WorldWideScience

Sample records for solutions unit brings

  1. Wind Energy Solutions : to bring renewable energy everywhere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baigent, K.

    2006-01-01

    This presentation provided details of Wind Energy Solutions (WES) Canada's current activities and research innovations. Established initially in Holland in 2004, WES Canada's corporate activities include technology development; licensing, registration and approvals; product development; manufacturing and distribution; and global service and maintenance training. WES Canada is the exclusive importer of WES turbines for Canada and the United States, and offers turnkey wind energy solutions for local dealers and installers. WES product technology aims to provide flexible logistics, as well as to facilitate local production and project development. WES turbines range from 2.5 kW to 250 KW and are available for both on-site power generation and grid-connected applications. The presentation provided specifications for the WES 5 Tulipo wind turbine, a low noise level, low vibration turbine that provides 2 independent safety systems: a failsafe brake on fast shaft of gear; and emergency yawing. A series of photographs demonstrated the installation process of the Tulipo. It was noted that many WES turbines are used in farming applications, as the turbine fits easily on 1 truck, and is easy to install with a foundation made by a local contractor using WES technical drawings engineered for local soil conditions. The turbine is also suitable for factories, harbours, schools and remote villages. It was concluded that the turbines have been specifically engineered for cold climates, as an imbalance control will prevent operation when the blades have significant ice build-up. refs., tabs., figs

  2. Wind Energy Solutions : to bring renewable energy everywhere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leeuw de, J.

    2008-01-01

    This presentation discussed smaller wind turbines designed by the Netherlands-based company Wind Energy Solutions (WES). Ranging between 2.5 kW and 250 kW, the smaller turbines are used in farming applications as well as for factories, in isolated communities, and by utilities with smaller electricity grids. The company also designs off-grid and stand-alone turbines; turbines with equal-sized generators; and turbines that do not require dumploads, batteries, or flywheels. WES turbines have been installed at farms, in parking lots, airports, gas stations, and on the grounds of large office buildings. The company advises that it is important to conduct initial surveys of the location for planned turbines before purchasing them. Legal and financial issues must also be explored, and wind speed data must be obtained in order to select an appropriate turbine. WES has also designed a range of control rooms, turbine cables, and remote monitoring devices for smaller wind turbines, as well as electronic microprocessors and inverters with PLC interfaces. Details of wind turbine installation procedures were included in this presentation. tabs., figs

  3. Bringing quality improvement into the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, Tracy R; Hyzy, Robert C

    2007-02-01

    During the last several years, many governmental and nongovernmental organizations have championed the application of the principles of quality improvement to the practice of medicine, particularly in the area of critical care. To review the breadth of approaches to quality improvement in the intensive care unit, including measures such as mortality and length of stay, and the use of protocols, bundles, and the role of large, multiple-hospital collaboratives. Several agencies have participated in the application of the quality movement to medicine, culminating in the development of standards such as the intensive care unit core measures of the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations. Although "zero defects" may not be possible in all measurable variables of quality in the intensive care unit, several measures, such as catheter-related bloodstream infections, can be significantly reduced through the implementation of improved processes of care, such as care bundles. Large, multiple-center, quality improvement collaboratives, such as the Michigan Keystone Intensive Care Unit Project, may be particularly effective in improving the quality of care by creating a "bandwagon effect" within a geographic region. The quality revolution is having a significant effect in the critical care unit and is likely to be facilitated by the transition to the electronic medical record.

  4. Bringing back the bridge solution to establish a fixed link over the Strait of Gibraltar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz Simal, P.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this essay is to address some of the aspects of the Bridge alternative and to examine the conclusions reached back in 1995 over the feasibility of such a solution. Although having been left aside for decades, the Bridge Solution of the Strait of Gibraltar Crossing Project has been brought back to life as an available alternative to close the gap between the two continents, being the reason to have recently detected some impediment down into the lower layers of the site laying grounds. All of which has revealed further geotechnical issues to tackle. Given the current level of development the Tunnel solution has reached, the 20-year-old Bridge solution needs to be fully updated in order to catch up with the former: As well as taking into consideration the new trends present in the state of the art on design of structures, the Bridge solution would also entail updating construction procedures if it is to incorporate all the potentialities offered by: (1) related tools (2) machinery, and (3), many new ideas which, coming from distinct industrial sectors others than the public works, have worked their way through the construction field. Furthermore, it would be necessary to bear in mind the ceaseless development materials science is going through, which involves constant increases in both levels of resilience and number of characteristics such materials present. (Author)

  5. Issues and Solutions for Bringing Heterogeneous Water Cycle Data Sets Together

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acker, James; Kempler, Steven; Teng, William; Belvedere, Deborah; Liu, Zhong; Leptoukh, Gregory

    2010-01-01

    The water cycle research community has generated many regional to global scale products using data from individual NASA missions or sensors (e.g., TRMM, AMSR-E); multiple ground- and space-based data sources (e.g., Global Precipitation Climatology Project [GPCP] products); and sophisticated data assimilation systems (e.g., Land Data Assimilation Systems [LDAS]). However, it is often difficult to access, explore, merge, analyze, and inter-compare these data in a coherent manner due to issues of data resolution, format, and structure. These difficulties were substantiated at the recent Collaborative Energy and Water Cycle Information Services (CEWIS) Workshop, where members of the NASA Energy and Water cycle Study (NEWS) community gave presentations, provided feedback, and developed scenarios which illustrated the difficulties and techniques for bringing together heterogeneous datasets. This presentation reports on the findings of the workshop, thus defining the problems and challenges of multi-dataset research. In addition, the CEWIS prototype shown at the workshop will be presented to illustrate new technologies that can mitigate data access roadblocks encountered in multi-dataset research, including: (1) Quick and easy search and access of selected NEWS data sets. (2) Multi-parameter data subsetting, manipulation, analysis, and display tools. (3) Access to input and derived water cycle data (data lineage). It is hoped that this presentation will encourage community discussion and feedback on heterogeneous data analysis scenarios, issues, and remedies.

  6. Contributing to shipping container security: can passive sensors bring a solution?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janssens-Maenhout, G.; De Roo, F.; Janssens, W.

    2010-01-01

    Illicit trafficking of fissionable material in container cargoes is recognized as a potential weakness in Nuclear Security. Triggered by the attacks of 11 September 2001, measures were undertaken to enhance maritime security in extension to the Safety Of Life At Sea Convention and in line with the US Container Security Initiatives. Effective detection techniques are needed that allow the inspector to intercept illicit trafficking of nuclear weapons components or components of other nuclear explosive devices. Many security measures focus on active interrogation of the container content by X-ray scan, which might be extended with the newly developed tagged neutron inspection system. Both active interrogation techniques can, with the current huge volume of container traffic, only be applied to a limited number of selected containers. The question arises whether a passive detection technique can offer an alternative solution. This study investigates if containers equipped with a small passive detector will register during transport the neutron irradiation by fissionable material such as plutonium in a measurable way. In practice, 4/5 of the containers are about 1/8 filled with hydrogenous material and undergo a typical 2 months route. For this reference case, it was found that the most compatible passive detector would be an activation foil of iridium. Monte-Carlo simulations showed that for the reference case the activity of a 250 μm thin foil with 6 cm 2 cross-section would register 1.2 Bq when it is irradiated by a significant quantity of Reactor-Grade PuO 2 . However this activity drops with almost two orders of magnitude for other fillings and other isotopic compositions and forms of the Pu-source. The procedure of selecting the target material for Pu detection is detailed with the theoretical methods, in order to be useful for other applications. Moreover the value of such additional passive sensors for securing maritime container transport is situated within

  7. Immigration and Ideas: What Did Russian Scientists "Bring" to the United States?

    OpenAIRE

    Ina Ganguli

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines how high-skilled immigrants contribute to knowledge diffusion using a rich data set of Russian scientists and US citations to Soviet-era publications. Analysis of a panel of US cities and scientific fields shows that citations to Soviet-era work increased significantly with the arrival of immigrants. A difference-in-differences analysis with matched paper pairs also shows that after Russian scientists moved to the United States, citations to their Soviet-era papers increas...

  8. Integrating generation and transmission networks reliability for unit commitment solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jalilzadeh, S.; Shayeghi, H.; Hadadian, H.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a new method with integration of generation and transmission networks reliability for the solution of unit commitment (UC) problem. In fact, in order to have a more accurate assessment of system reserve requirement, in addition to unavailability of generation units, unavailability of transmission lines are also taken into account. In this way, evaluation of the required spinning reserve (SR) capacity is performed by applying reliability constraints based on loss of load probability and expected energy not supplied (EENS) indices. Calculation of the above parameters is accomplished by employing a novel procedure based on the linear programming which it also minimizes them to achieve optimum level of the SR capacity and consequently a cost-benefit reliability constrained UC schedule. In addition, a powerful solution technique called 'integer-coded genetic algorithm (ICGA)' is being used for the solution of the proposed method. Numerical results on the IEEE reliability test system show that the consideration of transmission network unavailability has an important influence on reliability indices of the UC schedules

  9. Bring out your dead!: A study of income inequality and life expectancy in the United States, 2000-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Terrence D; Jorgenson, Andrew

    2018-01-01

    We test whether income inequality undermines female and male life expectancy in the United States. We employ data for all 50 states and the District of Columbia and two-way fixed effects to model state-level average life expectancy as a function of multiple income inequality measures and time-varying characteristics. We find that state-level income inequality is inversely associated with female and male life expectancy. We observe this general pattern across four measures of income inequality and under the rigorous conditions of state-specific and year-specific fixed effects. If income inequality undermines life expectancy, redistribution policies could actually improve the health of states. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Structure–Activity Relationship of Oligomeric Flavan-3-ols: Importance of the Upper-Unit B-ring Hydroxyl Groups in the Dimeric Structure for Strong Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshitomo Hamada

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Proanthocyanidins, which are composed of oligomeric flavan-3-ol units, are contained in various foodstuffs (e.g., fruits, vegetables, and drinks and are strongly biologically active compounds. We investigated which element of the proanthocyanidin structure is primarily responsible for this functionality. In this study, we elucidate the importance of the upper-unit of 4–8 condensed dimeric flavan-3-ols for antimicrobial activity against Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae and cervical epithelioid carcinoma cell line HeLa S3 proliferation inhibitory activity. To clarify the important constituent unit of proanthocyanidin, we synthesized four dimeric compounds, (−-epigallocatechin-[4,8]-(+-catechin, (−-epigallocatechin-[4,8]-(−-epigallocatechin, (−-epigallocatechin-[4,8]-(−-epigallocatechin-3-O-gallate, and (+-catechin-[4,8]-(−-epigallocatechin and performed structure–activity relationship (SAR studies. In addition to antimicrobial activity against S. cerevisiae and proliferation inhibitory activity on HeLa S3 cells, the correlation of 2,2-diphenyl-l-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging activity with the number of phenolic hydroxyl groups was low. On the basis of the results of our SAR studies, we concluded that B-ring hydroxyl groups of the upper-unit of the dimer are crucially important for strong and effective activity.

  11. Bringing testing to the people - benefits of mobile unit HIV/syphilis testing in Lima, Peru, 2007-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipsitz, Mindy C; Segura, Eddy R; Castro, José Luis; Smith, Edward; Medrano, Carlos; Clark, Jesse L; Lake, Jordan E; Cabello, Robinson

    2014-04-01

    Mobile unit (MU) HIV testing is an alternative method of providing healthcare access. We compared demographic and behavioural characteristics, HIV testing history and HIV prevalence between participants seeking testing at a MU vs. fixed clinic (FC) in Lima, Peru. Our analysis included men and transgender women (TW) in Lima aged ≥ 18 years old seeking HIV testing at their first visit to a community-based MU or FC from October 2007 to November 2009. HIV testing history, HIV serostatus and behavioural characteristics were analysed. A large percentage of MU attendees self-identified as transgender (13%) or heterosexual (41%). MU attendees were more likely to engage in transactional sex (24% MU vs. 10% FC, p < 0.001), use alcohol/drugs during their last sexual encounter (24% MU vs. 20% FC, p < 0.01) and/or be a first-time HIV tester (48% MU vs. 41% FC, p < 0.001). MU HIV prevalence was 9% overall and 5% among first-time testers (49% in TW and 11% in men who have sex with men [MSM] first-time testers). MU testing reached large numbers of at-risk (MSM/TW) populations engaged in unsafe sexual behaviours, making MU outreach a worthy complement to FC testing. Investigation into whether MU attendees would otherwise access HIV testing is warranted to determine the impact of MU testing.

  12. The control Unit of radiopharmacie: the solution of radioplarmacies management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jimenez, R.; Oyarzabal, I.

    2002-01-01

    Nuclear Medicine Departments administer unit doses of radiopharmaceuticals to patients. There unit doses are prepared in radio pharmacies either in the Hospital or in centralized radio pharmacies capable of servicing several Hospitals. This article describes the characteristics of centralized radio pharmacies and their advantages over units in Hospitals as well as the technological features that Molypharma has added to their own centralized radio pharmacies. (Author)

  13. The big bang and inflation united by an analytic solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bars, Itzhak; Chen, Shih-Hung

    2011-01-01

    Exact analytic solutions for a class of scalar-tensor gravity theories with a hyperbolic scalar potential are presented. Using an exact solution we have successfully constructed a model of inflation that produces the spectral index, the running of the spectral index, and the amplitude of scalar perturbations within the constraints given by the WMAP 7 years data. The model simultaneously describes the big bang and inflation connected by a specific time delay between them so that these two events are regarded as dependent on each other. In solving the Friedmann equations, we have utilized an essential Weyl symmetry of our theory in 3+1 dimensions which is a predicted remaining symmetry of 2T-physics field theory in 4+2 dimensions. This led to a new method of obtaining analytic solutions in the 1T field theory which could in principle be used to solve more complicated theories with more scalar fields. Some additional distinguishing properties of the solution includes the fact that there are early periods of time when the slow-roll approximation is not valid. Furthermore, the inflaton does not decrease monotonically with time; rather, it oscillates around the potential minimum while settling down, unlike the slow-roll approximation. While the model we used for illustration purposes is realistic in most respects, it lacks a mechanism for stopping inflation. The technique of obtaining analytic solutions opens a new window for studying inflation, and other applications, more precisely than using approximations.

  14. Risk management solutions for Cernavoda Unit #2 NPP completion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chirica, T.; Pall, S.

    2002-01-01

    The greatest risk facing today's electric utilities is change. Utility risk managers are being challenged to address the changes of deregulation, new technologies and changing work force. The utilities must be more aware of where all its costs are located to face with the challenge of competition, forcing them to respond with lower prices and innovative services. For completion of large projects, like Cernavoda NPP, Unit 2, the utilities are facing also with certain specific risks: politic, economic, social. The natural perils or machinery breakdown are common risks for operation as well as for construction-commissioning projects. Beyond the explicit challenges associated with the completion of a nuclear power plant in a transition economy environment, the utilities are facing with new risk factors such as professional liability, political risk, product warranty and liability, international exposure, etc. Changes in other governmental policies are also affecting large projects, mentioning healthcare, workplace safety, workers' compensation, environmental clean up, etc.(author)

  15. Bringing Your Baby Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Educators Search English Español Bringing Your Baby Home KidsHealth / For Parents / Bringing Your Baby Home What's ... recall your baby's seemingly endless crying episodes. The Home Front Introducing your baby to others at home ...

  16. Bringing back the bridge solution to establish a fixed link over the Strait of Gibraltar; Replanteamiento constructivo del Punte del Enlace Fijo a traves del Estrecho de Gibraltar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz Simal, P.

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this essay is to address some of the aspects of the Bridge alternative and to examine the conclusions reached back in 1995 over the feasibility of such a solution. Although having been left aside for decades, the Bridge Solution of the Strait of Gibraltar Crossing Project has been brought back to life as an available alternative to close the gap between the two continents, being the reason to have recently detected some impediment down into the lower layers of the site laying grounds. All of which has revealed further geotechnical issues to tackle. Given the current level of development the Tunnel solution has reached, the 20-year-old Bridge solution needs to be fully updated in order to catch up with the former: As well as taking into consideration the new trends present in the state of the art on design of structures, the Bridge solution would also entail updating construction procedures if it is to incorporate all the potentialities offered by: (1) related tools (2) machinery, and (3), many new ideas which, coming from distinct industrial sectors others than the public works, have worked their way through the construction field. Furthermore, it would be necessary to bear in mind the ceaseless development materials science is going through, which involves constant increases in both levels of resilience and number of characteristics such materials present. (Author)

  17. Optimization Solutions for Improving the Performance of the Parallel Reduction Algorithm Using Graphics Processing Units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ion LUNGU

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we research, analyze and develop optimization solutions for the parallel reduction function using graphics processing units (GPUs that implement the Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA, a modern and novel approach for improving the software performance of data processing applications and algorithms. Many of these applications and algorithms make use of the reduction function in their computational steps. After having designed the function and its algorithmic steps in CUDA, we have progressively developed and implemented optimization solutions for the reduction function. In order to confirm, test and evaluate the solutions' efficiency, we have developed a custom tailored benchmark suite. We have analyzed the obtained experimental results regarding: the comparison of the execution time and bandwidth when using graphic processing units covering the main CUDA architectures (Tesla GT200, Fermi GF100, Kepler GK104 and a central processing unit; the data type influence; the binary operator's influence.

  18. Prestart-up hydrogen peroxide solution washing of NPP unit with the RBMK-type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruzdev, N.I.; Man'kina, N.N.; Al'tshuller, M.A.

    1979-01-01

    Presented are the results of industrial hydrogen peroxide solution washing of condensating-feed system conducted on the second unit of the Kursk NPP. Duration of the washing constituted 8 hours. The hydrogen peroxide concentration during first 4 hours was 10-20 mg/kg at a flow rate of 260 m 2 /h, during the following 4 hours it constituted 2-5 mg/kg at a flow rate of 1000 m 3 /h. It is found out that prestart-up hydrogen peroxide washing of NPP power units with the RBMK-type reactor permits: to simplify essentially the technology and scheme of washing process; to reduce a flow rate of desalt washing water; to except environmental contamination with washing solutions and reagents being neutralized; to reduce the time of washing process; to reduce the time necessary for the achievement of reference water condition factors, and to increase the unit reliability and to improve a radiation situation

  19. Unit commitment solution using agglomerative and divisive cluster algorithm : an effective new methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reddy, N.M.; Reddy, K.R. [G. Narayanamma Inst. of Technology and Science, Hyderabad (India). Dept. of Electrical Engineering; Ramana, N.V. [JNTU College of Engineering, Jagityala (India). Dept. of Electrical Engineering

    2008-07-01

    Thermal power plants consist of several generating units with different generating capacities, fuel cost per MWH generated, minimum up/down times, and start-up or shut-down costs. The Unit Commitment (UC) problem in power systems involves determining the start-up and shut-down schedules of thermal generating units to meet forecasted load over a future short term for a period of one to seven days. This paper presented a new approach for the most complex UC problem using agglomerative and divisive hierarchical clustering. Euclidean costs, which are a measure of differences in fuel cost and start-up costs of any two units, were first calculated. Then, depending on the value of Euclidean costs, similar type of units were placed in a cluster. The proposed methodology has 2 individual algorithms. An agglomerative cluster algorithm is used while the load is increasing, and a divisive cluster algorithm is used when the load is decreasing. A search was conducted for an optimal solution for a minimal number of clusters and cluster data points. A standard ten-unit thermal unit power system was used to test and evaluate the performance of the method for a period of 24 hours. The new approach proved to be quite effective and satisfactory. 15 refs., 9 tabs., 5 figs.

  20. Bringing the mountain to Mohammed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hibbs, S.M.; Bell, H.H.; Bowman, F.M.; Hitchin, C.; Jackson, M.

    1987-01-01

    New free electron laser (FEL) technology at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) promises electron-cyclotron plasma heating at power levels, cost efficiency, and tunable frequency range far beyond the capabilities of existing technology. LLNL has the high-current induction linear accelerators needed to drive such an FEL. Thus, the first stage of the Microwave Tokamak Experiment (MTX), designed to test this new technology, was to bring the Alcator-C tokamak across the United States from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) to LLNL in California. The authors discuss why the tokamak was moved across the country and described the move

  1. Bringing Things Together

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gundelach, Peter

    2017-01-01

    as facts, i.e. establish a scientific authoritative truth. In a case study from Denmark, the paper shows how the first survey - a study of seamstresses - was carried out by bringing several cognitive and organizational elements together: a network of researchers, a method for sampling, the construction...

  2. Applied energy solutions to grain elevator units; Cogeracao em unidades armazenadoras de graos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teixeira, Carlos Alberto [Universidadfe Federal Rural de Pernambuco (UAST/UFRPE), Serra Talhada, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Agronomia], E-mail: carlos.teixeira@uast.ufrpe.br; Oliveira Filho, Delly; Lacerda Filho, Adilio Flauzino de; Martins, Jose Helvecio [Universidade Federal de Vicosa (UFV), MG (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Agricola

    2009-07-01

    Solutions of energy can be adopted, to help the demand side management. The distributed generation and the cogeneration are management at the supply side, that should be adopted in grain elevator units. Aiming to point energy solutions to grain elevator units to become more energetically independent from the utilities and oscillations of the market. This study was done in a grain elevator units from Sao Paulo State. They were considered: (I) the patterns of electric power consumption in this crop periods; (II) different types of cogeneration systems; and (III) connection costs. The main conclusions of this work were: cogeneration is possible and viable in grain elevator units; the price of sale of the surplus energy in the cogeneration system influences, directly, decision to implement a cogeneration system; the electric power generation with the own production of firewood was decisive in the profitability of the cogeneration project; the option of connection of the electric power net favors the implantation of a cogeneration system; and the possibility of rejection steam use for drying grains (author)

  3. Optimal Thermal Unit Commitment Solution integrating Renewable Energy with Generator Outage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sivasakthi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The increasing concern of global climate changes, the promotion of renewable energy sources, primarily wind generation, is a welcome move to reduce the pollutant emissions from conventional power plants. Integration of wind power generation with the existing power network is an emerging research field. This paper presents a meta-heuristic algorithm based approach to determine the feasible dispatch solution for wind integrated thermal power system. The Unit Commitment (UC process aims to identify the best feasible generation scheme of the committed units such that the overall generation cost is reduced, when subjected to a variety of constraints at each time interval. As the UC formulation involves many variables and system and operational constraints, identifying the best solution is still a research task. Nowadays, it is inevitable to include power system reliability issues in operation strategy. The generator failure and malfunction are the prime influencing factor for reliability issues hence they have considered in UC formulation of wind integrated thermal power system. The modern evolutionary algorithm known as Grey Wolf Optimization (GWO algorithm is applied to solve the intended UC problem. The potential of the GWO algorithm is validated by the standard test systems. Besides, the ramp rate limits are also incorporated in the UC formulation. The simulation results reveal that the GWO algorithm has the capability of obtaining economical resolutions with good solution quality.

  4. Homogeneous solutions of stationary Navier-Stokes equations with isolated singularities on the unit sphere. II. Classification of axisymmetric no-swirl solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Li, YanYan; Yan, Xukai

    2018-05-01

    We classify all (- 1)-homogeneous axisymmetric no-swirl solutions of incompressible stationary Navier-Stokes equations in three dimension which are smooth on the unit sphere minus the south and north poles, parameterizing them as a four dimensional surface with boundary in appropriate function spaces. Then we establish smoothness properties of the solution surface in the four parameters. The smoothness properties will be used in a subsequent paper where we study the existence of (- 1)-homogeneous axisymmetric solutions with non-zero swirl on S2 ∖ { S , N }, emanating from the four dimensional solution surface.

  5. Solution of relativistic quantum optics problems using clusters of graphical processing units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordon, D.F., E-mail: daviel.gordon@nrl.navy.mil; Hafizi, B.; Helle, M.H.

    2014-06-15

    Numerical solution of relativistic quantum optics problems requires high performance computing due to the rapid oscillations in a relativistic wavefunction. Clusters of graphical processing units are used to accelerate the computation of a time dependent relativistic wavefunction in an arbitrary external potential. The stationary states in a Coulomb potential and uniform magnetic field are determined analytically and numerically, so that they can used as initial conditions in fully time dependent calculations. Relativistic energy levels in extreme magnetic fields are recovered as a means of validation. The relativistic ionization rate is computed for an ion illuminated by a laser field near the usual barrier suppression threshold, and the ionizing wavefunction is displayed.

  6. Bringing science to business

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemetti, Paul

    2005-06-01

    Bringing science to business seems rather straight forward. Technology is constantly moving forward and new inventions are being brought into the market place. Science parks and technology parks have sprung out all around the globe competing against each other and trying to keep their own doors open by bringing in new business, thereby creating much needed income to keep their operations moving forward. However, only a small handful ofthese centers around the world can truly be considered successful. It is the relationship between the scientists, start-up business, local universities, local government, and invited bigger business that allows the parks to succeed. The individual scientist wishing to enter into business or just hoping to get his invention into the pool of potential ideas; which might end up in the hands of an entrepreneur or an established company, is not always that simple. Universal success principles must be embraced to ensure success. One must believe in oneself and to strive for excellence. One must be able to see the other persons viewpoint and adapt and change his behavior in order to succeed. One must learn to create trust as well as learn to trust. Furthermore, one must learn to focus on the why of the process and not on the how. A market must be identified and benefits of local area must be sold to potential investor or business partners. A local success has in part to do with local cooperation.

  7. Bringing "indigenous" ownership back

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragelund, Peter

    2012-01-01

    policies thrive again, this time disguised in terms such as ‘empowerment’, but just as politicised as in the 1970s. Zambia is at the heart of this development. In the light of liberalisation, booming commodity prices and the increasing importance of Chinese investors, this article seeks to further our...... understanding of how processes of exclusion interact with domestic politics in Zambia. It argues that the Citizens Economic Empowerment Commission, a new institution to bring ownership back to Zambians, builds on a long tradition of nationalist policies in Zambia, while its actual work is strictly related...... to the critique of the growing foreign dominance over the economy, and in particular of the upsurge in Chinese investments....

  8. 76 FR 72007 - ZionSolutions, LLC; Zion Nuclear Power Station, Units 1 and 2; Exemption From Certain Security...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-21

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [Docket Nos. 50-295 and 50-304; NRC-2011-0244] ZionSolutions, LLC; Zion Nuclear Power Station, Units 1 and 2; Exemption From Certain Security Requirements 1.0 Background Zion Nuclear Power Station (ZNPS or Zion), Unit 1, is a Westinghouse 3250 MWt Pressurized Water Reactor...

  9. Analytical solutions for evaluating the thermal performances of wet air cooling coils under both unit and non-unit Lewis Factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia Liang; Chan, M.Y.; Deng, S.M.; Xu, X.G.

    2010-01-01

    Analytical solutions for evaluating the thermal performances of both chilled water wet cooling coils and direct expansion (DX) wet cooling coils, respectively, under both unit and non-unit Lewis Factors are developed and reported in this paper. The analytical solution was validated by comparing its predictions with those from numerically solving the fundamental governing equations of heat and mass transfer taking place in a wet cooling coil. With the analytical solutions, the distributions of air temperature and humidity ratio along air flow direction in a wet cooling coil can be predicted, and the differences in the thermal performances of the cooling coils under both unit and non-unit Lewis Factors can be identified. The analytical solutions, on one hand, can be a low-cost replacement to numerically solving the fundamental heat and mass transfer governing equations, and on the other hand, is able to deal with evaluating thermal performance for wet air cooling coils operated under both unit and non-unit Lewis Factors.

  10. Bringing up Gender: Academic Abjection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Emily F.

    2014-01-01

    The principal questions raised in this article are: what does it mean to bring up the topic of gender in a space where it is not known, and how can this moment of bringing up gender--or not bringing it up--be conceptualised? The article departs from the thoughts and questions that were provoked by an interview conducted with a Gender Studies…

  11. Conflicts between sandhill cranes and farmers in the western United States: evolving issues and solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Jane E.

    2012-01-01

    The main conflicts between Sandhill Cranes (Grus canadensis) and farmers in western United States occur in the Rocky Mountain region during migration and wintering periods. Most crop damage by cranes occurs in mature wheat (Triticum aestivum) and barley (Hordeum vulgare), young shoots of alfalfa (Medicago sativa) and cereal grains, chilies (Capsicum annuum), and silage corn (Zea mays). Damage is related to proximity of crop fields to roost sites and timing of crane concentrations relative to crop maturity or vulnerability. The evolution of conflicts between farmers and cranes and current solutions are described for two areas of the Rocky Mountains used by staging, migrating, or wintering cranes: Grays Lake, Idaho, and the Middle Rio Grande Valley, New Mexico. In both areas, conflicts with growing crane populations were aggravated by losses of wetlands and cropland, proximity of crops to roosts and other wetland areas, changing crop types and practices, and increasing urbanization. At Grays Lake, fall-staging cranes damaged barley fields near an important breeding refuge as well as fields 15-50 km away. In the Middle Rio Grande Valley, migrating and wintering cranes damaged young alfalfa fields, chilies, and silage corn. Solutions in both areas have been addressed through cooperative efforts among federal and state agencies, that manage wetlands and croplands to increase food availability and carrying capacity on public lands, provide hazing programs for private landowners, and strategically target crane hunting to problem areas. Sustaining the success of these programs will be challenging. Areas important to Sandhill Cranes in the western United Sates experience continued loss of habitat and food resources due to urbanization, changes in agricultural crops and practices, and water-use conflicts, which threaten the abilities of both public and private landowners to manage wetlands and croplands for cranes. Conservation of habitats and water resources are important

  12. Homogeneous Solutions of Stationary Navier-Stokes Equations with Isolated Singularities on the Unit Sphere. I. One Singularity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Li, YanYan; Yan, Xukai

    2018-03-01

    We classify all (-1)-homogeneous axisymmetric no-swirl solutions of incompressible stationary Navier-Stokes equations in three dimension which are smooth on the unit sphere minus the south pole, parameterize them as a two dimensional surface with boundary, and analyze their pressure profiles near the north pole. Then we prove that there is a curve of (-1)-homogeneous axisymmetric solutions with nonzero swirl, having the same smoothness property, emanating from every point of the interior and one part of the boundary of the solution surface. Moreover we prove that there is no such curve of solutions for any point on the other part of the boundary. We also establish asymptotic expansions for every (-1)-homogeneous axisymmetric solutions in a neighborhood of the singular point on the unit sphere.

  13. Bring learning into action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annemieke van den Berg

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Context: This critical reflection is about the positive effects for educational and research settings of participation in a two-day programme entitled ‘Using participatory action research and appreciative inquiry to research healthcare practice’. Aims: To reflect on the journey of positive developments in research and education that started with participation in this programme. Using Caring Conversations (Dewar, 2011 as a reflective framework of questions, this article discusses the journey in order to encourage others to consider the approach of appreciative inquiry to bring to life the concept of co-creation in research and education. Conclusions and implications for practice: Participation in this programme has led to the implementation of a variety of actions in educational and research settings. Central to all these actions is an appreciative approach to co-creation as a counterpart to today’s prevailing problem-based viewpoint. A possible factor behind these developments was the power of vulnerability experienced during the programme, a shared process of transformational learning. Implications for practice: This critical reflection: Provides an invitation to shift from a problem-based focus to a positive revolution Provides an appreciative reflective story about the power of vulnerability as an inspiration for others to move out of their comfort zone and seek to discover their own exceptionality Supports a shift from a facilitator-led to a co-creation approach in doing research and teaching with older adults

  14. Bringing in new Practices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Erik Skov; Riis, Jens Ove; Waehrens, Brian Vejrum

    2010-01-01

    social practice in the receiving organizational unit. The paper builds on six case studies in three MNEs with well established capabilities for transferring operations activities. Case studies illustrate how different aspects of the learning arena may be used for supporting knowledge and competence...

  15. Bringing Gravity to Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norsk, P.; Shelhamer, M.

    2016-01-01

    This panel will present NASA's plans for ongoing and future research to define the requirements for Artificial Gravity (AG) as a countermeasure against the negative health effects of long-duration weightlessness. AG could mitigate the gravity-sensitive effects of spaceflight across a host of physiological systems. Bringing gravity to space could mitigate the sensorimotor and neuro-vestibular disturbances induced by G-transitions upon reaching a planetary body, and the cardiovascular deconditioning and musculoskeletal weakness induced by weightlessness. Of particular interest for AG during deep-space missions is mitigation of the Visual Impairment Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome that the majority of astronauts exhibit in space to varying degrees, and which presumably is associated with weightlessness-induced fluid shift from lower to upper body segments. AG could be very effective for reversing the fluid shift and thus help prevent VIIP. The first presentation by Dr. Charles will summarize some of the ground-based and (very little) space-based research that has been conducted on AG by the various space programs. Dr. Paloski will address the use of AG during deep-space exploration-class missions and describe the different AG scenarios such as intra-vehicular, part-of-vehicle, or whole-vehicle centrifugations. Dr. Clement will discuss currently planned NASA research as well as how to coordinate future activities among NASA's international partners. Dr. Barr will describe some possible future plans for using space- and ground-based partial-G analogs to define the relationship between physiological responses and G levels between 0 and 1. Finally, Dr. Stenger will summarize how the human cardiovascular system could benefit from intermittent short-radius centrifugations during long-duration missions.

  16. Bring back the Glory!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Q. Whitman

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper, drafted in response to Dr. Kiesow’s question, »Wozu Rechtsgeschichte?«, begins with a backward glance at the nineteenth century, when legal history played a leading role in the intellectual life of the western world. Since those great days, when legal history attracted figures like Karl Marx and Max Weber, the field has fallen on hard times. This is in large part the inevitable consequence of the declining prestige of law itself, which no longer seems to matter in the way that it did in the nineteenth century. Nevertheless, the paper pleads for something of a Return of Grand Theory in legal history. It is true that we can never bring back the glory years. But we can be figures of importance in the public debates of our time if we remain mindful of what it is that gives law itself its enduring social importance. Law reflects, in an unsystematic but telling way, some of the basic value commitments of society-commitments such as the contemporary American commitment to the free market, or the contemporary European commitment to »human dignity«. Law also reflects stylized histories of a given society’s past-histories like that of the American triumph over race slavery, or the European triumph over Nazism. These value commitments and stylized histories are the natural territory of legal historians, who can best claim a role for themselves in public debate if they think of themselves as historians of values, rather than as historians of social realities.

  17. Bringing physics to life

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    `I'm doing a physics that is pulling me towards it.' `I like the course being more up to date.' `You learn the physics but you also think ``well I actually see a point in knowing this physics''.' `This course presents physics in a more interesting way as it focuses on practical activity and applications of physics.' `The industrial visit gives students the opportunity to look for science in action.' These are just some of the comments from students and teachers piloting the new Salters Horners Advanced Physics course (SHAP). Contexts and applications drive the course, providing interest and motivation for students and alerting them to some of the many career areas that involve physics. For example, the operation of a CD player leads to a study of waves and superposition; archaeological surveying and analysis brings in d.c. circuitry and x-ray diffraction; consideration of safety in rail transport involves learning about mechanics and electromagnetism. The course is produced by a team directed from the University of York and funded by a consortium of industrial and charitable sponsors. It is examined by Edexcel and support materials are published by Heinemann. The pilot, involving some 50 centres, began in September 1998 with the new subject core and the AS qualification intermediate between GCSE and the full A-level standard. The course has been fully approved by QCA, and from September 2000 it will be open to all. For comprehensive information about SHAP, visit the project's website: www.york.ac.uk/org/seg/salters/physics . Pilot materials for students, teachers and technicians are available from Heinemann. They will be re-edited and published in full colour for September 2000. Members of the team will attend the annual ASE meeting in Leeds this month; there will be a talk and a hands-on workshop where student activities can be sampled. Materials will be on view at the University of York stand. In addition, Edexcel and the York team are running a series of

  18. Safety brings CERNois together

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2012-01-01

    The World Day for Health and Safety at Work, which was celebrated at CERN on 27 April, provided an opportunity for the safety professionals and members of the CERN personnel to get together to discuss joint concerns. It was a good opportunity for people to learn to distinguish between good and bad habits.   Members of the CERN Fire Brigade advise the Director-General. Two weeks ago, for the second year running, CERN’s restaurants hosted World Day for Health and Safety at Work stands. And once again, the stands attracted considerable interest. “Many people consulted our experts on safety issues relating in particular to ergonomics and electrical risks, the two themes to which we devoted particular attention this time,” explained Charles-Edouard Sala, a member of the BE Department’s Safety Unit and co-organiser of the event. The cardiac massage competition organised by members of CERN's Fire Brigade attracted a large number of competitors. No fe...

  19. 78 FR 29158 - In the Matter of Zion Solutions, LLC; Zion Nuclear Power Station, Units 1 and 2; Order Approving...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-17

    ... and DPR-48] In the Matter of Zion Solutions, LLC; Zion Nuclear Power Station, Units 1 and 2; Order... formed for the purpose of acquiring ES, Inc. and is held by certain investment fund entities organized by... Environmental Management Programs, in writing, of such receipt no later than one (1) business day prior to the...

  20. Noise Pollution: Do We Need a Solution? An Analysis of Noise in a Cardiac Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Kevin M; Gagnon, Matthew; Hanna, Tyler; Mello, Brad; Fofana, Mustapha; Ciottone, Gregory; Molloy, Michael

    2016-08-01

    49.24% of alarms. The CCU cares for ill patients requiring constant monitoring. Despite advances in technology, measured noise levels for the hospital studied exceeded WHO standards of 40 dB and peaks of 45 dB, even during night hours when patients require rest. Further work is required to reduce noise levels and examine effects on patient satisfaction, clinical outcomes, and length of stay. Ryan KM , Gagnon M , Hanna T , Mello B , Fofana M , Ciottone G , Molloy M . Noise pollution: do we need a solution? An analysis of noise in a cardiac care unit. Prehosp Disaster Med. 2016;31(4):432-435.

  1. Bringing the market inside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, Thomas W

    2004-04-01

    During the dot-com boom, many people saw the potential for new communication technologies to enable radically new business models, but they were far too optimistic about the speed with which the revolution would occur. Now, as the bitter disillusionment of the dot-com bust begins to fade, we have a chance to think again--this time more rationally--about how best to take advantage of the remarkable changes these new technologies are gradually making possible. One such change is the ability to create markets inside companies, allowing decision making to be decentralized and introducing some of the efficiency, flexibility, and motivating influence of free markets. In this article, the author examines this nascent form of business organization, exploring the benefits as well as the potential risks. BP, for example, met its goal of reducing the company's greenhouse gas emissions nine years ahead of schedule, not by setting and enforcing targets for each division but by allowing business unit heads to buy and sell emissions permits among themselves using an electronic trading system. And Hewlett-Packard recently experimented with a system that allowed employees to buy and sell predictions about likely printer sales, using a kind of futures contract. The markets ended up predicting the actual printer sales with much more accuracy than official HP forecasts. At a fundamental level, these changes are enabled by the fact that electronic technologies allow information to be widely shared at little cost. This simple fact has a profound implication for organizing businesses. When more people have more information, they can use it to make their own well-informed decisions, appropriate to local circumstances, instead of following orders from above. As a result, even very large companies can benefit from the collective wisdom of their employees.

  2. Mechanical properties of regular porous biomaterials made from truncated cube repeating unit cells: Analytical solutions and computational models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedayati, R; Sadighi, M; Mohammadi-Aghdam, M; Zadpoor, A A

    2016-03-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) has enabled fabrication of open-cell porous biomaterials based on repeating unit cells. The micro-architecture of the porous biomaterials and, thus, their physical properties could then be precisely controlled. Due to their many favorable properties, porous biomaterials manufactured using AM are considered as promising candidates for bone substitution as well as for several other applications in orthopedic surgery. The mechanical properties of such porous structures including static and fatigue properties are shown to be strongly dependent on the type of the repeating unit cell based on which the porous biomaterial is built. In this paper, we study the mechanical properties of porous biomaterials made from a relatively new unit cell, namely truncated cube. We present analytical solutions that relate the dimensions of the repeating unit cell to the elastic modulus, Poisson's ratio, yield stress, and buckling load of those porous structures. We also performed finite element modeling to predict the mechanical properties of the porous structures. The analytical solution and computational results were found to be in agreement with each other. The mechanical properties estimated using both the analytical and computational techniques were somewhat higher than the experimental data reported in one of our recent studies on selective laser melted Ti-6Al-4V porous biomaterials. In addition to porosity, the elastic modulus and Poisson's ratio of the porous structures were found to be strongly dependent on the ratio of the length of the inclined struts to that of the uninclined (i.e. vertical or horizontal) struts, α, in the truncated cube unit cell. The geometry of the truncated cube unit cell approaches the octahedral and cube unit cells when α respectively approaches zero and infinity. Consistent with those geometrical observations, the analytical solutions presented in this study approached those of the octahedral and cube unit cells when

  3. Stochastic Unit Commitment via Progressive Hedging - Extensive Analysis of Solution Methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ordoudis, Christos; Pinson, Pierre; Zugno, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Owing to the massive deployment of renewable power production units over the last couple of decades, the use of stochastic optimization methods to solve the unit commitment problem has gained increasing attention. Solving stochastic unit commitment problems in large-scale power systems requires h...

  4. A constraint programming solution for the military unit path finding problem

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Leenen, L

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this chapter the authors present an algorithm to solve the Dynamic Military Unit Path Finding Problem (DMUPFP) which is based on Stentz’s well-known D* algorithm to solve dynamic path finding problems. The Military Unit Path Finding Problem...

  5. Possible Intervals for T- and M-Orders of Solutions of Linear Differential Equations in the Unit Disc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Chuaqui

    2011-01-01

    f(k+ak-1(zf(k-1+⋯+a1(zf′+a0(zf=0 with polynomial coefficients. In the present paper, it is shown by an example that a unit disc counterpart of such finite set does not contain all possible T- and M-orders of solutions, with respect to Nevanlinna characteristic and maximum modulus, if the coefficients are analytic functions belonging either to weighted Bergman spaces or to weighted Hardy spaces. In contrast to a finite set, possible intervals for T- and M-orders are introduced to give detailed information about the growth of solutions. Finally, these findings yield sharp lower bounds for the sums of T- and M-orders of functions in the solution bases.

  6. Bring Your Own Device or Bring Your Own Distraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laxman, Kumar; Holt, Craig

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this exploratory case study was to investigate the utilisation of Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) technologies in the classroom to determine if students and teachers perceive that the use of a digital device increased a learner's access to learning opportunities within the classroom, and, if the use of digital devices increased their…

  7. Planet Patrol. An Environmental Unit on Solid Waste Solutions for Grades 4-6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procter and Gamble Educational Services, Cincinnati, OH.

    This classroom unit was developed for use in grades 4-6 to help teach the concept of solid waste management. The teacher's guide provides an overview of the issue of solid waste disposal, a description of government, industry, and consumer roles in resolving the solid waste issue, and four lessons involving sanitary landfills, the reduction of…

  8. An Efficient Robust Solution to the Two-Stage Stochastic Unit Commitment Problem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blanco, Ignacio; Morales González, Juan Miguel

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposes a reformulation of the scenario-based two-stage unitcommitment problem under uncertainty that allows finding unit-commitment plansthat perform reasonably well both in expectation and for the worst caserealization of the uncertainties. The proposed reformulation is based onpart...

  9. Balancing conflicting values: ecosystem solutions in the Pacific Northwest of the United States and Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard W. Haynes; Robert C. Szaro; Dennis P. Dykstra

    2005-01-01

    Ecosystem approaches to sustainable forest management in the Pacific Northwest of the United States and Canada have arisen in response to significant changes that have occurred in these societies over the past century or so (Interagency Ecosystem Management Task Force, 1995). One such change as been rapid population growth along the Pacific Coast, where the mild...

  10. Innovative solutions: sample financial management business plan: neurosurgical intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanueva-Baldonado, Analiza; Barrett-Sheridan, Shirley E

    2010-01-01

    This article describes one institution's intention to implement a financial management business plan for a neurosurgical intensive care unit in a level I trauma center. The financial objective of this proposed business plan includes a service increase in the patient population requiring critical care in a way that will help control costs.

  11. THE UNITED RESCUE SYSTEM IN BULGARIA. CURRENT RESOURCE RELATED ISSUES AND PROSPECTIVE SOLUTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Baleva

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The article presents some problems related to securing the Bulgarian system for disaster management with the necessary resources for its proper functioning. The main challenges for the united rescue system in the country are analyzed, including those related to ensuring the system with the necessary material, financial and human resources. Some possibilities for solving these problems with the use of funds from the European Union are presented.

  12. Fermentation of solutions of glucose-protein concentrate in a cascade-multi-ray unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denshchikov, M T; Shashilova, V P

    1964-01-01

    Glucose-protein concentrate is a material obtained by the hydrolysis of corn, containing glucose 75 to 80, maltose, isomaltose, and other non-fermentable sugars 1.5 to 2, H/sub 2/O 15 to 17, mineral matter 1.9 to 1%, and N-containing materials 3.2 to 3.4 g/kg. In earlier fermentation trails with this material, after addition of H/sub 2/O, only 10 to 12% ethanol concentrations were obtained. With period addition of citric acid and replacement of the yeast at regular intervals, using a cascade-multitray unit, 12 to 13% concentrations of ethanol were obtained.

  13. SOFTWARE SOLUTIONS FOR MEASURING AND FORECASTING THE CASH GENERATING UNIT FLOWS RELATED TO INTANGIBLE ASSETS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica R GROSU

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In light of the difficulties encountered in assessing the value of the CGU (Cash Generating Unit and of the cash flows associated with goodwill or other intangible assets of a company and after performing the impairment test as provided by the IAS 36-Intangibile Asset and the forecasts related to it, the aim of this paper is to identify and suggest software instruments that would assist in the measurement and forecasting of these elements. The employment of the SPSS and the NeuroShell programmes in analyzing and forecasting the changes in CGU and CGU flows has helped compare the results and the ensuing error margins, thus giving the business entity the possibility to select the best software option, depending on certain variables identified on a micro or a macroeconomic level that may affect the depreciation or the increases in value of the underlying assets for CGU or CGU flows.

  14. Expanding Continuous Quality Improvement Capacity in the Medical Intensive Care Unit: Prehealth Volunteers as a Solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priest, Kelsey C; Lobingier, Hannah; McCully, Nancy; Lombard, Jackie; Hansen, Mark; Uchiyama, Makoto; Hagg, Daniel S

    2016-01-01

    Health care delivery systems are challenged to support the increasing demands for improving patient safety, satisfaction, and outcomes. Limited resources and staffing are common barriers for making significant and sustained improvements. At Oregon Health & Science University, the medical intensive care unit (MICU) leadership team faced internal capacity limitations for conducting continuous quality improvement, specifically for the implementation and evaluation of the mobility portion of an evidence-based care bundle. The MICU team successfully addressed this capacity challenge using the person power of prehealth volunteers. In the first year of the project, 52 trained volunteers executed an evidence-based mobility intervention for 305 critically ill patients, conducting more than 200 000 exercise repetitions. The volunteers contributed to real-time evaluation of the project, with the collection of approximately 26 950 process measure data points. Prehealth volunteers are an untapped resource for effectively expanding internal continuous quality improvement capacity in the MICU and beyond.

  15. UHF-RFID solutions for logistics units management in the food supply chain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Barge

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The availability of systems for automatic and simultaneous identification of several items belonging to a logistics unit during production, warehousing and delivering can improve supply chain management and speed traceability controls. Radio frequency identification (RFID is a powerful technique that potentially permits to reach this goal, but some aspects as, for instance, food product composition (e.g. moisture content, salt or sugar content and some peculiarities of the production environment (high moisture, high/low temperatures, metallic structures have prevented, so far, its application in food sector. In the food industry, composition and shape of items are much less regular than in other commodities sectors. In addition, a wide variety of packaging, composed by different materials, is employed. As material, size and shape of items to which the tag should be attached strongly influence the minimum power requested for tag functioning, performance improvements can be achieved only selecting suitable RF identifier for the specific combination of food product and packaging. When dealing with logistics units, the dynamic reading of a vast number of tags originates simultaneous broadcasting of signals (tag-to-tag collisions that could affect reading rates and the overall reliability of the identification procedure. This paper reports the results of an extensive analysis of the reading performance of UHF RFID systems for multiple dynamic electronic identification of food packed products in controlled conditions. Products were considered singularly or arranged on a logistics pallet. The effects on reading rate and reading zone of different factors, among which the type of product, the number and position of antennas, the field polarization, the reader RF power output, the interrogation protocol configuration as well as the transit speed, the number of tags and their interactions were analysed and compared.

  16. Youth tobacco use in the United States--problem, progress, goals, and potential solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glynn, T J; Greenwald, P; Mills, S M; Manley, M W

    1993-07-01

    Efforts to control tobacco use and tobacco-related morbidity and mortality in the United States continue to be generally successful. In the quarter century since the publication of the first Surgeon General's Report on Tobacco and Health, adult smoking rates in the United States have been reduced by nearly 34%. Controlling tobacco use among our nation's youth, however, has not been as successful. Although there was considerable success in reducing adolescent tobacco use in the late 1970s and early 1980s, tobacco use among youth has remained essentially stable for the past decade. The health and economic burden of tobacco use, current knowledge about youth tobacco use, and youth-related national tobacco reduction goals for the Year 2000 are reviewed. Analysis of the research of the past two decades clearly indicates that there is no "magic bullet" in existence or in sight for the reduction of tobacco use, either among youth or among adults. This does not mean that opportunities for significant advances through, for example, pharmacological therapies or the broad application of media or policy strategies should not continue to be explored, but that for the moment no single approach appears to work best. Rather, a comprehensive approach that applies multiple prevention and cessation strategies simultaneously appears to be most effective in tobacco use control. Among youth, the combination of tobacco control strategies that may work best includes those that involve the family, primary care physicians, and other health professionals such as nurses and dentists; programs that are carried out in schools and/or through the media; and societal approaches such as access and advertising restrictions and increased taxes.

  17. Bringing Secrecy into the Open

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Costas, Jana; Grey, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    This paper brings into focus the concept of organizational secrecy, defined as the ongoing formal and informal social processes of intentional concealment of information from actors by actors in organizations. It is argued that existing literature on the topic is fragmented and predominantly...... focused on informational rather than social aspects of secrecy. The paper distinguishes between formal and informal secrecy and theorizes the social processes of these in terms of identity and control. It is proposed that organizational secrecy be added to the analytical repertoire of organization studies....

