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Sample records for solve forest transportation

  1. Applying ant colony optimization metaheuristic to solve forest transportation planning problems with side constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marco A. Contreras; Woodam Chung; Greg Jones

    2008-01-01

    Forest transportation planning problems (FTPP) have evolved from considering only the financial aspects of timber management to more holistic problems that also consider the environmental impacts of roads. These additional requirements have introduced side constraints, making FTPP larger and more complex. Mixed-integer programming (MIP) has been used to solve FTPP, but...

  2. Transport equation solving methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granjean, P.M.

    1984-06-01

    This work is mainly devoted to Csub(N) and Fsub(N) methods. CN method: starting from a lemma stated by Placzek, an equivalence is established between two problems: the first one is defined in a finite medium bounded by a surface S, the second one is defined in the whole space. In the first problem the angular flux on the surface S is shown to be the solution of an integral equation. This equation is solved by Galerkin's method. The Csub(N) method is applied here to one-velocity problems: in plane geometry, slab albedo and transmission with Rayleigh scattering, calculation of the extrapolation length; in cylindrical geometry, albedo and extrapolation length calculation with linear scattering. Fsub(N) method: the basic integral transport equation of the Csub(N) method is integrated on Case's elementary distributions; another integral transport equation is obtained: this equation is solved by a collocation method. The plane problems solved by the Csub(N) method are also solved by the Fsub(N) method. The Fsub(N) method is extended to any polynomial scattering law. Some simple spherical problems are also studied. Chandrasekhar's method, collision probability method, Case's method are presented for comparison with Csub(N) and Fsub(N) methods. This comparison shows the respective advantages of the two methods: a) fast convergence and possible extension to various geometries for Csub(N) method; b) easy calculations and easy extension to polynomial scattering for Fsub(N) method [fr

  3. A method for solving neutron transport equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimitrijevic, Z.

    1993-01-01

    The procedure for solving the transport equation by directly integrating for case one-dimensional uniform multigroup medium is shown. The solution is expressed in terms of linear combination of function H n (x,μ), and the coefficient is determined from given conditions. The solution is applied for homogeneous slab of critical thickness. (author)

  4. THE PLANNING OF WOOD TRANSPORT ON THE FOREST ROADS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Hulusi Acar

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, needs for forest and raw wood materials has been increasing with the economic developments of the societies. But, the forest areas have been decreasing because of the pressures of the societies on forest especially in developing countries. In such regions, forest areas were on high mountainous areas. This situation is the same in Turkey, especially east Black Sea region. In Turkey, forest roads are still B forms of secondary roads. The wide of these roads are minimum 4 meters, generally minimum curve radius of them are 10 meters, and some times less then that. These roads do not have pavement and maintenance works were not made there too. And these roads are not suitable for transportation with truck-trailer. The transhipment problems form a typical example of the linear programming method. When this method applied, as well as solving transportation problems, distribution problems are solved related to transhipment.

  5. Optimal calculational schemes for solving multigroup photon transport problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubinin, A.A.; Kurachenko, Yu.A.

    1987-01-01

    A scheme of complex algorithm for solving multigroup equation of radiation transport is suggested. The algorithm is based on using the method of successive collisions, the method of forward scattering and the spherical harmonics method, and is realized in the FORAP program (FORTRAN, BESM-6 computer). As an example the results of calculating reactor photon transport in water are presented. The considered algorithm being modified may be used for solving neutron transport problems

  6. 36 CFR 212.2 - Forest transportation program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Forest transportation program... TRAVEL MANAGEMENT Administration of the Forest Transportation System § 212.2 Forest transportation... public at the headquarters of that administrative unit. (b) Forest transportation atlas. A forest...

  7. Fuzzy linear programming approach for solving transportation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Transportation problem (TP) is an important network structured linear programming problem that arises in several contexts and has deservedly received a great deal of attention in the literature. The central concept in this problem is to find the least total transportation cost of a commodity in order to satisfy demands at ...

  8. Fuzzy linear programming approach for solving transportation ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ALI EBRAHIMNEJAD

    Department of Mathematics, Qaemshahr Branch, Islamic Azad University, Qaemshahr, Iran e-mail: ..... est grade of membership at x are μ ˜AL (x) and μ ˜AU (x), respectively. ..... trapezoidal fuzzy numbers transportation problem (12) are.

  9. Solving the equation of neutron transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasfi, Rim

    2009-01-01

    This work is devoted to the study of some numerical methods of resolution of the problem of transport of the neutrons. We started by introducing the equation integro-differential transport of the neutrons. Then we applied the finite element method traditional for stationary and nonstationary linear problems in 2D. A great part is reserved for the presentation of the mixed numerical diagram and mixed hybrid with two types of uniform grids: triangular and rectangular. Thereafter we treated some numerical examples by implementations in Matlab in order to test the convergence of each method. To finish, we had results of simulation by the Monte Carlo method on a problem of two-dimensional transport with an aim of comparing them with the results resulting from the finite element method mixed hybrids. Some remarks and prospects conclude this work.

  10. Distributed Graphs for Solving Co-modal Transport Problems

    OpenAIRE

    Karama , Jeribi; Hinda , Mejri; Hayfa , Zgaya; Slim , Hammadi

    2011-01-01

    International audience; The paper presents a new approach based on a special distributed graphs in order to solve co-modal transport problems. The co-modal transport system consists on combining different transport modes effectively in terms of economic, environmental, service and financial efficiency, etc. However, the problem is that these systems must deal with different distributed information sources stored in different locations and provided by different public and private companies. In...

  11. Solving fully fuzzy transportation problem using pentagonal fuzzy numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheswari, P. Uma; Ganesan, K.

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, we propose a simple approach for the solution of fuzzy transportation problem under fuzzy environment in which the transportation costs, supplies at sources and demands at destinations are represented by pentagonal fuzzy numbers. The fuzzy transportation problem is solved without converting to its equivalent crisp form using a robust ranking technique and a new fuzzy arithmetic on pentagonal fuzzy numbers. To illustrate the proposed approach a numerical example is provided.

  12. OPTIMIZATION METHODS IN TRANSPORTATION OF FOREST PRODUCTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selçuk Gümüş

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Turkey has total of 21.2 million ha (27 % forest land. In this area, average 9 million m3 of logs and 5 million stere of fuel wood have been annually produced by the government forest enterprises. The total annual production is approximately 13million m3 Considering the fact that the costs of transporting forest products was about . 160 million TL in the year of 2006, the importance of optimizing the total costs in transportation can be better understood. Today, there is not common optimization method used at whole transportation problems. However, the decision makers select the most appropriate methods according to their aims.Comprehending of features and capacity of optimization methods is important for selecting of the most appropriate method. The evaluation of optimization methods that can be used at forest products transportation is aimed in this study.

  13. Finite element method for solving neutron transport problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferguson, J.M.; Greenbaum, A.

    1984-01-01

    A finite element method is introduced for solving the neutron transport equations. Our method falls into the category of Petrov-Galerkin solution, since the trial space differs from the test space. The close relationship between this method and the discrete ordinate method is discussed, and the methods are compared for simple test problems

  14. New numerical method for solving the solute transport equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, B.; Koplik, C.M.

    1978-01-01

    The solute transport equation can be solved numerically by approximating the water flow field by a network of stream tubes and using a Green's function solution within each stream tube. Compared to previous methods, this approach permits greater computational efficiency and easier representation of small discontinuities, and the results are easier to interpret physically. The method has been used to study hypothetical sites for disposal of high-level radioactive waste

  15. Deterministic methods to solve the integral transport equation in neutronic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warin, X.

    1993-11-01

    We present a synthesis of the methods used to solve the integral transport equation in neutronic. This formulation is above all used to compute solutions in 2D in heterogeneous assemblies. Three kinds of methods are described: - the collision probability method; - the interface current method; - the current coupling collision probability method. These methods don't seem to be the most effective in 3D. (author). 9 figs

  16. The transportation management division institutional program: Networking and problem solving

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGinnis, K.A.; Peterson, J.M.

    1989-06-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has several programs related to transportation. While these programs may have differing missions and legislative authority, the required activities are frequently similar. To ensure a DOE-wide perspective in developing transportation policies and procedures, a DOE Transportation Institutional Task Force (Task Force) has been formed, which is the primary focus of this paper. The Task Force, composed of representatives from each of the major DOE transportation programs, meets periodically to exchange experiences and insights on institutional issues related to Departmental shipping. The primary purpose of the group is to identify opportunities for productive interactions with the transportation community, including interested and affected members of the public. This paper will also focus sharply on the networking of DOE with the State, Tribal, and local officials in fostering better understanding and in solving problems. An example of such activity is the DOE's cooperative agreement with the Energy Task Force of the Urban Consortium. A major effort is to encourage cooperative action in identifying, addressing, and resolving issues that could impede the transportation of radioactive materials

  17. Numerical method for solving integral equations of neutron transport. II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loyalka, S.K.; Tsai, R.W.

    1975-01-01

    In a recent paper it was pointed out that the weakly singular integral equations of neutron transport can be quite conveniently solved by a method based on subtraction of singularity. This previous paper was devoted entirely to the consideration of simple one-dimensional isotropic-scattering and one-group problems. The present paper constitutes interesting extensions of the previous work in that in addition to a typical two-group anisotropic-scattering albedo problem in the slab geometry, the method is also applied to an isotropic-scattering problem in the x-y geometry. These results are compared with discrete S/sub N/ (ANISN or TWOTRAN-II) results, and for the problems considered here, the proposed method is found to be quite effective. Thus, the method appears to hold considerable potential for future applications. (auth)

  18. Modeling Blazar Spectra by Solving an Electron Transport Equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Tiffany; Finke, Justin; Becker, Peter A.

    2018-01-01

    Blazars are luminous active galaxies across the entire electromagnetic spectrum, but the spectral formation mechanisms, especially the particle acceleration, in these sources are not well understood. We develop a new theoretical model for simulating blazar spectra using a self-consistent electron number distribution. Specifically, we solve the particle transport equation considering shock acceleration, adiabatic expansion, stochastic acceleration due to MHD waves, Bohm diffusive particle escape, synchrotron radiation, and Compton radiation, where we implement the full Compton cross-section for seed photons from the accretion disk, the dust torus, and 26 individual broad lines. We used a modified Runge-Kutta method to solve the 2nd order equation, including development of a new mathematical method for normalizing stiff steady-state ordinary differential equations. We show that our self-consistent, transport-based blazar model can qualitatively fit the IR through Fermi g-ray data for 3C 279, with a single-zone, leptonic configuration. We use the solution for the electron distribution to calculate multi-wavelength SED spectra for 3C 279. We calculate the particle and magnetic field energy densities, which suggest that the emitting region is not always in equipartition (a common assumption), but sometimes matter dominated. The stratified broad line region (based on ratios in quasar reverberation mapping, and thus adding no free parameters) improves our estimate of the location of the emitting region, increasing it by ~5x. Our model provides a novel view into the physics at play in blazar jets, especially the relative strength of the shock and stochastic acceleration, where our model is well suited to distinguish between these processes, and we find that the latter tends to dominate.

  19. USING GIS AND AHP FOR PLANNING PRIMER TRANSPORTATION OF FOREST PRODUCTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. E. Akay

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Primer transportation is one of the most costly and time consuming forestry activities in extraction of timber from forest lands. Transportation methods are essentially determined based on terrain characteristics, especially ground slope. Besides, unsuitable machine selection and unplanned operations may cause ecological damages such as soil disturbance. Soil damage can lead to long term impacts on forest ecosystem. Thus, the optimum transportation methods should be determined by considering not only economic factors but also topographical factors and soil conditions. In recent decades, some of the advanced features of Geographical Information System (GIS assist decision makers to solve such complex transportation problems with various constraints. In this study, it was aimed to plan forest transportation operation by using GIS integrated Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP method, considering ground slope, soil type, and available transportation equipment in the region. This method was implemented within the border of İnegöl Forest Enterprise Chief in the city of Bursa in Turkey. Alternative transportation method included cable system, chute system, skidder, and farm tractor. GIS-based method integrated with AHP found that skidder was the optimal transportation method for about 60% of the study area, while farm tractor was the second most suitable method with 25% ground cover. The results indicated that GIS-based decision support systems can be effectively used as rational, quick, and economic tool for forest transportation planning.

  20. The intelligence of dual simplex method to solve linear fractional fuzzy transportation problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanamoorthy, S; Kalyani, S

    2015-01-01

    An approach is presented to solve a fuzzy transportation problem with linear fractional fuzzy objective function. In this proposed approach the fractional fuzzy transportation problem is decomposed into two linear fuzzy transportation problems. The optimal solution of the two linear fuzzy transportations is solved by dual simplex method and the optimal solution of the fractional fuzzy transportation problem is obtained. The proposed method is explained in detail with an example.

  1. The Intelligence of Dual Simplex Method to Solve Linear Fractional Fuzzy Transportation Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Narayanamoorthy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An approach is presented to solve a fuzzy transportation problem with linear fractional fuzzy objective function. In this proposed approach the fractional fuzzy transportation problem is decomposed into two linear fuzzy transportation problems. The optimal solution of the two linear fuzzy transportations is solved by dual simplex method and the optimal solution of the fractional fuzzy transportation problem is obtained. The proposed method is explained in detail with an example.

  2. Problem solving or social change? The Applegate and Grand Canyon Forest Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassandra Moseley; Brett KenCairn

    2001-01-01

    Natural resource conflicts have resulted in attempts at better collaboration between public and private sectors. The resulting partnerships approach collaboration either by problem solving through better information and management, or by requiring substantial social change. The Applegate Partnership in Oregon and the Grand Canyon Forest Partnership in Arizona...

  3. A Photon Free Method to Solve Radiation Transport Equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, B

    2006-01-01

    The multi-group discrete-ordinate equations of radiation transfer is solved for the first time by Newton's method. It is a photon free method because the photon variables are eliminated from the radiation equations to yield a N group XN direction smaller but equivalent system of equations. The smaller set of equations can be solved more efficiently than the original set of equations. Newton's method is more stable than the Semi-implicit Linear method currently used by conventional radiation codes

  4. Problem-solving performance and reproductive success of great tits in urban and forest habitats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preiszner, Bálint; Papp, Sándor; Pipoly, Ivett; Seress, Gábor; Vincze, Ernő; Liker, András; Bókony, Veronika

    2017-01-01

    Success in problem solving, a form of innovativeness, can help animals exploit their environments, and recent research suggests that it may correlate with reproductive success. Innovativeness has been proposed to be especially beneficial in urbanized habitats, as suggested by superior problem-solving performance of urban individuals in some species. If there is stronger selection for innovativeness in cities than in natural habitats, we expect problem-solving performance to have a greater positive effect on fitness in more urbanized habitats. We tested this idea in great tits (Parus major) breeding at two urban sites and two forests by measuring their problem-solving performance in an obstacle-removal task and a food-acquisition task. Urban pairs were significantly faster problem-solvers in both tasks. Solving speed in the obstacle-removal task was positively correlated with hatching success and the number of fledglings, whereas performance in the food-acquisition task did not correlate with reproductive success. These relationships did not differ between urban and forest habitats. Neophobia, sensitivity to human disturbance, and risk taking in the presence of a predator did not explain the relationships of problem-solving performance either with habitat type or with reproductive success. Our results suggest that the benefit of innovativeness in terms of reproductive success is similar in urban and natural habitats, implying that problem-solving skills may be enhanced in urban populations by some other benefits (e.g. increased survival) or reduced costs (e.g. more opportunities to gain practice with challenging tasks).

  5. Solving wood chip transport problems with computer simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis P. Bradley; Sharon A. Winsauer

    1976-01-01

    Efficient chip transport operations are difficult to achieve due to frequent and often unpredictable changes in distance to market, chipping rate, time spent at the mill, and equipment costs. This paper describes a computer simulation model that allows a logger to design an efficient transport system in response to these changing factors.

  6. Robust optimisation of forest transportation networks: a case study ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Forest transportation costs are the major cost component for many forest product supply chains. In order to minimise these costs, many organisations have turned ... The simulation results are then evaluated for robustness by means of seven robustness performance measures. For our case study, the results show that (1) the ...

  7. Transport casks help solve spent fuel interim storage problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dierkes, P.; Janberg, K.; Baatz, H.; Weinhold, G.

    1980-01-01

    Transport casks can be used as storage modules, combining the inherent safety of passive cooling with the absence of secondary radioactive waste and the flexibility to build up storage capacity according to actual requirements. In the Federal Republic of Germany, transport casks are being developed as a solution to its interim storage problems. Criteria for their design and licensing are outlined. Details are given of the casks and the storage facility. Tests are illustrated. (U.K.)

  8. Application of Trotter approximation for solving time dependent neutron transport equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stancic, V.

    1987-01-01

    A method is proposed to solve multigroup time dependent neutron transport equation with arbitrary scattering anisotropy. The recurrence relation thus obtained is simple, numerically stable and especially suitable for treatment of complicated geometries. (author)

  9. Selection and Penalty Strategies for Genetic Algorithms Designed to Solve Spatial Forest Planning Problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, M.P.; Sessions, J.; Hamann, J.D.

    2009-01-01

    Genetic algorithms (GAs) have demonstrated success in solving spatial forest planning problems. We present an adaptive GA that incorporates population-level statistics to dynamically update penalty functions, a process analogous to strategic oscillation from the tabu search literature. We also explore performance of various selection strategies. The GA identified feasible solutions within 96%, 98%, and 93% of a non spatial relaxed upper bound calculated for landscapes of 100, 500, and 1000 units, respectively. The problem solved includes forest structure constraints limiting harvest opening sizes and requiring minimally sized patches of mature forest. Results suggest that the dynamic penalty strategy is superior to the more standard static penalty implementation. Results also suggest that tournament selection can be superior to the more standard implementation of proportional selection for smaller problems, but becomes susceptible to premature convergence as problem size increases. It is therefore important to balance selection pressure with appropriate disruption. We conclude that integrating intelligent search strategies into the context of genetic algorithms can yield improvements and should be investigated for future use in spatial planning with ecological goals.

  10. Solving vertical transport and chemistry in air pollution models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkvens, P.J.F.; Bochev, M.A.; Krol, M.C.; Peters, W.; Verwer, J.G.; Chock, David P.; Carmichael, Gregory R.; Brick, Patricia

    2002-01-01

    For the time integration of stiff transport-chemistry problems from air pollution modelling, standard ODE solvers are not feasible due to the large number of species and the 3D nature. The popular alternative, standard operator splitting, introduces artificial transients for short-lived species.

  11. Solving Vertical Transport and Chemistry in Air Pollution Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkvens, P.J.F.; Bochev, M.A.; Verwer, J.G.; Krol, M.C.; Peters, W.

    For the time integration of stiff transport-chemistry problems from air pollution modelling, standard ODE solvers are not feasible due to the large number of species and the 3D nature. The popular alternative, standard operator splitting, introduces artificial transients for short-lived species.

  12. Usefulness of the risk assessment technique in solving transportation problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, J.F.; Hall, R.J.

    1976-08-01

    The purpose was to develop and use a model to assess the risk associated with the shipment of nuclear and non-nuclear hazardous energy-related materials. The analysis method comprises the steps of describing the system, identifying the release sequence, evaluating the sequence, and calculating and assessing the risk. Plutonium shipment is used as an example. Uses of this method to improve transportation safety are discussed. 12 fig

  13. Cosmic-ray neutron transport at a forest field site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Mie; Jensen, Karsten Høgh; Desilets, Darin

    2017-01-01

    -ray neutron intensity is essential (e.g., the effect of vegetation, litter layer and soil type). In this study the environmental effect is examined by performing a sensitivity analysis using neutron transport modeling. We use a neutron transport model with various representations of the forest and different...

  14. Hybrid subgroup decomposition method for solving fine-group eigenvalue transport problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasseri, Saam; Rahnema, Farzad

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • An acceleration technique for solving fine-group eigenvalue transport problems. • Coarse-group quasi transport theory to solve coarse-group eigenvalue transport problems. • Consistent and inconsistent formulations for coarse-group quasi transport theory. • Computational efficiency amplified by a factor of 2 using hybrid SGD for 1D BWR problem. - Abstract: In this paper, a new hybrid method for solving fine-group eigenvalue transport problems is developed. This method extends the subgroup decomposition method to efficiently couple a new coarse-group quasi transport theory with a set of fixed-source transport decomposition sweeps to obtain the fine-group transport solution. The advantages of the quasi transport theory are its high accuracy, straight-forward implementation and numerical stability. The hybrid method is analyzed for a 1D benchmark problem characteristic of boiling water reactors (BWR). It is shown that the method reproduces the fine-group transport solution with high accuracy while increasing the computational efficiency up to 12 times compared to direct fine-group transport calculations

  15. Solving vertical transport and chemistry in air pollution models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berkvens, P.J.F.; Botchev, M.A.; Verwer, J.G.; Krol, M.C.; Peters, W.

    2000-01-01

    For the time integration of stiff transport-chemistry problems from air pollution modelling, standard ODE solvers are not feasible due to the large number of species and the 3D nature. The popular alternative, standard operator splitting, introduces artificial transients for short-lived species. This complicates the chemistry solution, easily causing large errors for such species. In the framework of an operational global air pollution model, we focus on the problem formed by chemistry and vertical transport, which is based on diffusion, cloud-related vertical winds, and wet deposition. Its specific nature leads to full Jacobian matrices, ruling out standard implicit integration. We compare Strang operator splitting with two alternatives: source splitting and an (unsplit) Rosenbrock method with approximate matrix factorization, all having equal computational cost. The comparison is performed with real data. All methods are applied with half-hour time steps, and give good accuracies. Rosenbrock is the most accurate, and source splitting is more accurate than Strang splitting. Splitting errors concentrate in short-lived species sensitive to solar radiation and species with strong emissions and depositions. 30 refs

  16. Radon levels and transport parameters in Atlantic Forest soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farias, E.E.G. de; Silva Neto, P.C. da; Souza, E.M. de; De Franca, E.J.; Hazin, C.A.

    2016-01-01

    In natural forest soils, the radon transport processes can be significantly intensified due to the contribution of living organism activities to soil porosity. In this paper, the first results of the radon concentrations were obtained for soil gas from the Atlantic Forest, particularly in the Refugio Ecologico Charles Darwin, Brazil. The estimation of permeability and radon exhalation rate were carried out in this conservation unit. For forested soils, radon concentrations as high as 40 kBq m -3 were found. Based on the radon concentrations and on the permeability parameter, the results indicated considerable radon hazard for human occupation in the neighborhood. (author)

  17. A MULTI-AGENT SYSTEM FOR FOREST TRANSPORT ACTIVITY PLANNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alberto Araújo Júnior

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to propose and implement a conceptual model of an intelligent system in a georeferenced environment to determine the design of forest transport fleets. For this, we used a multi-agent systems based tool, which is the subject of studies of distributed artificial intelligence. The proposed model considers the use of plantation mapping (stands and forest roads, as well as information about the different vehicle transport capacities. The system was designed to adapt itself to changes that occur during the forest transport operation process, such as the modification of demanded volume or the inclusion of route restrictions used by the vehicles. For its development, we used the Java programming language associated with the LPSolve library for the optimization calculation, the JADE platform to develop agents, and the ArcGis Runtime to determine the optimal transport routes. Five agents were modelled: the transporter, controller, router, loader and unloader agents. The model is able to determine the amount of trucks among the different vehicles available that meet the demand and availability of routes, with a focus on minimizing the total costs of timber transport. The system can also rearrange itself after the transportation routes change during the process.

  18. Normal scheme for solving the transport equation independently of spatial discretization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zamonsky, O.M.

    1993-01-01

    To solve the discrete ordinates neutron transport equation, a general order nodal scheme is used, where nodes are allowed to have different orders of approximation and the whole system reaches a final order distribution. Independence in the election of system discretization and order of approximation is obtained without loss of accuracy. The final equations and the iterative method to reach a converged order solution were implemented in a two-dimensional computer code to solve monoenergetic, isotropic scattering, external source problems. Two benchmark problems were solved using different automatic selection order methods. Results show accurate solutions without spatial discretization, regardless of the initial selection of distribution order. (author)

  19. Environmental sensitive road planning and transportation techniques in forest engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Hulusi Acar

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Forestry management has activities dealing with technical, economic, social and environmental services. Forestry operations which are carried out on forest areas , an important part of the ecosistem are materialized in open space. This forestry activities on large areas and high sloping generally, include many different techniques. It is needed primarily to the forest road network in terms of forest management. Determining the approriate route in the natural environment, planning and road construction affairs for forest roads which are necessary accessing in forest areas, is also of great importance from an environmental viewpoint as well as technical and economic manner. Forest road planning which can not be changed later and left a permanent mark on the natural environment carries much more importance to the environment especially on sloping land. This is because, it is important choosing correct type of roaf structure, and doing periodic maintenance of the roads. Skidding activities, after wood production, is important in terms of its impact on forest soil and by means of effects on saplings and trees on the releated forest areas.The development of environmental sensitive techniques is difficult, limited or expensive for this wood extraction works which are made more difficult conditons in the sloping terrain. Therefore, especially in using some silvicultural methods wood extraction damages are even greater. In this study; some road planning, road construction and wood extraction techniques which performed by me have been made to examine the environmental aspects. Environment-friendly forest roads and primary transport techniques on the forest ecosystem are briefly explained and discussed in the frame of the environmental aspects.

  20. Solving the Single-Sink, Fixed-Charge, Multiple-Choice Transportation Problem by Dynamic Programming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Tue; Andersen, Kim Allan; Klose, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    This paper considers a minimum-cost network flow problem in a bipartite graph with a single sink. The transportation costs exhibit a staircase cost structure because such types of transportation cost functions are often found in practice. We present a dynamic programming algorithm for solving...... this so-called single-sink, fixed-charge, multiple-choice transportation problem exactly. The method exploits heuristics and lower bounds to peg binary variables, improve bounds on flow variables, and reduce the state-space variable. In this way, the dynamic programming method is able to solve large...... instances with up to 10,000 nodes and 10 different transportation modes in a few seconds, much less time than required by a widely used mixed-integer programming solver and other methods proposed in the literature for this problem....

  1. LASL models for environmental transport of radionuclides in forests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallegos, A.F.; Smith, W.J.; Johnson, L.J.

    1978-01-01

    The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory has been developing techniques for evaluating the adequacy of shallow land radioactive disposal sites to contain disposed radionuclides. This report discusses developments in applying a Biological Transport Model to simulate the cycling of plutonium in pinyon-juniper, and ponderosa pine forest ecosystems through serial stage developments using plant growth dynamics created in the model

  2. Sediment transport and channel morphology of small, forested streams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marwan A. Hassan; Michael Church; Thomas E. Lisle; Francesco Brardinoni; Lee Benda; Gordon E. Grant

    2005-01-01

    This paper reviews sediment transport and channel morphology in small, forested streams in the Pacific Northwest region of North America to assess current knowledge of channel stability and morphology relevant to riparian management practices around small streams. Small channels are defined as ones in which morphology and hydraulics may be significantly influenced by...

  3. The discontinuous finite element method for solving Eigenvalue problems of transport equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Shulin; Wang, Ruihong

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, the multigroup transport equations for solving the eigenvalues λ and K_e_f_f under two dimensional cylindrical coordinate are discussed. Aimed at the equations, the discretizing way combining discontinuous finite element method (DFE) with discrete ordinate method (SN) is developed, and the iterative algorithms and steps are studied. The numerical results show that the algorithms are efficient. (author)

  4. A symmetrized quasi-diffusion method for solving multidimensional transport problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miften, M.M.; Larsen, E.W.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, the authors propose a 'symmetrized' QD (SQD) method in which the non-self-adjoint QD diffusion problem is replaced by two self-adjoint diffusion problems. These problems are more easily discretized and more efficiently solved than in the standard QD method. They also give SQD calculational results for transport problems in x-y geometry

  5. The H-N method for solving linear transport equation: theory and application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaskas, A.; Gulecyuz, M.C.; Tezcan, C.

    2002-01-01

    The system of singular integral equation which is obtained from the integro-differential form of the linear transport equation as a result of Placzec lemma is solved. Application are given using the exit distributions and the infinite medium Green's function. The same theoretical results are also obtained with the use of the singular eigenfunction of the method of elementary solutions

  6. FMCEIR: a Monte Carlo program for solving the stationary neutron and gamma transport equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taormina, A.

    1978-05-01

    FMCEIR is a three-dimensional Monte Carlo program for solving the stationary neutron and gamma transport equation. It is used to study the problem of neutron and gamma streaming in the GCFR and HHT reactor channels. (G.T.H.)

  7. A consistent formulation of the finite element method for solving diffusive-convective transport problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carmo, E.G.D. do; Galeao, A.C.N.R.

    1986-01-01

    A new method specially designed to solve highly convective transport problems is proposed. Using a variational approach it is shown that this weighted residual method belongs to a class of Petrov-Galerkin's approximation. Some examples are presented in order to demonstrate the adequacy of this method in predicting internal or external boundary layers. (Author) [pt

  8. Nonlinear Projective-Iteration Methods for Solving Transport Problems on Regular and Unstructured Grids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dmitriy Y. Anistratov; Adrian Constantinescu; Loren Roberts; William Wieselquist

    2007-01-01

    This is a project in the field of fundamental research on numerical methods for solving the particle transport equation. Numerous practical problems require to use unstructured meshes, for example, detailed nuclear reactor assembly-level calculations, large-scale reactor core calculations, radiative hydrodynamics problems, where the mesh is determined by hydrodynamic processes, and well-logging problems in which the media structure has very complicated geometry. Currently this is an area of very active research in numerical transport theory. main issues in developing numerical methods for solving the transport equation are the accuracy of the numerical solution and effectiveness of iteration procedure. The problem in case of unstructured grids is that it is very difficult to derive an iteration algorithm that will be unconditionally stable

  9. Mapping online transportation service quality and multiclass classification problem solving priorities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamsyah, Andry; Rachmadiansyah, Imam

    2018-03-01

    Online transportation service is known for its accessibility, transparency, and tariff affordability. These points make online transportation have advantages over the existing conventional transportation service. Online transportation service is an example of disruptive technology that change the relationship between customers and companies. In Indonesia, there are high competition among online transportation provider, hence the companies must maintain and monitor their service level. To understand their position, we apply both sentiment analysis and multiclass classification to understand customer opinions. From negative sentiments, we can identify problems and establish problem-solving priorities. As a case study, we use the most popular online transportation provider in Indonesia: Gojek and Grab. Since many customers are actively give compliment and complain about company’s service level on Twitter, therefore we collect 61,721 tweets in Bahasa during one month observations. We apply Naive Bayes and Support Vector Machine methods to see which model perform best for our data. The result reveal Gojek has better service quality with 19.76% positive and 80.23% negative sentiments than Grab with 9.2% positive and 90.8% negative. The Gojek highest problem-solving priority is regarding application problems, while Grab is about unusable promos. The overall result shows general problems of both case study are related to accessibility dimension which indicate lack of capability to provide good digital access to the end users.

  10. Natural Gas Container Transportation: the Alternative Way to Solve the World’s Energy Transportation Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M. Shendrik

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The container gas transportation for low and medium level consumers as an alternative to pipelines is considered. The options for gas supply schemes, based on road and rail transport are given. The advantages and disadvantages of both types of gas transporting are described, the areas of their effective using are separated in the article. Promising implementations of technology in environment of economic crisis and also considering world trends of energy development are presented. The most advanced organization of compressed gas condensate transportation of unprepared gas fields in large diameter universal cylindrical balloons (up to 1000 mm are reasoned. The problem of compressed gas sea transportation are well disclosed, but the alternative ways of gas transportation by land are not investigated enough. Compressed Natural Gas (CNG Technology - is new promising technology for natural gas transportation by specially designed vessels – CNG-vessels. The feature of this technology is that natural gas can be downloaded directly near gas deposits and unloaded - directly into the customer's network. This eliminates significant capital investments in underwater pipelining or gas liquefaction plants. The main objects of investment are CNG-vessels themselves. The most attractive places for implementation of CNG-technology are sea (offshore natural gas deposits. Numerous international experts estimate the natural gas transportation by CNG-vessels in 1.5-2.0 times more cost-beneficial in comparison with offshore pipelines transportation, or in comparison with LNG (Liquefied Natural Gas shipping with natural gas transportation volume between 0.5 and 4.0 billion cubic meters per year on the route from 250 to 2,500 sea miles. This technology makes possible to provide gas supplement to the mountain and abounding in water areas, remote and weakly gasified regions. Described technology deserves special attention in the case of depleted and low-power oil and

  11. Solving the transport equation with quadratic finite elements: Theory and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferguson, J.M.

    1997-01-01

    At the 4th Joint Conference on Computational Mathematics, the author presented a paper introducing a new quadratic finite element scheme (QFEM) for solving the transport equation. In the ensuing year the author has obtained considerable experience in the application of this method, including solution of eigenvalue problems, transmission problems, and solution of the adjoint form of the equation as well as the usual forward solution. He will present detailed results, and will also discuss other refinements of his transport codes, particularly for 3-dimensional problems on rectilinear and non-rectilinear grids

  12. Algorithms for solving the single-sink fixed-charge transportation problem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klose, Andreas

    2006-01-01

    The single-sink fixed-charge transportation problem is an important subproblem of the fixed-charge transportation problem. Just a few methods have been proposed in the literature to solve this problem. In this paper, solution approaches based on dynamic programming and implicit enumeration...... are revisited. It is shown how the problem size as well as the search space of a recently published dynamic programming method can be reduced by exploiting reduced cost information. Additionally, a further implicit enumeration approach relying on solution concepts for the binary knapsack problem is introduced...

  13. An improved computational version of the LTSN method to solve transport problems in a slab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardona, Augusto V.; Oliveira, Jose Vanderlei P. de; Vilhena, Marco Tullio de; Segatto, Cynthia F.

    2008-01-01

    In this work, we present an improved computational version of the LTS N method to solve transport problems in a slab. The key feature relies on the reordering of the set of S N equations. This procedure reduces by a factor of two the task of evaluating the eigenvalues of the matrix associated to SN approximations. We present numerical simulations and comparisons with the ones of the classical LTS N approach. (author)

  14. Adomian decomposition method for solving the telegraph equation in charged particle transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdou, M.A.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, the analysis for the telegraph equation in case of isotropic small angle scattering from the Boltzmann transport equation for charged particle is presented. The Adomian decomposition is used to solve the telegraph equation. By means of MAPLE the Adomian polynomials of obtained series (ADM) solution have been calculated. The behaviour of the distribution function are shown graphically. The results reported in this article provide further evidence of the usefulness of Adomain decomposition for obtaining solution of linear and nonlinear problems

  15. Transportation for maternal emergencies in Tanzania: empowering communities through participatory problem solving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, T; Kanenda, O; Ahluwalia, I; Kouletio, M

    2001-10-01

    Inadequate health care and long delays in obtaining care during obstetric emergencies are major contributors to high maternal death rates in Tanzania. Formative research conducted in the Mwanza region identified several transportation-related reasons for delays in receiving assistance. In 1996, the Cooperative for Assistance and Relief Everywhere (CARE) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) began an effort to build community capacity for problem-solving through participatory development of community-based plans for emergency transportation in 50 villages. An April 2001 assessment showed that 19 villages had begun collecting funds for transportation systems; of 13 villages with systems available, 10 had used the system within the last 3 months. Increased support for village health workers and greater participation of women in decision making were also observed.

  16. Transport methods: general. 7. Formulation of a Fourier-Boltzmann Transformation to Solve the Three-Dimensional Transport Equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stancic, V.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents some elements of a new approach to solve analytically the linearized three-dimensional (3-D) transport equation of neutral particles. Since this task is of such special importance, we present some results of a paper that is still in progress. The most important is that using this transformation, an integro-differential equation with an analytical solution is obtained. For this purpose, a simplest 3-D equation is being considered which describes the transport process in an infinite medium. Until now, this equation has been analytically considered either using the Laplace transform with respect to time parameter t or applying the Fourier transform over the space coordinate. Both of them reduce the number of differential terms in the equation; however, evaluation of the inverse transformation is complicated. In this paper, we introduce for the first time a Fourier transform induced by the Boltzmann operator. For this, we use a complete set of 3-D eigenfunctions of the Boltzmann transport operator defined in a similar way as those that have been already used in 3-D transport theory as a basic set to transform the transport equation. This set consists of a continuous part and a discrete one with spectral measure. The density distribution equation shows the known form asymptotic behavior. Several applications are to be performed using this equation and compared to the benchmark one. Such an analysis certainly would be out of the available space

  17. An application of Social Values for Ecosystem Services (SolVES) to three national forests in Colorado and Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherrouse, Benson C.; Semmens, Darius J.; Clement, Jessica M.

    2014-01-01

    Despite widespread recognition that social-value information is needed to inform stakeholders and decision makers regarding trade-offs in environmental management, it too often remains absent from ecosystem service assessments. Although quantitative indicators of social values need to be explicitly accounted for in the decision-making process, they need not be monetary. Ongoing efforts to map such values demonstrate how they can also be made spatially explicit and relatable to underlying ecological information. We originally developed Social Values for Ecosystem Services (SolVES) as a tool to assess, map, and quantify nonmarket values perceived by various groups of ecosystem stakeholders. With SolVES 2.0 we have extended the functionality by integrating SolVES with Maxent maximum entropy modeling software to generate more complete social-value maps from available value and preference survey data and to produce more robust models describing the relationship between social values and ecosystems. The current study has two objectives: (1) evaluate how effectively the value index, a quantitative, nonmonetary social-value indicator calculated by SolVES, reproduces results from more common statistical methods of social-survey data analysis and (2) examine how the spatial results produced by SolVES provide additional information that could be used by managers and stakeholders to better understand more complex relationships among stakeholder values, attitudes, and preferences. To achieve these objectives, we applied SolVES to value and preference survey data collected for three national forests, the Pike and San Isabel in Colorado and the Bridger–Teton and the Shoshone in Wyoming. Value index results were generally consistent with results found through more common statistical analyses of the survey data such as frequency, discriminant function, and correlation analyses. In addition, spatial analysis of the social-value maps produced by SolVES provided information that was

  18. A Hybrid Dynamic Programming for Solving Fixed Cost Transportation with Discounted Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhad Ghassemi Tari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of allocating different types of vehicles for transporting a set of products from a manufacturer to its depots/cross docks, in an existing transportation network, to minimize the total transportation costs, is considered. The distribution network involves a heterogeneous fleet of vehicles, with a variable transportation cost and a fixed cost in which a discount mechanism is applied on the fixed part of the transportation costs. It is assumed that the number of available vehicles is limited for some types. A mathematical programming model in the form of the discrete nonlinear optimization model is proposed. A hybrid dynamic programming algorithm is developed for finding the optimal solution. To increase the computational efficiency of the solution algorithm, several concepts and routines, such as the imbedded state routine, surrogate constraint concept, and bounding schemes, are incorporated in the dynamic programming algorithm. A real world case problem is selected and solved by the proposed solution algorithm, and the optimal solution is obtained.

  19. Multi-level methods for solving multigroup transport eigenvalue problems in 1D slab geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anistratov, D. Y.; Gol'din, V. Y.

    2009-01-01

    A methodology for solving eigenvalue problems for the multigroup neutron transport equation in 1D slab geometry is presented. In this paper we formulate and compare different variants of nonlinear multi-level iteration methods. They are defined by means of multigroup and effective one-group low-order quasi diffusion (LOQD) equations. We analyze the effects of utilization of the effective one-group LOQD problem for estimating the eigenvalue. We present numerical results to demonstrate the performance of the iteration algorithms in different types of reactor-physics problems. (authors)

  20. Comparison of two Ssub(infinity) methods for solving the neutron transport equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mennig, J.; Brandt, D.; Haelg, W.

    1978-01-01

    A semianalytic method (S 0 sub(infinity)) is presented for solving the monoenergetic multi-region transport equation. This method is compared with results from S 1 sub(infinity)-theory given in the literature. Application of S 1 sub(infinity)-theory to reactor shields may lead to negative neutron fluxes and to flux oscillations. These unphysical effects are completely avoided by the new method. Numerical results demonstrate the limitations of S 1 sub(infinity) and confirm the numerical stability of (S 0 sub(infinity)). (Auth.)

  1. On some examples of pollutant transport problems solved numerically using the boundary element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azis, Moh. Ivan; Kasbawati; Haddade, Amiruddin; Astuti Thamrin, Sri

    2018-03-01

    A boundary element method (BEM) is obtained for solving a boundary value problem of homogeneous anisotropic media governed by diffusion-convection equation. The application of the BEM is shown for two particular pollutant transport problems of Tello river and Unhas lake in Makassar Indonesia. For the two particular problems a variety of the coefficients of diffusion and the velocity components are taken. The results show that the solutions vary as the parameters change. And this suggests that one has to be careful in measuring or determining the values of the parameters.

  2. Adjacent-cell Preconditioners for solving optically thick neutron transport problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azmy, Y.Y.

    1994-01-01

    We develop, analyze, and test a new acceleration scheme for neutron transport methods, the Adjacent-cell Preconditioner (AP) that is particularly suited for solving optically thick problems. Our method goes beyond Diffusion Synthetic Acceleration (DSA) methods in that it's spectral radius vanishes with increasing cell thickness. In particular, for the ID case the AP method converges immediately, i.e. in one iteration, to 10 -4 pointwise relative criterion in problems with dominant cell size of 10 mfp or thicker. Also the AP has a simple formalism and is cell-centered hence, multidimensional and high order extensions are easier to develop, and more efficient to implement

  3. Improved method for solving the neutron transport problem by discretization of space and energy variables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bosevski, T.

    1971-01-01

    The polynomial interpolation of neutron flux between the chosen space and energy variables enabled transformation of the integral transport equation into a system of linear equations with constant coefficients. Solutions of this system are the needed values of flux for chosen values of space and energy variables. The proposed improved method for solving the neutron transport problem including the mathematical formalism is simple and efficient since the number of needed input data is decreased both in treating the spatial and energy variables. Mathematical method based on this approach gives more stable solutions with significantly decreased probability of numerical errors. Computer code based on the proposed method was used for calculations of one heavy water and one light water reactor cell, and the results were compared to results of other very precise calculations. The proposed method was better concerning convergence rate, decreased computing time and needed computer memory. Discretization of variables enabled direct comparison of theoretical and experimental results

  4. The ADO-nodal method for solving two-dimensional discrete ordinates transport problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barichello, L.B.; Picoloto, C.B.; Cunha, R.D. da

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Two-dimensional discrete ordinates neutron transport. • Analytical Discrete Ordinates (ADO) nodal method. • Heterogeneous media fixed source problems. • Local solutions. - Abstract: In this work, recent results on the solution of fixed-source two-dimensional transport problems, in Cartesian geometry, are reported. Homogeneous and heterogeneous media problems are considered in order to incorporate the idea of arbitrary number of domain division into regions (nodes) when applying the ADO method, which is a method of analytical features, to those problems. The ADO-nodal formulation is developed, for each node, following previous work devoted to heterogeneous media problem. Here, however, the numerical procedure is extended to higher number of domain divisions. Such extension leads, in some cases, to the use of an iterative method for solving the general linear system which defines the arbitrary constants of the general solution. In addition to solve alternative heterogeneous media configurations than reported in previous works, the present approach allows comparisons with results provided by other metodologies generated with refined meshes. Numerical results indicate the ADO solution may achieve a prescribed accuracy using coarser meshes than other schemes.

  5. Solving lot-sizing problem with quantity discount and transportation cost

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Amy H. I.; Kang, He-Yau; Lai, Chun-Mei

    2013-04-01

    Owing to today's increasingly competitive market and ever-changing manufacturing environment, the inventory problem is becoming more complicated to solve. The incorporation of heuristics methods has become a new trend to tackle the complex problem in the past decade. This article considers a lot-sizing problem, and the objective is to minimise total costs, where the costs include ordering, holding, purchase and transportation costs, under the requirement that no inventory shortage is allowed in the system. We first formulate the lot-sizing problem as a mixed integer programming (MIP) model. Next, an efficient genetic algorithm (GA) model is constructed for solving large-scale lot-sizing problems. An illustrative example with two cases in a touch panel manufacturer is used to illustrate the practicality of these models, and a sensitivity analysis is applied to understand the impact of the changes in parameters to the outcomes. The results demonstrate that both the MIP model and the GA model are effective and relatively accurate tools for determining the replenishment for touch panel manufacturing for multi-periods with quantity discount and batch transportation. The contributions of this article are to construct an MIP model to obtain an optimal solution when the problem is not too complicated itself and to present a GA model to find a near-optimal solution efficiently when the problem is complicated.

  6. Island Megalopolises: Tunnel Systems as a Critical Alternative in Solving Transport Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir V. Makarov

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available A principal difficulty with island megalopolises is the transport problem, which results from limited surface land on an already developed island, on which roads and car parking can be placed. This limitation leads to traffic jams on the small number of roads and to intrusive car parking in any available surface location, resulting in safety issues. The city of Vladivostok is located on the Muravyov-Amursky Peninsula in the Russia Far East region (the Primorsky Krai. This city is essentially the third capital of Russia because of its important geopolitical location. To address the car traffic problems in Vladivostok, and because of the absence of places to build new roads, the city administration has proposed the usage of the beaches and waterfronts along the sea coast in this regard. This decision is in sharp conflict with Vladivostok’s ecological and social aspirations to be recognized as a world-class city. It also neglects the lessons that have been learned in many other waterfront cities around the world, as such cities have first built aboveground waterfront highways and later decided to remove them at great expense, in order to allow their citizens to properly enjoy the environmental and historical assets of their waterfronts. A key alternative would be to create an independent tunneled transport system along with added underground parking so that the transport problems can be addressed in a manner that enhances the ecology and livability of the city. A comparison of the two alternatives for solving the transport problem, that is, underground versus aboveground, shows the significant advantages of the independent tunnel system. Complex efficiency criteria have been developed in order to quantify the estimation of the alternative variants of the Vladivostok transport system. It was determined that the underground project is almost 1.8 times more advantageous than the aboveground alternative. Keywords: Megalopolises, Transport, Tunnels

  7. Quantifying Sediment Transport in a Premontane Transitional Cloud Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waring, E. R.; Brumbelow, J. K.

    2013-12-01

    Quantifying sediment transport is a difficult task in any watershed, and relatively little direct measurement has occurred in tropical, mountainous watersheds. The Howler Monkey Watershed (2.2 hectares) is located in a premontane transitional cloud forest in San Isidro de Peñas Blancas, Costa Rica. In June 2012, a V-notch stream-gaging weir was built in the catchment with a 8 ft by 6 ft by 4 ft concrete stilling basin. Sediment captured by the weir was left untouched for an 11 month time period. To collect the contents of the weir, the stream was rerouted and the weir was drained. The stilling basin contents were systematically sampled, and samples were taken to a lab and characterized using sieve and hydrometer tests. The wet volume of the remaining sediment was obtained, and dry mass was estimated. Particle size distribution of samples were obtained from lab tests, with 96% of sediment trapped by the weir being sand or coarser. The efficiency of the weir as a sediment collector was evaluated by comparing particle fall velocities to residence time of water in the weir under baseflow conditions. Under these assumptions, only two to three percent of the total mass of soil transported in the stream is thought to have been suspended in the water and lost over the V-notch. Data were compared to the Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE), a widely accepted method for predicting soil loss in agricultural watersheds. As expected, application of the USLE to a tropical rainforest was problematic with uncertainty in parameters yielding a soil loss estimate varying by a factor of 50. Continued monitoring of sediment transport should yield data for improved methods of soil loss estimation applicable to tropical mountainous forests.

  8. Transportation Self-Efficacy and Social Problem-Solving of Persons Who Are Blind or Visually Impaired.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crudden, Adele; O'Mally, Jamie; Antonelli, Karla

    2016-01-01

    Social problem-solving skills and transportation self-efficacy were assessed for 48 vocational rehabilitation consumers with visual disabilities who required assistance securing work transportation. Social problem solving was at the upper end of the normed average; transportation self-efficacy averaged 101.5 out of 140. Level of vision loss was not associated with score differences; urban residence related to slightly higher self-efficacy than suburban or rural residency. Participants appeared to have the skills necessary to secure employment transportation, but were less confident about transportation-seeking activities that required more initiative of social interaction. Training and information might help consumers gain confidence in these tasks and increase viable transportation options.

  9. Program to solve the multigroup discrete ordinates transport equation in (x,y,z) geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lathrop, K.D.

