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Sample records for solutions including ph

  1. Determination Of Ph Including Hemoglobin Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynard, John D.; Hendee, Shonn P.; Rohrscheib, Mark R.; Nunez, David; Alam, M. Kathleen; Franke, James E.; Kemeny, Gabor J.

    2005-09-13

    Methods and apparatuses of determining the pH of a sample. A method can comprise determining an infrared spectrum of the sample, and determining the hemoglobin concentration of the sample. The hemoglobin concentration and the infrared spectrum can then be used to determine the pH of the sample. In some embodiments, the hemoglobin concentration can be used to select an model relating infrared spectra to pH that is applicable at the determined hemoglobin concentration. In other embodiments, a model relating hemoglobin concentration and infrared spectra to pH can be used. An apparatus according to the present invention can comprise an illumination system, adapted to supply radiation to a sample; a collection system, adapted to collect radiation expressed from the sample responsive to the incident radiation; and an analysis system, adapted to relate information about the incident radiation, the expressed radiation, and the hemoglobin concentration of the sample to pH.

  2. Exercises in experimental physics including complete solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleischmann, R.; Loos, G.

    1978-01-01

    This collection of exercises is not only addressed to students of physics but also to scientists of other branches and to engineers. Possibilities are offered to the student to gain control on his growing knowledge from the beginning of his studies until the examination. The individual exercises are linked thematically and are mostly composed by several single tasks. Complete and detailed numerical solutions are presented. The topics covered are: (1) Mechanics, (2) thermodynamics, (3) oscillations and their propagation, (4) electricity and magnetism, (5) atomic physics, and (6) nuclear physics. (KBE)

  3. Metal extraction from Cetraria islandica (L. Ach. lichen using low pH solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANA A. CUCULOVIC

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Extraction of metals (K, Al, Ca, Mg, Fe, Cu, Ba, Zn, Mn and Sr from dry Cetraria islandica (L. Ach. lichen was performed using solutions similar to acid rain (solution A – H2SO4–HNO3–(NH42SO4 and solution B – H2SO4–HNO3–(NH42SO4–NH4NO3. The pH values of these solutions were 2.00, 2.58, 2.87, 3.28, and 3.75. Five consecutive extractions were performed with each solution. In all solutions, the extracted metal content, except Cu and Ca, was the highest in the first extract. The highest percentage of the metals desorbed in the first extraction was obtained using solutions with low pH values, 2.00, 2.58, and 2.87. The lowest percentage in the first extraction was obtained using solutions with pH 3.28 and 3.75, indicating influence of the H+ ion on the extraction. According to the results obtained, the investigated metals form two groups. The first group includes K, Al, Ca, Mg, and Fe. They were extracted in each of the five extractions at each of the pH values. The second group includes Ba, Zn, Mn, Cu, and Sr, which were not all extracted at each pH value. The first group yielded three types of extraction curves when the logarithms of extracted metal amounts were plotted as a function of the number of successive extractions. These effects indicate that three different positions (centres of metal ion accumulation exist in the lichen (due to sorption, complex formation, or other processes present in the tissues.

  4. Effect of nitrogen form and pH of nutrient solution on the changes in pH and EC of spinach rhizosphere in hydroponic culture

    OpenAIRE

    M. Parsazadeh; N. Najafi

    2011-01-01

    In this study, the effect of nitrate to ammonium ratio and pH of nutrient solution on the changes in pH and EC of rhizosphere during spinach growth period in perlite culture, under greenhouse conditions, was investigated. A split factorial experiment in a completely randomized design with four replications was conducted with three factors including nutrient solution’s pH in three levels (4.5, 6.5 and 8), nitrate to ammonium ratio of nutrient solution in five levels (100:0, 75:25, 50:50, 25:75...

  5. A solid-state pH sensor for nonaqueous media including ionic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Brianna C; Winther-Jensen, Orawan; Winther-Jensen, Bjorn; MacFarlane, Douglas R

    2013-04-02

    We describe a solid state electrode structure based on a biologically derived proton-active redox center, riboflavin (RFN). The redox reaction of RFN is a pH-dependent process that requires no water. The electrode was fabricated using our previously described 'stuffing' method to entrap RFN into vapor phase polymerized poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene). The electrode is shown to be capable of measuring the proton activity in the form of an effective pH over a range of different water contents including nonaqueous systems and ionic liquids (ILs). This demonstrates that the entrapment of the redox center facilitates direct electron communication with the polymer. This work provides a miniaturizable system to determine pH (effective) in nonaqueous systems as well as in ionic liquids. The ability to measure pH (effective) is an important step toward the ability to customize ILs with suitable pH (effective) for catalytic reactions and biotechnology applications such as protein preservation.

  6. Ionic liquids, electrolyte solutions including the ionic liquids, and energy storage devices including the ionic liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gering, Kevin L.; Harrup, Mason K.; Rollins, Harry W.

    2015-12-08

    An ionic liquid including a phosphazene compound that has a plurality of phosphorus-nitrogen units and at least one pendant group bonded to each phosphorus atom of the plurality of phosphorus-nitrogen units. One pendant group of the at least one pendant group comprises a positively charged pendant group. Additional embodiments of ionic liquids are disclosed, as are electrolyte solutions and energy storage devices including the embodiments of the ionic liquid.

  7. Electrolyte solutions including a phosphoranimine compound, and energy storage devices including same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaehn, John R.; Dufek, Eric J.; Rollins, Harry W.; Harrup, Mason K.; Gering, Kevin L.

    2017-09-12

    An electrolyte solution comprising at least one phosphoranimine compound and a metal salt. The at least one phosphoranimine compound comprises a compound of the chemical structure ##STR00001## where X is an organosilyl group or a tert-butyl group and each of R.sup.1, R.sup.2, and R.sup.3 is independently selected from the group consisting of an alkyl group, an aryl group, an alkoxy group, or an aryloxy group. An energy storage device including the electrolyte solution is also disclosed.

  8. The effect of pH on phosphorus availability and speciation in an aquaponics nutrient solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerozi, Brunno da Silva; Fitzsimmons, Kevin

    2016-11-01

    The interaction between the main ions in aquaponics nutrient solutions affects chemical composition and availability of nutrients, and nutrient uptake by plant roots. This study determined the effect of pH on phosphorus (P) speciation and availability in an aquaponics nutrient solution and used Visual MINTEQ to simulate P species and P activity. In both experimental and simulated results, P availability decreased with increase in pH of aquaponics nutrient solutions. According to simulations, P binds to several cations leaving less free phosphate ions available in solution. High pH values resulted in the formation of insoluble calcium phosphate species. The study also demonstrated the importance of organic matter and alkalinity in keeping free phosphate ions in solution at high pH ranges. It is recommended though that pH in aquaponics systems is maintained at a 5.5-7.2 range for optimal availability and uptake by plants. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Effect of pH value of applied solution on radioiodine sorption by soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szabova, T.

    1976-01-01

    Sorption of radioiodine by soils was followed under static conditions at different pH values of the initial solution in five soil types. Sorption of radioiodine by soils is affected by the amount of the organic mass and by the pH of solutions. With the same pH, soils containing a higher amount of the organic mass absorb more radioiodine. The highest sorption percentage of 131 I - for all pH values was found in meadow chernozem soil and the lowest in the rendzina and in carboniferous meadow soils. The highest sorption of 131 I - for degraded chernozem, meadow chernozem soils and brown soil was recorded at pH 5 and for carboniferous meadow soil and rendzina at pH 7. (author)

  10. A generalised solution for step-drawdown tests including flow ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    drinie

    2001-07-03

    Jul 3, 2001 ... interpreted as the theoretical solution of the groundwater flow equation for the .... and gravity force the water to flow from the rock matrix to the fracture. ..... Computational Mechanics Publications, Southampton. CLOOT AHJ ...

  11. Computer model of hydroponics nutrient solution pH control using ammonium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitts, M; Stutte, G

    1999-01-01

    A computer simulation of a hydroponics-based plant growth chamber using ammonium to control pH was constructed to determine the feasibility of such a system. In nitrate-based recirculating hydroponics systems, the pH will increase as plants release hydroxide ions into the nutrient solution to maintain plant charge balance. Ammonium is an attractive alternative to traditional pH controls in an ALSS, but requires careful monitoring and control to avoid overdosing the plants with ammonium. The primary advantage of using NH4+ for pH control is that it exploits the existing plant nutrient uptake charge balance mechanisms to maintain solution pH. The simulation models growth, nitrogen uptake, and pH of a l-m2 stand of wheat. Simulation results indicated that ammonium-based control of nutrient solution pH is feasible using a proportional integral controller. Use of a 1 mmol/L buffer (Ka = 1.6 x 10(-6)) in the nutrient solution is required.

  12. Peroxidase-mediated polymerization of 1-naphthol: impact of solution pH and ionic strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandari, Alok; Xu, Fangxiang; Koch, David E; Hunter, Robert P

    2009-01-01

    Peroxidase-mediated oxidation has been proposed as a treatment method for naphthol-contaminated water. However, the impact of solution chemistry on naphthol polymerization and removal has not been documented. This research investigated the impact of pH and ionic strength on peroxidase-mediated removal of 1-naphthol in completely mixed batch reactors. The impact of hydrogen peroxide to 1-naphthol ratio and activity of horseradish peroxidase was also studied. Size exclusion chromatography was used to estimate the molecular weight distribution of oligomeric products, and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry was used to estimate product structure. Naphthol transformation decreased with ionic strength, and substrate removal was lowest at neutral pHs. Solution pH influenced the size and the composition of the oligomeric products. An equimolar ratio of H(2)O(2):naphthol was sufficient for optimal naphthol removal. Polymerization products included naphthoquinones and oligomers derived from two, three, and four naphthol molecules. Our results illustrate the importance of water chemistry when considering a peroxidase-based approach for treatment of naphthol-contaminated waters.

  13. Canonical correlation of waste glass compositions and durability, including pH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oeksoy, D.; Pye, L.D.; Bickford, D.F.; Ramsey, W.G.

    1993-01-01

    Control of waste glass durability is a major concern in the immobilization of radioactive and mixed wastes. Leaching rate in standardized laboratory tests is being used as a demonstration of consistency of the response of waste glasses in the final disposal environment. The leaching of silicate and borosilicate glasses containing alkali or alkaline earth elements is known to be autocatalytic, in that the initial ion exchange of alkali in the glass for hydrogen ions in water results in the formation of OH and increases the pH of the leachate. The increased pH then increases the rate of silicate network attack, accelerating the leaching effect. In well formulated glasses this effect reaches a thermodynamic equilibrium when leachate saturation of a critical species, such as silica, or a dynamic equilibrium is reached when the pH shift caused by incremental leaching has negligible effect on pH. This report analyzes results of a seven leach test on waste glasses

  14. Considerations on prevention of phlebitis and venous pain from intravenous prostaglandin E(1) administration by adjusting solution pH: in vitro manipulations affecting pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohno, Emiko; Nishikata, Mayumi; Okamura, Noboru; Matsuyama, Kenji

    2008-01-01

    Prostaglandin E(1) (PGE(1); Alprostadil Alfadex) is a potent vasodilator and inhibitor of platelet aggregation used to treat patients with peripheral vascular disease. The main adverse effects of intravenous PGE(1) administration, phlebitis and venous pain, arise from the unphysiologically low pH of infusion solutions. When PGE(1) infusion solutions with a pH value greater then 6 are used, phlebitis and venous pain are considered to be avoidable. Beginning with a PGE(1) infusion solution with pH greater than 6, we add the amount of 7% sodium bicarbonate needed to bring the solution to pH 7.4 if phlebitis or venous pain develops. In the present study we established a convenient nomogram showing the relationship between the titratable acidity of various infusion solutions and the volume of 7% sodium bicarbonate required to attain pH 7.4 for preventing the phlebitis and venous pain associated with PGE(1) infusion.

  15. Influence of pH of spray solution on optoelectronic properties of cadmium oxide thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodlur, R. M.; Rabinal, M. K.

    2015-01-01

    Highly conducting transparent cadmium oxide thin films were prepared by the conventional spray pyrolysis technique. The pH of the spray solution is varied by adding ammonia/hydrochloric acid. The effect of pH on the morphology, crystallinity and optoelectronic properties of these films is studied. The structural analysis showed all the films in the cubic phase. For the films with pH < 7 (acidic condition), the preferred orientation is along the (111) direction and for those with pH >7 (alkaline condition), the preferred orientation is along the (200) direction. A lowest resistivity of 9.9 × 10 −4 Ω·cm (with carrier concentration = 5.1 × 10 20 cm −3 , mobility = 12.4 cm 2 /(V·s)) is observed for pH ≈ 12. The resistivity is tuned almost by three orders of magnitude by controlling the bath pH with optical transmittance more than 70%. Thus, the electrical conductivity of CdO films could be easily tuned by simply varying the pH of the spray solution without compromising the optical transparency. (paper)

  16. Solution of neutron slowing down equation including multiple inelastic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Wakil, S.A.; Saad, A.E.

    1977-01-01

    The present work is devoted the presentation of an analytical method for the calculation of elastically and inelastically slowed down neutrons in an infinite non absorbing homogeneous medium. On the basis of the Central limit theory (CLT) and the integral transform technique the slowing down equation including inelastic scattering in terms of the Green function of elastic scattering is solved. The Green function is decomposed according to the number of collisions. A formula for the flux at any lethargy O (u) after any number of collisions is derived. An equation for the asymptotic flux is also obtained

  17. Effect of Solution pH on the Adsorption of Paracetamol on Chemically Modified Activated Carbons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Bernal

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Paracetamol adsorption in acidic, neutral and basic media on three activated carbons with different chemistry surfaces was studied. A granular activated carbon (GAC was prepared from coconut shell; starting from this sample, an oxidized activated carbon (GACo was obtained by treating the GAC with a boiling solution of 6 M nitric acid, so to generate a greater number of oxygenated surface groups. In addition, a reduced activated carbon (GACr was obtained by heating the GAC at 1173 K, to remove the oxygenated surface groups. Paracetamol adsorption was higher for GACr due to the lower presence of oxygenated surface functional groups. Moreover, adsorption was highest at neutral pH. The magnitude of the interactions between paracetamol molecules and activated carbons was studied by measuring the immersion enthalpies of activated carbons in solution of paracetamol at different concentrations and pH values and by calculating the interaction enthalpy. The highest value was obtained for GACr in a paracetamol solution of 1000 mg L−1 at pH 7, confirming that paracetamol adsorption is favoured on basic activated carbons at pH values near to neutrality. Finally, the Gibbs energy changes confirmed the latter result, allowing explaining the different magnitudes of the interactions between paracetamol and activated carbons, as a function of solution pH.

  18. Effect of pH Upper Control Limit on Nutrient Solution Component and Water Spinach Growth under Hydroponics

    OpenAIRE

    Xuzhang Xue; Yinkun Li; Feng Li; Fang Zhang; Wenzhong Guo

    2015-01-01

    In this study, experiment with four levels of nutrient solution pH control upper limit was conducted to explore the optimal nutrient solution pH management scheme under hydroponics by evaluating the nutrient solution characters i.e., pH, Electric Conductivity (EC), nitrate, soluble phosphorus (soluble-P), water spinach growth and quality. The results showed that the nutrient solution pH was 8.2 and unsuitable for water spinach growth under the treatment with no pH regulation during the experi...

  19. From proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectra to pH. Assessment of {sup 1}H NMR pH indicator compound set for deuterium oxide solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tynkkynen, Tuulia, E-mail: tuulia.tynkkynen@uku.fi [Laboratory of Chemistry, Department of Biosciences, University of Kuopio, PO Box 1627, 70211 Kuopio (Finland); Tiainen, Mika; Soininen, Pasi; Laatikainen, Reino [Laboratory of Chemistry, Department of Biosciences, University of Kuopio, PO Box 1627, 70211 Kuopio (Finland)

    2009-08-19

    In this study, a protocol for pH determination from D{sub 2}O samples using {sup 1}H NMR pH indicator compounds was developed and assessed by exploring the pH-dependency of 13 compounds giving pH-dependent {sup 1}H NMR signals. The indicators cover the pH range from pH* 0 to 7.2. Equations to transform the indicator chemical shifts to pH estimates are given here for acetic acid, formic acid, chloroacetic acid, dichloroacetic acid, creatine, creatinine, glycine, histidine, 1,2,4-triazole, and TSP (2,2,3,3-tetradeutero-3-(trimethylsilyl)-propionic acid). To characterize the method in presence of typical solutes, the effects of common metabolites, albumin and ionic strength were also evaluated. For the ionic strengths, the effects were also modelled. The experiments showed that the use of pH sensitive {sup 1}H NMR chemical shifts allows the pH determination of typical metabolite solutions with accuracy of 0.01-0.05 pH units. Also, when the ionic strength is known with accuracy better than 0.1 mol dm{sup -3} and the solute concentrations are low, pH{sub nmr}{sup *} (the NMR estimate of pH) can be assumed to be within 0.05 pH units from potentiometrically determined pH.

  20. Corrosion studies of thermally sensitised AGR fuel element brace in pH7 and pH9.2 borate solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyfield, S.P.; Smith, C.A.

    1987-04-01

    Brace and cladding of AGR fuel elements sensitised in reactor are susceptible to intergranular and crevice corrosion, which may initiate in the pH7 borate pond storage environment of CEGB/SSEB stations. This report considers the benefit in corrosion control that is provided by raising the pond solution pH to 9.2, whilst maintaining the boron level at 1250 gm -3 . The greater corrosion protection provided by pH9.2 solution compared to the pH7 borate solution is demonstrated by a series of tests with non-active laboratory sensitised brace samples exposed to solutions dosed with chloride or sulphate in order to promote localised corrosion. The corrosion tests undertaken consisted of 5000 hour immersions at 32 0 C and shorter term electrochemically monitored experiments (rest potential, impedance, anodic current) generally conducted at 22 0 C. The pH9.2 solution effectively inhibited the initiation of crevice and intergranular corrosion in the presence of low levels of chloride and sulphate, whereas the pH7 solution did not always do so. However, the pH9.2 solution, dosed with 40 gm -3 chloride, failed to suppress fully crevice corrosion initiated in unborated 40 gm -3 chloride solution at 22 0 C. Fluoride is not deleterious at low levels ∼ 10 gm -3 in the borate solutions. The significant improvement in corrosion control demonstrated for the change from pH7 to pH9.2 borate solution on laboratory sensitised brace samples should ideally be confirmed using complete irradiated AGR fuel elements. (U.K.)

  1. Automated pH Control of Nutrient Solution in a Hydroponic Plant Growth System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, B.; Dogan, N.; Aglan, H.; Mortley, D.; Loretan, P.

    1998-01-01

    Over, the years, NASA has played an important role in providing to and the development of automated nutrient delivery and monitoring, systems for growing crops hydroponically for long term space missions. One example are the systems used in the Biomass Production Chamber (BPC) at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). The current KSC monitoring system is based on an engineering workstation using standard analog/digital input/output hardware and custom written software. The monitoring system uses completely separate sensors to provide a check of control sensor accuracy and has the ability to graphically display and store data form past experiment so that they are available for data analysis [Fortson, 1992]. In many cases, growing systems have not been fitted with the kind of automated control systems as used at KSC. The Center for Food and Environmental Systems for Human Exploration of Space (CFESH) located on the campus of Tuskegee University, has effectively grown sweetpotatoes and peanuts hydroponically for the past five years. However they have adjusted the pH electrical conductivity and volume of the hydroponic nutrient solution only manually at times when the solution was to be replenished or changed out according to its protocol (e.g. one-week, two-week, or two-day cycle). But the pH of the nutrient solution flowing through the channel is neither known nor controlled between the update, change out, or replenishment period. Thus, the pH of the nutrient solution is not held at an optimum level over the span of the plant's growth cycle. To solve this dilemma, an automated system for the control and data logging of pH data relative to sweetpotato production using the nutrient film technique (NFT) has been developed, This paper discusses a microprocessor-based system, which was designed to monitor, control, and record the pH of a nutrient solution used for growing sweetpotatoes using NFT.

  2. Solution and surface chemistry of the Se(IV)-Fe(0) reactions: Effect of initial solution pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Xuefen; Ling, Lan; Zhang, Wei-Xian

    2017-02-01

    Aspects of solution and solid-phase reactions between selenite (Se(IV)) and nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) were investigated. Experimental results on the effects of initial solution pH, formation and evolution of nZVI corrosion products, and speciation of selenium in nZVI were presented. In general, the rate of Se(IV) removal decreases with increasing initial pH. The observed rate constants of Se(IV) removal decreased from 0.3530 to 0.0364 min -1 as pH increased from 4.0 to 10.0. Composition and morphology of nZVI corrosion products and selenium species were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Results confirmed that Se(IV) was reduced to Se(0) and Se(-II) by nZVI. Lower solution pH favored further reduction of Se(0) to Se(-II). Amorphous FeOOH, magnetite/maghemite (Fe 3 O 4 /γ-Fe 2 O 3 ) and ferrous hydroxide (Fe(OH) 2 ) were identified as the main corrosion products. Under alkaline conditions, the corrosion products were mainly of Fe(OH) 2 along with small amounts of Fe 3 O 4 , while nZVI in acidic solutions was oxidized to mostly Fe 3 O 4 and amorphous FeOOH. Furthermore, these corrosion products acted as intermediates for electron transfer and reactive/sorptive sites for Se(IV) adsorption and reduction, thus played a crucial role in the removal of aqueous Se(IV). Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Calorimetric and diffractometric evidence for the sequential crystallization of buffer components and the consequential pH swing in frozen solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundaramurthi, Prakash; Shalaev, Evgenyi; Suryanarayanan, Raj

    2010-04-15

    Sequential crystallization of succinate buffer components in the frozen solution has been studied by differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffractometry (both laboratory and synchrotron sources). The consequential pH shifts were monitored using a low-temperature electrode. When a solution buffered to pH pK(a)(2), the freeze-concentrate pH first decreased and then increased due to the sequential crystallization of the basic (disodium succinate) followed by the acidic (monosodium succinate and succinic acid) buffer components. XRD provided direct evidence of the crystallization events in the frozen buffer solutions, including the formation of disodium succinate hexahydrate [Na(2)(CH(2)COO)(2).6H(2)O]. When the frozen solution was warmed in a differential scanning calorimeter, multiple endotherms attributable to the melting of buffer components and ice were observed. When the frozen solutions were dried under reduced pressure, ice sublimation was followed by dehydration of the crystalline hexahydrate to a poorly crystalline anhydrate. However, crystalline succinic acid and monosodium succinate were retained in the final lyophiles. The pH and the buffer salt concentration of the prelyo solution influenced the crystalline salt content in the final lyophile. The direction and magnitude of the pH shift in the frozen solution depended on both the initial pH and the buffer concentration. In light of the pH-sensitive nature of a significant fraction of pharmaceuticals (especially proteins), extreme care is needed in both the buffer selection and its concentration.

  4. 76 FR 81986 - Honeywell International, Inc., Automation and Control Solutions Division, Including On-Site...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-29

    ..., Inc., Automation and Control Solutions Division, Including On-Site Leased Workers From Manpower...., Automation and Control Solutions Division. The Department has determined that these workers were sufficiently...., Automation and Control Solutions Division, including on-site leased workers from Manpower, Spherion...

  5. Characterizing the correlation between dephosphorization and solution pH in a calcined water treatment plant sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhenming; Liu, Qidi; Li, Shuwen; Li, Fei; Zou, Jing; Liao, Xiaobin; Yuan, Baoling; Sun, Wenjie

    2018-04-26

    This study focused on characterizing the correlation between the dephosphorization process of calcined water treatment plant sludge (C-WTPS) and the solution initial pH in batch experiments. The specific aim was to illustrate the effect of different initial pH on the adsorption and desorption of phosphorous in C-WTPS. In addition, the effects of solution initial pH on the release of ammonia nitrogen and total organic carbon (TOC) from C-WTPS and the change of pH after adsorption were also investigated. The results demonstrated that the initial pH significantly influenced the adsorption of phosphorus on C-WTPS. When initial pH was increased from 3 to 10, the phosphorous absorption capacity reduced by 76.5%. Especially, when the initial pH reached to 11, the phosphorus adsorption capacity became a negative value, indicating that C-WTPS released phosphorus into the solution. The addition of C-WTPS to the solution had little impact on the initial pH of the solution. The absorbed phosphorous on C-WTPS was relatively stable in the pH range of 3 to 10. Nevertheless, when the solution pH was higher than 11, it can be easily released into the solution. Furthermore, by comparison with WTPS, C-WTPS released less ammonia nitrogen and TOC into the solution and adsorbed more phosphorus from the solution in the experimental pH range. Therefore, C-WTPS is more suitable to serve as a cost-effective sorbent for phosphorus removal.

  6. 76 FR 13666 - Pitney Bowes, Inc., Mailing Solutions Management, Global Engineering Group, Including On-Site...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-14

    ...., Mailing Solutions Management, Global Engineering Group, Including On-Site Leased Workers From Guidant... workers and former workers of Pitney Bowes, Inc., Mailing Solutions Management Division, Engineering... reviewed the certification to clarify the subject worker group's identity. Additional information revealed...

  7. Effect of Nitrogen Form and pH of Nutrient Solution on the Shoot Concentration of Phosphorus, Nitrate, and Nitrogen of Spinach in Hydroponic Culture

    OpenAIRE

    N. Najafi; M. Parsazadeh

    2010-01-01

    In order to study the effect of nitrogen form and pH of nutrient solution on the shoot concentration of P, nitrate, organic N + inorganic ammonium, and total N of spinach, a factorial experiment was conducted with two factors including pH of nutrient solution in three levels (4.5, 6.5 and 8.0) and nitrate to ammonium ratio of nutrient solution in five levels (100:0, 75:25, 50:50, 25:75 and 0:100). This factorial experiment was carried out in a completely randomized design with four replicatio...

  8. Biodesulfurization of vanadium-bearing titanomagnetite concentrates and pH control of bioleaching solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao-rong; Jiang, Sheng-cai; Liu, Yan-jun; Li, Hui; Wang, Hua-jun

    2013-10-01

    Vanadium-bearing titanomagnetite concentrates were desulfurized with Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans ( A. ferrooxidans). The sulfur content of the concentrates was reduced from 0.69wt% to 0.14wt% after bioleaching for 15 d with a 10% pulp density at 30°C. Maintaining a stable pH value during biodesulfurization was critical because of high acid consumption, resulting from a combination of nonoxidative and oxidative dissolution of pyrrhotite in acid solution. It is discovered that the citric acid-disodium hydrogen phosphate buffer of pH 2.0 can control the solution pH value smoothly in the optimal range of 2.0-3.0 for A. ferrooxidans growth. Using the buffer in the volume fraction range of 5.0%-15.0% stimulates A. ferrooxidans growth and improves the biodesulfurization efficiency. Compared with the buffer-free control case, the maximum increase of biodesulfurization rate is 29.7% using a 10.0vol% buffer. Bioleaching provides an alternative process for desulfurization of vanadium-bearing titanomagnetite ores.

  9. 75 FR 77664 - Honeywell International, Inc., Automation and Control Solutions Division, Including On-Site...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-13

    ..., Inc., Automation and Control Solutions Division, Including On-Site Leased Workers From Manpower... Solutions Division. The Department has determined that these workers were sufficiently under the control of Honeywell International, Inc., Automation and Control Solutions Division to be considered leased workers...

  10. 78 FR 19530 - Eastman Kodak Company (GCG), Electrographic Print Solutions, Including On-Site Leased Workers...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    ... Kodak Company (GCG), Electrographic Print Solutions, Including On-Site Leased Workers From Adecco and Datrose, Spencerport, New York; Eastman Kodak Company, IPS, Including On-Site Leased Workers From Adecco..., 2011, applicable to workers of Eastman Kodak Company (GCG), Electrographic Print Solutions, including...

  11. Temperature and pH driven association in uranyl aqueous solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Druchok

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available An association behavior of uranyl ions in aqueous solutions is explored. For this purpose a set of all-atom molecular dynamics simulations is performed. During the simulation, the fractions of uranyl ions involved in dimer and trimer formations were monitored. To accompany the fraction statistics one also collected distributions characterizing average times of the dimer and trimer associates. Two factors effecting the uranyl association were considered: temperature and pH. As one can expect, an increase of the temperature decreases an uranyl capability of forming the associates, thus lowering bound fractions/times and vice versa. The effect of pH was modeled by adding H+ or OH- ions to a "neutral" solution. The addition of hydroxide ions OH- favors the formation of the associates, thus increasing bound times and fractions. The extra H+ ions in a solution produce an opposite effect, thus lowering the uranyl association capability. We also made a structural analysis for all the observed associates to reveal the mutual orientation of the uranyl ions.

  12. 78 FR 25304 - Siemens Medical Solutions, USA, Inc., Oncology Care Systems (Radiation Oncology), Including On...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-30

    ..., USA, Inc., Oncology Care Systems (Radiation Oncology), Including On-Site Leased Workers From Source... Medical Solutions, USA, Inc., Oncology Care Systems (Radiation Oncology), including on- site leased... of February 2013, Siemens Medical Solutions, USA, Inc., Oncology Care Systems (Radiation Oncology...

  13. Revealing the Dimeric Crystal and Solution Structure of β-Lactoglobulin at pH 4 and Its pH and Salt Dependent Monomer–Dimer Equilibrium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khan, Sanaullah; Ipsen, Richard; Almdal, Kristoffer

    2018-01-01

    The dimeric structure of bovine β-lactoglobulin A (BLGA) at pH 4.0 was solved to 2.0 Å resolution. Fitting the BLGA pH 4.0 structure to SAXS data at low ionic strength (goodness of fit R-factor = 3.6%) verified the dimeric state in solution. Analysis of the monomer–dimer equilibrium at varying pH...... and ionic strength by SAXS and scattering modeling showed that BLGA is dimeric at pH 3.0 and 4.0, shifting toward a monomer at pH 2.2, 2.6, and 7.0 yielding monomer/dimer ratios of 80/20%, 50/50%, and 25/75%, respectively. BLGA remained a dimer at pH 3.0 and 4.0 in 50–150 mM NaCl, whereas the electrostatic...... shielding raised the dimer content at pH 2.2, 2.6, and 7.0, i.e., below and above the pI. Overall, the findings provide new insights into the molecular characteristics of BLGA relevant for dairy product formulations and for various biotechnological and pharmaceutical applications....

  14. Migration characteristics of cobalt-60 through sandy soil in high pH solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnuki, Toshihiko

    1992-01-01

    Migration characteristics of 60 Co through sandy soil in high pH solution has been investigated by both column and batch techniques. The association of 60 Co with the sandy soil and its components were studied by sequential extraction techniques. The concentration profile of 60 Co in the sandy soil column was composed of two exponential curves showing that 60 Co would consist of immobile and mobile fractions. The immobile 60 Co was retained by the sandy soil and was distributed near the top. Though the mobile 60 Co was little sorbed by soil and migrated through the soil column, maximum concentration of 60 Co in the effluents decreased slightly with increasing path length of the soil column. The sequential extraction of 60 Co from the sandy soil and from its components showed that 60 Co was sorbed by both manganese oxide and clay minerals. And manganese oxide is one of the responsible soil components for the observed decrease in the maximum concentration of 60 Co in the effluents. Although the content of manganese oxide in the sandy soil was 0.13%, manganese oxide is the important component to prevent from the migration of 60 Co in the high pH solution. (author)

  15. Unusual Salt and pH Induced Changes in Polyethylenimine Solutions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly A Curtis

    Full Text Available Linear PEI is a cationic polymer commonly used for complexing DNA into nanoparticles for cell-transfection and gene-therapy applications. The polymer has closely-spaced amines with weak-base protonation capacity, and a hydrophobic backbone that is kept unaggregated by intra-chain repulsion. As a result, in solution PEI exhibits multiple buffering mechanisms, and polyelectrolyte states that shift between aggregated and free forms. We studied the interplay between the aggregation and protonation behavior of 2.5 kDa linear PEI by pH probing, vapor pressure osmometry, dynamic light scattering, and ninhydrin assay. Our results indicate that: At neutral pH, the PEI chains are associated and the addition of NaCl initially reduces and then increases the extent of association.The aggregate form is uncollapsed and co-exists with the free chains.PEI buffering occurs due to continuous or discontinuous charging between stalled states.Ninhydrin assay tracks the number of unprotonated amines in PEI.The size of PEI-DNA complexes is not significantly affected by the free vs. aggregated state of the PEI polymer. Despite its simple chemical structure, linear PEI displays intricate solution dynamics, which can be harnessed for environment-sensitive biomaterials and for overcoming current challenges with DNA delivery.

  16. A study of specific sorption of neptunium(V) on smectite in low pH solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozai, Naofumi; Ohnuki, Toshihiko; Matsumoto, Junko; Banba, Tsunetaka; Ito, Yoshimoto

    1996-01-01

    The 'specific sorption' of neptunium(V) on smectite, in other words, a strong sorption undesorbable by 1 M KCl, is studied with a combination of batch type sorption and desorption experiments over a pH range of 2 to 5. Six types of homoionic smectite (Li-, Na-, K-, Cs-, Mg-, and Ca-smectite) are used in this study. Distribution coefficients (K d ) of neptunium for smectite vary over a wide pH range; the maximum K d value of ∝300 cm 3 x g -1 at around pH 2 for Li- and Na-smectite and the minimum value of ∝2 cm 3 x g -1 for Cs-smectite. The specific sorption of neptunium depends on pH and on the affinity of the exchangeable cation for smectite; the lower the pH of solution or the affinity, the larger the specific sorption. The neptunium-smectite association varies with the elapse of contact time. Within the first day of the neptunium-smectite contact the neptunium sorbed on na-smectite at low pH is desorbable by 1 M KCl solution, and on the passage of time most of the neuptunium sorbed becomes undesorbable by KCl (the specific sorption). Hydronium ion in solution is sorbed on smectite at low pH and dissociates the exchangeable cation from smectite into solution, and the specific sorption of neuptunium increases with increasing the exchangeable cation that is dissociated from smectite. (orig.)

  17. THE PREDICTION OF pH BY GIBBS FREE ENERGY MINIMIZATION IN THE SUMP SOLUTION UNDER LOCA CONDITION OF PWR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HYOUNGJU YOON

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available It is required that the pH of the sump solution should be above 7.0 to retain iodine in a liquid phase and be within the material compatibility constraints under LOCA condition of PWR. The pH of the sump solution can be determined by conventional chemical equilibrium constants or by the minimization of Gibbs free energy. The latter method developed as a computer code called SOLGASMIX-PV is more convenient than the former since various chemical components can be easily treated under LOCA conditions. In this study, SOLGASMIX-PV code was modified to accommodate the acidic and basic materials produced by radiolysis reactions and to calculate the pH of the sump solution. When the computed pH was compared with measured by the ORNL experiment to verify the reliability of the modified code, the error between two values was within 0.3 pH. Finally, two cases of calculation were performed for the SKN 3&4 and UCN 1&2. As results, pH of the sump solution for the SKN 3&4 was between 7.02 and 7.45, and for the UCN 1&2 plant between 8.07 and 9.41. Furthermore, it was found that the radiolysis reactions have insignificant effects on pH because the relative concentrations of HCl, HNO3, and Cs are very low.

  18. Adsorption of phenol by activated carbon: Influence of activation methods and solution pH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beker, Ulker; Ganbold, Batchimeg; Dertli, Halil; Guelbayir, Dilek Duranoglu

    2010-01-01

    Cherry stone based activated carbon derived from a canning industry was evaluated for its ability to remove phenol from an aqueous solution in a batch process. A comparative adsorption on the uptake of phenol by using commercial activated carbon (Chemviron CPG-LF), and two non-functional commercial polymeric adsorbents (MN-200 and XAD-2) containing a styrene-divinylbenzene macroporous hyperreticulated network have been also examined. Equilibrium studies were conducted in 25 mg L -1 initial phenol concentrations, 6.5-9 solution pH and at temperature of 30 deg. C. The experimental data were analyzed by the Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models. Besides, the cherry stone based activated carbons were carried out by using zinc chloride and KOH activation agents at different chemical ratios (activating agent/precursor), to develop carbons with well-developed porosity. The cherry stone activated carbon prepared using KOH as a chemical agent showed a high surface area. According to the results, activated carbons had excellent adsorptive characteristics in comparison with polymeric sorbents and commercial activated carbon for the phenol removal from the aqueous solutions.

  19. Effect of Nutrition Solution pH and Electrical Conductivity on Fusarium Wilt on Strawberry Plants in Hydroponic Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myeong Hyeon Nam

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Fusarium wilt on strawberry plants caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. fragariae (Fof is a major disease in Korea. The prevalence of this disease is increasing, especially in hydroponic cultivation in strawberry field. This study assessed the effect of nutrition solution pH and electrical conductivity (EC on Fusarium wilt in vitro and in field trials. pH levels of 5.0, 5.5, 6.0, 6.5, 7.0, and 7.5 were assayed in vitro and in field trials. EC levels at 0, 0.5, 0.8, 1.0, and 1.5 dS∙m⁻¹ were assayed in field trials. Mycelial growth of Fof increased with increasing pH and was highest at 25°C pH 7 and lowest at 20°C, pH 5.0 in vitro. The incidence of Fusarium wilt was lowest in the pH 6.5 treatment and highest in the pH 5 treatment in field trials. At higher pH levels, the EC decreased in the drain solution and the potassium content of strawberry leaves increased. In the EC assay, the severity of Fusarium wilt and nitrogen content of leaves increased as the EC increased. These results indicate that Fusarium wilt is related to pH and EC in hydroponic culture of strawberry plants.

  20. Gammaradiation effect on spectral properties of oxyhemoglobin solutions of different pH in the presence of serotonin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artyukhov, V.G.

    1979-01-01

    Changes in spectral properties of oxyhemoglobin solutions (pH 3 to 12) of mice exposed to gammaradiation (6000R) in the presence of serotonin have been studied. It was established that serotonin (5x10 -5 M) exerts a radioprotective effect in respect of oxyhemoglobin solutions of pH 5 to 9. Serotonin fails to protect protein in the presence of catalase (1x10 -6 M). It is stated that the process of formation of hydrogen peroxide/serotonin complex appreciably contributes to the protective action of the radioprotective agent in respect of gammairradiated oxyhemoglobin solutions

  1. Effect of initial pH and temperature of iron salt solutions on formation of magnetite nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gnanaprakash, G. [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Mahadevan, S. [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Jayakumar, T. [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Kalyanasundaram, P. [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Philip, John [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India)]. E-mail: philip@igcar.gov.in; Raj, Baldev [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India)

    2007-05-15

    We report the effect of initial pH and temperature of iron salt solutions on formation of magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles during co-precipitation. We synthesized nanoparticles by keeping the initial pH at 0.7, 1.5, 3.0, 4.7, 5.7, 6.7 for two different temperatures of 30 and 60 deg. C. When the initial pH (prior to alkali addition) of the salt solution was below 5, the nanoparticles formed were 100% spinel iron oxide. Average size of the magnetite particles increases with initial pH until ferrihydrite is formed at a pH of 3 and the size remains the same till 4.7 pH. The percentage of goethite formed along with non-stoichiometric magnetite was 35 and 78%, respectively, when the initial pH of the solution was 5.7 and 6.7. As the reaction temperature was increased to 60 deg. C, maintaining a pH of 6.7, the amount of goethite increased from 78 to 100%. These results show that the initial pH and temperature of the ferrous and ferric salt solution before initiation of the precipitation reaction are critical parameters controlling the composition and size of nanoparticles formed. We characterize the samples using X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and vibrating sample magnetometer. The results of the present work provide the right conditions to synthesis pure magnetite nanoparticles, without goethite impurities, through co-precipitation technique for ferrofluid applications.

  2. Effects of pH on the stability of cyanidin and cyanidin 3-O-β-glucopyranoside in aqueous solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakić Violeta P.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The colour variation, colour intensity and stability at various pH values (2.0, 4.0, 7.0 and 9.0 of cyanidin 3-O-β-glucopyranoside (Cy3Glc and its aglycone cyanidin was investigated during a period of 8 hours storage at 25ºC. Our data showed that pH of aqueous solution had impact on spectroscopic profile of cyanidin and Cy3Glc. Beginning with the most acidic solutions, increasing the pH induce bathochromic shifts of absorbance maximum in the visible range for all examined pH values (with the exception pH 4.0 for cyanidin, while the presence of the 3-glucosidic substitution induce hypsochromic shift. Compared to cyanidin, Cy3Glc has higher colour intensity and higher stability in the whole pH range, except at pH 7.0. The 3-glucosidic substitution influences on the colour intensity of Cy3Glc in the alkaline region. After 8-hour incubation of Cy3Glc and cyanidin at pH 2.0 and 25 ºC, 99% of Cy3Glc and only 27% of cyanidin remained unchanged.

  3. 78 FR 28642 - Eastman Kodak Company, Electrographic Print Solutions, Including On-Site Leased Workers From...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-15

    ... Kodak Company, Electrographic Print Solutions, Including On-Site Leased Workers From Adecco and Datrose, Spencerport, New York; Eastman Kodak Company, IPS, Including On-Site Leased Workers From Adecco, Dayton, Ohio... Trade Adjustment Assistance (TAA) filed on behalf of Eastman Kodak Company, Electrographic Print...

  4. Integrating chemical imaging of cationic trace metal solutes and pH into a single hydrogel layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoefer, Christoph; Santner, Jakob; Borisov, Sergey M.; Wenzel, Walter W.; Puschenreiter, Markus

    2017-01-01

    Gel-based, two-dimensional (2D) chemical imaging techniques are versatile methods for investigating biogeochemically active environments at high spatial resolution (sub-mm). State-of-the-art solute imaging techniques, such as diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) and planar optodes (PO), employ passive solute sampling or sensing. Combining these methods will provide powerful tools for studying the biogeochemistry of biological niches in soils and sediments. In this study we aimed at developing a combined single-layer gel for direct pH imaging using PO and sampling of anionic and cationic solutes by DGT, with subsequent analysis of the bound solutes by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). We tested three ultra-thin (<100 μm) polyurethane-based gels, incorporating anion and cation binding materials and the fluorescent pH indicator DCIFODA (2′,7′-dichloro-5(6)-N-octadecyl-carboxamidofluorescein). Results showed that PO-based pH sensing using DCIFODA was impossible in the presence of the anion binding materials due to interferences with DCIFODA protonation. One gel, containing only a cation binding material and DCIFODA, was fully characterized and showed similar performance characteristics as comparable DGT-only gels (applicable pH range: pH 5–8, applicable ionic strength range: 1–20 mmol L"-"1, cation binding capacity ∼24 μg cm"−"2). The dynamic range for PO-based pH mapping was between pH 5.5 and 7.5 with t_9_0 response time of ∼60 min. In a case study we demonstrated the gel's suitability for multi-analyte solute imaging and mapped pH gradients and concurrent metal solubility patterns in the rhizosphere of Salix smithiana. pH decreases in the rooted soil were co-localized with elevated solute fluxes of Al"3"+, Co"2"+, Cu"2"+, Fe, Mn"2"+, Ni"2"+ and Pb"2"+, indicating pH-induced metal solubilisation. - Highlights: • Diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) and planar optode (PO) imaging is combined. • A

  5. Integrating chemical imaging of cationic trace metal solutes and pH into a single hydrogel layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoefer, Christoph [Department of Forest and Soil Sciences, Institute of Soil Research, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna, Konrad-Lorenz-Strasse 24, A-3430 Tulln (Austria); Santner, Jakob, E-mail: jakob.santner@boku.ac.at [Department of Forest and Soil Sciences, Institute of Soil Research, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna, Konrad-Lorenz-Strasse 24, A-3430 Tulln (Austria); Department of Crop Sciences, Division of Agronomy, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna, Konrad-Lorenz-Strasse 24, 3430 Tulln (Austria); Borisov, Sergey M. [Institute of Analytical Chemistry and Food Chemistry, Graz University of Technology, Stremayrgasse 9, A-8010, Graz (Austria); Wenzel, Walter W.; Puschenreiter, Markus [Department of Forest and Soil Sciences, Institute of Soil Research, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna, Konrad-Lorenz-Strasse 24, A-3430 Tulln (Austria)

    2017-01-15

    Gel-based, two-dimensional (2D) chemical imaging techniques are versatile methods for investigating biogeochemically active environments at high spatial resolution (sub-mm). State-of-the-art solute imaging techniques, such as diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) and planar optodes (PO), employ passive solute sampling or sensing. Combining these methods will provide powerful tools for studying the biogeochemistry of biological niches in soils and sediments. In this study we aimed at developing a combined single-layer gel for direct pH imaging using PO and sampling of anionic and cationic solutes by DGT, with subsequent analysis of the bound solutes by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). We tested three ultra-thin (<100 μm) polyurethane-based gels, incorporating anion and cation binding materials and the fluorescent pH indicator DCIFODA (2′,7′-dichloro-5(6)-N-octadecyl-carboxamidofluorescein). Results showed that PO-based pH sensing using DCIFODA was impossible in the presence of the anion binding materials due to interferences with DCIFODA protonation. One gel, containing only a cation binding material and DCIFODA, was fully characterized and showed similar performance characteristics as comparable DGT-only gels (applicable pH range: pH 5–8, applicable ionic strength range: 1–20 mmol L{sup -1}, cation binding capacity ∼24 μg cm{sup −2}). The dynamic range for PO-based pH mapping was between pH 5.5 and 7.5 with t{sub 90} response time of ∼60 min. In a case study we demonstrated the gel's suitability for multi-analyte solute imaging and mapped pH gradients and concurrent metal solubility patterns in the rhizosphere of Salix smithiana. pH decreases in the rooted soil were co-localized with elevated solute fluxes of Al{sup 3+}, Co{sup 2+}, Cu{sup 2+}, Fe, Mn{sup 2+}, Ni{sup 2+} and Pb{sup 2+}, indicating pH-induced metal solubilisation. - Highlights: • Diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) and planar

  6. Impact of Initial pH and Pyrolysis Temperature on the Adsorption of Cr(Ⅵ from Aqueous Solutions on Corn Straw-based Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Shuai

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Batch experiments were performed on Cr(Ⅵ adsorption using four straw-based materials including corn straw and three kinds of biochar pyrolysed at 300 ℃, 450 ℃ and 600 ℃, respectively. The results showed that the Cr(Ⅵ adsorption were significantly affected by initial pH and pyrolysis temperature. The data were described by kinetic and isotherm models, and showed that the adsorption of Cr(Ⅵ was increased with the decrease of initial pH. The removal rates of Cr(Ⅵ were decreased with the increase of the pyrolysis temperature at pH=3 or pH=5. The biochar pyrolysed at 300 ℃ had the best capability of removing Cr(Ⅵ from aqueous solution at pH=1, and the maxi-mum adsorption quantity was 141.24 mg·g-1 approximately. It observed that both the lower initial pH and the lower pyrolysis temperature had positive effects on the removal of Cr(Ⅵ from aqueous solution.

  7. Comparison of DSMC and CFD Solutions of Fire II Including Radiative Heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liechty, Derek S.; Johnston, Christopher O.; Lewis, Mark J.

    2011-01-01

    The ability to compute rarefied, ionized hypersonic flows is becoming more important as missions such as Earth reentry, landing high mass payloads on Mars, and the exploration of the outer planets and their satellites are being considered. These flows may also contain significant radiative heating. To prepare for these missions, NASA is developing the capability to simulate rarefied, ionized flows and to then calculate the resulting radiative heating to the vehicle's surface. In this study, the DSMC codes DAC and DS2V are used to obtain charge-neutral ionization solutions. NASA s direct simulation Monte Carlo code DAC is currently being updated to include the ability to simulate charge-neutral ionized flows, take advantage of the recently introduced Quantum-Kinetic chemistry model, and to include electronic energy levels as an additional internal energy mode. The Fire II flight test is used in this study to assess these new capabilities. The 1634 second data point was chosen for comparisons to be made in order to include comparisons to computational fluid dynamics solutions. The Knudsen number at this point in time is such that the DSMC simulations are still tractable and the CFD computations are at the edge of what is considered valid. It is shown that there can be quite a bit of variability in the vibrational temperature inferred from DSMC solutions and that, from how radiative heating is computed, the electronic temperature is much better suited for radiative calculations. To include the radiative portion of heating, the flow-field solutions are post-processed by the non-equilibrium radiation code HARA. Acceptable agreement between CFD and DSMC flow field solutions is demonstrated and the progress of the updates to DAC, along with an appropriate radiative heating solution, are discussed. In addition, future plans to generate more high fidelity radiative heat transfer solutions are discussed.

  8. Local existence of solutions to the Euler-Poisson system, including densities without compact support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brauer, Uwe; Karp, Lavi

    2018-01-01

    Local existence and well posedness for a class of solutions for the Euler Poisson system is shown. These solutions have a density ρ which either falls off at infinity or has compact support. The solutions have finite mass, finite energy functional and include the static spherical solutions for γ = 6/5. The result is achieved by using weighted Sobolev spaces of fractional order and a new non-linear estimate which allows to estimate the physical density by the regularised non-linear matter variable. Gamblin also has studied this setting but using very different functional spaces. However we believe that the functional setting we use is more appropriate to describe a physical isolated body and more suitable to study the Newtonian limit.

  9. Influence of pH, temperature and thermal treatment on site corrosion of SAE 304 steel in chlorinated solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konrad, I.B.

    1982-01-01

    The electrochemical behaviour and fracture morphology of homogenized and sensitized type SAE 304 stainless steel U bent specimens, in 3% NaCl solution, at pH=2.0 and pH=7.0 both at room temperature and 100 0 C was studied. Polarization curves, galvanostatic and potentiostatic experiments were run. It could be observed that high temperature and low pH favour transgranular cracking and longer sensitization times lower fracture time and tend to give rise to intergranular fracture. Light sensitization can produce transgranular cracking even at room temperature, when the homogenized alloy does not present stress-corrosion cracking for the same condition. (Author) [pt

  10. The Possible "Proton Sponge " Effect of Polyethylenimine (PEI) Does Not Include Change in Lysosomal pH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Rikke Vicki; Mattebjerg, Maria Ahlm; Henriksen, Jonas Rosager

    2013-01-01

    is still elusive. The "proton sponge " hypothesis remains the most generally accepted mechanism, although it is heavily debated. This hypothesis is associated with the large buffering capacity of PEI and other polycations, which has been interpreted to cause an increase in lysosomal pH even though...... no conclusive proof has been provided. In the present study, we have used a nanoparticle pH sensor that was developed for pH measurements in the endosomal/lysosomal pathway. We have carried out quantitative measurements of lysosomal pH as a function of PEI content and correlate the results to the "proton sponge...... " hypothesis. Our measurements show that PEI does not induce change in lysosomal pH as previously suggested and quantification of PEI concentrations in lysosomes makes it uncertain that the "proton sponge " effect is the dominant mechanism of polyplex escape.Molecular Therapy (2012); doi:10.1038/mt.2012.185....

  11. Requirements for Ion and Solute Transport, and pH Regulation During Enamel Maturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    LACRUZ, RODRIGO S.; SMITH, CHARLES E.; MOFFATT, PIERRE; CHANG, EUGENE H.; BROMAGE, TIMOTHY G.; BRINGAS, PABLO; NANCI, ANTONIO; BANIWAL, SANJEEV K.; ZABNER, JOSEPH; WELSH, MICHAEL J.; KURTZ, IRA; PAINE, MICHAEL L.

    2012-01-01

    Transcellular bicarbonate transport is suspected to be an important pathway used by ameloblasts to regulate extracellular pH and support crystal growth during enamel maturation. Proteins that play a role in amelogenesis include members of the ABC transporters (SLC gene family and CFTR). A number of carbonic anhydrases (CAs) have also been identified. The defined functions of these genes are likely interlinked during enamel mineralization. The purpose of this study is to quantify relative mRNA levels of individual SLC, Cftr, and CAs in enamel cells obtained from secretory and maturation stages on rat incisors. We also present novel data on the enamel phenotypes for two animal models, amutant porcine(CFTR-ΔF508) and the NBCe1-null mouse.Our data show that two SLCs(AE2 and NBCe1),Cftr,and Car2, Car3,Car6,and Car12 are all significantly up-regulated at the onset of the maturation stage of amelogenesis when compared to the secretory stage. The remaining SLCs and CA gene transcripts showed negligible expression or no significant change in expression from secretory to maturation stages. The enamel of Cftr-ΔF508 adult pigs was hypomineralized and showed abnormal crystal growth. NBCe1-null mice enamel was structurally defective and had a marked decrease in mineral content relative to wild-type. These data demonstrate the importance of many non-matrix proteins to amelogenesis and that the expression levels of multiple genes regulating extracellular pH are modulated during enamel maturation in response to an increased need for pH buffering during hydroxyapatite crystal growth. PMID:21732355

  12. Effect of pH on the corrosion behaviour of SUS321 in the ammonia aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sang Yoon; Jeong, Y. H.; Baek, J. H.; Choi, B. K.; Lee, M. H.; Choi, B. S.; Yoon, J. H.; Lee, D. J.

    2003-02-01

    The corrosion characteristics of SUS321 for pressure vessel of SMART in pure water, ammonia aqueous solutions of pH 8.5 ∼ 11.5 at 300 .deg. C were evaluated by using static autoclaves. SUS321 specimen in the high temperature ammonia aqueous solution has weight gain or loss by the 4 reactions. And it depends on the refreshing period of the aqueous solution. So additional experiments by recirculating loop system were required to evaluate the corrosion behaviour of SUS321 in the ammonia aqueous solution

  13. 76 FR 73683 - Whirlpool Corporation, Including On-Site Leased Workers From Career Solutions TEC Staffing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-29

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration [TA-W-74,593] Whirlpool Corporation, Including On-Site Leased Workers From Career Solutions TEC Staffing, Andrews International, IBM Corporation... refrigerators and trash compactors. The notice was published in the Federal Register on October 25, 2010 (75 FR...

  14. 76 FR 72978 - Whirlpool Corporation Including On-Site Leased Workers From Career Solutions TEC Staffing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-28

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration [TA-W-74,593] Whirlpool Corporation Including On-Site Leased Workers From Career Solutions TEC Staffing, Andrews International, IBM Corporation... workers are engaged in the production of refrigerators and trash compactors. The notice was published in...

  15. Enzymatic characterization of peptidic materials isolated from aqueous solutions of ammonium cyanide (pH 9) and hydrocyanic acid (pH 6) exposed to ionizing radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niketic, V; Draganić, Z; Nesković, S; Draganić, I

    1982-01-01

    The enzymatic digestion of some radiolytically produced peptidic materials was examined. The substrates were compounds isolated from 0.1 molar solutions of NH4CN (pH 9) and HCN (pH 6), after their exposure to gamma rays from a 60Co source (15-20 Mrad doses). Commercial proteolytic enzymes pronase and aminopeptidase M were used. The examined materials were of composite nature and proteolytic action was systematically observed after their subsequent purification. In some fractions the effect was found to be positive with up to 30% of peptide bonds cleaved with respect to the amino acid content. These findings support our previous conclusions on the free radical induced formation of peptidic backbones without the intervention of amino acids. Some side effects were also noted which might be of interest in observations on enzymatic cleavage of other composite peptidic materials of abiotic origin.

  16. Influence of pH and oxygen content of buffer solutions on the corrosion behaviour of metallic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiedemann, K.H.

    1977-05-01

    The application of solutions to the decontamination of materials in nuclear installations is based on the condition that their corrosion behaviour is clearly understood. Since electrochemical corrosion is due to cathodic and anodic partial reactions which are influenced in different ways by the pH of the solution and the oxygen content it is suggested that the results of electrochemical experiments with buffer solutions be used as a model for predicting the corrosion behaviour of materials in other solutions. In the tests described here potentio-kinetic current-potential-curves have been traced and galvanic corrosion tests have been made. The results obtained in ascorbic acid, potassium hydrogen phthalate, ammonium citrate and acetate, sodium and potassium tartrate, ammonium hydrogen phosphate, sodium carbonate, hexamethylene tetramin, ethylene diamine enable - on the basis of summarized current-potential-curves - the metals studied to be classified in four groups characterized by clear differences concerning the influence of pH on the corrosion behaviour. (Auth.)

  17. Comparative study of buffered 50% glycolic acid (pH 3.0) + 0.5% salicylic acid solution vs Jessner's solution in patients with acne vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    In Jae, Jeong; Dong Ju, Hyun; Dong Hyun, Kim; Yoon, Moon Soo; Lee, Hee Jung

    2017-11-21

    Superficial chemical peels are frequently used in acne vulgaris treatment. Although glycolic acid (GA) has been widely used in clinical practice, its pH ranges from 0.08-2.75 and thus should be neutralized after application to avoid burns. To evaluate treatment efficacy and safety of chemical peeling using buffered 50% GA (pH 3.0) + 0.5% salicylic acid (SA) solution that does not need to be neutralized in the treatment of acne vulgaris compared to the conventional peeling using Jessner's solution. We performed a prospective, randomized, evaluator-blind, split-face clinical trial. Twenty patients were randomized by assigning one side of each patient's face to receive a 50% GA (pH 3.0) + 0.5% SA peel (GA side) and the other side to receive the Jessner's solution (Jessner's solution side). All patients underwent 2 sessions of treatment spaced 2 weeks apart. Lesion count, acne severity, subjective efficacy assessment, and side effects were evaluated. The total lesion count was significantly reduced for the GA and Jessner's solution sides (P  .05). The GA side had fewer side effects than the Jessner's solution side. The results of this study suggest that chemical peeling using the 50% GA (pH 3.0) + 0.5% SA solution can be as effective and convenient as the conventional peeling using Jessner's solution in the treatment of acne vulgaris and may show fewer adverse events than the conventional peeling. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. [Aluminum dissolution and changes of pH in soil solution during sorption of copper by aggregates of paddy soil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hai-Bo; Zhao, Dao-Yuan; Qin, Chao; Li, Yu-Jiao; Dong, Chang-Xun

    2014-01-01

    Size fractions of soil aggregates in Lake Tai region were collected by the low-energy ultrasonic dispersion and the freeze-desiccation methods. The dissolution of aluminum and changes of pH in soil solution during sorption of Cu2+ and changes of the dissolution of aluminum at different pH in the solution of Cu2+ by aggregates were studied by the equilibrium sorption method. The results showed that in the process of Cu2+ sorption by aggregates, the aluminum was dissoluted and the pH decreased. The elution amount of aluminum and the decrease of pH changed with the sorption of Cu2+, both increasing with the increase of Cu2+ sorption. Under the same conditions, the dissolution of aluminum and the decrease of pH were in the order of coarse silt fraction > silt fraction > sand fraction > clay fraction, which was negatively correlated with the amount of iron oxide, aluminum and organic matter. It suggested that iron oxide, aluminum and organic matters had inhibitory and buffering effect on the aluminum dissolution and the decrease of pH during the sorption of Cu2+.

