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Sample records for solvent polarity markers

  1. Effects of polar protic solvents on dual emissions of 3 ...

    TECS

    Figure 1. Scheme of the ESIPT reaction of 3-hydroxy- chromone, 1. Chart 1. Chemical structures of the studied ... Materials and methods. Absorption and ... 85. Table 1. Spectroscopic properties of 3HC dyes in different polar solvents.a. Solvent.

  2. Polar and low polar solvents media effect on dipole moments of some diazo Sudan dyes

    Zakerhamidi, M. S.; Golghasemi Sorkhabi, Sh.; Shamkhali, A. N.

    2014-06-01

    Absorption and fluorescence spectra of three Sudan dyes (SudanIII, SudanIV and Sudan black B) were recorded in various solvents with different polarity in the range of 300-800 nm, at room temperature. The solvatochromic method was used to investigate dipole moments of these dyes in ground and excited states, in different media. The solvatochromic behavior of these substances and their solvent-solute interactions were analyzed via solvent polarity parameters. Obtained results express the effects of solvation on tautomerism and molecular configuration (geometry) of Sudan dyes in solvent media with different polarity. Furthermore, analyze of solvent-solute interactions and value of ground and excited states dipole moments suggests different forms of resonance structures for Sudan dyes in polar and low-polar solvents.

  3. Dispersions of Goethite Nanorods in Aprotic Polar Solvents

    Delphine Coursault

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Colloidal suspensions of anisotropic nanoparticles can spontaneously self-organize in liquid-crystalline phases beyond some concentration threshold. These phases often respond to electric and magnetic fields. At lower concentrations, usual isotropic liquids are observed but they can display very strong Kerr and Cotton-Mouton effects (i.e., field-induced particle orientation. For many examples of these colloidal suspensions, the solvent is water, which hinders most electro-optic applications. Here, for goethite (α-FeOOH nanorod dispersions, we show that water can be replaced by polar aprotic solvents, such as N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP and dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO, without loss of colloidal stability. By polarized-light microscopy, small-angle X-ray scattering and electro-optic measurements, we found that the nematic phase, with its field-response properties, is retained. Moreover, a strong Kerr effect was also observed with isotropic goethite suspensions in these polar aprotic solvents. Furthermore, we found no significant difference in the behavior of both the nematic and isotropic phases between the aqueous and non-aqueous dispersions. Our work shows that goethite nanorod suspensions in polar aprotic solvents, suitable for electro-optic applications, can easily be produced and that they keep all their outstanding properties. It also suggests that this solvent replacement method could be extended to the aqueous colloidal suspensions of other kinds of charged anisotropic nanoparticles.

  4. Directed Assembly of Janus Cylinders by Controlling the Solvent Polarity.

    Kim, Jongmin; Choi, Chang-Hyung; Yeom, Su-Jin; Eom, Naye; Kang, Kyoung-Ku; Lee, Chang-Soo

    2017-08-01

    This study demonstrates the possibility of controlling the directed self-assembly of microsized Janus cylinders by changing the solvent polarity of the assembly media. Experimental results are analyzed and theoretical calculations of the free energy of adhesion (ΔG ad ) are performed to elucidate the underlying basic principles and investigate the effects of the solvent on the self-assembled structures. This approach will pave a predictive route for controlling the structures of assembly depending on the solvent polarity. In particular, we find that a binary solvent system with precisely controlled polarity induces directional assembly of the microsized Janus cylinders. Thus, the formation of two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) assembled clusters can be reliably tuned by controlling the numbers of constituent Janus cylinders in a binary solvent system. Finally, this approach is expanded to stepwise assembly, which forms unique microstructures via secondary growth of primary seed clusters formed by the Janus cylinders. We envision that this investigation is highly promising for the construction of desired superstructures using a wide variety of polymeric Janus microparticles with chemical and physical multicompartments.

  5. Dispersing surface-modified imogolite nanotubes in polar and non-polar solvents

    Li, Ming; Brant, Jonathan A.

    2018-02-01

    Furthering the development of nanocomposite structures, namely membranes for water treatment applications, requires that methods be developed to ensure nanoparticle dispersion in polar and non-polar solvents, as both are widely used in associated synthesis techniques. Here, we report on a two-step method to graft polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), and a one-step method for octadecylphosphonic acid (OPA), onto the outer surfaces of imogolite nanotubes. The goal of these approaches was to improve and maintain nanotube dispersion in polymer compatible polar and non-polar solvents. The PVP coating modified the imogolite surface charge from positive to weakly negative at pH ≤ 9; the OPA made it weakly positive at acidic pH values to negative at pH ≥ 7. The PVP surface coating stabilized the nanotubes through steric hindrance in polar protic, dipolar aprotic, and chloroform. In difference to the PVP, the OPA surface coating allowed the nanotubes to be dispersed in n-hexane and chloroform, but not in the polar solvents. The lack of miscibility in the polar solvents, as well as the better dispersion in n-hexane, was attributed to the stronger hydrophobicity of the OPA polymer relative to the PVP. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  6. Photophysics of Curcumin excited state in toluene-polar solvent mixtures: Role of H-bonding properties of the polar solvent

    Saini, R.K.; Das, K., E-mail: kaustuv@rrcat.gov.in

    2014-01-15

    Excited state dynamics of Curcumin in binary solvent mixtures of toluene and polar H-bonding solvents were compared by using an instrument endowed with 40 ps time resolution. The solvation time constant of Curcumin increases significantly (and can therefore be measured) in polar solvents which have, either, both H-bond donating and accepting ability, or, only H-bond donating ability. These results suggest that the rate limiting step in the excited state dynamics of the pigment might be the formation and reorganization of the intermolecular H-bonding between the keto group of the pigment and the H-bond donating moieties of the polar solvent. -- Highlights: • Excited state dynamics of Curcumin in a binary solvent mixture of toluene and three polar H-bonding solvents were compared. • The solvation time constant increases significantly with polar solvents having, H-bond donating and accepting, or, H-bond donating ability. • Observed results suggest that H-bonding property of polar solvent plays an important role in the excited state dynamics. • Intermolecular H-bonding between the keto group of the pigment and polar solvent may be the rate limiting step.

  7. Photophysics of Curcumin excited state in toluene-polar solvent mixtures: Role of H-bonding properties of the polar solvent

    Saini, R.K.; Das, K.

    2014-01-01

    Excited state dynamics of Curcumin in binary solvent mixtures of toluene and polar H-bonding solvents were compared by using an instrument endowed with 40 ps time resolution. The solvation time constant of Curcumin increases significantly (and can therefore be measured) in polar solvents which have, either, both H-bond donating and accepting ability, or, only H-bond donating ability. These results suggest that the rate limiting step in the excited state dynamics of the pigment might be the formation and reorganization of the intermolecular H-bonding between the keto group of the pigment and the H-bond donating moieties of the polar solvent. -- Highlights: • Excited state dynamics of Curcumin in a binary solvent mixture of toluene and three polar H-bonding solvents were compared. • The solvation time constant increases significantly with polar solvents having, H-bond donating and accepting, or, H-bond donating ability. • Observed results suggest that H-bonding property of polar solvent plays an important role in the excited state dynamics. • Intermolecular H-bonding between the keto group of the pigment and polar solvent may be the rate limiting step

  8. Alkali-assisted coal extraction with polar aprotic solvents

    Makgato, M.H.; Moitsheki, L.J.; Shoko, L.; Kgobane, B.L.; Morgan, D.L.; Focke, W.W. [SARChI Chair in Carbon Technology and Materials, Institute of Applied Materials, University of Pretoria, Pretoria 0002 (South Africa)

    2009-04-15

    Coal extraction experiments were conducted using a coal, containing ca. 10% ash, from the Tshikondeni mine in South Africa. This coal dissolves only to a limited extent in pure polar aprotic solvents such as dimethylformamide (DMF) and N-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone (NMP). However, the addition of a strong base, e.g. sodium hydroxide (NaOH) or sodium tert-butoxide increased the degree of coal dissolution in these organic solvents. Depending on the extraction conditions, carbon extraction efficiencies of up to 90% were obtained. Carbon precursor material was recovered from the solution as a gel by precipitation with water. Ash content was reduced from 10% in the coal to less than 1.6% in the coal extracts. Sodium sulfide (Na{sub 2}S) addition further reduced ash content and aided the recovery of carbon precursors that led to graphitizable cokes but the degree of extraction was significantly reduced. (author)

  9. Salting out the polar polymorph: analysis by alchemical solvent transformation.

    Duff, Nathan; Dahal, Yuba Raj; Schmit, Jeremy D; Peters, Baron

    2014-01-07

    We computationally examine how adding NaCl to an aqueous solution with α- and γ-glycine nuclei alters the structure and interfacial energy of the nuclei. The polar γ-glycine nucleus in pure aqueous solution develops a melted layer of amorphous glycine around the nucleus. When NaCl is added, a double layer is formed that stabilizes the polar glycine polymorph and eliminates the surface melted layer. In contrast, the non-polar α-glycine nucleus is largely unaffected by the addition of NaCl. To quantify the stabilizing effect of NaCl on γ-glycine nuclei, we alchemically transform the aqueous glycine solution into a brine solution of glycine. The alchemical transformation is performed both with and without a nucleus in solution and for nuclei of α-glycine and γ-glycine polymorphs. The calculations show that adding 80 mg/ml NaCl reduces the interfacial free energy of a γ-glycine nucleus by 7.7 mJ/m(2) and increases the interfacial free energy of an α-glycine nucleus by 3.1 mJ/m(2). Both results are consistent with experimental reports on nucleation rates which suggest: J(α, brine) transformation approach can predict the results for both polar and non-polar polymorphs. The results suggest a general "salting out" strategy for obtaining polar polymorphs and also a general approach to computationally estimate the effects of solvent additives on interfacial free energies for nucleation.

  10. The spectral properties of (--epigallocatechin 3-O-gallate (EGCG fluorescence in different solvents: dependence on solvent polarity.

    Vladislav Snitsarev

    Full Text Available (--Epigallocatechin 3-O-gallate (EGCG a molecule found in green tea and known for a plethora of bioactive properties is an inhibitor of heat shock protein 90 (HSP90, a protein of interest as a target for cancer and neuroprotection. Determination of the spectral properties of EGCG fluorescence in environments similar to those of binding sites found in proteins provides an important tool to directly study protein-EGCG interactions. The goal of this study is to examine the spectral properties of EGCG fluorescence in an aqueous buffer (AB at pH=7.0, acetonitrile (AN (a polar aprotic solvent, dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO (a polar aprotic solvent, and ethanol (EtOH (a polar protic solvent. We demonstrate that EGCG is a highly fluorescent molecule when excited at approximately 275 nm with emission maxima between 350 and 400 nm depending on solvent. Another smaller excitation peak was found when EGCG is excited at approximately 235 nm with maximum emission between 340 and 400 nm. We found that the fluorescence intensity (FI of EGCG in AB at pH=7.0 is significantly quenched, and that it is about 85 times higher in an aprotic solvent DMSO. The Stokes shifts of EGCG fluorescence were determined by solvent polarity. In addition, while the emission maxima of EGCG fluorescence in AB, DMSO, and EtOH follow the Lippert-Mataga equation, its fluorescence in AN points to non-specific solvent effects on EGCG fluorescence. We conclude that significant solvent-dependent changes in both fluorescence intensity and fluorescence emission shifts can be effectively used to distinguish EGCG in aqueous solutions from EGCG in environments of different polarity, and, thus, can be used to study specific EGCG binding to protein binding sites where the environment is often different from aqueous in terms of polarity.

  11. In silico study of amphiphilic nanotubes based on cyclic peptides in polar and non-polar solvent

    Vijayakumar, Vinodhkumar; Vijayaraj, Ramadoss; Peters, Günther H.J.

    2016-01-01

    The stability of cyclic peptide assemblies (CPs) forming a macromolecular nanotube structure was investigated in solvents of different polarity using computational methods. The stability and structure of the complexes were studied using traditional molecular dynamics (MD). Energy of dissociation ...

  12. Simultaneously 'pushing' and 'pulling' graphene oxide into low-polar solvents through a designed interface.

    Liu, Zhen; Liu, Jingquan; Wang, Yichao; Razal, Joselito M; Francis, Paul S; Biggs, Mark J; Barrow, Colin J; Yang, Wenrong

    2018-08-03

    Dispersing graphene oxide (GO) in low-polar solvents can realize a perfect self-assembly with functional molecules and application in removal of organic impurities that only dissolve in low-polar solvents. The surface chemistry of GO plays an important role in its dispersity in these solvents. The direct transfer of hydrophilic GO into low-polar solvents, however, has remained an experimental challenge. In this study, we design an interface to transfer GO by simultaneously 'pushing and pulling' the nanosheets into low-polar solvents. Our approach is outstanding due to the ability to obtain monolayers of chemically reduced GO (CRGO) with designed surface properties in the organic phase. Using the transferred GO or CRGO dispersions, we have fabricated GO/fullerene nanocomposites and assessed the ability of CRGOs for dye adsorption. We hope our work can provide a universal approach for the phase transfer of other nanomaterials.

  13. Characterization of microenvironment polarity and solvent accessibility of polysilsesquioxane xerogels by the fluorescent probe technique

    Shea, K.J.; Zhu, H.D. [Univ., of California, Irvine, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Loy, D.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-05-01

    Poly (1, 4 bis(triethoxysilyl)benzene) (PTESB), a representative of a new type of organic-inorganic hybrid polysilsesquioxane material, was characterized by fluorescence spectroscopy for both microenvironmental polarity and solvent accessibility. A dansyl fluorescent molecule was incorporated into the bulk as well as onto the surface of both PTESB and silica materials. Information about the microenvironment polarity and accessibility of PTESB to various organic solvents was determined and compared to that of silica gel. This study found that both the bulk and surface of PTESB are less polar than that of the silica material. The silica material is accessible to polar solvents and water, while YMB is accessible to polar solvents but not to water. The hydrophobicity of PTESB differentiates these new materials from silica gel.

  14. Effect of solvent polarity and temperature on the spectral and thermodynamic properties of exciplexes of 1-cyanonaphthalene with hexamethylbenzene in organic solvents

    Asim, Sadia; Mansha, Asim; Grampp, Günter; Landgraf, Stephan; Zahid, Muhammad; Bhatti, Ijaz Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    Study of the effect of solvent polarity and temperature is done on the exciplex emission spectra of 1-cyanonaphthalene with hexamethylbenzene. Exciplex system is studied in the range of partially polar solvents and in solvent mixture of propyl acetate and butyronitrile. The unique feature of this solvent mixture is that only the solvent polarity changes (6.0≤ε s ≤24.7) with the change in the mole fraction of solvents whereas the solvent viscosity and refractive index remains unaffected. Thermodynamic properties are calculated according to the models developed by Weller and Kuzmin. Fluorescence lifetimes for both the fluorophore as well as the exciplex are evaluated in all used solvents. Exciplex energetics as a function of solvent polarity and temperature are also discussed. Kuzmin model of self-consistent polarization is used for the explanation of the exciplex emission spectra. The effects of solvent polarity and temperature on energy of zero–zero transitions (hv 0 / ), Huang–Rhys factor (S), Gauss broadening of vibronic level (σ) and the dominant high-frequency vibration (hν ν ) are investigated. The strong dependence of exciplex stability and energetics upon the solvent polarity and temperature are observed. Full charge transfer exciplexes were observed in solvents of all polarities and stronger exciplex with large emission intensities were found in solvents of low polarities but with the increase in solvent polarity the exciplex becomes weak and they dissociate fastly into radical ion pairs. The kinetic model of Kuzmin was observed to reduce into the Weller kinetic model for this exciplex system with ∆G ET = −0.22 eV and the spectral shift, h∆ν>0.2 eV. - Highlights: • Exciplex formed as a result of mixing of charge transfer and locally excited states. • Effect of solvents polarity and temperature on the exciplex stability and thermodynamics. • Solvent polarity will decide the formation of contact radical ion pair or solvent separated

  15. Effect of solvent polarity and temperature on the spectral and thermodynamic properties of exciplexes of 1-cyanonaphthalene with hexamethylbenzene in organic solvents

    Asim, Sadia [Institute of Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, Graz University of Technology, Stremaryrgasse 9, A-8010 Graz (Austria); Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad (Pakistan); Mansha, Asim [Institute of Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, Graz University of Technology, Stremaryrgasse 9, A-8010 Graz (Austria); Department of Chemistry, Government College University, Faisalabad (Pakistan); Grampp, Günter, E-mail: grampp@tugraz.at [Institute of Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, Graz University of Technology, Stremaryrgasse 9, A-8010 Graz (Austria); Landgraf, Stephan [Institute of Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, Graz University of Technology, Stremaryrgasse 9, A-8010 Graz (Austria); Zahid, Muhammad [Institute of Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, Graz University of Technology, Stremaryrgasse 9, A-8010 Graz (Austria); Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad (Pakistan); Bhatti, Ijaz Ahmad [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad (Pakistan)

    2014-09-15

    Study of the effect of solvent polarity and temperature is done on the exciplex emission spectra of 1-cyanonaphthalene with hexamethylbenzene. Exciplex system is studied in the range of partially polar solvents and in solvent mixture of propyl acetate and butyronitrile. The unique feature of this solvent mixture is that only the solvent polarity changes (6.0≤ε{sub s}≤24.7) with the change in the mole fraction of solvents whereas the solvent viscosity and refractive index remains unaffected. Thermodynamic properties are calculated according to the models developed by Weller and Kuzmin. Fluorescence lifetimes for both the fluorophore as well as the exciplex are evaluated in all used solvents. Exciplex energetics as a function of solvent polarity and temperature are also discussed. Kuzmin model of self-consistent polarization is used for the explanation of the exciplex emission spectra. The effects of solvent polarity and temperature on energy of zero–zero transitions (hv{sub 0}{sup /}), Huang–Rhys factor (S), Gauss broadening of vibronic level (σ) and the dominant high-frequency vibration (hν{sub ν}) are investigated. The strong dependence of exciplex stability and energetics upon the solvent polarity and temperature are observed. Full charge transfer exciplexes were observed in solvents of all polarities and stronger exciplex with large emission intensities were found in solvents of low polarities but with the increase in solvent polarity the exciplex becomes weak and they dissociate fastly into radical ion pairs. The kinetic model of Kuzmin was observed to reduce into the Weller kinetic model for this exciplex system with ∆G{sub ET} = −0.22 eV and the spectral shift, h∆ν>0.2 eV. - Highlights: • Exciplex formed as a result of mixing of charge transfer and locally excited states. • Effect of solvents polarity and temperature on the exciplex stability and thermodynamics. • Solvent polarity will decide the formation of contact radical ion pair

  16. Influence of polar solvents on the enhancement of light-ends in ...

    Crude oil 'micelle' can be dispersed into fuels, oil and resin/asphalthene components using some hydrocarbon solvents. This can be adapted towards influencing/enhancing its product slates during the processing of crude oils. This research was carried out to investigate the effect of polar solvents (ethanol and acetone) in ...

  17. The Role of Solvent Polarity on Low-Temperature Methanol Synthesis Catalyzed by Cu Nanoparticles

    Ahoba-Sam, Christian [Department of Process, Energy and Environmental Technology, University College of Southeast Norway, Porsgrunn (Norway); Olsbye, Unni [Department of Chemistry, University of Oslo, Oslo (Norway); Jens, Klaus-Joachim, E-mail: Klaus.J.Jens@usn.no [Department of Process, Energy and Environmental Technology, University College of Southeast Norway, Porsgrunn (Norway)

    2017-07-14

    Methanol syntheses at low temperature in a liquid medium present an opportunity for full syngas conversion per pass. The aim of this work was to study the role of solvents polarity on low-temperature methanol synthesis reaction using eight different aprotic polar solvents. A “once through” catalytic system, which is composed of Cu nanoparticles and sodium methoxide, was used for methanol synthesis at 100°C and 20 bar syngas pressure. Solvent polarity rather than the 7–10 nm Cu (and 30 nm Cu on SiO{sub 2}) catalyst used dictated trend of syngas conversion. Diglyme with a dielectric constant (ε) = 7.2 gave the highest syngas conversion among the eight different solvents used. Methanol formation decreased with either increasing or decreasing solvent ε value of diglyme (ε = 7.2). To probe the observed trend, possible side reactions of methyl formate (MF), the main intermediate in the process, were studied. MF was observed to undergo two main reactions; (i) decarbonylation to form CO and MeOH and (ii) a nucleophilic substitution to form dimethyl ether and sodium formate. Decreasing polarity favored the decarbonylation side reaction while increasing polarity favored the nucleophilic substitution reaction. In conclusion, our results show that moderate polarity solvents, e.g., diglyme, favor MF hydrogenolysis and, hence, methanol formation, by retarding the other two possible side reactions.

  18. Anion-π aromatic neutral tweezers complexes: are they stable in polar solvents?

    Sánchez-Lozano, Marta; Otero, Nicolás; Hermida-Ramón, Jose M; Estévez, Carlos M; Mandado, Marcos

    2011-03-17

    The impact of the solvent environment on the stabilization of the complexes formed by fluorine (T-F) and cyanide (T-CN) substituted tweezers with halide anions has been investigated theoretically. The study was carried out using computational methodologies based on density functional theory (DFT) and symmetry adapted perturbation theory (SAPT). Interaction energies were obtained at the M05-2X/6-31+G* level. The obtained results show a large stability of the complexes in solvents with large dielectric constant and prove the suitability of these molecular tweezers as potential hosts for anion recognition in solution. A detailed analysis of the effects of the solvent on the electron withdrawing ability of the substituents and its influence on the complex stability has been performed. In particular, the interaction energy in solution was split up into intermonomer and solvent-complex terms. In turn, the intermonomer interaction energy was partitioned into electrostatic, exchange, and polarization terms. Polar resonance structures in T-CN complexes are favored by polar solvents, giving rise to a stabilization of the intermonomer interaction, the opposite is found for T-F complexes. The solvent-complex energy increases with the polarity of the solvent in T-CN complexes, nonetheless the energy reaches a maximum and then decreases slowly in T-F complexes. An electron density analysis was also performed before and after complexation, providing an explanation to the trends followed by the interaction energies and their different components in solution.

  19. Plasma-polymerized films providing selective affinity to the polarity of vaporized organic solvents

    Akimoto, Takuo; Ikeshita, Yusuke; Terashima, Ryo; Karube, Isao

    2009-01-01

    Plasma-polymerized films (PPFs) were fabricated as recognition membranes for a vapor-sensing device, and their affinity to vaporized organic solvents was evaluated with surface plasmon resonance. The affinity we intended to create is the selective sorption of the vaporized organic solvents depending on their polarity. For this purpose, acetonitrile, ethylenediamine (EDA), styrene, hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO), and hexamethyldisilazane were used to fabricate PPFs. Vaporized methanol, ethanol, and 1-propanol were used as high-polar solvents to be analyzed. Hexane, toluene, and p-xylene were used as low-polar solvents. As a result, the HMDSO-PPF with 97.3 o of contact angle was found to provide affinity to the low-polar solvents. In contrast, the EDA-PPF with 7.1 o of contact angle provided affinity to the high-polar solvents. Observations of the surface morphology of the HMDSO- and EDA-PPFs with a scanning electron microscope revealed that they are composed of nano-scale islands.

  20. How many molecular layers of polar solvent molecules control chemistry? The concept of compensating dipoles.

    Langhals, Heinz; Braun, Patricia; Dietl, Christian; Mayer, Peter

    2013-09-27

    The extension of the solvent influence of the shell into the volume of a polar medium was examined by means of anti-collinear dipoles on the basis of the E(T)(30) solvent polarity scale (i.e., the molar energy of excitation of a pyridinium-N-phenolatebetaine dye; generally: E(T) =28,591 nm kcal mol(-1)/λmax) where no compensation effects were found. As a consequence, solvent polarity effects are concentrated to a very thin layer of a few thousand picometres around the solute where extensions into the bulk solvent become unimportant. A parallelism to the thin surface layer of water to the gas phase is discussed. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Solvent polarity scale on the fluorescence spectra of a dansyl monomer copolymerizable in aqueous media

    Ren, Biye; Gao, Feng; Tong, Zhen; Yan, Yu

    1999-06-01

    A copolymerizable fluorescent monomer N-[2-[[[5-(N,N-dimethylamino)-1-naphthalenyl]sulfonyl]-amino]ethyl]-2-propenamide (DANSAEP) was synthesized, which exhibits dual fluorescence due to the twisted intramolecular charge transfer in the excited state. The emission maximum λem shifts from 463.3 nm in n-hexane to 530.0 nm in water, showing solvent polarity dependence. The relations between λem and the conventional solvent polarity parameters ET(30) or Z are linear, dividing solvents into protic and aprotic groups. Kamlet's linear solvation energy relationship gives a good description for λem as a solvent polarity scale. The increment of dipole moment Δ μ at the excited state was estimated as 5.09 D with the solvatochromic analysis.

  2. Solvent density mode instability in non-polar solutions

    and excited states of the solute with the compressibility and solvent structure is found to have .... The organization of the rest of the paper is as follows. ...... For the ground state term, as C2 is nearly flat at qσ = q0 = 2π, we can safely ignore.

  3. Solvent polarity effects on supramolecular chirality of a polyfluorene-thiophene copolymer.

    Hirahara, Takashi; Yoshizawa-Fujita, Masahiro; Takeoka, Yuko; Rikukawa, Masahiro

    2018-06-01

    This study demonstrates the supramolecular chirality control of a conjugated polymer via solvent polarity. We designed and synthesized a chiral polyfluorene-thiophene copolymer having two different chiral side chains at the 9-position of the fluorene unit. Chiral cyclic and alkyl ethers with different polarities were selected as the chiral side chains. The sign of the circular dichroism spectra in the visible wavelength region was affected by the solvent system, resulting from the change of supramolecular structure. The estimation of the solubility parameter revealed that the solubility difference of the side chains contributed to the change of the circular dichroism sign, which was also observed in spin-coated films prepared from good solvents having different polarities. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Effect of electrostatic interaction on thermochemical behavior of 12-crown-4 ether in various polar solvents

    Barannikov, Vladimir P.; Guseynov, Sabir S.; Vyugin, Anatoliy I.

    2010-01-01

    The enthalpies of solution of 12-crown-4 ether have been measured in chloroform, ethyl acetate, acetone, pyridine, acetonitrile and methanol at 298.15 K. The values of enthalpy of solvation and solute-solvent interaction were determined from the obtained results and similar literature data for 12-crown-4 in solvents of various polarities. It was shown that the certain correlation is observed between the enthalpy of solute-solvent interaction and the squared dipole moment of the solvent molecules for solutions in tetrachlormethane, ethyl acetate, pyridine, acetonitrile, DMF, DMSO and propylene carbonate. This means that the electrostatic interaction of 12-crown-4 with polar solvent molecules contributes significantly to the exothermic effect of solvation. The understated negative value was found for the enthalpy of interaction of 12-crown-4 with acetone that can be connected with domination of low polar conformer of the crown ether in acetone medium. The most negative values of enthalpy of solvation are observed for solutions in chloroform and water because of hydrogen bonding between O-atoms of crown ether and molecules of the indicated solvents. This effect is not observed for methanol. The negative coefficient of pairwise solute-solute interaction in methanol indicates that the effects of solvophobic solute-solute interaction and H-bonding of the ether molecule with chain associates of methanol are not evinced in the thermochemical behavior of 12-crown-4.

  5. Effects of solvent polarity on mutual polypropylene grafting by electron beam irradiation

    Geraldo, A.B.C.; Moura, E.; Somessari, E.S.R.; Silveira, C.G.; Paes, H.A.; Souza, C.A.; Fernandes, W.; Manzoli, J.E.

    2011-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Copolymerization by grafting is a process largely known and the advantages of modifying polymers by radiation includes superimposition of properties related to the backbone and the grafted chains in the absence of an initiator. This process produces low byproduct levels, costs and hazards. Since polypropylene is applied in many industrial and commercial sectors, the grafting process is an alternative to improve some of its physical and chemical properties. The aim of this work was to verify the effect of distinct organic solvents on polypropylene grafting process by mutual irradiation applying absorbed doses from 30 kGy to 100 kGy at dose rates of 2.2 kGy/s and 22.4 kGy/s. All process were performed in atmosphere air presence. Styrene was the monomer grafted on polymer substrate and some non-polar and polar organic solvents, like toluene, xylene, acetone, methanol and its homologous, were used at distinct concentrations. The grafted samples were evaluated by degree of styrene grafting (gravimetric determination) and the Mid-FTIR spectrophotometry. As a general behavior, the degree of grafting increases when absorbed dose values increase in a specific solvent until a maximum dose value (50-70 kGy), after this, the degree of grafting decreases. Moreover, the grafting process have high yields when protic polar solvents are used. These results suggest the grafting process does not have dependence of substrate swelling, that is expected when a non-polar substrate and a non-polar media are in contact. The grafting, in this case, can be related to the free radical generation at protic polar solvents in a first step of process mechanism; these reactive specimens start the reaction on substrate surface to allow the accessibility of monomer species to active sites. Some reaction mechanisms are proposed.

  6. Characterization of molecularly imprinted polymers using a new polar solvent titration method.

    Song, Di; Zhang, Yagang; Geer, Michael F; Shimizu, Ken D

    2014-07-01

    A new method of characterizing molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) was developed and tested, which provides a more accurate means of identifying and measuring the molecular imprinting effect. In the new polar solvent titration method, a series of imprinted and non-imprinted polymers were prepared in solutions containing increasing concentrations of a polar solvent. The polar solvent additives systematically disrupted the templation and monomer aggregation processes in the prepolymerization solutions, and the extent of disruption was captured by the polymerization process. The changes in binding capacity within each series of polymers were measured, providing a quantitative assessment of the templation and monomer aggregation processes in the imprinted and non-imprinted polymers. The new method was tested using three different diphenyl phosphate imprinted polymers made using three different urea functional monomers. Each monomer had varying efficiencies of templation and monomer aggregation. The new MIP characterization method was found to have several advantages. To independently verify the new characterization method, the MIPs were also characterized using traditional binding isotherm analyses. The two methods appeared to give consistent conclusions. First, the polar solvent titration method is less susceptible to false positives in identifying the imprinting effect. Second, the method is able to differentiate and quantify changes in binding capacity, as measured at a fixed guest and polymer concentration, arising from templation or monomer aggregation processes in the prepolymerization solution. Third, the method was also easy to carry out, taking advantage of the ease of preparing MIPs. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Decontamination of Oils Contaminated with Polychlorinated Biphenyls and Dibenzyl Disulfide Using Polar Aprotic Solvents

    Kaštánek, František; Matějková, Martina; Spáčilová, Lucie; Maléterová, Ywetta; Kaštánek, P.; Šolcová, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 4, č. 2 (2015), s. 41-48 ISSN 2319-5967 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR(CZ) TA04020151 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : corrosive sulfur * dibenzyl disulfide * polar aprotic solvents Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering http://www.ijesit.com/Volume%204/Issue%202/IJESIT201502_06.pdf

  8. Gels with exceptional thermal stability formed by bis(amino acid) oxalamide gelators and solvents of low polarity.

    Makarević, Janja; Jokić, Milan; Frkanec, Leo; Katalenić, Darinka; Zinić, Mladen

    2002-10-07

    Some bis (amino acid) oxalamide gelators form common thermo-reversible gels with various organic solvents but also gels of exceptional thermal stability with some solvents of medium and low polarity; the latter gels can be heated up to 50 degrees C higher temperatures than the bp of the solvent without apparent gel-to-sol transition.

  9. Ionic magnetic fluids in polar solvents with tuned counter-ions

    Lopes Filomeno, C. [Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, CNRS, Lab. PHENIX, Paris (France); Grupo de Fluidos Complexos Inst. de Quimica, Univ. de Brasília, Brasília (DF) (Brazil); Kouyaté, M. [Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, CNRS, Lab. PHENIX, Paris (France); Cousin, F. [Lab. Léon Brillouin – CE-Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Demouchy, G. [Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, CNRS, Lab. PHENIX, Paris (France); Dpt de physique, Univ. de Cergy Pontoise, Cergy-Pontoise (France); Dubois, E.; Michot, L.; Mériguet, G. [Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, CNRS, Lab. PHENIX, Paris (France); Perzynski, R., E-mail: regine.perzynski@upmc.fr [Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, CNRS, Lab. PHENIX, Paris (France); Peyre, V.; Sirieix-Plénet, J. [Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, CNRS, Lab. PHENIX, Paris (France); Tourinho, F.A. [Grupo de Fluidos Complexos Inst. de Quimica, Univ. de Brasília, Brasília (DF) (Brazil)

    2017-06-01

    The aim of the present study is to propose a new reproducible method for preparing colloidal dispersions of electrostatically charged nanoparticles (NPs) in polar solvents with different kinds of counter-ions. Maghemite NPs are here dispersed in solvents of different dielectric constant, namely water, dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) and an ionic liquid, ethylammonium nitrate (EAN). If the existence of a NP superficial charge happens to be necessary for the colloidal stability of the dispersions in these three solvents, the standard DLVO theory cannot be used any more to describe the colloidal stability in EAN. The structure of the dispersions and the strength of the interparticle repulsion are investigated by small angle X-ray scattering measurements, in association with Ludwig–Soret coefficient determinations. Specificities, associated to the nature of the counter-ions are identified in this work on the colloidal stability, on the interparticle repulsion and on the Ludwig–Soret coefficient. - Highlights: • A controlled synthesis of ionic magnetic fluids in three polar solvents is proposed. • Colloidal repulsion in the magnetic fluids depends on the counter-ion nature. • Soret coefficient of citrate-coated maghemite nanoparticles is probed in water-pH7. • Thermophilicity of nanoparticles depends on the nature of their counter-ions. • Nanoparticles dressed with same counter-ions have solvent-dependent thermoproperties.

  10. Biofiltration of paint solvent mixtures in two reactor types: overloading by polar components.

    Paca, Jan; Halecky, Martin; Misiaczek, Ondrej; Kozliak, Evguenii I; Jones, Kim

    2012-01-01

    Steady-state performances of a trickle bed reactor (TBR) and a biofilter (BF) in loading experiments with increasing inlet concentrations of polar solvents, acetone, methyl ethyl ketone, methyl isobutyl ketone and n-butyl acetate, were investigated, along with the system's dynamic responses. Throughout the entire experimentation time, a constant loading rate of aromatic components of 4 g(c)·m(-3)·h(-1) was maintained to observe the interactions between the polar substrates and aromatic hydrocarbons. Under low combined substrate loadings, the BF outperformed TBR not only in the removal of aromatic hydrocarbons but also in the removal of polar substrates. However, increasing the loading rate of polar components above the threshold value of 31-36 g(c)·m(-3)·h(-1) resulted in a steep and significant drop in the removal efficiencies of both polar (except for butyl acetate) and hydrophobic components, which was more pronounced in the BF; so the relative TBR/BF efficiency became reversed under such overloading conditions. A step-drop of the overall OL(POLAR) (combined loading by polar air pollutants) from overloading values to 7 g(c)·m(-3)·h(-1) resulted in an increase of all pollutant removal efficiencies, although in TBR the recovery was preceded by lag periods lasting between 5 min (methyl ethyl ketone) to 3.7 h (acetone). The occurrence of lag periods in the TBR recovery was, in part, due to the saturation of mineral medium with water-soluble polar solvents, particularly, acetone. The observed bioreactor behavior was consistent with the biological steps being rate-limiting.

  11. Solvent polarity and nanoscale morphology in bulk heterojunction organic solar cells: A case study

    Thomas, Ajith [Centre for Nano-Bio-Polymer Science and Technology, Department of Physics, St. Thomas College, Pala, Kerala 686574 (India); Research and Development Centre, Bharathiar University, Coimbatore, Tamilnadu 641046 (India); Elsa Tom, Anju; Ison, V. V., E-mail: isonvv@yahoo.in, E-mail: praveen@materials.iisc.ernet.in [Centre for Nano-Bio-Polymer Science and Technology, Department of Physics, St. Thomas College, Pala, Kerala 686574 (India); Rao, Arun D.; Varman, K. Arul; Ranjith, K.; Ramamurthy, Praveen C., E-mail: isonvv@yahoo.in, E-mail: praveen@materials.iisc.ernet.in [Department of Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Science Bangalore, Karnataka 560012 (India); Vinayakan, R. [Department of Chemistry, SVR NSS College Vazhoor, Kerala 686505 (India)

    2014-03-14

    Organic bulk heterojunction solar cells were fabricated under identical experimental conditions, except by varying the solvent polarity used for spin coating the active layer components and their performance was evaluated systematically. Results showed that presence of nitrobenzene-chlorobenzene composition governs the morphology of active layer formed, which is due to the tuning of solvent polarity as well as the resulting solubility of the P3HT:PCBM blend. Trace amount of nitrobenzene favoured the formation of better organised P3HT domains, as evident from conductive AFM, tapping mode AFM and surface, and cross-sectional SEM analysis. The higher interfacial surface area thus generated produced cells with high efficiency. But, an increase in the nitrobenzene composition leads to a decrease in cell performance, which is due to the formation of an active layer with larger size polymer domain networks with poor charge separation possibility.

  12. Solvent polarity and nanoscale morphology in bulk heterojunction organic solar cells: A case study

    Thomas, Ajith; Elsa Tom, Anju; Ison, V. V.; Rao, Arun D.; Varman, K. Arul; Ranjith, K.; Ramamurthy, Praveen C.; Vinayakan, R.

    2014-01-01

    Organic bulk heterojunction solar cells were fabricated under identical experimental conditions, except by varying the solvent polarity used for spin coating the active layer components and their performance was evaluated systematically. Results showed that presence of nitrobenzene-chlorobenzene composition governs the morphology of active layer formed, which is due to the tuning of solvent polarity as well as the resulting solubility of the P3HT:PCBM blend. Trace amount of nitrobenzene favoured the formation of better organised P3HT domains, as evident from conductive AFM, tapping mode AFM and surface, and cross-sectional SEM analysis. The higher interfacial surface area thus generated produced cells with high efficiency. But, an increase in the nitrobenzene composition leads to a decrease in cell performance, which is due to the formation of an active layer with larger size polymer domain networks with poor charge separation possibility

  13. Influence of polar solvents on photovoltaic performance of Monascusred dye-sensitized solar cell

    Lee, Jae Wook; Kim, Tae Young; Ko, Hyun Seok; Han, Shin; Lee, Suk-Ho; Park, Kyung Hee

    Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) were assembled using natural dyes extracted from Monascus red pigment as a sensitizer. In this work, we studied the adsorption characteristics for harvesting sunlight and the electrochemical behavior for electron transfer in Monascus red DSSC using different solvents. The effect of polar aprotic and protic solvents including water, ethanol, and dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) used in the sensitization process was investigated for the improvement in conversion efficiency of a cell. As for the Monascus red dye-sensitized electrode in DMSO solvent, the solar cell yields a short-circuit current density (Jsc) of 1.23 mA/cm2, a photovoltage (Voc) of 0.75 V, and a fill factor of 0.72, corresponding to an energy conversion efficiency (η) of 0.66%.

  14. Influence of polar solvents on photovoltaic performance of Monascusred dye-sensitized solar cell.

    Lee, Jae Wook; Kim, Tae Young; Ko, Hyun Seok; Han, Shin; Lee, Suk-Ho; Park, Kyung Hee

    2014-05-21

    Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) were assembled using natural dyes extracted from Monascus red pigment as a sensitizer. In this work, we studied the adsorption characteristics for harvesting sunlight and the electrochemical behavior for electron transfer in Monascus red DSSC using different solvents. The effect of polar aprotic and protic solvents including water, ethanol, and dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) used in the sensitization process was investigated for the improvement in conversion efficiency of a cell. As for the Monascus red dye-sensitized electrode in DMSO solvent, the solar cell yields a short-circuit current density (Jsc) of 1.23mA/cm(2), a photovoltage (Voc) of 0.75V, and a fill factor of 0.72, corresponding to an energy conversion efficiency (η) of 0.66%. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Lipase mediated synthesis of rutin fatty ester: Study of its process parameters and solvent polarity.

    Vaisali, C; Belur, Prasanna D; Regupathi, Iyyaswami

    2017-10-01

    Lipophilization of antioxidants is recognized as an effective strategy to enhance solubility and thus effectiveness in lipid based food. In this study, an effort was made to optimize rutin fatty ester synthesis in two different solvent systems to understand the influence of reaction system hydrophobicity on the optimum conditions using immobilised Candida antartica lipase. Under unoptimized conditions, 52.14% and 13.02% conversion was achieved in acetone and tert-butanol solvent systems, respectively. Among all the process parameters, water activity of the system was found to show highest influence on the conversion in each reaction system. In the presence of molecular sieves, the ester production increased to 62.9% in tert-butanol system, unlike acetone system. Under optimal conditions, conversion increased to 60.74% and 65.73% in acetone and tert-butanol system, respectively. This study shows, maintaining optimal water activity is crucial in reaction systems having polar solvents compared to more non-polar solvents. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Solvent polarity controls the helical conformation of short peptides rich in Calpha-tetrasubstituted amino acids.

    Bellanda, Massimo; Mammi, Stefano; Geremia, Silvano; Demitri, Nicola; Randaccio, Lucio; Broxterman, Quirinus B; Kaptein, Bernard; Pengo, Paolo; Pasquato, Lucia; Scrimin, Paolo

    2007-01-01

    The two peptides, rich in C(alpha)-tetrasubstituted amino acids, Ac-[Aib-L-(alphaMe)Val-Aib](2)-L-His-NH(2) (1) and Ac-[Aib-L-(alphaMe)Val-Aib](2)-O-tBu (2 a) are prevalently helical. They present the unique property of changing their conformation from the alpha- to the 3(10)-helix as a function of the polarity of the solvent: alpha in more polar solvents, 3(10) in less polar ones. Conclusive evidence of this reversible change of conformation is reported on the basis of the circular dichroism (CD) spectra and a detailed two-dimensional NMR analysis in two solvents (trifluoroethanol and methanol) refined with molecular dynamics calculations. The X-ray diffractometric analysis of the crystals of both peptides reveals that they assume a prevalent 3(10)-helix conformation in the solid state. This conformation is practically superimposable on that obtained from the NMR analysis of 1 in methanol. The NMR results further validate the reported CD signature of the 3(10)-helix and the use of the CD technique for its assessment.

  17. Covalent Surface Modification of Silicon Oxides with Alcohols in Polar Aprotic Solvents.

    Lee, Austin W H; Gates, Byron D

    2017-09-05

    Alcohol-based monolayers were successfully formed on the surfaces of silicon oxides through reactions performed in polar aprotic solvents. Monolayers prepared from alcohol-based reagents have been previously introduced as an alternative approach to covalently modify the surfaces of silicon oxides. These reagents are readily available, widely distributed, and are minimally susceptible to side reactions with ambient moisture. A limitation of using alcohol-based compounds is that previous reactions required relatively high temperatures in neat solutions, which can degrade some alcohol compounds or could lead to other unwanted side reactions during the formation of the monolayers. To overcome these challenges, we investigate the condensation reaction of alcohols on silicon oxides carried out in polar aprotic solvents. In particular, propylene carbonate has been identified as a polar aprotic solvent that is relatively nontoxic, readily accessible, and can facilitate the formation of alcohol-based monolayers. We have successfully demonstrated this approach for tuning the surface chemistry of silicon oxide surfaces with a variety of alcohol containing compounds. The strategy introduced in this research can be utilized to create silicon oxide surfaces with hydrophobic, oleophobic, or charged functionalities.

  18. Evidence for the TICT mediated nonradiative deexcitation process for the excited coumarin-1 dye in high polarity protic solvents

    Barik, Atanu [Radiation Chemistry and Chemical Dynamics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Kumbhakar, Manoj [Radiation Chemistry and Chemical Dynamics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Nath, Sukhendu [Radiation Chemistry and Chemical Dynamics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Pal, Haridas [Radiation Chemistry and Chemical Dynamics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2005-08-29

    Photophysical properties of coumarin-1 (C1) dye in different protic solvents have been investigated using steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence measurements. Correlation of the Stokes' shifts ({delta}{nu}-bar ) with the solvent polarity ({delta}f) suggests the intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) character for the dye fluorescent state. Fluorescence quantum yields ({phi}{sub f}) and lifetimes ({tau}{sub f}) of the dye show an abrupt reduction in high polarity solvents having {delta}f >{approx}0.28. In these solvents {tau}{sub f} is seen to be strongly temperature dependent, though it is temperature independent in solvents with {delta}f <{approx}0.28. It is inferred that in high polarity protic solvents there is a participation of an additional nonradiative decay process via the involvement of twisted intramolecular charge transfer (TICT) state. Unlike present results, no involvement of TICT state was observed even in strongly polar aprotic solvent like acetonitrile. It is indicated that the intermolecular hydrogen bonding of the dye with protic solvents in addition with the solvent polarity helps in the stabilization of the TICT state for C1 dye. Unlike most TICT molecules, the activation barrier ({delta}E{sub a}) for the TICT mediated nonradiative process for C1 dye is seen to increase with solvent polarity. This is rationalized on the basis of the assumption that the TICT to ground state conversion is the activation-controlled rate-determining step for the present system than the usual ICT to TICT conversion as encountered for most other TICT molecules.

  19. Lid opening and conformational stability of T1 Lipase is mediated by increasing chain length polar solvents

    Jonathan Maiangwa

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics and conformational landscape of proteins in organic solvents are events of potential interest in nonaqueous process catalysis. Conformational changes, folding transitions, and stability often correspond to structural rearrangements that alter contacts between solvent molecules and amino acid residues. However, in nonaqueous enzymology, organic solvents limit stability and further application of proteins. In the present study, molecular dynamics (MD of a thermostable Geobacillus zalihae T1 lipase was performed in different chain length polar organic solvents (methanol, ethanol, propanol, butanol, and pentanol and water mixture systems to a concentration of 50%. On the basis of the MD results, the structural deviations of the backbone atoms elucidated the dynamic effects of water/organic solvent mixtures on the equilibrium state of the protein simulations in decreasing solvent polarity. The results show that the solvent mixture gives rise to deviations in enzyme structure from the native one simulated in water. The drop in the flexibility in H2O, MtOH, EtOH and PrOH simulation mixtures shows that greater motions of residues were influenced in BtOH and PtOH simulation mixtures. Comparing the root mean square fluctuations value with the accessible solvent area (SASA for every residue showed an almost correspondingly high SASA value of residues to high flexibility and low SASA value to low flexibility. The study further revealed that the organic solvents influenced the formation of more hydrogen bonds in MtOH, EtOH and PrOH and thus, it is assumed that increased intraprotein hydrogen bonding is ultimately correlated to the stability of the protein. However, the solvent accessibility analysis showed that in all solvent systems, hydrophobic residues were exposed and polar residues tended to be buried away from the solvent. Distance variation of the tetrahedral intermediate packing of the active pocket was not conserved in organic solvent

  20. Ultra-high performance size-exclusion chromatography in polar solvents.

    Vancoillie, Gertjan; Vergaelen, Maarten; Hoogenboom, Richard

    2016-12-23

    Size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) is amongst the most widely used polymer characterization methods in both academic and industrial polymer research allowing the determination of molecular weight and distribution parameters, i.e. the dispersity (Ɖ), of unknown polymers. The many advantages, including accuracy, reproducibility and low sample consumption, have contributed to the worldwide success of this analytical technique. The current generation of SEC systems have a stationary phase mostly containing highly porous, styrene-divinylbenzene particles allowing for a size-based separation of various polymers in solution but limiting the flow rate and solvent compatibility. Recently, sub-2μm ethylene-bridged hybrid (BEH) packing materials have become available for SEC analysis. These packing materials can not only withstand much higher pressures up to 15000psi but also show high spatial stability towards different solvents. Combining these BEH columns with the ultra-high performance LC (UHPLC) technology opens up UHP-SEC analysis, showing strongly reduced runtimes and unprecedented solvent compatibility. In this work, this novel characterization technique was compared to conventional SEC using both highly viscous and highly polar solvents as eluent, namely N,N-dimethylacetamide (DMAc), N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) and methanol, focusing on the suitability of the BEH-columns for analysis of highly functional polymers. The results show a high functional group compatibility comparable with conventional SEC with remarkably short runtimes and enhanced resolution in methanol. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Electro-responsivity of ionic liquid boundary layers in a polar solvent revealed by neutron reflectance

    Pilkington, Georgia A.; Harris, Kathryn; Bergendal, Erik; Reddy, Akepati Bhaskar; Palsson, Gunnar K.; Vorobiev, Alexei; Antzutkin, Oleg. N.; Glavatskih, Sergei; Rutland, Mark W.

    2018-05-01

    Using neutron reflectivity, the electro-responsive structuring of the non-halogenated ionic liquid (IL) trihexyl(tetradecyl)phosphonium-bis(mandelato)borate, [P6,6,6,14][BMB], has been studied at a gold electrode surface in a polar solvent. For a 20% w/w IL mixture, contrast matched to the gold surface, distinct Kiessig fringes were observed for all potentials studied, indicative of a boundary layer of different composition to that of the bulk IL-solvent mixture. With applied potential, the amplitudes of the fringes from the gold-boundary layer interface varied systematically. These changes are attributable to the differing ratios of cations and anions in the boundary layer, leading to a greater or diminished contrast with the gold electrode, depending on the individual ion scattering length densities. Such electro-responsive changes were also evident in the reflectivities measured for the pure IL and a less concentrated (5% w/w) IL-solvent mixture at the same applied potentials, but gave rise to less pronounced changes. These measurements, therefore, demonstrate the enhanced sensitivity achieved by contrast matching the bulk solution and that the structure of the IL boundary layers formed in mixtures is strongly influenced by the bulk concentration. Together these results represent an important step in characterising IL boundary layers in IL-solvent mixtures and provide clear evidence of electro-responsive structuring of IL ions in their solutions with applied potential.

  2. 10.6% Certified Colloidal Quantum Dot Solar Cells via Solvent-Polarity-Engineered Halide Passivation.

    Lan, Xinzheng; Voznyy, Oleksandr; García de Arquer, F Pelayo; Liu, Mengxia; Xu, Jixian; Proppe, Andrew H; Walters, Grant; Fan, Fengjia; Tan, Hairen; Liu, Min; Yang, Zhenyu; Hoogland, Sjoerd; Sargent, Edward H

    2016-07-13

    Colloidal quantum dot (CQD) solar cells are solution-processed photovoltaics with broad spectral absorption tunability. Major advances in their efficiency have been made via improved CQD surface passivation and device architectures with enhanced charge carrier collection. Herein, we demonstrate a new strategy to improve further the passivation of CQDs starting from the solution phase. A cosolvent system is employed to tune the solvent polarity in order to achieve the solvation of methylammonium iodide (MAI) and the dispersion of hydrophobic PbS CQDs simultaneously in a homogeneous phase, otherwise not achieved in a single solvent. This process enables MAI to access the CQDs to confer improved passivation. This, in turn, allows for efficient charge extraction from a thicker photoactive layer device, leading to a certified solar cell power conversion efficiency of 10.6%, a new certified record in CQD photovoltaics.

  3. Carbon nanotube enhanced membrane distillation for online preconcentration of trace pharmaceuticals in polar solvents.

    Gethard, Ken; Mitra, Somenath

    2011-06-21

    Carbon nanotube enhanced membrane distillation (MD) is presented as a novel, online analytical preconcentration method for removing polar solvents thereby concentrating the analytes, making this technique an alternate to conventional thermal evaporation. In a carbon nanotube immobilized membrane (CNIM), the CNTs serve as sorbent sites and provide additional pathways for enhanced solvent vapor transport, thus enhancing preconcentration. Enrichment using CNIM doubled compared to membranes without CNTs, while the methanol flux and mass transfer coefficients increased by 61% and 519% respectively. The carbon nanotube enhanced MD process showed excellent precision (RSD of 3-5%), linearity, and the detection limits were in the range of 0.001 to 0.009 mg L(-1) by HPLC analysis.

  4. The Future of Polar Organometallic Chemistry Written in Bio-Based Solvents and Water.

    García-Álvarez, Joaquín; Hevia, Eva; Capriati, Vito

    2018-06-19

    There is a strong imperative to reduce the release of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) into the environment, and many efforts are currently being made to replace conventional hazardous VOCs in favour of safe, green and bio-renewable reaction media that are not based on crude petroleum. Recent ground-breaking studies from a few laboratories worldwide have shown that both Grignard and (functionalised) organolithium reagents, traditionally handled under strict exclusion of air and humidity and in anhydrous VOCs, can smoothly promote both nucleophilic additions to unsaturated substrates and nucleophilic substitutions in water and other bio-based solvents (glycerol, deep eutectic solvents), competitively with protonolysis, at room temperature and under air. The chemistry of polar organometallics in the above protic media is a complex phenomenon influenced by several factors, and understanding its foundational character is surely stimulating in the perspective of the development of a sustainable organometallic chemistry. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Polar-solvent-free colloidal synthesis of highly luminescent alkylammonium lead halide perovskite nanocrystals

    Vybornyi, Oleh; Yakunin, Sergii; Kovalenko, Maksym V.

    2016-03-01

    A novel synthesis of hybrid organic-inorganic lead halide perovskite nanocrystals (CH3NH3PbX3, X = Br or I) that does not involve the use of dimethylformamide or other polar solvents is presented. The reaction between methylamine and PbX2 salts is conducted in a high-boiling nonpolar solvent (1-octadecene) in the presence of oleylamine and oleic acid as coordinating ligands. The resulting nanocrystals are characterized by high photoluminescence quantum efficiencies of 15-50%, outstanding phase purity and tunable shapes (nanocubes, nanowires, and nanoplatelets). Nanoplatelets spontaneously assemble into micrometer-length wires by face-to-face stacking. In addition, we demonstrate amplified spontaneous emission from thin films of green-emitting CH3NH3PbBr3 nanowires with low pumping thresholds of 3 μJ cm-2.A novel synthesis of hybrid organic-inorganic lead halide perovskite nanocrystals (CH3NH3PbX3, X = Br or I) that does not involve the use of dimethylformamide or other polar solvents is presented. The reaction between methylamine and PbX2 salts is conducted in a high-boiling nonpolar solvent (1-octadecene) in the presence of oleylamine and oleic acid as coordinating ligands. The resulting nanocrystals are characterized by high photoluminescence quantum efficiencies of 15-50%, outstanding phase purity and tunable shapes (nanocubes, nanowires, and nanoplatelets). Nanoplatelets spontaneously assemble into micrometer-length wires by face-to-face stacking. In addition, we demonstrate amplified spontaneous emission from thin films of green-emitting CH3NH3PbBr3 nanowires with low pumping thresholds of 3 μJ cm-2. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Materials and methods, additional figures. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr06890h

  6. Solvent polarity effects on hyperfine couplings of cyclohexadienyl-type radicals

    Vujosevic', D.; Scheuermann, R.; Dilger, H.; Tucker, I.M.; Martyniak, A.; McKenzie, I.; Roduner, E.

    2006-01-01

    In this study muon-spin rotation (μSR) serves as a tool for sensitive monitoring of the environment of muoniated radicals in isotropic liquids. A systematic investigation of the behaviour of the hyperfine coupling constants of cyclohexadienyl-type radicals is performed, and it is found that they are in linear dependence on solvent polarity, with certain deviations. These deviations are discussed in detail. It is found that with increasing length of the hydroxyalkyl substituent group the perturbation of the phenyl ring becomes smaller

  7. Solvent polarity effects on hyperfine couplings of cyclohexadienyl-type radicals

    Vujosevic' , D. [Institut fuer Physikalische Chemie, University of Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 55, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Scheuermann, R. [Laboratory for Muon Spin Spectroscopy, Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Dilger, H. [Institut fuer Physikalische Chemie, University of Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 55, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Tucker, I.M. [Unilever Research and Development, Port Sunlight, Wirral CH63 3JW (United Kingdom); Martyniak, A. [Institut fuer Physikalische Chemie, University of Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 55, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany); McKenzie, I. [Institut fuer Physikalische Chemie, University of Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 55, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Roduner, E. [Institut fuer Physikalische Chemie, University of Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 55, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany)]. E-mail: e.rodunder@ipc.uni-stuttgart.de

    2006-03-31

    In this study muon-spin rotation ({mu}SR) serves as a tool for sensitive monitoring of the environment of muoniated radicals in isotropic liquids. A systematic investigation of the behaviour of the hyperfine coupling constants of cyclohexadienyl-type radicals is performed, and it is found that they are in linear dependence on solvent polarity, with certain deviations. These deviations are discussed in detail. It is found that with increasing length of the hydroxyalkyl substituent group the perturbation of the phenyl ring becomes smaller.

  8. Use of uranyl nitrate as a shift reagent in polar and inert solvents

    Nosov, B.P.

    1988-01-01

    This work examines the effect of uranyl nitrate as a shift reagent on the PMR spectra of different organic molecules in polar and inert solvents. In order to identify the coordination site of the uranyl ion, its effect on the spectra of amino acids and acetic or propionic acids in water was compared. It was found that the induced shifts of the protons in the corresponding positions of the different acids after addition of uranyl nitrate agreed to within ±0.01 ppm. When nitrogenous bases such as diethylamine and pyridine were added to solutions of the carboxylic acids with uranyl nitrate, an increase in the induced chemical shift of the resonance signals occurred. These facts suggest the coordination of the uranyl ion with the carboxyl oxygen both for acetic and propionic acids and for amino acids. The authors established that the addition of uranyl nitrate to solutions of organic compounds caused different downfield shifts of the resonance signals from the protons. In polar solvents shifts induced by uranyl nitrate in the PMR spectra of carboxylic acids occur only when nitrogenous bases are added

  9. Transfers of Colloidal Silica from Water into Organic Solvents of Intermediate Polarities

    Kasseh; Keh

    1998-01-15

    Dispersions of discrete metal-oxide submicroparticles in organic solvents of medium polarities are uneasy to generate and weakly documented. We address this topic along two general methods focusing on silica. Successive transfers of colloidal particles from water into n-propanol and then into 1,2-dichloroethane by azeotropic distillation yield a stable organosol. The particles are found to be propanol-coated by surface esterification to the extent of 0.40 nm2 per molecule. Alternatively, centrifugation-redispersion cycles make it possible to obtain stable suspensions of unaltered silica in methanol and acetonitrile starting from an aqueous silicasol. Particles are characterized by various methods including nitrogen adsorption, transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, and electrophoresis. The stabilities of these suspensions in various organic solvents are investigated with special concern for the role of residual water. Stabilization of silica in methanol is inconspicuously related to solvent permittivity and prominently dependent on the presence of adsorbed water. In contrast, the acetonitrile silicasol, which is unaffected by residual water, displays electrophoretic behavior compatible with electrostatic stabilization. Copyright 1998 Academic Press. Copyright 1998Academic Press

  10. Switchable polarity solvent for liquid phase microextraction of Cd(II) as pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate chelates from environmental samples

    Yilmaz, Erkan, E-mail: kimyager_erkan@hotmail.com; Soylak, Mustafa, E-mail: soylak@erciyes.edu.tr

    2015-07-30

    A switchable polarity solvent was synthesized from triethylamine (TEA)/water/CO{sub 2} (Dry ice) via proton transfer reaction has been used for the microextraction of cadmium(II) as pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate (APDC) chelate. Cd(II)-APDC chelate was extracted into the switchable polarity solvent drops by adding 2 mL 10 M sodium hydroxide solution. Analytical parameters affecting the complex formation and microextraction efficiency such as pH, amount of ligand, volume of switchable polarity solvent and NaOH, sample volume were optimized. The effects of foreign ions were found tolerably. Under optimum conditions, the detection limit was 0.16 μg L{sup −1} (3Sb/m, n = 7) and the relative standard deviation was 5.4% (n = 7). The method was validated by the analysis of certified reference materials (TMDA-51.3 fortified water, TMDA-53.3 fortified water and SPS-WW2 waste water, 1573a Tomato Leaves and Oriental Basma Tobacco Leaves (INCT-OBTL-5)) and addition/recovery tests. The method was successfully applied to determination of cadmium contents of water, vegetable, fruit and cigarette samples. - Highlights: • Switchable polarity solvent was synthesized from triethylamine (TEA)/water/CO{sub 2}. • The switchable polarity solvent has been used for the microextraction of cadmium(II). • The important factors were optimized. • The method was applied to determination of cadmium in real samples.

  11. Tipping Point for Expansion of Layered Aluminosilicates in Weakly Polar Solvents: Supercritical CO 2

    Schaef, Herbert T.; Loganathan, Narasimhan; Bowers, Geoffrey M.; Kirkpatrick, Robert J.; Yazaydin, A. O.; Burton, Sarah D.; Hoyt, David W.; Thanthiriwatte, Sahan; Dixon, David A.; McGrail, Bernard P.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Ilton, Eugene S.; Loring, John S.

    2017-10-11

    Layered aluminosilicates play a dominant role in the mechanical and gas storage properties of the subsurface, are used in diverse industrial applications, and serve as model materials for understanding solvent-ion-support systems. Although expansion in the presence of H2O is well known to be systematically correlated with the hydration free energy of the interlayer cation, in environments dominated by non-polar solvents (i.e. CO2), uptake into the interlayer is not well-understood. Using novel high pressure capabilities, we investigated the interaction of super-critical CO2 with Na+-, NH4+-, and Cs+-saturated montmorillonite, comparing results with predictions from molecular dynamics simulations. Despite the known trend in H2O, and that cation solvation energies in CO2 suggest a stronger interaction with Na+, both the NH4+- and Cs+-clays readily absorbed CO2 and expanded while the Na+-clay did not. The apparent inertness of the Na+-clay was not due to kinetics, as experiments seeking a stable expanded state showed that none exists. Molecular dynamics simulations revealed a large endothermicity to CO2 intercalation in the Na+-clay, but little or no energy barrier for the NH4+- and Cs+-clays. Consequently, we have shown for the first time that in the presence of a low dielectric constant gas swelling depends more on the strength of the interaction between interlayer cation and aluminosilicate sheets and less on that with solvent. The finding suggests a distinct regime in layered aluminosilicates swelling behavior triggered by low solvent polarizability, with important implications in geomechanics, storage and retention of volatile gases, and across industrial uses in gelling, decoloring, heterogeneous catalysis, and semi-permeable reactive barriers.