  18. Bringing nursing to the public.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazis, Cornelia; Schwendimann, René

    2009-11-01

    For the past 5 years, an unusual program has been evolving in the University of Basel's Institute of Nursing Science master's program in Basel, Switzerland. A special course designed to help nurses master public communication skills requires students to play the roles of journalist, exhibition curator, conference organizer, radio reporter, and news producer. Two faculty members, an experienced radio and newspaper journalist and a nurse scientist, teach and support the students. By developing their competence in media relations, participants prepare themselves to tackle the course's long-term goal of bringing the nursing profession into the public eye. Copyright 2009, SLACK Incorporated.

  19. Bringing Foreign Language Learning into the 21st century | Thomas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bringing Foreign Language Learning into the 21st Century. The different challenges facing foreign language lecturers are considered as well as the different methods used to teach a foreign language. Technology and multimedia are proposed not only as tools and supports but also as a possible solution. With the change ...

  20. BYOD: Bring your own disaster

    CERN Multimedia

    Computer Security Team

    2013-01-01

    Have you ever heard of “BYOD”? No, it is not a pop band. Try again. It is short for “Bring Your Own Device” (the French use “AVEC” -  “Apporter Votre Equipement personnel de Communication”) and describes an option long since offered at CERN: the possibility to bring along your personal laptop, smartphone or PDA, use it on CERN premises and connect it to the CERN office network. But hold on. As practical as it is, there is also a dark side.   The primary advantage, of course, is having a digital work environment tuned to your needs and preferences. It allows you to continue working at home. Similarly, you always have your music, address books and bookmarks with you. However, as valuable as this is, it is also a responsibility. Laptop theft is happening - outside CERN but also on site. In France, 30% of stolen laptops were stolen out of cars or homes, and 10% during travel. At CERN, on average one ...

  1. 75 FR 9455 - U.S. Biomedical Corp., (f/k/a United Textiles & Toys, Inc.), U.S. Environmental Solutions, Inc...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-02

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [File No. 500-1] U.S. Biomedical Corp., (f/k/a United Textiles & Toys, Inc.), U.S. Environmental Solutions, Inc. (n/k/a EnviroResolutions, Inc.), USA Bridge....S. Biomedical Corp. (f/k/a United Textiles & Toys, Inc.) because it has not filed any periodic...

  2. Science and Sport bringing people together

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2018-01-01

    ASCERI is the Association of the Sports Communities of the European Research Institutes and aims to contribute to a united Europe through regular sports meetings, bringing together members of public Research Institutes at European level. The Association's members come from over 42 Research Institutes spanning 15 countries. The association was born from the German "Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe" (KfK) football team who had the idea to play against other teams from institutes also involved in nuclear research. Therefore, six teams from different German centres were invited to take part in a "Reaktoren Fußballturnier" in Karlsruhe on 2 July 1966. Ever since, The Winter-ATOMIADE has taken place every three years and alternating with the Summer-ATOMIADE and a Mini Atomiade in between with numerous sports and leisure activities including football, skiing, golf, athletics, tennis, volleyball to name a few. CERN has been a regular participant ...

  3. Bringing climate change into natural resource management: proceedings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    L. Joyce; R. Haynes; R. White; R.J. Barbour

    2007-01-01

    These are the proceedings of the 2005 workshop titled implications of bringing climate into natural resource management in the Western United States. This workshop was an attempt to further the dialogue among scientists, land managers, landowners, interested stakeholders and the public about how individuals are addressing climate change in natural resource management....

  4. Bringing Interactivity to the Web: The JAVA Solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knee, Richard H.; Cafolla, Ralph

    Java is an object-oriented programming language of the Internet. It's popularity lies in its ability to create interactive Web sites across platforms. The most common Java programs are applications and applets, which adhere to a set of conventions that lets them run within a Java-compatible browser. Java is becoming an essential subject matter and…

  5. Bringing innovative solutions in food security to large populations in ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Corey Piccioni

    will increase demand and improve the incomes of more than 1 million West African farmers. ... turists will have access to micro-credit, technology, and training. ... gardening, and nutrition education—has helped to diversify diets and improve.

  6. Bringing solutions to big challenges. Energy - climate - technology (ECT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    The conference contains 45 presentations within the sections integrated policy and strategic perspectives on energy, climate change and technology, energy efficiency with prospects and measures, climate change and challenges for offshore energy and technology, possibilities for technology utilization, nuclear technology developments including some papers on thorium utilization, ethics of energy resource use and climate change, challenges and possibilities for the Western Norway and sustainability and security in an ECT-context. Some economic aspects are discussed as well. 16 of the 45 papers have been indexed for the database (tk)

  7. Using information campaigns to bring proven solutions to more ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Despite the well-documented advantages of improved legume technologies, adoption is slow. Constraints include the lack of information reaching farmers, along with the availability and affordability of high-quality seeds, fertilizers, and Rhizobium inoculants. This project aims to resolve these limitations to make the ...

  8. Bringing science to the policy table

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    “They shall beat their swords into plowshares, and their spears into pruning hooks. Nation shall not lift up sword against nation. Neither shall they learn war anymore." So says Isaiah 2:4, as transcribed on the famous wall in Ralph Bunche park, just the other side of 1st Avenue from the UN’s New York headquarters, where we held a celebration of our 60th anniversary year on Monday 20 October. I used the quotation in my opening address, since it is such a perfect fit to the theme of 60 years of science for peace and development.   The event was organised with the United Nations Economic and Social Council, ECOSOC, in the framework of CERN’s observer status at the UN, and although focused on CERN, its aim was broader. Presentations used CERN as an example to bring out the vital importance of science in general to the themes of peace and development. The event was presided over by Martin Sajdik, President of ECOSOC, and we were privileged to have presentat...

  9. Bring Your Own Device and Nurse Managers' Decision Making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Karen; Borycki, Elizabeth; Courtney, Karen L

    2017-02-01

    The Bring Your Own Device phenomenon is important in the healthcare environment because this trend is changing the workplace in healthcare organizations, such as British Columbia. At present, there is little research that exists in Canada to provide a distinct understanding of the complexities and difficulties unique to this phenomenon within the nursing practice. This study focused on the experiences and perceptions of nurse managers regarding how they make decisions on the use of personal handheld devices in the workplace. Telephone interviews (N = 10) and qualitative descriptive analysis were used. Four major themes emerged: (1) management perspective, (2) opportunities, (3) disadvantages, and (4) solutions. Nurse managers and other executives in healthcare organizations and health information technology departments need to be aware of the practice and organizational implications of the Bring Your Own Device movement.

  10. Exercise Brings Bone Benefits that Last

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Subscribe May 2014 Print this issue Health Capsule Exercise Brings Bone Benefits that Last En español Send ... lose bone. Studies of animals have shown that exercise during periods of rapid growth can lead to ...

  11. Pollution: Problems and Solutions. Grade Nine, Unit One, 9.1 Comprehensive Social Studies Curriculum for the Inner City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamison, Sandra; Campbell, Bruce

    The ninth grade unit of the FICSS series (Focus on Inner City Social Studies -- see SO 008 271) studies the economic and political realities of the inner city. This document, the first unit of the 9th grade section, deals with the ecological crises involving pollution and its causes. Specific problems include air pollution, pesticides, herbicides,…

  12. Controls on accumulation and soil solution partitioning of heavy metals across upland sites in United Kingdom (UK).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zia, Afia; van den Berg, Leon; Ahmad, Muhammad Nauman; Riaz, Muhammad; Zia, Dania; Ashmore, Mike

    2018-05-31

    A significant body of knowledge suggests that soil solution pH and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) strongly influence metal concentrations and speciation in porewater, however, these effects vary between different metals. This study investigated the factors influencing soil and soil solution concentrations of copper (Cu), lead (Pb), nickel (Ni) and zinc (Zn) under field conditions in upland soils from UK having a wide range of pH, DOC and organic matter contents. The study primarily focussed on predicting soil and soil solution metal concentrations from the data on total soil metal concentrations (HNO 3 extracts) and soil and soil solution properties (pH, DOC and organic matter content). We tested the multiple regression models proposed by Tipping et al. (2003) to predict heavy metal concentrations in soil solutions and the results indicated a better fit (higher R 2 values) in both studies for Pb compared to the Zn and Cu concentrations. Both studies observed consistent negative relationships of metals with pH and loss on ignition (LOI) suggesting an increase in soil solution metal concentrations with increasing acidity. The positive relationship between Pb concentrations in porewater and HNO 3 extracts was similar for both studies, however, similar relationships were not found for the Zn and Cu concentrations because of the negative coefficients for these metals in our study. The results of this study conclude that the predictive equations of Tipping et al. (2003) may not be applicable to the field sites where the range of DOC and metal concentrations is much lower than their study. Our study also suggests that the extent to which metals are partitioned into soil solution is lower in soils with a higher organic matter contents due to binding of these metals to soil organic matter. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Exploring a United States Maize Cellulose Biofuel Scenario Using an Integrated Energy and Agricultural Markets Solution Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biofuel feedstock production in the United States (US) is an emergent environmental nutrient management issue, whose exploration can benefit from a multi-scale and multimedia systems modeling approach that explicitly addresses diverging stakeholder interests. In the present anal...

  14. Smart Technology Brings Power to the People

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammerstrom, Donald J.; Gephart, Julie M.

    2006-12-01

    Imagine you’re at home one Saturday morning on the computer, as your son takes a shower, your daughter is watching TV, and a load of laundry is in your washer and dryer. Meanwhile, the fragrance of fresh-brewed coffee fills the house. You hear a momentary beep from the dryer that tells you that if you were to look, a high-energy price indicator would be displayed on the front panels of some of your favorite appliances. This tells you that you could save money right now by using less energy. (You’ve agreed to this arrangement to help your utility avoid a substation upgrade. In return, you get a lower rate most of the time.) So you turn off some of the unneeded lights in your home and opt to wait until evening to run the dishwasher. Meanwhile, some of your largest appliances have automatically responded to this signal and have already reduced your home’s energy consumption, saving you money. On January 11, 2006, demonstration projects were launched in 200 homes in the Pacific Northwest region of the United States to test and speed adoption of new smart grid technologies that can make the power grid more resilient and efficient. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, a U.S. Department of Energy national laboratory in Richland, Washington, is managing the yearlong study called the Pacific Northwest GridWise™ Testbed Demonstration, a project funded primarily by DOE. Through the GridWise™ Demonstration projects, researchers are gaining insight into energy consumers’ behavior while testing new technologies designed to bring the electric transmission system into the information age. Northwest utilities, appliance manufacturers and technology companies are also supporting this effort to demonstrate the devices and assess the resulting consumer response. A combination of devices, software and advanced analytical tools will give homeowners more information about their energy use and cost, and we want to know if this will modify their behavior. Approximately 100

  15. Marriage, Abortion, or Unwed Motherhood? How Women Evaluate Alternative Solutions to Premarital Pregnancies in Japan and the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertog, Ekaterina; Iwasawa, Miho

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the authors argue that to understand the very low incidence of outside-of-marriage childbearing in contemporary Japan one needs to take into account perceptions of all possible solutions to a premarital pregnancy: marriage, abortion, and childbearing outside wedlock. To demonstrate the particular impact of these perceptions in…

  16. Bringing Science to Life for Students, Teachers and the Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, K.

    2012-04-01

    Bringing Science to Life for Students, Teachers and the Community Prior to 2008, 5th grade students at two schools of the New Haven Unified School District consistently scored in the bottom 20% of the California State Standards Test for science. Teachers in the upper grades reported not spending enough time teaching science, which is attributed to lack of time, resources or knowledge of science. A proposal was written to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Bay Watershed Education Grant program and funding was received for Bringing Science to Life for Students, Teachers and the Community to address these concerns and instill a sense of stewardship in our students. This program engages and energizes students in learning science and the protection of the SF Bay Watershed, provides staff development for teachers, and educates the community about conservation of our local watershed. The project includes a preparation phase, outdoor phase, an analysis and reporting phase, and teacher training and consists of two complete units: 1) The San Francisco Bay Watershed Unit and 2) the Marine Environment Unit. At the end of year 5, our teachers were teaching more science, the community was engaged in conservation of the San Francisco Bay Watershed and most importantly, student scores increased on the California Science Test at one site by over 121% and another site by 152%.

  17. Bring Your Own Technology (BYOT to Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph M. Woodside

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In an effort to reduce costs and increase worker satisfaction, many businesses have implemented a concept known as Bring Your Own Device (BYOD or Bring Your Own Technology (BYOT. Similarly, many school districts are beginning to implement BYOT policies and programs to improve educational learning opportunities for students who have a wide variety of technology devices. BYOT allow districts with limited budgets enable usage of technology while improving student engagement. This paper explores the technology devices, and educational implications of policies, device management, security and included components.

  18. Researched solutions for long-term accommodation units for drug-resistant tuberculosis patients in South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Parsons, S

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available H and provincial recipients for the planning, design and construction of the units as well as to manage project implementation. The project has provided a unique opportunity to review current policy, to develop guidelines for long-term accommodation of patients...

  19. Engineering solutions to the long-term stabilization and isolation of uranium mill tailings in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanders, D.R.; Lommler, J.C.

    1995-01-01

    Engineering solutions to the safe and environmentally protective disposal and isolation of uranium mill tailings in the US include many factors. Cover design, materials selection, civil engineering, erosive forces, and cost effectiveness are only a few of those factors described in this paper. The systems approach to the engineering solutions employed in the US is described, with emphasis on the standards prescribed for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project. Stabilization and isolation of the tailings from humans and the environment are the primary goals of the US uranium mill tailings control standards. The performance of cover designs with respect to water infiltration, radon exhalation, geotechnical stability, erosion protection, human and animal intrusion prevention, and longevity are addressed. The need for and frequency of surveillance efforts to ensure continued disposal system performance are also assessed

  20. The PAANEEAC programme: bringing EIA professionals together

    OpenAIRE

    Nooteboom, Sibout; Boven, G.; Post, Reinoud

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ National EIA systems include many actors: EIA agencies, project proponents, sectoral authorities, environmental and social NGOs, consultants, academics, lawyers, politicians and even journalists. Their views and actions largely determine whether EIA systems are successfully strengthened. The PAANEEAC programme assisted national associations of EIA professionals in Central Africa to bring all these actors together, to become platforms for exchange, and to undertake...

  1. Bringing History Alive in the Classroom!

    Science.gov (United States)

    McRae, Lee, Ed.

    1996-01-01

    This document consists of the first four issues of a serial publication, "Bringing History Alive in the Classroom!" The volumes focus on: (1) "A Sampling of Renaissance Instruments," which includes: information on Christopher Columbus, Leondardo da Vinci, and William Shakespeare, a timeline from the middle ages through the renaissance, Queen…

  2. DNA Barcoding Investigations Bring Biology to Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musante, Susan

    2010-01-01

    This article describes how DNA barcoding investigations bring biology to life. Biologists recognize the power of DNA barcoding not just to teach biology through connections to the real world but also to immerse students in the exciting process of science. As an investigator in the Program for the Human Environment at Rockefeller University in New…

  3. Synthesis, Properties, Calculations and Applications of Small Molecular Host Materials Containing Oxadiazole Units with Different Nitrogen and Oxygen Atom Orientations for Solution-Processable Blue Phosphorescent OLEDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Hua; Wu, Hongyu; Chen, Liangyuan; Ma, Songhua; Zhou, Kaifeng; Yan, Guobing; Shen, Jiazhong; Chen, Dongcheng; Su, Shi-Jian

    2018-03-01

    A series of new small molecules based on symmetric electron-acceptor of 1,3,4-oxadiazole moiety or its asymmetric isomer of 1,2,4-oxadiazole unit were successfully synthesized and applied to solution-processable blue phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes for the first time, and their thermal, photophysical, electrochemical properties and density functional theory calculations were studied thoroughly. Due to the high triplet energy levels ( E T, 2.82-2.85 eV), the energy from phosphorescent emitter of iridium(III) bis[(4,6-difluorophenyl)-pyridinate- N,C2']picolinate (FIrpic) transfer to the host molecules could be effectively suppressed and thus assuring the emission of devices was all from FIrpic. In comparison with the para-mode conjugation in substitution of five-membered 1,3,4-oxadiazole in 134OXD, the meta-linkages of 1,2,4-isomer appending with two phenyl rings cause the worse conjugation degree and the electron delocalization as well as the lower electron-withdrawing ability for the other 1,2,4-oxadiazole-based materials. Noting that the solution-processed device based on 134OXD containing 1,3,4-oxadiazole units without extra vacuum thermal-deposited hole/exciton-blocking layer and electron-transporting layer showed the highest maximum current efficiency (CEmax) of 8.75 cd/A due to the excellent charge transporting ability of 134OXD, which far surpassed the similar devices based on other host materials containing 1,2,4-oxadiazole units. Moreover, the device based on 134OXD presented small efficiency roll-off with current efficiency (CE) of 6.26 cd/A at high brightness up to 100 cd/m2. This work demonstrates different nitrogen and oxygen atom orientations of the oxadiazole-based host materials produce major impact on the optoelectronic characteristics of the solution-processable devices.

  4. Solution-processable red-emission organic materials containing triphenylamine and benzothiodiazole units: synthesis and applications in organic light-emitting diodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yi; Zhou, Yi; He, Qingguo; He, Chang; Yang, Chunhe; Bai, Fenglian; Li, Yongfang

    2009-06-04

    Three solution-processable red-emissive organic materials with a hole-transporting unit triphenylamine (TPA) as the core part and a D-pi-A bipolar structure as the branch part, TPA-BT (single-branched molecule), b-TPA-BT (bibranched molecule), and t-TPA-BT (tribranched molecule), were synthesized by the Heck coupling reaction. Herein, for the D-pi-A push-pull structure, we use TPA as the electron donor, benzothiodiazole (BT) as the electron acceptor, and the vinylene bond as the pi-bridge connecting the TPA and BT units. The compounds exhibit good solubility in common organic solvents, benefited from the three-dimensional spatial configuration of TPA units and the branch structure of the molecules. TPA-BT, b-TPA-BT, and t-TPA-BT show excellent photoluminescent properties with maximum emission peaks at ca. 630 nm. High-performance red-emission organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) were fabricated with the active layer spin coated from a solution of these compounds. The OLED based on TPA-BT displayed a low turn-on voltage of 2.0 V, a maximum luminance of 12192 cd/m2, and a maximum current efficiency of 1.66 cd/A, which is among the highest values for the solution-processed red-emission OLEDs. In addition, high-performance white-light-emitting diodes (WLEDs) with maximum luminance around 4400 cd/m2 and maximum current efficiencies above 4.5 cd/A were realized by separately doping the three TPA-BT-containing molecules as red emitter and poly(6,6'-bi-(9,9'-dihexylfluorene)- co-(9,9'-dihexylfluorene-3-thiophene-5'-yl)) as green emitter into blue poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene-2,7-diyl) host material with suitable weight ratios.

  5. 车载系统MirrorLink方案的研究%Research of head-unit MirrorLink solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张元文; 陈玮

    2013-01-01

    介绍了车载系统的MirrorLink方案,分析了它的协议架构,对其两个主要内容——VNC架构和音视频传输架构做了介绍.分析了VNC架构中的核心RFB协议的过程和实现,RFB协议是负责MirrorLink系统中的界面传输和控制信号的传递,对它的编码要求进行分析,提出了更加优化的编码方式;在音视频架构中,提出了一种改进的可应用于车载MirrorLink中的UPnp视音频传输方案.%This paper presents the ear' s MirrorLink solution,analyses the protocol architecture. It simply introduced the two main content-VNC architecture and audio & video transmission architecture. In VNC architecture introduced the core protocol-RFB protocol implementation, it used to transfer the HMI screen and the control signals, analyzed coding requirements and proposed more optimized coding methods. In audio & video transmission architecture it proposed an improved UPnp video and audio transmission scheme ,it can be applied to the vehicle MirrorLink solution.

  6. Extent and effects of recurrent shortages of purified-protein derivative tuberculin skin test antigen solutions - United States, 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-13

    Two purified-protein derivative (PPD) tuberculin skin test (TST) antigen solutions are approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA): Tubersol (Sanofi Pasteur Limited) and Aplisol (JHP Pharmaceuticals, LLC). Tubersol was out of production in late 2012 through April 2013. Shortages of Aplisol have resulted from increased demand as practitioners have sought a substitute for Tubersol. Tubersol production resumed in May 2013, and supplies had been nearly restored by early June. However, in mid-July, state tuberculosis (TB) control officials notified CDC of difficulty obtaining Tubersol and Aplisol. Sanofi Pasteur notified FDA of a temporary delay in the availability of tuberculin in the 10-dose and 50-dose presentations. In mid-October, the 10-dose presentation was being returned to market, on allocation, which means that historical purchasing practices determine the amount that customers are allotted. In late October, the 50-dose presentation was being returned to market, also on allocation, one vial per historical customer per month. Supplies are forecast to approach normal during January 2014, after distributors have restored their supply chains. A compensatory surge in testing after deferment of testing during the periods of shortage might cause further temporary instability of supplies. In mid-August 2013, officials in 29 of 52 U.S. jurisdictions noted a shortage of at least one PPD TST antigen solution in health departments to the extent that it interrupted activities. This report includes a summary of the extent and effects of the shortages and a reiteration of advice on how to adapt to them.

  7. Bringing optics to Fab Labs in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Aurèle; Zuidwijk, Thim; Urbach, Paul

    2017-08-01

    The Optics Group of Delft University of Technology plays a major role in teaching optics to bachelor and master students. In addition, the group has a long record of introducing, demonstrating and teaching optics to quite diverse groups of people from outside of the university. We will describe some of these activities and focus on a recently started project funded by the European Commission called Phablabs 4.0, which aims to bring photonics to European Fab labs.

  8. Editorial: Biotechnology Journal brings more than biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungbauer, Alois; Lee, Sang Yup

    2015-09-01

    Biotechnology Journal always brings the state-of-the-art biotechnologies to our readers. Different from other topical issues, this issue of Biotechnology Journal is complied with a series of exiting reviews and research articles from spontaneous submissions, again, addressing society's actual problems and needs. The progress is a real testimony how biotechnology contributes to achievements in healthcare, better utilization of resources, and a bio-based economy. Copyright © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Decision making on the Breeder reactor in Britain and the United States: problems and solutions in the plutonium economy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rydell, R.J.

    1980-01-01

    One objective of this study is to develop a framework of analysis that is useful for investigating the conditions shaping the respective roles of science and politics in decision making on technology policy. The analytical framework used focuses upon the interactive R and D process and specifies the factors affecting change in and of that process. The distinguishing feature of this new analytical framework is its utility for investigating how participants in and R and D process go about defining and solving a growing variety of problems that they encounter as the costs, impacts, and stakes of technological change become more readily apparent. The framework is then applied to a particularly complex and politically controversial technology, the nuclear breeder reactor. Britain and the United States, the original pioneers of technology utilizing plutonium to produce electricity, were singled out in order to test the utility of the analytical framework for the comparative study of the R and D decision-making process. Although the study does not purport to have exhausted all possible interpretations of this complex subject, the results of the study suggest that the interactive R and D process represents an improvement over conventional modes of conceptualizing how R and D policies are formulated and changed. Efforts to resolve major national and international problems relating to science and technology will ultimately succeed only to the extent that these efforts are grounded in a deeper understanding of the conditions affecting how these problems are defined and approached in actual decision-making environments

  10. Bringing the environment down to earth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhardt, F L

    1999-01-01

    The debate on business and the environment has typically been framed in simple yes-or-no terms: "Does it pay to be green?" But the environment, like other business issues, requires a more complex approach--one that demands more than such all-or-nothing thinking. Managers need to ask instead, "Under what circumstances do particular kinds of environmental investments deliver returns to shareholders?" This article presents five approaches that managers can take to identify those circumstances and integrate the environment into their business thinking. These approaches will enable companies with the right industry structure, competitive position, and managerial skills to reconcile their responsibility to shareholders with the pressure to be faithful stewards of the earth's resources. Some companies can distance themselves from competitors by differentiating their products and commanding higher prices for them. Others may be able to "manage" their competitors by imposing a set of private regulations or by helping to shape the rules written by government officials. Still others may be able to cut costs and help the environment simultaneously. Almost all can learn to improve their management of risk and thus reduce the outlays associated with accidents, lawsuits, and boycotts. And some companies may even be able to make systemic changes that will redefine competition in their markets. All five approaches can help managers bring the environment down to earth. And that means bringing the environment back into the fold of business problems and determining when it really pays to be green.

  11. Alteração do teor de cálcio no banho de DP para 2,5 mEq/L é eficaz no reestabelecimento dos valores preconizados por diretrizes atuais em pacientes com PTH < 150 pg/dL Low-calcium peritoneal dialysis solution is effective in bringing PTH levels to the range recommended by current guidelines in patients with PTH levels < 150 pg/dL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thyago Proença de Moraes

    2010-09-01

    followed by nephrosclerosis (25% and glomerulonephritis (14%. Converted group presented a greater increase in PTH levels when compared with the control group (Δ194 pg/dL versus Δ 92/dL; p < 0,05. Among patients switched to low calcium solution, 41% reached the target values (PTH 150300 pg/mL compared to 14% whose remain with normal calcium solutions (p < 0.05. There were no differences between groups regarding calcium, phosphorus and alkaline phosphatase. CONCLUSION: In patients with PTH < 150 pg/mL conversion to low calcium solutions (2.5 mEq/L appears to be a simple and effective strategy to bring PTH levels to the range determined by current guidelines when compared with 3.5mEq/L calcium PD solutions.

  12. Bringing Exoplanet Habitability Investigations to High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woody, Mary Anne; Sohl, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Habitability, a.k.a. habitat suitability, is a topic typically discussed in Biology class. We present here a curriculum unit that introduces the topic of global-scale planetary habitability in a Physics classroom, allowing students to emulate the process of doing cutting-edge science and re-framing an otherwise "typical" physics unit in a more engaging and interactive way.

  13. The Power of Questions to Bring Balance to the Curriculum in the Age of New Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Prado, Pixita; McMillen, Susan E.; Friedland, Ellen S.

    2017-01-01

    The Common Core State Standards (CCSS); the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS); and the College, Career, and Civic Life (C3) Framework for Social State Standards are bringing many changes to schools and classrooms across the United States. This article suggests using the power of questions to make connections across seemingly disparate…

  14. Bringing Pulsed Laser Welding into Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Flemmming Ove

    1996-01-01

    In this paper, some research and develop-ment activities within pulsed laser welding technology at the Tech-nical University of Denmark will be described. The laser group at the Insti-tute for Manufacturing Technology has nearly 20 years of experience in laser materials process-ing. Inter......-nationally the group is mostly known for its contri-butions to the development of the laser cutting process, but further it has been active within laser welding, both in assisting industry in bringing laser welding into production in several cases and in performing fundamental R & D. In this paper some research...... activities concerning the weldability of high alloyed austenitic stainless steels for mass production industry applying industrial lasers for fine welding will be described. Studies on hot cracking sensitivity of high alloyed austenitic stainless steel applying both ND-YAG-lasers and CO2-lasers has been...

  15. Developing a web page: bringing clinics online.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Ronnie; Berns, Susan

    2004-01-01

    Introducing clinical staff education, along with new policies and procedures, to over 50 different clinical sites can be a challenge. As any staff educator will confess, getting people to attend an educational inservice session can be difficult. Clinical staff request training, but no one has time to attend training sessions. Putting the training along with the policies and other information into "neat" concise packages via the computer and over the company's intranet was the way to go. However, how do you bring the clinics online when some of the clinical staff may still be reluctant to turn on their computers for anything other than to gather laboratory results? Developing an easy, fun, and accessible Web page was the answer. This article outlines the development of the first training Web page at the University of Wisconsin Medical Foundation, Madison, WI.

  16. Bringing Space Weather Down to Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiff, P. H.; Sumners, C.

    2005-05-01

    Most of the public has no idea what Space Weather is, but a number of innovative programs, web sites, magazine articles, TV shows and planetarium shows have taken space weather from an unknown quantity to a much more visible field. This paper reviews new developments, including the new Space Weather journal, the very popular spaceweather.com website, new immersive planetarium shows that can go "on the road", and well-publicized Sun-Earth Day activities. Real-time data and reasonably accurate spaceweather forecasts are available from several websites, with many subscribers. Even the renaissance of amateur radio because of Homeland Security brings a new generation of learners to wonder what is going on in the Sun today. The NSF Center for Integrated Space Weather Modeling has a dedicated team to reach both the public and a greater diversity of new scientists.

  17. Solution for backfitting of a controlled atmosphere area in radiopharmaceuticals unit: the mobile unit of decontamination; Solution pour la mise en conformite d'une zone d'atmosphere controlee en unite de radiopharmacie: l'unite mobile de decontamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreau, H.; Desruet, M.D. [Radiopharmacie, CHU de Grenoble, (France); Gallazzini-Crepin, C.; Calizzano, A.; Bourre, J.C. [clinique universitaire de medecine nucleaire, CHU de Grenoble, (France); Skalli, S.; Foroni, L. [pole de pharmacie, CHU de Grenoble, (France); Fagret, D. [clinique universitaire de medecine nucleaire, CHU de Grenoble, (France)

    2009-05-15

    The laboratory of radiopharmaceuticals preparation is a controlled area, defined by good practices of preparation. In order to answer to this regulatory requirement, the environment follow-up is made regularly by the hygiene service of the Grenoble University hospital center (C.H.U.). The results of the last sampling turned out to be wrong. Our objective are to remedy this air contamination and to improve the particulate air quality. A mobile unit of air cleaning allowed to be in accordance with the law at the air cleanliness level for the area of radiopharmaceuticals preparation at the Grenoble C.H.U.. It allows to answer to exigence of good practices of preparation face to the controlled atmosphere areas, in a rapid way, efficient way and cheap way, especially before the reorganization of radiopharmacy place. (N.C.)

  18. Bringing Seismological Research into the School Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlis, G. L.; Hamburger, M. W.

    2004-12-01

    One of the primary goals of educational seismology programs is to bring inquiry-based research to the middle- and high-school classroom setting. Although it is often stated as a long-term goal of science outreach programs, in practice there are many barriers to research in the school setting, among them increasing emphasis on test-oriented training, decreasing interest and participation in science fairs, limited teacher confidence and experience for mentoring research, insufficient student preparedness for research projects, and the short term of university involvement (typically limited to brief one-day encounters). For the past three+ years we have tried to address these issues through a focused outreach program we have called the PEPP Research Fellows Program. This is treated as an honors program in which high school teachers in our group nominate students with interests in science careers. These students are invited to participate in the program, and those who elect to take part participate in a one-day education and training session in the fall. Rather than leave research projects completely open, we direct the students at toward one of two specific, group-oriented projects (in our case, one focusing on local recordings of mining explosions, and a second on teleseismic body-wave analysis), but we encourage them to act as independent researchers and follow topics of interest. The students then work on seismic data from the local educational network or from the IRIS facilities. Following several months of informal interaction with teachers and students (email, web conferencing, etc.), we bring the students and teachers to our university for a weekend research symposium in the spring. Students present their work in oral or poster form and prizes are given for the best papers. Projects range from highly local projects (records of seismic noise at school X) to larger-scale regional projects (analysis of teleseismic P-wave delays at PEPP network stations) From 20 to

  19. Poster power brings together electronics community

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    An 'Electronics at CERN' poster session was displayed on the mezzanine in building 500 for two days from 30 November. The display consisted of 20 posters and brought together a wide range of electronic projects designed and assembled by CERN teams and other collaborators involved in the building of the LHC. This was the first time this event had been held. As its organiser John Evans (IT/DES) explained, 'the idea came from the experience of attending conferences outside CERN, where you may find projects from CERN you didn't know about. It's nice to bring them together so we can all benefit from the efforts made.' The work on show spanned different departments and experiments, ranging from microelectronics to equipment designed for giant magnets. The invited audience was equally broad and included engineers, physicists as well as the electronics community at CERN. An informal gathering of all the exhibitors also offered an opportunity to view and discuss the work over a cup of coffee. 'The poster session acts...

  20. Investigations of solution-processed charge generation unit with low concentration of small molecule doped in p-type/HAT-CN{sub 6} for tandem OLED

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talik, N.A., E-mail: azrina_talik@hotmail.com [Low Dimensional Material Research Centre (LDMRC), Physics Dept., Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Yeoh, K.H. [Low Dimensional Material Research Centre (LDMRC), Physics Dept., Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Centre for Photonics and Advanced Materials Research (CPR), Lee Kong Chian Faculty of Engineering and Science, University Tunku Abdul Rahman, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia); Ng, C.Y.B. [Low Dimensional Material Research Centre (LDMRC), Physics Dept., Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Tan, C.Y. [Centre of Advanced Manufacturing & Material Processing (AMMP), Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Yap, B.K., E-mail: kbyap@uniten.edu.my [Centre of Microelectronic and Nano Engineering (CeMNE), College of Engineering, Universiti Tenaga Nasional, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2016-01-15

    We investigated the charge generation and injection mechanism in solution processed charge generation unit (CGU) used in our high performance tandem organic light emitting diode (OLED) via capacitance–voltage (C–V) and current density–voltage (J–V) measurements. By doping 2 wt% of small molecule 1,1-bis-(4-bis(4-tolyl)-aminophenyl) cyclohexene (TAPC) into Poly (N-vinylcarbazole) (PVK) as p-type layer of the CGU, we obtained more than two folds improvement in the tandem device efficiency compared to single device. The performance improvement of the TAPC doped CGU could be attributed to low built-in potential, large vacuum level shift as well as high charge density for efficient charge generation. - Highlights: • Charge-generation and injection mechanism in CGU for tandem OLED is investigated. • Small molecule, TAPC doped in p-type/HAT-CN{sub 6} has been used for tandem OLED. • The improvement attributes to the lower V{sub bi} and larger ΔV{sub L} in doped layer. • Narrower W and high carrier density also contribute to efficiency improvement.

  1. Investigations of solution-processed charge generation unit with low concentration of small molecule doped in p-type/HAT-CN6 for tandem OLED

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talik, N.A.; Yeoh, K.H.; Ng, C.Y.B.; Tan, C.Y.; Yap, B.K.

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the charge generation and injection mechanism in solution processed charge generation unit (CGU) used in our high performance tandem organic light emitting diode (OLED) via capacitance–voltage (C–V) and current density–voltage (J–V) measurements. By doping 2 wt% of small molecule 1,1-bis-(4-bis(4-tolyl)-aminophenyl) cyclohexene (TAPC) into Poly (N-vinylcarbazole) (PVK) as p-type layer of the CGU, we obtained more than two folds improvement in the tandem device efficiency compared to single device. The performance improvement of the TAPC doped CGU could be attributed to low built-in potential, large vacuum level shift as well as high charge density for efficient charge generation. - Highlights: • Charge-generation and injection mechanism in CGU for tandem OLED is investigated. • Small molecule, TAPC doped in p-type/HAT-CN 6 has been used for tandem OLED. • The improvement attributes to the lower V bi and larger ΔV L in doped layer. • Narrower W and high carrier density also contribute to efficiency improvement.

  2. Implementation of Trauma-Informed Care and Brief Solution-Focused Therapy: A Quality Improvement Project Aimed at Increasing Engagement on an Inpatient Psychiatric Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aremu, Babatunde; Hill, Pamela D; McNeal, Joanne M; Petersen, Mary A; Swanberg, Debbie; Delaney, Kathleen R

    2018-03-14

    Addressing tense and escalating situations with noncoercive measures is an important element of inpatient psychiatric treatment. Although restraint rates are frequently monitored, the use of pro re nata (PRN) intramuscular (IM) injections to address agitation is also an important indicator. In 2015, at the current study site, a significant increase was noted in PRN IM medication use despite unit leadership's efforts to build a culture of trauma-informed care (TIC). The purpose of the current quality improvement project was to educate staff on methods to incorporate TIC into daily practice and the use of brief solution-focused therapy techniques in escalating situations. Measurement of attitudes toward patient aggression and engagement with patients followed two waves of staff education. Upon completion of the project, a decrease in PRN IM medications, improvement in staff attitudes toward patient aggression, and improved sense of staff competency in handling tense situations were noted. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, xx(x), xx-xx.]. Copyright 2018, SLACK Incorporated.

  3. Bringing Together Latino Children and Their Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shachter, Jaqueline

    In order to acquaint teachers with the range of children's literature about Latino culture, this paper describes works of writers from both the United States and Latin America. The materials described, written in English or Spanish, range from fiction and nonfiction to filmstrips and magazines. A list of 50 books, magazines, and nonprint materials…

  4. Bringing University Pedagogical Approach into Companies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Lise B.; S. Stachowicz, Marian

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes and discusses how the university pedagogical approach used in engineering education can be applied in a corporate setting. Problem Based and Project Organised Learning (PBL) pedagogical approach has been used in engineering education at Aalborg University for 30 years...... and this PBL structure was implemented in a Danish company which wanted to establish a learning environment, so that their employees would share their knowledge and understanding of the work processes across different departments. The pedagogical approach is described and two workshops are used as examples...... a project and found solutions for for problems related to their work. Several of the problem solutions were implemented. The participants evaluated the process and the outcome of the workshops very as very good. Furthermore the results show that the pedagogical method which has been used within engineering...

  5. Neighbors United for Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westhoff, Wayne W.; Corvin, Jaime; Virella, Irmarie

    2009-01-01

    Modeled upon the ecclesiastic community group concept of Latin America to unite and strengthen the bond between the Church and neighborhoods, a community-based organization created Vecinos Unidos por la Salud (Neighbors United for Health) to bring health messages into urban Latino neighborhoods. The model is based on five tenants, and incorporates…

  6. Kursk ASSET brings praise for plant operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    An Assessment of Safety Significant Events Team (ASSET) from the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) visited Kursk on 19-31 July 1992 - the first time such a group had been to a RBMK reactor site. Kursk is a four unit station and the IAEA Team was able to consider safety significant events over its 45 reactor-year history. all four units have good operating records, with lifetime load factors of 70-80%. The ASSET's aim was to consider the plants current safety provisions for prevention of accidents and incidents. ASSET recommendations may cover the design and operability of the plant, personnel or operating procedures. At Kursk the Team found that ''highly qualified plant management and a very dedicated and knowledgeable operating staff'' was a major asset. They found a sound maintenance programme although some aspects of the facility appeared neglected. This was attributed to Russian industrial priorities that focused on functionality rather than appearance. it was in the test and maintenance personnel that the ASSET mission found the safety culture weakest. Some of their recommendations are reported in this article. (Author)

  7. Effective communications bring greater public acceptance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clawson, C.

    1992-01-01

    In 1986, GPU Nuclear Corporation announced a plan to evaporate into the atmosphere 2.3 million gal of water remaining from the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) accident. The water would be processed to remove most of the radioactivity, but still remaining were >1,000 Ci of tritium to be released to the atmosphere during the evaporation process. It was expected that, following regulatory approvals, it would take >2 yr to complete the process. Fed by well-established antinuclear groups, public concern about evaporating the TMI-2-accident-generated water ran high among residents living near the plant. In the years since the TMI-2 accident, GPU Nuclear had developed a highly effective communications program in the communities surrounding TMI. This ongoing program provided a solid foundation on which to create and implement a risk communications approach to community understanding and acceptance of the evaporation process

  8. Bringing life to soil physical processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallett, P. D.

    2013-12-01

    When Oklahoma's native prairie grass roots were replaced by corn, the greatest environmental (and social) disaster ever to hit America ensued. The soils lost structure, physical binding by roots was annihilated and when drought came the Great Dust Bowl commenced. This form of environmental disaster has repeated over history and although not always apparent, similar processes drive the degradation of seemingly productive farmland and forests. But just as negative impacts on biology are deleterious to soil physical properties, positive impacts could reverse these trends. In finding solutions to soil sustainability and food security, we should be able to exploit biological processes to improve soil physical properties. This talk will focus on a quantitative understanding of how biology changes soil physical behaviour. Like the Great Dust Bowl, it starts with reinforcement mechanisms by plant roots. We found that binding of soil by cereal (barley) roots within 5 weeks of planting can more than double soil shear strength, with greater plant density causing greater reinforcement. With time, however, the relative impact of root reinforcement diminishes due to root turnover and aging of the seedbed. From mechanical tests of individual roots, reasonable predictions of reinforcement by tree roots are possible with fibre bundle models. With herbaceous plants like cereals, however, the same parameters (root strength, stiffness, size and distribution) result in a poor prediction. We found that root type, root age and abiotic factors such as compaction and waterlogging affect mechanical behaviour, further complicating the understanding and prediction of root reinforcement. For soil physical stability, the interface between root and soil is an extremely important zone in terms of resistance of roots to pull-out and rhizosphere formation. Compounds analogous to root exudates have been found with rheological tests to initially decrease the shear stress where wet soils flow, but

  9. ERP SOLUTIONS FOR SMEs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TUTUNEA MIHAELA FILOFTEIA

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The integration of activities, the business processes as well as their optimization, bring the perspective of profitable growth and create significant and competitive advantages in any company. The adoption of some ERP integrated software solutions, from SMEs’ perspective, must be considered as a very important management decision in medium and long term. ERP solutions, along with the transparent and optimized management of all internal processes, also offer an intra and inter companies collaborative platform, which allows a rapid expansion of activities towards e- business and mobile-business environments. This material introduces ERP solutions for SMEs from commercial offer and open source perspective; the results of comparative analysis of the solutions on the specific market, can be an useful aid to the management of the companies, in making the decision to integrate business processes, using ERP as a support.

  10. Bringing Water into an Integrated Assessment Framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Thomson, Allison M.; Sands, Ronald; Pitcher, Hugh M.

    2010-11-30

    We developed a modeling capability to understand how water is allocated within a river basin and examined present and future water allocations among agriculture, energy production, other human requirements, and ecological needs. Water is an essential natural resource needed for food and fiber production, household and industrial uses, energy production, transportation, tourism and recreation, and the functioning of natural ecosystems. Anthropogenic climate change and population growth are anticipated to impose unprecedented pressure on water resources during this century. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) researchers have pioneered the development of integrated assessment (IA) models for the analysis of energy and economic systems under conditions of climate change. This Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) effort led to the development of a modeling capability to evaluate current and future water allocations between human requirements and ecosystem services. The Water Prototype Model (WPM) was built in STELLA®, a computer modeling package with a powerful interface that enables users to construct dynamic models to simulate and integrate many processes (biological, hydrological, economics, sociological). A 150,404-km2 basin in the United States (U.S.) Pacific Northwest region served as the platform for the development of the WPM. About 60% of the study basin is in the state of Washington with the rest in Oregon. The Columbia River runs through the basin for 874 km, starting at the international border with Canada and ending (for the purpose of the simulation) at The Dalles dam. Water enters the basin through precipitation and from streamflows originating from the Columbia River at the international border with Canada, the Spokane River, and the Snake River. Water leaves the basin through evapotranspiration, consumptive uses (irrigation, livestock, domestic, commercial, mining, industrial, and off-stream power generation), and streamflow

  11. Bring your own device (BYOD) to work trend report

    CERN Document Server

    Hayes, Bob

    2013-01-01

    Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) to Work examines the emerging BYOD (Bring Your Own Device to work) trend in corporate IT. BYOD is the practice of employees bringing personally-owned mobile devices (e.g., smartphones, tablets, laptops) to the workplace, and using those devices to access company resources such as email, file servers, and databases. BYOD presents unique challenges in data privacy, confidentiality, security, productivity, and acceptable use that must be met proactively by information security professionals. This report provides solid background on the practice, original res

  12. Dubna at Play Exhibition Science Bringing Nations Together

    CERN Multimedia

    1999-01-01

    The small town of Dubna brings together the advantages of urban and country lifestyles. Dubna people spend a large part of their time outdoors taking part in all kind of sports or simply enjoying the beautiful surroundings.

  13. Dubna at Play Exhibition Science Bringing Nations Together

    CERN Multimedia

    1997-01-01

    The small town of Dubna brings together the advantages of urban and country lifestyles. Dubna people spend a large part of their time outdoors taking part in all kind of sports or simply enjoying the beautiful surroundings.

  14. FORMED: Bringing Formal Methods to the Engineering Desktop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-01

    FORMED: BRINGING FORMAL METHODS TO THE ENGINEERING DESKTOP BAE SYSTEMS FEBRUARY 2016 FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE...This report is published in the interest of scientific and technical information exchange, and its publication does not constitute the Government’s...BRINGING FORMAL METHODS TO THE ENGINEERING DESKTOP 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8750-14-C-0024 5b. GRANT NUMBER N/A 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 63781D

  15. A Review of Bring Your Own Device on Security Issues

    OpenAIRE

    Morufu Olalere; Mohd Taufik Abdullah; Ramlan Mahmod; Azizol Abdullah

    2015-01-01

    Mobile computing has supplanted internet computing because of the proliferation of cloud-based applications and mobile devices (such as smartphones, palmtops, and tablets). As a result of this, workers bring their mobile devices to the workplace and use them for enterprise work. The policy of allowing the employees to work with their own personal mobile devices is called Bring Your Own Devices (BYOD). In this article, ...

  16. International education is a broken field: Can ubuntu education bring solutions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piper, Benjamin

    2016-02-01

    Ubuntu is an African philosophy of human kindness; applying it in the Global South would fundamentally alter the design of the education sector. This essay argues, however, that the field of international educational development is not, in fact, structured to support an education influenced by ubuntu ideals. Specifically, the educational development milieu includes donors, implementers and academicians who do not sufficiently question the power dynamics which underpin education development. This creates a field where the power imbalances between donors and host governments are not interrogated, where development workers place too much faith in their own knowledge rather than that of local education experts, and where development practitioners rarely appreciate the privilege of working in countries which are not their own. An ubuntu education would alter the educational development field in myriad critical ways, a few of which are suggested in this essay. Educational development programmes in universities and intake programmes for implementers and donors should teach officers humility, appreciating existing local talent and expertise. Donor programmes should incentivise reflective practice which formally embeds appreciation for local culture and expertise, thereby supporting structures which help educational development experts to review their metacognitive processes. The field should also dramatically increase the numbers of local, minority and female educational development practitioners and provide more avenues for advancement for those groups. These are activities which are critical to supporting the education development field, but require a fundamental change of attitude by practitioners to ensure the right kind of relationships between the West and the Global South.

  17. Integrated ECT-strategies of Vattenfall. Bringing solutions to big challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svensson, Goeran

    2008-01-01

    The presentation presents the Vattenfall company vision of being a leading European energy company, the development strategies and the focus on renewable energy sources, carbon storage, nuclear power and other power sources (tk)

  18. International Education Is a Broken Field: Can "Ubuntu" Education Bring Solutions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piper, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    "Ubuntu" is an African philosophy of human kindness; applying it in the Global South would fundamentally alter the design of the education sector. This essay argues, however, that the field of international educational development is not, in fact, structured to support an education influenced by "ubuntu" ideals. Specifically,…

  19. Bringing the LHC and ATLAS to a regional planetarium

    CERN Document Server

    Schwienhorst, Reinhard

    2011-01-01

    An outreach effort has started at Michigan State University to bring particle physics, the Large Hadron Collider, and the ATLAS experiment to a general audience at the Abrams planetarium on the MSU campus. A team of undergraduate students majoring in physics, communications arts & sciences, and journalism are putting together short clips about ATLAS and the LHC to be shown at the planetarium.

  20. Driven: Bringing German Auto Concepts to the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adney, Cara

    2012-01-01

    A world away from the red dirt of Oklahoma, David Shields and Shelly Smith felt right at home. A national grant took the Meridian Technology Center automotive teachers on a trip to Germany that car lovers only dream about. The tour to the major automakers last summer has them geared up and bringing fresh ideas to the classroom. They spent four…

  1. Practical ways of bringing innovations and creativity into the school ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article describes the practical ways of bringing innovations and creativity into the school library media programme in Nigeria. Discussion focused on areas on creativity and innovations such as environmental design, staffing, outreach activities, library cooperation, and introduction of ICT system. Keywords: Innovations ...

  2. "Bring Your Own Device": Considering Potential Risks to Student Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merga, Margaret K.

    2016-01-01

    Background and context: Schools in Australia and internationally are increasingly adopting a Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) approach to teaching and learning. The review: While discussion of a BYOD approach has taken place, there is a dearth of consideration of the potential impact of BYOD policy on student health. Implementation of a BYOD policy…

  3. Bring Your Own Digital Device in Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newhouse, C. Paul; Cooper, Martin; Pagram, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    This article reports on an investigation to advise a teacher education institution on the feasibility of having a "Bring Your Own Digital Device" policy for students. The investigation built on components of two research projects while adding the comprehensive testing of representative potential hardware and software platforms. The…

  4. Biblionef SA: Bringing books to the bookless | Williams | Innovation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Biblionef SA: Bringing books to the bookless. Jean Williams. Abstract. No abstract available. Innovation (2003) No. 26, pp 43-47. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians ...

  5. Bring Your Own Device: Parental Guidance (PG) Suggested

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiger, Derick; Herro, Dani

    2015-01-01

    Educators are incorporating students' mobile devices into the schooling experience via Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) initiatives. This is advantageous for many reasons, most notably, improving access to Internet resources and digital tools in support of teaching and learning. Obtaining parental support is key to BYOD success. Therefore, this study…

  6. Bringing Curriculum Theory and Didactics Together: A Deweyan Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Zongyi

    2016-01-01

    Using Dewey's method of resolution for resolving a dualism exemplified in "The Child and the Curriculum," this article reconciles and brings together two rival schools of thought--curriculum theory and didactics--in China. The central thesis is that the rapprochement requires a reconceptualisation of curriculum theory and didactics in…

  7. Bringing Knowledge Back In: Perspectives from Liberal Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Zongyi

    2018-01-01

    From the vantage point of liberal education, this article attempts to contribute to the conversation initiated by Michael Young and his colleagues on 'bringing knowledge back' into the current global discourse on curriculum policy and practice. The contribution is made through revisiting the knowledge-its-own-end thesis associated with Newman and…

  8. Fiber-to-the-home: bringing the services the end-user

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Hoven, G. N.; Pluk, E. G. C.

    2006-07-01

    The ever increasing bandwidth demand will put large pressure on classical broadband communication networks. Optical fiber, with its high bandwidth, offers a solution to this emerging problem. Fiber-to-the-home (FTTH) can provide end-users with virtually unlimited bandwidth, creating the opportunity to receive any service they like. FTTH networks consist of a passive network, active equipment and a top-layer which brings the services to the end-user. Companies and organisations who are deploying FTTH networks are not the traditional telecom and cable operators, but utility companies, housing corporations and local communities. The FTTH network deployed in Nuenen is a good example showing the strength of FTTH. In the future, bandwidth demand will increase even more. Intelligent solutions, such as flexible bandwidth, can have large added value for future FTTH networks.