  19. In vitro effectiveness of Castellani solution including various ingredients against different microorganisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şükran Çopur

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: As the external auditory canal is a moisturearea, it facilitates the growth of bacteria and fungi. Infectionsand inflammation due to Staphylococcus aureus,Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Aspergillus spp. and Candidaalbicans can develop in this area. Classical Castellanisolution including boric acid, fenol, fucsin, resorcinol, acetone,and alcohol is used for external ear tract infectionsdue to fungi and bacteria, and also for the superficial dermatophytoses,and eczematous dermatitis of the externalear tract infections.The purpose of this study is to investigate of the in vitroeffectiveness of classical Castellani solution and its differentformulations with different dilutions against the standardyeast and bacteria strains.Methods: C. albicans ATCC 10231, C. krusei ATCC6258, C. dubliniensis CD 36, C. guilliermondii ATCC6260, C. parapsilosis ATCC22019, E. coli ATCC 25922,P. aeruginosa ATCC 27853, MRSA ATCC 43300, Staphylococcusaureus ATCC 25923, and S. epidermidis ATCC12228 strains were included in the study. Broth microdilutionmethod was used for each microorganism and Castellaniformulation. The tests are repeated at least twice.Results: The inhibitory concentration of classical Castellanisolution against bacteria and fungi is 1/64-1/256,1/32-1/64 for fuchsin free solution, 1/32-1/128 for boricacid-free solution and, 1/64-1/128 for resorcinol-free solution.Conclusions: As a conclusion we think that the classicalCastellani solution and its different formulations at variousdilutions may be effective antimicrobial agents for differentpatient populations. J Clin Exp Invest 2013; 4 (3:302-305Key words: Castellani solution, antimicrobial activity, in vitro

  20. Dansyl-8-aminoquinoline as a sensitive pH fluorescent probe with dual-responsive ranges in aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Min; Zheng, Shuyu; Ma, Liguo; Zhao, Meili; Deng, Lengfang; Yang, Liting; Ma, Li-Jun

    2014-04-24

    A sensitive pH fluorescent probe based on dansyl group, dansyl-8-aminoquinoline (DAQ), has been synthesized. The probe showed dual-responsive ranges to pH changes, one range from 2.00 to 7.95 and another one from 7.95 to 10.87 in aqueous solution, as it showed pKa values of 5.73 and 8.56 under acid and basic conditions, respectively. Furthermore, the pH response mechanism of the probe was explored successfully by using NMR spectra. The results indicated that the responses of DAQ to pH changes should attribute to the protonation of the nitrogen atom in the dimethylamino group and deprotonation of sulfonamide group. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Effect of Aging Temperature on Corrosion Behavior of Sintered 17-4 PH Stainless Steel in Dilute Sulfuric Acid Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szewczyk-Nykiel, Aneta; Kazior, Jan

    2017-07-01

    The general corrosion behavior of sintered 17-4 PH stainless steel processed under different processing conditions in dilute sulfuric acid solution at 25 °C was studied by open-circuit potential measurement and potentiodynamic polarization technique. The corrosion resistance was evaluated based on electrochemical parameters, such as polarization resistance, corrosion potential, corrosion current density as well as corrosion rate. The results showed that the precipitation-hardening treatment could significantly improve the corrosion resistance of the sintered 17-4 PH stainless steel in studied environment. As far as the influence of aging temperature on corrosion behavior of the sintered 17-4 PH stainless steel is concerned, polarization resistance and corrosion rate are reduced with increasing aging temperature from 480 up to 500 °C regardless of the temperature of solution treatment. It can be concluded that the highest corrosion resistance in 0.5 M H2SO4 solution exhibits 17-4 PH after solution treatment at 1040 °C followed by aging at 480 °C.

  2. A new slurry pH model accounting for effects of ammonia and carbon dioxide volatilization on solution speciation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, V.; Markfoged, R.; Hafner, S. D.

    2014-01-01

    a reduced variable that combines time and location and an analytical approach to solving the resulting system of equations using Mathematica. To evaluate the model, we made measurements of pH at a resolution of 0.1 mm in the top 30 mm of an ammonium bicarbonate solution. These measurements show the creation...

  3. Chemical Composition and Evaluation of Nicotine, Tobacco Alkaloids, pH and Selected Flavors in e-Cigarette Cartridges and Refill Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisko, Joseph G.; Tran, Hang; Stanfill, Stephen B.; Blount, Benjamin C.; Watson, Clifford H.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) use is increasing dramatically in developed countries, but little is known about these rapidly evolving products. This study analyzed and evaluated the chemical composition including nicotine, tobacco alkaloids, pH and flavors in 36 e-liquids brands from four manufacturers. Methods We determined the concentrations of nicotine, alkaloids, and select flavors and measured pH in solutions used in e-cigarettes. E-cigarette products were chosen based upon favorable consumer approval ratings from online review websites. Quantitative analyses were performed using strict quality assurance/quality control (QC) validated methods previously established by our lab for the measurement of nicotine, alkaloids, pH and flavors. Results Three-quarters of the products contained lower measured nicotine levels than the stated label values (6% - 42% by concentration). The pH for e-liquids ranged from 5.1 – 9.1. Minor tobacco alkaloids were found in all samples containing nicotine, and their relative concentrations varied widely among manufacturers. A number of common flavor compounds were analyzed in all e-liquids. Conclusions Free nicotine levels calculated from the measurement of pH correlated with total nicotine content. The direct correlation between the total nicotine concentration and pH suggests that the alkalinity of nicotine drives the pH of e-cigarette solutions. A higher percentage of nicotine exists in the more absorbable free form as total nicotine concentration increases. A number of products contained tobacco alkaloids at concentrations that exceed U.S. Pharmacopeia limits for impurities in nicotine used in pharmaceutical and food products. PMID:25636907

  4. Chemical Composition and Evaluation of Nicotine, Tobacco Alkaloids, pH, and Selected Flavors in E-Cigarette Cartridges and Refill Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisko, Joseph G; Tran, Hang; Stanfill, Stephen B; Blount, Benjamin C; Watson, Clifford H

    2015-10-01

    Electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) use is increasing dramatically in developed countries, but little is known about these rapidly evolving products. This study analyzed and evaluated the chemical composition including nicotine, tobacco alkaloids, pH, and flavors in 36 e-liquids brands from 4 manufacturers. We determined the concentrations of nicotine, alkaloids, and select flavors and measured pH in solutions used in e-cigarettes. E-cigarette products were chosen based upon favorable consumer approval ratings from online review websites. Quantitative analyses were performed using strict quality assurance/quality control validated methods previously established by our lab for the measurement of nicotine, alkaloids, pH, and flavors. Three-quarters of the products contained lower measured nicotine levels than the stated label values (6%-42% by concentration). The pH for e-liquids ranged from 5.1-9.1. Minor tobacco alkaloids were found in all samples containing nicotine, and their relative concentrations varied widely among manufacturers. A number of common flavor compounds were analyzed in all e-liquids. Free nicotine levels calculated from the measurement of pH correlated with total nicotine content. The direct correlation between the total nicotine concentration and pH suggests that the alkalinity of nicotine drives the pH of e-cigarette solutions. A higher percentage of nicotine exists in the more absorbable free form as total nicotine concentration increases. A number of products contained tobacco alkaloids at concentrations that exceed U.S. pharmacopeia limits for impurities in nicotine used in pharmaceutical and food products. © Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco 2015. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  5. Closed-form solutions for linear regulator design of mechanical systems including optimal weighting matrix selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanks, Brantley R.; Skelton, Robert E.

    1991-01-01

    Vibration in modern structural and mechanical systems can be reduced in amplitude by increasing stiffness, redistributing stiffness and mass, and/or adding damping if design techniques are available to do so. Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR) theory in modern multivariable control design, attacks the general dissipative elastic system design problem in a global formulation. The optimal design, however, allows electronic connections and phase relations which are not physically practical or possible in passive structural-mechanical devices. The restriction of LQR solutions (to the Algebraic Riccati Equation) to design spaces which can be implemented as passive structural members and/or dampers is addressed. A general closed-form solution to the optimal free-decay control problem is presented which is tailored for structural-mechanical system. The solution includes, as subsets, special cases such as the Rayleigh Dissipation Function and total energy. Weighting matrix selection is a constrained choice among several parameters to obtain desired physical relationships. The closed-form solution is also applicable to active control design for systems where perfect, collocated actuator-sensor pairs exist.

  6. Effects of solution pH and complexing reagents on uranium and thorium desorption under saturated equilibrium conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yug-Yea; Yu, C.

    1992-01-01

    Three contaminated bulk surface soils were used for investigating the effect of solution pH and complexing reagents on uranium and thorium desorption. At a low solution pH, the major chemical species of uranium and thorium, uranyl UO 2 +2 , thorium dihydroxide Th(OH) 2 +2 , and thorium hydroxide Th(OH) +3 , tend to form complexes with acetates in the solution phase, which increases the fractions of uranium and thorium desorbed into this phase. At a high solution pH, important uranium and thorium species such as uranyl tricarbonate complex UO 2 (CO) 33 -4 and thorium tetrahydroxide complex Th(OH) 4 tend to resist complexation with acetates. The presence of complexing reagents in solution can release radionuclides such as uranium and/or thorium from the soil to the solution by forming soluble complexes. Sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO 3 ) and diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) are strong complex formers that released 38% to 62% of total uranium activity and 78% to 86% of total thorium activity, respectively, from the soil samples investigated. Solutions of 0.1 molar sodium nitrate (NaNO 3 ) and 0.1 molar sodium sulfate (Na 2 SO 4 ) were not effective complex formers with uranium and thorium under the experimental conditions. Fractions of uranium and thorium desorbed by 0.15g/200ml humic acid ranged from 4.62% to 6.17% and 1.59% to 7.09%, respectively. This work demonstrates the importance of a knowledge of solution chemistry in investigating the desorption of radionuclides

  7. Low-temperature solution processing of palladium/palladium oxide films and their pH sensing performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Yiheng; Alam, Arif U; Pan, Si; Howlader, Matiar M R; Ghosh, Raja; Selvaganapathy, P Ravi; Wu, Yiliang; Deen, M Jamal

    2016-01-01

    Highly sensitive, easy-to-fabricate, and low-cost pH sensors with small dimensions are required to monitor human bodily fluids, drinking water quality and chemical/biological processes. In this study, a low-temperature, solution-based process is developed to prepare palladium/palladium oxide (Pd/PdO) thin films for pH sensing. A precursor solution for Pd is spin coated onto pre-cleaned glass substrates and annealed at low temperature to generate Pd and PdO. The percentages of PdO at the surface and in the bulk of the electrodes are correlated to their sensing performance, which was studied by using the X-ray photoelectron spectroscope. Large amounts of PdO introduced by prolonged annealing improve the electrode's sensitivity and long-term stability. Atomic force microscopy study showed that the low-temperature annealing results in a smooth electrode surface, which contributes to a fast response. Nano-voids at the electrode surfaces were observed by scanning electron microscope, indicating a reason for the long-term degradation of the pH sensitivity. Using the optimized annealing parameters of 200°C for 48 h, a linear pH response with sensitivity of 64.71±0.56 mV/pH is obtained for pH between 2 and 12. These electrodes show a response time shorter than 18 s, hysteresis less than 8 mV and stability over 60 days. High reproducibility in the sensing performance is achieved. This low-temperature solution-processed sensing electrode shows the potential for the development of pH sensing systems on flexible substrates over a large area at low cost without using vacuum equipment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. An analysis of dietary fiber and fecal fiber components including pH in rural Africans with colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Faruk

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Colorectal cancer (CRC is now a major public health problem with heavy morbidity and mortality in rural Africans despite the lingering dietary fiber-rich foodstuffs consumption. Studies have shown that increased intake of dietary fiber which contribute to low fecal pH and also influences the activity of intestinal microbiota, is associated with a lowered risk for CRC. However, whether or not the apparent high dietary fiber consumption by Africans do not longer protects against CRC risk is unknown. This study evaluated dietary fiber intake, fecal fiber components and pH levels in CRC patients. Methods: Thirty-five subjects (CRC=21, control=14, mean age 45 years were recruited for the study. A truncated food frequency questionnaire and modified Goering and Van Soest procedures were used. Results: We found that all subjects consumed variety of dietary fiber-rich foodstuffs. There is slight preponderance in consumption of dietary fiber by the control group than the CRC patients. We also found a significant difference in the mean fecal neutral detergent fiber, acid detergent fiber, hemicellulose, cellulose and lignin contents from the CRC patients compared to the controls (P<0.05. The CRC patients had significantly more fecal pH level than the matched apparently healthy controls (P=0.017. Conclusions: The identified differences in the fecal fiber components and stool pH levels between the 2 groups may relate to CRC incidence and mortality in rural Africans. There is crucial need for more hypothesis-driven research with adequate funding on the cumulative preventive role of dietary fiber-rich foodstuffs against colorectal cancer in rural Africans “today.”

  9. An analysis of dietary fiber and fecal fiber components including pH in rural Africans with colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faruk, Mohammed; Ibrahim, Sani; Adamu, Ahmed; Rafindadi, Abdulmumini Hassan; Ukwenya, Yahaya; Iliyasu, Yawale; Adamu, Abdullahi; Aminu, Surajo Mohammed; Shehu, Mohammed Sani; Ameh, Danladi Amodu; Mohammed, Abdullahi; Ahmed, Saad Aliyu; Idoko, John; Ntekim, Atara; Suleiman, Aishatu Maude; Shah, Khalid Zahir; Adoke, Kasimu Umar

    2018-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is now a major public health problem with heavy morbidity and mortality in rural Africans despite the lingering dietary fiber-rich foodstuffs consumption. Studies have shown that increased intake of dietary fiber which contribute to low fecal pH and also influences the activity of intestinal microbiota, is associated with a lowered risk for CRC. However, whether or not the apparent high dietary fiber consumption by Africans do not longer protects against CRC risk is unknown. This study evaluated dietary fiber intake, fecal fiber components and pH levels in CRC patients. Thirty-five subjects (CRC=21, control=14), mean age 45 years were recruited for the study. A truncated food frequency questionnaire and modified Goering and Van Soest procedures were used. We found that all subjects consumed variety of dietary fiber-rich foodstuffs. There is slight preponderance in consumption of dietary fiber by the control group than the CRC patients. We also found a significant difference in the mean fecal neutral detergent fiber, acid detergent fiber, hemicellulose, cellulose and lignin contents from the CRC patients compared to the controls ( P fiber components and stool pH levels between the 2 groups may relate to CRC incidence and mortality in rural Africans. There is crucial need for more hypothesis-driven research with adequate funding on the cumulative preventive role of dietary fiber-rich foodstuffs against colorectal cancer in rural Africans "today."

  10. X-ray absorption spectroscopic study of trivalent and tetravalent actinides in solution at varying pH values

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brendebach, B.; Banik, N.L.; Marquardt, C.M.; Rothe, J.; Denecke, M.A.; Geckeis, H. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany). Inst. fuer Nukleare Entsorgung

    2009-07-01

    We perform X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) investigations to monitor the stabilization of redox sensitive trivalent and tetravalent actinide ions in solution at acidic conditions in a pH range from 0 to 3 after treatment with holding reductants, hydroxylamine hydrochloride (NH{sub 2}OHHCl) and Rongalite (sodium hydroxymethanesulfinate, CH{sub 3}NaO{sub 3}S). X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) measurements clearly demonstrate the stability of the actinide species for several hours under the given experimental conditions. Hence, structural parameters can be accurately derived by extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) investigations. The coordination structure of oxygen atoms belonging to water ligands surrounding the actinide ions does not change with increasing pH value (approximately 11 O atoms at 2.42 A in the case of U(IV) at pH 1, 9 0 atoms at 2.52 A for Np(III) at pH 1.5, and 10 O atoms at 2.49 A for Pu(III) up to pH 3), indicating that hydrolysis reactions are suppressed under the given chemical conditions. (orig.)

  11. Adsorption of cadmium by activated carbon cloth: influence of surface oxidation and solution pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangel-Mendez, J R; Streat, M

    2002-03-01

    The surface of activated carbon cloth (ACC), based on polyacrylonitrile fibre as a precursor, was oxidised using nitric acid, ozone and electrochemical oxidation to enhance cadmium ion exchange capacity. Modified adsorbents were physically and chemically characterised by pH titration, direct titration, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, elemental analysis, surface area and porosimetry, and scanning electron microscopy. BET surface area decreased after oxidation, however, the total ion exchange capacity increased by a factor of approximately 3.5 compared to the commercial as-received ACC. A very significant increase in cadmium uptake, by a factor of 13, was observed for the electrochemically oxidised ACC. Equilibrium sorption isotherms were determined at pH 4, 5 and 6 and these showed that cadmium uptake increased with increasing pH. There was clear evidence of physical damage to ozone-oxidised fibre, however, acid and electrochemically oxidised samples were completely stable.

  12. Effect of chitosan on the heat stability of whey protein solution as a function of pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhengtao; Xiao, Qian

    2017-03-01

    Chitosan was reported to interact with proteins through electrostatic interactions. Their interaction was influenced by pH, which was not fully characterized. Further research on the interactions between protein and chitosan at different pH and their influence on the thermal denaturation of proteins is necessary. In this research, the effect of chitosan on the heat stability of whey protein solution at pH 4.0-6.0 was studied. At pH 4.0, a small amount chitosan was able to prevent the heat-induced denaturation and aggregation of whey protein molecules. At higher pH values (5.5 and 6.0), whey proteins complexed with chitosan through electrostatic attraction. The formation of chitosan-whey protein complexes at pH 5.5 improved the heat stability of dispersions and no precipitation could be detected up to 20 days. The dispersion with a medium amount of chitosan (chitosan:whey protein 1:5) produced the most stable particles, which had an average radius of 135 ± 14 nm and a zeta potential value of 36 ± 1 mV. In contrast, at pH 6.0 only the dispersion with a high amount of chitosan (chitosan:whey protein 1:2) showed good shelf stability up to 20 days. It was possible to produce heat-stable whey protein beverages by regulating the interaction between chitosan and whey protein molecules. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  13. Effect of pH and chloride on the micro-mechanism of pitting corrosion for high strength pipeline steel in aerated NaCl solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yafei; Cheng, Guangxu; Wu, Wei; Qiao, Qiao; Li, Yun; Li, Xiufeng

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Pitting behavior of X80 steel in aerated NaCl solutions is studied systematically. • Unique large pit morphology is observed in neutral/acidic NaCl solutions. • In low pH solutions, pit will propagate in the horizontal direction, leading to the shallow shape of pitting morphology; in high pH solutions, the pit sizes are much smaller. • Film growth, which is dependent on the pH and chloride concentration, has great influence on the cathodic reaction by affecting oxygen diffusion process. - Abstract: The pitting corrosion mechanism of high strength pipeline steel in aerated NaCl solutions with different pH and chloride content was investigated, using potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The pitting behavior in alkaline solutions was found to be significantly different from that in neutral and acidic solutions. Electrochemical results and SEM images indicate that the product film formed on the steel surface results in different corrosion behavior in an alkaline solution. SEM images show that pH and chloride concentration in the bulk solution have a great influence on the pitting morphology. Unique large pit morphology due to corrosion in neutral/acidic solutions with 0.05 mol/L NaCl was observed. The relationship between solution pH and the effect of chloride concentration is also discussed

  14. Modified Organosilica Core-Shell Nanoparticles for Stable pH Sensing in Biological Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Kye J; Huynh, Gabriel T; Kouskousis, Betty P; Fletcher, Nicholas L; Houston, Zachary H; Thurecht, Kristofer J; Corrie, Simon R

    2018-04-19

    Continuous monitoring using nanoparticle-based sensors has been successfully employed in complex biological systems, yet the sensors still suffer from poor long-term stability partially because of the scaffold materials chosen to date. Organosilica core-shell nanoparticles containing a mixture of covalently incorporated pH-sensitive (shell) and pH-insensitive (core) fluorophores is presented as a continuous pH sensor for application in biological media. In contrast to previous studies focusing on similar materials, we sought to investigate the sensor characteristics (dynamic range, sensitivity, response time, stability) as a function of material properties. The ratio of the fluorescence intensities at specific wavelengths was found to be highly sensitive to pH over a physiologically relevant range (4.5-8) with a response time of pH-specific signals when stored at room temperature for more than 80 days. Finally, we demonstrated that the nanosensors successfully monitored the pH of a bacterial culture over 15 h and that pH changes in the skin of mouse cadavers could also be observed via in vivo fluorescence imaging following subcutaneous injection. The understanding gained from linking sensor characteristics and material properties will inform the next generation of optical nanosensors for continuous-monitoring applications.

  15. Redox reactions for group 5 elements, including element 105, in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionova, G.V.; Pershina, V.; Johnson, E.; Fricke, B.; Schaedel, M.

    1992-08-01

    Standard redox potentials Edeg(M z+x /M z+ ) in acidic solutions for group 5 elements including element 105 (Ha) and the actinide, Pa, have been estimated on the basis of the ionization potentials calculated via the multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock method. Stability of the pentavalent state was shown to increase along the group from V to Ha, while that of the tetra- and trivalent states decreases in this direction. Our estimates have shown no extra stability of the trivalent state of hahnium. Element 105 should form mixed-valence complexes by analogy with Nb due to the similar values of their potentials Edeg(M 3+ /M 2+ ). The stability of the maximum oxidation state of the elements decreases in the direction 103 > 104 > 105. (orig.)

  16. 78 FR 70584 - ATOS IT Solutions & Services, Inc., Billing and Collections Department, Including Workers Whose...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-26

    ...) Wages are Reported Through Siemens IT Solutions and Services, Mason, Ohio; Amended Certification... Solutions & Services, Inc., Billing and Collections Department, Mason, Ohio. The workers are engaged in... workers separated from employment at the Mason, Ohio location of ATOS IT Solutions & Services, Inc...

  17. pH sensing characteristics and biosensing application of solution-gated reduced graphene oxide field-effect transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Il-Yung; Kim, Duck-Jin; Jung, Jin-Heak; Yoon, Ok Ja; Thanh, Tien Nguyen; Quang, Trung Tran; Lee, Nae-Eung

    2013-07-15

    Solution-gated reduced graphene oxide field-effect transistors (R-GO FETs) were investigated for pH sensing and biochemical sensing applications. A channel of a networked R-GO film formed by self-assembly was incorporated as a sensing layer into a solution-gated FET structure for pH sensing and the detection of acetylcholine (Ach), which is a neurotransmitter in the nerve system, through enzymatic reactions. The fabricated R-GO FET was sensitive to protons (H(+)) with a pH sensitivity of 29 mV/pH in terms of the shift of the charge neutrality point (CNP), which is attributed to changes in the surface potential caused by the interaction of protons with OH surface functional groups present on the R-GO surface. The R-GO FET immobilized with acetylcholinesterase (AchE) was used to detect Ach in the concentration range of 0.1-10mM by sensing protons generated during the enzymatic reactions. The results indicate that R-GO FETs provide the capability to detect protons, demonstrating their applicability as a biosensing device for enzymatic reactions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of Iodide and Hydrogen Peroxide on Measuring High Temperature pH in Various Lithium Borate Buffer Solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Jae Sik; Yun, Myung Hee; Yeon, Jei Won; Song, Kyu Seok [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-10-15

    In a reactor coolant system of nuclear power plants, the need for reliable high temperature pH electrodes has resulted from interests in the corrosion and corrosion product behaviors of the structural materials in a high temperature coolant system. In developing the electrodes for measuring the high temperature pH of aqueous solutions, it is necessary to note two major problems: the chemical stability of an electrode against other chemical impurities, and an electrode's integrity as the temperature and pressure are varied between operational extremes. Over the past decade Macdonald et al. and Danielson et al. have developed many ceramic membrane pH electrodes based on a yttrium stabilized zirconium oxide. However, there are still many experimental difficulties associated with the problems in obtaining electrochemical information across different pressure boundaries and against many kinds of chemical impurities caused by the radiolysis of water and the leakage of a fuel clad. In the present work, we investigated the effects of the environmental factors on a high temperature pH. The selected environmental factors are as follows: system pressure, and chemical species such as iodide and hydrogen peroxide ions.

  19. Effect of pH Value on the Electrochemical and Stress Corrosion Cracking Behavior of X70 Pipeline Steel in the Dilute Bicarbonate Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Z. Y.; Liu, Z. Y.; Wang, L. W.; Ma, H. C.; Du, C. W.; Li, X. G.; Wang, X.

    2015-11-01

    In this work, effects of pH value on the electrochemical and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of X70 pipeline steel in the dilute bicarbonate solutions were investigated using electrochemical measurements, slow strain rate tensile tests and surface analysis techniques. Decrease of the solution pH from 6.8 to 6.0 promotes the anodic dissolution and cathodic reduction simultaneously. Further decrease of the pH value mainly accelerates the cathodic reduction of X70 pipeline steel. As a result, when the solution pH decreases form 6.8 to 5.5, SCC susceptibility decreases because of the enhancement of the anodic dissolution. When the solution pH decreases from 5.5 to 4.0, SCC susceptibility increases gradually because of the acceleration of cathodic reactions.

  20. Binding of sodium dodecyl sulfate with linear and branched polyethyleneimines in aqueous solution at different pH values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hao; Wang, Yilin; Yan, Haike; Zhang, Jin; Thomas, Robert K

    2006-02-14

    Isothermal titration microcalorimetry (ITC), conductivity, and turbidity measurements have been carried out to study the interaction of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) with polyethyleneimines (PEI) including linear PEI and branched PEI at different pH values of 3, 7, and 10. In all cases, the polymers show a remarkable affinity toward SDS. At pH 3, the polymer PEI is a strong polycation, and the binding is dominated by electrostatic 1:1 charge neutralization with the anionic surfactant. At pH 7, the electrostatic attraction between SDS and PEI is weak, and the hydrophobic interaction becomes stronger. At the natural pH of 10, PEI is essentially nonionic and binds SDS in the form of polymer-bound surfactant aggregates. The charge neutralization concentration (C1) of SDS for the PEI-SDS complex can be derived from the curves of variation of the enthalpy, conductivity, and turbidity with SDS concentration. There is good agreement between the results from the three methods and all show a decrease with increasing pH. The total interaction enthalpies (deltaH(total)) of PEI with SDS are obtained from the observed enthalpy curves and the difference enthalpy (deltaH*) between the total enthalpy of branched PEI with SDS, and the total enthalpy of linear PEI with SDS can be derived from the obtained deltaH(total). The difference deltaH* increases dramatically as pH increases, which indicates that the interactions are different for linear PEI and branched PEI at high pH values. A schematic map of the different states of aggregation is presented.

  1. Magnetite synthesis from ferrous iron solution at pH 6.8 in a continuous stirred tank reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mos, Yvonne M; Zorzano, Karin Bertens; Buisman, Cees J N; Weijma, Jan

    2018-04-01

    Partial oxidation of defined Fe 2+ solutions is a well-known method for magnetite synthesis in batch systems. The partial oxidation method could serve as basis for an iron removal process in drinking water production, yielding magnetite (Fe 3 O 4 ) as a compact and valuable product. As a first step toward such a process, a series of experiments was carried out, in which magnetite was synthesized from an Fe 2+ solution in a 2 L continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) at atmospheric pressure and 32 °C. In four experiments, elevating the pH from an initial value of 5.5 or 6.0 to a final value of 6.8, 7.0 or 7.5 caused green rust to form, eventually leading to magnetite. Formation of NH 4 + in the reactor indicated that NO 3 - and subsequently NO 2 - served as the oxidant. However, mass flow analysis revealed an influx of O 2 to the reactor. In a subsequent experiment, magnetite formation was achieved in the absence of added nitrate. In another experiment, seeding with magnetite particles led to additional magnetite precipitation without the need for a pH elevation step. Our results show, for the first time, that continuous magnetite formation from an Fe 2+ solution is possible under mild conditions, without the need for extensive addition of chemicals.

  2. Retrofitting the Low Impact Development Practices into Developed Urban areas Including Barriers and Potential Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafique, Muhammad; Kim, Reeho

    2017-06-01

    Low impact development (LID)/green infrastructure (GI) practices have been identified as the sustainable practices of managing the stormwater in urban areas. Due to the increasing population, most of the cities are more developing which results in the change of natural area into impervious areas (roads, buildings etc.). Moreover, urbanization and climate change are causing many water-related problems and making over cities unsafe and insecure. Under these circumstances, there is a need to introduce new stormwater management practices into developed cities to reduce the adverse impacts of urbanization. For this purpose, retrofitting low impact development practices demands more attention to reduce these water-related problems and trying to make our cities sustainable. In developed areas, there is a little space is available for the retrofitting of LID practices for the stormwater management. Therefore, the selection of an appropriate place to retrofitting LID practices needs more concern. This paper describes the successfully applied retrofitting LID practices around the globe. It also includes the process of applying retrofitting LID practices at the suitable place with the suitable combination. Optimal places for the retrofitting of different LID practices are also mentioned. This paper also highlights the barriers and potential solutions of retrofitting LID practices in urban areas.

  3. Retrofitting the Low Impact Development Practices into Developed Urban areas Including Barriers and Potential Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shafique Muhammad

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Low impact development (LID/green infrastructure (GI practices have been identified as the sustainable practices of managing the stormwater in urban areas. Due to the increasing population, most of the cities are more developing which results in the change of natural area into impervious areas (roads, buildings etc.. Moreover, urbanization and climate change are causing many water-related problems and making over cities unsafe and insecure. Under these circumstances, there is a need to introduce new stormwater management practices into developed cities to reduce the adverse impacts of urbanization. For this purpose, retrofitting low impact development practices demands more attention to reduce these water-related problems and trying to make our cities sustainable. In developed areas, there is a little space is available for the retrofitting of LID practices for the stormwater management. Therefore, the selection of an appropriate place to retrofitting LID practices needs more concern. This paper describes the successfully applied retrofitting LID practices around the globe. It also includes the process of applying retrofitting LID practices at the suitable place with the suitable combination. Optimal places for the retrofitting of different LID practices are also mentioned. This paper also highlights the barriers and potential solutions of retrofitting LID practices in urban areas.

  4. An online interactive geometric database including exact solutions of Einstein's field equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishak, Mustapha; Lake, Kayll

    2002-01-01

    We describe a new interactive database (GRDB) of geometric objects in the general area of differential geometry. Database objects include, but are not restricted to, exact solutions of Einstein's field equations. GRDB is designed for researchers (and teachers) in applied mathematics, physics and related fields. The flexible search environment allows the database to be useful over a wide spectrum of interests, for example, from practical considerations of neutron star models in astrophysics to abstract space-time classification schemes. The database is built using a modular and object-oriented design and uses several Java technologies (e.g. Applets, Servlets, JDBC). These are platform-independent and well adapted for applications developed for the World Wide Web. GRDB is accompanied by a virtual calculator (GRTensorJ), a graphical user interface to the computer algebra system GRTensorII, used to perform online coordinate, tetrad or basis calculations. The highly interactive nature of GRDB allows systematic internal self-checking and minimization of the required internal records. This new database is now available online at http://grdb.org

  5. Experiments on the effect of sphagnum on the pH of salt solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, K T; Thompson, T G

    1936-01-01

    Addition of sphagnum to salt solutions produced marked increases in the concentrations of the hydrogen ions, as measured both electrometrically and colorimetrically. The greater the concentration of the salt solution, the greater the increase in hydrogen ion concentration upon the addition of sphagnum. With a given salt concentration, the hydrogen ion concentration increased with increase in quantity of sphagnum added. The divalent cations produced greater increases in the hydrogen concentration than the monovalent cations for equal weights of sphagnum. Divalent anions, while showing an increase in hydrogen ions, upon the addition of sphagnum were far less effective in increasing the hydrogen ion concentrations. Sphagnum may be a useful reagent for regulating the acidity of salt solutions for many types of scientific work. It seems probable that the adsorption of metallic and hydroxyl ions explains, at least in part, the acidity of the water of sphagnum bogs.

  6. Effect of pH Changes on Antioxidant Capacity and the Content of Betalain Pigments During the Heating of a Solution of Red Beet Betalains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikołajczyk-Bator Katarzyna

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Red beets and their products are mainly consumed after processing. In this study, the effect of pH on changes in antioxidant capacity (AC and the content of betalain pigments were analysed during the heating of a betalain preparation solution. With pH ranging from 4 to 9 during the heat-treatment, the content of red pigments decreased depending on the pH level of the sample. The losses of red pigments in the investigated betalain preparation solution increased along with rising pH levels of the heated solution. The greatest losses were recorded at pH of 9.0. An opposite correlation was observed for yellow pigments. The content of yellow pigments in the heated betalain preparation solution was increasing along with increasing pH. The most pronounced increase in the content of yellow pigments was found at pH of 6.5 and 7.0. At the same time, the heated betalain preparation solution was shown to exhibit a higher antioxidant capacity at pH of 6.0 (14.9 μmol Trolox/mL than at pH of 4.0 (12.6 μmol Trolox/mL. It was observed that the increase in the antioxidant capacity in heated betalain preparation solutions with pH in the 6.0–6.5 range occurred as a result of increased concentrations of neobetanin, assessed by HPLC, within the pH range from 5.0 to 6.5.

  7. Radiolysis of permanganate and its mixtures with bromate and nitrate ions in solution at pH 10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dedgaonkar, V.G.; Kulkarni, S.A.; Mahajan, C.T.

    1981-01-01

    γ-radiolysis of aqueous solutions of pure permanganate and its binary mixture with nitrite and bromate ions at pH 10 is studied as a function of concentration and dose. In pure system G(-MnO 4 - ) increases with the increase in initial concentration from 0.68 to a maximum of 25. The rise is sharp above 10 -2 M concentration which indicates the occurrence of a chain mechanism. In the presence of bromate or nitrite the G value decreases: the G(-MnO 4 - ) in 10 -3 M permanganate solution is 1.07, with 10 -1 M bromate it is 0.2 and with 10 -2 M nitrite it is 0.7. A mechanism based on the cometitive kinetics is envisaged to explain the observed results. (author)

  8. Radiolysis of nitrite, bromate and permanganate ions and their binary mixtures in aqueous solutions at pH 10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dedgaonkar, V.G.; Kulkarni, S.A.; Mahajan, C.T.

    1981-01-01

    #betta#-radiolysis of pure systems viz. nitrite, bromate and permanganate and their binary mixtures (MNO 4- /NO 2- , MnO 4- /BrO 3- ) in aqueous solution at pH 10 is studied as a function of dose and concentration. In pure systems the G(NO 3- ), G(Br - ) and G(-MnO 4- ) increase with increasing concentration. The first two show an identical limiting value of approximately 0.5 while the last increases from 0.68 below 10 4 M and reaches 2.5 at 10 - 2 M concentration. Presence of 10 - 1 M BrO 3- or 10 - 2 M NO 2- reduces the G(-MnO 4- ) from 1.07 for the pure 10 - 3 M permanganate solution to 0.2 and 0.7 respectively. A mechanism based on the competitive kinetics is envisaged to explain the observed results. (author)

  9. Exact solutions of the population balance equation including particle transport, using group analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Fubiao; Meleshko, Sergey V.; Flood, Adrian E.

    2018-06-01

    The population balance equation (PBE) has received an unprecedented amount of attention in recent years from both academics and industrial practitioners because of its long history, widespread use in engineering, and applicability to a wide variety of particulate and discrete-phase processes. However it is typically impossible to obtain analytical solutions, although in almost every case a numerical solution of the PBEs can be obtained. In this article, the symmetries of PBEs with homogeneous coagulation kernels involving aggregation, breakage and growth processes and particle transport in one dimension are found by direct solving the determining equations. Using the optimal system of one and two-dimensional subalgebras, all invariant solutions and reduced equations are obtained. In particular, an explicit analytical physical solution is also presented.

  10. Changes in soil solution Zn and pH and uptake of Zn by arbuscular mycorrhizal red clover in Zn-contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X; Christie, P

    2001-01-01

    Red clover plants inoculated with Glomus mosseae were grown in a sterile pasture soil containing 50 mg Zn kg(-1) in 'Plexiglas' (acrylic) containers with nylon net partitions (30 microm mesh) designed to separate the soil into a central root zone and two outer zones for hyphal growth with no root penetration. Two porous plastic soil moisture samplers were installed in each pot, one in the root compartment and the other in one of the hyphal compartments. The soil in the outer compartments was amended with one of the four application rates of Zn (as ZnSO4) ranging from 0 to 1000 mg kg(-1). Non-mycorrhizal controls were included, and there were five replicates of each treatment in a randomised block in a glasshouse. Uninoculated plants received supplementary P to avoid yield limitation due to low soil P status. Plants grew in the central compartment for nine weeks. Soil moisture samples were collected 4, 24 and 62 days after sowing to monitor changes in the Zn concentration and pH of the soil solution. At harvest, the mean mycorrhizal infection rate of inoculated plants ranged from 29% to 34% of total root length and was little affected by Zn application. Root and shoot yields were not affected by mycorrhizal infection. Plant Zn concentration and uptake were lower in mycorrhizal plants than non-mycorrhizal controls, and this effect was more pronounced with increasing Zn application rate to the soil. Soil solution Zn concentrations were lower and pH values were higher in mycorrhizal treatments than non-mycorrhizal controls and the mycorrhiza effect was more pronounced at higher Zn application rates. The protective effect of mycorrhiza against plant Zn uptake may have been associated with changes in Zn solubility mediated by changes in the soil solution pH, or by immobilisation of Zn in the extraradical mycelium.

  11. Redox properties of phenosafranine at zeolite-modified electrodes-Effect of surface modification and solution pH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Easwaramoorthi, S.; Natarajan, P.

    2008-01-01

    Redox properties of cationic dye phenosafranine (3,7-diamino-5-phenylphenazenium chloride) (PS + ) were studied at zeolite-modified electrodes using Zeolite-Y and NaZSM-5. The peak current and peak potential of phenosafranine-adsorbed zeolite were found to be influenced by the pH of the electrolyte solution. Observation of a second redox couple is suggested to be due to formation of new species at low concentration from the reduced phenosafranine at the zeolite-modified electrodes. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles encapsulated in the cavities of the zeolite or anchored on the external surface of the zeolite do not seem to affect the redox properties of adsorbed PS + . When the cyclic voltammograms are recorded immediately after the electrode is immersed into the solution, the redox potential of PS + is found to be sensitive to the nature of the zeolite surface. The peak potential shifts towards positive region under continuous cycles as the surface hydroxyl groups get protonated in acidic electrolyte solution thereby forcing the movement of dye molecules from the zeolite surface to the zeolite electrode solution interface. The electron transfer rate constants for the adsorbed dye at the electrode are calculated to be 2.5 ± 0.2 s -1 and 3.5 ± 0.2 s -1 for the zeolite-Y electrode and the ZSM-5 electrode, respectively by the Laviron equation

  12. An approximate JKR solution for a general contact, including rough contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciavarella, M.

    2018-05-01

    In the present note, we suggest a simple closed form approximate solution to the adhesive contact problem under the so-called JKR regime. The derivation is based on generalizing the original JKR energetic derivation assuming calculation of the strain energy in adhesiveless contact, and unloading at constant contact area. The underlying assumption is that the contact area distributions are the same as under adhesiveless conditions (for an appropriately increased normal load), so that in general the stress intensity factors will not be exactly equal at all contact edges. The solution is simply that the indentation is δ =δ1 -√{ 2 wA‧ /P″ } where w is surface energy, δ1 is the adhesiveless indentation, A‧ is the first derivative of contact area and P‧‧ the second derivative of the load with respect to δ1. The solution only requires macroscopic quantities, and not very elaborate local distributions, and is exact in many configurations like axisymmetric contacts, but also sinusoidal waves contact and correctly predicts some features of an ideal asperity model used as a test case and not as a real description of a rough contact problem. The solution permits therefore an estimate of the full solution for elastic rough solids with Gaussian multiple scales of roughness, which so far was lacking, using known adhesiveless simple results. The result turns out to depend only on rms amplitude and slopes of the surface, and as in the fractal limit, slopes would grow without limit, tends to the adhesiveless result - although in this limit the JKR model is inappropriate. The solution would also go to adhesiveless result for large rms amplitude of roughness hrms, irrespective of the small scale details, and in agreement with common sense, well known experiments and previous models by the author.

  13. 75 FR 22846 - Norgren Automation Solutions, Including Workers Whose Unemployment Insurance (UI) Wages Are Paid...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-30

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration [TA-W-72,524] Norgren Automation... Engineering and Automation Division, A Subsidiary of Norgren, Inc.: Clinton Township, MI; Amended... workers of Norgren Automation Solutions, Erie Engineering and Automation Division, a subsidiary of Norgren...

  14. 76 FR 2710 - Pitney Bowes, Inc., Mailing Solutions Management Division Including On-Site Leased Workers of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-14

    ...., Mailing Solutions Management Division Including On-Site Leased Workers of Guidant Group, and Teleworkers... Bowes, Inc., Mailing Solutions Management Division, Engineering Quality Assurance, Shelton, Connecticut... identity of the subject worker group. The worker group consists of workers of Pitney Bowes, Inc., the...

  15. A new force field including charge directionality for TMAO in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usui, Kota; Nagata, Yuki; Hunger, Johannes; Bonn, Mischa; Sulpizi, Marialore

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new force field for trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO), which is designed to reproduce the long-lived and highly directional hydrogen bond between the TMAO oxygen (O TMAO ) atom and surrounding water molecules. Based on the data obtained by ab initio molecular dynamics simulations, we introduce three dummy sites around O TMAO to mimic the O TMAO lone pairs and we migrate the negative charge on the O TMAO to the dummy sites. The force field model developed here improves both structural and dynamical properties of aqueous TMAO solutions. Moreover, it reproduces the experimentally observed dependence of viscosity upon increasing TMAO concentration quantitatively. The simple procedure of the force field construction makes it easy to implement in molecular dynamics simulation packages and makes it compatible with the existing biomolecular force fields. This paves the path for further investigation of protein-TMAO interaction in aqueous solutions.

  16. A new force field including charge directionality for TMAO in aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Usui, Kota; Nagata, Yuki, E-mail: sulpizi@uni-mainz.de, E-mail: nagata@mpip-mainz.mpg.de; Hunger, Johannes; Bonn, Mischa [Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, Ackermannweg 10, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Sulpizi, Marialore, E-mail: sulpizi@uni-mainz.de, E-mail: nagata@mpip-mainz.mpg.de [Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Staudingerweg 7, 55099 Mainz (Germany)

    2016-08-14

    We propose a new force field for trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO), which is designed to reproduce the long-lived and highly directional hydrogen bond between the TMAO oxygen (O{sub TMAO}) atom and surrounding water molecules. Based on the data obtained by ab initio molecular dynamics simulations, we introduce three dummy sites around O{sub TMAO} to mimic the O{sub TMAO} lone pairs and we migrate the negative charge on the O{sub TMAO} to the dummy sites. The force field model developed here improves both structural and dynamical properties of aqueous TMAO solutions. Moreover, it reproduces the experimentally observed dependence of viscosity upon increasing TMAO concentration quantitatively. The simple procedure of the force field construction makes it easy to implement in molecular dynamics simulation packages and makes it compatible with the existing biomolecular force fields. This paves the path for further investigation of protein-TMAO interaction in aqueous solutions.

  17. A solution of the Schrodinger equation with two-body correlations included

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabre de la Ripelle, M.

    1984-01-01

    A procedure for introducing the two-body correlations in the solution of the Schrodinger equation is described. The N-body Schrodinger equation for nucleons subject to two-(or many)-body N-N interaction has never been solved with accuracy except for few-body systems. Indeed it is difficult to take the two-body correlations generated by the interaction into account in the wave function

  18. pH effect on pit potential and protection potential of stainless steels AISI-304, 310 and 316 in NaCl solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabral, U.Q.; Sathler, L.; Mariano Neto, F.

    1973-06-01

    For three austenitic stainless steels, AISI 304, 310 and 316, the pH influence on the rupture, protection and corrosion potentials was studied in a 0,5N NACl solution. The pit potentials determined by the chronogalvonometric method, are pH independent within the acid range. They showed a rough linear variation within the basic range having a maximum corresponding to the pH value of 8.8. The electrochemical hysteresis method, employed for determining the protection potential, presented a total pH independence for the AISI 316. The other steels showed a small dependence within the basic range but with a tendency for the protection potential to become slightly more active with increasing pH, within the acid range. It was also noted for the three steels studied that the corrosion potental became more active with increasing pH, within the basic range [pt

  19. Skin physiology in men and women: in vivo evaluation of 300 people including TEWL, SC hydration, sebum content and skin surface pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luebberding, S; Krueger, N; Kerscher, M

    2013-10-01

    Evidence is given that differences in skin physiological properties exist between men and women. However, despite an assessable number of available publications, the results are still inconsistent. Therefore, the aim of this clinical study is the first systematic assessment of gender-related differences in skin physiology in men and women, with a special focus on changes over lifetime. A total of 300 healthy male and female subjects (20-74 years) were selected following strict criteria including age, sun behaviour or smoking habits. TEWL, hydration level, sebum production and pH value were measured with worldwide-acknowledged biophysical measuring methods at forehead, cheek, neck, volar forearm and dorsum of hand. Until the age of 50 men's TEWL is significantly lower than the water loss of women of the same age, regardless of the location. With ageing gender-related differences in TEWL assimilate. Young men show higher SC hydration in comparison with women. But, whereas SC hydration is stable or even increasing in women over lifetime, the skin hydration in men is progressively decreasing, beginning at the age of 40. Sebum production in male skin is always higher and stays stable with increasing age, whereas sebum production in women progressively decreases over lifetime. Across all localizations and age groups, the pH value in men is below 5, the pH value of female subjects is, aside from limited expectations, higher than 5. Skin physiological distinctions between the sexes exist and are particularly remarkable with regard to sebum production and pH value. © 2013 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  20. pH Sensing Properties of Flexible, Bias-Free Graphene Microelectrodes in Complex Fluids: From Phosphate Buffer Solution to Human Serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ping, Jinglei; Blum, Jacquelyn E; Vishnubhotla, Ramya; Vrudhula, Amey; Naylor, Carl H; Gao, Zhaoli; Saven, Jeffery G; Johnson, Alan T Charlie

    2017-08-01

    Advances in techniques for monitoring pH in complex fluids can have a significant impact on analytical and biomedical applications. This study develops flexible graphene microelectrodes (GEs) for rapid (pH of complex biofluids by measuring real-time Faradaic charge transfer between the GE and a solution at zero electrical bias. For an idealized sample of phosphate buffer solution (PBS), the Faradaic current is varied monotonically and systematically with the pH, with a resolution of ≈0.2 pH unit. The current-pH dependence is well described by a hybrid analytical-computational model, where the electric double layer derives from an intrinsic, pH-independent (positive) charge associated with the graphene-water interface and ionizable (negative) charged groups. For ferritin solution, the relative Faradaic current, defined as the difference between the measured current response and a baseline response due to PBS, shows a strong signal associated with ferritin disassembly and the release of ferric ions at pH ≈2.0. For samples of human serum, the Faradaic current shows a reproducible rapid (pH. By combining the Faradaic current and real-time current variation, the methodology is potentially suitable for use to detect tumor-induced changes in extracellular pH. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Stress corrosion cracking of X80 pipeline steel exposed to high pH solutions with different concentrations of bicarbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Lin; Du, Cui-wei; Liu, Zhi-yong; Li, Xiao-gang

    2013-07-01

    Susceptibilities to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of X80 pipeline steel in high pH solutions with various concentrations of HCO{3/-} at a passive potential of -0.2 V vs. SCE were investigated by slow strain rate tensile (SSRT) test. The SCC mechanism and the effect of HCO{3/-} were discussed with the aid of electrochemical techniques. It is indicated that X80 steel shows enhanced susceptibility to SCC with the concentration of HCO{3/-} increasing from 0.15 to 1.00 mol/L, and the susceptibility can be evaluated in terms of current density at -0.2 V vs. SCE. The SCC behavior is controlled by the dissolution-based mechanism in these circumstances. Increasing the concentration of HCO{3/-} not only increases the risk of rupture of passive films but also promotes the anodic dissolution of crack tips. Besides, little susceptibility to SCC is found in dilute solution containing 0.05 mol/L HCO{3/-} for X80 steel. This can be attributed to the inhibited repassivation of passive films, manifesting as a more intensive dissolution in the non-crack tip areas than at the crack tips.

  2. Ph3CCOOSnPh3.Ph3PO AND Ph3CCOOSnPh3.Ph3AsO: SYNTHESIS AND INFRARED STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ABDOU MBAYE

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The mixture of ethanolic solutions of Ph3CCOOSnPh3 and Ph3PO or Ph3AsO gives Ph3CCOOSnPh3.Ph3PO and Ph3CCOOSnPh3.Ph3AsO adducts which have been characterized by infrared spectroscopy. A discrete structure is suggested for both, the environment around the tin centre being trigonal bipyramidal, the triphenylacetate anion behaving as a mondentate ligand.

  3. Effect of pH on corrosion behavior of CuCrZr in solution without and with NaCl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwok, C.T.; Wong, P.K. [Department of Electromechanical Engineering, University of Macau (China); Man, H.C. [Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering, Hong Kong Polytechnic University (Hong Kong); Cheng, F.T., E-mail: apaftche@polyu.edu.h [Department of Applied Physics, Hong Kong Polytechnic University (Hong Kong)

    2009-10-01

    CuCrZr is a high copper alloy widely used as electrical and thermal conducting material, especially in heat exchangers in nuclear reactors. In this respect, the physical and fatigue properties of CuCrZr have been extensively studied. The electrochemical behavior of CuCrZr, on the other hand, has not been adequately investigated. In the present study, the effect of pH on the corrosion behavior of CuCrZr in aqueous solutions without and with chloride (0.6 M NaCl) was studied. The pH of the solutions is found to exert significant influence on the corrosion behavior of CuCrZr. In acidic solutions without chloride, the corrosion of CuCrZr is ascribed to active dissolution with soluble products. In neutral and alkaline solutions without NaCl, the presence of oxides on the surface of CuCrZr leads to a noble shift in corrosion potential and passivation results in increased corrosion resistance. In chloride solutions at various pH values, the chloride ions influence the formation of the surface layers and the anodic dissolution process during polarization. At high pH, CuCrZr shows significant passivity and high corrosion resistance due to the growth of Cu{sub 2}O/Cu(OH) film which hinders further dissolution whereas at low pH the corrosion resistance is lowered due to active dissolution of Cu.

  4. Effect of pH on corrosion behavior of CuCrZr in solution without and with NaCl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwok, C.T.; Wong, P.K.; Man, H.C.; Cheng, F.T.

    2009-01-01

    CuCrZr is a high copper alloy widely used as electrical and thermal conducting material, especially in heat exchangers in nuclear reactors. In this respect, the physical and fatigue properties of CuCrZr have been extensively studied. The electrochemical behavior of CuCrZr, on the other hand, has not been adequately investigated. In the present study, the effect of pH on the corrosion behavior of CuCrZr in aqueous solutions without and with chloride (0.6 M NaCl) was studied. The pH of the solutions is found to exert significant influence on the corrosion behavior of CuCrZr. In acidic solutions without chloride, the corrosion of CuCrZr is ascribed to active dissolution with soluble products. In neutral and alkaline solutions without NaCl, the presence of oxides on the surface of CuCrZr leads to a noble shift in corrosion potential and passivation results in increased corrosion resistance. In chloride solutions at various pH values, the chloride ions influence the formation of the surface layers and the anodic dissolution process during polarization. At high pH, CuCrZr shows significant passivity and high corrosion resistance due to the growth of Cu 2 O/Cu(OH) film which hinders further dissolution whereas at low pH the corrosion resistance is lowered due to active dissolution of Cu.

  5. Tuning interionic interaction by rationally controlling solution pH for highly selective colorimetric sensing of arginine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Qin; Hao, Jie; Ma, Wenjie; Yu, Ping; Mao, Lanqun

    2016-04-01

    Direct selective sensing of arginine in central nervous systems remains very essential to understanding of the molecular basis of some physiological events. This study presents the first demonstration on a simple yet effective method for arginine sensing with gold nanoparticles (Au-NPs) as the signal readout. The rationale for the method is based on the pH-dependent feature of the interionic interaction between cysteine and arginine. At pH 6.0, cysteine can only interact with arginine through the ion-pair interaction and such interaction can lead to the changes in both the solution color and UV-vis spectrum of the cysteine-protected Au-NPs upon the addition of arginine. These changes are further developed into an analytical strategy for effective sensing of arginine by rationally controlling the pH values of Au-NP dispersions with the ratio of the absorbance at 650 nm (A 650) to that at 520 nm (A 520) (A 650/A 520) as a parameter for analysis. The method is responsive to arginine without the interference from other species in the cerebral system; under the optimized conditions, the A 650/A 520 values are linear with the concentration of arginine within a concentration range from 0.80 to 64 μM, yet remain unchanged with the addition of other kinds of amino acids or the species in the central nervous system into the Au-NPs dispersion containing cysteine. The method demonstrated here is reliable and robust and could thus be used for detection of the increase of arginine in central nervous systems.

  6. Closed-form solutions for linear regulator-design of mechanical systems including optimal weighting matrix selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanks, Brantley R.; Skelton, Robert E.

    1991-01-01

    This paper addresses the restriction of Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR) solutions to the algebraic Riccati Equation to design spaces which can be implemented as passive structural members and/or dampers. A general closed-form solution to the optimal free-decay control problem is presented which is tailored for structural-mechanical systems. The solution includes, as subsets, special cases such as the Rayleigh Dissipation Function and total energy. Weighting matrix selection is a constrained choice among several parameters to obtain desired physical relationships. The closed-form solution is also applicable to active control design for systems where perfect, collocated actuator-sensor pairs exist. Some examples of simple spring mass systems are shown to illustrate key points.

  7. Thermodynamics of aqueous carbonate solutions including mixtures of sodium carbonate, bicarbonate, and chloride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peiper, J.C.; Pitzer, K.S.

    1982-01-01

    Recently the authors examined electrochemical-cell data leading to values of the activity coefficient for aqueous sodium bicarbonate. Since that preliminary analysis, new experimental measurements have been published which contribute significantly to the overall thermodynamic understanding of (sodium carbonate + sodium bicarbonate + carbonic acid). In this more extensive examination we consider a wide variety of measurements leading to activity coefficients of Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ and NaHCO/sub 3/ from 273 to 323 K and to relative molar enthalpies and heat capacities at 298.15 K. Tables of thermodynamic quantities at selected temperatures are included. 47 references, 2 figures, 6 tables.

  8. Kinetic Rate Law Parameter Measurements on a Borosilicate Waste Glass: Effect of Temperature, pH, and Solution Composition on Alkali Ion Exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierce, Eric M.; McGrail, B PETER.; Icenhower, J P.; Rodriguez, Elsa A.; Steele, Jackie L.; Baum, Steven R.

    2004-01-01

    The reaction kinetics of glass is controlled by matrix dissolution and ion exchange (IEX). Dissolution of an alkali-rich simulated borosilicate waste glass was investigated using single-pass flow-through (SPFT) experiments. Experiments were conducted as a function of temperature, pH, and solution composition by varying the SiO 2 (aq) activity in the influent solution. Results showed that under dilute conditions matrix dissolution increased with increasing pH and temperature, and decreased with increasing SiO 2 (aq) activity. IEX rates decreased with increasing pH and temperature, and increased with increasing SiO 2 (aq) activity. Over the solution composition range interrogated in this study the dominant dissolution mechanism changed from matrix dissolution to IEX. These results suggest that ''secondary'' reactions may become dominant under certain environmental conditions and emphasize the need to incorporate these reactions into dissolution rate models

  9. Estimation of Hydrazine Decomposition on Measuring the High-Temperature pH in Hydrazine/ETA Solutions at 553 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Jae Sik; Yeon, Jei Won; Yun, Myung Hee; Song, Kyu Seok; Lee, Sang Ill

    2010-01-01

    Hydrazine is one of the most excellent oxygen scavengers used in the secondary circuit of nuclear power plants. Furthermore, in some pants, the hydrazine is used as a source of hydrogen required to suppress radiolysis of the coolant water in the primary loop. When hydrazine was exposed in the high temperature and high pressure water, it can be decomposed into the various products such as NH 3 , N 2 , H 2 , and NO 3 ions. As the result, the pH of solution containing hydrazine in the condition of the high temperature and high pressure can be changed by those decomposed products. In the present work, we investigated the decomposition behavior of hydrazine in ETA (ethanol amine) solution. In addition, we measured the high temperature pH at 553 K on the various hydrazine/ETA solutions for confirming the applicability of the yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ)- based pH electrode in secondary circuit of the nuclear power plants

  10. Gravity-driven pH adjustment for site-specific protein pKa measurement by solution-state NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei

    2017-12-01

    To automate pH adjustment in site-specific protein pKa measurement by solution-state NMR, I present a funnel with two caps for the standard 5 mm NMR tube. The novelty of this simple-to-build and inexpensive apparatus is that it allows automatic gravity-driven pH adjustment within the magnet, and consequently results in a fully automated NMR-monitored pH titration without any hardware modification on the NMR spectrometer.

  11. Beam envelope solution of a finite emittance beam including space charge and acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larson, D.J.; Cole, F.T.; Mills, F.E.