    1976-04-01

    Numerical formulations and programming algorithms are given for the THREETRAN computer program which solves the discrete ordinates, multigroup transport equation in (x,y,z) geometry. An efficient, flexible, and general data-handling strategy is derived to make use of three hierarchies of storage: small core memory, large core memory, and disk file. Data management, input instructions, and sample problem output are described. A six-group, S 4 , 18 502 mesh point, 2 800 zone, k/sub eff/ calculation of the ZPPR-4 critical assembly required 144 min of CDC-7600 time to execute to a convergence tolerance of 5 x 10 -4 and gave results in good qualitative agreement with experiment and other calculations. 6 references

  10. Transmission probability method for solving neutron transport equation in three-dimensional triangular-z geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Guoming [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710049 (China)], E-mail: gmliusy@gmail.com; Wu Hongchun; Cao Liangzhi [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710049 (China)

    2008-09-15

    This paper presents a transmission probability method (TPM) to solve the neutron transport equation in three-dimensional triangular-z geometry. The source within the mesh is assumed to be spatially uniform and isotropic. At the mesh surface, the constant and the simplified P{sub 1} approximation are invoked for the anisotropic angular flux distribution. Based on this model, a code TPMTDT is encoded. It was verified by three 3D Takeda benchmark problems, in which the first two problems are in XYZ geometry and the last one is in hexagonal-z geometry, and an unstructured geometry problem. The results of the present method agree well with those of Monte-Carlo calculation method and Spherical Harmonics (P{sub N}) method.

  11. A multilevel cost-space approach to solving the balanced long transportation problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanaugh, Kevin J.; Henson, Van Emden

    1993-01-01

    We develop a multilevel scheme for solving the balanced long transportation problem, that is, given a set (c(sub kj)) of shipping costs from a set of M supply nodes S(sub k) to a set of N demand nodes D(sub j), we seek to find a set of flows, (x(sub kj)), that minimizes the total cost Sigma(sub k=1)(exp M) Sigma(sub j=1)(exp N) x(sub kj)c(sub kj). We require that the problem be balanced, that is, the total demand must equal the total supply. Solution techniques for this problem are well known from optimization and linear programming. We examine this problem, however, in order to develop principles that can then be applied to more intractible problems of optimization. We develop a multigrid scheme for solving the problem, defining the grids, relaxation, and intergrid operators. Numerical experimentation shows that this line of research may prove fruitful. Further research directions are suggested.

  12. Variable neighborhood search to solve the vehicle routing problem for hazardous materials transportation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bula, Gustavo Alfredo; Prodhon, Caroline; Gonzalez, Fabio Augusto; Afsar, H Murat; Velasco, Nubia

    2017-02-15

    This work focuses on the Heterogeneous Fleet Vehicle Routing problem (HFVRP) in the context of hazardous materials (HazMat) transportation. The objective is to determine a set of routes that minimizes the total expected routing risk. This is a nonlinear function, and it depends on the vehicle load and the population exposed when an incident occurs. Thus, a piecewise linear approximation is used to estimate it. For solving the problem, a variant of the Variable Neighborhood Search (VNS) algorithm is employed. To improve its performance, a post-optimization procedure is implemented via a Set Partitioning (SP) problem. The SP is solved on a pool of routes obtained from executions of the local search procedure embedded on the VNS. The algorithm is tested on two sets of HFVRP instances based on literature with up to 100 nodes, these instances are modified to include vehicle and arc risk parameters. The results are competitive in terms of computational efficiency and quality attested by a comparison with Mixed Integer Linear Programming (MILP) previously proposed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. A fast, parallel algorithm to solve the basic fluvial erosion/transport equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, J.

    2012-04-01

    Quantitative models of landform evolution are commonly based on the solution of a set of equations representing the processes of fluvial erosion, transport and deposition, which leads to predict the geometry of a river channel network and its evolution through time. The river network is often regarded as the backbone of any surface processes model (SPM) that might include other physical processes acting at a range of spatial and temporal scales along hill slopes. The basic laws of fluvial erosion requires the computation of local (slope) and non-local (drainage area) quantities at every point of a given landscape, a computationally expensive operation which limits the resolution of most SPMs. I present here an algorithm to compute the various components required in the parameterization of fluvial erosion (and transport) and thus solve the basic fluvial geomorphic equation, that is very efficient because it is O(n) (the number of required arithmetic operations is linearly proportional to the number of nodes defining the landscape), and is fully parallelizable (the computation cost decreases in a direct inverse proportion to the number of processors used to solve the problem). The algorithm is ideally suited for use on latest multi-core processors. Using this new technique, geomorphic problems can be solved at an unprecedented resolution (typically of the order of 10,000 X 10,000 nodes) while keeping the computational cost reasonable (order 1 sec per time step). Furthermore, I will show that the algorithm is applicable to any regular or irregular representation of the landform, and is such that the temporal evolution of the landform can be discretized by a fully implicit time-marching algorithm, making it unconditionally stable. I will demonstrate that such an efficient algorithm is ideally suited to produce a fully predictive SPM that links observationally based parameterizations of small-scale processes to the evolution of large-scale features of the landscapes on

  14. TOC and TRIZ: using a dual-methodological approach to solve a forest harvesting problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ian Conradie

    2005-01-01

    Although cut-to-length forest harvesting with harvesters and forwarders is hardly used in some parts of the world, it has many advantages over conventional harvesting systems. Research has shown that the core reason for the low adoption of CTL in the southeastern USA is the complexity of the equipment to optimize value recovery. In this paper we delve deeper into this...

  15. Modelling of radionuclide transport in forests: Review and future perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaw, G.; Schell, W.; Linkov, I.

    1997-01-01

    Ecological modeling is a powerful tool which can be used to synthesize information on the dynamic processes which occur in ecosystems. Models of radionuclide transport in forests were first constructed in the mid-1960's, when the consequences of global fallout from nuclear weapons tests and waste disposal in the environment were of great concern. Such models were developed based on site-specific experimental data and were designed to address local needs. These models had a limited applicability in evaluating distinct ecosystems and deposition scenarios. Given the scarcity of information, the same experimental data sets were often used both for model calibration and validation, an approach which clearly constitutes a methodological error. Even though the carry modeling attempts were far from being faultless, they established a useful conceptual approach in that they tried to capture general processes in ecosystems and thus had a holistic nature. Later, radioecological modeling attempted to reveal ecosystem properties by separating the component parts from the whole system, as an approach to simplification. This method worked well for radionuclide transport in agricultural ecosystems, in which the biogeochemistry of radionuclide cycling is relatively well understood and can be influenced by fertilization. Several models have been successfully developed and applied to human dose evaluation and emergency response to contaminating events in agricultural lands

  16. LOCFES-B: Solving the one-dimensional transport equation with user-selected spatial approximations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarvis, R.D.; Nelson, P.

    1993-01-01

    Closed linear one-cell functional (CLOF) methods constitute an abstractly defined class of spatial approximations to the one-dimensional discrete ordinates equations of linear particle transport that encompass, as specific instances, the vast majority of the spatial approximations that have been either used or suggested in the computational solution of these equations. A specific instance of the class of CLOF methods is defined by a (typically small) number of functions of the cell width, total cross section, and direction cosine of particle motion. The LOCFES code takes advantage of the latter observation by permitting the use, within a more-or-less standard source iteration solution process, of an arbitrary CLOF method as defined by a user-supplied subroutine. The design objective of LOCFES was to provide automated determination of the order of accuracy (i.e., order of the discretization error) in the fine-mesh limit for an arbitrary user-selected CLOF method. This asymptotic order of accuracy is one widely used measure of the merit of a spatial approximation. This paper discusses LOCFES-B, which is a code that uses methods developed in LOCFES to solve one-dimensional linear particle transport problems with any user-selected CLOF method. LOCFES-B provides automatic solution of a given problem to within an accuracy specified by user input and provides comparison of the computational results against results from externally provided benchmark results

  17. Angular finite volume method for solving the multigroup transport equation with piecewise average scattering cross sections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calloo, A.; Vidal, J.F.; Le Tellier, R.; Rimpault, G., E-mail: ansar.calloo@cea.fr, E-mail: jean-francois.vidal@cea.fr, E-mail: romain.le-tellier@cea.fr, E-mail: gerald.rimpault@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DER/SPRC/LEPh, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2011-07-01

    This paper deals with the solving of the multigroup integro-differential form of the transport equation for fine energy group structure. In that case, multigroup transfer cross sections display strongly peaked shape for light scatterers and the current Legendre polynomial expansion is not well-suited to represent them. Furthermore, even if considering an exact scattering cross sections representation, the scattering source in the discrete ordinates method (also known as the Sn method) being calculated by sampling the angular flux at given directions, may be wrongly computed due to lack of angular support for the angular flux. Hence, following the work of Gerts and Matthews, an angular finite volume solver has been developed for 2D Cartesian geometries. It integrates the multigroup transport equation over discrete volume elements obtained by meshing the unit sphere with a product grid over the polar and azimuthal coordinates and by considering the integrated flux per solid angle element. The convergence of this method has been compared to the S{sub n} method for a highly anisotropic benchmark. Besides, piecewise-average scattering cross sections have been produced for non-bound Hydrogen atoms using a free gas model for thermal neutrons. LWR lattice calculations comparing Legendre representations of the Hydrogen scattering multigroup cross section at various orders and piecewise-average cross sections for this same atom are carried out (while keeping a Legendre representation for all other isotopes). (author)

  18. A numerical spectral approach to solve the dislocation density transport equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djaka, K S; Taupin, V; Berbenni, S; Fressengeas, C

    2015-01-01

    A numerical spectral approach is developed to solve in a fast, stable and accurate fashion, the quasi-linear hyperbolic transport equation governing the spatio-temporal evolution of the dislocation density tensor in the mechanics of dislocation fields. The approach relies on using the Fast Fourier Transform algorithm. Low-pass spectral filters are employed to control both the high frequency Gibbs oscillations inherent to the Fourier method and the fast-growing numerical instabilities resulting from the hyperbolic nature of the transport equation. The numerical scheme is validated by comparison with an exact solution in the 1D case corresponding to dislocation dipole annihilation. The expansion and annihilation of dislocation loops in 2D and 3D settings are also produced and compared with finite element approximations. The spectral solutions are shown to be stable, more accurate for low Courant numbers and much less computation time-consuming than the finite element technique based on an explicit Galerkin-least squares scheme. (paper)

  19. Angular finite volume method for solving the multigroup transport equation with piecewise average scattering cross sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calloo, A.; Vidal, J.F.; Le Tellier, R.; Rimpault, G.

    2011-01-01

    This paper deals with the solving of the multigroup integro-differential form of the transport equation for fine energy group structure. In that case, multigroup transfer cross sections display strongly peaked shape for light scatterers and the current Legendre polynomial expansion is not well-suited to represent them. Furthermore, even if considering an exact scattering cross sections representation, the scattering source in the discrete ordinates method (also known as the Sn method) being calculated by sampling the angular flux at given directions, may be wrongly computed due to lack of angular support for the angular flux. Hence, following the work of Gerts and Matthews, an angular finite volume solver has been developed for 2D Cartesian geometries. It integrates the multigroup transport equation over discrete volume elements obtained by meshing the unit sphere with a product grid over the polar and azimuthal coordinates and by considering the integrated flux per solid angle element. The convergence of this method has been compared to the S_n method for a highly anisotropic benchmark. Besides, piecewise-average scattering cross sections have been produced for non-bound Hydrogen atoms using a free gas model for thermal neutrons. LWR lattice calculations comparing Legendre representations of the Hydrogen scattering multigroup cross section at various orders and piecewise-average cross sections for this same atom are carried out (while keeping a Legendre representation for all other isotopes). (author)

  20. On the adequacy of message-passing parallel supercomputers for solving neutron transport problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azmy, Y.Y.

    1990-01-01

    A coarse-grained, static-scheduling parallelization of the standard iterative scheme used for solving the discrete-ordinates approximation of the neutron transport equation is described. The parallel algorithm is based on a decomposition of the angular domain along the discrete ordinates, thus naturally producing a set of completely uncoupled systems of equations in each iteration. Implementation of the parallel code on Intcl's iPSC/2 hypercube, and solutions to test problems are presented as evidence of the high speedup and efficiency of the parallel code. The performance of the parallel code on the iPSC/2 is analyzed, and a model for the CPU time as a function of the problem size (order of angular quadrature) and the number of participating processors is developed and validated against measured CPU times. The performance model is used to speculate on the potential of massively parallel computers for significantly speeding up real-life transport calculations at acceptable efficiencies. We conclude that parallel computers with a few hundred processors are capable of producing large speedups at very high efficiencies in very large three-dimensional problems. 10 refs., 8 figs

  1. An extended step characteristic method for solving the transport equation in general geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeHart, M.D.; Pevey, R.E.; Parish, T.A.

    1994-01-01

    A method for applying the discrete ordinates method to solve the Boltzmann transport equation on arbitrary two-dimensional meshes has been developed. The finite difference approach normally used to approximate spatial derivatives in extrapolating angular fluxes across a cell is replaced by direct solution of the characteristic form of the transport equation for each discrete direction. Thus, computational cells are not restricted to the geometrical shape of a mesh element characteristic of a given coordinate system. However, in terms of the treatment of energy and angular dependencies, this method resembles traditional discrete ordinates techniques. By using the method developed here, a general two-dimensional space can be approximated by an irregular mesh comprised of arbitrary polygons. Results for a number of test problems have been compared with solutions obtained from traditional methods, with good agreement. Comparisons include benchmarks against analytical results for problems with simple geometry, as well as numerical results obtained from traditional discrete ordinates methods by applying the ANISN and TWOTRAN-II computer programs

  2. A hopfield-like artificial neural network for solving inverse radiation transport problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sang Hoon

    1997-02-01

    In this thesis, we solve inverse radiation transport problems by an Artificial Neural Network(ANN) approach. ANNs have many interesting properties such as nonlinear, parallel, and distributed processing. Some of the promising applications of ANNs are optimization, image and signal processing, system control, etc. In some optimization problems, Hopfield Neural Network(HNN) which has one-layered and fully interconnected neurons with feed-back topology showed that it worked well with acceptable fault tolerance and efficiency. The identification of radioactive source in a medium with a limited number of external detectors is treated as an inverse radiation transport problem in this work. This kind of inverse problem is usually ill-posed and severely under-determined; however, its applications are very useful in many fields including medical diagnosis and nondestructive assay of nuclear materials. Therefore, it is desired to develop efficient and robust solution algorithms. Firstly, we study a representative ANN model which has learning ability and fault tolerance, i.e., feed-forward neural network. It has an error backpropagation learning algorithm processed by reducing error in learning patterns that are usually results of test or calculation. Although it has enough fault tolerance and efficiency, a major obstacle is 'curse of dimensionality'--required number of learning patterns and learning time increase exponentially proportional to the problem size. Therefore, in this thesis, this type of ANN is used as benchmarking the reliability of the solution. Secondly, another approach for solving inverse problems, a modified version of HNN is proposed. When diagonal elements of the interconnection matrix are not zero, HNN may become unstable. However, most problems including this identification problem contain non-zero diagonal elements when programmed on neural networks. According to Soulie et al., discrete random iterations could produce the stable minimum state

  3. Spectral finite element methods for solving fractional differential equations with applications in anomalous transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carella, Alfredo Raul

    2012-09-15

    Quantifying species transport rates is a main concern in chemical and petrochemical industries. In particular, the design and operation of many large-scale industrial chemical processes is as much dependent on diffusion as it is on reaction rates. However, the existing diffusion models sometimes fail to predict experimentally observed behaviors and their accuracy is usually insufficient for process optimization purposes. Fractional diffusion models offer multiple possibilities for generalizing Flick's law in a consistent manner in order to account for history dependence and nonlocal effects. These models have not been extensively applied to the study of real systems, mainly due to their computational cost and mathematical complexity. A least squares spectral formulation was developed for solving fractional differential equations. The proposed method was proven particularly well-suited for dealing with the numerical difficulties inherent to fractional differential operators. The practical implementation was explained in detail in order to enhance reproducibility, and directions were specified for extending it to multiple dimensions and arbitrarily shaped domains. A numerical framework based on the least-squares spectral element method was developed for studying and comparing anomalous diffusion models in pellets. This simulation tool is capable of solving arbitrary integro-differential equations and can be effortlessly adapted to various problems in any number of dimensions. Simulations of the flow around a cylindrical particle were achieved by extending the functionality of the developed framework. A test case was analyzed by coupling the boundary condition yielded by the fluid model with two families of anomalous diffusion models: hyperbolic diffusion and fractional diffusion. Qualitative guidelines for determining the suitability of diffusion models can be formulated by complementing experimental data with the results obtained from this approach.(Author)

  4. LOCFES-B: A program for solving the one-dimensional particle transport equation with user-selected CLOF methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarvis, R.D.; Nelson, P.

    1995-01-01

    LOCFES-B solves the steady-state, monoenergetic and azimuthally symmetric neutral-particle transport equation in one-dimensional plane-parallel geometry. LOCFES-B is designed to facilitate testing and comparison of different spatial approximations in neutron transport. Accordingly, it permits performance of user-provided CLOF spatial approximations to be compared directly on successively refined mesh sizes and user-input physical problems with automatic comparison of results. if desired, to user-supplied benchmark results

  5. LUCKY-TD code for solving the time-dependent transport equation with the use of parallel computations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moryakov, A. V., E-mail: sailor@orc.ru [National Research Centre Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation)

    2016-12-15

    An algorithm for solving the time-dependent transport equation in the P{sub m}S{sub n} group approximation with the use of parallel computations is presented. The algorithm is implemented in the LUCKY-TD code for supercomputers employing the MPI standard for the data exchange between parallel processes.

  6. Estimation of radioactive 137-cesium transportation by litterfall, stemflow and throughfall in the forests of Fukushima

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endo, Izuki; Ohte, Nobuhito; Iseda, Kohei; Tanoi, Keitaro; Hirose, Atsushi; Kobayashi, Natsuko I.; Murakami, Masashi; Tokuchi, Naoko; Ohashi, Mizue

    2015-01-01

    Since the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident in March 2011, large areas of the forests around Fukushima have become highly contaminated by radioactive nuclides. To predict the future dynamics of radioactive cesium ( 137 Cs) in the forest catchment, it is important to measure each component of its movement within the forest. Two years after the accident, we estimated the annual transportation of 137 Cs from the forest canopy to the floor by litterfall, throughfall and stemflow. Seasonal variations in 137 Cs transportation and differences between forests types were also determined. The total amount of 137 Cs transported from the canopy to the floor in two deciduous and cedar plantation forests ranged between 3.9 and 11.0 kBq m −2  year −1 . We also observed that 137 Cs transportation with litterfall increased in the defoliation period, simply because of the increased amount of litterfall. 137 Cs transportation with throughfall and stemflow increased in the rainy season, and 137 Cs flux by litterfall was higher in cedar plantation compared with that of mixed deciduous forest, while the opposite result was obtained for stemflow. - Highlights: • Annual flux of 137 Cs by litterfall, throughfall and stemflow was estimated in two types of forest in Fukushima, Japan. • Annual amount of 137 Cs transportation was 3.9–11.0 kBq m −2 year −1 in two years after the accident. • 137 Cs flux by litterfall was higher in cedar plantation than that of mixed deciduous forest. • 137 Cs transportation with throughfall and stemflow increased in rainy season.

  7. Analysis and development of spatial hp-refinement methods for solving the neutron transport equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fournier, D.

    2011-01-01

    The different neutronic parameters have to be calculated with a higher accuracy in order to design the 4. generation reactor cores. As memory storage and computation time are limited, adaptive methods are a solution to solve the neutron transport equation. The neutronic flux, solution of this equation, depends on the energy, angle and space. The different variables are successively discretized. The energy with a multigroup approach, considering the different quantities to be constant on each group, the angle by a collocation method called SN approximation. Once the energy and angle variable are discretized, a system of spatially-dependent hyperbolic equations has to be solved. Discontinuous finite elements are used to make possible the development of hp-refinement methods. Thus, the accuracy of the solution can be improved by spatial refinement (h-refinement), consisting into subdividing a cell into sub-cells, or by order refinement (p-refinement), by increasing the order of the polynomial basis. In this thesis, the properties of this methods are analyzed showing the importance of the regularity of the solution to choose the type of refinement. Thus, two error estimators are used to lead the refinement process. Whereas the first one requires high regularity hypothesis (analytical solution), the second one supposes only the minimal hypothesis required for the solution to exist. The comparison of both estimators is done on benchmarks where the analytic solution is known by the method of manufactured solutions. Thus, the behaviour of the solution as a regard of the regularity can be studied. It leads to a hp-refinement method using the two estimators. Then, a comparison is done with other existing methods on simplified but also realistic benchmarks coming from nuclear cores. These adaptive methods considerably reduces the computational cost and memory footprint. To further improve these two points, an approach with energy-dependent meshes is proposed. Actually, as the

  8. Modeling soil erosion and transport on forest landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge Sun; Steven G McNulty

    1998-01-01

    Century-long studies on the impacts of forest management in North America suggest sediment can cause major reduction on stream water quality. Soil erosion patterns in forest watersheds are patchy and heterogeneous. Therefore, patterns of soil erosion are difficult to model and predict. The objective of this study is to develop a user friendly management tool for land...

  9. A Hybrid Dynamic Programming for Solving Fixed Cost Transportation with Discounted Mechanism

    OpenAIRE

    Farhad Ghassemi Tari

    2016-01-01

    The problem of allocating different types of vehicles for transporting a set of products from a manufacturer to its depots/cross docks, in an existing transportation network, to minimize the total transportation costs, is considered. The distribution network involves a heterogeneous fleet of vehicles, with a variable transportation cost and a fixed cost in which a discount mechanism is applied on the fixed part of the transportation costs. It is assumed that the number of available vehicles i...

  10. Improve forest inventory with access data-measure transport distance and cost to market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis P. Bradley

    1972-01-01

    Describes a method for relating forest inventory volumes to transport distances and costs. The process, originally developed in Sweden, includes a computer program that can be used to summarize volumes by transport costs per cord to specified delivery point. The method has many potential applications in all aspects of resource analysis.

  11. The operational efficiency of waterway transport of forest chips on Finland's Lake Saimaa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karttunen, K.; Ranta, T. [Lappeenranta Univ. of Technology, LUT Savo Sustainable Technologies, Mikkeli (Finland); Vaatainen, K.; Asikainen, A. [The Finnish Forest Research Inst., Joensuu (Finland)], E-mail: kalle.karttunen@lut.fi

    2012-11-01

    New and cost-efficient methods for use in supply chains for energy wood should be found, to reach the targets of the renewable energy utilisation set by the European Union. The long-distance waterway transportation of forest fuels should be thoroughly investigated, especially in areas where the transport distance is long and waterways could provide a feasible method of conveying forest fuel. In comparison to transport of forest chips by truck, barge-based waterway transport shows a competitive advantage due to the larger loads and higher bulk density of chips it allows. The cost-efficiency of waterway transportation operations related to forest chips in Finland's Lake Saimaa region was studied using practical demonstrations and discrete-event simulation. The varying demand for fuel wood in three separate bio-power plants on the Saimaa lakeside (near the cities of Varkaus, Mikkeli, and Savonlinna) was addressed in several barge transportation scenarios. Finally, the economy of barge transportation was compared to the economy of truck transportation as a function of transportation distance and in terms of the annual performance of the transportation methods examined. The waterway supply chain of forest chips was cost-competitive to road transport by truck after 100-150 km. According to the simulation study, the most economical waterway transport options were based on fixed barge system and shift-independent harbor logistics where loading and unloading of barges were carried-out with a wheeled loader and a belt conveyor. Total supply chain costs including the best waterway logistics from road side storage to power plant ranged from 10.75 euros to 11.64 euros/MWh in distances of 100-150 km by waterways. The energy-density of forest chips in the barge load was found to be, on average, 25% higher than that in truck hauling, because of the better compaction of chips. Waterway transport is a viable option for long-distance transportation of forest chips in Eastern

  12. A Spatial Discretization Scheme for Solving the Transport Equation on Unstructured Grids of Polyhedra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, K.G.

    2000-01-01

    In this work, we develop a new spatial discretization scheme that may be used to numerically solve the neutron transport equation. This new discretization extends the family of corner balance spatial discretizations to include spatial grids of arbitrary polyhedra. This scheme enforces balance on subcell volumes called corners. It produces a lower triangular matrix for sweeping, is algebraically linear, is non-negative in a source-free absorber, and produces a robust and accurate solution in thick diffusive regions. Using an asymptotic analysis, we design the scheme so that in thick diffusive regions it will attain the same solution as an accurate polyhedral diffusion discretization. We then refine the approximations in the scheme to reduce numerical diffusion in vacuums, and we attempt to capture a second order truncation error. After we develop this Upstream Corner Balance Linear (UCBL) discretization we analyze its characteristics in several limits. We complete a full diffusion limit analysis showing that we capture the desired diffusion discretization in optically thick and highly scattering media. We review the upstream and linear properties of our discretization and then demonstrate that our scheme captures strictly non-negative solutions in source-free purely absorbing media. We then demonstrate the minimization of numerical diffusion of a beam and then demonstrate that the scheme is, in general, first order accurate. We also note that for slab-like problems our method actually behaves like a second-order method over a range of cell thicknesses that are of practical interest. We also discuss why our scheme is first order accurate for truly 3D problems and suggest changes in the algorithm that should make it a second-order accurate scheme. Finally, we demonstrate 3D UCBL's performance on several very different test problems. We show good performance in diffusive and streaming problems. We analyze truncation error in a 3D problem and demonstrate robustness in a

  13. Integral transform method for solving neutron transport problems with general anisotropic scattering in a cylinder of finite height

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, V.; Sahni, D.C.

    1983-01-01

    In this paper, the authors present the mathematical techniques that were developed for solving the integral transport equation for the criticality of a homogeneous cylinder of finite height with general anisotropic scattering. They present the integral transport equations for the Fourier transformed spherical harmonic moments of the angular flux. These moments are also represented by a series of products of spherical Bessel functions. The criticality problem is, then, posed by the matrix eigenvalue problem whose eigenvector is composed of the expansion coefficients mentioned above. An methodology of calculating the general matrix element is discussed by using the recursion relations derived in this paper. Finally, for the one-group criticality of finite cylinders, the benchmark results are generated when scattering is linearly anisotropic. Also, these benchmarks are solved and compared with the S/sub N/ method of TWOTRAN

  14. A method for solving the spherical harmonics equations applied for space-energy transport of fast and resonance neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matausek, M.

    1972-01-01

    A new proposed method for solving the space-energy dependent spherical harmonics equations represents a methodological contribution to neutron transport theory. The proposed method was applied for solving the problem of spec-energy transport of fast and resonance neutrons in multi-zone, cylindrical y symmetric infinite reactor cell and is related to previously developed procedure for treating the thermal energy region. The advantages of this method are as follows: a unique algorithm was obtained for detailed determination of spatial and energy distribution of neutrons (from thermal to fast) in the reactor cell; these detailed distributions enable more precise calculations of criticality conditions, obtaining adequate multigroup data and better interpretation of experimental data; computing time is rather short

  15. Properties of Aged Forest Fire Plumes after Intercontinental Transport across the Atlantic Ocean

    OpenAIRE

    Weinzierl, Bernadett; Petzold, Andreas; Fiebig, Markus; Huntrieser, Heidi; Minikin, Andreas; Stohl, Andreas; real, Elsa; Law, Kathy; Cozic, Julie; Weingartner, Ernest

    2006-01-01

    In summer 2004 the long-range transport of particles emitted from large forest fires in Canada and Alaska contributed significantly to the aerosol loading of the free troposphere over Europe . Airborne in situ measurements on the intercontinental transport of aerosols from biogenic and anthropogenic origin were performed at the European west coast as a part of the ICARTT-ITOP study (Intercontinental Transport of Ozone and Precursors). During the study the German Falcon 20 E-5 research aircraf...

  16. Zero point and zero suffix methods with robust ranking for solving fully fuzzy transportation problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngastiti, P. T. B.; Surarso, Bayu; Sutimin

    2018-05-01

    Transportation issue of the distribution problem such as the commodity or goods from the supply tothe demmand is to minimize the transportation costs. Fuzzy transportation problem is an issue in which the transport costs, supply and demand are in the form of fuzzy quantities. Inthe case study at CV. Bintang Anugerah Elektrik, a company engages in the manufacture of gensets that has more than one distributors. We use the methods of zero point and zero suffix to investigate the transportation minimum cost. In implementing both methods, we use robust ranking techniques for the defuzzification process. The studyresult show that the iteration of zero suffix method is less than that of zero point method.

  17. Policy Recommendation from Stakeholders to Improve Forest Products Transportation: A Qualitative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil Koirala

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available With recently announced federal funding and subsidies to redevelop vacant mills and the communities they were in, the forest products industry in Maine is poised to gain its momentum once again. One of the important components influencing the cost of delivered forest products is transportation. A recent study in the region has shown that the location and availability of markets along with lack of skilled labor force are the major challenges faced by the forest products transportation sector in Maine. This study was focused on developing a management guideline which included various field level options for improving trucking enterprises in Maine. For this, a qualitative research approach utilizing a case study research tradition was employed, with in-depth semi-structured interviews with professionals directly related to the forest products transportation sector used for data generation. Thirteen semi-structured interviews were conducted, with each being audio recorded and later transcribed verbatim. Interview transcriptions were analyzed using NVivo 11. Suggestions, like increasing benefits to drivers and providing training, were proposed for challenges related to manpower shortage, while the marketing of new forest products and adjustment in some state-level policies were proposed for challenges related to the forest products market condition of the state.

  18. Two split cell numerical methods for solving 2-D non-equilibrium radiation transport equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Tinggui

    2004-11-01

    Two numerically positive methods, the step characteristic integral method and subcell balance method, for solving radiative transfer equations on quadrilateral grids are presented. Numerical examples shows that the schemes presented are feasible on non-rectangle grid computation, and that the computing results by the schemes presented are comparative to that by the discrete ordinate diamond scheme on rectangle grid. (author)

  19. SOLVING TRANSPORT LOGISTICS PROBLEMS IN A VIRTUAL ENTERPRISE THROUGH ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE METHODS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitaliy PAVLENKO

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper offers a solution to the problem of material flow allocation within a virtual enterprise by using artificial intelligence methods. The research is based on the use of fuzzy relations when planning for optimal transportation modes to deliver components for manufactured products. The Fuzzy Logic Toolbox is used to determine the optimal route for transportation of components for manufactured products. The methods offered have been exemplified in the present research. The authors have built a simulation model for component transportation and delivery for manufactured products using the Simulink graphical environment for building models.

  20. SOLVING TRANSPORT LOGISTICS PROBLEMS IN A VIRTUAL ENTERPRISE THROUGH ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE METHODS

    OpenAIRE

    PAVLENKO, Vitaliy; PAVLENKO, Tetiana; MOROZOVA, Olga; KUZNETSOVA, Anna; VOROPAI, Olena

    2017-01-01

    The paper offers a solution to the problem of material flow allocation within a virtual enterprise by using artificial intelligence methods. The research is based on the use of fuzzy relations when planning for optimal transportation modes to deliver components for manufactured products. The Fuzzy Logic Toolbox is used to determine the optimal route for transportation of components for manufactured products. The methods offered have been exemplified in the present research. The authors have b...

  1. Forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis R. Iverson; Mark W. Schwartz

    1994-01-01

    Originally diminished by development, forests are coming back: forest biomass is accumulating. Forests are repositories for many threatened species. Even with increased standing timber, however, biodiversity is threatened by increased forest fragmentation and by exotic species.

  2. The effects of rising energy costs and transportation mode mix on forest fuel procurement costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rauch, Peter; Gronalt, Manfred

    2011-01-01

    Since fossil fuels have been broadly recognized as a non-renewable energy source that threatens the climate, sustainable and CO 2 neutral energy sources - such as forest fuels - are being promoted in Europe, instead. With the expeditiously growing forest fuel demand, the strategic problem of how to design a cost-efficient distribution network has evolved. This paper presents an MILP model, comprising decisions on modes of transportation and spatial arrangement of terminals, in order to design a forest fuel supply network for Austria. The MILP model is used to evaluate the impacts of rising energy costs on procurement sources, transport mix and procurement costs on a national scale, based on the example of Austria. A 20% increase of energy costs results in a procurement cost increase of 7%, and another 20% increase of energy costs would have similar results. While domestic waterways become more important as a result of the first energy cost increase, rail only does so after the second. One way to decrease procurement costs would be to reduce the share of empty trips with truck and trailer. Reducing this share by 10% decreases the average procurement costs by up to 20%. Routing influences the modal split considerably, and the truck transport share increases from 86% to 97%, accordingly. Increasing forest fuel imports by large CHPs lowers domestic competition and also enables smaller plants to cut their procurement costs. Rising forest fuel imports via ship will not significantly decrease domestic market shares, but they will reduce procurement costs considerably. (author)

  3. Application of Trotter approximation for solving time dependent neutron transport equation; Primena Trotterove aproksimacije za resavanje vremenski zavisne transportne jednacine neutrona

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stancic, V [Institut za nuklearne nauke Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Yugoslavia)

    1987-07-01

    A method is proposed to solve multigroup time dependent neutron transport equation with arbitrary scattering anisotropy. The recurrence relation thus obtained is simple, numerically stable and especially suitable for treatment of complicated geometries. (author)

  4. Solving the Single-Sink, Fixed-Charge, Multiple-Choice Transportation Problem by Dynamic Programming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rauff Lind Christensen, Tue; Klose, Andreas; Andersen, Kim Allan

    important aspects of supplier selection, an important application of the SSFCTP, this does not reflect the real life situation. First, transportation costs faced by many companies are in fact piecewise linear. Secondly, when suppliers offer discounts, either incremental or all-unit discounts, such savings......The Single-Sink, Fixed-Charge, Multiple-Choice Transportation Problem (SSFCMCTP) is a problem with versatile applications. This problem is a generalization of the Single-Sink, Fixed-Charge Transportation Problem (SSFCTP), which has a fixed-charge, linear cost structure. However, in at least two...... are neglected in the SSFCTP. The SSFCMCTP overcome this problem by incorporating a staircase cost structure in the cost function instead of the usual one used in SSFCTP. We present a dynamic programming algorithm for the resulting problem. To enhance the performance of the generic algorithm a number...

  5. Axial and radial water transport and internal water storage in tropical forest canopy trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelley A. James; Frederick C. Meinzer; Guillermo Goldstein; David Woodruff; Timothy Jones; Teresa Restom; Monica Mejia; Michael Clearwater; Paula. Campanello

    2003-01-01

    Heat and stable isotope tracers were used to study axial and radial water transport in relation to sapwood anatomical characteristics and internal water storage in four canopy tree species of a seasonally dry tropical forest in Panama. Anatomical characteristics of the wood and radial profiles of sap flow were measured at the base, upper trunk, and crown of a single...

  6. On the history of a stochastic ansatz for solving the transport equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, M.M.R.

    2010-01-01

    A very useful approximate tool for understanding the role of random material properties on solutions of the transport equation is described and its historical derivation given. The development of this stochastic tool, from its introduction by Randall, to its use in describing current problems involving dichotomic or pseudo-dichotomic Markov processes is discussed.

  7. Solving the two-dimensional stationary transport equation with the aid of the nodal method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mesina, M.

    1976-07-01

    In this document the two-dimensional stationary transport equation for the geometry of a fuel assembly or for a system of square boxes has been formulated as an algebraic eigenvalue problem, and the solution was achieved with the computer code NODE 2 which was developed for this purpose. (orig.) [de

  8. Forest residue baling due diligence assessment, proving and transport trials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    Transport is known to be the most significant cost element to wood fuel supply cost, with the cost of comminution being the most variable depending on the method chosen. It has been shown in previous studies that wood fuel compaction in the form of compression can significantly increase the net load capability of the transport systems currently available, thereby leading to significant savings in delivered price. The study identified the Fiberpac residue compression machine suitable for use under UK conditions. The Fiberpac machine was trialled for a period of approximately 6 months to gain information on productivity, reliability and production costs. (author)

  9. Applying the response matrix method for solving coupled neutron diffusion and transport problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sibiya, G.S.

    1980-01-01

    The numerical determination of the flux and power distribution in the design of large power reactors is quite a time-consuming procedure if the space under consideration is to be subdivided into very fine weshes. Many computing methods applied in reactor physics (such as the finite-difference method) require considerable computing time. In this thesis it is shown that the response matrix method can be successfully used as an alternative approach to solving the two-dimension diffusion equation. Furthermore it is shown that sufficient accuracy of the method is achieved by assuming a linear space dependence of the neutron currents on the boundaries of the geometries defined for the given space. (orig.) [de

  10. Transmission probability method based on triangle meshes for solving unstructured geometry neutron transport problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Hongchun [Nuclear Engineering Department, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049, Shaanxi (China)]. E-mail: hongchun@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Liu Pingping [Nuclear Engineering Department, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049, Shaanxi (China); Zhou Yongqiang [Nuclear Engineering Department, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049, Shaanxi (China); Cao Liangzhi [Nuclear Engineering Department, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049, Shaanxi (China)

    2007-01-15

    In the advanced reactor, the fuel assembly or core with unstructured geometry is frequently used and for calculating its fuel assembly, the transmission probability method (TPM) has been used widely. However, the rectangle or hexagon meshes are mainly used in the TPM codes for the normal core structure. The triangle meshes are most useful for expressing the complicated unstructured geometry. Even though finite element method and Monte Carlo method is very good at solving unstructured geometry problem, they are very time consuming. So we developed the TPM code based on the triangle meshes. The TPM code based on the triangle meshes was applied to the hybrid fuel geometry, and compared with the results of the MCNP code and other codes. The results of comparison were consistent with each other. The TPM with triangle meshes would thus be expected to be able to apply to the two-dimensional arbitrary fuel assembly.

  11. Transport control of forest fuels by fleet manager, mobile terminals and GPS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sikanen, Lauri; Asikainen, Antti; Lehikoinen, Mikko

    2005-01-01

    Chip transportation is undertaken by private transportation enterprises that are contracted by a larger wood fuel trader. Compared with industrial roundwood supply the volumes and value of wood fuel supply are markedly lower. As a result, the possibilities to invest in information systems for transport management are limited. New portable, wireless communication techniques and internet-based systems for fleet management enable more cost-efficient control systems with low investment costs in hard and software and also low operating costs. Mobile handsets with GPS, digital road map display and global positioning systems (GPS) or general purpose radio service data transfer protocol can be used as mobile terminals in chippers and trucks. In addition, transport management personnel can use them to locate in-forest wood fuel storage piles into the map database as well as point suitable routing to the storage piles. In a pilot study, conducted in Central Finland, an internet based management tool, Arbonaut Fleet ManagerTM, was tailored for forest fuel supply chain management and trailed for three months. It was found that use of mobile handsets with GPS and map display assisted especially in exact location of in-forest wood fuel storage piles by managers. They assisted also trucks and chippers in navigation to storages and landings, but the screen was too small for reading during driving. The management system was found helpful in stock accounting and GPS-based vehicle tracking gave transportation distances directly for invoicing

  12. Are double trailers cost effective for transporting forest biomass on steep terrain?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rene Zamora-Cristales

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Transportation of forest biomass on steep terrain involves logistical challenges. Trucks with large single trailers are often unable to travel on forest roads due to their narrowness, tight curves, adverse grades and limited areas to turn around. A shorter trailer must be used but then transportation capacity is limited by the trailer volume due to the low bulk density of the processed biomass, particularly when the biomass is dry. With double trailers, transportation capacity can be limited by allowable legal weight based on axle number and spacing. We developed a simulation model that explores the economic feasibility of using double-trailer configurations to transport forest biomass to a bioenergy facility from the grinder at a landing or from a centralized yard in Washington, Oregon and California. Results show that double trailers can be a cost effective alternative to single trailers under limited conditions in Oregon and Washington, but they are not a competitive option in California due to the state's transportation regulations.

  13. Discrete energy formulation of neutron transport theory applied to solving the discrete ordinates equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ching, J.; Oblow, E.M.; Goldstein, H.

    1976-01-01

    An algebraic equivalence between the point-energy and multigroup forms of the Boltzmann transport equation is demonstrated that allows the development of a discrete energy, discrete ordinates method for the solution of radiation transport problems. In the discrete energy method, the group averaging required in the cross-section processing for multigroup calculations is replaced by a faster numerical quadrature scheme capable of generating transfer cross sections describing all the physical processes of interest on a fine point-energy grid. Test calculations in which the discrete energy method is compared with the multigroup method show that, for the same energy grid, the discrete energy method is much faster, although somewhat less accurate, than the multigroup method. However, the accuracy of the discrete energy method increases rapidly as the spacing between energy grid points is decreased, approaching that of multigroup calculations. For problems requiring great detail in the energy spectrum, the discrete energy method is therefore expected to be far more economical than the multigroup technique for equivalent accuracy solutions. This advantage of the point method is demonstrated by application to the study of neutron transport in a thick iron slab

  14. Logistics of long-distance truck transportation of forest chips; Metsaehakkeen autokuljetuksen logistiikka - PUUT20

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ranta, T.; Halonen, P.; Frilander, P. [VTT Processes, Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Asikainen, A. [Finnish Forest Research Centre, Joensuu (Finland); Lehikoinen, M.; Vaeaetaeinen, K. [Joensuu Univ. (Finland)

    2002-07-01

    The objective of the project was to develop the long-distance transportation of forest chips by means of better transport economy and control of logistics activities. Different loading methods were tested to make the load sufficiently compact and to intensify the use of load space of the chip trucks. The usability of mobile positioning devices was tested in the operational environment of forest chips procurement. The arrivals and inbound logistics activities of power plant were modeled by aid of simulation model to estimate the queuing time of chip trucks with alternative course of action. According to the follow-up study of chip trucks and simulation of receiving activities substantial developing potential was found to decrease the terminal 1.19 times of trucks both in loading stage at forest terminal and unloading stage at power plant receiving area. By trucks with interchangeable containers terminal times can be decreased by developing the logistics of production chain for example by means of the pilot production control system evaluated in the project or by dimensioning the capacity of whole chain to match better for prevailing operational environment. With shorter distances the number of containers or the trailer size can be designed for smaller volume whereas with longer distances the transport economy will be emphasized. The capacity of weight limited the load size except for summer period alongside with dry forest chips. Instead of maximize the load volume, more essential will be to decrease the unloaded weight and effectiveness of loading and unloading stage. Loading method, where belt conveyor was equipped with mechanical ejector, compressed the load some 15% compared with blowing device. The energy consumption was also essentially lower. The pilot-period of production control system showed that the mobile positioning devices and digital maps will improve the planning and control activities of forest chip production. When the procurement amounts of forest

  15. Characteristics of Sediment Transportation in Two Contrasting Oak Forested Watersheds in the Lesser Central Himalaya, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qazi, N. U. Q.; Bruijnzeel, S., Sr.; Rai, S. P., Sr.

    2015-12-01

    Sediment transfer from mountainous areas to lowland areas is one of the most important geomorphological processes globally with the bulk of the sediment yield from such areas typically deriving from mass wastage processes. This study presents monthly, seasonal and annual variations in sediment transport (both suspended load and bedload) as well as dissolved loads over three consecutive water years (2008-2011) for two small forested watersheds with contrasting levels of forest disturbance in the Lesser Himalaya of Northwest India. Seasonal and annual suspended sediment yields were strongly influenced by amounts of rainfall and streamflow and showed a 10-63 fold range between wet and dry years. Of the annual load, some 93% was produced on average during the monsoon season (June-September). Sediment production by the disturbed forest catchment was 1.9-fold (suspended sediment) to 5.9-fold (bedload) higher than that for the well-stocked forest catchment. By contrast, dissolved loads varied much less between years, seasons (although minimal during the dry summer season), and degree of forest disturbance. Total mechanical denudation rates were 1.6 times and 4.6 times larger than chemical denudation rates for the little disturbed and the heavily disturbed forest catchment, respectively whereas overall denudation rates were estimated at 0.69 and 1.04 mm per 1000 years, respectively.

  16. Progress in Solving the Elusive Ag Transport Mechanism in TRISO Coated Particles: What is new?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isabella Van Rooyen

    2014-10-01

    The TRISO particle for HTRs has been developed to an advanced state where the coating withstands internal gas pressures and retains fission products during irradiation and under postulated accidents. However, one exception is Ag that has been found to be released from high quality TRISO coated particles when irradiated and can also during high temperature accident heating tests. Although out- of- pile laboratory tests have never hither to been able to demonstrate a diffusion process of Ag in SiC, effective diffusion coefficients have been derived to successfully reproduce measured Ag-110m releases from irradiated HTR fuel elements, compacts and TRISO particles It was found that silver transport through SiC does not proceed via bulk volume diffusion. Presently grain boundary diffusion that may be irradiation enhanced either by neutron bombardment or by the presence of fission products such as Pd, are being investigated. Recent studies of irradiated AGR-1 TRISO fuel using scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), transmission kukuchi diffraction (TKD) patterns and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) have been used to further the understanding of Ag transport through TRISO particles. No silver was observed in SiC grains, but Ag was identified at triple-points and grain boundaries of the SiC layer in the TRISO particle. Cadmium was also found in some of the very same triple junctions, but this could be related to silver behavior as Ag-110m decays to Cd-110. Palladium was identified as the main constituent of micron-sized precipitates present at the SiC grain boundaries and in most SiC grain boundaries and the potential role of Pd in the transport of Ag will be discussed.

  17. A Novel Algorithm for Solving the Multidimensional Neutron Transport Equation on Massively Parallel Architectures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azmy, Yousry

    2014-06-10

    We employ the Integral Transport Matrix Method (ITMM) as the kernel of new parallel solution methods for the discrete ordinates approximation of the within-group neutron transport equation. The ITMM abandons the repetitive mesh sweeps of the traditional source iterations (SI) scheme in favor of constructing stored operators that account for the direct coupling factors among all the cells' fluxes and between the cells' and boundary surfaces' fluxes. The main goals of this work are to develop the algorithms that construct these operators and employ them in the solution process, determine the most suitable way to parallelize the entire procedure, and evaluate the behavior and parallel performance of the developed methods with increasing number of processes, P. The fastest observed parallel solution method, Parallel Gauss-Seidel (PGS), was used in a weak scaling comparison with the PARTISN transport code, which uses the source iteration (SI) scheme parallelized with the Koch-baker-Alcouffe (KBA) method. Compared to the state-of-the-art SI-KBA with diffusion synthetic acceleration (DSA), this new method- even without acceleration/preconditioning-is completitive for optically thick problems as P is increased to the tens of thousands range. For the most optically thick cells tested, PGS reduced execution time by an approximate factor of three for problems with more than 130 million computational cells on P = 32,768. Moreover, the SI-DSA execution times's trend rises generally more steeply with increasing P than the PGS trend. Furthermore, the PGS method outperforms SI for the periodic heterogeneous layers (PHL) configuration problems. The PGS method outperforms SI and SI-DSA on as few as P = 16 for PHL problems and reduces execution time by a factor of ten or more for all problems considered with more than 2 million computational cells on P = 4.096.

  18. Avian influenza surveillance with FTA cards: field methods, biosafety, and transportation issues solved.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Robert H S; van Hooft, Pim; Waldenström, Jonas; Latorre-Margalef, Neus; Ydenberg, Ronald C; Prins, Herbert H T

    2011-08-02

    Avian Influenza Viruses (AIVs) infect many mammals, including humans(1). These AIVs are diverse in their natural hosts, harboring almost all possible viral subtypes(2). Human pandemics of flu originally stem from AIVs(3). Many fatal human cases during the H5N1 outbreaks in recent years were reported. Lately, a new AIV related strain swept through the human population, causing the 'swine flu epidemic'(4). Although human trading and transportation activity seems to be responsible for the spread of highly pathogenic strains(5), dispersal can also partly be attributed to wild birds(6, 7). However, the actual reservoir of all AIV strains is wild birds. In reaction to this and in face of severe commercial losses in the poultry industry, large surveillance programs have been implemented globally to collect information on the ecology of AIVs, and to install early warning systems to detect certain highly pathogenic strains(8-12). Traditional virological methods require viruses to be intact and cultivated before analysis. This necessitates strict cold chains with deep freezers and heavy biosafety procedures to be in place during transport. Long-term surveillance is therefore usually restricted to a few field stations close to well equipped laboratories. Remote areas cannot be sampled unless logistically cumbersome procedures are implemented. These problems have been recognised(13, 14) and the use of alternative storage and transport strategies investigated (alcohols or guanidine)(15-17). Recently, Kraus et al.(18) introduced a method to collect, store and transport AIV samples, based on a special filter paper. FTA cards(19) preserve RNA on a dry storage basis(20) and render pathogens inactive upon contact(21). This study showed that FTA cards can be used to detect AIV RNA in reverse-transcription PCR and that the resulting cDNA could be sequenced and virus genes and determined. In the study of Kraus et al.(18) a laboratory isolate of AIV was used, and samples were handled

  19. Approximate method for solving the velocity dependent transport equation in a slab lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrari, A.