  9. Radiology clinical synopsis: a simple solution for obtaining an adequate clinical history for the accurate reporting of imaging studies on patients in intensive care units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, Mervyn D.; Alam, Khurshaid

    2005-01-01

    Lack of clinical history on radiology requisitions is a universal problem. We describe a simple Web-based system that readily provides radiology-relevant clinical history to the radiologist reading radiographs of intensive care unit (ICU) patients. Along with the relevant history, which includes primary and secondary diagnoses, disease progression and complications, the system provides the patient's name, record number and hospital location. This information is immediately available to reporting radiologists. New clinical information is immediately entered on-line by the radiologists as they are reviewing images. After patient discharge, the data are stored and immediately available if the patient is readmitted. The system has been in routine clinical use in our hospital for nearly 2 years. (orig.)

  10. Analysis of the reasons for failures of the 1500 MW turbines HP diaphragms on the EDF N4 units. Implementation of a solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franc, J. C.; Franconville, M.

    2002-01-01

    The full text follows. Diaphragms are major components of an impulse type steam turbine since they hold the fixed blades which allow part of the steam expansion (the other part being on the moving blades mounted on the rotor) The 4 impulse type 1500 MW nuclear steam turbines, from the EDF N4 program,were commissioned in 1996 on the CHOOZ and then CIVAUX plants.The diaphragms, located in the HP(high pressure) part of these turbines, have shown signs of failures very soon, due to a cracking of assembly welds,which is dangerous for the machines integrity. These failures questioned a construction mode which had been highly experienced previously. A large campaign of inspections and tests was carried out to feature the ways of failure,on site or in the factory during manufacturing.Site measurements combined with numerical simulations allowed to define excitations, harmful to these components,during operation. Temporary solutions were applied in order to allow immediate restart of the plants.In parallel,a modification of the diaphragms design and assembly method was studied and applied to withstand the various operating stresses. (author)

  11. Design of extraction system in BRing at HIAF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Shuang; Yang, Jiancheng; Zhang, Jinquan; Shen, Guodong; Ren, Hang; Liu, Jie; Shangguan, Jingbing; Zhang, Xiaoying; Zhang, Jingjing; Mao, Lijun; Sheng, Lina; Yin, Dayu; Wang, Geng; Wu, Bo; Yao, Liping; Tang, Meitang; Cai, Fucheng; Chen, Xiaoqiang

    2018-06-01

    The Booster Ring (BRing), which is the key part of HIAF (High Intensity heavy ion Accelerator Facility) complex at IMP (Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences), can provide uranium (A / q = 7) beam with a wide extraction energy range of 200-800 MeV/u. To fulfill a flexible beam extraction for multi-purpose experiments, both fast and slow extraction systems will be accommodated in the BRing. The fast extraction system is used for extracting short bunched beam horizontally in single-turn. The slow extraction system is used to provide quasi-continuous beam by the third order resonance and RF-knockout scheme. To achieve a compact structure, the two extraction systems are designed to share the same extraction channel. The general design of the fast and slow extraction systems and simulation results are discussed in this paper.

  12. BRINGING STRATEGIC THINKING TO A CHINESE TOBACCO LOGISTICS CENTER

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Liubaihe

    2012-01-01

    Recently operation and logistics activities have played a more strategic role as tobacco business enterprises’ main functions. Because of the increasing costs of e.g. warehousing and inventory, transportation, personnel and other relevant materials, the different parties in the supply chain are facing more challenges and opportunities. On the one hand, this brings about improvements to the process flow and communications within the logistics activities for the sake of saving materials and ...

  13. Model Testing - Bringing the Ocean into the Laboratory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aage, Christian

    2000-01-01

    Hydrodynamic model testing, the principle of bringing the ocean into the laboratory to study the behaviour of the ocean itself and the response of man-made structures in the ocean in reduced scale, has been known for centuries. Due to an insufficient understanding of the physics involved, however......, the early model tests often gave incomplete or directly misleading results.This keynote lecture deals with some of the possibilities and problems within the field of hydrodynamic and hydraulic model testing....

  14. Solution Processed Organic Photovoltaic Cells Using D-A-D-A-D Type Small Molecular Donor Materials with Benzodithiophene and Diketopyrrolopyrrole Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sangman; Nam, So Yeon; Suh, Dong Hack; Lee, Jaemin; Lee, Changjin; Yoon, Sung Cheol

    2016-03-01

    Organic photovoltaic Cells (OPVs) have been considered to be a next-generation energy source to overcome exhaustion of resources. Currently, OPVs are developed based on two types of donor material with polymer and small molecule. Polymeric donor materials have shown better power conversion efficiency (PCE) than small molecular donor materials, since it's easy to control the morphology of photoactive film. However, the difficulty in synthetic reproducibility and purification of polymeric donor were main drawback to overcome. And then, recently small molecule donor materials have been overcome bad morphology of OPVs film by using appropriate alkyl substituents and relatively long conjugation system. In this study, we designed and synthesized D-A-D-A-D type small molecular donor materials containing alternatively linked benzodithiophene (BDT) and diketopyrrolopyrrole (DPP) units. Also, we studied on the effect of photovoltaic performance of prepared small molecular D-A-D-A-D type donor with variation of thiophene links and with/without hexyl substituent. Our small molecular donors showed HOMO energy levels from -5.26 to -5.34 eV and optical bandgaps from 1.70 to 1.87 eV by CV (cyclic voltammetry) and UV/Vis spectroscopy, respectively. Finally, 3.4% of PCE can be obtained using a mixture of BDT(DPP)2-T2 and PCBM as an active layer with a Voc of 0.78 V, a Jsc of 9.72 mA/cm2, and a fill factor of 0.44 under 100 mW/cm2 AM 1.5G simulated light. We will discuss the performance of D-A-D-A-D type small molecular donor based OPVs with variation of both terminal substituents.

  15. Process for heating a part of an equipment to bring a fluid flowing in this part at a fixed temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chavanne, Claude; Vanderchmitt, Andre.

    1978-01-01

    Processs for heating a valve, pump and connections of a circuit so as to bring or maintain the fluid flowing through them at a temperature such that its change of state or a modification of its physical characteristics is avoided, by means of a heating unit built in a high thermal conductivity material, made integral with the heated component and including electric heating facilities [fr

  16. Plugging solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharipov, A U; Yangirov, I Z

    1982-01-01

    A clay-powder, cement, and water-base plugging solution is proposed having reduced solution viscosity characteristics while maintaining tensile strength in cement stone. This solution utilizes silver graphite and its ingredients, by mass weight, are as follows: cement 51.2-54.3%; claypowder 6.06-9.1%; silver graphite 0.24-0.33%; with water making up the remainder.

  17. Annual report of STACY operation in FY.1999. Experiments on two unit neutron-interacting system with slab-shaped core tanks and 10% enriched uranyl nitrate solution (1). (contract research)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onodera, Seiji; Sono, Hiroki; Hirose, Hideyuki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment] [and others

    2000-11-01

    A new series of experiments on two unit neutron-interacting system started in the last half of FY.1999 at STACY (Static Experiment Critical Facility) in NUCEF (Nuclear Fuel Cycle Safety Engineering Research Facility). The experiments were conducted with two slab-shaped core tanks and 10% enriched uranyl nitrate solution. The dimensions of the core tanks are 35 cm in thickness, 70 cm in width and 150 cm in height. In the experiments, critical level heights were measured varying the distance between the two core tanks under the non-reflected condition in order to evaluate reactivity effects on the neutron interaction between the two core tanks. This report summarizes the data on the operation and the fuel management for the 25 experiments conducted in the last half of FY.1999. (author)

  18. Bringing a Finnish Company to the Russian E-Market

    OpenAIRE

    Veselova, Victoria

    2012-01-01

    The main objective of the project was to enable a small business case company that is operating in the town of Lappeenranta, Finland, to reach successfully its target segment (Russian consumers) with the help of digital technology in order to increase sales both in its physical shop and in online store. In order to reach the aim of the project and bring Russian consumers and the case company together by the means of electronic marketing, a marketing plan for the promotional campaigns of th...

  19. Bringing indigenous ownership back to the private sector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragelund, Peter

    . This time disguised in terms like empowerment and unequal opportunities but just as politicised as in the 1970s. In light of the current anti-Chinese sentiments in Zambia, this paper seeks to further our understanding of private sector policy making in Zambia. It argues that populist politics, referring...... been particularly present in all sectors of the Zambian economy. Foreign ownership, however, is not new to African societies and several African countries pursued indigenisation policies in the wake of independence to bring ownership back to their own citizens. Now indigenisation policies thrive again...

  20. Bring Your Own Device - Providing Reliable Model of Data Access

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stąpór Paweł

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a model of Bring Your Own Device (BYOD as a model network, which provides the user reliable access to network resources. BYOD is a model dynamically developing, which can be applied in many areas. Research network has been launched in order to carry out the test, in which as a service of BYOD model Work Folders service was used. This service allows the user to synchronize files between the device and the server. An access to the network is completed through the wireless communication by the 802.11n standard. Obtained results are shown and analyzed in this article.

  1. Bring Your Own Device in the Information Literacy Classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Stonebraker, Ilana; Robertshaw, M Brooke; Kirkwood, Hal; Dugan, Mary

    2014-01-01

    In the 2013 school year, a team of librarians in the Parrish Library of Management and Economics at Purdue University taught a business information literacy course to approximately 500 management students in eight 70-person sessions. Due to limitations on a set of iPads borrowed from another department, one of two concurrent classes was taught with a set of iPads, while another had a Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) policy, where students brought their own laptops or iPads. Focus groups, observat...

  2. A Review of Bring Your Own Device on Security Issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morufu Olalere

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Mobile computing has supplanted internet computing because of the proliferation of cloud-based applications and mobile devices (such as smartphones, palmtops, and tablets. As a result of this, workers bring their mobile devices to the workplace and use them for enterprise work. The policy of allowing the employees to work with their own personal mobile devices is called Bring Your Own Devices (BYOD. In this article, we discuss BYOD’s background, prevalence, benefits, challenges, and possible security attacks. We then review contributions of academic researchers on BYOD. The Universiti Putra Malaysia online databases (such as IEEE Xplore digital library, Elsevier, Springer, ACM digital library were used to search for peer-reviewed academic publications and other relevant publications on BYOD. The Google Scholar search engine was also used. Our thorough review shows that security issues comprise the most significant challenge confronting BYOD policy and that very little has been done to tackle this security challenge. It is our hope that this review will provide a theoretical background for future research and enable researchers to identify researchable areas of BYOD.

  3. Building Local Capacity to Bring Arts Education to All Children: Lessons Learned from the First Half of the Ford Foundation's National Demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spilka, Gertrude; Long, Meg

    2009-01-01

    Interested in bringing the benefits of the arts as integral to quality education for all children, in 2004 the Ford Foundation launched the National Arts Education Initiative, a seven-year demonstration in nine communities across the United States. Building from arts education programs that serve "pockets" of children, Ford investments…

  4. Bringing history to life: simulating landmark experiments in psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boynton, David M; Smith, Laurence D

    2006-05-01

    The course in history of psychology can be challenging for students, many of whom enter it with little background in history and faced with unfamiliar names and concepts. The sheer volume of material can encourage passive memorization unless efforts are made to increase student involvement. As part of a trend toward experiential history, historians of science have begun to supplement their lectures with demonstrations of classic physics experiments as a way to bring the history of science to life. Here, the authors report on computer simulations of five landmark experiments from early experimental psychology in the areas of reaction time, span of attention, and apparent motion. The simulations are designed not only to permit hands-on replication of historically important results but also to reproduce the experimental procedures closely enough that students can gain a feel for the nature of early research and the psychological processes being studied.

  5. Mathematical models in biology bringing mathematics to life

    CERN Document Server

    Ferraro, Maria; Guarracino, Mario

    2015-01-01

    This book presents an exciting collection of contributions based on the workshop “Bringing Maths to Life” held October 27-29, 2014 in Naples, Italy.  The state-of-the art research in biology and the statistical and analytical challenges facing huge masses of data collection are treated in this Work. Specific topics explored in depth surround the sessions and special invited sessions of the workshop and include genetic variability via differential expression, molecular dynamics and modeling, complex biological systems viewed from quantitative models, and microscopy images processing, to name several. In depth discussions of the mathematical analysis required to extract insights from complex bodies of biological datasets, to aid development in the field novel algorithms, methods and software tools for genetic variability, molecular dynamics, and complex biological systems are presented in this book. Researchers and graduate students in biology, life science, and mathematics/statistics will find the content...

  6. Archaeopteryx: Bringing the Dino-Bird to Life

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergmann, Uwe

    2011-01-01

    Some 150 million years ago, a strange creature died in a tropical lagoon that today is located in Bavaria, Germany. In 1861, a single feather of this creature was discovered. Not long afterward, a complete fossil was found with the same bird-like feathers but dinosaur-like anatomical features. Darwin had just published 'On the Origin of Species'; could this be the missing link that Darwin's supporters hoped to find? Recently, two of the now eleven discovered Archaeopteryx fossils, and that first feather, were brought to SLAC, where, using the intense X-ray beam, researchers searched for the chemical remains of the original living creatures. Please join us for this lecture, which will explain how the studies attempt to bring the original dino-bird back to life.

  7. Archaeopteryx: Bringing the Dino-Bird to Life

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergmann, Uwe

    2011-01-25

    Some 150 million years ago, a strange creature died in a tropical lagoon that today is located in Bavaria, Germany. In 1861, a single feather of this creature was discovered. Not long afterward, a complete fossil was found with the same bird-like feathers but dinosaur-like anatomical features. Darwin had just published 'On the Origin of Species'; could this be the missing link that Darwin's supporters hoped to find? Recently, two of the now eleven discovered Archaeopteryx fossils, and that first feather, were brought to SLAC, where, using the intense X-ray beam, researchers searched for the chemical remains of the original living creatures. Please join us for this lecture, which will explain how the studies attempt to bring the original dino-bird back to life.

  8. Solution preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seitz, M.G.

    1982-01-01

    Reviewed in this statement are methods of preparing solutions to be used in laboratory experiments to examine technical issues related to the safe disposal of nuclear waste from power generation. Each approach currently used to prepare solutions has advantages and any one approach may be preferred over the others in particular situations, depending upon the goals of the experimental program. These advantages are highlighted herein for three approaches to solution preparation that are currently used most in studies of nuclear waste disposal. Discussion of the disadvantages of each approach is presented to help a user select a preparation method for his particular studies. Also presented in this statement are general observations regarding solution preparation. These observations are used as examples of the types of concerns that need to be addressed regarding solution preparation. As shown by these examples, prior to experimentation or chemical analyses, laboratory techniques based on scientific knowledge of solutions can be applied to solutions, often resulting in great improvement in the usefulness of results

  9. 'Bring your companies here'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curry, Lynne

    2010-07-01

    The United States had a banner year 2009 as the global leader in wind power capacity totally installed and they continue to attract foreign investors. But thee are still big challenges facing the national wind industry. (orig.)

  10. Designing Integrated Product- Service System Solutions in Manufacturing Industries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Costa, Nina; Patrício, Lia; Morelli, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Manufacturing firms are increasingly evolving towards the design of integrated product-service solutions but servitization literature does not provide specific guidance on how to design these integrated solutions. Building upon ProductService System (PSS) and Service Design (SD) approaches...... how it brings new insights to manufacturing companies moving to a service, value cocreation perspective....

  11. Bringing Solid-State Magnetocaloric Cooling to the Market: A Commercialization Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abu-Heiba, Ahmad [ORNL; Sikes, Karen [CSRA; Blackburn, Julia [CSRA; Abdelaziz, Omar [ORNL; Mehdizadeh Momen, Ayyoub [ORNL

    2017-12-01

    Air conditioning has become a staple in American life, bringing improved health, productivity, and comfort to 93% of single-family homes as of 2015, compared to only 76% in 1990. This rise in demand has contributed to the 2.51 quads (12.5%) of total annual energy consumption in residential buildings attributable to space cooling (U.S. Energy Information Administration 2017). Accompanying this upward trend in space cooling has been increased refrigerant use, which has historically contributed to ozone depletion, global warming, or both. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory – along with German-based partner Vacuumschmelze GmbH & Co. KG – is working to reduce energy consumption and refrigerant use through the development of a next-generation, solid-state magnetocaloric cooling system. The purpose of this study is to investigate market potential of these systems in the United States, including information on the industry landscape, market share and unit shipment projections, optimal price points, and barriers to market entry.

  12. Assessing the Decision Process towards Bring Your Own Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koester, Richard F.

    2017-01-01

    Information technology continues to evolve to the point where mobile technologies--such as smart phones, tablets, and ultra-mobile computers have the embedded flexibility and power to be a ubiquitous platform to fulfill the entire user's computing needs. Mobile technology users view these platforms as adaptable enough to be the single solution for…

  13. Bringing Interpretability and Visualization with Artificial Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gritsenko, Andrey

    2017-01-01

    Extreme Learning Machine (ELM) is a training algorithm for Single-Layer Feed-forward Neural Network (SLFN). The difference in theory of ELM from other training algorithms is in the existence of explicitly-given solution due to the immutability of initialed weights. In practice, ELMs achieve performance similar to that of other state-of-the-art…

  14. Disulfide Bridges: Bringing Together Frustrated Structure in a Bioactive Peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Schulten, Klaus; Gruebele, Martin; Bansal, Paramjit S; Wilson, David; Daly, Norelle L

    2016-04-26

    Disulfide bridges are commonly found covalent bonds that are usually believed to maintain structural stability of proteins. Here, we investigate the influence of disulfide bridges on protein dynamics through molecular dynamics simulations on the cysteine-rich trypsin inhibitor MCoTI-II with three disulfide bridges. Correlation analysis of the reduced cyclic peptide shows that two of the three disulfide distances (Cys(11)-Cys(23) and Cys(17)-Cys(29)) are anticorrelated within ∼1 μs of bridge formation or dissolution: when the peptide is in nativelike structures and one of the distances shortens to allow bond formation, the other tends to lengthen. Simulations over longer timescales, when the denatured state is less structured, do not show the anticorrelation. We propose that the native state contains structural elements that frustrate one another's folding, and that the two bridges are critical for snapping the frustrated native structure into place. In contrast, the Cys(4)-Cys(21) bridge is predicted to form together with either of the other two bridges. Indeed, experimental chromatography and nuclear magnetic resonance data show that an engineered peptide with the Cys(4)-Cys(21) bridge deleted can still fold into its near-native structure even in its noncyclic form, confirming the lesser role of the Cys(4)-Cys(21) bridge. The results highlight the importance of disulfide bridges in a small bioactive peptide to bring together frustrated structure in addition to maintaining protein structural stability. Copyright © 2016 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Bringing Classroom-Based Assessment into the EFL classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Finch

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available   This paper describes how English as a Foreign Language (EFL teachers can bring reliable, valid, user-friendly assessment into their classrooms, and thus improve the quality of learning that occurs there. Based on the experience of the author as a an EFL teacher and teacher-trainer, it is suggested that the promotion and development of autonomy, intrinsic motivation, and self-esteem that takes place in a Classroom-Based Assessment (CBA environment facilitates an holistic approach to language learning and prepares the students for the high-stakes tests that often determine their motivation for learning English. Rather than relying on the memorization of language code, form, lexis, and prepared answers, students who have learned in a CBA environment are able to self-assess, peer-assess, build portfolios, and edit their own work. Not only does this reduce the assessment burden on the teacher, but it also develops the skills of problem-solving, critical thinking, and summarization in the students, in addition to a heightened awareness of the language-learning process. By learning how to set goals, assess their achievements, and reflect on their future learning needs, students become more efficient language learners. While acknowledging the place of standardized, summative tests in contemporary society, it is suggested that CBA in the EFL classroom can enhance long-term learning and consequently enable and empower students to prepare for their future learning needs.

  16. Bringing gender sensitivity into healthcare practice: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celik, Halime; Lagro-Janssen, Toine A L M; Widdershoven, Guy G A M; Abma, Tineke A

    2011-08-01

    Despite the body of literature on gender dimensions and disparities between the sexes in health, practical improvements will not be realized effectively as long as we lack an overview of the ways how to implement these ideas. This systematic review provides a content analysis of literature on the implementation of gender sensitivity in health care. Literature was identified from CINAHL, PsycINFO, Medline, EBSCO and Cochrane (1998-2008) and the reference lists of relevant articles. The quality and relevance of 752 articles were assessed and finally 11 original studies were included. Our results demonstrate that the implementation of gender sensitivity includes tailoring opportunities and barriers related to the professional, organizational and the policy level. As gender disparities are embedded in healthcare, a multiple track approach to implement gender sensitivity is needed to change gendered healthcare systems. Conventional approaches, taking into account one barrier and/or opportunity, fail to prevent gender inequality in health care. For gender-sensitive health care we need to change systems and structures, but also to enhance understanding, raise awareness and develop skills among health professionals. To bring gender sensitivity into healthcare practice, interventions should address a range of factors. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  17. Bringing the Science of JWST to the Public

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Joel D.; Smith, Denise A.; Lawton, Brandon L.; Meinke, Bonnie K.; Jirdeh, Hussein

    2017-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope is the successor to the Hubble Space Telescope. STScI and the Office of Public Outreach are committed to bringing awareness of the technology, the excitement, and the future science potential of this great observatory to the public and to the scientific community, prior to its 2018 launch. The challenges in ensuring the high profile of JWST (understanding the infrared, the vast distance to the telescope's final position, and the unfamiliar science territory) requires us to lay the proper background, particularly in the area of spectroscopy. We currently engage the full range of the public and scientific communities using a variety of high impact, memorable initiatives, in combination with modern technologies to extend reach, linking the science goals of Webb to the ongoing discoveries being made by Hubble. Webbtelescope.org, the public hub for scientific information related to JWST, is now open. We have injected Webb-specific content into ongoing outreach programs: for example, partnering with high impact science communicators such as MinutePhysics to produce timely and concise content; partnering with musicians and artists to link science and art. Augmented reality apps showcase NASA’s telescopes in a format usable by anyone with a smartphone, and visuals from increasingly affordable 3D VR technologies.

  18. Does shaping bring an advantage for reversed field pinch plasmas?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, S.C.; Xu, X.Y.; Wang, Z.R.; Liu, Y.Q.

    2013-01-01

    The MHD–kinetic hybrid toroidal stability code MARS-K (Liu et al 2008 Phys. Plasmas 15 112503) is applied to study the shaping effects on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stabilities in reversed field pinch (RFP) plasmas, where both elongation and triangularity are taken into account. The ideal wall β (the ratio of the gaso-kinetic to magnetic pressures) limit set by the ideal kink mode/resistive wall mode in shaped RFP is investigated first, followed by a study of the kinetic damping on the resistive wall mode. Physics understanding of the results is provided by a systematic numerical analysis. Furthermore, the stability boundary of the linear resistive tearing mode in shaped RFP plasmas is computed and compared with that of the circular case. Finally, bootstrap currents are calculated for both circular and shaped RFP plasmas. Overall, the results of these studies indicate that the current circular cross-section is an appropriate choice for RFP devices, in the sense that the plasma shaping does not bring an appreciable advantage to the RFP performance in terms of macroscopic stabilities. In order to reach a steady-state operation, future RFP fusion reactors will probably need a substantial fraction of external current drives, due to the unfavourable scaling for the plasma-generated bootstrap current in the RFP configuration. (paper)

  19. Bringing Superconductor Digital Technology to the Market Place

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisenoff, Martin

    The unique properties of superconductivity can be exploited to provide the ultimate in electronic technology for systems such as ultra-precise analogue-to-digital and digital-to-analogue converters, precise DC and AC voltage standards, ultra high speed logic circuits and systems (both digital and hybrid analogue-digital systems), and very high throughput network routers and supercomputers which would have superior electrical performance at lower overall electrical power consumption compared to systems with comparable performance which are fabricated using conventional room temperature technologies. This potential for high performance electronics with reduced power consumption would have a positive impact on slowing the increase in the demand for electrical utility power by the information technology community on the overall electrical power grid. However, before this technology can be successfully brought to the commercial market place, there must be an aggressive investment of resources and funding to develop the required infrastructure needed to yield these high performance superconductor systems, which will be reliable and available at low cost. The author proposes that it will require a concerted effort by the superconductor and cryogenic communities to bring this technology to the commercial market place or make it available for widespread use in scientific instrumentation.

  20. Demarketing fear: Bring the nuclear issue back to rational discourse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Charles C.

    2014-01-01

    This paper attempts to explore the strategies for breaking the deadlock between the demand for resolving climate crisis and the resistance to deploying nuclear power. Since our present renewable technology is not advanced enough to replace fossil fuel power plants, nuclear power becomes the only available means that can buy us more time to explore better energy sources for coping with the dilemma of global warming and energy security. Therefore, this paper proposes an elaborated fear appeal framework that may shed light on the intervention points for mitigating fear. By examining the influence of fear appeal on the nuclear issue, three strategies for demarketing the nuclear fear of the public are recommended. The paper concludes that only when energy policy makers and the nuclear industry recognize the significance of minimizing fear and begin to work on removing the sources of fear, can we then expect to bring the nuclear issue back to rational discourse. - Highlights: • Both cognition and emotion are critical in decision-making processes. • Dealing with the emotion of fear is essential for resolving the nuclear issue. • Fear should be mitigated to make rational discourses on nuclear power happen. • Fear can be mitigated by manipulating issue familiarity and response feasibility. • Using equivalency and issue framing may alter public perceptions of nuclear power

  1. Genes and plays: bringing ELSI issues to life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothenberg, Karen H; Bush, Lynn W

    2012-02-01

    Ethical complexities surround the promise of genomic technology and the power of genetic information as they alter conceptions of identity and dynamics within personal and professional relationships. Creative approaches such as dramatic vignettes offer a unique analytical stage for imagining the bioethical past and future. Dramatic narratives can bring to life images of differing perspectives and values when experiencing innovations in medicine. Although the scientific landscape shifts, concerns expressed in theatre from 50 years ago parallel many contemporary ELSI (ethical, legal, and social implications) issues, highlighting the ongoing struggle to appreciate the impact of emerging genetic technologies on relationships. To illuminate these enduring concerns, we explore how perceptions and relationships have influenced-and been influenced by-genetics as portrayed through dramatic vignettes. We build on the legacy of using case vignettes as a clinical teaching modality, and believe similar value exists within the research ethics domain. The selection of dialogue discussed encompasses abbreviated excerpts from two existing and one original vignette that we staged at the ELSI 2011 Congress and various academic and health institutions.

  2. Frontier Fields: Bringing the Distant Universe into View

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenhamer, Bonnie; Lawton, Brandon L.; Summers, Frank; Ryer, Holly

    2014-06-01

    The Frontier Fields is a multi-cycle program of six deep-field observations of strong-lensing galaxy clusters that will be taken in parallel with six deep “blank fields.” The three-year long collaborative program centers on observations from NASA’s Great Observatories, who will team up to look deeper into the universe than ever before, and potentially uncover galaxies that are as much as 100 times fainter than what the telescopes can typically see. Because of the unprecedented views of the universe that will be achieved, the Frontier Fields science program is ideal for informing audiences about scientific advances and topics in STEM. For example, the program provides an opportunity to look back on the history of deep field observations and how they changed (and continue to change) astronomy, while exploring the ways astronomers approach big science problems. As a result, the Space Telescope Science Institute’s Office of Public Outreach has initiated an education and public outreach (E/PO) project to follow the progress of the Frontier Fields program - providing a behind-the-scenes perspective of this observing initiative. This poster will highlight the goals of the Frontier Fields E/PO project and the cost-effective approach being used to bring the program’s results to both the public and educational audiences.

  3. Bringing Western-standard service stations to the Baltic countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pesonen, H.

    1992-01-01

    Neste is the only Western oil company so far to have established a service station presence in the Baltic, with the exception of Norway's Statoil, which has one outlet near Tallinn Airport. Neste has an important logistical advantage compared to other companies in this respect as its two Finnish refineries are ideally located for supplying the region with high-quality petroleum products. Neste's first joint venture in the Baltic, Traffic Service, based in Estonia, was set up with Eesti Kutus in 1988 and opened its first service station in 1990. Other joint ventures are now up and running in Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, and St. Petersburg. A total of 10 - 15 stations, the majority strategically located along the route of the Via Baltica, are expected to be operational by the end of this year. The Neste network comprises a combination of new outlets and refurbished older stations that have been modernized to bring them up to Western standards. These offer a comprehensive range of fuels, lubricants, spare parts, and accessories, as well as food, confectionery, and coffee shop services. Some stations also offer repair and car wash facilities. Adapting to the transition from a communist economy to a Western, capitalist one has not been easy for the Baltic countries, and has inevitably created difficulties for companies like Neste, in areas such as legislation covering land ownership. Neste's joint ventures have also encountered difficulties in instilling the Western approach to business efficiency, and customer service in a workforce used to the Soviet retail system

  4. Integrated solution for field operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubin, Renaud; Dionis, Francois [EDF, Chatou (France)

    2014-08-15

    This document presents our approach to design and to implement mobile applications for field operations. Internal on-field studies yield to the fact that the value added by mobile solutions is correlated with the easiness of their integration with each other and with the underlying information systems. Moreover, the fast-growing mobile market brings new concepts to the mass and industrial applications design can benefit from these. As a consequence, a simple components-based approach has been applied to design and develop mobile applications for field operations and on-site experiments of the resulting applications have been conducted.

  5. Integrated solution for field operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aubin, Renaud; Dionis, Francois

    2014-01-01

    This document presents our approach to design and to implement mobile applications for field operations. Internal on-field studies yield to the fact that the value added by mobile solutions is correlated with the easiness of their integration with each other and with the underlying information systems. Moreover, the fast-growing mobile market brings new concepts to the mass and industrial applications design can benefit from these. As a consequence, a simple components-based approach has been applied to design and develop mobile applications for field operations and on-site experiments of the resulting applications have been conducted

  6. Integrated solution for field operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aubin, Renaud; Dionis, Francois

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the authors' approach to design and to implement mobile applications for field operations. Internal on-field studies can yield the fact that the value-added by mobile solutions is correlated with the easiness of their integration with each other and with the underlying information systems. Moreover, the fast-growing mobile market brings new concepts to the mass and industrial applications design can benefit from these. As a consequence, a simple components-based approach has been applied to design and develop mobile applications for field operations and on-site experiments of the resulting applications have been conducted. (author)

  7. Atoms for Peace Exhibition Science Bringing Nations Together

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    "Atoms for Peace", this old slogan is gaining a new meaning today. Rejecting confrontation, mankind looks for new ways to unite the world. Political and economic integration makes it possible to use the great potential and high technologies of the military-industrial complex for constructing new scientific facilities.

  8. Soil Solution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sonneveld, C.; Voogt, W.

    2009-01-01

    The characteristics of the soil solution in the root environment in the greenhouse industry differ much from those for field grown crops. This is caused firstly by the growing conditions in the greenhouse, which strongly differ from those in the field and secondly the function attributed to the soil

  9. Seeding Solutions

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The Crucible Group operates on the basis of good faith –– producing best effort non-consensus texts. ..... science and technology-based solutions to agricultural production constraints, it is ...... In 1997 researchers at Case Western Reserve Medical School in Ohio (US) ...... Is there a need to update the system-wide IP audit?

  10. Circular Solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Annevelink, E.; Bos, H.L.; Meesters, K.P.H.; Oever, van den M.J.A.; Haas, de W.; Kuikman, P.J.; Rietra, R.P.J.J.; Sikirica, N.

    2016-01-01

    The fifth part of this report on Circular Solutions is about the circular principle From Waste to Resource. The purpose of this study is to select promising options for the implementation of this circular principle and to elaborate these options further.

  11. Podcast solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Geoghegan, Michael W

    2005-01-01

    Podcasting is the art of recording radio show style audio tracks, then distributing them to listeners on the Web via podcasting software such as iPodder. From downloading podcasts to producing a track for fun or profit, ""Podcast Solutions"" covers the entire world of podcasting with insight, humor, and the unmatched wisdom of experience.

  12. Who's bringing you hot ideas and how are you responding?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davenport, Thomas H; Prusak, Laurence; Wilson, H James

    2003-02-01

    There's an unsung hero in your organization. It's the person who's bringing in new ideas from the outside about how to manage better. These aren't your product and service innovators--those people are celebrated loudly and often. This is the manager who, for instance, first uttered the phrase "balance scorecard" in your hallways, or "real options," or "intellectual capital." Managerial innovation is an increasingly important source of competitive advantage--especially given the speed with which product innovations are copied--but it doesn't happen automatically. It takes a certain kind of person to welcome new management ideas and usher them into an organization. The authors recently studied 100 such people to find out how they translate new ideas into action in their organizations. They discovered that they are a distinct type of practitioner; that is to say, they resemble their counterparts in other organizations more than they resemble their own colleagues, and they share a common way of working. "Idea practitioners," as the authors call them, begin by scouting for ideas. All of them are avid readers of management literature and enthusiastic participants in business conferences; many are friendly with business gurus. Once they've identified an idea that seems to hold promise, they tailor it to fit their organizations' specific needs. Next, they actively sell the idea--to senior executives, to the rank and file, to middle managers. And finally, they get the ball rolling by participating in small-scale experiments. But when those take off, they get out of the way and let others execute. In this article, the authors identify the characteristics of idea practitioners and offer strategies for managing them wisely.

  13. Gender equity and tobacco control: bringing masculinity into focus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, Martha; Barraclough, Simon

    2010-03-01

    Gender is a key but often overlooked--determinant of tobacco use, especially in Asia, where sex-linked differences in prevalence rates are very large. In this article we draw upon existing data to consider the implications of these patterns for gender equity and propose approaches to redress inequity through gender-sensitive tobacco control activities. International evidence demonstrates that, in many societies, risk behaviours (including tobacco use) are practised substantially more by men and boys, and are also viewed as expressions of masculine identity. While gender equity focuses almost exclusively on the relative disadvantage of girls and women that exists in most societies, disproportionate male use of tobacco has profound negative consequences for men (as users) and for women (nonusers). Surprisingly, health promotion and tobacco control literature rarely focus on the role of gender in health risks among boys and men. However, tobacco industry marketing has masterfully incorporated gender norms, and also other important cultural values, to ensure its symbols are context-specific. By addressing gender-specific risks within the local cultural context--as countries are enjoined to do within the Framework Convention's Guiding Principles--it may be possible to accelerate the impact of mechanisms such as tobacco pricing, restrictions on marketing, smoking bans and provision of accurate information. It is essential that we construct a new research-to-policy framework for gender-sensitive tobacco control. Successful control of tobacco can only be strengthened by bringing males, and the concept of gender as social construction, back into our research and discussion on health and gender equity.

  14. Underworld - Bringing a Research Code to the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moresi, L. N.; Mansour, J.; Giordani, J.; Farrington, R.; Kaluza, O.; Quenette, S.; Woodcock, R.; Squire, G.

    2017-12-01

    While there are many reasons to celebrate the passing of punch card programming and flickering green screens,the loss of the sense of wonder at the very existence of computers and the calculations they make possible shouldnot be numbered among them. Computers have become so familiar that students are often unaware that formal and careful design of algorithms andtheir implementations remains a valuable and important skill that has to be learned and practiced to achieveexpertise and genuine understanding. In teaching geodynamics and geophysics at undergraduate level, we aimed to be able to bring our researchtools into the classroom - even when those tools are advanced, parallel research codes that we typically deploy on hundredsor thousands of processors, and we wanted to teach not just the physical concepts that are modelled by these codes but asense of familiarity with computational modelling and the ability to discriminate a reliable model from a poor one. The underworld code (www.underworldcode.org) was developed for modelling plate-scale fluid mechanics and studyingproblems in lithosphere dynamics. Though specialised for this task, underworld has a straightforwardpython user interface that allows it to run within the environment of jupyter notebooks on a laptop (at modest resolution, of course).The python interface was developed for adaptability in addressing new research problems, but also lends itself to integration intoa python-driven learning environment. To manage the heavy demands of installing and running underworld in a teaching laboratory, we have developed a workflow in whichwe install docker containers in the cloud which support a number of students to run their own environment independently. We share ourexperience blending notebooks and static webpages into a single web environment, and we explain how we designed our graphics andanalysis tools to allow notebook "scripts" to be queued and run on a supercomputer.

  15. Imaginative ethics--bringing ethical praxis into sharper relief.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansson, Mats G

    2002-01-01

    The empirical basis for this article is three years of experience with ethical rounds at Uppsala University Hospital. Three standard approaches of ethical reasoning are examined as potential explanations of what actually occurs during the ethical rounds. For reasons given, these are not found to be satisfying explanations. An approach called "imaginative ethics", is suggested as a more satisfactory account of this kind of ethical reasoning. The participants in the ethical rounds seem to draw on a kind of moral competence based on personal life experience and professional competence and experience. By listening to other perspectives and other experiences related to one particular patient story, the participants imagine alternative horizons of moral experience and explore a multitude of values related to clinical practice that might be at stake. In his systematic treatment of aesthetics in the Critique of Judgement, Kant made use of an operation of thought that, if applied to ethics, will enable us to be more sensitive to the particulars of each moral situation. Based on this reading of Kant, an account of imaginative ethics is developed in order to bring the ethical praxis of doctors and nurses into sharper relief. The Hebraic and the Hellenic traditions of imagination are used in order to illuminate some of the experiences of ethical rounds. In conclusion, it is argued that imaginative ethics and principle-based ethics should be seen as complementary in order to endow a moral discourse with ethical authority. Kantian ethics will do the job if it is remembered that Kant suggested only a modest, negative role of principle-based deliberation.

  16. When Biology & Physics Meet Exhibition Science Bringing Nations Together

    CERN Multimedia

    1997-01-01

    Politicians have come to realize the necessity of uniting the efforts of scientists. This is clear from the address of the President of Georgia E Shevardnadze to the JINR scientists : "The idea of collective participation in fundamental research is not only valuable per se. It is another opportunity for harmonious co-operation of representatives of different peoples and scientific schools in the single process of evolution of the world civilisation".

  17. Planting the Seed Exhibition Science Bringing Nations Together

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    "... our attention has turned to the question of developing this new international unit, a laboratory or institution where it would be possible to carry out scientific work above and beyond the framework of the various nations taking part [...] this body could be endowed with greater resources than those available to the national laboratories and could then embark upon tasks whose magnitude and nature preclude them from being done by the latter on their own." Louis de Broglie

  18. Solution Prototype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Efeoglu, Arkin; Møller, Charles; Serie, Michel

    2013-01-01

    This paper outlines an artifact building and evaluation proposal. Design Science Research (DSR) studies usually consider encapsulated artifact that have relationships with other artifacts. The solution prototype as a composed artifact demands for a more comprehensive consideration in its systematic...... environment. The solution prototype that is composed from blending product and service prototype has particular impacts on the dualism of DSR’s “Build” and “Evaluate”. Since the mix between product and service prototyping can be varied, there is a demand for a more agile and iterative framework. Van de Ven......’s research framework seems to fit this purpose. Van de Ven allows for an iterative research approach to problem solving with flexible starting point. The research activity is the result between the iteration of two dimensions. This framework focuses on the natural evaluation, particularly on ex...

  19. Kaiserschnitten Wien - Let's bring the forest in the city

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajda Primožič

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The location is part of the Vienna River Valley, known as "Wiental", one of the most dissonant, incongruous, and contested areas of Vienna. Depending on one’s perspective, the Vienna River Valley can be viewed as a transit corridor, an unresolved urban area, an urban interface, an inter- zone, an infrastructure bundle, an ugly wound in the urban landscape, a socially charged boundary, etc. We started the project with urban pattern analyses on different scales: the scale of the city, the scale of Wiental (from Schönbrunn to Hofburg and on a minor scale, i.e. the scale of the project.The analysis showed that Wiental constitutes the main connection between the city centre and suburbia and the countryside in the background of the city. With its clear morphological importance, it could become a green axis of the city, a pleasant place for people, rather than having only an infrastructural role. Our concept is to bring new character to Wiental by making it a pedestrian- and cyclist-friendly green axis. Our initial goal was to reduce car traffic. We proposed introducing a park-and-ride system, which would become a point of transfer where car traffic is replaced by public transport and cycle traffic. Through the afforestation of Wiental, the area could become a park or recreational route, and the quality of life in the area would improve.An important aspect of the project was dealing with the Danube. We proposed to manage the flood peaks by introducing a dam, and after the point of regulation, we arranged the River into two levels: an ambient upper flow and infrastructural lower flow in the existing channel. Also, by rearranging "Naschmarkt" with the Danube uncovered, we predicted an extension of tourism from the city centre to Schönbrunn by bicycle or on foot, which could be followed by an expansion of the public programme. We wanted to show that the Danube, with an appropriate environment, could become a significant element of the city structure.

  20. Will the warmer temperature bring the more intensity precipitation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yutong, Z., II; Wang, T.

    2017-12-01

    Will the warmer temperature bring the more intensity precipitation?Over the past several decades, changes in climate are amplified over the Tibetan Plateau(TP), with warming trend almost being twice as large as the global average. In sharp contrast, there is a large spatial discrepancy of the variations in precipitation extremes, with increasing trends found in the southern and decreasing trends in central TP. These features motivate are urgent need for an observation-based understanding of how precipitation extremes respond to climate change. Here we examine the relation between precipitation intensity with atmospheric temperature, dew point temperature (Td) and convective available potential energy (CAPE) in Tibet Plateau. Owing to the influences of the westerlies and Indian monsoon on Tibetan climate, the stations can be divided into three sub-regions in TP: the westerlies region (north of 35°N, N = 28), the monsoon region (south of 30°N in TP, N = 31), and the transition region (located between 30°N and 35°N, N = 48). We found that the intensity precipitation does not follow the C-C relation and there is a mix of positive and negative slope. To better understand why different scaling occurs with temperature in district region, using the dew point temperature replace the temperature, although there is significant variability in relative humidity values, at most stations, there appears to be a general increase in relative humidity associated. It is likely that the observed rise in relative humidity can assist in explaining the negative scaling of extreme precipitation at westerlies domain and monsoon domain, with the primary reason why precipitation extremes expected to increase follows from the fact that a warmer atmosphere can "hold" more moisture. This suggests that not only on how much the moisture the atmosphere can hold, but on how much moisture exits in atmosphere. To understand the role of dynamic on extreme precipitation, we repeat the precipitation

  1. Preparing for the worst : Calgary startup brings emergency response into the digital age

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, M.

    2009-01-01

    The potential danger of blowouts and oil spills is present in areas with high concentration of energy facilities and infrastructure. Ensuring that all possible measures have been taken to alert residents as early as possible is one way to alleviate fears of well blowouts, gas processing plant leaks, pipeline failures, or refinery or upgrader explosions. This article presented the GeoAlert, a high technology solution developed by Cell Bridge Communications Corporation to bring emergency response into the modern communications era. The features, benefits, and applications of GeoAlert were described. The program is a web-based emergency notification geographic information system application, that created a digital audit trail, and served as an internal communications and training platform, and had the potential to eliminate duplication among oil companies with overlapping jurisdictions. The system enabled companies to program emergency zones based on precise geographical co-ordinates and to use the system to proactively manage emergency response. It was concluded that the most visually striking feature of GeoAlert is its three-dimensional satellite mapping technology, which could display plumes as a purple-coloured initial isolation zone laid over designated emergency planning zones, moving in real-time while automatically identifying who should be notified and when. 1 fig.

  2. Tsetse Fly Genome Breakthrough Brings Hope for African Farmers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    Scientists have cracked the genetic code of the bloodsucking tsetse fly, prompting hope that the breakthrough will help future efforts to control one of the most devastating livestock diseases in sub-Saharan Africa spread by the insect. The tsetse genome was sequenced and annotated during a 10-year international collaborative effort that involved the Insect Pest Control Laboratory run jointly by the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in Vienna. The achievement allows scientists to better study the fly's genes and their functions, knowledge that should open the door for researching ways to control the insect

  3. Peabody Western brings its old mines into new competitive era

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sprouls, M.W.

    1994-10-01

    Peabody Western Coal Co., manages four surface mines that mark Peabody's expansion from the Midwest to the West. The mines began operating between 1964 and 1973, before the surge of western coal mine start-ups brought about by the oil price shock of 1973 and 1974 and the subsequent investments in coal by American oil companies. Despite good demand for western low-sulfur coals, the prices are low due to production overcapacity that was built in the 1970s. The result is that older mines have had to be creative to reduce costs and retain customers amid stiff competition. The mining units - Black Mesa and Kayenta in Arizona, Big Sky in Montana and Seneca in Colorado - now must handle coal supply administration, financial analysis, engineering, environmental compliance, labor relations and community relations at their sites. Peabody Western's Flagstaff, Ariz., headquarters staff will be reduced by about 30 people, although many of them will be assigned to mining units. All four surface mines use draglines, and each supplies a primary customer, but the mines have as many differences as similarities. Altogether, the mines produce about 17 million tons annually and employ 1,100 people.

  4. Bringing Context and Structure Back into Situated Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hotho, Jasper J.; Saka-Helmhout, Ayse; Becker-Ritterspach, Florian

    2014-01-01

    Practice-based studies have progressed thinking in the knowledge, learning and innovation fields by emphasizing the continual negotiation of social structures and meaning through participation. Yet, only a few contributions discuss how participation and learning are affected by broader structures....... This is an inconsistency in the understanding of ‘situated’ learning where learning through participation is restricted to the immediate community involved in a social activity. We aim to address this inconsistency by investigating the effects of the interplay between institutional and organizational structures...... institutional systems.In contrast to older views, our case findings suggest that while the interplay between institutional context and organizational structure indeed matters, it does not determine collective participation and situated learning as actors can actively create solutions when structural conditions...

  5. Bringing the material back in: US responses to the global climate change regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, D.R.

    2006-01-01

    Since environmental sociology was born as a sub-discipline of sociology, its proponents have encouraged sociological research that incorporates environmental factors. After a quarter of a century, however, sociological research continues to overlook the role of environmental factors - even when the object of the research is to understand an environmental issue. This paper analyzes the role of environmental factors to understand the ways that natural resource interests have been translated into political outcome in the form of American responses to the potential regulation of greenhouse gases. Incorporating data about natural resource use and national decision-making both before and after the Bush Administration's decision to pull out of negotiations for the Kyoto Protocol, this paper concludes that comprehending fully political decisions about global climate change in the United States requires that we recognize the conjoint constitution between policy-making and the environmental factors that are affected by such policies. More broadly, this research supports the notion that, in order to understand social phenomena more fully, sociologists must recommit to bringing environmental factors into social research. (author)

  6. Winter warriors : Alberta company bringing hydronic heating to oilsands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ball, C.

    2005-10-01

    Hydronic heating systems are expected to become the norm on oilsands construction sites. This article presented an overview of Innovative Climate Solutions Inc. (ICS), an Alberta company who specialize in portable flame-free climate-control systems, and have earned a reputation for staying on the leading edge of technology. ICS has now established a joint venture and local Fort McMurray presence with AirCon Technologies. ICS has focused on portable flame-free heat, concrete curing, grown thawing and drying equipment services. Increasingly drying applications are used year-round to improve project schedules, as these systems can reduce excessive humidity in work environments to improve productivity and safety. Drywall compound, paint and textures cure quickly during cool or damp summer nights, and dry heat also prevents prevents moisture, safeguarding a site against mould. As well as providing solutions to overcome cold weather challenges, ICS-trained climate control consultants work closely with each customer to determine fuel costs, heating needs, and how much equipment is needed. ICS systems output capacity of up to 1.2 million Btu per system, and have the power to thaw 24,000 square feet of ground or cure 36,000 square feet of concrete per system. The design allows one climate-control system to handle the heating needs for an entire construction project, reducing downtime associated with traditional methods of cold-weather construction and preventing emissions risks to workers. The system draws upon a centrally located hydronic water heater which warms a heat-transfer fluid. The fluid is then pumped through a fluid circulation system loop to heat exchangers at remote locations. The systems can run for 125 days between oil changes, with up to 75 hours of run time between re-fuelling. 3 figs.

  7. From the Moon: Bringing Space Science to Diverse Audiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runyon, C. J.; Hall, C.; Joyner, E.; Meyer, H. M.; M3 Science; E/PO Team

    2011-12-01

    NASA's Apollo missions held a place in the mindset of many Americans - we dared to go someplace where humans had never set foot, a place unknown and beyond our imaginations. These early NASA missions and discoveries resulted in an enhanced public understanding of the Moon. Now, with the human element so far removed from space exploration, students must rely on textbooks, TV's, and computers to build their understanding of our Moon. However, NASA educational materials about the Moon are stale and out-of-date. In addition, they do not effectively address 21st Century Skills, an essential for today's classrooms. Here, we present a three-part model for developing opportunities in lunar science education professional development that is replicable and sustainable and integrates NASA mission-derived data (e.g., Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M3)/Chandrayaan-1). I) With the return of high resolution/high spatial data from M3/Chandrayaan-1, we can now better explore and understand the compositional variations on the lunar surface. Data and analysis techniques from the imaging spectrometer are incorporated into the M3 Educator's Guide: Seeing the Moon in a New Light. The guide includes an array of activities and lessons to help educators and students understand how NASA is currently exploring the Moon. The guide integrates NASA maps and data into the interactive lessons, bringing the excitement of scientific exploration and discovery into the classroom. II) Utilizing the M3 Educator's Guide as well as educational activities from more current NASA lunar missions, we offer two sustained professional development opportunities for educators to explore the Moon through interactive and creative strategies. 1) Geology of the Moon, an online course offered through Montana State University's National Teacher Enhancement Network, is a 3-credit graduate course. 2) Fly Me to the Moon, offered through the College of Charleston's Office of Professional Development in Education, is a two

  8. A first attempt to bring computational biology into advanced high school biology classrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Suzanne Renick; Coon, William; Donley, Kristin; Scott, Abby; Goldberg, Debra S

    2011-10-01

    Computer science has become ubiquitous in many areas of biological research, yet most high school and even college students are unaware of this. As a result, many college biology majors graduate without adequate computational skills for contemporary fields of biology. The absence of a computational element in secondary school biology classrooms is of growing concern to the computational biology community and biology teachers who would like to acquaint their students with updated approaches in the discipline. We present a first attempt to correct this absence by introducing a computational biology element to teach genetic evolution into advanced biology classes in two local high schools. Our primary goal was to show students how computation is used in biology and why a basic understanding of computation is necessary for research in many fields of biology. This curriculum is intended to be taught by a computational biologist who has worked with a high school advanced biology teacher to adapt the unit for his/her classroom, but a motivated high school teacher comfortable with mathematics and computing may be able to teach this alone. In this paper, we present our curriculum, which takes into consideration the constraints of the required curriculum, and discuss our experiences teaching it. We describe the successes and challenges we encountered while bringing this unit to high school students, discuss how we addressed these challenges, and make suggestions for future versions of this curriculum.We believe that our curriculum can be a valuable seed for further development of computational activities aimed at high school biology students. Further, our experiences may be of value to others teaching computational biology at this level. Our curriculum can be obtained at http://ecsite.cs.colorado.edu/?page_id=149#biology or by contacting the authors.

