WorldWideScience

Sample records for solvent impregnated resin

  1. Solvent impregnated resin for isolation of U(VI) from industrial wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karve, M.; Rajgor, R.V.

    2008-01-01

    A solid-phase extraction method based upon impregnation of Cyanex 302 (bis(2,4,4- trimethylpentyl)mono-thio-phosphinic acid) on Amberlite XAD-2 resin is proposed for isolation of U(VI) from uranmicrolite ore tailing samples and industrial effluent samples. U(VI) was sorbed from nitric acid media on the solvent-impregnated resin (SIR) and was recovered completely with 1.0 M HCl. Based upon sorption behavior of U(VI) with Cyanex 302, it was quantitatively sorbed on the SIR in a dynamic method, while the other metal ions were not sorbed by the modified resin. The preparation of impregnated resin is simple, based upon physical interaction of the extractant and solid support, has good sorption capacity for U(VI), and is also reliable for detection of traces of U(VI). (authors)

  2. Selective recovery of a pyridine derivative from an aqueous waste stream containing acetic acid and succinonitrile with solvent impregnated resins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bokhove, J.; Visser, T.J.; Schuur, Boelo; de Haan, A.B.

    2015-01-01

    Solvent impregnated resins (SIRs) were evaluated for the recovery of pyridine derivatives from an aqueous waste-stream containing also acetic acid and succinonitrile. For this purpose, a new solvent was developed, synthesized and impregnated in Amberlite XAD4. Sorption studies were used to determine

  3. Development of separation process of Dy, Y, Tm and Yb from heavier rare earth residue by solvent impregnated resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, J.; Matsumoto, S.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: Heavier rare earth which is contained in a small amount in ores such as bastnesite and monazite has been accumulated as heavier rare earth residue without doing separation and purification due to lack of suitable methods. The heavier rare earth residue includes seven rare earth elements such as Tb, Dy, Ho, Y, Er, Tm and Yb. Separation and recovery process of Dy, Y, Tm and Yb from leached solution of the heavier rare earth residue was investigated by using a column method with a solvent impregnated resin. The solvent impregnated resin was prepared by impregnation of organophosphorous extractant whose trade name is PC-88A into a macro porous resin, Amberlite XAD-7. It was almost impossible to separate them in simple adsorption and elution steps. However, we attained to individually separate Dy, Y, Tm and Yb from the leached solution first by changing eluent concentration gradually from pH 2 to 2mol/ l HCl in the elution step, and secondly by using a development column and changing eluent concentration in the elution step. The separation process flow was proposed for heavier rare earth residue by using the solvent impregnated resin method

  4. Resin impregnation process for producing a resin-fiber composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Raymond J. (Inventor); Moore, William E. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    Process for vacuum impregnation of a dry fiber reinforcement with a curable resin to produce a resin-fiber composite, by drawing a vacuum to permit flow of curable liquid resin into and through a fiber reinforcement to impregnate same and curing the resin-impregnated fiber reinforcement at a sufficient temperature and pressure to effect final curing. Both vacuum and positive pressure, e.g. autoclave pressure, are applied to the dry fiber reinforcement prior to application of heat and prior to any resin flow to compact the dry fiber reinforcement, and produce a resin-fiber composite of reduced weight, thickness and resin content, and improved mechanical properties. Preferably both a vacuum and positive pressure, e.g. autoclave pressure, are also applied during final curing.

  5. Impregnation of soft biological specimens with thermosetting resins and elastomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Hagens, G

    1979-06-01

    A new method for impregnation of biological specimens with thermosetting resins and elastomers is described. The method has the advantage that the original relief of the surface is retained. The impregnation is carried out by utilizing the difference between the high vapor tension of the intermedium (e.g., methylene chloride) and the low vapor tension of the solution to be polymerized. After impregnation, the specimen is subject to polymerization conditions without surrounding embedding material. The optical and mechanical properties can be selected by proper choice from various kinds of resins and different procedures, for example, by complete or incomplete impregnation. Acrylic resins, polyester resins, epoxy resins, polyurethanes and silicone rubber have been found suitable for the method. Excellent results have been obtained using transparent silicone rubber since after treatment the specimens are still flexible and resilient, and have retained their natural appearance.

  6. Physical and chemical durability of cement impregnated epoxy resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suryantoro

    1997-01-01

    Immobilization of simulation radioactive waste contains Cs and Sr with cement impregnated epoxy resin has been done. Low level liquid waste in 30% weight mixed cement homogeneously and then set in its curing time about 28 days. Waste from was impregnated with epoxy resin (Bisphenol-A-diglycidylether) and use Triethylenteramin as catalyst. the sample of cement impregnated epoxy resin 2.5 cm x 2.5 cm in diameter and length was tested by Paul Weber. The compressive strength was obtained of 4.08 kN.cm - 2. The sochxlet apparatus was run on flow rate of 300 ml/hour at 100 o C and during 24 hours. The leaching rate of Cs was round on 5.5 x 10 - 4 g.cm - 2.d - 1 and Sr was 6.1 x 10 - 4 g.cm - 2.d - 1 (author)

  7. Chiral separation of amino-alcohols using extractant impregnated resins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Babic, K.; Driessen, G.H.M.; van der Ham, Aloysius G.J.; de Haan, A.B.

    2007-01-01

    The performance of extractant impregnated resin (EIR) technology for chiral separation of amino-alcohols has been investigated. Phenylglycinol was selected as an archetype model enantiomer and azophenolic crown ether was used as a versatile enantioselective extractant. 1-Phenyloctane was selected as

  8. Textile impregnation with thermoplastic resin - models and application

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loendersloot, Richard; Grouve, Wouter Johannes Bernardus; Lamers, E.A.D.; Wijskamp, Sebastiaan; Kelly, P.A.; Bickerton, S.; Lescher, P.; Govignon, Q.

    2012-01-01

    One of the key issues of the development of cost-effective thermoplastic composites for the aerospace industry is the process quality control. A complete, void free impregnation of the textile reinforcement by the thermoplastic resin is an important measure of the quality of composites. The

  9. Solid phase extraction of Am (III) by resins impregnated with multiply diglycolamide-functionalized ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gujar, R.B.; Ansari, S.A.; Mohapatra, P.K.; Verboom, W.

    2016-01-01

    Solvent extraction studies with multiply diglycolamide-functionalized extractants such as tripodal diglycolamide (T-DGA) or diglycolamide-functionalized calix(4)arene (C4DGA) ligands have shown excellent results as compared to those of normal DGA ligands such as TODGA. A very high selectivity for Am(III) has been reported with these ligands with respect to U(VI) and Pu(IV). High selectivities and large extraction efficiencies of these ligands towards trivalent f elements were ascribed to a co-operative complexation mechanism. Furthermore, the extraction efficiency of these ligands increased several folds in ionic liquid medium as compared to paraffinic solvents. It was of interest, therefore, to prepare extraction chromatographic resins by impregnation of solvent systems containing these ligands in an ionic liquid. In the present work, solid phase extraction studies were carried out using these two multiply diglycolamide-functionalized extractants, viz. T-DGA (resin I) and C4DGA (resin-II) containing the ionic liquid C 4 mim. NTf 2 impregnated on Chromosorb-W

  10. The effect of type and mixture of resin on the properties of impregnated paper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    hossein Kermanian

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out in order to investigate the effects of different types of resins and also their mixtures on the impregnated paper properties. In this regard, pure urea resin (100%, mixture of melamine and urea resins with various combinations (60/40 and 70/30 and 50/50, mixture of nano-fiber cellulose ratios of 1, 2 and 3 percent with urea resin and pure PVA (100% were used to impregnate of newsprint basic paper of Mazandaran wood and paper industries. Immersion of samples in the impregnation step were done in two time of 5 and 10 seconds. Next, melamine resin was used for surface coating and then absorption of resin in the impregnation and coating process measured. Results showed that in the impregnation step with pure urea (100%, in the respect of absorption rate and surface properties of melamine paper, the best time of impregnation was obtained 10 seconds. In the combined treatment, adding up to 30% melamine to urea resin, as impregnation step resin, offers better properties in terms of stain resistance, cigarette resistance, resistance to cracking and resistance to hot water steam for impregnatedmade paper. By adding nanocellulose up to 1% in impregnation resin, better properties is obtained for melamine paper. Also, PVA as impregnation resin, can be offer similar quality to pure urea in the resulting melamine papers.

  11. Extraction behaviour of Am(III) and Eu(III) from nitric acid medium in TEHDGA-HDEHP impregnated resins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saipriya, G.; Kumar, T. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre Facilities, Kalpakkam (India). Kalpakkam Reprocessing Plant; Kumaresan, R.; Nayak, P.K.; Venkatesan, K.A.; Antony, M.P. [Indira Gandhi Center for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India). Fuel Chemistry Div.

    2016-07-01

    The extraction behaviour of Am(III) and Eu(III) from nitric acid medium was studied in the solvent impregnated resins containing extractants such as tetra-bis(2-ethylhexyl)diglycolamide (TEHDGA) or bis-(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid (HDEHP) or mixture of TEHDGA+HDEHP. The rate of extraction of Am(III) and Eu(III) from 1 M nitric acid and the effect of various parameters, such as the concentration of nitric acid in aqueous phase and concentration of TEHDGA and HDEHP in resin phase, on the distribution coefficient of Am(III) and Eu(III) was studied. The distribution coefficient of Am(III) and Eu(III) in HDEHP-impregnated resin decreased and that in TEHDGA-impregnated resin increased, with increase in the concentration of nitric acid. However, in (TEHDGA+HDEHP) - impregnated resin, synergic extraction was observed at lower nitric acid concentration and antagonism at higher nitric acid concentration. The mechanism of Am(III) and Eu(III) extraction in the combined resin was investigated by slope analysis method. The extraction of various metal ions present in the fast reactor simulated high-level liquid waste was studied. The separation factor of Am(III) over Eu(III) was studied using citrate-buffered diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) solution.

  12. A new resin system for the impregnation and bonding of large magnet coils

    CERN Document Server

    Evans, D

    1998-01-01

    ATLAS is an instrument which forms part of the Large Hadron Collider, a high energy physics experiment which is under construction at CERN, Geneva, Switzerland. The properties of the candidate resin systems developed for the impregnation of the Atlas End Cap Toroid magnets are presented. The resin systems contain a blend of two resins; a low viscosity Bisphenol F resin, with a long chain aliphatic epoxide resin. An aromatic amine curing agent was used. It was found that increased additions of the long chain aliphatic epoxide resin resulted in longer useable life, lower glass transition temperature, lower modulus, higher toughness and higher bond strength at 4 K. (4 refs).

  13. Conservation of a medieval climbing stem by freeze-drying and resin impregnation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaudy, R.; Slais, E.; Eibner, C.

    1985-12-01

    The conservation of a climbing stem originating from a medieval mining adit is described. The fragile wet object was preserved by a combined process consisting of freeze-drying after a polyethylene glycol bath and consecutive resin impregnation with curing by gamma irradiation. The whole conservation process took 1 year. The result is discussed. (Author)

  14. Solvent cleaning system and method for removing contaminants from solvent used in resin recycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnert, George W [Harrisonville, MO; Hand, Thomas E [Lee's Summit, MO; DeLaurentiis, Gary M [Jamestown, CA

    2009-01-06

    A two step solvent and carbon dioxide based system that produces essentially contaminant-free synthetic resin material and which further includes a solvent cleaning system for periodically removing the contaminants from the solvent so that the solvent can be reused and the contaminants can be collected and safely discarded in an environmentally safe manner.

  15. Purification of degraded TBP solvent using macroreticular anion exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kartha, P.K.S.; Kutty, P.V.E.; Janaradanan, C.; Ramanujam, A.; Dhumwad, R.K.

    1989-01-01

    Tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) diluted with a suitable diluent is commonly used for solvent extraction in Purex process for the recovery of uranium and plutonium from irradiated nuclear fuels. This solvent gets degraded due to various factors, the main degradation product being dibutyl phosphoric acid (HDBP). A solvent cleanup step is generally incorporated in the process for removing the degradation products from the used solvent. A liquid-liquid cleanup system using sodium carbonate or sodium hydroxide solution is routinely used. Considering certain advantages, like the possibility of loading the resin almost to saturation capacity and the subsequent disposal of the spent resin by incineration and the feasibility of adopting it to the process, a liquid-solid system has been tried as an alternate method, employing various available macroreticular anion exchange resins in OH - form for the sorption of HDBP from TBP. After standardizing the various conditions for the satisfactory removal of HDBP from TBP using synthetic mixtures, resins were tested with process solvent in batch contacts. The parameters studied were (1) capacity of different resins for HDBP sorption (2) influence of acidity, uranium and HDBP on the sorption behaviour of the latter (3) removal of fission products from the solvent by the resin and (4) regeneration and recycling of the resin. (author). 2 figs., 13 tabs., 17 refs

  16. Conservation of waterlogged wood by freeze-drying and optional resin impregnation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaudy, R.

    1987-09-01

    As a contribution to the 'International Comparative Study on Waterlogged Wood' (Grattan-Schweingruber-Project) of the ICOM Working Group on Waterlogged Organic Materials seven archaeological wood samples from sites in Canada, England, the Netherlands, Japan, Norway and Western Australia have been treated. The conservation process consisted of freeze-drying following a polyethylene glycol (PEG 400) treatment and - for fragile objects - of a resin impregnation using a radiation-curable impregnant and gamma radiation for curing. The results are discussed, however without paying regard to the other contributions to this international study. 20 refs., 3 tabs., 30 figs. (Author)

  17. Extraction and Separation of Uranium (VI) and Thorium (IV) Using Tri-n-dodecylamine Impregnated Resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metwally, E.; Saleh, A.Sh.; El-Naggar, H.A.

    2005-01-01

    Extraction of U(VI) and Th(IV) from chloride and nitrate solutions with tri-n- dodecylamine impregnated on Amberlite XAD4, was investigated. The distribution of U(VI) and Th(IV) was studied at different concentrations of acid, salting-out agent, extractant, aqueous metal ion and other parameters. Absorption spectral studies have been investigated for uranium species in both aqueous HCl solution and the resin phase. From these studies, it is suggested that the tetrachloro complex of U(VI) is formed in the extraction of uranium (VI) from hydrochloric acid solutions by TDA impregnated resin. Stripping of the extracted U(VI) and Th(IV) was assayed with HCl and HNO 3 . Finally, the separation of uranium from thorium and fission products in HCl media was achieved

  18. Apparatus and method for removing solvent from carbon dioxide in resin recycling system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnert, George W [Harrisonville, MO; Hand, Thomas E [Lee's Summit, MO; DeLaurentiis, Gary M [Jamestown, CA

    2009-01-06

    A two-step resin recycling system and method solvent that produces essentially contaminant-free synthetic resin material. The system and method includes one or more solvent wash vessels to expose resin particles to a solvent, the solvent contacting the resin particles in the one or more solvent wash vessels to substantially remove contaminants on the resin particles. A separator is provided to separate the solvent from the resin particles after removal from the one or more solvent wash vessels. The resin particles are next exposed to carbon dioxide in a closed loop carbon dioxide system. The closed loop system includes a carbon dioxide vessel where the carbon dioxide is exposed to the resin, substantially removing any residual solvent remaining on the resin particles after separation. A separation vessel is also provided to separate the solvent from the solvent laden carbon dioxide. Both the carbon dioxide and the solvent are reused after separation in the separation vessel.

  19. In situ processing of concrete surface by impregnation and polymerization of an organic resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellecchia, V.; Ursella, P.; Moretto, G.

    1990-01-01

    The impregnation by resins of concrete structures is widely known as PIC (Polymer Impregnated Concrete). This process is normally used to improve the physical-chemical features of prefabricated items in particular to raise their lifetime under severe environmental conditions. The main target of this research contract was the verification of the possibility of a proper impregnation of existing concrete surfaces, of any dimensions and position, by comparing the obtained characteristics with those of untreated original material to check the improvement of chemical-physical properties and durability. In a nuclear facility, this goal is very important with reference to the long-term integrity of concrete walls during plant operative lifetime and after the final shutdown and decommissioning of the plant, if its dismantling is deferred. The operative steps of the research were the design, manufacturing and implementation of a tailored prototype equipment, the setting-up of the machine, the project and erection of a walling unit made of different density sectors in nuclear grade concrete and optimisation of the PIC process phases (dehydration, degassing, monomer injection, thermal cycles) during the experimental campaign. The data collected from samples gathered from field application gave results very similar to laboratory impregnated samples, thus confirming the satisfactory running of the prototype unit. Particularly the resin penetration, in spite of low porosity of nuclear grade concrete matrix, reached depths well beyond 50 mm with a significant increase of mechanical features, leaching resistance to aggressive agents and an appreciable sealing of concrete porosity

  20. [Mechanism of gold solid extraction from aurocyanide solution using D3520 resin impregnated with TRPO].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiang-Jun; Wang, Shi-Xiong; Zou, An-Qin; Chen, Jing; Guo, Hong

    2014-02-01

    Trialkyphosphine oxides (TRPO) was successfully used for the impregnation of D3520 resin to prepare an extractant-impregnated resin (EIR). Solid extraction of Au(I) from alkaline cyanide solution was studied using this extractant-impregnated resin (EIR), with addition of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTMAB), directly into the aurous aqueous phase in advance. The mechanism of solid extraction was further investigated by means of FTIR, XPS and SEM. The column separation studies have shown that cationic surfactant CTMAB played a key role in the solid phase extraction, and the resin containing TRPO were effective for the extraction of gold when the molar ratio of CTMAB: Au( I ) reached 1:1. FTIR spectroscopy of gold loaded EIR showed that the frequency of C[triple bond]N stretching vibration was at 2144 cm(-1), and the frequency of P=O stretching vibration shifted to lower frequency from 1153 to 1150 cm(-1). The XPS spectrum of N(1s), Au(4f7/2) and Au(4f5/2) sugges- ted that the coordination environment of gold did not change before and after extraction, and gold was still as the form of Au (CN)2(-) anion exiting in the loaded resin; O(1s) spectrum showed that the chemically combined water significantly increased after solid extraction from 30.74% to 42.34%; Comparing to the P(2p) spectrum before and after extraction, the binding energy increased from 132. 15 to 132. 45 eV, indicating there maybe existing hydrogen-bond interaction between P=O and water molecule, such as P=O...H-O-H. The above results obtained established that in the solid extraction process, the hydrophobic ion association [CTMA+ x Au(CN)] diffused from the bulk solution into the pores of the EIR, and then be solvated by TRPO adsorbed in the pores through hydrogen bonding bridged by the water molecules.

  1. Role of iron catalyst impregnated by solvent swelling method in pyrolytic removal of coal nitrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashi, J.; Kusakabe, K.; Morooka, S.; Nielsen, M.; Furimsky, E. [Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan). Dept. of Chemical Science and Technology

    1995-11-01

    Organometallic iron precursors, ferrocene and ferric acetate, were impregnated into Illinois No. 6 (IL), Wyoming (WY) and Yallourn (YL) coals by solvent swelling technique in THF, ethanol, and a THF/ethanol binary solvent. Then iron-impregnated coals were pyrolyzed in a flow of helium at atmospheric pressure in a fixed bed and a thermobalance. Conversion of coal nitrogen to N{sub 2} was 20, 38 and 30% respectively, for original IL, WY, and YL coals. Iron formed from both precursors lowered the onset temperature of N{sub 2} evolution by 20-100{degree}C. When ferrocene was impregnated in coals at a concentration of 1.7-1.8 wt% as Fe, nitrogen conversion was increased to 52, 71 and 68% for IL, WY and YL coals, respectively. Ferric acetate impregnated into IL coal from THF/ethanol solution increased the nitrogen conversion much more than that from ethanol solution. The expansion of microporous coal structure by the swelling was essential for better dispersion of the catalyst precursor. The evolution of HCN as well as NH{sub 3} was effectively suppressed above 600{degree}C by the presence of iron but not influenced significantly by combinations of catalyst precursors and solvents. The increase in N{sub 2} yield was compensated by the decrease in nitrogen emitted as HCN and NH{sub 3} and in tar and char. The increase in CO evolution from the iron-impregnated IL coal at 600-800{degree}C was explained by catalytic rearrangement of aromatic structure of char, accompanying the removal of nitrogen as N{sub 2}. In a range of 600-750{degree}C, the evolution of CO as well as N{sub 2} from the other coals increased remarkably with a significant decrease in CO{sub 2} gasification in char microproes. 32 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Mechanical and Magnetic Properties of YBCO Superconductor with Bi/CNT Composite and Resin/CNT Impregnation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, W. S.; Jang, G. E.; Han, Y. H.; Sung, T. H.

    2007-01-01

    Bi/CNT composite and resin/CNT were chosen to improve the mechanical properties of YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7 (YBCO) superconductor. In order to elucidate the effects of Bi/CNT composite and resin/CNT in YBCO superconductors, melt texture superconductor were impregnated by mixed compound of Bi and CNT into the artificial holes parallel to the c-axis, which were drilled on the YBCO superconductor. Various amount of Bi/CNT and resin/CNT were impregnated to YBCO superconductor with different holes diameters. Typical artificial holes diameters were 0.5, 0.7, and 1.0 mm respectively. Result of three-point bending test measurement, the bending strength with resin/CNT impregnation was improved up to 59.64 MPa as compared with 50.79 MPa of resin/CNT free bulk. Resin/CNT impregnation has been found to be one of the effective ways in improving the mechanical properties of bulk superconductor.

  3. Mechanical, dielectric, and physicochemical properties of impregnating resin based on unsaturated polyesterimides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetouhi, Louiza; Petitgas, Benoit; Dantras, Eric; Martinez-Vega, Juan

    2017-10-01

    This work aims to characterize the dielectric and the mechanical properties of a resin based on an unsaturated polyesterimide diluted in methacrylate reactive diluents used in the impregnation of rotating machines. The broadband dielectric spectrometry and the dynamic mechanical analysis were used to quantify the changes in dielectric and mechanical properties of the network PEI resin, as a function of temperature and frequency. The network characterizations highlight the presence of two main relaxations, α and α', confirmed by the differential scanning calorimetry analysis, showing the complexity of the chemical composition of this resin. The dielectric spectroscopy shows a significant increase in the dielectric values due to an increase of the material conductivity, while the mechanical spectroscopy shows an important decrease of the polymer rigidity and viscosity expressed by an important decrease in the storage modulus. The PEI resin shows a high reactivity when it is submitted in successive heating ramps, which involves in a post-cross-linking reaction. Contribution to the topical issue "Electrical Engineering Symposium (SGE 2016)", edited by Adel Razek

  4. Ionic-liquid-impregnated resin for the microwave-assisted solid-liquid extraction of triazine herbicides in honey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lijie; Song, Ying; Hu, Mingzhu; Yu, Cui; Zhang, Hanqi; Yu, Aimin; Ma, Qiang; Wang, Ziming

    2015-09-01

    Microwave-assisted ionic-liquid-impregnated resin solid-liquid extraction was developed for the extraction of triazine herbicides, including cyanazine, metribuzin, desmetryn, secbumeton, terbumeton, terbuthylazine, dimethametryn, and dipropetryn in honey samples. The ionic-liquid-impregnated resin was prepared by immobilizing 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate in the microspores of resin. The resin was used as the extraction adsorbent. The extraction and enrichment of analytes were performed in a single step. The extraction time can be shortened greatly with the help of microwave. The effects of experimental parameters including type of resin, type of ionic liquid, mass ratio of resin to ionic liquid, extraction time, amount of the impregnated resin, extraction temperature, salt concentration, and desorption conditions on the extraction efficiency, were investigated. A Box-Behnken design was applied to the selection of the experimental parameters. The recoveries were in the range of 80.1 to 103.4% and the relative standard deviations were lower than 6.8%. The present method was applied to the analysis of honey samples. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Extraction behaviour of Am(III) and Eu(III) from nitric acid medium in CMPO-HDEHP impregnated resins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saipriya, K.; Kumar, T. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre Facilities (India). Kalpakkam Reproscessing Plants; Kumaresan, R.; Nayak, P.K.; Venkatesan, K.A.; Antony, M.P. [Indira Gandhi Center for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India). Fuel Chemistry Div.

    2016-05-01

    Chromatographic resin containing extractants such as octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (CMPO) or bis-(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid (HDEHP) or mixture of extractants (CMPO + HDEHP) in an acrylic polymer matrix was prepared and studied for the extraction of Am(III) and Eu(III) over a range of nitric acid concentration. The effect of various parameters such as concentration of nitric acid in aqueous phase and the concentration of CMPO and HDEHP in the resin phase was studied. The distribution coefficient of Am(III) and Eu(III) in the impregnated resin increased with increased in the concentration of nitric acid for CMPO-impregnated resin, whereas a reverse trend was observed in HDEHP impregnated resin. In case of resin containing both the extractants, synergism was observed at low nitric acid concentration and antagonism at high nitric acid concentration. The mechanism of extraction was probed by slope analysis method at 0.01 and 2 M nitric acid concentrations. Citrate-buffered DTPA was used for the selective separation of Am(III), and a separation factor of 3-4 was obtained at pH 3.

  6. Multi-podant diglycolamides and room temperature ionic liquid impregnated resins: an excellent combination for extraction chromatography of actinides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gujar, R.B.; Ansari, S.A.; Verboom, Willem; Mohapatra, P.K.

    2016-01-01

    Extraction chromatography resins, prepared by impregnating two multi-podant diglycolamide ligands, viz. diglycolamide-functionalized calix[4]arene (C4DGA) and tripodal diglycolamide (T-DGA) dissolved in the room temperature ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)amide

  7. Carbon Dioxide Capture by Deep Eutectic Solvent Impregnated Sea Mango Activated Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zulkurnai, N. Z.; Ali, U. F. Md.; Ibrahim, N.; Manan, N. S. Abdul

    2018-03-01

    The increment amount of the CO2 emission by years has become a major concern worldwide due to the global warming issue. However, the influence modification of activated carbon (AC) has given a huge revolution in CO2 adsorption capture compare to the unmodified AC. In the present study, the Deep Eutectic Solvent (DES) modified surface AC was used for Carbon Dioxide (CO2) capture in the fixed-bed column. The AC underwent pre-carbonization and carbonization processes at 519.8 °C, respectively, with flowing of CO2 gas and then followed by impregnation with 53.75% phosphoric acid (H3PO4) at 1:2 precursor-to-activant ratios. The prepared AC known as sea mango activated carbon (SMAC) was impregnated with DES at 1:2 solid-to-liquid ratio. The DES is composing of choline chloride and urea with ratio 1:2 choline chloride to urea. The optimum adsorption capacity of SMAC was 33.46 mgco2/gsol and 39.40 mgco2/gsol for DES modified AC (DESAC).

  8. Highly radiation-resistant vacuum impregnation resin systems for fusion magnet insulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabian, P.E.; Munshi, N.A.; Denis, R.J.

    2002-01-01

    Magnets built for fusion devices such as the newly proposed Fusion Ignition Research Experiment (FIRE) need to be highly reliable, especially in a high radiation environment. Insulation materials are often the weak link in the design of superconducting magnets due to their sensitivity to high radiation doses, embrittlement at cryogenic temperatures, and the limitations on their fabricability. An insulation system capable of being vacuum impregnated with desirable properties such as a long pot-life, high strength, and excellent electrical integrity and which also provides high resistance to radiation would greatly improve magnet performance and reduce the manufacturing costs. A new class of insulation materials has been developed utilizing cyanate ester chemistries combined with other known radiation-resistant resins, such as bismaleimides and polyimides. These materials have been shown to meet the demanding requirements of the next generation of devices, such as FIRE. Post-irradiation testing to levels that exceed those required for FIRE showed no degradation in mechanical properties. In addition, the cyanate ester-based systems showed excellent performance at cryogenic temperatures and possess a wide range of processing variables, which will enable cost-effective fabrication of new magnets. This paper details the processing parameters, mechanical properties at 76 K and 4 K, as well as post-irradiation testing to dose levels surpassing 10 8 Gy

  9. Isothermal relaxation current and microstructure changes of thermally aged polyester films impregnated by epoxy resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiongwei; Sun, Potao; Peng, Qingjun; Sima, Wenxia

    2018-01-01

    In this study, to understand the effect of thermal aging on polymer films degradation, specimens of polyester films impregnated by epoxy resin with different thermal aging temperatures (80 and 130 °C) and aging times (500, 1600, 2400 and 3000 h) are prepared, then charge de-trapping properties of specimens are investigated via the isothermal relaxation current (IRC) measurement, the distributions of trap level and its corresponding density are obtained based on the modified IRC model. It is found that the deep trap density increases remarkably at the beginning of thermal aging (before 1600 h), but it decreases obviously as the aging degree increases. At elevated aging temperature and, in particular considering the presence of air gap between two-layer insulation, the peak densities of deep traps decrease more significant in the late period of aging. It can be concluded that it is the released energy from de-trapping process leads to the fast degradation of insulation. Moreover, after thermal aging, the microstructure changes of crystallinity and molecular structures are analyzed via the x-ray diffraction experiment and Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. The results indicate that the variation of the deep trap density is closely linked with the changes of microstructure, a larger interface of crystalline/amorphous phase, more defects and broken chains caused by thermal aging form higher deep trap density stored in the samples.

  10. Multi-podant diglycolamides and room temperature ionic liquid impregnated resins: An excellent combination for extraction chromatography of actinides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gujar, R B; Ansari, S A; Verboom, W; Mohapatra, P K

    2016-05-27

    Extraction chromatography resins, prepared by impregnating two multi-podant diglycolamide ligands, viz. diglycolamide-functionalized calix[4]arene (C4DGA) and tripodal diglycolamide (T-DGA) dissolved in the room temperature ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)amide (RTIL: C4mimTf2N) on Chromosorb-W (an inert solid support), gave excellent results for the removal of trivalent actinides from acidic waste solutions. Distribution coefficient measurements on several metal ions showed selective sorption of Am(III) over hexavalent uranyl ions and other fission product elements such as strontium and cesium. The sorbed metal ions could be efficiently desorbed with a complexing solution containing guanidine carbonate and EDTA buffer. The sorption of Am(III) on both resins followed pseudo-second order rate kinetics with rate constants of 1.37×10(-6) and 6.88×10(-7)g/cpmmin for T-DGA and C4DGA resins, respectively. The metal sorption on both resins indicated the Langmuir monolayer chemisorption phenomenon with Eu(III) sorption capacities of 4.83±0.21 and 0.52±0.05mg per g of T-DGA and C4DGA resins, respectively. The results of column studies show that these resins are of interest for a possible application for the recovery of hazardous trivalent actinides from dilute aqueous solutions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Studies on the sorption behaviours of Th(IV) and U(VI) from aqueous sulphate solutions using impregnated resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khatab, A.F.; Sheta, M.E.; Mahfouz, M.G.; Tolba, A.A.

    2007-01-01

    The sorption behaviours of thorium (IV) and uranium (VI) from aqueous sulphate solutions have been studied using n-dodecylamine and tri-n-octylamine (TOA) dissolved in benzene and impregnated onto amberlite XAD-4 (styrene-divinyl benzene copolymer). The sorption behaviours were evaluated as a function of free acidity, salting out effect, ph value, equilibrium time, V/m ratio, initial metal ion concentration, loaded amine concentration and sorption temperature. The equilibrium time for Th(IV) and U(VI) sorption from aqueous sulphate solution was found to be 90 and 60 minutes, respectively. The sorption of Th(IV) was quantitatively at ph range 3.7-4.3 and at 4.3-5.2 for U(VI). The sorption capacity of the impregnated resin was determined by batch method and it was found to be 0.031 and 0.033 mmol/g for Th(IV) and U(VI), respectively. Elution of Th(IV) from thorium-loaded impregnated resin was quantitatively achieved by using 2 mol/l HNO 3 and by using 0.1 mol/l HCl for U(VI)

  12. Solvent purification with high-porosity (macroreticular) ion-exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKibben, J.M.

    Numerous solvent degradation products exist in all of our process solvents that are not efficiently removed in the routine solvent washing operation. Tests indicate that a relatively new type of resin - variously called high-porosity, macroreticular, or macroporous resin - removes at least some of these persistent chemicals and substantially improves the quality of any TBP process solvent. A plant test is proposed for the purification of the first cycle solvent of the HM process, in which a loop will be installed to draw a small side stream of solvent from the washed solvent hold tank (904), pass it through a 2.7 ft 3 resin column, and return it to the same tank

  13. Direct measurement of elastic modulus of Nb 3Sn using extracted filaments from superconducting composite wire and resin impregnation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hojo, M.; Matsuoka, T.; Hashimoto, M.; Tanaka, M.; Sugano, M.; Ochiai, S.; Miyashita, K.

    2006-10-01

    Young's modulus of Nb3Sn filaments in Nb3Sn/Cu superconducting composite wire was investigated in detail. Nb3Sn filaments were first extracted from composite wire. Nitric acid and hydrofluoric acid were used to remove copper stabilizer, Nb3Sn/Nb barrier and bronze. Then, Nb3Sn filaments were impregnated with epoxy resin to form simple filament bundle composite rods. A large difference in Young's moduli of filaments and epoxy resin enhance the accuracy of the measurement of Nb3Sn filament modulus. The ratio of Nb3Sn to Nb in filaments and the number of filaments in the fiber bundle composite rods were used in the final calculation of the Young's modulus of Nb3Sn. The obtained modulus of 127 GPa was the lower bound of the already reported values.

  14. Direct measurement of elastic modulus of Nb3Sn using extracted filaments from superconducting composite wire and resin impregnation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hojo, M.; Matsuoka, T.; Hashimoto, M.; Tanaka, M.; Sugano, M.; Ochiai, S.; Miyashita, K.

    2006-01-01

    Young's modulus of Nb 3 Sn filaments in Nb 3 Sn/Cu superconducting composite wire was investigated in detail. Nb 3 Sn filaments were first extracted from composite wire. Nitric acid and hydrofluoric acid were used to remove copper stabilizer, Nb 3 Sn/Nb barrier and bronze. Then, Nb 3 Sn filaments were impregnated with epoxy resin to form simple filament bundle composite rods. A large difference in Young's moduli of filaments and epoxy resin enhance the accuracy of the measurement of Nb 3 Sn filament modulus. The ratio of Nb 3 Sn to Nb in filaments and the number of filaments in the fiber bundle composite rods were used in the final calculation of the Young's modulus of Nb 3 Sn. The obtained modulus of 127 GPa was the lower bound of the already reported values

  15. Studies Regarding As(V Adsorption from Underground Water by Fe-XAD8-DEHPA Impregnated Resin. Equilibrium Sorption and Fixed-Bed Column Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela Ciopec

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The characteristics of arsenic adsorption onto Fe-XAD8-DEHPA resin were studied on the laboratory scale using aqueous solutions and natural underground waters. Amberlite XAD8 resin was impregnated with di(2-ethylhexyl phosphoric acid (DEHPA via the dry method of impregnation. Fe(III ions were loaded onto the impregnated resin by exploiting the high affinity of arsenic towards iron. The studies were conducted by both in contact and continuous modes. Kinetics data revealed that the removal of arsenic by Fe-XAD8-DEHPA resin is a pseudo-second-order reaction. The equilibrium data were modelled with Freundlich Langmuir and Dubinin Radushkevich (D-R isotherms and it was found that the Freundlich model give the poorest correlation coefficient. The maximum adsorption capacity obtained from the Langmuir isotherm is 22.6 µg As(V/g of Fe-XAD8-DEHPA resin. The mean free energy of adsorption was found in this study to be 7.2 kJ/mol and the ΔG° value negative (−9.2 kJ/mol. This indicates that the sorption process is exothermal, spontaneous and physical in nature. The studied Fe-XAD8-DEHPA resin showed excellent arsenic removal performance by sorption, both from synthetic solution and the natural water sample, and could be regenerated simply by using aqueous NaOH or HCl solutions.

  16. Acidic resin-catalysed conversion of fructose into furan derivatives in low boiling point solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hong; Cao, Quan; Li, Chunhu; Mu, Xindong

    2011-09-27

    Conversion of fructose into furan derivatives 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) and 5-methoxymethylfurfural (MMF) is performed in tetrahydrofuran (THF) and methanol-organic solvent systems, catalysed by an acidic resin Amberlyst-15. The melted fructose can be converted into HMF on the surface of the solid resin catalyst in the presence of THF as an extracting phase, which is a good solvent for HMF and other by-products. The solid resin catalyst can be reused eleven times without losing its catalytic ability, with an average HMF yield of approximately 50%. Upon the addition of methanol, the generated HMF can further react with methanol to form MMF, and the total yield of HMF and MMF could be promoted to 65%. GC-MS analysis confirms the formation of a small amount of methyl levulinate in methanolorganic solvent system. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Evaluation of pre-impregnated resin-glass systems for insulating superconducting magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schermer, R.I.

    1975-01-01

    Superconducting magnets using adiabatically stable conductors may be fabricated using a resin-glass insulating system applied to the conductor before winding and cured after winding. Preliminary screening for strength and convenience of use has been performed on seven possible candidate systems. Results are presented for butt-tensile tests at 300 0 K and 77 0 K and a description is given of the physical handling characteristics for each system. (U.S.)

  18. Improving molten fluoride salt and Xe135 barrier property of nuclear graphite by phenolic resin impregnation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhao; Lian, Pengfei; Song, Yan; Liu, Zhanjun; Song, Jinliang; Zhang, Junpeng; Feng, Jing; Yan, Xi; Guo, Quangui

    2018-02-01

    A densification process has been conducted on isostatic graphite (IG-110, TOYO TANSO CO., Ltd., Japan) by impregnating phenolic resin to get the densified isostatic graphite (D-IG-110) with pore diameter of nearly 11 nm specifically for molten salt reactor application. The microstructure, mechanical, thermophysical and other properties of graphite were systematically investigated and compared before and after the densification process. The molten fluoride salt and Xe135 penetration in the graphite were evaluated in a high-pressure reactor and a vacuum device, respectively. Results indicated that D-IG-110 exhibited improved properties including infiltration resistance to molten fluoride salt and Xe135 as compared to IG-110 due to its low porosity of 2.8%, the average pore diameter of 11 nm and even smaller open pores on the surface of the graphite. The fluoride salt infiltration amount of IG-110 was 13.5 wt% under 1.5 atm and tended to be saturated under 3 atm with the fluoride salt occupation of 14.8 wt%. As to the D-IG-110, no salts could be detected even up to 10 atm attempted loading. The helium diffusion coefficient of D-IG-110 was 6.92 × 10-8 cm2/s, significantly less than 1.21 × 10-2 cm2/s of IG-110. If these as-produced properties for impregnated D-IG-110 could be retained during MSR operation, the material could prove effective at inhibiting molten fluoride salt and Xe135 inventories in the graphite.

  19. Interphase Mobility and Migration of Hydrophobic Organic Metal Extractant Molecules in Solvent Impregnated Resins

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Warshawsky, A.; Strikovsky, A. G.; Vilensky, M. Y.; Jeřábek, Karel

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 37, č. 11 (2002), s. 2607-2622 ISSN 0149-6395 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA104/96/0582 Grant - others:AID(US) 013-085 Keywords : polymers * reagents Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 0.779, year: 2002

  20. The properties of anion-exchange resines in mixtures of organic solvents and water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naveh, J.

    1978-02-01

    The behaviour of anion-exchange resins in water and mixtures of organic solvents and water was studied with special reference to the swelling of the polymer and to the density and enthalpy changes accompanying the swelling. A linear dependence was found between the swelling of dry resin and 1/X (X being the nominal cross-linking percent of the polymer). This dependence is interpreted theoretically. The nominal cross-linking percent,defined by the quantity ratio of the components, is corrected for real cross-linking percent. For the swelling of the resin in dilute aqueous alcohols, a preference for the alcohol was found which is enhanced as the molecular weight of the alcohol increases. Moreover, for certain mole fractions, the preference of the perchlorate form of the resin is greater than that of the chloride form. The temperature dependence of the swelling was measured and the invasion of an electrolyte (LiCl), dissolved in the aqueous-organic phase, into the resine phase was determined. Contrary to what usually happens in pure aqueous phase, where the electrolyte is rejected in accordance with the Donnan law, an almost total invasion of the electrolyte into the resin phase occurs. (author)

  1. Effect of solvent content on resin hybridization in wet dentin bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong; Spencer, Paulette; Yao, Xiaomei; Brenda, Bohaty

    2007-09-15

    With wet bonding techniques, the channels between the demineralized dentin collagen fibrils are filled with debris, solvent, and water. Commercial adhesives include solvents such as ethanol or acetone to facilitate resin-infiltration into this wet substrate. Under in vivo conditions, the solvent may be diluted because of repeated exposure of the material to the atmosphere, or concentrated because of separation of the bonding liquids into layers within the bottle. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of different concentrations of ethanol (10-50%) on infiltration of the adhesive resin and collagen fibril encapsulation in the adhesive/dentin interface using light microscopy, micro-Raman spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. The results indicated that under wet bonding conditions the hybridization process was highly sensitive to the initial solvent concentration in the adhesive system. The staining and scanning electron microscopy results showed that the quality of the interfacial hybrid layer was poor at the lower (10%) or higher (50%) ethanol content. Micro-Raman analysis indicated that there was a distinct difference in the degree of adhesive penetration among adhesives containing different concentrations of ethanol. Adhesives containing 10 or 50% ethanol did not realize effective penetration; the penetration of the adhesive monomers increased dramatically when the initial ethanol content was 30%. The amount of solvents are essential for achieving effective bonding to dentin. Copyright 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Resin purification from Dragons Blood by using sub critical solvent extraction method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saifuddin; Nahar

    2018-04-01

    Jernang resin (dragon blood) is the world's most expensive sap. The resin obtained from jernang that grows only on the islands of Sumatra and Borneo. Jernang resin is in demand by the State of China, Hong Kong, and Singapore since they contain compounds that have the potential dracohordin as a medicinal ingredient in the biological and pharmacological activity such as antimicrobial, antiviral, antitumor and cytotoxic activity. The resin extracting process has conventionally been done by drizzly with maceration method as one way of processing jernang, which is done by people in Bireuen, Aceh. However, there are still significant obstacles, namely the quality of the yield that obtained lower than the jernang resin. The technological innovation carried out by forceful extraction process maceration by using methanol produced a yield that is higher than the extraction process maceration method carried out in Bireuen. Nevertheless, the use of methanol as a solvent would raise the production costs due to the price, which is relatively more expensive and non-environmentally friendly. To overcome the problem, this research proposed a process, which is known as subcritical solvent method. This process is cheap, and also abundant and environmentally friendly. The results show that the quality of jernang resins is better than the one that obtained by the processing group in Bireuen. The quality of the obtained jernang by maceration method is a class-A quality based on the quality specification requirements of jernang (SNI 1671: 2010) that has resin (b/b) 73%, water (w/w) of 6.8%, ash (w/b) 7%, impurity (w/w) 32%, the melting point of 88°C and red colours. While the two-stage treatment obtained a class between class-A and super quality, with the resin (b/b) 0.86%, water (w/w) of 6.5%, ash (w/w) of 2.8%, levels of impurities (w/w) of 9%, the melting point of 88 °C and dark-red colours.

  3. Development of solvent-free offset ink using vegetable oil esters and high molecular-weight resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jung Min; Kim, Young Han; Kim, Sung Bin

    2013-01-01

    In the development of solvent-free offset ink, the roles of resin molecular weight and used solvent on the ink performance were evaluated by examining the relationship between the various properties of resin and solvent and print quality. To find the best performing resin, the soy-oil fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) was applied to the five modified-phenolic resins having different molecular weights. It is found from the experimental results that the ink made of higher molecular weight and better solubility resin gives better printability and print quality. It is because larger molecular weight resin with better solubility gives higher rate of ink transfer. From the ink application of different esters to high molecular weight resin, the best printing performance was yielded from the soy-oil fatty acid butyl ester (FABE). It is due to its high kinematic viscosity resulting in the smallest change of ink transfer weight upon multiple number of printing, which improves the stability of ink quality.

  4. Food Simulating Organic Solvents for Evaluating Crosslink Density of Bulk Fill Composite Resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neveen M. Ayad

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To evaluate crosslink densities of two bulk fill composite resins and determine if the used Food Simulating Organic Solvent (FSOS affected them. Methods. Forty specimens were prepared from SureFill and SonicFill bulk fill composite resins, 20 each. All specimens were stored dry for 24 h. Each group was divided into 2 subgroups: stored in ethanol (E 75% or in methyl ethyl ketone (MEK 100% for 24 h. Crosslink density was evaluated by calculating the difference between the Vickers hardness numbers of the specimens stored dry and after their storage in FSOS. The data were statistically analyzed using t-test. Results. The means of crosslink density in E and MEK were 6.99% and 9.44% for SureFill and 10.54% and 11.92% for SonicFill, respectively. t-test displayed significant differences between crosslink densities of SureFill and SonicFill: (P<0.0001 in E and (P=0.02 in MEK and between crosslink densities of SureFill in E and MEK (P=0.02. Conclusions. Crosslink density of bulk fill composite resin can be evaluated using E or MEK. SureFill has higher crosslink density than SonicFill in both E and MEK.

  5. High drug load, stable, manufacturable and bioavailable fenofibrate formulations in mesoporous silica: a comparison of spray drying versus solvent impregnation methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Shiqi; Shen, Shoucang; Tan, David Cheng Thiam; Ng, Wai Kiong; Liu, Xueming; Chia, Leonard S O; Irwan, Anastasia W; Tan, Reginald; Nowak, Steven A; Marsh, Kennan; Gokhale, Rajeev

    2016-01-01

    Encapsulation of drugs in mesoporous silica using co-spray drying process has been recently explored as potential industrial method. However, the impact of spray drying on manufacturability, physiochemical stability and bioavailability in relation to conventional drug load processes are yet to be fully investigated. Using a 2(3) factorial design, this study aims to investigate the effect of drug-loading process (co-spray drying and solvent impregnation), mesoporous silica pore size (SBA-15, 6.5 nm and MCM-41, 2.5 nm) and percentage drug load (30% w/w and 50% w/w) on material properties, crystallinity, physicochemical stability, release profiles and bioavailability of fenofibrate (FEN) loaded into mesoporous silica. From the scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) images, powder X-ray diffraction and Differential scanning calorimetry measurements, it is indicated that the co-spray drying process was able to load up to 50% (w/w) FEN in amorphous form onto the mesoporous silica as compared to the 30% (w/w) for solvent impregnation. The in vitro dissolution rate of the co-spray dried formulations was also significantly (p = 0.044) better than solvent impregnated formulations at the same drug loading. Six-month accelerated stability test at 40 °C/75 RH in open dish indicated excellent physical and chemical stability of formulations prepared by both methods. The amorphous state of FEN and the enhanced dissolution profiles were well preserved, and very low levels of degradation were detected after storage. The dog data for the three selected co-spray-dried formulations revealed multiple fold increment in FEN bioavailability compared to the reference crystalline FEN. These results validate the viability of co-spray-dried mesoporous silica formulations with high amorphous drug load as potential drug delivery systems for poorly water soluble drugs.

  6. Impregnation of 12-tungstophosphoric acid on silica - part II: effect of different solvents on the impregnation and catalytic activity in methyl esterification of stearic acid; Impregnacao do acido 12-tungstofosforico em silica - parte II: efeito de diferentes solventes na impregnacao e atividade catalitica na esterificacao metilica de acido estearico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scroccaro, Karine Isabel; Yamamoto, Carlos I., E-mail: karineisabel@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Federal do Parana (UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Centro Politecnico. Departamento de Engenharia Quimica; Tanobe, Valcineide O. de A.; Oliveira, Alan Antonio de [Universidade Federal do Parana (UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia e Tecnologia Florestal; Wypych, Fernando [Universidade Federal do Parana (UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Departamento de Quimica

    2014-04-15

    Materials obtained by the immobilization of 12-tungstophosphoric acid (PTA) on silica using the method of impregnation with excess solution in distinct solvents (aqueous HCl, methanol:H{sub 2}O, and acetonitrile) were evaluated for use as catalysts in the methyl esterification of stearic acid. Optimum conditions were established for the impregnation of 0.5 g (w/w) of PTA on amorphous silica, under stirring at 150 rpm for 24 h, using 20 mL of 0.1 mol L{sup -1} HCl as the solvent. After calcination at 200 deg C, high conversions were obtained under mild reaction conditions, resulting in high turnover numbers. The catalyst was evaluated in ten catalytic cycles of use, where the activity was reduced only slightly, attesting its stability and the possibility to apply it to industrial production of methylesters. (author)

  7. Development study of concrete reinforcement made of aramid fiber-reinforced plastic rods with high radiation resistance. 1. Epoxy resin compounds with a handling at room temperature impregnation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Udagawa, Akira; Seguchi, Tadao; Moriya, Toshio; Matsubara, Sumiyuki; Hongou, Yoshihiko

    1999-03-01

    Aramid fiber-reinforced plastic (ArFRP) rods were developed in order to avoid from conduction current and/or magnetization of the metallic reinforcement using concrete constructions. For the polymer matrix, new epoxy resin compounds consist of tetraglycidyl diaminodiphenylmethane (30%), diglycidyl ether of bisphenol-A (60%), styrene oxide (10%) and aromatic diamine as a hardner were found to be the best formulation, and which were easily impregnated to the aramid fiber braiding yarn at room temperature. The ArFRP rods has a high radiation resistance, and the tensile strength was maintained to 98% (1.45 GPa) after irradiation dose of 100 MGy (absorbed energy MJ/kg), which is available for the reinforcement of concrete construction for the house of fusion reactor with super conducting magnets. (author)

  8. Color stability of bulk-fill and incremental-fill resin-based composites polished with aluminum-oxide impregnated disks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uzay Koc-Vural

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives This study aimed to evaluate the color stability of bulk-fill and nanohybrid resin-based composites polished with 3 different, multistep, aluminum-oxide impregnated finishing and polishing disks. Materials and Methods Disk-shaped specimens (8 mm in diameter and 4 mm in thickness were light-cured between two glass slabs using one nanohybid bulk-fill (Tetric EvoCeram, Ivoclar Vivadent, one micro-hybrid bulk-fill (Quixfil, Dentsply, and two nanohybrid incremental-fill (Filtek Ultimate, 3M ESPE; Herculite XRV Ultra, Kerr resin-based composites, and aged by thermocycling (between 5 - 55℃, 3,000 cycles. Then, they were divided into subgroups according to the polishing procedure as SwissFlex (Coltène/Whaledent, Optidisc (Kerr, and Praxis TDV (TDV Dental (n = 12 per subgroup. One surface of each specimen was left unpolished. All specimens were immersed in coffee solution at 37℃. The color differences (ΔE were measured after 1 and 7 days of storage using a colorimeter based on CIE Lab system. The data were analyzed by univariate ANOVA, Mann-Whitney U test, and Friedmann tests (α = 0.05. Results Univariate ANOVA detected significant interactions between polishing procedure and composite resin and polishing procedure and storage time (p 0.05. Polishing reduced the discoloration resistance of Tetric EvoCeram/SwissFlex, Tetric EvoCeram/Praxis TDV, Quixfil-SwissFlex, and all Herculite XRV Ultra groups after 7 days storage (p < 0.05. Conclusions Discoloration resistance of bulk-fill resin-based composites can be significantly affected by the polishing procedures.

  9. Effect of organic solvents compared to sandblasting on the repair bond strength of nanohybrid and nanofilled composite resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Torres Brum

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study evaluated the effect of different surface treatments on the repair bond strength of nanohybrid (Empress Direct and nanofilled (Filtek Z350 XT composite resins. Materials and Methods: A total of 120 specimens of each material (7.5 x 4.5 x 3 mm were prepared and polished with SiC paper. Half of the specimens were kept in water for seven days and the other half for six months; they were then divided into six groups according to the type of surface treatment: negative control (no treatment, Al2O3sandblasted, liquid acetone, acetone gel, liquid alcohol and alcohol gel. Following application of the silane coupling agent and the adhesive system, composite resin cylinders were fabricated on the specimens and light cured (20 seconds. The same composite resins were used for the repair. Additionally, ten intact specimens of each composite resin (without repair were prepared (positive control. The specimens were then loaded to failure in the microshear mode. Three additional specimens were fabricated in each group, and the surface treatments were analyzed by atomic force microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Results: The nanofilled composite resin showed higher cohesive strength and repair bond strength than the nanohybrid composite resin. The aging process affected the repair bond strength of the nanofilled composite resin. Al2O3sandblasting was more efficient for the nanofilled composite resin and promoted greater surface roughness in both materials. The solvents demonstrated higher efficacy for the nanohybrid composite resin. Conclusion: The strengths resulting from the solvents were material dependent, and Al2O3sandblasting resulted in superior repair bond strength in both materials.

  10. Effect of organic solvents compared to sandblasting on the repair bond strength of nanohybrid and nanofilled composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brum, Rafael Torres; Vieira, Sergio; Freire, Andrea; Mazur, Rui Fernando; De Souza, Evelise Machado; Rached, Rodrigo Nunes

    2017-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of different surface treatments on the repair bond strength of nanohybrid (Empress Direct) and nanofilled (Filtek Z350 XT) composite resins. A total of 120 specimens of each material (7.5 x 4.5 x 3 mm) were prepared and polished with SiC paper. Half of the specimens were kept in water for seven days and the other half for six months; they were then divided into six groups according to the type of surface treatment: negative control (no treatment), Al2O3sandblasted, liquid acetone, acetone gel, liquid alcohol and alcohol gel. Following application of the silane coupling agent and the adhesive system, composite resin cylinders were fabricated on the specimens and light cured (20 seconds). The same composite resins were used for the repair. Additionally, ten intact specimens of each composite resin (without repair) were prepared (positive control). The specimens were then loaded to failure in the microshear mode. Three additional specimens were fabricated in each group, and the surface treatments were analyzed by atomic force microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The nanofilled composite resin showed higher cohesive strength and repair bond strength than the nanohybrid composite resin. The aging process affected the repair bond strength of the nanofilled composite resin. Al2O3sandblasting was more efficient for the nanofilled composite resin and promoted greater surface roughness in both materials. The solvents demonstrated higher efficacy for the nanohybrid composite resin. The strengths resulting from the solvents were material dependent, and Al2O3sandblasting resulted in superior repair bond strength in both materials.

  11. SOLVENT EFFECTS IN THE LIQUID-PHASE HYDRATION OF CYCLOHEXENE CATALYZED BY A MACROPOROUS STRONG ACID ION-EXCHANGE RESIN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    PANNEMAN, HJ; BEENACKERS, AACM

    1992-01-01

    The liquid-phase hydration of cyclohexene, a pseudo first order reversible reaction catalyzed by a strong acid ion exchange resin, macroporous Amberlite XE 307, was investigated in solvent mixtures of water and sulfolane. A decrease by a factor of 3 and 6 is observed in the experimentally measured

  12. An efficient ultrasound assisted approach for the impregnation of room temperature ionic liquid onto Dowex 1 × 8 resin matrix and its application toward the enhanced adsorption of chromium (VI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalidhasan, S.; Santhana Krishna Kumar, A.; Vidya Rajesh; Rajesh, N.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Ultrasound assisted impregnation of an ionic liquid in a Dowex resin matrix is studied through various physicochemical and spectroscopic techniques. ► Chromium is adsorbed with a high adsorption capacity of 230.9 mg g −1 . ► The adsorbent is regenerated using HCl–ascorbic acid mixture. ► Chromium could be effectively detoxified from an industrial effluent and the developed method was validated with the analysis of a certified reference material. - Abstract: The work discussed in this paper is based on the utilization of ultrasound in conjunction with an ionic liquid (Aliquat 336) impregnated Dowex 1 × 8 resin for the effective adsorption of chromium. Ionic liquids are known for their selectivity toward metal extraction and ultrasonic medium offers efficient energy transfer for impregnating the ionic liquid in the resin matrix. The molecular interaction between the ionic liquid impregnated resin and chromium was studied through various physicochemical and spectroscopic techniques. The influence of various analytical parameters on the adsorption of Cr(VI) such as pH, adsorbent dosage, temperature and interference of foreign ions was studied in detail. Chromium (VI) was quantitatively adsorbed in the pH range of 3.5–4, with a high adsorption capacity of 230.9 mg g −1 in conformity with the Langmuir isotherm model. The study of thermodynamic parameters showed that the adsorption process is exothermic and spontaneous. The adsorbent could be regenerated using 1 mol L −1 HCl–0.28 mol L −1 ascorbic acid mixture. Chromium could be effectively detoxified from an industrial effluent and finally the developed method was validated with the analysis of a certified reference material (BCR-715). The obtained results indicated that the ultrasonic assisted impregnation of the room temperature ionic liquid significantly enhances and improves the removal efficiency of Cr(VI).

  13. HTGR fuel development: loading of uranium on carboxylic acid cation-exchange resins using solvent extraction of nitrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haas, P.A.

