WorldWideScience

Sample records for solvated alkali atoms

  1. Spectra of alkali atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santoso, Budi; Arumbinang, Haryono.

    1981-01-01

    Emission spectra of alkali atoms has been determined by using spectrometer at the ultraviolet to infra red waves range. The spectra emission can be obtained by absorption spectrophotometric analysis. Comparative evaluations between experimental data and data handbook obtained by spark method were also presented. (author tr.)

  2. Conductometric determination of solvation numbers of alkali metal cations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fialkov, Yu.Ya.; Gorbachev, V.Yu.; Chumak, V.L.

    1997-01-01

    Theories describing the interrelation of ion mobility with their effective radii in solutions are considered. Possibility of using these theories for determination the solvation numbers n s of some ions is estimated. According to conductometric data values of n s are calculated for alkali metal ions in propylene carbonate. The data obtained are compared with solvation numbers determined with the use of entropies of ions solvation. Change of n s values within temperature range 273.15-323.15 K is considered. Using literature data the effect of crystallographic radii of cations and medium permittivity on the the values of solvation numbers of cations are analyzed. (author)

  3. Electrical resistivities and solvation enthalpies for solutions of salts in liquid alkali metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubberstey, P.; Dadd, A.T.

    1982-01-01

    An empirical correlation is shown to exist between the resistivity coefficients drho/dc for solutes in liquid alkali metals and the corresponding solvation enthalpies Usub(solvn) of the neutral gaseous solute species. Qualitative arguments based on an electrostatic solvation model in which the negative solute atom is surrounded by a solvation sphere of positive solvent ion cores are used to show that both parameters are dependent on the charge density of the solute atom and hence on the extent of charge transfer from solvent to solute. Thus as the charge density of the solute increases, the solvation enthalpy increases regularly and the resistivity coefficients pass through a maximum to give the observed approximately parabolic drho/dc versus Usub(solvn) relationship. (Auth.)

  4. Mechanical filter for alkali atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Toporkov, D K

    2000-01-01

    A device for separating gases of different mass is discussed. Such a device could be used in a laser-driven spin exchange source of polarized hydrogen atoms to reduce the contamination of alkali atoms. A Monte Carlo simulation has shown that the suggested apparatus based on a commercial turbo pump could reduce by a factor of 10-15 the concentration of the alkali-metal atoms in the hydrogen flow from a laser driven polarized source. This would greatly enhance the effective polarization in hydrogen targets.

  5. Electron detachment energies in high-symmetry alkali halide solvated-electron anions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anusiewicz, Iwona; Berdys, Joanna; Simons, Jack; Skurski, Piotr

    2003-07-01

    We decompose the vertical electron detachment energies (VDEs) in solvated-electron clusters of alkali halides in terms of (i) an electrostatic contribution that correlates with the dipole moment (μ) of the individual alkali halide molecule and (ii) a relaxation component that is related to the polarizability (α) of the alkali halide molecule. Detailed numerical ab initio results for twelve species (MX)n- (M=Li,Na; X=F,Cl,Br; n=2,3) are used to construct an interpolation model that relates the clusters' VDEs to their μ and α values as well as a cluster size parameter r that we show is closely related to the alkali cation's ionic radius. The interpolation formula is then tested by applying it to predict the VDEs of four systems [i.e., (KF)2-, (KF)3-, (KCl)2-, and (KCl)3-] that were not used in determining the parameters of the model. The average difference between the model's predicted VDEs and the ab initio calculated electron binding energies is less than 4% (for the twelve species studied). It is concluded that one can easily estimate the VDE of a given high-symmetry solvated electron system by employing the model put forth here if the α, μ and cation ionic radii are known. Alternatively, if VDEs are measured for an alkali halide cluster and the α and μ values are known, one can estimate the r parameter, which, in turn, determines the "size" of the cluster anion.

  6. Electron excitation of alkali atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ormonde, S.

    1979-02-01

    The development and testing of a synthesized close-coupling effective model potential ten-channel electron-atom scattering code and some preliminary calculations of resonances in cross sections for the excitation of excited states of potassium by low energy electrons are described. The main results obtained are: identification of 1 S and 1 D structures in excitation cross sections below the 5 2 S threshold of neutral potassium; indications of additional structures - 1 P and 1 D between the 5 2 S and 5 2 D thresholds; and a suggested explanation of anomalously high interstate-electron impact excitation cross sections inferred from experiments on potassium-seeded plasmas. The effective potential model imbedded in the code can be used to simulate any atomic system that can be approximated by a single bound electron outside an ionic core. All that is needed is a set of effective potential parameters--experimental or theoretical. With minor modifications the code could be adapted to calculations of electron scattering by two-electron systems

  7. Magnetoelectric Jones spectroscopy of alkali atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernushkin, V V; Mironova, P V; Ovsiannikov, V D

    2008-01-01

    The Jones effect in a medium of free atoms exposed to static electric and magnetic fields is a useful tool for determining details of an atomic structure. For atoms in their nS ground states irradiated by a monochromatic wave in resonance with a single-photon transition to an n' D state, the bilinear Jones effect is not shaded by the quadratic Kerr and Cotton-Mouton effects, nor by the linear in magnetic field Faraday effect. The position and shape of the amplitude resonance may provide information on spectroscopic properties of atomic levels. We generalize equations for the Jones-effect amplitude to the case of a doublet structure of energy levels and calculate corresponding parameters for alkali atoms. General equations are derived for the amplitude dependence on the relative orientation of the static electric and magnetic fields and on the angle between the static field and the major axis of the wave polarization vector. These equations demonstrate explicitly that the three bilinear-in-static-fields optical birefringence effects-(i) the Jones birefringence (in parallel fields), (ii) the linear birefringence and (iii) the directional birefringence (the last two in perpendicular fields)-correspond to particular cases of the bilinear-in-static-fields correction to the amplitude of Rayleigh forward scattering

  8. Solvation Effect on Complexation of Alkali Metal Cations by a Calix[4]arene Ketone Derivative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Požar, Josip; Nikšić-Franjić, Ivana; Cvetnić, Marija; Leko, Katarina; Cindro, Nikola; Pičuljan, Katarina; Borilović, Ivana; Frkanec, Leo; Tomišić, Vladislav

    2017-09-14

    The medium effect on the complexation of alkali metal cations with a calix[4]arene ketone derivative (L) was systematically examined in methanol, ethanol, N-methylformamide, N,N-dimethylformamide, dimethyl sulfoxide, and acetonitrile. In all solvents the binding of Na + cation by L was rather efficient, whereas the complexation of other alkali metal cations was observed only in methanol and acetonitrile. Complexation reactions were enthalpically controlled, while ligand dissolution was endothermic in all cases. A notable influence of the solvent on NaL + complex stability could be mainly attributed to the differences in complexation entropies. The higher NaL + stability in comparison to complexes with other alkali metal cations in acetonitrile was predominantly due to a more favorable complexation enthalpy. The 1 H NMR investigations revealed a relatively low affinity of the calixarene sodium complex for inclusion of the solvent molecule in the calixarene hydrophobic cavity, with the exception of acetonitrile. Differences in complex stabilities in the explored solvents, apart from N,N-dimethylformamide and acetonitrile, could be mostly explained by taking into account solely the cation and complex solvation. A considerable solvent effect on the complexation equilibria was proven to be due to an interesting interplay between the transfer enthalpies and entropies of the reactants and the complexes formed.

  9. Solubility and solvation of alkali metal perchlorates, tetramethyl and tetraethylammonium in aqua-ketone solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kireev, A.A.; Pak, T.G.; Bezuglyj, V.D.

    1998-01-01

    The KClO 4 , RbClO 4 , CsClO 4 , (CH 3 ) 4 NClO 4 , (C 2 H 5 ) 4 NClO 4 solubility in water and water-acetone, water-methylethylketone mixtures is determined through the method of isothermal saturation at 298.15 K. Dissociation constants of alkali metals perchlorates in acetone and its 90% mixtures (by volume) are determined conductometrically. Solubility products and standard energies of the Gibbs transfer of the studied electrolytes from water into water-acetone and water-methylethylketone solvents. It is established that the Gibbs standard energies of Na + , K + , Rb + and Cs + cations transfer from water to water-ketone solvents are close to each other. It is shown that the effect of acetone and methylethylketone on solvation of the studied electrolytes is practically similar

  10. Electronic and atomic structures of liquid tellurium containing alkali elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawakita, Yukinobu; Yao, Makoto; Endo, Hirohisa.

    1997-01-01

    The measurements of electrical conductivity σ, density, EXAFS and neutron scattering were carried out for liquid K-Te and Rb-Te mixtures. The conductivity σ decreases rapidly with alkali concentration and a metal-semiconductor transition occurs at about 10 at.% alkali. It is found that the compositional variation of σ is nearly independent of the alkali species. The Te-Te bond length deduced from EXAFS and neutron scattering measurements is 2.8 A and changes little with alkali concentrations. The average distances from K and Rb atom to Te atoms are 3.6 A and 3.8 A, respectively. Two kinds of relaxation processes are observed in quasielastic neutron scattering for K 20 Te 80 . Upon the addition of alkali the interaction between the neighbouring Te chains, which is responsible for the metallic conduction, weaken considerably. (author)

  11. Chemical effects of alkali atoms on critical temperature in superconducting alkali-doped fullerides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetfleisch, F.; Gunnarsson, O.; Srama, R.; Han, J. E.; Stepper, M.; Roeser, H.-P.; Bohr, A.; Lopez, J. S.; Mashmool, M.; Roth, S.

    2018-03-01

    Alkali metal doped fullerides (A3C60) are superconductors with critical temperatures, Tc, extending up to 38 K. Tc is known to depend strongly on the lattice parameter a, which can be adjusted by physical or chemical pressure. In the latter case an alkali atom is replaced by a different sized one, which changes a. We have collected an extensive data base of experimental data for Tc from very early up to recent measurements. We disentangle alkali atom chemical effects on Tc, beyond the well-known consequences of changing a. It is found that Tc, for a fixed a, is typically increased as smaller alkali atoms are replaced by larger ones, except for very large a. Possible reasons for these results are discussed. Although smaller in size than the lattice parameter contribution, the chemical effect is not negligible and should be considered in future physical model developments.

  12. Long-range interactions among three alkali-metal atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marinescu, M.; Starace, A.F.

    1996-01-01

    The long-range asymptotic form of the interaction potential surface for three neutral alkali-metal atoms in their ground states may be expressed as an expansion in inverse powers of inter-nuclear distances. The first leading powers are proportional to the dispersion coefficients for pairwise atomic interactions. They are followed by a term responsible for a three body dipole interaction. The authors results consist in evaluation of the three body dipole interaction coefficient between three alkali-metal atoms. The generalization to long-range n atom interaction terms will be discussed qualitatively

  13. Momentum densities and Compton profiles of alkali-metal atoms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. It is assumed that the dynamics of valence electrons of alkali-metal atoms can be well accounted for by a quantum-defect theoretic model while the core electrons may be supposed to move in a self-consistent field. This model is used to study the momentum properties of atoms from. 3Li to 37Rb. The numerical ...

  14. Positronium-alkali atom scattering at medium energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakraborty, Ajoy; Basu, Arindam; Sarkar, Nirmal K; Sinha, Prabal K

    2004-01-01

    We investigate the scattering of orthopositronium (o-Ps) atom off different atomic alkali targets (Na to Cs) at low and medium energies (up to 120 eV). Projectile-elastic and target-elastic close-coupling models have been employed to investigate the systems in addition to the static-exchange model. Elastic, excitation and total cross sections have been reported for all four systems. The magnitude of the alkali excitation cross section increases with increasing atomic number of the target atom while the position of the peak value shifts towards lower incident energies. The magnitudes of the Ps excitation and ionization cross sections increase steadily with atomic number with no change in the peak position. The reported results show regular behaviour with increasing atomic number of the target atom. Scattering parameters for the Ps-Rb and Ps-Cs systems are being reported for the first time

  15. A coupled channel study on a binding mechanism of positronic alkali atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubota, Yoshihiro; Kino, Yasushi

    2008-01-01

    In order to investigate the binding mechanism of weakly bound states of positronic alkali atoms, we calculate the energies and wavefunctions using the Gaussian expansion method (GEM) where a positronium (Ps)-alkali ion channel and a positron-alkali atom channel are explicitly introduced. The energies of the bound states are updated using a model potential that reproduces well the observed energy levels of alkali atoms. The binding mechanism of the positronic alkali atom is analyzed by the wavefunctions obtained. The structure of the positronic alkali atom has been regarded as a Ps cluster orbiting the alkali ion, which is described by the Ps-alkali ion channel. We point out that the fraction having the positron-alkali atom configuration is small but plays an indispensable role for the weakly bound system

  16. Polarizabilities and hyperpolarizabilities of the alkali metal atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuentealba, P. (Chile Univ., Santiago (Chile). Departamento de Fisica and Centro de Mecanica Cuantica Aplicada (CMCA)); Reyes, O. (Chile Univ., Santiago (Chile). Dept. de Fisica)

    1993-08-14

    The electric static dipole polarizability [alpha], quadrupole polarizability C, dipole-quadrupole polarizability B, and the second dipole hyperpolarizability [gamma] have been calculated for the alkali metal atoms in the ground state. The results are based on a pseudopotential which is able to incorporate the very important core-valence correlation effect through a core polarization potential, and, in an empirical way, the main relativistic effects. The calculated properties compare very well with more elaborated calculations for the Li atom, excepting the second hyperpolarizability [gamma]. For the other atoms, there is neither theoretical nor experimental information about most of the higher polarizabilities. Hence, the results of this paper should be seen as a first attempt to give a complete account of the series expansion of the interaction energy of an alkali metal atom and a static electric field. (author).

  17. Polarizabilities and hyperpolarizabilities of the alkali metal atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuentealba, P.; Reyes, O.

    1993-01-01

    The electric static dipole polarizability α, quadrupole polarizability C, dipole-quadrupole polarizability B, and the second dipole hyperpolarizability γ have been calculated for the alkali metal atoms in the ground state. The results are based on a pseudopotential which is able to incorporate the very important core-valence correlation effect through a core polarization potential, and, in an empirical way, the main relativistic effects. The calculated properties compare very well with more elaborated calculations for the Li atom, excepting the second hyperpolarizability γ. For the other atoms, there is neither theoretical nor experimental information about most of the higher polarizabilities. Hence, the results of this paper should be seen as a first attempt to give a complete account of the series expansion of the interaction energy of an alkali metal atom and a static electric field. (author)

  18. Momentum densities and Compton profiles of alkali-metal atoms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    It is assumed that the dynamics of valence electrons of alkali-metal atoms can be well accounted for by a quantum-defect theoretic model while the core electrons may be supposed to move in a self-consistent field. This model is used to study the momentum properties of atoms from 3Li to 37Rb. The numerical results ...

  19. Inner-shell excitation of alkali-metal atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiwary, S.N.

    1987-06-01

    Inner-shell excitation of alkali-metal atoms, which leads to auto-ionization, is reviewed. The validity of quantum mechanical approximation is analyzed and the importance of exchange and correlation is demonstrated. Basic difficulties in making accurate calculations for inner-shell excitation process are discussed. Suggestions are made for further study of inner-shell process in atoms and ions. (author). 26 refs, 4 figs, 1 tab

  20. Negative ion formation in collisions involving excited alkali atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheret, M.

    1988-01-01

    Ion-pair production is considered as the prototype of the crossing problem between potential energy curves. In general an alkali atom is one of the reactants the other being an halogen, hydrogen atom or molecule. Experimental results are generally analyzed in the framework of the Landau-Zener-Stuekelberg theory, ionization potential and electron affinity, being the most important parameters. In order to vary these parameters over a wide range two experimental works have been devoted to systems of excited alkali atoms colliding with ground state alkali atoms. In the first study Rb atoms are excited to various ns or nd states from Rb(5d) to Rb(9s) in a cell. The second study is devoted to the Na(3p)-Na(3s) system, in this study also the possibility of creating excited negative ions (Na - (3s3p)) has been investigated. These results are presented and analyzed. Finally further developments of the subject are suggested. 17 refs.; 8 figs.; 1 table

  1. Direct Frequency Comb Spectroscopy of Alkali Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhananga, Trinity; Palm, Christopher; Nguyen, Khoa; Guttikonda, Srikanth; Kimball, Derek Jackson

    2011-11-01

    We are using direct frequency comb spectroscopy to study transition frequencies and excited state hyperfine structure in potassium and rubidium using 2-photon transitions excited directly with the frequency-doubled output of a erbium fiber optical frequency comb. The frequency comb output is directed in two counterpropagating directions through a vapor cell containing the atomic vapor of interest. A pair of optical filters is used to select teeth of the comb in order to identify the transition wavelengths. A photomultiplier tube (PMT) measures fluorescence from a decay channel wavelength selected with another optical filter. Using different combinations of filters enables a wide range of transitions to be investigated. By scanning the repetition rate, a Doppler-free spectrum can be obtained enabling kHz-resolution spectral measurements. The thermal motion of the atoms in the vapor cell actually eliminates the need to fine-tune the offset frequency and repetition rate, alleviating a somewhat challenging requirement for spectroscopy of cold atoms. Our investigations are laying the groundwork for a long-term research program to use direct frequency comb spectroscopy to understand the complex spectra of rare-earth atoms.

  2. Quantitative measurement of solvation shells using frequency modulated atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchihashi, T.; Higgins, M.; Nakayama, Y.; Sader, J. E.; Jarvis, S. P.

    2005-03-01

    The nanoscale specificity of interaction measurements and additional imaging capability of the atomic force microscope make it an ideal technique for measuring solvation shells in a variety of liquids next to a range of materials. Unfortunately, the widespread use of atomic force microscopy for the measurement of solvation shells has been limited by uncertainties over the dimensions, composition and durability of the tip during the measurements, and problems associated with quantitative force calibration of the most sensitive dynamic measurement techniques. We address both these issues by the combined use of carbon nanotube high aspect ratio probes and quantifying the highly sensitive frequency modulation (FM) detection technique using a recently developed analytical method. Due to the excellent reproducibility of the measurement technique, additional information regarding solvation shell size as a function of proximity to the surface has been obtained for two very different liquids. Further, it has been possible to identify differences between chemical and geometrical effects in the chosen systems.

  3. Atomic forces between noble gas atoms, alkali ions, and halogen ions for surface interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, J. W.; Outlaw, R. A.; Heinbockel, J. H.

    1988-01-01

    The components of the physical forces between noble gas atoms, alkali ions, and halogen ions are analyzed and a data base developed from analysis of the two-body potential data, the alkali-halide molecular data, and the noble gas crystal and salt crystal data. A satisfactory global fit to this molecular and crystal data is then reproduced by the model to within several percent. Surface potentials are evaluated for noble gas atoms on noble gas surfaces and salt crystal surfaces with surface tension neglected. Within this context, the noble gas surface potentials on noble gas and salt crystals are considered to be accurate to within several percent.

  4. Reactive scattering of electronically excited alkali atoms with molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mestdagh, J.M.; Balko, B.A.; Covinsky, M.H.; Weiss, P.S.; Vernon, M.F.; Schmidt, H.; Lee, Y.T.

    1987-06-01

    Representative families of excited alkali atom reactions have been studied using a crossed beam apparatus. For those alkali-molecule systems in which reactions are also known for ground state alkali and involve an early electron transfer step, no large differences are observed in the reactivity as Na is excited. More interesting are the reactions with hydrogen halides (HCl): it was found that adding electronic energy into Na changes the reaction mechanism. Early electron transfer is responsible of Na(5S, 4D) reactions, but not of Na(3P) reactions. Moreover, the NaCl product scattering is dominated by the HCl - repulsion in Na(5S, 4D) reactions, and by the NaCl-H repulsion in the case of Na(3P). The reaction of Na with O 2 is of particular interest since it was found to be state specific. Only Na(4D) reacts, and the reaction requires restrictive constraints on the impact parameter and the reactants' relative orientation. The reaction with NO 2 is even more complex since Na(4D) leads to the formation of NaO by two different pathways. It must be mentioned however, that the identification of NaO as product in these reactions has yet to be confirmed

  5. (e, 2e) triple differential cross sections of alkali and alkali earth atoms: Na, K and Mg, Ca

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hitawala, U; Purohit, G; Sud, K K

    2008-01-01

    Recently low-energy measurements have been reported for alkali targets Na and K and alkali earth targets Mg and Ca in coplanar symmetric geometry. We report the results of our calculation of triple differential cross section (TDCS) for electron impact single ionization (i.e. (e, 2e) processes) of alkali atoms Na, K and alkali earth atoms Mg, Ca in coplanar symmetric geometry. We have performed the present calculations using the distorted-wave Born approximation (DWBA) formalism at intermediate incident electron energies used in the recently performed experiments. Ionization takes place from the valence shell for all the targets investigated and the outgoing electrons share the excess energy equally. We have also considered the effect of target polarization in our DWBA calculations which may be an important quantity at incident electron energies used in the present investigation. We find that the DWBA formalism is able to reproduce most of the trend of experimental data and may provide a future direction for further investigation of ionization process on alkali and alkali earth metals. It is also observed that the second-order effects are more important to understand the collision dynamics of (e, 2e) processes on alkali earth targets

  6. Watching the Solvation of Atoms in Liquids One Solvent Molecule at a Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragg, Arthur E.; Glover, William J.; Schwartz, Benjamin J.

    2010-06-01

    We use mixed quantum-classical molecular dynamics simulations and ultrafast transient hole-burning spectroscopy to build a molecular-level picture of the motions of solvent molecules around Na atoms in liquid tetrahydrofuran. We find that even at room temperature, the solvation of Na atoms occurs in discrete steps, with the number of solvent molecules nearest the atom changing one at a time. This explains why the rate of solvent relaxation differs for different initial nonequilibrium states, and reveals how the solvent helps determine the identity of atomic species in liquids.

  7. Silver atom solvation and desolvation in ice matrices: study of solvation shell geometry by electron spin resonance and electron spin echo methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kevan, L; Narayana, P A

    1978-01-01

    Results of studies of the solvation shell structure of silver atoms in ice matrix at 4/sup 0/K by electron spin resonance (ESR) and electron spin echo spectrometry are reported. Drastic change in the hyperfine coupling constant of the silver atom was noted when the silver atom initially produced at 4/sup 0/K was warmed to 77/sup 0/K and reexamined by ESR at 4/sup 0/K. This suggested a very drastic rearrangement of the water molecules surrounding the silver atom. The geometric arrangement of water molecules around the silver atom produced at 4/sup 0/K was what would be expected for a solvated silver ion, indicating that no rearrangement had occurred after the silver atom formed. The addition of a little thermal excitation (heating to 77/sup 0/K) results in the geometry changes than can be explained by assuming either that a water molecule rotates around one of its OH bands or by the development of a hydrogen bond between the silver atom and one of the first solvation shell water molecules. Optical excitation in the absorption band of the silver atom in the ice matrix at 400nm resulted in desolvation of the silver ion or a reversion to the structure originally obtained by reaction of solver salts in ic matrix with radiation produced electrons. This was best explained by a charge transfer mechanism. (BLM)

  8. Positron total scattering cross-sections for alkali atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Nidhi; Singh, Suvam; Antony, Bobby

    2018-01-01

    Positron-impact total scattering cross-sections for Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs and Fr atoms are calculated in the energy range from 5-5000 eV employing modified spherical complex optical potential formalism. The main aim of this work is to apply this formalism to the less studied positron-target collision systems. The results are compared with previous theoretical and experimental data, wherever available. In general, the present data show overall agreement and consistency with other results. Furthermore, we have done a comparative study of the results to investigate the effect of atomic size on the cross-sections as we descend through the group in the periodic table. We have also plotted a correlation graph of the present total cross-sections with polarizability and number of target electrons. The two correlation plots confirm the credibility and consistency of the present results. Besides, this is the first theoretical attempt to report positron-impact total cross-sections of alkali atoms over such a wide energy range.

  9. Optical--microwave pumping of alkali atoms and population capture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleksandrov, E.B.; Vershovskii, A.K.

    1985-01-01

    The steady-state distribution of the populations of the hyperfine sublevels of the ground state of alkali atoms is calculated for the case in which the atoms are subjected to a spectrally selective optical pumping on 2 S 1 /sub // 2 -- 2 P/sub 1/2,3/2/ transitions and a simultaneous pumping by microwave fields which are at resonance with transitions in the hyperfine structure of the ground state, F = 2, M/sub F/ = +- 2, +- 1bold-arrow-left-rightF = 1, M/sub F/ = +- 1. The addition of the microwave pumping is shown to substantially increase the population difference for the O--O transition in the hyperfine structure. During selective optical pumping of the F = 1 level, the population inversion which can be achieved for the O--O transition is limited by the effect of population capture. This capture can be eliminated by using incoherent microwave fields. The quality factor of the O--O resonance is calculated as a function of the parameters of the pump. The outlook for the use of composite pumping in frequency-stabilization systems is discussed

  10. Spectroscopic and Kinetic Measurements of Alkali Atom-Rare Gas Excimers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-11-04

    vapors – Exciplex molecules absorb over much greater bandwidth • Control of inherent high optical gain to minimize ASE and optimize laser oscillation... Exciplex assisted diode Pumped Alkali Laser (XPAL) • Education of a future generation of laser scientists VG09-227-2 Physical Sciences Inc. Novel Approach...This new laser exploits the optical properties of weakly-bound alkali/rare-gas exciplexes for pumping the 2P1/2, 3/2 alkali atomic excited states 4

  11. Energy distributions of atoms sputtered from alkali halides by 540 eV electrons, Ch.1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Overeijnder, H.; Szymonski, M.; Haring, A.; Vries, A.E. de

    1978-01-01

    The emission of halogen and alkali atoms, occurring under bombardment of alkali halides with electrons has been investigated. The electron energy was 540 eV and the temperature of the target was varied between room temperature and 400 0 C. The energy distribution of the emitted neutral particles was measured with a time of flight method. It was found that either diffusing interstitial halogen atoms or moving holes dominate the sputtering process above 200 0 C. Below 150 0 C alkali halides with lattice parameters s/d >= 0.33 show emission of non-thermal halogen atoms. s is the interionic space between two halogen ions in a direction and d is the diameter of a halogen atom. In general the energy distribution of the alkali and halogen atoms is thermal above 200 0 C, but not Maxwellian. (Auth.)

  12. Effect of charging on silicene with alkali metal atom adsorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Manman; Li, Zhongyao; Gong, Shi-Jing

    2018-02-01

    Based on first-principles calculations, we studied the effects of charging on the structure, binding energy and electronic properties of silicene with alkali metal (AM) atom (Li, Na or K) adsorption. In AMSi2, electron doping enlarges the lattice constant of silicene, while the influence of hole doping is non-monotonic. In AMSi8, the lattice constant increases/decreases almost linearly with the increase in electron/hole doping. In addition, the AM-Si vertical distance can be greatly enlarged by excessive hole doping in both AMSi2 and AMSi8 systems. When the hole doping is as large as  +e per unit cell, both AMSi2 and AMSi8 can be transformed from metal to semiconductor. However, the binding energy would be negative in the AM+ Si2 semiconductor. It suggests AM+ Si2 is unstable in this case. In addition, the electron doping and the AM-Si vertical distance would greatly influence the band gap of silicene in LiSi8 and NaSi8, while the band gap in KSi8 is relatively stable. Therefore, KSi8 may be a more practicable material in nanotechnology.

  13. Long-range interactions between excited helium and alkali-metal atoms

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, J.-Y.; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo; Shi, T.-Y.; Tang, L.-Y.; Yan, Z.-C.

    2012-01-01

    –5% in the coefficient C6, and 1–10% in the coefficients C8 and C10. The dispersion coefficients Cn for the interaction of He(2 1,3S) and He(2 1,3P) with the ground-state alkali-metal atoms and for the interaction of He(2 1,3S) with the alkali-metal atoms in their first

  14. Analysis of the physical atomic forces between noble gas atoms, alkali ions and halogen ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, J. W.; Heinbockel, J. H.; Outlaw, R. A.

    1986-01-01

    The physical forces between atoms and molecules are important in a number of processes of practical importance, including line broadening in radiative processes, gas and crystal properties, adhesion, and thin films. The components of the physical forces between noble gas atoms, alkali ions, and halogen ions are analyzed and a data base for the dispersion forces is developed from the literature based on evaluations with the harmonic oscillator dispersion model for higher order coefficients. The Zener model of the repulsive core is used in the context of the recent asymptotic wave functions of Handler and Smith; and an effective ionization potential within the Handler and Smith wave functions is defined to analyze the two body potential data of Waldman and Gordon, the alkali-halide molecular data, and the noble gas crystal and salt crystal data. A satisfactory global fit to this molecular and crystal data is then reproduced by the model to within several percent. Surface potentials are evaluated for noble gas atoms on noble gas and salt crystal surfaces with surface tension neglected. Within this context, the noble gas surface potentials on noble gas and salt crystals are considered to be accurate to within several percent.

  15. Long-range interactions between alkali and alkaline-earth atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Jun; Cheng Yongjun; Mitroy, J

    2013-01-01

    Dispersion coefficients between the alkali metal atoms (Li–Rb) and alkaline-earth metal atoms (Be–Sr) are evaluated using matrix elements computed from frozen core configuration interaction calculations. Besides dispersion coefficients with both atoms in their respective ground states, dispersion coefficients are also given for the case where one atom is in its ground state and the other atom is in a low-lying excited state. (paper)

  16. Photoionization of subvalence p-subshell in alkali and alkaline-earth atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yagishita, A.; Hayaishi, T.; Itoh, Y.

    1986-11-01

    Photoionization of alkali and alkaline-earth atoms has been investigated by means of a time-of-flight mass spectrometer combined with monochromatised synchrotron radiation and an atomic beam, in the wavelength region of 350 - 750 A. For alkaline-earth atoms, it has been made clear that a two-step autoionization following an innershell excitation plays an important role for doubly charged ions. For alkali atoms, relative photoionization cross sections have been measured for the first time. Moreover, a tentative assignment of spectral lines for Rb and Cs in the complex spectral region has been attemped based on the photoionization data. (author)

  17. Refined potentials for rare gas atom adsorption on rare gas and alkali-halide surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, J. W.; Heinbockel, J. H.; Outlaw, R. A.

    1985-01-01

    The utilization of models of interatomic potential for physical interaction to estimate the long range attractive potential for rare gases and ions is discussed. The long range attractive force is calculated in terms of the atomic dispersion properties. A data base of atomic dispersion parameters for rare gas atoms, alkali ion, and halogen ions is applied to the study of the repulsive core; the procedure for evaluating the repulsive core of ion interactions is described. The interaction of rare gas atoms on ideal rare gas solid and alkali-halide surfaces is analyzed; zero coverage absorption potentials are derived.

  18. Polarization of stable and radioactive noble gas nuclei by spin exchange with laser pumped alkali atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calaprice, F.; Happer, W.; Schreiber, D.

    1984-01-01

    The nuclei of noble gases can be strongly polarized by spin exchange with sufficiently dense optically pumped alkali vapors. Only a small fraction of the spin angular momentum of the alkali atoms is transferred to the nuclear spin of the noble gas. Most of the spin angular momentum is lost to translational angular momentum of the alkali and noble gas atoms about each other. For heavy noble gases most of the angular momentum transfer occurs in alkali-noble-gas van der Waals molecules. The transfer efficiency depends on the formation and breakup rates of the van der Waals molecules in the ambient gas. Experimental methods to measure the spin transfer efficiencies have been developed. Nuclei of radioactive noble gases have been polarized by these methods, and the polarization has been detected by observing the anisotropy of the radioactive decay products. Very precise measurements of the magnetic moments of the radioactive nuclei have been made. 12 references, 9 figures

  19. Spin-rotation interaction of alkali-metal endash He-atom pairs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, T.G.; Thywissen, J.H.; Happer, W.

    1997-01-01

    A treatment of the spin-rotation coupling between alkali-metal atoms and He atoms is presented. Rotational distortions are accounted for in the wave function using a Coriolis interaction in the rotating frame. The expectation value of the spin-orbit interaction gives values of the spin-rotation coupling that explain previous experimental results. For spin-exchange optical pumping, the results suggest that lighter alkali-metal atoms would be preferred spin-exchange partners, other factors being equal. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  20. Tuning the electronic structure of graphene through alkali metal and halogen atom intercalation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Sohail; Miró, Pere; Audiffred, Martha; Heine, Thomas

    2018-04-01

    The deposition, intercalation and co-intercalation of heavy alkali metals and light halogens atoms in graphene mono- and bilayers have been studied using first principles density-functional calculations. Both the deposition and the intercalation of alkali metals gives rise to n-type doping due to the formation of M+-C- pairs. The co-intercalation of a 1:1 ratio of alkali metals and halogens derives into the formation of ionic pairs among the intercalated species, unaltering the electronic structure of the layered material.

  1. [Measurement of atomic number of alkali vapor and pressure of buffer gas based on atomic absorption].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Hui-jie; Quan, Wei; Liu, Xiang; Chen, Yao; Lu, Ji-xi

    2015-02-01

    High sensitivitymagnetic measurementscanbe achieved by utilizing atomic spinmanipulation in the spin-exchange-relaxation-free (SERF) regime, which uses an alkali cell as a sensing element. The atomic number density of the alkali vapor and the pressure of the buffer gasare among the most important parameters of the cell andrequire accurate measurement. A method has been proposed and developedto measure the atomic number density and the pressure based on absorption spectroscopy, by sweeping the absorption line and fittingthe experiment data with a Lorentzian profile to obtainboth parameters. Due to Doppler broadening and pressure broadening, which is mainly dominated by the temperature of the cell and the pressure of buffer gas respectively, this work demonstrates a simulation of the errorbetween the peaks of the Lorentzian profile and the Voigt profile caused by bothfactors. The results indicates that the Doppler broadening contribution is insignificant with an error less than 0.015% at 313-513 K for a 4He density of 2 amg, and an error of 0.1% in the presence of 0.6-5 amg at 393 K. We conclude that the Doppler broadening could be ignored under above conditions, and that the Lorentzianprofile is suitably applied to fit the absorption spectrumobtainingboth parameters simultaneously. In addition we discuss the resolution and the instability due to thelight source, wavelength and the temperature of the cell. We find that the cell temperature, whose uncertainty is two orders of magnitude larger than the instability of the light source and the wavelength, is one of the main factors which contributes to the error.

  2. Electron spin resonance of the solvation of radiation-produced silver atoms in alcohol-water mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, A.S.W.; Kevan, L.

    1982-01-01

    Frozen solutions of silver salts exposed to 60 Co γ-irradiation form silver atoms by reaction of radiation-produced electrons with the silver ion. At 4 K the silver atoms are initially produced in a nonequilibrium or presolvated state and upon brief thermal excitation to 77 K the first solvation shell geometry changes towards an equilibrium or solvated silver atom. This is most pronounced in water but also occurs in methanol, ethanol and n-propanol matrices. The changes in the electron spin resonance magnetic parameters upon silver atom solvation have been determined. In alcohol-water mixtures Ag 0 is preferentially solvated by polycrystalline water at low alcohol concentration. Above a particular alcohol mole percent Ag 0 suddenly changes its environment to a glassy alcohol one. This sudden change occurs at 17, 13 and 6 mol % methanol, ethanol and n-propanol, respectively. These mole percents correlate with the minimum of the excess enthalpy of mixing and with the hydrogen atom trapping ability of these alcohol-water mixtures. The results also suggest that the local environmental disorder around Ag 0 increases with alcohol chain length in alcohol-water frozen solutions. (author)

  3. The solvation reaction field for a hydrogen atom in a dielectric continuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chipman, D.M.

    1996-01-01

    A reaction field exists even for a nonpolar solute embedded in a spherical cavity within a surrounding homogeneous dielectric continuum. This arises from the tail of the electronic wave function that penetrates beyond the cavity boundary into the dielectric region. This effect, which is neglected or treated only in cursory fashion in most reaction field implementations, is examined in detail for the simple case of a ground state hydrogen atom, where very accurate solutions of the relevant equations can be obtained. Properties considered include the penetration of the electron outside the cavity, the electronic density at the nucleus, the electron binding energy, the electrostatic free energy of solvation, the polarizability, and the vertical 1s→2p excitation energy. Also, the effect of the common approximation of neglecting the volume polarization and treating only the surface polarization contribution to the reaction field is critically evaluated. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  4. Emission Channeling Studies of the Lattice Site of Oversized Alkali Atoms Implanted in Metals

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    % IS340 \\\\ \\\\ As alkali atoms have the largest atomic radius of all elements, the determination of their lattice configuration following implantation into metals forms a critical test for the various models predicting the lattice site of implanted impurity atoms. The site determination of these large atoms will especially be a crucial check for the most recent model that relates the substitutional fraction of oversized elements to their solution enthalpy. Recent exploratory $^{213}$Fr and $^{221}$Fr $\\alpha$-emission channeling experiments at ISOLDE-CERN and hyperfine interaction measurements on Fr implanted in Fe gave an indication for anomalously large substitutional fractions. To investigate further the behaviour of Fr and other alkali atoms like Cs and Rb thoroughly, more on-line emission channeling experiments are needed. We propose a number of shifts for each element, where the temperature of the implanted metals will be varied between 50$^\\circ$ and 700$^\\circ$~K. Temperature dependent measurements wi...

  5. Long-range interactions between excited helium and alkali-metal atoms

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, J.-Y.

    2012-12-03

    The dispersion coefficients for the long-range interaction of the first four excited states of He, i.e., He(2 1,3S) and He(2 1,3P), with the low-lying states of the alkali-metal atoms Li, Na, K, and Rb are calculated by summing over the reduced matrix elements of the multipole transition operators. For the interaction between He and Li the uncertainty of the calculations is 0.1–0.5%. For interactions with other alkali-metal atoms the uncertainty is 1–3% in the coefficient C5, 1–5% in the coefficient C6, and 1–10% in the coefficients C8 and C10. The dispersion coefficients Cn for the interaction of He(2 1,3S) and He(2 1,3P) with the ground-state alkali-metal atoms and for the interaction of He(2 1,3S) with the alkali-metal atoms in their first 2P states are presented in this Brief Report. The coefficients for other pairs of atomic states are listed in the Supplemental Material.

  6. Study of absorption spectra for alkali and alkaline earth metal salts in flameless atomic absorption spectrometry using a carbon tube atomizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasuda, Seiji; Kakiyama, Hitoo

    1975-01-01

    Absorption spectra of various salts such as alkali metal salts, alkaline earth dichlorides, and ammonium halides were investigated and absorptions of some molecular species produced in the carbon tube were identified. The aqueous solution (20 μl) containing 1.0 mg/ml of each salt was placed in the carbon tube atomizer and heated in a similar manner to usual flameless atomic absorption method. D 2 -lamp was used as a continuous light source and argon gas was employed as an inert sheath gas. The spectra were obtained over the range of wavelength 200 to 350 nm. When alkali halides were feeded, the absorption spectra agreed with those of alkali halide vapors. Therefore, in such cases vapors of the alkali halides were probably produced by the sublimation or vaporization in the atomizer. The spectra of alkali perchlorates were considered to be those of alkali chlorides produced by the pyrolysis of the perchlorates in the atomizer. The absorptions of alkaline earth chlorides below 250 nm were probably due to their gaseous states. Sulfur dioxide was found to be produced by the pyrolysis of alkali sulfates, bisulfates and sulfites in the atomizer, Alkali phosphates and pyrophosphates gave almost identical spectra below 300 nm. Gamma band spectrum of nitrogen monoxide was observed from 200 to 240 nm during ashing at bout 330 0 C for alkali nitrates and nitrites. Ammonia vapor was produced from ammonium halides during drying at about 170 0 C. Although the absorptions of alkali carbonates and hydroxides were almost undetectable, the same spectra as those of alkali halides were observed by the addition of ammonium halides to the solutions of alkali compounds. This shows that alkali halides are produced in the atomizer by the addition of halide ions. (auth.)

  7. ns-ms excitation of alkali atoms in the Glauber approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barros, H.G. de P.L. de

    1980-05-01

    An expression for the scattering amplitude in the Glauber approximation for ns-ms electronic excitation of alkali atoms is obtained. The interaction potential between the incident electron, the core electrons and N-1 protons is approximated by an appropriate spherical potential. (Author) [pt

  8. s-wave elastic scattering of antihydrogen off atomic alkali-metal targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinha, Prabal K.; Ghosh, A. S.

    2006-01-01

    We have investigated the s-wave elastic scattering of antihydrogen atoms off atomic alkali-metal targets (Li, Na, K, and Rb) at thermal energies (10 -16 -10 -4 a.u.) using an atomic orbital expansion technique. The elastic cross sections of these systems at thermal energies are found to be very high compared to H-H and H-He systems. The theoretical models employed in this study are so chosen to consider long-range forces dynamically in the calculation. The mechanism of cooling suggests that Li may be considered to be a good candidate as a buffer gas for enhanced cooling of antihydrogen atoms to ultracold temperature

  9. Collisions of alkali negative ions with atomic and molecular targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Champion, R.; Scott, D.; Hug, M.S.; Doverspike, L.

    1986-01-01

    Ion-beam measurements are presented for the total cross section σ/sub e/(E) for electron detachment of Na - , K - . and Cs - in low-energy (E/sub lab/ - projectile is previously unreported and extends our recent study of Na - and K - . The motivation for this work is due in part to the observation that these alkali-metal anions (denoted M - ) are similar to H - in that they have two s-electrons outside a closed shell. In particular, it is of interest to determine whether the energy dependence of σ/sub e/(E) for M - is similar to that observed for H - . 21 refs., 5 figs

  10. Adsorption of alkali and alkaline-earth metal atoms on stanene: A first-principles study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadioglu, Yelda; Ersan, Fatih [Department of Physics, Adnan Menderes University, 09100 Aydın (Turkey); Gökoğlu, Gökhan [Department of Physics, Karabük University, 78050 Karabük (Turkey); Aktürk, Olcay Üzengi [Department of Electrical & Electronics Engineering, Adnan Menderes University, 09100 Aydın (Turkey); Nanotechnology Application and Research Center, Adnan Menderes University, 09100 Aydın (Turkey); Aktürk, Ethem, E-mail: ethem.akturk@adu.edu.tr [Department of Physics, Adnan Menderes University, 09100 Aydın (Turkey); Nanotechnology Application and Research Center, Adnan Menderes University, 09100 Aydın (Turkey)

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a study on the adsorption of alkali and alkaline-earth metal atoms on single-layer stanene with different levels of coverage using first-principles plane wave calculations within spin-polarized density functional theory. The most favorable adsorption site for alkali atoms (Li, Na, K) were found to be the hollow site similar to other group IV single-layers, but the case of alkaline-earths on stanene is different from silicene and germanene. Whereas Mg and Ca are bound to stanene at hollow site, the bridge site is found to be energetically favorable for Be adatom. All adsorbed atoms are positively charged due to the charge transfer from adatom to stanene single-layer. The semimetallic bare stanene become metallic except for Be adsorption. The Beryllium adsorption give rise to non-magnetic semiconducting ground state. Our results illustrate that stanene has a reactive and functionalizable surface similar to graphene or silicene. - Highlights: • Alkali and alkaline-earth metal atoms form stronger bonds with stanene compared to other group IV monolayers. • Semi-metallic stanene becomes nonmagnetic metal for Li, Na, K, Mg, and Ca atoms adsorption. • Semi-metallic stanene becomes nonmagnetic semiconductor with 94 meV band gap for Be atom adsorption.

  11. Multi-quantum excitation in optically pumped alkali atom: rare gas mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galbally-Kinney, K. L.; Rawlins, W. T.; Davis, S. J.

    2014-03-01

    Diode-pumped alkali laser (DPAL) technology offers a means of achieving high-energy gas laser output through optical pumping of the D-lines of Cs, Rb, and K. The exciplex effect, based on weak attractive forces between alkali atoms and polarizable rare gas atoms (Ar, Kr, Xe), provides an alternative approach via broadband excitation of exciplex precursors (XPAL). In XPAL configurations, we have observed multi-quantum excitation within the alkali manifolds which result in infrared emission lines between 1 and 4 μm. The observed excited states include the 42FJ states of both Cs and Rb, which are well above the two-photon energy of the excitation laser in each case. We have observed fluorescence from multi-quantum states for excitation wavelengths throughout the exciplex absorption bands of Cs-Ar, Cs-Kr, and Cs-Xe. The intensity scaling is roughly first-order or less in both pump power and alkali concentration, suggesting a collisional energy pooling excitation mechanism. Collisional up-pumping appears to present a parasitic loss term for optically pumped atomic systems at high intensities, however there may also be excitation of other lasing transitions at infrared wavelengths.

  12. Living Colloidal Metal Particles from Solvated Metal Atoms. Clustering of Metal Atoms in Organic Media 15.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-09-23

    attributed to these solutions, especially toward heart disease. And in 1618 Antoni published Panacea Aurea : Auro Potabile 4 which centered on the...probably a slow process (discussed next under the electrophoresis section ). Electrophoresis: Electrophoresis, the movement of charged particles in...electrical properties. Experimental Section Preparation of a Typical Au-Acetone Colloid The metal atom reactor has been described previo sly. 3 9 ’ 5 9 ’ 6 0

  13. Bose-Einstein condensation in atomic alkali gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Robert J.

    1998-05-01

    I present a review of the time-independent Gross-Pitaevskii (GP), Bogoliubov, and finite-temperature Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (HFB) mean-field theories used to study trapped, Bose-Einstein condensed alkali gases. Numerical solutions of the (zero-temperature) GP equation are presented for attractive (negative scattering length) and repulsive (positive scattering length) interactions. Comparison is made with the Thomas-Fermi and (variational) trial wavefunction appr oximations that are used in the literature to study condensed gases. Numerical calculations of the (zero-temperature) Bogoliubov quasi-particle excitation frequencies are found to be in excellent agreement with the experimental results. The finite-temperature properties of condensed gases are examined using the Popov approximation (of the HFB theory) and a simple two-gas model. Specific, quantitative comparisons are made with experimental results for finite-temperature excitation frequencies. Qualitative comparisons are made between the results of the Popov approximation, two-gas model, and other published models for condensate fraction and thermal density distribution. The time-independent mean-field theories are found to be in excellent agreement with experimental results at relatively low temperatures (high condensate fractions). However, at higher temperatures (and condensate fractions of less than 50%) there are significant discrepancies between experimental data and theoretical calculations. This work was undertaken at the University of Maryland at College Park and was supported in part by the National Science Foundation (PHY-9601261) and the U.S. Office of Naval Research.

  14. Solvation free energies and partition coefficients with the coarse-grained and hybrid all-atom/coarse-grained MARTINI models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genheden, Samuel

    2017-10-01

    We present the estimation of solvation free energies of small solutes in water, n-octanol and hexane using molecular dynamics simulations with two MARTINI models at different resolutions, viz. the coarse-grained (CG) and the hybrid all-atom/coarse-grained (AA/CG) models. From these estimates, we also calculate the water/hexane and water/octanol partition coefficients. More than 150 small, organic molecules were selected from the Minnesota solvation database and parameterized in a semi-automatic fashion. Using either the CG or hybrid AA/CG models, we find considerable deviations between the estimated and experimental solvation free energies in all solvents with mean absolute deviations larger than 10 kJ/mol, although the correlation coefficient is between 0.55 and 0.75 and significant. There is also no difference between the results when using the non-polarizable and polarizable water model, although we identify some improvements when using the polarizable model with the AA/CG solutes. In contrast to the estimated solvation energies, the estimated partition coefficients are generally excellent with both the CG and hybrid AA/CG models, giving mean absolute deviations between 0.67 and 0.90 log units and correlation coefficients larger than 0.85. We analyze the error distribution further and suggest avenues for improvements.

  15. Solvation free energies and partition coefficients with the coarse-grained and hybrid all-atom/coarse-grained MARTINI models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genheden, Samuel

    2017-10-01

    We present the estimation of solvation free energies of small solutes in water, n-octanol and hexane using molecular dynamics simulations with two MARTINI models at different resolutions, viz. the coarse-grained (CG) and the hybrid all-atom/coarse-grained (AA/CG) models. From these estimates, we also calculate the water/hexane and water/octanol partition coefficients. More than 150 small, organic molecules were selected from the Minnesota solvation database and parameterized in a semi-automatic fashion. Using either the CG or hybrid AA/CG models, we find considerable deviations between the estimated and experimental solvation free energies in all solvents with mean absolute deviations larger than 10 kJ/mol, although the correlation coefficient is between 0.55 and 0.75 and significant. There is also no difference between the results when using the non-polarizable and polarizable water model, although we identify some improvements when using the polarizable model with the AA/CG solutes. In contrast to the estimated solvation energies, the estimated partition coefficients are generally excellent with both the CG and hybrid AA/CG models, giving mean absolute deviations between 0.67 and 0.90 log units and correlation coefficients larger than 0.85. We analyze the error distribution further and suggest avenues for improvements.

  16. Optically pumped polarized alkali atomic beams and targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, L.W.

    1984-01-01

    The optical pumping of 23 Na and 6 Li atomic beams is discussed. Experiments on the optical pumping of 23 Na atomic beams using either a single mode dye laser followed by a double passed acousto-optic modulator or a multimode dye laser are reported. The optical pumping of a 23 Na vapor target for use in a polarized H - ion source is discussed. Results on the use of viton as a wall coating with a long relaxation time are reported. 31 references, 6 figures, 3 tables

  17. Circular dichroism of magnetically induced transitions for D2 lines of alkali atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonoyan, A.; Sargsyan, A.; Klinger, E.; Hakhumyan, G.; Leroy, C.; Auzinsh, M.; Papoyan, A.; Sarkisyan, D.

    2018-03-01

    In this letter we study magnetic circular dichroism in alkali atoms exhibiting asymmetric behaviour of magnetically induced transitions. The magnetic field \\textbf{B}\\parallel\\textbf{k} induces transitions between Δ F = +/-2 hyperfine levels of alkali atoms and in the range of ∼0.1{\\text{--}}3 \\text{kG} magnetic field, the intensities of these transitions experience significant enhancement. We have inferred a general rule applicable for the D 2 lines of all alkali atoms, that is the transition intensity enhancement is around four times larger for the case of σ+ than for σ- excitation for Δ F = +2 , whereas it is several hundreds of thousand times larger in the case of σ- than that for σ+ polarization for Δ F = -2 . This asymmetric behaviour results in circular dichroism. For experimental verification we employed half-wavelength-thick atomic vapor nanocells using a derivative of the selective reflection technique, which provides a sub-Doppler spectroscopic linewidth (∼50 \\text{MHz} ). The presented theoretical curves well describe the experimental results. This effect can find applications particularly in parity violation experiments.

  18. Excited-atom production by electron and ion bombardment of alkali halides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walkup, R.E.; Avouris, P.; Ghosh, A.P.

    1987-01-01

    We present experimental results on the production of excited atoms by electron and ion bombardment of alkali halides. For the case of electron bombardment, Doppler shift measurements show that the electronically excited atoms have a thermal velocity distribution in equilibrium with the surface temperature. Measurements of the absolute yield of excited atoms, the distribution of population among the excited states, and the systematic dependence on incident electron current and sample temperature support a model in which the excited atoms are produced by gas-phase collisions between desorbed ground-state atoms and secondary electrons. In contrast, for the case of ion bombardment, the excited atoms are directly sputtered from the surface, with velocity distributions characteristic of a collision cascade, and with typical energies of --10 eV

  19. Realizing analogues of color superconductivity with ultracold alkali atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Hara, K M

    2011-01-01

    A degenerate three-component Fermi gas of atoms with identical attractive interactions is expected to exhibit superfluidity and magnetic order at low temperature and, for sufficiently strong pairwise interactions, become a Fermi liquid of weakly interacting trimers. The phase diagram of this system is analogous to that of quark matter at low temperature, motivating strong interest in its investigation. We describe how a three-component gas below the superfluid critical temperature can be prepared in an optical lattice. To realize an SU(3)-symmetric system, we show how pairwise interactions in the three-component atomic system can be made equal by applying radiofrequency and microwave radiation. Finally, motivated by the aim to make more accurate models of quark matter, which have color, flavor and spin degrees of freedom, we discuss how an atomic system with SU(2)xSU(3) symmetry can be achieved by confining a three-component Fermi gas in the p-orbital band of an optical lattice potential.

  20. Reaction dynamics of electronically excited alkali atoms with simpler molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, P.S.; Mestdagh, J.M.; Schmidt, H.; Vernon, M.F.; Covinsky, M.H.; Balko, B.A.; Lee, Y.T.

    1985-05-01

    The reactions of electronically excited sodium atoms with simple molecules have been studied in crossed molecular beams experiments. Electronically excited Na(3 2 P/sub 3/2/, 4 2 D/sub 5/2/, and 5 2 S/sub 1/2/) were produced by optical pumping using single frequency dye lasers. The effects of the symmetry, and the orientation and alignment of the excited orbital on the chemical reactivity, and detailed information on the reaction dynamics were derived from measurements of the product angular and velocity distributions. 12 refs., 9 figs

  1. A numerical study of spin-dependent organization of alkali-metal atomic clusters using density-functional method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xuan; Ito, Haruhiko; Torikai, Eiko

    2012-01-01

    We calculate the different geometric isomers of spin clusters composed of a small number of alkali-metal atoms using the UB3LYP density-functional method. The electron density distribution of clusters changes according to the value of total spin. Steric structures as well as planar structures arise when the number of atoms increases. The lowest spin state is the most stable and Li n , Na n , K n , Rb n , and Cs n with n = 2–8 can be formed in higher spin states. In the highest spin state, the preparation of clusters depends on the kind and the number of constituent atoms. The interaction energy between alkali-metal atoms and rare-gas atoms is smaller than the binding energy of spin clusters. Consequently, it is possible to self-organize the alkali-metal-atom clusters on a non-wetting substrate coated with rare-gas atoms.

  2. Calculation of parameters of the interaction potential between excited alkali atoms and mercury atoms: The Cs*, Pr*-Hg interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glushkov, A.V.

    1994-01-01

    Based on the method of effective potential involving the new polarization interaction potential calculated from polarization diagrams of the perturbation theory in the Thomas-Fermi approximation, the main parameters of the interatomic potentials (equilibrium distances, potential well depth) are evaluated for a system consisting of an alkali atom in the ground and excited states and of a mercury atom. The results of calculations of quasi-molecular terms for the A-Hg system, where A = Na, Cs, Fr, are reported, some of which are obtained for the first time. A comparison is made with available experimental and theoretical data. 29 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  3. Electron capture in proton collisions with alkali atoms as a three-body problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avakov, G.V.; Blokhintsev, L.D.; Kadyrov, A.S.; Mukhamedzhanov, A.M.

    1992-01-01

    A previous paper proposed an approach to the calculation of electron transfer reactions in ion-atomic collisions based on the Faddeev three-body equations written in the Alt-Grassberger-Sandhas form. In the present work this approach is used to describe the electron capture in proton collisions with alkali atoms. The results of calculation of the total and partial cross sections for charge exchange in proton collisions with Li, Na, K and Rb atoms are presented. The calculated total cross sections are in good agreement with experiment for light target atoms. In going over to heavier targets, the theoretical total cross sections, while agreeing in form, tend to be larger than the experimental ones. The calculated partial cross sections for electron capture into the 2s state of the H atom are also in agreement with experiment. Some other partial cross sections were also calculated. (author)

  4. Fast switching of alkali atom dispensers using laser-induced heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffin, P.F.; Weatherill, K.J.; Adams, C.S.

    2005-01-01

    We show that by using an intense laser source to locally heat an alkali atom dispenser, one can generate a high flux of atoms followed by fast recovery (<100 ms) of the background pressure when the laser is extinguished. For repeated heating pulses a switch-on time for the atomic flux of 200 ms is readily attainable. This technique is suited to ultracold atom experiments using simple ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) chambers. Laser-induced heating provides a fast repetition of the experimental cycle, which, combined with low atom loss due to background gas collisions, is particularly useful for experiments involving far-off resonance optical traps, where sufficient laser power (0.5-4 W) is readily available

  5. Two-photon direct frequency comb spectroscopy of alkali atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palm, Christopher; Pradhananga, Trinity; Nguyen, Khoa; Montcrieffe, Caitlin; Kimball, Derek

    2012-11-01

    We have studied transition frequencies and excited state hyperfine structure in rubidium using 2-photon transitions excited directly with the frequency-doubled output of a erbium fiber optical frequency comb. The frequency comb output is directed in two counterpropagating directions through a vapor cell containing the rubidium vapor. A pair of optical filters is used to select teeth of the comb in order to identify the transition wavelengths. A photomultiplier tube (PMT) measures fluorescence from a decay channel wavelength selected with another optical filter. Using different combinations of filters enables a wide range of transitions to be investigated. By scanning the repetition rate, a Doppler-free spectrum can be obtained enabling kHz-resolution spectral measurements. An interesting dependence of the 2-photon spectrum on the energy of the intermediate state of the 2-photon transition is discussed. Our investigations are laying the groundwork for a long-term research program to use direct frequency comb spectroscopy to understand the complex spectra of rare-earth atoms.

  6. Continuation of Atomic Spectroscopy on Alkali Isotopes at ISOLDE

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Laser optical measurements on Rb, Cs and Fr have already been performed at ISOLDE in 1978-79. The hyperfine structure and isotope shift of |7|6|-|9|8Rb, |1|1|8|-|1|4|5Cs, |2|0|8|-|2|1|3Fr and 14 of their isomers have been studied. Among the wealth of information which has been obtained, the most important are the first observation of an optical transition of the element Fr, the evidence of the onset of nuclear deformation at N~=~60 for Rb isotopes and the shape isomerism isotopes. \\\\ \\\\ From both the atomic and nuclear physics point of view, new studies seem very promising: \\item - the search for new optical transitions in Fr; the shell effect in the rms charge radius at N~=~126 for Fr isotopes \\item - the study of a possible onset of deformation for Cs isotopes beyond |1|4|5Cs \\item - the study of a region of static deformation in neutron-deficient Rb isotopes. \\\\ \\\\ \\end{enumerate} A new apparatus has been built. The principle remains the same as used in our earlier experiments. The improvements concern ess...