  9. Microsoft SQL Server OLAP Solution - A Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Badiozamany, Sobhan

    2010-01-01

    Microsoft SQL Server 2008 offers technologies for performing On-Line Analytical Processing (OLAP), directly on data stored in data warehouses, instead of moving the data into some offline OLAP tool. This brings certain benefits, such as elimination of data copying and better integration with the DBMS compared with off-line OLAP tools. This report reviews SQL Server support for OLAP, solution architectures, tools and components involved. Standard storage options are discussed but the focus of ...

  10. Sound cable crossing brings inexpensive electric power to Long Island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grzan, J.; Goyette, R.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that while many electric-utility customers in New York State benefit from inexpensive hydroelectric power from Canada and upstate New York, lack of sufficient transmission connections have prevented this electricity from reaching Long Island. However, a newly constructed underground/underwater link capable of carrying 700-MW now transmits low-cost electricity to the island, saving money for customers. The self-contained fluid-filled cable used for the underwater portion of the project is the largest underwater cable in the world. The use of high-pressure, fluid-filled pipe-type cable on the land portion represents the largest application of paper-polypropylene-paper (PPP) insulated cable in the United States. State-of-the-art technologies were implemented in the use of temperature monitoring and leak detection systems, SF 6 gas-insulated substation, and underwater cable laying and embedment techniques

  11. Sickle cell trait and sudden death--bringing it home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Bruce L.

    2007-01-01

    Sickle cell trait continues to be the leading cause of sudden death for young African Americans in military basic training and civilian organized sports. The syndrome may have caused the death of up to 10 college football players since 1974 and, as recently as 2000, was suspected as the cause of death of three U.S. Army recruits. The penal military-style boot camps in the United States and the recent death of two teenagers with sickle cell trait merits renewed vigor in the education of athletic instructors, the military and the public about conditions associated with sudden death in individuals with sickle cell trait. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:17393956

  12. The Washington Academy of Biomedical Engineering (WABME) Quarterly Workshops: Clinical Problems and Engineering Solutions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wong, Kenneth

    2005-01-01

    ... University and Howard University. A prime component of WABME activities is a quarterly series of research workshops, which bring together problem-rich biomedical disciplines and solution-rich engineering and scientific disciplines...

  13. Higher Education Partners with the Federal Government for PKI: Both Communities Bring Substantial Expertise and Investment to the Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    PKI for Networked Higher Education Working Group.

    2000-01-01

    One barrier to Web-based education is lack of an effective system to identify and authorize involved participants, content, and institutions. PKI (public-key infrastructure) is an emerging technology that can certify the correct identity of each person and communication in Web-based learning. A June 2000 National Science Foundation workshop…

  14. Bringing New Families to the Museum One Baby at a Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Alicia

    2012-01-01

    "Bring Your Baby to the Danforth Museum of Art" is a program for mothers. Unlike other museum programs that focus on the needs of children, Bring Your Baby caters to the intellectual interests of the adult parent. Parents learn about artworks, play with babies in a beautiful environment, and socialize with other families. The program is…

  15. Features of course definition system control for a mode of preliminary bringing to horizon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    О.А. Сущенко

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available  The features of course definition system consisting of   platform in gimbal suspension, tuned rotor gyroscopes and pendulous accelerometers for a mode of preliminary bringing to horizon are reviewed. The mathematical description of the mode of preliminary bringing to horizon is derived and the appropriate control moments are determined.

  16. 29 CFR 779.110 - Employees in retailing whose activities may bring them under the Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Employees in retailing whose activities may bring them under the Act. 779.110 Section 779.110 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR... Production of Goods for Commerce § 779.110 Employees in retailing whose activities may bring them under the...

  17. Fleet DNA Brings Fleet Data to Life, Informs R&D | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleet DNA Brings Fleet Data to Life, Informs R&D Science and Technology Highlights Highlights in Research & Development Fleet DNA Brings Fleet Data to Life, Informs R&D Key Research Results Achievement Built on over 11.5 million miles of vehicle operations data, Fleet DNA helps users

  18. Fleet DNA Brings Fleet Data to Life, Informs R&D | News | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleet DNA Brings Fleet Data to Life, Informs R&D Fleet DNA Brings Fleet Data to Life, Informs R De La Rosa, NREL 34672 The Fleet DNA clearinghouse of commercial vehicle operations data features Odyne-have tapped into Fleet DNA." The data-driven insight and decision-making capabilities

  19. [Female labor force participation and bringing up children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooz, I

    1994-11-01

    In Hungary large numbers of women began to perform paid work outside the household from the 1960s on. Among women 15-54 years old the proportion engaged in income-producing activity in the 1930s was 30.8%, almost 50% in 1960, over 70% in 1980 (vs. 87.4% for men). In Hungary women in the early reproductive years have a low employment level, but once their children are kindergarten age their employment level approximates that of men. In 1990 there were 360,000 children 0-5 years old who did not attend child care centers or kindergartens, presumably they were taken care of at home. The increasing trend of female employment is one of the most direct causes of the decline of fertility. The number of children also affects the employment of women. In the United Kingdom twice as many women under the age of 34 with 1 or 2 children work than in France; 37% of mothers with children 0-4 years old and 53% with children 5-9 years old are employed. In Sweden 90% of mothers 35-44 years old with children 0-6 years old and 95% of them with children 7-16 years old are employed. In the United States 48.7% of mothers with children under the age of 6 are employed vs. 62.1% of mothers with children 6-17 years old. Maternity leave of several weeks or months is common in Europe. In a number of industrialized countries and also in Hungary the working and lactating mother gets favorable working hours, increased vacation, and sick leave for caring for sick children. In Hungary child care centers for children under 3 are operating in only 1300 settlements out of 3300 settlements. Similarly, in most western European countries only 2-6% of these children could be accommodated during 1986-89 except for Denmark (48%), Belgium (20%), and France (20%). The situation was much better for children over 3, where the average was 60%. In 1988 part-time work among women with children 0-6 years years old ranged from 10.3 to 57.7% in 11 European countries, but the loss of income and career opportunities are

  20. Hibernate Recipes A Problem-Solution Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Mak, Gary

    2010-01-01

    Hibernate continues to be the most popular out-of-the-box framework solution for Java Persistence and data/database accessibility techniques and patterns. It is used for e-commerce-based web applications as well as heavy-duty transactional systems for the enterprise. Gary Mak, the author of the best-selling Spring Recipes, now brings you Hibernate Recipes. This book contains a collection of code recipes and templates for learning and building Hibernate solutions for you and your clients. This book is your pragmatic day-to-day reference and guide for doing all things involving Hibernate. There

  1. Generalized solutions of nonlinear partial differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Rosinger, EE

    1987-01-01

    During the last few years, several fairly systematic nonlinear theories of generalized solutions of rather arbitrary nonlinear partial differential equations have emerged. The aim of this volume is to offer the reader a sufficiently detailed introduction to two of these recent nonlinear theories which have so far contributed most to the study of generalized solutions of nonlinear partial differential equations, bringing the reader to the level of ongoing research.The essence of the two nonlinear theories presented in this volume is the observation that much of the mathematics concernin

  2. Bringing problem based learning to life using virtual reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Linda; Sadler, Lynne; Surtees, Geoffrey

    2005-03-01

    Recent UK government policy advocates the need for a more flexible approach to nurse education and ;Fitness for Practice' stresses the importance of information technology and computer mediated learning facilities in the future of nursing education [Department of Health, Making a Difference, Strengthening the Nursing, Midwifery and Health Visiting Contribution to Health Care, Department of Health, 1999; The United Kingdom Central Council For Nursing, Fitness for Practice, The UKCC Commission for Nursing and Midwifery Education, 1999]. In response to this recommendation, a virtual reality package has been designed as a learning resource within adult pre-registration nursing education. This learning and teaching strategy is used in conjunction with problem based learning, enabling students to visualise individual/family life in a community setting. Students are encouraged to consider wider issues such as social and environmental factors and their impact upon health. The virtual reality package acts as one of a number of triggers. This paper will discuss the early development and offer an example of its use as a learning and teaching strategy within year two of a three year programme.

  3. Leveraging Telehealth to Bring Volunteer Physicians Into Underserved Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uscher-Pines, Lori; Rudin, Robert; Mehrotra, Ateev

    2017-06-01

    Many disadvantaged communities lack sufficient numbers of local primary care and specialty physicians. Yet tens of thousands of physicians, in particular those who are retired or semiretired, desire meaningful volunteer opportunities. Multiple programs have begun to use telehealth to bridge the gap between volunteer physicians and underserved patients. In this brief, we describe programs that are using this model and discuss the promise and pitfalls. Physician volunteers in these programs report that the work can be fulfilling and exciting, a cutting-edge yet convenient way to remain engaged and contribute. Given the projected shortfall of physicians in the United States, recruiting retired and semiretired physicians to provide care through telehealth increases the total supply of active physicians and the capacity of the existing workforce. However, programs typically use volunteers in a limited capacity because of uncertainty about the level and duration of commitment. Acknowledging this reality, most programs only use volunteer physicians for curbside consults rather than fully integrating them into longitudinal patient care. The part-time availability of volunteers may also be difficult to incorporate into the workflow of busy safety net clinics. As more physicians volunteer in a growing number of telehealth programs, the dual benefits of enriching the professional lives of volunteers and improving care for underserved communities will make further development of these programs worthwhile.

  4. Dynamic optimization of a FCC converter unit: numerical analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Almeida Nt

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Fluidized-bed Catalytic Cracking (FCC is a process subject to frequent variations in the operating conditions (including feed quality and feed rate. The production objectives usually are the maximization of LPG and gasoline production. This fact makes the FCC converter unit an excellent opportunity for real-time optimization. The present work aims to apply a dynamic optimization in an industrial FCC converter unit, using a mechanistic dynamic model, and to carry out a numerical analysis of the solution procedure. A simultaneous approach was used to discretize the system of differential-algebraic equations and the resulting large-scale NLP problem was solved using the IPOPT solver. This study also does a short comparison between the results obtained by a potential dynamic real-time optimization (DRTO against a possible steady-state real-time optimization (RTO application. The results demonstrate that the application of dynamic real-time optimization of a FCC converter unit can bring significant benefits in production.

  5. Bringing Together Users and Developers of Forest Biomass Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Molly Elizabeth; Macauley, Molly K.

    2012-01-01

    private sector because much forest acreage in the United States is privately held and needs data for forest management. Additional key outcomes identified by meeting participants include the following: (1) Priority should be given to building into the biomass product ease of use and low costs (including costs of hardware, software, and analysis requirements), (2) CMS products should also be relevant to other biomass measures for forest watershed management, habitat protection for biodiversity, and assessment of markets for ecosystem services, (3) CMS leadership should engage with the Subsidiary Body for Scientific and Technological Advice of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change as they establish measuring, reporting, and verification standards, and (4) CMS leadership should continue to keep sister agencies and other organizations informed as CMS develops, particularly via the agencies active in the U.S. Global Change Research Program Carbon Cycle Interagency Working Group (U.S. Geological Survey, U.S. Department of Agriculture, and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) and nongovernmental organizations.

  6. A pyramid solution at Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    In the Kiev '92 competition to find a solution to the problem of containing the stricken Chernobyl unit 4, the PPROTECTOR proposal, put forward by a British-led international consortium, ranked fifth after the first round of judging. It made extensive use of advanced CAD techniques. (Author)

  7. Interface unit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keyson, D.V.; Freudenthal, A.; De Hoogh, M.P.A.; Dekoven, E.A.M.

    2001-01-01

    The invention relates to an interface unit comprising at least a display unit for communication with a user, which is designed for being coupled with a control unit for at least one or more parameters in a living or working environment, such as the temperature setting in a house, which control unit

  8. 16-channel analog store and multiplexer unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brossard, M; Kulka, Z [Clermont-Ferrand-2 Univ., 63 - Aubiere (France). Lab. de Physique Corpusculaire

    1979-03-15

    A 16-channel analog store and multiplexer unit is described. The unit enables storing and selection of analog information which is then digitally encoded by single ADC. This solution becomes economically attractive particularly in multidetector pulse height analysis systems.

  9. Bring Hidden Hazards to the Publics Attention, Understanding, and Informed Decision by Coordinating Federal Education Initiatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niepold, F.; Karsten, J. L.; Wei, M.; Jadin, J.

    2010-12-01

    In the 2010 National Research Council’s America’s Climate Choices’ report on Informing Effective Decisions and Actions Related to Climate Change concluded; “Education and communication are among the most powerful tools the nation has to bring hidden hazards to public attention, understanding, and action.” They conclude that the “current and future students, the broader public, and policymakers need to understand the causes, consequences, and potential solutions to climate change, develop scientific thinking and problem-solving skills, and improve their ability to make informed decisions.” The U.S. Global Change Research Program (USGCRP) works to integrate the climate related activities of these different agencies, with oversight from the Office of Science and Technology Policy and other White House offices. USGCRP’s focus is now on evaluating optimal strategies for addressing climate change risks, improving coordination among the Federal agencies, engaging stakeholders (including national policy leaders and local resource managers) on the research results to all and improving public understanding and decision-making related to global change. Implicit to these activities is the need to educate the public about the science of climate change and its consequences, as well as coordinate Federal investments related to climate change education. In a broader sense, the implementation of the proposed Interagency Taskforce on Climate Change Communication and Education will serve the evolving USGCRP mandates around cross-cutting, thematic elements, as recommended by the National Research Council (NRC, 2009) and the U.S. Climate Change Science Program Revised Research Plan: An update to the 2003 Strategic Plan (USGCRP, 2008), to help the Federal government “capitalize on its investments and aid in the development of increased climate literacy for the Nation.” This session will update the participants on the work to date and the near term coordinated plans

  10. The Quake-Catcher Network: Bringing Seismology to Homes and Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, J. F.; Cochran, E. S.; Christensen, C. M.; Saltzman, J.; Taber, J.; Hubenthal, M.

    2011-12-01

    The Quake-Catcher Network (QCN) is a collaborative initiative for developing the world's largest, low-cost strong-motion seismic network by utilizing sensors in and attached to volunteer internet-connected computers. QCN is not only a research tool, but provides an educational tool for teaching earthquake science in formal and informal environments. A central mission of the Quake-Catcher Network is to provide scientific educational software and hardware so that K-12 teachers, students, and the general public can better understand and participate in the science of earthquakes and earthquake hazards. With greater understanding, teachers, students, and interested individuals can share their new knowledge, resulting in continued participation in the project, and better preparation for earthquakes in their homes, businesses, and communities. The primary educational outreach goals are 1) to present earthquake science and earthquake hazards in a modern and exciting way, and 2) to provide teachers and educators with seismic sensors, interactive software, and educational modules to assist in earthquake education. QCNLive (our interactive educational computer software) displays recent and historic earthquake locations and 3-axis real-time acceleration measurements. This tool is useful for demonstrations and active engagement for all ages, from K-college. QCN provides subsidized sensors at 49 for the general public and 5 for K-12 teachers. With your help, the Quake-Catcher Network can provide better understanding of earthquakes to a broader audience. Academics are taking QCN to classrooms across the United States and around the world. The next time you visit a K-12 classroom or teach a college class on interpreting seismograms, bring a QCN sensor and QCNLive software with you! To learn how, visit http://qcn.stanford.edu.

  11. Aquaculture: a promising solution for food insecurity, poverty and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    With increasing food production challenges such as dwindling capture fisheries and impacts of climate change becoming more eminent, solutions to food insecurity and malnutrition in Kenya must bring about quick results in food availability by stimulating more own-food production. Aquaculture has so far been recognized ...

  12. Pressure profiles of the BRing based on the simulation used in the CSRm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J. C.; Li, P.; Yang, J. C.; Yuan, Y. J.; Wu, B.; Chai, Z.; Luo, C.; Dong, Z. Q.; Zheng, W. H.; Zhao, H.; Ruan, S.; Wang, G.; Liu, J.; Chen, X.; Wang, K. D.; Qin, Z. M.; Yin, B.

    2017-07-01

    HIAF-BRing, a new multipurpose accelerator facility of the High Intensity heavy-ion Accelerator Facility project, requires an extremely high vacuum lower than 10-11 mbar to fulfill the requirements of radioactive beam physics and high energy density physics. To achieve the required process pressure, the bench-marked codes of VAKTRAK and Molflow+ are used to simulate the pressure profiles of the BRing system. In order to ensure the accuracy of the implementation of VAKTRAK, the computational results are verified by measured pressure data and compared with a new simulation code BOLIDE on the current synchrotron CSRm. Since the verification of VAKTRAK has been done, the pressure profiles of the BRing are calculated with different parameters such as conductance, out-gassing rates and pumping speeds. According to the computational results, the optimal parameters are selected to achieve the required pressure for the BRing.

  13. Bring Me Men: Intertextual Identity Formation at the US Air Force Academy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schifani, Katherine L

    2008-01-01

    .... It took twenty-one years from when the first class entered in 1955 before the Air Force Academy saw its first women, one walking famously on her first day in front of the "Bring Me Men..." ramp (BMMR...

  14. Pressure profiles of the BRing based on the simulation used in the CSRm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, J.C., E-mail: wangjiachen@impcas.ac.cn [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Li, P., E-mail: lipeng@impcas.ac.cn [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Yang, J.C.; Yuan, Y.J. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Wu, B. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Chai, Z.; Luo, C. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Dong, Z.Q. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Zheng, W.H. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Zhao, H.; Ruan, S.; Wang, G.; Liu, J.; Chen, X.; Wang, K.D.; Qin, Z.M. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Yin, B. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2017-07-11

    HIAF-BRing, a new multipurpose accelerator facility of the High Intensity heavy-ion Accelerator Facility project, requires an extremely high vacuum lower than 10{sup −11} mbar to fulfill the requirements of radioactive beam physics and high energy density physics. To achieve the required process pressure, the bench-marked codes of VAKTRAK and Molflow+ are used to simulate the pressure profiles of the BRing system. In order to ensure the accuracy of the implementation of VAKTRAK, the computational results are verified by measured pressure data and compared with a new simulation code BOLIDE on the current synchrotron CSRm. Since the verification of VAKTRAK has been done, the pressure profiles of the BRing are calculated with different parameters such as conductance, out-gassing rates and pumping speeds. According to the computational results, the optimal parameters are selected to achieve the required pressure for the BRing.

  15. Collaborative Science with Indigenous Knowledge for Climate Solutions: Why, How, and with Whom?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, J.; Lazrus, H.; Gough, B.

    2017-12-01

    The inherent complexity of climate change requires diverse perspectives to understand and respond to its impacts. The Rising Voices: Collaborative Science with Indigenous Knowledge for Climate Solutions (Rising Voices) program represents a growing network of engaged Indigenous and non-Indigenous scientists committed to cross-cultural and collaborative research and activities to understand and mitigate the impacts of extreme weather and climate change. Five annual Rising Voices workshops have occurred since 2013, engaging hundreds of participants from across Tribal communities, the United States, and internationally over the years. Housed at the National Center for Atmospheric Research, Rising Voices aims to expand how diversity is understood in atmospheric science, to include intellectual diversity stemming from distinct cultural backgrounds. It envisions collaborative research that brings together Indigenous knowledges and science with Western climate and weather sciences in a respectful and inclusive manner to achieve culturally relevant and scientifically robust climate and weather adaptation solutions. The premise of the program and the research and collaborations it produces is that there is an opportunity cost to not involving diverse knowledge systems and observations from varied cultural backgrounds in addressing climate change. We cannot afford that cost given the challenges ahead. This poster presents some of the protocols, methods, challenges, and outcomes of cross-cultural research between Western and Indigenous scientists and communities from across the United States. It also presents some of the recommendations that have emerged from Rising Voices workshops over the past five years.

  16. Anthology of dry storage solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allimann, Nathalie; Otton, Camille [AREVA, Paris (France)

    2012-03-15

    Around 35,000 PWR, BWR or Veer used fuel elements with various enrichment value up to 5%, various cooling time down to 2 years and various burn-ups up to 60,000 Mwd/tU are currently stored in AREVA dry storage solutions. These solutions are delivered in the United States, in Japan and in many European countries like Belgium, Switzerland, Italy, Armenia and Germany. With more than 1000 dry storage solutions delivered all over the world AREVA is the leader on this market. Dealing with dry storage is not an easy task. Products have to be flexible, to be adapted to customer needs and to the national regulations which may stipulate very strict tests such as airplane crash or simulation of earthquake. To develop a dry storage solution for a foreign country means to deal with its national competent authorities. All the national competent authorities do not have the same requirements. Storage conditions may also be different.

  17. Anthology of dry storage solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allimann, Nathalie; Otton, Camille

    2012-01-01

    Around 35,000 PWR, BWR or Veer used fuel elements with various enrichment value up to 5%, various cooling time down to 2 years and various burn-ups up to 60,000 Mwd/tU are currently stored in AREVA dry storage solutions. These solutions are delivered in the United States, in Japan and in many European countries like Belgium, Switzerland, Italy, Armenia and Germany. With more than 1000 dry storage solutions delivered all over the world AREVA is the leader on this market. Dealing with dry storage is not an easy task. Products have to be flexible, to be adapted to customer needs and to the national regulations which may stipulate very strict tests such as airplane crash or simulation of earthquake. To develop a dry storage solution for a foreign country means to deal with its national competent authorities. All the national competent authorities do not have the same requirements. Storage conditions may also be different

  18. Improving Security in Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) Environment by Controlling Access

    OpenAIRE

    Muhammad, M.A.; Zadeh, P.B.; Ayesh, Aladdin, 1972-

    2017-01-01

    With the rapid increase in smartphones and tablets, Bring Your Own Devices (BYOD) has simplified computing by introducing the use of personally owned devices. These devices can be utilised in accessing business enterprise contents and networks. The effectiveness of BYOD offers several business benefits like employee job satisfaction, increased job efficiency and flexibility. However, allowing employees to bring their own devices could lead to a plethora of security issues; like data theft, un...

  19. Bring-Your-Own-Device (BYOD): An Evaluation of Associated Risks to Corporate Information Security

    OpenAIRE

    Yeboah-Boateng, Ezer Osei; Boaten, Francis Edmund

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluates the cyber-risks to Business Information Assets posed by the adoption of Bring-Your-Own-Device (BYOD) to the workplace. BYOD is an emerging trend where employees bring and use personal computing devices on the companys network to access applications and sensitive data like emails, calendar and scheduling applications, documents, etc. Employees are captivated by BYOD because they can have access to private items as well as perform certain job functions while being unrestric...

  20. Transitioning HIV-infected adolescents to adult care at 14 clinics across the United States: using adolescent and adult providers' insights to create multi-level solutions to address transition barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philbin, Morgan M; Tanner, Amanda E; Chambers, Brittany D; Ma, Alice; Ware, Samuella; Lee, Sonia; Fortenberry, J Dennis; The Adolescent Trials Network

    2017-10-01

    HIV-infected adolescents have disproportionately low rates of care retention and viral suppression. Approximately half disengage from care while transitioning to adult clinics, in part due to fragmented care systems and lack of streamlined protocols. We conducted 58 qualitative interviews with social service and health care providers across 14 Adolescent Trials Network clinics (n = 28) and 20 adult clinics that receive transitioning adolescents (n = 30) from August 2015-June 2016. We used the constant comparative approach to examine processes, barriers, and facilitators of adult care transition. Transition barriers coalesced around three levels. Structural: insurance eligibility, transportation, and HIV-related stigma; Clinical: inter-clinic communication, differences in care cultures, and resource/personnel limitations; and Individual: adolescents' transition readiness and developmental capacity. Staff-initiated solutions (e.g., grant-funded transportation) were often unsustainable and applied individual-level solutions to structural-level barriers. Comprehensive initiatives, which develop collaborative policies and protocols that support providers' ability to match the solution and barrier level (i.e., structural-to-structural), are sorely needed. These initiatives should also support local systematic planning to facilitate inter-clinic structures and communication. Such approaches will help HIV-infected adolescents transition to adult care and improve long-term health outcomes.

  1. Enhanced safety features of CHASHMA NPP UNIT-2 to encounter selected severe accidents, various challenges involved to prove the adequacy of severe accidents prevention/mitigation measures and to write management guidelines with one possible solution to these challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iqbal, Z.; Minhaj, A.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes enhanced safety features of Chashma Nuclear Power Plant Unit-2 (C-2), a 325 MWe PWR to encounter selected severe accidents and discusses various challenges involved to prove the adequacy of severe accidents encountering measures and to write severe accident management guidelines (SAMGs) in compliance with the recently introduced national regulations based on the new IAEA nuclear safety standards. C-2 is being built by China National Nuclear Corporation (CNNC) for Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission (PAEC). Its twin, Unit-1 (C-1) also a 325 MWe PWR, was commissioned in 2000. Nuclear power safety with reference to severe accidents should be treated as a global issue and therefore the developed countries should include the people of developing countries in nuclear power industry's various severe accidents based research and development programs. The implementation of this idea may also deliver few other useful and mutually beneficial byproducts. (author)

  2. Mobile emergency response unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadi, W.J.; Trolan, R.T.; Becker, J.F.

    1979-01-01

    The Hotspot quick-response unit was the solution to a requirement to find, identify, and control areas of radioactive contamination at the scene of a nuclear weapons accident. The unit consists of two trucks and two trailers, and is designed to be transported by one U.S. Air Force C-141. One truck (generator truck) carries a 40 kW generator-heater-air conditioner combination, spare tires, and accessories. The other (water truck) carries supplies and a 250-gal water tank. One trailer (counting trailer) contains detecting, counting, and recording equipment. The other (decontaminating trailer) contains a shower, sink, 30-gal hot water tank, and supplies

  3. Bring about benefit, forestall harm: what communication studies say about spirituality and cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tullis, Jillian A

    2010-01-01

    Technological advances in medicine allow health care providers to diagnose diseases earlier, diminish suffering, and prolong life. These advances, although widely revered for changing the face of cancer care, come at a cost for patients, families, and even health care providers. One widely cited consequence of better diagnostics and improved treatment regiments is the sense that there is always one more test or therapy available to extend life. Such an approach to cancer care can prove detrimental to patients? healing. In addition, these new tests and treatments further focus attention on the body as the site of healing and cure while downplaying other aspects of health. The absence of psychological, social, and spiritual care from a patient's cancer care plan compromises healing and makes palliative and end of life care more complicated. In this essay, I discuss the tensions that exist between contemporary cancer care and spirituality and use Communication Studies scholarship to navigate the challenges of integrating a patient's religious or spiritual beliefs into their cancer treatment and care. In addition to discussing the challenges of communicating about sensitive topics such as illness, spirituality, and dying, this article uses narrative examples from a comprehensive cancer center and a hospice (both in the United States) to understand how people with cancer and other terminal illnesses communicate their spirituality and how these conversations influence health care choices and provide comfort. By understanding how patients communicate about topics such as the meaning of life, quality of life, dying and death, providers are better equipped to offer care that is consistent with a patient's beliefs and life goals. This approach maintains that communication is more than a means of transferring information, but is constitutive. By understanding that communication creates our lives and shapes our worlds, lay and professional caregivers can meet patients where

  4. A Groundwater project for K-12 schools: Bringing research into the classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodak, C. M.; Walsh, M.; Gensic, J.

    2011-12-01

    Simple water quality test kits were used in a series of K-12 classrooms to demonstrate scientific processes and to motivate learning in K-12 students. While focused on student learning, this project also allowed collection of regional data on groundwater quality (primarily nitrate) in the study area. The project consisted of development and administration of a weeklong groundwater quality unit introduced to K-12 schools in northern Indiana and taught by a graduate student in an engineering discipline. The structure of the week started with an introduction to basic groundwater concepts modified for the specific grade level; for this project the students ranged from grades 4-12. In addition to groundwater basics, the purpose of the collection of the water quality data, as well as relevance to the research of the graduate student, were outlined. The students were then: (i) introduced to two simple water quality testing methods for nitrates, (ii) required to hypothesize as to which method will likely be "better" in application, and (iii) asked to practice using these two methods under laboratory conditions. Following practice, the students were asked to discuss their hypotheses relative to what was observed during the practice focusing on which testing method was more accurate and/or precise. The students were then encouraged to bring water samples from their home water system (many of which are on private wells) to analyze within groups. At the end of the week, the students shared their experience in this educational effort, as well as the resulting nitrate data from numerous groundwater wells (as collected by the students). Following these discussions the data were added to an online database housed on a wiki sponsored by the Notre Dame Extended Research Community (http://wellhead.michianastem.org/home). These data were plotted using the free service MapAList to visually demonstrate to the students the spatial distribution of the data and how their results have

  5. Registered dietitian nutritionists bring value to emerging health care delivery models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jortberg, Bonnie T; Fleming, Michael O

    2014-12-01

    Health care in the United States is the most expensive in the world; however, most citizens do not receive quality care that is comprehensive and coordinated. To address this gap, the Institute for Healthcare Improvement developed the Triple Aim (ie, improving population health, improving the patient experience, and reducing costs), which has been adopted by patient-centered medical homes and accountable care organizations. The patient-centered medical home and other population health models focus on improving the care for all people, particularly those with multiple morbidities. The Joint Principles of the Patient-Centered Medical Home, developed by the major primary care physician organizations in 2007, recognizes the key role of the multidisciplinary team in meeting the challenge of caring for these individuals. Registered dietitian nutritionists (RDNs) bring value to this multidisciplinary team by providing care coordination, evidence-based care, and quality-improvement leadership. RDNs have demonstrated efficacy for improvements in outcomes for patients with a wide variety of medical conditions. Primary care physicians, as well as several patient-centered medical home and population health demonstration projects, have reported the benefits of RDNs as part of the integrated primary care team. One of the most significant barriers to integrating RDNs into primary care has been an insufficient reimbursement model. Newer innovative payment models provide the opportunity to overcome this barrier. In order to achieve this integration, the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and RDNs must fully understand and embrace the opportunities and challenges that the new health care delivery and payment models present, and be prepared and empowered to lead the necessary changes. All stakeholders within the health care system need to more fully recognize and embrace the value and multidimensional role of the RDN on the multidisciplinary team. The Academy's Patient

  6. Generating Units

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Generating Units are any combination of physically connected generators, reactors, boilers, combustion turbines, and other prime movers operated together to produce...

  7. Formation of catalyst deposits in flue gas slide valves at an FCC unit: an experimental solution; Formacao de depositos de catalisador em valvula corredica dos gases de combustao de unidade de FCC: uma experiencia de solucao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Luiz Eduardo Magalhaes Correa da; Rodrigues, Jayme Thadeu [PETROBRAS (Brazil). Refinaria Alberto Pasqualini

    1990-04-01

    We describe flue gas slide valve sticking at the FCC (fluid catalytic cracking) Unit Alberto Pasqualini Refinery (REFAP/PETROBRAS). Findings show that this sticking was due to the formation of catalyst deposits below the slide valve guides. A retrospective survey has suggested that what caused troubleshooting was dragging by medium steam in the cat cracker. We present a theoretical formulation to account for catalyst deposit formation, as well as some points that should be observed in order to minimize the problem. (author) 13 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. A Dual Egalitarian Solution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klijn, F.; Slikker, M.; Tijs, S.H.

    2000-01-01

    In this note we introduce an egalitarian solution, called the dual egalitarian solution, that is the natural counterpart of the egalitarian solution of Dutta and Ray (1989).We prove, among others, that for a convex game the egalitarian solution coincides with the dual egalitarian solution for its

  9. Using appreciative inquiry to bring neonatal nurses and parents together to enhance family-centred care: A collaborative workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trajkovski, Suza; Schmied, Virginia; Vickers, Margaret; Jackson, Debra

    2015-06-01

    Family-centred care (FCC) has been well recognised, accepted and reported in the literature as an optimised way of caring for hospitalised children. While neonatal units strive to adopt this philosophy, published research suggests there are difficulties implementing FCC principles in daily practice. Appreciative inquiry (AI) is a philosophy and methodology that offers a unique, strength-based approach to promoting organisational learning and positive organisational change. As a participatory approach, AI facilitates change from the ground up and lends itself to building effective partnerships or collaborations. This article reports the findings of a one-day workshop using an AI methodology to bring neonatal nurses and parents together to enhance the FCC within a neonatal intensive care unit in Sydney, Australia. Participants (n = 15) developed collaborative insights of optimal FCC that can be built upon to support neonates and their families in the future. Shared visions were formed, strategies identified and a development plan made for ongoing collaborations and partnerships. AI provides a flexible framework that enables the mandatory collaboration needed to develop action plans that can form the catalyst for organizational change in health-care research and practice. © The Author(s) 2013.

  10. The Engaged Microbiologist: Bringing the Microbiological Sciences to the K-12 Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westenberg, David J

    2016-03-01

    Exposing K-12 students to cutting edge science that impacts their daily lives can bring classroom lessons to life. Citizen-science projects are an excellent way to bring high-level science to the classroom and help satisfy one of the cornerstone concepts of the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS), "engaging in practices that scientists and engineers actually use." This can be a daunting task for teachers who may lack the background or resources to integrate these projects into the classroom. This is where scientific societies such as the American Society for Microbiology (ASM) can play a critical role. ASM encourages its members to engage with the K-12 community by providing networking opportunities and resources for ASM members and K-12 teachers to work together to bring microbiology into the classroom. Journal of Microbiology & Biology Education.

  11. Effect of B-ring substitution pattern on binding mode of propionamide selective androgen receptor modulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohl, Casey E; Wu, Zengru; Chen, Jiyun; Mohler, Michael L; Yang, Jun; Hwang, Dong Jin; Mustafa, Suni; Miller, Duane D; Bell, Charles E; Dalton, James T

    2008-10-15

    Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) are essentially prostate sparing androgens, which provide therapeutic potential in osteoporosis, male hormone replacement, and muscle wasting. Herein we report crystal structures of the androgen receptor (AR) ligand-binding domain (LBD) complexed to a series of potent synthetic nonsteroidal SARMs with a substituted pendant arene referred to as the B-ring. We found that hydrophilic B-ring para-substituted analogs exhibit an additional region of hydrogen bonding not seen with steroidal compounds and that multiple halogen substitutions affect the B-ring conformation and aromatic interactions with Trp741. This information elucidates interactions important for high AR binding affinity and provides new insight for structure-based drug design.

  12. Frontier Fields: A Cost-Effective Approach to Bringing Authentic Science to the Education Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenhamer, B.; Lawton, B.; Summers, F.; Ryer, H.

    2015-11-01

    For more than two decades, the Hubble EPO program has sought to bring the wonders of the universe to the education community and the public, and to engage audiences in the adventure of scientific discovery. Program components include standards-based, curriculum-support materials, exhibits and exhibit components, and professional development workshops. The main underpinnings of the program's infrastructure are scientist-educator development teams, partnerships, and an embedded program evaluation component. The Space Telescope Science Institute's Office of Public Outreach is leveraging this existing infrastructure to bring the Frontier Fields science program to the education community in a cost-effective way. Frontier Fields observations and results have been, and will continue to be, embedded into existing product lines and professional development offerings. We also are leveraging our new social media strategy to bring the science program to the public in the form of an ongoing blog.

  13. The Engaged Microbiologist: Bringing the Microbiological Sciences to the K–12 Community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J. Westenberg

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Exposing K–12 students to cutting edge science that impacts their daily lives can bring classroom lessons to life. Citizen-science projects are an excellent way to bring high-level science to the classroom and help satisfy one of the cornerstone concepts of the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS, “engaging in practices that scientists and engineers actually use.” This can be a daunting task for teachers who may lack the background or resources to integrate these projects into the classroom. This is where scientific societies such as the American Society for Microbiology (ASM can play a critical role. ASM encourages its members to engage with the K–12 community by providing networking opportunities and resources for ASM members and K–12 teachers to work together to bring microbiology into the classroom.

  14. Smart grids infrastructure, technology, and solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Borlase, Stuart

    2012-01-01

    What exactly is smart grid? Why is it receiving so much attention? What are utilities, vendors, and regulators doing about it? Answering these questions and more, Smart Grids: Infrastructure, Technology, and Solutions gives readers a clearer understanding of the drivers and infrastructure of one of the most talked-about topics in the electric utility market-smart grid. This book brings together the knowledge and views of a vast array of experts and leaders in their respective fields.Key Features Describes the impetus for change in the electric utility industry Discusses the business drivers, b

  15. Increasing of the processing capacity of an alkanoamine in aqueous solution mixed sour gas treatment unit; Incremento de la capacidad de procesamiento de una planta de tratamiento de gas amargo con mezclas de alcanolaminas en solucion acuosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernal, J. Manuel; Valtierra, Victor H.; Cabrales, Alberto [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Mexico City (Mexico)

    1998-07-01

    The necessity of increasing the process capacity of the existing sour gas treating units, has been a factor that has driven the investigation centers to develop new solvent formulations that could been capable of removing the sour gases without majors changes in the equipment that conforms those units. In this sense, the Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo has carried out the study in order to increase the processing capacity of a sour gas treatment plant of Petroleos Mexicanos. In this work, the use of solvents or alternative formulations, based on the use of methyl-diethanolamine (MDEA), as single solvent, or in mixture with others are considered. Our experimental data indicates that the use of MDEA in a formulation, in mixture with another amines, carry out to combination of attributes such as high absorption capacity and a high speed of absorption of the preferred acid gas (H{sub 2}S), besides it reduces the degradation index of the solvent and minimizes the equipment corrosion situation that is transformed in considerable improvement in the processing capacity and/or in the energy process savings, finally the operative problems are minimized. (author)

  16. Teaching Chinese as a Second Language: From Taiwan to the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Shuliang

    2014-01-01

    Teaching Chinese as a second language in Taiwan vs. in the United States. How are they different? What are the challenges to teachers? This article will bring to you interesting findings from the perspective of a native speaking Chinese teacher.

  17. Breaking the bottleneck : how best can we bring oil sands products to demanding markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prince, D.

    2006-01-01

    Alberta-based Altex Energy Ltd. is pursuing the development of an innovative heavy oil/bitumen pipeline from Alberta to the United States Gulf Coast (USGC). This energy infrastructure development company is led by a proven management team that developed and constructed the 3,700 km long Alliance Pipeline system. This presentation included a map of the $3.7 billion dollar Alliance Pipeline that identified the mainline compressor stations, lateral compressor stations, area offices and head offices. It was noted that oilsands will represent the most significant resource plays for many years. A graph indicating bitumen supply forecasts from 2005 to 2020 suggests that bitumen production will have exponential growth over the foreseeable future. Labor, materials and infrastructure limitations will create barriers to oilsands growth, as will uncertain market access. For that reason, assured pipeline capacity is needed along with an infrastructure to refineries and a favourable competitive balance for Canadian producers. The presentation addressed issues regarding marketing choices and the challenges of upgrading in Alberta. The economics of diluting heavy oil was also discussed along with industry response to the diluent challenge. Altex's proposed solution of a new direct greenfield pipeline from Alberta to the USGC would reach the largest refinery market in North America as well as the largest heavy oil/bitumen consuming regions. The Altex solution would be complementary to heavy oil/bitumen in Alberta. The proprietary pipeline technology permits alternative diluents, eliminating much of the diluent penalty. It mitigates the risks of upgrading in Alberta and competes on a cost basis with other expansion alternatives. The Altex pipeline system eliminates the need for costly condensate diluent, but accepts all current diluents. It transports up to 90 per cent more bitumen than clean diluted bitumen in a conventional pipeline. It can also transport as much as 175 per cent

  18. Bringing Together Interactive Digital Storytelling with Tangible Interaction : Challenges and Opportunities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Catala, Alejandro; Theune, Mariët; Sylla, Cristina; Ribeiro, Pedro; Nunes, Nuno; Oakley, Ian; Nisi, Valentina

    2017-01-01

    This workshop aims to explore challenges and potential opportunities in bringing interactive digital storytelling into the realm of tangible and embodied interaction. To this end, experts from both fields are invited to present and discuss their ideas. Besides fostering discussion and potential

  19. Training Champions: 8 Ways to Bring out the Best in Your Major Gifts Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Elizabeth B.

    2013-01-01

    In this article, Elizabeth B. Herman, a trainer, facilitator, and coach with 25 years' success leading higher education campaigns and advancement teams, offers the following eight ways to bring out the best in a major gifts team: (1) Match ability and temperament to the job; (2) Allow autonomy and celebrate small wins; (3) Make prompt, fair…

  20. Bringing back the book through digital experiences: e-Books and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bringing back the book through digital experiences: e-Books and digital media as platforms for reading among school children. ... for technology has changed the format of books and reading platforms from print to ereaders. ... print. Findings further showed that there is no significant difference in the attitude of boys and girls ...

  1. Consumer Advertising: Its Role in Bringing a Product to Market. Revised Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procter and Gamble Educational Services, Cincinnati, OH.

    This kit, designed for high school classes, considers advertising from both consumers' and manufacturers' perspectives. The role of advertising in relation to free enterprise principles is discussed in chapter 1, while chapter 2 provides a history of U.S. advertising processes and development. Chapter 3 describes advertising's role in bringing a…

  2. Bring Back Our Girls, Social Mobilization: Implications for Cross-Cultural Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olutokunbo, Adekalu Samuel; Suandi, Turiman; Cephas, Oluwaseyitan Rotimi; Abu-Samah, Irza Hanie

    2015-01-01

    Social mobilization is a proactive measure for community development that salvages the society from destruction and disaster. From sociological perspective, this paper discusses the concept of social mobilization and its implications for cross-cultural research. To do this, the study uses the "Bring Back Our Girls" Global Campaign, as…

  3. Bringing Work Home: Take-Home Pesticide Exposure Among Farm Families

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Curwin, B.D.

    2006-01-01

    In this thesis take-home pesticide exposure among farm families, with an emphasis on herbicides, was investigated. Take-home exposure occurs when a worker unwittingly brings home a substance on his or her clothing or shoes, thereby potentially exposing his or her family. The pesticides investigated

  4. Exploring Factors That Influence Technology-Based Distractions in Bring Your Own Device Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Robin; Benzimra, Daniel; Li, Jia

    2017-01-01

    Previous research on distractions and the use of mobile devices (personal digital assistants, tablet personal computers, or laptops) have been conducted almost exclusively in higher education. The purpose of the current study was to examine the frequency and influence of distracting behaviors in Bring Your Own Device secondary school classrooms.…

  5. Contingent Commitments: Bringing Part-Time Faculty into Focus. Methodology Supplement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center for Community College Student Engagement, 2014

    2014-01-01

    Center reporting prior to 2013 focused primarily on descriptive statistics (frequencies and means) of student and faculty behaviors. The goal of the analyses reported here and in "Contingent Commitments: Bringing Part-Time Faculty into Focus" is to understand the engagement of part-time or contingent faculty in various activities that…

  6. Descendit ad [in] inferna:'A matter of no small moment in bringing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Descendit ad [in] inferna:'A matter of no small moment in bringing about redemption' ... and make one suspicious about certain ecclesiastical biases. Spatial terms in the Creed should therefore not be demythologised, but rather be transformed in accordance with the insights of the contemporary physics of time and space.

  7. Bring-Your-Own-Device: Turning Cell Phones into Forces for Good

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imazeki, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Over the last few years, classroom response systems (or "clickers") have become increasingly common. Although most systems require students to use a standalone handheld device, bring-your-own-device (BYOD) systems allow students to use devices they already own (e.g., a cell phone, tablet or laptop) to submit responses via text message or…

  8. Bringing (Century-Old) Technology into the Classroom. Part I: Teaching Mechanics and Thermodynamics with Antiques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jewett, John W., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    The notion of bringing technology into the classroom has been the subject of many recent presentations at conferences and papers in physics teaching journals. The use of devices such as laptops, smartphones, tablets, and clickers is rising in today's classrooms and laboratories. PhET simulations have been available online for over a decade. A…

  9. Bringing up condom use and using condoms with new sexual partners : Intentional or habitual?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yzer, M.C; Siero, F.W.; Buunk, Abraham (Bram)

    2001-01-01

    A prospective study of 94 Dutch adults who have casual sexual partners examined whether two important aspects of safe sex. namely bringing up condom use (BCU) and actual condom use (ACU) are intentional or habitual. For each of these aspects, a model based on the Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB:

  10. Bringing Adam Smith's Pin Factory to Life: Field Trips and Discussions as Forms of Experiential Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galizzi, Monica

    2014-01-01

    Educators are often aware of the need to implement a variety of teaching techniques to reach out to students with different learning styles. I describe an attempt to target multimodal learners by bringing classical economic texts and concepts to life through discussions, field visits and role playing exercises. In my Labor Economics class I…

  11. Crawl and crowd to bring machine translation to under-resourced languages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toral Ruiz, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    We present a widely applicable methodology to bring machine translation (MT) to under-resourced languages in a cost-effective and rapid manner. Our proposal relies on web crawling to automatically acquire parallel data to train statistical MT systems if any such data can be found for the language

  12. Data Nuggets: Bringing Real Data into the Classroom to Unearth Students' Quantitative & Inquiry Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultheis, Elizabeth H.; Kjelvik, Melissa K.

    2015-01-01

    Current educational reform calls for increased integration between science and mathematics to overcome the shortcomings in students' quantitative skills. Data Nuggets (free online resource, http://datanuggets.org) are worksheets that bring data into the classroom, repeatedly guiding students through the scientific method and making claims…

  13. Clickers in the Flipped Classroom: Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) to Promote Student Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Hsiu-Ting

    2017-01-01

    Flipped classrooms continue to grow in popularity across all levels of education. Following this pedagogical trend, the present study aimed to enhance the face-to-face instruction in flipped classrooms with the use of clickers. A game-like clicker application was implemented through a bring your own device (BYOD) model to gamify classroom dynamics…

  14. An Empirical Study towards Understanding User Acceptance of Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Gary; Guan, Yuanyuan; Chau, Juliana

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses the findings of a research study investigating user acceptance of bring your own device (BYOD) practice to support teaching and learning in a Hong Kong university. Forty-four undergraduate students and two teachers participated in the study. To collect their ratings of agreement with respect to several BYOD-related issues,…

  15. Bring Your Own Device to Secondary School: The Perceptions of Teachers, Students and Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, David; Adhikar, Janak

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on the first two years of a Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) initiative in a New Zealand secondary school, using data derived from a series of surveys of teachers, parents and students, who are the main stakeholders in the transformation to a BYOD school. In this paper we analyse data gathered from these surveys, which consists…

  16. Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) and Teacher Pedagogy in a New Zealand Primary School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rae, Genevieve; Dabner, Nicki; Mackey, Julie

    2017-01-01

    The practice of students bringing their own mobile devices (BYOD) to school is increasingly being used to leverage digital learning opportunities in New Zealand schools. This paper presents a summary of the findings from a case study that explored the experiences of three primary school teachers as they introduced BYOD into their classrooms for…

  17. Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) Programs in the Classroom: Teacher Use, Equity, and Learning Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fincher, Derrel

    2016-01-01

    This study explores teacher perceptions of Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) programs in the classroom, with a focus on teacher use, student equity of access, and student ability to use their devices as learning tools. While one-to-one laptop programs (students assigned identical school-owned laptop or tablet) has an extensive body of literature behind…

  18. Bring Your Own Device--A Snapshot of Two Australian Primary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Damian; Twining, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Background: The use of 1:1 and Bring Your Own Device strategies in schools is in its infancy and little is known about how mobile devices such as tablets are being used to support educational practice. Purpose: In this article, two suburban primary schools in Sydney, Australia were focused on with an aim to understand how mobile device strategies…

  19. Bringing Vision to Practice: Planning and Provisioning the New Library Resource Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Lisa

    2004-01-01

    The most critical factor in creating a successful school library is the development of a clear vision of the mission and functionality of this integral learning space. However, the process of bringing a vision to realization involves harsh realities and sensible planning. The budget will determine many purchasing decisions and therefore it is…

  20. 21 CFR 1005.24 - Costs of bringing product into compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Costs of bringing product into compliance. 1005.24 Section 1005.24 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... include: (a) Travel expenses of the supervising officer; (b) Per diem in lieu of subsistence of the...

  1. Explore: An Action to Bring Science and Technology Closer to Secondary School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torras-Melenchon, Nuria; Grau, M. Dolors; Font-Soldevila, Josep; Freixas, Josep

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the experience of an initiative, the EXPLORE courses, designed to bring science and technology closer to secondary school. The EXPLORE courses, organised by "EXPLORATORI: Natural Resources" project, are particularly addressed to secondary school teachers and are conducted at Catalonia (North East of Spain). The main…

  2. Bringing Mohamed to the Mountain: Situated Professional Development in a Ubiquitous Computing Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swan, Karen; Kratcoski, Annette; Mazzer, Pat; Schenker, Jason

    2005-01-01

    This article describes an ongoing situated professional development program in which teachers bring their intact classes for an extended stay in a ubiquitous computing environment equipped with a variety of state-of-the-art computing devices. The experience is unique in that it not only situates teacher learning about technology integration in…

  3. The Wild-Card Character of "Bring Your Own:" A Panel Discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, W. Gardner; Fitch, Megan; German, Robert F., Jr.; Hulvey, Dale; McIntosh, Keith; McPherson, Michael R.; O'Keefe, John

    2013-01-01

    Panelists on the front lines of higher education information technology share their thoughts on Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) and what it could mean for colleges and universities. Five questions were asked of each panelist. These were: (1) How strategically important to higher education is the BYOD phenomenon? Is it simply a passing fad? (2) Should…

  4. Five Ways to Hack and Cheat with Bring-Your-Own-Device Electronic Examinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Phillip

    2016-01-01

    Bring-your-own-device electronic examinations (BYOD e-exams) are a relatively new type of assessment where students sit an in-person exam under invigilated conditions with their own laptop. Special software restricts student access to prohibited computer functions and files, and provides access to any resources or software the examiner approves.…

  5. Digital Natives: The Millennial Workforce's Intention to Adopt Bring Your Own Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulton, Joel

    2017-01-01

    Bring your own device (BYOD) is the use of uncontrolled devices, which increases risks to business data and intellectual property. Like centralized and distributed computing adoption before it, the rapid proliferation of BYOD has outstripped security advances. The trend is growing due to the expectations of the Millennial workforce and its high…

  6. Bringing the Tools of Big Science to Bear on Local Environmental Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronson, Scott; Jones, Keith W.; Brown, Maria

    2013-01-01

    We describe an interactive collaborative environmental education project that makes advanced laboratory facilities at Brookhaven National Laboratory accessible for one-year or multi-year science projects for the high school level. Cyber-enabled Environmental Science (CEES) utilizes web conferencing software to bring multi-disciplinary,…

  7. 'They bring AIDS to us and say we give it to them': Socio-structural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    'They bring AIDS to us and say we give it to them': Socio-structural context of female sex workers' vulnerability to HIV infection in Ibadan Nigeria. ... We describe the complex interaction between these themes and how they combine to increase the risk of HIV infection among FSWs. The impact of previous interventions to ...