    1966-01-01

    A method is described that is intended to provide an approximate solution of the transport equation in a medium simulating a water-moderated plate filled reactor core. This medium is constituted by a periodic array of water channels and absorbing plates. The velocity dependent transport equation in slab geometry is included. The computation is performed in a water channel: the absorbing plates are accounted for by the boundary conditions. The scattering of neutrons in water is assumed isotropic, which allows the use of a double Pn approximation to deal with the angular dependence. This method is able to represent the discontinuity of the angular distribution at the channel boundary. The set of equations thus obtained is dependent only on x and v and the coefficients are independent on x. This solution suggests to try solutions involving Legendre polynomials. This scheme leads to a set of equations v dependent only. To obtain an explicit solution, a thermalization model must now be chosen. Using the secondary model of Cadilhac a solution of this set is easy to get. The numerical computations were performed with a particular secondary model, the well-known model of Wigner and Wilkins. (author) [fr

  20. Production and Transport of Ozone From Boreal Forest Fires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasick, David; Liu, Jane; Osman, Mohammed; Sioris, Christopher; Liu, Xiong; Najafabadi, Omid; Parrington, Mark; Palmer, Paul; Strawbridge, Kevin; Duck, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    In the summer of 2010, the BORTAS (Quantifying the impact of BOReal forest fires on Tropospheric oxidants over the Atlantic using Aircraft and Satellites) mission was planned by several universities and government agencies in the United Kingdom, Canada, and USA. Nearly 100 ozone soundings were made at 13 stations through the BORTAS Intensive Sounding Network, although aircraft measurements were unfortunately cancelled due to the volcanic eruption in Iceland. 2010 was actually an exceptional year for Canadian boreal fires. MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) fire count data shows large fire events in Saskatchewan on several days in July. High amounts of NO2 close to the large fires are observed from OMI satellite data, indicating that not all NO2 is converted to PAN. Also associated with the fires, large amounts of CO, another precursor of ozone, are observed in MOPITT (Measurements Of Pollution In The Troposphere), AIRS and TES (Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer) satellite data in the middle to upper troposphere. These chemical conditions combined with sunny weather all favour ozone production. Following days with large fire activity, layers of elevated ozone mixing ratio (over 100 ppbv) are observed downwind at several sites. Back-trajectories suggest the elevated ozone in the profile is traceable to the fires in Saskatchewan. Lidar profiles also detect layers of aerosol at the same heights. However, the layers of high ozone are also associated with low humidity, which is not expected from a combustion source, and suggests the possibility of entrainment of stratospheric air.

  1. Solving the multigroup adjoint transport equations using the method of cyclic characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assawaroongruengchot, M.; Marleau, G. [Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, Inst. de genie nucleaire, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)]. E-mail: monchai.assawar@polymtl.ca

    2005-07-01

    The adjoint transport solution algorithm based on the method of cyclic characteristics (MOCC) is developed for the heterogeneous 2D geometries. The adjoint characteristics equation associated with a cyclic tracking line is formulated, then a closed form for adjoint angular flux can be determined. The acceleration techniques are implemented using the group-reduction and group-splitting techniques. To demonstrate the efficacy of the algorithm, the calculations are performed on the 37 pin CANDU cell and on the Watanabe-Maynard benchmark problem. Comparisons of adjoint flux and k{sub eff} results obtained by MOCC and collision probability (CP) methods are performed. The mathematical relationship between pseudo-adjoint flux obtained by CP method and adjoint flux by MOCC method is presented. (author)

  2. Solving the multigroup adjoint transport equations using the method of cyclic characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assawaroongruengchot, M.; Marleau, G.

    2005-01-01

    The adjoint transport solution algorithm based on the method of cyclic characteristics (MOCC) is developed for the heterogeneous 2D geometries. The adjoint characteristics equation associated with a cyclic tracking line is formulated, then a closed form for adjoint angular flux can be determined. The acceleration techniques are implemented using the group-reduction and group-splitting techniques. To demonstrate the efficacy of the algorithm, the calculations are performed on the 37 pin CANDU cell and on the Watanabe-Maynard benchmark problem. Comparisons of adjoint flux and k eff results obtained by MOCC and collision probability (CP) methods are performed. The mathematical relationship between pseudo-adjoint flux obtained by CP method and adjoint flux by MOCC method is presented. (author)

  3. DATA MINING WORKSPACE AS AN OPTIMIZATION PREDICTION TECHNIQUE FOR SOLVING TRANSPORT PROBLEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasiia KUPTCOVA

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This article addresses the study related to forecasting with an actual high-speed decision making under careful modelling of time series data. The study uses data-mining modelling for algorithmic optimization of transport goals. Our finding brings to the future adequate techniques for the fitting of a prediction model. This model is going to be used for analyses of the future transaction costs in the frontiers of the Czech Republic. Time series prediction methods for the performance of prediction models in the package of Statistics are Exponential, ARIMA and Neural Network approaches. The primary target for a predictive scenario in the data mining workspace is to provide modelling data faster and with more versatility than the other management techniques.

  4. The discrete ordinates method for solving the azimuthally dependent transport equation in plane geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chalhoub, Ezzat Selim

    1997-01-01

    The method of discrete ordinates is applied to the solution of the slab albedo problem with azimuthal dependence in transport theory. A new set of quadratures appropriate to the problem is introduced. In addition to the ANISN code, modified to include the proposed formalism, two new programs, PEESNC and PEESNA, which were created on the basis of the discrete ordinates formalism, using the direct integration method and the analytic solution method respectively, are used in the generation of results for a few sample problems. Program PEESNC was created to validate the results obtained with the discrete ordinates method and the finite difference approximation (ANISN), while program PEESNA was developed in order to implement an analytical discrete ordinates formalism, which provides more accurate results. The obtained results for selected sample problems are compared with highly accurate numerical results published in the literature. Compared to ANISN and PEESNC, program PEESNA presents a greater efficiency in execution time and much more precise numerical results. (author)

  5. Solving the traffic assignment problem using real data for a segment of Medellin's transportation network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alberto González Calderón

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo está basado en datos obtenidos en los más recientes estudios de transporte que se han realizado en el Área Metropolitana del Valle de Aburrá. (Medellín y otros 9 municipios. Estos estudios fueron la Encuesta Origen Destino (2005, análisis de las rutas de buses (2005 y el Plan Maestro de Movilidad (2006. En el artículo se explica el proceso utilizado para el desarrollo de una aplicación informática para resolver el problema determinístico de equilibrio de usuario en la red vial de Medellín. El código fue construido usando Visual Basic.NET ® y Microsoft Excel ® para la ejecución de algunas operaciones en un segmento de la red vial de Medellín. La distribución del flujo del equilibrio de usuario fue encontrada usando el algoritmo de Frank-Wolfe y fueron analizados algunos aspectos tales como número de iteraciones, patrones de convergencia, tiempo de respuesta y cambios en la demanda de viajes en la red. Los modelos de asignación del tránsito fueron analizados para las horas pico de la tarde. Se compararon los resultados de la asignación del tránsito del algoritmo desarrollado en este trabajo con los resultados de TransCAD ® para los datos del 2005 y fue encontrado que el software es un poco más rápido que el algoritmo, pero sin embargo éste último puede ser una buena herramienta para profesionales y estudiantes para la modelación de redes pequeñas.

  6. Radionuclides deposition and fine sediment transport in a forested watershed, central Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, S.; Gomi, T.; Kato, H.; Tesfaye, T.; Onda, Y.

    2011-12-01

    We investigated radionuclides deposition and fine sediment transport in a 13 ha headwater watershed, Tochigi prefecture, located in 98.94 km north of Tokyo. The study site was within Karasawa experimental forest, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology. We conducted fingerprinting approach, based on the activities of fallout radionuclides, including caesium-134 (Cs-134) caesium-137 (Cs-137) and excess lead-210 (Pb-210ex). For indentifying specific sources of fine sediment, we sampled tree, soil on forested floor, soil on logging road surface, stream bed and stream banks. We investigated the radionuclides (i.e., as Cs-134, Cs-137 and Pb-210ex) deposition on tree after accident of nuclear power plants on March 11, 2011. We sampled fruits, leaves, branches, stems, barks on Japanese cedar (Sugi) and Japanese cypress (Hinoki). To analyze the samples, gammaray spectrometry was performed at a laboratory at the University of Tsukuba (Tsukuba City, Japan) using n-type coaxial low-energy HPGe gamma detectors (EGC-200-R and EGC25-195-R of EURYSIS Co., Lingolsheim, France) coupled with a multichannel analyzer. We also collected soil samples under the forest canopy in various soil depths from 2, 5, 10, 20, 30 cm along transect of hillslopes. Samples at forest road were collected road segments crossing on the middle section of monitoring watersheds. Fine sediment transport in the streams were collected at the outlet of 13 ha watersheds using integrated suspended sediment samplers. This study indicates the some portion of radio nuclide potentially remained on the tree surface. Part of the deposited radionuclides attached to soil particles and transported to the streams. Most of the fine sediment can be transported on road surface and/or near stream side (riparian zones).

  7. Analysis of a HP-refinement method for solving the neutron transport equation using two error estimators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fournier, D.; Le Tellier, R.; Suteau, C.; Herbin, R.

    2011-01-01

    The solution of the time-independent neutron transport equation in a deterministic way invariably consists in the successive discretization of the three variables: energy, angle and space. In the SNATCH solver used in this study, the energy and the angle are respectively discretized with a multigroup approach and the discrete ordinate method. A set of spatial coupled transport equations is obtained and solved using the Discontinuous Galerkin Finite Element Method (DGFEM). Within this method, the spatial domain is decomposed into elements and the solution is approximated by a hierarchical polynomial basis in each one. This approach is time and memory consuming when the mesh becomes fine or the basis order high. To improve the computational time and the memory footprint, adaptive algorithms are proposed. These algorithms are based on an error estimation in each cell. If the error is important in a given region, the mesh has to be refined (h−refinement) or the polynomial basis order increased (p−refinement). This paper is related to the choice between the two types of refinement. Two ways to estimate the error are compared on different benchmarks. Analyzing the differences, a hp−refinement method is proposed and tested. (author)

  8. Comparative analyses of forest fuels in a life cycle perspective with a focus on transport systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eriksson, Lisa Naeslund [Ecotechnology, Department of Engineering, Physics and Mathematics, Mid Sweden University, SE-831 25 Oestersund (Sweden)

    2008-08-15

    Local, national and international transportation of forest fuels with regard to costs, primary energy use and CO{sub 2} emission was analysed. The main issue was the extent to which both mode and distance of transport affect the monetary cost, CO{sub 2} emission and primary energy use arising from the use of various types of forest residues for energy purpose. Local applications proved the most efficient options of those studied. Chipping of bundles at a terminal, for transport by rail and sea to national or international end-users, has low costs and produces only modest CO{sub 2} emissions. For the pellet options, the cost is about the same as for chipping, but require more primary energy and emit more CO{sub 2}. The traditional chipping system is more expensive than the other options. The costs of the international options over a transport distance of 1100 km vary between 21 and 28 EUR{sub 2007}/MWh, whereas pellet options cost between 22 and 25 EUR{sub 2007}/MWh. The primary energy required for transport of logging residues vis-a-vis pellets falls in the range 4-7% and 2-4%, respectively, of the bio-energy delivered. The primary energy needed to produce pellets gives them a lower fossil fuel substitution rate per hectare, compared with bundle systems. Similarly, for chip systems vis-a-vis bundle systems, the biomass delivered to the conversion plant is reduced by the greater physical dry-matter losses entailed by chipping systems in the forest-fuel chain. (author)

  9. Study of a method to solve the one speed, three dimensional transport equation using the finite element method and the associated Legendre function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, A.

    1991-01-01

    A method to solve three dimensional neutron transport equation and it is based on the original work suggested by J.K. Fletcher (42, 43). The angular dependence of the flux is approximated by associated Legendre functions and the finite element method is applied to the space components is presented. When the angular flux, the scattering cross section and the neutrons source are expanded in associated Legendre functions, the first order neutron transport equation is reduced to a coupled set of second order diffusion like equations. These equations are solved in an iterative way by the finite element method to the moments. (author)

  10. Forest-derived methane in the Swedish transport sector: A closing window?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lönnqvist, Tomas; Grönkvist, Stefan; Sandberg, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Forest-derived methane could complement biogas from anaerobic digestion as a transport fuel. The conditions for a systemic transition have been analyzed in this article. The analysis contains three blocks: the vehicle gas development, the policy framework, and commercial projects to produce methane from forest biomass. The results reveal that several conditions for a systemic transition are in place. There is established infrastructure for feedstock supply and biofuels distribution. Infrastructure development is an important albeit not determining factor. Private and public actors have advanced plans for commercial scale plants, technological know-how, and experience from a demonstration plant. However, a major barrier for a systemic transition is the low predictability of Swedish policy instruments. The Swedish government is not free to design policy instruments but must consider compatibility with the EU framework and has changed the energy tax on biofuels several times to avoid overcompensation according to the EU regulation. This has contributed to the low predictability. The interviewees have suggested several concrete policy instruments. However, they have also emphasized that the exact design of the policy instruments is less important than the predictability of the support. - Highlights: • Forest-derived methane may complement biogas from anaerobic digestion in transport. • There are infrastructure and industrial actors ready for a commercial introduction. • The predictability of Swedish policy instruments is perceived as very low. • Compatibility with EU framework constrains Swedish policy instruments design.

  11. Numerical modeling of watershed-scale radiocesium transport coupled with biogeochemical cycling in forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, K.; Tada, K.; Tawara, Y.; Tosaka, H.; Ohno, K.; Asami, M.; Kosaka, K.

    2015-12-01

    Since the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident, intensive monitoring and modeling works on radionuclide transfer in environment have been carried out. Although Cesium (Cs) concentration has been attenuating due to both physical and environmental half-life (i.e., wash-off by water and sediment), the attenuation rate depends clearly on the type of land use and land cover. In the Fukushima case, studying the migration in forest land use is important for predicting the long-term behavior of Cs because most of the contaminated region is covered by forests. Atmospheric fallout is characterized by complicated behavior in biogeochemical cycle in forests which can be described by biotic/abiotic interactions between many components. In developing conceptual and mathematical model on Cs transfer in forest ecosystem, defining the dominant components and their interactions are crucial issues (BIOMASS, 1997-2001). However, the modeling of fate and transport in geosphere after Cs exports from the forest ecosystem is often ignored. An integrated watershed modeling for simulating spatiotemporal redistribution of Cs that includes the entire region from source to mouth and surface to subsurface, has been recently developed. Since the deposited Cs can migrate due to water and sediment movement, the different species (i.e., dissolved and suspended) and their interactions are key issues in the modeling. However, the initial inventory as source-term was simplified to be homogeneous and time-independent, and biogeochemical cycle in forests was not explicitly considered. Consequently, it was difficult to evaluate the regionally-inherent characteristics which differ according to land uses, even if the model was well calibrated. In this study, we combine the different advantages in modeling of forest ecosystem and watershed. This enable to include more realistic Cs deposition and time series of inventory can be forced over the land surface. These processes are integrated

  12. Freight transportation and the potential for invasions of exotic insects in urban and periurban forests of the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuel Colunga-Garcia; Robert A. Haack; Adesoji O. Adelaja

    2009-01-01

    Freight transportation is an important pathway for the introduction and dissemination of exotic forest insects (EFI). Identifying the final destination of imports is critical in determining the likelihood of EFI establishment. We analyzed the use of regional freight transport information to characterize risk of urban and periurban areas to EFI introductions. Specifc...

  13. The use of radiocarbon to constrain current and future soil organic matter turnover and transport in a temperate forest

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braakhekke, M.C.; Beer, C.; Schrumpf, M.; Ahrens, B.; Hoosbeek, M.R.; Kruijt, B.; Kabat, P.; Reichstein, M.; Ekici, A.

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the merits of radiocarbon measurements for estimating soil organic matter (SOM) turnover and vertical transport for a temperate deciduous forest in Germany. Eleven parameters, defining decomposition and transport in the soil carbon model SOMPROF, were estimated using a Bayesian

  14. Transporting dynamics of radioactive cesium in a forest ecosystem and its discharge processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iseda, Kohei; Ohte, Nobuhito; Tanoi, Keitaro; Endo, Izuki; Oda, Tomoki; Kato, Hiroyu [Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Sciences, University of Tokyo (Japan)

    2014-07-01

    A lot of radioactive substance including {sup 137}Cs, {sup 134}Cs fell out to Tohoku and Kanto region in particular Fukushima prefecture after the accident of Fukushima-daiichi nuclear power plant. Generally, cesium tends to attach to clay particle and organic matter. These clay particle and organic matter can potentially flow out from the forest through the river to the downstream not only as particulate matter but also dissolved matter. It is likely that behavior of cesium is similar to sediment locomotion. The objective of this study is to understand transporting dynamics of radioactive cesium inside and outside of the forest. We started investigations on transporting dynamics of cesium in the forest upper stream of Kami-Oguni river in Date city Fukushima prefecture located in about 50 km from the nuclear power plant since July 2012. We conducted river water sampling at 9 points along the river from the uppermost stream to the middle reaches during low flow condition once a month. We also sampled river water during storm event for 5 times in order to capture the change of {sup 137}Cs concentration in a flood stage. Samples were filtered and separated into particulate and dissolved matters using glass micro-fiber filters (GF/F). Samples were analyzed their {sup 137}Cs concentration by Germanium semiconductor detector at University of Tokyo. During low flow condition, {sup 137}Cs was detected only a very small amount both in particulate and dissolved matters. In contrast, during high flow condition, {sup 137}Cs was detected about 10-100 times higher than that of during low flow condition in particulate matter. We estimated discharge flux of {sup 137}Cs from the forest using the relations between water discharge and {sup 137}Cs concentration. It was 0.977 Bq/(m2 day ) (2012/8/31-2013/4/19). In the forest, we set 2 deciduous tree plots (Quercus serrata, Zelkova serrata and so on) and 1 evergreen confer plot (Cyptomeria japonica). Atmospheric depositions of {sup 137

  15. Forests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melin, J.

    1997-01-01

    Forests have the capacity to trap and retain radionuclides for a substantial period of time. The dynamic behaviour of nutrients, pollution and radionuclides in forests is complex. The rotation period of a forest stand in the Nordic countries is about 100 years, whilst the time for decomposition of organic material in a forest environment can be several hundred years. This means that any countermeasure applied in the forest environment must have an effect for several decades, or be reapplied continuously for long periods of time. To mitigate the detrimental effect of a contaminated forest environment on man, and to minimise the economic loss in trade of contaminated forest products, it is necessary to understand the mechanisms of transfer of radionuclides through the forest environment. It must also be stressed that any countermeasure applied in the forest environment must be evaluated with respect to long, as well as short term, negative effects, before any decision about remedial action is taken. Of the radionuclides studied in forests in the past, radiocaesium has been the main contributor to dose to man. In this document, only radiocaesium will be discussed since data on the impact of other radionuclides on man are too scarce for a proper evaluation. (EG)

  16. VENTURE: a code block for solving multigroup neutronics problems applying the finite-difference diffusion-theory approximation to neutron transport, version II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vondy, D.R.; Fowler, T.B.; Cunningham, G.W.

    1977-11-01

    The report documents the computer code block VENTURE designed to solve multigroup neutronics problems with application of the finite-difference diffusion-theory approximation to neutron transport (or alternatively simple P 1 ) in up to three-dimensional geometry. It uses and generates interface data files adopted in the cooperative effort sponsored by the Reactor Physics Branch of the Division of Reactor Research and Development of the Energy Research and Development Administration. Several different data handling procedures have been incorporated to provide considerable flexibility; it is possible to solve a wide variety of problems on a variety of computer configurations relatively efficiently

  17. VENTURE: a code block for solving multigroup neutronics problems applying the finite-difference diffusion-theory approximation to neutron transport, version II. [LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vondy, D.R.; Fowler, T.B.; Cunningham, G.W.

    1977-11-01

    The report documents the computer code block VENTURE designed to solve multigroup neutronics problems with application of the finite-difference diffusion-theory approximation to neutron transport (or alternatively simple P/sub 1/) in up to three-dimensional geometry. It uses and generates interface data files adopted in the cooperative effort sponsored by the Reactor Physics Branch of the Division of Reactor Research and Development of the Energy Research and Development Administration. Several different data handling procedures have been incorporated to provide considerable flexibility; it is possible to solve a wide variety of problems on a variety of computer configurations relatively efficiently.

  18. VENTURE: a code block for solving multigroup neutronics problems applying the finite-difference diffusion-theory approximation to neutron transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vondy, D.R.; Fowler, T.B.; Cunningham, G.W.

    1975-10-01

    The computer code block VENTURE, designed to solve multigroup neutronics problems with application of the finite-difference diffusion-theory approximation to neutron transport (or alternatively simple P 1 ) in up to three-dimensional geometry is described. A variety of types of problems may be solved: the usual eigenvalue problem, a direct criticality search on the buckling, on a reciprocal velocity absorber (prompt mode), or on nuclide concentrations, or an indirect criticality search on nuclide concentrations, or on dimensions. First-order perturbation analysis capability is available at the macroscopic cross section level

  19. Soil, plant, and transport influences on methane in a subalpine forest under high ultraviolet irradiance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Baer

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have demonstrated direct methane emission from plant foliage under aerobic conditions, particularly under high ultraviolet (UV irradiance. We examined the potential importance of this phenomenon in a high-elevation conifer forest using micrometeorological techniques. Vertical profiles of methane and carbon dioxide in forest air were monitored every 2 h for 6 weeks in summer 2007. Day to day variability in above-canopy CH4 was high, with observed values in the range 1790 to 1910 nmol mol−1. High CH4 was correlated with high carbon monoxide and related to wind direction, consistent with pollutant transport from an urban area by a well-studied mountain-plain wind system. Soils were moderately dry during the study. Vertical gradients of CH4 were small but detectable day and night, both near the ground and within the vegetation canopy. Gradients near the ground were consistent with the forest soil being a net CH4 sink. Using scalar similarity with CO2, the magnitude of the summer soil CH4 sink was estimated at ~1.7 mg CH4 m−2 h−1, which is similar to other temperate forest upland soils. The high-elevation forest was naturally exposed to high UV irradiance under clear sky conditions, with observed peak UVB irradiance >2 W m−2. Gradients and means of CO2 within the canopy under daytime conditions showed net uptake of CO2 due to photosynthetic drawdown as expected. No evidence was found for a significant foliar CH4 source in the vegetation canopy, even under high UV conditions. While the possibility of a weak foliar source cannot be excluded given the observed soil sink, overall this subalpine forest was a net sink for atmospheric methane during the growing season.

  20. Solving public passenger transportation problems: a need for policy reorientation. [Brokerage or consumer-oriented approach needed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, F.W. Jr.; Oen, K.

    1977-01-01

    Public transportation has declined because policymakers and outdated regulations have restricted the evolution of transportation systems which more closely reflect the mobility and lifestyles of today. Public policy needs to take a consumer-oriented approach to public transportation by recognizing that all consumers do not have the same transportation needs and that one or two modes of transportation cannot satisfy these needs. This report argues that if public transportation is to become an efficient method of satisfying the transportation needs of a community, a brokerage or consumer-oriented approach should be adopted. The transportation broker will match specific individual needs with a broad array of transportation services, and overcome institutional, legal, and operational barriers to the development of new forms of transportation service. 51 references or footnotes.

  1. Radionuclide transport along a boreal hill slope - elevated soil water concentrations in riparian forest soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lidman, Fredrik; Boily, Aasa; Laudon, Hjalmar [Dept. of Forest Ecology and Management, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, 901 83 Umeaa (Sweden); Koehler, Stephan J. [Dept. of Aquatic Sciences and Assessment, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, P.O. 7050, 750 07 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2014-07-01

    The transport of radionuclides from forest ecosystems and out into surface waters is a crucial process for understanding the long-term fate of radionuclides in the boreal landscape. Boreal forests are typically dominated by podzol soils, but the streams draining the forests are often lined by highly organic, often peat-like soils, which the radionuclides must pass through in order to reach the stream. This so-called riparian zone therefore represents a fundamentally different biogeochemical environment than ordinary forest soils, e.g. by exhibiting significantly lower pH and higher concentrations of organic colloids, which significantly can affect the mobility of many radionuclides. Since the riparian zone is the last terrestrial environment that the groundwater is in contact with before it enters the stream, previous research has demonstrated its profound impact on the stream water chemistry. Hence, the riparian soils should also be important for the transport and accumulation of radionuclides. Therefore, soil water was sampled using suction lysimeters installed at different depths along a 22 m long forested hill slope transect in northern Sweden, following the flow pathway of the groundwater from the uphill podzol to the riparian zone near the stream channel. The analyses included a wide range of hydrochemical parameters and many radiologically important elements, e.g. U, Th, Ni, C, Sr, Cs, REEs and Cl. The sampling was repeated ten times throughout a year in order to also capture the temporal variability of the soil water chemistry. The water chemistry of the investigated transect displayed a remarkable change as the groundwater approached the stream channel. Strongly increased concentrations of many elements were observed in the riparian soils. For instance, the concentrations of Th were more than 100 times higher than in the riparian zone than in the uphill forest, suggesting that the riparian zone may be a hotspot for radionuclide accumulation. The reason

  2. Aerosol dynamics within and above forest in relation to turbulent transport and dry deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ü. Rannik

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A 1-D atmospheric boundary layer (ABL model coupled with a detailed atmospheric chemistry and aerosol dynamical model, the model SOSAA, was used to predict the ABL and detailed aerosol population (characterized by the number size distribution time evolution. The model was applied over a period of 10 days in May 2013 to a pine forest site in southern Finland. The period was characterized by frequent new particle formation events and simultaneous intensive aerosol transformation. The aim of the study was to analyze and quantify the role of aerosol and ABL dynamics in the vertical transport of aerosols. It was of particular interest to what extent the fluxes above the canopy deviate from the particle dry deposition on the canopy foliage due to the above-mentioned processes. The model simulations revealed that the particle concentration change due to aerosol dynamics frequently exceeded the effect of particle deposition by even an order of magnitude or more. The impact was, however, strongly dependent on particle size and time. In spite of the fact that the timescale of turbulent transfer inside the canopy is much smaller than the timescales of aerosol dynamics and dry deposition, leading us to assume well-mixed properties of air, the fluxes at the canopy top frequently deviated from deposition inside the forest. This was due to transformation of aerosol concentration throughout the ABL and resulting complicated pattern of vertical transport. Therefore we argue that the comparison of timescales of aerosol dynamics and deposition defined for the processes below the flux measurement level do not unambiguously describe the importance of aerosol dynamics for vertical transport above the canopy. We conclude that under dynamical conditions reported in the current study the micrometeorological particle flux measurements can significantly deviate from the dry deposition into the canopy. The deviation can be systematic for certain size ranges so that the

  3. Influence of root-water-uptake parameterization on simulated heat transport in a structured forest soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Votrubova, Jana; Vogel, Tomas; Dohnal, Michal; Dusek, Jaromir

    2015-04-01

    Coupled simulations of soil water flow and associated transport of substances have become a useful and increasingly popular tool of subsurface hydrology. Quality of such simulations is directly affected by correctness of its hydraulic part. When near-surface processes under vegetation cover are of interest, appropriate representation of the root water uptake becomes essential. Simulation study of coupled water and heat transport in soil profile under natural conditions was conducted. One-dimensional dual-continuum model (S1D code) with semi-separate flow domains representing the soil matrix and the network of preferential pathways was used. A simple root water uptake model based on water-potential-gradient (WPG) formulation was applied. As demonstrated before [1], the WPG formulation - capable of simulating both the compensatory root water uptake (in situations when reduced uptake from dry layers is compensated by increased uptake from wetter layers), and the root-mediated hydraulic redistribution of soil water - enables simulation of more natural soil moisture distribution throughout the root zone. The potential effect on heat transport in a soil profile is the subject of the present study. [1] Vogel T., M. Dohnal, J. Dusek, J. Votrubova, and M. Tesar. 2013. Macroscopic modeling of plant water uptake in a forest stand involving root-mediated soil-water redistribution. Vadose Zone Journal, 12, 10.2136/vzj2012.0154. The research was supported by the Czech Science Foundation Project No. 14-15201J.

  4. Modelling Interactions between forest pest invasions and human decisions regarding firewood transport restrictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlow, Lee-Ann; Cecile, Jacob; Bauch, Chris T; Anand, Madhur

    2014-01-01

    The invasion of nonnative, wood-boring insects such as the Asian longhorned beetle (A. glabripennis) and the emerald ash borer (A. planipennis) is a serious ecological and economic threat to Canadian deciduous and mixed-wood forests. Humans act as a major vector for the spread of these pests via firewood transport, although existing models do not explicitly capture human decision-making regarding firewood transport. In this paper we present a two-patch coupled human-environment system model that includes social influence and long-distance firewood transport and examines potential strategies for mitigating pest spread. We found that increasing concern regarding infestations (f) significantly reduced infestation. Additionally it resulted in multiple thresholds at which the intensity of infestation in a patch was decreased. It was also found that a decrease in the cost of firewood purchased in the area where it is supposed to be burned (Cl) resulted in an increased proportion of local-firewood strategists, and a 67% decrease in Cl from $6.75 to $4.50 was sufficient to eliminate crosspatch infestation. These effects are synergistic: increasing concern through awareness and education campaigns acts together with reduced firewood costs, thereby reducing the required threshold of both awareness and economic incentives. Our results indicate that the best management strategy includes a combination of public education paired with firewood subsidization.

  5. Investigation of radioactive cesium transportation from forest canopy to floor by litterfall, stemflow and throughfall in northern Fukushima

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, I.; Ohte, N.; Iseda, K.; Tanoi, K.; Hirose, A.; Kobayashi, N. I.; Murakami, M.; Tokuchi, N.; Ohashi, M.

    2015-12-01

    After the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident due to Great East Japan Earthquake in March 11th 2011, large areas of forest have been highly contaminated by the radioactive nuclides. Most of the deposited radioactive material to the canopy is then washed out with rainfall or leaf fall due to the tree phenology. There have been studies showing that the amount of 137Cs transportation differs among litter components and water pathways, and was affected by seasonal variations. Thus, to evaluate the amount of 137Cs flux from canopy to forest floor, continuous monitoring of each component (litterfall, throughfall and stemflow) is required. We investigated the annual transfer of 137Cs from the forest canopy to the floor by litterfall, throughfall and stemflow at two different forest types in northern Fukushima after two years from the accident. Seasonal variations in 137Cs transportation and differences between forests types were also determined. Forest sites were set in the upstream part of Kami-Oguni River catchment at Date city, which locates approximately 50km northwest from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant. The study sites consisted of two deciduous (Mixed deciduous-1, Mixed deciduous-2) and one cedar (Cedar plantation) stands. The cumulative 137Cs transportation from the forest canopy to the floor was 6.6 kBq m-2 year-1 for the Mixed deciduous-1, 3.9 kBq m-2 year-1 for the Mixed deciduous-2 and 11.0 kBq m-2 year-1 for the Cedar plantation. 137Cs transportation with litterfall increased in the defoliation period which correlated with the increased amount of litterfall. 137Cs transportation with throughfall and stemflow increased in the rainy season. 137Cs flux by litterfall was higher in Cedar plantation compared with that of mixed deciduous forests, while the opposite result was obtained for stemflow. The ratio of annual 137Cs flux and the estimated 137Cs amount deposited in the forests will be discussed.

  6. Aerosol dynamics within and above forest in relation to turbulent transport and dry deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rannik, Üllar; Zhou, Luxi; Zhou, Putian

    2016-01-01

    of 10 days in May 2013 to a pine forest site in southern Finland. The period was characterized by frequent new particle formation events and simultaneous intensive aerosol transformation. The aim of the study was to analyze and quantify the role of aerosol and ABL dynamics in the vertical transport...... of aerosols. It was of particular interest to what extent the fluxes above the canopy deviate from the particle dry deposition on the canopy foliage due to the above-mentioned processes. The model simulations revealed that the particle concentration change due to aerosol dynamics frequently exceeded...... the effect of particle deposition by even an order of magnitude or more. The impact was, however, strongly dependent on particle size and time. In spite of the fact that the timescale of turbulent transfer inside the canopy is much smaller than the timescales of aerosol dynamics and dry deposition, leading...

  7. Water uptake and transport in lianas and co-occurring trees of a seasonally dry tropical forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    José Luis Andrade; Frederick C. Meinzer; Guillermo Goldstein; Stefan A. Schnitzer

    2005-01-01

    Water uptake and transport were studied in eight liana species in a seasonally dry tropical forest on Barro Colorado Island, Panama. Stable hydrogen isotope composition (δD) of xylem and soil water, soil volumetric water content (θv), and basal sap flow were measured during the 1997 and...

  8. Impact of Atmospheric Long Range Transport of Lead, Mercury and Cadmium on the Swedish Forest Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansson, K.; Bergbaeck, B.; Tyler, G.

    2001-01-01

    Emissions of Hg, Pb, and Cd to air are transported over wide areas in Europe and deposited far away from their sources. About 80% of the atmospheric deposition of these metals in south Sweden originate from emissions in other countries. As a result of the increased anthropogenic deposition the concentrations of Hg, Pb, and Cd in the morlayer of forest soils have increased considerably, mainly during the 20th century. Although the atmospheric deposition of these elements has declined during the most recent decades, the reduction of the input of Hg and Pb is not sufficient to prevent a further accumulation. The concentrations of Hg and Pb are still increasing by ca. 0.5and ca. 0.2% annually in the surface layer of forest soils.In contrast, the Cd concentration is currently decreasing in a large part of Sweden as a result of both deposition decreases and enhanced leaching induced by soil acidification. The accumulation factors of Hg and Pb, especially in the forest topsoils of south Sweden, are already above those at which adverse effects on soil biological processes and organisms have been demonstrated in studies of gradients from local emission sources and laboratory assessment. There are also indications of such effects at the current regional concentrations of Hg and Pbin mor layers from south Sweden, judging from observations in field and laboratory studies. There is an apparent risk of Pb induced reduction in microbial activity over parts of south Sweden. This might cause increased accumulation of organic matter and a reduced availability of soil nutrients. At current concentrations of Hg in Swedish forest soils,effects similar to those of Pb are likely. Increased concentrations of these elements in organs of mammals and birds have also been measured, though decreases have been demonstrated in recent years, related to changes in atmospheric deposition rates. As a result of current and past deposition in south Sweden, concentrations of Hg in fish have increased

  9. Wetland influence on mercury fate and transport in a temperate forested watershed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selvendiran, Pranesh [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY 13244 (United States)], E-mail: pselvend@syr.edu; Driscoll, Charles T. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY 13244 (United States)], E-mail: ctdrisco@syr.edu; Bushey, Joseph T. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY 13244 (United States)], E-mail: jtbushey@syr.edu; Montesdeoca, Mario R. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY 13244 (United States)], E-mail: mmontesd@syr.edu

    2008-07-15

    The transport and fate of mercury (Hg) was studied in two forest wetlands; a riparian peatland and an abandoned beaver meadow. The proportion of total mercury (THg) that was methyl mercury (% MeHg) increased from 2% to 6% from the upland inlets to the outlet of the wetlands. During the growing season, MeHg concentrations were approximately three times higher (0.27 ng/L) than values during the non-growing season (0.10 ng/L). Transport of Hg species was facilitated by DOC production as indicated by significant positive relations with THg and MeHg. Elevated concentrations of MeHg and % MeHg (as high as 70%) were found in pore waters of the riparian and beaver meadow wetlands. Groundwater interaction with the stream was limited at the riparian peatland due to the low hydraulic conductivity of the peat. The annual fluxes of THg and MeHg at the outlet of the watershed were 2.3 and 0.092 {mu}g/m{sup 2}-year respectively. - Wetlands are sources of THg and MeHg; the production of MeHg is seasonally dependent and driven by sulfate reduction in wetlands.

  10. Wetland influence on mercury fate and transport in a temperate forested watershed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selvendiran, Pranesh; Driscoll, Charles T.; Bushey, Joseph T.; Montesdeoca, Mario R.

    2008-01-01

    The transport and fate of mercury (Hg) was studied in two forest wetlands; a riparian peatland and an abandoned beaver meadow. The proportion of total mercury (THg) that was methyl mercury (% MeHg) increased from 2% to 6% from the upland inlets to the outlet of the wetlands. During the growing season, MeHg concentrations were approximately three times higher (0.27 ng/L) than values during the non-growing season (0.10 ng/L). Transport of Hg species was facilitated by DOC production as indicated by significant positive relations with THg and MeHg. Elevated concentrations of MeHg and % MeHg (as high as 70%) were found in pore waters of the riparian and beaver meadow wetlands. Groundwater interaction with the stream was limited at the riparian peatland due to the low hydraulic conductivity of the peat. The annual fluxes of THg and MeHg at the outlet of the watershed were 2.3 and 0.092 μg/m 2 -year respectively. - Wetlands are sources of THg and MeHg; the production of MeHg is seasonally dependent and driven by sulfate reduction in wetlands

  11. ANISN-L, a CDC-7600 code which solves the one-dimensional, multigroup, time dependent transport equation by the method of discrete ordinates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilcox, T. P.

    1973-09-20

    The code ANISN-L solves the one-dimensional, multigroup, time-independent Boltzmann transport equation by the method of discrete ordinates. In problems involving a fissionable system, it can calculate the system multiplication or alpha. In such cases, it is also capable of determining isotopic concentrations, radii, zone widths, or buckling in order to achieve a given multiplication or alpha. The code may also calculate fluxes caused by a specified fixed source. Neutron, gamma, and coupled neutron--gamma problems may be solved in either the forward or adjoint (backward) modes. Cross sections describing upscatter, as well as the usual downscatter, may be employed. This report describes the use of ANISN-L; this is a revised version of ANISN which handles both large and small problems efficiently on CDC-7600 computers. (RWR)

  12. Improving Transportation Services for the University of the Thai Chamber of Commerce: A Case Study on Solving the Mixed-Fleet Vehicle Routing Problem with Split Deliveries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suthikarnnarunai, N.; Olinick, E.

    2009-01-01

    We present a case study on the application of techniques for solving the Vehicle Routing Problem (VRP) to improve the transportation service provided by the University of The Thai Chamber of Commerce to its staff. The problem is modeled as VRP with time windows, split deliveries, and a mixed fleet. An exact algorithm and a heuristic solution procedure are developed to solve the problem and implemented in the AMPL modeling language and CPLEX Integer Programming solver. Empirical results indicate that the heuristic can find relatively good solutions in a small fraction of the time required by the exact method. We also perform sensitivity analysis and find that a savings in outsourcing cost can be achieved with a small increase in vehicle capacity.

  13. Using MOPITT data and a Chemistry and Transport Model to Investigate Injection Height of Plumes from Boreal Forest Fires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyer, E. J.; Allen, D. J.; Kasischke, E. S.; Warner, J. X.

    2003-12-01

    Trace gas emissions from boreal forest fires are a significant factor in atmospheric composition and its interannual variability. A number of recent observations of emissions plumes above individual fire events (Fromm and Servranckx, 2003; COBRA 2003; Lamarque et al., 2003; Wotawa and Trainer, 2000) suggest that vertical properties of forest fire emission plumes can be very different from fossil fuel emission plumes. Understanding and constraining the vertical properties of forest fire emission plumes and their injection into the atmosphere during fire events is critical for accurate modeling of atmospheric transport and chemistry. While excellent data have been collected in a handful of experiments on individual fire events, a systematic examination of the range of behavior observed in fire events has been hampered by the scarcity of vertical profiles of atmospheric composition. In this study, we used a high-resolution model of boreal forest fire emissions (Kasischke et al, in review) as input to the Goddard/UM CTM driven by the GEOS-3 DAS, operating at 2 by 2.5 degrees with 35 vertical levels. We modeled atmospheric injection and transport of CO emissions during the fire season of 2000 (May-September). We altered the parameters of the model to simulate a range of scenarios of plume injection, and compared the resulting output to the CO profiles from the MOPITT instrument. The results presented here pertain to the boreal forest, but our methods should be useful for atmospheric modelers hoping to more realistically model transport of emission plumes from biomass burning. References: COBRA2003: see http://www.fas.harvard.edu/~cobra/smoke_canada_030530.pdf Fromm, M. and R. Servranckx, 2003. "Stratospheric Injection of Forest Fire Emissions on August 4, 1998: A Satellite Image Analysis of the Causal Supercell Convection." Geophysical Research Abstracts 5:13118. Kasischke, E.S.; E.J. Hyer, N.H.F. French, A.I. Sukhinin, J.H. Hewson, B.J. Stocks, in review. "Carbon

  14. Methodology for solving the equation of transport ordered discrete TORT code in the reactor IPEN/MB-01; Metodologia para resolver la ecuacion del transporte con el codigo de Ordenadas Discretas TORT en el reactor IPEN/MB-01

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernal, A.; Abarca, A.; Barrachina, T.; Miro, R.; Verdu, G.

    2013-07-01

    The resolution of the neutron transport equation in steady state in pool-type nuclear reactors, is normally achieved through 2 different numerical methods: Monte Carlo (stochastic) and discrete ordinates (deterministic). The discrete ordinates method solves the neutron transport equation for a set of specific addresses, obtaining a set of equations and solutions for each direction, where the solution for each direction is the angular flux. With the aim of treating energy dependence, used energy multigroup approximation, thus obtaining a set of equations that depends on the number of energy groups considered.

  15. Modeling soil erosion and sediment transport from fires in forested watersheds of the South Carolina Piedmont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler Crumbley; Ge Sun; Steve McNulty

    2008-01-01

    Forested watersheds in the Southeastern U.S. provide high quality water vital to ecosystem integrity and downstream aquatic resources. Excessive sedimentation from human activities in forest streams is of concern to responsible land managers. Prescribed fire is a common treatment applied to Southeastern piedmont forests and the risk of wildfire is becoming increasingly...

  16. Modeling soil erosion and sediment transport from fires in forested watersheds of the South Carolina Piedmont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler Crumbley; Ge Sun; Steve McNulty

    2007-01-01

    Forested watersheds in the Southeastern U.S. provide high quality water vital to ecosystem integrity and downstream aquatic resources. Excessive sedimentation from human activities in forest streams is of concern to responsible land managers. Prescribed fire is a common treatment applied to Southeastern Piedmont forests and the risk of wildfire is becoming increasingly...

  17. Influence of forest road buffer zones on sediment transport in the Southern Appalachian Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnny M. Grace; Stanley J. Zarnoch

    2013-01-01

    A gap exists in the understanding of the effectiveness of forest road best management practices (BMP) in controlling sediment movement and minimizing risks of sediment delivery to forest streams. The objective of this paper is to report the findings of investigations to assess sediment travel distances downslope of forest roads in the Appalachian region, relate...

  18. A duality approach for solving bounded linear programming problems with fuzzy variables based on ranking functions and its application in bounded transportation problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimnejad, Ali

    2015-08-01

    There are several methods, in the literature, for solving fuzzy variable linear programming problems (fuzzy linear programming in which the right-hand-side vectors and decision variables are represented by trapezoidal fuzzy numbers). In this paper, the shortcomings of some existing methods are pointed out and to overcome these shortcomings a new method based on the bounded dual simplex method is proposed to determine the fuzzy optimal solution of that kind of fuzzy variable linear programming problems in which some or all variables are restricted to lie within lower and upper bounds. To illustrate the proposed method, an application example is solved and the obtained results are given. The advantages of the proposed method over existing methods are discussed. Also, one application of this algorithm in solving bounded transportation problems with fuzzy supplies and demands is dealt with. The proposed method is easy to understand and to apply for determining the fuzzy optimal solution of bounded fuzzy variable linear programming problems occurring in real-life situations.

  19. Some improvements in the discrete ordinate method of B.G. Carlson for solving the neutron transport equation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Askew, J R; Brissenden, R J [Technical Assessments and Services Division, Atomic Energy Establishment, Winfrith, Dorchester, Dorset (United Kingdom)

    1963-08-15

    This report gives an account of the DSN method for simulating neutron transport, together with methods of solution developed to deal with problems in the physics of thermal reactors, for which previously available computer programmes were unsatisfactory. The methods described are those incorporated in the programmes WINFRITH DSN written in FORTRAN language for the IBM 7090 and STRETCH computers. (author)

  20. Boreal forest fires in 1997 and 1998: a seasonal comparison using transport model simulations and measurement data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Spichtinger

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Forest fire emissions have a strong impact on the concentrations of trace gases and aerosols in the atmosphere. In order to quantify the influence of boreal forest fire emissions on the atmospheric composition, the fire seasons of 1997 and 1998 are compared in this paper. Fire activity in 1998 was very strong, especially over Canada and Eastern Siberia, whereas it was much weaker in 1997. According to burned area estimates the burning in 1998 was more than six times as intense as in 1997. Based on hot spot locations derived from ATSR (Along Track Scanning Radiometer data and official burned area data, fire emissions were estimated and their transport was simulated with a Lagrangian tracer transport model. Siberian and Canadian forest fire tracers were distinguished to investigate the transport of both separately. The fire emissions were transported even over intercontinental distances. Due to the El Niño induced meteorological situation, transport from Siberia to Canada was enhanced in 1998. Siberian fire emissions were transported towards Canada and contributed concentrations more than twice as high as those due to Canada's own CO emissions by fires. In 1998 both tracers arrive at higher latitudes over Europe, which is due to a higher North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO index in 1998. The simulated emission plumes are compared to CMDL (Climate Monitoring and Diagnostics Laboratory CO2 and CO data, Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS aerosol index (AI data and Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME tropospheric NO2 and HCHO columns. All the data show clearly enhanced signals during the burning season of 1998 compared to 1997. The results of the model simulation are in good agreement with ground-based as well as satellite-based measurements.

  1. Laser radiation in active amplifying media treated as a transport problem - Transfer equation derived and exactly solved

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, S. R. D.; Gupta, Santanu D.

    1991-10-01

    The flow of laser radiation in a plane-parallel cylindrical slab of active amplifying medium with axial symmetry is treated as a problem in radiative transfer. The appropriate one-dimensional transfer equation describing the transfer of laser radiation has been derived by an appeal to Einstein's A, B coefficients (describing the processes of stimulated line absorption, spontaneous line emission, and stimulated line emission sustained by population inversion in the medium) and considering the 'rate equations' to completely establish the rational of the transfer equation obtained. The equation is then exactly solved and the angular distribution of the emergent laser beam intensity is obtained; its numerically computed values are given in tables and plotted in graphs showing the nature of peaks of the emerging laser beam intensity about the axis of the laser cylinder.

  2. Progress in Solving the Elusive Ag Transport Mechanism in TRISO Coated Particles: “What is new?”

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rooyen, I.J. van; Petti, D.A.; Nabielek, H.; Neethling, J.H; Kania, M.J.

    2014-01-01

    The tristructural isotropic (TRISO) particle for a high temperature reactor (HTR) has been developed to an advanced state where the coating withstands internal gas pressures and retains nearly all fission products during irradiation and under postulated accidents. However, one exception is silver (Ag) that has been found to be released from high quality TRISO coated particles during irradiation and high temperature accident heating tests. Although out-of-pile laboratory tests have yet to elucidate the mechanism of transport of Ag through silicon carbide (SiC), effective diffusion coefficients have been derived to successfully reproduce measured "1"1"0"mAg- releases from irradiated HTR fuel elements, compacts and TRISO particles. It was found that Ag transport through SiC does not proceed via bulk volume diffusion. Presently grain boundary diffusion that may be irradiation enhanced either by neutron bombardment or by the presence of fission products such as palladium (Pd), are the two hypotheses that have been proposed. Recent studies of irradiated AGR-1 TRISO fuel using scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), transmission Kikuchi diffraction (TKD) patterns, and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) have been used to further the understanding of Ag transport through TRISO particles. No Ag was observed in SiC grains, but Ag was identified at triple-points and grain boundaries of the SiC layer in the TRISO particle. Cadmium (Cd) was also found in some of the very same triple junctions, but this could be related to silver behavior as "1"1"0"mAg decays to "1"1"0Cd or true Cd release as a fission product. Palladium was identified as the main constituent of micron-sized precipitates present at the SiC grain boundaries. The potential role of Pd in the transport of Ag will be discussed further. (author)

  3. Analysis of space and energy homogenization techniques for the solving of the neutron transport equation in nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magat, Ph.