    1975-09-01

    The reference fuel kernel for recycle of 233 U to HTGR's (High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors) is prepared by loading carboxylic acid cation-exchange resins with uranium and carbonizing at controlled conditions. The purified 233 UO 2 (NO 3 ) 2 solution from a fuel reprocessing plant contains excess HNO 3 (NO 3 - /U ratio of approximately 2.2). The reference flowsheet for a 233 U recycle fuel facility at Oak Ridge uses solvent extraction of nitrate by a 0.3 M secondary amine in a hydrocarbon diluent to prepare acid-deficient uranyl nitrate. This nitrate extraction, along with resin loading and amine regeneration steps, was demonstrated in 14 runs. No significant operating difficulties were encountered. The process is controlled via in-line pH measurements for the acid-deficient uranyl nitrate solutions. Information was developed on pH values for uranyl nitrate solution vs NO 3 - /U mole ratios, resin loading kinetics, resin drying requirements, and other resin loading process parameters. Calculations made to estimate the capacities of equipment that is geometrically safe with respect to control of nuclear criticality indicate 100 kg/day or more of uranium for single nitrate extraction lines with one continuous resin loading contactor or four batch loading contactors. (auth)

  14. Kinetic, equilibrium and thermodynamic studies on sorption of uranium and thorium from aqueous solutions by a selective impregnated resin containing carminic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahmani-Sani, Abolfazl; Hosseini-Bandegharaei, Ahmad; Hosseini, Seyyed-Hossein; Kharghani, Keivan; Zarei, Hossein; Rastegar, Ayoob

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The objective of the study is to investigate the potential application of a selective EIR for sorption of U(VI) and Th(IV) ions. • The effects of several physiochemical parameters were investigated. • The sorption kinetics and sorption isotherms were used to explain the sorption mechanism. • The thermodynamic studies showed the feasibility of sorption process. • The EIR beads showed a great potential for effective removal of U(VI) and Th(IV) ions. - Abstract: In this work, the removal of uranium and thorium ions from aqueous solutions was studied by solid–liquid extraction using an advantageous extractant-impregnated resin (EIR) prepared by loading carminic acid (CA) onto Amberlite XAD-16 resin beads. Batch sorption experiments using CA/XAD-16 beads for the removal of U(VI) and Th(IV) ions were carried out as a function of several parameters, like equilibration time, metal ion concentration, etc. The equilibrium data obtained from the sorption experiments were adjusted to the Langmuir isotherm model and the calculated maximum sorption capacities in terms of monolayer sorption were in agreement with those obtained from the experiments. The experimental data on the sorption behavior of both metal ions onto the EIR beads fitted well in both Bangham and intra-particle diffusion kinetic models, indicating that the intra-particle diffusion is the rate-controlling step. The thermodynamic studies at different temperatures revealed the feasibility and the spontaneous nature of the sorption process for both uranium and thorium ions

  15. Improved hemocompatibility of silicone rubber extracorporeal tubing via solvent swelling-impregnation of S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP) and evaluation in rabbit thrombogenicity model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brisbois, Elizabeth J; Major, Terry C; Goudie, Marcus J; Bartlett, Robert H; Meyerhoff, Mark E; Handa, Hitesh

    2016-06-01

    Blood-contacting devices, including extracorporeal circulation (ECC) circuits, can suffer from complications due to platelet activation and thrombus formation. Development of nitric oxide (NO) releasing polymers is one method to improve hemocompatibility, taking advantage of the ability of low levels of NO to prevent platelet activation/adhesion. In this study a novel solvent swelling method is used to load the walls of silicone rubber tubing with the NO donor S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP). This SNAP-silicone rubber tubing exhibits an NO flux of ca. 1×10(-10)molcm(-2)min(-1), which mimics the range of NO release from the normal endothelium, which is stable for at least 4h. Images of the tubing before and after swelling, obtained via scanning electron microscopy, demonstrate that this swelling method has little effect on the surface properties of the tubing. The SNAP-loaded silicone rubber and silicone rubber control tubing are used to fabricate ECC circuits that are evaluated in a rabbit model of thrombogenicity. After 4h of blood flow, the SNAP-loaded silicone rubber circuits were able to preserve the blood platelet count at 64% of baseline (vs. 12% for silicone rubber control). A 67% reduction in the degree of thrombus formation within the thrombogenicity chamber was also observed. This study demonstrates the ability to improve the hemocompatibility of existing/commercial silicone rubber tubing via a simple solvent swelling-impregnation technique, which may also be applicable to other silicone-based blood-contacting devices. Localized nitric oxide (NO) release can be achieved from biomedical grade polymers doped with S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP). Despite the promising in vitro and in vivo biocompatibility results reported for these NO releasing polymers, many of these materials may face challenges in being translated to clinical applications, especially in the areas of polymer processing and manufacturing. In this study, we report a solvent

  16. Formation of functionalized nanoclusters by solvent evaporation and their effect on the physicochemical properties of dental composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Henry A; Giraldo, Luis F; Casanova, Herley

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this work was to study the effect of silica nanoclusters (SiNC), obtained by a solvent evaporation method and functionalized by 3-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane (MPS) and MPS+octyltrimethoxysilane (OTMS) (50/50wt/wt), on the rheological, mechanical and sorption properties of urethane dimethylacrylate (UDMA)/triethylenglycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) (80/20wt/wt) resins blend. Silica nanoparticles (SiNP) were silanized with MPS or MPS+OTMS (50/50wt/wt) and incorporated in an UDMA-isopropanol mix to produce functionalized silica nanoclusters after evaporating the isopropanol. The effect of functionalized SiNC on resins rheological properties was determined by large and small deformation tests. Mechanical, thermal, sorption and solubility properties were evaluated for composite materials. The UDMA/TEGDMA (80/20wt/wt) resins blend with added SiNC (ca. 350nm) and functionalized with MPS showed a Newtonian flow behavior associated to their spheroidal shape, whereas the resins blend with nanoclusters silanized with MPS+OTMS (50/50wt/wt) (ca. 400nm) showed a shear-thinning behavior due to nanoclusters irregular shape. Composite materials prepared with bare silica nanoclusters showed lower compressive strength than functionalized silica nanoclusters. MPS functionalized nanoclusters showed better mechanical properties but higher water sorption than functionalized nanoclusters with both silane coupling agents, MPS and OTMS. The solvent evaporation method applied to functionalized nanoparticles showed to be an alternative way to the sinterization method for producing nanoclusters, which improved some dental composite mechanical properties and reduced water sorption. The shape of functionalized silica nanoclusters showed to have influence on the rheological properties of SiNC resin suspensions and the mechanical and sorption properties of light cured composites. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Studies on the absorption of uranium and plutonium on macroporous anion-exchange resins from mixed solvent media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chetty, K.V.; Mapara, P.M.; Godbole, A.G.; Swarup, Rajendra

    1995-01-01

    The ion-exchange studies on uranium and plutonium using macroporous anion-exchange resins from an aqueous-organic solvent mixed media were carried out to develop a method for their separation. Out of the several water miscible organic solvents tried, methanol and acetone were found to be best suited. Distribution data for U(VI) and Pu(IV) for three macroporous resins Tulsion A-27(MP) (strong base), Amberlyst A-26(MP) (strong base) and Amberlite XE-270(MP) (weak base) as a function of (i) nitric acid concentration (ii) organic solvent concentration were obtained. Based on the data separation factors for Pu/U were calculated. Column experiments using Tulsion A-27(MP) from a synthetic feed (HNO 3 - methanol and HNO 3 - acetone) containing Pu and U in different ratios were carried out. Plutonium was recovered from the bulk of the actual solution generated during the dissolution of plutonium bearing fuels. The method has the advantage of loading plutonium from as low as 1M nitric acid in presence of methanol or acetone and could be used satisfactorily for its recovery from solutions containing plutonium and uranium. (author). 11 refs., 4 figs., 16 tabs

  18. Response behavior of an epoxy resin/amine curing agent/carbon black composite film to various solvents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo Yanling [School of Chemistry and Materials Science, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi' an 710062 (China)]. E-mail: luoyl0401@yahoo.com.cn; Li Zhanqing [School of Chemistry and Materials Science, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi' an 710062 (China); Lan Wenxiang [School of Chemistry and Materials Science, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi' an 710062 (China)

    2007-04-25

    A novel polymer based sensitive film was prepared from thermosetting epoxy resins (EP) filled with carbon blacks. The curing reaction of amine curing agents with epoxy resins and the response of the curing resultants to solvent vapors were dealt with. The influence of the types and content of carbon blacks and curing agents, and curing temperatures and time on curing reactions and response selectivity of the conductive films were investigated. The structural characterization was conducted on a Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometer (FTIR). The results indicated that the conductive films showed high response selectivity to polar solvent vapors, especially to chloroform vapor, while no response was observed in non-polar solvent vapors. The responsivity of the film increased with the decreased carbon black contents. The film filled with acetylene carbon black gave an optimal response, with responsivity of about 700 times. The response performances were improved with the amount of curing agents increased, and an optimal response appeared at the amount of the curing agent of 8%. The film's responsivity was remarkably enhanced, the reversibility property, however, rapidly declined in the order of diethyleneltriamine < triethylenetetramine < ethylenediamine. The curing reaction tended to complete with the curing temperature elevated and the curing time prolonged. But the response performance dropped because of over cross-linking as the temperature was too high or the time was too long.

  19. Response behavior of an epoxy resin/amine curing agent/carbon black composite film to various solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Yanling; Li Zhanqing; Lan Wenxiang

    2007-01-01

    A novel polymer based sensitive film was prepared from thermosetting epoxy resins (EP) filled with carbon blacks. The curing reaction of amine curing agents with epoxy resins and the response of the curing resultants to solvent vapors were dealt with. The influence of the types and content of carbon blacks and curing agents, and curing temperatures and time on curing reactions and response selectivity of the conductive films were investigated. The structural characterization was conducted on a Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometer (FTIR). The results indicated that the conductive films showed high response selectivity to polar solvent vapors, especially to chloroform vapor, while no response was observed in non-polar solvent vapors. The responsivity of the film increased with the decreased carbon black contents. The film filled with acetylene carbon black gave an optimal response, with responsivity of about 700 times. The response performances were improved with the amount of curing agents increased, and an optimal response appeared at the amount of the curing agent of 8%. The film's responsivity was remarkably enhanced, the reversibility property, however, rapidly declined in the order of diethyleneltriamine < triethylenetetramine < ethylenediamine. The curing reaction tended to complete with the curing temperature elevated and the curing time prolonged. But the response performance dropped because of over cross-linking as the temperature was too high or the time was too long

  20. Potassium Hydroxide Impregnated Alumina (KOH-Alumina) as a Recyclable Catalyst for the Solvent-Free Multicomponent Synthesis of Highly Functionalized Substituted Pyridazines and/or Substituted Pyridazin-3(2H)-ones under Microwave Irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mecadon, Hormi; Myrboh, Bekington

    2011-01-01

    The work described herein employs potassium hydroxide impregnated alumina (KOH-alumina) as a mild, efficient, and recyclable catalyst for a one-pot solvent-free and environmentally safer synthesis of 3,4,6-triarylpyridazines and some substituted pyridazines from active methylene carbonyl species, 1,2-dicarbonyls, and hydrazine hydrate by microwave (MW) irradiation. The method offers highly convergent, inexpensive, and functionality-tolerable procedure for rapid access to important pyridazine compounds in good yields.

  1. System for removing contaminants from plastic resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnert, George W.; Hand, Thomas E.; DeLaurentiis, Gary M.

    2010-11-23

    A resin recycling system that produces essentially contaminant-free synthetic resin material in an environmentally safe and economical manner. The system includes receiving the resin in container form. A grinder grinds the containers into resin particles. The particles are exposed to a solvent in one or more solvent wash vessels, the solvent contacting the resin particles and substantially removing contaminants on the resin particles. A separator is used to separate the resin particles and the solvent. The resin particles are then placed in solvent removing element where they are exposed to a solvent removing agent which removes any residual solvent remaining on the resin particles after separation.

  2. SOLVENT EFFECTS ON THE HYDRATION OF CYCLOHEXENE CATALYZED BY A STRONG ACID ION-EXCHANGE RESIN .3. EFFECT OF SULFOLANE ON THE EQUILIBRIUM CONVERSION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    PANNEMAN, HJ; BEENACKERS, AACM

    The liquid-phase hydration of cyclohexene, a pseudo-first-order reversible reaction catalyzed by a strong acid ion-exchange resin, was investigated in solvent mixtures of water and sulfolane. Macroporous Amberlite XE 307 was used because of its superior catalytic activity. Chemical equilibrium

  3. SOLVENT EFFECTS ON THE HYDRATION OF CYCLOHEXENE CATALYZED BY A STRONG ACID ION-EXCHANGE RESIN .2. EFFECT OF SULFOLANE ON THE REACTION-KINETICS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    PANNEMAN, HJ; BEENACKERS, AACM

    The kinetics of the' hydration of cyclohexene, catalyzed by a strong acid ion-exchange resin, have been studied in a packed bed reactor at temperatures between 353 and 413 K and a pressure of 20 bar. The kinetic rate constants were measured as a function of temperature and solvent composition (0-90

  4. A Mathematical Model of Repeated Impregnation of Porous Bodies with Solutions of Polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Glebov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes basic methods of impregnating porous bodies with solutions of polymers and their use to manufacture prepregs. It also describes the existing methods of manufacturing multilayer prepregs to produce aerospace coating of the spacecraft "Soyuz". It is shown that these prepregs have to meet high requirements for the content of the polymer, as compared with other composite materials, about 35 - 40% of the mass. Methods used for their manufacturing are long-term and non-controllable. The assumption is made that using the vacuum impregnation technology of a woven material will allow to accelerate the manufacturing process of these prepregs and improve their quality.In reviewing the technical literature have been found works on modeling the processes of impregnation, but they are aimed only at studying the speed of the woven material impregnation by various fluids and determining the time of impregnation. There were no models found to define prepreg parameters during the process of multiple impregnations. The aim of this work is to develop the simple mathematical model, which enables us to predict the polymer content of volatile products in the prepreg after each cycle of multiple impregnation of woven material with a solution of the polymer.To consider the vacuum impregnation method are used the prepregs based on silica and silica-nylon stitch-bonding fabric and bakelite varnish LBS-4 containing 50 - 60% of phenol resin and the solvent with minor impurities of pure phenol and water, as an example. To describe the process of vacuum impregnation of the porous work-piece is developed a mathematical description of the process of filling the porous space of the material with a varnish. It is assumed that the varnish components fill the porous space of the material in the same proportion as they are contained in the varnish.It is shown that a single impregnation cannot ensure the content of phenol resin in the prepreg over 32%, which does

  5. Ester-free Thiol-X Resins: New Materials with Enhanced Mechanical Behavior and Solvent Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podgórski, Maciej; Becka, Eftalda; Chatani, Shunsuke; Claudino, Mauro; Bowman, Christopher N

    A series of thiol-Michael and radical thiol-ene network polymers were successfully prepared from ester-free as well as ester-containing monomer formulations. Polymerization reaction rates, dynamic mechanical analysis, and solvent resistance experiments were performed and compared between compositions with varied ester loading. The incorporation of ester-free alkyl thiol, vinyl sulfone and allylic monomers significantly improved the mechanical properties when compared with commercial, mercaptopropionate-based thiol-ene or thiol-Michael networks. For polymers with no hydrolytically degradable esters, glass transition temperatures (T g 's) as high as 100 °C were achieved. Importantly, solvent resistance tests demonstrated enhanced stability of ester-free formulations over PETMP-based polymers, especially in concentrated basic solutions. Kinetic analysis showed that glassy step-growth polymers are readily formed at ambient conditions with conversions reaching 80% and higher.

  6. Ester-free Thiol-X Resins: New Materials with Enhanced Mechanical Behavior and Solvent Resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Podgórski, Maciej; Becka, Eftalda; Chatani, Shunsuke; Claudino, Mauro; Bowman, Christopher N.

    2015-01-01

    A series of thiol-Michael and radical thiol-ene network polymers were successfully prepared from ester-free as well as ester-containing monomer formulations. Polymerization reaction rates, dynamic mechanical analysis, and solvent resistance experiments were performed and compared between compositions with varied ester loading. The incorporation of ester-free alkyl thiol, vinyl sulfone and allylic monomers significantly improved the mechanical properties when compared with commercial, mercapto...

  7. Nanocomposites with Liquid-Like Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes Dispersed in Epoxy Resin without Solvent Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Liquid-like multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWNTs were prepared with as-received carboxylic MWNTs-COOH and poly(ethylene oxide-block-poly(propylene oxide-block-poly(ethylene oxide (PEO-b-PPO-b-PEO through hydrogen bonding. The sample has liquid-like behavior above 58°C. The MWNTs content is 26.6 wt%. The liquid-like MWNTs nanofluids were incorporated into epoxy matrix with solvent-free process and dispersed well. When the liquid-like MWNTs nanofluids content is up to 1 wt%, the impact toughness of the nanocomposite is 153% higher than the pure epoxy matrix.

  8. Comparison of the compressive strength of impregnated and nonimpregnated eucalyptus subjected to two different pressures and impregnation times

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waldemir Rodrigues

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The durability of wood is affected by several factors. For this reason, much research has been done on a variety of chemical compounds for impregnating wood, aimed at preserving it while simultaneously improving its properties. Recent studies of the properties of impregnated wood have demonstrated the possibility of substantially improving its mechanical characteristics. Thus, the purpose of this work was to compare the strength to parallel compression of wooden fibers (Eucalyptus grandis, both nonimpregnated and impregnated with a monocomponent resin, from the standpoint of pressure and impregnation time, aiming at its structural utilization. The results demonstrate that the compressive strength of impregnated test specimens is greater than that of nonimpregnated ones, indicating that monocomponent polyurethane resin can be considered suitable for impregnating wood, since it increases the compressive strength of eucalyptus.

  9. Separation/preconcentration of trace Pb(II and Cd(II with 2-mercaptobenzothiazole impregnated Amberlite XAD-1180 resin and their determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şerife Tokalıoğlu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A new chelating resin, 2-mercaptobenzothiazole loaded Amberlite XAD-1180 was prepared and used for separation and preconcentration of Cd(II and Pb(II ions prior to their determinations by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The optimum pH for simultaneous retention of the elements and the best elution means for their simultaneous elution were 9.5 and 2 mol L−1 HNO3, respectively. The detection limits for Cd(II and Pb(II were 0.35 and 5.0 μg L−1, respectively. The accuracy of the method was confırmed both by analyzing the certified reference material (RM 8704 Buffalo river sediment and performing recovery studies.

  10. Optimization of the rheological properties of epoxy resins for glass and carbon reinforced plastics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phyo Maung, Pyi; Malysheva, G.; Romanova, I.

    2016-10-01

    Vacuum assisted resin transfer moulding (VARTM) offers advantages such as simplicity, low cost of consumables, and the ability to carry out the impregnation process and curing without using expensive equipment and tooling. In the VARTM process, rheological properties of resin have a critical impact on the impregnation and curing process. In this article, the experimental results of viscosity are presented, including the glass transition temperature, and the tensile and bending strength of the epoxy binders with the amine hardener, which depend on the quantity of its active solvent composition. The active solvent used is diethylene glycol. It shows that for an increase in the content of the active solvent, a reduction in the viscosity and a reduction of the glass transition temperature and strength occurs. The optimum composition of the binder is selected by using the Pareto optimization criteria and the Cayley - Smorodinskaya method. By using the epoxy binder, the active solvent should not exceed 10-15% by weight. This approach helps to optimize the amount of active solvent added to the epoxy resins for the criterion of viscosity, strength, and heat resistance.

  11. Effect of pH and complementary ion concentration on nitrate removal using puroliteA400 Resin impregnated Cu in batch system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turmuzi, M.; Tarigan, Z. N.; Nadapdap, L.; Batubara, F.

    2018-02-01

    The total nitrogen content in water bodies should be below 50 mg NO3 -/L (11.3 mgN/l) World Health Organization (WHO) 2006. The content of nitrogen exceeding the quality standard threshold will cause damage to the aquatic ecosystem and be carcinogenic to humans. The Purolite A-400 resin will be modified with Cu metal by batch method to see the adsorption allowance of nitrate in synthetic liquid waste with nitrate concentration of 50 mg/l. This study will evaluate the effect of pH and complementary ions on the adsorption process. From the result of the research, the second order pseudo model is the most suitable adsorption kinetics model. For the adsorption isotherms the most suitable model is the Freundlich adsorption isotherm model. The optimum pH conditions were at the range of 8.5. The addition of complementary ions sulfate and phosphate did not show any significant change, but sulfate is the most effective complementary ion with a content of 20 mg/l.

  12. Radiation hardenable impregnating agents for the consolidating conservation of wooden objects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaudy, R.

    1985-01-01

    Radiation hardenable impregnating agents offer some advantages over the conventional agents. At the author's institution objects up to 110 cm length can be impregnated for conservation. More than 200 monomers and resins have been investigated. The procedure of impregnation is outlined and some kinds of wooden objects conserved in this way listed. (G.W.)

  13. Caracterização de um pré-impregnado aeronáutico por FT-IR e análise térmica Characterization of pre-impregnated of epoxy resin/carbon fiber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanesa C. G. M. Ferrari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho consiste na caracterização de um pré-impregnado ("prepreg" de resina epoxídica/fibra de carbono, usando-se espectroscopia no infravermelho com transformada de Fourier (FT-IR, análise termogravimétrica (TG, calorimetria exploratória diferencial (DSC e análise térmica dinâmico-mecânica (DMTA. A análise por FT-IR foi realizada nos modos de transmissão (pastilha de KBr, pirólise em bico de Bunsen e controlada e detecção fotoacústica (PAS. Os espectros de FT-IR de transmissão revelaram a presença de resina epoxídica, grupos ciano, amínicos e bisfenol A, que possibilitaram identificar o provável agente de cura:a cianoguanidina (ou dicianodiamida do sistema epoxídico. Os espectros de FT-IR/PAS permitiram acompanhar as alterações espectrométricas causadas pela cura. A análise térmica auxiliou na observação e compreensão dos eventos durante o processo de cura, etapas de gelificação e vitrificação, e da influência destas nas temperaturas de transição vítrea (Tg do material curado e na escolha do intervalo de temperatura de cura, que é um dos parâmetros mais importantes do processo produtivo.This work explores the characterization of pre-impregnated ("prepreg" materials made with an epoxy resin/carbon fiber, using FT-IR spectroscopy, thermogravimetry (TG, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC and dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA. FT-IR spectroscopy was used in the transmission mode (KBr pellets, pyrolysis without control and controlled pyrolysis and photoacoustic detection (FT-IR/PAS. The transmission FT-IR spectra revealed the presence of epoxy resin, cyano groups, amine and bisphenol A, which allowed us to identify the probable agent of cure: cyanoguanidine (or DCD. With FT-IR/PAS it was possible to monitor spectrometric changes caused by curing. The thermal analysis assisted in observing and understanding events during the curing process, including the gelation and vitrification steps. It

  14. Solid-Phase Extraction of Trace Amounts of Uranium(VI in Environmental Water Samples Using an Extractant-Impregnated Resin Followed by Detection with UV-Vis Spectrophotometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Hosseini-Bandegharaei

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A stable extractant-impregnated resin (EIR containing Chrome Azurol B was prepared using Amberlite XAD-2010 as a porous polymeric support. The new EIR was employed for trace separation and preconcentration of U(VI ion followed by spectrophotometric determination with the arsenazo III procedure. CAB/XAD-2010 exhibited excellent selectivity for U(VI ion over coexisting ions. Experimental parameters including pH, contact time, shaking speed, and ionic strength were investigated by batch extraction methods. Maximum sorption of U(VI ions occurred at pH 4.3–6.9. The capacity of EIR was found to be 0.632 mmol·g−1. Equilibrium was reached in 25 min and the loading half-time, t1/2, was less than 6 min. The equilibrium adsorption isotherm of U(VI was fitted with the Langmuir adsorption model. In addition, a column packed with CAB/XAD-2010 was used for column-mode separation and preconcentration of U(VI ion. For the optimization of the dynamic procedure, effects of sample volume, sample and eluent flow rate, eluent concentration, and its volume were investigated. The preconcentration factors for U(VI were found out to be 160. But, for convenience, a preconcentration factor of 150 was utilized for the column-mode preconcentration. The dynamic procedure gave a detection limit of 5.0×10-10 mol·L−1 (0.12 μg·L−1 for U(VI ion. The proposed dynamic method showed good performance in analyzing environmental water samples.

  15. Effect of the solvent type and polymerization conditions on the curing kinetics, thermal and viscoelastic performance of poly(amide-imide resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Rasheva

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Isothermal and non-isothermal curing kinetics of both N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP and N-methylimidazole (MI based poly(amide-imide (PAI resins were investigated by DSC analysis using tightly closed high-pressure crucibles. Several exothermal peaks on the non-isothermal DSC-traces were observed and attributed to the reactions of different functional groups of PAI-resin. Furthermore the final conversion (polymerization degree of PAI was determined under isothermal conditions, simulating three programs with the post-curing temperatures set as 215, 240 and 270°C. For the MI-PAI based resin, the conversion values were found to be much higher compared to those for the NMP-PAI system. Compared to NMP-based PAI-resin, a shift of the main exothermal peaks to the lower temperatures was observed in the non-isothermal kinetic investigations when MI was used as a solvent. This was accompanied with a reduction of activation energy (Ea values, as up to a factor of 3 determined by the Flynn-Wall-Ozawa approach for all the main formation reactions. It indicates a catalytic effect of MI on the PAI polymerization. In addition, conversion values were determined according to the Di Benedetto equation for both systems cured using open molds in the oven. Regardless the different post-curing temperatures, the conversion values were similar for all the samples. Thermal and viscoelastic properties as well as crosslink density (nc were also investigated for these systems. It was found that the MI-based samples demonstrate lower nc values compared to the NMP-based ones at an almost two times higher storage modulus (E' at room temperature.

  16. Monomers and Monomer Mixtures Used in Impregnation of Fibrous Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1968-10-15

    Some important properties of monomers and polymers in relation to their use for reinforcement of fibrous materials are listed. Some monomers and their properties important in impregnation of fibrous materials are also listed. In general it is not advantageous to use a pure monomer for impregnation but rather a mixture of monomers or a mixture of a monomer and a low molecular weight polymer such as unsaturated polyester. Some of these mixtures which have been well studied in connection with WPC are listed together with some of their properties when used in WPC. Other monomer mixtures may well come in question and other monomers can probably be used. For instance, it is reported from Japan that the cheap monomer ethyleneoxide, which cannot be polymerized by gamma radiation as such, can be polymerized (in bulk) as a mixture with methylmethacrylate. Good results with WPC have generally been obtained without swelling agents but more is grafted if some swelling agent is used, and it is possible that a swelling agent might be useful in the case of fibre-boards. Solvents, plasticizers, crosslinkable natural resins, aromatic chlorinated hydrocarbons, and retardants can be added, and with their use the properties of WPC can be widely modified. For example, a chlorinated wax can act as retardant, can reduce the total dose of radiation and can increase the flame resistance simultaneously.

  17. Comparison of solvent extraction and extraction chromatography resin techniques for uranium isotopic characterization in high-level radioactive waste and barrier materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurtado-Bermúdez, Santiago; Villa-Alfageme, María; Mas, José Luis; Alba, María Dolores

    2018-07-01

    The development of Deep Geological Repositories (DGP) to the storage of high-level radioactive waste (HLRW) is mainly focused in systems of multiple barriers based on the use of clays, and particularly bentonites, as natural and engineered barriers in nuclear waste isolation due to their remarkable properties. Due to the fact that uranium is the major component of HLRW, it is required to go in depth in the analysis of the chemistry of the reaction of this element within bentonites. The determination of uranium under the conditions of HLRW, including the analysis of silicate matrices before and after the uranium-bentonite reaction, was investigated. The performances of a state-of-the-art and widespread radiochemical method based on chromatographic UTEVA resins, and a well-known and traditional method based on solvent extraction with tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP), for the analysis of uranium and thorium isotopes in solid matrices with high concentrations of uranium were analysed in detail. In the development of this comparison, both radiochemical approaches have an overall excellent performance in order to analyse uranium concentration in HLRW samples. However, due to the high uranium concentration in the samples, the chromatographic resin is not able to avoid completely the uranium contamination in the thorium fraction. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Fiber reinforced silicon-containing arylacetylene resin composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available A silicon-containing arylacetylene resin (SAR, a poly(dimethylsilyleneethynylene phenyleneethynylene (PMSEPE, was synthesized. The PMSEPE is a solid resin at ambient temperature with a softening temperature about 60°C and soluble in some solvents like tetrahydrofuran. The melt viscosity of the PMSEPE resin is less than 1 Pa•s. The resin could cure at the temperature of lower than 200°C. Fiber reinforced PMSEPE composites were prepared from prepregs which were made by the impregnation of fibers in PMSEPE resin solution. The composites exhibit good mechanical properties at room temperature and 250°C. The observation on fracture surfaces of the composites reinforced by glass fibers and carbon fibers demonstrates that the adhesion between the fibers and resin is good. The results from an oxyacetylene flame test show that the composites have good ablation performance and XRD analyses indicate that SiC forms in the residues during the ablation of the composites.

  19. Method of removing contaminants from plastic resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnert, George W.; Hand, Thomas E.; DeLaurentiis, Gary M.

    2008-11-18

    A method for removing contaminants from synthetic resin material containers using a first organic solvent system and a second carbon dioxide system. The organic solvent is utilized for removing the contaminants from the synthetic resin material and the carbon dioxide is used to separate any residual organic solvent from the synthetic resin material.

  20. Method for removing contaminants from plastic resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnert, George W.; Hand, Thomas E.; DeLaurentiis, Gary M.

    2008-12-30

    A method for removing contaminants from synthetic resin material containers using a first organic solvent system and a second carbon dioxide system. The organic solvent is utilized for removing the contaminants from the synthetic resin material and the carbon dioxide is used to separate any residual organic solvent from the synthetic resin material.

  1. Low Cost, Lightweight Gravity Coring and Improved Epoxy Impregnation Applied to Laminated Maar Sediment in Vietnam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan P. Schimmelmann

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available In response to the need for lightweight and affordable sediment coring and high-resolution structural documentation of unconsolidated sediment, we developed economical and fast methods for (i recovering short sediment cores with undisturbed topmost sediment, without the need for a firmly anchored coring platform, and (ii rapid epoxy-impregnation of crayon-shaped subcores in preparation for thin-sectioning, with minimal use of solvents and epoxy resin. The ‘Autonomous Gravity Corer’ (AGC can be carried to remote locations and deployed from an inflatable or makeshift raft. Its utility was tested on modern unconsolidated lacustrine sediment from a ~21 m deep maar lake in Vietnam’s Central Highlands near Pleiku. The sedimentary fabric fidelity of the epoxy-impregnation method was demonstrated for finely laminated artificial flume sediment. Our affordable AGC is attractive not only for work in developing countries, but lends itself broadly for coring in remote regions where challenging logistics prevent the use of heavy coring equipment. The improved epoxy-impregnation technique saves effort and costly chemical reagents, while at the same time preserving the texture of the sediment.

  2. Processing effects in production of composite prepreg by hot melt impregnation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmielewski, C.; Jayaraman, K.; Petty, C. A.

    1993-06-01

    The hot melt impregnation process for producing composite prepreg has been studied. The role of the exit die is highlighted by operating without impregnation bars. Experimental results show that when a fiber tow is pulled through a resin bath and then through a wedge shaped die, the total resin mass fraction and the extent of resin impregnation in the tow increase with the processing viscosity. The penetration of resin into a fiber bundle is greater when the resin viscosity is higher. This trend is unchanged over a range of tow speeds up to the breaking point. A theoretical model is developed to describe the effect of processing conditions and die geometry on the degree of impregnation. Calculations with this model indicate that for a given die geometry, the degree of impregnation increases from 58 percent to 90 percent as the ratio of the clearance between the tow and the die wall, to the total die gap is decreased from 0.15 to 0.05. Physical arguments related to the effective viscosity of the prepreg show that the clearance ratio is independent of the tow speed, but decreases as the ratio of the effective shear viscosity of the prepreg to the resin viscosity increases. This provides a connection between the experimental results obtained with varying resin viscosity and the computational results obtained with varying clearance values at the die inlet.

  3. Characterization of Merbau Extractives as a Potential Wood-Impregnating Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamaludin Malik

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the major content of merbau extractives (ME and their potential use as an impregnating material for low-quality timber. Extraction was done by maceration with ethanol, ethyl-acetate, and hot-water. Physico-chemical, phyto-chemical, UV-visible, and infrared spectroscopy, as well as py-GCMS analysis were then performed on dried extract. The results showed that organic solvent extractions resulted in much higher yields, by 12.50% than that of hot water (1.10%. The merbau extractives liquid obtained had a low acidity, with a pH ranging from 5 to 6, which is typical of phenolic compounds. Flavonoids and phenolics were found as the major compounds. UV-vis spectra showed that ME (λ=279 nm consists of conjugated or aromatic systems, similar to standard resorcinol, which was used as the reference (λ=274 nm. The FTIR spectra showed the absorption bands at 3369 cm-1 that represent the functional group of hydroxyl (OH bonds, and 1619 and 1510 cm-1, representing the aromatic ring (C=C, which could be associated with resorcinol. The Py-GCMS showed that ME is predominated by resorcinol (C6H6O2 with a 79% concentration. The ME could be potentially used for producing phenolic/resorcinolic resin through polymerization, which could be applied for wood impregnation.

  4. Differential scanning calorimetry of the effects of temperature and humidity on phenol-formaldehyde resin cure

    Science.gov (United States)

    X.-M. Wang; B. Riedl; A.W. Christiansen; R.L. Geimer

    1994-01-01

    Phenol-formaldehyde (PF) resin is a widely used adhesive in the manufacture of wood composites. However, curing behaviour of the resin under various environmental conditions is not well known. A differential scanning calorimeter was employed to characterize the degree of resin cure in this study. Resin-impregnated glass cloth samples with varied moisture contents (0,31...

  5. An in vitro Method for Predicting Inhalation Toxicity of Impregnation Spray Products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørli, Jorid B.; Hansen, Jitka S.; Nørgaard, Asger Wisti

    2015-01-01

    Impregnation spray products are used for making surfaces water and dirt repellent. The products are composed of one or more active film-forming components dissolved or suspended in an appropriate solvent mixture. Exposure to impregnation spray products may cause respiratory distress and new cases...

  6. METHOD OF IMPREGNATING A POROUS MATERIAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, G.N.

    1960-06-01

    A method of impregnating a porous body with an inorganic uranium- containing salt is outlined and comprises dissolving a water-soluble uranium- containing salt in water; saturating the intercommunicating pores of the porous body with the salt solution; infusing ammonia gas into the intercommunicating pores of the body, the ammonia gas in water chemically reacting with the water- soluble uranium-containing salt in the water solvent to form a nonwater-soluble uranium-containing precipitant; and evaporating the volatile unprecipitated products from the intercommunicating pores whereby the uranium-containing precipitate is uniformly distributed in the intercommunicating peres of the porous body.

  7. 21 CFR 177.1655 - Polysulfone resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... disodium salt of 4,4′-isopropylidenediphenol is made to react with 4,4′-dichlorodiphenyl sulfone in such a... Limitations Dimethyl sulfoxide Not to exceed 50 parts per million as residual solvent in finished basic resin... residual solvent in finished basic resin in paragraph (a)(1) of this section. N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone Not to...

  8. 21 CFR 177.1580 - Polycarbonate resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...′-iso-propylidenediphenol with molten diphenyl carbonate in the presence of the disodium salt of 4,4... chloride Monochlorobenzene Not to exceed 500 p.p.m. as residual solvent in finished resin. Pentaerythritol...-88-3) Not to exceed 800 parts per million as residual solvent in finished resin. Triethylamine (c...

  9. Processing of intractable polymers using reactive solvents: 1. Poly(2,6-dimethyl-1,4-phenylene ether)/epoxy resin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Venderbosch, R.W.; Meijer, H.E.H.; Lemstra, P.J.

    1994-01-01

    A new processing route for poly(2,6-dimethyl-1,4-phenylene ether) (PPE), an intractable polymer on account of its thermal and oxidative sensitivity, was explored. PPE can be dissolved at elevated temperatures in epoxy resin and these solutions can then be processed at temperatures as low as 175°C.

  10. Evaluation and control of poisoning of impregnated carbons used for organic iodide removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovach, J.L.; Rankovic, L.

    1979-01-01

    By the evaluation of the chemical reactions which have taken place on impregnated activated carbon surfaces exposed to nuclear reactor atmospheric environments, the role of various impregnants has been studied. The evaluation shows several different paths for the aging and posioning to take place. The four major causes were found to be: organic solvent contamination; inorganic acid gas contamination; formation of organic acids on carbon surface; and, formation of SO 2 from carbon sulfur content. Prevention of poisoning by the first two paths can be accomplished only by procedural changes within the facility. However the last three poisoning paths can be controlled to some extent by the selection of carbon pretreatment techniques and the type of impregnant used. Results were generated by evaluating used carbons from 14 nuclear power plants and by artificial poisoning of laboratory impregnated carbons. Impregnants which have antioxidant properties, besides reaction with organic iodides, can increase the life of the impregnated activated carbons

  11. Durability of Gamma Irradiated Polymer Impregnated Blended Cement Pastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khattab, M.M.; Abdel-Rahman, H.A.; Younes, M.M.

    2010-01-01

    This study is focusing on durability and performance of the neat blended cement paste as well as those of the polymer-impregnated paste towards seawater and various concentrations of magnesium sulfate solutions up to 6 months of curing. The neat blended cement paste is prepared by a partial substitution of ordinary Portland cement with 5% of active rice husk ash (RHA). These samples were cured under tap water for 7 days. Similar samples were impregnated with unsaturated polyester resin (UPE) and subjected to various doses of gamma rays ranging from 10 to 50 kGy. The results showed that the irradiated impregnated specimens gave higher values of compressive strength than the neat blended cement paste specimens. On immersing the neat blended cement specimens and polymer impregnated specimens especially that irradiated at 30 kGy in seawater and different concentrations of magnesium sulfate solutions up to 6 months of curing, the results showed that the polymer impregnated blended cement (OPC-RHA-UPE) paste have a good resistance towards aggressive media as compared to the neat blended cement (OPC-RHA) paste. The results also indicated that the sea water has a greater corrosive effect than the magnesium sulfate solutions. These results were confirmed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP)

  12. Kinetic Model of Resin-Catalyzed Decomposition of Acetone Cyanohydrin in Organic Solvent%有机溶剂中树脂催化丙酮氰醇分解反应的动力学模型

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    章亭洲; 杨立荣; 朱自强; 吴坚平

    2003-01-01

    Decomposition of acetone cyanohydrin is the first-step reaction for preparing (S)-α-cyano-3-phenoxybenzyl alcohol (CPBA) by the one-pot method in organic media. Considering the compatibility of bio-catalysts with chemical catalysts and the successive operation in the bioreactor, anion exchange resin (D301) wasused as catalyst for this reaction. External diffusion limitation was excluded by raising rotational speed to higherthan 190r@min-1 in both solvents. Internal diffusion limitation was verified to be insignificant in this reactionsystem. The effect of acetone cyanohydrin concentration on the reaction was also investigated. An intrinsic kineticmodel was proposed when the mass transfer limitation was excluded, and the average deviation of the model is10.5%.

  13. Fiber-reinforced Composite Resin Prosthesis to Restore Missing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A fiber-reinforced composite inlay-onlay FPD was used for a single posterior tooth replacement in a patient refusing implant for psychological reasons. The FRC-FPD was made of pre-impregnated E-glass fibers (everStick, StickTeck, Turku, Finland) embedded in a resin matrix (Stick Resin, StickTeck, Turku, Finland).

  14. SOLVENT EFFECTS ON THE HYDRATION OF CYCLOHEXENE CATALYZED BY A STRONG ACID ION-EXCHANGE RESIN .1. SOLUBILITY OF CYCLOHEXENE IN AQUEOUS SULFOLANE MIXTURES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    PANNEMAN, HJ; BEENACKERS, AACM

    The solubility of cyclohexene in different water-sulfolane mixtures was measured between 313 and 413 K. The results demonstrate a sharp increase of the solubility of cyclohexene with increasing percentages of sulfolane in the solvent mixture. Without sulfolane the increase of the solubility with

  15. Impregnation of cinnamaldehyde into cassava starch biocomposite films using supercritical fluid technology for the development of food active packaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Ana Cristina; Dias, Ana M A; Sousa, Hermínio C; Tadini, Carmen C

    2014-02-15

    In this work, supercritical solvent impregnation (SSI) has been tested for the incorporation of natural compounds into biocomposite materials for food packaging. Cinnamaldehyde, with proved antimicrobial activity against fungi commonly found in bread products, was successfully impregnated on biocomposite cassava starch based materials using supercritical carbon dioxide as solvent. Different process experimental conditions were tested (pressure, impregnation time and depressurization rate) at a fixed temperature (35 °C) in order to study their influence on the amount of impregnated cinnamaldehyde as well as on the morphology of the films. Results showed that all conditions permitted to impregnate antimicrobial active amounts superior to those previously obtained using conventional incorporation methods. Moreover, a significant decrease of the equilibrium water vapor sorption capacity and water vapor permeability of the films was observed after SSI processing which is a clear advantage of the process, considering the envisaged applications. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Advanced Examination Techniques Applied to the Assessment of Vacuum Pressure Impregnation (VPI) of ITER Correction Coils

    CERN Document Server

    Sgobba, Stefano; Samain, Valerie; Libeyre, Paul; Cecillon, Alexandre; Dawid, J

    2014-01-01

    The ITER Magnet System includes a set of 18 superconducting correction coils (CC) which are used to compensate the error field modes arising from geometrical deviations caused by manufacturing and assembly tolerances. The turn and ground insulation are electrically insulated with a multi-layer fiberglass polyimide interleaved composite, impregnated with epoxy resin using vacuum pressure impregnation (VPI). Adequate high voltage insulation (5 kV), mechanical strength and rigidity of the winding pack should be achieved after impregnation and curing of the insulation system. VPI is an effective process to avoid defects such dry spots and incomplete wet out. This insulation technology has also been developed since several years for application to large superconducting coils and more recently to ITER CC. It allows the coils to be impregnated without impacting on their functional characteristics. One of the critical challenges associated with the construction of the CC is the qualification of the VPI insulation. Se...

  17. INVESTIGATION OF THE PROCESS OF TARTARIC ACID SEPARATION ON AMBERLITE XAD2 IMPREGNATED WITH AMBERLITE LA-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Marchitan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This work describes an investigation of the process of reactive ion-exchange separation of tartaric acid from model systems with macroreticular resin AmberliteXAD2 impregnated with liquid ion-exchanger Amberlite LA-2 in batch equipment.The condition of Amberlite XAD2 impregnation process was investigated. Freudlichand Langmuir equations were verified and values of enthalpy, entropy and Gibbs energy were calculated. This article is an extended abstract of a communicationpresented at the Conference Ecological Chemistry 2012.

  18. Managing Coil Epoxy Vacuum Impregnation Systems at the Manufacturing Floor Level To Achieve Ultimate Properties in State-of-the-Art Magnet Assemblies

    CERN Document Server

    Hubrig, Jeffrey G

    2005-01-01

    Liquid epoxy resin impregnation systems remain a state-of-the-art polymer material for vacuum and vacuum/pressure impregnation applications in the manufacture of both advanced and conventional coil winding configurations. Epoxy resins inherent latitude in processing parameters accounts for their continued popularity in engineering applications, but also for the tendency to overlook or misinterpret the requisite processing parameters on the manufacturing floor. Resin system impregnation must be managed in detail in order to achieve device life cycle reliability. This closer look reveals how manufacturing floor level management of material acceptance, handling and storage, pre- and post- impregnation processing and cure can be built into a manufacturing plan to increase manufacturing yield, lower unit cost and ensure optimum life cycle performance of the coil.

  19. Methods for the characterization of impregnating pitches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Compin, S.; Ben Aim, R.; Couderc, P.; Saint-Romain, J.L.

    1987-11-01

    This paper discusses modification of the impregnation performance of various pitches. The filtration ability, which expresses the impregnation performance, was studied using gel permeation chromatography and scanning electron microscopy. 16 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Radiation-curable impregnating agents for the conservation of archaeologic wooden objects. Part 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaudy, R.; Wendrinsky, J.; Kalteis, H.; Grienauer, W.

    1982-12-01

    As a continuation of the work described in OEFZS Ber. No. 4165, impregnating agents curable by ionizing radiation, such as free radical polymerizable monomers or artificial resins, have been investigated. Specific weight and viscosity of the liquid mixtures have been as well determined as the specific weight and gel content of the gamma radiation-cured samples. Hardness and elastic behaviour have been estimated only. The shrinkage during hardening was found to be 5 to 12 % for low viscous mixtures (up to 600 mPa.s) and 3 to 8 % for higher viscous impregnating agents. The results are to be discussed. (Author) [de

  1. The Effect of Water Repellent Surface Impregnation on Durability of Cement-Based Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In many cases, service life of reinforced concrete structures is severely limited by chloride penetration until the steel reinforcement or by carbonation of the covercrete. Water repellent treatment on the surfaces of cement-based materials has often been considered to protect concrete from these deteriorations. In this paper, three types of water repellent agents have been applied on the surface of concrete specimens. Penetration profiles of silicon resin in treated concrete have been determined by FT-IR spectroscopy. Water capillary suction, chloride penetration, carbonation, and reinforcement corrosion in both surface impregnated and untreated specimens have been measured. Results indicate that surface impregnation reduced the coefficient of capillary suction of concrete substantially. An efficient chloride barrier can be established by deep impregnation. Water repellent surface impregnation by silanes also can make the process of carbonation action slow. In addition, it also has been concluded that surface impregnation can provide effective corrosion protection to reinforcing steel in concrete with migrating chloride. The improvement of durability and extension of service life for reinforced concrete structures, therefore, can be expected through the applications of appropriate water repellent surface impregnation.

  2. Impregnation transition in a powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raux, Pascal; Cockenpot, Heloise; Quere, David; Clanet, Christophe

    2011-11-01

    When an initially dry pile of micrometrical grains comes into contact with a liquid, one can observe different behaviors, function of the wetting properties. If the contact angle with the solid is low, the liquid will invade the pile (impregnation), while for higher contact angles, the grains will stay dry. We present an experimental study of this phenomenon: a dry pile of glass beads is deposed on the liquid surface, and we vary the contact angle of the liquid on the grains. We report a critical contact angle below which impregnation always occurs, and develop a model to explain its value. Different parameters modifying this critical contact angle are also investigated. Collaboration with Marco Ramaioli, Nestle Research Center, Lausanne, Switzerland.

  3. Oil-Impregnated Polyethylene Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Ranit; Habibi, Mohammad; Rashed, Ziad; Berbert, Otacilio; Shi, Shawn; Boreyko, Jonathan

    2017-11-01

    Slippery liquid-infused porous surfaces (SLIPS) minimize the contact angle hysteresis of a wide range of liquids and aqueous food products. Although hydrophobic polymers are often used as the porous substrate for SLIPS, the choice of polymer has been limited to silicone-based or fluorine-based materials. Hydrocarbon-based polymers, such as polyethylene, are cost effective and widely used in food packaging applications where SLIPS would be highly desirable. However, to date there have been no reports on using polyethylene as a SLIPS substrate, as it is considered highly impermeable. Here, we show that thin films of low-density polyethylene can be stably impregnated with carbon-based oils without requiring any surface modification. Wicking tests reveal that oils with sufficient chemical compatibility follow Washburn's equation. The nanometric effective pore size of the polyethylene does result in a very low wicking speed, but by using micro-thin films and a drawdown coater, impregnation can still be completed in under one second. The oil-impregnated polyethylene films promoted ultra-slippery behavior for water, ketchup, and yogurt while remaining durable even after being submerged in ketchup for over one month. This work was supported by Bemis North America (AT-23981).

  4. In situ treatment of concrete surfaces by organic impregnation and polymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ursella, P.; Moretti, G.; Pellecchia, V.

    1990-01-01

    The impregnation by resins of concrete structures is a process well known at PIC (Polymer Impregnated Concrete). This process improves the physical-chemical features of concrete matrixes in order to extend their durability when severe environmental conditions may occur. The main objective of this research contract has been the verification of a proper impregnation 'in situ' of existing concrete surfaces, of any laying in the space, by means of a prototype machine, expressly designed and implemented, and verification of the increase of mechanical resistance, leach resistance, durability of treated material. In a nuclear facility this goal is very important in relation to the long term integrity of concrete structures during operating lifetime and, in particular, after final shutdown. (author)

  5. Fabrication and Evaluation of Graphite Fiber-Reinforced Polyimide Composite Tube Forms Using Modified Resin Transfer Molding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exum, Daniel B.; Ilias, S.; Avva, V. S.; Sadler, Bob

    1997-01-01

    The techniques necessary for the fabrication of a complex three-dimensional tubular form using a PMR-type resin have been developed to allow for the construction of several tubes with good physical and mechanical properties. Employing established resin transfer molding practices, the relatively non-hazardous AMB-21 in acetone formulation was used to successfully impregnate four layers of AS4 braided graphite fiber preform previously loaded around an aluminum cylindrical core in an enclosed mold cavity. Using heat and vacuum, the solvent was evaporated to form a prepreg followed by a partial imidization and removal of condensation products. The aluminum core was replaced by a silicone rubber bladder and the cure cycle continued to the final stage of 550 F with a bladder internal pressure of 200 lbs/sq in while simultaneously applying a strong vacuum to the prepreg for removal of any additional imidization products. A combination of several modifications to the standard resin transfer molding methodology enabled the mold to 'breathe', allowing the imidization products a pathway for escape. AMB-21 resin was chosen because of the carcinogenic nature of the primary commercial polyimide PMR-15. The AMB-21 resin was formulated using commercially available monomers or monomer precursors and dissolved in a mixture of methyl alcohol and acetone. The viscosity of the resulting monomer solution was checked by use of a Brookfield rheometer and adjusted by adding acetone to an easily pumpable viscosity of about 600 cP. In addition, several types of chromatographic and thermal analyses were of the braids, and excess handling of the preforms broke some of the microscopic fibers, needlessly decreasing the strength of the finished part. In addition, three dimensional braided preforms with fibers along the length of the tube will be significantly stronger in tension than the braided preforms used in this study.

  6. PEG-related polymer resins as synthetic supports

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Combinatorial chemistry has become a significant part of the discovery and optimization process for novel drugs,affinity ligands,and catalysts.The polymeric supports play a key role in combinatory chemistry.Therefore,various kinds of functional polymer resins have been exploited as supports,reagents,and catalysts in organic synthesis.In comparison to the conventional Merrifield resins,the poly(ethylene glycol)(PEG)-related polymer resins have advantages including good compatibilities with polar solvents,good solvent absorbency and swelling properties.This review focuses primarily on the more recent work in the field of developing PEG-related polymer resins as supports for organic synthesis.

  7. Resin composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benetti, Ana Raquel; Peutzfeldt, Anne; Lussi, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate how the modulus of elasticity of resin composites influences marginal quality in restorations submitted to thermocyclic and mechanical loading. METHODS: Charisma, Filtek Supreme XTE and Grandio were selected as they were found to possess different moduli of elasticity...... of resin composite (p=0.81) on the quality of dentine margins was observed, before or after loading. Deterioration of all margins was evident after loading (p....008). CONCLUSIONS: The resin composite with the highest modulus of elasticity resulted in the highest number of gap-free enamel margins but with an increased incidence of paramarginal enamel fractures. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE: The results from this study suggest that the marginal quality of restorations can...

  8. 21 CFR 177.2415 - Poly(aryletherketone) resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 12,000, as determined by gel permeation chromatography in comparison with polystyrene standards, and... calorimetry. (b) Optional adjuvant substances. The basic resins identified in paragraph (a) may contain... percent by weight as a residual solvent in the finished basic resin. (c) Extractive limitations. The...

  9. Measurements of volatile compound contents in resins using a moisture analyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Masanori; Nagano, Futami; Endo, Kazuhiko; Ohno, Hiroki

    2010-02-01

    The contents of volatile adhesive compounds, such as water, solvents, and residual unpolymerized monomers, affect the integrity and durability of adhesive bonding. However, there is no method available that can be used to rapidly assess the residual solvent or water contents of adhesive resins. This study examined the effectiveness of a digital moisture analyzer to measure the volatile compound contents of resins. Five self-etching adhesives and seven experimental light-cured resins prepared with different contents (0, 10, and 20% by weight) of water or solvents (acetone and ethanol) were examined in this study. The resins were prepared using different methods (with and without air blast or light-curing) to simulate the clinical conditions of adhesive application. Resin weight changes (% of weight loss) were determined as the residual volatile compound contents, using the moisture analyzer. After the measurements, the resin films were examined using a scanning electron microscope. The weight changes of the resins were found to depend on the amount of water or solvents evaporating from the resin. Water and solvents were evaporated by air blast or light-curing, but some of the water and solvents remained in the cured resin. The moisture analyzer is easy to operate and is a useful instrument for using to measure the residual volatile compound contents of adhesive resin.

  10. Solvent extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coombs, D.M.; Latimer, E.G.

    1988-01-05

    It is an object of this invention to provide for the demetallization and general upgrading of heavy oil via a solvent extracton process, and to improve the efficiency of solvent extraction operations. The yield and demetallization of product oil form heavy high-metal content oil is maximized by solvent extractions which employ either or all of the following techniques: premixing of a minor amount of the solvent with feed and using countercurrent flow for the remaining solvent; use of certain solvent/free ratios; use of segmental baffle tray extraction column internals and the proper extraction column residence time. The solvent premix/countercurrent flow feature of the invention substantially improves extractions where temperatures and pressures above the critical point of the solvent are used. By using this technique, a greater yield of extract oil can be obtained at the same metals content or a lower metals-containing extract oil product can be obtained at the same yield. Furthermore, the premixing of part of the solvent with the feed before countercurrent extraction gives high extract oil yields and high quality demetallization. The solvent/feed ratio features of the invention substanially lower the captial and operating costs for such processes while not suffering a loss in selectivity for metals rejection. The column internals and rsidence time features of the invention further improve the extractor metals rejection at a constant yield or allow for an increase in extract oil yield at a constant extract oil metals content. 13 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Separation of yttrium using carbon nanotube doped polymeric beads impregnated with D2EHPA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dasgupta, Kinshuk; Yadav, Kartikey K.; Singh, D.K.; Anitha, M.; Singh, H.

    2013-01-01

    Di-2-ethylhexyl phosphoric acid impregnated polyethersulfone based composite beads in combination with additives such as polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) has been prepared by non-solvent phase inversion method. The synthesized beads were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, thermogravimetry and infra-red spectroscopy. Effect of additives on bead morphology, solvent impregnation capacity, extractability and stability has been examined to compare their suitability for yttrium recovery from acidic medium. Microstructural investigation as well as experimental findings confirmed the role of additives in modifying the pore structures in beads, responsible for varied degree of yttrium extraction. Further the role of metal ion concentration in aqueous phase on its recovery by polymeric beads was also evaluated. Among the tested beads PES/D2EHPA/MWCNT/PVA beads were found to be superior for Y(Ill) extraction. (author)

  12. Surface functionalization of SBA-15 by the solvent-free method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yimeng; Zheng Yingwu; Zhu Jianhua

    2004-01-01

    A solvent-free technique was employed for fast modification of mesoporous materials. Copper, chromium and iron oxide species could be highly dispersed in SBA-15 by manually grinding the corresponding precursor salts and the host, followed by calcinations for the first time. This method is more effective to spontaneously disperse oxide species onto SBA-15 than impregnation, probably forming monolayer or submonolayer dispersion of salts or oxides. Besides, Cr(VI) species dominate in the mixing sample while Cr(III) species dominate in the impregnation one. In the temperature programmed surface reaction of nitrosamines, the sample prepared by solvent-free method showed a higher catalytic activity than the impregnation one

  13. An innovative process for the impregnation of magnet coils and other structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, D.; Morgan, J.T.

    1992-01-01

    The need to bond and encapsulate the conductor in many types of superconductive magnet is well understood. The choice of materials for bonding may influence the performance of the coil and the technique used for its application. This paper considers the merits of three types of close-quote bonding close-quote procedure and presents details of an innovative method for the vacuum impregnation of coils. The process has been developed and evaluated in an attempt to remove some of the uncertainties of the vacuum impregnation process that traditionally may be eliminated only with the use of sealed mould tools and high quality vacuum chambers. For large magnets or for mass production, this process may lead to a reduction in tooling and plant costs, together with reduced resin consumption and improved health and safety factors. The process has been developed in conjunction with a resin system that has been designed to exhibit excellent thermal shock characteristics and to minimise preparation time and post impregnation cleaning requirements

  14. A Binder Viscosity Effect on the Wet-Wounded Composite Porosity in the Impregnating Bath

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Komkov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to define experimentally an impregnation rate of VM-1 glass fibers and CBM aramid bundles with the epoxy binder EDB-10 using wet method of winding. During the impregnation process of the fibrous fillers by the liquid binder, air is displaced from the interfiber space of fiber and bundle. With the composite product winding a fiber impregnation process is short. That is why gas inclusions or pores are formed in the polymer-fiber compositeThe impregnation rate or porosity of wound material will depend directly on the binder viscosity. To reduce an epoxy binder viscosity temporarily is possible by two ways. The first is to heat a liquid epoxy composition EDB-10 to the maximum possible temperature during the winding process of the product. The second method is to dilute the binder by a solvent, such as acetone or alcohol. However, the solvent reduces its strength.The paper presents experimental data to show the volumetric content of pores in the wound composite affected only by the viscosity of the epoxy binder. Heating a binder allowed us to regulate a changing conditional viscosity of the binder in the impregnating bath for the normal conditions of impregnation. Other impacts on the impregnation and filament-winding processes, such as filler kinks, squeeze, vacuuming binder, highly tensioned winding, and others were not used.Experimentally obtained dependences of the porosity value of wound composite on the conditional viscosity of binder are nonlinear and can be used to design heaters for impregnating devices of winders. The research technique and results can be used in development of technological processes to manufacture composite structures by winding from the other reinforcing fibrous fillers and thermo-active binders.The results show that the volumetric content of pores can significantly vary within 8 - 14 % of material volume. Therefore, to reduce the number of pores in the wound composite to 1-2 %, auxiliary

  15. Preparation of Highly Conductive Yarns by an Optimized Impregnation Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amba Sankar, K. N.; Mohanta, Kallol

    2018-03-01

    We report the development of the electrical conductivity in textile yarns through impregnation and post-treatment of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) polystyrene sulfonate (PEDOT:PSS). The conductive polymer is deposited on fibers, which fills the gap space within the hierarchical structure of the yarns. Organic nonpolar solvents act as reducing agent to increase the density of PEDOT moieties on the yarns, galvanizing increment in conductivity values. Post-treatment by ethylene glycol transforms the resonance configuration of the conductive moieties of conjugated polymer, which helps in further enhancement of electrical conductivity of the yarns. We have optimized the method in terms of loading and conformal change of the polymer to have a lesser resistance of the coated conductive yarns. The minimum resistance achieved has a value of 77 Ωcm-1. This technique of developing conductivity in conventional yarns enables retaining the flexibility of yarns and feeling of softness which would find suitable␣applications for wearable electronics.

  16. Deasphalting solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrillo, J. A; Caceres, J; Vela, G; Bueno, H

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes how the deasphalted oil (DMO) or demetalized oil (DMO) quality (CCR, Ni, V end asphaltenes contents) changes with: DAO or DMO yield, solvent/feed ratio, type of vacuum reside (from paraffinic to blends with vis breaking bottoms), extraction temperature and extraction solvent (propane, propylene, n-butane and I butane)

  17. Strengthening of limestone by the impregnation - gamma irradiation method. Results of tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramiere, R.; Tassigny, C. de

    1975-04-01

    The method developed by the Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Grenoble (France) strengthens the stones by impregnation with a styrene resin/liquid polystyrene mixture followed by polymerization under gamma irradiation. This method is applicable to stones which can be taken into the laboratory for treatment. The increase in strength of 6 different species of French limestone has been quantitatively recorded. The following parameters were studied: possibility of water migration inside the stones, improvements of the mechanical properties of the impregnated stone, standing up to freeze-thaw conditions and artificial ageing of the stones which causes only minor changes in the appearance of the stone and a negligible decrease in weight [fr

  18. Radiation processed composite materials of wood and elastic polyester resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tapolcai, I.; Czvikovszky, T.

    1983-01-01

    The radiation polymerization of multifunctional unsaturated polyester-monomer mixtures in wood forms interpenetrating network system. The mechanical resistance (compression, abrasion, hardness, etc.) of these composite materials are generally well over the original wood, however the impact strength is almost the same or even reduced, in comparison to the wood itself. An attempt is made using elastic polyester resins to produced wood-polyester composite materials with improved modulus of elasticity and impact properties. For the impregnation of European beech wood two types of elastic unsaturated polyester resins were used. The exothermic effect of radiation copolymerization of these resins in wood has been measured and the dose rate effects as well as hardening dose was determined. Felxural strength and impact properties were examined. Elastic unsaturated polyester resins improved the impact strength of wood composite materials. (author)

  19. Effect of impregnation pressure and time on the porosity, structure and properties of polyacrylonitrile-fiber based carbon composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venugopalan, Ramani, E-mail: rvg@barc.gov.in [Powder Metallurgy Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Roy, Mainak, E-mail: mainak73@barc.gov.in [Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Thomas, Susy [High Pressure Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Patra, A.K. [Solid State Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Sathiyamoorthy, D. [Powder Metallurgy Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Tyagi, A.K. [Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2013-02-15

    Carbon–carbon composites may find applications in critical parts of advanced nuclear reactors. A series of carbon–carbon composites were prepared using polyacrylonitrile (PAN) based carbon fibers. The materials were densified by impregnating two-dimensional (2D) preforms with liquid phenol formaldehyde resin at different pressures and for different periods of time and then carbonizing those by slowly heating at 1000 °C. Effects of the processing parameters on the structure of the composites were extensively studied. The study showed conclusively that open porosity decreased with increasing impregnation pressure, whereas impregnation time had lesser effect. Matrix–resin bonding also improved at higher pressure. d{sub 002} spacing decreased and ordering along c-axis increased with concomitant increase in sp{sup 2}-carbon fraction at higher impregnation pressures. The fiber reinforced composites exhibited short range ordering of carbon atoms and satisfied structural conditions (d{sub 002} values) of amorphous carbon according to the turbostratic model for non-graphitic carbon materials. The composites had pellet-density of ∼85% of the theoretical value, low thermal expansion and negligible neutron-poisoning. They maintained structural integrity and retained disordered nature even on heat-treatment at ca. 1800 °C.