  8. Unit Manning

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McGinniss, Mike

    2003-01-01

    .... This decision combines two crucial initiatives: first, transforming the Army from an individual soldier replacement system to a unit manning system that enhances cohesion and keeps trained soldiers, leaders, and commanders together longer, thereby...

  9. Detector Unit

    CERN Multimedia

    1960-01-01

    Original detector unit of the Instituut voor Kernfysisch Onderzoek (IKO) BOL project. This detector unit shows that silicon detectors for nuclear physics particle detection were already developed and in use in the 1960's in Amsterdam. Also the idea of putting 'strips' onto the silicon for high spatial resolution of a particle's impact on the detector were implemented in the BOL project which used 64 of these detector units. The IKO BOL project with its silicon particle detectors was designed, built and operated from 1965 to roughly 1977. Detector Unit of the BOL project: These detectors, notably the ‘checkerboard detector’, were developed during the years 1964-1968 in Amsterdam, The Netherlands, by the Natuurkundig Laboratorium of the N.V. Philips Gloeilampen Fabrieken. This was done in close collaboration with the Instituut voor Kernfysisch Onderzoek (IKO) where the read-out electronics for their use in the BOL Project was developed and produced.

  10. Kerr generalized solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papoyan, V.V.

    1989-01-01

    A Kerr generalized solution for a stationary axially-symmetric gravitational field of rotating self-gravitational objects is given. For solving the problem Einstein equations and their combinations are used. The particular cases: internal and external Schwarzschild solutions are considered. The external solution of the stationary problem is a Kerr solution generalization. 3 refs

  11. Drilling unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Umanchik, N P; Demin, A V; Khrustalev, N N; Linnik, G N; Lovchev, S V; Rozin, M M; Sidorov, R V; Sokolov, S I; Tsaregradskiy, Yu P

    1981-01-01

    A drilling unit is proposed which includes a hydraulic lifter, hydraulic multiple-cylinder pump with valve distribution and sectional drilling pump with separators of the working and flushing fluid. In order to reduce metal consumption and the overall dimensions of the drilling unit, the working cavity of each cylinder of the hydraulic multiple-cylinder pump is equipped with suction and injection valves and is hydraulically connected to the working cavity by one of the sections of the drilling pump.

  12. Radiochromic liquid solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noakes, J.E.; Culp, R.A.

    1983-01-01

    A radiochromic solution which is sensitive to small dosages of ionizing and ultraviolet radiation is described. It consists of a solution of a leucocyanide dye in a clear polar solvent with enough organic acid added to make the solution at least slightly acidic and responds to radiation by permanently changing color. Up to one half of the solution by weight can be replaced by a second solution of an aromatic solvent and an organic fluor. Another modification of the invention is a solution of a leucocyanide dye in a clear polar solvent having an aromatic group, an organic fluor, and enough organic acid to make the solution at least slightly acidic. (author)

  13. Implantable electronics: emerging design issues and an ultra light-weight security solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narasimhan, Seetharam; Wang, Xinmu; Bhunia, Swarup

    2010-01-01

    Implantable systems that monitor biological signals require increasingly complex digital signal processing (DSP) electronics for real-time in-situ analysis and compression of the recorded signals. While it is well-known that such signal processing hardware needs to be implemented under tight area and power constraints, new design requirements emerge with their increasing complexity. Use of nanoscale technology shows tremendous benefits in implementing these advanced circuits due to dramatic improvement in integration density and power dissipation per operation. However, it also brings in new challenges such as reliability and large idle power (due to higher leakage current). Besides, programmability of the device as well as security of the recorded information are rapidly becoming major design considerations of such systems. In this paper, we analyze the emerging issues associated with the design of the DSP unit in an implantable system. Next, we propose a novel ultra light-weight solution to address the information security issue. Unlike the conventional information security approaches like data encryption, which come at large area and power overhead and hence are not amenable for resource-constrained implantable systems, we propose a multilevel key-based scrambling algorithm, which exploits the nature of the biological signal to effectively obfuscate it. Analysis of the proposed algorithm in the context of neural signal processing and its hardware implementation shows that we can achieve high level of security with ∼ 13X lower power and ∼ 5X lower area overhead than conventional cryptographic solutions.

  14. Terra: The Evolution Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Bruce

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author offers pieces of advice for those who are considering developing an integrated program. He stresses how important it is to let one's program evolve. Another emphasis for him is to bring skills, passion, and experience to what a program becomes. The key is to find the right curriculum connections that allow these…

  15. Liquid scintillation solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, E.C.

    1976-01-01

    The liquid scintillation solution described includes a mixture of: a liquid scintillation solvent, a primary scintillation solute, a secondary scintillation solute, a variety of appreciably different surfactants, and a dissolving and transparency agent. The dissolving and transparency agent is tetrahydrofuran, a cyclic ether. The scintillation solvent is toluene. The primary scintillation solute is PPO, and the secondary scintillation solute is dimethyl POPOP. The variety of appreciably different surfactants is composed of isooctylphenol-polyethoxyethanol and sodium dihexyl sulphosuccinate [fr

  16. Electroerosion method for preparation of saturated solutions of ruthenium hydroxochloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikhalev, V.A.; Andrianov, G.A.; Zhadanov, B.V.; Ryazanov, A.I.

    1987-01-01

    A pilot plant for carrying out electroerosion processes using pulse current of high unit power is developed. The solution process of metallic Ru in concentrated HCl is investigated. The possibility of preparation of ruthenium hydroxochloride solutions of 300 g/l concentration is established; it gives the possibility of Ru solution under conditions similar to the process of salting out

  17. Plutonium solution analyzer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, D.A.

    1994-09-01

    A fully automated analyzer has been developed for plutonium solutions. It was assembled from several commercially available modules, is based upon segmented flow analysis, and exhibits precision about an order of magnitude better than commercial units (0.5%-O.05% RSD). The system was designed to accept unmeasured, untreated liquid samples in the concentration range 40-240 g/L and produce a report with sample identification, sample concentrations, and an abundance of statistics. Optional hydraulics can accommodate samples in the concentration range 0.4-4.0 g/L. Operating at a typical rate of 30 to 40 samples per hour, it consumes only 0.074 mL of each sample and standard, and generates waste at the rate of about 1.5 mL per minute. No radioactive material passes through its multichannel peristaltic pump (which remains outside the glovebox, uncontaminated) but rather is handled by a 6-port, 2-position chromatography-type loop valve. An accompanying computer is programmed in QuickBASIC 4.5 to provide both instrument control and data reduction. The program is truly user-friendly and communication between operator and instrument is via computer screen displays and keyboard. Two important issues which have been addressed are waste minimization and operator safety (the analyzer can run in the absence of an operator, once its autosampler has been loaded)

  18. Plutonium solution analyzer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burns, D.A.

    1994-09-01

    A fully automated analyzer has been developed for plutonium solutions. It was assembled from several commercially available modules, is based upon segmented flow analysis, and exhibits precision about an order of magnitude better than commercial units (0.5%-O.05% RSD). The system was designed to accept unmeasured, untreated liquid samples in the concentration range 40-240 g/L and produce a report with sample identification, sample concentrations, and an abundance of statistics. Optional hydraulics can accommodate samples in the concentration range 0.4-4.0 g/L. Operating at a typical rate of 30 to 40 samples per hour, it consumes only 0.074 mL of each sample and standard, and generates waste at the rate of about 1.5 mL per minute. No radioactive material passes through its multichannel peristaltic pump (which remains outside the glovebox, uncontaminated) but rather is handled by a 6-port, 2-position chromatography-type loop valve. An accompanying computer is programmed in QuickBASIC 4.5 to provide both instrument control and data reduction. The program is truly user-friendly and communication between operator and instrument is via computer screen displays and keyboard. Two important issues which have been addressed are waste minimization and operator safety (the analyzer can run in the absence of an operator, once its autosampler has been loaded).

  19. CISP: Simulation Platform for Collective Instabilities in the BRing of HIAF project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J.; Yang, J. C.; Xia, J. W.; Yin, D. Y.; Shen, G. D.; Li, P.; Zhao, H.; Ruan, S.; Wu, B.

    2018-02-01

    To simulate collective instabilities during the complicated beam manipulation in the BRing (Booster Ring) of HIAF (High Intensity heavy-ion Accelerator Facility) or other high intensity accelerators, a code, named CISP (Simulation Platform for Collective Instabilities), is designed and constructed in China's IMP (Institute of Modern Physics). The CISP is a scalable multi-macroparticle simulation platform that can perform longitudinal and transverse tracking when chromaticity, space charge effect, nonlinear magnets and wakes are included. And due to its well object-oriented design, the CISP is also a basic platform used to develop many other applications (like feedback). Several simulations, completed by the CISP in this paper, agree with analytical results very well, which shows that the CISP is fully functional now and it is a powerful platform for the further collective instability research in the BRing or other accelerators. In the future, the CISP can also be extended easily into a physics control system for HIAF or other facilities.

  20. Fundamental solutions of singular SPDEs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selesi, Dora

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Fundamental solutions of linear SPDEs are constructed. → Wick-convolution product is introduced for the first time. → Fourier transformation maps Wick-convolution into Wick product. → Solutions of linear SPDEs are expressed via Wick-convolution with fundamental solutions. → Stochastic Helmholtz equation is solved. - Abstract: This paper deals with some models of mathematical physics, where random fluctuations are modeled by white noise or other singular Gaussian generalized processes. White noise, as the distributional derivative od Brownian motion, which is the most important case of a Levy process, is defined in the framework of Hida distribution spaces. The Fourier transformation in the framework of singular generalized stochastic processes is introduced and its applications to solving stochastic differential equations involving Wick products and singularities such as the Dirac delta distribution are presented. Explicit solutions are obtained in form of a chaos expansion in the Kondratiev white noise space, while the coefficients of the expansion are tempered distributions. Stochastic differential equations of the form P(ω, D) ◊ u(x, ω) = A(x, ω) are considered, where A is a singular generalized stochastic process and P(ω, D) is a partial differential operator with random coefficients. We introduce the Wick-convolution operator * which enables us to express the solution as u = s*A ◊ I ◊(-1) , where s denotes the fundamental solution and I is the unit random variable. In particular, the stochastic Helmholtz equation is solved, which in physical interpretation describes waves propagating with a random speed from randomly appearing point sources.

  1. Can Programming Frameworks Bring Smartphones into the Mainstream of Psychological Science?

    OpenAIRE

    Piwek, Lukasz; Ellis, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Smartphones continue to provide huge potential for psychological science and the advent of novel research frameworks brings new opportunities for researchers who have previously struggled to develop smartphone applications. However, despite this renewed promise, smartphones have failed to become a standard item within psychological research. Here we consider the key issues that continue to limit smartphone adoption within psychological science and how these barriers might be diminishing in li...

  2. The Opportunities and Challenges of Bringing New Metrology Equipment to Market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perloff, David S.

    2005-09-01

    This paper provides an overview of the economic and technological factors which are driving the demand for new metrology and inspection equipment, the challenges and opportunities facing new companies in bringing such equipment to market, and the funding environment in which new companies must raise capital to finance their efforts. Seven metrology companies and one inspection equipment company that have received first-time venture backing since 2000 are used to illustrate how these specialized businesses are launched and funded.

  3. Organisational Capabilities Required for Enabling Employee Mobility through Bring- Your-Own-Device Concept

    OpenAIRE

    Toperesu, B-Abee; Van Belle, Jean-Paul

    2017-01-01

    Background: Mobile device adoption is on the rise and people are increasingly using mobile devices as a part of their lives. Studies have shown that people can use mobile devices to perform their work duties from anywhere. Organisations are now exploring ways of enabling and supporting mobility for employees’ mobile devices, including BYOD (Bring-Your-Own-Device) policies. Objective: The objective of this study is to identify the main capabilities required for enterprise mobility. Methods/App...

  4. Bringing the field into the classroom: an innovative methodology in global health teaching

    OpenAIRE

    Dr. M H Bryant, MBBS; J Wolff, MD

    2015-01-01

    Background: The practice of global health is difficult to teach from a US-based classroom. Students benefit from experiencing how theory becomes practice in the chaotic environments of under-resourced health programmes in developing countries. We could not take our students to the field during weekly course work, so we designed a course to bring the field to the students. We created innovative partnerships with locally based organisations that implement programmes in developing countries. Eac...

  5. Ad valorem versus unit taxes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schröder, Philipp J.H.; Sørensen, Allan

    2010-01-01

    a general equilibrium monopolistic competition model with heterogeneous firms and intra-industry reallocations. We show that the welfare superiority of ad valorem over unit taxes under imperfect competition is not only preserved but amplified. The additional difference between the tools arises because unit...... taxes distort relative prices, which in turn reduces average industry productivity through reallocations (the survival and increased market share of lower productivity firms). Importantly, numerical solutions of the model reveal that the relative welfare loss from using the unit tax increases...

  6. The 'added value' GPs bring to commissioning: a qualitative study in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Neil; Coleman, Anna; Wright, Michael; Gadsby, Erica; McDermott, Imelda; Petsoulas, Christina; Checkland, Kath

    2014-11-01

    The 2012 Health and Social Care Act in England replaced primary care trusts with clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) as the main purchasing organisations. These new organisations are GP-led, and it was claimed that this increased clinical input would significantly improve commissioning practice. To explore some of the key assumptions underpinning CCGs, and to examine the claim that GPs bring 'added value' to commissioning. In-depth interviews with clinicians and managers across seven CCGs in England between April and September 2013. A total of 40 clinicians and managers were interviewed. Interviews focused on the perceived 'added value' that GPs bring to commissioning. Claims to GP 'added value' centred on their intimate knowledge of their patients. It was argued that this detailed and concrete knowledge improves service design and that a close working relationship between GPs and managers strengthens the ability of managers to negotiate. However, responders also expressed concerns about the large workload that they face and about the difficulty in engaging with the wider body of GPs. GPs have been involved in commissioning in many ways since fundholding in the 1990s, and claims such as these are not new. The key question is whether these new organisations better support and enable the effective use of this knowledge. Furthermore, emphasis on experiential knowledge brings with it concerns about representativeness and the extent to which other voices are heard. Finally, the implicit privileging of GPs' personal knowledge ahead of systematic public health intelligence also requires exploration. © British Journal of General Practice 2014.

  7. [Conservation Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texas Education Agency, Austin.

    Each of the six instructional units deals with one aspect of conservation: forests, water, rangeland, minerals (petroleum), and soil. The area of the elementary school curriculum with which each correlates is indicated. Lists of general and specific objectives are followed by suggested teaching procedures, including ideas for introducing the…

  8. Colliding black hole solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, Mainuddin

    2005-01-01

    A new solution of Einstein equation in general relativity is found. This solution solves an outstanding problem of thermodynamics and black hole physics. Also this work appears to conclude the interpretation of NUT spacetime. (author)

  9. How the pill became a lifestyle drug: the pharmaceutical industry and birth control in the United States since 1960.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Elizabeth Siegel

    2012-08-01

    Marketing decisions, rather than scientific innovations, have guided the development and positioning of contraceptive products in recent years. I review the stalled progress in contraceptive development in the decades following the advent of the Pill in 1960 and then examine the fine-tuning of the market for oral contraceptives in the 1990s and 2000s. Although birth control has been pitched in the United States as an individual solution, rather than a public health strategy, the purpose of oral contraceptives was understood by manufacturers, physicians, and consumers to be the prevention of pregnancy, a basic health care need for women. Since 1990, the content of that message has changed, reflecting a shift in the drug industry's view of the contraception business. Two factors contributed to bring about this change: first, the industry's move away from research and development in birth control and second, the growth of the class of medications known as lifestyle drugs.

  10. PFP solution stabilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aftanas, B.L.

    1996-01-01

    This Functional Design Criteria (FDC) addresses remediation of the plutonium-bearing solutions currently in inventory at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). The recommendation from the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is that the solutions be treated thermally and stabilized as a solid for long term storage. For solutions which are not discardable, the baseline plan is to utilize a denitration process to stabilize the solutions prior to packaging for storage

  11. Rose George: Deep Sea and Foreign Going: Inside Shipping, the Invisible Industry that Brings you 90% of Everything

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taudal Poulsen, René

    2014-01-01

    Book review of: Rose George: Deep Sea and Foreign Going: Inside Shipping, the Invisible Industry that Brings you 90% of Everything. London :Portobello Books, 2013. 320 pp. ISBN 9781846272639......Book review of: Rose George: Deep Sea and Foreign Going: Inside Shipping, the Invisible Industry that Brings you 90% of Everything. London :Portobello Books, 2013. 320 pp. ISBN 9781846272639...

  12. 36 CFR 1280.8 - May I bring a seeing-eye dog or other assistance animal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false May I bring a seeing-eye dog or other assistance animal? 1280.8 Section 1280.8 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL... dog or other assistance animal? Yes, persons with disabilities may bring guide dogs or other animals...

  13. Classical solutions in supergravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baaklini, N.S.; Ferrara, S.; Nieuwenhuizen Van, P.

    1977-06-01

    Classical solutions of supergravity are obtained by making finite global supersymmetry rotation on known solutions of the field equations of the bosonic sector. The Schwarzschild and the Reissner-Nordstoem solutions of general relativity are extended to various supergravity systems and the modification to the perihelion precession of planets is discussed

  14. Liquid scintillation solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, E.C.

    1977-01-01

    A liquid scintillation solution is described which includes (1) a scintillation solvent (toluene and xylene), (2) a primary scintillation solute (PPO and Butyl PBD), (3) a secondary scintillation solute (POPOP and Dimethyl POPOP), (4) a plurality of substantially different surfactants and (5) a filter dissolving and/or transparentizing agent. 8 claims

  15. Cooking Up Creative Solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiley, H. S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2012-05-31

    There comes a time in every scientist’s career when one's mind seems to hit a wall. You can’t think of a new experiment that hasn’t been done before or figure out how to crack a problem that is blocking your progress. The easy questions have been answered. You go back to the wellspring of your creativity and find it dry. What to do? Collaborating with investigators who are investigating problems from a different data or analytical perspective is the best way I know to kick-start research creativity. They not only can provide new data, but they can also bring an expertise on how to get the most “flavor” out of the ingredient that they bring to your problem. As the complexity of the important biological problems continues to grow, too many cooks will never spoil the broth, but become a hallmark of the most creative research.

  16. Future Directions for Urban Forestry Research in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    John F. Dwyer; David J. Nowak; Gary W. Watson

    2002-01-01

    Urban forestry research promises to continue to be an integral part of the growth and development of forestry in urban and urbanizing areas of the United States. The future is expected to bring increased emphasis on research in support of the care of trees and other plants, ecological restoration, and comprehensive and adaptive management across the landscape....

  17. Business Intelligence Integrated Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristescu Marian Pompiliu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper shows how businesses make decisions better and faster in terms of customers, partners and operations by turning data into valuable business information. The paper describes how to bring together people's and business intelligence information to achieve successful business strategies. There is the possibility of developing business intelligence projects in large and medium-sized organizations only with the Microsoft product described in the paper, and possible alternatives can be discussed according to the required features.

  18. Radiation chemistry of aqueous solutions of acetonitrile and propionitrile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shushtarian, M.J.

    1975-01-01

    The radiation chemistry of water and aqueous solutions is a branch of radiation chemistry dealing with chemical changes in water and aqueous solutions induced by high energy radiations. High energy radiations of interest in radiation chemistry are short-wave electromagnetic radiations (X- and γ-rays) and fast charged particles (α- and β-particles, electrons, deuterons and fission fragments). The energy of the particles and photons bringing about chemical reactions in the field of modern radiation chemistry is much higher than that of photons causing photochemical reactions

  19. On classical solutions of SU(3) gauge field equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakrabarti, A.

    1975-01-01

    Static classical solutions of SU(3) gauge field equations are studied. The roles of the O(3) subgroup and of the quadrupole generators are discussed systematically. The general form thus obtained leads, through-out, to a high degree of symmetry in the results. This brings in some simplifying features. An octet of scalar mesons is finally added. Certain classes of exact solutions are given that are singular at the origin. A generalized gauge condition is pointed out. The relation of the general form to known particular cases is discussed [fr

  20. Solvent wash solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neace, J.C.

    1986-01-01

    This patent describes a process for removing diluent degradation products from a solvent extraction solution comprising an admixture of an organic extractant for uranium and plutonium and a non-polar organic liquid diluent, which has been used to recover uranium and plutonium from spent nuclear fuel. Comprising combining a wash solution consisting of: (a) water; and (b) a positive amount up to about, an including, 50 volume percent of at least one highly-polar water-miscible organic solvent, based on the total volume of the water and the highly-polar organic solvent, with the solvent extraction solution after uranium and plutonium values have been stripped from the solvent extraction solution, the diluent degradation products dissolving in the highly-polar organic solvent and the extractant and diluent of the extraction solution not dissolving in the highly-polar organic solvent, and separating the highly-polar organic solvent and the extraction solution to obtain a purified extraction solution

  1. Proteins in solution: Fractal surfaces in solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Tscheliessnig

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The concept of the surface of a protein in solution, as well of the interface between protein and 'bulk solution', is introduced. The experimental technique of small angle X-ray and neutron scattering is introduced and described briefly. Molecular dynamics simulation, as an appropriate computational tool for studying the hydration shell of proteins, is also discussed. The concept of protein surfaces with fractal dimensions is elaborated. We finish by exposing an experimental (using small angle X-ray scattering and a computer simulation case study, which are meant as demonstrations of the possibilities we have at hand for investigating the delicate interfaces that connect (and divide protein molecules and the neighboring electrolyte solution.

  2. Differential and difference equations a comparison of methods of solution

    CERN Document Server

    Maximon, Leonard C

    2016-01-01

    This book, intended for researchers and graduate students in physics, applied mathematics and engineering, presents a detailed comparison of the important methods of solution for linear differential and difference equations - variation of constants, reduction of order, Laplace transforms and generating functions - bringing out the similarities as well as the significant differences in the respective analyses. Equations of arbitrary order are studied, followed by a detailed analysis for equations of first and second order. Equations with polynomial coefficients are considered and explicit solutions for equations with linear coefficients are given, showing significant differences in the functional form of solutions of differential equations from those of difference equations. An alternative method of solution involving transformation of both the dependent and independent variables is given for both differential and difference equations. A comprehensive, detailed treatment of Green’s functions and the associat...

  3. Virtual Reality: Bringing the Awe of Our Science into The Classroom with VR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, R. E.; Turrin, M.; Frearson, N.; Boghosian, A.; Ferrini, V. L.; Simpson, F.

    2016-12-01

    The geosciences are rich in imagery, making them compelling material for immersive teaching experiences. We often work in remote locations, places where few others are able to travel. Flat 2 D images from the field have served explorers and scientists well from the lantern slides brought back from Antarctica to the images scientists and educators now use in powerpoint presentations. These images provide a backdrop to introduce the experience for formal classes and informal presentations. Our stories from the field bring the setting alive for the participants. The travelers presented and the audience passively listened. Immersive learning opportunities are much more powerful than lecturing. We have enlisted both VR and drone imagery to bring learners fully into the experience of science. A 360 VR image brings the viewer into the moment of discovery. Both have been shown to create an active learning setting fully under the learner's control; they explore at their own pace and following their own interest. This learning `sticks', becoming part of the participant's own unique experience in the space. We are building VR images of field experiences and VR data immersion experiences that will transport people into new locations, building a field experience that they can not only see but fully explore. Through VR we introduce new experiences that showcase our science, our careers and our collaborations. Users can spin the view up to see the helicopter landing in a remote field location by the ice. Spin to the right and see a colleague collecting a reading from instruments that have been pulled from the LC130 aircraft. Turn the view to the left and see the harsh windswept environment along the edge of an ice shelf. Look down and note that you feet are encased in snow boots to keep them warm and stable on the ice. The viewer is in the field as part of the science team. Learning in the classroom and through social media is now fully 360 and fully immersive.

  4. The ‘added value’ GPs bring to commissioning: a qualitative study in primary care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Neil; Coleman, Anna; Wright, Michael; Gadsby, Erica; McDermott, Imelda; Petsoulas, Christina; Checkland, Kath

    2014-01-01

    Background The 2012 Health and Social Care Act in England replaced primary care trusts with clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) as the main purchasing organisations. These new organisations are GP-led, and it was claimed that this increased clinical input would significantly improve commissioning practice. Aim To explore some of the key assumptions underpinning CCGs, and to examine the claim that GPs bring ‘added value’ to commissioning. Design and setting In-depth interviews with clinicians and managers across seven CCGs in England between April and September 2013. Method A total of 40 clinicians and managers were interviewed. Interviews focused on the perceived ‘added value’ that GPs bring to commissioning. Results Claims to GP ‘added value’ centred on their intimate knowledge of their patients. It was argued that this detailed and concrete knowledge improves service design and that a close working relationship between GPs and managers strengthens the ability of managers to negotiate. However, responders also expressed concerns about the large workload that they face and about the difficulty in engaging with the wider body of GPs. Conclusion GPs have been involved in commissioning in many ways since fundholding in the 1990s, and claims such as these are not new. The key question is whether these new organisations better support and enable the effective use of this knowledge. Furthermore, emphasis on experiential knowledge brings with it concerns about representativeness and the extent to which other voices are heard. Finally, the implicit privileging of GPs’ personal knowledge ahead of systematic public health intelligence also requires exploration. PMID:25348997

  5. Solution mining process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Showalter, W.E.

    1984-01-01

    A solution mining process which may be used for uranium, thorium, vanadium, copper, nickel, molybdenum, rhenium, and selenium is claimed. During a first injection-and-production phase of between 6 months and 5 years, a leaching solution is injected through at least one well into the formation to solubilize the mineral values and form a pregnant liquor. This liquor is recovered through another well. The leaching solution contains sulfuric acid, nitric acid, hydrochloric acid, carbonic acid, an alkali metal carbonate, an alkali metal bicarbonate, ammonium carbonate or ammonium bicarbonate. Subsequently during a first production-only phase of between about 2 weeks and one year, injection of the leaching solution is suspended but pregnant liquor is still recovered. This stage is followed by a second injection-and-production phase of between 6 months and 5 years and a second production-only phase. The mineral values are separated from the pregnant liquor to form a barren liquor. The leaching agent is introduced into this liquor, and the solution is recycled. In a second claim for the solution mining of uranium, dilute carbonic acid is used as the leaching solution. The solution has a pH less than 7 and a bicarbonate ion concentration between about 380 ppm and 1000 ppm. The injection-and-production phase lasts between one and two years and the production only phase takes between one and four months. Carbon dioxide is introduced into the barren liquor to form a dilute carbonic acid solution and the solution is recycled

  6. Bringing science to bear--on peace, not war: elaborating on psychology's potential to promote peace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leidner, Bernhard; Tropp, Linda R; Lickel, Brian

    2013-10-01

    We argue that psychological and contextual factors play important roles in bringing about, facilitating, and escalating violent conflict. Yet rather than conclude that violent conflict is inevitable, we believe psychology's contributions can extend beyond understanding the origins and nature of violent conflict, to promote nonviolence and peace. In this article, we summarize psychological perspectives on the conditions and motivations underlying violent conflict. Drawing on this work, we then discuss psychological and contextual factors that can mitigate violence and war and promote nonviolence and peace. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved

  7. BioVersys Works to Bring Antibiotic Resistance to an End.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tigges, Marcel; Gitzinger, Marc

    2014-12-01

    BioVersys, founded in 2008, is working on bringing a technology for screening and for the development of 'transcriptional regulator inhibiting compounds' (TRICs) to patients in order to overcome antibiotic resistance. The co-founders share their view on what makes successful scientists pursue a career as start-up entrepreneurs rather than a classic academic career. They describe the history and milestones of their company, and how their everyday work differs from that of peers in an academic or industrial research setting.

  8. Old Books Bring New Life to the Brick and Mortar Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosken, S.

    2012-08-01

    If all the library books and journals can be viewed on your desk top, why come to the physical library? The USNO Library tried to bring the patrons inside the library. One method was to rotate rare book displays each month. As the library holds a fabulous collection of ancient astronomy books, including Copernicus, Kepler, Galileo, and Newton, we have abundant resources. The presentation will highlight the varied displays and offer a Rare Books 101 explanation of paper, printing, binding and a behind-the-scenes look at how old books are maintained and preserved.

  9. The Robobo Project: Bringing Educational Robotics Closer to Real-World Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bellas, Francisco; Naya, Martin; Varela, Gervasio

    2017-01-01

    The Robobo Project is a STEM-based project that aims to bring educational robotics, in primary and high school, closer to real-world applications. It is based on the use of a smartphone-based robotic platform called Robobo, a very flexible programming environment, and a set of lessons to integrate...... them. The smartphone provides high-level hardware capabilities in terms of sensors, communications and processing capabilities that allow to create more practical and realistic lessons that exploit human-robot interaction, with a small investment. In this paper, we present the main elements...

  10. Perspectives on mathematical practices bringing together philosophy of mathematics, sociology of mathematics, and mathematics education

    CERN Document Server

    van Kerkhove, Bart

    2007-01-01

    Philosophy of mathematics today has transformed into a very complex network of diverse ideas, viewpoints, and theories. Sometimes the emphasis is on the ""classical"" foundational work (often connected with the use of formal logical methods), sometimes on the sociological dimension of the mathematical research community and the ""products"" it produces, then again on the education of future mathematicians and the problem of how knowledge is or should be transmitted from one generation to the next. The editors of this book felt the urge, first of all, to bring together the widest variety of aut

  11. Strategies of bringing drug product marketing applications to meet current regulatory standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yan; Freed, Anita; Lavrich, David; Raghavachari, Ramesh; Huynh-Ba, Kim; Shah, Ketan; Alasandro, Mark

    2015-08-01

    In the past decade, many guidance documents have been issued through collaboration of global organizations and regulatory authorities. Most of these are applicable to new products, but there is a risk that currently marketed products will not meet the new compliance standards during audits and inspections while companies continue to make changes through the product life cycle for continuous improvement or market demands. This discussion presents different strategies to bringing drug product marketing applications to meet current and emerging standards. It also discusses stability and method designs to meet process validation and global development efforts.

  12. Microcontroller Unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tulaev, A.B.

    1994-01-01

    The general purpose micro controller unit based on 8-bit single-chip microcomputer of the MCS-51 family is described. The controller has the data and program memories, a serial interface and an external bus for functional I/O extensions. The controller consists of a microcomputer chip, up to 4 ROM-RAM chips and 10 SSI and MSI chips, and it measures 160x120 mm. Both hardware and software micro system debugging tools are described. (author). 8 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  13. Additive Manufacturing Solutions in the United States Marine Corps

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    public release. Distribution is unlimited. 12b. DISTRIBUTION CODE 13. ABSTRACT (maximum 200 words) This project conducts a cost benefit analysis to...continuous liquid interface production (CLIP). The findings from the cost benefit analysis show a cost advantage for additive manufacturing at the...Corps, cost benefit analysis, CLIP 15. NUMBER OF PAGES 119 16. PRICE CODE 17. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF REPORT Unclassified 18. SECURITY

  14. An Environmental Unit for the Social Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroll, Claudia J.

    Based on the inquiry method of learning, this instructional unit attempts to encourage students to discover for themselves the facts, problems, values, conflicts, and potential solutions of an environmental issue. Specifically, it deals with surface mining in the United States, with special focus on surface mining in Illinois. Materials and…

  15. Fracking in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Renee

    2015-01-01

    Over the last decade, advances in technology have made it profitable to extract natural gas from shale, leading to a boom in shale gas development in the United States. Hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, the controversial method for extracting natural gas, offers numerous benefits: relatively cheap energy, enhanced energy security, job creation, tax revenues and decreased dependence on dirty coal. Fracking, however, can also increase greenhouse gas emissions, pollute the air and result in health effects, consume huge quantities of water, and cause earthquakes. While some areas welcome fracking for the economic benefits it brings, other communities are attempting to ban fracking altogether. This article examines the benefits and risks of fracking in the U.S

  16. Liquid scintillation solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, E.C.

    1976-01-01

    The invention deals with a liquid scintillation solution which contains 1) a scintillation solvent (toluol), 2) a primary scintillation solute (PPO), 3) a secondary scintillation solute (dimethyl POPOP), 4) several surfactants (iso-octyl-phenol polyethoxy-ethanol and sodium di-hexyl sulfosuccinate) essentially different from one another and 5) a filter resolution and/or transparent-making agent (cyclic ether, especially tetrahydrofuran). (HP) [de

  17. Prospective Elementary Teachers' Conceptions of Unitizing with Whole Numbers and Fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobias, Jennifer M.; Roy, George J.; Safi, Farshid

    2015-01-01

    This article examines prospective elementary teachers' conceptions of unitizing with whole numbers and fraction concepts and operations throughout a semester-long mathematics content course. Student work samples and classroom conversations are used to illustrate the types of unitizing understandings that prospective teachers bring to teacher…

  18. PERVASIVE BUSINESS INTELLIGENCE SOLUTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocsana Tonis (Bucea-Manea

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The utility of BI solutions is accepted all over the world in the modern organizations. However, the BI solutions do not offer a constant feedback in line with the organizational activities. In this context, there have been developed pervasive BI solutions which are present at different levels of the organization, so that employees can observe only what is most relevant to their day-to-day tasks. They are organized in vertical silos, with clearly identified performance and expectations. The paper emphasizes the role of pervasive BI solutions in reaching the key performance indicators of the modern organizations, more important in the context of crisis.

  19. The Commonwealth Games as an Example of Bringing States Closer Through Sport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kobierecki Michał Marcin

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article is to investigate the issue of positive sports diplomacy directed at bringing countries closer and deepening cooperation between them. Generally, sports diplomacy is a broader term and may include various ways of utilizing sport, both negative and positive, even for the sake of nation-branding. Positive sports diplomacy most commonly refers to bringing hostile states closer together, but it may also be used to deepen political alliances or foster friendship and cooperation between states that are not mutually hostile. The research focuses on the latter form of positive sports diplomacy. The investigation is a case study concerning the Commonwealth Games, a sports event that is held once every four years and gathers countries and territories that used to belong to the former British Empire. The research therefore aims to determine whether this event, the second largest multisport event in the world, is significant from political and diplomatic perspectives. A second research question concerns whether the Commonwealth Games should be seen as an attempt by Great Britain to maintain influence in its former colonies. The research attempts to test the hypothesis that the Commonwealth Games are an important contributor to sustaining ties between states of the former British Empire.

  20. Where has the public gone and will communications technology bring them back?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutterman, L.; Smith, R.

    1997-01-01

    This paper addresses the decreasing number of persons interested and participating in the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) or open-quotes Superfundclose quotes process. It also looks at communications technology to bring people back into participation in the Superfund process. The material studied and the technologies evaluated involve the Environmental Restoration Program at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The conclusions are probably valid for most DOE Superfund activities. Where has the public gone? The public has taken an interest in issues that they perceive have greater impact on their quality of life and that have an adverse impact on the environment, such as the shipment and storage of spent nuclear fuel. Will communications technology bring them back? Technology can do many things: it can reduce cost; it can allow quicker access to and from the public; it can offer more information; and it can increase interest because of its novelty for short periods of time, but it will not, in and of its own, create public involvement

  1. Bringing Space Scientists, Teachers, and Students Together With The CINDI E/PO Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urquhart, M.; Hairston, M.

    2007-12-01

    We will report on the activities, challenges, and successes of the ongoing collaboration between the William B. Hanson Center for Space Sciences (CSS) and the Department of Science/Mathematics Education (SME) at the University of Texas at Dallas. At the core of our partnership is the Education and Public Outreach program for the Coupled Ion / Neutral Dynamics Investigation (CINDI) instrument. CINDI is a NASA-funded program on the Air Force's Communication / Navigation Outage Forecast Satellite (C/NOFS) which will be launched in summer 2008. The CSS faculty and research scientists and the SME faculty and students have created a dynamic program that brings scientists and K-12 teachers together. Our activities include middle and high school curriculum development, teachers workshops, graduate course work for teachers, creation of the popular "Cindi in Space" educational comic book, and bringing K-12 teachers and students to work and/or visit with the CINDI scientists. We will present the outcomes of this collaborative effort as well as our recent experience of having a physics teacher from a local high school as our Teacher in Residence at CSS in summer 2007.

  2. Possible room temperature superconductivity in conductors obtained by bringing alkanes into contact with a graphite surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasushi Kawashima

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Electrical resistances of conductors obtained by bringing alkanes into contact with a graphite surface have been investigated at room temperatures. Ring current in a ring-shaped container into which n-octane-soaked thin graphite flakes were compressed did not decay for 50 days at room temperature. After two HOPG plates were immersed into n-heptane and n-octane at room temperature, changes in resistances of the two samples were measured by four terminal technique. The measurement showed that the resistances of these samples decrease to less than the smallest resistance that can be measured with a high resolution digital voltmeter (0.1μV. The observation of persistent currents in the ring-shaped container suggests that the HOPG plates immersed in n-heptane and n-octane really entered zero-resistance state at room temperature. These results suggest that room temperature superconductor may be obtained by bringing alkanes into contact with a graphite surface.

  3. Fuel cells for vehicle applications in cars - bringing the future closer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panik, Ferdinand

    Among all alternative drive systems, the fuel cell electric propulsion system has the highest potential to compete with the internal combustion engine. For this reason, Daimler-Benz AG has entered into a co-operative alliance with Ballard Power Systems, with the objectives of bringing fuel cell vehicles to the market. Apart from the fuel cell itself, fuel cell vehicles require comprehensive system technology to provide fuel and air supply, cooling, energy management, electric and electronic functions. The system technology determines to a large extent the cost, weight, efficiency, performance and overall customer benefit of fuel cell vehicles. Hence, Daimler-Benz and Ballard are pooling their expertise in fuel cell system technology in a joint company, with the aim of bringing their fuel cell vehicular systems to the stage of maturity required for market entry as early as possible. Hydrogen-fuelled zero-emission fuel cell transit `buses' will be the first market segment addressed, with an emphasis on the North American and European markets. The first buses are already scheduled for delivery to customers in late 1997. Since a liquid fuel like methanol is easier to handle in passenger cars, fuel reforming technologies are developed and will shortly be demonstrated in a prototype, as well. The presentation will cover concepts of fuel cell vehicles with an emphasis on system technology, the related testing procedures and results as well as an outline of market entry strategies.

  4. A Concise Equation of State for Aqueous Solutions of Electrolytes Incorporating Thermodynamic Laws and Entropy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raji Heyrovská

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Recently, the author suggested a simple and composite equation of state by incorporating fundamental thermodynamic properties like heat capacities into her earlier concise equation of state for gases based on free volume and molecular association / dissociation. This work brings new results for aqueous solutions, based on the analogy of the equation of state for gases and solutions over wide ranges of pressures (for gases and concentrations (for solutions. The definitions of entropy and heat energy through the equation of state for gases, also holds for solutions.

  5. Contemporary solutions for managing Class III malocclusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathamuni Rengarajan Krishnaswamy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Although patients with Class III malocclusions constitute a small percentage of the average orthodontic practice, providing them with optimal treatment is a daunting task. The treatment approach is dependent upon the growth status of the individual and the severity of the skeletal dysplasia. For growing individuals, facemask therapy to protract the maxilla is ineffective because of its dependence on dental anchorage to bring forth skeletal correction. Orthodontic camouflage in nongrowing mild skeletal Class III individuals is met with limited success because of the anatomical boundaries and the conventional biomechanics. Orthognathic surgery to correct the maxillomandibular relations is time-consuming, and the facial esthetics is compromised during the orthodontic decompensation period. Contemporary solutions to overcome these limitations are now viable with the use of temporary anchorage devices and by performing surgery prior to orthodontic decompensation. The rationale for employing these contemporary approaches will be discussed in this study with illustrative cases.

  6. Mobile speech and advanced natural language solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Markowitz, Judith

    2013-01-01

    Mobile Speech and Advanced Natural Language Solutions provides a comprehensive and forward-looking treatment of natural speech in the mobile environment. This fourteen-chapter anthology brings together lead scientists from Apple, Google, IBM, AT&T, Yahoo! Research and other companies, along with academicians, technology developers and market analysts.  They analyze the growing markets for mobile speech, new methodological approaches to the study of natural language, empirical research findings on natural language and mobility, and future trends in mobile speech.  Mobile Speech opens with a challenge to the industry to broaden the discussion about speech in mobile environments beyond the smartphone, to consider natural language applications across different domains.   Among the new natural language methods introduced in this book are Sequence Package Analysis, which locates and extracts valuable opinion-related data buried in online postings; microintonation as a way to make TTS truly human-like; and se...

  7. Dextran solution optical activity in Tb (III) ion presence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasconcellos, Sandra S.; Rodrigues, J.F.; Faljoni-Alario, A.

    1984-01-01

    Optical activity studies of aqueous solutions of dextrana in presence of Tb (III) or without it shows the complex with the hidroxyl groups of C 2 and C 3 of monomeric unit participation is formed. (L.M.J.) [pt

  8. Solar unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sukhanov, A M; Trushevskiy, S N; Tveryanovich, E V

    1982-01-01

    A solar unit is proposed which contains an inclined solar collector with supply and outlet pipelines, the first of which is connected to the source of a heat carrier, while the second is connected through the valve to the tank for collecting heated heat carrier equipped with a device for recovery. In order to improve the effectiveness of heating the heat carrier, it additionally contains a concentrator of solar radiation and a device for maintaining a level of the heat carrier in the collector in the zone of the focal spot of the concentrator, while the heat pipeline is connected to the source of the heat carrier with the help of a device for maintaining the level of the heat carrier.

  9. Solute-solute interactions in intermetallic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banerjee, Debashis; Murray, Ryan; Collins, Gary S., E-mail: collins@wsu.edu [Washington State University, Department of Physics and Astronomy (United States); Zacate, Matthew O. [Northern Kentucky University, Department of Physics and Geology (United States)

    2017-11-15

    Experiments were carried out on highly ordered GdAl{sub 2} samples containing extremely dilute mole fractions of{sup 111}In/Cd probe-atom solutes (about 10{sup −11}), intrinsic antisite atoms Al{sub Gd} having mole fractions of order 0-10{sup −2}, and doped with Ag solutes at mole fractions of order 10{sup −2}. Three types of defect interactions were investigated. (1) Quadrupole interactions caused by Ag-solute atoms neighboring{sup 111}In/Cd solute probe atoms were detected using the method of perturbed angular correlation of gamma rays (PAC). Three complexes of pairs of In-probes and Ag-solutes occupying neighboring positions on Gd- and Al-sublattices were identified by comparing site fractions in Gd-poor and Gd-rich GdAl{sub 2}(Ag) samples and from the symmetry of the quadrupole interactions. Interaction enthalpies between solute-atom pairs were determined from temperature dependences of observed site fractions. Repulsive interactions were observed for close-neighbor complexes In{sub Gd}+Ag{sub Gd} and In{sub Gd}+Ag{sub Al} pairs, whereas a slightly attractive interaction was observed for In{sub Al}+Ag{sub Al}. Interaction enthalpies were all small, in the range ±0.15 eV. (2) Quadrupole interactions caused by intrinsic antisite atoms Al{sub Gd} neighboring In{sub Gd} probes were also detected and site fractions measured as a function of temperature, as in previous work on samples not doped with Ag-solutes [Temperature- and composition-driven changes in site occupation of solutes in Gd{sub 1+3x}Al{sub 2−3x}, Zacate and Collins (Phys. Rev. B69, 174202 (1))]. However, the effective binding enthalpy between In{sub Gd} probe and Al{sub Gd} antisite was found to change sign from -0.12 eV (attractive interaction) in undoped samples to + 0.24 eV (repulsive) in Ag-doped samples. This may be attributed to an attractive interaction between Al{sub Gd} antisite atoms and Ag-dopants that competes with the attractive interaction between In{sub Gd} and Al{sub Gd

  10. MPEG-1 low-cost encoder solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grueger, Klaus; Schirrmeister, Frank; Filor, Lutz; von Reventlow, Christian; Schneider, Ulrich; Mueller, Gerriet; Sefzik, Nicolai; Fiedrich, Sven

    1995-02-01

    A solution for real-time compression of digital YCRCB video data to an MPEG-1 video data stream has been developed. As an additional option, motion JPEG and video telephone streams (H.261) can be generated. For MPEG-1, up to two bidirectional predicted images are supported. The required computational power for motion estimation and DCT/IDCT, memory size and memory bandwidth have been the main challenges. The design uses fast-page-mode memory accesses and requires only one single 80 ns EDO-DRAM with 256 X 16 organization for video encoding. This can be achieved only by using adequate access and coding strategies. The architecture consists of an input processing and filter unit, a memory interface, a motion estimation unit, a motion compensation unit, a DCT unit, a quantization control, a VLC unit and a bus interface. For using the available memory bandwidth by the processing tasks, a fixed schedule for memory accesses has been applied, that can be interrupted for asynchronous events. The motion estimation unit implements a highly sophisticated hierarchical search strategy based on block matching. The DCT unit uses a separated fast-DCT flowgraph realized by a switchable hardware unit for both DCT and IDCT operation. By appropriate multiplexing, only one multiplier is required for: DCT, quantization, inverse quantization, and IDCT. The VLC unit generates the video-stream up to the video sequence layer and is directly coupled with an intelligent bus-interface. Thus, the assembly of video, audio and system data can easily be performed by the host computer. Having a relatively low complexity and only small requirements for DRAM circuits, the developed solution can be applied to low-cost encoding products for consumer electronics.

  11. Dienone-phenol Rearrangement of C-9 Oxygenated Decalinic Dienone and Analogs through B-Ring Cleavage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Dehydrogenation of 9-hydroxy decalinic enones and analogs with DDQ resulted in a formal dienone-phenol type rearrangement via B-ring cleavage, while the corresponding dienone acetates underwent base-catalyzed formal dienone-phenol type rearrangement analogously.

  12. How an EAM solution could support a new build project?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luanco, E.

    2008-01-01

    In the context of the nuclear renaissance, the purpose of this paper is to address from an Enterprise Asset Management system (EAM) prospective the business needs of all the main stake holders of a new NPP? These are the Architect Engineers AE, the EPC and the future operator of a new NPP? It also covers the regulatory and asset life cycle management aspects of such a project. Besides meeting the US specific 10CFR part 52 requirements of the new combine construction and operating license (COL) process, we will review the generic ones which needs be satisfied no matter the country where this new build project is taking place. It also covers plant life cycle considerations with regards of the key information generated by the plant constructors and design providers which are of importance to the future NPP operators. All these requirements bring their own lot of issues that an appropriate EAM solution could address. Ventyx (formerly Indus International), is a nuclear EAM solutions provider for the passed 30 years and its solution used all over the world. This paper will review these requirements which could easily be supported by such a solution and review its potential key benefits it could bring to all involved parties. (authors)

  13. Solutions of nuclear pairing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balantekin, A. B.; Pehlivan, Y.

    2007-01-01

    We give the exact solution of orbit dependent nuclear pairing problem between two nondegenerate energy levels using the Bethe ansatz technique. Our solution reduces to previously solved cases in the appropriate limits including Richardson's treatment of reduced pairing in terms of rational Gaudin algebra operators

  14. On Lovelock vacuum solution

    OpenAIRE

    Dadhich, Naresh

    2010-01-01

    We show that the asymptotic large $r$ limit of all Lovelock vacuum and electrovac solutions with $\\Lambda$ is always the Einstein solution in $d \\geq 2n+1$ dimensions. It is completely free of the order $n$ of the Lovelock polynomial indicating universal asymptotic behaviour.

  15. Rational Solutions and Lump Solutions of the Potential YTSF Equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hong-Qian; Chen, Ai-Hua

    2017-07-01

    By using of the bilinear form, rational solutions and lump solutions of the potential Yu-Toda-Sasa-Fukuyama (YTSF) equation are derived. Dynamics of the fundamental lump solution, n1-order lump solutions, and N-lump solutions are studied for some special cases. We also find some interaction behaviours of solitary waves and one lump of rational solutions.

  16. The United States and the Kurds: Case Studies in United States Engagement

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lambert, Peter

    1997-01-01

    ..., between 1969- 1975, and 1990-1996. Both eras saw the United States able to influence events relating to the Kurds in support of a larger regional policy, only to find no easy solution to the Kurdish quest for autonomy...

  17. Bolting multicenter solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bena, Iosif [Institut de Physique Théorique, Université Paris Saclay, CEA, CNRS, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Bossard, Guillaume [Centre de Physique Théorique, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS, Université Paris-Saclay, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Katmadas, Stefanos; Turton, David [Institut de Physique Théorique, Université Paris Saclay, CEA, CNRS, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)

    2017-01-30

    We introduce a solvable system of equations that describes non-extremal multicenter solutions to six-dimensional ungauged supergravity coupled to tensor multiplets. The system involves a set of functions on a three-dimensional base metric. We obtain a family of non-extremal axisymmetric solutions that generalize the known multicenter extremal solutions, using a particular base metric that introduces a bolt. We analyze the conditions for regularity, and in doing so we show that this family does not include solutions that contain an extremal black hole and a smooth bolt. We determine the constraints that are necessary to obtain smooth horizonless solutions involving a bolt and an arbitrary number of Gibbons-Hawking centers.

