTPA-octreotide in six cases, and with those of 111 In-DOTA-TOC in five cases. With the new tracer tumours were imaged within 15 min after injection and showed the highest target/non-target ratios 4 h after injection. Tumour uptake persisted up to 20 h p.i. The rate of blood clearance was similar to that of 111 In-DTPA-octreotide but faster than that of 111 In-DOTA-TOC, while urinary excretion was lower compared with the 111 In derivatives. Semi-quantitative region of interest analysis showed that 99m Tc-EDDA/HYNIC-TOC produced higher tumour/organ (target/non-target) ratios than the 111 In derivatives, especially in relation to heart and muscle. Significantly more lesions could be detected in 99m Tc images. We conclude that 99m Tc-EDDA/HYNIC-TOC shows better imaging properties for the identification of somatostatin receptor-positive tumour sites than currently available 111 In-labelled octreotide derivatives. (orig.)

  16. 99mTc-EDDA/HYNIC-TOC: a new 99mTc-labelled radiopharmaceutical for imaging somatostatin receptor-positive tumours; first clinical results and intra-patient comparison with 111In-labelled octreotide derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decristoforo, C; Mather, S J; Cholewinski, W; Donnemiller, E; Riccabona, G; Moncayo, R

    2000-09-01

    [111In-diethylene triamine penta-acetic acid-D-Phe1]-octreotide (DTPA-octreotide) scintigraphy has gained widespread acceptance as a diagnostic clinical procedure in oncology for imaging somatostatin receptor-positive tumours. However, indium-111 as a radiolabel has several drawbacks, including limited availability, suboptimal gamma energy and high radiation burden to the patient. We have recently reported on the preclinical development of 99mTc-EDDA/HYNIC-TOC, a new octreotide derivative which showed promising results both in vitro and in vivo. We now report our initial clinical experiences with this new radiopharmaceutical in ten oncological patients. The clinical diagnoses were: carcinoid syndrome (n=5), thyroid cancer (n=3), pancreatic cancer (n=1) and pituitary tumour (n=1). The biodistribution and kinetics of 99mTc-EDDA/HYNIC-TOC were compared with those of 111In-DTPA-octreotide in six cases, and with those of 111In-DOTA-TOC in five cases. With the new tracer tumours were imaged within 15 min after injection and showed the highest target/non-target ratios 4 h after injection. Tumour uptake persisted up to 20 h p.i. The rate of blood clearance was similar to that of 111In-DTPA-octreotide but faster than that of 111In-DOTA-TOC, while urinary excretion was lower compared with the 111In derivatives. Semi-quantitative region of interest analysis showed that 99mTc-EDDA/HYNIC-TOC produced higher tumour/organ (target/non-target) ratios than the 111In derivatives, especially in relation to heart and muscle. Significantly more lesions could be detected in 99mTc images. We conclude that 99mTcEDDA/HYNIC-TOC shows better imaging properties for the identification of somatostatin receptor-positive tumour sites than currently available 111In-labelled octreotide derivatives.

  17. Receptor scintigraphy using the Tc-99M-labelled somatostatin analogue EDDA-TRYCINE-HYNIC-TOC: clinical results in different tumor types and comparison with In-111 DOTATOC during Y-90 DOTATOC radioreceptor therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baum, R.P.; Schmuecking, M.; Fischer, S.; Przetak, C.; Niesen, A.; Maecke, H.R.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate Tc-99m EDDA-TRYCINE-HYNIC-TOC in patients with somatostatin receptor positive tumours (staging, pre-therapeutic dosimetry for radioreceptor therapy and restaging after therapy) in comparison with In-111 DOTATOC. Material and Methods: The Tc-99m labelled somatostatin analogue was synthesized by an optimized procedure in our pharmaceutical laboratory using lyophilized kits (radiochemical purity by HPLC, TLC > 95%, product stability in vitro 4 to 6h). So far, 58 patients (60 examinations) were studied after injection of 580-890 MBq (median 673 MBq) EDDA-TRYCINE-HYNIC-TOC. The histologically proven tumours were neuroendocrine neoplasias, renal carcinomas, bronchial carcinoma, mesothelioma and malignant fibrous histiocytoma. The imaging protocol consisted of whole-body scans and planar images of the tumor region (15 min, 1 h, 2 h, 4 h, 8 h, 24 h p.i.) and additionally SPECT-images (1 h und 4 h p.i.). For semi-quantitative assessment, individual regions of interest (ROI) were drawn in order to generate time-activity curves and to calculate tumour-to-tissue/background ratios which were compared by visual grading (scala 0 to 3+). Furthermore, pharmacokinetic analyses were carried out (radioactivity kinetics in plasma and urine). In some selected patients, image fusion of whole-body scans was performed with CT and/or MRT and/or PET using a NUD software and a HERMES computer. Results: 10 out of 58 patients showed an intense tracer accumulation in the SSTR-positive tumours (visual 3+, tumour/background ratio >2,5). In these patients, radioreceptor therapy was carried out using Y-90 DOTATOC (simultaneous injection von 150 MBq In-111 DOTATOC). All pretherapeutic scans with the Tc-99m labelled ligand (4 h p.i.) showed a similar overall pattern of biodistribution and tumour uptake in comparison to the therapy scans with In-111 / Y-90 DOTATOC (24 h p.i.). The Tc-99m EDDA-TRYCINE-HYNIC-TOC scans (incl. SPECT) offered superior imaging properties with earlier tumour

  18. Receptor imaging with a new Tc-99m labelled somatostatin analogue (Tc-99m EDDA-TRYCINE-HYNIC-TOC): first clinical results and comparison with In-111 Dotatoc during radioreceptor therapy with Y-90 Dotatoc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baum, R.P.; Schmuecking, M.; Fischer, S.; Przetak, C.; Niesen, A.; Maecke, H.R.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: To evaluate Tc-99m EDDA-TRYCINE-HYNIC-TOC (TET-H-TOC) in patients with somatostatin receptor (SSTR)-positive tumors (staging, pretherapeutic indication for radioreceptor therapy and restaging after therapy) in comparison with In-111 DOTATOC. The Tc-99m labelled somatostatin analogue was synthesized by an optimized procedure in our pharmaceutical lab using lyophilized kits (radiochemical purity by HPLC, TLC > 95 %, product stability in vitro 4 to 6 h). So far, 46 patients (53 examinations) were studied after injection of 580-890 MBq (median 673 MBq) TET-H-TOC. The histologically proven tumors were endocrine neoplasias, renal carcinomas, bronchial carcinoma, mesothelioma and malignant fibrous histiocytoma. The imaging protocol consisted of whole-body scans and planar images of the tumor region (15 min, 1 h, 2 h, 4 h, 8 h, 24 h p.i.) and additionally SPECT-images (1 h and 4 h p.i.). For semi-quantitative assessment, individual regions of interest (ROI) were drawn in order to generate time-activity curves and to calculate tumor-to-tissue/background ratios which were compared by visual grading (scale 0 to 3+). Furthermore, pharmacokinetic analyses were carried out (radioactivity kinetics in plasma and urine). In some selected patients, image fusion of the whole-body scans was performed with CT and/or MRT and/or PET using a HERMES computer. 7 out of 46 patients showed an intense tracer accumulation in the SSTR-positive tumors (visual 3+, tumor / background ratio >2,5). In these patients, radioreceptor therapy was carried out using Y-90 DOTATOC (simultaneous injection of 150 MBq In-111 DOTATOC). All pretherapeutic scans with the Tc-99m labelled ligand (4 h p.i.) showed a similar overall pattern of biodistribution and tumor uptake in comparison to the therapy scans with In-111 / Y-90 DOTATOC 24 h p.i. The Tc-99m EDDA-HYNIC-TOC scans (incl. SPECT) offered superior imaging properties with earlier tumor visualization (all lesions were detected 1 h p.i.) as compared

  19. Receptor oligomerization in family B1 of G-protein-coupled receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roed, Sarah Norklit; Ørgaard, Anne; Jørgensen, Rasmus

    2012-01-01

    , the glucagon receptor, and the receptors for parathyroid hormone (PTHR1 and PTHR2). The dysregulation of several family B1 receptors is involved in diseases, such as diabetes, chronic inflammation, and osteoporosis which underlines the pathophysiological importance of this GPCR subfamily. In spite of this......, investigation of family B1 receptor oligomerization and especially its pharmacological importance is still at an early stage. Even though GPCR oligomerization is a well-established phenomenon, there is a need for more investigations providing a direct link between these interactions and receptor functionality......The superfamily of the seven transmembrane G-protein-coupled receptors (7TM/GPCRs) is the largest family of membrane-associated receptors. GPCRs are involved in the pathophysiology of numerous human diseases, and they constitute an estimated 30-40% of all drug targets. During the last two decades...

  20. Calcitonin and calcitonin receptor-like receptors: common themes with family B GPCRs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barwell, James; Gingell, Joseph J; Watkins, Harriet A; Archbold, Julia K; Poyner, David R; Hay, Debbie L

    2012-05-01

    The calcitonin receptor (CTR) and calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR) are two of the 15 human family B (or Secretin-like) GPCRs. CTR and CLR are of considerable biological interest as their pharmacology is moulded by interactions with receptor activity-modifying proteins. They also have therapeutic relevance for many conditions, such as osteoporosis, diabetes, obesity, lymphatic insufficiency, migraine and cardiovascular disease. In light of recent advances in understanding ligand docking and receptor activation in both the family as a whole and in CLR and CTR specifically, this review reflects how applicable general family B GPCR themes are to these two idiosyncratic receptors. We review the main functional domains of the receptors; the N-terminal extracellular domain, the juxtamembrane domain and ligand interface, the transmembrane domain and the intracellular C-terminal domain. Structural and functional findings from the CLR and CTR along with other family B GPCRs are critically appraised to gain insight into how these domains may function. The ability for CTR and CLR to interact with receptor activity-modifying proteins adds another level of sophistication to these receptor systems but means careful consideration is needed when trying to apply generic GPCR principles. This review encapsulates current thinking in the realm of family B GPCR research by highlighting both conflicting and recurring themes and how such findings relate to two unusual but important receptors, CTR and CLR. © 2011 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2011 The British Pharmacological Society.

  1. Monitoring of Biodistribution and Persistence of Conditionally Replicative Adenovirus in a Murine Model of Ovarian Cancer Using Capsid-Incorporated mCherry and Expression of Human Somatostatin Receptor Subtype 2 Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor P. Dmitriev

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A significant limiting factor to the human clinical application of conditionally replicative adenovirus (CRAd-based virotherapy is the inability to noninvasively monitor these agents and their potential persistence. To address this issue, we proposed a novel imaging approach that combines transient expression of the human somatostatin receptor (SSTR subtype 2 reporter gene with genetic labeling of the viral capsid with mCherry fluorescent protein. To test this dual modality system, we constructed the Ad5/3Δ24pIXcherry/SSTR CRAd and validated its capacity to generate fluorescent and nuclear signals in vitro and following intratumoral injection. Analysis of 64Cu-CB-TE2A-Y3-TATE biodistribution in mice revealed reduced uptake in tumors injected with the imaging CRAd relative to the replication-incompetent, Ad-expressing SSTR2 but significantly greater uptake compared to the negative CRAd control. Optical imaging demonstrated relative correlation of fluorescent signal with virus replication as determined by viral genome quantification in tumors. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography studies demonstrated that we can visualize radioactive uptake in tumors injected with imaging CRAd and the trend for greater uptake by standardized uptake value analysis compared to control CRAd. In the aggregate, the plasticity of our dual imaging approach should provide the technical basis for monitoring CRAd biodistribution and persistence in preclinical studies while offering potential utility for a range of clinical applications.

  2. A family of photoswitchable NMDA receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlin, Shai; Szobota, Stephanie; Reiner, Andreas; Carroll, Elizabeth C; Kienzler, Michael A; Guyon, Alice; Xiao, Tong; Trauner, Dirk; Isacoff, Ehud Y

    2016-01-01

    NMDA receptors, which regulate synaptic strength and are implicated in learning and memory, consist of several subtypes with distinct subunit compositions and functional properties. To enable spatiotemporally defined, rapid and reproducible manipulation of function of specific subtypes, we engineered a set of photoswitchable GluN subunits ('LiGluNs'). Photo-agonism of GluN2A or GluN2B elicits an excitatory drive to hippocampal neurons that can be shaped in time to mimic synaptic activation. Photo-agonism of GluN2A at single dendritic spines evokes spine-specific calcium elevation and expansion, the morphological correlate of LTP. Photo-antagonism of GluN2A alone, or in combination with photo-antagonism of GluN1a, reversibly blocks excitatory synaptic currents, prevents the induction of long-term potentiation and prevents spine expansion. In addition, photo-antagonism in vivo disrupts synaptic pruning of developing retino-tectal projections in larval zebrafish. By providing precise and rapidly reversible optical control of NMDA receptor subtypes, LiGluNs should help unravel the contribution of specific NMDA receptors to synaptic transmission, integration and plasticity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12040.001 PMID:26929991

  3. Maturing of the nuclear receptor family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazar, Mitchell A

    2017-04-03

    Members of the nuclear receptor (NR) superfamily of ligand-regulated transcription factors play important roles in reproduction, development, and physiology. In humans, genetic mutations in NRs are causes of rare diseases, while hormones and drugs that target NRs are in widespread therapeutic use. The present issue of the JCI includes a series of Review articles focused on specific NRs and their wide range of biological functions. Here I reflect on the past, present, and potential future highlights of research on the NR superfamily.

  4. Multiple Receptor Subtypes for the CGRP Super-Family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Quirion

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular evidence for the existence of multiple receptors for CGRP has been rather difficult to obtain. Over 10 years after suggesting the existence of at least two classes (CGRP1 and CGRP2 of CGRP receptors on the basis of pharmacological data[1], molecular data on the CGRP2 receptor subtype are still lacking as well as potent and selective antagonists. The situation is somewhat different for the functional CGRP1 subtype which is likely composed of diverse subunits CRLR, RAMP1 and possibly RCP[2]. Moreover, BIBN 4096BS was recently reported as the first nonpeptide highly potent CGRP1 receptor antagonist[3]. However, in situ hybridization and receptor autoradiographic data have clearly shown the existence of major mismatches (e.g., cerebellum between the discrete localization of CRLR, RAMP1, and specific CGRP binding sites supporting the existence of CGRP receptor subtypes. Functional studies have also provided evidence in that regard (for a recent review: [4]. Accordingly, additional studies aiming at cloning additional CGRP receptors are certainly warranted. Similarly, recent evidence from various laboratories including ours suggests the existence of more than one class (CRLR and RAMP2 of adrenomedullin receptors at least in the rat brain. In contrast, most evidence suggests the existence of a single class of amylin receptors. In brief, it appears that multiple receptors or receptor complexes do exist for CGRP and related peptides but their composition is apparently unique among the GPCR super-family and additional data are needed to fully establish the molecular organization of each subtype. Supported by CIHR of Canada.

  5. Genetic diversity of bitter taste receptor gene family in Sichuan

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Genetic diversity of bitter taste receptor gene family in Sichuan domestic and Tibetan chicken populations. YUAN SU DIYAN LI UMA GAUR YAN WANG NAN WU BINLONG CHEN HONGXIAN XU HUADONG YIN YAODONG HU QING ZHU. RESEARCH ARTICLE Volume 95 Issue 3 September 2016 pp 675-681 ...

  6. Yttrium-90 and indium-111 labelling, receptor binding and biodistribution of [DOTA0,d-Phe1,Tyr3[octreotide, a promising somatostatin analogue for radionuclide therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jong, M. de; Bakker, W.H.; Krenning, E.P.; Breeman, W.A.P.; Pluijm, M.E. van der; Bernard, B.F.; Visser, T.J.; Jermann, E.; Behe, M.; Powell, P.; Maecke, H.R.

    1997-01-01

    In vitro octreotide receptor binding of [ 111 In-DOTA 0 ,d-Phe 1 ,Tyr 3 [octreotide ( 111 In-DOTATOC) and the in vivo metabolism of 90 Y- or 111 In-labelled DOTATOC were investigated in rats in comparison with [ 111 In-DTPA 0 [octreotide [ 111 In-DTPAOC). 111 In-DOTATOC was found to have an affinity similar to octreotide itself for the octreotide receptor in rat cerebral cortex microsomes. Twenty-four hours after injection of 90 Y- or 111 In-labelled DOTATOC, uptake of radioactivity in the octreotide receptor-expressing tissues pancreas, pituitary, adrenals and tumour was a factor of 2-6 that after injection of 111 In-DTPAOC. Uptake of labelled DOTATOC in pituitary, pancreas, adrenals and tumour was almost completely blocked by pretreatment with 0.5 mg unlabelled octreotide, indicating specific binding to the octreotide receptors. These findings strongly indicate that 90 Y-DOTATOC is a promising radiopharmaceutical for radiotherapy and that 111 In-DOTATOC is of potential value for diagnosis of patients with octreotide receptor-positive lesions, such as most neuroendocrine tumours. (orig.). With 3 figs., 2 tabs

  7. Signal transduction through the IL-4 and insulin receptor families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L M; Keegan, A; Frankel, M; Paul, W E; Pierce, J H

    1995-07-01

    Activation of tyrosine kinase-containing receptors and intracellular tyrosine kinases by ligand stimulation is known to be crucial for mediating initial and subsequent events involved in mitogenic signal transduction. Receptors for insulin and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) contain cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase domains that undergo autophosphorylation upon ligand stimulation. Activation of these receptors also leads to pronounced and rapid tyrosine phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS-1) in cells of connective tissue origin. A related substrate, designated 4PS, is similarly phosphorylated by insulin and IGF-1 stimulation in many hematopoietic cell types. IRS-1 and 4PS possess a number of tyrosine phosphorylation sites that are within motifs that bind specific SH2-containing molecules known to be involved in mitogenic signaling such as PI-3 kinase, SHPTP-2 (Syp) and Grb-2. Thus, they appear to act as docking substrates for a variety of signaling molecules. The majority of hematopoietic cytokines bind to receptors that do not possess intrinsic kinase activity, and these receptors have been collectively termed as members of the hematopoietin receptor superfamily. Despite their lack of tyrosine kinase domains, stimulation of these receptors has been demonstrated to activate intracellular kinases leading to tyrosine phosphorylation of multiple substrates. Recent evidence has demonstrated that activation of different members of the Janus family of tyrosine kinases is involved in mediating tyrosine phosphorylation events by specific cytokines. Stimulation of the interleukin 4 (IL-4) receptor, a member of the hematopoietin receptor superfamily, is thought to result in activation of Jak1, Jak3, and/or Fes tyrosine kinases.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Union of {sup 99m} Tc-HYNIC-TOC at the somatostatin receptors in cells of pancreas cancer; Union del {sup 99m} Tc-HYNIC-TOC a los receptores de somatostatina en celulas de cancer de pancreas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez C, J [Facultad de Medicina, UAEM, 50000 Toluca, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Ramirez I, M T [INCMNSZ, Vasco de Quiroga Num. 15, Tlalpan, 14000 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Ferro F, G; Pedraza L, M [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2005-07-01

    The radiation toxic effects have been used in therapy however much 50 years. The absorbed radiation dose can be determined at cellular level using cancerous cell cultures. If the deposited In vitro radiation dose coming from similar activities of several therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals it can compare it will be possible to choose the therapeutic radiopharmaceutical that it offers better dosimetric characteristics for the patient. The objective of this original investigation was to determine the union percentage of the octreotide {sup 99m}Tc-HYNlC-TOC to the somatostatin receivers in cells of cancer pancreas as well as the internalization, externalization and cellular viability. It was used the octapeptide, (octreotide, TOC) labelled with {sup 99m}Tc by means of the HYNIC chelating agent (6-hydrazine pyridine-3-carboxylic acid) and 3 cellular lines of murine pancreas cancer (AR42J), of cancer of human pancreas (CAPAN) and of one negative cellular line for somatostatin receivers (WRL-68). The {sup 99m}Tc-HYNIC-TOC was compared against two negative proofs for somatostatin receivers: the peptide {sup 99m}Tc-UBI and the {sup 99m}TcO{sub 4}. The cellular lines were conserved in the synthetic media Dulbecco-Eagle. After 2, 4 and 24 h of exhibition to the radiation, the cells are picked up and its are determined the viability by count in a Neubauer camera using tripan blue. In the same times it was calculated the union percentage of the radiopharmaceutical to the cells and the internalization (union to the cytoplasm) and the externalization (union to membrane receivers). With those figures it was calculated the absorbed radiation dose at cellular level. Results: At 4 hours the union percentage of the {sup 99m}Tc-HYNlC-TOC to the AR42-J cells was 6.83 times greater than for the WRL-68 control cells of human papilloma, (without receivers of the somatostatin) and for the CAPAN them 4 times greater than for the same cells used as negative control, for the case of the {sup 99m

  9. Union of {sup 99m} Tc-HYNIC-TOC at the somatostatin receptors in cells of pancreas cancer; Union del {sup 99m} Tc-HYNIC-TOC a los receptores de somatostatina en celulas de cancer de pancreas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez C, J. [Facultad de Medicina, UAEM, 50000 Toluca, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Ramirez I, M.T. [INCMNSZ, Vasco de Quiroga Num. 15, Tlalpan, 14000 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Ferro F, G.; Pedraza L, M. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2005-07-01

    The radiation toxic effects have been used in therapy however much 50 years. The absorbed radiation dose can be determined at cellular level using cancerous cell cultures. If the deposited In vitro radiation dose coming from similar activities of several therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals it can compare it will be possible to choose the therapeutic radiopharmaceutical that it offers better dosimetric characteristics for the patient. The objective of this original investigation was to determine the union percentage of the octreotide {sup 99m}Tc-HYNlC-TOC to the somatostatin receivers in cells of cancer pancreas as well as the internalization, externalization and cellular viability. It was used the octapeptide, (octreotide, TOC) labelled with {sup 99m}Tc by means of the HYNIC chelating agent (6-hydrazine pyridine-3-carboxylic acid) and 3 cellular lines of murine pancreas cancer (AR42J), of cancer of human pancreas (CAPAN) and of one negative cellular line for somatostatin receivers (WRL-68). The {sup 99m}Tc-HYNIC-TOC was compared against two negative proofs for somatostatin receivers: the peptide {sup 99m}Tc-UBI and the {sup 99m}TcO{sub 4}. The cellular lines were conserved in the synthetic media Dulbecco-Eagle. After 2, 4 and 24 h of exhibition to the radiation, the cells are picked up and its are determined the viability by count in a Neubauer camera using tripan blue. In the same times it was calculated the union percentage of the radiopharmaceutical to the cells and the internalization (union to the cytoplasm) and the externalization (union to membrane receivers). With those figures it was calculated the absorbed radiation dose at cellular level. Results: At 4 hours the union percentage of the {sup 99m}Tc-HYNlC-TOC to the AR42-J cells was 6.83 times greater than for the WRL-68 control cells of human papilloma, (without receivers of the somatostatin) and for the CAPAN them 4 times greater than for the same cells used as negative control, for the case of the {sup 99m

  10. Sensitive radioimmunoassay for somatostatin using N-(/sup 125/I)-tyr-somatostatin as labelled antigen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dupont, A [CHUL, Quebec (Canada). Lab. of Molecular Endocrinology and Service of Gastro-Enterology; Coy, D H; Alvarado-Urbina, G; Cote, J; Meyers, C A; McManus, J; Barden, N; De Lean, A; Labrie, F

    1979-01-01

    A sensitive radioimmunoassay for somatostatin using N-(/sup 125/I)-Tyr-somatostatin is described and compared with using (/sup 125/I)-Tyr/sup 1/-somatostatin. The minimum detectable amount of somatostatin using N-(/sup 125/I)-Tyr-somatostatin as tracer was 0.1 to 0.5 pg, which is approximately 10-fold lower detection limit of the RIA using (/sup 125/I)-Tyr/sup 1/-somatostatin. Moreover, it was found that the shelf-life of N-(/sup 125/I)-Tyr-somatostatin was prolonged in comparison with labelled Tyr/sup 1/-somatostatin. Human pancreatic and gastric extracts displayed immunological similarity to synthetic somatostatin tetradecapeptide.

  11. Concordance between results of somatostatin receptor scintigraphy with {sup 111}In-DOTA-DPhe{sup 1}-Tyr{sup 3}-octreotide and chromogranin A assay in patients with neuroendocrine tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, Margarida [Medical University of Innsbruck, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Innsbruck (Austria); Hietzing Hospital, Institute of Nuclear Medicine, Vienna (Austria); Gabriel, Michael; Heute, Dirk; Putzer, Daniel; Virgolini, Irene [Medical University of Innsbruck, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Innsbruck (Austria); Griesmacher, Andrea [Medical University of Innsbruck, Central Institute of Medical and Chemical Laboratory Diagnostics, Innsbruck (Austria)

    2008-10-15

    Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS) and chromogranin A (CgA) assay have successfully been implemented in the clinical work-up and management of neuroendocrine tumour (NET) patients. However, there is still a lack of studies comparing results in these patients. Our aim was to compare directly in NET patients SRS and CgA assay results with special regard to tumour features such as grade of malignancy, primary origin, disease extent and function. One hundred twenty consecutive patients with histological confirmed NETs were investigated with {sup 111}In-DOTA-DPhe{sup 1}-Tyr{sup 3}-octreotide ({sup 111}In-DOTA-TOC) SRS and CgA immunoradiometric assay. Tumours were classified by cell characteristics [well-differentiated NETs, well-differentiated neuroendocrine carcinomas, poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinomas (PDNECs)], primary origin (foregut, midgut, hindgut, undetermined), disease extent (limited disease, metastases, primary tumour and metastases) and functionality (secretory, nonsecretory). SRS was positive in 107 (89%) patients; CgA levels were increased in 95 (79%) patients. Overall, concordance between SRS and CgA results was found in 84 patients. Positive SRS but normal CgA level were found in 24 patients, with higher prevalence (p<0.05) in patients with nonsecretory tumours. Conversely, negative SRS but CgA level increased were seen in 12 patients, with higher proportion (p < 0.05) in patients with PDNECs and tumours of hindgut origin. Overall, {sup 111}In-DOTA-TOC SRS proved to be more sensitive than CgA in NETs patients. Tumour differentiation, disease extent and presence of liver metastases impact both SRS and CgA results, whereas nonsecretory activity is a negative predictor of only CgA increase. PDNECs and hindgut origin of tumours predispose to discrepancies with negative SRS but increased CgA levels. (orig.)

  12. MTA family of coregulators in nuclear receptor biology and pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manavathi, Bramanandam; Singh, Kamini; Kumar, Rakesh

    2007-01-01

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) rely on coregulators (coactivators and corepressors) to modulate the transcription of target genes. By interacting with nucleosome remodeling complexes, NR coactivators potentiate transcription, whereas corepressors inhibit transcription of the target genes. Metastasis-associated proteins (MTA) represent an emerging family of novel NR coregulators. In general, MTA family members form independent nucleosome remodeling and deacetylation (NuRD) complexes and repress the transcription of different genes by recruiting histone deacetylases onto their target genes. However, MTA1 also acts as a coactivator in a promoter-context dependent manner. Recent findings that repression of estrogen receptor transactivation functions by MTA1, MTA1s, and MTA2 and regulation of MTA3 by estrogen signaling have indicated the significance of these proteins in NR signaling. Here, we highlight the action of MTA proteins on NR signaling and their roles in pathophysiological conditions. PMID:18174918

  13. Evolution of the vertebrate insulin receptor substrate (Irs) gene family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Salam, Ahmad; Irwin, David M

    2017-06-23

    Insulin receptor substrate (Irs) proteins are essential for insulin signaling as they allow downstream effectors to dock with, and be activated by, the insulin receptor. A family of four Irs proteins have been identified in mice, however the gene for one of these, IRS3, has been pseudogenized in humans. While it is known that the Irs gene family originated in vertebrates, it is not known when it originated and which members are most closely related to each other. A better understanding of the evolution of Irs genes and proteins should provide insight into the regulation of metabolism by insulin. Multiple genes for Irs proteins were identified in a wide variety of vertebrate species. Phylogenetic and genomic neighborhood analyses indicate that this gene family originated very early in vertebrae evolution. Most Irs genes were duplicated and retained in fish after the fish-specific genome duplication. Irs genes have been lost of various lineages, including Irs3 in primates and birds and Irs1 in most fish. Irs3 and Irs4 experienced an episode of more rapid protein sequence evolution on the ancestral mammalian lineage. Comparisons of the conservation of the proteins sequences among Irs paralogs show that domains involved in binding to the plasma membrane and insulin receptors are most strongly conserved, while divergence has occurred in sequences involved in interacting with downstream effector proteins. The Irs gene family originated very early in vertebrate evolution, likely through genome duplications, and in parallel with duplications of other components of the insulin signaling pathway, including insulin and the insulin receptor. While the N-terminal sequences of these proteins are conserved among the paralogs, changes in the C-terminal sequences likely allowed changes in biological function.

  14. Trace amine-associated receptor 1-Family archetype or iconoclast?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandy, David K

    2007-12-01

    Interest has recently been rekindled in receptors that are activated by low molecular weight, noncatecholic, biogenic amines that are typically found as trace constituents of various vertebrate and invertebrate tissues and fluids. The timing of this resurgent focus on receptors activated by the "trace amines" (TA) beta-phenylethylamine (PEA), tyramine (TYR), octopamine (OCT), synephrine (SYN), and tryptamine (TRYP) is the direct result of 2 publications that appeared in 2001 describing the cloning of a novel G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) referred to by their discoverers Borowsky et al. as TA1 and Bunzow et al. as TA receptor 1 (TAR1). When heterologously expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes and various eukaryotic cell lines, recombinant rodent and human TAR dose-dependently couple to the stimulation of adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP) production. Structure-activity profiling based on this functional response has revealed that in addition to the TA, other biologically active compounds containing a 2-carbon aliphatic side chain linking an amino group to at least 1 benzene ring are potent and efficacious TA receptor agonists with amphetamine (AMPH), methamphetamine, 3-iodothyronamine, thyronamine, and dopamine (DA) among the most notable. Almost 100 years after the search for TAR began, numerous TA1/TAR1-related sequences, now called TA-associated receptors (TAAR), have been identified in the genome of every species of vertebrate examined to date. Consequently, even though heterologously expressed TAAR1 fits the pharmacological criteria established for a bona fide TAR, a major challenge for those working in the field is to discern the in vivo pharmacology and physiology of each purported member of this extended family of GPCR. Only then will it be possible to establish whether TAAR1 is the family archetype or an iconoclast.

  15. The repertoire of olfactory C family G protein-coupled receptors in zebrafish: candidate chemosensory receptors for amino acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ngai John

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vertebrate odorant receptors comprise at least three types of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs: the OR, V1R, and V2R/V2R-like receptors, the latter group belonging to the C family of GPCRs. These receptor families are thought to receive chemosensory information from a wide spectrum of odorant and pheromonal cues that influence critical animal behaviors such as feeding, reproduction and other social interactions. Results Using genome database mining and other informatics approaches, we identified and characterized the repertoire of 54 intact "V2R-like" olfactory C family GPCRs in the zebrafish. Phylogenetic analysis – which also included a set of 34 C family GPCRs from fugu – places the fish olfactory receptors in three major groups, which are related to but clearly distinct from other C family GPCRs, including the calcium sensing receptor, metabotropic glutamate receptors, GABA-B receptor, T1R taste receptors, and the major group of V2R vomeronasal receptor families. Interestingly, an analysis of sequence conservation and selective pressure in the zebrafish receptors revealed the retention of a conserved sequence motif previously shown to be required for ligand binding in other amino acid receptors. Conclusion Based on our findings, we propose that the repertoire of zebrafish olfactory C family GPCRs has evolved to allow the detection and discrimination of a spectrum of amino acid and/or amino acid-based compounds, which are potent olfactory cues in fish. Furthermore, as the major groups of fish receptors and mammalian V2R receptors appear to have diverged significantly from a common ancestral gene(s, these receptors likely mediate chemosensation of different classes of chemical structures by their respective organisms.

  16. 99mTc-HYNIC-somatostatin analogues for imaging SST receptor positive tumours, preclinical evaluation and comparison with 111In-Octreotide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decristoforo, C.; Melendez-Alafort, L.; Sosabowski, J.K.; Mather, S.J.

    2001-01-01

    HYNIC-TOC and HYNIC-RC-160 were prepared and radiolabelled at high specific activities using tricine, EDDA and tricine/nicotinic acid as co-ligand systems. Radioligand binding assays were performed on membranes prepared from receptor-positive cell lines. Biodistribution and tumour uptake were determined in AR42J tumour bearing nude mice and compared to 99m Tc-MAG-3-RC-160 and 111 In-DTPA-Octreotide. Specific tumour uptake between 2.4 and 9.6%ID/g was found for the 99m Tc labelled HYNIC-conjugates compared to 0.2% for the 99m Tc-MAG-3-RC-160 and 4.3% ID/g for 111 In-DTPA-Octreotide. RC-160 conjugates showed lower tumour uptake and greater hepatobiliary excretion than TOC. Tricine as co-ligand showed higher levels of radioactivity in muscle, blood and liver, while tricine/NA produced significant levels of activity in the GI-tract. EDDA showed the most promising overall biodistribution profile with similar tumour: liver and GI-tract ratios to those obtained with 111 In-DTPA-Octreotide, lower ratios in blood and muscle but considerably higher tumour/kidney ratios. (author)

  17. Breast cancer imaging using radiolabelled somatostatin analogues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalm, Simone U.; Melis, Marleen; Emmering, Jasper; Kwekkeboom, Dik J.; Jong, Marion de

    2016-01-01

    Imaging and therapy using radiolabelled somatostatin analogues are methods successfully used in patients with somatostatin receptor (SSTR)-expressing neuroendocrine tumours. Since these techniques were first introduced, many improvements have been made. SSTR expression has also been reported on breast cancer (BC). Currently mammography, magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound are the most frequent methods used for BC imaging. Since SSTR expression on BC was demonstrated, clinical studies examining the feasibility of visualizing primary BC using SSTR radioligands have been performed. However, to date SSTR-mediated nuclear imaging is not used clinically in BC patients. The aim of this review is to assess whether recent improvements made within nuclear medicine may enable SSTR-mediated imaging to play a role in BC management. For this we critically analysed results of past studies and discussed the potential of the improvements made within nuclear medicine on SSTR-mediated nuclear imaging of BC. Seven databases were searched for publications on BC imaging with SSTR radioligands. The papers found were analysed by 3 individual observers to identify whether the studies met the pre-set inclusion criteria defined as studies in which nuclear imaging using radiolabelled SST analogues was performed in patients with breast lesions. Twenty-four papers were selected for this review including studies on SSTR-mediated nuclear imaging in BC, neuroendocrine BC and other breast lesions. The analysed studies were heterogeneous with respect to the imaging method, imaging protocol, patient groups and the radiolabelled SST analogues used. Despite the fact that the analysed studies were heterogeneous, sensitivity for primary BC ranged from 36–100%. In a subset of the studies LN lesions were visualized, but sensitivity was lower compared to that for primary tumours. A part of the studies included benign lesions and specificity ranged from 22–100%. Furthermore, false negatives and

  18. Improved safety and efficacy of 213Bi-DOTATATE-targeted alpha therapy of somatostatin receptor-expressing neuroendocrine tumors in mice pre-treated with L-lysine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Ho Sze; Konijnenberg, Mark W; Daniels, Tamara; Nysus, Monique; Makvandi, Mehran; de Blois, Erik; Breeman, Wouter A; Atcher, Robert W; de Jong, Marion; Norenberg, Jeffrey P

    2016-12-01

    Targeted alpha therapy (TAT) offers advantages over current β-emitting conjugates for peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) of neuroendocrine tumors. PRRT with 177 Lu-DOTATATE or 90 Y-DOTATOC has shown dose-limiting nephrotoxicity due to radiopeptide retention in the proximal tubules. Pharmacological protection can reduce renal uptake of radiopeptides, e.g., positively charged amino acids, to saturate in the proximal tubules, thereby enabling higher radioactivity to be safely administered. The aim of this preclinical study was to evaluate the therapeutic effect of 213 Bi-DOTATATE with and without renal protection using L-lysine in mice. Tumor uptake and kinetics as a function of injected mass of peptide (range 0.03-3 nmol) were investigated using 111 In-DOTATATE. These results allowed estimation of the mean radiation absorbed tumor dose for 213 Bi-DOTATATE. Pharmacokinetics and dosimetry of 213 Bi-DOTATATE was determined in mice, in combination with renal protection. A dose escalation study with 213 Bi-DOTATATE was performed to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) with and without pre-administration of L-lysine as for renal protection. Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) served as renal biomarker to determine kidney injury. The maximum mean radiation absorbed tumor dose occurred at 0.03 nmol and the minimum at 3 nmol. Similar mean radiation absorbed tumor doses were determined for 0.1 and 0.3 nmol with a mean radiation absorbed dose of approximately 0.5 Gy/MBq 213 Bi-DOTATATE. The optimal mass of injected peptide was found to be 0.3 nmol. Tumor uptake was similar for 111 In-DOTATATE and 213 Bi-DOTATATE at 0.3 nmol peptide. Lysine reduced the renal uptake of 213 Bi-DOTATATE by 50% with no effect on the tumor uptake. The MTD was <13.0 ± 1.6 MBq in absence of L-lysine and 21.7 ± 1.9 MBq with L-lysine renal protection, both imparting an LD 50 mean renal radiation absorbed dose of 20 Gy. A correlation was found between the

  19. Current knowledge on the sensitivity of the {sup 68}Ga-somatostatin receptor positron emission tomography and the SUV{sub max} reference range for management of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Virgolini, Irene; Gabriel, Michael; Kroiss, Alexander; Guggenberg, Elisabeth von; Prommegger, Rupert; Warwitz, Boris; Nilica, Bernhard; Roig, Ilanos Geraldo; Rodrigues, Margarida; Uprimny, Christian [Medical University of Innsbruck, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Innsbruck (Austria)

    2016-10-15

    Physiologically increased pancreatic uptake at the head/uncinate process is observed in more than one-third of patients after injection of one of the three {sup 68}Ga-labelled octreotide-based peptides used for somatostatin (sst) receptor (r) imaging. There are minor differences between these {sup 68}Ga-sstr-binding peptides in the imaging setting. On {sup 68}Ga-sstr-imaging the physiological uptake can be diffuse or focal and usually remains stable over time. Differences in the maximal standardised uptake values (SUV{sub max}) reported for the normal pancreas as well as for pancreatic neuroendocrine tumour (PNET) lesions may be related to several factors, including (a) differences in the peptide binding affinities as well as differences in sstr subtype expression of pancreatic α- and β-cells, and heterogeneity / density of tumour cells, (b) differences in scanner resolution, image reconstruction techniques and acquisition protocols, (c) mostly retrospective study designs, (d) mixed patient populations, or (e) interference with medications such as treatment with long-acting sst analogues. The major limitation in most of the studies lies in the lack of histopathological confirmation of abnormal findings. There is a significant overlap between the calculated SUV{sub max}-values for physiological pancreas and PNET-lesions of the head/uncinate process that do not favour the use of quantitative parameters in the clinical setting. Anecdotal long-term follow-up studies have even indicated that increased uptake in the head/uncinate process still can turn out to be malignant over years of follow up. SUV{sub max}-data for the pancreatic body and tail are limited. Therefore, any visible focal tracer uptake in the pancreas must be considered as suspicious for malignancy irrespective of quantitative parameters. In general, sstr-PET/CT has significant implications for the management of NET patients leading to a change in treatment decision in about one-third of patients

  20. Somatostatin Receptor Scintigraphy in Medullary Thyroid Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Horst-Schrivers, Anouk N. A.; Brouwers, Adrienne; Links, Thera; Hubalewska‐Dydejczyk, Alicja; Signore, Alberto; de Jong, Marion; Dierckx, Rudi A.; Buscombe, John; Van de Wiele, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) is a neuroendocrine tumor originating from the calcitonin‐secreting C cells. Surgery, consisting of a total thyroidectomy and an extensive lymph node dissection, is the only effective treatment in MTC; however, metastases are frequently found in the regional cervical

  1. Common structural basis for constitutive activity of the ghrelin receptor family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Birgitte; Holliday, Nicholas D; Bach, Anders

    2004-01-01

    Three members of the ghrelin receptor family were characterized in parallel: the ghrelin receptor, the neurotensin receptor 2 and the orphan receptor GPR39. In transiently transfected COS-7 and human embryonic kidney 293 cells, all three receptors displayed a high degree of ligand......-independent signaling activity. The structurally homologous motilin receptor served as a constitutively silent control; upon agonist stimulation, however, it signaled with a similar efficacy to the three related receptors. The constitutive activity of the ghrelin receptor and of neurotensin receptor 2 through the G...... demonstrated that the epitope-tagged ghrelin receptor was constitutively internalized but could be trapped at the cell surface by an inverse agonist, whereas GPR39 remained at the cell surface. Mutational analysis showed that the constitutive activity of both the ghrelin receptor and GPR39 could systematically...

  2. Somatostatin in the caudal spinal cord

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, H D

    1984-01-01

    . In all of these regions somatostatin-positive cell bodies were also observed. In the intermediate gray matter stained terminals were present around the central canal in a varying number. The most prominent stainability was found in the lumbosacral transition zone. Many terminals were also observed...... was particularly low in the motoneuron neuropil. However, a dense somatostatin network was found in the sixth lumbar segment in relation to the neurons in Onuf's nucleus X complex, the nucleus that innervates the small pelvic muscles including the striated sphincters. It is concluded that somatostatin, besides...

  3. Purification of family B G protein-coupled receptors using nanodiscs: Application to human glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingying Cai

    Full Text Available Family B G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs play vital roles in hormone-regulated homeostasis. They are drug targets for metabolic diseases, including type 2 diabetes and osteoporosis. Despite their importance, the signaling mechanisms for family B GPCRs at the molecular level remain largely unexplored due to the challenges in purification of functional receptors in sufficient amount for biophysical characterization. Here, we purified the family B GPCR human glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1 receptor (GLP1R, whose agonists, e.g. exendin-4, are used for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. The receptor was expressed in HEK293S GnTl- cells using our recently developed protocol. The protocol incorporates the receptor into the native-like lipid environment of reconstituted high density lipoprotein (rHDL particles, also known as nanodiscs, immediately after the membrane solubilization step followed by chromatographic purification, minimizing detergent contact with the target receptor to reduce denaturation and prolonging stabilization of receptor in lipid bilayers without extra steps of reconstitution. This method yielded purified GLP1R in nanodiscs that could bind to GLP-1 and exendin-4 and activate Gs protein. This nanodisc purification method can potentially be a general strategy to routinely obtain purified family B GPCRs in the 10s of microgram amounts useful for spectroscopic analysis of receptor functions and activation mechanisms.