  7. First-principles simulations on the new hybrid phases of germanene with alkali metal atoms coverage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Jianmei [Hunan Key Laboratory for Computation and Simulation in Science and Engineering, School of Mathematics and Computational Science, Xiangtan University, Hunan 411105 (China); Tang, Chan; Zhong, Jianxin [Hunan Key Laboratory for Micro-Nano Energy Materials and Devices, School of Physics and Optoelectronic Engineering, Xiangtan University, Hunan 411105 (China); Mao, Yuliang, E-mail: ylmao@xtu.edu.cn [Hunan Key Laboratory for Micro-Nano Energy Materials and Devices, School of Physics and Optoelectronic Engineering, Xiangtan University, Hunan 411105 (China)

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The predicted new phase of complete lithiated germanene is more favorable to form than germanane. • Besides ionic interactions, covalent component in some extent leads the complete lithiated germanene into a semiconductor. • 2D phases of Ge{sub 2}X{sub 1} (X = Li, Na, K) are metallic with weak polarization. • Half-lithiated germanene exhibits local magnetic moments on the Ge atoms neighbored with Li adatoms. - Abstract: We present first-principles calculations of a new type hybrid phases composed by buckled germanene with saturated or half-saturated alkali metal atoms adsorption. Our energetics and electronic structure analysis suggests that adsorbed alkali metal atoms (Li, Na, K) can be used as covered adatoms to synthesize germanene-based new phases in two dimensional. The predicted new phases of Ge{sub 2}X{sub 2} and Ge{sub 2}X{sub 1} (X = Li, Na, K) relative to the single germanene sheet could exist at room temperature. The formation energy of Ge{sub 2}Li{sub 2} configuration obtained from complete lithiation is even more favorable than that of germanane. Charge transfer is significant between the alkali metal atoms and Ge, indicating the ionic interactions between them. Furthermore, our charge density analysis indicates that covalent component in some extent exists in Ge{sub 2}X{sub 2} and Ge{sub 2}X{sub 1} (X = Li, Na, K) 2D phases, which even leads the complete lithiated germanene into a semiconductor with an energy gap of 0.14 eV. We report that 2D phases of Ge{sub 2}X{sub 1} (X = Li, Na, K) are metallic with weak polarization on the Fermi level and in unoccupied states. It is found that half-lithiated germanene exhibits local magnetic moments of 0.48 μ{sub B} on the Ge atoms neighbored with Li adatoms.

  8. Light absorption during alkali atom-noble gas atom interactions at thermal energies: a quantum dynamics treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, Alexander B; Reyes, Andrés; Micha, David A

    2006-10-21

    The absorption of light during atomic collisions is treated by coupling electronic excitations, treated quantum mechanically, to the motion of the nuclei described within a short de Broglie wavelength approximation, using a density matrix approach. The time-dependent electric dipole of the system provides the intensity of light absorption in a treatment valid for transient phenomena, and the Fourier transform of time-dependent intensities gives absorption spectra that are very sensitive to details of the interaction potentials of excited diatomic states. We consider several sets of atomic expansion functions and atomic pseudopotentials, and introduce new parametrizations to provide light absorption spectra in good agreement with experimentally measured and ab initio calculated spectra. To this end, we describe the electronic excitation of the valence electron of excited alkali atoms in collisions with noble gas atoms with a procedure that combines l-dependent atomic pseudopotentials, including two- and three-body polarization terms, and a treatment of the dynamics based on the eikonal approximation of atomic motions and time-dependent molecular orbitals. We present results for the collision induced absorption spectra in the Li-He system at 720 K, which display both atomic and molecular transition intensities.

  9. Properties of solvated electrons, alkali anions and other species in metal solutions and kinetics of cation and electron exchange reactions. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dye, J.L.

    1979-01-01

    The properties of solutions of alkali metals in amine solvents were studied by optical, ETR, NMR and electrochemical methods. Complexation of the alkali cations by crown ethers and cryptands permitted the preparation of concentrated solutions of alkali metals in amine and ether solvents. Extensive alkali metal NMR studies of the exchange of M + with crown-ethers and cryptands and of the alkali metal anion, M - , were made. The first crystalline salt of an alkali metal anion, Na + Cryptand [2.2.2]Na - was synthesized and characterized and led to the preparation of other alkali metal anion salts. This research provided the foundation for continuing studies of crystalline alkalide salts

  10. Ni(salen): a system that forms many solvates with interacting Ni atoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siegler, M.A.M.; Lutz, M.

    2009-01-01

    Recrystallization of [N,N’-Ethylene-bis(salicylideneiminato)]-nickel(II) [Ni(salen)] has been carried out from a large selection of solvents. Crystals can be either solvent free or solvates. This study is based on X-ray crystal structure determinations, which include the redetermination of Ni(salen)

  11. Solvation in atomic liquids: connection between Gaussian field theory and density functional theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Sergiievskyi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available For the problem of molecular solvation, formulated as a liquid submitted to the external potential field created by a molecular solute of arbitrary shape dissolved in that solvent, we draw a connection between the Gaussian field theory derived by David Chandler [Phys. Rev. E, 1993, 48, 2898] and classical density functional theory. We show that Chandler's results concerning the solvation of a hard core of arbitrary shape can be recovered by either minimising a linearised HNC functional using an auxiliary Lagrange multiplier field to impose a vanishing density inside the core, or by minimising this functional directly outside the core — indeed a simpler procedure. Those equivalent approaches are compared to two other variants of DFT, either in the HNC, or partially linearised HNC approximation, for the solvation of a Lennard-Jones solute of increasing size in a Lennard-Jones solvent. Compared to Monte-Carlo simulations, all those theories give acceptable results for the inhomogeneous solvent structure, but are completely out-of-range for the solvation free-energies. This can be fixed in DFT by adding a hard-sphere bridge correction to the HNC functional.

  12. ARC: An open-source library for calculating properties of alkali Rydberg atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šibalić, N.; Pritchard, J. D.; Adams, C. S.; Weatherill, K. J.

    2017-11-01

    We present an object-oriented Python library for the computation of properties of highly-excited Rydberg states of alkali atoms. These include single-body effects such as dipole matrix elements, excited-state lifetimes (radiative and black-body limited) and Stark maps of atoms in external electric fields, as well as two-atom interaction potentials accounting for dipole and quadrupole coupling effects valid at both long and short range for arbitrary placement of the atomic dipoles. The package is cross-referenced to precise measurements of atomic energy levels and features extensive documentation to facilitate rapid upgrade or expansion by users. This library has direct application in the field of quantum information and quantum optics which exploit the strong Rydberg dipolar interactions for two-qubit gates, robust atom-light interfaces and simulating quantum many-body physics, as well as the field of metrology using Rydberg atoms as precise microwave electrometers. Program Files doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.17632/hm5n8w628c.1 Licensing provisions: BSD-3-Clause Programming language: Python 2.7 or 3.5, with C extension External Routines: NumPy [1], SciPy [1], Matplotlib [2] Nature of problem: Calculating atomic properties of alkali atoms including lifetimes, energies, Stark shifts and dipole-dipole interaction strengths using matrix elements evaluated from radial wavefunctions. Solution method: Numerical integration of radial Schrödinger equation to obtain atomic wavefunctions, which are then used to evaluate dipole matrix elements. Properties are calculated using second order perturbation theory or exact diagonalisation of the interaction Hamiltonian, yielding results valid even at large external fields or small interatomic separation. Restrictions: External electric field fixed to be parallel to quantisation axis. Supplementary material: Detailed documentation (.html), and Jupyter notebook with examples and benchmarking runs (.html and .ipynb). [1] T.E. Oliphant

  13. Higher-order Cn dispersion coefficients for the alkali-metal atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitroy, J.; Bromley, M.W.J.

    2005-01-01

    The van der Waals coefficients, from C 11 through to C 16 resulting from second-, third-, and fourth-order perturbation theory are estimated for the alkali-metal (Li, Na, K, and Rb) atoms. The dispersion coefficients are also computed for all possible combinations of the alkali-metal atoms and hydrogen. The parameters are determined from sum rules after diagonalizing a semiempirical fixed core Hamiltonian in a large basis. Comparisons of the radial dependence of the C n /r n potentials give guidance as to the radial regions in which the various higher-order terms can be neglected. It is seen that including terms up to C 10 /r 10 results in a dispersion interaction that is accurate to better than 1% whenever the inter-nuclear spacing is larger than 20a 0 . This level of accuracy is mainly achieved due to the fortuitous cancellation between the repulsive (C 11 ,C 13 ,C 15 ) and attractive (C 12 ,C 14 ,C 16 ) dispersion forces

  14. Internal Spin Control, Squeezing and Decoherence in Ensembles of Alkali Atomic Spins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Leigh Morgan

    Large atomic ensembles interacting with light are one of the most promising platforms for quantum information processing. In the past decade, novel applications for these systems have emerged in quantum communication, quantum computing, and metrology. Essential to all of these applications is the controllability of the atomic ensemble, which is facilitated by a strong coupling between the atoms and light. Non-classical spin squeezed states are a crucial step in attaining greater ensemble control. The degree of entanglement present in these states, furthermore, serves as a benchmark for the strength of the atom-light interaction. Outside the broader context of quantum information processing with atomic ensembles, spin squeezed states have applications in metrology, where their quantum correlations can be harnessed to improve the precision of magnetometers and atomic clocks. This dissertation focuses upon the production of spin squeezed states in large ensembles of cold trapped alkali atoms interacting with optical fields. While most treatments of spin squeezing consider only the case in which the ensemble is composed of two level systems or qubits, we utilize the entire ground manifold of an alkali atom with hyperfine spin f greater than or equal to 1/2, a qudit. Spin squeezing requires non-classical correlations between the constituent atomic spins, which are generated through the atoms' collective coupling to the light. Either through measurement or multiple interactions with the atoms, the light mediates an entangling interaction that produces quantum correlations. Because the spin squeezing treated in this dissertation ultimately originates from the coupling between the light and atoms, conventional approaches of improving this squeezing have focused on increasing the optical density of the ensemble. The greater number of internal degrees of freedom and the controllability of the spin-f ground hyperfine manifold enable novel methods of enhancing squeezing. In

  15. Refined Dummy Atom Model of Mg(2+) by Simple Parameter Screening Strategy with Revised Experimental Solvation Free Energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yang; Zhang, Haiyang; Feng, Wei; Tan, Tianwei

    2015-12-28

    Metal ions play an important role in the catalysis of metalloenzymes. To investigate metalloenzymes via molecular modeling, a set of accurate force field parameters for metal ions is highly imperative. To extend its application range and improve the performance, the dummy atom model of metal ions was refined through a simple parameter screening strategy using the Mg(2+) ion as an example. Using the AMBER ff03 force field with the TIP3P model, the refined model accurately reproduced the experimental geometric and thermodynamic properties of Mg(2+). Compared with point charge models and previous dummy atom models, the refined dummy atom model yields an enhanced performance for producing reliable ATP/GTP-Mg(2+)-protein conformations in three metalloenzyme systems with single or double metal centers. Similar to other unbounded models, the refined model failed to reproduce the Mg-Mg distance and favored a monodentate binding of carboxylate groups, and these drawbacks needed to be considered with care. The outperformance of the refined model is mainly attributed to the use of a revised (more accurate) experimental solvation free energy and a suitable free energy correction protocol. This work provides a parameter screening strategy that can be readily applied to refine the dummy atom models for metal ions.

  16. First-principles study of the alkali earth metal atoms adsorption on graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Minglei [School of Mechanical Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing 211189, Jiangsu (China); Tang, Wencheng, E-mail: 101000185@seu.edu.cn [School of Mechanical Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing 211189, Jiangsu (China); Ren, Qingqiang [State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha 410083, Hunan (China); Wang, Sake [Department of Physics, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096, Jiangsu (China); JinYu [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing 211189, Jiangsu (China); Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Advanced Metallic Materials, Southeast University, Nanjing 211189, Jiangsu (China); Du, Yanhui [School of Mechanical Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing 211189, Jiangsu (China); Zhang, Yajun [Department of Engineering Mechanics, School of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027, Zhejiang (China)

    2015-11-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The adsorption of Be and Mg adatoms on graphene is physisorption. • Ca, Sr, and Ba adatoms bond ionically to graphene and the most stable adsorption site for them is hollow site. • The zero band gap semiconductor graphene becomes metallic and magnetic after the adsorption of Ca, Sr, and Ba adatoms. - Abstract: Geometries, electronic structures, and magnetic properties for alkali earth metal atoms absorbed graphene have been studied by first-principle calculations. For Be and Mg atoms, the interactions between the adatom and graphene are weak van der Waals interactions. In comparison, Ca, Sr and Ba atoms adsorption on graphene exhibits strong ionic bonding with graphene. We found that these atoms bond to graphene at the hollow site with a significant binding energy and large electron transfer. It is intriguing that these adatoms may induce important changes in both the electronic and magnetic properties of graphene. Semimetal graphene becomes metallic and magnetic due to n-type doping. Detailed analysis shows that the s orbitals of these adatoms should be responsible for the arising of the magnetic moment. We believe that our results are suitable for experimental exploration and useful for graphene-based nanoelectronic and data storage.

  17. First-principles study of the alkali earth metal atoms adsorption on graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Minglei; Tang, Wencheng; Ren, Qingqiang; Wang, Sake; JinYu; Du, Yanhui; Zhang, Yajun

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The adsorption of Be and Mg adatoms on graphene is physisorption. • Ca, Sr, and Ba adatoms bond ionically to graphene and the most stable adsorption site for them is hollow site. • The zero band gap semiconductor graphene becomes metallic and magnetic after the adsorption of Ca, Sr, and Ba adatoms. - Abstract: Geometries, electronic structures, and magnetic properties for alkali earth metal atoms absorbed graphene have been studied by first-principle calculations. For Be and Mg atoms, the interactions between the adatom and graphene are weak van der Waals interactions. In comparison, Ca, Sr and Ba atoms adsorption on graphene exhibits strong ionic bonding with graphene. We found that these atoms bond to graphene at the hollow site with a significant binding energy and large electron transfer. It is intriguing that these adatoms may induce important changes in both the electronic and magnetic properties of graphene. Semimetal graphene becomes metallic and magnetic due to n-type doping. Detailed analysis shows that the s orbitals of these adatoms should be responsible for the arising of the magnetic moment. We believe that our results are suitable for experimental exploration and useful for graphene-based nanoelectronic and data storage.

  18. Precision Measurements of Atomic Lifetimes and Hyperfine Energies in Alkali Like Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanner, Carol E.

    2005-01-01

    outside of a closed shell, provide the simplest open shell systems for detailed comparisons between experiment and theory. This program initially focused on measurements of excited state atomic lifetimes in alkali atomic systems. Our first measurements of atomic lifetimes in cesium surpassed the precision and accuracy of previous measurements and sparked renewed interest in the need for greater precision in lifetime measurements throughout the atomic physics community. After enhancing the capabilities of the laser systems built for these initial measurements, we began a study hyperfine energy splittings in cesium using a thermal atomic beam. The results surpassed previous measurements by more than an order of magnitude and lead to the first observation of the nuclear magnetic octupole moment in cesium demonstrating the inadequacy of the nuclear shell model for predicting high order nuclear moments. The laser system and atomic beam apparatus developed for these endeavors turned out to be perfectly suited for exploring the possibility of making absolute optical frequency measurements of atomic transitions. We initiated collaboration with researchers at NIST so that the desired optical frequencies could be reference with respect to the primary microwave frequency standard (Cs atomic fountain NIST-FI) via a femtosecond laser frequency comb. Our first absolute optical frequency measurement, of the cesium D2 line, surpassed the accuracy of a previous measurement by more than an order of magnitude. An absolute optical frequency measurement of the cesium D1 line, now near completion, also surpasses previous results and places us in a position to be able to report a new value for the fine structure constant which is the fundamental dimensionless constant that underlies all electromagnetic interactions

  19. Precision Measurements of Atomic Lifetimes and Hyperfine Energies in Alkali Like Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanner, Carol E.

    2005-03-04

    outside of a closed shell, provide the simplest open shell systems for detailed comparisons between experiment and theory. This program initially focused on measurements of excited state atomic lifetimes in alkali atomic systems. Our first measurements of atomic lifetimes in cesium surpassed the precision and accuracy of previous measurements and sparked renewed interest in the need for greater precision in lifetime measurements throughout the atomic physics community. After enhancing the capabilities of the laser systems built for these initial measurements, we began a study hyperfine energy splittings in cesium using a thermal atomic beam. The results surpassed previous measurements by more than an order of magnitude and lead to the first observation of the nuclear magnetic octupole moment in cesium demonstrating the inadequacy of the nuclear shell model for predicting high order nuclear moments. The laser system and atomic beam apparatus developed for these endeavors turned out to be perfectly suited for exploring the possibility of making absolute optical frequency measurements of atomic transitions. We initiated collaboration with researchers at NIST so that the desired optical frequencies could be reference with respect to the primary microwave frequency standard (Cs atomic fountain NIST-FI) via a femtosecond laser frequency comb. Our first absolute optical frequency measurement, of the cesium D2 line, surpassed the accuracy of a previous measurement by more than an order of magnitude. An absolute optical frequency measurement of the cesium D1 line, now near completion, also surpasses previous results and places us in a position to be able to report a new value for the fine structure constant which is the fundamental dimensionless constant that underlies all electromagnetic interactions.

  20. A numerical study of spin-dependent organization of alkali-metal atomic clusters using density-functional method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Xuan, E-mail: liu.x.ad@m.titech.ac.jp; Ito, Haruhiko [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology (Japan); Torikai, Eiko [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Medicine and Engineering, University of Yamanashi (Japan)

    2012-08-15

    We calculate the different geometric isomers of spin clusters composed of a small number of alkali-metal atoms using the UB3LYP density-functional method. The electron density distribution of clusters changes according to the value of total spin. Steric structures as well as planar structures arise when the number of atoms increases. The lowest spin state is the most stable and Li{sub n}, Na{sub n}, K{sub n}, Rb{sub n}, and Cs{sub n} with n = 2-8 can be formed in higher spin states. In the highest spin state, the preparation of clusters depends on the kind and the number of constituent atoms. The interaction energy between alkali-metal atoms and rare-gas atoms is smaller than the binding energy of spin clusters. Consequently, it is possible to self-organize the alkali-metal-atom clusters on a non-wetting substrate coated with rare-gas atoms.

  1. Dynamic polarizabilities and Van der Waals coefficients for alkali atoms Li, Na and alkali dimer molecules Li2, Na2 and NaLi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mérawa, M.; Dargelos, A.

    1998-07-01

    The present paper gives an account of investigations of the polarizability of the alkali atoms Li, Na, diatomics homonuclear and heteronuclear Li2, Na2 and NaLi at SCF (Self Consistent Field) level of approximation and at correlated level, using a time Time-Dependent Gauge Invariant method (TDGI). Our static polarizability values agree with the best experimental and theoretical determinations. The Van der Waals C6 coefficients for the atom-atom, atom-dimer and dimer-dimer interactions have been evaluated. Les polarisabilités des atomes alcalins Li, Na, et des molécules diatomiques homonucléaires et hétéronucléaire Li2, Na2 et NaLi, ont été calculées au niveau SCF (Self Consistent Field) et au niveau corrélé à partir d'une méthode invariante de jauge dépendante du temps(TDGI). Nos valeurs des polarisabilités statiques sont en accord avec les meilleurs déterminations expérimentales et théoriques. Les coefficients C6 de Van de Waals pour les interactions atome-atome, atome-dimère et dimère-dimère ont également été évalués.

  2. Aging studies on micro-fabricated alkali buffer-gas cells for miniature atomic clocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdullah, S.; Affolderbach, C.; Gruet, F.; Mileti, G.

    2015-01-01

    We report an aging study on micro-fabricated alkali vapor cells using neon as a buffer gas. An experimental atomic clock setup is used to measure the cell's intrinsic frequency, by recording the clock frequency shift at different light intensities and extrapolating to zero intensity. We find a drift of the cell's intrinsic frequency of (−5.2 ± 0.6) × 10 −11 /day and quantify deterministic variations in sources of clock frequency shifts due to the major physical effects to identify the most probable cause of the drift. The measured drift is one order of magnitude stronger than the total frequency variations expected from clock parameter variations and corresponds to a slow reduction of buffer gas pressure inside the cell, which is compatible with the hypothesis of loss of Ne gas from the cell due to its permeation through the cell windows. A negative drift on the intrinsic cell frequency is reproducible for another cell of the same type. Based on the Ne permeation model and the measured cell frequency drift, we determine the permeation constant of Ne through borosilicate glass as (5.7 ± 0.7) × 10 −22 m 2 s −1  Pa −1 at 81 °C. We propose this method based on frequency metrology in an alkali vapor cell atomic clock setup based on coherent population trapping for measuring permeation constants of inert gases

  3. Dissipation and oscillatory solvation forces in confined liquids studied by small amplitude atomic force spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Beer, Sissi; van den Ende, Henricus T.M.; Mugele, Friedrich

    2010-01-01

    We determine conservative and dissipative tip–sample interaction forces from the amplitude and phase response of acoustically driven atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers using a non-polar model fluid (octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane, which displays strong molecular layering) and atomically flat

  4. Research Investigation Directed Toward Extending the Useful Range of the Electromagnetic Spectrum. [atomic spectra and electronic structure of alkali metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, S. R.; Happer, W.

    1974-01-01

    The report discusses completed and proposed research in atomic and molecular physics conducted at the Columbia Radiation Laboratory from July 1972 to June 1973. Central topics described include the atomic spectra and electronic structure of alkali metals and helium, molecular microwave spectroscopy, the resonance physics of photon echoes in some solid state systems (including Raman echoes, superradiance, and two photon absorption), and liquid helium superfluidity.

  5. Finite-field evaluation of the Lennard-Jones atom-wall interaction constant C3 for alkali-metal atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, W.R.; Dzuba, V.A.; Safronova, U.I.; Safronova, M.S.

    2004-01-01

    A finite-field scaling method is applied to evaluate the Lennard-Jones interaction constant C 3 for alkali-metal atoms. The calculations are based on the relativistic single-double approximation in which single and double excitations of Dirac-Hartree-Fock wave functions are included to all orders in perturbation theory

  6. Ballistic Evaporation and Solvation of Helium Atoms at the Surfaces of Protic and Hydrocarbon Liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Alexis M; Lancaster, Diane K; Faust, Jennifer A; Hahn, Christine; Reznickova, Anna; Nathanson, Gilbert M

    2014-11-06

    Atomic and molecular solutes evaporate and dissolve by traversing an atomically thin boundary separating liquid and gas. Most solutes spend only short times in this interfacial region, making them difficult to observe. Experiments that monitor the velocities of evaporating species, however, can capture their final interactions with surface solvent molecules. We find that polarizable gases such as N2 and Ar evaporate from protic and hydrocarbon liquids with Maxwell-Boltzmann speed distributions. Surprisingly, the weakly interacting helium atom emerges from these liquids at high kinetic energies, exceeding the expected energy of evaporation from salty water by 70%. This super-Maxwellian evaporation implies in reverse that He atoms preferentially dissolve when they strike the surface at high energies, as if ballistically penetrating into the solvent. The evaporation energies increase with solvent surface tension, suggesting that He atoms require extra kinetic energy to navigate increasingly tortuous paths between surface molecules.

  7. The effects of correlation, relativity, quantum electrodynamics, nuclear size and parity non-conservation in alkali atoms and alkali-like ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiwary, S.N.

    1995-01-01

    The present review briefly presents the growing experimental as well as theoretical interests in recent years in the effects of (1) correlation, (2) relativity, (3) quantum electrodynamic (QED), (4) finite nuclear size (FNS) and (5) parity non-conservation (PNC) on the high precision electronic structure of alkali atoms and alkali-like ions. Many high precision experiments have been performed which need very high accurate theoretical prediction for correct interpretation and identification of different physical effects involved. Some experiments separate these effects and some do not. Several sophisticated theoretical techniques have been developed for corrections of these effects which play an extremely important role in order to obtain results of high accuracy to well below 1% level and to understand experimental observations of high precision. Correlation, relativity and finite nuclear size effects have been treated on an equal footing in some theoretical methods but QED and PNC have been calculated separately. At present, there is no theory which accounts all five effects in a coherent and unified manner. Future challenges and directions, in reliable structure calculations in atoms and ions, have been discussed and suggested. (author). 83 refs, 3 figs, 9 tabs

  8. Alkali-resistant low-temperature atomic-layer-deposited oxides for optical fiber sensor overlays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosiel, K.; Dominik, M.; Ściślewska, I.; Kalisz, M.; Guziewicz, M.; Gołaszewska, K.; Niedziółka-Jonsson, J.; Bock, W. J.; Śmietana, M.

    2018-04-01

    This paper presents an investigation of properties of selected metallic oxides deposited at a low temperature (100 °C) by atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique, relating to their applicability as thin overlays for optical fiber sensors resistant in alkaline environments. Hafnium oxide (Hf x O y with y/x approx. 2.70), tantalum oxide (Ta x O y with y/x approx. 2.75) and zirconium oxide (Zr x O y with y/x approx. 2.07), which deposition was based, respectively, on tetrakis(ethylmethyl)hafnium, tantalum pentachloride and tetrakis(ethylmethyl)zirconium with deionized water, were tested as thin layers on planar Si (100) and glass substrates. Growth per cycle (GPC) in the ALD processes was 0.133-0.150 nm/cycle. Run-to-run GPC reproducibility of the ALD processes was best for Hf x O y (0.145 ± 0.001 nm/cycle) and the poorest for Ta x O y (0.133 ± 0.003 nm/cycle). Refractive indices n of the layers were 2.00-2.10 (at the wavelength λ = 632 nm), with negligible k value (at λ for 240-930 nm). The oxides examined by x-ray diffractometry proved to be amorphous, with only small addition of crystalline phases for the Zr x O y . The surfaces of the oxides had grainy but smooth topographies with root-mean square roughness ˜0.5 nm (at 10 × 10 μm2 area) according to atomic force microscopy. Ellipsometric measurements, by contrast, suggest rougher surfaces for the Zr x O y layers. The surfaces were also slightly rougher on the glass-based samples than on the Si-based ones. Nanohardness and Young modules were 4.90-8.64 GPa and 83.7-104.4 GPa, respectively. The tests of scratch resistance revealed better tribological properties for the Hf x O y and the Ta x O y than for the Zr x O y . The surfaces were hydrophilic, with wetting angles of 52.5°-62.9°. The planar oxides on Si, being resistive even to concentrated alkali (pH 14), proved to be significantly more alkali-resistive than Al2O3. The Ta x O y overlay was deposited on long-period grating sensor induced in optical

  9. Density functional theory calculations on alkali and the alkaline Ca atoms adsorbed on graphene monolayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimakis, Nicholas; Valdez, Danielle; Flor, Fernando Antonio; Salgado, Andres; Adjibi, Kolade; Vargas, Sarah; Saenz, Justin

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Li, K, Na, and Ca graphene interaction is primarily ionic, whereas small covalent interactions also co-exist in these cases. • Van der Waals interactions are revealed by comparing adatom-graphene geometries between 1.4% and 3% adatom coverages and using Grimme corrections. • The Li, K, Na graphene interactions are accurately described by both PBE0 and PBE functionals. For Ca/graphene, the PBE0 functional should not be used. • For Li, K, and Na adsorbed on graphene, adatom-graphene interaction weakens as the adatom coverages increases. • The Ca-graphene interaction strength, which is stronger at high coverages, is opposite to increases in the Ca–4s orbital population. - Abstract: The adsorption of the alkali Li, K, and Na and the alkaline Ca on graphene is studied using periodic density functional theory (DFT) under various adatom coverages. The charge transfers between the adatom and the graphene sheet and the almost unchanged densities-of-states spectra in the energy region near and below the Fermi level support an ionic bond pattern between the adatom and the graphene atoms. However, the presence of small orbital overlap between the metal and the nearest graphene atom is indicative of small covalent bonding. Van der Waals interactions are examined through a semiempirical correction in the DFT functional and by comparing adatom-graphene calculations between 3% and 1.4% adatom coverages. Optimized adatom-graphene geometries identify the preferred adatom sites, whereas the adatom-graphene strength is correlated with the adsorption energy and the adatom distance from the graphene plane. Calculated electronic properties and structural parameters are obtained using hybrid functionals and a generalized gradient approximation functional paired with basis sets of various sizes. We found that due to long range electrostatic forces between the alkali/alkaline adatoms and the graphene monolayer, the adatom-graphene structural and electronic

  10. Density functional theory calculations on alkali and the alkaline Ca atoms adsorbed on graphene monolayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dimakis, Nicholas, E-mail: nicholas.dimakis@utrgv.edu [Department of Physics, University of Texas Rio Grande Valley, Edinburg, TX (United States); Valdez, Danielle; Flor, Fernando Antonio; Salgado, Andres; Adjibi, Kolade [Department of Physics, University of Texas Rio Grande Valley, Edinburg, TX (United States); Vargas, Sarah; Saenz, Justin [Robert Vela High School, Edinburg, TX (United States)

    2017-08-15

    Highlights: • Li, K, Na, and Ca graphene interaction is primarily ionic, whereas small covalent interactions also co-exist in these cases. • Van der Waals interactions are revealed by comparing adatom-graphene geometries between 1.4% and 3% adatom coverages and using Grimme corrections. • The Li, K, Na graphene interactions are accurately described by both PBE0 and PBE functionals. For Ca/graphene, the PBE0 functional should not be used. • For Li, K, and Na adsorbed on graphene, adatom-graphene interaction weakens as the adatom coverages increases. • The Ca-graphene interaction strength, which is stronger at high coverages, is opposite to increases in the Ca–4s orbital population. - Abstract: The adsorption of the alkali Li, K, and Na and the alkaline Ca on graphene is studied using periodic density functional theory (DFT) under various adatom coverages. The charge transfers between the adatom and the graphene sheet and the almost unchanged densities-of-states spectra in the energy region near and below the Fermi level support an ionic bond pattern between the adatom and the graphene atoms. However, the presence of small orbital overlap between the metal and the nearest graphene atom is indicative of small covalent bonding. Van der Waals interactions are examined through a semiempirical correction in the DFT functional and by comparing adatom-graphene calculations between 3% and 1.4% adatom coverages. Optimized adatom-graphene geometries identify the preferred adatom sites, whereas the adatom-graphene strength is correlated with the adsorption energy and the adatom distance from the graphene plane. Calculated electronic properties and structural parameters are obtained using hybrid functionals and a generalized gradient approximation functional paired with basis sets of various sizes. We found that due to long range electrostatic forces between the alkali/alkaline adatoms and the graphene monolayer, the adatom-graphene structural and electronic

  11. Ground state of the polar alkali-metal-atom-strontium molecules: Potential energy curve and permanent dipole moment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerout, R.; Aymar, M.; Dulieu, O.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we investigate the structure of the polar alkali-metal-atom-strontium diatomic molecules as possible candidates for the realization of samples of ultracold polar molecular species not yet investigated experimentally. Using a quantum chemistry approach based on effective core potentials and core polarization potentials, we model these systems as effective three-valence-electron systems, allowing for calculation of electronic properties with full configuration interaction. The potential curve and the permanent dipole moment of the 2 Σ + ground state are determined as functions of the internuclear distance for LiSr, NaSr, KSr, RbSr, and CsSr molecules. These molecules are found to exhibit a significant permanent dipole moment, though smaller than those of the alkali-metal-atom-Rb molecules.

  12. Determination of Arsenic in Soil Alkali by Graphite Furnace Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometery Using Modified Corn Silk Fiber as Adsorbent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, X.; Ju, S.; Liu, M.; Zhao, Y.

    2015-01-01

    A safe, rapid, simple and environmentally friendly method based modified corn silk fiber (MC), chemical modified with succinic anhydride (C/sub 4/H/sub 4/O/sub 3/), was developed for the extraction and preconcentration of As(III) in food additives soil alkali sample prior to graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) analysis. The structure and properties of VC (unmodified corn silk fiber) and MC were analyzed and discussed by means of FTIR, SEM and TG, and the effect of adsorbent amount, pH, soil alkali solution concentration, adsorption time and adsorption temperature were carefully optimized. Under the optimum conditions, the relative standard deviations (RSD, n=6) were 1.27-3.05%, the calibration graph was linear in the range of 0-100 meu g/ L and the limits of detection (LOD) was 0.13 meu g/L. The surface of MC became loose and porous which increased the adsorption area. Comparing with VC, carboxy groups were measured in MC and the increase of negative electron group in fiber molecular made its coordination combining ability with As(III) enhanced; In comparison with the removal arsenic rate of VC, MC's significantly increased by 2.86 fold. The recovery rate of soil alkali, treated by VC and MC, reached to 96.85% and 94.32%, and it did not affected the function of soil alkali. (author)

  13. Investigation of the atom-atom and structural relaxation in liquid alkali metals by means of the memory function formalism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blagoveshchenskii, N. M.; Novikov, A. G.; Savostin, V. V.

    2011-01-01

    An attempt is made to systematize the data on the relaxation characteristics of liquid alkali metals (Li, Na, and K), which were investigated based on neutron-scattering data with the application of the two-time memory function formalism.

  14. Ultrafast electron dynamics at alkali/ice structures adsorbed on a metal surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, Michael

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this work is to study the interaction between excess electrons in water ice structures adsorbed on metal surfaces and other charged or neutral species, like alkali ions, or chemically reactive molecules, like chlorofluorocarbons (CFC), respectively. The excess electrons in the ice can interact with the ions directly or indirectly via the hydrogen bonded water molecules. In both cases the presence of the alkali influences the population, localization, and lifetime of electronic states of excess electrons in the ice adlayer. These properties are of great relevance when considering the highly reactive character of the excess electrons, which can mediate chemical reactions by dissociative electron attachment (DEA). The influence of alkali adsorption on electron solvation and transfer dynamics in ice structures is investigated for two types of adsorption configurations using femtosecond time-resolved two-photon photoelectron spectroscopy. In the first system alkali atoms are coadsorbed on top of a wetting amorphous ice film adsorbed on Cu(111). At temperatures between 60 and 100 K alkali adsorption leads to the formation of positively charged alkali ions at the ice/vacuum interface. The interaction between the alkali ions at the surface and the dipole moments of the surrounding water molecules results in a reorientation of the water molecules. As a consequence new electron trapping sites, i.e. at local potential minima, are formed. Photoinjection of excess electrons into these alkali-ion covered amorphous ice layers, results in the trapping of a solvated electron at an alkali-ion/water complex. In contrast to solvation in pure amorphous ice films, where the electrons are located in the bulk of the ice layer, solvated electrons at alkali-ion/water complexes are located at the ice/vacuum interface. They exhibit lifetimes of several picoseconds and show a fast energetic stabilization. With ongoing solvation, i.e. pump-probe time delay, the electron transfer is

  15. Alkali metal ion battery with bimetallic electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boysen, Dane A; Bradwell, David J; Jiang, Kai; Kim, Hojong; Ortiz, Luis A; Sadoway, Donald R; Tomaszowska, Alina A; Wei, Weifeng; Wang, Kangli

    2015-04-07

    Electrochemical cells having molten electrodes having an alkali metal provide receipt and delivery of power by transporting atoms of the alkali metal between electrode environments of disparate chemical potentials through an electrochemical pathway comprising a salt of the alkali metal. The chemical potential of the alkali metal is decreased when combined with one or more non-alkali metals, thus producing a voltage between an electrode comprising the molten the alkali metal and the electrode comprising the combined alkali/non-alkali metals.

  16. Semiempirical calculation of van der Waals coefficients for alkali-metal and alkaline-earth-metal atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitroy, J.; Bromley, M.W.J.

    2003-01-01

    The van der Waals coefficients, C 6 , C 8 , and C 10 for the alkali-metal (Li, Na, K, and Rb) and alkaline-earth-metal (Be, Mg, Ca, and Sr) atoms are estimated by a combination of ab initio and semiempirical methods. Polarizabilities and atom-wall coefficients are given as a diagnostic check, and the lowest order nonadiabatic dispersion coefficient, D 8 and the three-body coefficient, C 9 are also presented. The dispersion coefficients are in agreement with the available relativistic many-body perturbation theory calculations. The contribution from the core was included by using constrained sum rules involving the core polarizability and Hartree-Fock expectation values to estimate the f-value distribution

  17. Measuring the spin polarization of alkali-metal atoms using nuclear magnetic resonance frequency shifts of noble gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. H. Liu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available We report a novel method of measuring the spin polarization of alkali-metal atoms by detecting the NMR frequency shifts of noble gases. We calculated the profile of 87Rb D1 line absorption cross sections. We then measured the absorption profile of the sample cell, from which we calculated the 87Rb number densities at different temperatures. Then we measured the frequency shifts resulted from the spin polarization of the 87Rb atoms and calculated its polarization degrees at different temperatures. The behavior of frequency shifts versus temperature in experiment was consistent with theoretical calculation, which may be used as compensative signal for the NMRG closed-loop control system.

  18. Efficient molecular mechanics simulations of the folding, orientation, and assembly of peptides in lipid bilayers using an implicit atomic solvation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordner, Andrew J.; Zorman, Barry; Abagyan, Ruben

    2011-10-01

    Membrane proteins comprise a significant fraction of the proteomes of sequenced organisms and are the targets of approximately half of marketed drugs. However, in spite of their prevalence and biomedical importance, relatively few experimental structures are available due to technical challenges. Computational simulations can potentially address this deficit by providing structural models of membrane proteins. Solvation within the spatially heterogeneous membrane/solvent environment provides a major component of the energetics driving protein folding and association within the membrane. We have developed an implicit solvation model for membranes that is both computationally efficient and accurate enough to enable molecular mechanics predictions for the folding and association of peptides within the membrane. We derived the new atomic solvation model parameters using an unbiased fitting procedure to experimental data and have applied it to diverse problems in order to test its accuracy and to gain insight into membrane protein folding. First, we predicted the positions and orientations of peptides and complexes within the lipid bilayer and compared the simulation results with solid-state NMR structures. Additionally, we performed folding simulations for a series of host-guest peptides with varying propensities to form alpha helices in a hydrophobic environment and compared the structures with experimental measurements. We were also able to successfully predict the structures of amphipathic peptides as well as the structures for dimeric complexes of short hexapeptides that have experimentally characterized propensities to form beta sheets within the membrane. Finally, we compared calculated relative transfer energies with data from experiments measuring the effects of mutations on the free energies of translocon-mediated insertion of proteins into lipid bilayers and of combined folding and membrane insertion of a beta barrel protein.

  19. Microscopic solvation of a lithium atom in water-ammonia mixed clusters: solvent coordination and electron localization in presence of a counterion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratihar, Subha; Chandra, Amalendu

    2008-07-14

    The microsolvation structures and energetics of water-ammonia mixed clusters containing a lithium atom, i.e., Li(H(2)O)(n)(NH(3)), n = 1-5, are investigated by means of ab initio theoretical calculations. Several structural aspects such as the solvent coordination to the metal ion and binding motifs of the free valence electron of the metal are investigated. We also study the energetics aspects such as the dependence of vertical ionization energies on the cluster size, and all these structural and energetics aspects are compared to the corresponding results of previously studied anionic water-ammonia clusters without a metal ion. It is found that the Li-O and Li-N interactions play a very important role in stabilizing the lithium-water-ammonia clusters, and the presence of these metal ion-solvent interactions also affect the characteristics of electron solvation in these clusters. This is seen from the spatial distribution of the singly occupied molecular orbital (SOMO) which holds the ejected valence electron of the Li atom. For very small clusters, SOMO electron density is found to exist mainly at the vicinity of the Li atom, whereas for larger clusters, it is distributed outside the first solvation shell. The free dangling hydrogens of water and ammonia molecules are involved in capturing the SOMO electron density. In some of the conformers, OH{e}HO and OH{e}HN types of interactions are found to be present. The presence of the metal ion at the center of the cluster ensures that the ejected electron is solvated at a surface state only, whereas both surface and interiorlike states were found for the free electron in the corresponding anionic clusters without a metal ion. The vertical ionization energies of the present clusters are found to be higher than the vertical detachment energies of the corresponding anionic clusters which signify a relatively stronger binding of the free electron in the presence of the positive metal counterion. The shifts in different

  20. Dispersion coefficients for H and He interactions with alkali-metal and alkaline-earth-metal atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitroy, J.; Bromley, M.W.J.

    2003-01-01

    The van der Waals coefficients C 6 , C 8 , and C 10 for H and He interactions with the alkali-metal (Li, Na, K, and Rb) and alkaline-earth-metal (Be, Mg, Ca, and Sr) atoms are determined from oscillator strength sum rules. The oscillator strengths were computed using a combination of ab initio and semiempirical methods. The dispersion parameters generally agree with close to exact variational calculations for Li-H and Li-He at the 0.1% level of accuracy. For larger systems, there is agreement with relativistic many-body perturbation theory estimates of C 6 at the 1% level. These validations for selected systems attest to the reliability of the present dispersion parameters. About half the present parameters lie within the recommended bounds of the Standard and Certain compilation [J. Chem. Phys. 83, 3002 (1985)

  1. Solvation thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Ben-Naim, Arieh

    1987-01-01

    This book deals with a subject that has been studied since the beginning of physical chemistry. Despite the thousands of articles and scores of books devoted to solvation thermodynamics, I feel that some fundamen­ tal and well-established concepts underlying the traditional approach to this subject are not satisfactory and need revision. The main reason for this need is that solvation thermodynamics has traditionally been treated in the context of classical (macroscopic) ther­ modynamics alone. However, solvation is inherently a molecular pro­ cess, dependent upon local rather than macroscopic properties of the system. Therefore, the starting point should be based on statistical mechanical methods. For many years it has been believed that certain thermodynamic quantities, such as the standard free energy (or enthalpy or entropy) of solution, may be used as measures of the corresponding functions of solvation of a given solute in a given solvent. I first challenged this notion in a paper published in 1978 b...

  2. First-principles dynamics treatment of light emission in collisions between alkali-metal atom and noble-gas atom collisions at 10keV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, Alexander B.; Reyes, Andrés; Micha, David A.

    2006-12-01

    Collision-induced light emission during the interaction of an alkali-metal atom and a noble-gas atom is treated within a first-principles, or direct, dynamics approach that calculates a time-dependent electric dipole for the whole system, and spectral emission cross sections from its Fourier transform. These cross sections are very sensitive to excited diatomic potentials and a source of information on their shape. The coupling between electronic transitions and nuclear motions is treated with atomic pseudopotentials and an electronic density matrix coupled to trajectories for the nuclei. A recently implemented pseudopotential parametrization scheme is used here for the ground and excited states of the LiHe system, and to calculate state-to-state dipole moments. To verify the accuracy of our new parameters, we recalculate the integral cross sections for the LiHe system in the keV energy regime and obtain agreement with other results from theory and experiment. We further present results for the emission spectrum from 10keV Li(2s)+He collisions, and compare them to experimental values available in the region of light emitted at 300-900nm .

  3. Studies of base pair sequence effects on DNA solvation based on all-atom molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Surjit B; Mezei, Mihaly; Beveridge, David L

    2012-07-01

    Detailed analyses of the sequence-dependent solvation and ion atmosphere of DNA are presented based on molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on all the 136 unique tetranucleotide steps obtained by the ABC consortium using the AMBER suite of programs. Significant sequence effects on solvation and ion localization were observed in these simulations. The results were compared to essentially all known experimental data on the subject. Proximity analysis was employed to highlight the sequence dependent differences in solvation and ion localization properties in the grooves of DNA. Comparison of the MD-calculated DNA structure with canonical A- and B-forms supports the idea that the G/C-rich sequences are closer to canonical A- than B-form structures, while the reverse is true for the poly A sequences, with the exception of the alternating ATAT sequence. Analysis of hydration density maps reveals that the flexibility of solute molecule has a significant effect on the nature of observed hydration. Energetic analysis of solute-solvent interactions based on proximity analysis of solvent reveals that the GC or CG base pairs interact more strongly with water molecules in the minor groove of DNA that the AT or TA base pairs, while the interactions of the AT or TA pairs in the major groove are stronger than those of the GC or CG pairs. Computation of solvent-accessible surface area of the nucleotide units in the simulated trajectories reveals that the similarity with results derived from analysis of a database of crystallographic structures is excellent. The MD trajectories tend to follow Manning's counterion condensation theory, presenting a region of condensed counterions within a radius of about 17 A from the DNA surface independent of sequence. The GC and CG pairs tend to associate with cations in the major groove of the DNA structure to a greater extent than the AT and TA pairs. Cation association is more frequent in the minor groove of AT than the GC pairs. In general, the

  4. Hydrogen storage property of alkali and alkaline-earth metal atoms decorated C24 fullerene: A DFT study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yafei; Cheng, Xinlu

    2018-04-01

    The hydrogen storage behavior of alkali and alkaline-earth metal (AM = Li, Na, K, Mg, Ca) atoms decorated C24 fullerene was investigated by using density functional theory (DFT) study. Our results indicate that the AM atoms prefer to adsorb atop the center of tetragon of C24 fullerene with the largest binding energy than other possible adsorption sites. Moreover, the hydrogen storage gravimetric density of 24H2/6Li/C24, 24H2/6Na/C24 and 36H2/6Ca/C24 configurations reaches up to 12.7 wt%, 10.1 wt% and 12 wt%, higher than the year 2020 target from the US department of energy (DOE). Also, the average adsorption energies of H2 molecules of the 24H2/6Li/C24, 24H2/6Na/C24 and 36H2/6Ca/C24 configurations are -0.198 eV/H2, -0.164 eV/H2 and -0.138 eV/H2, locate the desirable range under the physical adsorption at near ambient conditions. These findings will have important implications on designing new hydrogen storage materials in the future.

  5. Interfacing transitions of different alkali atoms and telecom bands using one narrowband photon pair source

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schunk, Gerhard; Vogl, Ulrich; Strekalov, Dmitry V.

    2015-01-01

    Quantum information technology strongly relies on the coupling of optical photons with narrowband quantum systems, such as quantum dots, color centers, and atomic systems. This coupling requires matching the optical wavelength and bandwidth to the desired system, which presents a considerable pro...

  6. Defect formation and desorption of metal atoms from alkali halide crystals under low energy electron bombardment studied by optical absorption and mass spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seifert, N.R.

    1993-04-01

    This work presents an extensive investigation of electronically induced desorption of ground-state alkali atoms from alkali halides and for the first time correlates directly the desorption with the stability and spatial distribution of the defects formed during bombardment. The electron impact results in the formation of stable F-centers and F-center clusters in the bulk of the crystals. In striking contrast a significant metallization of the surface is observed. Even at temperatures as low as 90 deg C the metallization is achieved within the time resolution of our detection system, which can only be explained by the rapid diffusion of hot holes. Superimposed to the fast and short diffusion of hot holes is the slow F-center diffusion. Measuring the distribution of defects with low energy ion sputtering techniques indicates that at least in the case of LiF the observed diffusion constant of F-centers agrees with values derived by using methods different from that applied here. At low temperatures the formation of F-center clusters and metal on the surface dominates. Colloid formation clearly requires higher temperatures (typically around 200 deg C). This is a strong evidence that efficient F-center diffusion is necessary for the formation of metallic particles (colloids) in the bulk of the crystals. Desorption of alkali atoms from alkali halides at temperatures around room temperature is due to weakly bound alkali atoms. For elevated temperatures the stability of the metallic clusters in the bulk of the crystals (i.e. colloids) are the rate limiting process. (author)

  7. Emission Channeling Studies on the Behaviour of Light Alkali Atoms in Wide-Band-Gap Semiconductors

    CERN Multimedia

    Recknagel, E; Quintel, H

    2002-01-01

    % IS342 \\\\ \\\\ A major problem in the development of electronic devices based on diamond and wide-band-gap II-VI compound semiconductors, like ZnSe, is the extreme difficulty of either n- or p-type doping. The only reports of successful n-type doping of diamond involves ion implanted Li, which was found to be an intersititial donor. Recent theoretical calculations suggest that Na, P and N dopant atoms are also good candidates for n-type doping of diamond. No experimental evidence has been obtained up to now, mainly because of the complex and partly unresolved defect situation created during ion implantation, which is necessary to incorporate potential donor atoms into diamond. \\\\ \\\\In the case of ZnSe, considerable effort has been invested in trying to fabricate pn-junctions in order to make efficient, blue-light emitting diodes. However, it has proved to be very difficult to obtain p-type ZnSe, mainly because of electrical compensation related to background donor impurities. Li and Na are believed to be ampho...

  8. An experimental study of charge exchange process in the energy range 1-30 keV during the passage of alkali metal ions and atoms through cesium and potassium vapour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wittchow, F.

    1979-01-01

    An experimental study is presented of the charge exchange processes in the energy range of about 1-30 keV during the passage of positive alkali ions and alkali atoms through potassium and cesium vapour. The experimental set-up designed for this experiment includes a thermionic source for positive alkali ions with an acceleration stage, a first charge exchange cell to produce fast alkali atoms, a second charge exchange cell with a surface ionisation detector to determine the alkali metal vapor target thickness and a detection system with electrostatic bending of the charged secondary species. The maximum negative ion yield has been determined for the collision systems Li + + K, Na + + K, K + + K, and Rb + + K, and for another eleven systems the charge transfer cross-sections have been measured too. (orig./GG) [de

  9. The structures of endohedral complexes between C60 and alkali or halogen atoms, and the interactions between them - a theoretical approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Jimin; Xu Zhijin

    1994-01-01

    In this paper, some properties of endohedral complexes formed between C 60 and alkali or halogen atoms, (Alk rateat C 60 ) (Alk = Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs) and (Hal rateat C 60 ) (Hal = F, Cl, Br, I), which include electronic structures, stabilities, potential energies at different positions of the endohedral atoms, cage radius changes and charge distributions, have been computed by the quantum-chemical EHMO/ASED method. The computational results show that the potential energies of the systems have minima when the endohedral atoms are put at the center of the C 60 cage for K, Rb, Cs and F, Cl, Br, I, but the minimum points of the potential energies are at r ∝ 1.6 A for Li and at r ∝ 1.3 A for Na deviated from the cage center. The curves of potential energies along five different directions vary only a little, that is, the potential field is basically sphero-symmetrical in the C 60 cage. It has been pointed out that the endohedral complex systems of C 60 with alkalis and halogens, (Alk rateat aC 60 ) and (Hal rateat C 60 ), can be separated into two subsystems quite well, in which the interaction between the endohedral atom and the C's of the C 60 cage can be described with the (exp-6-1) potential function. (orig.)

  10. Influence of the dynamic Stark effect on long-term frequency stability of a self-oscillating magnetometer with laser-pumped alkali atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranov, A. A.; Ermak, S. V.; Kulachenkov, N. K.; Petrenko, M. V.; Sagitov, E. A.; Semenov, V. V.

    2017-11-01

    This paper presents the results of investigation Stark shift effect influence on the long-term stability of a dual scheme of quantum magnetometers. Such scheme allows suppressing Stark shift components when a certain pumping light polarization is applied. As a result, long-term stability of a quantum sensor increases. However, when low-frequency (LF) and microwave fields are attached to a single vapor cell a coherence circulation in hyperfine structure of alkali atoms takes place. Physical origin of this effect is associated with the so called “dressed” atom theory, when atom is “dressed” by LF field. It yields in multiphoton absorption and resonance frequency shift. First estimates for this shift based on density matrix evolution formalism are provided in the paper.

  11. Adsorption of alkali, alkaline-earth, simple and 3d transition metal, and nonmetal atoms on monolayer MoS2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. D. Li

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Single adsorption of different atoms on pristine two-dimensional monolayer MoS2 have been systematically investigated by using density functional calculations with van der Waals correction. The adatoms cover alkali metals, alkaline earth metals, main group metal, 3d-transition metals, coinage metal and nonmetal atoms. Depending on the adatom type, metallic, semimetallic or semiconducting behavior can be found in direct bandgap monolayer MoS2. Additionally, local or long-range magnetic moments of two-dimensional MoS2 sheet can also attained through the adsorption. The detailed atomic-scale knowledge of single adsorption on MoS2 monolayer is important not only for the sake of a theoretical understanding, but also device level deposition technological application.

  12. Adsorption of alkali, alkaline-earth, simple and 3d transition metal, and nonmetal atoms on monolayer MoS{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, X. D.; Fang, Y. M.; Wu, S. Q., E-mail: zzhu@xmu.edu.cn, E-mail: wsq@xmu.edu.cn [Department of Physics and Institute of Theoretical Physics and Astrophysics, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Zhu, Z. Z., E-mail: zzhu@xmu.edu.cn, E-mail: wsq@xmu.edu.cn [Department of Physics and Institute of Theoretical Physics and Astrophysics, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Fujian Provincial Key Laboratory of Theoretical and Computational Chemistry, Xiamen 361005 (China)

    2015-05-15

    Single adsorption of different atoms on pristine two-dimensional monolayer MoS{sub 2} have been systematically investigated by using density functional calculations with van der Waals correction. The adatoms cover alkali metals, alkaline earth metals, main group metal, 3d-transition metals, coinage metal and nonmetal atoms. Depending on the adatom type, metallic, semimetallic or semiconducting behavior can be found in direct bandgap monolayer MoS{sub 2}. Additionally, local or long-range magnetic moments of two-dimensional MoS{sub 2} sheet can also attained through the adsorption. The detailed atomic-scale knowledge of single adsorption on MoS{sub 2} monolayer is important not only for the sake of a theoretical understanding, but also device level deposition technological application.

  13. Thermodynamic functions of ion solvation in normal alcohols of aliphatic series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sergeeva, I.A.

    1978-01-01

    Thermodynamic functions of ion solvation of alkali, alkaline earth metals and halogenides in 9 alcohols are calculated using the earlier suggested method. It is shown that summary values are in good accord with experimental ones, the deviations do not surpass 0-5%, solvation energies of one and the same electrolyte in the series of n-alcohols do not change, enthalpy and entropy of solvation increase from lower alcohols to higher ones

  14. Ab Initio Study of Chemical Reactions of Cold SrF and CaF Molecules with Alkali-Metal and Alkaline-Earth-Metal Atoms: The Implications for Sympathetic Cooling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosicki, Maciej Bartosz; Kędziera, Dariusz; Żuchowski, Piotr Szymon

    2017-06-01

    We investigate the energetics of the atom exchange reaction in the SrF + alkali-metal atom and CaF + alkali-metal atom systems. Such reactions are possible only for collisions of SrF and CaF with the lithium atoms, while they are energetically forbidden for other alkali-metal atoms. Specifically, we focus on SrF interacting with Li, Rb, and Sr atoms and use ab initio methods to demonstrate that the SrF + Li and SrF + Sr reactions are barrierless. We present potential energy surfaces for the interaction of the SrF molecule with the Li, Rb, and Sr atoms in their energetically lowest-lying electronic spin states. The obtained potential energy surfaces are deep and exhibit profound interaction anisotropies. We predict that the collisions of SrF molecules in the rotational or Zeeman excited states most likely have a strong inelastic character. We discuss the prospects for the sympathetic cooling of SrF and CaF molecules using ultracold alkali-metal atoms.

  15. The chemistry of the liquid alkali metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Addison, C.C.

    1984-01-01

    A study of liquid alkali metals. It encourages comparison with molecular solvents in chapter covering the nature and reactivity of dissolved species, solvation, solubility and electrical conductivity of solutions. It demonstrates lab techniques unique to liquid alkali metals. It discusses large-scale applications from storage batteries to sodium-cooled reactors and future fusion reactors, and associated technological problems. Contents: Some Basic Physical and Chemical Properties; Manipulation of the Liquids; The Chemistry of Purification Methods; Species Formed by Dissolved Elements; Solubilities and Analytical Methods; Alkali Metal Mixtures; Solvation in Liquid Metal; Reactions Between Liquid Alkali Metals and Water; Reactions of Nitrogen with Lithium and the Group II Metals in Liquid Sodium; The Formation, Dissociation and Stability of Heteronuclear Polyatomic Anions; Reactions of the Liquid Alkali Metals and Their Alloys with Simple Alipatic Hydrocarbons; Reactions of the Liquid Alkali Metals with Some Halogen Compounds; Hydrogen, Oxygen and Carbon Meters; Surface Chemistry and Wetting; Corrosion of Transition Metals by the Liquid Alkali Metals; Modern Applications of the Liquid Alkali Metals

  16. Where do ions solvate?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We study a simple model of ionic solvation inside a water cluster. The cluster is modeled as a spherical dielectric continuum. It is found that unpolarizable ions always prefer the bulk solvation. On the other hand, for polarizable ions, there exists a critical value of polarization above which surface solvation becomes ...

  17. Solvation in supercritical water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cochran, H.D.; Cummings, P.T.; Karaborni, S.

    1991-01-01

    The aim of this work is to determine the solvation structure in supercritical water composed with that in ambient water and in simple supercritical solvents. Molecular dynamics studies have been undertaken of systems that model ionic sodium and chloride, atomic argon, and molecular methanol in supercritical aqueous solutions using the simple point charge model of Berendsen for water. Because of the strong interactions between water and ions, ionic solutes are strongly attractive in supercritical water, forming large clusters of water molecules around each ion. Methanol is found to be a weakly-attractive solute in supercritical water. The cluster of excess water molecules surrounding a dissolved ion or polar molecule in supercritical aqueous solutions is comparable to the solvent clusters surrounding attractive solutes in simple supercritical fluids. Likewise, the deficit of water molecules surrounding a dissolved argon atom in supercritical aqueous solutions is comparable to that surrounding repulsive solutes in simple supercritical fluids. The number of hydrogen bonds per water molecule in supercritical water was found to be about one third the number in ambient water. The number of hydrogen bonds per water molecule surrounding a central particle in supercritical water was only mildly affected by the identify of the central particle--atom, molecule, or ion. These results should be helpful in developing a qualitative understanding of important processes that occur in supercritical water. 29 refs., 6 figs

  18. Infrared spectroscopy of model electrochemical interfaces in ultrahigh vacuum: some implications for ionic and chemisorbate solvation at electrode surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villegas, Ignacio; Kizhakevariam, Naushad; Weaver, Michael J.