  18. Determination of U and Pu in highly radioactive solutions. Application to the analysis of fuel reprocessing solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denis, Alphonse

    Various devices intended for the X-ray fluorescence analysis of U and Pu in radioactive solutions were developed in a hot cell: a device for sample deposition and preparation; a measurement unit. The problems investigated are described [fr

  19. Natural spatial and temporal variations in groundwater chemistry in fractured, sedimentary rocks: scale and implications for solute transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoven, Stephen J. van der; Kip Solomon, D.; Moline, Gerilynn R.

    2005-01-01

    Natural tracers (major ions, δ 18 O, and O 2 ) were monitored to evaluate groundwater flow and transport to a depth of 20 m below the surface in fractured sedimentary (primarily shale and limestone) rocks. Large temporal variations in these tracers were noted in the soil zone and the saprolite, and are driven primarily by individual storm events. During nonstorm periods, an upward flow brings water with high TDS, constant δ 18 O, and low dissolved O 2 to the water table. During storm events, low TDS, variable δ 18 O, and high dissolved O 2 water recharges through the unsaturated zone. These oscillating signals are rapidly transmitted along fracture pathways in the saprolite, with changes occurring on spatial scales of several meters and on a time scale of hours. The variations decreased markedly below the boundary between the saprolite and less weathered bedrock. Variations in the bedrock units occurred on time scales of days and spatial scales of at least 20 m. The oscillations of chemical conditions in the shallow groundwater are hypothesized to have significant implications for solute transport. Solutes and colloids that adsorb onto aquifer solids can be released into solution by decreases in ionic strength and pH. The decreases in ionic strength also cause thermodynamic undersaturation of the groundwater with respect to some mineral species and may result in mineral dissolution. Redox conditions are also changing and may result in mineral dissolution/precipitation. The net result of these chemical variations is episodic transport of a wide range of dissolved solutes or suspended particles, a phenomenon rarely considered in contaminant transport studies

  20. The CPEX Data Portal: Bringing Together Different Types of Data for Different Types of Users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knosp, B.; Li, P.; Vu, Q. A.; Hristova-Veleva, S. M.; Turk, J.; Lambrigtsen, B.

    2017-12-01

    The NASA Convective Processes Experiment (CPEX) aircraft field campaign took place in the summer of 2017 in the North Atlantic / Caribbean Ocean region. During this campaign, the NASA DC-8 aircraft carried several instruments that took measurements with the goal of collecting data to help answer questions about convective storm initiation, organization, growth, and dissipation. To help researchers answer science questions about convective storms, the CPEX Data Portal (https://cpexportal.jpl.nasa.gov) was created to bring together relevant satellite and model data, along with aircraft data observed during the campaign. The CPEX Data Portal was designed for two major functions: 1) assist with mission planning by providing a near real-time snapshot of what was going on in the broader North Atlantic domain and 2) bring together different types of data after the aircraft flights had finished to allow researchers to dive deeper into the data. Both functions necessitated collecting a host of disparate data from different instrument types that inherently have differences in resolution, spatial and temporal domain, and quality. Additionally, users of this data portal had varying levels of experience with the different data types (e.g. some used aircraft data before, but not with satellite data). Users were also at different points in their careers - both students and seasoned researchers participated in the campaign and brought different understandings of the physical processes depicted in the portal's visualizations. The CPEX Data Portal team used the existing JPL Tropical Cyclone Information System's near real-time data portal software package to launch a campaign-specific portal to host data during and after the CPEX campaign. This web-based portal includes the ability to visualize pre-generated images of physical quantities from satellites, models, and aircraft instruments, and brings them together in a common virtual globe for given spatial and temporal criteria. Users

  1. Demonstration of TEG-powered wireless autonomous transducer solution for condition monitoring in industrial environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Ziyang; Patrascu, Mihai; Su, Jiale; Vullers, Ruud J.M. [imec the Netherlands, Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2011-07-01

    Imec/Holst Centre focuses on the development of wireless autonomous transducer solution, which is poised to bring about huge impact in the sectors of health care, machinery, transportation and energy, etc. In this paper, we first showcase a TEG-powered demonstration for condition monitoring in industrial environment. Composing of sensor-actuator, front-end interface, digital signal processing unit and radio, the developed wireless sensor node can monitor the changing operating condition, i.e. the loading on a rolling-element bearing, on a rotating shaft. The use of a specially designed TEG, working in tandem with an energy storage device, can significantly improve the energy autonomy of the condition monitoring system as a whole. The different components in the demonstration are presented. Subsequently, the experimental results of vibration signature analysis are exhibited. On one hand, the presented demonstration sheds light on the huge potential of thermoelectric energy harvesting to achieve energy autonomy. On the other hand, it also points to the aspects that are in need of further development, namely miniaturization and cost reduction of energy harvesters. Aimed at the delivery of cost-effective miniaturized thermoelectric harvesting devices, imec/Holst Centre has been tackling with the relevant challenges by resorting to, but not limited to, its expertise in micromachining. An update on the latest research results is subsequently given with regard to various micromachined thermoelectric devices, fully fledged wearable TEGs with custom designed package and thermoelectric material property optimization. (orig.)

  2. Asperger syndrome and the supposed obligation not to bring disabled lives into the world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Pat

    2010-09-01

    Asperger syndrome (AS) is an autistic spectrum condition that shares the range of social impairments associated with classic autism widely regarded as disabling, while also often giving rise to high levels of ability in areas such as maths, science, engineering and music. The nature of this striking duality of disability and ability is examined, along with its implications for our thinking about disability and the relevance of levels and kinds of disability to reproductive choices. In particular, it may be seen as posing a challenge to John Harris's influential position in reproductive ethics relating to disability. The paper argues that if, as Harris maintains, there is a quite general moral obligation to avoid bringing disabled lives into the world regardless of the level of disability, then AS must be seen as having a strong claim to be exempt from such an obligation. However, a broader critique of Harris's position leads to the conclusion that, in fact, this putative obligation does not exist.

  3. Can programming frameworks bring smartphones into the mainstream of psychological science?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukasz Piwek

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Smartphones continue to provide huge potential for psychological science and the advent of novel research frameworks brings new opportunities for researchers who have previously struggled to develop smartphone applications. However, despite this renewed promise, smartphones have failed to become a standard item within psychological research. Here we consider the key barriers that continue to limit smartphone adoption within psychological science and how these barriers might be diminishing in light of ResearchKit and other recent methodological developments. We conclude that while these programming frameworks are certainly a step in the right direction it remains challenging to create usable research-orientated applications with current frameworks. Smartphones may only become an asset for psychology and social science as a whole when development software that is both easy to use, secure, and becomes freely available.

  4. Organisational Capabilities Required for Enabling Employee Mobility through Bring- Your-Own-Device Concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toperesu B-Abee

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mobile device adoption is on the rise and people are increasingly using mobile devices as a part of their lives. Studies have shown that people can use mobile devices to perform their work duties from anywhere. Organisations are now exploring ways of enabling and supporting mobility for employees’ mobile devices, including BYOD (Bring-Your-Own-Device policies. Objective: The objective of this study is to identify the main capabilities required for enterprise mobility. Methods/Approach: This qualitative research study presents empirical results based on interviews with selected senior IS managers of large organizations. Results: The main findings of this study suggest that information security and mobile device management are among the main capabilities required for enterprise mobility. Conclusions: Enterprise mobility is an emerging field which has received very little research attention. More research in the field will help organisations make informed decisions on how to increase productivity, sales and efficiency while achieving employee satisfaction through enterprise mobility.

  5. Bringing Online Learning to Campus: The Hybridization of Teaching and Learning at Brigham Young University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory L. Waddoups

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The primary purpose of Brigham Young University (BYU is to provide students with a combination of sacred and secular education often described as the "BYU experience". Achieving this purpose is challenged by the rapid growth in Church membership and an enrollment cap of 30,000 students. To address these challenges, BYU sponsors the use of technology to bridge the gap between the increased Church membership and the number of students allowed under the enrollment caps. This institutional case study shows how these challenges have influenced the hybridization of teaching and learning for on campus (resident and off campus (distance students. It also describes how BYU has brought distance education to campus, and is beginning to bring campus-based educational practices to distance education.

  6. Can Programming Frameworks Bring Smartphones into the Mainstream of Psychological Science?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piwek, Lukasz; Ellis, David A

    2016-01-01

    Smartphones continue to provide huge potential for psychological science and the advent of novel research frameworks brings new opportunities for researchers who have previously struggled to develop smartphone applications. However, despite this renewed promise, smartphones have failed to become a standard item within psychological research. Here we consider the key issues that continue to limit smartphone adoption within psychological science and how these barriers might be diminishing in light of ResearchKit and other recent methodological developments. We conclude that while these programming frameworks are certainly a step in the right direction it remains challenging to create usable research-orientated applications with current frameworks. Smartphones may only become an asset for psychology and social science as a whole when development software that is both easy to use and secure becomes freely available.

  7. Descendit ad [in] inferna: ‘A matter of no small moment in bringing about redemption’

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Buitendag

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available This article endorses Calvin’s conviction that the ‘descendit ad inferna’ of the Apostles’ Creed is part of the ‘summary of doctrine‘ and a matter of ‘no small moment in bringing about redemption‘ (Calvin 1960:Inst. II, xvi, 8. The reason for this role, however, is not Calvin’s metaphorical interpretation of the clause. Instead, the author tries to argue that a scientific theological approach will maintain the clause because of its transcendence of finitude and the proclamation of Christ’s victory. The whole of creation is delivered from sin. Proper hermeneutics will take the original socio–historical environment into account and make one suspicious about certain ecclesiastical biases. Spatial terms in the Creed should therefore not be demythologised, but rather be transformed in accordance with the insights of the contemporary physics of time and space.

  8. What Job will Bring Satisfaction? An Analysis based on Responses of Students Studying Business in Kazakhstan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuliya Frolova

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This research sheds a light on an under-researched topic of job satisfaction in Kazakhstan. Young people, who today are pursuing their bachelor degree, but tomorrow will start working, were chosen as a sample. This article should be especially interesting to employers because it reveals which factors – among those that potentially contribute to job satisfaction – will bring the expected effect in Kazakhstan and thus are worthy of investments. The study is based on the survey conducted by the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM in the years 2005- 2012 among U.S. employees. The results of the study suggest that rating list of factors that mostly contribute to job satisfaction, which was compiled on the basis of the answers provided by the respondents from Kazakhstan, is quite different from the rating lists of factors mostly contributing to job satisfaction of U.S. employees.

  9. Bringing the Great American Eclipse of 2017 to Audiences across the Nation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, C. A.; Mayo, L.; Cline, T. D.; Ng, C.; Stephenson, B. E.

    2015-12-01

    The August 21, 2017 eclipse across America will be seen by an estimated 500 million people from northern Canada to South America as well as parts of western Europe and Africa. Through This "Great American Eclipse" NASA in partnership with Google, the American Parks Network, American Astronomical Society, the Astronomical League, and numerous other science, education, outreach, and public communications groups and organizations will develop the approaches, resources, partnerships, and technology applications necessary to bring the excitement and the science of the August 21st, 2017 total solar eclipse across America to formal and informal audiences in the US and around the world. This effort will be supported by the highly visible and successful Sun Earth Days program and will be the main theme for Sun-Earth Days 2017.This presentation will discuss NASA's education and communication plans for the eclipse and will detail a number of specific programs and partnerships being leveraged to enhance our reach and impact.

  10. Method of bringing nuclear power plant to fractional electrical load conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iljunin, V.G.; Kuznetsoy, I.A.; Murogov, V.M.; Shmelev, A.N.

    1978-01-01

    A method is described of bringing a nuclear power plant to fractional electric load conditions, which power plant comprises at least two nuclear reactors, at least one nuclear reactor being a breeder and both reactors transferring heat to the turbine working substance, consisting in that the consumption of the turbine working substance is reduced in accordance with a predetermined fractional load. At the same time, the amount of heat being transferred from the nuclear reactors to the turbine working substance is reduced, for which purpose the reactors are included in autonomous cooling circuits to successively transfer heat to the turbine working substance. The breeding reactor is included in the cooling circuit with a lower coolant temperature, the temperature of the coolant at the inlet and outlet of the breeder being reduced to a level ensuring the operation of the nuclear power plant in predetermined fractional load conditions, due to which the power of the breeder is increased, and afterheat is removed

  11. Bringing authentic service learning to the classroom: benefits and lessons learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, Leslie C.

    2016-06-01

    Project-based learning, which has gained significant attention within K-12 education, provides rich hands-on experiences for students. Bringing an element of service to the projects allow students to engage in a local or global community, providing an abundance of benefits to the students’ learning. For example, service projects build confidence, increase motivation, and exercise problem-solving and communication skills in addition to developing a deep understanding of content. I will present lessons I have learned through four years of providing service learning opportunities in my classroom. I share ideas for astronomy projects, tips for connecting and listening to a community, and helpful guidelines to hold students accountable in order to ensure a productive and educational project.

  12. Thick brane solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dzhunushaliev, Vladimir; Minamitsuji, Masato; Folomeev, Vladimir

    2010-01-01

    This paper gives a comprehensive review on thick brane solutions and related topics. Such models have attracted much attention from many aspects since the birth of the brane world scenario. In many works, it has been usually assumed that a brane is an infinitely thin object; however, in more general situations, one can no longer assume this. It is also widely considered that more fundamental theories such as string theory would have a minimal length scale. Many multidimensional field theories coupled to gravitation have exact solutions of gravitating topological defects, which can represent our brane world. The inclusion of brane thickness can realize a variety of possible brane world models. Given our understanding, the known solutions can be classified into topologically non-trivial solutions and trivial ones. The former class contains solutions of a single scalar (domain walls), multi-scalar, gauge-Higgs (vortices), Weyl gravity and so on. As an example of the latter class, we consider solutions of two interacting scalar fields. Approaches to obtain cosmological equations in the thick brane world are reviewed. Solutions with spatially extended branes (S-branes) and those with an extra time-like direction are also discussed.

  13. Termination unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traeholt, Chresten [Frederiksberg, DK; Willen, Dag [Klagshamn, SE; Roden, Mark [Newnan, GA; Tolbert, Jerry C [Carrollton, GA; Lindsay, David [Carrollton, GA; Fisher, Paul W [Heiskell, TN; Nielsen, Carsten Thidemann [Jaegerspris, DK

    2014-01-07

    This invention relates to a termination unit comprising an end-section of a cable. The end section of the cable defines a central longitudinal axis and comprising end-parts of N electrical phases, an end-part of a neutral conductor and a surrounding thermally insulation envelope adapted to comprising a cooling fluid. The end-parts of the N electrical phases and the end-part of the neutral conductor each comprising at least one electrical conductor and being arranged in the cable concentrically around a core former with a phase 1 located relatively innermost, and phase N relatively outermost in the cable, phase N being surrounded by the neutral conductor, electrical insulation being arrange between neighboring electrical phases and between phase N and the neutral conductor, and wherein the end-parts of the neutral conductor and the electrical phases each comprise a contacting surface electrically connected to at least one branch current lead to provide an electrical connection: The contacting surfaces each having a longitudinal extension, and being located sequentially along the longitudinal extension of the end-section of the cable. The branch current leads being individually insulated from said thermally insulation envelope by individual electrical insulators.

  14. Termination unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Traeholt, Chresten; Willen, Dag; Roden, Mark; Tolbert, Jerry C.; Lindsay, David; Fisher, Paul W.; Nielsen, Carsten Thidemann

    2016-05-03

    Cable end section comprises end-parts of N electrical phases/neutral, and a thermally-insulation envelope comprising cooling fluid. The end-parts each comprises a conductor and are arranged with phase 1 innermost, N outermost surrounded by the neutral, electrical insulation being between phases and N and neutral. The end-parts comprise contacting surfaces located sequentially along the longitudinal extension of the end-section. A termination unit has an insulating envelope connected to a cryostat, special parts at both ends comprising an adapter piece at the cable interface and a closing end-piece terminating the envelope in the end-section. The special parts houses an inlet and/or outlet for cooling fluid. The space between an inner wall of the envelope and a central opening of the cable is filled with cooling fluid. The special part at the end connecting to the cryostat houses an inlet or outlet, splitting cooling flow into cable annular flow and termination annular flow.

  15. Bringing explicit insight into cognitive psychology features during clinical reasoning seminars: a prospective, controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nendaz, Mathieu R; Gut, Anne M; Louis-Simonet, Martine; Perrier, Arnaud; Vu, Nu V

    2011-04-01

    Facets of reasoning competence influenced by an explicit insight into cognitive psychology features during clinical reasoning seminars have not been specifically explored. This prospective, controlled study, conducted at the University of Geneva Faculty of Medicine, Switzerland, assessed the impact on sixth-year medical students' patient work-up of case-based reasoning seminars, bringing them explicit insight into cognitive aspects of their reasoning. Volunteer students registered for our three-month Internal Medicine elective were assigned to one of two training conditions: standard (control) or modified (intervention) case-based reasoning seminars. These seminars start with the patient's presenting complaint and the students must ask the tutor for additional clinical information to progress through case resolution. For this intervention, the tutors made each step explicit to students and encouraged self-reflection on their reasoning processes. At the end of their elective, students' performances were assessed through encounters with two standardized patients and chart write-ups. Twenty-nine students participated, providing a total of 58 encounters. The overall differences in accuracy of the final diagnosis given to the patient at the end of the encounter (control 63% vs intervention 74%, p = 0.53) and of the final diagnosis mentioned in the patient chart (61% vs 70%, p = 0.58) were not statistically significant. The students in the intervention group significantly more often listed the correct diagnosis among the differential diagnoses in their charts (75% vs 97%, p = 0.02). This case-based clinical reasoning seminar intervention, designed to bring students insight into cognitive features of their reasoning, improved aspects of diagnostic competence.

  16. Professional Hadoop solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Lublinsky, Boris; Yakubovich, Alexey

    2013-01-01

    The go-to guidebook for deploying Big Data solutions with Hadoop Today's enterprise architects need to understand how the Hadoop frameworks and APIs fit together, and how they can be integrated to deliver real-world solutions. This book is a practical, detailed guide to building and implementing those solutions, with code-level instruction in the popular Wrox tradition. It covers storing data with HDFS and Hbase, processing data with MapReduce, and automating data processing with Oozie. Hadoop security, running Hadoop with Amazon Web Services, best practices, and automating Hadoop processes i

  17. Potencial hidrogeniônico de soluções de cloridrato de dobutamina expostas a condições ambientais de unidades de cuidados intensivos neonatais Hydrogen-ion potential of dobutamine hydrochloride solutions exposed to environmental conditions of neonatal intensive care units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidiane L. Reis

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Verificar o potencial hidrogeniônico (pH de soluções de cloridrato de dobutamina sob condições ambientais que mimetizam unidades de cuidados intensivos neonatais. MÉTODOS: Analisou-se pH do fármaco em solução glicosada 5% ou NaCl 0,9% segundo temperatura (22 e 37 °C, luz (escuro, lâmpadas fluorescentes ambiente e equipamento de fototerapia e equipos (incolor e âmbar em intervalos de tempo (0, 1, 24, 48, 72 e 96 horas. RESULTADOS: Evidenciaram-se valores próximos de pH do fármaco na apresentação comercial e diluído. Obteve-se média de pH de 3,45±0,19 a 22 °C e de 3,55±0,20 a 37 °C. A média de pH das soluções mantidas no escuro foi de 3,62±0,09, na luz ambiente, de 3,63±0,07, e sob fototerapia, de 3,31±0,16. Soluções em equipos incolores tiveram média menor (3,41±0,24 do que em âmbares (3,52±0,15. Obtiveram-se menores valores de pH nas soluções sob fototerapia em equipos incolores (3,17±0,03 do que em âmbares (3,55±0,03. CONCLUSÃO: Sob a luz da fototerapia houve maior variação do pH das soluções, e o emprego de equipos âmbares minimizou tal efeito.OBJECTIVE: To verify the hydrogen-ion potential (pH of dobutamine hydrochloride solutions under environmental conditions similar to those of neonatal intensive care units. METHODS: We analyzed the pH of the drug diluted in 5% dextrose in water or 0.9% NaCl under different conditions of temperature (22 and 37 °C and light (dark, fluorescent light bulbs, and phototherapy equipment, using colorless and amber intravenous sets at time intervals of 0, 1, 24, 48, 72, and 96 hours. RESULTS: The pH values of the marketed form of the drug and the diluted drug were similar. The pH means were 3.45±0.19 at 22 °C and 3.55±0.20 at 37 °C. The average of the pH according to light conditions were as follows: in the dark = 3.62±0.09, under room light = 3.63±0.07, and exposed to phototherapy = 3.31±0.16. Solutions stored in colorless intravenous sets had a lower

  18. Periodic solutions of asymptotically linear Hamiltonian systems without twist conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng Rong [Coll. of Mathematics and Physics, Nanjing Univ. of Information Science and Tech., Nanjing (China); Dept. of Mathematics, Southeast Univ., Nanjing (China); Zhang Dongfeng [Dept. of Mathematics, Southeast Univ., Nanjing (China)

    2010-05-15

    In dynamical system theory, especially in many fields of applications from mechanics, Hamiltonian systems play an important role, since many related equations in mechanics can be written in an Hamiltonian form. In this paper, we study the existence of periodic solutions for a class of Hamiltonian systems. By applying the Galerkin approximation method together with a result of critical point theory, we establish the existence of periodic solutions of asymptotically linear Hamiltonian systems without twist conditions. Twist conditions play crucial roles in the study of periodic solutions for asymptotically linear Hamiltonian systems. The lack of twist conditions brings some difficulty to the study. To the authors' knowledge, very little is known about the case, where twist conditions do not hold. (orig.)

  19. OIL SOLUTIONS POWDER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Technical product bulletin: aka OIL SOLUTIONS POWDER, SPILL GREEN LS, this miscellaneous oil spill control agent used in cleanups initially behaves like a synthetic sorbent, then as a solidifier as the molecular microencapsulating process occurs.

  20. Conductometry of electrolyte solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safonova, Lyubov P.; Kolker, Arkadii M.

    1992-09-01

    A review is given of the theories of the electrical conductance of electrolyte solutions of different ionic strengths and concentrations, and of the models of ion association. An analysis is made of the methods for mathematical processing of experimental conductometric data. An account is provided of various theories describing the dependence of the limiting value of the ionic electrical conductance on the properties of the solute and solvent. The bibliography includes 115 references.

  1. Solutions to horava gravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lü, H; Mei, Jianwei; Pope, C N

    2009-08-28

    Recently Horava proposed a nonrelativistic renormalizable theory of gravitation, which reduces to Einstein's general relativity at large distances, and that may provide a candidate for a UV completion of Einstein's theory. In this Letter, we derive the full set of equations of motion, and then we obtain spherically symmetric solutions and discuss their properties. We also obtain solutions for the Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker cosmological metric.

  2. Piezoelectric Energy Harvesting Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caliò, Renato; Rongala, Udaya Bhaskar; Camboni, Domenico; Milazzo, Mario; Stefanini, Cesare; de Petris, Gianluca; Oddo, Calogero Maria

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews the state of the art in piezoelectric energy harvesting. It presents the basics of piezoelectricity and discusses materials choice. The work places emphasis on material operating modes and device configurations, from resonant to non-resonant devices and also to rotational solutions. The reviewed literature is compared based on power density and bandwidth. Lastly, the question of power conversion is addressed by reviewing various circuit solutions. PMID:24618725

  3. Radiolysis of spray solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habersbergerova, A.; Janovsky, I.

    1985-01-01

    The factors were studied affecting thiosulfate radiolysis in the so-called spray solution for nuclear power plant containments. The reaction mechanism of primary radiolytic reactions leading to thiosulfate decomposition was studied using pulse radiolysis. Also measured was hydrazine loss in the irradiation of the bubbling solution intended for the capture of volatile chemical forms of radioiodine. Pulse radiolysis was used to study the kinetics of hydrazine reaction with elemental iodine. (author)

  4. Finding Solutions to the Challenges of Internationalisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The book brings about the invincible process of internationalisation, encompassing various levels of analysis. Taking a holistic point of view, the volume brings about key alterations preserving how economies, industries and firms adjust their activities, value systems and cognitive frameworks...

  5. A boring solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radiuk, M I; Iushkova, N E; Kozubovskii, A I

    1979-10-25

    A boring solution is being patented for boring for oil and gas, which can be used in wells, where the temperature of the circulating liquid reaches 100/sup 0/. Polyvinyl acetate emulsion (PVE) is added for the purpose of decreasing viscosity of the solution at a temperature of agression into the boring solution containing clay, water, carboxymethylcellulose (CBC), a chloride from the number of sodium, potassium, or magnesium chlorides. The solution has the following composition in %: clay, 10 to 20; CBC, 1.5 to 2.0; chloride, 5 to 20; PVE, 0.5 to 2; water, up to 100. In accordance to GOST 1000-62 for the accepted PVE, the compound has the following composition, in %: monomer, 0.8; dry residue, greater than or equal to 50; plasticizer (tributyl phthalate), 5 to 15. The boring solution is processed according to the following method. The original solution, containing clay, water, salts, receives 1.5 to 2% CBC and afterwards it is processed with 0.5 to 2% PVE.

  6. Pollution! Find a STEM solution!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takač, Danijela; Moćan, Marina

    2016-04-01

    Primary and secondary school Pantovčak is an innovative school in downtown Zagreb, Croatia. The school is involved in many projects concerning STEM education. Pollution! Find a STEM solution! is a two year long cross-curricular project that grew out of identified need to develop STEM and ICT skills more. Pisa results make evident that students' knowledge is poor and motivation for math and similar subjects is low. Implying priorities of European Commission, like e-learning, raises motivation and also develops basic skills and improves knowledge in science, math, physic, ICT. Main objectives are to increase students' interest in STEM education and careers and introduce them to all available new trends in technology, engineering and science in their region by visiting clean technology industries and strengthening links with them, to introduce some future digital jobs and prepare students for rapid technological changes by integrating ICT into classroom practice more, to highlight the importance of global environmental issues and improve the knowledge in the areas of sustainable development and renewable energy, to develop collaborative partnership between schools and the wider community in formal, non-formal and informal learning, to support multilingualism by publishing Open Educational Resources in 8 different languages and to strengthen the professional profile of the teaching profession. The project brings together 231 teachers and 2729 students from five different European countries in learning to think globally and work on activities that contribute to the community's well-being. There are altogether 33 activities, divided in 4 categories. STEM activities are focused on students building the devices for measuring air, light and noise pollution in their school and homes. They use the scientific method to analyze the data and compare the results with their peers to find a solution. Eskills, digital literacy and digital jobs are focused on introducing career

  7. Bringing service design to manufacturing companies: integrating PSS and service design approaches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Costa, Nina; Patrício, Lia; Morelli, Nicola

    2018-01-01

    in a manufacturing industry. This paper details how the application supports the design of product–service system solutions from the exploration to the implementation stages, highlighting the physical evidence of service, and contributes to advance design research at the intersection of PSS and Service Design.......Manufacturing companies increasingly try to innovate in their offers to consumers by creating more complete solutions that combine product and service components. However, shifting from a product-centric perspective to a solution-oriented perspective is challenging. The present study adopted...... a design research methodology and built on Service-Dominant logic, integrating the human-oriented perspective of Service Design with an organizational network-oriented perspective of Product–Service System. It creates a new Integrative PSS approach, evolves design models, and provides an application...

  8. Social information solution; Shakai joho solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-01-10

    An information system for government offices is developed, a system that integrally supports operations inside government offices and the staff service operations by combining Intra Net as the basis of an information system with Internet. The objective of the system is as follows: (1) Information sharing in the place of work and utilization of information resources. (2) Improvement in administrative services and vitalization of an interchange of residents through the preparation of Internet environment. (3) Rationalization of staff operations through groupeware. In addition, by building a network system for the entire region, information communication service is to be provided as a solution between the residents and the administration in the occurrence of a disaster as well as for home care, medical and nursing assistance in the health, medical and welfare fields. (translated by NEDO)

  9. Fifty per cent reduction in solution gas flaring : a report to the Saddle Hills Awareness Committee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    Information by the Alberta Energy Company to the Saddle Hills Awareness Committee (SHAC) regarding company operations in the West Peace River Arch of the western Canadian Sedimentary Basin in northwest Alberta is presented, the purpose being to bring the Committee up-to-date, and respond to concerns about the health effects of sour gas emissions. The SHAC represents citizens who are concerned about issues relating to sour gas emissions. AEC West, a business unit of Alberta Energy Company, operates two sour gas processing plants, one sweet gas plant and three sour oil batteries in the Grande Prairie area. AEC's gas plants are connected by pipelines and process petroleum and natural gas products from approximately 200 oil and gas wells. The H 2 S content of the natural gas being processed by AEC's various plants ranges from trace amounts to 11 per cent. Activities at AEC's Hythe plant and at the Sexsmith plant, and the company's gas storage project are briefly reviewed. An analysis is included of the role that flaring plays in the petroleum and natural gas industry, emphasizing AEC West's efforts during 1997 to reduce solution gas flaring volumes from single well oil batteries by 50 per cent. Other AEC West environmental protection initiatives include the preliminary regional airshed study sponsored by the company which resulted in part from SHAC feedback and in part from the innovative approach of AEC employees. AEC West established the industry's first Ombudsman to provide a problem resolution focus on landowner complaints and introduced a policy of making available solution gas that would eventually be flared to industrial colleagues, free of charge

  10. Passive House Solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strom, I.; Joosten, L.; Boonstra, C. [DHV Sustainability Consultants, Eindhoiven (Netherlands)

    2006-05-15

    PEP stands for 'Promotion of European Passive Houses' and is a consortium of European partners, supported by the European Commission, Directorate General for Energy and Transport. In this working paper an overview is given of Passive House solutions. An inventory has been made of Passive House solutions for new build residences applied in each country. Based on this, the most common basic solutions have been identified and described in further detail, including the extent to which solutions are applied in common and best practice and expected barriers for the implementation in each country. An inventory per country is included in the appendix. The analysis of Passive House solutions in partner countries shows high priority with regard to the performance of the thermal envelope, such as high insulation of walls, roofs, floors and windows/ doors, thermal bridge-free construction and air tightness. Due to the required air tightness, special attention must be paid to indoor air quality through proper ventilation. Finally, efficient ((semi-)solar) heating systems for combined space and DHW heating still require a significant amount of attention in most partner countries. Other basic Passive House solutions show a smaller discrepancy with common practice and fewer barriers have been encountered in partner countries. In the next section, the general barriers in partner countries have been inventoried. For each type of barrier a suggested approach has been given. Most frequently encountered barriers in partner countries are: limited know-how; limited contractor skills; and acceptation of Passive Houses in the market. Based on the suggested approaches to overcoming barriers, this means that a great deal of attention must be paid to providing practical information and solutions to building professionals, providing practical training to installers and contractors and communication about the Passive House concept to the market.

  11. INTERNET CONNECTIVITY FOR MASS PRODUCED UNITS WITHOUT USER INTERFACE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2000-01-01

    To the manufacturer of mass produced units without a user interface, typically field level units, connection of these units to a communications network for enabling servicing, control and trackability is of interest. To provide this connection, a solution is described in which an interface...

  12. SciServer Compute brings Analysis to Big Data in the Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raddick, Jordan; Medvedev, Dmitry; Lemson, Gerard; Souter, Barbara

    2016-06-01

    SciServer Compute uses Jupyter Notebooks running within server-side Docker containers attached to big data collections to bring advanced analysis to big data "in the cloud." SciServer Compute is a component in the SciServer Big-Data ecosystem under development at JHU, which will provide a stable, reproducible, sharable virtual research environment.SciServer builds on the popular CasJobs and SkyServer systems that made the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) archive one of the most-used astronomical instruments. SciServer extends those systems with server-side computational capabilities and very large scratch storage space, and further extends their functions to a range of other scientific disciplines.Although big datasets like SDSS have revolutionized astronomy research, for further analysis, users are still restricted to downloading the selected data sets locally - but increasing data sizes make this local approach impractical. Instead, researchers need online tools that are co-located with data in a virtual research environment, enabling them to bring their analysis to the data.SciServer supports this using the popular Jupyter notebooks, which allow users to write their own Python and R scripts and execute them on the server with the data (extensions to Matlab and other languages are planned). We have written special-purpose libraries that enable querying the databases and other persistent datasets. Intermediate results can be stored in large scratch space (hundreds of TBs) and analyzed directly from within Python or R with state-of-the-art visualization and machine learning libraries. Users can store science-ready results in their permanent allocation on SciDrive, a Dropbox-like system for sharing and publishing files. Communication between the various components of the SciServer system is managed through SciServer‘s new Single Sign-on Portal.We have created a number of demos to illustrate the capabilities of SciServer Compute, including Python and R scripts

  13. Bringing it All Together: NODC's Geoportal Server as an Integration Tool for Interoperable Data Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, K. S.; Li, Y.

    2011-12-01

    The US National Oceanographic Data Center (NODC) has implemented numerous interoperable data technologies in recent years to enhance the discovery, understanding, and use of the vast quantities of data in the NODC archives. These services include OPeNDAP's Hyrax server, Unidata's THREDDS Data Server (TDS), NOAA's Live Access Server (LAS), and most recently the ESRI ArcGIS Server. Combined, these technologies enable NODC to provide access to its data holdings and products through most of the commonly-used standardized web services like the Data Access Protocol (DAP) and the Open Geospatial Consortium suite of services such as the Web Mapping Service (WMS) and Web Coverage Service (WCS). Despite the strong demand for and use of these services, the acronym-rich environment of services can also result in confusion for producers of data to the NODC archives, for consumers of data from the NODC archives, and for the data stewards at the archives as well. The situation is further complicated by the fact that NODC also maintains some ad hoc services like WODselect, and that not all services can be applied to all of the tens of thousands of collections in the NODC archive; where once every data set was available only through FTP and HTTP servers, now many are also available from the LAS, TDS, Hyrax, and ArcGIS Server. To bring order and clarity to this potentially confusing collection of services, NODC deployed the Geoportal Server into its Archive Management System as an integrating technology that brings together its various data access, visualization, and discovery services as well as its overall metadata management workflows. While providing an enhanced web-based interface for more integrated human-to-machine discovery and access, the deployment also enables NODC for the first time to support a robust set of machine-to-machine discovery services such as the Catalog Service for the Web (CS/W), OpenSearch, and Search and Retrieval via URL (SRU) . This approach allows NODC

  14. Analyzing Solutions High in Total Dissolved Solids for Rare Earth Elements (REEs) Using Cation Exchange and Online Pre-Concentration with the seaFAST2 Unit; NETL-TRS-7-2017; NETL Technical Report Series; U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory: Albany, OR, 2017; p 32

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, J. [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Albany, OR (United States); Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States). College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Science; Torres, M. [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States). College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Science; Verba, C. [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Albany, OR (United States); Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States); Hakala, A. [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States)

    2017-08-01

    The accurate quantification of the rare earth element (REE) dissolved concentrations in natural waters are often inhibited by their low abundances in relation to other dissolved constituents such as alkali, alkaline earth elements, and dissolved solids. The high abundance of these constituents can suppress the overall analytical signal as well as create isobaric interferences on the REEs during analysis. Waters associated with natural gas operations on black shale plays are characterized by high salinities and high total dissolved solids (TDS) contents >150,000 mg/L. Methods used to isolate and quantify dissolved REEs in seawater were adapted in order to develop the capability of analyzing REEs in waters that are high in TDS. First, a synthetic fluid based on geochemical modelling of natural brine formation fluids was created within the Marcellus black shale with a TDS loading of 153,000 mg/L. To this solution, 1,000 ng/mL of REE standards was added based on preliminary analyses of experimental fluids reacted at high pressure and temperature with Marcellus black shale. These synthetic fluids were then run at three different dilution levels of 10, 100, and 1,000–fold dilutions through cation exchange columns using AG50-X8 exchange resin from Eichrom Industries. The eluent from the cation columns were then sent through a seaFAST2 unit directly connected to an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICP-MS) to analyze the REEs. Percent recoveries of the REEs ranged from 80–110% and fell within error for the external reference standard used and no signal suppression or isobaric interferences on the REEs were observed. These results demonstrate that a combined use of cation exchange columns and seaFAST2 instrumentation are effective in accurately quantifying the dissolved REEs in fluids that are >150,000 mg/L in TDS and have Ba:Eu ratios in excess of 380,000.

  15. Siemens IT solutions for power sector. PROFIT solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lunter, P.

    2004-01-01

    The cost reduction, flexibility and revenue increase, potential exploitation, productivity increase, and business opportunities exploitation - that is all what can be required in the races for the promonent positioning on the electricity power market. These requirements can be realized by the sophisticated IT solutions hand-tailored to the special requirements of the electric power producers and tradesmen. This approach makes it possible to achieve greater profit. Our solutions 'PROFIT Solutions', that are symbiosis of the most progressive information technologies and the power plant techniques of the company Siemens, satisfy submitted specifications in substantial measure. The system solutions 'PROFIT Solutions' comprise three solution groups: process, operation a business. The solutions of the group 'IT Process Solutions' increase flexibility and manoeuvrability of equipment, improve the efficiency and contribute to more economical operation of the power generation. Solutions 'IT Process Solutions' simplify and shorten the period of power cycles and conduce to higher labour productivity. Solutions group 'IT Process Solutions' approaches equipment to the market - supports the profit strategies, helps quickly and expertly to determine and predict hazards. The extension PROFIT Cockpit means the nuance to the solutions world 'PROFIT Solutions'. The survey about the whole installation is within reach at the simple touch of a button. It is possible to compile the total system part by part from single solutions 'PROFIT Solutions'. As a matter of fact all single parts can be interconnected with already existing solutions. Routines 'PROFIT Solutions' cooperate with all modern control systems. (author)

  16. Solute segregation during irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiedersich, H.; Okamoto, P.R.; Lam, N.Q.

    1977-01-01

    Irradiation at elevated temperature induces redistribution of the elements in alloys on a microstructural level. This phenomenon is caused by differences in the coupling of the various alloy constituents to the radiation-induced defect fluxes. A simple model of the segregation process based on coupled reaction-rate and diffusion equations is discussed. The model gives a good description of the experimentally observed consequences of radiation-induced segregation, including enrichment or depletion of solute elements near defect sinks such as surfaces, voids and dislocations; precipitation of second phases in solid solutions; precipitate redistribution in two-phase alloys; and effects of defect-production rates on void-swelling rates in alloys with minor solute additions

  17. Superstrings fermionic solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rausch de Traubenberg, M.

    1990-06-01

    The solutions proposed by the superstring theory are classified and compared. In order to obtain some of the equivalences, the demonstration is based on the coincidence of the excitation spectrum and the quantum numbers from different states. The fermionic representation of the heterotical strings is discussed. The conformal invariance and the supersymmetric results extended to two dimensions are investigated. Concerning the fermionic strings, the formalism and a phenomenological solution involving three families of quarks, chiral leptons and leptons from the E 6 gauge group are presented. The equivalence between real and complex fermions is discussed. The similarity between some of the solutions of the Wess-Zumino-Witten model and the orbifolds is considered. The formal calculation program developed for reproducing the theory's low energy spectra, in the fermionic string formalism is given [fr

  18. Bringing the (disabled) body to personality psychology: A case study of Samantha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Jonathan M

    2017-12-09

    Personality psychology has largely ignored the experiences of people with disabilities. This article strives to bring the thriving, interdisciplinary field of disability studies to personality psychology via a case study of Samantha (N = 1). Samantha feels that she grew up as a hearing person who could not hear and is now a deaf person who can hear. Narrative identity provides the theoretical, methodological, and analytical framework for the rich, qualitative examination of Samantha's life story, interwoven with approaches from disability studies and intersectionality theory. Two Life Story Interviews (McAdams, 2008), conducted 2 weeks prior to Samantha's cochlear implant surgery and again 7 weeks after the surgery, provide the foundation for this case study and are interpreted alongside additional self-report measures. Grounded theory methods were used to interpret Samantha's narrative identity. Samantha's story demonstrates the ways in which narrative identity can serve as a foundation for meaning and psychological well-being, as well as a demonstration of the ways in which the study of identity can be enriched by perspectives from disability studies. As an initial effort at integrating personality psychology and disability studies, this article sought to approach this task by privileging ethical representation over generalizability. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Bringing Back the Social Affordances of the Paper Memo to Aerospace Systems Engineering Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidoff, Scott; Holloway, Alexandra

    2014-01-01

    Model-based systems engineering (MBSE) is a relatively new field that brings together the interdisciplinary study of technological components of a project (systems engineering) with a model-based ontology to express the hierarchical and behavioral relationships between the components (computational modeling). Despite the compelling promises of the benefits of MBSE, such as improved communication and productivity due to an underlying language and data model, we observed hesitation to its adoption at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory. To investigate, we conducted a six-month ethnographic field investigation and needs validation with 19 systems engineers. This paper contributes our observations of a generational shift in one of JPL's core technologies. We report on a cultural misunderstanding between communities of practice that bolsters the existing technology drag. Given the high cost of failure, we springboard our observations into a design hypothesis - an intervention that blends the social affordances of the narrative-based work flow with the rich technological advantages of explicit data references and relationships of the model-based approach. We provide a design rationale, and the results of our evaluation.

  20. How can we bring public health in all policies? Strategies for healthy societies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizio Bert

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available New scenarios are emerging in the European and worldwide context: the ageing of society, the climate changes, the increasing of health inequalities and the financial crisis. In this context, the scientific community and the decision-makers agree on the role of health in all policies (HiAP strategy in improving the population’s health. The HiAP takes into account factors not strictly related to health but with important health consequences. To bring public health in all policies a change is needed, but there are some obstacles to overcome: for instance, the lack of evidence regarding the governance tools and frameworks for HiAP, the difficulty of convincing stakeholders and producing a cultural change in the political positioning of decision-makers. Consequently, it is necessary: i to implement stronger and responsible decision-support approaches, such as health impact assessment and health technology assessment; ii to encourage and coordinate all relevant sectors in playing their part in reducing health gaps within the European Union; iii to strengthen cooperation and make better use of existing networks and existing public health and related institutions. The final aim will be to monitor the impact of the health determinants in order to promote the effective implementation of HiAP approach.

  1. Bringing solar home systems to rural El Salvador: lessons for small NGOs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balint, Peter J.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the results of case studies examining two independent projects that worked to bring solar home systems (SHSs) to isolated communities in El Salvador. Both projects were implemented by small nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) that did not have prior experience with SHSs. One project was market-based: families were given the opportunity to purchase the systems at going prices. The other was donor-based: residents were provided the equipment in return for their agreement to cooperate in local environmental protection efforts. Results of a comparative analysis support several conclusions. (1) For small NGOs, the promotion of markets is appealing because of the potential for financial sustainability; yet a reliance on markets may also heighten complexity and increase opportunities for failure. (2) In implementation of market-based projects, all stakeholders, including potential consumers, private-sector service providers, and the staff of NGOs acting as project managers, will face pressures to modify and adapt their attitudes and behaviors. (3) Alternative models for small-scale projects that integrate market-based and donor-based design features deserve consideration

  2. Bringing People Back into Protected Forests in Developing Countries: Insights from Co-Management in Malawi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leo Zulu

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This study examines struggles to bring people back into protected forests to enhance sustainable forest management and livelihoods using insights emerging from a co-management project in Malawi. It uses mixed social science methods and a process-based conceptualization of co-management to analyze experiences, and theory of reciprocal altruism to explain major findings of continuing local forest-user commitment to co-management despite six years of conservation burdens largely for minimal financial benefits. It argues that overemphasis on cash incentives as the motivation for “self-interested” users to participate in co-management overlooks locally significant non-cash motivations, inflates local expectations, and creates perverse incentives that undermine socio-ecological goals. Some non-cash incentives outweighed cash-driven ones. Findings support broadening of incentives mechanisms, including via nested cross-scale institutional arrangements for holistic management that integrates adjacent forests into forest-reserve co-management. Strengthened institutions, improving community/government and intra-community trust, improved village forests easing pressure on the reserve, measures minimizing elite capture, and impetus from an external threat, enhanced forest condition. Generous forest rights and appropriate community licensing and benefit-sharing systems also helped. Bureaucratic/donor inefficiencies, wood-extraction challenges, poor forest-based enterprise development, and low resource value undermined performance. Insights on forest-management planning, fair cost-sharing, targeting the poor, and need for social learning are highlighted.

  3. Advances in e-health and telemedicine: strategy to bring health service users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson Giovanni Jiménez Barbosa

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The e-health and telemedicine have emerged as tools to facilitate access to health services, both populations far from the centres, and those who reside near them is not easily accessible or require constant controls by their professionals health traffickers. Objective: To reflect on the uses, progress and difficulties faced by Information and Communication Technologies (ICT as a strategy to bring health services to users. Methodology: qualitative hermeneutic research; advanced in two phases. The first, theoretical review by finding relevant articles in scientific databases. The second phase, critical analysis of literature found, in order to understand the dynamics generated from the use of ICT in the health sector, its current uses and prospected, and the risk that can generate its implementation for providers and patients. Results: The e-health and telemedicine have advanced in their development process andColombiahas not been outside, but there are still drawbacks of ethical, legal and operational order, which are not static and show great variation over time, becoming challenges are not independent but are associated with the dynamic progress of ICT. Conclusion: e-health and telemedicine are valid strategies to improve access to health services to communities. But require the development of processes to prevent, mitigate and / or exceed the inconveniences that may arise from its use. 

  4. Bringing your tools to CyVerse Discovery Environment using Docker [version 2; referees: 3 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Upendra Kumar Devisetty

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Docker has become a very popular container-based virtualization platform for software distribution that has revolutionized the way in which scientific software and software dependencies (software stacks can be packaged, distributed, and deployed. Docker makes the complex and time-consuming installation procedures needed for scientific software a one-time process. Because it enables platform-independent installation, versioning of software environments, and easy redeployment and reproducibility, Docker is an ideal candidate for the deployment of identical software stacks on different compute environments such as XSEDE and Amazon AWS. Cyverse's Discovery Environment also uses Docker for integrating its powerful, community-recommended software tools into CyVerse's production environment for public use. This paper will help users bring their tools into CyVerse DE which will not only allows users to integrate their tools with relative ease compared to the earlier method of tool deployment in DE but also help users to share their apps with collaborators and also release them for public use.

  5. Bringing your tools to CyVerse Discovery Environment using Docker [version 3; referees: 3 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Upendra Kumar Devisetty

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Docker has become a very popular container-based virtualization platform for software distribution that has revolutionized the way in which scientific software and software dependencies (software stacks can be packaged, distributed, and deployed. Docker makes the complex and time-consuming installation procedures needed for scientific software a one-time process. Because it enables platform-independent installation, versioning of software environments, and easy redeployment and reproducibility, Docker is an ideal candidate for the deployment of identical software stacks on different compute environments such as XSEDE and Amazon AWS. Cyverse's Discovery Environment also uses Docker for integrating its powerful, community-recommended software tools into CyVerse's production environment for public use. This paper will help users bring their tools into CyVerse DE which will not only allows users to integrate their tools with relative ease compared to the earlier method of tool deployment in DE but also help users to share their apps with collaborators and also release them for public use.

  6. Bringing your tools to CyVerse Discovery Environment using Docker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devisetty, Upendra Kumar; Kennedy, Kathleen; Sarando, Paul; Merchant, Nirav; Lyons, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Docker has become a very popular container-based virtualization platform for software distribution that has revolutionized the way in which scientific software and software dependencies (software stacks) can be packaged, distributed, and deployed. Docker makes the complex and time-consuming installation procedures needed for scientific software a one-time process. Because it enables platform-independent installation, versioning of software environments, and easy redeployment and reproducibility, Docker is an ideal candidate for the deployment of identical software stacks on different compute environments such as XSEDE and Amazon AWS. CyVerse's Discovery Environment also uses Docker for integrating its powerful, community-recommended software tools into CyVerse's production environment for public use. This paper will help users bring their tools into CyVerse Discovery Environment (DE) which will not only allows users to integrate their tools with relative ease compared to the earlier method of tool deployment in DE but will also help users to share their apps with collaborators and release them for public use.

  7. Bringing your tools to CyVerse Discovery Environment using Docker [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Upendra Kumar Devisetty

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Docker has become a very popular container-based virtualization platform for software distribution that has revolutionized the way in which scientific software and software dependencies (software stacks can be packaged, distributed, and deployed. Docker makes the complex and time-consuming installation procedures needed for scientific software a one-time process. Because it enables platform-independent installation, versioning of software environments, and easy redeployment and reproducibility, Docker is an ideal candidate for the deployment of identical software stacks on different compute environments such as XSEDE and Amazon AWS. CyVerse’s Discovery Environment also uses Docker for integrating its powerful, community-recommended software tools into CyVerse’s production environment for public use. This paper will help users bring their tools into CyVerse Discovery Environment (DE which will not only allows users to integrate their tools with relative ease compared to the earlier method of tool deployment in DE but will also help users to share their apps with collaborators and release them for public use.

  8. Does Gonadotropin Releasing Hormone Agonists plus add-back therapy bring an aurora to orthodontic treatment?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Lingyong

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Obviously, long therapy time of orthodontic treatment and a number of its adverse effects, such as pain, root resorption, enamel demineralization, periodontal disease, are the main reasons of complaints from patients. It is the first thing for an orthodontist to shorten the period of treatment and decrease the complications of orthodontic treatment as much as possible. The Hypothesis: We hypothesis Gonadotropin Releasing Hormone Agonists (GnRHa and add-back therapy can create the "therapeutic window", namely, the appropriate estrogen level and assuage the adverse effects of estrogen deficiency which should be avoided as much as possible. Evaluation of the Hypothesis: It is generally acknowledged that estrogen has direct regulating role in bone metabolism by acting on osteoblasts and osteoclasts. Estrogen deficiency can increase the rate of orthodontic tooth movement and also bring about some adverse effects. The appropriate estrogen level, which we call the "therapeutic window" in orthodontic treatment, can speed up the orthodontic tooth movement and eliminate the adverse effects as far as possible. GnRHa can be the maker of estrogen deficiency; meanwhile, add-back therapy can remove the adverse effects by estrogen deficiency. So, we believe that GnRHa plus add-back therapy could be a new adjuvant method of orthodontic treatment and be good for orthodontists and patients.