  20. Preparation and characterization of antibacterial orthodontic resin containing silver nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Jin; Heo, Min; Lee, Donghyun; Han, Seungheui; Moon, Ji-Hoi; Lim, Ho-Nam; Kwon, Il Keun

    2018-02-01

    In this study, we developed a hybrid dental resin containing silver nanoparticle (AgNPs) to eliminate periodontal disease causing bacteria such as streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) and streptococcus sobrinus (S. sobrinus). The silver nanoparticles enables the resin to prevent oral pathogen growth during orthodontic therapy. First, AgNPs were directly synthesized in dimethylformamide (DMF) solvent with a capping agent. Second, pure orthodontic primer was mixed with the synthesized AgNPs solvent-slurry followed by photocuring. The resultant material was characterized by physicochemical characterization. Finally, an in vitro antimicrobial test was carried out. The results showed that the AgNPs were fully synthesized and clearly embedded in dental resin. In the bacterial test, the dental resin containing AgNPs showed potent antimicrobial activity against two kinds of bacteria. In conclusion, our methodology may allow for the generation of a wide range of dental resin and composite products which inhibit periodontitis causing bacteria.

  1. Solvent substitution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    The DOE Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Office of Technology Development and the Air Force Engineering and Services Center convened the First Annual International Workshop on Solvent Substitution on December 4--7, 1990. The primary objectives of this joint effort were to share information and ideas among attendees in order to enhance the development and implementation of required new technologies for the elimination of pollutants associated with industrial use of hazardous and toxic solvents; and to aid in accelerating collaborative efforts and technology transfer between government and industry for solvent substitution. There were workshop sessions focusing on Alternative Technologies, Alternative Solvents, Recovery/Recycling, Low VOC Materials and Treatment for Environmentally Safe Disposal. The 35 invited papers presented covered a wide range of solvent substitution activities including: hardware and weapons production and maintenance, paint stripping, coating applications, printed circuit boards, metal cleaning, metal finishing, manufacturing, compliance monitoring and process control monitoring. This publication includes the majority of these presentations. In addition, in order to further facilitate information exchange and technology transfer, the US Air Force and DOE solicited additional papers under a general ''Call for Papers.'' These papers, which underwent review and final selection by a peer review committee, are also included in this combined Proceedings/Compendium. For those involved in handling, using or managing hazardous and toxic solvents, this document should prove to be a valuable resource, providing the most up-to-date information on current technologies and practices in solvent substitution. Individual papers are abstracted separated

  2. Solvent substitution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-01-01

    The DOE Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Office of Technology Development and the Air Force Engineering and Services Center convened the First Annual International Workshop on Solvent Substitution on December 4--7, 1990. The primary objectives of this joint effort were to share information and ideas among attendees in order to enhance the development and implementation of required new technologies for the elimination of pollutants associated with industrial use of hazardous and toxic solvents; and to aid in accelerating collaborative efforts and technology transfer between government and industry for solvent substitution. There were workshop sessions focusing on Alternative Technologies, Alternative Solvents, Recovery/Recycling, Low VOC Materials and Treatment for Environmentally Safe Disposal. The 35 invited papers presented covered a wide range of solvent substitution activities including: hardware and weapons production and maintenance, paint stripping, coating applications, printed circuit boards, metal cleaning, metal finishing, manufacturing, compliance monitoring and process control monitoring. This publication includes the majority of these presentations. In addition, in order to further facilitate information exchange and technology transfer, the US Air Force and DOE solicited additional papers under a general Call for Papers.'' These papers, which underwent review and final selection by a peer review committee, are also included in this combined Proceedings/Compendium. For those involved in handling, using or managing hazardous and toxic solvents, this document should prove to be a valuable resource, providing the most up-to-date information on current technologies and practices in solvent substitution. Individual papers are abstracted separated.

  3. Immobilization of spent resin with epoxy resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gultom, O.; Suryanto; Sayogo; Ramdan

    1997-01-01

    immobilization of spent resin using epoxy resin has been conducted. The spent resin was mixtured with epoxy resin in variation of concentration, i.e., 30, 40, 50, 60, 70 weight percent of spent resin. The mixture were pour into the plastic tube, with a diameter of 40 mm and height of 40 mm. The density, compressive strength and leaching rate were respectively measured by quanta chrome, paul weber apparatus and gamma spectrometer. The results showed that the increasing of waste concentration would be decreased the compressive strength, and increased density by immobilized waste. The leaching rate of 137 Cs from waste product was not detected in experiment (author)

  4. Experimental and theoretical investigation of mechanical disturbances in epoxy-impregnated superconducting coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwasa, Y.; Bobrov, E.S.; Tsukamoto, O.; Takaghi, T.; Fujita, H.; Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge

    1985-01-01

    The theoretical correlation between shear stress and epoxy resin fracture developed in an earlier paper was verified experimentally using a series of epoxy-impregnated, thin-walled superconducting test coils. In test coils with both ends rigidly clamped, cracks occurred as transport current was increased; during a training sequence the test was terminated by a premature quench. Using acoustic emission and voltage signals, each premature quench was linked directly to a crack occurring near one of the ends. Test coils which had both ends unsupported, giving the winding freedom to expand radially, did not experience epoxy fracture and showed no premature quenches. (author)

  5. Impregnation of leather during "freeze-drying"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storch, Mikkel; Vestergaard Poulsen Sommer, Dorte; Hovmand, Ida

    2016-01-01

    Freeze-drying is a recognized method for the preservation of waterlogged objects. Naturally, freeze-drying has also been used for waterlogged archaeological leather often after treatment with Na2.EDTA and impregnation with PEG; but the treated leather sometimes suffers from “excessive drying......” becoming too stiff and brittle. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of a conventional freeze-drying method against an alternative freeze-drying method that preserves the natural moisture content of the leather. Both new and archaeological waterlogged leather were included in the study...... suggest that the process which takes place within the leather during the freeze-drying in not actual freeze-drying, but rather a sophisticated way of distributing the impregnating agent. The pure ice phase freezes out, but the impregnating agent remains liquid as the temperature does not become low enough...

  6. Swelling kinetics and impregnation of PLA with thymol under supercritical CO2 conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milovanović Stoja L.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work was aimed to study swelling kinetics of polylactic acid (PLA and its impregnation with thymol in supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2 medium. The influences of temperature and soaking time on the swelling kinetics and impregnation yield of PLA cylindrical disc and film were investigated. Swelling experiments were performed in a high pressure view cell at 10 MPa and temperatures of 40°C, 60°C and 75°C for 2 to 24 h. On the basis of swelling kinetics, pressure of 10 MPa and temperature of 40°C were chosen for supercritical solvent impregnation (SSI of the PLA samples during 2 to24 h. The highest swelling extent was observed for the PLA monolith after 24 h treatment with pure scCO2 (7.5% and scCO2 with thymol (118.3%. It was shown that sufficiently high amount of thymol can be loaded into both PLA monolith and film using SSI after only 2 h (10.0% and 6.6%, respectively. Monolith and film of PLA impregnated with thymol could be suitable for active food packaging and sterile medical disposables.

  7. Drug smuggling using clothing impregnated with cocaine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, Seán D; Power, John D

    2005-11-01

    A case study is presented where a woman travelling from South America to the Republic of Ireland was detained at Dublin Airport and articles of clothing she had in her luggage were found to be impregnated with cocaine. The study shows that the amount of powder recovered from the garments was approximately 14% of the total weight of the garments. The cocaine was in the form of cocaine hydrochloride and the purity was approximately 80%. An examination of the garments under filtered light highlighted the areas exposed to cocaine and indicated that the method of impregnation was by pouring liquid containing cocaine onto the clothing.

  8. Resin infusion of large composite structures modeling and manufacturing process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loos, A.C. [Michigan State Univ., Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, East Lansing, MI (United States)

    2006-07-01

    The resin infusion processes resin transfer molding (RTM), resin film infusion (RFI) and vacuum assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) are cost effective techniques for the fabrication of complex shaped composite structures. The dry fibrous preform is placed in the mold, consolidated, resin impregnated and cured in a single step process. The fibrous performs are often constructed near net shape using highly automated textile processes such as knitting, weaving and braiding. In this paper, the infusion processes RTM, RFI and VARTM are discussed along with the advantages of each technique compared with traditional composite fabrication methods such as prepreg tape lay up and autoclave cure. The large number of processing variables and the complex material behavior during infiltration and cure make experimental optimization of the infusion processes costly and inefficient. Numerical models have been developed which can be used to simulate the resin infusion processes. The model formulation and solution procedures for the VARTM process are presented. A VARTM process simulation of a carbon fiber preform was presented to demonstrate the type of information that can be generated by the model and to compare the model predictions with experimental measurements. Overall, the predicted flow front positions, resin pressures and preform thicknesses agree well with the measured values. The results of the simulation show the potential cost and performance benefits that can be realized by using a simulation model as part of the development process. (au)

  9. TRUEX process solvent cleanup with solid sorbents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tse, Pui-Kwan; Reichley-Yinger, L.; Vandegrift, G.F.

    1989-01-01

    Solid sorbents, alumina, silica gel, and Amberlyst A-26 have been tested for the cleanup of degraded TRUEX-NPH solvent. A sodium carbonate scrub alone does not completely remove acidic degradation products from highly degraded solvent and cannot restore the stripping performance of the solvent. By following the carbonate scrub with either neutral alumina or Amberlyst A-26 anion exchange resin, the performance of the TRUEX-NPH is substantially restored. The degraded TRUEX-NPH was characterized before and after treatment by supercritical fluid chromatography. Its performance was evaluated by americium distribution ratios, phase-separation times, and lauric acid distribution coefficients. 17 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs

  10. Solvent substitutes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evanoff, S.P.

    1995-01-01

    The environmental and industrial hygiene regulations promulgated since 1980, most notably the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA), the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments to the Resources Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), and the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, have brought about an increased emphasis on user exposure, hazardous waste generation, and air emissions. As a result, industry is performing a fundamental reassessment of cleaning solvents, processes, and procedures. The more progressive organizations have made their goal the elimination of solvents that may pose significant potential human health and environmental hazards. This chapter discusses solvent cleaning in metal-finishing, metal-manufacturing, and industrial maintenance applications; precision cleaning; and electronics manufacturing. Nonmetallic cleaning, adhesives, coatings, inks, and aerosols also will be addressed, but in a more cursory manner

  11. Titanium impregnated borosilicate zeolites for epoxidation catalysis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Přech, Jan; Vitvarová, Dana; Lupínková, Lenka; Kubů, Martin; Čejka, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 212, AUG 2015 (2015), s. 28-34 ISSN 1387-1811 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP106/11/0819 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : borosilicate * titanium impregnation * epoxidation Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.349, year: 2015

  12. Flammability studies of impregnated paper sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivan Simkovic; Anne Fuller; Robert White

    2011-01-01

    Paper sheets impregnated with flame retardants made from agricultural residues and other additives were studied with the cone calorimeter. The use of sugar beet ethanol eluent (SBE), CaCl2, and ZnCl2 lowered the peak rate of heat release (PRHR) the most in comparison to water treated material. The average effective heat of...

  13. Combustion properties of wood impregnated with commercial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of this study was to determine some combustion properties of Calabrian pine (Pinus brutia Ten.) wood specimens impregnated with aqueous solutions of commercial fertilizers. Ammonium sulphate (AS) and diammonium phosphate (DAP) were used as commercial fertilizers. Diammonium phosphate and ...

  14. Batch extracting process using magnetic particle held solvents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunez, L.; Vandergrift, G.F.

    1995-11-21

    A process is described for selectively removing metal values which may include catalytic values from a mixture containing same, wherein a magnetic particle is contacted with a liquid solvent which selectively dissolves the metal values to absorb the liquid solvent onto the magnetic particle. Thereafter the solvent-containing magnetic particles are contacted with a mixture containing the heavy metal values to transfer metal values into the solvent carried by the magnetic particles, and then magnetically separating the magnetic particles. Ion exchange resins may be used for selective solvents. 5 figs.

  15. Recycling of impregnated wood and impregnating agents - combustion plant technology; Kyllaestetyn puutavaran ja kyllaestysaineiden kierraetys - polttolaitostekniikka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syrjaenen, T.; Kangas, E. [Kestopuu Oy, Helsinki (Finland)

    2000-07-01

    It has been estimated that in the 20th century it is possible to recycle about 70 000 m{sup 3} of impregnated wood, corresponding to about 48 % of the total amount of annually demolished impregnated wood. The amount is estimated to grow up to 130 000 m{sup 3} in 2015 (about 65% of demolished impregnated wood). In the beginning half of the recyclable impregnated wood is poles, but the share of sawn timber will increase as the time goes by. The poles and pieces of them are demolished and transported to an intermediate storage e.g. on the yard of an electricity supply company, from which they can be fetched in larger quantities. Even wood impregnation plant can act as intermediate storage sites. Collection points for impregnated construction timber can be established on timer sales companies, but most of it will be collected at waste processing sites. The economy of impregnated wood recycling chain depends on the sales income of generated energy. Calculations show that collection, transportation and processing costs can be covered with the sales of impregnated wood for energy generation and with recycling fees. The recycling fee for sawn timber would be 20 FIM/m{sup 3} and that for poles 64 FIM/m{sup 3}. In 2001 recycling fees were set for impregnated wood, the fees being 11 FIM/m{sup 3} for sawn timber and 42 FIM/m{sup 3} for poles. Collected impregnated wood can be crushed with either fixed or movable crushers used for crushing of waste wood. The impurities of wood (bolts, nails, stones, etc.), large dimensions of wood, in- homogenous material and dust require special features for the crushing equipment. Crushing device can be equipped with feeding crane and saw for processing of large-dimension wood, and metal detectors and magnetic separators if needed, but the large metal scrap has to be removed before crushing. At present in Finland there is not a combustion plant capable for combustion of impregnated wood without any modification. Improvements of flue gas

  16. Supercritical CO2 impregnation of PLA/PCL films with natural substances for bacterial growth control in food packaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milovanovic, Stoja; Hollermann, Gesa; Errenst, Cornelia; Pajnik, Jelena; Frerich, Sulamith; Kroll, Stephen; Rezwan, Kurosch; Ivanovic, Jasna

    2018-05-01

    Biodegradable polymers with antibacterial properties are highly desirable materials for active food packaging applications. Thymol, a dietary monoterpene phenol with a strong antibacterial activity is abundant in plants belonging to the genus Thymus. This study presents two approaches for supercritical CO 2 impregnation of poly(lactic acid)(PLA)/poly(ε-caprolactone)(PCL) blended films to induce antibacterial properties of the material: (i) a batch impregnation process for loading pure thymol, and (ii) an integrated supercritical extraction-impregnation process for isolation of thyme extract and its incorporation into the films, operated in both batch or semi-continuous modes with supercritical solution circulation. The PCL content in films, impregnation time and CO 2 flow regime were varied to maximize loading of the films with thymol or thyme extract with preserving films' structure and thermal stability. Representative film samples impregnated with thymol and thyme extract were tested against Gram (-) (Escherichia coli) and Gram(+) (Bacillus subtilis) model strains, by measuring their metabolic activity and re-cultivation after exposure to the films. The film containing thymol (35.8 wt%) showed a strong antibacterial activity leading to a total reduction of bacterial cell viability. Proposed processes enable fast, controlled and organic solvent-free fabrication of the PLA/PCL films containing natural antibacterial substances at moderately low temperature, with a compact structure and a good thermal stability, for potential use as active food packaging materials. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Refining of fossil resin flotation concentrate from western coal. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, G.F.; Miller, J.D.

    1995-02-16

    During the past several years, significant research efforts have been made to develop process technology for the selective flotation of fossil resin from western coals. As a result of these efforts, several new flotation technologies have been developed. Operation of a proof-of-concept continuous flotation circuit showed the selective flotation process to be sufficiently profitable to justify the development of a fossil resin industry. However, little attention has been given to the refining of the fossil resin flotation concentrate although solvent refining is a critical step for the fossil resin to become a marketable product. In view of this situation, DOE funded this two-year project to evaluate the following aspects of the fossil resin refining technology: 1) Characterization of the fossil resin flotation concentrate and its refined products; 2) Kinetics of fossil resin extraction; 3) Effects of operating variables on solvent extraction; 4) Extraction solvents; 5) Proof-of-concept continuous refining tests; and 6) Technical and economic analysis. The results from this research effort have led to the following conclusions: Hexane- or heptane-refined fossil resin has a light-yellow color, a melting point of 140 - 142{degrees}C, a density of 1.034 gram/cm, and good solubility in nonpolar solvents. Among the four solvents evaluated (hexane, heptane, toluene and ethyl acetate), hexane is the most appropriate solvent based on overall technical and economic considerations. Batch extraction tests and kinetic studies suggest that the main interaction between the resin and the solvent is expected to be the forces associated with solvation phenomena. Temperature has the most significant effect on extraction rate. With hexane as the solvent, a recovery of 90% cam be achieved at 50{degrees}C and 10% solids concentration with moderate agitation for 1 hour.

  18. Mechanical and Thermal Properties of Epoxy Composites Containing Zirconia-Impregnated Halloysite Nanotubes with Different Loadings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Suhyun; Kim, Moon Il; Shon, Minyoung; Seo, Bongkuk; Lim, Choongsun

    2018-09-01

    Epoxy resins are widely used in various industrial fields due to their low cost, good workability, heat resistance, and good mechanical strength. However, they suffer from brittleness, an issue that must be addressed for further applications. To solve this problem, additional fillers are needed to improve the mechanical and thermal properties of the resins; zirconia is one such filler. However, it has been reported that aggregation may occur in the epoxy composites as the amount of zirconia increases, preventing enhancement of the mechanical strength of the epoxy composites. Herein, to reduce the aggregation, zirconia was well dispersed on halloysite nanotubes (HNTs), which have high thermal and mechanical strength, by a conventional wet impregnation method. The HNTs were impregnated with zirconia at different loadings using zirconyl chloride octahydrate as a precursor. The mechanical and thermal strengths of the epoxy composites with these fillers were investigated. The zirconia-impregnated HNTs (Zr/HNT) were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and tunneling electron microscopy (TEM). The hardening conditions of the epoxy composites were analyzed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The thermal strength of the epoxy composites was studied by thermomechanical analysis (TMA) and micro-calorimetry and the mechanical strength of the epoxy composites (flexural strength and tensile strength) was studied by using a universal testing machine (UTM). The mechanical and thermal strengths of the epoxy composites with Zr/HNT were improved compared to those of the epoxy composite with HNT, and also increased as the zirconia loading on HNT increased.

  19. Applications of Blue Light-curing Acrylic Resin to Forensic Sample Preparation and Microtomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groves, Ethan; Palenik, Christopher S

    2016-03-01

    This study discusses the results of an evaluation of a one-part blue light-curing acrylic resin for embedding trace evidence prior to the preparation of thin sections with a microtome. Through a comparison to several epoxy resins, the physical properties relevant to both trace evidence examination and analytical microscopy in general, including as viscosity, clarity, color, hardness, and cure speed, were explored. Finally, thin sections from paint samples embedded in this acrylic resin were evaluated to determine if, through smearing or impregnation, the resin contributed to the infrared spectra. The results of this study show that blue light-curing acrylic resins provide the desired properties of an embedding medium, generate high-quality thin sections, and can significantly simplify the preparation of paint chips, fibers and a multitude of other types of microscopic samples in the forensic trace evidence laboratory. © 2015 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  20. Recovery of value-added fossil resin from El-Maghara coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibrahim, S.S.; Mostafa, S.I. [Central Metallurgical R and D Inst., Cairo (Egypt)

    2003-06-01

    El-Maghara coal was confirmed to contain a substantial amount of fossil resin intimately associated with its macerals. Macroscopic identification as well as physical diagnosis of solvent refined resinite material proved its particular significance and sufficient value to justify a fossil resin industry in Egypt. This resin has thermosetting properties superior to most synthetics resins available from petrochemicals. It could compete in the market as a chemical commodity in high-speed printing and high-performance adhesive applications. It could have also special values as a feedstock for high-density jet fuel after proper hydrogenation. The froth flotation technique was applied to recover this valuable material from El-Maghara ground coal. The solvent extraction method using commercial solvents was used to refine the resinite fraction collected as flotation concentrate. The variables affecting the flotation technique were studied. Characterization of refined resin was applied. (orig.)

  1. Petroleum Resins: Separation, Character, and Role in Petroleum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Simon Ivar; Speight, James

    2001-01-01

    are precipitated, adsorbents are added to the n-pentane solutions of the resins and oils, by which process the resins are adsorbed and subsequently recovered by the use of a more polar solvent, and the oils remain in solution. The resin fraction plays an important role in the stability of petroleum and prevents...... separation of the asphaltene constituents as a separate phase. Indeed, the absence of the resin fraction (produced by a variety of methods) from the maltenes influences the ability of the de-resined maltenes to accommodate the asphaltenes either in solution or as a stable part of a colloidal system. In spite....... Suggestions are also made regarding current thoughts of the role of these constituents on the structure and stability of petroleum....

  2. Quick analytical separation of glucose and fructose with impregnated woven glass fiber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, S.C.

    1978-01-01

    (1) A wide separation of glucose and fructose was obtained in 30 min with simple, inexpensive equipment using polysilicic impregnated woven glass fiber and the solvent acetone-n-butanol-1 M H 3 BO 3 (50:40:10). (2) A calibration of a radiochromatogram scanner was performed for 11 C. (3) Three Rsub(F) values could be compared to provide positive chemical identification of [ 11 C]glucose and [ 11 C]fructose. (4) Radiochemical composition and approximate specific activity were determined from a small aliquot (1-4 μl). (Auth.)

  3. Physico-mechanical Properties of Electron Beam Irradiated Particle boards Based on Wood flour/ Polyethylene/Cement Kiln Dust Impregnated with Unsaturated Polyester

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Rahman, H.A.; Khattab, M.M.; Ismail, M.R.

    2010-01-01

    Particle boards were fabricated by mixing wood flour (WF), low density polyethylene (LDPE) and cement kiln dust (CKD) under hot pressure; and then impregnated in unsaturated polyester resin. These impregnated particle boards were subjected to various doses of electron beam irradiation up to 50 kGy. The physico-mechanical properties were characterized in terms of flexural strength, impact strength, water absorption, thickness swelling, and the thermal stability. The results showed that the partial replacement of wood flour with cement kiln dust up to 20% by weight improved the values of flexural strength, and impact strength. However, the water absorption percentage and thickness swelling values decreased with increasing the CKD ratio up to 40%. Furthermore, the treatment with electron beam irradiation doses improved the physico-mechanical properties of the impregnated particle boards up to 50 kGy. The improved results were confirmed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA)

  4. Impregnating Systems for Producing Wood-Plastic Composite Materials and Resinified Woods by Radiochemical Means

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laizier, J.; Laroche, R.; Marchand, J.

    1969-01-01

    The effect of the nature of the components in the impregnation mixture on the characteristics of wood-plastic combinations has been studied in the case of beech by applying a wide variety of compositions. In particular, the effect of water (in the impregnator, and in the form of moisture in the wood) on the characteristics of the products obtained has been determined. It has been shown that, in place of the conventional method for preparing resinified woods (using a ternary monomer-solvent-water mixture), it is possible to use a method involving comonomers, which obviate the need to dry the wood after treatment. The evaluation of the results obtained is based on the value of the impregnation rate and on the modifications in microscopic structure; these emphasize the differences between the types of filler and enable comparisons to be drawn with the dimensional stabilities observed. Measurements of variations in dimensions and the recurrence of moisture have made it possible to establish a classification based on the types of monomer used and the operating conditions. It is shown that a whole range of products is obtained, the properties of which differ widely and are comparatively easily adaptable to the purpose specified. These properties illustrate clearly the differences and characteristics of resinified woods as opposed to conventional wood-plastic materials. (author) [fr

  5. Experimental Study of Impregnation Birch and Aspen Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Vladislavovich Grigorev

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available An experimental study of wood impregnation was implemented by applying centrifugal methods. The impregnants were a 10% aqueous solution of potassium chloride and a 2% aqueous solution of borax. Birch (Betula pendula and aspen (Populus tremula wood samples in different moisture content were tested. The impregnation time in the centrifugal device were 30 seconds repeated 21 times, and the samples were measured after every 30 seconds. The experimental results were fitted to a nonlinear filtration law, which indicated that the centrifugal wood impregnation was dependent on wood species, wood moisture, rotational speed, and radius. Determination of rotational speed and centrifuge radius for impregnating aspen and birch at varying lengths and humidity under conditions of the nonlinear impregnant filtration law can be done using the example charts that were developed and presented in this study.

  6. Development and Characterization of Novel Polyurethane Films Impregnated with Tolfenamic Acid for Therapeutic Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilal Istanbullu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study deals with the preparation of polyurethane (PU films impregnated with a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, tolfenamic acid (TA. Solvent evaporation technique has been employed for the preparation of TA-PU films in two different ratios of 1 : 2 and 1 : 5 in Tetrahydrofuran (THF or THF-ethanol mixtures. The prepared films were characterized using X-Ray Diffraction (XRD, Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM, and release studies. The results indicate transformation of crystalline TA to its amorphous form. The degree of crystallinity changes both by increasing the polymer concentration and solvent used for the film preparations. The release profiles of TA were also found to be affected, showing a decrease from approximately 50% to 25% from 1 : 2 to 1 : 5 ratios, respectively.

  7. Polyvinyl chloride resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hong Jae

    1976-06-01

    This book contains polyvinyl chloride resin industry with present condition such as plastic industry and polyvinyl chloride in the world and Japan, manufacture of polyvinyl chloride resin ; suspension polymerization and solution polymerization, extruding, injection process, hollow molding vinyl record, vacuum forming, polymer powders process, vinyl chloride varnish, vinyl chloride latex, safety and construction on vinyl chloride. Each chapter has descriptions on of process and kinds of polyvinyl chloride resin.

  8. Wood construction and magnetic characteristics of impregnated type magnetic wood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oka, Hideo; Hojo, Atsushi; Seki, Kyoushiro; Takashiba, Toshio

    2002-01-01

    The results of experiments involving the AC and DC magnetic characteristics of impregnated type magnetic wood were studied by taking into consideration the wood construction and fiber direction. The experimental results show that the sufficient amount of impregnated magnetic fluid varies depending on the fiber direction and length, and the grain face of the wood material. The impregnated type magnetic wood sample that is fully impregnated by magnetic fluid has a 60% saturation magnetization compared to the saturation magnetization of magnetic fluid. Samples for which the wood fiber direction was the same as the direction of the magnetic path had a higher magnetization intensity and permeability

  9. Development of new and improved polymer matrix resin systems, phase 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, M. S.

    1983-01-01

    Vinystilbazole (vinylstryrylpyridine) and vinylpolystyrulpyridine were prepared for the purpose of modifying bismaleimide composite resins. Cure studies of resins systems were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry. The vinylstyrylpyridine-modified bismaleimide composite resins were found to have lower cure and gel temperatures, and shorter cure times than the corresponding unmodified composite resins. The resin systems were reinforced with commercially avialable satin-weave carbon cloth. Prepregs were fabricated by solvent or hot melt techniques. Thermal stability, flammability, moisture absorption, and mechanical properties of the composites (such as flexural strength, modulus, tensile and short beam shear strength) were determined. Composite laminates showed substantial improvements in both processability and mechanical properties compared to he bismaleimide control systems. The vinylstyrylpyridine modified bismaleimide resins can be used as advanced matrix resins for graphite secondary structures where ease of processing, fireworthiness, and high temperature stability are required for aerospace applications.

  10. Extracting solid carbonaceous materials with solvents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1936-02-08

    Solvent extraction of solid carbonaceous materials is performed in the presence of powdered catalysts together with alkaline substances. Oxides of nickel or iron or nickel nitrate have been used together with caustic soda or potash solutions or milk of lime. Solvents used include benzenes, middle oils, tars, tetrahydronaphthalene. The extraction is performed at 200 to 500/sup 0/C under pressures of 20 to 200 atm. Finely ground peat was dried and mixed with milk of lime and nickel nitrate and an equal quantity of middle oil. The mixture was heated for 3 h at 380/sup 0/C at 90 atm. 88.5% of the peat was extracted. In a similar treatment brown coal was impregnated with solutions of caustic soda and ferric chloride.

  11. Sensibilidade do carrapato Boophilus microplus a solventes Sensibility of Boophilus microplus tick to solvents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carolina de Souza Chagas

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Os experimentos envolvendo o uso de acaricidas sintéticos ou naturais, geralmente necessitam da utilização de um solvente. Com a finalidade de verificar a sensibilidade do carrapato bovino Boophilus microplus a diferentes solventes, larvas e fêmeas ingurgitadas deste ectoparasito foram expostas a sete solventes em cinco diferentes concentrações, na ausência e presença de azeite de oliva. Os resultados mostraram que a utilização do azeite de oliva não produz resultados diferentes estatisticamente em testes de larvas com papel impregnado, fato não verificado em testes de imersão de adultos com compostos hidrofílicos. A mortalidade média causada pelos solventes foi menor nos testes com papel impregnado, aumentando nos testes de imersão de larvas e de adultos. Solventes de baixo peso molecular e pouca viscosidade como o álcool metílico e o álcool etílico, não interferiram na mortalidade média em testes biológicos de B. microplus, principalmente em concentrações inferiores a 76%.Experiments carried out with synthetic or natural acaricides usually use a solvent. To investigate the sensitivity of Boophilus microplus cattle tick to different solvents, larvae and engorged female were subjected to seven solvents in five different concentrations. It was done in the presence and absence of olive oil. The results showed that the utilization of olive oil doesn't produce different statistical results in impregnated paper larvae test. It did not happen in adults immersion test with hydrophilic compounds. The mean mortality caused by solvents was small in impregnated paper larvae test, increasing in immersion tests of larvae and adults. Solvents with low molecular weight and viscosity like ethyl alcohol and methyl alcohol did not cause interference in the mortality of B. microplus in biological tests, mainly in concentrations below 76%.

  12. Relationship Between the Process Parameters and Resin Content of a Glass/Epoxy Prepreg Produced by Dipping Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Reza Khalafi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The properties of prepregs are characterized in terms of their volatile content, resin content, the degree of pre-cure, void content, tack and flow ability. Resin content is one of the most important properties of prepregs so that its changing will result in altered properties such as, tack and resin flow. In order to monitor the resin content, a quantitative relation to the processing parameters such as line speed, viscosity and distance between the resin up taking rollers have to be determined. In this study, a tri-axial E-glass fabric with the areal weight of 1025 g/m2 and an epoxy resin (Epon 828 were used to produce the prepreg by the dipping method. In the theoretical part of this work, the free coating is studied and as a result the thickness layer of the coating resin through the resin bath is calculated by Landau-Levich model. In continuation, the achieved thickness was considered as a feed for the calendering process. Using the momentum equation for the passing impregnated fibres through the extra resin uptake rollers, the relation between the internal resin layer thickness and final coating resin layer thickness was achieved in an integral equation form. In order to solve this integral equation, MAPLE software was applied. The theoretical results were in good agreement with the experimental data and showed that the resin content increased linearly with increasing the distance between rollers, the radius and roller angular velocity. In contrast, the resin content decreased with increasing the line speed. According to our calculations, the effect of the resin viscosity variation on the resin content was negligibly small.

  13. Manufacturing of a REBCO racetrack coil using thermoplastic resin aiming at Maglev application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizuno, Katsutoshi; Ogata, Masafumi; Hasegawa, Hitoshi

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We propose a novel REBCO coil structure which applies thermoplastic resin. • The thermoplastic resin bonds the coil winding and cooling plates. • The adhesiveness of the resin is strong enough to withstand the thermal stress. • The thermoplastic resin does not cause the degradation because of its high viscosity. • We successfully made a full-scale racetrack REBCO coil with the thermoplastic resin. - Abstract: The REBCO coated conductor is a promising technology for the Maglev application in terms of its high critical temperature. The operating temperature of the on-board magnets can be around 40–50 K with the coated conductor. The REBCO coils are cooled by cryocoolers directly, and hence the thermal design of the REBCO coils significantly changes from that of LTS coils. We have developed a novel REBCO coil structure using thermoplastic resin. The coil is not impregnated and the thermoplastic resin is used to bond the coil winding and the heat transfer members, e.g. copper and aluminum plates. The viscosity of the thermoplastic resin is high enough for the thermoplastic resin not to permeate between the turns in the coil. Therefore, the thermal stress does not occur and the risk of degradation is removed. This paper contains the following three topics. First, the thermal resistance of the thermoplastic resin was measured at cryogenic temperature. Then, a small round REBCO coil was experimentally produced. It has been confirmed that the thermoplastic resin does not cause the degradation and, the adhesion between the coil winding and copper plates withstands the thermal stress. Finally, we successfully produced a full-scale racetrack REBCO coil applying the coil structure with the thermoplastic resin.

  14. Manufacturing of a REBCO racetrack coil using thermoplastic resin aiming at Maglev application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizuno, Katsutoshi, E-mail: mizuno.katsutoshi.14@rtri.or.jp; Ogata, Masafumi; Hasegawa, Hitoshi

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • We propose a novel REBCO coil structure which applies thermoplastic resin. • The thermoplastic resin bonds the coil winding and cooling plates. • The adhesiveness of the resin is strong enough to withstand the thermal stress. • The thermoplastic resin does not cause the degradation because of its high viscosity. • We successfully made a full-scale racetrack REBCO coil with the thermoplastic resin. - Abstract: The REBCO coated conductor is a promising technology for the Maglev application in terms of its high critical temperature. The operating temperature of the on-board magnets can be around 40–50 K with the coated conductor. The REBCO coils are cooled by cryocoolers directly, and hence the thermal design of the REBCO coils significantly changes from that of LTS coils. We have developed a novel REBCO coil structure using thermoplastic resin. The coil is not impregnated and the thermoplastic resin is used to bond the coil winding and the heat transfer members, e.g. copper and aluminum plates. The viscosity of the thermoplastic resin is high enough for the thermoplastic resin not to permeate between the turns in the coil. Therefore, the thermal stress does not occur and the risk of degradation is removed. This paper contains the following three topics. First, the thermal resistance of the thermoplastic resin was measured at cryogenic temperature. Then, a small round REBCO coil was experimentally produced. It has been confirmed that the thermoplastic resin does not cause the degradation and, the adhesion between the coil winding and copper plates withstands the thermal stress. Finally, we successfully produced a full-scale racetrack REBCO coil applying the coil structure with the thermoplastic resin.

  15. Suitability of conophor oil for the production of aklyd resins, and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Oil was extracted from Tetracaripidum conophorum nut (conophor plant) using solvent extraction method, with hexane as solvent. The oil obtained was used to synthesize an alkyd resin, which in turn was utilized in the production of white gloss paints and vanishes. The IR and UV analysis of the oil showed the presence of ...

  16. Iron impregnated carbon materials with improved physicochemical characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, Irfan; Adnan, Rohana; Wan Ngah, Wan Saime; Mohamed, Norita

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The morphology of raw AC was altered upon Fe impregnation and surface oxidation. • Surface modification had increased the pores diameter and surface functionalities. • Development of iron oxides have been expected on Fe impregnated carbon materials. • The M1, M2 and M3 have revealed magnetic susceptibility in applied magnetic field. • Dyes removal efficiency of M3 was notably higher (90–99%) than the raw AC (60–85%). - Abstract: This paper highlights the effect of iron impregnation and surface oxidation on the physicochemical characteristics of iron impregnated carbon materials. These materials were characterized by various techniques like surface area, pore size distribution, SEM/EDX, CHN, XRD, FTIR, TG/DT, VSM and XPS analyses. The increase in the surface functionalities and pores diameter (3.51–5.49 nm) of the iron-impregnated carbon materials was observed with the increase in iron contents and surface oxidation. The saturated magnetization values (0.029–0.034 emu/g) for the iron-impregnated carbon materials reflected the magnetic tendency due to the development of small size iron oxides on their surfaces. The XPS spectra revealed the existence of different oxidation states of the corresponding metals on the iron impregnated carbon materials. The percentage removal of model dyes (Methylene Blue and Methyl Orange) by iron-impregnated carbon materials was enhanced (>90%) with the increase in iron contents and pores diameters.

  17. Effects of impregnation with boron compounds on the surface ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Liebl.) which met the requirements of ASTM D 358 were impregnated according to ASTM D 1413 with boric acid (Ba) and borax (Bx) by vacuum technique. After impregnation, surfaces were coated with cellulosic, synthetic, polyurathane, water-based, acrylic and acid hardening varnishes in accordance with ASTM D 3023 ...

  18. Impact of impregnation with boron compounds on combustion ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study examined the impacts of varnishing after impregnation with boron compounds on combustion properties of oriental beech. The test samples prepared from oriental beech (Fagus orientalis Lipsky) wood were impregnated according to ASTM D 1413–76–99 with boric acid (Ba) or borax (Bx) using a vacuum ...

  19. Studies of properties of rubber wood with impregnation of polymer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Impregnation of rubber wood has been carried out under different conditions by using styrene as grafting monomer and glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) as crosslinker. Properties such as dimensional stability, water absorption, hardness, tensile strength, flexural strength, etc of the impregnated wood have been checked and ...

  20. Physico-chemical studies of gamma-irradiated polyester. Impregnated cement mortar composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ismail, M.R.; Afifi, M.S.

    1998-01-01

    The effect of impregnation time on the physico-chemical and mechanical properties of polyester-cement mortar composite has been investigated. The samples were soaked in unsaturated polyester resin containing 40% styrene monomer at impregnation times ranging from 1-15 hours and then exposed to 50 kGy of γ-irradiation. The effects on polymer loading, compressive strength, apparent porosity, and water absorption in addition to IR spectra and TGA of the samples were studied. It was found that, the polymer loading and compressive strength increase with the increased of soaking time up to 4 hours and there is no significant improvement of the polymer loading and strength. Whereas, the apparent porosity and water absorption behave in an opposite direction. These are attributed to the presence of polymer in the pores of the samples. IR spectra showed that, new bands appeared as result of the reaction between polyester and set cement. TGA showed that, the polyester cement composite has higher thermal stability as a compared to irradiated polyester. (author)

  1. Impregnation of Ibuprofen into Polycaprolactone using supercritical carbon dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoganathan, Roshan; Mammucari, Raffaella; Foster, Neil R, E-mail: n.foster@unsw.edu.a [Supercritical Fluids Research Group, School of Chemical Sciences and Engineering, University of New South Wales, NSW 2052 (Australia)

    2010-03-01

    Polycaprolactone (PCL) is a Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved biodegradable polyester used in tissue engineering applications. Ibuprofen is an anti-inflammatory drug which has good solubility in supercritical CO{sub 2} (SCCO{sub 2}). The solubility of CO{sub 2} in PCL allows for the impregnation of CO{sub 2}-soluble therapeutic agents into the polymer via a supercritical fluid (SCF) process. Polymers impregnated with bio-active compounds are highly desired for medical implants and controlled drug delivery. In this study, the use of CO{sub 2} to impregnate PCL with ibuprofen was investigated. The effect of operating conditions on the impregnation of ibuprofen into PCL was investigated over two pressure and two temperature levels, 150bar and 200bar, 35{sup 0}C and 40 {sup 0}C, respectively. Polycaprolactone with drug-loadings as high as 27% w/w were obtained. Impregnated samples exhibited controlled drug release profiles over several days.

  2. Impregnation of Ibuprofen into Polycaprolactone using supercritical carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoganathan, Roshan; Mammucari, Raffaella; Foster, Neil R

    2010-01-01

    Polycaprolactone (PCL) is a Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved biodegradable polyester used in tissue engineering applications. Ibuprofen is an anti-inflammatory drug which has good solubility in supercritical CO 2 (SCCO 2 ). The solubility of CO 2 in PCL allows for the impregnation of CO 2 -soluble therapeutic agents into the polymer via a supercritical fluid (SCF) process. Polymers impregnated with bio-active compounds are highly desired for medical implants and controlled drug delivery. In this study, the use of CO 2 to impregnate PCL with ibuprofen was investigated. The effect of operating conditions on the impregnation of ibuprofen into PCL was investigated over two pressure and two temperature levels, 150bar and 200bar, 35 0 C and 40 0 C, respectively. Polycaprolactone with drug-loadings as high as 27% w/w were obtained. Impregnated samples exhibited controlled drug release profiles over several days.

  3. Solventless LARC-160 Polyimide Matrix Resin. [applied for use in aerospace engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stclair, T. L.; Jewell, R. A.

    1978-01-01

    The addition polyimide, LARC-160, which was originally synthesized from low cost liquid monomers as a laminating resin in ethanol, was prepared as a solventless, high viscosity, neat liquid resin. The resin was processed by hot-melt coating techniques into graphite prepreg with excellent tack and drape. Comparable data on graphite reinforced laminates made from solvent-coated and various hot-melt coated prepreg were generated. LARC-160, because of its liquid nature, can be easily autoclave processed to produce low void laminates. Liquid chromatographic fingerprints indicate good reaction control on resin scale ups. Minor changes in monomer ratios were also made to improve the thermal aging performance of graphite laminates.

  4. Some properties of castor oil affecting its performance as a capacitor impregnant and their significance to future impregnant research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boicourt, G.P.

    1975-01-01

    For a considerable time castor oil and polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) have been the principal impregnants used in energy-storage capacitors. Castor oil has proven to be better than PCB for pulsed applications. PCB's have come under attack as an environmental hazard, while castor oil is a vegetable product and its supply and quality are subject to fluctuation. These two facts make the development of new impregnants desirable. The properties of PCB as a capacitor impregnant are well known. This paper first compares a number of properties of castor oil and PCB's. A comparison is made between the lives of castor oil capacitors and comparable PCB energy-storage capacitors. Some of the physical and chemical properties of castor oil which make it a good pulse capacitor impregnant are examined. These properties can be used as a guide for future research on new pulse capacitor impregnants

  5. Study on mechanical properties of fly ash impregnated glass fiber reinforced polymer composites using mixture design analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satheesh Raja, R.; Manisekar, K.; Manikandan, V.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • FRP with and without fly ash filler were prepared. • Mechanical properties of composites were analyzed. • Mixture Design Method was used to model the system. • Experimental and mathematical model results were compared. - Abstract: This paper describes the mechanical behavior of fly ash impregnated E-glass fiber reinforced polymer composite (GFRP). Initially the proportion of fiber and resin were optimized from the analysis of the mechanical properties of the GFRP. It is observed that the 30 wt% of E-glass in the GFRP without filler material yields better results. Then, based on the optimized value of resin content, the varying percentage of E-glass and fly ash was added to fabricate the hybrid composites. Results obtained in this study were mathematically evaluated using Mixture Design Method. Predictions show that 10 wt% addition of fly ash with fiber improves the mechanical properties of the composites. The fly ash impregnated GFRP yields significant improvement in mechanical strength compared to the GFRP without filler material. The surface morphologies of the fractured specimens were characterized using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). The chemical composition and surface morphology of the fly ash is analyzed by using Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) and Scanning Electron Microscope

  6. Characteristics of peaks of inhalation exposure to organic solvents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Preller, L.; Burstyn, I.; Pater, N. de; Kromhout, H.

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: To determine which exposure metrics are sufficient to characterize 'peak' inhalation exposure to organic solvents (OS) during spraying operations. Methods: Personal exposure measurements (n = 27; duration 5-159 min) were collected during application of paints, primers, resins and glues

  7. Silicone Resin Applications for Ceramic Precursors and Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaki Narisawa

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews the applications of silicone resins as ceramic precursors. The historical background of silicone synthesis chemistry is introduced to explain the production costs and supply availability of various silicones. Thermal degradation processes of silicones are classified in terms of the main chain structure and cyclic oligomer expulsion process, which determine the resulting ceramic yield and the chemical composition. The high temperature decomposition of Si-O-C beyond 1,400 °C in an inert atmosphere and formation of a protective silica layer on material surfaces beyond 1,200 °C in an oxidative atmosphere are discussed from the viewpoints of the wide chemical composition of the Si-O-C materials. Applications of the resins for binding agents, as starting materials for porous ceramics, matrix sources with impregnation, fiber spinning and ceramic adhesions are introduced. The recent development of the process of filler or cross-linking agent additions to resin compounds is also introduced. Such resin compounds are useful for obtaining thick coatings, MEMS parts and bulk ceramics, which are difficult to obtain by pyrolysis of simple organometallic precursors without additives.

  8. Influence of polar solvents on the enhancement of light-ends in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Crude oil 'micelle' can be dispersed into fuels, oil and resin/asphalthene components using some hydrocarbon solvents. This can be adapted towards influencing/enhancing its product slates during the processing of crude oils. This research was carried out to investigate the effect of polar solvents (ethanol and acetone) in ...

  9. Possible preparation of wood-plastic materials based on unsaturated polyester resins and methyl metacrylate, by radiation and chemical methods in combination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pesek, M.

    1982-01-01

    The preparation of wood-plastic combinations (WPC) using combined methods for curing intermediate products and final products is described. In the first step, impregnated wood was irradiated using doses of 1 to 10 kGy in the presence of chemical initiators of polymerization. Thereafter, curing of this partly cured impregnating mixture was accomplished in the wood at elevated temperatures with the aid of chemical initiators of polymerization. Impregnation mixtures based on unsaturated polyester resins and methyl methacrylate, and the wood species European Beech (Fagus silvatica) and Black Alder (Alnus glutinosa) were used. The results indicate that this method of preparing WPC allows substantially lower radiation doses to be used, i.e., doses in the range of 1 to 2.5 kGy. These doses gelatinate the impregnation mixture in the wood so that the subsequent curing by chemical polymerization initiators proceeds without the impregnation mixture flowing out of the wood, and without forming bosses and incrustations. Intermediate products and wood products needing no further finish may thus be prepared: in some cases regrinding or repolish is sufficient. The possibility of using impregnation mixtures based on various unsaturated polyester resins was investigated, and the influence on the curing process of temperature, polymerization initiator concentration, methyl methacrylate concentration, inhibitor concentration, and other factors affecting curing was evaluated. (author)

  10. Preparation of Sr adsorptive fiber by impregnating with crown ether derivative for 90Sr measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horita, Takuma; Asai, Shiho; Hanzawa, Yukiko; Kitatsuji, Yoshihiro; Konda, Miki; Saito, Kyoichi; Fujiwara, Kunio; Sugo, Takanobu

    2017-01-01

    A Sr adsorption fiber was prepared for rapid analysis of 90 Sr content in the fiber using radiation-induced emulsion graft polymerization and subsequent chemical modification. A polyethylene fiber with a diameter of 13 μm was first immersed in a methanol solution of an epoxy-group-containing vinyl monomer, glycidyl methacrylate (GMA), and polyoxyethylene sorbitol ester (Tween20) as a surfactant for the graft-polymerization of GMA. Octadecylamine was then bound to a polymer chain extending from the fiber surface, providing hydrophobicity to the polymer chain. Dicyclohexano-18-crown-6 (DCH18C6) was finally impregnated onto the polymer chain via a hydrophobic interaction between the octadecyl moiety of the polymer chain and the cyclohexyl moiety of DCH18C6. The fiber surface structure, characterized by DCH18C6 molecules loosely entangled with polymer chains, allowed for the rapid adsorption of Sr ions at an adsorption rate of approximately 100-times higher than that of a commercially available Sr-selective resin (Sr Resin ® ). (author)

  11. Manufacturing of a REBCO racetrack coil using thermoplastic resin aiming at Maglev application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Katsutoshi; Ogata, Masafumi; Hasegawa, Hitoshi

    2015-11-01

    The REBCO coated conductor is a promising technology for the Maglev application in terms of its high critical temperature. The operating temperature of the on-board magnets can be around 40-50 K with the coated conductor. The REBCO coils are cooled by cryocoolers directly, and hence the thermal design of the REBCO coils significantly changes from that of LTS coils. We have developed a novel REBCO coil structure using thermoplastic resin. The coil is not impregnated and the thermoplastic resin is used to bond the coil winding and the heat transfer members, e.g. copper and aluminum plates. The viscosity of the thermoplastic resin is high enough for the thermoplastic resin not to permeate between the turns in the coil. Therefore, the thermal stress does not occur and the risk of degradation is removed. This paper contains the following three topics. First, the thermal resistance of the thermoplastic resin was measured at cryogenic temperature. Then, a small round REBCO coil was experimentally produced. It has been confirmed that the thermoplastic resin does not cause the degradation and, the adhesion between the coil winding and copper plates withstands the thermal stress. Finally, we successfully produced a full-scale racetrack REBCO coil applying the coil structure with the thermoplastic resin.

  12. Differences in interfacial bond strengths of graphite fiber-epoxy resin composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Needles, H. L.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of epoxy-size and degree of cure on the interfacial bonding of an epoxy-amine-graphite fiber composite system is examined. The role of the fiber-resin interface in determining the overall mechanical properties of composites is poorly understood. A good interfacial adhesive bond is required to achieve maximum stress transfer to the fibers in composites, but at the same time some form of energy absorbing interfacial interaction is needed to achieve high fracture toughening. The incompatibility of these two processes makes it important to understand the nature and basic factors involved at the fiber-resin interface as stress is applied. The mechanical properties including interlaminar shear values for graphite fiber-resin composites are low compared to glass and boron-resin composites. These differences have been attributed to poor fiber-matrix adhesion. Graphite fibers are commonly subjected to post-treatments including application of organic sizing in order to improve their compatibility with the resin matrix and to protect the fiber tow from damage during processing and lay-up. In such processes, sized graphite fiber tow is impregnated with epoxy resin and then layed-up i nto the appropriate configuration. Following an extended ambient temperature cure, the graphite-resin composite structure is cured at elevated temperature using a programmed temperature sequence to cure and then cool the product.

  13. Separation and characterization of resins and asphaltenes coming from Castilla crude Evaluation of their molecular interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navarro, Lina; Alvarez, Mario; Grosso, Jorge Luis; Navarro, Uriel

    2004-01-01

    The study of resins and asphaltenes, the heaviest fractions of oil, has become an area of interest due to the abundance of heavy crude oils in Colombia and Latin America. We studied the chemical composition of the heavy fractions of Castilla crude oil, evaluated some of its molecular parameters and found evidence of the interaction between the resins extracted from the crude with the asphaltenes of the original crude. With this objective, we carried out at the pilot plant level precipitation of the resin-asphaltene (R-A) aggregate by adding and mixing under controlled conditions, a paraffin solvent, from the Apiay refinery, called Apiasol. By extracting Soxhlet with the same solvent, resin 1 of aggregate R-A was separated. Resin ll defined as the soluble fraction that is part of the maltenes, was separated from the deasphalted crude by open column chromatography, using alumina as support, according to the SAR method (Saturated, Aromatics, Resins). The fractions of resins and the asphaltenes obtained, were characterized by: Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR), FT-lR, DRX, elementary analysis (C, H, N, S), metal content (Ni and V), distribution of molecular weight by GPC, and average molecular weight by VPO. The results obtained show evidence that resin l which is part of the aggregate has less average molecular weight than resin ll which is present in the fraction of maltenes. In addition, some changes were found in the elementary analysis of among the resins. On the one hand, and taking into account the existing theories of molecular interactions among these fractions, it was found that the resins l separated from the R-A aggregate, when added to the crude, they stabilize their asphaltenes. This evaluation was carried out by analyzing the flocculation point of the crude and its mixtures with 1,9% and 3,8% of resin l, when they are titrated with a precipitating agent in an NIR cell that works with high pressure and temperature

  14. Long term stability of cannabis resin and cannabis extracts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholst, Christian

    2010-01-01

      The aim of the present study was to investigate the stability of cannabinoids in cannabis resin slabs and cannabis extracts upon long-term storage. The levels of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), cannabinol (CBN), cannabidiol (CBD) and cannabigerol (CBG) on both neutral and acidic form were measured...... stored in extracted form at room temperature the degradation rate of acidic THC increased significantly relative to resin material with concentration halve-lives of 35 and 91 days in daylight and darkness, respectively. Once cannabis material is extracted into organic solvents, care should be taken...

  15. Reactions of sulphur mustard on impregnated carbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, G K; Singh, Beer

    2004-12-31

    Activated carbon of surface area 1100 m2/gm is impregnated with 4% sodium hydroxide plus 3% Cr(VI) as CrO3 with and without 5% ethylene diamine (EDA), 4% magnesium nitrate and 5% ruthenium chloride by using their aqueous solutions. These carbons are characterized for surface area analysis by BET conventional method and exposed to the vapours of sulphur mustard (HD) at room temperature (30 degrees C). After 24 h, the reaction products are extracted in dichloromethane and analyzed using gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Hemisulphur mustard, thiodiglycol, 1,4-oxathiane are observed to be the products of reaction between sulphur mustard and NaOH/CrO3/C system, whereas on NaOH/CrO3/EDA/C system HD reacted to give 1,4-thiazane. On Mg(NO3)2/C system it gave hemisulphur mustard and thiodiglycol. On RuCl3/C system it degraded to divinyl sulphone. Residual sulphur mustard is observed along with reaction products in all systems studied. Reaction mechanisms are also proposed for these interesting surface reactions. Above-mentioned carbons can be used in filtration systems for protection against hazardous gases such as sulphur mustard.

  16. Reactions of sulphur mustard on impregnated carbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, G.K.; Singh, Beer

    2004-01-01

    Activated carbon of surface area 1100 m 2 /gm is impregnated with 4% sodium hydroxide plus 3% Cr(Vi) as CrO 3 with and without 5% ethylene diamine (EDA), 4% magnesium nitrate and 5% ruthenium chloride by using their aqueous solutions. These carbons are characterized for surface area analysis by BET conventional method and exposed to the vapours of sulphur mustard (HD) at room temperature (30 deg. C). After 24 h, the reaction products are extracted in dichloromethane and analyzed using gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Hemisulphur mustard, thiodiglycol, 1,4-oxathiane are observed to be the products of reaction between sulphur mustard and NaOH/CrO 3 /C system, whereas on NaOH/CrO 3 /EDA/C system HD reacted to give 1,4-thiazane. On Mg(NO 3 ) 2 /C system it gave hemisulphur mustard and thiodiglycol. On RuCl 3 /C system it degraded to divinyl sulphone. Residual sulphur mustard is observed along with reaction products in all systems studied. Reaction mechanisms are also proposed for these interesting surface reactions. Above-mentioned carbons can be used in filtration systems for protection against hazardous gases such as sulphur mustard

  17. Fracture in Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Parul; Chavez-Garcia, Jose; Pham, John

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a novel technique to understand the failure mechanisms inside thermal protection materials. The focus of this research is on the class of materials known as phenolic impregnated carbon ablators. It has successfully flown on the Stardust spacecraft and is the thermal protection system material chosen for the Mars Science Laboratory and SpaceX Dragon spacecraft. Although it has good thermal properties, structurally, it is a weak material. To understand failure mechanisms in carbon ablators, fracture tests were performed on FiberForm(Registered TradeMark) (precursor), virgin, and charred ablator materials. Several samples of these materials were tested to investigate failure mechanisms at a microstructural scale. Stress-strain data were obtained simultaneously to estimate the tensile strength and toughness. It was observed that cracks initiated and grew in the FiberForm when a critical stress limit was reached such that the carbon fibers separated from the binder. However, both for virgin and charred carbon ablators, crack initiation and growth occurred in the matrix (phenolic) phase. Both virgin and charred carbon ablators showed greater strength values compared with FiberForm samples, confirming that the presence of the porous matrix helps in absorbing the fracture energy.

  18. A kinetic study of pyrolysis in pitch impregnated electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kocaefe, D.; Charette, A.; Ferland, J.; Couderc, P.; Saint-Romain, J.L. (Universite du Quebec a Chicoutini, Chicoutini, PQ (Canada))

    1990-12-01

    A study was conducted on carbon electrodes which were impregnated with three different pitches. The focus of the study was to investigate the pyrolysis of pitch impregnated electrodes. For the purposes of the research an experimental technique and calculation procedure were developed. A kinetic model was used to interpret the data, comparison of model predictions and experimental data showed good agreement. 17 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Possible preparation of wood-plastic composites based on unsaturated polyester resins and styrene by radiation and chemical methods in combination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pesek, M.; Pultar, F.; Jarkovsky, J.; Andr, J.

    1983-01-01

    Using the radiation chemical method it is possible to prepare wood-plastic composites using doses of 1 to 2.5 kGy. The impregnation mixture in the wood gelatinates and subsequent curing using chemical initiators takes place without outflow of the mixture from the wood and without formation of incrustations. The basic components of the impregnation mixtures used were unsaturated polyester resins; styrene or methyl methacrylate was used as the thinner. The proven initiator of polymerization was 2,2'-azobisisobutyronitrile. The technology is described of wood impregnation and radiation or chemical curing. The effects were monitored of viscosity, temperature, radiation dose and the concentrations of the individual components of the impregnation mixtures and initiators of polymerization on the process of the preparation of wood-plastic composites. (M.D.)

  20. Solvents and solvent effects in organic chemistry

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Reichardt, C; Welton, T

    2011-01-01

    .../guest complexation equilibria and reactions in biphasic solvent systems and neoteric solvents, respectively. More than 900 new references have been added, giving preference to review articles, and many older ones have been deleted. New references either replace older ones or are added to the end of the respective reference list of each chapter. Th...

  1. Chelating ion exchange with macroreticular hydroxamic acid resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, R.J.

    1980-01-01

    The synthesis, reactions, and analytical applications of hydroxamic acids, including chelating resins with this functional group, are reviewed. A procedure for attaching N-phenyl hydroxamic acid groups to Amberlite XAD-4 is described. The extraction of 20 metal ions from 2 M hydrochloric acid by this resin is discussed. Conditions for the quantitative extraction and back-extraction of 9 ions are reported. Results are compared with work on solvent extraction with N-phenylbenzohydroxamic acid. Procedures for attaching N-methyl and N-unsubstituted hydroxamic acid groups to Amberlite XAD-4 are described. The N-phenyl, N-methyl, and N-unsubstituted hydroxamic acid resins are compared with respect to metal-ion complexation. The scope of applications for hydroxamic acid resins is investigated by studying the extraction of 19 metal ions as a function of pH. The resins are especially suitable for the extraction of zirconium(IV), titanium(IV), and uranium(IV) from strongly acidic solution. Aluminum(III) is separated from calcium and phosphate by extraction at pH 4. The use of the resins for the purification of reagents, concentration of trace constituents, and chromatographic separation is demonstrated

  2. Physicochemical and bioactive properties of innovative resin-based materials containing functional halloysite-nanotubes fillers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degrazia, Felipe Weidenbach; Leitune, Vicente Castelo Branco; Takimi, Antonio Shigueaki; Collares, Fabrício Mezzomo; Sauro, Salvatore

    2016-09-01

    This study aimed to assess the degree of conversion, microhardness, solvent degradation, contact angle, surface free energy and bioactivity (e.g., mineral precipitation) of experimental resin-based materials containing, pure or triclosan-encapsulated, aluminosilicate-(halloysite) nanotubes. An experimental resin blend was prepared using bis-GMA/TEGDMA, 75/25wt% (control). Halloysite nanotubes (HNT) doped with or without triclosan (TCN) were first analyzed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). HNT or HNT/TCN fillers were incorporated into the resin blend at different concentrations (5, 10, and 20wt%). Seven experimental resins were created and the degree of conversion, microhardness, solvent degradation and contact angle were assessed. Bioactive mineral precipitation induced by the experimental resins was evaluated through Raman spectroscopy and SEM-EDX. TEM showed a clear presence of TCN particles inside the tubular lumen and along the outer surfaces of the halloysite nanotubes. The degree of conversion, surface free energy, microhardness, and mineral deposition of polymers increased with higher amount of HNTs. Conversely, the higher the amount (20wt%) of TCN-loaded HNTs the lower the microhardness of the experimental resins. The incorporation of pure or TCN-loaded aluminosilicate-(halloysite) nanotubes into resin-based materials increase the bioactivity of such experimental restorative materials and promotes mineral deposition. Therefore, innovative resin-based materials containing functional halloysite-nanotube fillers may represent a valuable alternative for therapeutic minimally invasive treatments. Copyright © 2016 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Organic Solvent Tropical Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    COWLEY, W.L.