    1995-07-01

    The utility of infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy (IRAS) for examining structure and bonding for model electrochemical interfaces in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) is illustrated, focusing specifically on the solvation of cations and chemisorbed carbon monoxide on Pt(111). These systems were chosen partly in view of the availability of IRAS data (albeit limited to chemisorbate vibrations) for the corresponding in-situ metal-solution interfaces, enabling direct spectral comparisons to be made with the "UHV electrochemical model" systems. Kelvin probe measurements of the metal-UHV surface potential changes (ΔΦ) attending alterations in the interfacial composition are also described: these provide the required link to the in-situ electrode potentials as well as yielding additional insight into surface solvation. Variations in the negative electronic charge density and, correspondingly, in the cation surface concentration (thereby mimicking charge-induced alterations in the electrode potential below the potential of zero charge) are achieved by potassium atom dosage onto Pt(111). Of the solvents selected for discussion here — deuterated water, methanol, and acetonitrile — the first two exhibit readily detectable vibrational bands which provide information on the ionic solvation structure. Progressively dosing these solvents onto Pt(111) in the presence of low potassium coverages yields marked alterations in the solvent vibrational bands which can be understood in terms of sequential cation solvation. Comparison between these spectra for methanol with analogous data for sequential methanol solvation of gas-phase alkali cations enables the influence of the interfacial environment to be assessed. The effects of solvating chemisorbed CO are illustrated for acetonitrile; the markedly larger shifts in CO frequencies and binding sites for dilute CO adlayers can be accounted for in terms of short-range coadsorbate interactions in addition to longer-range Stark effects

  19. Atomic parity violation in heavy alkalis: detection by stimulated emission for cesium and traps for cold francium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanguinetti, St

    2004-07-01

    The present work deals with the recent advances of atomic spectroscopy experiments on cesium and francium, which aim at precise parity violation (PV) measurements in these atoms. Within the framework of a 'double-badged thesis', the candidate devoted himself on the one hand to the preliminary PV measurement (8% accuracy) of the present Cs experiment at the Kastler-Brossel laboratory in Paris and on the other hand to the preparation of a Fr radioactive atomic sample (production and trapping) at the LNL (INFN) in Italy. The two experiments are at very different stages. The measurements reported for cesium were actually made possible thanks to the work initiated in 1991, for the PV detection by stimulated emission. The Italian experiment is instead in a beginning stage: in order to probe the properties of francium, which is unstable, a number of atoms large enough has to be first produced and collected. The PV schemes which proved to be well suited for cesium are a solid starting point for the case of francium. (author)

  20. Intensity-modulated polarizabilities and magic trapping of alkali-metal and divalent atoms in infrared optical lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topcu, Turker; Derevianko, Andrei

    2014-05-01

    Long range interactions between neutral Rydberg atoms has emerged as a potential means for implementing quantum logical gates. These experiments utilize hyperfine manifold of ground state atoms to act as a qubit basis, while exploiting the Rydberg blockade mechanism to mediate conditional quantum logic. The necessity for overcoming several sources of decoherence makes magic wavelength trapping in optical lattices an indispensable tool for gate experiments. The common wisdom is that atoms in Rydberg states see trapping potentials that are essentially that of a free electron, and can only be trapped at laser intensity minima. We show that although the polarizability of a Rydberg state is always negative, the optical potential can be both attractive or repulsive at long wavelengths (up to ~104 nm). This opens up the possibility of magic trapping Rydberg states with ground state atoms in optical lattices, thereby eliminating the necessity to turn off trapping fields during gate operations. Because the wavelengths are near the CO2 laser band, the photon scattering and the ensuing motional heating is also reduced compared to conventional traps near low lying resonances, alleviating an important source of decoherence. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF) Grant No. PHY-1212482.

  1. Tunable electronic and magnetic properties in germanene by alkali, alkaline-earth, group III and 3d transition metal atom adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sheng-shi; Zhang, Chang-wen; Ji, Wei-xiao; Li, Feng; Wang, Pei-ji; Hu, Shu-jun; Yan, Shi-shen; Liu, Yu-shen

    2014-08-14

    We performed first-principles calculations to study the adsorption characteristics of alkali, alkali-earth, group III, and 3d transition-metal (TM) adatoms on germanene. We find that the adsorption of alkali or alkali-earth adatoms on germanene has minimal effects on geometry of germanene. The significant charge transfer from alkali adatoms to germanene leads to metallization of germanene, whereas alkali-earth adatom adsorption, whose interaction is a mixture of ionic and covalent, results in semiconducting behavior with an energy gap of 17-29 meV. For group III adatoms, they also bind germanene with mixed covalent and ionic bonding character. Adsorption characteristics of the transition metals (TMs) are rather complicated, though all TM adsorptions on germanene exhibit strong covalent bonding with germanene. The main contributions to the strong bonding are from the hybridization between the TM 3d and Ge pz orbitals. Depending on the induced-TM type, the adsorbed systems can exhibit metallic, half-metallic, or semiconducting behavior. Also, the variation trends of the dipole moment and work function with the adsorption energy across the different adatoms are discussed. These findings may provide a potential avenue to design new germanene-based devices in nanoelectronics.

  2. Heidelberg polarized alkali source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraemer, D.; Steffens, E.; Jaensch, H.; Philipps Universitaet, Marburg, Germany)

    1984-01-01

    A new atomic beam type polarized alkali ion source has been installed at Heidelberg. In order to improve the beam polarization considerably optical pumping is applied in combination with an adiabatic medium field transition which results in beams in single hyperfine sublevels. The m state population is determined by laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy. Highly polarized beams (P/sub s/ > 0.9, s = z, zz) with intensities of 30 to 130 μA can be extracted for Li + and Na + , respectively

  3. [Experimental and computation studies of polar solvation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This report from the Pennsylvania State University contains seven sections: (1) radiative rate effects in solvatlvatochromic probes; (2) intramolecular charge transfer reactions; (3) Solvation dynamics in low temperature alcohols; (4) Ionic solvation dynamics; (5) solvation and proton-transfer dynamics in 7-azaindole; (6) computer simulations of solvation dynamics; (7) solvation in supercritical fluids. 20 refs., 11 figs

  4. Ultraviolet optical absorption of alkali cyanides and alkali halide cyanides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza Camargo Junior, S.A. de.

    1982-09-01

    The ultraviolet absorption spectra of alkali cyanide and mixed alkali halide cyanide crystals were measured at temperatures ranging from 300K down to 4.2K. A set of small absorption peaks was observed at energies near 6 eV and assigned to parity forbidden X 1 Σ + →a' 3 Σ + transitions of the CN - molecular ions. It was observed that the peak position depends on the alkali atom while the absorption cross section strongly depends on the halogen and on the CN - concentration of the mixed crystals. These effects are explained in terms of an interaction between the triplet molecular excitons and charge transfer excitons. The experimental data were fit with a coupling energy of a few meV. The coupling mechanism is discussed and it is found to be due to the overlap between the wave functions of the two excitations. (Author) [pt

  5. Interfacial solvation thermodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Amotz, Dor

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have reached conflicting conclusions regarding the interplay of cavity formation, polarizability, desolvation, and surface capillary waves in driving the interfacial adsorptions of ions and molecules at air–water interfaces. Here we revisit these questions by combining exact potential distribution results with linear response theory and other physically motivated approximations. The results highlight both exact and approximate compensation relations pertaining to direct (solute–solvent) and indirect (solvent–solvent) contributions to adsorption thermodynamics, of relevance to solvation at air–water interfaces, as well as a broader class of processes linked to the mean force potential between ions, molecules, nanoparticles, proteins, and biological assemblies. (paper)

  6. Abacavir methanol 2.5-solvate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phuong-Truc T. Pham

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The structure of abacavir (systematic name: {(1S,4R-4-[2-amino-6-(cyclopropylamino-9H-purin-9-yl]cyclopent-2-en-1-yl}methanol, C14H18N6O·2.5CH3OH, consists of hydrogen-bonded ribbons which are further held together by additional hydrogen bonds involving the hydroxyl group and two N atoms on an adjacent purine. The asymmetric unit also contains 2.5 molecules of methanol solvate which were grossly disordered and were excluded using SQUEEZE subroutine in PLATON [Spek, (2009. Acta Cryst. D65, 148–155].

  7. Solution enthalpies of alkali metal halides in water and heavy water mixtures with dimethyl sulfoxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egorov, G.I.

    1994-01-01

    Solution enthalpies of CsF, LiCl, NaI, CsI and some other halides of alkali metals and tetrabutylammonium have been measured by the method of calorimetry. Standard solution enthalpies of all alkali metals (except rubidium) halides in water and heavy water mixtures with dimethylsulfoxide at 298.15 K have been calculated. Isotopic effects in solvation enthalpy of the electrolytes mentioned in aqueous solutions of dimethylsulfoxide have been discussed. 29 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs

  8. Thin Metallic Films from Solvated Metal Atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-07-14

    Departamento de Quimica , Universidad de Concepcion, Cassilla 3-:, c oncepcion, Chile. -I{ - ~ *~.’JS*~M 4 .~4\\ 821 19 the gold particles were negatively...1:i, 7 J. AdpI. Radiat. s toD.. 21(l),36-8 (1970). 12. L. G. Colombetti, D. A. Goadwin, and R. J. Hermanson, Nuclear Aed. 10, 597-6u2. (1C69). 13. L

  9. Milk-alkali syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcium-alkali syndrome; Cope syndrome; Burnett syndrome; Hypercalcemia; Calcium metabolism disorder ... Milk-alkali syndrome is almost always caused by taking too many calcium supplements, usually in the form of calcium carbonate. Calcium ...

  10. Atomic Beam Merging and Suppression of Alkali Contaminants in Multi Body High Power Targets: Design and Test of Target and Ion Source Prototypes at ISOLDE

    CERN Document Server

    Bouquerel, Elian J A; Lettry, J; Stora, T

    2009-01-01

    The next generation of high power ISOL-facilities will deliver intense and pure radioactive ion beams. Two key issues of developments mandatory for the forthcoming generation of ISOL target-ion source units are assessed and demonstrated in this thesis. The design and production of target and ion-source prototypes is described and dedicated measurements at ISOLDE-CERN of their radioisotope yields are analyzed. The purity of short lived or rare radioisotopes suffer from isobaric contaminants, notably alkalis which are highly volatile and easily ionized elements. Therefore, relying on their chemical nature, temperature controlled transfer lines were equipped with a tube of quartz that aimed at trapping these unwanted elements before they reached the ion source. The successful application yields high alkali-suppression factors for several elements (ie: 80, 82mRb, 126, 142Cs, 8Li, 46K, 25Na, 114In, 77Ga, 95, 96Sr) for quartz temperatures between 300ºC and 1100ºC. The enthalpies of adsorption on quartz were measu...

  11. Multiple time step molecular dynamics in the optimized isokinetic ensemble steered with the molecular theory of solvation: Accelerating with advanced extrapolation of effective solvation forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omelyan, Igor; Kovalenko, Andriy

    2013-01-01

    We develop efficient handling of solvation forces in the multiscale method of multiple time step molecular dynamics (MTS-MD) of a biomolecule steered by the solvation free energy (effective solvation forces) obtained from the 3D-RISM-KH molecular theory of solvation (three-dimensional reference interaction site model complemented with the Kovalenko-Hirata closure approximation). To reduce the computational expenses, we calculate the effective solvation forces acting on the biomolecule by using advanced solvation force extrapolation (ASFE) at inner time steps while converging the 3D-RISM-KH integral equations only at large outer time steps. The idea of ASFE consists in developing a discrete non-Eckart rotational transformation of atomic coordinates that minimizes the distances between the atomic positions of the biomolecule at different time moments. The effective solvation forces for the biomolecule in a current conformation at an inner time step are then extrapolated in the transformed subspace of those at outer time steps by using a modified least square fit approach applied to a relatively small number of the best force-coordinate pairs. The latter are selected from an extended set collecting the effective solvation forces obtained from 3D-RISM-KH at outer time steps over a broad time interval. The MTS-MD integration with effective solvation forces obtained by converging 3D-RISM-KH at outer time steps and applying ASFE at inner time steps is stabilized by employing the optimized isokinetic Nosé-Hoover chain (OIN) ensemble. Compared to the previous extrapolation schemes used in combination with the Langevin thermostat, the ASFE approach substantially improves the accuracy of evaluation of effective solvation forces and in combination with the OIN thermostat enables a dramatic increase of outer time steps. We demonstrate on a fully flexible model of alanine dipeptide in aqueous solution that the MTS-MD/OIN/ASFE/3D-RISM-KH multiscale method of molecular dynamics

  12. Atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuchs, Alain; Villani, Cedric; Guthleben, Denis; Leduc, Michele; Brenner, Anastasios; Pouthas, Joel; Perrin, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Completed by recent contributions on various topics (atoms and the Brownian motion, the career of Jean Perrin, the evolution of atomic physics since Jean Perrin, relationship between scientific atomism and philosophical atomism), this book is a reprint of a book published at the beginning of the twentieth century in which the author addressed the relationship between atomic theory and chemistry (molecules, atoms, the Avogadro hypothesis, molecule structures, solutes, upper limits of molecular quantities), molecular agitation (molecule velocity, molecule rotation or vibration, molecular free range), the Brownian motion and emulsions (history and general features, statistical equilibrium of emulsions), the laws of the Brownian motion (Einstein's theory, experimental control), fluctuations (the theory of Smoluchowski), light and quanta (black body, extension of quantum theory), the electricity atom, the atom genesis and destruction (transmutations, atom counting)

  13. Alkali metal and alkali metal hydroxide intercalates of the layered transition metal disulfides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanzaki, Y.; Konuma, M.; Matsumoto, O.

    1981-01-01

    The intercalation reaction of some layered transition metal disulfides with alkali metals, alkali metal hydroxides, and tetraalkylammonium hydroxides were investigated. The alkali metal intercalates were prepared in the respective metal-hexamethylphosphoric triamide solutions in vaccuo, and the hydroxide intercalates in aqueous hydroxide solutions. According to the intercalation reaction, the c-lattice parameter was increased, and the increase indicated the expansion of the interlayer distance. In the case of alkali metal intercalates, the expansion of the interlayer distance increased continuously, corresponding to the atomic radius of the alkali metal. On the other hand, the hydroxide intercalates showed discrete expansion corresponding to the effective ionic radius of the intercalated cation. All intercalates of TaS 2 amd NbS 2 were superconductors. The expansion of the interlayer distance tended to increase the superconducting transition temperature in the intercalates of TaS 2 and vice versa in those of NbS 2 . (orig.)

  14. Atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auffray, J.P.

    1997-01-01

    The atom through centuries, has been imagined, described, explored, then accelerated, combined...But what happens truly inside the atom? And what are mechanisms who allow its stability? Physicist and historian of sciences, Jean-Paul Auffray explains that these questions are to the heart of the modern physics and it brings them a new lighting. (N.C.)

  15. Alkali metal hydride formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method of producing alkali metal hydrides by absorbing hydrogen gas under pressure into a mixture of lower alkyl mono amines and alkali metal alkyl amides selected from sodium and potassium amides formed from said amines. The present invention also includes purification of a mixture of the amines and amides which contain impurities, such as is used as a catalytic exchange liquid in the enrichment of deuterium, involving the formation of the alkali metal hydride

  16. Terahertz radiation in alkali vapor plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Xuan; Zhang, X.-C.

    2014-01-01

    By taking advantage of low ionization potentials of alkali atoms, we demonstrate terahertz wave generation from cesium and rubidium vapor plasmas with an amplitude nearly one order of magnitude larger than that from nitrogen gas at low pressure (0.02–0.5 Torr). The observed phenomena are explained by the numerical modeling based upon electron tunneling ionization

  17. Theories of the solvated electron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kestner, N.R.

    1987-01-01

    In this chapter the authors address only the final state of the electron, that is, the solvated state, which, if no chemical reaction would occur, is a stable entity with well-defined characteristics. Except for some metal-ammonia solutions, and possible a few other cases, such stable species, in reality, exist but a short time (often as short as microseconds). Nevertheless, this chapter only deals with this final time-independent,'' completely solvated,'' equilibrium species. The last statement is added to indicate that the solvent around the electron has also come to thermal equilibrium with the field of the charge

  18. Tris[2-(deuteriomethylsulfanylphenyl]phosphine deuteriochloroform 0.125-solvate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seik Weng Ng

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The title deuterated tripodal phosphine, C21H12D9PS3·0.125CDCl3, crystallizes as two independent molecules, one of which lies on a general position and the other about a threefold rotation axis, and as a deuteriochloroform solvate. The solvent molecule is disordered about a site of symmetry 3, so that the ratio of phosphine to solvent is 8:1. The P atom adopts a pyramidal coordination geometry.

  19. A molecular dynamics study for the isomerization of Ar solvated (benzene){sub 2}-K{sup +} heteroclusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alberti, M. [CERQT, Departament de Quimica Fisica Parc Cientific, Universitat de Barcelona, Marti i Franques, 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Pacifici, L. [Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, University of Perugia, via Vanvitelli, 1 06123 Perugia (Italy); Lagana, A. [Department of Chemistry, University of Perugia, via Elce di Sotto, 8 06123 Perugia (Italy)], E-mail: lag@dyn.unipg.it; Aguilar, A. [CERQT, Departament de Quimica Fisica Parc Cientific, Universitat de Barcelona, Marti i Franques, 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2006-08-21

    A dynamical study of the (benzene){sub 2}-K{sup +} heteroclusters solvated by Ar atoms has been performed using an analytical force field of the atom (ion)-bond type. An analysis of the relevant calculated structural and energetic properties of these systems is made to understand involved molecular processes. The key effect found in the calculations is the tieing up of the two rings to sandwich K{sup +} and the weaking of this effect by solvation.

  20. Unusual solvation through both p-orbital lobes of a carbene carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadad, C. Z., E-mail: cacier.hadad@udea.edu.co [Grupo de Química-Física Teórica, Instituto de Química, Universidad de Antioquia, A. A. 1226 Medellín (Colombia); Jenkins, Samantha [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan Normal University, Changsha, Hunan 410081 (China); Flórez, Elizabeth [Departamento de Ciencias Básicas, Universidad de Medellín, Carrera 87 N° 30-65, Medellín (Colombia)

    2015-03-07

    As a result of a configurational space search done to explain the experimental evidence of transient specific solvation of singlet fluorocarbene amide with tetrahydrofuran, we found that the most stable structures consist in a group in which each oxygen of two tetrahydrofuran molecules act as electron donor to its respective empty p-orbital lobe of the carbene carbon atom, located at each side of the carbene molecular plane. This kind of species, which to our knowledge has not been reported before, explains very well the particular experimental characteristics observed for the transient solvation of this system. We postulate that the simultaneous interaction to both p-orbital lobes seems to confer a special stability to the solvation complexes, because this situation moves away the systems from the proximity of the corresponding transition states for the ylide products. Additionally, we present an analysis of other solvation complexes and a study of the nature of the involved interactions.

  1. Fragmentation study of isolated and nano-solvated biomolecules induced by collision with multiply charged ions and neutral particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernigaud, V.

    2009-01-01

    This thesis concerns a gas phase study of the fragmentation of bio-molecular systems induced by slow collisions with multiply charged ions (in the keV-region), alkali atoms and rare gases. The main objective was to study the physical processes involved in the dissociation of highly electronically excited systems. In order to elucidate the intrinsic properties of certain biomolecules (porphyrins and amino acids) we have performed experiments in the gas phase with isolated systems. The obtained results demonstrate the high stability of porphyrins after electron removal and attachment. Furthermore, a dependence of the fragmentation pattern produced by multiply charged ions on the isomeric structure of the alanine molecule has been shown. In a second part of the thesis, a strong influence of the environment of the biomolecule on the fragmentation channels, their modification and their new opening, has been clearly proven. This phenomenon occurs in the presence of other surrounding biomolecules (clusters of nucleobases) as well as for molecules of a solvent (molecules of water, methanol and acetonitrile) in which the biomolecule is embedded. In order to extend these studies to larger systems, a new experimental set-up, based on an electro-spray ion source combined with a quadrupole mass filter has been developed. Due to the successful tests and proposed improvements of the device future experiments will become available concerning the fragmentation of large charged and solvated bio-molecular systems induced by collision processes. (author) [fr

  2. MTS-MD of Biomolecules Steered with 3D-RISM-KH Mean Solvation Forces Accelerated with Generalized Solvation Force Extrapolation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omelyan, Igor; Kovalenko, Andriy

    2015-04-14

    We developed a generalized solvation force extrapolation (GSFE) approach to speed up multiple time step molecular dynamics (MTS-MD) of biomolecules steered with mean solvation forces obtained from the 3D-RISM-KH molecular theory of solvation (three-dimensional reference interaction site model with the Kovalenko-Hirata closure). GSFE is based on a set of techniques including the non-Eckart-like transformation of coordinate space separately for each solute atom, extension of the force-coordinate pair basis set followed by selection of the best subset, balancing the normal equations by modified least-squares minimization of deviations, and incremental increase of outer time step in motion integration. Mean solvation forces acting on the biomolecule atoms in conformations at successive inner time steps are extrapolated using a relatively small number of best (closest) solute atomic coordinates and corresponding mean solvation forces obtained at previous outer time steps by converging the 3D-RISM-KH integral equations. The MTS-MD evolution steered with GSFE of 3D-RISM-KH mean solvation forces is efficiently stabilized with our optimized isokinetic Nosé-Hoover chain (OIN) thermostat. We validated the hybrid MTS-MD/OIN/GSFE/3D-RISM-KH integrator on solvated organic and biomolecules of different stiffness and complexity: asphaltene dimer in toluene solvent, hydrated alanine dipeptide, miniprotein 1L2Y, and protein G. The GSFE accuracy and the OIN efficiency allowed us to enlarge outer time steps up to huge values of 1-4 ps while accurately reproducing conformational properties. Quasidynamics steered with 3D-RISM-KH mean solvation forces achieves time scale compression of conformational changes coupled with solvent exchange, resulting in further significant acceleration of protein conformational sampling with respect to real time dynamics. Overall, this provided a 50- to 1000-fold effective speedup of conformational sampling for these systems, compared to conventional MD

  3. Determination of membrane hydration numbers of alkali metal ions by insertion in a conducting polymer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skaarup, Steen; Junaid Mohamed Jafeen, Mohamed; Careem, M.A.

    2010-01-01

    , and a secondary (or outer) solvation shell, consisting of all other water molecules whose properties are still influenced significantly by the cation. Knowing the hydration number is important when considering, for instance, the transport of Na+ and K+ in biological cell membranes, since their different behavior...... may depend on the details of ion hydration. Although the solvation of alkali metal ions in aqueous solution has been discussed for many years, there is still no clear consensus. Part of the discrepancy is simply that different methods measure over different time scales, and therefore do...... not necessarily define the same hydration shell. This work presents a systematic study of one special variant of the hydration numbers of the 5 alkali metal ions, using the electrochemical insertion of the ions in a conducting polymer (polypyrrole containing the large immobile anion DBS-). The technique...

  4. Ab initio studies on the solvation, electronic structures and intracluster reactions in M(+)L(n), with M(+)=magnesium and calcium singly-charged ions, L=water, methanol, ammonia, and n=1-6, and the elimination of a hydrogen atom in H atom in hydrated sodium clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Ka Wai

    The solvation and electronic structures of M+Ln, with M+ = Mg+ and Cat, L = H2O, CH 3OH and NH3, n=1-6 were investigated by ab initio calculations using G03 package and density functional theory based ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations with projector augmented-wave (PAW) method and a planewave basis set using Vienna Ab initio Simulation Package (VASP). Furthermore, ab initio studies on the intracluster reactions of Mg+ and Ca+ ions with different solvent molecules, H2O, CH3OH and NH3, were also done using G03 package. Finally, the elimination of a H atom in Na(H2O)n was studied. Such studies on the interactions and reactivity in gas clusters can provide insights into their analogies existing in condense phase. Interactions of Mg+ and Ca+ ions in different solvent molecules, H2O, CH3OH and NH3, were calculated with B3LYP and MP2 methods with basis sets 6-31+g** and 6-311+g**. A systematic comparison on the structures and reactivities of these clusters should provide a better understanding on the interplay of the ion-solvent, solvent-solvent, and electron-solvent interactions. It can provide a better understanding on the structures and bonding of complexes having analogies to those existing in condense phase. For Mg+(CH3OH)n and Ca+(CH 3OH)n, both H-elimination from OH/CH bond and CH3-elimination were investigated. H-elimination from O---H bond becomes more accessible for large cluster due to the diffusion of electron density to O---H bond. Studies on the H-elimination in Mg+(NH3)n and H-elimination from C---H bond in Mg+(CH3OH) n show that the reaction barriers flatten above 20 kcal/mol as n reaches 4 and above. These calculation results prove that the source of loss of H atom in ground state Mg+(CH3OH)n should be through the O---H bond rather than through the C---H bond. Compared to Mg+(CH3OH)n, the reaction barriers for H-elimination in Mg+(NH3)n is much larger, which is in consistent with the experimental observation of little H-elimination for Mg

  5. Photoemission spectroscopy study of a multi-alkali photocathode

    CERN Document Server

    Ettema, A R H

    2000-01-01

    In this paper a photoemission study of the highest core levels of the elements and the electron escape barrier (work function) in a multi-alkali photocathode are presented. The core levels indicate that the alkali atoms are in an oxidized state and therefore the compound Na sub 2 KSb can be regarded as an ionic semiconductor. The measured escape barrier of the Cs sub 2 O surface layer is determined as 2.3 eV.

  6. Alkali promotion of N-2 dissociation over Ru(0001)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Jens Jørgen; Hammer, Bjørk; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet

    1998-01-01

    Using self-consistent density functional calculations, we show that adsorbed Na and Cs lower the barrier for dissociation of N2 on Ru(0001). Since N2 dissociation is a crucial step in the ammonia synthesis reaction, we explain in this way the experimental observation that alkali metals promote th...... the ammonia synthesis reaction over Ru catalysts. We also show that the origin of this effect is predominantly a direct electrostatic attraction between the adsorbed alkali atoms and the dissociating molecule....

  7. Effect of alkali ion on relaxation properties of binary alkali-borate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lomovskoj, V.A.; Bartenev, G.M.

    1992-01-01

    Method of relaxation spectrometry were used to analyze the data on internal friction spectra of lithium, sodium, potassium and rubidium alkali-borate glasses in wide range of temperatures and frequencies. The nature of two relaxation processes was clarified: β m -process, related with mobility of alkaline metal cations, and α-process (vitrification), conditioned by system transformation from viscous-flow to vitreous state. It is shown that atomic-molecular mechanism of vitrification process changes when passing from vitreous B 2 O 3 to alkali-borate glasses

  8. Three-atom clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pen'kov, F.M.

    1998-01-01

    The Born-Oppenheimer approximation is used to obtain an equation for the effective interaction in three atoms bound by a single electron. For low binding energies in an 'electron + atom' pair, long-range forces arise between the atoms, leading to bound states when the size of the three-atom cluster is a few tens of angstrom. A system made of alkali-metal atoms is considered as an example

  9. Rydberg atoms in strong fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleppner, D.; Tsimmerman, M.

    1985-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical achievements in studying Rydberg atoms in external fields are considered. Only static (or quasistatic) fields and ''one-electron'' atoms, i.e. atoms that are well described by one-electron states, are discussed. Mainly behaviour of alkali metal atoms in electric field is considered. The state of theoretical investigations for hydrogen atom in magnetic field is described, but experimental data for atoms of alkali metals are presented as an illustration. Results of the latest experimental and theoretical investigations into the structure of Rydberg atoms in strong fields are presented

  10. Vibrations of alkali metal overlayers on metal surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rusina, G G; Eremeev, S V; Borisova, S D; Echenique, P M; Chulkov, E V; Benedek, G

    2008-01-01

    We review the current progress in the understanding of vibrations of alkalis adsorbed on metal surfaces. The analysis of alkali vibrations was made on the basis of available theoretical and experimental results. We also include in this discussion our recent calculations of vibrations in K/Pt(111) and Li(Na)/Cu(001) systems. The dependence of alkali adlayer localized modes on atomic mass, adsorption position and coverage as well as the dependence of vertical vibration frequency on the substrate orientation is discussed. The square root of atomic mass dependence of the vertical vibration energy has been confirmed by using computational data for alkalis on the Al(111) and Cu(001) substrates. We have confirmed that in a wide range of submonolayer coverages the stretch mode energy remains nearly constant while the energy of in-plane polarized modes increases with the increase of alkali coverage. It was shown that the spectrum of both stretch and in-plane vibrations can be very sensitive to the adsorption position of alkali atoms and substrate orientation

  11. Understanding Lithium Solvation and Diffusion through Topological Analysis of First-Principles Molecular Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhatia, Harsh [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Gyulassy, Attila [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ong, Mitchell [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Lordi, Vincenzo [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Draeger, Erik [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Pask, John [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Pascucci, Valerio [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bremer, Peer -Timo [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-09-27

    The performance of lithium-ion batteries is strongly influenced by the ionic conductivity of the electrolyte, which depends on the speed at which Li ions migrate across the cell and relates to their solvation structure. The choice of solvent can greatly impact, both, the solvation and diffusivity of Li ions. In this work, we present our application of the topological techniques to extract and predict such behavior in the data generated by the first-principles molecular dynamics simulation of Li ions in an important organic solvent -ethylene carbonate. More specifically, we use the scalar topology of the electron charge density field to analyze the evolution of the solvation structures. This allows us to derive a parameter-free bond definition for lithium-oxygen bonds, to provide a quantitative measure for bond strength, and to understand the regions of influence of each atom in the simulation. This has provided new insights into how and under what conditions certain bonds may form and break. As a result, we can identify and, more importantly, predict, unstable configurations in solvation structures. This can be very useful in understanding when small changes to the atoms' movements can cause significantly different bond structures to evolve. Ultimately, this promises to allow scientists to explore lithium ion solvation and diffusion more systematically, with the aim of new insights and potentially accelerating the calculations themselves.

  12. Updated Abraham solvation parameters for polychlorinated biphenyls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Noort, P.C.M.; Haftka, J.J.H.; Parsons, J.R.

    2010-01-01

    This study shows that the recently published polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) Abraham solvation parameters predict PCB air−n-hexadecane and n-octanol−water partition coefficients very poorly, especially for highly ortho-chlorinated congeners. Therefore, an updated set of PCB solvation parameters was

  13. Updated Abraham solvation parameters for polychlorinated biphenyls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noort, van P.C.M.; Haftka, J.J.H.; Parsons, J.R.

    2010-01-01

    This study shows that the recently published polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) Abraham solvation parameters predict PCB air-n-hexadecane and n-octanol-water partition coefficients very poorly, especially for highly ortho-chlorinated congeners. Therefore, an updated set of PCB solvation parameters was

  14. Ionic liquids: radiation chemistry, solvation dynamics and reactivity patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wishart, J.F.; Funston, A.M.; Szreder, T.

    2006-01-01

    slow solvation dynamics of the excess electron in ILs (which vary over a wide viscosity range) increases the importance of pre-solvated electron reactivity and consequently alters product distributions. Scavenging of the excess electron before it becomes fully solvated is a significant facet of the overall radiation sensitivity of ionic liquids, possibly due to less competition from slower electron solvation processes. Parallel measurements of excess electron solvation processes and emission dynamics (Stokes shift and polarization anisotropy decay) of solvatochromic coumarin-153 show that the reorganization dynamics of ionic liquids extend to much longer timescales (nanoseconds) than in conventional polar solvents (picoseconds). This phenomenon profoundly influences the reactivity and energetics of radiolytically-generated excess electrons. The slow solvation dynamics would also be expected to significantly alter transition state dynamics and provide a potential means to control product distribution. This becomes particularly important for transition states with a very different polarity from the reactants and/or products. Electron reactions with several aromatic acceptors, acids, and oxygen were measured in (MeBu 3 N + )(NTf 2 - ). Rate constants for solvated electron capture by benzophenone, pyrene and phenanthrene were on the order of 1.6x10 8 M -1 ·s -1 , typically 100 times slower than observed in conventional polar solvents. The reactions of hydrogen atoms with several of the same reactants were measured in the same ionic liquid. H-atoms react very rapidly with pyrene and phenanthrene (∼3 x 10 9 L·mol -1 ·s -1 ) to form H-adduct radicals. The H-atom rate constants are similar to the values measured or estimated for the same reactions in aqueous solutions. The H-atom reactions with the aromatic hydrocarbons must be diffusion-controlled, but are faster than diffusion-controlled reactions for solvated electrons in the same ionic liquid. The results indicate

  15. Organic solvation of intercalated cations in V/sub 2/O/sub 5/ xerogels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemordant, D.; Bouhaouss, A.; Aldbert, P.; Baffier, N.

    1986-01-01

    V/sub 2/O/sub 5/ xerogels (V/sub 2/O/sub 5/, 1.6H/sub 2/O) undergo a topotactic reversible exchange reaction at room temperature in organic solvents containing monovalent alkali or divalent (Mn/sup 2+/) cations. Basal spacing are dependent on solvent type and charge-to-radius ratio of guest cations. From the interlayer distances, two solvation stages have been inferred, depending on the nature of the solvent and of the cation, except with Cs/sup +/ for which no intracrystalline swelling by organic solvents is observed

  16. ALKALI RESISTANT CATALYST

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2008-01-01

    The present invention concerns the selective removal of nitrogen oxides (NOx) from gasses. In particular, the invention concerns a process, a catalyst and the use of a catalyst for the selective removal of nitrogen oxides in the presence of ammonia from gases containing a significant amount...... of alkali metal and/or alkali-earth compounds which process comprises using a catalyst combined of (i) a formed porous superacidic support, said superacidic support having an Hammett acidity stronger than Ho=-12, and (ii) a metal oxide catalytic component deposited on said superacidic support selected from...

  17. Methods of recovering alkali metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumhansl, James L; Rigali, Mark J

    2014-03-04

    Approaches for alkali metal extraction, sequestration and recovery are described. For example, a method of recovering alkali metals includes providing a CST or CST-like (e.g., small pore zeolite) material. The alkali metal species is scavenged from the liquid mixture by the CST or CST-like material. The alkali metal species is extracted from the CST or CST-like material.

  18. ALKALI FUSION OF ROSETTA ZIRCON

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DAHER, A.

    2008-01-01

    The decomposition of Rosetta zircon by fusion with different types of alkalis has been investigated. These alkalis include sodium hydroxide, potassium hydroxide and eutectic mixture of both. The influences of the reaction temperature, zircon to alkalis ratio, fusion time and the stirring of the reactant on the fusion reaction have been evaluated. The obtained results favour the decomposition of zircon with the eutectic alkalis mixture by a decomposition efficiency of 96% obtained at 500 0 C after one hour

  19. Alkali (Li, K and Na) and alkali-earth (Be, Ca and Mg) adatoms on SiC single layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baierle, Rogério J.; Rupp, Caroline J.; Anversa, Jonas

    2018-03-01

    First-principles calculations within the density functional theory (DFT) have been addressed to study the energetic stability, and electronic properties of alkali and alkali-earth atoms adsorbed on a silicon carbide (SiC) single layer. We observe that all atoms are most stable (higher binding energy) on the top of a Si atom, which moves out of the plane (in the opposite direction to the adsorbed atom). Alkali atoms adsorbed give raise to two spin unpaired electronic levels inside the band gap leading the SiC single layer to exhibit n-type semiconductor properties. For alkaline atoms adsorbed there is a deep occupied spin paired electronic level inside the band gap. These finding suggest that the adsorption of alkaline and alkali-earth atoms on SiC layer is a powerful feature to functionalize two dimensional SiC structures, which can be used to produce new electronic, magnetic and optical devices as well for hydrogen and oxygen evolution reaction (HER and OER, respectively). Furthermore, we observe that the adsorption of H2 is ruled by dispersive forces (van der Waals interactions) while the O2 molecule is strongly adsorbed on the functionalized system.

  20. The Inhomogeneous Light Shift in Alkali Atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-06-24

    N AMP’. LAS R 1GEEAOCON R ’", DONTROLLERR MA LNETSHEL Fig. 1. Exp mn ta Ar a g m n . S i c o i i n A and B corr spon to the arSran e tsO used/ PtoS...Calculation Parameters laser linewidth A~V La 100 MHz laser beam diameter a - 0.45 cm absorption linewidth DV 50 ~ longitudinal relaxation rate y 100...Verlag, Berlin-Heidelberg-New York, 1975), pp. 176- 185. 12. S. Pancharatnam, J. Opt. Soc. Am. 56, 1636 (1966). 13. C. Cohen-Tannoudji, Metrologia 13

  1. Autoionizing Rydberg series in alkali atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulov, M.A.; Ivanov, V.K.; Cherepkov, N.A.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The results of many-body calculations of autoionizing resonance structure in neutral potassium, rubidium and cesium associated with the ns 2 np 6 (n+1)s → nsnp 6 (n+1)smp Rydberg excitations are presented. The numerical method based on the Many-Body Perturbation Theory takes into account the dynamic polarization and screening of electron-electron interaction by collective motion of the whole electronic system. The many-electron effects are shown to determine the resonance shapes. The numerically obtained cross section for photoionization of 3p electrons in neutral K in the vicinity of the 3s threshold is presented. The structure has the complex shape of 3s → mp resonances due to different behavior of electrons with the opposite spin projections

  2. Atom-surface potentials and atom interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babb, J.F.

    1998-01-01

    Long-range atom-surface potentials characterize the physics of many actual systems and are now measurable spectroscopically in deflection of atomic beams in cavities or in reflection of atoms in atomic fountains. For a ground state, spherically symmetric atom the potential varies as -1/R 3 near the wall, where R is the atom-surface distance. For asymptotically large distances the potential is weaker and goes as -1/R 4 due to retardation arising from the finite speed of light. This diminished interaction can also be interpreted as a Casimir effect. The possibility of measuring atom-surface potentials using atomic interferometry is explored. The particular cases studied are the interactions of a ground-state alkali-metal atom and a dielectric or a conducting wall. Accurate descriptions of atom-surface potentials in theories of evanescent-wave atomic mirrors and evanescent wave-guided atoms are also discussed. (author)

  3. Comparative assessment of computational methods for the determination of solvation free energies in alcohol-based molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Silvia A; Sousa, Sergio F

    2013-06-05

    The determination of differences in solvation free energies between related drug molecules remains an important challenge in computational drug optimization, when fast and accurate calculation of differences in binding free energy are required. In this study, we have evaluated the performance of five commonly used polarized continuum model (PCM) methodologies in the determination of solvation free energies for 53 typical alcohol and alkane small molecules. In addition, the performance of these PCM methods, of a thermodynamic integration (TI) protocol and of the Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) and generalized Born (GB) methods, were tested in the determination of solvation free energies changes for 28 common alkane-alcohol transformations, by the substitution of an hydrogen atom for a hydroxyl substituent. The results show that the solvation model D (SMD) performs better among the PCM-based approaches in estimating solvation free energies for alcohol molecules, and solvation free energy changes for alkane-alcohol transformations, with an average error below 1 kcal/mol for both quantities. However, for the determination of solvation free energy changes on alkane-alcohol transformation, PB and TI yielded better results. TI was particularly accurate in the treatment of hydroxyl groups additions to aromatic rings (0.53 kcal/mol), a common transformation when optimizing drug-binding in computer-aided drug design. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Solvates of silico-12-molybdic acid with alcohols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Punchuk, I.N.; Chuvaev, V.F.

    1984-01-01

    With the aim of investigating interaction processes of solid heteropolyacids and organic compounds, solvates are prepared. Solvates are products of adding gaseous methanol, ethanol and isopropanol to silico-12-molybdic acid. The compounds are studied by IR and PMR spectroscopy methods. Possible models for solvate structure are considered, as well as their connection with solvate properties and thermal decomposition

  5. Upgrading of petroleum oil feedstocks using alkali metals and hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, John Howard

    2014-09-09

    A method of upgrading an oil feedstock by removing heteroatoms and/or one or more heavy metals from the oil feedstock composition. This method reacts the oil feedstock with an alkali metal and an upgradant hydrocarbon. The alkali metal reacts with a portion of the heteroatoms and/or one or more heavy metals to form an inorganic phase separable from the organic oil feedstock material. The upgradant hydrocarbon bonds to the oil feedstock material and increases the number of carbon atoms in the product. This increase in the number of carbon atoms of the product increases the energy value of the resulting oil feedstock.

  6. Reaction of alkali nitrates with PuO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, T.; Ohuchi, K.; Takahashi, K.; Fujino, T.

    1990-01-01

    Improvement of solubility of plutonium dioxide (PuO 2 ) in acid solution is important to establish the nuclear fuel reprocessing technique for uranium-plutonium mixed oxide fuels. If insoluble PuO 2 can be converted into any soluble plutonium compounds, problems arising from the fuel dissolution process will be reduced to a great extent. Alkali metal plutonates and alkaline-earth plutonates are known to have enhanced solubility in mineral acids. However, the reaction conditions to form such plutonates and characterization thereof are not well elucidated. Then the reactivity and reaction conditions to form lithium and sodium plutonates from their nitrates and PuO 2 were studied at temperatures between 500 and 900 degree C and alkali metal to plutonium atom ratios between 0.5 and 6 by means of thermogravimetry as well as X-ray diffraction technique. The reaction behavior of alkali plutonates will be discussed in comparison with corresponding alkali uranates

  7. Solvation of monovalent anions in formamide and methanol: Parameterization of the IEF-PCM model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boees, Elvis S.; Bernardi, Edson; Stassen, Hubert; Goncalves, Paulo F.B.

    2008-01-01

    The thermodynamics of solvation for a series of monovalent anions in formamide and methanol has been studied using the polarizable continuum model (PCM). The parameterization of this continuum model was guided by molecular dynamics simulations. The parameterized PCM model predicts the Gibbs free energies of solvation for 13 anions in formamide and 16 anions in methanol in very good agreement with experimental data. Two sets of atomic radii were tested in the definition of the solute cavities in the PCM and their performances are evaluated and discussed. Mean absolute deviations of the calculated free energies of solvation from the experimental values are in the range of 1.3-2.1 kcal/mol

  8. 1 SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION Nonpolar Solvation Dynamics ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IITP

    . S. NP. ( t. ) ( )t. SNeqm. NP. (a). (b). Figure S2. (a) Nonequilibrium solvation response functions calculated after averaging over different number of nonequilibrium trajectories. The response function converges after averaging over more than ...

  9. Alkali cyanides; destructive distillation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clancy, J C

    1925-12-02

    The destructive distillation of carbonaceous substances can be accomplished by heating them in a bath of molten alkali and cyanide. Liquid hydrocarbons are produced. The separation of the cyanide from the coke or carbonaceous residues by filtration leaves a substantial quantity of cyanide absorbed by the carbon. A feasible method for removal has been developed by mixing the mixture of cyanide and coke with sodium carbonate or other alkali in the molten state, then treating this substance with nitrogen with or without ammonia to convert most of the carbon to cyanide. The carbonaceous material may be mixed with a liquid hydrocarbon such as petroleum, shale oil, or heavy tar oil, heated, and introduced below the surface of the liquid cyanide which partially decomposes and hydrogenates the coal to increase the yield of hydrocarbons. Dry ammonia may be bubbled through the reaction mixture to effect agitation and to form more cyanide.

  10. Solvated electron structure in glassy matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kevan, L.

    1981-01-01

    Current knowledge of the detailed geometrical structure of solvated electrons in aqueous and organic media is summarized. The geometry of solvated electrons in glassy methanol, ethanol, and 2-methyltetrahydrofuran is discussed. Advanced electron magnetic resonance methods and development of new methods of analysis of electron spin echo modulation patterns, second moment line shapes, and forbidden photon spin-flip transitions for paramagnetic species in these disordered systems are discussed. 66 references are cited

  11. Trimesic acid dimethyl sulfoxide solvate: space group revision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvain Bernès

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The structure of the title solvate, C9H6O6·C2H6OS, was determined 30 years ago [Herbstein, Kapon & Wasserman (1978. Acta Cryst. B34, 1613–1617], with data collected at room temperature, and refined in the space group P21. The present redetermination, based on high-resolution diffraction data, shows that the actual space group is more likely to be P21/m. The crystal structure contains layers of trimesic acid molecules lying on mirror planes. A mirror plane also passes through the S and O atoms of the solvent molecule. The molecules in each layer are interconnected through strong O—H...O hydrogen bonds, forming a two-dimensional supramolecular network within each layer. The donor groups are the hydroxyls of the trimesic acid molecules, while the acceptors are the carbonyl or the sulfoxide O atoms.

  12. Structural Diversity in Alkali Metal and Alkali Metal Magnesiate Chemistry of the Bulky 2,6-Diisopropyl-N-(trimethylsilyl)anilino Ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, M Ángeles; Zabala, Andoni; Kennedy, Alan R; Mulvey, Robert E

    2016-10-10

    Bulky amido ligands are precious in s-block chemistry, since they can implant complementary strong basic and weak nucleophilic properties within compounds. Recent work has shown the pivotal importance of the base structure with enhancement of basicity and extraordinary regioselectivities possible for cyclic alkali metal magnesiates containing mixed n-butyl/amido ligand sets. This work advances alkali metal and alkali metal magnesiate chemistry of the bulky arylsilyl amido ligand [N(SiMe 3 )(Dipp)] - (Dipp=2,6-iPr 2 -C 6 H 3 ). Infinite chain structures of the parent sodium and potassium amides are disclosed, adding to the few known crystallographically characterised unsolvated s-block metal amides. Solvation by N,N,N',N'',N''-pentamethyldiethylenetriamine (PMDETA) or N,N,N',N'-tetramethylethylenediamine (TMEDA) gives molecular variants of the lithium and sodium amides; whereas for potassium, PMDETA gives a molecular structure, TMEDA affords a novel, hemi-solvated infinite chain. Crystal structures of the first magnesiate examples of this amide in [MMg{N(SiMe 3 )(Dipp)} 2 (μ-nBu)] ∞ (M=Na or K) are also revealed, though these breakdown to their homometallic components in donor solvents as revealed through NMR and DOSY studies. © 2016 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  13. Alkali metal hafnium oxide scintillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourret-Courchesne, Edith; Derenzo, Stephen E.; Taylor, Scott Edward

    2018-05-08

    The present invention provides for a composition comprising an inorganic scintillator comprising an alkali metal hafnate, optionally cerium-doped, having the formula A2HfO3:Ce; wherein A is an alkali metal having a valence of 1, such as Li or Na; and the molar percent of cerium is 0% to 100%. The alkali metal hafnate are scintillators and produce a bright luminescence upon irradiation by a suitable radiation.

  14. Theoretical investigation on the alkali-metal doped BN fullerene as a material for hydrogen storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkataramanan, Natarajan Sathiyamoorthy; Belosludov, Rodion Vladimirovich; Note, Ryunosuke; Sahara, Ryoji; Mizuseki, Hiroshi; Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki

    2010-01-01

    Graphical abstract: First-principles calculations have been used to investigate hydrogen adsorption on alkali atom doped B 36 N 36 clusters. Adsorption of alkali atoms involves a charge transfer process, creating positively-charged alkali atoms and this polarizes the H 2 molecules and increases their binding energy. The maximum hydrogen storage capacity of Li doped BN fullerene is 8.9 wt.% in which 60 hydrogen atoms were chemisorbed and 12 H 2 were adsorbed in molecular form. - Abstract: First-principles calculations have been used to investigate hydrogen adsorption on alkali atom doped B 36 N 36 clusters. The alkali atom adsorption takes place near the six tetragonal bridge sites available on the cage, thereby avoiding the notorious clustering problem. Adsorption of alkali atoms involves a charge transfer process, creating positively charged alkali atoms and this polarizes the H 2 molecules thereby, increasing their binding energy. Li atom has been found to adsorb up to three hydrogen molecules with an average binding energy of 0.189 eV. The fully doped Li 6 B 36 N 36 cluster has been found to hold up to 18 hydrogen molecules with the average binding energy of 0.146 eV. This corresponds to a gravimetric density of hydrogen storage of 3.7 wt.%. Chemisorption on the Li 6 B 36 N 36 has been found to be an exothermic reaction, in which 60 hydrogen atoms chemisorbed with an average chemisorption energy of -2.13 eV. Thus, the maximum hydrogen storage capacity of Li doped BN fullerene is 8.9 wt.% in which 60 hydrogen atoms were chemisorbed and 12 hydrogen molecules were adsorbed in molecular form.

  15. The influence of alkali promoters on coadsorbed molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umbach, E.

    1986-01-01

    A model has been suggested recently based on the results of an extensive study of the coadsorbate system CO + K on Ru(001). It is introduced and discussed in this article based on previous results and on results obtained very recently for a similar coadsorbate system, CO + K/Ni(111). This model is in competition with a variety of differing or similar ideas and interpretations which are mostly based on similar experimental results. Some of these other models postulate a lying-down, or strongly tilted, molecule in the presence of alkali atoms, at least at low coverages. The CO molecule is usually considered to be attached to the substrate and to be closely coadsorbed to the alkali neighbor(s) but sometimes even a vertical or horizontal adsorption on top of the alkali layer has been suggested. The interaction between alkali and CO has been described as indirect via the substrate or direct by forming a ''π''-bond between adjacent alkalis and CO molecules or even by forming an ionic K/sub x/-CO/sub y/ complex. Some authors prefer a model in which the main (or exclusive) interaction comes from a charge transfer from the donating alkali into the 2π orbital of the coadsorbed CO, thus, enhancing the C- metal and reducing the C-O bond strength

  16. Structural properties of low-density liquid alkali metals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The static structure factors of liquid alkali metals have been modelled at temperatures close to their melting points and a few higher temperatures using the reverse Monte Carlo (RMC) method. The positions of 5000 atoms in a box, with full periodicity, were altered until the experimental diffraction data of the structure factor ...

  17. Superconductivity and electrical resistivity in alkali metal doped ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We consider a two-peak model for the phonon density of states to investigate the nature of electron pairing mechanism for superconducting state in fullerides. We first study the intercage interactions between the adjacent C60 cages and expansion of lattice due to the intercalation of alkali atoms based on the spring model to ...

  18. Solvation quantities from a COSMO-RS equation of state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panayiotou, C.; Tsivintzelis, I.; Aslanidou, D.; Hatzimanikatis, V.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Extension of the successful COSMO-RS model to an equation-of-state model. • Two scaling constants, obtained from atom-specific contributions. • Overall estimation of the solvation quantities and contributions. - Abstract: This work focuses on the extension of the successful COSMO-RS model of mixtures into an equation-of-state model of fluids and its application for the estimation of solvation/hydration quantities of a variety of chemical substances. These quantities include free-energies, enthalpies and entropies of hydration as well as the separate contributions to each of them. Emphasis is given on the estimation of contributions from the conformational changes of solutes upon solvation and the associated restructuring of solvent in its immediate neighborhood. COSMO-RS is a quantum-mechanics based group/segment contribution model in which the Quasi-Chemical (QC) approach is used for the description of the non-random distribution of interacting segments in the system. Thus, the equation-of-state development is done through such a QC framework. The new model will not need any adjustable parameters for the strong specific interactions, such as hydrogen bonds, since they will be provided by the quantum-mechanics based cosmo-files – a key feature of COSMO-RS model. It will need, however, one volumetric and one energy parameter per fluid, which are scaling constants or molecular descriptors of the fluid and are obtained from rather easily available data such as densities, boiling points, vapor pressures, heats of vaporization or second virial coefficients. The performance and the potential of the new equation-of-state model to become a fully predictive model are critically discussed

  19. Charge transfer in gold--alkali-metal systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, R.E.; Weinert, M.

    1994-01-01

    Based on conventional electronegativity arguments, gold--alkali-metal compounds are expected to be among the most ''ionic'' of metallic compounds. The concepts of ionicity and charge transfer are difficult to quantify. However, the changes in bonding in the 50/50 Au--alkali-metal systems between the elemental metals and the compounds are so severe that observations can readily be made concerning their character. The results, as obtained from self-consistent electronic-structure calculations, lead to the apparently odd observation that the electron density at the alkali-metal sites in the compound increases significantly and this involves high l componennts in the charge density. This increase, however, can be attributed to Au-like orbitals spatially overlapping the alkali-metal sites. In a chemical sense, it is reasonable to consider the alkali-metal transferring charge to these Au orbitals. While normally the difference in heats of formation between muffin-tin and full-potential calculations for transition-metal--transition-metal and transition-metal--main-group (e.g., Al) compounds having high site symmetry are small, for the gold--alkali-metal systems, the changes in bonding in the compounds cause differences of ∼0.5 eV/atom between the two classes of potential. Any serious estimate of the electronic structure in these systems must account for these aspherical bonding charges. The origin of the semiconducting behavior of the heavy-alkali-metal Au compounds is shown to arise from a combination of the Au-Au separations and the ionic character of the compounds; the light-alkali-metal Au compounds, with their smaller Au-Au separations, do not have a semiconducting gap. Core-level shifts and isomer shifts are also briefly discussed

  20. On-chip fabrication of alkali-metal vapor cells utilizing an alkali-metal source tablet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsujimoto, K; Hirai, Y; Sugano, K; Tsuchiya, T; Tabata, O; Ban, K; Mizutani, N

    2013-01-01

    We describe a novel on-chip microfabrication technique for the alkali-metal vapor cell of an optically pumped atomic magnetometer (OPAM), utilizing an alkali-metal source tablet (AMST). The newly proposed AMST is a millimeter-sized piece of porous alumina whose considerable surface area holds deposited alkali-metal chloride (KCl) and barium azide (BaN 6 ), source materials that effectively produce alkali-metal vapor at less than 400 °C. Our experiments indicated that the most effective pore size of the AMST is between 60 and 170 µm. The thickness of an insulating glass spacer holding the AMST was designed to confine generated alkali metal to the interior of the vapor cell during its production, and an integrated silicon heater was designed to seal the device using a glass frit, melted at an optimum temperature range of 460–490 °C that was determined by finite element method thermal simulation. The proposed design and AMST were used to successfully fabricate a K cell that was then operated as an OPAM with a measured sensitivity of 50 pT. These results demonstrate that the proposed concept for on-chip microfabrication of alkali-metal vapor cells may lead to effective replacement of conventional glassworking approaches. (paper)

  1. Decalcification resistance of alkali-activated slag

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komljenovic, Miroslav M., E-mail: miroslav.komljenovic@imsi.rs [Institute for Multidisciplinary Research, University of Belgrade, Kneza Viseslava 1, 11030 Belgrade (Serbia); Bascarevic, Zvezdana, E-mail: zvezdana@imsi.bg.ac.rs [Institute for Multidisciplinary Research, University of Belgrade, Kneza Viseslava 1, 11030 Belgrade (Serbia); Marjanovic, Natasa, E-mail: natasa@imsi.bg.ac.rs [Institute for Multidisciplinary Research, University of Belgrade, Kneza Viseslava 1, 11030 Belgrade (Serbia); Nikolic, Violeta, E-mail: violeta@imsi.bg.ac.rs [Institute for Multidisciplinary Research, University of Belgrade, Kneza Viseslava 1, 11030 Belgrade (Serbia)

    2012-09-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effects of decalcification on properties of alkali-activated slag were studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Decalcification was performed by concentrated NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3} solution (accelerated test). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Portland-slag cement (CEM II/A-S 42.5 N) was used as a benchmark material. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Decalcification led to strength decrease and noticeable structural changes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Alkali-activated slag showed significantly higher resistance to decalcification. - Abstract: This paper analyses the effects of decalcification in concentrated 6 M NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3} solution on mechanical and microstructural properties of alkali-activated slag (AAS). Portland-slag cement (CEM II/A-S 42.5 N) was used as a benchmark material. Decalcification process led to a decrease in strength, both in AAS and in CEM II, and this effect was more pronounced in CEM II. The decrease in strength was explicitly related to the decrease in Ca/Si atomic ratio of C-S-H gel. A very low ratio of Ca/Si {approx}0.3 in AAS was the consequence of coexistence of C-S-H(I) gel and silica gel. During decalcification of AAS almost complete leaching of sodium and tetrahedral aluminum from C-S-H(I) gel also took place. AAS showed significantly higher resistance to decalcification in relation to the benchmark CEM II due to the absence of portlandite, high level of polymerization of silicate chains, low level of aluminum for silicon substitution in the structure of C-S-H(I), and the formation of protective layer of polymerized silica gel during decalcification process. In stabilization/solidification processes alkali-activated slag represents a more promising solution than Portland-slag cement due to significantly higher resistance to decalcification.

  2. Biomolecular electrostatics and solvation: a computational perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Pengyu; Chun, Jaehun; Thomas, Dennis G; Schnieders, Michael J; Marucho, Marcelo; Zhang, Jiajing; Baker, Nathan A

    2012-11-01

    An understanding of molecular interactions is essential for insight into biological systems at the molecular scale. Among the various components of molecular interactions, electrostatics are of special importance because of their long-range nature and their influence on polar or charged molecules, including water, aqueous ions, proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates, and membrane lipids. In particular, robust models of electrostatic interactions are essential for understanding the solvation properties of biomolecules and the effects of solvation upon biomolecular folding, binding, enzyme catalysis, and dynamics. Electrostatics, therefore, are of central importance to understanding biomolecular structure and modeling interactions within and among biological molecules. This review discusses the solvation of biomolecules with a computational biophysics view toward describing the phenomenon. While our main focus lies on the computational aspect of the models, we provide an overview of the basic elements of biomolecular solvation (e.g. solvent structure, polarization, ion binding, and non-polar behavior) in order to provide a background to understand the different types of solvation models.

  3. Molecular modeling of nucleic Acid structure: electrostatics and solvation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergonzo, Christina; Galindo-Murillo, Rodrigo; Cheatham, Thomas E

    2014-12-19

    This unit presents an overview of computer simulation techniques as applied to nucleic acid systems, ranging from simple in vacuo molecular modeling techniques to more complete all-atom molecular dynamics treatments that include an explicit representation of the environment. The third in a series of four units, this unit focuses on critical issues in solvation and the treatment of electrostatics. UNITS 7.5 & 7.8 introduced the modeling of nucleic acid structure at the molecular level. This included a discussion of how to generate an initial model, how to evaluate the utility or reliability of a given model, and ultimately how to manipulate this model to better understand its structure, dynamics, and interactions. Subject to an appropriate representation of the energy, such as a specifically parameterized empirical force field, the techniques of minimization and Monte Carlo simulation, as well as molecular dynamics (MD) methods, were introduced as a way of sampling conformational space for a better understanding of the relevance of a given model. This discussion highlighted the major limitations with modeling in general. When sampling conformational space effectively, difficult issues are encountered, such as multiple minima or conformational sampling problems, and accurately representing the underlying energy of interaction. In order to provide a realistic model of the underlying energetics for nucleic acids in their native environments, it is crucial to include some representation of solvation (by water) and also to properly treat the electrostatic interactions. These subjects are discussed in detail in this unit. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  4. Purification of alkali metal nitrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorucci, Louis C.; Gregory, Kevin M.

    1985-05-14

    A process is disclosed for removing heavy metal contaminants from impure alkali metal nitrates containing them. The process comprises mixing the impure nitrates with sufficient water to form a concentrated aqueous solution of the impure nitrates, adjusting the pH of the resulting solution to within the range of between about 2 and about 7, adding sufficient reducing agent to react with heavy metal contaminants within said solution, adjusting the pH of the solution containing reducing agent to effect precipitation of heavy metal impurities and separating the solid impurities from the resulting purified aqueous solution of alkali metal nitrates. The resulting purified solution of alkali metal nitrates may be heated to evaporate water therefrom to produce purified molten alkali metal nitrate suitable for use as a heat transfer medium. If desired, the purified molten form may be granulated and cooled to form discrete solid particles of alkali metal nitrates.

  5. Phosphorus-containing podands. 14. Effect of alkyl substituents at phosphorus atom on complexing ability of neutral monopodands. On the nature of abnormal alkyl effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsvetkov, E.N.; Evreinov, V.I.; Bondarenko, N.A.; Safronova, Z.V.