  4. Purification of family B G protein-coupled receptors using nanodiscs: Application to human glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yingying; Liu, Yuting; Culhane, Kelly J; DeVree, Brian T; Yang, Yang; Sunahara, Roger K; Yan, Elsa C Y

    2017-01-01

    Family B G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) play vital roles in hormone-regulated homeostasis. They are drug targets for metabolic diseases, including type 2 diabetes and osteoporosis. Despite their importance, the signaling mechanisms for family B GPCRs at the molecular level remain largely unexplored due to the challenges in purification of functional receptors in sufficient amount for biophysical characterization. Here, we purified the family B GPCR human glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor (GLP1R), whose agonists, e.g. exendin-4, are used for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. The receptor was expressed in HEK293S GnTl- cells using our recently developed protocol. The protocol incorporates the receptor into the native-like lipid environment of reconstituted high density lipoprotein (rHDL) particles, also known as nanodiscs, immediately after the membrane solubilization step followed by chromatographic purification, minimizing detergent contact with the target receptor to reduce denaturation and prolonging stabilization of receptor in lipid bilayers without extra steps of reconstitution. This method yielded purified GLP1R in nanodiscs that could bind to GLP-1 and exendin-4 and activate Gs protein. This nanodisc purification method can potentially be a general strategy to routinely obtain purified family B GPCRs in the 10s of microgram amounts useful for spectroscopic analysis of receptor functions and activation mechanisms.

  5. Switch from antagonist to agonist after addition of a DOTA chelator to a somatostatin analog

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reubi, Jean Claude; Cescato, Renzo; Waser, Beatrice; Erchegyi, Judit; Rivier, Jean E.

    2010-01-01

    Peptide receptor targeting has become an increasingly attractive method to target tumors diagnostically and radiotherapeutically. Peptides linked to a variety of chelators have been developed for this purpose. They have, however, rarely been tested for their agonistic or antagonistic properties. We report here on a somatostatin antagonist that switched to an agonist upon coupling to a DOTA chelator. Two novel somatostatin analogs, 406-040-15 and its DOTA-coupled counterpart 406-051-20, with and without cold Indium labeling, were tested for their somatostatin receptor subtypes 1-5 (sst 1 -sst 5 ) binding affinity using receptor autoradiography. Moreover, they were tested functionally for their ability to affect sst 2 and sst 3 internalization in vitro in HEK293 cells stably expressing the human sst 2 or sst 3 receptor, using an immunofluorescence microscopy-based internalization assay. All three compounds were characterized as pan-somatostatin analogs having a high affinity for all five sst. In the sst 2 internalization assay, all three compounds showed an identical behavior, namely, a weak agonistic effect complemented by a weak antagonistic effect, compatible with the behavior of a partial agonist. Conversely, in the sst 3 internalization assay, 406-040-15 was a full antagonist whereas its DOTA-coupled counterpart, 406-051-20, with and without Indium labeling, switched to a full agonist. Adding the DOTA chelator to the somatostatin analog 406-040-15 triggers a switch at sst 3 receptor from an antagonist to an agonist. This indicates that potential radioligands for tumor targeting should always be tested functionally before further development, in particular if a chelator is added. (orig.)

  6. Identification of the receptors for somatostatin (SST) and cortistatin (CST) in chickens and investigation of the roles of cSST28, cSST14, and cCST14 in inhibiting cGHRH1-27NH2-induced growth hormone secretion in cultured chicken pituitary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Fengyan; Huang, Guian; Gao, Shunyu; Li, Juan; Yan, Zhenxin; Wang, Yajun

    2014-03-25

    Somatostatin receptors (SSTRs) are proposed to mediate the actions of somatostatin (SST) and its related peptide, cortistatin (CST), in vertebrates. However, the identity, functionality, and tissue expression of these receptors remain largely unknown in most non-mammalian vertebrates including birds. In this study, five SSTRs (named cSSTR1, cSSTR2, cSSTR3, cSSTR4, cSSTR5) were cloned from chicken brain by RT-PCR. Using a pGL3-CRE-luciferase reporter system, we demonstrated that activation of each cSSTR expressed in CHO cells by cSST28, cSST14 and cCST14 treatment could inhibit forskolin-induced luciferase activity of CHO cells, indicating the functional coupling of all cSSTRs to Gi protein(s). Interestingly, cSSTR1-4 expressed in CHO cells could be activated by cSST28, cSST14 and cCST14 with high potencies, suggesting that they may function as the receptors common for these peptides. In contrast, cSSTR5 could be potently activated by cSST28 only, indicating that it is a cSST28-specific receptor. Using RT-PCR, wide expression of cSSTRs was detected in chicken tissues including pituitary. In accordance with their expression in pituitary, cSST28, cSST14, and cCST14 were demonstrated to inhibit basal and novel cGHRH1-27NH2-induced GH secretion in cultured chicken pituitary cells dose-dependently (0-10nM) by Western blot analysis, suggesting the involvement of cSSTR(s) common for these peptides in mediating their inhibitory actions. Collectively, our study establishes a molecular basis to elucidate the roles of SST/CST in birds and provide insights into the roles of SST/CST in vertebrates, such as their conserved actions on pituitary. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Localisation and mechanism of renal retention of radiolabelled somatostatin analogues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melis, Marleen; Krenning, Eric P.; Bernard, Bert F.; Jong, Marion de [Erasmus MC, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Barone, Raffaella [UCL, Centre of Nuclear Medicine and Laboratory of PET, Brussels (Belgium); Visser, Theo J. [Erasmus MC, Department of Internal Medicine, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2005-10-01

    Radiolabelled somatostatin analogues, such as octreotide and octreotate, are used for tumour scintigraphy and radionuclide therapy. The kidney is the most important critical organ during such therapy owing to the reabsorption and retention of radiolabelled peptides. The aim of this study was to investigate in a rat model both the localisation and the mechanism of renal uptake after intravenous injection of radiolabelled somatostatin analogues. The multi-ligand megalin/cubilin receptor complex, responsible for reabsorption of many peptides and proteins in the kidney, is an interesting candidate for renal endocytosis of these peptide analogues. For localisation studies, ex vivo autoradiography and micro-autoradiography of rat kidneys were performed 1-24 h after injection of radiolabelled somatostatin analogues and compared with the renal anti-megalin immunohistochemical staining pattern. To confirm a role of megalin in the mechanism of renal retention of [{sup 111}In-DTPA]octreotide, the effects of three inhibitory substances were explored in rats. Renal ex vivo autoradiography showed high cortical radioactivity and lower radioactivity in the outer medulla. The distribution of cortical radioactivity was inhomogeneous. Micro-autoradiography indicated that radioactivity was only retained in the proximal tubules. The anti-megalin immunohistochemical staining pattern showed a strong similarity with the renal [{sup 111}In-DTPA]octreotide ex vivo autoradiograms. Biodistribution studies showed that co-injection of positively charged d-lysine reduced renal uptake to 60% of control. Sodium maleate reduced renal [{sup 111}In-DTPA]octreotide uptake to 15% of control. Finally, cisplatin pre-treatment of rats reduced kidney uptake to 70% of control. Renal retention of [{sup 111}In-DTPA]octreotide is confined to proximal tubules in the rat kidney, in which megalin-mediated endocytosis may play an important part. (orig.)

  8. Radioimmunoassay of somatostatin: methodological problems and physiological investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penman, E.; Wass, J.A.H.

    1981-01-01

    Somatostatin, a tetradecapeptide, has a wide distribution throughout the central nervous system and the gastrointestinal tract and a broad spectrum of biological actions. In order to investigate its various physiological roles in man, a radioimmunoassay was developed for somatostatin in human blood plasma, which is described here. This RIA was used to investigate possible factors influencing somatostatin secretion. Changes in somatin levels produced by changes in insulin, glucagon and growth hormone levels were studied via the response of plasma immunoreactive somatostatin to hormonal stimuli in normal man. The influence of fasting and food consumption was studied; and the site of origin of circulating immunoreactive somatostatin was investigated in patients. (Auth.)

  9. Radiolabeled somatostatin analog scintigraphy in oncology and immune diseases: an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwekkeboom, D.J.; Krenning, E.P.

    1997-01-01

    [ 111 In-DTPA-D-Phe 1 [-octreotide is a new radiopharmaceutical with a great potential for the visualization of somatostatin receptor-positive tumors, granulomas, and diseases in which activated leukocytes play a role. The overall sensitivity of [ 111 In-DTPA-D-Phe 1 [-octreotide scintigraphy to localize neuroendocrine tumors is high. In several neuroendocrine tumor types, inclusion of somatostatin receptor imaging in the localization or staging procedure may be very rewarding, either in terms of cost-effectiveness, patient management, or quality of life. In our opinion, this holds true for patients with carcinoids, gastrinomas, paragangliomas, small-cell lung carcinoma, and selected cases of patients with insulinomas. The value of [ 111 In-DTPA-D-Phe 1 [-octreotide scintigraphy in patients with other tumors, such as breast cancer, malignant lymphomas, or in patients with granulomatous diseases, has to be established. (orig.). With 4 figs., 1 tab

  10. Uptake kinetics of the somatostatin receptor ligand [86Y]DOTA-dPhe1-Tyr3-octreotide ([86Y]SMT487) using positron emission tomography in non-human primates and calculation of radiation doses of the 90Y-labelled analogue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roesch, F.; Brockmann, J.; Koehle, M.

    1999-01-01

    [ 90 Y]DOTA-dPhe 1 -Tyr 3 -octreotide ([ 90 Y]-SMT487) has been suggested as a promising radiotherapeutic agent for somatostatin receptor-expressing tumours. In order to quantify the in vivo parameters of this compound and the radiation doses delivered to healthy organs, the analogue [ 86 Y]DOTA-dPhe 1 -Tyr 3 -octreotide was synthesised and its uptake measured in baboons using positron emission tomography (PET). [ 86 Y]DOTA-dPhe 1 -Tyr 3 -octreotide was administered at two different peptide concentrations, namely 2 and 100 μg peptide per m 2 body surface. The latter concentration corresponded to a radiotherapeutic dose. In a third protocol [ 86 Y]DOTA-dPhe 1 -Tyr 3 -octreotide was injected in conjunction with a simultaneous infusion of an amino acid solution that was high in l-lysine in order to lower the renal uptake of radioyttrium. Quantitative whole-body PET scans were recorded to measure the uptake kinetics for kidneys, liver, lung and bone. The individual absolute uptake kinetics were used to calculate the radiation doses for [ 90 Y]DOTA-dPhe 1 -Tyr 3 -octreotide according to the MIRD recommendations extrapolated to a 70-kg human. The highest radiation dose was received by the kidneys, with 2.1-3.3 mGy per MBq [ 90 Y]DOTA-dPhe 1 -Tyr 3 -octreotide injected. For the 100 μg/m 2 SMT487 protocol with amino acid co-infusion this dose was about 20%-40% lower than for the other two treatment protocols. The liver and the red bone marrow received doses ranging from 0.32 to 0.53 mGy and 0.03 to 0.07 mGy per MBq [ 90 Y]DOTA-dPhe 1 -Tyr 3 -octreotide, respectively. The average effective dose equivalent amounted to 0.23-0.32 mSv/MBq. The comparatively low estimated radiation doses to normal organs support the initiation of clinical phase I trials with [ 90 Y]DOTA-dPhe 1 -Tyr 3 -octreotide in patients with somatostatin receptor-expressing tumours. (orig.)

  11. Uptake kinetics of the somatostatin receptor ligand [{sup 86}Y]DOTA-dPhe{sup 1}-Tyr{sup 3}-octreotide ([{sup 86}Y]SMT487) using positron emission tomography in non-human primates and calculation of radiation doses of the {sup 90}Y-labelled analogue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roesch, F.; Brockmann, J. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Nuklearchemie; Herzog, H.; Muehlensiepen, H.; Mueller-Gaertner, H.W. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Medizin; Stolz, B.; Marbach, P. [Novartis Pharma AG, Basel (Switzerland); Koehle, M. [Klinikum der Freien Universitaet Berlin (Germany)

    1999-04-29

    [{sup 90}Y]DOTA-dPhe{sup 1}-Tyr{sup 3}-octreotide ([{sup 90}Y]-SMT487) has been suggested as a promising radiotherapeutic agent for somatostatin receptor-expressing tumours. In order to quantify the in vivo parameters of this compound and the radiation doses delivered to healthy organs, the analogue [{sup 86}Y]DOTA-dPhe{sup 1}-Tyr{sup 3}-octreotide was synthesised and its uptake measured in baboons using positron emission tomography (PET). [{sup 86}Y]DOTA-dPhe{sup 1}-Tyr{sup 3}-octreotide was administered at two different peptide concentrations, namely 2 and 100 {mu}g peptide per m{sup 2} body surface. The latter concentration corresponded to a radiotherapeutic dose. In a third protocol [{sup 86}Y]DOTA-dPhe{sup 1}-Tyr{sup 3}-octreotide was injected in conjunction with a simultaneous infusion of an amino acid solution that was high in l-lysine in order to lower the renal uptake of radioyttrium. Quantitative whole-body PET scans were recorded to measure the uptake kinetics for kidneys, liver, lung and bone. The individual absolute uptake kinetics were used to calculate the radiation doses for [{sup 90}Y]DOTA-dPhe{sup 1}-Tyr{sup 3}-octreotide according to the MIRD recommendations extrapolated to a 70-kg human. The highest radiation dose was received by the kidneys, with 2.1-3.3 mGy per MBq [{sup 90}Y]DOTA-dPhe{sup 1}-Tyr{sup 3}-octreotide injected. For the 100 {mu}g/m{sup 2} SMT487 protocol with amino acid co-infusion this dose was about 20%-40% lower than for the other two treatment protocols. The liver and the red bone marrow received doses ranging from 0.32 to 0.53 mGy and 0.03 to 0.07 mGy per MBq [{sup 90}Y]DOTA-dPhe{sup 1}-Tyr{sup 3}-octreotide, respectively. The average effective dose equivalent amounted to 0.23-0.32 mSv/MBq. The comparatively low estimated radiation doses to normal organs support the initiation of clinical phase I trials with [{sup 90}Y]DOTA-dPhe{sup 1}-Tyr{sup 3}-octreotide in patients with somatostatin receptor-expressing tumours. (orig

  12. Theoretical and Computational Studies of Peptides and Receptors of the Insulin Family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harish Vashisth

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Synergistic interactions among peptides and receptors of the insulin family are required for glucose homeostasis, normal cellular growth and development, proliferation, differentiation and other metabolic processes. The peptides of the insulin family are disulfide-linked single or dual-chain proteins, while receptors are ligand-activated transmembrane glycoproteins of the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK superfamily. Binding of ligands to the extracellular domains of receptors is known to initiate signaling via activation of intracellular kinase domains. While the structure of insulin has been known since 1969, recent decades have seen remarkable progress on the structural biology of apo and liganded receptor fragments. Here, we review how this useful structural information (on ligands and receptors has enabled large-scale atomically-resolved simulations to elucidate the conformational dynamics of these biomolecules. Particularly, applications of molecular dynamics (MD and Monte Carlo (MC simulation methods are discussed in various contexts, including studies of isolated ligands, apo-receptors, ligand/receptor complexes and intracellular kinase domains. The review concludes with a brief overview and future outlook for modeling and computational studies in this family of proteins.

  13. Somatostatin analogue scintigraphy and tuberculosis: case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biancheri, I.; Rudenko, B.; Vautrin, P.; Raddoul, J.; Lamfichek, N.; Kantelip, B.; Mantion, G.

    2005-01-01

    Scintigraphy using a radiolabelled somatostatin analogue (111 In-pentetreotide) is useful in the detection of neuroendocrine tumors. But this radiopharmaceutical accumulates also in solid tumours or in inflammatory diseases such as granulomatosis. We present a case of 111 In-pentetreotide uptake in a tuberculous adenopathy. (author)

  14. Molecular evolution of a chordate specific family of G protein-coupled receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leese Florian

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chordate evolution is a history of innovations that is marked by physical and behavioral specializations, which led to the development of a variety of forms from a single ancestral group. Among other important characteristics, vertebrates obtained a well developed brain, anterior sensory structures, a closed circulatory system and gills or lungs as blood oxygenation systems. The duplication of pre-existing genes had profound evolutionary implications for the developmental complexity in vertebrates, since mutations modifying the function of a duplicated protein can lead to novel functions, improving the evolutionary success. Results We analyzed here the evolution of the GPRC5 family of G protein-coupled receptors by comprehensive similarity searches and found that the receptors are only present in chordates and that the size of the receptor family expanded, likely due to genome duplication events in the early history of vertebrate evolution. We propose that a single GPRC5 receptor coding gene originated in a stem chordate ancestor and gave rise by duplication events to a gene family comprising three receptor types (GPRC5A-C in vertebrates, and a fourth homologue present only in mammals (GPRC5D. Additional duplications of GPRC5B and GPRC5C sequences occurred in teleost fishes. The finding that the expression patterns of the receptors are evolutionarily conserved indicates an important biological function of these receptors. Moreover, we found that expression of GPRC5B is regulated by vitamin A in vivo, confirming previous findings that linked receptor expression to retinoic acid levels in tumor cell lines and strengthening the link between the receptor expression and the development of a complex nervous system in chordates, known to be dependent on retinoic acid signaling. Conclusions GPRC5 receptors, a class of G protein-coupled receptors with unique sequence characteristics, may represent a molecular novelty that helped non

  15. Origins of the many NPY-family receptors in mammals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larhammar, D; Wraith, A; Berglund, M M

    2001-01-01

    The NPY system has a multitude of effects and is particularly well known for its role in appetite regulation. We have found that the five presently known receptors in mammals arose very early in vertebrate evolution before the appearance of jawed vertebrates 400 million years ago. The genes Y(1), Y....... These observations pertain to the discussion whether ligands or receptors tend to appear first in evolution. The roles of Y(1) and Y(5) in feeding may differ between species demonstrating the importance of performing functional studies in additional mammals to mouse and rat....

  16. Genetic diversity of bitter taste receptor gene family in Sichuan ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Previous research had revealed that chicken has only three bitter taste receptor genes (Tas2r1, ... Journal of Genetics, DOI 10.1007/s12041-016-0684-4, Vol. ..... between red-winged blackbirds and European starlings. ... Academic Press,.

  17. Multiple kisspeptin receptors in early Osteichthyans provide new insights into the evolution of this receptor family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pasquier, J.; Lafont, A._G.; Jeng, S.-R.

    2012-01-01

    Deorphanization of GPR54 receptor a decade ago led to the characterization of the kisspeptin receptor (Kissr) in mammals and the discovery of its major role in the brain control of reproduction. While a single gene encodes for Kissr in eutherian mammals including human, other vertebrates present ...

  18. ATAR, a novel tumor necrosis factor receptor family member, signals through TRAF2 and TRAF5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, H; Solovyev, I; Colombero, A; Elliott, R; Kelley, M; Boyle, W J

    1997-05-23

    Members of tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) family signal largely through interactions with death domain proteins and TRAF proteins. Here we report the identification of a novel TNFR family member ATAR. Human and mouse ATAR contain 283 and 276 amino acids, respectively, making them the shortest known members of the TNFR superfamily. The receptor is expressed mainly in spleen, thymus, bone marrow, lung, and small intestine. The intracellular domains of human and mouse ATAR share only 25% identity, yet both interact with TRAF5 and TRAF2. This TRAF interaction domain resides at the C-terminal 20 amino acids. Like most other TRAF-interacting receptors, overexpression of ATAR activates the transcription factor NF-kappaB. Co-expression of ATAR with TRAF5, but not TRAF2, results in synergistic activation of NF-kappaB, suggesting potentially different roles for TRAF2 and TRAF5 in post-receptor signaling.

  19. Potentiation of peptide receptor radionuclide therapy by the PARP inhibitor olaparib

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Nonnekens (Julie); M. van Kranenburg (Melissa); C.E.M.T. Beerens (Cecile); M. Suker (Mustafa); M. Doukas (Michael); C.H.J. van Eijck (Casper); M. de Jong (Marcel); D.C. van Gent (Dik)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractMetastases expressing tumor-specific receptors can be targeted and treated by binding of radiolabeled peptides (peptide receptor radionuclide therapy or PRRT). For example, patients with metastasized somatostatin receptor-positive neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) can be treated with

  20. The under-appreciated promiscuity of the epidermal growth factor receptor family.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean P Kennedy

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Each member of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR family plays a key role in normal development, homeostasis and a variety of pathophysiological conditions, most notably in cancer. According to the prevailing dogma, these four receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs; EGFR, ERBB2, ERBB3 and ERBB4 function exclusively through the formation of homodimers and heterodimers within the EGFR family. These combinatorial receptor interactions are known to generate increased interactome diversity and therefore influence signalling output, subcellular localization and function of the heterodimer. This molecular plasticity is also thought to play a role in the development of resistance towards targeted cancer therapies aimed at these known oncogenes. Interestingly, many studies now challenge this dogma and suggest that the potential for EGFR family receptors to interact with more distantly related RTKs is much greater than currently appreciated. Here we discuss how the promiscuity of these oncogenic receptors may lead to the formation of many unexpected receptor pairings and the significant implications for the efficiency of many targeted cancer therapies.

  1. Familial Risk for Major Depression is Associated with Lower Striatal 5-HT4 Receptor Binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Karine; Torstensen, Eva; Holst, Klaus K

    2014-01-01

    was to determine whether familial risk for MDD is associated with cerebral 5-HT4 receptor binding as measured with [(11)C]SB207145 brain PET imaging. Familial risk is the most potent risk factor of MDD. METHODS: We studied 57 healthy individuals (mean age 36 yrs, range 20-86; 21 women), 26 of which had first......-degree relatives treated for MDD. RESULTS: We found that having a family history of MDD was associated with lower striatal 5-HT4 receptor binding (p = 0.038; in individuals below 40 years, p = 0.013). Further, we found evidence for a "risk-dose effect" on 5-HT4 receptor binding, since the number of first......-degree relatives with a history of MDD binding correlated negatively with 5-HT4 receptor binding in both the striatum (p = 0.001) and limbic regions (p = 0.012). CONCLUSIONS: Our data suggest that the 5-HT4 receptor is involved in the neurobiological mechanism underlying familial risk for depression...

  2. Ligand Activation of TAM Family Receptors-Implications for Tumor Biology and Therapeutic Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davra, Viralkumar; Kimani, Stanley G; Calianese, David; Birge, Raymond B

    2016-11-29

    The TAM family of receptors (i.e., Tyro3, Axl, and Mertk), and their ligands Growth arrest specific factor 6 (Gas6) and Protein S (Pros1) contribute to several oncogenic processes, such as cell survival, invasion, migration, chemo-resistance, and metastasis, whereby expression often correlates with poor clinical outcomes. In recent years, there has been great interest in the study of TAM receptors in cancer, stemming both from their roles as oncogenic signaling receptors, as well as their roles in tumor immunology. As a result, several classes of TAM inhibitors that include small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors, monoclonal antibodies, decoy receptors, as well as novel strategies to target TAM ligands are being developed. This paper will review the biology of TAM receptors and their ligands with a focus on cancer, as well as evidence-based data for the continued pursuit of TAM/Gas6 inhibitors in clinical practice.

  3. MRAP and MRAP2 are bidirectional regulators of the melanocortin receptor family

    OpenAIRE

    Chan, Li F.; Webb, Tom R.; Chung, Teng-Teng; Meimaridou, Eirini; Cooray, Sadani N.; Guasti, Leonardo; Chapple, J. Paul; Egertová, Michaela; Elphick, Maurice R.; Cheetham, Michael E.; Metherell, Louise A.; Clark, Adrian J. L.

    2009-01-01

    The melanocortin receptor (MCR) family consists of 5 G protein-coupled receptors (MC1R–MC5R) with diverse physiologic roles. MC2R is a critical component of the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis, whereas MC3R and MC4R have an essential role in energy homeostasis. Mutations in MC4R are the single most common cause of monogenic obesity. Investigating the way in which these receptors signal and traffic to the cell membrane is vital in understanding disease processes related to MCR dysfunction....

  4. Familial defective apolipoprotein B-100: low density lipoproteins with abnormal receptor binding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Innerarity, T.L.; Weisgraber, K.H.; Arnold, K.S.; Mahley, R.W.; Krauss, R.M.; Vega, G.L.; Grundy, S.M.

    1987-01-01

    Previous in vivo turnover studies suggested that retarded clearance of low density lipoproteins (LDL) from the plasma of some hypercholesterolemic patients is due to LDL with defective receptor binding. The present study examined this postulate directly by receptor binding experiments. The LDL from a hypercholesterolemic patient (G.R.) displayed a reduced ability to bind to the LDL receptors on normal human fibroblasts. The G.R. LDL possessed 32% of normal receptor binding activity. Likewise, the G.R. LDL were much less effective than normal LDL in competing with 125 I-labeled normal LDL for cellular uptake and degradation and in stimulating intracellular cholesteryl ester synthesis. The defect in LDL binding appears to be due to a genetic abnormality of apolipoprotein B-100: two brothers of the proband possess LDL defective in receptor binding, whereas a third brother and the proband's son have normally binding LDL. Further, the defect in receptor binding does not appear to be associated wit an abnormal lipid composition or structure of the LDL. Normal and abnormal LDL subpopulations were partially separated from plasma of two subjects by density-gradient ultracentrifugation, a finding consistent with the presence of a normal and a mutant allele. The affected family members appear to be heterozygous for this disorder, which has been designated familial defective apolipoprotein B-100. These studies indicate that the defective receptor binding results in inefficient clearance of LDL and the hypercholesterolemia observed in these patients

  5. Neuro-psychopharmacological perspective of Orphan receptors of Rhodopsin (class A) family of G protein-coupled receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Muhammad Zahid; He, Ling

    2017-04-01

    In the central nervous system (CNS), G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the most fruitful targets for neuropsychopharmacological drug development. Rhodopsin (class A) is the most studied class of GPCR and includes orphan receptors for which the endogenous ligand is not known or is unclear. Characterization of orphan GPCRs has proven to be challenging, and the production pace of GPCR-based drugs has been incredibly slow. Determination of the functions of these receptors may provide unexpected insight into physiological and neuropathological processes. Advances in various methods and techniques to investigate orphan receptors including in situ hybridization and knockdown/knockout (KD/KO) showed extensive expression of these receptors in the mammalian brain and unmasked their physiological and neuropathological roles. Due to these rapid progress and development, orphan GPCRs are rising as a new and promising class of drug targets for neurodegenerative diseases and psychiatric disorders. This review presents a neuropsychopharmacological perspective of 26 orphan receptors of rhodopsin (class A) family, namely GPR3, GPR6, GPR12, GPR17, GPR26, GPR35, GPR39, GPR48, GPR49, GPR50, GPR52, GPR55, GPR61, GPR62, GPR63, GPR68, GPR75, GPR78, GPR83, GPR84, GPR85, GPR88, GPR153, GPR162, GPR171, and TAAR6. We discussed the expression of these receptors in mammalian brain and their physiological roles. Furthermore, we have briefly highlighted their roles in neurodegenerative diseases and psychiatric disorders including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, neuroinflammation, inflammatory pain, bipolar and schizophrenic disorders, epilepsy, anxiety, and depression.

  6. The nuclear receptor gene family in the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas, contains a novel subfamily group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogeler, Susanne; Galloway, Tamara S; Lyons, Brett P; Bean, Tim P

    2014-05-15

    Nuclear receptors are a superfamily of transcription factors important in key biological, developmental and reproductive processes. Several of these receptors are ligand- activated and through their ability to bind endogenous and exogenous ligands, are potentially vulnerable to xenobiotics. Molluscs are key ecological species in defining aquatic and terrestrial habitats and are sensitive to xenobiotic compounds in the environment. However, the understanding of nuclear receptor presence, function and xenobiotic disruption in the phylum Mollusca is limited. Here, forty-three nuclear receptor sequences were mined from the genome of the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas. They include members of NR0-NR5 subfamilies, notably lacking any NR6 members. Phylogenetic analyses of the oyster nuclear receptors have been conducted showing the presence of a large novel subfamily group not previously reported, which is named NR1P. Homologues to all previous identified nuclear receptors in other mollusc species have also been determined including the putative heterodimer partner retinoid X receptor, estrogen receptor and estrogen related receptor. C. gigas contains a highly diverse set of nuclear receptors including a novel NR1 group, which provides important information on presence and evolution of this transcription factor superfamily in invertebrates. The Pacific oyster possesses two members of NR3, the sex steroid hormone receptor analogues, of which there are 9 in humans. This provides increasing evidence that steroid ligand specific expansion of this family is deuterostome specific. This new knowledge on divergence and emergence of nuclear receptors in C. gigas provides essential information for studying regulation of molluscan gene expression and the potential effects of xenobiotics.

  7. Synthesis, radiochemistry and biological evaluation of a new somatostatin analogue (SDZ 219-387) labelled with technetium-99m

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maina, T.; Stolz, B.; Albert, R.; Bruns, C.; Koch, P.; Maecke, H.

    1994-01-01

    A new derivative of octreotide SDZ 219-387 [PnAO-(D)Phe 1 -octreotide] was synthesized, which binds specifically and with high affinity to somatostatin receptors in vitro (pK i =9.79±0.16). This new somatostatin analogue chelates technetium-99m under mild labelling conditions in good yields. The resulting [ 99m Tc]SDZ 219-387 was stable up to 6 h after labelling and could be isolated in a pure radiochemical and chemical form by high-perfomance liquid chromatographic purification. The intravenous administration of purified [ 99m Tc]SDZ 219-387 revealed that the radioligand was rapidly cleared from circulation, and tumour uptake of 0.38% ID/g was observed at 1.5 h post injection. [ 99m Tc]SDZ 219-387 specifically interacted with somatostatin binding sites on the tumour. However, the radioligand is highly lipophilic and excreted mainly through the hepatobiliary system. As a consequence, [ 99m Tc]SDZ 219-387 exhibits increased background activity and therefore is not appropriate for the in vivo visualization of somatostatin receptor-positive tumours and/or their metastases in the abdomen. (orig.)

  8. Molecular cloning, expression, and sequence analysis of GPRC6A, a novel family C G-protein-coupled receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wellendorph, Petrine; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    2004-01-01

    with a significant homology to the human calcium-sensing receptor (CaR, 34% aa sequence identity), the taste receptor 1 (T1R1, 28%), and the metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (mGluR1, 24%), places GPRC6A in family C of the GPCRs. Interestingly, GPRC6A bears the highest resemblance with an odorant goldfish 5...

  9. CRDB: database of chemosensory receptor gene families in vertebrate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Dong

    Full Text Available Chemosensory receptors (CR are crucial for animals to sense the environmental changes and survive on earth. The emergence of whole-genome sequences provides us an opportunity to identify the entire CR gene repertoires. To completely gain more insight into the evolution of CR genes in vertebrates, we identified the nearly all CR genes in 25 vertebrates using homology-based approaches. Among these CR gene repertoires, nearly half of them were identified for the first time in those previously uncharacterized species, such as the guinea pig, giant panda and elephant, etc. Consistent with previous findings, we found that the numbers of CR genes vary extensively among different species, suggesting an extreme form of 'birth-and-death' evolution. For the purpose of facilitating CR gene analysis, we constructed a database with the goals to provide a resource for CR genes annotation and a web tool for exploring their evolutionary patterns. Besides a search engine for the gene extraction from a specific chromosome region, an easy-to-use phylogenetic analysis tool was also provided to facilitate online phylogeny study of CR genes. Our work can provide a rigorous platform for further study on the evolution of CR genes in vertebrates.

  10. Mutations in the nuclear bile acid receptor FXR cause progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Ospina, Natalia; Potter, Carol J.; Xiao, Rui; Manickam, Kandamurugu; Kim, Mi-Sun; Kim, Kang Ho; Shneider, Benjamin L.; Picarsic, Jennifer L.; Jacobson, Theodora A.; Zhang, Jing; He, Weimin; Liu, Pengfei; Knisely, A. S.; Finegold, Milton J.; Muzny, Donna M.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Lupski, James R.; Plon, Sharon E.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Eng, Christine M.; Yang, Yaping; Washington, Gabriel C.; Porteus, Matthew H.; Berquist, William E.; Kambham, Neeraja; Singh, Ravinder J.; Xia, Fan; Enns, Gregory M.; Moore, David D.

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal cholestasis is a potentially life-threatening condition requiring prompt diagnosis. Mutations in several different genes can cause progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis, but known genes cannot account for all familial cases. Here we report four individuals from two unrelated families with neonatal cholestasis and mutations in NR1H4, which encodes the farnesoid X receptor (FXR), a bile acid-activated nuclear hormone receptor that regulates bile acid metabolism. Clinical features of severe, persistent NR1H4-related cholestasis include neonatal onset with rapid progression to end-stage liver disease, vitamin K-independent coagulopathy, low-to-normal serum gamma-glutamyl transferase activity, elevated serum alpha-fetoprotein and undetectable liver bile salt export pump (ABCB11) expression. Our findings demonstrate a pivotal function for FXR in bile acid homeostasis and liver protection. PMID:26888176

  11. Trace Amine-Associated Receptor 1 – Family Archetype or Iconoclast?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandy, David K.

    2009-01-01

    Interest has recently been rekindled in receptors that are activated by low molecular weight, non-catecholic, biogenic amines that are typically found as trace constituents of various vertebrate and invertebrate tissues and fluids. The timing of this resurgent focus on receptors activated by the ‘trace amines’ (TAs) β-phenylethylamine (PEA), tyramine (TYR), octopamine (OCT), synephrine (SYN), and tryptamine (TRYP) is the direct result of two publications that appeared in 2001 describing the cloning of a novel G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) referred to by their discoverers as TA1 (Borowsky et al., 2001) and TAR1 (Bunzow et al., 2001). When heterologously expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes and various eukaryotic cell lines recombinant rodent and human TA receptors dose-dependently couple to the stimulation of cAMP production. Structure-activity profiling based on this functional response has revealed that in addition to the TAs, other biologically active compounds containing a 2 carbon aliphatic side chain linking an amino group to at least one benzene ring are potent and efficacious TA receptor agonists with amphetamine, methamphetamine, 3-iodothyronamine, thyronamine, and dopamine among the most notable. Almost 100 years after the search for TA receptors began numerous TA1/TAR1-related sequences, now called Trace Amine-Associated Receptors (TAARs), have been identified in the genome of every species of vertebrate examined to date. Consequently, even though heterologously expressed TAAR1 fits the pharmacological criteria established for a bona fide TA receptor a major challenge for those working in the field is to discern the in vivo pharmacology and physiology of each purported member of this extended family of GPCRs. Only then will it be possible to establish whether TAAR1 is the family archetype or an iconoclast. PMID:17888514

  12. Mapping of Wnt-Frizzled interactions by multiplex CRISPR targeting of receptor gene families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voloshanenko, Oksana; Gmach, Philipp; Winter, Jan; Kranz, Dominique; Boutros, Michael

    2017-11-01

    Signaling pathway modules are often encoded by several closely related paralogous genes that can have redundant roles and are therefore difficult to analyze by loss-of-function analysis. A typical example is the Wnt signaling pathway, which in mammals is mediated by 19 Wnt ligands that can bind to 10 Frizzled (FZD) receptors. Although significant progress in understanding Wnt-FZD receptor interactions has been made in recent years, tools to generate systematic interaction maps have been largely lacking. Here we generated cell lines with multiplex mutant alleles of FZD1 , FZD2 , and FZD7 and demonstrate that these cells are unresponsive to canonical Wnt ligands. Subsequently, we performed genetic rescue experiments with combinations of FZDs and canonical Wnts to create a functional ligand-receptor interaction map. These experiments showed that whereas several Wnt ligands, such as Wnt3a, induce signaling through a broad spectrum of FZD receptors, others, such as Wnt8a, act through a restricted set of FZD genes. Together, our results map functional interactions of FZDs and 10 Wnt ligands and demonstrate how multiplex targeting by clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/Cas9 can be used to systematically elucidate the functions of multigene families.-Voloshanenko, O., Gmach, P., Winter, J., Kranz, D., Boutros, M. Mapping of Wnt-Frizzled interactions by multiplex CRISPR targeting of receptor gene families. © The Author(s).

  13. Transmembrane signal transduction by peptide hormones via family B G protein-coupled receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly J Culhane

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Although family B G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs contain only 15 members, they play key roles in transmembrane signal transduction of hormones. Family B GPCRs are drug targets for developing therapeutics for diseases ranging from metabolic to neurological disorders. Despite their importance, the molecular mechanism of activation of family B GPCRs remains largely unexplored due to the challenges in expression and purification of functional receptors to the quantity for biophysical characterization. Currently, there is no crystal structure available of a full-length family B GPCR. However, structures of key domains, including the extracellular ligand binding regions and seven-helical transmembrane regions, have been solved by X-ray crystallography and NMR, providing insights into the mechanisms of ligand recognition and selectivity, and helical arrangements within the cell membrane. Moreover, biophysical and biochemical methods have been used to explore functions, key residues for signaling, and the kinetics and dynamics of signaling processes. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the signal transduction mechanism of family B GPCRs at the molecular level and comments on the challenges and outlook for mechanistic studies of family B GPCRs.

  14. Dynamic evolution of toll-like receptor multigene families in echinoderms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine M Buckley

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The genome of the purple sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, was the first to be sequenced from a long-lived large invertebrate. Analysis of this genome uncovered a surprisingly complex immune system in which the moderately sized sets of pattern recognition receptors that form the core of vertebrate innate immunity are encoded in large multigene families. The sea urchin genome contains 253 Toll-like receptor (TLR genes, more than 200 Nod-like receptors and 1095 scavenger receptor cysteine-rich domains, a ten-fold expansion relative to vertebrates. Given their stereotypic structure and simple intron-exon architecture, the TLRs are the most tractable of these families for more detailed analysis. An immune defense role for these receptors is suggested by their sequence diversity and expression in immunologically active tissues, including phagocytes. This complexity of the sea urchin TLR multigene families largely derives from expansions that are independent of those in vertebrates and protostomes, although a small family of TLRs with structure similar to that of Drosophila Toll likely originated in an ancient eumetazoan ancestor. Several other invertebrate deuterostome genomes have been sequenced, including the cephalochordate, Branchiostoma floridae and the sea urchin Lytechinus variegatus, as well as partial sequences from two other sea urchin species. Here, we present an analysis of the invertebrate deuterostome TLRs with emphasis on the echinoderms. Representatives of most of the S. purpuratus TLR subfamilies and homologs of the protostome-like sequences are found in L. variegatus. The phylogeny of these genes within sea urchins highlights lineage-specific expansions at higher resolution than is evident at the phylum level. These analyses identify quickly evolving TLR subfamilies that are likely to have novel functions and other, more stable, subfamilies that may function similarly to those of vertebrates.