    2000-01-01

    This report provides the basis for closing the organic solvent safety issue. Sufficient information is presented to conclude that risk posed by an unmitigated organic solvent fire is within risk evaluation guidelines

  4. Canyon solvent cleaning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reif, D.J.

    1986-01-01

    The HM Process at the Savannah River Plant (SRP) uses 7.5% tributylphosphate in n-paraffin as an extraction solvent. During use, the solvent is altered due to hydrolysis and radiolysis, forming materials that influence product losses, produce decontamination, and separation efficiencies. Laboratory studies to improve online solvent cleaning have shown the carbonate washing, although removing residual solvent activity does not remove binding ligands that hold fission products in the solvent. Treatment of solvent by an alumina adsorption process removes binding ligands and significantly improves recycle solvent performance. Both laboratory work defining a full-scale alumina adsorption process and the use of the process to clean HM Process first cycle solvent are presented

  5. Solvent wash solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neace, J.C.

    1986-01-01

    This patent describes a process for removing diluent degradation products from a solvent extraction solution comprising an admixture of an organic extractant for uranium and plutonium and a non-polar organic liquid diluent, which has been used to recover uranium and plutonium from spent nuclear fuel. Comprising combining a wash solution consisting of: (a) water; and (b) a positive amount up to about, an including, 50 volume percent of at least one highly-polar water-miscible organic solvent, based on the total volume of the water and the highly-polar organic solvent, with the solvent extraction solution after uranium and plutonium values have been stripped from the solvent extraction solution, the diluent degradation products dissolving in the highly-polar organic solvent and the extractant and diluent of the extraction solution not dissolving in the highly-polar organic solvent, and separating the highly-polar organic solvent and the extraction solution to obtain a purified extraction solution

  6. Anhydrous polymer-based coating with sustainable controlled release functionality for facile, efficacious impregnation, and delivery of antimicrobial peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Kaiyang; Saravanan, Rathi; Chong, Kelvin K L; Goh, Sharon H M; Chua, Ray R Y; Tambyah, Paul A; Chang, Matthew W; Kline, Kimberly A; Leong, Susanna S J

    2018-04-17

    Anhydrous polymers are actively explored as alternative materials to overcome limitations of conventional hydrogel-based antibacterial coating. However, the requirement for strong organic solvent in polymerization reactions often necessitates extra protection steps for encapsulation of target biomolecules, lowering encapsulation efficiency, and increasing process complexity. This study reports a novel coating strategy that allows direct solvation and encapsulation of antimicrobial peptides (HHC36) into anhydrous polycaprolactone (PCL) polymer-based dual layer coating. A thin 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) film is layered onto the peptide-impregnated PCL as a diffusion barrier, to modulate and enhance release kinetics. The impregnated peptides are eventually released in a controlled fashion. The use of 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol (TFE), as polymerization and solvation medium, induces the impregnated peptides to adopt highly stable turned conformation, conserving peptide integrity, and functionality during both encapsulation and subsequent release processes. The dual layer coating showed sustained antibacterial functionality, lasting for 14 days. In vivo assessment using an experimental mouse wounding model demonstrated good biocompatibility and significant antimicrobial efficacy of the coating under physiological conditions. The coating was translated onto silicone urinary catheters and showed promising antibacterial efficacy, even outperforming commercial silver-based Dover cather. This anhydrous polymer-based platform holds immense potential as an effective antibacterial coating to prevent clinical device-associated infections. The simplicity of the coating process enhances its industrial viability. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Weather ability studies of phenolic resin coated woods and glass fiber reinforced laminates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munir, A.; Hussain, R.; Rizvi, M.H.; Ahmed, F.

    1997-01-01

    Phenolic resins have made a major breakthrough in the field of high technology in 80's. These are now active participants of h igh tech' areas ranging from electronics, computers, communication, outer space, aerospace, advanced materials, bio materials and technology. A phenol - formaldehyde (1:1.5) resin having resin content of 70% synthesized in the laboratory has been applied for wood coating and reinforcing glass fiber. The weatherability and solvent resistance of these items have been studied and results discussed keeping in view the envisaged application for structural materials and chemical equipment. The toxic materials released during contact with solvents for chemical applications and during degradation general have been monitored. The results are discussed with reference to environmental pollution due to these resins and their composites under different conditions. (authors)

  8. Preparation of supported heterogeneous catalysts by pulse impregnation: Application to Ru[sub 3](CO)[sub 12]/2,2[prime]-bipyridine/SiO[sub 2] catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haukka, M.; Pakkanen, T.A. (Univ. of Joensuu (Finland))

    1994-07-01

    In this paper, the authors introduce pulse impregnation, a method for preparing supported heterogeneous catalysts by successive impregnation cycles. Pulse impregnation is a method for preparing supported heterogeneous catalysts from the liquid phase. In the pulse-impregnation technique the catalyst surface is grown gradually in consecutive cycles, with each cycle consisting of separate deposition and activation steps. During the deposition step, the catalyst precursor or precursors are deposited onto the support from a suitable solvent. The actual chemically bonded catalyst phase is formed during the activation step (e.g., thermal activation). Pulse impregnation was tested in the separate deposition of 2,2[prime]-bipyridine and Ru[sub 3](CO)[sub 12] onto a silica support, and in the preparation of Ru[sub 3](CO)[sub 12]/2,2[prime]-bipyridine/SiO[sub 2] catalyst, in a column-type reactor system. Macroscopically uniform deposition was achieved with both 2,2[prime]-bipyridine and Ru[sub 3](CO)[sub 12]. Various solvent systems were used to control the amount of solute adsorbed during deposition. In the preparation of the Ru[sub 3](CO)[sub 12]/2,2[prime]-bipyridine/SiO[sub 2] catalyst, the ruthenium content increased nearly linearly with the number of preparation cycles. The effects of the preparation method on the catalyst activity was also tested in 1-hexane hydroformylation. 31 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  9. 21 CFR 177.1440 - 4,4′-Isopropylidenediphenol-epichlorohydrin resins minimum molecular weight 10,000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... ADDITIVES: POLYMERS Substances for Use as Basic Components of Single and Repeated Use Food Contact Surfaces... or components of articles intended for use in producing, manufacturing, packing, processing... solvent in finished resin. Ethyl alcohol Toluene Not to exceed 1,000 p.p.m. as residual solvent in...

  10. PROTECTIVE TREATMENT OF WOOD IMPREGNATING COMPOSITION OF PETROCHEMICAL WASTE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. V. Maslakova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of experimental and theoretical studies aimed at expanding the applications of the copolymers on the basis of the waste styrene production. One of the areas is used as impregnating compositions of wood materials, selection of optimal conditions modification on samples of the most widely used in the industry of wood, such as birch, aspen and other. Studies were conducted to obtain and use an impregnating compositions based on copolymers synthesized from waste products of styrene and the cubic remainder rectification of ethylbenzene (CRRE for the protective treatment of birch wood. Identified physic-chemical characteristics of physical mixtures of copolymers «CORS», «STAM», CRRE at different ratios. Studied the process of modification birch using the method of experiment planning greco-latin square of the fourth order, and the influence of such factors as the temperature of the impregnating composition, the duration of the impregnation, the temperature and duration of thermal treatment on the performance moisture resistance of wood. Were established optimal conditions modification birch wood treated impregnating compositions on the basis of physical mixtures of copolymer «CORS» with CRRE and copolymer «STAM» with CRRE is the mixing ratio 2:1, the duration and temperature of the impregnation 7 h and 95 0C, time and temperature of heat treatment 7 h and 170 0C, respectively. A sealing composition containing CRRE with copolymer «STAM» 1:2 is more preferable, as in the structure of the copolymer «STAM» contains carboxyl and anhydrite group. Thus was justified use for the modification of natural wood impregnating compositions on the basis of physical mixtures of CRRE with copolymers «CORS» and «STAM», which improve the properties of wood, increase moisture and weather resistance more than twice.

  11. Optimal Composite Material for Low Cost Fabrication of Large Composite Aerospace Structures using NASA Resins or POSS Nanoparticle Modifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamontia, Mark A.; Gruber, Mark B.; Jensen, Brian J.

    2006-01-01

    Thermoplastic laminates in situ consolidated via tape or tow placement require full mechanical properties. Realizing full properties requires resin crystallinity to be controlled - partial crystallinity leads to unacceptably low laminate compression properties. There are two approaches: utilize an amorphous matrix resin; or place material made from a semi-crystalline resin featuring kinetics faster than the process. In this paper, a matrix resin evaluation and trade study was completed with commercial and NASA amorphous polyimides on the one hand, and with PEKK mixed with POSS nanoparticles for accelerated crystallinity growth on the other. A new thermoplastic impregnated material, 6 mm wide (0.25-in) AS-4 carbon/LaRC(TradeMark)8515 dry polyimide tow, was fabricated. Since LaRC(TradeMark)8515 is fully amorphous, it attains full properties following in situ consolidation, with no post processing required to build crystallinity. The tow in situ processing was demonstrated via in situ thermoplastic filament winding it into rings.

  12. Contact allergic dermatitis from melamine formaldehyde resins in a patient with a negative patch-test reaction to formaldehyde.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Gavin, Juan; Loureiro Martinez, Manuel; Fernandez-Redondo, Virginia; Seoane, Maria-José; Toribio, Jaime

    2008-01-01

    Melamine paper is a basic material used in the furniture industry for home and office interiors. Contact allergic dermatitis from melamine formaldehyde resins (MFRs) should be considered in patients who work on melamine paper impregnation lines. We report a case of a 28-year-old female plywood worker who developed eczema on the dorsal side of her hands and wrists after 2 years of working on the melamine paper impregnation line. She had a relevant positive patch-test reaction to MFR, with a negative reaction to formaldehyde. Contact dermatitis due to MFR is not common, and it is usually related to products that are not fully cured or to close contact with intermediate products on the assembly line. Formaldehyde release from MFR can explain most of the positive responses. To our knowledge, this is the first report of MFR contact allergic dermatitis in a worker on a melamine paper impregnation line.

  13. Radiation curable epoxy resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Najvar, D.J.

    1978-01-01

    A carboxyl containing polymer is either prepared in the presence of a polyepoxide or reacted with a polyepoxide. The polymer has sufficient acid groups to react with only about 1 to 10 percent of the epoxide (oxirane) groups. The remaining epoxide groups are reacted with an unsaturated monocarboxylic acid such as acrylic or methacrylic acid to form a radiation curable resin

  14. Occupational contact dermatitis caused by aniline epoxy resins in the aircraft industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesonen, Maria; Suuronen, Katri; Jolanki, Riitta; Aalto-Korte, Kristiina; Kuuliala, Outi; Henriks-Eckerman, Maj-Len; Valtanen, Ilona; Alanko, Kristiina

    2015-08-01

    Tetraglycidyl-4,4'-methylenedianiline (TGMDA) is an aniline epoxy resin used in, for example, resin systems of pre-impregnated composite materials (prepregs) of the aircraft industry. Allergic contact dermatitis caused by TGMDA in prepregs has been described previously. To report on 9 patients with occupational allergic contact dermatitis caused by TGMDA in epoxy glues used in helicopter assembly. The patients were examined with patch testing at the Finnish Institute of Occupational Health in 2004-2009. The first patient was diagnosed by testing both components of two epoxy glues from the workplace, and was also tested with glue ingredients, including TGMDA. The following patients were tested with the glues and TGMDA. The resin parts of the glues were analysed for their epoxy compounds, including TGMDA. All of the patients had a patch test reaction to one or both of the resin parts of the TGMDA-containing glues. Eight of them had a strong allergic reaction to TGMDA, and one had a doubtful reaction to TGMDA. Two of the patients also had an allergic reaction to triglycidyl-p-aminophenol (TGPAP), another aniline epoxy resin, which was not present in the TGMDA-containing glues. In aircraft industry workers with suspected occupational dermatitis, aniline epoxy resins should be considered and patch tested as possible contact allergens. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Improvement in char formability of phenolic resin for development of Carbon/Carbon composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hajhosseini, M.; Payami, A.; Ghaffarian, S. R.; Rezadoust, A. M.

    2008-01-01

    In the processing of carbon/carbon composites using polymer resin as the matrix precursor, it is inevitable that a porous structure was formed after carbonization. As a result, densification by liquid phase impregnation followed by recarbonization is required to obtain a densified composite. Consequently, the char formability of resin is an important factor in reducing the number of densification cycles and hence the processing cost. In this study, a novel approach is adopted to improve the densification of carbon/carbon composites by using a new phenolic resin modified by pitch. For this purpose, soluble part of pitch was extracted and dispersed in resol type phenolic resin. The polymerization reaction was performed in presence of para-formaldehyde and a resol-pitch compound was obtained. The second compound was prepared by mixing novolac-furfural in 55:45 weight ratio containing 9% by weight hexamethylene tetramine. This compound was added to resol-pitch compound in 10,20,50 and 80 w %. The microstructure of carbonized resin was investigated by X-ray diffraction and char yield, and the linear and volumetric shrinkage were obtained. Results show that in 80:20 ratio of resol-pitch to novolac-furfural , the char yield would be maximized by 71% and volumetric shrinkage would be minimized at 16.4%. At the same time, XRD results indicate that the resin has a strong ability to graphitize carbon/carbon composites matrix as a necessary step for its processing

  16. Impregnated Fibrous Materials. Report of a Study Group on Impregnated Fibrous Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1968-10-15

    There has recently been renewed interest in the use of radiation from radioisotopes or particle accelerators to initiate and sustain chemical reactions. Particular attention is being paid to the production of wood-plastic composites, a process which is now a commercial reality with radiation competing against chemical methods to enhance the properties of wood. It has been reported that water repellancy, hardness, weathering, insect and chemical resistance, compressive, bending and shear strength can be significantly improved by the process, but so far there has been a limited commercial outlet for the product. Papers on this subject were presented at the International Atomic Energy Agency's Symposium on Industrial Uses of Large Radiation Sources, Salzburg, May 1963, and since then the Agency has been aware of the interest of developing countries in conducting research on wood and other fibrous materials as a means of further exploiting natural resources. It was felt that some attempt should be made to co-ordinate, on a regional basis, the work being done in this field and at the same time review the world status, including the associated technology in such areas as monomer-polymer chemistry and impregnation techniques where they are directly related to this work. Because of the wide range of fibrous materials being studied there, Asia and the Far East was chosen as the most representative area and 39 participants from 13 countries, and from international organizations, met in Bangkok from 20 to 24 November 1967 to assess the potential of impregnated fibrous materials. This report is a record of the meeting and is based not only on work performed both inside and outside the region but also on details of the resources and industries in the area.

  17. Starch-modified magnetite nanoparticles for impregnation into cartilage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soshnikova, Yulia M., E-mail: yuliasoshnikova@gmail.com [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute on Laser and Information Technologies (Russian Federation); Roman, Svetlana G.; Chebotareva, Natalia A. [A.N. Bach Institute of Biochemistry (Russian Federation); Baum, Olga I. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute on Laser and Information Technologies (Russian Federation); Obrezkova, Mariya V. [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Department of Chemistry (Russian Federation); Gillis, Richard B.; Harding, Stephen E. [University of Nottingham, National Centre for Macromolecular Hydrodynamics (United Kingdom); Sobol, Emil N. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute on Laser and Information Technologies (Russian Federation); Lunin, Valeriy V. [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Department of Chemistry (Russian Federation)

    2013-11-15

    The paper presents preparation and characterization of starch-modified Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles (NPs) in aqueous dispersion after impregnation into healthy and damaged types of cartilage. We show that starch-modified dispersion has a narrower size distribution than a non‐stabilized one. The average hydrodynamic radius of magnetite NPs in a dispersion used for impregnation into cartilage is (48 ± 1) nm with the width of the distribution from 5 to 200 nm. We investigate stability of aqueous magnetite NPs dispersions during storage and with increase in temperature (up to 70 °C). We find that polydisperse magnetite NPs can penetrate into cartilage and the size and concentration of impregnated particles depend on the organization of the tissue structure. The results confirm the possibility of application of magnetite NPs in diagnostics and laser treatment of degenerative cartilage deceases.

  18. Supercritical CO2 impregnation of polyethylene components for medical purposes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gamse Thomas

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Modem hip and knee endoprosthesis are produced in titanium and to reduce the friction at the contact area polymer parts, mainly ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMW-PE, are installed. The polyethylene is impregnated with a-tocopherol (vitamin E before processing for remarkable decrease of oxidative degradation. Cross linked UHMW-PE offers much higher stability, but a-tocopherol cannot be added before processing, because a-tocopherol hinders the cross linking process accompanied by a heavy degradation of the vitamin. The impregnation of UHMW-PE with a-tocopherol has to be performed after the cross linking process and an accurate concentration has to be achieved over the cross section of the whole material. In the first tests UHMW-PE-cubes were stored in pure a-tocopherol under inert atmosphere at temperatures from 100 to 150 °C resulting in a high mass fraction of a-tocopherol in the edge zones and no constant concentration over the cross section. For better distribution and for regulating the mass fraction of a-tocopherol in the cross linked UHMW-PE material supercritical CO2 impregnation tests were investigated. Again UHMW-PE-cubes were impregnated in an autoclave with a-tocopherol dissolved in supercritical CO2 at different pressures and temperatures with variable impregnation times and vitamin E concentrations. Based on the excellent results of supercritical CO2 impregnation standard hip and knee cups were stabilized nearly homogeneously with varying mass fraction of a-tocopherol.

  19. Embedding in thermosetting resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buzonniere, A. de

    1985-01-01

    Medium activity waste coming either from nuclear power plants in operation such as evaporator concentrates, spent resins, filter cartridges or the dismantling of installations are embedded in order to obtain a product suitable for long term disposal. Embedding in thermosetting resins (polyester or epoxy) is one among currently used techniques; it is being developed by the CEA (Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique) and Technicatome (subsidiary of CEA and EDF). The process is easy to operate and yields excellent results particularly as far as volume reduction and radioelement containment (cesium particularly) are concerned. The process has already been in operation in four stationary plants for several years. Extension of the process to mobile units has been completed by Technicatome in collaboration with the CEA [fr

  20. Paramagnetic epoxy resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. C. Vazquez Barreiro

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This work illustrates that macrocycles can be used as crosslinking agents for curing epoxy resins, provided that they have appropriate organic functionalities. As macrocycles can complex metal ions in their structure, this curing reaction allows for the introduction of that metal ion into the resin network. As a result, some characteristic physical properties of the metallomacrocycle could be transferred to the new material. The bisphenol A diglycidyl ether (BADGE, n = 0 and hemin (a protoporphyrin IX containing the Fe(III ion, and an additional chloride ligand have been chosen. The new material has been characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR, Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM, and magnetic susceptibility measurements. Fe(III remains in the high-spin state during the curing process and, consequently, the final material exhibits the magnetic characteristics of hemin. The loss of the chlorine atom ligand during the cure of the resin allows that Fe(III can act as Lewis acid, catalyzing the crosslinking reactions. At high BADGE n = 0/hemin ratios, the formation of ether and ester bonds occurs simultaneously during the process.

  1. Influence of Solvent-Solvent and Solute-Solvent Interaction Properties on Solvent-Mediated Potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Shiqi

    2005-01-01

    A recently proposed universal calculational recipe for solvent-mediated potential is applied to calculate excess potential of mean force between two large Lennard-Jones (LJ) or hard core attractive Yukawa particles immersed in small LJ solvent bath at supercritical state. Comparison between the present prediction with a hypernetted chain approximation adopted for solute-solute correlation at infinitely dilute limit and existing simulation data shows high accuracy for the region with large separation, and qualitative reliability for the solute particle contact region. The calculational simplicity of the present recipe allows for a detailed investigation on the effect of the solute-solvent and solvent-solvent interaction details on the excess potential of mean force. The resultant conclusion is that gathering of solvent particles near a solute particle leads to repulsive excess PMF, while depletion of solvent particles away from the solute particle leads to attractive excess PMF, and minor change of the solvent-solvent interaction range has large influence on the excess PMF.

  2. 杉木地板基材表面的浸渍抗菌%Antibacterial Treatment on Surface of China Fir Floor Substrate with MF Impregnation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔举庆; 张洋; 贾翀; 韩书广; 张岩; 曹轩

    2013-01-01

    研究了杉木地板基材表面经过三聚氰胺抗菌树脂浸渍处理后抗菌性能.结果表明:未经处理杉木基材不具备抗菌性能,经过三聚氰胺浸渍处理后具备一定的抗菌性能,可能因为甲醛释放或三聚氰胺自身对细菌起到抑制作用;添加载银抗菌剂后,杉木表面的抗菌性能不断增强,当三聚氰胺中抗菌剂质量分数达1%时,抗菌率达99.9%,符合抗菌产品的要求,但抗菌剂的加入对浸渍树脂的渗透性有一定的延迟作用.%China fir floor substrate impregnated with antibacterial MF resin was investigated. The results demonstrated that China fir has no antibacterial performance, while the one impregnated with pristine MF resin could kill some bacterium on its surface because of the formaldehyde emission or MF resin. The antibacterial performance can be continually improved with the increase of antibacterial agent. It will meet the requirements of antibacterial products, when the antibacterial rate is 99.9% with 1% of silver antimicrobial agent. However, the permeability of MF resin will be retarded in the presence of antimicrobial agent.

  3. Recovery of uranium from 30 vol % tributyl phosphate solvents containing dibutyl phosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mailen, J.C.; Tallent, O.K.

    1986-01-01

    A number of solid sorbents were tested for the removal of uranium and dibutyl phosphate (DBP) from 30% tributyl phosphate (TBP) solvent. The desired clean uranium product can be obtained either by removing the DBP, leaving the uranium in the solvent for subsequent stripping, or by removing the uranium, leaving the DBP in the solvent for subsequent treatment. The tests performed show that it is relatively easy to preferentially remove uranium from solvents containing uranium and DBP, but quite difficult to remove DBP preferentially. The current methods could be used by removing the uranium (as by a cation exchange resin) and then using either an anion exchange resin in the hydroxyl form or a conventional treatment with a basic solution to remove the DBP. Treatment of a solvent with a cation exchange resin could be useful for recovery of valuable metals from solvents containing DBP and might be used to remove cations before scrubbing a solvent with a basic solution to minimize emulsion formation. 6 refs., 9 figs

  4. The addition of nanostructured hydroxyapatite to an experimental adhesive resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitune, Vicente Castelo Branco; Collares, Fabrício Mezzomo; Trommer, Rafael Mello; Andrioli, Daniela Guerra; Bergmann, Carlos Pérez; Samuel, Susana Maria Werner

    2013-04-01

    Was produced nanostructured hydroxyapatite (HAnano) and evaluated the influence of its incorporation in an adhesive resin. HAnano was produced by a flame-based process and was characterized by scanning electron microscopy. The surface area, particle size, micro-Raman and cytotoxicity were evaluated. The organic phase was formulated by mixing 50 wt.% Bis-GMA, 25 wt.% TEGDMA, and 25 wt.% HEMA. HAnano was added at seven different concentrations: 0; 0.5; 1; 2; 5; 10 and 20 wt.%. Adhesive resins with hydroxyapatite incorporation were evaluated for their radiopacity, degree of conversion, flexural strength, softening in solvent and microshear bond strength. The data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc test (α=0.05), except for softening in solvent (paired t-test) and cytotoxicity (two-way ANOVA and Bonferroni). HAnano presented 15.096 m(2)/g of specific surface area and a mean size of 26.7 nm. The radiopacity values were not different from those of 1-mm aluminium. The degree of conversion ranged from 52.2 to 63.8%. The incorporation of HAnano did not influence the flexural strength, which ranged from 123.3 to 143.4MPa. The percentage of reduction of the microhardness after immersion in the solvent became lower as the HAnano concentration increased. The addition of 2% nanostructured hydroxyapatite resulted in a higher value of microshear bond strength than the control group (phydroxyapatite into an adhesive resin presented the best results. The incorporation of nanostructured hydroxyapatite increases the adhesive properties and may be a promising filler for adhesive resin. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Properties of carbonisation products obtained from impregnated coal

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Plevová, Eva; Šugárková, Věra; Kaloč, M.; Vaculíková, Lenka

    -, - (2008), s. 52-61. ISBN 978-80-248-1939-6 Grant - others:GA CŘ(CZ) GA105/00/1698 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30860518 Keywords : chlorides * impregnation * coal Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry

  6. Arsenic removal using silver-impregnated Prosopis spicigera L ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Arsenic removal using silver-impregnated Prosopis spicigera L. wood (PSLW) activated carbon: batch and column studies. ... Arsenic uptake has no regular trend with increasing pH; contains two adsorption maxima, the first adsorption maximum at pH 4.0 and a second adsorption maximum at pH 10.0. The extent of As (III) ...

  7. Impregnation of LSM Based Cathodes for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højberg, Jonathan; Søgaard, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Composites cathodes consisting of strontium doped lanthanum manganite (LSM) and yttria stabilized zirconia have been impregnated with the nitrates corresponding to the nominal compositions: La0.75Sr0.25Mn1.05O3 +/-delta (LSM25), Ce0.8Sm0.2O2 (SDC) and a combination of both (dual). The latter...

  8. Leaching of Silver from Silver-Impregnated Food Storage Containers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauri, James F.; Niece, Brian K.

    2011-01-01

    The use of silver in commercial products has proliferated in recent years owing to its antibacterial properties. Food containers impregnated with micro-sized silver promise long food life, but there is some concern because silver can leach out of the plastic and into the stored food. This laboratory experiment gives students the opportunity to…

  9. Fabrication of HTR fuel elements by a gaseous impregnation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blin, J.C.; Berthier, J.; Devillard, J.

    1976-01-01

    The results obtained with the gaseous impregnation process are described. The successive steps of the fabrication in their present state of realization are given together with the results obtained after irradiation. A comparison between this process and a classical method is presented

  10. Determination of atmospheric nitrogen dioxide by sampling with impregnated filters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galiano, J.A.; Palomares, F.

    1978-01-01

    The performance of filters impregnated with triethanolamine for the collection and subsequent determination of atmospheric nitrogen dioxide is studied taking into account the influence of several parameters: storage of filters, reagents, elapsed time, sampling efficiency, etc. The results obtained for sampling times of 24 hours are satisfactory. (author) [es

  11. Forecasting the condition of petroleum impregnated load bearing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Petroleum products (PP) used in industrial processes systematically fall on the load-bearing CRC structures and gradually impregnate therein. Currently, available guidelines for the assessment of technical condition and reliability of load-bearing CRC structures do not fully take into account the effect of viscosity of PP that ...

  12. X-ray initiated polymerization of wood impregnants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cleland, Marshall R.; Galloway, Richard A. [IBA Industrial, Inc., Edgewood, NY (United States); Berejka, Anthony J. [Ionicorp, Huntington, NY 11743 (United States)], E-mail: berejka@msn.com; Montoney, Daniel [Strathmore Products, Syracuse, NY (United States); Driscoll, Mark; Smith, Leonard; Scott Larsen, L. [State University of New York, SUNY-ESF, Syracuse, NY (United States)

    2009-07-15

    X-rays, derived from a high energy, high-current electron beam (EB), initiated in-situ polymerization of a unique class of monomers that were found to penetrate the cell walls of wood. X-rays initiated an auto-catalytic acrylic polymerization and penetrated through thick pieces of wood. The final cured product having the polymerizate, a polymer, both in the wood cell lumens and in the cell walls is called wood impregnated with a wood-polymer penetrant (WPP). The controlled lower dose rate of X-rays overcame disproportionation encountered when using higher dose-rate electron beam initiation. With X-rays, the in-situ polymerization took place in one exposure of modest dose. With EB, multiple passes were needed to avoid excessive heat build-up and monomer volatilization. Having entered the cell walls of the wood and then being polymerized within the cell walls, these radiation-cured unique monomers imparted outstanding dimensional stability upon exposure of the impregnated wood to humidity cycling. The preferred monomer system was also chemically modified prior to impregnation with agents that would remain in the wood and prevent the growth of fungi and other microbials. This technique differs from historic uses of monomers that merely filled the lumens of the wood (historic wood-polymer composites), which are only suitable for indoor use. The WPP impregnated wood that was either X-ray cured or EB cured demonstrated enhanced structural properties, dimensional stability, and decay resistance.

  13. X-ray initiated polymerization of wood impregnants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleland, Marshall R.; Galloway, Richard A.; Berejka, Anthony J.; Montoney, Daniel; Driscoll, Mark; Smith, Leonard; Scott Larsen, L.

    2009-01-01

    X-rays, derived from a high energy, high-current electron beam (EB), initiated in-situ polymerization of a unique class of monomers that were found to penetrate the cell walls of wood. X-rays initiated an auto-catalytic acrylic polymerization and penetrated through thick pieces of wood. The final cured product having the polymerizate, a polymer, both in the wood cell lumens and in the cell walls is called wood impregnated with a wood-polymer penetrant (WPP). The controlled lower dose rate of X-rays overcame disproportionation encountered when using higher dose-rate electron beam initiation. With X-rays, the in-situ polymerization took place in one exposure of modest dose. With EB, multiple passes were needed to avoid excessive heat build-up and monomer volatilization. Having entered the cell walls of the wood and then being polymerized within the cell walls, these radiation-cured unique monomers imparted outstanding dimensional stability upon exposure of the impregnated wood to humidity cycling. The preferred monomer system was also chemically modified prior to impregnation with agents that would remain in the wood and prevent the growth of fungi and other microbials. This technique differs from historic uses of monomers that merely filled the lumens of the wood (historic wood-polymer composites), which are only suitable for indoor use. The WPP impregnated wood that was either X-ray cured or EB cured demonstrated enhanced structural properties, dimensional stability, and decay resistance.

  14. Monomer-Polymer Chemistry and the Impregnation Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stannett, V. [North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC (United States)

    1968-10-15

    A brief outline of early polymerization techniques is followed by a description of polymerization process chemistry, impregnation and polymerization methods and criteria for the choice of monomer. General considerations, including the effects of polymerization inhibitors, swelling agents, radiation dose rate and sample thickness, are enumerated. (author)

  15. The edible cocktail: the effect of sugar and alcohol impregnation on the crunchiness of fruit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholten, E.; Peters, M.M.J.P.

    2012-01-01

    Vacuum impregnation is seen as a valuable technique for flavor pairing in the catering industry. One of the applications of this technique is the creation of edible cocktails by impregnating of fruits with liquors, leading to an interplay of different flavors. However, the effect of the impregnation

  16. Hazardous solvent substitution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twitchell, K.E.

    1995-01-01

    This article is an overview of efforts at INEL to reduce the generation of hazardous wastes through the elimination of hazardous solvents. To aid in their efforts, a number of databases have been developed and will become a part of an Integrated Solvent Substitution Data System. This latter data system will be accessible through Internet

  17. Contact allergy to epoxy resin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bangsgaard, Nannie; Thyssen, Jacob Pontoppidan; Menné, Torkil

    2012-01-01

    Background. Epoxy resin monomers are strong skin sensitizers that are widely used in industrial sectors. In Denmark, the law stipulates that workers must undergo a course on safe handling of epoxy resins prior to occupational exposure, but the effectiveness of this initiative is largely unknown...... in an educational programme. Conclusion. The 1% prevalence of epoxy resin contact allergy is equivalent to reports from other countries. The high occurrence of epoxy resin exposure at work, and the limited use of protective measures, indicate that reinforcement of the law is required....

  18. Simultaneous separation and detection of actinides in acidic solutions using an extractive scintillating resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roane, J E; DeVol, T A

    2002-11-01

    An extractive scintillating resin was evaluated for the simultaneous separation and detection of actinides in acidic solutions. The transuranic extractive scintillating (TRU-ES) resin is composed of an inert macroporous polystyrene core impregnated with organic fluors (diphenyloxazole and 1,4-bis-(4-methyl-5-phenyl-2-oxazolyl)benzene) and an extractant (octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide in tributyl phosphate). The TRU-ES resin was packed into FEP Teflon tubing to produce a flow cell (0.2-mL free column volume), which is placed into a scintillation detection system to obtain pulse height spectra and time series data during loading and elution of actinides onto/from the resin. The alpha-particle absolute detection efficiencies ranged from 77% to 96.5%, depending on the alpha energy and quench. In addition to the on-line analyses, off-line analyses of the effluent can be conducted using conventional detection methods. The TRU-ES resin was applied to the quantification of a mixed radionuclide solution and two actual waste samples. The on-line characterization of the mixed radionuclide solution was within 10% of the reported activities whereas the agreement with the waste samples was not as good due to sorption onto the sample container walls and the oxidation state of plutonium. Agreement between the on-line and off-line analyses was within 35% of one another for both waste samples.

  19. Automation of static and dynamic non-dispersive liquid phase microextraction. Part 2: Approaches based on impregnated membranes and porous supports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexovič, Michal; Horstkotte, Burkhard; Solich, Petr; Sabo, Ján

    2016-02-11

    A critical overview on automation of modern liquid phase microextraction (LPME) approaches based on the liquid impregnation of porous sorbents and membranes is presented. It is the continuation of part 1, in which non-dispersive LPME techniques based on the use of the extraction phase (EP) in the form of drop, plug, film, or microflow have been surveyed. Compared to the approaches described in part 1, porous materials provide an improved support for the EP. Simultaneously they allow to enlarge its contact surface and to reduce the risk of loss by incident flow or by components of surrounding matrix. Solvent-impregnated membranes or hollow fibres are further ideally suited for analyte extraction with simultaneous or subsequent back-extraction. Their use can therefore improve the procedure robustness and reproducibility as well as it "opens the door" to the new operation modes and fields of application. However, additional work and time are required for membrane replacement and renewed impregnation. Automation of porous support-based and membrane-based approaches plays an important role in the achievement of better reliability, rapidness, and reproducibility compared to manual assays. Automated renewal of the extraction solvent and coupling of sample pretreatment with the detection instrumentation can be named as examples. The different LPME methodologies using impregnated membranes and porous supports for the extraction phase and the different strategies of their automation, and their analytical applications are comprehensively described and discussed in this part. Finally, an outlook on future demands and perspectives of LPME techniques from both parts as a promising area in the field of sample pretreatment is given. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Catalyst of a metal heteropoly acid salt that is insoluble in a polar solvent on a non-metallic porous support and method of making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong [Richland, WA; Peden, Charles H. F. [West Richland, WA; Choi, Saemin [Richland, WA

    2002-10-29

    The present invention includes a catalyst having (a) a non-metallic support having a plurality of pores; (b) a metal heteropoly acid salt that is insoluble in a polar solvent on the non-metallic support; wherein at least a portion of the metal heteropoly acid salt is dispersed within said plurality of pores. The present invention also includes a method of depositing a metal heteropoly acid salt that is insoluble in a polar solvent onto a non-metallic support having a plurality of pores. The method has the steps of: (a) obtaining a first solution containing a first precursor of a metal salt cation; (b) obtaining a second solution containing a second precursor of a heteropoly acid anion in a solvent having a limited dissolution potential for said first precursor; (c) impregnating the non-metallic support with the first precursor forming a first precursor deposit within the plurality of pores, forming a first precursor impregnated support; (d) heating said first precursor impregnated support forming a bonded first precursor impregnated support; (e) impregnating the second precursor that reacts with the precursor deposit and forms the metal heteropoly acid salt.

  1. Resin regenerating device in condensate desalting system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Yoshiaki; Igarashi, Hiroo; Oosumi, Katsumi; Nishimura, Yusaku; Ebara, Katsuya; Shindo, Norikazu.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the accuracy in the separation of anionic and cationic exchange resins. Constitution: Resins transferred from a condensate desalting column are charged in a cationic exchange resin column. The temperature of water for separating and transferring the resins is measured by a temperature detector disposed in a purified water injection line, and water is adjusted to a suitable flow rate for the separation and transfer of the resins by an automatic flow rate control valve, and then is injected. The resins are separated into cationic exchange resins and anionic exchange resins, in which only the anionic exchange resins are transferred, through an anionic exchange transfer line, into an anionic exchange resin column. By controlling the flow rate depending on the temperature of the injected water, the developing rate of the resin layer is made constant to enable separation and transfer of the resins at high accuracy. (Seki, T.)

  2. Grimsel test site. Investigation phase VI. Pore space geometry project. Characterisation of pore space geometry by 14C-MMA impregnation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelokaski, M.; Siitari-Kauppi, M.; Kauppi, I.; Hellmuth, K.-H.; Moeri, A.; Inderbitzin, L.; Biggin, C.; Kickmaier, W.; Martin, A.

    2010-04-01

    In Finland high-level radioactive waste is planned to be disposed of in a deep geological repository within a crystalline host rock. The potential role of the geosphere as a safety barrier in repository performance assessment is well established. However, uncertainties in both transport pathway definition and pore space characterisation of crystalline rock still exist and the repository safety evaluation today requires going from laboratory and surface-based field work to the underground repository level. Little is known about the changes to rock transport properties during sampling and decompression. Recent investigations using resin impregnation of the rock matrix at the Grimsel Test Site imply that non-conservative errors in calculated transport properties derived from laboratory data may reach factors of two to three. Due to the potentially great significance of pore space characterisation to safety analysis calculations, it was decided to study the rock matrix characteristics in situ using methylmethacrylate (MMA) resin labelled with 14 C. During the last decade, the poly-methylmethacrylate (PMMA) method has been developed for characterising the porosity of low permeable granitic rocks in the laboratory. Impregnation with 14 C-labelled methylmethacrylate ( 14 C-MMA) and autoradiography allows investigation of the spatial distribution of accessible porosity at the centimetre scale. Quantitative measurements of total or mineral-specific local porosities have been obtained using image analysis tools. Electron microscopy examinations and mercury porosimetry measurements have provided detailed information on pore and fissure apertures. The objective of this work was to develop an in situ application of the PMMA impregnation technique. The changes in rock porosity due to stress relaxation when overcoring the samples from the bedrock for the laboratory studies were examined. The concept behind the work was to inject 14 C-MMA from a central borehole at a depth of

  3. Forming of complex-shaped composite tubes using optimized bladder-assisted resin transfer molding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schillfahrt, Christian; Fauster, Ewald; Schledjewski, Ralf

    2018-05-01

    This work addresses the manufacturing of tubular composite structures by means of bladder-assisted resin transfer molding using elastomeric bladders. In order to achieve successful processing of such parts, knowledge of the compaction and impregnation behavior of the textile preform is vital. Hence, efficient analytical models that describe the influencing parameters of the preform compaction and filling stage were developed and verified through practical experiments. A process window describing optimal and critical operating conditions during the injection stage was created by evaluating the impact of the relevant process pressures on filling time. Finally, a cascaded injection procedure was investigated that particularly facilitates the manufacturing of long composite tubes.

  4. Properties of the Carboxylate ion exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allard, Bert; Dario, Maarten; Boren, Hans; Torstenfelt, Boerje; Puigdomenech, Ignasi; Johansson, Claes

    2002-09-01

    Weakly acidic, carboxylic resin has been selected, together with strong base anion resins, for water purification at the Forsmark 1 and 2 reactors. For the strong (but not the weak) ion exchange resin the Nuclear Power Inspectorate has given permission to dispose the spent resins in the SFR 1 (the Final Repository for Radioactive Operational Waste). This report gives a review of the carboxylic resins and comes to the conclusion that the resins are very stable and that there should not exist any risks for increased leaching of radionuclides from SFR 1 if these resins are disposed (compared to the strong resins)

  5. [Acrylic resin removable partial dentures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baat, C. de; Witter, D.J.; Creugers, N.H.J.

    2011-01-01

    An acrylic resin removable partial denture is distinguished from other types of removable partial dentures by an all-acrylic resin base which is, in principle, solely supported by the edentulous regions of the tooth arch and in the maxilla also by the hard palate. When compared to the other types of

  6. Chemoviscosity modeling for thermosetting resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, S. N.; Hou, T. H.; Bai, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    A chemoviscosity model, which describes viscosity rise profiles accurately under various cure cycles, and correlates viscosity data to the changes of physical properties associated with structural transformations of the thermosetting resin system during cure, was established. Work completed on chemoviscosity modeling for thermosetting resins is reported.

  7. Cure shrinkage in casting resins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, J. Brock [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-02-01

    A method is described whereby the shrinkage of a casting resin can be determined. Values for the shrinkage of several resin systems in frequent use by Sandia have been measured. A discussion of possible methods for determining the stresses generated by cure shrinkage and thermal contraction is also included.

  8. Evaluation of optimal silver amount for the removal of methyl iodide on silver-impregnated adsorbents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, G.I.; Cho, I.H.; Kim, J.H.; Oh, W.Z.

    2001-01-01

    The adsorption characteristics of methyl iodide generated from the simulated off-gas stream on various adsorbents such as silver-impregnated zeolite (AgX), zeocarbon and activated carbon were investigated. An extensive evaluation was made on the optimal silver impregnation amount for the removal of methyl iodide at temperatures up to 300 deg. C. The degree of adsorption efficiency of methyl iodide on silver-impregnated adsorbent is strongly dependent on impregnation amount and process temperature. A quantitative comparison of adsorption efficiencies on three adsorbents in a fixed bed was investigated. The influence of temperature, methyl iodide concentration and silver impregnation amount on the adsorption efficiency is closely related to the pore characteristics of adsorbents. It shows that the effective impregnation ratio was about 10wt%, based on the degree of silver utilization for the removal of methyl iodide. The practical applicability of silver-impregnated zeolite for the removal of radioiodine generated from the DUPIC process was consequently proposed. (author)

  9. Adhesive permeability affects coupling of resin cements that utilise self-etching primers to dentine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, R M; Pegoraro, T A; Tay, F R; Pegoraro, L F; Silva, N R F A; Pashley, D H

    2004-01-01

    To examine the effects of an experimental bonding technique that reduces the permeability of the adhesive layer on the coupling of resin cements to dentine. Extracted human third molars had their mid to deep dentin surface exposed flat by transversally sectioning the crowns. Resin composite overlays were constructed and cemented to the surfaces using either Panavia F (Kuraray) or Bistite II DC (Tokuyama) resin cements mediated by their respective one-step or two-step self-etch adhesives. Experimental groups were prepared in the same way, except that the additional layer of a low-viscosity bonding resin (LVBR, Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus, 3M ESPE) was placed on the bonded dentine surface before luting the overlays with the respective resin cements. The bonded assemblies were stored for 24 h in water at 37 degrees C and subsequently prepared for microtensile bond strength testing. Beams of approximately 0.8 mm(2) were tested in tension at 0.5 mm/min in a universal tester. Fractured surfaces were examined under scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Additional specimens were prepared and examined with TEM using a silver nitrate-staining technique. Two-way ANOVA showed significant interactions between materials and bonding protocols (p0.05). SEM observation of the fractured surfaces in Panavia F showed rosette-like features that were exclusive for specimens bonded according to manufacturer's directions. Such features corresponded well with the ultrastructure of the interfaces that showed more nanoleakage associated with the more permeable adhesive interface. The application of the additional layer of the LVBR reduced the amount of silver impregnation for both adhesives suggesting that reduced permeability of the adhesives resulted in improved coupling of the resin cements to dentin. Placement of an intermediate layer of a LVBR between the bonded dentine surface and the resin cements resulted in improved coupling of Panavia F to dentine.

  10. Solvent - solute interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urbanczyk, A.; Kalinowski, M.K.

    1983-01-01

    The electronic absorption spectrum of vanadyl acetylacetonate has been studied in 15 organic solvents. It has been found that wavenumbers and molar absorptivities of the long-wavelength bands (d-d transitions) can be well described by a complementary Lewis acid-base model including Gutmann's donor number [Gutmann V., Wychera E., Inorg. Nucl. Chem. Letters 2, 257 (1966)] and acceptor number [Mayer U., Gutmann V., Gerger W., Monatsh. Chem. 106, 1235 (1975)] of a solvent. This model describes also the solvent effect of the hyperfine splitting constant, Asub(iso)( 51 V), from e.s.r. spectra of VOacac 2 . These observations are discussed in terms of the donor-acceptor concept for solvent-solute interactions. (Author)

  11. Barium depletion study on impregnated cathodes and lifetime prediction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roquais, J.M.; Poret, F.; Doze, R. le; Ricaud, J.L.; Monterrin, A.; Steinbrunn, A.

    2003-01-01

    In the thermionic cathodes used in cathode ray-tubes (CRTs), barium is the key element for the electronic emission. In the case of the dispenser cathodes made of a porous tungsten pellet impregnated with Ba, Ca aluminates, the evaporation of Ba determines the cathode lifetime with respect to emission performance in the CRT. The Ba evaporation results in progressive depletion of the impregnating material inside the pellet. In the present work, the Ba depletion with time has been extensively characterized over a large range of cathode temperature. Calculations using the depletion data allowed modeling of the depletion as a function of key parameters. The link between measured depletion and emission in tubes has been established, from which an end-of-life criterion was deduced. Taking modeling into account, predicting accelerated life-tests were performed using high-density maximum emission current (MIK)

  12. Heavy metal ion adsorption onto polypyrrole-impregnated porous carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Moonjung; Jang, Jyongsik

    2008-09-01

    Polypyrrole-impregnated porous carbon was readily synthesized using vapor infiltration polymerization of pyrrole monomers. The results show that the functionalized polymer layer was successfully coated onto the pore surface of carbon without collapse of mesoporous structure. The modified porous carbon exhibited an improved complexation affinity for heavy metal ions such as mercury, lead, and silver ions due to the amine group of polypyrrole. The introduced polypyrrole layer could provide the surface modification to be applied for heavy metal ion adsorbents. Especially, polymer-impregnated porous carbon has an enhanced heavy metal ion uptake, which is 20 times higher than that of adsorbents with amine functional groups. Furthermore, the relationship between the coated polymer amount and surface area was also investigated in regard to adsorption capacity.

  13. Performance of Conformable Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator in Aerothermal Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, Jeremy; Fan, Wendy; Stackpoole, Mairead; Kao, David; Skokova, Kristina; Chavez-Garcia, Jose

    2012-01-01

    Conformable Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator, a cousin of Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA), was developed at NASA Ames Research Center as a lightweight thermal protection system under the Fundamental Aeronautics Program. PICA is made using a brittle carbon substrate, which has a very low strain to failure. Conformable PICA is made using a flexible carbon substrate, a felt in this case. The flexible felt significantly increases the strain to failure of the ablator. PICA is limited by its thermal mechanical properties. Future NASA missions will require heatshields that are more fracture resistant than PICA and, as a result, NASA Ames is working to improve PICA's performance by developing conformable PICA to meet these needs. Research efforts include tailoring the chemistry of conformable PICA with varying amounts of additives to enhance mechanical properties and testing them in aerothermal environments. This poster shows the performance of conformable PICA variants in arc jets tests. Some mechanical and thermal properties will also be presented.

  14. Rhodamine 6G impregnated porous silica: A photoluminescence study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anedda, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Cagliari and INMF UdR Cagliari, SP no8, Km 0700, 09042, Monserrato (Canada) (Italy); Carbonaro, C.M. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Cagliari and INMF UdR Cagliari, SP no8, Km 0700, 09042, Monserrato (Canada) (Italy)]. E-mail: cm.carbonaro@dsf.unica.it; Clemente, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Cagliari and INMF UdR Cagliari, SP no8, Km 0700, 09042, Monserrato (Ca) (Italy); Corpino, R. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Cagliari and INMF UdR Cagliari, SP no8, Km 0700, 09042, Monserrato (Ca) (Italy); Ricci, P.C. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Cagliari and INMF UdR Cagliari, SP no8, Km 0700, 09042, Monserrato (Ca) (Italy); Rossini, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Cagliari and INMF UdR Cagliari, SP no8, Km 0700, 09042, Monserrato (Ca) (Italy)

    2005-12-15

    The optical properties of rhodamine 6G dye confined in porous silica are reported. Photoluminescence properties of embedded chromophores in mesoporous hosts can be affected by the surrounding matrices: shifts in emission spectra and variations of photoluminescence quantum yield are found as compared to dye solutions. Host-guest interactions are studied here by varying both SiO{sub 2} xerogels porosity and the dye concentration. Comparing samples obtained by impregnating matrices with 5.4 and 18.2 nm pores with solutions having concentrations in the rhodamine 6G high laser gain, matrices with 5.4 nm pores impregnated with a dye concentration of 5 x 10{sup -4} M are found to be the most stable and efficient in the examined range.

  15. Silver impregnation in situ: an aid to radiographic interpretation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyd, J.; Rantanen, N.W.

    1984-01-01

    In evaluating radiographs of the limb joints and head, students encounter difficulty where superimposition occurs. By replacing calcium with silver salts in the bone, enhanced radiopacity can be produced. In this study, silver impregnation was used to increase the radiopacity of individual carpal and tarsal bones, selected bones of the skull and the sinuses, and guttural pouch of the horse. This provides an interpretation aid for teaching radiographic anatomy of these regions

  16. Surrogate nits impregnated with white piedra--a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorpade, A

    2004-07-01

    White piedral spores packed inside empty pedicular nits were accidentally found on microscopic examination in a 42-year-old Indian woman who presented with hair loss. The diagnosis of piedra was confirmed on culture. She responded to topical 2% miconazole nitrate solution and manual removal of the nits. This is the first case report of pedicular nits found to be impregnated with spores of white piedra.

  17. Estimation of tribological anticorrosion properties of impregnated nitriding layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwanow, J.; Senatorski, J.; Tacikowski, J.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper is described aim, experimental and test result of tribological anticorrosion properties of thin nitriding layer (12.5 μm) obtained on 45 steel grade in controlled gas-nitriding process (570 o C, 4 h) impregnated with oil-based formulations, containing corrosion inhibitor BS-43, modified with tribological additives based on ashen organometallic compounds as well as ash-free organic compounds. It was stated, that tribological additives does not influence, in fact, on behaviour of corrosion resistance of nitriding layers impregnated with oil-base formulations mainly connected with inhibitor BS-43. Synergy of tribological additive and corrosion inhibitor is however more visible in modelling of wear resistance of nitriding layer. The influence nature of tribological additives in combination with corrosion inhibitor BS-43 is dependent on their kind and as result improves or worsens the wear resistance by friction. Hence in choice of impregnated formulation, which is enable to accomplish of tribological anticorrosion requirements, determined, above all, tribological additive. (author)

  18. Mercury adsorption properties of sulfur-impregnated adsorbents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsi, N.-C.; Rood, M.J.; Rostam-Abadi, M.; Chen, S.; Chang, R.

    2002-01-01

    Carbonaceous and noncarbonaceous adsorbents were impregnated with elemental sulfur to evaluate the chemical and physical properties of the adsorbents and their equilibrium mercury adsorption capacities. Simulated coal combustion flue gas conditions were used to determine the equilibrium adsorption capacities for Hg0 and HgCl2 gases to better understand how to remove mercury from gas streams generated by coal-fired utility power plants. Sulfur was deposited onto the adsorbents by monolayer surface deposition or volume pore filling. Sulfur impregnation increased the total sulfur content and decreased the total and micropore surface areas and pore volumes for all of the adsorbents tested. Adsorbents with sufficient amounts of active adsorption sites and sufficient microporous structure had mercury adsorption capacities up to 4,509 ??g Hg/g adsorbent. Elemental sulfur, organic sulfur, and sulfate were formed on the adsorbents during sulfur impregnation. Correlations were established with R2>0.92 between the equilibrium Hg0/HgCl2 adsorption capacities and the mass concentrations of elemental and organic sulfur. This result indicates that elemental and organic sulfur are important active adsorption sites for Hg0 and HgCl2.

  19. Chromatography resin support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobos, James G.

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus and method of using an improved chromatography resin support is disclosed. The chromatography support platform is provided by a stainless steel hollow cylinder adapted for being inserted into a chromatography column. An exterior wall of the stainless steel cylinder defines a groove for carrying therein an "O"-ring. The upper surface of the stainless steel column is covered by a fine stainless steel mesh welded to the edges of the stainless steel cylinder. When placed upon a receiving ledge defined within a chromatography column, the "O"-ring provides a fluid tight seal with the inner edge wall of the chromatography cylinder. The stainless steel mesh supports the chromatography matrix and provides a back flushable support which is economical and simple to construct.

  20. [Acrylic resin removable partial dentures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Baat, C; Witter, D J; Creugers, N H J

    2011-01-01

    An acrylic resin removable partial denture is distinguished from other types of removable partial dentures by an all-acrylic resin base which is, in principle, solely supported by the edentulous regions of the tooth arch and in the maxilla also by the hard palate. When compared to the other types of removable partial dentures, the acrylic resin removable partial denture has 3 favourable aspects: the economic aspect, its aesthetic quality and the ease with which it can be extended and adjusted. Disadvantages are an increased risk of caries developing, gingivitis, periodontal disease, denture stomatitis, alveolar bone reduction, tooth migration, triggering of the gag reflex and damage to the acrylic resin base. Present-day indications are ofa temporary or palliative nature or are motivated by economic factors. Special varieties of the acrylic resin removable partial denture are the spoon denture, the flexible denture fabricated of non-rigid acrylic resin, and the two-piece sectional denture. Furthermore, acrylic resin removable partial dentures can be supplied with clasps or reinforced by fibers or metal wires.

  1. Production of renewable phenolic resins by thermochemical conversion of biomass: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Effendi, A.; Gerhauser, H.; Bridgwater, A.V. [Bio-Energy Research Group, Aston University, Birmingham B4 7ET (United Kingdom)

    2008-10-15

    This review covers the production and utilisation of liquids from the thermal processing of biomass and related materials to substitute for synthetic phenol and formaldehyde in phenol formaldehyde resins. These resins are primarily employed in the manufacture of wood panels such as plywood, MDF, particle-board and OSB. The most important thermal conversion methods for this purpose are fast pyrolysis and vacuum pyrolysis, pressure liquefaction and phenolysis. Many feedstocks have been tested for their suitability as sources of phenolics including hard and softwoods, bark and residual lignins. Resins have been prepared utilising either the whole liquid product, or a phenolics enriched fraction obtained after fractional condensation or further processing, such as solvent extraction. None of the phenolics production and fractionation techniques covered in this review are believed to allow substitution of 100% of the phenol content of the resin without impacting its effectiveness compared to commercial formulations based on petroleum derived phenol. This survey shows that considerable progress has been made towards reaching the goal of a price competitive renewable resin, but that further research is required to meet the twin challenges of low renewable resin cost and satisfactory quality requirements. Particular areas of concern are wood panel press times, variability of renewable resin properties, odour, lack of reactive sites compared to phenol and potential for increased emissions of volatile organic compounds. (author)

  2. Purex process solvent: literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geier, R.G.

    1979-10-01

    This document summarizes the data on Purex process solvent presently published in a variety of sources. Extracts from these various sources are presented herein and contain the work done, the salient results obtained, and the original, unaltered conclusions of the author of each paper. Three major areas are addressed: solvent stability, solvent quality testing, and solvent treatment processes. 34 references, 44 tables.

  3. Purex process solvent: literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geier, R.G.

    1979-10-01

    This document summarizes the data on Purex process solvent presently published in a variety of sources. Extracts from these various sources are presented herein and contain the work done, the salient results obtained, and the original, unaltered conclusions of the author of each paper. Three major areas are addressed: solvent stability, solvent quality testing, and solvent treatment processes. 34 references, 44 tables

  4. Resinous constituent extracting process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sayer, W F

    1947-10-07

    The method of recovering oily constituents from coal or oil shale comprising the saturation of coal or oil shale in a sealed vessel with an organic solution having a boiling point at atmospheric pressure of not exceeding 220/sup 0/C, elevating the temperature within the vessel to a temperature below the cracking temperature of the constituents and maintaining the pressure within the vessel below 51 pounds, to extract the oily material from the coal or oil shale and subsequently separating the solvent from the oily material.

  5. Effects of blood contamination on resin-resin bond strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eiriksson, Sigurdur O; Pereira, Patricia N R; Swift, Edward J; Heymann, Harald O; Sigurdsson, Asgeir

    2004-02-01

    Incremental placement and curing of resin composites has been recommended. However, this requires longer operating time, and therefore, increased risk of contamination. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of blood contamination on microtensile bond strengths (microTBS) between resin interfaces and to determine the best decontamination method to re-establish the original resin-resin bond strength. The top surfaces of 64, 4-mm composite blocks (Z-250, Renew, APX, Pertac II) were untreated as the control, or were treated as follows: blood applied and dried on the surface (Treatment 1), blood applied, rinsed, dried (Treatment 2), blood applied, rinsed, and an adhesive applied (Single Bond, One-Step, Clearfil SE, Prompt L-Pop) (Treatment 3). Fresh composite was applied and light-cured in 2-mm increments. After 24 h storage in water, the specimens were sectioned into 0.7-mm thick slabs, trimmed to a cross-sectional area of 1 mm(2), and loaded to failure at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min using an Instron universal testing machine. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Fisher's PLSD test (pcontamination resulted in resin-resin bond strengths of only 1.0-13.1 MPa. Rinsing raised bond strengths to over 40 MPa for each material. Use of an adhesive further increased bond strengths except for Pertac II. Rinsing blood from contaminated surfaces increases the resin-resin bond strength significantly and the application of an appropriate adhesive increases the bond strength to control levels.

  6. Replacement of hazardous chromium impregnating agent from silver/copper/chromium-impregnated active carbon using triethylenediamine to remove hydrogen sulfide, trichloromethane, ammonia, and sulfur dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Li-Chun; Chung, Ying-Chien

    2009-03-01

    Activated carbon (AC) is widely used as an effective adsorbent in many applications, including industrial-scale air purification systems and air filter systems in gas masks. In general, ACs without chemical impregnation are good adsorbents of organic vapors but poor adsorbents of low-molecular-weight or polar gases such as chlorine, sulfur dioxide (SO2), formaldehyde, and ammonia (NH3). Impregnated ACs modified with metallic impregnating agents (ASC-carbons; e.g., copper, chromium, and silver) enhance the adsorbing properties of the ACs for simultaneously removing specific poisonous gases, but disposal of the chromium metal salt used to impregnate the ACs has the potential to result in situations that are toxic to both humans and the environment, thereby necessitating the search for replaceable organic impregnating agents that represent a much lower risk. The aim of this study was to assess the gas removal efficiency of an AC in which the organic impregnating agent triethylenediamine (TEDA) largely replaced the metallic impregnating agent chromium. We assessed batch and continuous adsorption capacities in situ for removing simulated hydrogen sulfide (H2S), trichloromethane (CHCl3), NH3, and SO2 gases. Brunauer-Emmet-Teller measurements and scanning electron microscopy analyses identified the removal mechanism by which TEDA-impregnated AS-carbon (dechromium ASC-carbon) adsorbs gases and determined the removal capacity for H2S, CHCl3, NH3, and SO2 to be 311, 258, 272, and 223 mg/g-C, respectively. These results demonstrate that TEDA-impregnated AS-carbon is significantly more efficient than ASC-carbon in adsorbing these four gases. Organic TEDA-impregnating agents have also been proven to be a reliable and environmental friendly agent and therefore a safe replacement of the hazardous chromium found in conventional ASC-carbon used in removing toxic gases from the airstream.

  7. Puncture-Healing Thermoplastic Resin Carbon-Fiber-Reinforced Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Keith L. (Inventor); Siochi, Emilie J. (Inventor); Grimsley, Brian W. (Inventor); Cano, Roberto J. (Inventor); Czabaj, Michael W. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A composite comprising a combination of a self-healing polymer matrix and a carbon fiber reinforcement is described. In one embodiment, the matrix is a polybutadiene graft copolymer matrix, such as polybutadiene graft copolymer comprising poly(butadiene)-graft-poly(methyl acrylate-co-acrylonitrile). A method of fabricating the composite is also described, comprising the steps of manufacturing a pre-impregnated unidirectional carbon fiber preform by wetting a plurality of carbon fibers with a solution, the solution comprising a self-healing polymer and a solvent, and curing the preform. A method of repairing a structure made from the composite of the invention is described. A novel prepreg material used to manufacture the composite of the invention is described.

  8. Long term stability of cannabis resin and cannabis extracts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholst, Christian

    2010-01-01

    at room temperature, 4 °C and - 20 °C for up to 4 years. Acidic THC degrades exponentially via decarboxylation with concentration halve-lives of approximately 330 and 462 days in daylight and darkness, respectively. The degradation of neutral THC seems to occur somewhat slower. When cannabinoids were...... stored in extracted form at room temperature the degradation rate of acidic THC increased significantly relative to resin material with concentration halve-lives of 35 and 91 days in daylight and darkness, respectively. Once cannabis material is extracted into organic solvents, care should be taken...