  12. studies dielectric behaviour of some long chain alcohols and their mixtures with a non-polar solvent at various concentration

    Yaqub, M.; Ahmed, S.S.; Hussain, A.

    2006-01-01

    Dielectric constant, refractive index and the Kirkwood linear correlation factor of 1-propanol, 1-butanol and 1-pentanol in mixtures with carbon tetrachloride at various concentration have been measured at fixed frequency (100 KHz) at 303.15 K. For the study of dielectric properties of polar molecules in a non-polar solvent at different concentrations, polarization per unit volume and excess free-energy of mixing were evaluated at this temperature. In order to study the association of polar molecules in such a non-polar solvent, the Kirkwood correlation factor (g) between molecular pairs, which exists due to the hydrogen bond association suggesting the presence of some dimension in the liquid phase with a number of dimmers, was determined. The refractive index and dielectric constant measurements are expected to shed some light on the configuration of molecules in various mixtures, and give some idea about the specific interactions between components, which decrese with the increase in the concentration of alcohol. All the three mixtures showed different behaviour for the value of correlation factor (g) as a function of concentration. The response of 1-pentanol was broadly identical to that of small chain alcohols. The different behaviour of the correlation factor (g) was interpreted in terms of the Kirkwood-Frohlich theory, as it takes into account, explicitly, such type of short and long range interactions of a mixture of polar molecules with non-polar solvents. (author)

  13. Speeding up the self-assembly of a DNA nanodevice using a variety of polar solvents

    Kang, Di; Duan, Ruixue; Tan, Yerpeng; Hong, Fan; Wang, Boya; Chen, Zhifei; Xu, Shaofang; Lou, Xiaoding; Wei, Wei; Yurke, Bernard; Xia, Fan

    2014-11-01

    The specific recognition and programmable assembly properties make DNA a potential material for nanodevices. However, the more intelligent the nanodevice is, the more complicated the structure of the nanodevice is, which limits the speed of DNA assembly. Herein, to address this problem, we investigate the performance of DNA Strand Displacement Reaction (DSDR) in a mixture of polar organic solvents and aqueous buffer and demonstrate that the organic polar solvent can speed up DNA self-assembly efficiently. Taking DSDR in 20% ethanol as an example, first we have demonstrated that the DSDR is highly accelerated in the beginning of the reaction and it can complete 60% of replacement reactions (160% enhancement compared with aqueous buffer) in the first 300 seconds. Secondly, we calculated that the ΔΔG of the DSDR in 20% ethanol (-18.2 kcal mol-1) is lower than that in pure aqueous buffer (-32.6 kcal mol-1), while the activation energy is lowered by introducing ethanol. Finally, we proved that the DSDR on the electrode surface can also be accelerated using this simple strategy. More importantly, to test the efficacy of this approach in nanodevices with a complicated and slow DNA self-assembly process, we apply this strategy in the hybridization chain reaction (HCR) and prove the acceleration is fairly obvious in 20% ethanol, which demonstrates the feasibility of the proposed strategy in DNA nanotechnology and DNA-based biosensors.The specific recognition and programmable assembly properties make DNA a potential material for nanodevices. However, the more intelligent the nanodevice is, the more complicated the structure of the nanodevice is, which limits the speed of DNA assembly. Herein, to address this problem, we investigate the performance of DNA Strand Displacement Reaction (DSDR) in a mixture of polar organic solvents and aqueous buffer and demonstrate that the organic polar solvent can speed up DNA self-assembly efficiently. Taking DSDR in 20% ethanol as an

  14. Exfoliation of graphite into graphene in polar solvents mediated by amphiphilic hexa-peri-hexabenzocoronene.

    Kabe, Ryota; Feng, Xinliang; Adachi, Chihaya; Müllen, Klaus

    2014-11-01

    A water-soluble surfactant consisting of hexa-peri-hexabenzocoronene (HBC) as hydrophobic aromatic core and hydrophilic carboxy substituents was synthesized. It exhibited a self-assembled nanofiber structure in the solid state. Profiting from the π interactions between the large aromatic core of HBC and graphene, the surfactant mediated the exfoliation of graphite into graphene in polar solvents, which was further stabilized by the bulky hydrophilic carboxylic groups. A graphene dispersion with a concentration as high as 1.1 mg L(-1) containing 2-6 multilayer nanosheets was obtained. The lateral size of the graphene sheets was in the range of 100-500 nm based on atomic force microscope (AFM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) measurements. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Thermodynamic constrains for life based on non-aqueous polar solvents on free-floating planets.

    Badescu, Viorel

    2011-02-01

    Free-floating planets (FFPs) might originate either around a star or in solitary fashion. These bodies can retain molecular gases atmospheres which, upon cooling, have basal pressures of tens of bars or more. Pressure-induced opacity of these gases prevents such a body from eliminating its internal radioactive heat and its surface temperature can exceed for a long term the melting temperature of a life-supporting solvent. In this paper two non-aqueous but still polar solvents are considered: hydrogen sulfide and ammonia. Thermodynamic requirements to be fulfilled by a hypothetic gas constituent of a life-supporting FFP's atmosphere are studied. The three gases analyzed here (nitrogen, methane and ethane) are candidates. We show that bodies with ammonia oceans are possible in interstellar space. This may happen on FFPs of (significantly) smaller or larger mass than the Earth. Generally, in case of FFP smaller in size than the Earth, the atmosphere exhibits a convective layer near the surface and a radiative layer at higher altitudes while the atmosphere of FFPs larger in size than Earth does not exhibit a convective layer. The atmosphere mass of a life-hosting FFP of Earth size is two or three orders of magnitude larger than the mass of Earth atmosphere. For FFPs larger than the Earth and specific values of surface pressure and temperature, there are conditions for condensation (in the ethane atmosphere). Some arguments induce the conclusion than the associated surface pressures and temperatures should be treated with caution as appropriate life conditions.

  16. Estimate of electrostatic solvation free energy of electron in various polar solvents by using modified born equation

    Yamashita, Kazuo; Kitamura, Mitsutaka; Imai, Hideo

    1976-01-01

    The modified Born equation was tentatively applied to estimate the electrostatic free energies of solvation of the electron in various polar solvents. The related data of halide ions and a datum of the hydration free energy of the electron obtained by radiation chemical studies were used for the numerical calculations. (auth.)

  17. Comparison of methanol and isopropanol as wash solvents for determination of hair cortisol concentration in grizzly bears and polar bears.

    Kroshko, Thomas; Kapronczai, Luciene; Cattet, Marc R L; Macbeth, Bryan J; Stenhouse, Gordon B; Obbard, Martyn E; Janz, David M

    2017-01-01

    Methodological differences among laboratories are recognized as significant sources of variation in quantification of hair cortisol concentration (HCC). An important step in processing hair, particularly when collected from wildlife, is the choice of solvent used to remove or "wash" external hair shaft cortisol prior to quantification of HCC. The present study systematically compared methanol and isopropanol as wash solvents for their efficiency at removing external cortisol without extracting internal hair shaft cortisol in samples collected from free-ranging grizzly bears and polar bears. Cortisol concentrations in solvents and hair were determined in each of one to eight washes of hair with each solvent independently. •There were no significant decreases in internal hair shaft cortisol among all eight washes for either solvent, although methanol removed detectable hair surface cortisol after one wash in grizzly bear hair whereas hair surface cortisol was detected in all eight isopropanol washes.•There were no significant differences in polar bear HCC washed one to eight times with either solvent, but grizzly bear HCC was significantly greater in hair washed with isopropanol compared to methanol.•There were significant differences in HCC quantified using different commercial ELISA kits commonly used for HCC determinations.

  18. Nitrobenzene anti-parallel dimer formation in non-polar solvents

    Toshiyuki Shikata

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the dielectric and depolarized Rayleigh scattering behaviors of nitrobenzene (NO2-Bz, which is a benzene mono-substituted with a planar molecular frame bearing the large electric dipole moment 4.0 D, in non-polar solvents solutions, such as tetrachloromethane and benzene, at up to 3 THz for the dielectric measurements and 8 THz for the scattering experiments at 20 °C. The dielectric relaxation strength of the system was substantially smaller than the proportionality to the concentration in a concentrated regime and showed a Kirkwood correlation factor markedly lower than unity; gK ∼ 0.65. This observation revealed that NO2-Bz has a tendency to form dimers, (NO2-Bz2, in anti-parallel configurations for the dipole moment with increasing concentration of the two solvents. Both the dielectric and scattering data exhibited fast and slow Debye-type relaxation modes with the characteristic time constants ∼7 and ∼50 ps in a concentrated regime (∼15 and ∼30 ps in a dilute regime, respectively. The fast mode was simply attributed to the rotational motion of the (monomeric NO2-Bz. However, the magnitude of the slow mode was proportional to the square of the concentration in the dilute regime; thus, the mode was assigned to the anti-parallel dimer, (NO2-Bz2, dissociation process, and the slow relaxation time was attributed to the anti-parallel dimer lifetime. The concentration dependencies of both the dielectric and scattering data show that the NO2-Bz molecular processes are controlled through a chemical equilibrium between monomers and anti-parallel dimers, 2NO2-Bz ↔ (NO2-Bz2, due to a strong dipole-dipole interaction between nitro groups.

  19. Influence of anion on thermophysical properties of ionic liquids with polar solvent

    Govinda, Varadhi; Reddy, P. Madhusudhana; Attri, Pankaj; Venkatesu, P.; Venkateswarlu, P.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► We have reported a series of ionic liquids (ILs) involving a common cation. ► The molecular interactions between ILs and DMSO. ► The results for observed anion dependent phenomena. ► Redlich–Kister polynomial was used to correlate the results. ► The intermolecular interactions were analyzed on the basis of properties. -- Abstract: In this work, we have reported a series of ionic liquids (ILs) involving a common cation trimethyl ammonium, ([(CH 3 ) 3 NH] + ), with generally used anions (acetate, [CH 3 COO] − , sulfate, [HSO 4 ] − , phosphate, [H 2 PO 4 ] − ). To address the molecular interactions between the relatively new class of solvents such as trimethylammonium acetate [(CH 3 ) 3 NH + ] [CH 3 COO – ] (TMAA), trimethylammonium hydrogen sulfate [(CH 3 ) 3 NH + ][HSO 4 − ] (TMAS), and trimethylammonium dihydrogen phosphate [(CH 3 ) 3 NH + ][H 2 PO 4 – ] (TMAP), with the polar solvent, dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), the density (ρ), speed of sound (u) and viscosity (η) values have been measured over complete concentration range and wide temperature range from 298.15 K to 313.15 K in steps of 5 K under ambient pressure. By using these experimental results, excess volumes (V E ), isentropic compressibility deviations (Δκ s ) and viscosity deviations (Δη) were obtained for all these binary systems at all experimental temperatures. The results are correlated by the Redlich−Kister type function to derive the coefficients and estimate the standard error. Further, the results for observed anion dependent phenomena and temperature influence on measured and derived properties are also discussed

  20. Effect of dynamic surface polarization on the oxidative stability of solvents in nonaqueous Li-O 2 batteries

    Khetan, Abhishek; Pitsch, Heinz; Viswanathan, Venkatasubramanian

    2017-09-01

    Polarization-induced renormalization of the frontier energy levels of interacting molecules and surfaces can cause significant shifts in the excitation and transport behavior of electrons. This phenomenon is crucial in determining the oxidative stability of nonaqueous electrolytes in high-energy density electrochemical systems such as the Li-O2 battery. On the basis of partially self-consistent first-principles Sc G W0 calculations, we systematically study how the electronic energy levels of four commonly used solvent molecules, namely, dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), dimethoxyethane (DME), tetrahydrofuran (THF), and acetonitrile (ACN), renormalize when physisorbed on the different stable surfaces of Li2O2 , the main discharge product. Using band level alignment arguments, we propose that the difference between the solvent's highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) level and the surface's valence-band maximum (VBM) is a refined metric of oxidative stability. This metric and a previously used descriptor, solvent's gas phase HOMO level, agree quite well for physisorbed cases on pristine surfaces where ACN is oxidatively most stable followed by DME, THF, and DMSO. However, this effect is intrinsically linked to the surface chemistry of the solvent's interaction with the surface states and defects, and depends strongly on their nature. We conclusively show that the propensity of solvent molecules to oxidize will be significantly higher on Li2O2 surfaces with defects as compared to pristine surfaces. This suggests that the oxidative stability of a solvent is dynamic and is a strong function of surface electronic properties. Thus, while gas phase HOMO levels could be used for preliminary solvent candidate screening, a more refined picture of solvent stability requires mapping out the solvent stability as a function of the state of the surface under operating conditions.

  1. Sugar-Based Polyamides: Self-Organization in Strong Polar Organic Solvents.

    Rosu, Cornelia; Russo, Paul S; Daly, William H; Cueto, Rafael; Pople, John A; Laine, Roger A; Negulescu, Ioan I

    2015-09-14

    Periodic patterns resembling spirals were observed to form spontaneously upon unassisted cooling of d-glucaric acid- and d-galactaric acid-based polyamide solutions in N-methyl-N-morpholine oxide (NMMO) monohydrate. Similar observations were made in d-galactaric acid-based polyamide/ionic liquid (IL) solutions. The morphologies were investigated by optical, polarized light and confocal microscopy assays to reveal pattern details. Differential scanning calorimetry was used to monitor solution thermal behavior. Small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering data reflected the complex and heterogeneous nature of the self-organized patterns. Factors such as concentration and temperature were found to influence spiral dimensions and geometry. The distance between rings followed a first-order exponential decay as a function of polymer concentration. Fourier-Transform Infrared Microspectroscopy analysis of spirals pointed to H-bonding between the solvent and the pendant hydroxyl groups of the glucose units from the polymer backbone. Tests on self-organization into spirals of ketal-protected d-galactaric acid polyamides in NMMO monohydrate confirmed the importance of the monosaccharide's pendant free hydroxyl groups on the formation of these patterns. Rheology performed on d-galactaric-based polyamides at high concentration in NMMO monohydrate solution revealed the optimum conditions necessary to process these materials as fibers by spinning. The self-organization of these sugar-based polyamides mimics certain biological materials.

  2. A comparison of geochemical features of extracts from coal-seams source rocks with different polarity solvents

    Chen, Jianping; Deng, Chunping; Wang, Huitong

    2009-02-15

    There exists a great difference in group-type fractions and biomarker distributions of chloroform extracts from coals and coal-seams oils, which makes the source identification of coal-seams oils in sedimentary basins rather difficult. The experiment, in which four different polarity solvents, n-hexane, benzene, dichloromethane and chloroform, were used to extract 9 coal-seams source rocks and 3 typical lacustrine source rocks, showed that the yield of extracts increased gradually with increasing solvent polarity. The distribution features of their n-alkanes, isoprenoids and sterane and terpane biomarkers remained, in general, similar, showing no distinct enrichment or depletion for a certain fraction by any solvent. The compositional analysis on n-hexane and chloroform extracts showed that the absolute amount (concentration) of biomarkers was relatively low for the n-hexane extract but comparatively high for the chloroform extract, this difference became great among coal-seams source rocks but small among lacustrine mudstones. The statistical analysis on the relative amount of the 18 major biomarkers in n-hexane and chloroform extracts from 10 source rock samples showed that extracts with a proportional error for the same biomarker of less than 5% (including the analytical error) accounted for 84% while those with a proportional error over 10% amounted to below 5%. This suggested that the outcome of oil-source correlation made by these biomarkers will be independent of variations in amounts of saturates and biomarkers arising from solvent polarity. Therefore, biomarkers obtained from organic-rich source rocks including coals by the extraction with the commonly used chloroform solvent can be applied for the oilsource correlation of coal-seams petroliferous basins.

  3. Temperature dependence measurements and structural characterization of trimethyl ammonium ionic liquids with a highly polar solvent.

    Attri, Pankaj; Venkatesu, Pannuru; Hofman, T

    2011-08-25

    We report the synthesis and characterization of a series of an ammonium ionic liquids (ILs) containing acetate, dihydrogen phosphate, and hydrogen sulfate anions with a common cation. To characterize the thermophysical properties of these newly synthesized ILs with the highly polar solvent N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF), precise measurements such as densities (ρ) and ultrasonic sound velocities (u) over the whole composition range have been performed at atmospheric pressure and over wide temperature ranges (25-50 °C). The excess molar volume (V(E)) and the deviation in isentropic compressibilities (Δκ(s)) were predicted using these temperature dependence properties as a function of the concentration of ILs. The Redlich-Kister polynomial was used to correlate the results. The ILs investigated in the present study included trimethylammonium acetate [(CH(3))(3)NH][CH(3)COO] (TMAA), trimethylammonium dihydrogen phosphate [(CH(3))(3)NH][H(2)PO(4)] (TMAP), and trimethylammonium hydrogen sulfate [(CH(3))(3)NH][HSO(4)] (TMAS). The intermolecular interactions and structural effects were analyzed on the basis of the measured and the derived properties. In addition, the hydrogen bonding between ILs and DMF has been demonstrated using semiempirical calculations with help of Hyperchem 7. A qualitative analysis of the results is discussed in terms of the ion-dipole, ion-pair interactions, and hydrogen bonding between ILs and DMF molecules and their structural factors. The influence of the anion of the protic IL, namely, acetate (CH(3)COO), dihydrogen phosphate (H(2)PO(4)), and hydrogen sulfate (HSO(4)), on the thermophysical properties is also provided. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  4. Influence of solvent polarization and non-uniform ion size on electrostatic properties between charged surfaces in an electrolyte solution

    Sin, Jun-Sik

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, we study electrostatic properties between two similar or oppositely charged surfaces immersed in an electrolyte solution by using the mean-field approach accounting for solvent polarization and non-uniform size effects. Applying a free energy formalism accounting for unequal ion sizes and orientational ordering of water dipoles, we derive coupled and self-consistent equations to calculate electrostatic properties between charged surfaces. Electrostatic properties for similarly charged surfaces depend on the counterion size but not on the coion size. Moreover, electrostatic potential and osmotic pressure between similarly charged surfaces are found to be increased with increasing counterion size. On the other hand, the corresponding ones between oppositely charged surfaces are related to both sizes of positive and negative ions. For oppositely charged surfaces, the electrostatic potential, number density of solvent molecules, and relative permittivity of an electrolyte having unequal ion sizes are not symmetric about the centerline between the charged surfaces. For either case, the consideration of solvent polarization results in a decrease in the electrostatic potential and the osmotic pressure compared to the case without the effect.

  5. Organic high ionic strength aqueous two-phase solvent system series for separation of ultra-polar compounds by spiral high-speed counter-current chromatography

    Zeng, Yun; Liu, Gang; Ma, Ying; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Ito, Yoichiro

    2011-01-01

    Existing two-phase solvent systems for high-speed countercurrent chromatography cover the separation of hydrophobic to moderately polar compounds, but often fail to provide suitable partition coefficient values for highly polar compounds such as sulfonic acids, catecholamines and zwitter ions. The present paper introduces a new solvent series which can be applied for the separation of these polar compounds. It is composed of 1-butanol, ethanol, saturated ammonium sulfate and water at various volume ratios and consists of a series of 10 steps which are arranged according to the polarity of the solvent system so that the two-phase solvent system with suitable K values for the target compound(s) can be found in a few steps. Each solvent system gives proper volume ratio and high density difference between the two phases to provide a satisfactory level of retention of the stationary phase in the spiral column assembly. The method is validated by partition coefficient measurement of four typical polar compounds including methyl green (basic dye), tartrazine (sulfonic acid), tyrosine (zwitter ion) and epinephrine (a catecholamine), all of which show low partition coefficient values in the polar 1-butanol-water system. The capability of the method is demonstrated by separation of three catecholamines. PMID:22033108

  6. Direct Detection of the Ion Pair to Free Ions Transformation upon Complexation with an Ion Receptor in Non‐Polar Solvents by using Conductometry

    Iseda, Kazuya

    2018-01-01

    Abstract In this study, we performed conductometry in various organic solvents to directly detect the transformation from tetrabutylammonium chloride (TBACl) ion‐pair salt to the free ions through complexation with meso‐octamethylcalix[4]pyrrole (CP), which is a well‐known receptor for chloride anions. In the presence of CP, the conductivity of TBACl increases in various non‐polar solvents, indicating that complexation with CP enhances the ionic dissociation of TBACl in such non‐polar solvents. In other words, CP recognizes chloride as an ion‐paired salt as well as a free anion in non‐polar solvents. Additionally, the TBA(CP–Cl) complex exhibited a considerably lower ion‐pairing constant (K ip) than TBACl in non‐polar solvents, resulting in enhanced conductivity. Based on these findings, we can conclude that complexation of an anion with a hydrophobic anion receptor will be useful for creating functional and stimuli‐responsive soft materials in organic solvents using coulombic forces. PMID:29610717

  7. Direct Detection of the Ion Pair to Free Ions Transformation upon Complexation with an Ion Receptor in Non-Polar Solvents by using Conductometry.

    Iseda, Kazuya; Kokado, Kenta; Sada, Kazuki

    2018-03-01

    In this study, we performed conductometry in various organic solvents to directly detect the transformation from tetrabutylammonium chloride ( TBACl ) ion-pair salt to the free ions through complexation with meso -octamethylcalix[4]pyrrole ( CP ), which is a well-known receptor for chloride anions. In the presence of CP , the conductivity of TBACl increases in various non-polar solvents, indicating that complexation with CP enhances the ionic dissociation of TBACl in such non-polar solvents. In other words, CP recognizes chloride as an ion-paired salt as well as a free anion in non-polar solvents. Additionally, the TBA(CP - Cl ) complex exhibited a considerably lower ion-pairing constant ( K ip ) than TBACl in non-polar solvents, resulting in enhanced conductivity. Based on these findings, we can conclude that complexation of an anion with a hydrophobic anion receptor will be useful for creating functional and stimuli-responsive soft materials in organic solvents using coulombic forces.

  8. Novel Paradigm Supercapacitors V: Significance of Organic Polar Solvents and Salt Identities

    2017-06-01

    146 E. DISCUSSION OF VARIABLES ..........................................................146 1. Viscosity and Density...146 Table 77. Kinematic Viscosity and Density of Water and Tested Solvents...surface area per unit mass, or unit volume [22]. Examples of this material include carbon, conductive clays , some metal and oxides and graphene. These

  9. Solvent effect on the degree of (a)synchronicity in polar Diels-Alder reactions from the perspective of the reaction force constant analysis.

    Yepes, Diana; Martínez-Araya, Jorge I; Jaque, Pablo

    2017-12-29

    In this work, we computationally evaluated the influence of six different molecular solvents, described as a polarizable continuum model at the M06-2X/6-31+G(d,p) level, on the activation barrier/reaction rate, overall energy change, TS geometry, and degree of (a)synchronicity of two concerted Diels-Alder cycloadditions of acrolein (R1) and its complex with Lewis acid acrolein···BH 3 (R2) to cyclopentadiene. In gas-phase, we found that both exothermicity and activation barrier are only reduced by about 2.0 kcal mol -1 , and the asynchronicity character of the mechanism is accentuated when BH 3 is included. An increment in the solvent's polarity lowers the activation energy of R1 by 1.3 kcal mol -1 , while for R2 the reaction rate is enhanced by more than 2000 times at room temperature (i.e., the activation energy decreases by 4.5 kcal mol -1 ) if the highest polar media is employed. Therefore, a synergistic effect is achieved when both external agents, i.e., Lewis acid catalyst and polar solvent, are included together. This effect was ascribed to the ability of the solvent to favor the encounter between cyclopentadiene and acrolein···BH 3 . This was validated by the asymmetry of the TS which becomes highly pronounced when either both or just BH 3 is considered or the solvent's polarity is increased. Finally, the reaction force constant κ(ξ) reveals that an increment in the solvent's polarity is able to turn a moderate asynchronous mechanism of the formation of the new C-C σ-bonds into a highly asynchronous one. Graphical abstract A synergistic effect is achieved when both external agents, i.e., Lewis acid catalyst and polar solvent, are included together: lowered energy barriers and increased asynchronicities.

  10. Asphaltene self-association: Modeling and effect of fractionation with a polar solvent

    Garcia, Daniel Merino; Murgich, J; Andersen, Simon Ivar

    2004-01-01

    of DeltaH(a) obtained suggest that a fraction of asphaltenes is not active in the calorimetric experiments. Asphaltenes from Venezuela (LM1) and Mexico (KU) have been fractionated by precipitation with a mixture of acetone and toluene. It is considered that the most polar compounds are collected...

  11. Synthesis of sol–gel silica particles in reverse micelles with mixed-solvent polar cores: tailoring nanoreactor structure and properties

    Bürglová, Kristýna; Hlaváč, Jan [Institute of Molecular and Translational Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry (Czech Republic); Bartlett, John R., E-mail: jbartlett@usc.edu.au [University of the Sunshine Coast, Faculty of Science, Health, Education and Engineering (Australia)

    2015-07-15

    In this paper, we describe a new approach for producing metal oxide nano- and microparticles via sol–gel processing in confined media (sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl)sulfosuccinate reverse micelles), in which the chemical and physical properties of the polar aqueous core of the reverse micelles are modulated by the inclusion of a second polar co-solvent. The co-solvents were selected for their capacity to solubilise compounds with low water solubility and included dimethylsulfoxide, dimethylformamide, ethylene glycol, n-propanol, dimethylacetamide and N-methylpyrrolidone. A broad range of processing conditions across the sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl)sulfosuccinate/cyclohexane/water phase diagram were identified that are suitable for preparing particles with dimensions <50 to >500 nm. In contrast, only a relatively narrow range of processing conditions were suitable for preparing such particles in the absence of the co-solvents, highlighting the role of the co-solvent in modulating the properties of the polar core of the reverse micelles. A mechanism is proposed that links the interactions between the various reactive sites on the polar head group of the surfactant and the co-solvent to the nucleation and growth of the particles.

  12. Polymeric Sorbent with Controlled Surface Polarity: An Alternate for Solid-Phase Extraction of Nerve Agents and Their Markers from Organic Matrix.

    Roy, Kanchan Sinha; Purohit, Ajay Kumar; Chandra, Buddhadeb; Goud, D Raghavender; Pardasani, Deepak; Dubey, Devendra Kumar

    2018-06-05

    Extraction and identification of lethal nerve agents and their markers in complex organic background have a prime importance from the forensic and verification viewpoint of the Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC). Liquid-liquid extraction with acetonitrile and commercially available solid phase silica cartridges are extensively used for this purpose. Silica cartridges exhibit limited applicability for relatively polar analytes, and acetonitrile extraction shows limited efficacy toward relatively nonpolar analytes. The present study describes the synthesis of polymeric sorbents with tunable surface polarity, their application as a solid-phase extraction (SPE) material against nerve agents and their polar as well as nonpolar markers from nonpolar organic matrices. In comparison with the acetonitrile extraction and commercial silica cartridges, the new sorbent showed better extraction efficiency toward analytes of varying polarity. The extraction parameters were optimized for the proposed method, which included ethyl acetate as an extraction solvent and n-hexane as a washing solvent. Under optimized conditions, method linearity ranged from 0.10 to 10 μg mL -1 ( r 2 = 0.9327-0.9988) for organophosphorus esters and 0.05-20 μg mL -1 ( r 2 = 0.9976-0.9991) for nerve agents. Limits of detection (S:N = 3:1) in the SIM mode were found in the range of 0.03-0.075 μg mL -1 for organophosphorus esters and 0.015-0.025 μg mL -1 for nerve agents. Limits of quantification (S:N = 10:1) were found in the range of 0.100-0.25 μg mL -1 for organophosphorus esters and 0.05-0.100 μg mL -1 for nerve agents in the SIM mode. The recoveries of the nerve agents and their markers ranged from 90.0 to 98.0% and 75.0 to 95.0% respectively. The repeatability and reproducibility (with relative standard deviations (RSDs) %) for organophosphorus esters were found in the range of 1.35-8.61% and 2.30-9.25% respectively. For nerve agents, the repeatability range from 1.00 to 7.75% and reproducibility

  13. A methanolic extract of Trigonella foenum-graecum (fenugreek seeds regulates markers of macrophage polarization.

    Nurudeen Hassan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Macrophages are key cellular mediators in diabetes-related inflammation. Molecular cues such as cytokines found in the tissue microenvironment regulates the polarization of macrophages into an M1 (pro-inflammatory or M2 (immunoregulatory phenotype. Recent evidence suggests that M1 macrophages in diabetic patients may contribute to the complications associated with the disease such as atherosclerosis. Trigonella foenum- graecum (Tfg: fenugreek seeds have been used in traditional medicine in Asia, Africa and the Middle-East for their alleged anti-diabetic properties. Objective: To identify the molecular mechanism(s through which Tfg seeds exert their effects, we investigated the role of a crude methanolic extract of Tfg (FME seeds on macrophage polarization in vitro. Method: THP-1 macrophages (Mϕ were treated with gBSA in the presence/absence of FME and the release and expression of M1 and M2 markers/cytokines were analysed. The role of FME on NF-κB activity was also explored using transfected HEK-293T cells. Results: This study found that the FME significantly (P<0.05 decreased gBSA-induced secretion of M1 cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8 in THP-1 Mϕ cells. In the presence of gBSA, FME also significantly increased the gene expression of the M2 marker Dectin-1, but had no effect on IL-10, IL-1Ra. FME also significantly decreased TNF-α induced NF-kB reporter activity. Conclusion: These results suggest that FME can regulate the expression of M1 and M2 markers in THP-1 Mϕ cells. This may be potentially through the modulation of NF-kB activity. Further work should be carried out to identify precise mechanism(s involved in the effects of FME and Tfg seeds.

  14. Produced Water Treatment Using the Switchable Polarity Solvent Forward Osmosis (SPS FO) Desalination Process: Preliminary Engineering Design Basis

    Wendt, Daniel; Adhikari, Birendra; Orme, Christopher; Wilson, Aaron

    2016-05-01

    Switchable Polarity Solvent Forward Osmosis (SPS FO) is a semi-permeable membrane-based water treatment technology. INL is currently advancing SPS FO technology such that a prototype unit can be designed and demonstrated for the purification of produced water from oil and gas production operations. The SPS FO prototype unit will used the thermal energy in the produced water as a source of process heat, thereby reducing the external process energy demands. Treatment of the produced water stream will reduce the volume of saline wastewater requiring disposal via injection, an activity that is correlated with undesirable seismic events, as well as generate a purified product water stream with potential beneficial uses. This paper summarizes experimental data that has been collected in support of the SPS FO scale-up effort, and describes how this data will be used in the sizing of SPS FO process equipment. An estimate of produced water treatment costs using the SPS FO process is also provided.

  15. Esterase Active in Polar Organic Solvents from the Yeast Pseudozyma sp. NII 08165

    Deepthy Alex

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Esterases/lipases active in water miscible solvents are highly desired in biocatalysis where substrate solubility is limited and also when the solvent is desired as an acyl acceptor in transesterification reactions, as with the case of biodiesel production. We have isolated an esterase from the glycolipid producing yeast-Pseudozyma sp. NII 08165 which in its crude form was alkali active, thermo stable, halo tolerant and also capable of acting in presence of high methanol concentration. The crude enzyme which maintained 90% of its original activity after being treated at 70°C was purified and the properties were characterized. The partially purified esterase preparation had temperature and pH optima of 60°C and 8.0 respectively. The enzyme retained almost complete activity in presence of 25% methanol and 80% activity in the same strength of ethanol. Conditions of enzyme production were optimized, which lead to 9 fold increase in the esterase yield. One of the isoforms of the enzyme LIP1 was purified to homogeneity and characterized. Purified LIP1 had a Km and Vmax of 0.01 and 1.12, respectively. The purified esterase lost its thermo and halo tolerance but interestingly, retained 97% activity in methanol.

  16. Communication: Potentials of mean force study of ionic liquid ion pair aggregation in polar covalent molecule solvents

    Bandlamudi, Santosh Rathan Paul; Benjamin, Kenneth M.

    2018-05-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were conducted for 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium methylsulfate [EMIM][MeSO4] dissolved in six polar covalent molecules [acetic acid, acetone, chloroform, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), isopropyl alcohol, and methanol] to understand the free energies of ionic liquid (IL) ion pairing/aggregation in the limit of infinite dilution. Free energy landscapes or potentials of mean force (PMF) were computed using umbrella sampling and the weighted histogram analysis method. The PMF studies showed the strongest IL ion pairing in chloroform, and the strength of IL ion pairing decreases in the order of chloroform, acetone, propanol, acetic acid, DMSO, and methanol. In the limit of infinite dilution, the free energy curves for IL ion aggregation in co-solvents were characterized by two distinct minima [global (˜3.6 Å) and local (˜5.7 Å)], while free energy values at these minima differed significantly for IL in each co-solvent. The PMF studies were extended for determining the free energy of IL ion aggregation as a function of concentration of methanol. Studies showed that as the concentration of methanol increased, the free energy of ion aggregation decreased, suggesting greater ion pair stability, in agreement with previously reported MD clustering and radial distribution function data.

  17. Solvent wash solution

    Neace, J.C.

    1986-01-01

    This patent describes a process for removing diluent degradation products from a solvent extraction solution comprising an admixture of an organic extractant for uranium and plutonium and a non-polar organic liquid diluent, which has been used to recover uranium and plutonium from spent nuclear fuel. Comprising combining a wash solution consisting of: (a) water; and (b) a positive amount up to about, an including, 50 volume percent of at least one highly-polar water-miscible organic solvent, based on the total volume of the water and the highly-polar organic solvent, with the solvent extraction solution after uranium and plutonium values have been stripped from the solvent extraction solution, the diluent degradation products dissolving in the highly-polar organic solvent and the extractant and diluent of the extraction solution not dissolving in the highly-polar organic solvent, and separating the highly-polar organic solvent and the extraction solution to obtain a purified extraction solution

  18. Solvent Dependency of the UV-Vis Spectrum of Indenoisoquinolines: Role of Keto-Oxygens as Polarity Interaction Probes

    Coletta, Andrea; Castelli, Silvia; Chillemi, Giovanni; Sanna, Nico; Cushman, Mark; Pommier, Yves; Desideri, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    Indenoisoquinolines are the most promising non-campthotecins topoisomerase IB inhibitors. We present an integrated experimental/computational investigation of the UV-Vis spectra of the IQNs parental compound (NSC314622) and two of its derivatives (NSC724998 and NSC725776) currently undergoing Phase I clinical trials. In all the three compounds a similar dependence of the relative absorption intensities at 270 nm and 290 nm on solvent polarity is found. The keto-oxygens in positions 5 and 11 of the molecular scaffold of the molecule are the principal chromophores involved in this dependence. Protic interactions on these sites are also found to give rise to absorptions at wavelength <250 nm observed in water solution, due to the stabilization of highly polarized tautomers of the molecule. These results suggest that the keto-oxygens are important polarizable groups that can act as useful interactors with the molecular receptor, providing at the same time an useful fingerprint for the monitoring of the drug binding to topoisomerase IB. PMID:24086299

  19. Co-C Dissociation of Adenosylcobalamin (Coenzyme B-12): Role of Dispersion, Induction Effects, Solvent Polarity, and Relativistic and Thermal Corrections

    Kepp, Kasper Planeta

    2014-01-01

    for dispersion, relativistic effects, solvent polarity, basis set superposition error, and thermal and vibrational effects were investigated, totaling more than SSO single-point energies for the large model. The results show immense variability depending on method, including solvation, functional type...

  20. In situ alcoholysis of triacylglycerols by application of switchable-polarity solvents. A new derivatization procedure for the gas-chromatographic analysis of vegetable oils.

    Saliu, Francesco; Orlandi, Marco

    2013-10-01

    We describe a new use of switchable-polarity solvents for the simultaneous derivatization and extraction of triacylglycerols from vegetable oils before gas-chromatographic analysis. Different equimolecular mixtures of the commercially available amidine 1,8-diazabicyclo[5.4.0]undec-7-ene and n-alkyl alcohols were tested. Triolein was used as a model compound. Very good results were achieved by using butanol (recovery of butyl oleate was 89 ± 4%). The procedure was applied for the characterization of the fatty acid profile of different vegetable oils. No statistically significant differences from the results obtained with the application of two traditional methods were evidenced. Moreover, the use of switchable-polarity solvents showed many advantages: owing to the basicity of the amidines, no catalyst was required; the transterification reaction was conducted under mild conditions, one step and in situ; no particular matrix interferences were evidenced; the solvent was recovered.

  1. Scanning force microscopy study of phase segregation in fuel cell membrane materials as a function of solvent polarity and relative humidity

    Hawley, Marilyn Emily [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kim, Yu S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hjelm, Rex P [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Scanning force microscopy (SFM) phase imaging provides a powerful method for directly studying and comparing phase segregation in fuel cell membrane materials due to different preparation and under different temperature and hwnidity exposures. In this work, we explored two parameters that can influence phase segregation: the properties of the solvents used in casting membrane films and how these solvents alter phase segregation after exposure to boiling water as a function of time. SFM was used under ambient conditions to image phase segregation in Nafion samples prepared using five different solvents. Samples were then subjected to water vapor maintained at 100C for periods ranging from 30 minutes to three hours and re-imaged using the same phase imaging conditions. SFM shows what appears to be an increase in phase segregation as a function of solvent polarity that changes as a function of water exposure.

  2. Influence of Solvent Polarity and DNA-Binding on Spectral Properties of Quaternary Benzo[c]phenanthridine Alkaloids.

    Michal Rájecký

    Full Text Available Quaternary benzo[c]phenanthridine alkaloids are secondary metabolites of the plant families Papaveraceae, Rutaceae, and Ranunculaceae with anti-inflammatory, antifungal, antimicrobial and anticancer activities. Their spectral changes induced by the environment could be used to understand their interaction with biomolecules as well as for analytical purposes. Spectral shifts, quantum yield and changes in lifetime are presented for the free form of alkaloids in solvents of different polarity and for alkaloids bound to DNA. Quantum yields range from 0.098 to 0.345 for the alkanolamine form and are below 0.033 for the iminium form. Rise of fluorescence lifetimes (from 2-5 ns to 3-10 ns and fluorescence intensity are observed after binding of the iminium form to the DNA for most studied alkaloids. The alkanolamine form does not bind to DNA. Acid-base equilibrium constant of macarpine is determined to be 8.2-8.3. Macarpine is found to have the highest increase of fluorescence upon DNA binding, even under unfavourable pH conditions. This is probably a result of its unique methoxy substitution at C12 a characteristic not shared with other studied alkaloids. Association constant for macarpine-DNA interaction is 700000 M(-1.

  3. The Case for Tetrahedral Oxy-subhydride (TOSH Structures in the Exclusion Zones of Anchored Polar Solvents Including Water

    Klaus Oehr

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We hypothesize a mechanistic model of how negatively-charged exclusion zones (EZs are created. While the growth of EZs is known to be associated with the absorption of ambient photonic energy, the molecular dynamics giving rise to this process need greater elucidation. We believe they arise due to the formation of oxy-subhydride structures (OH−(H2O4 with a tetrahedral (sp3 (OH−(H2O3 core. Five experimental data sets derived by previous researchers were assessed in this regard: (1 water-derived EZ light absorbance at specific infrared wavelengths, (2 EZ negative potential in water and ethanol, (3 maximum EZ light absorbance at 270 nm ultraviolet wavelength, (4 ability of dimethyl sulphoxide but not ether to form an EZ, and (5 transitory nature of melting ice derived EZs. The proposed tetrahedral oxy-subhydride structures (TOSH appear to adequately account for all of the experimental evidence derived from water or other polar solvents.

  4. Polar aprotic solvent-water mixture as the medium for catalytic production of hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) from bread waste.

    Yu, Iris K M; Tsang, Daniel C W; Chen, Season S; Wang, Lei; Hunt, Andrew J; Sherwood, James; De Oliveira Vigier, Karine; Jérôme, François; Ok, Yong Sik; Poon, Chi Sun

    2017-12-01

    Valorisation of bread waste for hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) synthesis was examined in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO)-, tetrahydrofuran (THF)-, acetonitrile (ACN)-, and acetone-water (1:1v/v), under heating at 140°C with SnCl 4 as the catalyst. The overall rate of the process was the fastest in ACN/H 2 O and acetone/H 2 O, followed by DMSO/H 2 O and THF/H 2 O due to the rate-limiting glucose isomerisation. However, the formation of levulinic acid (via rehydration) and humins (via polymerisation) was more significant in ACN/H 2 O and acetone/H 2 O. The constant HMF maxima (26-27mol%) in ACN/H 2 O, acetone/H 2 O, and DMSO/H 2 O indicated that the rates of desirable reactions (starch hydrolysis, glucose isomerisation, and fructose dehydration) relative to undesirable pathways (HMF rehydration and polymerisation) were comparable among these mediums. They also demonstrated higher selectivity towards HMF production over the side reactions than THF/H 2 O. This study differentiated the effects of polar aprotic solvent-water mediums on simultaneous pathways during biomass conversion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Geochemical markers of soil anthropogenic contaminants in polar scientific stations nearby (Antarctica, King George Island).

    Prus, Wojciech; Fabiańska, Monika J; Łabno, Radosław

    2015-06-15

    The organic contamination of Antarctic soils and terrestrial sediments from nearby of five polar scientific stations on King George Island (Antarctica) was investigated. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was applied to find composition of dichloromethane extracts of soil and terrestrial sediments. The presence of geochemical markers, such as n-alkanes, steranes, pentacyclic triterpenoids, and alkyl PAHs, their distribution types, and values of their ratios indicates the predominating source of organic fossil fuels and products of their refining rather than from the natural Antarctic environment. Fossil fuel-originated compounds well survived in conditions of Antarctic climate over long times thus enabling to characterize geochemical features of source fossil fuel identified as petroleum expelled from kerogen II of algal/bacterial origins deposited in sub-oxic conditions and being in the middle of catagenesis. Both microbial activity and water leaching play an important role in degradation of terrestrial oil spills in the Antarctica climate, and petroleum alteration occurs lowly over long periods of time. Synthetic anthropogenic compounds found in terrestrial Antarctica sediments included diisopropylnaphthalenes, products of their sulfonates degradation in paper combustion, and organophosporus compounds used as retardants and plasticizers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Extraction of Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs) and Dibenzyl Disulfide from Transformer Oils using Polar Aprotic Solvents andReductive Dehalogenation of Extracted PCBs

    Kaštánek, P. (Petr); Kaštánek, F. (František); Maléterová, Y. (Ywetta); Matějková, M. (Martina); Spáčilová, L. (Lucie); Šolcová, O. (Olga)

    2014-01-01

    Extractions of PCBs from mineral oils with polar aprotic solvents (PAS) acrylonitrile AC, dimethyl sulfoxide DMSO, dimethyl formamide DMF, N-methyl pyrrolidone NMP and propylene carbonate PC were performed in order to compare the extraction efficiencies. In a single-stage extraction performed at room temperature, the efficiencies ranged from the highest to the lowest as follows: NMP → DMF → DMSO → PC → AC. NMP exhibited the highest efficiency, around 70%. . Pyridine N-oxide was also used a...

  7. An absorbing microwave micro-solid-phase extraction device used in non-polar solvent microwave-assisted extraction for the determination of organophosphorus pesticides

    Wang Ziming; Zhao Xin; Xu Xu; Wu Lijie; Su Rui; Zhao Yajing; Jiang Chengfei; Zhang Hanqi; Ma Qiang; Lu Chunmei; Dong Deming

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► An absorbing microwave μ-SPE device packed with activated carbon was used. ► Absorbing microwave μ-SPE device was made and used to enrich the analytes. ► Absorbing microwave μ-SPE device was made and used to heat samples directly. ► MAE-μ-SPE was applied to the extraction of OPPs with non-polar solvent only. - Abstract: A single-step extraction-cleanup method, including microwave-assisted extraction (MAE) and micro-solid-phase extraction (μ-SPE), was developed for the extraction of ten organophosphorus pesticides in vegetable and fruit samples. Without adding any polar solvent, only one kind of non-polar solvent (hexane) was used as extraction solvent in the whole extraction step. Absorbing microwave μ-SPE device, was prepared by packing activated carbon with microporous polypropylene membrane envelope, and used as not only the sorbent in μ-SPE, but also the microwave absorption medium. Some experimental parameters effecting on extraction efficiency was investigated and optimized. 1.0 g of sample, 8 mL of hexane and three absorbing microwave μ-SPE devices were added in the microwave extraction vessel, the extraction was carried out under 400 W irradiation power at 60 °C for 10 min. The extracts obtained by MAE-μ-SPE were directly analyzed by GC–MS without any clean-up process. The recoveries were in the range of 93.5–104.6%, and the relative standard deviations were lower than 8.7%.

  8. An absorbing microwave micro-solid-phase extraction device used in non-polar solvent microwave-assisted extraction for the determination of organophosphorus pesticides

    Wang Ziming, E-mail: wangziming@jlu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, 2699 Qianjin Street, Changchun 130012 (China); College of Environment and Resources, Jilin University, 2699 Qianjin Street, Changchun 130012 (China); Zhao Xin; Xu Xu; Wu Lijie; Su Rui; Zhao Yajing; Jiang Chengfei; Zhang Hanqi [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, 2699 Qianjin Street, Changchun 130012 (China); Ma Qiang [Chinese Academy of Inspection and Quarantine, Beijing 100123 (China); Lu Chunmei [College of Technology Center, Jilin Entry-Exit Inspection and Quarantine Bureau, Changchun 130062 (China); Dong Deming [College of Environment and Resources, Jilin University, 2699 Qianjin Street, Changchun 130012 (China)

    2013-01-14

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An absorbing microwave {mu}-SPE device packed with activated carbon was used. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Absorbing microwave {mu}-SPE device was made and used to enrich the analytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Absorbing microwave {mu}-SPE device was made and used to heat samples directly. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MAE-{mu}-SPE was applied to the extraction of OPPs with non-polar solvent only. - Abstract: A single-step extraction-cleanup method, including microwave-assisted extraction (MAE) and micro-solid-phase extraction ({mu}-SPE), was developed for the extraction of ten organophosphorus pesticides in vegetable and fruit samples. Without adding any polar solvent, only one kind of non-polar solvent (hexane) was used as extraction solvent in the whole extraction step. Absorbing microwave {mu}-SPE device, was prepared by packing activated carbon with microporous polypropylene membrane envelope, and used as not only the sorbent in {mu}-SPE, but also the microwave absorption medium. Some experimental parameters effecting on extraction efficiency was investigated and optimized. 1.0 g of sample, 8 mL of hexane and three absorbing microwave {mu}-SPE devices were added in the microwave extraction vessel, the extraction was carried out under 400 W irradiation power at 60 Degree-Sign C for 10 min. The extracts obtained by MAE-{mu}-SPE were directly analyzed by GC-MS without any clean-up process. The recoveries were in the range of 93.5-104.6%, and the relative standard deviations were lower than 8.7%.

  9. Salting-out-enhanced ionic liquid microextraction with a dual-role solvent for simultaneous determination of trace pollutants with a wide polarity range in aqueous samples.

    Gao, Man; Qu, Jingang; Chen, Kai; Jin, Lide; Dahlgren, Randy Alan; Wang, Huili; Tan, Chengxia; Wang, Xuedong

    2017-11-01

    In real aquatic environments, many occupational pollutants with a wide range of polarities coexist at nanogram to milligram per liter levels. Most reported microextraction methods focus on extracting compounds with similar properties (e.g., polarity or specific functional groups). Herein, we developed a salting-out-enhanced ionic liquid microextraction based on a dual-role solvent (SILM-DS) for simultaneous detection of tetracycline, doxycycline, bisphenol A, triclosan, and methyltriclosan, with log K ow ranging from -1.32 to 5.40 in complex milk and environmental water matrices. The disperser in the ionic-liquid-based dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction was converted to the extraction solvent in the subsequent salting-out-assisted microextraction procedures, and thus a single solvent performed a dual role as both extractant and disperser in the SILM-DS process. Acetonitrile was selected as the dual-role solvent because of its strong affinity for both ionic liquids and water, as well as the extractant in the salting-out step. Optimized experimental conditions were 115 μL [C 8 MIM][PF 6 ] as extractor, 1200 μL acetonitrile as dual-role solvent, pH 2.0, 5.0 min ultrasound extraction time, 3.0 g Na 2 SO 4 , and 3.0 min vortex extraction time. Under optimized conditions, the recoveries of the five pollutants ranged from 74.5 to 106.9%, and their LODs were 0.12-0.75 μg kg -1 in milk samples and 0.11-0.79 μg L -1 in environmental waters. Experimental precision based on relative standard deviation was 1.4-6.4% for intraday and 2.3-6.5% for interday analyses. Compared with previous methods, the prominent advantages of the newly developed method are simultaneous determination of pollutants with a wide range of polarities and a substantially reduced workload for ordinary environmental monitoring and food tests. Therefore, the new method has great application potential for simultaneous determination of trace pollutants with strongly contrasting polarities in several

  10. Solvent extraction of indium and gallium complexes with bromopyrogallol red by mixed extractants containing chloroform, a polar organic solvent and monocarboxylic acids

    Pyatnitskij, I.V.; Lysenko, O.V.; Kolomiets, L.L.

    1987-01-01

    Solvent extraction of indium and gallium complexes with bromopyragallol red (BPR) has been studied using mixed extractants containing chloroform, capronic acid (HL) and 1-pentanol (S) (extractant 1), and chloroform, HL, S and propionic acid (extractant 2). The latter is more selectie and extracts only the indium complex. Optimal conditions have been found for the extraction of In-BRP complex (pH 6.3-6.5; C BPR 1.5x10 -4 M) its composition has been estimated and discussed

  11. An absorbing microwave micro-solid-phase extraction device used in non-polar solvent microwave-assisted extraction for the determination of organophosphorus pesticides.

    Wang, Ziming; Zhao, Xin; Xu, Xu; Wu, Lijie; Su, Rui; Zhao, Yajing; Jiang, Chengfei; Zhang, Hanqi; Ma, Qiang; Lu, Chunmei; Dong, Deming

    2013-01-14

    A single-step extraction-cleanup method, including microwave-assisted extraction (MAE) and micro-solid-phase extraction (μ-SPE), was developed for the extraction of ten organophosphorus pesticides in vegetable and fruit samples. Without adding any polar solvent, only one kind of non-polar solvent (hexane) was used as extraction solvent in the whole extraction step. Absorbing microwave μ-SPE device, was prepared by packing activated carbon with microporous polypropylene membrane envelope, and used as not only the sorbent in μ-SPE, but also the microwave absorption medium. Some experimental parameters effecting on extraction efficiency was investigated and optimized. 1.0 g of sample, 8 mL of hexane and three absorbing microwave μ-SPE devices were added in the microwave extraction vessel, the extraction was carried out under 400 W irradiation power at 60°C for 10 min. The extracts obtained by MAE-μ-SPE were directly analyzed by GC-MS without any clean-up process. The recoveries were in the range of 93.5-104.6%, and the relative standard deviations were lower than 8.7%. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Catalyst of a metal heteropoly acid salt that is insoluble in a polar solvent on a non-metallic porous support and method of making

    Wang, Yong [Richland, WA; Peden, Charles H. F. [West Richland, WA; Choi, Saemin [Richland, WA

    2002-10-29

    The present invention includes a catalyst having (a) a non-metallic support having a plurality of pores; (b) a metal heteropoly acid salt that is insoluble in a polar solvent on the non-metallic support; wherein at least a portion of the metal heteropoly acid salt is dispersed within said plurality of pores. The present invention also includes a method of depositing a metal heteropoly acid salt that is insoluble in a polar solvent onto a non-metallic support having a plurality of pores. The method has the steps of: (a) obtaining a first solution containing a first precursor of a metal salt cation; (b) obtaining a second solution containing a second precursor of a heteropoly acid anion in a solvent having a limited dissolution potential for said first precursor; (c) impregnating the non-metallic support with the first precursor forming a first precursor deposit within the plurality of pores, forming a first precursor impregnated support; (d) heating said first precursor impregnated support forming a bonded first precursor impregnated support; (e) impregnating the second precursor that reacts with the precursor deposit and forms the metal heteropoly acid salt.

  13. Photoinduced electron transfer in covalent ruthenium-anthraquinone dyads: relative importance of driving-force, solvent polarity, and donor-bridge energy gap.

    Hankache, Jihane; Wenger, Oliver S

    2012-02-28

    Four rigid rod-like molecules comprised of a Ru(bpy)(3)(2+) (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine) photosensitizer, a 9,10-anthraquinone electron acceptor, and a molecular bridge connecting the two redox partners were synthesized and investigated by optical spectroscopic and electrochemical means. An attempt was made to assess the relative importance of driving-force, solvent polarity, and bridge variation on the rates of photoinduced electron transfer in these molecules. Expectedly, introduction of tert-butyl substituents in the bipyridine ligands of the ruthenium complex and a change in solvent from dichloromethane to acetonitrile lead to a significant acceleration of charge transfer rates. In dichloromethane, photoinduced electron transfer is not competitive with the inherent excited-state deactivation processes of the photosensitizer. In acetonitrile, an increase in driving-force by 0.2 eV through attachment of tert-butyl substituents to the bpy ancillary ligands causes an increase in electron transfer rates by an order of magnitude. Replacement of a p-xylene bridge by a p-dimethoxybenzene spacer entails an acceleration of charge transfer rates by a factor of 3.5. In the dyads from this study, the relative order of importance of individual influences on electron transfer rates is therefore as follows: solvent polarity ≥ driving-force > donor-bridge energy gap.

  14. Markers

    Healthy Schools Network, Inc., 2011

    2011-01-01

    Dry erase whiteboards come with toxic dry erase markers and toxic cleaning products. Dry erase markers labeled "nontoxic" are not free of toxic chemicals and can cause health problems. Children are especially vulnerable to environmental health hazards; moreover, schools commonly have problems with indoor air pollution, as they are more densely…

  15. Fatty acids of polar lipids in heart tissue are good taxonomic markers ...

    The fatty acid profiles in total, neutral and polar lipids in the heart tissues of five freshwater fish species (Nile perch Lates niloticus, Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus, marbled lungfish Protopterus aethiopicus, Bagrus docmak and African catfish Clarias gariepinus) from Lakes Victoria and Kyoga were determined ...

  16. CO2-Binding Organic Liquids Gas Capture with Polarity-Swing-Assisted Regeneration Full Technology Feasibility Study B1 - Solvent-based Systems

    Heldebrant, David J

    2014-08-31

    PNNL, Fluor Corporation and Queens University (Kingston, ON) successfully completed a three year comprehensive study of the CO2BOL water-lean solvent platform with Polarity Swing Assisted Regeneration (PSAR). This study encompassed solvent synthesis, characterization, environmental toxicology, physical, thermodynamic and kinetic property measurements, Aspen Plus™ modeling and bench-scale testing of a candidate CO2BOL solvent molecule. Key Program Findings The key program findings are summarized as follows: • PSAR favorably reduced stripper duties and reboiler temperatures with little/no impact to absorption column • >90% CO2 capture was achievable at reasonable liquid-gas ratios in the absorber • High rich solvent viscosities (up to 600 cP) were successfully demonstrated in the bench-scale system. However, the projected impacts of high viscosity to capital cost and operational limits compromised the other levelized cost of electricity benefits. • Low thermal conductivity of organics significantly increased the required cross exchanger surface area, and potentially other heat exchange surfaces. • CO2BOL had low evaporative losses during bench-scale testing • There was no evidence of foaming during bench scale testing • Current CO2BOL formulation costs project to be $35/kg • Ecotoxicity (Water Daphnia) was comparable between CO2BOL and MEA (169.47 versus 103.63 mg/L) • Full dehydration of the flue gas was determined to not be economically feasible. However, modest refrigeration (13 MW for the 550 MW reference system) was determined to be potentially economically feasible, and still produce a water-lean condition for the CO2BOLs (5 wt% steady-state water loading). • CO2BOLs testing with 5 wt% water loading did not compromise anhydrous performance behavior, and showed actual enhancement of CO2 capture performance. • Mass transfer of CO2BOLs was not greatly impeded by viscosity • Facile separation of antisolvent from lean CO2BOL was

  17. Experimental study and thermodynamic modeling for determining the effect of non-polar solvent (hexane)/polar solvent (methanol) ratio and moisture content on the lipid extraction efficiency from Chlorella vulgaris.

    Malekzadeh, Mohammad; Abedini Najafabadi, Hamed; Hakim, Maziar; Feilizadeh, Mehrzad; Vossoughi, Manouchehr; Rashtchian, Davood

    2016-02-01

    In this research, organic solvent composed of hexane and methanol was used for lipid extraction from dry and wet biomass of Chlorella vulgaris. The results indicated that lipid and fatty acid extraction yield was decreased by increasing the moisture content of biomass. However, the maximum extraction efficiency was attained by applying equivolume mixture of hexane and methanol for both dry and wet biomass. Thermodynamic modeling was employed to estimate the effect of hexane/methanol ratio and moisture content on fatty acid extraction yield. Hansen solubility parameter was used in adjusting the interaction parameters of the model, which led to decrease the number of tuning parameters from 6 to 2. The results indicated that the model can accurately estimate the fatty acid recovery with average absolute deviation percentage (AAD%) of 13.90% and 15.00% for the two cases of using 6 and 2 adjustable parameters, respectively. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. RNG1 is a Late Marker of the Apical Polar Ring in Toxoplasma gondii

    Tran, Johnson Q.; de Leon, Jessica C.; Li, Catherine; Huynh, My-Hang; Beatty, Wandy; Morrissette, Naomi S.

    2010-01-01

    The asexually proliferating stages of apicomplexan parasites cause acute symptoms of diseases such as malaria, cryptosporidiosis and toxoplasmosis. These stages are characterized by the presence of two independent microtubule organizing centers (MTOCs). Centrioles are found at the poles of the intranuclear spindle. The apical polar ring (APR), a MTOC unique to apicomplexans, organizes subpellicular microtubules which impose cell shape and apical polarity on these protozoa. Here we describe the characteristics of a novel protein that localizes to the APR of Toxoplasma gondii which we have named ring-1 (RNG1). There are related RNG1 proteins in Neospora caninum and Sarcocystis neurona but no obvious homologs in Plasmodium spp., Cryptosporidium spp. or Babesia spp. RNG1 is a small, low-complexity, detergent-insoluble protein that assembles at the APR very late in the process of daughter parasite replication. We were unable to knock-out the RNG1 gene, suggesting that its gene product is essential. Tagged RNG1 lines have also allowed us to visualize the APR during growth of Toxoplasma in the microtubule-disrupting drug oryzalin. Oryzalin inhibits nuclear division and cytokinesis although Toxoplasma growth continues, and similar to earlier observations of unchecked centriole duplication in oryzalin-treated parasites, the APR continues to duplicate during aberrant parasite growth. PMID:20658557

  19. Electrochemical characterization of praseodymia doped zircon. Catalytic effect on the electrochemical reduction of molecular oxygen in polar organic solvents

    Domenech, Antonio, E-mail: antonio.domenech@uv.es [Departament de Quimica Analitica, Universitat de Valencia, Dr. Moliner, 50, 46100 Burjassot, Valencia (Spain); Montoya, Noemi; Alarcon, Javier [Departament de Quimica Inorganica, Universitat de Valencia, Dr. Moliner, 50, 46100 Burjassot, Valencia (Spain)

    2011-08-01

    Highlights: > Electrochemical characterization of Pr centers in praseodymia-doped zircon. > Study of the catalytic effect on the reduction of peroxide radical anion in nonaqueous solvents. > Assessment of non-uniform distribution of Pr centers in the zircon grains. - Abstract: The voltammetry of microparticles and scanning electrochemical microscopy methodologies are applied to characterize praseodymium centers in praseodymia-doped zircon (Pr{sub x}Zr{sub (1-y)}Si{sub (1-z)}O{sub 4}; y + z = x; 0.02 < x < 0.10) specimens prepared via sol-gel synthetic routes. In contact with aqueous electrolytes, two overlapping Pr-centered cathodic processes, attributable to the Pr (IV) to Pr (III) reduction of Pr centers in different sites are obtained. In water-containing, air-saturated acetone and DMSO solutions as solvent, Pr{sub x}Zr{sub (1-y)}Si{sub (1-z)}O{sub 4} materials produce a significant catalytic effect on the electrochemical reduction of peroxide radical anion electrochemically generated. These electrochemical features denote that most of the Pr centers are originally in its 4+ oxidation state in the parent Pr{sub x}Zr{sub (1-y)}Si{sub (1-z)}O{sub 4} specimens. The variation of the catalytic performance of such specimens with potential scan rate, water concentration and Pr loading suggests that Pr is not uniformly distributed within the zircon grains, being concentrated in the outer region of such grains.

  20. Differential expression of p-ERM, a marker of cell polarity, in benign and neoplastic oviductal epithelium.

    Ning, Gang; Bijron, Jonathan G; Yuan, Ju; Hirsch, Michelle S; McKeon, Frank D; Nucci, Marisa R; Crum, Christopher P; Xian, Wa

    2013-07-01

    Serous tubal intraepithelial carcinoma (STIC) is a noninvasive phase of pelvic serous cancer at risk for metastasizing. Because of its biologic significance, its accurate distinction from nonmalignant mimics is important. Loss of cell orientation is an important feature of STIC. We sought to determine whether the immunohistochemical localization of cytoskeletal-organizing proteins phospho-ezrin-radaxin-moesin (p-ERM) would be useful in making this distinction. The benign oviductal entities (normal and p53 signatures), premalignant atypias (tubal intraepithelial lesions in transition), serous intraepithelial carcinomas (STICs), and carcinomas were analyzed for 5 staining patterns and compared. Linear or uniform luminal p-ERM staining was strongly associated with benign mucosa in contrast to STICs, in which it was lost and often replaced by nonlinear or nonuniform patterns highlighting individually cell groups or single cells. Premalignant atypias were similar to benign mucosa by p-ERM staining and retained the linear luminal pattern. This study shows, for the first time, that patterns of staining for an immunohistochemical correlate of cell polarity (p-ERM) differ between STICs, their benign counterparts and premalignant atypias that do not fulfill the criteria for STICs. If confirmed, these findings warrant further analysis of indices of cell polarity as objective markers for the diagnosis and mapping of the evolution of pelvic serous precursors.