  15. Effects of the single and combined treatment with dopamine agonist, somatostatin analog and mTOR inhibitors in a human lung carcinoid cell line: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pivonello, Claudia; Rousaki, Panagoula; Negri, Mariarosaria; Sarnataro, Maddalena; Napolitano, Maria; Marino, Federica Zito; Patalano, Roberta; De Martino, Maria Cristina; Sciammarella, Concetta; Faggiano, Antongiulio; Rocco, Gaetano; Franco, Renato; Kaltsas, Gregory A; Colao, Annamaria; Pivonello, Rosario

    2017-06-01

    Somatostatin analogues and mTOR inhibitors have been used as medical therapy in lung carcinoids with variable results. No data are available on dopamine agonists as treatment for lung carcinoids. The main aim of the current study was to evaluate the effect of the combined treatment of somatostatin analogue octreotide and the dopamine agonist cabergoline with mTOR inhibitors in an in vitro model of typical lung carcinoids: the NCI-H727 cell line. In NCI-H727 cell line, reverse transcriptase-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunofluorescence were assessed to characterize the expression of the somatostatin receptor 2 and 5, dopamine receptor 2 and mTOR pathway components. Fifteen typical lung carcinoids tissue samples have been used for somatostatin receptor 2, dopamine receptor 2, and the main mTOR pathway component p70S6K expression and localization by immunohistochemistry. Cell viability, fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis and western blot have been assessed to test the pharmacological effects of octreotide, cabergoline and mTOR inhibitors, and to evaluate the activation of specific cell signaling pathways in NCI-H727 cell line. NCI-H727 cell line expressed somatostatin receptor 2, somatostatin receptor 5 and dopamine receptor 2 and all mTOR pathway components at messenger and protein levels. Somatostatin receptor 2, dopamine receptor 2, and p70S6K (non phosphorylated and phosphorylated) proteins were expressed in most typical lung carcinoids tissue samples. Octreotide and cabergoline did not reduce cell viability as single agents but, when combined with mTOR inhibitors, they potentiate mTOR inhibitors effect after long-term exposure, reducing Akt and ERK phosphorylation, mTOR escape mechanisms, and increasing the expression DNA-damage-inducible transcript 4, an mTOR suppressor. In conclusion, the single use of octreotide and cabergoline is not sufficient to block cell viability but the combined approach of these agents with mTOR inhibitors

  16. Immuno-reactive somatostatin in the cerebro-spinal fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohler, J.

    1983-01-01

    In the present work the lumbar cerebro-spinal fluid of 178 patients with different neurological affections was examined with the aid of a specific radioimmunoassay for somatostatin. 18 patients without any pathologic neurological findings served as controls. In degenerative diseases of the brain, reduced somatostatin levels in the cerebro-spinal fluid as compared to the controls were measured. In 3 patients with isolated cerebellar atrophy no reduction of the somatostatin content was found; rather the values were highly normal. Huntington-Chorea also is a case apart. In patients with manifest affections, the somatostatin reduction, amounting to 54.6%, was particularly notable as compared to the controls. By contrast, degenerative diseases with predominant medullary and spastic affection are characterized by significantly increased somatostatin levels. Again, in non-spastic patients the values were not significantly different from those of the controls. Patients with inflammations of the brain and meminges as well as with tumors of the nervous system showed somatostatin levels increased by about 60.8% respectively 51.8% as compared to the controls. Epileptic patients normally exhibit a reduced somatostatin level in the cerebro-spinal fluid, but the reduction is not significant. Disseminated encephalomyclitis, whether chromic or acute, is not found to be associated with significant modifications of the somatostatin level in the cerebro-spinal fluid. Strikingly, however, patients in which the disease took a serious or very serious clinical course showed also the lowest somatostatin levels in the cerebro-spinal fluid. In patients exhibiting the roof compression symptom in consequence of a prolapse of the disk, no significant modifications were found. By contrast, in patients with the symptoms of a transverse lesion, significantly increased somatostatin values were measured. (orig./MG) [de

  17. Natural killer cell receptor genes in the family Equidae: not only Ly49.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Futas

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells have important functions in immunity. NK recognition in mammals can be mediated through killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR and/or killer cell lectin-like Ly49 receptors. Genes encoding highly variable NK cell receptors (NKR represent rapidly evolving genomic regions. No single conservative model of NKR genes was observed in mammals. Single-copy low polymorphic NKR genes present in one mammalian species may expand into highly polymorphic multigene families in other species. In contrast to other non-rodent mammals, multiple Ly49-like genes appear to exist in the horse, while no functional KIR genes were observed in this species. In this study, Ly49 and KIR were sought and their evolution was characterized in the entire family Equidae. Genomic sequences retrieved showed the presence of at least five highly conserved polymorphic Ly49 genes in horses, asses and zebras. These findings confirmed that the expansion of Ly49 occurred in the entire family. Several KIR-like sequences were also identified in the genome of Equids. Besides a previously identified non-functional KIR-Immunoglobulin-like transcript fusion gene (KIR-ILTA and two putative pseudogenes, a KIR3DL-like sequence was analyzed. In contrast to previous observations made in the horse, the KIR3DL sequence, genomic organization and mRNA expression suggest that all Equids might produce a functional KIR receptor protein molecule with a single non-mutated immune tyrosine-based inhibition motif (ITIM domain. No evidence for positive selection in the KIR3DL gene was found. Phylogenetic analysis including rhinoceros and tapir genomic DNA and deduced amino acid KIR-related sequences showed differences between families and even between species within the order Perissodactyla. The results suggest that the order Perissodactyla and its family Equidae with expanded Ly49 genes and with a potentially functional KIR gene may represent an interesting model for

  18. Natural Killer Cell Receptor Genes in the Family Equidae: Not only Ly49

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futas, Jan; Horin, Petr

    2013-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells have important functions in immunity. NK recognition in mammals can be mediated through killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) and/or killer cell lectin-like Ly49 receptors. Genes encoding highly variable NK cell receptors (NKR) represent rapidly evolving genomic regions. No single conservative model of NKR genes was observed in mammals. Single-copy low polymorphic NKR genes present in one mammalian species may expand into highly polymorphic multigene families in other species. In contrast to other non-rodent mammals, multiple Ly49-like genes appear to exist in the horse, while no functional KIR genes were observed in this species. In this study, Ly49 and KIR were sought and their evolution was characterized in the entire family Equidae. Genomic sequences retrieved showed the presence of at least five highly conserved polymorphic Ly49 genes in horses, asses and zebras. These findings confirmed that the expansion of Ly49 occurred in the entire family. Several KIR-like sequences were also identified in the genome of Equids. Besides a previously identified non-functional KIR-Immunoglobulin-like transcript fusion gene (KIR-ILTA) and two putative pseudogenes, a KIR3DL-like sequence was analyzed. In contrast to previous observations made in the horse, the KIR3DL sequence, genomic organization and mRNA expression suggest that all Equids might produce a functional KIR receptor protein molecule with a single non-mutated immune tyrosine-based inhibition motif (ITIM) domain. No evidence for positive selection in the KIR3DL gene was found. Phylogenetic analysis including rhinoceros and tapir genomic DNA and deduced amino acid KIR-related sequences showed differences between families and even between species within the order Perissodactyla. The results suggest that the order Perissodactyla and its family Equidae with expanded Ly49 genes and with a potentially functional KIR gene may represent an interesting model for evolutionary biology of

  19. Transcription control and neuronal differentiation by agents that activate the LXR nuclear receptor family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, A; Vogel, R; Holloway, M K; Rutledge, S J; Friedman, O; Yang, Z; Rodan, G A; Friedman, E

    1999-09-10

    LXR and PPAR receptors belong to the nuclear receptor superfamily of transcriptional activating factors. Using ligand-dependent transcription assays, we found that 5-tetradecyloxy-2-furancarboxylic acid (TOFA) transactivates chimeric receptors composed of the glucocorticoid receptor DNA binding domain and the ligand binding regions of PPARalpha, PPARbeta (NUC-1) and LXRbeta (NER) receptors. In the same assays, ligands for PPARs (oleic acid, WY-14643 and L-631,033) and LXRs (hydroxycholesterols) maintain their respective receptor selectivity. TOFA and hydroxycholesterols also stimulate transcription from a minimal fibrinogen promoter that is under the control of AP-1 or NF-kappaB transcription factor binding sites. In addition to their effects on transcription, these LXRbeta activators induce neuronal differentiation in rat pheochromocytoma cells. TOFA and the natural LXR agonist, 22 (R)-hydroxycholesterol, stimulate neurite outgrowth in 55 and 28% of cells, respectively. No neurite outgrowth was induced by the related 22(S)-hydroxycholesterol, which does not activate the LXR family. These results suggest that the hydroxycholesterol signaling pathway has a complex effect on transcription that mediates the activity of TOFA and hydroxycholesterol on neuronal differentiation in pheochromocytoma cells.

  20. Novel skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor mutation in a large Brazilian family with malignant hyperthermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWilliams, S; Nelson, T; Sudo, R T; Zapata-Sudo, G; Batti, M; Sambuughin, N

    2002-07-01

    Malignant hyperthermia (MH) is an autosomal dominant disorder that predisposes susceptible individuals to a potentially life-threatening crisis when exposed to commonly used anesthetics. Mutations in the skeletal muscle calcium release channel, ryanodine receptor (RYR1) are associated with MH in over 50% of affected families. Linkage analysis of the RYR1 gene region at 19q13 was performed in a large Brazilian family and a distinct disease co-segregating haplotype was revealed in the majority of members with diagnosis of MH. Subsequent sequencing of RYR1 mutational hot spots revealed a nucleotide substitution of C to T at position 7062, causing a novel amino acid change from Arg2355 to Cys associated with MH in the family. Haplotype analysis of the RYR1 gene area at 19q13 in the family with multiple MH members is an important tool in identification of genetic cause underlying this disease.

  1. The Role of Nuclear Receptor-Binding SET Domain Family Histone Lysine Methyltransferases in Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Richard L; Swaroop, Alok; Troche, Catalina; Licht, Jonathan D

    2017-06-01

    The nuclear receptor-binding SET Domain (NSD) family of histone H3 lysine 36 methyltransferases is comprised of NSD1, NSD2 (MMSET/WHSC1), and NSD3 (WHSC1L1). These enzymes recognize and catalyze methylation of histone lysine marks to regulate chromatin integrity and gene expression. The growing number of reports demonstrating that alterations or translocations of these genes fundamentally affect cell growth and differentiation leading to developmental defects illustrates the importance of this family. In addition, overexpression, gain of function somatic mutations, and translocations of NSDs are associated with human cancer and can trigger cellular transformation in model systems. Here we review the functions of NSD family members and the accumulating evidence that these proteins play key roles in tumorigenesis. Because epigenetic therapy is an important emerging anticancer strategy, understanding the function of NSD family members may lead to the development of novel therapies. Copyright © 2017 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  2. Somatostatin-Immunoreactive Pancreaticoduodenal Neuroendocrine Neoplasms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelund Luna, Iben; Monrad, Nina; Binderup, Tina

    2016-01-01

    , and biochemical features as well as treatment and prognosis. DESIGN: Twenty-three patients with p-dSOM (9 duodenal, 12 pancreatic, 2 unknown primary tumour) were identified from our prospective neuroendocrine tumour (NET) database, and data according to the study aims were recorded. RESULTS: Of the 9 patients...... with duodenal SOM the m/f ratio was 4/5. All males and one female had NF-1. Seven patients had stage 1A-B and 2 had stage 2B disease. The Ki-67 index was 1-5% (median 2%). Plasma somatostatin was elevated in patients with 2B disease. Of the 14 patients with pancreatic SOM or unknown primary tumour the m/f ratio...... was 2/12. One male had MEN-1. Five had stage 1A-2B and nine had stage 4. The Ki-67 index was 1-40% (median 7%). Plasma somatostatin was elevated in seven patients. Patients reported symptoms related to the somatostatinoma syndrome, but none fulfilled the criteria for a full syndrome. Primary tumour...

  3. A survey of the pyrabactin resistance-like abscisic acid receptor gene family in poplar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jingling; Li, Hejuan; Peng, Yajing; Yang, Lei; Zhao, Fugeng; Luan, Sheng; Lan, Wenzhi

    2017-08-03

    The conserved PYR/PYL/RCAR family acts as abscisic acid (ABA) receptors for land plants to adapt to terrestrial environments. Our recent study reported that the exogenous overexpression of poplar PtPYRL1 and PtPYRL5, the PYR/PYL/RCAR orthologs, promoted the sensitivity of transgenic Arabidopsis to ABA responses. Here, we surveyed the PtPYRL family in poplar, and revealed that although the sequence and structure are relatively conserved among these receptors, PtPYRL members have differential expression patterns and the sensitivity to ABA or drought treatment, suggesting that PtPYRLs might be good candidates to a future biotechnological use to enhance poplar resistance to water-stress environments.

  4. Does somatostatin have a role in the regulation of cortisol secretion in primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease (PPNAD)? A clinical and in vitro investigation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Z. Bram (Zakariae); P. Xekouki (Paraskevi); E. Louiset (Estelle); M. Keil (Mark); D. Avgeropoulos (Dimitrios); C. Giatzakis (Christoforos); M. Nesterova (Maria); N. Sinaii (Ninet); L.J. Hofland (Leo); R. Cherqaoui (Rabia); H. Lefebvre (Hervé); C.A. Stratakis (Constantine)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractContext: Somatostatin (SST) receptors (SSTRs) are expressed in a number of tissues, including the adrenal cortex, but their role in cortisol secretion has not been well characterized. Objectives: The objective of the study was to investigate the expression of SSTRs in the adrenal cortex

  5. The D1 family dopamine receptor, DopR, potentiates hind leg grooming behavior in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitmon, E; Stephens, G; Parkhurst, S J; Wolf, F W; Kehne, G; Taylor, M; Lebestky, T

    2016-03-01

    Drosophila groom away debris and pathogens from the body using their legs in a stereotyped sequence of innate motor behaviors. Here, we investigated one aspect of the grooming repertoire by characterizing the D1 family dopamine receptor, DopR. Removal of DopR results in decreased hind leg grooming, as substantiated by quantitation of dye remaining on mutant and RNAi animals vs. controls and direct scoring of behavioral events. These data are also supported by pharmacological results that D1 receptor agonists fail to potentiate grooming behaviors in headless DopR flies. DopR protein is broadly expressed in the neuropil of the thoracic ganglion and overlaps with TH-positive dopaminergic neurons. Broad neuronal expression of dopamine receptor in mutant animals restored normal grooming behaviors. These data provide evidence for the role of DopR in potentiating hind leg grooming behaviors in the thoracic ganglion of adult Drosophila. This is a remarkable juxtaposition to the considerable role of D1 family dopamine receptors in rodent grooming, and future investigations of evolutionary relationships of circuitry may be warranted. © 2016 The Authors. Genes, Brain and Behavior published by International Behavioural and Neural Genetics Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. The role of somatostatin in GLP-1-induced inhibition of glucagon secretion in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørgaard, Anne; Holst, Jens J

    2017-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists are currently used for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Their main mechanism of action is enhancement of glucose-induced insulin secretion (from increased beta cell glucose sensitivity) and inhibition of glucagon secretion...... on glucagon secretion is heavily debated. Glucagon inhibition is also said to be glucose-dependent, although it is unclear what is meant by this. We hypothesise here that GLP-1 does not inhibit glucagon secretion during hypoglycaemia because the inhibition depends on somatostatin secretion, which in turn...

  7. Calcitonin gene-related peptide and somatostatin releases correlated with the area under the lafutidine concentration-time curve in human plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikawa, K; Shimatani, T; Azuma, Y; Inoue, M; Morikawa, N

    2006-08-01

    To examine the effects of the histamine H(2)-receptor antagonist, lafutidine, at clinical dosage (10 mg tablet after a standardized meal) on plasma levels of the gastrointestinal peptides, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), somatostatin and gastrin. Six healthy male volunteers ate a standardized meal, and received either lafutidine orally at a dose of 10 mg or water only (control). Blood samples were taken before and up to 4 h after the drug administration. Plasma lafutidine concentrations were determined by high pressure liquid chromatography. Pharmacokinetic analysis of lafutidine was performed using one-compartmental model. The levels of immunoreactive substances of plasma CGRP, somatostatin and gastrin were measured by enzyme immunoassay, and the amount of peptide release was calculated by the trapezoidal method. Lafutidine significantly increased plasma CGRP levels at 1, 1.5, 2.5 and 4 h and the total amount of CGRP release (192 +/- 14.0 pg.h/mL) compared with the control group (128 +/- 21.5 pg.h/mL). Lafutidine significantly increased the plasma somatostatin levels at 1 and 1.5 h, and the total amount of somatostatin released (107 +/- 18.2 pg.h/mL) compared with the control (78.4 +/- 7.70 pg.h/mL). The area under the drug concentration-time curve (AUC) from 0 to 4 h after administration correlated well with the Delta-CGRP and Delta-somatostatin release but not with total amount of gastrin released. However, plasma gastrin levels were significantly elevated at 1.5 h after drug administration. Lafutidine at clinical dosage increases plasma CGRP and the somatostatin. The amounts released correlated with the AUC of lafutidine in humans. These results suggest that the increased release of CGRP and somatostatin may contribute to its gastroprotective and anti-acid secretory effect.

  8. Cysteamine induces cholecystokinin release from the duodenum. Evidence for somatostatin as an inhibitory paracrine regulator of cholecystokinin secretion in the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abucham, J.; Reichlin, S.

    1990-01-01

    To determine whether cholecystokinin secretion is regulated by endogenous somatostatin, somatostatin deficiency was induced in vivo with cysteamine (250 mg/kg body wt, IV) or anti-somatostatin antiserum in anaesthetized rats and in vitro with cysteamine (30 micrograms/mL) in a rat duodenum-incubation system. Cholecystokinin secretion was assessed in vivo by measuring amylase in duodenal perfusates collected at 10-minute intervals for 1 hour and in vitro by a carboxy-terminal radioimmunoassay. Cysteamine induced a marked decrease in duodenal immunoreactive somatostatin both in vivo (50%) and in vitro (60%). The rate of amylase secretion increased from 9.7 +/- 2.1 U (mean +/- SE) to 28.0 +/- 4.8 U at 20 minutes (P less than 0.001). The cholecystokinin-receptor antagonist CR-1392 abolished amylase response for 30 minutes, whereas the more potent antagonists Asperlicin (18.0 mg/kg body wt, IV) and L-364,718 (0.25 mg/kg body wt, IV) caused prolonged blockade. The rate of amylase secretion in gastrectomized animals increased from 7.2 +/- 2.0 U to 15.0 +/- 2.2 U 20 minutes after cysteamine administration (P less than 0.01), indicating that the effect was not due to the presence of gastrin. In vitro, cysteamine caused a nearly fourfold increase in cholecystokinin secretion compared with controls (63.1 +/- 4.9 vs. 15.2 +/- 3.7, respectively; P less than 0.001). In vivo immunoneutralization of circulating somatostatin with a high-affinity and high-capacity antiserum produced no significant change in the rate of amylase secretion. These results suggest that cholecystokinin secretion is tonically inhibited by somatostatin and that this effect is mediated by locally secreted (paracrine) but not by circulating somatostatin

  9. Demonstration of functional low-density lipoprotein receptors by protein blotting in fibroblasts from a subject with homozygous receptor-negative familial hypercholesterolemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semenkovich, C.F.; Ostlund, R.E. Jr.; Yang, J.; Reaban, M.E.

    1985-01-01

    We report the detection of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptors by the technique of receptor blotting in fibroblasts from a patient with homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (FHC) previously classified as ''receptor negative.'' Solubilized receptors were electrophoresed, transferred to nitrocellulose paper, treated with LDL followed by radiolabeled antibody to LDL, and visualized by autoradiography. GM 2000 FHC fibroblasts revealed LDL receptors with an apparent molecular weight of approximately 140,000, the same as in normal cells. LDL receptor activity by blotting in GM 2000 cells was greatly diminished in comparison with normal cells, but was calcium dependent. Receptor activity was also detectable by conventional monolayer binding and degradation assays. Thus, GM 2000 cells have profoundly diminished LDL receptor activity, but retain the genetic capacity to make LDL receptor material of normal molecular weight that is capable of binding LDL. Previous studies have demonstrated the presence of trace amounts of immunoreactive LDL receptor protein in fibroblasts from some receptor-negative FHC homozygotes. These studies are extended by demonstrating the ability of this material to bind LDL

  10. Complex Determinants in Specific Members of the Mannose Receptor Family Govern Collagen Endocytosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jürgensen, Henrik J; Johansson, Kristina; Madsen, Daniel H

    2014-01-01

    Members of the well-conserved mannose receptor (MR) protein family have been functionally implicated in diverse biological and pathological processes. Importantly, a proposed common function is the internalization of collagen for intracellular degradation occurring during bone development, cancer...... invasion, and fibrosis protection. This functional relationship is suggested by a common endocytic capability and a candidate collagen-binding domain. Here we conducted a comparative investigation of each member's ability to facilitate intracellular collagen degradation. As expected, the family members u......PARAP/Endo180 and MR bound collagens in a purified system and internalized collagens for degradation in cellular settings. In contrast, the remaining family members, PLA2R and DEC-205, showed no collagen binding activity and were unable to mediate collagen internalization. To pinpoint the structural elements...

  11. The relaxin family peptide receptors and their ligands : new developments and paradigms in the evolution from jawless fish to mammals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yegorov, Sergey; Bogerd, Jan; Good, Sara V

    2014-01-01

    Relaxin family peptide receptors (Rxfps) and their ligands, relaxin (Rln) and insulin-like (Insl) peptides, are broadly implicated in the regulation of reproductive and neuroendocrine processes in mammals. Most placental mammals harbour genes for four receptors, namely rxfp1, rxfp2, rxfp3 and rxfp4.

  12. Study of somatostatin in simple obesity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdel-Hafez, M A; El-Ghazaly, S; El-Feky, N A; Sayed, S N [Cairo Univ. (Egypt)

    1990-02-01

    C-peptide, as a marker for pancreatic beta cells function, and somatostatin (SS) in plasma of obese males (n = 15) and a corresponding normal weight control subjects (n = 10) are studied. Fasting plasma SS and serum C-peptide are significantly higher in obese vs lean group. This can be explained by hypertrophy of both D- and B-cells of the pancreatic islets reported by other investigators. Post-prandial plasma SS is insignificantly increased in obese vs the control group whereas the increase in C-peptide levels is significant suggesting unequal response of B- and D-cells to meal in the obese group. It is concluded that circulating SS may play an important role in the development if obesity. Hyperinsulinaemia documented in obesity may be due to hypersecretion of insulin. That may contribute to increased somatomedin-C in obesity. (author).

  13. Study of somatostatin in simple obesity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Hafez, M.A.; El-Ghazaly, S.; El-Feky, N.A.; Sayed, S.N.

    1990-01-01

    C-peptide, as a marker for pancreatic beta cells function, and somatostatin (SS) in plasma of obese males (n = 15) and a corresponding normal weight control subjects (n = 10) are studied. Fasting plasma SS and serum C-peptide are significantly higher in obese vs lean group. This can be explained by hypertrophy of both D- and B-cells of the pancreatic islets reported by other investigators. Post-prandial plasma SS is insignificantly increased in obese vs the control group whereas the increase in C-peptide levels is significant suggesting unequal response of B- and D-cells to meal in the obese group. It is concluded that circulating SS may play an important role in the development if obesity. Hyperinsulinaemia documented in obesity may be due to hypersecretion of insulin. That may contribute to increased somatomedin-C in obesity. (author)

  14. Preclinical evaluation of somatostatin analogs bearing two macrocyclic chelators for high specific activity labeling with radiometals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Storch, D.; Schmitt, J.S.; Waldherr, C.; Maecke, H.R.; Waser, B.; Reubi, J.C.

    2007-01-01

    Radiometallated analogues of the regulatory peptide somatostatin are of interest in the in vivo localization and targeted radiotherapy of somatostatin receptor-overexpressing tumors. An important aspect of their use in vivo is a fast and efficient labeling (complexation) protocol for radiometals along with a high specific activity. We describe in this manuscript synthetic methods for the coupling of two chelators (1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid = DOTA) to the bioactive peptide [Tyr 3 ,Thr 8 ]-octreotide (TATE) in order to increase the specific activity (radioactivity in Bq per mole peptide). The full chelator-linker-peptide conjugate was assembled on solid support using standard Fmoc chemistry. Two DOTA-chelators were linked to the peptide using lysine or N,N'-bis(3-aminopropyl)-glycine (Apg); in addition, pentasarcosine (Sar 5 ) was used as a spacer between the chelators and the peptide to probe its influence on biology and pharmacology. Complexation rates with In 3+ and Y 3+ salts and the corresponding radiometals were high, the bis-DOTA-derivatives showed higher complexation rates and gave higher specific activity than DOTA-TATE. Pharmacological and biological data of the complexed molecules did not show significant differences if compared to the parent peptide [ 111/nat In-DOTA]-TATE except for [( 111/nat In-DOTA) 2 -Apg]-TATE which showed a lower binding affinity and rate of internalization into tumor cells. The biodistribution of [( 111/nat In-DOTA)-Lys( 111/nat In-DOTA)]-TATE in the rat tumor model (AR4-2J) showed a high and specific (as shown by a blocking experiment) tracer uptake in somatostatin receptor-positive tissue but a lower tumor uptake compared to [ 111/nat In-DOTA]-TATE. (orig.)

  15. Using paleogenomics to study the evolution of gene families: origin and duplication history of the relaxin family hormones and their receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey Yegorov

    Full Text Available Recent progress in the analysis of whole genome sequencing data has resulted in the emergence of paleogenomics, a field devoted to the reconstruction of ancestral genomes. Ancestral karyotype reconstructions have been used primarily to illustrate the dynamic nature of genome evolution. In this paper, we demonstrate how they can also be used to study individual gene families by examining the evolutionary history of relaxin hormones (RLN/INSL and relaxin family peptide receptors (RXFP. Relaxin family hormones are members of the insulin superfamily, and are implicated in the regulation of a variety of primarily reproductive and neuroendocrine processes. Their receptors are G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR's and include members of two distinct evolutionary groups, an unusual characteristic. Although several studies have tried to elucidate the origins of the relaxin peptide family, the evolutionary origin of their receptors and the mechanisms driving the diversification of the RLN/INSL-RXFP signaling systems in non-placental vertebrates has remained elusive. Here we show that the numerous vertebrate RLN/INSL and RXFP genes are products of an ancestral receptor-ligand system that originally consisted of three genes, two of which apparently trace their origins to invertebrates. Subsequently, diversification of the system was driven primarily by whole genome duplications (WGD, 2R and 3R followed by almost complete retention of the ligand duplicates in most vertebrates but massive loss of receptor genes in tetrapods. Interestingly, the majority of 3R duplicates retained in teleosts are potentially involved in neuroendocrine regulation. Furthermore, we infer that the ancestral AncRxfp3/4 receptor may have been syntenically linked to the AncRln-like ligand in the pre-2R genome, and show that syntenic linkages among ligands and receptors have changed dynamically in different lineages. This study ultimately shows the broad utility, with some caveats, of

  16. The role of TAM family receptors and ligands in the nervous system: From development to pathobiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafit-Zagardo, Bridget; Gruber, Ross C; DuBois, Juwen C

    2018-03-04

    Tyro3, Axl, and Mertk, referred to as the TAM family of receptor tyrosine kinases, are instrumental in maintaining cell survival and homeostasis in mammals. TAM receptors interact with multiple signaling molecules to regulate cell migration, survival, phagocytosis and clearance of metabolic products and cell debris called efferocytosis. The TAMs also function as rheostats to reduce the expression of proinflammatory molecules and prevent autoimmunity. All three TAM receptors are activated in a concentration-dependent manner by the vitamin K-dependent growth arrest-specific protein 6 (Gas6). Gas6 and the TAMs are abundantly expressed in the nervous system. Gas6, secreted by neurons and endothelial cells, is the sole ligand for Axl. ProteinS1 (ProS1), another vitamin K-dependent protein functions mainly as an anti-coagulant, and independent of this function can activate Tyro3 and Mertk, but not Axl. This review will focus on the role of the TAM receptors and their ligands in the nervous system. We highlight studies that explore the function of TAM signaling in myelination, the visual cortex, neural cancers, and multiple sclerosis (MS) using Gas6 -/- and TAM mutant mice models. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. The TIM and TAM families of phosphatidylserine receptors mediate dengue virus entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meertens, Laurent; Carnec, Xavier; Lecoin, Manuel Perera; Ramdasi, Rasika; Guivel-Benhassine, Florence; Lew, Erin; Lemke, Greg; Schwartz, Olivier; Amara, Ali

    2012-10-18

    Dengue viruses (DVs) are responsible for the most medically relevant arboviral diseases. However, the molecular interactions mediating DV entry are poorly understood. We determined that TIM and TAM proteins, two receptor families that mediate the phosphatidylserine (PtdSer)-dependent phagocytic removal of apoptotic cells, serve as DV entry factors. Cells poorly susceptible to DV are robustly infected after ectopic expression of TIM or TAM receptors. Conversely, DV infection of susceptible cells is inhibited by anti-TIM or anti-TAM antibodies or knockdown of TIM and TAM expression. TIM receptors facilitate DV entry by directly interacting with virion-associated PtdSer. TAM-mediated infection relies on indirect DV recognition, in which the TAM ligand Gas6 acts as a bridging molecule by binding to PtdSer within the virion. This dual mode of virus recognition by TIM and TAM receptors reveals how DVs usurp the apoptotic cell clearance pathway for infectious entry. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Experience with indium-111 and yttrium-90-labeled somatostatin analogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virgolini, I; Traub, T; Novotny, C; Leimer, M; Füger, B; Li, S R; Patri, P; Pangerl, T; Angelberger, P; Raderer, M; Burggasser, G; Andreae, F; Kurtaran, A; Dudczak, R

    2002-01-01

    The high level expression of somatostatin receptors (SSTR) on various tumor cells has provided the molecular basis for successful use of radiolabeled octreotide / lanreotide analogs as tumor tracers in nuclear medicine. Other (nontumoral) potential indications for SSTR scintigraphy are based on an increased lymphocyte binding at sites of inflammatory or immunologic diseases such as thyroid-associated ophthalmology. The vast majority of human tumors seem to over-express the one or the other of five distinct hSSTR subtype receptors. Whereas neuroendocrine tumors frequently overexpress hSSTR2, intestinal adenocarcinomas seem to overexpress more often hSSTR3 or hSSTR4, or both of these hSSTR. In contrast to In-DTPA-DPhe(1)-octreotide (OctreoScan(R)) which binds to hSSTR2 and 5 with high affinity (Kd 0.1-5 nM), to hSSTR3 with moderate affinity (K(d) 10-100 nM) and does not bind to hSSTR1 and hSSTR4, (111)In / (90)Y-DOTA-lanreotide was found to bind to hSSTR2, 3, 4, and 5 with high affinity, and to hSSTR1 with lower affinity (K(d) 200 nM). Based on its unique hSSTR binding profile, (111)In-DOTA-lanreotide was suggested to be a potential radioligand for tumor diagnosis, and (90)Y-DOTA-lanreotide suitable for receptor-mediated radionuclide therapy. As opposed to (111)In-DTPA-DPhe(1)-octreotide and (111)In-DOTA-DPhe(1)-Tyr(3)-octreotide, discrepancies in the scintigraphic results were seen in about one third of (neuroendocrine) tumor patients concerning both the tumor uptake as well as detection of tumor lesions. On a molecular level, these discrepancies seem to be based on a "higherrdquuo; high-affinity binding of (111)In-DOTA-DPhe(1)-Tyr(3)-octreotide to hSSTR2 (K(d) 0.1-1 nM). Other somatostatin analogs with divergent affinity to the five known hSSTR subtype receptors have also found their way into the clinics, such as (99m)Tc-depreotide (NeoSpect(R); NeoTect(R)). Most of the imaging results are reported for neuroendocrine tumors (octreotide analogs) or nonsmall cell

  19. Are radiogallium-labelled DOTA-conjugated somatostatin analogues superior to those labelled with other radiometals?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antunes, P.; Ginj, M.; Zhang, H.; Maecke, H. [University Hospital Basel, Division of Radiological Chemistry, Basel (Switzerland); Waser, B.; Reubi, J.C. [University of Bern, Institute of Pathology, Bern (Switzerland); Baum, R.P. [Zentralklinik Bad Berka, Department of Nuclear Medicine/PETCT-Center, Bad Berka (Germany)

    2007-07-15

    Gallium-68 is a metallic positron emitter with a half-life of 68 min that is ideal for the in vivo use of small molecules, such as [{sup 68}Ga-DOTA,Tyr{sup 3}]octreotide, in the diagnostic imaging of somatostatin receptor-positive tumours. In preclinical studies it has shown a striking superiority over its {sup 111}In-labelled congener. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether third-generation somatostatin-based, radiogallium-labelled peptides show the same superiority. Peptides were synthesised on solid phase. The receptor affinity was determined by in vitro receptor autoradiography. The internalisation rate was studied in AR4-2J and hsst-HEK-transfected cell lines. The pharmacokinetics was studied in a rat xenograft tumour model, AR4-2J. All peptides showed high affinities on hsst2, with the highest affinity for the Ga{sup III}-complexed peptides. On hsst3 the situation was reversed, with a trend towards lower affinity of the Ga{sup III} peptides. A significantly increased internalisation rate was found in sst2-expressing cells for all {sup 67}Ga-labelled peptides. Internalisation into HEK-sst3 was usually faster for the {sup 111}In-labelled peptides. No internalisation was found into sst5. Biodistribution studies employing [{sup 67}Ga-DOTA,1-Nal{sup 3}]octreotide in comparison to [{sup 111}In-DOTA,1-Nal{sup 3}]octreotide and [{sup 67}Ga-DOTA,Tyr{sup 3}]octreotide showed a significantly higher and receptor-mediated uptake of the two{sup 67}Ga-labelled peptides in the tumour and somatostatin receptor-positive tissues. A patient study illustrated the potential advantage of a broad receptor subtype profile radiopeptide over a high-affinity sst2-selective radiopeptide. This study demonstrates that {sup 67/68}Ga-DOTA-octapeptides show distinctly better preclinical, pharmacological performances than the {sup 111}In-labelled peptides, especially on sst2-expressing cells and the corresponding animal models. They may be excellent candidates for further

  20. Are radiogallium-labelled DOTA-conjugated somatostatin analogues superior to those labelled with other radiometals?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antunes, P.; Ginj, M.; Zhang, H.; Maecke, H.; Waser, B.; Reubi, J.C.; Baum, R.P.

    2007-01-01

    Gallium-68 is a metallic positron emitter with a half-life of 68 min that is ideal for the in vivo use of small molecules, such as [ 68 Ga-DOTA,Tyr 3 ]octreotide, in the diagnostic imaging of somatostatin receptor-positive tumours. In preclinical studies it has shown a striking superiority over its 111 In-labelled congener. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether third-generation somatostatin-based, radiogallium-labelled peptides show the same superiority. Peptides were synthesised on solid phase. The receptor affinity was determined by in vitro receptor autoradiography. The internalisation rate was studied in AR4-2J and hsst-HEK-transfected cell lines. The pharmacokinetics was studied in a rat xenograft tumour model, AR4-2J. All peptides showed high affinities on hsst2, with the highest affinity for the Ga III -complexed peptides. On hsst3 the situation was reversed, with a trend towards lower affinity of the Ga III peptides. A significantly increased internalisation rate was found in sst2-expressing cells for all 67 Ga-labelled peptides. Internalisation into HEK-sst3 was usually faster for the 111 In-labelled peptides. No internalisation was found into sst5. Biodistribution studies employing [ 67 Ga-DOTA,1-Nal 3 ]octreotide in comparison to [ 111 In-DOTA,1-Nal 3 ]octreotide and [ 67 Ga-DOTA,Tyr 3 ]octreotide showed a significantly higher and receptor-mediated uptake of the two 67 Ga-labelled peptides in the tumour and somatostatin receptor-positive tissues. A patient study illustrated the potential advantage of a broad receptor subtype profile radiopeptide over a high-affinity sst2-selective radiopeptide. This study demonstrates that 67/68 Ga-DOTA-octapeptides show distinctly better preclinical, pharmacological performances than the 111 In-labelled peptides, especially on sst2-expressing cells and the corresponding animal models. They may be excellent candidates for further development for clinical studies. (orig.)

  1. Familial Risk for Major Depression is Associated with Lower Striatal 5-HT4 Receptor Binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Karine; Torstensen, Eva; Holst, Klaus Kähler

    2015-01-01

    was to determine whether familial risk for MDD is associated with cerebral 5-HT4 receptor binding as measured with [(11)C]SB207145 brain PET imaging. Familial risk is the most potent risk factor of MDD. METHODS: We studied 57 healthy individuals (mean age 36 yrs, range 20-86; 21 women), 26 of which had first...

  2. Working memory span capacity improved by a D2 but not D1 receptor family agonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarantino, Isadore S; Sharp, Richard F; Geyer, Mark A; Meves, Jessica M; Young, Jared W

    2011-06-01

    Patients with schizophrenia exhibit poor working memory (WM). Although several subcomponents of WM can be measured, evidence suggests the primary subcomponent affected in schizophrenia is span capacity (WMC). Indeed, the NIMH-funded MATRICS initiative recommended assaying the WMC when assessing the efficacy of a putative therapeutic for FDA approval. Although dopamine D1 receptor agonists improve delay-dependent memory in animals, evidence for improvements in WMC due to dopamine D1 receptor activation is limited. In contrast, the dopamine D2-family agonist bromocriptine improves WMC in humans. The radial arm maze (RAM) can be used to assess WMC, although complications due to ceiling effects or strategy confounds have limited its use. We describe a 12-arm RAM protocol designed to assess whether the dopamine D1-family agonist SKF 38393 (0, 1, 3, and 10 mg/kg) or bromocriptine (0, 1, 3, and 10 mg/kg) could improve WMC in C57BL/6N mice (n=12) in cross-over designs. WMC increased and strategy usage decreased with training. The dopamine D1 agonist SKF 38393 had no effect on WMC or long-term memory. Bromocriptine decreased WMC errors, without affecting long-term memory, consistent with human studies. These data confirm that WMC can be measured in mice and reveal drug effects that are consistent with reported effects in humans. Future research is warranted to identify the subtype of the D2-family of receptors responsible for the observed improvement in WMC. Finally, this RAM procedure may prove useful in developing animal models of deficient WMC to further assess putative treatments for the cognitive deficits in schizophrenia. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Three family members with elevated plasma cobalamin, transcobalamin and soluble transcobalamin receptor (sCD320)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann-Lücke, Elke; Arendt, Johan F B; Nissen, Peter H

    2013-01-01

    deficiency were found. DNA sequencing of the TCN2 gene revealed several known polymorphisms not associated with highly elevated transcobalamin levels. Upon gel filtration, sCD320 eluted as a larger molecule than previously reported. By incubation with anti-transcobalamin antibodies, we precipitated both...... transcobalamin and part of sCD320. CONCLUSIONS: The high cobalamin levels were mainly explained by high levels of holoTC, possibly caused by complex formation with its soluble receptor, sCD320. The family occurrence points to a genetic explanation....

  4. [Coactivators in energy metabolism: peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator 1 family].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rui; Chang, Yong-sheng; Fang, Fu-de

    2009-12-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1 (PGC1) family is highly expressed in tissues with high energy metabolism. They coactivate transcription factors in regulating genes engaged in processes such as gluconeogenesis, adipose beta-oxydation, lipoprotein synthesis and secretion, mitochondrial biogenesis, and oxidative metabolism. Protein conformation studies demonstrated that they lack DNA binding domains and act as coactivators through physical interaction with transcription factors. PGC1 activity is regulated at transcription level or by multiple covalent chemical modifications such as phosphorylation, methylation and acetylation/deacetylation. Abnormal expression of PGC1 coactivators usually is closely correlated with diseases such as diabetes, obesity, hyperglycemia, hyperlipemia, and arterial and brain neuron necrosis diseases.

  5. Cross-talk between the NR3B and NR4A families of orphan nuclear receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lammi, Johanna; Rajalin, Ann-Marie; Huppunen, Johanna; Aarnisalo, Piia

    2007-01-01

    Estrogen-related receptors (NR3B family) and Nurr1, NGFI-B, and Nor1 (NR4A family) are orphan nuclear receptors lacking identified natural ligands. The mechanisms regulating their transcriptional activities have remained elusive. We have previously observed that the members of NR3B and NR4A families are coexpressed in certain cell types such as osteoblasts and that the ability of Nurr1 to transactivate the osteopontin promoter is repressed by ERRs. We have now studied the cross-talk between NR3B and NR4A receptors. We show that NR3B and NR4A receptors mutually repress each others' transcriptional activity. The repression involves intact DNA-binding domains and dimerization interfaces but does not result from competition for DNA binding or from heterodimerization. The activation functions of NR3B and NR4A receptors are dispensable for the cross-talk. In conclusion, we report that cross-talk between NR3B and NR4A receptors is a mechanism modulating the transcriptional activities of these orphan nuclear receptors

  6. International Union of Pharmacology. LXXXIX. Update on the Extended Family of Chemokine Receptors and Introducing a New Nomenclature for Atypical Chemokine Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachelerie, Francoise; Ben-Baruch, Adit; Burkhardt, Amanda M.; Combadiere, Christophe; Farber, Joshua M.; Graham, Gerard J.; Horuk, Richard; Sparre-Ulrich, Alexander Hovard; Locati, Massimo; Luster, Andrew D.; Mantovani, Alberto; Matsushima, Kouji; Nibbs, Robert; Nomiyama, Hisayuki; Power, Christine A.; Proudfoot, Amanda E. I.; Rosenkilde, Mette M.; Rot, Antal; Sozzani, Silvano; Thelen, Marcus; Yoshie, Osamu; Zlotnik, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Sixteen years ago, the Nomenclature Committee of the International Union of Pharmacology approved a system for naming human seven-transmembrane (7TM) G protein-coupled chemokine receptors, the large family of leukocyte chemoattractant receptors that regulates immune system development and function, in large part by mediating leukocyte trafficking. This was announced in Pharmacological Reviews in a major overview of the first decade of research in this field [Murphy PM, Baggiolini M, Charo IF, Hébert CA, Horuk R, Matsushima K, Miller LH, Oppenheim JJ, and Power CA (2000) Pharmacol Rev 52:145–176]. Since then, several new receptors have been discovered, and major advances have been made for the others in many areas, including structural biology, signal transduction mechanisms, biology, and pharmacology. New and diverse roles have been identified in infection, immunity, inflammation, development, cancer, and other areas. The first two drugs acting at chemokine receptors have been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), maraviroc targeting CCR5 in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/AIDS, and plerixafor targeting CXCR4 for stem cell mobilization for transplantation in cancer, and other candidates are now undergoing pivotal clinical trials for diverse disease indications. In addition, a subfamily of atypical chemokine receptors has emerged that may signal through arrestins instead of G proteins to act as chemokine scavengers, and many microbial and invertebrate G protein-coupled chemokine receptors and soluble chemokine-binding proteins have been described. Here, we review this extended family of chemokine receptors and chemokine-binding proteins at the basic, translational, and clinical levels, including an update on drug development. We also introduce a new nomenclature for atypical chemokine receptors with the stem ACKR (atypical chemokine receptor) approved by the Nomenclature Committee of the International Union of Pharmacology and the Human

  7. Nuclear functions and subcellular trafficking mechanisms of the epidermal growth factor receptor family

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that various diseases, including many types of cancer, result from alteration of subcellular protein localization and compartmentalization. Therefore, it is worthwhile to expand our knowledge in subcellular trafficking of proteins, such as epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and ErbB-2 of the receptor tyrosine kinases, which are highly expressed and activated in human malignancies and frequently correlated with poor prognosis. The well-characterized trafficking of cell surface EGFR is routed, via endocytosis and endosomal sorting, to either the lysosomes for degradation or back to the plasma membrane for recycling. A novel nuclear mode of EGFR signaling pathway has been gradually deciphered in which EGFR is shuttled from the cell surface to the nucleus after endocytosis, and there, it acts as a transcriptional regulator, transmits signals, and is involved in multiple biological functions, including cell proliferation, tumor progression, DNA repair and replication, and chemo- and radio-resistance. Internalized EGFR can also be transported from the cell surface to several intracellular compartments, such as the Golgi apparatus, the endoplasmic reticulum, and the mitochondria, in addition to the nucleus. In this review, we will summarize the functions of nuclear EGFR family and the potential pathways by which EGFR is trafficked from the cell surface to a variety of cellular organelles. A better understanding of the molecular mechanism of EGFR trafficking will shed light on both the receptor biology and potential therapeutic targets of anti-EGFR therapies for clinical application. PMID:22520625

  8. Clinical experience in the screening and management of a large kindred with familial isolated pituitary adenoma due to an aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting protein (AIP) mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Fred; Hunter, Steven; Bradley, Lisa; Chahal, Harvinder S; Storr, Helen L; Akker, Scott A; Kumar, Ajith V; Orme, Stephen M; Evanson, Jane; Abid, Noina; Morrison, Patrick J; Korbonits, Márta; Atkinson, A Brew

    2014-04-01

    Germline AIP mutations usually cause young-onset acromegaly with low penetrance in a subset of familial isolated pituitary adenoma families. We describe our experience with a large family with R304* AIP mutation and discuss some of the diagnostic dilemmas and management issues. The aim of the study was to identify and screen mutation carriers in the family. Forty-three family members participated in the study. The study was performed in university hospitals. We conducted genetic and endocrine screening of family members. We identified 18 carriers of the R304* mutation, three family members with an AIP-variant A299V, and two family members who harbored both changes. One of the two index cases presented with gigantism and pituitary apoplexy, the other presented with young-onset acromegaly, and both had surgery and radiotherapy. After genetic and clinical screening of the family, two R304* carriers were diagnosed with acromegaly. They underwent transsphenoidal surgery after a short period of somatostatin analog treatment. One of these two patients is in remission; the other achieved successful pregnancy despite suboptimal control of acromegaly. One of the A299V carrier family members was previously diagnosed with a microprolactinoma; we consider this case to be a phenocopy. Height of the unaffected R304* carrier family members is not different compared to noncarrier relatives. Families with AIP mutations present particular problems such as the occurrence of large invasive tumors, poor response to medical treatment, difficulties with fertility and management of pregnancy, and the finding of AIP sequence variants of unknown significance. Because disease mostly develops at a younger age and penetrance is low, the timing and duration of the follow-up of carriers without overt disease requires further study. The psychological and financial impact of prolonged clinical screening must be considered. Excellent relationships between the family, endocrinologists, and

  9. Somatostatin receptors and their ligands in the human immune system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V.A.S.H. Dalm (Virgil)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractMaintenance of homeostasis is essential for survival of the mammalian organism. For a long time it was believed that the different systems in the human body act independently from each other to achieve this goal. However, during the last decades it has become more evident that the

  10. PET tracers for somatostatin receptor imaging of neuroendocrine tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnbeck, Camilla Bardram; Knigge, Ulrich; Kjær, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors have shown rising incidence mainly due to higher clinical awareness and better diagnostic tools over the last 30 years. Functional imaging of neuroendocrine tumors with PET tracers is an evolving field that is continuously refining the affinity of new tracers in the search...... these PET tracers further....