  9. Bending characteristics of resin concretes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ribeiro Maria Cristina Santos

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In this research work the influence of composition and curing conditions in bending strength of polyester and epoxy concrete is analyzed. Various mixtures of resin and aggregates were considered in view of an optimal combination. The Taguchi methodology was applied in order to reduce the number of tests, and in order to evaluate the influence of various parameters in concrete properties. This methodology is very useful for the planning of experiments. Test results, analyzed by this methodology, shown that the most significant factors affecting bending strength properties of resin concretes are the type of resin, resin content and charge content. An optimal formulation leading to a maximum bending strength was achieved in terms of material parameters.

  10. Mechanism for transporting used resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, Yoshikazu; Yusa, Hideo; Kamiya, Kunio.

    1975-01-01

    Object: In the operation of a light water reactor type atomic power plant, to permit transport and reuse of used ion exchange resin used for the filtering or cleaning of cooling water or the desalting of radioactive exhaust liquid through an ejector. Structure: Used ion exchange resin within a desalter having high radioactivity is withdrawn through the action of an ejector and led to a solid-liquid separator for separation into used resin and water. The separated resin is directly collected in a storage tank while the separated water is forced through a circulating pump to a gas-liquid separator for separation into gas having radioactivity and water. The separated gas is led to a radioactive gas treatment station while the water deprived of the gas is recirculated by a drive water pump for repeated use. (Kamimura, M.)

  11. Bulk-Fill Resin Composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benetti, Ana Raquel; Havndrup-Pedersen, Cæcilie; Honoré, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    the restorative procedure. The aim of this study, therefore, was to compare the depth of cure, polymerization contraction, and gap formation in bulk-fill resin composites with those of a conventional resin composite. To achieve this, the depth of cure was assessed in accordance with the International Organization...... for Standardization 4049 standard, and the polymerization contraction was determined using the bonded-disc method. The gap formation was measured at the dentin margin of Class II cavities. Five bulk-fill resin composites were investigated: two high-viscosity (Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill, SonicFill) and three low......-viscosity (x-tra base, Venus Bulk Fill, SDR) materials. Compared with the conventional resin composite, the high-viscosity bulk-fill materials exhibited only a small increase (but significant for Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill) in depth of cure and polymerization contraction, whereas the low-viscosity bulk...

  12. Mechanism for transporting used resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugimoto, Y; Yusa, H; Kamiya, K

    1975-01-16

    In the operation of a light water reactor type atomic power plant the objectives is to permit transport and reuse of used ion exchange resin used for the filtering or cleaning of cooling water or the desalting of radioactive exhaust liquid through an ejector. Used ion exchange resin within a desalter having high radioactivity is withdrawn through the action of an ejector and led to a solid-liquid separator for separation into used resin and water. The separated resin is directly collected in a storage tank while the separated water is forced through a circulating pump to a gas-liquid separator for separation into gas having radioactivity and water. The separated gas is led to a radioactive gas treatment station while the water deprived of the gas is recirculated by a drive water pump for repeated use.

  13. Effect of organic solvents on desorption and atomic absorption determination of heavy metal ions after ion exchange concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pilipenko, A.T.; Safronova, V.G.; Zakrevskaya, L.V.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of organic solvents (acetone, methylethylketone, dioxane, ethanol) on desorption of Cu, Mn, Co, Cd, Zn, Pb, Ni from cationite KU-23 ion exchange resin and on the detection limits of their atomic absorption determination has been examined. Cobalt and cadmium can be separated quantitatively using desorption by a mixture of HCl and acetone. Addition of an organic solvent results in a higher absorbance, mainly due to a high rate and efficiency of atomization. Acetone has proved to be the best solvent: addition of 60 vol. % of this solvent to the concentrate provides 2 times lower detection limits for the heavy metas in water

  14. Separation by solvent extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holt, C.H. Jr.

    1976-01-01

    In a process for separating fission product values from U and Pu values contained in an aqueous solution, an oxidizing agent is added to the solution to secure U and Pu in their hexavalent state. The aqueous solution is contacted with a substantially water-immiscible organic solvent with agitation while the temperature is maintained at from -1 to -2 0 C until the major part of the water present is frozen. The solid ice phase is continuously separated as it is formed and a remaining aqueous liquid phase containing fission product values and a solvent phase containing Pu and U values are separated from each other. The last obtained part of the ice phase is melted and added to the separated liquid phase. The resulting liquid is treated with a new supply of solvent whereby it is practically depleted of U and Pu

  15. Study by dynamic light scattering of an o/w emulsion of an epoxi resin dispersed in water by means of a triblock copolymer of type PEO-PPO-PEO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uscanga, E. H.; Rio, J. M. del; Avendano-Gomez, J. R.

    2009-01-01

    The curing epoxy resins are widely used in various fields of chemical industry, such as adhesives, automotive, coatings, etc. The process operation consisting of flow and mixing of epoxy resins become difficult due to their high viscosity. One solution is to dissolve the epoxy resin in volatile organic solvents (VOS) such as toluene, xylene or benzene. However, the use of VOS is not only expensive but harmful to the environment. (Author)

  16. PETI-298 Prepared by Microwave Synthesis: Neat Resin and Composite Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Joseph G.; Connell, John W.; Li, Chao-Jun; Wu, Wei; Criss, Jim M., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    PETI-298 is a high temperature/high performance matrix resin that is processable into composites by resin transfer molding (RTM), resin infusion and vacuum assisted RTM techniques. It is typically synthesized in a polar aprotic solvent from the reaction of an aromatic anhydride and a combination of diamines and endcapped with phenylethynylphthalic anhydride. Microwave synthesis of PETI-298 was investigated as a means to eliminate solvent and decrease reaction time. The monomers were manually mixed and placed in a microwave oven for various times to determine optimum reaction conditions. The synthetic process was subsequently scaled-up to 330g. Three batches were synthesized and combined to give 1 kg of material that was characterized for thermal and rheological properties and compared to PETI-298 prepared by the classic solution based synthetic method. The microwave synthesized PETI-298 was subsequently used to fabricate flat laminates on T650 carbon fabric by RTM. The composite panels were analyzed and mechanical properties determined and compared with those fabricated from PETI-298 prepared by the classic solution method. The microwave synthesis process and characterization of neat resin and carbon fiber reinforced composites fabricated by RTM will be presented. KEY WORDS: Resin Transfer Molding, High Temperature Polymers, Phenylethynyl Terminated Imides, Microwave Synthesis

  17. Synthesis of wrinkled mesoporous silica and its reinforcing effect for dental resin composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ruili; Habib, Eric; Zhu, X X

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this work is to explore the reinforcing effect of wrinkled mesoporous silica (WMS), which should allow micromechanical resin matrix/filler interlocking in dental resin composites, and to investigate the effect of silica morphology, loading, and compositions on their mechanical properties. WMS (average diameter of 496nm) was prepared through the self-assembly method and characterized by the use of the electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, and the N 2 adsorption-desorption measurements. The mechanical properties of resin composites containing silanized WMS and nonporous smaller silica were evaluated with a universal mechanical testing machine. Field-emission scanning electron microscopy was used to study the fracture morphology of dental composites. Resin composites including silanized silica particles (average diameter of 507nm) served as the control group. Higher filler loading of silanized WMS substantially improved the mechanical properties of the neat resin matrix, over the composites loaded with regular silanized silica particles similar in size. The impregnation of smaller secondary silica particles with diameters of 90 and 190nm, denoted respectively as Si90 and Si190, increased the filler loading of the bimodal WMS filler (WMS-Si90 or WMS-Si190) to 60wt%, and the corresponding composites exhibited better mechanical properties than the control fillers made with regular silica particles. Among all composites, the optimal WMS-Si190- filled composite (mass ratio WMS:Si190=10:90, total filler loading 60wt%) exhibited the best mechanical performance including flexural strength, flexural modulus, compressive strength and Vickers microhardness. The incorporation of WMS and its mixed bimodal fillers with smaller silica particles led to the design and formulation of dental resin composites with superior mechanical properties. Copyright © 2017 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Application of THOR-Technology on resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorenzen, J.; Lindberg, M.

    2003-01-01

    The THermal Organic Reduction (THOR) process, developed and patented by studsvik utilises pyrolysis / steam reforming technology. The THOR-process provides a reliable and safe method for treating a wide variety of LLW in a unique, fluidised bed treatment system at moderate temperature. This technology is suitable for processing hazardous, mixed and dry active LLW with appropriate waste feed modifications. Both solid and liquid LLRW and ILRW streams including ion exchange resins, activated carbon (charcoal), graphite, oils, solvents and cleaning solutions with contact radiation levels of up to 4 Sv/hr can be processed. Studsvik has completed over four years of operation at its facility at Erwin, Tennessee, USA. During this period studsvik has processed more than 1,5 thousand tons of radioactive ion exchange bead resins. powdered filter media and active carbon, with a cumulative total radioactivity of about 7 (E+8) MBq. Operations have demonstrated consistent, reliable, robust operating characteristics. Due to the widely varying characteristics of the incoming waste streams various efficiencies and volume reductions have been experienced. Input waste has varied in total inorganic content from 90%. A substantial element of this variability has been the ''soluble salt'' content of the input waste streams. Final reformed residue comprises a non-dispersible, granular solid which is suitable for long-term storage or direct burial in a qualified container. Special containers, THOR-liners, are available from studsvik for the transport of waste from the customer to the Erwin facility and HICs (high integrity containers) for transport of the residues to Barnwell. The paper will give an overview of the last four years of commercial operations processing LLRW from commercial nuclear power plans. (orig.)

  19. Characteristics of resin floc dispersion of anion and cation exchange resin in precoat filter using powdered ion exchange resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adachi, Tetsurou (Nitto Denko Corp., Ibaraki, Osaka (Japan)); Sawa, Toshio; Shindoh, Toshikazu

    1989-09-01

    The filtration performance of mixed filter aid consisting of powdered anion and cation exchange resins used in the precoat filter is closely related to the characteristics of resin floc dispersion. The factors related to resin floc dispersion of anion and cation exchange resin were investigated by measuring the specific settle volume of resin floc as an evaluating index in addition to the measurement of physical, chemical and electrochemical properties of powdered ion exchange resin. The effect of adsorption of iron oxide and polymer electrolyte and of ion exchange were determined. In addition, considered floc dispersion with adsorbing iron oxide, it was assumed that the amount and filling ratio of resin floc were related to summation and multiplication of surface electric charge respectively. An experimental expression was obtained for simulation of the change of specific settle volume of resin floc by particle size, surface area, ion exchange capacity and degree of ionization of the powdered ion exchange resin. (author).

  20. Characteristics of resin floc dispersion of anion and cation exchange resin in precoat filter using powdered ion exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adachi, Tetsurou; Sawa, Toshio; Shindoh, Toshikazu.

    1989-01-01

    The filtration performance of mixed filter aid consisting of powdered anion and cation exchange resins used in the precoat filter is closely related to the characteristics of resin floc dispersion. The factors related to resin floc dispersion of anion and cation exchange resin were investigated by measuring the specific settle volume of resin floc as an evaluating index in addition to the measurement of physical, chemical and electrochemical properties of powdered ion exchange resin. The effect of adsorption of iron oxide and polymer electrolyte and of ion exchange were determined. In addition, considered floc dispersion with adsorbing iron oxide, it was assumed that the amount and filling ratio of resin floc were related to summation and multiplication of surface electric charge respectively. An experimental expression was obtained for simulation of the change of specific settle volume of resin floc by particle size, surface area, ion exchange capacity and degree of ionization of the powdered ion exchange resin. (author)

  1. X-ray Tomography and Impregnation Methods to Analyze Pore Space Hetrerogeneities at the Hydrated State

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pret, D.; Ferrage, E.; Tertre, E.; Robinet, J.C.; Faurel, M.; Hubert, F.; Pelletier, M.; Bihannic, I.

    2013-01-01

    For clay based materials, the investigation of both mineral skeleton and pore space organization as well as water distribution remains a key and challenging task. Such information is however required in order to fully understand and model their macroscopic hydro-mechanical or transport properties. In particular, as far as swelling clay minerals are involved, even pure clay materials are well known to represent spatially heterogeneous, anisotropic and deformable media from the nanometre to the centimetre scale. Probing their organization over such extremely large scale range requires the combination of different techniques providing quantitative results that can be used to feed global balances of water and pore distributions. Bulk physical measurements have been used for decades for analyzing clay systems at the dry state or for hydrated states under free macroscopic swelling conditions of samples. These approaches need to be associated to reveal the complexity of the pore space network. Indeed, all probes exhibit contrasted accessibilities and provide data on the basis of simple geometrical models either about pore or neck/throat size for a given size range. The main interest of imaging techniques is their ability to reveal the spatial heterogeneities of organization as well as the real morphology of pores. Still, they are poorly documented in literature as preparation procedures and extraction of quantitative data are not straightforward for clay materials. Clay organization is highly reactive and is, for example, a function of the resin/water removal technique used during embedding process, the content/composition of pore water or the pressure applied. Imaging techniques based on electron beam generally requires vacuum conditions around the sample and imply its impregnation by a resin. It is then generally difficult to assess the hydration state corresponding to the organization observed. Coupling different techniques is thus only possible when similar

  2. Optical study of planar waveguides based on oxidized porous silicon impregnated with laser dyes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chouket, A. [Unite de recherche de Spectroscopie Raman, Departement de Physique, Faculte des Sciences de Tunis, Elmanar 2092, Tunis (Tunisia); Charrier, J. [Laboratoire d' Optronique CNRS-UMR FOTON 6082, Universite de Rennes 1, ENSSAT-6 rue de Kerampont, BP 80518, 22305 Lannion Cedex (France); Elhouichet, H. [Unite de recherche de Spectroscopie Raman, Departement de Physique, Faculte des Sciences de Tunis, Elmanar 2092, Tunis (Tunisia)], E-mail: habib.elhouichet@fst.rnu.tn; Oueslati, M. [Unite de recherche de Spectroscopie Raman, Departement de Physique, Faculte des Sciences de Tunis, Elmanar 2092, Tunis (Tunisia)

    2009-05-15

    Oxidized porous silicon optical planar waveguides were elaborated and impregnated with rhodamine B and rhodamine 6G. The waveguiding, absorption, and photoluminescence properties of these impregnated waveguides were studied. Successful impregnation of the structure with laser dyes is shown from photoluminescence and reflectivity measurements. Furthermore, the reflectivity spectra prove the homogenous incorporation of both dye molecules inside the pores of the matrices. The refractive indices of waveguide layers were determined before and after dye impregnation to indicate the conservation of guiding conditions. The optical losses in the visible wavelengths are studied as a function of dye concentration. The dye absorption is the main reason for these losses.

  3. Porous solid backbone impregnation for electrochemical energy conversion systems

    KAUST Repository

    Boulfrad, Samir

    2013-09-19

    An apparatus and method for impregnating a porous solid backbone. The apparatus may include a platform for holding a porous solid backbone, an ink jet nozzle configured to dispense a liquid solution onto the porous solid backbone, a positioning mechanism configured to position the ink jet nozzle proximate to a plurality of locations of the porous solid backbone, and a control unit configured to control the positioning mechanism to position the ink jet nozzle proximate to the plurality of locations and cause the ink jet nozzle to dispense the liquid solution onto the porous solid backbone.

  4. Differences and commonalities impregnation of dry and wet sand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maujuda МUZAFFAROVA

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to research new methods of physic-chemical methods of preventing deflation to protect railways and highways from such phenomena as exogenous sand drifts. In particular, first studied the possibility of using binders in sand wet state. Results can significantly extend the scope of the method, and identified with particular impregnation maintaining stability requirements protective cover reduces both the concentration previously recommended binders, and their costs, thereby securing implementation in practice of shifting sands resource-saving technology.

  5. Porous solid backbone impregnation for electrochemical energy conversion systems

    KAUST Repository

    Boulfrad, Samir; Jabbour, Ghassan

    2013-01-01

    An apparatus and method for impregnating a porous solid backbone. The apparatus may include a platform for holding a porous solid backbone, an ink jet nozzle configured to dispense a liquid solution onto the porous solid backbone, a positioning mechanism configured to position the ink jet nozzle proximate to a plurality of locations of the porous solid backbone, and a control unit configured to control the positioning mechanism to position the ink jet nozzle proximate to the plurality of locations and cause the ink jet nozzle to dispense the liquid solution onto the porous solid backbone.

  6. Mass impregnation plant speeds high voltage cable production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1965-05-07

    A mass impregnation and continuous sheath extrusion plant that will eliminate the long period of vacuum treatment usually required for high voltage oil-filled cables is among the latest techniques included in the new factory at Pirelli General's Eastleigh works. The new factory is said to be the first in Europe designed solely for the manufacture of the full range of oil-filled cables. Possible future increases of system voltages to about 750-kV ac or 1000-kV dc have been taken into account in the design of the works, so that only a small amount of modification and new plant will be involved.

  7. Evaluation of level of impregnation monomers in hydrotalcite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carmo, Danieli M. do; Machado, Jacson S.C.; Oliveira, Marcelo F.L.; Oliveira, Marcia G.; Soares, Bluma G.

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the impregnation degree of 1,6-hexamethylene diisocyanate and 1,4-butanediol monomers in hydrotalcite clays it was prepared dispersions with mixing ratio 1:100 (clay/monomer), using the Ultraturrax and Ultrasound. Subsequently the samples were characterized by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy and X-ray Diffraction. Swelling tests and Tyndall effect were used to illustrate the different dispersions. The results indicated a strong interaction between the hydrotalcite with 1,6-hexamethylene diisocyanate, favoring the formation of intercalated structures. (author)

  8. Adsorption of saponin compound in Carica papaya leaves extract using weakly basic ion exchanger resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abidin, Noraziani Zainal; Janam, Anathasia; Zubairi, Saiful Irwan

    2016-11-01

    Adsorption of saponin compound in papaya leaves juice extract using Amberlite® IRA-67 resin was not reported in previous studies. In this research, Amberlite® IRA-67 was used to determine the amount of saponin that can be adsorbed using different weights of dry resin (0.1 g and 0.5 g). Peleg model was used to determine the maximum yield of saponin (43.67 mg) and the exhaustive time (5.7 days) prior to a preliminary resin-saponin adsorption study. After adsorption process, there was no significant difference (p>0.05) in total saponin content (mg) for sample treated with 0.1 g (3.79 ± 0.55 mg) and sample treated with 0.5 g (3.43 ± 0.51 mg) dry weight resin. Long-term kinetic adsorption of resin-saponin method (>24 hours) should be conducted to obtain optimum freed saponin extract. Besides that, sample treated with 0.1 g dry weight resin had high free radical scavenging value of 50.33 ± 2.74% compared to sample treated with 0.5 g dry weight resin that had low free radical scavenging value of 24.54 ± 1.66% dry weights. Total saponin content (mg), total phenolic content (mg GAE) and free radical scavenging activity (%) was investigated to determine the interaction of those compounds with Amberlite® IRA-67. The RP-HPLC analysis using ursolic acid as standard at 203 nm showed no peak even though ursolic acid was one of the saponin components that was ubiquitous in plant kingdom. The absence of peak was due to weak solubility of ursolic acid in water and since it was only soluble in solvent with moderate polarity. The Pearson's correlation coefficient for total saponin content (mg) versus total phenolic content (mg GAE) and radical scavenging activity (%) were +0.959 and +0.807. Positive values showed that whenever there was an increase in saponin content (mg), the phenolic content (mg GAE) and radical scavenging activity (%) would also increase. However, as the resin-saponin adsorption was carried out, there was a significant decrease of radical scavenging activity

  9. Organic solvent topical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    COWLEY, W.L.

    1999-05-13

    This report provides the basis for closing the organic solvent safety issue. Sufficient information is presented to conclude that risk posed by an organic solvent fire is within risk evaluation guidelines. This report updates information contained in Analysis of Consequences of Postulated Solvent Fires in Hanford Site Waste Tanks. WHC-SD-WM-CN-032. Rev. 0A (Cowley et al. 1996). However, this document will not replace Cowley et al (1996) as the primary reference for the Basis for Interim Operation (BIO) until the recently submitted BIO amendment (Hanson 1999) is approved by the US Department of Energy. This conclusion depends on the use of controls for preventing vehicle fuel fires and for limiting the use of flame cutting in areas where hot metal can fall on the waste surface.The required controls are given in the Tank Waste Remediation System Technical Safety Requirements (Noorani 1997b). This is a significant change from the conclusions presented in Revision 0 of this report. Revision 0 of this calcnote concluded that some organic solvent fire scenarios exceeded risk evaluation guidelines, even with controls imposed.

  10. Organic solvent topical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cowley, W.L.

    1998-04-30

    This report is the technical basis for the accident and consequence analyses used in the Hanford Tank Farms Basis for Interim Operation. The report also contains the scientific and engineering information and reference material needed to understand the organic solvent safety issue. This report includes comments received from the Chemical Reactions Subcommittee of the Tank Advisory Panel.

  11. Organic solvent topical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    COWLEY, W.L.

    1999-01-01

    This report provides the basis for closing the organic solvent safety issue. Sufficient information is presented to conclude that risk posed by an organic solvent fire is within risk evaluation guidelines. This report updates information contained in Analysis of Consequences of Postulated Solvent Fires in Hanford Site Waste Tanks. WHC-SD-WM-CN-032. Rev. 0A (Cowley et al. 1996). However, this document will not replace Cowley et al (1996) as the primary reference for the Basis for Interim Operation (BIO) until the recently submitted BIO amendment (Hanson 1999) is approved by the US Department of Energy. This conclusion depends on the use of controls for preventing vehicle fuel fires and for limiting the use of flame cutting in areas where hot metal can fall on the waste surface.The required controls are given in the Tank Waste Remediation System Technical Safety Requirements (Noorani 1997b). This is a significant change from the conclusions presented in Revision 0 of this report. Revision 0 of this calcnote concluded that some organic solvent fire scenarios exceeded risk evaluation guidelines, even with controls imposed

  12. Organic solvent topical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowley, W.L.

    1998-01-01

    This report is the technical basis for the accident and consequence analyses used in the Hanford Tank Farms Basis for Interim Operation. The report also contains the scientific and engineering information and reference material needed to understand the organic solvent safety issue. This report includes comments received from the Chemical Reactions Subcommittee of the Tank Advisory Panel

  13. DESIGNING GREENER SOLVENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Computer-aided design of chemicals and chemical mixtures provides a powerful tool to help engineers identify cleaner process designs and more-benign alternatives to toxic industrial solvents. Three software programs are discussed: (1) PARIS II (Program for Assisting the Replaceme...

  14. Method of solidifying radioactive ion exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minami, Yuji; Tomita, Toshihide

    1989-01-01

    Spent anion exchange resin formed in nuclear power plants, etc. generally catch only a portion of anions in view of the ion exchange resins capacity and most of the anions are sent while possessing activities to radioactive waste processing systems. Then, the anion exchange resins increase the specific gravity by the capture of the anions. Accordingly, anions are caused to be captured on the anion exchange resin wastes such that the specific gravity of the anion exchange resin wastes is greater than that of the thermosetting resins to be mixed. This enables satisfactory mixing with the thermosetting resins and, in addition, enables to form integral solidification products in which anion exchange resins and cation exchange resins are not locallized separately and which are homogenous and free from cracks. (T.M.)

  15. Manufacturing of REBCO coils strongly bonded to cooling members with epoxy resin aimed at its application to Maglev

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizuno, Katsutoshi; Ogata, Masafumi; Hasegawa, Hitoshi

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Paraffin has a risk of losing thermal coupling during cooling down. • We propose an epoxy impregnated REBCO coil co-wound with PTFE tape. • The coil is tightly bonded to cooling members by epoxy resin without the degradation. • We made a REBCO racetrack coil with the same outer dimension as the Maglev magnet. - Abstract: The REBCO coated conductor has been attracted attention because of its high current density in the presence of high magnetic field. If the coated conductor is applied to Maglev, the operational temperature of the on-board magnets will be over 40 K and energy consumption of cryocoolers will be reduced. That high operational temperature also means the absence of liquid helium. Therefore, reliable thermal coupling is desirable for cooling the coils. We propose an epoxy impregnated REBCO coil co-wound with PTFE tape. While the PTFE tape prevents the performance degradation of the coil, the epoxy resin bonds the coil to cooling members. We carried out three experiments to confirm that the coil structure which we propose has robust thermal coupling without the degradation. First, thermal resistances of paraffin and epoxy were measured varying the temperature from room temperature to 10 K. The measurement result indicates that paraffin has a risk of losing thermal coupling during cooling down. In another experiment, PTFE (polytetrafluoroethylene) tape insulator prevented performance degradation of a small epoxy impregnated REBCO coil, while another REBCO coil with polyimide tape showed clear performance degradation. Finally, we produced a racetrack REBCO coil with the same outer dimension as a Maglev on-board magnet coil. Although the racetrack coil was installed in a GFRP coil case and tightly bonded to the case by epoxy impregnation, any performance degradation was not observed

  16. Manufacturing of REBCO coils strongly bonded to cooling members with epoxy resin aimed at its application to Maglev

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizuno, Katsutoshi, E-mail: mizuno.katsutoshi.14@rtri.or.jp; Ogata, Masafumi; Hasegawa, Hitoshi

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • Paraffin has a risk of losing thermal coupling during cooling down. • We propose an epoxy impregnated REBCO coil co-wound with PTFE tape. • The coil is tightly bonded to cooling members by epoxy resin without the degradation. • We made a REBCO racetrack coil with the same outer dimension as the Maglev magnet. - Abstract: The REBCO coated conductor has been attracted attention because of its high current density in the presence of high magnetic field. If the coated conductor is applied to Maglev, the operational temperature of the on-board magnets will be over 40 K and energy consumption of cryocoolers will be reduced. That high operational temperature also means the absence of liquid helium. Therefore, reliable thermal coupling is desirable for cooling the coils. We propose an epoxy impregnated REBCO coil co-wound with PTFE tape. While the PTFE tape prevents the performance degradation of the coil, the epoxy resin bonds the coil to cooling members. We carried out three experiments to confirm that the coil structure which we propose has robust thermal coupling without the degradation. First, thermal resistances of paraffin and epoxy were measured varying the temperature from room temperature to 10 K. The measurement result indicates that paraffin has a risk of losing thermal coupling during cooling down. In another experiment, PTFE (polytetrafluoroethylene) tape insulator prevented performance degradation of a small epoxy impregnated REBCO coil, while another REBCO coil with polyimide tape showed clear performance degradation. Finally, we produced a racetrack REBCO coil with the same outer dimension as a Maglev on-board magnet coil. Although the racetrack coil was installed in a GFRP coil case and tightly bonded to the case by epoxy impregnation, any performance degradation was not observed.

  17. Preparation of molecularly imprinted adsorptive resin for trapping of ligustrazine from the traditional Chinese herb Ligusticum chuanxiong Hort

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Zhifeng; Guo Tingting; Guo Mufan

    2008-01-01

    A highly selective molecularly imprinted adsorptive resin for ligustrazine was prepared by melamine-urea-formaldehyde (MUF) gel. In the experiments, two pieces of MUF gel were synthesized firstly; one was added ligustrazine hydrochloride as the template molecule in it to prepare the imprinted adsorptive resin, and the other was not. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed that both resins were the porous with a network structure whether or not it was added template molecule. The imprinted adsorptive resin had an absorbability of 85.22% measured by a 200 mg L -1 solution of ligustrazine hydrochloride at room temperature. The resin of MUF without template, on the other hand, displayed an adsorption capacity of almost zero. It illuminated the imprinted adsorptive resin formed ligustrazine recognition sites when the template molecule had been eluted. In the present paper, ligustrazine was effectively separated and enriched from herbs by using a solid-phase adsorptive column filled with the imprinted adsorptive resin. Its eluate, obtained from three kinds of solvents, was analyzed by GC-MS, and the results indicated that the imprinted adsorptive resin showed a high selectivity for ligustrazine. This is believed to be beneficial for extracting natural and highly purified ligustrazine

  18. Disposal of bead ion exchange resin wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gay, R.L.; Granthan, L.F.

    1985-01-01

    Bead ion exchange resin wastes are disposed of by a process which involves spray-drying a bead ion exchange resin waste in order to remove substantially all of the water present in such waste, including the water on the surface of the ion exchange resin beads and the water inside the ion exchange resin beads. The resulting dried ion exchange resin beads can then be solidified in a suitable solid matrix-forming material, such as a polymer, which solidifies to contain the dried ion exchange resin beads in a solid monolith suitable for disposal by burial or other conventional means

  19. The selection and properties of epoxide resins used for the insulation of magnet systems in radiation environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, D.C.; Scott, J.M.; Goebel, K.; Schoenbacher, H.

    1981-01-01

    Laboratory tests have been carried out on five types of epoxy resins - four based on bisphenol A, one on hydantoin-bisphenol A - applicable in the construction of large magnet coils. Two of the resin compositions have already been used in large quantities as insulating material for magnets at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN); the others were selected for comparison according to their good radiation resistance, good initial mechanical properties, and optimal properties for vacuum impregnation. Three types of tests are discussed in detail: creep, crack propagation (as a measure of toughness), and radiation resistance. The results show that the resin composition with hydantoin exhibits the best resistance to crack propagation but, on the other hand, the lowest resistance to ionizing radiation, and can therefore not be recommended for use in a radiation environment. Among the other materials based on biosphenol A, better toughness values were obtained with lower-cross-linked resin systems, whereas the radiation resistance is better for highly-cross-linked materials. It is concluded that a reasonable compromise combining good processing and operational properties with sufficiently high radiation resistance is obtained with a standard epoxy-resin-type bisphenol A with a specially formulated anhydride hardener and an amine-substituted phenol-type accelerator. (orig.)

  20. Flow injection on-line spectrophotometric determination of thorium(IV) after preconcentration on XAD-4 resin impregnated with oxytetracycline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shahida, Shabnam; Khan, Muhammad Haleem [Univ. of Azad Jammu and Kashmir, Muzaffarabad (Pakistan). Dept. of Chemistry; Ali, Akbar [Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, Islamabad (Pakistan). Chemistry Div.

    2014-02-15

    A very sensitive, selective and simple flow injection time-based method was developed for on-line preconcentration and determination of thorium(IV) at micro g L{sup -1} levels in environmental samples. The system operation was based on thorium(IV) ion retention at pH 4.0 in the minicolumn at a flow rate of 15.2 mL min{sup -1}. The trapped complex was then eluted with 3.6 mol L{sup -1} HCl at a flow rate of 4.9 mL min{sup -1}. The amount of thorium(IV) in the eluate was measured spectrophotometrically at 651 nm using arsenazo-III solution (0.05 % in 3.6 mol L{sup -1} HCl stabilized with 1 % triton X-100, 4.9 mL min{sup -1}) as colorimetric reagent. All chemical, and flow injection variables were optimized for the quantitative preconcentration of metal and a study of interference level of various ions was also carried out. The system offered low backpressure and improved sensitivity and selectivity. At a preconcentration time of 60 s and a sample frequency of 40 h{sup -1}, the enhancement factor was 97, the detection limit was 0.25 μg L{sup -1}, and the precision expressed as relative standard deviation was 1.08 % (at 50 μg L{sup -1}), whereas for 300 s of the preconcentration time and a sample frequency of 10 h{sup -1}, the enhancement factor of 357, the detection limit (3s) of 0.069 μg L{sup -1} and the precision of 1.32 % (at 10 μg L{sup -1}) was reported. The accuracy of the developed method was sufficient and evaluated by the analysis of certified reference material IAEA-SL-1 (Lake Sediment) and spiked water samples.

  1. Flow injection on-line spectrophotometric determination of thorium(IV) after preconcentration on XAD-4 resin impregnated with oxytetracycline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shahida, Shabnam; Khan, Muhammad Haleem; Ali, Akbar

    2014-01-01

    A very sensitive, selective and simple flow injection time-based method was developed for on-line preconcentration and determination of thorium(IV) at micro g L"-"1 levels in environmental samples. The system operation was based on thorium(IV) ion retention at pH 4.0 in the minicolumn at a flow rate of 15.2 mL min"-"1. The trapped complex was then eluted with 3.6 mol L"-"1 HCl at a flow rate of 4.9 mL min"-"1. The amount of thorium(IV) in the eluate was measured spectrophotometrically at 651 nm using arsenazo-III solution (0.05 % in 3.6 mol L"-"1 HCl stabilized with 1 % triton X-100, 4.9 mL min"-"1) as colorimetric reagent. All chemical, and flow injection variables were optimized for the quantitative preconcentration of metal and a study of interference level of various ions was also carried out. The system offered low backpressure and improved sensitivity and selectivity. At a preconcentration time of 60 s and a sample frequency of 40 h"-"1, the enhancement factor was 97, the detection limit was 0.25 μg L"-"1, and the precision expressed as relative standard deviation was 1.08 % (at 50 μg L"-"1), whereas for 300 s of the preconcentration time and a sample frequency of 10 h"-"1, the enhancement factor of 357, the detection limit (3s) of 0.069 μg L"-"1 and the precision of 1.32 % (at 10 μg L"-"1) was reported. The accuracy of the developed method was sufficient and evaluated by the analysis of certified reference material IAEA-SL-1 (Lake Sediment) and spiked water samples.

  2. Solvent selection methodology for pharmaceutical processes: Solvent swap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Papadakis, Emmanouil; Kumar Tula, Anjan; Gani, Rafiqul

    2016-01-01

    A method for the selection of appropriate solvents for the solvent swap task in pharmaceutical processes has been developed. This solvent swap method is based on the solvent selection method of Gani et al. (2006) and considers additional selection criteria such as boiling point difference...... in pharmaceutical processes as well as new solvent swap alternatives. The method takes into account process considerations such as batch distillation and crystallization to achieve the swap task. Rigorous model based simulations of the swap operation are performed to evaluate and compare the performance...

  3. Improvements in solvent extraction columns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aughwane, K.R.

    1987-01-01

    Solvent extraction columns are used in the reprocessing of irradiated nuclear fuel. For an effective reprocessing operation a solvent extraction column is required which is capable of distributing the feed over most of the column. The patent describes improvements in solvent extractions columns which allows the feed to be distributed over an increased length of column than was previously possible. (U.K.)

  4. Synthesis of non-ionic and ionic resins for BEP intaglio inks curing by electron-beam radiation. Annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, B.J.; Dickens, B.

    1992-01-01

    The inks currently used to print US postage stamps on web presses are dried by heat evaporation of solvents. Emission of solvents into the atmosphere is governed by Local and Federal Government Regulations. Reduction of these emissions to acceptable levels can be accomplished by either of two methods available to the BEP. The work was part of a continuing effort to produce resins for use in formulation of intaglio inks for the printing of postage stamps and security documents. The inks are to be cured by exposure to an electron beam. The uncured inks are cleaned from the roller and wiping blade by washing the wiping blade with neutral water or with caustic water. Laboratory scale work on the urethane/polyethylene oxide/methacrylate resins has now been concluded and information on the synthesis has been provided to BEP for patenting and scaleup. Some effort on nonionic resins continued into FY88

  5. Solvent extraction columns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Middleton, P.; Smith, J.R.

    1979-01-01

    In pulsed columns for use in solvent extraction processes, e.g. the reprocessing of nuclear fuel, the horizontal perforated plates inside the column are separated by interplate spacers manufactured from metallic neutron absorbing material. The spacer may be in the form of a spiral or concentric circles separated by radial limbs, or may be of egg-box construction. Suitable neutron absorbing materials include stainless steel containing boron or gadolinium, hafnium metal or alloys of hafnium. (UK)

  6. Hazardous solvent substitution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twitchell, K.E.

    1995-01-01

    Eliminating hazardous solvents is good for the environment, worker safety, and the bottom line. However, even though we are motivated to find replacements, the big question is 'What can we use as replacements for hazardous solvents?'You, too, can find replacements for your hazardous solvents. All you have to do is search for them. Search through the vendor literature of hundreds of companies with thousands of products. Ponder the associated material safety data sheets, assuming of course that you can obtain them and, having obtained them, that you can read them. You will want to search the trade magazines and other sources for product reviews. You will want to talk to users about how well the product actually works. You may also want to check US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and other government reports for toxicity and other safety information. And, of course, you will want to compare the product's constituent chemicals with the many hazardous constituency lists to ensure the safe and legal use of the product in your workplace

  7. Conservation of mining and metallurgic arachaeologic wooden objects by impregnation and radiation curing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaudy, R.; Slais, E.; Eibner, C.

    1983-05-01

    The conservation of mining and metallurgic archaeologic wooden objects of different grade of destruction by impregnation with radiation-curable impregnating agents followed by in-situ-curing with gamma rays is described. Dry objects have been consolidated after cautious cleaning, whereas wet findings had to be freezedried first. The results are discussed. (Author) [de

  8. 21 CFR 529.1003 - Flurogestone acetate-impregnated vaginal sponge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Flurogestone acetate-impregnated vaginal sponge... § 529.1003 Flurogestone acetate-impregnated vaginal sponge. (a) Specifications. Each vaginal sponge... ewes during their normal breeding season. (2) Limitations. Using applicator provided, insert sponge...

  9. Impacts of impregnation with boric acid and borax on the red colour ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Impacts of impregnation with boric acid and borax on the red colour tone of some hardwoods and varnishes. H Keskin, M Atar, A Ketizmen. Abstract. This study was performed to determine the impacts of impregnation with boric acid and borax on the red colour tone of some hardwoods and varnishes. For this purpose, the ...

  10. Apple snack enriched with L-arginine using vacuum impregnation/ohmic heating technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Jorge; Echeverria, Julian; Silva, Andrea; Escudero, Andrea; Petzold, Guillermo; Mella, Karla; Escudero, Carlos

    2017-07-01

    Modern life has created a high demand for functional food, and in this context, emerging technologies such as vacuum impregnation and ohmic heating have been applied to generate functional foods. The aim of this research was to enrich the content of the semi-essential amino acid L-arginine in apple cubes using vacuum impregnation, conventional heating, and ohmic heating. Additionally, combined vacuum impregnation/conventional heating and vacuum impregnation/ohmic heating treatments were evaluated. The above treatments were applied at 30, 40 and 50  ℃ and combined with air-drying at 40 ℃ in order to obtain an apple snack rich in L-arginine. Both the impregnation kinetics of L-arginine and sample color were evaluated. The impregnated samples created using vacuum impregnation/ohmic heating at 50 ℃ presented a high content of L-arginine, an effect attributed primarily to electropermeabilization. Overall, vacuum impregnation/ohmic heating treatment at 50 ℃, followed by drying at 40 ℃, was the best process for obtaining an apple snack rich in L-arginine.

  11. Impregnation of bio-oil from small diameter pine into wood for moisture resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas J. Robinson; Brian K. Via; Oladiran Fasina; Sushil Adhikari; Emily Carter

    2011-01-01

    Wood pyrolysis oil consists of hundreds of complex compounds, many of which are phenolic-based and exhibit hydrophobic properties. Southern yellow pine was impregnated with a pyrolysis oil-based penetrant using both a high pressure and vacuum impregnation systems, with no significant differences in retention levels. Penetrant concentrations ranging from 5-50% pyrolysis...

  12. The sampling of sulfur dioxide in air with impregnated filter paper

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huygen, C.

    1963-01-01

    A method is suggested for the sampling of sulfur dioxide in air with impregnated filter paper instead of bubblers. The best aqueous impregnating solution contained potassium hydroxide with glycerol or triethanolamine. The possibilities and limitations of the method are discussed. High collection

  13. The sampling of hydrogen sulfide in air with impregnated filter paper

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huygen, C.

    1964-01-01

    A method is proposed for the quantitative collection of hydrogen sulfide in air on impregnated filter paper. An aqueous solution of potassium hydroxide, potassium zincate and glycerol is used as impregnating fluid. The stability of the collected sulfide and the efficiency of collection at different

  14. Conservation experiments applying radiation-curable impregnating agents to intact and artifically decayed wood samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaudy, R.; Slais, E.

    1983-02-01

    Conservation experiments have been performed applying 10 selected impregnating agents to intact and chemically as well as biologically decayed wood samples. The quality of the radiation-curable impregnating agents could be valued by determination of the monomer uptake, the alteration of dimensions and volume and the deformation of the samples. The results are to be discussed. (Author) [de

  15. Impregnation of mesoporous silica for catalyst preparation studied with differential scanning calorimetry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eggenhuisen, T.M.; van Steenbergen, M.J.; Talsma, H.; de Jongh, P.E.; de Jong, K.P.

    2009-01-01

    Aqueous impregnation of mesoporous silica as a first step in catalyst preparation was studied to investigate the distribution of the metal-precursor solution over the support. The degree of pore-filling after impregnation was determined using the freezing point depression of confined liquids. A

  16. Removal of hydrogen sulfide and sulfur dioxide by carbons impregnated with triethylenediamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Li-Chun; Chang, Tsu-Hua; Chung, Ying-Chien

    2007-12-01

    Activated carbon (AC) adsorption has long been considered to be a readily available technology for providing protection against exposure to acutely toxic gases. However, ACs without chemical impregnation have proven to be much less efficient than impregnated ACs in terms of gas removal. The impregnated ACs in current use are usually modified with metalloid impregnation agents (ASC-carbons; copper, chromium, or silver) to simultaneously enhance the chemical and physical properties of the ACs in removing specific poisonous gases. These metalloid agents, however, can cause acute poisoning to both humans and the environment, thereby necessitating the search for organic impregnation agents that present a much lower risk. The aim of the study reported here was to assess AC or ASC-carbon impregnated with triethylenediamine (TEDA) in terms of its adsorption capability for simulated hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and sulfur dioxide (SO2) gases. The investigation was undergone in a properly designed laboratory-scale and industrial fume hood evaluation. Using the system reported here, we obtained a significant adsorption: the removal capability for H2S and SO2 was 375 and 229 mg/g-C, respectively. BET measurements, element analysis, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive spectrometry identified the removal mechanism for TEDA-impregnated AC to be both chemical and physical adsorption. Chemical adsorption and oxidation were the primary means by which TEDA-impregnated ASC-carbons removed the simulated gases.

  17. Action of ionizing radiation on epoxy resins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van de Voorde, M. E.

    1970-12-01

    The resistance of classical and experimental epoxy resins to irradiation was studied. The resistance to irradiation of epoxy resins of diverse compositions as well as the development of resins having a radioresistance that approaches that of certain ceramics are discussed. Sources of irradiation and the techniques of dosimetry used are described. The structures of certain epoxy resins and of hardeners are given. The preparation of these resins and their physical properties is described. The effects of radiation on epoxy resins, as well as conditions of irradiation, and suggested mechanisms for degradation of the irradiated resins are discussed. The relationship between chemical structure of the resins and their physical properties is evaluated. (115 references) (JCB)

  18. Method for loading resin beds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Notz, K.J.; Rainey, R.H.; Greene, C.W.; Shockley, W.E.

    1978-01-01

    An improved method of preparing nuclear reactor fuel by carbonizing a uranium loaded cation exchange resin provided by contacting a H+ loaded resin with a uranyl nitrate solution deficient in nitrate, comprises providing the nitrate deficient solution by a method comprising the steps of reacting in a reaction zone maintained between about 145 to 200 0 C, a first aqueous component comprising a uranyl nitrate solution having a boiling point of at least 145 0 C with a second aqueous component to provide a gaseous phase containing HNO 3 and a reaction product comprising an aqueous uranyl nitrate solution deficient in nitrate

  19. Characteristics of scandate-impregnated cathodes with sub-micron scandia-doped matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Haiqing; Gu Xin; Pan Kexin; Wang Yiman; Liu Wei; Zhang Ke; Wang Jinshu; Zhou Meiling; Li Ji

    2005-01-01

    We describe in this paper scandate-impregnated cathodes with sub-micron scandia-doped tungsten matrices having an improved uniformity of the Sc distribution. The scandia-doped tungsten powders were made by both liquid-solid doping and liquid-liquid doping methods on the basis of previous research. By improving pressing, sintering and impregnating procedures, we have obtained scandate-impregnated cathodes with a good uniformity of the Sc 2 O 3 - distribution. The porosity of the sub-micron structure matrix and content of impregnants inside the matrix are similar to those of conventionally impregnated cathodes. Space charge limited current densities of more than 30 A/cm 2 at 850 deg. C b have been obtained in a reproducible way. The current density continuously increases during the first 2000 h life test at 950 deg. C b with a dc load of 2 A/cm 2 and are stable for at least 3000 h

  20. Resin for processing radioactive waste water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onozuka, Teruo; Shindo, Manabu; Kiba, Hideaki; Kubota, Hirohisa; Sawada, Shintaro.

    1995-01-01

    The present invention concerns an anionic exchange resin having a long service life with less radiation degradation. The resin is an anionic exchange resin in which a trimethyl ammonium group is introduced to a copolymer of 4-bromo-butoxymethyl styrene and divinyl benzene. The resin is excellent in economic performance, and can reduce the frequency for the exchange of cross-linked anionic exchangers. (T.M.)

  1. Resin for processing radioactive waste water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onozuka, Teruo; Shindo, Manabu [Tohoku Electric Power Co., Inc., Sendai (Japan); Kiba, Hideaki; Kubota, Hirohisa; Sawada, Shintaro

    1995-11-07

    The present invention concerns an anionic exchange resin having a long service life with less radiation degradation. The resin is an anionic exchange resin in which a trimethyl ammonium group is introduced to a copolymer of 4-bromo-butoxymethyl styrene and divinyl benzene. The resin is excellent in economic performance, and can reduce the frequency for the exchange of cross-linked anionic exchangers. (T.M.).

  2. SOLVENT FIRE BY-PRODUCTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, D; Samuel Fink, S

    2006-05-22

    Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) conducted a burn test of the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) solvent to determine the combustion products. The testing showed hydrogen fluoride gas is not a combustion product from a solvent fire when up to 70% of the solvent is consumed. The absence of HF in the combustion gases may reflect concentration of the modifier containing the fluoride groups in the unburned portion. SwRI reported results for other gases (CO, HCN, NOx, formaldehyde, and hydrocarbons). The results, with other supporting information, can be used for evaluating the consequences of a facility fire involving the CSSX solvent inventory.

  3. Evaluation of extractants and chelating resins in polishing actinide-contaminated waste streams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreiber, S.B.; Dunn, S.L.; Yarbro, S.L.

    1991-06-01

    At the Los Alamos National Laboratory Plutonium Facility, anion exchange is used for recovering plutonium from nitric acid solutions. Although this approach recovers >99%, the trace amounts of plutonium and other actinides remaining in the effluent require additional processing. We are doing research to develop a secondary unit operation that can directly polish the effluent so that actinide levels are reduced to below the maximum allowed for facility discharge. We selected solvent extraction, the only unit operation that can meet the stringent process requirements imposed; several carbonyl and phosphoryl extractants were evaluated and their performance characterized. We also investigated various engineering approaches for solvent extraction; the most promising was a chelating resin loaded with extractant. Our research now focuses on the synthesis of malonamides, and our goal is to bond these extractants to a resin matrix. 7 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab

  4. 21 CFR 177.1680 - Polyurethane resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Polyurethane resins. 177.1680 Section 177.1680 Food... of Single and Repeated Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1680 Polyurethane resins. The polyurethane...) For the purpose of this section, polyurethane resins are those produced when one or more of the...

  5. Campuran kitosan dengan resin akrilik sebagai bahan gigi tiruan penghambat Candida albicans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Titik Ismiyati

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The mixture of acrylic resin and chitosan as denture material to inhibit Candida albicans. The inhibition of Candida albicans in denture resin has an important role to prevent the development of denture stomatitis. Chitosan is a natural polymer compound derived from shrimp waste which can function as an antifungal Acrylik resin cannot be mixed with chitosan. To obtain a homogeneous mixture, the mixture was added a coupling agen acrylic acid and acetone. The research objective was to study the mixture of acrylic resin and chitosan with solvent acrylic acid and acetone as a denture that can inhibit the growth of Candida albicans. Methods: The samples used discs in 10 mm diameter and 2 mm thickness, made from heat cured acrylic resin mixed with chitosan dissolved in acrylat acid and acetone. They were divided into 4 groups. Group 1 was acrylic resin without chitosan as a control, group 2, 3 and 4 were the mixture of acrylic resin and 5 ml chitosan in 0.5%, 1%, and 2% concentration respectively. The fourier transform irfrared spectroscopy (FTIR and the digital optical microscope were used to synthesize and analyze. The Kruskal Wallis was used to analyze the data. The results showed that the mixture of acrylic resin with chitosan significantly inhibited the growth of Candida albicans. Conclusion: a mixture of acrylic resins and chitosan can be fungistatic, so it can be developed as an antifungal denture material.   ABSTRAK Penghambatan Candida albicans pada gigi tiruan resin akrilik dapat memainkan peran penting dalam mencegah perkembangan denture stomatitis. Kitosan adalah senyawa polimer alam yang berasal dari limbah udang yang dapat berfungsi sebagai antijamur. Resin akrilik tidak dapat bercampur dengan kitosan. Untuk mendapatkan campuran yang homogen, campuran tersebut ditambah coupling agent asam akrilat dan aseton. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengkaji campuran resin akrilik dan kitosan dan asam akrilat pelarut aseton sebagai bahan gigi

  6. Antibiotic impregnated total femur spacers: a technical tip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin D. Canham, MD

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Simultaneous prosthetic joint infection of ipsilateral hip and knee arthroplasties is often accompanied by significant bone loss and presents a challenging reconstructive problem. Two-stage reconstruction is favored and requires the placement of a total femur spacer, which is not a commercially available device. We describe a surgical technique, reporting on 2 cases in which a customized total femur antibiotic impregnated spacer was created by combining an articulating knee spacer and an articulating hip spacer with a reinforced cement dowel construct connecting the 2 spacers. Custom total femoral spacers are useful in the management of infected femoral megaprostheses and cases with ipsilateral injected hip and knee arthroplasties and severe femoral bone loss. Keywords: total femur spacer, revision arthroplasty, total hip arthroplasty, total knee arthroplasty, prosthetic joint infection

  7. Evaluation and improvement of gamma-ray stability of chelating resins containing oxy-acid groups of phosphorus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jyo, Akinori; Yamabe, Kazunori; Shuto, Taketomi

    1998-01-01

    Chelating resins containing oxy-acid groups of phosphorus, such as phosphonic and phosphoric acid groups have been studied from the point of view of solvent extraction processes for the separation of nuclear fuel elements as well as of fission product ones. The present work was planned to evaluate the effect of gamma-ray on properties of the resins and to obtain directional information for design of the resins having high stability to gamma-ray. It was clarified that gamma-ray stability of the resins is not high; tolerance limit is ca. 2.3x10 3 C/kg. The present work also clarified that polymers crosslinked with divinylbenzene have much higher gamma-ray stability than ones crosslinked with dimetacrylate esters of oligo (ethylene glycol)s. (J.P.N.)

  8. Do water based resins find their use in radiation cure applications?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravijst, J.-P.

    1995-01-01

    There is an increasing demand for UV/EB formulation without monomers. Water dilutable oligomers offer one approach to formulations of this type. Several ways to use water as a primary means of reducing oligomer viscosities are reviewed. A number of new water dilutable acrylate resins were prepared having different functionalities and properties. Depending on the structure, viscosity decreases significantly by adding water. Good reactivity, solvent and water resistance were achieved after curing

  9. Resins production: batch plant automation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banti, M.; Mauri, G.

    1996-01-01

    Companies that look for automation in their plants without external resources, have at their disposal flexible, custom and easy to use DCS, open towards PLC. In this article it is explained why Hoechts has followed this way of new plants for resins production automation

  10. Occupational exposure to epoxy resins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terwoert, J.; Kersting, K.

    2014-01-01

    Products based on epoxy resins as a binder have become popular in various settings, among which the construction industry and in windmill blade production, as a result of their excellent technical properties. However, due to the same properties epoxy products are a notorious cause of allergic skin

  11. Removal of radioactive caesium from low level radioactive waste (LLW) streams using cobalt ferrocyanide impregnated organic anion exchanger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valsala, T.P., E-mail: tpvalsala@yahoo.co.in [Waste Management Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay 400 085 (India); Roy, S.C. [PREFRE Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Tarapur 401 502 (India); Shah, J.G. [Back End Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay 400 085 (India); Gabriel, J.; Raj, Kanwar [Waste Management Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay 400 085 (India); Venugopal, V. [Radiochemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay 400 085 (India)

    2009-07-30

    The volumes of low level waste (LLW) generated during the operation of nuclear reactor are very high and require a concentration step before suitable matrix fixation. The volume reduction (concentration) is achieved either by co-precipitating technique or by the use of highly selective sorbents and ion exchange materials. The present study details the preparation of cobalt ferrocyanide impregnated into anion exchange resin and its evaluation with respect to removal of Cs in LLW streams both in column mode and batch mode operations. The Kd values of the prepared exchanger materials were found to be very good in actual reactor LLW solutions also. It was observed that the exchanger performed very well in the pH range of 3-9. A batch size of 6 g l{sup -1} of the exchanger was enough to give satisfactory decontamination for Cs in actual reactor LLW streams. The lab scale and pilot plant scale performance of the exchanger material in both batch mode and column mode operations was very good.

  12. Measurement of emissions during the crosslinking of phenolic resins. Problems with cross-sensibility when determining formaldehyde. Messung von Emissionen bei der Aushaertung von Phenolharzen. Probleme durch Querempfindlichkeiten bei der Bestimmung von Formaldehyd

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haub, H.G.; Muehlhauser, S.; Mueller, F.J.; Gardziella, A. (Bakelite GmbH, Iserlohn (Germany, F.R.))

    1988-04-01

    Phenol and formol (37-50% aqueous solution of formaldehyde) are the main raw materials for the production of phenolic resins. Hexamethylene tetramine is the common constituent for crosslinking when processing phenol novolaks. Most of the today colorimetric methods for the determination of formaldehyde have a strong cross sensibility to hexamethylene tetramine. The error may be 1-2 powers of ten. The only exception is the AHMT-method. Hexamethylene tetramine-containing phenolic resin systems are required for grinding and friction materials, for textile fibre mass and in the foundry industries (croning process). These systems are also used for refractories, for impregnation and for producing carbon and graphite materials. (orig.).

  13. Solvent effects in chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Buncel, Erwin

    2015-01-01

    This book introduces the concepts, theory and experimental knowledge concerning solvent effects on the rate and equilibrium of chemical reactions of all kinds.  It begins with basic thermodynamics and kinetics, building on this foundation to demonstrate how a more detailed understanding of these effects may be used to aid in determination of reaction mechanisms, and to aid in planning syntheses. Consideration is given to theoretical calculations (quantum chemistry, molecular dynamics, etc.), to statistical methods (chemometrics), and to modern day concerns such as ""green"" chemistry, where ut

  14. Oxygen index tests of thermosetting resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilwee, W. J., Jr.; Parker, J. A.; Kourtides, D. A.

    1980-01-01

    The flammability characteristics of nine thermosetting resins under evaluation for use in aircraft interiors are described. These resins were evaluated using the Oxygen Index (ASTM 2863) testing procedure. The test specimens consisted of both neat resin and glass reinforced resin. When testing glass-reinforced samples it was observed that Oxygen Index values varied inversely with resin content. Oxygen values were also obtained on specimens exposed to temperatures up to 300 C. All specimens experienced a decline in Oxygen Index when tested at an elevated temperature.

  15. Commercial Ion Exchange Resin Vitrification Studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cicero-Herman, C.A

    2002-01-01

    In the nuclear industry, ion exchange resins are used for purification of aqueous streams. The major contaminants of the resins are usually the radioactive materials that are removed from the aqueous streams. The use of the ion exchange resins creates a waste stream that can be very high in both organic and radioactive constituents. Therefore, disposal of the spent resin often becomes an economic problem because of the large volumes of resin produced and the relatively few technologies that are capable of economically stabilizing this waste. Vitrification of this waste stream presents a reasonable disposal alternative because of its inherent destruction capabilities, the volume reductions obtainable, and the durable product that it produces

  16. Cleanup of Savannah River Plant solvent using solid sorbents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mailen, J.C.; Tallent, O.K.

    1985-04-01

    The degradation products produced in Purex solvent by exposure to nitric acid and radiation can be divided into two groups: those which are removed by scrubbing with sodium carbonate solutions and those which are not; these latter materials are called secondary degradation products. This study investigated the use of solid sorbents for removal of the secondary degradation products from first-cycle Savannah River Plant solvent that had been previously washed with sodium carbonate solution. Silica gel, activated charcoal, macroreticular resin, attapulgite clay and activated alumina were the sorbents investigated in preliminary testing. Activated alumina was found to be most effective for improving phase separation of the solvent from sodium carbonate solutions and for increasing the interfacial tension. The activated alumina was also the sorbent most useful for removing complexants which retain plutonium at low acidity, but it was less effective in removing anionic surfactants and ruthenium. We found that the capacity of the activated alumina was greatly improved by drying the solvent before treatment

  17. Solvent effects in the synergistic solvent extraction of Co2+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kandil, A.T.; Ramadan, A.

    1979-01-01

    The extraction of Co 2+ from a 0.1M ionic strength aqueous phase (Na + , CH 3 COOH) of pH = 5.1 was studied using thenoyltrifluoroacetone, HTTA, in eight different solvents and HTTA + trioctylphosphine oxide, TOPO, in the same solvents. A comparison of the effect of solvent dielectric constant on the equilibrium constant shows a synergism as a result of the increased hydrophobic character imparted to the metal complex due to the formation of the TOPO adduct. (author)

  18. Spray drying of bead resins: feasibility tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gay, R.L.; Grantham, L.F.; Jones, L.J.

    1984-01-01

    Rockwell International has developed a volume reduction system for low-level reactor wastes based on drying the wastes in a heated-air spray dryer. The drying of slurries of sodium sulfate, boric acid, and powdered ion exchange resins was demonstrated in previous tests. The drying of bead ion exchange resins can be especially difficult due to the relatively large size of bead resins (about 500 to 800 microns) and their natural affinity for water. This water becomes part of the pore structure of the resins and normally comprises 50 t 60 wt % of the resin weight. A 76-cm-diameter spray dryer was used for feasibility tests of spray drying of cation and anion bead resins. These resins were fed to the dryer in the as-received form (similar to dewatered resins) and as slurries. A dry, free-flowing product was produced in all the tests. The volume of the spray-dried product was one-half to one-third the volume of the as-received material. An economic analysis was made of the potential cost savings that can be achieved using the Rockwel spray dryer system. In-plant costs, transportation costs, and burial costs of spray-dried resins were compared to similar costs for disposal of dewatered resins. A typical utility producing 170 m 3 (6,000 ft 3 ) per year of dewatered resins can save $600,000 to $700,000 per year using this volume reduction system

  19. Solvent extraction of zirconium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S.S.; Yoon, J.H.

    1981-01-01

    The extraction of zirconium(VI) from an aqueous solution of constant ionic strength with versatic acid-10 dissolved in benzen was studied as a function of pH and the concentration of zirconium(VI) and organic acid. The effects of sulphate and chlorine ions on the extraction of the zirconium(VI) were briefly examined. It was revealed that (ZrOR 2 .2RH) is the predominant species of extracted zirconium(VI) in the versatic acid-10. The chemical equation and the apparent equilibrium constants thereof have been determined as follows. (ZrOsup(2+))aq+ 2(R 2 H 2 )sub(org) = (ZrOR 2 .2RH)sub(org)+2(H + )aq Ksub(Zr) = (ZrOR 2 .2RH)sub(org)(H + ) 2 /(ZrOsup(2+))sub(aq)(R 2 H 2 )sup(2)sub(org) = 3.3 x 10 -7 . The synergistic effects of TBP and D2EHPA were also studied. In the mixed solvent with 0.1M TBP, the synergistic effect was observed, while the mixed solvent with D2EHPA showed the antisynergistic effect. (Author)

  20. Solvent free one pot synthesis of amidoalkyl naphthols over phosphotungstic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divya P. Narayanan

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Montmorillonite KSF clay was effectively modified by the encapsulation of phosphotungstic acid into the clay layers via sonication followed by incipient wet impregnation method. The prepared catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR and scanning electron microscopy (SEM techniques. The catalytic activities of the prepared systems were investigated in the solvent free synthesis of amidoalkyl naphthols by the multicomponent one-pot condensation of an aldehyde, β-naphthol and an amide or urea. Excellent yield, shorter reaction time, easy work-up, and reusability of the catalyst are the main attractions of this green procedure.