  1. Polyacrylonitrile nanofiber as polar solvent N,N-dimethyl formamide sensor based on quartz crystal microbalance technique

    Rianjanu, A.; Julian, T.; Hidayat, S. N.; Suyono, E. A.; Kusumaatmaja, A.; Triyana, K.

    2018-04-01

    Here, we describe an N,N-dimethyl formamide (DMF) vapour sensor fabricated by coating polyacrylonitrile (PAN) nanofiber structured on quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). The PAN nanofiber sensors with an average diameter of 225 nm to 310 nm were fabricated via electrospinning process with different mass deposition on QCM substrate. The nanostructured of PAN nanofiber offers a high specific surface area that improved the sensing performance of nanofiber sensors. Benefiting from that fine structure, and high polymer-solvent affinity between PAN and DMF, the development of DMF sensors presented good response at ambient temperature. Since there is no chemical reaction between PAN nanofiber and DMF vapour, weak physical interaction such absorption and swelling were responsible for the sensing behavior. The results are indicating that the response of PAN nanofiber sensors has more dependency on the nanofiber structure (specific surface area) rather than its mass deposition. The sensor also showed good stability after a few days sensing. These findings have significant implications for developing DMF vapour sensor based on QCM coated polymer nanofibers.

  2. Kinetics and Optimization of Lipophilic Kojic Acid Derivative Synthesis in Polar Aprotic Solvent Using Lipozyme RMIM and Its Rheological Study

    Nurazwa Ishak

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis of kojic acid derivative (KAD from kojic and palmitic acid (C16:0 in the presence of immobilized lipase from Rhizomucor miehei (commercially known as Lipozyme RMIM, was studied using a shake flask system. Kojic acid is a polyfunctional heterocycles that acts as a source of nucleophile in this reaction allowing the formation of a lipophilic KAD. In this study, the source of biocatalyst, Lipozyme RMIM, was derived from the lipase of Rhizomucor miehei immobilized on weak anion exchange macro-porous Duolite ES 562 by the adsorption technique. The effects of solvents, enzyme loading, reaction temperature, and substrate molar ratio on the reaction rate were investigated. In one-factor-at-a-time (OFAT experiments, a high reaction rate (30.6 × 10−3 M·min−1 of KAD synthesis was recorded using acetone, enzyme loading of 1.25% (w/v, reaction time of 12 h, temperature of 50 °C and substrate molar ratio of 5:1. Thereafter, a yield of KAD synthesis was optimized via the response surface methodology (RSM whereby the optimized molar ratio (fatty acid: kojic acid, enzyme loading, reaction temperature and reaction time were 6.74, 1.97% (w/v, 45.9 °C, and 20 h respectively, giving a high yield of KAD (64.47%. This condition was reevaluated in a 0.5 L stirred tank reactor (STR where the agitation effects of two impellers; Rushton turbine (RT and pitch-blade turbine (PBT, were investigated. In the STR, a very high yield of KAD synthesis (84.12% was achieved using RT at 250 rpm, which was higher than the shake flask, thus indicating better mixing quality in STR. In a rheological study, a pseudoplastic behavior of KAD mixture was proposed for potential application in lotion formulation.

  3. Kinetics and Optimization of Lipophilic Kojic Acid Derivative Synthesis in Polar Aprotic Solvent Using Lipozyme RMIM and Its Rheological Study.

    Ishak, Nurazwa; Lajis, Ahmad Firdaus B; Mohamad, Rosfarizan; Ariff, Arbakariya B; Mohamed, Mohd Shamzi; Halim, Murni; Wasoh, Helmi

    2018-02-24

    The synthesis of kojic acid derivative (KAD) from kojic and palmitic acid (C16:0) in the presence of immobilized lipase from Rhizomucor miehei (commercially known as Lipozyme RMIM), was studied using a shake flask system. Kojic acid is a polyfunctional heterocycles that acts as a source of nucleophile in this reaction allowing the formation of a lipophilic KAD. In this study, the source of biocatalyst, Lipozyme RMIM, was derived from the lipase of Rhizomucor miehei immobilized on weak anion exchange macro-porous Duolite ES 562 by the adsorption technique. The effects of solvents, enzyme loading, reaction temperature, and substrate molar ratio on the reaction rate were investigated. In one-factor-at-a-time (OFAT) experiments, a high reaction rate (30.6 × 10 -3 M·min -1 ) of KAD synthesis was recorded using acetone, enzyme loading of 1.25% ( w / v ), reaction time of 12 h, temperature of 50 °C and substrate molar ratio of 5:1. Thereafter, a yield of KAD synthesis was optimized via the response surface methodology (RSM) whereby the optimized molar ratio (fatty acid: kojic acid), enzyme loading, reaction temperature and reaction time were 6.74, 1.97% ( w / v ), 45.9 °C, and 20 h respectively, giving a high yield of KAD (64.47%). This condition was reevaluated in a 0.5 L stirred tank reactor (STR) where the agitation effects of two impellers; Rushton turbine (RT) and pitch-blade turbine (PBT), were investigated. In the STR, a very high yield of KAD synthesis (84.12%) was achieved using RT at 250 rpm, which was higher than the shake flask, thus indicating better mixing quality in STR. In a rheological study, a pseudoplastic behavior of KAD mixture was proposed for potential application in lotion formulation.

  4. Application of acetone acetals as water scavengers and derivatization agents prior to the gas chromatographic analysis of polar residual solvents in aqueous samples.

    van Boxtel, Niels; Wolfs, Kris; Van Schepdael, Ann; Adams, Erwin

    2015-12-18

    The sensitivity of gas chromatography (GC) combined with the full evaporation technique (FET) for the analysis of aqueous samples is limited due to the maximum tolerable sample volume in a headspace vial. Using an acetone acetal as water scavenger prior to FET-GC analysis proved to be a useful and versatile tool for the analysis of high boiling analytes in aqueous samples. 2,2-Dimethoxypropane (DMP) was used in this case resulting in methanol and acetone as reaction products with water. These solvents are relatively volatile and were easily removed by evaporation enabling sample enrichment leading to 10-fold improvement in sensitivity compared to the standard 10μL FET sample volumes for a selection of typical high boiling polar residual solvents in water. This could be improved even further if more sample is used. The method was applied for the determination of residual NMP in an aqueous solution of a cefotaxime analogue and proved to be considerably better than conventional static headspace (sHS) and the standard FET approach. The methodology was also applied to determine trace amounts of ethylene glycol (EG) in aqueous samples like contact lens fluids, where scavenging of the water would avoid laborious extraction prior to derivatization. During this experiment it was revealed that DMP reacts quantitatively with EG to form 2,2-dimethyl-1,3-dioxolane (2,2-DD) under the proposed reaction conditions. The relatively high volatility (bp 93°C) of 2,2-DD makes it possible to perform analysis of EG using the sHS methodology making additional derivatization reactions superfluous. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. A marker of animal-vegetal polarity in the egg of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus. The pigment band.

    Sardet, C; Chang, P

    1985-09-01

    We have examined the subequatorial accumulation of pigment granules (the so-called 'pigment band') in the egg of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus, which constitutes an unambiguous marker of animal-vegetal polarity. Most of the reddish pigment granules are situated at the periphery of the egg. They exhibit occasional saltatory movements and can aggregate into large patches. Pigment granules are retained as a band in the isolated cortex when the egg surface complex is isolated by shearing eggs attached to polylysine-coated surfaces with calcium-free isotonic solutions. Pigment granules remain as the main vesicular component of fertilized egg cortices or of unfertilized egg cortices perfused with calcium to provoke cortical granule exocytosis. They may be anchored to the isolated cortex through associations with the plasma membrane and with an extensive subsurface network of rough endoplasmic reticulum (rough ER). Pigment granules contain antimonate-precipitable calcium and, in this respect and many others, resemble acidic vesicles recently identified in the cortex of unpigmented sea urchin eggs. We discuss the similarities observed between granules and acidic vesicles in various urchin egg species and their possible functions.

  6. Evaluation of thermophysical properties of ionic liquids with polar solvent: a comparable study of two families of ionic liquids with various ions.

    Govinda, Varadhi; Attri, Pankaj; Venkatesu, Punnuru; Venkateswarlu, Ponneri

    2013-10-17

    In this work, we explore and compare the role of the ion effect on the thermophysical properties of two families of ionic liquids (ILs), namely, tetra-alkyl ammonium cation [R4N](+) with hydroxide [OH](-) anion and 1-alkyl-3-methyl imidazolium cation [amim](+) with different anions (chloride, methyl sulfate, and tetrafluoroborate), with polar solvent such as dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) in the temperature range from 25 to 40 °C and over the whole concentration range of ILs. Two families of ILs, namely, tetramethyl ammonium hydroxide [(CH3)4N][OH] (TMAH), tetraethyl ammonium hydroxide [(C2H5)4N][OH] (TEAH), tetrapropyl ammonium hydroxide [(C3H7)4N][OH] (TPAH), and tetrabutyl ammonium hydroxide [(C4H9)4N][OH] (TBAH) from ammonium-based ILs and 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride [Emim][Cl], 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium methylsulfate [Emim][MeSO4], 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate [Bmim][BF4], and 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([Bmim][Cl]) from imidazolium family of ILs, are used in the present study. To address the molecular interactions of ILs with DMSO, densities (ρ), ultrasonic sound velocities (u), and viscosities (η) have been measured over the entire composition range and at four temperatures, 25, 30, 35, and 40 °C, under atmospheric pressure. From these experimental data, the excess molar volume (V(E)), the deviation in isentropic compressibility (Δκs), and the deviation in viscosity (Δη) were calculated and were adequately correlated by using the Redlich-Kister polynomial equation. The measured and predicted data were interpreted on the basis of intermolecular interactions and structural effects between like and unlike molecules upon mixing. The hydrogen-bonding features between ammonium-based ILs and DMSO were analyzed using molecular modeling program by HyperChem 7.

  7. Recent results on solvation dynamics of electron and spur reactions of solvated electron in polar solvents studied by femtosecond laser spectroscopy and picosecond pulse radiolysis

    Mostafavi, M.

    2006-01-01

    . Nevertheless, the results show that the effect of the molecular structure of the solvents on solvation dynamics of electron is not negligible. The first study of picosecond pulse radiolysis of neat tetrahydrofuran (THF) by pulse-probe method was performed using the ELYSE picosecond pulse electron facility. ELYSE is a laser triggered electron accelerator that delivers at repetition rate of 1-50 Hz, electron pulses with a duration 5-15 ps, a charge of 2-7 nC and a kinetic energy tuneable in the range 2-9 MeV. The pulse- probe study of neat THF shows a fast decay of absorbance at 790 nm within 2.5 ns (Figure 2). This decay is assigned to the solvated electron. From the decay we deduced the time dependent G-value of solvated electron in the picosecond time range. The ratio between the initial absorbance (at 30 ps) and at 2.5 ns is about 2. In similar conditions, the same ratio in water and in the alcohols is 1.15, 1.25, respectively. In fact, the G-value of solvated electron in THF is much more time dependent that those in polar solvents like water and alcohols. We compared the time dependent G value for solvated electron between two methods: direct time resolved measurement and scavenging method. The analysis suggests either that the initial yield in THF (at zero time) is lower than in water or that a very fast decay occurs within the electron pulse.Eventually, the first pulse radiolysis measurements at picosecond range and at elevated temperature in water is studied by pulse-probe method using a high temperature high pressure cell. This study is done in collaboration with the Radiolysis laboratory of CEA/Saclay. The kinetics of the hydrated electron are found to be temperature dependent (Figure 3) and are qualitatively in agreement with radiolytic yield values obtained at elevated temperature after spur reactions. Assuming the same initial G value at picosecond time range for different temperatures, we deduce that at 350 degree C the yield at nanosecond range becomes almost the

  8. Effect of Viscosity and Polar Properties of Solvent on Dynamics of Photoinduced Charge Transfer in BTA-1 Cation — Derivative of Thioflavin T

    Gogoleva, S. D.; Stsiapura, V. I.

    2018-05-01

    It was found that the spectral and fluorescent properties of BTA-1C cation in protic and aprotic solvents differ. It was shown that for solutions in long-chain alcohols viscosity is the main factor that determines the dynamics of intramolecular charge transfer in the excited state of the BTA-1C molecule. In the case of aprotic solvents a correlation was found between the rate constant of twisted intramolecular charge transfer (TICT) during rotation of fragments of the molecule in relation to each other in the excited state and the solvent relaxation rate: k TICT 1/τ S .

  9. Intramolecular, Exciplex-Mediated, Proton-Coupled, Charge-Transfer Processes in N,N-Dimethyl-3-(1-pyrenyl)propan-1-ammonium Cations: Influence of Anion, Solvent Polarity, and Temperature.

    Safko, Trevor M; Faleiros, Marcelo M; Atvars, Teresa D Z; Weiss, Richard G

    2016-06-16

    An intramolecular exciplex-mediated, proton-coupled, charge-transfer (PCCT) process has been investigated for a series of N,N-dimethyl-3-(1-pyrenyl)propan-1-ammonium cations with different anions (PyS) in solvents of low to intermediate polarity over a wide temperature range. Solvent mediates both the equilibrium between conformations of the cation that place the pyrenyl and ammonium groups in proximity (conformation C) or far from each other (conformation O) and the ability of the ammonium group to transfer a proton adiabatically in the PyS excited singlet state. Thus, exciplex emission, concurrent with the PCCT process, was observed only in hydrogen-bond accepting solvents of relatively low polarity (tetrahydrofuran, ethyl acetate, and 1,4-dioxane) and not in dichloromethane. From the exciplex emission and other spectroscopic and thermodynamic data, the acidity of the ammonium group in conformation C of the excited singlet state of PyS (pKa*) has been estimated to be ca. -3.4 in tetrahydrofuran. The ratios between the intensities of emission from the exciplex and the locally excited state (IEx/ILE) appear to be much more dependent on the nature of the anion than are the rates of exciplex formation and decay, although the excited state data do not provide a quantitative measure of the anion effect on the C-O equilibrium. The activation energies associated with exciplex formation in THF are calculated to be 0.08 to 0.15 eV lower than for the neutral amine, N,N-dimethyl-3-(1-pyrenyl)propan-1-amine. Decay of the exciplexes formed from the deprotonation of PyS is hypothesized to occur through charge-recombination processes. To our knowledge, this is the first example in which photoacidity and intramolecular exciplex formation (i.e., a PCCT reaction) are coupled.

  10. Solvent extraction

    Coombs, D.M.; Latimer, E.G.

    1988-01-05

    It is an object of this invention to provide for the demetallization and general upgrading of heavy oil via a solvent extracton process, and to improve the efficiency of solvent extraction operations. The yield and demetallization of product oil form heavy high-metal content oil is maximized by solvent extractions which employ either or all of the following techniques: premixing of a minor amount of the solvent with feed and using countercurrent flow for the remaining solvent; use of certain solvent/free ratios; use of segmental baffle tray extraction column internals and the proper extraction column residence time. The solvent premix/countercurrent flow feature of the invention substantially improves extractions where temperatures and pressures above the critical point of the solvent are used. By using this technique, a greater yield of extract oil can be obtained at the same metals content or a lower metals-containing extract oil product can be obtained at the same yield. Furthermore, the premixing of part of the solvent with the feed before countercurrent extraction gives high extract oil yields and high quality demetallization. The solvent/feed ratio features of the invention substanially lower the captial and operating costs for such processes while not suffering a loss in selectivity for metals rejection. The column internals and rsidence time features of the invention further improve the extractor metals rejection at a constant yield or allow for an increase in extract oil yield at a constant extract oil metals content. 13 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Deasphalting solvents

    Carrillo, J. A; Caceres, J; Vela, G; Bueno, H

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes how the deasphalted oil (DMO) or demetalized oil (DMO) quality (CCR, Ni, V end asphaltenes contents) changes with: DAO or DMO yield, solvent/feed ratio, type of vacuum reside (from paraffinic to blends with vis breaking bottoms), extraction temperature and extraction solvent (propane, propylene, n-butane and I butane)

  12. Solvent substitution

    1990-01-01

    The DOE Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Office of Technology Development and the Air Force Engineering and Services Center convened the First Annual International Workshop on Solvent Substitution on December 4--7, 1990. The primary objectives of this joint effort were to share information and ideas among attendees in order to enhance the development and implementation of required new technologies for the elimination of pollutants associated with industrial use of hazardous and toxic solvents; and to aid in accelerating collaborative efforts and technology transfer between government and industry for solvent substitution. There were workshop sessions focusing on Alternative Technologies, Alternative Solvents, Recovery/Recycling, Low VOC Materials and Treatment for Environmentally Safe Disposal. The 35 invited papers presented covered a wide range of solvent substitution activities including: hardware and weapons production and maintenance, paint stripping, coating applications, printed circuit boards, metal cleaning, metal finishing, manufacturing, compliance monitoring and process control monitoring. This publication includes the majority of these presentations. In addition, in order to further facilitate information exchange and technology transfer, the US Air Force and DOE solicited additional papers under a general ''Call for Papers.'' These papers, which underwent review and final selection by a peer review committee, are also included in this combined Proceedings/Compendium. For those involved in handling, using or managing hazardous and toxic solvents, this document should prove to be a valuable resource, providing the most up-to-date information on current technologies and practices in solvent substitution. Individual papers are abstracted separated

  13. Solvent substitution

    1990-01-01

    The DOE Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Office of Technology Development and the Air Force Engineering and Services Center convened the First Annual International Workshop on Solvent Substitution on December 4--7, 1990. The primary objectives of this joint effort were to share information and ideas among attendees in order to enhance the development and implementation of required new technologies for the elimination of pollutants associated with industrial use of hazardous and toxic solvents; and to aid in accelerating collaborative efforts and technology transfer between government and industry for solvent substitution. There were workshop sessions focusing on Alternative Technologies, Alternative Solvents, Recovery/Recycling, Low VOC Materials and Treatment for Environmentally Safe Disposal. The 35 invited papers presented covered a wide range of solvent substitution activities including: hardware and weapons production and maintenance, paint stripping, coating applications, printed circuit boards, metal cleaning, metal finishing, manufacturing, compliance monitoring and process control monitoring. This publication includes the majority of these presentations. In addition, in order to further facilitate information exchange and technology transfer, the US Air Force and DOE solicited additional papers under a general Call for Papers.'' These papers, which underwent review and final selection by a peer review committee, are also included in this combined Proceedings/Compendium. For those involved in handling, using or managing hazardous and toxic solvents, this document should prove to be a valuable resource, providing the most up-to-date information on current technologies and practices in solvent substitution. Individual papers are abstracted separated.

  14. Acetone-based cellulose solvent.

    Kostag, Marc; Liebert, Tim; Heinze, Thomas

    2014-08-01

    Acetone containing tetraalkylammonium chloride is found to be an efficient solvent for cellulose. The addition of an amount of 10 mol% (based on acetone) of well-soluble salt triethyloctylammonium chloride (Et3 OctN Cl) adjusts the solvent's properties (increases the polarity) to promote cellulose dissolution. Cellulose solutions in acetone/Et3 OctN Cl have the lowest viscosity reported for comparable aprotic solutions making it a promising system for shaping processes and homogeneous chemical modification of the biopolymer. Recovery of the polymer and recycling of the solvent components can be easily achieved. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Study of solvent-conjugated polymer interactions by polarized spectroscopy: MEH-PPV and Poly(9,9'-dioctylfluorene-2,7-diyl)

    Cossiello, Rafael F.; Susman, Mariano D.; Aramendia, Pedro F.; Atvars, Teresa D.Z.

    2010-01-01

    Absorption, emission, and anisotropy measurements were performed on poly-[2-methoxy-5(2'-ethylhexyloxy)-1,4-phenylenevinylene] (MEH-PPV) and poly-(9,9'-dioctylfluorene-2,7-diyl) (PF) solutions of various solvents, and in thin films deposited from them. The good correlation of MEH-PPV absorption and emission energy with Hildebrandt's dispersive parameter indicate that dispersive forces regulate the effective extent of the luminophore. The excitation and the emission spectra of α and β chains can be distinguished in PF solutions using the steady-state anisotropy. PF films show greater memory effect from the solutions from which they were spun than MEH-PPV. Anisotropy of MEH-PPV is very low, both in solutions and in films reflecting efficient energy migration. Anisotropy of PF in solutions and films demonstrates great differences in energy transfer efficiency within the α and β phases, while there is no energy transfer between these chain conformations.

  16. The Extracts and Major Compounds Derived from Astragali Radix Alter Mitochondrial Bioenergetics in Cultured Cardiomyocytes: Comparison of Various Polar Solvents and Compounds

    Yun Huang

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Astragali Radix (AR is a widely used “Qi-invigorating” herb in China for its tonic effects in strengthening biological tissues. The extract of AR contains abundant antioxidants, including astragalosides and isoflavonoids. However, very few reports have systematically measured the effects of the major components of AR on cell mitochondrial bioenergetics. Here, a systemic approach employing an extracellular flux analyzer was developed to evaluate mitochondrial respiration in cultured cardiomyocyte cells H9C2. The effects of different polar extractives, as well as of the major compounds of AR, were compared. The contents of astragaloside IV, calycosin, formononetin, and genistein in the AR extracts obtained by using water, 50% ethanol, and 90% ethanol were measured by liquid chromatograph-mass spectrometer (LC–MS. The antioxidant activities of the AR extracts, as well as of their major compounds, were determined by measuring the free radical scavenging activity and protective effects in tert-butyl hydroperoxide (tBHP-treated H9C2 cells. By monitoring the real-time oxygen consumption rate (OCR in tBHP-treated cardiomyocytes with a Seahorse extracellular flux analyzer, the tonic effects of the AR extracts and of their main compounds on mitochondrial bioenergetics were evaluated. AR water extracts possessed the strongest antioxidant activity and protective effects in cardiomyocytes exposed to oxidative stress. The protection was proposed to be mediated via increasing the spare respiratory capacity and mitochondrial ATP production in the stressed cells. The major compounds of AR, astragaloside IV and genistein, showed opposite effects in regulating mitochondrial bioenergetics. These results demonstrate that highly polar extracts of AR, especially astragaloside-enriched extracts, possess better tonic effects on mitochondrial bioenergetics of cultured cardiomyocytes than extracts with a lower polarity.

  17. Third phase formation in organic solutions in the extraction of mono-acids by tertiary trialcoyl-amines diluted in very slightly polar organic solvents

    Robaglia, Michele

    1973-01-01

    The phenomena of third phase formation which can occur during the extraction of an acid with a tertiary amine diluted in a low polarity diluent are studied. In the first part a system including water (TnOA - C 6 H 12 - HCl - H 2 O) is compared with an anhydrous system (TnOA - C 6 H 12 - HCl - N 2 ). There are two kinds of gaps. One during amine salification, another one during the extraction of excess acid. The important part of the water content of the organic phase is demonstrated. The presence of water enhances the gaps. The polar water molecules are dissolved inside the tri-octylamine salt micelles. The heavy phase is formed by aggregates, the light phase represents the solubility of the non soluble species in the medium. In the second part are studied the influence of some parameters (like nature of diluent, acid, amine and temperature) on the gaps formation and on the extraction of excess acid and water. In every cases the part played by water remains the same. Finally some comparisons are made between tertiary systems and binary systems which formed them. The binary systems were studied by the mean of crystallization curves. (author) [fr

  18. Extracción de Sustancias Hidrofóbicas de Andisols Repelentes al Agua del Oriente Antioqueño, con Solventes Polares

    Jaramillo J. Daniel F.

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available Muestras de Andisols repelentes al agua fueron sometidas a extracciones con mezclas de solventes orgánicos de diferentes polaridaddes; los lavados con mezclas de polaridades 5 y 6 removieron completamente la hidrofobicidad del suelo, sin importar el orden en el cual se hicieron. Del comportamiento del suelo frente a las secuencias de extracción se pudo concluir que los compuestos orgánicos del suelo se acumulan en él en forma de capas, las cuales pueden presentar alternancia de compuestos hidrofóbicos con compuestos hidrofílicos; además, los compuestos más hidrofóbicos son removidos por las mezclas de solventes de mayor grado de polaridad. Se plantea la existencia de dos tipos básicos de hidrofobicidad en los compuestos orgánicos del suelo: una "hidrofobicidad posible ": la que se manifiesta cuando la arena desarrolla repelencia al agua al recibir los extractos y que detecta la presencia de compuestos hidrofóbicos en ellos. La otra, la "hidrofobicidad activa": la que se produce en suelos humectables cuando reciben extractos hidrofóbicos y muestra, no sólo la presencia de los compuestos hidrofóbicos en ellos, sino también que se están presentando las condiciones para que ellos interactúen con los componentes originales del suelo y se desarrolle la hidrofobicidad en el mismo. Extractos obtenidos por lavado de raíces finas y acículas recién caídas de Pinus patula, con mezclas de polaridades 5 y 6, no indugeron repelencia apreciable al agua, ni en suelos humectables ni en arena lavada, cuando se aplicaron en concentraciones menores de 0.4%, lo que sugiere que estos materiales deben tener algún grado de transformación para que le impriman al suelo la hidrofobicidad; además, las raíces tienen una mayor hidrofobicidad potencial que las acículas.

  19. New biphasic solvent system based on cyclopentyl methyl ether for the purification of a non-polar synthetic peptide by pH-zone refining centrifugal partition chromatography.

    Amarouche, Nassima; Boudesocque, Leslie; Borie, Nicolas; Giraud, Matthieu; Forni, Luciano; Butte, Alessandro; Edwards, Florence; Renault, Jean-Hugues

    2014-06-01

    A new type 1 ternary biphasic system composed of cyclopentyl methyl ether, dimethylformamide and water was developed, characterized and successfully used for the purification of a lipophilic, protected peptide by pH-zone refining centrifugal partition chromatography. The protected peptide is an 8-mer, key intermediate in bivalirudin (Angiomax®) synthesis and shows a very low solubility in the solvents usually used in liquid chromatography. All ionic groups, except the N-terminal end of the peptide, are protected by a benzyl group. The purification of this peptide was achieved with a purity of about 99.04% and a recovery of 94% using the new ternary biphasic system cyclopentyl methyl ether/dimethylformamide/water (49:40:11, v/v) in the descending pH-zone refining mode with triethylamine (28 mM) as the retainer and methanesulfonic acid (18 mM) as the eluter. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Solvent substitutes

    Evanoff, S.P.

    1995-01-01

    The environmental and industrial hygiene regulations promulgated since 1980, most notably the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA), the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments to the Resources Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), and the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, have brought about an increased emphasis on user exposure, hazardous waste generation, and air emissions. As a result, industry is performing a fundamental reassessment of cleaning solvents, processes, and procedures. The more progressive organizations have made their goal the elimination of solvents that may pose significant potential human health and environmental hazards. This chapter discusses solvent cleaning in metal-finishing, metal-manufacturing, and industrial maintenance applications; precision cleaning; and electronics manufacturing. Nonmetallic cleaning, adhesives, coatings, inks, and aerosols also will be addressed, but in a more cursory manner

  1. Green solvents and technologies for oil extraction from oilseeds

    Kumar, S. P. Jeevan; Prasad, S. Rajendra; Banerjee, Rintu; Agarwal, Dinesh K.; Kulkarni, Kalyani S.; Ramesh, K. V.

    2017-01-01

    Oilseeds are crucial for the nutritional security of the global population. The conventional technology used for oil extraction from oilseeds is by solvent extraction. In solvent extraction, n-hexane is used as a solvent for its attributes such as simple recovery, non-polar nature, low latent heat of vaporization (330?kJ/kg) and high selectivity to solvents. However, usage of hexane as a solvent has lead to several repercussions such as air pollution, toxicity and harmfulness that prompted to...

  2. Qualitative and quantitative evaluation of solvent systems for countercurrent separation.

    Friesen, J Brent; Ahmed, Sana; Pauli, Guido F

    2015-01-16

    Rational solvent system selection for countercurrent chromatography and centrifugal partition chromatography technology (collectively known as countercurrent separation) studies continues to be a scientific challenge as the fundamental questions of comparing polarity range and selectivity within a solvent system family and between putative orthogonal solvent systems remain unanswered. The current emphasis on metabolomic investigations and analysis of complex mixtures necessitates the use of successive orthogonal countercurrent separation (CS) steps as part of complex fractionation protocols. Addressing the broad range of metabolite polarities demands development of new CS solvent systems with appropriate composition, polarity (π), selectivity (σ), and suitability. In this study, a mixture of twenty commercially available natural products, called the GUESSmix, was utilized to evaluate both solvent system polarity and selectively characteristics. Comparisons of GUESSmix analyte partition coefficient (K) values give rise to a measure of solvent system polarity range called the GUESSmix polarity index (GUPI). Solvatochromic dye and electrical permittivity measurements were also evaluated in quantitatively assessing solvent system polarity. The relative selectivity of solvent systems were evaluated with the GUESSmix by calculating the pairwise resolution (αip), the number of analytes found in the sweet spot (Nsw), and the pairwise resolution of those sweet spot analytes (αsw). The combination of these parameters allowed for both intra- and inter-family comparison of solvent system selectivity. Finally, 2-dimensional reciprocal shifted symmetry plots (ReSS(2)) were created to visually compare both the polarities and selectivities of solvent system pairs. This study helps to pave the way to the development of new solvent systems that are amenable to successive orthogonal CS protocols employed in metabolomic studies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Gas separation by composite solvent-swollen membranes

    Matson, Stephen L.; Lee, Eric K. L.; Friesen, Dwayne T.; Kelly, Donald J.

    1989-01-01

    There is disclosed a composite immobulized liquid membrane of a solvent-swollen polymer and a microporous organic or inorganic support, the solvent being at least one highly polar solvent containing at least one nitrogen, oxygen, phosphorous or sulfur atom, and having a boiling point of at least 100.degree. C. and a specified solubility parameter. The solvent or solvent mixture is homogeneously distributed through the solvent-swollen polymer from 20% to 95% by weight. The membrane is suitable for acid gas scrubbing and oxygen/nitrogen separation.

  4. Gas separation by composite solvent-swollen membranes

    Matson, S.L.; Lee, E.K.L.; Friesen, D.T.; Kelly, D.J.

    1989-04-25

    There is disclosed a composite immobilized liquid membrane of a solvent-swollen polymer and a microporous organic or inorganic support, the solvent being at least one highly polar solvent containing at least one nitrogen, oxygen, phosphorus or sulfur atom, and having a boiling point of at least 100 C and a specified solubility parameter. The solvent or solvent mixture is homogeneously distributed through the solvent-swollen polymer from 20% to 95% by weight. The membrane is suitable for acid gas scrubbing and oxygen/nitrogen separation. 3 figs.

  5. Phase equilibria of carbohydrates in polar solvents

    Jonsdottir, Svava Osk; Rasmussen, Peter

    1999-01-01

    A method for calculating interaction energies and interaction parameters with molecular mechanics methods is extended to predict solid-liquid equilibria (SLE) for saccharides in aqueous solution, giving results in excellent agreement with experimental values. Previously, the method has been shown...

  6. Development of Switchable Polarity Solvent Draw Solutes

    Wilson, Aaron D.

    2016-11-01

    Results of a computational fluid dynamic (CFD) study of flow and heat transfer in a printed circuit heat exchanger (PCHE) geometry are presented. CFD results obtained from a two-plate model are compared to corresponding experimental results for the validation. This process provides the basis for further application of the CFD code to PCHE design and performance analysis in a variety of internal flow geometries. As a part of the code verification and validation (V&V) process, CFD simulation of a single semicircular straight channel under laminar isothermal conditions was also performed and compared to theoretical results. This comparison yielded excellent agreement with the theoretical values. The two-plate CFD model based on the experimental PCHE design overestimated the effectiveness and underestimated the pressure drop. However, it is found that the discrepancy between the CFD result and experimental data was mainly caused by the uncertainty in the geometry of heat exchanger during the fabrication. The CFD results obtained using a slightly smaller channel diameter yielded good agreement with the experimental data. A separate investigation revealed that the average channel diameter of the OSU PCHE after the diffusion-bonding was 1.93 mm on the cold fluid side and 1.90 mm on the hot fluid side which are both smaller than the nominal design value. Consequently, the CFD code was shown to have sufficient capability to evaluate the heat exchanger thermal-hydraulic performance.

  7. Solvent induced supramolecular anisotropy in molecular gels

    Rogers, Michael A., E-mail: mroger09@uoguelph.ca [Department of Food Science, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, N3C3X9 (Canada); Corradini, Maria G. [Department of Food Science, University of Massachusetts Amherst, Amherst, MA, 01003 (United States); Emge, Thomas [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ, 08901 (United States)

    2017-06-15

    Herein is the first report of solvent induced anisotropy in 12-hydroxystearic acid self-assembled fibrillar networks. Increasing the chain length of polar solvent, such as nitriles and ketones, tailored the anisotropy of the fibrillar aggregates. 12HSA molecular gels, comprised of alkanes, exhibited an isotropic fibrillar network irrespective of the alkane chain length. In polar solvents, anisotropy, observed using 2D powder x-ray diffraction profiles, is correlated to a fibrillar supramolecular morphologies in long chain nitriles and ketones while sphereulitic crystals are correlated to x-ray diffraction patterns with an isotropic scatter intensity in short chain ketones and nitriles. These changes directly modify the final physical properties of the gels. - Highlights: • 12-HSA self-assembles into crystalline supramolecular morphologies depending on the solvent. • Alkanes, short chain nitriles and ketones led to 12-HSA displaying supramolecular isotropy. • In long chain nitriles and ketones, 12-HSA displays supramolecular anisotropy.

  8. Solvent induced supramolecular anisotropy in molecular gels

    Rogers, Michael A.; Corradini, Maria G.; Emge, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Herein is the first report of solvent induced anisotropy in 12-hydroxystearic acid self-assembled fibrillar networks. Increasing the chain length of polar solvent, such as nitriles and ketones, tailored the anisotropy of the fibrillar aggregates. 12HSA molecular gels, comprised of alkanes, exhibited an isotropic fibrillar network irrespective of the alkane chain length. In polar solvents, anisotropy, observed using 2D powder x-ray diffraction profiles, is correlated to a fibrillar supramolecular morphologies in long chain nitriles and ketones while sphereulitic crystals are correlated to x-ray diffraction patterns with an isotropic scatter intensity in short chain ketones and nitriles. These changes directly modify the final physical properties of the gels. - Highlights: • 12-HSA self-assembles into crystalline supramolecular morphologies depending on the solvent. • Alkanes, short chain nitriles and ketones led to 12-HSA displaying supramolecular isotropy. • In long chain nitriles and ketones, 12-HSA displays supramolecular anisotropy.

  9. Solvent Optimization for Efficient Enzymatic Monoacylglycerol Production Based on a Glycerolysis Reaction

    Damstrup, Marianne; Jensen, Tine; Sparsø, Flemming V.

    2005-01-01

    This study was aimed at screening solvent systems of varying polarities to identify suitable solvents for efficient and practical enzymatic glycerolysis. Several pure solvents and solvent mixtures were screened in a batch reaction system consisting of glycerol, sunflower oil, and Novozymo (R) 435...

  10. Solvents interactions with thermochromic print

    Mirela Rožić

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the interactions between different solvents (benzene, acetone, cyclohexanone, various alcohols and water and thermochromic printing ink were investigated. Thermochromic printing ink was printed on metal surface. Components of thermochromic printing inks are polymeric microcapsules and classic yellow offset printing ink. Below its activation temperature, dye and developer within the microcapsules form a blue coloured complex. Therefore, thermochromic print is green. By heating above the activation temperature, blue colour of the complex turns into the leuco dye colourless state and the green colour of the prints turns into the yellow colour of the classic offset pigment. The results of the interaction with various solvents show that the thermochromic print is stable in all tested solvents except in ethanol, acetone and cyclohexanone. In ethanol, the green colour of the print becomes yellow. SEM analysis shows that microcapsules are dissolved. In acetone and cyclohexanone, the green colour of the print turns into blue, and the microcapsules become significantly more visible. Thus, the yellow pigment interacts with examined ketones. Based on the obtained interactions it can be concluded that the microcapsules have more polar nature than the classical pigment particles. Solvent-thermocromic print interactions were analysed using Hansen solubility parameters that rank the solvents based on their estimated interaction capabilities.

  11. A molecular dynamics study of intramolecular proton transfer reaction of malonaldehyde in solution based upon a mixed quantum-classical approximation. II. Proton transfer reaction in non-polar solvent

    Kojima, H.; Yamada, A.; Okazaki, S.

    2015-05-01

    The intramolecular proton transfer reaction of malonaldehyde in neon solvent has been investigated by mixed quantum-classical molecular dynamics (QCMD) calculations and fully classical molecular dynamics (FCMD) calculations. Comparing these calculated results with those for malonaldehyde in water reported in Part I [A. Yamada, H. Kojima, and S. Okazaki, J. Chem. Phys. 141, 084509 (2014)], the solvent dependence of the reaction rate, the reaction mechanism involved, and the quantum effect therein have been investigated. With FCMD, the reaction rate in weakly interacting neon is lower than that in strongly interacting water. However, with QCMD, the order of the reaction rates is reversed. To investigate the mechanisms in detail, the reactions were categorized into three mechanisms: tunneling, thermal activation, and barrier vanishing. Then, the quantum and solvent effects were analyzed from the viewpoint of the reaction mechanism focusing on the shape of potential energy curve and its fluctuations. The higher reaction rate that was found for neon in QCMD compared with that found for water solvent arises from the tunneling reactions because of the nearly symmetric double-well shape of the potential curve in neon. The thermal activation and barrier vanishing reactions were also accelerated by the zero-point energy. The number of reactions based on these two mechanisms in water was greater than that in neon in both QCMD and FCMD because these reactions are dominated by the strength of solute-solvent interactions.

  12. Solvents and solvent effects in organic chemistry

    Reichardt, C; Welton, T

    2011-01-01

    .../guest complexation equilibria and reactions in biphasic solvent systems and neoteric solvents, respectively. More than 900 new references have been added, giving preference to review articles, and many older ones have been deleted. New references either replace older ones or are added to the end of the respective reference list of each chapter. Th...

  13. Polarized neutrons

    Williams, W.G.

    1988-01-01

    The book on 'polarized neutrons' is intended to inform researchers in condensed matter physics and chemistry of the diversity of scientific problems that can be investigated using polarized neutron beams. The contents include chapters on:- neutron polarizers and instrumentation, polarized neutron scattering, neutron polarization analysis experiments and precessing neutron polarization. (U.K.)

  14. Organic Solvent Tropical Report

    COWLEY, W.L.

    2000-01-01

    This report provides the basis for closing the organic solvent safety issue. Sufficient information is presented to conclude that risk posed by an unmitigated organic solvent fire is within risk evaluation guidelines

  15. Canyon solvent cleaning

    Reif, D.J.

    1986-01-01

    The HM Process at the Savannah River Plant (SRP) uses 7.5% tributylphosphate in n-paraffin as an extraction solvent. During use, the solvent is altered due to hydrolysis and radiolysis, forming materials that influence product losses, produce decontamination, and separation efficiencies. Laboratory studies to improve online solvent cleaning have shown the carbonate washing, although removing residual solvent activity does not remove binding ligands that hold fission products in the solvent. Treatment of solvent by an alumina adsorption process removes binding ligands and significantly improves recycle solvent performance. Both laboratory work defining a full-scale alumina adsorption process and the use of the process to clean HM Process first cycle solvent are presented

  16. Nonhazardous solvent composition and method for cleaning metal surfaces

    Googin, J.M.; Simandl, R.F.; Thompson, L.M.

    1993-01-01

    A solvent composition for displacing greasy and oily contaminants as well as water and/or aqueous residue from metallic surfaces, especially surfaces of radioactive materials so that such surfaces can be wiped clean of the displaced contaminants, water and/or aqueous residue. The solvent composition consists essentially of a blend of nonpolar aliphatic hydrocarbon solvent having a minimum flash point of about 140 F and 2 to 25 volume percent of a polar solvent having a flash point sufficiently high so as to provide the solvent composition with a minimum flash point of at least 140 F. The solvent composition is nonhazardous so that when it is used to clean the surfaces of radioactive materials the waste in the form of paper or cloth wipes, lab coats and the like used in the cleaning operation is not considered to be mixed waste composed of a hazardous solvent and a radioactive material

  17. Enthalpies of solvation of ethylene oxide oligomers CH{sub 3}O(CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}O){sub n}CH{sub 3} (n = 1 to 4) in different H-bonding solvents: Methanol, chloroform, and water. Group contribution method as applied to the polar oligomers

    Barannikov, Vladimir P., E-mail: vpb@isc-ras.ru [Institute of Solution Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Academicheskaya Str. 1, Ivanovo 153045 (Russian Federation); Guseynov, Sabir S.; Vyugin, Anatoliy I. [Institute of Solution Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Academicheskaya Str. 1, Ivanovo 153045 (Russian Federation)

    2011-12-15

    Highlights: > Solvation enthalpy is found for ethylene oxide oligomers in chloroform and methanol. > Coefficients of solute-solute interaction are determined for oligomers in methanol. > Enthalpies of hydrogen bonding of oligomers with chloroform and water are estimated. > Additivity scheme is developed for describing enthalpies of solvation of oligomers. - Abstract: The enthalpies of solution and solvation of ethylene oxide oligomers CH{sub 3}O(CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}O){sub n}CH{sub 3} (n = 1 to 4) in methanol and chloroform have been determined from calorimetric measurements at T = 298.15 K. The enthalpic coefficients of pairwise solute-solute interaction for methanol solutions have been calculated. The enthalpic characteristics of the oligomers in methanol, chloroform, water and tetrachloromethane have been compared. The hydrogen bonding of the oligomers with chloroform and water molecules is exhibited in the values of solvation enthalpy and coefficient of solute-solute interaction. This effect is not observed for methanol solvent. The thermochemical data evidence an existence of multi-centred hydrogen bonds in associates of polyethers with the solvent molecules. Enthalpies of hydrogen bonding of the oligomers with chloroform and water have been estimated. The additivity scheme has been developed to describe the enthalpies of solvation of ethylene oxide oligomers, unbranched monoethers and n-alkanes in chloroform, methanol, water, and tetrachloromethane. The correction parameters for contribution of repeated polar groups and correction term for methoxy-compounds have been introduced. The obtained group contributions permit to describe the enthalpies of solvation of unbranched monoethers and ethylene oxide oligomers in the solvents with standard deviation up to 0.6 kJ . mol{sup -1}. The values of group contributions and corrections are strongly influenced by solvent properties.

  18. Green solvents and technologies for oil extraction from oilseeds.

    Kumar, S P Jeevan; Prasad, S Rajendra; Banerjee, Rintu; Agarwal, Dinesh K; Kulkarni, Kalyani S; Ramesh, K V

    2017-01-01

    Oilseeds are crucial for the nutritional security of the global population. The conventional technology used for oil extraction from oilseeds is by solvent extraction. In solvent extraction, n -hexane is used as a solvent for its attributes such as simple recovery, non-polar nature, low latent heat of vaporization (330 kJ/kg) and high selectivity to solvents. However, usage of hexane as a solvent has lead to several repercussions such as air pollution, toxicity and harmfulness that prompted to look for alternative options. To circumvent the problem, green solvents could be a promising approach to replace solvent extraction. In this review, green solvents and technology like aqueous assisted enzyme extraction are better solution for oil extraction from oilseeds. Enzyme mediated extraction is eco-friendly, can obtain higher yields, cost-effective and aids in obtaining co-products without any damage. Enzyme technology has great potential for oil extraction in oilseed industry. Similarly, green solvents such as terpenes and ionic liquids have tremendous solvent properties that enable to extract the oil in eco-friendly manner. These green solvents and technologies are considered green owing to the attributes of energy reduction, eco-friendliness, non-toxicity and non-harmfulness. Hence, the review is mainly focussed on the prospects and challenges of green solvents and technology as the best option to replace the conventional methods without compromising the quality of the extracted products.

  19. Exciplex ensemble modulated by excitation mode in intramolecular charge-transfer dyad: effects of temperature, solvent polarity, and wavelength on photochemistry and photophysics of tethered naphthalene-dicyanoethene system.

    Aoki, Yoshiaki; Matsuki, Nobuo; Mori, Tadashi; Ikeda, Hiroshi; Inoue, Yoshihisa

    2014-09-19

    Solvent, temperature, and excitation wavelength significantly affected the photochemical outcomes of a naphthalene-dicyanoethene system tethered by different number (n) of methylene groups (1-3). The effect of irradiation wavelength was almost negligible for 2a but pronounced for 3a. The temperature dependence and theoretical calculations indicated the diversity of exciplex conformations, an ensemble of which can be effectively altered by changing excitation wavelength to eventually switch the regioselectivity of photoreactions.

  20. Influence of Solvent-Solvent and Solute-Solvent Interaction Properties on Solvent-Mediated Potential

    Zhou Shiqi

    2005-01-01

    A recently proposed universal calculational recipe for solvent-mediated potential is applied to calculate excess potential of mean force between two large Lennard-Jones (LJ) or hard core attractive Yukawa particles immersed in small LJ solvent bath at supercritical state. Comparison between the present prediction with a hypernetted chain approximation adopted for solute-solute correlation at infinitely dilute limit and existing simulation data shows high accuracy for the region with large separation, and qualitative reliability for the solute particle contact region. The calculational simplicity of the present recipe allows for a detailed investigation on the effect of the solute-solvent and solvent-solvent interaction details on the excess potential of mean force. The resultant conclusion is that gathering of solvent particles near a solute particle leads to repulsive excess PMF, while depletion of solvent particles away from the solute particle leads to attractive excess PMF, and minor change of the solvent-solvent interaction range has large influence on the excess PMF.

  1. Hazardous solvent substitution

    Twitchell, K.E.

    1995-01-01

    This article is an overview of efforts at INEL to reduce the generation of hazardous wastes through the elimination of hazardous solvents. To aid in their efforts, a number of databases have been developed and will become a part of an Integrated Solvent Substitution Data System. This latter data system will be accessible through Internet

  2. Spectroscopic and DFT study of solvent effects on the electronic absorption spectra of sulfamethoxazole in neat and binary solvent mixtures

    Almandoz, M. C.; Sancho, M. I.; Blanco, S. E.

    2014-01-01

    The solvatochromic behavior of sulfamethoxazole (SMX) was investigated using UV-vis spectroscopy and DFT methods in neat and binary solvent mixtures. The spectral shifts of this solute were correlated with the Kamlet and Taft parameters (α, β and π*). Multiple lineal regression analysis indicates that both specific hydrogen-bond interaction and non specific dipolar interaction play an important role in the position of the absorption maxima in neat solvents. The simulated absorption spectra using TD-DFT methods were in good agreement with the experimental ones. Binary mixtures consist of cyclohexane (Cy)-ethanol (EtOH), acetonitrile (ACN)-dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), ACN-dimethylformamide (DMF), and aqueous mixtures containing as co-solvents DMSO, ACN, EtOH and MeOH. Index of preferential solvation was calculated as a function of solvent composition and non-ideal characteristics are observed in all binary mixtures. In ACN-DMSO and ACN-DMF mixtures, the results show that the solvents with higher polarity and hydrogen bond donor ability interact preferentially with the solute. In binary mixtures containing water, the SMX molecules are solvated by the organic co-solvent (DMSO or EtOH) over the whole composition range. Synergistic effect is observed in the case of ACN-H2O and MeOH-H2O, indicating that at certain concentrations solvents interact to form association complexes, which should be more polar than the individual solvents of the mixture.

  3. Sorption behaviour of polystyrene grafted sago starch in various solvents

    Janarthanan, P.; Yunus, W.M.Z.W.; Ahmed, M.B.; Rahman, M.Z.; Haron, M.J.; Silong, S.

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes swelling properties of polystyrene grafted sago starch in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO); chloroform (CHCl/sub 3/), water, acetone carbon tetrachloride (CCl/sub 4/) cyclohexanone and toluene. The copolymer for this study was prepared by grafting styrene onto sago starch using ceric ammonium nitrate as a redox initiator. Solvent uptake of the copolymer with respect to time was obtained by soaking the samples in chosen solvents for various time intervals at 25+-1 degree centigrade. The results obtained from swelling of polystyrene grafted sago starch in polar and non polar solvents showed that the percentage of swelling at equilibrium and the swelling rate coefficient decreased in the following order: DMSO > water > acetone cyclohexanone approx. CHCl/sub 3/ > toluene approx. CCl/sub 4/. Dimethyl sulfoxide showed the highest percentage of swelling at equilibrium that is 765%. Diffusions of the solvents onto the polymers were found to be of a Fickian only for DMSO. (author)

  4. Organic solvents improve hydrocarbon desorption and biodegradation in highly contaminated weathered soils

    Garcia-Rivero, M. [Tecnologico de Estudios Superiores de Ecatepec, Mexico City (Mexico); Saucedo-Casteneda, G.; Gutierrez-Rojas, M. [Autonoma Metropolitan Univ., Mexico City (Mexico). Dept. of Biotechnology

    2007-07-15

    A toluene-based microbial slurry phase system was used to remediate hydrocarbons (HC) in highly contaminated soil samples collected from a site next to a working refinery in Mexico. Initial HC concentrations of the samples were 237.2 {+-} 16,6 g kg{sup -1} in dry soil. The microbial consortium consisted of 10 different strains in a mineral solution. Non-polar solvents used in the phase system included hexane, benzene, and toluene. Polar solvents included n-butanol, acetone, and methanol. The bioavailability of the HCs was increased using both polar and nonpolar solvents in order to promote desorption from the soil and to enhance overall HC biodegradation. HC desorption was analyzed in an abiotic system. Respiration and residual HCs were examined after a period of 30 days in order to compare the effects of the 2 solvents. The biodegradation extracts were then fractionated in a silica gel column to determine if the solvents actually enhanced the biodegradation of specific HC fractions. The study showed that induced dipole interactions forces resulted when nonpolar molecules were dissolved into a nonpolar solvent. Results for desorption and solubility varied among the 6 solvents. Higher dielectric constants resulted in higher solubility and desorption of HCs for nonpolar solvents, while the opposite effect was observed for polar solvents. It was concluded that toluene produced better biodegradation results than any of the milder solvents. 34 refs., 4 tabs., 1 fig.

  5. Polar organic marker compounds in atmospheric aerosols during the LBA-SMOCC 2002 biomass burning experiment in Rondônia, Brazil: sources and source processes, time series, diel variations and size distributions

    M. Claeys

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of polar organic marker compounds were performed on aerosols that were collected at a pasture site in the Amazon basin (Rondônia, Brazil using a high-volume dichotomous sampler (HVDS and a Micro-Orifice Uniform Deposit Impactor (MOUDI within the framework of the 2002 LBA-SMOCC (Large-Scale Biosphere Atmosphere Experiment in Amazônia – Smoke Aerosols, Clouds, Rainfall, and Climate: Aerosols From Biomass Burning Perturb Global and Regional Climate campaign. The campaign spanned the late dry season (biomass burning, a transition period, and the onset of the wet season (clean conditions. In the present study a more detailed discussion is presented compared to previous reports on the behavior of selected polar marker compounds, including levoglucosan, malic acid, isoprene secondary organic aerosol (SOA tracers and tracers for fungal spores. The tracer data are discussed taking into account new insights that recently became available into their stability and/or aerosol formation processes. During all three periods, levoglucosan was the most dominant identified organic species in the PM2.5 size fraction of the HVDS samples. In the dry period levoglucosan reached concentrations of up to 7.5 μg m−3 and exhibited diel variations with a nighttime prevalence. It was closely associated with the PM mass in the size-segregated samples and was mainly present in the fine mode, except during the wet period where it peaked in the coarse mode. Isoprene SOA tracers showed an average concentration of 250 ng m−3 during the dry period versus 157 ng m−3 during the transition period and 52 ng m−3 during the wet period. Malic acid and the 2-methyltetrols exhibited a different size distribution pattern, which is consistent with different aerosol formation processes (i.e., gas-to-particle partitioning in the case of malic acid and heterogeneous formation from gas-phase precursors in the case of

  6. Solvent jet desorption capillary photoionization-mass spectrometry.

    Haapala, Markus; Teppo, Jaakko; Ollikainen, Elisa; Kiiski, Iiro; Vaikkinen, Anu; Kauppila, Tiina J; Kostiainen, Risto

    2015-03-17

    A new ambient mass spectrometry method, solvent jet desorption capillary photoionization (DCPI), is described. The method uses a solvent jet generated by a coaxial nebulizer operated at ambient conditions with nitrogen as nebulizer gas. The solvent jet is directed onto a sample surface, from which analytes are extracted into the solvent and ejected from the surface in secondary droplets formed in collisions between the jet and the sample surface. The secondary droplets are directed into the heated capillary photoionization (CPI) device, where the droplets are vaporized and the gaseous analytes are ionized by 10 eV photons generated by a vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) krypton discharge lamp. As the CPI device is directly connected to the extended capillary inlet of the MS, high ion transfer efficiency to the vacuum of MS is achieved. The solvent jet DCPI provides several advantages: high sensitivity for nonpolar and polar compounds with limit of detection down to low fmol levels, capability of analyzing small and large molecules, and good spatial resolution (250 μm). Two ionization mechanisms are involved in DCPI: atmospheric pressure photoionization, capable of ionizing polar and nonpolar compounds, and solvent assisted inlet ionization capable of ionizing larger molecules like peptides. The feasibility of DCPI was successfully tested in the analysis of polar and nonpolar compounds in sage leaves and chili pepper.

  7. Selective nonspecific solvation under dielectric saturation and fluorescence spectra of dye solutions in binary solvents.

    Bakhshiev, N G; Kiselev, M B

    1991-09-01

    The influence of selective nonspecific solvation on the fluorescence spectra of three substitutedN-methylphthalimides in a binary solvent system consisting of a nonpolar (n-heptane) and a polar (pyridine) component has been studied under conditions close to dielectric saturation. The substantially nonlinearity of the effect is confirmation that the spectral shifts of fluorescence bands depend on the number of polar solvent molecules involved in solvating the dye molecule. The measured fluorescence spectral shifts determined by substituting one nonpolar solvent molecula with a polar one in the proximity of the dye molecule agree quantitatively with the forecasts of the previously proposed semiempirical theory which describes this nonlinear solvation phenomenon.

  8. Solvent - solute interaction

    Urbanczyk, A.; Kalinowski, M.K.

    1983-01-01

    The electronic absorption spectrum of vanadyl acetylacetonate has been studied in 15 organic solvents. It has been found that wavenumbers and molar absorptivities of the long-wavelength bands (d-d transitions) can be well described by a complementary Lewis acid-base model including Gutmann's donor number [Gutmann V., Wychera E., Inorg. Nucl. Chem. Letters 2, 257 (1966)] and acceptor number [Mayer U., Gutmann V., Gerger W., Monatsh. Chem. 106, 1235 (1975)] of a solvent. This model describes also the solvent effect of the hyperfine splitting constant, Asub(iso)( 51 V), from e.s.r. spectra of VOacac 2 . These observations are discussed in terms of the donor-acceptor concept for solvent-solute interactions. (Author)

  9. Radiation destruction of vitamin A in lipid solvents

    Snauwaert, F.; Maes, E.; Tobback, P.; Bhushan, B.

    1978-01-01

    The radiation response of vitamin A alcohol and its acetate derivative was compared in different lipid solvents. In all the solvents vitamin A alcohol exhibited a much higher radiation sensitivity than its ester counterpart. The nature of the solvent and the initial concentration was found to have a great influence on the extent of radiation degradation of vitamin A alcohol. In contrast to a high radiolability in non-polar solvents, vitamin A alcohol exhibited a remarkable stability in isopropanol. In addition, in isopropanol the G(-) relationship with radiation dose showed a reverse trend to that observed for other solvents. A thin-layer chromatographic procedure was developed for separation of the radiation degradation products. (author)

  10. Nitropyrroles, Diels-Alder reactions assisted by microwave irradiation and solvent effect. An experimental and theoretical study

    Mancini, Pedro M. E.; Kneeteman, María N.; Cainelli, Mauro; Ormachea, Carla M.; Domingo, Luis R.

    2017-11-01

    The behaviors of N-tosylnitropyrroles acting as electrophilic dienophiles in polar Diels-Alder reactions joint to different dienes of increeased nucleophilicity are analyzed. The reactions were developed under microwave irradiation using toluene or protic ionic liquids (PILs) as solvents and in free solvent conditions. In all the cases explored we observed good yields in short reaction times. For these reactions, the free solvent condition and the use of protic ionic liquids as solvents offer similar results. However, the free solvent conditions favor environmental sustainability. The role of PILs in these polar Diels-Alder reactions has been theoretically studied within the Molecular Electron Density Theory.

  11. Photophysical properties of coumarin-120: Unusual behavior in nonpolar solvents

    Pal, Haridas; Nad, Sanjukta; Kumbhakar, Manoj

    2003-01-01

    Photophysical properties of coumarin-120 (C120; 7-amino-4-methyl-1,2-benzopyrone) dye have been investigated in different solvents using steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence and picosecond laser flash photolysis (LFP) and nanosecond pulse radiolysis (PR) techniques. C120 shows unusual photophysical properties in nonpolar solvents compared to those in other solvents of moderate to higher polarities. Where the Stokes shifts (Δν-bar=ν-bar abs -ν-bar fl ), fluorescence quantum yields (Φ f ), and fluorescence lifetimes (τ f ) show more or less linear correlation with the solvent polarity function Δf={(ε-1)/(2ε+1)-(n 2 -1)/(2n 2 +1)}, all these parameters are unusually lower in nonpolar solvents. Unlike in other solvents, both Φ f and τ f in nonpolar solvents are also strongly temperature dependent. It is indicated that the excited singlet (S 1 ) state of C120 undergoes a fast activation-controlled nonradiative deexcitation in nonpolar solvents, which is absent in all other solvents. LFP and PR studies indicate that the intersystem crossing process is negligible for the present dye in all the solvents studied. Photophysical behavior of C120 in nonpolar solvent has been rationalized assuming that in these solvents the dye exists in a nonpolar structure, with its 7-NH 2 group in a pyramidal configuration. In this structure, since the 7-NH 2 group is bonded to the 1,2-benzopyrone moiety by a single bond, the former group can undergo a fast flip-flop motion, which in effect causes the fast nonradiative deexcitation of the dye excited state. In moderate to higher polarity solvents, it is indicated that the dye exists in an intramolecular charge-transfer structure, where the bond between 7-NH 2 group and the 1,2-benzopyrone moiety attains substantial double bond character. In this structure, the flip-flop motion of the 7-NH 2 group is highly restricted and thus there is no fast nonradiative deexcitation process for the excited dye

  12. Design of a coil satellite centrifuge and its performance on counter-current chromatographic separation of 4-methylumbelliferyl sugar derivatives with polar organic-aqueous two-phase solvent systems.

    Shinomiya, Kazufusa; Tokura, Koji; Kimura, Emiru; Takai, Midori; Harikai, Naoki; Yoshida, Kazunori; Yanagidaira, Kazuhiro; Ito, Yoichiro

    2015-05-01

    A new high-speed counter-current chromatograph, named coil satellite centrifuge (CSC), was designed and fabricated in our laboratory. The CSC apparatus produces the satellite motion such that the coiled column simultaneously rotates around the sun axis (the angular velocity, ω1), the planet axis (ω2) and the satellite axis (the central axis of the column) (ω3). In order to achieve this triplicate rotary motion without twisting of the flow tube, the rotation of each axis was determined by the following formula: ω1=ω2+ω3. This relation enabled to lay out the flow tube without twisting by the simultaneous rotation of three axes. The flow tube was introduced from the bottom side of the apparatus into the sun axis of the first rotary frame reaching the upper side of the planet axis and connected to the column in the satellite axis. The performance of the apparatus was examined on separation of 4-methylumbelliferyl (MU) sugar derivatives as test samples with organic-aqueous two-phase solvent systems composed of ethyl acetate/1-butanol/water (3:2:5, v/v) for lower phase mobile and (1:4:5, v/v) for upper phase mobile. With lower phase mobile, five 4-MU sugar derivatives including β-D-cellobioside (Cel), β-D-glucopyranoside, α-D-mannopyranoside, β-D-fucopyranoside and α-L-fucopyranoside (α-L-Fuc) were separated with the combined rotation around each axis at counterclockwise (CCW) (ω1) - CCW (ω2) - CCW (ω3) by the flow tube distribution. With upper phase mobile, three 4-MU sugar derivatives including α-L-Fuc, β-D-galactopyranoside and Cel were separated with the combined rotation around each axis at clockwise (CW) (ω1) - CW (ω2) - CW (ω3) by the flow tube distribution. A series of experiments on peak resolution and stationary phase retention revealed that better partition efficiencies were obtained at the flow rate of 0.5 mL/min (column 1) and 0.8 mL/min (column 2) for lower phase mobile and 0.2 mL/min (column 1) and 0.4 mL/min (column 2) for upper phase

  13. Purex process solvent: literature review

    Geier, R.G.

    1979-10-01

    This document summarizes the data on Purex process solvent presently published in a variety of sources. Extracts from these various sources are presented herein and contain the work done, the salient results obtained, and the original, unaltered conclusions of the author of each paper. Three major areas are addressed: solvent stability, solvent quality testing, and solvent treatment processes. 34 references, 44 tables.

  14. Purex process solvent: literature review

    Geier, R.G.