    1985-01-01

    The intermediate-energy electron-cooling effort at the University of Wisconsin began as a collaboration with the University of California - Santa Barbara free electron laser group to measure the emittance of their test device. The measurement indicated that the optics of the FEL test device were extremely good; there was no emittance degradation throughout the system. For this reason, the electron gun for the electron-cooling effort has been designed to be optically identical to the UCSB gun designed by Hermannsfeldt of SLAC. The optics program used to investigate the gun behavior is EGUN, written by Hermannsfeldt. Because of the complicated problem of electron optics at the start of the Pelletron accelerating column, the first 120 kV of acceleration in the Pelletron is included in the gun optical study. At that point in the Pelletron, the electric field no longer has any significant radial component and the following optical treatment of the device is done

  12. Gamma radiation and osmotic potential of the nutrient solution differentially affect macronutrient concentrations, pH and EC in chilhuacle pepper fruits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Victor Garcia-Gaytan, Libia Iris Trejo-Tellez; Olga Tejeda-Sartorius; Maribel Ramirez-Martinez; Julian Delgadillo-Martinez; Fernando Carlos Gomez-Merino; Soledad Garcia-Morales

    2018-01-01

    Chilhuacle pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) seeds were exposed to gamma radiation (GR) doses (0, 10, 80 and 120 Gy), and plants were grown in hydroponics with different osmotic potentials (OP) (- 0.036, - 0.072, - 0.092, and - 0.108 MPa) in the nutrient solution. We measured the nutrient concentrations, pH and electrical conductivity (EC) in fruits at different time points after transplanting (70, 90 and 130 dat), and found the GR, nutrient solution OP and their interactions differentially affected N, P, K, Ca, and Mg concentrations, as well as pH and EC in chilhuacle peppers. (author)

  13. 75 FR 77665 - Whirlpool Corporation, Including On-Site Leased Workers From Career Solutions TEC Staffing and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-13

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration [TA-W-74,593] Whirlpool Corporation, Including On-Site Leased Workers From Career Solutions TEC Staffing and Andrews International, Fort Smith... subject firm. The workers are engaged in the production of refrigerators and trash compactors. The company...

  14. Soil solution Zn and pH dynamics in non-rhizosphere soil and in the rhizosphere of Thlaspi caerulescens grown in a Zn/Cd-contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Y M; Christie, P; Baker, A J

    2000-07-01

    Temporal changes in soil solution properties and metal speciation were studied in non-rhizosphere soil and in the rhizosphere of the hyperaccumulator Thlaspi caerulescens J. & C. Presl (population from Prayon, Belgium) grown in a Zn- and Cd-contaminated soil. This paper focuses on soil solution Zn and pH dynamics during phytoextraction. The concentration of Zn in both non-rhizosphere and rhizosphere soil solutions decreased from 23 mg/l at the beginning to 2 mg/l at the end of the experiment (84 days after transplanting of seedlings), mainly due to chemical sorption. There was no significant difference in overall Zn concentration between the planted and the unplanted soil solutions (P > 0.05). Soil solution pH decreased initially and then increased slightly in both planted and unplanted soil zones. From 60 to 84 days after transplanting, the pH of the rhizosphere soil solution was higher than that of non-rhizosphere soil solution (P<0.05). Zn uptake by the hyperaccumulator plants was 8.8 mg per pot (each containing 1 kg oven-dry soil) on average. The data indicate that the potential of T. caerulescens to remove Zn from contaminated soil may not be related to acidification of the rhizosphere.

  15. The influence of surface modification, coating agents and pH value of aqueous solutions on physical properties of magnetite nanoparticles investigated by ESR method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobosz, Bernadeta, E-mail: benia@amu.edu.pl [Medical Physics Division, Faculty of Physics, Adam Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 85, 61-614 Poznań (Poland); Krzyminiewski, Ryszard [Medical Physics Division, Faculty of Physics, Adam Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 85, 61-614 Poznań (Poland); Kurczewska, Joanna; Schroeder, Grzegorz [Faculty of Chemistry, Adam Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 89B, 61-614 Poznań (Poland)

    2017-05-01

    The article presents the results of electron spin resonance (ESR) studies for aqueous solutions of functionalized superparamagnetic iron(II,III) oxide nanoparticles. The samples studied differed in type of organic ligands at the magnetite surface, type of coating agent and pH value of aqueous solutions. The ESR spectra of the samples were obtained at room temperature and at 230 K. The field cooling (FC) experiment was performed for selected samples, and the effective anisotropy field (H{sub K2}) and the first order magnetocrystalline anisotropy constant (K{sub 1}) was calculated. The process of the nanoparticles diffusion in different environments (human blood, human serum) forced by an inhomogeneous magnetic field was monitored and their interactions with different solvents have been discussed. It has been shown that ESR method is useful to observe the impact of organic ligands at the magnetite surface, type of coating agent and pH value of aqueous solutions on the properties of iron(II,III) oxide nanoparticles. - Highlights: • The influence of different organic ligands, coatings and pH values of aqueous solutions on the physical properties of the magnetite nanoparticles studied by ESR method. • Nanoparticles diffusion forced by inhomogeneous magnetic field monitored by ESR and explained. • A narrow line separated in ESR spectra by CREM. • The influence of different coatings and pH values of aqueous solutions on ESR spectra of TEMPO attached to the magnetite core.

  16. Tetrachloroethylene Removal Rate from Aqueous Solutions by Pumice Doped with Copper: An Evaluation of the Effect of pH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Almasi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Tetrachloroethylene (TCE is a chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbon, used in many industries. Effective and efficient treatment of industrial wastewater, containing TCE, is one of the environmental requirements. The purpose of this study was to determine the role of alkaline environments in TCE removal rate from aqueous solutions, using copper-doped pumice. This experimental study was performed, using granulated pumice stones with a mesh 4 (8.4 mm in alkaline conditions; the samples were coated with copper. Copper-doped pumice was prepared as a bed at doses of 1, 2, and 3 g/L; the study was performed at pH ranges of 3, 7, and 11. Based on the results, copper-doped pumice showed good efficacy in TCE removal; in addition, its performance increased in alkaline conditions. Therefore, use of this stone for the treatment of wastewater, containing TCE, is effective due to its availability and low cost. Besides, it can be considered a good option, given its high efficiency in the absorption process.

  17. Calculation of the equilibrium pH in a multiple-buffered aqueous solution based on partitioning of proton buffering: a new predictive formula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Minhtri K; Kao, Liyo; Kurtz, Ira

    2009-06-01

    Upon the addition of protons to an aqueous solution containing multiple buffers, the final H+ concentration ([H+]) at equilibrium is determined by the partitioning of added H+ among the various buffer components. In the analysis of acid-base chemistry, the Henderson-Hasselbalch equation and the Stewart strong ion formulation can only describe (rather than predict) the equilibrium pH following a proton load since these formulas calculate the equilibrium pH only when the reactant concentrations at equilibrium(1) 1The term "equilibrium" refers to the steady state proton and reactant concentrations when the buffering of excess protons by the various buffers is complete. are already known. In this regard, it is simpler to directly measure the equilibrium pH rather than measure the equilibrium reactant concentrations to calculate the equilibrium pH. As these formulas cannot predict the final equilibrium [H+] following a proton load to a multiple-buffered aqueous solution, we developed a new quantitative approach for predicting the equilibrium [H+] that is based on the preequilibrium(2)2 The term "preequilibrium" refers to the initial proton and reactant concentrations immediately upon addition of protons and before the buffering of excess protons by the various buffers. concentrations of all buffers in an aqueous solution. The mathematical model used to derive our equation is based on proton transfer buffer equilibria without requiring the incorporation of electroneutrality considerations. The model consists of a quartic polynomial equation that is derived based solely on the partitioning of H+ among the various buffer components. We tested the accuracy of the model using aqueous solutions with various buffers and measured the equilibrium pH values following the addition of HCl. Our results confirmed the accuracy of our new equation (r2 = 1; measured pH vs. predicted pH), indicating that it quantitatively accounts for the underlying acid-base phenomenology.

  18. Calculation of the equilibrium pH in a multiple-buffered aqueous solution based on partitioning of proton buffering: a new predictive formula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Minhtri K.; Kao, Liyo; Kurtz, Ira

    2009-01-01

    Upon the addition of protons to an aqueous solution containing multiple buffers, the final H+ concentration ([H+]) at equilibrium is determined by the partitioning of added H+ among the various buffer components. In the analysis of acid-base chemistry, the Henderson-Hasselbalch equation and the Stewart strong ion formulation can only describe (rather than predict) the equilibrium pH following a proton load since these formulas calculate the equilibrium pH only when the reactant concentrations at equilibrium1 1The term “equilibrium” refers to the steady state proton and reactant concentrations when the buffering of excess protons by the various buffers is complete. are already known. In this regard, it is simpler to directly measure the equilibrium pH rather than measure the equilibrium reactant concentrations to calculate the equilibrium pH. As these formulas cannot predict the final equilibrium [H+] following a proton load to a multiple-buffered aqueous solution, we developed a new quantitative approach for predicting the equilibrium [H+] that is based on the preequilibrium22The term “preequilibrium” refers to the initial proton and reactant concentrations immediately upon addition of protons and before the buffering of excess protons by the various buffers. concentrations of all buffers in an aqueous solution. The mathematical model used to derive our equation is based on proton transfer buffer equilibria without requiring the incorporation of electroneutrality considerations. The model consists of a quartic polynomial equation that is derived based solely on the partitioning of H+ among the various buffer components. We tested the accuracy of the model using aqueous solutions with various buffers and measured the equilibrium pH values following the addition of HCl. Our results confirmed the accuracy of our new equation (r2 = 1; measured pH vs. predicted pH), indicating that it quantitatively accounts for the underlying acid-base phenomenology. PMID

  19. UV-photodegradation of desipramine: Impact of concentration, pH and temperature on formation of products including their biodegradability and toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khaleel, Nareman D.H.; Mahmoud, Waleed M.M. [Sustainable Chemistry and Material Resources, Institute of Sustainable and Environmental Chemistry, Leuphana University of Lüneburg, Scharnhorststraße 1 C13, DE 21335 Lüneburg (Germany); Pharmaceutical Analytical Chemistry Department, Faculty of Pharmacy, Suez Canal University, Ismailia 41522 (Egypt); Olsson, Oliver [Sustainable Chemistry and Material Resources, Institute of Sustainable and Environmental Chemistry, Leuphana University of Lüneburg, Scharnhorststraße 1 C13, DE 21335 Lüneburg (Germany); Kümmerer, Klaus, E-mail: klaus.kuemmerer@leuphana.de [Sustainable Chemistry and Material Resources, Institute of Sustainable and Environmental Chemistry, Leuphana University of Lüneburg, Scharnhorststraße 1 C13, DE 21335 Lüneburg (Germany)

    2016-10-01

    Desipramine (DMI) is a widely used tricyclic antidepressant, and it is the major metabolite of imipramine (IMI) and lofepramine (LMI); IMI and LMI are two of the most commonly used tricyclic antidepressants. If DMI enters the aquatic environment, it can be transformed by the environmental bacteria or UV radiation. Therefore, photolysis of DMI in water was performed using a simulated sunlight Xenon-lamp and a UV-lamp. Subsequently, the biodegradability of DMI and its photo-transformation products (PTPs) formed during its UV photolysis was studied. The influence of variable conditions, such as initial DMI concentration, solution pH, and temperature, on DMI UV photolysis behavior was also studied. The degree of mineralization of DMI and its PTPs was monitored. A Shimadzu HPLC-UV apparatus was used to follow the kinetic profile of DMI during UV-irradiation; after that, ion-trap and high-resolution mass spectrometry coupled with chromatography were used to monitor and identify the possible PTPs. The environmentally relevant properties and selected toxicity properties of DMI and the non-biodegradable PTPs were predicted using different QSAR models. DMI underwent UV photolysis with first-order kinetics. Quantum yields were very low. DOC values indicated that DMI formed new PTPs and was not completely mineralized. Analysis by means of high-resolution mass spectrometry revealed that the photolysis of DMI followed three main photolysis pathways: isomerization, hydroxylation, and ring opening. The photolysis rate was inversely proportional to initial DMI concentration. The pH showed a significant impact on the photolysis rate of DMI, and on the PTPs in terms of both formation kinetics and mechanisms. Although temperature was expected to increase the photolysis rate, it showed a non-significant impact in this study. Results from biodegradation tests and QSAR analysis revealed that DMI and its PTPs are not readily biodegradable and that some PTPs may be human and/or eco

  20. Methods of pH determination in Calcareous soils of Oman: The effect of Electrolyte and soil solution ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Busaidi, A.; Cookson, P.

    2002-01-01

    Determination of pH assists in understanding many reactions that occur in soil. Soil pH values are highly sensitive to the procedure used for determination. In this study, pH was measured in different electrolytes [distilled water (pHw), 0.01MCaCl2 (pHCa), 1MKCl (pHk), and 0.01MBaCl2 (pHba)] with different soil: electrolyte ratios (i.e. 1:1, 1:2.5 and 1:5). The objective was to determine the effect of each electrolyte and dilution ratio on pH of saline and non-saline soils from Oman. It was found that ph values varied significantly between electrolytes and with different dilution ratios. Linear regression equations were generated between electrolytes, dilution ratios and were mostly significant. Soil pH values determined in different electrolytes were significantly interrelated. Water appeared as a highly suitable solvent for soil pH measurements because it is simple and values familiar to soil users. However, alkaline errors and electrode instabilities due to liquid junction and soluble salt effects, affected soil pH measurements, especially in water, and resulted in alkaline errors during pH measurements. Errors were minimized when pH was measured in electrolytes rather than in water. (author)

  1. SPATIAL AND TEMPORAL PATTERN OF SOIL pH AND Eh AND THEIR IMPACT ON SOLUTE IRON CONTENT IN A WETLAND (TRANSDANUBIA, HUNGARY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SZALAI ZOLTÁN

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Land mosaics have direct and indirect influence on chemical reaction and redox condition of soils. The present paper deals with the relationship between some environmental factors (such as soil andvegetation patterns, micro-relief, water regime, temperature and incident solar radiation and the pH, Eh of soils and solute iron in a headwater wetland in Transdanubia, Hungary. Measurements have been taken in four different patches and along their boundaries: sedge (Carex vulpina, Carex riparia, three patches and two species, horsetail (Equisetum arvense, common nettle (Urtica dioica. Thespatial pattern of the studied parameters are influenced by the water regime, micro-topography, climatic conditions and by direct and indirect effects of vegetation. The indirect effect can be the shading, which has influence on soil temperature and on the incident solar radiation (PAR. Root respiration and excretion of organic acids appear as direct effects.. There have been measured individual pH and Eh characteristic in the studied patches. Soil Eh, pH and solute iron have shown seasonal dynamics. Higher redox potentials (increasingly oxidative conditions and higher pH values were measured between late autumn and early spring. The increasing physiological activity of plants causes lower pH and Eh and it leads to higher spatial differences. Although temperature is an essential determining factor for Eh and pH, but our results suggest it rather has indirect effectsthrough plants on wetlands.

  2. The study on the pH behavior of the HFSC leached solution. The development of model considering the pozzolanic reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Yasushi; Mihara, Morihiro

    2005-09-01

    The development of low alkalinity cement (high fly-ash contained silica-fume cement, HFSC) has been carried out in JNC. Low alkalinity for this cement is achieved by adding pozzolan materials to ordinary portland cement and Ca ion attributed to high alkalinity is consumed by forming CHS gel. This report shows the calculation model to predict the composition for HFSC reacted solution which considers cement mineral dissolution/precipitation as equilibrium reactions and dissolution for pozzolan material as a kinetic reaction. The dissolution kinetic equation for pozzolan material is also derived from leaching experiment. This calculation model is applied to the leaching experiment where powdered HFSC was reacted with distilled water. As a result of comparison between calculation and experimental measurement at the early stage for leaching the tendency for pH, pH decrease from 12.5 to 11.5 drastically, could be interpreted by this calculation model, however, after this drastic pH decreasing pH predicted by calculation model also shows drastic decrease whereas pH for experiment decreased mildly around pH 11.5. It could be thought that this difference between experiment and calculation is caused by inappropriate modelling for CSH gel dissolution/precipitation of C/S value lower than 1.0. For this C/S range thermodynamic data for intermediate and end member for solid solution for CSH gel and in addition the reaction kinetic for CSH gel should be examined in detail. (author)

  3. Contribution of solution pH and buffer capacity to suppress intergranular stress corrosion cracking of sensitized type 304 stainless steel at 95 C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, S.; Shibata, T.; Haruna, T.

    1999-01-01

    Controlling pH of high-temperature water to ∼pH 7 at 300 C by adding lithium hydroxide (LiOH) into the coolant system of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) successfully has been mitigating the corrosion of PWR component materials. The effects of solution pH and buffer capacity on intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of sensitized type 304 stainless steel ([SS] UNS S30400) was examined at 95 C by slow strain rate technique (SSRT) with an in-situ cracking observation system. It was found that an increase in solution pH or buffer capacity increased crack initiation time and decreased mean crack initiation frequency, but exerted almost no effect on crack propagation. This inhibition effect on IGSCC initiation was explained as resulting from a retarding effect of solution pH and buffer capacity on the decrease in pH at crack nuclei caused by the hydrolysis of metal ions dissolved when the passive film was ruptured by strain in SSRT

  4. Influence of alkaline (PH 8.3-12.0) and saline solutions on chemical, mineralogical and physical properties of two different bentonites - batch experiments at 25 deg. C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heikola, Tiina; Vuorinen, Ulla; Kumpulainen, Sirpa; Kiviranta, Leena; Korkeakoski, Petri

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Construction of a spent fuel repository deep in the bedrock will need supporting structures using cement materials. A part of them can be removed before closure but still it is estimated that about 1000 tonnes will remain in the host rock. Degradation of cementitious materials produces leachates of high pH. If such an alkaline plume reaches the bentonite buffer, it may induce mineralogical and chemical changes in bentonite over long term, and further affect the safety functions of the buffer. Laboratory experiments were done with the objective to gain data of possible alterations in mineralogical, chemical and physical properties of bentonites contacted with high-pH saline solutions. Two untreated, high grade, Na- and Ca-bentonites, were used in batch experiments, which were carried out in an anaerobic glove-box at 25±1 deg. C for 554 days. Each bentonite sample (20 g) was leached with approximately 3.8 L of leaching solution, which equals 190 mL/g of bentonite. The bentonites were leached with three types of simulated cement waters (pH 9.7, 11.3 and 12.0) and one saline groundwater simulate (pH 8.3) as a reference. The leaching solutions were 0.3 M, and contained NaCl and CaCl 2 , and trace amounts of SiO 2 , K, Br, Mg and SO 4 . Dissolved oxygen and carbon dioxide were removed from leaching solutions before mixing of bentonite in PC bottles. The samples were placed on a platform shaker in order to allow better contact between bentonite and the leaching solution. The evolution of pH in the samples was followed by measuring the pH-value of each sample in the solution phase approximately twice a week and the solution was renewed when values of two to three consecutive measurements did not change. On average, the leaching solution was renewed once a month. For each renewal of the leaching solution the phases were separated, the reacted solution withdrawn, and the chemical composition analysed. Before analysis the

  5. pH variation and influence in an autotrophic nitrogen removing biofilm system using an efficient numerical solution strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vangsgaard, Anna Katrine; Mauricio Iglesias, Miguel; Valverde Perez, Borja

    2013-01-01

    A pH simulator consisting of an efficient numerical solver of a system of nine nonlinear equations was constructed and implemented in the modeling software MATLAB. The pH simulator was integrated in a granular biofilm model and used to simulate the pH profiles within granules performing...... the nitritation-anammox process for a range of operating points. The simulation results showed that pH profiles were consistently increasing with increasing depth into the granule, since the proton producing aerobic ammonium oxidizers (AOB) were located close to the granule surface.Despite this pH profile, more...... NH3 was available for AOB than for anaerobic ammonium oxidizers (AnAOB), located in the center of the granules. However, operating at a higher oxygen loading resulted in steeper changes in pH over the depth of the granule and caused the NH3 concentration profile to increase from the granule surface...

  6. Transport and Retention of TiO2 Rutile Nanoparticles in Saturated Porous Media: Influence of Solution pH, Ionic Strength, and the Presence of Humic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    The influence of solution pH, ionic strength, and varying concentrations of the Suwannee River Humic Acid (SRHA) on the transport of titanium dioxide (TiO2, rutile) nanoparticle aggregates (nTiO2) in saturated porous media was investigated through systematically examining the tra...

  7. Role of Metal Cations on the corrosion behaviour of 8090-T851 in a pH 2.0 solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murthy, K.S.N.; Ambat, Rajan; Dwarakadasa, E.S.

    1994-01-01

    The influence of cations such as Cu2+, Al3+ and Li+ on the corrosion behaviour of 8090-T851(Al-Li) alloy in a pH 2.0 HCl solution was investigated by weight loss and polarisation techniques. Weight loss experiments showed that the effect of cation is a strong function of its nature...

  8. Solutions of the Dirac Equation with the Shifted DENG-FAN Potential Including Yukawa-Like Tensor Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahya, W. A.; Falaye, B. J.; Oluwadare, O. J.; Oyewumi, K. J.

    2013-08-01

    By using the Nikiforov-Uvarov method, we give the approximate analytical solutions of the Dirac equation with the shifted Deng-Fan potential including the Yukawa-like tensor interaction under the spin and pseudospin symmetry conditions. After using an improved approximation scheme, we solved the resulting schr\\"{o}dinger-like equation analytically. Numerical results of the energy eigenvalues are also obtained, as expected, the tensor interaction removes degeneracies between spin and pseudospin doublets.

  9. The passivation of calcite by acid mine water. Column experiments with ferric sulfate and ferric chloride solutions at pH 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soler, Josep M. [Institute of Earth Sciences ' Jaume Almera' (CSIC), Lluis Sole i Sabaris s/n, 08028 Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Institute of Environmental Assessment and Water Research (CSIC), Jordi Girona 18, 08034 Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain)], E-mail: jsoler@ija.csic.es; Boi, Marco [Institute of Earth Sciences ' Jaume Almera' (CSIC), Lluis Sole i Sabaris s/n, 08028 Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Institute of Environmental Assessment and Water Research (CSIC), Jordi Girona 18, 08034 Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Mogollon, Jose Luis [Institute of Earth Sciences ' Jaume Almera' (CSIC), Lluis Sole i Sabaris s/n, 08028 Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Instituto de Ciencias de la Tierra, Universidad Central de Venezuela, Caracas 1020-A (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Cama, Jordi; Ayora, Carlos [Institute of Earth Sciences ' Jaume Almera' (CSIC), Lluis Sole i Sabaris s/n, 08028 Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Institute of Environmental Assessment and Water Research (CSIC), Jordi Girona 18, 08034 Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Nico, Peter S.; Tamura, Nobumichi; Kunz, Martin [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2008-12-15

    Column experiments, simulating the behavior of passive treatment systems for acid mine drainage, have been performed. Acid solutions (HCl or H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, pH 2), with initial concentrations of Fe(III) ranging from 250 to 1500 mg L{sup -1}, were injected into column reactors packed with calcite grains at a constant flow rate. The composition of the solutions was monitored during the experiments. At the end of the experiments (passivation of the columns), the composition and structure of the solids were measured. The dissolution of calcite in the columns caused an increase in pH and the release of Ca into the solution, leading to the precipitation of gypsum and Fe-oxyhydroxysulfates (Fe(III)-SO{sub 4}-H{sup +} solutions) or Fe-oxyhydroxychlorides (Fe(III)-Cl-H{sup +} solutions). The columns worked as an efficient barrier for some time, increasing the pH of the circulating solutions from 2 to {approx}6-7 and removing its metal content. However, after some time (several weeks, depending on the conditions), the columns became chemically inert. The results showed that passivation time increased with decreasing anion and metal content of the solutions. Gypsum was the phase responsible for the passivation of calcite in the experiments with Fe(III)-SO{sub 4}-H{sup +} solutions. Schwertmannite and goethite appeared as the Fe(III) secondary phases in those experiments. Akaganeite was the phase responsible for the passivation of the system in the experiments with Fe(III)-Cl-H{sup +} solutions.

  10. Collection and storage of red blood cells with anticoagulant and additive solution with a physiologic pH

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burger, Patrick; Korsten, Herbert; Verhoeven, Arthur J.; de Korte, Dirk; van Bruggen, Robin

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A donation of whole blood is most commonly collected in acidic citrate-phosphate-dextrose (CPD) variants with pH 5.2 to 6.2 as anticoagulants. Previously, we have shown that the initial pH after red blood cell (RBC) preparation can have an effect on RBCs during storage. First, we

  11. PhD Crisis Discourse: A Critical Approach to the Framing of the Problem and Some Australian "Solutions"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuthbert, Denise; Molla, Tebeje

    2015-01-01

    A feature of HE reform discourse is the tendency to construct the rationale for reform in terms of averting calamity and risk. We refer to this risk talk as "crisis discourse." This study examines the formulation of PhD crisis discourse internationally and in Australia. We find that a key feature of PhD crisis discourse is that…

  12. pH variation and influence in an autotrophic nitrogen removing biofilm system using an efficient numerical solution strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vangsgaard, Anna Katrine; Mauricio-Iglesias, Miguel; Valverde-Pérez, Borja; Gernaey, Krist V; Sin, Gürkan

    2013-01-01

    A pH simulator consisting of an efficient numerical solver of a system of nine nonlinear equations was constructed and implemented in the modeling software MATLAB. The pH simulator was integrated in a granular biofilm model and used to simulate the pH profiles within granules performing the nitritation-anammox process for a range of operating points. The simulation results showed that pH profiles were consistently increasing with increasing depth into the granule, since the proton-producing aerobic ammonium-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) were located close to the granule surface. Despite this pH profile, more NH3 was available for AOB than for anaerobic ammonium oxidizers, located in the center of the granules. However, operating at a higher oxygen loading resulted in steeper changes in pH over the depth of the granule and caused the NH3 concentration profile to increase from the granule surface towards the center. The initial value of the background charge and influent bicarbonate concentration were found to greatly influence the simulation result and should be accurately measured. Since the change in pH over the depth of the biofilm was relatively small, the activity potential of the microbial groups affected by the pH did not change more than 5% over the depth of the granules.

  13. Fate of cadmium at the soil-solution interface: a thermodynamic study as influenced by varying pH at South 24 Parganas, West Bengal, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karak, Tanmoy; Paul, Ranjit Kumar; Das, Sampa; Das, Dilip K; Dutta, Amrit Kumar; Boruah, Romesh K

    2015-11-01

    A study on the sorption kinetics of Cd from soil solution to soils was conducted to assess the persistence of Cd in soil solution as it is related to the leaching, bioavailability, and potential toxicity of Cd. The kinetics of Cd sorption on two non-contaminated alkaline soils from Canning (22° 18' 48.02″ N and 88° 39' 29.0″ E) and Lakshmikantapur (22° 06' 16.61″ N and 88° 19' 08.66″ E) of South 24 Parganas, West Bengal, India, were studied using conventional batch experiment. The variable soil suspension parameters were pH (4.00, 6.00, 8.18, and 9.00), temperatures (308, 318, and 328 K) and Cd concentrations (5-100 mg L(-1)). The average rate coefficient (kavg) and half-life (t1/2) values indicate that the persistence of Cd in soil solution is influenced by both temperature and soil suspension pH. The concentration of Cd in soil solution decreases with increase of temperature; therefore, Cd sorption on the soil-solution interface is an endothermic one. Higher pH decreases the t 1/2 of Cd in soil solution, indicating that higher pH (alkaline) is not a serious concern in Cd toxicity than lower pH (acidic). Based on the energy of activation (Ea) values, Cd sorption in acidic pH (14.76±0.29 to 64.45±4.50 kJ mol(-1)) is a surface control phenomenon and in alkaline pH (9.33±0.09 to 44.60±2.01 kJ mol(-1)) is a diffusion control phenomenon The enthalpy of activation (ΔH∓) values were found to be between 7.28 and 61.73 kJ mol(-1). Additionally, higher positive energy of activation (ΔG∓) values (46.82±2.01 to 94.47±2.36 kJ mol(-1)) suggested that there is an energy barrier for product formation.

  14. Effect of surface chemistry, solution pH, and ionic strength on the removal of herbicides diuron and amitrole from water by an activated carbon fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontecha-Cámara, M A; López-Ramón, M V; Alvarez-Merino, M A; Moreno-Castilla, C

    2007-01-30

    A study was conducted on the effects of carbon surface chemistry, solution pH, and ionic strength on the removal of diuron and amitrole from aqueous solutions by adsorption on an as-received and oxidized activated carbon fiber. Results obtained were explained by the surface characteristics of the adsorbents and the characteristics of the herbicide molecules. Under the experimental conditions used, diuron uptake was much higher than that of amitrole, despite its larger molecular dimensions, due to the lesser water solubility, greater hydrophobicity, and larger dipolar moment of diuron compared with amitrole. Uptake variations associated with differences in carbon surface oxidation, solution pH, and ionic strength were explained by corresponding changes in electrostatic, hydrophobic, and van der Waals interactions.

  15. Influence of the solution pH in the 6-mercaptopurine self-assembled monolayer (6MP-SAM) on a Au(111) single-crystal electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madueño, Rafael; García-Raya, Daniel; Viudez, Alfonso J; Sevilla, José M; Pineda, Teresa; Blázquez, Manuel

    2007-10-23

    Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of 6-mercaptopurine (6MP) have been prepared on a Au(111) single-crystal electrode by immersion of the metal surface in a 100 microM 6MP and 0.01 M HClO4 solution. The 6MP-SAM Au(111) single-crystal electrodes were transferred to the cell and allowed to equilibrate with the different aqueous working solutions before the electrochemical experiments. The influence of the solution pH was studied by cyclic voltammetry, double layer capacitance curves, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The electrochemical behavior of the 6MP-SAM in acetic acid at pH 4 presents important differences in comparison to that obtained in 0.1 M KOH solutions. Cyclic voltammograms for the reductive desorption process in acid medium are broad and show some features that can be explained by a phase transition between a chemisorbed and a physisorbed state of the 6MP molecules. The low solubility of these molecules in acid medium could explain this phenomenon and the readsorption of the complete monolayer when the potential is scanned in the positive direction. The variation of the double-layer capacitance values in the potential range of monolayer stability with the pH suggests that the acid-base chemistry of the 6MP molecules is playing a role. This fact has been studied by following the variations of the electron-transfer rate constant of the highly charged redox probes as are Fe(CN)(6)-3/-4 and Ru(NH3)(6)+3/+2 as a function of solution pH. The apparent surface pKa value for the 6MP-SAM (pKa approximately 8) is explained by the total conversion of the different 6MP tautomers that exist in solution to the thiol species in the adsorbed state.

  16. Effects of EDTA on the electronic properties of passive film formed on Fe-20Cr in pH 8.5 buffer solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Eun Ae; Kwon, Hyuk Sang; Beranrd, Frederic

    2003-01-01

    The electronic properties of the passive film formed on Fe-20Cr ferritic stainless steel in pH 8.5 buffer solution containing 0.05 M EDTA (ethylene diammine tetraacetic acid) were examined by the photocurrent measurements and Mott-Schottky analysis for the film. XPS depth profile for the film demonstrated that Cr content in the outermost layer of the passive film was higher in the solution with EDTA than that in the solution without EDTA, due to selective dissolution of Fe by EDTA. In the solution with EDTA, the passive film showed characteristics of an amorphous or highly disordered n-type semiconductor. The band gap energies of the passive film are estimated to be ∼ 3.0 eV, irrespective of film formation potential from 0 to 700 mV SCE and of presence of EDTA. However, the donor density of the passive film formed in the solution with EDTA is much higher than that formed in the solution without EDTA, due to an increase in oxygen vacancy resulted from the dissolution of Fe-oxide in the outermost layer of the passive film. These results support the proposed model that the passive film formed on Fe-20Cr in pH 8.5 buffer solution mainly consists of Cr-substituted γ-Fe 2 O 3

  17. Passivation Characteristics of Alloy Corrosion-Resistant Steel Cr10Mo1 in Simulating Concrete Pore Solutions: Combination Effects of pH and Chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Zhiyong; Sun, Wei; Jiang, Jinyang; Song, Dan; Ma, Han; Zhang, Jianchun; Wang, Danqian

    2016-09-01

    The electrochemical behaviour for passivation of new alloy corrosion-resistant steel Cr10Mo1 immersed in alkaline solutions with different pH values (13.3, 12.0, 10.5, and 9.0) and chloride contents (0.2 M and 1.0 M), was investigated by various electrochemical techniques: linear polarization resistance, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and capacitance measurements. The chemical composition and structure of passive films were determined by XPS. The morphological features and surface composition of the immersed steel were evaluated by SEM together with EDS chemical analysis. The results evidence that pH plays an important role in the passivation of the corrosion-resistant steel and the effect is highly dependent upon the chloride contents. In solutions with low chloride (0.2 M), the corrosion-resistant steel has notably enhanced passivity with pH falling from 13.3 to 9.0, but does conversely when in presence of high chloride (1.0 M). The passive film on the corrosion-resistant steel presents a bilayer structure: an outer layer enriched in Fe oxides and hydroxides, and an inner layer, rich in Cr species. The film composition varies with pH values and chloride contents. As the pH drops, more Cr oxides are enriched in the film while Fe oxides gradually decompose. Increasing chloride promotes Cr oxides and Fe oxides to transform into their hydroxides with little protection, and this is more significant at lower pH (10.5 and 9.0). These changes annotate passivation characteristics of the corrosion-resistant steel in the solutions of different electrolyte.

  18. The electrochemical behaviour of stainless steel AISI 304 in alkaline solutions with different pH in the presence of chlorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freire, L.; Carmezim, M.J.; Ferreira, M.G.S.; Montemor, M.F.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → The passivation and passivation breakdown of AISI 304 in alkaline solutions with different pH was studied. → The electrochemical behaviour and the corrosion resistance in chloride environments were evaluated using d.c. potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. → The results were modelled using a hierarchically distributed circuit and revealed a more susceptible surface at pH 9. → The passive film characterization was carried out by SEM and EDS analysis, revealing the existence of MnS inclusions and the increase of Cr/Fe ratio in the attacked areas, preferably the vicinity of those inclusions. - Abstract: Nowadays, stainless steel reinforcements appear as an effective solution to increase the durability of reinforced concrete structures exposed to very aggressive environments. AISI 304 is widely used for this purpose. Although the improved durability of reinforcing AISI 304, when compared to carbon steel, there is a high probability of pitting susceptibility in the presence of chlorides. Thus, the present work aims at studying the passivation and passivation breakdown of AISI 304 in alkaline solutions of different pH (pH from 13 to 9), simulating the interstitial concrete electrolyte. These solutions were contaminated with different concentrations of chloride ions (3% and 10%, as NaCl). The electrochemical behaviour was evaluated by d.c. potentiodynamic polarization and by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The morphological features and the changes observed in the surface composition were evaluated by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) together with EDS chemical analysis. The results evidence that pH plays an important role in the evolution of the film resistance and charge transfer processes. Moreover, the effect is highly dependent upon the chloride content and immersion time.

  19. Removal of radiocobalt from aqueous solutions by kaolinite affected by solid content, pH, ionic strength, contact time and temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kan Li; Zhengjie Liu; Lei Chen; Yunhui Dong; Jun Hu; Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei

    2013-01-01

    The kaolinite sample was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and X-ray powder diffraction, and was applied as adsorbent for the removal of radiocobalt ions from radioactive wastewater. The results demonstrated that the sorption of Co(II) was strongly dependent on pH and ionic strength at low pH values, and independent of pH and ionic strength at high pH values. The sorption of Co(II) was dominated by outer-sphere surface complexation or ion exchange at low pH values, whereas inner-sphere surface complexation was the main sorption mechanism at high pH values. The sorption isotherms were well described by Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevich models. The thermodynamic parameters (i.e., ΔGdeg, ΔSdeg, ΔHdeg) calculated from the temperature-dependent sorption isotherms indicated that the sorption of Co(II) on kaolinite was an endothermic and spontaneous process. The results of high sorption capacity of kaolinite suggested that the kaolinite sample was a suitable material for the preconcentration of Co(II) from large volumes of aqueous solutions and as backfill materials in nuclear waste management. (author)

  20. pH sensing in aqueous solutions using a MnO2 thin film electrodeposited on a glassy carbon electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cherchour, N.; Deslouis, C.; Messaoudi, B.; Pailleret, A.

    2011-01-01

    An electrolysis technique at a constant potential was used to develop a highly reproducible and fast elaboration method of adherent manganese dioxide thin films on a glassy carbon electrode from aqueous solutions containing sulfuric acid and manganese sulfate. The resulting films were found to have a nanostructured character presumably due rather to birnessite (δ-MnO 2 ) than to γ-MnO 2 , as suggested by their Raman and XRD signatures. They lead to modified electrodes that present an obvious although complex pH dependent potentiometric response. This sensor indeed showed a single slope non-Nernstian linear behaviour over the 1.5-12 pH range for increasing pH direction ('trace'), whereas a Nernstian two slopes linear behaviour was observed for decreasing pH direction ('re-trace'). Preliminary EIS experiments carried out at a pH value of 1.8 seem to reveal a sensitivity mechanism based on proton insertion process at least at highly acidic pH values.

  1. pH sensing in aqueous solutions using a MnO{sub 2} thin film electrodeposited on a glassy carbon electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherchour, N. [Laboratoire de Technologie des Materiaux et Genie des Procedes (LTMGP), Departement de Genie des Procedes, Universite A. Mira, Route de Targa Ouzemmour, 06000 Bejaia (Algeria); CNRS, UPR 15, Laboratoire Interfaces et Systemes Electrochimiques (LISE, case courrier 133), 4 Place Jussieu, F-75005 Paris (France); UPMC Univ. Paris VI, UPR 15, Laboratoire Interfaces et Systemes Electrochimiques (LISE, case courrier 133), 4 Place Jussieu, F-75005 Paris (France); Deslouis, C. [CNRS, UPR 15, Laboratoire Interfaces et Systemes Electrochimiques (LISE, case courrier 133), 4 Place Jussieu, F-75005 Paris (France); UPMC Univ. Paris VI, UPR 15, Laboratoire Interfaces et Systemes Electrochimiques (LISE, case courrier 133), 4 Place Jussieu, F-75005 Paris (France); Messaoudi, B. [Laboratoire de Technologie des Materiaux et Genie des Procedes (LTMGP), Departement de Genie des Procedes, Universite A. Mira, Route de Targa Ouzemmour, 06000 Bejaia (Algeria); Pailleret, A., E-mail: alain.pailleret@upmc.fr [CNRS, UPR 15, Laboratoire Interfaces et Systemes Electrochimiques (LISE, case courrier 133), 4 Place Jussieu, F-75005 Paris (France); UPMC Univ. Paris VI, UPR 15, Laboratoire Interfaces et Systemes Electrochimiques (LISE, case courrier 133), 4 Place Jussieu, F-75005 Paris (France)

    2011-11-30

    An electrolysis technique at a constant potential was used to develop a highly reproducible and fast elaboration method of adherent manganese dioxide thin films on a glassy carbon electrode from aqueous solutions containing sulfuric acid and manganese sulfate. The resulting films were found to have a nanostructured character presumably due rather to birnessite ({delta}-MnO{sub 2}) than to {gamma}-MnO{sub 2}, as suggested by their Raman and XRD signatures. They lead to modified electrodes that present an obvious although complex pH dependent potentiometric response. This sensor indeed showed a single slope non-Nernstian linear behaviour over the 1.5-12 pH range for increasing pH direction ('trace'), whereas a Nernstian two slopes linear behaviour was observed for decreasing pH direction ('re-trace'). Preliminary EIS experiments carried out at a pH value of 1.8 seem to reveal a sensitivity mechanism based on proton insertion process at least at highly acidic pH values.

  2. Influence of pH on Cr(VI) ions removal from aqueous solutions using carboxymethyl cellulose-based hydrogel as adsorbent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anah, L.; Astrini, N.

    2017-03-01

    The major problem in heavy metal pollution is that these metals are not biodegradable and accordingly accumulate in the bodies of living organisms, causing dangerous diseases and serious cell disorder. According to World Health Organization (WHO), the long term exposure of Cr(VI) levels of over 0.1 ppm causes respiratory problems, liver and kidney damage, and carcinogenicity.Due to its easy operation and of various cheap adsorbents development, adsorption has been proved to be efficient and most economically attractive technique and feasible to the removal of toxic heavy metal from wastewater. The study aimed to report the removal of Cr(VI) ions from aqueous solutions through adsorption process using carboxymethyl cellulose-graft-poly(acrylic acid) (CMC-g-PAA) hydrogel as adsorbent.Effect of pH was studied to remove hexavalent chromium.Graft copolymerization of poly(acrylic acid) onto carboxymethyl cellulose was carried out in the presence of benzoyl peroxide redox initiator and methylenbisacrylamide as crosslinker agent. Batch experiments were carried out to investigate the effects ofinitial pH.The adsorption of Cr(VI) ions as a function of pH was conducted in the initial pH range of 1 to 8. The results indicated that acidic pH strongly favored the adsorption. The optimum pH for adsorption of Cr(VI) ranged from 1 to 3, and the maximum uptake of Cr(VI) from the solution was 6.53 mg/g at pH 1 and 30°C. FTIR spectroscopy, SEM analyses were performed on the adsorbent before and after Cr(VI) binding. All analyses confirmed the complexation of Cr(VI) ions on the adsorbent.

  3. Effect of the pH in the adsorption and in the immersion enthalpy of monohydroxylated phenols from aqueous solutions on activated carbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco-Martínez, D A; Giraldo, L; Moreno-Piraján, J C

    2009-09-30

    An activated carbon Carbochem--PS230 was modified by chemical and thermal treatment in flow of H(2) in order to evaluate the influence of the activated carbon chemical surface in the adsorption of the monohydroxylated phenols. The solid-solution interaction was determined by analyzing the adsorption isotherms at 298 K at pH 7, 9 and 11 during 48 h. The adsorption capacity of activated carbons increases when the pH solution decreases. The amount adsorbed increases in the reduced carbon at the maximum adsorption pH and decreases in the oxidized carbon. In the sample of granulated activated carbon, CAG, the monohydroxylated phenols adsorption capacity diminishes in the following order catechol >hydroquinone >resorcinol, at the three pH values. The experimental data are evaluated with Freundlich's and Langmuir's models. The immersion enthalpies are determined and increase with the retained amount, ranging between 21.5 and 45.7 J g(-1). In addition, the immersion enthalpies show more interaction with the reduced activated carbon that has lower total acidity contents.

  4. Semi-mechanistic partial buffer approach to modeling pH, the buffer properties, and the distribution of ionic species in complex solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougherty, Daniel P; Da Conceicao Neta, Edith Ramos; McFeeters, Roger F; Lubkin, Sharon R; Breidt, Frederick

    2006-08-09

    In many biological science and food processing applications, it is very important to control or modify pH. However, the complex, unknown composition of biological media and foods often limits the utility of purely theoretical approaches to modeling pH and calculating the distributions of ionizable species. This paper provides general formulas and efficient algorithms for predicting the pH, titration, ionic species concentrations, buffer capacity, and ionic strength of buffer solutions containing both defined and undefined components. A flexible, semi-mechanistic, partial buffering (SMPB) approach is presented that uses local polynomial regression to model the buffering influence of complex or undefined components in a solution, while identified components of known concentration are modeled using expressions based on extensions of the standard acid-base theory. The SMPB method is implemented in a freeware package, (pH)Tools, for use with Matlab. We validated the predictive accuracy of these methods by using strong acid titrations of cucumber slurries to predict the amount of a weak acid required to adjust pH to selected target values.

  5. Electrochemical Corrosion Behavior of Carbon Steel and Hot Dip Galvanized Steel in Simulated Concrete Solution with Different pH Values

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanchen XIE

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Hot dip galvanizing technology is now widely used as a method of protection for steel rebars. The corrosion behaviors of Q235 carbon steel and hot galvanized steel in a Ca(OH2 solution with a pH from 10 to 13 was investigated by electrode potential and polarization curves testing. The results indicated that carbon steel and hot galvanized steel were all passivated in a strong alkaline solution. The electrode potential of hot dip galvanized steel was lower than that of carbon steel; thus, hot dip galvanized steel can provide very good anodic protection for carbon steel. However, when the pH value reached 12.5, a polarity reversal occurred under the condition of a certain potential. Hot dip galvanized coating became a cathode, and the corrosion of carbon steel accelerated. The electrochemical behaviors and passivation abilities of hot dip galvanized steel and carbon steel were affected by pH. The higher the pH value was, the more easily they were passivated.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.23.3.16675

  6. Study of the crystallographic phase change on copper (I) selenide thin films prepared through chemical bath deposition by varying the pH of the solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandoval-Paz, M.G., E-mail: myrnasandoval@udec.cl [Departament of Physics, Faculty of Physical Sciences and Mathematics, University of Concepcion, Box 160-C, Concepción (Chile); Rodríguez, C.A. [Department of Materials Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Concepción, Edmundo Larenas 270, Concepción 4070409 (Chile); Porcile-Saavedra, P.F. [Departament of Physics, Faculty of Physical Sciences and Mathematics, University of Concepcion, Box 160-C, Concepción (Chile); Trejo-Cruz, C. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Biobío, Avenue Collao 1202, Box 5C, Concepción 4051381 (Chile)

    2016-07-15

    Copper (I) selenide thin films with orthorhombic and cubic structure were deposited on glass substrates by using the chemical bath deposition technique. The effects of the solution pH on the films growth and subsequently the structural, optical and electrical properties of the films were studied. Films with orthorhombic structure were obtained from baths wherein both metal complex and hydroxide coexist; while films with cubic structure were obtained from baths where the metal hydroxide there is no present. The structural modifications are accompanied by changes in bandgap energy, morphology and electrical resistivity of the films. - Graphical abstract: “Study of the crystallographic phase change on copper (I) selenide thin films prepared through chemical bath deposition by varying the pH of the solution” by M. G. Sandoval-Paz, C. A. Rodríguez, P. F. Porcile-Saavedra, C. Trejo-Cruz. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Copper (I) selenide thin films were obtained by chemical bath deposition. • Orthorhombic to cubic phase change was induced by varying the reaction solution pH. • Orthorhombic phase is obtained mainly from a hydroxides cluster mechanism. • Cubic phase is obtained mainly from an ion by ion mechanism. • Structural, optical and electrical properties are presented as a function of pH.

  7. Ni removal from aqueous solutions by chemical reduction: Impact of pH and pe in the presence of citrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Chi-Wang; Yu, Jui-Hsuan; Liang, Yang-Min; Chou, Yi-Hsuan; Park, Hyung-June; Choo, Kwang-Ho; Chen, Shiao-Shing

    2016-01-01

    The chemical precipitation of Ni ions from industrial wastewater at alkaline pH values creates waste chemical sludge (e.g., Ni(OH)_2). We herein focused on Ni removal via chemical reduction using dithionite, by converting Ni(II) to its elemental or other valuable forms. Without the presence of a chelator (e.g., citrate), the nickel reduction efficiency increased with increasing dithionite:Ni molar ratio, reaching 99% at ratios above 3:1. The effect of pH on Ni reduction was in agreement with the standard redox potentials (pe"0) of dithionite, which became more negative with an increase in pH leading to greater Ni reduction efficiencies. With the formation of Ni-citrate chelates, however, the Ni reduction deteriorated. Elevated pH and temperature improved nickel reduction, due to the greater reducing power of dithionite. The optimal pH value for Ni(II) reduction was found to be 8. Injecting Cu seed particles enhanced the rate and amount of Ni reduced. NiS and Ni_3S_2 were identified in the crystal of the resulting solids by X-ray crystallography, and the presence of elemental Ni was explained by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The chemical reduction of actual printed circuit board wastewater with the dithionite:Ni(II) molar ratio dose of 12:1 retrieved 99% nickel after 30-min reaction at 40 °C.

  8. Ni removal from aqueous solutions by chemical reduction: Impact of pH and pe in the presence of citrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Chi-Wang, E-mail: chiwang@mail.tku.edu.tw [Department of Water Resources and Environmental Engineering, Tamkang University, No. 151 Yingzhuan Road, Tamsui District, New Taipei City, 25137, Taiwan (China); Yu, Jui-Hsuan [Department of Water Resources and Environmental Engineering, Tamkang University, No. 151 Yingzhuan Road, Tamsui District, New Taipei City, 25137, Taiwan (China); Department of Marine Leisure and Tourism, Taipei College of Maritime Technology, No. 150, Sec. 3, Binhai Road, Tamsui District, New Taipei City, 251, Taiwan (China); Liang, Yang-Min; Chou, Yi-Hsuan [Department of Water Resources and Environmental Engineering, Tamkang University, No. 151 Yingzhuan Road, Tamsui District, New Taipei City, 25137, Taiwan (China); Park, Hyung-June [Department of Environmental Engineering, Kyungpook National University, 80 Daehak-ro, Buk-gu, Daegu, 41566 (Korea, Republic of); Choo, Kwang-Ho, E-mail: chookh@knu.ac.kr [Department of Environmental Engineering, Kyungpook National University, 80 Daehak-ro, Buk-gu, Daegu, 41566 (Korea, Republic of); Chen, Shiao-Shing [Institute of Environmental Engineering and Management, National Taipei University of Technology, No. 1, Sec. 3, Chung-Hsiao E. Road, Taipei, 106, Taiwan (China)

    2016-12-15

    The chemical precipitation of Ni ions from industrial wastewater at alkaline pH values creates waste chemical sludge (e.g., Ni(OH){sub 2}). We herein focused on Ni removal via chemical reduction using dithionite, by converting Ni(II) to its elemental or other valuable forms. Without the presence of a chelator (e.g., citrate), the nickel reduction efficiency increased with increasing dithionite:Ni molar ratio, reaching 99% at ratios above 3:1. The effect of pH on Ni reduction was in agreement with the standard redox potentials (pe{sup 0}) of dithionite, which became more negative with an increase in pH leading to greater Ni reduction efficiencies. With the formation of Ni-citrate chelates, however, the Ni reduction deteriorated. Elevated pH and temperature improved nickel reduction, due to the greater reducing power of dithionite. The optimal pH value for Ni(II) reduction was found to be 8. Injecting Cu seed particles enhanced the rate and amount of Ni reduced. NiS and Ni{sub 3}S{sub 2} were identified in the crystal of the resulting solids by X-ray crystallography, and the presence of elemental Ni was explained by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The chemical reduction of actual printed circuit board wastewater with the dithionite:Ni(II) molar ratio dose of 12:1 retrieved 99% nickel after 30-min reaction at 40 °C.

  9. Aggregation and metal-complexation behaviour of THPP porphyrin in ethanol/water solutions as function of pH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zannotti, Marco; Giovannetti, Rita; Minofar, Babak; Řeha, David; Plačková, Lydie; D'Amato, Chiara A.; Rommozzi, Elena; Dudko, Hanna V.; Kari, Nuerguli; Minicucci, Marco

    2018-03-01

    The effect of pH change on 5,10,15,20-Tetrakis(4-hydroxyphenyl)-21H,23H-porphine (THPP) with its aggregation as function of water-ethanol mixture was studied with UV-vis, fluorescence, Raman and computational analysis. In neutral pH, THPP was present as free-base and, increasing the water amount, aggregation occurred with the formation of H- and J-aggregates. The aggregation constant and the concentration of dimers were calculated, other information about the dimer aggregation were evaluated by computational study. In acidic pH, by the insertions of two hydrogens in the porphyrin rings, the porphyrin changed its geometry with a ring deformation confirmed by red-shifted spectrum and quenching in fluorescence; at this low pH, increasing the water amount, the acidic form (THPPH2)2 + resulted more stable due to a polar environment with stronger interaction by hydrogen bonding. In basic pH, reached by NH4OH, THPP porphyrin was able to react with alkali metals in order to form sitting-atop complex (M2THPP) confirmed by the typical absorption spectrum of metallo-porphyrin, Raman spectroscopy and by computational analysis.

  10. Effects of sodium hypochlorite and high pH buffer solution in electrokinetic soil treatment on soil chromium removal and the functional diversity of soil microbial community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cang Long; Zhou Dongmei; Alshawabkeh, Akram N.; Chen Haifeng

    2007-01-01

    Effects of sodium hypochlorite (NaClO), applied as an oxidant in catholyte, and high pH buffer solution on soil Cr removal and the functional diversity of soil microbial community during enhanced electrokinetic treatments of a chromium (Cr) contaminated red soil are evaluated. Using pH control system to maintain high alkalinity of soil together with the use of NaClO increased the electrical conductivities of soil pore liquid and electroosmotic flux compared with the control (Exp-01). The pH control and NaClO improved the removal of Cr(VI) and total Cr from the soil. The highest removal percentages of soil Cr(VI) and total Cr were 96 and 72%, respectively, in Exp-04 when the pH value of the anolyte was controlled at 10 and NaClO was added in the catholyte. The alkaline soil environment and introduction of NaClO in the soil enhanced the desorption of Cr(VI) from the soil and promoted Cr(III) oxidation to mobile Cr(VI), respectively. However, the elevated pH and introduction of NaClO in the soil, which are necessary for improving the removal efficiency of soil Cr, resulted in a significantly adverse impact on the functional diversity of soil microbial community. It suggests that to assess the negative impact of extreme conditions for enhancing the extraction efficiencies of Cr on the soil properties and function is necessary

  11. Influence of the pH value of a colloidal gold solution on the absorption spectra of an LSPR-assisted sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Jin; Li, Wenbin; Zhu, Mao; Zhang, Wei; Niu, Wencheng; Liu, Guohua

    2014-01-01

    The localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPRs) of gold particles assembled on a crystal plate are a powerful tool for biological sensors. Here, we prepare gold colloids in different pH solutions. We monitor the effects of the particle radius and particle coverage on the absorption spectra of AT-cut (r-face dihedral angle of about 3°) crystal plates supporting gold nanoparticles. The surface morphologies were monitored on silicon dioxide substrates using ultraviolet and visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The results showed that the gold particle coverage decreases with increasing pH value of the gold colloid solution. This phenomenon demonstrates that self-assembled gold surfaces were formed via the electrostatic adsorption of gold particles on the positively charged, ionized amino groups on the crystal plates in the acidic solution. The spectrum of gold nanoparticles with different coverage degree on the crystal plates showed that the LSPR properties are highly dependent on pH

  12. Diffusion of flexible, charged, nanoscopic molecules in solution: Size and pH dependence for PAMAM dendrimer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiti, Prabal K.; Bagchi, Biman

    2009-12-01

    In order to understand self-diffusion (D) of a charged, flexible, and porous nanoscopic molecule in water, we carry out very long, fully atomistic molecular dynamics simulation of PAMAM dendrimer up to eight generations in explicit salt water under varying pH. We find that while the radius of gyration (Rg) varies as N1/3, the self-diffusion constant (D ) scales, surprisingly, as N-α, with α =0.39 at high pH and 0.5 at neutral pH, indicating a dramatic breakdown of Stokes-Einstein relation for diffusion of charged nanoscopic molecules. The variation in D as a function of radius of gyration demonstrates the importance of treating water and ions explicitly in the diffusion process of a flexible nanoscopic molecule. In agreement with recent experiments, the self-diffusion constant increases with pH, revealing the importance of dielectric friction in the diffusion process. The shape of a dendrimer is found to fluctuate on a nanosecond time scale. We argue that this flexibility (and also the porosity) of the dendrimer may play an important role in determining the mean square displacement of the dendrimer and the breakdown of the Stokes-Einstein relation between diffusion constant and the radius.

  13. The effect of solution pH and peroxide in the TiO2-induced photocatalysis of chlorinated aniline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, W.; Choy, W.K.; So, T.Y.

    2007-01-01

    Chlorinated anilines are frequently used in the industry as starting materials for chemical synthesis. This type of compounds can end up as pollutants in wastewater. 2-Chloroaniline (2-ClA) was selected irradiating under monochromatic UV light at 300 nm. The reaction rate could be enhanced by introducing low level of H 2 O 2 into the UV/TiO 2 system. Excess H 2 O 2 could not increase the HO· generation but retarded the reaction rate. The pH effect was also investigated in UV/TiO 2 and UV/TiO 2 /H 2 O 2 systems. All the experimental results show that pH is a sensitive parameter to the rate of degradation. Low reaction rate at acidic pH could be accounted by the dark adsorption test which has also proven the photocatalysis of TiO 2 may contribute to a two-step process: (1) 2-ClA pre-adsorbed onto TiO 2 and (2) photoexcitation of TiO 2 . At high pH, rate enhancement could be observed at UV/TiO 2 system because of the increase generation of HO·. However, the introduction of H 2 O 2 slowdown the decay rate at such alkaline medium

  14. New analytical methodology for analysing S(IV) species at low pH solutions by one stage titration method (bichromatometry) with a clear colour change. Could potentially replace the state-of-art-method iodometry at low pH analysis due higher accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santasalo-Aarnio, Annukka; Galfi, Istvan; Virtanen, Jorma; Gasik, Michael M

    2017-01-01

    A new, faster and more reliable analytical methodology for S(IV) species analysis at low pH solutions by bichromatometry is proposed. For decades the state of the art methodology has been iodometry that is still well justified method for neutral solutions, thus at low pH media possess various side reactions increasing inaccuracy. In contrast, the new methodology has no side reactions at low pH media, requires only one titration step and provides a clear color change if S(IV) species are present in the solution. The method is validated using model solutions with known concentrations and applied to analyses of gaseous SO2 from purged solution in low pH media samples. The results indicate that bichromatometry can accurately analyze SO2 from liquid samples having pH even below 0 relevant to metallurgical industrial processes.