    1997-04-01

    Today neutron transport in PWR's core is routinely computed through the transport-diffusion(2 groups) scheme. This method gives satisfactory results for reactors operating in normal conditions but the 2 group diffusion approximation is unable to take into account interface effects or anisotropy. The improvement of this scheme is logically possible through the use of a simplified P N method (SP N ) for the modeling of the core. The comparison between S N calculations and SP N calculations shows an excellent agreement on eigenvalues as well as on power maps. We can notice that: -) it is no use extending the development beyond P 3 , there is no effect; -) the P 1 development is adequate; and -) the P 0 development is totally inappropriate. Calculations performed on the N4 core of the Chooz power plant have enabled us to compare diffusion operators with transport operators (SP 1 , SP 3 , SP 5 and SP 7 ). These calculations show that the implementation of the SP N method is feasible but the extra-costs in computation times and memory are important. We recommend: SP 5 P 1 calculations for heterogeneous 2-dimension geometry and SP 3 P 1 calculations for the homogeneous 3-dimension geometry. (A.C.)

  4. Heat transport in two-dimensional materials by directly solving the phonon Boltzmann equation under Callaway's dual relaxation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yangyu; Wang, Moran

    2017-10-01

    The single mode relaxation time approximation has been demonstrated to greatly underestimate the lattice thermal conductivity of two-dimensional materials due to the collective effect of phonon normal scattering. Callaway's dual relaxation model represents a good approximation to the otherwise ab initio solution of the phonon Boltzmann equation. In this work we develop a discrete-ordinate-method (DOM) scheme for the numerical solution of the phonon Boltzmann equation under Callaway's model. Heat transport in a graphene ribbon with different geometries is modeled by our scheme, which produces results quite consistent with the available molecular dynamics, Monte Carlo simulations, and experimental measurements. Callaway's lattice thermal conductivity model with empirical boundary scattering rates is examined and shown to overestimate or underestimate the direct DOM solution. The length convergence of the lattice thermal conductivity of a rectangular graphene ribbon is explored and found to depend appreciably on the ribbon width, with a semiquantitative correlation provided between the convergence length and the width. Finally, we predict the existence of a phonon Knudsen minimum in a graphene ribbon only at a low system temperature and isotope concentration so that the average normal scattering rate is two orders of magnitude stronger than the intrinsic resistive one. The present work will promote not only the methodology for the solution of the phonon Boltzmann equation but also the theoretical modeling and experimental detection of hydrodynamic phonon transport in two-dimensional materials.

  5. Compaction parameters and technologies in forest- and long- distance transportation of wood fuels; Tiivistaemisparametrit ja -tekniikat puupolttoaineiden metsae- ja kaukokuljetuksessa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaipainen, H [VTT Energy, Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    1997-12-01

    The objective of the research is to increase the level of knowledge by the aid of systematic research on the timber and the compacting of the fragments of it for forest and lorry transportation. Theoretical information on the compacting phenomena, and the factors effecting on them, will be composed in the study, and the compacting techniques with different raw materials will be studied experimentally. The objective is to reduce the forest transportation costs by 10 % and those of lorry transportation by 15 - 20 % depending on the raw material to be transported. The data obtained in the researches carried out both in Finland and abroad will be investigated in the project. The data consists also of the baling and bundling of felling residues and small-diameter wood. A test equipment, by which the compacting parameters of first thinning pine and spruce felling residues will be determined under winter conditions, was constructed to serve the experimental part of the research. The compacting tests were started at the end of January 1997, so the results of the tests will be available for the final report of 1997 in March 1997. (orig.)

  6. Floyd-A∗ Algorithm Solving the Least-Time Itinerary Planning Problem in Urban Scheduled Public Transport Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider an ad hoc Floyd-A∗ algorithm to determine the a priori least-time itinerary from an origin to a destination given an initial time in an urban scheduled public transport (USPT network. The network is bimodal (i.e., USPT lines and walking and time dependent. The modified USPT network model results in more reasonable itinerary results. An itinerary is connected through a sequence of time-label arcs. The proposed Floyd-A∗ algorithm is composed of two procedures designated as Itinerary Finder and Cost Estimator. The A∗-based Itinerary Finder determines the time-dependent, least-time itinerary in real time, aided by the heuristic information precomputed by the Floyd-based Cost Estimator, where a strategy is formed to preestimate the time-dependent arc travel time as an associated static lower bound. The Floyd-A∗ algorithm is proven to guarantee optimality in theory and, demonstrated through a real-world example in Shenyang City USPT network to be more efficient than previous procedures. The computational experiments also reveal the time-dependent nature of the least-time itinerary. In the premise that lines run punctually, “just boarding” and “just missing” cases are identified.

  7. Coupling of discrete ordinates methods by transmission of boundary conditions in solving the neutron transport equation in slab geometry; Couplage de discretisations aux ordonnees discretes d`equations de transport 1D par passage de conditions frontieres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bal, G. [Departement MMN, Service IMA, Direction des Etudes et Recherches, Electricite de France (EDF), 92 - Clamart (France)

    1995-10-01

    Neutron transport in nuclear reactors is quite well modelled by the linear Boltzmann transport equation. Its solution is relatively easy, but unfortunately too expensive to achieve whole core computations. Thus, we have to simplify it, for example by homogenizing some physical characteristics. However, the solution may then be inaccurate. Moreover, in strongly homogeneous areas, the error may be too big. Then we would like to deal with such an inconvenient by solving the equation accurately on this area, but more coarsely away from it, so that the computation is not too expensive. This problem is the subject of a thesis. We present here some results obtained for slab geometry. The couplings between the fine and coarse discretization regions could be conceived in a number of approaches. Here, we only deal with the coupling at crossing the interface between two sub-domains. In the first section, we present the coupling of discrete ordinate methods for solving the homogeneous, isotropic and mono-kinetic equation. Coupling operators are defined and shown to be optimal. The second and the third sections are devoted to an extension of the previous results when the equation is non-homogeneous, anisotropic and multigroup (under some restrictive assumptions). Some numerical results are given in the case of isotropic and mono-kinetic equations. (author) 15 refs.

  8. Numerical simulations of forest fire propagation and smoke transport as an external hazard assessment methodology development for a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okano, Yasushi; Yamano, Hidemasa

    2016-01-01

    A new method has been developed to assess potential challenges by forest fire smoke on a cooling function of a decay heat removal system (DHRS) of a sodium-cooled fast reactor. Combinational numerical simulations of a forest fire propagation and a smoke transport were performed to evaluate a cumulative amount of smoke captured on air filters of the DHRS. The forest fire propagation simulations were performed using FARSITE code to evaluate a temporal increase of a forest fire spread area, a frontal fireline location, reaction intensity, and fireline intensity. Peripheral boundary of the forest fire spread area is shaped like an ellipse on the terrain, and the active forest fire area from which smoke is produced as a forest fire product is increased with forest fire spread. The smoke transport simulations were performed using ALOFT-FT code where a spatial distribution of smoke density, especially of particle matter (PM), is evaluated. The snapshot (i.e. at a certain time step) outputs by FARSITE on the reaction intensity and the fireline intensity were utilized as the input data for ALOFT-FT, while it was conservatively assumed that the smoke generated from the active forest fire area along the periphery boundary rises up from the frontal fireline location nearest to a nuclear power plant (NPP) and that prevailing wind transports all smoke to an NPP in the leeward side. The evaluated time-dependent changes of spatial PM density were utilized to calculate a cumulative amount of PM captured on the air filters of the DHRS. Sensitivity analysis was performed on prevailing wind speed to which both the fireline intensity and the smoke transport behavior are sensitive. The total amount of PM on the air filters was conservatively estimated around several hundred grams per m 2 which is well below the utilization limit. (author)

  9. Defining sustainable transport in rural tourism: experiences from the New Forest

    OpenAIRE

    Dickinson, Janet E.; Smith, A.; Robbins, Derek K.

    2017-01-01

    Transport policy agendas have long sought to bring about more sustainable transport at tourism destinations. While there are examples of successes, it remains unclear what inroads have been made towards creating a sustainable transport future. Policy directions have evolved over a number of years and in many tourism destination contexts it is far from clear what a desirable transport future looks like. When translated to implementation, the aims of initiatives can be unclear and baseline meas...

  10. Life-Cycle Energy and GHG Emissions of Forest Biomass Harvest and Transport for Biofuel Production in Michigan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengli Zhang

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available High dependence on imported oil has increased U.S. strategic vulnerability and prompted more research in the area of renewable energy production. Ethanol production from renewable woody biomass, which could be a substitute for gasoline, has seen increased interest. This study analysed energy use and greenhouse gas emission impacts on the forest biomass supply chain activities within the State of Michigan. A life-cycle assessment of harvesting and transportation stages was completed utilizing peer-reviewed literature. Results for forest-delivered ethanol were compared with those for petroleum gasoline using data specific to the U.S. The analysis from a woody biomass feedstock supply perspective uncovered that ethanol production is more environmentally friendly (about 62% less greenhouse gas emissions compared with petroleum based fossil fuel production. Sensitivity analysis was conducted with key inputs associated with harvesting and transportation operations. The results showed that research focused on improving biomass recovery efficiency and truck fuel economy further reduced GHG emissions and energy consumption.

  11. Freight transportation and the potential for invasions of exotic insects in urban and periurban forests of the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colunga-Garcia, Manuel; Haack, Robert A; Adelaja, Adesoji O

    2009-02-01

    Freight transportation is an important pathway for the introduction and dissemination of exotic forest insects (EFI). Identifying the final destination of imports is critical in determining the likelihood of EFI establishment. We analyzed the use of regional freight transport information to characterize risk of urban and periurban areas to EFI introductions. Specific objectives were to 1) approximate the final distribution of selected imports among urban areas of the United States, 2) characterize the final distribution of imports in terms of their spatial aggregation and dominant world region of origin, and 3) assess the effect of the final distribution of imports on the level of risk to urban and periurban forests from EFI. Freight pattern analyses were conducted for three categories of imports whose products or packaging materials are associated with EFI: wood products, nonmetallic mineral products, and machinery. The final distribution of wood products was the most evenly distributed of the three selected imports, whereas machinery was most spatially concentrated. We found that the type of import and the world region of origin greatly influence the final distribution of imported products. Risk assessment models were built based on the amount of forestland and imports for each urban area The model indicated that 84-88% of the imported tonnage went to only 4-6% of the urban areas in the contiguous United States. We concluded that freight movement information is critical for proper risk assessment of EFI. Implications of our findings and future research needs are discussed.

  12. Solving "Smart City" Transport Problems by Designing Carpooling Gamification Schemes with Multi-Agent Systems: The Case of the So-Called "Mordor of Warsaw".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olszewski, Robert; Pałka, Piotr; Turek, Agnieszka

    2018-01-06

    To reduce energy consumption and improve residents' quality of life, "smart cities" should use not only modern technologies, but also the social innovations of the "Internet of Things" (IoT) era. This article attempts to solve transport problems in a smart city's office district by utilizing gamification that incentivizes the carpooling system. The goal of the devised system is to significantly reduce the number of cars, and, consequently, to alleviate traffic jams, as well as to curb pollution and energy consumption. A representative sample of the statistical population of people working in one of the biggest office hubs in Poland (the so-called "Mordor of Warsaw") was surveyed. The collected data were processed using spatial data mining methods, and the results were a set of parameters for the multi-agent system. This approach made it possible to run a series of simulations on a set of 100,000 agents and to select an effective gamification methodology that supports the carpooling process. The implementation of the proposed solutions (a "serious game" variation of urban games) would help to reduce the number of cars by several dozen percent, significantly reduce energy consumption, eliminate traffic jams, and increase the activity of the smart city residents.

  13. Direct advection measurements do not help to solve the night-time CO2 closure problem: Evidence from three different forests

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Aubinet, M.; Feigenwinter, C.; Heinesch, B.; Bernhofer, C.; Canepa, E.; Lindroth, A.; Montagnani, L.; Rebmann, C.; Sedlák, Pavel; Van Gorsel, E.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 150, č. 5 (2010), s. 655-664 ISSN 0168-1923 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA300420803 Grant - others:European Commission(XE) GOCECT2003-505572 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : Advection * Forests * CO2 fluxes * Eddy covariance Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology Impact factor: 3.228, year: 2010

  14. Persistent wind-induced enhancement of diffusive CO2 transport in a mountain forest snowpack

    Science.gov (United States)

    D. R. Bowling; W. J. Massman

    2011-01-01

    Diffusion dominates the transport of trace gases between soil and the atmosphere. Pressure gradients induced by atmospheric flow and wind interacting with topographical features cause a small but persistent bulk flow of air within soil or snow. This forcing, called pressure pumping or wind pumping, leads to a poorly quantified enhancement of gas transport beyond the...

  15. Aerosol dynamics within and above forest in relation to turbulent transport and dry deposition

    OpenAIRE

    Rannik, Üllar; Zhou, Luxi; Zhou, Putian; Gierens, Rosa; Mammarella, Ivan; Sogachev, Andrey; Boy, Michael

    2016-01-01

    A 1-D atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) model coupled with a detailed atmospheric chemistry and aerosol dynamical model, the model SOSAA, was used to predict the ABL and detailed aerosol population (characterized by the number size distribution) time evolution. The model was applied over a period of 10 days in May 2013 to a pine forest site in southern Finland. The period was characterized by frequent new particle formation events and simultaneous intensive aerosol transforma...

  16. Transport and Breakdown of Organic Matter in Urban and Forested Streams: The Effects of Altered Hydrology and Landscape Position

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belt, K. T.; Swan, C. M.; Pouyat, R. V.; Kaushal, S.; Groffman, P. M.; Stack, W. P.; Fisher, G. T.

    2006-05-01

    A better understanding of how urbanization and trees interact to alter organic matter transport and cycling is needed to assess retention in catchments and streams, as well as to estimate the magnitude of carbon fluxes to the atmosphere and to downstream aquatic ecosystems. The influx of particulate and dissolved organic matter (POM/DOC) to headwater streams normally originates within or near riparian areas, and is important to aquatic food webs in stream ecosystems. Urban catchments, however, have huge effective drainage densities (due to storm drainage infrastructure), which facilitate a POM/DOC "gutter subsidy" to streams that dwarfs riparian inputs and alters benthic litter quality (and represents a major short-circuit in the carbon vegetation-soil cycle.) We measured in-situ leaf litter breakdown rates, flows, DOC, BOD and nutrients in forested, suburban and urban streams of the BES LTER and Baltimore City DPW sampling networks, which encompassed a variety of urban and rural landscapes. Sycamore and Planetree leaf litter in-situ experiments revealed faster breakdown rates for suburban and urban landscape litter than for riparian litter, with rates being much faster than literature values for forested catchments. DOC, BOD and nutrient data (storm and dry weather) from BES/DPW stream sites showed much higher concentrations and loads in the more urbanized catchments and indicate the streams are likely heterotrophic and experience transient but high dissolved oxygen demands. High nutrient concentrations, faster litter breakdown rates, and substantially higher upland urban fluxes of organic matter (particulate and dissolved) in urban streams suggest that export rates are likely substantially higher than in forested systems and that carbon loads to both downstream aquatic systems and to the atmosphere (as CO2) are substantial.

  17. Domain decomposition method using a hybrid parallelism and a low-order acceleration for solving the Sn transport equation on unstructured geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odry, Nans

    2016-01-01

    Deterministic calculation schemes are devised to numerically solve the neutron transport equation in nuclear reactors. Dealing with core-sized problems is very challenging for computers, so much that the dedicated core calculations have no choice but to allow simplifying assumptions (assembly- then core scale steps..). The PhD work aims at overcoming some of these approximations: thanks to important changes in computer architecture and capacities (HPC), nowadays one can solve 3D core-sized problems, using both high mesh refinement and the transport operator. It is an essential step forward in order to perform, in the future, reference calculations using deterministic schemes. This work focuses on a spatial domain decomposition method (DDM). Using massive parallelism, DDM allows much more ambitious computations in terms of both memory requirements and calculation time. Developments were performed inside the Sn core solver Minaret, from the new CEA neutronics platform APOLLO3. Only fast reactors (hexagonal periodicity) are considered, even if all kinds of geometries can be dealt with, using Minaret. The work has been divided in four steps: 1) The spatial domain decomposition with no overlap is inserted into the standard algorithmic structure of Minaret. The fundamental idea involves splitting a core-sized problem into smaller, independent, spatial sub-problems. angular flux is exchanged between adjacent sub-domains. In doing so, all combined sub-problems converge to the global solution at the outcome of an iterative process. Various strategies were explored regarding both data management and algorithm design. Results (k eff and flux) are systematically compared to the reference in a numerical verification step. 2) Introducing more parallelism is an unprecedented opportunity to heighten performances of deterministic schemes. Domain decomposition is particularly suited to this. A two-layer hybrid parallelism strategy, suited to HPC, is chosen. It benefits from the

  18. Experimental study on water transport observations of desert riparian forests in the lower reaches of the Tarim River in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yaning; Li, Weihong; Zhou, Honghua; Chen, Yapeng; XinmingHao; Fu, Aihong; Ma, Jianxin

    2017-06-01

    Studying the water use processes of desert riparian vegetation in arid regions and analyzing the response and adaptation strategies of plants to drought stress are of great significance for developing ecological restoration measures. Based on field monitoring and test analyses of physiological ecological indicators of dominant species (Populus euphratica and Tamarix chinensis) in the desert riparian forest in the lower reaches of the Tarim River, the water relations of P. euphratica and T. chinensis under drought stress are discussed and some water use strategies put forward. The results show that (1) concerning plant water uptake, desert riparian forests depend mainly on groundwater to survive under long-term water stress. (2) Concerning plant water distribution, the survival of P. euphratica and nearby shallow root plants is mainly due to the hydraulic lift and water redistribution of P. euphratica under drought stress. (3) Concerning plant water transport, P. euphratica sustains the survival of competitive and advantageous branches by improving their ability to acquire water while restraining the growth of inferior branches. (4) Concerning plant transpiration, the sap flow curves of daily variations of P. euphratica and T. chinensis were wide-peak sin and narrower-peak respectively. T. chinensis has better environmental adaptability.

  19. Hydrogeomorphic linkages of sediment transport in headwater streams, Maybeso Experimental Forest, southeast Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomi, Takashi; Sidle, Roy C.; Swanston, Douglas N.

    2004-03-01

    Hydrogemorphic linkages related to sediment transport in headwater streams following basin wide clear-cut logging on Prince of Wales Island, southeast Alaska, were investigated. Landslides and debris flows transported sediment and woody debris in headwater tributaries in 1961, 1979, and 1993. Widespread landsliding in 1961 and 1993 was triggered by rainstorms with recurrence intervals (24 h precipitation) of 7.0 years and 4.2 years respectively. Occurrence, distribution, and downstream effects of these mass movements were controlled by landform characteristics such as channel gradient and valley configuration. Landslides and channelized debris flows created exposed bedrock reaches, log jams, fans, and abandoned channels. The terminus of the deposits did not enter main channels because debris flows spread and thinned on the unconfined bottom of the U-shaped glaciated valley. Chronic sediment input to channels included surface erosion of exposed till (rain splash, sheet erosion, and freeze-thaw action) and bank failures. Bedload sediment transport in a channel impacted by 1993 landslides and debris flows was two to ten times greater and relatively finer compared with bedload transport in a young alder riparian channel that had last experienced a landslide and debris flow in 1961. Sediment transport and storage were influenced by regeneration of riparian vegetation, storage behind recruited woody debris, development of a streambed armour layer, and the decoupling of hillslopes and channels. Both spatial and temporal variations of sediment movement and riparian condition are important factors in understanding material transport within headwaters and through channel networks.

  20. Using Nitrate Isotopes to Distinguish Pathways along which Unprocessed Atmospheric Nitrate is Transported through Forests to Streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebestyen, S. D.

    2013-12-01

    Evaluation of natural abundance oxygen and nitrogen isotopes in nitrate has revealed that atmospheric deposition of nitrate to forests sometimes has direct effects on the timing and magnitude of stream nitrate concentrations. Large amounts of unprocessed atmospheric nitrate have sometimes been found in streams during snowmelt and stormflow events. Despite increasing evidence that unprocessed atmospheric nitrate may be transported without biological processing to streams at various times and multiple locations, little has been reported about specific hydrological processes. I synthesized research findings from a number of studies in which nitrate isotopes have been measured over the past decade. Unprocessed nitrate may predominate in surficial soil waters after rainfall and snowmelt events relative to nitrate that originated from nitrification. Although transport to deep groundwater may be important in the most nitrogen saturated catchments, the transport of unprocessed atmospheric nitrate along shallow subsurface flowpaths is likely more important in many moderately N-polluted ecosystems, which predominate in the northeastern USA where most of my study sites are located. The presence of unprocessed atmospheric nitrate in surficial soils was linked to stream nitrate concentrations when large amounts of unprocessed nitrate were occasionally routed along lateral, shallow subsurface flowpaths during stormflow events. During these events, water tables rose to saturate shallow-depth soils. When catchments were drying or dryer, atmospheric nitrate was completely consumed by biological processing as flowpaths shifted from lateral to vertical transport through soils. The source areas of unprocessed atmospheric nitrate were usually limited to soils that were adjacent to streams, with little to no near-surface saturation and transport of unprocessed nitrate from more distal hillslope positions. The occasional large amounts of unprocessed atmospheric nitrate in soil water

  1. An aerosol boomerang: Rapid around-the-world transport of smoke from the December 2006 Australian forest fires observed from space

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dirksen, R.J.; Folkert Boersma, K.; Laat, de J.; Stammes, P.; van der Werf, G.R.; Val Martin, M.; Kelder, H.M.

    2009-01-01

    We investigate rapid around-the-world transport of a smoke aerosol plume released by intense forest fires in southeastern Australia in December 2006. During the first half of December 2006, southeastern Australia suffered from severe drought and exceptionally high temperatures. On 14 December 2006,

  2. An aerosol boomerang : rapid around-the-world transport of smoke from the December 2006 Australian forest fires observed from space

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dirksen, R.J.; Boersma, K.F.; Laat, de J.; Stammes, P.; Werf, van der G.R.; Martin, M.V.; Kelder, H.

    2009-01-01

    We investigate rapid around-the-world transport of a smoke aerosol plume released by intense forest fires in southeastern Australia in December 2006. During the first half of December 2006, southeastern Australia suffered from severe drought and exceptionally high temperatures. On 14 December 2006,

  3. Modelling and prediction of air pollutant transport during the 2014 biomass burning and forest fires in peninsular Southeast Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duc, Hiep Nguyen; Bang, Ho Quoc; Quang, Ngo Xuan

    2016-02-01

    During the dry season, from November to April, agricultural biomass burning and forest fires especially from March to late April in mainland Southeast Asian countries of Myanmar, Thailand, Laos and Vietnam frequently cause severe particulate pollution not only in the local areas but also across the whole region and beyond due to the prevailing meteorological conditions. Recently, the BASE-ASIA (Biomass-burning Aerosols in South East Asia: Smoke Impact Assessment) and 7-SEAS (7-South-East Asian Studies) studies have provided detailed analysis and important understandings of the transport of pollutants, in particular, the aerosols and their characteristics across the region due to biomass burning in Southeast Asia (SEA). Following these studies, in this paper, we study the transport of particulate air pollution across the peninsular region of SEA and beyond during the March 2014 burning period using meteorological modelling approach and available ground-based and satellite measurements to ascertain the extent of the aerosol pollution and transport in the region of this particular event. The results show that the air pollutants from SEA biomass burning in March 2014 were transported at high altitude to southern China, Hong Kong, Taiwan and beyond as has been highlighted in the BASE-ASIA and 7-SEAS studies. There are strong evidences that the biomass burning in SEA especially in mid-March 2014 has not only caused widespread high particle pollution in Thailand (especially the northern region where most of the fires occurred) but also impacted on the air quality in Hong Kong as measured at the ground-based stations and in LulinC (Taiwan) where a remote background monitoring station is located.

  4. Hydrological and seasonal export mechanisms for nitrate transport from a forested catchment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rusjan, S; Mikos, M; Brilly, M

    2008-01-01

    Understanding of interactions between hydrological and biogeochemical responses of catchments on rainfall events is usually unclear from periodic measurements and requires tracing of the temporal dynamics of the processes. Smaller streams reflect strong connections between hydrological processes of the rainfall runoff formation and biogeochemical processes in the catchment; consequently, the responsiveness of the streamwater chemistry to changed hydrological states is very high. The study was carried out in 2007, within the 42 km 2 forested Padez catchment in the southwestern part of Slovenia, which is characterized by distinctive flushing, an almost torrential hydrological regime influenced by impermeable flysch geological settings. Recorded hydrographs which, in the hydrological and biogeochemical sense, differed substantially, disclosed a highly variable, but at the same time a strong linkage between hydrological, biogeochemical and particular topographic controls of nitrate exports from the spatial perspective of a studied catchment. The role of specific hydrological events on the nitrate mobilization proved to be important as the size of the accumulated nitrate pool available for mobilization was large throughout the observed hydrographs. The biogeochemical environment of the forest soils presumably significantly affects the size of the available nitrate pool in the studied catchment.

  5. Optimizing Biomass Feedstock Logistics for Forest Residue Processing and Transportation on a Tree-Shaped Road Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hee Han

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available An important task in forest residue recovery operations is to select the most cost-efficient feedstock logistics system for a given distribution of residue piles, road access, and available machinery. Notable considerations include inaccessibility of treatment units to large chip vans and frequent, long-distance mobilization of forestry equipment required to process dispersed residues. In this study, we present optimized biomass feedstock logistics on a tree-shaped road network that take into account the following options: (1 grinding residues at the site of treatment and forwarding ground residues either directly to bioenergy facility or to a concentration yard where they are transshipped to large chip vans, (2 forwarding residues to a concentration yard where they are stored and ground directly into chip vans, and (3 forwarding residues to a nearby grinder location and forwarding the ground materials. A mixed-integer programming model coupled with a network algorithm was developed to solve the problem. The model was applied to recovery operations on a study site in Colorado, USA, and the optimal solution reduced the cost of logistics up to 11% compared to the conventional system. This is an important result because this cost reduction propagates downstream through the biomass supply chain, reducing production costs for bioenergy and bioproducts.

  6. The Impact of Source Distribution on Scalar Transport over Forested Hills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Andrew N.; Harman, Ian N.

    2015-08-01

    Numerical simulations of neutral flow over a two-dimensional, isolated, forested ridge are conducted to study the effects of scalar source distribution on scalar concentrations and fluxes over forested hills. Three different constant-flux sources are considered that span a range of idealized but ecologically important source distributions: a source at the ground, one uniformly distributed through the canopy, and one decaying with depth in the canopy. A fourth source type, where the in-canopy source depends on both the wind speed and the difference in concentration between the canopy and a reference concentration on the leaf, designed to mimic deposition, is also considered. The simulations show that the topographically-induced perturbations to the scalar concentration and fluxes are quantitatively dependent on the source distribution. The net impact is a balance of different processes affecting both advection and turbulent mixing, and can be significant even for moderate topography. Sources that have significant input in the deep canopy or at the ground exhibit a larger magnitude advection and turbulent flux-divergence terms in the canopy. The flows have identical velocity fields and so the differences are entirely due to the different tracer concentration fields resulting from the different source distributions. These in-canopy differences lead to larger spatial variations in above-canopy scalar fluxes for sources near the ground compared to cases where the source is predominantly located near the canopy top. Sensitivity tests show that the most significant impacts are often seen near to or slightly downstream of the flow separation or reattachment points within the canopy flow. The qualitative similarities to previous studies using periodic hills suggest that important processes occurring over isolated and periodic hills are not fundamentally different. The work has important implications for the interpretation of flux measurements over forests, even in

  7. Whole-tree water transport scales with sapwood capacitance in tropical forest canopy trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    F.C. Meinzer; S.A. James; G. Goldstein; D. Woodruff

    2003-01-01

    The present study examines the manner in which several whole-tree water transport properties scale with species specific variation in sapwood water storage capacity. The hypothesis that constraints on relationships between sapwood capacitance and other water relations characteristics lead to predictable scaling relationships between intrinsic capacitance and whole-tree...

  8. Chemistry and transport of soluble humic substances in forested watersheds of the Adirondack Park, New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronan, C.S.; Aiken, G.R.

    1985-01-01

    Studies were conducted in conjunction with the Integrated Lake-Watershed Acidification Study (ILWAS) to examine the chemistry and leaching patterns of soluble humic substances in forested watersheds of the Adirondack region. During the summer growing season, mean dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations in the ILWAS watersheds ranged from 21-32 mg C l-1 in O/A horizon leachates, from 5-7 mg C l-1 in B horizon leachates, from 2-4 mg C l-1 in groundwater solutions, from 6-8 mg C l-1 in first order streams, from 3-8 mg C l-1 in lake inlets, and from 2-7 mg C l-1 in lake outlets. During the winter, mean DOC concentrations dropped significantly in the upper soil profile. Soil solutions from mixed and coniferous stands contained as much as twice the DOC concentration of lysimeter samples from hardwood stands. Results of DOC fractionation analysis showed that hydrophobia and hydrophilic acids dominate the organic solute composition of natural waters in these watersheds. Charge balance and titration results indicated that the general acid-base characteristics of the dissolved humic mixture in these natural waters can be accounted for by a model organic acid having an averagepKa of 3.85, an average charge density of 4-5 ??eq mg-1 C at ambient pH, and a total of 6-7 meq COOH per gram carbon. ?? 1985.

  9. Foliar uptake of fog water and transport belowground alleviates drought effects in the cloud forest tree species, Drimys brasiliensis (Winteraceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eller, Cleiton B; Lima, Aline L; Oliveira, Rafael S

    2013-07-01

    Foliar water uptake (FWU) is a common water acquisition mechanism for plants inhabiting temperate fog-affected ecosystems, but the prevalence and consequences of this process for the water and carbon balance of tropical cloud forest species are unknown. We performed a series of experiments under field and glasshouse conditions using a combination of methods (sap flow, fluorescent apoplastic tracers and stable isotopes) to trace fog water movement from foliage to belowground components of Drimys brasiliensis. In addition, we measured leaf water potential, leaf gas exchange, leaf water repellency and growth of plants under contrasting soil water availabilities and fog exposure in glasshouse experiments to evaluate FWU effects on the water and carbon balance of D. brasiliensis saplings. Fog water diffused directly through leaf cuticles and contributed up to 42% of total foliar water content. FWU caused reversals in sap flow in stems and roots of up to 26% of daily maximum transpiration. Fog water transported through the xylem reached belowground pools and enhanced leaf water potential, photosynthesis, stomatal conductance and growth relative to plants sheltered from fog. Foliar uptake of fog water is an important water acquisition mechanism that can mitigate the deleterious effects of soil water deficits for D. brasiliensis. © 2013 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2013 New Phytologist Trust.

  10. Resuspension and redistribution of radionuclides during grassland and forest fires in the Chernobyl exclusion zone: part II. Modeling the transport process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoschenko, V.I.; Kashparov, V.A.; Levchuk, S.E.; Glukhovskiy, A.S.; Khomutinin, Yu.V.; Protsak, V.P.; Lundin, S.M.; Tschiersch, J.

    2006-01-01

    To predict parameters of radionuclide resuspension, transport and deposition during forest and grassland fires, several model modules were developed and adapted. Experimental data of controlled burning of prepared experimental plots in the Chernobyl exclusion zone have been used to evaluate the prognostic power of the models. The predicted trajectories and elevations of the plume match with those visually observed during the fire experiments in the grassland and forest sites. Experimentally determined parameters could be successfully used for the calculation of the initial plume parameters which provide the tools for the description of various fire scenarios and enable prognostic calculations. In summary, the model predicts a release of some per mille from the radionuclide inventory of the fuel material by the grassland fires. During the forest fire, up to 4% of 137 Cs and 9 Sr and up to 1% of the Pu isotopes can be released from the forest litter according to the model calculations. However, these results depend on the parameters of the fire events. In general, the modeling results are in good accordance with the experimental data. Therefore, the considered models were successfully validated and can be recommended for the assessment of the resuspension and redistribution of radionuclides during grassland and forest fires in contaminated territories

  11. Papers on climatology in relation to agriculture, transportation, water resources, etc.: The Coconino Forest Experiment Station near Flagstaff, Ariz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    G. A. Pearson

    1910-01-01

    The largest pine forest on the North American Continent extends from north-central Arizona in a southeasterly direction into southwestern New Mexico, a distance of approximately 250 miles The forest occupies an extensive plateau, known as the Colorado Plateau, which has a general elevation of from 6,000 to 8,000 feet above sea level, with numerous peaks the highest of...

  12. Effects of forest road amelioration techniques on soil bulk density, surface runoff, sediment transport, soil moisture and seedling growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randy K. Kolka; Mathew F. Smidt

    2004-01-01

    Although numerous methods have been used to retire roads, new technologies have evolved that can potentially ameliorate soil damage, lessen ,the generation of nonpoint source pollution and increase tree productivity on forest roads. In this study we investigated the effects of three forest road amelioration techniques, subsoiling, recontouring and traditional...

  13. Analysis and development of spatial hp-refinement methods for solving the neutron transport equation; Analyse et developpement de methodes de raffinement hp en espace pour l'equation de transport des neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fournier, D.

    2011-10-10

    The different neutronic parameters have to be calculated with a higher accuracy in order to design the 4. generation reactor cores. As memory storage and computation time are limited, adaptive methods are a solution to solve the neutron transport equation. The neutronic flux, solution of this equation, depends on the energy, angle and space. The different variables are successively discretized. The energy with a multigroup approach, considering the different quantities to be constant on each group, the angle by a collocation method called SN approximation. Once the energy and angle variable are discretized, a system of spatially-dependent hyperbolic equations has to be solved. Discontinuous finite elements are used to make possible the development of hp-refinement methods. Thus, the accuracy of the solution can be improved by spatial refinement (h-refinement), consisting into subdividing a cell into sub-cells, or by order refinement (p-refinement), by increasing the order of the polynomial basis. In this thesis, the properties of this methods are analyzed showing the importance of the regularity of the solution to choose the type of refinement. Thus, two error estimators are used to lead the refinement process. Whereas the first one requires high regularity hypothesis (analytical solution), the second one supposes only the minimal hypothesis required for the solution to exist. The comparison of both estimators is done on benchmarks where the analytic solution is known by the method of manufactured solutions. Thus, the behaviour of the solution as a regard of the regularity can be studied. It leads to a hp-refinement method using the two estimators. Then, a comparison is done with other existing methods on simplified but also realistic benchmarks coming from nuclear cores. These adaptive methods considerably reduces the computational cost and memory footprint. To further improve these two points, an approach with energy-dependent meshes is proposed. Actually, as the

  14. Transportation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Adams, James; Carr, Ron; Chebl, Maroun; Coleman, Robert; Costantini, William; Cox, Robert; Dial, William; Jenkins, Robert; McGovern, James; Mueller, Peter

    2006-01-01

    ...., trains, ships, etc.) and maximizing intermodal efficiency. A healthy balance must be achieved between the flow of international commerce and security requirements regardless of transportation mode...

  15. Solução de problemas de planejamento florestal com restrições de inteireza utilizando busca tabu Solving forest management problems with integer constraints using tabu search

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio Lopes Rodrigues

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho teve como objetivos desenvolver e testar um algoritmo com base na metaheurística busca tabu (BT, para a solução de problemas de gerenciamento florestal com restrições de inteireza. Os problemas avaliados tinham entre 93 e 423 variáveis de decisão, sujeitos às restrições de singularidade, produção mínima e produção máxima periódicas. Todos os problemas tiveram como objetivo a maximização do valor presente líquido. O algoritmo para implementação da BT foi codificado em ambiente delphi 5.0 e os testes foram efetuados em um microcomputador AMD K6II 500 MHZ, com memória RAM de 64 MB e disco rígido de 15GB. O desempenho da BT foi avaliado de acordo com as medidas de eficácia e eficiência. Os diferentes valores ou categorias dos parâmetros da BT foram testados e comparados quanto aos seus efeitos na eficácia do algoritmo. A seleção da melhor configuração de parâmetros foi feita com o teste L&O, a 1% de probabilidade, e as análises através de estatísticas descritivas. A melhor configuração de parâmetros propiciou à BT eficácia média de 95,97%, valor mínimo igual a 90,39% e valor máximo igual a 98,84%, com um coeficiente de variação de 2,48% do ótimo matemático. Para o problema de maior porte, a eficiência da BT foi duas vezes superior à eficiência do algoritmo exato branch and bound, apresentando-se como uma abordagem muito atrativa para solução de importantes problemas de gerenciamento florestal.This work aimed to develop and test an algorithm based on Tabu Search (TS metaheuristics; to solve problems of forest management with integer constraints. TS was tested in five problems containing between 12 and 423 decision variables subjected to singularity constraints, minimum and maximum periodic productions. All the problems aimed at maximizing the net present value. TS was codified into delphi 5.0 language and the tests were performed in a microcomputer AMD K6II 500 MHZ, RAM memory 64 MB

  16. Metaheurística Simulated Annealing para solução de problemas de planejamento florestal com restrições de integridade Simulated Annealing metaheuristic to solve forest planning problem with integer constraints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio Lopes Rodrigues

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Os objetivos deste trabalho foram desenvolver e testar a metaheurística SA para solução de problemas de gerenciamento florestal com restrições de integridade. O algoritmo SA desenvolvido foi testado em quatro problemas, contendo entre 93 e 423 variáveis de decisão, sujeitos às restrições de singularidade, produção mínima e produção máxima, periodicamente. Todos os problemas tiveram como objetivo a maximização do valor presente líquido. O algoritmo SA foi codificado em liguagem delphi 5.0 e os testes foram efetuados em um microcomputador AMD K6II 500 MHZ, com memória RAM de 64 MB e disco rígido de 15GB. O desempenho da SA foi avaliado de acordo com as medidas de eficácia e eficiência. Os diferentes valores ou categorias dos parâmetros da SA foram testados e comparados quanto aos seus efeitos na eficácia do algoritmo. A seleção da melhor configuração de parâmetros foi feita com o teste L&O, a 1% de probabilidade, e as análises foram realizadas através de estatísticas descritivas. A melhor configuração de parâmetros propiciou à SA eficácia média de 95,36%, valor mínimo de 83,66%, valor máximo de 100% e coeficiente de variação igual a 3,18% do ótimo matemático obtido pelo algoritmo exato branch and bound. Para o problema de maior porte, a eficiência da SA foi dez vezes superior à eficiência do algoritmo exato branch and bound. O bom desempenho desta heurística reforçou as conclusões, tiradas em outros trabalhos, do seu enorme potencial para resolver importantes problemas de gerenciamento florestal de difícil solução pelos instrumentos computacionais da atualidade.The objectives of this work was to develop and test an algorithm based on Simulated Annealing (SA metaheuristic to solve problems of forest management with integer constraints. The algorithm SA developed was tested in five problems containing between 93 and 423 decision variables, periodically subject to singularity constraints, minimum

  17. Metaheurística algoritmo genético para solução de problemas de planejamento florestal com restrições de integridade Genetic algorithm metaheuristic to solve forest planning problem with integer constraints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio Lopes Rodrigues

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Os objetivos deste trabalho foram desenvolver e testar um algoritmo genético (AG para a solução de problemas de gerenciamento florestal com restrições de integridade. O AG foi testado em quatro problemas, contendo entre 93 e 423 variáveis de decisão, sujeitos às restrições de singularidade, produção mínima e produção máxima, periodicamente. Todos os problemas tiveram como objetivo a maximização do valor presente líquido. O AG foi codificado em ambiente delphi 5.0 e os testes foram realizados em um microcomputador AMD K6II 500 MHZ, com memória RAM de 64 MB e disco rígido de 15GB. O desempenho do AG foi avaliado de acordo com as medidas de eficácia e eficiência. Os valores ou categorias dos parâmetros do AG foram testados e comparados quanto aos seus efeitos na eficácia do algoritmo. A seleção da melhor configuração de parâmetros foi feita com o teste L&O, a 1% de probabilidade, e as análises foram realizadas através de estatísticas descritivas. A melhor configuração de parâmetros propiciou ao AG eficácia média de 94,28%, valor mínimo de 90,01%, valor máximo de 98,48%, com coeficiente de variação de 2,08% do ótimo matemático, obtido pelo algoritmo exato branch and bound. Para o problema de maior porte, a eficiência do AG foi cinco vezes superior à eficiência do algoritmo exato branch and bound. O AG apresentou-se como uma abordagem bastante atrativa para solução de importantes problemas de gerenciamento florestal.The objectives of this work was to develop and test a Genetic Algorithm (GA to solve problems of forest management with integer constraints. GA was tested in five problems containing 93 - 423 decision variables, periodically subject to singularity constraints, minimum and maximum production. The problems had the objective of maximizing the net present value. GA was codified into delphi 5.0 language and the tests were performed in a microcomputer AMD K6II 500 MHZ, with RAM memory of 64 MB

  18. Transportation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1998-01-01

    Here is the decree of the thirtieth of July 1998 relative to road transportation, to trade and brokerage of wastes. It requires to firms which carry out a road transportation as well as to traders and to brokers of wastes to declare their operations to the prefect. The declaration has to be renewed every five years. (O.M.)

  19. Atmospheric mercury deposition and its contribution of the regional atmospheric transport to mercury pollution at a national forest nature reserve, southwest China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ming; Wang, Dingyong; Du, Hongxia; Sun, Tao; Zhao, Zheng; Wei, Shiqing

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric mercury deposition by wet and dry processes contributes to the transformation of mercury from atmosphere to terrestrial and aquatic systems. Factors influencing the amount of mercury deposited to subtropical forests were identified in this study. Throughfall and open field precipitation samples were collected in 2012 and 2013 using precipitation collectors from forest sites located across Mt. Jinyun in southwest China. Samples were collected approximately every 2 weeks and analyzed for total (THg) and methyl mercury (MeHg). Forest canopy was the primary factor on THg and MeHg deposition. Simultaneously, continuous measurements of atmospheric gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) were carried out from March 2012 to February 2013 at the summit of Mt. Jinyun. Atmospheric GEM concentrations averaged 3.8 ± 1.5 ng m(-3), which was elevated compared with global background values. Sources identification indicated that both regional industrial emissions and long-range transport of Hg from central, northeast, and southwest China were corresponded to the elevated GEM levels. Precipitation deposition fluxes of THg and MeHg in Mt. Jinyun were slightly higher than those reported in Europe and North America, whereas total fluxes of MeHg and THg under forest canopy on Mt. Jiuyun were 3 and 2.9 times of the fluxes of THg in wet deposition in the open. Highly elevated litterfall deposition fluxes suggest that even in remote forest areas of China, deposition of atmospheric Hg(0) via uptake by vegetation leaf may be a major pathway for the deposition of atmospheric Hg. The result illustrates that areas with greater atmospheric pollution can be expected to have greater fluxes of Hg to soils via throughfall and litterfall.

  20. First use of a compound-specific stable isotope (CSSI) technique to trace sediment transport in upland forest catchments of Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo-Linares, Claudio; Schuller, Paulina; Castillo, Alejandra; Ovando-Fuentealba, Luis; Muñoz-Arcos, Enrique; Alarcón, Oscar; de Los Santos-Villalobos, Sergio; Cardoso, Renan; Muniz, Marcelo; Meigikos Dos Anjos, Roberto; Bustamante-Ortega, Ramón; Dercon, Gerd

    2018-03-15

    Land degradation is a problem affecting the sustainability of commercial forest plantations. The identification of critical areas prone to erosion can assist this activity to better target soil conservation efforts. Here we present the first use of the carbon-13 signatures of fatty acids (C14 to C24) in soil samples for spatial and temporal tracing of sediment transport in river bodies of upland commercial forest catchments in Chile. This compound-specific stable isotope (CSSI) technique was tested as a fingerprinting approach to determine the degree of soil erosion in pre-harvested forest catchments with surface areas ranging from 12 to 40ha. For soil apportionment a mixing model based on a Bayesian inference framework was used (CSSIAR v.2.0). Approximately four potential sediment sources were used for the calculations of all of the selected catchments. Unpaved forestry roads were shown to be the main source of sediment deposited at the outlet of the catchments (30-75%). Furthermore, sampling along the stream channel demonstrated that sediments were mainly comprised of sediment coming from the unpaved roads in the upper part of the catchments (74-98%). From this it was possible to identify the location and type of primary land use contributing to the sediment delivered at the outlet of the catchments. The derived information will allow management to focus efforts to control or mitigate soil erosion by improving the runoff features of the forest roads. The use of this CSSI technique has a high potential to help forestry managers and decision makers to evaluate and mitigate sources of soil erosion in upland forest catchments. It is important to highlight that this technique can also be a good complement to other soil erosion assessment and geological fingerprinting techniques, especially when attempting to quantify (sediment loads) and differentiate which type of land use most contributes to sediment accumulation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Transportation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Allshouse, Michael; Armstrong, Frederick Henry; Burns, Stephen; Courts, Michael; Denn, Douglas; Fortunato, Paul; Gettings, Daniel; Hansen, David; Hoffman, D. W; Jones, Robert

    2007-01-01

    .... The ability of the global transportation industry to rapidly move passengers and products from one corner of the globe to another continues to amaze even those wise to the dynamics of such operations...

  2. Year-round variations in the fluvial transport load of particulate 137Cs in a forested catchment affected by the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeshi Matsunaga; Takahiro Nakanishi; Mariko Atarashi-Andoh; Erina Takeuchi; Kotomi Muto; Katsunori Tsuduki; Syusaku Nishimura; Jun Koarashi; Shigeyoshi Otosaka; Tsutomu Sato

    2016-01-01

    Particulate 137 Cs was collected from stream water for 2 years to assess the long-term trend of 137 Cs discharge from a forest after the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant accident. A seasonal increase in the fluvial transport load of particulate 137 Cs in suspended solids (SS) was observed in July-October when rainfall was abundant. The 137 Cs load was controlled by the SS load. This control was attributed to cesium affinity for phyllosilicate clay minerals as verified by the low extractability of particulate 137 Cs. These findings indicate the fluvial particulate 137 Cs load is significantly related to the climate and geomorphological features of Japan. (author)

  3. Login wood. Logistic for the Treatment of Forest Biomass; Loginwood. Logistica para el tratamiento de biomasa forestal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez Sanchez, R.; Ayala Schraemili, F.

    2008-07-01

    This paper is about developing a logistic for the treatment of the forest prunes, including specific machines so far. Collecting, treatment, and transportation of forest biomass residues to valuation energy plant. Key words: collecting, treatment, transportation of forest prunes. (Author)

  4. Human-Forest Relationships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ritter, Eva; Dauksta, D.

    2012-01-01

    The relationship between human beings and forests has been important for the development of society. It is based on various productive, ecological, social and cultural functions of forests. The cultural functions, including the spiritual and symbolic role of forests, are often not addressed...... with the same attention as the other functions. The aim of this paper is to put a stronger emphasis on the fact that the acknowledgement of cultural bonds is needed in the discussion of sustainable development. Forest should not only be considered as a technical means to solve environmental and economic...... problems. To achieve a deeper understanding of the dependency of society on forests, it is necessary to recognise the role of forests in our consciousness of being human. Giving a historical overview about the cultural bonds between people and forests, the first part of the paper puts focus on non...

  5. Solving the transport equation by Monte Carlo method and application for biological shield calculations; Resavanje transportne jednacine Monte Carlo metodom i njena primena u zadacima proracuna bioloskog stita

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kocic, A [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1977-07-01

    General sampling Monte Carlo scheme for neutron transport equation has been described. Programme TRANSFER for neutron beam transmission analysis has been used to calculate the neutron leakage spectrum, detector efficiency and neutron angular distribution of the example problem (author) [Serbo-Croat] U radu se najpre razmatraju osnovni problemi resavanja transportne jednacine i nacin kako Monte Karlo metoda omogucuje da se prevazidju neki od njih: visedimenzionalnost zadatka, problem dubokog prodiranja i dovoljno fino tretiranje efikasnih preseka. Dalje, govori se o iskustvima sa primenom Monte Karlo metode u Laboratoriji za nuklearnu energetiku i tehnicku fiziku i o primeni ove metode na probleme zastite. Na kraju dati su i analizirani ilustrativni primeri proracuna transporta neutrona kroz ravan sloj zastitnog materijala koriscenjem Monte Karlo programa TRANSFER (author)

  6. Transport of fallout radiocesium in the soil by bioturbation. A random walk model and application to a forest soil with a high abundance of earthworms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunzl, K.