    1979-10-01

    This document summarizes the data on Purex process solvent presently published in a variety of sources. Extracts from these various sources are presented herein and contain the work done, the salient results obtained, and the original, unaltered conclusions of the author of each paper. Three major areas are addressed: solvent stability, solvent quality testing, and solvent treatment processes. 34 references, 44 tables

  15. Isolation Of Compounds Of Steroids Teripang Gamat (Stichopus variegatus With Various Types Of Solvents

    Meydia Meydia

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Sea cucumber is one of the fisheries commodity that has an important economic value. Generally istraded in dried form (beche-de-mer. One of thebioactive substances contained in sea cucumber is steroidcompounds that serves as an aphrodisiac and sex reversal. The purpose of this study was to extract thesteroid of the gamma sea cucumber by using three types of solvents (methanol, ethyl acetate and hexaneand get the best solvent in producing the highest yield of the steroids. The study revealed that steroid ofgamma sea cucumber (Stichopus variegatus dissolved completely ethyl acetate (semi-polar solvent duringthe first phase, second phase and the third phase of extraction. In the methanol (polar solvent steroids onlydissolved in the first extraction phase, while using the hexane (non polar solvent steroid was undetectable.Fractionation by thin layer chromatography was obtained two fractions that identified as cholesterol (Rf =0.96 and testosterone (Rf = 0.91.

  16. Bioelectric modulation of macrophage polarization

    Li, Chunmei; Levin, Michael; Kaplan, David L.

    2016-02-01

    Macrophages play a critical role in regulating wound healing and tissue regeneration by changing their polarization state in response to local microenvironmental stimuli. The native roles of polarized macrophages encompass biomaterials and tissue remodeling needs, yet harnessing or directing the polarization response has been largely absent as a potential strategy to exploit in regenerative medicine to date. Recent data have revealed that specific alteration of cells’ resting potential (Vmem) is a powerful tool to direct proliferation and differentiation in a number of complex tissues, such as limb regeneration, craniofacial patterning and tumorigenesis. In this study, we explored the bioelectric modulation of macrophage polarization by targeting ATP sensitive potassium channels (KATP). Glibenclamide (KATP blocker) and pinacidil (KATP opener) treatment not only affect macrophage polarization, but also influence the phenotype of prepolarized macrophages. Furthermore, modulation of cell membrane electrical properties can fine-tune macrophage plasticity. Glibenclamide decreased the secretion and gene expression of selected M1 markers, while pinacidil augmented M1 markers. More interestingly, glibencalmide promoted macrophage alternative activation by enhancing certain M2 markers during M2 polarization. These findings suggest that control of bioelectric properties of macrophages could offer a promising approach to regulate macrophage phenotype as a useful tool in regenerative medicine.

  17. Separation by solvent extraction

    Holt, C.H. Jr.

    1976-01-01

    In a process for separating fission product values from U and Pu values contained in an aqueous solution, an oxidizing agent is added to the solution to secure U and Pu in their hexavalent state. The aqueous solution is contacted with a substantially water-immiscible organic solvent with agitation while the temperature is maintained at from -1 to -2 0 C until the major part of the water present is frozen. The solid ice phase is continuously separated as it is formed and a remaining aqueous liquid phase containing fission product values and a solvent phase containing Pu and U values are separated from each other. The last obtained part of the ice phase is melted and added to the separated liquid phase. The resulting liquid is treated with a new supply of solvent whereby it is practically depleted of U and Pu

  18. Polarization developments

    Prescott, C.Y.

    1993-07-01

    Recent developments in laser-driven photoemission sources of polarized electrons have made prospects for highly polarized electron beams in a future linear collider very promising. This talk discusses the experiences with the SLC polarized electron source, the recent progress with research into gallium arsenide and strained gallium arsenide as a photocathode material, and the suitability of these cathode materials for a future linear collider based on the parameters of the several linear collider designs that exist

  19. Solvent Extraction and Characterization of Neutral Lipids in Oocystis sp

    Anthony, Renil [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Ohio University, Athens, OH (United States); Stuart, Ben, E-mail: stuart@ohio.edu [Department of Civil Engineering, Ohio University, Athens, OH (United States)

    2015-01-20

    Microalgae are a favorable feedstock for bioproducts and biofuels due to their high oil content, fast growth rates, and low resource demands. Solvent lipid extraction efficiency from microalgae is dependent on algal strain and the extraction solvent. Four non-polar extraction solvents were evaluated for the recovery of neutral cellular lipids from microalgae Oocystis sp. (University of Texas at Austin LB2396). Methylene chloride, hexane, diethyl ether, and cyclohexane were selected as the extraction solvents. The lipid extracts were derivatized and analyzed using gas chromatography–mass spectroscopy. All solvent extracts contained hexadecanoic acid, linoleic acid, and linolenic acid; accounting for 70% of total lipid content with a proportional wt% composition of the three fatty acids, except for the hexane extracts that showed only hexadecanoic acid and linoleic acid. While not statistically differentiated, methylene chloride proved to be the most effective solvent for Oocystis sp. among the four solvents tested with a total average neutral lipid recovery of 0.25% of dry weight followed by diethyl ether (0.18%), cyclohexane (0.14%), and hexane (0.11%). This research presents a simple methodology to optimize the selection of lipid specific extraction solvents for the microalgal strain selected.

  20. Solvent Extraction and Characterization of Neutral Lipids in Oocystis sp.

    Renil eAnthony

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Microalgae are a favorable feedstock for bioproducts and biofuels due to their high oil content, fast growth rates and low resource demands. Solvent lipid extraction efficiency from microalgae is dependent on algal strain and the extraction solvent. Four non-polar extraction solvents were evaluated for the recovery of neutral cellular lipids from microalgae Oocystis sp. (UTEX LB2396. Methylene chloride, hexane, diethyl ether, and cyclohexane were selected as the extraction solvents. All solvent extracts contained hexadecanoic acid, linoleic acid and linolenic acid; accounting for 70% of total lipid content with a proportional wt% composition of the three fatty acids, except for the hexane extracts that showed only hexadecanoic acid and linoleic acid. While not statistically differentiated, methylene chloride proved to be the most effective solvent for Oocystis sp. among the four solvents tested with a total average neutral lipid recovery of 0.25% of dry weight followed by diethyl ether (0.18%, cyclohexane (0.14% and hexane (0.11%. This research presents a simple methodology to optimize the selection of lipid specific extraction solvents for the microalgal strain selected.

  1. Solvent Extraction and Characterization of Neutral Lipids in Oocystis sp

    Anthony, Renil; Stuart, Ben

    2015-01-01

    Microalgae are a favorable feedstock for bioproducts and biofuels due to their high oil content, fast growth rates, and low resource demands. Solvent lipid extraction efficiency from microalgae is dependent on algal strain and the extraction solvent. Four non-polar extraction solvents were evaluated for the recovery of neutral cellular lipids from microalgae Oocystis sp. (University of Texas at Austin LB2396). Methylene chloride, hexane, diethyl ether, and cyclohexane were selected as the extraction solvents. The lipid extracts were derivatized and analyzed using gas chromatography–mass spectroscopy. All solvent extracts contained hexadecanoic acid, linoleic acid, and linolenic acid; accounting for 70% of total lipid content with a proportional wt% composition of the three fatty acids, except for the hexane extracts that showed only hexadecanoic acid and linoleic acid. While not statistically differentiated, methylene chloride proved to be the most effective solvent for Oocystis sp. among the four solvents tested with a total average neutral lipid recovery of 0.25% of dry weight followed by diethyl ether (0.18%), cyclohexane (0.14%), and hexane (0.11%). This research presents a simple methodology to optimize the selection of lipid specific extraction solvents for the microalgal strain selected.

  2. Self-Assembly of Block and Graft Copolymers in Organic Solvents: An Overview of Recent Advances

    Leonard Ionut Atanase

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This review is an attempt to update the recent advances in the self-assembly of amphiphilic block and graft copolymers. Their micellization behavior is highlighted for linear AB, ABC triblock terpolymers, and graft structures in non-aqueous selective polar and non-polar solvents, including solvent mixtures and ionic liquids. The micellar characteristics, such as particle size, aggregation number, and morphology, are examined as a function of the copolymers’ architecture and molecular characteristics.

  3. Diluent effects in solvent extraction. The Effects of Diluents in Solvent Extraction - a literature study

    Loefstroem-Engdahl, Elin; Aneheim, Emma; Ekberg, Christian; Foreman, Mark; Skarnemark, Gunnar

    2010-01-01

    The fact that the choice of organic diluent is important for a solvent extraction process goes without saying. Several factors, such as e.g. price, flash point, viscosity, polarity etc. each have their place in the planning of a solvent extraction system. This high number of variables makes the lack of compilations concerning diluent effects to an interesting topic. Often the interest for the research concerning a specific extraction system focuses on the extractant used and the complexes built up during an extraction. The diluents used are often classical ones, even if it has been shown that choice of diluent can affect extraction as well as separation in an extraction system. An attempt to point out important steps in the understanding of diluent effects in solvent extraction is here presented. This large field is, of course, not summarized in this article, but an attempt is made to present important steps in the understanding of diluents effects in solvent extraction. Trying to make the information concerning diluent effects and applications more easily accessible this review offers a selected summarizing of literature concerning diluents effects in solvent extraction. (authors)

  4. Investigation of the Use of a Bio-Derived Solvent for Non-Solvent-Induced Phase Separation (NIPS Fabrication of Polysulfone Membranes

    Xiaobo Dong

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Organic solvents, such as N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP and dimethylacetamide (DMAc, have been traditionally used to fabricate polymeric membranes. These solvents may have a negative impact on the environment and human health; therefore, using renewable solvents derived from biomass is of great interest to make membrane fabrication sustainable. Methyl-5-(dimethylamino-2-methyl-5-oxopentanoate (Rhodiasolv PolarClean is a bio-derived, biodegradable, nonflammable and nonvolatile solvent. Polysulfone is a commonly used polymer to fabricate membranes due to its thermal stability, strong mechanical strength and good chemical resistance. From cloud point curves, PolarClean showed potential to be a solvent for polysulfone. Membranes prepared with PolarClean were investigated in terms of their morphology, porosity, water permeability and protein rejection, and were compared to membranes prepared with traditional solvents. The pores of polysulfone/PolarClean membranes were sponge-like, and the membranes displayed higher water flux values (176.0 ± 8.8 LMH along with slightly higher solute rejection (99.0 ± 0.51%. On the other hand, PSf/DMAc membrane pores were finger-like with lower water flux (63.1 ± 12.4 LMH and slightly lower solute rejection (96 ± 2.00% when compared to PSf/PolarClean membranes.

  5. Studies on sludge from waxy crude oil storage tank. II. Solvent fractionation

    Fazal, S.A.; Zarapkar, S.S.; Joshi, G.C. [D.G. Ruparel College, Bombay (India). Dept. of Chemistry

    1995-12-31

    The sludge formed from crude oil (Bombay Hindu Crude oil) dump storage has been analysed by solvent extraction with a series of solvents of increasing polarity. The extract fractions so obtained have been analysed extensively. The nature of the sludge is compared with the similar sludges reported by other workers. 9 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Organic solvent topical report

    COWLEY, W.L.

    1999-05-13

    This report provides the basis for closing the organic solvent safety issue. Sufficient information is presented to conclude that risk posed by an organic solvent fire is within risk evaluation guidelines. This report updates information contained in Analysis of Consequences of Postulated Solvent Fires in Hanford Site Waste Tanks. WHC-SD-WM-CN-032. Rev. 0A (Cowley et al. 1996). However, this document will not replace Cowley et al (1996) as the primary reference for the Basis for Interim Operation (BIO) until the recently submitted BIO amendment (Hanson 1999) is approved by the US Department of Energy. This conclusion depends on the use of controls for preventing vehicle fuel fires and for limiting the use of flame cutting in areas where hot metal can fall on the waste surface.The required controls are given in the Tank Waste Remediation System Technical Safety Requirements (Noorani 1997b). This is a significant change from the conclusions presented in Revision 0 of this report. Revision 0 of this calcnote concluded that some organic solvent fire scenarios exceeded risk evaluation guidelines, even with controls imposed.

  7. Organic solvent topical report

    Cowley, W.L.

    1998-04-30

    This report is the technical basis for the accident and consequence analyses used in the Hanford Tank Farms Basis for Interim Operation. The report also contains the scientific and engineering information and reference material needed to understand the organic solvent safety issue. This report includes comments received from the Chemical Reactions Subcommittee of the Tank Advisory Panel.

  8. Organic solvent topical report

    COWLEY, W.L.

    1999-01-01

    This report provides the basis for closing the organic solvent safety issue. Sufficient information is presented to conclude that risk posed by an organic solvent fire is within risk evaluation guidelines. This report updates information contained in Analysis of Consequences of Postulated Solvent Fires in Hanford Site Waste Tanks. WHC-SD-WM-CN-032. Rev. 0A (Cowley et al. 1996). However, this document will not replace Cowley et al (1996) as the primary reference for the Basis for Interim Operation (BIO) until the recently submitted BIO amendment (Hanson 1999) is approved by the US Department of Energy. This conclusion depends on the use of controls for preventing vehicle fuel fires and for limiting the use of flame cutting in areas where hot metal can fall on the waste surface.The required controls are given in the Tank Waste Remediation System Technical Safety Requirements (Noorani 1997b). This is a significant change from the conclusions presented in Revision 0 of this report. Revision 0 of this calcnote concluded that some organic solvent fire scenarios exceeded risk evaluation guidelines, even with controls imposed

  9. Organic solvent topical report

    Cowley, W.L.

    1998-01-01

    This report is the technical basis for the accident and consequence analyses used in the Hanford Tank Farms Basis for Interim Operation. The report also contains the scientific and engineering information and reference material needed to understand the organic solvent safety issue. This report includes comments received from the Chemical Reactions Subcommittee of the Tank Advisory Panel

  10. DESIGNING GREENER SOLVENTS

    Computer-aided design of chemicals and chemical mixtures provides a powerful tool to help engineers identify cleaner process designs and more-benign alternatives to toxic industrial solvents. Three software programs are discussed: (1) PARIS II (Program for Assisting the Replaceme...

  11. Neutron polarization

    Firk, F.W.K.

    1976-01-01

    Some recent experiments involving polarized neutrons are discussed; they demonstrate how polarization studies provide information on fundamental aspects of nuclear structure that cannot be obtained from more traditional neutron studies. Until recently, neutron polarization studies tended to be limited either to very low energies or to restricted regions at higher energies, determined by the kinematics of favorable (p, vector n) and (d, vector n) reactions. With the advent of high intensity pulsed electron and proton accelerators and of beams of vector polarized deuterons, this is no longer the case. One has entered an era in which neutron polarization experiments are now being carried out, in a routine way, throughout the entire range from thermal energies to tens-of-MeV. The significance of neutron polarization studies is illustrated in discussions of a wide variety of experiments that include the measurement of T-invariance in the β-decay of polarized neutrons, a search for the effects of meson exchange currents in the photo-disintegration of the deuteron, the determination of quantum numbers of states in the fission of aligned 235 U and 237 Np induced by polarized neutrons, and the double- and triple-scattering of fast neutrons by light nuclei

  12. Polarization holography

    Nikolova, L.; Ramanujam, P.S.

    Current research into holography is concerned with applications in optically storing, retrieving, and processing information. Polarization holography has many unique properties compared to conventional holography. It gives results in high efficiency, achromaticity, and special polarization...... properties. This books reviews the research carried out in this field over the last 15 years. The authors provide basic concepts in polarization and the propagation of light through anisotropic materials, before presenting a sound theoretical basis for polarization holography. The fabrication...... and characterization of azobenzene based materials, which remain the most efficient for the purpose, is described in detail. This is followed by a description of other materials that are used in polarization holography. An in-depth description of various applications, including display holography and optical storage...

  13. Solvents effects on crystallinity and dissolution of β-artemether.

    Xu, Jianghui; Singh, Vikramjeet; Yin, Xianzhen; Singh, Parbeen; Wu, Li; Xu, Xiaonan; Guo, Tao; Sun, Lixin; Gui, Shuangying; Zhang, Jiwen

    2017-03-01

    β-artemether (ARM) is a widely used anti-malarial drug isolated from the Chinese antimalarial plant, Artemisia annua. The solvent effects on crystal habits and dissolution of ARM were thoroughly investigated and discussed herein. The ARM was recrystallized in nine different solvents of varied polarity, namely, methanol, ethanol, isopropanol, tetrahydrofuran, dichloromethane, trichloromethane, ethyl acetate, acetone and hexane by solvent evaporation method. The obtained crystals were morphologically characterized using scanning electron microscope (SEM). The average sizes of crystals were 1.80-2.64 μm calculated from microscopic images using Image-Pro software. No significant change in chemical structure was noticed after recrystallization and the specific band at 875 cm -1 wavenumber (C-O-O-C) confirmed the presence of most sensitive functional group in the ARM chemical structure. The existence and production of two polymorphic forms, polymorph A and polymorph B, was confirmed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD). The data suggested that the fabrication of polymorph B can be simply obtained from the recrystallization of ARM in a specific solvent. Significant effects of solvent polarity, crystals shapes and sizes on drug dissolution were noticed during in vitro dissolution test. The release kinetics were calculated and well fitted by the Higuchi and Hixon-Crowell models. The ARM-methanol and ARM-hexane showed highest and slowest dissolution, respectively, due to the effects of solvent polarity and crystal morphologies. Overall, proper selection of the solvents for the final crystallization of ARM helps to optimize dissolution and bioavailability for a better delivery of anti-malarial drug.

  14. Kinetic isotope effects and tunnelling in the proton-transfer reaction between 4-nitrophenylnitromethane and tetramethylguanidine in various aprotic solvents

    Caldin, E.F.; Mateo, S.

    1975-01-01

    Rates and equilibrium constants have been determined for the proton-transfer reaction of 4-nitrophenylnitromethane, NO 2 C 6 H 4 CH 2 NO 2 , and its αα-deuterated analogue NO 2 C 6 H 4 CD 2 NO 2 , with the strong base tetramethylguanidine [HN=C(NMe 2 ) 2 ), at temperatures between -60 0 C and +65 0 in a range of aprotic solvents. Spectrophotometry and the stopped-flow technique were used. The reaction is a simple proton-transfer process leading to an ion-pair. The kinetic isotope effects are correlated with the polarity of the solvents, as measured by the dielectric constant or by the empirical parameter Esub(T). In the less polar solvents they are exceptionally large. In toluene, for example, at 25 0 C the rate ratio ksup(H)/ksup(D) = 45 +- 2, the activation energy difference Esub(a)sup(D) - Esub(a)sup(H) =4.3 +- 0.3 kcal molsup(-1) (16 kJ molsup(-1), and the ratio of the pre-exponential factors logsub(10) (Asup(D)/Asup(H)) = 1.5 +- 0.2+ and even larger values of logsub(10)(Asup(D)/Asup(H)) are found for mesitylene (1.94 +- 0.06) and cyclohexane (2.4 +- 0.2). Positive deviations from linear Arrhenius plots are found for these solvents. Tunnelling is the only interpretation that cannot account for these results. For the more polar solvents (dielectric constant 7 to 37), the isotope effects are closer to the range predicted by semi-classical theory. The isotope effects in all solvents have been fitted to Bell's equation for a parabolic barrier, and the barrier dimensions calculated for each solvent. The suggested interpretation of the results is that the solvent-solute interactions affect the height of the barrier and that motions of solvent molecules are coupled with the motion of the proton in the more polar solvents but not in the less polar ones; reorganization of solvent molecules accompanies the proton-transfer in the more polar solvents, but only electron-polarization in the less polar. Tunnelling has large effects in the less polar solvents, where the

  15. Synthesis of SERS active Au nanowires in different noncoordinating solvents

    Hou Xiaomiao; Zhang Xiaoling, E-mail: zhangxl@bit.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Cluster Science of Ministry of Education, Beijing Institute of Technology, Department of Chemistry, School of Science (China); Fang Yan, E-mail: fangyan@mail.cnu.edu.cn [Beijing Key Laboratory for Nano-Photonics and Nano-Structure (NPNS), Capital Normal University (China); Chen Shutang; Li Na; Zhou Qi [Key Laboratory of Cluster Science of Ministry of Education, Beijing Institute of Technology, Department of Chemistry, School of Science (China)

    2011-06-15

    Au nanowires with length up to micrometers were synthesized through a simple and one-pot solution growth method. HAuCl{sub 4} was reduced in a micellar structure formed by 1-octadecylamine and oleic acid in hexane, heptane, toluene and chloroform, respectively. As the non-polarity of noncoordinating solvents can affect the nucleation and growth rates of Au nanostructures, Au nanowires with different diameters could be obtained by changing the noncoordinating solvents in the synthetic process. The influences of the solvents on the morphology of Au nanowires were systematically studied. When using hexane as reaction solvent, the product turned to be high portion of Au nanowires with more uniform size than the others. Furthermore, surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectrum of 2-thionaphthol was obtained on the Au nanowire-modified substrate, indicating that the as-synthesized Au nanowires have potential for highly sensitive optical detection application.

  16. Tumors markers

    Yamaguchi-Mizumoto, N.H.

    1989-01-01

    In order to study blood and cell components alterations (named tumor markers) that may indicate the presence of a tumor, several methods are presented. Aspects as diagnostic, prognostic, therapeutic value and clinical evaluation are discussed. (M.A.C.)

  17. Solvent selection methodology for pharmaceutical processes: Solvent swap

    Papadakis, Emmanouil; Kumar Tula, Anjan; Gani, Rafiqul

    2016-01-01

    A method for the selection of appropriate solvents for the solvent swap task in pharmaceutical processes has been developed. This solvent swap method is based on the solvent selection method of Gani et al. (2006) and considers additional selection criteria such as boiling point difference...... in pharmaceutical processes as well as new solvent swap alternatives. The method takes into account process considerations such as batch distillation and crystallization to achieve the swap task. Rigorous model based simulations of the swap operation are performed to evaluate and compare the performance...

  18. Improvements in solvent extraction columns

    Aughwane, K.R.

    1987-01-01

    Solvent extraction columns are used in the reprocessing of irradiated nuclear fuel. For an effective reprocessing operation a solvent extraction column is required which is capable of distributing the feed over most of the column. The patent describes improvements in solvent extractions columns which allows the feed to be distributed over an increased length of column than was previously possible. (U.K.)

  19. Solvent extraction columns

    Middleton, P.; Smith, J.R.

    1979-01-01

    In pulsed columns for use in solvent extraction processes, e.g. the reprocessing of nuclear fuel, the horizontal perforated plates inside the column are separated by interplate spacers manufactured from metallic neutron absorbing material. The spacer may be in the form of a spiral or concentric circles separated by radial limbs, or may be of egg-box construction. Suitable neutron absorbing materials include stainless steel containing boron or gadolinium, hafnium metal or alloys of hafnium. (UK)

  20. Ionic polarization

    Mahan, G.D.

    1992-01-01

    Ferroelectricity occurs in many different kinds of materials. Many of the technologically important solids, which are ferroelectric, can be classified as ionic. Any microscopic theory of ferroelectricity must contain a description of local polarization forces. We have collaborated in the development of a theory of ionic polarization which is quite successful. Its basic assumption is that the polarization is derived from the properties of the individual ions. We have applied this theory successfully to diverse subjects as linear and nonlinear optical response, phonon dispersion, and piezoelectricity. We have developed numerical methods using the local Density approximation to calculate the multipole polarizabilities of ions when subject to various fields. We have also developed methods of calculating the nonlinear hyperpolarizability, and showed that it can be used to explain light scattering experiments. This paper elaborates on this polarization theory

  1. Hazardous solvent substitution

    Twitchell, K.E.

    1995-01-01

    Eliminating hazardous solvents is good for the environment, worker safety, and the bottom line. However, even though we are motivated to find replacements, the big question is 'What can we use as replacements for hazardous solvents?'You, too, can find replacements for your hazardous solvents. All you have to do is search for them. Search through the vendor literature of hundreds of companies with thousands of products. Ponder the associated material safety data sheets, assuming of course that you can obtain them and, having obtained them, that you can read them. You will want to search the trade magazines and other sources for product reviews. You will want to talk to users about how well the product actually works. You may also want to check US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and other government reports for toxicity and other safety information. And, of course, you will want to compare the product's constituent chemicals with the many hazardous constituency lists to ensure the safe and legal use of the product in your workplace

  2. Generating highly polarized nuclear spins in solution using dynamic nuclear polarization

    Wolber, J.; Ellner, F.; Fridlund, B.

    2004-01-01

    A method to generate strongly polarized nuclear spins in solution has been developed, using Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) at a temperature of 1.2K, and at a field of 3.354T, corresponding to an electron spin resonance frequency of 94GHz. Trityl radicals are used to directly polarize 13C...... and other low-γ nuclei. Subsequent to the DNP process, the solid sample is dissolved rapidly with a warm solvent to create a solution of molecules with highly polarized nuclear spins. Two main applications are proposed: high-resolution liquid state NMR with enhanced sensitivity, and the use...

  3. Polarization experiments

    Halzen, F.

    1977-02-01

    In a theoretical review of polarization experiments two important points are emphasized: (a) their versatility and their relevance to a large variety of aspects of hadron physics (tests of basic symmetries; a probe of strong interaction dynamics; a tool for hadron spectroscopy); (b) the wealth of experimental data on polarization parameters in pp and np scattering in the Regge language and in the diffraction language. (author)

  4. Tolerance of anaerobic bacteria to chlorinated solvents.

    Koenig, Joanna C; Groissmeier, Kathrin D; Manefield, Mike J

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this research was to evaluate the effects of four chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs), perchloroethene (PCE), carbon tetrachloride (CT), chloroform (CF) and 1,2-dichloroethane (1,2-DCA), on the growth of eight anaerobic bacteria: four fermentative species (Escherichia coli, Klebsiella sp., Clostridium sp. and Paenibacillus sp.) and four respiring species (Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Geobacter sulfurreducens, Shewanella oneidensis and Desulfovibrio vulgaris). Effective concentrations of solvents which inhibited growth rates by 50% (EC50) were determined. The octanol-water partition coefficient or log Po/w of a CAH proved a generally satisfactory measure of its toxicity. Most species tolerated approximately 3-fold and 10-fold higher concentrations of the two relatively more polar CAHs CF and 1,2-DCA, respectively, than the two relatively less polar compounds PCE and CT. EC50 values correlated well with growth rates observed in solvent-free cultures, with fast-growing organisms displaying higher tolerance levels. Overall, fermentative bacteria were more tolerant to CAHs than respiring species, with iron- and sulfate-reducing bacteria in particular appearing highly sensitive to CAHs. These data extend the current understanding of the impact of CAHs on a range of anaerobic bacteria, which will benefit the field of bioremediation.

  5. Sorption mechanism of solvent vapors to coals; Sekitan eno yobai joki no shuchaku kiko no kaiseki

    Shimizu, K.; Takanohashi, T.; Iino, M. [Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan). Institute for Chemical Reaction Science

    1996-10-28

    With an objective to clarify the interactions between micropore structure of coal and solvent reagents, a sorption experiment was carried out under solvent saturated vapor pressure. Low-volatile bituminous coal, Pocahontas No. 3 coal, has the aromatic ring structure developed, and makes solvent more difficult to diffuse into coal, hence sorption amount is small. Methanol has permeated since its polarity is high. High-volatile bituminous coal, Illinois No. 6 coal, makes solvent penetrate easily, and the sorption amount was large with both of aromatic and polar solvents. Since brown coal, Beulah Zap coal, contains a large amount of oxygen, and hydrogen bonding is predominant, sorption amount of cyclohexane and benzene having no polarity is small. Methanol diffuses while releasing hydrogen bond due to its polarity, and its sorption amount is large. A double sorption model is available, which expresses the whole sorption amount as a sum of physical sorption amount and amount of permeation into coal. This model was applied when it explained successfully the sorption behavior of the solvents relative to coals, excepting some of the systems. However, also observed were such abnormal behavior as sorption impediment due to interactions between coal surface and solvents, and permeation impediment due to hydroxyl groups inside the coals. 1 ref., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Polarization measurement for internal polarized gaseous targets

    Ye Zhenyu; Ye Yunxiu; Lv Haijiang; Mao Yajun

    2004-01-01

    The authors present an introduction to internal polarized gaseous targets, polarization method, polarization measurement method and procedure. To get the total nuclear polarization of hydrogen atoms (including the polarization of the recombined hydrogen molecules) in the target cell, authors have measured the parameters relating to atomic polarization and polarized hydrogen atoms and molecules. The total polarization of the target during our measurement is P T =0.853 ± 0.036. (authors)

  7. SOLVENT FIRE BY-PRODUCTS

    Walker, D; Samuel Fink, S

    2006-05-22

    Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) conducted a burn test of the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) solvent to determine the combustion products. The testing showed hydrogen fluoride gas is not a combustion product from a solvent fire when up to 70% of the solvent is consumed. The absence of HF in the combustion gases may reflect concentration of the modifier containing the fluoride groups in the unburned portion. SwRI reported results for other gases (CO, HCN, NOx, formaldehyde, and hydrocarbons). The results, with other supporting information, can be used for evaluating the consequences of a facility fire involving the CSSX solvent inventory.

  8. The influence of molecular architecture and solvent type on the size and structure of poly(benzyl ether) dendrimers by SANS

    Evmenenko, G.; Bauer, B.J.; Kleppinger, R.; Forier, B.; Dehaen, W.; Amis, E.J.; Mischenko, N.; Reynaers, H.

    2001-01-01

    The size of poly(benzyl ether) dendrimers with different molecular architectures was measured by small angle neutron scattering (SANS). Both polar and non-polar solvents were used to measure the effect of solvent type. The radius of gyration (Rg) of all of the dendrimers follows a scaling law of Rg

  9. High temperature solvent extraction of oil shale and bituminous coal using binary solvent mixtures

    Goetz, G.K.E. [Lehrstuhl fuer Geologie, Geochemie und Lagerstaetten des Erdoels und der Kohle, RWTH Aachen (Germany)

    1997-12-31

    A high volatile bituminous coal from the Saar Basin and an oil shale from the Messel deposit, both Germany, were extracted with binary solvent mixtures using the Advanced Solvent Extraction method (ASE). Extraction temperature and pressure were kept at 100 C, respectively 150 C, and 20,7 MPa. After the heating phase (5 min) static extractions were performed with mixtures (v:v, 1:3) of methanol with toluene, respectively trichloromethane, for further 5 min. Extract yields were the same or on a higher level compared to those from classical soxhlet extractions (3 days) using the same solvents at 60 C. Comparing the results from ASE with those from supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) the extract yields were similar. Increasing the temperature in ASE releases more soluble organic matter from geological samples, because compounds with higher molecular weight and especially more polar substances were solubilized. But also an enhanced extraction efficiency resulted for aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons which are used as biomarkers in Organic Geochemistry. Application of thermochemolysis with tetraethylammonium hydroxide (TEAH) using pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (Py-GC-MS) on the extraction residues shows clearly that at higher extraction temperatures minor amounts of free fatty acids or their methyl esters (original or produced by ASE) were trapped inside the pore systems of the oil shale or the bituminous coal. ASE offers a rapid and very efficient extraction method for geological samples reducing analysis time and costs for solvents. (orig.)

  10. Heavy atoms as molecular probes in studying the solvent dependence of the dynamics of triplet exciplexes

    Steiner, U.; Winter, G.

    1981-01-01

    Electron transfer reactions between thiopyronine triplet (acceptor 3 A + ) and the electron donors (D), aniline, p-Br-aniline and p-I-aniline, are investigated by flash spectroscopy in solvents of different viscosity and polarity. Due to the heavy-atom effect the radical yield becomes very sensitive to the solvent influence, which can be explained by the dynamic properties of a triplet exciplex ( 3 (AD + )) formed as a primary product in the reaction between acceptor triplet and donor. Whereas on variation of solvent viscosity the solvent cage effect on the dissociation of 3 (AD + ) is observed, a change in solvent polarity is suggested to affect the radiationless deactivation of 3 (AD + ) to the ground state of the components. (author)

  11. Optimization of soy isoflavone extraction with different solvents using the simplex-centroid mixture design.

    Yoshiara, Luciane Yuri; Madeira, Tiago Bervelieri; Delaroza, Fernanda; da Silva, Josemeyre Bonifácio; Ida, Elza Iouko

    2012-12-01

    The objective of this study was to optimize the extraction of different isoflavone forms (glycosidic, malonyl-glycosidic, aglycone and total) from defatted cotyledon soy flour using the simplex-centroid experimental design with four solvents of varying polarity (water, acetone, ethanol and acetonitrile). The obtained extracts were then analysed by high-performance liquid chromatography. The profile of the different soy isoflavones forms varied with different extractions solvents. Varying the solvent or mixture used, the extraction of different isoflavones was optimized using the centroid-simplex mixture design. The special cubic model best fitted to the four solvents and its combination for soy isoflavones extraction. For glycosidic isoflavones extraction, the polar ternary mixture (water, acetone and acetonitrile) achieved the best extraction; malonyl-glycosidic forms were better extracted with mixtures of water, acetone and ethanol. Aglycone isoflavones, water and acetone mixture were best extracted and total isoflavones, the best solvents were ternary mixture of water, acetone and ethanol.

  12. Epoxidation of polybutadiene rubber in non polar solvent

    Schneider, Luciane K. de A.; Jacobi, Marly A.M.

    2005-01-01

    The epoxidation of polybutadiene rubber in cyclohexane, at 50 deg C, by the method of performic acid generated in situ, at different reagent concentration was investigated. The epoxy degree was determined by 1 H-RMN, and because of the gelation and coagulation of modified rubber during the reaction, only a maximum of 30 mol % of epoxy degree could be achieved. The reaction followed a first order kinetic in relation to hydrogen peroxide and acid concentration showing a rate constant of 4,0 (± 0,5) x 10 -5 L.mol-1.seg -1 . (author)

  13. A Correlation between the Activity of Candida antarctica Lipase B and Differences in Binding Free Energies of Organic Solvent and Substrate

    Banik, Sindrila Dutta; Nordblad, Mathias; Woodley, John

    2016-01-01

    in an inhibitory effect which is also confirmed by the binding free energies for the solvent and substrate molecules estimated from the simulations. Consequently, the catalytic activity of CALB decreases in polar solvents. This effect is significant, and CALB is over 10 orders of magnitude more active in nonpolar...... of the enzyme may be ascribed to binding of solvent molecules to the enzyme active site region and the solvation energy of substrate molecules in the different solvents. Polar solvent molecules interact strongly with CALB and compete with the substrate to bind to the active site region, resulting...

  14. Vegetable Oils as Alternative Solvents for Green Oleo-Extraction, Purification and Formulation of Food and Natural Products.

    Yara-Varón, Edinson; Li, Ying; Balcells, Mercè; Canela-Garayoa, Ramon; Fabiano-Tixier, Anne-Sylvie; Chemat, Farid

    2017-09-05

    Since solvents of petroleum origin are now strictly regulated worldwide, there is a growing demand for using greener, bio-based and renewable solvents for extraction, purification and formulation of natural and food products. The ideal alternative solvents are non-volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that have high dissolving power and flash point, together with low toxicity and less environmental impact. They should be obtained from renewable resources at a reasonable price and be easy to recycle. Based on the principles of Green Chemistry and Green Engineering, vegetable oils could become an ideal alternative solvent to extract compounds for purification, enrichment, or even pollution remediation. This review presents an overview of vegetable oils as solvents enriched with various bioactive compounds from natural resources, as well as the relationship between dissolving power of non-polar and polar bioactive components with the function of fatty acids and/or lipid classes in vegetable oils, and other minor components. A focus on simulation of solvent-solute interactions and a discussion of polar paradox theory propose a mechanism explaining the phenomena of dissolving polar and non-polar bioactive components in vegetable oils as green solvents with variable polarity.

  15. Sources of polarized neutrons

    Walter, L.

    1983-01-01

    Various sources of polarized neutrons are reviewed. Monoenergetic source produced with unpolarized or polarized beams, white sources of polarized neutrons, production by transmissions through polarized hydrogen targets and polarized thermal neutronsare discussed, with appropriate applications included. (U.K.)

  16. (SSR) markers

    acer

    2013-06-26

    Jun 26, 2013 ... analysis was in general agreement with PCoA in discrimi- nating the cultivars. Conclusions. Estimation of morphological diversity may provide addi- tional information on the present finding. Nonetheless, the 29 SSR markers provided considerable genetic reso- lution and this genetic diversity analysis ...

  17. (SSR) markers

    SAM

    2014-07-30

    Jul 30, 2014 ... India and the country is currently the leading producer, consumer and exporter of ... registration with the competent authority for plant variety protection. Conventionally ... detection of duplicates, parental verification in crosses, gene tagging in .... allelic patterns as revealed by the current set of SSR markers.

  18. Solvent effects in chemistry

    Buncel, Erwin

    2015-01-01

    This book introduces the concepts, theory and experimental knowledge concerning solvent effects on the rate and equilibrium of chemical reactions of all kinds.  It begins with basic thermodynamics and kinetics, building on this foundation to demonstrate how a more detailed understanding of these effects may be used to aid in determination of reaction mechanisms, and to aid in planning syntheses. Consideration is given to theoretical calculations (quantum chemistry, molecular dynamics, etc.), to statistical methods (chemometrics), and to modern day concerns such as ""green"" chemistry, where ut

  19. Solvent effects in the synergistic solvent extraction of Co2+

    Kandil, A.T.; Ramadan, A.

    1979-01-01

    The extraction of Co 2+ from a 0.1M ionic strength aqueous phase (Na + , CH 3 COOH) of pH = 5.1 was studied using thenoyltrifluoroacetone, HTTA, in eight different solvents and HTTA + trioctylphosphine oxide, TOPO, in the same solvents. A comparison of the effect of solvent dielectric constant on the equilibrium constant shows a synergism as a result of the increased hydrophobic character imparted to the metal complex due to the formation of the TOPO adduct. (author)

  20. Solvent extraction of zirconium

    Kim, S.S.; Yoon, J.H.

    1981-01-01

    The extraction of zirconium(VI) from an aqueous solution of constant ionic strength with versatic acid-10 dissolved in benzen was studied as a function of pH and the concentration of zirconium(VI) and organic acid. The effects of sulphate and chlorine ions on the extraction of the zirconium(VI) were briefly examined. It was revealed that (ZrOR 2 .2RH) is the predominant species of extracted zirconium(VI) in the versatic acid-10. The chemical equation and the apparent equilibrium constants thereof have been determined as follows. (ZrOsup(2+))aq+ 2(R 2 H 2 )sub(org) = (ZrOR 2 .2RH)sub(org)+2(H + )aq Ksub(Zr) = (ZrOR 2 .2RH)sub(org)(H + ) 2 /(ZrOsup(2+))sub(aq)(R 2 H 2 )sup(2)sub(org) = 3.3 x 10 -7 . The synergistic effects of TBP and D2EHPA were also studied. In the mixed solvent with 0.1M TBP, the synergistic effect was observed, while the mixed solvent with D2EHPA showed the antisynergistic effect. (Author)

  1. Polarization study

    Nurushev, S.B.

    1989-01-01

    Brief review is presented of the high energy polarization study including experimental data and the theoretical descriptions. The mostimportant proposals at the biggest accelerators and the crucial technical developments are also listed which may become a main-line of spin physics. 35 refs.; 10 figs.; 4 tabs

  2. Polar Stratigraphy

    1999-01-01

    These three images were taken on three different orbits over the north polar cap in April 1999. Each shows a different part of the same ice-free trough. The left and right images are separated by a distance of more than 100 kilometers (62 miles). Note the similar layers in each image.

  3. Marker lamps

    Watkins, D.V.

    1980-01-01

    A marker lamp is described which consists of a block of transparent plastics material encapsulated in which is a radioactive light source. These lights comprise a small sealed glass capsule, the hollow inside surface of which is coated with phosphor and which contains tritium or similar radioactive gas. The use of such lamps for identification marking of routes, for example roads, and for identification of underwater oil pipelines is envisaged. (U.K.)

  4. Solvent effects on the photochemistry of dimethyl sulfoxide-Cl complexes studied by combined pulse radiolysis and laser flash photolysis

    Sumiyoshi, Takashi; Minegishi, Hideki; Fujiyoshi, Ryoko; Sawamura, Sadashi

    2006-01-01

    Photolysis of complexes of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) with chlorine atoms results in rapid and permanent photobleaching which may be due to intramolecular hydrogen abstraction. The effects of solvent polarity were examined in a wide variety of DMSO-carbon tetrachloride mixed solvents. The quantum yields of photobleaching decreased from 0.27 to 0.08 as the solvent polarity increased, while significant changes were observed in the low DMSO concentration range ( -3 ). This cannot be accounted for by simple solvent polarity effects. The effects of polar and nonpolar additives were also examined and it is concluded that the specific solvation effect of DMSO was the main cause of the significant change in quantum yields in the low concentration range of DMSO

  5. Measurement of dielectric constant of organic solvents by indigenously developed dielectric probe

    Keshari, Ajay Kumar; Rao, J. Prabhakar; Rao, C. V. S. Brahmmananda; Ramakrishnan, R.; Ramanarayanan, R. R.

    2018-04-01

    The extraction, separation and purification of actinides (uranium and plutonium) from various matrices are an important step in nuclear fuel cycle. One of the separation process adopted in an industrial scale is the liquid-liquid extraction or solvent extraction. Liquid-liquid extraction uses a specific ligand/extractant in conjunction with suitable diluent. Solvent extraction or liquid-liquid extraction, involves the partitioning of the solute between two immiscible phases. In most cases, one of the phases is aqueous, and the other one is an organic solvent. The solvent used in solvent extraction should be selective for the metal of interest, it should have optimum distribution ratio, and the loaded metal from the organic phase should be easily stripped under suitable experimental conditions. Some of the important physical properties which are important for the solvent are density, viscosity, phase separation time, interfacial surface tension and the polarity of the extractant.

  6. Influence of molecular geometry, exchange-correlation functional, and solvent effects in the modeling of vertical excitation energies in phthalocyanines using time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) and polarized continuum model TDDFT methods: can modern computational chemistry methods explain experimental controversies?

    Nemykin, Victor N; Hadt, Ryan G; Belosludov, Rodion V; Mizuseki, Hiroshi; Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki

    2007-12-20

    A time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) approach coupled with 14 different exchange-correlation functionals was used for the prediction of vertical excitation energies in zinc phthalocyanine (PcZn). In general, the TDDFT approach provides a more accurate description of both visible and ultraviolet regions of the UV-vis and magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) spectra of PcZn in comparison to the more popular semiempirical ZINDO/S and PM3 methods. It was found that the calculated vertical excitation energies of PcZn correlate with the amount of Hartree-Fock exchange involved in the exchange-correlation functional. The correlation was explained on the basis of the calculated difference in energy between occupied and unoccupied molecular orbitals. The influence of PcZn geometry, optimized using different exchange-correlation functionals, on the calculated vertical excitation energies in PcZn was found to be relatively small. The influence of solvents on the calculated vertical excitation energies in PcZn was considered for the first time using a polarized continuum model TDDFT (PCM-TDDFT) method and was found to be relatively small in excellent agreement with the experimental data. For all tested TDDFT and PCM-TDDFT cases, an assignment of the Q-band as an almost pure a1u (HOMO)-->eg (LUMO) transition, initially suggested by Gouterman, was confirmed. Pure exchange-correlation functionals indicate the presence of six 1Eu states in the B-band region of the UV-vis spectrum of PcZn, while hybrid exchange-correlation functionals predict only five 1Eu states for the same energy envelope. The first two symmetry-forbidden n-->pi* transitions were predicted in the Q0-2 region and in the low-energy tail of the B-band, while the first two symmetry-allowed n-->pi* transitions were found within the B-band energy envelope when pure exchange-correlation functionals were used for TDDFT calculations. The presence of a symmetry-forbidden but vibronically allowed n

  7. Solvent effects on the excited-state double proton transfer mechanism in the 7-azaindole dimer: a TDDFT study with the polarizable continuum model.

    Yu, Xue-Fang; Yamazaki, Shohei; Taketsugu, Tetsuya

    2017-08-30

    Solvent effects on the excited-state double proton transfer (ESDPT) mechanism in the 7-azaindole (7AI) dimer were investigated using the time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) method. Excited-state potential energy profiles along the reaction paths in a locally excited (LE) state and a charge transfer (CT) state were calculated using the polarizable continuum model (PCM) to include the solvent effect. A series of non-polar and polar solvents with different dielectric constants were used to examine the polarity effect on the ESDPT mechanism. The present results suggest that in a non-polar solvent and a polar solvent with a small dielectric constant, ESDPT follows a concerted mechanism, similar to the case in the gas phase. In a polar solvent with a relatively large dielectric constant, however, ESDPT is likely to follow a stepwise mechanism via a stable zwitterionic intermediate in the LE state on the adiabatic potential energy surface, although inclusion of zero-point vibrational energy (ZPE) corrections again suggests the concerted mechanism. In the meantime, the stepwise reaction path involving the CT state with neutral intermediates is also examined, and is found to be less competitive than the concerted or stepwise path in the LE state in both non-polar and polar solvents. The present study provides a new insight into the experimental controversy of the ESDPT mechanism of the 7AI dimer in a solution.

  8. Preferential solvation of fluorenone and 4-hydroxyfluorenone in binary solvent mixtures

    Jozefowicz, Marek; Heldt, Janina R.

    2003-01-01

    Preferential solvation of fluorenone and 4-hydroxyfluorenone in binary solvent mixtures has been studied using steady-state spectroscopic measurements. This study concerns the solvent-induced shift of the absorption and fluorescence spectra of both molecules in two solvent mixtures, i.e., cyclohexane-tetrahydrofuran and cyclohexane-ethanol. The first system contains polar solute molecules, fluorenone and 4-hydroxyfluorenone, in a mixture of polar aprotic (tetrahydrofuran) and non-polar (cyclohexane) solvents. In the second solvents mixture, hydrogen bonding with solute molecules (ethanol) may occur. The results of spectroscopic measurements are analysed using theoretical models of Bakshiev, Mazurenko and Suppan which describe preferential solvation phenomena. In the case of cyclohexane-tetrahydrofuran mixtures, the deviation from linearity in the absorption and fluorescence solvatochromic shifts vs. the solution polarity is due to non-specific dipolar solvent-solute interactions. For cyclohexane-ethanol binary mixtures, both non-specific and specific (hydrogen bond and proton-relay tautomerization) interactions contribute to the observed solvatochromism

  9. Xerogel p-anisidinapropilsílica: estudo da estabilidade térmica e da resistência à lixiviação com solventes p-anisidinepropylsilica xerogel: thermal stability and resistance to leaching by solvents

    Leonardo Franken

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available The xerogel p-anisidinepropylsilica was obtained. This solid presents some residual paraffin and also a small fraction of high organofunctionalized material that was leached in polar solvent. The xerogel purification could be achieved by exhaustively washing with hexane and dichloromethane solvents, or submitting the xerogel to thermal treatment up to 300 ºC, in vacuum. The resulting purified xerogel material present an appreciable thermal stability and resistance to leaching by solvents.

  10. Solvent accessible surface area (ASA) of simulated phospholipid membranes

    Tuchsen, E.; Jensen, Morten Østergaard; Westh, P.

    2003-01-01

    The membrane-solvent interface has been investigated through calculations of the solvent accessible surface area (ASA) for simulated membranes of DPPC and POPE. For DPPC at 52 degreesC we found an ASA of 126 +/- 8 Angstrom(2) per lipid molecule, equivalent to twice the projected lateral area......, even the most exposed parts of the PC head-group show average ASAs of less than half of its maximal or 'fully hydrated' value. The average ASA of a simulated POPE membrane was 96 +/- 7 Angstrom(2) per lipid. The smaller value than for DPPC reflects much lower ASA of the ammonium ion, which is partially...... compensated by increased exposure of the ethylene and phosphate moieties. The ASA of the polar moieties Of (PO4, NH3 and COO) constitutes 65% of the total accessible area for POPE, making this interface more polar than that of DPPC. It is suggested that ASA information can be valuable in attempts...

  11. Microfluidic Extraction of Biomarkers using Water as Solvent

    Amashukeli, Xenia; Manohara, Harish; Chattopadhyay, Goutam; Mehdi, Imran

    2009-01-01

    A proposed device, denoted a miniature microfluidic biomarker extractor (mu-EX), would extract trace amounts of chemicals of interest from samples, such as soils and rocks. Traditionally, such extractions are performed on a large scale with hazardous organic solvents; each solvent capable of dissolving only those molecules lying within narrow ranges of specific chemical and physical characteristics that notably include volatility, electric charge, and polarity. In contrast, in the mu-EX, extractions could be performed by use of small amounts (typically between 0.1 and 100 L) of water as a universal solvent. As a rule of thumb, in order to enable solvation and extraction of molecules, it is necessary to use solvents that have polarity sufficiently close to the polarity of the target molecules. The mu-EX would make selection of specific organic solvents unnecessary, because mu-EX would exploit a unique property of liquid water: the possibility of tuning its polarity to match the polarity of organic solvents appropriate for extraction of molecules of interest. The change of the permittivity of water would be achieved by exploiting interactions between the translational states of water molecules and an imposed electromagnetic field in the frequency range of 300 to 600 GHz. On a molecular level, these interactions would result in disruption of the three-dimensional hydrogen-bonding network among liquid-water molecules and subsequent solvation and hydrolysis of target molecules. The mu-EX is expected to be an efficient means of hydrolyzing chemical bonds in complex macromolecules as well and, thus, enabling analysis of the building blocks of these complex chemical systems. The mu-EX device would include a microfluidic channel, part of which would lie within a waveguide coupled to an electronically tuned source of broad-band electromagnetic radiation in the frequency range from 300 to 600 GHz (see figure). The part of the microfluidic channel lying in the waveguide would

  12. Cooling crystallization of Indomethacin from different organic solvents

    Malwade, Chandrakant Ramkrishna; Qu, Haiyan

    , 25, 35, and 45 °C. The solvents with varying polarities (ethanol, methanol, ethyl acetate, acetone, acetonitrile, and dichloromethane) were used for solubility measurement. Maximum solubility of IMC was observed in acetone, while acetonitrile showed the lowest solubility. Solid phase analysis...... of excess solute with XRPD and Raman spectroscopy confirmed formation of IMC solvate in acetone, methanol and dichloromethane at 15 °C. Based on solubility of IMC, the solvents ethanol, ethyl acetate, acetone, and dichloromethane were selected for crystallization experiments. Nucleation kinetics of IMC...... in selected solvents was investigated through the measurement of induction time at 5 °C and 15 °C. Longer induction times were observed for IMC in ethanol at both temperatures compared to the one in acetone. Metastable α form of IMC was obtained from ethanol, while solvate of IMC was produced from acetone....

  13. Benchmarking Continuum Solvent Models for Keto-Enol Tautomerizations.

    McCann, Billy W; McFarland, Stuart; Acevedo, Orlando

    2015-08-13

    Experimental free energies of tautomerization, ΔGT, were used to benchmark the gas-phase predictions of 17 different quantum mechanical methods and eight basis sets for seven keto-enol tautomer pairs dominated by their enolic form. The G4 method and M06/6-31+G(d,p) yielded the most accurate results, with mean absolute errors (MAE's) of 0.95 and 0.71 kcal/mol, respectively. Using these two theory levels, the solution-phase ΔGT values for 23 unique tautomer pairs composed of aliphatic ketones, β-dicarbonyls, and heterocycles were computed in multiple protic and aprotic solvents. The continuum solvation models, namely, polarizable continuum model (PCM), polarizable conductor calculation model (CPCM), and universal solvation model (SMD), gave relatively similar MAE's of ∼1.6-1.7 kcal/mol for G4 and ∼1.9-2.0 kcal/mol with M06/6-31+G(d,p). Partitioning the tautomer pairs into their respective molecular types, that is, aliphatic ketones, β-dicarbonyls, and heterocycles, and separating out the aqueous versus nonaqueous results finds G4/PCM utilizing the UA0 cavity to be the overall most accurate combination. Free energies of activation, ΔG(‡), for the base-catalyzed keto-enol interconversion of 2-nitrocyclohexanone were also computed using six bases and five solvents. The M06/6-31+G(d,p) reproduced the ΔG(‡) with MAE's of 1.5 and 1.8 kcal/mol using CPCM and SMD, respectively, for all combinations of base and solvent. That specific enolization was previously proposed to proceed via a concerted mechanism in less polar solvents but shift to a stepwise mechanism in more polar solvents. However, the current calculations suggest that the stepwise mechanism operates in all solvents.

  14. Selective solvent extraction of oils

    1938-04-09

    In the selective solvent extraction of naphthenic base oils, the solvent used consists of the extract obtained by treating a paraffinic base oil with a selective solvent. The extract, or partially spent solvent is less selective than the solvent itself. Selective solvents specified for the extraction of the paraffinic base oil are phenol, sulphur dioxide, cresylic acid, nitrobenzene, B:B/sup 1/-dichlorethyl ether, furfural, nitroaniline and benzaldehyde. Oils treated are Coastal lubricating oils, or naphthenic oils from the cracking, or destructive hydrogenation of coal, tar, lignite, peat, shale, bitumen, or petroleum. The extraction may be effected by a batch or counter-current method, and in the presence of (1) liquefied propane, or butane, or naphtha, or (2) agents which modify the solvent power such as, water, ammonia, acetonitrile, glycerine, glycol, caustic soda or potash. Treatment (2) may form a post-treatment effected on the extract phase. In counter-current treatment in a tower some pure selective solvent may be introduced near the raffinate outlet to wash out any extract therefrom.

  15. Relaxation phenomena of polar non-polar liquid mixtures under low ...

    der high-frequency electric field have gained much importance to study the structure as ... Purohit et al [1,2] and Srivastava and Srivastava [3] had measured the real ε¼ ... The cell containing the experimental liquid in a given solvent .... due to inductive, mesomeric and electromeric effects of the substituent polar groups at-.

  16. Reactivity of cyclohex-1-enylcarboxylic and 2-methylcyclohex-1-enylcarboxylic acids with diazodiphenylmethane in aprotic solvents

    VERA V. KRSTIC

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Rate constants for the reaction of diazodiphenylmethane with cyclohex-1-enylcarboxylic acid and 2-methylcyclohex-1-enylcarboxylic acid were determined in nine aprotic solvents, as well as in seven protic solvents, at 30°C using the appropriate UV-spectroscopic method. In protic solvents the unsubsituted acid displayed higher reaction rates than the methyl-substituted one. The results in aprotic solvents showed quite the opposite, and the reaction rates were considerably lower. In order to explain the obtained results through solvent effects, reaction rate constants (k of the examined acids were correlated using the total solvatochromic equation of the form: log k=logk0+sp*+aa+bb, where p* is the measure of the solvent polarity, a represents the scale of the solvent hydrogen bond donor acidities (HBD and b represents the scale of the solvent hydrogen bond acceptor basicities (HBA. The correlation of the kinetic data were carried out by means of multiple linear regression analysis and the opposite effects of aprotic solvents, as well as the difference in the influence of protic and aprotic solvents on the reaction of the two examined acids with DDM were discussed. The results presented in this paper for cyclohex-1-enylcarboxylic and 2-methylcyclohex-1-enylcarboxylic acids were compared with the kinetic data for benzoic acid obtained in the same chemical reaction, under the same experimental conditions.

  17. Selection and design of solvents

    Gani, Rafiqul

    and design of solvents will be presented together with application examples. The selection problem is defined as finding known chemicals that match the desired functions of a solvent for a specified set of applications. The design problem is defined as finding the molecular structure (or mixture of molecules....... With increasing interest on issues such as waste, sustainability, environmental impact and green chemistry, the selection and design of solvents have become important problems that need to be addressed during chemical product-process design and development. Systematic methods and tools suitable for selection......) that match the desired functions of a solvent for a specified set of applications. Use of organic chemicals and ionic liquids as solvents will be covered....

  18. Preferential solvation and solvation shell composition of free base and protonated 5, 10, 15, 20-tetrakis(4-sulfonatophenyl)porphyrin in aqueous organic mixed solvents

    Farajtabar, Ali; Jaberi, Fatemeh; Gharib, Farrokh

    2011-12-01

    The solvatochromic properties of the free base and the protonated 5, 10, 15, 20-tetrakis(4-sulfonatophenyl)porphyrin (TPPS) were studied in pure water, methanol, ethanol (protic solvents), dimethylsulfoxide, DMSO, (non-protic solvent), and their corresponding aqueous-organic binary mixed solvents. The correlation of the empirical solvent polarity scale ( ET) values of TPPS with composition of the solvents was analyzed by the solvent exchange model of Bosch and Roses to clarify the preferential solvation of the probe dyes in the binary mixed solvents. The solvation shell composition and the synergistic effects in preferential solvation of the solute dyes were investigated in terms of both solvent-solvent and solute-solvent interactions and also, the local mole fraction of each solvent composition was calculated in cybotactic region of the probe. The effective mole fraction variation may provide significant physico-chemical insights in the microscopic and molecular level of interactions between TPPS species and the solvent components and therefore, can be used to interpret the solvent effect on kinetics and thermodynamics of TPPS. The obtained results from the preferential solvation and solvent-solvent interactions have been successfully applied to explain the variation of equilibrium behavior of protonation of TPPS occurring in aqueous organic mixed solvents of methanol, ethanol and DMSO.

  19. Solvent extraction of Zn and metals in Zn ores by nonphosphorous solvents

    Auchapt, J.M.; Tostain, Jacqueline.

    1975-07-01

    This bibliography follows a first work on Zn solvent extraction by organo-phosphorous compounds. The other solvents used in Zn extraction, are studied: oxygenated nonphosphorous solvents (ketones, alcohols, carboxylic acids, sulfonates), nitrogenous solvents and hydrocarbons [fr

  20. Cesium Concentration in MCU Solvent

    Walker, D

    2006-01-01

    During Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) Unit (MCU) operations, Cs-137 concentrations in product streams will vary depending on the location in the process and on the recent process conditions. Calculations of cesium concentrations under a variety of operating conditions reveal the following: (1) Under nominal operations with salt solution feed containing 1.1 Ci Cs-137 per gallon, the maximum Cs-137 concentration in the process will occur in the strip effluent (SE) and equal 15-16.5 Ci/gal. (2) Under these conditions, the majority of the solvent will contain 0.005 to 0.01 Ci/gal, with a limited portion of the solvent in the contactor stages containing ∼4 Ci/gal. (3) When operating conditions yield product near 0.1 Ci Cs-137/gal in the decontaminated salt solution (DSS), the SE cesium concentration will be the same or lower than in nominal operations, but majority of the stripped solvent will increase to ∼2-3 Ci/gal. (4) Deviations in strip and waste stream flow rates cause the largest variations in cesium content: (a) If strip flow rates deviate by -30% of nominal, the SE will contain ∼23 Ci/gal, although the cesium content of the solvent will increase to only 0.03 Ci/gal; (b) If strip flow rate deviates by -77% (i.e., 23% of nominal), the SE will contain 54 Ci/gal and solvent will contain 1.65 Ci/gal. At this point, the product DSS will just reach the limit of 0.1 Ci/gal, causing the DSS gamma monitors to alarm; and (c) Moderate (+10 to +30%) deviations in waste flow rate cause approximately proportional increases in the SE and solvent cesium concentrations. Recovery from a process failure due to poor cesium stripping can achieve any low cesium concentration required. Passing the solvent back through the contactors while recycling DSS product will produce a ∼70% reduction during one pass through the contactors (assuming the stripping D value is no worse than 0.36). If the solvent is returned to the solvent hold tank (containing additional

  1. Polar Polygons

    2005-01-01

    18 August 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows dark-outlined polygons on a frost-covered surface in the south polar region of Mars. In summer, this surface would not be bright and the polygons would not have dark outlines--these are a product of the presence of seasonal frost. Location near: 77.2oS, 204.8oW Image width: width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Spring

  2. Processing of polymers using reactive solvents

    Lemstra, P.J.; Kurja, J.; Meijer, H.E.H.; Meijer, H.E.H.

    1997-01-01

    A review with many refs. on processing of polymers using reactive solvents including classification of synthetic polymers, guidelines for the selection of reactive solvents, basic aspects of processing, examples of intractable and tractable polymer/reactive solvent system

  3. Solubility and crystallization of piroxicam from different solvents in evaporative and cooling crystallizations

    Qu, Haiyan; Ostergaard, Iben

    2018-01-01

    polarities; It has been found that the solubility of piroxicam in the solvents is in the following order: chloroform > dichloromethane > acetone > ethyl acetate > acetonitrile > acetic acid > methanol > hexane. Crystallization of piroxicam from different solvents has been performed with evaporative.......Results obtained in the present work showed the stochastic nature of nucleation of different polymorphs as well as the complexity of the crystallization of a polymorphic system....

  4. Molecular and ionic hydrogen bond formation in fluorous solvents.

    O'Neal, Kristi L; Weber, Stephen G

    2009-01-08

    There are only a few studies of noncovalent association in fluorous solvents and even fewer that are quantitative. A full understanding, particularly of stoichiometry and binding strength of noncovalent interactions in fluorous solvents could be very useful in improved molecular-receptor-based extractions, advancements in sensor technologies, crystal engineering, and supramolecular chemistry. This work investigates hydrogen bonding between heterocyclic bases and a perfluoropolyether with a terminal carboxylic acid group (Krytox 157FSH (1)), chiefly in FC-72 (a mixture of perfluorohexanes). In particular, we were interested in whether or not proton transfer occurs, and if so, under what conditions in H-bonded complexes. Continuous variations experiments show that in FC-72 weaker bases (pyrazine, pyrimidine, and quinazoline) form 1:1 complexes with 1, whereas stronger bases (quinoline, pyridine, and isoquinoline) form 1:3 complexes. Ultraviolet and infrared spectral signatures reveal that the 1:1 complexes are molecular (B.HA) whereas the 1:3 complexes are ionic (BH+.A-HAHA). Infrared spectra of 1:3 ionic complexes are discussed in detail. Literature and experimental data on complexes between N-heterocyclic bases and carboxylic acids in a range of solvents are compiled to compare solvent effects on proton transfer. Polar solvents support ionic hydrogen bonds at a 1:1 mol ratio. In nonpolar organic solvents, ionic hydrogen bonds are only observed in complexes with 1:2 (base/acid) stoichiometries. In fluorous solvents, a larger excess of acid, 1:3, is necessary to facilitate proton transfer in hydrogen bonds between carboxylic acids and the bases studied.