  15. Influence of storage solution on enamel demineralization submitted to pH cycling Influência da solução de armazenagem na desmineralização do esmalte submetido à ciclagem de pH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Silva Moura

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Extracted human teeth are frequently used for research or educational purposes. Therefore, it is necessary to store them in disinfectant solutions that do not alter dental structures. Thus, this study evaluated the influence of storage solution on enamel demineralization. For that purpose, sixty samples were divided into the following groups: enamel stored in formaldehyde (F1, stored in thymol (T1, stored in formaldehyde and submitted to pH cycling (F2, stored in thymol and submitted to pH cycling (T2. All samples were evaluated by cross-sectional microhardness analysis and had their percentage of mineral volume versus micrometer (integrated area determined. Differences between groups were found up to 30-µm depth from the enamel surface (p Dentes humanos extraídos são freqüentemente utilizados para propósitos educacionais ou de pesquisa. Desta forma, é necessário o armazenamento dos mesmos em soluções desinfetantes que não alterem a estrutura dental. Para tanto, sessenta espécimes foram divididos nos seguintes grupos: esmalte armazenado em formol (F1, armazenado em timol (T1, armazenado em formol e submetido à ciclagem de pH (F2 e armazenado em timol e submetido à ciclagem de pH (T2, sendo avaliados por meio de análise de microdureza longitudinal e tiveram a porcentagem de volume mineral pro micrômetro determinada. Diferenças entre os grupos foram encontradas até a profundidade de 30µm da superfície do esmalte (p<0,05, onde o grupo mais desmineralizado era T2. Foi concluído que a solução de armazenagem influenciou na reação do substrato dental a um desafio cariogênico, sugerindo que o formaldeído pode aumentar a resistência do esmalte à desmineralização promovida pelo modelo de ciclagem de pH, quando comparado à desmineralização ocorrida no esmalte armazenado em timol.

  16. The development of a cholesterol biosensor using a liquid crystal/aqueous interface in a SDS-included β-cyclodextrin aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munir, Sundas; Park, Soo-Young, E-mail: psy@knu.ac.kr

    2015-09-17

    Sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) including β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) (β-CD{sub SDS}) was used to detect cholesterol at the 4-cyano-4′-pentylbiphenyl (5CB)/aqueous interface in transmission electron microscopy (TEM) grid cells. The β-CD acts as a host for SDS (guest). The guest SDS enclosed within the β-CD cavity was replaced with cholesterol by injecting cholesterol solution into the TEM cell at concentrations greater than 3 μM. The replacement of SDS with cholesterol was confirmed by pH measurement and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The SDS excluded from the β-CD altered the planar orientation of the 5CB confined within the TEM grid cell to a homeotropic orientation. This planar-to-homeotropic transition was observed using a polarized optical microscope under crossed polarizers. This convenient TEM grid cell provides a new method for the selective detection of cholesterol without immobilization of the detecting receptors (enzyme, antibody, or aptamer) or the use of sophisticated instruments. - Highlights: • β-CD-SDS inclusion was used for the detection of cholesterol at 5CB/aqueous interface. • The SDS enclosed within the β-CD cavity was replaced by cholesterol. • The released SDS from the β-CD caused homeotropic orientation of 5CB. • The cholesterol was detected from planar-to-homeotropic transition of 5CB. • This convenient TEM grid cell provides a new method for the selective detection of cholesterol.

  17. The development of a cholesterol biosensor using a liquid crystal/aqueous interface in a SDS-included β-cyclodextrin aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munir, Sundas; Park, Soo-Young

    2015-01-01

    Sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) including β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) (β-CD_S_D_S) was used to detect cholesterol at the 4-cyano-4′-pentylbiphenyl (5CB)/aqueous interface in transmission electron microscopy (TEM) grid cells. The β-CD acts as a host for SDS (guest). The guest SDS enclosed within the β-CD cavity was replaced with cholesterol by injecting cholesterol solution into the TEM cell at concentrations greater than 3 μM. The replacement of SDS with cholesterol was confirmed by pH measurement and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The SDS excluded from the β-CD altered the planar orientation of the 5CB confined within the TEM grid cell to a homeotropic orientation. This planar-to-homeotropic transition was observed using a polarized optical microscope under crossed polarizers. This convenient TEM grid cell provides a new method for the selective detection of cholesterol without immobilization of the detecting receptors (enzyme, antibody, or aptamer) or the use of sophisticated instruments. - Highlights: • β-CD-SDS inclusion was used for the detection of cholesterol at 5CB/aqueous interface. • The SDS enclosed within the β-CD cavity was replaced by cholesterol. • The released SDS from the β-CD caused homeotropic orientation of 5CB. • The cholesterol was detected from planar-to-homeotropic transition of 5CB. • This convenient TEM grid cell provides a new method for the selective detection of cholesterol.

  18. Modelling of the effect of solute structure and mobile phase pH and composition on the retention of phenoxy acid herbicides in reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aschi, Massimiliano; D'Archivio, Angelo Antonio; Mazzeo, Pietro; Pierabella, Mirko; Ruggieri, Fabrizio

    2008-01-01

    A feed-forward artificial neural network (ANN) learned by error back-propagation is used to generate a retention predictive model for phenoxy acid herbicides in isocratic reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. The investigated solutes (18 compounds), apart from the most common herbicides of this class, include some derivatives of benzoic acid and phenylacetic acid structurally related to phenoxy acids, as a whole covering a pK a range between 2.3 and 4.3. A mixed model in terms of both solute descriptors and eluent attributes is built with the aim of predicting retention in water-acetonitrile mobile phases within a large range of composition (acetonitrile from 30% to 70%, v/v) and acidity (pH of water before mixing with acetonitrile ranging between 2 and 5). The set of input variables consists of solute pK a and quantum chemical molecular descriptors of both the neutral and dissociated form, %v/v of acetonitrile in the mobile phase and pH of aqueous phase before mixing with acetonitrile. After elimination of redundant variables, a nine-dimensional model is identified and its prediction ability is evaluated by external validation based on three solutes not involved in model generation and by cross-validation. A multilinear counterpart in terms of the same descriptors is seen to provide a noticeably poorer retention prediction

  19. Modelling of the effect of solute structure and mobile phase pH and composition on the retention of phenoxy acid herbicides in reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aschi, Massimiliano [Dipartimento di Chimica, Ingegneria Chimica e Materiali, Universita degli Studi di L' Aquila, Via Vetoio, 67010 Coppito, L' Aquila (Italy); D' Archivio, Angelo Antonio [Dipartimento di Chimica, Ingegneria Chimica e Materiali, Universita degli Studi di L' Aquila, Via Vetoio, 67010 Coppito, L' Aquila (Italy)], E-mail: darchivi@univaq.it; Mazzeo, Pietro; Pierabella, Mirko; Ruggieri, Fabrizio [Dipartimento di Chimica, Ingegneria Chimica e Materiali, Universita degli Studi di L' Aquila, Via Vetoio, 67010 Coppito, L' Aquila (Italy)

    2008-06-02

    A feed-forward artificial neural network (ANN) learned by error back-propagation is used to generate a retention predictive model for phenoxy acid herbicides in isocratic reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. The investigated solutes (18 compounds), apart from the most common herbicides of this class, include some derivatives of benzoic acid and phenylacetic acid structurally related to phenoxy acids, as a whole covering a pK{sub a} range between 2.3 and 4.3. A mixed model in terms of both solute descriptors and eluent attributes is built with the aim of predicting retention in water-acetonitrile mobile phases within a large range of composition (acetonitrile from 30% to 70%, v/v) and acidity (pH of water before mixing with acetonitrile ranging between 2 and 5). The set of input variables consists of solute pK{sub a} and quantum chemical molecular descriptors of both the neutral and dissociated form, %v/v of acetonitrile in the mobile phase and pH of aqueous phase before mixing with acetonitrile. After elimination of redundant variables, a nine-dimensional model is identified and its prediction ability is evaluated by external validation based on three solutes not involved in model generation and by cross-validation. A multilinear counterpart in terms of the same descriptors is seen to provide a noticeably poorer retention prediction.

  20. Dry matter and nitrogen accumulation are not affected by superoptimal concentration of ammonium in flowing solution culture with pH control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rideout, J. W.; Raper, C. D. Jr; Raper CD, J. r. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    While it is known that superoptimal concentrations of the nitrate (NO3-) ion in solution culture do not increase NO3- uptake or dry matter accumulation, the same is not known for the ammonium (NH4+) ion. An experiment was conducted utilizing flowing solution culture with pH control to investigate the influence of superoptimal NH4+ concentrations on dry matter, nitrogen (N), potassium (K), calcium (Ca), and magnesium (Mg) accumulation by nonnodulated soybean plants. Increasing the NH4+ concentration in solution from 1 to 10 mM did not affect dry matter or N accumulation. Accumulations of K, Ca, and Mg were slightly decreased with increased NH4+ concentration. The NH4+ uptake system, which is saturated at less than 1mM NH4+, is able to regulate uptake of NH4+ at concentrations as high as 10 mM.

  1. Analysis of the electric conductivity and pH behaviors in recycled drainage solution of rose cv. Charlotte plants grown in substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Fernando Yepes V

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In open soilless cropping systems contamination from nutrient lixiviation is generated making it necessary to design closed or semi-closed systems, which require the determination of the maximum saline levels in recycling solutions. In this study, the electric conductivity (EC and pH behaviors were analyzed in drainage solution intended for recycling in the crop; in addition, parameters were used to estimate nutrient availability for the plants in a substrate based cropping system. This research project was carried out under greenhouse conditions in the municipality of Mosquera (Colombia. Rose cv. Charlotte grafted on "Natal briar" stocks were used, sown in pots arranged on elevated beds, 15 m in length. This project was carried out using a split-plot design with sub-plots (with the substrate as the main plot and the recycling as the sub-plot, three kinds of substrate and three recycling percentages (0, 50, and 100%, for a total of 27 experimental units. Substrate mixtures based on burned rice husk and coconut fiber were used. Recycling during one harvest cycle of the roses did not show EC and pH values above those that are considered to have a negative impact on production; however, an increasing behavior in the EC and pH values was observed. Likewise, no significant differences between the 50 and 100% recycling were observed, which means 100% recycling can be used, optimizing nutrient use and water conservation

  2. Effect of Strength and Microstructure on Stress Corrosion Cracking Behavior and Mechanism of X80 Pipeline Steel in High pH Carbonate/Bicarbonate Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Min; Du, Cuiwei; Li, Xiaogang; Liu, Zhiyong; Wang, Shengrong; Zhao, Tianliang; Jia, Jinghuan

    2014-04-01

    The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behaviors and mechanisms of X80 pipeline steels with different strength and microstructure in high pH carbonate/bicarbonate solution were investigated by slow strain rate testing and electrochemical test. The results showed that the cracking mode of low strength X80 steel composed of bulky polygonal ferrite and granular bainite in high pH solution was intergranular (IGSCC), and the SCC mechanism was anodic dissolution (AD). While the mixed cracking mode of high strength X80 steel consisted of fine acicular ferrite and granular bainite was intergranular (IGSCC) in the early stage, and transgranular (TGSCC) in the later stage. The decrease of pH value of crack tip was probably the key reason for the occurrence of TGSCC. The SCC mechanism may be a mixed mode of AD and hydrogen embrittlement (HE), and the HE mechanism may play a significant role in the deep crack propagation at the later stage. The cracking modes and SCC mechanisms of the two X80 steels were associated with its microstructure and strength.

  3. Self-assembly behavior of pH- and thermosensitive amphiphilic triblock copolymers in solution: experimental studies and self-consistent field theory simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Chunhua; Zhang, Liangshun; Lin, Jiaping; Wang, Liquan

    2008-10-09

    We investigated, both experimentally and theoretically, the self-assembly behaviors of pH- and thermosensitive poly(L-glutamic acid)- b-poly(propylene oxide)-b-poly(L-glutamic acid) (PLGA-b-PPO-b-PLGA) triblock copolymers in aqueous solution by means of transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS), circular dichroism (CD), and self-consistent field theory (SCFT) simulations. Vesicles were observed when the hydrophilic PLGA block length is shorter or the pH value of solution is lower. The vesicles were found to transform to spherical micelles when the PLGA block length increases or its conformation changes from helix to coil with increasing the pH value. In addition, increasing temperature gives rise to a decrease in the size of aggregates, which is related to the dehydration of the PPO segments at higher temperatures. The SCFT simulation results show that the vesicles transform to the spherical micelles with increasing the fraction or statistical length of A block in model ABA triblock copolymer, which corresponds to the increase in the PLGA length or its conformation change from helix to coil in experiments, respectively. The SCFT calculations also provide chain distribution information in the aggregates. On the basis of both experimental and SCFT results, the mechanism of the structure change of the PLGA- b-PPO- b-PLGA aggregates was proposed.

  4. Hemoglobin bioconjugates with surface-protected gold nanoparticles in aqueous media: The stability depends on solution pH and protein properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Caño, Rafael; Mateus, Lucia; Sánchez-Obrero, Guadalupe; Sevilla, José Manuel; Madueño, Rafael; Blázquez, Manuel; Pineda, Teresa

    2017-11-01

    The identification of the factors that dictate the formation and physicochemical properties of protein-nanomaterial bioconjugates are important to understand their behavior in biological systems. The present work deals with the formation and characterization of bioconjugates made of the protein hemoglobin (Hb) and gold nanoparticles (AuNP) capped with three different molecular layers (citrate anions (c), 6-mercaptopurine (MP) and ω-mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUA)). The main focus is on the behavior of the bioconjugates in aqueous buffered solutions in a wide pH range. The stability of the bioconjugates have been studied by UV-visible spectroscopy by following the changes in the localized surface resonance plasmon band (LSRP), Dynamic light scattering (DLS) and zeta-potential pH titrations. It has been found that they are stable in neutral and alkaline solutions and, at pH lower than the protein isoelectric point, aggregation takes place. Although the surface chemical properties of the AuNPs confer different properties in respect to colloidal stability, once the bioconjugates are formed their properties are dictated by the Hb protein corona. The protein secondary structure, as analyzed by Attenuated total reflectance infrared (ATR-IR) spectroscopy, seems to be maintained under the conditions of colloidal stability but some small changes in protein conformation take place when the bioconjugates aggregate. These findings highlight the importance to keep the protein structure upon interaction with nanomaterials to drive the stability of the bioconjugates. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. A highly selective chemosensor for colorimetric detection of Hg2+ and fluorescence detection of pH changes in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kavitha, Ramasamy; Stalin, Thambusamy

    2014-01-01

    A naturally existing and unmodified simple chemosensor, 2-hydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone (2HNQ), was identified and used for both the colorimetric detection of Hg 2+ and the fluorescent (on-off) detection of pH. The distinct color change and quenching of fluorescence emission was visible to the naked eye. More importantly, the chemosensor was used in combination with β-cyclodextrin (β-CD), which enabled the sensor to be solubilized and stabilized in aqueous solutions. The sensor selectively detected Hg 2+ via the stable 1:1 complexation of the CåO and OH groups with Hg 2+ and reflected pH changes in the range from 6 to 12 via a fluorescence on–off response resulting from the deprotonation of the hydroxyl group in 2HNQ. - Highlights: • The 2-Hydroxy-1,4-Naphthoquinone (2HNQ) chemosensor is capable of both colorimetric detection of Hg 2+ and a fluorescence on-off response to pH. • The distinct color change and quenching of fluorescence emission are detectable with the naked eye. • The on– off fluorescence response in the pH range from 6– to 12 is due to the deprotonation of the hydroxyl group in 2HNQ

  6. Chemical Speciation and Bond Lengths of Organic Solutes by Core-Level Spectroscopy: pH and Solvent Influence on p-Aminobenzoic Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Joanna S; Gainar, Adrian; Suljoti, Edlira; Xiao, Jie; Golnak, Ronny; Aziz, Emad F; Schroeder, Sven L M

    2015-05-04

    Through X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopies, the chemical, electronic and structural properties of organic species in solution can be observed. Near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) and resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) measurements at the nitrogen K-edge of para-aminobenzoic acid reveal both pH- and solvent-dependent variations in the ionisation potential (IP), 1s→π* resonances and HOMO-LUMO gap. These changes unequivocally identify the chemical species (neutral, cationic or anionic) present in solution. It is shown how this incisive chemical state sensitivity is further enhanced by the possibility of quantitative bond length determination, based on the analysis of chemical shifts in IPs and σ* shape resonances in the NEXAFS spectra. This provides experimental access to detecting even minor variations in the molecular structure of solutes in solution, thereby providing an avenue to examining computational predictions of solute properties and solute-solvent interactions. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Corrosion Effects on the Fatigue Crack Propagation of Giga-Grade Steel and its Heat Affected Zone in pH Buffer Solutions for Automotive Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, H. S.

    2018-03-01

    Corrosion fatigue crack propagation test was conducted of giga-grade steel and its heat affected zone in pH buffer solutions, and the results were compared with model predictions. Pure corrosion effect on fatigue crack propagation, particularly, in corrosive environment was evaluated by means of the modified Forman equation. As shown in results, the average corrosion rate determined from the ratio of pure corrosion induced crack length to entire crack length under a cycle load were 0.11 and 0.37 for base metal and heat affected zone, respectively, with load ratio of 0.5, frequency of 0.5 and pH 10.0 environment. These results demonstrate new interpretation methodology for corrosion fatigue crack propagation enabling the pure corrosion effects on the behavior to be determined.

  8. Technetium recovery from high alkaline solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nash, Charles A.

    2016-07-12

    Disclosed are methods for recovering technetium from a highly alkaline solution. The highly alkaline solution can be a liquid waste solution from a nuclear waste processing system. Methods can include combining the solution with a reductant capable of reducing technetium at the high pH of the solution and adding to or forming in the solution an adsorbent capable of adsorbing the precipitated technetium at the high pH of the solution.

  9. Degradation kinetics of fisetin and quercetin in solutions affected by medium pH, temperature and co-existed proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Jing

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Impacts of medium pH, temperature and coexisted proteins on the degradation of two flavonoids fisetin and quercetin were assessed by spectroscopic method in the present study. Based on the measured degradation rate constants (k, fisetin was more stable than quercetin in all cases. Increasing medium pH from 6.0 to 7.5 at 37°C enhanced respective k values of fisetin and quercetin from 8.30x10−3 and 2.81x10−2 to 0.202 and 0.375 h-1 (P<0.05. In comparison with their degradation at 37°C, fisetin and quercetin showed larger k values at higher temperature (0.124 and 0.245 h−1 at 50°C, or 0.490 and 1.42 h−1 at 65°C. Four protein products in medium could stabilize the two flavonoids (P<0.05, as these proteins at 0.10 g L-1 decreased respective k values of fisetin and quercetin to 2.28x10−2-2.98x10−2 and 4.37´10−2-5.97x10−2 h−1. Hydrophobic interaction between the proteins and the two flavonoids was evidenced responsible for the stabilization, as sodium dodecyl sulfate could destroy the stabilization significantly (P<0.05. Casein and soybean protein provided greater stabilization than whey protein isolate. It is thus concluded that higher temperature and alkaline pH can enhance flavonoid loss, whereas coexisted proteins as flavonoid stabilizers can inhibit flavonoid degradation.

  10. Effective extraction of radioactive cesium from various pollutants with a detergent solution including Mg2+ and K+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noguchi, Yuki; Kida, Toshiyuki; Kato, Eiichi; Akashi, Mitsuru; Shimizu, Kikuo

    2015-01-01

    Radioactive cesium (Cs) is extracted effectively from various polluted samples such as soil, silt, and burned ash by washing with a detergent solution comprised of KCl, MgCl 2 , and hydroxyethyl cellulose in a 5% H 2 SO 4 aqueous solution. Repeatedly washing extracts more than 65% of the radioactive Cs. (author)

  11. Passive behaviour of alloy corrosion-resistant steel Cr10Mo1 in simulating concrete pore solutions with different pH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ai, Zhiyong; Jiang, Jinyang; Sun, Wei; Song, Dan; Ma, Han; Zhang, Jianchun; Wang, Danqian

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A new alloy corrosion-resistant steel Cr10Mo1 is developed for reinforcing rebar of concrete in severe environments. • The effects of pH on the passive behaviour of Cr10Mo1 steel compared with plain carbon steel were studied systematically by electrochemical techniques and surface analysis. • The mechanism for self-reinforcing passivity against carbonation of the corrosion-resistant steel is revealed. - Abstract: The passive behaviour of new alloy corrosion-resistant steel Cr10Mo1 and plain carbon steel (as a comparison) in simulating concrete pore solutions of different pH (ranging from 13.5 to 9.0) under open circuit potential conditions, was evaluated by various electrochemical techniques: potentiodynamic polarization, capacitance measurements and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The chemical composition and structure of passive films were investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS). The electrochemical responses of passive films show that Cr10Mo1 steel has an increasing passivity with pH decreasing while carbon steel dose conversely, revealing carbonation does no negative effect on passivation of the corrosion-resistant steel. SIMS reveals that the passive film on the corrosion-resistant steel presents a bilayer structure: an outer layer mainly consisting of Fe oxides and hydroxides, and an inner layer enriched in Cr species, while only a Fe-concentrated layer for carbon steel. According to the XPS analysis results, as the pH decreases, more stable and protective Cr oxides are enriched in the film on Cr10Mo1 steel while Fe oxides gradually decompose. Higher content of Cr oxides in the film layer provides Cr10Mo1 corrosion-resistant steel more excellent passivity at lower pH.

  12. Passive behaviour of alloy corrosion-resistant steel Cr10Mo1 in simulating concrete pore solutions with different pH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ai, Zhiyong, E-mail: 230139452@seu.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing 211189, Jiangsu (China); Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Construction Materials, Nanjing 211189, Jiangsu (China); Jiang, Jinyang, E-mail: jiangjinyang16@163.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing 211189, Jiangsu (China); Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Construction Materials, Nanjing 211189, Jiangsu (China); Sun, Wei, E-mail: sunwei@seu.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing 211189, Jiangsu (China); Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Construction Materials, Nanjing 211189, Jiangsu (China); Song, Dan, E-mail: songdancharls@hhu.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing 211189, Jiangsu (China); Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Construction Materials, Nanjing 211189, Jiangsu (China); College of Mechanics and Materials, Hohai University, Nanjing 210098, Jiangsu (China); Ma, Han, E-mail: mahan-iris@shasteel.cn [Research Institute of Jiangsu Shasteel Iron and Steel, Zhangjiagang 215625, Jiangsu (China); Zhang, Jianchun, E-mail: Zhangjc-iris@shasteel.cn [Research Institute of Jiangsu Shasteel Iron and Steel, Zhangjiagang 215625, Jiangsu (China); Wang, Danqian, E-mail: wonderbaba@126.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing 211189, Jiangsu (China); Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Construction Materials, Nanjing 211189, Jiangsu (China)

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • A new alloy corrosion-resistant steel Cr10Mo1 is developed for reinforcing rebar of concrete in severe environments. • The effects of pH on the passive behaviour of Cr10Mo1 steel compared with plain carbon steel were studied systematically by electrochemical techniques and surface analysis. • The mechanism for self-reinforcing passivity against carbonation of the corrosion-resistant steel is revealed. - Abstract: The passive behaviour of new alloy corrosion-resistant steel Cr10Mo1 and plain carbon steel (as a comparison) in simulating concrete pore solutions of different pH (ranging from 13.5 to 9.0) under open circuit potential conditions, was evaluated by various electrochemical techniques: potentiodynamic polarization, capacitance measurements and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The chemical composition and structure of passive films were investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS). The electrochemical responses of passive films show that Cr10Mo1 steel has an increasing passivity with pH decreasing while carbon steel dose conversely, revealing carbonation does no negative effect on passivation of the corrosion-resistant steel. SIMS reveals that the passive film on the corrosion-resistant steel presents a bilayer structure: an outer layer mainly consisting of Fe oxides and hydroxides, and an inner layer enriched in Cr species, while only a Fe-concentrated layer for carbon steel. According to the XPS analysis results, as the pH decreases, more stable and protective Cr oxides are enriched in the film on Cr10Mo1 steel while Fe oxides gradually decompose. Higher content of Cr oxides in the film layer provides Cr10Mo1 corrosion-resistant steel more excellent passivity at lower pH.

  13. Effects of pH and Competing Anions on the Solution Speciation of Arsenic by Ion Exchange Resins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Impellitteri, Christopher A.; Ryan, JAmes A.; Al-Abed, Souhail R.; Scheckel, Kirk G.; Randall, Paul M.; Richardson, Collin A.

    2003-03-26

    Anion-exchange resins (AER) are used to differentiate As(V) and As(III) by retaining As(V) and allowing As(III) to pass through. AERs allow rapid speciation of As in the field which precludes the effects of sample preservation on As speciation. Aqueous environmental samples contain anions that may interfere with the speciation of As. This study compares the speciation of As by two commercially available AERs. A silica-based AER was selected for further study. As(V) and As(III) were passed through the AER in the presence of NO3 -, SO4 2-, HPO4 2-, Cl- and HCO3 - at pH 4, 6 and 8. Recoveries of As species in mixed systems range between 90 to 100%. Breakthrough curves for As(V) are presented which allow calculation of loading rates. HPO4 2- has the greatest effect on the speciation of As by AER.

  14. Study of the pitting and repassiv,tion corrosion potential of zicaloy-4 halides solutions at 250C and several pH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardiazabal, J.I.; Cordova, R.; Gomez, H.; Layana, G.; Schrebler, R.

    1987-01-01

    The electrochemical behaviour of Zircaloy-4 electrode in chloride, bromide and iodide acid solution was investigated at 25 0 C employing stationary, quasi-stationary and potentiodynamic techniques. The results show that the pitting and repassivation potentials are independent on pH but both are dependent on halice concentration, following linear relation ships in these cases. It is also possible to correlate the pitting potential with the ionic radius of the anions, allowing thus to establish an order in their agressive properties. This order was extrapolated for fluoride ion and further experimental measurements show that the corrosion potential of Zircaloy-4 in acid or neutra solution of this ion (which undergoes active dissolution) is coincident with that predicted from the Ep v/s ionic radius determined for the other halides. (Author) [pt

  15. Effect of pH and uranium concentration on interaction of uranium(VI) and uranium(IV) with organic ligands in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, W.C.; Victor, D.M.; Chakrabarti, C.L.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of pH and uranium concentration on the interactions of uranium(VI) and uranium(IV) with organic ligands was studied by employing dialysis and ultrafiltration techniques. The interactions of U(VI) and U(IV) with organic ligands in nitrate or chloride aqueous solution have been found to be pH-dependent. The stability constants of uranium-organic complexes decrease in the order: fulvic acid>humic acid>tannic acid for U(VI) and humic acid>tannic acid>fulvic acid for U(IV). Scatchard plots for the uranium-organic acid systems indicate two types of binding sites with a difference in stability constants of about 10 2 . Ultrafiltration of uranium-humic acid complexes indicates that U(VI) and U(IV) ions are concentrated in larger molecular size fractions (>5.1 nm) at pH less than or equal to 3 and in smaller molecular size fractions (in the range 5.1 to 3.1 nm and 2.4 to 1.9 nm) at pH greater than or equal to 5. 7 figures, 4 tables

  16. Electrochemical characteristics of bioresorbable binary MgCa alloys in Ringer's solution: Revealing the impact of local pH distributions during in-vitro dissolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mareci, D; Bolat, G; Izquierdo, J; Crimu, C; Munteanu, C; Antoniac, I; Souto, R M

    2016-03-01

    Biodegradable magnesium-calcium (MgCa) alloy is a very attractive biomaterial. Two MgCa alloys below the solid solubility of Ca were considered, as to solely investigate the effect of Ca content on the behavior of magnesium and the pH changes associated to metal dissolution. X-ray diffraction analysis and optical microscopy showed that both Mg-0.63Ca and Mg-0.89Ca alloys were solely composed of α(Mg) phase. Degradation characteristics and electrochemical characterization of MgCa alloys were investigated during exposure to Ringer's solution at 37 °C by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and scanning electrochemical microscopy. The impedance behavior showed both capacitive and inductive features that are related to the alloy charge transfer reaction and the relaxation of the absorbed corrosion compounds, and can be described in terms of an equivalent circuit. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was employed to view the surface morphology of the MgCa samples after 1 week immersion in Ringer's solution showing extensive precipitation of corrosion products, whereas the substrate shows evidence of a non-uniform corrosion process. Energy dispersive analysis showed that the precipitates contained oxygen, calcium, magnesium and chlorine, and the Mg:Ca ratios were smaller than in the alloys. Scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) was used to visualize local pH changes associated to these physicochemical processes with high spatial resolution. The occurrence of pH variations in excess of 3 units between anodic and cathodic half-cell reactions was monitored in situ. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. The effect of solution pH on the electrochemical performance of nanocrystalline metal ferrites MFe2O4 (M=Cu, Zn, and Ni) thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsayed, E. M.; Rashad, M. M.; Khalil, H. F. Y.; Ibrahim, I. A.; Hussein, M. R.; El-Sabbah, M. M. B.

    2016-04-01

    Nanocrystalline metal ferrite MFe2O4 (M=Cu, Zn, and Ni) thin films have been synthesized via electrodeposition-anodization process. Electrodeposited (M)Fe2 alloys were obtained from aqueous sulfate bath. The formed alloys were electrochemically oxidized (anodized) in aqueous (1 M KOH) solution, at room temperature, to the corresponding hydroxides. The parameters controlling the current efficiency of the electrodeposition of (M)Fe2 alloys such as the bath composition and the current density were studied and optimized. The anodized (M)Fe2 alloy films were annealed in air at 400 °C for 2 h. The results revealed the formation of three ferrite thin films were formed. The crystallite sizes of the produced films were in the range between 45 and 60 nm. The microstructure of the formed film was ferrite type dependent. The corrosion behavior of ferrite thin films in different pH solutions was investigated using open circuit potential (OCP) and potentiodynamic polarization measurements. The open circuit potential indicates that the initial potential E im of ZnFe2O4 thin films remained constant for a short time, then sharply increased in the less negative direction in acidic and alkaline medium compared with Ni and Cu ferrite films. The values of the corrosion current density I corr were higher for the ZnFe2O4 films at pH values of 1 and 12 compared with that of NiFe2O4 and CuFe2O4 which were higher only at pH value 1. The corrosion rate was very low for the three ferrite films when immersion in the neutral medium. The surface morphology recommended that Ni and Cu ferrite films were safely used in neutral and alkaline medium, whereas Zn ferrite film was only used in neutral atmospheres.

  18. The effect of high pH alkaline solutions on the mineral stability of the Boom Clay - Batch experiments at 60 deg. C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honty, M.; De Craen, M.; Wang, L.; Madejova, J.; Czimerova, A.; Pentrak, M.; Stricek, I.; Van Geet, M.

    2010-01-01

    Boom Clay is currently viewed as a reference host formation for studies on deep geological disposal of radioactive waste in Belgium. The interactions between bulk rock Boom Clay and 0.1 M KOH, 0.1 M NaOH, 0.1 M Ca(OH) 2 , young cement water and evolved cement water solutions, ranging in pH from 12.5 to 13.2, were examined as static batch experiments at 60 deg. C to simulate alkaline plume perturbations, which are expected to occur in the repository due to the presence of concrete. Both liquids and solids were investigated at specific times between 90 and 510 days in order to control the elemental budget and to search for potential mineralogical alterations. Also, the clay fraction was separated from the whole-rock Boom Clay at the end of each run and characterized for its mineralogical composition. Thereby, the importance of the mineral matrix to buffer the alkaline attack and the role of organic matter to protect clay minerals were also addressed. The results indicate that the degree of geochemical perturbation in Boom Clay is dependent on the initial pH of the applied solution together with the nature of the major cation in the reactant fluids. The higher the initial pH of the media, the stronger its interaction with Boom Clay. No major non-clay mineralogical alteration of the Boom Clay was detected, but dissolution of kaolinite, smectite and illite occurred within the studied experimental conditions. The dissolution of clays is accompanied by the decrease in the layer charge, followed by a decrease in the cation-exchange capacity. The highest TOC values coincide with the highest total elemental concentrations in the leachates, and correspondingly, the highest dissolution degree. However, no quantitative link could be established between the degree of organic matter decomposition and clay dissolution.

  19. The nature of rusts and corrosion characteristics of low alloy and plain carbon steels in three kinds of concrete pore solution with salinity and different pH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, J.K.; Singh, D.D.N.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► LAS rebars corrode 2–3 times slower than PCS in concrete pore solution and mortars. ► Raman and XRD studies show that goethite and maghemite phases of rusts formed on LAS. ► On PCS unstable phases of lepidocrocite and akaganite are formed. ► EIS confirms more stable rust on LAS than on PCS. ► A model is proposed to explain formation of passive film on surface of steels. - Abstract: Correlation of corrosion characteristics and nature of rusts on low alloy (LA) and plain carbon (PC) steels exposed in simulated concrete pore solution of different pH is studied. Rusts formed under wet/dry conditions are examined by Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. LA rust is more adherent compared to PC as confirmed by measurement of weight in gain and electrochemical studies. EIS results show improvement in protective properties of steels with passage of time. Both steels are found prone to pitting attack in chloride contaminated pore solution. Rebars embedded in concrete exhibit same trend as recorded in solution exposure tests.

  20. The effect of sulfide on the aerobic corrosion of carbon steel in near-neutral pH saline solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherar, B.W.A.; Keech, P.G.; Shoesmith, D.W.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► The corrosion rate is low when steel is exposed to anaerobic conditions (pH = 8.9). ► An anaerobic to aerobic corrosion with sulfide switch increases the corrosion rate. ► Aerobic exposure induces the formation of goethite-covered tubercles. ► Continual sulfide exposure leads to the slow conversion of goethite to mackinawite. - Abstract: Severe corrosion damage may occur when gas transmission pipelines are exposed, at disbonded coating locations, to trapped waters containing sulfide followed by secondary exposure to air. Aerobic corrosion with sulfide was investigated in a long-term corrosion experiment in which corrosion was monitored by measurement of the corrosion potential and polarization resistance obtained from linear polarization resistance measurements. The properties and composition of the corrosion product deposits formed were determined using scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis, and Raman spectroscopy. A switch from aerobic to aerobic-with-sulfide corrosion doubles the relative corrosion rate.

  1. Exact Solution of a Faraday's Law Problem that Includes a Nonlinear Term and Its Implication for Perturbation Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulcher, Lewis P.

    1979-01-01

    Presents an exact solution to the nonlinear Faraday's law problem of a rod sliding on frictionless rails with resistance. Compares the results with perturbation calculations based on the methods of Poisson and Pincare and of Kryloff and Bogoliuboff. (Author/GA)

  2. Effect of electrolyte valency, alginate concentration and pH on engineered TiO₂ nanoparticle stability in aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loosli, Frédéric; Le Coustumer, Philippe; Stoll, Serge

    2015-12-01

    Agglomeration and disagglomeration processes are expected to play a key role on the fate of engineered nanoparticles in natural aquatic systems. These processes are investigated here in detail by studying first the stability of TiO2 nanoparticles in the presence of monovalent and divalent electrolytes at different pHs (below and above the point of zero charge of TiO2) and discussing the importance of specific divalent cation adsorption with the help of the DLVO theory as well as the importance of the nature of the counterions. Then the impact of one polysaccharide (alginate) on the stability of agglomerates formed under pH and water hardness representative of Lake Geneva environmental conditions is investigated. In these conditions the large TiO2 agglomerates (diameter>1μm) are positively charged due to Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) specific adsorption and alginate, which is negatively charged, adsorbs onto the agglomerate surface. Our results indicate that the presence of alginate at typical natural organic matter concentration (1-10 mg L(-1)) strongly modifies the TiO2 agglomerate (50 mg L(-1)) stability by inducing their partial and rapid disagglomeration. The importance of disagglomeration is found dependent on the alginate concentration with maximum of disagglomeration obtained for alginate concentration ≥8 mg L(-1) and leading to 400 nm fragments. From an environmental point of view partial restabilization of TiO2 agglomerates in the presence of alginate constitutes an important outcome. Disagglomeration will enhance their transport and residence time in aquatic systems which is an important step in the current knowledge on risk assessment associated to engineered nanoparticles. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Taxonomy of Means and Ends in Aquaculture Production—Part 2: The Technical Solutions of Controlling Solids, Dissolved Gasses and pH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bjorgvin Vilbergsson

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In engineering design, knowing the relationship between the means (technique and the end (desired function or outcome is essential. The means in Aquaculture are technical solutions like airlifts that are used to achive desired functionality (an end like controlling dissolved gasses. In previous work, the authors identified possible functions by viewing aquaculture production systems as transformation processes in which inputs are transformed by treatment techniques (means and produce outputs (ends. The current work creates an overview of technical solutions of treatment functions for both design and research purposes. A comprehensive literature review of all areas of technical solutions is identified and categorized into a visual taxonomy of the treatment functions for controlling solids, controlling dissolved gasses and controlling pH alkalinity and hardness. This article is the second in a sequence of four and partly presents the treatments functions in the taxonomy. The other articles in this series present complementary aspects of this research: Part 1, A transformational view on aquaculture and functions divided into input, treatment and output functions; Part 2, The current taxonomy paper; Part 3, The second part of the taxonomy; and Part 4, Mapping of the means (techniques for multiple treatment functions.

  4. Fluidized-Bed Coating with Sodium Sulfate and PVA-TiO2, 2. Influence of Coating Solution Viscosity, Stickiness, pH, and Droplet Diameter on Agglomeration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hede, Peter Dybdahl; Bach, Poul; Jensen, Anker Degn

    2009-01-01

    In the first part of this study [Hede, P. D.; Bach, P.; Jensen, A. D. Ind. Eng. Chem. Res. 2009, 49, 1914], agglomeration regime maps were developed for two types of coatings: sodium sulfate and PVA-TiO2. It was observed here how the agglomeration tendency is always lower for the salt coating...... the PVA-TiO2 coating formulation and process to achieve a low tendency of agglomeration, similar to that of the salt coating process. The best results for the PVA-TiO2 solution are obtained by substituting the PVA-TiO2 in equal amounts with Neodol 23-6.5 and further reducing the pH value in the coating...

  5. Ex situ characterization of metallurgical inclusions in X100 pipeline steel before and after immersion in a neutral pH bicarbonate solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yingbo; Liu, Jie [Key Laboratory of Advanced Ceramics and Machining Technology (Ministry of Education), School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Deng, Yida [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Composite and Functional Materials, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Han, Xiaopeng [Key Laboratory of Advanced Ceramics and Machining Technology (Ministry of Education), School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Hu, Wenbin [Key Laboratory of Advanced Ceramics and Machining Technology (Ministry of Education), School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Tianjin Key Laboratory of Composite and Functional Materials, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Zhong, Cheng, E-mail: cheng.zhong@tju.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Advanced Ceramics and Machining Technology (Ministry of Education), School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China)

    2016-07-15

    The initiation of corrosion pits in pipeline steels plays an important role in the development of stress corrosion cracking. In order to reveal the effect of inclusions on corrosion initiation sites and also to clarify contradictory results from previous literature, we proposed an ex situ characterization method that is allowed to characterize exactly the same inclusion or location of the surface of steel before and after corrosion tests. The time-dependent corrosion behaviour of the inclusions and the surrounding X100 steel matrix at the same area before and after early stage immersion in a near-neutral pH bicarbonate solution was investigated by ex situ scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis and localized electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (LEIS). The sizes of most inclusions in X100 steel are below 3 μm. The results challenge the long-held opinion of previous work that corrosion pit initiations are related with the inclusions. It has been found that most of the inclusions remain stable (intact) during the whole testing time although severe corrosion occurs on the matrix of the steel. The chemical composition of the inclusion greatly affects the chemical stability of the inclusion. SiO{sub 2} inclusions and complex inclusions with a high SiO{sub 2} content remain intact although obvious general corrosion occurs on the steel matrix under the investigated immersion period. Inclusions with little Si, such as Al–Mg–Ca–O enriched inclusions, totally disappear after certain immersion time. During the immersion, the corrosion product tends to deposit at the interstice between the inclusion and steel matrix. - Highlights: • Ex situ characterization of metallurgical inclusions in X100 pipeline steel. • The pipeline steel was immersed in neutral pH bicarbonate solution. • Majority of inclusions remain stable during the whole testing time. • The chemical stability of metallurgical inclusions depends on the SiO{sub 2

  6. Ex situ characterization of metallurgical inclusions in X100 pipeline steel before and after immersion in a neutral pH bicarbonate solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Yingbo; Liu, Jie; Deng, Yida; Han, Xiaopeng; Hu, Wenbin; Zhong, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    The initiation of corrosion pits in pipeline steels plays an important role in the development of stress corrosion cracking. In order to reveal the effect of inclusions on corrosion initiation sites and also to clarify contradictory results from previous literature, we proposed an ex situ characterization method that is allowed to characterize exactly the same inclusion or location of the surface of steel before and after corrosion tests. The time-dependent corrosion behaviour of the inclusions and the surrounding X100 steel matrix at the same area before and after early stage immersion in a near-neutral pH bicarbonate solution was investigated by ex situ scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis and localized electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (LEIS). The sizes of most inclusions in X100 steel are below 3 μm. The results challenge the long-held opinion of previous work that corrosion pit initiations are related with the inclusions. It has been found that most of the inclusions remain stable (intact) during the whole testing time although severe corrosion occurs on the matrix of the steel. The chemical composition of the inclusion greatly affects the chemical stability of the inclusion. SiO_2 inclusions and complex inclusions with a high SiO_2 content remain intact although obvious general corrosion occurs on the steel matrix under the investigated immersion period. Inclusions with little Si, such as Al–Mg–Ca–O enriched inclusions, totally disappear after certain immersion time. During the immersion, the corrosion product tends to deposit at the interstice between the inclusion and steel matrix. - Highlights: • Ex situ characterization of metallurgical inclusions in X100 pipeline steel. • The pipeline steel was immersed in neutral pH bicarbonate solution. • Majority of inclusions remain stable during the whole testing time. • The chemical stability of metallurgical inclusions depends on the SiO_2 content.

  7. The effect of pH on the corrosion behavior of intermetallic compounds Ni{sub 3}(Si,Ti) and Ni{sub 3}(Si,Ti) + 2Mo in sodium chloride solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Priyotomo, Gadang, E-mail: gada001@lipi.go.id; Nuraini, Lutviasari, E-mail: Lutviasari@gmail.com [Research Center for Metallurgy and Material, Indonesian Institute of Sciences, Kawasan PUSPIPTEK Gd.474, Setu, Tangerang Selatan, Banten 15314 (Indonesia); Kaneno, Yasuyuki, E-mail: kaneno@mtr.osakafu-u.ac.id [Department of Materials Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka Prefecture University, 1-1 Gakuen-cho, Sakai, Osaka 599-8531 (Japan)

    2015-12-29

    The corrosion behavior of the intermetallic compounds, Ni{sub 3}(Si,Ti) (L1{sub 2}: single phase) and Ni{sub 3}(Si,Ti) + 2Mo (L1{sub 2} and (L12 + Ni{sub ss}) mixture region), has been investigated using an immersion test, electrochemical method and surface analytical method (SEM; scanning electron microscope and EDAX: Energy Dispersive X-ray) in 0.5 kmol/m{sup 3} NaCl solutions at various pH. The corrosion behavior of nickel alloy C-276 was studied under the same experimental conditions as a reference. It was found that the uniform attack was observed on Ni{sub 3}(Si,Ti) for the immersion test at lower pH, while the pitting attack was observed on this compound for this test at neutral solution. Furthermore, Ni{sub 3}(Si,Ti)+2Mo had the preferential dissolution of L1{sub 2} compared to (L1{sub 2} + Ni{sub ss}) mixture region at lower pH, while pitting attack occurred in (L1{sub 2} + Ni{sub ss}) mixture region at neutral solution. For both intermetallic compounds, the magnitude of pitting and uniform attack decrease with increasing pH of solutions. From the immersion test and polarization curves, the corrosion resistance of Ni{sub 3}(Si,Ti)+2Mo is lower than that of Ni{sub 3}(Si,Ti), while the nickel alloy C-276 is the highest one at various pH of solutions. On the other hand, in the lower pH of solutions, the corrosion resistance of tested materials decreased significantly compared to those in neutral and higher pH of solutions.

  8. Solution pH and oligoamine molecular weight dependence of the transition from monolayer to multilayer adsorption at the air-water interface from sodium dodecyl sulfate/oligoamine mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halacheva, S S; Penfold, J; Thomas, R K; Webster, J R P

    2013-05-14

    Neutron reflectivity and surface tension have been used to investigate the solution pH and oligoamine molecular weight dependence of the adsorption of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)/oligoamine mixtures at the air-water interface. For diethylenetriamine, triamine, or triethylenetetramine, tetramine mixed with SDS, there is monolayer adsorption at pH 7 and 10, and multilayer adsorption at pH 3. For the slightly higher molecular weight tetraethylenepentamine, pentamine, and pentaethylenehexamine, hexamine, the adsorption is in the form of a monolayer at pH 3 and multilayers at pH 7 and 10. Hence, there is a pH driven transition from monolayer to multilayer adsorption, which shifts from low pH to higher pH as the oligoamine molecular weight increases from tetramine to pentamine. This results from the relative balance between the electrostatic attraction between the SDS and amine nitrogen group which decreases as the charge density decreases with increasing pH, the ion-dipole interaction between the amine nitrogen and SDS sulfate group which is dominant at higher pH, and the hydrophobic interalkyl chain interaction between bound SDS molecules which changes with oligoamine molecular weight.

  9. Modelling the effect of acoustic waves on the thermodynamics and kinetics of phase transformation in a solution: Including mass transportation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haqshenas, S R; Ford, I J; Saffari, N

    2018-01-14

    Effects of acoustic waves on a phase transformation in a metastable phase were investigated in our previous work [S. R. Haqshenas, I. J. Ford, and N. Saffari, "Modelling the effect of acoustic waves on nucleation," J. Chem. Phys. 145, 024315 (2016)]. We developed a non-equimolar dividing surface cluster model and employed it to determine the thermodynamics and kinetics of crystallisation induced by an acoustic field in a mass-conserved system. In the present work, we developed a master equation based on a hybrid Szilard-Fokker-Planck model, which accounts for mass transportation due to acoustic waves. This model can determine the kinetics of nucleation and the early stage of growth of clusters including the Ostwald ripening phenomenon. It was solved numerically to calculate the kinetics of an isothermal sonocrystallisation process in a system with mass transportation. The simulation results show that the effect of mass transportation for different excitations depends on the waveform as well as the imposed boundary conditions and tends to be noticeable in the case of shock waves. The derivations are generic and can be used with any acoustic source and waveform.

  10. Formation of M-Like Intermediates in Proteorhodopsin in Alkali Solutions (pH ≥ ∼8.5) Where the Proton Release Occurs First in Contrast to the Sequence at Lower pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamogami, Jun; Sato, Keitaro; Kurokawa, Sukuna; Yamada, Takumi; Nara, Toshifumi; Demura, Makoto; Miyauchi, Seiji; Kikukawa, Takashi; Muneyuki, Eiro; Kamo, Naoki

    2016-02-23

    Proteorhodopsin (PR) is an outward light-driven proton pump observed in marine eubacteria. Despite many structural and functional similarities to bacteriorhodopsin (BR) in archaea, which also acts as an outward proton pump, the mechanism of the photoinduced proton release and uptake is different between two H(+)-pumps. In this study, we investigated the pH dependence of the photocycle and proton transfer in PR reconstituted with the phospholipid membrane under alkaline conditions. Under these conditions, as the medium pH increased, a blue-shifted photoproduct (defined as Ma), which is different from M, with a pKa of ca. 9.2 was produced. The sequence of the photoinduced proton uptake and release during the photocycle was inverted with the increase in pH. A pKa value of ca. 9.5 was estimated for this inversion and was in good agreement with the pKa value of the formation of Ma (∼ 9.2). In addition, we measured the photoelectric current generated by PRs attached to a thin polymer film at varying pH. Interestingly, increases in the medium pH evoked bidirectional photocurrents, which may imply a possible reversal of the direction of the proton movement at alkaline pH. On the basis of these findings, a putative photocycle and proton transfer scheme in PR under alkaline pH conditions was proposed.

  11. Remoção de metais pesados de efluentes aquosos pela zeólita natural escolecita - influência da temperatura e do pH na adsorção em sistemas monoelementares Heavy metals removal from wastewater by the natural zeolite scolecite - temperature and pH influence in single-metal solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Sarti Jimenez

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Cation exchange capabilities of a Brazilian natural zeolite, identified as scolecite, were evaluated for application in wastewater control. We investigated the process of sorption of chromium(III, nickel(II, cadmium(II and manganese(II in synthetic aqueous effluents, including adsorption isotherms of single-metal solutions. The natural zeolite showed the ability to take up the tested heavy metals in the order Cr(III > Cd(II > Ni(II > Mn(II, and this could be related to the valence and the hydration radius of the metal cations. The influence of temperature (25, 40 and 60 ºC and initial pH value (from 4 to 6 was also evaluated. It was found that the adsorption increased substantially when the temperature was raised to 60 ºC and that maximum adsorption capacity was observed at pH 6. These results demonstrate that scolecite can be used for removal of heavy metals from aqueous effluents, under optimized conditions.

  12. Carbon steel corrosion under anaerobic-aerobic cycling conditions in near-neutral pH saline solutions - Part 1: Long term corrosion behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherar, B.W.A.; Keech, P.G.; Shoesmith, D.W.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Anaerobic-aerobic cycling on pipeline steel forms two distinct surface morphologies. → Seventy-five percentage of the surface was covered by a black, compact layer ∼4.5 μm thick. → A tubercle, ∼3 to 4 mm in cross section, covered the remaining 25% of surface. → The tubercle cross section showed a single large pit ∼275 μm deep. - Abstract: The influence of anaerobic-aerobic cycling on pipeline steel corrosion was investigated in near-neutral carbonate/sulphate/chloride solution (pH 9) over 238 days. The corrosion rate increased and decreased as exposure conditions were switched between redox conditions. Two distinct corrosion morphologies were observed. The majority of the surface corroded uniformly to produce a black magnetite/maghemite layer approximately 4.5 μm thick. The remaining surface was covered with an orange tubercle, approximately 3-4 mm in cross section. Analysis of the tubercle cross section revealed a single large pit approximately 275 μm deep. Repeated anaerobic-aerobic cycling localized the corrosion process within this tubercle-covered pit.

  13. The effect of aerobic corrosion on anaerobically-formed sulfide layers on carbon steel in dilute near-neutral pH saline solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherar, B.W.A.; Keech, P.G.; Shoesmith, D.W.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •The corrosion rate is low when steel is exposed to anaerobic conditions (pH = 8.9). •An anaerobic corrosion with sulfide to aerobic switch increases the corrosion rate. •Aerobic conditions leads to corrosion and oxide deposition beneath FeS. •Continual air exposure leads to the blistering of the original FeS film. -- Abstract: The aerobic corrosion of pipeline steel was investigated in an aqueous sulfide solution by monitoring the corrosion potential and periodically measuring the polarization resistance. The properties and composition of the corrosion product deposits formed were determined using scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis, and Raman spectroscopy. The establishment of aerobic conditions leads to corrosion and (oxyhydr)oxide deposition beneath the anaerobically-formed mackinawite film originally present on the steel surface. This leads to blistering and spalling of the sulfide film. Chemical conversion of the mackinawite to Fe(III) (oxyhydr)oxides also occurs but is a relatively slow reaction

  14. Standard Practice for Use of Mattsson's Solution of pH 7.2 to Evaluate the Stress- Corrosion Cracking Susceptibility of Copper-Zinc Alloys

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers the preparation and use of Mattsson's solution of pH 7.2 as an accelerated stress-corrosion cracking test environment for brasses (copper-zinc base alloys). The variables (to the extent that these are known at present) that require control are described together with possible means for controlling and standardizing these variables. 1.2 This practice is recommended only for brasses (copper-zinc base alloys). The use of this test environment is not recommended for other copper alloys since the results may be erroneous, providing completely misleading rankings. This is particularly true of alloys containing aluminum or nickel as deliberate alloying additions. 1.3 This practice is intended primarily where the test objective is to determine the relative stress-corrosion cracking susceptibility of different brasses under the same or different stress conditions or to determine the absolute degree of stress corrosion cracking susceptibility, if any, of a particular brass or brass component ...

  15. Evaluation method of iodine re-evolution from an in-containment water pool after a loss of coolant accident, Part I: pH estimation of a solution with various chemicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Tae Hyeon; Jeong, Ji Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • It is required to evaluate re-evolved iodine from sump water after LOCA. • pH evaluation based on Gibbs free energy minimization. • Program was developed to evaluate chemical equilibrium and pH solutions. • Predictions are in good agreement with experimental data. - Abstract: Radioactive iodine, which is released into the atmosphere of the containment building, is absorbed into the containment spray water and dissolved to be ionized. This iodine-rich water is then transported to the in-containment refueling water storage tank (IRWST) in APR1400 nuclear power plants. When the pH of the water is below 7, the dissolved iodine converts to molecular iodine and re-evolves from the water and returns to the atmosphere. A series of studies have been conducted in order to evaluate the iodine re-evolution from the IRWST. This study consists of two parts: the pH evaluation method and the evaluation of the iodine re-evolution. This paper presents the first part, i.e. the pH evaluation method. The equilibrium concentrations of various chemicals in a solution are determined at the minimum Gibbs’ free energy. This method is useful for complex reactant problems rather than equilibrium constants method because the latter method requires numerous equilibrium constants and there might be missing equilibrium constants associated with the solution. The calculated pH values of solutions are compared with the experimental measurements in order to validate this method and the thermodynamic data of the chemicals incorporated into the program. The estimated values for solutions are in good agreement with the experimental measurements within a difference of less than 3.3%.

  16. Dependency of the band gap of electrodeposited Copper oxide thin films on the concentration of copper sulfate (CuSO4.5H2O) and pH in bath solution for photovoltaic applications

    KAUST Repository

    Islam, Md. Anisul

    2016-03-10

    In this study, Copper oxide thin films were deposited on copper plate by electrodeposition process in an electrolytic bath containing CuSO4.5H2O, 3M lactic acid and NaOH. Copper oxide films were electrodeposited at different pH and different concentration of CuSO4.5H2O and the optical band gap was determined from their absorption spectrum which was obtained from UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy. It was found that copper oxide films which were deposited at low concentration of CuSO4.5H2O have higher band gap than those deposited at higher bath concentration. The band gap of copper oxide films also significantly changes with pH of the bath solution. It was also observed that with the increase of the pH of bath solution band gap of copper oxide film decreased. © 2015 IEEE.

  17. PH sensor

    OpenAIRE

    Artero, C.; Nogueras Cervera, Marc; Manuel Lázaro, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a design of a marine instrument for the measurement of pH in seawater. The measurement system consists of a pH electrode connected to the underwater observatory OBSEA. The extracted data are useful for scientists researching ocean acidification. Peer Reviewed

  18. Influência do pH da solução extrativa no teor de antocianinas em frutos de morango Influence of the extraction solution pH on the content of anthocyanins in strawberry fruits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celso Luiz Bordignon Jr.

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Nos últimos anos, os estudos sobre a composição química do fruto do morangueiro vêm ganhando destaque devido ao seu elevado consumo e às atividades biológicas atribuídas a ele. Além disso, os principais metabólitos secundários encontrados nesses frutos são as antocianinas, compostos responsáveis pela intensa coloração vermelha e amplamente utilizados como corantes naturais pela indústria alimentícia. Neste trabalho, foram preparados diferentes extratos de frutos de morango com a cultivar Oso Grande, com o intuito de verificar a influência do pH no perfil espectroscópico do extrato e no teor de antocianos. O extrato em pH 1,0 forneceu um perfil clássico para antocianinas na análise por espectroscopia no ultravioleta, assim como um maior teor de antocianinas nos frutos frescos devido a uma extração mais eficiente das substâncias de interesse.Recently, the study on the chemical composition of the strawberry fruit has been recognized in view of its increased consumption and biological activities. Moreover, the main secondary metabolites found in strawberry fruits are anthocyanins, which are the compounds responsible for the intense red color of the fruit and are widely used as natural colorants by the food industry. In this work, were prepared different extracts with strawberry fruits of the cultivar Oso Grande in order to verify the pH influence on the spectroscopic profile of the strawberry extracts and on the content of anthocyanins. The results indicate that at pH 1,0 the extract showed a classic profile to anthocyanins through ultraviolet spectra analysis and a higher content of anthocyanins in fresh fruits.

  19. Colorimetric study of malvidin-3-O-glucoside copigmented by phenolic compounds: The effect of molar ratio, temperature, pH, and ethanol content on color expression of red wine model solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bo; Yang, Xue-Shan; Li, Ning-Ning; Zhu, Xia; Sheng, Wen-Jun; He, Fei; Duan, Chang-Qing; Han, Shun-Yu

    2017-12-01

    In the recent research, the copigmentations of malvidin-3-O-glucoside with eight types of phenolic copigments have been investigated. The influence of the pigment/copigment molar ratio, the reaction temperature, the pH and the ethanol content of solutions has been examined. The results showed that the copigmentation effect was dependent on not only the particular structures of the phenolic compounds but also the factors of the reaction systems. The increase of the copigment concentration can strengthen the copigmentation effect, improve the solution color, and enhance the red-purple features. Different temperatures had different influences on the copigmentation reactions. The destruction of the copigmentation complexes can result in the hypsochromic shift of the reaction solution when the temperature was higher than 20°C. The bathochromic shift of the solution gradually progressed with the increase of the pH value. A significant copigmentation feature was spotted when pH reached 3.0, which demonstrates obvious red-purple characterization. The addition of the ethanol weakened the copigmentation effect. According to measurement through color analysis, it was found that the color differences caused by ethanol in red wine were typically attributed to quantitative changes. Remarkably, all of the above delicate color deviations caused by the structural or environmental factors can be precisely and conveniently depicted via the CIELAB space analysis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. An All-Solid-State pH Sensor Employing Fluorine-Terminated Polycrystalline Boron-Doped Diamond as a pH-Insensitive Solution-Gate Field-Effect Transistor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shintani, Yukihiro; Kobayashi, Mikinori; Kawarada, Hiroshi

    2017-05-05

    A fluorine-terminated polycrystalline boron-doped diamond surface is successfully employed as a pH-insensitive SGFET (solution-gate field-effect transistor) for an all-solid-state pH sensor. The fluorinated polycrystalline boron-doped diamond (BDD) channel possesses a pH-insensitivity of less than 3mV/pH compared with a pH-sensitive oxygenated channel. With differential FET (field-effect transistor) sensing, a sensitivity of 27 mv/pH was obtained in the pH range of 2-10; therefore, it demonstrated excellent performance for an all-solid-state pH sensor with a pH-sensitive oxygen-terminated polycrystalline BDD SGFET and a platinum quasi-reference electrode, respectively.