    2002-01-01

    It is well known that bioturbation can contribute significantly to the vertical transport of fallout radionuclides in grassland soils. To examine this effect also for a forest soil, activity-depth profiles of Chernobyl-derived 134Cs from a limed plot (soil, hapludalf under spruce) with a high abundance of earthworms (Lumbricus rubellus) in the Olu horizon (thickness=3.5 cm) were evaluated and compared with the corresponding depth profiles from an adjacent control plot. For this purpose, a random-walk based transport model was developed, which considers (1) the presence of an initial activity-depth distribution, (2) the deposition history of radiocesium at the soil surface, (3) individual diffusion/dispersion coefficients and convection rates for the different soil horizons, and (4) mixing by bioturbation within one soil horizon. With this model, the observed 134Cs-depth distribution at the control site (no bioturbation) and at the limed site could be simulated quite satisfactorily. It is shown that the observed, substantial long-term enrichment of 134Cs in the bioturbation horizon can be modeled by an exceptionally effective diffusion process, combined with a partial reflection of the randomly moving particles at the two borders of the bioturbation zone. The present model predicts significantly longer residence times of radiocesium in the organic soil layer of the forest soil than obtained from a first-order compartment model, which does not consider bioturbation explicitly

  7. Parameterized isoprene and monoterpene emissions from the boreal forest floor: Implementation into a 1D chemistry-transport model and investigation of the influence on atmospheric chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogensen, Ditte; Aaltonen, Hermanni; Aalto, Juho; Bäck, Jaana; Kieloaho, Antti-Jussi; Gierens, Rosa; Smolander, Sampo; Kulmala, Markku; Boy, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are emitted from the biosphere and can work as precursor gases for aerosol particles that can affect the climate (e.g. Makkonen et al., ACP, 2012). VOC emissions from needles and leaves have gained the most attention, however other parts of the ecosystem also have the ability to emit a vast amount of VOCs. This, often neglected, source can be important e.g. at periods where leaves are absent. Both sources and drivers related to forest floor emission of VOCs are currently limited. It is thought that the sources are mainly due to degradation of organic matter (Isidorov and Jdanova, Chemosphere, 2002), living roots (Asensio et al., Soil Biol. Biochem., 2008) and ground vegetation. The drivers are biotic (e.g. microbes) and abiotic (e.g. temperature and moisture). However, the relative importance of the sources and the drivers individually are currently poorly understood. Further, the relative importance of these factors is highly dependent on the tree species occupying the area of interest. The emission of isoprene and monoterpenes where measured from the boreal forest floor at the SMEAR II station in Southern Finland (Hari and Kulmala, Boreal Env. Res., 2005) during the snow-free period in 2010-2012. We used a dynamic method with 3 automated chambers analyzed by Proton Transfer Reaction - Mass Spectrometer (Aaltonen et al., Plant Soil, 2013). Using this data, we have developed empirical parameterizations for the emission of isoprene and monoterpenes from the forest floor. These parameterizations depends on abiotic factors, however, since the parameterizations are based on field measurements, biotic features are captured. Further, we have used the 1D chemistry-transport model SOSAA (Boy et al., ACP, 2011) to test the seasonal relative importance of inclusion of these parameterizations of the forest floor compared to the canopy crown emissions, on the atmospheric reactivity throughout the canopy.

  8. Development of a numerical experiment technique to solve inverse gamma-ray transport problems with application to nondestructive assay of nuclear waste barrels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, C.J.; Anghaie, S.

    1998-01-01

    A numerical experimental technique is presented to find an optimum solution to an undetermined inverse gamma-ray transport problem involving the nondestructive assay of radionuclide inventory in a nuclear waste drum. The method introduced is an optimization scheme based on performing a large number of numerical simulations that account for the counting statistics, the nonuniformity of source distribution, and the heterogeneous density of the self-absorbing medium inside the waste drum. The simulation model uses forward projection and backward reconstruction algorithms. The forward projection algorithm uses randomly selected source distribution and a first-flight kernel method to calculate external detector responses. The backward reconstruction algorithm uses the conjugate gradient with nonnegative constraint or the maximum likelihood expectation maximum method to reconstruct the source distribution based on calculated detector responses. Total source activity is determined by summing the reconstructed activity of each computational grid. By conducting 10,000 numerical simulations, the error bound and the associated confidence level for the prediction of total source activity are determined. The accuracy and reliability of the simulation model are verified by performing a series of experiments in a 208-ell waste barrel. Density heterogeneity is simulated by using different materials distributed in 37 egg-crate-type compartments simulating a vertical segment of the barrel. Four orthogonal detector positions are used to measure the emerging radiation field from the distributed source. Results of the performed experiments are in full agreement with the estimated error and the confidence level, which are predicted by the simulation model

  9. Optimizing biomass feedstock logistics for forest residue processing and transportation on a tree-shaped road network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hee Han; Woodam Chung; Lucas Wells; Nathaniel Anderson

    2018-01-01

    An important task in forest residue recovery operations is to select the most cost-efficient feedstock logistics system for a given distribution of residue piles, road access, and available machinery. Notable considerations include inaccessibility of treatment units to large chip vans and frequent, long-distance mobilization of forestry equipment required to process...

  10. Transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Faculty ii INDUSTRY TRAVEL Domestic Assistant Deputy Under Secretary of Defense (Transportation Policy), Washington, DC Department of...developed between the railroad and trucking industries. Railroads: Today’s seven Class I freight railroad systems move 42% of the nation’s intercity ...has been successfully employed in London to reduce congestion and observed by this industry study during its travels . It is currently being

  11. Transport behavior of radioactive caesium from forests contaminated by the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant accident through river water system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iijima, K.; Funaki, H.; Ohyama, T.; Niizato, T.; Sato, H.; Yui, M. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (Japan)

    2014-07-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has carried out 'the project on the Long-term Assessment of Transport of Radioactive Contaminant in the Environment of Fukushima (F-TRACE project)' since the end of 2012. Radioactive caesium (Cs) has been distributed by the fallout by the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (1F-NPP) accident, and forests in mountain areas have large amount of inventory of radioactive Cs and cover relatively large part of contaminated area of Fukushima. In this project, the transport behavior of radioactive Cs from the forests to biosphere and sea is evaluated by computer simulation based on the results of field observation and laboratory experiments. The results are used to predict evolution of effective dose of the residents in the affected area due to the transport, specify the dominant pathway of Cs, and propose effective methodology to constrain the transport along the pathway. This study reports the specific transport behavior of Cs observed in the basins of five rivers by means of the field investigation and laboratory experiments during the first year of the project. Radioactive Cs located at the crown was considered to be transported to the soil surface by litter fall, stem flow and canopy drip in the Japanese cedar tree forests. Even after two years since the accident, more than 90% of radioactive Cs was still been remained within 5 cm depth from the top of the soil, indicating that the distribution coefficient of radioactive Cs onto the specific minerals such as clay was significantly high. In the river, relatively higher dose rate was observed at the flood channel where fine-grained soil particles were trapped by growing vegetation, while low dose rate was observed beside the river channel where coarse sand or gravel accumulated. The results suggested that fine-grained soil particles containing minerals adsorbing large amount of radioactive Cs were transported in high water level and trapped by the vegetation. In the dam

  12. Cosmic-ray neutron transport at a forest field site: the sensitivity to various environmental conditions with focus on biomass and canopy interception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreasen, Mie; Jensen, Karsten H.; Desilets, Darin; Zreda, Marek; Bogena, Heye R.; Looms, Majken C.

    2017-04-01

    Cosmic-ray neutron intensity is inversely correlated to all hydrogen present in the upper decimeters of the subsurface and the first few hectometers of the atmosphere above the ground surface. This correlation forms the base of the cosmic-ray neutron soil moisture estimation method. The method is, however, complicated by the fact that several hydrogen pools other than soil moisture affect the neutron intensity. In order to improve the cosmic-ray neutron soil moisture estimation method and explore the potential for additional applications, knowledge about the environmental effect on cosmic-ray neutron intensity is essential (e.g., the effect of vegetation, litter layer and soil type). In this study the environmental effect is examined by performing a sensitivity analysis using neutron transport modeling. We use a neutron transport model with various representations of the forest and different parameters describing the subsurface to match measured height profiles and time series of thermal and epithermal neutron intensities at a field site in Denmark. Overall, modeled thermal and epithermal neutron intensities are in satisfactory agreement with measurements; however, the choice of forest canopy conceptualization is found to be significant. Modeling results show that the effect of canopy interception, soil chemistry and dry bulk density of litter and mineral soil on neutron intensity is small. On the other hand, the neutron intensity decreases significantly with added litter-layer thickness, especially for epithermal neutron energies. Forest biomass also has a significant influence on the neutron intensity height profiles at the examined field site, altering both the shape of the profiles and the ground-level thermal-to-epithermal neutron ratio. This ratio increases with increasing amounts of biomass, and was confirmed by measurements from three sites representing agricultural, heathland and forest land cover. A much smaller effect of canopy interception on the ground

  13. Influence of forest and rangeland management on anadromous fish habitat in Western North America: water transportation and storage of logs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    J.R. Sedell; W.S. Duval

    1985-01-01

    Environmental effects of water transportation of logs in western North America include the historical driving of logs in rivers and streams, and the current dumping, sorting, transportation, and storage of logs in rivers and estuaries in British Columbia and southeastern Alaska. The historical discussion focuses on habitat losses and volumes of...

  14. Radioactive caesium in Boreal forest landscapes - Dynamics and transport in food webs. Summary of research 1986-1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergman, R.; Nylen, T.; Palo, T

    1998-12-01

    The need for - but also the paucity of - radioecological knowledge concerning the boreal forest became particularly apparent after the nuclear power plant accident in Chernobyl in April 1986. As a consequence several new projects were initiated in the Nordic countries with particular focus on the behaviour of radioactivecaesium in terrestrial and aquatic systems characteristic for the Fenno-Scandinavian landscapes. Among these new projects a multi-disciplinary co-operation in Umeaa between scientists at the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, and the Defence Research Establishment emerged. Initially this joint work focused mainly on descriptions of the dynamic changes of the content of radioactive caesium in soil-plant and animal communities in the county of Vaesterbotten. Most of the studies have been performed at the Vindeln experimental forest, 60 km NW of Umeaa. Plants of key interest were: bilberry (Vaccinium myrtillus), birch (Betula spp.), and pine (Pinus sylvestris), and among the animals: the moose (Alces alces) and a small rodent, the forest vole (Clethrionomus glareolus). Gradually over the past ten years the research has entered the stage where the specific causes of the caesium behaviour have been addressed - partly by the help of models developed for simulating forest ecosystems, partly by complementary field experiments. This paper reviews our main findings on this theme concerning the behaviour of radioactive caesium in boreal landscapes and significant pathways to man, as has become apparent from the radioecological co-operation dating from about ten years back. A list of the publications arising from these studies since 1986 is also presented in this report.

  15. Radioactive caesium in Boreal forest landscapes - Dynamics and transport in food webs. Summary of research 1986-1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergman, R.; Nylen, T.; Palo, T.

    1998-12-01

    The need for - but also the paucity of - radioecological knowledge concerning the boreal forest became particularly apparent after the nuclear power plant accident in Chernobyl in April 1986. As a consequence several new projects were initiated in the Nordic countries with particular focus on the behaviour of radioactive caesium in terrestrial and aquatic systems characteristic for the Fenno-Scandinavian landscapes. Among these new projects a multi-disciplinary co-operation in Umeaa between scientists at the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, and the Defence Research Establishment emerged. Initially this joint work focused mainly on descriptions of the dynamic changes of the content of radioactive caesium in soil-plant and animal communities in the county of Vaesterbotten. Most of the studies have been performed at the Vindeln experimental forest, 60 km NW of Umeaa. Plants of key interest were: bilberry (Vaccinium myrtillus), birch (Betula spp.), and pine (Pinus sylvestris), and among the animals: the moose (Alces alces) and a small rodent, the forest vole (Clethrionomus glareolus). Gradually over the past ten years the research has entered the stage where the specific causes of the caesium behaviour have been addressed - partly by the help of models developed for simulating forest ecosystems, partly by complementary field experiments. This paper reviews our main findings on this theme concerning the behaviour of radioactive caesium in boreal landscapes and significant pathways to man, as has become apparent from the radioecological co-operation dating from about ten years back. A list of the publications arising from these studies since 1986 is also presented in this report

  16. Verification of a One-Dimensional Model of CO2 Atmospheric Transport Inside and Above a Forest Canopy Using Observations at the Norunda Research Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalets, Ivan; Avila, Rodolfo; Mölder, Meelis; Kovalets, Sophia; Lindroth, Anders

    2018-07-01

    A model of CO2 atmospheric transport in vegetated canopies is tested against measurements of the flow, as well as CO2 concentrations at the Norunda research station located inside a mixed pine-spruce forest. We present the results of simulations of wind-speed profiles and CO2 concentrations inside and above the forest canopy with a one-dimensional model of profiles of the turbulent diffusion coefficient above the canopy accounting for the influence of the roughness sub-layer on turbulent mixing according to Harman and Finnigan (Boundary-Layer Meteorol 129:323-351, 2008; hereafter HF08). Different modelling approaches are used to define the turbulent exchange coefficients for momentum and concentration inside the canopy: (1) the modified HF08 theory—numerical solution of the momentum and concentration equations with a non-constant distribution of leaf area per unit volume; (2) empirical parametrization of the turbulent diffusion coefficient using empirical data concerning the vertical profiles of the Lagrangian time scale and root-mean-square deviation of the vertical velocity component. For neutral, daytime conditions, the second-order turbulence model is also used. The flexibility of the empirical model enables the best fit of the simulated CO2 concentrations inside the canopy to the observations, with the results of simulations for daytime conditions inside the canopy layer only successful provided the respiration fluxes are properly considered. The application of the developed model for radiocarbon atmospheric transport released in the form of ^{14}CO2 is presented and discussed.

  17. Solving “Smart City” Transport Problems by Designing Carpooling Gamification Schemes with Multi-Agent Systems: The Case of the So-Called “Mordor of Warsaw”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Olszewski

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available To reduce energy consumption and improve residents’ quality of life, “smart cities” should use not only modern technologies, but also the social innovations of the “Internet of Things” (IoT era. This article attempts to solve transport problems in a smart city’s office district by utilizing gamification that incentivizes the carpooling system. The goal of the devised system is to significantly reduce the number of cars, and, consequently, to alleviate traffic jams, as well as to curb pollution and energy consumption. A representative sample of the statistical population of people working in one of the biggest office hubs in Poland (the so-called “Mordor of Warsaw” was surveyed. The collected data were processed using spatial data mining methods, and the results were a set of parameters for the multi-agent system. This approach made it possible to run a series of simulations on a set of 100,000 agents and to select an effective gamification methodology that supports the carpooling process. The implementation of the proposed solutions (a “serious game” variation of urban games would help to reduce the number of cars by several dozen percent, significantly reduce energy consumption, eliminate traffic jams, and increase the activity of the smart city residents.

  18. Solving “Smart City” Transport Problems by Designing Carpooling Gamification Schemes with Multi-Agent Systems: The Case of the So-Called “Mordor of Warsaw”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turek, Agnieszka

    2018-01-01

    To reduce energy consumption and improve residents’ quality of life, “smart cities” should use not only modern technologies, but also the social innovations of the “Internet of Things” (IoT) era. This article attempts to solve transport problems in a smart city’s office district by utilizing gamification that incentivizes the carpooling system. The goal of the devised system is to significantly reduce the number of cars, and, consequently, to alleviate traffic jams, as well as to curb pollution and energy consumption. A representative sample of the statistical population of people working in one of the biggest office hubs in Poland (the so-called “Mordor of Warsaw”) was surveyed. The collected data were processed using spatial data mining methods, and the results were a set of parameters for the multi-agent system. This approach made it possible to run a series of simulations on a set of 100,000 agents and to select an effective gamification methodology that supports the carpooling process. The implementation of the proposed solutions (a “serious game” variation of urban games) would help to reduce the number of cars by several dozen percent, significantly reduce energy consumption, eliminate traffic jams, and increase the activity of the smart city residents. PMID:29316643

  19. Do Cloud Properties in a Puerto Rican Tropical Montane Cloud Forest Depend on Occurrence of Long-Range Transported African Dust?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiegel, Johanna K.; Buchmann, Nina; Mayol-Bracero, Olga L.; Cuadra-Rodriguez, Luis A.; Valle Díaz, Carlos J.; Prather, Kimberly A.; Mertes, Stephan; Eugster, Werner

    2014-09-01

    We investigated cloud properties of warm clouds in a tropical montane cloud forest at Pico del Este (1,051 m a.s.l.) in the northeastern part of Puerto Rico to address the question of whether cloud properties in the Caribbean could potentially be affected by African dust transported across the Atlantic Ocean. We analyzed data collected during 12 days in July 2011. Cloud droplet size spectra were measured using the FM-100 fog droplet spectrometer that measured droplet size distributions in the range from 2 to 49 µm, primarily during fog events. The droplet size spectra revealed a bimodal structure, with the first peak ( D < 6 µm) being more pronounced in terms of droplet number concentrations, whereas the second peak (10 µm < D < 20 µm) was found to be the one relevant for total liquid water content (LWC) of the cloud. We identified three major clusters of characteristic droplet size spectra by means of hierarchical clustering. All clusters differed significantly from each other in droplet number concentration (), effective diameter (ED), and median volume diameter (MVD). For the cluster comprising the largest droplets and the lowest droplet number concentrations, we found evidence of inhomogeneous mixing in the cloud. Contrastingly, the other two clusters revealed microphysical behavior, which could be expected under homogeneous mixing conditions. For those conditions, an increase in cloud condensation nuclei—e.g., from processed African dust transported to the site—is supposed to lead to an increased droplet concentration. In fact, one of these two clusters showed a clear shift of cloud droplet size spectra towards smaller droplet diameters. Since this cluster occurred during periods with strong evidence for the presence of long-range transported African dust, we hypothesize a link between the observed dust episodes and cloud characteristics in the Caribbean at our site, which is similar to the anthropogenic aerosol indirect effect.

  20. Problem Solving and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Chandralekha

    2009-07-01

    One finding of cognitive research is that people do not automatically acquire usable knowledge by spending lots of time on task. Because students' knowledge hierarchy is more fragmented, "knowledge chunks" are smaller than those of experts. The limited capacity of short term memory makes the cognitive load high during problem solving tasks, leaving few cognitive resources available for meta-cognition. The abstract nature of the laws of physics and the chain of reasoning required to draw meaningful inferences makes these issues critical. In order to help students, it is crucial to consider the difficulty of a problem from the perspective of students. We are developing and evaluating interactive problem-solving tutorials to help students in the introductory physics courses learn effective problem-solving strategies while solidifying physics concepts. The self-paced tutorials can provide guidance and support for a variety of problem solving techniques, and opportunity for knowledge and skill acquisition.

  1. Teaching Creative Problem Solving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Kip W.; Martin, Loren

    1992-01-01

    Interpersonal and cognitive skills, adaptability, and critical thinking can be developed through problem solving and cooperative learning in technology education. These skills have been identified as significant needs of the workplace as well as for functioning in society. (SK)

  2. Mineralogical effects of an experimental forest fire on a goethite/ferrihydrite soil - an attempt to solve the presence of hematite and maghemite in topsoils in a temperate region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nørnberg, Per; Vendelboe, Anders L.; Gunnlaugsson, Haraldur P.; Merrison, Jonathan P.; Finster, Kai; Jensen, Svend K.

    2010-05-01

    Isolated soil spots, a few square metres in size, as red as Munsell colour 10R ¾ are found in Denmark. These spots are well known as places that have been exposed to fire. However, a long-standing unresolved puzzle is the presence of extended areas with high iron content (8-40 %) where goethite and ferrihydrite are present in the topsoil along with hematite and maghemite. Hematite and particularly maghemite would normally not be expected to occur under the temperate humid Danish climate, but be interpreted as the result of high temperature as found in tropical areas or after forest fires. However, a body of evidence argues against these sites having been exposed to fire. In an attempt to get closer to an explanation of this iron mineralogy, an experimental forest fire was produced. The results showed a clear mineralogical zonation down to 10 cm depth. This was not observed at the natural sites, which contained a uniform mixture of goethite/ferrihydrite, hematite and maghemite down to 20 cm depth. The experimental forest fire furthermore left charcoal and ashes at the topsoil, produced high pH and decreased organic matter content, all of which is in contrast to the natural sites. Physical and chemical date as well as XRD, Mössbauer spectroscopic data and TEM micrographs from the sites will be presented. The conclusion from this work is that the mineralogy of these sites is not consistent with exposure to fire, but may rather result from long term transformation within a reducing environment, possibly involving microorganisms. References: Nørnberg, P., Vendelboe, A.L., Gunnlaugsson, H.P., Merrison, J.P., Finster, K., Jensen, S.K. 2009 Mineralogy after an experimental forest fire on Quaternary soil goethite, compared with a hematite, maghemite, goethite containing topsoil. Clay Minerals, 44, 239-247. Nørnberg, P., Gunnlaugsson, H.P., Merrison, J.P., Vendelboe, A.L. 2009: Salten Skov I: A Martian dust analogue. Planetary and Space Science, 57, 628-631. Nørnberg, P

  3. Transport methods: general. 1. The Analytical Monte Carlo Method for Radiation Transport Calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, William R.; Brown, Forrest B.

    2001-01-01

    We present an alternative Monte Carlo method for solving the coupled equations of radiation transport and material energy. This method is based on incorporating the analytical solution to the material energy equation directly into the Monte Carlo simulation for the radiation intensity. This method, which we call the Analytical Monte Carlo (AMC) method, differs from the well known Implicit Monte Carlo (IMC) method of Fleck and Cummings because there is no discretization of the material energy equation since it is solved as a by-product of the Monte Carlo simulation of the transport equation. Our method also differs from the method recently proposed by Ahrens and Larsen since they use Monte Carlo to solve both equations, while we are solving only the radiation transport equation with Monte Carlo, albeit with effective sources and cross sections to represent the emission sources. Our method bears some similarity to a method developed and implemented by Carter and Forest nearly three decades ago, but there are substantive differences. We have implemented our method in a simple zero-dimensional Monte Carlo code to test the feasibility of the method, and the preliminary results are very promising, justifying further extension to more realistic geometries. (authors)

  4. The potential of detecting intermediate-scale biomass and canopy interception in a coniferous forest using cosmic-ray neutron intensity measurements and neutron transport modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreasen, M.; Looms, M. C.; Bogena, H. R.; Desilets, D.; Zreda, M. G.; Sonnenborg, T. O.; Jensen, K. H.

    2014-12-01

    The water stored in the various compartments of the terrestrial ecosystem (in snow, canopy interception, soil and litter) controls the exchange of the water and energy between the land surface and the atmosphere. Therefore, measurements of the water stored within these pools are critical for the prediction of e.g. evapotranspiration and groundwater recharge. The detection of cosmic-ray neutron intensity is a novel non-invasive method for the quantification of continuous intermediate-scale soil moisture. The footprint of the cosmic-ray neutron probe is a hemisphere of a few hectometers and subsurface depths of 10-70 cm depending on wetness. The cosmic-ray neutron method offers measurements at a scale between the point-scale measurements and large-scale satellite retrievals. The cosmic-ray neutron intensity is inversely correlated to the hydrogen stored within the footprint. Overall soil moisture represents the largest pool of hydrogen and changes in the soil moisture clearly affect the cosmic-ray neutron signal. However, the neutron intensity is also sensitive to variations of hydrogen in snow, canopy interception and biomass offering the potential to determine water content in such pools from the signal. In this study we tested the potential of determining canopy interception and biomass using cosmic-ray neutron intensity measurements within the framework of the Danish Hydrologic Observatory (HOBE) and the Terrestrial Environmental Observatories (TERENO). Continuous measurements at the ground and the canopy level, along with profile measurements were conducted at towers at forest field sites. Field experiments, including shielding the cosmic-ray neutron probes with cadmium foil (to remove lower-energy neutrons) and measuring reference intensity rates at complete water saturated conditions (on the sea close to the HOBE site), were further conducted to obtain an increased understanding of the physics controlling the cosmic-ray neutron transport and the equipment used

  5. Long range transport of smoke particles from Canadian forest fires to the Mediterranean basin during June 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Iorio, T.; Anello, F.; Bommarito, C.; Cacciani, M.; Denjean, C.; De Silvestri, L.; Di Biagio, C.; di Sarra, A.; Ellul, R.; Formenti, P.; Gómez-Amo, J.; Martinez-Lozano, J. A.; Meloni, D.; Monteleone, F.; Pace, G.; Piacentino, S.; Schioppo, R.; Sferlazzo, D.

    2013-12-01

    The first Special Observation Period (SOP1) of the ChArMEx (Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment) campaign occurred from June 12 to July 5, 2013. We discuss measurements carried out in the central Mediterranean sector at the ENEA Station for Climatic Observation on the island of Lampedusa (35.5°N, 12.6°E, Italy), at the Global Atmospheric Watch (GAW) station on the island of Gozo (36.0°N, 14.3°E; Malta), at Capo Granitola station along the southern coast of Sicily (37.6°N, 12.6°E) and onboard the ATR42 French instrumented aircraft. Several aerosol layers at various altitudes were detected by lidar at Lampedusa, one of the ChArMEx supersites, throughout June 27 and in the early part of June 28. A first dense layer between 2 and 4 km altitude, associated with transport of desert dust from Africa, was present in the morning of June 27 and disappeared around noon. Around midday, several thin layers started to appear between 5 and 12 km, and down to 2 km afterwards. The aerosol optical depth (AOD) peaked at about 0.45 around noon. The occurrence of the layers above 2 km was associated with a progressive increase of the Ångström exponent (AE), revealing the growing amount of small sized particles. The AE exceeded 1.8 in the late afternoon. Radiosonde and microwave radiometer profiles show a very dry mid troposphere, with a moderate increase in relative humidity in correspondence with the aerosol layer at about 11 km. The low humidity suggests the intrusion of upper tropospheric airmasses in the mid troposphere. Multiwavelength lidar backscattering, depolarization, and color ratio profiles, as well as their morphological evolution, suggest that the layers between 2 and 12 km occurring in the afternoon are composed by fine aerosols and are not due to cloud particles. Backward trajectories show that the airmasses containing the fine particles originated from North America. They overpassed Canada in correspondence with intense wildfires occurring on June 22 and

  6. Processes Influencing Ozone Levels in Alaskan Forest Fires Plumes during Long-Range Transport over the North Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Real, E.; Law, K. S.; Wienzierl, B.; Fiebig, M.; Petzold, A.; Wild, O.; Methven, J.; Arnold, S.; Stohl, A.; Huntrieser, H.; hide

    2006-01-01

    A case of long-range transport of a biomass burning plume from Alaska to Europe is analyzed using a Lagrangian approach. This plume was sampled several times in the free troposphere over North America, the North Atlantic and Europe by 3 different aircraft during the IGAC Lagrangian 2K4 experiment which was part of the ICARTT/ITOP measurement intensive in summer 2004. Measurements in the plume showed enhanced values of CO, VOCs and NOy, mainly in form of PAN. Observed O3 levels increased by 17 ppbv over 5 days. A photochemical trajectory model, CiTTyCAT, is used to examine processes responsible for the chemical evolution of the plume. The model was initialized with upwind data, and compared with downwind measurements. The influence of high aerosol loading on photolysis rates in the plume is investigated using in-situ aerosol measurements in the plume and lidar retrievals of optical depth as input into a photolysis code (Fast-J), run in the model. Significant impacts on photochemistry are found with a decrease of 18 percent in O3 production and 24 percent in O3 destruction over 5 days when including aerosols. The plume is found to be chemically active with large O3 increases attributed primarily to PAN decomposition during descent of the plume towards Europe. The predicted O3 changes are very dependent on temperature changes during transport, and also, on water vapor levels in the lower troposphere which can lead to O3 destruction. Simulation of mixing/dilution was necessary to reproduce observed pollutants level in the plume. Mixing was simulated using background concentrations from measurements in air masses in close proximity to the plume, and mixing timescales (averaging 6.25 days) were derived from CO changes. Observed and simulated O3/CO correlations in the plume are also compared in order to evaluate the photochemistry in the model. Observed slopes changed from negative to positive over 5 days. This change, which can be attributed largely to photochemistry, is

  7. Urban Forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    David Nowak

    2016-01-01

    Urban forests (and trees) constitute the second forest resource considered in this report. We specifically emphasize the fact that agricultural and urban forests exist on a continuum defined by their relationship (and interrelationship) with a given landscape. These two forest types generally serve different purposes, however. Whereas agricultural forests are...

  8. Distributed Problem-Solving

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chemi, Tatiana

    2016-01-01

    This chapter aims to deconstruct some persistent myths about creativity: the myth of individualism and of the genius. By looking at literature that approaches creativity as a participatory and distributed phenomenon and by bringing empirical evidence from artists’ studios, the author presents a p......, what can educators at higher education learn from the ways creative groups solve problems? How can artists contribute to inspiring higher education?......This chapter aims to deconstruct some persistent myths about creativity: the myth of individualism and of the genius. By looking at literature that approaches creativity as a participatory and distributed phenomenon and by bringing empirical evidence from artists’ studios, the author presents...... a perspective that is relevant to higher education. The focus here is on how artists solve problems in distributed paths, and on the elements of creative collaboration. Creative problem-solving will be looked at as an ongoing dialogue that artists engage with themselves, with others, with recipients...

  9. Solving Environmental Problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørding Olsen, Anders; Sofka, Wolfgang; Grimpe, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    for Research and Technological Development (FP7), our results indicate that the problem-solving potential of a search strategy increases with the diversity of existing knowledge of the partners in a consortium and with the experience of the partners involved. Moreover, we identify a substantial negative effect...... dispersed. Hence, firms need to collaborate. We shed new light on collaborative search strategies led by firms in general and for solving environmental problems in particular. Both topics are largely absent in the extant open innovation literature. Using data from the European Seventh Framework Program...

  10. Soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) transport and retention in tropical, rain forest streams draining a volcanic landscape in Costa Rica: In situ SRP amendment to streams and laboratory studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triska, F.; Pringle, C.M.; Duff, J.H.; Avanzino, R.J.; Zellweger, G.

    2006-01-01

    Soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) transport/retention was determined in two rain forest streams (Salto, Pantano) draining La Selva Biological Station, Costa Rica. There, SRP levels can be naturally high due to groundwater enriched by geothermal activity within the surfically dormant volcanic landscape, and subsequently discharged at ambient temperature. Combined field and laboratory approaches simulated high but natural geothermal SRP input with the objective of estimating the magnitude of amended SRP retention within high and low SRP settings and determining the underlying mechanisms of SRP retention. First, we examined short-term SRP retention/transport using combined SRP-conservative tracer additions at high natural in situ concentrations. Second, we attempted to observe a DIN response during SRP amendment as an indicator of biological uptake. Third, we determined SRP release/retention using laboratory sediment assays under control and biologically inhibited conditions. Short-term in situ tracer-SRP additions indicated retention in both naturally high and low SRP reaches. Retention of added SRP mass in Upper Salto (low SRP) was 17% (7.5 mg-P m-2 h-1), and 20% (10.9 mg-P m-2 h -1) in Lower Salto (high SRP). No DIN response in either nitrate or ammonium was observed. Laboratory assays using fresh Lower Salto sediments indicated SRP release (15.4 ?? 5.9 ??g-P g dry wt.-1 h -1), when incubated in filter sterilized Salto water at ambient P concentration, but retention when incubated in filter sterilized river water amended to 2.0 mg SRP l-1 (233.2 ?? 5.8 ??g-P g dry wt. -1 h-1). SRP uptake/release was similar in both control- and biocide-treated sediments indicating predominantly abiotic retention. High SRP retention even under biologically saturated conditions, absence of a DIN response to amendment, patterns of desorption following amendment, and similar patterns of retention and release under control and biologically inhibited conditions all indicated

  11. Introspection in Problem Solving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäkel, Frank; Schreiber, Cornell

    2013-01-01

    Problem solving research has encountered an impasse. Since the seminal work of Newell und Simon (1972) researchers do not seem to have made much theoretical progress (Batchelder and Alexander, 2012; Ohlsson, 2012). In this paper we argue that one factor that is holding back the field is the widespread rejection of introspection among cognitive…

  12. Problem Solving in Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Kim; Heyck-Williams, Jeff; Timpson Gray, Elicia

    2017-01-01

    Problem solving spans all grade levels and content areas, as evidenced by this compilation of projects from schools across the United States. In one project, high school girls built a solar-powered tent to serve their city's homeless population. In another project, 4th graders explored historic Jamestown to learn about the voices lost to history.…

  13. Solving Linear Differential Equations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen, K.A.; Put, M. van der

    2010-01-01

    The theme of this paper is to 'solve' an absolutely irreducible differential module explicitly in terms of modules of lower dimension and finite extensions of the differential field K. Representations of semi-simple Lie algebras and differential Galo is theory are the main tools. The results extend

  14. Solving a binary puzzle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Utomo, P.H.; Makarim, R.H.

    2017-01-01

    A Binary puzzle is a Sudoku-like puzzle with values in each cell taken from the set {0,1} {0,1}. Let n≥4 be an even integer, a solved binary puzzle is an n×n binary array that satisfies the following conditions: (1) no three consecutive ones and no three consecutive zeros in each row and each

  15. Electric Current Solves Mazes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayrinhac, Simon

    2014-01-01

    We present in this work a demonstration of the maze-solving problem with electricity. Electric current flowing in a maze as a printed circuit produces Joule heating and the right way is instantaneously revealed with infrared thermal imaging. The basic properties of electric current can be discussed in this context, with this challenging question:…

  16. On Solving Linear Recurrences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobbs, David E.

    2013-01-01

    A direct method is given for solving first-order linear recurrences with constant coefficients. The limiting value of that solution is studied as "n to infinity." This classroom note could serve as enrichment material for the typical introductory course on discrete mathematics that follows a calculus course.

  17. Forest rights

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balooni, Kulbhushan; Lund, Jens Friis

    2014-01-01

    One of the proposed strategies for implementation of reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation plus (REDD+) is to incentivize conservation of forests managed by communities under decentralized forest management. Yet, we argue that this is a challenging road to REDD+ because...... conservation of forests under existing decentralized management arrangements toward a push for extending the coverage of forests under decentralized management, making forest rights the hard currency of REDD+....

  18. Toward Solving the Problem of Problem Solving: An Analysis Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roesler, Rebecca A.

    2016-01-01

    Teaching is replete with problem solving. Problem solving as a skill, however, is seldom addressed directly within music teacher education curricula, and research in music education has not examined problem solving systematically. A framework detailing problem-solving component skills would provide a needed foundation. I observed problem solving…

  19. Development of risk assessment methodology of decay heat removal function against external hazards for sodium-cooled fast reactors. (3) Numerical simulations of forest fire spread and smoke transport as an external hazard assessment methodology development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okano, Yasushi; Yamano, Hidemasa

    2015-01-01

    As a part of a development of the risk assessment methodologies against external hazards, a new methodology to assess forest fire hazards is being developed. Frequency and consequence of the forest fire are analyzed to obtain the hazard intensity curve and then Level 1 probabilistic safety assessment is performed to obtain the conditional core damage probability due to the challenges by the forest fire. 'Heat', 'flame', 'smoke' and 'flying object' are the challenges to a nuclear power plant. For a sodium-cooled fast reactor, a decay heat removal under accident conditions is operated with an ultimate heat sink of air, then, the challenge by 'smoke' will potentially be on the air filter of the system. In this paper, numerical simulations of forest fire propagation and smoke transport were performed with sensibility studies to weather conditions, and the effect by the smoke on the air filter was quantitatively evaluated. Forest fire propagation simulations were performed using FARSITE code. A temporal increase of a forest fire spread area and a position of the frontal fireline are obtained by the simulation, and 'reaction intensity' and 'frontal fireline intensity' as the indexes of 'heat' are obtained as well. The boundary of the fire spread area is shaped like an ellipse on the terrain, and the boundary length is increased with time and fire spread. The sensibility analyses on weather conditions of wind, temperature, and humidity were performed, and it was summarized that 'forest fire spread rate' and 'frontal fireline intensity' depend much on wind speed and humidity. Smoke transport simulations were performed by ALOFT-FT code where three-dimensional spatial distribution of smoke density, especially of particle matters of PM2.5 and PM10, are evaluated. The snapshot outputs, namely 'reaction intensity' and 'position of frontal fireline', from the sensibility studies of the FARSITE were directly utilized as the input data for ALOFT-FT, whereas it is assumed that the

  20. Zoning of the Russian Federation territory based on forest management and forest use intensity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Маrtynyuk

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Over extended periods issues of forest management intensification are important in all aspects of Russian forest sector development. Sufficient research has been done in silviculture, forest planning and forest economics to address forest management intensification targets. Systems of our national territory forest management and forest economics zoning due to specifics of timber processing and forest area infrastructure have been developed. Despite sufficient available experience in sustainable forest management so far intensification issues were addressed due to development of new woodlands without proper consideration of forest regeneration and sustainable forest management operations. It resulted in forest resource depletion and unfavorable substitution of coniferous forests with less valuable softwood ones in considerable territories (especially accessible for transport. The situation is complicated since degree of forest ecosystem changes is higher in territories with high potential productivity. Ongoing changes combined with the present effective forest management system resulted in a situation where development of new woodlands is impossible without heavy investments in road construction; meanwhile road construction is unfeasible due to distances to timber processing facilities. In the meantime, changes in forest legislation, availability of forest lease holding, and promising post-logging forest regeneration technologies generate new opportunities to increase timber volumes due to application of other procedures practically excluding development of virgin woodlands. With regard to above, the Russian territory was zoned on a basis of key factors that define forest management and forest use intensification based on forest ecosystem potential productivity and area transport accessibility. Based on available data with GIS analysis approach (taking into consideration value of various factors the Russian Federation forest resources have been

  1. Soil strength and forest operations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beekman, F.

    1987-01-01

    The use of heavy machinery and transport vehicles is an integral part of modern forest operations. This use often causes damage to the standing trees and to the soil. In this study the effects of vehicle traffic on the soil are analysed and the possible consequences for forest management

  2. Unwelcome Guests: Extoic Forest Pests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun Jiang-Hua

    2002-01-01

    Exotic forest pests cost China and the United States billions of dollars each year. Current regulatory systems worldwide are over-whelmed with the increasing volume of international trade. Trade in nursery stock, wood products, pallets and dunnage have proven the most common means of transport for exotic forest pests. Despite our best efforts, pests such as chestnut...

  3. FRM: ADVANCED FOREST PRODUCTS MARKETING

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    techniques and high cost of transportation are some of the problems encountered in the production and marketing of prosopis condiment in Makurdi metropolis. Key words: ... this, forest managers should no longer be concerned solely with ...

  4. Creativity and Problem Solving

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vidal, Rene Victor Valqui

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents some modern and interdisciplinary concepts about creativity and creative processes of special relevance for Operational Research workers. Central publications in the area Creativity-Operational Research are shortly reviewed. Some creative tools and the Creative Problem Solving...... approach are also discussed. Finally, some applications of these concepts and tools are outlined. Some central references are presented for further study of themes related to creativity or creative tools....

  5. Creativity and problem Solving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René Victor Valqui Vidal

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents some modern and interdisciplinary concepts about creativity and creative processes of special relevance for Operational Research workers. Central publications in the area Creativity-Operational Research are shortly reviewed. Some creative tools and the Creative Problem Solving approach are also discussed. Finally, some applications of these concepts and tools are outlined. Some central references are presented for further study of themes related to creativity or creative tools.

  6. Monitoring of long-range transported air pollutants and precipitation. Monitoring programme for forest damage. Abstract of annual reports 1996; Overvaaking av langtransportert forurenset luft og nedboer. Overvaakingsprogram for skogskader. Sammendrag av aarsrapporter 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    This report sums up the results for 1996 of two monitoring programmes: `` Norwegian Monitoring Programme for Long-Range Transported Air Pollutants`` and ``Norwegian forest monitoring programme``. The atmospheric pollution is monitored by measurements of chemical main components in the air and in precipitation. The effects of the pollutants on water quality are followed by monitoring of rivers, lakes and field research areas. The effects on fish are followed by regional investigations on benthic organisms, zooplankton and fish populations in rivers and lakes. Water chemical samples are taken each month from 16 rivers and acid material is monitored at seven field research areas. Samples are also taken from 200 lakes every autumn. The biological monitoring programme comprises fish in lakes and streams and benthic animals in lakes. The monitoring of forest damage uses three nation-wide areas from which registrations have been taken over a period of ten years. 28 figs., 6 tabs.

  7. Forest soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles H. (Hobie) Perry; Michael C. Amacher

    2009-01-01

    Productive soils are the foundation of sustainable forests throughout the United States. Forest soils are generally subjected to fewer disturbances than agricultural soils, particularly those that are tilled, so forest soils tend to have better preserved A-horizons than agricultural soils. Another major contrast between forest and agricultural soils is the addition of...

  8. Forest hydrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge Sun; Devendra Amatya; Steve McNulty

    2016-01-01

    Forest hydrology studies the distribution, storage, movement, and quality of water and the hydrological processes in forest-dominated ecosystems. Forest hydrological science is regarded as the foundation of modern integrated water¬shed management. This chapter provides an overview of the history of forest hydrology and basic principles of this unique branch of...

  9. Forest Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    S. Hummel; K. L. O' Hara

    2008-01-01

    Global variation in forests and in human cultures means that a single method for managing forests is not possible. However, forest management everywhere shares some common principles because it is rooted in physical and biological sciences like chemistry and genetics. Ecological forest management is an approach that combines an understanding of universal processes with...

  10. Modeling soil CO2 production and transport to investigate the intra-day variability of surface efflux and soil CO2 concentration measurements in a scots pine forest (Pinus Sylvestris, L.)

    OpenAIRE

    Goffin, Stéphanie; Wylock, Christophe; Haut, Benoît; Maier, Martin; Longdoz, Bernard; Aubinet, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Aimed:The main aim of this study is to improve the mechanistic understanding of soil CO2 efflux (Fs), especially its temporal variation at short-time scales, by investigating, through modeling, which underlying process among CO2 production and its transport up to the atmosphere is responsible for observed intra-day variation of Fs and soil CO2 concentration [CO2].Methods:In this study, a measurement campaign of Fs and vertical soil [CO2] profiles was conducted in a Scots Pine Forest soil in H...

  11. Appreciative Problem Solving

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, David

    2012-01-01

    Many industrial production work systems have increased in complexity, and their new business model scompete on innovation, rather than low cost.At a medical device production facility committed to Lean Production, a research project was carried out to use Appreciative Inquiry to better engage...... employee strengths in continuou simprovements of the work system. The research question was: “How can Lean problem solving and Appreciative Inquiry be combined for optimized work system innovation?” The research project was carried out as a co-creation process with close cooperation between researcher...

  12. Simon on problem solving

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foss, Kirsten; Foss, Nicolai Juul

    2006-01-01

    as a general approach to problem solving. We apply these Simonian ideas to organisational issues, specifically new organisational forms. Specifically, Simonian ideas allow us to develop a morphology of new organisational forms and to point to some design problems that characterise these forms.......Two of Herbert Simon's best-known papers are 'The Architecture of Complexity' and 'The Structure of Ill-Structured Problems.' We discuss the neglected links between these two papers, highlighting the role of decomposition in the context of problems on which constraints have been imposed...

  13. Planning and Problem Solving

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-10-01

    Artificial Intelig ~ence (Vol. III, edited by Paul R. Cohen and’ Edward A.. Feigenbaum)’, The chapter was written B’ Paul Cohen, with contributions... Artificial Intelligence (Vol. III, edited by Paul R. Cohen and EdWard A. Feigenbaum). The chapter was written by Paul R. Cohen, with contributions by Stephen...Wheevoats"EntermdI’ Planning and Problem ’Solving by Paul R. Cohen Chaptb-rXV-of Volumec III’of the Handbook of Artificial Intelligence edited by Paul R

  14. Solving Differential Equations in R: Package deSolve

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this paper we present the R package deSolve to solve initial value problems (IVP) written as ordinary differential equations (ODE), differential algebraic equations (DAE) of index 0 or 1 and partial differential equations (PDE), the latter solved using the method of lines appr...

  15. Solving Differential Equations in R: Package deSolve

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soetaert, K.E.R.; Petzoldt, T.; Setzer, R.W.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present the R package deSolve to solve initial value problems (IVP) written as ordinary differential equations (ODE), differential algebraic equations (DAE) of index 0 or 1 and partial differential equations (PDE), the latter solved using the method of lines approach. The

  16. Effects of earthworms on slopewash, surface runoff, and fine-litter transport on a humid-tropical forested hillslope in eastern Puerto Rico: Chapter G in Water quality and landscape processes of four watersheds in eastern Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Matthew C.; Liu, Zhigang Liu; Zou, Xiaoming; Murphy, Sheila F.; Stallard, Robert F.

    2012-01-01

    Rainfall, slopewash (the erosion of soil particles), surface runoff, and fine-litter transport were measured in tropical wet forest on a hillslope in the Luquillo Experimental Forest, Puerto Rico, from February 1998 until April 2000. Slopewash data were collected using Gerlach troughs at eight plots, each 2 square meters in area. Earthworms were excluded by electroshocking from four randomly selected plots. The other four (control) plots were undisturbed. During the experiment, earthworm population in the electroshocked plots was reduced by 91 percent. At the end of the experiment, the electroshocked plots had 13 percent of earthworms by count and 6 percent by biomass as compared with the control plots. Rainfall during the sampling period (793 days) was 9,143 millimeters. Mean and maximum rainfall by sampling period (mean of 16 days) were 189 and 563 millimeters, respectively. Surface runoff averaged 0.6 millimeters and 1.2 millimeters by sampling period for the control and experimental plots, equal to 0.25 and 0.48 percent of mean rainfall, respectively. Disturbance of the soil environment by removal of earthworms doubled runoff and increased the transport (erosion) of soil and organic material by a factor of 4.4. When earthworms were removed, the erosion of mineral soil (soil mass left after ashing) and the transport of fine litter were increased by a factor of 5.3 and 3.4, respectively. It is assumed that increased runoff is a function of reduced soil porosity, resulting from decreased burrowing and reworking of the soil in the absence of earthworms. The background, or undisturbed, downslope transport of soil, as determined from the control plots, was 51 kilograms per hectare and the "disturbance" rate, determined from the experimental plots, was 261 kilograms per hectare. The background rate for downslope transport of fine litter was 71 kilograms per hectare and the disturbance rate was 246 kilograms per hectare. Data from this study indicate that the reduction

  17. Solved problems in electromagnetics

    CERN Document Server

    Salazar Bloise, Félix; Bayón Rojo, Ana; Gascón Latasa, Francisco

    2017-01-01

    This book presents the fundamental concepts of electromagnetism through problems with a brief theoretical introduction at the beginning of each chapter. The present book has a strong  didactic character. It explains all the mathematical steps and the theoretical concepts connected with the development of the problem. It guides the reader to understand the employed procedures to learn to solve the exercises independently. The exercises are structured in a similar way: The chapters begin with easy problems increasing progressively in the level of difficulty. This book is written for students of physics and engineering in the framework of the new European Plans of Study for Bachelor and Master and also for tutors and lecturers. .

  18. Solved problems in electrochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piron, D.L.

    2004-01-01

    This book presents calculated solutions to problems in fundamental and applied electrochemistry. It uses industrial data to illustrate scientific concepts and scientific knowledge to solve practical problems. It is subdivided into three parts. The first uses modern basic concepts, the second studies the scientific basis for electrode and electrolyte thermodynamics (including E-pH diagrams and the minimum energy involved in transformations) and the kinetics of rate processes (including the energy lost in heat and in parasite reactions). The third part treats larger problems in electrolysis and power generation, as well as in corrosion and its prevention. Each chapter includes three sections: the presentation of useful principles; some twenty problems with their solutions; and, a set of unsolved problems

  19. Forest Resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2016-06-01

    Forest biomass is an abundant biomass feedstock that complements the conventional forest use of wood for paper and wood materials. It may be utilized for bioenergy production, such as heat and electricity, as well as for biofuels and a variety of bioproducts, such as industrial chemicals, textiles, and other renewable materials. The resources within the 2016 Billion-Ton Report include primary forest resources, which are taken directly from timberland-only forests, removed from the land, and taken to the roadside.