  11. [The scintigraphy of somatostatin receptors in the carcinoid tumor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banzo, J; Abós, M D; Prats, E; Delgado , M; Razola, P; García, S; Gomollón, F; García, F

    2001-02-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the diagnostic utility of 111In-DTPA-D-Phe1-octreotide scintigraphy in the different situations that can be present when an examination is requested during the clinical course of the carcinoid tumor (CT). We have performed 41 scintigraphies with 111In-octreotide (145-185 MBq) in 35 patients (19 females and 16 males) with clinically suspected or confirmed CT. The patients were classified into five groups: Group A: Indolent symptoms of CT (n=9); B: CT staging located in lung (n=4), stomach (n=2), cecum (n=1), thymus (n=1) and pancreas (n=1); C: Carcinoid syndrome (n=1); D: CT staging after surgery located in pancreas (n=1), ovary (n=1), cecum (n=1), stomach (n=1), appendix (n=1) and ileum (n=1); and E: Post-treatment follow-up (n=13), with CT located in bronchial tree (n=5), small intestine (n=3), appendix (n=2), thymus (n=1), ovary (n=1) and unknown primary tumor (n=1). Three patients of this group had one scintigraphic study before the treatment. Head and neck, thorax and abdomen images were obtained at 4 and 24 h in all of the patients and SPECT images of the abdomen (n=14), thorax (n=10), and brain (n=1) were obtained at 24 h in 25 patients. Group A: In the 3 patients with a positive scintigraphy, the definitive diagnosis was meningioma, Hurtle cell's carcinoma and lung adenocarcinoma. The clinical follow-up in the six other patients, at least during one year, did not show any evidence of CT. Group B: Six of the 9 CT were detected with the scintigraphy. In 2 cases of bronchial CT, the scan showed sarcoidotic regional lymph node involvement and CT hepatic and bone metastases, respectively. Group C: The scintigraphy detected hepatic metastases from an unknown primary tumor. Group D: The scintigraphy was positive in 3 cases (hepatic or/and abdominal metastases) and was normal in the other 3. The scintigraphy was negative in one patient with peritoneal metastases. Group E: The scintigraphy was normal in 7 patients in concordance with the clinical follow-up. In 3 patients with a scintigraphy performed prior to treatment, the scintigraphy detected recurrence (thymic CT), progression of the metastatic disease (ovarian CT) and partial regression of the hepatic metastases (carcinoid syndrome). In the three other patients, the scintigraphy showed metastases located in liver in one patient and hepatic and extra-hepatic metastases in the two other patients. The sensitivity and specificity of 111In-Octreotide in the detection of the primary tumor and metastases were 72% and 84% respectively. The 111In-Octreotide scintigraphy has a low diagnostic utility in patients with indolent symptoms of CT. However, it is the first line of diagnosis for the staging of the CT and to evaluate the follow up after therapy.

  12. Polymorphisms of the low-density lipoprotein receptor gene in Brazilian individuals with heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.A. Salazar

    2000-11-01

    Full Text Available Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH is a metabolic disorder inherited as an autosomal dominant trait characterized by an increased plasma low-density lipoprotein (LDL level. The disease is caused by several different mutations in the LDL receptor gene. Although early identification of individuals carrying the defective gene could be useful in reducing the risk of atherosclerosis and myocardial infarction, the techniques available for determining the number of the functional LDL receptor molecules are difficult to carry out and expensive. Polymorphisms associated with this gene may be used for unequivocal diagnosis of FH in several populations. The aim of our study was to evaluate the genotype distribution and relative allele frequencies of three polymorphisms of the LDL receptor gene, HincII1773 (exon 12, AvaII (exon 13 and PvuII (intron 15, in 50 unrelated Brazilian individuals with a diagnosis of heterozygous FH and in 130 normolipidemic controls. Genomic DNA was extracted from blood leukocytes by a modified salting-out method. The polymorphisms were detected by PCR-RFLP. The FH subjects showed a higher frequency of A+A+ (AvaII, H+H+ (HincII1773 and P1P1 (PvuII homozygous genotypes when compared to the control group (P<0.05. In addition, FH probands presented a high frequency of A+ (0.58, H+ (0.61 and P1 (0.78 alleles when compared to normolipidemic individuals (0.45, 0.45 and 0.64, respectively. The strong association observed between these alleles and FH suggests that AvaII, HincII1773 and PvuII polymorphisms could be useful to monitor the inheritance of FH in Brazilian families.

  13. Receptor Activity-modifying Protein-directed G Protein Signaling Specificity for the Calcitonin Gene-related Peptide Family of Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weston, Cathryn; Winfield, Ian; Harris, Matthew; Hodgson, Rose; Shah, Archna; Dowell, Simon J; Mobarec, Juan Carlos; Woodlock, David A; Reynolds, Christopher A; Poyner, David R; Watkins, Harriet A; Ladds, Graham

    2016-10-14

    The calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) family of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is formed through the association of the calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR) and one of three receptor activity-modifying proteins (RAMPs). Binding of one of the three peptide ligands, CGRP, adrenomedullin (AM), and intermedin/adrenomedullin 2 (AM2), is well known to result in a Gα s -mediated increase in cAMP. Here we used modified yeast strains that couple receptor activation to cell growth, via chimeric yeast/Gα subunits, and HEK-293 cells to characterize the effect of different RAMP and ligand combinations on this pathway. We not only demonstrate functional couplings to both Gα s and Gα q but also identify a Gα i component to CLR signaling in both yeast and HEK-293 cells, which is absent in HEK-293S cells. We show that the CGRP family of receptors displays both ligand- and RAMP-dependent signaling bias among the Gα s , Gα i , and Gα q/11 pathways. The results are discussed in the context of RAMP interactions probed through molecular modeling and molecular dynamics simulations of the RAMP-GPCR-G protein complexes. This study further highlights the importance of RAMPs to CLR pharmacology and to bias in general, as well as identifying the importance of choosing an appropriate model system for the study of GPCR pharmacology. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. Somatostatin analogues labelled with 99mTc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obenaus, E.; Crudo, J.; Edreira, M.; Viaggi, M.; De Castiglia, S.G.

    2001-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to study the biological and radiochemical behaviour of two somatostatin analogues, the RC-160 and Tyr3Octreotide(TOC) peptides when labelling with 99m Tc by two methods: direct and indirect using S-benzoyl- mercaptoacetyl triglycine (MAG-3) and hydrazinonicotinamide (HYNIC) as chelating agents. RC-160 was labelled with 125I (30% labelling yield) in order to examine its receptor specificity and to study the biodistribution in normal animals. A total binding of 30% and a non specific binding lower than 10% was obtained. On the other hand, the RC-160 was labelled with 99m Tc by a direct method (70% labelling yield), using sodium ascorbate and dithionite in order to reduce the peptide and 99m Tc, respectively. The synthesis of RC-160 with S-benzoyl MAG-3 and TOC with HYNIC, for labelling with 99m Tc are also described. The conjugates were prepared on a small scale and labelled with the radionuclide using tricine as co-ligands for HYNIC conjugates. Chromatographic studies were performed using HPLC system and radiochemical purities higher than 75% and 95% were obtained respectively. Biodistributions studies in normal Wistar rats were performed and results were correlated with chromatographic and protein binding properties. Lower lipophilicity of the labelled conjugates resulted in a higher renal excretion. HYNIC-TOC complex showed promising results when labelling with 99m Tc using tricine as co-ligand although higher stability should be found for ternary co-ligands compared to tricine. (author)

  15. Basal Forebrain Gating by Somatostatin Neurons Drives Prefrontal Cortical Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa, Nelson; Alonso, Alejandra; Morales, Cristian; Espinosa, Pedro; Chávez, Andrés E; Fuentealba, Pablo

    2017-11-17

    The basal forebrain provides modulatory input to the cortex regulating brain states and cognitive processing. Somatostatin-expressing neurons constitute a heterogeneous GABAergic population known to functionally inhibit basal forebrain cortically projecting cells thus favoring sleep and cortical synchronization. However, it remains unclear if somatostatin cells can regulate population activity patterns in the basal forebrain and modulate cortical dynamics. Here, we demonstrate that somatostatin neurons regulate the corticopetal synaptic output of the basal forebrain impinging on cortical activity and behavior. Optogenetic inactivation of somatostatin neurons in vivo rapidly modified neural activity in the basal forebrain, with the consequent enhancement and desynchronization of activity in the prefrontal cortex, reflected in both neuronal spiking and network oscillations. Cortical activation was partially dependent on cholinergic transmission, suppressing slow waves and potentiating gamma oscillations. In addition, recruitment dynamics was cell type-specific, with interneurons showing similar temporal profiles, but stronger responses than pyramidal cells. Finally, optogenetic stimulation of quiescent animals during resting periods prompted locomotor activity, suggesting generalized cortical activation and increased arousal. Altogether, we provide physiological and behavioral evidence indicating that somatostatin neurons are pivotal in gating the synaptic output of the basal forebrain, thus indirectly controlling cortical operations via both cholinergic and non-cholinergic mechanisms. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Deficiencies in fat-soluble vitamins in long-term users of somatostatin analogue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fiebrich, H. -B.; van den Berg, G.; Kema, I. P.; Links, T. P.; Kleibeuker, J. H.; van Beek, A. P.; Walenkamp, A. M. E.; Sluiter, W. J.; de Vries, E. G. E.

    2010-01-01

    P>Background Somatostatin analogues are administered to control hormone hypersecretion in acromegaly and carcinoid patients. Somatostatin analogues can increase fat in the stools, which can lead to loss of fat-soluble vitamins. The effect of long-term somatostatin analogue use on vitamin levels

  17. Diet-Induced Growth Is Regulated via Acquired Leptin Resistance and Engages a Pomc-Somatostatin-Growth Hormone Circuit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heiko Löhr

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Anorexigenic pro-opiomelanocortin (Pomc/alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (αMSH neurons of the hypothalamic melanocortin system function as key regulators of energy homeostasis, also controlling somatic growth across different species. However, the mechanisms of melanocortin-dependent growth control still remain ill-defined. Here, we reveal a thus-far-unrecognized structural and functional connection between Pomc neurons and the somatotropic hypothalamo-pituitary axis. Excessive feeding of larval zebrafish causes leptin resistance and reduced levels of the hypothalamic satiety mediator pomca. In turn, this leads to reduced activation of hypophysiotropic somatostatin (Sst-neurons that express the melanocortin receptor Mc4r, elevated growth hormone (GH expression in the pituitary, and enhanced somatic growth. Mc4r expression and αMSH responsiveness are conserved in Sst-expressing hypothalamic neurons of mice. Thus, acquired leptin resistance and attenuation of pomca transcription in response to excessive caloric intake may represent an ancient mechanism to promote somatic growth when food resources are plentiful. : The melanocortin system controls energy homeostasis and somatic growth, but the underlying mechanisms are elusive. Löhr et al. identify a functional neural circuit in which Pomc neurons stimulate hypothalamic somatostatin neurons, thereby inhibiting hypophyseal growth hormone production. Excessive feeding and acquired leptin resistance attenuate this pathway, allowing faster somatic growth when food resources are rich. Keywords: Pomc neuron, somatostatin neuron, somatic growth, growth hormone, melanocortin system, high-fat diet, obesity, leptin resistance, zebrafish, mouse

  18. Technetium-99m somatostatin analogues: effect of labelling methods and peptide sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decristoforo, C.; Mather, S.J.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper the preclinical evaluation of the somatostatin analogue RC160 labelled with technetium-99m using bifunctional chelators (BFCs) based on the hydrazinonicotinamide (HYNIC) and N 3 S system is described and a comparison made with [Tyr 3 ]-octreotide (TOC). Conjugates of both peptides with HYNIC, and of RC160 with benzoyl-MAG 3 and an N 3 S-adipate derivative were prepared and radiolabelling performed at high specific activities using tricine, tricine/nicotinic acid and ethylenediamine-N,N'-diacetic adic (EDDA) as co-ligands for HYNIC conjugates. All conjugates and 99m Tc-labelled peptides showed preserved binding affinity for the somatostatin receptor (IC50, Kd 99m Tc-RC160 derivatives compared with 99m Tc-EDDA/HYNIC-[Tyr 3 ]-octreotide (0.2%-3.5%ID/g vs 9.7%ID/g) and correlated well with the reduced internalisation rate for RC160 derivatives. Our results show that the selection of the labelling approach as well as the right choice of the peptide structure are crucial for labelling peptides with 99m Tc to achieve complexes with favourable biodistribution. Despite the relatively low tumour uptake compared with 99m Tc-EDDA/HYNIC-[Tyr 3 ]-octreotide, 99m Tc-RC160 could play a role in imaging tumours that do not bind octreotide derivatives. (orig.)

  19. Familial risks and estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer in Hong Kong Chinese women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lap Ah Tse

    Full Text Available The role of family history to the risk of breast cancer was analyzed by incorporating menopausal status in Hong Kong Chinese women, with a particular respect to the estrogen receptor-positive (ER+ type.Seven hundred and forty seven breast cancer incident cases and 781 hospital controls who had completed information on family cancer history in first-degree relatives (nature father, mother, and siblings were recruited. Odds ratio for breast cancer were calculated by unconditional multiple logistic regression, stratified by menopausal status (a surrogate of endogenous female sex hormone level and age and type of relative affected with the disease. Further subgroup analysis by tumor type according to ER status was investigated.Altogether 52 (6.96% breast cancer cases and 23 (2.95% controls was found that the patients' one or more first-degree relatives had a history of breast cancer, showing an adjusted odds ratio (OR of 2.41 (95%CI: 1.45-4.02. An excess risk of breast cancer was restricted to the ER+ tumor (OR = 2.43, 95% CI: 1.38-4.28, with a relatively higher risk associated with an affected mother (OR = 3.97, 95%CI: 1.46-10.79 than an affected sister (OR = 2.06, 95%CI: 1.07-3.97, while the relative risk was more prominent in the subgroup of pre-menopausal women. Compared with the breast cancer overall, the familial risks to the ER+ tumor increased progressively with the number of affected first-degree relatives.This study provides new insights on a relationship between family breast cancer history, menopausal status, and the ER+ breast cancer. A separate risk prediction model for ER+ tumor in Asian population is desired.

  20. Familial risks and estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer in Hong Kong Chinese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Lap Ah; Li, Mengjie; Chan, Wing-cheong; Kwok, Chi-hei; Leung, Siu-lan; Wu, Cherry; Yu, Ignatius Tak-sun; Yu, Wai-cho; Lao, Xiangqian; Wang, Xiaorong; Wong, Carmen Ka-man; Lee, Priscilla Ming-yi; Wang, Feng; Yang, Xiaohong Rose

    2015-01-01

    The role of family history to the risk of breast cancer was analyzed by incorporating menopausal status in Hong Kong Chinese women, with a particular respect to the estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) type. Seven hundred and forty seven breast cancer incident cases and 781 hospital controls who had completed information on family cancer history in first-degree relatives (nature father, mother, and siblings) were recruited. Odds ratio for breast cancer were calculated by unconditional multiple logistic regression, stratified by menopausal status (a surrogate of endogenous female sex hormone level and age) and type of relative affected with the disease. Further subgroup analysis by tumor type according to ER status was investigated. Altogether 52 (6.96%) breast cancer cases and 23 (2.95%) controls was found that the patients' one or more first-degree relatives had a history of breast cancer, showing an adjusted odds ratio (OR) of 2.41 (95%CI: 1.45-4.02). An excess risk of breast cancer was restricted to the ER+ tumor (OR = 2.43, 95% CI: 1.38-4.28), with a relatively higher risk associated with an affected mother (OR = 3.97, 95%CI: 1.46-10.79) than an affected sister (OR = 2.06, 95%CI: 1.07-3.97), while the relative risk was more prominent in the subgroup of pre-menopausal women. Compared with the breast cancer overall, the familial risks to the ER+ tumor increased progressively with the number of affected first-degree relatives. This study provides new insights on a relationship between family breast cancer history, menopausal status, and the ER+ breast cancer. A separate risk prediction model for ER+ tumor in Asian population is desired.

  1. Somatostatin-like peptide and regeneration capacities in planarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bautz, A; Schilt, J

    1986-11-01

    The presence of a neuropeptide immunologically related to somatostatin (SRIF) has been investigated in the neurosecretory cells of two regenerating planarian species (Dugesia lugubris and Dendrocoelum lacteum). A correlation has been shown between the discharge of the SRIF-like-immunoreactive cells during the first hours after amputation and the capacity to regenerate, and between the persistence of numerous positive cells and the lack of regeneration. These results suggest that somatostatin might play a regulatory (inhibitory) role on the cellular proliferation which leads to the blastema edification.

  2. Minireview: nuclear receptor coregulators of the p160 family: insights into inflammation and metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollins, David A; Coppo, Maddalena; Rogatsky, Inez

    2015-04-01

    Nuclear receptor coactivators (NCOAs) are multifunctional transcriptional coregulators for a growing number of signal-activated transcription factors. The members of the p160 family (NCOA1/2/3) are increasingly recognized as essential and nonredundant players in a number of physiological processes. In particular, accumulating evidence points to the pivotal roles that these coregulators play in inflammatory and metabolic pathways, both under homeostasis and in disease. Given that chronic inflammation of metabolic tissues ("metainflammation") is a driving force for the widespread epidemic of obesity, insulin resistance, cardiovascular disease, and associated comorbidities, deciphering the role of NCOAs in "normal" vs "pathological" inflammation and in metabolic processes is indeed a subject of extreme biomedical importance. Here, we review the evolving and, at times, contradictory, literature on the pleiotropic functions of NCOA1/2/3 in inflammation and metabolism as related to nuclear receptor actions and beyond. We then briefly discuss the potential utility of NCOAs as predictive markers for disease and/or possible therapeutic targets once a better understanding of their molecular and physiological actions is achieved.

  3. Sequence comparisons of odorant receptors among tortricid moths reveal different rates of molecular evolution among family members.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colm Carraher

    Full Text Available In insects, odorant receptors detect volatile cues involved in behaviours such as mate recognition, food location and oviposition. We have investigated the evolution of three odorant receptors from five species within the moth genera Ctenopseustis and Planotrotrix, family Tortricidae, which fall into distinct clades within the odorant receptor multigene family. One receptor is the orthologue of the co-receptor Or83b, now known as Orco (OR2, and encodes the obligate ion channel subunit of the receptor complex. In comparison, the other two receptors, OR1 and OR3, are ligand-binding receptor subunits, activated by volatile compounds produced by plants--methyl salicylate and citral, respectively. Rates of sequence evolution at non-synonymous sites were significantly higher in OR1 compared with OR2 and OR3. Within the dataset OR1 contains 109 variable amino acid positions that are distributed evenly across the entire protein including transmembrane helices, loop regions and termini, while OR2 and OR3 contain 18 and 16 variable sites, respectively. OR2 shows a high level of amino acid conservation as expected due to its essential role in odour detection; however we found unexpected differences in the rate of evolution between two ligand-binding odorant receptors, OR1 and OR3. OR3 shows high sequence conservation suggestive of a conserved role in odour reception, whereas the higher rate of evolution observed in OR1, particularly at non-synonymous sites, may be suggestive of relaxed constraint, perhaps associated with the loss of an ancestral role in sex pheromone reception.

  4. Regulation of somatostatin release in the nervous system of the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheppard, M.

    1979-08-01

    This thesis represents the work done to study the release of somatostatin from the rat central nervous system in vitro, providing some evidence for a physiological role for somatostatin. Somatostatin was measured by a sensitive and specific radioimmunoassay devoloped in the laboratory. Chapter 2 reviews the literature on hypothalamic peptides and control of an anterior pituitary function, somatostatin, other central nervous system peptides and neurosecretion. Chapter 3 describes the central nervous system tissue dissection technique, the radioimmunoassay for somatostatin and the tissue levels of somatostatin immunoreactivity in different areas of the central nervous system. Chapter 4 deals with the release of immunoreactive somatostatin from incubated rat hypothalamus in vitro and the influence of other hormones and neuropeptides on this release. Chapter 5 describes the preparation of isolated nerve endings (synaptosomes) from four different areas of rat brain, the localisation of somatostatin to the synaptosome fraction of brain homogenates and the release of somatostatin from these synaptosomes. Chapter 6 deals with the release of somatostatin from incubated rat spinal cord in vitro. Chapter 7 presents the results of the characterisation of released immunoreactive material, the technique utilised being serial dilution of immunoreactive material and comparison to the standard curve, Sephadex gel chromatography, affinity chromatography, and the effect of released immunoreactive somatostatin on growth hormone release from perifused hemipituitaries in vitro, i.e. biological activity. Chapter 8 provides a summary of the main conclusions reached in this study and is followed by the Appendix describing chemical and biochemical methods, histological techniques, and statistical methods

  5. Radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis: examination of chemokine and chemokine receptor families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Carl J; Williams, Jacqueline P; Okunieff, Paul; Finkelstein, Jacob N

    2002-03-01

    Fibrosis is a common outcome of chronic inflammation or injury. Pulmonary fibrosis may be the result of abnormal repair after an acute inflammatory response. The process of repair initiated by a tissue insult is largely a function of the activation of cells to produce important biological mediators such as cytokines, growth factors and chemokines, which orchestrate most aspects of the inflammatory response. Consequently, altered regulation of the production of inflammatory cell cytokines and chemokines after injury and repair likely contributes to the fibrosis. Our hypothesis is that chronic expression of specific chemokine and chemokine receptors during the fibrotic phase induced by thoracic irradiation may perpetuate the recruitment and activation of lymphocytes and macrophages, which may contribute to the development of fibrosis. Fibrosis-sensitive (C57BL/6) and fibrosis-resistant (C3H/HeJ) mice were irradiated with a single dose of 12.5 Gy to the thorax. Total lung RNA was prepared and hybridized using microarray analysis and RNase protection assays. At 26 weeks postirradiation, messages encoding the chemokines BLC (now known as Scyb13), C10 (now known as Scya6), IP-10 (now known as Scyb10), MCP-1 (now known as Scya2), MCP-3 (now known as Scya7), MIP-1gamma (now known as Scya9), and RANTES (now known as Scya5) and the chemokine receptors Ccr1, Ccr2, Ccr5 and Ccr6 were elevated in fibrosis-sensitive (C57BL/6) mice. In contrast, only the messages encoding SDF-1alpha (now known as Sdf1) and Ccr1 were elevated 26 weeks postirradiation in fibrosis-resistant (C3H/HeJ) mice. Our results point to the CC and CCR family members as the predominant chemokine responders during the development of fibrosis. These studies suggest that monocyte/macrophage and lymphocyte recruitment and activation are key components of radiation-induced fibrosis.

  6. Parathyroid hormone induces the Nrna family of nuclear orphan receptors in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pirih, Flavia Q.; Aghaloo, Tara L.; Bezouglaia, Olga; Nervina, Jeanne M.; Tetradis, Sotirios

    2005-01-01

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) has both anabolic and catabolic effects on bone metabolism, although the molecular mechanisms mediating these effects are largely unknown. Among the transcription factors induced by Pth in osteoblasts are the nerve growth factor-inducible factor B (NR4A; NGFI-B) family of orphan nuclear receptors: Nurr1, Nur77, and NOR-1. PTH induces NR4A members through the cAMP-protein kinase A (PKA) pathway in vitro. We report here that PTH rapidly and transiently induced expression of all three NR4A genes in PTH-target tissues in vivo. In calvaria, long bones, and kidneys, NR4A induction was maximal 0.5-1 h after a single intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of 80 μg/kg PTH. Nur77 demonstrated the highest expression, followed, in order, by Nurr1 and NOR-1. In calvaria and long bone, PTH-induced expression of each NR4A gene was detectable at 10 μg/kg i.p. with maximum induction at 40-80 μg/kg. PTH (3-34) did not induce NR4A mRNA levels in calvaria, long bone, and kidney in vivo, confirming our in vitro results that NR4A genes are induced primarily through the cAMP-PKA pathway. The magnitude of PTH-induced NR4A expression was comparable in vivo and in vitro. However, NR4A mRNA levels peaked and returned to baseline faster in vivo. Both in vivo and in vitro, PTH induced NR4A pre-mRNA levels suggesting that induction of these genes is, at least in part, through activation of mRNA synthesis. The in vivo induction of the NR4A family members by PTH suggests their involvement in, at least some, PTH-induced changes in bone metabolism

  7. Tissue-type plasminogen activator-binding RNA aptamers inhibiting low-density lipoprotein receptor family-mediated internalisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjerregaard, Nils; Bøtkjær, Kenneth A; Helsen, Nicky; Andreasen, Peter A; Dupont, Daniel M

    2015-07-01

    Recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA, trade name Alteplase), currently the only drug approved by the US Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency for the treatment of cerebral ischaemic stroke, has been implicated in a number of adverse effects reportedly mediated by interactions with the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) family receptors, including neuronal cell death and an increased risk of cerebral haemorrhage. The tissue-type plasminogen activator is the principal initiator of thrombolysis in human physiology, an effect that is mediated directly via localised activation of the plasmin zymogen plasminogen at the surface of fibrin clots in the vascular lumen. Here, we sought to identify a ligand to tPA capable of inhibiting the relevant LDL family receptors without interfering with the fibrinolytic activity of tPA. Systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) was employed to isolate tPA-binding RNA aptamers, which were characterised in biochemical assays of tPA association to low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 (LRP-1, an LDL receptor family member); tPA-mediated in vitro and ex vivo clot lysis; and tPA-mediated plasminogen activation in the absence and presence of a stimulating soluble fibrin fragment. Two aptamers, K18 and K32, had minimal effects on clot lysis, but were able to efficiently inhibit tPA-LRP-1 association and LDL receptor family-mediated endocytosis in human vascular endothelial cells and astrocytes. These observations suggest that coadministration alongside tPA may be a viable strategy to improve the safety of thrombolytic treatment of cerebral ischaemic stroke by restricting tPA activity to the vascular lumen.

  8. THESEUS 1, FERONIA and relatives: a family of cell wall-sensing receptor kinases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Alice Y; Wu, Hen-Ming

    2011-12-01

    The plant cell wall provides form and integrity to the cell as well as a dynamic interface between a cell and its environment. Therefore mechanisms capable of policing changes in the cell wall, signaling cellular responses including those that would feedback regulate cell wall properties are expected to play important roles in facilitating growth and ensuring survival. Discoveries in the last few years that the Arabidopsis THESEUS 1 receptor-like kinase (RLK) may function as a sensor for cell wall defects to regulate growth and that its relatives FERONIA and ANXURs regulate pollen tube integrity imply strongly that they play key roles in cell wall-related processes. Furthermore, FERONIA acts as a cell surface regulator for RAC/ROP GTPases and activates production of reactive oxygen species which are, respectively, important molecular switches and mediators for diverse processes. These findings position the THESEUS 1/FERONIA family RLKs as surface regulators and potential cell wall sensors capable of broadly and profoundly impacting cellular pathways in response to diverse signals. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Toward a better understanding of the interaction between TGF-β family members and their ALK receptors

    KAUST Repository

    Romano, Valentina; Raimondo, Domenico; Calvanese, Luisa; D’ Auria, Gabriella; Tramontano, Anna; Falcigno, Lucia

    2012-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) proteins are a family of structurally related extracellular proteins that trigger their signaling functions through interaction with the extracellular domains of their cognate serine/threonine kinase receptors. The specificity of TGF-β/receptor binding is complex and gives rise to multiple functional roles. Additionally, it is not completely understood at the atomic level. Here, we use the most reliable computational methods currently available to study systems involving activin-like kinase (ALK) receptors ALK4 and ALK7 and their multiple TGF-β ligands. We built models for all these proteins and their complexes for which experimental structures are not available. By analyzing the surfaces of interaction in six different TGF-β/ALK complexes we could infer which are the structural distinctive features of the ligand-receptor binding mode. Furthermore, this study allowed us to rationalize why binding of the growth factors GDF3 and Nodal to the ALK4 receptor requires the Cripto co-factor, whilst binding to the ALK7 receptor does not. © Springer-Verlag 2012.

  10. Toward a better understanding of the interaction between TGF-β family members and their ALK receptors

    KAUST Repository

    Romano, Valentina

    2012-02-22

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) proteins are a family of structurally related extracellular proteins that trigger their signaling functions through interaction with the extracellular domains of their cognate serine/threonine kinase receptors. The specificity of TGF-β/receptor binding is complex and gives rise to multiple functional roles. Additionally, it is not completely understood at the atomic level. Here, we use the most reliable computational methods currently available to study systems involving activin-like kinase (ALK) receptors ALK4 and ALK7 and their multiple TGF-β ligands. We built models for all these proteins and their complexes for which experimental structures are not available. By analyzing the surfaces of interaction in six different TGF-β/ALK complexes we could infer which are the structural distinctive features of the ligand-receptor binding mode. Furthermore, this study allowed us to rationalize why binding of the growth factors GDF3 and Nodal to the ALK4 receptor requires the Cripto co-factor, whilst binding to the ALK7 receptor does not. © Springer-Verlag 2012.

  11. A novel mutation in the calcium-sensing receptor gene in an Irish pedigree showing familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia: a case report.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Elamin, Wael F

    2010-01-01

    Familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia is a rare autosomal dominant disorder characterized by asymptomatic and non-progressive hypercalcemia due to mutations of the calcium-sensing receptor gene. Disorders of calcium metabolism are very common in the elderly, and they can coexist with familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia in affected families.

  12. Hilar somatostatin interneuron loss reduces dentate gyrus inhibition in a mouse model of temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Gabrielle; Balgooyen, Laura; Mattis, Joanna; Deisseroth, Karl; Buckmaster, Paul S

    2016-06-01

    In patients with temporal lobe epilepsy, seizures usually start in the hippocampus, and dentate granule cells are hyperexcitable. Somatostatin interneurons are a major subpopulation of inhibitory neurons in the dentate gyrus, and many are lost in patients and animal models. However, surviving somatostatin interneurons sprout axon collaterals and form new synapses, so the net effect on granule cell inhibition remains unclear. The present study uses optogenetics to activate hilar somatostatin interneurons and measure the inhibitory effect on dentate gyrus perforant path-evoked local field potential responses in a mouse model of temporal lobe epilepsy. In controls, light activation of hilar somatostatin interneurons inhibited evoked responses up to 40%. Epileptic pilocarpine-treated mice exhibited loss of hilar somatostatin interneurons and less light-induced inhibition of evoked responses. These findings suggest that severe epilepsy-related loss of hilar somatostatin interneurons can overwhelm the surviving interneurons' capacity to compensate by sprouting axon collaterals. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 International League Against Epilepsy.

  13. Insight into pattern of codon biasness and nucleotide base usage in serotonin receptor gene family from different mammalian species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dass, J Febin Prabhu; Sudandiradoss, C

    2012-07-15

    5-HT (5-Hydroxy-tryptamine) or serotonin receptors are found both in central and peripheral nervous system as well as in non-neuronal tissues. In the animal and human nervous system, serotonin produces various functional effects through a variety of membrane bound receptors. In this study, we focus on 5-HT receptor family from different mammals and examined the factors that account for codon and nucleotide usage variation. A total of 110 homologous coding sequences from 11 different mammalian species were analyzed using relative synonymous codon usage (RSCU), correspondence analysis (COA) and hierarchical cluster analysis together with nucleotide base usage frequency of chemically similar amino acid codons. The mean effective number of codon (ENc) value of 37.06 for 5-HT(6) shows very high codon bias within the family and may be due to high selective translational efficiency. The COA and Spearman's rank correlation reveals that the nucleotide compositional mutation bias as the major factors influencing the codon usage in serotonin receptor genes. The hierarchical cluster analysis suggests that gene function is another dominant factor that affects the codon usage bias, while species is a minor factor. Nucleotide base usage was reported using Goldman, Engelman, Stietz (GES) scale reveals the presence of high uracil (>45%) content at functionally important hydrophobic regions. Our in silico approach will certainly help for further investigations on critical inference on evolution, structure, function and gene expression aspects of 5-HT receptors family which are potential antipsychotic drug targets. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Unique expression pattern of the three insulin receptor family members in the rat mammary gland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvid, Henning; Klopfleisch, Robert; Vienberg, Sara Gry

    2011-01-01

    mammary gland. Using laser micro-dissection, quantitative RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry, we examined the expression of IR (insulin receptor), IGF-1R (IGF-1 receptor), IRR (insulin receptor-related receptor), ERα (estrogen receptor alpha), ERβ (estrogen receptor beta) and PR (progesteron receptor......) in young, virgin, female Sprague-Dawley rats and compared to expression in reference organs. The mammary gland displayed the highest expression of IRR and IGF-1R. In contrast, low expression of IR transcripts was observed in the mammary gland tissue with expression of the IR-A isoform being 5-fold higher...... than the expression of the IR-B. By immunohistochemistry, expression of IR and IGF-1R was detected in all mammary gland epithelial cells. Expression of ERα and PR was comparable between mammary gland and ovary, whereas expression of ERβ was lower in mammary gland than in the ovary. Finally, expression...

  15. Molecular cloning of a novel, putative G protein-coupled receptor from sea anemones structurally related to members of the FSH, TSH, LH/CG receptor family from mammals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nothacker, H P; Grimmelikhuijzen, C J

    1993-01-01

    hormone (FSH, TSH, LH/CG) receptor family from mammals, including a very large, extracellular N terminus (18-25% sequence identity) and a 7 transmembrane region (44-48% sequence identity). As with the mammalian glycoprotein hormone receptor genes, the sea anemone receptor gene yields transcripts which can...... be alternatively spliced, thereby yielding a shortened receptor variant only containing the large extracellular (soluble) N terminus. All this is strong evidence that the putative glycoprotein hormone receptor from sea anemones is evolutionarily related to those from mammals. This is the first report showing...

  16. High molecular somatostatin, an interfering factor in radioimmunoassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diel, F.; Schneider, E.; Baumann, H.

    1977-01-01

    Cyclic Tyr 1 -somatostatin (Tyr 1 -SRIF) is radioiodinated by the lactoperoxidase method. Purification is achieved by Sephadex G-25 adsorption chromatography. Specific anti-SRIF serum (FA1) has been raised in rabbits. A dose response curve is obtained in the range of 5 - 5,000 pg per tube using an antiserum dilution of 1:2,000. There is little cross-reaction with linear somatostatin and none with ocytocin, (lys-, arg-) vasopressin, valinomycin, polymyxin, insulin, glucagon, human growth hormone (hGH), and thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH). For recovery tests, extraction procedures are necessary. Thin-layer chromatography (TLC) and polyacrylamide-disc-electrophoresis (Disc-PAGE) are performed to identify the presumed high molecular 125 I-Tyr 1 -SRIF associate. This high molecular associate may represent an interfering factor in the radioimmunoassay for cyclic SRIF. (orig./AJ) [de

  17. Modes of Action and Functions of ERECTA-family Receptor-like Kinases in Plant Organ Growth and Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    TORII, Keiko U.

    2012-05-01

    Higher plants constitute the central resource for renewable lignocellulose biomass that can supplement for the world's depleting stores of fossil fuels. As such, understanding the molecular and genetic mechanisms of plant organ growth will provide key knowledge and genetic resources that enables manipulation of plant biomass feedstock for better growth and productivity. The goal of this proposal is to understand how cell proliferation and growth are coordinated during aboveground organ morphogenesis, and how cell-cell signaling mediated by a family of receptor kinases coordinates plant organogenesis. The well-established model plant Arabidopsis thaliana is used for our research to facilitate rapid progress. Specifically, we focus on how ERECTA-family leucine-rich repeat receptor kinases (LRR-RLKs) interact in a synergistic manner to promote organogenesis and pattern formation in Arabidopsis. This project was highly successful, resulted in fourteen publications including nine peer-reviewed original research articles. One provisional US patent has been filed through this DOE funding. We have addressed the critical roles for a family of receptor kinases in coordinating proliferation and differentiation of plants, and we successfully elucidated the downstream targets of this signaling pathway in specifying stomatal patterning.

  18. The CRF Family of Neuropeptides and their Receptors - Mediators of the Central Stress Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedic, Nina; Chen, Alon; Deussing, Jan M.

    2018-01-01

    Background: Dysregulated stress neurocircuits, caused by genetic and/or environmental changes, underlie the development of many neuropsychiatric disorders. Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) is the major physiological activator of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and conse-quently a primary regulator of the mammalian stress response. Together with its three family members, urocortins (UCNs) 1, 2, and 3, CRF integrates the neuroendocrine, autonomic, metabolic and behavioral responses to stress by activating its cognate receptors CRFR1 and CRFR2. Objective: Here we review the past and current state of the CRF/CRFR field, ranging from pharmacologi-cal studies to genetic mouse models and virus-mediated manipulations. Results: Although it is well established that CRF/CRFR1 signaling mediates aversive responses, includ-ing anxiety and depression-like behaviors, a number of recent studies have challenged this viewpoint by revealing anxiolytic and appetitive properties of specific CRF/CRFR1 circuits. In contrast, the UCN/CRFR2 system is less well understood and may possibly also exert divergent functions on physiol-ogy and behavior depending on the brain region, underlying circuit, and/or experienced stress conditions. Conclusion: A plethora of available genetic tools, including conventional and conditional mouse mutants targeting CRF system components, has greatly advanced our understanding about the endogenous mecha-nisms underlying HPA system regulation and CRF/UCN-related neuronal circuits involved in stress-related behaviors. Yet, the detailed pathways and molecular mechanisms by which the CRF/UCN-system translates negative or positive stimuli into the final, integrated biological response are not completely un-derstood. The utilization of future complementary methodologies, such as cell-type specific Cre-driver lines, viral and optogenetic tools will help to further dissect the function of genetically defined CRF/UCN neurocircuits in the context of

  19. Ryanodine receptors, a family of intracellular calcium ion channels, are expressed throughout early vertebrate development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Houdini HT

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Calcium signals ([Ca2+]i direct many aspects of embryo development but their regulation is not well characterised. Ryanodine receptors (RyRs are a family of intracellular Ca2+ release channels that control the flux of Ca2+ from internal stores into the cytosol. RyRs are primarily known for their role in excitation-contraction coupling in adult striated muscle and ryr gene mutations are implicated in several human diseases. Current evidence suggests that RyRs do not have a major role to play prior to organogenesis but regulate tissue differentiation. Findings The sequences of the five zebrafish ryr genes were confirmed, their evolutionary relationship established and the primary sequences compared to other vertebrates, including humans. RyRs are differentially expressed in slow (ryr1a, fast (ryr3 and both types (ryr1b of developing skeletal muscle. There are two ryr2 genes (ryr2a and ryr2b which are expressed exclusively in developing CNS and cardiac tissue, respectively. In addition, ryr3 and ryr2a mRNA is detectable in the initial stages of development, prior to embryonic axis formation. Conclusions Our work reveals that zebrafish ryr genes are differentially expressed throughout the developing embryo from cleavage onwards. The data suggests that RyR-regulated Ca2+ signals are associated with several aspects of embryonic development, from organogenesis through to the differentiation of the musculoskeletal, cardiovascular and nervous system. These studies will facilitate further work to explore the developmental function of RyRs in each of these tissue types.