  1. Metal/Metal Oxide Differential Electrode pH Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, William; Buehler, Martin; Keymeulen, Didier

    2007-01-01

    Solid-state electrochemical sensors for measuring the degrees of acidity or alkalinity (in terms of pH values) of liquid solutions are being developed. These sensors are intended to supplant older electrochemical pH sensors that include glass electrode structures and reference solutions. The older sensors are fragile and subject to drift. The present developmental solid-state sensors are more rugged and are expected to be usable in harsh environments. The present sensors are based on a differential-electrode measurement principle. Each sensor includes two electrodes, made of different materials, in equilibrium with the solution of interest.

  2. PH-Sensitive Nanogels Synthesised by Radiation-Induced Cross-Linking of Hydrogen-Bonded Interpolymer Complexes in Aqueous Solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulanski, P.; Kadłubowski, S.; Henke, A.; Olejnik, A.K.; Rokita, B.; Wach, R.; Rosiak, J.M.

    2010-01-01

    Nanogels, i.e., internally cross-linked hydrophilic polymeric particles of sub-micron sizes, gained much interest over the last years due to their possible application as components of advanced type of medicines, like drug carriers. It is expected that they can facilitate distribution and delivery of different types of biologically active substances (including proteins, peptides and oligonucleotides) in a controlled way within the human body. Nanogels and their bigger analogues – microgels, are mainly synthesised through free-radical cross-linking polymerization of monomers. This synthetic routine can be carried out in solution but more often emulsion techniques are preferred (mini- or microemulsion) due to easier size control and exclusion of the macrogelation process. Additionally, surfactant-free emulsion polymerization (SFEP) is the method of choice for the preparation of temperature-sensitive particles, mainly based on poly(N-isopropylacrylamide).Nanogels were also successfully prepared by intramolecular cross-linking of single macromolecules. More recently, covalent stabilization was utilized to obtain the self-assembled structures like micelles of amphiphilic block copolymers, held by relatively weak physical interactions. Due to low stability of these polymolecular systems against dilution or temperature changes, different chemistry-based strategies to turn them into permanent nanopaticles were proposed in the literature (e.g., independent stabilization of a core or a shell of the micelles)

  3. PH-Sensitive Nanogels Synthesised by Radiation-Induced Cross-Linking of Hydrogen-Bonded Interpolymer Complexes in Aqueous Solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulanski, P.; Kadłubowski, S.; Henke, A.; Olejnik, A. K.; Rokita, B.; Wach, R.; Rosiak, J.M., E-mail: slawekka@mitr.p.lodz.pl [Technical University of Lodz, Wroblewskiego 15, 93-590 Lodz (Poland)

    2010-07-01

    Nanogels, i.e., internally cross-linked hydrophilic polymeric particles of sub-micron sizes, gained much interest over the last years due to their possible application as components of advanced type of medicines, like drug carriers. It is expected that they can facilitate distribution and delivery of different types of biologically active substances (including proteins, peptides and oligonucleotides) in a controlled way within the human body. Nanogels and their bigger analogues – microgels, are mainly synthesised through free-radical cross-linking polymerization of monomers. This synthetic routine can be carried out in solution but more often emulsion techniques are preferred (mini- or microemulsion) due to easier size control and exclusion of the macrogelation process. Additionally, surfactant-free emulsion polymerization (SFEP) is the method of choice for the preparation of temperature-sensitive particles, mainly based on poly(N-isopropylacrylamide).Nanogels were also successfully prepared by intramolecular cross-linking of single macromolecules. More recently, covalent stabilization was utilized to obtain the self-assembled structures like micelles of amphiphilic block copolymers, held by relatively weak physical interactions. Due to low stability of these polymolecular systems against dilution or temperature changes, different chemistry-based strategies to turn them into permanent nanopaticles were proposed in the literature (e.g., independent stabilization of a core or a shell of the micelles)

  4. Influence of pH, temperature, and concentration on stabilization of aqueous hornet silk solution and fabrication of salt-free materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameda, Tsunenori

    2015-01-01

    We found that an aqueous solution of silk from cocoons produced by hornet larvae (hornet silk) can be obtained when the solution is adjusted to basic conditions of pH > 9.2. It is known that native hornet cocoons can be dissolved in concentrated aqueous solution of salts, such as lithium bromide (LiBr) and calcium chloride (CaCl2). Upon the removal of these salts from solution by dialysis, solidification, gelation, or sedimentation of hornet silk is known to occur. In the present study, under basic conditions, however, no such solidification occurred, even after salt removal. In this study, ammonia was used for alkalization of solution because it is volatilized during the casting process and pure hornet silk materials can be obtained after drying. The effects of the concentrations of hornet silk and ammonia, as well as dialysis temperature, on preventing gelation during dialysis were investigated. Dialysis conditions that limit the degradation of hornet silk by hydrolysis in alkali solution were identified. Moreover, casting conditions to prepare flexible and transparent hornet silk film from aqueous ammonia solution were optimized. Molecular structural analysis of hornet silk in aqueous ammonia solution and cast film indicated the formation of α-helix conformations. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Recovery of uranium from sulphate solutions containing molybdenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weir, D.R.; Genik-Sas-Berezowsky, R.M.

    1983-01-01

    A process for recovering uranium from a sulphate solution containing dissolved uranium and molybdenum includes reacting the solution with ammonia (pH 8 to 10), the pH of the original solution must not exceed 5.5 and after the addition of ammonia the pH must not be in the vicinity of 7 for a significant time. The resultant uranium precipitate is relatively uncontaminated by molybdenum. The precipitate is then separated from the remaining solution while the pH is maintained within the stated range

  6. Cinética do escurecimeno não-enzimático com soluções modelo de açúcares e aminoácidos em pH neutro e ácido = Kinetic of non-enzimatic browning with model solutions of sugar and aminoacids in neutral and acid pH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vandré Barbosa Brião

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A cor dos alimentos é um importante atributo para a escolha do consumidor. O escurecimento é desejável em alguns alimentos pela cor e pelo aroma produzidos (como nos casos do pão e carne assada, mas, é indesejável em outros (como no tratamento térmico de leite. A reação de Maillard é influenciada pela natureza dos açúcares e aminoácidos envolvidos, bem como pelo pH e temperatura do processo. O objetivo do trabalho foi avaliar o escurecimento de soluções modelo contendo açúcares e aminoácidos pela reação de Maillard em pH neutro e ácido, obtendo as taxas de reação e avaliando a cinética dela. Doistipos de açúcares (glicose e lactose foram misturados com dois tipos de aminoácidos (glicina ou glutamato de sódio em pH 7,0 e pH 5,1. As soluções (2 mol L-1 foram aquecidas em água fervente (97ºC, e a absorbância medida (420 nm em intervalos de tempo. A glicose apresentou maior taxa de reação que a lactose, enquanto que entre os aminoácidos a glicina reagiu com intensidade semelhante ao glutamato. A redução do pH do meio retarda a reação, e o escurecimento demonstrou menor taxa de reação em pH ácido.The color of food is an important attribute for consumer choice. Browning is desirable in some foods due to the color and flavor itproduces (such as in bread and roasted meat, but is undesirable for others (such as heattreated milk. The Maillard reaction is influenced by the nature of the sugars and amino acids involved, as well as the pH and temperature of the process. The aim of this work was to evaluate the browning of model solutions containing sugars and amino acids due to the Maillard reaction in neutral and acid pH, and to calculate the reaction rate and the kinetics of the reaction. Two types of sugars (glucose or lactose were mixed with amino acids(glycine or sodium glutamate in pH 7.0 or pH 5.1. The solutions (2 mol L-1 were heated in boiling water (97ºC, and the absorbance was measured (420 nm at time

  7. Effect of interactions between carbon dioxide enrichment and NH4+/NO3- ratio on pH of culturing nutrient solution,growth and vigor of tomato root system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Juan LI; Jianmin ZHOU

    2008-01-01

    A growth chamber experiment was conducted to investigate the influence of NH4+/NO3- ratio and elevated CO2 concentration on the pH in nutrient solution,growth and root vigor system of tomato seedling roots,which attempts to understand whether the elevated CO2 concentration can alleviate the harmful effects of higher NH4+-N concentration in nutrient solutions on the tomato root system.Tomato (Lycopersicon esculenturn Mill.var.Hezuo 906) was grown in pots with nutrient solutions varying in NH4+/NO3- ratio (0:1,1:3,1:1,3:1and 1:0) and the growth chambers were supplied with with the growth process and CO2 concentration increased.At both CO2 levels,pH increased when 100% NO3--N was supplied and decreased in other treatments.The pH decrease in the nutrient solution was directly correlated to the NH4+-N proportion.The pH value was more reduced in 100% NH4+-N nutrient solution than increased in the 100% NO3--N nutrient solution.CO2 enrichment increased the dry weight of shoots and roots,root vigor system,total absorbing area and active absorbing area of tomato seedlings.All the measurement indexes above were increased in the elevated CO2 concentration treatment with the NO3- proportion increase in the nutrient solutions.Thus,under the elevated CO2 concentration,the dry weights of shoots and roots,root vigor system,total root absorbing area and active absorbing area were found to be inversely correlated to NH4+/NO3- ratio,leading to about 65.8%,78.0%,18.9%,12.9% and 18.9% increase,respectively,compared with that under the ambient CO2 concentration.Our results indicated that tomato seedling roots may benefit mostly from CO2 enrichment when 100% NO3--N nutrient solutions was supplied,but the CO2 concentration elevation did not alleviate the harmful effects when 100% NHa+-N was supplied.

  8. Effects of milk curd on saliva secretion in healthy volunteer compared to baseline, 2% pilocarpine and equivalent pH adjusted acetic acid solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babaee, Neda; Gholizadehpasha, Atefeh; Zahedpasha, Samir; Moghadamnia, Yasaman; Zamaninejad, Shiva; Moghadamnia, Ali Akbar

    2011-01-01

    Dry mouth is a common clinical problem, and different products have been proposed to improve it. In this investigation, the effects of "milk curd" on the amount of saliva secretion were studied. A total of 32 patients (aged 20-30) were selected from healthy volunteers. Milk curd concentrations of 0.5, 1, 2 and 4%, and 2% pilocarpine were prepared as drops. The impact of the drugs on the saliva weight was assessed after 1-5 min. To determine the effects of the pH of the milk curd on the amount of saliva secretion, different concentrations of acetic acid were used. At the end of the first minute, the differences between the data for all groups were statistically significant, and the difference between the 2% and 4% milk curd groups was higher than the others (P saliva secreted at the end of the second minute between the baseline and 4% milk curd groups and between the 0.5% and 4% MC groups were significant (P = 0.006 and P = 0.025, respectively). In total, there was no significant difference between the effect of various pH treatments and the amount of baseline saliva secretion. Milk curd has a significant local impact, and the saliva increase depends on the dose. It seems that this effect is not only related to its acidic taste. As a result, factors other than pH are involved in the effect.

  9. Effects of milk curd on saliva secretion in healthy volunteer compared to baseline, 2% pilocarpine and equivalent pH adjusted acetic acid solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neda Babaee

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dry mouth is a common clinical problem, and different products have been proposed to improve it. In this investigation, the effects of "milk curd" on the amount of saliva secretion were studied. Materials and Methods: A total of 32 patients (aged 20-30 were selected from healthy volunteers. Milk curd concentrations of 0.5, 1, 2 and 4%, and 2% pilocarpine were prepared as drops. The impact of the drugs on the saliva weight was assessed after 1-5 min. To determine the effects of the pH of the milk curd on the amount of saliva secretion, different concentrations of acetic acid were used. Results: At the end of the first minute, the differences between the data for all groups were statistically significant, and the difference between the 2% and 4% milk curd groups was higher than the others (P < 0.0001. The differences in the amount of the saliva secreted at the end of the second minute between the baseline and 4% milk curd groups and between the 0.5% and 4% MC groups were significant (P = 0.006 and P = 0.025, respectively. In total, there was no significant difference between the effect of various pH treatments and the amount of baseline saliva secretion. Conclusion: Milk curd has a significant local impact, and the saliva increase depends on the dose. It seems that this effect is not only related to its acidic taste. As a result, factors other than pH are involved in the effect.

  10. Influence of variation in mobile phase pH and solute pK(a) with the change of organic modifier fraction on QSRRs of hydrophobicity and RP-HPLC retention of weakly acidic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Shu-ying; Liang, Chao; Zou, Kuan; Qiao, Jun-qin; Lian, Hong-zhen; Ge, Xin

    2012-11-15

    The variation in mobile phase pH and ionizable solute dissociation constant (pK(a)) with the change of organic modifier fraction in hydroorganic mobile phase has seemingly been a troublesome problem in studies and applications of reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC). Most of the early studies regarding the RP-HPLC of acid-base compounds have to measure the actual pH of the mixed mobile phase rigorously, sometimes bringing difficulties in the practices of liquid chromatographic separation. In this paper, the effect of this variation on the apparent n-octanol/water partition coefficient (K(ow)″) and the related quantitative structure-retention relationship (QSRR) of logK(ow)″ vs. logk(w), the logarithm of retention factor of analytes in neat aqueous mobile phases, was investigated for weakly acidic compounds. This QSRR is commonly used as a classical method for K(ow) measurement by RP-HPLC. The theoretical and experimental derivation revealed that the variation in mobile phase pH and solute pK(a) will not affect the QSRRs of acidic compounds. This conclusion is proved to be suitable for various types of ion-suppressors, i.e., strong acid (perchloric acid), weak acid (acetic acid) and buffer salt (potassium dihydrogen phosphate/phosphoric acid, PBS). The QSRRs of logK(ow)″ vs. logk(w) were modeled by 11 substituted benzoic acids using different types of ion-suppressors in a binary methanol-water mobile phase to confirm our deduction. Although different types of ion-suppressor all can be used as mobile phase pH modifiers, the QSRR model obtained by using perchloric acid as the ion-suppressor was found to have the best result, and the slightly inferior QSRRs were obtained by using acetic acid or PBS as the ion-suppressor. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Efeito da concentração de coagulantes e do pH da solução na turbidez da água, em recirculação, utilizada no processamento dos frutos do cafeeiro Effects from the concentration of coagulants and pH solution on the turbidity of the recirculating water used in the coffee cherry processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio T. Matos

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Com o objetivo de determinar a dose e a faixa de pH dos coagulantes sulfato de alumínio (SA, sulfato ferroso clorado (SFC, cloreto férrico (CF e extrato de semente de moringa (ESM, que proporcionassem maior eficiência na remoção da turbidez na água residuária da despolpa de frutos do cafeeiro (ARDC, após serem efetuadas cinco recirculações, foram conduzidos ensaios de coagulação/floculação utilizando o aparelho "Jar-test". Todos esses coagulantes foram avaliados nas concentrações de 0; 0,5; 1,0; 1,5; 2,0; 2,5 e 3,0 g L-1. No caso da solução preparada com ESM, as doses utilizadas foram: 0; 10; 20; 30; 40; 50 e 60 mL L-1. O pH da solução em teste foi alterado, utilizando-se do hidróxido de sódio (NaOH, na concentração de 0,3 mol L-1, sendo avaliadas as faixas de 4,0 a 5,0; 5,0 a 6,0; 6,0 a 7,0 e 7,0 a 8,0. No ensaio de coagulação/floculação, o ESM proporcionou maior remoção de SS (sólidos em suspensão da ARDC com a dose de 10 mL L-1 e pH de 4,27 (natural. Para os coagulantes SA e CF, os melhores resultados foram obtidos com a concentração de 3 g L-1 e pH de 7,27 e, para o coagulante SFC, com a concentração de 3 g L-1 e pH de 4,27.Aiming the determination of the dose and pH range of the coagulants aluminum sulfate (AS, chlorinated ferrous sulfate (CFS, ferric chloride (FC and Moringa oleifera seed extract (MSE that would provide a higher efficiency in removing the turbidity from the coffee cherry pulping wastewater (CPW, five recirculations were accomplished and the coagulation/flocculation assays were conducted, by using the Jar-test device. The concentrations (0; 0.5; 1.0; 1.5; 2.0; 2.5 and 3.0 g L- 1 were evaluated. In the case of the MSE-prepared solution, the following doses were used: 0; 10; 20; 30; 40; 50 and 60 mL L-1. The pH of the solution under test was changed, by using the sodium hydroxide (NaOH at the concentration of 0.3 mol L-1, whereas the ranges from 4.0 to 5.0; 5.0 to 6.0; 6.0 to 7.0; and 7

  12. Carbon steel protection in G.S. (Girlder sulfide) plants. A protective layer formation in saturated solution of sulfohydric acid in water at pH = 4.43. Pt. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruzzoni, P.; Burkart, A.L.; Garavaglia, R.N.

    1985-04-01

    As complement to the experiences on carbon steel passivation for its use in G.S. (Girlder sulfide) heavy water production plants, the results herein obtained are given, processing the material with a saturated solution at 2.3 MPa of full pressure and 125 temperature degree of H 2 S in NaOH 5 x 10 -3 M, which, at an equilibrium point, the pH is 4.43. The characteristics, the composition and adherence to the layer formed and the corrosion velocity data are analyzed. (Author) [es

  13. The Influence of pH and Temperature on the Stability of N-[(Piperidinemethylene]daunorubicin Hydrochloride and a Comparison of the Stability of Daunorubicin and Its Four New Amidine Derivatives in Aqueous Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikołaj Piekarski

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of pH and temperature on the stability of N-[(piperidinemethylene]daunorubicin hydrochloride (PPD was investigated. Degradation was studied using an HPLC method. Specific acid-base catalysis of PPD involves hydrolysis of protonated molecules of PPD catalyzed by hydrogen ions and spontaneous hydrolysis under the influence of water zwitterions, unprotonated molecules, and monoanions of PPD. The thermodynamic parameters of these reactions, energy, enthalpy, and entropy, were calculated. Also, the stability of daunorubicin and its new amidine derivatives (piperidine, morpholine, pyrrolidine, and hexahydroazepin-1-yl in aqueous solutions was compared and discussed.

  14. Zn availability in nutrient solutions for cucumber (Cucumis sativus L) in hydroponics as affected by Fe-chelates and pH

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voogt, W.; Sonneveld, C.

    2017-01-01

    In soil-less culture systems Fe is usually supplied as chelate to ensure an adequate availability of this element. As chelates have affinity for many metal ions these chelates will interact with other cation nutrients in nutrient solutions. This affects the availability of Fe and other nutrients.

  15. Partitioning of organic matter and heavy metals in a sandy soil: Effects of extracting solution, solid to liquid ratio and pH

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fest, P.M.J.; Temminghoff, E.J.M.; Comans, R.N.J.; Riemsdijk, van W.H.

    2008-01-01

    In sandy soils the behavior of heavy metals is largely controlled by soil organic matter (solid and dissolved organic matter; SOC and DOC). Therefore, knowledge of the partitioning of organic matter between the solid phase and soil solution is essential for adequate predictions of the total

  16. A comparative study of the metastable equilibrium solubility behavior of high-crystallinity and low-crystallinity carbonated apatites using pH and solution strontium as independent variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heslop, D D; Bi, Y; Baig, A A; Otsuka, M; Higuchi, W I

    2005-09-01

    Using solution strontium and pH as independent variables, the metastable equilibrium solubility (MES) behavior of two carbonated apatite (CAP) samples has been examined, a high-crystallinity CAP (properties expected to be similar to dental enamel) and a low-crystallinity CAP (properties expected to be similar to bone mineral). CAP samples were prepared by precipitation/digestion: (CAP A: high-crystallinity, 1.3 wt% CO3, synthesized at 85 degrees C; CAP B: low-crystallinity, 6.4 wt% CO3, synthesized at 50 degrees C). Baseline MES distributions were determined in a series of 0.1 M acetate buffers containing only calcium and phosphate (no strontium) over a broad range of solution conditions. To assess the influence of strontium, MES profiles were determined in a similar fashion with 20, 40, 60, and 80% of the solution calcium being replaced on an equal molar basis by solution strontium. To determine the correct function governing CAP dissolution, ion activity products (IAPs) were calculated from the compositions of buffer solutions based on the hydroxyapatite template (Ca(10-n)Sr(n)(PO4)6(OH)2 (n = 0-10)) and the calcium/hydroxide deficient hydroxyapatite template (Ca(9-n)Sr(n)(HPO4)(PO4)5OH (n = 0-9)). (a) for CAP A, at high solution strontium/calcium ratios, the MES profiles were essentially superimposable when the solution IAPs were calculated using the stoichiometry of Ca6Sr4(PO4)6(OH)2 and for CAP B by a stoichiometry of Ca7Sr2(HPO4)(PO4)5OH; (b) for CAP A, at low strontium/calcium ratios, the stoichiometry yielding MES data superpositioning was found to be that of hydroxyapatite and for CAP B, that of calcium/hydroxide deficient hydroxyapatite. When other stoichiometries were assumed, good superpositioning of the data was not possible.

  17. Direct measurement of CO2 solubility and pH in NaCl hydrothermal solutions by combining in-situ potentiometry and Raman spectroscopy up to 280 °C and 150 bar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truche, Laurent; Bazarkina, Elena F.; Berger, Gilles; Caumon, Marie-Camille; Bessaque, Gilles; Dubessy, Jean

    2016-03-01

    The in-situ monitoring of aqueous solution chemistry at elevated temperatures and pressures is a major challenge in geochemistry. Here, we combined for the first time in-situ Raman spectroscopy for concentration measurements and potentiometry for pH measurement in a single hydrothermal cell equipped with sampling systems and operating under controlled conditions of temperature and pressure. Dissolved CO2 concentration and pH were measured at temperatures up to 280 °C and pressures up to 150 bar in the H2O-CO2 and H2O-CO2-NaCl systems. A Pitzer specific-ion-interaction aqueous model was developed and confirmed the accuracy and consistency of the measurements, at least up to 250 °C. The revised Pitzer parameters for the H2O-CO2-NaCl system were formatted for the Phreeqc geochemical software. Significant changes with respect to the Pitzer.dat database currently associated with Phreeqc were observed. The new model parameters are now available for further applications. The Raman and pH probes tested here may also be applied to field monitoring of hydrothermal springs, geothermal wells, and oil and gas boreholes.

  18. Analytic 1D pn junction diode photocurrent solutions following ionizing radiation and including time-dependent changes in the carrier lifetime.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Axness, Carl L.; Keiter, Eric Richard; Kerr, Bert (New Mexico Tech, Socorro, NM)

    2011-04-01

    Circuit simulation tools (e.g., SPICE) have become invaluable in the development and design of electronic circuits in radiation environments. These codes are often employed to study the effect of many thousands of devices under transient current conditions. Device-scale simulation tools (e.g., MEDICI) are commonly used in the design of individual semiconductor components, but require computing resources that make their incorporation into a circuit code impossible for large-scale circuits. Analytic solutions to the ambipolar diffusion equation, an approximation to the carrier transport equations, may be used to characterize the transient currents at nodes within a circuit simulator. We present new transient 1D excess carrier density and photocurrent density solutions to the ambipolar diffusion equation for low-level radiation pulses that take into account a finite device geometry, ohmic fields outside the depleted region, and an arbitrary change in the carrier lifetime due to neutron irradiation or other effects. The solutions are specifically evaluated for the case of an abrupt change in the carrier lifetime during or after, a step, square, or piecewise linear radiation pulse. Noting slow convergence of the raw Fourier series for certain parameter sets, we use closed-form formulas for some of the infinite sums to produce 'partial closed-form' solutions for the above three cases. These 'partial closed-form' solutions converge with only a few tens of terms, which enables efficient large-scale circuit simulations.

  19. Electrochemical characteristics of bioresorbable binary MgCa alloys in Ringer's solution: Revealing the impact of local pH distributions during in-vitro dissolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mareci, D., E-mail: danmareci@yahoo.com [Faculty of Chemical Engineering and Environmental Protection, The “Gheorghe Asachi” Technical University of Iasi, 700050, Iasi (Romania); Bolat, G. [Faculty of Chemical Engineering and Environmental Protection, The “Gheorghe Asachi” Technical University of Iasi, 700050, Iasi (Romania); Izquierdo, J. [Department of Chemistry, University of La Laguna, P.O. Box 456, E-38200 La Laguna (Tenerife) (Spain); Crimu, C.; Munteanu, C. [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, The “Gheorghe Asachi” Technical University of Iasi, 700050, Iasi (Romania); Antoniac, I. [Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Politehnica of Bucharest, 060042 Bucharest (Romania); Souto, R.M., E-mail: rsouto@ull.es [Department of Chemistry, University of La Laguna, P.O. Box 456, E-38200 La Laguna (Tenerife) (Spain); Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Politehnica of Bucharest, 060042 Bucharest (Romania)

    2016-03-01

    Biodegradable magnesium–calcium (MgCa) alloy is a very attractive biomaterial. Two MgCa alloys below the solid solubility of Ca were considered, as to solely investigate the effect of Ca content on the behavior of magnesium and the pH changes associated to metal dissolution. X-ray diffraction analysis and optical microscopy showed that both Mg–0.63Ca and Mg–0.89Ca alloys were solely composed of α(Mg) phase. Degradation characteristics and electrochemical characterization of MgCa alloys were investigated during exposure to Ringer's solution at 37 °C by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and scanning electrochemical microscopy. The impedance behavior showed both capacitive and inductive features that are related to the alloy charge transfer reaction and the relaxation of the absorbed corrosion compounds, and can be described in terms of an equivalent circuit. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was employed to view the surface morphology of the MgCa samples after 1 week immersion in Ringer's solution showing extensive precipitation of corrosion products, whereas the substrate shows evidence of a non-uniform corrosion process. Energy dispersive analysis showed that the precipitates contained oxygen, calcium, magnesium and chlorine, and the Mg:Ca ratios were smaller than in the alloys. Scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) was used to visualize local pH changes associated to these physicochemical processes with high spatial resolution. The occurrence of pH variations in excess of 3 units between anodic and cathodic half-cell reactions was monitored in situ. - Highlights: • Spontaneous degradation of MgCa alloys in Ringer's solution characterized at 37 °C • Reactivity differences between Mg0.63Ca and Mg0.89Ca are evidenced using multiscale electrochemical characterization. • Electrochemical activation occurs heterogeneously on the alloy surface. • Metal dissolution is accompanied by local pH changes. • Mg0.63Ca degrades faster

  20. Influence of solution pH on the electron transport of the self-assembled nanoarrays of single-walled carbon nanotube-cobalt tetra-aminophthalocyanine on gold electrodes: Electrocatalytic detection of epinephrine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozoemena, Kenneth I. [Chemistry Department, University of Pretoria, Pretoria 0002 (South Africa)], E-mail: kenneth.ozoemena@up.ac.za; Nkosi, Dudu; Pillay, Jeseelan [Chemistry Department, University of Pretoria, Pretoria 0002 (South Africa)

    2008-02-15

    This paper provides first evidence of the impact of solution pH on the heterogeneous electron transfer rate constants of self-assembled films of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) and SWCNT integrated to cobalt(II)tetra-aminophthalocyanine (SWCNT-CoTAPc) by sequential self-assembly. Using cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, we proved that both SAMs exhibit notable differences in their response to different buffered solution pH, with and without the presence of redox probe, [Fe(CN){sub 6}]{sup 4-}/[Fe(CN){sub 6}]{sup 3-}. Surface pK{sub a} value for the Au-Cys-SWCNT-CoTAPc was estimated as ca. 7.8, compared to that of the Au-Cys-SWCNT of about 5.5. Interestingly, both redox-active SAMs gave similar analytical response for epinephrine, giving well-resolved square wave voltammograms, with linear concentration range up to 130 {mu}M, sensitivity of ca. 9.4 x 10{sup -3} AM{sup -1}, and limit of detection ca. 6 {mu}M. This analytical result implies that there is no detectable advantage of one of the SAMs over the other in the electrocatalytic detection of this neurotransmitter.

  1. Deposition and separation of W and Mo from aqueous solutions with simultaneous hydrogen production in stacked bioelectrochemical systems (BESs): Impact of heavy metals W(VI)/Mo(VI) molar ratio, initial pH and electrode material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Liping; Li, Ming; Pan, Yuzhen; Quan, Xie; Yang, Jinhui; Puma, Gianluca Li

    2018-04-16

    The deposition and separation of W and Mo from aqueous solutions with simultaneous hydrogen production was investigated in stacked bioelectrochemical systems (BESs) composed of microbial electrolysis cell (1#) serially connected with parallel connected microbial fuel cell (2#). The impact of W/Mo molar ratio (in the range 0.01 mM : 1 mM and vice-versa), initial pH (1.5 to 4.0) and cathode material (stainless steel mesh (SSM), carbon rod (CR) and titanium sheet (TS)) on the BES performance was systematically investigated. The concentration of Mo(VI) was more influential than W(VI) in determining the rate of deposition of both metals and the rate of hydrogen production. Complete metal recovery was achieved at equimolar W/Mo ratio of 0.05 mM : 0.05 mM. The rates of metal deposition and hydrogen production increased at acidic pH, with the fastest rates at pH 1.5. The morphology of the metal deposits and the valence of the Mo were correlated with W/Mo ratio and pH. CR cathodes (2#) coupled with SSM cathodes (1#) achieved a significant rate of hydrogen production (0.82 ± 0.04 m 3 /m 3 /d) with W and Mo deposition (0.049 ± 0.003 mmol/L/h and 0.140 ± 0.004 mmol/L/h (1#); 0.025 ± 0.001 mmol/L/h and 0.090 ± 0.006 mmol/L/h (2#)). Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. The Effect of Micro/Nano-metrics Size on the Interaction of Jordanian Aluminosilicate Raw Materials with High pH Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldabsheh, Islam; Garcia-Valles, Maite; Martinez, Salvador

    2014-05-01

    Environmental preservation has become a driving force behind the search for new sustainable and environmentally friendly composites to replace conventional concrete produced from ordinary Portland cement (OPC). Current researches concentrate on developing building products (geopolymers) through geopolymerization. The goal is to produce low cost construction materials for green housing. Geopolymerization is the process of polymerizing minerals with high silica and alumina at low temperature by the use of alkali solutions. Dissolution is the most important process for supplying the high initial Al and Si concentrations to produce the gel phase that is responsible for geopolymerization. This study has been focused on the influence of different micrometric particle sizes of three Jordanian raw materials on their dissolution behavior in sodium hydroxide solution. The samples are kaolinite, volcanic tuff and silica sand. The dissolution properties of each material, alone and mixed with the other two materials were studied in different concentrations (5 and 10 M) using (NaOH) at 25ºC, and shaking time for 24 and 168 h. To better understand the dissolution process, the alkaline solution was renewed after the desired time in order to know if the Al-Si raw material is completely dissolved or not. Different analytical techniques were used to characterize raw materials physically, mineralogically, chemically and thermally. All processed samples either centrifuged solutions or solid residues were fully characterized. The leached concentrations of Al and Si were determined by inductively coupled plasma (ICP). X-ray Diffraction Technique (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), and Thermo Gravimetric Analysis (TGA) were used to evaluate the solid residue characterization compared with the original ones. The three aluminosilicate raw materials have indicated variable degrees of solubility under highly alkaline conditions. The method for the size reduction of the used raw

  3. Methods of producing adsorption media including a metal oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Nicholas R; Tranter, Troy J

    2014-03-04

    Methods of producing a metal oxide are disclosed. The method comprises dissolving a metal salt in a reaction solvent to form a metal salt/reaction solvent solution. The metal salt is converted to a metal oxide and a caustic solution is added to the metal oxide/reaction solvent solution to adjust the pH of the metal oxide/reaction solvent solution to less than approximately 7.0. The metal oxide is precipitated and recovered. A method of producing adsorption media including the metal oxide is also disclosed, as is a precursor of an active component including particles of a metal oxide.

  4. O pH da calda de aplicação e a absorção de ácido giberélico por frutas de laranja cv. ‘Valência’ The solution pH on gibberellic acid uptake by cv. ‘Valência’ orange fruits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Guilherme Casagrande Jr.

    1999-10-01

    different solution pH. The treatments consisted of 5 concentrations of gibberellic acid (0; 5; 10; 15; and 20 ppm and 3 pHs (3; 4.5; and 6. The aplication was made in May, when fruits were at green-yellow stage, and samples were collected every 30 days until November. The variables studied were coloration and thickness of the peel, total soluble solids (TSS, pH of juice, percent of juice, total acid (TA, ratio TSS/TA and technological index. The results obtained did not allow to conclude that gibberellic acid had any influence on the characteristics of the juice. The thickness of the peel was not affected by gibberellic acid. However, gibberellic acid caused a retaintion of the green color of the peel with increasing concentration, causing the fruits to remain greener. This was observed for all solution pHs. At pH 3, the fruits were greener than under the other pHs, and at the normal pH (4.5 The green coloration in the fruits persisted for a louger time than at pH=6, suggesting that acid pHs increase the uptake of gibberelic acid by the plants. It was also observed that gibberellic acid delayed the regreening of the fruits, what happens when the temperature becomes higher.

  5. Adsorção de cromo (VI por carvão ativado granular de soluções diluídas utilizando um sistema batelada sob pH controlado Chromium (VI adsorption by GAC from diluted solutions in batch system and controlled ph

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Santos Souza

    2009-09-01

    solutions, and batch systems with controlled pH. The functional groups on the CAG surface was carried out by the Boehm method. In addition, effect of pH on the Cr(VI adsorption, adsorption equilibrium, and kinetic were studied under experimental conditions (pH = 6, MA = 6g, for 90min.. On the GAC surface, carboxylic groups were found to be in higher concentrations (MAS=0,43 mmol/gCAG, which increase the Cr(VI adsorption, principally in acidic pH values. The adsorption capacity is dependent on the pH of the solution, due to its influence on the surface properties of the CAG and different ionic forms of the Cr(VI solutions. The adsorption equilibrium data was adjusted satisfactorily by the Langmuir isotherm (R²=0,988, favorable type. From kinetics adsorption of 20 mg/L and 5 mg/L, the results were compatible with the national legislation (Res. nº 357/05. Therefore, the experimental system using (CAG was efficient in removing the Cr(VI from liquid streams containing low concentrations of the metal.

  6. Programmable pH buffers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gough, Dara Van; Huber, Dale L.; Bunker, Bruce C.; Roberts, Mark E.

    2017-01-24

    A programmable pH buffer comprises a copolymer that changes pK.sub.a at a lower critical solution temperature (LCST) in water. The copolymer comprises a thermally programmable polymer that undergoes a hydrophobic-to-hydrophilic phase change at the LCST and an electrolytic polymer that exhibits acid-base properties that are responsive to the phase change. The programmable pH buffer can be used to sequester CO.sub.2 into water.

  7. Plant Habitat (PH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onate, Bryan

    2016-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) will soon have a platform for conducting fundamental research of Large Plants. Plant Habitat (PH) is designed to be a fully controllable environment for high-quality plant physiological research. PH will control light quality, level, and timing, temperature, CO2, relative humidity, and irrigation, while scrubbing ethylene. Additional capabilities include leaf temperature and root zone moisture and oxygen sensing. The light cap will have red (630 nm), blue (450 nm), green (525 nm), far red (730 nm) and broad spectrum white LEDs. There will be several internal cameras (visible and IR) to monitor and record plant growth and operations.

  8. Molecular dynamics investigation of ferrous-ferric electron transfer in a hydrolyzing aqueous solution: Calculation of the pH dependence of the diabatic transfer barrier and the potential of mean force

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rustad, James R.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Felmy, Andrew R.

    2004-01-01

    We present a molecular model for ferrous-ferric electron transfer in an aqueous solution that accounts for electronic polarizability and exhibits spontaneous cation hydrolysis. An extended Lagrangian technique is introduced for carrying out calculations of electron-transfer barriers in polarizable systems. The model predicts that the diabatic barrier to electron transfer increases with increasing pH, due to stabilization of the Fe 3+ by fluctuations in the number of hydroxide ions in its first coordination sphere, in much the same way as the barrier would increase with increasing dielectric constant in the Marcus theory. We have also calculated the effect of pH on the potential of mean force between two hydrolyzing ions in aqueous solution. As expected, increasing pH reduces the potential of mean force between the ferrous and ferric ions in the model system. The magnitudes of the predicted increase in diabatic transfer barrier and the predicted decrease in the potential of mean force nearly cancel each other at the canonical transfer distance of 0.55 nm. Even though hydrolysis is allowed in our calculations, the distribution of reorganization energies has only one maximum and is Gaussian to an excellent approximation, giving a harmonic free energy surface in the reorganization energy F(ΔE) with a single minimum. There is thus a surprising amount of overlap in electron-transfer reorganization energies for Fe 2+ -Fe(H 2 O) 6 3+ , Fe 2+ -Fe(OH)(H 2 O) 5 2+ , and Fe 2+ -Fe(OH) 2 (H 2 O) + couples, indicating that fluctuations in hydrolysis state can be viewed on a continuum with other solvent contributions to the reorganization energy. There appears to be little justification for thinking of the transfer rate as arising from the contributions of different hydrolysis states. Electronic structure calculations indicate that Fe(H 2 O) 6 2+ -Fe(OH) n (H 2 O) 6-n (3-n)+ complexes interacting through H 3 O 2 - bridges do not have large electronic couplings

  9. Ratiometric Imaging of Extracellular pH in Dental Biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlafer, Sebastian; Dige, Irene

    2016-01-01

    The pH in bacterial biofilms on teeth is of central importance for dental caries, a disease with a high worldwide prevalence. Nutrients and metabolites are not distributed evenly in dental biofilms. A complex interplay of sorption to and reaction with organic matter in the biofilm reduces...... the diffusion paths of solutes and creates steep gradients of reactive molecules, including organic acids, across the biofilm. Quantitative fluorescent microscopic methods, such as fluorescence life time imaging or pH ratiometry, can be employed to visualize pH in different microenvironments of dental biofilms...... allows monitoring both vertical and horizontal pH gradients in real-time without mechanically disturbing the biofilm. However, care must be taken to differentiate accurately between extra- and intracellular compartments of the biofilm. Here, the ratiometric dye, seminaphthorhodafluor-4F 5-(and-6...

  10. Preface of "The Second Symposium on Border Zones Between Experimental and Numerical Application Including Solution Approaches By Extensions of Standard Numerical Methods"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortleb, Sigrun; Seidel, Christian

    2017-07-01

    In this second symposium at the limits of experimental and numerical methods, recent research is presented on practically relevant problems. Presentations discuss experimental investigation as well as numerical methods with a strong focus on application. In addition, problems are identified which require a hybrid experimental-numerical approach. Topics include fast explicit diffusion applied to a geothermal energy storage tank, noise in experimental measurements of electrical quantities, thermal fluid structure interaction, tensegrity structures, experimental and numerical methods for Chladni figures, optimized construction of hydroelectric power stations, experimental and numerical limits in the investigation of rain-wind induced vibrations as well as the application of exponential integrators in a domain-based IMEX setting.

  11. 3-dimensional magnetotelluric inversion including topography using deformed hexahedral edge finite elements and direct solvers parallelized on symmetric multiprocessor computers - Part II: direct data-space inverse solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordy, M.; Wannamaker, P.; Maris, V.; Cherkaev, E.; Hill, G.

    2016-01-01

    Following the creation described in Part I of a deformable edge finite-element simulator for 3-D magnetotelluric (MT) responses using direct solvers, in Part II we develop an algorithm named HexMT for 3-D regularized inversion of MT data including topography. Direct solvers parallelized on large-RAM, symmetric multiprocessor (SMP) workstations are used also for the Gauss-Newton model update. By exploiting the data-space approach, the computational cost of the model update becomes much less in both time and computer memory than the cost of the forward simulation. In order to regularize using the second norm of the gradient, we factor the matrix related to the regularization term and apply its inverse to the Jacobian, which is done using the MKL PARDISO library. For dense matrix multiplication and factorization related to the model update, we use the PLASMA library which shows very good scalability across processor cores. A synthetic test inversion using a simple hill model shows that including topography can be important; in this case depression of the electric field by the hill can cause false conductors at depth or mask the presence of resistive structure. With a simple model of two buried bricks, a uniform spatial weighting for the norm of model smoothing recovered more accurate locations for the tomographic images compared to weightings which were a function of parameter Jacobians. We implement joint inversion for static distortion matrices tested using the Dublin secret model 2, for which we are able to reduce nRMS to ˜1.1 while avoiding oscillatory convergence. Finally we test the code on field data by inverting full impedance and tipper MT responses collected around Mount St Helens in the Cascade volcanic chain. Among several prominent structures, the north-south trending, eruption-controlling shear zone is clearly imaged in the inversion.

  12. Changes in EC , pH and in the concentrations of nitrate, ammonium, sodium and chlorine in the drainage solution of a crop of roses on substrates with drainage recycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariela Rodríguez

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The rose cultivation system has been changing from soil to substrate on the Plateau of Bogota. The objective of this study was the monitoring of the EC, pH, and the levels of nitrate, ammonium, sodium and chlorine in a drainage solution in a crop of roses with substrates based on burnt rice husk and coconut fiber. The Charlotte rose variety grafted onto ‘Natal Briar’ was planted in a greenhouse located in one of the SENA facilities in Mosquera (Colombia; with a density of 6.5 plants/ m². For this experiment, a split plot design was used arranged in randomized blocks with a three-level recirculating system (0, 50 and 100% on the substrates 100% burnt rice husk; 65% burnt rice husk plus 35% coconut fiber; and 35% burnt rice husk plus 65% coconut fiber, repeated three times. The EC decreased from 2.7 to 1.3 mS cm-1 within weeks 2 and 5 which demonstrated an increase of mineral consumption by the plants. The pH levels dropped from 7.46 to 6.27 within weeks 3 to 8 and then increased to 7.39 within weeks 8 to 12. Nitrate concentrations showed a decreasing trend in recirculation treatments within weeks 2 to 12. A lower ammonium concentration was observed at week 4 in treatments with and without recirculation during the vegetative stage. The levels of sodium and chloride increased in treatments with a recirculation system, without signs of toxicity

  13. BSA-coated nanoparticles for improved SERS-based intracellular pH sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiao-Shan; Hu, Pei; Cui, Yan; Zong, Cheng; Feng, Jia-Min; Wang, Xin; Ren, Bin

    2014-12-16

    Local microenvironment pH sensing is one of the key parameters for the understanding of many biological processes. As a noninvasive and high sensitive technique, surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) has attracted considerable interest in the detection of the local pH of live cells. We herein develop a facile way to prepare Au-(4-MPy)-BSA (AMB) pH nanosensor. The 4-MPy (4-mercaptopyridine) was used as the pH sensing molecule. The modification of the nanoparticles with BSA not only provides a high sensitive response to pH changes ranging from pH 4.0 to 9.0 but also exhibits a high sensitivity and good biocompatibility, stability, and reliability in various solutions (including the solutions of high ionic strength or with complex composition such as the cell culture medium), both in the aggregation state or after long-term storage. The AMB pH nanosensor shows great advantages for reliable intracellular pH analysis and has been successfully used to monitor the pH distribution of live cells and can address the grand challenges in SERS-based pH sensing for practical biological applications.

  14. Examining the relationship between school district size and science achievement in Texas including rural school administrator perceptions of challenges and solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Matthew James

    Rural and small schools have almost one-third of all public school enrollment in America, yet typically have the fewest financial and research based resources. Educational models have been developed with either the urban or suburban school in mind, and the rural school is often left with no other alternative except this paradigm. Rural based educational resources are rare and the ability to access these resources for rural school districts almost non-existent. Federal and state based education agencies provide some rural educational based programs, but have had virtually no success in answering rural school issues. With federal and state interest in science initiatives, the challenge that rural schools face weigh in. To align with that focus, this study examined Texas middle school student achievement in science and its relationship with school district enrollment size. This study involved a sequential transformative mixed methodology with the quantitative phase driving the second qualitative portion. The quantitative research was a non-experimental causal-comparative study conducted to determine whether there is a significant difference between student achievement on the 2010 Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills 8 th grade science results and school district enrollment size. The school districts were distributed into four categories by size including: a) small districts (32-550); b) medium districts (551-1500); c) large districts (1501-6000); and d) mega-sized districts (6001-202,773). A one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was conducted to compare the district averages from the 2010 TAKS 8th grade science assessment results and the four district enrollment groups. The second phase of the study was qualitative utilizing constructivism and critical theory to identify the issues facing rural and small school administrators concerning science based curriculum and development. These themes and issues were sought through a case study method and through use of semi

  15. Evaluation of the electrochemical behavior of U2.5Zr7.5Nb and U3Zr9Nb uranium alloys in relation to the pH and the solution aeration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansur, Fabio Abud; Santos, Ana Maria Matildes dos; Ferraz, Wilmar Barbosa; Figueiredo, Celia de Araujo

    2011-01-01

    The Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN) is developing, in cooperation with the Centro Tecnologico da Marinha (CTMSP), the advanced nuclear plate type fuel for the second core of the land-based reactor prototype of the Laboratorio de Geracao Nucleo-Eletrica (LABGENE). Recent investigations have shown that the fuel made of uranium-based niobium and zirconium alloys reaches the best performance relative to other fuels, e.g. UO 2 . Niobium and Zirconium also increase the corrosion resistance and the mechanical strength of the uranium alloys. By means of electrochemical techniques the corrosion behavior of alloys U 2 . 5 Zr 7.5 Nb and U 3 Zr 9 Nb, developed at CDTN and heat treated in the temperature range of 200 deg C to 600 deg C, was assessed. The effect of the parameters pH and solution aeration was studied as well as the influence of zirconium and niobium alloying elements in the corrosion of uranium. The techniques used were open circuit potential, electrochemical impedance and potentiodynamic anodic polarization at room temperature. The tests were performed in a three-electrode electrochemical cell with Ag/AgCl (3M KCl) as the reference electrode and a platinum plate as the auxiliary electrode. The potentiodynamic polarization curves of uranium and its alloys in acidic solutions showed regions with anodic currents limited by a passive film. The presence of niobium and zirconium contributed for the formation of this film. The impedance data showed the presence of two semicircles in the Bode diagram, indicating the occurrence of two distinct electrochemical processes. The data were fitted to an equivalent circuit model in order to obtain parameters of the electrochemical processes and evaluate the effect of the studied variables. (author)

  16. Alkaline pH sensor molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murayama, Takashi; Maruyama, Ichiro N

    2015-11-01

    Animals can survive only within a narrow pH range. This requires continual monitoring of environmental and body-fluid pH. Although a variety of acidic pH sensor molecules have been reported, alkaline pH sensor function is not well understood. This Review describes neuronal alkaline pH sensors, grouped according to whether they monitor extracellular or intracellular alkaline pH. Extracellular sensors include the receptor-type guanylyl cyclase, the insulin receptor-related receptor, ligand-gated Cl- channels, connexin hemichannels, two-pore-domain K+ channels, and transient receptor potential (TRP) channels. Intracellular sensors include TRP channels and gap junction channels. Identification of molecular mechanisms underlying alkaline pH sensing is crucial for understanding how animals respond to environmental alkaline pH and how body-fluid pH is maintained within a narrow range. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Spectroscopic determination of pH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faanu, A.; Glover, E.T.; Bailey, E.; Rochelle, C.

    2009-01-01

    A technique of measuring pH at temperature range of 20 - 70 0 C and high pressure conditions of 1 - 200 atmospheres has been developed by relating the ratio of absorbance peaks of indicator solutions (basic and acidic) as a function of pH, using ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometer. The pH values of the buffer solutions measured at 20 0 C and 70 0 C indicated slight temperature dependence, while the pressure had no effect. The pH of the buffer solutions increased with temperature with relative standard deviations in the range 0.4 - 0.5 % at 95 % confidence interval. The possible causes of the temperature dependence were attributed to changes in pH values as the temperature changed. (au)

  18. Low pH Cements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savage, David; Benbow, Steven

    2007-05-01

    The development of low-pH cements for use in geological repositories for radioactive waste stems from concerns over the potential for deleterious effects upon the host rock and other EBS materials (notably bentonite) under the hyperalkaline conditions (pH > 12) of cement pore fluids. Low pH cement (also known as low heat cement) was developed by the cement industry for use where large masses of cement (e.g. dams) could cause problems regarding heat generated during curing. In low pH cements, the amount of cement is reduced by substitution of materials such as fly ash, blast furnace slag, silica fume, and/or non-pozzolanic silica flour. SKB and Posiva have ruled out the use of blast furnace slag and fly-ash and are focusing on silica fume as a blending agent. Currently, no preferred composition has been identified by these agencies. SKB and Posiva have defined a pH limit ≤ 11 for cement grout leachates. To attain this pH, blending agents must comprise at least 50 wt % of dry materials. Because low pH cement has little, or no free portlandite, the cement consists predominantly of calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) gel with a Ca/Si ratio ≤ 0.8. Although there are potential implications for the performance of the spent fuel and cladding due to the presence of hyperalkaline fluids from cement, the principal focus for safety assessment lies with the behaviour of bentonite. There are a number of potential constraints on the interaction of hyperalkaline cement pore fluids with bentonite, including mass balance, thermodynamic issues, mass transport, and kinetics, but none of these is likely to be limiting if conventional OPC cements are employed in repository construction. Nevertheless: Low-pH cements may supply approximately 50 % less hydroxyl ions than conventional OPC for a given volume of cement, but mass balance constraints are complicated by the uncertainty concerning the type of secondary minerals produced during cement-bentonite interaction. The change of aqueous

  19. Low pH Cements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savage, David; Benbow, Steven [Quintessa Ltd., Henley-on-Thames (United Kingdom)

    2007-05-15

    The development of low-pH cements for use in geological repositories for radioactive waste stems from concerns over the potential for deleterious effects upon the host rock and other EBS materials (notably bentonite) under the hyperalkaline conditions (pH > 12) of cement pore fluids. Low pH cement (also known as low heat cement) was developed by the cement industry for use where large masses of cement (e.g. dams) could cause problems regarding heat generated during curing. In low pH cements, the amount of cement is reduced by substitution of materials such as fly ash, blast furnace slag, silica fume, and/or non-pozzolanic silica flour. SKB and Posiva have ruled out the use of blast furnace slag and fly-ash and are focusing on silica fume as a blending agent. Currently, no preferred composition has been identified by these agencies. SKB and Posiva have defined a pH limit {<=} 11 for cement grout leachates. To attain this pH, blending agents must comprise at least 50 wt % of dry materials. Because low pH cement has little, or no free portlandite, the cement consists predominantly of calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) gel with a Ca/Si ratio {<=} 0.8. Although there are potential implications for the performance of the spent fuel and cladding due to the presence of hyperalkaline fluids from cement, the principal focus for safety assessment lies with the behaviour of bentonite. There are a number of potential constraints on the interaction of hyperalkaline cement pore fluids with bentonite, including mass balance, thermodynamic issues, mass transport, and kinetics, but none of these is likely to be limiting if conventional OPC cements are employed in repository construction. Nevertheless: Low-pH cements may supply approximately 50 % less hydroxyl ions than conventional OPC for a given volume of cement, but mass balance constraints are complicated by the uncertainty concerning the type of secondary minerals produced during cement-bentonite interaction. The change of aqueous

  20. Methodologically controlled variations in laboratory and field pH measurements in waterlogged soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elberling, Bo; Matthiesen, Henning

    2007-01-01

    artefacts is critical. But the study includes agricultural and forest soils for comparison. At a waterlogged site, Laboratory results were compared with three different field methods: calomel pH probes inserted in the soil from pits, pH measurements of soil solution extracted from the soil, and pH profiles...... using a solid-state pH electrode pushed into the soil from the surface. Comparisons between in situ and laboratory methods revealed differences of more than 1 pH unit. The content of dissolved ions in soil solution and field observations of O2 and CO2 concentrations were used in the speciation model...... PHREEQE in order to predict gas exchange processes. Changes in pH in soil solution following equilibrium in the laboratory could be explained mainly by CO2 degassing. Only soil pH measured in situ using either calomel or solid-state probes inserted directly into the soil was not affected by gas exchange...

  1. A ph sensor based on a flexible substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wen-Ding

    pH sensor is an essential component used in many chemical, food, and bio-material industries. Conventional glass electrodes have been used to construct pH sensors, however, have some disadvantages. Glass electrodes are easily affected by alkaline or HF solution, they require a high input impedance pH meter, they often exhibit a sluggish response. In some specific applications, it is also difficult to use glass electrodes for in vivo biomedical or food monitoring applications due to the difficulty of size miniaturization, planarization and polymerization based on current manufacturing technologies. In this work, we have demonstrated a novel flexible pH sensor based on low-cost sol-gel fabrication process of iridium oxide (IrOx) sensing film (IROF). A pair of flexible miniature IrOx/AgCl electrode generated the action potential from the solution by electrochemical mechanism to obtain the pH level of the reagent. The fabrication process including sol-gel, thermal oxidation, and the electro-plating process of the silver chloride (AgCl) reference electrode were reported in the work. The IrOx film was verified and characterized using electron dispersive analysis (EDAX), scanning electron microscope (SEM), and x-ray diffraction (XRD). The flexible pH sensor's performance and characterization have been investigated with different testing parameters such as sensitivity, response time, stability, reversibility, repeatability, selectivity and temperature dependence. The flexible IrOx pH sensors exhibited promising sensing performance with a near-Nernstian response of sensitivity which is between --51.1mV/pH and --51.7mV/pH in different pH levels ranging from 1.5 to 12 at 25°C. Two applications including gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) diagnosis and food freshness wireless monitoring using our micro-flexible IrOx pH sensors were demonstrated. For the GERD diagnosing system, we embedded the micro flexible pH sensor on a 1.2cmx3.8cm of the capsule size of wireless sensor

  2. Computer simulation of the effect of temperature on pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kipp, J E; Schuck, D F

    1995-11-01

    The effect of temperature on solution pH was simulated by computer (program PHTEMP). We have determined that the change in pH due to shifts in acid-base equilibria [delta pH = pH(60 degrees C) - pH(25 degrees C)] can be substantial for compounds such as aliphatic amines that have high enthalpies for acid dissociation. This is of particular significance during elevated temperature experiments in which changes in the pKa values of formulation components, and hence the solution pH, can accelerate decomposition as compared to those formulations where sensitive functionality is absent. PHTEMP afforded the following results at initial pH = 7 (25 degrees C): (a) 0.1 M triethylamine (delta H zero = 10.4 kcal/mol) delta pH approximately -0.8; (b) 0.1 M acetic acid (delta H zero = -0.1 kcal/mol) delta pH approximately 0; (c) 0.1 M sulfuric acid (delta H zero 1 = -12 kcal/mol; delta H zero 2 = -5.4 kcal/mol) delta pH approximately -0.4. Solutions of general pharmaceutical interest were also studied and included a 12-component amino acid mixture, 0.1 M glycine, and 0.1 M triethylamine in either 0.02 M citric acid or 0.05 M TRIS buffer. In each case the pH change with temperature was dependent on the concentrations of components, the enthalpies for each acid dissociation, and the starting pH. At lower pH ( 9). These results are interpreted as the effect of a relative change in hydronium ion activity, delta H+/H+(initial), due to temperature-induced shifts in equilibria (acid dissociation, water autoprotolysis). This relative change must become larger as H+ decreases (pH increases). The output of PHTEMP was experimentally verified with 0.1 M glycine and with a multiple component amino acid solution. In both cases, agreement with prediction was excellent. The results of this investigation underscore the need to critically review formulation choices for both thermodynamic and traditional kinetic effects on the resulting product stability.

  3. Similarity of salt influences on the pH of buffers, polyelectrolytes, and proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voinescu, Alina E; Bauduin, Pierre; Pinna, M Cristina; Touraud, Didier; Ninham, Barry W; Kunz, Werner

    2006-05-04

    Changes in pH induced by the addition of electrolytes to buffers, polyelectrolytes (a polycarboxy polymethylene and a polyethyleneimine), and proteins (casein, whey, and lysozyme) solutions are explored systematically. The two buffer systems are triethanolamine/triethanolammonium chloride and citric acid/sodium citrate. These are chosen because of the similarity of their acid-base equilibria with those of amino acids predominant in most proteins, that is, amino acids that include carboxylate or ammonium groups in their structures. The pH of triethanolamine and of citrate buffers respectively increases and decreases when salt is added. At low electrolyte concentrations (buffer solutions. It is even possible to qualitatively predict these changes in protein solutions simply from the primary protein structure. At least in the systems considered here, the specific ion effects on pH seem to correlate with the bulk activity coefficients of the added electrolytes, at least at moderate salt concentrations.

  4. Method for producing rapid pH changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, J.H.; Campillo, A.J.; Shapiro, S.L.; Winn, K.R.

    A method of initiating a rapid pH change in a solution comprises irradiating the solution with an intense flux of electromagnetic radiation of a frequency which produces a substantial pK change to a compound in solution. To optimize the resulting pH change, the compound being irradiated in solution should have an excited state lifetime substantially longer than the time required to establish an excited state acid-base equilibrium in the solution. Desired pH changes can be accomplished in nanoseconds or less by means of picosecond pulses of laser radiation.

  5. Acid Rain, pH & Acidity: A Common Misinterpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, David B.; Thompson, Ronald E.

    1989-01-01

    Illustrates the basis for misleading statements about the relationship between pH and acid content in acid rain. Explains why pH cannot be used as a measure of acidity for rain or any other solution. Suggests that teachers present acidity and pH as two separate and distinct concepts. (RT)

  6. pH in atomic scale simulations of electrochemical interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossmeisl, Jan; Chan, Karen; Ahmed, Rizwan

    2013-01-01

    Electrochemical reaction rates can strongly depend on pH, and there is increasing interest in electrocatalysis in alkaline solution. To date, no method has been devised to address pH in atomic scale simulations. We present a simple method to determine the atomic structure of the metal......|solution interface at a given pH and electrode potential. Using Pt(111)|water as an example, we show the effect of pH on the interfacial structure, and discuss its impact on reaction energies and barriers. This method paves the way for ab initio studies of pH effects on the structure and electrocatalytic activity...

  7. ph Sensitive hydrogel as colon specific drug delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alarifi, A.S.