  5. Effects of Extraction Solvents on the Quantification of Free Amino Acids in Lyophilised Brewer’s Yeast

    Andreea STĂNILĂ

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to test some solvents in order to improve the free amino acids extraction from lyophilised brewer’s yeast. The brewer’ yeast was treated with four types of extraction solvents: Solvent I – acetonitrile 25%/HCl 0.01M (ACN; Solvent II – ethanol 80%; solvent III – HCl 0.05M/deionized water (1/1 volume; Solvent IV – HCl 0.05M/ethanol 80% (1/1 volume. The supernatants were analysed by HPLC-DAD-ESI-MS method. Acetonitrile provided the less quantities and number of amino acids extracted due to its weaker polarity. Solvent II and IV (ethanol, respectively acidified ethanol, which have an increased polarity, extracted 15 amino acids due to the addition of HCl in solvent IV. Solvent III (acidified water proved to be the best extraction solvent for the amino acids from brewer’s yeast providing the separation of 17 compounds: GLN, ASN, SER, GLY, ALA, ORN, PRO, HIS, LYS, GLU, TRP, LEU, PHE, ILE, AAA, HPHE, TYR.

  6. Insights into the effects of solvent properties in graphene based electric double-layer capacitors with organic electrolytes

    Zhang, Shuo; Bo, Zheng; Yang, Huachao; Yang, Jinyuan; Duan, Liangping; Yan, Jianhua; Cen, Kefa

    2016-12-01

    Organic electrolytes are widely used in electric double-layer capacitors (EDLCs). In this work, the microstructure of planar graphene-based EDLCs with different organic solvents are investigated with molecular dynamics simulations. Results show that an increase of solvent polarity could weaken the accumulation of counter-ions nearby the electrode surface, due to the screen of electrode charges and relatively lower ionic desolvation. It thus suggests that solvents with low polarity could be preferable to yield high EDL capacitance. Meanwhile, the significant effects of the size and structure of solvent molecules are reflected by non-electrostatic molecule-electrode interactions, further influencing the adsorption of solvent molecules on electrode surface. Compared with dimethyl carbonate, γ-butyrolactone, and propylene carbonate, acetonitrile with relatively small-size and linear structure owns weak non-electrostatic interactions, which favors the easy re-orientation of solvent molecules. Moreover, the shift of solvent orientation in surface layer, from parallel orientation to perpendicular orientation relative to the electrode surface, deciphers the solvent twin-peak behavior near negative electrode. The as-obtained insights into the roles of solvent properties on the interplays among particles and electrodes elucidate the solvent influences on the microstructure and capacitive behavior of EDLCs using organic electrolytes.

  7. A comparative study on the effect of solvent on nucleophilic fluorination with [18F]fluoride. Protic solvents as co-solvents in SN2 and SNAr reactions

    Koivula, T.; Simecek, J.; Jalomaeki, J.; Helariutta, K.; Airaksinen, A.J.

    2011-01-01

    The effect of solvent on nucleophilic substitution with cyclotron-produced [ 18 F]fluoride was studied in polar aprotic (CH 3 CN and DMF) and protic solvent (t-BuOH and t-amyl alcohol) mixtures (CH 3 CN/co-solvent, 2:8) in a series of model compounds, 4-(R 1 -methyl)benzyl R 2 -benzoates, using a K2.2.2/[ 18 F]KF phase transfer system (R 1 = -Cl, -OMs or -OH; R 2 = -Cl, -I or -NO 2 ). 18 F-fluorination of compounds 1-3, with chloride or mesylate as a leaving group in the benzylic position (R 1 ), afforded the desired 4-([ 18 F]fluoromethyl)benzyl analogues in all solvents during 15 min reaction time. The highest radiochemical yields (RCY) in all the studied reaction temperatures (80, 120 and 160 C) were achieved in CH 3 CN. Radiochemical yields in protic solvents were comparable to RCY in CH 3 CN only with the sulfonate ester 3 as a starting material. 18 F-Fluorination of the benzylic halides 1 and 2 was not promoted in the same extent; in addition, labelled side-products were detected at higher reaction temperatures. Radiofluorination in tert-alcohols was also studied using [ 18 F]CsF with and without added phase transfer catalyst, resulting in both conditions lower RCY when compared to K2.2.2/[ 18 F]KF system. Protic solvents were not able to promote aromatic 18 F-fluorination. 18 F-Fluorination of compound 5, having para-activated nitro group in the aromatic position (R 2 ), failed in tert-alcohols even at the highest temperature, but it was labelled successfully in DMF and to some extent in CH 3 CN. (orig.)

  8. Handbook of organic solvent properties

    Smallwood, Ian

    2012-01-01

    The properties of 72 of the most commonly used solvents are given, tabulated in the most convenient way, making this book a joy for industrial chemists to use as a desk reference. The properties covered are those which answer the basic questions of: Will it do the job? Will it harm the user? Will it pollute the air? Is it easy to handle? Will it pollute the water? Can it be recovered or incinerated? These are all factors that need to be considered at the early stages of choosing a solvent for a new product or process.A collection of the physical properties of most commonly used solvents, their

  9. Strategic Polarization.

    Kalai, Adam; Kalai, Ehud

    2001-08-01

    In joint decision making, similarly minded people may take opposite positions. Consider the example of a marriage in which one spouse gives generously to charity while the other donates nothing. Such "polarization" may misrepresent what is, in actuality, a small discrepancy in preferences. It may be that the donating spouse would like to see 10% of their combined income go to charity each year, while the apparently frugal spouse would like to see 8% donated. A simple game-theoretic analysis suggests that the spouses will end up donating 10% and 0%, respectively. By generalizing this argument to a larger class of games, we provide strategic justification for polarization in many situations such as debates, shared living accommodations, and disciplining children. In some of these examples, an arbitrarily small disagreement in preferences leads to an arbitrarily large loss in utility for all participants. Such small disagreements may also destabilize what, from game-theoretic point of view, is a very stable equilibrium. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  10. Nonadiabatic dynamics of electron transfer in solution: Explicit and implicit solvent treatments that include multiple relaxation time scales

    Schwerdtfeger, Christine A.; Soudackov, Alexander V.; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2014-01-01

    The development of efficient theoretical methods for describing electron transfer (ET) reactions in condensed phases is important for a variety of chemical and biological applications. Previously, dynamical dielectric continuum theory was used to derive Langevin equations for a single collective solvent coordinate describing ET in a polar solvent. In this theory, the parameters are directly related to the physical properties of the system and can be determined from experimental data or explicit molecular dynamics simulations. Herein, we combine these Langevin equations with surface hopping nonadiabatic dynamics methods to calculate the rate constants for thermal ET reactions in polar solvents for a wide range of electronic couplings and reaction free energies. Comparison of explicit and implicit solvent calculations illustrates that the mapping from explicit to implicit solvent models is valid even for solvents exhibiting complex relaxation behavior with multiple relaxation time scales and a short-time inertial response. The rate constants calculated for implicit solvent models with a single solvent relaxation time scale corresponding to water, acetonitrile, and methanol agree well with analytical theories in the Golden rule and solvent-controlled regimes, as well as in the intermediate regime. The implicit solvent models with two relaxation time scales are in qualitative agreement with the analytical theories but quantitatively overestimate the rate constants compared to these theories. Analysis of these simulations elucidates the importance of multiple relaxation time scales and the inertial component of the solvent response, as well as potential shortcomings of the analytical theories based on single time scale solvent relaxation models. This implicit solvent approach will enable the simulation of a wide range of ET reactions via the stochastic dynamics of a single collective solvent coordinate with parameters that are relevant to experimentally accessible

  11. Solvent-dependent fluorescence enhancement and piezochromism of a carbazole-substituted naphthopyran

    Liu, Lihui; Wang, Aixia [Faculty of Chemistry, Northeast Normal University, Changchun 130024 (China); Wang, Guang, E-mail: wangg923@nenu.edu.cn [Faculty of Chemistry, Northeast Normal University, Changchun 130024 (China); Munyentwari, Alexis [Faculty of Chemistry, Northeast Normal University, Changchun 130024 (China); Zhou, Yihan, E-mail: yhzhou@ciac.ac.cn [National Analytical Research Center of Electrochemistry and Spectroscopy, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130022 (China)

    2015-09-15

    A novel carbazole-substituted naphthopyran, 3,3-bis-(4-carbazolylphenyl)-[3H]-naphtho[2,1-b]pyran (CzNP) was designed and synthesized. The new compound exhibited normal photochromism in dichloromethane solution and the UV irradiation did not influence its fluorescence. On the contrary, the fluorescence of CzNP in N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) was intensively enhanced to 29 times after 60 min of the UV irradiation and this enhanced fluorescence can be quenched by addition of triethylamine (TEA). The study of enhanced extent of fluorescence of CzNP in solvents with different polarities and in mixed solvents demonstrated that the enhanced fluorescence is dependent on the polarity of solvents. The larger the polarity of solvent was, the stronger was the fluorescence of CzNP. CzNP also exhibited piezochromic performance and the pressure led to the cleavage of the C–O bond of pyran ring. - Highlights: • A carbazole-substituted photochromic naphthopyran was designed and synthesized. • The fluorescence was enhanced under the existence of DMF and UV irradiation. • The polarity of solvent was the dominating factor to affect the fluorescence. • The new compound also displayed piezochromic performance.

  12. Uranium refining by solvent extraction

    Kraikaew, J.

    1996-01-01

    The yellow cake refining was studied in both laboratory and semi-pilot scales. The process units mainly consist of dissolution and filtration, solvent extraction, and precipitation and filtration. Effect of flow ratio (organic flow rate/ aqueous flow rate) on working efficiencies of solvent extraction process was studied. Detailed studies were carried out on extraction, scrubbing and stripping processes. Purity of yellow cake product obtained is high as 90.32% U 3 O 8

  13. Thermodynamically based solvent design for enzymatic saccharide acylation with hydroxycinnamic acids in non-conventional media

    Zeuner, Birgitte; Kontogeorgis, Georgios; Riisager, Anders

    2012-01-01

    as well as other enzymatic hydroxycinnamate acylations in ionic liquid systems. The choice of solvent system is highly decisive for enzyme stability, selectivity, and reaction yields in these synthesis reactions. To increase the understanding of the reaction environment and to facilitate solvent screening......-free microemulsions of a hydrocarbon, a polar alcohol, and water are interesting solvent systems because they accommodate different substrate and product solubilities and maintain enzyme stability. Ionic liquids may provide advantages as solvents in terms of increased substrate and product solubility, higher...... of their amphiphilicity and antioxidative potential. Synthetic reactions using mono- or disaccharides as one of the substrates may moreover direct new routes for biomass upgrading in the biorefinery. The paper reviews the available data for enzymatic hydroxycinnamate saccharide ester synthesis in organic solvent systems...

  14. Thin-film composite crosslinked polythiosemicarbazide membranes for organic solvent nanofiltration (OSN)

    Aburabie, Jamaliah

    2015-01-01

    In this work we report a new class of solvent stable thin-film composite (TFC) membrane fabricated on crosslinked polythiosemicarbazide (PTSC) as substrate that exhibits superior stability compared with other solvent stable polymeric membranes reported up to now. Integrally skinned asymmetric PTSC membranes were prepared by the phase inversion process and crosslinked with an aromatic bifunctional crosslinker to improve the solvent stability. TFC membranes were obtained via interfacial polymerization using trimesoyl chloride (TMC) and diaminopiperazine (DAP) monomers. The membranes were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and contact angle measurement.The membranes exhibited high fluxes toward solvents like tetrahydrofuran (THF), dimethylformamide (DMF) and dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) ranging around 20L/m2 h at 5bar with a molecular weight cut off (MWCO) of around 1000g/mol. The PTSC-based thin-film composite membranes are very stable toward polar aprotic solvents and they have potential applications in the petrochemical and pharmaceutical industry.

  15. Action of solvents on torbanite and the nature of extracted products

    Dulhunty, J A

    1943-01-01

    Tests were made on torbanite with polar and nonpolar solvents under various conditions. Torbanite undergoes no change when heated below 250/sup 0/C, but depolymerization of the organic matter, absorption of solvent, and swelling and softening of the torbanite occurred between 250 and 300/sup 0/C, although no appreciable quantity of soluble product was formed. Between 300 and 350/sup 0/C depolymerization continued and more solvent was absorbed, which caused swelling, softening, and partial breakdown of the physical structure of torbanite. The intimate mixture of torbanite and solvent produced a jellylike mass, which could not be filtered. Continued heating between 350 and 400/sup 0/C caused the organic matter to dissolve in the solvent and produced a complete breakdown in the physical structure of the torbanite. The extracts consisted largely of heavy paraffin compounds, including waxes.

  16. Polarized secondary radioactive beams

    Zaika, N.I.

    1992-01-01

    Three methods of polarized radioactive nuclei beam production: a) a method nuclear interaction of the non-polarized or polarized charged projectiles with target nuclei; b) a method of polarization of stopped reaction radioactive products in a special polarized ion source with than following acceleration; c) a polarization of radioactive nuclei circulating in a storage ring are considered. Possible life times of the radioactive ions for these methods are determined. General schemes of the polarization method realizations and depolarization problems are discussed

  17. Polar crane

    Makosinski, S.

    1981-01-01

    In many applications polar cranes have to be repeatedly positioned with high accuracy. A guidance system is disclosed which has two pairs of guides. Each guide consists of two rollers carried by a sheave rotatable mounted on the crane bridge, the rollers being locatable one on each side of a guideway, e.g. the circular track on which the bridge runs. The pairs of guides are interconnected by respective rope loops which pass around and are locked to the respective pairs of sheaves in such a manner that movement of one guide results in equal movement of the other guide in a sense to maintain the repeatability of positioning of the centre of the bridge. A hydraulically-linked guide system is also described. (author)

  18. Dynamically polarized hydrogen target as a broadband, wavelength-independent thermal neutron spin polarizer

    Zhao Jinkui; Garamus, Vasil M.; Mueller, Wilhelm; Willumeit, Regine

    2005-01-01

    A hydrogen-rich sample with dynamically polarized hydrogen nuclei was tested as a wavelength-independent neutron transmission spin polarizer. The experiment used a modified setup of the dynamic nuclear polarization target station at the GKSS research center. The standard solvent sample at the GKSS DNP station was used. It is 2.8mm thick and consists of 43.4wt% water, 54.6wt% glycerol, and 2wt% of EHBA-Cr(v) complex. The wavelength of the incident neutrons for the transmission experiment was λ=8.1A with Δλ/λ=10%. The polarization of neutron beam after the target sample was analyzed with a supermirror analyzer. A neutron polarization of -52% was achieved at the hydrogen polarization of -69%. Further experiments will test the feasibility of other hydrogen-rich materials, such as methane, as the polarizer. A theoretical calculation shows that a polarized methane target would allow over 95% neutron polarizations with more than 30% transmission

  19. Solvent/Non-Solvent Sintering To Make Microsphere Scaffolds

    Laurencin, Cato T.; Brown, Justin L.; Nair, Lakshmi

    2011-01-01

    A solvent/non-solvent sintering technique has been devised for joining polymeric microspheres to make porous matrices for use as drug-delivery devices or scaffolds that could be seeded with cells for growing tissues. Unlike traditional sintering at elevated temperature and pressure, this technique is practiced at room temperature and pressure and, therefore, does not cause thermal degradation of any drug, protein, or other biochemical with which the microspheres might be loaded to impart properties desired in a specific application. Also, properties of scaffolds made by this technique are more reproducible than are properties of comparable scaffolds made by traditional sintering. The technique involves the use of two miscible organic liquids: one that is and one that is not a solvent for the affected polymer. The polymeric microspheres are placed in a mold having the size and shape of the desired scaffold, then the solvent/non-solvent mixture is poured into the mold to fill the void volume between the microspheres, then the liquid mixture is allowed to evaporate. Some of the properties of the resulting scaffold can be tailored through choice of the proportions of the liquids and the diameter of the microspheres.

  20. Sensitivity of viscosity Arrhenius parameters to polarity of liquids

    Kacem, R. B. H.; Alzamel, N. O.; Ouerfelli, N.

    2017-09-01

    Several empirical and semi-empirical equations have been proposed in the literature to estimate the liquid viscosity upon temperature. In this context, this paper aims to study the effect of polarity of liquids on the modeling of the viscosity-temperature dependence, considering particularly the Arrhenius type equations. To achieve this purpose, the solvents are classified into three groups: nonpolar, borderline polar and polar solvents. Based on adequate statistical tests, we found that there is strong evidence that the polarity of solvents affects significantly the distribution of the Arrhenius-type equation parameters and consequently the modeling of the viscosity-temperature dependence. Thus, specific estimated values of parameters for each group of liquids are proposed in this paper. In addition, the comparison of the accuracy of approximation with and without classification of liquids, using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test, shows a significant discrepancy of the borderline polar solvents. For that, we suggested in this paper new specific coefficient values of the simplified Arrhenius-type equation for better estimation accuracy. This result is important given that the accuracy in the estimation of the viscosity-temperature dependence may affect considerably the design and the optimization of several industrial processes.

  1. Ionic Liquids in Selective Oxidation: Catalysts and Solvents.

    Dai, Chengna; Zhang, Jie; Huang, Chongpin; Lei, Zhigang

    2017-05-24

    Selective oxidation has an important role in environmental and green chemistry (e.g., oxidative desulfurization of fuels and oxidative removal of mercury) as well as chemicals and intermediates chemistry to obtain high-value-added special products (e.g., organic sulfoxides and sulfones, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids, epoxides, esters, and lactones). Due to their unique physical properties such as the nonvolatility, thermal stability, nonexplosion, high polarity, and temperature-dependent miscibility with water, ionic liquids (ILs) have attracted considerable attention as reaction solvents and media for selective oxidations and are considered as green alternatives to volatile organic solvents. Moreover, for easy separation and recyclable utilization, IL catalysts have attracted unprecedented attention as "biphasic catalyst" or "immobilized catalyst" by immobilizing metal- or nonmetal-containing ILs onto mineral or polymer supports to combine the unique properties of ILs (chemical and thermal stability, capacity for extraction of polar substrates and reaction products) with the extended surface of the supports. This review highlights the most recent outcomes on ILs in several important typical oxidation reactions. The contents are arranged in the series of oxidation of sulfides, oxidation of alcohols, epoxidation of alkenes, Baeyer-Villiger oxidation reaction, oxidation of alkanes, and oxidation of other compounds step by step involving ILs as solvents, catalysts, reagents, or their combinations.

  2. Environment effects on the optical properties of some fluorinated poly(oxadiazole ether)s in binary solvent mixtures

    Homocianu, Mihaela; Ipate, Alina Mirela; Hamciuc, Corneliu; Airinei, Anton

    2015-01-01

    The solvatochromic behavior of some fluorinated poly(oxadiazole ether)s was studied using UV–vis absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy in neat solvents and in their solvent mixtures at several ratios of cosolvents. Quantitative investigations of the spectral changes caused by solvent polarity were discussed using the Lippert‐Mataga, Bakhshiev and Kawski–Chamma–Viallet polarity functions. Repartitioning of cosolvent between local (solvation shell) and bulk phase was investigated by means of a solvatochromic shift method in chloroform–N,N-dimethylformamide (CHCl 3 /DMF) and chloroform–dimethyl sulfoxide (CHCl 3 /DMSO) solvent mixtures. Solvatochromic properties in the binary solvent environments were predominantly influenced by the acidity and basicity of the solvent systems. The fluorescence quenching process by nitrobenzene was characterized by Stern–Volmer plots which display a positive deviation from linearity. This was explained by static and dynamic quenching mechanisms. - Highlights: • Solvatochromic behavior in solvent mixtures was studied. • Stokes shift and local environments in binary mixed solvent were discussed. • Repartitioning of cosolvent between local and bulk phase in solvent mixture has been investigated. • Fluorescence intensity was quenched in presence of nitrobenzene

  3. The effect of various solvents on the back channel of solution-processed In-Ga-Zn-O thin-film transistors intended for biosensor applications

    Kim, Si Joon; Jung, Joohye; Yoon, Doo Hyun; Kim, Hyun Jae

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of exposing solution-processed In-Ga-Zn-O (IGZO) thin-film transistors (TFTs), intended for biosensor applications, to various solvents. Various solvents, such as the nonpolar solvent chlorobenzene and the polar solvents ethanol and deionized (DI) water, were dropped and adsorbed on exposed IGZO channel surfaces. All IGZO TFT devices exhibited a negative threshold voltage shift and a sub-threshold swing degradation, without an accompanying degradation in field-effect mobility. These variations depended on the dielectric constant of the solvents; with the exception of the IGZO TFT device exposed to DI water, they all gradually returned to their initial states.

  4. Is Water a Universal Solvent for Life?

    Pohorill, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    There are strong reasons to believe that the laws, principles and constraints of physics and chemistry are universal. It is much less clear how this universality translates into our understanding of the origins of life. Conventionally, discussions of this topic focus on chemistry that must be sufficiently rich to seed life. Although this is clearly a prerequisite for the emergence of living systems, I propose to focus instead on self-organization of matter into functional structures capable of reproduction, evolution and responding to environmental changes. In biology, most essential functions are largely mediated by noncovalent interactions (interactions that do not involve making or breaking chemical bonds). Forming chemical bonds is only a small part of what living systems do. There are specific implications of this point of view for universality. I will concentrate on one of these implications. Strength of non-covalent interactions must be properly tuned. If they were too weak, the system would exhibit undesired, uncontrolled response to natural fluctuations of physical and chemical parameters. If they were too strong kinetics of biological processes would be slow and energetics costly. This balance, however, is not a natural property of complex chemical systems. Instead, it has to be achieved with the aid of an appropriate solvent for life. In particular, potential solvents for life must be characterized by a high dielectric constant to ensure solubility of polar species and sufficient flexibility of biological structures stabilized by electrostatic interactions. Among these solvents, water exhibits a remarkable trait that it also promotes solvophobic (hydrophobic) interactions between non-polar species, typically manifested by a tendency of these species to aggregate and minimize their contacts with the aqueous solvent. Hydrophobic interactions are responsible, at least in part, for many self-organization phenomena in biological systems, such as the formation

  5. Virtual colorimetric sensor array: single ionic liquid for solvent discrimination.

    Galpothdeniya, Waduge Indika S; Regmi, Bishnu P; McCarter, Kevin S; de Rooy, Sergio L; Siraj, Noureen; Warner, Isiah M

    2015-04-21

    There is a continuing need to develop high-performance sensors for monitoring organic solvents, primarily due to the environmental impact of such compounds. In this regard, colorimetric sensors have been a subject of intense research for such applications. Herein, we report a unique virtual colorimetric sensor array based on a single ionic liquid (IL) for accurate detection and identification of similar organic solvents and mixtures of such solvents. In this study, we employ eight alcohols and seven binary mixtures of ethanol and methanol as analytes to provide a stringent test for assessing the capabilities of this array. The UV-visible spectra of alcoholic solutions of the IL used in this study show two absorption bands. Interestingly, the ratio of absorbance for these two bands is found to be extremely sensitive to alcohol polarity. A virtual sensor array is created by using four different concentrations of IL sensor, which allowed identification of these analytes with 96.4-100% accuracy. Overall, this virtual sensor array is found to be very promising for discrimination of closely related organic solvents.

  6. Porous polymeric membranes with thermal and solvent resistance

    Pulido, Bruno

    2017-05-30

    Polymeric membranes are highly advantageous over their ceramic counterparts in terms of the simplicity of the manufacturing process, cost and scalability. Their main disadvantages are low stability at temperatures above 200 °C, and in organic solvents. We report for the first time porous polymeric membranes manufactured from poly(oxindolebiphenylylene) (POXI), a polymer with thermal stability as high as 500 °C in oxidative conditions. The membranes were prepared by solution casting and phase inversion by immersion in water. The asymmetric porous morphology was characterized by scanning electronic microscopy. The pristine membranes are stable in alcohols, acetone, acetonitrile and hexane, as well as in aqueous solutions with pH between 0 and 14. The membrane stability was extended for application in other organic solvents by crosslinking, using various dibromides, and the efficiency of the different crosslinkers was evaluated by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). POXI crosslinked membranes are stable up to 329 °C in oxidative conditions and showed organic solvent resistance in polar aprotic solvents with 99% rejection of Red Direct 80 in DMF at 70 °C. With this development, the application of polymeric membranes could be extended to high temperature and harsh environments, fields currently dominated by ceramic membranes.

  7. Molecular accessibility in solvent swelled coals. Final report

    Kispert, L.D.

    1994-04-01

    The conversion of coal by an economically feasible catalytic method requires the catalyst to diffuse into the coal sample so that hydrogenation catalysis can occur from within as well as the normal surface catalysis. Thus an estimate of the size, shape, and reactivity, of the pores in the coal before and after the swelling with different solvents is needed so that an optimum sized catalyst will be used. This study characterizes the accessible area found in Argonne Premium Coal Samples (APCS) using a EPR spin probe technique. The properties deduced in this manner correlate well with the findings deduced from SANS, NMR, SEM, SAXS and light scattering measurements. The use of nitroxide spin probes with swelling solvents is a simple way in which to gain an understanding of the pore structure of coals, how it changes in the presence of swelling solvents and the chemistry that occurs at the pore wall. Hydrogen bonding sites occur primarily in low-rank coals and vary in reactive strength as rank is varied. Unswelled coals contain small, spherical pores which disappear when coal is swelled in the presence of polar solvents. Swelling studies of polystyrene-divinyl benzene copolymers implied that coal is polymeric, contains significant quantities of covalent cross-links and the covalent cross-link density increases with rank.

  8. Solvent extraction: the coordination chemistry behind extractive metallurgy.

    Wilson, A Matthew; Bailey, Phillip J; Tasker, Peter A; Turkington, Jennifer R; Grant, Richard A; Love, Jason B

    2014-01-07

    The modes of action of the commercial solvent extractants used in extractive hydrometallurgy are classified according to whether the recovery process involves the transport of metal cations, M(n+), metalate anions, MXx(n-), or metal salts, MXx into a water-immiscible solvent. Well-established principles of coordination chemistry provide an explanation for the remarkable strengths and selectivities shown by most of these extractants. Reagents which achieve high selectivity when transporting metal cations or metal salts into a water-immiscible solvent usually operate in the inner coordination sphere of the metal and provide donor atom types or dispositions which favour the formation of particularly stable neutral complexes that have high solubility in the hydrocarbons commonly used in recovery processes. In the extraction of metalates, the structures of the neutral assemblies formed in the water-immiscible phase are usually not well defined and the cationic reagents can be assumed to operate in the outer coordination spheres. The formation of secondary bonds in the outer sphere using, for example, electrostatic or H-bonding interactions are favoured by the low polarity of the water-immiscible solvents.

  9. Nuclear polarization and neutrons

    Glaettli, H.

    1985-01-01

    Different possibilities for the use of polarized nuclei in thermal neutron scattering on condensed matter are reviewed. Highly polarized nuclei are the starting point for studying dipolar magnetic order. Systematic measurement of spin-dependent scattering lengths is possible on samples with polarized nuclei. Highly polarized hydrogen should help to unravel complicated structures in chemistry and biology. The use of polarized proton targets as an energy-independent neutron polarizer in the thermal and epithermal region should be considered afresh. (author)

  10. Multiple sclerosis and organic solvents

    Mortensen, J T; Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik; Rasmussen, K

    1998-01-01

    We investigated a possible causal relation between exposure to organic solvents in Danish workers (housepainters, typographers/printers, carpenters/cabinetmakers) and onset of multiple sclerosis. Data on men included in the Danish Multiple Sclerosis Register (3,241 men) were linked with data from......, and butchers. Over a follow-up period of 20 years, we observed no increase in the incidence of multiple sclerosis among men presumed to be exposed to organic solvents. It was not possible to obtain data on potential confounders, and the study design has some potential for selection bias. Nevertheless......, the study does not support existing hypotheses regarding an association between occupational exposure to organic solvents and multiple sclerosis....

  11. Indium recovery by solvent extraction

    Fortes, Marilia Camargos Botelho

    1999-04-01

    Indium has been recovered as a byproduct from residues generated from the sulfuric acid leaching circuits in mineral plants for zinc recovery. Once its recovery comes from the slags of other metals recovery, it is necessary to separate it from the other elements which usually are present in high concentrations. Many works have been approaching this separation and indicate the solvent extraction process as the main technique used. In Brazilian case, indium recovery depends on the knowledge of this technique and its development. This paper describes the solvent extraction knowledge for the indium recovery from aqueous solutions generated in mineral plants. The results for determination of the best experimental conditions to obtain a high indium concentration solution and minimum iron poisoning by solvent extraction with di (2-ethylhexyl)-phosphoric acid (D2EHPA) solubilized in isoparafin and exxsol has been presented. (author)

  12. Photonic crystal based sensor for organic solvents and for solvent-water mixtures.

    Fenzl, Christoph; Hirsch, Thomas; Wolfbeis, Otto S

    2012-12-12

    Monodisperse polystyrene nanoparticles with a diameter of 173 nm were incorporated into a polydimethylsiloxane matrix where they display an iridescent color that can be attributed to the photonic crystal effect. The film is of violet color if placed in plain water, but turns to red in the presence of the non-polar solvent n-hexane. Several solvents were studied in some detail. We show that such films are capable of monitoring the water content of ethanol/water mixtures, where only 1% (v/v) of water leads to a shift of the peak wavelength of reflected light by 5 nm. The method also can be applied to determine, both visually and instrumentally, the fraction of methanol in ethanol/methanol mixtures. Here, a fraction of 1% of methanol (v/v) results in a wavelength shift of 2 nm. The reflected wavelength is not influenced by temperature changes nor impeded by photobleaching. The signal changes are fully reversible and response times are <1 s.

  13. Photonic Crystal Based Sensor for Organic Solvents and for Solvent-Water Mixtures

    Otto S. Wolfbeis

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Monodisperse polystyrene nanoparticles with a diameter of 173 nm were incorporated into a polydimethylsiloxane matrix where they display an iridescent color that can be attributed to the photonic crystal effect. The film is of violet color if placed in plain water, but turns to red in the presence of the non-polar solvent n-hexane. Several solvents were studied in some detail. We show that such films are capable of monitoring the water content of ethanol/water mixtures, where only 1% (v/v of water leads to a shift of the peak wavelength of reflected light by 5 nm. The method also can be applied to determine, both visually and instrumentally, the fraction of methanol in ethanol/methanol mixtures. Here, a fraction of 1% of methanol (v/v results in a wavelength shift of 2 nm. The reflected wavelength is not influenced by temperature changes nor impeded by photobleaching. The signal changes are fully reversible and response times are <1 s.

  14. Synthesis and investigation of solvent effects on the ultraviolet absorption spectra of 5-substituted-4-methyl-3-cyano-6-hydroxy-2-pyridones

    NATASA V. VALENTIC

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available A number of 5-substituted-4-methyl-3-cyano-6-hydroxy-2-pyridones from cyanoacetamide and the corresponding alkyl ethyl acetoacetates were synthesized according to modified literature procedures. The alkyl ethyl acetoacetates were obtained by the reaction of C-alkylation of ethyl acetoacetate. An investigation of the reaction conditions for the synthesis of 4-methyl-3-cyano-6-hydroxy-2-pyridone from cyanoacetamide and ethyl acetoacetate in eight different solvents was also performed. The ultraviolet absorption spectra of synthesized pyridones were measured in nine different solvents in the range 200–400 nm. The effects of solvent polarity and hydrogen bonding on the absorption spectra are interpreted by means of linear solvation energy relationships using a general equation of the form n = n0 + sp* + aa + bb, where p* is a measure of the solvent polarity, a is the scale of the solvent hydrogen bond donor acidities and b is the scale of the solvent hydrogen bond acceptor basicities.

  15. Solvent sorting in (mixed solvent electrolyte) systems: Time-resolved ...

    lar solvents as an effective single component dipo- lar liquid that is characterized ... and time (t) dependent solvation energy of mobile dipo- lar solute with density ..... Even though this way for modification of C is purely ad- hoc, the observation ...

  16. Isolation Of Compounds Of Steroids Teripang Gamat (Stichopus variegatus With Various Types Of Solvents

    Meydia Meydia

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available AbstractSea cucumber is one of the fisheries commodity that has an important economic value. Generally is traded in dried form (beche-de-mer. One of thebioactive substances contained in sea cucumber is steroid compounds that serves as an aphrodisiac and sex reversal. The purpose of this study was to extract the steroid of the gamma sea cucumber by using three types of solvents (methanol, ethyl acetate and hexane and get the best solvent in producing the highest yield of the steroids. The study revealed that steroid of gamma sea cucumber (Stichopus variegatus dissolved completely ethyl acetate (semi-polar solvent during the first phase, second phase and the third phase of extraction. In the methanol (polar solvent steroids only dissolved in the first extraction phase, while using the hexane (non polar solvent steroid was undetectable. Fractionation by thin layer chromatography was obtained two fractions that identified as cholesterol (Rf = 0.96 and testosterone (Rf = 0.91.

  17. High stability of few layer graphene nanoplatelets in various solvents

    Xu, X; Zhou, Jian; Lubineau, Gilles

    2017-01-01

    Dispersion of few-layer graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs) in liquid media is a crucial step for various applications. Here, we highlight a simple, nondestructive method for preparing stable aqueous colloidal solutions with GNP powder quickly dispersed in 5 wt.% sodium–hypochlorite- (NaClO) and sodium-bromide- (NaBr) salted solvent by bath sonication. This method makes it possible to easily prepare a highly concentrated colloidal solution (1 mgcenterdotml−1) of GNPs that can easily be re-dispersed in water (treated GNPs). The aqueous suspension we prepared remained stable for longer than a few weeks. We made similar tests with various solvents and dispersibility appeared to decrease with decreasing polarity. High-concentration suspensions using our facile dispersion method could be of particular interest to the large community using graphene for a diversity of applications.

  18. High stability of few layer graphene nanoplatelets in various solvents

    Xu, X

    2017-04-25

    Dispersion of few-layer graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs) in liquid media is a crucial step for various applications. Here, we highlight a simple, nondestructive method for preparing stable aqueous colloidal solutions with GNP powder quickly dispersed in 5 wt.% sodium–hypochlorite- (NaClO) and sodium-bromide- (NaBr) salted solvent by bath sonication. This method makes it possible to easily prepare a highly concentrated colloidal solution (1 mgcenterdotml−1) of GNPs that can easily be re-dispersed in water (treated GNPs). The aqueous suspension we prepared remained stable for longer than a few weeks. We made similar tests with various solvents and dispersibility appeared to decrease with decreasing polarity. High-concentration suspensions using our facile dispersion method could be of particular interest to the large community using graphene for a diversity of applications.

  19. Neutron polarization in polarized 3He targets

    Friar, J.L.; Gibson, B.F.; Payne, G.L.; Bernstein, A.M.; Chupp, T.E.

    1990-01-01

    Simple formulas for the neutron and proton polarizations in polarized 3 He targets are derived assuming (1) quasielastic final states; (2) no final-state interactions; (3) no meson-exchange currents; (4) large momentum transfers; (5) factorizability of 3 He SU(4) response-function components. Numerical results from a wide variety of bound-state solutions of the Faddeev equations are presented. It is found that this simple model predicts the polarization of neutrons in a fully polarized 3 He target to be 87%, while protons should have a slight residual polarization of -2.7%. Numerical studies show that this model works very well for quasielastic electron scattering

  20. The effect of solvents on the stabilities (color and Fe) of anthocyanin isolated from the red-color-melinjo peels

    Tarmizi, Ermiziar, E-mail: uph-ermi@yahoo.com, E-mail: ermitarmizi@gmail.com; Saragih, Raskita, E-mail: raskitasaragih@yahoo.com [Indonesia Institute of Technology (ITI), Raya PuspiptekSerpong, Tangerang Banten 15320 (Indonesia); Lalasari, Latifa Hanum, E-mail: ifa-sari@yahoo.com, E-mail: lati003@lipi.go.id [Research Centre for Metallurgy and Material, Indonesian Institute of Sciences (LIPI), KawasanPuspiptekSerpong, Tangerang Selatan 15314 (Indonesia)

    2015-12-29

    Anthocyanin from the red-color-melinjo peels could be isolated using a polar solvent (ethanol) [ermiziar, 2010]. The amount of hydrocarbons in the structure of anthocyanin might cause that anthocyanin could be isolated using a non polar solvent. The purpose of research is to isolate anthocyanin using non polar solvents (hexane and petroleum ether) with maceration steps for 24 hours and separate solvents using rotary evaporator equipment. The stability of anthocyanin could be observed every week (1,2,3 and 4 weeks) in various environmental conditions (with or without light in refrigerator and open or closed storage). The characterization of anthocyanin was analyzed with visual (physic photo) and or using equipments such as Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) for determining functional groups, Ultraviolet–Visible Spectroscopy (UV/Vis) with 500-550 nm wavelengths for deciding absorption of anthocyanin and atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) for analyzing Fe element. The result showed that anthocyanin isolation with hexane solvent has yield higher than petroleum eter solvent. From the results of physic observation for 4 weeks looked that there are changing colors of samples significant after 3 and 4 weeks in cooler with or without light. The stability of anthocyanin color was the best on the storage time until 2 weeks using hexane solvent in refrigerator and closed condition that it has absorption of 0.6740 with 500 nm wavelengths and Fe concentration 6.29 ppm.

  1. The effect of solvents on the stabilities (color and Fe) of anthocyanin isolated from the red-color-melinjo peels

    Tarmizi, Ermiziar; Saragih, Raskita; Lalasari, Latifa Hanum

    2015-01-01

    Anthocyanin from the red-color-melinjo peels could be isolated using a polar solvent (ethanol) [ermiziar, 2010]. The amount of hydrocarbons in the structure of anthocyanin might cause that anthocyanin could be isolated using a non polar solvent. The purpose of research is to isolate anthocyanin using non polar solvents (hexane and petroleum ether) with maceration steps for 24 hours and separate solvents using rotary evaporator equipment. The stability of anthocyanin could be observed every week (1,2,3 and 4 weeks) in various environmental conditions (with or without light in refrigerator and open or closed storage). The characterization of anthocyanin was analyzed with visual (physic photo) and or using equipments such as Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) for determining functional groups, Ultraviolet–Visible Spectroscopy (UV/Vis) with 500-550 nm wavelengths for deciding absorption of anthocyanin and atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) for analyzing Fe element. The result showed that anthocyanin isolation with hexane solvent has yield higher than petroleum eter solvent. From the results of physic observation for 4 weeks looked that there are changing colors of samples significant after 3 and 4 weeks in cooler with or without light. The stability of anthocyanin color was the best on the storage time until 2 weeks using hexane solvent in refrigerator and closed condition that it has absorption of 0.6740 with 500 nm wavelengths and Fe concentration 6.29 ppm

  2. A class of fluorescent heterocyclic dyes revisited: photophysics, structure, and solvent effects

    Zhu, Lianjie; Jensen, Hans-Christian Becker; Henriksen, Lars

    2009-01-01

    The photophysical behavior of a series of 2-methylthio-5-(Z-carbonyl)thieno-[3,4-e]-3,4-dihydro-1,2,3-triazine-4-ones was investigated by absorption and emission spectroscopy in a range of solvents representing a systematic variation in polarity, polarizability, as well as hydrogen bond donating ...

  3. Spectral behaviour of eosin Y in different solvents and aqueous surfactant media

    Chakraborty, Moumita; Panda, Amiya Kumar

    2011-10-01

    Photophysical behaviour of the anionic xanthene dye, eosin Y (EY) was investigated in solvents of different polarities as well as in the presence of aqueous cationic surfactants. From the correlation between ET(30) and Kosower Z values of EY in different solvents, subsequent parameters for EY were determined in the presence of surfactants. A red shift, both in the absorption and emission spectra of EY, was observed with decreasing solvent polarity. Dimerisation of EY was found to be dependent on solvent polarity. Cationic surfactants retarded the process of dimerisation, which were evident from the lower dimerisation constant ( KD) values, compared to that of in pure water. Dye-surfactant interaction constants were determined at different temperatures (298-318 K) and subsequently the thermodynamic parameters, viz., Δ G°, Δ H° and Δ S° were evaluated using the interaction constant values. The fluorescence spectra of EY followed the same trend as in the absorption spectra, although with lesser extents. Stokes shifts were calculated and correlated with the polarity of the medium. Fluorescence of EY was initially quenched by the cationic surfactants in their pre-micellar region, which then followed a red shift with intensity enhancement. Fluorescence quenching was found to be of Stern-Volmer type where the excited state lifetime of EY remained unchanged in different surfactant media. However, the anisotropy value of EY was changed in the post micellar region of surfactants.

  4. Use of solvent to regulate the degree of polymerisation in weakly associated supramolecular oligomers

    Bähring, Steffen; Kim, D. S.; Duedal, T.

    2014-01-01

    Using a tetrathiafulvalene functionalised calix[4] pyrrole (TTF-C[4]P; 1) and alkyl diester-linked bis-dinitrophenols (2-4), it was found that the solvent polarity and linker length have an effect on the molecular aggregation behaviour. 2D H-1 NOESY, DOSY NMR and UV-vis-NIR spectroscopic studies...

  5. Solvent effects on the fluorescence and effective three-photon absorption of a Zn(II)-[meso-tetrakis(4-octyloxyphenyl)porphyrin

    Wan, Yong; Xue, Yuxiong; Sheng, Ning; Rui, Guanghao; Lv, Changgui; He, Jun; Gu, Bing; Cui, Yiping

    2018-06-01

    The fluorescence and effective three-photon absorption (3PA) properties of Zn(II)-[meso-tetrakis(4-octyloxyphenyl)porphyrin] (labeled Zn(II)-porphyrin) dissolved in three different polar solvents were systematically investigated. The electrochemical and photophysical properties of Zn(II)-porphyrin were investigated by 1H NMR spectra, IR spectra, mass spectroscopy, and electronic absorption spectra. The fluorescence emission of Zn(II)-porphyrin in three different solvents excited at the wavelengths of 420 nm (Soret band) and 550 nm (Q-band) were analyzed. By performing Z-scan experiments with femtosecond laser pulses at a wavelength of 800 nm, the effective 3PA process of Zn(II)-porphyrin in three different solvents was observed and the underlying mechanism was discussed in detail. It is found that the fluorescence spectra slightly depend on the polarity of the solvent. Interestingly, the effective 3PA properties of Zn(II)-porphyrin strongly depend on the solvent polarity. The lower the solvent polarity is, the larger effective 3PA cross-section is. Low polar solvents are beneficial to applications of Zn(II)-porphyrin in optical limiting, photodynamic therapy, etc.

  6. Influence of the solvent environments on the spectral features of CdSe quantum dots with and without ZnS shell

    Ibnaouf, K.H., E-mail: kheo90@gmail.com [Al Imam Mohammad Ibn Saud Islamic University (IMSIU), Physics Department, College of Science, P.O. Box 90905, Riyadh 11623 (Saudi Arabia); Prasad, Saradh; Al Salhi, M.S.; Hamdan, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, College of Science, King Saud University, P.O. Box 2455, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia); Research Chair for Laser Diagnosis of Cancer, King Saud University (Saudi Arabia); Zaman, M.B. [CEREM, College of Engineering, King Saud University (Saudi Arabia); Advanced Medical Research Institute of Canada, Sudbury (Canada); El Mir, L. [Al Imam Mohammad Ibn Saud Islamic University (IMSIU), Physics Department, College of Science, P.O. Box 90905, Riyadh 11623 (Saudi Arabia)

    2014-05-01

    The spectral properties of 5 nm size of bare CdSe and (CdSe)ZnS core–shell quantum dots (QDs) have been recorded and investigated under different solvent environments with different polarities and different concentrations. The results showed that the spectral profile of absorption did not change for both quantum dots in different solvents under a wide range of concentrations. On the other hand, the photoluminescence (PL) spectra of (CdSe)ZnS core–shell quantum dots in non-polar solvents showed two bands; the primary around 420 nm and the secondary around 620 nm. In contrast, the PL spectra of bare CdSe in non-polar solvents, showed a very strong band around 590 nm, with a total absence of the primary wavelength band at 420 nm. Under high polar solvent environments, bare CdSe showed a new peak around 420 nm, which was totally absent in non-polar solvent. Therefore, the solvent plays an important role in the PL spectra of bare CdSe and (CdSe)ZnS core–shell quantum dots.

  7. Improved Purex solvent scrubbing methods

    Mailen, J.C.; Tallent, O.K.

    1984-01-01

    Studies of hydrazine and hydroxylamine salts as solvent scrubbing agents that can be decomposed into gases are summarized. Results from testing of countercurrent scrubbers and solid sorber columns that produce lesser amounts of permanent salts are reported. The status of studies of the acid-degradation of paraffin diluent and the options for removal of long-chain organic acids is given

  8. Risk assessment for halogenated solvents

    Travis, C.C.

    1988-01-01

    A recent development in the cancer risk area is the advent of biologically based pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic models. These models allow for the incorporation of biological and mechanistic data into the risk assessment process. These advances will not only improve the risk assessment process for halogenated solvents but will stimulate and guide basic research in the biological area

  9. Nonlocal Poisson-Fermi model for ionic solvent.

    Xie, Dexuan; Liu, Jinn-Liang; Eisenberg, Bob

    2016-07-01

    We propose a nonlocal Poisson-Fermi model for ionic solvent that includes ion size effects and polarization correlations among water molecules in the calculation of electrostatic potential. It includes the previous Poisson-Fermi models as special cases, and its solution is the convolution of a solution of the corresponding nonlocal Poisson dielectric model with a Yukawa-like kernel function. The Fermi distribution is shown to be a set of optimal ionic concentration functions in the sense of minimizing an electrostatic potential free energy. Numerical results are reported to show the difference between a Poisson-Fermi solution and a corresponding Poisson solution.

  10. Activity and conformation of lysozyme in molecular solvents, protic ionic liquids (PILs) and salt-water systems.

    Wijaya, Emmy C; Separovic, Frances; Drummond, Calum J; Greaves, Tamar L

    2016-09-21

    Improving protein stabilisation is important for the further development of many applications in the pharmaceutical, specialty chemical, consumer product and agricultural sectors. However, protein stabilization is highly dependent on the solvent environment and, hence, it is very complex to tailor protein-solvent combinations for stable protein maintenance. Understanding solvent features that govern protein stabilization will enable selection or design of suitable media with favourable solution environments to retain protein native conformation. In this work the structural conformation and activity of lysozyme in 29 solvent systems were investigated to determine the role of various solvent features on the stability of the enzyme. The solvent systems consisted of 19 low molecular weight polar solvents and 4 protic ionic liquids (PILs), both at different water content levels, and 6 aqueous salt solutions. Small angle X-ray scattering, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and UV-vis spectroscopy were used to investigate the tertiary and secondary structure of lysozyme along with the corresponding activity in various solvation systems. At low non-aqueous solvent concentrations (high water content), the presence of solvents and salts generally maintained lysozyme in its native structure and enhanced its activity. Due to the presence of a net surface charge on lysozyme, electrostatic interactions in PIL-water systems and salt solutions enhanced lysozyme activity more than the specific hydrogen-bond interactions present in non-ionic molecular solvents. At higher solvent concentrations (lower water content), solvents with a propensity to exhibit the solvophobic effect, analogous to the hydrophobic effect in water, retained lysozyme native conformation and activity. This solvophobic effect was observed particularly for solvents which contained hydroxyl moieties. Preferential solvophobic effects along with bulky chemical structures were postulated to result in less

  11. Characterization of polarized THP-1 macrophages and polarizing ability of LPS and food compounds.

    Chanput, Wasaporn; Mes, Jurriaan J; Savelkoul, Huub F J; Wichers, Harry J

    2013-02-01

    Little is known about the polarizing potential of currently used human macrophage cell lines, while a better understanding phenomena can support the prediction of effects in vivo based on in vitro analysis. To test the polarization capability of PMA differentiated-THP-1 macrophages (M0), cells were stimulated with 20 ng ml(-1) IFNγ + 1 μg ml(-1) LPS and 20 ng ml(-1) IL-4, which are known to influence macrophage polarization in vivo and ex vivo into the M1 and M2 state, respectively. Apart from several well-known M1 and M2 markers, also new possible markers for M1 and M2 polarization were analysed in this study. The expression of M1 marker genes was up-regulated in IFNγ + LPS stimulated-M0 THP-1 macrophages. The IL-4 stimulated-M0 THP-1 macrophages expressed M2 cell membrane receptor genes. However, M2 chemokine and their receptor genes were only slightly up-regulated which might be due to the complexity of the secondary cell-cell interaction of the chemokine system. Lipopolysaccharides from E. coli (LPS) and food compounds [lentinan, vitamin D3 (vD3) and the combination of lentinan + vitamin D3 (Len + vD3)] were investigated for their polarizing ability on M0 THP-1 macrophages towards either the M1 or M2 state. LPS (700 ng ml(-1)) was able to skew M0 THP-1 macrophages towards the M1 direction since all analysed M1 marker genes were strongly expressed. Lentinan, vD3 and Len + vD3 did not induce expression of either M1 or M2 markers, indicating no polarizing ability of these compounds. Based on the expression of M1 and M2 marker genes we concluded that THP-1 macrophages could be successfully polarized into either the M1 or M2 state. Therefore, they can be used as a new macrophage polarizing model to estimate the polarizing/switching ability of test food compounds.

  12. Polarized electron sources

    Prepost, R.

    1994-01-01

    The fundamentals of polarized electron sources are described with particular application to the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The SLAC polarized electron source is based on the principle of polarized photoemission from Gallium Arsenide. Recent developments using epitaxially grown, strained Gallium Arsenide cathodes have made it possible to obtain electron polarization significantly in excess of the conventional 50% polarization limit. The basic principles for Gallium and Arsenide polarized photoemitters are reviewed, and the extension of the basic technique to strained cathode structures is described. Results from laboratory measurements of strained photocathodes as well as operational results from the SLAC polarized source are presented

  13. Polarized electron sources

    Prepost, R. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    1994-12-01

    The fundamentals of polarized electron sources are described with particular application to the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The SLAC polarized electron source is based on the principle of polarized photoemission from Gallium Arsenide. Recent developments using epitaxially grown, strained Gallium Arsenide cathodes have made it possible to obtain electron polarization significantly in excess of the conventional 50% polarization limit. The basic principles for Gallium and Arsenide polarized photoemitters are reviewed, and the extension of the basic technique to strained cathode structures is described. Results from laboratory measurements of strained photocathodes as well as operational results from the SLAC polarized source are presented.

  14. Polarized neutron spectrometer

    Abov, Yu.G.; Novitskij, V.V.; Alfimenkov, V.P.; Galinskij, E.M.; Mareev, Yu.D.; Pikel'ner, L.B.; Chernikov, A.N.; Lason', L.; Tsulaya, V.M.; Tsulaya, M.I.

    2000-01-01

    The polarized neutron spectrometer, intended for studying the interaction of polarized neutrons with nuclei and condensed media in the area of energies from thermal up to several electron-volt, is developed at the IBR-2 reactor (JINR, Dubna). Diffraction on the Co(92%)-Fe(8%) magnetized monocrystals is used for the neutron polarization and polarization analysis. The neutron polarization within the whole energy range equals ∼ 95% [ru

  15. Ultrasonication-Assisted Solvent Extraction of Quercetin Glycosides from ‘Idared’ Apple Peels

    Gwendolyn M. Huber

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Quercetin and quercetin glycosides are physiologically active flavonol molecules that have been attributed numerous health benefits. Recovery of such molecules from plant matrices depends on a variety of factors including polarity of the extraction solvent. Among the solvents of a wide range of dielectric constants, methanol recovered the most quercetin and its glycosides from dehydrated ‘Idared’ apple peels. When ultra-sonication was employed to facilitate the extraction, exposure of 15 min of ultrasound wavelengths of dehydrated apple peel powder in 80% to 100% (v/v methanol in 1:50 (w:v solid to solvent ratio provided the optimum extraction conditions for quercetin and its glycosides. Acidification of extraction solvent with 0.1% (v/v or higher concentrations of HCl led to hydrolysis of naturally occurring quercetin glycosides into the aglycone as an extraction artifact.

  16. NaPdPS{sub 4} and RbPdPS{sub 4}: systems with infinite straight ((1)/({infinity}))[PdPS{sub 4}]{sup -} chains soluble in polar solvents and the structure of cubic RbPdPS{sub 4}{l_brace}Rb{sub 0.33}P{sub 0.4}S{sub 2.23}O{sub x}{r_brace}

    Coste, Servane; Hanko, Jason; Bujoli-Doeuff, Martine; Louarn, Guy; Evain, Michel; Brec, Raymond; Alonso, Bruno; Jobic, S; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G

    2003-11-01

    The synthesis, crystal structures, chemical and spectroscopic properties of NaPdPS{sub 4}, RbPdPS{sub 4}, and RbPdPS{sub 4}{l_brace}Rb{sub 0.33}P{sub 0.4}S{sub 2.23}O{sub x}{r_brace} are described. NaPdPS{sub 4}, RbPdPS{sub 4}, are isostructural and crystallize in the tetragonal system I4/mcm with cell parameters a=7.3074(8) A, c=12.2308(14) A and a=8.2954(3) A, c=12.2284(4) A respectively. RbPdPS{sub 4}{l_brace}Rb{sub 0.33}P{sub 0.4}S{sub 2.23}O{sub x}{r_brace} is cubic, space group Pm-3n and a=12.0042(2) A. All compounds contain the same ((1)/({infinity}))[PdPS{sub 4}]{sup -} chains made of alternating square planar Pd{sup 2+} cations and tetrahedral [PS{sub 4}]{sup 3-} anions. RbPdPS{sub 4}{l_brace}Rb{sub 0.33}P{sub 0.4}S{sub 2.23}O{sub x}{r_brace} contains co-crystallized highly disordered molecular species encapsulated within [Rb{sub 8}] cubic cavities. Spectroscopic solid state {sup 31}P NMR, infrared and Raman data as well as elemental analysis suggest that these species could be S{sub n}{sup 2-} (n=3 or 4) anions and possibly cationic [P{sub 4}S{sub 6}O]{sup 6+} fragments. NaPdPS{sub 4} and RbPdPS{sub 4} exhibit exfoliative dissolution in polar solvents giving rise to solutions that show signs of complex fluid behavior.

  17. Iodine removing method in organic solvent

    Suzuki, Takeo; Sakurai, Manabu

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To effectively remove iodine in an organic solvent to thereby remove iodine in the solvent that can be re-used or put to purning treatment. Method: Organic solvent formed from wastes of nuclear facilities is mixed with basic lead acetate, or silica gel or activated carbon incorporated with such a compound to adsorb iodine in the organic solvent to the basic lead acetate. Then, iodine in the organic solvent is removed by separating to eliminate the basic lead acetate adsorbing iodine from the organic solvent or by passing the organic solvent through a tower or column charged or pre-coated with silica gel or activated carbon incorporated with lead acetate. By using basic lead acetate as the adsorbents, iodine can effective by adsorbed and eliminated. Thus, the possibility of circumstantial release of iodine can be reduced upon reusing or burning treatment of the organic solvent. (Kamimura, M.)

  18. Computer Aided Solvent Selection and Design Framework

    Mitrofanov, Igor; Conte, Elisa; Abildskov, Jens

    and computer-aided tools and methods for property prediction and computer-aided molecular design (CAMD) principles. This framework is applicable for solvent selection and design in product design as well as process design. The first module of the framework is dedicated to the solvent selection and design...... in terms of: physical and chemical properties (solvent-pure properties); Environment, Health and Safety (EHS) characteristic (solvent-EHS properties); operational properties (solvent–solute properties). 3. Performing the search. The search step consists of two stages. The first is a generation and property...... identification of solvent candidates using special software ProCAMD and ProPred, which are the implementations of computer-aided molecular techniques. The second consists of assigning the RS-indices following the reaction–solvent and then consulting the known solvent database and identifying the set of solvents...

  19. Canyon solvent cleaning with solid adsorbents

    Reif, D.J.

    1987-01-01

    The HM Process at the Savannah River Plant (SRP) uses 7.5% tributyl phosphate in n-paraffin as an extraction solvent. During use, the solvent is altered due to hydrolysis and radiolysis, forming materials that influence product losses, product decontamination, and separation efficiencies. Laboratory studies to improve online solvent cleaning have shown that carbonate washing, although removing residual solvent activity, does not remove binding ligands that hold fission products in the solvent. Treatment of solvent with a solid adsorbent removes binding ligands and significantly improves recycle solvent performance. Both laboratory work defining a full-scale adsorption process and the use of the process to clean HM Process first cycle solvent are presented

  20. Recent solvent extraction experience at Savannah River

    Gray, L.W.; Burney, G.A.; Gray, J.H.; Hodges, M.E.; Holt, D.L.; Macafee, I.M.; Reif, D.J.; Shook, H.E.

    1986-01-01

    Tributyl phosphate-based solvent extraction processes have been used at Savannah River for more than 30 years to separate and purify thorium, uranium, neptunium, plutonium, americium, and curium isotopes. This report summarizes the advancement of solvent extraction technology at Savannah River during the 1980's. Topics that are discussed include equipment improvements, solvent treatment, waste reduction, and an improved understanding of the various chemistries in the process streams entering, within, and leaving the solvent extraction processes

  1. Solvent extraction studies of RERTR silicide fuels

    Gouge, Anthony P.

    1983-01-01

    Uranium silicide fuels, which are candidate RERTR fuel compositions, may require special considerations in solvent extraction reprocessing. Since Savannah River Plant may be reprocessing RERTR fuels as early as 1985, studies have been conducted at Savannah River Laboratory to demonstrate the solvent extraction behavior of this fuel. Results of solvent extraction studies with both unirradiated and irradiated fuel are presented along with the preliminary RERTR solvent extraction reprocessing flow sheet for Savannah River Plant. (author)

  2. Effect of Solvents on the Product Distribution and Reaction Rate of a Buchwald-Hartwig Amination Reaction

    Christensen, H.; Kiil, Søren; Dam-Johansen, Kim

    2006-01-01

    The Buchwald-Hartwig amination reaction between p-bromotoluene and piperazine in the presence of the homogeneous catalytic system Pd(dba)(2)/(+/-)-BINAP and the base NaO-t-Bu was investigated in two different classes of solvents: aprotic, nonpolar and aprotic, polar. The reaction was carried out...... solvent for the Buchwald-Hartwig amination reaction under the conditions applied was m-xylene....

  3. Crystal Nucleation of Tolbutamide in Solution: Relationship to Solvent, Solute Conformation, and Solution Structure.

    Zeglinski, Jacek; Kuhs, Manuel; Khamar, Dikshitkumar; Hegarty, Avril C; Devi, Renuka K; Rasmuson, Åke C

    2018-04-03

    The influence of the solvent in nucleation of tolbutamide, a medium-sized, flexible and polymorphic organic molecule, has been explored by measuring nucleation induction times, estimating solvent-solute interaction enthalpies using molecular modelling and calorimetric data, probing interactions and clustering with spectroscopy, and modelling solvent-dependence of molecular conformation in solution. The nucleation driving force required to reach the same induction time is strongly solvent-dependent, increasing in the order: acetonitrilenucleation difficulty is a function of the strength of solvent-solute interaction, with emphasis on the interaction with specific H-bonding polar sites of importance in the crystal structure. A clear exception from this rule is the most difficult nucleation in toluene despite the weakest solvent-solute interactions. However molecular dynamics modelling predicts that tolbutamide assumes an intramolecularly H-bonded conformation in toluene, substantially different from and more stable than the conformation in the crystal structure, and thus presenting an additional barrier to nucleation. This explains why nucleation in toluene is the most difficult and why the relatively higher propensity for aggregation of tolbutamide molecules in toluene solution, as observed with FTIR spectroscopy, does not translate into easier nucleation. Thus, our combined experimental and molecular modelling study suggests that the solvent can influence on the nucleation not only via differences in the desolvation but also through the influence on molecular conformation. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Pressure and solvent shifts of charge transfer absorption band of iodine complexes

    Sawamura, Seiji; Taniguchi, Yoshihiro; Suzuki, Keizo

    1979-01-01

    Absorption spectra of the CT band of I 2 complexes were observed in several nonpolar solvents at 1 bar, and in heptane up to 4400 bar. All solvent shifts were red with an increase in (n 2 - 1)/(2n 2 + 1), the refractive index (n) function of solvents, consistent with the solvent shift theory. On the other hand pressure caused a variety of shifts, that is, red shifts in benzene-, toluene-, and mesitylene-I 2 complexes, an inversion shift from red to blue in HMB-I 2 complex, and blue shifts in Et 3 N-, n-Pr 3 N-, and n-Bu 3 N-I 2 complexes, though increase in pressure invariably raises the (n 2 - 1)/(2n 2 + 1) value of solvent. The pressure shifts of I 2 complexes seem to be interpreted by a sum of two effects. One is the increased polarity of the solvent, which causes a red shift. The other is the decrease in the bond distance between a donor and an acceptor, which contributes to a blue shift in a strong CT complex and to a red shift in a week one. The pressure and solvent shifts of I 2 complexes were compared with those of π-donor-TCNE complexes. (author)

  5. Restoring solvent for nuclear separation processes

    Reif, D.J.

    1987-01-01

    Solvent extraction separation processes are used to recover usable nuclear materials from spent fuels. These processes involve the use of an extractant/diluent (solvent) for separation of the reusable actinides from unwanted fission products. The most widely used processes employ tributyl phosphate as an extractant diluted with a normal-paraffin hydrocarbon. During use, the solvent is altered due to hydrolysis and radiolysis, forming materials that influence product losses, product decontamination, and separation efficiencies. In most processes, the solvent is recycled after cleaning. Solvent cleaning generally involves scrubbing with a sodium carbonate solution. Studies at the Savannah River Laboratory have shown that carbonate washing, although removing residual solvent activity, does not remove more solvent-soluble binding ligands (formed by solvent degradation), which hold fission products in the solvent. Treatment of the solvent with a solid adsorbent after carbonate washing removes binding ligands and significantly improves recycled solvent performance. Laboratory work to establish the advantage of adsorbent cleaning and the development of a full-scale adsorption process is described. The application of this process for cleaning the first cycle solvent of a Savannah River Plant production process is discussed

  6. Solvent Extraction of Furfural From Biomass

    Humphrey, M. F.