  20. Sex bias in copy number variation of olfactory receptor gene family depends on ethnicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farideh eShadravan

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Gender plays a pivotal role in the human genetic identity and is also manifested in many genetic disorders particularly mental retardation. In this study its effect on copy number variation (CNV, known to cause genetic disorders was explored. As the olfactory receptor (OR repertoire comprises the largest human gene family, it was selected for this study, which was carried out within and between three populations, derived from 150 individuals from the 1000 Genome Project. Analysis of 3872 CNVs detected among 791 OR loci, in which 307 loci showed CNV, revealed the following novel findings: Sex bias in CNV was significantly more prevalent in uncommon than common CNV variants of OR pseudogenes, in which the male genome showed more CNVs; and in one-copy number loss compared to complete deletion of OR pseudogenes; both findings implying a more recent evolutionary role for gender. Sex bias in copy number gain was also detected. Another novel finding was that the observed six bias was largely dependent on ethnicity and was in general absent in East Asians. Using a CNV public database for sick children (ISCA the application of these findings for improving clinical molecular diagnostics is discussed by showing an example of sex bias in CNV among kids with autism. Additional clinical relevance is discussed, as the most polymorphic CNV-enriched OR cluster in the human genome, located on chr 15q11.2, is found near the PWS/AS bi-directionally imprinted region associated with two well-known mental retardation syndromes. As olfaction represents the primitive cognition in most mammals, arguably in competition with the development of a larger brain, the extensive retention of OR pseudogenes in females of this study, might point to a parent-of-origin indirect regulatory role for OR pseudogenes in the embryonic development of human brain. Thus any perturbation in the temporal regulation of olfactory system could lead to developmental delay disorders including

  1. Relevance of the NR4A sub-family of nuclear orphan receptors in trophoblastic BeWo cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, Sudha Saryu; Gupta, Satish Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Nur-77, a member of the NR4A sub-family of nuclear orphan receptors, is downregulated in the placentae of pre-eclamptic women. Here, we investigate the relevance of Nor-1, Nurr-1 and Nur-77 in trophoblastic cell differentiation. Their transcript levels were found to be significantly upregulated in BeWo cells treated with forskolin. The maximum increase was observed after 2 h, with a second peak in the expression levels after 48 h. The expression of NR4A sub-family members was also found to be upregulated in BeWo cells after treatment with hCG and GnRH. A similar significant increase was observed at the respective protein levels after 2 and 48 h of treatment with forskolin, hCG or GnRH. Silencing Nor-1, Nurr-1 or Nur-77 individually did not show any effect on forskolin-, hCG- and/or GnRH-mediated BeWo cell fusion and/or hCG secretion. After silencing any one member of the NR4A sub-family, an increase in the transcript levels of the other sub-family members was observed, indicating a compensatory effect due to their functional redundancy. Simultaneously silencing all three NR4A sub-family members significantly downregulated forskolin- and hCG-mediated BeWo cell fusion and/or hCG secretion. However, a considerable amount of cell death occurred after forskolin or hCG treatment as compared to the control siRNA-transfected cells. These results suggest that the NR4A sub-family of nuclear orphan receptors has a role in trophoblastic cell differentiation.

  2. Expression analysis of the Toll-like receptor and TIR domain adaptor families of zebrafish.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, A.H.; Krens, SF Gabby; Rodriguez, IA Medina; He, S; Bitter, W.; Snaar-Jagalska, B Ewa; Spaink, H.P.

    2004-01-01

    The zebrafish genomic sequence database was analysed for the presence of genes encoding members of the Toll-like receptors (TLR) and interleukin receptors (IL-R) and associated adaptor proteins containing a TIR domain. The resulting predictions show the presence of one or more counterparts for the

  3. Radio-peptides targeting g-protein coupled receptors in cancer: from bench to bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maecke, H.R.

    2015-01-01

    Full text of publication follows. In the development of targeted imaging and therapy agents the most important challenge and prerequisite is to identify and validate the molecular targets of any disease. The targets should be specific, relevant, easily accessible and highly expressed. In addition they should have no or at least very low expression in normal tissue. Among the many drug targets is the large family of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). It is the most important family of marketed drugs and the basic accomplishments in the field were recognised by the award of the recent Nobel price in chemistry. GPCRs also play a role in cancer. Several of these receptors are massively over-expressed in different human tumors such as neuroendocrine tumors (over-expression of the somatostatin receptor family), prostate and breast tumors (bombesin receptor family), brain tumors (NK1 receptor) etc.. This allows to develop (nuclear, MRI, optical) probes for imaging and potentially targeted therapy (theragnostics). Natural ligands targeting GPCRs are often peptides. They need to be modified for metabolic stability, modified for labeling with radio-metals (conjugation of bifunctional chelators) or radio-halogens (prosthetic groups). Preserved biological integrity after modification and labeling needs to be assured, long retention times in the tumor is important, conferred by internalisation. Radio-metal labeling in particular needs to be reasonably fast and the radio metal complexes have to show high stability with regard to radio-metal release. These prerequisites will be discussed for somatostatin receptor based radio-peptides in particular. For a successful clinical application preclinical imaging and biodistribution in adequate animal models are mandatory. New tracers for positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) will be presented for neuroendocrine tumors and prostate cancer. In particular radiolabeled antagonists will

  4. Somatostatin ontogenesis in the gastrointestinal and pancreatic tract: study in normal rats and during a induced diabetes in neonates rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunha, M.C.

    1980-01-01

    The ontogenic studies of somatostatin of pancreas, ileum and duodenum of Wistar rats and the rats with induced diabetes were done. The radioimmunologic method to dose the somatostatin was used. (L.M.J.)

  5. Cytokine-like factor-1, a novel soluble protein, shares homology with members of the cytokine type I receptor family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elson, G C; Graber, P; Losberger, C; Herren, S; Gretener, D; Menoud, L N; Wells, T N; Kosco-Vilbois, M H; Gauchat, J F

    1998-08-01

    In this report we describe the identification, cloning, and expression pattern of human cytokine-like factor 1 (hCLF-1) and the identification and cloning of its murine homologue. They were identified from expressed sequence tags using amino acid sequences from conserved regions of the cytokine type I receptor family. Human CLF-1 and murine CLF-1 shared 96% amino acid identity and significant homology with many cytokine type I receptors. CLF-1 is a secreted protein, suggesting that it is either a soluble subunit within a cytokine receptor complex, like the soluble form of the IL-6R alpha-chain, or a subunit of a multimeric cytokine, e.g., IL-12 p40. The highest levels of hCLF-1 mRNA were observed in lymph node, spleen, thymus, appendix, placenta, stomach, bone marrow, and fetal lung, with constitutive expression of CLF-1 mRNA detected in a human kidney fibroblastic cell line. In fibroblast primary cell cultures, CLF-1 mRNA was up-regulated by TNF-alpha, IL-6, and IFN-gamma. Western blot analysis of recombinant forms of hCLF-1 showed that the protein has the tendency to form covalently linked di- and tetramers. These results suggest that CLF-1 is a novel soluble cytokine receptor subunit or part of a novel cytokine complex, possibly playing a regulatory role in the immune system and during fetal development.

  6. GH and IGF-I induction by passive immunization of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss Walbaum using a somatostatin 14 antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inhibition of the growth axis by somatostatin was studied in juvenile rainbow trout using passive immunization with a previously isolated somatostatin antibody (antiSS-14). Upon subcutaneously injection of laying hens (Gallus domesticus) with conjugated somatostatin-14 (SS-14), the antiSS-14 was iso...

  7. Excessive grooming induced by somatostatin or its analog SMS 201-995

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wimersma Greidanus, T.B. van; Maigret, C.; Krechting, B.

    1987-01-01

    Intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of somatostatin or SMS 201-995 induces excessive grooming behavior in rats. The grooming inducing effect of somatostatin is rather weak, as doses of 300 ng or less did not result in increased total grooming scores. In contrast a dose of 10 ng SMS

  8. A novel germline mutation in the aryl hydrocarbon receptor-interacting protein (AIP) gene in an Italian family with gigantism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbani, C; Russo, D; Raggi, F; Lombardi, M; Sardella, C; Scattina, I; Lupi, I; Manetti, L; Tomisti, L; Marcocci, C; Martino, E; Bogazzi, F

    2014-10-01

    Acromegaly usually occurs as a sporadic disease, but it may be a part of familial pituitary tumor syndromes in rare cases. Germline mutations in the aryl hydrocarbon receptor-interacting protein (AIP) gene have been associated with a predisposition to familial isolated pituitary adenoma. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the AIP gene in a patient with gigantism and in her relatives. Direct sequencing of AIP gene was performed in fourteen members of the family, spanning among three generations. The index case was an 18-year-old woman with gigantism due to an invasive GH-secreting pituitary adenoma and a concomitant tall-cell variant of papillary thyroid carcinoma. A novel germline mutation in the AIP gene (c.685C>T, p.Q229X) was identified in the proband and in two members of her family, who did not present clinical features of acromegaly or other pituitary disorders. Eleven subjects had no mutation in the AIP gene. Two members of the family with clinical features of acromegaly refused either the genetic or the biochemical evaluation. The Q229X mutation was predicted to generate a truncated AIP protein, lacking the last two tetratricopeptide repeat domains and the final C-terminal α-7 helix. We identified a new AIP germline mutation predicted to produce a truncated AIP protein, lacking its biological properties due to the disruption of the C-terminus binding sites for both the chaperones and the client proteins of AIP.

  9. Cholecystokinin inhibits gastrin secretion independently of paracrine somatostatin secretion in the pig

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, P T; Hansen, L; Hilsted, L

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cholecystokinin inhibits the secretion of gastrin from antral G cells, an effect that is speculated to be mediated by D cells secreting somatostatin. The aim of the study was to test directly whether cholecystokinin inhibition of antral gastrin secretion is mediated by somatostatin....... METHODS: The effects of CCK on gastrin and somatostatin secretion were studied in isolated vascularly perfused preparations of pig antrum before and after immunoneutralization brought about by infusion of large amounts of a high affinity monoclonal antibody against somatostatin. RESULTS: CCK infusion...... at 10(-9) M and 10(-8) M decreased gastrin output to 70.5% +/- 7.6% (n = 8) and 76.3% +/- 3.6% (n = 7) of basal output, respectively. CCK at 10(-10) M had no effect (n = 6). Somatostatin secretion was dose-dependently increased by CCK infusion and increased to 268 +/- 38.2% (n = 7) of basal secretion...

  10. The Role of TAM Family Receptors in Immune Cell Function: Implications for Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paolino, Magdalena; Penninger, Josef M

    2016-10-21

    The TAM receptor protein tyrosine kinases-Tyro3, Axl, and Mer-are essential regulators of immune homeostasis. Guided by their cognate ligands Growth arrest-specific gene 6 (Gas6) and Protein S (Pros1), these receptors ensure the resolution of inflammation by dampening the activation of innate cells as well as by restoring tissue function through promotion of tissue repair and clearance of apoptotic cells. Their central role as negative immune regulators is highlighted by the fact that deregulation of TAM signaling has been linked to the pathogenesis of autoimmune, inflammatory, and infectious diseases. Importantly, TAM receptors have also been associated with cancer development and progression. In a cancer setting, TAM receptors have a dual regulatory role, controlling the initiation and progression of tumor development and, at the same time, the associated anti-tumor responses of diverse immune cells. Thus, modulation of TAM receptors has emerged as a potential novel strategy for cancer treatment. In this review, we discuss our current understanding of how TAM receptors control immunity, with a particular focus on the regulation of anti-tumor responses and its implications for cancer immunotherapy.

  11. THYROID HORMONE RECEPTOR BETA GENE MUTATION (P453A) IN A TURKISH FAMILY PRODUCING RESISTANCE TO THYROID HORMONE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayraktaroglu, Taner; Noel, Janet; Mukaddes, Nahit Motavalli; Refetoff, Samuel

    2018-01-01

    Two members of a Turkish family, a mother and son, had thyroid function tests suggestive of resistance to thyroid hormone (RTH). The clinical presentation was, however, different. The mother (proposita) had palpitation, weakness, tiredness, nervousness, dry mouth and was misdiagnosed as having multinodular toxic goiter which was treated with antithyroid drugs and partial thyroidectomy. Her younger son had attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and primary encopresis, but normal intellectual quotient. Both had elevated serum iodothyronine levels with nonsuppressed thyrotropin. A mutation in one allele of the thyroid hormone receptor beta gene (P453A) was identified, providing a genetic confirmation for the diagnosis of RTH. PMID:18561095

  12. Cell-to-cell communication and cellular environment alter the somatostatin status of delta cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, Catriona, E-mail: catriona.kelly@qub.ac.uk [SAAD Centre for Pharmacy and Diabetes, School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Ulster, Coleraine (United Kingdom); Flatt, Peter R.; McClenaghan, Neville H. [SAAD Centre for Pharmacy and Diabetes, School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Ulster, Coleraine (United Kingdom)

    2010-08-20

    Research highlights: {yields} TGP52 cells display enhanced functionality in pseudoislet form. {yields} Somatostatin content was reduced, but secretion increased in high glucose conditions. {yields} Cellular interactions and environment alter the somatostatin status of TGP52 cells. -- Abstract: Introduction: Somatostatin, released from pancreatic delta cells, is a potent paracrine inhibitor of insulin and glucagon secretion. Islet cellular interactions and glucose homeostasis are essential to maintain normal patterns of insulin secretion. However, the importance of cell-to-cell communication and cellular environment in the regulation of somatostatin release remains unclear. Methods: This study employed the somatostatin-secreting TGP52 cell line maintained in DMEM:F12 (17.5 mM glucose) or DMEM (25 mM glucose) culture media. The effect of pseudoislet formation and culture medium on somatostatin content and release in response to a variety of stimuli was measured by somatostatin EIA. In addition, the effect of pseudoislet formation on cellular viability (MTT and LDH assays) and proliferation (BrdU ELISA) was determined. Results: TGP52 cells readily formed pseudoislets and showed enhanced functionality in three-dimensional form with increased E-cadherin expression irrespective of the culture environment used. However, culture in DMEM decreased cellular somatostatin content (P < 0.01) and increased somatostatin secretion in response to a variety of stimuli including arginine, calcium and PMA (P < 0.001) when compared with cells grown in DMEM:F12. Configuration of TGP52 cells as pseudoislets reduced the proliferative rate and increased cellular cytotoxicity irrespective of culture medium used. Conclusions: Somatostatin secretion is greatly facilitated by cell-to-cell interactions and E-cadherin expression. Cellular environment and extracellular glucose also significantly influence the function of delta cells.

  13. Cell-to-cell communication and cellular environment alter the somatostatin status of delta cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, Catriona; Flatt, Peter R.; McClenaghan, Neville H.

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → TGP52 cells display enhanced functionality in pseudoislet form. → Somatostatin content was reduced, but secretion increased in high glucose conditions. → Cellular interactions and environment alter the somatostatin status of TGP52 cells. -- Abstract: Introduction: Somatostatin, released from pancreatic delta cells, is a potent paracrine inhibitor of insulin and glucagon secretion. Islet cellular interactions and glucose homeostasis are essential to maintain normal patterns of insulin secretion. However, the importance of cell-to-cell communication and cellular environment in the regulation of somatostatin release remains unclear. Methods: This study employed the somatostatin-secreting TGP52 cell line maintained in DMEM:F12 (17.5 mM glucose) or DMEM (25 mM glucose) culture media. The effect of pseudoislet formation and culture medium on somatostatin content and release in response to a variety of stimuli was measured by somatostatin EIA. In addition, the effect of pseudoislet formation on cellular viability (MTT and LDH assays) and proliferation (BrdU ELISA) was determined. Results: TGP52 cells readily formed pseudoislets and showed enhanced functionality in three-dimensional form with increased E-cadherin expression irrespective of the culture environment used. However, culture in DMEM decreased cellular somatostatin content (P < 0.01) and increased somatostatin secretion in response to a variety of stimuli including arginine, calcium and PMA (P < 0.001) when compared with cells grown in DMEM:F12. Configuration of TGP52 cells as pseudoislets reduced the proliferative rate and increased cellular cytotoxicity irrespective of culture medium used. Conclusions: Somatostatin secretion is greatly facilitated by cell-to-cell interactions and E-cadherin expression. Cellular environment and extracellular glucose also significantly influence the function of delta cells.

  14. The relaxin family peptide receptors and their ligands: new developments and paradigms in the evolution from jawless fish to mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yegorov, Sergey; Bogerd, Jan; Good, Sara V

    2014-12-01

    Relaxin family peptide receptors (Rxfps) and their ligands, relaxin (Rln) and insulin-like (Insl) peptides, are broadly implicated in the regulation of reproductive and neuroendocrine processes in mammals. Most placental mammals harbour genes for four receptors, namely rxfp1, rxfp2, rxfp3 and rxfp4. The number and identity of rxfps in other vertebrates are immensely variable, which is probably attributable to intraspecific variation in reproductive and neuroendocrine regulation. Here, we highlight several interesting, but greatly overlooked, aspects of the rln/insl-rxfp evolutionary history: the ancient origin, recruitment of novel receptors, diverse roles of selection, differential retention and lineage-specific loss of genes over evolutionary time. The tremendous diversity of rln/insl and rxfp genes appears to have arisen from two divergent receptors and one ligand that were duplicated by whole genome duplications (WGD) in early vertebrate evolution, although several genes, notably relaxin in mammals, were also duplicated via small scale duplications. Duplication and loss of genes have varied across lineages: teleosts retained more WGD-derived genes, dominated by those thought to be involved in neuroendocrine regulation (rln3, insl5 and rxfp 3/4 genes), while eutherian mammals witnessed the diversification and rapid evolution of genes involved in reproduction (rln/insl3). Several genes that arose early in evolutionary history were lost in most mammals, but retained in teleosts and, to a lesser extent, in early diverging tetrapods. To elaborate on their evolutionary history, we provide updated phylogenies of the Rxfp1/2 and Rxfp3/4 receptors and their ligands, including new sequences from early diverging vertebrate taxa such as coelacanth, skate, spotted gar, and lamprey. We also summarize the recent progress made towards understanding the functional biology of Rxfps in non-mammalian taxa, providing a new conceptual framework for research on Rxfp signaling across

  15. Nuclear receptor 4A (NR4A) family - orphans no more.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safe, Stephen; Jin, Un-Ho; Morpurgo, Benjamin; Abudayyeh, Ala; Singh, Mandip; Tjalkens, Ronald B

    2016-03-01

    The orphan nuclear receptors NR4A1, NR4A2 and NR4A3 are immediate early genes induced by multiple stressors, and the NR4A receptors play an important role in maintaining cellular homeostasis and disease. There is increasing evidence for the role of these receptors in metabolic, cardiovascular and neurological functions and also in inflammation and inflammatory diseases and in immune functions and cancer. Despite the similarities of NR4A1, NR4A2 and NR4A3 and their interactions with common cis-genomic elements, they exhibit unique activities and cell-/tissue-specific functions. Although endogenous ligands for NR4A receptors have not been identified, there is increasing evidence that structurally-diverse synthetic molecules can directly interact with the ligand binding domain of NR4A1 and act as agonists or antagonists, and ligands for NR4A2 and NR4A3 have also been identified. Since NR4A receptors are key factors in multiple diseases, there are opportunities for the future development of NR4A ligands for clinical applications in treating multiple health problems including metabolic, neurologic and cardiovascular diseases, other inflammatory conditions, and cancer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The EGFR family of receptors sensitizes cancer cells towards UV light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Steffen B.; Neves Petersen, Teresa; Olsen, Birgitte

    2008-01-01

    A combination of bioinformatics, biophysical, advanced laser studies and cell biology lead to the realization that laser-pulsed UV light stops cancer growth and induces apoptosis. We have previously shown that laser-pulsed UV (LP-UV) illumination of two different skin-derived cancer cell lines both...... bridges. The EGF receptor is often overexpressed in cancers and other proliferative skin disorders, it might be possible to significantly reduce the proliferative potential of these cells making them good targets for laser-pulsed UV-light treatment. The discovery that UV light can be used to open...... disulphide bridges in proteins upon illumination of nearby aromatic amino acids was the first step that lead to the hypothesis that UV light could modulate the structure and therefore the function of these key receptor proteins. The observation that membrane receptors (EGFR) contained exactly the motifs...

  17. G-Protein-coupled receptors as potential drug candidates in preeclampsia: targeting the relaxin/insulin-like family peptide receptor 1 for treatment and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Kirk P

    2016-09-01

    Important roles for G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) have been identified in the maternal physiological adaptations to pregnancy and in the pathogenesis of preeclampsia. On this basis, GPCRs are potential therapeutic targets for preeclampsia. In this review, vasopressin and apelin are initially considered in this context before the focus on the hormone relaxin and its cognate receptor, the relaxin/insulin-like family peptide receptor 1 (RXFP1). Based on both compelling scientific rationale and a promising safety profile, the relaxin ligand-receptor system is comprehensively evaluated as a potential therapeutic endpoint in preeclampsia. The published literature relating to the topic was searched through January 2016 using PubMed. Relaxin is a peptide hormone secreted by the corpus luteum; it circulates in the luteal phase and during pregnancy. Activation of RXFP1 is vasodilatory; thus, relaxin supplementation is expected to at least partly restore the fundamental vasodilatory changes of normal pregnancy, thereby alleviating maternal organ hypoperfusion, which is a major pathogenic manifestation of severe preeclampsia. Specifically, by exploiting its pleiotropic hemodynamic attributes in preeclampsia, relaxin administration is predicted to (i) reverse robust arterial myogenic constriction; (ii) blunt systemic and renal vasoconstriction in response to activation of the angiotensin II receptor, type 1; (iii) mollify the action of endogenous vasoconstrictors on uterine spiral arteries with failed remodeling and retained smooth muscle; (iv) increase arterial compliance; (v) enhance insulin-mediated glucose disposal by promoting skeletal muscle vasodilation and (vi) mobilize and activate bone marrow-derived angiogenic progenitor cells, thereby repairing injured endothelium and improving maternal vascularity in organs such as breast, uterus, pancreas, skin and fat. By exploiting its pleiotropic molecular attributes in preeclampsia, relaxin supplementation is

  18. Somatostatin Negatively Regulates Parasite Burden and Granulomatous Responses in Cysticercosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitra Khumbatta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cysticercosis is an infection of tissues with the larval cysts of the cestode, Taenia  solium. While live parasites elicit little or no inflammation, dying parasites initiate a granulomatous reaction presenting as painful muscle nodules or seizures when cysts are located in the brain. We previously showed in the T. crassiceps murine model of cysticercosis that substance P (SP, a neuropeptide, was detected in early granulomas and was responsible for promoting granuloma formation, while somatostatin (SOM, another neuropeptide and immunomodulatory hormone, was detected in late granulomas; SOM’s contribution to granuloma formation was not examined. In the current studies, we used somatostatin knockout (SOM−/− mice to examine the hypothesis that SOM downmodulates granulomatous inflammation in cysticercosis, thereby promoting parasite growth. Our results demonstrated that parasite burden was reduced 5.9-fold in SOM−/− mice compared to WT mice (P<0.05. This reduction in parasite burden in SOM−/− mice was accompanied by a 95% increase in size of their granulomas (P<0.05, which contained a 1.5-fold increase in levels of IFN-γ and a 26-fold decrease in levels of IL-1β (P<0.05 for both compared to granulomas from WT mice. Thus, SOM regulates both parasite burden and granulomatous inflammation perhaps through modulating granuloma production of IFN-γ and IL-1β.

  19. Active postoperative acromegaly: sustained remission after discontinuation of somatostatin analogues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Alvarez-Escola

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In patients with active acromegaly after pituitary surgery, somatostatin analogues are effective in controlling the disease and can even be curative in some cases. After treatment discontinuation, the likelihood of disease recurrence is high. However, a small subset of patients remains symptom-free after discontinuation, with normalized growth hormone (GH and insulin-like growth factor (IGF1 levels. The characteristics of patients most likely to achieve sustained remission after treatment discontinuation are not well understood, although limited evidence suggests that sustained remission is more likely in patients with lower GH and IGF1 levels before treatment withdrawal, in those who respond well to low-dose treatment, in those without evidence of adenoma on an MRI scan and/or in patients who receive long-term treatment. In this report, we describe the case of a 56-year-old female patient treated with lanreotide Autogel for 11 years. Treatment was successfully discontinued, and the patient is currently disease-free on all relevant parameters (clinical, biochemical and tumour status. The successful outcome in this case adds to the small body of literature suggesting that some well-selected patients who receive long-term treatment with somatostatin analogues may achieve sustained remission.

  20. Tumour uptake of the radiolabelled somatostatin analogue [DOTA0,TYR3]octreotide is dependent on the peptide amount

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jong, M. de; Breeman, W.A.P.; Bernard, B.F.; Gameren, A. van; Bruin, E. de; Bakker, W.H.; Van der Pluijm, M.E.; Krenning, E.P.; Visser, T.J.; Maecke, H.R.

    1999-01-01

    Radiolabelled tumour receptor-binding peptides can be used for in vivo scintigraphic imaging. Recently, the somatostatin analogue [Tyr 3 ]octreotide (d-Phe-c(Cys-Tyr-d-Trp-Lys-Thr-Cys)-Thr(ol)) was derivatized with the chelator DOTA (tetra-azacyclododecane-tetra-acetic acid), enabling stable radiolabelling with both the high-energy beta particle-emitter yttrium-90 and the Auger electron-emitter indium-111. The thus produced radiolabelled compounds are promising for peptide receptor radionuclide therapy. Our previous in vitro and in vivo (rat) experiments with these radiolabelled compounds showed favourable binding and biodistribution characteristics with high uptake and retention in the target organs. We also demonstrated receptor-specific, time- and temperature-dependent internalization of radiolabelled [DOTA 0 ,Tyr 3 ]octreotide in somatostatin receptor subtype 2 (sst 2 )-positive rat pancreatic tumour cell lines. In this study we have investigated the effects of differences in the amount of injected peptide on tissue distribution of 111 In-labelled [DOTA 0 ,Tyr 3 ]octreotide in normal, i.e. non-tumour-bearing, and CA20948 tumour-bearing rats. This was done in order to find the amount of peptide at which the highest uptake in target tissues is achieved, and thereby to increase the potential of radionuclide therapy while simultaneously ensuring the lowest possible radiotoxicity in normal organs. Uptake of radiolabelled [DOTA 0 ,Tyr 3 ]octreotide in sst 2 -positive organs showed different bell-shaped functions of the amount of injected peptide, being highest at 0.05 (adrenals), 0.05-0.1 (pituitary and stomach) and 0.25 (pancreas) μg. Uptake in the tumour was highest at 0.5 μg injected peptide. The highest uptake was found at peptide amounts that were lower than those reported for [ 111 In-DTPA 0 ]octreotide (d-Phe-c(Cys-Phe-d-Trp-Lys-Thr-Cys)-Thr(ol), DTPA = diethylene-triamine-penta-acetic acid), consistent with the higher receptor affinity of the first compound

  1. Novel nonsense mutation of the endothelin-B receptor gene in a family with Waardenburg-Hirschsprung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syrris, P; Carter, N D; Patton, M A

    1999-11-05

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) comprises sensorineural hearing loss, hypopigmentation of skin and hair, and pigmentary disturbances of the irides. Four types of WS have been classified to date; in WS type IV (WS4), patients additionally have colonic aganglionosis (Hirschsprung disease, HSCR). Mutations in the endothelin-3 (EDN3), endothelin-B receptor (EDNRB), and Sox10 genes have been identified as causative for WS type IV. We screened a family with a combined WS-HSCR phenotype for mutations in the EDNRB locus using standard DNA mutation analysis and sequencing techniques. We have identified a novel nonsense mutation at codon 253 (CGA-->TGA, Arg-->STOP). This mutation leads to a premature end of the translation of EDNRB at exon 3, and it is predicted to produce a truncated and nonfunctional endothelin-B receptor. All affected relatives were heterozygous for the Arg(253)-->STOP mutation, whereas it was not observed in over 50 unrelated individuals used as controls. These data confirm the role of EDNRB in the cause of the Waardenburg-Hirschsprung syndrome and demonstrate that in WS-HSCR there is a lack of correlation between phenotype and genotype and a variable expression of disease even within the same family. Copyright 1999 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. Microbial receptor assay for rapid detection and identification of seven families of antimicrobial drugs in milk: collaborative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charm, S.E.; Chi, R.

    1988-01-01

    A microbial competitive receptor assay for detecting residues of antibiotic families in milk was studied collaboratively by 13 laboratories. In this method, microbial cells added to a milk sample provide specific binding sites for which 14 C or 3 H labeled drug competes with drug resides in the sample. The 14 C or 3 H binding to the specific binding sites is measured in a scintillation counter and compared with a zero standard milk. If the sample is statistically different from the zero standard, it is positive. The assay takes about 15 min. The binding reaction occurs between the receptor site and the drug functional group, so all members of a drug family are detected. In this case, beta-lactams, tetracyclines, macrolides, aminoglycosides, novobiocin, chloramphenicol, and sulfonamides, including p-amino-benzoic acid (PABA) and its other analogs, are detectable. The incidence of false negative determinations among samples is about 1%; the incidence of false positives is about 3%. For negative cases, the relative standard deviations for repeatability ranged from 0 to 5% and for reproducibility from 0 to 6%. For positive cases, relative standard deviations ranged from 0 to 13% for repeatability and from 0 to 14% for reproducibility. The method has been adopted official first action

  3. Effects of the neuroprotective drugs somatostatin and brimonidine on retinal cell models of diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltramo, Elena; Lopatina, Tatiana; Mazzeo, Aurora; Arroba, Ana I; Valverde, Angela M; Hernández, Cristina; Simó, Rafael; Porta, Massimo

    2016-12-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is considered a microvascular disease, but recent evidence has underlined early involvement of the neuroretina with interactions between microvascular and neural alterations. Topical administration of somatostatin (SST), a neuroprotective molecule with antiangiogenic properties, prevents diabetes-induced retinal neurodegeneration in animals. The α 2 -adrenergic receptor agonist brimonidine (BRM) decreases vitreoretinal vascular endothelial growth factor and inhibits blood-retinal barrier breakdown in diabetic rats. However, SST and BRM effects on microvascular cells have not yet been studied. We investigated the behaviour of these drugs on the crosstalk between microvasculature and neuroretina. Expression of SST receptors 1-5 in human retinal pericytes (HRP) was checked. We subsequently evaluated the effects of diabetic-like conditions (high glucose and/or hypoxia) with/without SST/BRM on HRP survival. Endothelial cells (EC) and photoreceptors were maintained in the above conditions and their conditioned media (CM) used to culture HRP. Vice versa, HRP-CM was used on EC and photoreceptors. Survival parameters were assessed. HRP express the SST receptor 1 (SSTR1). Glucose fluctuations mimicking those occurring in diabetic subjects are more damaging for pericytes and photoreceptors than stable high glucose and hypoxic conditions. SST/BRM added to HRP in diabetic-like conditions decrease EC apoptosis. However, neither SST nor BRM changed the response of pericytes and neuroretina-vascular crosstalk under diabetic-like conditions. Retinal pericytes express SSTR1, indicating that they can be a target for SST. Exposure to SST/BRM had no adverse effects, direct or mediated by the neuroretina, suggesting that these molecules could be safely evaluated for the treatment of ocular diseases.

  4. En route to new blockbuster antihistamines:surveying the offspring of the expanding histamine receptor family

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leurs, R.; Vischer, H.F.; Wijtmans, M.; De Esch, I.J.

    2011-01-01

    With the recognition of two new histamine receptors at the start of the new millennium, the field of histamine research has seen a clear revival. In the last 10 years, many academic and industrial groups have taken up the challenge to target these new members of the aminergic G-protein-coupled

  5. Ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs) of the delta family (GluD1 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Muhammad Zahid Khan

    2016-10-20

    Oct 20, 2016 ... GluD1 knockout mice (GluD1 KO) have normal learning in the Morris water maze .... could bind and activate the receptor.5,6 D-Ser and glycine have now been identified as .... English editing of this manuscript. References. 1.

  6. Ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs) of the delta family (GluD1 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... such as Neurexin1. This review presents current knowledge regarding the expression, structure and function of Glu delta receptors (GluD1, GluD2) in brain, focusing on synapse formation, function and dysfunction. Keywords: iGluRs; GluD1; GluD2; Synaptogenesis; Autism spectrum disorder (ASD); Schizophrenia (SCZ) ...

  7. Polymorphisms in the estrogen receptor 1 and vitamin C and matrix metalloproteinase gene families are associated with susceptibility to lymphoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine F Skibola

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL is the fifth most common cancer in the U.S. and few causes have been identified. Genetic association studies may help identify environmental risk factors and enhance our understanding of disease mechanisms. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: 768 coding and haplotype tagging SNPs in 146 genes were examined using Illumina GoldenGate technology in a large population-based case-control study of NHL in the San Francisco Bay Area (1,292 cases 1,375 controls are included here. Statistical analyses were restricted to HIV- participants of white non-Hispanic origin. Genes involved in steroidogenesis, immune function, cell signaling, sunlight exposure, xenobiotic metabolism/oxidative stress, energy balance, and uptake and metabolism of cholesterol, folate and vitamin C were investigated. Sixteen SNPs in eight pathways and nine haplotypes were associated with NHL after correction for multiple testing at the adjusted q<0.10 level. Eight SNPs were tested in an independent case-control study of lymphoma in Germany (494 NHL cases and 494 matched controls. Novel associations with common variants in estrogen receptor 1 (ESR1 and in the vitamin C receptor and matrix metalloproteinase gene families were observed. Four ESR1 SNPs were associated with follicular lymphoma (FL in the U.S. study, with rs3020314 remaining associated with reduced risk of FL after multiple testing adjustments [odds ratio (OR = 0.42, 95% confidence interval (CI = 0.23-0.77 and replication in the German study (OR = 0.24, 95% CI = 0.06-0.94. Several SNPs and haplotypes in the matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP3 and MMP9 genes and in the vitamin C receptor genes, solute carrier family 23 member 1 (SLC23A1 and SLC23A2, showed associations with NHL risk. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings suggest a role for estrogen, vitamin C and matrix metalloproteinases in the pathogenesis of NHL that will require further validation.

  8. Characterization of a family of gamma-ray-induced CHO mutants demonstrates that the ldlA locus is diploid and encodes the low-density lipoprotein receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sege, R.D.; Kozarsky, K.F.; Krieger, M.

    1986-01-01

    The ldlA locus is one of four Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell loci which are known to be required for the synthesis of functional low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptors. Previous studies have suggested that the ldlA locus is diploid and encodes the LDL receptor. To confirm this assignment, we have isolated a partial genomic clone of the Chinese hamster LDL receptor gene and used this and other nucleic acid and antibody probes to study a family of ldlA mutants isolated after gamma-irradiation. Our analysis suggests that there are two LDL receptor alleles in wild-type CHO cells. Each of the three mutants isolated after gamma-irradiation had detectable deletions affecting one of the two LDL receptor alleles. One of the mutants also had a disruption of the remaining allele, resulting in the synthesis of an abnormal receptor precursor which was not subject to Golgi-associated posttranslational glycoprotein processing. The correlation of changes in the expression, structure, and function of LDL receptors with deletions in the LDL receptor genes in these mutants directly demonstrated that the ldlA locus in CHO cells is diploid and encodes the LDL receptor. In addition, our analysis suggests that CHO cells in culture may contain a partial LDL receptor pseudogene

  9. On the Emerging Role of the Taste Receptor Type 1 (T1R Family of Nutrient-Sensors in the Musculoskeletal System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoichiro Kokabu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The special sense of taste guides and guards food intake and is essential for body maintenance. Salty and sour tastes are sensed via ion channels or gated ion channels while G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs of the taste receptor type 1 (T1R family sense sweet and umami tastes and GPCRs of the taste receptor type 2 (T2R family sense bitter tastes. T1R and T2R receptors share similar downstream signaling pathways that result in the stimulation of phospholipase-C-β2. The T1R family includes three members that form heterodimeric complexes to recognize either amino acids or sweet molecules such as glucose. Although these functions were originally described in gustatory tissue, T1R family members are expressed in numerous non-gustatory tissues and are now viewed as nutrient sensors that play important roles in monitoring global glucose and amino acid status. Here, we highlight emerging evidence detailing the function of T1R family members in the musculoskeletal system and review these findings in the context of the musculoskeletal diseases sarcopenia and osteoporosis, which are major public health problems among the elderly that affect locomotion, activities of daily living, and quality of life. These studies raise the possibility that T1R family member function may be modulated for therapeutic benefit.

  10. Joint association of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor variants with abdominal obesity in American Indians: the Strong Heart Family Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yun; Yang, Jingyun; Yeh, Fawn; Cole, Shelley A; Haack, Karin; Lee, Elisa T; Howard, Barbara V; Zhao, Jinying

    2014-01-01

    Cigarette smoke is a strong risk factor for obesity and cardiovascular disease. The effect of genetic variants involved in nicotine metabolism on obesity or body composition has not been well studied. Though many genetic variants have previously been associated with adiposity or body fat distribution, a single variant usually confers a minimal individual risk. The goal of this study is to evaluate the joint association of multiple variants involved in cigarette smoke or nicotine dependence with obesity-related phenotypes in American Indians. To achieve this goal, we genotyped 61 tagSNPs in seven genes encoding nicotine acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in 3,665 American Indians participating in the Strong Heart Family Study. Single SNP association with obesity-related traits was tested using family-based association, adjusting for traditional risk factors including smoking. Joint association of all SNPs in the seven nAChRs genes were examined by gene-family analysis based on weighted truncated product method (TPM). Multiple testing was controlled by false discovery rate (FDR). Results demonstrate that multiple SNPs showed weak individual association with one or more measures of obesity, but none survived correction for multiple testing. However, gene-family analysis revealed significant associations with waist circumference (p = 0.0001) and waist-to-hip ratio (p = 0.0001), but not body mass index (p = 0.20) and percent body fat (p = 0.29), indicating that genetic variants are jointly associated with abdominal, but not general, obesity among American Indians. The observed combined genetic effect is independent of cigarette smoking per se. In conclusion, multiple variants in the nAChR gene family are jointly associated with abdominal obesity in American Indians, independent of general obesity and cigarette smoking per se.

  11. Novel sst2-selective somatostatin agonists. Three-dimensional consensus structure by NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grace, Christy Rani R.; Erchegyi, Judit; Koerber, Steven C.; Reubi, Jean Claude; Rivier, Jean; Riek, Roland

    2008-01-01

    The three-dimensional NMR structures of six octapeptide agonist analogues of somatostatin (SRIF) in the free form are described. These analogues, with the basic sequence H-DPhe/Phe2-c[Cys3-Xxx7-DTrp8-Lys9-Thr10-Cys14]-Thr-NH2 (the numbering refers to the position in native SRIF), with Xxx7 being Ala/Aph, exhibit potent and highly selective binding to human SRIF type 2 (sst2) receptors. The backbone of these sst2-selective analogues have the usual type-II’ β-turn reported in the literature for sst2/3/5-subtype-selective analogues. Correlating biological results and NMR studies led to the identification of the side chains of DPhe2, DTrp8 and Lys9 as the necessary components of the sst2 pharmacophore. This is the first study to show that the aromatic ring at position 7 (Phe7) is not critical for sst2 binding and that it plays an important role in sst3 and sst5 binding. This pharmacophore is therefore different from that proposed by others for sst2/3/5 analogues. PMID:16854054

  12. The radioimmunoassay and physiology of somatostatin in the pancreas and gastrointestinal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, C; Arnold, R

    1978-05-01

    Radioimmunoassays for somatostain have demonstrated that high concentrations of the polypeptide are present in the pancreas and gastrointestinal tract of a number of species. Although measurement in tissue extracts is relatively unproblematic, detection and characterization of somatostatin-like material in plasma has proved technically difficult. Studies of pancreatic somatostatin release in vitro suggest a possible function in the regulation of islet hormone secretion, but the mode of action remains to be elucidated. Although, at present, no clinical relevance can be attributed to the somatostain radioimmunoassay reports of somatostatin secreting tumors and changes in stomach tissue content in patients with ulcer disease indicate a contributory role in the pathophysiology of certain disease states.

  13. Feeding and the rhodopsin family G-Protein Coupled Receptors (GPCRs in nematodes and arthropods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joao Carlos dos Reis Cardoso

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In vertebrates, receptors of the rhodopsin G-protein coupled superfamily (GPCRs play an important role in the regulation of feeding and energy homeostasis and are activated by peptide hormones produced in the brain-gut axis. These peptides regulate appetite and energy expenditure by promoting or inhibiting food intake. Sequence and function homologues of human GPCRs involved in feeding exist in the nematode roundworm, Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans and the arthropod fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster (D. melanogaster, suggesting that the mechanisms that regulate food intake emerged early and have been conserved during metazoan radiation. Nematodes and arthropods are the most diverse and successful animal phyla on Earth. They can survive in a vast diversity of environments and have acquired distinct life styles and feeding strategies. The aim of the present review is to investigate if this diversity has affected the evolution of invertebrate GPCRs. Homologues of the C. elegans and D. melanogaster rhodopsin receptors were characterized in the genome of other nematodes and arthropods and receptor evolution compared. With the exception of bombesin receptors (BBR that are absent from nematodes, a similar gene complement was found. In arthropods, rhodopsin GPCR evolution is characterized by species-specific gene duplications and deletions and in nematodes by gene expansions in species with a free-living stage and gene deletions in representatives of obligate parasitic taxa. Based upon variation in GPCR gene number and potentially divergent functions within phyla we hypothesize that life style and feeding diversity practiced by nematodes and arthropods was one factor that contributed to rhodopsin GPCR gene evolution. Understanding how the regulation of food intake has evolved in invertebrates will contribute to the development of novel drugs to control nematodes and arthropods and the pests and diseases that use them as vectors.

  14. Feeding and the rhodopsin family g-protein coupled receptors in nematodes and arthropods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, João C R; Félix, Rute C; Fonseca, Vera G; Power, Deborah M

    2012-01-01

    In vertebrates, receptors of the rhodopsin G-protein coupled superfamily (GPCRs) play an important role in the regulation of feeding and energy homeostasis and are activated by peptide hormones produced in the brain-gut axis. These peptides regulate appetite and energy expenditure by promoting or inhibiting food intake. Sequence and function homologs of human GPCRs involved in feeding exist in the nematode roundworm, Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans), and the arthropod fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster (D. melanogaster), suggesting that the mechanisms that regulate food intake emerged early and have been conserved during metazoan radiation. Nematodes and arthropods are the most diverse and successful animal phyla on Earth. They can survive in a vast diversity of environments and have acquired distinct life styles and feeding strategies. The aim of the present review is to investigate if this diversity has affected the evolution of invertebrate GPCRs. Homologs of the C. elegans and D. melanogaster rhodopsin receptors were characterized in the genome of other nematodes and arthropods and receptor evolution compared. With the exception of bombesin receptors (BBR) that are absent from nematodes, a similar gene complement was found. In arthropods, rhodopsin GPCR evolution is characterized by species-specific gene duplications and deletions and in nematodes by gene expansions in species with a free-living stage and gene deletions in representatives of obligate parasitic taxa. Based upon variation in GPCR gene number and potentially divergent functions within phyla we hypothesize that life style and feeding diversity practiced by nematodes and arthropods was one factor that contributed to rhodopsin GPCR gene evolution. Understanding how the regulation of food intake has evolved in invertebrates will contribute to the development of novel drugs to control nematodes and arthropods and the pests and diseases that use them as vectors.