    1996-01-01

    The previously revealed unusual effect of alkyl substituents at phosphorus atom in phosphorus-containing monopodands of the general formula o-R 2 P(O)C 6 H 4 (OCH 2 CH 2 ) n OC 6 H 4 P(O)R 2 -o, n=1-5, R = Alk, Ph, OEt on their complexing ability towards alkali metals cations has been interpreted. Alkyl radicals create great spatial obstacles to rotation of R 2 P(O) fragments around the C-P bond as compared with other substituents, which gives rise to the appearance of anomalous alkyl effect. Solvation is an additional factor, which can bring about the anomalous effect appearance or a change in the degree of its pronouncement. 47 refs.; 3 figs.; 7 tabs

  6. Atomistic characterization of the active-site solvation dynamics of a model photocatalyst

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt van Driel, Tim; Kjær, Kasper Skov; Hartsock, Robert W.

    2016-01-01

    The interactions between the reactive excited state of molecular photocatalysts and surrounding solvent dictate reaction mechanisms and pathways, but are not readily accessible to conventional optical spectroscopic techniques. Here we report an investigation of the structural and solvation dynami...... of the iridium atoms by the acetonitrile solvent and demonstrate the viability of using diffuse X-ray scattering at free-electron laser sources for studying the dynamics of photocatalysis....

  7. Alkali metal and alkali earth metal gadolinium halide scintillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourret-Courchesne, Edith; Derenzo, Stephen E.; Parms, Shameka; Porter-Chapman, Yetta D.; Wiggins, Latoria K.

    2016-08-02

    The present invention provides for a composition comprising an inorganic scintillator comprising a gadolinium halide, optionally cerium-doped, having the formula A.sub.nGdX.sub.m:Ce; wherein A is nothing, an alkali metal, such as Li or Na, or an alkali earth metal, such as Ba; X is F, Br, Cl, or I; n is an integer from 1 to 2; m is an integer from 4 to 7; and the molar percent of cerium is 0% to 100%. The gadolinium halides or alkali earth metal gadolinium halides are scintillators and produce a bright luminescence upon irradiation by a suitable radiation.

  8. Influence of temperature and molecular structure on ionic liquid solvation layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakeham, Deborah; Hayes, Robert; Warr, Gregory G; Atkin, Rob

    2009-04-30

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) force profiling is used to investigate the structure of adsorbed and solvation layers formed on a mica surface by various room temperature ionic liquids (ILs) ethylammonium nitrate (EAN), ethanolammonium nitrate (EtAN), ethylammonium formate (EAF), propylammonium formate (PAF), ethylmethylammonium formate (EMAF), and dimethylethylammonium formate (DMEAF). At least seven layers are observed for EAN at 14 degrees C (melting point 13 degrees C), decreasing as the temperature is increased to 30 degrees C due to thermal energy disrupting solvophobic forces that lead to segregation of cation alkyl tails from the charged ammonium and nitrate moieties. The number and properties of the solvation layers can also be controlled by introducing an alcohol moiety to the cation's alkyl tail (EtAN), or by replacing the nitrate anion with formate (EAF and PAF), even leading to the detection of distinct cation and anion sublayers. Substitution of primary by secondary or tertiary ammonium cations reduces the number of solvation layers formed, and also weakens the cation layer adsorbed onto mica. The observed solvation and adsorbed layer structures are discussed in terms of the intermolecular cohesive forces within the ILs.

  9. The charge-asymmetric nonlocally determined local-electric (CANDLE) solvation model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sundararaman, Ravishankar; Goddard, William A. [Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States)

    2015-02-14

    Many important applications of electronic structure methods involve molecules or solid surfaces in a solvent medium. Since explicit treatment of the solvent in such methods is usually not practical, calculations often employ continuum solvation models to approximate the effect of the solvent. Previous solvation models either involve a parametrization based on atomic radii, which limits the class of applicable solutes, or based on solute electron density, which is more general but less accurate, especially for charged systems. We develop an accurate and general solvation model that includes a cavity that is a nonlocal functional of both solute electron density and potential, local dielectric response on this nonlocally determined cavity, and nonlocal approximations to the cavity-formation and dispersion energies. The dependence of the cavity on the solute potential enables an explicit treatment of the solvent charge asymmetry. With four parameters per solvent, this “CANDLE” model simultaneously reproduces solvation energies of large datasets of neutral molecules, cations, and anions with a mean absolute error of 1.8 kcal/mol in water and 3.0 kcal/mol in acetonitrile.

  10. Febuxostat-Minoxidil Salt Solvates: Crystal Structures, Characterization, Interconversion and Solubility Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Yang Li

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Three febuxostat-minoxidil salt solvates with acetone (ACE, tetrahydrofuran (THF and isopropanol (IPA are synthesized by solvent-assisted grinding and characterized by infrared (IR, nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR, single crystal and powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD, thermogravimetry (TG and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC. These febuxostat-minoxidil salt solvates feature isostructural with the same stoichiometries (1:1:1 molecule ratio. The proton transfers from the carboxylic group of febuxostat (FEB to imino N atom of minoxidil (MIN, which forms the motif with combined R 2 2 (9 R 4 2 (8 R 2 2 (9 graph set in the three solvates. The solvents occupy the different positions related to the motif, which results in the apparent differences in PXRD patterns before/after desolvation although they are isostructures. The FEB-MIN·THF was more thermostable than FEB-MIN·ACE and FEB-MIN·IPA relative to solvent removal from DSC patterns, which is different from the results from the solvent-exchange experiments in chemical kinetics. All three salt solvates exhibit increased equilibrium solubility compared to FEB in aqueous medium.

  11. DFT study of the interaction between DOTA chelator and competitive alkali metal ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frimpong, E; Skelton, A A; Honarparvar, B

    2017-09-01

    1, 4, 7, 10-tetraazacyclododecane-1, 4, 7, 10-tetracetic acid (DOTA) is an important chelator for radiolabeling of pharmaceuticals. The ability of alkali metals found in the body to complex with DOTA and compete with radio metal ions can alter the radiolabeling process. Non-covalent interactions between DOTA complexed with alkali metals Li + , Na + , K + and Rb + , are investigated with density functional theory using B3LYP and ωB97XD functionals. Conformational possibilities of DOTA were explored with a varying number of carboxylic pendant arms of DOTA in close proximity to the ions. It is found that the case in which four arms of DOTA are interacting with ions is more stable than other conformations. The objective of this study is to explore the electronic structure properties upon complexation of alkali metals Li + Na + , K + and Rb + with a DOTA chelator. Interaction energies, relaxation energies, entropies, Gibbs free energies and enthalpies show that the stability of DOTA, complexed with alkali metals decreases down the group of the periodic table. Implicit water solvation affects the complexation of DOTA-ions leading to decreases in the stability of the complexes. NBO analysis through the natural population charges and the second order perturbation theory, revealed a charge transfer between DOTA and alkali metals. Conceptual DFT-based properties such as HOMO/LUMO energies, ΔE HOMO-LUMO and chemical hardness and softness indicated a decrease in the chemical stability of DOTA-alkali metal complexes down the alkali metal series. This study serves as a guide to researchers in the field of organometallic chelators, particularly, radiopharmaceuticals in finding the efficient optimal match between chelators and various metal ions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Solvated protein-DNA docking using HADDOCK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dijk, Marc van; Visscher, Koen M.; Kastritis, Panagiotis L.; Bonvin, Alexandre M. J. J., E-mail: a.m.j.j.bonvin@uu.nl [Utrecht University, Bijvoet Center for Biomolecular Research, Faculty of Science-Chemistry (Netherlands)

    2013-05-15

    Interfacial water molecules play an important role in many aspects of protein-DNA specificity and recognition. Yet they have been mostly neglected in the computational modeling of these complexes. We present here a solvated docking protocol that allows explicit inclusion of water molecules in the docking of protein-DNA complexes and demonstrate its feasibility on a benchmark of 30 high-resolution protein-DNA complexes containing crystallographically-determined water molecules at their interfaces. Our protocol is capable of reproducing the solvation pattern at the interface and recovers hydrogen-bonded water-mediated contacts in many of the benchmark cases. Solvated docking leads to an overall improvement in the quality of the generated protein-DNA models for cases with limited conformational change of the partners upon complex formation. The applicability of this approach is demonstrated on real cases by docking a representative set of 6 complexes using unbound protein coordinates, model-built DNA and knowledge-based restraints. As HADDOCK supports the inclusion of a variety of NMR restraints, solvated docking is also applicable for NMR-based structure calculations of protein-DNA complexes.

  13. Solvated protein–DNA docking using HADDOCK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dijk, Marc van; Visscher, Koen M.; Kastritis, Panagiotis L.; Bonvin, Alexandre M. J. J.

    2013-01-01

    Interfacial water molecules play an important role in many aspects of protein–DNA specificity and recognition. Yet they have been mostly neglected in the computational modeling of these complexes. We present here a solvated docking protocol that allows explicit inclusion of water molecules in the docking of protein–DNA complexes and demonstrate its feasibility on a benchmark of 30 high-resolution protein–DNA complexes containing crystallographically-determined water molecules at their interfaces. Our protocol is capable of reproducing the solvation pattern at the interface and recovers hydrogen-bonded water-mediated contacts in many of the benchmark cases. Solvated docking leads to an overall improvement in the quality of the generated protein–DNA models for cases with limited conformational change of the partners upon complex formation. The applicability of this approach is demonstrated on real cases by docking a representative set of 6 complexes using unbound protein coordinates, model-built DNA and knowledge-based restraints. As HADDOCK supports the inclusion of a variety of NMR restraints, solvated docking is also applicable for NMR-based structure calculations of protein–DNA complexes.

  14. Solvated protein-DNA docking using HADDOCK

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, Marc; Visscher, Koen M; Bonvin, Alexandre M.J.J; Kastritis, Panagiotis L.

    2013-01-01

    Interfacial water molecules play an important role in many aspects of protein-DNA specificity and recognition. Yet they have been mostly neglected in the computational modeling of these complexes. We present here a solvated docking protocol that allows explicit inclusion of water molecules in the

  15. Partial solvation parameters and LSER molecular descriptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panayiotou, Costas

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The one-to-one correspondence of LSER molecular descriptors and partial solvation parameters (PSPs) for propionic acid. Highlights: ► Quantum-mechanics based development of a new QSPR predictive method. ► One-to-one correspondence of partial solvation parameters and LSER molecular descriptors. ► Development of alternative routes for the determination of partial solvation parameters and solubility parameters. ► Expansion and enhancement of solubility parameter approach. - Abstract: The partial solvation parameters (PSP) have been defined recently, on the basis of the insight derived from modern quantum chemical calculations, in an effort to overcome some of the inherent restrictions of the original definition of solubility parameter and expand its range of applications. The present work continues along these lines and introduces two new solvation parameters, the van der Waals and the polarity/refractivity ones, which may replace both of the former dispersion and polar PSPs. Thus, one may use either the former scheme of PSPs (dispersion, polar, acidic, and basic) or, equivalently, the new scheme (van der Waals, polarity/refractivity, acidic, basic). The new definitions are made in a simple and straightforward manner and, thus, the strength and appeal of the widely accepted concept of solubility parameter is preserved. The inter-relations of the various PSPs are critically discussed and their values are tabulated for a variety of common substances. The advantage of the new scheme of PSPs is the bridge that makes with the corresponding Abraham’s LSER descriptors. With this bridge, one may exchange information between PSPs, LSER experimental scales, and quantum mechanics calculations such as via the COSMO-RS theory. The proposed scheme is a predictive one and it is applicable to, both, homo-solvated and hetero-solvated compounds. The new scheme is tested for the calculation of activity coefficients at infinite dilution, for octanol

  16. Density functional theory based screening of ternary alkali-transition metal borohydrides: A computational material design project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hummelshøj, Jens Strabo; Landis, David; Voss, Johannes

    2009-01-01

    We present a computational screening study of ternary metal borohydrides for reversible hydrogen storage based on density functional theory. We investigate the stability and decomposition of alloys containing 1 alkali metal atom, Li, Na, or K (M1); and 1 alkali, alkaline earth or 3d/4d transition...

  17. Lieb-Liniger-like model of quantum solvation in CO-4HeN clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrelly, D.; Iñarrea, M.; Lanchares, V.; Salas, J. P.

    2016-05-01

    Small 4He clusters doped with various molecules allow for the study of "quantum solvation" as a function of cluster size. A peculiarity of quantum solvation is that, as the number of 4He atoms is increased from N = 1, the solvent appears to decouple from the molecule which, in turn, appears to undergo free rotation. This is generally taken to signify the onset of "microscopic superfluidity." Currently, little is known about the quantum mechanics of the decoupling mechanism, mainly because the system is a quantum (N + 1)-body problem in three dimensions which makes computations difficult. Here, a one-dimensional model is studied in which the 4He atoms are confined to revolve on a ring and encircle a rotating CO molecule. The Lanczos algorithm is used to investigate the eigenvalue spectrum as the number of 4He atoms is varied. Substantial solvent decoupling is observed for as few as N = 5 4He atoms. Examination of the Hamiltonian matrix, which has an almost block diagonal structure, reveals increasingly weak inter-block (solvent-molecule) coupling as the number of 4He atoms is increased. In the absence of a dopant molecule the system is similar to a Lieb-Liniger (LL) gas and we find a relatively rapid transition to the LL limit as N is increased. In essence, the molecule initially—for very small N—provides a central, if relatively weak, attraction to organize the cluster; as more 4He atoms are added, the repulsive interactions between the identical bosons start to dominate as the solvation ring (shell) becomes more crowded which causes the molecule to start to decouple. For low N, the molecule pins the atoms in place relative to itself; as N increases the atom-atom repulsion starts to dominate the Hamiltonian and the molecule decouples. We conclude that, while the notion of superfluidity is a useful and correct description of the decoupling process, a molecular viewpoint provides complementary insights into the quantum mechanism of the transition from a molecular

  18. Advanced dielectric continuum model of preferential solvation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basilevsky, Mikhail; Odinokov, Alexey; Nikitina, Ekaterina; Grigoriev, Fedor; Petrov, Nikolai; Alfimov, Mikhail

    2009-01-01

    A continuum model for solvation effects in binary solvent mixtures is formulated in terms of the density functional theory. The presence of two variables, namely, the dimensionless solvent composition y and the dimensionless total solvent density z, is an essential feature of binary systems. Their coupling, hidden in the structure of the local dielectric permittivity function, is postulated at the phenomenological level. Local equilibrium conditions are derived by a variation in the free energy functional expressed in terms of the composition and density variables. They appear as a pair of coupled equations defining y and z as spatial distributions. We consider the simplest spherically symmetric case of the Born-type ion immersed in the benzene/dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) solvent mixture. The profiles of y(R ) and z(R ) along the radius R, which measures the distance from the ion center, are found in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. It is shown that for a given solute ion z(R ) does not depend significantly on the composition variable y. A simplified solution is then obtained by inserting z(R ), found in the MD simulation for the pure DMSO, in the single equation which defines y(R ). In this way composition dependences of the main solvation effects are investigated. The local density augmentation appears as a peak of z(R ) at the ion boundary. It is responsible for the fine solvation effects missing when the ordinary solvation theories, in which z =1, are applied. These phenomena, studied for negative ions, reproduce consistently the simulation results. For positive ions the simulation shows that z ≫1 (z =5-6 at the maximum of the z peak), which means that an extremely dense solvation shell is formed. In such a situation the continuum description fails to be valid within a consistent parametrization.

  19. Upgrading platform using alkali metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, John Howard

    2014-09-09

    A process for removing sulfur, nitrogen or metals from an oil feedstock (such as heavy oil, bitumen, shale oil, etc.) The method involves reacting the oil feedstock with an alkali metal and a radical capping substance. The alkali metal reacts with the metal, sulfur or nitrogen content to form one or more inorganic products and the radical capping substance reacts with the carbon and hydrogen content to form a hydrocarbon phase. The inorganic products may then be separated out from the hydrocarbon phase.

  20. Alkali silica reaction (ASR) in cement free alkali activated sustainable concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-19

    This report summarizes the findings of an experimental evaluation into alkali silica : reaction (ASR) in cement free alkali-activated slag and fly ash binder concrete. The : susceptibility of alkali-activated fly ash and slag concrete binders to dele...

  1. Alkali Rydberg states in electromagnetic fields: computational physics meets experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krug, A.

    2001-11-01

    We study highly excited hydrogen and alkali atoms ('Rydberg states') under the influence of a strong microwave field. As the external frequency is comparable to the highly excited electron's classical Kepler frequency, the external field induces a strong coupling of many different quantum mechanical energy levels and finally leads to the ionization of the outer electron. While periodically driven atomic hydrogen can be seen as a paradigm of quantum chaotic motion in an open (decaying) quantum system, the presence of the non-hydrogenic atomic core - which unavoidably has to be treated quantum mechanically - entails some complications. Indeed, laboratory experiments show clear differences in the ionization dynamics of microwave driven hydrogen and non-hydrogenic Rydberg states. In the first part of this thesis, a machinery is developed that allows for numerical experiments on alkali and hydrogen atoms under precisely identical laboratory conditions. Due to the high density of states in the parameter regime typically explored in laboratory experiments, such simulations are only possible with the most advanced parallel computing facilities, in combination with an efficient parallel implementation of the numerical approach. The second part of the thesis is devoted to the results of the numerical experiment. We identify and describe significant differences and surprising similarities in the ionization dynamics of atomic hydrogen as compared to alkali atoms, and give account of the relevant frequency scales that distinguish hydrogenic from non-hydrogenic ionization behavior. Our results necessitate a reinterpretation of the experimental results so far available, and solve the puzzle of a distinct ionization behavior of periodically driven hydrogen and non-hydrogenic Rydberg atoms - an unresolved question for about one decade. Finally, microwave-driven Rydberg states will be considered as prototypes of open, complex quantum systems that exhibit a complicated temporal decay

  2. Hydration number of alkali metal ions determined by insertion in a conducting polymer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skaarup, Steen

    2008-01-01

    of all other water molecules whose properties are still influenced significantly by the cation. Knowing the hydration number is important when considering, for instance, the transport of Na+ and K+ in biological cell membranes, since their different behavior may depend on the details of ion hydration....... The solvation of alkali metal ions has been discussed for many years without a clear consensus. This work presents a systematic study of the hydration numbers of the 5 alkali metal ions, using the electrochemical insertion of the ions in a conducting polymer (polypyrrole containing the large immobile anion DBS...... direct calculation of the number of M+ ions entering the film, and therefore the inserted M+ mass. The mass of the water molecules is calculated as a difference. The results yield the following primary hydration numbers: Li+: 5.5-5.6; Na+: 4.0-4.1; K+: 2.0-2.5; Rb+: 0.6-1.2; Cs+: ~0. The most important...

  3. Additive scheme for calculation of solvation enthalpies of heterocyclic aromatic compounds. Sublimation/vaporization enthalpy at 298.15 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solomonov, Boris N.; Nagrimanov, Ruslan N.; Mukhametzyanov, Timur A.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Additivity scheme for solvation enthalpies estimation of heteroaromatic compounds was proposed. • Method for determination of vaporization/sublimation enthalpies directly at 298.15 K was developed. • Solution enthalpies of 25 heteroaromatic compounds were measured. • Vaporization/sublimation enthalpies of 44 heteroaromatic compounds were determined. • Obtained values are in good agreement with the results of conventional methods. - Abstract: Hereby we propose a method for determination of vaporization and sublimation enthalpies of heterocyclic and carbonyl-containing aromatic compounds at 298.15 K. According to this method vaporization and sublimation enthalpies at 298.15 K are determined based on enthalpies of solvation and solution. Solvation enthalpies of heteroatomatic and carbonyl-containing compounds are calculated using an additive scheme from the solvation enthalpy of closest aromatic hydrocarbon and contributions related to the exchange of CH-groups of hydrocarbon with corresponding substituent atoms or groups. Measured solution enthalpies together with calculated solvation enthalpies allowed to calculate corresponding vaporization and sublimation enthalpies at 298.15 K for a large number of heterocyclic and carbonyl-containing compounds. We have also found that in a number of cases instead of solution enthalpy in benzene at 298.15 K fusion enthalpy at the melting temperature can be used. Comparison between literature data and calculated vaporization and sublimation enthalpies demonstrates satisfactory performance of the proposed method.

  4. Additive scheme for calculation of solvation enthalpies of heterocyclic aromatic compounds. Sublimation/vaporization enthalpy at 298.15 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solomonov, Boris N., E-mail: boris.solomonov@kpfu.ru; Nagrimanov, Ruslan N.; Mukhametzyanov, Timur A.

    2016-06-10

    Highlights: • Additivity scheme for solvation enthalpies estimation of heteroaromatic compounds was proposed. • Method for determination of vaporization/sublimation enthalpies directly at 298.15 K was developed. • Solution enthalpies of 25 heteroaromatic compounds were measured. • Vaporization/sublimation enthalpies of 44 heteroaromatic compounds were determined. • Obtained values are in good agreement with the results of conventional methods. - Abstract: Hereby we propose a method for determination of vaporization and sublimation enthalpies of heterocyclic and carbonyl-containing aromatic compounds at 298.15 K. According to this method vaporization and sublimation enthalpies at 298.15 K are determined based on enthalpies of solvation and solution. Solvation enthalpies of heteroatomatic and carbonyl-containing compounds are calculated using an additive scheme from the solvation enthalpy of closest aromatic hydrocarbon and contributions related to the exchange of CH-groups of hydrocarbon with corresponding substituent atoms or groups. Measured solution enthalpies together with calculated solvation enthalpies allowed to calculate corresponding vaporization and sublimation enthalpies at 298.15 K for a large number of heterocyclic and carbonyl-containing compounds. We have also found that in a number of cases instead of solution enthalpy in benzene at 298.15 K fusion enthalpy at the melting temperature can be used. Comparison between literature data and calculated vaporization and sublimation enthalpies demonstrates satisfactory performance of the proposed method.

  5. Is Electronegativity a Useful Descriptor for the 'Pseudo-Alkali-Metal' NH4?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whiteside, Alexander; Xantheas, Sotiris S.; Gutowski, Maciej S.

    2011-01-01

    Molecular ions in the form of 'pseudo-atoms' are common structural motifs in chemistry, with properties that are transferrable between different compounds. We have determined the electronegativity of the 'pseudo-alkali metal' ammonium (NH4) and evaluated its reliability as a descriptor in comparison to the electronegativities of the alkali metals. The computed properties of its binary complexes with astatine and of selected borohydrides confirm the similarity of NH4 to the alkali metal atoms, although the electronegativity of NH4 is relatively large in comparison to its cationic radius. We paid particular attention to the molecular properties of ammonium (angular anisotropy, geometric relaxation, and reactivity), which can cause deviations from the behaviour expected of a conceptual 'true alkali metal' with this electronegativity. These deviations allow for the discrimination of effects associated with the polyatomic nature of NH4.

  6. Process for the disposal of alkali metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, L.C.

    1979-01-01

    The invention describes a method of disposing of alkali metals by forming a solid waste for storage. The method comprises preparing an aqueous disposal solution of at least 55 weight percent alkali metal hydroxide, heating the alkali metal to melting temperature to form a feed solution, and spraying the molten feed solution into the disposal solution. The alkali metal reacts with the water in the disposal solution in a controlled reaction which produces alkali metal hydroxide, hydrogen and heat and thereby forms a solution of alkali metal hydroxides. Water is added to the solution in amounts sufficient to maintain the concentration of alkali metal hydroxides in the solution at 70 to 90 weight percent, and to maintain the temperature of the solution at about the boiling point. Removing and cooling the alkali metal hydroxide solution thereby forms a solid waste for storage. The method is particularly applicable to radioactive alkali metal reactor coolant. (auth)

  7. Solvation of excess electrons trapped in charge pockets on molecular surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalbout, Abraham F.

    This work considers the ability of hydrogen fluoride (HF) to solvate excess electrons located on cyclic hydrocarbon surfaces. The principle applied involves the formation of systems in which excess electrons can be stabilized not only on concentrated molecular surface charge pockets but also by HF. Recent studies have shown that OH groups can form stable hydrogen-bonded networks on one side of a hydrocarbon surface (i.e. cyclohexane sheets), at the same time, the hydrogen atoms on the opposite side of this surface form a pocket of positive charge can attract the excess electron. This density can be further stabilized by the addition of an HF molecule that can form an 'anion with an internally solvated electron' (AISE) state. These systems are shown to be stable with respect to vertical electron detachment (VDE).

  8. Relaxation dynamics following transition of solvated electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnett, R.B.; Landman, U.; Nitzan, A.

    1989-01-01

    Relaxation dynamics following an electronic transition of an excess solvated electron in clusters and in bulk water is studied using an adiabatic simulation method. In this method the solvent evolves classically and the electron is constrained to a specified state. The coupling between the solvent and the excess electron is evaluated via the quantum expectation value of the electron--water molecule interaction potential. The relaxation following excitation (or deexcitation) is characterized by two time scales: (i) a very fast (/similar to/20--30 fs) one associated with molecular rotations in the first solvation shell about the electron, and (ii) a slower stage (/similar to/200 fs), which is of the order of the longitudinal dielectric relaxation time. The fast relaxation stage exhibits an isotope effect. The spectroscopical consequences of the relaxation dynamics are discussed

  9. Generalized Born Models of Macromolecular Solvation Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashford, Donald; Case, David A.

    2000-10-01

    It would often be useful in computer simulations to use a simple description of solvation effects, instead of explicitly representing the individual solvent molecules. Continuum dielectric models often work well in describing the thermodynamic aspects of aqueous solvation, and approximations to such models that avoid the need to solve the Poisson equation are attractive because of their computational efficiency. Here we give an overview of one such approximation, the generalized Born model, which is simple and fast enough to be used for molecular dynamics simulations of proteins and nucleic acids. We discuss its strengths and weaknesses, both for its fidelity to the underlying continuum model and for its ability to replace explicit consideration of solvent molecules in macromolecular simulations. We focus particularly on versions of the generalized Born model that have a pair-wise analytical form, and therefore fit most naturally into conventional molecular mechanics calculations.

  10. Theory of optical spectra of solvated electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kestner, N.R.

    1975-01-01

    During the last few years better theoretical models of solvated electron have been developed. These models allow one to calculate a priori the observable properties of the trapped electron. One of the most important and most widely determined properties is the optical spectrum. In this paper we consider the predictions of the theories not only as to the band maximum but line shape and width. In addition we will review how the theories predict these will depend on the solvent, pressure, temperature, and solvent density. In all cases extensive comparisons will be made with experimental work. In addition four new areas will be explored and recent results will be presented. These concern electrons in dense polar gases, the time development of the solvated electron spectrum, solvated electrons in mixed solvents, and photoelectron emission spectra (PEE) as it relates to higher excited states. This paper will review all recent theoretical calculations and present a critical review of the present status and future developments which are anticipated. The best theories are quite successful in predicting trends, and qualitative agreement concerning band maximum. The theory is still weak in predicting line shape and line width

  11. Preferential solvation: dividing surface vs excess numbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Seishi; Matubayasi, Nobuyuki

    2014-04-10

    How do osmolytes affect the conformation and configuration of supramolecular assembly, such as ion channel opening and actin polymerization? The key to the answer lies in the excess solvation numbers of water and osmolyte molecules; these numbers are determinable solely from experimental data, as guaranteed by the phase rule, as we show through the exact solution theory of Kirkwood and Buff (KB). The osmotic stress technique (OST), in contrast, purposes to yield alternative hydration numbers through the use of the dividing surface borrowed from the adsorption theory. However, we show (i) OST is equivalent, when it becomes exact, to the crowding effect in which the osmolyte exclusion dominates over hydration; (ii) crowding is not the universal driving force of the osmolyte effect (e.g., actin polymerization); (iii) the dividing surface for solvation is useful only for crowding, unlike in the adsorption theory which necessitates its use due to the phase rule. KB thus clarifies the true meaning and limitations of the older perspectives on preferential solvation (such as solvent binding models, crowding, and OST), and enables excess number determination without any further assumptions.

  12. Preferential Solvation of an Asymmetric Redox Molecule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Kee Sung; Rajput, Nav Nidhi; Vijayakumar, M.; Wei, Xiaoliang; Wang, Wei; Hu, Jian Z.; Persson, Kristin A.; Mueller, Karl T.

    2016-12-15

    The fundamental correlations between inter-molecular interactions, solvation structure and functionality of electrolytes are in many cases unknown, particularly for multi-component liquid systems. In this work, we explore such correlations by investigating the complex interplay between solubility and solvation structure for the electrolyte system comprising N-(ferrocenylmethyl)-N,N-dimethyl-N-ethylammonium bistrifluoromethylsulfonimide (Fc1N112-TFSI) dissolved in a ternary carbonate solvent mixture using combined NMR relaxation and computational analyses. Probing the evolution of the solvent-solvent, ion-solvent and ion-ion interactions with an increase in solute concentration provides a molecular level understanding of the solubility limit of the Fc1N112-TFSI system. An increase in solute con-centration leads to pronounced Fc1N112-TFSI contact-ion pair formation by diminishing solvent-solvent and ion-solvent type interactions. At the solubility limit, the precipitation of solute is initiated through agglomeration of contact-ion pairs due to overlapping solvation shells.

  13. Alkali-vapor laser-excimer pumped alkali laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yue Desheng; Li Wenyu; Wang Hongyan; Yang Zining; Xu Xiaojun

    2012-01-01

    Based on the research internal and overseas, the principle of the excimer pumped alkali laser (XPAL) is explained, and the advantages and disadvantages of the XPAL are analyzed. Taking into consideration the difficulties that the diode pumped alkali laser (DPAL) meets on its development, the ability to solve or avoid these difficulties of XPAL is also analyzed. By summing up the achievements of the XPAL, the possible further prospect is proposed. The XPAL is of possibility to improve the performance of the DPAL. (authors)

  14. Alkali-aggregate reactivity (AAR) facts book.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    This document provides detailed information on alkali-aggregate reactivity (AAR). It primarily discusses alkali-silica reaction (ASR), covering the chemistry, symptoms, test methods, prevention, specifications, diagnosis and prognosis, and mitigation...

  15. Method of making alkali metal hydrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecharsky, Vitalij K.; Gupta, Shalabh; Pruski, Marek; Hlova, Ihor; Castle, Andra

    2017-05-30

    A method is provided for making alkali metal hydrides by mechanochemically reacting alkali metal and hydrogen gas under mild temperature (e.g room temperature) and hydrogen pressure conditions without the need for catalyst, solvent, and intentional heating or cooling.

  16. Electrolytic method to make alkali alcoholates using ion conducting alkali electrolyte/separator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Ashok V [Salt Lake City, UT; Balagopal, Shekar [Sandy, UT; Pendelton, Justin [Salt Lake City, UT

    2011-12-13

    Alkali alcoholates, also called alkali alkoxides, are produced from alkali metal salt solutions and alcohol using a three-compartment electrolytic cell. The electrolytic cell includes an anolyte compartment configured with an anode, a buffer compartment, and a catholyte compartment configured with a cathode. An alkali ion conducting solid electrolyte configured to selectively transport alkali ions is positioned between the anolyte compartment and the buffer compartment. An alkali ion permeable separator is positioned between the buffer compartment and the catholyte compartment. The catholyte solution may include an alkali alcoholate and alcohol. The anolyte solution may include at least one alkali salt. The buffer compartment solution may include a soluble alkali salt and an alkali alcoholate in alcohol.

  17. Construction of thermionic alkali-ion sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ul Haq, F.

    1986-01-01

    A simple technique is described by which singly charged alkali ions of K, Na, Li, Rb and Cs are produced by heating ultra-pure chemical salts of different alkali metals on tungsten filaments without employing a temperature measuring device. The character of alkali-ion currents at different heating powers and the remarkably constant ion emission current for prolonged periods are discussed. (author)

  18. Alkali binding in hydrated Portland cement paste

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Wei; Brouwers, Jos

    2010-01-01

    The alkali-binding capacity of C–S–H in hydrated Portland cement pastes is addressed in this study. The amount of bound alkalis in C–S–H is computed based on the alkali partition theories firstly proposed by Taylor (1987) and later further developed by Brouwers and Van Eijk (2003). Experimental data

  19. Exciton emissions in alkali cyanides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weid, J.P. von der.

    1979-10-01

    The emissions of Alkali Cyanides X irradiated at low temperature were measured. In addition to the molecular (Frenkel Type) exciton emissions, another emitting centre was found and tentatively assigned to a charge transfer self trapped exciton. The nature of the molecular exciton emitting state is discussed. (Author) [pt

  20. Modifying Poisson equation for near-solute dielectric polarization and solvation free energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Pei-Kun, E-mail: peikun@isu.edu.tw

    2016-06-15

    Highlights: • We modify the Poisson equation. • The dielectric polarization was calculated from the modified Poisson equation. • The solvation free energies of the solutes were calculated from the dielectric polarization. • The calculated solvation free energies were similar to those obtained from MD simulations. - Abstract: The dielectric polarization P is important for calculating the stability of protein conformation and the binding affinity of protein–protein/ligand interactions and for exploring the nonthermal effect of an external electric field on biomolecules. P was decomposed into the product of the electric dipole moment per molecule p; bulk solvent density N{sub bulk}; and relative solvent molecular density g. For a molecular solute, 4πr{sup 2}p(r) oscillates with the distance r to the solute, and g(r) has a large peak in the near-solute region, as observed in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Herein, the Poisson equation was modified for computing p based on the modified Gauss’s law of Maxwell’s equations, and the potential of the mean force was used for computing g. For one or two charged atoms in a water cluster, the solvation free energies of the solutes obtained by these equations were similar to those obtained from MD simulations.

  1. Photoinduced electron transfer and solvation in iodide-doped acetonitrile clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrler, Oli T; Griffin, Graham B; Young, Ryan M; Neumark, Daniel M

    2009-04-02

    We have used ultrafast time-resolved photoelectron imaging to measure charge transfer dynamics in iodide-doped acetonitrile clusters I(-)(CH(3)CN)(n) with n = 5-10. Strong modulations of vertical detachment energies were observed following charge transfer from the halide, allowing interpretation of the ongoing dynamics. We observe a sharp drop in the vertical detachment energy (VDE) within 300-400 fs, followed by a biexponential increase that is complete by approximately 10 ps. Comparison to theory suggests that the iodide is internally solvated and that photodetachment results in formation of a diffuse electron cloud in a confined cavity. We interpret the initial drop in VDE as a combination of expansion of the cavity and localization of the excess electron on one or two solvent molecules. The subsequent increase in VDE is attributed to a combination of the I atom leaving the cavity and rearrangement of the acetonitrile molecules to solvate the electron. The n = 5-8 clusters then show a drop in VDE of around 50 meV on a much longer time scale. The long-time VDEs are consistent with those of (CH(3)CN)(n)(-) clusters with internally solvated electrons. Although the excited-state created by the pump pulse decays by emission of a slow electron, no such decay is seen by 200 ps.

  2. High-dimensional neural network potentials for solvation: The case of protonated water clusters in helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schran, Christoph; Uhl, Felix; Behler, Jörg; Marx, Dominik

    2018-03-01

    The design of accurate helium-solute interaction potentials for the simulation of chemically complex molecules solvated in superfluid helium has long been a cumbersome task due to the rather weak but strongly anisotropic nature of the interactions. We show that this challenge can be met by using a combination of an effective pair potential for the He-He interactions and a flexible high-dimensional neural network potential (NNP) for describing the complex interaction between helium and the solute in a pairwise additive manner. This approach yields an excellent agreement with a mean absolute deviation as small as 0.04 kJ mol-1 for the interaction energy between helium and both hydronium and Zundel cations compared with coupled cluster reference calculations with an energetically converged basis set. The construction and improvement of the potential can be performed in a highly automated way, which opens the door for applications to a variety of reactive molecules to study the effect of solvation on the solute as well as the solute-induced structuring of the solvent. Furthermore, we show that this NNP approach yields very convincing agreement with the coupled cluster reference for properties like many-body spatial and radial distribution functions. This holds for the microsolvation of the protonated water monomer and dimer by a few helium atoms up to their solvation in bulk helium as obtained from path integral simulations at about 1 K.

  3. A light water excess heat reaction suggests that cold fusion may be alkali-hydrogen fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bush, R.T.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that Mills and Kneizys presented data in support of a light water excess heat reaction obtained with an electrolytic cell highly reminiscent of the Fleischmann-Pons cold fusion cell. The claim of Mills and Kneizys that their excess heat reaction can be explained on the basis of a novel chemistry, which supposedly also explains cold fusion, is rejected in favor of their reaction being, instead, a light water cold fusion reaction. It is the first known light water cold fusion reaction to exhibit excess heat, it may serve as a prototype to expand our understanding of cold fusion. From this new reactions are deduced, including those common to past cold fusion studies. This broader pattern of nuclear reactions is typically seen to involve a fusion of the nuclides of the alkali atoms with the simplest of the alkali-type nuclides, namely, protons, deuterons, and tritons. Thus, the term alkali-hydrogen fusion seems appropriate for this new type of reaction with three subclasses: alkali-hydrogen fusion, alkali-deuterium fusion, and alkali-tritium fusion. A new three-dimensional transmission resonance model (TRM) is sketched. Finally, preliminary experimental evidence in support of the hypothesis of a light water nuclear reaction and alkali-hydrogen fusion is reported. Evidence is presented that appears to strongly implicate the transmission resonance phenomenon of the new TRM

  4. Structure peculiarities of mixed alkali silicate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bershtein, V.A.; Gorbachev, V.V.; Egorov, V.

    1980-01-01

    The thermal porperties and structure of alkali and mixed alkali (Li, Na, K) silicate glasses by means of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), the positron annihilation method, X-ray fluorescence and infrared (300-30 cm -1 ) spectroscopy were studied. Introduction of different alkali cations in glass results in nonadditive change in their electron structure (bond covalence degree growth) and the thermal behaviour. The different manifestations of mixed alkali effect can be explained by the lessening of long distance Coulomb interactions and strengthening the short-range forces in the mixed alkali glasses. (orig.)

  5. Nonpolar solvation dynamics for a nonpolar solute in room ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sandipa Indra

    2018-01-30

    Jan 30, 2018 ... Keywords. Solvation dynamics; nonpolar solvation; ionic liquid; molecular dynamics; linear response theory. 1. ... J. Chem. Sci. (2018) 130:3 spectrum of the excited probe molecule for imida- .... Therefore, the solute and the RTIL ions interact only ... interval of 30 ps from a long equilibrium trajectory of dura-.

  6. Rotation and solvation of ammonium ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perrin, C.L.; Gipe, R.K.

    1987-01-01

    From nitrogen-15 spin-lattice relaxation times and nuclear Overhauser enhancements, the rotational correlations time tau/sub c/ for 15 NH 4 + was determined in s series of solvents. Values of tau/sub c/ range from 0.46 to 20 picoseconds. The solvent dependent of tau/sub c/ cannot be explained in terms of solvent polarity, molecular dipole moment, solvent basicity, solvent dielectric relaxation, or solvent viscosity. The rapid rotation and the variation with solvent can be accounted for by a model that involves hydrogen bonding of an NH proton to more than one solvent molecule in a disordered solvation environment. 25 references, 1 table

  7. Crown Ether Complexes of Alkali-Metal Chlorides from SO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter, Kirsten; Rudel, Stefan S; Buchner, Magnus R; Kraus, Florian; von Hänisch, Carsten

    2017-07-18

    The structures of alkali-metal chloride SO 2 solvates (Li-Cs) in conjunction with 12-crown-4 or 1,2-disila-12-crown-4 show strong discrepancies, despite the structural similarity of the ligands. Both types of crown ethers form 1:1 complexes with LiCl to give [Li(1,2-disila-12-crown-4)(SO 2 Cl)] (1) and [Li(12-crown-4)Cl]⋅4 SO 2 (2). However, 1,2-disila-12-crown-4 proved unable to coordinate cations too large for the cavity diameter, for example, by the formation of sandwich-type complexes. As a result, 12-crown-4 reacts exclusively with the heavier alkali-metal chlorides NaCl, KCl and RbCl. Compounds [Na(12-crown-4) 2 ]Cl⋅4 SO 2 (3) and [M(12-crown-4) 2 (SO 2 )]Cl⋅4 SO 2 (4: M=K; 5: M=Rb) all showed S-coordination to the chloride ions through four SO 2 molecules. Compounds 4 and 5 additionally exhibit the first crystallographically confirmed non-bridging O,O'-coordination mode of SO 2 . Unexpectedly, the disila-crown ether supports the dissolution of RbCl and CsCl in the solvent and gives the homoleptic SO 2 -solvated alkali-metal chlorides [MCl⋅3 SO 2 ] (6: M=Rb; 7: M=Cs), which incorporate bridging μ-O,O'-coordinating moieties and the unprecedented side-on O,O'-coordination mode. All compounds were characterised by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The crown ether complexes were additionally studied by using NMR spectroscopy, and the presence of SO 2 at ambient temperature was revealed by IR spectroscopy of the neat compounds. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Gradient heating protocol for a diode-pumped alkali laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, He; Wang, You; Han, Juhong; Yu, Hang; Rong, Kepeng; Wang, Shunyan; An, Guofei; Wang, Hongyuan; Zhang, Wei; Wu, Peng; Yu, Qiang

    2018-06-01

    A diode-pumped alkali laser (DPAL) has gained rapid development in the recent years. Until now, the structure with single heater has been widely utilized to adjust the temperature of an alkali vapor cell in most of the literatures about DPALs. However, for an end-pumped DPAL using single heater, most pump energy is absorbed by the gain media near the entrance cell window because of the large absorption cross section of atomic alkali. As a result, the temperature in the pumping area around the entrance window will go up rapidly, especially in a case of high pumping density. The temperature rise would bring about some negative influences such as thermal effects and variations in population density. In addition, light scattering and window contamination aroused by the chemical reaction between the alkali vapor and the buffer gas will also affect the output performance of a DPAL system. To find a solution to these problems, we propose a gradient heating approach in which several heaters are tandem-set along the optical axis to anneal an alkali vapor cell. The temperature at the entrance window is adjusted to be lower than that of the other side. By using this novel scheme, one can not only achieve a homogeneous absorption of the pump energy along the cell axis, but also decrease the possibility of the window damage in a DPAL configuration. The theoretical simulation of the laser output features has been carried out for a configuration of multiple heaters. Additionally, the DPAL output performance under different gradient temperatures is also discussed in this paper. The conclusions might be helpful for development of a high-powered and high-beam-quality DPAL.

  9. Synthesis and structural characterization of alkali metal arsinoamides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao; Gamer, Michael T; Roesky, Peter W

    2017-12-20

    The aminoarsane Mes 2 AsN(H)Ph was prepared from Mes 2 AsCl and aniline in good yields. Deprotonation of Mes 2 AsN(H)Ph with suitable alkali metal bases resulted in the corresponding alkali metal derivatives. Thus, reaction of Mes 2 AsN(H)Ph with nBuLi, NaN(SiMe 3 ) 2 , or KH gave the metal complexes [(Mes 2 AsNPh){Li(OEt 2 ) 2 }], [(Mes 2 AsNPh){Na(OEt 2 )}] 2 , and [(Mes 2 AsNPh){K(THF)}] 2 . These are the first metal complexes ligated by an arsinoamide. All solid-state structures were established by single crystal X-ray diffraction. The lithium compounds form a monomer in the solid-state, whereas the sodium and the potassium derivatives are dimers. In the dimeric compounds intra- and intermolecular π-interaction of the aromatic rings with the metal atoms is observed.

  10. Emission spectra of alkali-metal (K,Na,Li)-He exciplexes in cold helium gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enomoto, K.; Hirano, K.; Kumakura, M.; Takahashi, Y.; Yabuzaki, T.

    2004-01-01

    We have observed emission spectra of excimers and exciplexes composed of a light alkali-metal atom in the first excited state and 4 He atoms [K*He n (n=1-6), Na * He n (n=1-4), and Li * He n (n=1,2)] in cryogenic He gas (the temperature 2 K -1 . Differently from exciplexes with heavier alkali-metal atoms, the spectra for the different number of He atoms were well separated, so that their assignment could be made experimentally. Comparing with the spectra of K * He n , we found that the infrared emission spectrum of the K atom excited in liquid He was from K*He 6 . To confirm the assignment, we have also carried out ab initio calculation of adiabatic potential curves and peak positions of the emission spectra of the exciplexes

  11. Mechanisms and kinetics of electrodeposition of alkali metals on solid and liquid mercury electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Wenzhe.

    1993-01-01

    Electroreduction of alkali metal ions at mercury is an important area in electrochemistry related to the battery industry. In this work, four major topics were considered: alkali metal/mercury interactions; electrosorption of alkali metal ions on solid mercury; electroreduction of alkali metal/crown ether complexes; and ammonium amalgam formation. The formation of alkali metal-mercury intermetallic compounds was studied on liquid and frozen thin layer mercury electrodes. The stoichiometry of the compounds produced under these conditions was determined using cyclic voltammetry. As expected, formation of a new phase was preceded by nucleation phenomena, which were particularly easy to monitor at solid Hg electrodes. The nucleation kinetics were studied using the chronoamperometric method. At very low temperatures, when the mobility of mercury atoms was restricted, the electrosorption of alkali metal ions on solid mercury electrodes was noted. Subsequent study allowed determination of the electrosorption parameters. The free energy of electrosorption is discussed in terms of interactions between alkali metals and mercury. The effect of crown ethers on the kinetics of alkali metal ion reduction was studied at both standard size and ultramicro-mercury electrodes in nonaqueous solutions using ultrafast cyclic voltammetry and ac voltammetry. The usefulness of ultrafast cyclic voltammetry with ultramicroelectrodes in measurements of the kinetics of amalgam formation was verified in a brief study of cadmium ion reduction. The mechanism of the complex reduction at mercury was analyzed based on the free energy changes before and after the activation state. In addition, the stoichiometry and formation constants of the crown ether/alkali metal complexes were determined using cyclic voltammetry. The mechanism of electroreduction of ammonium ions at mercury electrodes in non-aqueous media was analyzed.

  12. Molybdenum/alkali metal/ethylene glycol complexes useful as epoxidation catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marquis, E.T.; Sanderson, J.R.; Keating, K.P.

    1987-01-01

    This patent describes a clear, storage stable solution of a molybdenum/alkali metal/ethylene glycol complex in ethylene glycol made by the process comprising: reacting at an elevated temperature between about 25 0 and 150 0 C a solid ammonium molybdate or a hydrate thereof and a solid alkali metal molybdate or a hydrate thereof with ethylene glycol, such that the ratio of moles of ethylene glycol to total gram atoms of molybdenum in the molybdates ranges from about 7:10 to 10:1, and the ratio of gram atoms of molybdenum in the ammonium molybdate or hydrate thereof to gram atoms of molybdenum in the alkali metal molybdate is from about 1:1 to about 20:1 to thereby provide a reaction product composed of a solution of an alkali metal-containing complex of molybdenum, alkali metal and ethylene glycol and by-products, including water, in the ethylene glycol and subsequently stripping the solution at a reduced pressure to remove from about 5 to about 25% of the reaction product, as distillate, to thereby provide a storage stable solution of the complex in the ethylene glycol having a molybdenum content of about 6 wt. % to about 20 wt. %, a water concentration of about 0.1 wt. % to about 6 wt. % and an acid number of more than about 60

  13. Ionic strength independence of charge distributions in solvation of biomolecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Virtanen, J. J. [Department of Chemistry, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); James Franck Institute, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Sosnick, T. R. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Institute for Biophysical Dynamics, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Computation Institute, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Freed, K. F. [Department of Chemistry, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); James Franck Institute, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Computation Institute, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)

    2014-12-14

    Electrostatic forces enormously impact the structure, interactions, and function of biomolecules. We perform all-atom molecular dynamics simulations for 5 proteins and 5 RNAs to determine the dependence on ionic strength of the ion and water charge distributions surrounding the biomolecules, as well as the contributions of ions to the electrostatic free energy of interaction between the biomolecule and the surrounding salt solution (for a total of 40 different biomolecule/solvent combinations). Although water provides the dominant contribution to the charge density distribution and to the electrostatic potential even in 1M NaCl solutions, the contributions of water molecules and of ions to the total electrostatic interaction free energy with the solvated biomolecule are comparable. The electrostatic biomolecule/solvent interaction energies and the total charge distribution exhibit a remarkable insensitivity to salt concentrations over a huge range of salt concentrations (20 mM to 1M NaCl). The electrostatic potentials near the biomolecule's surface obtained from the MD simulations differ markedly, as expected, from the potentials predicted by continuum dielectric models, even though the total electrostatic interaction free energies are within 11% of each other.

  14. Ionic strength independence of charge distributions in solvation of biomolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Virtanen, J. J.; Sosnick, T. R.; Freed, K. F.

    2014-01-01

    Electrostatic forces enormously impact the structure, interactions, and function of biomolecules. We perform all-atom molecular dynamics simulations for 5 proteins and 5 RNAs to determine the dependence on ionic strength of the ion and water charge distributions surrounding the biomolecules, as well as the contributions of ions to the electrostatic free energy of interaction between the biomolecule and the surrounding salt solution (for a total of 40 different biomolecule/solvent combinations). Although water provides the dominant contribution to the charge density distribution and to the electrostatic potential even in 1M NaCl solutions, the contributions of water molecules and of ions to the total electrostatic interaction free energy with the solvated biomolecule are comparable. The electrostatic biomolecule/solvent interaction energies and the total charge distribution exhibit a remarkable insensitivity to salt concentrations over a huge range of salt concentrations (20 mM to 1M NaCl). The electrostatic potentials near the biomolecule's surface obtained from the MD simulations differ markedly, as expected, from the potentials predicted by continuum dielectric models, even though the total electrostatic interaction free energies are within 11% of each other

  15. Sub-Shot-Noise Magnetometry with a Correlated Spin-Relaxation Dominated Alkali-Metal Vapor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kominis, I. K.

    2008-01-01

    Spin noise sets fundamental limits to the precision of measurements using spin-polarized atomic vapors, such as performed with sensitive atomic magnetometers. Spin squeezing offers the possibility to extend the measurement precision beyond the standard quantum limit of uncorrelated atoms. Contrary to current understanding, we show that, even in the presence of spin relaxation, spin squeezing can lead to a significant reduction of spin noise, and hence an increase in magnetometric sensitivity, for a long measurement time. This is the case when correlated spin relaxation due to binary alkali-atom collisions dominates independently acting decoherence processes, a situation realized in thermal high atom-density magnetometers and clocks

  16. On-line alkali monitoring - Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, Christer; Ljung, P.; Woxlin, H.

    1997-02-01

    As a consequence of the increased knowledge of the environmental impact of combustion based heat and power generation, the use of renewable biofuels will be increased. An obstacle associated to biofuel combustion compared to other fuels is the large release of alkali. Alkali compounds in flue gases are known to cause severe operational problems. Three of the major problems are; fouling of superheating tubes (causing reduced heat transfer and possibly corrosion), agglomeration of the bed material in fluidized beds, and poisoning of SCR catalysts. Yet another alkali related problem arises when, in order to increase the electric efficiency of combustion power plants, combined-cycle technology is used. Alkali vapour present in the fuel gas for the gas turbine is condensed to particles which increase corrosion and erosion of the turbine blades. The research on ash related operational problems has to be extended in order to ensure future use of biofuels in heat and power generation. In all successful research, adequate tools are necessary. To investigate ash related problems the key issue is to be able to perform continuous alkali measurements. This pilot study has investigated the need of continuous alkali measurements, which alkali species are harmful in the different applications and also available instrumentation capable of measuring the specific alkali species. The report gives a short summary presenting alkali related operational problems. In addition a schematic overview is given, showing the alkali species that possibly can exist in various parts of the power plant. 48 refs, 13 figs, 4 tabs

  17. A simple equilibrium theoretical model and predictions for a continuous wave exciplex pumped alkali laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carroll, David L; Verdeyen, Joseph T

    2013-01-01

    The exciplex pumped alkali laser (XPAL) system has been demonstrated in mixtures of Cs vapour, Ar, with and without ethane, by pumping Cs-Ar atomic collision pairs and subsequent dissociation of diatomic, electronically excited CsAr molecules (exciplexes or excimers). The blue satellites of the alkali D 2 lines provide an advantageous pathway for optically pumping atomic alkali lasers on the principal series (resonance) transitions with broad linewidth (>2 nm) semiconductor diode lasers. The development of a simple theoretical analysis of continuous-wave XPAL systems is presented along with predictions as a function of temperature and pump intensity. The model predicts that an optical-to-optical efficiency in the range of 40-50% can be achieved for XPAL.

  18. Thermodynamic and kinetic analysis of solid-phase interaction of alkali metal carbonates with arsenic pentoxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pashinkin, A.S.; Buketov, E.A.; Isabaeva, S.M.; Kasenov, B.K.

    1985-01-01

    The thermodynamic analysis of solid-phase reactions of alkali metal carbonates with arsenic pentoxide showing the possibility of formation of all arsenates at a higher than the room temperature is performed. Energetically most advantageous is formation of meta-arsenates. It is shown that temperature increase favours the reaction process. By Gibbs standard energy decrease the reactions form the Li>Na>K>Rb>Cs series. On the base of calculation data linear dependence of Gibbs standard energy in reactions on the atomic number of alkali metalis established. By the continuous weighing method the kinetics of interaction of alkali metal carbonates with arsenic pentoxide under isothermal conditions in the 450-500 deg C range is studied. Studies is the dependence of apparent energy of interaction of carbonates wih As 2 0 5 an atomic parameters of al

  19. Solvation of hydrocarbons in aqueous-organic mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sedov, I.A.; Magsumov, T.I.; Solomonov, B.N.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Thermodynamic functions of solvation in mixtures of water with acetone and acetonitrile are measured at T = 298.15 K. • Solvation of n-octane and toluene in aqueous-organic mixtures is studied. • When increasing water content, Gibbs free energies grow up steadily, while enthalpies have a maximum. • Hydrocarbons are preferentially solvated with organic cosolvent even in mixtures with rather high water content. • Acetonitrile suppresses the hydrophobic effect less than acetone. - Abstract: We study the solvation of two hydrocarbons, n-octane and toluene, in binary mixtures of water with organic cosolvents. Two polar aprotic cosolvents that are miscible with water in any proportions, acetonitrile and acetone, were considered. We determine the magnitudes of thermodynamic functions of dissolution and solvation at T = 298.15 K in the mixtures with various compositions. Solution calorimetry was used to measure the enthalpies of solution, and GC headspace analysis was applied to obtain limiting activity coefficients of solutes in the studied systems. For the first time, the enthalpies of solution of alkane in the mixtures with high water content were measured directly. We observed well-pronounced maxima of the dependencies of enthalpies of solvation from the composition of solvent and no maxima for the Gibbs free energies of solvation. Two factors are concluded to be important to explain the observed tendencies: high energy cost of reorganization of binary solvent upon insertion of solute molecules and preferential surrounding of hydrocarbons with the molecules of organic cosolvent. Enthalpy-entropy compensation leads to a steady growth of the Gibbs free energies with increasing water content. On the other hand, consideration of the plots of the Gibbs free energy against enthalpy of solvation clearly shows that the solvation properties are changed dramatically after addition of a rather small amount of organic cosolvents. It is shown that they

  20. Development and application of QM/MM methods to study the solvation effects and surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dibya, Pooja Arora [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Quantum mechanical (QM) calculations have the advantage of attaining high-level accuracy, however QM calculations become computationally inefficient as the size of the system grows. Solving complex molecular problems on large systems and ensembles by using quantum mechanics still poses a challenge in terms of the computational cost. Methods that are based on classical mechanics are an inexpensive alternative, but they lack accuracy. A good trade off between accuracy and efficiency is achieved by combining QM methods with molecular mechanics (MM) methods to use the robustness of the QM methods in terms of accuracy and the MM methods to minimize the computational cost. Two types of QM combined with MM (QM/MM) methods are the main focus of the present dissertation: the application and development of QM/MM methods for solvation studies and reactions on the Si(100) surface. The solvation studies were performed using a discreet solvation model that is largely based on first principles called the effective fragment potential method (EFP). The main idea of combining the EFP method with quantum mechanics is to accurately treat the solute-solvent and solvent-solvent interactions, such as electrostatic, polarization, dispersion and charge transfer, that are important in correctly calculating solvent effects on systems of interest. A second QM/MM method called SIMOMM (surface integrated molecular orbital molecular mechanics) is a hybrid QM/MM embedded cluster model that mimics the real surface.3 This method was employed to calculate the potential energy surfaces for reactions of atomic O on the Si(100) surface. The hybrid QM/MM method is a computationally inexpensive approach for studying reactions on larger surfaces in a reasonably accurate and efficient manner. This thesis is comprised of four chapters: Chapter 1 describes the general overview and motivation of the dissertation and gives a broad background of the computational methods that have been employed in this work

  1. Solvation of lithium ion in dimethoxyethane and propylene carbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaban, Vitaly

    2015-07-01

    Solvation of the lithium ion (Li+) in dimethoxyethane (DME) and propylene carbonate (PC) is of scientific significance and urgency in the context of lithium-ion batteries. I report PM7-MD simulations on the composition of Li+ solvation shells (SH) in a few DME/PC mixtures. The equimolar mixture features preferential solvation by PC, in agreement with classical MD studies. However, one DME molecule is always present in the first SH, supplementing the cage formed by five PC molecules. As PC molecules get removed, DME gradually substitutes vacant places. In the PC-poor mixtures, an entire SH is populated by five DME molecules.

  2. Liquid alkali metals and alkali-based alloys as electron-ion plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tosi, M.P.

    1981-06-01

    The article reviews the theory of thermodynamic and structural properties of liquid alkali metals and alkali-based alloys, within the framework of linear screening theory for the electron-ion interactions. (author)

  3. Study of e-+ alkaline atom inelastic collisions with the Glauber approxmation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bielschowsky, C.E.

    1984-01-01

    Glauber's approximation is used to study discrete excitations in alkali atoms by electron impact. The interaction between the incident electron and the core electrons and (N-1) nuclear charges is described through an Yukawa-like potential. Analitical expressions for m 2 S and m 2 P excitations are obtained, as well as numerical results for several excitations processes in alkali atoms. (Author) [pt

  4. Alkali Metal Variation and Twisting of the FeNNFe Core in Bridging Diiron Dinitrogen Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWilliams, Sean F; Rodgers, Kenton R; Lukat-Rodgers, Gudrun; Mercado, Brandon Q; Grubel, Katarzyna; Holland, Patrick L

    2016-03-21

    Alkali metal cations can interact with Fe-N2 complexes, potentially enhancing back-bonding or influencing the geometry of the iron atom. These influences are relevant to large-scale N2 reduction by iron, such as in the FeMoco of nitrogenase and the alkali-promoted Haber-Bosch process. However, to our knowledge there have been no systematic studies of a large range of alkali metals regarding their influence on transition metal-dinitrogen complexes. In this work, we varied the alkali metal in [alkali cation]2[LFeNNFeL] complexes (L = bulky β-diketiminate ligand) through the size range from Na(+) to K(+), Rb(+), and Cs(+). The FeNNFe cores have similar Fe-N and N-N distances and N-N stretching frequencies despite the drastic change in alkali metal cation size. The two diketiminates twist relative to one another, with larger dihedral angles accommodating the larger cations. In order to explain why the twisting has so little influence on the core, we performed density functional theory calculations on a simplified LFeNNFeL model, which show that the two metals surprisingly do not compete for back-bonding to the same π* orbital of N2, even when the ligand planes are parallel. This diiron system can tolerate distortion of the ligand planes through compensating orbital energy changes, and thus, a range of ligand orientations can give very similar energies.