  1. Preparation and Properties of Moisture-absorbing Film Impregnated with Polyacrylic Acid Partial Sodium Salt Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Youn Suk; Park, Insik; Choi, Hong Yeol

    2014-01-01

    Moisture is a major factor causing the deteriorative physical change, microbial growth, and chemical reaction of the products. In this study, the moisture absorbing composite films have been prepared with moisture absorbing material of polyacrylic acid partial sodium salt (PAPSS) impregnated on LLDPE polymer for the functional packaging applications. The results showed that PAPSS impregnated film illustrated uniformly dispersed PAPSS particles in the LLDPE polymer matrix. The transparency of the PAPSS impregnated film decreased slightly at higher PAPSS concentrations. An increase in the PAPSS content for moisture-absorbing films showed a similar decrease in tensile strength, percent elongation at break, and tear strength. Their values of films impregnated with PAPSS of 0.5, 1, and 2% showed no significant difference. Meanwhile, 4% PAPSS films significantly decreased the values of mechanical properties compared to the films impregnated with different PAPSS levels. Values of the oxygen permeability and water vapor permeability for PAPSS impregnated films decreased significantly with greater PAPSS. The results indicate that 4% PAPSS impregnated in LLDPE films had high affinity of moisture absorbencies compared to the other films. The mathematical equation that best described the moisture sorption isotherm of each film sample was the GAB equation at 25 .deg. C. The crystallization and melting temperatures of PAPSS films were influenced by the addition of PAPSS material, but showed good thermal stability

  2. Preparation of iron-impregnated granular activated carbon for arsenic removal from drinking water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang Qigang; Lin Wei; Ying Weichi

    2010-01-01

    Granular activated carbon (GAC) was impregnated with iron through a new multi-step procedure using ferrous chloride as the precursor for removing arsenic from drinking water. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analysis demonstrated that the impregnated iron was distributed evenly on the internal surface of the GAC. Impregnated iron formed nano-size particles, and existed in both crystalline (akaganeite) and amorphous iron forms. Iron-impregnated GACs (Fe-GACs) were treated with sodium hydroxide to stabilize iron in GAC and impregnated iron was found very stable at the common pH range in water treatments. Synthetic arsenate-contaminated drinking water was used in isotherm tests to evaluate arsenic adsorption capacities and iron use efficiencies of Fe-GACs with iron contents ranging from 1.64% to 12.13% (by weight). Nonlinear regression was used to obtain unbiased estimates of Langmuir model parameters. The arsenic adsorption capacity of Fe-GAC increased significantly with impregnated iron up to 4.22% and then decreased with more impregnated iron. Fe-GACs synthesized in this study exhibited higher affinity for arsenate as compared with references in literature and shows great potential for real implementations.

  3. Preparation of Palladium-Impregnated Ceria by Metal Complex Decomposition for Methane Steam Reforming Catalysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Worawat Wattanathana

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Palladium-impregnated ceria materials were successfully prepared via an integrated procedure between a metal complex decomposition method and a microwave-assisted wetness impregnation. Firstly, ceria (CeO2 powders were synthesized by thermal decomposition of cerium(III complexes prepared by using cerium(III nitrate or cerium(III chloride as a metal source to form a metal complex precursor with triethanolamine or benzoxazine dimer as an organic ligand. Palladium(II nitrate was consequently introduced to the preformed ceria materials using wetness impregnation while applying microwave irradiation to assist dispersion of the dopant. The palladium-impregnated ceria materials were obtained by calcination under reduced atmosphere of 10% H2 in He stream at 700°C for 2 h. Characterization of the palladium-impregnated ceria materials reveals the influences of the metal complex precursors on the properties of the obtained materials. Interestingly, the palladium-impregnated ceria prepared from the cerium(III-benzoxazine dimer complex revealed significantly higher BET specific surface area and higher content of the more active Pdδ+ (δ > 2 species than the materials prepared from cerium(III-triethanolamine complexes. Consequently, it exhibited the most efficient catalytic activity in the methane steam reforming reaction. By optimization of the metal complex precursors, characteristics of the obtained palladium-impregnated ceria catalysts can be modified and hence influence the catalytic activity.

  4. Preparation and Properties of Moisture-absorbing Film Impregnated with Polyacrylic Acid Partial Sodium Salt Material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Youn Suk; Park, Insik [Yonsei University, Wonju (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Hong Yeol [CJ Cheiljedang, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-15

    Moisture is a major factor causing the deteriorative physical change, microbial growth, and chemical reaction of the products. In this study, the moisture absorbing composite films have been prepared with moisture absorbing material of polyacrylic acid partial sodium salt (PAPSS) impregnated on LLDPE polymer for the functional packaging applications. The results showed that PAPSS impregnated film illustrated uniformly dispersed PAPSS particles in the LLDPE polymer matrix. The transparency of the PAPSS impregnated film decreased slightly at higher PAPSS concentrations. An increase in the PAPSS content for moisture-absorbing films showed a similar decrease in tensile strength, percent elongation at break, and tear strength. Their values of films impregnated with PAPSS of 0.5, 1, and 2% showed no significant difference. Meanwhile, 4% PAPSS films significantly decreased the values of mechanical properties compared to the films impregnated with different PAPSS levels. Values of the oxygen permeability and water vapor permeability for PAPSS impregnated films decreased significantly with greater PAPSS. The results indicate that 4% PAPSS impregnated in LLDPE films had high affinity of moisture absorbencies compared to the other films. The mathematical equation that best described the moisture sorption isotherm of each film sample was the GAB equation at 25 .deg. C. The crystallization and melting temperatures of PAPSS films were influenced by the addition of PAPSS material, but showed good thermal stability.

  5. EDF specifications on nuclear grade resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mascarenhas, Darren; Gressier, Frederic; Taunier, Stephane; Le-Calvar, Marc; Ranchoux, Gilles; Marteau, Herve; Labed, Veronique

    2012-09-01

    Ion exchange resins are widely used across EDF, especially within the nuclear division for the purification of water. Important applications include primary circuit, secondary circuit and effluent treatment, which require high quality nuclear grade resins to retain the dissolved species, some of which may be radioactive. There is a need for more and more efficient purification in order to decrease worker dose during maintenance but also to decrease volumes of radioactive resin waste. Resin performance is subject to several forms of degradation, including physical, chemical, thermal and radioactive, therefore appropriate resin properties have to be selected to reduce such effects. Work has been done with research institutes, manufacturers and on EDF sites to select these properties, create specifications and to continuously improve on these specifications. An interesting example of research regarding resin performance is the resin degradation under irradiation. Resins used in the CVCS circuit of EDF nuclear power plants are subject to irradiation over their lifetime. A study was carried out on the effects of total integrated doses of 0.1, 1 and 10 MGy on typically used EDF mixed bed resins in a 'mini-CVCS' apparatus to simultaneously test actual primary circuit fluid. The tests confirmed that the resins still perform efficiently after a typical CVCS radiation dose. Certain resins also need additional specifications in order to maintain the integrity of the particular circuits they are used in. Recently, EDF has updated its requirements on these high purity nuclear grade resins, produced generic doctrines for all products and materials used on site which include resins of all grades, and as a result have also updated a guide on recommended resin usage for the French fleet of reactors. An overview of the evolutions will be presented. (authors)

  6. Effects of solvents on the early stage stiffening rate of demineralized dentin matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Fernanda C P; Otsuki, Masayuki; Pashley, David H; Tay, Franklin R; Carvalho, Ricardo M

    2005-05-01

    To monitor the stiffening rate of demineralized dentin matrix at the early stages after exposure to different neat solvents. Dentin beams approximately 0.8x0.7x8.0 mm were obtained from human third molars. After covering their ends with resin composite, the middle exposed length of 4.0mm (gauge-length) was demineralized in 0.5 M EDTA (pH 7.0) for 7 days. The specimens were gripped by a testing machine, pre-loaded to 10 g and cyclically stressed in tension to 5% strain, for 30 repeated cycles (total 20 min) at 0.6 mm/min while immersed in water (control). Then, water was replaced by either 100% acetone, methanol, ethanol, propanol, HEMA or air and the specimens subjected to the same cyclic protocol. The maximum apparent modulus of elasticity (E(Max)) was calculated for every cycle, plotted as a function of time and subjected to regression analysis. Stiffening rate was calculated as changes in E (min). Regression analysis examined the relationship between E and time for each solvent. Data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and Student-Newman-Keuls test at alpha=0.05. Regression analysis showed that E increased significantly with time in all water-free solvents (R2=0.8-0.99). Stiffening rate was higher for acetone (0.9 MPa/min) and ethanol (0.8 MPa/min), intermediate for air (0.7 MPa/min), methanol (0.6 MPa/min) and propanol (0.5 MPa/min), lower for HEMA (0.2 MPa/min) and practically none for water (0.07 MPa/min) with prate of demineralized dentin matrix is both time and solvent-dependent. The ability of solvents to promptly stiffen the demineralized dentin matrix may be important in maintaining the resin-infiltrated matrix expanded during the solvent evaporation stage of resin bonding.

  7. Study of adsorption properties of impregnated charcoal for airborne iodine and methyl iodide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi-dong, L.; Sui-yuang, H.

    1985-01-01

    The adsorption characteristics of airborne radioiodine and methyl iodide on impregnated charcoal were investigated. The activated charcoal tested was made from home-made oil-palm shells, and KI and TEDA were used as impregnants. A new technique was used to plot the dynamic partial adsorption isotherm at challenge concentrations (concentration range of iodine: 1-20 ppm v/v). Some adsorption properties of the impregnated charcoal were estimated with the dynamic partial adsorption isotherm. The dependences of the adsorption capacity and penetration behavior for airborne iodine and methyl iodide on the ambient conditions (temperature, relative humidity, and superficial velocity) were studied

  8. Polymer-filled microcontainers for oral delivery loaded using supercritical impregnation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marizza, Paolo; Keller, Stephan Sylvest; Müllertz, Anette

    2014-01-01

    with a quasi-no-waste performance. Then ketoprofen is impregnated in the polymer matrix by using supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) as loading medium. The amount of polymer is controlled by the volume and the number of droplets of dispensed polymer and drug loading is tuned by varying the impregnation...... procedures. This work proposes an effective loading technique for a poorly soluble model drug in microcontainers, by combining inkjet printing and supercritical fluid impregnation. Well defined quantities of poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) (PVP) solutions are dispensed into microcontainers by inkjet printing...

  9. Produced water treatment using polymeric resins; Resinas polimericas para tratamento da agua produzida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Louvisse, Ana Maria Travalloni; Freire, Norma de Oliveira [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas; Queiros, Yure Gomes de Carvalho; Silva, Carla Michele Frota da; Barros, Cintia Chagas; Lucas, Elizabeth Fernandes [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Macromoleculas

    2008-07-01

    The treatment and disposal of oily waters from oil production and refining processes represent an important technological pass for attendance of the ambient legislation and to the politics of the Cia of search of the environmental excellence. The reuse or reinjection of the co-produced water has been considered an interesting strategical alternative, however, the water quality requirement for these processes demands a pretreatment step, considering the exit effluent from primary and secondary treatment processes currently used. This work presents resulted of the polymeric resin development for tertiary treatment of oily waters with low oil and grasses content and fine solids, including the dissolved fraction. These resins can adsorb, in reversible form, organic components. Its high adsorption capacity is determined by the polarity, superficial area, range of porosity and a wide distribution of particle size and pore. Another important characteristic is the possibility of its use in some cycles of work due to its weak forces of interaction between the contaminants and the surface of the resin. Regeneration can be carried through of diverse forms, including the use of solvent, with or without the variation of temperature and/or pH. The gotten results indicated a high resin adsorption capacity, with concentrated oily water treatment volume 10,000 times the volume of resin used. (author)

  10. [Influence of retainer design on fixation strength of resin-bonded glass fiber reinforced composite fixed cantilever dentures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrikas, O A; Voroshilin, Iu G; Petrikas, I V

    2013-01-01

    Fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) fixed partial dentures (FPD) have become an accepted part of the restorative dentist's armamentarium. The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro the influence of retainer design on the strength of two-unit cantilever resin-bonded glass FRC-FPDs. Four retainer designs were tested: a dual wing, a dual wing + horizontal groove, a dual wing + occlusal rest and a step-box. Of each design on 7 human mandibular molars, FRC-FPDs of a premolar size were produced. The FRC framework was made of resin Revolution (Kerr) impregnated glass fibers (GlasSpan, GlasSpan) and veneered with hybrid resin composite (Charisma, Kulzer). Revolution (Kerr) was used as resin luting cement. FRC-FPDs were loaded to failure in a universal testing machine. T (Student's)-test was used to evaluate the data. The four designs were analyzed with finite element analysis (FEA) to reveal the stress distribution within the tooth/restoration complex. Significantly lower fracture strengths were observed with inlay-retained FPDs (step-box: 172±11 N) compared to wing-retained FPDs (poptimal design for replacement of a single premolar by means of a two-unit cantilever FRC-FPDs.

  11. Foam, Foam-resin composite and method of making a foam-resin composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cranston, John A. (Inventor); MacArthur, Doug E. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    This invention relates to a foam, a foam-resin composite and a method of making foam-resin composites. The foam set forth in this invention comprises a urethane modified polyisocyanurate derived from an aromatic amino polyol and a polyether polyol. In addition to the polyisocyanurate foam, the composite of this invention further contains a resin layer, wherein the resin may be epoxy, bismaleimide, or phenolic resin. Such resins generally require cure or post-cure temperatures of at least 350.degree. F.

  12. Manufacturing of REBCO coils strongly bonded to cooling members with epoxy resin aimed at its application to Maglev

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Katsutoshi; Ogata, Masafumi; Hasegawa, Hitoshi

    2014-11-01

    The REBCO coated conductor has been attracted attention because of its high current density in the presence of high magnetic field. If the coated conductor is applied to Maglev, the operational temperature of the on-board magnets will be over 40 K and energy consumption of cryocoolers will be reduced. That high operational temperature also means the absence of liquid helium. Therefore, reliable thermal coupling is desirable for cooling the coils. We propose an epoxy impregnated REBCO coil co-wound with PTFE tape. While the PTFE tape prevents the performance degradation of the coil, the epoxy resin bonds the coil to cooling members. We carried out three experiments to confirm that the coil structure which we propose has robust thermal coupling without the degradation. First, thermal resistances of paraffin and epoxy were measured varying the temperature from room temperature to 10 K. The measurement result indicates that paraffin has a risk of losing thermal coupling during cooling down. In another experiment, PTFE (polytetrafluoroethylene) tape insulator prevented performance degradation of a small epoxy impregnated REBCO coil, while another REBCO coil with polyimide tape showed clear performance degradation. Finally, we produced a racetrack REBCO coil with the same outer dimension as a Maglev on-board magnet coil. Although the racetrack coil was installed in a GFRP coil case and tightly bonded to the case by epoxy impregnation, any performance degradation was not observed.

  13. IMPREGNATED FIBROUS CHEMOSORBENTS OF ACID GASES FOR RESPIRATORY PURPOSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Ennan

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The present review is dedicated to the analysis of scientific works carried out in Physico- Chemical Institute of Environment and Human Protection (Odessa, Ukrainie and directed to the development of import-substituting sorption-filtering materials for respiratory purposes – impregnated fibrous chemisorbents (IFCS of acid gases, which are manufactured using standard equipment, as well as affordable and inexpensive chemical reagents and carriers of domestic origin. The process of chemisorption of sulphur dioxide by hexamethylenetetramine (HMTA modified nonwoven fibrous material resulted acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of HMTA to form aminomethanesulfonic acid and toxic formaldehyde. The IFCS with HMTA carried was recommended to use for air purification only from SiF4, HF, HCl and Cl2. Chemisorption of sulphur dioxide by fibrous materials impregnated by ethanolamines (monoethanolamine, diethanomamine, triethanomamine and N-methylethanolamine and polyethylenepolyamine (PEPA occurs only in the presence of “free” water with formation of “onium” sulphites, hydrosulphites and pyrosulphites. IFCS-PEPA (dynamic activity is 1,38 mmol(SO2/g are not inferior to the protective characteristics of IFCS with Na2CO3, HMTA, ethanolamines and the best foreign ionexchange fibrous chemisorbents brand VION and FIBAN (dynamic activity is 0,263 ÷0,422 mmol(SO2/g under conditions of respirators actual use (jAGM = 60 ÷ 90 %, TAGM = 297 K, VAGM = 2,0 sm/s, СSO2 = 20 ÷ 1000 mg/g3, QPEPA = 3,45 mmol/g. It is recommended to use the condensation products of primary alkylamines with formaldehyde (with large molar masses than the bases, complex compounds of amines with 3d-metals (Ni(II and Cu(II, salts of amine with aminoacids (glycine and polybasic acids (orthophosphoric acid (pKa1 = 2,12 and citric acid (pKa1 = 3,13 for manufacturing of IFCS of acid gases The IFCS with indication of dynamic absorptive capacity “wearing” (IVKS-I was developed.

  14. Synthesis, structure and properties of novel epoxy and rubber-modified epoxy impregnated Y-Ba-Cu-O superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low, I.M.; Lim, F.W.; Chisholm, W.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports the synthesis, structure and properties of novel YBa 2 Cu 3 O 6+x (123) - polymer composites. The polymers used were epoxy and rubber-modified epoxy resins. Superconducting composites with good strength, toughness, hardness and chemical resistance have been successfully fabricated. The presence of polymer(s) does not appear to affect the superconducting (T c ) of about 90 K. Levitation experiments show that the height (z) of the levitating magnet depends on sample thickness, and mass and pole strength of the magnet. A simple image force model best describes the observed dependence of z on the mass and pole strength. Atomic absorption and pH measurements in the corrosion study show that the polymer coating provides an impermeable barrier to the ingress of solvents and a concomitant resistance to phase decomposition. 12 refs., 2 tabs., 5 figs

  15. Oxidative dehydration of glycerol to acrylic acid over vanadium-impregnated zeolite beta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pestana, Carolina F.M.; Guerra, Antonio C.O.; Turci, Cassia C. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica; Ferreira, Glaucio B. [Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica; Mota, Claudio J.A., E-mail: cmota@iq.ufrj.br [INCT Energia e Ambiente, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-01-15

    The oxidative dehydration of glycerol to acrylic acid was studied over vanadium-impregnated zeolite Beta. Catalysts were prepared by wet impregnation of ammonium metavanadate over ammonium-exchanged zeolite Beta, followed by air calcination at 823 K. Impregnation reduced the specific surface area, but did not significantly affected the acidity (Bronsted and Lewis) of the zeolites. The catalytic evaluation was carried out in a fixed bed flow reactor using air as the carrier and injecting glycerol by means of a syringe pump. Acrolein was the main product, with acetaldehyde and hydroxy-acetone (acetol) being also formed. Acrylic acid was formed with approximately 25% selectivity at 548 K over the impregnated zeolites. The result can be explained by XPS (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy) measurements, which indicated a good dispersion of the vanadium inside the pores. (author)

  16. Effects of radiation induced polymerisation on the mechanical properties of polymer impregnated concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohgishi, S.; Ono, H.; Kasahara, Y.

    1980-01-01

    In this programme, effects of electron irradiation energy on mechanical properties of polymer impregnated concrete (PIC) were examined with regard to the density of the base cement mortar, the total exposure dose, the radiation source and other factors. (author)

  17. Inkjet Impregnation for Tailoring Air Electrode Microstructure to Improve Solid Oxide Cells Performance

    KAUST Repository

    Da’ as, Eman H.

    2015-01-01

    The urge to lower the operating temperature of solid oxide cells (SOCs) to the intermediate ranges between 500-700°C motivated the research into impregnation processes, which offer highly efficient SOC air electrodes at low operating temperatures

  18. Oxidative dehydration of glycerol to acrylic acid over vanadium-impregnated zeolite beta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pestana, Carolina F.M.; Guerra, Antonio C.O.; Turci, Cassia C.

    2013-01-01

    The oxidative dehydration of glycerol to acrylic acid was studied over vanadium-impregnated zeolite Beta. Catalysts were prepared by wet impregnation of ammonium metavanadate over ammonium-exchanged zeolite Beta, followed by air calcination at 823 K. Impregnation reduced the specific surface area, but did not significantly affected the acidity (Bronsted and Lewis) of the zeolites. The catalytic evaluation was carried out in a fixed bed flow reactor using air as the carrier and injecting glycerol by means of a syringe pump. Acrolein was the main product, with acetaldehyde and hydroxy-acetone (acetol) being also formed. Acrylic acid was formed with approximately 25% selectivity at 548 K over the impregnated zeolites. The result can be explained by XPS (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy) measurements, which indicated a good dispersion of the vanadium inside the pores. (author)

  19. Catalytic flash pyrolysis of oil-impregnated-wood and jatropha cake using sodium based catalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Imran, Ali; Bramer, Eddy A.; Seshan, Kulathuiyer; Brem, Gerrit

    2015-01-01

    Catalytic pyrolysis of wood with impregnated vegetable oil was investigated and compared with catalytic pyrolysis of jatropha cake making use of sodium based catalysts to produce a high quality bio-oil. The catalytic pyrolysis was carried out in two

  20. Polymerization of impregnated monomer in wood by microwave irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawase, Kaoru; Hayakawa, Kiyoshi

    1976-01-01

    The manufacturing of a wood-plastic combination (WPC) by irradiation of microwave (2,450 and 915 +- 50 MHz) or gamma-ray was carried out. After the impregnation of dry woods (Hinoki: Chamaecyparis obtusa Endl., Buna: Acer mono Maxim., and Kaede: Fagus crenata Blume) with the mixture of the vinyl monomers and chemical reagents, the monomer in wood was polymerized by irradiation. In case of polymerization with microwave (2,450 MHz) the effect of oxygen was not recognized, but in the case of gamma-ray the rate of polymerization remarkably decreased in the presence of oxygen. The polymerization of various monomers was carried out also in the air, and the conversions of styrene, methyl-, ethyl-, n-propyl-, and n-butyl-methacrylate were 51.8 -- 89.1%, but that of vinyl acetate was lower (4.3 -- 8.2%). The conversion of monomers with irradiation of 915 MHz microwave was very low (2.6 -- 33.5%). The conversion of monomers increased when toluylene diisocyanate was added in the monomers. The percentage of extraction with hot benzene of WPC (chip) decreased by the addition of toluylene diisocyanate. It was concluded from C.H.N. analyses that the reaction took place among the wood, toluylene diisocyanate and methyl methacrylate. (auth.)

  1. Rheological analysis of the phenolic and furfuryl resins used in the carbon materials processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edson Cocchieri Botelho

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available Carbon materials processing is an advanced technology due to its aerospace and medical applications. In the aerospace area one can mention the carbon/carbon composites used in rockets and aeronautical brakes; in the medical area one can mention the intrabody implant tools such as heart and hydrocephalic valves and pacemaker electrode tips. The highly sophisticated purpose of its application requires a very tight processing control, which defines the microstructure the mechanical, thermal and electrical characteristics of the final material. The objective of this study is to correlate rheological, chromatographic and thermal analysis of phenolic and furfuryl resins, aiming their use as raw materials in carbon/carbon composite and glassy carbon processing. The obtained results are correlated and used directly in the establishment of the adequate parameters for carbon reinforcement impregnation and to prepare glassy carbon samples with controlled porosity.

  2. Selective solvent extraction of oils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1938-04-09

    In the selective solvent extraction of naphthenic base oils, the solvent used consists of the extract obtained by treating a paraffinic base oil with a selective solvent. The extract, or partially spent solvent is less selective than the solvent itself. Selective solvents specified for the extraction of the paraffinic base oil are phenol, sulphur dioxide, cresylic acid, nitrobenzene, B:B/sup 1/-dichlorethyl ether, furfural, nitroaniline and benzaldehyde. Oils treated are Coastal lubricating oils, or naphthenic oils from the cracking, or destructive hydrogenation of coal, tar, lignite, peat, shale, bitumen, or petroleum. The extraction may be effected by a batch or counter-current method, and in the presence of (1) liquefied propane, or butane, or naphtha, or (2) agents which modify the solvent power such as, water, ammonia, acetonitrile, glycerine, glycol, caustic soda or potash. Treatment (2) may form a post-treatment effected on the extract phase. In counter-current treatment in a tower some pure selective solvent may be introduced near the raffinate outlet to wash out any extract therefrom.

  3. Resin Systems and Chemistry-Degradation Mechanisms and Durability in Long-Term Durability of Polymeric Matrix Composites. Chapter 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinkley, Jeffrey A.; Connell, John W.

    2012-01-01

    In choosing a polymer-matrix composite material for a particular application, a number of factors need to be weighed. Among these are mechanical requirements, fabrication method (e.g. press-molding, resin infusion, filament winding, tape layup), and use conditions. Primary among the environmental exposures encountered in aerospace structures are moisture and elevated temperatures, but certain applications may require resistance to other fluids and solvents, alkaline agents, thermal cycling, radiation, or rapid, localized heating (for example, lightning strike). In this chapter, the main classes of polymer resin systems found in aerospace composites will be discussed. Within each class, their responses to environmental factors and the associated degradation mechanisms will be reviewed.

  4. Carbonization of heavy metal impregnated sewage sludge oriented towards potential co-disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dou, Xiaomin; Chen, Dezhen; Hu, Yuyan; Feng, Yuheng; Dai, Xiaohu

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • The carbonization of SS with externally impregnated heavy metals was investigated. • Externally impregnated heavy metals can be immobilized in the SSC. • Higher carbonization temperature help produce non-hazardous SSC. • Incineration FA can be kneaded into SS for co-disposal through co-carbonization. - Abstract: Sewage sludge (SS) is adopted as a stabilizer to immobilize externally impregnated heavy metals through carbonization oriented towards the co-disposal of SS and some hazardous wastes. Firstly Cu and Pb were impregnated into SS to ascertain the impregnating capacity and leaching behaviours of heavy metals in the resulting sewage sludge char (SSC). Meanwhile, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were employed to detect the heavy metal phase in the SSC. The results showed that within 400–800 °C and an impregnating concentration ≨0.5 wt%, more than 90% of the externally impregnated Cu and Pb were remained in the SSC and immobilized. And higher temperatures helped produce non-hazardous SSC. In addition, SEM and XRD analyses revealed that externally impregnated heavy metals could be converted into stable forms and evenly distributed throughout the SSC. In the second step municipal solid waste incineration fly ash (FA) was kneaded into SS and subjected to carbonization; it has been proved that the heavy metals in FA can be well immobilized in the resulting char when FA: SS mass ratio is 1:5. Those results show that sewage sludge can be co-carbonized with wastes contaminated with heavy metals to achieve co-disposal.

  5. Conservation of diverse old wooden objects by impregnation and radiation curing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaudy, R.; Slais, E.; Eibner, C.

    1983-12-01

    The conservation by impregnation with radiation-curable impregnating agents and subsequent curing with gamma radiation of an medieval wooden window-frame, several gold-coated frame fragments, a primitive flail and a poppy mallet as well as fragments of a painted mail-box and of a border is described and the results are discussed. The process is especially suited for the consolidation of heavily decayed porous objects, e.g. archaeologic findings. (Author) [de

  6. Partial-impregnation techniques in the production of wood-polymer composites through gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Plessis, T.A.; Du Toit, G.S.; Jurriaanse, A.

    1977-04-01

    Radiation-processed wood-polymer composites produced from various partially impregnated Pinus species grown in South Africa were investigated and compared to a number of locally available noble hardwoods in respect of dimensional stability, hardness, homogeneity and weathering properties. This investigation clearly demonstrates that, through partial-impregnation techniques, wood-polymer composites can be formed from the locally grown Pinus species with a considerable saving in monomer costs without sacrificing most of the important physical properties of these materials [af

  7. Carbonization of heavy metal impregnated sewage sludge oriented towards potential co-disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dou, Xiaomin [Thermal & Environmental Engineering Institute, Tongji University, Shanghai 201804 (China); Chen, Dezhen, E-mail: chendezhen@tongji.edu.cn [Thermal & Environmental Engineering Institute, Tongji University, Shanghai 201804 (China); Hu, Yuyan; Feng, Yuheng [Thermal & Environmental Engineering Institute, Tongji University, Shanghai 201804 (China); Dai, Xiaohu [National Engineering Research Centre for Urban Pollution Control, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China)

    2017-01-05

    Highlights: • The carbonization of SS with externally impregnated heavy metals was investigated. • Externally impregnated heavy metals can be immobilized in the SSC. • Higher carbonization temperature help produce non-hazardous SSC. • Incineration FA can be kneaded into SS for co-disposal through co-carbonization. - Abstract: Sewage sludge (SS) is adopted as a stabilizer to immobilize externally impregnated heavy metals through carbonization oriented towards the co-disposal of SS and some hazardous wastes. Firstly Cu and Pb were impregnated into SS to ascertain the impregnating capacity and leaching behaviours of heavy metals in the resulting sewage sludge char (SSC). Meanwhile, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were employed to detect the heavy metal phase in the SSC. The results showed that within 400–800 °C and an impregnating concentration ≨0.5 wt%, more than 90% of the externally impregnated Cu and Pb were remained in the SSC and immobilized. And higher temperatures helped produce non-hazardous SSC. In addition, SEM and XRD analyses revealed that externally impregnated heavy metals could be converted into stable forms and evenly distributed throughout the SSC. In the second step municipal solid waste incineration fly ash (FA) was kneaded into SS and subjected to carbonization; it has been proved that the heavy metals in FA can be well immobilized in the resulting char when FA: SS mass ratio is 1:5. Those results show that sewage sludge can be co-carbonized with wastes contaminated with heavy metals to achieve co-disposal.

  8. Thin layer chromatography of glucose and sorbitol on Cu(II)-impregnated silica gel plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadzija, O. (Ruder Boskovic Inst., Zagreb (Croatia)); Spoljar, B. (Ruder Boskovic Inst., Zagreb (Croatia)); Sesartic, L. (Inst. of Immunology, Zagreb (Croatia))

    1994-04-01

    A thin-layer chromatographic (TLC) separation of glucose and sorbitol on CU(II)-impregnated silica gel plates with n-propanol: Water (4:1) v/v as developer and potassium permanganate as detecting reagent has been worked out. The new impregnant is completely insoluble in water and thus enables the use of an aqueous developer. The R[sub f]-values are 55 and 10 for glucose and sorbitol, respectively. (orig.)

  9. Selection and design of solvents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gani, Rafiqul

    and design of solvents will be presented together with application examples. The selection problem is defined as finding known chemicals that match the desired functions of a solvent for a specified set of applications. The design problem is defined as finding the molecular structure (or mixture of molecules....... With increasing interest on issues such as waste, sustainability, environmental impact and green chemistry, the selection and design of solvents have become important problems that need to be addressed during chemical product-process design and development. Systematic methods and tools suitable for selection......) that match the desired functions of a solvent for a specified set of applications. Use of organic chemicals and ionic liquids as solvents will be covered....

  10. Uranium determination in soil samples using Eichrom resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marabini, S.; Serdeiro, Nelidad H.

    2003-01-01

    Traditionally, the radiochemical methods for uranium activity determination in soil samples by alpha spectrometry, use some techniques like solvent extraction, precipitation and ion exchange in the separation and purification stages. In the last years, some new materials have been developed for using in extraction chromatography, specific for actinides determinations. In the present method the long and tedious stages were eliminated, and the reagents consumption and concentration were minimised. This new procedure was applied to soils since it is one of the most complex matrices. In order to reduce time and chemical reagents, the soil samples up to 0,5 g were leached with nitric, hydrofluoric and perchloric acids in hermetic sealed recipients of Teflon at 150 C degrees during 5 hours. UTEVA Eichrom resin was used for uranium separation and purification. The uranium activity concentration was determined by alpha spectrometry. Several standard samples were analysed and the results are presented. (author)

  11. Thermal Effect on the phosphoric Acid Impregnated Activated Carbon Fiber and Adsorption Properties Toward Isoprene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Taek Sung; Lee, Jin Hyok; Kang, Kyung suk [Department of Chemical Engineering, College of Engineering, Chungnam National University, Taejon (Korea); Kim, Kwang Young [Ace Lab. Co. Ltd. Taejon (Korea); Rhee, Moon Soo [Korea Ginseng and Tobacoo Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    2001-05-01

    To introduce chemisorption property and improve adsorption capacities for isoprene, ACF (Activated Carbon Fiber) was impregnated by phosphoric acid. As the impregnated ACF was dried by programmed temperature from 300 degree C to 500 degree C, degree of impregnation, surface area, thermal stability and adsorption properties for isoprene were observed. The degree of impregnation of the ACF, dried at the 400 degree C, was 12.7 w/w% and surface area was 1148 m{sup 2}/g. Over the temperature range of 450 degree C to 700 degree C, there was one-step thermal degradation by the thermal decomposition of phosphonyl group. The adsorption rate of phosphoric acid on the impregnated ACF, which was dried at 400 degree C, was the fastest. The breakthrough time of ACF that was dried at 400 degree C was 18 min., and its adsorption capacity improved roughly 7.2 times in comparison to the pure ACF. In addition, it was observed the adsorption properties persisted even after the regeneration. The adsorption efficiency of regenerated ACF was 66 percent compared to the unused impregnated ACF. 21 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Laser incising of wood: Impregnation of columns with water-soluble dye

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hattori, N.; Ando, K.; Kitayama, S.; Nakamura, Y.

    1994-01-01

    To know whether or not laser incising is a useful pre-treatment technique in impregnating a chemical fluid into lumber, pin holes were made in columns of hinoki (Chamaecyparis obtusa Endl.), sugi (Cryptomeria japonica D. Don), karamatsu (Larix leptolepis Gordon) and douglas-fir (Pseudo-tsuga menziesii Franco) with 1.7 kW CO2 laser, and a water-soluble dye was impregnated into these columns with a local pressure impregnation device. Retentions, and lengths and widths of penetrations from each hole were measured quantitatively. Referring to the results of the preparatory experiment mentioned above, incising patterns for sugi and douglas-fir were designed, and the same water-soluble dye was impregnated into the laser-incised columns as well as into non-incised ones with the vacuum-pressure method to obtain penetrated layers with the target depths completely. As a result, a retention of 200 kg/m3 of dye could be achieved for a column of douglas-fir even if it is a species difficult to impregnate. The penetrated layer also could be formed completely at the depth of the laser incision. Therefore, it is concluded that laser incising can be used for the pre-treatment before impregnation of wood columns. (author)

  13. Carbonization of heavy metal impregnated sewage sludge oriented towards potential co-disposal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Xiaomin; Chen, Dezhen; Hu, Yuyan; Feng, Yuheng; Dai, Xiaohu

    2017-01-05

    Sewage sludge (SS) is adopted as a stabilizer to immobilize externally impregnated heavy metals through carbonization oriented towards the co-disposal of SS and some hazardous wastes. Firstly Cu and Pb were impregnated into SS to ascertain the impregnating capacity and leaching behaviours of heavy metals in the resulting sewage sludge char (SSC). Meanwhile, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were employed to detect the heavy metal phase in the SSC. The results showed that within 400-800°C and an impregnating concentration ≨0.5wt%, more than 90% of the externally impregnated Cu and Pb were remained in the SSC and immobilized. And higher temperatures helped produce non-hazardous SSC. In addition, SEM and XRD analyses revealed that externally impregnated heavy metals could be converted into stable forms and evenly distributed throughout the SSC. In the second step municipal solid waste incineration fly ash (FA) was kneaded into SS and subjected to carbonization; it has been proved that the heavy metals in FA can be well immobilized in the resulting char when FA: SS mass ratio is 1:5. Those results show that sewage sludge can be co-carbonized with wastes contaminated with heavy metals to achieve co-disposal. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Research and development of lithium isotope separation using an ionic-liquid impregnated organic membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoshino, Tsuyoshi

    2013-01-01

    The tritium needed as a fuel for fusion reactors is produced by the neutron capture reaction of lithium-6 ( 6 Li) in tritium breeding materials. However, natural Li contains only about 7.6 at.% 6 Li. In Japan, new lithium isotope separation technique using ionic-liquid impregnated organic membranes have been developed. The improvement in the durability of the ionic-liquid impregnated organic membrane is one of the main issues for stable, long-term operation of electrodialysis cells while maintaining good performance. Therefore, we developed highly-durable ionic-liquid impregnated organic membrane. Both ends of the ionic-liquid impregnated organic membrane were covered by a nafion 324 overcoat to prevent the outflow of the ionic liquid. The transmission of Lithium aqueous solution after 10 hours under the highly-durable ionic-liquid impregnated organic membrane is almost 13%. So this highly-durable ionic-liquid impregnated organic membrane for long operating of electrodialysis cells has been developed through successful prevention of ion liquid dissolution. (J.P.N.)

  15. Effects of impregnation methods and drying conditions on quinoline hydrodenitrogenation over Ni-W based catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Fang; Qiu, Zegang; Zhao, Liangfu; Xiang, Hongwei [Institute of Coal Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China); Guo, Shaoqing [Taiyuan University of Science and Technology (China)

    2014-04-15

    The effects of impregnation methods (co-impregnation and sequential impregnation) and drying conditions (air and vacuum) on the structure and catalytic behavior of MCM-41 supported Ni-W catalysts were investigated. The catalysts were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), diffuse reflectance UV-Vis absorbance spectroscopy (DRS), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and pyridine adsorbed infrared spectroscopy (Py-IR) techniques. They were tested for hydrodenitrogenation (HDN) of quinoline at temperatures of 300-400 deg C. The HDN results showed that the catalysts prepared by co-impregnation were more active than the catalysts prepared by sequential impregnation and the catalysts prepared by drying under vacuum were more active than the catalysts dried in air. Characterization revealed that the co-impregnation method and drying under vacuum promoted the dispersion of W, the formation of the active phases, and the formation of acidic sites on the catalysts. (author)

  16. Solidifying power station resins and sludges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willis, A.S.D.; Haigh, C.P.

    1984-01-01

    Radioactive ion exchange resins and sludges arise at nuclear power stations from various operations associated with effluent treatment and liquid waste management. As the result of an intensive development programme, the Central Electricity Generating Board (CEGB) has designed a process to convert power station resins and sludges into a shielded, packaged solid monolithic form suitable for final disposal. Research and development, the generic CEGB sludge/resin conditioning plant and the CEGB Active Waste Project are described. (U.K.)

  17. Volumetric polymerization shrinkage of contemporary composite resins

    OpenAIRE

    Nagem Filho, Halim; Nagem, Haline Drumond; Francisconi, Paulo Afonso Silveira; Franco, Eduardo Batista; Mondelli, Rafael Francisco Lia; Coutinho, Kennedy Queiroz

    2007-01-01

    The polymerization shrinkage of composite resins may affect negatively the clinical outcome of the restoration. Extensive research has been carried out to develop new formulations of composite resins in order to provide good handling characteristics and some dimensional stability during polymerization. The purpose of this study was to analyze, in vitro, the magnitude of the volumetric polymerization shrinkage of 7 contemporary composite resins (Definite, Suprafill, SureFil, Filtek Z250, Fill ...

  18. Removal of radiocesium using cation exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita-Murase, Yuko; Mizumura, Ryosuke; Tachibana, Yoshitaka; Kanazawa, Hideko

    2013-01-01

    Cation exchange resins (calcium polystyrene sulfonate, Ca-resin and sodium polystyrene sulfonate, Na-resin) have been used as agents to improve hyperkerlemia. For removing 137 Cs from the human body, the adsorption ability of the resin for 137 Cs was examined and evaluated. Resin (0.03 g) and 137 Cs (ca.1 kBq) were introduced into 3 mL of water, the Japanese Pharmacopoeia 1st fluid for a dissolution test (pH 1.2) and 2nd fluid (pH 6.8), respectively, and shaken. After 1-3 hours, the 137 Cs adsorption (%) of Na-resin was 99% in water, 60% in a pH 1.2 fluid and, 66% in a pH 6.8 fluid. By adding potassium, the 137 Cs adsorption (%) of Ca-resin was reduced. However, the 137 Cs adsorption (%) of Na-resin was almost unchanged. These results show that both resins have adsorption ability for 137 Cs in the stomach and the intestines. Therefore, the proposed method will be an effective means in the case of a radiological emergency due to 137 Cs. (author)

  19. The absorption of plutonium by anion resins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durham, R. W.; Mills, R.

    1961-10-15

    Equilibrium experiments have shown Pu{sup +4} to be absorbed from nitric acid onto an anion resin as a complex anion Pu(NO{sub 3}){sub 6}{sup -2}. The amount of absorption is dependent on the plutonium and nitric acid concentrations in the equilibrium solution with a maximum at 7N to 8N HNO{sub 3}. A low cross-linked resin has a higher capacity and reaches equilibrium more rapidly than the normally supplied resin. Saturation capacity of one per cent cross-linked Nalcite SBR (Dowex 1), 50 -- 100 mesh, is 385 mg Pu/gram dry resin. (author)

  20. Novel silica-based ion exchange resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-11-01

    Eichrom`s highly successful Diphonixo resin resembles a conventional ion exchange resin in its use of sulfonic acid ligands on a styrene- divinylbenzene matrix. Diphonix resin exhibits rapid exchange kinetics that allow economical operation of ion exchange systems. Unlike conventional resins, Diphonix resin contains chelating ligands that are diphosphonic acid groups that recognize and remove the targeted metals and reject the more common elements such as sodium, calcium and magnesium. This latter property makes Diphonix ideal for many industrial scale applications, including those involving waste treatment. For treatment of low-level, transuranic (TRU) and high- level radioactive wastes, Diphonix`s polystyrene backbone hinders its application due to radiolytic stability of the carbon-hydrogen bonds and lack of compatibility with expected vitrification schemes. Polystyrene-based Diphonix is approximately 60% carbon- hydrogen. In response to an identified need within the Department of Energy for a resin with the positive attributes of Diphonix that also exhibits greater radiolytic stability and final waste form compatibility, Eichrom has successfully developed a new, silica-based resin version of Diphonix. Target application for this new resin is for use in environmental restoration and waste management situations involving the processing of low-level, transuranic and high-level radioactive wastes. The resin can also be used for processing liquid mixed waste (waste that contains low level radioactivity and hazardous constituents) including mixed wastes contaminated with organic compounds. Silica-based Diphonix is only 10% carbon-hydrogen, with the bulk of the matrix silica.

  1. Solvent extraction of Zn and metals in Zn ores by nonphosphorous solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auchapt, J.M.; Tostain, Jacqueline.

    1975-07-01

    This bibliography follows a first work on Zn solvent extraction by organo-phosphorous compounds. The other solvents used in Zn extraction, are studied: oxygenated nonphosphorous solvents (ketones, alcohols, carboxylic acids, sulfonates), nitrogenous solvents and hydrocarbons [fr

  2. A high-performance renewable thermosetting resin derived from eugenol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Benjamin G; Sahagun, Christopher M; Guenthner, Andrew J; Groshens, Thomas J; Cambrea, Lee R; Reams, Josiah T; Mabry, Joseph M

    2014-07-01

    A renewable bisphenol, 4,4'-(butane-1,4-diyl)bis(2-methoxyphenol), was synthesized on a preparative scale by a solvent-free, Ru-catalyzed olefin metathesis coupling reaction of eugenol followed by hydrogenation. After purification, the bisphenol was converted to a new bis(cyanate) ester by standard techniques. The bisphenol and cyanate ester were characterized rigorously by NMR spectroscopy and single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies. After complete cure, the cyanate ester exhibited thermal stability in excess of 350 °C and a glass transition temperature (Tg ) of 186 °C. As a result of the four-carbon chain between the aromatic rings, the thermoset displayed a water uptake of only 1.8% after a four day immersion in 85 °C water. The wet Tg of the material (167 °C) was only 19 °C lower than the dry Tg , and the material showed no significant degradation as a result of the water treatment. These results suggest that this resin is well suited for maritime environments and provide further evidence that full-performance resins can be generated from sustainable feedstocks. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Double Vacuum Bag Process for Resin Matrix Composite Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Tan-Hung (Inventor); Jensen, Brian J. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A double vacuum bag molding assembly with improved void management and laminate net shape control which provides a double vacuum enviromnent for use in fabricating composites from prepregs containing air and/or volatiles such as reactive resin matrix composites or composites from solvent containing prepregs with non-reactive resins matrices. By using two vacuum environments during the curing process, a vacuum can be drawn during a B-stage of a two-step cycle without placing the composite under significant relative pressure. During the final cure stage, a significant pressure can be applied by releasing the vacuum in one of the two environments. Inner and outer bags are useful for creating the two vacuum environments with a perforated tool intermediate the two. The composite is placed intermediate a tool plate and a caul plate in the first environment with the inner bag and tool plate defining the first environment. The second environment is characterized by the outer bag which is placed over the inner bag and the tool plate.

  4. PETIs as High-Temperature Resin-Transfer-Molding Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connell, John N.; Smith, Joseph G., Jr.; Hergenrother, Paul M.

    2005-01-01

    Compositions of, and processes for fabricating, high-temperature composite materials from phenylethynyl-terminated imide (PETI) oligomers by resin-transfer molding (RTM) and resin infusion have been developed. Composites having a combination of excellent mechanical properties and long-term high-temperature stability have been readily fabricated. These materials are particularly useful for the fabrication of high-temperature structures for jet-engine components, structural components on highspeed aircraft, spacecraft, and missiles. Phenylethynyl-terminated amide acid oligomers that are precursors of PETI oligomers are easily made through the reaction of a mixture of aromatic diamines with aromatic dianhydrides at high stoichiometric offsets and 4-phenylethynylphthalic anhydride (PEPA) as an end-capper in a polar solvent such as N-methylpyrrolidinone (NMP). These oligomers are subsequently cyclodehydrated -- for example, by heating the solution in the presence of toluene to remove the water by azeotropic distillation to form low-molecular-weight imide oligomers. More precisely, what is obtained is a mixture of PETI oligomeric species, spanning a range of molecular weights, that exhibits a stable melt viscosity of less than approximately 60 poise (and generally less than 10 poise) at a temperature below 300 deg C. After curing of the oligomers at a temperature of 371 deg C, the resulting polymer can have a glass-transition temperature (Tg) as high as 375 C, the exact value depending on the compositions.

  5. Cesium Concentration in MCU Solvent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, D

    2006-01-01

    During Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) Unit (MCU) operations, Cs-137 concentrations in product streams will vary depending on the location in the process and on the recent process conditions. Calculations of cesium concentrations under a variety of operating conditions reveal the following: (1) Under nominal operations with salt solution feed containing 1.1 Ci Cs-137 per gallon, the maximum Cs-137 concentration in the process will occur in the strip effluent (SE) and equal 15-16.5 Ci/gal. (2) Under these conditions, the majority of the solvent will contain 0.005 to 0.01 Ci/gal, with a limited portion of the solvent in the contactor stages containing ∼4 Ci/gal. (3) When operating conditions yield product near 0.1 Ci Cs-137/gal in the decontaminated salt solution (DSS), the SE cesium concentration will be the same or lower than in nominal operations, but majority of the stripped solvent will increase to ∼2-3 Ci/gal. (4) Deviations in strip and waste stream flow rates cause the largest variations in cesium content: (a) If strip flow rates deviate by -30% of nominal, the SE will contain ∼23 Ci/gal, although the cesium content of the solvent will increase to only 0.03 Ci/gal; (b) If strip flow rate deviates by -77% (i.e., 23% of nominal), the SE will contain 54 Ci/gal and solvent will contain 1.65 Ci/gal. At this point, the product DSS will just reach the limit of 0.1 Ci/gal, causing the DSS gamma monitors to alarm; and (c) Moderate (+10 to +30%) deviations in waste flow rate cause approximately proportional increases in the SE and solvent cesium concentrations. Recovery from a process failure due to poor cesium stripping can achieve any low cesium concentration required. Passing the solvent back through the contactors while recycling DSS product will produce a ∼70% reduction during one pass through the contactors (assuming the stripping D value is no worse than 0.36). If the solvent is returned to the solvent hold tank (containing additional

  6. Effect of Reinforcement Using Stainless Steel Mesh, Glass Fibers, and Polyethylene on the Impact Strength of Heat Cure Denture Base Resin - An In Vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, H B Mallikarjuna; Shaik, Sharaz; Sachdeva, Harleen; Khare, Sumit; Haralur, Satheesh B; Roopa, K T

    2015-06-01

    The impact strength of denture base resin is of great concern and many approaches have been made to strengthen acrylic resin dentures. The objective of this study was to compare the impact strength of the denture base resin with and without reinforcement and to evaluate the impact strength of denture base resin when reinforced with stainless steel mesh, glass fiber, and polyethylene fibers in the woven form. The specimens (maxillary denture bases) were fabricated using a standard polyvinylsiloxane mold with conventional heat cured polymethyl methacrylate resin. The specimens were divided into four groups (n = 10). Group I specimens or control group were not reinforced. Group II specimens were reinforced with stainless steel mesh and Group III and Group IV specimens were reinforced with three percent by weight of glass fibers and polyethylene fibers in weave form respectively. All the specimens were immersed in water for 1-week before testing. The impact strength was measured with falling weight impact testing machine. One-way analysis of variance and Tukey's post-hoc test were used for statistical analysis. Highest impact strength values were exhibited by the specimens reinforced with polyethylene fibers followed by glass fibers, stainless steel mesh, and control group. Reinforcement of maxillary complete dentures showed a significant increase in impact strength when compared to unreinforced dentures. Polyethylene fibers exhibit better impact strength followed by glass fibers and stainless steel mesh. By using pre-impregnated glass and polyethylene fibers in woven form (prepregs) the impact strength of the denture bases can be increased effectively.

  7. Processing of polymers using reactive solvents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lemstra, P.J.; Kurja, J.; Meijer, H.E.H.; Meijer, H.E.H.

    1997-01-01

    A review with many refs. on processing of polymers using reactive solvents including classification of synthetic polymers, guidelines for the selection of reactive solvents, basic aspects of processing, examples of intractable and tractable polymer/reactive solvent system

  8. Radium separation through complexation by aqueous crown ethers and ion exchange or solvent extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiarizia, R.; Dietz, M.L.; Horwitz, E.P. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Chemistry Div.; Burnett, W.C. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States). Dept. of Oceanography

    1997-11-01

    The effect of three water-soluble, unsubstituted crown ethers (15-crown-5 (15C5), 18-crown-6 (18C6) and 21-crown-7 (21C7)) on the uptake of Ca, Sr, Ba and Ra cations by a sulfonic acid cation exchange resin, and on the extraction of the same cations by xylene solutions of dinonylnaphthalenesulfonic acid (HDNNS) from aqueous hydrochloric acid solutions has been investigated. The crown ethers enhance the sorption of the larger cations by the ion exchange resin, thereby improving the resin selectivity over calcium, a result of a synergistic interaction between the crown ether and the ionic functional groups of the resin. Similarly, the extraction of the larger alkaline earth cations into xylene by HDNNS is strongly synergized by the presence of the crown ethers in the aqueous phase. Promising results for intra-Group IIa cation separations have been obtained using each of the three crown ethers as the aqueous ligands and the sulfonic acid cation exchange resin. Even greater separation factors for the radium-calcium couple have been measured with the crown-ethers and HDNNS solutions in the solvent extraction mode. The application of the uptake and extraction results to the development of radium separation schemes is discussed and a possible flowchart for the determination of {sup 226}Ra/{sup 228}Ra in natural waters is presented.

  9. Handbook of organic solvent properties

    CERN Document Server

    Smallwood, Ian

    2012-01-01

    The properties of 72 of the most commonly used solvents are given, tabulated in the most convenient way, making this book a joy for industrial chemists to use as a desk reference. The properties covered are those which answer the basic questions of: Will it do the job? Will it harm the user? Will it pollute the air? Is it easy to handle? Will it pollute the water? Can it be recovered or incinerated? These are all factors that need to be considered at the early stages of choosing a solvent for a new product or process.A collection of the physical properties of most commonly used solvents, their

  10. Acetone-based cellulose solvent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostag, Marc; Liebert, Tim; Heinze, Thomas

    2014-08-01

    Acetone containing tetraalkylammonium chloride is found to be an efficient solvent for cellulose. The addition of an amount of 10 mol% (based on acetone) of well-soluble salt triethyloctylammonium chloride (Et3 OctN Cl) adjusts the solvent's properties (increases the polarity) to promote cellulose dissolution. Cellulose solutions in acetone/Et3 OctN Cl have the lowest viscosity reported for comparable aprotic solutions making it a promising system for shaping processes and homogeneous chemical modification of the biopolymer. Recovery of the polymer and recycling of the solvent components can be easily achieved. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. In vitro progression of artificial white spot lesions sealed with an infiltrant resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelani, R; Zandona, A F; Lippert, F; Kamocka, M M; Eckert, G

    2014-01-01

    This study assessed the ability of an infiltrant resin (Icon, DMG Chemisch-Pharmazeutische Fabrik GmbH, Hamburg, Germany) to prevent artificial lesion progression in vitro when used to impregnate white spot lesions and also assessed the effect of saliva contamination on resin infiltration. Enamel specimens (n=252) were prepared and covered with nail varnish, leaving a window of sound enamel. After demineralization (pH 5.0; four weeks), specimens were divided into six groups (n=42 per group): group 1, 2% fluoride gel (positive control); group 2, resin infiltrant; group 3, resin infiltrant + fluoride gel; group 4, no treatment (negative control); group 5, resin infiltrant application after saliva contamination; and group 6, resin infiltrant + fluoride gel after saliva contamination. Specimens from each group were cut perpendicular to the surface, and one-half of each specimen was exposed to a demineralizing solution for another four weeks. The other half was set aside as a record of initial lesion depth and was used later in the determination of lesion progression. Lesion progression and infiltrant penetration were measured using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and transverse microradiography (TMR). For lesion depth, based on CLSM, groups 2 and 3 showed the least changes when submitted to demineralization challenge, followed by group 1, then groups 5 and 6, and finally group 4. There were no significant differences between groups 2 and 3 or groups 5 and 6 in their ability to inhibit further lesion progression (p<0.05). Based on TMR, groups 2 and 3 also showed the fewest changes when submitted to demineralization challenge, followed by group 5, then groups 1 and 6, and finally group 4. In terms of mineral loss as measured by TMR, all groups that contained fluoride (groups 1, 3, and 6) show less percentage change in mineral loss than the groups that did not contain fluoride (groups 2, 4, and 5). It can be concluded that infiltrant penetration into early

  12. A novel nanoparticles impregnated ocular insert for enhanced bioavailability to posterior segment of eye: In vitro, in vivo and stability studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rathod, Lalaji V.; Kapadia, Rakhee; Sawant, Krutika K.

    2017-01-01

    The present investigation was carried out to demonstrate with the help of in vitro and in vivo studies that nanoparticles impregnated ocular inserts effectively delivers significant concentration of drug to the posterior segment of eye after topical administration for treatment of glaucoma. Drug loaded Nanoparticles and their ocular insert have been reported to reduce side effects of orally administered Acetazolamide. Eudragit NPs were prepared by the solvent diffusion nanoprecipitation technique. The prepared NPs were evaluated for various parameters such as particle size, zeta potential, % entrapment efficiency, % drug loading, DSC, FTIR, TEM and stability studies. Ocular inserts of NPs were prepared by solvent casting method. The prepared ocular inserts were evaluated for thickness, content uniformity, folding endurance, disintegration time, morphology and stability study. The NPs and ocular inserts were evaluated for in-vitro drug diffusion study, ex-vivo trans-corneal permeability study, in-vivo ocular tolerability and intra ocular pressure (IOP) reduction study. The optimized batch was stable for a period of 3 months in lyophilized form. The optimized formulations had size range of 367 nm ± 8 nm, zeta potential around + 7 mV ± 1.3 mV and 51.61% ± 3.84% entrapment efficiency with 19% ± 1.40% drug loading. The ex-vivo trans-corneal study showed higher cumulative corneal permeation, flux across corneal tissue (2.460 ± 0.028 μg/ml) and apparent corneal permeability (3.926 × 10 −6 cm 2 /s & 3.863 × 10 −6 cm 2 /s) from drug loaded Eudragit NPs and Ocular inserts as compared to drug solution (0.671 ± 0.020 μg/ml & 3.166 × 10 −6 cm 2 /s). In-vivo study showed the Eudragit NPs and ocular insert produced significant (P < 0.001) lowering in intra ocular pressure compared with the solution of free drug after 3 h of topical ocular administration. Plain Eudragit NPs caused no inflammation and/or discomfort in rabbit eyes and neither affected the intra

  13. A novel nanoparticles impregnated ocular insert for enhanced bioavailability to posterior segment of eye: In vitro, in vivo and stability studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rathod, Lalaji V.; Kapadia, Rakhee; Sawant, Krutika K., E-mail: dr_krutikasawant@rediffmail.com

    2017-02-01

    The present investigation was carried out to demonstrate with the help of in vitro and in vivo studies that nanoparticles impregnated ocular inserts effectively delivers significant concentration of drug to the posterior segment of eye after topical administration for treatment of glaucoma. Drug loaded Nanoparticles and their ocular insert have been reported to reduce side effects of orally administered Acetazolamide. Eudragit NPs were prepared by the solvent diffusion nanoprecipitation technique. The prepared NPs were evaluated for various parameters such as particle size, zeta potential, % entrapment efficiency, % drug loading, DSC, FTIR, TEM and stability studies. Ocular inserts of NPs were prepared by solvent casting method. The prepared ocular inserts were evaluated for thickness, content uniformity, folding endurance, disintegration time, morphology and stability study. The NPs and ocular inserts were evaluated for in-vitro drug diffusion study, ex-vivo trans-corneal permeability study, in-vivo ocular tolerability and intra ocular pressure (IOP) reduction study. The optimized batch was stable for a period of 3 months in lyophilized form. The optimized formulations had size range of 367 nm ± 8 nm, zeta potential around + 7 mV ± 1.3 mV and 51.61% ± 3.84% entrapment efficiency with 19% ± 1.40% drug loading. The ex-vivo trans-corneal study showed higher cumulative corneal permeation, flux across corneal tissue (2.460 ± 0.028 μg/ml) and apparent corneal permeability (3.926 × 10{sup −6} cm{sup 2}/s & 3.863 × 10{sup −6} cm{sup 2}/s) from drug loaded Eudragit NPs and Ocular inserts as compared to drug solution (0.671 ± 0.020 μg/ml & 3.166 × 10{sup −6} cm{sup 2}/s). In-vivo study showed the Eudragit NPs and ocular insert produced significant (P < 0.001) lowering in intra ocular pressure compared with the solution of free drug after 3 h of topical ocular administration. Plain Eudragit NPs caused no inflammation and/or discomfort in rabbit eyes and

  14. Input to Resin Column Structural Analysis if Autocatalytic Resin Reaction Occurs in HB-Line Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallman, D.F.