    2011-01-01

    γ-radiation induced graft copolymerization and crosslinking was for the synthesis of ph-sensitive hydrogels composed of poly (vinyl pyrrolidone) acrylic acid. The prepared hydrogels were subjected to swelling test to evaluate the effects of ph and ionic strength of the surrounding solution. Drastic changes in the swelling parameters where observed by changing the surrounding solution ph values. The release of ibuprofen from hydrogels was monitored as a function of time at ph 1 and ph 7 in order to evaluate the prepared copolymer ability for colon- specific drug carrier uses.

  8. Corrosion of zirconium alloys in alternating pH environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayer, P.; Manolescu, A.V.

    1985-01-01

    Behaviour of two commercial alloys, Zircaloy-2 and zirconium-2.5 wt% niobium were investigated in an environment of alternating pH. Corrosion advancement and scale morphology of coupons exposed to aqueous solution of LiOH (pH 10.2 and 14) were followed as a function of temperature (300-360 degreesC) and time (up to 165 days). The test sequence consisted of short term exposure to high pH and re-exposure to low pH solutions for extended period of time followed by a short term test in high pH. The results of these tests and detailed post-corrosion analysis indicate a fundamental difference between the corrosion behaviour of these two materials. Both alloys corrode fast in high pH environments, but only zirconium-2.5 wt% niobium continues to form detectable new oxide in low pH solution

  9. Influence of pH on extracellular matrix preservation during lung decellularization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, Tomoshi; Balestrini, Jenna L; Mendez, Julio; Calle, Elizabeth A; Zhao, Liping; Niklason, Laura E

    2014-12-01

    The creation of decellularized organs for use in regenerative medicine requires the preservation of the organ extracellular matrix (ECM) as a means to provide critical cues for differentiation and migration of cells that are seeded onto the organ scaffold. The purpose of this study was to assess the influence of varying pH levels on the preservation of key ECM components during the decellularization of rat lungs. Herein, we show that the pH of the 3-[(3-cholamidopropyl)dimethylammonio]-1-propanesulfonate (CHAPS)-based decellularization solution influences ECM retention, cell removal, and also the potential for host response upon implantation of acellular lung tissue. The preservation of ECM components, including elastin, fibronectin, and laminin, were better retained in the lower pH conditions that were tested (pH ranges tested: 8, 10, 12); glycosaminoglycans were preserved to a higher extent in the lower pH groups as well. The DNA content following decellularization of the rat lung was inversely correlated with the pH of the decellularization solution. Despite detectible levels of cyotoskeletal proteins and significant residual DNA, tissues decellularized at pH 8 demonstrated the greatest tissue architecture maintenance and the least induction of host response of all acellular conditions. These results highlight the effect of pH on the results obtained by organ decellularization and suggest that altering the pH of the solutions used for decellularization may influence the ability of cells to properly differentiate and home to appropriate locations within the scaffold, based on the preservation of key ECM components and implantation results.

  10. Paulette Gray, Ph.D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulette S. Gray, Ph.D. is the Director for the Division of Extramural Activities (DEA). As the director of the division, she is responsible for the overall scientific, fiscal, and administrative management of the division, including broad strategic planning, development, implementation, and evaluation.

  11. Trimerization Dictates Solution Opalescence of a Monoclonal Antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Teng-Chieh; Langford, Alex Jacob; Kumar, Sandeep; Ruesch, John Carl; Wang, Wei

    2016-08-01

    Opalescence, sometimes observed in antibody solutions, is thought to be mediated by light scattering of soluble oligomers or insoluble particulates. However, mechanistic features, such as stoichiometry and self-association affinity of oligomeric species related to opalescence, are poorly understood. Here, opalescence behavior of a monoclonal antibody (mAb-1) solution was studied over a wide range of solution conditions including different protein concentrations, pH, and in the presence or absence of salt. Hydrodynamic and thermodynamic properties of mAb-1 solutions were studied by analytical ultracentrifugation and dynamic light scattering. Opalescence in mAb-1 solutions is pH and concentration dependent. The degree of opalescence correlates with reversible monomer-trimer equilibrium detected by analytical ultracentrifugation. Increased trimer formation corresponds to increased opalescence in mAb-1 solutions at higher pH and protein concentrations. Addition of NaCl shifts this equilibrium toward monomer and reduces solution opalescence. This study demonstrates that opalescence in mAb-1 solutions does not arise from the light scattering of monomer or random molecular self-associations but is strongly correlated with a specific self-association stoichiometry and affinity. Importantly, at pH 5.5 (far below isoelectric point of mAb-1), the solution is not opalescent and with nonideal behavior. This study also dissects several parameters to describe the hydrodynamic and thermodynamic nonideality. Copyright © 2016 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Microscopic monitoring of extracellular pH in dental biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlafer, Sebastian; Garcia, Javier; Greve, Matilde

    pH in dental biofilm is a key virulence factor for the development of caries lesions. The complex three-dimensional architecture of dental biofilms leads to steep gradients of nutrients and metabolites, including organic acids, across the biofilm. For decades, measuring pH in dental biofilm has...... been limited to monitoring bulk pH with electrodes. Although pH microelectrodes with a better spatial resolution have been developed, they do not permit to monitor horizontal pH gradients in real-time. Quantitative fluorescent microscopic techniques, such as fluorescence lifetime imaging or pH...... ratiometry, can be employed to map the pH landscape in dental biofilm with more detail. However, when pH sensitive fluorescent probes are used to visualize pH in biofilms, it is crucial to differentiate between extracellular and intracellular pH. Intracellular microbial pH and pH in the extracellular matrix...

  13. Regularities of radium coprecipitation with barium sulfate from salt solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudryavskij, Yu.P.; Rakhimova, O.V.

    2007-01-01

    Coprecipitation of radium with barium sulfate from highly concentrated NaCl solutions is studied, including the effects of the initial solution composition, alkaline reagent (CaO, NaOH), supporting electrolyte (NaCl) concentration, and pH. The process is promoted by high NaCl concentration in the initial solution, which is due to structural transformation and change in the sorption activity of the BaSO 4 precipitate in salt solutions. The results obtained were applied to recovery of radium from process solutions during the development and introduction of improved procedure for disinfection and decontamination of waste yielded by chlorination of loparite concentrates [ru

  14. Sugar-based gemini surfactant with a vesicle-to-micelle transition at acidic pH and a reversible vesicle flocculation near neutral pH

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Johnsson, M; Wagenaar, A; Engberts, JBFN

    2003-01-01

    A sugar-based (reduced glucose) gemini surfactant forms vesicles in dilute aqueous solution near neutral pH. At lower pH, there is a vesicle-to-micelle transition within a narrow pH region (pH 6.0-5.6). The vesicles are transformed into large cylindrical micelles that in turn are transformed into

  15. Alkaline pH activates the transport activity of GLUT1 in L929 fibroblast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunnink, Stephen M; Kerk, Samuel A; Kuiper, Benjamin D; Alabi, Ola D; Kuipers, David P; Praamsma, Riemer C; Wrobel, Kathryn E; Louters, Larry L

    2014-04-01

    The widely expressed mammalian glucose transporter, GLUT1, can be acutely activated in L929 fibroblast cells by a variety of conditions, including glucose deprivation, or treatment with various respiration inhibitors. Known thiol reactive compounds including phenylarsine oxide and nitroxyl are the fastest acting stimulators of glucose uptake, implicating cysteine biochemistry as critical to the acute activation of GLUT1. In this study, we report that in L929 cells glucose uptake increases 6-fold as the pH of the uptake solution is increased from 6 to 9 with the half-maximal activation at pH 7.5; consistent with the pKa of cysteine residues. This pH effect is essentially blocked by the pretreatment of the cells with either iodoacetamide or cinnamaldehyde, compounds that form covalent adducts with reduced cysteine residues. In addition, the activation by alkaline pH is not additive at pH 8 with known thiol reactive activators such as phenylarsine oxide or hydroxylamine. Kinetic analysis in L929 cells at pH 7 and 8 indicate that alkaline conditions both increases the Vmax and decreases the Km of transport. This is consistent with the observation that pH activation is additive to methylene blue, which activates uptake by increasing the Vmax, as well as to berberine, which activates uptake by decreasing the Km. This suggests that cysteine biochemistry is utilized in both methylene blue and berberine activation of glucose uptake. In contrast a pH increase from 7 to 8 in HCLE cells does not further activate glucose uptake. HCLE cells have a 25-fold higher basal glucose uptake rate than L929 cells and the lack of a pH effect suggests that the cysteine biochemistry has already occurred in HCLE cells. The data are consistent with pH having a complex mechanism of action, but one likely mediated by cysteine biochemistry. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. PH og modernismen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahnfeldt-Mollerup, Merete

    2012-01-01

    Artiklen kaster et kritisk blik på Poul Henningsens samfundsanalyse og dennes sammenhæng med hans design. PH ses i en bredere national og international sammenhæng. Diskussion af designmetoder, æstetik og Bauhaus.......Artiklen kaster et kritisk blik på Poul Henningsens samfundsanalyse og dennes sammenhæng med hans design. PH ses i en bredere national og international sammenhæng. Diskussion af designmetoder, æstetik og Bauhaus....

  17. Alterações da motilidade antroduodenal e do pH gástrico após ressecção gástrica parcial incluindo a área correspondente ao marca-passo do estômago de cães Antroduodenal motility and pH changes after partial gastrectomy including the pacemaker region of the dog's stomach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Afonso Nunes Nassif

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available As alterações funcionais da motilidade antroduodenal ainda não foram bem caracterizadas até a presente data. O marca-passo gástrico, possivelmente localiza-se junto à grande curvatura, próximo ao fundo gástrico. A partir dele, ondas de despolarização dirigem-se ao estômago, duodeno e às demais partes do intestino delgado. OBJETIVO: Avaliar a influência do marca-passo gástrico sobre a motilidade gastroduodenal em cães. MÉTODOS: O protocolo experimental constou de três etapas. Na primeira, realizou-se esofagostomia cervical seguida de manometria antroduodenal eletrônica e pH-metria em 20 cães (grupo controle, durante 4 horas. Na segunda etapa, realizou-se a ressecção de parte do fundo gástrico e da área do marca-passo gástrico, com técnica videolaparoscópica. Na terceira, decorridos três meses, repetiu-se a manometria antroduodenal e a pH-metria gástrica. RESULTADOS: No grupo controle observou-se traçado típico de motilidade antroduodenal, com complexo interdigestivo de motilidade (IMC com fases 1, 2 e 3; na pH-metria, observou-se padrão de acidez com linha de base em pH de 1,15. Após a ressecção gástrica parcial, a manometria apresentou, no geral, aumento na freqüência de contrações, aumento da participação relativa da fase 2 e diminuição da participação relativa da fase 3. No pH gástrico, observou-se aumento no percentual de pH 0 - 1 e pH 1 - 2, bem como diminuição na porcentagem de pH 6 - 7, com conseqüente diminuição do pH gástrico e redução no tempo prandial. CONCLUSÃO: Pela retirada da área do marca-passo gástrico ocorreram alterações de motilidade antroduodenal, permanecendo porém a ocorrência de IMC's completos.BACKGROUND: Functional alterations of antroduodenal motility are not well defined at present. The gastric pacemaker is located at the greater curvature, next to the fundus. PURPOSE: The aim was to evaluate the influence of the gastric pacemaker on the gastroduodenal

  18. pCO2 And pH regulation of cerebral blood flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SeongHun eYoon

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available CO2 Serves as one of the fundamental regulators of cerebral blood flow. It is widely considered that this regulation occurs through pCO2-driven changes in pH of the cerebral spinal fluid, with elevated and lowered pH causing direct relaxation and contraction of the smooth muscle, respectively. However, some findings also suggest that pCO2 acts independently of and/or in conjunction with altered pH. This action may be due to a direct effect of cerebral spinal fluid pCO2 on the smooth muscle as well as on the endothelium, nerves, and astrocytes. Findings may also point to an action of arterial pCO2 on the endothelium to regulate smooth muscle contractility. Thus, the effects of pH and pCO2 may be influenced by the absence/presence of different cell types in the various experimental preparations. Results may also be influenced by experimental parameters including myogenic tone as well as solutions containing significantly altered HCO3- concentrations, i.e., solutions routinely employed to differentiate the effects of pH from pCO2. In sum, it appears that pCO2, independently and in conjunction with pH, may regulate cerebral blood flow.

  19. High sensitivity pH sensing on the BEOL of industrial FDSOI transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahhal, Lama; Ayele, Getenet Tesega; Monfray, Stéphane; Cloarec, Jean-Pierre; Fornacciari, Benjamin; Pardoux, Eric; Chevalier, Celine; Ecoffey, Serge; Drouin, Dominique; Morin, Pierre; Garnier, Philippe; Boeuf, Frederic; Souifi, Abdelkader

    2017-08-01

    In this work we demonstrate the use of Fully Depleted Silicon On Insulator (FDSOI) transistors as pH sensors with a 23 nm silicon nitride sensing layer built in the Back-End-Of-Line (BEOL). The back end process to deposit the sensing layer and fabricate the electrical structures needed for testing is detailed. A series of tests employing different pH buffer solutions has been performed on transistors of different geometries, controlled via the back gate. The main findings show a shift of the drain current (ID) as a function of the back gate voltage (VB) when different pH buffer solutions are probed in the range of pH 6 to pH 8. This shift is observed at VB voltages swept from 0 V to 3 V, demonstrating the sensor operation at low voltage. A high sensitivity of up to 250 mV/pH unit (more than 4-fold larger than Nernstian response) is observed on FDSOI MOS transistors of 0.06 μm gate length and 0.08 μm gate width. She is currently working as a Postdoctoral researcher at Institut des nanotechnologies de Lyon in collaboration with STMicroelectronics and Université de Sherbrook (Canada) working on ;Integration of ultra-low-power gas and pH sensors with advanced technologies;. Her research interest includes selection, machining, optimisation and electrical characterisation of the sensitive layer for a low power consumption gas sensor based on advanced MOS transistors.

  20. Design of an optically stable pH sensor based on immobilization of Giemsa on triacetylcellulose membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodadoust, Saeid; Kouri, Narges Cham; Talebiyanpoor, Mohammad Sharif; Deris, Jamile; Pebdani, Arezou Amiri

    2015-12-01

    In this work a simple, inexpensive, and sensitive optical sensor based on triacetylcellulose membrane as solid support was developed by using immobilization of Giemsa indicator for pH measurement. In this method, the influence variables on the membrane performance including pH concentration of indicator, response time, ionic strength, and reversibility were investigated. At optimum values of all variables the response of optical pH sensor is linear in the pH range of 3.0-12.0. This optical sensor was produced through simultaneous binding of the Giemsa on the activated triacetylcellulose membrane which responded to the pH changes in a broader linear range within less than 2.0 min and suitable reproducibility (RSDsensor was stable after 6 months of storage in the water/ethanol (50:50, v/v) solution without any measurable divergence in response properties (less than 5% RSD). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Highly Sensitive and Wide-Dynamic-Range Multichannel Optical-Fiber pH Sensor Based on PWM Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Md Rajibur Rahaman; Kang, Shin-Won

    2016-11-09

    In this study, we propose a highly sensitive multichannel pH sensor that is based on an optical-fiber pulse width modulation (PWM) technique. According to the optical-fiber PWM method, the received sensing signal's pulse width changes when the optical-fiber pH sensing-element of the array comes into contact with pH buffer solutions. The proposed optical-fiber PWM pH-sensing system offers a linear sensing response over a wide range of pH values from 2 to 12, with a high pH-sensing ability. The sensitivity of the proposed pH sensor is 0.46 µs/pH, and the correlation coefficient R² is approximately 0.997. Additional advantages of the proposed optical-fiber PWM pH sensor include a short/fast response-time of about 8 s, good reproducibility properties with a relative standard deviation (RSD) of about 0.019, easy fabrication, low cost, small size, reusability of the optical-fiber sensing-element, and the capability of remote sensing. Finally, the performance of the proposed PWM pH sensor was compared with that of potentiometric, optical-fiber modal interferometer, and optical-fiber Fabry-Perot interferometer pH sensors with respect to dynamic range width, linearity as well as response and recovery times. We observed that the proposed sensing systems have better sensing abilities than the above-mentioned pH sensors.

  2. Behavior of the sorption of {sup 60} Co in aqueous solution on inorganic materials as function of p H; Comportamiento de la sorcion del {sup 60} Co en solucion acuosa sobre materiales inorganicos como una funcion del pH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granados, F.; Bulbulian, S.; Solache R, M. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Bertin, V. [UAM-I, 09340 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2004-07-01

    The sorption of the {sup 60} Co is evaluated in aqueous solution on Mg O, MnO{sub 2}, TiO{sub 2}, Sn O, activated carbon and hydrotalcite calcined as a function of the p H, using the method for lots and quantifying at the {sup 60} Co for gamma spectrometry. Likewise it was explained the one behavior of the sorption of the {sup 60} Co in the materials with base in the chemical species of this radioactive isotope in aqueous solution. The chemical species of the {sup 60} Co in solution were identified by electrophoresis of high voltage for the different p H values. It was found that under the experimental conditions, the {sup 60} Co showed a significant sorption on MnO{sup 2}, TiO{sup 2} and activated carbon. On the other hand, in Mg O, Sn O and calcined hydrotalcite also was observed a sorption, although in smaller quantities. The studied hydrated metallic oxides retained the {sup 60} Co for ion exchange via. It was found that the {sup 60} Co was present as a cationic specie to p H 1, 3, 5 and 7 and like a neutral specie to alkaline p H. (Author)

  3. Effect of pH and phosphate on calcium carbonate polymorphs precipitated at near-freezing temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hu, Yu-Bin; Wolthers, Mariëtte; Wolf-Gladrow, Dieter A.; Nehrke, Gernot

    2015-01-01

    The effects of pH and phosphate on the precipitation of calcium carbonate polymorphs from aqueous solution were investigated. Experiments were carried out at near-freezing temperature and two different pH conditions (pH 13.4 and 9.0). At each pH condition, solutions having different concentrations

  4. pH dependent polymeric micelle adsorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLean, S C; Gee, M L [The University of Melbourne, VIC (Australia). School of Chemistry

    2003-07-01

    Full text: Poly(2-vinylpyridine)-poly(ethylene oxide) (P2VP-PEO) shows potential as a possible drug delivery system for anti-tumour drugs since it forms pH dependent polymeric micelles. Hence to better understand the adsorption behaviour of this polymer we have studied the interaction forces between layers of P2VP-PEO adsorbed onto silica as a function of solution pH using an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). When P2VP-PEO is initially adsorbed above the pKa of the P2VP block, P2VP-PEO adsorbs from solution as micelles that exist as either partially collapsed- or a hemi-micelles at the silica surface. Below the pKa of P2VP, the P2VP-PEO adsorbs as unimers, forming a compact layer with little looping and tailing into solution. When initial adsorption of P2VP-PEO is in the form of unimers, any driving force to self-assembly of the now charge neutral polymer is kinetically hindered. Hence, after initial adsorption at pH 3.6, a subsequent increase in pH to 6.6 results in a slow surface restructuring towards self-assembly and equilibrium. When the pH is increased from pH 6.6 to 9.7 there is a continuation of the evolution of the system to its equilibrium position during which the adsorbed P2VP-PEO unimers continue to 'unravel' from the surface, extending away from it, towards eventual complete surface self-assembly.

  5. The Semen pH Affects Sperm Motility and Capacitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ji; Chen, Li; Li, Jie; Li, Hongjun; Hong, Zhiwei; Xie, Min; Chen, Shengrong; Yao, Bing

    2015-01-01

    As the chemical environment of semen can have a profound effect on sperm quality, we examined the effect of pH on the motility, viability and capacitation of human sperm. The sperm in this study was collected from healthy males to avoid interference from other factors. The spermatozoa cultured in sperm nutrition solution at pH 5.2, 6.2, 7.2 and 8.2 were analyzed for sperm total motility, progressive motility (PR), hypo-osmotic swelling (HOS) rate, and sperm penetration. Our results showed that these parameters were similar in pH 7.2 and 8.2 sperm nutrition solutions, but decreased in pH 5.2 and 6.2 solutions. The HOS rate exhibited positive correlation with the sperm total motility and PR. In addition, the sperm Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity at different pHs was measured, and the enzyme activity was significantly lower in pH 5.2 and 6.2 media, comparing with that in pH 8.2 and pH 7.2 solutions. Using flow cytometry (FCM) and laser confocal scanning microscopy (LCSM) analysis, the intracellular Ca2(+ )concentrations of sperm cultured in sperm capacitation solution at pH 5.2, 6.2, 7.2 and 8.2 were determined. Compared with that at pH 7.2, the mean fluorescence intensity of sperm in pH 5.2 and 6.2 media decreased significantly, while that of pH 8.2 group showed no difference. Our results suggested that the declined Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity at acidic pHs result in decreased sperm movement and capacitation, which could be one of the mechanisms of male infertility.

  6. On Calibration of pH Meters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Da-Ming Zhu

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available The calibration of pH meters including the pH glass electrode, ISE electrodes,buffers, and the general background for calibration are reviewed. Understanding of basicconcepts of pH, pOH, and electrode mechanism is emphasized. New concepts of pH, pOH,as well as critical examination of activity, and activity coefficients are given. Theemergence of new solid state pH electrodes and replacement of the salt bridge with aconducting wire have opened up a new horizon for pH measurements. A pH buffer solutionwith a conducting wire may be used as a stable reference electrode. The misleadingunlimited linear Nernstian slope should be discarded. Calibration curves with 3 nonlinearportions for the entire 0—14 pH range due to the isoelectric point change effect areexplained. The potential measurement with stirring or unstirring and effects by double layer(DL and triple layer (TL will be discussed.

  7. Investigations on the use of pneumatic cross-flow nebulizers with dual solution loading including the correction of matrix effects in elemental determinations by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, Mathieu; Broekaert, Jose A.C.

    2007-01-01

    The use of a so-called trihedral and a T-shaped cross-flow pneumatic nebulizer with dual solution loading for inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry has been studied. By these devices analyte clouds from two solutions can be mixed during the aerosol generation step. For both nebulizers the correction of matrix effects using internal standardization and standard addition calibration in an on-line way was investigated and compared to elemental determinations using a conventional cross-flow nebulizer and calibration with synthetic standard solutions without matrix matching. A significant improvement of accuracy, both for calibration with internal standardization and standard addition, was obtained in the case of four synthetic solutions containing each 40 mmol L -1 Na, K, Rb and Ba as matrix elements and 300 μg L -1 Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni and Pb as analytes. Calibration by standard addition in the case of dual solution loading has been shown to be very useful in the determination of elements at minor and trace levels in steel and alumina reference materials. The results of analysis for minor concentrations of Cr, Cu and Ni in steel as well as for Ca, Fe, Ga, Li, Mg, Mn, Na, Si and Zn in alumina powder certified reference materials subsequent to sample dissolution were found to be in good agreement with the certificates. Limits of detection were found to be only slightly above those for a conventional cross-flow nebulizer and a precision better than 3% was realized with both novel nebulizers

  8. Determining pH of strip-mine spoils

    Science.gov (United States)

    W. A. Berg

    1969-01-01

    Results with the LaMotte-Morgan method for determining soil pH-or the solution modification of this method-usually agreed fairly well with the results from using a pH meter, the recognized standard. Results obtained with the Soiltex and Hellige-Truog methods often deviated somewhat from the pH meter readings; and the Hydrion papers and the Kelway pH tester often gave...

  9. Differential Sensor for PH Monitoring of Environmental Objects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romanenko Sergey

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Differential pH sensor is proposed. Reference electrode and measuring electrode are the same type. Reference electrode is immersed in standard buffer solution with known pH value. The differential pH sensor has longer service life as compared with the traditionally used sensors with silver chloride reference electrode. Ultrasonic cleaning system is proposed to clean the primary measuring transducer from pollution that form as result of silting during long-term operation with the sensor.

  10. Chapter A6. Section 6.4. pH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilde, Franceska D.; Busenberg, Eurybiades; Radtke, Dean B.

    2006-01-01

    Measurement of pH is critical to the understanding of the viability and vulnerability of environmental waters and is considered a master variable in determining the aqueous geochemistry of an aqueous system. pH is a measure that represents the hydrogen-ion concentration (activity) of a solution. This section of the National Field Manual (NFM) describes U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) guidance and protocols for measurement of pH in ground and surface waters.

  11. Development of a novel pH sensor based upon Janus Green B immobilized on triacetyl cellulose membrane: Experimental design and optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamkouri, Narges; Niazi, Ali; Zare-Shahabadi, Vali

    2016-03-01

    A novel pH optical sensor was prepared by immobilizing an azo dye called Janus Green B on the triacetylcellulose membrane. Condition of the dye solution used in the immobilization step, including concentration of the dye, pH, and duration were considered and optimized using the Box-Behnken design. The proposed sensor showed good behavior and precision (RSD < 5%) in the pH range of 2.0-10.0. Advantages of this optical sensor include on-line applicability, no leakage, long-term stability (more than 6 months), fast response time (less than 1 min), high selectivity and sensitivity as well as good reversibility and reproducibility.

  12. Evolution of pH during in-situ leaching in small concrete cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saguees, A.A. [Univ. of South Florida, Tampa, FL (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Moreno, E.I. [Univ. of South Florida, Tampa, FL (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering]|[CINVESTAV Merida-Unit (Mexico); Andrade, C. [CSIC, Madrid (Spain). Inst. Eduardo Torroja de Ciencias de la Construccion

    1997-11-01

    Small amounts (0.4 cc) of neutral water placed in small cylindrical cavities (5 mm diameter) in concrete exposed to 100% relative humidity first developed a pH comparable to that of a saturated Ca(OH){sub 2} solution. The pH then increased over a period of days-weeks toward a higher terminal value. A micro pH electrode arrangement was used. This behavior was observed in samples of 12 different concrete mix designs, including some with pozzolanic additions. The average terminal cavity pH closely approached that of expressed pore water from the same concretes. A simplified mathematical model reproduced the experimentally observed behavior. The model assumed inward diffusional transport of the pH-determining species in the surrounding concrete pore solution. The experimental results were consistent with the model predictions when using diffusion parameters on the order of those previously reported for alkali cations in concrete. The cavity size, cavity water content, and exposure to atmospheric CO{sub 2} should be minimized when attempting to obtain cavity pH values approaching those of the surrounding pore water.

  13. Stabilization of pH in solid-matrix hydroponic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frick, J.; Mitchell, C. A.

    1993-01-01

    2-[N-morpholino]ethanesulfonic acid (MES) buffer or Amberlite DP-1 (cation-exchange resin beads) were used to stabilize substrate pH of passive-wicking, solid-matrix hydroponic systems in which small canopies of Brassica napus L. (CrGC 5-2, genome : ACaacc) were grown to maturity. Two concentrations of MES (5 or 10 mM) were included in Hoagland 1 nutrient solution. Alternatively, resin beads were incorporated into the 2 vermiculite : 1 perlite (v/v) growth medium at 6% or 12% of total substrate volume. Both strategies stabilized pH without toxic side effects on plants. Average seed yield rates for all four pH stabilization treatments (13.3 to 16.9 g m-2 day-1) were about double that of the control (8.2 g m-2 day-1), for which there was no attempt to buffer substrate pH. Both the highest canopy seed yield rate (16.9 g m-2 day-1) and the highest shoot harvest index (19.5%) occurred with the 6% resin bead treatment, even though the 10 mM MES and 12% bead treatments maintained pH within the narrowest limits. The pH stabilization methods tested did not significantly affect seed oil and protein contents.

  14. PhD Dissertations

    OpenAIRE

    Redazione Reti Medievali (a cura di)

    2010-01-01

    Report of PhD Dissertations.Anna Airò La scrittura delle regole. Politica e istituzioni a Taranto nel Quattrocento, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medievale, Università degli studi di Firenze, 2005 Pasquale Arfé La Clavis Physicae II (316-529) di Honorius Augustodunensis. Studio ed edizione critica, Tesi di dottorato in Storia della filosofia medievale, Università degli Studi di Napoli "L'Orientale", 2005 Alessandro Azzimonti Scrittura agiografica e strutture di potere nell'Italia c...

  15. Neoclassical transport including collisional nonlinearity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candy, J; Belli, E A

    2011-06-10

    In the standard δf theory of neoclassical transport, the zeroth-order (Maxwellian) solution is obtained analytically via the solution of a nonlinear equation. The first-order correction δf is subsequently computed as the solution of a linear, inhomogeneous equation that includes the linearized Fokker-Planck collision operator. This equation admits analytic solutions only in extreme asymptotic limits (banana, plateau, Pfirsch-Schlüter), and so must be solved numerically for realistic plasma parameters. Recently, numerical codes have appeared which attempt to compute the total distribution f more accurately than in the standard ordering by retaining some nonlinear terms related to finite-orbit width, while simultaneously reusing some form of the linearized collision operator. In this work we show that higher-order corrections to the distribution function may be unphysical if collisional nonlinearities are ignored.

  16. Electrocatalytic hydrogen evolution under densely buffered neutral pH conditions

    KAUST Repository

    Shinagawa, Tatsuya

    2015-08-18

    Under buffered neutral pH conditions, solute concentrations drastically influence the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). The iR-free HER performance as a function of solute concentration was found to exhibit a volcano-shaped trend in sodium phosphate solution at pH 5, with the maximum occurring at 2 M. A detailed microkinetic model that includes calculated activity coefficients, solution resistance, and mass-transport parameters accurately describes the measured values, clarifying that the overall HER performance is predominantly governed by mass-transport of slow phosphate ions (weak acid). In the HER at the optimum concentration of approximately 2 M sodium phosphate at pH 5, our theoretical model predicts that the concentration overpotential accounts for more than half of the required overpotential. The substantial concentration overpotential would originate from the electrolyte property, suggesting that the proper electrolyte engineering will result in an improved apparent HER performances. The significance of concentration overpotential shown in the study is critical in the advancement of electrocatalysis, biocatalysis, and photocatalysis.

  17. Electrocatalytic hydrogen evolution under densely buffered neutral pH conditions

    KAUST Repository

    Shinagawa, Tatsuya; Takanabe, Kazuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Under buffered neutral pH conditions, solute concentrations drastically influence the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). The iR-free HER performance as a function of solute concentration was found to exhibit a volcano-shaped trend in sodium phosphate solution at pH 5, with the maximum occurring at 2 M. A detailed microkinetic model that includes calculated activity coefficients, solution resistance, and mass-transport parameters accurately describes the measured values, clarifying that the overall HER performance is predominantly governed by mass-transport of slow phosphate ions (weak acid). In the HER at the optimum concentration of approximately 2 M sodium phosphate at pH 5, our theoretical model predicts that the concentration overpotential accounts for more than half of the required overpotential. The substantial concentration overpotential would originate from the electrolyte property, suggesting that the proper electrolyte engineering will result in an improved apparent HER performances. The significance of concentration overpotential shown in the study is critical in the advancement of electrocatalysis, biocatalysis, and photocatalysis.

  18. Esophageal pH monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    pH monitoring - esophageal; Esophageal acidity test ... Esophageal pH monitoring is used to check how much stomach acid is entering the esophagus. It also checks how well the acid is cleared downward into the ...

  19. Functional and molecular characterization of transmembrane intracellular pH regulators in human dental pulp stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Gunng-Shinng; Lee, Shiao-Pieng; Huang, Shu-Fu; Chao, Shih-Chi; Chang, Chung-Yi; Wu, Gwo-Jang; Li, Chung-Hsing; Loh, Shih-Hurng

    2018-06-01

    Homeostasis of intracellular pH (pH i ) plays vital roles in many cell functions, such as proliferation, apoptosis, differentiation and metastasis. Thus far, Na + -H + exchanger (NHE), Na + -HCO 3 - co-transporter (NBC), Cl - /HCO 3 - exchanger (AE) and Cl - /OH - exchanger (CHE) have been identified to co-regulate pH i homeostasis. However, functional and biological pH i -regulators in human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) have yet to be identified. Microspectrofluorimetry technique with pH-sensitive fluorescent dye, BCECF, was used to detect pH i changes. NH 4 Cl and Na + -acetate pre-pulse were used to induce intracellular acidosis and alkalosis, respectively. Isoforms of pH i -regulators were detected by Western blot technique. The resting pH i was no significant difference between that in HEPES-buffered (nominal HCO 3 - -free) solution or CO 2 /HCO 3 -buffered system (7.42 and 7.46, respectively). The pH i recovery following the induced-intracellular acidosis was blocked completely by removing [Na + ] o , while only slowed (-63%) by adding HOE694 (a NHE1 specific inhibitor) in HEPES-buffered solution. The pH i recovery was inhibited entirely by removing [Na + ] o , while adding HOE 694 pulse DIDS (an anion-transporter inhibitor) only slowed (-55%) the acid extrusion. Both in HEPES-buffered and CO 2 /HCO 3 -buffered system solution, the pH i recovery after induced-intracellular alkalosis was entirely blocked by removing [Cl - ] o . Western blot analysis showed the isoforms of pH i regulators, including NHE1/2, NBCe1/n1, AE1/2/3/4 and CHE in the hDPSCs. We demonstrate for the first time that resting pH i is significantly higher than 7.2 and meditates functionally by two Na + -dependent acid extruders (NHE and NBC), two Cl - -dependent acid loaders (CHE and AE) and one Na + -independent acid extruder(s) in hDPSCs. These findings provide novel insight for basic and clinical treatment of dentistry. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Evaluating Nanoparticle Sensor Design for Intracellular pH Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benjaminsen, Rikke Vicki; Sun, Honghao; Henriksen, Jonas Rosager

    2011-01-01

    Particle-based nanosensors have over the last decade been designed for optical fluorescent-based ratiometric measurements of pH in living cells. However, quantitative and time-resolved intracellular measurements of pH in endosomes and lysosomes using particle nanosensors is challenging...... and there is a need to improve measurement methodology. In the present paper, we have successfully carried out time resolved pH measurements in endosomes and lyosomes in living cells using nanoparticle sensors and show the importance of sensor choice for successful quantification. We have studied two nanoparticle...... quantification of pH is an unfortunate result when measuring pH too close to the limit of the sensitive range of the sensors. Triple-labeled nanosensors with a pH measurement range of 3.2-7.0, which was synthesized by adding two pH-sensitive fluorophores with different pKa to each sensor, seem to be a solution...

  1. Ternary complex formation at mineral/solution interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leckie, J.O.

    1995-01-01

    Adsorption of trace concentrations of radionuclides and heavy metals from aqueous solution is dependent on pH, absorbent and adsorbate concentration, and speciation of the metal in solution. In particular, complexation of metal ions by organic and inorganic ligands can dramatically alter adsorption behavior compared to ligand-free systems. The presence of complexing ligands can cause the formation of ''metal like'' or ''ligand like'' ternary surface complexes depending on whether adsorption of the ternary complex increases or decreases with increasing pH, respectively. Examples of ternary surface complexes behaving ''metal like'' include uranyl-EDTA surface complexes on goethite, neptunyl-EDTA surface complexes on hematite and neptunyl-humic surface complexes on gibbsite. Examples of ''ligand like'' ternary surface complexes include uranyl-carbonato and neptunyl-carbonato surface complexes on iron oxides. The effects of complex solutions and multimineralic systems are discussed. (authors). 39 refs., 16 figs., 8 tabs

  2. Shelf-Life of Chlorine Solutions Recommended in Ebola Virus Disease Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Qais; Lubeck-Schricker, Maya; Wells, Emma; Wolfe, Marlene K; Lantagne, Daniele

    2016-01-01

    In Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) outbreaks, it is widely recommended to wash living things (handwashing) with 0.05% (500 mg/L) chlorine solution and non-living things (surfaces, personal protective equipment, dead bodies) with 0.5% (5,000 mg/L) chlorine solution. Chlorine solutions used in EVD response are primarily made from powdered calcium hypochlorite (HTH), granular sodium dichloroisocyanurate (NaDCC), and liquid sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), and have a pH range of 5-11. Chlorine solutions degrade following a reaction highly dependent on, and unusually sensitive to, pH, temperature, and concentration. We determined the shelf-life of 0.05% and 0.5% chlorine solutions used in EVD response, including HTH, NaDCC, stabilized NaOCl, generated NaOCl, and neutralized NaOCl solutions. Solutions were stored for 30 days at 25, 30, and 35°C, and tested daily for chlorine concentration and pH. Maximum shelf-life was defined as days until initial concentration fell to pH = 7) had a maximum shelf-life of a few hours, NaDCC solutions (pH = 6) 2 days, generated NaOCl solutions (pH = 9) 6 days, and HTH and stabilized NaOCl solutions (pH 9-11) >30 days. Models were developed for solutions with maximum shelf-lives between 1-30 days. Extrapolating to 40°C, the maximum predicted shelf-life for 0.05% and 0.5% NaDCC solutions were 0.38 and 0.82 hours, respectively; predicted shelf-life for 0.05% and 0.5% generated NaOCl solutions were >30 and 5.4 days, respectively. Each chlorine solution type offers advantages and disadvantages to responders, as: NaDCC is an easy-to-import high-concentration effervescent powder; HTH is similar, but forms a precipitate that may clog pipes; and, NaOCl solutions can be made locally, but are difficult to transport. We recommend responders chose the most appropriate source chlorine compound for their use, and ensure solutions are stored at appropriate temperatures and used or replaced before expiring.

  3. Aqueous solutions/nuclear glasses interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delage, F.; Advocat, T.; Vernaz, E.; Crovisier, J.L.

    1991-01-01

    Interactions results of the borosilicate glass used in radioactive wastes confinement and aqueous solutions at various temperature and PH show that for the glass components: - the release rate evolution follows an Arrhenius law, - in acid PH, there is a selective dissolution, - in basic PH, there is a stoechiometric dissolution [fr

  4. Biobased, Internally pH-Sensitive Materials: Immobilized Yellow Fluorescent Protein as an Optical Sensor for Spatiotemporal Mapping of pH Inside Porous Matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consolati, Tanja; Bolivar, Juan M; Petrasek, Zdenek; Berenguer, Jose; Hidalgo, Aurelio; Guisán, Jose M; Nidetzky, Bernd

    2018-02-28

    The pH is fundamental to biological function and its measurement therefore crucial across all biosciences. Unlike homogenous bulk solution, solids often feature internal pH gradients due to partition effects and confined biochemical reactions. Thus, a full spatiotemporal mapping for pH characterization in solid materials with biological systems embedded in them is essential. In here, therefore, a fully biocompatible methodology for real-time optical sensing of pH within porous materials is presented. A genetically encoded ratiometric pH sensor, the enhanced superfolder yellow fluorescent protein (sYFP), is used to functionalize the internal surface of different materials, including natural and synthetic organic polymers as well as silica frameworks. By using controlled, tailor-made immobilization, sYFP is homogenously distributed within these materials and so enables, via self-referenced imaging analysis, pH measurements in high accuracy and with useful spatiotemporal resolution. Evolution of internal pH is monitored in consequence of a proton-releasing enzymatic reaction, the hydrolysis of penicillin by a penicillin acylase, taking place in solution or confined to the solid surface of the porous matrix. Unlike optochemical pH sensors, which often interfere with biological function, labeling with sYFP enables pH sensing without altering the immobilized enzyme's properties in any of the materials used. Fast response of sYFP to pH change permits evaluation of biochemical kinetics within the solid materials. Thus, pH sensing based on immobilized sYFP represents a broadly applicable technique to the study of biology confined to the internally heterogeneous environment of solid matrices.

  5. In vitro synthesis and purification of PhIP-deoxyguanosine and PhIP-DNA oligomer covalent complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman, J.

    1994-12-01

    2-Amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) is a heterocyclic amine compound formed when meats are cooked at high temperatures. PhIP damages DNA by forming covalent complexes with DNA carcinogen. In an effort to understand how the binding of PhIP to DNA may cause cancer, it is important to characterize the structures of PhIP-damaged DNA molecules. Our HPLC data support fluorescence and {sup 32}P Post-labeling studies which indicate the formation of several species of 2{prime}deoxyguanosine-(dG) or oligodeoxynucleotide-PhIP adducts. The reaction of PhIP with dG resulted in a reddish precipitate that was likely the major adduct, N-(deoxyguanosin-8-yl)-PhIP (dG-C8-PhIP) adduct, with a more polar adduct fraction remaining in the supernatant. Reversed-phase HPLC analysis of the adducts in the supernatant revealed the existence of species of much shorter retention times than the dG-C8-PhIP adduct, confirming that these species are more polar than dG-C8-PhIP. At least four adducts were formed in the reaction of PhIP with DNA oligomer. HPLC analysis of the PhIP-DNA oligomer supernatant after butanol extractions revealed four unresolved peaks which spectra had maximum wavelengths between 340 and 360 nm. Though adduct peaks were not completely resolved, there was {approximately}3 minutes interval between the DNA oligomer peak and the adduct peaks. Furthermore, fluorescence emission data of the DNA oligomer-PhIP adduct solution show heterogeneous binding. The more polar PhIP adducts were fraction-collected and their structures will be solved by nuclear magnetic resonance or x-ray crystallography.

  6. Pyrite oxidation at circumneutral pH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, Carl O.; Herman, Janet S.

    1991-02-01

    Previous studies of pyrite oxidation kinetics have concentrated primarily on the reaction at low pH, where Fe(III) has been assumed to be the dominant oxidant. Studies at circumneutral pH, necessitated by effective pH buffering in some pyrite oxidation systems, have often implicitly assumed that the dominant oxidant must be dissolved oxygen (DO), owing to the diminished solubility of Fe(III). In fact, Fe(III)(aq) is an effective pyrite oxidant at circumneutral pH, but the reaction cannot be sustained in the absence of DO. The purpose of this experimental study was to ascertain the relative roles of Fe(III) and DO in pyrite oxidation at circumneutral pH. The rate of pyrite oxidation was first-order with respect to the ratio of surface area to solution volume. Direct determinations of both Fe(II) (aq)> and Fe(III) (aq) demonstrated a dramatic loss of Fe(II) from the solution phase in excess of the loss for which oxidation alone could account. Based on rate data, we have concluded that Fe(II) is adsorbed onto the pyrite surface. Furthermore, Fe(II) is preferred as an adsorbate to Fe(III), which we attribute to both electrostatic and acid-base selectivity. We also found that the rate of pyrite oxidation by either Fe(III) (aq) or DO is reduced in the presence of aqueous Fe(II), which leads us to conclude that, under most natural conditions, neither Fe(III) (aq) nor DO directly attacks the pyrite surface. The present evidence suggests a mechanism for pyrite oxidation that involves adsorbed Fe( II ) giving up electrons to DO and the resulting Fe(III) rapidly accepting electrons from the pyrite. The adsorbed Fe is, thus, cyclically oxidized and reduced, while it acts as a conduit for electrons traveling from pyrite to DO. Oxygen is transferred from the hydration sphere of the adsorbed Fe to pyrite S. The cycle of adsorbed Fe oxidation and reduction and the successive addition of oxygen to pyrite S continues until a stable sulfoxy species dissociates from the surface. Prior

  7. Toxicity evaluation of pH dependent stable Achyranthes aspera herbal gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Alok; Kumari, Sarika; Kumar, Arvind

    2016-01-01

    Nanoparticles have gained substantial attention for the control of various diseases. However, any adverse effect of herbal gold nanoparticles (HGNPs) on animals including human being has not been investigated in details. The objectives of current study are to assess the cytotoxicity of HGNPs synthesized by using leaf extract of Achyranthes aspera, and long epoch stability. The protocol deals with stability of HGNPs in pH dependent manner. Visually, HGNPs formation is characterized by colour change of extract from dark brown to dark purple after adding gold chloride solution (1 mM). The 100 μg/ml HGNPs concentration has been found nontoxic to the cultured spleenocyte cells. Spectrophotometric analysis of nanoparticles solution gave a peak at 540 nm which corresponds to surface plasmon resonance absorption band. As per scanning electron microscopy and Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), size of HGNPs are in the range of 50-80 nm (average size 70 nm) with spherical morphology. TEM-selected area electron diffraction observation showed hexagonal texture. HGNPs showed substantial stability at higher temperature (85 °C), pH 10 and salt concentration (5 M). The zeta potential value of HGNPs is -35.9 mV at temperature 25 °C, pH 10 showing its good quality with better stability in comparison to pH 6 and pH 7. The findings advocate that the protocol for the synthesis of HGNPs is easy and quick with good quality and long epoch stability at pH 10. Moreover, non-toxic dose could be widely applicable for human health as a potential nano-medicine in the future to cure diseases.

  8. PhD Dissertations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redazione Reti Medievali (a cura di

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Report of PhD Dissertations. Francesco Barone Istituzioni, società ed economia a Catania nel tardo medioevo (XIV-XV secolo, Tesi di dottorato in Storia medievale (XVI ciclo, Università degli Studi di Firenze, 2004   Laura Berti Ceroni Il territorio e le strutture di Cesarea e Classe tra tarda antichità e alto medioevo in rapporto con Ravenna, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia e Informatica, Università degli studi di Bologna, 2002-2003.   Marco Bicchierai Poppi dalla signoria dei conti Guidi al vicariato del Casentino (1360-1480, Tesi di dottorato in Storia medievale (XIV ciclo, Università degli Studi di Firenze, 2004   Emanuela Garimberti Spatiosa ad habitandum loca. Luoghi e identità nella Historia Langobardorum di Paolo Diacono, Tesi di dottorato in Storia medievale (XV ciclo, Università degli Studi di Bologna, 2004   Lorenzo Tanzini Sistemi normativi e pratiche istituzionali a Firenze dalla fine del XIII all’inizio del XV secolo, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medievale (XVI ciclo, Università degli Studi di Firenze, 2004   Stefania Tarquini Pellegrinaggio e asseto urbano di Roma, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia dei centri, delle vie e della cultura dei pellegrinaggi nel Medioevo euro mediterraneo (XV ciclo, Università degli studi di Lecce, 2003

  9. PhD Dissertations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redazione Reti Medievali (a cura di

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Report of PhD dissertations. Andrea Brugnoli Una storia locale: l’organizzazione del territorio veronese nel medioevo: trasformazioni della realtà e schemi notarili (IX-metà XII secolo, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Scienze Storiche e Antropologiche (XXII ciclo, Università degli Studi di Verona, 2010   Luca Filangieri Famiglie e gruppi dirigenti a Genova (secoli XII-metà XIII, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medievale (XXII ciclo, Università degli Studi di Firenze, 2010   Jakub Kujawi ski Wernakularna kolekcja historiograficzna z rękopisu francuskiego nr 688 z Biblioteki Narodowej w Paryżu. Studium źródłoznawcze (La raccolta dei volgarizzamenti delle opere storiografiche nel manoscritto francese 688 della Biblioteca Nazionale di Parigi, Tesi di dottorato, Università “Adam Mickiewicz”, Facoltà di Storia, Pozna, a.a. 2009/2010   Marta Longhi I signori “de Radicata”. Strategie di affermazione familiare e patrimoniale nel Piemonte dei secoli XII-XIV, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Istituzioni, Società, Religioni dal Tardo Antico alla fine del Medioevo (XX ciclo, Università di Torino, 2008

  10. PhD Dissertations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redazione Reti Medievali (a cura di

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Reporto of PhD Dissertations.   Mario Dalle Carbonare Società, potere e clientele nell’Irlanda altomedievale (secoli V-IX, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia sociale europea, Università "Ca' Foscari" di Venezia, 2003 Vieri Mazzoni La legislazione antighibellina e la politica oligarchica della Parte Guelfa di Firenze nel secondo Trecento (1347-1378, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia Medievale (ciclo XII, Università degli Studi di Firenze   Alma Poloni Pisa dalle origini del movimento popolare alla discesa di Ludovico il Bavaro. I gruppi dirigenti cittadini tra continuità e trasformazione, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia dell'Europa nel medioevo, Università degli studi di Pisa, 2003   Andrea Puglia Potere marchionale, amministrazione del territorio, società locali dalla morte di Ugo di Tuscia a Guelfo VI di Baviera (1001-1160, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medievale, Università degli studi di Milano, 2003

  11. The influence of pH on the adsorption of lead by Na-clinoptilolite ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The influence of pH on the adsorption of lead by Na-clinoptilolite: Kinetic and equilibrium studies. ... At high pH of the contact solution, the adsorption process occurs by ion exchange and at low pH; i.e., it is physical. The variation of the Gibbs free energy demonstrates that adsorption occurs spontaneously. The process was ...

  12. Synthesis of sub-millimeter calcite from aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimi, M. A.; Morrison, J. M.; Burns, P. C.

    2011-12-01

    A novel aqueous synthesis that leads to the formation of calcite (CaCO3) crystals, up to 500μm in diameter, will be used to facilitate the study of contaminant transport in aqueous environmental systems. Existing processes tend to be complicated and often yield nanometer-sized or amorphous CaCO3. The synthesis method presented here, which involves slow mixing of concentrated solutions of CaCl2 ¬and (NH4)2CO3, produces single crystals of rhombohedral calcite in 2 to 4 days. Variations on the experimental method, including changes in pH and solution concentration, were explored to optimize the synthesis. Scanning Electron Microscope images show the differences in size and purity observed when the crystals are grown at pH values ranging from 2 to 6. The crystals grown from solutions of pH 2 were large (up to 500 micrometers in diameter) with minimal polycrystalline calcium carbonate, while crystals grown from solutions with pH values beyond 4 were smaller (up to 100 micrometers in diameter) with significant polycrystalline calcium carbonate. The synthesis method, materials characterization, and use in future actinide contaminant studies will be discussed.

  13. Reactive solute transport in acidic streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broshears, R.E.

    1996-01-01

    Spatial and temporal profiles of Ph and concentrations of toxic metals in streams affected by acid mine drainage are the result of the interplay of physical and biogeochemical processes. This paper describes a reactive solute transport model that provides a physically and thermodynamically quantitative interpretation of these profiles. The model combines a transport module that includes advection-dispersion and transient storage with a geochemical speciation module based on MINTEQA2. Input to the model includes stream hydrologic properties derived from tracer-dilution experiments, headwater and lateral inflow concentrations analyzed in field samples, and a thermodynamic database. Simulations reproduced the general features of steady-state patterns of observed pH and concentrations of aluminum and sulfate in St. Kevin Gulch, an acid mine drainage stream near Leadville, Colorado. These patterns were altered temporarily by injection of sodium carbonate into the stream. A transient simulation reproduced the observed effects of the base injection.

  14. Intracellular pH in rat pancreatic ducts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novak, I; Hug, M; Greger, R

    1997-01-01

    In order to study the mechanism of H+ and HCO3- transport in a HCO3- secreting epithelium, pancreatic ducts, we have measured the intracellular pH (pHi) in this tissue using the pH sensitive probe BCECF. We found that exposures of ducts to solutions containing acetate/acetic acid or NH4+/NH3...... buffers (20 mmol/l) led to pHi changes in accordance with entry of lipid-soluble forms of the buffers, followed by back-regulation of pHi by duct cells. In another type of experiment, changes in extracellular pH of solutions containing HEPES or HCO3-/CO2 buffers led to significant changes in pHi that did....... Under some conditions, these exchangers can be invoked to regulate cell pH....

  15. Effect of fluoridated varnish and silver diamine fluoride solution on enamel demineralization: pH-cycling study Efeito do verniz fluoretado e da solução de diamino fluoreto de prata na desmineralização do esmalte: estudo utilizando modelo de ciclagem de pH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Carlos Botazzo Delbem

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: In the present investigation, the anticariogenic effect of fluoride released by two products commonly applied in infants was evaluated. METHODS: Bovine sound enamel blocks were randomly allocated to each one of the treatment groups: control (C, varnish (V and diamine silver fluoride solution (D. The blocks were submitted to pH cycles in an oven at 37ºC. Next, surface and cross-sectional microhardness were assessed to calculate the percentage loss of surface microhardness (%SML and the mineral loss (deltaZ. The fluoride present in enamel was also determined. RESULTS: F/Px10-3 (ANOVA, pOBJETIVOS: Este trabalho avaliou o efeito anticariogênico do flúor liberado por dois produtos comumente aplicados em crianças. MÉTODOS: Para isto, utilizaram-se blocos de esmalte de dentes bovinos distribuídos aleatoriamente em três grupos de tratamento: controle (C, verniz fluoretado (V e solução de diamino fluoreto de prata (D. Os blocos foram submetidos à ciclagem de pH a 37ºC. Após, realizou-se o teste de microdureza de superfície (para o cálculo da % da perda de microdureza de superfície - %SML e em secção longitudinal do esmalte (% de alteração da área mineral - %deltaZ e a determinação do flúor presente no esmalte (F/P x 10-3. RESULTADOS: As concentrações de flúor (ANOVA, p<0,05 na 1ª camada do esmalte, antes da ciclagem de pH, foram (C, V e D: 1,6ª; 21,6b e 4,0c. Os resultados de %SML (Kruskal-Wallis, p<0.05 foram: -64,0ª, -45,2b e -53,1c. Os valores de %deltaZ (ANOVA, p<0.05 foram: -18,7ª, -7,7b e -17,3ª. CONCLUSÃO: Os dados sugerem que o flúor liberado pelo verniz apresentou maior interação com o esmalte promovendo menor perda mineral quando comparado à solução de diamino de prata.

  16. Iodine evolution and pH control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beahm, E.C.; Lorenz, R.A.; Weber, C.F.

    1993-01-01

    The pH is the major factor in determining the extent of I 2 in solution. In containment where no pH-control chemicals are present, the acidity or basicity of the water pool will be determined by materials that are introduced into containment as a result of the accident itself. These materials may be fission products (i.e., cesium compounds), thermally produced products (i.e., core-concrete aerosols), or compounds produced by radiation (i.e., nitric acid). In situations where pH levels fall below ∼7, the formation of I 2 will occur in irradiated iodide solutions. A correlation between pH and iodine formation is needed so that the amounts I 2 in water pools can be assessed. This, in turn, determines the amount of I 2 in the atmosphere available for escape by containment leakage. A number of calculational routines based on more than 100 differential equations representing individual reactions can be found in the literature. In this work, it is shown that a simpler approach based on the steady-state decomposition of hydrogen peroxide should correctly describe iodine formation in severe accidents. Comparisons with test data show this approach to be valid. The most important acids in containment will be nitric acid (HNO 3 ), produced by irradiation of water and air, and hydrochloric acid (HCl), produced by irradiation or heating of electrical cable insulation. The most important bases in containment will be cesium hydroxide, cesium borate (or cesium carbonate), and in some plants pH additives, such as sodium hydroxide or sodium phosphate

  17. Investigation of the fabrication parameters of thick film metal oxide-polymer pH electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gac, Arnaud

    2002-01-01

    This thesis describes a study into the development of an optimum material and fabrication process for the production of thick film pH electrodes. These devices consist of low cost, miniature and rugged pH sensors formed by screen printing a metal oxide bearing paste onto a high temperature (∼850 deg C) fired metal back contact supported on a standard alumina substrate. The pH sensitive metal oxide layer must be fabricated at relatively low temperatures (<300 deg C) in order to maintain the pH sensitivity of the layer and hence requires the use of a suitably stable low temperature curing binder. Bespoke fabricated inks are derived from a Taguchi style factorial experimental plans in which, different binder types, curing temperatures, hydration level and percentage mixtures of different metal oxides and layer thicknesses were investigated. The pH responses of 18 printed electrodes per batch were assessed in buffer solutions with respect to a commercial reference electrode forming a complete potentiometric circuit. The evaluation criteria used in the study included the device-to-device variation in sensitivity of the pH sensors and their sensitivity variation as a function of time. The results indicated the importance of the choice of binder type in particular on the performance characteristics. Reproducible device-to-device variation in sensitivity was determined for the best inks found, whatever the ink fabrication batch. A reduction in the sensitivity variation with time has been determined using the mathematical models derived from an experimental plan. The lack of reproducibility of the sensitivity magnitude, regardless of the ink manufacturing batch, seems to be a recurrent problem with prototype inks. Experimental sub-Nernstian responses are discussed in the light of possible pH mechanisms. (author)

  18. The increase in pH during aging of porous sol-gel silica spheres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Titulaer, M.K.; Kegel, W.K.; Jansen, J.B.H.; Geus, John W.

    1994-01-01

    The increase in pH in the hydrothermal fluid is studied after hydrothermal aging of porous silica gel spheres of 1–3 mm diameter. The porous silica spheres are formed by the sol-gel process from a supersaturated silica solution. The increase of the pH of the hydrothermal solution affects the silica

  19. Radiolysis of nucleosides in aqueous solutions: base liberation by the base attack mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, S.

    1984-01-01

    On the radiolysis of uridine and some other nucleosides in aqueous solution, a pH-dependent liberation of uracil or the corresponding base was found. e - sub(aq) and HOsup(anion radicals) 2 gave no freed bases, although many oxidizing radicals, including OH, Clsup(anion radicals) 2 , Brsup(anion radicals) 2 , (CNS)sup(anion radicals) 2 and SOsup(anion radicals) 4 , did cause the release of unaltered bases, depending on the pH of the solutions. The base yields were generally high at pH >= 11, with the exception of SOsup(anion radicals) 4 , which gave a rather high yield of uracil (from uridine) even in the pH region of - , present at high pH as the dissociated form of OH, may act partly as an oxidizing radical. A plausible mechanism of 3 1 -radical formation is discussed. (author)

  20. Mechanisms of intragastric pH sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goo, Tyralee; Akiba, Yasutada; Kaunitz, Jonathan D

    2010-12-01

    Luminal amino acids and lack of luminal acidity as a result of acid neutralization by intragastric foodstuffs are powerful signals for acid secretion. Although the hormonal and neural pathways underlying this regulatory mechanism are well understood, the nature of the gastric luminal pH sensor has been enigmatic. In clinical studies, high pH, tryptic peptides, and luminal divalent metals (Ca(2+) and Mg(2+)) increase gastrin release and acid production. The calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR), first described in the parathyroid gland but expressed on gastric G cells, is a logical candidate for the gastric acid sensor. Because CaSR ligands include amino acids and divalent metals, and because extracellular pH affects ligand binding in the pH range of the gastric content, its pH, metal, and nutrient-sensing functions are consistent with physiologic observations. The CaSR is thus an attractive candidate for the gastric luminal sensor that is part of the neuroendocrine negative regulatory loop for acid secretion.