  5. Direct observation of the release of alkali vapor species in biofuel combustion and gasification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    French, R.J.; Milne, T.A. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1993-12-31

    The largest present use of biomass for energy is in combustion for steam and electrical power. Biofuels have an acknowledged advantage over coal as a solid fuel because of their low sulfur and ash content. However, some forms of biomass have substantial quantities of alkali metals and chlorine. In addition, evidence indicates that the alkali in biomass is largely atomically dispersed, resulting in its facile mobilization into the gas-phase. Gaseous alkali compounds aggravate problems of slagging, fouling, and corrosion on heat transfer surfaces in present-day boilers. These problems can be particularly severe when mixed and variable agricultural residues are burned. Furthermore, the next generation of biomass-to-power systems will likely involve combined cycle gas turbines, where alkali tolerances are especially restrictive. In this paper, we report on laboratory studies in which biofuels are combusted under simulated turbine or boiler-firing conditions. Gaseous alkali, sulfur, nitrogen, and halogen-containing species are measured by direct extraction from the hot gases through molecular-beam mass spectrometry (MBMS). The experimental apparatus will be described and its capability illustrated with results of time-resolved evolution of species like K, KCl, KOH, SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} from small samples of biomass in combustion environments. The nature and release of such species will be explicated by referring to thermodynamic equilibrium predictions and the form of alkali in solid, gaseous, and liquid biofuels.

  6. Epitaxial Growth of a Methoxy-Functionalized Quaterphenylene on Alkali Halide Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balzer, Frank; Sun, Rong; Parisi, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    The epitaxial growth of the methoxy functionalized para-quaterphenylene (MOP4) on the (001) faces of the alkali halides NaCl and KCl and on glass is investigated by a combination of lowenergy electron diffraction (LEED), polarized light microscopy (PLM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and X...

  7. Zero-point energy effects in anion solvation shells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habershon, Scott

    2014-05-21

    By comparing classical and quantum-mechanical (path-integral-based) molecular simulations of solvated halide anions X(-) [X = F, Cl, Br and I], we identify an ion-specific quantum contribution to anion-water hydrogen-bond dynamics; this effect has not been identified in previous simulation studies. For anions such as fluoride, which strongly bind water molecules in the first solvation shell, quantum simulations exhibit hydrogen-bond dynamics nearly 40% faster than the corresponding classical results, whereas those anions which form a weakly bound solvation shell, such as iodide, exhibit a quantum effect of around 10%. This observation can be rationalized by considering the different zero-point energy (ZPE) of the water vibrational modes in the first solvation shell; for strongly binding anions, the ZPE of bound water molecules is larger, giving rise to faster dynamics in quantum simulations. These results are consistent with experimental investigations of anion-bound water vibrational and reorientational motion.

  8. Proton solvation and proton transfer in chemical and electrochemical processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lengyel, S.; Conway, B.E.

    1983-01-01

    This chapter examines the proton solvation and characterization of the H 3 O + ion, proton transfer in chemical ionization processes in solution, continuous proton transfer in conductance processes, and proton transfer in electrode processes. Topics considered include the condition of the proton in solution, the molecular structure of the H 3 O + ion, thermodynamics of proton solvation, overall hydration energy of the proton, hydration of H 3 O + , deuteron solvation, partial molal entropy and volume and the entropy of proton hydration, proton solvation in alcoholic solutions, analogies to electrons in semiconductors, continuous proton transfer in conductance, definition and phenomenology of the unusual mobility of the proton in solution, solvent structure changes in relation to anomalous proton mobility, the kinetics of the proton-transfer event, theories of abnormal proton conductance, and the general theory of the contribution of transfer reactions to overall transport processes

  9. Energy loss spectroscopy study of Si(111)--alkali metal interfaces at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avci, R.

    1986-01-01

    Studies are made at approx.150 K under ultrahigh vacuum conditions on a wide range of alkali metal coverages on Si(111)-7 x 7. Negative second-derivative backscattered electron energy loss spectroscopy is used with 100 eV primary electrons. The interaction of the alkali metals with the silicon substrate goes through two stages as a function of alkali coverage: In the initial coverages, for less than approx.0.3 monolayer of alkali atoms, the basic reaction is that of charge transfer from the alkali atoms to the Si surface with a loss peak at approx.3.3 eV associated with the charge transfer states. The second stage of reaction: starting after the depletion of all the Si surface states: falls in a coverage range between approx.0.3 and approx.1 monolayer, in which the formation of a metallic layer with a coverage-dependent loss feature at about 2 eV is observed. At still higher coverages, multiple surface and bulk plasmon excitations and their combinations are dominant. In the overall scattering processes most of the parallel momentum (approx.3 A -1 ) is transferred to the sample during the elastic backscattering from the surface, and all the losses are essentially attributed to the forward inelastic scattering before and/or after the elastic process takes place near the metal/Si interface

  10. Ultrafast transient-absorption of the solvated electron in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Y.; Alfano, J.C.; Walhout, P.K.; Barbara, P.F.

    1994-01-01

    Ultrafast near infrared (NIR)-pump/variable wavelength probe transient-absorption spectroscopy has been performed on the aqueous solvated electron. The photodynamics of the solvated electron excited to its p-state are qualitatively similar to previous measurements of the dynamics of photoinjected electrons at high energy. This result confirms the previous interpretation of photoinjected electron dynamics as having a rate-limiting bottleneck at low energies presumably involving the p-state

  11. Highly reproducible alkali metal doping system for organic crystals through enhanced diffusion of alkali metal by secondary thermal activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jinho; Park, Chibeom; Song, Intek; Koo, Jin Young; Yoon, Taekyung; Kim, Jun Sung; Choi, Hee Cheul

    2018-05-16

    In this paper, we report an efficient alkali metal doping system for organic single crystals. Our system employs an enhanced diffusion method for the introduction of alkali metal into organic single crystals by controlling the sample temperature to induce secondary thermal activation. Using this system, we achieved intercalation of potassium into picene single crystals with closed packed crystal structures. Using optical microscopy and Raman spectroscopy, we confirmed that the resulting samples were uniformly doped and became K 2 picene single crystal, while only parts of the crystal are doped and transformed into K 2 picene without secondary thermal activation. Moreover, using a customized electrical measurement system, the insulator-to-semiconductor transition of picene single crystals upon doping was confirmed by in situ electrical conductivity and ex situ temperature-dependent resistivity measurements. X-ray diffraction studies showed that potassium atoms were intercalated between molecular layers of picene, and doped samples did not show any KH- nor KOH-related peaks, indicating that picene molecules are retained without structural decomposition. During recent decades, tremendous efforts have been exerted to develop high-performance organic semiconductors and superconductors, whereas as little attention has been devoted to doped organic crystals. Our method will enable efficient alkali metal doping of organic crystals and will be a resource for future systematic studies on the electrical property changes of these organic crystals upon doping.

  12. Extending the Solvation-Layer Interface Condition Continum Electrostatic Model to a Linearized Poisson-Boltzmann Solvent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molavi Tabrizi, Amirhossein; Goossens, Spencer; Mehdizadeh Rahimi, Ali; Cooper, Christopher D; Knepley, Matthew G; Bardhan, Jaydeep P

    2017-06-13

    We extend the linearized Poisson-Boltzmann (LPB) continuum electrostatic model for molecular solvation to address charge-hydration asymmetry. Our new solvation-layer interface condition (SLIC)/LPB corrects for first-shell response by perturbing the traditional continuum-theory interface conditions at the protein-solvent and the Stern-layer interfaces. We also present a GPU-accelerated treecode implementation capable of simulating large proteins, and our results demonstrate that the new model exhibits significant accuracy improvements over traditional LPB models, while reducing the number of fitting parameters from dozens (atomic radii) to just five parameters, which have physical meanings related to first-shell water behavior at an uncharged interface. In particular, atom radii in the SLIC model are not optimized but uniformly scaled from their Lennard-Jones radii. Compared to explicit-solvent free-energy calculations of individual atoms in small molecules, SLIC/LPB is significantly more accurate than standard parametrizations (RMS error 0.55 kcal/mol for SLIC, compared to RMS error of 3.05 kcal/mol for standard LPB). On parametrizing the electrostatic model with a simple nonpolar component for total molecular solvation free energies, our model predicts octanol/water transfer free energies with an RMS error 1.07 kcal/mol. A more detailed assessment illustrates that standard continuum electrostatic models reproduce total charging free energies via a compensation of significant errors in atomic self-energies; this finding offers a window into improving the accuracy of Generalized-Born theories and other coarse-grained models. Most remarkably, the SLIC model also reproduces positive charging free energies for atoms in hydrophobic groups, whereas standard PB models are unable to generate positive charging free energies regardless of the parametrized radii. The GPU-accelerated solver is freely available online, as is a MATLAB implementation.

  13. A hybrid neutron diffraction and computer simulation study on the solvation of N-methylformamide in dimethylsulfoxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordeiro, João M. M.; Soper, Alan K.

    2013-01-01

    The solvation of N-methylformamide (NMF) by dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) in a 20% NMF/DMSO liquid mixture is investigated using a combination of neutron diffraction augmented with isotopic substitution and Monte Carlo simulations. The aim is to investigate the solute-solvent interactions and the structure of the solution. The results point to the formation of a hydrogen bond (H-bond) between the H bonded to the N of the amine group of NMF and the O of DMSO particularly strong when compared with other H-bonded liquids. Moreover, a second cooperative H-bond is identified with the S atom of DMSO. As a consequence of these H-bonds, molecules of NMF and DMSO are rather rigidly connected, establishing very stable dimmers in the mixture and very well organized first and second solvation shells.

  14. Dynamics of solvation and desolvation of rubidium attached to He nanodroplets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vangerow, J. von; John, O.; Stienkemeier, F.; Mudrich, M.

    2015-01-01

    The real-time dynamics of photoexcited and photoionized rubidium (Rb) atoms attached to helium (He) nanodroplets is studied by femtosecond pump-probe mass spectrometry. While excited Rb atoms in the perturbed 6p-state (Rb * ) desorb off the He droplets, Rb + photoions tend to sink into the droplet interior when created near the droplet surface. The transition from Rb + solvation to full Rb * desorption is found to occur at a delay time τ ∼ 600 fs for Rb * in the 6pΣ-state and τ ∼ 1200 fs for the 6pΠ-state. Rb + He ions are found to be created by directly exciting bound Rb * He exciplex states as well as by populating bound Rb + He-states in a photoassociative ionization process

  15. Dynamics of solvation and desolvation of rubidium attached to He nanodroplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Vangerow, J.; John, O.; Stienkemeier, F.; Mudrich, M.

    2015-07-01

    The real-time dynamics of photoexcited and photoionized rubidium (Rb) atoms attached to helium (He) nanodroplets is studied by femtosecond pump-probe mass spectrometry. While excited Rb atoms in the perturbed 6p-state (Rb*) desorb off the He droplets, Rb+ photoions tend to sink into the droplet interior when created near the droplet surface. The transition from Rb+ solvation to full Rb* desorption is found to occur at a delay time τ ˜ 600 fs for Rb* in the 6pΣ-state and τ ˜ 1200 fs for the 6pΠ-state. Rb+He ions are found to be created by directly exciting bound Rb*He exciplex states as well as by populating bound Rb+He-states in a photoassociative ionization process.

  16. Dynamics of solvation and desolvation of rubidium attached to He nanodroplets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vangerow, J. von; John, O.; Stienkemeier, F.; Mudrich, M., E-mail: mudrich@physik.uni-freiburg.de [Physikalisches Institut, Universität Freiburg, 79104 Freiburg (Germany)

    2015-07-21

    The real-time dynamics of photoexcited and photoionized rubidium (Rb) atoms attached to helium (He) nanodroplets is studied by femtosecond pump-probe mass spectrometry. While excited Rb atoms in the perturbed 6p-state (Rb{sup *}) desorb off the He droplets, Rb{sup +} photoions tend to sink into the droplet interior when created near the droplet surface. The transition from Rb{sup +} solvation to full Rb{sup *} desorption is found to occur at a delay time τ ∼ 600 fs for Rb{sup *} in the 6pΣ-state and τ ∼ 1200 fs for the 6pΠ-state. Rb{sup +}He ions are found to be created by directly exciting bound Rb{sup *}He exciplex states as well as by populating bound Rb{sup +}He-states in a photoassociative ionization process.

  17. Estimation of abraham solvation equation coefficients for hydrogen bond formation from abraham solvation parameters for solute activity and basicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noort, van P.C.M.

    2013-01-01

    Abraham solvation equations find widespread use in environmental chemistry and pharmaco-chemistry. The coefficients in these equations, which are solvent (system) descriptors, are usually determined by fitting experimental data. To simplify the determination of these coefficients in Abraham

  18. Process for the disposal of alkali metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, L.C.

    1977-01-01

    Large quantities of alkali metals may be safely reacted for ultimate disposal by contact with a hot concentrated caustic solution. The alkali metals react with water in the caustic solution in a controlled reaction while steam dilutes the hydrogen formed by the reaction to a safe level. 6 claims

  19. Water-enhanced solvation of organics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jane H. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1993-07-01

    Water-enhanced solvation (WES) was explored for Lewis acid solutes in Lewis base organic solvents, to develop cheap extract regeneration processes. WES for solid solutes was determined from ratios of solubilities of solutes in water-sat. and low-water solvent; both were determined from solid-liquid equilibrium. Vapor-headspace analysis was used to determine solute activity coefficients as function of organic phase water concentration. WES magnitudes of volatile solutes were normalized, set equal to slope of log γs vs xw/xs curve. From graph shape Δ(log γs) represents relative change in solute activity coefficient. Solutes investigated by vapor-headspace analysis were acetic acid, propionic acid, ethanol, 1,2-propylene glycol, 2,3-butylene glycol. Monocarboxylic acids had largest decrease in activity coefficient with water addition followed by glycols and alcohols. Propionic acid in cyclohexanone showed greatest water-enhancement Δ(log γacid)/Δ(xw/xacid) = -0.25. In methylcyclohexanone, the decrease of the activity coefficient of propionic acid was -0.19. Activity coefficient of propionic acid in methylcyclohexanone stopped decreasing once the water reached a 2:1 water to acid mole ratio, implying a stoichiometric relation between water, ketone, and acid. Except for 2,3-butanediol, activity coefficients of the solutes studied decreased monotonically with water content. Activity coefficient curves of ethanol, 1,2-propanediol and 2,3-butanediol did not level off at large water/solute mole ratio. Solutes investigated by solid-liquid equilibrium were citric acid, gallic acid, phenol, xylenols, 2-naphthol. Saturation concentration of citric acid in anhydrous butyl acetate increased from 0.0009 to 0.087 mol/L after 1.3 % (g/g) water co-dissolved into organic phase. Effect of water-enhanced solvation for citric acid is very large but very small for phenol and its derivatives.

  20. Method of handling radioactive alkali metal waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolson, R.D.; McPheeters, C.C.

    Radioactive alkali metal is mixed with particulate silica in a rotary drum reactor in which the alkali metal is converted to the monoxide during rotation of the reactor to produce particulate silica coated with the alkali metal monoxide suitable as a feed material to make a glass for storing radioactive material. Silica particles, the majority of which pass through a 95 mesh screen or preferably through a 200 mesh screen, are employed in this process, and the preferred weight ratio of silica to alkali metal is 7 to 1 in order to produce a feed material for the final glass product having a silica to alkali metal monoxide ratio of about 5 to 1.

  1. Method of handling radioactive alkali metal waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mcpheeters, C.C.; Wolson, R.D.

    1980-01-01

    Radioactive alkali metal is mixed with particulate silica in a rotary drum reactor in which the alkali metal is converted to the monoxide during rotation of the reactor to produce particulate silica coated with the alkali metal monoxide suitable as a feed material to make a glass for storing radioactive material. Silica particles, the majority of which pass through a 95 mesh screen or preferably through a 200 mesh screen, are employed in this process, and the preferred weight ratio of silica to alkali metal is 7 to 1 in order to produce a feed material for the final glass product having a silica to alkali metal monoxide ratio of about 5 to 1

  2. Electric dipole moments and chemical bonding of diatomic alkali-alkaline earth molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pototschnig, Johann V; Hauser, Andreas W; Ernst, Wolfgang E

    2016-02-17

    We investigate the properties of alkali-alkaline earth diatomic molecules in the lowest Σ(+) states of the doublet and quartet multiplicity by ab initio calculations. In all sixteen cases studied, the permanent electric dipole moment points in opposite directions for the two spin states. This peculiarity can be explained by molecular orbital theory. We further discuss dissociation energies and bond distances. We analyze trends and provide an empirically motivated model for the prediction of the permanent electric dipole moment for combinations of alkali and alkaline earth atoms not studied in this work.

  3. Cluster expansion of the solvation free energy difference: Systematic improvements in the solvation of single ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pliego, Josefredo R.

    2017-07-01

    The cluster expansion method has been used in the imperfect gas theory for several decades. This paper proposes a cluster expansion of the solvation free energy difference. This difference, which results from a change in the solute-solvent potential energy, can be written as the logarithm of a finite series. Similar to the Mayer function, the terms in the series are related to configurational integrals, which makes the integrand relevant only for configurations of the solvent molecules close to the solute. In addition, the terms involve interaction of solute with one, two, and so on solvent molecules. The approach could be used for hybrid quantum mechanical and molecular mechanics methods or mixed cluster-continuum approximation. A simple form of the theory was applied for prediction of pKa in methanol; the results indicated that three explicit methanol molecules and the dielectric continuum lead to a root of mean squared error (RMSE) of only 1.3 pKa units, whereas the pure continuum solvation model based on density method leads to a RMSE of 6.6 pKa units.

  4. Preferential solvation of single ions in mixed solvents: Part 1. New experimental approach and solvation of monovalent ions in methanol-water and acetonitrile-water mixture. Part 2. Theoretical computation and comparison with experimental data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rege, Aarti C.; Venkataramani, B.; Gupta, A.R.

    1999-06-01

    Preferential solvation of single ion solutions has been studied with Li + , Na + , K + and Ag +- forms of Dowex 50W resins of different cross-linkings in methanol-water and acetonitrile (AN)- water mixtures. The solvent uptake by this alkali metal ionic forms of Dowex 50W resins was studied in an isopiestic set-up using 2,4,6 and 8 m LiCl solutions in 11.0, 20.8, 44.3 and 70.2 % (w/w) methanol-water mixtures and that of Na +- and Ag +- forms using 14.6 to 94.3 % (w/w) AN - water mixtures. The solvent sorbed in the resin phase was extracted by Rayleigh-type distillation and analysed gas chromatographically. The data were analysed by the N s (mole fraction of the organic solvent in the resin phase) vs n t au (total solvent content in the resin phase) plots and separation factor, alpha(ratio of mole fraction of the solvents in the resin and solution phases) or N s vs m (molality in the resin phase) plots. The limiting values of these plots gave the composition of the solvent in the primary solvation shell around the single ion. The compositions of the primary solvation shell around Li + , Na + , and K + in methanol-water mixtures and Na + and Ag + in acetonitrile (AN) - water mixtures have been computed using Franks equation and the approach of Marcus and compared with the experimental results obtained with the above mentioned ionic forms of Dowex 50W resins in different mixed solvents. The experimental results for Li + showed good agreement with the values computed using Franks equation for all methanol-water composition. However, in the case of Na + and K + in methanol-water mixtures and Na + in AN-water mixtures, there was agreement only at lower organic solvent content and the Franks equation predicted higher values for the organic solvent in the primary solvation shell around the cation at higher organic solvent content as compared to experimental results

  5. Density dependent atomic motion in a liquid alkali metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pilgrim, W.-C.; Hosokawa, S.; Morkel, C.

    2001-01-01

    Inelastic X-ray and neutron scattering results obtained from liquid sodium and rubidium are presented. They cover the entire liquid range between melting and liquid vapour critical point. At high densities the dynamics of the liquid metal is characterized by collective excitations. The corresponding dispersion relations indicate the existence of surprisingly stable next neighbouring shells leading to an increase of the propagation speed for the collective modes. Below 2ρ crit. the dynamics changes from collective to localized indicating the existence of molecular aggregates. This interpretation is in accord with a simple model where the properties of a Rb- and a Rb 2 - lattice are calculated using density functional theory. (orig.)

  6. SO2 Solvation in the 1-Ethyl-3-Methylimidazolium Thiocyanate Ionic Liquid by Incorporation into the Extended Cation-Anion Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firaha, Dzmitry S; Kavalchuk, Mikhail; Kirchner, Barbara

    We have carried out an ab initio molecular dynamics study on the sulfur dioxide (SO 2 ) solvation in 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium thiocyanate for which we have observed that both cations and anions play an essential role in the solvation of SO 2 . Whereas, the anions tend to form a thiocyanate- and much less often an isothiocyanate-SO 2 adduct, the cations create a "cage" around SO 2 with those groups of atoms that donate weak interactions like the alkyl hydrogen atoms as well as the heavy atoms of the [Formula: see text]-system. Despite these similarities between the solvation of SO 2 and CO 2 in ionic liquids, an essential difference was observed with respect to the acidic protons. Whereas CO 2 avoids accepting hydrogen bonds form the acidic hydrogen atoms of the cations, SO 2 can from O(SO 2 )-H(cation) hydrogen bonds and thus together with the strong anion-adduct it actively integrates in the hydrogen bond network of this particular ionic liquid. The fact that SO 2 acts in this way was termed a linker effect by us, because the SO 2 can be situated between cation and anion operating as a linker between them. The particular contacts are the H(cation)[Formula: see text]O(SO 2 ) hydrogen bond and a S(anion)-S(SO 2 ) sulfur bridge. Clearly, this observation provides a possible explanation for the question of why the SO 2 solubility in these ionic liquids is so high.

  7. Order and correlation contributions to the entropy of hydrophobic solvation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Maoyuan; Besford, Quinn Alexander; Mulvaney, Thomas; Gray-Weale, Angus, E-mail: gusgw@gusgw.net [School of Chemistry, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia)

    2015-03-21

    The entropy of hydrophobic solvation has been explained as the result of ordered solvation structures, of hydrogen bonds, of the small size of the water molecule, of dispersion forces, and of solvent density fluctuations. We report a new approach to the calculation of the entropy of hydrophobic solvation, along with tests of and comparisons to several other methods. The methods are assessed in the light of the available thermodynamic and spectroscopic information on the effects of temperature on hydrophobic solvation. Five model hydrophobes in SPC/E water give benchmark solvation entropies via Widom’s test-particle insertion method, and other methods and models are tested against these particle-insertion results. Entropies associated with distributions of tetrahedral order, of electric field, and of solvent dipole orientations are examined. We find these contributions are small compared to the benchmark particle-insertion entropy. Competitive with or better than other theories in accuracy, but with no free parameters, is the new estimate of the entropy contributed by correlations between dipole moments. Dipole correlations account for most of the hydrophobic solvation entropy for all models studied and capture the distinctive temperature dependence seen in thermodynamic and spectroscopic experiments. Entropies based on pair and many-body correlations in number density approach the correct magnitudes but fail to describe temperature and size dependences, respectively. Hydrogen-bond definitions and free energies that best reproduce entropies from simulations are reported, but it is difficult to choose one hydrogen bond model that fits a variety of experiments. The use of information theory, scaled-particle theory, and related methods is discussed briefly. Our results provide a test of the Frank-Evans hypothesis that the negative solvation entropy is due to structured water near the solute, complement the spectroscopic detection of that solvation structure by

  8. Standard electrode potential, Tafel equation, and the solvation thermodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matyushov, Dmitry V

    2009-06-21

    Equilibrium in the electronic subsystem across the solution-metal interface is considered to connect the standard electrode potential to the statistics of localized electronic states in solution. We argue that a correct derivation of the Nernst equation for the electrode potential requires a careful separation of the relevant time scales. An equation for the standard metal potential is derived linking it to the thermodynamics of solvation. The Anderson-Newns model for electronic delocalization between the solution and the electrode is combined with a bilinear model of solute-solvent coupling introducing nonlinear solvation into the theory of heterogeneous electron transfer. We therefore are capable of addressing the question of how nonlinear solvation affects electrochemical observables. The transfer coefficient of electrode kinetics is shown to be equal to the derivative of the free energy, or generalized force, required to shift the unoccupied electronic level in the bulk. The transfer coefficient thus directly quantifies the extent of nonlinear solvation of the redox couple. The current model allows the transfer coefficient to deviate from the value of 0.5 of the linear solvation models at zero electrode overpotential. The electrode current curves become asymmetric in respect to the change in the sign of the electrode overpotential.

  9. Solvation structures of lithium halides in methanol–water mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarkar, Atanu; Dixit, Mayank Kumar; Tembe, B.L.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Potentials of mean force for Li + -halides are calculated in methanol–water mixtures. • Stable CIP for x methanol = 1.0 becomes unstable at and below x methanol = 0.75. • The Li + ion is preferentially solvated by methanol molecules. • The halide ions are preferentially solvated by water molecules. - Abstract: The potentials of mean force (PMFs) for the ion pairs, Li + −Cl − , Li + −Br − and Li + −I − have been calculated in five methanol–water compositions. The results obtained are verified by trailing the trajectories and calculating the ion pair distance residence times. Local structures around the ions are studied using the radial distribution functions, density profiles, orientational correlation functions, running coordination numbers and excess coordination numbers. The major change in PMF is observed as the methanol mole fraction (x methanol ) is changed from 1.0 to 0.75. The stable contact ion pair occurring for x methanol = 1.0 becomes unstable at and below x methanol = 0.75. The preferential solvation data show that the halide ions are always preferentially solvated by water molecules. Although the lithium ion is preferentially solvated by methanol molecules, there is significant affinity towards water molecules as well

  10. Lieb-Liniger-like model of quantum solvation in CO-{sup 4}He{sub N} clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farrelly, D. [Departamento de Matemáticas y Computación, Universidad de La Rioja, 26006 Logroño (Spain); Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Utah State University, Logan, Utah 84322-0300 (United States); Iñarrea, M.; Salas, J. P. [Área de Física Aplicada, Universidad de La Rioja, 26006 Logroño (Spain); Lanchares, V. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Utah State University, Logan, Utah 84322-0300 (United States)

    2016-05-28

    Small {sup 4}He clusters doped with various molecules allow for the study of “quantum solvation” as a function of cluster size. A peculiarity of quantum solvation is that, as the number of {sup 4}He atoms is increased from N = 1, the solvent appears to decouple from the molecule which, in turn, appears to undergo free rotation. This is generally taken to signify the onset of “microscopic superfluidity.” Currently, little is known about the quantum mechanics of the decoupling mechanism, mainly because the system is a quantum (N + 1)-body problem in three dimensions which makes computations difficult. Here, a one-dimensional model is studied in which the {sup 4}He atoms are confined to revolve on a ring and encircle a rotating CO molecule. The Lanczos algorithm is used to investigate the eigenvalue spectrum as the number of {sup 4}He atoms is varied. Substantial solvent decoupling is observed for as few as N = 5 {sup 4}He atoms. Examination of the Hamiltonian matrix, which has an almost block diagonal structure, reveals increasingly weak inter-block (solvent-molecule) coupling as the number of {sup 4}He atoms is increased. In the absence of a dopant molecule the system is similar to a Lieb-Liniger (LL) gas and we find a relatively rapid transition to the LL limit as N is increased. In essence, the molecule initially—for very small N—provides a central, if relatively weak, attraction to organize the cluster; as more {sup 4}He atoms are added, the repulsive interactions between the identical bosons start to dominate as the solvation ring (shell) becomes more crowded which causes the molecule to start to decouple. For low N, the molecule pins the atoms in place relative to itself; as N increases the atom-atom repulsion starts to dominate the Hamiltonian and the molecule decouples. We conclude that, while the notion of superfluidity is a useful and correct description of the decoupling process, a molecular viewpoint provides complementary insights into the

  11. Electron transport through monovalent atomic wires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Y. J.; Brandbyge, Mads; Puska, M. J.

    2004-01-01

    at the chain determine the conductance. As a result, the conductance for noble-metal chains is close to one quantum of conductance, and it oscillates moderately so that an even number of chain atoms yields a higher value than an odd number. The conductance oscillations are large for alkali-metal chains......Using a first-principles density-functional method we model electron transport through linear chains of monovalent atoms between two bulk electrodes. For noble-metal chains the transport resembles that for free electrons over a potential barrier whereas for alkali-metal chains resonance states...... and their phase is opposite to that of noble-metal chains....

  12. Solvation of actinide salts in water using a polarizable continuum model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Narendra; Seminario, Jorge M

    2015-01-29

    In order to determine how actinide atoms are dressed when solvated in water, density functional theory calculations have been carried out to study the equilibrium structure of uranium plutonium and thorium salts (UO2(2+), PuO2(2+), Pu(4+), and Th(4+)) both in vacuum as well as in solution represented by a conductor-like polarizable continuum model. This information is of paramount importance for the development of sensitive nanosensors. Both UO2(2+) and PuO2(2+) ions show coordination number of 4-5 with counterions replacing one or two water molecules from the first coordination shell. On the other hand, Pu(4+), has a coordination number of 8 both when completely solvated and also in the presence of chloride and nitrate ions with counterions replacing water molecules in the first shell. Nitrates were found to bind more strongly to Pu(IV) than chloride anions. In the case of the Th(IV) ion, the coordination number was found to be 9 or 10 in the presence of chlorides. Moreover, the Pu(IV) ion shows greater affinity for chlorides than the Th(IV) ion. Adding dispersion and ZPE corrections to the binding energy does not alter the trends in relative stability of several conformers because of error cancelations. All structures and energetics of these complexes are reported.

  13. The initial stages of NaCl dissolution: Ion or ion pair solvation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimes, Jiri; Michaelides, Angelos

    2009-03-01

    The interaction of water with rock salt (NaCl) is important in a wide variety of natural processes and human activities. A lot is known about NaCl dissolution at the macroscopic level but we do not yet have a detailed atomic scale picture of how salt crystals dissolve. Here we report an extensive series of density functional theory, forcefield and molecular dynamics studies of water clusters at flat and defective NaCl surfaces and NaCl clusters. The focus is on answering seemingly elementary questions such as how many water molecules are needed before it becomes favorable to extract an ion or a pair of ions from the crystal or the cluster. It turns out, however, that the answers to these questions are not so straightforward: below a certain number of water molecules (˜ 12) solvation of individual ions is less costly and above this number solvation of ion pairs is favored. These results reveal a hitherto unknown complexity in the NaCl dissolution process born out of a subtle interplay between water-water and water-ion interactions.

  14. Effective interactions between nanoparticles: Creating temperature-independent solvation environments for self-assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yadav, Hari O. S., E-mail: cyz108802@chemistry.iitd.ac.in, E-mail: hariyadav.iitd@gmail.com; Shrivastav, Gourav; Agarwal, Manish; Chakravarty, Charusita [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology-Delhi, New Delhi 110016 (India)

    2016-06-28

    The extent to which solvent-mediated effective interactions between nanoparticles can be predicted based on structure and associated thermodynamic estimators for bulk solvents and for solvation of single and pairs of nanoparticles is studied here. As a test of the approach, we analyse the strategy for creating temperature-independent solvent environments using a series of homologous chain fluids as solvents, as suggested by an experimental paper [M. I. Bodnarchuk et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 132, 11967 (2010)]. Our conclusions are based on molecular dynamics simulations of Au{sub 140}(SC{sub 10}H{sub 21}){sub 62} nanoparticles in n-alkane solvents, specifically hexane, octane, decane and dodecane, using the TraPPE-UA potential to model the alkanes and alkylthiols. The 140-atom gold core of the nanocrystal is held rigid in a truncated octahedral geometry and the gold-thiolate interaction is modeled using a Morse potential. The experimental observation was that the structural and rheological properties of n-alkane solvents are constant over a temperature range determined by equivalent solvent vapour pressures. We show that this is a consequence of the fact that long chain alkane liquids behave to a good approximation as simple liquids formed by packing of monomeric methyl/methylene units. Over the corresponding temperature range (233–361 K), the solvation environment is approximately constant at the single and pair nanoparticle levels under good solvent conditions. However, quantitative variations of the order of 10%–20% do exist in various quantities, such as molar volume of solute at infinite dilution, entropy of solvation, and onset distance for soft repulsions. In the opposite limit of a poor solvent, represented by vacuum in this study, the effective interactions between nanoparticles are no longer temperature-independent with attractive interactions increasing by up to 50% on decreasing the temperature from 361 K to 290 K, accompanied by an increase in

  15. Process to separate alkali metal salts from alkali metal reacted hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordon, John Howard; Alvare, Javier; Larsen, Dennis; Killpack, Jeff

    2017-06-27

    A process to facilitate gravimetric separation of alkali metal salts, such as alkali metal sulfides and polysulfides, from alkali metal reacted hydrocarbons. The disclosed process is part of a method of upgrading a hydrocarbon feedstock by removing heteroatoms and/or one or more heavy metals from the hydrocarbon feedstock composition. This method reacts the oil feedstock with an alkali metal and an upgradant hydrocarbon. The alkali metal reacts with a portion of the heteroatoms and/or one or more heavy metals to form an inorganic phase containing alkali metal salts and reduced heavy metals, and an upgraded hydrocarbon feedstock. The inorganic phase may be gravimetrically separated from the upgraded hydrocarbon feedstock after mixing at a temperature between about 350.degree. C. to 400.degree. C. for a time period between about 15 minutes and 2 hours.

  16. Alkali metal for ultraviolet band-pass filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardesich, Nick (Inventor); Fraschetti, George A. (Inventor); Mccann, Timothy A. (Inventor); Mayall, Sherwood D. (Inventor); Dunn, Donald E. (Inventor); Trauger, John T. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    An alkali metal filter having a layer of metallic bismuth deposited onto the alkali metal is provided. The metallic bismuth acts to stabilize the surface of the alkali metal to prevent substantial surface migration from occurring on the alkali metal, which may degrade optical characteristics of the filter. To this end, a layer of metallic bismuth is deposited by vapor deposition over the alkali metal to a depth of approximately 5 to 10 A. A complete alkali metal filter is described along with a method for fabricating the alkali metal filter.

  17. 17O NMR Studies of the Solvation State of cis/trans Isomers of Amides and Model Protected Peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerothanassis, Ioannis P.; Vakka, Constantina; Troganis, Anastasios

    1996-06-01

    17O shielding constants have been utilized to investigate solvation differences of the cis/trans isomers ofN-methylformamide (NMF),N-ethylformamide (NEF), andtert-butylformamide (TBF) in a variety of solvents with particular emphasis on aqueous solution. Comparisons are also made with protected peptides of the formulas CH3CO-YOH, CH3CO-Y-NHR (Y = Pro, Sar), and CH3CO-Y-Z-NHR (Y = Pro; Z =D-Ala) selectively enriched in17O at the acetyl oxygen atom. Hydration at the amide oxygen induces large and specific modifications of the17O shielding constants, which are practically the same for the cis and trans isomers of NMF, NEF, and the protected peptides. Fortert-butylformamide, the strong deshielding of the trans isomer compared to that of the cis isomer may be attributed to an out-of-plane (torsion-angle) deformation of the amide bond and/or a significant reduction of solvation of the trans isomer due to steric inhibition of the bulkytert-butyl group. Good linear correlation between δ(17O) of amides and δ(17O) of acetone was found for different solvents which have varying dielectric constants and solvation abilities. Sum-over-states calculations, within the solvaton model, underestimate effects of the dielectric constant of the medium on17O shielding, while finite-perturbation-theory calculations give good agreement with the experiment.

  18. 17O NMR Studies of the Solvation State of cissolidustrans Isomers of Amides and Model Protected Peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerothanassis; Vakka; Troganis

    1996-06-01

    17O shielding constants have been utilized to investigate solvation differences of the cissolidustrans isomers of N-methylformamide (NMF), N-ethylformamide (NEF), and tert-butylformamide (TBF) in a variety of solvents with particular emphasis on aqueous solution. Comparisons are also made with protected peptides of the formulas CH3CO-YOH, CH3CO-Y-NHR (Y = Pro, Sar), and CH3CO-Y-Z-NHR (Y = Pro; Z = D-Ala) selectively enriched in 17O at the acetyl oxygen atom. Hydration at the amide oxygen induces large and specific modifications of the 17O shielding constants, which are practically the same for the cis and trans isomers of NMF, NEF, and the protected peptides. For tert-butylformamide, the strong deshielding of the trans isomer compared to that of the cis isomer may be attributed to an out-of-plane (torsion-angle) deformation of the amide bond andsolidusor a significant reduction of solvation of the trans isomer due to steric inhibition of the bulky tert-butyl group. Good linear correlation between delta(17O) of amides and delta(17O) of acetone was found for different solvents which have varying dielectric constants and solvation abilities. Sum-over-states calculations, within the solvaton model, underestimate effects of the dielectric constant of the medium on 17O shielding, while finite-perturbation-theory calculations give good agreement with the experiment.

  19. Density of mixed alkali borate glasses: A structural analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doweidar, H.; El-Damrawi, G.M.; Moustafa, Y.M.; Ramadan, R.M.

    2005-01-01

    Density of mixed alkali borate glasses has been correlated with the glass structure. It is assumed that in such glasses each alkali oxide associates with a proportional quantity of B 2 O 3 . The number of BO 3 and BO 4 units related to each type of alkali oxide depends on the total concentration of alkali oxide. It is concluded that in mixed alkali borate glasses the volumes of structural units related to an alkali ion are the same as in the corresponding binary alkali borate glass. This reveals that each type of alkali oxide forms its own borate matrix and behaves as if not affected with the presence of the other alkali oxide. Similar conclusions are valid for borate glasses with three types of alkali oxide

  20. Relaxation of quadrupole orientation in an optically pumped alkali vapour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernabeu, E; Tornos, J

    1985-04-01

    The relaxation of quadrupole orientation (alignment) in an optically pumped alkali vapour is theoretically studied by taking into account the relaxation processes by alkali-buffer gas, alkali-alkali with spin exchange and alkali-cell wall (diffusion process) collisions. The relaxation transients of the quadrupole orientation are obtained by introducing a first-order weak-pumping approximation (intermediate pumping) less restrictive than the usually considered (zeroth order) one.

  1. Milk Alkali and Hydrochlorothiazide: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babar Parvez

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypercalcemia is a relatively common clinical problem in both outpatient and inpatient settings. Primary pathophysiology is the entry of calcium that exceeds its excretion into urine or deposition in bone into circulation. Among a wide array of causes of hypercalcemia, hyperparathyroidism and malignancy are the most common, accounting for greater than 90 percent of cases. Concordantly, there has been a resurgence of milk-alkali syndrome associated with the ingestion of large amounts of calcium and absorbable alkali, making it the third leading cause of hypercalcemia (Beall and Scofield, 1995 and Picolos et al., 2005. This paper centers on a case of over-the-counter calcium and alkali ingestion for acid reflux leading to milk alkali with concordant use of thiazide diuretic for hypertension.

  2. Difference rule-a new thermodynamic principle: prediction of standard thermodynamic data for inorganic solvates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, H Donald Brooke; Glasser, Leslie

    2004-12-08

    We present a quite general thermodynamic "difference" rule, derived from thermochemical first principles, quantifying the difference between the standard thermodynamic properties, P, of a solid n-solvate (or n-hydrate), n-S, containing n molecules of solvate, S (water or other) and the corresponding solid parent (unsolvated) salt: [P[n-solvate] - P[parent

  3. Enthalpies of solution, enthalpies of fusion and enthalpies of solvation of polyaromatic hydrocarbons: Instruments for determination of sublimation enthalpy at 298.15 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solomonov, Boris N., E-mail: boris.solomonov@ksu.ru; Varfolomeev, Mikhail A.; Nagrimanov, Ruslan N.; Mukhametzyanov, Timur A.; Novikov, Vladimir B.

    2015-12-20

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Solution enthalpies of aromatic hydrocarbons were measured at 298.15 K. • Solution enthalpy of aromatic hydrocarbons in benzene is equal to their fusion enthalpy. • Method for calculation of solvation enthalpy of aromatic hydrocarbons was proposed. • Approach for estimation of aromatic hydrocarbons sublimation enthalpy was developed. • Obtained sublimation enthalpies coincide well with the recommended literature data. - Abstract: In this work a simple method for calculation of solvation enthalpies of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in various solvents at 298.15 K was proposed. According to this method the enthalpy of solvation of any polyaromatic hydrocarbon in a particular solvent can be calculated on the basis of the general formula of the compound, the solvation enthalpy of benzene in the same solvent and parameter related to the contribution of hydrogen atom into solvation enthalpy. The validity of the proposed method was confirmed by the comparison of calculated and experimentally measured values of solvation enthalpies of PAHs in benzene, tetrahydrofuran and acetonitrile. This method was used for determination of the sublimation enthalpy of PAHs at 298.15 K based on the general relationship between the enthalpy of sublimation/vaporization of the compound of interest and its enthalpies of solution and solvation in the same solvent at 298.15 K. Enthalpies of solution at infinite dilution of several PAHs were measured in acetonitrile, benzene and tetrahydrofuran at 298.15 K. It was shown that solution enthalpies of PAHs in benzene at 298.15 K are approximately equal to their fusion enthalpies at the melting temperature. Solvation enthalpies of 15 PAHs at 298.15 K calculated according to the proposed method together with corresponding fusion enthalpy values (at the melting temperature) were used to calculate the sublimation enthalpy values at 298.15 K. Comparison of the obtained results with recommended values of

  4. Alkali metals and group IIA metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenton, D.E.

    1987-01-01

    This chapter on the coordination complexes of the alkali metals of group IIA starts with a historical perspective of their chemistry, from simple monodentate ligands, metal-β-diketonates to the macrocyclic polyethers which act as ligands to the alkali and akaline earth metals. Other macrocyclic ligands include quarterenes, calixarenes, porphyrins, phthalocyanines and chlorophylls. A section on the naturally occurring ionophores and carboxylic ionophores is included. (UK)

  5. Calcium silicate hydrate: Crystallisation and alkali sorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, S.

    2000-01-01

    Homogeneous single C-S-H gels has been prepared for the investigation of alkali binding potential and crystallisation. A distribution coefficient, R d , was introduced to express the partition of alkali between solid and aqueous phases at 25 deg. C. R d is independent of alkali hydroxide concentration and depends only on Ca:Si ratio over wide ranges of alkali concentration. The trend of numerical values of R d indicates that alkali bonding into the solid improves as its Ca:Si ratio decreases. Reversibility is demonstrated, indicating a possibility of constant R d value of the material. Al has been introduced to form C-A-S-H gels and their alkali sorption properties also determined. Al substituted into C-S-H markedly increases R d , indicating enhancement of alkali binding. However, the dependence of R d on alkali concentration is non-ideal with composition. A two-site model for bonding is presented. Crystallisation both under saturated steam and 1 bar vapour pressure has been investigated. It has been shown that heat treatment by saturated steam causes crystallisation of gels. The principal minerals obtained were (i) C-S-H gel and Ca(OH) 2 at -55 deg. C, (ii) 1.1 nm tobermorite, jennite and afwillite at 85 -130 deg. C, and (iii) xonotlite, foshagite and hillebrandite at 150-180 deg. C. Properties of crystalline C-S-H were also reported for reversible phase transformation, pH conditioning ability, seeding effect and solubility. At 1 bar pressure, crystallisation is slower than in saturated steam due to lower water activity. Tobermorite-like nanodomains develop during reaction at low Ca/Si ratios. In some Ca-rich compositions, Ca(OH) 2 is exsolved and occurs as nano-sized crystallites. (author)

  6. Water Evaporation and Conformational Changes from Partially Solvated Ubiquitin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saravana Prakash Thirumuruganandham

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Using molecular dynamics simulation, we study the evaporation of water molecules off partially solvated ubiquitin. The evaporation and cooling rates are determined for a molecule at the initial temperature of 300 K. The cooling rate is found to be around 3 K/ns, and decreases with water temperature in the course of the evaporation. The conformation changes are monitored by studying a variety of intermediate partially solvated ubiquitin structures. We find that ubiquitin shrinks with decreasing hydration shell and exposes more of its hydrophilic surface area to the surrounding.

  7. Dipole moments of molecules solvated in helium nanodroplets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stiles, Paul L.; Nauta, Klaas; Miller, Roger E.

    2003-01-01

    Stark spectra are reported for hydrogen cyanide and cyanoacetylene solvated in helium nanodroplets. The goal of this study is to understand the influence of the helium solvent on measurements of the permanent electric dipole moment of a molecule. We find that the dipole moments of the helium solvated molecules, calculated assuming the electric field is the same as in vacuum, are slightly smaller than the well-known gas-phase dipole moments of HCN and HCCCN. A simple elliptical cavity model quantitatively accounts for this difference, which arises from the dipole-induced polarization of the helium

  8. Laser-Induced Photofragmentation Fluorescence Imaging of Alkali Compounds in Flames.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leffler, Tomas; Brackmann, Christian; Aldén, Marcus; Li, Zhongshan

    2017-06-01

    Laser-induced photofragmentation fluorescence has been investigated for the imaging of alkali compounds in premixed laminar methane-air flames. An ArF excimer laser, providing pulses of wavelength 193 nm, was used to photodissociate KCl, KOH, and NaCl molecules in the post-flame region and fluorescence from the excited atomic alkali fragment was detected. Fluorescence emission spectra showed distinct lines of the alkali atoms allowing for efficient background filtering. Temperature data from Rayleigh scattering measurements together with simulations of potassium chemistry presented in literature allowed for conclusions on the relative contributions of potassium species KOH and KCl to the detected signal. Experimental approaches for separate measurements of these components are discussed. Signal power dependence and calculated fractions of dissociated molecules indicate the saturation of the photolysis process, independent on absorption cross-section, under the experimental conditions. Quantitative KCl concentrations up to 30 parts per million (ppm) were evaluated from the fluorescence data and showed good agreement with results from ultraviolet absorption measurements. Detection limits for KCl photofragmentation fluorescence imaging of 0.5 and 1.0 ppm were determined for averaged and single-shot data, respectively. Moreover, simultaneous imaging of KCl and NaCl was demonstrated using a stereoscope with filters. The results indicate that the photofragmentation method can be employed for detailed studies of alkali chemistry in laboratory flames for validation of chemical kinetic mechanisms crucial for efficient biomass fuel utilization.

  9. Spectral emission from the alkali inductively-coupled plasma: Theory and experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Bazurto

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The weakly-ionized, alkali inductively-coupled plasma (ICP has a long history as the light source for optical pumping. Today, its most significant application is perhaps in the rubidium atomic frequency standard (RAFS, arguably the workhorse of atomic timekeeping in space, where it is crucial to the RAFS’ functioning and performance (and routinely referred to as the RAFS’ “rf-discharge lamp”. In particular, the photon flux from the lamp determines the signal-to-noise ratio of the device, and variations in ICP brightness define the long-term frequency stability of the atomic clock as a consequence of the ac-Stark shift (i.e., the light-shift. Given the importance of Rb atomic clocks to diverse satellite navigation systems (e.g., GPS, Galileo, BeiDou – and thereby the importance of alkali ICPs to these systems – it is somewhat surprising to find that the physical processes occurring within the discharge are not well understood. As a consequence, researchers do not understand how to improve the spectral emission from the lamp except at a trial-and-error level, nor do they fully understand the nonlinear mechanisms that result in ICP light instability. Here, we take a first step in developing an intuitive, semi-quantitative model of the alkali rf-discharge lamp, and we perform a series of experiments to validate the theory’s predictions.

  10. Spectral emission from the alkali inductively-coupled plasma: Theory and experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazurto, R.; Huang, M.; Camparo, J.

    2018-04-01

    The weakly-ionized, alkali inductively-coupled plasma (ICP) has a long history as the light source for optical pumping. Today, its most significant application is perhaps in the rubidium atomic frequency standard (RAFS), arguably the workhorse of atomic timekeeping in space, where it is crucial to the RAFS' functioning and performance (and routinely referred to as the RAFS' "rf-discharge lamp"). In particular, the photon flux from the lamp determines the signal-to-noise ratio of the device, and variations in ICP brightness define the long-term frequency stability of the atomic clock as a consequence of the ac-Stark shift (i.e., the light-shift). Given the importance of Rb atomic clocks to diverse satellite navigation systems (e.g., GPS, Galileo, BeiDou) - and thereby the importance of alkali ICPs to these systems - it is somewhat surprising to find that the physical processes occurring within the discharge are not well understood. As a consequence, researchers do not understand how to improve the spectral emission from the lamp except at a trial-and-error level, nor do they fully understand the nonlinear mechanisms that result in ICP light instability. Here, we take a first step in developing an intuitive, semi-quantitative model of the alkali rf-discharge lamp, and we perform a series of experiments to validate the theory's predictions.

  11. Resonant Pump-dump Quantum Control of Solvated Dye Molecules with Phase Jumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konar, Arkaprabha; Lozovoy, Vadim; Dantus, Marcos

    2014-03-01

    Quantum coherent control of two photon and multiphoton excitation processes in atomic and condensed phase systems employing phase jumps has been well studied and understood. Here we demonstrate coherent quantum control of a two photon resonant pump-dump process in a complex solvated dye molecule. Phase jump in the frequency domain via a pulse shaper is employed to coherently enhance the stimulated emission by an order of magnitude when compared to transform limited pulses. Red shifted stimulated emission from successive low energy Stokes shifted excited states leading to narrowband emission are observed upon scanning the pi step across the excitation spectrum. A binary search space routine was also employed to investigate the effects of other types of phase jumps on stimulated emission and to determine the optimum phase that maximizes the emission. Understanding the underlying mechanism of this kind of enhancement will guide us in designing pulse shapes for enhancing stimulated emission, which can be further applied in the field of imaging.

  12. Theoretical-experimental study of the solvation enthalpy of acetone in dilute aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arroyo, S. Tolosa; Martin, J.A. Sanson; Garcia, A. Hidalgo

    2005-01-01

    The present paper describes molecular dynamics simulations of aqueous solutions at infinite dilution with acetone as solute. Lennard-Jones with electrostatic term (12-6-1 potentials) were employed to describe the solute-solvent interactions. The Morokuma decomposition scheme of ab initio interaction energies at the SCF level and the ESIE charges on the solute atoms were used to reproduce the exchange and Coulomb electrostatic contributions of the solute-water interaction potential. Some extensions, such as including the dispersion component evaluated at MP2 level, were added to the traditional calculation procedures in order to improve the results of the solvation enthalpy. The results obtained with the EX-DIS-ES model were compared with the experimental calorimetry values, the observed agreement being acceptable

  13. Differential geometry based solvation model II: Lagrangian formulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhan; Baker, Nathan A; Wei, G W

    2011-12-01

    Solvation is an elementary process in nature and is of paramount importance to more sophisticated chemical, biological and biomolecular processes. The understanding of solvation is an essential prerequisite for the quantitative description and analysis of biomolecular systems. This work presents a Lagrangian formulation of our differential geometry based solvation models. The Lagrangian representation of biomolecular surfaces has a few utilities/advantages. First, it provides an essential basis for biomolecular visualization, surface electrostatic potential map and visual perception of biomolecules. Additionally, it is consistent with the conventional setting of implicit solvent theories and thus, many existing theoretical algorithms and computational software packages can be directly employed. Finally, the Lagrangian representation does not need to resort to artificially enlarged van der Waals radii as often required by the Eulerian representation in solvation analysis. The main goal of the present work is to analyze the connection, similarity and difference between the Eulerian and Lagrangian formalisms of the solvation model. Such analysis is important to the understanding of the differential geometry based solvation model. The present model extends the scaled particle theory of nonpolar solvation model with a solvent-solute interaction potential. The nonpolar solvation model is completed with a Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) theory based polar solvation model. The differential geometry theory of surfaces is employed to provide a natural description of solvent-solute interfaces. The optimization of the total free energy functional, which encompasses the polar and nonpolar contributions, leads to coupled potential driven geometric flow and PB equations. Due to the development of singularities and nonsmooth manifolds in the Lagrangian representation, the resulting potential-driven geometric flow equation is embedded into the Eulerian representation for the purpose of

  14. Studies on the alkali-silica reaction rim in a simplified calcium-alkali-silicate system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zheng, Kunpeng; Adriaensens, Peter; De Schutter, Geert; Ye, G.; Taerwe, Luc

    2016-01-01

    This work is intended to provide a better understanding about the properties and roles of the reaction rim in an alkali-silica reaction. A simplified calcium-alkali-silicate system was created to simulate the multiple interactions among reactive silica, alkaline solution and portlandite near the

  15. Thermodynamics of solvation and solvophobic effect in formamide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sedov, I.A.; Stolov, M.A.; Solomonov, B.N.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Enthalpies of solution of apolar organic compounds in formamide were measured. • Gibbs free energies of solution were experimentally determined. • Influence of the solvophobic effect on solvation thermodynamics was studied. • Thermodynamic features of solutions in formamide resemble those of aqueous solutions. -- Abstract: Using semi-adiabatic calorimetry, we measured the enthalpies of solution for various low-polar compounds including alkanes, aromatic hydrocarbons and their halogenated derivatives in formamide at temperature of 298 K. For the same compounds, the values of limiting activity coefficients in formamide were determined using GC headspace analysis at 298 K, and Gibbs free energies of solution and solvation were calculated. Based on these data and the available literature values of the Gibbs free energy of solvation in formamide for a number of other low-polar solutes, a study of the solvophobic effect in this solvent is performed, and its resemblance to the hydrophobic effect in aqueous solutions is demonstrated. It is shown that the contribution of the solvophobic effect into the solvation Gibbs free energy in formamide is much higher than that in aliphatic alcohols, but lower than that in water. Like in water, the magnitude of this contribution for different solutes linearly increases with the solute molecular volume. Solvophobic effect also significantly affects the enthalpies of dissolution in formamide, causing them to be more negative in the case of alkanes and more positive in the case of arenes

  16. Isotope effect in enthalpy of solvation of the lithium ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krestov, G.A.; Egorov, G.I.; Korolev, V.P.

    1989-01-01

    At 298.15 K, the authors determined the standard enthalpies of solution for 6 LiCl and 7 LiCl in water, heavy water, dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) and aqueous solutions of DMSO. The authors have established that solvation of 6 Li + is differentiated in water and DMSO to a greater degree than for 7 Li +

  17. The solvation of carbohydrates in dimethylsulfoxide and water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, S.; Diaz, M.D.; Horwat, Ch.

    1999-01-01

    The solvation of sucrose and other carbohydrates in DMSO and water is probed by intermolecular NOE measurements. The NOE effects are interpreted in terms of specific binding of the solvent to certain sites of the molecules. It is shown that DMSO attaches to specific sites of the sucrose molecule, whereas for water such a clear differentiation cannot be proven. (author)

  18. Microscopic picture of the aqueous solvation of glutamic acid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leenders, E.J.M.; Bolhuis, P.G.; Meijer, E.J.

    2008-01-01

    We present molecular dynamics simulations of glutamic acid and glutamate solvated in water, using both density functional theory (DFT) and the Gromos96 force field. We focus on the microscopic aspects of the solvation−particularly on the hydrogen bond structures and dynamics−and investigate the

  19. On the coupling between molecular diffusion and solvation shell exchange

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Klaus Braagaard; Rey, Rossend; Masia, Marco

    2005-01-01

    The connection between diffusion and solvent exchanges between first and second solvation shells is studied by means of molecular dynamics simulations and analytic calculations, with detailed illustrations for water exchange for the Li+ and Na+ ions, and for liquid argon. First, two methods...

  20. Comparison between implicit and hybrid solvation methods for the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Both implicit solvation method (dielectric polarizable continuum model, DPCM) and hybrid ... the free energy change (ΔGsol) as per the PCM ... Here the gas phase change is written as ΔGg = ΔEelec + ..... bution to the field of electrochemistry.

  1. Polarizability and Aqueous Solvation of the Sulfate Dianion

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jungwirth, Pavel; Curtis, J. E.; Tobias, D. J.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 367, - (2003), s. 704-710 ISSN 0009-2614 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A032 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : polarizability * aqueous solvation * dianion Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.438, year: 2003

  2. Ionic Liquids: Radiation Chemistry, Solvation Dynamics and Reactivity Patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wishart, J.F.

    2011-01-01

    Ionic liquids (ILs) are a rapidly expanding family of condensed-phase media with important applications in energy production, nuclear fuel and waste processing, improving the efficiency and safety of industrial chemical processes, and pollution prevention. ILs generally have low volatilities and are combustion-resistant, highly conductive, recyclable and capable of dissolving a wide variety of materials. They are finding new uses in chemical synthesis, catalysis, separations chemistry, electrochemistry and other areas. Ionic liquids have dramatically different properties compared to conventional molecular solvents, and they provide a new and unusual environment to test our theoretical understanding of primary radiation chemistry, charge transfer and other reactions. We are interested in how IL properties influence physical and dynamical processes that determine the stability and lifetimes of reactive intermediates and thereby affect the courses of reactions and product distributions. We study these issues by characterization of primary radiolysis products and measurements of their yields and reactivity, quantification of electron solvation dynamics and scavenging of electrons in different states of solvation. From this knowledge we wish to learn how to predict radiolytic mechanisms and control them or mitigate their effects on the properties of materials used in nuclear fuel processing, for example, and to apply IL radiation chemistry to answer questions about general chemical reactivity in ionic liquids that will aid in the development of applications listed above. Very early in our radiolysis studies it became evident that the slow solvation dynamics of the excess electron in ILs (which vary over a wide viscosity range) increase the importance of pre-solvated electron reactivity and consequently alter product distributions and subsequent chemistry. This difference from conventional solvents has profound effects on predicting and controlling radiolytic yields

  3. Barium atoms and N20 molecular agregates reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Visticot, J.P.; Mestdagh, J.M.; Alcaraz, C.; Cuvellier, J.; Berlande, J.