    1984-01-01

    Solvent-extraction method reduces energy required to remove furfural produced during acid hydrolysis of biomass. Acid hydrolysis performed in vessel containing both solvents and reacting ingredients. With intimate contact between solvents and aqueous hydrolyis liqour, furfural removed form liquor almost as fast as it forms.

  7. Adaptive Resolution Simulation of MARTINI Solvents

    Zavadlav, Julija; Melo, Manuel N.; Cunha, Ana V.; de Vries, Alex H.; Marrink, Siewert J.; Praprotnik, Matej

    We present adaptive resolution dynamics simulations of aqueous and apolar solvents coarse-grained molecular models that are compatible with the MARTINI force field. As representatives of both classes solvents we have chosen liquid water and butane, respectively, at ambient temperature. The solvent

  8. Polarized targets and beams

    Meyer, W.

    1985-01-01

    First the experimental situation of the single-pion photoproduction and the photodisintegration of the deuteron is briefly discussed. Then a description of the Bonn polarization facilities is given. The point of main effort is put on the polarized target which plays a vital role in the program. A facility for photon induced double polarization experiments at ELSA will be presented in section 4. Properties of a tensor polarized deuteron target are discussed in section 5. The development in the field of polarized targets, especially on new target materials, enables a new generation of polarized target experiments with (polarized) electrons. Some comments on the use of a polarized target in combination with electron beams will be discussed in section 6. Electron deuteron scattering from a tensor polarized deuteron target is considered and compared with other experimental possibilities. (orig./HSI)

  9. The Solvent Selection framework: solvents for organic synthesis, separation processes and ionic-organic synthesis

    Mitrofanov, Igor; Sansonetti, Sascha; Abildskov, Jens

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a systematic integrated framework for solvent selection and solvent design. The framework is divided into several modules, which can tackle specific problems in various solvent-based applications. In particular, three modules corresponding to the following solvent selection pr...

  10. Solvent cleaning system and method for removing contaminants from solvent used in resin recycling

    Bohnert, George W [Harrisonville, MO; Hand, Thomas E [Lee's Summit, MO; DeLaurentiis, Gary M [Jamestown, CA

    2009-01-06

    A two step solvent and carbon dioxide based system that produces essentially contaminant-free synthetic resin material and which further includes a solvent cleaning system for periodically removing the contaminants from the solvent so that the solvent can be reused and the contaminants can be collected and safely discarded in an environmentally safe manner.

  11. Accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) - a fast and automated technique with low solvent consumption for the extraction of solid samples (T12)

    Hoefler, F.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) is a modern extraction technique that significantly streamlines sample preparation. A common organic solvent as well as water is used as extraction solvent at elevated temperature and pressure to increase extraction speed and efficiency. The entire extraction process is fully automated and performed within 15 minutes with a solvent consumption of 18 ml for a 10 g sample. For many matrices and for a variety of solutes, ASE has proven to be equivalent or superior to sonication, Soxhlet, and reflux extraction techniques while requiring less time, solvent and labor. First ASE has been applied for the extraction of environmental hazards from solid matrices. Within a very short time ASE was approved by the U.S. EPA for the extraction of BNAs, PAHs, PCBs, pesticides, herbicides, TPH, and dioxins from solid samples in method 3545. Especially for the extraction of dioxins the extraction time with ASE is reduced to 20 minutes in comparison to 18 h using Soxhlet. In food analysis ASE is used for the extraction of pesticide and mycotoxin residues from fruits and vegetables, the fat determination and extraction of vitamins. Time consuming and solvent intensive methods for the extraction of additives from polymers as well as for the extraction of marker compounds from herbal supplements can be performed with higher efficiencies using ASE. For the analysis of chemical weapons the extraction process and sample clean-up including derivatization can be automated and combined with GC-MS using an online ASE-APEC-GC system. (author)

  12. Micron-sized columnar grains of CH3NH3PbI3 grown by solvent-vapor assisted low-temperature (75 °C) solid-state reaction: The role of non-coordinating solvent-vapor

    Zheng, Huifeng; Liu, Yangqiao; Sun, Jing

    2018-04-01

    The preparation of hybrid perovskite films with large columnar grains via low-temperature solid-state reaction remains a big challenge. Conventional solvent annealing using DMF, DMSO and ethanol, etc. fails to work effectively at low temperature (solar cells based on benzyl-alcohol-vapor annealing (75 °C), delivered much higher photovoltaic performance, better stability and smaller hysteresis than those based on conventional thermal annealing. Additionally, a champion power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 15.1% was obtained and the average PCE reached 12.2% with a tiny deviation. Finally, the mechanism of solvent annealing with non-coordinating solvent was discussed. Moreover, we revealed that high polarity and high boiling point of the solvent used for generating vapor, was critical to grow micron-sized columnar grains at such a low temperature (75 °C). This work will contribute to understanding the mechanism of grain growth in solvent annealing and improving its facility and effectiveness.

  13. Solvent/oxidant-switchable synthesis of multisubstituted quinazolines and benzimidazoles via metal-free selective oxidative annulation of arylamidines.

    Lin, Jian-Ping; Zhang, Feng-Hua; Long, Ya-Qiu

    2014-06-06

    A fast and simple divergent synthesis of multisubstituted quinazolines and benzimidazoles was developed from readily available amidines, via iodine(III)-promoted oxidative C(sp(3))-C(sp(2)) and C(sp(2))-N bond formation in nonpolar and polar solvents, respectively. Further selective synthesis of quinazolines in polar solvent was realized by TEMPO-catalyzed sp(3)C-H/sp(2)C-H direct coupling of the amidine with K2S2O8 as the oxidant. No metal, base, or other additives were needed.

  14. Insecticide solvents: interference with insecticidal action.

    Brattsten, L B; Wilkinson, C F

    1977-06-10

    Several commercial solvent mixtures commonly used as insecticide carriers in spray formulations increase by more than threefold the microsomal N-demethylation of p-chloro N-methylaniline in midgut preparations of southern army-worm (Spodoptera eridania) larvae exposed orally to the test solvents. Under laboratory conditions, the same solvent mixtures exhibit a protective action against the in vivo toxicity of the insecticide carbaryl to the larvae. The data are discussed with respect to possible solvent-insecticide interactions occurring under field conditions and, more broadly, to potential toxicological hazards of these solvents to humans.

  15. Organic solvents in electromembrane extraction: recent insights

    Huang, Chuixiu; Gjelstad, Astrid; Pedersen-Bjergaard, Stig

    2016-01-01

    the introduction. Under the influence of an electrical field, EME is based on electrokinetic migration of the analytes through a supported liquid membrane (SLM), which is an organic solvent immobilized in the pores of the polymeric membrane, and into the acceptor solution. Up to date, close to 150 research...... articles with focus on EME have been published. The current review summarizes the performance of EME with different organic solvents and discusses several criteria for efficient solvents in EME. In addition, the authors highlight their personal perspective about the most promising organic solvents for EME...... and have indicated that more fundamental work is required to investigate and discover new organic solvents for EME....

  16. Relation between separation factor of carbon isotope and chemical reaction of CO2 with amine in nonaqueous solvent

    Takeshita, Kenji; Kitamoto, Asashi

    1989-01-01

    The separation factor for carbon isotope exchange reaction between CO 2 and amine in nonaqueous solvent was related to absorption reaction of CO 2 in a solution. The test solutions were mixtures of primary amine (such as butylamine and tert-butylamine) or secondary amine (such as diethylamine, dipropylamine and dibutylamine) diluted with nonpolar solvent (octane or triethyalmine) or polar solvent (methanol), respectively. The isotope exchange reaction consists of three steps related to chemical reaction of CO 2 in amine and nonaqueous solvent mixture, namely the reaction between CO 2 and carbamic acid, that between CO 2 and amine carbamate, and that between CO 2 and carbamic ion. Above all, the isotope separation factor between CO 2 and carbamic acid had the highest value. The overall separation factor can be higher in amine-nonaqueous solvent mixture where the concentration of carbamic acid becomes higher. (author)

  17. Scattering with polarized neutrons

    Schweizer, J.

    2007-01-01

    In the history of neutron scattering, it was shown very soon that the use of polarized neutron beams brings much more information than usual scattering with unpolarized neutrons. We shall develop here the different scattering methods that imply polarized neutrons: 1) polarized beams without polarization analysis, the flipping ratio method; 2) polarized beams with a uniaxial polarization analysis; 3) polarized beams with a spherical polarization analysis. For all these scattering methods, we shall give examples of the physical problems which can been solved by these methods, particularly in the field of magnetism: investigation of complex magnetic structures, investigation of spin or magnetization densities in metals, insulators and molecular compounds, separation of magnetic and nuclear scattering, investigation of magnetic properties of liquids and amorphous materials and even, for non magnetic material, separation between coherent and incoherent scattering. (author)

  18. Polarized Light Corridor Demonstrations.

    Davies, G. R.

    1990-01-01

    Eleven demonstrations of light polarization are presented. Each includes a brief description of the apparatus and the effect demonstrated. Illustrated are strain patterns, reflection, scattering, the Faraday Effect, interference, double refraction, the polarizing microscope, and optical activity. (CW)

  19. Techniques in polarization physics

    Clausnitzer, G.

    1974-01-01

    A review of the current status of the technical tools necessary to perform different kinds of polarization experiments is presented, and the absolute and relative accuracy with which data can be obtained is discussed. A description of polarized targets and sources of polarized fast neutrons is included. Applications of polarization techniques to other fields is mentioned briefly. (14 figures, 3 tables, 110 references) (U.S.)

  20. An organic solvent-, detergent-, and thermo-stable alkaline protease from the mesophilic, organic solvent-tolerant Bacillus licheniformis 3C5.

    Rachadech, W; Navacharoen, A; Ruangsit, W; Pongtharangkul, T; Vangnai, A S

    2010-01-01

    Bacillus licheniformis 3C5, isolated as mesophilic bacterium, exhibited tolerance towards a wide range of non-polar and polar organic solvents at 45 degrees C. It produced an extracellular organic solvent-stable protease with an apparent molecular mass of approximately 32 kDa. The inhibitory effect of PMSF and EDTA suggested it is likely to be an alkaline serine protease. The protease was active over abroad range of temperatures (45-70 degrees C) and pH (8-10) range with an optimum activity at pH 10 and 65 degrees C. It was comparatively stable in the presence ofa relatively high concentration (35% (v/v)) of organic solvents and various types of detergents even at a relatively high temperature (45 degrees C). The protease production by B. licheniformis 3C5 was growth-dependent. The optimization of carbon and nitrogen sources for cell growth and protease production revealed that yeast extract was an important medium component to support both cell growth and the protease production. The overall properties of the protease produced by B. licheniformis 3C5 suggested that this thermo-stable, solvent-stable, detergent-stable alkaline protease is a promising potential biocatalyst for industrial and environmental applications.

  1. Polarized Moessbauer transitions

    Barb, D.

    1975-01-01

    Theoretical aspects of the emission, absorption and scattering of polarized gamma rays are reviewed for a general case of combined magnetic and electric hyperfine interactions; various possibilities of obtaining polarized gamma sources are described and examples are given of the applications of Moessbauer spectroscopy with polarized gamma rays in solving problems of solid state physics. (A.K.)

  2. Geographical Income Polarization

    Azhar, Hussain; Jonassen, Anders Bruun

    inter municipal income inequality. Counter factual simulations show that rising property prices to a large part explain the rise in polarization. One side-effect of polarization is tendencies towards a parallel polarization of residence location patterns, where low skilled individuals tend to live...

  3. Calculation of polarization effects

    Chao, A.W.

    1983-09-01

    Basically there are two areas of accelerator applications that involve beam polarization. One is the acceleration of a polarized beam (most likely a proton beam) in a synchrotron. Another concerns polarized beams in an electron storage ring. In both areas, numerical techniques have been very useful

  4. Solvent Effects in Asymmetric Hetero Diels-Alder and Ene Reactions

    Johannsen, Mogens; Jørgensen, Karl Anker

    1996-01-01

    The use of polar solvents such as nitromethane or 2-nitropropane leads to a significant improvement of the catalytic properties of a cationic copper-Lewis acid in the hetero Diels-Alder reaction of alkyl glyoxylates with dienes; The scope of a newly developed copper(II)-bisoxazoline catalyst...... for the hetero Diels-Alder reaction is demonstrated by the reaction of different dienes with alkyl glyoxylates in nitroalkane solvents with the formation of the hetero Diels-Alder adduct in high enantiomeric excess as the major product. The synthetic application of the reaction is exemplified by an improved...

  5. Advanced integrated solvent extraction systems

    Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.; Leonard, R.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1997-10-01

    Advanced integrated solvent extraction systems are a series of novel solvent extraction (SX) processes that will remove and recover all of the major radioisotopes from acidic-dissolved sludge or other acidic high-level wastes. The major focus of this effort during the last 2 years has been the development of a combined cesium-strontium extraction/recovery process, the Combined CSEX-SREX Process. The Combined CSEX-SREX Process relies on a mixture of a strontium-selective macrocyclic polyether and a novel cesium-selective extractant based on dibenzo 18-crown-6. The process offers several potential advantages over possible alternatives in a chemical processing scheme for high-level waste treatment. First, if the process is applied as the first step in chemical pretreatment, the radiation level for all subsequent processing steps (e.g., transuranic extraction/recovery, or TRUEX) will be significantly reduced. Thus, less costly shielding would be required. The second advantage of the Combined CSEX-SREX Process is that the recovered Cs-Sr fraction is non-transuranic, and therefore will decay to low-level waste after only a few hundred years. Finally, combining individual processes into a single process will reduce the amount of equipment required to pretreat the waste and therefore reduce the size and cost of the waste processing facility. In an ongoing collaboration with Lockheed Martin Idaho Technology Company (LMITCO), the authors have successfully tested various segments of the Advanced Integrated Solvent Extraction Systems. Eichrom Industries, Inc. (Darien, IL) synthesizes and markets the Sr extractant and can supply the Cs extractant on a limited basis. Plans are under way to perform a test of the Combined CSEX-SREX Process with real waste at LMITCO in the near future.

  6. 40 CFR 80.510 - What are the standards and marker requirements for NRLM diesel fuel and ECA marine fuel?

    2010-07-01

    ... Motor Vehicle Diesel Fuel; Nonroad, Locomotive, and Marine Diesel Fuel; and ECA Marine Fuel General... of marker solvent yellow 124. (2) All motor vehicle and NRLM diesel fuel shall be free of solvent... yellow 124 shall be considered motor vehicle diesel fuel or NRLM diesel fuel, as appropriate. (5) Any...

  7. Superinsulating Polyisocyanate Based Aerogels: A Targeted Search for the Optimum Solvent System.

    Zhu, Zhiyuan; Snellings, Geert M B F; Koebel, Matthias M; Malfait, Wim J

    2017-05-31

    Polyisocyanate based aerogels combine ultralow thermal conductivities with better mechanical properties than silica aerogel, but these properties critically depend on the nature of the gelation solvent, perhaps more so than on any other parameter. Here, we present a systematic study of the relationship between the polyurethane-polyisocyanurate (PUR-PIR) aerogel microstructure, surface area, thermal conductivity, and density and the gelation solvent's Hansen solubility parameters for an industrially relevant PUR-PIR rigid foam formulation. We first investigated aerogels prepared in acetone-dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) blends and observed a minimum in thermal conductivity (λ) and maximum in specific surface area for an acetone:DMSO ratio of 85:15 v/v. We then prepared PUR-PIR aerogels in 32 different solvent blends, divided into three series with δ Dispersion , δ Polarity , and δ H-bonding fixed at 15.94, 11.30, and 7.48 MPa 1/2 , respectively, corresponding to the optimum parameters for the acetone:DMSO series. The aerogel properties display distinct dependencies on the various solubility parameters: aerogels with low thermal conductivity can be synthesized in solvents with a high δ H-bonding parameter (above 7.2) and δ Dispersion around 16.3 MPa 1/2 . In contrast, the δ Polarity parameter is of lesser importance. Our study highlights the importance of the gelation solvent, clarifies the influence of the different solvent properties, and provides a methodology for a targeted search across the solvent chemical space based on the Hansen solubility parameters.

  8. Carbon Nanotube Dispersion in Solvents and Polymer Solutions: Mechanisms, Assembly, and Preferences.

    Pramanik, Chandrani; Gissinger, Jacob R; Kumar, Satish; Heinz, Hendrik

    2017-12-26

    Debundling and dispersion of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in polymer solutions play a major role in the preparation of carbon nanofibers due to early effects on interfacial ordering and mechanical properties. A roadblock toward ultrastrong fibers is the difficulty to achieve homogeneous dispersions of CNTs in polyacrylonitrile (PAN) and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) precursor solutions in solvents such as dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), N,N-dimethylacetamide (DMAc), and N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF). In this contribution, molecular dynamics simulations with accurate interatomic potentials for graphitic materials that include virtual π electrons are reported to analyze the interaction of pristine single wall CNTs with the solvents and polymer solutions at 25 °C. The results explain the barriers toward dispersion of SWCNTs and quantify CNT-solvent, polymer-solvent, as well as CNT-polymer interactions in atomic detail. Debundling of CNTs is overall endothermic and unfavorable with dispersion energies of +20 to +30 mJ/m 2 in the pure solvents, + 20 to +40 mJ/m 2 in PAN solutions, and +20 to +60 mJ/m 2 in PMMA solutions. Differences arise due to molecular geometry, polar, van der Waals, and CH-π interactions. Among the pure solvents, DMF restricts CNT dispersion less due to the planar geometry and stronger van der Waals interactions. PAN and PMMA interact favorably with the pure solvents with dissolution energies of -0.7 to -1.1 kcal per mole monomer and -1.5 to -2.2 kcal per mole monomer, respectively. Adsorption of PMMA onto CNTs is stronger than that of PAN in all solvents as the molecular geometry enables more van der Waals contacts between alkyl groups and the CNT surface. Polar side groups in both polymers prefer interactions with the polar solvents. Higher polymer concentrations in solution lead to polymer aggregation via alkyl groups and reduce adsorption onto CNTs. PAN and PMMA solutions in DMSO and dilute solutions in DMF support CNT dispersion more than other

  9. Acceleration of polarized particles

    Buon, J.

    1992-05-01

    The spin kinetics of polarized beams in circular accelerators is reviewed in the case of spin-1/2 particles (electrons and protons) with emphasis on the depolarization phenomena. The acceleration of polarized proton beams in synchrotrons is described together with the cures applied to reduce depolarization, including the use of 'Siberian Snakes'. The in-situ polarization of electrons in storage rings due to synchrotron radiation is studied as well as depolarization in presence of ring imperfections. The applications of electron polarization to accurately calibrate the rings in energy and to use polarized beams in colliding-beam experiments are reviewed. (author) 76 refs., 19 figs., 1 tab

  10. Theory of polyelectrolytes in solvents.

    Chitanvis, Shirish M

    2003-12-01

    Using a continuum description, we account for fluctuations in the ionic solvent surrounding a Gaussian, charged chain and derive an effective short-ranged potential between the charges on the chain. This potential is repulsive at short separations and attractive at longer distances. The chemical potential can be derived from this potential. When the chemical potential is positive, it leads to a meltlike state. For a vanishingly low concentration of segments, this state exhibits scaling behavior for long chains. The Flory exponent characterizing the radius of gyration for long chains is calculated to be approximately 0.63, close to the classical value obtained for second order phase transitions. For short chains, the radius of gyration varies linearly with N, the chain length, and is sensitive to the parameters in the interaction potential. The linear dependence on the chain length N indicates a stiff behavior. The chemical potential associated with this interaction changes sign, when the screening length in the ionic solvent exceeds a critical value. This leads to condensation when the chemical potential is negative. In this state, it is shown using the mean-field approximation that spherical and toroidal condensed shapes can be obtained. The thickness of the toroidal polyelectrolyte is studied as a function of the parameters of the model, such as the ionic screening length. The predictions of this theory should be amenable to experimental verification.

  11. Polarization effects. Volume 2

    Courant, E.

    1981-01-01

    The use of polarized proton beams in ISABELLE is important for several general reasons: (1) With a single longitudinally polarized proton beam, effects involving parity violation can be identified and hence processes involving weak interactions can be separated from those involving strong and electromagnetic interactions. (2) Spin effects are important in the strong interactions and can be useful for testing QCD. The technique for obtaining polarized proton beams in ISABELLE appears promising, particularly in view of the present development of a polarized proton beam for the AGS. Projections for the luminosity in ISABELLE for collisions of polarized protons - one or both beams polarized with longitudinal or transverse polarization - range from 1/100 to 1 times the luminosity for unpolarized protons.

  12. The Physics of Polarization

    Landi Degl'Innocenti, Egidio

    2015-10-01

    The introductory lecture that has been delivered at this Symposium is a condensed version of an extended course held by the author at the XII Canary Island Winter School from November 13 to November 21, 2000. The full series of lectures can be found in Landi Degl'Innocenti (2002). The original reference is organized in 20 Sections that are here itemized: 1. Introduction, 2. Description of polarized radiation, 3. Polarization and optical devices: Jones calculus and Muller matrices, 4. The Fresnel equations, 5. Dichroism and anomalous dispersion, 6. Polarization in everyday life, 7. Polarization due to radiating charges, 8. The linear antenna, 9. Thomson scattering, 10. Rayleigh scattering, 11. A digression on Mie scattering, 12. Bremsstrahlung radiation, 13. Cyclotron radiation, 14. Synchrotron radiation, 15. Polarization in spectral lines, 16. Density matrix and atomic polarization, 17. Radiative transfer and statistical equilibrium equations, 18. The amplification condition in polarized radiative transfer, and 19. Coupling radiative transfer and statistical equilibrium equations.

  13. Physicochemical and catalytic properties of Au nanorods micro-assembled in solvents of varying dipole moment and refractive index

    Kaur, Rupinder; Pal, Bonamali, E-mail: bpal@thapar.edu

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • Physicochemical activities of Au nanorods in water largely differ from organic solvents. • Au nanorods agglomeration increased with dipole moments of different polar solvents. • Refractive indexes of Au nanorods dispersion in various polar solvents are enhanced. • Electrokinetics significantly altered depending on agglomerated size of Au nanorods. • Catalysis or co-catalysis activity is varied as per the extent of Au nanorods coagulation. - Abstract: This paper deals with the impact of dipole moment (1.66–3.96 D) and refractive index (1.333–1.422) of the dispersion solvent on the plasmon absorption, surface charge, zeta potential, and adsorption properties of Au nanorods (AuNRs). AuNRs (length ≈ 53 nm and width ≈ 20 nm) undergo agglomeration (size 50–180 nm) with increase in the dipole moment of solvent (iPrOH < MeOH < DMF < DMSO). Whereas, no such coagulation occurs in H{sub 2}O and CCl{sub 4} suspension as confirmed by DLS and TEM size distribution. The electrostatic interaction of AuNRs with its surface adsorbed solvent dipoles leads to alteration of the their ionic state, absolute electronic charge and zeta potential (+49.79 mV in H{sub 2}O, +8.99 mV in DMF and −4.65 mV in MeOH dispersion) to a greater extent. This interaction distinctly modifies the adsorption behavior of polar molecules like p-nitrophenol and salicylic acid on AuNRs surface, as evidenced by the measured changes in their electro-kinetic parameters. As a result, we observe a substantial difference in catalytic and co-catalytic activities of AuNRs dispersed in various solvents as mentioned above because the catalytic properties of AuNRs are strongly dependent on the type of solvent in which they are dispersed.

  14. Crosslinked copolyazoles with a zwitterionic structure for organic solvent resistant membranes

    Chisca, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    The preparation of crosslinked membranes with a zwitterionic structure based on a facile reaction between a newly synthesized copolyazole with free OH groups and (3-glycidyloxypropyl)trimethoxysilane (GPTMS) is reported. The new OH-functionalized copolyazole is soluble in common organic solvents, such as tetrahydrofuran (THF), dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), N,N′-dimethylformamide (DMF) and N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) and can be easily processed by phase inversion. After crosslinking with GPTMS, the membranes acquire high solvent resistance. We show the membrane performance and the influence of the crosslinking reaction conditions on the thermal stability, surface polarity, pore morphology, and solvent resistance. By using UV-spectroscopy we monitored the solvent resistance of the membranes in four aggressive solvents (THF, DMSO, DMF and NMP) for 30 days. After this time, only minor changes (less than 2%) were detected for membranes subjected to a crosslinking reaction for 6 hours or longer. Our data suggest that the novel crosslinked membranes can be used for industrial applications in wide harsh environments in the presence of organic solvents.

  15. Effect of extraction solvents on polyphenols and antioxidant activity of medicinal halophytes

    Qasim, M.; Aziz, I.; Gul, B.

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the most effective solvent for extraction of polyphenols and antioxidant activity of medicinally important coastal halophytes (Thespesia populneoides, Salvadora persica, Ipomoea pes-caprae, Suaeda fruticosa and Pluchea lanceolata) known for high antioxidant potential. Five different solvents (water, 80% methanol, 80% ethanol, acetone and chloroform) were used to quantify polyphenols including total phenolic (TPC), total flavonoid (TFC) and proanthocyanidin contents (PC) and antioxidant capacity using DPPH radical scavenging and Ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) activities. Among solvents of different polarities 80% methanol appeared most effective for polyphenol extraction. Thespesia populneoides had the highest polyphenols (TPC, TFC and PC) followed by Salvadora persica. Highest antioxidant activity was also found in T. populneoides and S. persica using the same solvent (80% methanol) which appeared better than synthetic antioxidants (BHA and BHT). The correlation analyses of each solvent showed strong to weak relationships among all studied parameters with maximum values (r and R2) in methanol followed by ethanol and water. Weaker correlation of acetone and chloroform indicates low capacity of these solvents both for polyphenol extraction and antioxidant activity. Our results reveal that aqueous methanol extracts of coastal halophytes had comparatively higher antioxidant activity than commercial antioxidants which indicate both their prospective efficacy and potential to replace synthetic derivatives from edible and medicinal products. (abstract)

  16. Sustainable development of gree solvent separation process

    Lisickov, Kiril; Fidancevska, Emilija; Grujic, Radoslav; Srebrenkoska, Vineta; Kuvendziev, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Solvents defi ne a major part of the environmental performance of processes in the chemical industry and impact on cost, safety and health issues. The idea of green solvents expresses the goal to minimize the environmental impact resulting from the use of solvents in chemical production. In spite of conventional separation methods, precise process green technologies are based on the application of modern processes and process equipment as well as control and management...

  17. Supercritical solvent extraction of oil sand bitumen

    Imanbayev, Ye. I.; Ongarbayev, Ye. K.; Tileuberdi, Ye.; Mansurov, Z. A.; Golovko, A. K.; Rudyk, S.

    2017-08-01

    The supercritical solvent extraction of bitumen from oil sand studied with organic solvents. The experiments were performed in autoclave reactor at temperature above 255 °C and pressure 29 atm with stirring for 6 h. The reaction resulted in the formation of coke products with mineral part of oil sands. The remaining products separated into SARA fractions. The properties of the obtained products were studied. The supercritical solvent extraction significantly upgraded extracted natural bitumen.

  18. Canyon solvent cleaning with activated alumina

    Reif, D.J.

    1987-01-01

    This paper presents recent work at SRL concerning the cleaning of solvent extraction solvent used at SRP. The paper explains why we undertook the work, and some laboratory studies on two approaches to solvent cleaning, namely extended carbonate washing and use of solid adsorbents. The paper then discusses scale-up of the preferred method and the results of the full-scale cleaning. 19 figs

  19. Workshop on polarized neutron filters and polarized pulsed neutron experiments

    Itoh, Shinichi

    2004-07-01

    The workshop was held in KEK by thirty-three participants on April 26, 2004. The polarized neutron filter method was only discussed. It consists of three parts; the first part was discussed on the polarized neutron methods, the second part on the polarized neutron experiments and the third on the pulse neutron spectrometer and polarized neutron experiments. The six papers were presented such as the polarized 3 He neutron spin filter, neutron polarization by proton polarized filter, soft master and neutron scattering, polarized neutron in solid physics, polarization experiments by chopper spectroscope and neutron polarization system in superHRPD. (S.Y.)

  20. Natural deep eutectic solvents (NADES) as green solvents for carbon dioxide capture

    Mulia, Kamarza; Putri, Sylvania; Krisanti, Elsa; Nasruddin

    2017-03-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effectiveness of Natural Deep Eutectic Solvent (NADES), consisting of choline chloride and a hydrogen bonding donor (HBD) compound, in terms of carbon dioxide absorption. Solubility of carbon dioxide in NADES was found to be influenced HBD compound used and choline chloride to HBD ratio, carbon dioxide pressure, and contact time. HBD and choline/HBD ratios used were 1,2-propanediol (1:2), glycerol (1:2), and malic acid (1:1). The carbon dioxide absorption measurement was conducted using an apparatus that utilizes the volumetric method. Absorption curves were obtained up to pressures of 30 bar, showing a linear relationship between the amount absorbed and the final pressure of carbon dioxide. The choline and 1,2-propanediol eutectic mixture absorbs the highest amount of carbon dioxide, approaching 0.1 mole-fraction at 3.0 MPa and 50°C. We found that NADES ability to absorb carbon dioxide correlates with its polarity as tested using Nile Red as a solvatochromic probe.

  1. Process for hydrogenating coal and coal solvents

    Shridharani, K.G.; Tarrer, A.R.

    1983-02-15

    A novel process is described for the hydrogenation of coal by the hydrogenation of a solvent for the coal in which the hydrogenation of the coal solvent is conducted in the presence of a solvent hydrogenation catalyst of increased activity, wherein the hydrogenation catalyst is produced by reacting ferric oxide with hydrogen sulfide at a temperature range of 260/sup 0/ C to 315/sup 0/ C in an inert atmosphere to produce an iron sulfide hydrogenation catalyst for the solvent. Optimally, the reaction temperature is 275/sup 0/ C. Alternately, the reaction can be conducted in a hydrogen atmosphere at 350/sup 0/ C.

  2. Process for hydrogenating coal and coal solvents

    Tarrer, Arthur R.; Shridharani, Ketan G.

    1983-01-01

    A novel process is described for the hydrogenation of coal by the hydrogenation of a solvent for the coal in which the hydrogenation of the coal solvent is conducted in the presence of a solvent hydrogenation catalyst of increased activity, wherein the hydrogenation catalyst is produced by reacting ferric oxide with hydrogen sulfide at a temperature range of 260.degree. C. to 315.degree. C. in an inert atmosphere to produce an iron sulfide hydrogenation catalyst for the solvent. Optimally, the reaction temperature is 275.degree. C. Alternately, the reaction can be conducted in a hydrogen atmosphere at 350.degree. C.

  3. Aminosilicone solvent recovery methods and systems

    Spiry, Irina Pavlovna; Perry, Robert James; Wood, Benjamin Rue; Singh, Surinder Prabhjot; Farnum, Rachel Lizabeth; Genovese, Sarah Elizabeth

    2018-02-13

    The present invention is directed to aminosilicone solvent recovery methods and systems. The methods and systems disclosed herein may be used to recover aminosilicone solvent from a carbon dioxide containing vapor stream, for example, a vapor stream that leaves an aminosilicone solvent desorber apparatus. The methods and systems of the invention utilize a first condensation process at a temperature from about 80.degree. C. to about 150.degree. C. and a second condensation process at a temperature from about 5.degree. C. to about 75.degree. C. The first condensation process yields recovered aminosilicone solvent. The second condensation process yields water.

  4. Molecular Thermodynamic Modeling of Mixed Solvent Solubility

    Ellegaard, Martin Dela; Abildskov, Jens; O’Connell, John P.

    2010-01-01

    A method based on statistical mechanical fluctuation solution theory for composition derivatives of activity coefficients is employed for estimating dilute solubilities of 11 solid pharmaceutical solutes in nearly 70 mixed aqueous and nonaqueous solvent systems. The solvent mixtures range from...... nearly ideal to strongly nonideal. The database covers a temperature range from 293 to 323 K. Comparisons with available data and other existing solubility methods show that the method successfully describes a variety of observed mixed solvent solubility behaviors using solute−solvent parameters from...

  5. Instrumentation with polarized neutrons

    Boeni, P.; Muenzer, W.; Ostermann, A.

    2009-01-01

    Neutron scattering with polarization analysis is an indispensable tool for the investigation of novel materials exhibiting electronic, magnetic, and orbital degrees of freedom. In addition, polarized neutrons are necessary for neutron spin precession techniques that path the way to obtain extremely high resolution in space and time. Last but not least, polarized neutrons are being used for fundamental studies as well as very recently for neutron imaging. Many years ago, neutron beam lines were simply adapted for polarized beam applications by adding polarizing elements leading usually to unacceptable losses in neutron intensity. Recently, an increasing number of beam lines are designed such that an optimum use of polarized neutrons is facilitated. In addition, marked progress has been obtained in the technology of 3 He polarizers and the reflectivity of large-m supermirrors. Therefore, if properly designed, only factors of approximately 2-3 in neutron intensity are lost. It is shown that S-benders provide neutron beams with an almost wavelength independent polarization. Using twin cavities, polarized beams with a homogeneous phase space and P>0.99 can be produced without significantly sacrificing intensity. It is argued that elliptic guides, which are coated with large m polarizing supermirrors, provide the highest flux.

  6. Tantalum markers in radiography

    Aronson, A.S.; Jonsson, N.; Alberius, P.

    1985-01-01

    The biocompatibility of two types of radiopaque tantalum markers was evaluated histologically. Reactions to pin markers (99.9% purity) and spherical markers (95.2% purity) were investigated after 3-6 weeks in rabbits and 5-48 weeks in children with abnormal growth. Both marker types were firmly attached to bone trabeculae; this was most pronounced in rabbit bone, and no adverse macroscopic reactions were observed. Microscopically, no reactions or only slight fibrosis of bone tissue were detected, while soft tissues only demonstrated a minor inflammatory reaction. Nevertheless, the need for careful preparation and execution of marker implantations is stressed, and particularly avoidance iof the use of emery in sharpening of cannulae. The bioinertness of tantalum was reconfirmed as was its suitability for use as skeletal and soft tissue radiographic markers. (orig.)

  7. Modelos contínuos do solvente: fundamentos Continuum solvation models: fundamentals

    Josefredo R. Pliego Jr

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Continuum solvation models are nowadays widely used in the modeling of solvent effects and the range of applications goes from the calculation of partition coefficients to chemical reactions in solution. The present work presents a detailed explanation of the physical foundations of continuum models. We discuss the polarization of a dielectric and its representation through the volume and surface polarization charges. The Poisson equation for a dielectric was obtained and we have also derived and discuss the apparent surface charge method and its application for free energy of solvation calculations.

  8. Solvent anode for plutonium purification

    Bowersox, D.F.; Fife, K.W.; Christensen, D.C.

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a technique to allow complete oxidation of plutonium from the anode during plutonium electrorefining. This will eliminate the generation of a ''spent'' anode heel which requires further treatment for recovery. Our approach is to employ a solvent metal in the anode to provide a liquid anode pool throughout electrorefining. We use molten salts and metals in ceramic crucibles at 700 0 C. Our goal is to produce plutonium metal at 99.9% purity with oxidation and transfer of more than 98% of the impure plutonium feed metal from the anode into the salt and product phases. We have met these criteria in experiments on the 100 to 1000 g scale. We plan to scale our operations to 4 kg of feed plutonium and to optimize the process parameters

  9. Quantitation of buried contamination by use of solvents. [degradation of silicone polymers by amine solvents

    Pappas, S. P.; Hsiao, Y. C.; Hill, L. W.

    1973-01-01

    Spore recovery form cured silicone potting compounds using amine solvents to degrade the cured polymers was investigated. A complete list of solvents and a description of the effect of each on two different silicone polymers is provided.

  10. Cleanup of 7.5% tributyl phosphate/n-paraffin solvent-extraction solvent

    Reif, D.J.

    1987-02-01

    The HM process at the Savannah River Plant uses 7.5% tributyl phosphate in n-paraffin as an extraction solvent. During use, the solvent is altered due to hydrolysis and radiolysis, forming materials which influence product losses, product decontamination, and separation efficiencies. Laboratory studies to improve online solvent cleaning have shown that carbonate washing, although removing residual solvent activity, does not remove binding ligands which hold fission products in the solvent. Treatment of solvent by an alumina adsorption process removes binding ligands and significantly improves recycle solvent performance. Both laboratory work defining a full-scale alumina adsorption process and the use of the process to clean HM process first cycle solvent is discussed

  11. Implicit solvent simulations of DNA and DNA-protein complexes: Agreement with explicit solvent vs experiment

    Chocholoušová, Jana; Feig, M.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 110, č. 34 (2006), s. 17240-17251 ISSN 1520-6106 Keywords : implicit solvent * explicit solvent * protein DNA complex Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 4.115, year: 2006

  12. Solvent Vapour Detection with Cholesteric Liquid Crystals—Optical and Mass-Sensitive Evaluation of the Sensor Mechanism

    Adnan Mujahid

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Cholesteric liquid crystals (CLCs are used as sensitive coatings for the detection of organic solvent vapours for both polar and non-polar substances. The incorporation of different analyte vapours in the CLC layers disturbs the pitch length which changes the optical properties, i.e., shifting the absorption band. The engulfing of CLCs around non-polar solvent vapours such as tetrahedrofuran (THF, chloroform and tetrachloroethylene is favoured in comparison to polar ones, i.e., methanol and ethanol. Increasing solvent vapour concentrations shift the absorbance maximumto smaller wavelengths, e.g., as observed for THF. Additionally, CLCs have been coated on acoustic devices such as the quartz crystal microbalance (QCM to measure the frequency shift of analyte samples at similar concentration levels. The mass effect for tetrachloroethylene was about six times higher than chloroform. Thus, optical response can be correlated with intercalation in accordance to mass detection. The mechanical stability was gained by combining CLCs with imprinted polymers. Therefore, pre-concentration of solvent vapours was performed leading to an additional selectivity.

  13. Excited-state inter- and intramolecular proton transfer in methyl 3-hydroxy-2-quinoxalinate: effects of solvent and acid or base concentrations

    Dogra, S.K.

    2005-01-01

    Absorption, fluorescence excitation and fluorescence spectroscopy, combined with time-dependent spectroscopy and semi-empirical (AM1) and density functional theory using Gaussian 98 program calculations have been used to study the effects of solvent and acid or base concentration on the spectral characteristics of methyl 3-hydroxy-2-quinoxalinate (M3HQ). M3HQ is present as enol in less polar solvents and as keto in polar media. In non-polar solvents, large Stokes shifted fluorescence band is assigned to the phototautomer, formed by the excited-state intramolecular proton transfer, whereas fluorescence is only observed from keto in the polar solvents. In aqueous and polar solvents the monocation (MC5/MC6) is formed by protonating the carbonyl oxygen atom in the ground (S 0 ) and the first excited singlet states (S 1 ). Dication is formed by protonating one of ?N- atom of MC5/MC6. Monoanion is formed by deprotonating the phenolic proton of enol in the basic solution. pK a values for different prototropic equilibriums were determined in S 0 and S 1 states and discussed

  14. Mn(II)-coordinated Fluorescent Carbon Dots: Preparation and Discrimination of Organic Solvents

    Wang, Yuru; Wang, Tianren; Chen, Xi; Xu, Yang; Li, Huanrong

    2018-04-01

    Herein, we prepared a Mn(II)-coordinated carbon dots (CDs) with fluorescence and MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) bimodal properties by a one-pot solvothermal method and separated via silica column chromatography. The quantum yield of the CDs increased greatly from 2.27% to 6.75% with increase of Mn(II) doping, meanwhile the CDs exhibited a higher MR activity (7.28 mM-1s-1) than that of commercial Gd-DTPA (4.63 mM-1s-1). In addition, white light emitting CDs were obtained by mixing the different types of CDs. Notably, these CDs exhibited different fluorescence emissions in different organic solvents and could be used to discriminate organic solvents based on the polarity and protonation of the solvents.

  15. Multiphoton polarization Bremsstrahlung effect

    Golovinskij, P.A.

    2001-01-01

    A general approach to induced polarization effects was formulated on the basis of theory of many particles in a strong periodic field. Correlation with the perturbation theory is shown and the types of effective polarization potentials both for isolated atoms and ions, and for ions in plasma, are provided. State of art in the theory of forced polarization Bremsstrahlung effect is analyzed and some outlooks for further experimental and theoretical studies are outlined [ru

  16. Electronic excitations in a dielectric continuum solvent with quantum Monte Carlo: Acrolein in water

    Floris, Franca Maria, E-mail: floris@dcci.unipi.it; Amovilli, Claudio [Dipartimento di Chimica e Chimica Industriale, Università di Pisa, Via Risorgimento 35, 56126 Pisa (Italy); Filippi, Claudia [MESA Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands)

    2014-01-21

    We investigate here the vertical n → π{sup *} and π → π{sup *} transitions of s-trans-acrolein in aqueous solution by means of a polarizable continuum model (PCM) we have developed for the treatment of the solute at the quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) level of the theory. We employ the QMC approach which allows us to work with highly correlated electronic wave functions for both the solute ground and excited states and, to study the vertical transitions in the solvent, adopt the commonly used scheme of considering fast and slow dielectric polarization. To perform calculations in a non-equilibrium solvation regime for the solute excited state, we add a correction to the global dielectric polarization charge density, obtained self consistently with the solute ground-state wave function by assuming a linear-response scheme. For the solvent polarization in the field of the solute in the ground state, we use the static dielectric constant while, for the electronic dielectric polarization, we employ the solvent refractive index evaluated at the same frequency of the photon absorbed by the solute for the transition. This choice is shown to be better than adopting the most commonly used value of refractive index measured in the region of visible radiation. Our QMC calculations show that, for standard cavities, the solvatochromic shifts obtained with the PCM are underestimated, even though of the correct sign, for both transitions of acrolein in water. Only by reducing the size of the cavity to values where more than one electron is escaped to the solvent region, we regain the experimental shift for the n → π{sup *} case and also improve considerably the shift for the π → π{sup *} transition.

  17. Electronic excitations in a dielectric continuum solvent with quantum Monte Carlo: Acrolein in water

    Floris, Franca Maria; Amovilli, Claudio; Filippi, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    We investigate here the vertical n → π * and π → π * transitions of s-trans-acrolein in aqueous solution by means of a polarizable continuum model (PCM) we have developed for the treatment of the solute at the quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) level of the theory. We employ the QMC approach which allows us to work with highly correlated electronic wave functions for both the solute ground and excited states and, to study the vertical transitions in the solvent, adopt the commonly used scheme of considering fast and slow dielectric polarization. To perform calculations in a non-equilibrium solvation regime for the solute excited state, we add a correction to the global dielectric polarization charge density, obtained self consistently with the solute ground-state wave function by assuming a linear-response scheme. For the solvent polarization in the field of the solute in the ground state, we use the static dielectric constant while, for the electronic dielectric polarization, we employ the solvent refractive index evaluated at the same frequency of the photon absorbed by the solute for the transition. This choice is shown to be better than adopting the most commonly used value of refractive index measured in the region of visible radiation. Our QMC calculations show that, for standard cavities, the solvatochromic shifts obtained with the PCM are underestimated, even though of the correct sign, for both transitions of acrolein in water. Only by reducing the size of the cavity to values where more than one electron is escaped to the solvent region, we regain the experimental shift for the n → π * case and also improve considerably the shift for the π → π * transition

  18. Electronic excitations in a dielectric continuum solvent with quantum Monte Carlo: Acrolein in water

    Floris, Franca Maria; Filippi, Claudia; Amovilli, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    We investigate here the vertical n → π* and π → π* transitions of s-trans-acrolein in aqueous solution by means of a polarizable continuum model (PCM) we have developed for the treatment of the solute at the quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) level of the theory. We employ the QMC approach which allows us to work with highly correlated electronic wave functions for both the solute ground and excited states and, to study the vertical transitions in the solvent, adopt the commonly used scheme of considering fast and slow dielectric polarization. To perform calculations in a non-equilibrium solvation regime for the solute excited state, we add a correction to the global dielectric polarization charge density, obtained self consistently with the solute ground-state wave function by assuming a linear-response scheme. For the solvent polarization in the field of the solute in the ground state, we use the static dielectric constant while, for the electronic dielectric polarization, we employ the solvent refractive index evaluated at the same frequency of the photon absorbed by the solute for the transition. This choice is shown to be better than adopting the most commonly used value of refractive index measured in the region of visible radiation. Our QMC calculations show that, for standard cavities, the solvatochromic shifts obtained with the PCM are underestimated, even though of the correct sign, for both transitions of acrolein in water. Only by reducing the size of the cavity to values where more than one electron is escaped to the solvent region, we regain the experimental shift for the n → π* case and also improve considerably the shift for the π → π* transition.

  19. Airborne Laser Polarization Sensor

    Kalshoven, James, Jr.; Dabney, Philip

    1991-01-01

    Instrument measures polarization characteristics of Earth at three wavelengths. Airborne Laser Polarization Sensor (ALPS) measures optical polarization characteristics of land surface. Designed to be flown at altitudes of approximately 300 m to minimize any polarizing or depolarizing effects of intervening atmosphere and to look along nadir to minimize any effects depending on look angle. Data from measurements used in conjunction with data from ground surveys and aircraft-mounted video recorders to refine mathematical models used in interpretation of higher-altitude polarimetric measurements of reflected sunlight.

  20. Polarization of Be stars

    Johns, M.W.

    1975-01-01

    Linear polarization of starlight may be produced by electron scattering in the extended atmospheres of early type stars. Techniques are investigated for the measurement and interpretation of this polarization. Polarimetric observations were made of twelve visual double star systems in which at least one member was a B type star as a means of separating the intrinsic stellar polarization from the polarization produced in the interstellar medium. Four of the double stars contained a Be star. Evidence for intrinsic polarization was found in five systems including two of the Be systems, one double star with a short period eclipsing binary, and two systems containing only normal early type stars for which emission lines have not been previously reported. The interpretation of these observations in terms of individual stellar polarizations and their wavelength dependence is discussed. The theoretical basis for the intrinsic polarization of early type stars is explored with a model for the disk-like extended atmospheres of Be stars. Details of a polarimeter for the measurement of the linear polarization of astronomical point sources are also presented with narrow band (Δ lambda = 100A) measurements of the polarization of γ Cas from lambda 4000 to lambda 5800

  1. Polarization at SLC

    Swartz, M.L.

    1988-07-01

    The SLAC Linear Collider has been designed to readily accommodate polarized electron beams. Considerable effort has been made to implement a polarized source, a spin rotation system, and a system to monitor the beam polarization. Nearly all major components have been fabricated. At the current time, several source and polarimeter components have been installed. The installation and commissioning of the entire system will take place during available machine shutdown periods as the commissioning of SLC progresses. It is expected that a beam polarization of 45% will be achieved with no loss in luminosity. 13 refs., 15 figs

  2. Influence of electrolyte ion-solvent interactions on the performances of supercapacitors porous carbon electrodes

    Decaux, C.; Matei Ghimbeu, C.; Dahbi, M.; Anouti, M.; Lemordant, D.; Béguin, F.; Vix-Guterl, C.; Raymundo-Piñero, E.

    2014-10-01

    The development of advanced and safe electrochemical supercapacitors or hybrid supercapacitors combining a battery electrode material such as graphite and a porous carbon electrode implies the use of new electrolytes containing a tetra-alkylammonium or lithium salt dissolved preferentially in a safe and environmentally friendly solvent such as alkylcarbonates. In those systems, the carbon porosity of the activated carbon electrode controls the electrochemical behavior of the whole device. In this work, it is demonstrated that electrolytes containing highly polarizing ions such as Li+ dissolved in polar solvents such as alkylcarbonates do not completely loss their solvation shell at the opposite of what is observed for poorly solvated cations like TEABF4. As a consequence, the optimal carbon pore size for obtaining the largest energy density, while keeping a high power density, is wider when strongly solvated cations, like Li+ are used than for conventional organic electrolytes using acetonitrile as solvent and TEA+ as salt cations. TEA+ cations are easily desolvated and hence are able to penetrate in small pores matching the dimensions of bare ions. The dissimilarity of behavior of alkylcarbonates and acetonitrile based electrolytes highlights the importance of ion-solvent interactions when searching the optimal porous texture for the electrode material.

  3. Solvent effects on extraction of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in ambient aerosol samples

    Flasch Mira

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs in the ambient particulate matter pose one of the most important issues in the focus of environmental management. The concentration of their representative, Benzo(apyrene (BaP, undergoes limitations according to European Union directive. However, a successful control over the pollution levels and their sources is limited by the high uncertainty of analytical and statistical approaches used for their characterization. Here we compare differences in PAH concentrations related to the use of different solvents in the course of ultrasonic extraction of a certified reference material (PM10-like PAH mixture and filter samples of ambient particulate matter collected in Austria for the CG-MS PAH analysis. Using solvents of increasing polarity: Cyclohexane (0,006, Toluene (0,099, Dichloromethane (0,309, Acetone (0,43 and Acetonitrile (0,460, as well as mixtures of those, filters representing high and low concentrations of particulate matter were investigated. Although some scatter of the obtained concentrations was observed no trend related to the polarity of the solvent became visible. Regarding the reproducibility, which can be expected of PAH analysis no significant difference between the different solvents was determined. This result is valid for all compounds under investigation.

  4. Solvent-vapor-assisted imprint lithography

    Voicu, Nicoleta E.; Ludwigs, Sabine; Crossland, Edward J. W.; Andrew, Piers; Steiner, Ullrich

    2007-01-01

    Sub-micrometer features are replicated into high-molecular-weight polymer resists by using solvent-assisted nanoimprint lithography (see figure). By swelling the polymer in a controlled solvent-vapor atmosphere, millibar pressures and ambient temperatures are sufficient to achieve high-fidelity

  5. Into the depths of deep eutectic solvents

    Rodriguez, N.; Alves da Rocha, M.A.; Kroon, M.C.

    2015-01-01

    Ionic liquids (ILs) have been successfully tested in a wide range of applications; however, their high price and complicated synthesis make them infeasible for large scale implementation. A decade ago, a new generation of solvents so called deep eutectic solvents (DESs) was reported for the first

  6. Remediation of Contaminated Soils by Solvent Flushing

    Augustijn, Dionysius C.M.; Jessup, Ron E.; Rao, P. Suresh C.; Wood, A. Lynn

    1994-01-01

    Solvent flushing is a potential technique for remediating a waste disposal/spill site contaminated with organic chemicals. This technique involves the injection of a solvent mixture (e.g., water plus alcohols) that enhances contaminant solubility, reduces the retardation factor, and increases the

  7. Structuring of polymer solutions upon solvent evaporation

    Schaefer, C.; van der Schoot, P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/102140618; Michels, J. J.

    2015-01-01

    The morphology of solution-cast, phase-separated polymers becomes finer with increasing solvent evaporation rate. We address this observation theoretically for a model polymer where demixing is induced by steady solvent evaporation. In contrast to what is the case for a classical, thermal quench

  8. Radiopaque anastomosis marker

    Elliott, D.P.; Halseth, W.L.

    1977-01-01

    This invention relates to split ring markers fabricated in whole or in part from a radiopaque material, usually metal, having the terminal ends thereof and a medial portion formed to define eyelets by means of which said marker can be sutured to the tissue at the site of an anastomosis to provide a visual indication of its location when examined fluoroscopically

  9. Theoretical Study on the Extraction of Alkaline Earth Salts by 18-Crown-6: Roles of Counterions, Solvent Types and Extraction Temperatures

    Saprizal Hadisaputra

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The roles of counterions, solvent types and extraction temperatures on the selectivity of 18-crown-6 (L toward alkaline earth salts MX2 (M = Ca, Sr, Ba; X = Cl-, NO3- have been studied by density functional method at B3LYP level of theory in gas and solvent phase. In gas phase, the chloride anion Cl- is the preference counterion than nitrate anion NO3-. This result is confirmed by the interaction energies, the second order interaction energies, charge transfers, energy difference between HOMO-LUMO and electrostatic potential maps. The presence of solvent reversed the gas phase trend. It is found that NO3- is the preference counterion in solvent phase. The calculated free energies demonstrate that the solvent types strongly change the strength of the complex formation. The free energies are exothermic in polar solvent while for the non polar solvent the free energies are endothermic. As the temperature changes the free energies also vary where the higher the temperatures the lower the free energy values. The calculated free energies are correlated well with the experimental stability constants. This theoretical study would have a strong contribution in planning the experimental conditions in terms of the preference counterions, solvent types and optimum extraction temperatures.

  10. Solvent distillations studies for a reprocessing plant

    Ginisty, C.; Guillaume, B.

    1989-01-01

    The substantial amounts of solvent used in large reprocessing plants are such that considerable care must be paid to solvent management to limit the production of organic wastes. The installation of intensive treatment by chemical regeneration serves to increase the service life of the solvent. General solvent management, combined with a distillation unit under reduced pressure also helps to recycle the two components of the solvent at a low activity level. Distillation also serves to remove the heavy degradation products that are generally responsible for poor hydraulic behavior and for the holdup of radioactive products such as plutonium, zirconium and ruthenium. From the safety standpoint, the flashpoint of the distilled diluent tends to rise. It can therefore be recycled without risk

  11. Method of decomposing radioactive organic solvent wastes

    Uki, Kazuo; Ichihashi, Toshio; Hasegawa, Akira; Sato, Tatsuaki

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To decompose radioactive organic solvent wastes or radioactive hydrocarbon solvents separated therefrom into organic materials under moderate conditions, as well as greatly decrease the amount of secondary wastes generated. Method: Radioactive organic solvent wastes comprising an organic phosphoric acid ester ingredient and a hydrocarbon ingredient as a diluent therefor, or radioactive hydrocarbon solvents separated therefrom are oxidatively decomposed by hydrogen peroxide in an aqueous phosphoric acid solution of phosphoric acid metal salts finally into organic materials to perform decomposing treatment for the radioactive organic solvent wastes. The decomposing reaction is carried out under relatively moderate conditions and cause less burden to facilities or the likes. Further, since the decomposed liquid after the treatment can be reused for the decomposing reaction as a catalyst solution secondary wastes can significantly be decreased. (Yoshihara, H.)

  12. Extraction and identification of cyclobutanones from irradiated cheese employing a rapid direct solvent extraction method.

    Tewfik, Ihab

    2008-01-01

    2-Alkylcyclobutanones (cyclobutanones) are accepted as chemical markers for irradiated foods containing lipid. However, current extraction procedures (Soxhlet-florisil chromatography) for the isolation of these markers involve a long and tedious clean-up regime prior to gas chromatography-mass spectrophotometry identification. This paper outlines an alternative isolation and clean-up method for the extraction of cyclobutanones in irradiated Camembert cheese. The newly developed direct solvent extraction method enables the efficient screening of large numbers of food samples and is not as resource intensive as the BS EN 1785:1997 method. Direct solvent extraction appears to be a simple, robust method and has the added advantage of a considerably shorter extraction time for the analysis of foods containing lipid.

  13. The chemistry of nonaqueous solvents v.4 solution phenomena and aprotic solvents

    Lagowski, J J

    1976-01-01

    The Chemistry of Nonaqueous Solvents, Volume IV: Solution Phenomena and Aprotic Solvents focuses on the chemistry of nonaqueous solvents, with emphasis on solution phenomena and aprotic solvents such as tetramethylurea, inorganic acid chlorides, cyclic carbonates, and sulfolane. This book is organized into seven chapters and begins with an overview of the theory of electrical conductivity and elementary experimental considerations, along with some of the interesting research on nonaqueous solvents. It then turns to a discussion on hydrogen bonding phenomena in nonaqueous systems as probed

  14. PARIS II: Computer Aided Solvent Design for Pollution Prevention

    This product is a summary of U.S. EPA researchers' work developing the solvent substitution software tool PARIS II (Program for Assisting the Replacement of Industrial Solvents, version 2.0). PARIS II finds less toxic solvents or solvent mixtures to replace more toxic solvents co...

  15. Natural deep eutectic solvents as new potential media for green technology

    Dai, Yuntao; Spronsen, Jaap van; Witkamp, Geert-Jan; Verpoorte, Robert; Choi, Young Hae

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Natural products were used as a source for deep eutectic solvents and ionic liquids. ► We define own chemical and physical properties of natural deep eutectic solvents. ► Interaction between natural deep eutectic solvents and solutes was confirmed by NMR. ► The developed natural deep eutectic solvents were applied as green media. - Abstract: Developing new green solvents is one of the key subjects in Green Chemistry. Ionic liquids (ILs) and deep eutectic solvents, thus, have been paid great attention to replace current harsh organic solvents and have been applied to many chemical processing such as extraction and synthesis. However, current ionic liquids and deep eutectic solvents have still limitations to be applied to a real chemical industry due to toxicity against human and environment and high cost of ILs and solid state of most deep eutectic solvents at room temperature. Recently we discovered that many plant abundant primary metabolites changed their state from solid to liquid when they were mixed in proper ratio. This finding made us hypothesize that natural deep eutectic solvents (NADES) play a role as alternative media to water in living organisms and tested a wide range of natural products, which resulted in discovery of over 100 NADES from nature. In order to prove deep eutectic feature the interaction between the molecules was investigated by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. All the tested NADES show clear hydrogen bonding between components. As next step physical properties of NADES such as water activity, density, viscosity, polarity and thermal properties were measured as well as the effect of water on the physical properties. In the last stage the novel NADES were applied to the solubilization of wide range of biomolecules such as non-water soluble bioactive natural products, gluten, starch, and DNA. In most cases the solubility of the biomolecules evaluated in this study was greatly higher than water. Based on the

  16. Natural deep eutectic solvents as new potential media for green technology

    Dai, Yuntao [Natural Products Laboratory, Institute of Biology, Leiden University, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Spronsen, Jaap van; Witkamp, Geert-Jan [Laboratory for Process Equipment, Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Verpoorte, Robert [Natural Products Laboratory, Institute of Biology, Leiden University, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Choi, Young Hae, E-mail: y.choi@chem.leidenuniv.nl [Natural Products Laboratory, Institute of Biology, Leiden University, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands)

    2013-03-05

    Highlights: ► Natural products were used as a source for deep eutectic solvents and ionic liquids. ► We define own chemical and physical properties of natural deep eutectic solvents. ► Interaction between natural deep eutectic solvents and solutes was confirmed by NMR. ► The developed natural deep eutectic solvents were applied as green media. - Abstract: Developing new green solvents is one of the key subjects in Green Chemistry. Ionic liquids (ILs) and deep eutectic solvents, thus, have been paid great attention to replace current harsh organic solvents and have been applied to many chemical processing such as extraction and synthesis. However, current ionic liquids and deep eutectic solvents have still limitations to be applied to a real chemical industry due to toxicity against human and environment and high cost of ILs and solid state of most deep eutectic solvents at room temperature. Recently we discovered that many plant abundant primary metabolites changed their state from solid to liquid when they were mixed in proper ratio. This finding made us hypothesize that natural deep eutectic solvents (NADES) play a role as alternative media to water in living organisms and tested a wide range of natural products, which resulted in discovery of over 100 NADES from nature. In order to prove deep eutectic feature the interaction between the molecules was investigated by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. All the tested NADES show clear hydrogen bonding between components. As next step physical properties of NADES such as water activity, density, viscosity, polarity and thermal properties were measured as well as the effect of water on the physical properties. In the last stage the novel NADES were applied to the solubilization of wide range of biomolecules such as non-water soluble bioactive natural products, gluten, starch, and DNA. In most cases the solubility of the biomolecules evaluated in this study was greatly higher than water. Based on the

  17. Induced Polarization Influences the Fundamental Forces in DNA Base Flipping

    Lemkul, Justin A.; Savelyev, Alexey; MacKerell, Alexander D.

    2014-01-01

    Base flipping in DNA is an important process involved in genomic repair and epigenetic control of gene expression. The driving forces for these processes are not fully understood, especially in the context of the underlying dynamics of the DNA and solvent effects. We studied double-stranded DNA oligomers that have been previously characterized by imino proton exchange NMR using both additive and polarizable force fields. Our results highlight the importance of induced polarization on the base...

  18. System and process for polarity swing assisted regeneration of gas selective capture liquids

    Heldebrant, David J.; Tegrotenhuis, Ward E.; Freeman, Charles J.; Elliott, Michael L.; Koech, Phillip K.; Humble, Paul H.; Zheng, Feng; Zhang, Jian

    2017-07-18

    A polarity swing-assisted regeneration (PSAR) process is disclosed for improving the efficiency of releasing gases chemically bound to switchable ionic liquids. Regeneration of the SWIL involves addition of a quantity of non-polar organic compound as an anti-solvent to destabilize the SWIL, which aids in release of the chemically bound gas. The PSAR decreases gas loading of a SWIL at a given temperature and increases the rate of gas release compared to heating in the absence of anti-solvent.

  19. Fabrication and characterization of poly(L-lactic acid) gels induced by fibrous complex crystallization with solvents

    Matsuda, Yasuhiro [ORNL; Fukatsu, Akinobu [Shizuoka University, Hamamatsu, Japan; Wang, Yangyang [ORNL; Miyamoto, Kazuaki [Shizuoka University, Hamamatsu, Japan; Mays, Jimmy [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Tasaka, Shigeru [Shizuoka University, Hamamatsu, Japan

    2014-01-01

    Complex crystal induced gelation of poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) solutions was studied for a series of solvents, including N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF). By cooling the solutions prepared at elevated temperatures, PLLA gels were produced in solvents that induced complex crystals ( -crystals) with PLLA. Fibrous structure of PLLA in the gel with DMF was observed by polarizing optical microscopy, field emission electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. Upon heating, the crystal form of PLLA in the DMF gel changed from -crystal to a-crystal, the major crystal form in common untreated PLLA films, but the morphology and high elastic modulus of the gel remained until the a-crystal dissolved at higher temperature. In addition, a solvent exchanging method was developed, which allowed PLLA gels to be prepared in other useful solvents that do not induce -crystals without losing the morphology and mechanical properties.