  20. Next-generation simulation and optimization platform for forest management and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antti Makinen; Jouni Kalliovirta; Jussi Rasinmaki

    2009-01-01

    Late developments in the objectives and the data collection methods of forestry create new challenges and possibilities in forest management planning. Tools in forest management and forest planning systems must be able to make good use of novel data sources, use new models, and solve complex forest planning tasks at different scales. The SIMulation and Optimization (...

  1. On linear transport problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ignatovich, V.K.

    1989-01-01

    The equations. governing the transport of radiation in plane media of finite thickness are formulated and solved in terms reflection and extintion of radiation inthe case of semi infinite media. 13 refs

  2. Soil strength and forest operations

    OpenAIRE

    Beekman, F.

    1987-01-01

    The use of heavy machinery and transport vehicles is an integral part of modern forest operations. This use often causes damage to the standing trees and to the soil. In this study the effects of vehicle traffic on the soil are analysed and the possible consequences for forest management discussed. The study is largely restricted to sandy and loamy soils because of their importance for Dutch forestry.

    Soil strength, defined as the resistance of soil structure against the impa...

  3. Difficulties in Genetics Problem Solving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolman, Richard R.

    1982-01-01

    Examined problem-solving strategies of 30 high school students as they solved genetics problems. Proposes a new sequence of teaching genetics based on results: meiosis, sex chromosomes, sex determination, sex-linked traits, monohybrid and dihybrid crosses (humans), codominance (humans), and Mendel's pea experiments. (JN)

  4. Problem Solving, Scaffolding and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shih-Yin

    2012-01-01

    Helping students to construct robust understanding of physics concepts and develop good solving skills is a central goal in many physics classrooms. This thesis examine students' problem solving abilities from different perspectives and explores strategies to scaffold students' learning. In studies involving analogical problem solving…

  5. Problem Solving on a Monorail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrow, Lloyd H.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    This activity was created to address a lack of problem-solving activities for elementary children. A "monorail" activity from the Evening Science Program for K-3 Students and Parents program is presented to illustrate the problem-solving format. Designed for performance at stations by groups of two students. (LZ)

  6. Solving complex fisheries management problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petter Johnsen, Jahn; Eliasen, Søren Qvist

    2011-01-01

    A crucial issue for the new EU common fisheries policy is how to solve the discard problem. Through a study of the institutional set up and the arrangements for solving the discard problem in Denmark, the Faroe Islands, Iceland and Norway, the article identifies the discard problem as related...

  7. Texas' forests, 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    James W. Bentley; Consuelo Brandeis; Jason A. Cooper; Christopher M. Oswalt; Sonja N. Oswalt; KaDonna Randolph

    2014-01-01

    This bulletin describes forest resources of the State of Texas at the time of the 2008 forest inventory. This bulletin addresses forest area, volume, growth, removals, mortality, forest health, timber product output, and the economy of the forest sector.

  8. Forest resources of the Lincoln National Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    John D. Shaw

    2006-01-01

    The Interior West Forest Inventory and Analysis (IWFIA) program of the USDA Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station, as part of its national Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) duties, conducted forest resource inventories of the Southwestern Region (Region 3) National Forests. This report presents highlights of the Lincoln National Forest 1997 inventory...

  9. Gender Bias Affects Forests Worldwide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlène Elias

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Gender biases persist in forestry research and practice. These biases result in reduced scientific rigor and inequitable, ineffective, and less efficient policies, programs, and interventions. Drawing from a two-volume collection of current and classic analyses on gender in forests, we outline five persistent and inter-related themes: gendered governance, tree tenure, forest spaces, division of labor, and ecological knowledge. Each emerges across geographic regions in the northern and southern hemisphere and reflects inequities in women’s and men’s ability to make decisions about and benefit from trees, forests, and their products. Women’s ability to participate in community-based forest governance is typically less than men’s, causing concern for social equity and forest stewardship. Women’s access to trees and their products is commonly more limited than men’s, and mediated by their relationship with their male counterparts. Spatial patterns of forest use reflect gender norms and taboos, and men’s greater access to transportation. The division of labor results in gender specialization in the collection of forest products, with variations in gender roles across regions. All these gender differences result in ecological knowledge that is distinct but also complementary and shifting across the genders. The ways gender plays out in relation to each theme may vary across cultures and contexts, but the influence of gender, which intersects with other factors of social differentiation in shaping forest landscapes, is global.

  10. Problem Solving with General Semantics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewson, David

    1996-01-01

    Discusses how to use general semantics formulations to improve problem solving at home or at work--methods come from the areas of artificial intelligence/computer science, engineering, operations research, and psychology. (PA)

  11. How to solve mathematical problems

    CERN Document Server

    Wickelgren, Wayne A

    1995-01-01

    Seven problem-solving techniques include inference, classification of action sequences, subgoals, contradiction, working backward, relations between problems, and mathematical representation. Also, problems from mathematics, science, and engineering with complete solutions.

  12. Interactive Problem-Solving Interventions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Frew Demeke Alemu

    concerted efforts of unofficial actors to establish unofficial communication ... Frew Demeke Alemu (LLB, LLM in International Human Rights Law from Lund ..... 24 Tamra Pearson d'Estrée (2009), “Problem-Solving Approaches”, (in The SAGE ...

  13. Evaluating forest management policies by parametric linear programing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel I. Navon; Richard J. McConnen

    1967-01-01

    An analytical and simulation technique, parametric linear programing explores alternative conditions and devises an optimal management plan for each condition. Its application in solving policy-decision problems in the management of forest lands is illustrated in an example.

  14. Tangram solved? Prefrontal cortex activation analysis during geometric problem solving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayaz, Hasan; Shewokis, Patricia A; Izzetoğlu, Meltem; Çakır, Murat P; Onaral, Banu

    2012-01-01

    Recent neuroimaging studies have implicated prefrontal and parietal cortices for mathematical problem solving. Mental arithmetic tasks have been used extensively to study neural correlates of mathematical reasoning. In the present study we used geometric problem sets (tangram tasks) that require executive planning and visuospatial reasoning without any linguistic representation interference. We used portable optical brain imaging (functional near infrared spectroscopy--fNIR) to monitor hemodynamic changes within anterior prefrontal cortex during tangram tasks. Twelve healthy subjects were asked to solve a series of computerized tangram puzzles and control tasks that required same geometric shape manipulation without problem solving. Total hemoglobin (HbT) concentration changes indicated a significant increase during tangram problem solving in the right hemisphere. Moreover, HbT changes during failed trials (when no solution found) were significantly higher compared to successful trials. These preliminary results suggest that fNIR can be used to assess cortical activation changes induced by geometric problem solving. Since fNIR is safe, wearable and can be used in ecologically valid environments such as classrooms, this neuroimaging tool may help to improve and optimize learning in educational settings.

  15. Organization of private forest sector in Timok forest area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vojislav Milijic

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Today, private forest owners (PFOs in Serbia cooperate in form of private forest owners associations (PFOAs. Currently, there are 20 PFOAs, of which 15 are in Timok region. Initiatives of PFOs from Timok forest area, animated the owners from other parts of the country and led to foundation of Serbian Federation of Forest Owners' Associations. Twelve of PFOAs from Timok forest area are the founders of Serbian private forest owners' umbrella organization. Restructuring of Public Enterprise (PE "Srbijasume", which started in 2001, led to development of private small and medium forest enterprises, engaged as contractors of PE for harvesting, timber transport and construction of forest roads. The objectives of this paper are to elaborate if there are differences between PFOs in Serbia and Timok region and to analyze organization of private forest owners in Timok forest area. In order to reach these objectives, results of PRIFORT project were used. This project focused on four countries of Western Balkans region: Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Serbia and Macedonia. The aim of this project was to explore precondition for formation of PFOs in this region. Quantitative survey (n = 350 of randomly selected PFOs was conducted in nine municipalities in Serbia, of which two were in Timok region (n = 100. The results show that there are differences between PFOs in Serbia and Timok region in number of PFOs, size of private property and in additional incentives. These results also indicate that economic interest is a motive for establishment of PFOAs and that state support is very important for their development. Since a number of PFOs are entrepreneurs, it can be assumed that, further development of theirs organizations could lead to development of SMEs clusters. 

  16. Solving the uncommon nuclear reactor core neutronics problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vondy, D.R.; Fowler, T.B.

    1983-01-01

    Calculational procedures have been implemented for solving importance and higher harmonic neutronics problems. Solutions are obtained routinely to support analysis of reactor core performance, treating up to three space coordinates with the multigroup diffusion theory approximation to neutron transport. The techniques used and some of the calculational difficulties are discussed

  17. U.S. Forest Greenhouse Gas Impacts of a continued Expansion of E.U. Wood Pellet Demand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latta, G.; Baker, J.; Ohrel, S. B.

    2016-12-01

    The United States has ambitious goals of greenhouse gas (GHG) reductions. A portion of these reductions are based on expected contributions from land use, land use change, and forestry (LULUCF). The European Union has similar goals which have resulted in a doubling of wood pellets exported from US ports destined for EU power plants over the last few years. There are potential conflicts between the GHG consequences of this pellet supply and the LULUCF contribution to US GHG goals. This study seeks to inform the discussion by modeling US forest GHG accounts using data measured on a grid of over 150,000 USDA Forest Service, Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) forestland plots across the conterminous United States. Empirical yield functions are estimate from plot log volume, biomass and carbon and provide the basis for changes in forest characteristics over time. Demand data based on a spatial database of over 2,000 forest product manufacturing facilities representing 11 intermediate and 13 final solid and pulpwood products. Manufacturing and logging costs are specific to slope, log size, and volume removed along with transportation costs based on fuel prices, FIA plot, and milling locations. The resulting partial spatial equilibrium model of the US forest sector is solved annually for the period 2010 - 2030 with demand shifted by energy prices and macroeconomic indicators from the US EIA's Annual Energy Outlook for a series of potential wood pellet export targets. For each wood pellet export level simulated, figures showing historic and scenario-specific forest products production are generated. Maps of the spatial allocation of both forest harvesting and carbon fluxes are presented at the National level and detail is given in both the US North and Southeast.

  18. Price of forest chips decreasing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakkila, P.

    2001-01-01

    carried out from final cutting areas there the production of forest chips can be integrated to harvesting of industrial wood. Moisture content and the share of needles of logging residue chips are higher, and the particle size of it is inhomogeneous. Improved harvesting technology is the main reason for the decrease of the price of logging residue chips. Automating of felling made the piling of residues nearly free of charge. Competition in the machine and transportation services decreased the costs of industrial wood by 20-30% in a decade. Average price of forest chips has decreased because the share of logging residues of the forest chips production has increased. The price (excl. VAT) of forest chips for heating plants in Finland varies between 40 - 80 FIM/MWh, the average being 53 FIM/MWh, and in Sweden about 80 FIM/MWh, and 75 FIM/MWh for industry. The taxation of fossil fuel in Sweden is higher than in Finland. Sweden uses over 3 M m 3 of forest chips, the corresponding figures for Finland being about 1 M m 3 . Forest chips are used as a mixture with industrial wood residues. Production costs of industrial wood residues are lower than those of the forest chips. Alternative fuels for plants using forest chips are bark, sawdust and peat. Target price of Bioenergy research program for forest chips was 45 FIM/MWh

  19. Solving and Interpreting Large-scale Harvest Scheduling Problems by Duality and Decomposition

    OpenAIRE

    Berck, Peter; Bible, Thomas

    1982-01-01

    This paper presents a solution to the forest planning problem that takes advantage of both the duality of linear programming formulations currently being used for harvest scheduling and the characteristics of decomposition inherent in the forest land class-relationship. The subproblems of decomposition, defined as the dual, can be solved in a simple, recursive fashion. In effect, such a technique reduces the computational burden in terms of time and computer storage as compared to the traditi...

  20. Transport Statistics - Transport - UNECE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sustainable Energy Statistics Trade Transport Themes UNECE and the SDGs Climate Change Gender Ideas 4 Change UNECE Weekly Videos UNECE Transport Areas of Work Transport Statistics Transport Transport Statistics About us Terms of Reference Meetings and Events Meetings Working Party on Transport Statistics (WP.6

  1. Boreal forests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Essen, P.A.; Ericson, L.; Ehnstroem, B.; Sjoeberg, K.

    1997-01-01

    We review patterns and processes important for biodiversity in the Fennoscandian boreal forest, describe man's past and present impact and outline a strategy for conservation. Natural disturbances, particularly forest fire and gap formation, create much of the structural and functional diversity in forest ecosystems. Several boreal plants and animals are adapted to fire regimes. In contrast, many organisms (epiphytic lichens, fungi, invertebrates) require stable conditions with long continuity in canopy cover. The highly mechanized and efficient Fennoscandian forest industry has developed during the last century. The result is that most natural forest has been lost and that several hundreds of species, mainly cryptograms and invertebrates, are threatened. The forestry is now in a transition from exploitation to sustainable production and has recently incorporated some measures to protect the environment. Programmes for maintaining biodiversity in the boreal forest should include at least three parts. First, the system of forest reserves must be significantly improved through protection of large representative ecosystems and key biotopes that host threatened species. Second, we must restore ecosystem properties that have been lost or altered. Natural disturbance regimes must be allowed to operate or be imitated, for example by artificial fire management. Stand-level management should particularly increase the amount of coarse woody debris, the number of old deciduous trees and large, old conifers, by using partial cutting. Third, natural variation should also be mimicked at the landscape level, for example, by reducing fragmentation and increasing links between landscape elements. Long-term experiments are required to evaluate the success of different management methods in maintaining biodiversity in the boreal forest. (au) 260 refs

  2. Theory of the one-dimensional forest-fire model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paczuski, M.; Bak, P.

    1993-01-01

    Turbulent cascade processes are studied in terms of a one-dimensional forest-fire model. A hier- archy of steady-state equations for the forests and the holes between them is constructed and solved within a mean-field closure scheme. The exact hole distribution function is found to be N H (s)=4N/[s(s+1)(s+2)], where N is the number of forests

  3. Customer-centered problem solving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samelson, Q B

    1999-11-01

    If there is no single best way to attract new customers and retain current customers, there is surely an easy way to lose them: fail to solve the problems that arise in nearly every buyer-supplier relationship, or solve them in an unsatisfactory manner. Yet, all too frequently, companies do just that. Either we deny that a problem exists, we exert all our efforts to pin the blame elsewhere, or we "Band-Aid" the problem instead of fixing it, almost guaranteeing that we will face it again and again.

  4. Simon on Problem-Solving

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foss, Kirsten; Foss, Nicolai Juul

    as a general approach to problem solving. We apply these Simonian ideas to organizational issues, specifically new organizational forms. Specifically, Simonian ideas allow us to develop a morphology of new organizational forms and to point to some design problems that characterize these forms.Keywords: Herbert...... Simon, problem-solving, new organizational forms. JEL Code: D23, D83......Two of Herbert Simon's best-known papers are "The Architecture of Complexity" and "The Structure of Ill-Structured Problems." We discuss the neglected links between these two papers, highlighting the role of decomposition in the context of problems on which constraints have been imposed...

  5. Interactive problem solving using LOGO

    CERN Document Server

    Boecker, Heinz-Dieter; Fischer, Gerhard

    2014-01-01

    This book is unique in that its stress is not on the mastery of a programming language, but on the importance and value of interactive problem solving. The authors focus on several specific interest worlds: mathematics, computer science, artificial intelligence, linguistics, and games; however, their approach can serve as a model that may be applied easily to other fields as well. Those who are interested in symbolic computing will find that Interactive Problem Solving Using LOGO provides a gentle introduction from which one may move on to other, more advanced computational frameworks or more

  6. Inference rule and problem solving

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goto, S

    1982-04-01

    Intelligent information processing signifies an opportunity of having man's intellectual activity executed on the computer, in which inference, in place of ordinary calculation, is used as the basic operational mechanism for such an information processing. Many inference rules are derived from syllogisms in formal logic. The problem of programming this inference function is referred to as a problem solving. Although logically inference and problem-solving are in close relation, the calculation ability of current computers is on a low level for inferring. For clarifying the relation between inference and computers, nonmonotonic logic has been considered. The paper deals with the above topics. 16 references.

  7. Human Problem Solving in 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funke, Joachim

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a bibliography of 263 references related to human problem solving, arranged by subject matter. The references were taken from PsycInfo and Academic Premier data-base. Journal papers, book chapters, and dissertations are included. The topics include human development, education, neuroscience, and research in applied settings. It…

  8. Solved problems in classical electromagnetism

    CERN Document Server

    Franklin, Jerrold

    2018-01-01

    This original Dover publication is the companion to a new edition of the author's Classical Electromagnetism: Second Edition. The latter volume will feature only basic answers; this book will contain some problems from the reissue as well as many other new ones. All feature complete, worked-out solutions and form a valuable source of problem-solving material for students.

  9. Error Patterns in Problem Solving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babbitt, Beatrice C.

    Although many common problem-solving errors within the realm of school mathematics have been previously identified, a compilation of such errors is not readily available within learning disabilities textbooks, mathematics education texts, or teacher's manuals for school mathematics texts. Using data on error frequencies drawn from both the Fourth…

  10. Quantitative Reasoning in Problem Solving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramful, Ajay; Ho, Siew Yin

    2015-01-01

    In this article, Ajay Ramful and Siew Yin Ho explain the meaning of quantitative reasoning, describing how it is used in the to solve mathematical problems. They also describe a diagrammatic approach to represent relationships among quantities and provide examples of problems and their solutions.

  11. Students' Problem Solving and Justification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Barbara; Maher, Carolyn A.

    2004-01-01

    This paper reports on methods of students' justifications of their solution to a problem in the area of combinatorics. From the analysis of the problem solving of 150 students in a variety of settings from high-school to graduate study, four major forms of reasoning evolved: (1) Justification by Cases, (2) Inductive Argument, (3) Elimination…

  12. Solving Differential Equations in R: Package deSolve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karline Soetaert

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present the R package deSolve to solve initial value problems (IVP written as ordinary differential equations (ODE, differential algebraic equations (DAE of index 0 or 1 and partial differential equations (PDE, the latter solved using the method of lines approach. The differential equations can be represented in R code or as compiled code. In the latter case, R is used as a tool to trigger the integration and post-process the results, which facilitates model development and application, whilst the compiled code significantly increases simulation speed. The methods implemented are efficient, robust, and well documented public-domain Fortran routines. They include four integrators from the ODEPACK package (LSODE, LSODES, LSODA, LSODAR, DVODE and DASPK2.0. In addition, a suite of Runge-Kutta integrators and special-purpose solvers to efficiently integrate 1-, 2- and 3-dimensional partial differential equations are available. The routines solve both stiff and non-stiff systems, and include many options, e.g., to deal in an efficient way with the sparsity of the Jacobian matrix, or finding the root of equations. In this article, our objectives are threefold: (1 to demonstrate the potential of using R for dynamic modeling, (2 to highlight typical uses of the different methods implemented and (3 to compare the performance of models specified in R code and in compiled code for a number of test cases. These comparisons demonstrate that, if the use of loops is avoided, R code can efficiently integrate problems comprising several thousands of state variables. Nevertheless, the same problem may be solved from 2 to more than 50 times faster by using compiled code compared to an implementation using only R code. Still, amongst the benefits of R are a more flexible and interactive implementation, better readability of the code, and access to R’s high-level procedures. deSolve is the successor of package odesolve which will be deprecated in

  13. Problem solving skills for schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, J; Li, Chunbo

    2007-04-18

    The severe and long-lasting symptoms of schizophrenia are often the cause of severe disability. Environmental stress such as life events and the practical problems people face in their daily can worsen the symptoms of schizophrenia. Deficits in problem solving skills in people with schizophrenia affect their independent and interpersonal functioning and impair their quality of life. As a result, therapies such as problem solving therapy have been developed to improve problem solving skills for people with schizophrenia. To review the effectiveness of problem solving therapy compared with other comparable therapies or routine care for those with schizophrenia. We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group's Register (September 2006), which is based on regular searches of BIOSIS, CENTRAL, CINAHL, EMBASE, MEDLINE and PsycINFO. We inspected references of all identified studies for further trials. We included all clinical randomised trials comparing problem solving therapy with other comparable therapies or routine care. We extracted data independently. For homogenous dichotomous data we calculated random effects, relative risk (RR), 95% confidence intervals (CI) and, where appropriate, numbers needed to treat (NNT) on an intention-to-treat basis. For continuous data, we calculated weighted mean differences (WMD) using a random effects statistical model. We included only three small trials (n=52) that evaluated problem solving versus routine care, coping skills training or non-specific interaction. Inadequate reporting of data rendered many outcomes unusable. We were unable to undertake meta-analysis. Overall results were limited and inconclusive with no significant differences between treatment groups for hospital admission, mental state, behaviour, social skills or leaving the study early. No data were presented for global state, quality of life or satisfaction. We found insufficient evidence to confirm or refute the benefits of problem solving therapy as an additional

  14. The implications of new forest tenure reforms and forestry property markets for sustainable forest management and forest certification in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Juan; Innes, John L

    2013-11-15

    This study examines issues existing in the southern collective forests in China, particularly prior to the implementation of new forest tenure reforms, such as continued illegal logging and timber theft, inadequate availability of finance and inconsistent forest-related policies. Such problems are believed to be hindering the adoption of sustainable forest management (SFM) and forest certification by forest farmers in China. Two strategies were introduced by the Chinese government with the purpose of addressing these issues, namely forest tenure reforms and their associated supporting mechanism, forestry property markets. Through two case studies in southern China, we investigated the effectiveness of the two strategies as well as their implications for the adoption of SFM and forest certification. The two cases were Yong'an in Fujian province and Tonggu in Jiangxi province. Personal interviews with open-ended questions were conducted with small-scale forest farmers who had already benefited from the two strategies as well as market officers working for the two selected forestry property markets. The study identified eight issues constraining the potential adoption of SFM and certification in China, including limited finance, poorly developed infrastructure and transport systems, insecure forest tenures, inconsistent forest policies, low levels of awareness, illegal forest management practices, lack of local cooperative organizations, and inadequate knowledge and technical transfer. We found that the new forest tenure reforms and forestry property markets had generally fulfilled their original objectives and had the capacity to assist in addressing many of the issues facing forests prior to the reforms. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Transport phenomena an introduction to advanced topics

    CERN Document Server

    Glasgow, Larry A

    2010-01-01

    Enables readers to apply transport phenomena principles to solve advanced problems in all areas of engineering and science This book helps readers elevate their understanding of, and their ability to apply, transport phenomena by introducing a broad range of advanced topics as well as analytical and numerical solution techniques. Readers gain the ability to solve complex problems generally not addressed in undergraduate-level courses, including nonlinear, multidimensional transport, and transient molecular and convective transport scenarios. Avoiding rote memorization, the author em

  16. Genetics problem solving and worldview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, Esther

    The research goal was to determine whether worldview relates to traditional and real-world genetics problem solving. Traditionally, scientific literacy emphasized content knowledge alone because it was sufficient to solve traditional problems. The contemporary definition of scientific literacy is, "The knowledge and understanding of scientific concepts and processes required for personal decision-making, participation in civic and cultural affairs and economic productivity" (NRC, 1996). An expanded definition of scientific literacy is needed to solve socioscientific issues (SSI), complex social issues with conceptual, procedural, or technological associations with science. Teaching content knowledge alone assumes that students will find the scientific explanation of a phenomenon to be superior to a non-science explanation. Formal science and everyday ways of thinking about science are two different cultures (Palmer, 1999). Students address this rift with cognitive apartheid, the boxing away of science knowledge from other types of knowledge (Jedege & Aikenhead, 1999). By addressing worldview, cognitive apartheid may decrease and scientific literacy may increase. Introductory biology students at the University of Minnesota during fall semester 2005 completed a written questionnaire-including a genetics content-knowledge test, four genetic dilemmas, the Worldview Assessment Instrument (WAI) and some items about demographics and religiosity. Six students responded to the interview protocol. Based on statistical analysis and interview data, this study concluded the following: (1) Worldview, in the form of metaphysics, relates to solving traditional genetic dilemmas. (2) Worldview, in the form of agency, relates to solving traditional genetics problems. (3) Thus, worldview must be addressed in curriculum, instruction, and assessment.

  17. TRANSPORTATION INDUSTRY EFFECTIVE MANAGEMENT CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. I. Kuznetsov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Main aspects that determine conditions of transportation industry effective management and decrease of transportation expenses are discussed. Theoretical concepts making it possible to solve the problem of scientific management of the whole country’s goods transportation costs are provided for. Main approaches are presented to the solution of motor transport operation ecological optimization problem as well as to the rise of motor transport workers’ labor productivity, to the increase of transportation vehicles use efficiency and to determine functional capacity of the motor transport complex.

  18. Climate and Hydrological Data Analysis for hydrological and solute transport modelling purposes in the Muriaé River basin, Atlantic Forest Biome, SE Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Juliana; Künne, Annika; Kralisch, Sven; Fink, Manfred; Brenning, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    The Muriaé River basin in SE Brazil has been experiencing an increasing pressure on water resources, due to the population growth of the Rio de Janeiro urban area connected with the growth of the industrial and agricultural sector. This leads to water scarcity, riverine forest degradation, soil erosion and water quality problems among other impacts. Additionally the region has been suffering with seasonal precipitation variations leading to extreme events such as droughts, floods and landslides. Climate projections for the near future indicate a high inter-annual variability of rainfall with an increase in the frequency and intensity of heavy rainfall events combined with a statistically significant increase in the duration of dry periods and a reduced duration of wet periods. This may lead to increased soil erosion during the wet season, while the longer dry periods may reduce the vegetation cover, leaving the soil even more exposed and vulnerable to soil erosion. In consequence, it is crucial to understand how climate affects the interaction between the timing of extreme rainfall events, hydrological processes, vegetation growth, soil cover and soil erosion. In this context, physically-based hydrological modelling can contribute to a better understanding of spatial-temporal process dynamics in the Earth's system and support Integrated Water Resourses Management (IWRM) and adaptation strategies. The study area is the Muriaé river basin which has an area of approx. 8000 km² in Minas Gerais and Rio de Janeiro States. The basin is representative of a region of domain of hillslopes areas with the predominancy of pasture for livestock production. This study will present some of the relevant analyses which have been carried out on data (climate and streamflow) prior to using them for hydrological modelling, including consistency checks, homogeneity, pattern and statistical analyses, or annual and seasonal trends detection. Several inconsistencies on the raw data were

  19. Evaluation of High-Temporal-Resolution Bedload Sensors for Tracking Channel Bed Movement and Transport Thresholds in Forested Mountain Headwater Catchments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, S.; Conklin, M. H.; Bales, R. C.

    2014-12-01

    sink. Overall, these sensors show promise for collecting continuous data for high gradient, forested, mountain streams. Additional benefits include their relatively low cost both monetarily (under $1000) and in labor compared to traditional methods as well as not requiring the trade-off between temporal resolution and length of study that traditional methods do.

  20. THE PROBLEMS OF PASSENGER TRANSPORTATIONS IN AN INTERNATIONAL COMMUNICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. S. Barash

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The basic aspects of international passenger transportations in Ukraine are represented. The analysis of present situation in these transportations is carried out. Some variants of solving the problems of passenger transportations in an international communication are considered.

  1. Illinois' Forests 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susan J. Crocker; Gary J. Brand; Brett J. Butler; David E. Haugen; Dick C. Little; Dacia M. Meneguzzo; Charles H. Perry; Ronald J. Piva; Barry T. Wilson; Christopher W. Woodall

    2009-01-01

    The first full, annualized inventory of Illinois' forests reports more than 4.5 million acres of forest land with an average of 459 trees per acre. Forest land is dominated by oak/hickory forest types, which occupy 65 percent of total forest land area. Seventy-two percent of forest land consists of sawtimber, 20 percent contains poletimber, and 8 percent contains...

  2. Minnesota's Forests 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick D. Miles; David Heinzen; Manfred E. Mielke; Christopher W. Woodall; Brett J. Butler; Ron J. Piva; Dacia M. Meneguzzo; Charles H. Perry; Dale D. Gormanson; Charles J. Barnett

    2011-01-01

    The second full annual inventory of Minnesota's forests reports 17 million acres of forest land with an average volume of more than 1,000 cubic feet per acre. Forest land is dominated by the aspen forest type, which occupies nearly 30 percent of the total forest land area. Twenty-eight percent of forest land consists of sawtimber, 35 percent poletimber, 35 percent...

  3. Effects of long-range transported pollutants on vegetation in boreal coniferous forests: Results from an five year investigation in the Solholmfjell area, Gjerstad, Aust-Agder; Effekter av langtransporterte luftforurensninger i boreal barskog: resultater av fem aars undersoekelser i Solhomfjell-omraadet, Gjerstad, Aust-Agder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oekland, R H

    1996-01-01

    The conference paper relates to a project on investigating the effects of long-range transported pollutants in Norway. The paper gives a brief description of the more important results obtained in the project. The aim of the project was to investigate the pollution load in vegetation, soils and trees in Norwegian forest areas of the coniferous type. The project included the collection of samples from 200 test areas in a period of five years. 11 refs.

  4. SHA-1, SAT-solving, and CNF

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Motara, YM

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available the intersection between the SHA-1 preimage problem, the encoding of that problem for SAT-solving, and SAT-solving. The results demonstrate that SAT-solving is not yet a viable approach to take to solve the preimage problem, and also indicate that some...

  5. Assessing Algebraic Solving Ability: A Theoretical Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Lim Hooi; Yew, Wun Thiam

    2012-01-01

    Algebraic solving ability had been discussed by many educators and researchers. There exists no definite definition for algebraic solving ability as it can be viewed from different perspectives. In this paper, the nature of algebraic solving ability in terms of algebraic processes that demonstrate the ability in solving algebraic problem is…

  6. Methods of solving nonstandard problems

    CERN Document Server

    Grigorieva, Ellina

    2015-01-01

    This book, written by an accomplished female mathematician, is the second to explore nonstandard mathematical problems – those that are not directly solved by standard mathematical methods but instead rely on insight and the synthesis of a variety of mathematical ideas.   It promotes mental activity as well as greater mathematical skills, and is an ideal resource for successful preparation for the mathematics Olympiad. Numerous strategies and techniques are presented that can be used to solve intriguing and challenging problems of the type often found in competitions.  The author uses a friendly, non-intimidating approach to emphasize connections between different fields of mathematics and often proposes several different ways to attack the same problem.  Topics covered include functions and their properties, polynomials, trigonometric and transcendental equations and inequalities, optimization, differential equations, nonlinear systems, and word problems.   Over 360 problems are included with hints, ...

  7. Confluent-Functional solving systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.N. Koval

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper proposes a statistical knowledge-acquision approach. The solving systems are considered, which are able to find unknown structural dependences between situational and transforming variables on the basis of statistically analyzed input information. Situational variables describe features, states and relations between environment objects. Transforming variables describe transforming influences, exerted by a goal-oriented system onto an environment. Unknown environment rules are simulated by a structural equations system, associating situational and transforming variables.

  8. Productivity and Cost Analysis of Forest Harvesting Operation in Matang Mangrove Forest, Perak, Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert Empawi Tindit

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Matang Mangrove Forest is under systematic management since 1902 and still considered as the best managed mangrove forest in the world. This research was conducted to measure the time and productivity of forest harvesting operation and also to analyze the cost and revenue of mangrove forest harvesting operation at Matang mangrove forest. This project had been carried out in cooperation with Seri Sepetang Enterprise, one of the harvesting licenses in Kuala Sepetang, Perak. Data collections were taken in every station starting from standing tree until to the Kiln-Drying jetty. The data then calculated by using the formulas of productivity and cost analysis. As the result, the productivity for felling, bucking and debarking, the manual skidding using wheel-barrow and the water transportation are 1.84 tan/hour, 3.82 tan/hour and 4.64 tan/hour respectively. The cost for each operation of 9 tan log volume for felling, bucking and debarking, the manual skidding using wheel-barrow and the water transportation are RM 56.88, RM 10.80 and RM 36.72 respectively. As the revenue, the company paid RM 260 per 9 tan of log for the in-forest operation (felling, manual skidding and loading to the ship and pay RM 80 per 9 tan for the water transportation, and they gained the net profit of RM 192.32 and RM 43.28 respectively. The average of forest harvesting operation is twice operation in a day (equal with 2 x 9-ton volume of log production a day, so they will gain a double profit. In conclusion, the forest harvesting operation is sustainably managed for supplying the raw material of charcoal industries in Matang mangrove forest. Since, they work manually and spend much energy in this forest harvesting operation, so for further study it recommends to conduct the ergonomics evaluation during forest harvesting operation at Matang Mangrove Forest.

  9. Analysis of space and energy homogenization techniques for the solving of the neutron transport equation in nuclear reactor; Analyse des techniques d'homogeneisation spatiale et energetique dans la resolution de l'equation du transport des neutrons dans les reacteurs nucleaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magat, Ph

    1997-04-01

    Today neutron transport in PWR's core is routinely computed through the transport-diffusion(2 groups) scheme. This method gives satisfactory results for reactors operating in normal conditions but the 2 group diffusion approximation is unable to take into account interface effects or anisotropy. The improvement of this scheme is logically possible through the use of a simplified P{sub N} method (SP{sub N}) for the modeling of the core. The comparison between S{sub N} calculations and SP{sub N} calculations shows an excellent agreement on eigenvalues as well as on power maps. We can notice that: -) it is no use extending the development beyond P{sub 3}, there is no effect; -) the P{sub 1} development is adequate; and -) the P{sub 0} development is totally inappropriate. Calculations performed on the N4 core of the Chooz power plant have enabled us to compare diffusion operators with transport operators (SP{sub 1}, SP{sub 3}, SP{sub 5} and SP{sub 7}). These calculations show that the implementation of the SP{sub N} method is feasible but the extra-costs in computation times and memory are important. We recommend: SP{sub 5}P{sub 1} calculations for heterogeneous 2-dimension geometry and SP{sub 3}P{sub 1} calculations for the homogeneous 3-dimension geometry. (A.C.)

  10. Analysis of space and energy homogenization techniques for the solving of the neutron transport equation in nuclear reactor; Analyse des techniques d'homogeneisation spatiale et energetique dans la resolution de l'equation du transport des neutrons dans les reacteurs nucleaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magat, Ph

    1997-04-01

    Today neutron transport in PWR's core is routinely computed through the transport-diffusion(2 groups) scheme. This method gives satisfactory results for reactors operating in normal conditions but the 2 group diffusion approximation is unable to take into account interface effects or anisotropy. The improvement of this scheme is logically possible through the use of a simplified P{sub N} method (SP{sub N}) for the modeling of the core. The comparison between S{sub N} calculations and SP{sub N} calculations shows an excellent agreement on eigenvalues as well as on power maps. We can notice that: -) it is no use extending the development beyond P{sub 3}, there is no effect; -) the P{sub 1} development is adequate; and -) the P{sub 0} development is totally inappropriate. Calculations performed on the N4 core of the Chooz power plant have enabled us to compare diffusion operators with transport operators (SP{sub 1}, SP{sub 3}, SP{sub 5} and SP{sub 7}). These calculations show that the implementation of the SP{sub N} method is feasible but the extra-costs in computation times and memory are important. We recommend: SP{sub 5}P{sub 1} calculations for heterogeneous 2-dimension geometry and SP{sub 3}P{sub 1} calculations for the homogeneous 3-dimension geometry. (A.C.)

  11. Forest insurance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis T. Williams

    1949-01-01

    Standing timber is one of the few important kinds of property that are not generally covered by insurance. Studies made by the Forest Service and other agencies have indicated that the risks involved in the insurance of timber are not unduly great, provided they can be properly distributed. Such studies, however, have thus far failed to induce any notable development...

  12. Forest Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    NASA's Technology Applications Center, with other government and academic agencies, provided technology for improved resources management to the Cibola National Forest. Landsat satellite images enabled vegetation over a large area to be classified for purposes of timber analysis, wildlife habitat, range measurement and development of general vegetation maps.

  13. From soil water to surface water – how the riparian zone controls element transport from a boreal forest to a stream

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Lidman

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Boreal headwaters are often lined by strips of highly organic soils, which are the last terrestrial environment to leave an imprint on discharging groundwater before it enters a stream. Because these riparian soils are so different from the Podzol soils that dominate much of the boreal landscape, they are known to have a major impact on the biogeochemistry of important elements such as C, N, P and Fe and the transfer of these elements from terrestrial to aquatic ecosystems. For most elements, however, the role of the riparian zone has remained unclear, although it should be expected that the mobility of many elements is affected by changes in, for example, pH, redox potential and concentration of organic carbon as they are transported through the riparian zone. Therefore, soil water and groundwater was sampled at different depths along a 22 m hillslope transect in the Krycklan catchment in northern Sweden using soil lysimeters and analysed for a large number of major and trace elements (Al, As, B, Ba, Ca, Cd, Cl, Co, Cr, Cs, Cu, Fe, K, La, Li, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, Pb, Rb, Se, Si, Sr, Th, Ti, U, V, Zn, Zr and other parameters such as sulfate and total organic carbon (TOC. The results showed that the concentrations of most investigated elements increased substantially (up to 60 times as the water flowed from the uphill mineral soils and into the riparian zone, largely as a result of higher TOC concentrations. The stream water concentrations of these elements were typically somewhat lower than in the riparian zone, but still considerably higher than in the uphill mineral soils, which suggests that riparian soils have a decisive impact on the water quality of boreal streams. The degree of enrichment in the riparian zone for different elements could be linked to the affinity for organic matter, indicating that the pattern with strongly elevated concentrations in riparian soils is typical for organophilic substances. One likely explanation is that the

  14. Combating Forest Corruption: the Forest Integrity Network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gupta, A.; Siebert, U.

    2004-01-01

    This article describes the strategies and activities of the Forest Integrity Network. One of the most important underlying causes of forest degradation is corruption and related illegal logging. The Forest Integrity Network is a timely new initiative to combat forest corruption. Its approach is to

  15. Forest ownership dynamics of southern forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brett J. Butler; David N. Wear

    2013-01-01

    Key FindingsPrivate landowners hold 86 percent of the forest area in the South; two-thirds of this area is owned by families or individuals.Fifty-nine percent of family forest owners own between 1 and 9 acres of forest land, but 60 percent of family-owned forests are in holdings of 100 acres or more.Two-...

  16. Framework for reactive mass transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mads Mønster; Johannesson, Björn; Geiker, Mette Rica

    2014-01-01

    Reactive transport modeling is applicable for a range of porous materials. Here the modeling framework is focused on cement-based materials, where ion diffusion and migration are described by the Poisson-Nernst-Planck equation system. A two phase vapor/liquid flow model, with a sorption hysteresis...... description is coupled to the system. The mass transport is solved by using the finite element method where the chemical equilibrium is solved explicitly by an operator splitting method. The IPHREEQC library is used as chemical equilibrium solver. The equation system, solved by IPHREEQC, is explained...

  17. Problem solving through recreational mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    Averbach, Bonnie

    1999-01-01

    Historically, many of the most important mathematical concepts arose from problems that were recreational in origin. This book takes advantage of that fact, using recreational mathematics - problems, puzzles and games - to teach students how to think critically. Encouraging active participation rather than just observation, the book focuses less on mathematical results than on how these results can be applied to thinking about problems and solving them. Each chapter contains a diverse array of problems in such areas as logic, number and graph theory, two-player games of strategy, solitaire ga

  18. Problem solving and inference mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furukawa, K; Nakajima, R; Yonezawa, A; Goto, S; Aoyama, A

    1982-01-01

    The heart of the fifth generation computer will be powerful mechanisms for problem solving and inference. A deduction-oriented language is to be designed, which will form the core of the whole computing system. The language is based on predicate logic with the extended features of structuring facilities, meta structures and relational data base interfaces. Parallel computation mechanisms and specialized hardware architectures are being investigated to make possible efficient realization of the language features. The project includes research into an intelligent programming system, a knowledge representation language and system, and a meta inference system to be built on the core. 30 references.

  19. Forest fires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuller, M.

    1991-01-01

    This book examines the many complex and sensitive issues relating to wildland fires. Beginning with an overview of the fires of 1980s, the book discusses the implications of continued drought and considers the behavior of wildland fires, from ignition and spread to spotting and firestorms. Topics include the effects of weather, forest fuels, fire ecology, and the effects of fire on plants and animals. In addition, the book examines firefighting methods and equipment, including new minimum impact techniques and compressed air foam; prescribed burning; and steps that can be taken to protect individuals and human structures. A history of forest fire policies in the U.S. and a discussion of solutions to fire problems around the world completes the coverage. With one percent of the earth's surface burning every year in the last decade, this is a penetrating book on a subject of undeniable importance

  20. CTCN: Colloid transport code -- nuclear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, R.

    1993-01-01

    This report describes the CTCN computer code, designed to solve the equations of transient colloidal transport of radionuclides in porous and fractured media. This Fortran 77 package solves systems of coupled nonlinear differential-algebraic equations with a wide range of boundary conditions. The package uses the Method of Lines technique with a special section which forms finite-difference discretizations in up to four spatial dimensions to automatically convert the system into a set of ordinary differential equations. The CTCN code then solves these equations using a robust, efficient ODE solver. Thus CTCN can be used to solve population balance equations along with the usual transport equations to model colloid transport processes or as a general problem solver to treat up to four-dimensional differential-algebraic systems

  1. Comparing Sustainable Forest Management Certifications Standards: A Meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Rawson. Clark

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available To solve problems caused by conventional forest management, forest certification has emerged as a driver of sustainable forest management. Several sustainable forest management certification systems exist, including the Forest Stewardship Council and those endorsed by the Programme for the Endorsement of Forest Certification, such as the Canadian Standards Association - Sustainable Forestry Management Standard CAN/CSA - Z809 and Sustainable Forestry Initiative. For consumers to use certified products to meet their own sustainability goals, they must have an understanding of the effectiveness of different certification systems. To understand the relative performance of three systems, we determined: (1 the criteria used to compare the Forest Stewardship Council, Canadian Standards Association - Sustainable Forestry Management, and Sustainable Forestry Initiative, (2 if consensus exists regarding their ability to achieve sustainability goals, and (3 what research gaps must be filled to improve our understanding of how forest certification systems affect sustainable forest management. We conducted a qualitative meta-analysis of 26 grey literature references (books, industry and nongovernmental organization publications and 9 primary literature references (articles in peer-reviewed academic journals that compared at least two of the aforementioned certification systems. The Forest Stewardship Council was the highest performer for ecological health and social sustainable forest management criteria. The Canadian Standards Association - Sustainable Forestry Management and Sustainable Forestry Initiative performed best under sustainable forest management criteria of forest productivity and economic longevity of a firm. Sixty-two percent of analyses were comparisons of the wording of certification system principles or criteria; 34% were surveys of foresters or consumers. An important caveat to these results is that only one comparison was based on

  2. Dispersal of forest insects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcmanus, M. L.

    1979-01-01

    Dispersal flights of selected species of forest insects which are associated with periodic outbreaks of pests that occur over large contiguous forested areas are discussed. Gypsy moths, spruce budworms, and forest tent caterpillars were studied for their massive migrations in forested areas. Results indicate that large dispersals into forested areas are due to the females, except in the case of the gypsy moth.

  3. South Dakota's forests 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronald J. Piva; W. Keith Moser; Douglas D. Haugan; Gregory J. Josten; Gary J. Brand; Brett J. Butler; Susan J. Crocker; Mark H. Hansen; Dacia M. Meneguzzo; Charles H. Perry; Christopher W. Woodall

    2009-01-01

    The first completed annual inventory of South Dakota's forests reports almost 1.7 million acres of forest land. Softwood forests make up 74 percent of the total forest land area; the ponderosa pine forest type by itself accounts for 69 percent of the total.

  4. Forest report 2016

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    This forest condition report of Hesse (Germany) includes the following topics: forest condition survey for all tree species, forest in the in the Rhine-Main area, weather and climate, soil water balance and drought stress, insects and fungi, Forestry Environment Monitoring, infiltrated substances, main results of Forest soil survey in Hesse (BZE II), the substrate group red sandstone, heavy metal contamination of forests.

  5. Mapping Forest Inventory and Analysis forest land use: timberland, reserved forest land, and other forest land

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark D. Nelson; John Vissage

    2007-01-01

    The Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program produces area estimates of forest land use within three subcategories: timberland, reserved forest land, and other forest land. Mapping these subcategories of forest land requires the ability to spatially distinguish productive from unproductive land, and reserved from nonreserved land. FIA field data were spatially...

  6. Forests and Forest Cover - MDC_NaturalForestCommunity

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — A point feature class of NFCs - Natural Forest Communities. Natural Forest Community shall mean all stands of trees (including their associated understory) which...

  7. Solving rational expectations models using Excel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strulik, Holger

    2004-01-01

    Problems of discrete time optimal control can be solved using backward iteration and Microsoft Excel. The author explains the method in general and shows how the basic models of neoclassical growth and real business cycles are solved......Problems of discrete time optimal control can be solved using backward iteration and Microsoft Excel. The author explains the method in general and shows how the basic models of neoclassical growth and real business cycles are solved...

  8. CO2 fluxes near a forest edge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sogachev, Andrey; Leclerc, Monique Y.; Zhang, Gensheng

    2008-01-01

    In contrast with recent advances on the dynamics of the flow at a forest edge, few studies have considered its role on scalar transport and, in particular, on CO2 transfer. The present study addresses the influence of the abrupt roughness change on forest atmosphere CO2 exchange and contrasts...... as a function of both sources/sinks distribution and the vertical structure of the canopy. Results suggest that the ground source plays a major role in the formation of wave-like vertical CO2 flux behavior downwind of a forest edge, despite the fact that the contribution of foliage sources/sinks changes...

  9. LEGO Robotics: An Authentic Problem Solving Tool?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castledine, Alanah-Rei; Chalmers, Chris

    2011-01-01

    With the current curriculum focus on correlating classroom problem solving lessons to real-world contexts, are LEGO robotics an effective problem solving tool? This present study was designed to investigate this question and to ascertain what problem solving strategies primary students engaged with when working with LEGO robotics and whether the…

  10. Perspectives on Problem Solving and Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Merrienboer, Jeroen J. G.

    2013-01-01

    Most educators claim that problem solving is important, but they take very different perspective on it and there is little agreement on how it should be taught. This article aims to sort out the different perspectives and discusses problem solving as a goal, a method, and a skill. As a goal, problem solving should not be limited to well-structured…

  11. dwindling ethiopian forests

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eliasn

    1999-05-26

    May 26, 1999 ... Shelter for animals: Forests are natural “habitats for many wild animals. .... nificance of forest conservation and development in Ethiopia's combat ...... of forests are not, unfortunately, analogues to traffic lights where the impact.

  12. Tenure and forest income

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jagger, Pamela; Luckert, Martin K.; Duchelle, Amy E.

    2014-01-01

    We explore the relationship between tenure and forest income in 271 villages throughout the tropics. We find that state-owned forests generate more forest income than private and community-owned forests both per household and per hectare. We explore whether forest income varies according...... to the extent of rule enforcement, and congruence (i.e., overlap of user rights between owners and users). We find negative associations between enforcement and smallholder forest income for state-owned and community forests, and positive associations for privately owned forests. Where user rights are limited...... to formal owners we find negative associations for state-owned forests. Overlapping user rights are positively associated with forest income for community forests. Our findings suggest that policy reforms emphasizing enforcement and reducing overlapping claims to forest resources should consider possible...

  13. Indiana's Forests 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher W. Woodall; Mark N. Webb; Barry T. Wilson; Jeff Settle; Ron J. Piva; Charles H. Perry; Dacia M. Meneguzzo; Susan J. Crocker; Brett J. Butler; Mark Hansen; Mark Hatfield; Gary Brand; Charles. Barnett

    2011-01-01

    The second full annual inventory of Indiana's forests reports more than 4.75 million acres of forest land with an average volume of more than 2,000 cubic feet per acre. Forest land is dominated by the white oak/red oak/hickory forest type, which occupies nearly a third of the total forest land area. Seventy-six percent of forest land consists of sawtimber, 16...