    2001-07-10

    Solutions of plutonium in nitric acid are purified and concentrated using anion resin prior to precipitation. There have been instances of resin column explosions caused by autocatalytic reactions of anion resins in nitric acid within the DOE complex

  15. Bacterial adhesion forces to Ag-impregnated contact lens cases and transmission to contact lenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Wenwen; Busscher, Henk J; van der Mei, Henny C; Hooymans, Johanna M M

    2013-03-01

    To measure adhesion forces of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, and Serratia marcescens to a rigid contact lens (CL), standard polypropylene, and Ag-impregnated lens cases using atomic force microscopy and determine bacterial transmission from lens case to CL. Adhesion forces of bacterial strains to Ag-impregnated and polypropylene lens cases and a rigid CL were measured using atomic force microscopy. Adhesion forces were used to calculate Weibull distributions, from which transmission probabilities from lens case to CL were derived. Transmission probabilities were compared with actual transmission of viable bacteria from a lens case to the CL in 0.9% NaCl and in an antimicrobial lens care solution. Bacterial transmission probabilities from polypropylene lens cases based on force analysis coincided well for all strains with actual transmission in 0.9% NaCl. Bacterial adhesion forces on Ag-impregnated lens cases were much smaller than that on polypropylene and CLs, yielding a high probability of transmission. Comparison with actual bacterial transmission indicated bacterial killing due to Ag ions during colony-forming unit transmission from an Ag-impregnated lens case, especially for P. aeruginosa. Transmission of viable bacteria from Ag-impregnated lens cases could be further decreased by use of an antimicrobial lens care solution instead of 0.9% NaCl. Bacterial transmission probabilities are higher from Ag-impregnated lens cases than from polypropylene lens cases because of small adhesion forces, but this is compensated for by enhanced bacterial killing due to Ag impregnation, especially when in combination with an antimicrobial lens care solution. This calls for a balanced combination of antimicrobial lens care solutions and surface properties of a lens case and CL.

  16. Homogenization-assisted cavitation hybrid rotation extraction and macroporous resin enrichment of dihydroquercetin from Larix gmelinii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yu; Wang, Yinhang; Li, Wei; Ma, Chunhui; Liu, Shouxin

    2017-12-01

    Cavitation hybrid rotation, which was and is still looked upon as an unavoidable nuisance in the flow systems, for extraction processing intensification of active chemical compounds from natural products. In this study, a homogenization-assisted cavitation hybrid rotation extraction method was applied to extract dihydroquercetin (DHQ) from larch (Larix gmelinii) wood root. The extraction parameters were optimized in single factor experiments with the DHQ extraction yields as the response values. The optimum conditions were as follows: number of extractions, three; ethanol volume fraction for the extraction, 60%; liquid-solid ratio for homogenization, 10mL/g; homogenization time, 8min; liquid-solid ratio for cavitation extraction, 9mL/g, and cavitation extraction time, 35min. Under these conditions, the DHQ content in extract was 4.50±0.02mg/g, and the extraction efficiency was higher than those of traditional techniques. Cavitation can be effectively used to improve the extraction rate by increasing the mass transfer rates and possible rupture of cell wall due to formation of microcavities leading to higher product yields with reduced processing time and solvent consumption. After the extraction process, macroporous resin column chromatography was used to concentrate and purify the DHQ. Three resins were selected from fifteen macroporous resins for further investigation of their performance. Among these resins, AB-8 resin exhibited relatively better adsorption capacities and desorption ratios for DHQ. The ethanol volume fraction of the solutions for sample loading and desorption, and flow rates for loading and desorption were optimized for the macroporous resin column chromatography. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Properties of the Carboxylate ion exchange resins; Karboxylatjonbytarmassans egenskaper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allard, Bert; Dario, Maarten [Oerebro Univ. (Sweden); Boren, Hans [Linkoepings Univ. (Sweden); Torstenfelt, Boerje [Swedpower, Stockholm (Sweden); Puigdomenech, Ignasi; Johansson, Claes [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden)

    2002-09-01

    Weakly acidic, carboxylic resin has been selected, together with strong base anion resins, for water purification at the Forsmark 1 and 2 reactors. For the strong (but not the weak) ion exchange resin the Nuclear Power Inspectorate has given permission to dispose the spent resins in the SFR 1 (the Final Repository for Radioactive Operational Waste). This report gives a review of the carboxylic resins and comes to the conclusion that the resins are very stable and that there should not exist any risks for increased leaching of radionuclides from SFR 1 if these resins are disposed (compared to the strong resins)

  18. Resin Viscosity Influence on Fiber Compaction in Tapered Resin Injection Pultrusion Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuram, N. B.; Roux, J. A.; Jeswani, A. L.

    2018-06-01

    Viscosity of the liquid resin effects the chemical and mechanical properties of the pultruded composite. In resin injection pultrusion manufacturing the liquid resin is injected into a specially designed tapered injection chamber through the injection slots present on top and bottom of the chamber. The resin is injected at a pressure so as to completely wetout the fiber reinforcements inside the tapered injection chamber. As the resin penetrates through the fibers, the resin also pushes the fibers away from the wall towards the center of chamber causing compaction of the fiber reinforcements. The fibers are squeezed together due to compaction, making resin penetration more difficult; thus higher resin injection pressures are required to efficaciously penetrate through the compacted fibers and achieve complete wetout. The impact of resin viscosity on resin flow, fiber compaction, wetout and on the final product is further discussed. Injection chamber design predominantly effects the resin flow inside the chamber and the minimum injection pressure required to completely wet the fibers. Therefore, a desirable injection chamber design is such that wetout occurs at lower injection pressures and at low internal pressures inside the injection chamber.

  19. Preferential solvation of single ions in mixed solvents: Part 1. New experimental approach and solvation of monovalent ions in methanol-water and acetonitrile-water mixture. Part 2. Theoretical computation and comparison with experimental data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rege, Aarti C.; Venkataramani, B.; Gupta, A.R.

    1999-06-01

    Preferential solvation of single ion solutions has been studied with Li + , Na + , K + and Ag +- forms of Dowex 50W resins of different cross-linkings in methanol-water and acetonitrile (AN)- water mixtures. The solvent uptake by this alkali metal ionic forms of Dowex 50W resins was studied in an isopiestic set-up using 2,4,6 and 8 m LiCl solutions in 11.0, 20.8, 44.3 and 70.2 % (w/w) methanol-water mixtures and that of Na +- and Ag +- forms using 14.6 to 94.3 % (w/w) AN - water mixtures. The solvent sorbed in the resin phase was extracted by Rayleigh-type distillation and analysed gas chromatographically. The data were analysed by the N s (mole fraction of the organic solvent in the resin phase) vs n t au (total solvent content in the resin phase) plots and separation factor, alpha(ratio of mole fraction of the solvents in the resin and solution phases) or N s vs m (molality in the resin phase) plots. The limiting values of these plots gave the composition of the solvent in the primary solvation shell around the single ion. The compositions of the primary solvation shell around Li + , Na + , and K + in methanol-water mixtures and Na + and Ag + in acetonitrile (AN) - water mixtures have been computed using Franks equation and the approach of Marcus and compared with the experimental results obtained with the above mentioned ionic forms of Dowex 50W resins in different mixed solvents. The experimental results for Li + showed good agreement with the values computed using Franks equation for all methanol-water composition. However, in the case of Na + and K + in methanol-water mixtures and Na + in AN-water mixtures, there was agreement only at lower organic solvent content and the Franks equation predicted higher values for the organic solvent in the primary solvation shell around the cation at higher organic solvent content as compared to experimental results

  20. Overview on resins available in microlithography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serre, B.; Schue, F.; Montginoul, C.; Giral, L.

    1985-01-01

    Lithographic equipments using electrons and X radiation are developed. Velocity and resolution requirements fix the nature of the material to irradiate. Circuit making principles are recalled here; resists (organic polymers) are employed for it. The different types of resins and then needed characteristics are reviewed here. In the scope of electron sensitive resins methyl polymethacrylate and derivative and its copolymers (and copolymers of methacrylonitrile) and reticulated copolymers are studied. Polysulfones are also presented (poly(buten-1 sulfone), poly(styrene sulfone), poly(methyl-1 cyclopentene-1 sulfone). The interest in photosensitive resins (such as AZ) as electron sensitive resins is recalled. In the field of negative resins, the polyepoxyds, polystyrene and halogenated derivates from polystyrene (CMS and PCMS), the poly(vinyl-2 naphtalene) and its derivatives (PSTTF) are presented. The X radiation sensitive resins are also reviewed: the methyl polymethacrylate and its halogenated derivates, the acrylic homopolymers and copolymers (example of poly(acrylate of chlorinated alcoyls). The resins developable by plasma are mentioned. At last, for photosensitive resins, the diazide polydiene systems are presented together with systems diazo-2 2H-naphtalenone-1. The systems with salt photolysis are just recalled [fr

  1. Epoxidation of linseed oil-Alkyd resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motawie, A.M.; Ismail, E.A.; Mazroua, A.M.; Abd EI Aziem, M.S.; Ramadan, A.M.

    2004-01-01

    Three types of different linseed oil-alkyd resin ( Alk (I), Alk (II), and Alk (III) ) were prepared with the calculated amounts of mono glycerides and adipic acid (1:1, 1:2, and 2:1 Eq.Wt) respectively via monoglyceride method. The obtained alkyd resins were epoxidized via reaction with the calculated quantities of peracetic acid, which was prepared by the reaction of acetic anhydride with H 2 O 2 . Epoxidation occurred with the ratio (1: 1, 1 :3, and 1:6 Eq. Wt) of alkyd to peracetic acid. The effect of reaction time on the epoxy group content was measured during the epoxidation process. The prepared alkyd resins were analyzed by IR and H 1 NMR. The metal coated film properties of epoxidized alkyd resins were compared with those of unmodified alkyd resins. It was observed that the coating films of epoxidized alkyd resins have better in drying properties, hardness, adhesion, impact and flexibility than those of un epoxidized alkyd resins. The flammability properties of the paper coated films for the prepared brominated epoxidized alkyd resins were found to be fire retardant

  2. 21 CFR 177.1595 - Polyetherimide resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... polyetherimide resin identified in this section may be safely used as an article or component of an article... substances required in the production of basic resins or finished food-contact articles. The optional... and Applied Nutrition (HFS-200), Food and Drug Administration, 5100 Paint Branch Pkwy., College Park...

  3. 21 CFR 177.2440 - Polyethersulfone resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Components of Articles Intended for Repeated Use § 177.2440 Polyethersulfone resins. Polyethersulfone resins identified in paragraph (a) of this section may be safely used as articles or components of articles intended... Petition Control (HFS-215), Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition, 1110 Vermont Ave. NW., suite 1200...

  4. Modified resins for solid-phase extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, James S.; Sun, Jeffrey J.

    1991-12-10

    A process of treating aqueous solutions to remove organic solute contaminants by contacting an aqueous solution containing polar organic solute contaminants with a functionalized polystyrene-divinyl benzene adsorbent resin, with the functionalization of said resin being accomplished by organic hydrophilic groups such as hydroxymethyl, acetyl and cyanomethyl.

  5. Measurement of opalescence of resin composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong-Keun; Lu, Huan; Powers, John M

    2005-11-01

    Opalescence is an optical property, where there is light scattering of the shorter wavelengths of the visible spectrum, giving the material a bluish appearance under reflected light and an orange/brown appearance under transmitted light. The objective of this study was to determine the opalescence of resin composites with a color measuring spectrophotometer. Colors of A2 and enamel or translucent shades of four resin composites and of an unfilled resin measured in the reflectance and transmittance modes were compared, and the opalescence parameter (OP) was calculated as the difference in blue-yellow coordinate (Deltab*) and red-green parameter (Deltaa*) between the reflected and transmitted colors of 1-mm thick specimens. The masking effect was calculated as the color difference between the color of a black background and the color of specimen over the black background. The range of OP in resin composites was 5.7-23.7, which was higher than that of the unfilled resin. However, there were significant differences among the brands and shades of the resin composites. Opalescence varied by brand and shade of the resin composites, and contributed to the masking of background color along with translucency parameter. Some of the resin composites actually displayed opalescence.

  6. CO{sub 2} capture using fly ash-derived activated carbons impregnated with low molecular mass amines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, K.M.; Arenillas, A.; Drage, T.C.; Snape, C.E. [University of Nottingham, Nottingham (United Kingdom). Nottingham Fuel and Energy Centre

    2005-07-01

    Two different approaches to develop high capacity CO{sub 2} sorbents are presented. Firstly, the modification of the surface chemistry of low cost carbons by impregnation with a basic nitrogen-containing polymer (i.e.polyethylenimine) is described. Relatively low molecular mass (MM) amines, namely diethanolamine (DEA, MM 105) and tetraethylenepentaamineacrylonitrile (TEPAN, MM 311) are used to produce high capacity CO{sub 2} sorbents from activated carbons derived from unburned carbon in fly ash, which have low mesoporosities. The CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity and thermal stability of the prepared sorbents was measured as a function of temperature in a thermogravimetric analyser. The results indicate that TEPAN is more effective than DEA; at a temperature of 75{sup o}C, fly ash-derived activated carbons loaded with TEPAN achieved CO{sub 2} adsorption capacities in excess of 5 wt%, which compares fabvourably with the CO{sub 2} absorption capacity of 6.5 wt% achieved with a mesoporous silica loaded with TEPAN, and outperforms fly ash-derived activated carbons loaded with PEI. TEPAN has also been shown to have a higher thermal stability than DEA. The second approach involves the development of high nitrogen content carbon matrix adsorbents by carbonisation and subsequent thermal or chemical activation of a range of materials (polyacrylonitrile, glucose-amine mixtures, melamine and urea/melamine-formaldehyde resins). The results show that although the amount of nitrogen incorporated to the final adsorbent is important, the N-functionality seems to be more relevant for increasing CO{sub 2} uptake. However, the adsorbent obtained from carbazole-sugar co-pyrolysis, despite the lower amount of N incorporated, shows high CO{sub 2} uptake, up to 9 wt%, probably because the presence of more basic functionalities as determined by XPS analysis. 9 refs., 2 figs.

  7. Extraction of Co ions from ion-exchange resin by supercritical carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ju, Min Su; Koh, Moon Sung; Yang, Sung Woo; Park, Kwang Heon; Kim, Hak Won; Kim, Hong Doo

    2005-01-01

    There are a number of liquid treatment processes for eliminating radioactive ionic contaminants in nuclear facilities. One of the most common treatment methods for aqueous streams is the use of ion exchange, which is a well-developed technique that has been employed for many years in the nuclear industry. More specifically speaking, systems that ion exchange method is applied to in nuclear power plants are liquid radioactive waste treatment system, chemical and volume control system, steam generator blowdown treatment system, and service water supply system. During the operation of nuclear power plants, radioactive contaminants such as Co-60, Mn-54, Fe-59 and Cs-137 are contained in liquid radioactive wastes. And the wastes containing small amount of uranium are generated in nuclear fuel cycle facilities. To treat the liquid radioactive waste, we usually install ion exchangers rather than evaporators due to their simplicity and effectiveness, and this trend is increasing. However, the ion exchange process produces large volume of spent organic resin, and has some problems of radiation damage and thermal instability. And the reuse of the resin is limited due to the degradation of ion-exchanging ability. For this reason, were should consider a better method to expand the lifetime of the resin or to reduce the volume of radioactive resin wastes by extracting radioactive contaminants located in the resin. Supercritical fluid CO 2 has many good points as a process solvent that include low viscosity, negligible surface tension, and variable selectivity. And supercritical fluids have physical properties of both liquid and gas such as good penetration with a high dissolution capability. Supercritical fluids have been widely used in extraction, purification, and recovery processes. A number of workers applied supercritical CO 2 solvent for cleaning of precision devices and waste treatments. Since supercritical CO 2 has its mild critical point at 31 and 73.8bar as .deg. C

  8. Spatial repellency of metofluthrin-impregnated multilayer paper strip against Aedes albopictus under outdoor conditions, Nagasaki, Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Argueta, Tamara Belzabel Obispo; Kawada, Hitoshi; Takagi, Masahiro

    2004-01-01

    Spatial repellency of a new device in which metofluthrin, a newly synthesized pyrethroid, is impregnated into a multilayer paper strip, against Aedes albopictus was evaluated under outdoor conditions. High spatial repellency (>80%) with the metofluthrin-impregnated (200 mg) device lasted for more than 6 weeks, while the repellency with the same device impregnated with the same amount of transfluthrin declined within 5 weeks after treatment.

  9. Uranium refining by solvent extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraikaew, J.

    1996-01-01

    The yellow cake refining was studied in both laboratory and semi-pilot scales. The process units mainly consist of dissolution and filtration, solvent extraction, and precipitation and filtration. Effect of flow ratio (organic flow rate/ aqueous flow rate) on working efficiencies of solvent extraction process was studied. Detailed studies were carried out on extraction, scrubbing and stripping processes. Purity of yellow cake product obtained is high as 90.32% U 3 O 8

  10. Embedding of reactor wastes in plastic resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    STEAG Kernenergie GmbH is so far the only firm commercially to condition radioactive bead ion exchange resins by embedding in polystyrene resins. The objective of the work reported here was to study and develop methods for immobilization of other reactor wastes in plastic resins. Comparison studies on high quality cement however showed favourable results for cement with respect to process safety and economy. For this reason STEAG interrupted its work in the field of resin embedding after about one year. The work carried out during this period is surveyed in this report, which includes a comprehensive literature study on reactor wastes and their solidification in plastic resins as well as on regulations with regard to radioactive waste disposal in the member states of the European Communities

  11. Chemoviscosity modeling for thermosetting resins, 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, T. H.

    1985-01-01

    A new analytical model for simulating chemoviscosity of thermosetting resin was formulated. The model is developed by modifying the Williams-Landel-Ferry (WLF) theory in polymer rheology for thermoplastic materials. By assuming a linear relationship between the glass transition temperature and the degree of cure of the resin system under cure, the WLF theory can be modified to account for the factor of reaction time. Temperature dependent functions of the modified WLF theory constants were determined from the isothermal cure data of Lee, Loos, and Springer for the Hercules 3501-6 resin system. Theoretical predictions of the model for the resin under dynamic heating cure cycles were shown to compare favorably with the experimental data reported by Carpenter. A chemoviscosity model which is capable of not only describing viscosity profiles accurately under various cure cycles, but also correlating viscosity data to the changes of physical properties associated with the structural transformations of the thermosetting resin systems during cure was established.

  12. Electrodialytic decontamination of spent ion exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nott, B.R.

    1982-01-01

    Development of a novel electrodialytic decontamination process for the selective removal of radioactive Cs from spent ion exchange resins containing large amounts of Li is described. The process involves passage of a dc electric current through a bed of the spent ion exchange resin in a specially designed electrodialytic cell. The radiocesium so removed from a volume of the spent resin is concentrated onto a much smaller volume of a Cs selective sorbent to achieve a significant radioactive waste volume reduction. Technical feasibility of the electrodialytic resin decontamination process has been demonstrated on a bench scale with a batch of simulated spent ion exchange resin and using potassium cobalt ferrocyanide as the Cs selective sorbent. A volume reduction factor between 10 and 17 has been estimated. The process appears to be economically attractive. Improvements in process economics can be expected from optimization of the process. Other possible applications of the EDRD process have been identified

  13. Solidification of ion exchange resin wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-08-01

    Solidification media investigated included portland type I, portland type III and high alumina cements, a proprietary gypsum-based polymer modified cement, and a vinyl ester-styrene thermosetting plastic. Samples formulated with hydraulic cement were analyzed to investigate the effects of resin type, resin loading, waste-to-cement ratio, and water-to-cement ratio. The solidification of cation resin wastes with portland cement was characterized by excessive swelling and cracking of waste forms, both after curing and during immersion testing. Mixed bed resin waste formulations were limited by their cation component. Additives to improve the mechanical properties of portland cement-ion exchange resin waste forms were evaluated. High alumina cement formulations dislayed a resistance to deterioration of mechanical integrity during immersion testing, thus providing a significant advantage over portland cements for the solidification of resin wastes. Properties of cement-ion exchange resin waste forms were examined. An experiment was conducted to study the leachability of 137 Cs, 85 Sr, and 60 Co from resins modified in portland type III and high alumina cements. The cumulative 137 Cs fraction release was at least an order of magnitude greater than that of either 85 Sr or 60 Co. Release rates of 137 Cs in high alumina cement were greater than those in portland III cement by a factor of two.Compressive strength and leach testing were conducted for resin wastes solidified with polymer-modified gypsum based cement. 137 Cs, 85 Sr, and 60 Co fraction releases were about one, two and three orders of magnitude higher, respectively, than in equivalent portland type III cement formulations. As much as 28.6 wt % dry ion exchange resin was successfully solidified using vinyl ester-styrene compared with a maximum of 25 wt % in both portland and gypsum-based cement

  14. Physicochemical properties of vanadium impregnated Al-PILCs: Effect of vanadium source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balci, Suna, E-mail: sunabalci@gazi.edu.tr; Tecimer, Aylin

    2015-03-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Vanadium was incorporated into Al-PILC using NaVO{sub 3} or VOSO{sub 4}·3H{sub 2}O precursors by wet impregnation, washing after wet impregnation and impregnation from solution methods. • The layered structure of the supports was retained after the vanadium incorporation. • Incorporation took place both by settling and ion exchange mechanism with the treatment VOSO{sub 4}·3H{sub 2}O precursor while settling was dominant in the use of NaVO{sub 3} precursor. • Treatment with VOSO{sub 4}·3H{sub 2}O which was acidic in solution resulted in more structural deformation. • V{sub 2}O{sub 5} and VO{sub 2} were found as the major oxide forms on the impregnated samples. Loading of vanadyl sulfate hydrate (VOSO{sub 4}·H{sub 2}O) resulted in higher V/Si ratio. Most of the vanadium was bonded in +5 oxide form. • Changes in the FTIR signals after vanadium incorporation caused by Brønsted and Lewis sites, silanol, water and vanadium vibrations were occured. • Dehydroxylation of the structure took place around 300 °C. Samples obtained by impregnation and washing after wet impregnation methods resulted in similar mass losses and the wet impregnated sample showed the highest mass loss among the impregnated samples. - Summary: Clay from the Middle Anatolian previously pillared by Al{sub 13}-Keggin ions and then calcined at 300 °C (Al-PILC) was impregnated with aqueous solutions of vanadium precursors by impregnation from solution (I), wet impregnation (WI) and washing after wet impregnation (WWI) methods. The crystal and textural properties were evaluated by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), nitrogen sorption and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images. Vanadium incorporation into the Al-PILC resulted decreases in the basal spacing from 1.75 nm to 1.35 nm with the preserved typical layered structure. The use of sodium metavanadate (NaVO{sub 3}) as the source and the impregnation from solution as the incorporation method

  15. Pyrolysis of Spent Ion Exchange Resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braehler, Georg; Slametschka, Rainer

    2012-09-01

    Ion exchangers (IEX in international language) are used to remove radionuclides from the primary coolant in all nuclear power stations with a water cooling circuit. This is done by continuously removing a volume of coolant from the primary circuit and passing it through coolers, filters and the ion exchange beds. Cation and anion exchangers, in the form of coarse-grained resin beads in pressurized-water reactors and as finely ground powdered resins in boiling water reactors, are used. The trend for new power stations is to exploit all the possibilities for avoiding the generation of contaminated liquids and then to clean, as far as possible, the solutions that are nevertheless generated using ion exchange for it to be possible to dispose of them as non-radioactive waste. This relieves the burden on evaporator facilities, or means that these can even be dispensed with entirely. Regeneration is possible in principle, but little use is made of it. As the regeneration usual in conventional technologies is not employed in nuclear power stations, it is necessary to dispose of this material as radioactive waste. On the international level, a great number of processes are offered that are intended to meet the relevant national regulations, and these will be discussed in brief with their advantages and disadvantages. The aim is then to find a process which reduces the volume, yields an inert or mineralized product, works at temperatures of no more than approximately 600 deg. C and can be run in a simple facility. Originally, the pyrolysis process was developed to treat liquid organic waste from reprocessing. A typical application is the decomposition of spent solvent (TBP, tributyl phosphate, mixed with kerosene). In this process TBP is pyrolyzed together with calcium hydroxide in a fluidized bed facility at temperatures of around 500 deg. C, the calcium hydroxide reacts with the phosphate groups directly to form calcium pyrophosphate which contains all the radioactivity

  16. Incorporation of Hyperbranched Supramolecules into Nafion Ionic Domains via Impregnation and In-Situ Photopolymerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiruto Kudo

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Nafion membranes were impregnated with photocurable supramolecules, viz., hyperbranched polyester having pendant functional carboxylic acid groups (HBPEAc-COOH by swelling in methanol and subsequently photocured in-situ after drying. Structure-property relationships of the HBPEAc-COOH impregnated Nafion membranes were analyzed on the basis of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy, solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (SSNMR and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA. FTIR and SSNMR investigations revealed that about 7 wt % of HBPEAc-COOH was actually incorporated into the ionic domains of Nafion. The FTIR study suggests possible complexation via inter-species hydrogen bonding between the carboxylic groups of HBPEAc-COOH and the sulfonate groups of Nafion. The α-relaxation peak corresponding to the glass transition temperature of the ionic domains of the neat Nafion-acid form was found to increase from ~100 to ~130 °C upon impregnation with enhanced modulus afforded by the cured polyester network within the ionic domains. The AC impedance fuel cell measurement of the impregnated membrane exhibited an increasing trend of proton conductivity with increasing temperature, which eventually surpassed that of neat Nafion above 100 °C. Of particular importance is that the present paper is the first to successfully incorporate polymer molecules/networks into the Nafion ionic domains by means of impregnation with hyperbranched supramolecules followed by in-situ photopolymerization.

  17. Different Types of Waste Melamine Impregnated Paper (MIP in Particleboard Manufacturing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Halil BASBOGA

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Two different types of waste melamine impregnated paper (WMIP were generated in the manufactured coated board product plants. First one is obtained when the neat décor papers were impregnated (in the impregnation line with melamine urea formaldehyde and other chemicals (WMIP1. The second one is generated during the coating of the melamine impregnated papers on the board surfaces (WMIP2. In this study, the utilization of both WMIPs in the production of particleboard as an adhesivereplacement was investigated. First, waste melamine impregnated papers (WMIPs granulated into flour form using Pulverizator with cooling capabilities. Then, they were dry-mixed with surface and core layer particles at 10% or 15% loadings. Three different WMIPs (WMIP1, WMIP2 or their mixtures - 70% WMIP1+30% WMIP2 were used as adhesive-replacement. Mechanical properties including bending strength, modulus of elasticity, internal bond strength and surface stability of the samples were determined according to EN 310, EN 319 and EN 317 standards, respectively. Based on the results, the type of WMIP had significant effect on all mechanical properties investigated. Particleboards produced with both 10% and 15% of WMIP1 loading provided adequate results for the related standards. The best result was obtained when 15% of WMIP1 was used. It is concluded that WMIP1 might be used as an adhesive-replacement in particleboard manufacturing and may provide economic and environmental benefits.

  18. Supercritical impregnation of cinnamaldehyde into polylactic acid as a route to develop antibacterial food packaging materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villegas, Carolina; Torres, Alejandra; Rios, Mauricio; Rojas, Adrián; Romero, Julio; de Dicastillo, Carol López; Valenzuela, Ximena; Galotto, María José; Guarda, Abel

    2017-09-01

    Supercritical impregnation was used to incorporate a natural compound with antibacterial activity into biopolymer-based films to develop active food packaging materials. Impregnation tests were carried out under two pressure conditions (9 and 12MPa), and three depressurization rates (0.1, 1 and 10MPamin -1 ) in a high-pressure cell at a constant temperature equal to 40°C. Cinnamaldehyde (Ci), a natural compound with proven antimicrobial activity, was successfully incorporated into poly(lactic acid) films (PLA) using supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO 2 ), with impregnation yields ranging from 8 to 13% w/w. Higher pressure and slower depressurization rate seem to favor the Ci impregnation. The incorporation of Ci improved thermal, structural and mechanical properties of the PLA films. Impregnated films were more flexible, less brittle and more resistant materials than neat PLA films. The tested samples showed strong antibacterial activity against the selected microorganisms. In summary, this study provides an innovative route to the development of antibacterial biodegradable materials, which could be used in a wide range of applications of active food packaging. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Accelerated artificial aging of particleboards from residues of CCB treated Pinus sp. and castor oil resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marília da Silva Bertolini

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Tests simulating exposure to severe weather conditions have been relevant in seeking new applications for particleboard. This study aimed to produce particleboards with residues of CCB (chromium-copper-boron oxides impregnated Pinus sp. and castor oil-based polyurethane resin, and to evaluate their performance before and after artificial accelerated aging. Panels were produced with different particle mass, resin content and pressing time, resulting eight treatments. Particles moisture and size distribution were determined, beyond panel physical and mechanical properties, according to NBR14810-3: 2006. After characterization, treatments B and G (small adhesive consumption and better mechanical performance, respectively were chosen to artificial aging tests. Statistical results analysis showed best performances were achieved for waterproof aged samples, of both B and G treatments. As example, in treatment B, MOR and MOE values were 23 MPa and 2,297 MPa, samples before exposure; 26 MPa and 3,185 MPa, 32 MPa and 3,982 MPa for samples after exposure (non-sealed and sealed, respectively.

  20. Thermal and Ablative Properties of Ipns and Composites of High Ortho Resole Resin and Difurfurylidene Acetone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tariq S. NAJIM

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available High ortho resole resin was prepared by condensation of phenol with excess of formaldehyde in the presence of magnesium oxide as catalyst. Reaction of furfuraldehyde with acetone in basic medium led to difurfurylidene acetone (DFA. Their interpenetrating polymer network (IPNS were obtained by the reaction of predetermined quantities of difurfurylidene acetone and high ortho resole using p-toluene sulphonic acid (PTSA as curing agent. The thermal behavior of the resins was studied using thermogravimetry (TG under ambient and nitrogen atmospheres over a temperature range of (25-1000 Cº. It was observed that the IPN of 20% DFA – 80% resole has higher thermal stability than that of resole alone and the decomposition temperature was higher by 80 Cº. This behavior was attributed to highly cross linked structure and thermally stable backbone of ploy difurfurylidene acetone due to formation of ladder structure.Impregnation of chopped fiber glass type (E with the polymeric solutions was used to prepare their composites, and the ablative properties were investigated according to ASTM E-285 –80. It was observed that the IPN of (DFA- resol perform better than the resole composite alone.

  1. Thermal conductivity and Kapitza resistance of epoxy resin fiberglass tape at superfluid helium temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baudouy, B.; Polinski, J.

    2009-03-01

    The system of materials composed of fiberglass epoxy resin impregnated tape constitutes in many cases the electrical insulation for "dry"-type superconducting accelerator magnet such as Nb 3Sn magnets. Nb 3Sn magnet technology is still under development in a few programs to reach higher magnetic fields than what NbTi magnets can produce. The European program, Next European Dipole (NED), is one of such programs and it aims to develop and construct a 15 T class Nb 3Sn magnet mainly for upgrading the Large Hardron Collider. Superfluid helium is considered as one possible coolant and since the magnet has been designed with a "dry" insulation, the thermal conductivity and the Kapitza resistance of the electrical insulation are the key properties that must be know for the thermal design of such a magnet. Accordingly, property measurements of the epoxy resin fiberglass tape insulation system developed for the NED project was carried out in superfluid helium. Four sheets with thicknesses varying from 40 to 300 μm have been tested in a steady-state condition. The determined thermal conductivity, k, is [(25.8 ± 2.8) · T - (12.2 ± 4.9)] × 10 -3 W m -1 K -1 and the Kapitza resistance is given by R K = (1462 ± 345) · T(-1.86 ± 0.41) × 10 -6 Km 2 W -1 in the temperature range of 1.55-2.05 K.

  2. Effects of solvent evaporation on water sorption/solubility and nanoleakage of adhesive systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chimeli, Talita Baumgratz Cachapuz; D'Alpino, Paulo Henrique Perlatti; Pereira, Patrícia Nóbrega; Hilgert, Leandro Augusto; Di Hipólito, Vinicius; Garcia, Fernanda Cristina Pimentel

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the influence of solvent evaporation in the kinetics of water diffusion (water sorption-WS, solubility-SL, and net water uptake) and nanoleakage of adhesive systems. Disk-shaped specimens (5.0 mm in diameter x 0.8 mm in thickness) were produced (N=48) using the adhesives: Clearfil S3 Bond (CS3)/Kuraray, Clearfil SE Bond - control group (CSE)/Kuraray, Optibond Solo Plus (OS)/Kerr and Scotchbond Universal Adhesive (SBU)/3M ESPE. The solvents were either evaporated for 30 s or not evaporated (N=24/per group), and then photoactivated for 80 s (550 mW/cm2). After desiccation, the specimens were weighed and stored in distilled water (N=12) or mineral oil (N=12) to evaluate the water diffusion over a 7-day period. Net water uptake (%) was also calculated as the sum of WS and SL. Data were submitted to 3-way ANOVA/Tukey's test (α=5%). The nanoleakage expression in three additional specimens per group was also evaluated after ammoniacal silver impregnation after 7 days of water storage under SEM. Statistical analysis revealed that only the factor "adhesive" was significant (padhesives. CSE (control) presented significantly lower net uptake (5.4%). The nanoleakage was enhanced by the presence of solvent in the adhesives. Although the evaporation has no effect in the kinetics of water diffusion, the nanoleakage expression of the adhesives tested increases when the solvents are not evaporated.

  3. Solvent/Non-Solvent Sintering To Make Microsphere Scaffolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurencin, Cato T.; Brown, Justin L.; Nair, Lakshmi

    2011-01-01

    A solvent/non-solvent sintering technique has been devised for joining polymeric microspheres to make porous matrices for use as drug-delivery devices or scaffolds that could be seeded with cells for growing tissues. Unlike traditional sintering at elevated temperature and pressure, this technique is practiced at room temperature and pressure and, therefore, does not cause thermal degradation of any drug, protein, or other biochemical with which the microspheres might be loaded to impart properties desired in a specific application. Also, properties of scaffolds made by this technique are more reproducible than are properties of comparable scaffolds made by traditional sintering. The technique involves the use of two miscible organic liquids: one that is and one that is not a solvent for the affected polymer. The polymeric microspheres are placed in a mold having the size and shape of the desired scaffold, then the solvent/non-solvent mixture is poured into the mold to fill the void volume between the microspheres, then the liquid mixture is allowed to evaporate. Some of the properties of the resulting scaffold can be tailored through choice of the proportions of the liquids and the diameter of the microspheres.

  4. Improving multilayer films endurance by photoinduced interaction between Dawson-type polyoxometalate and diazo resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jishuang; Xu Lin; Cui Yang; Cao Weixiao; Li Zhuang

    2005-01-01

    A composite multilayer film constructed of Dawson anion [P 2 Mo 18 O 62 ] 6- and diazo resin (DR) was prepared by the electrostatic layer-by-layer (LbL) self-assembly method. The film could be stabilized by the photoinduced interaction between Dawson anion and diazo resin. IR spectra and X-ray photoelectron spectra revealed the possible occurrence of partial transformation from electrostatic interaction to covalent interaction between layers of the film after irradiation by UV light. Such transformation evidently increases the endurance of the film, which was demonstrated by AFM images and etching experiments with organic solvent. This study provides a new route to stabilze the polyoxometalate-based multilayer film by virtue of the photoinduced reaction with photosensitive polymer

  5. Improving multilayer films endurance by photoinduced interaction between Dawson-type polyoxometalate and diazo resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Jishuang [Department of Chemistry, Northeast Normal University, Renmin Street 5268, Changchun 130024 (China); Xu Lin [Department of Chemistry, Northeast Normal University, Renmin Street 5268, Changchun 130024 (China)]. E-mail: linxu@nenu.edu.cn; Cui Yang [Department of Chemistry, Northeast Normal University, Renmin Street 5268, Changchun 130024 (China); Cao Weixiao [College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Li Zhuang [Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Academia Sinica, Changchun 130022 (China)

    2005-03-15

    A composite multilayer film constructed of Dawson anion [P{sub 2}Mo{sub 18}O{sub 62}]{sup 6-} and diazo resin (DR) was prepared by the electrostatic layer-by-layer (LbL) self-assembly method. The film could be stabilized by the photoinduced interaction between Dawson anion and diazo resin. IR spectra and X-ray photoelectron spectra revealed the possible occurrence of partial transformation from electrostatic interaction to covalent interaction between layers of the film after irradiation by UV light. Such transformation evidently increases the endurance of the film, which was demonstrated by AFM images and etching experiments with organic solvent. This study provides a new route to stabilze the polyoxometalate-based multilayer film by virtue of the photoinduced reaction with photosensitive polymer.

  6. EPICOR-II resin degradation results from first resin samples of PF-8 and PF-20

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McConnell, J.W. Jr.; Sanders, R.D. Sr.

    1985-12-01

    The 28 March 1979 accident at Three Mile Island Unit 2 released approximately 560,000 gallons of contaminated water to the Auxiliary and Fuel Handling Buildings. The water was decontaminated using a demineralization system called EPICOR-II developed by Epicor, Inc. The Low-Level Waste Data Base Development - EPICOR-II Resin/Liner Investigation Project is studying the chemical and physical conditions of the synthetic ion exchange resins found in several EPICOR-II prefilters. This report summarizes results and analyses of the first sampling of ion exchange resins from EPICOR-II prefilters PE-8 and -20. Results are compared with baseline data from tests performed on unirradiated Epicor, Inc. resins to determine if degradation has occurred due to the high internal radiation dose received by the EPICOR-II resins. Results also are compared with recent findings on resin degradation by Battelle Columbus Laboratories and Brookhaven National Laboratory. Analyses comparing test results of resins from EPICOR-II prefilters PF-8 and -20 with unirradiated resins obtained from Epicor, Inc. show resin degradation has occurred in some of the EPICOR-II resins examined. The mechanism of degradation is compared with work of other researchers and is consistent with their findings. The strong acid cation resins (divinylbenzene, styrene base structure) are losing effective cross-linking along with scission of functional groups and are experiencing first an increase and eventually a decrease in total exchange capacity as the absorbed radiation dose increases. The phenolic cation resins (phenol-formaldehyde base structure) show a loss of effective cross-linking and oxidation of the polymer chain. Analyses of resins removed from EPICOR-II prefilters PF-8 and -20 over the next several years should show a further increase in degradation

  7. Decomposing method for ion exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sako, Takeshi; Sato, Shinshi; Akai, Yoshie; Moniwa, Shinobu; Yamada, Kazuo

    1998-01-01

    The present invention concerns a method of decomposing ion exchange resins generated in a nuclear power plant to carbon dioxide reliably in a short period of time. (1) The ion exchange resins are mixed with water, and then they are kept for a predetermined period of time in the presence of an inert gas at high temperature and high pressure exceeding the critical point of water to decompose the ion exchange resins. (2) The ion exchange resins is mixed with water, an oxidant is added and they are kept for a predetermined time in the presence of an inert gas at a high temperature and a high pressure exceeding a critical point of water of an inert gas at a high temperature to decompose the ion exchange resins. (3) An alkali or acid is added to ion exchange resins and water to control the hydrogen ion concentration in the solution and the ion exchange resins are decomposed in above-mentioned (1) or (2). Sodium hydroxide is used as the alkali and hydrochloric acid is used as the acid. In addition, oxygen, hydrogen peroxide or ozone is used as an oxidant. (I.S.)

  8. Controllable Impregnation Via Inkjet Printing for the Fabrication of Solid Oxide Cell Air Electrodes

    KAUST Repository

    Da'as, E. H.; Irvine, J. T. S.; Traversa, Enrico; Boulfrad, S.

    2013-01-01

    The impregnation method has been considered as one of the most successful techniques for the fabrication of highly efficient electrodes for solid oxide fuel and electrolysis cells (SOCs) at the lab scale. However, because the impregnation is usually performed manually, its irreproducibility remains a major problem that can be solved by using controllable techniques, such as inkjet printing. In this paper, lanthanum strontium manganite (LSM)/yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) air electrodes were prepared by infiltrating YSZ porous bodies with LSM precursor solution using inkjet printing, followed by annealing at 800°C for 2 hours. XRD analysis confirmed the formation of the LSM phase, which was in the form of nanoparticles with size in the 50-70 nm range on the YSZ walls, as revealed by FEG-SEM observations. The effect of printing parameters on the distribution of the impregnated phase was investigated and discussed.

  9. Surface studies of thermionic cathodes and the mechanism of operation of an impregnated tungsten cathode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forman, R.

    1976-09-01

    The surface properties of conventional impregnated cathodes were investigated by the use of Auger spectroscopy and work function measurements, and these were compared with a synthesized barium- or barium oxide coated tungsten surface. The barium- and barium oxide coated surfaces were prepared by evaporating barium onto a tungsten surface that can be heated to elevated temperatures. Multilayer or monolayer coverages can be investigated using this technique. The results of this study show that the surface of an impregnated tungsten cathode is identical to that observed for a synthesized monolayer or partial monolayer of barium on partially oxidized tungsten, using the criteria of identical Auger patterns and work functions. Desorption measurements of barium from a tungsten surface were also made. These results in conjunction with Auger and work function data were interpreted to show that throughout most of its life an impregnated cathode operating in the range of 1100 C has a partial monolayer rather than a monolayer of barium on its surface

  10. Recent progress and tests of radiation resistant impregnation materials for Nb3Sn coils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossert, R.; Krave, S.; Ambrosio, G.; Andreev, N.; Chlachidze, G.; Nobrega, A.; Novitski, I.; Yu, M.; Zlobin, A. V.

    2014-01-01

    Fermilab is collaborating with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) (US-LARP collaboration) to develop a large-aperture Nb3Sn superconducting quadrupole for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) luminosity upgrade. An important component of this work is the development of materials that are sufficiently radiation resistant for use in critical areas of the upgrade. This paper describes recent progress in characterization of materials, including the baseline CTD101K epoxy, cyanate ester blends, and Matrimid 5292, a bismaleimide-based system. Structural properties of "ten stacks" of cable impregnated with these materials are tested at room and cryogenic temperatures and compared to the baseline CT-101K. Experience with potting 1 and 2 meter long coils with Matrimid 5292 are described. Test results of a single 1-m coil impregnated with Matrimid 5292 are reported and compared to similar coils impregnated with the traditional epoxy.

  11. Controllable Impregnation Via Inkjet Printing for the Fabrication of Solid Oxide Cell Air Electrodes

    KAUST Repository

    Da'as, E. H.

    2013-10-07

    The impregnation method has been considered as one of the most successful techniques for the fabrication of highly efficient electrodes for solid oxide fuel and electrolysis cells (SOCs) at the lab scale. However, because the impregnation is usually performed manually, its irreproducibility remains a major problem that can be solved by using controllable techniques, such as inkjet printing. In this paper, lanthanum strontium manganite (LSM)/yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) air electrodes were prepared by infiltrating YSZ porous bodies with LSM precursor solution using inkjet printing, followed by annealing at 800°C for 2 hours. XRD analysis confirmed the formation of the LSM phase, which was in the form of nanoparticles with size in the 50-70 nm range on the YSZ walls, as revealed by FEG-SEM observations. The effect of printing parameters on the distribution of the impregnated phase was investigated and discussed.

  12. Impregnated cathode coated with tungsten thin film containing Sc2O3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, S.; Taguchi, S.; Watanabe, I.; Kawase, S.

    1987-01-01

    An impregnated cathode of a novel structure is proposed, fabricated, and evaluated. A thin tungsten film 100--400 nm in thickness containing various amounts of Sc 2 O 3 is coated on a standard impregnated cathode composed of a porous tungsten body in which electron emissive materials are impregnated. The electron emission property measured with a diode configuration is found to be dependent on Sc 2 O 3 content and surface atom distribution. Surface atom distribution is depicted by means of Auger electron spectroscopy. For high electron emission enhancement it is necessary for Sc 2 O 3 content to be 2.5--6.5 wt. % and for a layer of the order of a monolayer in thickness composed of Ba, Sc, and O to develop on the cathode surface

  13. Characteristic of Polymer-Impregnated Cement Mortar: Composites: Bulk Density and Microstructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Younes, M.M.; Abo-El-Enein, S.A.; El-Saft, M.M.; Sadek, M.A.; Zohdy, K.M.

    2010-01-01

    The effect of radiation initiated polymerization of some monomers on the physical properties of polymer-incorporated mortar was studied. The monomers used were: castor oil (C.O.), 4, 4'-diphenylmethane diisocyanate (MDI) and methyl methacrylate (MMA). Polymerization was carried out by subjecting the monomer-impregnated mortar specimens to different doses of gamma radiation. Where polyurethane (pu) and polyurethane -methyl methacrylate copolymers were formed within the pore system. The influence of polymer impregnation on the various physico-mechanical characteristics of the resulting composites was studied with respect to bulk density and polymer loading. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was employed to study the micro-structural characteristics of the neat hardened Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) mortar pastes and their polymer-impregnated composites

  14. Recent progress and tests of radiation resistant impregnation materials for Nb3Sn coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bossert, R.; Krave, S.; Ambrosio, G.; Andreev, N.; Chlachidze, G.; Nobrega, A.; Novitski, I.; Yu, M.; Zlobin, A. V.

    2014-01-01

    Fermilab is collaborating with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) (US-LARP collaboration) to develop a large-aperture Nb 3 Sn superconducting quadrupole for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) luminosity upgrade. An important component of this work is the development of materials that are sufficiently radiation resistant for use in critical areas of the upgrade. This paper describes recent progress in characterization of materials, including the baseline CTD101K epoxy, cyanate ester blends, and Matrimid 5292, a bismaleimide-based system. Structural properties of “ten stacks” of cable impregnated with these materials are tested at room and cryogenic temperatures and compared to the baseline CT-101K. Experience with potting 1 and 2 meter long coils with Matrimid 5292 are described. Test results of a single 1-m coil impregnated with Matrimid 5292 are reported and compared to similar coils impregnated with the traditional epoxy

  15. Antibiotic-Impregnated Bone Grafts in Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery: A Systematic Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos Anagnostakos

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available There exist several options for local antibiotic therapy in orthopaedic and trauma surgery. Over the past years, the use of antibiotic-impregnated bone grafts (AIBGs has become a popular procedure in the treatment of bone and joint infections. A major advantage of AIBGs involves the possibility of impregnation of various antibiotics depending on the sensitivity profile of the causative organism, whereas an additional surgery with removal of the antibiotic carrier is not necessary, as in the use of antibiotic-loaded bone cement. However, generalized conclusions cannot be clearly drawn from the existing literature due to differences of bone used, impregnation method, antibiotics, their doses, laboratory circumstances, or clinical indications. The present work reviews the literature regarding this topic and sheds some light onto the choice of bone and antibiotics, manufacturing details, and clinical experience.

  16. Removal efficiency of radioactive methyl iodide on TEDA-impregnated activated carbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez-Garcia, C.M.; Gonzalez, J.F.; Roman, S.

    2011-01-01

    Activated carbons were prepared by different series of carbon dioxide and steam activation from walnut shells for their optimal use as radioactive methyl iodide adsorbents in Nuclear Plants. The knowledge of the most favourable textural characteristics of the activated carbons was possible by the previous study of the commercial activated carbon currently used for this purpose. In order to increase their methyl iodide affinity, the effect of triethylenediamine impregnation was studied at 5 and 10 wt.%. The results obtained indicated that in both cases the adsorption efficiency is markedly improved by the addition of impregnant, which allows the adsorbate uptake to occur not only by physical adsorption, via non-specific interactions (as in non-impregnated carbons) but also by the specific interaction of triethylenediamine with radioactive methyl iodide. Methyl iodide retention efficiencies up to 98.1% were achieved. (author)

  17. Dielectric properties of transformer paper impregnated by mineral oil based magnetic fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timko, M; Marton, K; Tomco, L; Kopcansky, P; Koneracka, M

    2010-01-01

    The influence of combined magnetic and electric field on permittivity of transformer paper used in power transformers was observed. Transformer paper was impregnated by pure transformer oil ITO 100 and magnetic fluids based on transformer oil ITO 100 with different concentrations of magnetite nanoparticles. The measurements were carried out with help of high precision capacitance bridge. The electric intensity between circular planar electrodes was in the region of weak electric field (E > 10 6 V/m). The increase of electric permittivity of transformer paper impregnated by magnetic fluid opposite pure transformer paper was observed. The experiments showed that permittivity of insulator system consisting of pure transformer paper and impregnated transformer paper naturally depends on number of paper layers. The magnetodielectric effect was found to be dependent on magnetite nanoparticles concentration in magnetic fluids.

  18. Thick-target Pixe analysis of chromium, copper and arsenic impregnated lumber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saarela, K-E.; Harju, L.; Lill, J-O.; Rajander, J.; Lindroos, A.; Heselius, S-J.

    1999-01-01

    Chromium, copper and arsenic (CCA) have for decades been used for wood preservation. Of these elements especially arsenic is very toxic. As CCA impregnated wood is still today used for many construction purposes, a monitoring of these metal ions is of great environmental importance. Thick-target PIXE is a powerful method for the determination of trace metals in wood. The TTPIXE method enabled study of variations of the elemental concentrations in lumber treated with CCA impregnation solution. Distribution patterns were obtained for both naturally occurring elements and elements introduced in the treatment process. During the impregnation process a desorption of e.g. alkali metal ions takes place from the wood. The sensitivity of the method is improved by dry ashing of the samples prior to PIXE analysis. The TTPIXE method was calibrated and validated using international certified reference materials (CRM) based on wood material

  19. Pore structure, mechanical properties and polymer characteristics of porous materials impregnated with methylmethacrylate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hastrup, K.

    1976-05-01

    The pore structure of porous materials plays a decisive role with regard to many properties of the materials. One therefore expects property improvement due to impregnation to be mostly brought about as a result of pore structure modification. This supposition formed the basis for the project here presented, which had the main aim of investigating polymer impregnation in relation to pore structure. Objectives were: 1) to examine the pore structure of hardened cement paste, beech wood and porous glass before and after gas-phase impregnation with methyl-methacrylate monomer and in situ polymerization, 2) to investigate the influence of the pore structure on the molecular weight of the polymer, 3) to investigate the influence of the degree of pore filling on the elastic modulus, damping coefficient and bending strength. (author)

  20. Dielectric microwave absorbing material processed by impregnation of carbon fiber fabric with polyaniline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiza de Castro Folgueras

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available It is a known fact that the adequate combination of components and experimental conditions may produce materials with specific requirements. This study presents the effect of carbon fiber fabric impregnation with polyaniline conducting polymer aiming at the radar absorbing material processing. The experiments consider the sample preparation with one and two impregnations. The prepared samples were evaluated by reflectivity measurements, in the frequency range of 8-12 GHz and scanning electron microscopy analyses. The correlation of the results shows that the quantity of impregnated material influences the performance of the processed microwave absorber. This study shows that the proposed experimental route provides flexible absorbers with absorption values of the incident radiation close to 87%.

  1. Safety evaluation of cation-exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalkwarf, D.R.

    1977-08-01

    Results are presented of a study to evaluate whether sufficient information is available to establish conservative limits for the safe use of cation-exchange resins in separating radionuclides and, if not, to recommend what new data should be acquired. The study was also an attempt to identify in-line analytical techniques for the evaluation of resin degradation during radionuclide processing. The report is based upon a review of the published literature and upon discussions with many people engaged in the use of these resins. It was concluded that the chief hazard in the use of cation-exchange resins for separating radionuclides is a thermal explosion if nitric acid or other strong oxidants are present in the process solution. Thermal explosions can be avoided by limiting process parameters so that the rates of heat and gas generation in the system do not exceed the rates for their transfer to the surroundings. Such parameters include temperature, oxidant concentration, the amounts of possible catalysts, the radiation dose absorbed by the resin and the diameter of the resin column. Current information is not sufficient to define safe upper limits for these parameters. They can be evaluated, however, from equations derived from the Frank-Kamenetskii theory of thermal explosions provided the heat capacities, thermal conductivities and rates of heat evolution in the relevant resin-oxidant mixtures are known. It is recommended that such measurements be made and the appropriate limits be evaluated. A list of additional safety precautions are also presented to aid in the application of these limits and to provide additional margins of safety. In-line evaluation of resin degradation to assess its safety hazard is considered impractical. Rather, it is recommended that the resin be removed from use before it has received the limiting radiation dose, evaluated as described above

  2. Solvents interactions with thermochromic print

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirela Rožić

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the interactions between different solvents (benzene, acetone, cyclohexanone, various alcohols and water and thermochromic printing ink were investigated. Thermochromic printing ink was printed on metal surface. Components of thermochromic printing inks are polymeric microcapsules and classic yellow offset printing ink. Below its activation temperature, dye and developer within the microcapsules form a blue coloured complex. Therefore, thermochromic print is green. By heating above the activation temperature, blue colour of the complex turns into the leuco dye colourless state and the green colour of the prints turns into the yellow colour of the classic offset pigment. The results of the interaction with various solvents show that the thermochromic print is stable in all tested solvents except in ethanol, acetone and cyclohexanone. In ethanol, the green colour of the print becomes yellow. SEM analysis shows that microcapsules are dissolved. In acetone and cyclohexanone, the green colour of the print turns into blue, and the microcapsules become significantly more visible. Thus, the yellow pigment interacts with examined ketones. Based on the obtained interactions it can be concluded that the microcapsules have more polar nature than the classical pigment particles. Solvent-thermocromic print interactions were analysed using Hansen solubility parameters that rank the solvents based on their estimated interaction capabilities.

  3. Posterior bulk-filled resin composite restorations.

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Dijken, Jan WV; Pallesen, Ulla

    2016-01-01

    up to 4mm as needed to fill the cavity 2mm short of the occlusal cavosurface. The occlusal part was completed with the nano-hybrid resin composite (Ceram X mono+). In the other cavity, the resin composite-only (Ceram X mono+) was placed in 2mm increments. The restorations were evaluated using...... Class II, 4 SDR-CeramX mono+ and 6 CeramXmono+-only restorations. The main reasons for failurewere tooth fracture (6) and secondary caries (4). The annual failure rate (AFR) for all restorations (Class I and II) was for the bulk-filled-1.1% and for the resin composite-only restorations 1...

  4. Immobilisation of ion exchange resins in cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, C.G.; Jolliffe, C.B.; Lee, D.J.

    1990-09-01

    The removal of activity from spent decontaminating solutions eg LOMI can be achieved using organic ion exchange resins. These resins can be successfully immobilised in cement based matrices. The optimum cement system contained 10% ordinary Portland cement 84% gg blast furnace slag, 6% microsilica with a water cement ratio of 0.5 and a dry resin loading of 36% with respect to total weight. This formulation was successfully scaled up to 200 litres giving a product with acceptable compressive strength, dimensional stability and elastic modulus. Storage of samples under water appears to have no detrimental effects on the product's properties. (author)

  5. Immobilisation of ion exchange resins in cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, C.G.; Jolliffe, C.B.; Lee, D.J.

    1990-09-01

    The removal of activity from spent decontaminating solutions eg LOMI can be achieved using organic ion exchange resins. These resins can be successfully immobilised in cement based matrices. The optimum cement system contained 10% ordinary Portland cement, 84% gg blast furnace slag, 6% microsilica with a water cement ratio of 0.5 and a dry resin loading of 36% with respect to total weight. This formulation was successfully scaled up to 200 litres giving a product with acceptable compressive strength, dimensional stability and elastic modulus. Storage of samples under water appears to have no detrimental effects on the products' properties. (author)

  6. Thermosetting resins for nuclear track detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, M.

    1985-01-01

    Several new thermosetting resins with a three dimensional network structure like CR-39 were polymerized to study their characteristics for use as nuclear track detectors. During the course of this study, thermosetting resins with good etching properties and various sensitivities have been obtained. The comparison of the molecular structures of these resins gives up an important clue for the development of highly sensitive polymeric track detectors. They will also be useful for observations of ultra-heavy cosmic rays and heavily ionizing particles at low energies. (orig.)

  7. Thermosetting resins for nuclear track detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, Masami; Yokota, Rikio

    1985-01-01

    Several new thermosetting resins with a three dimensional network structure like CR-39 were polymerized to study their characteristics for use as nuclear track detectors. During the course of this study, thermosetting resins with good etching properties and various sensitivities have been obtained. The comparison of the molecular structures of these resins gives us an important clue for the development of highly sensitive polymeric track detectors. They will also be useful for observations of ultra-heavy cosmic rays and heavily ionizing particles at low energies. (author)

  8. Incineration of ion-exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valkiainen, M.; Nykyri, M.

    1985-01-01

    Incineration of ion-exchange resins in a fluidized bed was studied on a pilot plant scale at the Technical Research Centre of Finland. Both granular and powdered resins were incinerated in dry and slurry form. Different bed materials were used in order to trap as much cesium and cobalt (inactive tracers) as possible in the bed. Also the sintering of the bed materials was studied in the presence of sodium. When immobilized with cement the volume of ash-concrete is 4 to 22% of the concrete of equal compressive strength acquired by direct solidification. Two examples of multi-purpose equipment capable of incinerating ion-exchange resins are presented. (orig.)

  9. SEM and elemental analysis of composite resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosoda, H.; Yamada, T.; Inokoshi, S.

    1990-01-01

    Twenty-four chemically cured, 21 light-cured anterior, three light-cured anterior/posterior, and 18 light-cured posterior composite resins were examined using scanning electron microscopy, and the elemental composition of their filler particles was analyzed with an energy dispersive electron probe microanalyzer. According to the results obtained, the composite resins were divided into five groups (traditional, microfilled type, submicrofilled type, hybrid type, and semihybrid), with two additional hypothetical categories (microfilled and hybrid). Characteristics of each type were described with clinical indications for selective guidance of respective composite resins for clinical use

  10. Thermosetting behavior of pitch-resin from heavy residue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qingfang, Z.; Yansheng, G.; Baohua, H.; Yuzhen, Z. [China Univ. of Petroleum, Dongying, Shandong (China). State Key LAboratory of Heavy Oil Processing, Heavy Oil Research Inst.

    2006-07-01

    Thermosetting resins are widely employed as a basic matrix for c/c composites in carbon materials production. A new type of synthesized thermosetting resin is called pitch resin. Pitch resin is a cheaper resin and possesses a potential opportunity for future use. However, the thermosetting behavior of pitch resin is not very clear. The hardening process and conditions for thermosetting are very important for future use of pitch resin. B-stage pitch resin is a soluble and meltable inter-media condensed polymer, which is not fully reacted and is of a low molecular weight. The insoluble and unmelted pitch resin can only be obtained from synthesized B-stage resin after a hardening stage. This paper presented an experiment that synthesized B-stage pitch resin with a link agent (PXG) under catalyst action from fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) of the slurry's aromatic enriched component (FCCDF). The paper discussed the experiment, including the synthesis of pitch resin and thermosetting of pitch resin. Two kinds of thermosetting procedures were used in the study called one-step thermosetting and two-step thermosetting. It was concluded that the B-stage pitch resin could be hardened after a thermosetting procedure by heat treatment. The thermosetting pitch resin from 2-step thermosetting possesses was found to have better thermal resistant properties than that of the 1-step thermosetting pitch resin. 13 refs., 2 tabs., 6 figs.

  11. Drug loading into porous calcium carbonate microparticles by solvent evaporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preisig, Daniel; Haid, David; Varum, Felipe J O; Bravo, Roberto; Alles, Rainer; Huwyler, Jörg; Puchkov, Maxim

    2014-08-01

    Drug loading into porous carriers may improve drug release of poorly water-soluble drugs. However, the widely used impregnation method based on adsorption lacks reproducibility and efficiency for certain compounds. The aim of this study was to evaluate a drug-loading method based on solvent evaporation and crystallization, and to investigate the underlying drug-loading mechanisms. Functionalized calcium carbonate (FCC) microparticles and four drugs with different solubility and permeability properties were selected as model substances to investigate drug loading. Ibuprofen, nifedipine, losartan potassium, and metronidazole benzoate were dissolved in acetone or methanol. After dispersion of FCC, the solvent was removed under reduced pressure. For each model drug, a series of drug loads were produced ranging from 25% to 50% (w/w) in steps of 5% (w/w). Loading efficiency was qualitatively analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) using the presence of agglomerates and drug crystals as indicators of poor loading efficiency. The particles were further characterized by mercury porosimetry, specific surface area measurements, differential scanning calorimetry, and USP2 dissolution. Drug concentration was determined by HPLC. FCC-drug mixtures containing equivalent drug fractions but without specific loading strategy served as reference samples. SEM analysis revealed high efficiency of pore filling up to a drug load of 40% (w/w). Above this, agglomerates and separate crystals were significantly increased, indicating that the maximum capacity of drug loading was reached. Intraparticle porosity and specific surface area were decreased after drug loading because of pore filling and crystallization on the pore surface. HPLC quantification of drugs taken up by FCC showed only minor drug loss. Dissolution rate of FCC loaded with metronidazole benzoate and nifedipine was faster than the corresponding FCC-drug mixtures, mainly due to surface enlargement, because only small

  12. Xe-133 recuperation by adsorption in active carbon impregnated with PF5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mondino, A.V.; Marques, R.O.