  15. Identification and phylogeny of the tomato receptor-like proteins family

    OpenAIRE

    Ermis Yanes-Paz; Gioser María Ramos-Echazábal; Glay Chinea; Yanelis Capdesuñer Ruiz; Ramón Santos Bermúdez

    2017-01-01

    The receptor-like proteins (RLPs) play multiple roles in development and defense. In the current work 75 RLPs were identified in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) using iterative BLAST searches and domain prediction. A phylogenetic tree including all the identified RLPs from tomato and some functionally characterized RLPs from other species was built to identify their putative homologues in tomato. We first tested whether C3-F-based phylogeny was a good indicator of functional relation between...

  16. Multiple functions and essential roles of nuclear receptor coactivators of bHLH-PAS family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecenova, L; Farkas, Robert

    2016-07-01

    Classical non-peptide hormones, such as steroids, retinoids, thyroid hormones, vitamin D3 and their derivatives including prostaglandins, benzoates, oxysterols, and bile acids, are collectively designated as small lipophilic ligands, acting via binding to the nuclear receptors (NRs). The NRs form a large superfamily of transcription factors that participate virtually in every key biological process. They control various aspects of animal development, fertility, gametogenesis, and numerous metabolic pathways, and can be misregulated in many types of cancers. Their enormous functional plasticity, as transcription factors, relates in part to NR-mediated interactions with plethora of coregulatory proteins upon ligand binding to their ligand binding domains (LBD), or following covalent modification. Here, we review some general views of a specific group of NR coregulators, so-called nuclear receptor coactivators (NRCs) or steroid receptor coactivators (SRCs) and highlight some of their unique functions/roles, which are less extensively mentioned and discussed in other reviews. We also try to pinpoint few neglected moments in the cooperative action of SRCs, which may also indicate their variable roles in the hormone-independent signaling pathways.

  17. Clinical applications of somatostatin analogs for growth hormone-secreting pituitary adenomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang JW

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ji-wen Wang,1,2 Ying Li,3 Zhi-gang Mao,1,2 Bin Hu,1,2 Xiao-bing Jiang,1,2 Bing-bing Song,4 Xin Wang,4 Yong-hong Zhu,4 Hai-jun Wang1,21Department of Neurosurgery and Pituitary Tumor Center, The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, 2Key Laboratory of Pituitary Adenoma in Guangdong Province, 3State Key Laboratory of Ophthalmology, Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center, Sun Yat-sen University, 4Department of Histology and Embryology, Zhongshan School of Medicine, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, People's Republic of ChinaAbstract: Excessive growth hormone (GH is usually secreted by GH-secreting pituitary adenomas and causes gigantism in juveniles or acromegaly in adults. The clinical complications involving cardiovascular, respiratory, and metabolic systems lead to elevated morbidity in acromegaly. Control of serum GH and insulin-like growth factor (IGF 1 hypersecretion by surgery or pharmacotherapy can decrease morbidity. Current pharmacotherapy includes somatostatin analogs (SAs and GH receptor antagonist; the former consists of lanreotide Autogel (ATG and octreotide long-acting release (LAR, and the latter refers to pegvisomant. As primary medical therapy, lanreotide ATG and octreotide LAR can be supplied in a long-lasting formulation to achieve biochemical control of GH and IGF-1 by subcutaneous injection every 4–6 weeks. Lanreotide ATG and octreotide LAR provide an effective medical treatment, whether as a primary or secondary therapy, for the treatment of GH-secreting pituitary adenoma; however, to maximize benefits with the least cost, several points should be emphasized before the application of SAs. A comprehensive assessment, especially of the observation of clinical predictors and preselection of SA treatment, should be completed in advance. A treatment process lasting at least 3 months should be implemented to achieve a long-term stable blood concentration. More satisfactory surgical outcomes for noninvasive macroadenomas treated

  18. Clinical Significance of ErbB Receptor Family in Urothelial Carcinoma of the Bladder: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuh-Shyan Tsai

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The prognostic importance of examining ErbB receptor family expression in human bladder cancer remains uncertain. Using published evidence, we examined the clinical value and the updated results of clinical trials targeting ErbB receptor family members. Twenty-seven articles from 65 references related to ErbB receptor expression assessment in bladder cancer were reviewed. The estimates included the association significance, hazard ratios, and 95% confidence intervals (CIs from actuarial curves and survival analyses. A meta-analysis was done on those reports using univariate log-rank tests or a Cox-regression model. The methods of analysis and study subjects chosen varied widely among studies. The overall risks of disease progression for patients with EGFR or ErbB2 overexpression were 4.5 (95% CI: 2.5–8.4 and 1.1 (95% CI: 0.6–1.9, and the risks of mortality were 3.0 (95% CI: 1.6–5.9 and 1.1 (95% CI: 1.0–1.2, respectively. However, the significance of coexpression patterns of the ErbB receptor family remains controversial. None of six clinical trials yielded convincing results for blockading ErbB receptor signaling in urothelial carcinoma. The results of this analysis suggest that assessing co-expression patterns of the ErbB family may provide better prognostic information for bladder cancer patients.

  19. Ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs of the delta family (GluD1 and GluD2 and synaptogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Zahid Khan

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Glutamate delta-1 (GluD1 and glutamate delta-2 (GluD2 form the delta family of ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs and are distinct from other (iGluRs in that they do not exhibit typical agonist-induced ion channel currents. Recent studies have demonstrated a crucial role of the delta receptors in synapse formation by interacting with presynaptic proteins such as Neurexin1. This review presents current knowledge regarding the expression, structure and function of Glu delta receptors (GluD1, GluD2 in brain, focusing on synapse formation, function and dysfunction.

  20. receptores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salete Regina Daronco Benetti

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Se trata de un estudio etnográfico, que tuvo lo objetivo de interpretar el sistema de conocimiento y del significado atribuidos a la sangre referente a la transfusión sanguínea por los donadores y receptores de un banco de sangre. Para la colecta de las informaciones se observaron los participantes y la entrevista etnográfica se realizó el análisis de dominio, taxonómicos y temáticos. Los dominios culturales fueron: la sangre es vida: fuente de vida y alimento valioso; creencias religiosas: fuentes simbólicas de apoyos; donación sanguínea: un gesto colaborador que exige cuidarse, gratifica y trae felicidad; donación sanguínea: fuente simbólica de inseguridad; estar enfermo es una condición para realizar transfusión sanguínea; transfusión sanguínea: esperanza de vida; Creencias populares: transfusión sanguínea como riesgo para la salud; donadores de sangre: personas benditas; donar y recibir sangre: como significado de felicidad. Temática: “líquido precioso que origina, sostiene, modifica la vida, provoca miedo e inseguridad”.

  1. Functional evolution of a multigene family: orthologous and paralogous pheromone receptor genes in the turnip moth, Agrotis segetum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan-Dan Zhang

    Full Text Available Lepidopteran pheromone receptors (PRs, for which orthologies are evident among closely related species, provide an intriguing example of gene family evolution in terms of how new functions may arise. However, only a limited number of PRs have been functionally characterized so far and thus evolutionary scenarios suffer from elements of speculation. In this study we investigated the turnip moth Agrotis segetum, in which female moths produce a mixture of chemically related pheromone components that elicit specific responses from receptor cells on male antennae. We cloned nine A. segetum PR genes and the Orco gene by degenerate primer based RT-PCR. The nine PR genes, named as AsegOR1 and AsegOR3-10, fall into four distinct orthologous clusters of known lepidopteran PRs, of which one contains six paralogues. The paralogues are under relaxed selective pressure, contrasting with the purifying selection on other clusters. We identified the receptors AsegOR9, AsegOR4 and AsegOR5, specific for the respective homologous pheromone components (Z-5-decenyl, (Z-7-dodecenyl and (Z-9-tetradecenyl acetates, by two-electrode voltage clamp recording from Xenopus laevis oocytes co-expressing Orco and each PR candidate. These receptors occur in three different orthologous clusters. We also found that the six paralogues with high sequence similarity vary dramatically in ligand selectivity and sensitivity. Different from AsegOR9, AsegOR6 showed a relatively large response to the behavioural antagonist (Z-5-decenol, and a small response to (Z-5-decenyl acetate. AsegOR1 was broadly tuned, but most responsive to (Z-5-decenyl acetate, (Z-7-dodecenyl acetate and the behavioural antagonist (Z-8-dodecenyl acetate. AsegOR8 and AsegOR7, which differ from AsegOR6 and AsegOR1 by 7 and 10 aa respectively, showed much lower sensitivities. AsegOR10 showed only small responses to all the tested compounds. These results suggest that new receptors arise through gene duplication, and

  2. Somatostatin analogues labelled with 99mTc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obenaus, Esteban R.; Crudo, Jose L.; Edreira, Martin M.; Castiglia, Silvia G.

    1999-01-01

    Biological and radiochemical studies have been carried out on two labelled somatostatin analogues, the peptide RC-150 and the Tyr 3 -Octreotide. Both analogues have been labelled with 99m Tc using the direct and the indirect method and MAG-3 and HYNIC as chelating agents. By the direct method RC-150 was labelled using sodium ascorbate and dithionite as reducing agents. The radiochemical purity was 70%. By the indirect method, in the case of RC-160 with MAG-3 a radiochemical purity higher than 70% was attained while a purity of 100% was reached in the case of Tyr 3 -Octreotide with HYNIC. The biological distribution of HYNIC-Tyr 3 -Octreotide has been studied in rats. (author)

  3. The Toll-like receptor gene family is integrated into human DNA damage and p53 networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Menendez

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In recent years the functions that the p53 tumor suppressor plays in human biology have been greatly extended beyond "guardian of the genome." Our studies of promoter response element sequences targeted by the p53 master regulatory transcription factor suggest a general role for this DNA damage and stress-responsive regulator in the control of human Toll-like receptor (TLR gene expression. The TLR gene family mediates innate immunity to a wide variety of pathogenic threats through recognition of conserved pathogen-associated molecular motifs. Using primary human immune cells, we have examined expression of the entire TLR gene family following exposure to anti-cancer agents that induce the p53 network. Expression of all TLR genes, TLR1 to TLR10, in blood lymphocytes and alveolar macrophages from healthy volunteers can be induced by DNA metabolic stressors. However, there is considerable inter-individual variability. Most of the TLR genes respond to p53 via canonical as well as noncanonical promoter binding sites. Importantly, the integration of the TLR gene family into the p53 network is unique to primates, a recurrent theme raised for other gene families in our previous studies. Furthermore, a polymorphism in a TLR8 response element provides the first human example of a p53 target sequence specifically responsible for endogenous gene induction. These findings-demonstrating that the human innate immune system, including downstream induction of cytokines, can be modulated by DNA metabolic stress-have many implications for health and disease, as well as for understanding the evolution of damage and p53 responsive networks.

  4. Oestrogen receptor beta isoform expression in sporadic colorectal cancer, familial adenomatous polyposis and progressive stages of colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stevanato Filho, Paulo Roberto; Aguiar Júnior, Samuel; Begnami, Maria Dirlei

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Among the sex hormones, oestrogen may play a role in colorectal cancer, particularly in conjunction with oestrogen receptor-β (ERβ). The expression of ERβ isoform variants and their correlations with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) syndrome and sporadic colorectal carcinomas...... was identified in sporadic polyps and in sporadic colorectal cancer as well as in polyps from FAP syndrome patients compared with normal tissues (p expression in polyps (p ..., no differences were observed when sporadic colorectal carcinomas were compared to normal mucosa tissues. These findings suggest an association of the ERβ isoform variants in individuals affected by germline mutations of the APC gene. Progressively decreased expression of ERβ was found in polyps at early stages...

  5. Harnessing Integrative Omics to Facilitate Molecular Imaging of the Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Family for Precision Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pool, Martin; de Boer, H Rudolf; Hooge, Marjolijn N Lub-de; van Vugt, Marcel A T M; de Vries, Elisabeth G E

    2017-01-01

    Cancer is a growing problem worldwide. The cause of death in cancer patients is often due to treatment-resistant metastatic disease. Many molecularly targeted anticancer drugs have been developed against 'oncogenic driver' pathways. However, these treatments are usually only effective in properly selected patients. Resistance to molecularly targeted drugs through selective pressure on acquired mutations or molecular rewiring can hinder their effectiveness. This review summarizes how molecular imaging techniques can potentially facilitate the optimal implementation of targeted agents. Using the human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER) family as a model in (pre)clinical studies, we illustrate how molecular imaging may be employed to characterize whole body target expression as well as monitor drug effectiveness and the emergence of tumor resistance. We further discuss how an integrative omics discovery platform could guide the selection of 'effect sensors' - new molecular imaging targets - which are dynamic markers that indicate treatment effectiveness or resistance.

  6. Peroxisomal proliferator activated receptor-γ deficiency in a Canadian kindred with familial partial lipodystrophy type 3 (FPLD3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cao Henian

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Familial partial lipodystrophy (Dunnigan type 3 (FPLD3, Mendelian Inheritance in Man [MIM] 604367 results from heterozygous mutations in PPARG encoding peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor-γ. Both dominant-negative and haploinsufficiency mechanisms have been suggested for this condition. Methods We present a Canadian FPLD3 kindred with an affected mother who had loss of fat on arms and legs, but no increase in facial, neck, suprascapular or abdominal fat. She had profound insulin resistance, diabetes, severe hypertriglyceridemia and relapsing pancreatitis, while her pre-pubescent daughter had normal fat distribution but elevated plasma triglycerides and C-peptide and depressed high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Results The mother and daughter were each heterozygous for PPARG nonsense mutation Y355X, whose protein product in vitro was transcriptionally inactive with no dominant-negative activity against the wild-type receptor. In addition the mutant protein appeared to be markedly unstable. Conclusion Taken together with previous studies of human PPARG mutations, these findings suggest that PPAR-γ deficiency due either to haploinsufficiency or to substantial activity loss due to dominant negative interference of the normal allele product's function can each contribute to the FPLD3 phenotype.

  7. Expression profiles of relaxin family peptides and their receptors indicate their influence on spermatogenesis in the domestic cat (Felis catus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, B C; Müller, K; Jewgenow, K

    2015-07-01

    Disturbed spermatogenesis is a common problem in felines. Studying spermatogenesis in the domestic cat can improve the understanding of the biological background and help to counteract fertility problems in other feline species. Here, we analyzed 3 relaxin family peptides (relaxin, relaxin-3, and INSL3) and their receptors (RXFP1, RXFP2, and RXFP3) as potential spermatogenic factors involving their expression in the testis at different stages of its development. It may be concluded from its stage-dependent expression that relaxin, together with RXFP1, appears to be involved in the first stage of spermatogenesis, whereas relaxin-3 via binding to RXFP3 influences spermiogenesis. Furthermore, correlations were observed between relaxin, relaxin-3, RXFP1, RXFP2 and RXFP3 messenger RNA expression, and the relative numbers of haploid cells in testes. The peptide INSL3 was highly expressed at all testis development stages. Because of the low and stage-independent expression of its receptor RXFP2, an auto- and/or paracrine function of INSL3 in spermatogenesis seems unlikely. In the adult testis, messenger RNA expression of relaxin, RXFP1, and RXFP3 predominantly occurs in the tubular testis compartment, whereas INLS3 is mainly expressed in the interstitium. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. STC1 interference on calcitonin family of receptors signaling during osteoblastogenesis via adenylate cyclase inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terra, Silvia R; Cardoso, João Carlos R; Félix, Rute C; Martins, Leo Anderson M; Souza, Diogo Onofre G; Guma, Fatima C R; Canário, Adelino Vicente M; Schein, Vanessa

    2015-03-05

    Stanniocalcin 1 (STC1) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) are involved in bone formation/remodeling. Here we investigate the effects of STC1 on functional heterodimer complex CALCRL/RAMP1, expression and activity during osteoblastogenesis. STC1 did not modify CALCRL and ramp1 gene expression during osteoblastogenesis when compared to controls. However, plasma membrane spatial distribution of CALCRL/RAMP1 was modified in 7-day pre-osteoblasts exposed to either CGRP or STC1, and both peptides induced CALCRL and RAMP1 assembly. CGRP, but not STC1 stimulated cAMP accumulation in 7-day osteoblasts and in CALCRL/RAMP1 transfected HEK293 cells. Furthermore, STC1 inhibited forskolin stimulated cAMP accumulation of HEK293 cells, but not in CALCRL/RAMP1 transfected HEK293 cells. However, STC1 inhibited cAMP accumulation in calcitonin receptor (CTR) HEK293 transfected cells stimulated by calcitonin. In conclusion, STC1 signals through inhibitory G-protein modulates CGRP receptor spatial localization during osteoblastogenesis and may function as a regulatory factor interacting with calcitonin peptide members during bone formation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Identification and phylogeny of the tomato receptor-like proteins family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ermis Yanes-Paz

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The receptor-like proteins (RLPs play multiple roles in development and defense. In the current work 75 RLPs were identified in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L. using iterative BLAST searches and domain prediction. A phylogenetic tree including all the identified RLPs from tomato and some functionally characterized RLPs from other species was built to identify their putative homologues in tomato. We first tested whether C3-F-based phylogeny was a good indicator of functional relation between related proteins of different species. Indeed, the functionally characterized CLAVATA2 (CLV2, the maize ortholog FASCIATED EAR2 (FEA2 and a putative tomato CLV2 described in Uniprot clustered together, which validates the approach. Using this approach Solyc12g042760.1.1 was identified as the putative tomato homologue of TOO MANY MOUTHS (TMM. It was shown that proteins in the same cluster of the phylogenetic tree share functional relations since several clusters of functionally related proteins i.e. the Ve cluster, the Cf cluster, and the Eix clade were formed.   Keywords: phylogeny, receptors, RLP, tomato

  10. Family environment and adult resilience: contributions of positive parenting and the oxytocin receptor gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bekh Bradley

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Abundant research shows that childhood adversity increases the risk for adult psychopathology while research on influences of positive family environment on risk for psychopathology is limited. Similarly, a growing body of research examines genetic and gene by environment predictors of psychopathology, yet such research on predictors of resilience is sparse. Objectives: We examined the role of positive factors in childhood family environment (CFE and the OXTR rs53576 genotype in predicting levels of adult resilient coping and positive affect. We also examined whether the relationship between positive factors in the CFEs and adult resilient coping and positive affect varied across OXTR rs53576 genotype. Methods: We gathered self-report data on childhood environment, trauma history, and adult resilience and positive affect in a sample of 971 African American adults. Results: We found that positive CFE was positively associated with higher levels of resilient coping and positive affect in adulthood after controlling for childhood maltreatment, other trauma, and symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder. We did not find a direct effect of OXTR 53576 on a combined resilient coping/positive-affect-dependent variable, but we did find an interaction of OXTR rs53576 with family environment. Conclusions: Our data suggest that even in the face of adversity, positive aspects of the family environment may contribute to resilience. These results highlight the importance of considering protective developmental experiences and the interaction of such experiences with genetic variants in risk and resilience research.For the abstract or full text in other languages, please see Supplementary files under Article Tools online

  11. Depletion of somatostatin-like immunoreactivity in the rat central nervous system by cysteamine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagar, S.M.; Landry, D.; Millard, W.J.; Badger, T.M.; Arnold, M.A.; Martin, J.B.

    1982-01-01

    Selective neurotoxins have been of value in providing a means for specifically interfering with the actions of endogenous neurotransmitter candidates. Others have shown cysteamine (CSH) to deplete the gastrointestinal tract and hypothalamus of rats of immunoreactive somatostatin, suggesting a toxic action of that compound directed against somatostatin-containing cells. The present study further defines the actions of cysteamine on somatostatin in the central nervous system. (CNS). Cysteamine hydrochloride administered subcutaneously results in a depletion of somatostatin-like immunoreactivity (SLI) in the retina, brain, and cervical spinal cord of rats. The effect is demonstrable at doses of 30 mg/kg of body weight and above, occurs within 2 to 4 hr of a single injection of the drug, and is largely reversible within 1 week. The mean depletion of SLI observed within the CNS varies from 38% in cerebral cortex to 65% in cervical spinal cord 24 hr following administration of CSH, 300 mg/kg of body weight, s.c. By gel permeation chromatography, all molecular weight forms of SLI are affected, with the largest reductions in those forms that co-chromatograph with synthetic somatostatin-14 and somatostatin-28. These results indicate that CSH has a generalized, rapid, and largely reversible effect in depleting SLI from the rat CNS

  12. In vivo somatostatin, vasopressin, and oxytocin synthesis in diabetic rat hypothalamus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernstrom, J.D.; Fernstrom, M.H.; Kwok, R.P.

    1990-01-01

    The in vivo labeling of somatostatin-14, somatostatin-28, arginine vasopressin, and oxytocin was studied in rat hypothalamus after third ventricular administration of [35S]cysteine to streptozotocin-diabetic and normal rats. Immunoreactive somatostatin levels in hypothalamus were unaffected by diabetes, as was the incorporation of [35S]cysteine into hypothalamic somatostatin-14 and somatostatin-28. In contrast, immunoreactive vasopressin levels in hypothalamus and posterior pituitary (and oxytocin levels in posterior pituitary) were below normal in diabetic rats. Moreover, [35S]cysteine incorporation into hypothalamic vasopressin and oxytocin (probably mainly in the paraventricular nucleus because of its proximity to the third ventricular site of label injection) was significantly above normal. The increments in vasopressin and oxytocin labeling were reversed by insulin administration. In vivo cysteine specific activity and the labeling of acid-precipitable protein did not differ between normal and diabetic animals; effects of diabetes on vasopressin and oxytocin labeling were therefore not caused by simple differences in cysteine specific activity. These results suggest that diabetes (1) does not influence the production of somatostatin peptides in hypothalamus but (2) stimulates the synthesis of vasopressin and oxytocin. For vasopressin at least, the increase in synthesis may be a compensatory response to the known increase in its secretion that occurs in uncontrolled diabetes

  13. Iodination and stability of somatostatin analogues: comparison of iodination techniques. A practical overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Blois, Erik; Chan, Ho Sze; Breeman, Wouter A P

    2012-01-01

    For iodination ((125/127)I) of tyrosine-containing peptides, chloramin-T, Pre-Coated Iodo-Gen(®) tubes and Iodo-Beads(®) (Pierce) are commonly used for in vitro radioligand investigations and there have been reliant vendors hereof for decades. However, commercial availability of these radio-iodinated peptides is decreasing. For continuation of our research in this field we investigated and optimized (radio-)iodination of somatostatin analogues. In literature, radioiodination using here described somatostatin analogues and iodination techniques are described separately. Here we present an overview, including High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) separation and characterisation by mass spectrometry, to obtain mono- and di-iodinated analogues. Reaction kinetics of (125/127)I iodinated somatostatin analogues were investigated as function of reaction time and concentration of reactants, including somatostatin analogues, iodine and oxidizing agent. To our knowledge, for the here described somatostatin analogues, no (127)I iodination and optimization are described. (Radio-)iodinated somatostatin analogues could be preserved with a >90% radiochemical purity for 1 month after reversed phase HPLC-purification.

  14. The TAM family receptor tyrosine kinase TYRO3 is a negative regulator of type 2 immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Pamela Y.; Carrera Silva, Eugenio A.; De Kouchkovsky, Dimitri; Joannas, Leonel D.; Hao, Liming; Hu, Donglei; Huntsman, Scott; Eng, Celeste; Licona-Limón, Paula; Weinstein, Jason S.; Herbert, De’Broski R.; Craft, Joseph E.; Flavell, Richard A.; Repetto, Silvia; Correale, Jorge; Burchard, Esteban G.; Torgerson, Dara G.; Ghosh, Sourav; Rothlin, Carla V.

    2016-01-01

    Host responses against metazoan parasites or an array of environmental substances elicit type 2 immunity. Despite its protective function, type 2 immunity also drives allergic diseases. The mechanisms that regulate the magnitude of the type 2 response remain largely unknown. Here, we show that genetic ablation of a receptor tyrosine kinase encoded by Tyro3 in mice or the functional neutralization of its ortholog in human dendritic cells resulted in enhanced type 2 immunity. Furthermore, the TYRO3 agonist PROS1 was induced in T cells by the quintessential type 2 cytokine, interleukin-4. T cell–specific Pros1 knockouts phenocopied the loss of Tyro3. Thus, a PROS1-mediated feedback from adaptive immunity engages a rheostat, TYRO3, on innate immune cells to limit the intensity of type 2 responses. PMID:27034374

  15. Genetic diversity of bitter taste receptor gene family in Sichuan domestic and Tibetan chicken populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yuan; Li, Diyan; Gaur, Uma; Wang, Yan; Wu, Nan; Chen, Binlong; Xu, Zhongxian; Yin, Huadong; Hu, Yaodong; Zhu, Qing

    2016-09-01

    The sense of bitter taste plays a critical role in animals as it can help them to avoid intake of toxic and harmful substances. Previous research had revealed that chicken has only three bitter taste receptor genes (Tas2r1, Tas2r2 and Tas2r7). To better understand the genetic polymorphisms and importance of bitter taste receptor genes (Tas2rs) in chicken, here, we sequenced Tas2rs of 30 Sichuan domestic chickens and 30 Tibetan chickens. Thirteen single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) including three nonsynonymous mutations (m.359G>C, m.503C>A and m.583A>G) were detected in Tas2r1 (m. is the abbreviation for mutation); three SNPs were detected in Tas2r2, but none of them were missense mutation; eight SNPs were detected in Tas2r7 including six nonsynonymous substitutions (m.178G>A, m.421A>C, m.787C>T, m.832G>T, m.907A>T and m.943G>A). Tajima's D neutral test indicates that there is no population expansion in both populations, and the size of the population is relatively stable. All the three networks indicate that red jungle fowls share haplotypes with domestic chickens. In addition, we found that haplotypes H1 and HE1 were positively associated with high-altitude adaptation, whereas haplotypes H4 and HE4 showed a negative correlation with high-altitude adaptation in Tas2rs. Although, chicken has only three Tas2rs, our results showed that both Sichuan domestic chickens and Tibetan chickens have abundant haplotypes in Tas2rs, especially in Tas2r7, which might help chickens to recognize a wide variety of bitter-tasting compounds.

  16. Structure-guided identification of a family of dual receptor-binding PfEMP1 that is associated with cerebral malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lennartz, Frank; Adams, Yvonne; Bengtsson, Anja

    2017-01-01

    Cerebral malaria is a deadly outcome of infection by Plasmodium falciparum, occurring when parasite-infected erythrocytes accumulate in the brain. These erythrocytes display parasite proteins of the PfEMP1 family that bind various endothelial receptors. Despite the importance of cerebral malaria...

  17. Familial partial lipodystrophy phenotype resulting from a single-base mutation in deoxyribonucleic acid-binding domain of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monajemi, Houshang; Zhang, Lin; Li, Gang; Jeninga, Ellen H.; Cao, Henian; Maas, Mario; Brouwer, C. B.; Kalkhoven, Eric; Stroes, Erik; Hegele, Robert A.; Leff, Todd

    2007-01-01

    CONTEXT: Familial partial lipodystrophy (FPLD) results from coding sequence mutations either in LMNA, encoding nuclear lamin A/C, or in PPARG, encoding peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPARgamma). The LMNA form is called FPLD2 (MIM 151660) and the PPARG form is called FPLD3 (MIM

  18. Cbl-family ubiquitin ligases and their recruitment of CIN85 are largely dispensable for epidermal growth factor receptor endocytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Gulzar; Mohapatra, Bhopal; Schulte, Nancy A.; Nadeau, Scott; Luan, Haitao; Zutshi, Neha; Tom, Eric; Ortega-Cava, Cesar; Tu, Chun; Sanada, Masashi; Ogawa, Seishi; Toews, Myron L.; Band, Vimla; Band, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    Members of the Casitas B-Lineage Lymphoma (Cbl) family (Cbl, Cbl-b and Cbl-c) of ubiquitin ligases serve as negative regulators of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs). An essential role of Cbl-family protein-dependent ubiquitination for efficient ligand-induced lysosomal targeting and degradation is now well-accepted. However, a more proximal role of Cbl and Cbl-b as adapters for CIN85-endophilin recruitment to mediate ligand-induced initial internalization of RTKs is supported by some studies but refuted by others. Overexpression and/or incomplete depletion of Cbl proteins in these studies is likely to have contributed to this dichotomy. To address the role of endogenous Cbl and Cbl-b in the internalization step of RTK endocytic traffic, we established Cbl/Cbl-b double-knockout (DKO) mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) and demonstrated that these cells lack the expression of both Cbl-family members as well as endophilin A, while they express CIN85. We show that ligand-induced ubiquitination of EGFR, as a prototype RTK, was abolished in DKO MEFs, and EGFR degradation was delayed. These traits were reversed by ectopic human Cbl expression. EGFR endocytosis, assessed using the internalization of 125I-labeled or fluorescent EGF, or of EGFR itself, was largely retained in Cbl/Cbl-b DKO compared to wild type MEFs. EGFR internalization was also largely intact in Cbl/Cbl-b depleted MCF-10A human mammary epithelial cell line. Inducible shRNA-mediated knockdown of CIN85 in wild type or Cbl/Cbl-b DKO MEFs had no impact on EGFR internalization. Our findings, establish that, at physiological expression levels, Cbl, Cbl-b and CIN85 are largely dispensable for EGFR internalization. Our results support the model that Cbl-CIN85-endophilin complex is not required for efficient internalization of EGFR, a prototype RTK. PMID:25449262

  19. G protein-coupled receptor transmembrane binding pockets and their applications in GPCR research and drug discovery: a survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratochwil, Nicole A; Gatti-McArthur, Silvia; Hoener, Marius C; Lindemann, Lothar; Christ, Andreas D; Green, Luke G; Guba, Wolfgang; Martin, Rainer E; Malherbe, Pari; Porter, Richard H P; Slack, Jay P; Winnig, Marcel; Dehmlow, Henrietta; Grether, Uwe; Hertel, Cornelia; Narquizian, Robert; Panousis, Constantinos G; Kolczewski, Sabine; Steward, Lucinda

    2011-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) share a common architecture consisting of seven transmembrane (TM) domains. Various lines of evidence suggest that this fold provides a generic binding pocket within the TM region for hosting agonists, antagonists, and allosteric modulators. Hence, an automated method was developed that allows a fast analysis and comparison of these generic ligand binding pockets across the entire GPCR family by providing the relevant information for all GPCRs in the same format. This methodology compiles amino acids lining the TM binding pocket including parts of the ECL2 loop in a so-called 1D ligand binding pocket vector and translates these 1D vectors in a second step into 3D receptor pharmacophore models. It aims to support various aspects of GPCR drug discovery in the pharmaceutical industry. Applications of pharmacophore similarity analysis of these 1D LPVs include definition of receptor subfamilies, prediction of species differences within subfamilies in regard to in vitro pharmacology and identification of nearest neighbors for GPCRs of interest to generate starting points for GPCR lead identification programs. These aspects of GPCR research are exemplified in the field of melanopsins, trace amine-associated receptors and somatostatin receptor subtype 5. In addition, it is demonstrated how 3D pharmacophore models of the LPVs can support the prediction of amino acids involved in ligand recognition, the understanding of mutational data in a 3D context and the elucidation of binding modes for GPCR ligands and their evaluation. Furthermore, guidance through 3D receptor pharmacophore modeling for the synthesis of subtype-specific GPCR ligands will be reported. Illustrative examples are taken from the GPCR family class C, metabotropic glutamate receptors 1 and 5 and sweet taste receptors, and from the GPCR class A, e.g. nicotinic acid and 5-hydroxytryptamine 5A receptor. © 2011 Bentham Science Publishers

  20. Predictive value of T2 relative signal intensity for response to somatostatin analogs in newly diagnosed acromegaly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Ming; Zhang, Qilin [Fudan University, Department of Neurosurgery, Huashan Hospital, Shanghai Medical College, Shanghai (China); Shanghai Pituitary Tumor Center, Shanghai (China); Liu, Wenjuan; Li, Yiming; Zhang, Zhaoyun; Ye, Hongying; He, Min; Lu, Bin; Yang, Yeping [Shanghai Pituitary Tumor Center, Shanghai (China); Fudan University, Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Huashan Hospital, Shanghai Medical College, Shanghai (China); Wang, Meng [Fudan University, Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Huashan Hospital, Shanghai Medical College, Shanghai (China); Soochow University, Division of Endocrinology, the Second Affiliated Hospital, Suzhou (China); Zhu, Jingjing [Shanghai Pituitary Tumor Center, Shanghai (China); Fudan University, Department of Neuropathology, Huashan Hospital, Shanghai Medical College, Shanghai (China); Ma, Zengyi; He, Wenqiang; Li, Shiqi; Shou, Xuefei; Qiao, Nidan; Ye, Zhao; Zhang, Yichao; Zhao, Yao; Wang, Yongfei [Fudan University, Department of Neurosurgery, Huashan Hospital, Shanghai Medical College, Shanghai (China); Shanghai Pituitary Tumor Center, Shanghai (China); Yao, Zhenwei [Shanghai Pituitary Tumor Center, Shanghai (China); Fudan University, Department of Radiology, Huashan Hospital, Shanghai Medical College, Shanghai (China); Lu, Yun [Fudan University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Huashan Hospital, Shanghai Medical College, Shanghai (China)

    2016-11-15

    The difficulty of predicting the efficacy of somatostatin analogs (SSA) is not fully resolved. Here, we quantitatively evaluated the predictive value of relative signal intensity (rSI) on T1- and T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the short-term efficacy (3 months) of SSA therapy in patients with active acromegaly and assessed the correlation between MRI rSI and expression of somatostatin receptors (SSTR). This was a retrospective review of prospectively recorded data. Ninety-two newly diagnosed patients (37 males and 55 females) with active acromegaly were recruited. All patients were treated with pre-surgical SSA, followed by reassessment and transspenoidal surgery. rSI values were generated by calculating the ratio of SI in the tumor to the SI of normal frontal white matter. The Youden indices were calculated to determine the optimal cutoff of rSI to determine the efficacy of SSA. The correlation between rSI and expression of SSTR2/5 was analyzed by the Spearman rank correlation coefficient. T2 rSI was strongly correlated with biochemical sensitivity to SSA. The cutoff value of T2 rSI to distinguish biochemical sensitivity was 1.205, with a positive predictive value (PPV) of 81.5 % and a negative predictive value (NPV) of 77.3 %. No correlation was found between MRI and tumor size sensitivity. Moreover, T2 rSI was negatively correlated with the expression of SSTR5. T2 rSI correlates with the expression of SSTR5 and quantitatively predicts the biochemical efficacy of SSA in acromegaly. (orig.)

  1. An evaluation of the effects of somatostatin analogue therapy in non-functioning pituitary adenomas in comparison to acromegaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawada, Natalia Bożena; Kunert-Radek, Jolanta; Pawlikowski, Marek; Pisarek, Hanna; Radek, Maciej

    2016-01-01

    Non-functioning pituitary adenomas (NFPA) are often diagnosed late as invasive macroadenomas. The surgical resection is usually incomplete and about 50% of patients require additional surgery. Recent data suggest that somatostatin analogues (SSA), so important in the pharmacotherapy of acromegaly, can also be effective in the management of NFPA. We analysed data of patients who had been treated up to 10 years previously with SSA: 40 with acromegaly (23 - primary, 17 - recurrent tumours) and 22 with NFPA (4 - primary, 18 - recurrent tumours). Hormonal profile, dynamics of tumour size change, ophthalmic syndromes, somatostatin receptor (SSTR) scintigraphy, and immunohistochemistry of SSTR subtypes of operated tumours as well as side effects were investigated. Biochemical cure of acromegaly was achieved in 57.5% of patients, while reduction of tumour size was observed in 37% of patients and it was more frequent in not-operated cases. Regarding NFPA, stabilisation of tumour size was noticed in 68% of patients. Tumour shrinkage was reported in 9% of cases, but in 23% of the study group the adenoma size increased with indication for reoperation. The efficacy of SSA in NFPA is much lower in comparison to their well-established effects in the treatment of acromegaly. Stabilisation of tumour size, which is observed in the majority of NFPA, is significantly more frequent in comparison to the natural history of untreated NFPA and our previous studies as well. Analysis of SSTR subtypes is an argument in favour of introduction of novel broad-spectrum SSA that may be more effective in the treatment of NFPA. Referring to acromegaly, adenoma size decrease was reported more frequently in primary therapy. Considering recurrent tumours better outcomes were achieved in patients who were pre-treated with SSA before planned surgery. (Endokrynol Pol 2016; 67 (3): 292-298).

  2. Predictive value of T2 relative signal intensity for response to somatostatin analogs in newly diagnosed acromegaly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, Ming; Zhang, Qilin; Liu, Wenjuan; Li, Yiming; Zhang, Zhaoyun; Ye, Hongying; He, Min; Lu, Bin; Yang, Yeping; Wang, Meng; Zhu, Jingjing; Ma, Zengyi; He, Wenqiang; Li, Shiqi; Shou, Xuefei; Qiao, Nidan; Ye, Zhao; Zhang, Yichao; Zhao, Yao; Wang, Yongfei; Yao, Zhenwei; Lu, Yun

    2016-01-01

    The difficulty of predicting the efficacy of somatostatin analogs (SSA) is not fully resolved. Here, we quantitatively evaluated the predictive value of relative signal intensity (rSI) on T1- and T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the short-term efficacy (3 months) of SSA therapy in patients with active acromegaly and assessed the correlation between MRI rSI and expression of somatostatin receptors (SSTR). This was a retrospective review of prospectively recorded data. Ninety-two newly diagnosed patients (37 males and 55 females) with active acromegaly were recruited. All patients were treated with pre-surgical SSA, followed by reassessment and transspenoidal surgery. rSI values were generated by calculating the ratio of SI in the tumor to the SI of normal frontal white matter. The Youden indices were calculated to determine the optimal cutoff of rSI to determine the efficacy of SSA. The correlation between rSI and expression of SSTR2/5 was analyzed by the Spearman rank correlation coefficient. T2 rSI was strongly correlated with biochemical sensitivity to SSA. The cutoff value of T2 rSI to distinguish biochemical sensitivity was 1.205, with a positive predictive value (PPV) of 81.5 % and a negative predictive value (NPV) of 77.3 %. No correlation was found between MRI and tumor size sensitivity. Moreover, T2 rSI was negatively correlated with the expression of SSTR5. T2 rSI correlates with the expression of SSTR5 and quantitatively predicts the biochemical efficacy of SSA in acromegaly. (orig.)

  3. Predictive value of T2 relative signal intensity for response to somatostatin analogs in newly diagnosed acromegaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Ming; Zhang, Qilin; Liu, Wenjuan; Wang, Meng; Zhu, Jingjing; Ma, Zengyi; He, Wenqiang; Li, Shiqi; Shou, Xuefei; Li, Yiming; Zhang, Zhaoyun; Ye, Hongying; He, Min; Lu, Bin; Yao, Zhenwei; Lu, Yun; Qiao, Nidan; Ye, Zhao; Zhang, Yichao; Yang, Yeping; Zhao, Yao; Wang, Yongfei

    2016-11-01

    The difficulty of predicting the efficacy of somatostatin analogs (SSA) is not fully resolved. Here, we quantitatively evaluated the predictive value of relative signal intensity (rSI) on T1- and T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the short-term efficacy (3 months) of SSA therapy in patients with active acromegaly and assessed the correlation between MRI rSI and expression of somatostatin receptors (SSTR). This was a retrospective review of prospectively recorded data. Ninety-two newly diagnosed patients (37 males and 55 females) with active acromegaly were recruited. All patients were treated with pre-surgical SSA, followed by reassessment and transspenoidal surgery. rSI values were generated by calculating the ratio of SI in the tumor to the SI of normal frontal white matter. The Youden indices were calculated to determine the optimal cutoff of rSI to determine the efficacy of SSA. The correlation between rSI and expression of SSTR2/5 was analyzed by the Spearman rank correlation coefficient. T2 rSI was strongly correlated with biochemical sensitivity to SSA. The cutoff value of T2 rSI to distinguish biochemical sensitivity was 1.205, with a positive predictive value (PPV) of 81.5 % and a negative predictive value (NPV) of 77.3 %. No correlation was found between MRI and tumor size sensitivity. Moreover, T2 rSI was negatively correlated with the expression of SSTR5. T2 rSI correlates with the expression of SSTR5 and quantitatively predicts the biochemical efficacy of SSA in acromegaly.

  4. Development of 99mTc labelled somatostatin analogues and evaluation of their radiochemical and biological behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gano, L.; Patricio, L.

    2001-01-01

    Conjugates of two somatostatin analogues, octreotide and RC-160, with HYNIC were synthesized, characterized and purified by reverse phase HPLC. Radiolabelling of the conjugates with 99m Tc was achieved using tricine as co-ligand. High labelling efficiencies were obtained and 99m Tc peptides with high radiochemical purity were found when analysed both by ITLC and HPLC. In vitro stability of 99m Tc-peptides in human serum and towards cysteine challenge was determined by Cellogel electrophoresis and HPLC after ultrafiltration of serum solution through a 20 kDa cut off membrane. Biodistribution studies were performed in healthy mice at 5 and 30 minutes and 1, 2, 4 and 24 h post-injection. Urine and blood samples were collected at sacrifice time. Samples of urine and ultrafiltrate murine serum were analysed by electrophoresis and reverse phase HPLC in order to get some information about radiocompounds metabolism. Biological distribution of 99m Tc octreotide was also assayed in mice pre-treated with an excess of unlabelled peptide. From our results we conclude that this labelling method led to stable 99m Tc complexes both in vitro and in vivo when high specific activities (37-72 GBq/μmole) were used. Biodistribution studies of both 99m Tc-peptides indicated a radioactivity distribution profile with significant differences especially in the liver uptake that is higher for 99m Tc RC-160. However, a rapid blood clearance was obtained for both radiolabelled peptides, and the urine analysis indicated that 99m Tc peptide is mostly excreted as the initial complex. Pre-treatment with unlabelled peptide did not affect renal excretion of 99m TOC but pancreas and intestine radioactive uptake was significantly lower, indicating saturation of somatostatin receptors and selective uptake. (author)

  5. Nuclear receptors of the NR4a family are not required for the development and function of follicular T helper cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Weiwei; Zhao, Ruozhu; Yang, Runqing; Liu, Bo; Chen, Xin; Wu, Longyan; Qi, Hai

    2015-10-01

    Follicular T helper (Tfh) cells promote germinal center (GC) reaction and high-affinity antibody production. The molecular mechanisms that regulate development and function of Tfh cells are not fully understood. Here we report that ligand-independent nuclear receptors of the Nr4a family are highly expressed in Tfh cells. In a well-established adoptive transfer model, enforced expression of Nr4a receptors reduces helper T cell expansion but apparently increased the T cell capacity to promote the GC response. On the other hand, deletion of all Nr4a receptors in T cells did not significantly affect expansion or differentiation of Tfh cells or the development of GC reaction. These findings suggest that Nr4a receptors may promote but are not necessary for Tfh development or function in vivo. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Familial risk for mood disorder and the personality risk factor, neuroticism, interact in their association with frontolimbic serotonin 2A receptor binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frøkjær, Vibe Gedsø; Vinberg, Maj; Erritzoe, David

    2010-01-01

    Life stress is a robust risk factor for later development of mood disorders, particularly for individuals at familial risk. Likewise, scoring high on the personality trait neuroticism is associated with an increased risk for mood disorders. Neuroticism partly reflects stress vulnerability...... stress reactivity in individuals at high familial risk for mood disorders might enhance the effect of neuroticism in shaping the impact of potential environmental stress and thereby influence serotonergic neurotransmission....... and is positively correlated to frontolimbic serotonin 2A (5-HT(2A)) receptor binding. Here, we investigate whether neuroticism interacts with familial risk in relation to frontolimbic 5-HT(2A) receptor binding. Twenty-one healthy twins with a co-twin history of mood disorder and 16 healthy twins without a co...