    1988-06-01

    The collisions between a barium atom and N20 molecular agregates are studied, for a better understanding of the solvation part in a chemical reaction. The experiments are carried out in a crossed molecular beam device. The light coming from the collision zone is scattered, and analysed by means of a photon detector. A time-of-flight technique is applied in the investigation of the beam's polymer concentration. The results show a nearly negligible chemiluminescent effect in the reaction between barium and N20 polymer. A solvated BaO formation mechanism is proposed to justify the experimental results [fr

  4. A Non-Exploding Alkali Metal Drop on Water: From Blue Solvated Electrons to Bursting Molten Hydroxide

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mason, Philip E.; Buttersack, T.; Bauerecker, S.; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 42 (2016), s. 13019-13022 ISSN 1433-7851 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP208/12/G016 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : sodium potassium alloy * water * hydrated electrons Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 11.994, year: 2016

  5. Density dependence of the diffusion coefficient of alkali metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adebayo, G.A.; Anusionwu, B.C.; Njah, A.N.; Mathew, B.; Fabamise, O.A.T.

    2004-06-01

    The effect of density on transport coefficients of liquid Li, Na and K at high temperatures using the method of Molecular Dynamics simulation has been studied. Simulation of these liquid alkali metals were carried out with 800 particles in simulation boxes with periodic boundary conditions imposed. In order to test the reliability of the interatomic potential used in the calculations, experimental data on the structural properties were compared with calculated results. The calculations showed a linear relationship between the density and the diffusion coefficient in all the systems investigated except in lithium, where, due to the small size of the atom, standard molecular dynamics simulation method may not be appropriate for calculating the properties of interest. (author)

  6. Quantum mechanical study of molecular collisions at ultra-low energy: applications to alkali and alkaline-earth systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quemener, G.

    2006-10-01

    In order to investigate the collisional processes which occur during the formation of molecular Bose-Einstein condensates, a time-independent quantum mechanical formalism, based on hyperspherical coordinates, has been applied to the study of atom-diatom dynamics at ultra-low energies. We present theoretical results for three alkali systems, each composed of lithium, sodium or potassium atoms, and for an alkaline-earth system composed of calcium atoms. We also study dynamics at large and positive atom-atom scattering length. Evidence for the suppression of inelastic processes in a fermionic system is given, as well as a linear relation between the atom-diatom scattering length and the atom-atom scattering length. (author)

  7. Muonium centers in the alkali halides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumeler, H.; Kiefl, R.F.; Keller, H.; Kuendig, W.; Odermatt, W.; Patterson, B.D.; Schneider, J.W.; Savic, I.M.

    1986-01-01

    Muonium centers (Mu) in single crystals and powdered alkali halides have been studied using the high-timing-resolution transverse field μSR technique. Mu has been observed and its hyperfine parameter (HF) determined in every alkali halide. For the rocksalt alkali halides, the HF parameter A μ shows a systematic dependence on the host lattice constant. A comparison of the Mu HF parameter with hydrogen ESR data suggests that the Mu center is the muonic analogue of the interstitial hydrogen H i 0 -center. The rate of Mu diffusion can be deduced from the motional narrowing of the nuclear hyperfine interaction. KBr shows two different Mu states, a low-temperature Mu I -state and a high-temperature Mu II -state. (orig.)

  8. A procedure for preparing alkali metal hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemieux, R.U.; Sanford, C.E.; Prescott, J.F.

    1976-01-01

    A plain low cost, procedure for the continuous, low temperature preparation of sodium or potassium hydrides using cheap reagents is presented. Said invention is especially concerned with a process of purifying of a catalytic exchange liquid used for deuterium enrichment, in which an alkali metal hydride is produced as intermediate product. The procedure for producing the sodium and potassium hydrides consists in causing high pressure hydrogen to be absorbed by a mixture of at least a lower monoalkylamine and an alkylamide of an alkali metal from at least one of said amines [fr

  9. Salts of alkali metal anions and process of preparing same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dye, James L.; Ceraso, Joseph M.; Tehan, Frederick J.; Lok, Mei Tak

    1978-01-01

    Compounds of alkali metal anion salts of alkali metal cations in bicyclic polyoxadiamines are disclosed. The salts are prepared by contacting an excess of alkali metal with an alkali metal dissolving solution consisting of a bicyclic polyoxadiamine in a suitable solvent, and recovered by precipitation. The salts have a gold-color crystalline appearance and are stable in a vacuum at -10.degree. C. and below.

  10. Surface free energy of alkali and transition metal nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aqra, Fathi; Ayyad, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Size dependent surface free energy of spherical, cubic and disk Au nanoparticles. - Highlights: • A model to account for the surface free energy of metallic nanoparticles is described. • The model requires only the cohesive energy of the nanoparticle. • The surface free energy of a number of metallic nanoparticles has been calculated, and the obtained values agree well with existing data. • Surface energy falls down very fast when the number of atoms is less than hundred. • The model is applicable to any metallic nanoparticle. - Abstract: This paper addresses an interesting issue on the surface free energy of metallic nanoparticles as compared to the bulk material. Starting from a previously reported equation, a theoretical model, that involves a specific term for calculating the cohesive energy of nanoparticle, is established in a view to describe the behavior of surface free energy of metallic nanoparticles (using different shapes of particle: sphere, cube and disc). The results indicate that the behavior of surface energy is very appropriate for spherical nanoparticle, and thus, it is the most realistic shape of a nanoparticle. The surface energy of copper, silver, gold, platinum, tungsten, molybdenum, tantalum, paladium and alkali metallic nanoparticles is only prominent in the nanoscale size, and it decreases with the decrease of nanoparticle size. Thus, the surface free energy plays a more important role in determining the properties of nanoparticles than in bulk materials. It differs from shape to another, and falls down as the number of atoms (nanoparticle size) decreases. In the case of spherical nanoparticles, the onset of the sharp decrease in surface energy is observed at about 110 atom. A decrease of 16% and 45% in surface energy is found by moving from bulk to 110 atom and from bulk to 5 atom, respectively. The predictions are consistent with the reported data

  11. Secondary cell with orthorhombic alkali metal/manganese oxide phase active cathode material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doeff, Marca M.; Peng, Marcus Y.; Ma, Yanping; Visco, Steven J.; DeJonghe, Lutgard C.

    1996-01-01

    An alkali metal manganese oxide secondary cell is disclosed which can provide a high rate of discharge, good cycling capabilities, good stability of the cathode material, high specific energy (energy per unit of weight) and high energy density (energy per unit volume). The active material in the anode is an alkali metal and the active material in the cathode comprises an orthorhombic alkali metal manganese oxide which undergoes intercalation and deintercalation without a change in phase, resulting in a substantially linear change in voltage with change in the state of charge of the cell. The active material in the cathode is an orthorhombic structure having the formula M.sub.x Z.sub.y Mn.sub.(1-y) O.sub.2, where M is an alkali metal; Z is a metal capable of substituting for manganese in the orthorhombic structure such as iron, cobalt or titanium; x ranges from about 0.2 in the fully charged state to about 0.75 in the fully discharged state, and y ranges from 0 to 60 atomic %. Preferably, the cell is constructed with a solid electrolyte, but a liquid or gelatinous electrolyte may also be used in the cell.

  12. New bonding configuration on Si(111) and Ge(111) surfaces induced by the adsorption of alkali metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lottermoser, L.; Landemark, E.; Smilgies, D.M.

    1998-01-01

    The structure of the (3×1) reconstructions of the Si(111) and Ge(111) surfaces induced by adsorption of alkali metals has been determined on the basis of surface x-ray diffraction and low-energy electron diffraction measurements and density functional theory. The (3×1) surface results primarily f...... from the substrate reconstruction and shows a new bonding configuration consisting of consecutive fivefold and sixfold Si (Ge) rings in 〈11̅ 0〉 projection separated by channels containing the alkali metal atoms. © 1998 The American Physical Society...

  13. On the difference in oscillator strengths of inner shell excitations in noble gases and their alkali neighbors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amusia, M.Y.; Baltenkov, A.S.; Zhuravleva, G.I.

    1995-01-01

    It is demonstrated that the oscillator strength of resonant inner-shell excitation in a noble gas atom is considerably smaller than that in its alkali neighbor because in the latter case the effective charge acting upon excited electron is much bigger. With increase of the excitation's principal quantum number the difference between line intensities in noble gases and their alkali neighbors rapidly disappears. The calculations are performed in the Hartree-Fock approximation and with inclusion of rearrangement effects due to inner vacancy creation and its Auger decay. A paper has been submitted for publication

  14. A polarized alkali ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boettger, R.; Tungate, G.; Bauer, B.; Egelhof, P.; Moebius, K.H.; Steffens, E.

    1978-01-01

    The beam foil technique has been applied to detect nuclear vector polarization of a 10 keV 23 Na + beam. The result was about 70% of the atomic beam polarization thus limiting the depolarization by the surface ionizer to at most 30%. In a Coulomb excitation experiment with a tensor polarized 42 MeV 23 Na 7+ beam an effect of 0.011 +- 0.003 was measured yielding a value of t 20 approx. 0.04 for the beam polarization. The depolarization during the acceleration process can be estimated to be about 0.8. (orig.) [de

  15. 40 CFR 721.4740 - Alkali metal nitrites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alkali metal nitrites. 721.4740... Substances § 721.4740 Alkali metal nitrites. (a) Chemical substances and significant new use subject to reporting. (1) The category of chemical substances which are nitrites of the alkali metals (Group IA in the...

  16. 40 CFR 721.5278 - Substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., alkali salt. 721.5278 Section 721.5278 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5278 Substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt. (a) Chemical... as a substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt (PMN P-95-85) is subject to reporting under...

  17. 40 CFR 721.1878 - Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alkali metal alkyl borohydride... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1878 Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic). (a) Chemical substance... alkali metal alkyl borohydride (PMN P-00-1089) is subject to reporting under this section for the...

  18. 40 CFR 721.8900 - Substituted halogenated pyridinol, alkali salt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., alkali salt. 721.8900 Section 721.8900 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.8900 Substituted halogenated pyridinol, alkali salt. (a) Chemical... as substituted halogenated pyridinols, alkali salts (PMNs P-88-1271 and P-88-1272) are subject to...

  19. A polarizable QM/MM approach to the molecular dynamics of amide groups solvated in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwörer, Magnus; Wichmann, Christoph; Tavan, Paul, E-mail: tavan@physik.uni-muenchen.de [Lehrstuhl für BioMolekulare Optik, Ludwig-Maximilians Universität München, Oettingenstr. 67, 80538 München (Germany)

    2016-03-21

    The infrared (IR) spectra of polypeptides are dominated by the so-called amide bands. Because they originate from the strongly polar and polarizable amide groups (AGs) making up the backbone, their spectral positions sensitively depend on the local electric fields. Aiming at accurate computations of these IR spectra by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, which derive atomic forces from a hybrid quantum and molecular mechanics (QM/MM) Hamiltonian, here we consider the effects of solvation in bulk liquid water on the amide bands of the AG model compound N-methyl-acetamide (NMA). As QM approach to NMA we choose grid-based density functional theory (DFT). For the surrounding MM water, we develop, largely based on computations, a polarizable molecular mechanics (PMM) model potential called GP6P, which features six Gaussian electrostatic sources (one induced dipole, five static partial charge distributions) and, therefore, avoids spurious distortions of the DFT electron density in hybrid DFT/PMM simulations. Bulk liquid GP6P is shown to have favorable properties at the thermodynamic conditions of the parameterization and beyond. Lennard-Jones (LJ) parameters of the DFT fragment NMA are optimized by comparing radial distribution functions in the surrounding GP6P liquid with reference data obtained from a “first-principles” DFT-MD simulation. Finally, IR spectra of NMA in GP6P water are calculated from extended DFT/PMM-MD trajectories, in which the NMA is treated by three different DFT functionals (BP, BLYP, B3LYP). Method-specific frequency scaling factors are derived from DFT-MD simulations of isolated NMA. The DFT/PMM-MD simulations with GP6P and with the optimized LJ parameters then excellently predict the effects of aqueous solvation and deuteration observed in the IR spectra of NMA. As a result, the methods required to accurately compute such spectra by DFT/PMM-MD also for larger peptides in aqueous solution are now at hand.

  20. The mechanism for enhanced oxidation degradation of dioxin-like PCBs (PCB-77) in the atmosphere by the solvation effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Mei-Ling; Yang, Jia-Wen; Li, Yu

    2017-07-11

    The reaction pathways of PCB-77 in the atmosphere with ·OH, O 2 , NO x , and 1 O 2 were inferred based on density functional theory calculations with the 6-31G* basis set. The structures the reactants, transition states, intermediates, and products were optimized. The energy barriers and reaction heats were obtained to determine the energetically favorable reaction pathways. To study the solvation effect, the energy barriers and reaction rates for PCB-77 with different polar and nonpolar solvents (cyclohexane, benzene, carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, acetone, dichloromethane, ethanol, methanol, acetonitrile, dimethylsulfoxide, and water) were calculated. The results showed that ·OH preferentially added to the C5 atom of PCB-77, which has no Cl atom substituent, to generate the intermediate IM5. This intermediate subsequently reacted with O 2 via pathway A to generate IM5a, with an energy barrier of 7.27 kcal/mol and total reaction rate of 8.45 × 10 -8  cm 3 /molecule s. Pathway B involved direct dehydrogenation of IM5 to produce the OH-PCBs intermediate IM5b, with an energy barrier of 28.49 kcal/mol and total reaction rate of 1.15 × 10 -5  cm 3 /molecule s. The most likely degradation pathway of PCB-77 in the atmosphere is pathway A to produce IM5a. The solvation effect results showed that cyclohexane, carbon tetrachloride, and benzene could reduce the reaction energy barrier of pathway A. Among these solvents, the solvation effect of benzene was the largest, and could reduce the total reaction energy barrier by 25%. Cyclohexane, carbon tetrachloride, benzene, dichloromethane, acetone, and ethanol could increase the total reaction rate of pathway A. The increase in the reaction rate of pathway A with benzene was 8%. The effect of solvents on oxidative degradation of PCB-77 in the atmosphere is important. Graphical abstract The reaction pathways of PCB-77 in the atmosphere with •OH, O2, NOx, and 1O2 were inferred based on density functional theory

  1. Ionic Liquids: Radiation Chemistry, Solvation Dynamics and Reactivity Patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wishart, J.F.

    2008-01-01

    Ionic liquids (ILs) are a rapidly expanding family of condensed-phase media with important applications in energy production, nuclear fuel and waste processing, improving the efficiency and safety of industrial chemical processes, and pollution prevention. ILs are generally nonvolatile, noncombustible, highly conductive, recyclable and capable of dissolving a wide variety of materials. They are finding new uses in chemical synthesis, catalysis, separations chemistry, electrochemistry and other areas. Ionic liquids have dramatically different properties compared to conventional molecular solvents, and they provide a new and unusual environment to test our theoretical understanding of charge transfer and other reactions. We are interested in how IL properties influence physical and dynamical processes that determine the stability and lifetimes of reactive intermediates and thereby affect the courses of chemical reactions and product distributions. Successful use of ionic liquids in radiation-filled environments, where their safety advantages could be significant, requires an understanding of ionic liquid radiation chemistry. For example, characterizing the primary steps of IL radiolysis will reveal radiolytic degradation pathways and suggest ways to prevent them or mitigate their effects on the properties of the material. An understanding of ionic liquid radiation chemistry will also facilitate pulse radiolysis studies of general chemical reactivity in ILs, which will aid in the development of applications listed above. Very early in our radiolysis studies it became evident that slow solvation dynamics of the excess electron in ILs (which vary over a wide viscosity range) increases the importance of pre-solvated electron reactivity and consequently alters product distributions. Parallel studies of IL solvation phenomena using coumarin-153 dynamic Stokes shifts and polarization anisotropy decay rates are done to compare with electron solvation studies and to evaluate

  2. IONIC LIQUIDS: RADIATION CHEMISTRY, SOLVATION DYNAMICS AND REACTIVITY PATTERNS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    WISHART, J.F.

    2007-01-01

    energy production, nuclear fuel and waste processing, improving the efficiency and safety of industrial chemical processes, and pollution prevention. ILs are generally nonvolatile, noncombustible, highly conductive, recyclable and capable of dissolving a wide variety of materials. They are finding new uses in chemical synthesis, catalysis, separations chemistry, electrochemistry and other areas. Ionic liquids have dramatically different properties compared to conventional molecular solvents, and they provide a new and unusual environment to test our theoretical understanding of charge transfer and other reactions. We are interested in how IL properties influence physical and dynamical processes that determine the stability and lifetimes of reactive intermediates and thereby affect the courses of chemical reactions and product distributions. Successful use of ionic liquids in radiation-filled environments, where their safety advantages could be significant, requires an understanding of ionic liquid radiation chemistry. For example, characterizing the primary steps of IL radiolysis will reveal radiolytic degradation pathways and suggest ways to prevent them or mitigate their effects on the properties of the material. An understanding of ionic liquid radiation chemistry will also facilitate pulse radiolysis studies of general chemical reactivity in ILs, which will aid in the development of applications listed above. Very early in our radiolysis studies it became evident that slow solvation dynamics of the excess electron in ILs (which vary over a wide viscosity range) increases the importance of pre-solvated electron reactivity and consequently alters product distributions. Parallel studies of IL solvation phenomena using coumarin-153 dynamic Stokes shifts and polarization anisotropy decay rates are done to compare with electron solvation studies and to evaluate the influence of ILs on charge transport processes. Methods. Picosecond pulse radiolysis studies at BNL

  3. Investigation of anti-Relaxation coatings for alkali-metal vapor cells using surface science techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seltzer, S. J.; Michalak, D. J.; Donaldson, M. H.; Balabas, M. V.; Barber, S. K.; Bernasek, S. L.; Bouchiat, M.-A.; Hexemer, A.; Hibberd, A. M.; Jackson Kimball, D. F.; Jaye, C.; Karaulanov, T.; Narducci, F. A.; Rangwala, S. A.; Robinson, H. G.; Shmakov, A. K.; Voronov, D. L.; Yashchuk, V. V.; Pines, A.; Budker, D.

    2010-10-11

    Many technologies based on cells containing alkali-metal atomic vapor benefit from the use of antirelaxation surface coatings in order to preserve atomic spin polarization. In particular, paraffin has been used for this purpose for several decades and has been demonstrated to allow an atom to experience up to 10?000 collisions with the walls of its container without depolarizing, but the details of its operation remain poorly understood. We apply modern surface and bulk techniques to the study of paraffin coatings in order to characterize the properties that enable the effective preservation of alkali spin polarization. These methods include Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, atomic force microscopy, near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. We also compare the light-induced atomic desorption yields of several different paraffin materials. Experimental results include the determination that crystallinity of the coating material is unnecessary, and the detection of C=C double bonds present within a particular class of effective paraffin coatings. Further study should lead to the development of more robust paraffin antirelaxation coatings, as well as the design and synthesis of new classes of coating materials.

  4. Simple electrolyte solutions: Comparison of DRISM and molecular dynamics results for alkali halide solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joung, In Suk; Luchko, Tyler; Case, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Using the dielectrically consistent reference interaction site model (DRISM) of molecular solvation, we have calculated structural and thermodynamic information of alkali-halide salts in aqueous solution, as a function of salt concentration. The impact of varying the closure relation used with DRISM is investigated using the partial series expansion of order-n (PSE-n) family of closures, which includes the commonly used hypernetted-chain equation (HNC) and Kovalenko-Hirata closures. Results are compared to explicit molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, using the same force fields, and to experiment. The mean activity coefficients of ions predicted by DRISM agree well with experimental values at concentrations below 0.5 m, especially when using the HNC closure. As individual ion activities (and the corresponding solvation free energies) are not known from experiment, only DRISM and MD results are directly compared and found to have reasonably good agreement. The activity of water directly estimated from DRISM is nearly consistent with values derived from the DRISM ion activities and the Gibbs-Duhem equation, but the changes in the computed pressure as a function of salt concentration dominate these comparisons. Good agreement with experiment is obtained if these pressure changes are ignored. Radial distribution functions of NaCl solution at three concentrations were compared between DRISM and MD simulations. DRISM shows comparable water distribution around the cation, but water structures around the anion deviate from the MD results; this may also be related to the high pressure of the system. Despite some problems, DRISM-PSE-n is an effective tool for investigating thermodynamic properties of simple electrolytes. PMID:23387564

  5. Porous alkali activated materials with slow alkali release dynamic. Role of composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bumanis, G.; Bajare, D.

    2018-01-01

    Alkali activated materials (AAM) based on calcined metakaolin or illite clay together with waste by-products, such as waste glass or aluminium scrap recycling waste, were tested as value-added materials for pH stabilization in biogas technology where decrease of pH should be avoided. Porous materials with ability to slowly leach alkalis in the water media thus providing continuous control of the pH level were obtained. XRD, FTIR, SEM and titration methods were used to characterize AAM and their leaching properties. It is clear that composition of the material has an important effect on the diffusion of alkali from structure. Namely, higher Si/Al and Na/Al molar ratios may increase pore solution transfer to the leachate. The leaching rate of alkalis from the structure of AAM is high for the first few days, decreasing over time. It was possible to calculate the buffer capacity from the mixture design of AAM. [es

  6. Alkali resistant optical coatings for alkali lasers and methods of production thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soules, Thomas F; Beach, Raymond J; Mitchell, Scott C

    2014-11-18

    In one embodiment, a multilayer dielectric coating for use in an alkali laser includes two or more alternating layers of high and low refractive index materials, wherein an innermost layer includes a thicker, >500 nm, and dense, >97% of theoretical, layer of at least one of: alumina, zirconia, and hafnia for protecting subsequent layers of the two or more alternating layers of high and low index dielectric materials from alkali attack. In another embodiment, a method for forming an alkali resistant coating includes forming a first oxide material above a substrate and forming a second oxide material above the first oxide material to form a multilayer dielectric coating, wherein the second oxide material is on a side of the multilayer dielectric coating for contacting an alkali.

  7. A solvated electron lithium electrode for secondary batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammells, A. F.; Semkow, K. W.

    1986-09-01

    Attention is given to a novel method for the achievement of high electro-chemical reversibility in Li-based nonaqueous cells, using a liquid negative electrode that consists of Li dissolved in liquid ammonia as a solvated electron Li electrode. The containment of this liquid negative active material from direct contact to a liquid nonaqueous electrolyte in the positive electrode compartment was realized through the use of a Li-intercalated, electronically conducting ceramic membrane.

  8. Solvation dynamics of lithium salts in wet nitrobenzene

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Moakes, G.; Gelbaum, L. T.; Leisen, J.; Janata, J.; Mareček, Vladimír

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 593, 1-2 (2006), s. 111-118 ISSN 0022-0728 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/03/0822 Grant - others:Georgia Research Alliance(US) GRA.CG06.D Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : solvation * NMR * FTIR * nitrobenzene/water * solvatomers Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.339, year: 2006

  9. Benzonitrile: Electron affinity, excited states, and anion solvation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Andrew R.; Khuseynov, Dmitry; Sanov, Andrei

    2015-10-01

    We report a negative-ion photoelectron imaging study of benzonitrile and several of its hydrated, oxygenated, and homo-molecularly solvated cluster anions. The photodetachment from the unsolvated benzonitrile anion to the X ˜ 1 A 1 state of the neutral peaks at 58 ± 5 meV. This value is assigned as the vertical detachment energy (VDE) of the valence anion and the upper bound of adiabatic electron affinity (EA) of benzonitrile. The EA of the lowest excited electronic state of benzonitrile, a ˜ 3 A 1 , is determined as 3.41 ± 0.01 eV, corresponding to a 3.35 eV lower bound for the singlet-triplet splitting. The next excited state, the open-shell singlet A ˜ 1 A 1 , is found about an electron-volt above the triplet, with a VDE of 4.45 ± 0.01 eV. These results are in good agreement with ab initio calculations for neutral benzonitrile and its valence anion but do not preclude the existence of a dipole-bound state of similar energy and geometry. The step-wise and cumulative solvation energies of benzonitrile anions by several types of species were determined, including homo-molecular solvation by benzonitrile, hydration by 1-3 waters, oxygenation by 1-3 oxygen molecules, and mixed solvation by various combinations of O2, H2O, and benzonitrile. The plausible structures of the dimer anion of benzonitrile were examined using density functional theory and compared to the experimental observations. It is predicted that the dimer anion favors a stacked geometry capitalizing on the π-π interactions between the two partially charged benzonitrile moieties.

  10. Alkali metals in fungi of forest soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinichuk, M.; Taylor, A.; Rosen, K.; Nikolova, I.; Johanson, K.J.

    2009-01-01

    The high affinity of forest soil fungi for alkali metals such as potassium, rubidium, caesium as well as radiocaesium is shown and discussed. Good positive correlation was found between K: Rb concentration ratios in soil and in fungi, when correlation between K: Cs concentration ratios was less pronounced. (LN)

  11. Corrosion and compatibility in liquid alkali metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1978-01-01

    The literature dealing with liquid alkali metal corrosion of vanadium and its alloys is reviewed in the following subsections. Attention is given to both lithium and sodium data. Preceding this review, a brief outline of the current state of understanding of liquid metal corrosion mechanisms is provided

  12. Alkali slagging problems with biomass fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miles, T.R.; Miles, T.R. Jr.; Baxter, L.L.; Jenkins, B.M.; Oden, L.L.

    1993-12-31

    Biomass fueled power boilers are unable to burn more than minor percentages of annually generated agricultural fuels. Determining the mechanisms of deposit formation, and developing means of increasing the proportion of these annual biofuels to be fired are the aims of the ongoing Alkali Deposit Investigation sponsored by DOE/NREL with matching funds from industry sponsors, combining Science, Engineering and Industry.

  13. High effective silica fume alkali activator

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Abstract. Growing demands on the engineering properties of cement based materials and the urgency to decrease unsuitable ecologic impact of Portland cement manufacturing represent significant motivation for the development of new cement corresponding to these aspects. One category represents prospective alkali.

  14. Complexes in polyvalent metal - Alkali halide melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akdeniz, Z.; Tosi, M.P.

    1991-03-01

    Experimental evidence is available in the literature on the local coordination of divalent and trivalent metal ions by halogens in some 140 liquid mixtures of their halides with alkali halides. After brief reference to classification criteria for main types of local coordination, we focus on statistical mechanical models that we are developing for Al-alkali halide mixtures. Specifically, we discuss theoretically the equilibrium between (AlF 6 ) 3- and (AlF 4 ) - complexes in mixtures of AlF 3 and NaF as a function of composition in the NaF-rich region, the effect of the alkali counterion on this equilibrium, the possible role of (AlF 5 ) 2- as an intermediate species in molten cryolite, and the origin of the different complexing behaviours of Al-alkali fluorides and chlorides. We also present a theoretical scenario for processes of structure breaking and electron localization in molten cryolite under addition of sodium metal. (author). 26 refs, 2 tabs

  15. luminescence in coloured alkali halide crystals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    have studied the effect of annealing in chlorine gas on the ML of X-rayed KCl crystals. ..... high temperature because of the thermal bleaching of the coloration in alkali halide ..... [31] J Hawkins, Ph.D. Thesis (University of Reading, 1976).

  16. Comparison of solvation dynamics of electrons in four polyols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lampre, I.; Pernot, P.; Bonin, J. [Laboratoire de Chimie Physique/ELYSE, Universite Paris-Sud 11, UMR 8000, Bat. 349, Orsay F-91405 (France); CNRS, Orsay F-91405 (France); Mostafavi, M. [Laboratoire de Chimie Physique/ELYSE, Universite Paris-Sud 11, UMR 8000, Bat. 349, Orsay F-91405 (France); CNRS, Orsay F-91405 (France)], E-mail: mehran.mostafavi@lcp.u-psud.fr

    2008-10-15

    Using pump-probe transient absorption spectroscopy, we studied the solvation dynamics of the electron in liquid polyalcohols: ethane-1,2-diol, propane-1,2-diol, propane-1,3-diol and propane-1,2,3-triol. Time-resolved absorption spectra ranging from 440 to 720 nm were measured. Our study shows that the excess electron in the diols presents an intense and wide absorption band in the visible and near-IR spectral domain at early time after two-photon ionization of the neat solvent. Then, for the first tens of picoseconds, the electron spectrum shifts toward the blue domain and its bandwidth decreases as the red part of the initial spectrum rapidly drops, while the blue part hardly evolves. In contrast, in the triol, the absorption spectrum of the electron is early situated in the visible range after the pump pulse and then solely evolves in the red part. The Bayesian data analysis of the observed picosecond solvation dynamics with different models is in favor of a heterogeneous continuous relaxation. That is corroborated by the analogy between the change in the absorption band with increasing time or decreasing temperature. That tends to indicate a similar organization disorder of the solvent. Moreover, the electron solvation dynamics is very fast in propane-1,2,3-triol despite its high viscosity and highlight the role of the OH-group in that process.

  17. Improvements to the APBS biomolecular solvation software suite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurrus, Elizabeth; Engel, Dave; Star, Keith; Monson, Kyle; Brandi, Juan; Felberg, Lisa E; Brookes, David H; Wilson, Leighton; Chen, Jiahui; Liles, Karina; Chun, Minju; Li, Peter; Gohara, David W; Dolinsky, Todd; Konecny, Robert; Koes, David R; Nielsen, Jens Erik; Head-Gordon, Teresa; Geng, Weihua; Krasny, Robert; Wei, Guo-Wei; Holst, Michael J; McCammon, J Andrew; Baker, Nathan A

    2018-01-01

    The Adaptive Poisson-Boltzmann Solver (APBS) software was developed to solve the equations of continuum electrostatics for large biomolecular assemblages that have provided impact in the study of a broad range of chemical, biological, and biomedical applications. APBS addresses the three key technology challenges for understanding solvation and electrostatics in biomedical applications: accurate and efficient models for biomolecular solvation and electrostatics, robust and scalable software for applying those theories to biomolecular systems, and mechanisms for sharing and analyzing biomolecular electrostatics data in the scientific community. To address new research applications and advancing computational capabilities, we have continually updated APBS and its suite of accompanying software since its release in 2001. In this article, we discuss the models and capabilities that have recently been implemented within the APBS software package including a Poisson-Boltzmann analytical and a semi-analytical solver, an optimized boundary element solver, a geometry-based geometric flow solvation model, a graph theory-based algorithm for determining pK a values, and an improved web-based visualization tool for viewing electrostatics. © 2017 The Protein Society.

  18. Enthalpy-entropy compensation: the role of solvation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragan, Anatoliy I; Read, Christopher M; Crane-Robinson, Colyn

    2017-05-01

    Structural modifications to interacting systems frequently lead to changes in both the enthalpy (heat) and entropy of the process that compensate each other, so that the Gibbs free energy is little changed: a major barrier to the development of lead compounds in drug discovery. The conventional explanation for such enthalpy-entropy compensation (EEC) is that tighter contacts lead to a more negative enthalpy but increased molecular constraints, i.e., a compensating conformational entropy reduction. Changes in solvation can also contribute to EEC but this contribution is infrequently discussed. We review long-established and recent cases of EEC and conclude that the large fluctuations in enthalpy and entropy observed are too great to be a result of only conformational changes and must result, to a considerable degree, from variations in the amounts of water immobilized or released on forming complexes. Two systems exhibiting EEC show a correlation between calorimetric entropies and local mobilities, interpreted to mean conformational control of the binding entropy/free energy. However, a substantial contribution from solvation gives the same effect, as a consequence of a structural link between the amount of bound water and the protein flexibility. Only by assuming substantial changes in solvation-an intrinsically compensatory process-can a more complete understanding of EEC be obtained. Faced with such large, and compensating, changes in the enthalpies and entropies of binding, the best approach to engineering elevated affinities must be through the addition of ionic links, as they generate increased entropy without affecting the enthalpy.

  19. An analysis of the plasma impurity influx from alkali-metal coatings for fusion reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeWald, A.B.; Davidson, J.N.; Krauss, A.R.; Gruen, D.M.

    1982-01-01

    Recently, it has been proposed that alkali-metal covered surfaces be applied to magnetic fusion devices as a means of controlling plasma impurity contamination and shielding the substrate from erosion. Monolayer films of alkali metals have been shown to sputter primarily as ions under particle bombardment. Thus, it is thought that a sheath potential and/or magnetic fields encountered by a sputtered ion will return the ion to the surface without entering the plasma. In this paper, we investigate the net wall impurity influx associated with coatings which exhibit substantial secondary ion emission compared with those which sputter only as neutral atoms. Included in the analysis are sputtered substrate atoms. These are sometimes found to be a significant fraction of the total sputtering yield for low-Z alkali monolayers and affect the overall performance of such coatings. Estimates of the impurity influx made in the neighborhood of a sheath potential show that secondary-ion emitting coatings are effective as a means of inhibiting plasma impurity contamination and wall erosion. (orig.)

  20. Analysis of the plasma impurity influx from alkali-metal coatings for fusion-reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeWald, A.B.; Davidson, J.N.; Krauss, A.R.; Gruen, D.M.

    1982-01-01

    Recently, it has been proposed that alkali-metal covered surfaces be applied to magnetic fusion devices as a means of controlling plasma impurity contamination and shielding the substrate from erosion. Monolayer films of alkali metals have been shown to sputter primarily as ions under particle bombardment. Thus, it is thought that a sheath potential and/or magnetic fields encountered by a sputtered ion will return the ion to the surface without entering the plasma. In this paper, we investigate the net wall impurity influx associated with coatings which exhibit substantial secondary ion emission as compared to those which sputter only as neutral atoms. Included in the analysis are sputtered substrate atoms. These are sometimes found to be a significant fraction of the total sputtering yield for low-Z alkali monolayers and affect the overall performance of such coatings. Estimates of the impurity influx made in the neighborhood of a sheath potential show that secondary-ion emitting coatings are effective as a means of inhibiting plasma impurity contamination and wall erosion

  1. Potential energy surfaces for alkali plus noble gas pairs: a systematic comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blank, L. Aaron; Kedziora, Gary S.; Weeks, David E.

    2010-02-01

    Optically Pumped Alkali Lasers (OPAL) involve interactions of alkali atoms with a buffer gas typically consisting of a noble gas together with C2H4. Line broadening mechanisms are of particular interest because they can be used to match a broad optical pumping source with relatively narrow alkali absorption spectra. To better understand the line broadening processes at work in OPAL systems we focus on the noble gas collisional partners. A matrix of potential energy surfaces (PES) has been generated at the multi-configurational self consistent field (MCSCF) level for M + Ng, where M=Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs and Ng=He, Ne, Ar. The PES include the X2Σ ground state surface and the A2II, B2Σ excited state surfaces. In addition to the MCSCF surfaces, PES for Li+He have been calculated at the multi-reference singles and doubles configuration interaction (MRSDCI) level with spin-orbit splitting effects included. These surfaces provide a way to check the qualitative applicability of the MCSCF calculations. They also exhibit the avoided crossing between the B2Σ and A2II1/2 surfaces that is partially responsible for collision induced relaxation from the 2P3/2 to the 2P1/2 atomic levels.

  2. Push-Pull Laser-Atomic Oscillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jau, Y.-Y.; Happer, W.

    2007-01-01

    A vapor of alkali-metal atoms in the external cavity of a semiconductor laser, pumped with a time-independent injection current, can cause the laser to self-modulate at the 'field-independent 0-0 frequency' of the atoms. Push-pull optical pumping by the modulated light drives most of the atoms into a coherent superposition of the two atomic sublevels with an azimuthal quantum number m=0. The atoms modulate the optical loss of the cavity at the sharply defined 0-0 hyperfine frequency. As in a maser, the system is not driven by an external source of microwaves, but a very stable microwave signal can be recovered from the modulated light or from the modulated voltage drop across the laser diode. Potential applications for this new phenomenon include atomic clocks, the production of long-lived coherent atomic states, and the generation of coherent optical combs

  3. Thermodynamic properties of alkali borosilicate gasses and metaborates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asano, Mitsuru

    1992-01-01

    Borosilicate glasses are the proposed solidifying material for storing high level radioactive wastes in deep underground strata. Those have low melting point, and can contain relatively large amount of high level radioactive wastes. When borosilicate glasses are used for this purpose, they must be sufficiently stable and highly reliable in the vitrification process, engineered storage and the disposal in deep underground strata. The main vaporizing components from borosilicate glasses are alkali elements and boron. In this report, as for the vaporizing behavior of alkali borosilicate glasses, the research on thermodynamic standpoint carried out by the authors is explained, and the thermodynamic properties of alkali metaborates of monomer and dimer which are the main evaporation gases are reported. The evaporation and the activity of alkali borosilicate glasses, the thermodynamic properties of alkali borosilicate glasses, gaseous alkali metaborates and alkali metaborate system solid solution and so on are described. (K.I.)

  4. Two-pulse atomic coherent control spectroscopy of Eley-Rideal reactions: An application of an atom laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joergensen, Solvejg; Kosloff, Ronnie

    2003-01-01

    A spectroscopic application of the atom laser is suggested. The spectroscopy termed 2PACC (two-pulse atomic coherent control) employs the coherent properties of matter waves from a two-pulse atom laser. These waves are employed to control a gas-surface chemical recombination reaction. The method is demonstrated for an Eley-Rideal reaction of a hydrogen or alkali atom-laser pulse where the surface target is an adsorbed hydrogen atom. The reaction yields either a hydrogen or alkali hydride molecule. The desorbed gas-phase molecular yield and its internal state is shown to be controlled by the time and phase delay between two atom-laser pulses. The calculation is based on solving the time-dependent Schroedinger equation in a diabatic framework. The probability of desorption which is the predicted 2PACC signal has been calculated as a function of the pulse parameters

  5. Giant resonances in free atoms and in clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brechignac, C.; Connerade, J.P.

    1994-01-01

    A review of recent developments in the study of giant resonances in free atoms and in clusters is presented, with particular emphasis on the transition from free atoms to atoms in the condensed phase. Giant resonances in alkali and related metallic clusters due to the excitation of closed shells of delocalized electrons are also reviewed and the relation between different types of collective oscillations is discussed. (author)

  6. A new fundamental hydrogen defect in alkali halides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morato, S.P.; Luety, F.

    1978-01-01

    Atom hydrogen in neutral (H 0 ) and negative (H - ) form on substitutional and interstitial lattice sites gives rise to well characterized model defects in alkali-halides (U,U 1 ,U 2 ,U 3 centers), which have been extensively investigated in the past. When studying the photo-decomposition of OH - defects, a new configuration of atomic charged hidrogen was discovered, which can be produced in large quantities in the crystal and is apparently not connected to any other impurity. This new hidrogen defect does not show any pronounced electronic absorption, but displays a single sharp local mode band (at 1114cm -1 in KCl) with a perfect isotope shift. The defect can be produced by various UV or X-ray techniques in crystais doped with OH - , Sh - or H - defects. A detailed study of its formation kinetics at low temperature shows that it is primarily formed by the reaction of a mobile CI 2 - crowdion (H-center) with hidrogen defects [pt

  7. Recyclable hydrogen storage system composed of ammonia and alkali metal hydride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Hikaru [Department of Quantum Matter, AdSM, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8530 (Japan); Miyaoka, Hiroki; Hino, Satoshi [Institute for Advanced Materials Research, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8530 (Japan); Nakanishi, Haruyuki [Higashi-Fuji Technical Center, Toyota Motor Corporation, 1200 Misyuku, Susono, Shizuoka 410-1193 (Japan); Ichikawa, Takayuki; Kojima, Yoshitsugu [Department of Quantum Matter, AdSM, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8530 (Japan); Institute for Advanced Materials Research, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8530 (Japan)

    2009-12-15

    Ammonia (NH{sub 3}) reacts with alkali metal hydrides MH (M = Li, Na, and K) in an exothermic reaction to release hydrogen (H{sub 2}) at room temperature, resulting that alkali metal amides (MNH{sub 2}) which are formed as by-products. In this work, hydrogen desorption properties of these systems and the condition for the recycle from MNH{sub 2} back to MH were investigated systematically. For the hydrogen desorption reaction, the reactivities of MH with NH{sub 3} were better following the atomic number of M on the periodic table, Li < Na < K. It was confirmed that the hydrogen absorption reaction of all the systems proceeded under 0.5 MPa of H{sub 2} flow condition below 300 C. (author)

  8. Coherent correlation enhancement of outer shell photoionization cross sections of alkali-like ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amusia, M.Y.; Avdonina, B.; Pratt, R.H.

    1995-01-01

    An alkali-like ion interaction with inner electrons of an alkali-like ion leads to a significant increase in the photoionization cross section of the outer s electron. This occurs not only for ground-state ions with one s electron in the outer shell, but also when the outer s electron is in an excited state. The reason for this amplification, in addition to coherent enhancement in summing of the correlation amplitudes, is that the zero in the direct amplitude occurs below threshold. This leads to a constructive interference with the correlation amplitude above the photoionization threshold, in contrast to a destructive interference in the case of a neutral atom with the same electronic configuration, for which the zero occurs above threshold. Results of this research were published

  9. An alternative picture of alkali-metal-mediated metallation: cleave and capture chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulvey, Robert E

    2013-05-21

    This perspective article takes an alternative look at alkali-metal-mediated chemistry (exchange of a relatively inert C-H bond for a more reactive C-metal bond by a multicomponent reagent usually containing an alkali metal and a less electropositive metal such as magnesium or zinc). It pictures that the cleavage of selected C-H bonds can be accompanied by the capturing of the generated anion by the multi (Lewis acid)-(Lewis base) character of the residue of the bimetallic base. In this way small atoms or molecules (hydrides, oxygen-based anions) as well as sensitive organic anions (of substituted aromatic compounds, ethers or alkenes) can be captured. Cleave and capture reactions which occur in special positions on the organic substrate are also included.

  10. Ab initio joint density-functional theory of solvated electrodes, with model and explicit solvation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, Tomas

    2015-03-01

    the electrochemical context and how it is needed for realistic description of solvated electrode systems [], and how simple ``implicit'' polarized continuum methods fail radically in this context. Finally, we shall present a series of results relevant to battery, supercapacitor, and solar-fuel systems, one of which has led to a recent invention disclosure for improving battery cycle lifetimes. Supported as a part of the Energy Materials Center at Cornell, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by DOE/BES (award de-sc0001086) and by the New York State Division of Science, Technology and Innovation (NYSTAR, award 60923).

  11. Effect of alkali lignins with different molecular weights from alkali pretreated rice straw hydrolyzate on enzymatic hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yun; Qi, Benkun; Luo, Jianquan; Wan, Yinhua

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of alkali lignins with different molecular weights on enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulose. Different alkali lignins fractions, which were obtained from cascade ultrafiltration, were added into the dilute acid pretreated (DAP) and alkali pretreated (AP) rice straws respectively during enzymatic hydrolysis. The results showed that the addition of alkali lignins enhanced the hydrolysis and the enhancement for hydrolysis increased with increasing molecular weights of alkali lignins, with maximum enhancement being 28.69% for DAP and 20.05% for AP, respectively. The enhancement was partly attributed to the improved cellulase activity, and filter paper activity increased by 18.03% when adding lignin with highest molecular weight. It was found that the enhancement of enzymatic hydrolysis was correlated with the adsorption affinity of cellulase on alkali lignins, and the difference in surface charge and hydrophobicity of alkali lignins were responsible for the difference in affinity between cellulase and lignins. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Local structure of alkalis in mixed-alkali borate glass to elucidate the origin of mixed-alkali effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yomei Tokuda

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We report the structural analysis of Na+ and Cs+ in sodium cesium borate crystals and glasses using 23Na and 133Cs magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR spectroscopy. The composition dependence of NMR spectra of the borate was similar to that of the silicate: (1 the peak position of cesium borate crystals shifted to upfield for structures with larger Cs+ coordination numbers, (2 the MAS NMR spectra of xNa2O-yCs2O-3B2O3 (x = 0, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, 1.0, x + y = 1 glass showed that the average coordination number (CN of both the alkali cations decreases with increasing Cs+/(Na+ + Cs+ ratio. However, the degree of decrement in borates is much smaller than that in silicates. We have considered that the small difference in CN is due to 4-coordinated B, because it is electrically compensated by the alkali metal ions resulting in the restriction of having various coordinations of O to alkali metal.

  13. Network topology for the formation of solvated electrons in binary CaO–Al2O3 composition glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akola, Jaakko; Kohara, Shinji; Ohara, Koji; Fujiwara, Akihiko; Watanabe, Yasuhiro; Masuno, Atsunobu; Usuki, Takeshi; Kubo, Takashi; Nakahira, Atsushi; Nitta, Kiyofumi; Uruga, Tomoya; Weber, J. K. Richard; Benmore, Chris J.

    2013-01-01

    Glass formation in the CaO–Al2O3 system represents an important phenomenon because it does not contain typical network-forming cations. We have produced structural models of CaO–Al2O3 glasses using combined density functional theory–reverse Monte Carlo simulations and obtained structures that reproduce experiments (X-ray and neutron diffraction, extended X-ray absorption fine structure) and result in cohesive energies close to the crystalline ground states. The O–Ca and O–Al coordination numbers are similar in the eutectic 64 mol % CaO (64CaO) glass [comparable to 12CaO·7Al2O3 (C12A7)], and the glass structure comprises a topologically disordered cage network with large-sized rings. This topologically disordered network is the signature of the high glass-forming ability of 64CaO glass and high viscosity in the melt. Analysis of the electronic structure reveals that the atomic charges for Al are comparable to those for Ca, and the bond strength of Al–O is stronger than that of Ca–O, indicating that oxygen is more weakly bound by cations in CaO-rich glass. The analysis shows that the lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals occurs in cavity sites, suggesting that the C12A7 electride glass [Kim SW, Shimoyama T, Hosono H (2011) Science 333(6038):71–74] synthesized from a strongly reduced high-temperature melt can host solvated electrons and bipolarons. Calculations of 64CaO glass structures with few subtracted oxygen atoms (additional electrons) confirm this observation. The comparable atomic charges and coordination of the cations promote more efficient elemental mixing, and this is the origin of the extended cage structure and hosted solvated (trapped) electrons in the C12A7 glass. PMID:23723350

  14. The optical model in atomic physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarthy, I.E.

    1978-01-01

    The optical model for electron scattering on atoms has quite a short history in comparison with nuclear physics. The main reason for this is that there were insufficient data. Angular distribution for elastic and some inelastic scattering have now been measured for the atoms which exist in gaseous form at reasonable temperatures, inert gases, hydrogen, alkalies and mercury being the main ones out in. The author shows that the optical model makes sense in atomic physics by considering its theory and recent history. (orig./AH) [de

  15. Clusters of atoms and molecules theory, experiment, and clusters of atoms

    CERN Document Server

    1994-01-01

    Clusters of Atoms and Molecules is devoted to theoretical concepts and experimental techniques important in the rapidly expanding field of cluster science. Cluster properties are dicussed for clusteres composed of alkali metals, semiconductors, transition metals, carbon, oxides and halides of alkali metals, rare gases, and neutral molecules. The book is composed of several well-integrated treatments all prepared by experts. Each contribution starts out as simple as possible and ends with the latest results so that the book can serve as a text for a course, an introduction into the field, or as a reference book for the expert.

  16. Pyrolysis characteristic of kenaf studied with separated tissues, alkali pulp, and alkali li

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuo Kojima

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available To estimate the potential of kenaf as a new biomass source, analytical pyrolysis was performed using various kenaf tissues, i.e., alkali lignin and alkali pulp. The distribution of the pyrolysis products from the whole kenaf was similar to that obtained from hardwood, with syringol, 4-vinylsyringol, guaiacol, and 4-vinylguaiacol as the major products. The phenols content in the pyrolysate from the kenaf core was higher than that from the kenaf cuticle, reflecting the higher lignin content of the kenaf core. The ratios of the syringyl and guaiacyl compounds in the pyrolysates from the core and cuticle samples were 2.79 and 6.83, respectively. Levoglucosan was the major pyrolysis product obtained from the kenaf alkali pulp, although glycol aldehyde and acetol were also produced in high yields, as previously observed for other cellulosic materials. Moreover, the pathways for the formation of the major pyrolysis products from alkali lignin and alkali pulp were also described, and new pyrolysis pathways for carbohydrates have been proposed herein. The end groups of carbohydrates bearing hemiacetal groups were subjected to ring opening and then they underwent further reactions, including further thermal degradation or ring reclosing. Variation of the ring-closing position resulted in the production of different compounds, such as furans, furanones, and cyclopentenones.

  17. Unified mechanism of alkali and alkaline earth catalyzed gasification reactions of carbon by CO2 and H2O

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, S.G.; Yang, R.T.

    1997-01-01

    From molecular orbital calculations, a unified mechanism is proposed for the gasification reactions of graphite by CO2 and H2O, both uncatalyzed and catalyzed by alkali and alkaline earth catalysts. In this mechanism, there are two types of oxygen intermediates that are bonded to the active edge carbon atoms: an in-plane semiquinone type, Cf(O), and an off-plane oxygen bonded to two saturated carbon atoms that are adjacent to the semiquinone species, C(O)Cf(O). The rate-limiting step is the decomposition of these intermediates by breaking the C-C bonds that are connected to Cf(O). A new rate equation is derived for the uncatalyzed reactions, and that for the catalyzed reactions is readily available from the proposed mechanism. The proposed mechanism can account for several unresolved experimental observations: TPD and TK (transient kinetics) desorption results of the catalyzed systems, the similar activation energies for the uncatalyzed and catalyzed reactions, and the relative activities of the alkali and alkaline earth elements. The net charge of the edge carbon active site is substantially changed by gaining electron density from the alkali or alkaline earth element (by forming C-O-M, where M stands for metal). The relative catalytic activities of these elements can be correlated with their abilities of donating electrons and changing the net charge of the edge carbon atom. As shown previously (Chen, S. G.; Yang, R. T. J. Catal. 1993, 141, 102), only clusters of the alkali compounds are active. This derives from the ability of the clusters to dissociate CO2 and H2O to form O atoms and the mobility of the dissociated O atoms facilitated by the clusters.

  18. Thermal investigation of alkali metal hexacyanoruthenate (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okorskaya, A.P.; Sergeeva, A.N.; Pavlenko, L.I.; Semenishin, D.I.

    1978-01-01

    Thermal stability of Li, Na, K, Rb and Cs hexacyanoruthenates has been investigated. It has been established, that thermal decomposition of complexes depends upon outer spherical cations; complex compound stability decreasing with the rize of cation ionization potential. According to their thermal stability, alkali metal hexacyanoruthenates can be placed in the following row: Li < Na < K < Rb < Cs. Decomposition of Na, Rb and Cs complexes is accompanied by formation of thermally stable cyanides of these metals

  19. Alkali Metal Heat Pipe Life Issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid, Robert S.

    2004-01-01

    One approach to fission power system design uses alkali metal heat pipes for the core primary heat-transfer system. Heat pipes may also be used as radiator elements or auxiliary thermal control elements. This synopsis characterizes long-life core heat pipes. References are included where information that is more detailed can be found. Specifics shown here are for demonstration purposes and do not necessarily reflect current Nasa Project Prometheus point designs. (author)

  20. Alkali metal protective garment and composite material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballif, III, John L.; Yuan, Wei W.

    1980-01-01

    A protective garment and composite material providing satisfactory heat resistance and physical protection for articles and personnel exposed to hot molten alkali metals, such as sodium. Physical protection is provided by a continuous layer of nickel foil. Heat resistance is provided by an underlying backing layer of thermal insulation. Overlying outer layers of fireproof woven ceramic fibers are used to protect the foil during storage and handling.

  1. Solvation of carbonaceous molecules by para-H{sub 2} and ortho-D{sub 2} clusters. I. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calvo, F., E-mail: florent.calvo@univ-grenoble-alpes.fr [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, LIPHY, F-38000 Grenoble, France and CNRS, LIPHY, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Yurtsever, E. [Koç University, Rumelifeneriyolu, Sariyer, Istanbul 34450 (Turkey)

    2016-06-14

    This work theoretically examines the progressive coating of planar polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules ranging from benzene to circumcoronene (C{sub 54}H{sub 18}) by para-hydrogen and ortho-deuterium. The coarse-grained Silvera-Goldman potential has been extended to model the interactions between hydrogen molecules and individual atoms of the PAH and parametrized against quantum chemical calculations for benzene-H{sub 2}. Path-integral molecular dynamics simulations at 2 K were performed for increasingly large amounts of hydrogen coating the PAH up to the first solvation shell and beyond. From the simulations, various properties were determined such as the size of the first shell and its thickness as well as the solvation energy. The degree of delocalization was notably quantified from an energy landscape perspective, by monitoring the fluctuations among inherent structures sampled by the trajectories. Our results generally demonstrate a high degree of localization owing to relatively strong interactions between hydrogen and the PAH, and qualitatively minor isotopic effects. In the limit of large hydrogen amounts, the shell size and solvation energy both follow approximate linear relations with the numbers of carbon and hydrogen in the PAH.

  2. On the origin of alkali metals in Europa exosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozgurel, Ozge; Pauzat, Françoise; Ellinger, Yves; Markovits, Alexis; Mousis, Olivier; LCT, LAM

    2016-10-01

    At a time when Europa is considered as a plausible habitat for the development of an early form of life, of particular concern is the origin of neutral sodium and potassium atoms already detected in its exosphere (together with magnesium though in smaller abundance), since these atoms are known to be crucial for building the necessary bricks of prebiotic species. However their origin and history are still poorly understood. The most likely sources could be exogenous and result from the contamination produced by Io's intense volcanism and/or by meteoritic bombardment. These sources could also be endogenous if these volatile elements originate directly from Europa's icy mantle. Here we explore the possibility that neutral sodium and potassium atoms were delivered to the satellite's surface via the upwelling of ices formed in contact with the hidden ocean. These metallic elements would have been transferred as ions to the ocean at early epochs after Europa's formation, by direct contact of water with the rocky core. During Europa's subsequent cooling, the icy layers formed at the top of the ocean would have kept trapped the sodium and potassium, allowing their future progression to the surface and final identification in the exosphere of the satellite. To support this scenario, we have used chemistry numerical models based on first principle periodic density functional theory (DFT). These models are shown to be well adapted to the description of compact ice and are capable to describe the trapping and neutralization of the initial ions in the ice matrix. The process is found relevant for all the elements considered, alkali metals like Na and K, as well as for Mg and probably for Ca, their respective abundances depending essentially of their solubility and chemical capabilities to blend with water ices.

  3. Solvation of the electron in alcohols studied using the Argonne picosecond pulse radiolysis system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonah, C.D.; Kenney-Wallace, G.A.

    1979-01-01

    With a stroboscopic pulse radiolysis system, it is possible to measure the reactions of solvated electrons and dry electrons and the solvation time of electrons in alcohols from 20 psec to 350 psec. The solvation in alcohol and alcohol-alkane solutions is a complex process which depends on the microscopic structure of the fluid, so that the studies of solvation in alcohols as a function of temperature or as a function of the concentration of the alcohols must take into account the structure of the fluid being studied. The relaxation processes may not be dominant at low temperature. However, in room temperature alcohols, pre-existing traps are the dominant means of electron trapping. The extrapolation to water may be reasonable since water and alcohols both give similar final species. To obtain such idea of the solvation process in alcohols, the change of the absorption of electrons at 500 nm was measured. At very low concentration of alcohols in alkanes, electrons form a complex with a cluster of alcohol molecules, and the most probable size of this cluster is two alcohols (C 4 , C 10 ). The species formed is not solvated electrons, since the characteristic spectrum of solvated electrons is absent, and the conductivity of the species is far above that of solvated electrons. (Yamashita, S.)

  4. Molecular dynamics study of the solvation of an alpha-helical transmembrane peptide by DMSO

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duarte, A.M.; Mierlo, van C.P.M.; Hemminga, M.A.

    2008-01-01

    10-ns molecular dynamics study of the solvation of a hydrophobic transmembrane helical peptide in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is presented. The objective is to analyze how this aprotic polar solvent is able to solvate three groups of amino acid residues (i.e., polar, apolar, and charged) that are

  5. Studies of base pair sequence effects on DNA solvation based on all

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Detailed analyses of the sequence-dependent solvation and ion atmosphere of DNA are presented based on molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on all the 136 unique tetranucleotide steps obtained by the ABC consortium using the AMBER suite of programs. Significant sequence effects on solvation and ion localization ...

  6. Femtosecond spectroscopic study of the solvation of amphiphilic molecules by water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rezus, Y.L.A.; Bakker, H.J.

    2008-01-01

    We use polarization-resolved mid-infrared pump-probe spectroscopy to study the aqueous solvation of proline and N-methylacetamide. These molecules serve as models to study the solvation of proteins. We monitor the orientational dynamics of partly deuterated water molecules (HDO) that are present at

  7. Competitive solvation of (bis)(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide anion by acetonitrile and water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chaban, Vitaly

    2014-01-01

    Competitive solvation of an ion by two or more solvents is one of the key phenomena determining the identity of our world. Solvation in polar solvents frequently originates from non-additive non-covalent interactions. Pre-parametrized potentials poorly capture these interactions, unless the force...

  8. Alteration of alkali reactive aggregates autoclaved in different alkali solutions and application to alkali-aggregate reaction in concrete (II) expansion and microstructure of concrete microbar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Duyou; Mei Laibao; Xu Zhongzi; Tang Mingshu; Mo Xiangyin; Fournier, Benoit

    2006-01-01

    The effect of the type of alkalis on the expansion behavior of concrete microbars containing typical aggregate with alkali-silica reactivity and alkali-carbonate reactivity was studied. The results verified that: (1) at the same molar concentration, sodium has the strongest contribution to expansion due to both ASR and ACR, followed by potassium and lithium; (2) sufficient LiOH can completely suppress expansion due to ASR whereas it can induce expansion due to ACR. It is possible to use the duplex effect of LiOH on ASR and ACR to clarify the ACR contribution when ASR and ACR may coexist. It has been shown that a small amount of dolomite in the fine-grained siliceous Spratt limestone, which has always been used as a reference aggregate for high alkali-silica reactivity, might dedolomitize in alkaline environment and contribute to the expansion. That is to say, Spratt limestone may exhibit both alkali-silica and alkali-carbonate reactivity, although alkali-silica reactivity is predominant. Microstructural study suggested that the mechanism in which lithium controls ASR expansion is mainly due to the favorable formation of lithium-containing less-expansive product around aggregate particles and the protection of the reactive aggregate from further attack by alkalis by the lithium-containing product layer

  9. Alkali adsorption on Ni(1 1 1) and their coadsorption with CO and O

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Politano, A.; Formoso, V.; Chiarello, G.

    2008-01-01

    The adsorption of alkalis (Na, K) on Ni(1 1 1) and their coadsorption with CO and O were studied by high-resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy. Loss measurements of clean alkali adlayers provided the expected behaviour of the alkali-substrate vibration energy as a function of the alkali coverage. This result was achieved by eliminating any trace of CO contamination from the alkali adlayer. As a matter of fact, a significant softening of the alkali-Ni vibration energy was revealed in the alkali + CO coadsorbed phase. Moreover, alkali coadsorption with oxygen caused a weakening of the O-Ni bond and a strengthening of the alkali-Ni bond

  10. Time-dependent friction and solvation time correlation function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samanta, Alok; Ali, Sk Musharaf; Ghosh, Swapan K

    2005-01-01

    We have derived a new relation between the time-dependent friction and solvation time correlation function (STCF) for non-polar fluids. The friction values calculated using this relation and simulation results on STCF for a Lennard-Jones fluid are shown to have excellent agreement with the same obtained through mode-coupling theory. Also derived is a relation between the time-dependent dielectric friction and STCF for polar fluids. Routes are thus provided to obtain the time-dependent friction (non-polar as well as dielectric) from an experimentally measured quantity like STCF, even if the interparticle interaction potential is not known

  11. Equilibrium and nonequilibrium solvation and solute electronic structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, H.J.; Hynes, J.T.