  1. Solution mining process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Showalter, W.E.

    1984-01-01

    A solution mining process which may be used for uranium, thorium, vanadium, copper, nickel, molybdenum, rhenium, and selenium is claimed. During a first injection-and-production phase of between 6 months and 5 years, a leaching solution is injected through at least one well into the formation to solubilize the mineral values and form a pregnant liquor. This liquor is recovered through another well. The leaching solution contains sulfuric acid, nitric acid, hydrochloric acid, carbonic acid, an alkali metal carbonate, an alkali metal bicarbonate, ammonium carbonate or ammonium bicarbonate. Subsequently during a first production-only phase of between about 2 weeks and one year, injection of the leaching solution is suspended but pregnant liquor is still recovered. This stage is followed by a second injection-and-production phase of between 6 months and 5 years and a second production-only phase. The mineral values are separated from the pregnant liquor to form a barren liquor. The leaching agent is introduced into this liquor, and the solution is recycled. In a second claim for the solution mining of uranium, dilute carbonic acid is used as the leaching solution. The solution has a pH less than 7 and a bicarbonate ion concentration between about 380 ppm and 1000 ppm. The injection-and-production phase lasts between one and two years and the production only phase takes between one and four months. Carbon dioxide is introduced into the barren liquor to form a dilute carbonic acid solution and the solution is recycled

  2. pH tolerance of Daphnia pulex (leydig, emend. , richard)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, P; Ozburn, G W

    1969-01-01

    The survival time and reproduction of female Daphnia pulex in solutions varying in pH have been observed. Dilute sodium hydroxide or sulfuric acid solutions were added to four different diluent waters: distilled water, aerated tap water, aerated and filtered tap water from an aquarium containing Dace minnows, and Mcintyre River water. D. Pulex (initially up to 72 hours old) survived for the duration of the experiment (32 hours) in river water within a pH range of 6.1 to 10.3; in aquarium water within a pH range of 4.3 to 10.4; only at pH 6.4 and pH 7.6 in distilled water; and in none of the solutions using aerated tap water. The dissolved oxygen content was measured at the beginning and end of every experiment and was found never to fall below 6.2 p.p.M. Those individuals which survived were cultured in the laboratory and parthenogenesis was observed at pH values between 7.0 and 8.7.

  3. Investigating the sensitivity of PMMA optical fibres for use as an evanescent field absorption sensor in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lye, P G; Boerkamp, M; Ernest, A; Lamb, D W

    2005-01-01

    Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) optical fibres are low-cost polymer fibres that are generally more physically robust than silica fibres, are more flexible, yet like silica fibres have the potential to be used for practical evanescent field absorption sensors in aqueous solutions. However, evanescent field absorption in aqueous solutions is influenced by more than just the specific absorptivity of the solution in question. The physical configuration of the optical fibre itself, as well as surface charge interactions between the fibre and the chromophore in the solution also significantly affects the sensitivity of the fibre to evanescent field absorption. This paper reports on an investigation of numerous physical phenomena that influence evanescent field absorption for PMMA fibres using an aqueous solution of the dye Amidoblack. Parameters investigated included fibre coiling configuration and bend radius, fibre interaction length, and effect of solution pH. Coiled fibres were found to be more sensitive to evanescent field absorption than straight (uncoiled) lengths, and sensitivity was found to increase with a further reduction in bend radius. At high solution pH, the absorption versus solution concentration proved to be linear whereas at low pH the absorption versus concentration relationship exhibited a clear deviation from linearity. The observed nonlinearity at low pH points to the importance of accounting for electrostatic interactions between chromophore and fibre surface when designing a PMMA sensor for evanescent field absorption measurements in aqueous solutions

  4. FLEXIBLE PH SENSOR WITH POLYANILINE LAYER BASED ON IMPEDANCE MEASUREMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Chuang, Cheng-Hsin; Wu, Hsun-Pei; Chen, Cheng-Ho; Wu, Peng-Rong

    2012-01-01

    A flexible sensor with conducting polyaniline layer for detecting pH value based on the impedance measurement is fabricated and demonstrated in this study. The pH sensor consists of an interdigital electrode array on a flexible printed circuit and a thin-film polyaniline as the sensing layer. As the conductivity of polyaniline depends on the redox state, the impedance change of the polyaniline after it has reacted with different pH value solutions works as the sensing mechanism. In order to o...

  5. Effect of pH on Pulp Potential and Sulphide Mineral Flotation

    OpenAIRE

    GÖKTEPE, Ferihan

    2014-01-01

    Control of pH is one of the most widely applied methods for the modulation of mineral flotation. In this study the effect of pH on potential in solution and sulphur minerals flotation is discussed with various electrodes. The electrodes were platinum, gold, chalcopyrite, pyrite and galena. In solution, potentials were linearly dependent on pH with a different slope for each electrode. Chalcopyrite, pyrite, sphalerite and galena minerals flotation tests were performed in a microflot...

  6. Pretreatment Solution for Water Recovery Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muirhead, Dean (Inventor)

    2018-01-01

    Chemical pretreatments are used to produce usable water by treating a water source with a chemical pretreatment that contains a hexavalent chromium and an acid to generate a treated water source, wherein the concentration of sulfate compounds in the acid is negligible, and wherein the treated water source remains substantially free of precipitates after the addition of the chemical pretreatment. Other methods include reducing the pH in urine to be distilled for potable water extraction by pretreating the urine before distillation with a pretreatment solution comprising one or more acid sources selected from a group consisting of phosphoric acid, hydrochloric acid, and nitric acid, wherein the urine remains substantially precipitate free after the addition of the pretreatment solution. Another method described comprises a process for reducing precipitation in urine to be processed for water extraction by mixing the urine with a pretreatment solution comprising hexavalent chromium compound and phosphoric acid.

  7. Liquid scintillation solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, E.C.

    1976-01-01

    The liquid scintillation solution described includes a mixture of: a liquid scintillation solvent, a primary scintillation solute, a secondary scintillation solute, a variety of appreciably different surfactants, and a dissolving and transparency agent. The dissolving and transparency agent is tetrahydrofuran, a cyclic ether. The scintillation solvent is toluene. The primary scintillation solute is PPO, and the secondary scintillation solute is dimethyl POPOP. The variety of appreciably different surfactants is composed of isooctylphenol-polyethoxyethanol and sodium dihexyl sulphosuccinate [fr

  8. Ratiometric detection of pH fluctuation in mitochondria with a new fluorescein/cyanine hybrid sensor? ?Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Characterization of Mito-pH, emission spectra and photograph of Mito-pH solutions, linear fitting of the ratiometric response, and co-localization images at pH 8.50. See DOI: 10.1039/c4sc04021j Click here for additional data file.

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yuncong; Zhu, Chengcheng; Cen, Jiajie; Bai, Yang; He, Weijiang; Guo, Zijian

    2015-01-01

    The homeostasis of mitochondrial pH (pHm) is crucial in cell physiology. Developing small-molecular fluorescent sensors for the ratiometric detection of pHm fluctuation is highly demanded yet challenging. A ratiometric pH sensor, Mito-pH, was constructed by integrating a pH-sensitive FITC fluorophore with a pH-insensitive hemicyanine group. The hemicyanine group also acts as the mitochondria targeting group due to its lipophilic cationic nature. Besides its ability to target mitochondria, thi...

  9. A PhD is a PhD is a PhD

    OpenAIRE

    Ostrow, Deborah Anne

    2017-01-01

    A PhD is a PhD is a PhD is a practice-based project that interrogates the process of an artist undertaking PhD research under established criteria. It consists of an exegesis, an original screenplay, and a digital film made for online viewing, with images drawn from a range of documentaries and films found on YouTube. They have been dissected, re-assembled and then re-embedded to YouTube. The source material covers topics such as medicalization of madness, the conspicuous appropriation of uni...

  10. The pH Game.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemecology, 1996

    1996-01-01

    Describes a game that can be used to teach students about the acidity of liquids and substances around their school and enable them to understand what pH levels tell us about the environment. Students collect samples and measure the pH of water, soil, plants, and other natural material. (DDR)

  11. Highly Sensitive and Wide-Dynamic-Range Multichannel Optical-Fiber pH Sensor Based on PWM Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Md. Rajibur Rahaman; Kang, Shin-Won

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we propose a highly sensitive multichannel pH sensor that is based on an optical-fiber pulse width modulation (PWM) technique. According to the optical-fiber PWM method, the received sensing signal’s pulse width changes when the optical-fiber pH sensing-element of the array comes into contact with pH buffer solutions. The proposed optical-fiber PWM pH-sensing system offers a linear sensing response over a wide range of pH values from 2 to 12, with a high pH-sensing ability. The sensitivity of the proposed pH sensor is 0.46 µs/pH, and the correlation coefficient R2 is approximately 0.997. Additional advantages of the proposed optical-fiber PWM pH sensor include a short/fast response-time of about 8 s, good reproducibility properties with a relative standard deviation (RSD) of about 0.019, easy fabrication, low cost, small size, reusability of the optical-fiber sensing-element, and the capability of remote sensing. Finally, the performance of the proposed PWM pH sensor was compared with that of potentiometric, optical-fiber modal interferometer, and optical-fiber Fabry–Perot interferometer pH sensors with respect to dynamic range width, linearity as well as response and recovery times. We observed that the proposed sensing systems have better sensing abilities than the above-mentioned pH sensors. PMID:27834865

  12. Evaluation of the electrochemical behavior of U{sub 2.5}Zr{sub 7.5}Nb and U{sub 3}Zr{sub 9}Nb uranium alloys in relation to the pH and the solution aeration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mansur, Fabio Abud; Santos, Ana Maria Matildes dos; Ferraz, Wilmar Barbosa; Figueiredo, Celia de Araujo, E-mail: ferraz@cdtn.b [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN) is developing, in cooperation with the Centro Tecnologico da Marinha (CTMSP), the advanced nuclear plate type fuel for the second core of the land-based reactor prototype of the Laboratorio de Geracao Nucleo-Eletrica (LABGENE). Recent investigations have shown that the fuel made of uranium-based niobium and zirconium alloys reaches the best performance relative to other fuels, e.g. UO{sub 2}. Niobium and Zirconium also increase the corrosion resistance and the mechanical strength of the uranium alloys. By means of electrochemical techniques the corrosion behavior of alloys U{sub 2}.{sub 5}Zr{sub 7.5}Nb and U{sub 3}Zr{sub 9}Nb, developed at CDTN and heat treated in the temperature range of 200 deg C to 600 deg C, was assessed. The effect of the parameters pH and solution aeration was studied as well as the influence of zirconium and niobium alloying elements in the corrosion of uranium. The techniques used were open circuit potential, electrochemical impedance and potentiodynamic anodic polarization at room temperature. The tests were performed in a three-electrode electrochemical cell with Ag/AgCl (3M KCl) as the reference electrode and a platinum plate as the auxiliary electrode. The potentiodynamic polarization curves of uranium and its alloys in acidic solutions showed regions with anodic currents limited by a passive film. The presence of niobium and zirconium contributed for the formation of this film. The impedance data showed the presence of two semicircles in the Bode diagram, indicating the occurrence of two distinct electrochemical processes. The data were fitted to an equivalent circuit model in order to obtain parameters of the electrochemical processes and evaluate the effect of the studied variables. (author)

  13. Thermally activated dislocation motion including inertial effects in solid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isaac, R.D.

    1977-01-01

    Dislocation motion through an array of obstacles is considered in terms of the potential energy of the dislocation as it moves through the array. The obstacles form a series of potential wells and barriers which can trap the dislocations. The effect of thermal fluctuations and of a viscous drag on the motion of the dislocation is investigated by analogy with Brownian motion in a field of force. The rate of escape of a trapped dislocation is found to depend on the damping coefficient only for a large viscous drag. The probability that a dislocation will be trapped by a well or barrier is found to depend on the damping coefficient for a small viscous drag. This inertial effect determines how far a dislocation will travel after breaking away from an obstacle

  14. PhD on Track – designing learning for PhD students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunhild Austrheim

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Three years ago we started the project "Information Management for Knowledge Creation". The project was initiated to create online information literacy modules for PhD students. The result of our endeavours, PhD on Track, will be launched in May 2013. The initial stage of the project was mapping out the information behaviour of PhD students, as well as what services they require from the library through a literature review and a focus group study. The findings of these inquiries formed the knowledge base from which we developed our information literacy modules. Our paper will focus on the interaction between content production and user testing when creating PhD on Track. Methods: User testing has been employed throughout the production stage. We have tested navigation and organisation of the web site, content and usability. The project team have conducted expert testing. Analysis: The results from our user testing have played an important part in decisions concerning content production. Our working hypothesis was that the PhD students would want an encyclopaedic website, a place to quickly find answers. However, the user tests revealed that PhD students understood and expected the website to be learning modules. Conclusions: The PhD students in the tests agreed that a site such as this would be useful, especially to new PhD students. They also liked the design, but had some qualms with the level of information. They preferred shorter text, but with more depth. The students would likewise have preferred more practical examples, more illustrations and more discipline specific information. The current content of PhD on Track reflects the feedback from the user testing. We have retained initial ideas such as one section for reviewing and discovering research literature and one section for publishing PhD research work. In addition, we have included more practical examples to indicate efficient workflows or relevant actions in context. Illustrations

  15. Effect of pH on the complexation of kaempferol-4'-glucoside with three β-cyclodextrin derivatives: isothermal titration calorimetry and spectroscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yan; Dong, Li-Na; Liu, Min; Chen, Aiju; Feng, Shangcai; Wang, Bingquan; Sun, Dezhi

    2014-01-08

    The utilization of kaempferol and its glycosides in food and pharmaceutical industries could be improved by the formation of inclusion complexes with cyclodextrins at different pH. This study explores the complexation of kaempferol-4'-glucoside with sulfobutyl ether-β-cyclodextrin (SBE-β-CD), hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HP-β-CD), and methylated-β-cyclodextrin (M-β-CD) in phosphate buffer solutions of different pH using isothermal titration calorimetry, UV-vis absorption and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 298.2 K. Experimental results showed that kaempferol-4'-glucoside binds with the three β- cyclodextrins in the same 1:1 stoichiometry. The rank order of stability constants is SBE-β-CD > HP-β-CD > M-β-CD at the same pH level and pH 6.0 > pH 7.4 > pH 9.0 for the same cyclodextrin. The binding of kaempferol-4'-glucoside with the three β-cyclodextrin derivatives is synergistically driven by enthalpy and entropy at pH 6.0 and enthalpy-driven at pH 7.4 and 9.0. The possible inclusion mode was that in the cavity of β-CD is included the planar benzopyranic-4-one part of the kaempferol-4'-glucoside.

  16. The coordination chemistry of the neutral tris-2-pyridyl silicon ligand [PhSi(6-Me-2-py)3].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plajer, Alex J; Colebatch, Annie L; Enders, Markus; García-Romero, Álvaro; Bond, Andrew D; García-Rodríguez, Raúl; Wright, Dominic S

    2018-05-22

    Difficulties in the preparation of neutral ligands of the type [RSi(2-py)3] (where 2-py is an unfunctionalised 2-pyridyl ring unit) have thwarted efforts to expand the coordination chemistry of ligands of this type. However, simply switching the pyridyl substituents to 6-methyl-pyridyl groups (6-Me-2-py) in the current paper has allowed smooth, high-yielding access to the [PhSi(6-Me-2-py)3] ligand (1), and the first exploration of its coordination chemistry with transition metals. The synthesis, single-crystal X-ray structures and solution dynamics of the new complexes [{PhSi(6-Me-2-py)3}CuCH3CN][PF6], [{PhSi(6-Me-2-py)3}CuCH3CN][CuCl2], [{PhSi(6-Me-2-py)3}FeCl2], [{PhSi(6-Me-2-py)3}Mo(CO)3] and [{PhSi(6-Me-2-py)3}CoCl2] are reported. The paramagnetic Fe2+ and Co2+ complexes show strongly shifted NMR resonances for the coordinated pyridyl units due to large Fermi-contact shifts. However, magnetic anisotropy also leads to considerable pseudo-contact shifts so that both contributions have to be included in the paramagnetic NMR analysis.

  17. Impact of pH on the structure and function of neural cadherin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungles, Jared M; Dukes, Matthew P; Vunnam, Nagamani; Pedigo, Susan

    2014-12-02

    Neural (N-) cadherin is a transmembrane protein within adherens junctions that mediates cell-cell adhesion. It has 5 modular extracellular domains (EC1-EC5) that bind 3 calcium ions between each of the modules. Calcium binding is required for dimerization. N-Cadherin is involved in diverse processes including tissue morphogenesis, excitatory synapse formation and dynamics, and metastasis of cancer. During neurotransmission and tumorigenesis, fluctuations in extracellular pH occur, causing tissue acidosis with associated physiological consequences. Studies reported here aim to determine the effect of pH on the dimerization properties of a truncated construct of N-cadherin containing EC1-EC2. Since N-cadherin is an anionic protein, we hypothesized that acidification of solution would cause an increase in stability of the apo protein, a decrease in the calcium-binding affinity, and a concomitant decrease in the formation of adhesive dimer. The stability of the apo monomer was increased and the calcium-binding affinity was decreased at reduced pH, consistent with our hypothesis. Surprisingly, analytical SEC studies showed an increase in calcium-induced dimerization as solution pH decreased from 7.4 to 5.0. Salt-dependent dimerization studies indicated that electrostatic repulsion attenuates dimerization affinity. These results point to a possible electrostatic mechanism for moderating dimerization affinity of the Type I cadherin family. Extrapolating these results to cell adhesion in vivo leads to the assertion that decreased pH promotes adhesion by N-cadherin, thereby stabilizing synaptic junctions.

  18. Continuous pH monitoring in a perfused bioreactor system using an optical pH sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeevarajan, Antony S.; Vani, Sundeep; Taylor, Thomas D.; Anderson, Melody M.

    2002-01-01

    Monitoring and regulating the pH of the solution in a bioprocess is one of the key steps in the success of bioreactor operation. An in-line optical pH sensor, based on the optical absorption properties of phenol red present in the medium, was developed and tested in this work for use in NASA space bioreactors based on a rotating wall-perfused vessel system supporting a baby hamster kidney (BHK-21) cell culture. The sensor was tested over three 30-day and one 124-day cell runs. The pH sensor initially was calibrated and then used during the entire cell culture interval. The pH reported by the sensor was compared to that measured by a fiber optically coupled Shimadzu spectrophotometer and a blood gas analyzer. The maximum standard error of prediction for all the four cell runs for development pH sensor against BGA was +/-0.06 pH unit and for the fiber optically coupled Shimadzu spectrophotometer against the blood gas analyzer was +/-0.05 pH unit. The pH sensor system performed well without need of recalibration for 124 days. Copyright 2002 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. PhD supervisor-student relationship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FILIPE PRAZERES

    2017-10-01

    but also improve their coping skills, including critical thinking and problem-solving methods (5. The act of sharing knowledge and experiences can motivate the PhD students to persevere in their studies (10. When needed, supervisors should use their power of influence to increase the time that the student has available to devote to research while maintaining a part of their employment activities (health care‑related or not, since many PhD students are also full-time workers. Last but not least, supervisors and faculty members must encourage PhD students to pursue the available funding opportunities. Socioeconomic problems are known to be an issue for PhD students (5. Without the supervisor’s support – by dealing with PhD student’s emotions and personality –, research time, funding, and the student’s proactiviness, the doctoral journey may not attain success.

  20. Photodegradation of Paracetamol in Nitrate Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Cui; Qu, Ruijuan; Liang, Jinyan; Yang, Xi

    2010-11-01

    The photodegradation of paracetamol in nitrate solution under simulated solar irradiation has been investigated. The degradation rates were compared by varying environmental parameters including concentrations of nitrate ion, humic substance and pH values. The quantifications of paracetamol were conducted by HPLC method. The results demonstrate that the photodegradation of paracetamol followed first-order kinetics. The photoproducts and intermediates of paracetamol in the presence of nitrate ions were identified by extensive GC-MS method. The photodegradation pathways involving. OH radicals as reactive species were proposed.

  1. Photodegradation of Paracetamol in Nitrate Solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, Meng; Ruijuan, Qu; Jinyan, Liang; Xi, Yang [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2010-11-24

    The photodegradation of paracetamol in nitrate solution under simulated solar irradiation has been investigated. The degradation rates were compared by varying environmental parameters including concentrations of nitrate ion, humic substance and pH values. The quantifications of paracetamol were conducted by HPLC method. The results demonstrate that the photodegradation of paracetamol followed first-order kinetics. The photoproducts and intermediates of paracetamol in the presence of nitrate ions were identified by extensive GC-MS method. The photodegradation pathways involving. OH radicals as reactive species were proposed.

  2. Photodegradation of Paracetamol in Nitrate Solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng Cui; Qu Ruijuan; Liang Jinyan; Yang Xi

    2010-01-01

    The photodegradation of paracetamol in nitrate solution under simulated solar irradiation has been investigated. The degradation rates were compared by varying environmental parameters including concentrations of nitrate ion, humic substance and pH values. The quantifications of paracetamol were conducted by HPLC method. The results demonstrate that the photodegradation of paracetamol followed first-order kinetics. The photoproducts and intermediates of paracetamol in the presence of nitrate ions were identified by extensive GC-MS method. The photodegradation pathways involving. OH radicals as reactive species were proposed.

  3. Urine pH test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... urine test Male urinary tract References Bose A, Monk RD, Bushinsky DA. Kidney stones. In: Melmed S, Polonsky ... and its influence on urine pH. J Am Diet Assoc . 1995;95(7):791-797. PMID: 7797810 ...

  4. Exercise and Pulmonary Hypertension (PH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Situations Find a Doctor PH Care Centers PHA Classroom PHA Registry Insurance Guide Specialty Pharmacy Other Resources ... no published data in the medical literature regarding routine exercise in patients with PAH. However, there are ...

  5. Effect of pH on the adsorption of dodecylamine on montmorillonite: Insights from experiments and molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Chenliang; Min, Fanfei; Liu, Lingyun

    2017-12-01

    The hydrophobic aggregation in cationic surfactant suspension is an effective method to enhance the dewatering of clay-rich tailing. The solution pH can affect the adsorption behavior of cationic surfactant on clay mineral. The effect of pH on the adsorption of dodecylamine (DDA) on montmorillonite was investigated by the sedimentation test and the characterization of flocs images, contact angle, adsorption quantity, and fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, as well as molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. It was found that DDA ions were adsorbed on montmorillonite basal surfaces mainly by physical adsorption, including the electrostatic attraction and hydrogen bonding. A certain number of neutral DDA molecules can favor the adsorption of DDA. At pH around 8, the effect of hydrophobic modification was the best because DDA molecules and ions form compact and well-organized monolayer. The MD simulation results were in good agreement with that of contact angle, adsorption quantity and FTIR.

  6. Two decades of chemical imaging of solutes in sediments and soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santner, Jakob; Larsen, Morten; Kreuzeder, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    understanding of biogeochemical processes regulating the distribution of key elements and solutes including O2, CO2, pH, redox conditions as well as nutrient and contaminant ion species in structurally complex soils and sediments. Recently these methods have been applied in parallel or integrated as so...

  7. PhEDEx Data Service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egeland, Ricky; Wildish, Tony; Huang, Chih-Hao

    2010-01-01

    The PhEDEx Data Service provides access to information from the central PhEDEx database, as well as certificate-authenticated managerial operations such as requesting the transfer or deletion of data. The Data Service is integrated with the 'SiteDB' service for fine-grained access control, providing a safe and secure environment for operations. A plug-in architecture allows server-side modules to be developed rapidly and easily by anyone familiar with the schema, and can automatically return the data in a variety of formats for use by different client technologies. Using HTTP access via the Data Service instead of direct database connections makes it possible to build monitoring web-pages with complex drill-down operations, suitable for debugging or presentation from many aspects. This will form the basis of the new PhEDEx website in the near future, as well as providing access to PhEDEx information and certificate-authenticated services for other CMS dataflow and workflow management tools such as CRAB, WMCore, DBS and the dashboard. A PhEDEx command-line client tool provides one-stop access to all the functions of the PhEDEx Data Service interactively, for use in simple scripts that do not access the service directly. The client tool provides certificate-authenticated access to managerial functions, so all the functions of the PhEDEx Data Service are available to it. The tool can be expanded by plug-ins which can combine or extend the client-side manipulation of data from the Data Service, providing a powerful environment for manipulating data within PhEDEx.

  8. Economical wireless optical ratiometric pH sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vuppu, Sandeep; Kostov, Yordan; Rao, Govind

    2009-01-01

    The development and application of a portable, wireless fluorescence-based optical pH sensor is presented. The design incorporates the MSP430 microcontroller as the control unit, an RF transceiver for wireless communication, digital filters and amplifiers and a USB-based communication module for data transmission. The pH sensor is based on ratiometric fluorescence detection from pH sensitive dye incorporated in a peel-and-stick patch. The ability of the instrument to detect the pH of the solution with contact only between the sensor patch and the solution makes it partially non-invasive. The instrument also has the ability to transmit data wirelessly, enabling its use in processes that entail stringent temperature control and sterility. The use of the microcontroller makes it a reliable, low-cost and low-power device. The luminous intensity of the light source can be digitally controlled to maximize the sensitivity of the instrument. It has a resolution of 0.05 pH. The sensor is accurate and reversible over the pH range of 6.5–9

  9. Liquid scintillation solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, E.C.

    1977-01-01

    A liquid scintillation solution is described which includes (1) a scintillation solvent (toluene and xylene), (2) a primary scintillation solute (PPO and Butyl PBD), (3) a secondary scintillation solute (POPOP and Dimethyl POPOP), (4) a plurality of substantially different surfactants and (5) a filter dissolving and/or transparentizing agent. 8 claims

  10. Optoelectronic pH Meter: Further Details

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeevarajan, Antony S.; Anderson, Mejody M.; Macatangay, Ariel V.

    2009-01-01

    A collection of documents provides further detailed information about an optoelectronic instrument that measures the pH of an aqueous cell-culture medium to within 0.1 unit in the range from 6.5 to 7.5. The instrument at an earlier stage of development was reported in Optoelectronic Instrument Monitors pH in a Culture Medium (MSC-23107), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 28, No. 9 (September 2004), page 4a. To recapitulate: The instrument includes a quartz cuvette through which the medium flows as it is circulated through a bioreactor. The medium contains some phenol red, which is an organic pH-indicator dye. The cuvette sits between a light source and a photodetector. [The light source in the earlier version comprised red (625 nm) and green (558 nm) light-emitting diodes (LEDs); the light source in the present version comprises a single green- (560 nm)-or-red (623 nm) LED.] The red and green are repeatedly flashed in alternation. The responses of the photodiode to the green and red are processed electronically to obtain the ratio between the amounts of green and red light transmitted through the medium. The optical absorbance of the phenol red in the green light varies as a known function of pH. Hence, the pH of the medium can be calculated from the aforesaid ratio.

  11. pH induced protein-scaffold biosynthesis of tunable shape gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xiaorong; He Xiaoxiao; Wang Kemin; Ren Fang; Qin Zhihe

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a pH-inductive protein-scaffold biosynthesis of shape-tunable crystalline gold nanoparticles at room temperature has been developed. By simple manipulation of the reaction solution's pH, anisotropic gold nanoparticles including spheres, triangles and cubes could be produced by incubating an aqueous solution of sodium tetrachloroaurate with Dolichomitriopsis diversiformis biomasses after immersion in ultrapure Millipore water overnight. A moss protein with molecular weight of about 71 kDa and pI of 4.9 was the primary biomolecule involved in the biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles. The secondary configuration of the proteins by CD spectrum implied that the moss protein could display different secondary configurations including random coil, α-helix and intermediate conformations between random coil and α-helix for the experimental pH solution. The growth process of gold nanoparticles further showed that the moss protein with different configurations provided the template scaffold for the shape-controlled biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles. The constrained shape of the gold nanoparticles, however, disappeared in boiled moss extract. The gold nanoparticles with designed morphology were successfully reconstructed using the moss protein purified from the gold nanoparticles. Structural characterizations by SEM, TEM and SAED showed that the triangular and cubic gold nanoparticles were single crystalline.

  12. A method for measuring pH at high temperatures is presented

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudon, Luc.

    1979-01-01

    Two hydrogen electrodes are used and set up in a PTFE cell comprising two chambers connected through a saturated potassium chloride solution bridge. This cell is put in an autoclave containing hydrogen. The potential difference of the following cell is measured: H 2 , Pt, R solution - KCl saturated solution at 25 0 C - X solution, Pt, H 2 - The pH of the reference solution R is known up to 300 0 C and the X solution must have its pH to be determined. The precision of the measures at 300 0 C is estimated about +-0,1 pH unit. The dissociation constant of water is calculated from pH variations of alcaline solutions up to 300 0 C. The method has helped to measure the pH at 300 0 C of some boric acid solutions, with or without lithium hydroxide additions, in the following concentration range: B: 250 to 1500 ppm and Li: 0 to 3 ppm. Some concentrations are in fact those chosen for the primary circuits of pressurized water reactors. The pH of ammoniacal solutions is measured too and helped to determine the variations of the dissociation constant of ammonia with temperature [fr

  13. [pH sensors based on rubbery ormosils preparation and their spectrum studies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi; Dai, Yuan-jing; Li, Wei; Zhuang, Zhi-xia; Wang, Xiao-ru

    2002-02-01

    A new type of methyl substituted ormosils as a matrix for bromophenol blue (BPhB) and bromocresol green (BCG) is described. The new ormosils combine features of classical TEOS sol-gel material such as solvability in organic solvent and those of sol-gel glasses such as transparent and a porous structure, the ormosils also make a good mechanical stability. The influence of the conditions during the polymerisation process on the photochemical properties of BPhB and BCG has been studied. This sol-gel material was wed to immobilize pH-sensitive absorption dyes, bromothymol blue and bromocresol green, to prepare pH sensing films. The several aspects of the sensing films, including the leaching of the dye from gel, response time to different pH buffer solution, absorption spectra and the improvement of the immobilization of the dyes to filmo, were also discussed.

  14. pH control and rapid mixing in spinning NMR samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yesinowski, James P.; Sunberg, Richard J.; Benedict, James J.

    An apparatus is described which permits the acquisition of NMR spectra from spinning 20-mm sample tubes while: (1) constantly monitoring the pH; (2) adding reagents to maintain constant pH (pH-statting); (3) efficiently mixing the added reagent. The apparatus was built to study the spontaneous precipitation of calcium phosphates from supersaturated solutions using 31P NMR. Other applications include the rapid determination of NMR titration curves, and the minimization of temperature gradients in large sample tubes. The apparatus was used to measure the 31P chemical shift titration of dilute phosphoric acid, which yielded accurate shifts for the three species of protonated orthophosphate ion. The bulk magnetic susceptibility of 85% H 3PO 4 relative to a dilute aqueous sample was also measured, and is shown to contribute significantly to chemical shift measurements.

  15. The pH dependent Raman spectroscopic study of caffeine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jian; Gu, Huaimin; Zhong, Liang; Hu, Yongjun; Liu, Fang

    2011-02-01

    First of all the surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) and normal Raman spectra of caffeine aqueous solution were obtained at different pH values. In order to obtain the detailed vibrational assignments of the Raman spectroscopy, the geometry of caffeine molecule was optimized by density functional theory (DFT) calculation. By comparing the SERS of caffeine with its normal spectra at different pH values; it is concluded that pH value can dramatically affect the SERS of caffeine, but barely affect the normal Raman spectrum of caffeine aqueous solution. It can essentially affect the reorientation of caffeine molecule to the Ag colloid surface, but cannot impact the vibration of functional groups and chemical bonds in caffeine molecule.

  16. The effect of pH on the erosion of dentine and enamel by dietary acids in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, N X; Hughes, J A; Addy, M

    2001-09-01

    The reported incidence of tooth erosion caused by acidic soft drinks has been increasingly documented. Citric and phosphoric acids are the two main dietary acids present in these soft drinks. Many variables need to be determined in order to assess risk factors for dental erosion caused by beverage consumption including pH, titratable acidity, pKa, buffering capacity, hence the aim of these in vitro investigations. Methodologies included profiling flat enamel and dentine samples (acidic solutions adjusted with alkali over the available pH range; citric, phosphoric and hydrochloric acid were adjusted with sodium hydroxide and citric acid with trisodium citrate. Tissue loss was calculated by profilometry. Results showed that under these conditions citric acid caused far more erosion over the pH range employed than phosphoric acid for both tissue types. Citric acid compared with hydrochloric acid highlighted dissolution and chelation effects. Phosphoric acid caused minimal erosion over pH 3 for enamel and pH 4 for dentine. These factors could be considered in order to reduce the erosivity of acidic soft drinks.

  17. Solution chemistry of lanthanide complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brittain, H.G.

    1979-01-01

    Intermolecular energy transfer from Tb 3+ to Eu 3+ , luminescence intensity measurements, potentiometric titrations, differential absorption spectroscopy, and spectroscopic titrations were all used to study the binding of lanthanide ions by serine and threonine. At low pH (3.0 to 6.0) the complexes are mononuclear and ligand is only weakly bound. In the pH interval of 6.0 to 8.5 stronger interaction takes place between the ligand and the metal (with possible coordination of the undissociated hydroxyl group), and self-association of complexes becomes important. Above pH 8.5, base hydrolysis of the complexes leads to highly associated species in solution and shortly above this pH an insoluble precipitate is formed. It was found that energy could be transferred from Tb 3+ to Eu 3+ more efficiently among complexes prepared from racemic ligands than in complexes made from resolved ligand, but this stereoselectivity was only observed at pH values greater than 6.5 and in solutions having a 1:10 ratio of metal-to-ligand. No stereoselectivity was found in solutions having 1:5 ratios, and this observation was explained by the existence of 1:2 metal-ligand complexes existing in solutions having the higher ratio of metal-to-ligand (only 1:1 complexes are then found at lower ratios of metal-to-ligand). (author)

  18. Cadmium triggers Elodea canadensis to change the surrounding water pH and thereby Cd uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javed, M Tariq; Greger, Maria

    2011-01-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the influence of Elodea canadensis shoots on surrounding water pH in the presence of cadmium and the effect of plant-induced pH on cadmium uptake. The pH change in the surrounding nutrient solution and Cd uptake by Elodea shoots were investigated after cultivation of various plant densities (1, 3, 6 plants per 500 ml) in hydroponics at a starting pH of 4.0 and in the presence of different concentrations of cadmium (0, 0.1, 0.5 microM). Cadmium uptake was also investigated at different constant pH (4.0, 4.5, 5.5 and 6.5). To investigate if the pH change arose from photosynthetic activities, plants were grown under light, darkness or in the presence of a photosynthetic inhibitor, 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU), and 0.5 microM cadmium in the solution. Elodea had an ability to increase the surrounding water pH, when the initial pH was low, which resulted in increased accumulation of Cd. The higher the plant density, the more pronounced was the pH change. The pH increase was not due to the photosynthetic activity since the pH rise was more pronounced under darkness and in the presence of DCMU. The pH increase by Elodea was triggered by cadmium.

  19. Traceability of pH to the Mole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Filomena Camões

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Free acidity of aqueous solutions was initially defined in 1909 by Søren Peter Lauritz Sørensen as pH = −lgcH+ (c/mol·dm−3 or m/mol·kg−1 of the free hydrogen ions in solution, H+ soon (1910 was changed to pH = paH+ = −lgaH+, integrating the new concepts of activity, ai and activity coefficient γi, for the ionic species i under concern, H+ in this case; it is ai = −lg(miγi. Since individual ions do not exist alone in solution, primary pH values cannot be assigned solely by experimental measurements, requiring extra thermodynamic model assumptions for the activity coefficient, γH+, which has put pH in a unique situation of not being fully traceable to the International System of Units (SI. Also the concept of activity is often not felt to be as perceptible as that of concentration which may present difficulties, namely with the interpretation of data. pH measurements on unknown samples rely on calibration of the measuring setup with adequate reference pH buffers. In this work, the assignment of pH values to buffers closely matching the samples, e.g., seawater, is revisited. An approach is presented to assess the quantity pmH+ = −lgmH+ profiting from the fact that, contrary to single ion activity coefficients, mean activity coefficients,   can be assessed based on experimentally assessed quantities alone, γExp ±, thus ensuring traceability to the mole, the SI base unit for amount of substance. Compatibility between γExp ± and mean activity coefficient calculated by means of Pitzer model equations, γPtz ±, validates the model for its intended use.

  20. Evaluating nanoparticle sensor design for intracellular pH measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjaminsen, Rikke V; Sun, Honghao; Henriksen, Jonas R; Christensen, Nynne M; Almdal, Kristoffer; Andresen, Thomas L

    2011-07-26

    Particle-based nanosensors have over the past decade been designed for optical fluorescent-based ratiometric measurements of pH in living cells. However, quantitative and time-resolved intracellular measurements of pH in endosomes and lysosomes using particle nanosensors are challenging, and there is a need to improve measurement methodology. In the present paper, we have successfully carried out time-resolved pH measurements in endosomes and lyosomes in living cells using nanoparticle sensors and show the importance of sensor choice for successful quantification. We have studied two nanoparticle-based sensor systems that are internalized by endocytosis and elucidated important factors in nanosensor design that should be considered in future development of new sensors. From our experiments it is clear that it is highly important to use sensors that have a broad measurement range, as erroneous quantification of pH is an unfortunate result when measuring pH too close to the limit of the sensitive range of the sensors. Triple-labeled nanosensors with a pH measurement range of 3.2-7.0, which was synthesized by adding two pH-sensitive fluorophores with different pK(a) to each sensor, seem to be a solution to some of the earlier problems found when measuring pH in the endosome-lysosome pathway.

  1. Disposable Miniaturized Screen‐Printed pH and Reference Electrodes for Potentiometric Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Musa, Arnaud Emmanuel; del Campo, Francisco Javier; Abramova, Natalia

    2011-01-01

    This work describes the development of a miniaturized potentiometric system comprising a miniaturized quasi‐reference electrode (QRE) coupled to a solid‐state ion‐selective electrode (ISE) for the monitoring of pH. We describe the optimization of materials and fabrication processes including screen‐printing...... electrode) that can be used continuously for a period of not less than 7 days in aqueous solutions. Curing the Ag/AgCl pastes during 20 minutes at 120 °C after printing allowed the QREs to display excellent potential stability, as demonstrated by an open‐circuit‐potential standard deviation of ±1.2 mV over...

  2. New seismograph includes filters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-11-02

    The new Nimbus ES-1210 multichannel signal enhancement seismograph from EG and G geometrics has recently been redesigned to include multimode signal fillers on each amplifier. The ES-1210F is a shallow exploration seismograph for near subsurface exploration such as in depth-to-bedrock, geological hazard location, mineral exploration, and landslide investigations.

  3. Analytic device including nanostructures

    KAUST Repository

    Di Fabrizio, Enzo M.; Fratalocchi, Andrea; Totero Gongora, Juan Sebastian; Coluccio, Maria Laura; Candeloro, Patrizio; Cuda, Gianni

    2015-01-01

    A device for detecting an analyte in a sample comprising: an array including a plurality of pixels, each pixel including a nanochain comprising: a first nanostructure, a second nanostructure, and a third nanostructure, wherein size of the first nanostructure is larger than that of the second nanostructure, and size of the second nanostructure is larger than that of the third nanostructure, and wherein the first nanostructure, the second nanostructure, and the third nanostructure are positioned on a substrate such that when the nanochain is excited by an energy, an optical field between the second nanostructure and the third nanostructure is stronger than an optical field between the first nanostructure and the second nanostructure, wherein the array is configured to receive a sample; and a detector arranged to collect spectral data from a plurality of pixels of the array.

  4. Label-Free Carbon-Dots-Based Ratiometric Fluorescence pH Nanoprobes for Intracellular pH Sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shangguan, Jingfang; He, Dinggeng; He, Xiaoxiao; Wang, Kemin; Xu, Fengzhou; Liu, Jinquan; Tang, Jinlu; Yang, Xue; Huang, Jin

    2016-08-02

    Measuring pH in living cells is of great importance for better understanding cellular functions as well as providing pivotal assistance for early diagnosis of diseases. In this work, we report the first use of a novel kind of label-free carbon dots for intracellular ratiometric fluorescence pH sensing. By simple one-pot hydrothermal treatment of citric acid and basic fuchsin, the carbon dots showing dual emission bands at 475 and 545 nm under single-wavelength excitation were synthesized. It is demonstrated that the fluorescence intensities of the as-synthesized carbon dots at the two emissions are pH-sensitive simultaneously. The intensity ratio (I475 nm/I545 nm) is linear against pH values from 5.2 to 8.8 in buffer solution, affording the capability as ratiometric probes for intracellular pH sensing. It also displays that the carbon dots show excellent reversibility and photostability in pH measurements. With this nanoprobe, quantitative fluorescence imaging using the ratio of two emissions (I475 nm/I545 nm) for the detection of intracellular pH were successfully applied in HeLa cells. In contrast to most of the reported nanomaterials-based ratiometric pH sensors which rely on the attachment of additional dyes, these carbon-dots-based ratiometric probes are low in toxicity, easy to synthesize, and free from labels.

  5. Iridium Oxide pH Sensor Based on Stainless Steel Wire for pH Mapping on Metal Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahrestani, S.; Ismail, M. C.; Kakooei, S.; Beheshti, M.; Zabihiazadboni, M.; Zavareh, M. A.

    2018-03-01

    A simple technique to fabricate the iridium oxide pH sensor is useful in several applications such as medical, food processing and engineering material where it is able to detect the changes of pH. Generally, the fabrication technique can be classified into three types: electro-deposition iridium oxide film (EIrOF), activated iridium oxide film (AIROF) and sputtering iridium oxide film (SIROF). This study focuses on fabricating electrode, calibration and test. Electro-deposition iridium oxide film is a simple and effective method of fabricating this kind of sensor via cyclic voltammetry process. The iridium oxide thick film was successfully electrodeposited on the surface of stainless steel wire with 500 cycles of sweep potential. A further analysis under FESEM shows detailed image of iridium oxide film which has cauliflower-liked microstructure. EDX analysis shows the highest element present are iridium and oxygen which concluded that the process is successful. The iridium oxide based pH sensor has shown a good performance in comparison to conventional glass pH sensor when it is being calibrated in buffer solutions with 2, 4, 7 and 9 pH values. The iridium oxide pH sensor is specifically designed to measure the pH on the surface of metal plate.

  6. Saskatchewan resources. [including uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-09-01

    The production of chemicals and minerals for the chemical industry in Saskatchewan are featured, with some discussion of resource taxation. The commodities mentioned include potash, fatty amines, uranium, heavy oil, sodium sulfate, chlorine, sodium hydroxide, sodium chlorate and bentonite. Following the successful outcome of the Cluff Lake inquiry, the uranium industry is booming. Some developments and production figures for Gulf Minerals, Amok, Cenex and Eldorado are mentioned.

  7. Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

    2013-02-19

    A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

  8. Removal of heavy metals from synthetic solution by electrocoagulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Ilou

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work concerns the optimization of the operating conditions for the removal of heavy metals from synthetic solution by Electrocoagulation (EC. To reach this purpose, we prepared a synthetic wastewater containing certain heavy metals (Ni, Cu, Zn, Fe and Pb to study the influence of various parameters (conductivity, pH, time of electrolysis, current density and the initial concentration of the metal on the rate of removal of these metals. The results show that this rate of removal can reach 99.9 % in the following optimal conditions: pH included between 6 and 8 and a density of the current of 1~1.5A / dm2. This study shows that it is possible to remove metals in aqueous solution by the technique of electrocoagulation. 

  9. Measurements of spectral responses for developing fiber-optic pH sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Wook Jae; Heo, Ji Yeon; Jang, Kyoung Won; Seo, Jeong Ki; Moon, Jin Soo; Park, Jang-Yeon; Park, Byung Gi; Cho, Seunghyun; Lee, Bongsoo

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we have fabricated a fiber-optic pH sensor, which is composed of a light source, a pH-sensing probe, plastic optical fibers and a spectrometer, for determining the degree of infection by Helicobacter pylori in the stomach. As pH indicators, phenol red and m-cresol purple are used, and pH liquid solutions are prepared by mixing phenol red or m-cresol purple solutions and various kinds of pH buffer solutions. The light emitted by a light source is guided by plastic optical fibers to the pH liquid solution, and the optical characteristic of a reflected light is changed according to the color variations of the pH indicator in the pH-sensing probe. Therefore, we have measured the intensities and wavelength shifts of the reflected lights, which change according to the color variations of indicators at different pH values, by using a spectrometer for spectral analysis. Also, the relationships between the pH values of liquid solutions and the optical properties of the modulated lights are obtained on the basis of the changes of the colors of indicators.

  10. Meet EPA Scientist Jordan West, Ph.D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan West, Ph.D. is an aquatic ecologist at EPA. Her areas of expertise include freshwater & marine ecology, climate change impacts and adaptation, resilience and threshold theory, environmental risk assessment, expert elicitation & stakeholder processes

  11. The role of pH in heavy metal detoxification by biosorption from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The high level of toxic metal pollution in the environment is a result of increased human activities. The hydrogen ion concentration of solutions has been known to affect reactions in solutions. The role of pH in As(V), Pb(II) and Hg(II) ions detoxification by bio-sorption from aqueous solutions using coconut fiber and sawdust ...

  12. Titratable acidity of beverages influences salivary pH recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livia Maria Andaló TENUTA

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A low pH and a high titratable acidity of juices and cola-based beverages are relevant factors that contribute to dental erosion, but the relative importance of these properties to maintain salivary pH at demineralizing levels for long periods of time after drinking is unknown. In this crossover study conducted in vivo, orange juice, a cola-based soft drink, and a 10% sucrose solution (negative control were tested. These drinks differ in terms of their pH (3.5 ± 0.04, 2.5 ± 0.05, and 5.9 ± 0.1, respectively and titratable acidity (3.17 ± 0.06, 0.57 ± 0.04 and < 0.005 mmols OH- to reach pH 5.5, respectively. Eight volunteers with a normal salivary flow rate and buffering capacity kept 15 mL of each beverage in their mouth for 10 s, expectorated it, and their saliva was collected after 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, and 120 s. The salivary pH, determined using a mini pH electrode, returned to the baseline value at 30 s after expectoration of the cola-based soft drink, but only at 90 s after expectoration of the orange juice. The salivary pH increased to greater than 5.5 at 15 s after expectoration of the cola drink and at 30 s after expectoration of the orange juice. These findings suggest that the titratable acidity of a beverage influences salivary pH values after drinking acidic beverages more than the beverage pH.

  13. Titratable acidity of beverages influences salivary pH recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenuta, Livia Maria Andaló; Fernández, Constanza Estefany; Brandão, Ana Carolina Siqueira; Cury, Jaime Aparecido

    2015-01-01

    A low pH and a high titratable acidity of juices and cola-based beverages are relevant factors that contribute to dental erosion, but the relative importance of these properties to maintain salivary pH at demineralizing levels for long periods of time after drinking is unknown. In this crossover study conducted in vivo, orange juice, a cola-based soft drink, and a 10% sucrose solution (negative control) were tested. These drinks differ in terms of their pH (3.5 ± 0.04, 2.5 ± 0.05, and 5.9 ± 0.1, respectively) and titratable acidity (3.17 ± 0.06, 0.57 ± 0.04 and pH 5.5, respectively). Eight volunteers with a normal salivary flow rate and buffering capacity kept 15 mL of each beverage in their mouth for 10 s, expectorated it, and their saliva was collected after 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, and 120 s. The salivary pH, determined using a mini pH electrode, returned to the baseline value at 30 s after expectoration of the cola-based soft drink, but only at 90 s after expectoration of the orange juice. The salivary pH increased to greater than 5.5 at 15 s after expectoration of the cola drink and at 30 s after expectoration of the orange juice. These findings suggest that the titratable acidity of a beverage influences salivary pH values after drinking acidic beverages more than the beverage pH.

  14. Being Included and Excluded

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korzenevica, Marina

    2016-01-01

    Following the civil war of 1996–2006, there was a dramatic increase in the labor mobility of young men and the inclusion of young women in formal education, which led to the transformation of the political landscape of rural Nepal. Mobility and schooling represent a level of prestige that rural...... politics. It analyzes how formal education and mobility either challenge or reinforce traditional gendered norms which dictate a lowly position for young married women in the household and their absence from community politics. The article concludes that women are simultaneously excluded and included from...... community politics. On the one hand, their mobility and decision-making powers decrease with the increase in the labor mobility of men and their newly gained education is politically devalued when compared to the informal education that men gain through mobility, but on the other hand, schooling strengthens...

  15. pH variations during diafiltration due to buffer nonidealities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Youngbin; Yang, Deyu; Singh, Nripen; Arunkumar, Abhiram; Ghose, Sanchayita; Li, Zheng Jian; Zydney, Andrew L

    2017-11-01

    Diafiltration is used for final formulation of essentially all biotherapeutics. Several studies have demonstrated that buffer/excipient concentrations in the final diafiltered product can be different than that in the diafiltration buffer due to interactions between buffer species and the protein product. However, recent work in our lab has shown variations in solution pH that are largely independent of the protein concentration during the first few diavolumes. Our hypothesis is that these pH variations are due to nonidealities in the acid-base equilibrium coefficient. A model was developed for the diafiltration process accounting for the ionic strength dependence of the pK a . Experimental results obtained using phosphate and histidine buffers were in excellent agreement with model predictions. A decrease in ionic strength leads to an increase in the pK a for the phosphate buffer, causing a shift in the solution pH, even under conditions where the initial feed and the diafiltration buffer are at the same pH. This effect could be eliminated by matching the ionic strength of the feed and diafiltration buffer. The experimental data and model provide new insights into the factors controlling the pH profile during diafiltration processes. © 2017 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 33:1555-1560, 2017. © 2017 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  16. Capturing intracellular pH dynamics by coupling its molecular mechanisms within a fully tractable mathematical model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yann Bouret

    Full Text Available We describe the construction of a fully tractable mathematical model for intracellular pH. This work is based on coupling the kinetic equations depicting the molecular mechanisms for pumps, transporters and chemical reactions, which determine this parameter in eukaryotic cells. Thus, our system also calculates the membrane potential and the cytosolic ionic composition. Such a model required the development of a novel algebraic method that couples differential equations for slow relaxation processes to steady-state equations for fast chemical reactions. Compared to classical heuristic approaches based on fitted curves and ad hoc constants, this yields significant improvements. This model is mathematically self-consistent and allows for the first time to establish analytical solutions for steady-state pH and a reduced differential equation for pH regulation. Because of its modular structure, it can integrate any additional mechanism that will directly or indirectly affect pH. In addition, it provides mathematical clarifications for widely observed biological phenomena such as overshooting in regulatory loops. Finally, instead of including a limited set of experimental results to fit our model, we show examples of numerical calculations that are extremely consistent with the wide body of intracellular pH experimental measurements gathered by different groups in many different cellular systems.

  17. Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopic Analysis of RuO2 Based Thick Film pH Sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manjakkal, Libu; Djurdjic, Elvira; Cvejin, Katarina; Kulawik, Jan; Zaraska, Krzysztof; Szwagierczak, Dorota

    2015-01-01

    The conductimetric interdigitated thick film pH sensors based on RuO 2 were fabricated and their electrochemical reactions with solutions of different pH values were studied by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) technique. The microstructural properties and composition of the sensitive films were examined by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy. The EIS analysis of the sensor was carried out in the frequency range 10 mHz–2 MHz for pH values of test solutions 2–12. The electrical parameters of the sensor were found to vary with changing pH. The conductance and capacitance of the film were distinctly dependent on pH in the low frequency range. The Nyquist and Bode plots derived from the impedance data for the metal oxide thick film pH sensor provided information about the underlying electrochemical reactions

  18. pH in Action

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tijskens, L.M.M.; Biekman, E.S.A.

    2001-01-01

    Based on fundamental chemical relations, well-established in chemical engineering and chemical technology over almost a century, the effects of pH in food and agricultural products will be deduced for different situations and processes. Based on simple equilibria and dissociation of water, salts,

  19. Neuronal pH regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vorstrup, S; Jensen, K E; Thomsen, C

    1989-01-01

    The intracellular pH in the brain was studied in six healthy volunteers before and immediately after the administration of 2 g of acetazolamide. Phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy by a 1.5 tesla whole-body scanner was used. The chemical shift between the inorganic phosphate...

  20. Water-rock interactions and the pH stability of groundwater from Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebinger, M.H.

    1992-01-01

    Titrations of acidic solutions in waters from the tuff and carbonate aquifers at Yucca Mountain were simulated using the geochemical codes PHREEQE and EQ3/6. The simulations tested pH stability of the waters in the presence of different minerals and in their absence. Two acidic solutions, 10 -4 HCl and 10 -4 M UO 2 (NO 3 ) 2 , were titrated in to the water. Little pH and/or compositional change resulted in the groundwater when the HCl solution was titrated, but significant pH and CO 2 fugacity changes were observed when UO 2 (NO 3 ) 2 was titrated. Water interactions with alkali feldspar, quartz or cristobalite, and Ca-smectite buffered the pH and compositional changes in the carbonate water and decreased the magnitude of pH and compositional changes when small volumes of UO 2 (NO 3 ) 2 added to the tuffaceous waters

  1. pH Dependent Antimicrobial Peptides and Proteins, Their Mechanisms of Action and Potential as Therapeutic Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erum Malik

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs are potent antibiotics of the innate immune system that have been extensively investigated as a potential solution to the global problem of infectious diseases caused by pathogenic microbes. A group of AMPs that are increasingly being reported are those that utilise pH dependent antimicrobial mechanisms, and here we review research into this area. This review shows that these antimicrobial molecules are produced by a diverse spectrum of creatures, including vertebrates and invertebrates, and are primarily cationic, although a number of anionic examples are known. Some of these molecules exhibit high pH optima for their antimicrobial activity but in most cases, these AMPs show activity against microbes that present low pH optima, which reflects the acidic pH generally found at their sites of action, particularly the skin. The modes of action used by these molecules are based on a number of major structure/function relationships, which include metal ion binding, changes to net charge and conformational plasticity, and primarily involve the protonation of histidine, aspartic acid and glutamic acid residues at low pH. The pH dependent activity of pore forming antimicrobial proteins involves mechanisms that generally differ fundamentally to those used by pH dependent AMPs, which can be described by the carpet, toroidal pore and barrel-stave pore models of membrane interaction. A number of pH dependent AMPs and antimicrobial proteins have been developed for medical purposes and have successfully completed clinical trials, including kappacins, LL-37, histatins and lactoferrin, along with a number of their derivatives. Major examples of the therapeutic application of these antimicrobial molecules include wound healing as well as the treatment of multiple cancers and infections due to viruses, bacteria and fungi. In general, these applications involve topical administration, such as the use of mouth washes, cream formulations

  2. Graphite Screen-Printed Electrodes Applied for the Accurate and Reagentless Sensing of pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galdino, Flávia E; Smith, Jamie P; Kwamou, Sophie I; Kampouris, Dimitrios K; Iniesta, Jesus; Smith, Graham C; Bonacin, Juliano A; Banks, Craig E

    2015-12-01

    A reagentless pH sensor based upon disposable and economical graphite screen-printed electrodes (GSPEs) is demonstrated for the first time. The voltammetric pH sensor utilizes GSPEs which are chemically pretreated to form surface immobilized oxygenated species that, when their redox behavior is monitored, give a Nernstian response over a large pH range (1-13). An excellent experimental correlation is observed between the voltammetric potential and pH over the entire pH range of 1-13 providing a simple approach with which to monitor solution pH. Such a linear response over this dynamic pH range is not usually expected but rather deviation from linearity is encountered at alkaline pH values; absence of this has previously been attributed to a change in the pKa value of surface immobilized groups from that of solution phase species. This non-deviation, which is observed here in the case of our facile produced reagentless pH sensor and also reported in the literature for pH sensitive compounds immobilized upon carbon electrodes/surfaces, where a linear response is observed over the entire pH range, is explained alternatively for the first time. The performance of the GSPE pH sensor is also directly compared with a glass pH probe and applied to the measurement of pH in "real" unbuffered samples where an excellent correlation between the two protocols is observed validating the proposed GSPE pH sensor.

  3. Plugging solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharipov, A U; Yangirov, I Z

    1982-01-01

    A clay-powder, cement, and water-base plugging solution is proposed having reduced solution viscosity characteristics while maintaining tensile strength in cement stone. This solution utilizes silver graphite and its ingredients, by mass weight, are as follows: cement 51.2-54.3%; claypowder 6.06-9.1%; silver graphite 0.24-0.33%; with water making up the remainder.

  4. Stress corrosion cracking properties of 15-5PH steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Ferdinand

    1993-01-01

    Unexpected occurrence of failures, due to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of structural components, indicate a need for improved characterization of materials and more advanced analytical procedures for reliably predicting structures performance. Accordingly, the purpose of this study was to determine the stress corrosion susceptibility of 15-5PH steel over a wide range of applied strain rates in a highly corrosive environment. The selected environment for this investigation was a highly acidified sodium chloride (NaCl) aqueous solution. The selected alloy for the study was a 15-5PH steel in the H900 condition. The slow strain rate technique was selected to test the metals specimens.