  7. Mutation G805R in the transmembrane domain of the LDL receptor gene causes familial hypercholesterolemia by inducing ectodomain cleavage of the LDL receptor in the endoplasmic reticulum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thea Bismo Strøm

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available More than 1700 mutations in the low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR gene have been found to cause familial hypercholesterolemia (FH. These are commonly divided into five classes based upon their effects on the structure and function of the LDLR. However, little is known about the mechanism by which mutations in the transmembrane domain of the LDLR gene cause FH. We have studied how the transmembrane mutation G805R affects the function of the LDLR. Based upon Western blot analyses of transfected HepG2 cells, mutation G805R reduced the amounts of the 120 kDa precursor LDLR in the endoplasmic reticulum. This led to reduced amounts of the mature 160 kDa LDLR at the cell surface. However, significant amounts of a secreted 140 kDa G805R-LDLR ectodomain fragment was observed in the culture media. Treatment of the cells with the metalloproteinase inhibitor batimastat largely restored the amounts of the 120 and 160 kDa forms in cell lysates, and prevented secretion of the 140 kDa ectodomain fragment. Together, these data indicate that a metalloproteinase cleaved the ectodomain of the 120 kDa precursor G805R-LDLR in the endoplasmic reticulum. It was the presence of the polar Arg805 and not the lack of Gly805 which led to ectodomain cleavage. Arg805 also prevented γ-secretase cleavage within the transmembrane domain. It is conceivable that introducing a charged residue within the hydrophobic membrane lipid bilayer, results in less efficient incorporation of the 120 kDa G805R-LDLR in the endoplasmic reticulum membrane and makes it a substrate for metalloproteinase cleavage.

  8. A single amino acid substitution in the exoplasmic domain of the human growth hormone (GH) receptor confers familial GH resistance (Laron syndrome) with positive GH-binding activity by abolishing receptor homodimerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duquesnoy, P; Sobrier, M L; Duriez, B; Dastot, F; Buchanan, C R; Savage, M O; Preece, M A; Craescu, C T; Blouquit, Y; Goossens, M

    1994-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) elicits a variety of biological activities mainly mediated by the GH receptor (GHR), a transmembrane protein that, based on in vitro studies, seemed to function as a homodimer. To test this hypothesis directly, we investigated patients displaying the classic features of Laron syndrome (familial GH resistance characterized by severe dwarfism and metabolic dysfunction), except for the presence of normal binding activity of the plasma GH-binding protein, a molecule that derives from the exoplasmic-coding domain of the GHR gene. In two unrelated families, the same GHR mutation was identified, resulting in the substitution of a highly conserved aspartate residue by histidine at position 152 (D152H) of the exoplasmic domain, within the postulated interface sequence involved in homodimerization. The recombinant mutated receptor protein was correctly expressed at the plasma membrane. It displayed subnormal GH-binding activity, a finding in agreement with the X-ray crystal structure data inferring this aspartate residue outside the GH-binding domain. However, mAb-based studies suggested the critical role of aspartate 152 in the proper folding of the interface area. We show that a recombinant soluble form of the mutant receptor is unable to dimerize, the D152H substitution also preventing the formation of heterodimers of wild-type and mutant molecules. These results provide in vivo evidence that monomeric receptors are inactive and that receptor dimerization is involved in the primary signalling of the GH-associated growth-promoting and metabolic actions. Images PMID:8137822

  9. The ErbB family and androgen receptor signaling are targets of Celecoxib in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brizzolara, Antonella; Benelli, Roberto; Venè, Roberta; Barboro, Paola; Poggi, Alessandro; Tosetti, Francesca; Ferrari, Nicoletta

    2017-08-01

    Inflammation plays a central role in prostate cancer (PCa) development through significant crosstalk between the COX-2-ErbB family receptor network and androgen receptor (AR)-EGFR signaling pathways. The purpose of this work was to determine the ability of the COX-2 inhibitor Celecoxib to modulate the EGFR-AR signaling pathway in androgen-dependent PCa cells and to provide a rationale for its beneficial use in chemopreventive strategies. Functional studies of Celecoxib activity were performed on LNCaP prostate cancer cells. Western blotting, gene expression analysis, dual-luciferase reporter assay and ELISA were applied to assess the Celecoxib mechanisms of action. We found that Celecoxib, through EGF and amphiregulin (AREG) induction, caused EGFR and ErbB2 activation and consequent degradation associated with the inhibition of androgenic signaling. By upregulating the E3 ubiquitin ligase Nrdp1, Celecoxib also efficiently downregulated ErbB3, which is strongly implicated in castration-resistant prostate cancer. Lastly, Celecoxib directly regulated AR transcription and translation independent of ErbB activation by downregulating the RNA binding protein heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K). The simultaneous suppression of ErbB kinases and androgen signaling by Celecoxib represents a novel strategy to interrupt the vicious cycle of AR/ErbB cross-talk with the primary purpose of undermining their resilient signaling in prostate cancer progression. Our data provide important premises for the chemopreventive use of Celecoxib in the clinical management of prostate cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Functional importance of the Ala(116)-Pro(136) region in the calcium-sensing receptor. Constitutive activity and inverse agonism in a family C G-protein-coupled receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anders A.; Spalding, T A; Burstein, E S

    2000-01-01

    The calcium-sensing receptor (CaR) belongs to family C of the G-protein-coupled receptor superfamily. To date 14 activating mutations in CaR showing increased sensitivity to Ca(2+) have been identified in humans with autosomal dominant hypocalcemia. Four of these activating mutations are found......, suppressed the elevated basal response of the constitutively activated Ca/1a mutants demonstrating inverse agonist activity of CPCCOEt. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the Ala(116)-Pro(136) region is of key importance for the maintenance of the inactive conformation of CaR....

  11. The Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) Channel Family in Colletotrichum graminicola: A Molecular and Physiological Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Mario; Weihmann, Fabian; Schliebner, Ivo; Horbach, Ralf; Deising, Holger B; Wirsel, Stefan G R; Peiter, Edgar

    2016-01-01

    Calcium (Ca2+) is a universal second messenger in all higher organisms and centrally involved in the launch of responses to environmental stimuli. Ca2+ signals in the cytosol are initiated by the activation of Ca2+ channels in the plasma membrane and/or in endomembranes. Yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) contains a Ca2+-permeable channel of the TRP family, TRPY1, which is localized in the vacuolar membrane and contributes to cytosolic free Ca2+ ([Ca2+]cyt) elevations, for example in response to osmotic upshock. A TRPY1 homologue in the rice blast fungus is known to be important for growth and pathogenicity. To determine the role of the TRP channel family in the maize pathogen Colletotrichum graminicola, proteins homologous to TRPY1 were searched. This identified not one, but four genes in the C. graminicola genome, which had putative orthologs in other fungi, and which we named CgTRPF1 through 4. The topology of the CgTRPF proteins resembled that of TRPY1, albeit with a variable number of transmembrane (TM) domains additional to the six-TM-domain core and a diverse arrangement of putatively Ca2+-binding acidic motifs. All CgTRPF genes were expressed in axenic culture and throughout the infection of maize. Like TRPY1, all TRPF proteins of C. graminicola were localized intracellularly, albeit three of them were found not in large vacuoles, but co-localized in vesicular structures. Deletion strains for the CgTRPF genes were not altered in processes thought to involve Ca2+ release from internal stores, i.e. spore germination, the utilization of complex carbon sources, and the generation of tip-focussed [Ca2+]cyt spikes. Heterologous expression of CgTRPF1 through 4 in a tryp1Δ yeast mutant revealed that none of the channels mediated the release of Ca2+ in response to osmotic upshock. Accordingly, aequorin-based [Ca2+]cyt measurements of C. graminicola showed that in this fungus, osmotic upshock-triggered [Ca2+]cyt elevations were generated entirely by influx of Ca2

  12. The Transient Receptor Potential (TRP Channel Family in Colletotrichum graminicola: A Molecular and Physiological Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Lange

    Full Text Available Calcium (Ca2+ is a universal second messenger in all higher organisms and centrally involved in the launch of responses to environmental stimuli. Ca2+ signals in the cytosol are initiated by the activation of Ca2+ channels in the plasma membrane and/or in endomembranes. Yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae contains a Ca2+-permeable channel of the TRP family, TRPY1, which is localized in the vacuolar membrane and contributes to cytosolic free Ca2+ ([Ca2+]cyt elevations, for example in response to osmotic upshock. A TRPY1 homologue in the rice blast fungus is known to be important for growth and pathogenicity. To determine the role of the TRP channel family in the maize pathogen Colletotrichum graminicola, proteins homologous to TRPY1 were searched. This identified not one, but four genes in the C. graminicola genome, which had putative orthologs in other fungi, and which we named CgTRPF1 through 4. The topology of the CgTRPF proteins resembled that of TRPY1, albeit with a variable number of transmembrane (TM domains additional to the six-TM-domain core and a diverse arrangement of putatively Ca2+-binding acidic motifs. All CgTRPF genes were expressed in axenic culture and throughout the infection of maize. Like TRPY1, all TRPF proteins of C. graminicola were localized intracellularly, albeit three of them were found not in large vacuoles, but co-localized in vesicular structures. Deletion strains for the CgTRPF genes were not altered in processes thought to involve Ca2+ release from internal stores, i.e. spore germination, the utilization of complex carbon sources, and the generation of tip-focussed [Ca2+]cyt spikes. Heterologous expression of CgTRPF1 through 4 in a tryp1Δ yeast mutant revealed that none of the channels mediated the release of Ca2+ in response to osmotic upshock. Accordingly, aequorin-based [Ca2+]cyt measurements of C. graminicola showed that in this fungus, osmotic upshock-triggered [Ca2+]cyt elevations were generated entirely by

  13. Activation of Relaxin Family Receptor 1 from different mammalian species by relaxin peptide and small molecule agonist ML290

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaohua eHuang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Relaxin peptide (RLN, which signals through the relaxin family peptide 1 (RXFP1 GPCR receptor, has shown therapeutic effects in an acute heart failure clinical trial. We have identified a small molecule agonist of human RXFP1, ML290; however, it does not activate the mouse receptor. To find a suitable animal model for ML290 testing and to gain mechanistic insights into the interaction of various ligands with RXFP1, we have cloned rhesus macaque, pig, rabbit, and guinea pig RXFP1s and analyzed their activation by RLN and ML290. HEK293T cells expressing macaque or pig RXFP1 responded to relaxin and ML290 treatment as measured by an increase of cAMP production. Guinea pig RXFP1 responded to relaxin but had very low response to ML290 treatment only at highest concentrations used. The rabbit RXFP1 amino acid sequence was the most divergent, with a number of unique substitutions within the ectodomain and the 7-transmembrane domain (7TM. Two splice variants of rabbit RXFP1 derived through alternative splicing of the forth exon were identified. In contrast to the other species, rabbit RXFP1s were activated by ML290, but not with human, pig, mouse, or rabbit relaxins. Using FLAG-tagged constructs, we have shown that both rabbit RXFP1 variants are expressed on the cell surface. No binding of human Eu-labeled relaxin to rabbit RXFP1 was detected, suggesting that in this species RXFP1 might be non-functional. We used chimeric rabbit-human and guinea pig-human constructs to identify regions important for RLN or ML290 receptor activation. Chimeras with the human ectodomain and rabbit 7TM domain were activated by RLN, whereas substitution of part of the guinea pig 7TM domain with the human sequence only partially restored ML290 activation, confirming the allosteric mode of action for the two ligands. Our data demonstrate that macaque and pig models can be used for ML290 testing.

  14. A novel mutation of the adrenocorticotropin receptor (ACTH-R) gene in a family with the syndrome of isolated glucocorticoid deficiency, but no ACTH-R abnormalities in two families with the triple A syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsigos, C.; Arai, K.; Latronico, A.C. [National Inst. of Child Health and Human Development, Bethesda, MD (United States)]|[Temple Univ. School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States)]|[Children`s Hospital of New Jersey, Newark, NJ (United States)] [and others

    1995-07-01

    Isolated glucocorticoid deficiency (IGD) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by primary adrenocortical insufficiency, usually without mineralocorticoid deficiency. Occasionally, the disorder is associated with alacrima and achalasia of the esophagus (triple A syndrome), suggesting potential heterogeneity in its etiology. Mutations in the ACTH receptor gene have been reported in several families with IGD. We have amplified and directly sequenced the entire intronless ACTH receptor gene in 1 other family with IGD and 2 famlies with triple A syndrome. The proband with IGD was a homozygote for an A {r_arrow}G substitution, changing tyrosine 254 to cysteine in the third extracellular loop of the receptor protein, probably interfering with ligand binding. Both of her parents were heterozygotes for this mutation, which was not detected in 100 normal alleles. No mutations were identified in the entire coding area of the ACTH receptor in the 2 families with triple A syndrome, supporting the idea of a developmental or postreceptor defect in this syndrome. 19 refs., 1 fig.

  15. Labelling and quality control of somatostatin analogues with 99mTc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verdera, S.; Balter, H.; Rodriguez, G.; Robles, A.; Oliver, P.; Laiz, J.; Souto, B.

    2001-01-01

    Techniques and methodologies for labelling peptides with 99m Tc and methods for their purification, chemical, radiochemical and biological controls were evaluated. With the purpose of gaining experience, labelling with 125 I was also studied. RC-160 was labelled with 125 I using iodogen as well as chloramine-T method. Higher yields were obtained with chloramine-T method (60%), rendering 125 I-peptide with 98% of radiochemical purity, with specific activity of 240 μCi/μg - 274 μCi/μg. The product was stable for five weeks (at -20 deg. C). For somatostatin receptors studies rat brain cortex membrane was prepared. Maximum binding capacity was 24.7% and Kaff for the binding of RC-160 to receptor was estimated as 2.0x10 10 M -1 . Other peptides as β-(2-Naphthyl)- D Ala-Cys-Tyr- D Trp-Lys-Val-Cys-Thr amide (N-9642, Σ) and mouse epidermal growth factor (mEGF) were also labelled by means of limiting chloramine-T method. In case of mEGF the availability of membrane receptors allowed us to experiment in mice as well as in vitro. The reaction yields were up to 60% and 70% respectively. Biodistribution of 125 I-mEGF in a mouse with adenoma demonstrated preferential uptake in tumour (21,7% injected dose). The radioimmunoassay system gave 39% maximum binding (MB) and 50% displacement (ED 50 ) for 10 ng/mL unlabelled mEGF. Direct method and BFC's for labelling peptides with 99m Tc were investigated and purification and quality controls studies were performed by TLC, HPLC (UV and gamma detection). RC-160 was labelled by a direct method using sodium dithionite as reducing agent with radiochemical purity >95%. The product was stable up to six hours (at RT). Considerable adsorption problems were observed. Biological behavior was in accordance with the compounds' lipophilicity. The synthesis of TOC conjugates with HYNIC as BFC was done with 45%±5% (n=3) yield. Labelling of HYNIC-TOC with tricine as co-ligand was conducted with up to 90% yield. Studies of RC-160 labelling using

  16. Clinical applications of somatostatin analogs for growth hormone-secreting pituitary adenomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ji-wen; Li, Ying; Mao, Zhi-gang; Hu, Bin; Jiang, Xiao-bing; Song, Bing-bing; Wang, Xin; Zhu, Yong-hong; Wang, Hai-jun

    2014-01-01

    Excessive growth hormone (GH) is usually secreted by GH-secreting pituitary adenomas and causes gigantism in juveniles or acromegaly in adults. The clinical complications involving cardiovascular, respiratory, and metabolic systems lead to elevated morbidity in acromegaly. Control of serum GH and insulin-like growth factor (IGF) 1 hypersecretion by surgery or pharmacotherapy can decrease morbidity. Current pharmacotherapy includes somatostatin analogs (SAs) and GH receptor antagonist; the former consists of lanreotide Autogel (ATG) and octreotide long-acting release (LAR), and the latter refers to pegvisomant. As primary medical therapy, lanreotide ATG and octreotide LAR can be supplied in a long-lasting formulation to achieve biochemical control of GH and IGF-1 by subcutaneous injection every 4–6 weeks. Lanreotide ATG and octreotide LAR provide an effective medical treatment, whether as a primary or secondary therapy, for the treatment of GH-secreting pituitary adenoma; however, to maximize benefits with the least cost, several points should be emphasized before the application of SAs. A comprehensive assessment, especially of the observation of clinical predictors and preselection of SA treatment, should be completed in advance. A treatment process lasting at least 3 months should be implemented to achieve a long-term stable blood concentration. More satisfactory surgical outcomes for noninvasive macroadenomas treated with presurgical SA may be achieved, although controversy of such adjuvant therapy exists. Combination of SA and pegvisomant or cabergoline shows advantages in some specific cases. Thus, an individual treatment program should be established for each patient under a full evaluation of the risks and benefits. PMID:24421637

  17. Blockade of dopamine D1-family receptors attenuates the mania-like hyperactive, risk-preferring, and high motivation behavioral profile of mice with low dopamine transporter levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milienne-Petiot, Morgane; Groenink, Lucianne; Minassian, Arpi; Young, Jared W

    2017-10-01

    Patients with bipolar disorder mania exhibit poor cognition, impulsivity, risk-taking, and goal-directed activity that negatively impact their quality of life. To date, existing treatments for bipolar disorder do not adequately remediate cognitive dysfunction. Reducing dopamine transporter expression recreates many bipolar disorder mania-relevant behaviors (i.e. hyperactivity and risk-taking). The current study investigated whether dopamine D 1 -family receptor blockade would attenuate the risk-taking, hypermotivation, and hyperactivity of dopamine transporter knockdown mice. Dopamine transporter knockdown and wild-type littermate mice were tested in mouse versions of the Iowa Gambling Task (risk-taking), Progressive Ratio Breakpoint Test (effortful motivation), and Behavioral Pattern Monitor (activity). Prior to testing, the mice were treated with the dopamine D 1 -family receptor antagonist SCH 23390 hydrochloride (0.03, 0.1, or 0.3 mg/kg), or vehicle. Dopamine transporter knockdown mice exhibited hyperactivity and hyperexploration, hypermotivation, and risk-taking preference compared with wild-type littermates. SCH 23390 hydrochloride treatment decreased premature responding in dopamine transporter knockdown mice and attenuated their hypermotivation. SCH 23390 hydrochloride flattened the safe/risk preference, while reducing activity and exploratory levels of both genotypes similarly. Dopamine transporter knockdown mice exhibited mania-relevant behavior compared to wild-type mice. Systemic dopamine D 1 -family receptor antagonism attenuated these behaviors in dopamine transporter knockdown, but not all effects were specific to only the knockdown mice. The normalization of behavior via blockade of dopamine D 1 -family receptors supports the hypothesis that D 1 and/or D 5 receptors could contribute to the mania-relevant behaviors of dopamine transporter knockdown mice.

  18. Somatostatine analogs marked with 99m-TC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obenaus, E; Crudo, J; Edreira, M; Castiglia, S.G. de

    2003-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to study the biological and radiochemical behaviour of two somatostatin analogues, the RC-160 and Tyr 3 Octreotide(TOC) peptides when labeling with 99m Tc by an indirect method using S-Benzoyl- mercaptoacetyl triglycine (MAG3) and hydrazino nicotinamide (HYNIC) as chelating agents. The synthesis of RC160 with S-Benzoyl MAG3 and TOC with HYNIC, for labeling with 99m Tc are also described. The conjugates were prepared on a small scale and labeled with the radionuclide using tricine as coligands for HYNIC conjugates. Chromatographic studies were performed using an HPLC system and radiochemical purities higher than 75% and 95% were obtained respectively. Biodistributions studies in normal Wistar rats were performed and results were correlated with chromatographic and protein binding properties. Lower lipophilicity of the labeled conjugates resulted in a higher renal excretion. HYNIC-TOC complex showed promising results when labeling with 99m Tc using tricine as coligand although higher stability should be found for ternary coligands compared to tricine (Au)

  19. Somatostatin-expressing inhibitory interneurons in cortical circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iryna Yavorska

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Cortical inhibitory neurons exhibit remarkable diversity in their morphology, connectivity, and synaptic properties. Here, we review the function of somatostatin-expressing (SOM inhibitory interneurons, focusing largely on sensory cortex. SOM neurons also comprise a number of subpopulations that can be distinguished by their morphology, input and output connectivity, laminar location, firing properties, and expression of molecular markers. Several of these classes of SOM neurons show unique dynamics and characteristics, such as facilitating synapses, specific axonal projections, intralaminar input, and top-down modulation, which suggest possible computational roles. SOM cells can be differentially modulated by behavioral state depending on their class, sensory system, and behavioral paradigm. The functional effects of such modulation have been studied with optogenetic manipulation of SOM cells, which produces effects on learning and memory, task performance, and the integration of cortical activity. Different classes of SOM cells participate in distinct disinhibitory circuits with different inhibitory partners and in different cortical layers. Through these disinhibitory circuits, SOM cells help encode the behavioral relevance of sensory stimuli by regulating the activity of cortical neurons based on subcortical and intracortical modulatory input. Associative learning leads to long-term changes in the strength of connectivity of SOM cells with other neurons, often influencing the strength of inhibitory input they receive. Thus despite their heterogeneity and variability across cortical areas, current evidence shows that SOM neurons perform unique neural computations, forming not only distinct molecular but also functional subclasses of cortical inhibitory interneurons.

  20. Molecular analysis of the androgen-receptor gene in a family with receptor-positive partial androgen insensitivity: an unusual type of intronic mutation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.T. Brüggenwirth (Hennie); A.L.M. Boehmer (Annemie); S. Ramnarain; M.C. Verleun-Mooijman; D.P.E. Satijn (David); J. Trapman (Jan); J.A. Grootegoed (Anton); A.O. Brinkmann (Albert)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractIn the coding part and the intron-exon boundaries of the androgen-receptor gene of a patient with partial androgen insensitivity, no mutation was found. The androgen receptor of this patient displayed normal ligand-binding parameters and migrated as a

  1. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor overexpression in cancer and its impact on clinical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meike eKörner

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Peptide hormones of the glucagon-like peptide (GLP family play an increasing clinical role, such as GLP-1 in diabetes therapy. Moreover, GLP receptors are over-expressed in various human tumor types and therefore represent molecular targets for important clinical applications. In particular, virtually all benign insulinomas highly over-express GLP-1 receptors (GLP-1R. Targeting GLP-1R with the stable GLP-1 analogs 111In-DOTA/ DPTA-exendin-4 offers a new approach to successfully localize these small tumors. This non-invasive technique has the potential to replace the invasive localization of insulinomas by selective arterial stimulation and venous sampling. Malignant insulinomas, in contrast to their benign counterparts, express GLP-1R in only one third of the cases, while they more often express the somatostatin type 2 receptors. Importantly, one of the two receptors appears to be always expressed in malignant insulinomas. The GLP-1R overexpression in selected cancers is worth to be kept in mind with regard to the increasing use of GLP-1 analogs for diabetes therapy. While the functional role of GLP-1R in neoplasia is not known yet, it may be safe to monitore patients undergoing GLP-1 therapy carefully.

  2. Intermittent hypoxia induces the proliferation of rat vascular smooth muscle cell with the increases in epidermal growth factor family and erbB2 receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kyotani, Yoji, E-mail: cd147@naramed-u.ac.jp [Department of Pharmacology, Nara Medical University School of Medicine, Kashihara 634-8521 (Japan); Department of Pharmacy, Nara Medical University Hospital, Kashihara 634-8522 (Japan); Ota, Hiroyo [Second Department of Internal Medicine, Nara Medical University School of Medicine, Kashihara 634-8522 (Japan); Department of Biochemistry, Nara Medical University School of Medicine, Kashihara 634-8521 (Japan); Itaya-Hironaka, Asako; Yamauchi, Akiyo; Sakuramoto-Tsuchida, Sumiyo [Department of Biochemistry, Nara Medical University School of Medicine, Kashihara 634-8521 (Japan); Zhao, Jing; Ozawa, Kentaro; Nagayama, Kosuke; Ito, Satoyasu [Department of Pharmacology, Nara Medical University School of Medicine, Kashihara 634-8521 (Japan); Takasawa, Shin [Department of Biochemistry, Nara Medical University School of Medicine, Kashihara 634-8521 (Japan); Kimura, Hiroshi [Second Department of Internal Medicine, Nara Medical University School of Medicine, Kashihara 634-8522 (Japan); Uno, Masayuki [Department of Pharmacy, Nara Medical University Hospital, Kashihara 634-8522 (Japan); Yoshizumi, Masanori [Department of Pharmacology, Nara Medical University School of Medicine, Kashihara 634-8521 (Japan)

    2013-11-15

    Obstructive sleep apnea is characterized by intermittent hypoxia (IH), and associated with cardiovascular diseases, such as stroke and heart failure. These cardiovascular diseases have a relation to atherosclerosis marked by the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). In this study, we investigated the influence of IH on cultured rat aortic smooth muscle cell (RASMC). The proliferation of RASMC was significantly increased by IH without changing the level of apoptosis. In order to see what induces RASMC proliferation, we investigated the influence of normoxia (N)-, IH- and sustained hypoxia (SH)-treated cell conditioned media on RASMC proliferation. IH-treated cell conditioned medium significantly increased RASMC proliferation compared with N-treated cell conditioned medium, but SH-treated cell conditioned medium did not. We next investigated the epidermal growth factor (EGF) family as autocrine growth factors. Among the EGF family, we found significant increases in mRNAs for epiregulin (ER), amphiregulin (AR) and neuregulin-1 (NRG1) in IH-treated cells and mature ER in IH-treated cell conditioned medium. We next investigated the changes in erbB family receptors that are receptors for ER, AR and NRG1, and found that erbB2 receptor mRNA and protein expressions were increased by IH, but not by SH. Phosphorylation of erbB2 receptor at Tyr-1248 that mediates intracellular signaling for several physiological effects including cell proliferation was increased by IH, but not by SH. In addition, inhibitor for erbB2 receptor suppressed IH-induced cell proliferation. These results provide the first demonstration that IH induces VSMC proliferation, and suggest that EGF family, such as ER, AR and NRG1, and erbB2 receptor could be involved in the IH-induced VSMC proliferation. - Highlights: ●In vitro system for intermittent hypoxia (IH) and sustained hypoxia (SH). ●IH, but not SH, induces the proliferation of rat vascular smooth muscle cell. ●Epiregulin m

  3. Intermittent hypoxia induces the proliferation of rat vascular smooth muscle cell with the increases in epidermal growth factor family and erbB2 receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kyotani, Yoji; Ota, Hiroyo; Itaya-Hironaka, Asako; Yamauchi, Akiyo; Sakuramoto-Tsuchida, Sumiyo; Zhao, Jing; Ozawa, Kentaro; Nagayama, Kosuke; Ito, Satoyasu; Takasawa, Shin; Kimura, Hiroshi; Uno, Masayuki; Yoshizumi, Masanori

    2013-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea is characterized by intermittent hypoxia (IH), and associated with cardiovascular diseases, such as stroke and heart failure. These cardiovascular diseases have a relation to atherosclerosis marked by the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). In this study, we investigated the influence of IH on cultured rat aortic smooth muscle cell (RASMC). The proliferation of RASMC was significantly increased by IH without changing the level of apoptosis. In order to see what induces RASMC proliferation, we investigated the influence of normoxia (N)-, IH- and sustained hypoxia (SH)-treated cell conditioned media on RASMC proliferation. IH-treated cell conditioned medium significantly increased RASMC proliferation compared with N-treated cell conditioned medium, but SH-treated cell conditioned medium did not. We next investigated the epidermal growth factor (EGF) family as autocrine growth factors. Among the EGF family, we found significant increases in mRNAs for epiregulin (ER), amphiregulin (AR) and neuregulin-1 (NRG1) in IH-treated cells and mature ER in IH-treated cell conditioned medium. We next investigated the changes in erbB family receptors that are receptors for ER, AR and NRG1, and found that erbB2 receptor mRNA and protein expressions were increased by IH, but not by SH. Phosphorylation of erbB2 receptor at Tyr-1248 that mediates intracellular signaling for several physiological effects including cell proliferation was increased by IH, but not by SH. In addition, inhibitor for erbB2 receptor suppressed IH-induced cell proliferation. These results provide the first demonstration that IH induces VSMC proliferation, and suggest that EGF family, such as ER, AR and NRG1, and erbB2 receptor could be involved in the IH-induced VSMC proliferation. - Highlights: ●In vitro system for intermittent hypoxia (IH) and sustained hypoxia (SH). ●IH, but not SH, induces the proliferation of rat vascular smooth muscle cell. ●Epiregulin m

  4. Effect of somatostatin on nonesterified fatty acid levels modifies glucose homeostasis during fasting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendrick, G.K.; Frizzell, R.T.; Cherrington, A.D.

    1987-01-01

    In the 7-days fasted conscious dog, unlike the postabsorptive conscious dog, somatostatin infusion results in decreased levels of nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA) and increased glucose utilization (R d ) even when insulin and glucagon levels are held constant. The aim of this study was to determine whether NEFA replacement in such animals would prevent the increase in R d . In each of three protocols there was an 80-min tracer equilibration period, a 40-min basal period, and a 3-h test period. During the test period in the first protocol saline was infused, in the second protocol somatostatin was infused along with intraportal replacement amounts of insulin and glucagon (hormone replacement), while in the third protocol somatostatin plus the pancreatic hormones were infused with concurrent heparin plus Intralipid infusion. Glucose turnover was assessed using [3- 3 H]glucose. The peripheral levels of insulin, glucagon, and glucose were similar and constant in all three protocols; however, during somatostatin infusion, exogenous glucose infusion was necessary to maintain euglycemia. The NEFA level was constant during saline infusion and decreased in the hormone replacement protocol. In the hormone replacement plus NEFA protocol, the NEFA level did not change during the first 90-min period and then increased during the second 90-min period. After a prolonged fast in the dog, (1) somatostatin directly or indirectly inhibits adipose tissue NEFA release and causes a decrease in the plasma NEFA level, and (2) this decrease in the NEFA level causes an increase in R d

  5. Oestrogen receptor beta isoform expression in sporadic colorectal cancer, familial adenomatous polyposis and progressive stages of colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevanato Filho, Paulo Roberto; Aguiar Júnior, Samuel; Begnami, Maria Dirlei; Kuasne, Hellen; Spencer, Ranyell Matheus; Nakagawa, Wilson Toshihiko; Bezerra, Tiago Santoro; Kupper, Bruna Catin; Takahashi, Renata Maymi; Barros Filho, Mateus; Rogatto, Silvia Regina; Lopes, Ademar

    2017-11-13

    Among the sex hormones, oestrogen may play a role in colorectal cancer, particularly in conjunction with oestrogen receptor-β (ERβ). The expression of ERβ isoform variants and their correlations with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) syndrome and sporadic colorectal carcinomas are poorly described. This study aimed to investigate the expression levels of the ERβ1, ERβ2, ERβ4 and ERβ5 isoform variants using quantitative RT-PCR (921 analyses) in FAP, normal mucosa, adenomatous polyps and sporadic colorectal carcinomas. Decreased expression of ERβ isoforms was identified in sporadic polyps and in sporadic colorectal cancer as well as in polyps from FAP syndrome patients compared with normal tissues (p colorectal carcinomas were compared to normal mucosa tissues. These findings suggest an association of the ERβ isoform variants in individuals affected by germline mutations of the APC gene. Progressively decreased expression of ERβ was found in polyps at early stages of low-grade dysplasia, followed by T1-T2 and T3-T4 tumours (p colorectal cancer, the loss of expression was an independent predictor of recurrence, and ERβ1 and ERβ5 expression levels were associated with better disease-free survival (p = 0.002). These findings may provide a better understanding of oestrogens and their potential preventive and therapeutic effects on sporadic colorectal cancer and cancers associated with FAP syndrome.

  6. CRISPR Correction of a Homozygous Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor Mutation in Familial Hypercholesterolemia Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omer, Linda; Hudson, Elizabeth A; Zheng, Shirong; Hoying, James B; Shan, Yuan; Boyd, Nolan L

    2017-11-01

    Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is a hereditary disease primarily due to mutations in the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) that lead to elevated cholesterol and premature development of cardiovascular disease. Homozygous FH patients (HoFH) with two dysfunctional LDLR alleles are not as successfully treated with standard hypercholesterol therapies, and more aggressive therapeutic approaches to control cholesterol levels must be considered. Liver transplant can resolve HoFH, and hepatocyte transplantation has shown promising results in animals and humans. However, demand for donated livers and high-quality hepatocytes overwhelm the supply. Human pluripotent stem cells can differentiate to hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs) with the potential for experimental and clinical use. To be of future clinical use as autologous cells, LDLR genetic mutations in derived FH-HLCs need to be corrected. Genome editing technology clustered-regularly-interspaced-short-palindromic-repeats/CRISPR-associated 9 (CRISPR/Cas9) can repair pathologic genetic mutations in human induced pluripotent stem cells. We used CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing to permanently correct a 3-base pair homozygous deletion in LDLR exon 4 of patient-derived HoFH induced pluripotent stem cells. The genetic correction restored LDLR-mediated endocytosis in FH-HLCs and demonstrates the proof-of-principle that CRISPR-mediated genetic modification can be successfully used to normalize HoFH cholesterol metabolism deficiency at the cellular level.

  7. Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-1 mediates migration of human colorectal carcinoma cells by activation of Src family kinases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesslie, D P; Summy, J M; Parikh, N U; Fan, F; Trevino, J G; Sawyer, T K; Metcalf, C A; Shakespeare, W C; Hicklin, D J; Ellis, L M; Gallick, G E

    2006-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is the predominant pro-angiogenic cytokine in human malignancy, and its expression correlates with disease recurrence and poor outcomes in patients with colorectal cancer. Recently, expression of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors (VEGFRs) has been observed on tumours of epithelial origin, including those arising in the colon, but the molecular mechanisms governing potential VEGF-driven biologic functioning in these tumours are not well characterised. In this report, we investigated the role of Src family kinases (SFKs) in VEGF-mediated signalling in human colorectal carcinoma (CRC) cell lines. Vascular endothelial growth factor specifically activated SFKs in HT29 and KM12L4 CRC cell lines. Further, VEGF stimulation resulted in enhanced cellular migration, which was effectively blocked by pharmacologic inhibition of VEGFR-1 or Src kinase. Correspondingly, migration studies using siRNA clones with reduced Src expression confirmed the requirement for Src in VEGF-induced migration in these cells. Furthermore, VEGF treatment enhanced VEGFR-1/SFK complex formation and increased tyrosine phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase, p130 cas and paxillin. Finally, we demonstrate that VEGF-induced migration is not due, at least in part, to VEGF acting as a mitogen. These results suggest that VEGFR-1 promotes migration of tumour cells through a Src-dependent pathway linked to activation of focal adhesion components that regulate this process. PMID:16685275

  8. Characterization of a disease-causing Glu119-Lys mutation in the low-density lipoprotein receptor gene in two Danish families with heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, H K; Jensen, T G; Jensen, L G

    1994-01-01

    acid residue 119 in the third repeat of the cysteine-rich ligand binding domain of the mature LDL receptor. Disruption of LDL receptor function by the Glu119-Lys mutation was confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis and expression in COS-7 cells. By Western blotting the mutation was found to affect...

  9. Pertussis toxin inhibits somatostatin-induced K+ conductance in human pituitary tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, N.; Kojima, I.; Shibuya, N.; Ogata, E.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of pertussis toxin on somatostatin-induced K + current was examined in dissociated human pituitary tumor cells obtained from two acromegalic patients. Somatostatin-induced hyperpolarization or K + current was observed in 20 of 23 cells in adenoma 1 and 10 of 11 cells in adenoma 2. After treatment with pertussis toxin for 24 h, these responses were completely suppressed (0/14 in adenoma, 1, 0/10 in adenoma 2). Spontaneous action potentials, K + , Na + , and Ca 2+ currents were well preserved after pertussis toxin treatment. When crude membrane fraction was incubated with [ 32 P]NAD, a 41K protein was ADP-ribosylated by pertussis toxin. Hormone release was inhibited by somatostatin and this inhibition was blocked by pertussis toxin treatment

  10. In vitro effect of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol to stimulate somatostatin release and block that of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone by suppression of the release of prostaglandin E2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rettori, V.; Aguila, M.C.; McCann, S.M.; Gimeno, M.F.; Franchi, A.M.

    1990-01-01

    Previous in vivo studies have shown that Δ 9 -tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the principal active ingredient in marijuana, can suppress both luteinizing hormone (LH) and growth hormone (GH) secretion after its injection into the third ventricle of conscious male rats. The present studies were deigned to determine the mechanism of these effects. Various doses of THC were incubated with either stalk median eminence fragments (MEs) or mediobasal hypothalamic (MBH) fragments in vitro. Although THC (10 nM) did not alter basal release of LH-releasing hormone (LHRH) from MEs in vitro, it completely blocked the stimulatory action of dopamine or nonrepinephrine on LHRH release. The effective doses to block LHRH release were associated with a blockade of synthesis and release of prostaglandin E 2 (PGE 2 ) from MBH in vitro. In contrast to the suppressive effect of THC on LHRH release, somatostatin release from MEs was enhanced in a dose-related manner with a minimal effective dose of 1 nM. Since PGE 2 suppresses somatostatin release, this enhancement may also be related to the suppressive effect of THC on PGE 2 synthesis and release. The authors speculate that these actions are mediated by the recently discovered THC receptors in the tissue. The results indicate that the suppressive effect of THC on LH release is mediated by a blockade of LHRH release, whereas the suppressive effect of the compound on growth hormone release is mediated, at least in part, by a stimulation of somatostatin release

  11. Response, survival, and long-term toxicity after therapy with the radiolabeled somatostatin analogue [90Y-DOTA]-TOC in metastasized neuroendocrine cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imhof, Anna; Brunner, Philippe; Marincek, Nicolas; Briel, Matthias; Schindler, Christian; Rasch, Helmut; Mäcke, Helmut R; Rochlitz, Christoph; Müller-Brand, Jan; Walter, Martin A

    2011-06-10

    To investigate response, survival, and safety profile of the somatostatin-based radiopeptide (90)yttrium-labeled tetraazacyclododecane-tetraacetic acid modified Tyr-octreotide ([(90)Y-DOTA]-TOC) in neuroendocrine cancers. In a clinical phase II single-center open-label trial, patients with neuroendocrine cancers were treated with repeated cycles of [(90)Y-DOTA]-TOC. Each cycle consisted of a single intravenous injection of 3.7GBq/m(2) body-surface [(90)Y-DOTA]-TOC. Additional cycles were withheld in case of tumor progression and/or permanent toxicity. Overall, 1,109 patients received 2,472 cycles of [(90)Y-DOTA]-TOC (median, two; range, one to 10 cycles per patient). Of the 1,109 patients, 378 (34.1%) experienced morphologic response; 172 (15.5%), biochemical response; and 329 (29.7%), clinical response. During a median follow-up of 23 months, 491 patients (44.3%) died. Longer survival was correlated with each: morphologic (hazard ratio [HR], 0.46; 95% CI, 0.38 to 0.56; median survival, 44.7 v 18.3 months; P TOC treatment in a large cohort. Response to [(90)Y-DOTA]-TOC is associated with longer survival. Somatostatin receptor imaging is predictive for both survival after [(90)Y-DOTA]-TOC treatment and occurrence of renal toxicity.

  12. Somatostatin and serum gastrin in normal subjects and in patients with pernicious anaemia, chronic liver and renal disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Roith, D; Vinik, A I; Epstein, S; Baron, P; Olkenitzky, M N; Pimstone, B L

    1975-09-13

    The effects of somatostatin (growth hormone release inhibiting hormone) on basal gastrin were studied in patients suffering from pernicious anaemia and chronic renal and liver disease, and during sequential arginine/insulin-stimulated gastrin release in normal subjects. When basal gastrin concentrations were normal (10-50 pg/ml) in controls and in patients who were in renal and liver failure, somatostatin had no effect on gastrin levels. Raised basal gastrin levels in pernicious anaemia and in 2 cases of chronic renal disease, were significantly inhibited by somatostatin with a half-life (T-half) of 3 to 4 minutes. Arginine infusion caused an insignificant rise in serum gastrin which was unaffected by somatostatin, whereas insulin hypoglycaemia significantly stimulated gastrin release, which was inhibited by somatostatin.

  13. Molecular genetic analysis of the calcium sensing receptor gene in patients clinically suspected to have familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia: phenotypic variation and mutation spectrum in a Danish population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Peter H; Christensen, Signe E; Heickendorff, Lene

    2007-01-01

    CONTEXT: The autosomal dominantly inherited condition familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia (FHH) is characterized by elevated plasma calcium levels, relative or absolute hypocalciuria, and normal to moderately elevated plasma PTH. The condition is difficult to distinguish clinically from primary...... hyperparathyroidism and is caused by inactivating mutations in the calcium sensing receptor (CASR) gene. OBJECTIVE: We sought to define the mutation spectrum of the CASR gene in a Danish FHH population and to establish genotype-phenotype relationships regarding the different mutations. DESIGN AND PARTICIPANTS...