    1990-01-01

    When a molecular solute is immersed in a polar and polarizable solvent, the electronic wave function of the solute system is altered compared to its vacuum value; the solute electronic structure is thus solvent-dependent. Further, the wave function will be altered depending upon whether the polarization of the solvent is or is not in equilibrium with the solute charge distribution. More precisely, while the solvent electronic polarization should be in equilibrium with the solute electronic wave function, the much more sluggish solvent orientational polarization need not be. We call this last situation non-equilibrium solvation. We outline a nonlinear Schroedinger equation approach to these issues

  12. Role of trapped and solvated electrons in Ps formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stepanov, S.V.; Byakov, V.M.; Mikhin, K.V.; He, C.; Hirade, T.

    2005-01-01

    Role of trapped and solvated electrons in Ps formation is discussed. Combination of thermalized positron with such electrons is possible from the view point of the energy balance and may results in Ps formation. This process proceeds during all e = lifetime matter. Fitting of raw experimental e + -e - annihilation spectra has to be based on an adequate physical input, which often leads to necessity of nonexponential deconvolution of the spectra. We have interpreted the Ps formation data in polyethylene, ethylene-methylmethacrylate and polymethylmethacrylate in dark and in light vs. tome of the measurement and temperature. parameters characterized accumulation of trapped electrons and their recombination with counter ions and positrons are obtained. (author)

  13. Electrochemical redox reactions in solvated silica sol-gel glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Opallo, M.

    2002-01-01

    The studies of electrochemical redox reactions in solvated silica sol-gel glass were reviewed. The methodology of the experiments with emphasis on the direct preparation of the solid electrolyte and the application ultra microelectrodes was described. Generally, the level of the electrochemical signal is not much below that observed in liquid electrolyte. The current depends on time elapsed after gelation, namely the longer time, the smaller current. The differences between electrochemical behaviour of the redox couples in monoliths and thin layers were described. (author)

  14. Bis(1,3-dimethyl-1H-imidazolium hexafluorosilicate methanol 0.33-solvate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxim V. Borzov

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, 6C5H9N2+·3SiF62−·CH3OH, (I, was prepared by recrystallization of the crude salt from methanol along with solvent-free 2C5H9N2+·SiF62− (II. Crystals of these solvatomorphs can be separated manually. The solvate (I crystallizes in a rare hexagonal space group P6/mcc. Its asymmetric unit comprises one half of an imidazolium cation bisected by the crystallographic m-plane, one-sixth and one-twelfth of two crystallographically independent SiF62– dianions (Si atoms are located on the 3.2 and 6/m inversion centres, and one-twelfth of a methanol molecule (C atoms are situated on the 622 inversion centres, other atoms are disordered between general positions. In (I, all F atoms of 3.2-located SiF62– dianions participate in the formation of symmetry-equivalent contacts to the H atoms of imidazolium fragments, thus forming rod-type ensembles positioned on the -6 axes. These `pillar' rods are, in turn, F...H interlinked through SiF62– dianions disordered around the 6/m centres. The twelvefold disordered methanol molecules are appended to this array by O—H...F hydrogen bonds to the 6/m located SiF62– dianions. In terms of graph-set notation, the first and second level networks in (I are N1 = C22(7[3R44(14]D22(4 and N2 = D22(5 (C—H...O hydrogen bonds are not considered. After locating all symmetrically independent atoms in the cation and anions, there remained a strong (> 3 e Å−3 residual electron density peak located at the 622 inversion centre. Treatment of this pre-refined model with the SQUEEZE procedure in PLATON [Spek (2009. Acta Cryst. D65, 148–155] revealed two voids per unit cell, indicative of the presence of the solvent methanol molecule disordered about the 622 inversion centre.

  15. Alkali Influence on Synthesis of Solid Electrolyte Based on Alkali Nitrate-Alumina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yustinus Purwamargapratala; Purnama, S.; Purwanto, P.

    2008-01-01

    Research of solid electrolyte based on alumina with addition of alkali materials of barium nitrate, calcium nitrate, sodium nitrate and lithium nitrate has been done. Aluminium hydroxide and alkali nitrate were mixed in mole ratio of 1 : 1 in water media and pyrolyzed at 300 o C for 1 hour Pyrolysis result were then mixed with alumina in mole ratio of 1 : 1, compacted and heated at 600 o C for 3 hours. To characterize the sample, XRD (X-Ray Diffractometers) and LCR meter (impedance, capacitance, and resistance) were used for analysis the phase and conductivity properties. The result showed formation of alkali-aluminate in which Li-base have the highest room temperature conductivity of 3.1290 x 10 -5 S.cm -1 , while Ba-base have the lowest conductivity of 5.7266 x 10 -8 S.cm -1 . (author)

  16. Alkali depletion and ion-beam mixing in glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, G.W.

    1983-01-01

    Ion-implantation-induced alkali depletion in simple alkali-silicate glasses (12M 2 O.88SiO 2 ) has been studied for implantations at room temperature and near 77K. Results are consistent with a mechanism for alkali removal, by heavy ion bombardment, based on radiation-enhanced migration and preferential removal of alkali from the outermost layers. Similar results were obtained for mixed-alkali glasses ((12-x)Cs 2 .O.xM 2 O.88SiO 2 ) where, in addition, a mixed-alkali effect may also be operative. Some preliminary experiments with ion implantation through thin Al films on SiO 2 glass and on a phosphate glass show that inter-diffusion takes place and suggest that this ion-mixing technique may be a useful method for altering the physical properties of glass surfaces

  17. Method for the safe disposal of alkali metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, T.R.

    1977-01-01

    Alkali metals such as those employed in liquid metal coolant systems can be safely reacted to form hydroxides by first dissolving the alkali metal in relatively inert metals such as lead or bismuth. The alloy thus formed is contacted with a molten salt including the alkali metal hydroxide and possibly the alkali metal carbonate in the presence of oxygen. This oxidizes the alkali metal to an oxide which is soluble within the molten salt. The salt is separated and contacted with steam or steam--CO 2 mixture to convert the alkali metal oxide to the hydroxide. These reactions can be conducted with minimal hydrogen evolution and with the heat of reaction distributed between the several reaction steps. 5 claims, 1 figure

  18. Physical and optical studies in mixed alkali borate glasses with three types of alkali ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samee, M.A.; Awasthi, A.M.; Shripathi, T.; Bale, Shashidhar; Srinivasu, Ch.; Rahman, Syed

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → We report, for the first time, the mixed alkali effect in the (40-x)Li 2 O-xNa 2 O-10K 2 O-50B 2 O 3 glasses through optical properties, density and modulated DSC studies. → Optical band gap (E opt ) and Urbach energy (ΔE) have been evaluated. → The values of E opt and ΔE show non-linear behavior with compositional parameter showing the mixed alkali effect. → The glass stability S is observed to be less which may be important for the present glasses as promising material for non-optical applications. - Abstract: So far only a handful of publications have been concerned with the study of the mixed alkali effect in borate glasses containing three types of alkali ions. In the present work, the mixed alkali effect (MAE) has been investigated in the glass system (40-x)Li 2 O-xNa 2 O-10K 2 O-50B 2 O 3 . (0 ≤ x ≤ 40 mol%) through density and modulated DSC studies. The density and glass transition temperature of the present glasses varies non-linearly exhibiting mixed alkali effect. The glass stability is observed to be less which may be important for the present glasses as promising material for non-optical applications. We report, for the first time, the mixed alkali effect in the present glasses through optical properties. From the absorption edge studies, the values of indirect optical band gap (E opt ), direct optical band gap and Urbach energy (ΔE) have been evaluated. The values of E opt and ΔE show non-linear behavior with compositional parameter showing the mixed alkali effect. The average electronic polarizability of oxide ions α O 2- , optical basicity Λ, and Yamashita-Kurosawa's interaction parameter A have been examined to check the correlations among them and bonding character. Based on good correlation among electronic polarizability of oxide ions, optical basicity and interaction parameter, the present Li 2 O-Na 2 O-K 2 O-B 2 O 3 glasses are classified as normal ionic (basic) oxides.

  19. Survival probability in small angle scattering of low energy alkali ions from alkali covered metal surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neskovic, N.; Ciric, D.; Perovic, B.

    1982-01-01

    The survival probability in small angle scattering of low energy alkali ions from alkali covered metal surfaces is considered. The model is based on the momentum approximation. The projectiles are K + ions and the target is the (001)Ni+K surface. The incident energy is 100 eV and the incident angle 5 0 . The interaction potential of the projectile and the target consists of the Born-Mayer, the dipole and the image charge potentials. The transition probability function corresponds to the resonant electron transition to the 4s projectile energy level. (orig.)

  20. Determination of the common and rare alkalies in mineral analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, R.C.; Stevens, R.E.

    1934-01-01

    Methods are described which afford a determination of each member of the alkali group and are successful in dealing with the quantities of the rare alkalies found in rocks and minerals. The procedures are relatively rapid and based chiefly on the use of chloroplatinic acid, absolute alcohol and ether, and ammonium sulfate. The percentages of all the alkalies found in a number of minerals are given.

  1. Fluorescence quenching and the "ring-mode" to "red-mode" transition in alkali inductively coupled plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, M.; Bazurto, R.; Camparo, J.

    2018-01-01

    The ring-mode to red-mode transition in alkali metal inductively coupled plasmas (ICPs) (i.e., rf-discharge lamps) is perhaps the most important physical phenomenon affecting these devices as optical pumping light sources for atomic clocks and magnetometers. It sets the limit on useful ICP operating temperature, thereby setting a limit on ICP light output for atomic-clock/magnetometer signal generation, and it is a temperature region of ICP operation associated with discharge instability. Previous work has suggested that the mechanism driving the ring-mode to red-mode transition is associated with radiation trapping, but definitive experimental evidence validating that hypothesis has been lacking. Based on that hypothesis, one would predict that the introduction of an alkali-fluorescence quenching gas (i.e., N2) into the ICP would increase the ring-mode to red-mode transition temperature. Here, we test that prediction, finding direct evidence supporting the radiation-trapping hypothesis.

  2. Effective oscillator strength distributions of spherically symmetric atoms for calculating polarizabilities and long-range atom–atom interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Jun, E-mail: phyjiang@yeah.net [Key Laboratory of Atomic and Molecular Physics and Functional Materials of Gansu Province, College of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Northwest Normal University, Lanzhou 730070 (China); School of Engineering, Charles Darwin University, Darwin, Northern Territory, 0909 (Australia); Mitroy, J. [School of Engineering, Charles Darwin University, Darwin, Northern Territory, 0909 (Australia); Cheng, Yongjun, E-mail: cyj83mail@gmail.com [School of Engineering, Charles Darwin University, Darwin, Northern Territory, 0909 (Australia); Academy of Fundamental and Interdisciplinary Science, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150080 (China); Bromley, M.W.J., E-mail: brom@physics.uq.edu.au [School of Mathematics and Physics, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland 4075 (Australia)

    2015-01-15

    Effective oscillator strength distributions are systematically generated and tabulated for the alkali atoms, the alkaline-earth atoms, the alkaline-earth ions, the rare gases and some miscellaneous atoms. These effective distributions are used to compute the dipole, quadrupole and octupole static polarizabilities, and are then applied to the calculation of the dynamic polarizabilities at imaginary frequencies. These polarizabilities can be used to determine the long-range C{sub 6}, C{sub 8} and C{sub 10} atom–atom interactions for the dimers formed from any of these atoms and ions, and we present tables covering all of these combinations.

  3. Effective oscillator strength distributions of spherically symmetric atoms for calculating polarizabilities and long-range atom–atom interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Jun; Mitroy, J.; Cheng, Yongjun; Bromley, M.W.J.

    2015-01-01

    Effective oscillator strength distributions are systematically generated and tabulated for the alkali atoms, the alkaline-earth atoms, the alkaline-earth ions, the rare gases and some miscellaneous atoms. These effective distributions are used to compute the dipole, quadrupole and octupole static polarizabilities, and are then applied to the calculation of the dynamic polarizabilities at imaginary frequencies. These polarizabilities can be used to determine the long-range C 6 , C 8 and C 10 atom–atom interactions for the dimers formed from any of these atoms and ions, and we present tables covering all of these combinations

  4. Noncontact atomic force microscopy in liquid environment with quartz tuning fork and carbon nanotube probe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kageshima, M.; Jensenius, Henriette; Dienwiebel, M.

    2002-01-01

    A force sensor for noncontact atomic force microscopy in liquid environment was developed by combining a multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT) probe with a quartz tuning fork. Solvation shells of octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane surface were detected both in the frequency shift and dissipation. Due to t...

  5. Interaction of alkali metal nitrates with calcium carbonate and kyanite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Protsyuk, A.P.; Malakhov, A.I.; Karabanov, V.P.; Lebedeva, L.P.

    1978-01-01

    Thermographic, thermodynamic and X-ray phase studies have been made into the interaction of alkali metal nitrates with calcium carbonate and kyanite. Examined among other things was the effect of water vapor and carbon dioxide on the interaction between alkali metal nitrates and kyanite. The chemical mechanism of the occurring processes has been established. The interaction with calcium carbonates results in the formation of alkali metal carbonates and calcium oxide with liberation of nitrogen oxide and oxygen. The products of the interaction with kyanite are shown to be identical with the compounds forming when alkali metal carbonates are used

  6. Alkali absorption and citrate excretion in calcium nephrolithiasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakhaee, K.; Williams, R. H.; Oh, M. S.; Padalino, P.; Adams-Huet, B.; Whitson, P.; Pak, C. Y.

    1993-01-01

    The role of net gastrointestinal (GI) alkali absorption in the development of hypocitraturia was investigated. The net GI absorption of alkali was estimated from the difference between simple urinary cations (Ca, Mg, Na, and K) and anions (Cl and P). In 131 normal subjects, the 24 h urinary citrate was positively correlated with the net GI absorption of alkali (r = 0.49, p origin of hypocitraturia. However, the normal dependence was maintained in CDS and in idiopathic hypocitraturia, suggesting that reduced citrate excretion was largely dietary in origin as a result of low net alkali absorption (from a probable relative deficiency of vegetables and fruits or a relative excess of animal proteins).

  7. Coprecipitation of alkali metal ions with calcium carbonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okumura, Minoru; Kitano, Yasushi

    1986-01-01

    The coprecipitation of alkali metal ions Li + , Na + , K + and Rb + with calcium carbonate has been studied experimentally and the following results have been obtained: (1) Alkali metal ions are more easily coprecipitated with aragonite than with calcite. (2) The relationship between the amounts of alkali metal ions coprecipitated with aragonite and their ionic radii shows a parabolic curve with a peak located at Na + which has approximately the same ionic radius as Ca 2+ . (3) However, the amounts of alkali metal ions coprecipitated with calcite decrease with increasing ionic radius of alkali metals. (4) Our results support the hypothesis that (a) alkali metals are in interstitial positions in the crystal structure of calcite and do not substitute for Ca 2+ in the lattice, but (b) in aragonite, alkali metals substitute for Ca 2+ in the crystal structure. (5) Magnesium ions in the parent solution increase the amounts of alkali metal ions (Li + , Na + , K + and Rb + ) coprecipitated with calcite but decrease those with aragonite. (6) Sodium-bearing aragonite decreases the incorporation of other alkali metal ions (Li + , K + and Rb + ) into the aragonite. (author)

  8. Alkali metal control over N-N cleavage in iron complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grubel, Katarzyna; Brennessel, William W; Mercado, Brandon Q; Holland, Patrick L

    2014-12-03

    Though N2 cleavage on K-promoted Fe surfaces is important in the large-scale Haber-Bosch process, there is still ambiguity about the number of Fe atoms involved during the N-N cleaving step and the interactions responsible for the promoting ability of K. This work explores a molecular Fe system for N2 reduction, particularly focusing on the differences in the results obtained using different alkali metals as reductants (Na, K, Rb, Cs). The products of these reactions feature new types of Fe-N2 and Fe-nitride cores. Surprisingly, adding more equivalents of reductant to the system gives a product in which the N-N bond is not cleaved, indicating that the reducing power is not the most important factor that determines the extent of N2 activation. On the other hand, the results suggest that the size of the alkali metal cation can control the number of Fe atoms that can approach N2, which in turn controls the ability to achieve N2 cleavage. The accumulated results indicate that cleaving the triple N-N bond to nitrides is facilitated by simultaneous approach of least three low-valent Fe atoms to a single molecule of N2.

  9. Crystal structures of two solvates of (18-crown-6potassium acetate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phil Liebing

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The crystal and molecular strutures of two solvated forms of [K(18c6]OAc (18c6 = 18-crown-6 = 1,4,7,10,13,16-hexaoxacyclooctadecane and OAc = acetate were determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, namely (acetato-κ2O,O′(1,4,7,10,13,16-hexaoxacyclooctadecane-κ6Opotassium dihydrate, [K(CH3COO(C12H24O6]·2H2O (1 and (acetato-κ2O,O′aqua(1,4,7,10,13,16-hexaoxacyclooctadecane-κ6Opotassium acetic acid monosolvate [K(CH3COO(C12H24O6(H2O]·CH3COOH (2. In both compounds, the acetate anion is bonded to the potassium ion in a chelating fashion and the metal atom is consequently slightly displaced from the O6 plane of the crown ether. In the crystals, O—H...O hydrogen bonds lead to a polymeric ladder structure in the dihydrate 1, while the acetic acid hydrate 2 features inversion dimers.

  10. Affine-response model of molecular solvation of ions: Accurate predictions of asymmetric charging free energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardhan, Jaydeep P; Jungwirth, Pavel; Makowski, Lee

    2012-09-28

    Two mechanisms have been proposed to drive asymmetric solvent response to a solute charge: a static potential contribution similar to the liquid-vapor potential, and a steric contribution associated with a water molecule's structure and charge distribution. In this work, we use free-energy perturbation molecular-dynamics calculations in explicit water to show that these mechanisms act in complementary regimes; the large static potential (∼44 kJ/mol/e) dominates asymmetric response for deeply buried charges, and the steric contribution dominates for charges near the solute-solvent interface. Therefore, both mechanisms must be included in order to fully account for asymmetric solvation in general. Our calculations suggest that the steric contribution leads to a remarkable deviation from the popular "linear response" model in which the reaction potential changes linearly as a function of charge. In fact, the potential varies in a piecewise-linear fashion, i.e., with different proportionality constants depending on the sign of the charge. This discrepancy is significant even when the charge is completely buried, and holds for solutes larger than single atoms. Together, these mechanisms suggest that implicit-solvent models can be improved using a combination of affine response (an offset due to the static potential) and piecewise-linear response (due to the steric contribution).

  11. Affine-response model of molecular solvation of ions: Accurate predictions of asymmetric charging free energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardhan, Jaydeep P.; Jungwirth, Pavel; Makowski, Lee

    2012-01-01

    Two mechanisms have been proposed to drive asymmetric solvent response to a solute charge: a static potential contribution similar to the liquid-vapor potential, and a steric contribution associated with a water molecule's structure and charge distribution. In this work, we use free-energy perturbation molecular-dynamics calculations in explicit water to show that these mechanisms act in complementary regimes; the large static potential (∼44 kJ/mol/e) dominates asymmetric response for deeply buried charges, and the steric contribution dominates for charges near the solute-solvent interface. Therefore, both mechanisms must be included in order to fully account for asymmetric solvation in general. Our calculations suggest that the steric contribution leads to a remarkable deviation from the popular “linear response” model in which the reaction potential changes linearly as a function of charge. In fact, the potential varies in a piecewise-linear fashion, i.e., with different proportionality constants depending on the sign of the charge. This discrepancy is significant even when the charge is completely buried, and holds for solutes larger than single atoms. Together, these mechanisms suggest that implicit-solvent models can be improved using a combination of affine response (an offset due to the static potential) and piecewise-linear response (due to the steric contribution). PMID:23020318

  12. CL 14: Solvation structure and dynamics of room temperature ionic liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musat, Raluca M.; Polyansky, Dmitriy; Crowell, Robert A.; Thomas, Marie; Wishart, James F.; Takahashi, Kenji; Katsumura, Yosuke

    2010-01-01

    Room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) have emerged as a new class of solvents that, due to their unique properties (e.g., low volatility, large electrochemical window, high conductivity, etc.), have several potential applications. Among these are their possible use in nuclear fuel reprocessing, dye sensitized solar cells, and CO 2 sequestration. The properties of a given class of RTILs depend strongly on the choice of the counter anion. In this contribution we present new results using both static and time-resolved EXAFS (ca. 1 ns resolution) and time resolved optical absorption spectroscopy on a series of bromide containing imidazolium salts. The static results provide detailed information of the solvation shell of the bromide ion while the time-resolved data shed light on the nature and chemical behavior of the lowest lying charge transfer band, the physical motion of the bromine atom and its conversion to di-bromide. The photochemistry of the charge transfer (CT) band of the room temperature ionic liquid 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide is investigated using ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy (TA) in the near-IR and steady state UV absorption. Irradiation of the CT band at 266 nm results in the steady state production of di-bromide which absorbs strongly at 266 nm. It is shown that this photoproduct, which is apparently very stable, adversely affects ultrafast transient absorption measurements. Flowing and simultaneously translating the sample mitigates this effect and reveals new transient species and dynamics within the detection window of 850 nm to 1250 nm. (authors)

  13. Effect of alkali metal content of carbon on retention of iodine at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, A.G.

    1975-01-01

    Activated carbon for filters in reactor confinement systems is intentionally impregnated with iodine salts to enhance the removal of radioiodine from air streams containing organic iodides. When a variety of commercial impregnated carbons were evaluated for iodine retention at elevated temperatures (4 hours at 180 0 C), wide variations in iodine penetration were observed. The alkali metal and iodine content of carbon samples was determined by neutron activation analysis, and a strong correlation was shown between the atom ratio of iodine to alkali metals in the carbons and the high-temperature retention performance. Carbons containing excess alkali (especially potassium) have iodine penetration values 10 to 100 times lower than carbons containing excess iodine. Both low I/K ratios and high pH values were shown essential to high efficiency iodine retention; therefore, conversion of elemental iodine to ionic iodine is the basic reaction mechanism. The natural high K + content and high pH coconut carbons make coconut the preferred natural base material for nuclear air cleaning applications. Studies show, however, that treatment of low potassium carbons with a mixture of KOH and I 2 may produce a product equal to or better than I 2 -impregnated coconut carbons at a lower cost. (U.S.)

  14. Atom location using recoil ion spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Connor, D.J.

    1985-01-01

    Low energy ion scattering (LEIS) using inert gas and alkali ions is widely used in studies of the surface atomic layer. The extreme surface sensitivity of this technique ensures that it yields both compositional and structural information on clean and adsorbate covered surfaces. Low Energy Negative recoil Spectroscopy (LENRS) has been applied to a study of oxygen on Ni(110) to gauge the sensitivity to coverage and site location

  15. Alkali content of fly ash : measuring and testing strategies for compliance : [tech transfer summary].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    This study investigated the test methods used to determine the : alkali content of fly ash. It also evaluated if high-alkali fly ash : exacerbates alkali-silica reaction in laboratory tests and field : concrete.

  16. Alkali content of fly ash : measuring and testing strategies for compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Sodium and potassium are the common alkalis present in fly ash. Excessive amounts of fly ash alkalis can cause efflorescence : problems in concrete products and raise concern about the effectiveness of the fly ash to mitigate alkali-silica reaction (...

  17. Alkali emissions of the PCFB-process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuivalainen, R.; Eriksson, T.; Koskinen, J.; Lehtonen, P.

    1995-01-01

    Pressurized Circulating Fluidized Bed (PCFB) combustion technology has been developed by A. Ahlstrom Corporation since 1986. As a part of the development, a 10 MW PCFB Test Facility was constructed at Hans Ahlstrom Laboratory in Karhula, Finland in 1989. The Test Facility has been used for performance testing with different coal types through the years 1990-1994 in order to gain data for design and commercialization of the high-efficiency low- emission PCFB combustion technology. The project Y33 'Alkali emissions of the PCFB-process' was part of national LIEKKI 2 research program. The object of the project was to measure vapor phase Na and K concentrations in the PCFB flue gas after hot gas filter and investigate the effects of process conditions and sorbents on alkali release. The measured Na concentrations were between 0,03 and 0,21 ppm(w). The results of K were between 0,01 and 0,08 ppm(w). The accuracy of the results is about +-50 percent at this concentration range. The scatter of the data covers the effects of different process variables on the alkali emission . The measured emissions at 800-850 deg C are at the same order of magnitude as the guideline emission limits given by gas turbine manufacturers for flue gas at 1000-1200 deg C. The measurements and development of the analyses methods are planned to be continued during PcFB test runs in autumn 1995 in cooperation with laboratories of VTT Energy and Tampere University of Technology. (author)

  18. Cathode architectures for alkali metal / oxygen batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visco, Steven J; Nimon, Vitaliy; De Jonghe, Lutgard C; Volfkovich, Yury; Bograchev, Daniil

    2015-01-13

    Electrochemical energy storage devices, such as alkali metal-oxygen battery cells (e.g., non-aqueous lithium-air cells), have a cathode architecture with a porous structure and pore composition that is tailored to improve cell performance, especially as it pertains to one or more of the discharge/charge rate, cycle life, and delivered ampere-hour capacity. A porous cathode architecture having a pore volume that is derived from pores of varying radii wherein the pore size distribution is tailored as a function of the architecture thickness is one way to achieve one or more of the aforementioned cell performance improvements.

  19. Collisional broadening of alkali doublets by helium perturbers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mullamphy, D F T [School of Mathematics, Physics and Information Technology, James Cook University, Townsville 4811 (Australia); Peach, G [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Venturi, V [School of Mathematics, Physics and Information Technology, James Cook University, Townsville 4811 (Australia); Whittingham, I B [School of Mathematics, Physics and Information Technology, James Cook University, Townsville 4811 (Australia); Gibson, S J [School of Mathematics, Physics and Information Technology, James Cook University, Townsville 4811 (Australia)

    2007-03-28

    We report results for the Lorentzian profiles of the Li I, Na I and K I doublets and the Na I subordinate doublet broadened by helium perturbers for temperatures up to 3000 K. They have been obtained from a fully quantum-mechanical close-coupling description of the colliding atoms, the Baranger theory of line shapes and new ab initio potentials for the alkali-helium interaction. For all lines except the 769.9 nm K I line, the temperature dependence of the widths over the range 70 {<=} T {<=} 3000 K is accurately represented by the power law form w = aT{sup bb} with 0.38 < b < 0.43. The 769.9 nm K I line has this form for 500 {<=} T {<=} 3000 K with b having the higher value of 0.49. Although the shifts have a more complex temperature dependence, they all have the general feature of increasing with temperature above T {approx} 500 K apart from the 769.9 K I line whose shift decreases with temperature.

  20. Alkali-crown ether complexes at metal surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thontasen, Nicha; Deng, Zhitao; Rauschenbach, Stephan [Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Stuttgart (Germany); Levita, Giacomo [University of Trieste, Trieste (Italy); Malinowski, Nikola [Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Stuttgart (Germany); Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia (Bulgaria); Kern, Klaus [Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Stuttgart (Germany); EPFL, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2010-07-01

    Crown ethers are polycyclic ethers which, in solution, selectively bind cations depending on the size of the ring cavity. The study of a single host-guest complex is highly desirable in order to reveal the characteristics of these specific interactions at the atomic scale. Such detailed investigation is possible at the surface where high resolution imaging tools like scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) can be applied. Here, electrospray ion beam deposition (ES-IBD) is employed for the deposition of Dibenzo-24-crown-8 (DB24C8)-H{sup +}, -Na{sup +} and -Cs{sup +} complexes on a solid surface in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV). Where other deposition techniques have not been successful, this deposition technique combines the advantages of solution based preparation of the complex ions with a highly clean and controlled deposition in UHV. Single molecular structures and the cation-binding of DB24C8 at the surface are studied in situ by STM and MALDI-MS (matrix assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry). The internal structure of the complex, i.e. ring and cavity, is observable only when alkali cations are incorporated. The BD24C8-H{sup +} complex in contrast appears as a compact feature. This result is in good agreement with theoretical models based on density functional theory calculations.

  1. Atom optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balykin, V. I.; Jhe, W.

    1999-01-01

    Atom optics, in analogy to neutron and electron optics, deals with the realization of as a traditional elements, such as lenes, mirrors, beam splitters and atom interferometers, as well as a new 'dissipative' elements such as a slower and a cooler, which have no analogy in an another types of optics. Atom optics made the development of atom interferometer with high sensitivity for measurement of acceleration and rotational possible. The practical interest in atom optics lies in the opportunities to create atom microprobe with atom-size resolution and minimum damage of investigated objects. (Cho, G. S.)

  2. Optical orientation of atoms in plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhitnikov, R

    1979-06-01

    The results are summed up of experimental work on the optical orientation of atoms in a plasma conducted by the Atomic Radiospectroscopy Group at the AN SSSR Physical Technology Institute. The main methods of forming and observing the optical orientation of atoms in a helium plasma and an alkali metal plasma are described in detail. A quantum mechanical explanation is given of all observed phenomena. The most significant results include the discovery of the effect of the optical orientation of atoms in a plasma on the plasma optical and electrical properties, such as electric conductivity, emitted light intensity, ionization degree, and electron density. The phenomenon applies generally and is inherent to plasmas of different chemical compositions, at the optical orientation of atoms of different elements. The methods are indicated of the practical application of the phenomenon in designing principally new precision quantum magnetometers.

  3. Optical orientation of atoms in plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhitnikov, R.

    1979-01-01

    The results are summed up of experimental work on the optical orientation of atoms in a plasma conducted by the Atomic Radiospectroscopy Group at the AN SSSR Physical Technology Institute. The main methods of forming and observing the optical orientation of atoms in a helium plasma and an alkali metal plasma are described in detail. A quantum mechanical explanation is given of all observed phenomena. The most significant results include the discovery of the effect of the optical orientation of atoms in a plasma on the plasma optical and electrical properties, such as electric conductivity, emitted light intensity, ionization degree, and electron density. The phenomenon applies generally and is inherent to plasmas of different chemical compositions, at the optical orientation of atoms of different elements. The methods are indicated of the practical application of the phenomenon in designing principally new precision quantum magnetometers. (J.U.)

  4. Light-induced atomic desorption and related phenomena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burchianti, A; Bogi, A; Marinelli, C; Mariotti, E; Moi, L [CNISM and Physics Department, University of Siena, 53100 Siena (Italy)], E-mail: burchianti@unisi.it

    2009-07-15

    We review some recent studies on light-induced atomic desorption (LIAD) from dielectric surfaces. Alkali-metal atoms adsorbed either on organic films or on porous glass are released into the vapor phase under illumination. The measurements were performed in Pyrex resonance cells either coated with siloxane films or containing a porous glass sample. In both cases, the experimental results show that LIAD can be used to produce atomic densities suitable for most atomic physics experiments. Moreover, we find that photoinduced effects, correlated with LIAD, produce reversible formation and evaporation of alkali-metal clusters in porous glass. These processes depend on the light frequency, making the porous glass transmittance controllable by light.

  5. Possible applications of alkali-activated systems in construction

    OpenAIRE

    Boháčová, J.; Staněk, S.; Vavro, M. (Martin)

    2013-01-01

    This paper deals with the possibilities of using alkali-activated systems in construction. This article summarizes the advantages and disadvantages of geopolymer in comparison to Portland cement, summarizes research and practical applications of alkali-activated materials in our country and abroad, and provides an overview of directions where these alternative inorganic binders can be in the future very well applied.

  6. Structural, elastic, electronic and optical properties of bi-alkali ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The structural parameters, elastic constants, electronic and optical properties of the bi-alkali ... and efficient method for the calculation of the ground-state ... Figure 2. Optimization curve (E–V) of the bi-alkali antimonides: (a) Na2KSb, (b) Na2RbSb, (c) Na2CsSb, .... ical shape of the charge distributions in the contour plots.

  7. Thermochemical properties of the alkali hydroxides: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konings, R.J.M.; Cordfunke, E.H.P.

    1989-01-01

    The formation of volatile alkali hydroxides as a result of high-temperature steam corrosion plays an important role in nuclear technology. For the modeling of the volatilization processes, reliable thermodynamic data are required. In the present paper recent physico-chemical experiments by the authors will be discussed and the thermochemical properties of the alkali hydroxide series will be evaluated. (orig.)

  8. Language and Style in Zaynab Alkali's The Stillborn | Azuike ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper examines the language and style of Zaynab Alkali's The Stillborn. Alkali's style in The Stillborn lies in her effective deployment of linguo-literary resources to tell the story. The study scrutinizes the nexus of figures of speech and linguistic artifacts, which link the events and characters that populate her novel and ...

  9. 40 CFR 721.4660 - Alcohol, alkali metal salt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alcohol, alkali metal salt. 721.4660 Section 721.4660 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4660 Alcohol, alkali metal sal...

  10. Alkali aggregate reactivity in concrete structures in western Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, D.R.; Empey, D.

    1989-01-01

    In several regions of Canada, particularly parts of Ontario, Quebec and the Maritime Provinces, research, testing and evaluation of aged concrete structures in the field has shown that alkali aggregate reactivity can give rise to pronounced concrete deterioration, particularly in hydraulic structures subjected to saturation or alternate wetting and drying such as locks, dams, canals, etc. Concrete deterioration is mainly caused by alkali-silica reactions and alkali-carbonate reactions, but a third type of deterioration involves slow/late expanding alkali-silicate/silica reactivity. The alkalies NaOH and KOH in the concrete pore solutions are mainly responsible for attack on expansive rocks and minerals in concrete. Methods for evaluating alkali-aggregate reaction potential in aggregates, and field and laboratory methods for detecting deterioration are discussed. Examples of alkali-aggregate reactions in structures is western Canada are detailed, including a water reservoir at Canadian Forces Base Chilliwack in British Columbia, the Oldman River diversion and flume, the Lundbreck Falls Bridge, and the St Mary's Reservoir spillway, all in southern Alberta. Mitigative measures include avoidance of use of suspect aggregates, but if this cannot be avoided it is recommended to keep the total alkalies in the concrete as low as possible and minimize opportunities for saturation of concrete by moisture. 16 refs., 19 figs., 1 tab

  11. Metal analyses of ash derived alkalis from banana and plantain ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of this work was to determine the metal content of plantain and banana peels ash derived alkali and the possibility of using it as alternate and cheap source of alkali in soap industry. This was done by ashing the peels and dissolving it in de-ionised water to achieve the corresponding hydroxides with pH above ...

  12. [Raman spectra of endospores of Bacillus subtilis by alkali stress].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Rong; Lu, Ming-qian; Li, Feng; Shi, Gui-yu; Huang, Shu-shi

    2013-09-01

    To research the lethal mechanism of spores stressed by alkali, laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy (LTRS) combined with principal components analysis (PCA) was used to study the physiological process of single spore with alkali stress. The results showed that both spores and germinated spores had tolerance with alkali in a certain range, but the ability of spores was obviously lower than that of spores due to the release of their Ca2+ -DPA which plays a key role in spores resistance as well as spores resistance to many stresses; A small amount of Ca2+ -DPA of spores was observed to release after alkali stress, however, the behavior of release was different with the normal Ca2+ -DPA release behavior induced by L-alanine; The data before and after alkali stress of the spores and g. spores with PCA reflected that alkali mainly injured the membrane of spores, and alkali could be easily enter into the inner structure of spores to damage the structure of protein backbone and injure the nucleic acid of spores. We show that the alkali could result in the small amount of Ca2+ -DPA released by destroying the member channel of spores.

  13. Conduction bands and invariant energy gaps in alkali bromides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, P.K. de; Groot, R.A. de

    1998-01-01

    Electronic structure calculations of the alkali bromides LiBr, NaBr, KBr, RbBr and CsBr are reported. It is shown that the conduction band has primarily bromine character. The size of the band gaps of bromides and alkali halides in general is reinterpreted.

  14. Formation of lysinoalanine in egg white under alkali treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yan; Luo, Xuying; Li, Jianke; Xu, Mingsheng; Tu, Yonggang

    2016-03-01

    To investigate the formation mechanism of lysinoalanine (LAL) in eggs during the alkali treatment process, NaOH was used for the direct alkali treatment of egg white, ovalbumin, and amino acids; in addition, the amount of LAL formed during the alkali treatment process was measured. The results showed that the alkali treatment resulted in the formation of LAL in the egg white. The LAL content increased with increasing pH and temperature, with the LAL content first increasing and then leveling off with increasing time. The amount of LAL formed in the ovalbumin under the alkali treatment condition accounted for approximately 50.51% to 58.68% of the amount of LAL formed in the egg white. Thus, the LAL formed in the ovalbumin was the main source for the LAL in the egg white during the alkali treatment process. Under the alkali treatment condition, free L-serine, L-cysteine, and L-cystine reacted with L-lysine to form LAL; therefore, they are the precursor amino acids of LAL formed in eggs during the alkali treatment process. © 2016 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  15. Density functional study of ferromagnetism in alkali metal thin films

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    thickness uniform jellium model (UJM), and it is argued that within LSDA or GGA, alkali metal thin films cannot be claimed to have an FM ground state. Relevance of these results to the experiments on transition metal-doped alkali metal thin films ...

  16. Selective solvation extraction of gold from alkaline cyanide solution by alkyl phosphorus esters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, J.D.; Wan, R.Y.; Mooiman, M.B.; Sibrell, P.L.

    1987-01-01

    Research efforts have shown that solvation extraction of gold from alkaline cyanide solution is possible by alkyl phosphorus esters. Both tributyl phosphate (TBP) and dibutyl butyl phosphonate (DBBP) appear to be effective extractants for gold and exhibit high loading capacities exceeding 30 gpl. Selective solvation extraction of gold from alkaline cyanide solution can be achieved with selectivity factors relative to other cyanoanions as high as 1000 under certain circumstances. Variables influencing the selectivity such as ionic strength, temperature, and extractant structure, are discussed in terms of the extraction chemistry, which seems to involve the solvation of a M dot, dot, dot Au(CN)2 ion pair.

  17. Solvation of ions in the gas-phase: a molecular dynamics simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabarcos, Orlando M.; Lisy, James M.

    1996-07-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been performed on the collision between a cesium ion and a cluster of twenty methanol molecules. This process, generating a solvated ion, was studied over a range (1 to 25 eV) of eight collision energies. Preliminary analysis of this gas phase solvation has included the distribution of final ion cluster sizes, fragmentation patterns, solvation timescales and energetics. Two distinct patterns have emerged: a ballistic penetration of the neutral cluster at the higher collision energies and an evaporative evolution of the cluster ion at lower collision energies.

  18. Solvation of graphite oxide in water-methanol binary polar solvents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You, Shujie; Yu, Junchun; Sundqvist, Bertil; Talyzin, Alexandr V. [Department of Physics, Umeaa University, SE-901 87 Umeaa (Sweden)

    2012-12-15

    The phase transition between two solvated phases was studied by DSC for graphite oxide (GO) powders immersed in water-methanol mixtures of various compositions. GO forms solid solvates with two different compositions when immersed in methanol. Reversible phase transition between two solvate states due to insertion/desertion of methanol monolayer occurs upon temperature variations. The temperature point and the enthalpy ({Delta}H) of the phase transition are maximal for pure methanol and decrease linearly with increase of water fraction up to 30%. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  19. Selective nonspecific solvation under dielectric saturation and fluorescence spectra of dye solutions in binary solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhshiev, N G; Kiselev, M B

    1991-09-01

    The influence of selective nonspecific solvation on the fluorescence spectra of three substitutedN-methylphthalimides in a binary solvent system consisting of a nonpolar (n-heptane) and a polar (pyridine) component has been studied under conditions close to dielectric saturation. The substantially nonlinearity of the effect is confirmation that the spectral shifts of fluorescence bands depend on the number of polar solvent molecules involved in solvating the dye molecule. The measured fluorescence spectral shifts determined by substituting one nonpolar solvent molecula with a polar one in the proximity of the dye molecule agree quantitatively with the forecasts of the previously proposed semiempirical theory which describes this nonlinear solvation phenomenon.

  20. Solubility and Standard Gibb's energies of transfer of alkali metal perchlorates, tetramethyl- and tetraethylammonium from water to aqua-acetone solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kireev, A.A.; Pak, T.G.; Bezuglyj, V.D.

    1996-01-01

    Solubilities of KClO 4 , RbClO 4 , CsClO 4 , (CH 3 ) 4 NClO 4 , (C 2 M 5 ) 4 NClO 4 in water and water-acetone mixtures are determined by the method of isothermal saturation at 298.15 K. Dissociation constants of alkali metal perchlorates are found by conductometric method. Solubility products and standard Gibbs energies of transfer of corresponding electrolytes from water into water-acetone solvents are calculated. The character of transfer Gibbs energy dependence on solvent composition is explained by preferred solvation of cations by acetone molecules and anions-by water molecules. Features of tetraalkyl ammonium ions are explained by large changes in energy of cavity formation for these ions

  1. The utilization of alkali-treated melon husk by broilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abiola, S S; Amalime, A C; Akadiri, K C

    2002-09-01

    The effects of alkali treatment on chemical constituents of melon husk (MH) and performance characteristics of broilers fed alkali-treated MH (ATMH) diets were investigated. The chemical analysis showed that alkali treatment increased the ash content of MH (from 15.70% to 16.86%) and reduced the crude fibre content (from 29.00% to 14.00%). Result of feed intake was superior on 30% alkali diet with a value of 100.14 g/bird/day. Body weight gain decreased with increase in the level of ATMH in the diet. Highest dressing percentage of 66.33% and best meat/bone ratio of 2.57 were obtained on 10% and 20% alkali diets, respectively. Dietary treatments had significant effect (P poultry carcases and chicken meat with favourable shelf life.

  2. Atom-by-atom assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hla, Saw Wai

    2014-01-01

    Atomic manipulation using a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) tip enables the construction of quantum structures on an atom-by-atom basis, as well as the investigation of the electronic and dynamical properties of individual atoms on a one-atom-at-a-time basis. An STM is not only an instrument that is used to ‘see’ individual atoms by means of imaging, but is also a tool that is used to ‘touch’ and ‘take’ the atoms, or to ‘hear’ their movements. Therefore, the STM can be considered as the ‘eyes’, ‘hands’ and ‘ears’ of the scientists, connecting our macroscopic world to the exciting atomic world. In this article, various STM atom manipulation schemes and their example applications are described. The future directions of atomic level assembly on surfaces using scanning probe tips are also discussed. (review article)

  3. Solvation thermodynamics of phenylalcohols in lamellar phase surfactant dispersions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martyniak, A.; Scheuermann, R.; Dilger, H.; Tucker, I.M.; Burkert, T.; Hashmi, A.S.K.; Vujosevic', D.; Roduner, E.

    2006-01-01

    The distribution and the stability of five phenylalcohols in a lamellar phase composed of simple bilayers separated by water at 298 and 348K is explored using avoided-level-crossing muon-spin resonance (ALC-μSR). The dependence of the alignment of the bilayer chains on temperature appears to be a crucial factor determining the phenylalcohol partitioning: increasing order of the surfactant tails leads to expulsion of the solute. Moreover, we observed a systematic trend, the longer the chain the deeper the phenyl group dips into the lipid bilayer. Recent studies have shown that the hydrophobic effect is adequate to describe membrane partitioning of small amphiphilic molecules. The solvation thermodynamic properties ΔG sol , ΔH sol , and ΔS sol which determine the solute transfer from the double layer into water prove that the distribution also strongly depends on shape, chemical nature and different structure of phenylalcohols

  4. Solvation thermodynamics of phenylalcohols in lamellar phase surfactant dispersions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martyniak, A. [Institut fuer Physikalische Chemie, University of Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 55, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Scheuermann, R. [Laboratory for muon Spin Spectroscopy, Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Dilger, H. [Institut fuer Physikalische Chemie, University of Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 55, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Tucker, I.M. [Unilever Research and Development, Port Sunlight, Wirral CH63 3JW (United Kingdom); Burkert, T. [Institut fuer Organische Chemie, University of Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 55, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Hashmi, A.S.K. [Institut fuer Organische Chemie, University of Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 55, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Vujosevic' , D. [Institut fuer Physikalische Chemie, University of Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 55, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Roduner, E. [Institut fuer Physikalische Chemie, University of Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 55, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany)]. E-mail: e.roduner@ipc.uni-stuttgart.de

    2006-03-31

    The distribution and the stability of five phenylalcohols in a lamellar phase composed of simple bilayers separated by water at 298 and 348K is explored using avoided-level-crossing muon-spin resonance (ALC-{mu}SR). The dependence of the alignment of the bilayer chains on temperature appears to be a crucial factor determining the phenylalcohol partitioning: increasing order of the surfactant tails leads to expulsion of the solute. Moreover, we observed a systematic trend, the longer the chain the deeper the phenyl group dips into the lipid bilayer. Recent studies have shown that the hydrophobic effect is adequate to describe membrane partitioning of small amphiphilic molecules. The solvation thermodynamic properties {delta}G{sub sol}, {delta}H{sub sol}, and {delta}S{sub sol} which determine the solute transfer from the double layer into water prove that the distribution also strongly depends on shape, chemical nature and different structure of phenylalcohols.

  5. New diagnostic technique for Zeeman-compensated atomic beam slowing: technique and results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molenaar, P.A.; Straten, P. van der; Heideman, H.G.M.; Metcalf, H.

    1997-01-01

    We have developed a new diagnostic tool for the study of Zeeman-compensated slowing of an alkali atomic beam. Our time-of-flight technique measures the longitudinal veloc- ity distribution of the slowed atoms with a resolution below the Doppler limit of 30 cm/s. Furthermore, it can map

  6. Theory of competitive solvation of polymers by two solvents and entropy-enthalpy compensation in the solvation free energy upon dilution with the second solvent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudowicz, Jacek; Freed, Karl F; Douglas, Jack F

    2015-06-07

    We develop a statistical mechanical lattice theory for polymer solvation by a pair of relatively low molar mass solvents that compete for binding to the polymer backbone. A theory for the equilibrium mixture of solvated polymer clusters {AiBCj} and free unassociated molecules A, B, and C is formulated in the spirit of Flory-Huggins mean-field approximation. This theoretical framework enables us to derive expressions for the boundaries for phase stability (spinodals) and other basic properties of these polymer solutions: the internal energy U, entropy S, specific heat CV, extent of solvation Φsolv, average degree of solvation 〈Nsolv〉, and second osmotic virial coefficient B2 as functions of temperature and the composition of the mixture. Our theory predicts many new phenomena, but the current paper applies the theory to describe the entropy-enthalpy compensation in the free energy of polymer solvation, a phenomenon observed for many years without theoretical explanation and with significant relevance to liquid chromatography and other polymer separation methods.

  7. IRMPD Action Spectroscopy of Alkali Metal Cation-Cytosine Complexes: Effects of Alkali Metal Cation Size on Gas Phase Conformation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, B.; Wu, R.R.; Polfer, N.C.; Berden, G.; Oomens, J.; Rodgers, M.T.

    2013-01-01

    The gas-phase structures of alkali metal cation-cytosine complexes generated by electrospray ionization are probed via infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) action spectroscopy and theoretical calculations. IRMPD action spectra of five alkali metal cation-cytosine complexes exhibit both

  8. The alkali halide disk technique in infra-red spectrometry : Anomalous behaviour of some samples dispersed in alkali halide disks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tolk, A.

    1961-01-01

    Some difficulties encountered in the application of the alkali halide disk technique in infra-red spectrometry are discussed. Complications due to interaction of the sample with the alkali halide have been studied experimentally. It was found that the anomalous behaviour of benzoic acid, succinic

  9. A non-solvated form of [(Z-O-methyl-N-(2-methylphenylthiocarbamato-κS](triphenylphosphane-κPgold(I: crystal structure and Hirshfeld surface analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien Ing Yeo

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, [Au(C9H10NOS(C18H15P], features a near linear P—Au—S arrangement defined by phosphane P and thiolate S atoms with the minor distortion from the ideal [P—Au—S is 177.61 (2°] being traced in part to the close intramolecular approach of an O atom [Au...O = 3.040 (2 Å]. The packing features supramolecular layers lying parallel to (011 sustained by a combination of C—H...π and π–π [inter-centroid distance = 3.8033 (17 Å] interactions. The molecular structure and packing are compared with those determined for a previously reported hemi-methanol solvate [Kuan et al. (2008. CrystEngComm, 10, 548–564]. Relatively minor differences are noted in the conformations of the rings in the Au-containing molecules. A Hirshfeld surface analysis confirms the similarity in the packing with the most notable differences relating to the formation of C—H...S contacts between the constituents of the solvate.

  10. Entropic solvation force between surfaces modified by grafted chains: a density functional approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Pizio

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The behavior of a hard sphere fluid in slit-like pores with walls modified by grafted chain molecules composed of hard sphere segments is studied using density functional theory. The chains are grafted to opposite walls via terminating segments forming pillars. The effects of confinement and of "chemical" modification of pore walls on the entropic solvation force are investigated in detail. We observe that in the absence of adsorbed fluid the solvation force is strongly repulsive for narrow pores and attractive for wide pores. In the presence of adsorbed fluid both parts of the curve of the solvation force may develop oscillatory behavior dependent on the density of pillars, the number of segments and adsorption conditions. Also, the size ratio between adsorbed fluid species and chain segments is of importance for the development of oscillations. The choice of these parameters is crucial for efficient manipulation of the solvation force as desired for pores of different width.

  11. High-fidelity modelling of an exciplex pumped alkali laser with radiative transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palla, Andrew D; Carroll, David L; Verdeyen, Joseph T; Heaven, Michael C

    2011-01-01

    The exciplex-pumped alkali laser (XPAL) system has been demonstrated in mixtures of Cs vapour, Ar, and ethane by pumping Cs-Ar atomic collision pairs and subsequent dissociation of diatomic, electronically excited CsAr molecules (exciplexes or excimers). Because of the addition of atomic collision pairs and exciplex states, modelling of the XPAL system is far more complicated than the modelling of the classic diode-pumped alkali laser (DPAL). In this paper, we discuss BLAZE-V time-dependent multi-dimensional modelling of this new laser system including radiative transport and parasitic loss effects. A two-dimensional, time-dependent baseline simulation of a pulsed XPAL is presented and compared to data. Good agreement is achieved on a laser pulse full width at half-maximum and laser pulse rise time. Parametric simulations of pulsed XPAL system configurations similar to that of the baseline case, given both four- and five-level laser operation, are presented in which good agreement is obtained with outcoupled laser energy as a function of absorbed pump energy data. The potential impact of parasitic losses on modelled system configurations is discussed.

  12. High-fidelity modelling of an exciplex pumped alkali laser with radiative transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palla, Andrew D; Carroll, David L; Verdeyen, Joseph T [CU Aerospace, Champaign, IL 61820 (United States); Heaven, Michael C, E-mail: apalla@cuaerospace.com [Department of Chemistry, Emory University, Atlanta, GA 30322 (United States)

    2011-07-14

    The exciplex-pumped alkali laser (XPAL) system has been demonstrated in mixtures of Cs vapour, Ar, and ethane by pumping Cs-Ar atomic collision pairs and subsequent dissociation of diatomic, electronically excited CsAr molecules (exciplexes or excimers). Because of the addition of atomic collision pairs and exciplex states, modelling of the XPAL system is far more complicated than the modelling of the classic diode-pumped alkali laser (DPAL). In this paper, we discuss BLAZE-V time-dependent multi-dimensional modelling of this new laser system including radiative transport and parasitic loss effects. A two-dimensional, time-dependent baseline simulation of a pulsed XPAL is presented and compared to data. Good agreement is achieved on a laser pulse full width at half-maximum and laser pulse rise time. Parametric simulations of pulsed XPAL system configurations similar to that of the baseline case, given both four- and five-level laser operation, are presented in which good agreement is obtained with outcoupled laser energy as a function of absorbed pump energy data. The potential impact of parasitic losses on modelled system configurations is discussed.

  13. Structure and electrical resistivity of alkali-alkali and lithium-based liquid binary alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, A.K.; Mukherjee, K.K.

    1990-01-01

    Harmonic model potential, developed and used for simple metals is applied here to evaluate hardsphere diameters, which ensure minimum interionic pair potential for alkali-alkali (Na-K, Na-Rb, Na-Cs, K-Rb, K-Cs) and lithium-based (Li-Na, Li-Mg, Li-In, Li-Tl) liquid binary alloys as a function of composition for use in the determination of their partial structure factors. These structure factors are then used to calculate electrical resistivities of alloys considered. The computed values of electrical resistivity as a function of composition agree both, in magnitude and gradient reasonably well with experimental values in all cases except in Cs systems, where the disagreement is appreciable. (author)

  14. Solvation thermodynamics and heat capacity of polar and charged solutes in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedlmeier, Felix; Netz, Roland R.

    2013-03-01

    The solvation thermodynamics and in particular the solvation heat capacity of polar and charged solutes in water is studied using atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. As ionic solutes we consider a F- and a Na+ ion, as an example for a polar molecule with vanishing net charge we take a SPC/E water molecule. The partial charges of all three solutes are varied in a wide range by a scaling factor. Using a recently introduced method for the accurate determination of the solvation free energy of polar solutes, we determine the free energy, entropy, enthalpy, and heat capacity of the three different solutes as a function of temperature and partial solute charge. We find that the sum of the solvation heat capacities of the Na+ and F- ions is negative, in agreement with experimental observations, but our results uncover a pronounced difference in the heat capacity between positively and negatively charged groups. While the solvation heat capacity ΔCp stays positive and even increases slightly upon charging the Na+ ion, it decreases upon charging the F- ion and becomes negative beyond an ion charge of q = -0.3e. On the other hand, the heat capacity of the overall charge-neutral polar solute derived from a SPC/E water molecule is positive for all charge scaling factors considered by us. This means that the heat capacity of a wide class of polar solutes with vanishing net charge is positive. The common ascription of negative heat capacities to polar chemical groups might arise from the neglect of non-additive interaction effects between polar and apolar groups. The reason behind this non-additivity is suggested to be related to the second solvation shell that significantly affects the solvation thermodynamics and due to its large spatial extent induces quite long-ranged interactions between solvated molecular parts and groups.

  15. Role of Dispersive Fluorous Interaction in the Solvation Dynamics of the Perfluoro Group Containing Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Saptarsi; Chaterjee, Soumit; Halder, Ritaban; Jana, Biman; Singh, Prashant Chandra

    2017-08-17

    Perfluoro group containing molecules possess an important self-aggregation property through the fluorous (F···F) interaction which makes them useful for diverse applications such as medicinal chemistry, separation techniques, polymer technology, and biology. In this article, we have investigated the solvation dynamics of coumarin-153 (C153) and coumarin-6H (C6H) in ethanol (ETH), 2-fluoroethanol (MFE), and 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol (TFE) using the femtosecond upconversion technique and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation to understand the role of fluorous interaction between the solute and solvent molecules in the solvation dynamics of perfluoro group containing molecules. The femtosecond upconversion data show that the time scales of solvation dynamics of C6H in ETH, MFE, and TFE are approximately the same whereas the solvation dynamics of C153 in TFE is slow as compared to that of ETH and MFE. It has also been observed that the time scale of solvation dynamics of C6H in ETH and MFE is higher than that of C153 in the same solvents. MD simulation results show a qualitative agreement with the experimental data in terms of the time scale of the slow components of the solvation for all the systems. The experimental and simulation studies combined lead to the conclusion that the solvation dynamics of C6H in all solvents as well as C153 in ETH and MFE is mostly governed by the charge distribution of ester moieties (C═O and O) of dye molecules whereas the solvation of C153 in TFE is predominantly due to the dispersive fluorous interaction (F···F) between the perfluoro groups of the C153 and solvent molecules.

  16. Maternal exposure to alkali, alkali earth, transition and other metals: Concentrations and predictors of exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinwood, A.L.; Stasinska, A.; Callan, A.C.; Heyworth, J.; Ramalingam, M.; Boyce, M.; McCafferty, P.; Odland, J.Ø.

    2015-01-01

    Most studies of metals exposure focus on the heavy metals. There are many other metals (the transition, alkali and alkaline earth metals in particular) in common use in electronics, defense industries, emitted via combustion and which are naturally present in the environment, that have received limited attention in terms of human exposure. We analysed samples of whole blood (172), urine (173) and drinking water (172) for antimony, beryllium, bismuth, cesium, gallium, rubidium, silver, strontium, thallium, thorium and vanadium using ICPMS. In general most metals concentrations were low and below the analytical limit of detection with some high concentrations observed. Few factors examined in regression models were shown to influence biological metals concentrations and explained little of the variation. Further study is required to establish the source of metals exposures at the high end of the ranges of concentrations measured and the potential for any adverse health impacts in children. - This study has demonstrated exposure to alkali, alkali earth and transition metals in pregnant women with factors such as breastfeeding, fish oil use and diet affecting exposures

  17. Volcanic Origin of Alkali Halides on Io

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, L.; Fegley, B., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    The recent observation of NaCl (gas) on Io confirms our earlier prediction that NaCl is produced volcanically. Here we extend our calculations by modeling thermochemical equilibrium of O, S, Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs, F, Cl, Br, and I as a function of temperature and pressure in a Pele-like volcanic gas with O/S/Na/Cl/K = 1.518/1/0.05/0.04/0.005 and CI chondritic ratios of the other (as yet unobserved) alkalis and halogens. For reference, the nominal temperature and pressure for Pele is 1760 plus or minus 210 K and 0.01 bars based on Galileo data and modeling.

  18. Closed N-shell alkali spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, D.G.; Curtis, L.J.

    1982-01-01

    Term values and ionization potentials have been calculated for several ions in the promethium (N = 61) isoelectronic sequence. As the nuclear charge is increased, the ground configuration changes from 4f 13 5s 2 to 4f 14 5s giving the upper portion of the sequence an alkali-like character. According to our most recent Hartree-Fock calculations with first-order relativistic corrections, the ground term is 5s 2 S for Z > 77 (Ir XVII) and the first excited term is 5p 2 P 0 for Z > 84 (P 0 XXIV). Comparisons are made with calculations of Cowan in W XIV. The prospects for observation of these spectra in fast ion beams are discussed. (orig.)