  9. The QuarkNet CMS masterclass: bringing the LHC to students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecire, Kenneth; McCauley, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    QuarkNet is an educational program which brings high school teachers and their students into the particle physics research community. The program supports research experiences and professional development workshops and provides inquiry-oriented investigations, some using real experimental data. The CMS experiment at the LHC has released several thousand proton-proton collision events for use in education and outreach. QuarkNet, in collaboration with CMS, has developed a physics masterclass and e-Lab based on this data. A masterclass is a day-long educational workshop where high school students travel to nearby universities and research laboratories. There they learn from LHC physicists about the basics of particle physics and detectors. They then perform a simple measurement using LHC data, and share their results with other students around the world via videoconference. Since 2011 thousands of students from over 25 countries have participated in the CMS masterclass as organized by QuarkNet and the International Particle Physics Outreach Group (IPPOG).We describe here the masterclass exercise: the physics, the online event display and database preparation behind it, the measurement the students undertake, their results and experiences, and future plans for the exercise.

  10. Bringing home the health humanities: narrative humility, structural competency, and engaged pedagogy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsevat, Rebecca K; Sinha, Anoushka A; Gutierrez, Kevin J; DasGupta, Sayantani

    2015-11-01

    As health humanities programs grow and thrive across the country, encouraging medical students to read, write, and become more reflective about their professional roles, educators must bring a sense of self-reflexivity to the discipline itself. In the health humanities, novels, patient histories, and pieces of reflective writing are often treated as architectural spaces or "homes" that one can enter and examine. Yet, narrative-based learning in health care settings does not always allow its participants to feel "at home"; when not taught with a critical attention to power and pedagogy, the health humanities can be unsettling and even dangerous. Educators can mitigate these risks by considering not only what they teach but also how they teach it.In this essay, the authors present three pedagogical pillars that educators can use to invite learners to engage more fully, develop critical awareness of medical narratives, and feel "at home" in the health humanities. These pedagogical pillars are narrative humility (an awareness of one's prejudices, expectations, and frames of listening), structural competency (attention to sources of power and privilege), and engaged pedagogy (the protection of students' security and well-being). Incorporating these concepts into pedagogical practices can create safe and productive classroom spaces for all, including those most vulnerable and at risk of being "unhomed" by conventional hierarchies and oppressive social structures. This model then can be translated through a parallel process from classroom to clinic, such that empowered, engaged, and cared-for learners become empowering, engaging, and caring clinicians.

  11. Scientists in the Classroom Mentor Model Program - Bringing real time science into the K - 12 classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worssam, J. B.

    2017-12-01

    Field research finally within classroom walls, data driven, hands on with students using a series of electronic projects to show evidence of scientific mentor collaboration. You do not want to miss this session in which I will be sharing the steps to develop an interactive mentor program between scientists in the field and students in the classroom. Using next generation science standards and common core language skills you will be able to blend scientific exploration with scientific writing and communication skills. Learn how to make connections in your own community with STEM businesses, agencies and organizations. Learn how to connect with scientists across the globe to make your classroom instruction interactive and live for all students. Scientists, you too will want to participate, see how you can reach out and be a part of the K-12 educational system with students learning about YOUR science, a great component for NSF grants! "Scientists in the Classroom," a model program for all, bringing real time science, data and knowledge into the classroom.

  12. Planet Press: an EGU initiative to bring geoscientific research to children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Bárbara

    2016-04-01

    Planet Press (http://www.egu.eu/education/planet-press/) is an EGU educational project that aims to get children (mainly 7-13 year olds), as well as their parents and educators, interested in and engaged with up-to-date scientific research and news. Planet Press articles are short versions of EGU press releases written in child-friendly language. Because EGU press releases cover research published in the various EGU scientific journals, Planet Press focuses on topics as varied as air pollution, glaciers, climate change, earthquakes, ocean sciences, droughts and floods, or space sciences. The texts are reviewed by both scientists and educators to make sure they are accurate and clear to their target audience. By sharing new and exciting geoscientific research with young kids, we hope to inspire them to develop an interest in the Earth, planetary and space sciences. In this presentation, we describe how the Planet Press idea came about, how the project is run, and the challenges and lessons learnt since the launch of this educational initiative in 2014. Planet Press, which has the support of the EGU Committee on Education, is made possible by the work of volunteer scientists and educators who review and translate the texts. We are grateful for the help of Jane Robb, former EGU Educational Fellow, with launching the project. Planet Press is inspired by Space Scoop (http://www.spacescoop.org/), an initiative by UNAWE, the EU-Universe Awareness organisation, that brings astronomy news to children every week.

  13. NorthernLights Transmission : bringing competitive cogen energy from the oil sands to west coast markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hogan, M.J.C.

    2005-01-01

    NorthernLights Transmission is an initiative by TransCanada that proposes 2 major high-voltage direct current (HVDC) transmission lines to bring low cost, fossil fuelled and renewable generation from the Fort McMurray area to growing electricity markets in the Pacific Northwest, Nevada, Arizona and California. This presentation demonstrated why oil sands cogeneration, shipped via NorthernLights Transmission, is a very attractive resource for these markets. It was shown that the best generation resources are tied to natural resources such as coal, wind, oil sands cogeneration and hydro. Both the Pacific Northwest and California markets prefer low carbon dioxide generation. The proposed HVDC transmission lines would maximize the use of existing energy infrastructure corridors and rights-of-way where possible. This paper presented details of the proposed Celilo Project and the Inland Project, and noted that both are attractive from a technical and economic perspective. The transmission line for the Celilo project would originate in Fort McMurray and connect highly efficient cogeneration and other developing forms of generation to growing loads in the Pacific Northwest and northern California. The cogeneration plants will supply steam and electricity to northern Alberta's oil sands developments along with surplus electricity for export. tabs., figs

  14. The Janus Kinase (JAK) FERM and SH2 Domains: Bringing Specificity to JAK-Receptor Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrao, Ryan; Lupardus, Patrick J

    2017-01-01

    The Janus kinases (JAKs) are non-receptor tyrosine kinases essential for signaling in response to cytokines and interferons and thereby control many essential functions in growth, development, and immune regulation. JAKs are unique among tyrosine kinases for their constitutive yet non-covalent association with class I and II cytokine receptors, which upon cytokine binding bring together two JAKs to create an active signaling complex. JAK association with cytokine receptors is facilitated by N-terminal FERM and SH2 domains, both of which are classical mediators of peptide interactions. Together, the JAK FERM and SH2 domains mediate a bipartite interaction with two distinct receptor peptide motifs, the proline-rich "Box1" and hydrophobic "Box2," which are present in the intracellular domain of cytokine receptors. While the general sidechain chemistry of Box1 and Box2 peptides is conserved between receptors, they share very weak primary sequence homology, making it impossible to posit why certain JAKs preferentially interact with and signal through specific subsets of cytokine receptors. Here, we review the structure and function of the JAK FERM and SH2 domains in light of several recent studies that reveal their atomic structure and elucidate interaction mechanisms with both the Box1 and Box2 receptor motifs. These crystal structures demonstrate how evolution has repurposed the JAK FERM and SH2 domains into a receptor-binding module that facilitates interactions with multiple receptors possessing diverse primary sequences.

  15. Attempts to bring the trained teachers in the schools of Nepal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamsal, Jeevan

    2016-07-01

    To develop space activities and to industrialize astronomy, base of space education in the high schools must be very effective. This paper highlights the present scenario of space education and discusses the syllabus of astronomy in the different education level of Nepal. Astronomy is included in the curriculum of science book of middle school and high school which contains very few contents of solar system, constellations, galaxy, black holes and formation of stars. There is no any degree for higher studies in astronomy as a separate department in any university of Nepal. This paper also highlights the space activities and national level programs conducting in Nepal to support astronomy education. With the rise of many astronomical clubs and societies in the different regions of Nepal, astronomy education has been more effective in the recent time. Series of Galileo Teacher's Training Program in the different parts of Nepal being organized by Global Hands on Universe in cooperation with local astronomy clubs will be discuss in brief. The attempts to bring more trained and skilled teachers in the classroom by the government and non-government agencies are now gradually increasing. The competition of private schools and their capacity building workshops to their teachers to attract more students is also playing active role to shape the school education effective. The challenges, prospects and the practice of effective astronomy education prevailing in Nepal will be discuss. Key Words: Nepal, Astronomy Education, GTTP, Trained Teachers

  16. Using "Journeys in Film" to Bring Authentic STEM Activities to the K-12 Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rock, B. N.

    2017-12-01

    The "Journeys in Film" project brings important films and documentaries ("The Martian," "Hidden Figures," "River of Gold" and others) and curriculum-based, educational support activities to the classroom. Faculty from the University of New Hampshire, in partnership with selected local middle and high school teachers, developed a STEM Lesson Plan for Journeys in Film" focused on the soon-to-released documentary "River of Gold" which highlights tropical deforestation and illegal gold mining activities in the Peruvian jungles of the Amazon Basin. Using film clips (the Trailer) from the movie and the Lesson Plan, this approach allows pre-college students to learn how to use "Google Earth" to monitor chang-over-time and to quantify the areas of deforestation and mining using multi-date NOAA/USGS Landsat Thematic Mapper and ESA Copernicus satellite data. This approach will allow students to dconduct authentic hands-on science and mathematics to address a wide range of social and environmental issues associated with tropical deforestation in Peru.

  17. Livermore Lab's giant laser system will bring star power to Earth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moses, E.

    2010-01-01

    -free energy technology that can supply base load electricity to the world. Successful ignition experiments at NIF can be a springboard for a revolutionary, long-term solution to our energy security - laser inertial fusion energy, or LIFE. An advanced energy concept now under development at LLNL, LIFE will build on the physics and technology developed for NIF to help meet future worldwide energy needs in a safe, sustainable manner without carbon dioxide emissions. LIFE power plants would be inherently safe, use the limitless supply of hydrogen fuel found in the world's oceans, and be capable of supplying base load electricity to the world. By harnessing the universe's quintessential power source, fusion energy, the United States can continue its leadership in game-changing technologies that drive economic competitiveness. Successful demonstration of ignition and energy gain at NIF will be a transforming event that will solidify fusion's potential as an important energy source.

  18. Decontamination solution development studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, R.P.; Fetrow, L.K.; Kjarmo, H.E.; Pool, K.H.

    1993-09-01

    This study was conducted for the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as part of the Hanford Grout Technology Program (HGTP). The objective of this study was to identify decontamination solutions capable of removing radioactive contaminants and grout from the Grout Treatment Facility (GTF) process equipment and to determine the impact of these solutions on equipment components and disposal options. The reference grout used in this study was prepared with simulated double-shell slurry feed (DSSF) and a dry blend consisting of 40 wt % limestone flour, 28 wt % blast furnace slag, 28 wt % fly ash, and 4 wt % type I/II Portland cement

  19. Calculus problems and solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Ginzburg, Abraham

    2011-01-01

    Ideal for self-instruction as well as for classroom use, this text helps students improve their understanding and problem-solving skills in analysis, analytic geometry, and higher algebra. More than 1,200 problems appear in the text, with concise explanations of the basic notions and theorems to be used in their solution. Many are followed by complete answers; solutions for the others appear at the end of the book. Topics include sequences, functions of a single variable, limit of a function, differential calculus for functions of a single variable, fundamental theorems and applications of dif

  20. In Search of Solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørding Olsen, Anders

    when pursuing minor performance improvements in existing technologies. However, reliance on internal knowledge sources carries a risk of organizational inertia related to problem understanding and solution development in the shape of path-dependencies and preferences for exploitation and reapplication...... of existing knowledge. Such inertia may imbue innovation processes related to the development of new technologies with reduced novelty and an inability to recognize alternative and potentially more attractive solutions. As a result, over-reliance on internal knowledge sources is likely to inhibit the ability...

  1. Business Intelligence Integrated Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristescu Marian Pompiliu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A Business Intelligence solution concerns the simple, real-time access to complete information about the business shown in a relevant format of the report, graphic or dashboard type in order help the taking of strategic decisions regarding the direction in which the company goes. Business Intelligence does not produce data, but uses the data produced by the company’s applications. BI solutions extract their data from ERP (Enterprise Resource Planning, CRM (Customer Relationship Management, HCM (Human Capital Management, and Retail, eCommerce or other databases used in the company.

  2. Microsoft big data solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Jorgensen, Adam; Welch, John; Clark, Dan; Price, Christopher; Mitchell, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Tap the power of Big Data with Microsoft technologies Big Data is here, and Microsoft's new Big Data platform is a valuable tool to help your company get the very most out of it. This timely book shows you how to use HDInsight along with HortonWorks Data Platform for Windows to store, manage, analyze, and share Big Data throughout the enterprise. Focusing primarily on Microsoft and HortonWorks technologies but also covering open source tools, Microsoft Big Data Solutions explains best practices, covers on-premises and cloud-based solutions, and features valuable case studies. Best of all,

  3. Bringing Astronomy Activities and Science Content to Girls Locally and Nationally: A Girl Scout and NIRCam Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, M. L.; Lebofsky, L. A.; McCarthy, D. W.; Lebofsky, N.

    2013-04-01

    In 2003, the University of Arizona's (UA) NIRCam EPO team (NASA James Webb Space Telescope's Near-Infrared Camera) and the Girl Scouts of Southern Arizona began a long-term collaboration to bring STEM and astronomy activities and concepts to adult Girl Scout volunteers and staff and, in turn, their councils and girls, i.e., to train the trainers. Nationally, our goal is to reach adult volunteers and staff in all 112 councils. To date, this program has reached nearly 240 adults from 78 councils in 41 states, DC, Guam, and Japan, bringing together adult volunteers and staff, UA graduate students, and NIRCam scientists and educators to experience Arizona's dark skies.

  4. Hello World, It's Me: Bringing the Basic Speech Communication Course into the Digital Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkwood, Jessica; Gutgold, Nichola D.; Manley, Destiny

    2011-01-01

    During the past decade, instructors of speech communication have been adapting the introductory speech course to keep up with the television age. Learning units in speech textbooks now teach how to speak well on television, as well as how to interpret speeches in the media. This article argues that the computer age invites adaptation of the…

  5. Unplugged Cybersecurity: An Approach for Bringing Computer Science into the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fees, Rachel E.; da Rosa, Jennifer A.; Durkin, Sarah S.; Murray, Mark M.; Moran, Angela L.

    2018-01-01

    The United States Naval Academy (USNA) STEM Center for Education and Outreach addresses an urgent Navy and national need for more young people to pursue careers in STEM fields through world-wide outreach to 17,000 students and 900 teachers per year. To achieve this mission, the STEM Center has developed a hands-on and inquiry-based methodology to…

  6. The "New Institutionalism" in Organization Theory: Bringing Society and Culture Back in

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senge, Konstanze

    2013-01-01

    This investigation will discuss the emergence of an economistical perspective among the dominant approaches of organization theory in the United States since the inception of "organization studies" as an academic discipline. It maintains that Contingency theory, Resource Dependency theory, Population Ecology theory, and Transaction Cost theory…

  7. They Bring Their Memories with Them: Somali Bantu Resettlement in a Globalized World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Yda Jean

    2010-01-01

    The Somali Bantu, arriving in the United States after many years in Kenyan refugee camps, face significant barriers to successful integration into American society. Those responsible for managing initial resettlement at the local level were not prepared to provide appropriate assistance to this group. The arrival of the Somali Bantu highlighted…

  8. Brightening Lives: How Early Childhood Educators Can Bring Everyday Experiences to Children in Crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Karin

    2009-01-01

    More than one million children are homeless in the United States, and more than half of those are age 6 or younger. As the recession continues, even more families are finding themselves homeless. Studies have shown that children of all ages thrive when they have a safe space in which to explore the world around them, filled with spaces for play…

  9. Bringing Color into the Living Room: Analyzing "TV Guide" Covers, 1953 to 1997

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upright, Craig

    2015-01-01

    Many contemporary students are unfamiliar with the cultural history of television programming in the United States. References to iconic series that represented significant milestones in minority representations and discussions of racial issues--such as "I Spy," "Julia," "All in the Family," or even "The Cosby…

  10. 77 FR 33089 - Announcement of Entry Into Force of the Defense Trade Cooperation Treaty Between the United...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-05

    ..., 2012, the United States and the United Kingdom exchanged diplomatic notes bringing the Treaty between... of the rule published on March 21, 2012, implementing the Treaty and making other updates to the... 16592) implementing the Treaty and making other updates to the ITAR. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT...

  11. Phenomenology of polymer solution dynamics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Phillies, George D. J

    2011-01-01

    ... solutions, not dilute solutions or polymer melts. From centrifugation and solvent dynamics to viscosity and diffusion, experimental measurements and their quantitative representations are the core of the discussion...

  12. Aliteracy : causes and solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nielen, Thijs Martinus Johannes

    2016-01-01

    The reading motivation of the majority of students declines in the upper half of primary school, which implies a risk for aliteracy: Students can read but, due to lack of practice, their skills remain underdeveloped (Chapter 2). In this thesis we have explored causes and solutions for this important

  13. Solute transport in soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zee, van der S.E.A.T.M.; Leijnse, A.

    2013-01-01

    Solute transport is of importance in view of the movement of nutrient elements, e.g. towards the plant root system, and because of a broad range of pollutants. Pollution is not necessarily man induced, but may be due to geological or geohydrological causes, e.g. in the cases of pollution with

  14. An Inexpensive Solution Calorimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavanagh, Emma; Mindel, Sam; Robertson, Giles; Hughes, D. E. Peter

    2008-01-01

    We describe the construction of a simple solution calorimeter, using a miniature bead thermistor as a temperature-sensing element. This has a response time of a few seconds and made it possible to carry out a thermometric reaction in under a minute, which led to minimal heat losses. Small temperature changes of 1 K associated with enthalpies of…

  15. Aqueous polyethylene oxide solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breen, J.

    1987-01-01

    A number of aspects concerning the reorientation of polymer, water and ion hydration complexes have been studied in aqueous solution of polyethylene oxide (PEO). The polymer dynamics are investigated by 1 H-PEO and 13 C-PEO nuclear relaxation experiments. 162 refs.; 30 figs.; 19 tabs

  16. Child Labor Trafficking in the United States: A Hidden Crime

    OpenAIRE

    Kaufka Walts, Katherine

    2017-01-01

    Emerging research brings more attention to labor trafficking in the United States. However, very few efforts have been made to better understand or respond to labor trafficking of minors. Cases of children forced to work as domestic servants, in factories, restaurants, peddling candy or other goods, or on farms may not automatically elicit suspicion from an outside observer as compared to a child providing sexual services for money. In contrast to sex trafficking, labor trafficking is often t...

  17. Fast Coding Unit Encoding Mechanism for Low Complexity Video Coding

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Yuan; Liu, Pengyu; Wu, Yueying; Jia, Kebin; Gao, Guandong

    2016-01-01

    In high efficiency video coding (HEVC), coding tree contributes to excellent compression performance. However, coding tree brings extremely high computational complexity. Innovative works for improving coding tree to further reduce encoding time are stated in this paper. A novel low complexity coding tree mechanism is proposed for HEVC fast coding unit (CU) encoding. Firstly, this paper makes an in-depth study of the relationship among CU distribution, quantization parameter (QP) and content ...

  18. Total body irradiation with a reconditioned cobalt teletherapy unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Michael D C; Larouche, Renée-Xavière; Olivares, Marina; Léger, Pierre; Larkin, Joe; Freeman, Carolyn R; Podgorsak, Ervin B

    2006-01-01

    While the current trend in radiotherapy is to replace cobalt teletherapy units with more versatile and technologically advanced linear accelerators, there remain some useful applications for older cobalt units. The expansion of our radiotherapy department involved the decommissioning of an isocentric cobalt teletherapy unit and the replacement of a column-mounted 4-MV LINAC that has been used for total body irradiation (TBI). To continue offering TBI treatments, we converted the decommissioned cobalt unit into a dedicated fixed-field total body irradiator and installed it in an existing medium-energy LINAC bunker. This article describes the logistical and dosimetric aspects of bringing a reconditioned cobalt teletherapy unit into clinical service as a total body irradiator.

  19. Energy Innovation Portal Brings DOE Technologies to the Market (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-10-01

    For venture capitalists, energy entrepreneurs, and industry veterans, finding the right renewable energy or energy efficiency solution used to be like looking for a needle in a haystack. Now, a searchable treasure trove of innovative U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) technologies is available. Created by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), the online Energy Innovation Portal helps businesses and entrepreneurs access the intellectual property of DOE's 17 national laboratories and other research partners.

  20. Power Efficient Division and Square Root Unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Wei; Nannarelli, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Although division and square root are not frequent operations, most processors implement them in hardware to not compromise the overall performance. Two classes of algorithms implement division or square root: digit-recurrence and multiplicative (e.g., Newton-Raphson) algorithms. Previous work....... The proposed unit is compared to similar solutions based on the digit-recurrence algorithm and it is compared to a unit based on the multiplicative Newton-Raphson algorithm....

  1. Value added medicines: what value repurposed medicines might bring to society?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toumi, Mondher; Rémuzat, Cécile

    2017-01-01

    Background & objectives : Despite the wide interest surrounding drug repurposing, no common terminology has been yet agreed for these products and their full potential value is not always recognised and rewarded, creating a disincentive for further development. The objectives of the present study were to assess from a wide perspective which value drug repurposing might bring to society, but also to identify key obstacles for adoption of these medicines and to discuss policy recommendations. Methods : A preliminary comprehensive search was conducted to assess how the concept of drug repurposing was described in the literature. Following completion of the literature review, a primary research was conducted to get perspective of various stakeholders across EU member states on drug repurposing ( healthcare professionals, regulatory authorities and Health Technology Assessment (HTA) bodies/payers, patients, and representatives of the pharmaceutical industry developing medicines in this field). Ad hoc literature review was performed to illustrate, when appropriate, statements of the various stakeholders. Results : Various nomenclatures have been used to describe the concept of drug repurposing in the literature, with more or less broad definitions either based on outcomes, processes, or being a mix of both. In this context, Medicines for Europe (http://www.medicinesforeurope.com/value-added-medicines/) established one single terminology for these medicines, known as value added medicines, defined as 'medicines based on known molecules that address healthcare needs and deliver relevant improvements for patients, healthcare professionals and/or payers'. Stakeholder interviews highlighted three main potential benefits for value added medicines: (1) to address a number of medicine-related healthcare inefficiencies related to irrational use of medicines, non-availability of appropriate treatment options, shortage of mature products, geographical inequity in medicine access

  2. Bringing Scholarship to the Classroom: Strategies for promoting research through teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alisa Gaunder

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available An issue all academics grapple with is how to strike the desired balance between research and teaching. This balance is heavily influenced by the type of institution where one seeks employment. At liberal arts colleges, excellence is expected in the classroom and a premium is put on faculty student interaction. The expectation, however, is to be teacher-scholar, not simply teacher. And indeed, the desire of most professors at liberal arts colleges is to remain active in their field. With limited time and large teaching demands, the challenge becomes one of continuously making progress on one’s research agenda. When asked to consider how to connect scholarship and teaching on the “Bringing Scholarship to the Classroom: Japan Studies” panel at the ASIANetwork conference in March 2008, I realized I had developed several strategies to link my research and teaching. What I also realized was that all these strategies were influenced by the fact that I was a junior professor vying for tenure. That is, my motivation for connecting scholarship and teaching was largely instrumental. In addition to being able to speak more passionately about topics we research and therefore engage students more fully, I would argue that finding ways to incorporate one’s research in as many classes as possible is a way to better tackle the dual role of teacher-scholar. Connecting research and teaching can accelerate one’s research agenda simply by preventing the liberal arts professor from being torn in too many different directions.

  3. Bringing Western-standard service stations to the Baltic countries. Neste palvelee Baltiassa laadulla ja varmuudella

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pesonen, H.

    1992-01-01

    Neste is the only Western oil company so far to have established a service station presence in the Baltic, with the exception of Norway's Statoil, which has one outlet near Tallinn Airport. Neste has an important logistical advantage compared to other companies in this respect as its two Finnish refineries are ideally located for supplying the region with high-quality petroleum products. Neste's first joint venture in the Baltic, Traffic Service, based in Estonia, was set up with Eesti Kutus in 1988 and opened its first service station in 1990. Other joint ventures are now up and running in Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, and St. Petersburg. A total of 10 - 15 stations, the majority strategically located along the route of the Via Baltica, are expected to be operational by the end of this year. The Neste network comprises a combination of new outlets and refurbished older stations that have been modernized to bring them up to Western standards. These offer a comprehensive range of fuels, lubricants, spare parts, and accessories, as well as food, confectionery, and coffee shop services. Some stations also offer repair and car wash facilities. Adapting to the transition from a communist economy to a Western, capitalist one has not been easy for the Baltic countries, and has inevitably created difficulties for companies like Neste, in areas such as legislation covering land ownership. Neste's joint ventures have also encountered difficulties in instilling the Western approach to business efficiency, and customer service in a workforce used to the Soviet retail system.

  4. Rapid biodegradation of plastics by mealworms (larvae of Tenebrio molitor) brings hope to solve wasteplastic pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, W.; Yang, S.; Brandon, A. M.; Yang, Y.; Flanagan, J. A.; Fan, H. Q.; Cai, S. Y.; Wang, Z. Y.; Din, L. Y.; Daliang, N.; Yang, J.; Ren, J.; Tao, H. C.; Phillips, D.; Ren, N. Q.; Zhou, J.; Waymouth, R.; Criddle, C. S.

    2016-12-01

    Pollution of waste plastics in soil, river, ocean, landfill and potentially groundwater has been a major environment concern for decades. They include polystyrene (PS), polyethylene (PE) and others. Plastic particles could penetrate into groundwater and become potential threats to our groundwater Our recent research demonstrated that mealworm (larvae of Tenebrio molitor ), which are commercially used as animal and bird food and insect protein, can biodegrade PS and convert it to CO2 up within 48% within 12-14 hrs in mealworm gut. PS degradation was performed initially via depolymerization and then degradation within the mealworm guts. Gut microbiota plays a major role in PS biodegradation because the degradation is nearly completely inhibited when mealworms were fed with antibiotics. Physical and chemical analysis as well 13C labeled tests confirmed the biodegradation and mineralization of PS. The generality of plastic eating behavior of mealworms and biodegradation has been observed by testing mealworms from 11 different sources in China and the USA. All of the mealworms tested consume PS although at different relative rates. At ambient temperature (20-24 oC), the average daily consumption rate of PS ranged from 0.01 to 0.3 mg per 100 mealworms when fed PS alone. The mealworms also consumed low density polyethylene (LDPE) foam as sole diet. When mealworms were fed PS alone, the consumption rate and total amount consumed increased slightly as a function of temperature from 20 to 30 oC. Supplementing the diet with normal food (bran) enhanced the PS consumption rate and the total PS mass consumed. Microbial community analysis indicated that the microbial structure changed significantly after the diet was switched from normal food bran to PS or PS plus bran. PS-degrading bacterial strains have isolated and characterized. Our discoveries brings hopes to prevent or solve potential microplastics threats to groundwater.

  5. Bringing the ecosystem services concept into marine management decisions, supporting ecosystems-based management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tweddle, J. F.; Byg, A.; Davies, I.; Gubbins, M.; Irvine, K.; Kafas, A.; Kenter, J.; MacDonald, A.; Murray, R. B. O.; Potts, T.; Slater, A. M.; Wright, K.; Scott, B. E.

    2016-12-01

    The marine environment is under increasing use, putting pressure on marine ecosystems and increasing competition for space. New activities (e.g. renewable energy developments), evolving marine policies (e.g. implementation of marine protected areas), and climate change may drive changes in biodiversity and resulting ecosystem services (ES) that society and business utilise from coastal and marine systems. A process is needed that integrates ecological assessment of changes with stakeholder perceptions and valuation of ES, whilst balancing ease of application with the ability to deal with complex social-economic-ecological issues. The project "Cooperative participatory assessment of the impact of renewable technology on ecosystem services: CORPORATES" involved natural and social scientists, law and policy experts, and marine managers, with the aim of promoting more integrated decision making using ES concepts in marine management. CORPORATES developed a process to bring ES concepts into stakeholders' awareness. The interactive process, involving 2 workshops, employs interludes of knowledge exchange by experts on ecological processes underpinning ES and on law and policy. These enable mapping of benefits linked to activities, participatory system modelling, and deliberation of policy impacts on different sectors. The workshops were attended by industry representatives, regulatory/advisory partners, and other stakeholders (NGOs, SMEs, recreationalists, local government). Mixed sector groups produced new insights into links between activities and ES, and highlighted cross-sector concerns. Here we present the aspects of the process that successfully built shared understanding between industry and stakeholders of inter-linkages and interactions between ES, benefits, activities, and economic and cultural values. These methods provide an ES-based decision-support model for exchanging societal-ecological knowledge and providing stakeholder interaction in marine planning

  6. Evaluation of Music And Astronomy Under The Stars: Bringing Science To New Audiences At Music Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubowich, D.; Torff, B.

    2014-07-01

    Evaluations were conducted of the 2009-2012 NASA-funded Music and Astronomy Under the Stars (MAUS) program at outdoor concerts (see the separate MAUS poster at this meeting). MAUS promoted lifelong learning by providing opportunities for the public to look through telescopes, participate in hands-on activities, and view posters, banners, and videos at events where large numbers of people are gathered. Surveys were given to 1.6% of the concertgoers at MAUS events with the participants expressing their level of agreement on a four-point scale with the following statements: “The astronomy at this event has been an enjoyable experience;” “It has been easy to comprehend the astronomy at this event;” “This event has helped me learn new things about astronomy;” “This event has made me want to learn more about astronomy;” and “This event has increased my interest in science.” On a scale where 1 = strongly disagree, 2 = disagree, 3 = agree, and 4 = strongly agree, MAUS received high ratings (>3.34/4) on all outcomes. MAUS successfully reached people at different concerts who had little interest in science. MAUS appealed to concert attendees of both genders, all ages, multiple levels of education, and all musical tastes. MAUS positively influenced the public's knowledge of and interest in astronomy. The high ratings from virtually all respondents indicate that the gains were not restricted to science enthusiasts. The data strongly supports the conclusion that MAUS—bringing astronomy to people at musical events—is effective!

  7. Bringing Society to a Changing Polar Ocean: Polar Interdisciplinary Coordinated Education (ICE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schofield, O.

    2015-12-01

    Environmental changes in the Arctic and Antarctic appear to be accelerating and scientists are trying to understand both the patterns and the impacts of change. These changes will have profound impact on humanity and create a need for public education about these critical habitats. We have focused on a two-pronged strategy to increase public awareness as well as enable educators to discuss comfortably the implications of climate change. Our first focus is on entraining public support through the development of science documentaries about the science and people who conduct it. Antarctic Edge is a feature length award-winning documentary about climate change that has been released in May 2015 and has garnered interest in movie theatres and on social media stores (NetFlix, ITunes). This broad outreach is coupled with our group's interest assisting educators formally. The majority of current polar education is focused on direct educator engagement through personal research experiences that have impact on the participating educators' classrooms. Polar Interdisciplinary Coordinated Education (ICE) proposes to improve educator and student engagement in polar sciences through exposure to scientists and polar data. Through professional development and the creation of data tools, Polar ICE will reduce the logistical costs of bringing polar science to students in grades 6-16. We will provide opportunities to: 1) build capacity of polar scientists in communicating and engaging with diverse audiences; 2) create scalable, in-person and virtual opportunities for educators and students to engage with polar scientists and their research through data visualizations, data activities, educator workshops, webinars, and student research symposia; and 3) evaluate the outcomes of Polar ICE and contribute to our understanding of science education practices. We will use a blended learning approach to promote partnerships and cross-disciplinary sharing. This combined multi-pronged approach

  8. Catalysts for better health care. Medical tissue banks bring multiple benefits to countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, G.O.; Morales, J.

    2002-01-01

    For millions of injured and disabled people around the world, the treatment brings a new quality of life. Called tissue grafting or transplantation, it relies on the use of sterilized bone, skin, and other tissues to heal serious injuries, wounds, and sickness. Prime beneficiaries include severe burn victims, and men, women, and children suffering from crippling diseases, birth defects, and blindness. Long applied in plastic and orthopaedic surgery, tissue grafting once relied only on using a patient's own tissues, known as an autograft. But now tissues from human or animal donors (allograft) are used for transplantation. This new form of tissue grafting has made big strides over the past decade. An expanding number of facilities today prepare the valuable tissues to the high-quality standards demanded in medical care. Dozens of such new tissue banks have opened in Asia, Latin America, Europe, and North America. A productive channel of progress has been an IAEA-supported technical cooperation programme. Through it, experts have worked together behind the scenes to help national health authorities establish tissue banks, train associated staff, and develop standards and regulatory guides. The IAEA accordingly has gained more experience and success than any other international organization in supporting the establishment of tissue banks for medical use in developing countries. Increasingly for quality and cost reasons, the technology of irradiation is used to sterilize tissues for medical care. The IAEA, through its technical cooperation channels, assists national atomic energy authorities to safely and productively employ radiation technology. An interregional programme on radiation and tissue banking, initiated over a decade ago, today extends to 30 countries

  9. Neurological Disease Rises from Ocean to Bring Model for Human Epilepsy to Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John S. Ramsdell

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Domoic acid of macroalgal origin was used for traditional and medicinal purposes in Japan and largely forgotten until its rediscovery in diatoms that poisoned 107 people after consumption of contaminated mussels. The more severely poisoned victims had seizures and/or amnesia and four died; however, one survivor unexpectedly developed temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE a year after the event. Nearly a decade later, several thousand sea lions have stranded on California beaches with neurological symptoms. Analysis of the animals stranded over an eight year period indicated five clusters of acute neurological poisoning; however, nearly a quarter have stranded individually outside these events with clinical signs of a chronic neurological syndrome similar to TLE. These poisonings are not limited to sea lions, which serve as readily observed sentinels for other marine animals that strand during domoic acid poisoning events, including several species of dolphin and whales. Acute domoic acid poisoning is five-times more prominent in adult female sea lions as a result of the proximity of their year-round breeding grounds to major domoic acid bloom events. The chronic neurological syndrome, on the other hand, is more prevalent in young animals, with many potentially poisoned in utero. The sea lion rookeries of the Channel Islands are at the crossroads of domoic acid producing harmful algal blooms and a huge industrial discharge site for dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDTs. Studies in experimental animals suggest that chronic poisoning observed in immature sea lions may result from a spatial and temporal coincidence of DDTs and domoic acid during early life stages. Emergence of an epilepsy syndrome from the ocean brings a human epilepsy model to life and provides unexpected insights into interaction with legacy contaminants and expression of disease at different life stages.

  10. SEA Change: Bringing together Science, Engineering and the Arts at the University of Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perfit, M. R.; Mertz, M. S.; Lavelli, L.

    2014-12-01

    A group of interested and multifaceted faculty, administrators and students created the Science, Engineering, Arts Committee (SEA Change) two years ago at the University of Florida (UF). Recognizing that innovative ideas arise from the convergence of divergent thinkers, the committee seeks to bring together faculty in Science, Engineering, the Arts and others across campus to develop and disseminate innovative ideas for research, teaching and service that will enhance the campus intellectual environment. We meet regularly throughout the year as faculty with graduate and undergraduate students to catalyze ideas that could lead to collaborative or interdisciplinary projects and make recommendations to support innovative, critical and creative work. As an example, the Department of Geological Sciences and the School of Art and Art History collaborated on a competition among UF undergraduate painting students to create artistic works that related to geoscience. Each student gathered information from Geological Sciences faculty members to use for inspiration in creating paintings along with site-specific proposals to compete for a commission. The winning work was three-story high painting representing rock strata and the Florida environment entitled "Prairie Horizontals" that is now installed in the Geoscience building entrance atrium. Two smaller paintings of the second place winner, depicting geologists in the field were also purchased and displayed in a main hallway. Other activities supported by SEA Change have included a collaborative work of UF engineering and dance professors who partnered for the Creative Storytelling and Choreography Lab, to introduce basic storytelling tools to engineering students. A campus-wide gathering of UF faculty and graduate students titled Creative Practices: The Art & Science of Discovery featured guest speakers Steven Tepper, Victoria Vesna and Benjamin Knapp in spring 2014. The Committee plans to develop and foster ideas that will

  11. Twenty-first century learning for teachers: helping educators bring new skills into the classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, John I

    2006-01-01

    The motivation behind every educator's dedication and hard work in the classroom is the knowledge that his or her teaching will result in students' success in life. Educators are committed to implementing twenty-first century skills; they have no question that students need such skills to be equipped for life beyond school. Members of the National Education Association are enthusiastic about the Partnership for 21st Century Skills framework, yet express frustration that many schools do not have adequate resources to make the necessary changes. Teaching these skills poses significant new responsibilities for schools and educators. To make it possible for teachers to build twenty-first century skills into the curriculum, physical and policy infrastructures must exist, professional development and curriculum materials must be offered, and meaningful assessments must be available. With an established understanding of what skills need to be infused into the classroom-problem solving, analysis, and com- munications-and educators' commitment to the new skill set, this chapter explores how to make such a dramatic reform happen. The author discusses existing strategies that will guide educators in infusing twenty-first century skills into traditional content areas such as math, English, geography, and science. Ultimately, public policy regarding educational standards, professional development, assessments, and physical school structures must exist to enable educators to employ twenty-first century skills, leading to student success in contemporary life. Any concern about the cost of bringing this nation's educational system up to par internationally should be offset by the price that not making twenty-first century skills a priority in the classroom will have on future economic well-being.

  12. Bringing Internet-based education and intervention into mental health practice: afterdeployment.org

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josef I. Ruzek

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Internet-facilitated interventions may offer numerous advantages in reaching the large numbers of military service men and women exposed to traumatic events. The Internet is now a primary source of health-related information for consumers and research has shown the effectiveness of web-based interventions in addressing a range of mental health problems.Clinicians can learn how to bring Internet education and intervention into routine care, to help clients better understand mental health issues and learn skills for self-management of problems.The Afterdeployment.org (AD Internet site can be used by health care professionals serving U.S. military personnel returning from Iraq and Afghanistan, and their families. The site currently addresses 18 key domains of functioning, including post-traumatic stress, sleep, anger, alcohol and drugs, and military sexual trauma. It provides an extensive amount of client and family education that is suitable for immediate use by clients and providers, as well as the kinds of interactive workshop content and self-assessment tools that have been shown to be helpful in other treatment contexts. AD can be utilized in clinical practice in a variety of ways: as an adjunct to treatment for PTSD, to supplement existing treatments for a range of post-deployment problems, or as the primary focus of treatment for a client.AD represents a kind of service that is likely to become increasingly available in coming years and that is important for mental health providers to actively explore as a tool for extending their reach, improving their efficiency, and improving quality of care.For the abstract or full text in other languages, please see Supplementary files under Reading Tools online.

  13. Memories as religion: What can the broken continuity of tradition bring about? − Part two

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakub Urbaniak

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In postmodern societies the symbolic vacuum, a result of the loss of a unified religious tradition, calls for substitutes in the form of fragmentary and isolated memories. By drawing from the reservoir of those memories in an arbitrary and subjective way, privatised (de- institutionalised religion creates a kind of symbolic bricolage. Can such a bricolage become more than a mere ‘counterfeit’ of collective meaning that religion once used to provide? Can religious tradition, based on a broken continuity of memory, still bring about a matrix of the ways of expressing one’s faith? If so, how? This twofold study seeks to explore those and similar questions by means of showing, firstly, in what sense religion can be conceived of as memory which produces collective meanings (Part One and, secondly, what may happen when individualised and absolutised memories alienate themselves from a continuity of tradition, thus beginning to function as a sort of private religion (Part Two. Being the second part of the study in question, this article aims at exploring the postmodern crisis of religious memory, which includes the pluralisation of the channels of the sacred and the differentiation of a total religious memory into a plurality of specialised circles of memory. Firstly, it examines the three main aspects of the current crisis of continuity at large, namely the affirmation of the autonomous individual, the advance of rationalisation, and the process of institutional differentiation. Secondly, the plurality of the channels of the sacred is discussed in light of religion’s apparently unique way of drawing legitimisation from its reference to tradition. This is followed by two illustrations of the reconstruction of religious memory. In the final section of the article, a theological reflection on possible directions that may be taken in the face of the postmodern crisis of religious memory is offered.

  14. Skynet Junior Scholars: Bringing Astronomy to Deaf and Hard of Hearing Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, Kate; Williamson, Kathryn; Gartner, Constance; Hoette, Vivian L.; Heatherly, Sue Ann

    2016-01-01

    Skynet Junior Scholars (SJS), funded by the National Science Foundation, aims to engage middle school youth from diverse audiences in investigating the universe with research quality robotic telescopes. SJS project development goals include: 1) Online access to optical and radio telescopes, data analysis tools, and professional astronomers, 2) An age-appropriate web-based interface for controlling remote telescopes, 3) Inquiry-based standards-aligned instructional modules. From an accessibility perspective, the goal of the Skynet Junior Scholars project is to facilitate independent access to the project by all youth including those with blindness or low vision and those who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing.Deaf and Hard of Hearing (DHH) students have long been an underserved population within STEM fields, including astronomy. Two main barriers include: (1) insufficient corpus of American Sign Language (ASL) for astronomy terminology, and (2) DHH education professionals who lack astronomy background. A suite of vocabulary, accessible hands-on activities, and interaction with trained professionals, are critical for enhancing the background experiences of DHH youth, as they may come to an astronomy lesson lacking the basic "incidental learning" that is often taken for granted with hearing peers (for example, from astronomy in the media).A collaboration between the Skynet Junior Scholars (SJS) project and the Wisconsin School for the Deaf is bringing astronomy to the DHH community in an accessible way for the first time. We follow a group of seven DHH youth over one semester as they interact with the SJS tools and curriculum to understand how they assimilate astronomy experiences and benefit from access to telescopes both directly (on school campus and at Yerkes Observatory) and through Skynet's robotic telescope network (optical and radio telescopes, inquiry-based modules, data analysis tools, and professional astronomers). We report on our first findings of resources and

  15. Low resource ventilation unit; Ressourcebesparende ventilationsenhed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drivsholm, C.

    2012-03-15

    In the project a resource-saving ventilation device was developed which is based on the use of a regenerator and a reversible air flow. The regenerator is placed in the building envelope, and the concept works in the way that the heat in the air during ventilation is stored in the regenerator and brought back into the building by a reversible air change. The heated air is blown from inside the building out through the regenerator. In this way the regenerator accumulates the heat in the air. Over a period of 30-120 seconds, the regenerator capacity is utilized. When the regenerator cannot be further heated, the air flow is reversed and there is now blown cold air through the regenerator. Thereby the heat from the regenerator is released to the cold fresh air. Thus, the fresh air brings heat back into the building, whereby the air is replaced with a limited heat loss. Ventilation with a regenerator is described as micro-ventilation. The developed micro-ventilation unit was tested by the Danish Technological Institute. The test results shows that the unit performs according to expectations: 1) The heat recovery is 85%; 2) The flow through the unit is 80m3 per hour in a 5 section unit; 3) The noise level is 30 db(A) in a representative room; 4) The energy consumption is <300 J/m3. The unit is introduced into the market, and the first plants have been sold. (LN)

  16. Forced Spreading of Aqueous Solutions on Zwitterionic Sulfobetaine Surfaces for Rapid Evaporation and Solute Separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Cyuan-Jhang; Singh, Vickramjeet; Sheng, Yu-Jane; Tsao, Heng-Kwong

    2017-08-01

    Solute separation of aqueous mixtures is mainly dominated by water vaporization. The evaporation rate of an aqueous drop grows with increasing the liquid-gas interfacial area. The spontaneous spreading behavior of a water droplet on a total wetting surface provides huge liquid-gas interfacial area per unit volume; however, it is halted by the self-pinning phenomenon upon addition of nonvolatile solutes. In this work, it is shown that the solute-induced self-pinning can be overcome by gravity, leading to anisotropic spreading much faster than isotropic spreading. The evaporation rate of anisotropic spreading on a zwitterionic sulfobetaine surface is 25 times larger as that on a poly(methyl methacrylate) surface. Dramatic enhancement of evaporation is demonstrated by simultaneous formation of fog atop liquid film. During anisotropic spreading, the solutes are quickly precipitated out within 30 s, showing the rapid solute-water separation. After repeated spreading process for the dye-containing solution, the mean concentration of the collection is doubled, revealing the concentration efficiency as high as 100%. Gravity-enhanced spreading on total wetting surfaces at room temperature is easy to scale-up with less energy consumption, and thus it has great potentials for the applications of solute separation and concentration.

  17. Bringing Science to Bear--On Peace, Not War: Elaborating on Psychology's Potential to Promote Peace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leidner, Bernhard; Tropp, Linda R.; Lickel, Brian

    2013-01-01

    We argue that psychological and contextual factors play important roles in bringing about, facilitating, and escalating violent conflict. Yet rather than conclude that violent conflict is inevitable, we believe psychology's contributions can extend beyond understanding the origins and nature of violent conflict, to promote nonviolence and…

  18. The View of the Yeti: Bringing up Children in the Spirit of Self-Awareness and Kindredship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenbroeck, Michel

    Using the mythical creature of the Himalayas, the Yeti, as a symbol for the prejudices and assumptions that people prematurely make about each other, this book discusses bringing up children to accept and cherish diversity and helping them to thrive in an increasingly diverse world. Directed to educators and caregivers of toddlers and…

  19. 49 CFR 39.93 - What wheelchairs and other assistive devices may passengers with a disability bring onto a...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What wheelchairs and other assistive devices may passengers with a disability bring onto a passenger vessel? 39.93 Section 39.93 Transportation Office of the... and Services to Passengers With Disabilities § 39.93 What wheelchairs and other assistive devices may...

  20. Mobilizing Communities around HIV Prevention for Youth: How Three Coalitions Applied Key Strategies to Bring about Structural Changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chutuape, Kate S.; Willard, Nancy; Sanchez, Kenia; Straub, Diane M.; Ochoa, Tara N.; Howell, Kourtney; Rivera, Carmen; Ramos, Ibrahim; Ellen, Jonathan M.

    2010-01-01

    Increasingly, HIV prevention efforts must focus on altering features of the social and physical environment to reduce risks associated with HIV acquisition and transmission. Community coalitions provide a vehicle for bringing about sustainable structural changes. This article shares lessons and key strategies regarding how three community…

  1. Psychiatrists for Medically Complex Patients : Bringing Value at the Physical Health and Mental Health/Substance-Use Disorder Interface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kathol, Roger G.; Kunkel, Elisabeth J. S.; Weiner, Joseph S.; McCarron, Robert M.; Worley, Linda L. M.; Yates, William R.; Summergrad, Paul; Huyse, Frits J.

    2009-01-01

    Background: In their current configuration, traditional reactive consultation-liaison services see a small percentage of the general-hospital patients who could benefit from their care. These services are poorly reimbursed and bring limited value in terms of clinical improvement and reduction in

  2. Automated MAD and MIR structure solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terwilliger, Thomas C.; Berendzen, Joel

    1999-01-01

    A fully automated procedure for solving MIR and MAD structures has been developed using a scoring scheme to convert the structure-solution process into an optimization problem. Obtaining an electron-density map from X-ray diffraction data can be difficult and time-consuming even after the data have been collected, largely because MIR and MAD structure determinations currently require many subjective evaluations of the qualities of trial heavy-atom partial structures before a correct heavy-atom solution is obtained. A set of criteria for evaluating the quality of heavy-atom partial solutions in macromolecular crystallography have been developed. These have allowed the conversion of the crystal structure-solution process into an optimization problem and have allowed its automation. The SOLVE software has been used to solve MAD data sets with as many as 52 selenium sites in the asymmetric unit. The automated structure-solution process developed is a major step towards the fully automated structure-determination, model-building and refinement procedure which is needed for genomic scale structure determinations

  3. Weak solutions of magma equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnan, E.V.

    1999-01-01

    Periodic solutions in terms of Jacobian cosine elliptic functions have been obtained for a set of values of two physical parameters for the magma equation which do not reduce to solitary-wave solutions. It was also obtained solitary-wave solutions for another set of these parameters as an infinite period limit of periodic solutions in terms of Weierstrass and Jacobian elliptic functions

  4. Earnest Rutherford, the solution

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    If you did not make it to the Science & Society talk by John Campbell last week and are still wondering about the spelling of "Earnest", here is the solution: Two months after the birth of his fourth child on 30 August 1871 in Spring Grove, New Zealand, James Rutherford registered his son, who was recorded as "Earnest" in the Birth Register. Presumably the Registrar wrote the name down as it sounded and the father failed to notice the mistake when signing the Register.

  5. Molybdenum from uranium solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardner, H.E.

    1981-01-01

    A method of removing molybdenum from a uranium bearing solution is claimed. It comprises adding sufficient reactive lead compound to supply at least 90 percent of the stoichiometric quantity of lead ion required to fully react with the molybdenum present to form insoluble lead molybdate and continuing the reaction with agitation until the desired percentage of the molybdenum present has reacted with the lead ion

  6. Severe service sealing solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metcalfe, R.; Wensel, R.

    1994-09-01

    Successful sealing usually requires much more than initial leak-tightness. Friction and wear must also be acceptable, requiring a good understanding of tribology at the sealing interface. This paper describes various sealing solutions for severe service conditions. The CAN2A and CAN8 rotary face seals use tungsten carbide against carbon-graphite to achieve low leakage and long lifetime in nuclear main coolant pumps. The smaller CAN6 seal successfully uses tungsten carbide against silicon carbide in reactor water cleanup pump service. Where friction in CANDU fuelling machine rams must be essentially zero, a hydrostatic seal using two silicon carbide faces is the solution. In the NRU reactor moderator pumps, where pressure is much lower, eccentric seals that prevent boiling at the seal faces are giving excellent service. All these rotary face seals rely on supplementary elastomer seals between their parts. An integrated engineering approach to high performance sealing with O-rings is described. This is epitomized in critical Space Shuttle applications, but is increasingly being applied in CANDU plants. It includes gland design, selection and qualification of material, quality assurance, detection of defects and the effects of lubrication, surface finish, squeeze, stretch and volume constraints. In conclusion, for the severe service applications described, customized solutions have more than paid for themselves by higher reliability, lower maintenance requirements and reduced outage time. (author)

  7. Writing Game Center Apps in iOS Bringing Your Players Into the Game

    CERN Document Server

    Nahavandipoor, Vandad

    2011-01-01

    Now that Apple has introduced the GameKit framework to its iOS SDK, you can integrate Game Center features directly into your iPhone and iPad apps. This concise cookbook shows you how it's done, with 18 targeted recipes for adding leaderboards, user authentication, achievements, multiplayer games, and many other features. How do you display players' scores and achievements? How do you create Game Center accounts and add friends? Each recipe in this book includes a simple code solution you can put to work immediately, along with a detailed discussion that offers insight into why and how the r

  8. From the Web to the Grid Exhibition Science Bringing Nations Together

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    The World Wide Web, invented by Tim Berners-Lee at CERN in 1989, was CERN's response to a new wave of scientific collaborations, bigger and more distributed than ever before. Now, as CERN gears up for the LHC, the computing requirements of the LHC experiments are unprecedented. Meeting the LHC computing challenge will require collaborative work by many people around the world over the coming years. The laboratory aims to tackle the LHC computing challenge by involving computer scientists, scientists from other disciplines and, above all, industry. Their combined efforts could well produce solutions as important in the next ten years as the Web has been in the last.