  14. Proteomic plasma membrane profiling reveals an essential role for gp96 in the cell surface expression of LDLR family members, including the LDL receptor and LRP6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weekes, Michael P; Antrobus, Robin; Talbot, Suzanne; Hör, Simon; Simecek, Nikol; Smith, Duncan L; Bloor, Stuart; Randow, Felix; Lehner, Paul J

    2012-03-02

    The endoplasmic reticulum chaperone gp96 is required for the cell surface expression of a narrow range of proteins, including toll-like receptors (TLRs) and integrins. To identify a more comprehensive repertoire of proteins whose cell surface expression is dependent on gp96, we developed plasma membrane profiling (PMP), a technique that combines SILAC labeling with selective cell surface aminooxy-biotinylation. This approach allowed us to compare the relative abundance of plasma membrane (PM) proteins on gp96-deficient versus gp96-reconstituted murine pre-B cells. Analysis of unfractionated tryptic peptides initially identified 113 PM proteins, which extended to 706 PM proteins using peptide prefractionation. We confirmed a requirement for gp96 in the cell surface expression of certain TLRs and integrins and found a marked decrease in cell surface expression of four members of the extended LDL receptor family (LDLR, LRP6, Sorl1 and LRP8) in the absence of gp96. Other novel gp96 client proteins included CD180/Ly86, important in the B-cell response to lipopolysaccharide. We highlight common structural motifs in these client proteins that may be recognized by gp96, including the beta-propeller and leucine-rich repeat. This study therefore identifies the extended LDL receptor family as an important new family of proteins whose cell surface expression is regulated by gp96.

  15. Prevention of cold-associated acute inflammation in familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome by interleukin-1 receptor antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Hal M; Rosengren, Sanna; Boyle, David L; Cho, Jae Y; Nayar, Jyothi; Mueller, James L; Anderson, Justin P; Wanderer, Alan A; Firestein, Gary S

    Familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome (FCAS) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterised by recurrent episodes of rash, arthralgia, and fever after cold exposure. The genetic basis of this disease has been elucidated. Cryopyrin, the protein that is altered in FCAS, is one of the adaptor proteins that activate caspase 1, resulting in release of interleukin 1. An experimental cold challenge protocol was developed to study the acute inflammatory mechanisms occurring after a general cold exposure in FCAS patients and to investigate the effects of pretreatment with an antagonist of interleukin 1 receptor (IL-1Ra). ELISA, real-time PCR, and immunohistochemistry were used to measure cytokine responses. After cold challenge, untreated patients with FCAS developed rash, fever, and arthralgias within 1-4 h. Significant increases in serum concentrations of interleukin 6 and white-blood-cell counts were seen 4-8 h after cold challenge. Serum concentrations of interleukin 1 and cytokine mRNA in peripheral-blood leucocytes were not raised, but amounts of interleukin 1 protein and mRNA were high in affected skin. IL-1Ra administered before cold challenge blocked symptoms and increases in white-blood-cell counts and serum interleukin 6. The ability of IL-1Ra to prevent the clinical features and haematological and biochemical changes in patients with FCAS indicates a central role for interleukin 1beta in this disorder. Involvement of cryopyrin in activation of caspase 1 and NF-kappaB signalling suggests that it might have a role in many chronic inflammatory diseases. These findings support a new therapy for a disorder with no previously known acceptable treatment. They also offer insights into the role of interleukin 1beta in more common inflammatory diseases.

  16. Clinical features and growth hormone receptor gene mutations of patients with Laron syndrome from a Chinese family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Yan-Qin; Wei, Hong; Cao, Li-Zhi; Lu, Juan-Juan; Luo, Xiao-Ping

    2007-08-01

    Laron syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by defects of growth hormone receptor (GHR) gene. It is characterized by severe postnatal growth retardation and characteristic facial features as well as high circulating levels of growth hormone (GH) and low levels of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) and insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3). This report described the clinical features and GHR gene mutations in 2 siblings with Laron syndrome in a Chinese family. Their heights and weights were in the normal range at birth, but the growth was retarded after birth. When they presented to the clinic, the heights of the boy (8 years old) and his sister (11 years old) were 80.0 cm (-8.2 SDS) and 96.6 cm (-6.8 SDS) respectively. They had typical appearance features of Laron syndrome such as short stature and obesity, with protruding forehead, saddle nose, large eyes, sparse and thin silky hair and high-pitched voice. They had higher basal serum GH levels and lower serum levels of IGF-I, IGFBP-3 and growth hormone binding protein (GHBP) than normal controls. The peak serum GH level after colonidine and insulin stimulations in the boy was over 350 ng/mL. After one-year rhGH treatment, the boy's height increased from 80.0 cm to 83.3 cm. The gene mutation analysis revealed that two patients had same homozygous mutation of S65H (TCA -->CCA) in exon 4, which is a novel gene mutation. It was concluded that a definite diagnosis of Laron syndrome can be made based on characteristic appearance features and serum levels of GH, IGF-I, IGFBP-3 and GHBP. The S65H mutation might be the cause of Laron syndrome in the two patients.

  17. The kinesin-3 family motor KLP-4 regulates anterograde trafficking of GLR-1 glutamate receptors in the ventral nerve cord of Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Michael I; Ahlawat, Shikha; Kowalski, Jennifer R; Malkin, Emily; Koushika, Sandhya P; Juo, Peter

    2012-09-01

    The transport of glutamate receptors from the cell body to synapses is essential during neuronal development and may contribute to the regulation of synaptic strength in the mature nervous system. We previously showed that cyclin-dependent kinase-5 (CDK-5) positively regulates the abundance of GLR-1 glutamate receptors at synapses in the ventral nerve cord (VNC) of Caenorhabditis elegans. Here we identify a kinesin-3 family motor klp-4/KIF13 in a cdk-5 suppressor screen for genes that regulate GLR-1 trafficking. klp-4 mutants have decreased abundance of GLR-1 in the VNC. Genetic analysis of klp-4 and the clathrin adaptin unc-11/AP180 suggests that klp-4 functions before endocytosis in the ventral cord. Time-lapse microscopy indicates that klp-4 mutants exhibit decreased anterograde flux of GLR-1. Genetic analysis of cdk-5 and klp-4 suggests that they function in the same pathway to regulate GLR-1 in the VNC. Interestingly, GLR-1 accumulates in cell bodies of cdk-5 but not klp-4 mutants. However, GLR-1 does accumulate in klp-4-mutant cell bodies if receptor degradation in the multivesicular body/lysosome pathway is blocked. This study identifies kinesin KLP-4 as a novel regulator of anterograde glutamate receptor trafficking and reveals a cellular control mechanism by which receptor cargo is targeted for degradation in the absence of its motor.

  18. Orphan Nuclear Receptor NR4A1 Binds a Novel Protein Interaction Site on Anti-apoptotic B Cell Lymphoma Gene 2 Family Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godoi, Paulo H C; Wilkie-Grantham, Rachel P; Hishiki, Asami; Sano, Renata; Matsuzawa, Yasuko; Yanagi, Hiroko; Munte, Claudia E; Chen, Ya; Yao, Yong; Marassi, Francesca M; Kalbitzer, Hans R; Matsuzawa, Shu-Ichi; Reed, John C

    2016-07-01

    B cell lymphoma gene 2 (Bcl-2) family proteins are key regulators of programmed cell death and important targets for drug discovery. Pro-apoptotic and anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins reciprocally modulate their activities in large part through protein interactions involving a motif known as BH3 (Bcl-2 homology 3). Nur77 is an orphan member of the nuclear receptor family that lacks a BH3 domain but nevertheless binds certain anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins (Bcl-2, Bfl-1, and Bcl-B), modulating their effects on apoptosis and autophagy. We used a combination of NMR spectroscopy-based methods, mutagenesis, and functional studies to define the interaction site of a Nur77 peptide on anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins and reveal a novel interaction surface. Nur77 binds adjacent to the BH3 peptide-binding crevice, suggesting the possibility of cross-talk between these discrete binding sites. Mutagenesis of residues lining the identified interaction site on Bcl-B negated the interaction with Nur77 protein in cells and prevented Nur77-mediated modulation of apoptosis and autophagy. The findings establish a new protein interaction site with the potential to modulate the apoptosis and autophagy mechanisms governed by Bcl-2 family proteins. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. Chemokine receptors and cortical interneuron dysfunction in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volk, David W; Chitrapu, Anjani; Edelson, Jessica R; Lewis, David A

    2015-09-01

    Alterations in inhibitory (GABA) neurons, including deficiencies in the GABA synthesizing enzyme GAD67, in the prefrontal cortex in schizophrenia are pronounced in the subpopulations of neurons that contain the calcium-binding protein parvalbumin or the neuropeptide somatostatin. The presence of similar illness-related deficits in the transcription factor Lhx6, which regulates prenatal development of parvalbumin and somatostatin neurons, suggests that cortical GABA neuron dysfunction may be related to disturbances in utero. Since the chemokine receptors CXCR4 and CXCR7 guide the migration of cortical parvalbumin and somatostatin neurons from their birthplace in the medial ganglionic eminence to their final destination in the neocortex, we sought to determine whether altered CXCR4 and/or CXCR7 mRNA levels were associated with disturbances in GABA-related markers in schizophrenia. Quantitative PCR was used to quantify CXCR4 and CXCR7 mRNA levels in the prefrontal cortex of 62 schizophrenia and 62 healthy comparison subjects that were previously characterized for markers of parvalbumin and somatostatin neurons and in antipsychotic-exposed monkeys. We found elevated mRNA levels for CXCR7 (+29%; pschizophrenia subjects but not in antipsychotic-exposed monkeys. CXCR7 mRNA levels were inversely correlated with mRNA levels for GAD67, parvalbumin, somatostatin, and Lhx6 in schizophrenia but not in healthy subjects. These findings suggest that higher mRNA levels for CXCR7, and possibly CXCR4, may represent a compensatory mechanism to sustain the migration and correct positioning of cortical parvalbumin and somatostatin neurons in the face of other insults that disrupt the prenatal development of cortical GABA neurons in schizophrenia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. The retinoid X receptor response element in the human aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 promoter is antagonized by the chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter family of orphan receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pinaire, J; Hasanadka, R; Fang, M; Chou, WY; Stewart, MJ; Kruijer, W; Crabb, D

    2000-01-01

    Two tandem sites in the aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 promoter (designated FP330-5' and FP330-3') that bind members of the nuclear receptor superfamily mere recently identified. Antibodies against apolipoprotein regulatory protein (ARP-1) altered DNA-protein interactions in electrophoretic mobility shift

  1. Unique functional properties of somatostatin-expressing GABAergic neurons in mouse barrel cortex.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gentet, L.J.; Kremer, Y.; Taniguchi, H.; Huang, Z.J.; Staiger, J.F.; Petersen, C.C.H.

    2012-01-01

    Neocortical GABAergic neurons have diverse molecular, structural and electrophysiological features, but the functional correlates of this diversity are largely unknown. We found unique membrane potential dynamics of somatostatin-expressing (SOM) neurons in layer 2/3 of the primary somatosensory

  2. Effect of somatostatin on glucose homeostasis in conscious long-fasted dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevenson, R.W.; Steiner, K.E.; Hendrick, G.K.; Cherrington, A.D.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of somatostatin plus intraportal insulin and glucagon replacement (pancreatic clamp) on carbohydrate metabolism were studied in conscious dogs fasted for 7 days so that gluconeogenesis was a major contributor to total glucose production. By use of [3- 3 H]glucose, glucose production (R a ) and utilization (R d ) and glucose clearance were assessed before and after implementation of the pancreatic clamp. After an initial control period, somatostatin (0.8 μg·kg -1 ·min -1 ) was infused with intraportal replacement amounts of glucagon and insulin. The insulin infusion rate was varied to maintain euglycemia and then kept constant for 250 min. Plasma glucagon was similar before and during somatostatin infusion, while plasma insulin was lower. Plasma glucose levels remained similar while R a and R d and the ratio of glucose clearance to plasma insulin were significantly increased. Net hepatic lactate uptake and [ 14 C]alanine plus [ 14 C]lactate conversion to [ 14 C]glucose increased. In conclusion, somatostatin alters glucose clearance in 7-day fasted dogs, resulting in changes in several indices of carbohydrate metabolism

  3. Somatostatin in the rat periventricular nucleus: sex differences and effect of gonadal steroids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vugt, van H.H.; Heijning, van de B.J.M.; Beek, van der E.M.

    2008-01-01

    In the rat, the sexual dimorphism in growth hormone release is driven by sex steroids, and is suggested to result mainly from differences in somatostatin (SOM) release patterns from the median eminence. We studied the effect of gonadal steroids on SOM peptide-containing cells in the periventricular

  4. Tissue-type plasminogen activator in somatostatin cells of rat pancreas and hypothalamus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, P; Larsson, L I; Danø, K

    1987-01-01

    -PA, and immunoblotting analysis demonstrated one band with a similar electrophoretic mobility. No urokinase-type PA immunoreactivity was found in the rat endocrine pancreas. A granular t-PA immunoreactivity resembling that found in adjacent sections with somatostatin antiserum was found in the median eminence...

  5. An ochre mutation in the vitamin D receptor gene causes hereditary 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3-resistant rickets in three families

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritchie, H.H.; Hughes, M.R.; Thompson, E.T.; Pike, J.W.; O'Malley, B.W.; Malloy, P.J.; Feldman, D.; Hochberg, Z.

    1989-01-01

    Hereditary 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D 3 -resistant rickets is a rare autosomal-recessive disease resulting from target-organ resistance to the action of the active hormonal form of vitamin D. Four affected children from three related families with the classical syndrome of hereditary 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D 3 -resistant rickets and the absence of detectable binding to the vitamin D receptor (VDR) in cultured fibroblasts or lymphoblasts were examined for genetic abnormalities in the VDR gene. Genomic DNA from Epstein-Barr virus-transformed lymphoblasts of eight family members was isolated and amplified by polymerase chain reaction techniques. Amplified fragments containing the eight structural exons encoding the VDR protein were sequenced. The DNA from all affected children exhibited a single C → A base substitution within exon 7 at nucleotide 970. Although the affected children were all homozygotic for the mutation, the four parents tested all exhibited both wild-type and mutant alleles, indicating a heterozygous state. Recreated mutant receptor exhibited no specific 1,25-[ 3 H]dihydroxyvitamin D 3 binding and failed to activate a cotransfected VDR promoter-reporter gene construct. Thus these findings identify an ochre mutation in a human steroid hormone receptor in patients with hereditary 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D 3 -resistant rickets

  6. An ochre mutation in the vitamin D receptor gene causes hereditary 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D sub 3 -resistant rickets in three families

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritchie, H.H.; Hughes, M.R.; Thompson, E.T.; Pike, J.W.; O' Malley, B.W. (Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (USA)); Malloy, P.J.; Feldman, D. (Stanford Univ. School of Medicine, CA (USA)); Hochberg, Z. (Rambam Medical Center, Haifa (Israel))

    1989-12-01

    Hereditary 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3}-resistant rickets is a rare autosomal-recessive disease resulting from target-organ resistance to the action of the active hormonal form of vitamin D. Four affected children from three related families with the classical syndrome of hereditary 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3}-resistant rickets and the absence of detectable binding to the vitamin D receptor (VDR) in cultured fibroblasts or lymphoblasts were examined for genetic abnormalities in the VDR gene. Genomic DNA from Epstein-Barr virus-transformed lymphoblasts of eight family members was isolated and amplified by polymerase chain reaction techniques. Amplified fragments containing the eight structural exons encoding the VDR protein were sequenced. The DNA from all affected children exhibited a single C {yields} A base substitution within exon 7 at nucleotide 970. Although the affected children were all homozygotic for the mutation, the four parents tested all exhibited both wild-type and mutant alleles, indicating a heterozygous state. Recreated mutant receptor exhibited no specific 1,25-({sup 3}H)dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} binding and failed to activate a cotransfected VDR promoter-reporter gene construct. Thus these findings identify an ochre mutation in a human steroid hormone receptor in patients with hereditary 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3}-resistant rickets.

  7. Deletion in the first cysteine-rich repeat of low density lipoprotein receptor impairs its transport but not lipoprotein binding in fibroblasts from a subject with familial hypercholesterolemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leitersdorf, E.; Hobbs, H.H.; Fourie, A.M.; Jacobs, M.; Van Der Westhuyzen, D.R.; Coetzee, G.A.

    1988-01-01

    The ligand-binding domain of the low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor is composed of seven cysteine-rich repeats, each ∼ 40 amino acids long. Previous studies showed that if the first repeat of the ligand-binding domain (encoded by exon 2) is deleted, the receptor fails to bind an anti-LDL receptor monoclonal antibody (IgG-C7) but continues to bind LDL with high affinity. Cultured fibroblasts from a Black South African Xhosa patient (TT) with the clinical syndrome of homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia demonstrated high-affinity cell-surface binding of 125 I-labeled LDL but not 125 I-labeled IgG-C7. previous haplotype analysis, using 10 restriction fragment length polymorphic sites, suggested that the patient inherited two identical LDL receptor alleles. The polymerase chain reaction technique was used to selectively amplify exon 2 of the LDL receptor gene from this patient. Sequence analysis of the amplified fragment disclosed a deletion of six base pairs that removes two amino acids, aspartic acid and glycine, from the first cysteine-rich ligand binding repeat. The mutation creates a new Pst I restriction site that can be used to detect the deletion. The existence of this mutant allele confirms that the epitope of IgG-C7 is located in the first cysteine-rich repeat and that this repeat is not necessary for LDL binding. The mutant gene produced a normally sized 120-kilodalton LDL receptor precursor protein that matured to the 160-kilodalton form at less than one-fourth the normal rate

  8. A multiscale computational approach to dissect early events in the Erb family receptor mediated activation, differential signaling, and relevance to oncogenic transformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yingting; Purvis, Jeremy; Shih, Andrew; Weinstein, Joshua; Agrawal, Neeraj; Radhakrishnan, Ravi

    2007-06-01

    We describe a hierarchical multiscale computational approach based on molecular dynamics simulations, free energy-based molecular docking simulations, deterministic network-based kinetic modeling, and hybrid discrete/continuum stochastic dynamics protocols to study the dimer-mediated receptor activation characteristics of the Erb family receptors, specifically the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Through these modeling approaches, we are able to extend the prior modeling of EGF-mediated signal transduction by considering specific EGFR tyrosine kinase (EGFRTK) docking interactions mediated by differential binding and phosphorylation of different C-terminal peptide tyrosines on the RTK tail. By modeling signal flows through branching pathways of the EGFRTK resolved on a molecular basis, we are able to transcribe the effects of molecular alterations in the receptor (e.g., mutant forms of the receptor) to differing kinetic behavior and downstream signaling response. Our molecular dynamics simulations show that the drug sensitizing mutation (L834R) of EGFR stabilizes the active conformation to make the system constitutively active. Docking simulations show preferential characteristics (for wildtype vs. mutant receptors) in inhibitor binding as well as preferential enhancement of phosphorylation of particular substrate tyrosines over others. We find that in comparison to the wildtype system, the L834R mutant RTK preferentially binds the inhibitor erlotinib, as well as preferentially phosphorylates the substrate tyrosine Y1068 but not Y1173. We predict that these molecular level changes result in preferential activation of the Akt signaling pathway in comparison to the Erk signaling pathway for cells with normal EGFR expression. For cells with EGFR over expression, the mutant over activates both Erk and Akt pathways, in comparison to wildtype. These results are consistent with qualitative experimental measurements reported in the literature. We discuss these

  9. Pharmaceutical design and pharmacological characterization of Tc99m [99mTc] labelled somatostatin and gastrin analogues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guggenberg, E. von

    2004-10-01

    The development of regulatory peptide analogues radiolabelled with 99m Tc is of great interest for nuclear medicine applications, as 99m Tc shows very favourable imaging characteristics, such as low radiation burden to the patient, optimal image quality in SPECT, one-day-acquisition-protocol, availability on demand and cost effectiveness. In this work the principles of pharmaceutical design and preclinical pharmacological characterization of regulatory peptide analogues labelled with 99m Tc with possible application in tumour diagnosis are described. [ 99m Tc-EDDA-HYNIC0,Tyr3]octreotide ( 99m Tc-EDDA-HYNIC-TOC) is a promising new radiopharmaceutical with the potential to replace [ 111 In-DTPA0]octreotide in receptor scintigraphy of somatostatin receptor-positive tumours. Radiolabelling at high labelling yields and high specific activities could be obtained applying a coligand exchange labelling approach from tricine for EDDA under optimized conditions of pH, EDDA and stannous ion concentration. The resulting complex was characterized via HPLC, receptor binding and LC-MS. For the development of a freeze-dried kit formulation with long shelf-life, high stability of the final preparation and retained biological activity, the addition of bulking agent, the pH of the freeze-drying solution and the content of stannous chloride were of major importance. Different methods of radiochemical purity testing were evaluated to guarantee high quality of the preparation in a clinical setting, forming the basis for a further clinical evaluation of this promising new radiopharmaceutical. Radiolabelling of [D-Glu1]minigastrin (MG) with 99m Tc was studied applying two different labelling approaches. HYNIC-MG could be labelled using tricine and EDDA as coligands; and (Nalpha-His)Ac-MG was used as tridentate ligand for the 99m Tc carbonyl core. Stability experiments by HPLC analysis in PBS, serum, histidine- and cysteine-solutions as well as rat liver and kidney homogenates, receptor

  10. Synthesis and evaluation in vitro in cancer cells AR42J of the radiopharmaceutical 99mTc-Tyr3-Octreotide-dendrimer similar of somatostatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orocio R, E.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this project was preparing a multimeric system through the conjugation of several molecules of the peptide Tyr 3 -Octreotide to a dendrimer molecule based on Poly-amidoamine (PAMAM), as well as radiolabeled with 99m Tc and evaluating its behavior like new radiopharmaceutical similar of somatostatin. The dendrimer PAMAM generation 3.5 that possesses terminal groups of sodium carboxylate, was functionalized to peptide Tyr 3 -Octreotide through a reaction of peptide coupling with HATU (hexafluorophosphate (V) of 1-oxide-3-(bis(dimethylamino)methylene)-3H-[1,2,3]triazole[4,5-b]pyridine) as activating agent of carboxylate groups using the Size Exclusion Chromatography (Sec) as purification method. The product was characterized by Ultraviolet visible spectrophotometry, Mid-infrared and Far-infrared, Elemental analysis, Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, Scanning electron microscopy, Thermogravimetry and Differential scanning calorimetry. The radiolabeled with 99m Tc was carried out using a direct method that involves the reduction of the anion TcO 4 - with stannous chloride, so that the dendrimer is capable of coordinating to the technetium forming a chelate compound. The radiochemical purity of the radiolabeled compound was determined by thin layer chromatography using a sodium chloride solution to 20% (m/v) as mobile phase and was verified by molecular exclusion chromatography. The radiolabeled compound was possible to obtain it with a radiochemical purity superior to 90%. Also, the specific and not specific union was evaluated of the synthesized compound in mouse pancreas cancer cells AR42J, positive to somatostatin receptors, showing specific recognition for this receptors type with high cellular internalization. The biodistribution studies were carried out in BALB/c mice at different post injection times and in nude mice with induced tumors AR42J. The results showed that the 99m Tc-PAMAM-Tyr 3 -Octreotide is excreted by via renal as hepatobiliary

  11. Somatostatin is required for masculinization of growth hormone–regulated hepatic gene expression but not of somatic growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Malcolm J.; Otero-Corchon, Veronica; Parlow, Albert F.; Ramirez, Jose L.; Kumar, Ujendra; Patel, Yogesh C.; Rubinstein, Marcelo

    2001-01-01

    Pulsatile growth hormone (GH) secretion differs between males and females and regulates the sex-specific expression of cytochrome P450s in liver. Sex steroids influence the secretory dynamics of GH, but the neuroendocrine mechanisms have not been conclusively established. Because periventricular hypothalamic somatostatin (SST) expression is greater in males than in females, we generated knockout (Smst–/–) mice to investigate whether SST peptides are necessary for sexually differentiated GH secretion and action. Despite marked increases in nadir and median plasma GH levels in both sexes of Smst–/– compared with Smst+/+ mice, the mutant mice had growth curves identical to their sibling controls and retained a normal sexual dimorphism in weight and length. In contrast, the liver of male Smst–/– mice was feminized, resulting in an identical profile of GH-regulated hepatic mRNAs between male and female mutants. Male Smst-/- mice show higher expression of two SST receptors in the hypothalamus and pituitary than do females. These data indicate that SST is required to masculinize the ultradian GH rhythm by suppressing interpulse GH levels. In the absence of SST, male and female mice exhibit similarly altered plasma GH profiles that eliminate sexually dimorphic liver function but do not affect dimorphic growth. PMID:11413165

  12. A family of octopamine [corrected] receptors that specifically induce cyclic AMP production or Ca2+ release in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balfanz, Sabine; Strünker, Timo; Frings, Stephan; Baumann, Arnd

    2005-04-01

    In invertebrates, the biogenic-amine octopamine is an important physiological regulator. It controls and modulates neuronal development, circadian rhythm, locomotion, 'fight or flight' responses, as well as learning and memory. Octopamine mediates its effects by activation of different GTP-binding protein (G protein)-coupled receptor types, which induce either cAMP production or Ca(2+) release. Here we describe the functional characterization of two genes from Drosophila melanogaster that encode three octopamine receptors. The first gene (Dmoa1) codes for two polypeptides that are generated by alternative splicing. When heterologously expressed, both receptors cause oscillatory increases of the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration in response to applying nanomolar concentrations of octopamine. The second gene (Dmoa2) codes for a receptor that specifically activates adenylate cyclase and causes a rise of intracellular cAMP with an EC(50) of approximately 3 x 10(-8) m octopamine. Tyramine, the precursor of octopamine biosynthesis, activates all three receptors at > or = 100-fold higher concentrations, whereas dopamine and serotonin are non-effective. Developmental expression of Dmoa genes was assessed by RT-PCR. Overlapping but not identical expression patterns were observed for the individual transcripts. The genes characterized in this report encode unique receptors that display signature properties of native octopamine receptors.

  13. The TAM-family receptor Mer mediates production of HGF through the RhoA-dependent pathway in response to apoptotic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyun-Jung; Baen, Ji-Yeon; Lee, Ye-Ji; Choi, Youn-Hee; Kang, Jihee Lee

    2012-08-01

    The TAM receptor protein tyrosine kinases Tyro3, Axl, and Mer play important roles in macrophage function. We investigated the roles of the TAM receptors in mediating the induction of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) during the interaction of macrophages with apoptotic cells. Mer-specific neutralizing antibody, small interfering RNA (siRNA), and a recombinant Mer protein (Mer/Fc) inhibited HGF mRNA and protein expression, as well as activation of RhoA, Akt, and specific mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases in response to apoptotic cells. Inhibition of Axl or Tyro3 with specific antibodies, siRNA, or Fc-fusion proteins did not prevent apoptotic cell-induced HGF mRNA and protein expression and did not inhibit activation of the postreceptor signaling molecules RhoA and certain MAP kinases, including extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase and c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase. However, Axl- and Tyro3-specific blockers did inhibit the activation of Akt and p38 MAP kinase in response to apoptotic cells. In addition, none of the TAM receptors mediated the effects of apoptotic cells on transforming growth factor-β or epidermal growth factor mRNA expression. However, they were involved in the induction of vascular endothelial growth factor mRNA expression. Our data provide evidence that when macrophages interact with apoptotic cells, only Mer of the TAM-family receptors is responsible for mediating transcriptional HGF production through a RhoA-dependent pathway.

  14. Preliminary PET/CT Imaging with Somatostatin Analogs [68Ga]DOTAGA-TATE and [68Ga]DOTAGA-TOC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satpati, Drishty; Shinto, Ajit; Kamaleshwaran, K K; Sarma, Haladhar Dev; Dash, Ashutosh

    2017-12-01

    Somatostatin receptor positron emission tomography/X-ray computed tomography (SSTR-PET/CT) is a well-established technique for staging and detection of neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). Ga-68-labeled DOTA-conjugated octreotide analogs are the privileged radiotracers for diagnosis and therapeutic monitoring of NETs. Hence, we were interested in assessing the influence of promising, newer variant DOTAGA on the hydrophilicity, pharmacokinetics, and lesion pick-up of somatostatin analogs. Herein, the potential of ([ 68 Ga]DOTAGA, Tyr 3 , Thr 8 ) octreotide ([ 68 Ga]DOTAGA-TATE) and ([ 68 Ga]DOTAGA, Tyr 3 ) octreotide ([ 68 Ga]DOTAGA-TOC) as NET imaging agents has been investigated. Amenability of [ 68 Ga]DOTAGA-(TATE/TOC) to kit-type formulation has been demonstrated. Biodistribution studies were carried out in normal rats at 1 h post-injection (p.i.). [ 68 Ga]DOTAGA-(TATE/TOC) PET/CT scans were carried out in patients (70-170 MBq, 1 h p.i.) with histologically confirmed well-differentiated NETs. [ 68 Ga]DOTAGA-TATE exhibited hydrophilicity similar to [ 68 Ga]DOTA-TATE (log P = -3.51 vs -3.69) whereas [ 68 Ga]DOTAGA-TOC was more hydrophilic than [ 68 Ga]DOTA-TOC (log P = -3.27 vs -2.93). [ 68 Ga]DOTAGA-TATE and [ 68 Ga]DOTA-TATE showed almost identical blood and kidney uptake in normal rats whereas significantly fast clearance (p TOC also demonstrated rapid clearance from blood and kidneys (p TOC. The metastatic lesions in NET patients were well identified by [ 68 Ga]DOTAGA-TATE and [ 68 Ga]DOTAGA-TOC. The phenomenal analogy was observed between [ 68 Ga]DOTAGA-TATE and [ 68 Ga]DOTA-TATE as well as between [ 68 Ga]DOTAGA-TOC and [ 68 Ga]DOTA-TOC in biodistribution studies in rats. The good lesion detection ability of the two radiotracers indicates their potential as NET imaging radiotracers.

  15. The miR9863 family regulates distinct Mla alleles in barley to attenuate NLR receptor-triggered disease resistance and cell-death signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Liu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Barley (Hordeum vulgare L. Mla alleles encode coiled-coil (CC, nucleotide binding, leucine-rich repeat (NB-LRR receptors that trigger isolate-specific immune responses against the powdery mildew fungus, Blumeria graminis f. sp. hordei (Bgh. How Mla or NB-LRR genes in grass species are regulated at post-transcriptional level is not clear. The microRNA family, miR9863, comprises four members that differentially regulate distinct Mla alleles in barley. We show that miR9863 members guide the cleavage of Mla1 transcripts in barley, and block or reduce the accumulation of MLA1 protein in the heterologous Nicotiana benthamiana expression system. Regulation specificity is determined by variation in a unique single-nucleotide-polymorphism (SNP in mature miR9863 family members and two SNPs in the Mla miR9863-binding site that separates these alleles into three groups. Further, we demonstrate that 22-nt miR9863s trigger the biogenesis of 21-nt phased siRNAs (phasiRNAs and together these sRNAs form a feed-forward regulation network for repressing the expression of group I Mla alleles. Overexpression of miR9863 members specifically attenuates MLA1, but not MLA10-triggered disease resistance and cell-death signaling. We propose a key role of the miR9863 family in dampening immune response signaling triggered by a group of MLA immune receptors in barley.

  16. Evidence for a partial deficiency of the LDL (apo B,E) receptor within a family of rhesus monkeys with a spontaneous hypercholesterolemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scanu, A.M.; Khalil, A.; Tidore, M.; Kaiser, M.; Pfaffinger, D.; Carey, D.; Dawson, G.

    1987-01-01

    Spontaneous hypercholesterolemia is rare among non-human primates. Through screening of a rhesus monkey colony they have identified a family in which 3 out of its 6 members have a persistent hypercholesterolemia on a cholesterol-free Purina Chow diet and are high responders to a dietary fat challenge. On a basal diet the 3 affected animals also exhibited high plasma levels of LDL and apoB. To shed light on the mechanism of the hypercholesterolemia they have grown in culture fibroblasts from skin biopsies obtained from all members of the rhesus monkey family and 12 control. Binding studies at 4 0 C and ligand blotting experiments using 125 I-LDL of either normolipidemic rhesus monkeys or human subjects have shown that the fibroblasts from the 3 monkeys with a spontaneous hypercholesterolemia have a significant reduction of the number of LDL receptor and to the same extent as fibroblasts derived from subjects with heterozygous FH studied at the same time. The data suggest that the spontaneous elevation of plasma cholesterol observed in the 3 family members is related, at least in part, to a defective uptake of LDL by the LDL receptor pathway

  17. Regulation of C. elegans fat uptake and storage by acyl-CoA synthase-3 is dependent on NR5A family nuclear hormone receptor nhr-25

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mullaney, Brendan C; Blind, Raymond D; Lemieux, George A

    2010-01-01

    Acyl-CoA synthases are important for lipid synthesis and breakdown, generation of signaling molecules, and lipid modification of proteins, highlighting the challenge of understanding metabolic pathways within intact organisms. From a C. elegans mutagenesis screen, we found that loss of ACS-3...... mutant phenotypes require the nuclear hormone receptor NHR-25, a key regulator of C. elegans molting. Our findings suggest that ACS-3-derived long-chain fatty acyl-CoAs, perhaps incorporated into complex ligands such as phosphoinositides, modulate NHR-25 function, which in turn regulates an endocrine...... program of lipid uptake and synthesis. These results reveal a link between acyl-CoA synthase function and an NR5A family nuclear receptor in C. elegans....

  18. Identification of urocortin III, an additional member of the corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) family with high affinity for the CRF2 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, K; Li, C; Perrin, M H; Blount, A; Kunitake, K; Donaldson, C; Vaughan, J; Reyes, T M; Gulyas, J; Fischer, W; Bilezikjian, L; Rivier, J; Sawchenko, P E; Vale, W W

    2001-06-19

    The corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) family of neuropeptides includes the mammalian peptides CRF, urocortin, and urocortin II, as well as piscine urotensin I and frog sauvagine. The mammalian peptides signal through two G protein-coupled receptor types to modulate endocrine, autonomic, and behavioral responses to stress, as well as a range of peripheral (cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, and immune) activities. The three previously known ligands are differentially distributed anatomically and have distinct specificities for the two major receptor types. Here we describe the characterization of an additional CRF-related peptide, urocortin III, in the human and mouse. In searching the public human genome databases we found a partial expressed sequence tagged (EST) clone with significant sequence identity to mammalian and fish urocortin-related peptides. By using primers based on the human EST sequence, a full-length human clone was isolated from genomic DNA that encodes a protein that includes a predicted putative 38-aa peptide structurally related to other known family members. With a human probe, we then cloned the mouse ortholog from a genomic library. Human and mouse urocortin III share 90% identity in the 38-aa putative mature peptide. In the peptide coding region, both human and mouse urocortin III are 76% identical to pufferfish urocortin-related peptide and more distantly related to urocortin II, CRF, and urocortin from other mammalian species. Mouse urocortin III mRNA expression is found in areas of the brain including the hypothalamus, amygdala, and brainstem, but is not evident in the cerebellum, pituitary, or cerebral cortex; it is also expressed peripherally in small intestine and skin. Urocortin III is selective for type 2 CRF receptors and thus represents another potential endogenous ligand for these receptors.

  19. Correlation between familial cancer history and epidermal growth factor receptor mutations in Taiwanese never smokers with non-small cell lung cancer: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Po-Chung; Cheng, Yun-Chung

    2015-03-01

    Lung cancer is a leading cause of cancer deaths in the world. Cigarette smoking remains a prominent risk factor, but lung cancer incidence has been increasing in never smokers. Genetic abnormalities including epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations predominate in never smoking lung cancer patients. Furthermore, familial aggregations of patients with these mutations reflect heritable susceptibility to lung cancer. The correlation between familial cancer history and EGFR mutations in never smokers with lung cancer requires investigation. This was a retrospective case-control study that evaluated the prevalence of EGFR mutations in lung cancer patients with familial cancer history. Never smokers with lung cancer treated at a hospital in Taiwan between April 2012 and May 2014 were evaluated. Inclusion criteria were never smokers with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Exclusion criteria involved patients without records of familial cancer history or tumor genotype. This study included 246 never smokers with lung cancer. The study population mainly involved never smoking women with a mean age of 60 years, and the predominant tumor histology was adenocarcinoma. Lung cancer patients with familial cancer history had an increased prevalence of EGFR mutations compared to patients without family history [odds ratio (OR): 5.9; 95% confidence interval (CI): 3.3-10.6; Pnon-pulmonary cancers (OR: 5.0; 95% CI: 2.5-10.0; Pnever smoking lung cancer patients with familial cancer history. Moreover, a sizable proportion of never smoking cancer patients harbored these mutations. These observations have implications for the treatment of lung cancer in never smokers.

  20. Receptor homodimerization plays a critical role in a novel dominant negative P2RY12 variant identified in a family with severe bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundell, S J; Rabbolini, D; Gabrielli, S; Chen, Q; Aungraheeta, R; Hutchinson, J L; Kilo, T; Mackay, J; Ward, C M; Stevenson, W; Morel-Kopp, M-C

    2018-01-01

    Essentials Three dominant variants for the autosomal recessive bleeding disorder type-8 have been described. To date, there has been no phenotype/genotype correlation explaining their dominant transmission. Proline plays an important role in P2Y12R ligand binding and signaling defects. P2Y12R homodimer formation is critical for the receptor function and signaling. Background Although inherited platelet disorders are still underdiagnosed worldwide, advances in molecular techniques are improving disease diagnosis and patient management. Objective To identify and characterize the mechanism underlying the bleeding phenotype in a Caucasian family with an autosomal dominant P2RY12 variant. Methods Full blood counts, platelet aggregometry, flow cytometry and western blotting were performed before next-generation sequencing (NGS). Detailed molecular analysis of the identified variant of the P2Y12 receptor (P2Y12R) was subsequently performed in mammalian cells overexpressing receptor constructs. Results All three referred individuals had markedly impaired ADP-induced platelet aggregation with primary wave only, despite normal total and surface P2Y12R expression. By NGS, a single P2RY12:c.G794C substitution (p.R265P) was identified in all affected individuals, and this was confirmed by Sanger sequencing. Mammalian cell experiments with the R265P-P2Y12R variant showed normal receptor surface expression versus wild-type (WT) P2Y12R. Agonist-stimulated R265P-P2Y12R function (both signaling and surface receptor loss) was reduced versus WT P2Y12R. Critically, R265P-P2Y12R acted in a dominant negative manner, with agonist-stimulated WT P2Y12R activity being reduced by variant coexpression, suggesting dramatic loss of WT homodimers. Importantly, platelet P2RY12 cDNA cloning and sequencing in two affected individuals also revealed three-fold mutant mRNA overexpression, decreasing even further the likelihood of WT homodimer formation. R265 located within extracellular loop 3 (EL3) is

  1. Effect of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide and somatostatin on secretion of epidermal growth factor and bicarbonate from Brunner's glands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Steen Seier

    1984-01-01

    The effect of VIP and somatostatin on secretion of epidermal growth factor and bicarbonate from Brunner's glands was investigated in the rat. Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide infused in doses of 10 and 100 ng/kg/h significantly increased epidermal growth factor and bicarbonate output......, but the concentrations did not change. Somatostatin infused at doses of 1, 10, 100 and 1000 ng/kg/h against a background of VIP 100 ng/kg/h inhibited in dose-dependent fashion the stimulated epidermal growth factor and bicarbonate outputs from rat Brunner's gland pouches. Also basal secretion was inhibited...... growth factor and bicarbonate from Brunner's glands, an effect which is inhibited by somatostatin. A possible role for somatostatin in the control of Brunner's gland secretion is suggested....

  2. Host-parasite interaction: selective Pv-fam-a family proteins of Plasmodium vivax bind to a restricted number of human erythrocyte receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeeshan, Mohammad; Tyagi, Rupesh Kumar; Tyagi, Kriti; Alam, Mohd Shoeb; Sharma, Yagya Dutta

    2015-04-01

    Plasmodium vivax synthesizes the largest number of 36 tryptophan-rich proteins belonging to the Pv-fam-a family. These parasite proteins need to be characterized for their biological function because tryptophan-rich proteins from other Plasmodium species have been proposed as vaccine candidates. Recombinant P. vivax tryptophan-rich antigens (PvTRAgs) were used to determine their erythrocyte-binding activity by a cell-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, flow cytometry, and a rosetting assay. Only 4 (PvTRAg26.3, PvTRAg34, PvTRAg36, and PvTRAg36.6) of 21 PvTRAgs bind to host erythrocytes. The cross-competition data indicated that PvTRAg36 and PvTRAg34 share their erythrocyte receptors with previously described proteins PvTRAg38 and PvTRAg33.5, respectively. On the other hand, PvTRAg26.3 and PvTRAg36.6 cross-compete with each other and not with any other PvTRAg, indicating that these 2 proteins bind to the same but yet another set of erythrocyte receptor(s). Together, 10 of 36 PvTRAgs possess erythrocyte-binding activity in which each protein recognizes >1 erythrocyte receptor. Further, each erythrocyte receptor is shared by >1 PvTRAg. This redundancy may be useful for the parasite to invade red blood cells and cause disease pathogenesis, and it can be exploited to develop therapeutics against P. vivax malaria. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Nuclear receptor 5A (NR5A) family regulates 5-aminolevulinic acid synthase 1 (ALAS1) gene expression in steroidogenic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Yunfeng; Mizutani, Tetsuya; Imamichi, Yoshitaka; Yazawa, Takashi; Matsumura, Takehiro; Kawabe, Shinya; Kanno, Masafumi; Umezawa, Akihiro; Kangawa, Kenji; Miyamoto, Kaoru

    2012-11-01

    5-Aminolevulinic acid synthase 1 (ALAS1) is a rate-limiting enzyme for heme biosynthesis