  14. Percent Forest Cover (Future)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Forests provide economic and ecological value. High percentages of forest cover (FORPCTFuture) generally indicate healthier ecosystems and cleaner surface water....

  15. Percent Forest Cover

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Forests provide economic and ecological value. High percentages of forest cover (FORPCT) generally indicate healthier ecosystems and cleaner surface water. More...

  16. Mathematical foundations of transport theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ershov, Yu.I.; Shikhov, S.B.

    1985-01-01

    Foundations of mathematical transport theory are presented. Definitions and theorems of functional analysis are given. Linear kinetic equation of neutron transport in multiplication media is derived. A model of neutron interaction with nuclei of medium determining completely the coefficient properties in transport equation is described. Non-stationary problems regarding and without regard of d=e layed neutrons are analyzed. Results of solving Cauchy problem are discussed

  17. European mixed forests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bravo-Oviedo, Andres; Pretzsch, Hans; Ammer, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Aim of study: We aim at (i) developing a reference definition of mixed forests in order to harmonize comparative research in mixed forests and (ii) review the research perspectives in mixed forests. Area of study: The definition is developed in Europe but can be tested worldwide. Material...... and Methods: Review of existent definitions of mixed forests based and literature review encompassing dynamics, management and economic valuation of mixed forests. Main results: A mixed forest is defined as a forest unit, excluding linear formations, where at least two tree species coexist at any...... density in mixed forests, (iii) conversion of monocultures to mixed-species forest and (iv) economic valuation of ecosystem services provided by mixed forests. Research highlights: The definition is considered a high-level one which encompasses previous attempts to define mixed forests. Current fields...

  18. Forest tenure and sustainable forest management

    Science.gov (United States)

    J.P. Siry; K. McGinley; F.W. Cubbage; P. Bettinger

    2015-01-01

    We reviewed the principles and key literature related to forest tenure and sustainable forest management, and then examined the status of sustainable forestry and land ownership at the aggregate national level for major forested countries. The institutional design principles suggested by Ostrom are well accepted for applications to public, communal, and private lands....

  19. Community-powered problem solving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouillart, Francis; Billings, Douglas

    2013-04-01

    Traditionally, companies have managed their constituencies with specific processes: marketing to customers, procuring from vendors, developing HR policies for employees, and so on. The problem is, such processes focus on repeatability and compliance, so they can lead to stagnation. Inviting your constituencies to collectively help you solve problems and exploit opportunities--"co-creation"--is a better approach. It allows you to continually tap the skills and insights of huge numbers of stakeholders and develop new ways to produce value for all. The idea is to provide stakeholders with platforms (physical and digital forums) on which they can interact, get them to start exploring new experiences and connections, and let the system grow organically. A co-creation initiative by a unit of Becton, Dickinson and Company demonstrates how this works. A global leader in syringes, BD set out to deepen its ties with hospital customers and help them reduce the incidence of infections from unsafe injection and syringe disposal practices. The effort began with a cross-functional internal team, brought in the hospital procurement and supply managers BD had relationships with, and then reached out to hospitals' infection-prevention and occupational health leaders. Eventually product designers, nurses, sustainability staffers, and even hospital CFOs were using the platform, contributing data that generated new best practices and reduced infections.

  20. Forming of the regional core transport network taking into account the allocation of alternative energy sources based on artificial intelligence methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina ZHURAVSKAYA

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In the modern world the alternative energy sources, which considerably depend on a region, play more and more significant role. However, the transition of regions to new energy sources lead to the change of transport and logistic network configuration. The formation of optimal core transport network today is a guarantee of the successful economic development of a region tomorrow. The present article studies the issue of advanced core transport network development in a region based on the experience of European and Asian countries and the opportunity to adapt the best foreign experience to Russian conditions. On the basis of artificial intelligence methods for forest industry complex of Sverdlovskaya Oblast the algorithm of problem solution of an optimal logistic infrastructure allocation is offered and some results of a regional transport network are presented. These methods allowed to solve the set task in the conditions of information uncertainty. There are suggestions on the improvement of transport and logistic network in the territory of Sverdlovskaya Oblast. Traditionally the logistics of mineral fuel plays main role in regions development. Actually it is required to develop logistic strategic plans to be able to provide different possibilities of power-supply, flexible enough to change with the population density, transport infrastructure and demographics of different regions. The problem of logistic centers allocation was studied by many authors. The approach, offered by the authors of this paper is to solve the set of tasks by applying artificial intelligence methods, such as fuzzy set theory and genetic algorithms.

  1. Global climate change adaptation: examples from Russian boreal forests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krankina, O.N.; Dixon, R.K.; Kirilenko, A.P.; Kobak, K.I.

    1997-01-01

    The Russian Federation contains approximately 20% of the world's timber resources and more than half of all boreal forests. These forests play a prominent role in environmental protection and economic development at global, national, and local levels, as well as, provide commodities for indigenous people and habitat for a variety of plant and animal species. The response and feedbacks of Russian boreal forests to projected global climate change are expected to be profound. Current understanding of the vulnerability of Russian forest resources to projected climate change is discussed and examples of possible adaptation measures for Russian forests are presented including: (1) artificial forestation techniques that can be applied with the advent of failed natural regeneration and to facilitate forest migration northward; (2) silvicultural measures that can influence the species mix to maintain productivity under future climates; (3) identifying forests at risk and developing special management adaption measures for them: (4) alternative processing and uses of wood and non-wood products from future forests; and (5) potential future infrastructure and transport systems that can be employed as boreal forests shift northward into melting permafrost zones. Current infrastructure and technology can be employed to help Russian boreal forests adapt to projected global environmental change, however many current forest management practices may have to be modified. Application of this technical knowledge can help policymakers identify priorities for climate change adaptation

  2. 14 THE NAGI FOREST DENSITY AND NEED FOR PROTECTION ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tersor

    stock, security of land use and suitable financial and political ... Forests help absorb noise and some air pollutants, cool the air and .... disbranching, cross cutting and transportation. It should be ... sustainability and the technology employed is.

  3. An outline review of numerical transport methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budd, C.

    1981-01-01

    A brief review is presented of numerical methods for solving the neutron transport equation in the context of reactor physics. First the various forms of transport equation are given. Second, the various ways of classifying numerical transport methods are discussed. Finally each method (or class of methods) is outlined in turn. (U.K.)

  4. Students’ difficulties in probabilistic problem-solving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arum, D. P.; Kusmayadi, T. A.; Pramudya, I.

    2018-03-01

    There are many errors can be identified when students solving mathematics problems, particularly in solving the probabilistic problem. This present study aims to investigate students’ difficulties in solving the probabilistic problem. It focuses on analyzing and describing students errors during solving the problem. This research used the qualitative method with case study strategy. The subjects in this research involve ten students of 9th grade that were selected by purposive sampling. Data in this research involve students’ probabilistic problem-solving result and recorded interview regarding students’ difficulties in solving the problem. Those data were analyzed descriptively using Miles and Huberman steps. The results show that students have difficulties in solving the probabilistic problem and can be divided into three categories. First difficulties relate to students’ difficulties in understanding the probabilistic problem. Second, students’ difficulties in choosing and using appropriate strategies for solving the problem. Third, students’ difficulties with the computational process in solving the problem. Based on the result seems that students still have difficulties in solving the probabilistic problem. It means that students have not able to use their knowledge and ability for responding probabilistic problem yet. Therefore, it is important for mathematics teachers to plan probabilistic learning which could optimize students probabilistic thinking ability.

  5. IDEAL Problem Solving dalam Pembelajaran Matematika

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eny Susiana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Most educators agree that problem solving is among the most meaningful and importantkinds of learning and thingking. That is, the central focus of learning and instructionshould be learning to solve problems. There are several warrants supporting that claims.They are authenticity, relevance, problem solving engages deeper learning angtherefore enhances meaning making, and constructed to represent problems (problemsolving is more meaningful. It is the reason why we must provide teaching and learningto make student’s problem solving skill in progress. There are many informationprocessingmodels of problem solving, such as simplified model of the problem-solvingprocess by Gicks, Polya’s problem solving process etc. One of them is IDEAL problemsolving. Each letter of IDEAL is stand for an aspect of thinking that is important forproblem solving. IDEAL is identify problem, Define Goal, Explore possible strategies,Anticipate outcme and Act, and Look back and learn. Using peer interaction andquestion prompt in small group in IDEAL problem solving teaching and Learning canimprove problem solving skill.Kata kunci: IDEAL Problem Solving, Interaksi Sebaya, Pertanyaan Penuntun, KelompokKecil.

  6. AN INVESTIGATION ON THE FOREST ROAD PLANNING AND ROAD GROUND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hafız Hulusi ACAR

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available It is required that the capital used for construction of road must be technical, economical and used in its location. For this reason, the projects must be prepared for forest roads and all operations belong to roads must be guided according to these projects. In this investigation, available forest road network plan and constructed forest roads were investigated at the point of view technical and forest transportation. After this, it were studied to reach the highest exploitation rate as can as possible. Available forest road density were found as 11.9 m/ha in forest areas for Yesiltepe District. In this condition, exploitation rate was 78 %. After that, optimum forest road network were planned and road density were reached to 22 m/ha and exploitation rate to 86 %. Directed sample method were used from taking soil sample methods and samples were took in mixed system. According to results of the experiments, available forest roads were found in a good degree at the point of view endurance, pressing and transportation capacity. With these results, it is aimed to reach higher exploitation rate with given attention to landslide areas during planning of forest roads on the mountain areas such as Black Sea Region. For this reason, required importance must be given to planning of truck and logging roads. Ground analysis must be done and took care before during planning process of forest road network.

  7. Restoring forests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobs, Douglass F.; Oliet, Juan A.; Aronson, James

    2015-01-01

    of land requiring restoration implies the need for spatial prioritization of restoration efforts according to cost-benefit analyses that include ecological risks. To design resistant and resilient ecosystems that can adapt to emerging circumstances, an adaptive management approach is needed. Global change......, in particular, imparts a high degree of uncertainty about the future ecological and societal conditions of forest ecosystems to be restored, as well as their desired goods and services. We must also reconsider the suite of species incorporated into restoration with the aim of moving toward more stress resistant...... and competitive combinations in the longer term. Non-native species may serve an important role under some circumstances, e.g., to facilitate reintroduction of native species. Propagation and field establishment techniques must promote survival through seedling stress resistance and site preparation. An improved...

  8. Sustaining Urban Forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    John F. Dwyer; David J. Nowak

    2003-01-01

    The significance of the urban forest resource and the powerful forces for change in the urban environment make sustainability a critical issue in urban forest management. The diversity, connectedness, and dynamics of the urban forest establish the context for management that will determine the sustainability of forest structure, health, functions, and benefits. A...

  9. North Dakota's forests 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    David E. Haugen; Michael Kangas; Susan J. Crocker; Charles H. Perry; Christopher W. Woodall; Brett J. Butler; Barry T. Wilson; Dan J. Kaisershot

    2009-01-01

    The first completed annual inventory of North Dakota's forests reports estimates of more than 724,000 acres of forest land. Information about forest attributes and forest health is presented along with information on agents of change including changing land use patterns and the introduction of nonnative plants, insects, and disease.

  10. Forest Health Detectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bal, Tara L.

    2014-01-01

    "Forest health" is an important concept often not covered in tree, forest, insect, or fungal ecology and biology. With minimal, inexpensive equipment, students can investigate and conduct their own forest health survey to assess the percentage of trees with natural or artificial wounds or stress. Insects and diseases in the forest are…

  11. Wisconsin's forests, 2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles H. (Hobie) Perry; Vern A. Everson; Ian K. Brown; Jane Cummings-Carlson; Sally E. Dahir; Edward A. Jepsen; Joe Kovach; Michael D. Labissoniere; Terry R. Mace; Eunice A. Padley; Richard B. Rideout; Brett J. Butler; Susan J. Crocker; Greg C. Liknes; Randall S. Morin; Mark D. Nelson; Barry T. (Ty) Wilson; Christopher W. Woodall

    2008-01-01

    The first full, annualized inventory of Wisconsin's forests was completed in 2004 after 6,478 forested plots were visited. There are more than 16.0 million acres of forest land in the Wisconsin, nearly half of the State's land area; 15.8 million acres meet the definition of timberland. The total area of both forest land and timberland continues an upward...

  12. Managing Sierra Nevada forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malcolm North

    2012-01-01

    There has been widespread interest in applying new forest practices based on concepts presented in U.S. Forest Service General Technical Report PSW-GTR-220, "An Ecosystem Management Strategy for Sierran Mixed-Conifer Forests." This collection of papers (PSW-GTR-237) summarizes the state of the science in some topics relevant to this forest management approach...

  13. Using forest carbon credits to offset emissions in the downstream business

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hein, Lars

    2017-01-01

    A forthcoming report by Concawe, entitled Using Forest Carbon Credits to Offset Emissions in the Downstream Business, investigated whether, and how, forest carbon credits can be used to offset emissions from the European refining and road transport sectors. Forest carbon plays a major role in the

  14. The Public Debate about Roads on the National Forest: An Analysis of the News Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    David N. Bengston; David P. Fan

    1999-01-01

    Roads and road building on the US national forests have become the focus of intense public debate in recent years. Timber companies and others argued that forest roads are an essential transportation system for the production of commodities that society needs. Environmentalists and others reply that national forest roads constitute ecologically destructive "...

  15. Influência do cálculo de depreciação no imposto de renda e no fluxo de caixa de uma atividade de transporte florestal Influence of methods for calculating depreciation on the income tax and cash flow of a forest transportion activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Carlos de Freitas

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho buscou ilustrar um cenário de alternativas na cobrança de impostos, baseado em diferentes métodos de depreciação. A referência foi a atividade de transporte florestal, sendo o estudo desenvolvido para o caminhão bitrem. O fluxo de caixa foi calculado antes e depois dos impostos, sendo estes determinados com base num porcentual incidido sobre a renda tributável, que variou em função das metodologias utilizadas no cálculo da depreciação. Após a elaboração do fluxo de caixa pós-impostos, realizou-se um estudo econômico utilizando o Valor Presente Líquido (VPL. O impacto do imposto de renda ocasionou retrações na VPL de 53,36%, 52,22%, 50,54%, 48,07% e 47,72% quando se consideraram, respectivamente, os seguintes métodos de depreciação: soma inversa dos dígitos, fundo de renovação, linear, exponencial e soma dos dígitos. A metodologia mais compatível para o bitrem foi a mesma que apresentou maior VPL (soma dos dígitos, indicando que o método adotado pelo governo pode acarretar sobrecarga tributária. Isso reflete a necessidade de se estabelecerem critérios mais justos na cobrança de impostos, através da adoção de metodologias mais adequadas às realidades dos equipamentos.This work sought to illustrate a scenario of alternatives to taxation, based on different methods of depreciation. The parameter was the forest transportation activity, being the study developed for the Bitrem truck. Cash flow was calculated before and after taxation, which values were determined on the basis of a percentage on the taxable income, varying according to the methodologies used for calculating depreciation. After drawing up the post-taxation cash flow, an economic study was carried out using Net Present Value (NPV. The impact of the income tax caused a reduction in NPV of 53.36%, 52.22%, 50.54%, 48.07% and 47.72% respectively when considering the following methods of depreciation: inverse sum of the digits ; sinking fund

  16. Conceptual problem solving in high school physics

    OpenAIRE

    Jennifer L. Docktor; Natalie E. Strand; José P. Mestre; Brian H. Ross

    2015-01-01

    Problem solving is a critical element of learning physics. However, traditional instruction often emphasizes the quantitative aspects of problem solving such as equations and mathematical procedures rather than qualitative analysis for selecting appropriate concepts and principles. This study describes the development and evaluation of an instructional approach called Conceptual Problem Solving (CPS) which guides students to identify principles, justify their use, and plan their solution in w...

  17. Solving global optimization problems on GPU cluster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barkalov, Konstantin; Gergel, Victor; Lebedev, Ilya [Lobachevsky State University of Nizhni Novgorod, Gagarin Avenue 23, 603950 Nizhni Novgorod (Russian Federation)

    2016-06-08

    The paper contains the results of investigation of a parallel global optimization algorithm combined with a dimension reduction scheme. This allows solving multidimensional problems by means of reducing to data-independent subproblems with smaller dimension solved in parallel. The new element implemented in the research consists in using several graphic accelerators at different computing nodes. The paper also includes results of solving problems of well-known multiextremal test class GKLS on Lobachevsky supercomputer using tens of thousands of GPU cores.

  18. A method for unbalanced transportation problems in fuzzy ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Among linear programming problems, the transportation problem is very popular. ... Therefore, Zadeh (1965) introduced the concept of fuzzy numbers. ... While solving unbalanced transportation problems we come across two type of cases.

  19. Applying Cooperative Techniques in Teaching Problem Solving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krisztina Barczi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Teaching how to solve problems – from solving simple equations to solving difficult competition tasks – has been one of the greatest challenges for mathematics education for many years. Trying to find an effective method is an important educational task. Among others, the question arises as to whether a method in which students help each other might be useful. The present article describes part of an experiment that was designed to determine the effects of cooperative teaching techniques on the development of problem-solving skills.

  20. Assertiveness and problem solving in midwives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurtsal, Zeliha Burcu; Özdemir, Levent

    2015-01-01

    Midwifery profession is required to bring solutions to problems and a midwife is expected to be an assertive person and to develop midwifery care. This study was planned to examine the relationship between assertiveness and problem-solving skills of midwives. This cross-sectional study was conducted with 201 midwives between July 2008 and February 2009 in the city center of Sivas. The Rathus Assertiveness Schedule (RAS) and Problem Solving Inventory (PSI) were used to determine the level of assertiveness and problem-solving skills of midwives. Statistical methods were used as mean, standard deviation, percentage, Student's T, ANOVA and Tukey HSD, Kruskal Wallis, Fisher Exact, Pearson Correlation and Chi-square tests and P problem-solving skills training. A statistically significant negative correlation was found between the RAS and PSI scores. The RAS scores decreased while the problem-solving scores increased (r: -0451, P problem solving skills of midwives, and midwives who were assertive solved their problems better than did others. Assertiveness and problem-solving skills training will contribute to the success of the midwifery profession. Midwives able to solve problems, and display assertive behaviors will contribute to the development of midwifery profession.

  1. An Integrated Architecture for Engineering Problem Solving

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pisan, Yusuf

    1998-01-01

    .... This thesis describes the Integrated Problem Solving Architecture (IPSA) that combines qualitative, quantitative and diagrammatic reasoning skills to produce annotated solutions to engineering problems...

  2. West Virginia Forests 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall S. Morin; Gregory W. Cook; Charles J. Barnett; Brett J. Butler; Susan J. Crocker; Mark A. Hatfield; Cassandra M. Kurtz; Tonya W. Lister; William G. Luppold; William H. McWilliams; Patrick D. Miles; Mark D. Nelson; Charles H. (Hobie) Perry; Ronald J. Piva; James E. Smith; Jim Westfall; Richard H. Widmann; Christopher W. Woodall

    2016-01-01

    The annual inventory of West Virginia's forests, completed in 2013, covers nearly 12.2 million acres of forest land with an average volume of more than 2,300 cubic feet per acre. This report is based data collected from 2,808 plots located across the State. Forest land is dominated by the oak/hickory forest-type group, which occupies 74 percent of total forest...

  3. Illinois' Forests 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susan J. Crocker; Mark D. Nelson; Charles J. Barnett; Brett J. Butler; Grant M. Domke; Mark H. Hansen; Mark A. Hatfield; Tonya W. Lister; Dacia M. Meneguzzo; Ronald J. Piva; Barry T. Wilson; Christopher W. Woodall

    2013-01-01

    The second full annual inventory of Illinois' forests, completed in 2010, reports more than 4.8 million acres of forest land and 97 tree species. Forest land is dominated by oak/hickory and elm/ash/cottonwood forest-type groups, which occupy 93 percent of total forest land area. The volume of growing stock on timberland totals 7.2 billion cubic feet. The average...

  4. Nebraska's Forests 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dacia M Meneguzzo; Susan J. Crocker; Mark D. Nelson; Charles J. Barnett; Brett J. Butler; Grant M. Domke; Mark H. Hansen; Mark A. Hatfield; Greg C. Liknes; Andrew J. Lister; Tonya W. Lister; Ronald J. Piva; Barry T. (Ty) Wilson; Christopher W. Woodall

    2012-01-01

    The second full annual inventory of Nebraska's forests reports more than 1.5 million acres of forest land and 39 tree species. Forest land is dominated by the elm/ash/cottonwood and oak/hickory forest types, which occupy nearly half of the total forest land area. The volume of growing stock on timberland currently totals 1.1 billion cubic feet. The average annual...

  5. New Jersey's forests, 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susan J. Crocker; Mark D. Nelson; Charles J. Barnett; Gary J. Brand; Brett J. Butler; Grant M. Domke; Mark H. Hansen; Mark A. Hatfield; Tonya W. Lister; Dacia M. Meneguzzo; Charles H. Perry; Ronald J. Piva; Barry T. Wilson; Christopher W. Woodall; Bill. Zipse

    2011-01-01

    The first full annual inventory of New Jersey's forests reports more than 2.0 million acres of forest land and 83 tree species. Forest land is dominated by oak-hickory forest types in the north and pitch pine forest types in the south. The volume of growing stock on timberland has been rising since 1956 and currently totals 3.4 billion cubic feet. The average...

  6. Forest Grammar(Ⅰ)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张松懋

    1994-01-01

    Forest grammar,a new type of high-dimensional grammar,is proposed in this paper,of which both the left and the right parts of every production are concatenations of tree structures.A classification of forest grammar is studied,especially,a subclass of the forest grammar,i.e.the context-sensitive forest grammar,and one of its subclasses is defined,called the weak precedence forest grammar.

  7. New Jersey Forests 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susan J. Crocker; Charles J. Barnett; Brett J. Butler; Mark A. Hatfield; Cassandra M. Kurtz; Tonya W. Lister; Dacia M. Meneguzzo; Patrick D. Miles; Randall S. Morin; Mark D. Nelson; Ronald J. Piva; Rachel Riemann; James E. Smith; Christopher W. Woodall; William. Zipse

    2017-01-01

    The second full annual inventory of New Jersey’s forests reports more than 2.0 million acres of forest land and 77 tree species. Forest land is dominated by oak/hickory forest types in the north and pitch pine forest types in the south. The volume of growing stock on timberland has been rising since 1956 and currently totals 3.3 billion cubic feet. Average annual net...

  8. Michigan's Forests 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott A. Pugh; Lawrence D. Pedersen; Douglas C. Heym; Ronald J. Piva; Christopher W. Woodall; Charles J. Barnett; Cassandra M. Kurtz; W. Keith. Moser

    2012-01-01

    The seventh inventory of Michigan's forests, completed in 2009, describes more than 19.9 million acres of forest land. The data in this report are based on visits to 7,516 forested plots from 2005 to 2009. Timberland accounts for 97 percent of this forest land, and 62 percent is privately owned. The sugar maple/beech/yellow birch forest type accounts for 18...

  9. Michigan's forests 2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott A. Pugh; Mark H. Hansen; Lawrence D. Pedersen; Douglas C. Heym; Brett J. Butler; Susan J. Crocker; Dacia Meneguzzo; Charles H. Perry; David E. Haugen; Christopher Woodall; Ed Jepsen

    2009-01-01

    The first annual inventory of Michigan's forests, completed in 2004, covers more than 19.3 million acres of forest land. The data in this report are based on visits to 10,355 forested plots from 2000 to 2004. In addition to detailed information on forest attributes, this report includes data on forest health, biomass, land-use change, and timber-product outputs....

  10. Physiological aspects of forest disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziegler, H.

    1986-01-01

    Many kinds of forest disease having the most varied causes are currently classified as 'forest die-back'. These include for one part diseases of obvious etiology: infectious diseases, damage from frost and drought, as well as harmful effects of defined air pollutants from known sources. But apart from this, a fast growing tendency is noted for extensive damage to appear whose origin is not yet clearly elucidated and which are probably the result of many factors, in other words, which can be termed as 'chain disease'. A striking fact is that any scientist who has so far attributed that last-mentioned disease condition of forests to any single decisive cause, has chosen one from his own specific scientific field. Physiologic-biochemical analysis of the damage symptoms is impaired by the fact that trees are, for obvious biological reasons, difficult objects for providing precise data. Yet reliable statements can be made on the paths by which wet and dry depositions penetrate into the plant organs, the penetration of pollutants into the cell, their points of attack in cells and tissue (above all photosynthesis, material transport, and hormone balance), and their influence on the correlations between the individual organs. Particular attention should be paid to possible or indirect effects on the mycorrhiza of forest trees, i.e. on the symbiosis between roots and fungi. The physiologic-biochemical investigations and considerations reported provide circumstantial evidence, but no proof regarding the causes hitherto unexplained. (orig.) [de

  11. A set of numerical meteorological models for solving basic and some special problems in the Boris Kidric Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grscic, Z.

    1989-01-01

    Models for solving transport and dispersion problems of radioactive pollutants through atmosphere are briefly shown. These models are the base for solving and some special problems such as: estimating effective and physical heights of radioactive sources, computation of radioactive concentration distribution from multiple sources etc (author)

  12. Distance Measurement Solves Astrophysical Mysteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-08-01

    Location, location, and location. The old real-estate adage about what's really important proved applicable to astrophysics as astronomers used the sharp radio "vision" of the National Science Foundation's Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) to pinpoint the distance to a pulsar. Their accurate distance measurement then resolved a dispute over the pulsar's birthplace, allowed the astronomers to determine the size of its neutron star and possibly solve a mystery about cosmic rays. "Getting an accurate distance to this pulsar gave us a real bonanza," said Walter Brisken, of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Socorro, NM. Monogem Ring The Monogem Ring, in X-Ray Image by ROSAT satellite CREDIT: Max-Planck Institute, American Astronomical Society (Click on Image for Larger Version) The pulsar, called PSR B0656+14, is in the constellation Gemini, and appears to be near the center of a circular supernova remnant that straddles Gemini and its neighboring constellation, Monoceros, and is thus called the Monogem Ring. Since pulsars are superdense, spinning neutron stars left over when a massive star explodes as a supernova, it was logical to assume that the Monogem Ring, the shell of debris from a supernova explosion, was the remnant of the blast that created the pulsar. However, astronomers using indirect methods of determining the distance to the pulsar had concluded that it was nearly 2500 light-years from Earth. On the other hand, the supernova remnant was determined to be only about 1000 light-years from Earth. It seemed unlikely that the two were related, but instead appeared nearby in the sky purely by a chance juxtaposition. Brisken and his colleagues used the VLBA to make precise measurements of the sky position of PSR B0656+14 from 2000 to 2002. They were able to detect the slight offset in the object's apparent position when viewed from opposite sides of Earth's orbit around the Sun. This effect, called parallax, provides a direct measurement of

  13. Molecular science solving global problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunning, T.H. Jr.; Stults, B.R.

    1995-01-01

    From the late 1940s to the late 1980s, the Department of Energy (DOE) had a critical role in the Cold War. Many sites were built to contribute to the nation's nuclear weapons effort. However, not enough attention was paid to how the waste generated at these facilities should be handled. As a result, a number of sites fouled the soil around them or dumped low-level radioactive waste into nearby rivers. A DOE laboratory is under construction with a charter to help. Called the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), this national user facility will be located at DOE's Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in Richland, WA. This laboratory has been funded by DOE and Congress to play a major role as the nation confronts the enormous challenge of reducing environmental and human risks from hundreds of government and industrial waste sites in an economically viable manner. The original proposal for the EMSL took a number of twists and turns on its way to its present form, but one thing remained constant: the belief that safe, permanent, cost-effective solutions to many of the country's environmental problems could be achieved only by multidisciplinary teams working to understand and control molecular processes. The processes of most concern are those that govern the transport and transformation of contaminants, the treatment and storage of high-level mixed wastes, and the risks those contaminants ultimately pose to workers and the public

  14. Multicriteria vehicle routing problem solved by artificial immune system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogna MRÓWCZYŃSKA

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Vehicles route planning in large transportation companies, where drivers are workers, usually takes place on the basis of experience or intuition of the employees. Because of the cost and environmental protection, it is important to save fuel, thus planning routes in an optimal way. In this article an example of the problem is presented solving delivery vans route planning taking into account the distance and travel time within the constraints of vehicle capacities, restrictions on working time of drivers and having varying degrees of movement. An artificial immune system was used for the calculations.

  15. Solving the generalized Langevin equation with the algebraically correlated noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srokowski, T.; Ploszajczak, M.

    1997-01-01

    The Langevin equation with the memory kernel is solved. The stochastic force possesses algebraic correlations, proportional to 1/t. The velocity autocorrelation function and related quantities characterizing transport properties are calculated at the assumption that the system is in the thermal equilibrium. Stochastic trajectories are simulated numerically, using the kangaroo process as a noise generator. Results of this simulation resemble Levy walks with divergent moments of the velocity distribution. The motion of a Brownian particle is considered both without any external potential and in the harmonic oscillator field, in particular the escape from a potential well. The results are compared with memory-free calculations for the Brownian particle. (author)

  16. Forest dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frelich, Lee

    2016-01-01

    Forest dynamics encompass changes in stand structure, species composition, and species interactions with disturbance and environment over a range of spatial and temporal scales. For convenience, spatial scale is defined as individual tree, neighborhood, stand, and landscape. Whether a given canopy-leveling disturbance will initiate a sequence of development in structure with little change in composition or initiate an episode of succession depends on a match or mismatch, respectively, with traits of the dominant tree species that allow the species to survive disturbance. When these match, certain species-disturbance type combinations lock in a pattern of stand and landscape dynamics that can persist for several generations of trees; thus, dominant tree species regulate, as well as respond to, disturbance. A complex interaction among tree species, neighborhood effects, disturbance type and severity, landform, and soils determines how stands of differing composition form and the mosaic of stands that compose the landscape. Neighborhood effects (e.g., serotinous seed rain, sprouting, shading, leaf-litter chemistry, and leaf-litter physical properties) operate at small spatial extents of the individual tree and its neighbors but play a central role in forest dynamics by contributing to patch formation at stand scales and dynamics of the entire landscape. Dominance by tree species with neutral to negative neighborhood effects leads to unstable landscape dynamics in disturbance-prone regions, wherein most stands are undergoing succession; stability can only occur under very low-severity disturbance regimes. Dominance by species with positive effects leads to stable landscape dynamics wherein only a small proportion of stands undergo succession at any one time. Positive neighborhood effects are common in temperate and boreal zones, whereas negative effects are more common in tropical climates. Landscapes with positive dynamics have alternate categories of dynamics

  17. Marine cargo imports and forest pest introductions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank H. Koch

    2009-01-01

    A major pathway for the introduction of nonindigenous forest pests is accidental transport on cargo imported from overseas. Diseases may be brought into the United States via commercial trade of nursery stock or other live plant material, as has been suggested for Phytophthora ramorum, the pathogen that causes sudden oak death (Ivors and others 2006). Insects may...

  18. Are our forests declining. Why

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leygonie, R.

    1991-01-01

    This article first presents the historical background of recent events popularized under the names: acid rains, forests declines. The first major crisis was soil and lake acidifications in Scandinavian countries, then a fast forest decay, first in Germany, in the early eighties, then in a number of European countries, including France. These phenomena were attributed to atmospheric pollutions, essentially acidic pollution. The consequences were drastic legislations in Germany, then the European Directive on large combustion plants (November 1988). Another consequence was the UNECE Convention on long range transport of pollutants (1979). Observations in the field on tree declines (loss of needles or leaves, abnormal yellowings, soil studies, etc.) and laboratory experiments showed that causes are very complex, involving the low quality of soils, abnormal droughts, presence of pollutants in atmosphere, mainly ozone [fr

  19. Creativity and Insight in Problem Solving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golnabi, Laura

    2016-01-01

    This paper analyzes the thought process involved in problem solving and its categorization as creative thinking as defined by psychologist R. Weisberg (2006). Additionally, the notion of insight, sometimes present in unconscious creative thinking and often leading to creative ideas, is discussed in the context of geometry problem solving. In…

  20. Metacognition: Student Reflections on Problem Solving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wismath, Shelly; Orr, Doug; Good, Brandon

    2014-01-01

    Twenty-first century teaching and learning focus on the fundamental skills of critical thinking and problem solving, creativity and innovation, and collaboration and communication. Metacognition is a crucial aspect of both problem solving and critical thinking, but it is often difficult to get students to engage in authentic metacognitive…

  1. Parallel Algorithm Solves Coupled Differential Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, A.

    1987-01-01

    Numerical methods adapted to concurrent processing. Algorithm solves set of coupled partial differential equations by numerical integration. Adapted to run on hypercube computer, algorithm separates problem into smaller problems solved concurrently. Increase in computing speed with concurrent processing over that achievable with conventional sequential processing appreciable, especially for large problems.

  2. Measuring Problem Solving Skills in "Portal 2"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shute, Valerie J.; Wang, Lubin

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines possible improvement to problem solving skills as a function of playing the video game "Portal 2." Stealth assessment is used in the game to evaluate students' problem solving abilities--specifically basic and flexible rule application. The stealth assessment measures will be validated against commonly accepted…

  3. Conceptual Problem Solving in High School Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Docktor, Jennifer L.; Strand, Natalie E.; Mestre, José P.; Ross, Brian H.

    2015-01-01

    Problem solving is a critical element of learning physics. However, traditional instruction often emphasizes the quantitative aspects of problem solving such as equations and mathematical procedures rather than qualitative analysis for selecting appropriate concepts and principles. This study describes the development and evaluation of an…

  4. Concept mapping instrumental support for problem solving

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoyanov, S.; Stoyanov, Slavi; Kommers, Petrus A.M.

    2008-01-01

    The main theoretical position of this paper is that it is the explicit problem-solving support in concept mapping software that produces a stronger effect in problem-solving performance than the implicit support afforded by the graphical functionality of concept mapping software. Explicit

  5. Problem Solving Methods in Engineering Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartvig, Susanne C

    1999-01-01

    This short paper discusses typical engineering tasks and problem solving methods, based on a field study of engineering tasks at a Danish engineering firm. The field study has identified ten classes of design tasks and in this paper these classes are related to problem solving methods. The descri...

  6. The Process of Solving Complex Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Andreas; Greiff, Samuel; Funke, Joachim

    2012-01-01

    This article is about Complex Problem Solving (CPS), its history in a variety of research domains (e.g., human problem solving, expertise, decision making, and intelligence), a formal definition and a process theory of CPS applicable to the interdisciplinary field. CPS is portrayed as (a) knowledge acquisition and (b) knowledge application…

  7. Strategy Keys as Tools for Problem Solving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herold-Blasius, Raja

    2017-01-01

    Problem solving is one of the main competences we seek to teach students at school for use in their future lives. However, when dealing with mathematical problems, teachers encounter a wide variety of difficulties. To foster students' problem-solving skills, the authors developed "strategy keys." Strategy keys can serve as material to…

  8. Problem Solving Strategies among Primary School Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yew, Wun Thiam; Lian, Lim Hooi; Meng, Chew Cheng

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to examine problem solving strategies among primary school teachers. The researchers employed survey research design to examine their problem solving strategies. The participants of this study consisted of 120 primary school teachers from a public university in Peninsula Malaysia who enrolled in a 4-year Graduating…

  9. Teaching Effective Problem Solving Strategies for Interns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Louis L.

    2005-01-01

    This qualitative study investigates what problem solving strategies interns learn from their clinical teachers during their internships. Twenty-four interns who completed their internship in the elementary grades shared what problem solving strategies had the greatest impact upon them in learning how to deal with problems during their internship.…

  10. Some Applications of Algebraic System Solving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roanes-Lozano, Eugenio

    2011-01-01

    Technology and, in particular, computer algebra systems, allows us to change both the way we teach mathematics and the mathematical curriculum. Curiously enough, unlike what happens with linear system solving, algebraic system solving is not widely known. The aim of this paper is to show that, although the theory lying behind the "exact…

  11. Mathematical problem solving in primary school

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolovou, A.

    2011-01-01

    A student is engaged in (non-routine) problem solving when there is no clear pathway to the solution. In contrast to routine problems, non-routine ones cannot be solved through the direct application of a standard procedure. Consider the following problem: In a quiz you get two points for each

  12. A Multivariate Model of Physics Problem Solving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taasoobshirazi, Gita; Farley, John

    2013-01-01

    A model of expertise in physics problem solving was tested on undergraduate science, physics, and engineering majors enrolled in an introductory-level physics course. Structural equation modeling was used to test hypothesized relationships among variables linked to expertise in physics problem solving including motivation, metacognitive planning,…

  13. Solving applied mathematical problems with Matlab

    CERN Document Server

    Xue, Dingyu

    2008-01-01

    Computer Mathematics Language-An Overview. Fundamentals of MATLAB Programming. Calculus Problems. MATLAB Computations of Linear Algebra Problems. Integral Transforms and Complex Variable Functions. Solutions to Nonlinear Equations and Optimization Problems. MATLAB Solutions to Differential Equation Problems. Solving Interpolations and Approximations Problems. Solving Probability and Mathematical Statistics Problems. Nontraditional Solution Methods for Mathematical Problems.

  14. Auto Carrier Transporter Loading and Unloading Improvement

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Miller, Brian

    2003-01-01

    .... Any reduction in time and energy will result in a significant savings of money. The intent of this research is to develop an algorithm to solve the Auto Carrier Transport Pickup and Delivery Problem...

  15. Forest and climate change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    After having recalled the challenges the French forest has to face, and a brief overview of the status of forests in the world, this report proposes an overview of actions which are implemented to strengthen the carbon sequestration role of forests, at the international level and in France. It discusses the distribution of carbon, the forest carbon stocks (in the world, Europe and France), the actions against climate change, the costs and financing of the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions in the forest sector. It comments the status of international negotiations and how forests are taken into account. It presents the French forest and wood sector (characteristics of the forest in metropolitan France and overseas, wood as material and as energy). It recalls the commitment of the Grenelle de l'Environnement, and indicates the current forest studies

  16. DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION OF A FOREST SPATIAL DATABASE: AN APPLICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turan Sönmez

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available General Directorate of Forests (GDF has not yet created the spatial forest database to manage forest and catch the developed countries in forestry. The lack of spatial forest database results in collection of the spatial data redundancy, communication problems among the forestry organizations. Also it causes Turkish forestry to be backward of informatics’ era. To solve these problems; GDF should establish spatial forest database supported Geographic Information System (GIS. To design the spatial database, supported GIS, which provides accurate, on time and current data/info for decision makers and operators in forestry, and to develop sample interface program to apply and monitor classical forest management plans is paramount in contemporary forest management planning process. This research is composed of three major stages: (i spatial rototype database design considering required by the three hierarchical organizations of GDF (regional directorate of forests, forest enterprise, and territorial division, (ii user interface program developed to apply and monitor classical management plans based on the designed database, (iii the implementation of the designed database and its user interface in Artvin Central Planning Unit.

  17. Completeness theorems in transport theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zweifel, P.F.

    1984-01-01

    Ever since K. M.; Case's famous 1960 paper, transport theorists have been studying the questions of full- and half-range completeness for various transport type equations. The purpose of this note is to try to define exactly what is meant by completeness as it is needed, and used, in solving transport equations and to discuss some of the various techniques which have been, or might be, used to verify completeness. Attention is restricted to the question of full-range completeness. As a paradigm the generalized form of the transport equation first introduced by Beals is adopted

  18. Forest inventory in Myanmar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bo, Sit [Forest Resource Div., Forest Department (Myanmar)

    1993-10-01

    Forest inventory in Myanmar started in 1850s. Up till 1975, Myanmar Forest Department conducted forest inventories covering approximately one forest division every year. The National Forest Survey and Inventory Project funded by UNDP and assisted by FAO commenced in 1981 and the National Forest Management and Inventory project followed in 1986. Up till end March 1993, pre-investment inventory has covered 26.7 million acres, reconnaissance inventory 5.4 million acres and management inventory has carried out in 12 townships

  19. Forest inventory in Myanmar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sit Bo

    1993-01-01

    Forest inventory in Myanmar started in 1850s. Up till 1975, Myanmar Forest Department conducted forest inventories covering approximately one forest division every year. The National Forest Survey and Inventory Project funded by UNDP and assisted by FAO commenced in 1981 and the National Forest Management and Inventory project followed in 1986. Up till end March 1993, pre-investment inventory has covered 26.7 million acres, reconnaissance inventory 5.4 million acres and management inventory has carried out in 12 townships

  20. Forest resources of Mississippi’s national forests, 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonja N. Oswalt

    2011-01-01

    This bulletin describes forest resource characteristics of Mississippi’s national forests, with emphasis on DeSoto National Forest, following the 2006 survey completed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service, Forest Inventory and Analysis program. Mississippi’s national forests comprise > 1 million acres of forest land, or about 7 percent of all forest...

  1. Synthesizing Huber's Problem Solving and Kolb's Learning Cycle: A Balanced Approach to Technical Problem Solving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamis, Arnold; Khan, Beverly K.

    2009-01-01

    How do we model and improve technical problem solving, such as network subnetting? This paper reports an experimental study that tested several hypotheses derived from Kolb's experiential learning cycle and Huber's problem solving model. As subjects solved a network subnetting problem, they mapped their mental processes according to Huber's…

  2. Pre-Service Class Teacher' Ability in Solving Mathematical Problems and Skills in Solving Daily Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljaberi, Nahil M.; Gheith, Eman

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the ability of pre-service class teacher at University of Petrain solving mathematical problems using Polya's Techniques, their level of problem solving skills in daily-life issues. The study also investigates the correlation between their ability to solve mathematical problems and their level of problem solving…

  3. Forest report 2013; Waldzustandsbericht 2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-07-01

    This forest report of Lower Saxony (Germany) contains the following topics: weather and climate, forest protection, crown defoliation, infiltrated substances, environmental monitoring, insects and fungi, forest soil survey and forest site mapping, and nutritional status of beech on loess.

  4. Diffusion and transport phenomena in a collisional magnetoplasma ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Boltzmann-transport equation is analytically solved for two-component magnetoplasma using Chapman-Enskog analysis to include collisional diffusion transport having anisotropies in both streaming velocity and temperature components. The modified collisional integrals are analytically solved with flux integrals and ...

  5. Policy Networks and Forest Resource Management in Ghana

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Although the proximate causes of global· forest loss arc complex and quite ... Ghana within the framework of the Integrated Network Model. ... actors as key. to solving political, social, economic and environmental problems ... produce multiple networks. .... Timber Trade and Reconfiguration of Networks in the Late Colonial.

  6. Mapping of forest types confined to the lay of land

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. K. Farber

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The principles for the formation of forest typological classification and outlines promising areas for development, allowing to solve problems of not only inventory and forest management, but also mapping forest types are discussed in the paper. The analysis is performed by interpreting the concept of «natural regularity» proposed by D. L. Armand (1975. It is shown when the left side of the pattern is a set of indicators of site condition, structure of forest typological constructions will take into account not only the static indicators of the stands, but also their location, the origin and direction of the succession. For relatively similar climatic conditions, the indicators of the lay of land mainly limit the environment of formation of vegetation cover. The method of mapping forest types provides for consideration of site condition and indicators of stands of forest types. Testing is conducted on a test axis West-Sayan forest district, located in the mountains of southern Siberia. Conjugation types of forests, indicators of the topography revealed through the analysis of literary sources and characteristics of forest types accompanying diagnostic table (Smagin et al., 1980. The work is done in a GIS environment using DEM SRTM and Landsat space images. For indexing locations, the inputs are accepted: altitude (gradation 100 m, flat location, slope up to 20° and 20° slopes with northern and southern exposure. Classification of pixels of satellite images is conducted by the method of unsupervised classification separately for each scene, the high-altitude zone and location, which allows increase of the quality of interpretation, because the types of forests are confined to the topography. However completely avoiding mistakes is not possible. The main reasons are an inaccuracy of the DEM and the hit in one class of spectral brightness of different objects of interpretation. The map legend includes characteristics of the terrain, description

  7. PSQP: Puzzle Solving by Quadratic Programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andalo, Fernanda A; Taubin, Gabriel; Goldenstein, Siome

    2017-02-01

    In this article we present the first effective method based on global optimization for the reconstruction of image puzzles comprising rectangle pieces-Puzzle Solving by Quadratic Programming (PSQP). The proposed novel mathematical formulation reduces the problem to the maximization of a constrained quadratic function, which is solved via a gradient ascent approach. The proposed method is deterministic and can deal with arbitrary identical rectangular pieces. We provide experimental results showing its effectiveness when compared to state-of-the-art approaches. Although the method was developed to solve image puzzles, we also show how to apply it to the reconstruction of simulated strip-shredded documents, broadening its applicability.

  8. Solving the Schroedinger equation using Smolyak interpolants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avila, Gustavo; Carrington, Tucker Jr.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we present a new collocation method for solving the Schroedinger equation. Collocation has the advantage that it obviates integrals. All previous collocation methods have, however, the crucial disadvantage that they require solving a generalized eigenvalue problem. By combining Lagrange-like functions with a Smolyak interpolant, we device a collocation method that does not require solving a generalized eigenvalue problem. We exploit the structure of the grid to develop an efficient algorithm for evaluating the matrix-vector products required to compute energy levels and wavefunctions. Energies systematically converge as the number of points and basis functions are increased

  9. Forest industry wood fuel supply

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-01

    The potential for wood fired energy production in the UK is significant. Large scale developments are currently underway which could utilise over 100,000 green tonnes of forest residues. The fuel supply chain is likely to be complicated and there are perceived risks in its organisation and security. This report sets out to address some of these perceived risks and suggest suitable measures to reduce it. Six areas of the fuel supply chain have been studied, namely; Extraction, Comminution, Transport, Assessment and payment of wood fuel; Environmental impact; Nutrient recycling (ash disposal). (author)

  10. National Forest Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — This theme shows the USFS national forest boundaries in the state. This data was acquired from the GIS coordinators at both the Chippewa National Forest and the...

  11. Forest Grammar (Ⅱ)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张松懋

    1994-01-01

    The syntactic parsing algorithm of weak precedence forest grammar has been introduced and the correctness and unambiguity of this algorithm have been proved. An example is given to the syntactic parsing procedure of weak precedence forest grammar.

  12. Multi-Stage Transportation Problem With Capacity Limit

    OpenAIRE

    I. Brezina; Z. Čičková; J. Pekár; M. Reiff

    2010-01-01

    The classical transportation problem can be applied in a more general way in practice. Related problems as Multi-commodity transportation problem, Transportation problems with different kind of vehicles, Multi-stage transportation problems, Transportation problem with capacity limit is an extension of the classical transportation problem considering the additional special condition. For solving such problems many optimization techniques (dynamic programming, linear programming, special algor...

  13. 3D neutron transport modelization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warin, X.

    1996-12-01

    Some nodal methods to solve the transport equation in 3D are presented. Two nodal methods presented at an OCDE congress are described: a first one is a low degree one called RTN0; a second one is a high degree one called BDM1. The two methods can be made faster with a totally consistent DSA. Some results of parallelization show that: 98% of the time is spent in sweeps; transport sweeps are easily parallelized. (K.A.)

  14. 3D neutron transport modelization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warin, X.

    1996-12-01

    Some nodal methods to solve the transport equation in 3D are presented. Two nodal methods presented at an OCDE congress are described: a first one is a low degree one called RTN0; a second one is a high degree one called BDM1. The two methods can be made faster with a totally consistent DSA. Some results of parallelization show that: 98% of the time is spent in sweeps; transport sweeps are easily parallelized. (K.A.). 10 refs.

  15. Forms of Approximate Radiation Transport

    CERN Document Server

    Brunner, G

    2002-01-01

    Photon radiation transport is described by the Boltzmann equation. Because this equation is difficult to solve, many different approximate forms have been implemented in computer codes. Several of the most common approximations are reviewed, and test problems illustrate the characteristics of each of the approximations. This document is designed as a tutorial so that code users can make an educated choice about which form of approximate radiation transport to use for their particular simulation.

  16. West Virginia's Forests 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard H. Widmann; Gregory W. Cook; Charles J. Barnett; Brett J. Butler; Douglas M. Griffith; Mark A. Hatfield; Cassandra M. Kurtz; Randall S. Morin; W. Keith Moser; Charles H. Perry; Ronald J. Piva; Rachel Riemann; Christopher W. Woodall

    2012-01-01

    The first full annual inventory of West Virginia's forests reports 12.0 million acres of forest land or 78 percent of the State's land area. The area of forest land has changed little since 2000. Of this land, 7.2 million acres (60 percent) are held by family forest owners. The current growing-stock inventory is 25 billion cubic feet--12 percent more than in...