  9. Status of commercial food irradiation in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welt, M.A.

    1983-01-01

    It may be difficult for some to realize, but the United States is now starting its fourth decade in food irradiation research. This vast storehouse of research data now makes the ultimate task of bringing the technology to the consumer marketplace that much easier. Radiation Technology, Inc. of Rockaway, New Jersey has pioneered the use of radiation processing for the commercial preservation of food and has established the first food irradiation facility in the United States in West Memphis, Arkansas. The facility, designed by Radiation Technology, Inc., provides the necessary versatility to meet the needs of the food industry. (author)

  10. Status of commercial food irradiation in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welt, Martin A.

    It may be difficult for some to realize, but the United States is now starting its fourth decade in food irradiation research. This vast storehouse of research data now makes the ultimate task of bringing the technology to the consumer marketplace that much easier. Radiation Technology, Inc. of Rockaway, New Jersey has pioneered the use of radiation processing for the commercial preservation of food and has established the first food irradiation facility in the United States in West Memphis, Arkansas. The facility, designed by Radiation Technology, Inc., provides the necessary versatility to meet the needs of the food industry.

  11. Osmotic potential calculations of inorganic and organic aqueous solutions over wide solute concentration levels and temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cochrane, T. T., E-mail: agteca@hotmail.com [AGTECA S.A., 230 Oceanbeach Road, Mount Maunganui, Tauranga 3116 (New Zealand); Cochrane, T. A., E-mail: tom.cochrane@canterbury.ac.nz [Department of Civil and Natural Resources Engineering, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch 8140 (New Zealand)

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: To demonstrate that the authors’ new “aqueous solution vs pure water” equation to calculate osmotic potential may be used to calculate the osmotic potentials of inorganic and organic aqueous solutions over wide ranges of solute concentrations and temperatures. Currently, the osmotic potentials of solutions used for medical purposes are calculated from equations based on the thermodynamics of the gas laws which are only accurate at low temperature and solute concentration levels. Some solutions used in medicine may need their osmotic potentials calculated more accurately to take into account solute concentrations and temperatures. Methods: The authors experimented with their new equation for calculating the osmotic potentials of inorganic and organic aqueous solutions up to and beyond body temperatures by adjusting three of its factors; (a) the volume property of pure water, (b) the number of “free” water molecules per unit volume of solution, “N{sub f},” and (c) the “t” factor expressing the cooperative structural relaxation time of pure water at given temperatures. Adequate information on the volume property of pure water at different temperatures is available in the literature. However, as little information on the relative densities of inorganic and organic solutions, respectively, at varying temperatures needed to calculate N{sub f} was available, provisional equations were formulated to approximate values. Those values together with tentative t values for different temperatures chosen from values calculated by different workers were substituted into the authors’ equation to demonstrate how osmotic potentials could be estimated over temperatures up to and beyond bodily temperatures. Results: The provisional equations formulated to calculate N{sub f}, the number of free water molecules per unit volume of inorganic and organic solute solutions, respectively, over wide concentration ranges compared well with the calculations of N{sub f

  12. Osmotic potential calculations of inorganic and organic aqueous solutions over wide solute concentration levels and temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cochrane, T. T.; Cochrane, T. A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate that the authors’ new “aqueous solution vs pure water” equation to calculate osmotic potential may be used to calculate the osmotic potentials of inorganic and organic aqueous solutions over wide ranges of solute concentrations and temperatures. Currently, the osmotic potentials of solutions used for medical purposes are calculated from equations based on the thermodynamics of the gas laws which are only accurate at low temperature and solute concentration levels. Some solutions used in medicine may need their osmotic potentials calculated more accurately to take into account solute concentrations and temperatures. Methods: The authors experimented with their new equation for calculating the osmotic potentials of inorganic and organic aqueous solutions up to and beyond body temperatures by adjusting three of its factors; (a) the volume property of pure water, (b) the number of “free” water molecules per unit volume of solution, “N f ,” and (c) the “t” factor expressing the cooperative structural relaxation time of pure water at given temperatures. Adequate information on the volume property of pure water at different temperatures is available in the literature. However, as little information on the relative densities of inorganic and organic solutions, respectively, at varying temperatures needed to calculate N f was available, provisional equations were formulated to approximate values. Those values together with tentative t values for different temperatures chosen from values calculated by different workers were substituted into the authors’ equation to demonstrate how osmotic potentials could be estimated over temperatures up to and beyond bodily temperatures. Results: The provisional equations formulated to calculate N f , the number of free water molecules per unit volume of inorganic and organic solute solutions, respectively, over wide concentration ranges compared well with the calculations of N f using recorded

  13. Uranium solution mining: comparison of New Mexico with South Texas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conine, W.D.

    1980-01-01

    In-situ uranium-leaching or solution-mining operations are currently underway in both south Texas and Wyoming. Mobil Oil Corporation is in the process of applying solution-mining technology, such as that developed at the O'Hern facility in south Texas, to uranium orebodies located near Crownpoint, New Mexico. The O'Hern facility uses an alkaline-leach process to bring the uranium to the surface, where it is removed from solution using ion-exchange resin and chemical precipitation. Line-drive and five-spot well field patterns are used to inject and recover the leach solutions. Although details of ore occurrence in New Mexico differ from those in south Texas, laboratory, engineering-design, and field-hydrology tests indicate that solution mining of uranium should be feasible in New Mexico. To determine the commercial feasibility, Mobil is proceeding with the construction of pilot-plant facilities for a 75-gallon-perminute (gpm) test at an orebody near Crownpoint. The pilot test will use five-spot patterns at various spacings for production of uranium-bearing leachate. Initial surface processing will be the same as that used in south Texas

  14. Bringing a Chemical Laboratory Named Sam to Mars on the 2011 Curiosity Rover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahaffy, P. R.; Bleacher, L.; Jones, A.; Atreya, S. K.; Manning, H. L.; Cabane, M.; Webster, C. R.; Sam Team

    2010-12-01

    for the ChemMatters journal that is widely distributed to high school students. Informal education activities include professional development telecons for the NASA Museum Alliance and development of a landing site selection activity that will bring to the attention of students and the public the interesting work done by Mars scientists who study the best locations for Curiostiy to explore. Each of these products can be used by interested groups and venues wishing to participate in the Year of the Solar System. References: [1] Mahaffy, P.R., Space Sci. Rev. 135, 255 (2008). [2] Mahaffy, P.R. (2009) Geochem. News, 121. Acknowledgement: Funding for the SAM development was provided by NASA through the MSL Project and for the GC from the CNES.

  15. Bringing Legacy Visualization Software to Modern Computing Devices via Application Streaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Ward

    2014-05-01

    Planning software compatibility across forthcoming generations of computing platforms is a problem commonly encountered in software engineering and development. While this problem can affect any class of software, data analysis and visualization programs are particularly vulnerable. This is due in part to their inherent dependency on specialized hardware and computing environments. A number of strategies and tools have been designed to aid software engineers with this task. While generally embraced by developers at 'traditional' software companies, these methodologies are often dismissed by the scientific software community as unwieldy, inefficient and unnecessary. As a result, many important and storied scientific software packages can struggle to adapt to a new computing environment; for example, one in which much work is carried out on sub-laptop devices (such as tablets and smartphones). Rewriting these packages for a new platform often requires significant investment in terms of development time and developer expertise. In many cases, porting older software to modern devices is neither practical nor possible. As a result, replacement software must be developed from scratch, wasting resources better spent on other projects. Enabled largely by the rapid rise and adoption of cloud computing platforms, 'Application Streaming' technologies allow legacy visualization and analysis software to be operated wholly from a client device (be it laptop, tablet or smartphone) while retaining full functionality and interactivity. It mitigates much of the developer effort required by other more traditional methods while simultaneously reducing the time it takes to bring the software to a new platform. This work will provide an overview of Application Streaming and how it compares against other technologies which allow scientific visualization software to be executed from a remote computer. We will discuss the functionality and limitations of existing application streaming

  16. Bringing Terra Science to the People: 10 years of education and public outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riebeek, H.; Chambers, L. H.; Yuen, K.; Herring, D.

    2009-12-01

    The default image on Apple's iPhone is a blue, white, green and tan globe: the Blue Marble. The iconic image was produced using Terra data as part of the mission's education and public outreach efforts. As far-reaching and innovative as Terra science has been over the past decade, Terra education and public outreach efforts have been equally successful. This talk will provide an overview of Terra's crosscutting education and public outreach projects, which have reached into educational facilities—classrooms, museums, and science centers, across the Internet, and into everyday life. The Earth Observatory web site was the first web site designed for the public that told the unified story of what we can learn about our planet from all space-based platforms. Initially conceived as part of Terra mission outreach in 1999, the web site has won five Webby awards, the highest recognition a web site can receive. The Visible Earth image gallery is a catalogue of NASA Earth imagery that receives more than one million page views per month. The NEO (NASA Earth Observations) web site and WMS (web mapping service) tool serves global data sets to museums and science centers across the world. Terra educational products, including the My NASA Data web service and the Students' Cloud Observations Online (S'COOL) project, bring Terra data into the classroom. Both projects target multiple grade levels, ranging from elementary school to graduate school. S'COOL uses student observations of clouds to help validate Terra data. Students and their parents have puzzled over weekly "Where on Earth" geography quizzes published on line. Perhaps the most difficult group to reach is the large segment of the public that does not seek out science information online or in a science museum or classroom. To reach these people, EarthSky produced a series of podcasts and radio broadcasts that brought Terra science to more than 30 million people in 2009. Terra imagery, including the Blue Marble, have

  17. Using Virtual Reality to Bring Ocean Science Field Experiences to the Classroom and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite, A. J.; Rosenberg, A.; Frehm, V.; Gravinese, P.; Jackson, J.; Killingsworth, S.; Williams, C.

    2017-12-01

    While still in its infancy, the application of virtual reality (VR) technology to classroom education provides unparalleled opportunities to transport students to otherwise inaccessible localities and increase awareness of and engagement in STEAM fields. Here we share VR programming in development by the ANGARI Foundation, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit committed to advancing ocean science research and education. ANGARI Foundation's series of thematic VR films features the research of ocean scientists from onboard the Foundation's research vessel, R/V ANGARI. The films are developed and produced through an iterative process between expedition scientists, the film production team, and ANGARI staff and Educator Council members. Upon completion of filming, the K-12 and informal educators of ANGARI's Educator Council work with ANGARI staff and affiliated scientists to develop and implement standards-aligned (e.g. Next Generation Science Standards and International Baccalaureate) lesson plans for the classroom. The goal of ANGARI Foundation's VR films is to immerse broad audiences in the marine environment, while actively engaging them in the at-sea scientific methods of expert scientists, ultimately increasing knowledge of our oceans and promoting their conservation. The foundation's VR films and developed lessons are made available for free to the public via YouTube and www.ANGARI.org. While South Florida educators may request that ANGARI Foundation visit their classrooms and bring the necessary headsets to run the experience, the Foundation is also partnering with VR hardware companies to facilitate the acquisition and adoption of VR headsets by schools in the U.S. and abroad. In this presentation we will share our most recent VR film that highlights coral reef ecosystems and the Florida Reef Tract, taking an interdisciplinary approach to investigating how it has changed over time and the issues and opportunities it currently faces. We will also discuss classroom

  18. Bringing a Global Issue Closer to Home: The OSU Climate Change Webinar Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jentes Banicki, J.; Dierkes, C.

    2012-12-01

    When people think about the effects of climate change, many will still picture that iconic lone polar bear clinging to a shrinking iceberg in Antarctica. But many don't realize that the impacts that we will face here at home could also be severe, directly affecting the food we eat, the health we have, and the natural environments we appreciate. To help better explain and ultimately localize those impacts for Great Lakes residents, 10 departments within Ohio State University partnered in 2009 to create the Global Change, Local Impact webinar series. The monthly series brings in experts from around the Great Lakes region to discuss issues and impacts we will encounter regionally as our climate changes. Originally designed as a small series for Ohioans, the series has broadened to focus on Great Lakes-related issues, with more than 4,500 attendees representing 500 organizations in governmental agencies, academia, non-profit groups, private industry, and the legislature from around the country. Over the past two years, the OSU Climate Team expanded its educational reach by partnering with external groups like the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Great Lakes Regional Water Program, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and the Great Lakes Sea Grant Network to help deliver the most knowledgeable experts and resources for each Great Lake-focused climate topic and archive those resources on its www.changingclimate.osu.edu web site. As a result of these collaborative efforts, participants say the webinars are one of their primary resources for climate-related research information in the region, with 80-90% polled saying they use this information as an unbiased resource to help not only understand how climate change could affect local concerns like public health, agriculture, and infrastructure, but what they in their vocations and daily lives can do to prepare for it. For scientists and practitioners, this series serves as the perfect low carbon venue

  19. Bringing Antarctic Weddell seals to the classroom through PolarTREC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eilers, A. A.

    2017-12-01

    PolarTREC (Teachers and Researchers Exploring and Collaborating) is an NSF funded professional development opportunity in which K-12 teachers and informal educators participated in hands-on field research experiences in the Polar Regions. The program goal is to invigorate polar science education and understanding by bringing together educators and polar researchers. This unique opportunity for educators has two main components: a 4-6 week field experience and a classroom/community connection piece. In preparation for these experiences, museum educator Alex Eilers and science team lead Dr. Jennifer Burns planned, developed and executed extensive outreach efforts for both students and the community to highlight the Weddell seal research project during the 2012, 2014 and 2016 seasons. The following outreach activities summarize the team's most successful attempts at engaging schoolchildren, teachers and the public, creating a broader impact of the Weddell seal scientific project. On-line Daily journal entries were uploaded to the PolarTREC website encouraging an active interaction between the science team and participants. A Polar Connect event offered participants a real-time, interactive internet presentation with the team. Schools A multitude of on-site presentations were made in classrooms, at teacher workshops and faculty meetings. Two 45 minute labs were developed for students visiting the museum, Animals of the Antarctic and Journey to the Poles, the latter is now included in our ongoing program repertoire. Two travelling kits, Extreme Cold Weather Gear and The Weddell Seal, were developed by museum staff and continue to circulate through schools. A multi-lesson educational module was developed by museum staff to bridge the gap between the scientific research conducted in the field and students in grades 3-8. It contains curriculum-based lessons, field data and strategic methods to assist students in analyzing the data. Community Community-wide interest

  20. Power electronics solution to dust emissions from thermal power plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vukosavić Slobodan

    2010-01-01

    supplies are the best solution for new ESP installations, as well as for the reconstruction of existing facilities. The paper describes the topology of the HF HV power supply, power management and controls, and brings the most important details of the implementation. It is found that the HF HV solution achieves several significant improvements over the conventional thyristor system. It is possible to provide more precise control of the ESP parameters such as the output voltages and currents. It is also possible to make a rapid increase or decrease in voltage and to effectuate a very fast response to load changes. Due to this advantages it is possible to suppress the supply quickly in the case of sparking, reducing the spark energy and the quantity of ionized gasses produced by the electric arc. Reduction in the spark energy is up to 10 times compared to conventional thyristors solution. This means that the erosion of the electrode system is significantly reduced, and that the quality of the collection plates is preserved for much longer periods. At the same time, lower quantity of ionized gasses produced by the spark contribute to much shorter deionization intervals, required to quit sparking and evacuate charged particles in order to reinstate the voltage and proceed with the operation. In addition, HF HV power supply provides a significant reduction in size and weight of the complete ESP installation, hence reducing the tons of steel that has to be built in. Therefore, the HF HV power supply may be the key instrument to reducing the cost of the dedusting ecological equipment. Besides, size and weight reduction leads to cost savings of installation and maintenance. According to estimates, savings in steel may reach 30%, contributing to the overall cost savings of roughly 20%. Within this paper, in addition to describing the AR70/1000 unit topology and principles of operation, the paper presents the results and measurements obtained during extensive experimental

  1. Biblis unit A thirty years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauer, H.

    2004-01-01

    The first nuclear power plant in the Federal Republic of Germany started operation in 1961. It was followed by a consistent period of development until a new energy source had become available by the late sixties which was both powerful and capable of expansion. With 1200 MW electric power, the pressurized water reactor of Biblis A in 1974 was equipped with the world's most powerful single-shaft turbine generator. In 187,656 hours of operation, Biblis A over the past thirty years generated slightly more than 211 billion kWh of gross electricity (by July 31, 2004). The operating experience accumulated also resulted in improvements and modifications of technical plant systems in the 1970s and 1980s which served to bring the unit up to the then current state of the art. Modifications of technical plant systems serving to increase the safety margins or improve operating systems, always in the light of the state of the art, have been carried out consistently and continuously over the years. In combination with a high level of qualification of the operating personnel, which is ensured by an efficient system of primary and refresher training courses of responsible shift personnel and other groups of power plant personnel, this creates a lasting foundation of safe plant operation. In connection with the preparations for, and the execution of, revision outages, Biblis provided the first experience with a PWR of this size category. Unit A of the Biblis nuclear power station is proof of the fact that technical and safety challenges can be solved, and have been solved, by engineering expertise. The high availability and low susceptibility to failure of the plant demonstrate the widely optimized maintenance strategy and the high qualification and motivation of the staff. (orig.)

  2. Does a first-born female child bring mood risks to new Asian American mothers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Anh; Hardie, Thomas

    2013-07-01

    To define the relationship between gender of the first-born child and mood in Asian American mothers. A secondary analysis was used to address the objectives of the study. The sample was obtained from the Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS) of 40 states in the United States. The sample included 1,310 women of Asian origin who delivered their first children during the prior 2- to 4-month period. Based on data from the PRAMS survey mailed 2- to 4-months postpartum, participants were selected for inclusion in the study sample from those who had given birth to their first children and were of Chinese, Japanese, Filipino, or other Asian origin. Chi squared analyses and an independent sample t test were used to assess the relationship between the child's sex and the mother's response to three PRAM mood questions; a single score was generated by summing the responses to the three questions. There were no significant (p > .05) differences in rate of mood symptoms or the means of the aggregated score related to a child's gender. The study findings are similar to those reported in the United Kingdom and suggest that the cultural preference for a son is not a significant mood risk in Asian American women. © 2013 AWHONN, the Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses.

  3. Solution mining economics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunkin, G.G.

    1980-01-01

    The field of application of in-situ solution mining of uranium is described and areas of competition with open pit and underground mining identified. The influence of high interest rates and dollar inflation on present values and rate of return is shown to be minimized by low capitalization and short construction lead times typical of in-situ leaching ventures. A scheme of three major project account divisions is presented and basic parameters necessary for mine planning are listed. 1979 cost ranges and useful methods of estimation of capital and operating costs are given for the in-situ uranium mining method

  4. Total Logistic Plant Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dusan Dorcak

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The Total Logistics Plant Solutions, plant logistics system - TLPS, based on the philosophy of advanced control processes enables complex coordination of business processes and flows and the management and scheduling of production in the appropriate production plans and planning periods. Main attributes of TLPS is to create a comprehensive, multi-level, enterprise logistics information system, with a certain degree of intelligence, which accepts the latest science and research results in the field of production technology and logistics. Logistic model of company understands as a system of mutually transforming flows of materials, energy, information, finance, which is realized by chain activities and operations

  5. From Goods to Solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chakkol, Mehmet; Johnson, Mark; Raja, Jawwad

    2014-01-01

    Purpose – This paper aims to adopt service-dominant logic (SDL) to empirically explore network configurations resulting from the provision of goods, goods and services, and solutions. Design/methodology/approach – This paper uses a single, in-depth, exploratory case study in a truck manufacturer......: dyadic, triadic and tetradic. The extent to which different network actors contribute to value co-creation varies across the offerings. Research limitations/implications – This paper is based on a single, in-depth case study developed in one industrial context. Whilst this represents an appropriate...

  6. A plugging solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gen, O P; Azhigaliyev, G K; Dodonova, S Ye; Dyaltlova, N M; Novokhatskaya, I D; Ryabova, L I

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of the invention is to increase the durability of cement stone at 150 to 200C. The patent covers a plugging solution which consists of Portlandcement, sand and water. It additionally contains metal organic complexes of nitrylotrimethylphosphonic acid and organosiliconates of alkali or alkaline earth metals with the following component relationship in percent by mass: Portland cement, 42 to 43; sand, 27 to 28; metal organic complexes of nitrylotrimethylphosphonic acid, 0.01 to 1.5; organosiliconates of alkaline or alkaline earthmetals, 0.0025 to 0.375 and water, the remainder.

  7. Thoughts on History, Tuning and the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pace, David

    2017-01-01

    The Tuning Movement and the scholarship of teaching and learning have each had a significant impact on teaching history in higher education in the United States. But the isolation of these initiatives from each other has lessened their potential impact. Interactions between the two might bring together the intellectual exploration of scholarship…

  8. The United Nations University: The Concept, History, Structure, Financing, Objectives, Centres and Programmes. Guest Editorial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, J.

    2000-01-01

    The United Nations University (UNU) is an international academic organization which brings together leading international scholars to tackle world problems. This article describes for South African scholars, institutions, governments, and their agencies the importance of the work being undertaken by the UNU and encourages their participation. (EV)

  9. Switching dynamics in an interpersonal competition brings about "deadlock" synchronization of players.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akifumi Kijima

    Full Text Available In competitive sport game behavior, certain interpersonal patterns of movement coordination evolve even though each individual player only intends to exert their own strategy to win. To investigate this interpersonal pattern formation process, we asked pairs of naïve participants to engage in a play-tag game in which they had to remove a tag fastened to their partner's hip. Relative phase analysis of the players' step towards-away velocities indicated that anti-phase synchronization evolved across 10 repetitions of the game. We clarified evolution of this synchronization process using a dynamical model with an attractor (at relative π phase and a repeller (at 0 relative phase and discuss the self-organized nature of model and its ability to embody general solution for martial art interpersonal coordination.

  10. An Approach for e-inclusion: Bringing illiterates and disabled people into play

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Moura de Holanda

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available In emergent economies, the continued process of digitalizing the ICTs, summed up with some sociocultural particularies and porvety, contributes to cleave the society into two groups: the connected and the increasingly more disconnected or socially excluded. However, efforts to effectively narrow this kind of divide transcends the provision of access to web and other digital networks, mainly if the attention is focused on people with disabilities and lack of literacy. For these social groups, accessibility and intelligibility are the key barriers to e-society. A manner to mitigate then is the objective of an ongoing research project in which we are engaged and that comprises the elaboration and application of a methodology for developing solutions to e-inclusion in Brazil. This paper presents the central aspects of such an appoach, focusing on some activities which go beyond the connectivity provision and may help the most “excludeds” in bridging the divide.

  11. SI units in radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iyer, P S [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay (India). Div. of Radiation Protection

    1978-11-01

    The proposal of the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements that the special units of radiation and radioactivity-roentgen, rad, rem and curie-be replaced by the International System (SI) of Units has been accepted by international bodies. This paper reviews the resons for introducing the new units and their features. The relation between the special units and the corresponding SI units is discussed with examples. In spite of anticipated difficulties, the commission recommends a smooth and efficient changeover to the SI units in ten years.

  12. Electrochemical Solution Growth of Magnetic Nitrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monson, Todd C. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Pearce, Charles [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Magnetic nitrides, if manufactured in bulk form, would provide designers of transformers and inductors with a new class of better performing and affordable soft magnetic materials. According to experimental results from thin films and/or theoretical calculations, magnetic nitrides would have magnetic moments well in excess of current state of the art soft magnets. Furthermore, magnetic nitrides would have higher resistivities than current transformer core materials and therefore not require the use of laminates of inactive material to limit eddy current losses. However, almost all of the magnetic nitrides have been elusive except in difficult to reproduce thin films or as inclusions in another material. Now, through its ability to reduce atmospheric nitrogen, the electrochemical solution growth (ESG) technique can bring highly sought after (and previously inaccessible) new magnetic nitrides into existence in bulk form. This method utilizes a molten salt as a solvent to solubilize metal cations and nitrogen ions produced electrochemically and form nitrogen compounds. Unlike other growth methods, the scalable ESG process can sustain high growth rates (~mm/hr) even under reasonable operating conditions (atmospheric pressure and 500 °C). Ultimately, this translates into a high throughput, low cost, manufacturing process. The ESG process has already been used successfully to grow high quality GaN. Below, the experimental results of an exploratory express LDRD project to access the viability of the ESG technique to grow magnetic nitrides will be presented.

  13. Millennium Global Village-Net: bringing together Millennium Villages throughout sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanter, Andrew S; Negin, Joel; Olayo, Bernard; Bukachi, Frederick; Johnson, Edward; Sachs, Sonia Ehrlich

    2009-12-01

    The Millennium Villages Project (MVP), based at The Earth Institute at Columbia University, is a bottom-up, community led approach to show how villages in developing countries can get out of the poverty trap that afflicts more than a billion people worldwide. With well-targeted, practical inputs can help the community invest in a path leading to self-sustaining development. There are 80 Millennium Villages clustered in 10 countries throughout sub-Saharan Africa. MVP is an important development process for empowering communities to invest in a package of integrated interventions aiming to increase food production, improve access to safe water, health care, education and infrastructure. The process benefits from synergies of the integrated approach and relies on community leadership as empowered by proven technological inputs. MVP is committed to a science-based approach to assess and monitor the progress of the communities towards clear objectives; the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and to do so with mechanisms that are scalable and sustainable. This approach offers much more than simply collecting and analyzing data since the mechanism used for recording progress would provide a bridge over the divide which separates the haves and the have-nots (by facilitating the sharing of solutions from one community to another bidirectionally). By so doing, it allows people to enhance their own futures in a sustainable manner. Solutions found in one community are transferable to similar communities in other MVP villages. To achieve this goal, the MVP requires an information and communication system which can provide both necessary infrastructure for monitoring and evaluation, and tools for communicating among the villages, cities and countries. This system is called the Millennium Global Village-Net (MGV-Net). It takes advantage of the latest in open source software (OpenMRS), databases (MySQL), interface terminology, a centralized concept dictionary, and uses appropriate

  14. Classical solutions and extended supergravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    de Alfaro, V.; Fubini, S.; Furlan, G.

    1980-03-01

    The existence and properties of classical solutions for gravity coupled to matter fields have been investigated previously with the limitation to conformally flat solutions. In the search for a guiding criterion to determine the form of the coupling among the fields, one is led to consider supersymmetric theories, and the question arises whether classical solutions persist in these models. It is found that a discrepancy persists between supergravity and standard meron solutions. Owing to the appearance of the scalar field, a new set of meron solutions exists for particular Lagrangian models. In conclusion, the form of solutions in Minkowski space is discussed

  15. Data Redistribution through MY NASA DATA: Striving to bring authentic NASA data into education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, P. M.; Oostra, D.; Oots, P.; Chambers, L. H.; Moore, S.; Crecelius, S.; Taylor, J.

    2012-12-01

    The Mentoring and inquirY using NASA Data on Atmospheric and Earth science for Teachers and Amateurs (MY NASA DATA or MND) project was launched in 2004 to bring authentic data into K-12 education. The MND website features a Live Access Server (LAS), an open source tool which allows users to customize data sets to suit their individual needs, choosing from among 200 global Level 3 data sets. Approximately 120 lesson plans that utilize the available parameters are offered to help teachers and students get started with data exploration. Grade appropriate data documentation is also provided (with continual efforts to improve it to better meet the needs of this target audience). Through inquiry and lesson utilization, educators have several connection points to the data. As classrooms shift to problem-based and inquiry learning, the need for a data visualizer/server increases. Through numerous and growing connections to NASA satellite missions, and with access to data as a built-in feature, MND effectively fills this niche to provide a first level of data re-use that is friendly to the K-12 community. Offering a wide variety of data sets allows MND to support many science topics within the K-12 curriculum while extending the use of scientific data from NASA Earth science satellites. Lessons, created by educators across the country, allow MND to connect with the classroom teacher and to meet their data needs. As technology continues to evolve, a second level of data re-use becomes both interesting and possible. Thus, the MND team is now exploring new web and mobile platforms that can be built and distributed on an accelerated time cycle to keep up with information technology developments. With implementation of these new platforms come challenges in promoting new items to the education community, the public, and other potential users. Included in the list of challenges are: ever-evolving technology, prediction of the market, web/mobile platforms, and time-to-market for

  16. The impact of climate change on the global wine industry: Challenges & solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Renée Mozell

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the impact of climate change upon the global production of winegrapes and wine. It includes a review of the literature on the cause and effects of climate change, as well as illustrations of the specific challenges global warming may bring to the production of winegrapes and wine. More importantly, this paper provides some practical solutions that industry professionals can take to mitigate and adapt to the coming change in both vineyards and wineries.

  17. Feasibility study on renewable energy systems and selected insulation applications : smart solutions for energy saving

    OpenAIRE

    Cuadra Fonseca, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    Energy represents a big challenge for future generations; not only mineral and fossil energy sources are being exhausted, but also GHG emissions pollute the environment and disrupt life natural cycles bringing serious irreversible impacts on earth. Renewable energy sources, on the other hand, are unexhausted and free of pollution; solar power systems play an important role in the generation of clean energy, being one of the most cost-effective solutions. Besides, solar power systems have ...

  18. Internationalizing Services : Market research on exporting Finnish educational solutions to Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Asemokha, Agnes

    2012-01-01

    This thesis is aimed to bring clarity to the concept of internationalization and service (education) exports as an International Business tool. The study is commissioned by Finpros’ (The Finnish export organization) Future Learning Finland project an umbrella programme whose objective is internationalizing and exporting Finnish educational solutions to other countries. The commissioning party aims to use the study in its marketing activities. Therefore, this paper is built based on a hypothet...

  19. Server-based and server-less BYOD solutions to support electronic learning

    OpenAIRE

    McCarthy, Brian R.; Benson, Joshua C.

    2016-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited Over the past 10 years, bring your own device has become an emerging practice across the commercial landscape and has empowered employees to conduct work-related business from the comfort of their own phone, tablet, or other personal electronic device. Currently in the Department of Defense, and specifically the Department of the Navy, no viable solution exists for the delivery of eLearning content to a service member's personal device...

  20. Radioactive waste management solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siemann, Michael

    2015-01-01

    One of the more frequent questions that arise when discussing nuclear energy's potential contribution to mitigating climate change concerns that of how to manage radioactive waste. Radioactive waste is produced through nuclear power generation, but also - although to a significantly lesser extent - in a variety of other sectors including medicine, agriculture, research, industry and education. The amount, type and physical form of radioactive waste varies considerably. Some forms of radioactive waste, for example, need only be stored for a relatively short period while their radioactivity naturally decays to safe levels. Others remain radioactive for hundreds or even hundreds of thousands of years. Public concerns surrounding radioactive waste are largely related to long-lived high-level radioactive waste. Countries around the world with existing nuclear programmes are developing longer-term plans for final disposal of such waste, with an international consensus developing that the geological disposal of high-level waste (HLW) is the most technically feasible and safe solution. This article provides a brief overview of the different forms of radioactive waste, examines storage and disposal solutions, and briefly explores fuel recycling and stakeholder involvement in radioactive waste management decision making

  1. The Paperless Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    REI Systems, Inc. developed a software solution that uses the Internet to eliminate the paperwork typically required to document and manage complex business processes. The data management solution, called Electronic Handbooks (EHBs), is presently used for the entire SBIR program processes at NASA. The EHB-based system is ideal for programs and projects whose users are geographically distributed and are involved in complex management processes and procedures. EHBs provide flexible access control and increased communications while maintaining security for systems of all sizes. Through Internet Protocol- based access, user authentication and user-based access restrictions, role-based access control, and encryption/decryption, EHBs provide the level of security required for confidential data transfer. EHBs contain electronic forms and menus, which can be used in real time to execute the described processes. EHBs use standard word processors that generate ASCII HTML code to set up electronic forms that are viewed within a web browser. EHBs require no end-user software distribution, significantly reducing operating costs. Each interactive handbook simulates a hard-copy version containing chapters with descriptions of participants' roles in the online process.

  2. About the renewable and the seas energies in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamet, Ph.

    2006-01-01

    This report aims to bring some information on the regulations and the technologies in the United States in the domain of the seas energies. After a presentation of the different seas and renewable energies and the corresponding regulations in the United States, the author concludes of an energy in its infancy except for the offshore wind power where some big projects are implemented. (A.L.B.)

  3. The Cuba–United States Thaw: Building Bridges through Science and Global Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bausch, Daniel G.; Kouri, Vivian; Resik, Sonia; Acosta, Belsy; Guillen, Gerardo; Goraleski, Karen; Espinal, Marcos; Guzman, Maria G.

    2017-01-01

    Beginning in 2014, there has been significant progress in normalization of relations between Cuba and the United States. Herein, we discuss the history and recent progress in scientific collaboration between the two countries as well as the continued challenges. Science and global health diplomacy can be key tools in reestablishing a trusting and productive relationship of mutual and global benefit, bringing about better and healthier lives for people in both Cuba and the United States. PMID:28719268

  4. The Cuba-United States Thaw: Building Bridges Through Science and Global Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bausch, Daniel G; Kouri, Vivian; Resik, Sonia; Acosta, Belsy; Guillen, Gerardo; Goraleski, Karen; Espinal, Marcos; Guzman, Maria G

    2017-06-01

    AbstractBeginning in 2014, there has been significant progress in normalization of relations between Cuba and the United States. Herein, we discuss the history and recent progress in scientific collaboration between the two countries as well as the continued challenges. Science and global health diplomacy can be key tools in reestablishing a trusting and productive relationship of mutual and global benefit, bringing about better and healthier lives for people in both Cuba and the United States.

  5. Therapeutic hypothermia brings favorable neurologic outcomes in children with near drowning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ming-Chun; Chu, Chia-Hsiang; Cheng, Ching-Feng; Lin, Jun-Song; Chen, Jui-Hsia; Chang, Yu-Hsun

    2016-01-01

    A 1-year-10-month-old boy was admitted to our pediatric intensive care unit due to near drowning with pulmonary edema. A conventional ventilator with 100% oxygen supplementation was used initially, but was shifted to high frequency oscillatory ventilation as his oxygen saturation was around 84-88%. Therapeutic hypothermia was applied due to hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy with severe acidosis. His respiratory condition improved and he was extubated successfully on the 6 th hospital day. The patient had no obvious neurological defects and he was discharged in a stable condition after 17 days of hospitalization. Our case report demonstrates the advantages of therapeutic hypothermia on survival and neurological outcomes in treating pediatric near drowning patients.

  6. The feasibility of using 'bring your own device' (BYOD) technology for electronic data capture in multicentre medical audit and research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faulds, M C; Bauchmuller, K; Miller, D; Rosser, J H; Shuker, K; Wrench, I; Wilson, P; Mills, G H

    2016-01-01

    Large-scale audit and research projects demand robust, efficient systems for accurate data collection, handling and analysis. We utilised a multiplatform 'bring your own device' (BYOD) electronic data collection app to capture observational audit data on theatre efficiency across seven hospital Trusts in South Yorkshire in June-August 2013. None of the participating hospitals had a dedicated information governance policy for bring your own device. Data were collected by 17 investigators for 392 individual theatre lists, capturing 14,148 individual data points, 12, 852 (91%) of which were transmitted to a central database on the day of collection without any loss of data. BYOD technology enabled accurate collection of a large volume of secure data across multiple NHS organisations over a short period of time. Bring your own device technology provides a method for collecting real-time audit, research and quality improvement data within healthcare systems without compromising patient data protection. © 2015 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  7. What Change Can The New Developments In Energy Sector Bring Into the World`s Energypolitical and Geopolitical Order?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onur TUTULMAZ

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The recent developments bring US to a leading natural gas and oil producer position. The attempts in last 20 years to bring new horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing technologies together have developed a success in shale gas and oil production in US; the production volumes has reached to a position to redefine the market. Last estimations are bringing more information about the shale capacities of the major basins of the world. However, the estimates are based on a wide range of assumptions and consequently their results vary in a large scale. In any case, these developments have crucial economic, political and geopolitical consequences on the energy market, petroleum producer and consumer countries and regions. Despite the wide range of ambiguity of the estimated size of the resources, the estimations show US and North America has one of the biggest potential, already turning technology into the giant production numbers. Some of the estimations allege so big numbers can even mean to a new world order. The asymmetric nature of the potential, can also be said, increases some of the expected impacts too. In this study, basically, we want to supply an initial solid and economical evaluation to this ambiguity. We are trying to shape a frame for the new energy potential and to put it in a place in the current practice of the world. Secondly, in this context, we are underlying here some of the possible economic and geopolitical consequences each of which can constitute a subject of deeper study.

  8. Combined Heat and Power: Effective Energy Solutions for a Sustainable Future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shipley, Anna [SENTECH, Inc., Bethesda, MD (United States); Hampson, Anne [ICF, International, Arlington, VA (United States); Hedman, Bruce [ICF, International, Arlington, VA (United States); Garland, Patti [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bautista, Paul [SENTECH, Inc., Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2008-12-01

    This report describes in detail the four key areas where CHP has proven its effectiveness and holds promise for the future—as an: environmental solution, significantly reducing CO2 emissions through greater energy efficiency; competitive business solution, increasing efficiency, reducing business costs, and creating green-collar jobs; local energy solution, deployable throughout the United States; and infrastructure modernization solution, relieving grid congestion and improving energy security.

  9. Middle Eastern solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boersma, M.

    2001-01-01

    The need to consider the Middle East as a group of distinct countries and not as one single market and to tailor the services offered by companies is stressed. The cultures, political and social conditions, forms of the oil and gas industry in the countries making up the Middle East and their technology requirements are different and vary widely. The approach taken by Shell Global Solutions to these differences is described and illustrated with Shell's experiences in Oman and Saudi Arabia. Shell has found that Omanis are keen to work in their oil and gas industry, and to protect their country's natural environment. Saudi also have intense pride in their oil industry and here Shell supports refinery operators reduce costs while maintaining strict quality control. Shell has been selected to help Saudi Arabia develop its natural gas reserves; as part of the Core Venture 3 project, Shell will build a power desalination plant

  10. Solvent - solute interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urbanczyk, A.; Kalinowski, M.K.

    1983-01-01

    The electronic absorption spectrum of vanadyl acetylacetonate has been studied in 15 organic solvents. It has been found that wavenumbers and molar absorptivities of the long-wavelength bands (d-d transitions) can be well described by a complementary Lewis acid-base model including Gutmann's donor number [Gutmann V., Wychera E., Inorg. Nucl. Chem. Letters 2, 257 (1966)] and acceptor number [Mayer U., Gutmann V., Gerger W., Monatsh. Chem. 106, 1235 (1975)] of a solvent. This model describes also the solvent effect of the hyperfine splitting constant, Asub(iso)( 51 V), from e.s.r. spectra of VOacac 2 . These observations are discussed in terms of the donor-acceptor concept for solvent-solute interactions. (Author)

  11. 2010 Water & Aqueous Solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dor Ben-Amotz

    2010-08-13

    Water covers more than two thirds of the surface of the Earth and about the same fraction of water forms the total mass of a human body. Since the early days of our civilization water has also been in the focus of technological developments, starting from converting it to wine to more modern achievements. The meeting will focus on recent advances in experimental, theoretical, and computational understanding of the behavior of the most important and fascinating liquid in a variety of situations and applications. The emphasis will be less on water properties per se than on water as a medium in which fundamental dynamic and reactive processes take place. In the following sessions, speakers will discuss the latest breakthroughs in unraveling these processes at the molecular level: Water in Solutions; Water in Motion I and II; Water in Biology I and II; Water in the Environment I and II; Water in Confined Geometries and Water in Discussion (keynote lecture and poster winners presentations).

  12. Diffusion of aqueous solutions of ionic, zwitterionic, and polar solutes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Xiaojing; Huang, Qi; Dharmawardhana, Chamila Chathuranga; Ichiye, Toshiko

    2018-06-01

    The properties of aqueous solutions of ionic, zwitterionic, and polar solutes are of interest to many fields. For instance, one of the many anomalous properties of aqueous solutions is the behavior of water diffusion in different monovalent salt solutions. In addition, solutes can affect the stabilities of macromolecules such as proteins in aqueous solution. Here, the diffusivities of aqueous solutions of sodium chloride, potassium chloride, tri-methylamine oxide (TMAO), urea, and TMAO-urea are examined in molecular dynamics simulations. The decrease in the diffusivity of water with the concentration of simple ions and urea can be described by a simple model in which the water molecules hydrogen bonded to the solutes are considered to diffuse at the same rate as the solutes, while the remainder of the water molecules are considered to be bulk and diffuse at almost the same rate as pure water. On the other hand, the decrease in the diffusivity of water with the concentration of TMAO is apparently affected by a decrease in the diffusion rate of the bulk water molecules in addition to the decrease due to the water molecules hydrogen bonded to TMAO. In other words, TMAO enhances the viscosity of water, while urea barely affects it. Overall, this separation of water molecules into those that are hydrogen bonded to solute and those that are bulk can provide a useful means of understanding the short- and long-range effects of solutes on water.

  13. Natural climate solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griscom, Bronson W.; Adams, Justin; Ellis, Peter W.; Houghton, Richard A.; Lomax, Guy; Miteva, Daniela A.; Schlesinger, William H.; Shoch, David; Siikamäki, Juha V.; Smith, Pete; Woodbury, Peter; Zganjar, Chris; Blackman, Allen; Campari, João; Conant, Richard T.; Delgado, Christopher; Elias, Patricia; Gopalakrishna, Trisha; Hamsik, Marisa R.; Herrero, Mario; Kiesecker, Joseph; Landis, Emily; Laestadius, Lars; Leavitt, Sara M.; Minnemeyer, Susan; Polasky, Stephen; Potapov, Peter; Putz, Francis E.; Sanderman, Jonathan; Silvius, Marcel; Wollenberg, Eva; Fargione, Joseph

    2017-10-01

    Better stewardship of land is needed to achieve the Paris Climate Agreement goal of holding warming to below 2 °C; however, confusion persists about the specific set of land stewardship options available and their mitigation potential. To address this, we identify and quantify “natural climate solutions” (NCS): 20 conservation, restoration, and improved land management actions that increase carbon storage and/or avoid greenhouse gas emissions across global forests, wetlands, grasslands, and agricultural lands. We find that the maximum potential of NCS—when constrained by food security, fiber security, and biodiversity conservation—is 23.8 petagrams of CO2 equivalent (PgCO2e) y‑1 (95% CI 20.3–37.4). This is ≥30% higher than prior estimates, which did not include the full range of options and safeguards considered here. About half of this maximum (11.3 PgCO2e y‑1) represents cost-effective climate mitigation, assuming the social cost of CO2 pollution is ≥100 USD MgCO2e‑1 by 2030. Natural climate solutions can provide 37% of cost-effective CO2 mitigation needed through 2030 for a >66% chance of holding warming to below 2 °C. One-third of this cost-effective NCS mitigation can be delivered at or below 10 USD MgCO2‑1. Most NCS actions—if effectively implemented—also offer water filtration, flood buffering, soil health, biodiversity habitat, and enhanced climate resilience. Work remains to better constrain uncertainty of NCS mitigation estimates. Nevertheless, existing knowledge reported here provides a robust basis for immediate global action to improve ecosystem stewardship as a major solution to climate change.

  14. Location Intelligence Solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, D.

    2015-01-01

    Location Intelligence (LI) means using the spatial dimension of information as a key to support business processes. This spatial dimension has to be defined by geographic coordinates. Storing these spatial objects in a database allows for attaching a 'meaning' to them, like 'current position', 'border', 'building' or 'room'. Now the coordinates represent real-world objects, which can be relevant for the measurement, documentation, control or optimization of (parameters of) business processes aiming at different business objectives. But LI can only be applied, if the locations can be determined with an accuracy (in space and time) appropriate for the business process in consideration. Therefore the first step in any development of a LI solution is the analysis of the business process itself regarding its requirements for spatial and time resolution and accuracy. The next step is the detailed analysis of the surrounding conditions of the process: Does the process happen indoor and/or outdoor? Are there moving objects? If yes, how fast are they? How does the relevant environment look like? Is technical infrastructure available? Is the process restricted by regulations? As a result, a proper Location Detection Technology (LDT) has to be chosen in order to get reliable and accurate positions of the relevant objects. At the highly challenging conditions of the business processes IAEA inspectors are working with, the chosen LDTs have to deliver reliable positioning on ''room-level'' accuracy, even if there is no location enabling infrastructure in place, the objects (people) mostly are indoors and have to work under strong regulations. The presentation will give insights into innovative LI solutions based on technologies of different LDT providers. Pros and cons of combinations of different LDT (like multi- GNSS, IMU, camera, and human interaction based positioning) will be discussed from the

  15. Solute diffusivity in undisturbed soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægdsmand, Mette; Møldrup, Per; Schjønning, Per

    2012-01-01

    Solute diffusivity in soil plays a major role in many important processes with relation to plant growth and environmental issues. Soil solute diffusivity is affected by the volumetric water content as well as the morphological characteristics of water-filled pores. The solute diffusivity in intact...

  16. Bringing Computational Thinking into the High School Science and Math Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trouille, Laura; Beheshti, E.; Horn, M.; Jona, K.; Kalogera, V.; Weintrop, D.; Wilensky, U.; University CT-STEM Project, Northwestern; University CenterTalent Development, Northwestern

    2013-01-01

    Computational thinking (for example, the thought processes involved in developing algorithmic solutions to problems that can then be automated for computation) has revolutionized the way we do science. The Next Generation Science Standards require that teachers support their students’ development of computational thinking and computational modeling skills. As a result, there is a very high demand among teachers for quality materials. Astronomy provides an abundance of opportunities to support student development of computational thinking skills. Our group has taken advantage of this to create a series of astronomy-based computational thinking lesson plans for use in typical physics, astronomy, and math high school classrooms. This project is funded by the NSF Computing Education for the 21st Century grant and is jointly led by Northwestern University’s Center for Interdisciplinary Exploration and Research in Astrophysics (CIERA), the Computer Science department, the Learning Sciences department, and the Office of STEM Education Partnerships (OSEP). I will also briefly present the online ‘Astro Adventures’ courses for middle and high school students I have developed through NU’s Center for Talent Development. The online courses take advantage of many of the amazing online astronomy enrichment materials available to the public, including a range of hands-on activities and the ability to take images with the Global Telescope Network. The course culminates with an independent computational research project.

  17. Saddle point solutions in Yang-Mills-dilaton theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bizon, P.

    1992-01-01

    The coupling of a dilaton to the SU(2)-Yang-Mills field leads to interesting non-perturbative static spherically symmetric solutions which are studied by mixed analytical and numerical methods. In the abelian sector of the theory there are finite-energy magnetic and electric monopole solutions which saturate the Bogomol'nyi bound. In the nonabelian sector there exist a countable family of globally regular solutions which are purely magnetic but have zero Yang-Mills magnetic charge. Their discrete spectrum of energies is bounded from above by the energy of the abelian magnetic monopole with unit magnetic charge. The stability analysis demonstrates that the solutions are saddle points of the energy functional with increasing number of unstable modes. The existence and instability of these solutions are 'explained' by the Morse-theory argument recently proposed by Sudarsky and Wald. (author)

  18. Stability of stationary solutions for inflow problem on the micropolar fluid model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Haiyan

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, we study the asymptotic behavior of solutions to the initial boundary value problem for the micropolar fluid model in a half-line R+:=(0,∞). We prove that the corresponding stationary solutions of the small amplitude to the inflow problem for the micropolar fluid model are time asymptotically stable under small H1 perturbations in both the subsonic and degenerate cases. The microrotation velocity brings us some additional troubles compared with Navier-Stokes equations in the absence of the microrotation velocity. The proof of asymptotic stability is based on the basic energy method.

  19. A POSSIBLE SOLUTION WITH PASSIVE PROTECTION STRUCTURAL RESISTANCE ELEMENTS TO CARGO SHIPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MUNTEANU Ildikó Renata

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The authors are proposing an additional fire protection solution (semi-passive for cargo ships, by inserting in the tubular strength structure (hollow section, some rectangular, thin wall pipes manufactured of copper alloy, filled with cooling fluid, that, once the fire bursts, it will be activated (i.e. will be pumped into a closed circuit; this closed system contains also a well dimensioned radiator. This innovative solution could bring improvements with regard to the classic one, of intumescent paints, by extending the safe period for evacuating people and goods.

  20. Qualification of package units; Qualifizierung von Package Units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brombacher, M.; Walter, U. [Bayer AG, Leverkusen (Germany)

    1999-07-01

    The use of package units in pharmaceutical plants is increasing. If they are involved in the manufacture of pharmaceuticals and have an influence on the quality of the end product, the user is required to validate the processes used. Parallel to the growing demands with respect to the automation of these units, the importance of PCS equipment has increased and with this the necessity for its qualification. Experience to date shows that the manufacturer's awareness of these requirements can be heightened still further. This paper describes approaches for improving the present situation and should be interpreted not as criticism but as providing an opportunity to increase the knowledge base and work together to define solutions which satisfy the guidelines. (orig.) [German] Der Einsatz von Package Units in Pharma-Anlagen erfaehrt zunehmende Verbreitung. Wenn sie an der Herstellung von Arzneimitteln beteiligt sind und auf die Qualitaet des Endprodukts Einfluss nehmen, unterliegen sie der Validierungspflicht, die der Anwender zu gewaehrleisten hat. Entsprechend den wachsenden Anforderungen an die Automatisierung dieser Einheiten ist auch der Stellenwert der PLT-Ausruestung angestiegen und mit ihm die Notwendigkeit von deren Qualifizierung. Die bisherige Praxis zeigt, dass die Sensbilitaet der Hersteller diesen Anforderungen gegenueber noch besser entwickelt werden kann. Der Beitrag zeigt Wege auf, um die derzeitige Situation zu verbessern und sollte nicht als Kritik sondern als Chance aufgefasst werden, den Wissensstand auszugleichen und gemeinsam zu richtliniengerechten Loesungen zu kommen. (orig.)