  20. Distribution of multi-component solvents in solvent vapor extraction chamber

    Das, S. [Society of Petroleum Engineers, Richardson, TX (United States)]|[Marathon Oil Corp., Houston, TX (United States)

    2008-10-15

    Vapex process performance is sensitive to operating pressures, temperatures and the types of solvent used. The hydrocarbon solvents used in Vapex processes typically have between 5 and 10 per cent hydrocarbon impurities, and the accumulation of dense phases inside the vapor chamber reduces gravity drainage potential. This study investigated the partitioning of solvent compounds inside the vapor chamber during in situ Vapex processes.The aim of the study was to examine how the different components of the mixed solvent partitioned inside the extracted chamber during the oil and vapor phase. A 2-D homogenous reservoir model was used to simulate the Vapex process with a solvent mixture comprised of propane and methane at various percentages. The effect of injecting a hot solvent vapor was also investigated. The study showed that injected methane accumulated at both the top and the extraction interface. Accumulations near the top had a positive impact on solvent confinement in thin reservoirs. Diffusion of the solvent component was controlled by gas phase molecular diffusion, and was much faster than the diffusion of solvent molecules in the liquid phase. The use of hot solvent mixtures slowed the extraction process due to lower solvent solubility in the oil phase. It was concluded that the negative impact on viscosity reduction by dilution was not compensated by rises in temperature. 6 refs., 11 figs.

  1. TRANSVERSELY POLARIZED Λ PRODUCTION

    BORER, D.

    2000-01-01

    Transversely polarized Λ production in hard scattering processes is discussed in terms of a leading twist T-odd fragmentation function which describes the fragmentation of an unpolarized quark into a transversely polarized Λ. We focus on the properties of this function and its relevance for the RHIC and HERMES experiments

  2. Our Polar Past

    Clary, Renee; Wandersee, James

    2009-01-01

    The study of polar exploration is fascinating and offers students insights into the history, culture, and politics that affect the developing sciences at the farthest ends of Earth. Therefore, the authors think there is value in incorporating polar exploration accounts within modern science classrooms, and so they conducted research to test their…

  3. Marine polar steroids

    Stonik, Valentin A

    2001-01-01

    Structures, taxonomic distribution and biological activities of polar steroids isolated from various marine organisms over the last 8-10 years are considered. The peculiarities of steroid biogenesis in the marine biota and their possible biological functions are discussed. Syntheses of some highly active marine polar steroids are described. The bibliography includes 254 references.

  4. Polarized proton beams

    Roser, T.

    1995-01-01

    The acceleration of polarized proton beams in circular accelerators is complicated by the presence of numerous depolarizing spin resonances. Careful and tedious minimization of polarization loss at each of these resonances allowed acceleration of polarized proton beams up to 22 GeV. It has been the hope that Siberian Snakes, which are local spin rotators inserted into ring accelerators, would eliminate these resonances and allow acceleration of polarized beams with the same ease and efficiency that is now routine for unpolarized beams. First tests at IUCF with a full Siberian Snake showed that the spin dynamics with a Snake can be understood in detail. The author now has results of the first tests of a partial Siberian Snake at the AGS, accelerating polarized protons to an energy of about 25 GeV. These successful tests of storage and acceleration of polarized proton beams open up new possibilities such as stored polarized beams for internal target experiments and high energy polarized proton colliders

  5. Supercapacitor Electrolyte Solvents with Liquid Range Below -80 C

    Brandon, Erik; Smart, Marshall; West, William

    2010-01-01

    A previous NASA Tech Brief ["Low-Temperature Supercapacitors" (NPO-44386) NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 32, No 7 (July 2008), page 32] detailed ongoing efforts to develop non-aqueous supercapacitor electrolytes capable of supporting operation at temperatures below commercially available cells (which are typically limited to charging and discharging at > or equal to -40 C). These electrolyte systems may enable energy storage and power delivery for systems operating in extreme environments, such as those encountered in the Polar regions on Earth or in the exploration of space. Supercapacitors using these electrolytes may also offer improved power delivery performance at moderately low temperatures (e.g. -40 to 0 C) relative to currently available cells, offering improved cold-cranking and cold-weather acceleration capabilities for electrical or hybrid vehicles. Supercapacitors store charge at the electrochemical double-layer, formed at the interface between a high surface area electrode material and a liquid electrolyte. The current approach to extending the low-temperature limit of the electrolyte focuses on using binary solvent systems comprising a high-dielectric-constant component (such as acetonitrile) in conjunction with a low-melting-point co-solvent (such as organic formates, esters, and ethers) to depress the freezing point of the system, while maintaining sufficient solubility of the salt. Recent efforts in this area have led to the identification of an electrolyte solvent formulation with a freezing point of -85.7 C, which is achieved by using a 1:1 by volume ratio of acetonitrile to 1,3-dioxolane

  6. Comparative Assessment of Nonlocal Continuum Solvent Models Exhibiting Overscreening

    Ren Baihua

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonlocal continua have been proposed to offer a more realistic model for the electrostatic response of solutions such as the electrolyte solvents prominent in biology and electrochemistry. In this work, we review three nonlocal models based on the Landau-Ginzburg framework which have been proposed but not directly compared previously, due to different expressions of the nonlocal constitutive relationship. To understand the relationships between these models and the underlying physical insights from which they are derive, we situate these models into a single, unified Landau-Ginzburg framework. One of the models offers the capacity to interpret how temperature changes affect dielectric response, and we note that the variations with temperature are qualitatively reasonable even though predictions at ambient temperatures are not quantitatively in agreement with experiment. Two of these models correctly reproduce overscreening (oscillations between positive and negative polarization charge densities, and we observe small differences between them when we simulate the potential between parallel plates held at constant potential. These computations require reformulating the two models as coupled systems of local partial differential equations (PDEs, and we use spectral methods to discretize both problems. We propose further assessments to discriminate between the models, particularly in regards to establishing boundary conditions and comparing to explicit-solvent molecular dynamics simulations.

  7. Polarization Optics in Telecommunications

    Damask, Jay N

    2005-01-01

    The strong investments into optical telecommunications in the late 1990s resulted in a wealth of new research, techniques, component designs, and understanding of polarization effects in fiber. Polarization Optics in Telecommunications brings together recent advances in the field to create a standard, practical reference for component designers and optical fiber communication engineers. Beginning with a sound foundation in electromagnetism, the author offers a dissertation of the spin-vector formalism of polarization and the interaction of light with media. Applications discussed include optical isolators, optical circulators, fiber collimators, and a variety of applied waveplate and prism combinations. Also included in an extended discussion of polarization-mode dispersion (PMD) and polarization-dependent loss (PDL), their representation, behavior, statistical properties, and measurement. This book draws extensively from the technical and patent literature and is an up-to-date reference for researchers and c...

  8. Parallel Polarization State Generation.

    She, Alan; Capasso, Federico

    2016-05-17

    The control of polarization, an essential property of light, is of wide scientific and technological interest. The general problem of generating arbitrary time-varying states of polarization (SOP) has always been mathematically formulated by a series of linear transformations, i.e. a product of matrices, imposing a serial architecture. Here we show a parallel architecture described by a sum of matrices. The theory is experimentally demonstrated by modulating spatially-separated polarization components of a laser using a digital micromirror device that are subsequently beam combined. This method greatly expands the parameter space for engineering devices that control polarization. Consequently, performance characteristics, such as speed, stability, and spectral range, are entirely dictated by the technologies of optical intensity modulation, including absorption, reflection, emission, and scattering. This opens up important prospects for polarization state generation (PSG) with unique performance characteristics with applications in spectroscopic ellipsometry, spectropolarimetry, communications, imaging, and security.

  9. Stability of the solid electrolyte Li{sub 3}OBr to common battery solvents

    Schroeder, D.J. [Department of Engineering Technology, College of Engineering and Engineering Technology, Northern Illinois University, 301B Still Gym, DeKalb, IL 60115 (United States); Hubaud, A.A. [Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439-4837 (United States); Vaughey, J.T., E-mail: vaughey@anl.gov [Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439-4837 (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The stability of the anti-perovskite phase Li{sub 3}OBr has been assessed in a variety of battery solvents. - Highlights: • Lithium stable solid electrolyte Li{sub 3}OBr unstable to polar organic solvents. • Solvation with no dissolution destroys long-range structure. • Ion exchange with protons observed. - Abstract: Recently a new class of solid lithium ion conductors was reported based on the anti-perovskite structure, notably Li{sub 3}OCl and Li{sub 3}OBr. For many beyond lithium-ion battery uses, the solid electrolyte is envisioned to be in direct contact with liquid electrolytes and lithium metal. In this study we evaluated the stability of the Li{sub 3}OBr phase against common battery solvents electrolytes, including diethylcarbonate (DEC) and dimethylcarbonate (DMC), as well as a LiPF{sub 6} containing commercial electrolyte. In contact with battery-grade organic solvents, Li{sub 3}OBr was typically found to be insoluble but lost its crystallinity and reacted with available protons and in some cases with the solvent. A low temperature heat treatment was able to restore crystallinity of the samples; however evidence of proton ion exchange was conserved.

  10. Organic Solvent Tolerant Lipases and Applications

    Shivika Sharma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipases are a group of enzymes naturally endowed with the property of performing reactions in aqueous as well as organic solvents. The esterification reactions using lipase(s could be performed in water-restricted organic media as organic solvent(s not only improve(s the solubility of substrate and reactant in reaction mixture but also permit(s the reaction in the reverse direction, and often it is easy to recover the product in organic phase in two-phase equilibrium systems. The use of organic solvent tolerant lipase in organic media has exhibited many advantages: increased activity and stability, regiospecificity and stereoselectivity, higher solubility of substrate, ease of products recovery, and ability to shift the reaction equilibrium toward synthetic direction. Therefore the search for organic solvent tolerant enzymes has been an extensive area of research. A variety of fatty acid esters are now being produced commercially using immobilized lipase in nonaqueous solvents. This review describes the organic tolerance and industrial application of lipases. The main emphasis is to study the nature of organic solvent tolerant lipases. Also, the potential industrial applications that make lipases the biocatalysts of choice for the present and future have been presented.

  11. Mixed organic solvents induce renal injury in rats.

    Weisong Qin

    Full Text Available To investigate the injury effects of organic solvents on kidney, an animal model of Sprague-Dawley (SD rats treated with mixed organic solvents via inhalation was generated and characterized. The mixed organic solvents consisted of gasoline, dimethylbenzene and formaldehyde (GDF in the ratio of 2:2:1, and were used at 12,000 PPM to treat the rats twice a day, each for 3 hours. Proteinuria appeared in the rats after exposure for 5-6 weeks. The incidences of proteinuria in male and female rats after exposure for 12 weeks were 43.8% (7/16 and 25% (4/16, respectively. Urinary N-Acetyl-β-(D-Glucosaminidase (NAG activity was increased significantly after exposure for 4 weeks. Histological examination revealed remarkable injuries in the proximal renal tubules, including tubular epithelial cell detachment, cloud swelling and vacuole formation in the proximal tubular cells, as well as proliferation of parietal epithelium and tubular reflux in glomeruli. Ultrastructural examination found that brush border and cytoplasm of tubular epithelial cell were dropped, that tubular epithelial cells were partially disintegrated, and that the mitochondria of tubular epithelial cells were degenerated and lost. In addition to tubular lesions, glomerular damages were also observed, including segmental foot process fusion and loss of foot process covering on glomerular basement membrane (GBM. Immunofluorescence staining indicated that the expression of nephrin and podocin were both decreased after exposure of GDF. In contrast, increased expression of desmin, a marker of podocyte injury, was found in some areas of a glomerulus. TUNEL staining showed that GDF induced apoptosis in tubular cells and glomerular cells. These studies demonstrate that GDF can induce both severe proximal tubular damage and podocyte injury in rats, and the tubular lesions appear earlier than that of glomeruli.

  12. Mixed organic solvents induce renal injury in rats.

    Qin, Weisong; Xu, Zhongxiu; Lu, Yizhou; Zeng, Caihong; Zheng, Chunxia; Wang, Shengyu; Liu, Zhihong

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the injury effects of organic solvents on kidney, an animal model of Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats treated with mixed organic solvents via inhalation was generated and characterized. The mixed organic solvents consisted of gasoline, dimethylbenzene and formaldehyde (GDF) in the ratio of 2:2:1, and were used at 12,000 PPM to treat the rats twice a day, each for 3 hours. Proteinuria appeared in the rats after exposure for 5-6 weeks. The incidences of proteinuria in male and female rats after exposure for 12 weeks were 43.8% (7/16) and 25% (4/16), respectively. Urinary N-Acetyl-β-(D)-Glucosaminidase (NAG) activity was increased significantly after exposure for 4 weeks. Histological examination revealed remarkable injuries in the proximal renal tubules, including tubular epithelial cell detachment, cloud swelling and vacuole formation in the proximal tubular cells, as well as proliferation of parietal epithelium and tubular reflux in glomeruli. Ultrastructural examination found that brush border and cytoplasm of tubular epithelial cell were dropped, that tubular epithelial cells were partially disintegrated, and that the mitochondria of tubular epithelial cells were degenerated and lost. In addition to tubular lesions, glomerular damages were also observed, including segmental foot process fusion and loss of foot process covering on glomerular basement membrane (GBM). Immunofluorescence staining indicated that the expression of nephrin and podocin were both decreased after exposure of GDF. In contrast, increased expression of desmin, a marker of podocyte injury, was found in some areas of a glomerulus. TUNEL staining showed that GDF induced apoptosis in tubular cells and glomerular cells. These studies demonstrate that GDF can induce both severe proximal tubular damage and podocyte injury in rats, and the tubular lesions appear earlier than that of glomeruli.

  13. Study of the efectiveness of the mixed solvents for radically removing thiophenes from benzene and toluene by extractive rectification

    Miroshnicenko, A.A.; Fedosyuk, A.A.

    1981-01-01

    A study has been made of the selectivity of solvents under the conditions of liquid-liquid equilibrium in the systems which include thiophene, benzene, toluene, the polar solvent and n-decane. The presence of the latter has maintained the heterogeneity of the mixtures being studied. The systems under consideration were drawn up in volumetric ratios. Equilibrium was studied in thermostat units. The equilibrium phases were analyzed by a special method, while the coefficient of the relative distribution of the components with respect to selectivity was calculated by the known relations. The investigations of the systems with different solvents have shown that there are functionally selective classes of extractants in which selectivity is determined by free unsubstituted functional groups of a solvent. The growth of the selectivity of solvents according to the following classes has been observed: aprotic ones with a keto group < protic ones with a hydroxyl < < unsubstituted amides of acids < sulphones < sulphoxides. To study the liquid-vapor equilibrium, use was made of the most selective extractants (including DMSO, Pyrrolidone-2, carbamide, ethylene carbamide, and NMP) which were revealed earlier in extraction investigations. Since the most selective representative of acid amides, namely, ethylene carbamide and carbamide, are solids, they were studied in mixtures with the less selective liquid solvents of NMP and pyrrolidone-2. NMP-ethylene-carbamide-water and pyrrolidone-2-ethylene carbamida-water are the most selective mixed solvents, and preference is given to the latter one.

  14. Hierarchy of mechanisms involved in generating Na/K-ATPase polarity in MDCK epithelial cells

    Mays, R.W.; Siemers, K.A.; Fritz, B.A.; Lowe, A.W.; van Meer, G.; Nelson, W.J.

    1995-01-01

    We have studied mechanisms involved in generating a polarized distribution of Na/K-ATPase in the basal-lateral membrane of two clones of MDCK II cells. Both clones exhibit polarized distributions of marker proteins of the apical and basal-lateral membranes, including Na/K-ATPase, at steady state.

  15. Characterization and antioxidant activity of bovine serum albumin and sulforaphane complex in different solvent systems

    Dong, Xueyan; Zhou, Rui; Jing, Hao, E-mail: h200521@cau.edu.cn

    2014-02-15

    Modes and influencing factors of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and sulforaphane (SFN) interaction will help us understand the interaction mechanisms and functional changes of bioactive small molecule and biomacromolecule. This study investigated interaction mechanisms of BSA and SFN and associated antioxidant activity in three solvent systems of deionized water (dH{sub 2}O), dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and ethanol (EtOH), using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), fluorescence spectroscopy, synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy, DPPH and ABTS radical scavenging assays. The results revealed that SFN had ability to quench BSA's fluorescence in static modes, and to interact with BSA at both tyrosine (Tyr) and tryptophan (Trp) residues, while the Trp residues were highly sensitive, which was demonstrated by fluorescence at 340 nm. Hydrophobic forces, hydrogen bonds and van der Waals interactions were all involved in BSA and SFN interaction, which were not significantly changed by three solvents. The binding constant values and binding site numbers were in a descending order of dH{sub 2}O>DMSO>EtOH. The values of free energy change were in a descending order of dH{sub 2}O>DMSO>EtOH, which indicated that the binding forces were in a descending order of dH{sub 2}O>DMSO>EtOH. There was no significant difference in antioxidant activity between SFN and BSA–SFN. Moreover, three solvents had not significant influence on antioxidant activity of SFN and BSA–SFN. -- Highlights: • We report interaction mechanisms of BSA and sulforaphane in three solvent systems. • We report antioxidant activity of BSA–sulforaphane complex in three solvent systems. • Decreasing the solvent polarity will decrease the binding of BSA and sulforaphane. • Three solvents had not influence on antioxidant activity of BSA–sulforaphane.

  16. General Solvent-dependent Strategy toward Enhanced Oxygen Reduction Reaction in Graphene/Metal Oxide Nanohybrids: Effects of Nitrogen-containing Solvent

    Kao, Wei-Yao; Chen, Wei-Quan; Chiu, Yu-Hsiang; Ho, Yu-Hsuan; Chen, Chun-Hu

    2016-11-01

    A general solvent-dependent protocol directly influencing the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in metal oxide/graphene nanohybrids has been demonstrated. We conducted the two-step synthesis of cobalt oxide/N-doped graphene nanohybrids (CNG) with solvents of water, ethanol, and dimethylformamide (DMF), representing tree typical categories of aqueous, polar organic, and organic N-containing solvents commonly adopted for graphene nanocomposites preparation. The superior ORR performance of the DMF-hybrids can be attributed to the high nitrogen-doping, aggregation-free hybridization, and unique graphene porous structures. As DMF is the more effective N-source, the spectroscopic results support a catalytic nitrogenation potentially mediated by cobalt-DMF coordination complexes. The wide-distribution of porosity (covering micro-, meso-, to macro-pore) and micron-void assembly of graphene may further enhance the diffusion kinetics for ORR. As the results, CNG by DMF-synthesis exhibits the high ORR activities close to Pt/C (i.e. only 8 mV difference of half-wave potential with electron transfer number of 3.96) with the better durability in the alkaline condition. Additional graphene hybrids comprised of iron and manganese oxides also show the superior ORR activities by DMF-synthesis, confirming the general solvent-dependent protocol to achieve enhanced ORR activities.

  17. Solvent Handbook Database System user's manual

    1993-03-01

    Industrial solvents and cleaners are used in maintenance facilities to remove wax, grease, oil, carbon, machining fluids, solder fluxes, mold release, and various other contaminants from parts, and to prepare the surface of various metals. However, because of growing environmental and worker-safety concerns, government regulations have already excluded the use of some chemicals and have restricted the use of halogenated hydrocarbons because they affect the ozone layer and may cause cancer. The Solvent Handbook Database System lets you view information on solvents and cleaners, including test results on cleaning performance, air emissions, recycling and recovery, corrosion, and non-metals compatibility. Company and product safety information is also available

  18. Modeling of Salt Solubilities in Mixed Solvents

    Chiavone-Filho, O.; Rasmussen, Peter

    2000-01-01

    A method to correlate and predict salt solubilities in mixed solvents using a UNIQUAC+Debye-Huckel model is developed. The UNIQUAC equation is applied in a form with temperature-dependent parameters. The Debye-Huckel model is extended to mixed solvents by properly evaluating the dielectric...... constants and the liquid densities of the solvent media. To normalize the activity coefficients, the symmetric convention is adopted. Thermochemical properties of the salt are used to estimate the solubility product. It is shown that the proposed procedure can describe with good accuracy a series of salt...

  19. Solvent extraction in the nuclear fuel cycle

    Eccles, H.; Naylor, A.

    1987-01-01

    Solvent extraction techniques have been used in the uranium nuclear fuel cycle in three main areas; concentration of uranium from ore leach liquor, purification of ore concentrates and fuel reprocessing. Solvent extraction has been extended to the removal of transuranic elements from active waste liquor, the recovery of uranium from natural sources and the recovery of noble metals from active waste liquor. Schemes are presented for solvent extraction of uranium using the Amex or Dapex process; spent fuel reprocessing and the Purex process. Recent and future developments of the techniques are outlined. (UK)

  20. Chemical reactions in solvents and melts

    Charlot, G

    1969-01-01

    Chemical Reactions in Solvents and Melts discusses the use of organic and inorganic compounds as well as of melts as solvents. This book examines the applications in organic and inorganic chemistry as well as in electrochemistry. Organized into two parts encompassing 15 chapters, this book begins with an overview of the general properties and the different types of reactions, including acid-base reactions, complex formation reactions, and oxidation-reduction reactions. This text then describes the properties of inert and active solvents. Other chapters consider the proton transfer reactions in

  1. Spreadsheet algorithm for stagewise solvent extraction

    Leonard, R.A.; Regalbuto, M.C.

    1994-01-01

    The material balance and equilibrium equations for solvent extraction processes have been combined with computer spreadsheets in a new way so that models for very complex multicomponent multistage operations can be setup and used easily. A part of the novelty is the way in which the problem is organized in the spreadsheet. In addition, to facilitate spreadsheet setup, a new calculational procedure has been developed. The resulting Spreadsheet Algorithm for Stagewise Solvent Extraction (SASSE) can be used with either IBM or Macintosh personal computers as a simple yet powerful tool for analyzing solvent extraction flowsheets. 22 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  2. TRUEX process solvent cleanup with solid sorbents

    Tse, Pui-Kwan; Reichley-Yinger, L.; Vandegrift, G.F.

    1989-01-01

    Solid sorbents, alumina, silica gel, and Amberlyst A-26 have been tested for the cleanup of degraded TRUEX-NPH solvent. A sodium carbonate scrub alone does not completely remove acidic degradation products from highly degraded solvent and cannot restore the stripping performance of the solvent. By following the carbonate scrub with either neutral alumina or Amberlyst A-26 anion exchange resin, the performance of the TRUEX-NPH is substantially restored. The degraded TRUEX-NPH was characterized before and after treatment by supercritical fluid chromatography. Its performance was evaluated by americium distribution ratios, phase-separation times, and lauric acid distribution coefficients. 17 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs

  3. Polar bears at risk

    Norris, S.; Rosentrater, L.; Eid, P.M. [WWF International Arctic Programme, Oslo (Norway)

    2002-05-01

    Polar bears, the world's largest terrestrial carnivore, spend much of their lives on the arctic sea ice. This is where they hunt and move between feeding, denning, and resting areas. The world population, estimated at 22,000 bears, is made up of 20 relatively distinct populations varying in size from a few hundred to a few thousand animals. About 60 per cent of all polar bears are found in Canada. In general, the status of this species is stable, although there are pronounced differences between populations. Reductions in the extent and thickness of sea ice has lead the IUCN Polar Bear Specialist Group to describe climate change as one of the major threats facing polar bears today. Though the long-term effects of climate change will vary in different areas of the Arctic, impacts on the condition and reproductive success of polar bears and their prey are likely to be negative. Longer ice-free periods resulting from earlier break-up of sea ice in the spring and later formation in the fall is already impacting polar bears in the southern portions of their range. In Canada's Hudson Bay, for example, bears hunt on the ice through the winter and into early summer, after which the ice melts completely, forcing bears ashore to fast on stored fat until freeze-up in the fall. The time bears have on the ice to hunt and build up their body condition is cut short when the ice melts early. Studies from Hudson Bay show that for every week earlier that ice break-up occurs, bears will come ashore 10 kg lighter and in poorer condition. It is likely that populations of polar bears dividing their time between land and sea will be severely reduced and local extinctions may occur as greenhouse gas emissions continue to rise and sea ice melts. Expected changes in regional weather patterns will also impact polar bears. Rain in the late winter can cause maternity dens to collapse before females and cubs have departed, thus exposing occupants to the elements and to predators. Such

  4. Uranium refining by solvent extraction

    Kraikaew, J.; Srinuttrakul, W.

    2014-01-01

    The solvent extraction process to produce higher purity uranium from yellowcake was studied in laboratory scale. Yellowcake, which the uranium purity is around 70% and the main impurity is thorium, was obtained from monazite processing pilot plant of Rare Earth Research and Development Center in Thailand. For uranium re-extraction process, the extractant chosen was Tributylphosphate (TBP) in kerosene. It was found that the optimum concentration of TBP was 10% in kerosene and the optimum nitric acid concentration in uranyl nitrate feed solution was 4 N. An increase in concentrations of uranium and thorium in feed solution resulted in a decrease in the distribution of both components in the extractant. However, the distribution of uranium into the extractant was found to be more than that of thorium. The equilibration study of the extraction system, UO_2(NO_3)/4N HNO_3 – 10%TBP/Kerosene, was also investigated. Two extraction stages were calculated graphically from 100,000 ppm uranium concentration in feed solution input with 90% extraction efficiency and the flow ratio of aqueous phase to organic phase was adjusted to 1.0. For thorium impurity scrubbing process, 10% TBP in kerosene was loaded with uranium and minor thorium from uranyl nitrate solution prepared from yellowcake and was scrubbed with different low concentration nitric acid. The results showed that at nitric acid normality was lower than 1 N, uranium distributed well to aqueous phase. As conclusion, optimum nitric acid concentration for scrubbing process should not less than 1 N and diluted nitric acid or de-ionized water should be applied to strip uranium from organic phase in the final refining process. (author)

  5. Multiple marker abundance profiling

    Hooper, Cornelia M.; Stevens, Tim J.; Saukkonen, Anna

    2017-01-01

    proteins and the scoring accuracy of lower-abundance proteins in Arabidopsis. NPAS was combined with subcellular protein localization data, facilitating quantitative estimations of organelle abundance during routine experimental procedures. A suite of targeted proteomics markers for subcellular compartment...

  6. (DArT) markers

    2EH Graham Centre for Agricultural Innovation (NSW Department of Industry and Investment and Charles Sturt. University), P. O. Box 588 Wagga Wagga, NSW 2650, Australia. 3Guangxi .... and obtain marker statistics. The exact order of the ...

  7. VT Roadside Historic Markers

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — Roadside Historic Site Marker program has proven an effective way to commemorate Vermont’s many people, events, and places of regional, statewide, or national...

  8. Study of skin markers for magnetic resonance imaging examinations

    Takatsu, Yasuo; Umezaki, Yoshie; Miyati, Tosiaki; Yamamura, Kenichirou

    2013-01-01

    In magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), skin markers are used as a landmark in order to make plans for examinations. However, there isn't a lot of research about the material and shape of skin markers. The skin marker's essential elements are safety, good cost performance, high signal intensity for T 1 weighted image (T 1 WI) and T 2 weighted image (T 2 WI), and durable. In order to get a high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of T 1 WI and T 2 WI, baby oil, salad oil and olive oil were chosen, because these materials were easy to obtain and safe for the skin. The SNR of baby oil was the best. Baby oil was injected into the infusion tube, and the tube was solvent welded and cut by a heat sealer. In order to make ring shaped skin markers, both ends of the tube were stuck with adhesive tape. Three different diameters of markers were made (3, 5, 10 cmφ). Ring shaped skin markers were put on to surround the examination area, therefore, the edge of the examination area could be seen at every cross section. Using baby oil in the ring shaped infusion tube is simple, easy, and a highly useful skin marker. (author)

  9. Polarized atomic beams for targets

    Grueebler, W.

    1984-01-01

    The basic principle of the production of polarized atomic hydrogen and deuterium beams are reviewed. The status of the present available polarization, density and intensity are presented. The improvement of atomic beam density by cooling the hydrogen atoms to low velocity is discussed. The possible use of polarized atomic beams as targets in storage rings is shown. It is proposed that polarized atomic beams can be used to produce polarized gas targets with high polarization and greatly improved density

  10. GUIDE FOR POLARIZED NEUTRONS

    Sailor, V.L.; Aichroth, R.W.

    1962-12-01

    The plane of polarization of a beam of polarized neutrons is changed by this invention, and the plane can be flipped back and forth quicitly in two directions in a trouble-free manner. The invention comprises a guide having a plurality of oppositely directed magnets forming a gap for the neutron beam and the gaps are spaced longitudinally in a spiral along the beam at small stepped angles. When it is desired to flip the plane of polarization the magnets are suitably rotated to change the direction of the spiral of the gaps. (AEC)

  11. Heidelberg polarized alkali source

    Kraemer, D.; Steffens, E.; Jaensch, H.; Philipps Universitaet, Marburg, Germany)

    1984-01-01

    A new atomic beam type polarized alkali ion source has been installed at Heidelberg. In order to improve the beam polarization considerably optical pumping is applied in combination with an adiabatic medium field transition which results in beams in single hyperfine sublevels. The m state population is determined by laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy. Highly polarized beams (P/sub s/ > 0.9, s = z, zz) with intensities of 30 to 130 μA can be extracted for Li + and Na + , respectively

  12. The representation of neutron polarization

    Byrne, J.

    1979-01-01

    Neutron beam polarization representation is discussed under the headings; transfer matrices, coherent parity violation for neutrons, neutron spin rotation in helical magnetic fields, polarization and interference. (UK)

  13. [Chemical hazards when working with solvent glues].

    Domański, Wojciech; Makles, Zbigniew

    2012-01-01

    Solvent glues are used in a wide variety of industries, e.g., textile, footwear and rubber. The problem of workers' exposure to solvent vapors is rarely tackled within the area of occupational safety and health in small and medium-sized enterprises. In order to assess exposure to solvents, organic solvents emitted by glues were identified in the samples of workplace air. The concentration of acetone, benzene, cyclohexane, ethylbenzene, n-hexane, methylcyclohexane, butyl acetate and toluene were determined. The obtained results evidenced the presence of cyclohexane, ethylbenzene, ethylcyclohexane, heptane, n-hexane, o-xylene, methylcyclohexane, methylcyclopentane, butyl acetate and toluene in workplace air. The concentration of those compounds in workplace air was low, usually below 0.15 of MAC. At some workstations the presence of benzene was also observed. Occupational risk was assessed at workstations where gluing took place. It showed that the risk at those workstations was medium or low.

  14. Organic solvents from sugar cane molasses

    Oeser, H

    1970-01-01

    The production of organic solvents by fermentation of low priced cane molasses is discussed. Processes described and illustrated in detail include the production of acetone, butanol, ethanol, acetic acid, ethyl acetate and butyl acetate.

  15. Full scale solvent extraction remedial results

    Cash, A.B.

    1992-01-01

    Sevenson Extraction Technology, Inc. has completed the development of the Soil Restoration Unit (initially developed by Terra-Kleen Corporation), a mobile, totally enclosed solvent extraction treatment facility for the removal of organic contaminated media is greater by a closed loop, counter current process that recycles all solvents. The solvents used are selected for the individual site dependant upon the contaminants, such as PCB's, oil, etc. and the soil conditions. A mixture of up to fourteen non-toxic solvents can be used for complicated sites. The full scale unit has been used to treat one superfund site, the Traband Site in Tulsa, Oklahoma, and is currently treating another superfund site, the Pinette's Salvage Yard Site in Washburn, Maine. The full scale Soil Restoration Unit has also been used at a non-superfund site, as part of a TSCA Research and Development permit. The results from these sites will be discussed in brief herein, and in more detail in the full paper

  16. Enantioselective solvent-free Robinson annulation reactions

    Unknown

    solvents to effect an asymmetric synthesis is an important step forward towards ... In continuation of our preliminary communication 2, we wish to ..... formation of chiral enamine 74 from the reaction of S-proline with pro-R carbonyl group.

  17. STUDIES ON SOLVENT EXTRACTION OF FREE HYDROGEN ...

    synthesized through glucose degradation (glycolysis) to lactic acid. ... g sample into a well stoppered plastic bottle and mixed with 20 mL of distilled .... Recovery of used solvent is necessary because methylchloroform is toxic to the bacteria.

  18. Green and Bio-Based Solvents.

    Calvo-Flores, Francisco G; Monteagudo-Arrebola, María José; Dobado, José A; Isac-García, Joaquín

    2018-04-24

    Chemical reactions and many of the procedures of separation and purification employed in industry, research or chemistry teaching utilize solvents massively. In the last decades, with the birth of Green Chemistry, concerns about the employment of solvents and the effects on human health, as well as its environmental impacts and its dependence on non-renewable raw materials for manufacturing most of them, has drawn the attention of the scientific community. In this work, we review the concept of green solvent and the properties and characteristics to be considered green. Additionally, we discuss the different possible routes to prepare many solvents from biomass, as an alternative way to those methods currently applied in the petrochemical industry.

  19. Activity coefficients of solutes in binary solvents

    Gokcen, N.A.

    1982-01-01

    The activity coefficients in dilute ternary systems are discussed in detail by using the Margules equations. Analyses of some relevant data at high temperatures show that the sparingly dissolved solutes in binary solvents follow complex behavior even when the binary solvents are very nearly ideal. It is shown that the activity data on the solute or the binary system cannot permit computation of the remaining activities except for the regular solutions. It is also shown that a fourth-order equation is usually adequate in expressing the activity coefficient of a solute in binary solvents at high temperatures. When the activity data for a binary solvent are difficult to obtain in a certain range of composition, the activity data for a sparingly dissolved solute can be used to supplement determination of the binary activities

  20. An overview of industrial solvent use or is there life after chlorinated solvents?

    Green, B.

    1991-01-01

    Everyone using industrial chemicals has been affected by the fire- storm of new regulations governing solvent use. How will companies currently using hazardous solvents prepare for the changes ahead? What will the impact be on commonly used industrial solvents? What effect are environmental pressures having on solvent use and disposal? Are the responsible individuals in your company up-to-date on phase-out schedules? This paper is written for an audience of compliance coordinators, consultants, production engineers and corporate management. In it, the either addresses the above questions and discusses the specific products affected. The author reviews currently available alternatives to chlorinated and hazardous solvents and introduces a simple system for rating alternatives. The program also includes a discussion of solvent minimization programs and worker reeducation

  1. Use of solvent mixtures for total lipid extraction of Chlorella vulgaris and gas chromatography FAME analysis.

    Moradi-Kheibari, Narges; Ahmadzadeh, Hossein; Hosseini, Majid

    2017-09-01

    Lipid extraction is the bottleneck step for algae-based biodiesel production. Herein, 12 solvent mixture systems (mixtures of three non-polar and two polar organic solvents) were examined to evaluate their effects on the total lipid yield from Chlorella vulgaris (C. vulgaris). Moreover, the extraction yields of three solvent systems with maximum extraction efficiency of esterifiable lipids were determined by acidic transesterification and GC-FID analysis. Three solvent systems, which resulted in a higher extraction yield, were further subjected to fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) analysis. The total lipid extraction yields (based on dry biomass) were (38.57 ± 1.51), (25.33 ± 0.58), and (25.17 ± 1.14) %, for chloroform-methanol (1:2) (C1M2), hexane-methanol (1:2) (H1M2), and chloroform-methanol (2:1) (C2M1), respectively. The extraction efficiency of C1M2 was approximately 1.5 times higher than H1M2 and C2M1, whereas the FAME profile of extracted lipids by H1M2 and C1M2 were almost identical. Moreover, the esterifiable lipid extraction yields of (18.14 ± 2.60), (16.66 ± 0.35), and (13.22 ± 0.31) % (based on dry biomass) were obtained for C1M2, H1M2, and C2M1 solvent mixture systems, respectively. The biodiesel fuel properties produced from C. vulgaris were empirically predicted and compared to that of the EN 14214 and ASTM 6751 standard specifications.

  2. Occupational exposure to solvents and bladder cancer

    Hadkhale, Kishor; Martinsen, Jan Ivar; Weiderpass, Elisabete

    2017-01-01

    logistic regression model was used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and their 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). Increased risks were observed for trichloroethylene (HR 1.23, 95% 95% CI 1.12-1.40), toluene (HR 1.20, 95% CI 1.00-1.38), benzene (HR 1.16, 95% CI 1.04-1.31), aromatic hydrocarbon solvents (HR 1...... of occupational exposure to trichloroethylene, perchloroethylene, aromatic hydrocarbon solvents, benzene and toluene and the risk of bladder cancer....

  3. Computer-Aided Solvent Screening for Biocatalysis

    Abildskov, Jens; Leeuwen, M.B. van; Boeriu, C.G.

    2013-01-01

    constrained properties related to chemical reaction equilibrium, substrate and product solubility, water solubility, boiling points, toxicity and others. Two examples are provided, covering the screening of solvents for lipase-catalyzed transesterification of octanol and inulin with vinyl laurate....... Esterification of acrylic acid with octanol is also addressed. Solvents are screened and candidates identified, confirming existing experimental results. Although the examples involve lipases, the method is quite general, so there seems to be no preclusion against application to other biocatalysts....

  4. Solvent management in a reprocessing plant

    Guillaume, B.; Germain, M.; Puyou, M.; Rouyer, H.

    1987-01-01

    Solvent management in large capacity reprocessing plant is studied to limit production of organic wastes. Chemical processing increases life time of solvent. Low pressure distillation allows the recycling of TBP and diluent at a low activity level. Besides heavy degradation products are eliminated. For the safety the flash point of distillated diluent increases slightly. Tests on an industrial scale started in 1985 and since more than 500 cubic meters were treated [fr

  5. Solvent Dependency in the Quantum Efficiency of 4-[(4-Aminophenyl)-(4-imino-1-cyclohexa-2, 5- dienylidene) methyl] Aniline Hydrochloride.

    Pathrose, Bini; Nampoori, V P N; Radhakrishnan, P; Sahira, H; Mujeeb, A

    2015-05-01

    In the present work dual beam thermal lens technique is used for studying the solvent dependency on the quantum efficiency of a novel dye used for biomedical applications. The role of solvent in the absolute fluorescence quantum yield of 4-[(4-Aminophenyl)-(4-imino-1-cyclohexa-2, 5- dienylidene) methyl] aniline hydrochloride is studied using thermal lens technique. It is observed that the variation in solvents and its concentration results considerable variations in the fluorescence quantum yield. These variations are due to the non-radiative relaxation of the absorbed energy and because of the different solvent properties. The highest quantum yield of the dye is observed in the polar protic solvent-water.

  6. Solvent and ion-pairing effects on the chlorine kinetic isotope effect of t-butyl chloride

    McCord, B.R.

    1986-01-01

    The solvolysis of t-butyl chloride and 1-adamantyl chloride was measured in mixtures of aqueous 2,2,2-trifluoroethanols and in mixtures of aqueous ethanols. The KIEs for t-butyl chloride at 25 0 C in 94% TFE/water, and 60% ethanol/water (solvent mixtures with similar polarity) were 1.0097 and 1.0104 respectively. Further investigations showed a KIE of 1.0104 in 50% ethanol/water and 1.0105 in 100% ethanol while the isotope effect in the fluorinated ethanols rose from 1.0094 in 99% TFE/water to 1.0101 in 70% ethanol/water. The KIE in all these solvents were shown to be directly proportional to the nucleophilicity of the solvent and indicates nucleophilic attack on an ion pair. The similar KIE of t-butyl chloride in the ethanol/water solvents was found to support the contention that solvent polarity exerts a minimal effect on the chlorine KIE

  7. Interferometric polarization control

    Chuss, David T.; Wollack, Edward J.; Moseley, S. Harvey; Novak, Giles

    2006-01-01

    We develop the Jones and Mueller matrices for structures that allow control of the path length difference between two linear orthogonal polarizations and consider the effect of placing multiple devices in series. Specifically, we find that full polarization modulation (measurement of Stokes Q, U, and V) can be achieved by placing two such modulators in series if the relative angles of the beam-splitting grids with respect to the analyzer orientation are appropriately chosen. Such a device has several potential advantages over a spinning wave plate modulator for measuring astronomical polarization in the far infrared through millimeter: (i) The use of small, linear motions eliminates the need for cryogenic rotational bearings; (ii) the phase flexibility allows measurement of circular as well as linear polarization; and (iii) this architecture allows for both multiwavelength and broadband modulation. We also present initial laboratory results

  8. Dynamic nuclear spin polarization

    Stuhrmann, H B [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany)

    1996-11-01

    Polarized neutron scattering from dynamic polarized targets has been applied to various hydrogenous materials at different laboratories. In situ structures of macromolecular components have been determined by nuclear spin contrast variation with an unprecedented precision. The experiments of selective nuclear spin depolarisation not only opened a new dimension to structural studies but also revealed phenomena related to propagation of nuclear spin polarization and the interplay of nuclear polarisation with the electronic spin system. The observation of electron spin label dependent nuclear spin polarisation domains by NMR and polarized neutron scattering opens a way to generalize the method of nuclear spin contrast variation and most importantly it avoids precontrasting by specific deuteration. It also likely might tell us more about the mechanism of dynamic nuclear spin polarisation. (author) 4 figs., refs.

  9. Polarized proton colliders

    Roser, T.

    1995-01-01

    High energy polarized beam collisions will open up the unique physics opportunities of studying spin effects in hard processes. This will allow the study of the spin structure of the proton and also the verification of the many well documented expectations of spin effects in perturbative QCD and parity violation in W and Z production. Proposals for polarized proton acceleration for several high energy colliders have been developed. A partial Siberian Snake in the AGS has recently been successfully tested and full Siberian Snakes, spin rotators, and polarimeters for RHIC are being developed to make the acceleration of polarized beams to 250 GeV possible. This allows for the unique possibility of colliding two 250 GeV polarized proton beams at luminosities of up to 2 x 10 32 cm -2 s -1

  10. Hazardous Solvent Substitution Data System reference manual

    Branham-Haar, K.A.; Twitchell, K.E.

    1993-07-01

    Concern for the environment, in addition to Federal regulation, mandate the replacement of hazardous solvents with safer cleaning agents. Manufacturers are working to produce these replacement solvents. As these products are developed, potential users need to be informed of their availability. To promote the use of these new products instead of traditional solvents, the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) has developed the Hazardous Solvent Substitution Data System (HSSDS). The HSSDS provides a comprehensive system of information on alternatives to hazardous solvents and related subjects, and it makes that information available to solvent users, industrial hygienists, and process engineers. The HSSDS uses TOPIC reg-sign, a text retrieval system produced by Verity, Inc., to allow a user to search for information on a particular subject. TOPIC reg-sign produces a listing of the retrieved documents and allows the use to examine the documents individually and to use the information contained in them. This reference manual does not replace the comprehensive TOPIC reg-sign user documentation (available from Verity, Inc.), or the HSSDS Tutorial (available from the INEL). The purpose of this reference manual is to provide enough instruction on TOPIC reg-sign so the user may begin accessing the data contained in the HSSDS

  11. Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction: Chemical and Physical Properties of the Optimized Solvent

    Delmau, L.H.

    2002-10-08

    This work was undertaken to optimize the solvent used in the Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) process and to measure key chemical and physical properties related to its performance in the removal of cesium from the alkaline high-level salt waste stored in tanks at the Savannah River Site. The need to adjust the solvent composition arose from the prior discovery that the previous baseline solvent was supersaturated with respect to the calixarene extractant. The following solvent-component concentrations in Isopar{reg_sign} L diluent are recommended: 0.007 M calix[4]arene-bis(tert-octylbenzo-crown-6) (BOBCalixC6) extractant, 0.75 M 1-(2,2,3,3-tetrafluoropropoxy)-3-(4-sec-butylphenoxy)-2-propanol (Cs-7SB) phase modifier, and 0.003 M tri-n-octylamine (TOA) stripping aid. Criteria for this selection included BOBCalixC6 solubility, batch cesium distribution ratios (D{sub Cs}), calculated flowsheet robustness, third-phase formation, coalescence rate (dispersion numbers), and solvent density. Although minor compromises within acceptable limits were made in flowsheet robustness and solvent density, significant benefits were gained in lower risk of third-phase formation and lower solvent cost. Data are also reported for the optimized solvent regarding the temperature dependence of D{sub Cs} in extraction, scrubbing, and stripping (ESS); ESS performance on recycle; partitioning of BOBCalixC6, Cs-7SB, and TOA to aqueous process solutions; partitioning of organic anions; distribution of metals; solvent phase separation at low temperatures; solvent stability to elevated temperatures; and solvent density and viscosity. Overall, the technical risk of the CSSX process has been reduced by resolving previously identified issues and raising no new issues.

  12. Plasma polarization spectroscopy

    Iwamae, Atsushi; Horimoto, Yasuhiro; Fujimoto, Takashi; Hasegawa, Noboru; Sukegawa, Kouta; Kawachi, Tetsuya

    2005-01-01

    The electron velocity distribution function (EVDF) in plasma can be anisotropic in laser-produced plasmas. We have developed a new technique to evaluate the polarization degree of the emission lines in the extreme vacuum ultra violet wavelength region. The polarization of the emission lines and the continuums from the lithium-like nitrogen and from helium- and hydrogen-like carbon in recombining plasma is evaluated. Particle simulation in the velocity space gives the time scale for relaxation of anisotropic EVDFs. (author)

  13. No More Polarization, Please!

    Reinholt, Mia

    2006-01-01

    The organizational science literature on motivation has for long been polarized into two main positions; the organizational economic position focusing on extrinsic motivation and the organizational behavior position emphasizing intrinsic motivation. With the rise of the knowledge economy and the increasing levels of complexities it entails, such polarization is not fruitful in the attempt to explain motivation of organizational members. This paper claims that a more nuanced perspective on mot...

  14. Inertial polarization of dielectrics

    Zavodovsky, A. G.

    2011-01-01

    It was proved that accelerated motion of a linear dielectric causes its polarization. Accelerated translational motion of a dielectric's plate leads to the positive charge of the surface facing the direction of motion. Metal plates of a capacitor were used to register polarized charges on a dielectric's surface. Potential difference between the capacitor plates is proportional to acceleration, when acceleration is constant potential difference grows with the increase of a dielectric's area, o...

  15. Solvent-dependent excited-state hydrogen transfer and intersystem crossing in 2-(2′-hydroxyphenyl)-benzothiazole

    Aly, Shawkat Mohammede

    2015-02-12

    The excited-state intramolecular hydrogen transfer (ESIHT) of 2-(2′-hydroxyphenyl) benzothiazole (HBT) has been investigated in a series of nonpolar, polar aprotic, and polar protic solvents. A variety of state-of-the-art experimental methods were employed, including femto- and nanosecond transient absorption and fluorescence upconversion spectroscopy with broadband capabilities. We show that the dynamics and mechanism of ESIHT of the singlet excited HBT are strongly solvent-dependent. In nonpolar solvents, the data demonstrate that HBT molecules adopt a closed form stabilized by O-H⋯N chelated hydrogen bonds with no twisting angle, and the photoinduced H transfer occurs within 120 fs, leading to the formation of a keto tautomer. In polar solvents, owing to dipole-dipole cross talk and hydrogen bonding interactions, the H transfer process is followed by ultrafast nonradiative deactivation channels, including ultrafast internal conversion (IC) and intersystem crossing (ISC). This is likely to be driven by the twisting motion around the C-C bond between the hydroxyphenyl and thiazole moieties, facilitating the IC back to the enol ground state or to the keto triplet state. In addition, our femtosecond time-resolved fluorescence experiments indicate, for the first time, that the lifetime of the enol form in ACN is approximately 280 fs. This observation indicates that the solvent plays a crucial role in breaking the H bond and deactivating the excited state of the HBT. Interestingly, the broadband transient absorption and fluorescence up-conversion data clearly demonstrate that the intermolecular proton transfer from the excited HBT to the DMSO solvent is about 190 fs, forming the HBT anion excited state.

  16. Solvent-dependent excited-state hydrogen transfer and intersystem crossing in 2-(2′-hydroxyphenyl)-benzothiazole

    Aly, Shawkat Mohammede; Usman, Anwar; Alzayer, Maytham; Hamdi, Ghada A.; Alarousu, Erkki; Mohammed, Omar F.

    2015-01-01

    The excited-state intramolecular hydrogen transfer (ESIHT) of 2-(2′-hydroxyphenyl) benzothiazole (HBT) has been investigated in a series of nonpolar, polar aprotic, and polar protic solvents. A variety of state-of-the-art experimental methods were employed, including femto- and nanosecond transient absorption and fluorescence upconversion spectroscopy with broadband capabilities. We show that the dynamics and mechanism of ESIHT of the singlet excited HBT are strongly solvent-dependent. In nonpolar solvents, the data demonstrate that HBT molecules adopt a closed form stabilized by O-H⋯N chelated hydrogen bonds with no twisting angle, and the photoinduced H transfer occurs within 120 fs, leading to the formation of a keto tautomer. In polar solvents, owing to dipole-dipole cross talk and hydrogen bonding interactions, the H transfer process is followed by ultrafast nonradiative deactivation channels, including ultrafast internal conversion (IC) and intersystem crossing (ISC). This is likely to be driven by the twisting motion around the C-C bond between the hydroxyphenyl and thiazole moieties, facilitating the IC back to the enol ground state or to the keto triplet state. In addition, our femtosecond time-resolved fluorescence experiments indicate, for the first time, that the lifetime of the enol form in ACN is approximately 280 fs. This observation indicates that the solvent plays a crucial role in breaking the H bond and deactivating the excited state of the HBT. Interestingly, the broadband transient absorption and fluorescence up-conversion data clearly demonstrate that the intermolecular proton transfer from the excited HBT to the DMSO solvent is about 190 fs, forming the HBT anion excited state.

  17. The Polarization of Achernar

    McDavid, D.

    2005-11-01

    Recent near-infrared measurements of the angular diameter of Achernar (the bright Be star alpha Eridani) with the ESO VLT interferometer have been interpreted as the detection of an extremely oblate photosphere, with a ratio of equatorial to polar radius of at least 1.56 ± 0.05 and a minor axis orientation of 39° ± 1° (from North to East). The optical linear polarization of this star during an emission phase in 1995 September was 0.12 ± 0.02% at position angle 37° ± 8° (in equatorial coordinates), which is the direction of the projection of the rotation axis on the plane of the sky according to the theory of polarization by electron scattering in an equatorially flattened circumstellar disk. These two independent determinations of the orientation of the rotation axis are therefore in agreement. The observational history of correlations between Hα emission and polarization as found in the literature is that of a typical Be star, with the exception of an interesting question raised by the contrast between Schröder's measurement of a small polarization perpendicular to the projected rotation axis in 1969--70 and Tinbergen's measurement of zero polarization in 1974.5, both at times when emission was reportedly absent.

  18. Fusion of a polarized projectile with a polarized target

    Christley, J.A.; Johnson, R.C.; Thompson, I.J.

    1995-01-01

    The fusion cross sections for a polarized target with both unpolarized and polarized projectiles are studied. Expressions for the observables are given for the case when both nuclei are polarized. Calculations for fusion of an aligned 165 Ho target with 16 O and polarized 7 Li beams are presented

  19. Analysis of solvent extracts from coal liquefaction in a flowing solvent reactor

    Li, Wen-Ying; Feng, Jie; Xie, Ke-Chang [Key Laboratory of Coal Science and Technology, Taiyuan University of Technology, Ministry of Education and Shanxi Province, No. 79 Yingze West Street, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Kandiyoti, R. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Chemical Technology, Imperial College, University of London, London SW7 2BY (United Kingdom)

    2004-10-15

    Point of Ayr coal has been extracted using three solvents, tetralin, quinoline and 1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone (NMP) at two temperatures 350 and 450 C, corresponding approximately to before and after the onset of massive covalent bond scission by pyrolysis. The three solvents differ in solvent power and the ability to donate hydrogen atoms to stabilise free radicals produced by pyrolysis of the coal. The extracts were prepared in a flowing solvent reactor to minimise secondary thermal degradation of the primary extracts. Analysis of the pentane-insoluble fractions of the extracts was achieved by size exclusion chromatography, UV-fluorescence spectroscopy in NMP solvent and probe mass. With increasing extraction temperature, the ratio of the amount having big molecular weight to that having small molecular weight in tetralin extracts was increased; the tetralin extract yield increased from 12.8% to 75.9%; in quinoline, increasing extraction temperature did not have an effect on the molecular weight of products but there was a big increase in extract yield. The extracts in NMP showed the enhanced solvent extraction power at both temperatures, with a shift in the ratio of larger molecules to smaller molecules with increasing extraction temperature and with the highest conversion of Point of Ayr coal among these three solvents at both temperatures. Solvent adducts were detected in the tetralin and quinoline extracts by probe mass spectrometry; solvent products were formed from NMP at both temperatures.

  20. Dissolution Dynamic Nuclear Polarization capability study with fluid path

    Malinowski, Ronja Maja; Lipsø, Hans Kasper Wigh; Lerche, Mathilde Hauge

    2016-01-01

    Signal enhancement by hyperpolarization is a way of overcoming the low sensitivity in magnetic resonance; MRI in particular. One of the most well-known methods, dissolution Dynamic Nuclear Polarization, has been used clinically in cancer patients. One way of ensuring a low bioburden of the hyperp......Signal enhancement by hyperpolarization is a way of overcoming the low sensitivity in magnetic resonance; MRI in particular. One of the most well-known methods, dissolution Dynamic Nuclear Polarization, has been used clinically in cancer patients. One way of ensuring a low bioburden...... of the hyperpolarized product is by use of a closed fluid path that constitutes a barrier to contamination. The fluid path can be filled with the pharmaceuticals, i.e. imaging agent and solvents, in a clean room, and then stored or immediately used at the polarizer. In this study, we present a method of filling...

  1. Steady State and Time-Resolved Fluorescence Dynamics of Triphenylamine Based Oligomers with Phenylene/Thiophene/Furan in Solvents

    Qi, Zeng; Ying-Liang, Liu; Kang, Meng; Xiang-Jie, Zhao; Shu-Feng, Wang; Qi-Huang, Gong

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the photo-physical properties of a series of triphenylamine-based oligomers by steady-state and picosecond transient fluorescence measurements in solvents. The oligomers are composed alternatively with triphenylamine and phenylene/thiophene/furan group, bridged by vinyl group (PNB/PNT/PNF). Their fluorescence spectra show bathochromic phenomenon with solvent polarity and viscosity increasing. The fluorescence decays are bi-exponential for PNB and PNT, and tri-exponential for PNF in THF and aniline. The strong viscosity dependence suggests conformational relaxation along the PNF chain after photo excitation. (condensed matter: electronicstructure, electrical, magnetic, and opticalproperties)

  2. Spin boson models for quantum decoherence of electronic excitations of biomolecules and quantum dots in a solvent

    Gilmore, Joel; McKenzie, Ross H

    2005-01-01

    We give a theoretical treatment of the interaction of electronic excitations (excitons) in biomolecules and quantum dots with the surrounding polar solvent. Significant quantum decoherence occurs due to the interaction of the electric dipole moment of the solute with the fluctuating electric dipole moments of the individual molecules in the solvent. We introduce spin boson models which could be used to describe the effects of decoherence on the quantum dynamics of biomolecules which undergo light-induced conformational change and on biomolecules or quantum dots which are coupled by Foerster resonant energy transfer

  3. Polarized Light Microscopy

    Frandsen, Athela F.

    2016-01-01

    Polarized light microscopy (PLM) is a technique which employs the use of polarizing filters to obtain substantial optical property information about the material which is being observed. This information can be combined with other microscopy techniques to confirm or elucidate the identity of an unknown material, determine whether a particular contaminant is present (as with asbestos analysis), or to provide important information that can be used to refine a manufacturing or chemical process. PLM was the major microscopy technique in use for identification of materials for nearly a century since its introduction in 1834 by William Fox Talbot, as other techniques such as SEM (Scanning Electron Microscopy), FTIR (Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy), XPD (X-ray Powder Diffraction), and TEM (Transmission Electron Microscopy) had not yet been developed. Today, it is still the only technique approved by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for asbestos analysis, and is often the technique first applied for identification of unknown materials. PLM uses different configurations in order to determine different material properties. With each configuration additional clues can be gathered, leading to a conclusion of material identity. With no polarizing filter, the microscope can be used just as a stereo optical microscope, and view qualities such as morphology, size, and number of phases. With a single polarizing filter (single polars), additional properties can be established, such as pleochroism, individual refractive indices, and dispersion staining. With two polarizing filters (crossed polars), even more can be deduced: isotropy vs. anisotropy, extinction angle, birefringence/degree of birefringence, sign of elongation, and anomalous polarization colors, among others. With the use of PLM many of these properties can be determined in a matter of seconds, even for those who are not highly trained. McCrone, a leader in the field of polarized light microscopy, often

  4. Molecular markers in glioma.

    Ludwig, Kirsten; Kornblum, Harley I

    2017-09-01

    Gliomas are the most malignant and aggressive form of brain tumors, and account for the majority of brain cancer related deaths. Malignant gliomas, including glioblastoma are treated with radiation and temozolomide, with only a minor benefit in survival time. A number of advances have been made in understanding glioma biology, including the discovery of cancer stem cells, termed glioma stem cells (GSC). Some of these advances include the delineation of molecular heterogeneity both between tumors from different patients as well as within tumors from the same patient. Such research highlights the importance of identifying and validating molecular markers in glioma. This review, intended as a practical resource for both clinical and basic investigators, summarizes some of the more well-known molecular markers (MGMT, 1p/19q, IDH, EGFR, p53, PI3K, Rb, and RAF), discusses how they are identified, and what, if any, clinical relevance they may have, in addition to discussing some of the specific biology for these markers. Additionally, we discuss identification methods for studying putative GSC's (CD133, CD15, A2B5, nestin, ALDH1, proteasome activity, ABC transporters, and label-retention). While much research has been done on these markers, there is still a significant amount that we do not yet understand, which may account for some conflicting reports in the literature. Furthermore, it is unlikely that the investigator will be able to utilize one single marker to prospectively identify and isolate GSC from all, or possibly, any gliomas.

  5. Tumour markers in urology

    Schmid, L.; Fornara, P.; Fabricius, P.G.

    1988-01-01

    The same applies essentially also for the bladder carcinomas: There is no reliable marker for these cancers which would be useful for clinical purposes. TPA has proven to be too non-specific in malignoma-detection and therefore hardly facilitates clinical decision-making in individual cases. The CEA is not sensitive enough to be recommendable for routine application. However, in advanced stages a CEA examination may be useful if applied within the scope of therapeutic efforts made to evaluate efficacy. In cases of carcinomas of the prostate the sour prostate-specific phosphatase (SPP) and, more recently, especially the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) have proven in follow-up and therapy monitoring, whereby the PSA is superior to the SPP. Nevertheless, both these markers should be employed in therapy monitoring because differences in behaviour will be observed when the desired treatment effect is only achieved in one of the two markers producing tumour cell clonuses. Both markers, but especially the PSA, are quite reliably in agreement with the result of the introduced chemo-/hormone therapy, whereby an increase may be a sure indicator of relapse several months previous to clinical symptoms, imaging procedures, so-called routine laboratory results and subjective complaints. However, none of the 2 markers is appropriate for the purposes of screening or early diagnosis of carcinomas of the prostate. (orig.) [de

  6. When measured spin polarization is not spin polarization

    Dowben, P A; Wu Ning; Binek, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Spin polarization is an unusually ambiguous scientific idiom and, as such, is rarely well defined. A given experimental methodology may allow one to quantify a spin polarization but only in its particular context. As one might expect, these ambiguities sometimes give rise to inappropriate interpretations when comparing the spin polarizations determined through different methods. The spin polarization of CrO 2 and Cr 2 O 3 illustrate some of the complications which hinders comparisons of spin polarization values. (viewpoint)

  7. The Indigo Molecule Revisited Again: Assessment of the Minnesota Family of Density Functionals for the Prediction of Its Maximum Absorption Wavelengths in Various Solvents

    Francisco Cervantes-Navarro

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The Minnesota family of density functionals (M05, M05-2X, M06, M06L, M06-2X, and M06-HF were evaluated for the calculation of the UV-Vis spectra of the indigo molecule in solvents of different polarities using time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT and the polarized continuum model (PCM. The maximum absorption wavelengths predicted for each functional were compared with the known experimental results.

  8. The evolution of tensor polarization

    Huang, H.; Lee, S.Y.; Ratner, L.

    1993-01-01

    By using the equation of motion for the vector polarization, the spin transfer matrix for spin tensor polarization, the spin transfer matrix for spin tensor polarization is derived. The evolution equation for the tensor polarization is studied in the presence of an isolate spin resonance and in the presence of a spin rotor, or snake

  9. The polarization of fast neutrons

    Talov, V.V.

    2000-01-01

    The present work is the review of polarization of fast neutrons and methods of polarization analysis. This also includes information about polarization of fast neutrons from first papers, which described polarization in the D(d,n) 3 He, 7 Li(p,n) 7 Be, and T(p,n) 3 He reactions. (authors)

  10. Aqueous solutions that model the cytosol : studies on polarity, chemical reactivity and enzyme kinetics

    Asaad, N.; den Otter, M.J.; Engberts, J.B.F.N.