    1990-01-01

    Since the Mo-99 Fission Project has the aim to produce Xe-133 from gases generated in the alkaline dissolution of Al-U plates irradiated with thermal neutrons and, considering the importance of this radioisotope from the nuclear medicine point of view, studies to improve and optimize the Xe-133 recuperation were continued. Experiences were made on 'static' equilibrium employing high purity xenon and for the 'dynamic' case, Xe-133 mixed with a carrier and nitrogen as gas carrier; in this case, a 44% and a 34% increase in the capacity of xenon adsorption relaxed with activated carbon without being impregnated and impregnated with AgF, were respectively achieved. (Author) [es

  13. Characterization of impregnated GDC nano structures and their functionality in LSM based cathodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klemensø, Trine; Chatzichristodoulou, Christodoulos; Nielsen, Jimmi

    2012-01-01

    Porous composite cathodes of LSM–YSZ (lanthanum strontium manganite and yttria stabilized zirconia) were impregnated with GDC (gadolinia doped ceria) nano particles. The impregnation process was varied using none or different surfactants (Triton X-45, Triton X-100, P123), and the quantity...... on the LSM phase and the LSM grain boundaries. The observations suggest that the improved performance associated with GDC nano particles is related to the particles placed near the TPB (triple phase boundary) zone. The GDC extends the TPB by creating an ionic conducting network on top of the LSM particles...

  14. Comment on the mechanism of operation of the impregnated tungsten cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forman, R.

    1979-01-01

    Recent life-test measurements, over 20,000-30,000 h, on impregnated tungsten cathodes in tubes employing an open-type electron-gun structure, show emission current degradation with time. This is in contrast to those recently published by Rittner on B-type cathodes, run in close-spaced diodes, taken some years ago. These more recent life-test results are consistent with the model suggested by Forman and disputed by Rittner that the barium coverage on an impregnated cathode is less than a monolayer for most of its life and decreases with time.

  15. A Combined Electro-Thermal Breakdown Model for Oil-Impregnated Paper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Huang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The breakdown property of oil-impregnated paper is a key factor for converter transformer design and operation, but it is not well understood. In this paper, breakdown voltages of oil-impregnated paper were measured at different temperatures. The results showed that with the increase of temperature, electrical, electro-thermal and thermal breakdown occurred successively. An electro-thermal breakdown model was proposed based on the heat equilibrium and space charge transport, and negative differential mobility was introduced to the model. It was shown that carrier mobility determined whether it was electrical or thermal breakdown, and the model can effectively explain the temperature-dependent breakdown.

  16. Electrochemical in-situ impregnation of wood using a copper nail as source for copper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Block, Thomas; Nymark, Morten

    2011-01-01

    A new method for copper impregnation of wood in structures was suggested and tested in laboratory scale with specimen of new pine sapwood. A copper nail and a steel screw were placed in the wood, and an electric direct current field was applied, so the copper nail was anode and the screw...... was cathode. At the anode, copper ions were generated. The copper ions were transported into the wood by electromigration (movement of ions in an applied electric field) towards the cathode, and a volume between the two electrodes was thereby impregnated. Copper also moved to a lesser degree in the opposite...

  17. Influence of impregnation by inorganic substances on the yield of pyrolysis products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shevkoplyas, V N; Saranchuk, V I [AN Ukrainskoj SSR, Donetsk (Ukraine). Inst. Fiziko-Organicheskoj Khimii i Uglekhimii

    1998-09-01

    In papers was shown that fossil coals impregnation by aqueous solution of inorganic substances with a subsequent pyrolysis leads to the rise of the rate and depth of its organic mass destruction into liquid and gaseous products. This is, apperently, conditioned by changes in coals structure already on the stage of treatment. But, there are few papers that study an activating effect of inorganic reactants upon natural coals structure and their behaviour at pyrolysis. One of the methods which allows to judge structural transformation in coals at their impregnation by inorganic substances is an X-ray analysis. (orig.)

  18. Condensate-polisher resin-leakage quantification and resin-transport studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stauffer, C.C.; Doss, P.L.

    1983-04-01

    The objectives of this program were to: (1) determine the extent of resin leakage from current generation condensate polisher systems, both deep bed and powdered resin design, during cut-in, steady-state and flow transient operation, (2) analyze moisture separator drains and other secondary system samples for resin fragments and (3) document the level of organics in the secondary system. Resin leakage samples were obtained from nine-power stations that have either recirculating steam generators or once through steam generators. Secondary system samples were obtained from steam generator feedwater, recirculating steam generator blowdown and moisture separator drains. Analysis included ultraviolet light examination, SEM/EDX, resin quantification and infrared analysis. Data obtained from the various plants were compared and factors affecting resin leakage were summarized

  19. The mechanism of uranium adsorption on Resin 508 and isoelectric point of the resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Qingping; Lu Weichang; Su Huijuan; Hu Jinbo; Zhang Liqin; Chen Banglin

    1990-01-01

    The adsorption process of uranium by Resin 508 at the solid-liquid interface was investigated and the mechanism of uranium adsorption including adsorption dynamics, adsorption thermodynamics and isoelectric point of resin was studied. The results are as follows: The maximum of uranium adsorption is attained at pH5-7; Uranium adsorption isotherm by Resin 508 in experimental conditions agrees with Langmuir's adsorption isotherm, the maximum of uranium adsorbed (Vm) is 716 mg U/g-dried resin; The adsorption of uranium by Resin 508 is an endothermic reaction and ΔH = 16.87 kJ/mol; The exchange-adsorption rate is mainly controlled by liquid film diffusion; The isoelectric points of Resin 508 before and after uranium adsorption are found to be pH7.5 and pH5.7 respectively. It is a specific adsorption for uranium

  20. Multiple sclerosis and organic solvents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, J T; Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik; Rasmussen, K

    1998-01-01

    We investigated a possible causal relation between exposure to organic solvents in Danish workers (housepainters, typographers/printers, carpenters/cabinetmakers) and onset of multiple sclerosis. Data on men included in the Danish Multiple Sclerosis Register (3,241 men) were linked with data from......, and butchers. Over a follow-up period of 20 years, we observed no increase in the incidence of multiple sclerosis among men presumed to be exposed to organic solvents. It was not possible to obtain data on potential confounders, and the study design has some potential for selection bias. Nevertheless......, the study does not support existing hypotheses regarding an association between occupational exposure to organic solvents and multiple sclerosis....

  1. Indium recovery by solvent extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fortes, Marilia Camargos Botelho

    1999-04-01

    Indium has been recovered as a byproduct from residues generated from the sulfuric acid leaching circuits in mineral plants for zinc recovery. Once its recovery comes from the slags of other metals recovery, it is necessary to separate it from the other elements which usually are present in high concentrations. Many works have been approaching this separation and indicate the solvent extraction process as the main technique used. In Brazilian case, indium recovery depends on the knowledge of this technique and its development. This paper describes the solvent extraction knowledge for the indium recovery from aqueous solutions generated in mineral plants. The results for determination of the best experimental conditions to obtain a high indium concentration solution and minimum iron poisoning by solvent extraction with di (2-ethylhexyl)-phosphoric acid (D2EHPA) solubilized in isoparafin and exxsol has been presented. (author)

  2. Solvent Free Low-Melt Viscosity Imide Oligomers And Thermosetting Polyimide Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, CHun-Hua (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    This invention relates to the composition and a solvent-free process for preparing novel imide oligomers and polymers specifically formulated with effective amounts of a dianhydride such as 2,3,3',4-biphenyltetra carboxylic dianydride (a-BPDA), at least one aromatic diamine' and an endcapped of 4-phenylethynylphthalic anhydride (PEPA) or nadic anhydride to produce imide oligomers that possess a low-melt viscosity of 1-60 poise at 260-280" C. When the imide oligomer melt is cured at about 371 C. in a press or autoclave under 100-500 psi, the melt resulted in a thermoset polyimide having a glass transition temperature (T(sub g)) equal to and above 310 C. A novel feature of this process is that the monomers; namely the dianhydrides, diamines and the endcaps, are melt processable to form imide oligomers at temperatures ranging between 232-280 C. (450-535 F) without any solvent. These low-melt imide oligomers can be easily processed by resin transfer molding (RTM), vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) or the resin infusion process with fiber preforms e.g. carbon, glass or quartz preforms to produce polyimide matrix composites with 288-343C (550-650 F) high temperature performance capability.

  3. The investigation of copper-based impregnated activated carbons prepared from water-soluble materials for broad spectrum respirator applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, J.W.H.; Westreich, P.; Abdellatif, H.; Filbee-Dexter, P.; Smith, A.J.; Wood, T.E.; Croll, L.M.; Reynolds, J.H.; Dahn, J.R.

    2010-01-01

    The preparation of impregnated activated carbons (IACs) from aqueous, copper-containing solutions for broad spectrum gas filtration applications is studied here. Several samples were studied to determine the effect that impregnant loading, impregnant distribution and impregnant recipe had on the overall performance. Dynamic flow testing was used to determine the gas filtration capacity of the IAC samples versus a variety of challenge gases. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) were used to characterize the impregnant distribution on the carbon as a function of impregnant loading. Oven tests were performed to determine the thermal stability of the IAC samples exposed to elevated temperatures. The role impregnant distribution plays in gas filtration capacity and the overall performance of the IAC samples is discussed. The IAC samples prepared in this work were found to have gas filtration capacities as good as or better than broad spectrum respirator carbon samples prepared from the patent literature. IACs impregnated with an aqueous 2.4 M Cu(NO 3 ) 2 /0.04 M H 3 PO 4 .12MoO 3 /4 M HNO 3 solution that were heated to 200 deg. C under argon were found to have the best overall performance of the samples studied in this work.

  4. Determination of SO2 in the atmosphere using radioactive iodine kryptonate as impregnation medium of chromatographic paper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pruzinec, J.

    1975-01-01

    Chromatographic paper was impregnated with radioiodine kryptonate using the macrodiffusion technique. The decrease with time of the activity of the kryptonate-impregnated paper exposed to SO 2 -contaminated air was measured. From the decrease in chromatographic paper activity, the concentration of SO 2 was determined in the range 300 to 700 ppm. (A.K.)

  5. The investigation of copper-based impregnated activated carbons prepared from water-soluble materials for broad spectrum respirator applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, J.W.H.; Westreich, P.; Abdellatif, H.; Filbee-Dexter, P.; Smith, A.J. [Department of Physics and Atmospheric Science, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, B3H 3J5 (Canada); Wood, T.E. [3M Company, St. Paul, MN, 55144 (United States); Croll, L.M.; Reynolds, J.H. [3M Canada Company, Brockville, Ontario, K6V 5V8 (Canada); Dahn, J.R., E-mail: jeff.dahn@dal.ca [Department of Physics and Atmospheric Science, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, B3H 3J5 (Canada); Department of Chemistry, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, B3H 4J3 (Canada)

    2010-08-15

    The preparation of impregnated activated carbons (IACs) from aqueous, copper-containing solutions for broad spectrum gas filtration applications is studied here. Several samples were studied to determine the effect that impregnant loading, impregnant distribution and impregnant recipe had on the overall performance. Dynamic flow testing was used to determine the gas filtration capacity of the IAC samples versus a variety of challenge gases. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) were used to characterize the impregnant distribution on the carbon as a function of impregnant loading. Oven tests were performed to determine the thermal stability of the IAC samples exposed to elevated temperatures. The role impregnant distribution plays in gas filtration capacity and the overall performance of the IAC samples is discussed. The IAC samples prepared in this work were found to have gas filtration capacities as good as or better than broad spectrum respirator carbon samples prepared from the patent literature. IACs impregnated with an aqueous 2.4 M Cu(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}/0.04 M H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}.12MoO{sub 3}/4 M HNO{sub 3} solution that were heated to 200 deg. C under argon were found to have the best overall performance of the samples studied in this work.

  6. Solvent sorting in (mixed solvent electrolyte) systems: Time-resolved ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    lar solvents as an effective single component dipo- lar liquid that is characterized ... and time (t) dependent solvation energy of mobile dipo- lar solute with density ..... Even though this way for modification of C is purely ad- hoc, the observation ...

  7. 5-year clinical performance of resin composite versus resin modified glass ionomer restorative system in non-carious cervical lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franco, Eduardo Batista; Benetti, Ana Raquel; Ishikiriama, Sérgio Kiyoshi

    2006-01-01

    To comparatively assess the 5-year clinical performance of a 1-bottle adhesive and resin composite system with a resin-modified glass ionomer restorative in non-carious cervical lesions.......To comparatively assess the 5-year clinical performance of a 1-bottle adhesive and resin composite system with a resin-modified glass ionomer restorative in non-carious cervical lesions....

  8. Nanosilica Modification of Elastomer-Modified VARTM Epoxy Resins for Improved Resin and Composite Toughness

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Robinette, Jason; Bujanda, Andres; DeSchepper, Daniel; Dibelka, Jessica; Costanzo, Philip; Jensen, Robert; McKnight, Steven

    2007-01-01

    Recent publications have reported a synergy between rubber and silica in modified epoxy resins that results in significantly improved fracture toughness without reductions in other material properties...

  9. Method for regenerating magnetic polyamine-epichlorohydrin resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochen, Robert L.; Navratil, James D.

    1997-07-29

    Magnetic polymer resins capable of efficient removal of actinides and heavy metals from contaminated water are disclosed together with methods for making, using, and regenerating them. The resins comprise polyamine-epichlorohydrin resin beads with ferrites attached to the surfaces of the beads. Markedly improved water decontamination is demonstrated using these magnetic polymer resins of the invention in the presence of a magnetic field, as compared with water decontamination methods employing ordinary ion exchange resins or ferrites taken separately.

  10. A method for producing a hydrocarbon resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsachev, A B; Andonov, K S; Igliyev, S P

    1980-11-25

    Rock coal resin (KS), for instance, with a relative density of 1,150 to 1,190 kilograms per cubic meter, which contains 8 to 10 percent naphthaline, 1.5 to 2.8 percent phenol and 6 to 15 percent substances insoluble in toluene, or its mixture with rock coal or oil fractions of resin are subjected to distillation (Ds) in a pipe furnace with two evaporators (Is) and a distillation tower with a temperature mode in the second stage of 320 to 360 degrees and 290 to 340 degrees in the pitch compartment. A hydrocarbon resin is produced with a high carbon content, especially for the production of resin and dolomite refractory materials, as well as fuel mixtures for blast furnace and open hearth industry.

  11. Synthesis of improved phenolic and polyester resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delano, C. B.

    1980-01-01

    Thirty-seven cured phenolic resin compositions were prepared and tested for their ability to provide improved char residues and moisture resistance over state of the art epoxy resin composite matrices. Cyanate, epoxy novolac and vinyl ester resins were investigated. Char promoter additives were found to increase the anaerobic char yield at 800 C of epoxy novolacs and vinyl esters. Moisture resistant cyanate and vinyl ester compositions were investigated as composite matrices with Thornel 300 graphite fiber. A cyanate composite matrix provided state of the art composite mechanical properties before and after humidity exposure and an anaerobic char yield of 46 percent at 800 C. The outstanding moisture resistance of the matrix was not completely realized in the composite. Vinyl ester resins showed promise as candidates for improved composite matrix systems.

  12. Integrating Porous Resins In Enzymatic Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al-Haque, Naweed

    . Screening resins for moderately hydrophobic multi-component systems is challenging. Often it is found that the capacity of the resin is inversely related with product selectivity. Therefore a tradeoff has to be made between these parameters which can be crucial from an economic point of view. A low resin...... procedure. The screening therefore becomes a multi-objective task that has to be solved simultaneously. Such an approach has been applied in the method formulated in this framework. To overcome these challenges, different process strategies are required to obtain high yields. A number of different...... inhibition, has gained considerable recognition. The resins act as a reservoir for the inhibitory substrate and a sink for the inhibitory product and simultaneously attain the required high substrate loading to make the process economically feasible. In this way the potential benefit of the enzyme can...

  13. Amine chemistry. Update on impact on resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bachman, Gregory; Kellogg, Douglas; Wilkes, Marty

    2012-01-01

    Impurity removal in the steam cycle and the associated prevention of corrosion and/or fouling of system components are the goals of ion exchange resins. However, in many instances (such as a switch to amine chemistry or a change in product specifications), resins do not remove, and, in fact, contribute impurities to the steam cycle. This paper reviews recent data compiled to determine the direct and indirect effects of amines on ion exchange resins used in the power industry. Water chemistries have improved in recent years, in large part due to changes in chemistry and resins, but it is necessary to continue to develop products, processes and techniques to reduce impurities and improve overall water chemistry in power plant systems. (orig.)

  14. Amine chemistry. Update on impact on resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachman, Gregory; Kellogg, Douglas [Siemens Industry, Inc., Rockford, IL (United States). Technology and Lab Services; Wilkes, Marty [Siemens Industry, Inc., Rockford, IL (United States). Water Technologies Div.

    2012-03-15

    Impurity removal in the steam cycle and the associated prevention of corrosion and/or fouling of system components are the goals of ion exchange resins. However, in many instances (such as a switch to amine chemistry or a change in product specifications), resins do not remove, and, in fact, contribute impurities to the steam cycle. This paper reviews recent data compiled to determine the direct and indirect effects of amines on ion exchange resins used in the power industry. Water chemistries have improved in recent years, in large part due to changes in chemistry and resins, but it is necessary to continue to develop products, processes and techniques to reduce impurities and improve overall water chemistry in power plant systems. (orig.)

  15. Feasibility of vitrifying EPICOR II organic resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buelt, J.L.

    1981-11-01

    Two laboratory-scale runs have recently been completed to test the feasibility of a single-step incineration/vitrification process for Three Mile Island EPICOR II resins. The process utilizes vitrification equipment, specifically a 15-cm-dia in-can melter, and a specially designed feed technique. Two process tests, each conducted with 1.2 kg of EPICOR II resins loaded with nonradioactive cesium and strontium, showed excellent operational characteristics. Less than 0.8 wt% of the resins were entrained with the gaseous effluents in the second test. Cesium and strontium losses were controlled to 0.71 wt% and less. In addition, all the carbonaceous resins were converted completely to CO 2 with no detectable CO. Future activities are being directed to longer-term tests in laboratory-scale equipment to determine attainable volume reduction, process rates, and material conformance to processing conditions

  16. Influence of retainer design on two-unit cantilever resin-bonded glass fiber reinforced composite fixed dental prostheses: an in vitro and finite element analysis study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keulemans, Filip; De Jager, Niek; Kleverlaan, Cornelis J; Feilzer, Albert J

    2008-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro the influence of retainer design on the strength of two-unit cantilever resin-bonded glass fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) fixed dental prostheses (FDP). Four retainer designs were tested: a proximal box, a step-box, a dual wing, and a step-box-wing. Of each design on 8 human mandibular molars, FRC-FDPs of a premolar size were produced. The FRC framework was made of resin impregnated unidirectional glass fibers (Estenia C&B EG Fiber, Kuraray) and veneered with hybrid resin composite (Estenia C&B, Kuraray). Panavia F 2.0 (Kuraray) was used as resin luting cement. FRC-FDPs were loaded to failure in a universal testing machine. One-way ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc test were used to evaluate the data. The four designs were analyzed with finite element analysis (FEA) to reveal the stress distribution within the tooth/restoration complex. Significantly lower fracture strengths were observed with inlay-retained FDPs (proximal box: 300 +/- 65 N; step-box: 309 +/- 37 N) compared to wing-retained FDPs (p optimal design for replacement of a single premolar by means of a two-unit cantilever FRC-FDPs.

  17. Simulation of the Vacuum Assisted Resin Transfer Molding (VARTM) process and the development of light-weight composite bridging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Marc J.

    A continued desire for increased mobility in the aftermath of natural disasters, or on the battlefield, has lead to the need for improved light-weight bridging solutions. This research investigates the development of a carbon/epoxy composite bridging system to meet the needs for light-weight bridging. The research focuses on two main topics. The first topic is that of processing composite structures and the second is the design and testing of these structures. In recent years the Vacuum Assisted Resin Transfer Molding (VARTM) process has become recognized as a low-cost manufacturing alternative for large Fiber Reinforced Polymer (FRP) composite structures for civil, military, and aerospace applications. The success of the VARTM process (complete wet-out) is very sensitive to the resin injection strategy used and the proper placement of flow distribution materials and inlet and vacuum ports. Predicting the flow front pattern, the time required for infusing a part with resin, and the time required to bleed excess resin at the end of filling, is critical to ensure that the part will become completely impregnated and desired fiber volume fractions achieved prior to the resin gelling (initiation of cure). In order to eliminate costly trial and error experiments to determine the optimal infusion strategy, this research presents a simulation model which considers in-plane flow as well as flow through the thickness of the preform. In addition to resin filling, the current model is able to simulate the bleeding of resin at the end of filling to predict the required bleeding time to reach desired fiber volume fractions for the final part. In addition to processing, the second portion of the dissertation investigates the design and testing of composite bridge deck sections which also serve as short-span bridging for gaps up to 4 m in length. The research focuses on the design of a light-weight core material for bridge decking as well as proof loading of short-span bridge

  18. Photopolymerizable silicone monomers, oligomers, and resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobine, A.F.; Nakos, S.T.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this chapter is to acquaint the general photopolymer researcher with the historical development of the chemistry and technology of photopolymerizable silicone monomers, fluids, and resins. The current status of research in these areas is assessed. The focus of this chapter is not only on the polymer chemistry and application of this technology, but also on important aspects of the synthetic chemistry involved in the preparation of UV-curable silicone monomers, oligomers, and resins. 236 refs., 6 tabs

  19. Cycloaliphatic epoxide resins for cationic UV - cure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verschueren, K.; Balwant Kaur

    1999-01-01

    This paper introduces the cyclo - aliphatic epoxide resins used for the various applications of radiation curing and their comparison with acrylate chemistry. Radiation curable coatings and inks are pre - dominantly based on acrylate chemistry but over the last few years, cationic chemistry has emerged successfully with the unique properties inherent with cyclo - aliphatic epoxide ring structures. Wide variety of cationic resins and diluents, the formulation techniques to achieve the desired properties greatly contributes to the advancement of UV - curing technology

  20. Volumetric polymerization shrinkage of contemporary composite resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halim Nagem Filho

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The polymerization shrinkage of composite resins may affect negatively the clinical outcome of the restoration. Extensive research has been carried out to develop new formulations of composite resins in order to provide good handling characteristics and some dimensional stability during polymerization. The purpose of this study was to analyze, in vitro, the magnitude of the volumetric polymerization shrinkage of 7 contemporary composite resins (Definite, Suprafill, SureFil, Filtek Z250, Fill Magic, Alert, and Solitaire to determine whether there are differences among these materials. The tests were conducted with precision of 0.1 mg. The volumetric shrinkage was measured by hydrostatic weighing before and after polymerization and calculated by known mathematical equations. One-way ANOVA (a or = 0.05 was used to determine statistically significant differences in volumetric shrinkage among the tested composite resins. Suprafill (1.87±0.01 and Definite (1.89±0.01 shrank significantly less than the other composite resins. SureFil (2.01±0.06, Filtek Z250 (1.99±0.03, and Fill Magic (2.02±0.02 presented intermediate levels of polymerization shrinkage. Alert and Solitaire presented the highest degree of polymerization shrinkage. Knowing the polymerization shrinkage rates of the commercially available composite resins, the dentist would be able to choose between using composite resins with lower polymerization shrinkage rates or adopting technical or operational procedures to minimize the adverse effects deriving from resin contraction during light-activation.

  1. Non-hydrolytic sol-gel synthesis of epoxysilane-based inorganic-organic hybrid resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jana, Sunirmal; Lim, Mi Ae; Baek, In Chan; Kim, Chang Hae; Seok, Sang Il

    2008-01-01

    A silica-based inorganic-organic hybrid resins (IOHR) were synthesized by non-hydrolytic sol-gel process from 3-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane (GLYMO) and diphenylsilanediol (DPSD) at a fixed amount of (20 mol%) phenyltrimethoxysilane using barium hydroxide as a catalyst. The confirmation of condensation reaction in the IOHR was done by liquid state 29 Si NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) spectroscopy, measurement of viscosity as well as weight average molecular weight (W m ) of the IOHR. The W m of the IOHR was varied from 1091 to 2151, depending upon the DPSD content. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic measurements were performed to investigate the details of vibrational absorption bands in the IOHR. It was seen that up to 50 mol% of DPSD there were no absorption peaks in the region of 3000-3600 cm -1 responsible for O-H groups and it reappeared at 60 mol% of DPSD due to some unreacted OH groups present in the resin. The IOHR at all the compositions was oily transparent liquid, miscible with various organic solvents like toluene, cyclohexanone, chloroform, tehrahydrofuran (THF), etc., and also commercial epoxy resins but immiscible with water. The color of the IOHR was pale yellow, which lightened with increasing DPSD content. The IOHR having 40-50 mol% of DPSD were storable. The refractive index at 632.8 nm of the resin films varied from 1.556 to 1.588, depending upon the resin composition. Physico-chemical properties such as the thermal stability, visible transparency, etc. after curing were investigated as a function of the chemical composition

  2. Cleanup of TMI-2 demineralizer resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bond, W.D.; King, L.J.; Knauer, J.B.; Hofstetter, K.J.; Thompson, J.D.

    1985-01-01

    Radiocesium is being removed from Demineralizers A and B (DA and DB by a process that was developed from laboratory tests on small samples of resin from the demineralizers. The process was designed to elute the radiocesium from the demineralizer resins and then to resorb it onto the zeolite ion exchangers contained in the Submerged Demineralizer System (SDS). The process was also required to limit the maximum cesium activities in the resin eluates (SDS feeds) so that the radiation field surrounding the pipelines would not be excessive. The process consists of 17 stages of batch elution. In the initial stage, the resin is contacted with 0.18 M boric acid. Subsequent stages subject the resin to increasing concentrations of sodium in NaH 2 BO 3 -H 3 BO 3 solution (total B = 0.35 M) and then 1 M sodium hydroxide in the final stages. Results on the performance of the process in the cleanup of the demineralizers at TMI-2 are compared to those obtained from laboratory tests with small samples of the DA and DB resins. To date, 15 stages of batch elution have been completed on the demineralizers at TMI-2 which resulted in the removal of about 750 Ci of radiocesium from DA and about 3300 Ci from DB

  3. Preconcentration of plutonium and americium using the Actinide-CUTM Resin for human tissue analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qu, H.; Stuit, D.; Glover, S.E.; Love, S.F.; Filby, R.H.; Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA

    1998-01-01

    A method for the preconcentration of Am and Pu from human tissue solutions (liver, lung, bone etc) using the Actinide-CU Resin (EIChroM Industries) has been developed for their alpha-spectrometric determination. With near 100% recoveries were obtained by preconcentration, subsequent decomposition methods for eluent were developed. Good agreement for Pu and Am determination with the USTUR anion-exchange/solvent extraction method was demonstrated using previously analyzed human tissue solutions and NIST SRMs. The advantages of the preconcentration method applied to human tissue analysis are simplicity of operation, shorter analysis time compared to anion exchange/solvent extraction methods, and capacity to analyze large tissue samples (up to 15 g bone ash per analysis and 500 g soft tissue). (author)

  4. Improved Purex solvent scrubbing methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mailen, J.C.; Tallent, O.K.

    1984-01-01

    Studies of hydrazine and hydroxylamine salts as solvent scrubbing agents that can be decomposed into gases are summarized. Results from testing of countercurrent scrubbers and solid sorber columns that produce lesser amounts of permanent salts are reported. The status of studies of the acid-degradation of paraffin diluent and the options for removal of long-chain organic acids is given

  5. Risk assessment for halogenated solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Travis, C.C.

    1988-01-01

    A recent development in the cancer risk area is the advent of biologically based pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic models. These models allow for the incorporation of biological and mechanistic data into the risk assessment process. These advances will not only improve the risk assessment process for halogenated solvents but will stimulate and guide basic research in the biological area

  6. The Effects of Natural Weathering on Color Stability of Impregnated and Varnished Wood Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turkay Turkoglu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate effects of natural weathering on color stability of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L. and Oriental beech (Fagus orientalis L. impregnated with some chemicals [tanalith-E (TN-E, adolit-KD5 (AD-KD5, and chromated copper arsenate (CCA] and then varnished [synthetic varnish (SV and polyurethane varnish (PV]. While applying varnish increased lightness, impregnation decreased lightness of the wood specimens before natural weathering. Natural weathering caused greenish, bluish, and dark color tones of the wood surface. Total color change was increased with increasing exposure times in natural weathering. Untreated (control wood specimens exhibited higher color changes than the other wood specimens in all the stages of natural weathering. The total color changes of untreated Oriental beech specimens were less than untreated Scots pine specimens. The color stability of impregnated and varnished wood specimens gave better results than untreated and solely varnished wood specimens after natural weathering. The best color stability was obtained from both Oriental beech and Scots pine wood impregnated with TN-E before PV coating.

  7. Phosphate adsorption on aluminum-impregnated mesoporous silicates : surface structure and behavior of adsorbents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eun Woo Shin; James S. Han; Min Jang; Soo-Hong Min; Jae Kwang Park; Roger M. Rowell

    2004-01-01

    Phosphorus from excess fertilizers and detergents ends up washing into lakes, creeks, and rivers. This overabundance of phosphorus causes excessive aquatic plant and algae growth and depletes the dissolved oxygen supply in the water. In this study, aluminum-impregnated mesoporous adsorbents were tested for their ability to remove phosphate from water. The surface...

  8. 3D Imaging of Water-Drop Condensation on Hydrophobic and Hydrophilic Lubricant-Impregnated Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajiya, Tadashi; Schellenberger, Frank; Papadopoulos, Periklis; Vollmer, Doris; Butt, Hans-Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    Condensation of water from the atmosphere on a solid surface is an ubiquitous phenomenon in nature and has diverse technological applications, e.g. in heat and mass transfer. We investigated the condensation kinetics of water drops on a lubricant-impregnated surface, i.e., a micropillar array impregnated with a non-volatile ionic liquid. Growing and coalescing drops were imaged in 3D using a laser scanning confocal microscope equipped with a temperature and humidity control. Different stages of condensation can be discriminated. On a lubricant-impregnated hydrophobic micropillar array these are: (1) Nucleation on the lubricant surface. (2) Regular alignment of water drops between micropillars and formation of a three-phase contact line on a bottom of the substrate. (3) Deformation and bridging by coalescence which eventually leads to a detachment of the drops from the bottom substrate. The drop-substrate contact does not result in breakdown of the slippery behaviour. Contrary, on a lubricant-impregnated hydrophilic micropillar array, the condensed water drops replace the lubricant. Consequently, the surface loses its slippery property. Our results demonstrate that a Wenzel-like to Cassie transition, required to maintain the facile removal of condensed water drops, can be induced by well-chosen surface hydrophobicity.

  9. Field emission characteristics of SnO2/CNT composite prepared by microwave assisted wet impregnation

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kesavan Pillai, Sreejarani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available SnO2/CNT composites were prepared by microwave assisted wet impregnation at 60 °C. The process was optimized by varying the microwave power and reaction time. Raman analysis showed the typical features of the rutile phase of as-synthesized SnO2...

  10. Investigation of the Acoustic Properties of Chemically Impregnated Kayu Malam Wood Used for Musical Instrument

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Faruk Hossen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The chemical modification or impregnation through preparing the wood polymer composites (WPCs can effectively reduce the hygroscopicity as well as can improve the acoustic properties of wood. On the other hand, a small amount of nanoclay into the chemical mixture can further improve the different properties of the WPCs through the preparation of wood polymer nanocomposites (WPNCs. Kayu Malam wood species with styrene (St, vinyl acetate (VA, and montmorillonite (MMT nanoclay were used for the preparation of WPNCs. The acoustic properties such as specific dynamic Young’s modulus (Ed/γ, internal friction (Q−1, and acoustic conversion efficiency (ACE of wood were examined using free-free flexural vibration. It was observed that the chemically impregnated wood composite showed a higher value of Ed/γ than raw wood and the nanoclay-loaded wood nanocomposite showed the highest value. The reverse trend was observed in the case of Q−1. On the other hand, chemical impregnation has a minor effect on ACE of wood for musical instruments. The results suggested that the chemically impregnated Kayu Malam wood polymer nanocomposite (WPNC is suitable for making soundboards of violin and guitar instruments to be played longer without losing tone quality.

  11. Moisture effect on the dielectric response and space charge behaviour of mineral oil impregnated paper insulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao Jian; Liao Ruijin; Chen, George

    2011-01-01

    Dielectric response and space charge behaviour of oil-paper insulation sample with different moisture contents were investigated using the frequency dielectric spectroscopy (FDS) and the pulsed electroacoustic (PEA) technique, respectively. The influence of moisture on the dielectric response and space charge behaviour of oil impregnated paper insulation was analysed. Results show that the moisture has great effect on the FDS and space charge behaviour of oil impregnated paper insulation. In the frequency range of 10 -2 ∼10 6 Hz, the conductivity and the capacitance of oil impregnated paper increases with its moisture content. The space charge distribution of oil-paper sample with lower and higher moisture contents is very different from each other. The higher the moisture concentration of the oil impregnated paper, the easier the negative charge penetration into the insulation paper. There is a significant amount of positive charge accumulated at the paper-paper interface near to the cathode for oilpaper sample with lower moisture content. However, the positive charge appears in the middle layer paper for oil-paper sample with higher moisture content. Due to the high conductivity, the charge trapped in the oil-paper sample with higher moisture content disappears much faster than that in the oil-paper sample with lower moisture content after removing the voltage.

  12. Process for making 90 degree K. superconductors by impregnating cellulosic article with precursor solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolt, J.D.; Subramanian, M.A.

    1991-01-01

    This patent describes an improved process for preparing a shaped article of a superconducting composition having the formula MBa 2 Cu 3 O x wherein; M is selected from the group consisting of Y, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb and Lu; x is from about 6.5 to about 7.0; the composition having a superconducting transition temperature of about 90 K. It comprises: forming in acetic acid a mixture of M(C 2 H 3 O 2 ) 3 , barium acetate and copper acetate in an atomic ratio of M:Ba:Cu of about 1:2:3; heating the resulting mixture to boiling, and adding sufficient formic acid to dissolve any undissolved starting material while continuing to boil the solution; contacting an article of cellulose material with the solution thereby impregnating the article with the solution, the article having the shape desired; removing excess solution from the resulting impregnated article of cellulose material and drying the impregnated article; heating the impregnated article of cellulose material to a temperature from about 850 degree C to about 925 degree C in an oxygen-containing atmosphere for a time sufficient to form MBa 2 Cu 3 O y , where y is from about 6.0 to about 6.5, the heating effecting carbonization of the cellulose material and oxidization of carbon without ignition; and maintaining the resulting article in an oxygen-containing atmosphere while cooling for a time sufficient to obtained the desired product

  13. Bacterial Adhesion Forces to Ag-Impregnated Contact Lens Cases and Transmission to Contact Lenses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qu, Wenwen; Busscher, Henk J.; van der Mei, Henny C.; Hooymans, Johanna M. M.

    Purpose: To measure adhesion forces of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, and Serratia marcescens to a rigid contact lens (CL), standard polypropylene, and Ag-impregnated lens cases using atomic force microscopy and determine bacterial transmission from lens case to CL. Methods: Adhesion

  14. Fast, versatile x-ray fluorescence method for measuring tin in impregnated wood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drabæk, I.; Christensen, Leif Højslet

    1985-01-01

    The present paper describes an energy-dispersive x-ray fluorescence method for measuring tin in bis(tri-n-butyl)tin-oxide impregnated wood. The proposed method is of the backscatter/fundamental parameter type. Its versatility, precision, and accuracy is demonstrated by analyses of eleven samples...

  15. Anti-triatomine saliva immunoassays for the evaluation of impregnated netting trials against Chagas disease transmission

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Schwarz, Alexandra; Juarez, J. A.; Richards, J.; Rath, B.; Machaca, V. Q.; Castro, Y. E.; Málaga, E. S.; Levy, K.; Gilman, R. H.; Bern, C.; Verastegui, M.; Levy, M. Z.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 41, č. 6 (2011), s. 591-594 ISSN 0020-7519 R&D Projects: GA ČR GPP302/11/P798 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : Triatoma infestans * Impregnated net * Sentinel guinea pig * Saliva * Antibody response Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 3.393, year: 2011

  16. Clinical evaluation of a PHMB-impregnated biocellulose dressing on paediatric lacerations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elzinga, G.; van Doorn, J.; Wiersema, A. M.; Klicks, R. J.; Andriessen, A.; Alblas, J. G.; Spits, H.; Post, A.; van Gent, M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical benefits, primarily tolerability and reduction in pain levels, associated with the use of a PHMB-impregnated biosynthetic cellulose dressing (Suprasorb X + PHMB) on paediatric heel lacerations. Method: These lacerations were caused when children, who were being

  17. Catalytic flash pyrolysis of oil-impregnated-wood and jatropha cake using sodium based catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ali Imran, A.; Bramer, Eduard A.; Seshan, Kulathuiyer; Brem, Gerrit

    2016-01-01

    Catalytic pyrolysis of wood with impregnated vegetable oil was investigated and compared with catalytic pyrolysis of jatropha cake making use of sodium based catalysts to produce a high quality bio-oil. The catalytic pyrolysis was carried out in two modes: in-situ catalytic pyrolysis and post

  18. Impregnation of β-​tricalcium phosphate robocast scaffolds by in situ polymerization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martinez-Vazquez, F.J.; Perera, F.H.; Meulen, van der I.; Heise, A.; Pajares, A.; Miranda, P.

    2013-01-01

    Ring-¿opening polymn. of e-¿caprolactone (e-¿CL) and L-¿lactide (LLA) was performed to impregnate ß-¿tricalcium phosphate (ß-¿TCP) scaffolds fabricated by robocasting. Concd. colloidal inks prepd. from ß-¿TCP com. powders were used to fabricate porous structures consisting of a 3D mesh of

  19. Impregnated membranes for direct methanol fuel cells at high methanol concentrations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yildirim, M.H.; Schwarz, Alexander; Stamatialis, Dimitrios; Wessling, Matthias

    2009-01-01

    Sulfonated poly(phthalazinone ether ketone) (SPPEK) impregnated Solupor® microporous film (SPPEK–PE) and pure SPPEK membranes with two different ion-exchange capacities (IECs) were prepared and characterized for use in DMFC applications. Swelling, proton conductivity, diffusion and DMFC experiments

  20. Ecological risks of an old wood impregnation mill: application of the triad approach.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karjalainen, A.-M.; Kilpi-Koski, J.; Väisänen, A.O.; Penttinen, S.; van Gestel, C.A.M.; Penttinen, O.-P.

    2009-01-01

    Although many studies deal with the distribution and mobility of chromated copper arsenate (CCA) metals in soil, the ecotoxicity of CCA-contaminated soils is rarely studied. The Triad approach was applied to determine the ecological risks posed by a CCA mixture at a decommissioned wood impregnation

  1. Iron oxide impregnated filter paper (Pi test): a review of its development and methodological research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chardon, W.J.; Menon, R.G.; Chien, S.H.

    1996-01-01

    Iron oxide impregnated filter paper (FeO paper) has been used to study the availability of phosphorus (P) to plants and algae, P desorption kinetics and P dynamics in the field. Since its initial development a number of differences in the method of preparation of the paper and its application have

  2. Anti-biofilm and cytotoxicity activity of impregnated dressings with silver nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velázquez-Velázquez, Jorge Luis [Laboratorio de Microbiología, Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, UASLP (Mexico); Santos-Flores, Andrés; Araujo-Meléndez, Javier [Servicio de Epidemiología del Hospital Central “Dr. Ignacio Morones Prieto”, San Luis Potosí (Mexico); Sánchez-Sánchez, Roberto; Velasquillo, Cristina [Laboratorio de Biotecnología, Instituto Nacional de Rehabilitación (Mexico); González, Carmen [Laboratorio de Fisiología Celular, Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, UASLP (Mexico); Martínez-Castañon, Gabriel [Maestría en Ciencias Odontológicas Facultad de Estomatología, UASLP (Mexico); Martinez-Gutierrez, Fidel, E-mail: fidel@uaslp.mx [Laboratorio de Microbiología, Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, UASLP (Mexico)

    2015-04-01

    Infections arising from bacterial adhesion and colonization on chronic wounds are a significant healthcare problem. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) impregnated in dressing have attracted a great deal of attention as a potential solution. The goal of the present study was to evaluate the anti-biofilm activities of AgNPs impregnated in commercial dressings against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, bacteria isolated of chronic wounds from a hospital patient. The antimicrobial activity of AgNPs was tested within biofilms generated under slow fluid shear conditions using a standard bioreactor. A 2-log reduction in the number of colony-forming units of P. aeruginosa was recorded in the reactor on exposure to dressing impregnated with 250 ppm of AgNPs, diameter 9.3 ± 1.1 nm, and also showed compatibility to mammalian cells (human fibroblasts). Our study suggests that the use of dressings with AgNPs may either prevent or reduce microbial growth in the wound environment, and reducing wound bioburden may improve wound-healing outcomes. - Highlights: • Biological activities of silver nanoparticles for wound-healing purposes • Characterization of the silver nanoparticles impregnated in dressings • Reduction in the P. aeruginosa biofilm formation was statistically significant. • Compatibility to human dermal fibroblasts as the main cell type involved in the reparation • AgNPs covering the surfaces would provide great potential for prevention and treatment.

  3. Anti-biofilm and cytotoxicity activity of impregnated dressings with silver nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velázquez-Velázquez, Jorge Luis; Santos-Flores, Andrés; Araujo-Meléndez, Javier; Sánchez-Sánchez, Roberto; Velasquillo, Cristina; González, Carmen; Martínez-Castañon, Gabriel; Martinez-Gutierrez, Fidel

    2015-01-01

    Infections arising from bacterial adhesion and colonization on chronic wounds are a significant healthcare problem. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) impregnated in dressing have attracted a great deal of attention as a potential solution. The goal of the present study was to evaluate the anti-biofilm activities of AgNPs impregnated in commercial dressings against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, bacteria isolated of chronic wounds from a hospital patient. The antimicrobial activity of AgNPs was tested within biofilms generated under slow fluid shear conditions using a standard bioreactor. A 2-log reduction in the number of colony-forming units of P. aeruginosa was recorded in the reactor on exposure to dressing impregnated with 250 ppm of AgNPs, diameter 9.3 ± 1.1 nm, and also showed compatibility to mammalian cells (human fibroblasts). Our study suggests that the use of dressings with AgNPs may either prevent or reduce microbial growth in the wound environment, and reducing wound bioburden may improve wound-healing outcomes. - Highlights: • Biological activities of silver nanoparticles for wound-healing purposes • Characterization of the silver nanoparticles impregnated in dressings • Reduction in the P. aeruginosa biofilm formation was statistically significant. • Compatibility to human dermal fibroblasts as the main cell type involved in the reparation • AgNPs covering the surfaces would provide great potential for prevention and treatment

  4. Operating features of decorative polymer-impregnated concretes under severe operating conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapustina, I.B.; Lobasenok, V.A.; Yakimtsiv, V.P.

    1991-01-01

    The study was carried out to investigate the possibility of a decorative polymer-impregnated concrete as a lining material in radiation-endangered rooms. Their extreme properties such as radiation resistance, decontamination ability, fire resistance and melting-freezing cycle resistance were studied. The material proposed shows substantially high resistance under severe operating conditions

  5. The sampling of hydrogen fluoride in air with impregnated filter paper

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huygen, C.

    1963-01-01

    A method isproposed for the quantitative collection of hydrogen fluoride in air by drawing a known quantity of the air through filter paper impregnated with solutions of potassium hydroxide and glycerol or triethanolamine. Somu possibilities and limitations of the method are discussed.

  6. Moisture effect on the dielectric response and space charge behaviour of mineral oil impregnated paper insulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hao Jian; Liao Ruijin [State Key Laboratory of Power Transmission Equipment and System Security and New Technology, Chongqing University (China); Chen, George, E-mail: jh210v@ecs.soton.ac.uk [School of Electronics and Computer Science, University of Southampton (United Kingdom)

    2011-08-12

    Dielectric response and space charge behaviour of oil-paper insulation sample with different moisture contents were investigated using the frequency dielectric spectroscopy (FDS) and the pulsed electroacoustic (PEA) technique, respectively. The influence of moisture on the dielectric response and space charge behaviour of oil impregnated paper insulation was analysed. Results show that the moisture has great effect on the FDS and space charge behaviour of oil impregnated paper insulation. In the frequency range of 10{sup -2}{approx}10{sup 6}Hz, the conductivity and the capacitance of oil impregnated paper increases with its moisture content. The space charge distribution of oil-paper sample with lower and higher moisture contents is very different from each other. The higher the moisture concentration of the oil impregnated paper, the easier the negative charge penetration into the insulation paper. There is a significant amount of positive charge accumulated at the paper-paper interface near to the cathode for oilpaper sample with lower moisture content. However, the positive charge appears in the middle layer paper for oil-paper sample with higher moisture content. Due to the high conductivity, the charge trapped in the oil-paper sample with higher moisture content disappears much faster than that in the oil-paper sample with lower moisture content after removing the voltage.

  7. DTDGA impregnated XAD-16 beads for separation and recovery of palladium from acidic wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Krishan Kant; Kanagare, Anant B.; Bairwa, K.K.; Manmohan Kumar; Bajaj, Parma N.; Ruhela, Ritesh; Singh, Ajoy K.; Hubli, Rajendra C.

    2014-01-01

    In the present study DTDGA extractant impregnated XAD16 polymeric beads (DTDGA- XAD16) were synthesized by wet chemical method and the beads were characterized by various techniques viz. FT-IR, Optical microscopy, SEM and TGA. The DTDGA-XAD 16 beads were evaluated for separation and recovery of palladium from high level waste solutions (HLW)

  8. Modeling boron separation from water by activated carbon, impregnated and unimpregnated

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ristic, M.; Grbavcic, Z. [Belgrade Univ., Belgrade (BA). Faculty of Technology and Metallurgy; Marinovic, V. [Belgrade Univ., Belgrade (BA). Ist. of Technical Science of the Serbian Academy of Science and Arts

    2000-10-01

    The sorption of boron from boric acid water solution by impregnated activated carbon has been studied. Barium, calcium, mannitol, tartaric acid and citric acid were used as chemical active materials. All processes were performed in a chromatographic continuous system at 22{sup 0} C. Experimental results show that activated carbon impregnated with mannitol is effective in removing boron from water. The separation of boron from the wastewater from a factory for producing enameled dishes by activated carbon impregnated with mannitol was also performed. Two models have been applied to describe published and new data on boron sorption by impregnated activated carbon. Both of them are based on the analysis of boron concentration response to the step input function. This led to a mathematical model that quite successfully described impregnation effects on adsorption capacities. [Italian] E' stato studiato l'assorbimento del boro, mediante carbone attivo impregnato, da soluzioni acquose di acido borico. Quali materiali chimici attivi sono stati utilizzati: bario, calcio, mannitolo, acido tartarico ed acido citrico. Tutti i processi sono stati condotti in un sistema cromatografico continuo a 22{sup 0}C. I risultati sperimentali mostrano che il carbone attivo impregnato con mannitolo e' efficace nella rimozione del boro dall'acqua. E' anche stata effettuata la separazione del boro da acque di scarico di un'industria per la produzione di piatti smaltati mediante carbone attivo impregnato con mannitolo. Sono stati applicati due modelli per descrivere i risultati, pubblicati e nuovi, dell'assorbimento del boro mediante carbone attivo impregnato. Entrambi sono basati sull'analisi della risposta alla concentrazione di boro successivamente incrementata a stadi. Cio' porta ad un modello matematico che descrive abbastanza soddisfacentemente gli effetti dell'impregnazione sulla capacita' di assorbimento.

  9. Bond strength of resin-resin interfaces contaminated with saliva and submitted to different surface treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adilson Yoshio Furuse

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of different surface treatments on shear bond strength of saliva-contaminated resin-resin interfaces. Flat resin surfaces were fabricated. In the control group, no contamination or surface treatment was performed. The resin surfaces of the experimental groups were contaminated with saliva and air-dried, and then submitted to: (G1 rinsing with water and drying; (G2 application of an adhesive system; (G3 rinsing and drying, abrasion with finishing disks, etching and application of adhesive system; (G4 rinsing and drying, etching, application of silane and adhesive system. Resin cylinders were placed over the treated surfaces. The specimens were stored in water or ethanol. Shear bond strength tests were performed and the mode of failure was evaluated. Data were submitted to two-way ANOVA and Dunnett T3 test. Contamination of resin-resin interfaces with saliva significantly reduced shear strength, especially after prolonged storage (p<0.05. Similar values to the original bond strength were obtained after abrasion and application of adhesive (G3 or etching and application of silane and adhesive (G4. If contamination occurs, a surface treatment is required to guarantee an adequate interaction between the resin increments.

  10. Bond strength of resin-resin interfaces contaminated with saliva and submitted to different surface treatments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Furuse, Adilson Yoshio; da Cunha, Leonardo Fernandes; Benetti, Ana Raquel

    2007-01-01

    of silane and adhesive system. Resin cylinders were placed over the treated surfaces. The specimens were stored in water or ethanol. Shear bond strength tests were performed and the mode of failure was evaluated. Data were submitted to two-way ANOVA and Dunnett T3 test. Contamination of resin...

  11. Multiwall carbon nanotube embedded phenolic resin-based carbon foam for the removal of As (V) from contaminated water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rani Agrawal, Pinki; Singh, Nahar; Kumari, Saroj; Dhakate, Sanjay R.

    2018-03-01

    It is well proposed that micron or nano size filters requires to separate adsorbent from water after removal of adsorbate. However, even after filtration trace quantity of adsorbent remains in purified water, which deteriorates the quality of water for potability. To overcome these problems, multi walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) loaded Carbon Foam (CF) was fabricated by a sacrificial template process. In this process, multi walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and phenolic resin mixture was used for the impregnation of the polyurethane (PU) template. Impregnated PU Foam stabilized and carbonized to get MWCNTs embedded Carbon Foam (CF). The MWCNT loaded CF (MWCNTs-CF) was used for the removal of As (V) species from water. The proposed foam efficiently removes arsenic (As (V)) from water and it can be easily separated from water after purification without any sophisticated tools. The adsorption capacity of the proposed material was found to be 90.5 μg*g-1 at optimized condition of pH, time and concentration, which is excellent in comparison to several other materials utilized for removal of As (V). Kinetic and isotherm studies reveal that the multilayer adsorption over heterogeneous surface follows pseudo second order kinetics. The adsorption phenomena were further confirmed by several characterization techniques like scanning electron microscope (SEM), x-ray diffraction (XRD) spectroscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS).

  12. Effects of solvent evaporation on water sorption/solubility and nanoleakage of adhesive systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talita Baumgratz Cachapuz CHIMELI

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the influence of solvent evaporation in the kinetics of water diffusion (water sorption-WS, solubility-SL, and net water uptake and nanoleakage of adhesive systems. Material and Methods: Disk-shaped specimens (5.0 mm in diameter x 0.8 mm in thickness were produced (N=48 using the adhesives: Clearfil S3 Bond (CS3/Kuraray, Clearfil SE Bond - control group (CSE/Kuraray, Optibond Solo Plus (OS/Kerr and Scotchbond Universal Adhesive (SBU/3M ESPE. The solvents were either evaporated for 30 s or not evaporated (N=24/per group, and then photoactivated for 80 s (550 mW/cm2. After desiccation, the specimens were weighed and stored in distilled water (N=12 or mineral oil (N=12 to evaluate the water diffusion over a 7-day period. Net water uptake (% was also calculated as the sum of WS and SL. Data were submitted to 3-way ANOVA/Tukey's test (α=5%. The nanoleakage expression in three additional specimens per group was also evaluated after ammoniacal silver impregnation after 7 days of water storage under SEM. Results: Statistical analysis revealed that only the factor "adhesive" was significant (p<0.05. Solvent evaporation had no influence in the WS and SL of the adhesives. CSE (control presented significantly lower net uptake (5.4%. The nanoleakage was enhanced by the presence of solvent in the adhesives. Conclusions: Although the evaporation has no effect in the kinetics of water diffusion, the nanoleakage expression of the adhesives tested increases when the solvents are not evaporated.

  13. Iodine removing method in organic solvent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Takeo; Sakurai, Manabu

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To effectively remove iodine in an organic solvent to thereby remove iodine in the solvent that can be re-used or put to purning treatment. Method: Organic solvent formed from wastes of nuclear facilities is mixed with basic lead acetate, or silica gel or activated carbon incorporated with such a compound to adsorb iodine in the organic solvent to the basic lead acetate. Then, iodine in the organic solvent is removed by separating to eliminate the basic lead acetate adsorbing iodine from the organic solvent or by passing the organic solvent through a tower or column charged or pre-coated with silica gel or activated carbon incorporated with lead acetate. By using basic lead acetate as the adsorbents, iodine can effective by adsorbed and eliminated. Thus, the possibility of circumstantial release of iodine can be reduced upon reusing or burning treatment of the organic solvent. (Kamimura, M.)

  14. Computer Aided Solvent Selection and Design Framework

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitrofanov, Igor; Conte, Elisa; Abildskov, Jens

    and computer-aided tools and methods for property prediction and computer-aided molecular design (CAMD) principles. This framework is applicable for solvent selection and design in product design as well as process design. The first module of the framework is dedicated to the solvent selection and design...... in terms of: physical and chemical properties (solvent-pure properties); Environment, Health and Safety (EHS) characteristic (solvent-EHS properties); operational properties (solvent–solute properties). 3. Performing the search. The search step consists of two stages. The first is a generation and property...... identification of solvent candidates using special software ProCAMD and ProPred, which are the implementations of computer-aided molecular techniques. The second consists of assigning the RS-indices following the reaction–solvent and then consulting the known solvent database and identifying the set of solvents...

  15. Canyon solvent cleaning with solid adsorbents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reif, D.J.

    1987-01-01

    The HM Process at the Savannah River Plant (SRP) uses 7.5% tributyl phosphate in n-paraffin as an extraction solvent. During use, the solvent is altered due to hydrolysis and radiolysis, forming materials that influence product losses, product decontamination, and separation efficiencies. Laboratory studies to improve online solvent cleaning have shown that carbonate washing, although removing residual solvent activity, does not remove binding ligands that hold fission products in the solvent. Treatment of solvent with a solid adsorbent removes binding ligands and significantly improves recycle solvent performance. Both laboratory work defining a full-scale adsorption process and the use of the process to clean HM Process first cycle solvent are presented

  16. Thermal cycling effects on adhesion of resin-bovine enamel junction among different composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen-Cheng; Ko, Chia-Ling; Wu, Hui-Yu; Lai, Pei-Ling; Shih, Chi-Jen

    2014-10-01

    Thermal cycling is used to mimic the changes in oral cavity temperature experienced by composite resins when used clinically. The purpose of this study is to assess the thermal cycling effects of in-house produced composite resin on bonding strength. The dicalcium phosphate anhydrous filler surfaces are modified using nanocrystals and silanization (w/NP/Si). The resin is compared with commercially available composite resins Filtek Z250, Z350, and glass ionomer restorative material GIC Fuji-II LC (control). Different composite resins were filled into the dental enamel of bovine teeth. The bond force and resin-enamel junction graphical structures of the samples were determined after thermal cycling between 5 and 55°C in deionized water for 600 cycles. After thermal cycling, the w/NP/Si 30wt%, 50wt% and Filtek Z250, Z350 groups showed higher shear forces than glass ionomer GIC, and w/NP/Si 50wt% had the highest shear force. Through SEM observations, more of the fillings with w/NP/Si 30wt% and w/NP/Si 50wt% groups flowed into the enamel tubule, forming closed tubules with the composite resins. The push-out force is proportional to the resin flow depth and uniformity. The push-out tubule pore and resin shear pattern is the most uniform and consistent in the w/NP/Si 50wt% group. Accordingly, this developed composite resin maintains great mechanical properties after thermal cycling. Thus, it has the potential to be used in a clinical setting when restoring non-carious cervical lesions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Solvent free low-melt viscosity imide oligomers and thermosetting polymide composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Chun-Hua (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    .[.This invention relates to the composition and a solvent-free process for preparing novel imide oligomers and polymers specifically formulated with effective amounts of a dianhydride such as 2,3,3',4-biphenyltetra carboxylic dianydride (a-BPDA), at least one aromatic diamine and an endcapped of 4-phenylethynylphthalic anhydride (PEPA) or nadic anhydride to produce imide oligomers that possess a low-melt viscosity of 1-60 poise at 260-280.degree. C. When the imide oligomer melt is cured at about 371.degree. C. in a press or autoclave under 100-500 psi, the melt resulted in a thermoset polyimide having a glass transition temperature (T.sub.g) equal to and above 310.degree. C. A novel feature of this process is that the monomers; namely the dianhydrides, diamines and the endcaps, are melt processable to form imide oligomers at temperatures ranging between 232-280.degree. C. (450-535.degree. F.) without any solvent. These low-melt imide oligomers can be easily processed by resin transfer molding (RTM), vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) or the resin infusion process with fiber preforms e.g. carbon, glass or quartz preforms to produce polyimide matrix composites with 288-343.degree. C. (550-650.degree. F.) high temperature performance capability..]. .Iadd.This invention relates to compositions and a solvent-free reaction process for preparing imide oligomers and polymers specifically derived from effective amounts of dianhydrides such as 2,3,3',4'-biphenyltetracarboxylic dianhydride (a-BPDA), at least one aromatic polyamine and an end-cap such as 4-phenylethynyphthalic anhydride (PEPA) or nadic anhydride to produce imide oligomers that possess a low-melt viscosity of 1-60 poise at 260.degree. C.-280.degree. C..Iaddend.

  18. Recent solvent extraction experience at Savannah River

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, L.W.; Burney, G.A.; Gray, J.H.; Hodges, M.E.; Holt, D.L.; Macafee, I.M.; Reif, D.J.; Shook, H.E.

    1986-01-01

    Tributyl phosphate-based solvent extraction processes have been used at Savannah River for more than 30 years to separate and purify thorium, uranium, neptunium, plutonium, americium, and curium isotopes. This report summarizes the advancement of solvent extraction technology at Savannah River during the 1980's. Topics that are discussed include equipment improvements, solvent treatment, waste reduction, and an improved understanding of the various chemistries in the process streams entering, within, and leaving the solvent extraction processes

  19. Solvent extraction studies of RERTR silicide fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gouge, Anthony P.

    1983-01-01

    Uranium silicide fuels, which are candidate RERTR fuel compositions, may require special considerations in solvent extraction reprocessing. Since Savannah River Plant may be reprocessing RERTR fuels as early as 1985, studies have been conducted at Savannah River Laboratory to demonstrate the solvent extraction behavior of this fuel. Results of solvent extraction studies with both unirradiated and irradiated fuel are presented along with the preliminary RERTR solvent extraction reprocessing flow sheet for Savannah River Plant. (author)

  20. Hot dewatering and resin encapsulation of intermediate level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rickman, J.; Birch, D.

    1985-01-01

    The chemistry of the processes involved in the hot dewatering and encapsulation of alumino-ferric hydroxide floc in epoxide resin have been studied. Pretreatment of the floc to reduce resin attack and hydrolysis and to increase the dimensional stability of the solidified wasteform has been evaluated. It has been demonstrated that removal of ammonium nitrate from the floc and control of the residual water in the resin are important factors in ensuring dimensional stability of the solidified resin. Resin systems have been identified which, together with the appropriate waste pretreatment have successfully encapsulated a simulated magnox sludge producing a stable wasteform having mechanical and physical properties comparable with the basic resin. (author)