  17. Forests and water cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iovino F

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Based on a comprehensive literature analysis, a review on factors that control water cycle and water use in Mediterranean forest ecosystems is presented, including environmental variables and silvicultural treatments. This important issue is considered in the perspective of sustainable forest management of Mediterranean forests, with special regard to crucial environmental hazards such as forest fires and desertification risks related to climate change.

  18. Maine's forests 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    George L. McCaskill; William H. McWilliams; Charles J. Barnett; Brett J. Butler; Mark A. Hatfield; Cassandra M. Kurtz; Randall S. Morin; W. Keith Moser; Charles H. Perry; Christopher W. Woodall

    2011-01-01

    The second annual inventory of Maine's forests was completed in 2008 after more than 3,160 forested plots were measured. Forest land occupies almost 17.7 million acres, which represents 82 percent of the total land area of Maine. The dominant forest-type groups are maple/beech/yellow birch, spruce/fir, white/red/jack pine, and aspen/white birch. Statewide volume...

  19. Iowa Forests, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark D. Nelson; Charles J. Barnett; Matt Brewer; Brett J. Butler; Susan J. Crocker; Grant M. Domke; Dale D. Gormanson; Cassandra M. Kurtz; Tonya W. Lister; Stephen Matthews; William H. McWilliams; Dacia M. Meneguzzo; Patrick D. Miles; Randall S. Morin; Ronald J. Piva; Rachel Riemann; James E. Smith; Brian F. Walters; Jim Westfall; Christopher W. Woodall

    2016-01-01

    The third full annual inventory of Iowa's forests (2009-2013) indicates that just under 3 million acres of forest land exists in the State, 81 percent of which is in family forest ownership. Almost all of Iowa's forest land is timberland (96 percent), with an average volume of more than 1,000 cubic feet of growing stock per acre on timberland and more than 1,...

  20. Dipterocarpaceae: forest fires and forest recovery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Priadjati, A.

    2002-01-01

    One of the serious problems Indonesia is facing today is deforestation. Forests have been playing a very important role in Indonesia as the main natural resources for the economic growth of the country. Large areas of tropical forests, worldwide

  1. Determination of minimum flood flow for regeneration of floodplain forest from inundated forest width-stage curve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song-hao Shang

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Floods are essential for the regeneration and growth of floodplain forests in arid and semiarid regions. However, river flows, and especially flood flows, have decreased greatly with the increase of water diversion from rivers and/or reservoir regulation, resulting in severe deterioration of floodplain ecosystems. Estimation of the flood stage that will inundate the floodplain forest is necessary for the forest's restoration or protection. To balance water use for economic purposes and floodplain forest protection, the inundated forest width method is proposed for estimating the minimum flood stage for floodplain forests from the inundated forest width-stage curve. The minimum flood stage is defined as the breakpoint of the inundated forest width-stage curve, and is determined directly or analytically from the curve. For the analytical approach, the problem under consideration is described by a multi-objective optimization model, which can be solved by the ideal point method. Then, the flood flow at the minimum flood stage (minimum flood flow, which is useful for flow regulation, can be calculated from the stage-discharge curve. In order to protect the forest in a river floodplain in a semiarid area in Xinjiang subject to reservoir regulation upstream, the proposed method was used to determine the minimum flood stage and flow for the forest. Field survey of hydrology, topography, and forest distribution was carried out at typical cross sections in the floodplain. Based on the survey results, minimum flood flows for six typical cross sections were estimated to be between 306 m3/s and 393 m3/s. Their maximum, 393 m3/s, was considered the minimum flood flow for the study river reach. This provides an appropriate flood flow for the protection of floodplain forest and can be used in the regulation of the upstream reservoir.

  2. The dynamics of radionuclides in forest ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steiner, M.

    2003-01-01

    Foodstuff from forests, notably mushrooms and game, is still much higher contaminated than agricultural products. The dynamic transport and transfer processes relevant to radiocesium in forest ecosystems will be discussed. Fungi, notably their mycelia, and migration processes in forest soil play a key role. In the first phase after deposition, radiocesium is very mobile and infiltrates forest soil after direct deposition or weathering from the canopy, where it is quickly immobilized. Subsequently, it moves to deeper soil layers due to decomposition and mineralization of organic matter. This downward migration of radiocesium is almost completely compensated by an upward transport in fungal mycelia. Whereas the specific activities in the uppermost organic horizons decrease comparatively fast, the radiocesium content in deeper horizons may remain almost constant or even increase at the beginning. Fungi which specific to their species take up nutrients from different soil layers, reflect the different trends with time in their fruit bodies. Fungal mycelia play an important role not only in the vertical migration, but also in the horizontal transport of radiocesium in forest soil and the uptake by green plants. Most green plants of the forest ecosystem poor in nutrients take up nutrients and radiocesium through symbiotic fungi. The fruit bodies of Deer Truffle which grow below ground can exhibit activity levels one order of magnitude higher than those of edible mushrooms. At present there is a debate, whether highly contaminated Deer Truffle eaten by wild boar as a delicacy, can explain the trend of increasing contamination of wild boar which has been observed in the last few years in different regions of Germany. (orig.)

  3. Connecticut's forest resources, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brett J. Butler; Cassandra Kurtz; Christopher Martin; W. Keith Moser

    2011-01-01

    This publication provides an overview of forest resource attributes for Connecticut based on an annual inventory conducted by the Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program at the Northern Research Station of the U.S. Forest Service. These estimates, along with web-posted core tables, will be updated annually. For more information please refer to page 4 of this report...

  4. Connecticut's forest resources, 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brett J. Butler; Christopher Martin

    2011-01-01

    This publication provides an overview of forest resource attributes for Connecticut based on an annual inventory conducted by the Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program at the Northern Research Station of the U.S. Forest Service. These estimates, along with web-posted core tables, will be updated annually. For more information please refer to page 4 of this report...

  5. Forests of Connecticut, 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brett J. Butler

    2016-01-01

    This report provides an overview of forest resources in Connecticut based on an inventory conducted by the U.S. Forest Service, Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program of the Northern Research Station. Estimates are based on field data collected using the FIA annualized sample design. Results are for the measurement years 2010-2015 with comparisons made to 2005-...

  6. Vermont's Forest Resources, 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    R.S. Morin; R. De Geus

    2008-01-01

    This publication provides an overview of forest resource attributes for Vermont based on an annual inventory conducted by the Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program at the Northern Research Station of the U.S. Forest Service. These annual estimates, along with web-posted core tables, will be updated annually. For more information regarding past inventory reports...

  7. Forests of Virginia, 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    T.J. Brandeis; A.J. Hartsell; K.C. Randolph; C.M. Oswalt

    2018-01-01

    This resource update provides an overview of forest resources in Virginia based on an inventory conducted by the U.S. Forest Service, Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program at the Southern Research Station in cooperation with the Virginia Department of Forestry.

  8. Forests of Kentucky, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    C.M. Oswalt

    2015-01-01

    This resource update provides an overview of forest resource attributes for the Commonwealth of Kentucky based on an annual inventory conducted by the Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) Program at the Southern Research Station of the Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture in cooperation with the Kentucky Department of Natural Resources Division of Forestry....

  9. Forests of Alabama, 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andy Hartsell

    2016-01-01

    This resource update provides an overview of forest resources in Alabama based on an inventory conducted by the U.S. Forest Service, Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program at the Southern Research Station in cooperation with the Alabama Forestry Commission. Estimates are based on field data collected using the FIA annualized sample design and are updated yearly....

  10. Forests of Wisconsin, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles H. Perry

    2014-01-01

    This resource update provides an overview of forest resources in Wisconsin based on an inventory conducted by the U.S. Forest Service, Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program at the Northern Research Station in cooperation with the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources. Data estimates are based on field data collected using the FIA annualized sample design and...

  11. Forests of Pennsylvania, 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard H. Widmann

    2015-01-01

    This resource update provides an overview of the forest resources in Pennsylvania based on inventories conducted by the U.S. Forest Service, Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program of the Northern Research Station. Estimates are based on field data collected using the FIA annualized sample design and are updated yearly (see footnote 1 on page 4). Information about...

  12. Pennsylvania's forest resources, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    G.L. McCaskill; W.H. McWilliams; C.J. Barnett

    2013-01-01

    This publication provides an overview of forest resource attributes for Pennsylvania based on an annual inventory conducted by the Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program at the Northern Research Station of the U.S. Forest Service. These annual estimates, along with web-posted core tables, will be updated annually. For more information please refer to page 4 of...

  13. Pennsylvania's forest resources, 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    G.L. McCaskill; W.H. McWilliams; B.J. Butler; D.M. Meneguzzo; C.J. Barnett; M.H. Hansen

    2011-01-01

    This publication provides an overview of forest resource attributes for Pennsylvania based on an annual inventory conducted by the Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program at the Northern Research Station of the U.S. Forest Service. These annual estimates, along with web-posted core tables, will be updated annually. For more information please refer to page 4 of...

  14. Pennsylvania's forest resources, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    G.L. McCaskill; W.H. McWilliams; C.J. Barnett

    2012-01-01

    This publication provides an overview of forest resource attributes for Pennsylvania based on an annual inventory conducted by the Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program at the Northern Research Station of the U.S. Forest Service. These annual estimates, along with web-posted core tables, will be updated annually. For more information please refer to page 4 of...

  15. Pennsylvania's forest resources, 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    G.L. McCaskill; W.H. McWilliams; B.J. Butler; D.M. Meneguzzo; C.J. Barnett; M.H. Hansen

    2011-01-01

    This publication provides an overview of forest resource attributes for Pennsylvania based on an annual inventory conducted by the Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program at the Northern Research Station of the U.S. Forest Service. These annual estimates, along with web-posted core tables, will be updated annually. For more information please refer to page 4 of...

  16. Forests of Pennsylvania, 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard H. Widmann

    2016-01-01

    This resource update provides an overview of the forest resources in Pennsylvania based on inventories conducted by the U.S. Forest Service, Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program of the Northern Research Station (NRS). Estimates are based on field data collected using the FIA annualized sample design and are updated yearly1(see footnote 1, page 2). Information...

  17. Pennsylvania's forest resources, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    G.L. McCaskill; W.H. McWilliams; C.J. Barnett

    2011-01-01

    This publication provides an overview of forest resource attributes for Pennsylvania based on an annual inventory conducted by the Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program at the Northern Research Station of the U.S. Forest Service. These annual estimates, along with web-posted core tables, will be updated annually. For more information please refer to page 4 of...

  18. Pennsylvania's forest resources, 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    G.L. McCaskill; W.H. McWilliams; B.J. Butler; D.M. Meneguzzo; C.J. Barnett; M.H. Hansen

    2011-01-01

    This publication provides an overview of forest resource attributes for Pennsylvania based on an annual inventory conducted by the Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program at the Northern Research Station of the U.S. Forest Service. These annual estimates, along with web-posted core tables, will be updated annually. For more information, please refer to page 6 of...

  19. Forests of Pennsylvania, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    George L. McCaskill

    2014-01-01

    This publication provides an overview of the forest resources in Pennsylvania based upon inventories conducted by the USDA Forest Service, Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program of the Northern Research Station. Information about the national and regional FIA program is available online at http://fia.fs.fed.us. Since 1999, FIA has implemented an annual inventory...

  20. Forests of Kansas, 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dacia M. Meneguzzo

    2016-01-01

    This resource update provides an overview of forest resources in Kansas based on inventories conducted by the U.S. Forest Service, Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program of the Northern Research Station. For annual inventory years 2001-2013, the sample length was equal to 5 years. Beginning in 2014, the cycle length was changed to 7 years. For the 2015 inventory,...

  1. Forests of Iowa, 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark D. Nelson; Matt Brewer; Dacia M. Meneguzzo; Kathryne. Clark

    2016-01-01

    This resource update provides an overview of forest resources in Iowa based on inventories conducted by the U.S. Forest Service, Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program at the Northern Research Station in cooperation with the Iowa Department of Natural Resources. Estimates are based on field data collected using the FIA annualized sample design and are updated...

  2. Forests of Nebraska, 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dacia M. Meneguzzo; Susan J. Crocker

    2015-01-01

    This resource update provides an overview of forest resource attributes for Nebraska based on annual inventories conducted by the Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) Program of the Northern Research Station (NRS), U.S. Forest Service. The estimates presented in this update are based on field data collected in 2010-2014 with comparisons made to data collected from 2005-...

  3. Forests of Kansas, 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dacia M. Meneguzzo

    2017-01-01

    This resource update provides an overview of forest resources in Kansas based on inventories conducted by the U.S. Forest Service, Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program of the Northern Research Station. For annual inventory years 2001-2013, the sample length was equal to 5 years. Beginning in 2014, the cycle length was changed to 7 years. For the 2016 inventory,...

  4. Forests of Nebraska, 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dacia M. Meneguzzo

    2016-01-01

    This resource update provides an overview of forest resources in Nebraska based on inventories conducted by the U.S. Forest Service, Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program of the Northern Research Station. For annual inventory years 2001-2013, the sample length was equal to 5 years. Beginning in 2014, the cycle length was changed to 7 years. For the 2015 inventory...

  5. Forest resources and conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    William H. McWilliams; Linda S. Heath; Gordon C. Reese; Thomas L. Schmidt

    2000-01-01

    The forests of the northern United States support a rich mix of floral and faunal communities that provide inestimable benefits to society. Today's forests face a range of biotic and abiotic stressors, not the least of which may be environmental change. This chapter reviews the compositional traits of presettlement forests and traces the major land use patterns...

  6. Wisconsin's forest resources, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    C.H. Perry

    2011-01-01

    This publication provides an overview of forest resource attributes for Wisconsin based on an annual inventory conducted by the Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program at the Northern Research Station of the U.S. Forest Service. These estimates, along with web-posted core tables, will be updated annually. For more information please refer to page 4 of this report...

  7. Wisconsin's forest resources, 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    C.H. Perry; V.A. Everson

    2007-01-01

    Figure 2 was revised by the author in August 2008. This publication provides an overview of forest resource attributes for Wisconsin based on an annual inventory conducted by the Forest Inventory and Analysis program at the Northern Research Station of the U.S. Forest Service from 2002-2006. These estimates, along with associated core tables postedon the Internet, are...

  8. Wisconsin's Forest Resources, 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    C.H. Perry; V.A. Everson

    2008-01-01

    This publication provides an overview of forest resource attributes for Wisconsin based on an annual inventory conducted by the Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program of the U.S. Forest Service, Northern Research Station. These estimates, along with web-posted core tables, are updated annually. For more information please refer to page 4 of this report.

  9. Wisconsin's forest resources, 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    C.H. Perry

    2011-01-01

    This publication provides an overview of forest resource attributes for Wisconsin based on an annual inventory conducted by the Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program at the Northern Research Station of the U.S. Forest Service. These estimates, along with web-posted core tables, will be updated annually. For more information, please refer to page 4 of this report...

  10. Forest-fire models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haiganoush Preisler; Alan Ager

    2013-01-01

    For applied mathematicians forest fire models refer mainly to a non-linear dynamic system often used to simulate spread of fire. For forest managers forest fire models may pertain to any of the three phases of fire management: prefire planning (fire risk models), fire suppression (fire behavior models), and postfire evaluation (fire effects and economic models). In...

  11. Environmental problem-solving: Psychosocial factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Alan

    1982-11-01

    This is a study of individual differences in environmental problem-solving, the probable roots of these differences, and their implications for the education of resource professionals. A group of student Resource Managers were required to elaborate their conception of a complex resource issue (Spruce Budworm management) and to generate some ideas on management policy. Of particular interest was the way in which subjects dealt with the psychosocial aspects of the problem. A structural and content analysis of responses indicated a predominance of relatively compartmentalized styles, a technological orientation, and a tendency to ignore psychosocial issues. A relationship between problem-solving behavior and personal (psychosocial) style was established which, in the context of other evidence, suggests that problem-solving behavior is influenced by more deep seated personality factors. The educational implication drawn was that problem-solving cannot be viewed simply as an intellectual-technical activity but one that involves, and requires the education of, the whole person.

  12. Improving mathematical problem solving : A computerized approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harskamp, EG; Suhre, CJM

    Mathematics teachers often experience difficulties in teaching students to become skilled problem solvers. This paper evaluates the effectiveness of two interactive computer programs for high school mathematics problem solving. Both programs present students with problems accompanied by instruction

  13. Indoor Air Quality Problem Solving Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Use the IAQ Problem Solving Tool to learn about the connection between health complaints and common solutions in schools. This resource provides an easy, step-by-step process to start identifying and resolving IAQ problems found at your school.

  14. Problem solving using soft systems methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Land, L

    This article outlines a method of problem solving which considers holistic solutions to complex problems. Soft systems methodology allows people involved in the problem situation to have control over the decision-making process.

  15. Exact Algorithms for Solving Stochastic Games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kristoffer Arnsfelt; Koucky, Michal; Lauritzen, Niels

    2012-01-01

    Shapley's discounted stochastic games, Everett's recursive games and Gillette's undiscounted stochastic games are classical models of game theory describing two-player zero-sum games of potentially infinite duration. We describe algorithms for exactly solving these games....

  16. How to solve applied mathematics problems

    CERN Document Server

    Moiseiwitsch, B L

    2011-01-01

    This workbook bridges the gap between lectures and practical applications, offering students of mathematics, engineering, and physics the chance to practice solving problems from a wide variety of fields. 2011 edition.

  17. Physics: Quantum problems solved through games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maniscalco, Sabrina

    2016-04-01

    Humans are better than computers at performing certain tasks because of their intuition and superior visual processing. Video games are now being used to channel these abilities to solve problems in quantum physics. See Letter p.210

  18. Photoreactors for Solving Problems of Environmental Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchaikovskaya, O. N.; Sokolova, I. V.

    2015-04-01

    Designs and physical aspects of photoreactors, their capabilities for a study of kinetics and mechanisms of processes proceeding under illumination with light, as well as application of photoreactors for solving various applied problem are discussed.

  19. The art and science of problem solving

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vidal, Rene Victor Valqui

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we will document that real-life problem solving in complex situations demands both rational (scientific) and intuitive (artistic) thinking. First, the concepts of art and science will be discussed; differences and similarities will be enhanced. Thereafter the concept of group problem...... solving facilitation both as science and art will be presented. A case study related to examination's planning will be discussed to illustrate the main concepts in practice. In addition, other cases studies will also be shortly presented....

  20. Local Strategy Improvement for Parity Game Solving

    OpenAIRE

    Friedmann, Oliver; Lange, Martin

    2010-01-01

    The problem of solving a parity game is at the core of many problems in model checking, satisfiability checking and program synthesis. Some of the best algorithms for solving parity game are strategy improvement algorithms. These are global in nature since they require the entire parity game to be present at the beginning. This is a distinct disadvantage because in many applications one only needs to know which winning region a particular node belongs to, and a witnessing winning strategy may...

  1. Control de calidad de planta forestal

    OpenAIRE

    Ortega, Unai; Kindelman, Angelo; Hevia, Andrea; Álvarez, Eloy; Majada, J.P. (Juan)

    2009-01-01

    La calidad de la planta forestal (Materiales Forestales de Reproducción) que se utiliza en los programas de repoblación tiene un efecto crítico en el establecimiento y posterior supervivencia de los árboles en el monte.El objetivo de esta línea de trabajo del Programa de Investigación Forestal del Servicio Regional de Investigación y Desarrollo Agroalimentario (SERIDA), es desarrollar herramientas que faciliten la planificación y gestión de la producción, la comercialización y transporte de l...

  2. Conceptual problem solving in high school physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Docktor, Jennifer L.; Strand, Natalie E.; Mestre, José P.; Ross, Brian H.

    2015-12-01

    Problem solving is a critical element of learning physics. However, traditional instruction often emphasizes the quantitative aspects of problem solving such as equations and mathematical procedures rather than qualitative analysis for selecting appropriate concepts and principles. This study describes the development and evaluation of an instructional approach called Conceptual Problem Solving (CPS) which guides students to identify principles, justify their use, and plan their solution in writing before solving a problem. The CPS approach was implemented by high school physics teachers at three schools for major theorems and conservation laws in mechanics and CPS-taught classes were compared to control classes taught using traditional problem solving methods. Information about the teachers' implementation of the approach was gathered from classroom observations and interviews, and the effectiveness of the approach was evaluated from a series of written assessments. Results indicated that teachers found CPS easy to integrate into their curricula, students engaged in classroom discussions and produced problem solutions of a higher quality than before, and students scored higher on conceptual and problem solving measures.

  3. Could HPS Improve Problem-Solving?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Ricardo Lopes

    2013-05-01

    It is generally accepted nowadays that History and Philosophy of Science (HPS) is useful in understanding scientific concepts, theories and even some experiments. Problem-solving strategies are a significant topic, since students' careers depend on their skill to solve problems. These are the reasons for addressing the question of whether problem solving could be improved by means of HPS. Three typical problems in introductory courses of mechanics—the inclined plane, the simple pendulum and the Atwood machine—are taken as the object of the present study. The solving strategies of these problems in the eighteenth and nineteenth century constitute the historical component of the study. Its philosophical component stems from the foundations of mechanics research literature. The use of HPS leads us to see those problems in a different way. These different ways can be tested, for which experiments are proposed. The traditional solving strategies for the incline and pendulum problems are adequate for some situations but not in general. The recourse to apparent weights in the Atwood machine problem leads us to a new insight and a solving strategy for composed Atwood machines. Educational implications also concern the development of logical thinking by means of the variety of lines of thought provided by HPS.

  4. Diagrams benefit symbolic problem-solving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Junyi; Rittle-Johnson, Bethany; Fyfe, Emily R

    2017-06-01

    The format of a mathematics problem often influences students' problem-solving performance. For example, providing diagrams in conjunction with story problems can benefit students' understanding, choice of strategy, and accuracy on story problems. However, it remains unclear whether providing diagrams in conjunction with symbolic equations can benefit problem-solving performance as well. We tested the impact of diagram presence on students' performance on algebra equation problems to determine whether diagrams increase problem-solving success. We also examined the influence of item- and student-level factors to test the robustness of the diagram effect. We worked with 61 seventh-grade students who had received 2 months of pre-algebra instruction. Students participated in an experimenter-led classroom session. Using a within-subjects design, students solved algebra problems in two matched formats (equation and equation-with-diagram). The presence of diagrams increased equation-solving accuracy and the use of informal strategies. This diagram benefit was independent of student ability and item complexity. The benefits of diagrams found previously for story problems generalized to symbolic problems. The findings are consistent with cognitive models of problem-solving and suggest that diagrams may be a useful additional representation of symbolic problems. © 2017 The British Psychological Society.

  5. Conceptual problem solving in high school physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L. Docktor

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Problem solving is a critical element of learning physics. However, traditional instruction often emphasizes the quantitative aspects of problem solving such as equations and mathematical procedures rather than qualitative analysis for selecting appropriate concepts and principles. This study describes the development and evaluation of an instructional approach called Conceptual Problem Solving (CPS which guides students to identify principles, justify their use, and plan their solution in writing before solving a problem. The CPS approach was implemented by high school physics teachers at three schools for major theorems and conservation laws in mechanics and CPS-taught classes were compared to control classes taught using traditional problem solving methods. Information about the teachers’ implementation of the approach was gathered from classroom observations and interviews, and the effectiveness of the approach was evaluated from a series of written assessments. Results indicated that teachers found CPS easy to integrate into their curricula, students engaged in classroom discussions and produced problem solutions of a higher quality than before, and students scored higher on conceptual and problem solving measures.

  6. Forests and Forest Cover - DCNR - State Forest Lands 2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — The state forest boundry coverage is being updated frequently. It is derived from survey descriptions and will be, and has been in certain areas, adjusted to GPS...

  7. Development of a problem solving evaluation instrument; untangling of specific problem solving assets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Wendy Kristine

    The purpose of my research was to produce a problem solving evaluation tool for physics. To do this it was necessary to gain a thorough understanding of how students solve problems. Although physics educators highly value problem solving and have put extensive effort into understanding successful problem solving, there is currently no efficient way to evaluate problem solving skill. Attempts have been made in the past; however, knowledge of the principles required to solve the subject problem are so absolutely critical that they completely overshadow any other skills students may use when solving a problem. The work presented here is unique because the evaluation tool removes the requirement that the student already have a grasp of physics concepts. It is also unique because I picked a wide range of people and picked a wide range of tasks for evaluation. This is an important design feature that helps make things emerge more clearly. This dissertation includes an extensive literature review of problem solving in physics, math, education and cognitive science as well as descriptions of studies involving student use of interactive computer simulations, the design and validation of a beliefs about physics survey and finally the design of the problem solving evaluation tool. I have successfully developed and validated a problem solving evaluation tool that identifies 44 separate assets (skills) necessary for solving problems. Rigorous validation studies, including work with an independent interviewer, show these assets identified by this content-free evaluation tool are the same assets that students use to solve problems in mechanics and quantum mechanics. Understanding this set of component assets will help teachers and researchers address problem solving within the classroom.

  8. Hyperspectral sensing of forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodenough, David G.; Dyk, Andrew; Chen, Hao; Hobart, Geordie; Niemann, K. Olaf; Richardson, Ash

    2007-11-01

    Canada contains 10% of the world's forests covering an area of 418 million hectares. The sustainable management of these forest resources has become increasingly complex. Hyperspectral remote sensing can provide a wealth of new and improved information products to resource managers to make more informed decisions. Research in this area has demonstrated that hyperspectral remote sensing can be used to create more accurate products for forest inventory, forest health, foliar biochemistry, biomass, and aboveground carbon than are currently available. This paper surveys recent methods and results in hyperspectral sensing of forests and describes space initiatives for hyperspectral sensing.

  9. A Problem on Optimal Transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cechlarova, Katarina

    2005-01-01

    Mathematical optimization problems are not typical in the classical curriculum of mathematics. In this paper we show how several generalizations of an easy problem on optimal transportation were solved by gifted secondary school pupils in a correspondence mathematical seminar, how they can be used in university courses of linear programming and…

  10. Analysis of trends in isoprene and monoterpenes in a remote forest and an anthropogenic influenced forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usenko, S.; Sheesley, R. J.; Winfield, Z.; Yoon, S.; Erickson, M.; Flynn, J. H., III; Alvarez, S. L.; Wallace, H. W., IV; Griffin, R. J.

    2017-12-01

    The University of Houston Mobile Air Quality Laboratory (MAQL) was deployed to the University of Michigan Biological Station (UMBS) in July 2016 as part of the PROPHET-AMOS study and then was deployed to Jones Forest located north of Houston, TX from August 12 through September 23, 2016. Both sites are heavily forested, but UMBS is remote with no anthropogenic influence while Jones Forest sees frequent pollution transport from Houston. UMBS experienced periods of high isoprene:monoterpenes and periods of equivalent isoprene:monoterpenes, while Jones Forest had a consistently high isoprene:monoterpenes. This provided for a test bed to look at the interactions within two forested environments as well as the influence of anthropogenic sources. The MAQL was outfitted to measure O3 (2B Technology), NOy and SO2 (Thermo Scientific), NO/NOx (Air Quality Design), CO (Los Gatos), and select biogenic volatile organic carbon (BVOC) with their oxidation products (Ionicon PTR-MS). The instruments sampled from MAQL's 6 m tower at both sites. The UMBS site was below canopy and the Jones Forest site was in an open field surrounded by forest. The trends in isoprene and monoterpenes were explored in relation to time-of-day, temperature, and precipitation for both locations. In addition, the production of methyl vinyl ketone and methacrolein under these different conditions of meteorology, trace gas composition and BVOC composition was explored.

  11. Problem-Solving Test: Nucleocytoplasmic Shuttling of Pre-mRNA Binding Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2012-01-01

    Terms to be familiar with before you start to solve the test: transcription, pre-mRNA, RNA processing, RNA transport, RNA polymerase II, direct and indirect immunofluorescence staining, cell fractionation by centrifugation, oligo(dT)-cellulose chromatography, washing and elution of the column, ribonuclease, SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis,…

  12. Radiation Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urbatsch, Todd James [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-06-15

    We present an overview of radiation transport, covering terminology, blackbody raditation, opacities, Boltzmann transport theory, approximations to the transport equation. Next we introduce several transport methods. We present a section on Caseology, observing transport boundary layers. We briefly broach topics of software development, including verification and validation, and we close with a section on high energy-density experiments that highlight and support radiation transport.

  13. Determining an optimum inventory route for an areal object: the case of forest inventory in Finland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henna Etula

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In recent decades, routing based on Geographic Information Systems (GIS has become a major branch of technology, which has been used especially in applications related to transport and logistics. However, in terms of the development of methods, routing in a cross-country environment is more difficult, and hence research into it has been relatively scarce. This is particularly true in the context of complex routing problems involving visits to several locations. A typical example of a problem of this kind is field inventory, which is a data collection procedure used in many application areas, particularly those related to environmental research and the management of natural resources. This study presents a problem in which an efficient inventory route is determined for an areal object, such that the area visible from the route meets a prescribed threshold, while maintaining the shortest possible route. Although this problem, referred to here as the Areal Inventory Problem (AIP, is closely related to a multitude of routing and location allocation methods known in the context of GIS, none of them is very well-suited for solving the AIP. This study describes a general solution procedure for the AIP, and introduces an implementation of a heuristic algorithm that can be used to solve a real-world AIP within a reasonable time frame. The proposed approach is demonstrated with actual data related to field inventory practices carried out by the Finnish Forest Centre.

  14. Colloid transport code-nuclear user's manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, R.

    1992-01-01

    This report describes the CTCN computer code, designed to solve the equations of transient colloidal transport of radionuclides in porous and fractured media. This Fortran 77 package solves systems of coupled nonlinear differential equations with a wide range of boundary conditions. The package uses the Method of Lines technique with a special section which forms finite-difference discretizations in up to four spatial dimensions to automatically convert the system into a set of ordinary differential equations. The CTCN code then solves these equations using a robust, efficient ODE solver. Thus CTCN can be used to solve population balance equations along with the usual transport equations to model colloid transport processes or as a general problem solver to treat up to four-dimensional differential systems

  15. Forested wetland habitat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duberstein, Jamie A.; Krauss, Ken W.; Kennish, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    A forested wetland (swamp) is a forest where soils are saturated or flooded for at least a portion of the growing season, and vegetation, dominated by trees, is adapted to tolerate flooded conditions. A tidal freshwater forested wetland is a forested wetland that experiences frequent but short-term surface flooding via tidal action, with average salinity of soil porewater less than 0.5 g/l. It is known locally as tidal várzea in the Amazon delta, Brazil. A tidal saltwater forested wetland (mangrove forest) is a forested wetland that experiences frequent but short-term surface flooding via tidal action, with average salinity often exceeding 3 g/l and reaching levels that can exceed seawater. Mangrove ecosystems are composed of facultative halophytes that generally experience better growth at moderate salinity concentrations.

  16. The public debate about roads on the National Forests : an analysis of the new media : 1994-98

    Science.gov (United States)

    David N. Bengston; David P. Fan

    1999-01-01

    Roads and road building on the US national forests have become the focus of intense public debate in recent years. Timber companies and others argue that forest roads are an essential transportation system for the production of commodities that society needs. Environmentalists and others reply that national forest roads constitute ecologically destructive "...

  17. Lesion mapping of social problem solving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbey, Aron K; Colom, Roberto; Paul, Erick J; Chau, Aileen; Solomon, Jeffrey; Grafman, Jordan H

    2014-10-01

    Accumulating neuroscience evidence indicates that human intelligence is supported by a distributed network of frontal and parietal regions that enable complex, goal-directed behaviour. However, the contributions of this network to social aspects of intellectual function remain to be well characterized. Here, we report a human lesion study (n = 144) that investigates the neural bases of social problem solving (measured by the Everyday Problem Solving Inventory) and examine the degree to which individual differences in performance are predicted by a broad spectrum of psychological variables, including psychometric intelligence (measured by the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale), emotional intelligence (measured by the Mayer, Salovey, Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test), and personality traits (measured by the Neuroticism-Extraversion-Openness Personality Inventory). Scores for each variable were obtained, followed by voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping. Stepwise regression analyses revealed that working memory, processing speed, and emotional intelligence predict individual differences in everyday problem solving. A targeted analysis of specific everyday problem solving domains (involving friends, home management, consumerism, work, information management, and family) revealed psychological variables that selectively contribute to each. Lesion mapping results indicated that social problem solving, psychometric intelligence, and emotional intelligence are supported by a shared network of frontal, temporal, and parietal regions, including white matter association tracts that bind these areas into a coordinated system. The results support an integrative framework for understanding social intelligence and make specific recommendations for the application of the Everyday Problem Solving Inventory to the study of social problem solving in health and disease. © The Author (2014). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved

  18. Transport insurance of unirradiated nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matto, H.

    1985-01-01

    Special conditions must be taken into account in transport insurance for nuclear materials even if the nuclear risk involved is negligible, as in shipments of unirradiated nuclear fuels. The shipwreck of the 'Mont Louis' has raised a number of open points which must be solved pragmatically within the framework of transport insurance. Some proposals are outlined in the article. (orig.) [de

  19. Forest fuel and carbon balances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundborg, A.

    1994-10-01

    Forest fuel, i.e., branches and tops that remain after felling, are not considered to give a net surplus of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere. In order to, if possible, verify this theory a survey was made of the literature concerning different carbon flows related to forest fuel. Branches and needles that are not utilised as fuel nonetheless eventually become decomposed to carbon dioxide. Branches and stem wood are broken down in occasional cases to 60-80% already within 5-6 years but the decomposition rate varies strongly. A small amount of existing data suggest that branches and stems are broken down almost completely within 60-70 years, and earlier in some cases. Lignin is the component in needles and wood that is the most resistant to decomposition. Decomposition is favoured by optimal temperature and moisture, ground contact and ground animals. Material that is mulched during soil preparation is decomposed considerably faster than material that lies on the soil surface. Felling residues that are left on the soil are a large momentary addition to the soil's reserves of organic material but after a number of years the difference in soil organic material is small between places where fuel has been removed and places where felling residues have been left. High nitrogen deposition, fire control and effective forestry are factors that contribute to the increases in the reserves of soil organic material. It appears to be a good approximation to consider the forest fuel as being a neutral fuel as regards carbon dioxide in a longer perspective. In comparison with other biofuels and fossil fuels, forest fuel appears, together with Salix, to be the fuel that results in very little extra discharge of carbon dioxide or other greenhouse gases during its production, transport and processing. 70 refs, 5 figs, tabs

  20. Chamber transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, Craig L.

    2001-01-01

    Heavy ion beam transport through the containment chamber plays a crucial role in all heavy ion fusion (HIF) scenarios. Here, several parameters are used to characterize the operating space for HIF beams; transport modes are assessed in relation to evolving target/accelerator requirements; results of recent relevant experiments and simulations of HIF transport are summarized; and relevant instabilities are reviewed. All transport options still exist, including (1) vacuum ballistic transport, (2) neutralized ballistic transport, and (3) channel-like transport. Presently, the European HIF program favors vacuum ballistic transport, while the US HIF program favors neutralized ballistic transport with channel-like transport as an alternate approach. Further transport research is needed to clearly guide selection of the most attractive, integrated HIF system

  1. Development of atmosphere-soil-vegetation model for investigation of radioactive materials transport in terrestrial biosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katata, Genki; Nagai, Haruyasu; Zhang, Leiming; Held, Andreas; Serca, Dominique; Klemm, Otto

    2010-01-01

    In order to investigate the transport of radionuclides in the terrestrial biosphere we have developed a one-dimensional numerical model named SOLVEG that predicts the transfer of water, heat, and gaseous and particulate matters in atmosphere-soil-vegetation system. The SOLVEG represents atmosphere, soil, and vegetation as an aggregation of several layers. Basic equations used in the model are solved using the finite difference method. Most of predicted variables are interrelated with the source/sink terms of momentum, water, heat, gases, and particles based on mathematically described biophysical processes in atmosphere, soil and vegetation. The SOLVEG can estimate dry, wet and fog deposition of gaseous and particulate matters at each canopy layer. Performance tests of the SOLVEG with several observational sites were carried out. The SOLVEG predicted the observed temporal changes in water vapor, CO 2 , and ozone fluxes over vegetated surfaces. The SOLVEG also reproduced measured fluxes of fog droplets and of fine aerosols over the forest. (author)

  2. Innovative problem solving by wild spotted hyenas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson-Amram, Sarah; Holekamp, Kay E.

    2012-01-01

    Innovative animals are those able to solve novel problems or invent novel solutions to existing problems. Despite the important ecological and evolutionary consequences of innovation, we still know very little about the traits that vary among individuals within a species to make them more or less innovative. Here we examine innovative problem solving by spotted hyenas (Crocuta crocuta) in their natural habitat, and demonstrate for the first time in a non-human animal that those individuals exhibiting a greater diversity of initial exploratory behaviours are more successful problem solvers. Additionally, as in earlier work, we found that neophobia was a critical inhibitor of problem-solving success. Interestingly, although juveniles and adults were equally successful in solving the problem, juveniles were significantly more diverse in their initial exploratory behaviours, more persistent and less neophobic than were adults. We found no significant effects of social rank or sex on success, the diversity of initial exploratory behaviours, behavioural persistence or neophobia. Our results suggest that the diversity of initial exploratory behaviours, akin to some measures of human creativity, is an important, but largely overlooked, determinant of problem-solving success in non-human animals. PMID:22874748

  3. Estimating forest conversion rates with annual forest inventory data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul C. Van Deusen; Francis A. Roesch

    2009-01-01

    The rate of land-use conversion from forest to nonforest or natural forest to forest plantation is of interest for forest certification purposes and also as part of the process of assessing forest sustainability. Conversion rates can be estimated from remeasured inventory plots in general, but the emphasis here is on annual inventory data. A new estimator is proposed...

  4. Forest resources of the Nez Perce National Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michele Disney

    2010-01-01

    As part of a National Forest System cooperative inventory, the Interior West Forest Inventory and Analysis (IWFIA) Program of the USDA Forest Service conducted a forest resource inventory on the Nez Perce National Forest using a nationally standardized mapped-plot design (for more details see the section "Inventory methods"). This report presents highlights...

  5. Eastside forest management practices: historical overview, extent of their application, and their effects on sustainability of ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadwick D. Oliver; Larry L. Irwin; Walter H. Knapp

    1994-01-01

    Forest management of eastern Oregon and Washington began in the late 1800s as extensive utilization of forests for grazing, timber, and irrigation water. With time, protection of these values developed into active management for these and other values such as recreation. Silvicultural and administrative practices, developed to solve problems at a particular time have...

  6. On Teaching Problem Solving in School Mathematics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erkki Pehkonen

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The article begins with a brief overview of the situation throughout the world regarding problem solving. The activities of the ProMath group are then described, as the purpose of this international research group is to improve mathematics teaching in school. One mathematics teaching method that seems to be functioning in school is the use of open problems (i.e., problem fields. Next we discuss the objectives of the Finnish curriculum that are connected with problem solving. Some examples and research results are taken from a Finnish–Chilean research project that monitors the development of problem-solving skills in third grade pupils. Finally, some ideas on “teacher change” are put forward. It is not possible to change teachers, but only to provide hints for possible change routes: the teachers themselves should work out the ideas and their implementation.

  7. Methods of solving sequence and series problems

    CERN Document Server

    Grigorieva, Ellina

    2016-01-01

    This book aims to dispel the mystery and fear experienced by students surrounding sequences, series, convergence, and their applications. The author, an accomplished female mathematician, achieves this by taking a problem solving approach, starting with fascinating problems and solving them step by step with clear explanations and illuminating diagrams. The reader will find the problems interesting, unusual, and fun, yet solved with the rigor expected in a competition. Some problems are taken directly from mathematics competitions, with the name and year of the exam provided for reference. Proof techniques are emphasized, with a variety of methods presented. The text aims to expand the mind of the reader by often presenting multiple ways to attack the same problem, as well as drawing connections with different fields of mathematics. Intuitive and visual arguments are presented alongside technical proofs to provide a well-rounded methodology. With nearly 300 problems including hints, answers, and solutions,Met...

  8. Solving the SAT problem using Genetic Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arunava Bhattacharjee

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we propose our genetic algorithm for solving the SAT problem. We introduce various crossover and mutation techniques and then make a comparative analysis between them in order to find out which techniques are the best suited for solving a SAT instance. Before the genetic algorithm is applied to an instance it is better to seek for unit and pure literals in the given formula and then try to eradicate them. This can considerably reduce the search space, and to demonstrate this we tested our algorithm on some random SAT instances. However, to analyse the various crossover and mutation techniques and also to evaluate the optimality of our algorithm we performed extensive experiments on benchmark instances of the SAT problem. We also estimated the ideal crossover length that would maximise the chances to solve a given SAT instance.

  9. AI tools in computer based problem solving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beane, Arthur J.

    1988-01-01

    The use of computers to solve value oriented, deterministic, algorithmic problems, has evolved a structured life cycle model of the software process. The symbolic processing techniques used, primarily in research, for solving nondeterministic problems, and those for which an algorithmic solution is unknown, have evolved a different model, much less structured. Traditionally, the two approaches have been used completely independently. With the advent of low cost, high performance 32 bit workstations executing identical software with large minicomputers and mainframes, it became possible to begin to merge both models into a single extended model of computer problem solving. The implementation of such an extended model on a VAX family of micro/mini/mainframe systems is described. Examples in both development and deployment of applications involving a blending of AI and traditional techniques are given.

  10. Local Strategy Improvement for Parity Game Solving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Friedmann

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The problem of solving a parity game is at the core of many problems in model checking, satisfiability checking and program synthesis. Some of the best algorithms for solving parity game are strategy improvement algorithms. These are global in nature since they require the entire parity game to be present at the beginning. This is a distinct disadvantage because in many applications one only needs to know which winning region a particular node belongs to, and a witnessing winning strategy may cover only a fractional part of the entire game graph. We present a local strategy improvement algorithm which explores the game graph on-the-fly whilst performing the improvement steps. We also compare it empirically with existing global strategy improvement algorithms and the currently only other local algorithm for solving parity games. It turns out that local strategy improvement can outperform these others by several orders of magnitude.

  11. Variational approach in transport theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panta Pazos, R.; Tullio de Vilhena, M.

    2004-01-01

    In this work we present a variational approach to some methods to solve transport problems of neutral particles. We consider a convex domain X (for example the geometry of a slab, or a convex set in the plane, or a convex bounded set in the space) and we use discrete ordinates quadrature to get a system of differential equations derived from the neutron transport equation. The boundary conditions are vacuum for a subset of the boundary, and of specular reflection for the complementary subset of the boundary. Recently some different approximation methods have been presented to solve these transport problems. We introduce in this work the adjoint equations and the conjugate functions obtained by means of the variational approach. First we consider the general formulation, and then some numerical methods such as spherical harmonics and spectral collocation method. (authors)

  12. Variational approach in transport theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panta Pazos, R. [Nucler Engineering Department, UFRGS, Porto-Alegre (Brazil); Tullio de Vilhena, M. [Institute of Mathematics, UFRGS, Porto-Alegre (Brazil)

    2004-07-01

    In this work we present a variational approach to some methods to solve transport problems of neutral particles. We consider a convex domain X (for example the geometry of a slab, or a convex set in the plane, or a convex bounded set in the space) and we use discrete ordinates quadrature to get a system of differential equations derived from the neutron transport equation. The boundary conditions are vacuum for a subset of the boundary, and of specular reflection for the complementary subset of the boundary. Recently some different approximation methods have been presented to solve these transport problems. We introduce in this work the adjoint equations and the conjugate functions obtained by means of the variational approach. First we consider the general formulation, and then some numerical methods such as spherical harmonics and spectral collocation method. (authors)

  13. Developments in tokamak transport modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houlberg, W.A.; Attenberger; Lao, L.L.

    1981-01-01

    A variety of numerical methods for solving the time-dependent fluid transport equations for tokamak plasmas is presented. Among the problems discussed are techniques for solving the sometimes very stiff parabolic equations for particle and energy flow, treating convection-dominated energy transport that leads to large cell Reynolds numbers, optimizing the flow of a code to reduce the time spent updating the particle and energy source terms, coupling the one-dimensional (1-D) flux-surface-averaged fluid transport equations to solutions of the 2-D Grad-Shafranov equation for the plasma geometry, handling extremely fast transient problems such as internal MHD disruptions and pellet injection, and processing the output to summarize the physics parameters over the potential operating regime for reactors. Emphasis is placed on computational efficiency in both computer time and storage requirements

  14. New method for solving multidimensional scattering problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melezhik, V.S.

    1991-01-01

    A new method is developed for solving the quantum mechanical problem of scattering of a particle with internal structure. The multichannel scattering problem is formulated as a system of nonlinear functional equations for the wave function and reaction matrix. The method is successfully tested for the scattering from a nonspherical potential well and a long-range nonspherical scatterer. The method is also applicable to solving the multidimensional Schroedinger equation with a discrete spectrum. As an example the known problem of a hydrogen atom in a homogeneous magnetic field is analyzed

  15. Dreams and creative problem-solving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Deirdre

    2017-10-01

    Dreams have produced art, music, novels, films, mathematical proofs, designs for architecture, telescopes, and computers. Dreaming is essentially our brain thinking in another neurophysiologic state-and therefore it is likely to solve some problems on which our waking minds have become stuck. This neurophysiologic state is characterized by high activity in brain areas associated with imagery, so problems requiring vivid visualization are also more likely to get help from dreaming. This article reviews great historical dreams and modern laboratory research to suggest how dreams can aid creativity and problem-solving. © 2017 New York Academy of Sciences.

  16. Student Obstacles in Solving Algebraic Thinking Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andini, W.; Suryadi, D.

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this research is to analize the student obstacles on solving algebraic thinking problems in low grades elementary school. This research is a preliminary qualitative research, and involved 66 students of grade 3 elementary school. From the analysis student test results, most of student experience difficulty in solving algebraic thinking problems. The main obstacle is the student’s difficulty in understanding the problem of generalizing the pattern because the students are not accustomed to see the rules that exist in generalize the pattern.

  17. Vacuum engineering, calculations, formulas, and solved exercises

    CERN Document Server

    Berman, Armand

    1992-01-01

    This book was written with two main objectives in mind-to summarize and organize the vast material of vacuum technology in sets of useful formulas, and to provide a collection of worked out exercises showing how to use these formulas for solving technological problems. It is an ideal reference source for those with little time to devote to a full mathematical treatment of the many problems issued in vacuum practice, but who have a working knowledge of the essentials of vacuum technology, elementary physics, and mathematics. This time saving book employs a problem-solving approach throughout, p

  18. Problem solving with genetic algorithms and Splicer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayer, Steven E.; Wang, Lui

    1991-01-01

    Genetic algorithms are highly parallel, adaptive search procedures (i.e., problem-solving methods) loosely based on the processes of population genetics and Darwinian survival of the fittest. Genetic algorithms have proven useful in domains where other optimization techniques perform poorly. The main purpose of the paper is to discuss a NASA-sponsored software development project to develop a general-purpose tool for using genetic algorithms. The tool, called Splicer, can be used to solve a wide variety of optimization problems and is currently available from NASA and COSMIC. This discussion is preceded by an introduction to basic genetic algorithm concepts and a discussion of genetic algorithm applications.

  19. A Novel Approach for Solving Semidefinite Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Wei Jiao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel linearizing alternating direction augmented Lagrangian approach is proposed for effectively solving semidefinite programs (SDP. For every iteration, by fixing the other variables, the proposed approach alternatively optimizes the dual variables and the dual slack variables; then the primal variables, that is, Lagrange multipliers, are updated. In addition, the proposed approach renews all the variables in closed forms without solving any system of linear equations. Global convergence of the proposed approach is proved under mild conditions, and two numerical problems are given to demonstrate the effectiveness of the presented approach.

  20. Solving inversion problems with neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamgar-Parsi, Behzad; Gualtieri, J. A.

    1990-01-01

    A class of inverse problems in remote sensing can be characterized by Q = F(x), where F is a nonlinear and noninvertible (or hard to invert) operator, and the objective is to infer the unknowns, x, from the observed quantities, Q. Since the number of observations is usually greater than the number of unknowns, these problems are formulated as optimization problems, which can be solved by a variety of techniques. The feasibility of neural networks for solving such problems is presently investigated. As an example, the problem of finding the atmospheric ozone profile from measured ultraviolet radiances is studied.