  19. Existence of hexachlorocerates (4) of alkali metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiselev, Yu.M.; Filatov, I.Yu.; Popov, A.I.; Goryachenkova, S.A.; Martynenko, L.I.; Spitsyn, V.I. (Moskovskij Gosudarstvennyj Univ. (USSR))

    1985-01-01

    A possibility has been studied to prepare alkali metal hexachlorocerates (4) of the composition M/sub 2/CeCl/sub 6/ (M=Li, Na, K, Rb) according to the reaction 2MX + fH/sub 2/CeCl/sub 6/'' ..-->.. 2HX + M/sub 2/CeCl/sub 6/ (X=Cl/sup -/, NO/sub 3//sup -/). Using X-ray phase analysis and low-temperature hTA it has been shown, that under experimental conditions (-65 deg C) the rubidium-cerium chlorocomplex is formed, in which Ce is present in the form of Ce(4). The complex is unstable at approximately 20 deg C and under the effect of moisture gets hydrolyzed with the formation of Ce(3) derivatives. Isomorphism of Rb and Cs hexachlorocerates (4) is established. According to the data of the low-temperature DTA, the authors failed to prepare Li, Na, K hexachlorocerates (4).

  20. Radiation chemistry of the alkali halides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, V.J.; Chandratillake, M.R.

    1987-01-01

    By far the most thoroughly investigated group of compounds in solid-state radiation chemistry are the alkali halides. Some of the reasons are undoubtedly practical: large single crystals of high purity are readily prepared. The crystals are transparent over a wide range of wavelengths. They are more sensitive to radiation damage than most other ionic solids. The crystals have simple well-defined structures, and the products of radiolysis have also in many cases been clearly identified by a variety of experimental techniques, the most important being optical methods and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). In recent years the application of pulse techniques-radiolysis and laser photolysis-has yielded a wealth of information concerning the mechanisms of the primary processes of radiation damage, on the one hand, and of thermal and photolytic reactions that the radiolysis products undergo, on the other

  1. Controlled in-situ dissolution of an alkali metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jeffrey Donald; Dooley, Kirk John; Tolman, David Donald

    2012-09-11

    A method for the controllable dissolution of one or more alkali metals from a vessel containing a one or more alkali metals and/or one or more partially passivated alkali metals. The vessel preferably comprising a sodium, NaK or other alkali metal-cooled nuclear reactor that has been used. The alkali metal, preferably sodium, potassium or a combination thereof, in the vessel is exposed to a treatment liquid, preferably an acidic liquid, more preferably citric acid. Preferably, the treatment liquid is maintained in continuous motion relative to any surface of unreacted alkali metal with which the treatment liquid is in contact. The treatment liquid is preferably pumped into the vessel containing the one or more alkali metals and the resulting fluid is extracted and optionally further processed. Preferably, the resulting off-gases are processed by an off-gas treatment system and the resulting liquids are processed by a liquid disposal system. In one preferred embodiment, an inert gas is pumped into the vessel along with the treatment liquid.

  2. Alkali elemental and potassium isotopic compositions of Semarkona chondrules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, C.M. O'D.; Grossman, J.N.

    2005-01-01

    We report measurements of K isotope ratios in 28 Semarkona chondrules with a wide range of petrologic types and bulk compositions as well as the compositions of CPX-mesostasis pairs in 17 type I Semarkona chondrules, including two chondrules with radial alkali zonation and 19 type II chondrules. Despite the wide range in K/Al ratios, no systematic variations in K isotopic compositions were found. Semarkona chondrules do not record a simple history of Rayleigh-type loss of K. Experimentally determined evaporation rates suggest that considerable alkali evaporation would have occurred during chondrule formation. Nevertheless, based on Na CPX-mesostasis distribution coefficients, the alkali contents of the cores of most chondrules in Semarkona were probably established at the time of final crystallization. However, Na CPX-mesostasis distribution coefficients also show that alkali zonation in type I Semarkona chondrules was produced by entry of alkalis after solidification, probably during parent body alteration. This alkali metasomatism may have gone to completion in some chondrules. Our preferred explanation for the lack of systematic isotopic enrichments, even in alkali depleted type I chondrule cores, is that they exchanged with the ambient gas as they cooled. ?? The Meteoritical Society, 2005.

  3. Concrete alkali-silica reaction and nuclear radiation damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichikawa, Tsuneki

    2008-01-01

    The deterioration of concrete by alkali-silica reaction of aggregates (ASR) and the effect of nuclear radiations on the ASR have been reviewed based on our studies on the mechanism of ASR and the effect of nuclear radiations on the resistivity of minerals to alkaline solution. It has been found that the ASR is initiated by the attack of alkaline solution in concrete to silicious aggregates to convert them into hydrated alkali silicate. The consumption of alkali hydroxide by the aggregates induces the dissolution of Ca 2+ ions into the solution. The alkali silicate surrounding the aggregates then reacts with Ca 2+ ions to convert to insoluble tight and rigid reaction rims. The reaction rim allows the penetration of alkaline solution but prevents the leakage of viscous alkali silicate, so that alkali silicate generated afterward is accumulated in the aggregate to give an expansive pressure enough for cracking the aggregate and the surrounding concrete. The effect of nuclear radiation on the reactivity of quartz and plagioclase, a part of major minerals composing volcanic rocks as popular aggregates, to alkaline solution has been examined for clarifying whether nuclear radiations accelerates the ASR. It has been found that the irradiation of these minerals converts them into alkali-reactive amorphous ones. The radiation dose for plagioclase is as low as 10 8 Gy, which suggests that the ASR of concrete surrounding nuclear reactors is possible to be accelerated by nuclear radiation. (author)

  4. Radiation damage in the alkali halide crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diller, K.M.

    1975-10-01

    A general review is given of the experimental data on radiation damage in the alkali halide crystals. A report is presented of an experimental investigation of irradiation produced interstitial dislocation loops in NaCl. These loops are found to exhibit the usual growth and coarsening behaviour during thermal annealing which operates by a glide and self-climb mechanism. It is shown that the recombination of defects in these crystals is a two stage process, and that the loss of interstitials stabilized at the loops is caused by extrinsic vacancies. The theoretical techniques used in simulating point defects in ionic crystals are described. Shell model potentials are derived for all the alkali halide crystals by fitting to bulk crystal data. The fitting is supplemented by calculations of the repulsive second neighbour interactions using methods based on the simple electron gas model. The properties of intrinsic and substitutional impurity defects are calculated. The HADES computer program is used in all the defect calculations. Finally the report returns to the problems of irradiation produced interstitial defects. The properties of H centres are discussed; their structure, formation energies, trapping at impurities and dimerization. The structure, formation energies and mobility of the intermediate and final molecular defects are then discussed. The thermodynamics of interstitial loop formation is considered for all the alklai halide crystals. The nucleation of interstitial loops in NaCl and NaBr is discussed, and the recombination of interstitial and vacancy defects. The models are found to account for all the main features of the experimental data. (author)

  5. Element specificity of ortho-positronium annihilation for alkali-metal loaded SiO2 glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, K; Hatta, T

    2015-03-07

    Momentum distributions associated with ortho-positronium (o-Ps) pick-off annihilation photon are often influenced by light elements, as, e.g., carbon, oxygen, and fluorine. This phenomenon, so-called element specificity of o-Ps pick-off annihilation, has been utilized for studying the elemental environment around the open spaces. To gain an insight into the element specificity of o-Ps pick-off annihilation, the chemical shift of oxygen 1s binding energy and the momentum distributions associated with o-Ps pick-off annihilation were systematically investigated for alkali-metal loaded SiO2 glasses by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and positron-age-momentum correlation spectroscopy, respectively. Alkali metals introduced into the open spaces surrounded by oxygen atoms cause charge transfer from alkali metals to oxygen atoms, leading to the lower chemical shift for the oxygen 1s binding energy. The momentum distribution of o-Ps localized into the open spaces is found to be closely correlated with the oxygen 1s chemical shift. This correlation with the deepest 1s energy level evidences that the element specificity of o-Ps originates from pick-off annihilation with orbital electrons, i.e., dominantly with oxygen 2p valence electrons and s electrons with lower probability.

  6. Cation and anion dependence of stable geometries and stabilization energies of alkali metal cation complexes with FSA(-), FTA(-), and TFSA(-) anions: relationship with physicochemical properties of molten salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuzuki, Seiji; Kubota, Keigo; Matsumoto, Hajime

    2013-12-19

    Stable geometries and stabilization energies (Eform) of the alkali metal complexes with bis(fluorosulfonyl)amide, (fluorosulfonyl)(trifluoromethylslufonyl)amide and bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide (FSA(-), FTA(-) and TFSA(-)) were studied by ab initio molecular orbital calculations. The FSA(-) complexes prefer the bidentate structures in which two oxygen atoms of two SO2 groups have contact with the metal cation. The FTA(-) and TFSA(-) complexes with Li(+) and Na(+) prefer the bidentate structures, while the FTA(-) and TFSA(-) complexes with Cs(+) prefer tridentate structures in which the metal cation has contact with two oxygen atoms of an SO2 group and one oxygen atom of another SO2 group. The two structures are nearly isoenergetic in the FTA(-) and TFSA(-) complexes with K(+) and Rb(+). The magnitude of Eform depends on the alkali metal cation significantly. The Eform calculated for the most stable TFSA(-) complexes with Li(+), Na(+), K(+), Rb(+) and Cs(+) cations at the MP2/6-311G** level are -137.2, -110.5, -101.1, -89.6, and -84.1 kcal/mol, respectively. The viscosity and ionic conductivity of the alkali TFSA molten salts have strong correlation with the magnitude of the attraction. The viscosity increases and the ionic conductivity decreases with the increase of the attraction. The melting points of the alkali TFSA and alkali BETA molten salts also have correlation with the magnitude of the Eform, which strongly suggests that the magnitude of the attraction play important roles in determining the melting points of these molten salts. The anion dependence of the Eform calculated for the complexes is small (less than 2.9 kcal/mol). This shows that the magnitude of the attraction is not the cause of the low melting points of alkali FTA molten salts compared with those of corresponding alkali TFSA molten salts. The electrostatic interactions are the major source of the attraction in the complexes. The electrostatic energies for the most stable TFSA

  7. Atomic polarizabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safronova, M. S.; Mitroy, J.; Clark, Charles W.; Kozlov, M. G.

    2015-01-01

    The atomic dipole polarizability governs the first-order response of an atom to an applied electric field. Atomic polarization phenomena impinge upon a number of areas and processes in physics and have been the subject of considerable interest and heightened importance in recent years. In this paper, we will summarize some of the recent applications of atomic polarizability studies. A summary of results for polarizabilities of noble gases, monovalent, and divalent atoms is given. The development of the CI+all-order method that combines configuration interaction and linearized coupled-cluster approaches is discussed

  8. Atomic polarizabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safronova, M. S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Mitroy, J. [School of Engineering, Charles Darwin University, Darwin NT 0909 (Australia); Clark, Charles W. [Joint Quantum Institute, National Institute of Standards and Technology and the University of Maryland, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899-8410 (United States); Kozlov, M. G. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina 188300 (Russian Federation)

    2015-01-22

    The atomic dipole polarizability governs the first-order response of an atom to an applied electric field. Atomic polarization phenomena impinge upon a number of areas and processes in physics and have been the subject of considerable interest and heightened importance in recent years. In this paper, we will summarize some of the recent applications of atomic polarizability studies. A summary of results for polarizabilities of noble gases, monovalent, and divalent atoms is given. The development of the CI+all-order method that combines configuration interaction and linearized coupled-cluster approaches is discussed.

  9. Atomic physics

    CERN Document Server

    Foot, Christopher J

    2007-01-01

    This text will thoroughly update the existing literature on atomic physics. Intended to accompany an advanced undergraduate course in atomic physics, the book will lead the students up to the latest advances and the applications to Bose-Einstein Condensation of atoms, matter-wave inter-ferometry and quantum computing with trapped ions. The elementary atomic physics covered in the early chapters should be accessible to undergraduates when they are first introduced to the subject. To complement. the usual quantum mechanical treatment of atomic structure the book strongly emphasizes the experimen

  10. Model analysis of molecular conformations in terms of weak interactions between non bonded atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lombardi, E.

    1988-01-01

    The aim of the present paper is to establish a reliable basis for the evaluation of stable conformations and rotational barriers for molecules, with possible applications to systems of biological interest. It is proceeded in two steps: first, the effect of chemical environment on orbitals of a given atom is studied for diatomic units, adopting a valence-bond approach and considering, as prototypes, the two simplest series of diatomic molecules with one valence electron each, i.e. the alkali diatomics and the alkali hydrides. In the model, the orbital of the hydrogen atom by a simple (''1S'') gaussian function, the valence orbital of an alkali atom by a function (r 2 -a 2 ) times a simple gaussian (''2S'' gaussian). Dissociation energies D e and equilibrium distances R e are calculated using a scanning procedure. Agreement with experiment is quantitative for the alkali diatomics. For alkali hydrides, good agreement is obtained only if validity of a rule β e R e =constant, for the two atoms separately, is postulated; β e is the characteristic parameter of a ''1S'' gaussian (hydrogen) or a ''2S'' gaussian (alkali atom) function. In a second step, the authors assume validity of the same rule in conformational analysis for any single bonded A-B molecule with A=C, O, N, P, Si, Ge and B=H, or a halogen atom. Gauge β e values for H, F and C are obtained by fitting experimental rotational barriers in C 2 H 6 , C 2 F 6 and C 3 H 8 . Stable conformation of, and barriers to rotation in, ethane-like rotors are determined, applying first-order exchange perturbation theory, in terms of two- and many-center exchange interactions in cluster of non-bonded atoms. Some 60 molecules are analyzed. Agreement with experiments is strikngly good except for a few systematic deviation. Reasons for such discrepancies are discussed

  11. An atomic force microscopy study on the transition from mushrooms to octopus surface ''micelles'' by changing the solvent quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stamouli, A.; Pelletier, E.; Koutsos, V; van der Vegte, E.W.; Hadziioannou, G

    1996-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is used to study the behavior of a diblock copolymer onto a solid surface while the solvent quality is changed. In a first step, the copolymer poly(2-vinylpyridine)/polystyrene (P2VP/PS) is adsorbed onto mica from a selective solvent (the PS block is well solvated and

  12. Properties of Hooked Steel Fibers Reinforced Alkali Activated Material Concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Faris M. A.; Abdullah Mohd Mustafa Al Bakri; Ismail Khairul Nizar; Muniandy Ratnasamy; Mahmad Nor Aiman; Putra Jaya Ramadhansyah; Waried Wazien A. Z.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, alkali activated material was produced by using Class F fly ash from Manjung power station, Lumut, Perak, Malaysia. Fly ash then was activated by alkaline activator which is consisting of sodium silicate (Na2SiO3) and sodium hydroxide (NaOH). Hooked end steel fibers were added into the alkali activated material system with percentage vary from 0 % – 5 %. Chemical compositions of fly ash were first analyzed by using x-ray fluorescence (XRF). All hardened alkali activated materia...

  13. Control of alkali species in gasification systems: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turn, S.; Kinoshita, C.; Ishimura, D. Zhou, J.; Hiraki, T.; Masutani, S.

    2000-07-13

    Gas-phase alkali metal compounds contribute to fouling, slagging, corrosion, and agglomeration problems in energy conversion facilities. One mitigation strategy applicable at high temperature is to pass the gas stream through a fixed bed sorbent or getter material, which preferentially absorbs alkali via physical adsorption or chemisorption. This report presents results of an experimental investigation of high-temperature alkali removal from a hot filtered gasifier product gas stream using a packed bed of sorbent material. Two getter materials, activated bauxite and emathlite, were tested at two levels of space time by using two interchangeable reactors of different internal diameters. The effect of getter particle size was also investigated.

  14. Atomic physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armbruster, P.; Beyer, H.; Bosch, F.; Dohmann, H.D.; Kozhuharov, C.; Liesen, D.; Mann, R.; Mokler, P.H.

    1984-01-01

    The heavy ion accelerator UNILAC is well suited to experiments in the field of atomic physics because, with the aid of high-energy heavy ions atoms can be produced in exotic states - that is, heavy atoms with only a few electrons. Also, in close collisions of heavy ions (atomic number Z 1 ) and heavy target atoms (Z 2 ) short-lived quasi-atomic 'superheavy' systems will be formed - huge 'atoms', where the inner electrons are bound in the field of the combined charge Z 1 + Z 2 , which exceeds by far the charge of the known elements (Z <= 109). Those exotic or transient superheavy atoms delivered from the heavy ion accelerator make it possible to study for the first time in a terrestrial laboratory exotic, but fundamental, processes, which occur only inside stars. Some of the basic research carried out with the UNILAC is discussed. This includes investigation of highly charged heavy atoms with the beam-foil method, the spectroscopy of highly charged slow-recoil ions, atomic collision studies with highly ionised, decelerated ions and investigations of super-heavy quasi-atoms. (U.K.)

  15. Solvation of fluoroform and fluoroform-dimethylether dimer in liquid krypton: a theoretical cryospectroscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohls, Emilija; Mishev, Anastas; Pejov, Ljupčo

    2013-08-07

    fluoroform monomer, according to experiment, results in small C-H stretching frequency red shift (~-2 cm(-1)), while our approach predicts a blue shift of about 10 cm(-1). By a detailed analysis of the anharmonic C-H stretching frequency dependence on the position of the nearest solvent krypton atom and also by analyzing the vibrational Stark effect induced by the local fluctuating field component parallel to the C-H axis, we have derived several conclusions related to these observations. The frequency vs. C···Kr distance dependence shows appreciable fluctuations and even changes in sign at R values close to the maximum of the C···Kr radial distribution function, so that most of the first-shell Kr atoms are located at positions at which the CH frequency shifts acquire either small negative or small positive values. It so happens, therefore, that even the actual sign of the frequency shift is strongly dependent on the correct description of the first solvation shell around CF3H by the Monte Carlo method, much more than the other in-liquid properties calculated by similar approaches.

  16. Ultracold atoms on atom chips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krüger, Peter; Hofferberth, S.; Haller, E.

    2005-01-01

    Miniaturized potentials near the surface of atom chips can be used as flexible and versatile tools for the manipulation of ultracold atoms on a microscale. The full scope of possibilities is only accessible if atom-surface distances can be reduced to microns. We discuss experiments in this regime...

  17. Structural evolution of fluorinated graphene upon molten-alkali treatment probed by X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Xianqing, E-mail: lxq@gxu.edu.cn [Guangxi Colleges and Universities Key Laboratory of Novel Energy Materials and Related Technology, College of Physics Science and Technology, Guangxi University, Nanning 530004 (China); Guangxi Collaborative Innovation Center of Structure and Property for New Energy and Materials, School of Material Science and Engineering, Guilin University of Electronic Technology, Guilin 541004 (China); Pan, Deyou; Lao, Ming; Liang, Shuiying [Guangxi Colleges and Universities Key Laboratory of Novel Energy Materials and Related Technology, College of Physics Science and Technology, Guangxi University, Nanning 530004 (China); Huang, Dan; Zhou, Wenzheng; Guo, Jin [Guangxi Colleges and Universities Key Laboratory of Novel Energy Materials and Related Technology, College of Physics Science and Technology, Guangxi University, Nanning 530004 (China); Guangxi Collaborative Innovation Center of Structure and Property for New Energy and Materials, School of Material Science and Engineering, Guilin University of Electronic Technology, Guilin 541004 (China)

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • Structural evolution of FG during the molten-alkali treatment was studied. • XANES results reveal the transformation of surface functional groups of HFG. • The local and electronic structure of HFG can be tuned by varying the alkali-FG ratio. - Abstract: The structural evolution of fluorinated graphene (FG) nanosheets upon molten-alkali treatment has been systematically investigated utilizing X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy. It is found that the hydroxyl groups can progressively displace fluorine atoms to form covalent bonds to the graphene sheets under designed molten-alkali condition. The XANES spectra also reveal the formation of epoxide groups through intramolecular dehydration of neighbouring hydroxyl groups after substitution reaction. At high alkali-FG weight ratio, the restoration of the π-conjugated structure in graphene sheets can be observed due to the gradual decomposition of epoxide groups. Our experimental results indicate that the surface chemistry and electronic structure of hydroxyl-functionalized FG (HFG) can be readily tuned by varying the ratio of reactants.

  18. Influence of N-O chemistry on the excitation of alkali metals by a non-transferred DC plasma jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haeyrinen, Ville; Oikari, Risto; Hernberg, Rolf

    2004-01-01

    Excitation of Na(3p) and K(4p) states by a high velocity non-transferred direct current plasma jet was studied. A turbulent nitrogen plasma jet was discharged into an atmosphere consisting of nitrogen and oxygen, laden with trace amounts of alkali. The line reversal temperatures of Na and K depend on the molar fraction of oxygen and may deviate considerably from the gas temperature. The reaction pressure was 0.1 MPa. The measured line reversal temperatures were reproduced by a simple chemical model. At temperatures near 2000 K non-equilibrium is caused by association of nitrogen atoms by the Zeldovich mechanism, which affects the vibrational temperature of nitrogen molecules. Near 1000 K excitation may also take place due to a chemiluminescent mechanism between alkali metals and ozone

  19. Pyranose dehydrogenase ligand promiscuity: a generalized approach to simulate monosaccharide solvation, binding, and product formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael M H Graf

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The flavoenzyme pyranose dehydrogenase (PDH from the litter decomposing fungus Agaricus meleagris oxidizes many different carbohydrates occurring during lignin degradation. This promiscuous substrate specificity makes PDH a promising catalyst for bioelectrochemical applications. A generalized approach to simulate all 32 possible aldohexopyranoses in the course of one or a few molecular dynamics (MD simulations is reported. Free energy calculations according to the one-step perturbation (OSP method revealed the solvation free energies (ΔGsolv of all 32 aldohexopyranoses in water, which have not yet been reported in the literature. The free energy difference between β- and α-anomers (ΔGβ-α of all d-stereoisomers in water were compared to experimental values with a good agreement. Moreover, the free-energy differences (ΔG of the 32 stereoisomers bound to PDH in two different poses were calculated from MD simulations. The relative binding free energies (ΔΔGbind were calculated and, where available, compared to experimental values, approximated from Km values. The agreement was very good for one of the poses, in which the sugars are positioned in the active site for oxidation at C1 or C2. Distance analysis between hydrogens of the monosaccharide and the reactive N5-atom of the flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD revealed that oxidation is possible at HC1 or HC2 for pose A, and at HC3 or HC4 for pose B. Experimentally detected oxidation products could be rationalized for the majority of monosaccharides by combining ΔΔGbind and a reweighted distance analysis. Furthermore, several oxidation products were predicted for sugars that have not yet been tested experimentally, directing further analyses. This study rationalizes the relationship between binding free energies and substrate promiscuity in PDH, providing novel insights for its applicability in bioelectrochemistry. The results suggest that a similar approach could be applied to study

  20. Boundary layer friction of solvate ionic liquids as a function of potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hua; Rutland, Mark W; Watanabe, Masayoshi; Atkin, Rob

    2017-07-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been used to investigate the potential dependent boundary layer friction at solvate ionic liquid (SIL)-highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) and SIL-Au(111) interfaces. Friction trace and retrace loops of lithium tetraglyme bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide (Li(G4) TFSI) at HOPG present clearer stick-slip events at negative potentials than at positive potentials, indicating that a Li + cation layer adsorbed to the HOPG lattice at negative potentials which enhances stick-slip events. The boundary layer friction data for Li(G4) TFSI shows that at HOPG, friction forces at all potentials are low. The TFSI - anion rich boundary layer at positive potentials is more lubricating than the Li + cation rich boundary layer at negative potentials. These results suggest that boundary layers at all potentials are smooth and energy is predominantly dissipated via stick-slip events. In contrast, friction at Au(111) for Li(G4) TFSI is significantly higher at positive potentials than at negative potentials, which is comparable to that at HOPG at the same potential. The similarity of boundary layer friction at negatively charged HOPG and Au(111) surfaces indicates that the boundary layer compositions are similar and rich in Li + cations for both surfaces at negative potentials. However, at Au(111), the TFSI - rich boundary layer is less lubricating than the Li + rich boundary layer, which implies that anion reorientations rather than stick-slip events are the predominant energy dissipation pathways. This is confirmed by the boundary friction of Li(G4) NO 3 at Au(111), which shows similar friction to Li(G4) TFSI at negative potentials due to the same cation rich boundary layer composition, but even higher friction at positive potentials, due to higher energy dissipation in the NO 3 - rich boundary layer.

  1. Internal energy effects on the solvation and reactivity of multiply charged biomolecules for electrospray ionization mass spectroscopy. [Bovine ubiquitin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Light-Wahl, K.J.; Winger, B.E.; Rockwood, A.L.; Smith, R.D.

    1992-06-01

    Mild (capillary) interface conditions which do not completely desolvate the ions of proteins in electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) may be required to probe the higher order structures and weak associations. For the small protein bovine ubiquitin, two ion distributions (unsolvated ions and unresolved solvated ions) were observed. The resolvable solvation for leucine-enkephalin with methanol and water shows that the use of countercurrent N{sub 2} flow at the capillary affects the solvation observed. 2 figs. (DLC)

  2. Molecular beam scattering from clean surfaces of alkali halides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyers, J.A.

    1975-01-01

    Molecular beam scattering of light gases from in situ cleaved alkali halide surfaces has been studied as a means of developing molecular beam scattering as a surface characterization tool and as a means of obtaining information about the gas atom-solid surface potential interaction. For 4 He scattering from LiF carried out under improved resolution the main results are: (1) there are four bound states in the surface potential well, as energies of -5.8, -2.2, -0.6 and -0.1 MeV. (2) Most of the structure designated as ''fine structure'' is due either to transitions to these four levels via various small reciprocal lattice vectors or to the opening of diffraction channels. (3) The transitions involving the (01) and (0 anti 1) reciprocal lattice vectors (i.e., the ones nearly perpendicular to the incident wavevector) are strong; as much as 85 percent of the specular intensity may be removed. Transitions via the other small reciprocal lattice vectors are much weaker. (4) The widths of the lines are consistent with the velocity distribution, which has a half-width of about 2 percent. (5) The observed energies agree fairly well with those calculated for a zeta-function potential, but are not consistent with a Morse potential. The preliminary results for 4 He/NaF scattering are that there are three bound-states in the surface potential well and are quite similar to the LiF results. These energies are -5.0, -1.9, and -0.5 MeV. 4 He/NaF selective adsorption also shows ''fine structure'' and a more detailed analysis is called for here

  3. Coarse-grained models using local-density potentials optimized with the relative entropy: Application to implicit solvation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanyal, Tanmoy; Shell, M. Scott

    2016-01-01

    Bottom-up multiscale techniques are frequently used to develop coarse-grained (CG) models for simulations at extended length and time scales but are often limited by a compromise between computational efficiency and accuracy. The conventional approach to CG nonbonded interactions uses pair potentials which, while computationally efficient, can neglect the inherently multibody contributions of the local environment of a site to its energy, due to degrees of freedom that were coarse-grained out. This effect often causes the CG potential to depend strongly on the overall system density, composition, or other properties, which limits its transferability to states other than the one at which it was parameterized. Here, we propose to incorporate multibody effects into CG potentials through additional nonbonded terms, beyond pair interactions, that depend in a mean-field manner on local densities of different atomic species. This approach is analogous to embedded atom and bond-order models that seek to capture multibody electronic effects in metallic systems. We show that the relative entropy coarse-graining framework offers a systematic route to parameterizing such local density potentials. We then characterize this approach in the development of implicit solvation strategies for interactions between model hydrophobes in an aqueous environment.

  4. Magnetic properties of free alkali and transition metal clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heer, W. de; Milani, P.; Chatelain, A.

    1991-01-01

    The Stern-Gerlach deflections of small alkali clusters (N<6) and iron clusters (10< N<500) show that the paramagnetic alkali clusters always have a nondeflecting component, while the iron clusters always deflect in the high field direction. Both of these effects appear to be related to spin relaxation however in the case of alkali clusters it is shown that they are in fact caused by avoided level crossing in the Zeeman diagram. For alkali clusters the relatively weak couplings cause reduced magnetic moments where levels cross. For iron clusters however the total spin is strongly coupled to the molecular framework. Consequently this coupling is responsible for avoided level crossing which ultimately cause the total energy of the cluster to decrease with increasing magnetic field so that the iron clusters will deflect in one direction when introduced in an inhomogeneous magnetic field. Experiment and theory are discussed for both cases. (orig.)

  5. Saccharification of gamma-ray and alkali pretreated lignocellulosics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Begum, A.; Choudhury, N.

    1988-01-01

    Enzymic saccharification of gamma ray and alkali pretreated sawdust, rice straw, and sugar cane bagasse showed higher release of reducing sugar from pretreated substrates. By gamma ray treatment alone (500 kGy) reducing sugar release of 2.8, 9.2, and 10 g/l was obtained from 7.5% (w/v) sawdust, rice straw, and bagasse and the same substrates showed reducing sugar release of 4.2, 30, and 20 g/l respectively when treated with alkali (0.1 g/g). Combination of gamma ray with alkali treatment further increased the reducing sugar release to 10.2, 33, and 36 g/l from sawdust, rice straw, and bagasse respectively. The effects of gamma ray and alkali treatment on saccharification varied with the nature of the substrate

  6. Dipole-dipole van der Waals interaction in alkali halides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thakur, B.N.; Thakur, K.P.

    1978-01-01

    Values of van der Waals dipole-dipole constants and interaction energetics of alkali halides are reported using the recent data. The values obtained are somewhat larger than those of earlier workers. (orig.) [de

  7. Alkali-bonded ceramics with hierarchical tailored porosity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Landi, E.; Medri, V.; Papa, E.; Dědeček, Jiří; Klein, Petr; Benito, P.; Vaccari, A.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 73, SI (2013), s. 56-64 ISSN 0169-1317 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : alkali-bonded ceramics * metalcaolin * geopolymerization parameters Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.703, year: 2013

  8. Mineralization dynamics of metakaolin-based alkali-activated cements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gevaudan, Juan Pablo; Campbell, Kate M.; Kane, Tyler; Shoemaker, Richard K.; Srubar, Wil V.

    2017-01-01

    This paper investigates the early-age dynamics of mineral formation in metakaolin-based alkali-activated cements. The effects of silica availability and alkali content on mineral formation were investigated via X-ray diffraction and solid-state 29Si magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 2, 7, 14, and 28 days. Silica availability was controlled by using either liquid- (immediate) or solid-based (gradual) sodium silicate supplements. Mineral (zeolitic) and amorphous microstructural characteristics were correlated with observed changes in bulk physical properties, namely shrinkage, density, and porosity. Results demonstrate that, while alkali content controls the mineralization in immediately available silica systems, alkali content controls the silica availability in gradually available silica systems. Immediate silica availability generally leads to a more favorable mineral formation as demonstrated by correlated improvements in bulk physical properties.

  9. Method for intercalating alkali metal ions into carbon electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doeff, Marca M.; Ma, Yanping; Visco, Steven J.; DeJonghe, Lutgard

    1995-01-01

    A low cost, relatively flexible, carbon electrode for use in a secondary battery is described. A method is provided for producing same, including intercalating alkali metal salts such as sodium and lithium into carbon.

  10. Mineralization dynamics of metakaolin-based alkali-activated cements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gevaudan, Juan Pablo; Campbell, Kate M.; Kane, Tyler J.; Shoemaker, Richard K.; Srubar, Wil V.

    2017-01-01

    This paper investigates the early-age dynamics of mineral formation in metakaolin-based alkali-activated cements. The effects of silica availability and alkali content on mineral formation were investigated via X-ray diffraction and solid-state 29 Si magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 2, 7, 14, and 28 days. Silica availability was controlled by using either liquid- (immediate) or solid-based (gradual) sodium silicate supplements. Mineral (zeolitic) and amorphous microstructural characteristics were correlated with observed changes in bulk physical properties, namely shrinkage, density, and porosity. Results demonstrate that, while alkali content controls the mineralization in immediately available silica systems, alkali content controls the silica availability in gradually available silica systems. Immediate silica availability generally leads to a more favorable mineral formation as demonstrated by correlated improvements in bulk physical properties.

  11. Kinetics of molybdenite oxidizing leaching in alkali medium by ozone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medvedev, A.S.; Sokratova, N.B.; Litman, I.V.; Zelikman, A.N.

    1985-01-01

    On the basis of investigation of the process kinetics proposed is a model of oxidizing leaching of molybdenite in alkali medium while ozonization of the solution by ozoneair mixture. A kinetic equation is derived, that describes experimental data satisfactorily

  12. Dislocation unpinning model of acoustic emission from alkali halide ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The present paper reports the dislocation unpinning model of acoustic emis- sion (AE) from ... Acoustic emission; dislocation; alkali halide crystals; plastic deformation. ..... [5] T Nishimura, A Tahara and T Kolama, Jpn. Metal Inst. 64, 339 (2000).

  13. Dedolomitization and Alkali Reactions in Ohio-sourced Dolstone Aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-01

    Concrete samples produced using NW-Ohio sourced aggregates were evaluated for susceptibility to degradation and premature failure due to cracks formed by the volume expansion during hydration of silica gels produced by alkali-silica reactions between...

  14. The 4843 Alkali Metal Storage Facility Closure Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-06-01

    The 4843 AMSF has been used primarily to provide a centralized building to receive and store dangerous and mixed alkali metal waste, including sodium and lithium, which has been generated at the Fast Flux Test Facility and at various other Hanford Site operations that used alkali metals. Most of the dangerous and mixed alkali metal waste received consists of retired equipment from liquid sodium processes. The unit continues to store material. In general, only solid alkali metal waste that is water reactive is stored at the 4843 AMSF. The 4843 AMSF will be closed in a manner consistent with Ecology guidelines and regulations (WAC 173-303-610). The general closure procedure is detailed as follows

  15. Nonequilibrium quantum solvation with a time-dependent Onsager cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchberg, H.; Nalbach, P.; Thorwart, M.

    2018-04-01

    We formulate a theory of nonequilibrium quantum solvation in which parameters of the solvent are explicitly depending on time. We assume in a simplest approach a spherical molecular Onsager cavity with a time-dependent radius. We analyze the relaxation properties of a test molecular point dipole in a dielectric solvent and consider two cases: (i) a shrinking Onsager sphere and (ii) a breathing Onsager sphere. Due to the time-dependent solvent, the frequency-dependent response function of the dipole becomes time-dependent. For a shrinking Onsager sphere, the dipole relaxation is in general enhanced. This is reflected in a temporally increasing linewidth of the absorptive part of the response. Furthermore, the effective frequency-dependent response function shows two peaks in the absorptive part which are symmetrically shifted around the eigenfrequency. By contrast, a breathing sphere reduces damping as compared to the static sphere. Interestingly, we find a non-monotonous dependence of the relaxation rate on the breathing rate and a resonant suppression of damping when both rates are comparable. Moreover, the linewidth of the absorptive part of the response function is strongly reduced for times when the breathing sphere reaches its maximal extension.

  16. Cluster Formation of Polyphilic Molecules Solvated in a DPPC Bilayer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang-Yang Guo

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available We analyse the initial stages of cluster formation of polyphilic additive molecules which are solvated in a dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC lipid bilayer. Our polyphilic molecules comprise an aromatic (trans-bilayer core domain with (out-of-bilayer glycerol terminations, complemented with a fluorophilic and an alkyl side chain, both of which are confined within the aliphatic segment of the bilayer. Large-scale molecular dynamics simulations (1 μ s total duration of a set of six of such polyphilic additives reveal the initial steps towards supramolecular aggregation induced by the specific philicity properties of the molecules. For our intermediate system size of six polyphiles, the transient but recurrent formation of a trimer is observed on a characteristic timescale of about 100 ns. The alkane/perfluoroalkane side chains show a very distinct conformational distribution inside the bilayer thanks to their different philicity, despite their identical anchoring in the trans-bilayer segment of the polyphile. The diffusive mobility of the polyphilic additives is about the same as that of the surrounding lipids, although it crosses both bilayer leaflets and tends to self-associate.

  17. Molecular hydrogen solvated in water – A computational study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Śmiechowski, Maciej

    2015-01-01

    The aqueous hydrogen molecule is studied with molecular dynamics simulations at ambient temperature and pressure conditions, using a newly developed flexible and polarizable H 2 molecule model. The design and implementation of this model, compatible with an existing flexible and polarizable force field for water, is presented in detail. The structure of the hydration layer suggests that first-shell water molecules accommodate the H 2 molecule without major structural distortions and two-dimensional, radial-angular distribution functions indicate that as opposed to strictly tangential, the orientation of these water molecules is such that the solute is solvated with one of the free electron pairs of H 2 O. The calculated self-diffusion coefficient of H 2 (aq) agrees very well with experimental results and the time dependence of mean square displacement suggests the presence of caging on a time scale corresponding to hydrogen bond network vibrations in liquid water. Orientational correlation function of H 2 experiences an extremely short-scale decay, making the H 2 –H 2 O interaction potential essentially isotropic by virtue of rotational averaging. The inclusion of explicit polarizability in the model allows for the calculation of Raman spectra that agree very well with available experimental data on H 2 (aq) under differing pressure conditions, including accurate reproduction of the experimentally noted trends with solute pressure or concentration

  18. Preferential solvation and solvation shell composition of free base and protonated 5, 10, 15, 20-tetrakis(4-sulfonatophenyl)porphyrin in aqueous organic mixed solvents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farajtabar, Ali; Jaberi, Fatemeh; Gharib, Farrokh

    2011-12-01

    The solvatochromic properties of the free base and the protonated 5, 10, 15, 20-tetrakis(4-sulfonatophenyl)porphyrin (TPPS) were studied in pure water, methanol, ethanol (protic solvents), dimethylsulfoxide, DMSO, (non-protic solvent), and their corresponding aqueous-organic binary mixed solvents. The correlation of the empirical solvent polarity scale ( ET) values of TPPS with composition of the solvents was analyzed by the solvent exchange model of Bosch and Roses to clarify the preferential solvation of the probe dyes in the binary mixed solvents. The solvation shell composition and the synergistic effects in preferential solvation of the solute dyes were investigated in terms of both solvent-solvent and solute-solvent interactions and also, the local mole fraction of each solvent composition was calculated in cybotactic region of the probe. The effective mole fraction variation may provide significant physico-chemical insights in the microscopic and molecular level of interactions between TPPS species and the solvent components and therefore, can be used to interpret the solvent effect on kinetics and thermodynamics of TPPS. The obtained results from the preferential solvation and solvent-solvent interactions have been successfully applied to explain the variation of equilibrium behavior of protonation of TPPS occurring in aqueous organic mixed solvents of methanol, ethanol and DMSO.

  19. Ubiquitous atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spruch, G.M.; Spruch, L.

    1974-01-01

    The fundamentals of modern physics, including the basic physics and chemistry of the atom, elementary particles, cosmology, periodicity, and recent advances, are surveyed. The biology and chemistry of the life process is discussed to provide a background for considering the effects of atomic particles on living things. The uses of atomic power in space travel, merchant shipping, food preservation, desalination, and nuclear clocks are explored. (Pollut. Abstr.)

  20. Water Content of Lunar Alkali Fedlspar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, R. D.; Simon, J. I.; Wang, J.; Alexander, C. M. O'D.; Hauri, E. H.

    2016-01-01

    Detection of indigenous hydrogen in a diversity of lunar materials, including volcanic glass, melt inclusions, apatite, and plagioclase suggests water may have played a role in the chemical differentiation of the Moon. Spectroscopic data from the Moon indicate a positive correlation between water and Th. Modeling of lunar magma ocean crystallization predicts a similar chemical differentiation with the highest levels of water in the K- and Th-rich melt residuum of the magma ocean (i.e. urKREEP). Until now, the only sample-based estimates of water content of KREEP-rich magmas come from measurements of OH, F, and Cl in lunar apatites, which suggest a water concentration of alkali feldspar, a common mineral in K-enriched rocks, can have approx. 20 ppm of water, which implies magmatic water contents of approx. 1 wt % in the high-silica magmas. This estimate is 2 to 3 orders of magnitude higher than that estimated from apatite in similar rocks. However, the Cl and F contents of apatite in chemically similar rocks suggest that these melts also had high Cl/F ratios, which leads to spuriously low water estimates from the apatite. We can only estimate the minimum water content of urKREEP (+ bulk Moon) from our alkali feldspar data because of the unknown amount of degassing that led to the formation of the granites. Assuming a reasonable 10 to 100 times enrichment of water from urKREEP into the granites produces an estimate of 100-1000 ppm of water for the urKREEP reservoir. Using the modeling of and the 100-1000 ppm of water in urKREEP suggests a minimum bulk silicate Moon water content between 2 and 20 ppm. However, hydrogen loss was likely very significant in the evolution of the lunar mantle. Conclusions: Lunar granites crystallized between 4.3-3.8 Ga from relatively wet melts that degassed upon crystallization. The formation of these granites likely removed significant amounts of water from some mantle source regions, e.g. later mare basalts predicting derivation from a

  1. Alkali-slag cements for the immobilization of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, C.; Day, R.L.

    1996-01-01

    Alkali-slag cements consist of glassy slag and an alkaline activator and can show both higher early and later strengths than Type III Portland cement, if a proper alkaline activator is used. An examination of microstructure of hardened alkali-slag cement pastes with the help of XRD and SEM with EDAX shows that the main hydration product is C-S-H (B) with low C/S ratio and no crystalline substances exist such as Ca(OH) 2 , Al (OH) 3 and sulphoaluminates. Mercury intrusion tests indicate that hardened alkali-slag cement pastes have a lower porosity than ordinary Portland cement, and contain mainly gel pores. The fine pore structure of hardened alkali-slag cement pastes will restrict the ingress of deleterious substances and the leaching of harmful species such as radionuclides. The leachability of Cs + from hardened alkali-slag cement pastes is only half of that from hardened Portland cement. From all these aspects, it is concluded that alkali-slag cements are a better solidification matrix than Portland cement for radioactive wastes

  2. Two-phase alkali-metal experiments in reduced gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antoniak, Z.I.

    1986-06-01

    Future space missions envision the use of large nuclear reactors utilizing either a single or a two-phase alkali-metal working fluid. The design and analysis of such reactors require state-of-the-art computer codes that can properly treat alkali-metal flow and heat transfer in a reduced-gravity environment. A literature search of relevant experiments in reduced gravity is reported on here, and reveals a paucity of data for such correlations. The few ongoing experiments in reduced gravity are noted. General plans are put forth for the reduced-gravity experiments which will have to be performed, at NASA facilities, with benign fluids. A similar situation exists regarding two-phase alkali-metal flow and heat transfer, even in normal gravity. Existing data are conflicting and indequate for the task of modeling a space reactor using a two-phase alkali-metal coolant. The major features of past experiments are described here. Data from the reduced-gravity experiments with innocuous fluids are to be combined with normal gravity data from the two-phase alkali-metal experiments. Analyses undertaken here give every expectation that the correlations developed from this data base will provide a valid representation of alkali-metal heat transfer and pressure drop in reduced gravity

  3. Ionic interactions in alkali-aluminium tetrafluoride clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akdeniz, Z.; Cicek, Z.; Karaman, A.; Pastore, G.; Tosi, M.P.

    1999-08-01

    Complex anion structures ((AlF 4 ) - , (AlF 5 ) 2- and (AlF 6 ) 3- ) coexist in liquid mixtures of aluminium trifluoride and alkali fluorides in composition-dependent relative concentrations and are known to interact with the alkali counterions. We present a comparative study of the static and vibrational structures of MAlF 4 molecules (with M = any alkali), with the aim of developing and testing a refined model of the ionic interactions for applications to the Al-M fluoride mixtures. We find that, whereas an edge-bridged coordination is strongly favoured for Li in LiAIF 4 , edge-bridging and face-bridging of the alkali ion become energetically equivalent as one moves from Na to the heavier alkalis. This result is sensitive to the inclusion of alkali polarizability and may be interpreted as implying (for M = K, Rb or Cs) almost free relative rotations of the M + and (AlF 4 ) - partners at temperatures of relevance to experiment. The consistency of such a viewpoint with electron diffraction data on vapours and with Raman spectra on melts is discussed. (author)

  4. High alkali-resistant basalt fiber for reinforcing concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipatov, Ya.V.; Gutnikov, S.I.; Manylov, M.S.; Zhukovskaya, E.S.; Lazoryak, B.I.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Doping of basalt fiber with ZrSiO 4 increased its alkali resistance. • Alkali treatment results in formation of protective surface layer on fibers. • Morphology and chemical composition of surface layer were investigated. • Mechanical properties of fibers were analyzed by a Weibull distribution. • Zirconia doped basalt fibers demonstrate high performance in concrete. - Abstract: Basalt glasses and fibers with zirconia content in the range from 0 to 7 wt% were obtained using ZrSiO 4 as a zirconium source. Weight loss and tensile strength loss of fibers after refluxing in alkali solution were determined. Basalt fiber with 5.7 wt% ZrO 2 had the best alkali resistance properties. Alkali treatment results in formation of protective surface layer on fibers. Morphology and chemical composition of surface layer were investigated. It was shown that alkali resistance of zirconia doped basalt fibers is caused by insoluble compounds of Zr 4+ , Fe 3+ and Mg 2+ in corrosion layer. Mechanical properties of initial and leached fibers were evaluated by a Weibull distribution. The properties of basalt fibers with ZrSiO 4 were compared with AR-glass fibers. The performance of concrete with obtained fibers was investigated

  5. Atomic physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1976-01-01

    Research activities in atomic physics at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory during 1976 are described. Topics covered include: experiments on stored ions; test for parity violation in neutral weak currents; energy conservation and astrophysics; atomic absorption spectroscopy, atomic and molecular detectors; theoretical studies of quantum electrodynamics and high-z ions; atomic beam magnetic resonance; radiative decay from the 2 3 Po, 2 levels of helium-like argon; quenching of the metastable 2S/sub 1/2/ state of hydrogen-like argon in an external electric field; and lifetime of the 2 3 Po level of helium-like krypton

  6. Alkali and heavy metal emissions of the PCFB-process; Alkali- ja raskasmetallipaeaestoet PCFB-prosessista

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuivalainen, R; Eriksson, T; Lehtonen, P [Foster Wheeler Energia Oy, Karhula (Finland)

    1997-10-01

    Pressurized Circulating Fluidized Bed (PCFB) combustion technology has been developed in Karhula R and D Center since 1986. As part of the development, 10 MW PCFB test facility was built in 1989. The test facility has been used for performance testing with different coal types through the years 1990-1995 in order to gain data for design and commercialization of the high-efficiency low-emission PCFB combustion technology. The main object of the project was to measure vapor phase Na and K concentrations in the PCFB flue gas after hot gas filter and investigate the effects of process conditions and sorbents on alkali release. The measurements were performed using plasma assisted method of TUT Laboratory of Plasma Technology and wet absorption method of VTT Energy. The measurements were carried out during three test campaigns at PCFB Test Facility in Karhula. In autumn 1995 both VTT and TUT methods were used. The measurements of the following test period in spring 1996 were performed by VTT, and during the last test segment in autumn 1996 TUT method was in use. During the last test period, the TUT instrument was used as semi-continuous (3 values/minute) alkali analyzer for part of the time. The measured Na concentrations were below 30 ppb(w) in all measured data points. The results of K were below 10 ppb(w). The accuracies of the both methods are about +50 % at this concentration range. The scatter of the data covers the effects of different process variables on the alkali emission. The measured emissions are at the same order of magnitude as the guideline emission limits estimated by gas turbine manufacturers

  7. Relation between the electroforming voltage in alkali halide-polymer diodes and the bandgap of the alkali halide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bory, Benjamin F.; Wang, Jingxin; Janssen, René A. J.; Meskers, Stefan C. J.; Gomes, Henrique L.; De Leeuw, Dago M.

    2014-01-01

    Electroforming of indium-tin-oxide/alkali halide/poly(spirofluorene)/Ba/Al diodes has been investigated by bias dependent reflectivity measurements. The threshold voltages for electrocoloration and electroforming are independent of layer thickness and correlate with the bandgap of the alkali halide. We argue that the origin is voltage induced defect formation. Frenkel defect pairs are formed by electron–hole recombination in the alkali halide. This self-accelerating process mitigates injection barriers. The dynamic junction formation is compared to that of a light emitting electrochemical cell. A critical defect density for electroforming is 10 25 /m 3 . The electroformed alkali halide layer can be considered as a highly doped semiconductor with metallic transport characteristics

  8. Elastic modulus of the alkali-silica reaction rim in a simplified calcium-alkali-silicate system determined by nano-indentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zheng, Kunpeng; Lukovic, M.; De Schutter, Geert; Ye, G.; Taerwe, Luc

    2016-01-01

    This work aims at providing a better understanding of the mechanical properties of the reaction rim in the alkali-silica reaction. The elastic modulus of the calcium alkali silicate constituting the reaction rim, which is formed at the interface between alkali silicate and Ca(OH)2 in a

  9. Alternative alkali resistant deNOx catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Putluru, Siva Sankar Reddy; Kristensen, Steffen Buus; Due-Hansen, Johannes

    2012-01-01

    by onepot sol–gel method. All catalysts were characterized by BET, XRPD and NH3-TPD. Initial SCR activities of 8 out of 9 catalysts showed higher NO conversion at least at one temperature in the temperature range 300–500 ◦C compared to the conventional V2O5-WO3/TiO2 catalyst. After potassium poisoning (100......Alternative alkali resistant deNOx catalysts were prepared using three different supports ZrO2, TiO2 and Mordenite zeolite. The majority of the catalysts were prepared by incipient wetness impregnation of a commercial support, with vanadium, copper or iron precursor, one catalyst was prepared......–130 µmol of K/g of catalyst) the relative drop in SCR activity and acidity was lower for all the alternative catalysts compared to the industrial V2O5-WO3/TiO2 catalyst. Furthermore, Cu/MOR and Nano-V2O5/Sul-TiO2 catalysts showed 8–16 times higher SCR activities than the conventional even after high...

  10. Structured alkali halides for medical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitt, B.; Fuchs, M.; Hell, E.; Knuepfer, W.; Hackenschmied, P.; Winnacker, A.

    2002-01-01

    Image plates based on storage phosphors are a major application of radiation defects in insulators. Storage phosphors absorb X-ray quanta creating trapped electron-hole pairs in the material. Optical stimulation of the electron causes recombination leading to light emission. Application of image plates requires an optimal compromise between resolution (represented by the modulation transfer function (MTF)) and sensitivity. In our paper we present a new solution of the problem of combining a high MTF with a high sensitivity by structuring the image plates in form of thin needles acting as light guides. This suppresses the lateral spread of light which is detrimental to resolution. As doped CsBr, e.g. CsBr:Ga [Physica Medica XV (1999) 301], can pose a good storage phosphor evaporated layers are of interest in computed radiography. Needle structured CsI:Tl is used as scintillator in direct radiography [IEEE Trans. Nucl. Sci. 45 (3) (1998)]. CsBr layers have been produced by evaporation in vacuum and in inert gas atmosphere varying pressure and temperature. The resulting structures are of fibrous or columnar nature being in good agreement with the zone model of Thornton [Ann. Rev. Mater. Sci. 7 (1977) 239]. A zone model for CsBr has been developed. Measurements on doped alkali halide image plates having needle structure show good MTF at high sensitivity making a significant progress in image plate technology

  11. Electron scattering by trapped fermionic atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Haijun; Jhe, Wonho

    2002-01-01

    Considering the Fermi gases of alkali-metal atoms that are trapped in a harmonic potential, we study theoretically the elastic and inelastic scattering of the electrons by the trapped Fermi atoms and present the corresponding differential cross sections. We also obtain the stopping power for the cases that the electronic state as well as the center-of-mass state are excited both separately and simultaneously. It is shown that the elastic scattering process is no longer coherent in contrast to the electron scattering by the atomic Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC). For the inelastic scattering process, on the other hand, the differential cross section is found to be proportional to the 2/3 power of the number of the trapped atoms. In particular, the trapped fermionic atoms display the effect of ''Fermi surface,'' that is, only the energy levels near the Fermi energy have dominant contributions to the scattering process. Moreover, it is found that the stopping power scales as the 7/6 power of the atomic number. These results are fundamentally different from those of the electron scattering by the atomic BEC, mainly due to the different statistics obeyed by the trapped atomic systems

  12. On the applicability of the jellium model to the description of alkali clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matveentsev, A.; Lyalin, A.; Solovyov, I.A.; Solovyov, A.V.; Greiner, W.

    2003-01-01

    This work is devoted to the elucidation of the applicability of the jellium model to the description of alkali cluster properties. We compare the jellium model results with those derived within ab initio theoretical approaches and with experiments. On the basis of Hartree–Fock and local-density approximations we have calculated the binding energies per atom, ionization potentials, deformation parameters and optimized values of the Wigner–Seitz radii for neutral and singly charged sodium clusters with the number of atoms N ≤ 20. The characteristics calculated within the framework of the deformed jellium model are compared with the results derived from ab initio simulations of cluster electronic and ionic structure based on density functional theory and systematic post Hartree–Fock many-body perturbation theory accounting for all electrons in the system. The comparison performed demonstrates the great role of the cluster shape deformations in the formation cluster properties and quite reasonable level of applicability of the deformed jellium model. This elucidates the similarities of atomic cluster physics with the physics of atomic nuclei. (author)

  13. Breaking the polar-nonpolar division in solvation free energy prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bao; Wang, Chengzhang; Wu, Kedi; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2018-02-05

    Implicit solvent models divide solvation free energies into polar and nonpolar additive contributions, whereas polar and nonpolar interactions are inseparable and nonadditive. We present a feature functional theory (FFT) framework to break this ad hoc division. The essential ideas of FFT are as follows: (i) representability assumption: there exists a microscopic feature vector that can uniquely characterize and distinguish one molecule from another; (ii) feature-function relationship assumption: the macroscopic features, including solvation free energy, of a molecule is a functional of microscopic feature vectors; and (iii) similarity assumption: molecules with similar microscopic features have similar macroscopic properties, such as solvation free energies. Based on these assumptions, solvation free energy prediction is carried out in the following protocol. First, we construct a molecular microscopic feature vector that is efficient in characterizing the solvation process using quantum mechanics and Poisson-Boltzmann theory. Microscopic feature vectors are combined with macroscopic features, that is, physical observable, to form extended feature vectors. Additionally, we partition a solvation dataset into queries according to molecular compositions. Moreover, for each target molecule, we adopt a machine learning algorithm for its nearest neighbor search, based on the selected microscopic feature vectors. Finally, from the extended feature vectors of obtained nearest neighbors, we construct a functional of solvation free energy, which is employed to predict the solvation free energy of the target molecule. The proposed FFT model has been extensively validated via a large dataset of 668 molecules. The leave-one-out test gives an optimal root-mean-square error (RMSE) of 1.05 kcal/mol. FFT predictions of SAMPL0, SAMPL1, SAMPL2, SAMPL3, and SAMPL4 challenge sets deliver the RMSEs of 0.61, 1.86, 1.64, 0.86, and 1.14 kcal/mol, respectively. Using a test set of 94

  14. Polarization of photoelectrons produced from atoms by synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, V.W.; Lu, D.C.; Huang, K.N.

    1981-01-01

    The polarization of photoelectrons from stoms has proved to be an important tool for studying correlation effects in atoms, as well as relativistic effects such as the spin-orbit interaction. Extensive experimental and theoretical studies have been made of the Fano effect, which is the production of polarized electrons by photoionization of unpolarized atoms by circularly polarized light. The experiments have dealt mostly with alkali atoms and with photon energies slightly above the ionization thresholds. Measurements that could be made to utilize polarized radiation are discussed

  15. Numerical methods for atomic quantum gases with applications to Bose-Einstein condensates and to ultracold fermions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minguzzi, A.; Succi, S.; Toschi, F.; Tosi, M.P.; Vignolo, P.

    2004-01-01

    The achievement of Bose–Einstein condensation in ultra-cold vapours of alkali atoms has given enormous impulse to the study of dilute atomic gases in condensed quantum states inside magnetic traps and optical lattices. High-purity and easy optical access make them ideal candidates to investigate

  16. Atomic physics

    CERN Document Server

    Born, Max

    1969-01-01

    The Nobel Laureate's brilliant exposition of the kinetic theory of gases, elementary particles, the nuclear atom, wave-corpuscles, atomic structure and spectral lines, electron spin and Pauli's principle, quantum statistics, molecular structure and nuclear physics. Over 40 appendices, a bibliography, numerous figures and graphs.

  17. Early Atomism

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/015/10/0905-0925. Keywords. Atomic theory; Avogadro's hypothesis; atomic weights; periodic table; valence; molecular weights; molecular formula; isomerism. Author Affiliations. S Ramasesha1. Solid State and Structural Chemistry Unit, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012, ...

  18. Atom spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodling, K.

    1981-01-01

    Experiments on atom photoabsorption spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation in the 10-1000 eV range are reviewed. Properties of the necessary synchrotron radiation and the experiment on absorption spectroscopy are briefly described. Comparison with other spectroscopy methods is conducted. Some data on measuring photoabsorption, photoelectron emission and atom mass spectra are presented [ru

  19. Exotic atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horvath, D.; Lambrecht, R.M.

    1984-01-01

    This bibliography on exotic atoms covers the years 1939 till 1982. The annual entries are headed by an introduction describing the state of affairs of the branch of science and listing the main applications in quantum electrodynamics, particle physics, nuclear physics, atomic physics, chemical physics and biological sciences. The bibliography includes an author index and a subject index. (Auth.)

  20. Hydrophilic Solvation Dominates the Terahertz Fingerprint of Amino Acids in Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esser, Alexander; Forbert, Harald; Sebastiani, Federico; Schwaab, Gerhard; Havenith, Martina; Marx, Dominik

    2018-02-01

    Spectroscopy in the terahertz frequency regime is a sensitive tool to probe solvation-induced effects in aqueous solutions. Yet, a systematic understanding of spectral lineshapes as a result of distinct solvation contributions remains terra incognita. We demonstrate that modularization of amino acids in terms of functional groups allows us to compute their distinct contributions to the total terahertz response. Introducing the molecular cross-correlation analysis method provides unique access to these site-specific contributions. Equivalent groups in different amino acids lead to look-alike spectral contributions, whereas side chains cause characteristic but additive complexities. Specifically, hydrophilic solvation of the zwitterionic groups in valine and glycine leads to similar terahertz responses which are fully decoupled from the side chain. The terahertz response due to H-bonding within the large hydrophobic solvation shell of valine turns out to be nearly indistinguishable from that in bulk water in direct comparison to the changes imposed by the charged functional groups that form strong H-bonds with their hydration shells. Thus, the hydrophilic groups and their solvation shells dominate the terahertz absorption difference, while on the same intensity scale, the influence of hydrophobic water can be neglected.