    2004-01-01

    Concentrated solutions of a series of organic compounds have been prepared and the effects of these solutes on the properties of the solvent system assessed as a function of their concentration and nature. Polarity, as measured by Reichardt's E-T(30) probe, exhibits a linear variation with both

  11. Quantum Monte Carlo formulation of volume polarization in dielectric continuum theory

    Amovilli, Claudio; Filippi, Claudia; Floris, Franca Maria

    2008-01-01

    We present a novel formulation based on quantum Monte Carlo techniques for the treatment of volume polarization due to quantum mechanical penetration of the solute charge density in the solvent domain. The method allows to accurately solve Poisson’s equation of the solvation model coupled with the

  12. Determination and correlation of the solubility for diosgenin in alcohol solvents

    Chen Feixiong; Zhao Mingrui; Liu Chuochuo; Peng Feifei; Ren Baozeng

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The solubilities of diosgenin in different alcohols solvents have been obtained. ► The solubility decreases with the increase of the polarity of the alcohols solvents. ► The results show that the three models agree well with the experimental data. - Abstract: Using a laser monitoring technique, the solubility of diosgenin in ethanol, 1-propanol, 1-butanol, isobutyl alcohol, tert-butanol, 1-pentanol, and iso-octyl alcohol was measured over the temperature range from (290.15 to 330.15) K at atmospheric pressure. Its corresponding (solid + liquid) equilibrium data will provide essential support for industrial design and further theoretical studies. From the experimental results, the solubility of diosgenin in ethanol, 1-propanol, 1-butanol, isobutyl alcohol, tert-butanol, 1-pentanol, and iso-octyl alcohol was found to increase with increasing temperature and decrease with the increase of the polarity of the alcohols solvents. The Apelblat equation, the ideal model and the λh equation were used to correlate the solubility values. The results showed that the three models mentioned above agreed well with the experimental data.

  13. Solvent, isotope, and magnetic field effects in the geminate recombination of radical ion pairs

    Werner, H.; Staerk, H.; Weller, A.

    1978-01-01

    The magnetic field dependence of the geminate recombination triplet yield of radical ion pairs generated via photoinduced electron transfer in polar solvents is investigated for the systems pyrene/N,N-dimethylaniline (Py/DMA), pyrene/3,5-dimethoxy-N,N-dimethylaniline (Py/DMDMA), and the perdeuterated system Py-d 10 /DMA-d 11 . The magnetic field dependence characterized through its B/sub 1/2/ value is found to be dependent on the sum of the hyperfine coupling constants in the radical pair in agreement with previous theoretical predictions. A drastic reduction of the B/sub 1/2/ value is observed with the perdeuterated system. By means of measurements of the radical ion and triplet absorption signals with nanosecond time resolution, the influence of the solvent on the geminate singlet and triplet recombination yields is investigated. Complementary measurements of exciplex lifetimes and quantum yields are carried out in a series of solvents with different polarities in order to determine the rate constants of fluorescence emission and intersystem crossing in the exciplexes

  14. Polarized particles in storage rings

    Derbenev, Ya.S.; Kondratenko, A.M.; Serednyakov, S.I.; Skrinskij, A.N.; Tumajkin, G.M.; Shatunov, Yu.M.

    1977-01-01

    Experiments with polarized beams on the VEPP-2M and SPEAK storage rings are described. Possible methods of producing polarized particle beams in storage rings as well as method of polarization monitoring are counted. Considered are the processes of radiation polarization of electrons and positrons. It is shown, that to preserve radiation polarization the introduction of regions with a strong sign-variable magnetic field is recommended. Methods of polarization measurement are counted. It is suggested for high energies to use dependence of synchrotron radiation power on transverse polarization of electrons and positrons. Examples of using polarizability of colliding beams in storage rings are presented

  15. 29 CFR 1915.32 - Toxic cleaning solvents.

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Toxic cleaning solvents. 1915.32 Section 1915.32 Labor... Preservation § 1915.32 Toxic cleaning solvents. (a) When toxic solvents are used, the employer shall employ one or more of the following measures to safeguard the health of employees exposed to these solvents. (1...

  16. COMPUTER-AIDED SOLVENT DESIGN FOR POLLUTION PREVENTION: PARIS II

    Solvent substitution is an attractive way of elijminating the use of regulated solvents because it usually does not require major chanages in existing processes, equipment or operations. Successful solvent substitution is dependent on finding solvents that are as effective or be...

  17. Polarized Neutron Reflectometry of Nickel Corrosion Inhibitors.

    Wood, Mary H; Welbourn, Rebecca J L; Zarbakhsh, Ali; Gutfreund, Philipp; Clarke, Stuart M

    2015-06-30

    Polarized neutron reflectometry has been used to investigate the detailed adsorption behavior and corrosion inhibition mechanism of two surfactants on a nickel surface under acidic conditions. Both the corrosion of the nickel surface and the structure of the adsorbed surfactant layer could be monitored in situ by the use of different solvent contrasts. Layer thicknesses and roughnesses were evaluated over a range of pH values, showing distinctly the superior corrosion inhibition of one negatively charged surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulfate) compared to a positively charged example (dodecyl trimethylammonium bromide) due to its stronger binding interaction with the surface. It was found that adequate corrosion inhibition occurs at significantly less than full surface coverage.

  18. Polarized electrons at Jefferson laboratory

    Sinclair, C.K.

    1998-01-01

    The CEBAF accelerator at Jefferson laboratory can deliver CW electron beams to three experimental halls simultaneously. A large fraction of the approved scientific program at the lab requires polarized electron beams. Many of these experiments, both polarized and unpolarized, require high average beam current as well. Since all electrons delivered to the experimental halls originate from the same cathode, delivery of polarized beam to a single hall requires using the polarized source to deliver beam to all experiments in simultaneous operation. The polarized source effort at Jefferson Lab is directed at obtaining very long polarized source operational lifetimes at high average current and beam polarization; at developing the capability to deliver all electrons leaving the polarized source to the experimental halls; and at delivering polarized beam to multiple experimental halls simultaneously. Initial operational experience with the polarized source will be presented. copyright 1998 American Institute of Physics

  19. Polarized Electrons at Jefferson Laboratory

    Sinclair, C.K.

    1997-12-31

    The CEBAF accelerator at Jefferson laboratory can deliver CW electron beams to three experimental halls simultaneously. A large fraction of the approved scientific program at the lab requires polarized electron beams. Many of these experiments, both polarized and unpolarized, require high average beam current as well. Since all electrons delivered to the experimental halls originate from the same cathode, delivery of polarized beam to a single hall requires using the polarized source to deliver beam to all experiments in simultaneous operation. The polarized source effort at Jefferson Lab is directed at obtaining very long polarized source operational lifetimes at high average current and beam polarization; at developing the capability to deliver all electrons leaving the polarized source to the experimental halls; and at delivering polarized beam to multiple experimental halls simultaneously.initial operational experience with the polarized source will be presented.

  20. Polarization: A Must for Fusion

    Guidal M.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Recent realistic simulations confirm that the polarization of the fuel would improve significantly the DT fusion efficiency. We have proposed an experiment to test the persistence of the polarization in a fusion process, using a terawatt laser hitting a polarized HD target. The polarized deuterons heated in the plasma induced by the laser can fuse producing a 3He and a neutron in the final state. The angular distribution of the neutrons and the change in the corresponding total cross section are related to the polarization persistence. The experimental polarization of DT fuel is a technological challenge. Possible paths for Magnetic Confinement Fusion (MCF and for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF are reviewed. For MCF, polarized gas can be used. For ICF, cryogenic targets are required. We consider both, the polarization of gas and the polarization of solid DT, emphasizing the Dynamic Nuclear polarization (DNP of HD and DT molecules.

  1. Free energy functionals for polarization fluctuations: Pekar factor revisited.

    Dinpajooh, Mohammadhasan; Newton, Marshall D; Matyushov, Dmitry V

    2017-02-14

    The separation of slow nuclear and fast electronic polarization in problems related to electron mobility in polarizable media was considered by Pekar 70 years ago. Within dielectric continuum models, this separation leads to the Pekar factor in the free energy of solvation by the nuclear degrees of freedom. The main qualitative prediction of Pekar's perspective is a significant, by about a factor of two, drop of the nuclear solvation free energy compared to the total (electronic plus nuclear) free energy of solvation. The Pekar factor enters the solvent reorganization energy of electron transfer reactions and is a significant mechanistic parameter accounting for the solvent effect on electron transfer. Here, we study the separation of the fast and slow polarization modes in polar molecular liquids (polarizable dipolar liquids and polarizable water force fields) without relying on the continuum approximation. We derive the nonlocal free energy functional and use atomistic numerical simulations to obtain nonlocal, reciprocal space electronic and nuclear susceptibilities. A consistent transition to the continuum limit is introduced by extrapolating the results of finite-size numerical simulation to zero wavevector. The continuum nuclear susceptibility extracted from the simulations is numerically close to the Pekar factor. However, we derive a new functionality involving the static and high-frequency dielectric constants. The main distinction of our approach from the traditional theories is found in the solvation free energy due to the nuclear polarization: the anticipated significant drop of its magnitude with increasing liquid polarizability does not occur. The reorganization energy of electron transfer is either nearly constant with increasing the solvent polarizability and the corresponding high-frequency dielectric constant (polarizable dipolar liquids) or actually noticeably increases (polarizable force fields of water).

  2. Free energy functionals for polarization fluctuations: Pekar factor revisited

    Dinpajooh, Mohammadhasan; Newton, Marshall D.; Matyushov, Dmitry V.

    2017-01-01

    The separation of slow nuclear and fast electronic polarization in problems related to electron mobility in polarizable media was considered by Pekar 70 years ago. This separation leads to the Pekar factor in the free energy of solvation by the nuclear degrees of freedom, within dielectric continuum models. The main qualitative prediction of Pekar’s perspective is a significant, by about a factor of two, drop of the nuclear solvation free energy compared to the total (electronic plus nuclear) free energy of solvation. The Pekar factor enters the solvent reorganization energy of electron transfer reactions and is a significant mechanistic parameter accounting for the solvent effect on electron transfer. We study the separation of the fast and slow polarization modes in polar molecular liquids (polarizable dipolar liquids and polarizable water force fields) without relying on the continuum approximation. We derive the nonlocal free energy functional and use atomistic numerical simulations to obtain nonlocal, reciprocal space electronic and nuclear susceptibilities. A consistent transition to the continuum limit is introduced by extrapolating the results of finite-size numerical simulation to zero wavevector. The continuum nuclear susceptibility extracted from the simulations is numerically close to the Pekar factor. But, we derive a new functionality involving the static and high-frequency dielectric constants. The main distinction of our approach from the traditional theories is found in the solvation free energy due to the nuclear polarization: the anticipated significant drop of its magnitude with increasing liquid polarizability does not occur. The reorganization energy of electron transfer is either nearly constant with increasing the solvent polarizability and the corresponding high-frequency dielectric constant (polarizable dipolar liquids) or actually noticeably increases (polarizable force fields of water).

  3. Vitamin E Circular Dichroism Studies: Insights into Conformational Changes Induced by the Solvent’s Polarity

    Drew Marquardt

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We used circular dichroism (CD to study differences in CD spectra between α-, δ-, and methylated-α-tocopherol in solvents with different polarities. CD spectra of the different tocopherol structures differ from each other in intensity and peak locations, which can be attributed to chromanol substitution and the ability to form hydrogen bonds. In addition, each structure was examined in different polarity solvents using the Reichardt index—a measure of the solvent’s ionizing ability, and a direct measurement of solvent–solute interactions. Differences across solvents indicate that hydrogen bonding is a key contributor to CD spectra at 200 nm. These results are a first step in examining the hydrogen bonding abilities of vitamin E in a lipid bilayer.

  4. Hydrodynamic instabilities and concentration polarization coupled by osmotic pressure in a Taylor-Couette cell

    Martinand, Denis; Tilton, Nils

    2016-11-01

    This study addresses analytically and numerically the coupling between hydrodynamic instabilities and osmotic pressure driven by concentration polarization. The configuration consists of a Taylor-Couette cell filled with a Newtonian fluid carrying a passive scalar. Whereas the concentric inner and outer cylinders are membranes permeable to the solvent, they totally reject the scalar. As a radial in- or outflow of solvent is imposed through both cylinders, a concentration boundary layer develops on the cylinder where the solvent exits, until an equilibrium steady state is reached. In addition, the rotation of the inner cylinder is used to drive centrifugal instabilities in the form of toroidal vortices, which interact with the concentration boundary layer. By means of the osmotic pressure, concentration polarization is found to promote or hinder the hydrodynamic instabilities, depending on capacity of the vortices and diffusion to increase the concentration field at the membrane. The results obtained by analytical stability analysis agree with dedicated Direct Numerical Simulations.

  5. Study by polarized muon

    Yamazaki, Toshimitsu

    1977-01-01

    Experiments by using polarized muon beam are reported. The experiments were performed at Berkeley, U.S.A., and at Vancouver, Canada. The muon spin rotation is a useful method for the study of the spin polarization of conductive electrons in paramagnetic Pd metal. The muon Larmor frequency and the relaxation time can be obtained by measuring the time distribution of decay electrons of muon-electron process. The anomalous depolarization of negative muon spin rotation in the transitional metal was seen. The circular polarization of the negative muon X-ray was measured to make clear this phenomena. The experimental results show that the anomalous depolarization is caused at the 1-S-1/2 state. For the purpose to obtain the strong polarization of negative muon, a method of artificial polarization is proposed, and the test experiments are in progress. The study of the hyperfine structure of mu-mesic atoms is proposed. The muon capture rate was studied systematically. (Kato, T.)

  6. Polarized protons at RHIC

    Tannenbaum, M.J.

    1990-12-01

    The Physics case is presented for the use of polarized protons at RHIC for one or two months each year. This would provide a facility with polarizations of approx-gt 50% high luminosity ∼2.0 x 10 32 cm -2 s -1 , the possibility of both longitudinal and transverse polarization at the interaction regions, and frequent polarization reversal for control of systematic errors. The annual integrated luminosity for such running (∼10 6 sec per year) would be ∫ Ldt = 2 x 10 38 cm -2 -- roughly 20 times the total luminosity integrated in ∼ 10 years of operation of the CERN Collider (∼10 inverse picobarns, 10 37 cm -2 ). This facility would be unique in the ability to perform parity-violating measurements and polarization test of QCD. Also, the existence of p-p collisions in a new energy range would permit the study of ''classical'' reactions like the total cross section and elastic scattering, etc., and serve as a complement to measurements from p-bar p colliders. 11 refs

  7. The Bochum Polarized Target

    Reicherz, G.; Goertz, S.; Harmsen, J.; Heckmann, J.; Meier, A.; Meyer, W.; Radtke, E.

    2001-01-01

    The Bochum 'Polarized Target' group develops the target material 6 LiD for the COMPASS experiment at CERN. Several different materials like alcohols, alcanes and ammonia are under investigation. Solid State Targets are polarized in magnetic fields higher than B=2.5T and at temperatures below T=1K. For the Dynamic Nuclear Polarization process, paramagnetic centers are induced chemically or by irradiation with ionizing beams. The radical density is a critical factor for optimization of polarization and relaxation times at adequate magnetic fields and temperatures. In a high sensitive EPR--apparatus, an evaporator and a dilution cryostat with a continuous wave NMR--system, the materials are investigated and optimized. To improve the polarization measurement, the Liverpool NMR-box is modified by exchanging the fixed capacitor for a varicap diode which not only makes the tuning very easy but also provides a continuously tuned circuit. The dependence of the signal area upon the circuit current is measured and it is shown that it follows a linear function

  8. New Polymeric Membranes for Organic Solvent Nanofiltration

    Aburabie, Jamaliah

    2017-05-01

    The focus of this dissertation was the development, synthesis and modification of polymers for the preparation of membranes for organic solvent nanofiltration. High chemical stability in a wide range of solvents was a key requirement. Membranes prepared from synthesized polymers as well as from commercial polymers were designed and chemically modified to reach OSN requirements. A solvent stable thin-film composite (TFC) membrane is reported, which is fabricated on crosslinked polythiosemicarbazide (PTSC) as substrate. The membranes exhibited high fluxes towards solvents like THF, DMF and DMSO ranging around 20 L/m2 h at 5 bar with a MWCO of around 1000 g/mol. Ultrafiltration PTSC membranes were prepared by non-solvent induced phase separation and crosslinked with GPTMS. The crosslinking reaction was responsible for the formation of an inorganic-type-network that tuned the membrane pore size. The crosslinked membranes acquired high solvent stability in DMSO, DMF and THF with a MWCO above 1300 g/mol. Reaction Induced Phase Separation (RIPS) was introduced as a new method for the preparation of skinned asymmetric membranes. These membranes have two distinctive layers with different morphologies both from the same polymer. The top dense layer is composed of chemically crosslinked polymer chains while the bottom layer is a porous structure formed by non-crosslinked polymer chains. Such membranes were tested for vitamin B12 in solvents after either crosslinking the support or dissolving the support and fixing the freestanding membrane on alumina. Pebax® 1657 was utilized for the preparation of composite membranes by simple coating. Porous PAN membranes were coated with Pebax® 1657 which was then crosslinked using TDI. Crosslinked Pebax® membranes show high stability towards ethanol, propanol and acetone. The membranes were also stable in DMF once crosslinked PAN supports were used. Sodium alginate polymer was investigated for the preparation of thin film composite

  9. Measurement and correlation of solubility of cefmenoxime hydrochloride in pure solvents and binary solvent mixtures

    Wang, Jinxiu; Xie, Chuang; Yin, Qiuxiang; Tao, Linggang; Lv, Jun; Wang, Yongli; He, Fang; Hao, Hongxun

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Solubility of cefmenoxime hydrochloride in pure and binary solvents was determined. • The experimental solubility data were correlated by thermodynamic models. • A model was employed to calculate the melting temperature of cefmenoxime hydrochloride. • Mixing thermodynamic properties of cefmenoxime hydrochloride were calculated. - Abstract: The solubility of cefmenoxime hydrochloride in pure solvents and binary solvent mixtures was measured at temperatures from (283.15 to 313.15) K by using the UV spectroscopic method. The results reveal that the solubility of cefmenoxime hydrochloride increases with increasing temperature in all solvent selected. The solubility of cefmenoxime hydrochloride reaches its maximum value when the mole fraction of isopropanol is 0.2 in the binary solvent mixtures of (isopropanol + water). The modified Apelblat equation and the NRTL model were successfully used to correlate the experimental solubility in pure solvents while the modified Apelblat equation, the CNIBS/R–K model and the Jouyban–Acree model were applied to correlate the solubility in binary solvent mixtures. In addition, the mixing thermodynamic properties of cefmenoxime hydrochloride in different solvents were also calculated based on the NRTL model and experimental solubility data.

  10. Solvent/non-solvent sintering: a novel route to create porous microsphere scaffolds for tissue regeneration.

    Brown, Justin L; Nair, Lakshmi S; Laurencin, Cato T

    2008-08-01

    Solvent/non-solvent sintering creates porous polymeric microsphere scaffolds suitable for tissue engineering purposes with control over the resulting porosity, average pore diameter, and mechanical properties. Five different biodegradable biocompatible polyphosphazenes exhibiting glass transition temperatures from -8 to 41 degrees C and poly (lactide-co-glycolide), (PLAGA) a degradable polymer used in a number of biomedical settings, were examined to study the versatility of the process and benchmark the process to heat sintering. Parameters such as: solvent/non-solvent sintering solution composition and submersion time effect the sintering process. PLAGA microsphere scaffolds fabricated with solvent/non-solvent sintering exhibited an interconnected porosity and pore size of 31.9% and 179.1 mum, respectively which was analogous to that of conventional heat sintered PLAGA microsphere scaffolds. Biodegradable polyphosphazene microsphere scaffolds exhibited a maximum interconnected porosity of 37.6% and a maximum compressive modulus of 94.3 MPa. Solvent/non-solvent sintering is an effective strategy for sintering polymeric microspheres, with a broad spectrum of glass transition temperatures, under ambient conditions making it an excellent fabrication route for developing tissue engineering scaffolds and drug delivery vehicles. (c) 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Solvent extraction studies in miniature centrifugal contactors

    Siczek, A.A.; Meisenhelder, J.H.; Bernstein, G.J.; Steindler, M.J.

    1980-01-01

    A miniature short-residence-time centrifugal solvent extraction contactor and an eight-stage laboratory minibank of centrifugal contactors were used for testing the possibility of utilizing kinetic effects for improving the separation of uranium from ruthenium and zirconium in the Purex process. Results of these tests showed that a small improvement found in ruthenium and zirconium decontamination in single-stage solvent extraction tests was lost in the multistage extraction tests- in fact, the extent of saturation of the solvent by uranium, rather than the stage residence time, controlled the extent of ruthenium and zirconium extraction. In applying the centrifugal contactor to the Purex process, the primary advantages would be less radiolytic damage to the solvent, high troughput, reduced solvent inventory, and rapid attainment of steady-state operating conditions. The multistage mini contactor was also tested to determine the suitability of short-residence-time contactors for use with the Civex and Thorex processes and was found to be compatible with the requirements of these processes. (orig.) [de

  12. Ions, solutes and solvents, oh my!

    Kemp, Daniel David [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2009-08-01

    Modern methods in ab initio quantum mechanics have become efficient and accurate enough to study many gas-phase systems. However, chemists often work in the solution phase. The presence of solvent molecules has been shown to affect reaction mechanisms1, lower reaction energy barriers2, participate in energy transfer with the solute3 and change the physical properties of the solute4. These effects would be overlooked in simple gas phase calculations. Careful study of specific solvents and solutes must be done in order to fully understand the chemistry of the solution phase. Water is a key solvent in chemical and biological applications. The properties of an individual water molecule (a monomer) and the behavior of thousands of molecules (bulk solution) are well known for many solvents. Much is also understood about aqueous microsolvation (small clusters containing ten water molecules or fewer) and the solvation characteristics when bulk water is chosen to solvate a solute. However, much less is known about how these properties behave as the cluster size transitions from the microsolvated cluster size to the bulk. This thesis will focus on species solvated with water clusters that are large enough to exhibit the properties of the bulk but small enough to consist of fewer than one hundred solvent molecules. New methods to study such systems will also be presented.

  13. The effects of solvents and structure on the electronic absorption spectra of the isomeric pyridine carboxylic acid N-oxides

    Drmanić Saša Ž.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The ultraviolet absorption spectra of the carboxyl group of three isomeric pyridine carboxylic acids N-oxides (picolinic acid N-oxide, nicotinic acid N-oxide and isonicotinic acid N-oxide were determined in fourteen solvents in the wavelength range from 200 to 400 nm. The position of the absorption maxima (λmax of the examined acids showed that the ultraviolet absorption maximum wavelengths of picolinic acid N-oxide are the shortest, and those of isonicotinic acid N-oxide acid are the longest. In order to analyze the solvent effect on the obtained absorption spectra, the ultraviolet absorption frequencies of the electronic transitions in the carboxylic group of the examined acids were correlated using a total solvatochromic equation of the form max = v0 + sπ + aα+ bβ, where υmax is the absorption frequency (1/λmax, p is a measure of the solvent polarity, β represents the scale of solvent hydrogen bond acceptor basicities and α represent the scale of solvent hydrogen bond donor acidities. The correlation of the spectroscopic data was carried out by means of multiple linear regression analysis. The solvent effects on the ultraviolet absorption maximums of the examined acids were discussed.

  14. Edge of polar cap patches

    Hosokawa, K.; Taguchi, S.; Ogawa, Y.

    2016-04-01

    On the night of 4 December 2013, a sequence of polar cap patches was captured by an all-sky airglow imager (ASI) in Longyearbyen, Norway (78.1°N, 15.5°E). The 630.0 nm airglow images from the ASI of 4 second exposure time, oversampled the emission of natural lifetime (with quenching) of at least ˜30 sec, introduce no observational blurring effects. By using such high-quality ASI images, we succeeded in visualizing an asymmetry in the gradients between the leading/trailing edges of the patches in a 2-D fashion. The gradient in the leading edge was found to be 2-3 times steeper than that in the trailing edge. We also identified fingerlike structures, appearing only along the trailing edge of the patches, whose horizontal scale size ranged from 55 to 210 km. These fingers are considered to be manifestations of plasma structuring through the gradient-drift instability (GDI), which is known to occur only along the trailing edge of patches. That is, the current 2-D observations visualized, for the first time, how GDI stirs the patch plasma and such a mixing process makes the trailing edge more gradual. This result strongly implies a close connection between the GDI-driven plasma stirring and the asymmetry in the large-scale shape of patches and then suggests that the fingerlike structures can be used as markers to estimate the fine-scale structure in the plasma flow within patches.

  15. 40 CFR Table 5 to Subpart Qqqq of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for... HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends You may use the mass fraction values in the.... Solvent/solvent blend CAS. No. Average organic HAP mass fraction Typical organic HAP, percent by mass 1...

  16. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart IIIi of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for... Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends You may use the mass fraction values in the... Solvent/solvent blend CAS. No. Averageorganic HAP mass fraction Typical organic HAP, percent by mass 1...

  17. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart Oooo of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for... 63—Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends You may use the mass fraction... formulation data. Solvent/solvent blend CAS. No. Averageorganic HAP mass fraction Typical organic HAP, percent...

  18. Polarized source upgrading

    Clegg, T.B.; Rummel, R.L.; Carter, E.P.; Westerfeldt, C.R.; Lovette, A.W.; Edwards, S.E.

    1985-01-01

    The decision was made this past year to move the Lamb-shift polarized ion source which was first installed in the laboratory in 1970. The motivation was the need to improve the flexibility of spin-axis orientation by installing the ion source with a new Wien-filter spin precessor which is capable of rotating physically about the beam axis. The move of the polarized source was accomplished in approximately two months, with the accelerator being turned off for experiments during approximately four weeks of this time. The occasion of the move provided the opportunity to rewire completely the entire polarized ion source frame and to rebuild approximately half of the electronic chassis on the source. The result is an ion source which is now logically wired and carefully documented. Beams obtained from the source are much more stable than those previously available

  19. Spin polarized deuterium

    Glyde, H.R.; Hernadi, S.I.

    1986-01-01

    Several ground state properties of (electron) spin-polarized deuterium (D) such as the energy, single quasiparticle energies and lifetimes, Landau parameters and sound velocities are evaluated. The calculations begin with the Kolos-Wolneiwicz potential and use the Galitskii-FeynmanHartree-Fock (GFHF) approximation. The deuteron nucleas has spin I = 1, and spin states I/sub z/ = 1,0,-1. We explore D 1 , D 2 and D 3 in which, respectively, one spin state only is populated, two states are equally populated, and three states are equally populated. We find the GFHF describes D 1 well, but D 2 and D 3 less well. The Landau parameters, F/sub L/, are small compared to liquid 3 He and very small for doubly polarized D 1 (i.e. the F/sub L/ decrease with nuclear polarization)

  20. Polarized electron sources

    Clendenin, J.E.

    1995-05-01

    Polarized electron sources for high energy accelerators took a significant step forward with the introduction of a new laser-driven photocathode source for the SLC in 1992. With an electron beam polarization of >80% and with ∼99% uptime during continuous operation, this source is a key factor in the success of the current SLC high-energy physics program. The SLC source performance is used to illustrate both the capabilities and the limitations of solid-state sources. The beam requirements for future colliders are similar to that of the SLC with the addition in most cases of multiple-bunch operation. A design for the next generation accelerator source that can improve the operational characteristics and at least minimize some of the inherent limitations of present sources is presented. Finally, the possibilities for producing highly polarized electron beams for high-duty-factor accelerators are discussed

  1. Time Domain Induced Polarization

    Fiandaca, Gianluca; Auken, Esben; Christiansen, Anders Vest

    2012-01-01

    Time-domain-induced polarization has significantly broadened its field of reference during the last decade, from mineral exploration to environmental geophysics, e.g., for clay and peat identification and landfill characterization. Though, insufficient modeling tools have hitherto limited the use...... of time-domaininduced polarization for wider purposes. For these reasons, a new forward code and inversion algorithm have been developed using the full-time decay of the induced polarization response, together with an accurate description of the transmitter waveform and of the receiver transfer function......, to reconstruct the distribution of the Cole-Cole parameters of the earth. The accurate modeling of the transmitter waveform had a strong influence on the forward response, and we showed that the difference between a solution using a step response and a solution using the accurate modeling often is above 100...

  2. A lunar polar expedition

    Dowling, Richard; Staehle, Robert L.; Svitek, Tomas

    1992-09-01

    Advanced exploration and development in harsh environments require mastery of basic human survival skill. Expeditions into the lethal climates of Earth's polar regions offer useful lessons for tommorrow's lunar pioneers. In Arctic and Antarctic exploration, 'wintering over' was a crucial milestone. The ability to establish a supply base and survive months of polar cold and darkness made extensive travel and exploration possible. Because of the possibility of near-constant solar illumination, the lunar polar regions, unlike Earth's may offer the most hospitable site for habitation. The World Space Foundation is examining a scenario for establishing a five-person expeditionary team on the lunar north pole for one year. This paper is a status report on a point design addressing site selection, transportation, power, and life support requirements.

  3. A Solvent-Vapor Approach toward the Control of Block Ionomer Morphologies

    Mineart, Kenneth P.; Lee, Byeongdu; Spontak, Richard J.

    2016-04-26

    Sulfonated block ionomers possess advantageous properties for a wide range of diverse applications such as desalination membranes, fuel cells, electroactive media, and photovoltaic devices. Unfortunately, their inherently high incompatibilities and glass transition temperatures e ff ectively prevent the use of thermal annealing, routinely employed to re fi ne the morphologies of nonionic block copolymers. An alternative approach is therefore required to promote morphological equilibration in block ionomers. The present study explores the morphological characteristics of midblock- sulfonated pentablock ionomers (SBIs) di ff ering in their degree of sulfonation (DOS) and cast from solution followed by solvent-vapor annealing (SVA). Transmission electron microscopy con fi rms that fi lms deposited from di ff erent solvent systems form nonequilibrium morphologies due to solvent-regulated self-assembly and drying. A series of SVA tests performed with solvents varying in polarity reveals that exposing cast fi lms to tetrahydrofuran (THF) vapor for at least 2 h constitutes the most e ff ective SVA protocol, yielding the anticipated equilibrium morphology. That is, three SBI grades subjected to THF-SVA self-assemble into well-ordered lamellae wherein the increase in DOS is accompanied by an increase in lamellar periodicity, as measured by small-angle X-ray scattering.

  4. Enhanced fluidity liquid chromatography of inulin fructans using ternary solvent strength and selectivity gradients.

    Bennett, Raffeal; Olesik, Susan V

    2018-01-25

    The value of exploring selectivity and solvent strength ternary gradients in enhanced fluidity liquid chromatography (EFLC) is demonstrated for the separation of inulin-type fructans from chicory. Commercial binary pump systems for supercritical fluid chromatography only allow for the implementation of ternary solvent strength gradients which can be restrictive for the separation of polar polymeric analytes. In this work, a custom system was designed to extend the capability of EFLC to allow tuning of selectivity or solvent strength in ternary gradients. Gradient profiles were evaluated using the Berridge function (RF 1 ), normalized resolution product (NRP), and gradient peak capacity (P c ). Selectivity gradients provided the separation of more analytes over time. The RF 1 function showed favor to selectivity gradients with comparable P c to that of solvent strength gradients. NRP did not strongly correlate with P c or RF 1 score. EFLC with the hydrophilic interaction chromatography, HILIC, separation mode was successfully employed to separate up to 47 fructan analytes in less than 25 min using a selectivity gradient. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Description of the equilibrium conditions of chemical reactions in various solvents

    Roehl, H.

    1983-01-01

    Empirical knowledge is taken as the basis for establishing a method to predict the equilibrium conditions of reactions of macrocyclic polyethers and monovalent metal cations in various solvents. The reactions in the solvents under review can be well described by the donor number DN according to Gutmann, and by the parameters alpha and pi-asterisk for the H bonding donor and polarity/polarisability, respectively, using a three-parameter equation according to Kamlet/Taft. This applies to both protic and aprotic solvents. The calculations rely on data found in the literature and on own experimental results obtained by microcalorimetric examinations. The evaluation methods evolved for this purpose also allow, by means of additional dilution experiments, to convert the ''integral'', microcalorimetrically obtained complex stability constants, (i.e. those non-discriminating between different types of state such as ions or ion pairs) to the corresponding ''differentiating'' constants (referring to purely ionic quantities), and this applied to the various solvents used. The method does not use foreign ions and can thus also be applied to those cases for which the normal standardisation of reaction conditions published in the literature cannot be maintained (e.g. for reasons of solubility). In some cases it was possible to obtain additional information on the dissociation behaviour of the salts used, which revealed differently strong inclination to form higher aggregations in solution, as shown e.g. by the strong concentration dependence of the salt ion pair dissociation constants obtained. (orig./EF) [de

  6. Solvent effects on ion-receptor interactions in the presence of an external electric field.

    Novák, Martin; Foroutan-Nejad, Cina; Marek, Radek

    2016-11-09

    In this work we investigated the influence of an external electric field on the arrangement of the solvent shells around ions interacting with a carbon-based receptor. Our survey reveals that the mechanism of interaction between a monoatomic ion and a π-type ion receptor varies by the variation in the solvent polarity, the nature of the ion, and the strength of the external field. The characteristics of the ion-surface interaction in nonpolar solvents are similar to those observed in a vacuum. However, in water, we identified two mechanisms. Soft and polarizable ions preferentially interact with the π-receptor. In contrast, two bonded states were found for hard ions. A fully solvated ion, weakly interacting with the receptor at weak field, and a strong π-complex at the strong-field regime were identified. An abrupt variation in the potential energy surface (PES) associated with the rearrangement of the solvation shell on the surface of the receptor induced by an external field was observed both in implicit and explicit solvent environments. The electric field at which the solvation shell breaks is proportional to the hardness of the ion as has been suggested recently based on experimental observations.

  7. Effect of reaction solvent on hydroxyapatite synthesis in sol-gel process

    Nazeer, Muhammad Anwaar; Yilgor, Emel; Yagci, Mustafa Baris; Unal, Ugur; Yilgor, Iskender

    2017-12-01

    Synthesis of hydroxyapatite (HA) through sol-gel process in different solvent systems is reported. Calcium nitrate tetrahydrate (CNTH) and diammonium hydrogen phosphate (DAHP) were used as calcium and phosphorus precursors, respectively. Three different synthesis reactions were carried out by changing the solvent media, while keeping all other process parameters constant. A measure of 0.5 M aqueous DAHP solution was used in all reactions while CNTH was dissolved in distilled water, tetrahydrofuran (THF) and N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) at a concentration of 0.5 M. Ammonia solution (28-30%) was used to maintain the pH of the reaction mixtures in the 10-12 range. All reactions were carried out at 40 ± 2°C for 4 h. Upon completion of the reactions, products were filtered, washed and calcined at 500°C for 2 h. It was clearly demonstrated through various techniques that the dielectric constant and polarity of the solvent mixture strongly influence the chemical structure and morphological properties of calcium phosphate synthesized. Water-based reaction medium, with highest dielectric constant, mainly produced β-calcium pyrophosphate (β-CPF) with a minor amount of HA. DMF/water system yielded HA as the major phase with a very minor amount of β-CPF. THF/water solvent system with the lowest dielectric constant resulted in the formation of pure HA.

  8. The Swift Turbidity Marker

    Omar, Ahmad Fairuz; MatJafri, Mohd Zubir

    2011-01-01

    The Swift Turbidity Marker is an optical instrument developed to measure the level of water turbidity. The components and configuration selected for the system are based on common turbidity meter design concepts but use a simplified methodology to produce rapid turbidity measurements. This work is aimed at high school physics students and is the…

  9. Paleoreconstruction by biological markers

    Seifert, W K; Moldowan, J M

    1981-06-01

    During diagenesis and conversion of the original lipid fraction of biological systems to petroleum hydrocarbons, the following four basic events needed for paleoreconstruction may be monitored by biological markers: (1) sourcing, (2) maturation, (3) migration and (4) biodegradation. Actual cases of applying biological markers to petroleum exploration problems in different parts of the world are demonstrated. Cretaceous- and Phosphoria-sourced oils in the Wyoming Thrust Belt can be distinguished from one another by high quality source fingerprinting of biomarker terpanes using gas chromatography mass spectrometry. Identification of recently discovered biological markers, head-to-head isoprenoids, allows source differentiation between some oils from Sumatra. The degree of crude oil maturation in basins from California, Alaska, Russia, Wyoming and Louisiana can be assessed by specific biomarker ratios (20S/20R sterane epimers). Field evidence from such interpretation is augmented by laboratory pyrolysis of the rock. Extensive migration is documented by biomarkers in several oils. Biological marker results are consistent with the geological setting and add a dimension in assisting the petroleum explorationist towar paleoreconstruction.

  10. Magik Markers Trehvis

    2008-01-01

    Müra-rock'i viljelevast USA duost Magik Markers (ansambel osaleb režissöör Veiko Õunapuu uue mängufilmi "Püha Tõnu kiusamine" võtetel, kontsert 15. nov. Tartus klubis Trehv, vt. www.magikmarkers.audiosport.org.)

  11. Alternative Solvents through Green Chemistry Project

    Hintze, Paul E.; Quinn, Jacqueline

    2014-01-01

    Components in the aerospace industry must perform with accuracy and precision under extreme conditions, and surface contamination can be detrimental to the desired performance, especially in cases when the components come into contact with strong oxidizers such as liquid oxygen. Therefore, precision cleaning is an important part of a components preparation prior to utilization in aerospace applications. Current cleaning technologies employ a variety of cleaning agents, many of which are halogenated solvents that are either toxic or cause environmental damage. Thus, this project seeks to identify alternative precision cleaning solvents and technologies, including use of less harmful cleaning solvents, ultrasonic and megasonic agitation, low-pressure plasma cleaning techniques, and supercritical carbon dioxide extraction. Please review all data content found in the Public Data tab located at: https:techport.nasa.govview11697public

  12. Hazardous Solvent Substitution Data System tutorial

    Twitchell, K.E.; Skinner, N.L.

    1993-07-01

    This manual is the tutorial for the Hazardous Solvent Substitution Data System (HSSDS), an online, comprehensive system of information on alternatives to hazardous solvents and related subjects. The HSSDS data base contains product information, material safety data sheets, toxicity reports, usage reports, biodegradable data, product chemical element lists, and background information on solvents. HSSDS use TOPIC reg-sign to search for information based on a query defined by the user. TOPIC provides a full text retrieval of unstructured source documents. In this tutorial, a series of lessons is provided that guides the user through basic steps common to most queries performed with HSSDS. Instructions are provided for both window-based and character-based applications

  13. Characterization of tin films synthesized from ethaline deep eutectic solvent

    Ghosh, Swatilekha; Roy, Sudipta

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Tin deposition was achieved by galvanostatic method on the basic substrates from ethaline deep eutectic solvent without use of any additives. • The current potential behaviour of tin system changes with increase in concentration of hydrated tin chloride in ethaline. • The deposition rate in ethaline display three times lower value compared to aqueous electrolytes. • Fine grained crystals of 62 ± 10 nm were obtained for tin deposits. • The deposition process is economical and can be adapted for industrial applications. - Abstract: Tin (Sn) films were electrodeposited by galvanostatic method from ethaline deep eutectic solvent (DES), without any additives. The effect of various deposition parameters on the microstructure was studied. With increase in metal salt concentration from 0.01 to 0.1 M, changes in current–potential behaviour were observed in the polarization scans. This might be due to the existence of [SnCl 3 ] − , [Sn 2 Cl 5 ] − complexes in ethaline DES. Smooth and homogeneous deposits were obtained on a steel substrate surface by applying current density of 1.57 × 10 −3 A/cm 2 at 25 °C. Under these conditions the deposition rate was found to be 0.1 ± 10% μm/min and current efficiency was obtained as 84 ± 3%. XRD analysis of the deposit confirmed the polycrystalline tetragonal structure with mostly (2 0 0) orientation having a crystallite size about 62 ± 16% nm along with an internal strain of 0.0031 ± 22%. The present deposition method is simple, economical and can be adapted for industrial applications

  14. Modelling Polar Self Assembly

    Olvera de La Cruz, Monica; Sayar, Mehmet; Solis, Francisco J.; Stupp, Samuel I.

    2001-03-01

    Recent experimental studies in our group have shown that self assembled thin films of noncentrosymmetric supramolecular objects composed of triblock rodcoil molecules exhibit finite polar order. These aggregates have both long range dipolar and short range Ising-like interactions. We study the ground state of a simple model with these competing interactions. We find that the competition between Ising-like and dipolar forces yield a periodic domain structure, which can be controlled by adjusting the force constants and film thickness. When the surface forces are included in the potential, the system exhibits a finite macroscopic polar order.

  15. AGS polarized H- source

    Kponou, A.; Alessi, J.G.; Sluyters, T.

    1985-01-01

    The AGS polarized H - source is now operational. During a month-long experimental physics run in July 1984, pulses equivalent to 15 μA x 300 μs (approx. 3 x 10 10 protons) were injected into the RFQ preaccelerator. Beam polarization, measured at 200 MeV, was approx. 75%. After the run, a program to increase the H - yield of the source was begun and significant progress has been made. The H - current is now frequently 20 to 30 μA. A description of the source and some details of our operating experience are given. We also briefly describe the improvement program

  16. The polar mesosphere

    Morris, Ray; Murphy, Damian

    2008-01-01

    The mesosphere region, which lies at the edge of space, contains the coldest layer of the Earth's atmosphere, with summer temperatures as low as minus 130 °C. In this extreme environment ice aerosol layers have appeared since the dawn of industrialization—whose existence may arguably be linked to human influence—on yet another layer of the Earth's fragile atmosphere. Ground-based and space-based experiments conducted in the Arctic and Antarctic during the International Polar Year (IPY) aim to address limitations in our knowledge and to advance our understanding of thermal and dynamical processes at play in the polar mesosphere

  17. Imaging with Polarized Neutrons

    Nikolay Kardjilov

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Owing to their zero charge, neutrons are able to pass through thick layers of matter (typically several centimeters while being sensitive to magnetic fields due to their intrinsic magnetic moment. Therefore, in addition to the conventional attenuation contrast image, the magnetic field inside and around a sample can be visualized by detecting changes of polarization in a transmitted beam. The method is based on the spatially resolved measurement of the cumulative precession angles of a collimated, polarized, monochromatic neutron beam that traverses a magnetic field or sample.

  18. Polarization splitter and polarization rotator designs based on transformation optics.

    Kwon, Do-Hoon; Werner, Douglas H

    2008-11-10

    The transformation optics technique is employed in this paper to design two optical devices - a two-dimensional polarization splitter and a three-dimensional polarization rotator for propagating beams. The polarization splitter translates the TM- and the TE-polarized components of an incident beam in opposite directions (i.e., shifted up or shifted down). The polarization rotator rotates the polarization state of an incoming beam by an arbitrary angle. Both optical devices are reflectionless at the entry and exit interfaces. Design details and full-wave simulation results are provided.

  19. Polarized Proton Collisions at RHIC

    Bai, Mei; Alekseev, Igor G; Alessi, James; Beebe-Wang, Joanne; Blaskiewicz, Michael; Bravar, Alessandro; Brennan, Joseph M; Bruno, Donald; Bunce, Gerry; Butler, John J; Cameron, Peter; Connolly, Roger; De Long, Joseph; Drees, Angelika; Fischer, Wolfram; Ganetis, George; Gardner, Chris J; Glenn, Joseph; Hayes, Thomas; Hseuh Hsiao Chaun; Huang, Haixin; Ingrassia, Peter; Iriso, Ubaldo; Laster, Jonathan S; Lee, Roger C; Luccio, Alfredo U; Luo, Yun; MacKay, William W; Makdisi, Yousef; Marr, Gregory J; Marusic, Al; McIntyre, Gary; Michnoff, Robert; Montag, Christoph; Morris, John; Nicoletti, Tony; Oddo, Peter; Oerter, Brian; Osamu, Jinnouchi; Pilat, Fulvia Caterina; Ptitsyn, Vadim; Roser, Thomas; Satogata, Todd; Smith, Kevin T; Svirida, Dima; Tepikian, Steven; Tomas, Rogelio; Trbojevic, Dejan; Tsoupas, Nicholaos; Tuozzolo, Joseph; Vetter, Kurt; Wilinski, Michelle; Zaltsman, Alex; Zelenski, Anatoli; Zeno, Keith; Zhang, S Y

    2005-01-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider~(RHIC) provides not only collisions of ions but also collisions of polarized protons. In a circular accelerator, the polarization of polarized proton beam can be partially or fully lost when a spin depolarizing resonance is encountered. To preserve the beam polarization during acceleration, two full Siberian snakes were employed in RHIC to avoid depolarizing resonances. In 2003, polarized proton beams were accelerated to 100~GeV and collided in RHIC. Beams were brought into collisions with longitudinal polarization at the experiments STAR and PHENIX by using spin rotators. RHIC polarized proton run experience demonstrates that optimizing polarization transmission efficiency and improving luminosity performance are significant challenges. Currently, the luminosity lifetime in RHIC is limited by the beam-beam effect. The current state of RHIC polarized proton program, including its dedicated physics run in 2005 and efforts to optimize luminosity production in beam-beam limite...

  20. NMR spectroscopy using liquid crystal solvents

    Emsley, JW

    2013-01-01

    NMR Spectroscopy using Liquid Crystal Solvents covers the importance of using a liquid crystal solvent in NMR to derive nuclear dipolar spin-spin coupling constants. This book is composed of ten chapters, and begins with a brief description of the features and benefits of liquid crystal in NMR spectroscopic analysis. The succeeding chapters deal with the mode of operation of nuclear spin Hamiltonian for partially oriented molecules and the analysis of NMR spectra of partially oriented molecules, as well as the determination of rigid molecule structure. These topics are followed by discussions

  1. Catalog solvent extraction: anticipate process adjustments

    Campbell, S.G.; Brass, E.A.; Brown, S.J.; Geeting, M.W.

    2008-01-01

    The Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) utilizes commercially available centrifugal contactors to facilitate removal of radioactive cesium from highly alkaline salt solutions. During the fabrication of the contactor assembly, demonstrations revealed a higher propensity for foaming than was initially expected. A task team performed a series of single-phase experiments that revealed that the shape of the bottom vanes and the outer diameter of those vanes are key to the successful deployment of commercial contactors in the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Process. (authors)

  2. The influence of solvent stress on MMS-induced genetic change in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Zimmermann, F K; Rohlfs, A

    1991-01-01

    MMS induced mitotic recombination but not mitotic chromosome loss when tested in pure form in strain D61.M of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, confirming previous results of Albertini (1991), whereas in Aspergillus nidulans it also induced chromosomal malsegregation in addition to mitotic recombination (Käfer, 1988). However, induction of mitotic chromosome loss was observed in combination with strong inducers of chromosome loss such as the aprotic polar solvents ethyl acetate and to a lesser extent methyl ethyl ketone but not with gamma-valerolactone and propionitrile. In addition to this, 4 solvents, dimethyl formamide, dimethyl sulfoxide, dioxane and pyridine, enhanced the MMS-induced mitotic recombination in strain D61.M. An enhancement of MMS-induced mitotic recombination and reverse mutation could be demonstrated for ethyl acetate and gamma-valerolactone in yeast strain D7.

  3. Driving Forces Controlling Host-Guest Recognition in Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Solvent.

    Ingrosso, Francesca; Altarsha, Muhannad; Dumarçay, Florence; Kevern, Gwendal; Barth, Danielle; Marsura, Alain; Ruiz-López, Manuel F

    2016-02-24

    The formation of supramolecular host-guest complexes is a very useful and widely employed tool in chemistry. However, supramolecular chemistry in non-conventional solvents such as supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2 ), one of the most promising sustainable solvents, is still in its infancy. In this work, we explored a successful route to the development of green processes in supercritical CO2 by combining a theoretical approach with experiments. We were able to synthesize and characterize an inclusion complex between a polar aromatic molecule (benzoic acid) and peracetylated-β-cyclodextrin, which is soluble in the supercritical medium. This finding opens the way to wide, environmental friendly, applications of scCO2 in many areas of chemistry, including supramolecular synthesis, reactivity and catalysis, micro and nano-particle formation, molecular recognition, as well as enhanced extraction processes with increased selectivity. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. CO2 Binding Organic Liquids Gas Capture with Polarity Swing Assisted Regeneration

    Heldebrant, David [Battelle Memorial Institute, Columbus, OH (United States)

    2014-05-31

    This report outlines the comprehensive bench-scale testing of the CO2-binding organic liquids (CO2BOLs) solvent platform and its unique Polarity Swing Assisted Regeneration (PSAR). This study outlines all efforts on a candidate CO2BOL solvent molecule, including solvent synthesis, material characterization, preliminary toxicology studies, and measurement of all physical, thermodynamic and kinetic data, including bench-scale testing. Equilibrium and kinetic models and analysis were made using Aspen Plus™. Preliminary process configurations, a technoeconomic assessment and solvent performance projections for separating CO2 from a subcritical coal-fired power plant are compared to the U.S. Department of Energy's Case 10 monoethanolamine baseline.

  5. Post monitoring of a cyclodextrin remeditated chlorinated solvent contaminated aquifer

    Blanford, W. J.

    2006-12-01

    Hydroxypropyl-â-cyclodextrin (HPâCD) has been tested successfully in the laboratory and in the field for enhanced flushing of low-polarity contaminants from aquifers. The cyclodextrin molecule forms a toroidal structure, which has a hydrophobic cavity. Within this cavity, organic compounds of appropriate shape and size can form inclusion complexes, which is the basis for the use of cyclodextrin in groundwater remediation. The hydrophilic exterior of the molecule makes cyclodextrin highly water-soluble. The solubility of cyclodextrins can be further enhanced by adding functional groups, such as hydroxypropyl groups, to the cyclodextrin core. The aqueous solubility of HPâCD exceeds 950 g/L. These high solubilities are advantageous for field applications because they permit relatively high concentrations of the flushing agent. In order for cyclodextrin to become a feasible remediative alternative, it must be demonstrate a short term resistance to biodegradation during field application, but ultimately biodegrade so as not to pose a long term presence in the aquifer. The potential for degradation of cyclodextrin as well as changes in the chlorinated solvents and groundwater geochemistry were examined during the post monitoring of a field demonstration in a shallow aquifer at Little Creek Naval Amphibious Base in Virginia. It was found that a portion of the cyclodextrin remaining in the aquifer after the cessation of field activities biodegraded during the 425 days of post monitoring. This degradation also led to the degradation of the chlorinated solvents trichloroethylene and 1,1-trichloroethane through both biological and chemical processes. The aquifer remained anaerobic with average dissolved oxygen levels below 0.5 mg/L. Dissolved nitrate and sulfate concentrations within the cyclodextrin plume decreased due their being used as terminal electron acceptors during the degradation of the cyclodextrin. The concentrations of total iron at the field site showed no

  6. Broadband polarized emission from P(NDI2OD-T2) polymer.

    Ulrich, Steve; Sutch, Tabitha; Szulczewski, Greg; Schweizer, Matthias; Barbosa, Newton; Araujo, Paulo

    2018-05-18

    We investigate the P(NDI2OD-T2) photophysical properties via absorbance and fluorescence spectroscopy, in association with the experimental approach baptized Stokes Spectroscopy, which provides valuable material information through the acquisition and analysis of the fluorescence polarization degree. By changing solvents and using different samples such as solutions, thick, and thin films, it is possible to control the polarization degree spectrum associated to the fluorescence emitted by the polymer's isolated chains and aggregates. We show that the polarization degree could become a powerful tool to obtain information related to the samples morphology, which is connected to their microscopic structure. Moreover, the polarization degree spectra suggest that depolarization effects linked to energy and charge transfer mechanisms are likely taking place. Our findings indicate that P(NDI2OD-T2) polymers are excellent candidates for the advancement of organic technologies that rely on the emission and detection of polarized lights. © 2018 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  7. Substituent and solvent effects on spectroscopic properties of 2-amino-1,3-dicyano-5,6,7,8-tetrahydronaphthalene derivatives

    Józefowicz, M.; Bajorek, A.; Pietrzak, M.; Heldt, J.R.; Heldt, J.

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we report the photophysical properties of six, newly synthesized donor-substituted 2-amino-1,3-dicyano-5,6,7,8-tetrahydronaphthalene fluorophores. The steady-state and time-resolved spectroscopic experiments have been used to investigate the substituent and solvent effects on the locally excited (LE) and intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) emission. We demonstrate that the spectroscopic characteristics (fluorescence quantum yields, fluorescence decay times, radiative rate constants, and ground and excited state dipole moments) of the studied D–A dyes, as well as the reorganization energies characterizing the solute–solvent interactions and intramolecular torsion motions greatly depend on different substituents and microenvironment. On the basis of the experimental results and our previous quantum-chemical calculations, it was shown that two emitting charge transfer states: non-relaxed (ICT) NR and relaxed (ICT) R exist in six biphenyl derivatives dissolved in polar solvents (e.g., THF), whereas in non-polar medium (MCH) the existence of two emissive states have been attributed to non-relaxed and relaxed, locally excited state ((LE) NR , (LE) R ). - Highlights: • Spectroscopic properties greatly depend on different substituents and microenvironment. • Investigated dyes form a typically spectrally inhomogeneous system. • Two emitting charge transfer states (ICT) NR and (ICT) R exist in polar solvents. • In non-polar medium locally excited fluorescence is possible from (LE) NR and (LE) R states

  8. Continuum model of non-equilibrium solvation and solvent effect on ultra-fast processes

    Li Xiangyuan; Fu Kexiang; Zhu Quan

    2006-01-01

    In the past 50 years, non-equilibrium solvation theory for ultra-fast processes such as electron transfer and light absorption/emission has attracted particular interest. A great deal of research efforts was made in this area and various models which give reasonable qualitative descriptions for such as solvent reorganization energy in electron transfer and spectral shift in solution, were developed within the framework of continuous medium theory. In a series of publications by the authors, we clarified that the expression of the non-equilibrium electrostatic free energy that is at the dominant position of non-equilibrium solvation and serves as the basis of various models, however, was incorrectly formulated. In this work, the authors argue that reversible charging work integration was inappropriately applied in the past to an irreversible path linking the equilibrium or the non-equilibrium state. Because the step from the equilibrium state to the nonequilibrium state is factually thermodynamically irreversible, the conventional expression for non-equilibrium free energy that was deduced in different ways is unreasonable. Here the authors derive the non-equilibrium free energy to a quite different form according to Jackson integral formula. Such a difference throws doubts to the models including the famous Marcus two-sphere model for solvent reorganization energy of electron transfer and the Lippert-Mataga equation for spectral shift. By introducing the concept of 'spring energy' arising from medium polarizations, the energy constitution of the non-equilibrium state is highlighted. For a solute-solvent system, the authors separate the total electrostatic energy into different components: the self-energies of solute charge and polarized charge, the interaction energy between them and the 'spring energy' of the solvent polarization. With detailed reasoning and derivation, our formula for non-equilibrium free energy can be reached through different ways. Based on the

  9. Polarized coincidence electroproduction

    Heimann, R.L.

    1975-03-01

    A study is made of the inclusive electroproduction of single hadrons off a polarized target. Bjorken scaling laws and the hadron azimuthal distribution are derived from the quark parton model. The polarization asymmetries scale when the target spin is along the direction of the virtual photon, and (apart from significant exception) vanish for transverse spin. These results have a simple explanation; emphasis is given both to the general mathematical formalism and to intuitive physical reasoning. Through this framework other cases are considered: quarks with anomalous magnetic moment; renormalization group effects and asymptotic freedom; production of vector mesons (whose spin state is analysed by their decay); relation to large transverse momentum hadron production; and a covariant parton model calculation. Spin 0 partons and Regge singularities are also considered. All of these cases (apart from the last two) modify the pattern of conclusions. Vector meson production shows polarization enhancements in the density matrix element rhosub(0+); the renormalization group approach does not lead to any significant suppressions. They are also less severe in parton models for large Psub(T) hadrons, and are not supported by the covariantly formulated calculation. The origins of these differences are isolated and used to exemplify the sensitivity polarized hadron electroproduction has to delicate detail that is otherwise concealed. (author)

  10. Fluorescence confocal polarizing microscopy

    Much of the modern understanding of orientational order in liquid crystals (LCs) is based on polarizing microscopy (PM). A PM image bears only two-dimensional (2D) information, integrating the 3D pattern of optical birefringence over the path of light. Recently, we proposed a technique to image 3D director patterns by ...

  11. Optical neutron polarizers

    Hayter, J.B.

    1990-01-01

    A neutron wave will be refracted by an appropriately varying potential. Optical neutron polarizers use spatially varying, spin- dependent potentials to refract neutrons of opposite spin states into different directions, so that an unpolarized beam will be split into two beams of complementary polarization by such a device. This paper will concentrate on two methods of producing spin-dependent potentials which are particularly well-suited to polarizing cold neutron beams, namely thin-film structures and field-gradient techniques. Thin-film optical devices, such as supermirror multilayer structures, are usually designed to deviate only one spin-state, so that they offer the possibility of making insertion (transmission) polarizers. Very good supermirrors may now be designed and fabricated, but it is not always straightforward to design mirror-based devices which are useful in real (divergent beam) applications, and some practical configurations will be discussed. Field-gradient devices, which are usually based on multipolar magnets, have tended to be too expensive for general use, but this may change with new developments in superconductivity. Dipolar and hexapolar configurations will be considered, with emphasis on the focusing characteristics of the latter. 21 refs., 7 figs

  12. Titan Polar Landscape Evolution

    Moore, Jeffrey M.

    2016-01-01

    With the ongoing Cassini-era observations and studies of Titan it is clear that the intensity and distribution of surface processes (particularly fluvial erosion by methane and Aeolian transport) has changed through time. Currently however, alternate hypotheses substantially differ among specific scenarios with respect to the effects of atmospheric evolution, seasonal changes, and endogenic processes. We have studied the evolution of Titan's polar region through a combination of analysis of imaging, elevation data, and geomorphic mapping, spatially explicit simulations of landform evolution, and quantitative comparison of the simulated landscapes with corresponding Titan morphology. We have quantitatively evaluated alternate scenarios for the landform evolution of Titan's polar terrain. The investigations have been guided by recent geomorphic mapping and topographic characterization of the polar regions that are used to frame hypotheses of process interactions, which have been evaluated using simulation modeling. Topographic information about Titan's polar region is be based on SAR-Topography and altimetry archived on PDS, SAR-based stereo radar-grammetry, radar-sounding lake depth measurements, and superposition relationships between geomorphologic map units, which we will use to create a generalized topographic map.

  13. The polarized EMC effect

    W. Bentz; I. C. Cloet; A. W. Thomas

    2007-02-01

    We calculate both the spin independent and spin dependent nuclear structure functions in an effective quark theory. The nucleon is described as a composite quark-diquark state, and the nucleus is treated in the mean field approximation. We predict a sizable polarized EMC effect, which could be confirmed in future experiments.

  14. Polarizer reflectivity variations

    Ozarski, R.G.; Prior, J.

    1980-01-01

    On Shiva the beam energy along the chain is monitored using available reflections and/or transmission through beam steering, splitting, and polarizing optics without the intrusion of any additional glass for diagnostics. On the preamp table the diagnostic signal is obtained from the signal transmitted through turning mirrors. At the input of each chain the signal is obtained from the transmission through one of the mirrors used for the chain input alignment sensor (CHIP). At the chain output the transmission through the final turning mirror is used. These diagnostics have proved stable and reliable. However, one of the prime diagnostic locations is at the output of the beta rod. The energy at this location is measured by collecting small reflections from the last polarizer surface of the beta Pockels cell polarizer package. Unfortunately, calibration of this diagnostic has varied randomly, seldom remaining stable for a week or more. The cause of this fluctuation has been investigated for the past year and'it has been discovered that polarizer reflectivity varies with humidity. This report will deal with the possible causes that were investigated, the evidence that humidity is causing the variation, and the associated mechanism

  15. Spin-polarized photoemission

    Johnson, Peter D.

    1997-01-01

    Spin-polarized photoemission has developed into a versatile tool for the study of surface and thin film magnetism. In this review, we examine the methodology of the technique and its application to a number of different problems, including both valence band and core level studies. After a detailed review of spin-polarization measurement techniques and the related experimental requirements we consider in detail studies of the bulk properties both above and below the Curie temperature. This section also includes a discussion of observations relating to unique metastable phases obtained via epitaxial growth. The application of the technique to the study of surfaces, both clean and adsorbate covered, is reviewed. The report then examines, in detail, studies of the spin-polarized electronic structure of thin films and the related interfacial magnetism. Finally, observations of spin-polarized quantum well states in non-magnetic thin films are discussed with particular reference to their mediation of the oscillatory exchange coupling in related magnetic multilayers. (author)

  16. Polarization of Bremsstrahlung

    Miller, J.

    1957-01-01

    The numerical results for the polarization of Bremsstrahlung are presented. The multiple scattering of electrons in the target is taken into account. The angular-and photon energy dependences are seen on the curves for an incident 25 MeV electron energy. (Author) [fr

  17. No More Polarization, Please!

    Hansen, Mia Reinholt

    and the increasing levels of complexities it entails, such polarization is not fruitful in the attempt to explain motivation of organizational members. This paper claims that a more nuanced perspective on motivation, acknowledging the co-existence of intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, the possible interaction...

  18. DESY: HERA polarization

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    The new HERA electron-proton collider at DESY in Hamburg achieved the first luminosity for electron-proton collisions on 19 October last year. Only one month later, on 20 November, HERA passed another important milestone with the observation of transverse electron polarization

  19. Polarized Neutron Scattering

    Roessli, B.; Böni, P.

    2000-01-01

    The technique of polarized neutron scattering is reviewed with emphasis on applications. Many examples of the usefulness of the method in various fields of physics are given like the determination of spin density maps, measurement of complex magnetic structures with spherical neutron polarimetry, inelastic neutron scattering and separation of coherent and incoherent scattering with help of the generalized XYZ method.

  20. DESY: HERA polarization

    Anon.

    1992-03-15

    The new HERA electron-proton collider at DESY in Hamburg achieved the first luminosity for electron-proton collisions on 19 October last year. Only one month later, on 20 November, HERA passed another important milestone with the observation of transverse electron polarization.