  5. Microencapsulation of Clostridium difficile specific bacteriophages using microfluidic glass capillary devices for colon delivery using pH triggered release.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurinder K Vinner

    Full Text Available The prevalence of pathogenic bacteria acquiring multidrug antibiotic resistance is a global health threat to mankind. This has motivated a renewed interest in developing alternatives to conventional antibiotics including bacteriophages (viruses as therapeutic agents. The bacterium Clostridium difficile causes colon infection and is particularly difficult to treat with existing antibiotics; phage therapy may offer a viable alternative. The punitive environment within the gastrointestinal tract can inactivate orally delivered phages. C. difficile specific bacteriophage, myovirus CDKM9 was encapsulated in a pH responsive polymer (Eudragit® S100 with and without alginate using a flow focussing glass microcapillary device. Highly monodispersed core-shell microparticles containing phages trapped within the particle core were produced by in situ polymer curing using 4-aminobenzoic acid dissolved in the oil phase. The size of the generated microparticles could be precisely controlled in the range 80 μm to 160 μm through design of the microfluidic device geometry and by varying flow rates of the dispersed and continuous phase. In contrast to free 'naked' phages, those encapsulated within the microparticles could withstand a 3 h exposure to simulated gastric fluid at pH 2 and then underwent a subsequent pH triggered burst release at pH 7. The significance of our research is in demonstrating that C. difficile specific phage can be formulated and encapsulated in highly uniform pH responsive microparticles using a microfluidic system. The microparticles were shown to afford significant protection to the encapsulated phage upon prolonged exposure to an acid solution mimicking the human stomach environment. Phage encapsulation and subsequent release kinetics revealed that the microparticles prepared using Eudragit® S100 formulations possess pH responsive characteristics with phage release triggered in an intestinal pH range suitable for therapeutic

  6. THE FLOCCULATION MAXIMUM (pH) OF FIBRINOGEN AND SOME OTHER BLOOD-CLOTTING REAGENTS. (RELATIVE TURBIDIMETRY WITH THE EVELYN PHOTOELECTRIC COLORIMETER).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, J H

    1942-03-20

    By means of a novel adaptation of the Evelyn photoelectric colorimeter to the measurement of relative turbidities, the question of the flocculation maximum (F.M.) in acetate buffer solutions of varying pH and salt content has been studied on (a) an exceptionally stable prothrombin-free fibrinogen and its solutions after incipient thermal denaturation and incomplete tryptic proteolysis, (b) plasma, similarly treated, (c) prothrombin, thrombin, and (brain) thromboplastin solutions. All the fibrinogens show a remarkable uniformity of the precipitation pattern, viz. F.M. =4.7 (+/-0.2) pH in salt-containing buffer solutions and pH = 5.3 (+/-0.2) in salt-poor buffer (N/100 acetate). The latter approximates the isoelectric point (5.4) obtained by cataphoresis (14). There is no evidence that denaturation or digestion can produce any "second maximum." The data support the view that fibrin formation (under the specific influence of thrombin) is intrinsically unrelated to denaturation and digestion phenomena, although all three can proceed simultaneously in crude materials. A criticism is offered, therefore, of Wöhlisch's blood clotting theory. Further applications of the photoelectric colorimeter to coagulation problems are suggested, including kinetic study of fibrin formation and the assay of fibrinogen, with a possible sensitivity of 7.5 mg. protein in 100 cc. solution.

  7. Influence of the Dentinal Wall on the pH of Sodium Hypochlorite during Root Canal Irrigation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Macedo, Ricardo Gomes; Herrero, Noemi Pascual; Wesselink, Paul; Versluis, Michel; van der Sluis, Luc

    Introduction: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of dentin on the pH levels of different concentrations of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) solutions over time and to evaluate if preconditioning of dentin with 17% EDTA or agitation of the NaOCl solution influences these pH levels.

  8. Industrial PhD report: Sustainable Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Gitte Gylling Hammershøj

    2011-01-01

    Erhvervs PhD rapport udarbejdet i tilknytning til Erhvervs PhD kurset der er obligatorisk for Erhvervs PhD studerende. Rapporten omhandler relationer melllem den akademiske verden og industrien i sammenhæng med PhD projektet, betragtet og analyseret gennem teori om bæredygtig innovation....

  9. Imidazole as a pH Probe: An NMR Experiment for the General Chemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagan, William J., Jr.; Edie, Dennis L.; Cooley, Linda B.

    2007-01-01

    The analysis describes an NMR experiment for the general chemistry laboratory, which employs an unknown imidazole solution to measure the pH values. The described mechanism can also be used for measuring the acidity within the isolated cells.

  10. Synthesis and characterization of pH sensitive carboxySNARF-1 nanoreactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yenchi; Ostafin, Agnes; Mizukami, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    A rapid response dual wavelength emission pH sensor consisting of carboxySNARF-1 nanoreactors has been synthesized and shown to provide accurate pH measurements even in complex biological media, where the unprotected pH responsive dyes have failed. The carboxySNARF-1 nanoreactor is made of a calcium phosphate shell covering phosphatidylcholine liposomes filled with the dye. Its mean diameter is 150 nm with dynamic light scattering, the shell thickness is 5-7 nm with TEM, and it contains about 10 dyes/particle. The nanoreactor's response time to pH change nearly equals that of the dye in solution. Its pH titration curves at two different wavelengths are equivalent to those of the dye in solution and fluorescence intensity ratio dependent pH analysis is possible using the modified Henderson-Hasselbalch equation. However, the pH dependent fluorescence ratios of the dye in solution in the presence of plasma and albumin are distorted, and application of the Henderson-Hasselbalch equation is not possible. We have found that the distortions may be restored using cSNARF-1 nanoreactors and the pK a of the dye in the nanoreactor then equals that in solution. These results suggest that the interference to the dye for the pH analyses with the environmental molecules may be reduced or prohibited by usage of cSNARF-1 nanoreactors.

  11. Synthesis and characterization of pH sensitive carboxySNARF-1 nanoreactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Yenchi; Ostafin, Agnes [Department of Materials Science, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Mizukami, Hiroshi, E-mail: a.ostafin@utah.edu [Department of Biological Science, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2010-05-28

    A rapid response dual wavelength emission pH sensor consisting of carboxySNARF-1 nanoreactors has been synthesized and shown to provide accurate pH measurements even in complex biological media, where the unprotected pH responsive dyes have failed. The carboxySNARF-1 nanoreactor is made of a calcium phosphate shell covering phosphatidylcholine liposomes filled with the dye. Its mean diameter is 150 nm with dynamic light scattering, the shell thickness is 5-7 nm with TEM, and it contains about 10 dyes/particle. The nanoreactor's response time to pH change nearly equals that of the dye in solution. Its pH titration curves at two different wavelengths are equivalent to those of the dye in solution and fluorescence intensity ratio dependent pH analysis is possible using the modified Henderson-Hasselbalch equation. However, the pH dependent fluorescence ratios of the dye in solution in the presence of plasma and albumin are distorted, and application of the Henderson-Hasselbalch equation is not possible. We have found that the distortions may be restored using cSNARF-1 nanoreactors and the pK{sub a} of the dye in the nanoreactor then equals that in solution. These results suggest that the interference to the dye for the pH analyses with the environmental molecules may be reduced or prohibited by usage of cSNARF-1 nanoreactors.

  12. Development of a microprocessor-controlled coulometric system for stable ph control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergveld, Piet; van der Schoot, B.H.

    1983-01-01

    The coulometric pH control system utilizes a programmable coulostat for controlling the pH of a certain volume of unbuffered solution. Based on theoretical considerations, conditions are established which guarantee stable operation with maximum suppression of disturbances from the dissolution of

  13. Influence of pH, Salt and Temperature on Pressure Inactivation of Hepatitis A virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effects of pH (3-7), NaCl (0-6%), and temperature on pressure inactivation of hepatitis A virus (HAV) were determined. The HAV samples were treated at 400 MPa for 1 min at 5, 20, and 50C. Decreasing solution pH enhanced pressure inactivation of HAV. This enhanced inactivation effect was most e...

  14. The Synthesis, Characterization and Reactivity of a Series of Ruthenium N-triphos Ph Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phanopoulos, Andreas; Long, Nicholas; Miller, Philip

    2015-04-10

    Herein we report the synthesis of a tridentate phosphine ligand N(CH2PPh2)3 (N-triphos(Ph)) (1) via a phosphorus based Mannich reaction of the hydroxylmethylene phosphine precursor with ammonia in methanol under a nitrogen atmosphere. The N-triphos(Ph) ligand precipitates from the solution after approximately 1 hr of reflux and can be isolated analytically pure via simple cannula filtration procedure under nitrogen. Reaction of the N-triphos(Ph) ligand with [Ru3(CO)12] under reflux affords a deep red solution that show evolution of CO gas on ligand complexation. Orange crystals of the complex [Ru(CO)2{N(CH2PPh2)3}-κ(3)P] (2) were isolated on cooling to RT. The (31)P{(1)H} NMR spectrum showed a characteristic single peak at lower frequency compared to the free ligand. Reaction of a toluene solution of complex 2 with oxygen resulted in the instantaneous precipitation of the carbonate complex [Ru(CO3)(CO){N(CH2PPh2)3}-κ(3)P] (3) as an air stable orange solid. Subsequent hydrogenation of 3 under 15 bar of hydrogen in a high-pressure reactor gave the dihydride complex [RuH2(CO){N(CH2PPh2)3}-κ(3)P] (4), which was fully characterized by X-ray crystallography and NMR spectroscopy. Complexes 3 and 4 are potentially useful catalyst precursors for a range of hydrogenation reactions, including biomass-derived products such as levulinic acid (LA). Complex 4 was found to cleanly react with LA in the presence of the proton source additive NH4PF6 to give [Ru(CO){N(CH2PPh2)3}-κ(3)P{CH3CO(CH2)2CO2H}-κ(2)O](PF6) (6).

  15. Effects of pH on the crystallographic structure and magnetic properties of electrodeposited cobalt nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zafar, N.; Shamaila, S.; Sharif, R.; Wali, H.; Naseem, S.; Riaz, S.; Khaleeq-ur-Rahman, M.

    2015-01-01

    Anodic aluminum oxide templates with pore diameter of 40 nm and inter pore separation of 100 nm are prepared by two step anodization in 0.3 M oxalic acid solution. These templates are used to fabricate dc-deposited Co nanowires at different pH values of acidic bath. Continuous and densely packed nanowires having length ∼8 µm are observed. The hcp configuration appeared at moderate and high pH whereas both fcc and hcp phases are observed at low pH. However the crystallinity distorted at high pH due to formation of polycrystalline structure of cobalt nanowires. Alignment of easy-axis of nanowires can be tailored by varying pH of solution. - Highlights: • Variation in the structure of dc deposited cobalt nanowires can be obtained by varying pH of acidic bath. • The hcp structure is stable at room temperature with low voltage deposition for electrodeposited Co nanowires. Co with fcc structure, is stable at temperatures above 422 °C or at pH<3 with high potential. • The hcp (100) plane is obtained with pH∼3.5 and (101) is stable at pH∼5.5 due to variation in temperature inside the pores with respect to the pH. • Alignment of easy-axis of nanowires can be tailored by varying pH of solution

  16. Efeito do pH na adsorção e dessorção de cádmio em Latossolos brasileiros Effect of pH on cadmium adsorption and desorption in Brazilian Oxisols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Aparecida Pereira Pierangeli

    2005-07-01

    in soils are influenced by the surface of the soil colloid attributes and solution composition. This study evaluated the effect of the pH on Cd adsorption (Cd ads and desorption (Cd des in l7 Brazilian Oxisol samples that differed in their chemical, physical and mineralogical attributes. Samples of each soil, suspended in 5 mmol L-1 Ca(NO32 (pH adjusted to 4.5; 5.5, and 6.5; ratio soil:solution 1:67 were placed to react with 0.20 mmol L-1 Cd(NO32 (final ratio soil:solution 1:100 for 72 h, after which they were centrifuged and the Cd concentration of the solution determined. Thereafter, 25 mL of 5 mmol L-1 Ca(NO32 were added to the remaining residue to desorb the Cd retained in the soil samples. An increase of the pH solution from 4.5 to 5.5, from 4.5 to 6.5 and from 5.5 to 6.5 caused a 1.3; 2.2 and 1.7-fold increase in the Cd adsorption, respectively. The mean percentage of Cd adsorbed (Cd%ads was 27 (pH 4.5, 35 (pH 5.5 and 55% (pH 6.5. The effect of soil attributes on Cd ads was only evidenced at a pH of 5.5 and 6.5, by the correlations between Cd ads and the soil organic matter, specific superficial area (SSA, CEC at pH 7.0 (CEC, kaolinite, hematite, oxalate-and-DCB-Fe and clay contents. However, only CEC and clay content, at pH 5.5 and the SSA, at pH 6.5, were included in the model of Cd ads prediction, obtained through regression analyses. The adsorption in values of higher pH did not propitiate reduction in Cd des, which was around 20% for pH 4.5 and 40% for pH 5.5 and 6.5. The small proportions of Cd adsorbed by these Oxisols, mainly at lower pH values, which are an indication of high mobility and bioavailability, reinforces the need for the adoption of appropriate criteria to use or discard residues containing Cd in agricultural areas or close to aquifers.

  17. Solvent wash solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neace, J.C.

    1986-01-01

    This patent describes a process for removing diluent degradation products from a solvent extraction solution comprising an admixture of an organic extractant for uranium and plutonium and a non-polar organic liquid diluent, which has been used to recover uranium and plutonium from spent nuclear fuel. Comprising combining a wash solution consisting of: (a) water; and (b) a positive amount up to about, an including, 50 volume percent of at least one highly-polar water-miscible organic solvent, based on the total volume of the water and the highly-polar organic solvent, with the solvent extraction solution after uranium and plutonium values have been stripped from the solvent extraction solution, the diluent degradation products dissolving in the highly-polar organic solvent and the extractant and diluent of the extraction solution not dissolving in the highly-polar organic solvent, and separating the highly-polar organic solvent and the extraction solution to obtain a purified extraction solution

  18. Decomposition kinetics of aminoborane in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shvets, I.B.; Erusalimchik, I.G.

    1984-01-01

    Kinetics of aminoborane hydrolysis has been studied using the method of polarization galvanostatical curves on a platinum electrode in buffer solutions at pH 3; 5; 7. The supposition that the reaction of aminoborane hydrolysis is the reaction of the first order by aminoborane is proved. The rate constant of aminoborane decomposition in the solution with pH 5 is equal to: K=2.5x10 -5 s -1 and with pH 3 it equals K=1.12x10 -4 s -1

  19. Effects of pH and chloride concentration on pitting corrosion of AA6061 aluminum alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaid, B.; Saidi, D.; Benzaid, A.; Hadji, S.

    2008-01-01

    Effects of pH solution and chloride (Cl - ) ion concentration on the corrosion behaviour of alloy AA6061 immersed in aqueous solutions of NaCl have been investigated using measurements of weight loss, potentiodynamic polarisation, linear polarisation, cyclic polarisation experiment combined with open circuit potential transient technique and optical or scanning electron microscopy. The corrosion behaviour of the AA6061 aluminum alloy was found to be dependant on the pH and chloride concentration [NaCl] of solution. In acidic or slightly neutral solutions, general and pitting corrosion occurred simultaneously. In contrast, exposure to alkaline solutions results in general corrosion. Experience revealed that the alloy AA6061 was susceptible to pitting corrosion in all chloride solution of concentration ranging between 0.003 wt% and 5.5 wt% NaCl and an increase in the chloride concentration slightly shifted both the pitting E pit and corrosion E cor potentials to more active values. In function of the conditions of treatment, the sheets of the alloy AA6061 undergo two types of localised corrosion process, leading to the formation of hemispherical and crystallographic pits. Polarisation resistance measurements in acidic (pH = 2) and alkaline chloride solutions (pH = 12) which are in good agreement with those of weight loss, show that the corrosion kinetic is minimised in slightly neutral solutions (pH = 6)

  20. PROCESS FOR RECOVERY OF URANIUM VALUES FROM IMPURE SOLUTIONS THEREOF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilner, S.B.

    1959-11-01

    A process is presented for the recovery of uraninm values from impure solutions which are obtained, for example, by washing residual uranium salt or uranium metal deposits from stainless steel surfaces using an aqueous or certain acidic aqueous solutions. The solutions include uranyl and oxidized iron, chromium, nickel, and copper ions and may contain manganese, zinc, and silver ions. In accordance with one procedure. the uranyl ions are reduced to the uranous state, and the impurity ions are complexed with cyanide under acidic conditions. The solution is then treated with ammonium hydroxide or alkali metal hydroxide to precipitate uranous hydroxide away from the complexed impurity ions in the solution. Alternatively, an excess of alkali metal cyanide is added to the reduced solution until the solution becomes sufficiently alkaline for the uranons hydroxide to precipitate. An essential feature in operating the process is in maintaining the pH of the solution sufficiently acid during the complexing operation to prevent the precipitation of the impurity metal hydroxides.

  1. Assessment of the Effect of Fruit (Apple and Plain Yoghurt Consumption on Plaque pH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peyvand Moeiny

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nowadays, thanks to improvements in fruit yoghurt tastes, more tendencies are seen in their consumption especially among children. Therefore, their cariogenicity evaluation as healthy snacks is important. The goal of this study was the assessment of the consumption effect of two kinds of Iranian fruit (apple and plain yoghurts on dental plaque PH. Methods: In this experimental study, 10 healthy dentistry students were selected upon inclusion criteria. Plaque pH in the certain areas of the mouth was measured by microelectrode and digital pH meter. PH was measured at the baseline and intervals of 2, 5, 7, 10, 15, 20, 30, 40, 50 and 60 minutes after eating test products: fruit yoghurt (apple and plain Yoghurt. For positive control group, just the baseline PH and at intervals of 2 and 5 min after swishing with 10% sucrose solutions were recorded. The results were analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA. Results: Lowest pH was obtained after fruit yoghurt consumption followed by plain yoghurt and %10 sucrose solution and the plaque PH difference was significant (P=0.05. Furthermore, time duration which remained below the critical pH was longer after consuming fruit yoghurt. Conclusion: Both kinds of yoghurts were considered cariogenic since plaque pH drop below critical points. Average of plaque pH after consuming fruit yoghurt was significantly lower in almost all the time intervals

  2. Plant based dietary supplement increases urinary pH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rao A Venket

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Research has demonstrated that the net acid load of the typical Western diet has the potential to influence many aspects of human health, including osteoporosis risk/progression; obesity; cardiovascular disease risk/progression; and overall well-being. As urinary pH provides a reliable surrogate measure for dietary acid load, this study examined whether a plant-based dietary supplement, one marketed to increase alkalinity, impacts urinary pH as advertised. Methods Using pH test strips, the urinary pH of 34 healthy men and women (33.9 +/- 1.57 y, 79.3 +/- 3.1 kg was measured for seven days to establish a baseline urinary pH without supplementation. After this initial baseline period, urinary pH was measured for an additional 14 days while participants ingested the plant-based nutritional supplement. At the end of the investigation, pH values at baseline and during the treatment period were compared to determine the efficacy of the supplement. Results Mean urinary pH statistically increased (p = 0.03 with the plant-based dietary supplement. Mean urinary pH was 6.07 +/- 0.04 during the baseline period and increased to 6.21 +/- 0.03 during the first week of treatment and to 6.27 +/- 0.06 during the second week of treatment. Conclusion Supplementation with a plant-based dietary product for at least seven days increases urinary pH, potentially increasing the alkalinity of the body.

  3. ATLAS PhD Grants 2015

    CERN Multimedia

    Marcelloni De Oliveira, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    ATLAS PHd Grants - We are excited to announce the creation of a dedicated grant scheme (thanks to a donation from Fabiola Gianotti and Peter Jenni following their award from the Fundamental Physics Prize foundation) to encourage young and high-caliber doctoral students in particle physics research (including computing for physics) and permit them to obtain world class exposure, supervision and training within the ATLAS collaboration. This special PhD Grant is aimed at graduate students preparing a doctoral thesis in particle physics (incl. computing for physics) to spend one year at CERN followed by one year support also at the home Institute.

  4. Influence of Soil Solution Salinity on Molybdenum Adsorption by Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molybdenum (Mo) adsorption on five arid-zone soils from California was investigated as a function of equilibrium solution Mo concentration (0-30 mg L-1), solution pH (4-8), and electrical conductivity (EC = 0.3 or 8 dS m-1). Molybdenum adsorption decreased with increasing pH. An adsorption maximum...

  5. Influence of oxidation state on the pH dependence of hydrous iridium oxide films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steegstra, Patrick; Ahlberg, Elisabet

    2012-01-01

    Many electrochemical reactions taking place in aqueous solution consume or produce protons. The pH in the diffusion layer can therefore be significantly altered during the reaction and there is a need for in situ pH measurements tracing this near surface pH. In the present paper the rotating ring disc technique was used to measure near surface pH changes during oxygen reduction, utilising hydrous iridium oxide as the pH sensing probe. Before such experiments a good understanding of the pH sensing properties of these films is required and the impact of the oxidation state of the film on the pH sensing properties was investigated as well as the influence of solution redox species. The pH sensitivity (depicted by dE/dpH) was found to depend on the average oxidation state of the film in a manner resembling the cyclic voltammetry response. In all cases the pH response is “supernernstian” with more than one proton per electron. The origin of this behaviour is discussed in the context of acid-base properties of the film and the existence of both hydrous and anhydrous oxide phases. The pH response depends also on the redox properties of the solution but can be optimised for various purposes by conditioning the film at different potentials. This was clearly illustrated by adding hydrogen peroxide, an intermediate in the oxygen reduction reaction, to the solution. It was shown that hydrous iridium oxide can be used as a reliable in situ pH sensor provided that care is taken to optimise the oxidation state of the film.

  6. Critical assessment of the pH of children's soap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruna Rafaela Mendes

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To evaluate the pH value of children's antibacterial soaps and syndets used in children's baths and verify whether there is information regarding pH on the product label. Methods: Quantitative, cross-sectional, analytical observational study that included ninety soap samples, both in bar and liquid presentations, as follows: 67 children's soap (group 1, 17 antibacterial soaps (group 2, and 6 syndets (group 3. Each sample had its pH measured after 1% dilution. In addition to descriptive statistics, the Pearson-Yates chi-squared test and Student's t-tests were applied, considering the minimal significance level of 5%. The Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test, Fisher's exact test, and the Kruskal-Wallis test were used for inferential statistics. Results: The pH levels varied considerably between liquid and bar presentations, with lower levels (4.4-7.9 found for the liquids (p < 0.05. Syndets showed pH levels close to the ideal (slightly acid and the antibacterial soaps showed the highest pH levels (up to 11.34 (p < 0.05. Only two of the soaps included in the study had information about their pH levels on the product packaging. Conclusions: Knowledge of the pH of children's soap by doctors and users is important, considering the great pH variability found in this study. Moreover, liquid soaps, and especially syndets, are the most recommended for the sensitive skin of neonates and infants, in order to guarantee skin barrier efficacy.

  7. Critical assessment of the pH of children's soap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Bruna Rafaela; Shimabukuro, Danielle Midori; Uber, Marjorie; Abagge, Kerstin Taniguchi

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the pH value of children's antibacterial soaps and syndets used in children's baths and verify whether there is information regarding pH on the product label. Quantitative, cross-sectional, analytical observational study that included ninety soap samples, both in bar and liquid presentations, as follows: 67 children's soap (group 1), 17 antibacterial soaps (group 2), and 6 syndets (group 3). Each sample had its pH measured after 1% dilution. In addition to descriptive statistics, the Pearson-Yates chi-squared test and Student's t-tests were applied, considering the minimal significance level of 5%. The Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test, Fisher's exact test, and the Kruskal-Wallis test were used for inferential statistics. The pH levels varied considerably between liquid and bar presentations, with lower levels (4.4-7.9) found for the liquids (p<0.05). Syndets showed pH levels close to the ideal (slightly acid) and the antibacterial soaps showed the highest pH levels (up to 11.34) (p<0.05). Only two of the soaps included in the study had information about their pH levels on the product packaging. Knowledge of the pH of children's soap by doctors and users is important, considering the great pH variability found in this study. Moreover, liquid soaps, and especially syndets, are the most recommended for the sensitive skin of neonates and infants, in order to guarantee skin barrier efficacy. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  8. Uncertainties associated with lacking data for predictions of solid-solution partitioning of metals in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le, T.T. Yen; Hendriks, A. Jan

    2014-01-01

    Soil properties, i.e., pH and contents of soil organic matter (SOM), dissolved organic carbon (DOC), clay, oxides, and reactive metals, are required inputs to both mechanistic and empirical modeling in assessing metal solid-solution partitioning. Several of these properties are rarely measured in site-specific risk assessment. We compared the uncertainties induced by lacking data on these soil properties in estimating metal soil solution concentrations. The predictions by the Orchestra framework were more sensitive to lacking soil property data than the predictions by the transfer functions. The deviations between soil solution concentrations of Cd, Ni, Zn, Ba, and Co estimated with measured SOM and those estimated with generic SOM by the Orchestra framework were about 10 times larger than the deviations in the predictions by the transfer functions. High uncertainties were induced by lacking data in assessing solid-solution partitioning of oxy-anions like As, Mo, Sb, Se, and V. Deviations associated with lacking data in predicting soil solution concentrations of these metals by the Orchestra framework reached three-to-six orders of magnitude. The solid-solution partitioning of metal cations was strongly influenced by pH and contents of organic matter, oxides, and reactive metals. Deviations of more than two orders of magnitude were frequently observed between the estimates of soil solution concentrations with the generic values of these properties and the estimates based on the measured data. Reliable information on these properties is preferred to be included in the assessment by either the Orchestra framework or transfer functions. - Highlights: • Estimates of metal solid-solution partitioning sensitive to soil property data. • Uncertainty mainly due to lacking reactive metal contents, pH, and organic matter. • Soil solution concentrations of oxy-anions highly influenced by oxide contents. • Clay contents had least effects on solid-solution partitioning

  9. Uncertainties associated with lacking data for predictions of solid-solution partitioning of metals in soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le, T.T. Yen, E-mail: YenLe@science.ru.nl; Hendriks, A. Jan

    2014-08-15

    Soil properties, i.e., pH and contents of soil organic matter (SOM), dissolved organic carbon (DOC), clay, oxides, and reactive metals, are required inputs to both mechanistic and empirical modeling in assessing metal solid-solution partitioning. Several of these properties are rarely measured in site-specific risk assessment. We compared the uncertainties induced by lacking data on these soil properties in estimating metal soil solution concentrations. The predictions by the Orchestra framework were more sensitive to lacking soil property data than the predictions by the transfer functions. The deviations between soil solution concentrations of Cd, Ni, Zn, Ba, and Co estimated with measured SOM and those estimated with generic SOM by the Orchestra framework were about 10 times larger than the deviations in the predictions by the transfer functions. High uncertainties were induced by lacking data in assessing solid-solution partitioning of oxy-anions like As, Mo, Sb, Se, and V. Deviations associated with lacking data in predicting soil solution concentrations of these metals by the Orchestra framework reached three-to-six orders of magnitude. The solid-solution partitioning of metal cations was strongly influenced by pH and contents of organic matter, oxides, and reactive metals. Deviations of more than two orders of magnitude were frequently observed between the estimates of soil solution concentrations with the generic values of these properties and the estimates based on the measured data. Reliable information on these properties is preferred to be included in the assessment by either the Orchestra framework or transfer functions. - Highlights: • Estimates of metal solid-solution partitioning sensitive to soil property data. • Uncertainty mainly due to lacking reactive metal contents, pH, and organic matter. • Soil solution concentrations of oxy-anions highly influenced by oxide contents. • Clay contents had least effects on solid-solution partitioning

  10. Solutions of nuclear pairing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balantekin, A. B.; Pehlivan, Y.

    2007-01-01

    We give the exact solution of orbit dependent nuclear pairing problem between two nondegenerate energy levels using the Bethe ansatz technique. Our solution reduces to previously solved cases in the appropriate limits including Richardson's treatment of reduced pairing in terms of rational Gaudin algebra operators

  11. Dissolution-modulating mechanism of pH modifiers in solid dispersion containing weakly acidic or basic drugs with poor water solubility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Phuong Ha-Lien; Tran, Thao Truong-Dinh; Lee, Kyoung-Ho; Kim, Dong-Jin; Lee, Beom-Jin

    2010-05-01

    Although the solid dispersion method has been known to increase the dissolution rate of poorly water-soluble drugs by dispersing them in hydrophilic carriers, one obstacle of the solid dispersion method is its limited solubilization capacity, especially for pH-dependent soluble drugs. pH-modified solid dispersion, in which pH modifiers are incorporated, may be a useful method for increasing the dissolution rate of weakly acidic or basic drugs. Sufficient research, including the most recent reports, was undertaken in this review. How could the inclusion of the pH the pH modifiers in the solid dispersion system change drug structural behaviors, molecular interactions, microenvironmental pH, and/or release rate of pH modifiers, relating with the enhanced dissolution of weakly acidic or weakly basic drugs with poor water solubility? These questions have been investigated to determine the dissolution-modulating mechanism of pH modifiers in solid dispersion containing weakly acidic or basic drugs. It is believed that step-by-step mechanistic approaches could provide the ultimate solution for solubilizing several poorly water-soluble drugs with pH-dependent solubility from a solid dispersion system, as well as provide ideas for developing future dosage systems.

  12. CMOS COLOUR SENSOR BASED pH MEASUREMENT FOR WATER QUALITY ANALYSIS

    OpenAIRE

    Sanjay Kumar; Arvind Singh

    2016-01-01

    A Real-Time pH measurement system using a novel design Programmable CMOS optical Colour light to frequency converter TCS230 is presented. The system uses Bogen’s universal indicator solution combined with a white light source and the Programmable CMOS colour sensor TCS230 to measure pH as a function of colour change in a sample. Bogen’s universal indicator solution causes a colour change in a sample according to the pH of the sample. The output frequency from the colour-sensitive CM...

  13. Pb and Cd binding to natural freshwater biofilms developed at different pH: the important role of culture pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Xiuyi; Dong, Deming; Ding, Xiaoou; Yang, Fan; Jiang, Xu; Guo, Zhiyong

    2013-01-01

    The effects of solution pH on adsorption of trace metals to different types of natural aquatic solid materials have been studied extensively, but few studies have been carried out to investigate the effect of pH at which the solid materials were formed on the adsorption. The purpose of present study is to examine this effect of culture pH on metal adsorption to natural freshwater biofilms. The adsorption of Pb and Cd to biofilms which were developed at different culture pH values (ranging from 6.5 to 9.0) was measured at the same adsorption pH value (6.5). The culture pH had considerable effects on both composition and metal adsorption ability of the biofilms. Higher culture pH usually promoted the accumulation of organic material and Fe oxides in the biofilms. The culture pH also affected the quantity and species of algae in the biofilms. The adsorption of Pb and Cd to the biofilms generally increased with the increase of culture pH. This increase was minor at lower pH range and significant at higher pH range and was more remarkable for Cd adsorption than for Pb adsorption. The notable contribution of organic material to the adsorption at higher culture pH values was also observed. The profound impacts of culture pH on adsorption behavior of biofilms mainly resulted from the variation of total contents of the biofilm components and were also affected by the alteration of composition and properties of the components.

  14. PH Sensitive Polymers for Improving Reservoir Sweep and Conformance Control in Chemical Flooring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukul Sharma; Steven Bryant; Chun Huh

    2008-03-31

    There is an increasing opportunity to recover bypassed oil from depleted, mature oilfields in the US. The recovery factor in many reservoirs is low due to inefficient displacement of the oil by injected fluids (typically water). The use of chemical flooding methods to increase recovery efficiencies is severely constrained by the inability of the injected chemicals to contact the bypassed oil. Low sweep efficiencies are the primary cause of low oil recoveries observed in the field in chemical flooding operations even when lab studies indicate high oil recovery efficiency. Any technology that increases the ability of chemical flooding agents to better contact the remaining oil and reduce the amount of water produced in conjunction with the produced oil will have a significant impact on the cost of producing oil domestically in the US. This translates directly into additional economically recoverable reserves, which extends the economic lives of marginal and mature wells. The objective of this research project was to develop a low-cost, pH-triggered polymer for use in IOR processes to improve reservoir sweep efficiency and reservoir conformance in chemical flooding. Rheological measurements made on the polymer solution, clearly show that it has a low viscosity at low pH and exhibits a sudden increase in viscosity (by 2 orders of magnitude or more) at a pH of 3.5 to 4. This implies that the polymer would preferentially flow into zones containing water since the effective permeability to water is highest in these zones. As the pH of the zone increases due to the buffering capacity of the reservoir rock, the polymer solution undergoes a liquid to gel transition causing a sharp increase in the viscosity of the polymer solution in these zones. This allows operationally robust, in-depth conformance treatment of such water bearing zones and better mobility control. The rheological properties of HPAM solutions were measured. These include: steady-shear viscosity and

  15. Modeling the acid-base chemistry of organic solutes in Adirondack, New York, lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driscoll, Charles T.; Lehtinen, Michael D.; Sullivan, Timothy J.

    1994-02-01

    Data from the large and diverse Adirondack Lake Survey were used to calibrate four simple organic acid analog models in an effort to quantify the influence of naturally occurring organic acids on lake water pH and acid-neutralizing capacity (ANC). The organic acid analog models were calibrated to observations of pH, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), and organic anion (An-) concentrations from a reduced data set representing 1128 individual lake samples, expressed as 41 observations of mean pH, in intervals of 0.1 pH units from pH 3.9 to 7.0. Of the four organic analog approaches examined, including the Oliver et al. (1983) model, as well as monoprotic, diprotic, and triprotic representations, the triprotic analog model yielded the best fit (r2 = 0.92) to the observed data. Moreover, the triprotic model was qualitatively consistent with observed patterns of change in organic solute charge density as a function of pH. A low calibrated value for the first H+ dissociation constant (pKal = 2.62) and the observation that organic anion concentrations were significant even at very low pH (acidic functional groups. Inclusion of organic acidity in model calculations resulted in good agreement between measured and predicted values of lake water pH and ANC. Assessments to project the response of surface waters to future changes in atmospheric deposition, through the use of acidification models, will need to include representations of organic acids in model structure to make accurate predictions of pH and ANC.

  16. Influence of soil solution cation composition on boron adsorption by soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boron (B) adsorption on five arid-zone soil samples from California was investigated as a function of solution pH (4-10) and cation composition (Na, Ca, or Mg). Boron adsorption increased with increasing solution pH, reached an adsorption maximum near pH 9, and decreased with further increases with...

  17. Influence of pH on the localized corrosion of iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webley, R.; Henry, R.

    1986-06-01

    The influence of pH on the pitting corrosion of iron in chloride and sulfate solutions was determined using two artificial pit apparatuses to obtain the pH near the surface of the pit bottom. A glass membrane electrode and an antimony electrode were used to measure pH in the two apparatuses. Using solutions of NaCl and Na 2 SO 4 at current densities of 0.5, 5.0, and 10 mA/cm 2 pH's in the range 5 to 6 were obtained with the first apparatus. The antimony probe did not measure pH accurately in solutions of 1 N NaCl and 1 N Na 2 SO 4 and had an error of approximately 2 pH units. A one-dimensional transport model was developed to predict pH variations around the pit mouth and inside the pit. The validity of this model was not verified due to the relative lack of precision with pH measurement techniques

  18. Plaque pH Changes Following Consumption of Two Types of Plain and Bulky Bread.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortazavi, Shiva; Noin, Sogol

    2011-01-01

    Consistency, backing process and content differences could influence cariogenic potential of foods. The aim was to compare plaque pH changes following consumption of two types of bread with different physical characteristics. In this clinical trial, interproximal plaque pH of 10 volunteers with high risk of dental caries (saliva Streptococcus mutans > 10(5), high dental caries experience, and average DMFT =6.10 ± 1.56) was measured. Plain traditionally backed "Sangak bread" and soft bulky "Baguette bread" and %10 sucrose solution were tested in a cross over designed experiment. Baseline plaque pH was recorded and followed by 1, 5, 10, 15, 20, and 30 minutes intervals. Data was analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey test (α = 0.05). Sucrose solution caused the most pronounced pH and ΔpH drop from 7.15 ± 0.33 at baseline to 6.78 ± 0.29. Means plaque pH of 10% sucrose solution and Baguette were not statistically different at 1, 20 and 30 minutes (P > 0.05). Mean plaque pH of Sangak and Baguette showed significant differences at 0, 1, 20 and30 minutes (P bread samples within first 10 minutes, pH increased and then started to decrease during tenth to fifteenth minutes. During all experiment phases, the mean pH of Baguette with less consistency and carbohydrate content and higher rate of starch gelatination was lower compared to Sangak.

  19. Qualitative methods in PhD theses from general practice in Scandinavia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malterud, Kirsti; Hamberg, Katarina; Reventlow, Susanne

    2017-01-01

    . Qualitative studies are often included in Ph.D. theses from general practice in Scandinavia. Still, the Ph.D. programs across nations and institutions offer only limited training in qualitative methods. In this opinion article, we draw upon our observations and experiences, unpacking and reflecting upon...... values and challenges at stake when qualitative studies are included in Ph.D. theses. Hypotheses to explain these observations are presented, followed by suggestions for standards of evaluation and improvement of Ph.D. programs. The authors conclude that multimethod Ph.D. theses should be encouraged...

  20. Diurnal variation of intraoral pH and temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jung Eun; Lyons, Karl M; Kieser, Jules A; Waddell, Neil J

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to measure continuously the intraoral pH and temperature of healthy individuals to investigate their diurnal variations. Seventeen participants (mean age, 31±9 years) wore a custom-made intraoral appliance fitted with a pH probe and thermocouple for two sets of 24 h, while carrying out normal daily activities including sleep. The continuous changes in intraoral pH and temperature were captured using a sensor placed on the palatal aspect of the upper central incisors. The collected data were categorised into different status (awake and sleep) and periods (morning, afternoon, evening and night). Both quantitative and qualitative analyses were conducted. The intraoral pH change was found to show a distinctive daily rhythm, showing a 12-h interval between maximum (7.73) and minimum (6.6) pH values. The maximum and minimum values were found to repeat after 24 h. The mean pH over 48 h (two sets of 24 h) was found to be 7.27 (±0.74). There was significant difference found in pH when subjects were awake and asleep and different periods during the day ( P pH. There was a significant difference found in temperature depending on the time of the day, except between morning and afternoon ( P =0.78). Our results showed that there is a distinctive daily, circadian-like pattern in intraoral pH variation over a 24-h period, which has been considered as one of the risk factors in sleep-related dental diseases.

  1. Influence of adding borax and modifying pH on effectiveness of food attractants for melon fly (Diptera: Tephritidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duyck, P F; Rousse, P; Ryckewaert, P; Fabre, F; Quilici, S

    2004-06-01

    The melon fly, Bactrocera cucurbitae (Coquillett) (Diptera: Tephritidae), is the most damaging pest of cucurbits in Reunion Island. The influence of adding borax and modifying pH on the effectiveness of different food attractants for both sexes of the melon fly is analyzed by a release-recapture method in field cages. Adding borax to protein hydrolysates Nulure and Buminal strongly reduced their attractiveness for B. cucurbitae. Acidification of 5% Buminal solution (from pH 6 to pH 3) doubled its attractiveness for melon fly. Conversely, Torula yeast at pH 10.5 was significantly more attractive than the standard Torula yeast at pH 9 (28% of captured flies compared with 17%). However, a further pH increase of the yeast solution does not improve its attractiveness. The results are discussed in relation to other studies on pH modification of various baits for Tephritidae.

  2. Solution preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seitz, M.G.

    1982-01-01

    Reviewed in this statement are methods of preparing solutions to be used in laboratory experiments to examine technical issues related to the safe disposal of nuclear waste from power generation. Each approach currently used to prepare solutions has advantages and any one approach may be preferred over the others in particular situations, depending upon the goals of the experimental program. These advantages are highlighted herein for three approaches to solution preparation that are currently used most in studies of nuclear waste disposal. Discussion of the disadvantages of each approach is presented to help a user select a preparation method for his particular studies. Also presented in this statement are general observations regarding solution preparation. These observations are used as examples of the types of concerns that need to be addressed regarding solution preparation. As shown by these examples, prior to experimentation or chemical analyses, laboratory techniques based on scientific knowledge of solutions can be applied to solutions, often resulting in great improvement in the usefulness of results

  3. The Training and Work of Ph.D. Physical Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, S. J.; Schweitzer, A. E.

    2003-05-01

    Doctoral education has often been viewed as the pinnacle of the formal education system. How useful is doctoral training in one's later career? In an NSF-funded project, we set out to perform a study of the training, careers, and work activities of Ph.D. physical scientists. The study included both in-depth interviews and a survey sent out to a sample of Ph.D. holders 4-8 years after graduation. Come and find out the results of this study: What skills are most Ph.D. physical scientists using? What should graduate programs be teaching? Are Ph.D.'s who are working in their specific field of training happier than their counterparts working different jobs? What skills and preparation lead to future job satisfaction, perhaps the most important indicator of the "success" of graduate education? A preprint and further details can be found at the project web site at: spot.colorado.edu/ phdcarer.

  4. Reduction of exchangeable calcium and magnesium in soil with increasing pH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miyazawa Mário

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available A laboratory study was conducted with soil samples and synthetic solutions to investigate possible mechanisms related with reduction in KCl exchangeable Ca and Mg with increasing pH. Increasing soil pH over 5.3 with CaCO3 added to the soil and with NaOH solution added to soil/KCl suspension increased adsorptions of Ca and Mg. The reduction of Mg was greater than Ca and was related to the concentration of soil exchangeable Al. The decreases of soluble Ca and Mg following addition of Al in synthetic solution were at pH > 7.5. The isomorphic coprecipitation reaction with Al compounds may be the most possible mechanism responsible for the decrease of exchangeable Ca and Mg with increasing pH. Possible chemical reactions are presented.

  5. ISFET pH Sensitivity: Counter-Ions Play a Key Role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parizi, Kokab B; Xu, Xiaoqing; Pal, Ashish; Hu, Xiaolin; Wong, H S Philip

    2017-02-02

    The Field Effect sensors are broadly used for detecting various target analytes in chemical and biological solutions. We report the conditions under which the pH sensitivity of an Ion Sensitive Field Effect transistor (ISFET) sensor can be significantly enhanced. Our theory and simulations show that by using pH buffer solutions containing counter-ions that are beyond a specific size, the sensor shows significantly higher sensitivity which can exceed the Nernst limit. We validate the theory by measuring the pH response of an extended gate ISFET pH sensor. The consistency and reproducibility of the measurement results have been recorded in hysteresis free and stable operations. Different conditions have been tested to confirm the accuracy and validity of our experiment results such as using different solutions, various oxide dielectrics as the sensing layer and off-the-shelf versus IC fabricated transistors as the basis of the ISFET sensor.

  6. A simple protocol for the routine calibration of pH meters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. FEDERMAN NETO

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available

    A simplified laboratory protocol for the calibration of pH meters is described and tested. It is based on the use of two analytical primary buffer solutions, potassium hydrogen phthalate and Borax (sodium tetraborate decahydrate of precisely known concentrations and pH. The solutions may be stored at room temperature for long periods, without decomposition and used directly. The calibration of the meter can be checked with standard solutions of sodium dihydrogen phosphate, sodium carbonate, sodium benzoate, sodium salicylate or potassium oxalate. Methods for the purification of Borax and potassium chloride are also given, and a new method for the neutralization of 0.9% saline is suggested. Keywords: pH meters (calibration; saline (0.9%; pH standards; potassium biphthalate; Borax.

  7. Physicochemistry of the plasma-electrolyte solution interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Qiang; Saito, Kenji; Takemura, Yu-ichiro; Shirai, Hajime

    2008-01-01

    The atmospheric rf plasma discharge was successfully investigated using NaOH or HCl electrolyte solutions as a counter electrode at different pH values. The emission intensities of solution components, self bias, and electron density strongly depend on the pH value of electrolyte. An addition of ethanol to the electrolyte solutions enhanced the dehydration, which markedly promoted the emissions of solution components as well as electrons from the solution. An acidification of the solution was always observed after the plasma exposure and two coexisting mechanisms were proposed to give a reasonable interpretation. The plasma-electrolyte interface was discussed based on a model of hydrogen cycle

  8. Plaque pH changes following consumption of two types of plain and bulky bread

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiva Mortazavi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Consistency, backing process and content differences could influence cariogenic potential of foods. The aim was to compare plaque pH changes following consumption of two types of bread with different physical characteristics. Methods : In this clinical trial, interproximal plaque pH of 10 volunteers with high risk of dental caries (saliva Streptococcus mutans > 10 5 , high dental caries experience, and average DMFT =6.10 ± 1.56 was measured. Plain traditionally backed "Sangak bread" and soft bulky "Baguette bread" and %10 sucrose solution were tested in a cross over designed experiment. Baseline plaque pH was recorded and followed by 1, 5, 10, 15, 20, and 30 minutes intervals. Data was analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey test (α = 0.05. Results: Sucrose solution caused the most pronounced pH and ∆pH drop from 7.15 ± 0.33 at baseline to 6.78 ± 0.29. Means plaque pH of 10% sucrose solution and Baguette were not statistically different at 1, 20 and 30 minutes (P > 0.05. Mean plaque pH of Sangak and Baguette showed significant differences at 0, 1, 20 and30 minutes (P < 0.05. Sucrose solution caused a dramatic plaque pH drop during first 10 minutes and then within 30 minutes returned to baseline pH. For two bread samples within first 10 minutes, pH increased and then started to decrease during tenth to fifteenth minutes. Conclusion: During all experiment phases, the mean pH of Baguette with less consistency and carbohydrate content and higher rate of starch gelatination was lower compared to Sangak.

  9. Fetal scalp pH testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetal scalp blood; Scalp pH testing; Fetal blood testing - scalp; Fetal distress - fetal scalp testing; Labor - fetal scalp testing ... a baby. In these cases, testing the scalp pH can help the doctor decide whether the fetus ...

  10. Acid loading test (pH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003615.htm Acid loading test (pH) To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The acid loading test (pH) measures the ability of the ...

  11. Stability of Adrenaline in Irrigating Solution for Intraocular Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Yuuka; Kimura, Yasuhiro; Taogoshi, Takanori; Matsuo, Hiroaki; Kihira, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Intraocular irrigating solution containing 1 µg/mL adrenaline is widely used during cataract surgery to maintain pupil dilation. Prepared intraocular irrigating solutions are recommended for use within 6 h. After the irrigating solution is admistered for dilution, the adrenaline may become oxidized, and this may result in a decrease in its biological activity. However, the stability of adrenaline in intraocular irrigating solution is not fully understood. The aim of this study was to evaluate the stability of adrenaline in clinically used irrigating solutions of varying pH. Six hours after mixing, the adrenaline percentages remaining were 90.6%±3.7 (pH 7.2), 91.1%±2.2 (pH 7.5), and 65.2%±2.8 (pH 8.0) of the initial concentration. One hour after mixing, the percentages remaining were 97.6%±2.0 (pH 7.2), 97.4%±2.7 (pH 7.5), and 95.6%±3.3 (pH 8.0). The degradation was especially remarkable and time dependent in the solution at pH 8.0. These results indicate that the concentration of adrenaline is decreased after preparation. Moreover, we investigated the influence of sodium bisulfite on adrenaline stability in irrigating solution. The percentage adrenaline remaining at 6 h after mixing in irrigating solution (pH 8.0) containing sodium bisulfite at 0.5 µg/mL (concentration in irrigating solution) or at 500 µg/mL (concentration in the undiluted adrenaline preparation) were 57.5 and 97.3%, respectively. Therefore, the low concentration of sodium bisulfite in the irrigating solution may be a cause of the adrenaline loss. In conclusion, intraocular irrigation solution with adrenaline should be prepared just prior to its use in surgery.

  12. pH sensor calibration procedure

    OpenAIRE

    Artero Delgado, Carola; Nogueras Cervera, Marc; Manuel Lázaro, Antonio; Prat Tasias, Jordi; Prat Farran, Joana d'Arc

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the calibration of pH sensor located at the OBSEA marine Observatory. This instrument is based on an industrial pH electrode that is connected to a CTD instrument (Conductivity, Temperature, and Depth ). The calibration of the pH sensor has been done using a high precision spectrophotometer pH meter from Institute of Marine Sciences (ICM), and in this way it has been obtained a numerical function for the p H sensor propor...

  13. PhD students and integrative research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fry, G.; Tress, B.; Tress, G.

    2006-01-01

    The training of PhD students is currently very dynamic and varies widely from place to place. We present some examples of this variation and comment on how it may affect the way PhD students cope with integrative studies. Our focus is on the training needs of PhD students studying integrative

  14. Mechanistic study of lead desorption during the leaching process of ion-absorbed rare earths: pH effect and the column experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jie; Xue, Qiang; Chen, Honghan; Li, Wenting

    2017-05-01

    High concentrations of ammonium sulfate, often used in the in situ mining process, can result in a decrease of pH in the environment and dissolution of rare earth metals. Ammonium sulfate can also cause desorption of toxic heavy metals, leading to environmental and human health implications. In this study, the desorption behavior and fraction changes of lead in the ion-absorbed rare earth ore were studied using batch desorption experiments and column leaching tests. Results from batch desorption experiments showed that the desorption process of lead included fast and slow stages and followed an Elovich model well. The desorption rate and the proportion of lead content in the solution to the total lead in the soil were observed to increase with a decrease in the initial pH of the ammonium sulfate solution. The lead in soil included an acid-extractable fraction, reducible fraction, oxidizable fraction, and a residual fraction, with the predominant fractions being the reducible and acid-extractable fractions. Ninety-six percent of the extractable fraction in soil was desorbed into solution at pH = 3.0, and the content of the reducible fraction was observed to initially increase (when pH >4.0) and then decrease (when pH leaching tests indicated that the content of lead in the different fractions of soil followed the trend of reducible fraction > oxidizable fraction > acid-extractable fraction > residual fraction after the simulating leaching mining process. The change in pH was also found to have a larger influence on the acid-extractable and reducible fractions than the other two fractions. The proportion of the extractable fraction being leached was ca. 86%, and the reducible fraction was enriched along the migration direction of the leaching liquid. These results suggest that certain lead fractions may desorb again and contaminate the environment via acid rain, which provides significant information for environmental assessment and remediation after mining process

  15. Mechanistic study of lead desorption during the leaching process of ion-absorbed rare earths: pH effect and the column experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Q.; Tang, J., Sr.; Chen, H.

    2017-12-01

    High concentrations of ammonium sulfate, often used in the in-situ mining process, can result in a decrease of pH in the environment and dissolution of rare earth metals. Ammonium sulfate can also cause desorption of toxic heavy metals, leading to environmental and human health implications. In this study, the desorption behavior and fraction changes of lead in the ion-absorbed rare earth ore were studied using batch desorption experiments and column leaching tests. Results from batch desorption experiments showed that the desorption process of lead included fast and slow stages, and followed an Elovich model well. The desorption rate and the proportion of lead content in the solution to the total lead in the soil were observed to increase with a decrease in the initial pH of the ammonium sulfate solution. The lead in soil included an acid extractable fraction, reducible fraction, oxidizable fraction, and a residual fraction, with the predominant fractions being the reducible and acid extractable fractions. 96% of the extractable fraction in soil were desorbed into solution at pH=3.0, and the content of the reducible fraction was observed to initially increase (when pH>4.0) and then decrease (when pHleaching tests indicated that the content of lead in the different fractions of soil followed the trend of reducible fraction > oxidizable fraction > acid extractable fraction > residual fraction after the simulating leaching mining process. The change in pH was also found to have a larger influence on the acid extractable and reducible fractions than the other two fractions. The proportion of the extractable fraction being leached was ca. 86%, and the reducible fraction was enriched along the migration direction of the leaching liquid. These results suggest that certain lead fractions may desorb again and contaminate the environment via acid rain, which provides significant information for environmental assessment and remediation after mining process.

  16. Modulating secretory pathway pH by proton channel co-expression can increase recombinant protein stability in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jutras, Philippe V; D'Aoust, Marc-André; Couture, Manon M-J; Vézina, Louis-Philippe; Goulet, Marie-Claire; Michaud, Dominique; Sainsbury, Frank

    2015-09-01

    Eukaryotic expression systems are used for the production of complex secreted proteins. However, recombinant proteins face considerable biochemical challenges along the secretory pathway, including proteolysis and pH variation between organelles. As the use of synthetic biology matures into solutions for protein production, various host-cell engineering approaches are being developed to ameliorate host-cell factors that can limit recombinant protein quality and yield. We report the potential of the influenza M2 ion channel as a novel tool to neutralize the pH in acidic subcellular compartments. Using transient expression in the plant host, Nicotiana benthamiana, we show that ion channel expression can significantly raise pH in the Golgi apparatus and that this can have a strong stabilizing effect on a fusion protein separated by an acid-susceptible linker peptide. We exemplify the utility of this effect in recombinant protein production using influenza hemagglutinin subtypes differentially stable at low pH; the expression of hemagglutinins prone to conformational change in mildly acidic conditions is considerably enhanced by M2 co-expression. The co-expression of a heterologous ion channel to stabilize acid-labile proteins and peptides represents a novel approach to increasing the yield and quality of secreted recombinant proteins in plants and, possibly, in other eukaryotic expression hosts. Copyright © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Isotopic equilibria between sulphur solute species at high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, B.W.

    1978-01-01

    Sulphur solute species in ore solutions and geothermal discharges include HSO 4 - , SO 4 2- , H 2 S, and HS - , as well as the ion-paired species, NaHS 0 , NaHSO 4 - and Na 2 SO 4 0 . Observed sulphate-sulphide fractionation factors and the rates of attainment of isotopic equilibrium are likely to depend on the nature of the sulphur species actually taking part in these isotopic equilibria. Preliminary experiments in alkaline solution (pH 10.1 at 20 0 C) were carried out in a gold cell. No significant isotope fractionation was observed between the SO 4 2- and HS - in 29 days at 200 0 C, 63days at 300 0 C, or 90 days at 250 0 C. However, similar experiments at 350 0 C in sealed gold capsules at room temperature pH 8.5 showed slow exchange(t( 1 / 2 ) was calculated to be 510 days for the SO 4 2- -HS - exchange reaction using the theoretical fractionation of 20.2 0 / 00 ). The addition of NaCl appeared to have no affect on the exchange. However, pH strongly controls the reaction rate, and exchange probably involves H 2 S and the HSO 4 - ion. Additional preliminary experiments were conducted with a fivefold increase in the sulphur concentration; a decrease in t( 1 / 2 ) to 142 days resulted. Some inter-relationship between sulphur concentration and exchange rate thus exists. The important controlling parameters of isotope exchange (temperature, pH, and ΣS) can be seen to have influenced exchange in natural systems.(auth.)

  18. Stabilizing sodium hypochlorite at high pH: effects on soft tissue and dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungbluth, Holger; Marending, Monika; De-Deus, Gustavo; Sener, Beatrice; Zehnder, Matthias

    2011-05-01

    When sodium hypochlorite solutions react with tissue, their pH drops and tissue sorption decreases. We studied whether stabilizing a NaOCl solution at a high pH would increase its soft-tissue dissolution capacity and effects on the dentin matrix compared with a standard NaOCl solution of the same concentration and similar initial pH. NaOCl solutions were prepared by mixing (1:1) a 10% stock solution with water (standard) or 2 mol/L NaOH (stabilized). Physiological saline and 1 mol/L NaOH served as the controls. Chlorine content and alkaline capacity of NaOCl solutions were determined. Standardized porcine palatal soft-tissue specimens and human root dentin bars were exposed to test and control solutions. Weight loss percentage was assessed in the soft-tissue dissolution assay. Three-point bending tests were performed on the root dentin bars to determine the modulus of elasticity and flexural strength. Values between groups were compared using one-way analysis of variance with the Bonferroni correction for multiple testing (α pH level of 7.5, respectively. The stabilized NaOCl dissolved significantly more soft tissue than the standard solution, and the pH remained high. It also caused a higher loss in elastic modulus and flexure strength (P < .05) than the control solutions, whereas the standard solution did not. NaOH-stabilized NaOCl solutions have a higher alkaline capacity and are thus more proteolytic than standard counterparts. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Evaluation of pH of bathing soaps and shampoos for skin and hair care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Tarun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Normal healthy skin has potential of hydrogen (pH range of 5.4-5.9 and a normal bacterial flora. Use of soap with high pH causes an increase in skin pH, which in turn causes an increase in dehydrative effect, irritability and alteration in bacterial flora. The majority of soaps and shampoos available in the market do not disclose their pH. Aims and Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the pH of different brands of bathing soaps and shampoos available in the market. Materials and Methods: The samples of soaps and shampoos were collected from shops in the locality. The samples of different brands are coded before the analysis of the pH. Solution of each sample was made and pH was measured using pH meter. Results: Majority of the soaps have a pH within the range of 9-10. Majority of the shampoos have a pH within the range of 6-7. Conclusions: The soaps and shampoos commonly used by the population at large have a pH outside the range of normal skin and hair pH values. Therefore, it is hoped that before recommending soap to patient especially those who have sensitive and acne prone skin, due consideration is given to the pH factor and also that manufacturers will give a thought to pH of soaps and shampoos manufactured by them, so that their products will be more skin and hair friendly.

  20. Effect of pH on cadmium biosorption by coconut copra meal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ofomaja, Augustine E.; Ho, Y.-S.

    2007-01-01

    Biosorption of cadmium ion by coconut copra meal, an agricultural waste product was investigated as a function of initial solution pH and initial cadmium concentration. Pseudo-second-order kinetic analyses were performed to determine the rate constant of biosorption, the equilibrium capacity, and initial biosorption rate. Cadmium biosorption by copra meal was found to be dependent on the initial solution pH and initial cadmium concentration. Ion exchange occurred in the initial biosorption period. In addition, mathematical relationships were drawn to relate the change in the solution hydrogen ion concentration with equilibrium biosorption capacity, initial cadmium concentration, and equilibrium biosorption capacity

  1. Some effects of pH on iodine volatility in containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashmore, C.B.; Gwyther, J.R.; Sims, H.E.

    1994-01-01

    The behaviour of iodine in containment in the event of an accident involving fission product release would be strongly dependent on pH. High pH leads to a lower rate of radiolytic oxidation and in alkaline conditions the thermally stable form is IO 3 - . Much of the work on effects of pH on radiolytic oxidation reported in the literature may be erroneous or misleading because of postirradiation reaction and in this report some new experiments are described which were designed to overcome these problems involving sparged irradiated solutions of CsI spiked with 131 I. The rate of radiolytic oxidation has been measured as a function of pH between pH 4.6 and pH 9 and iodide concentrations between 10 -4 and 10 -6 mol dm -3 . Also discussed in the paper are factors which can affect the pH of the sump water and the effects of high pH in sprays. It is concluded that high pH is beneficial and it is important not only to achieve high pH but to maintain it. (author). 10 refs., 1 tab., 6 figs

  2. Separation of uranium and rare earth elements from Rirang ore leach solution by two-step precipitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sradjono; Erni Rifandriyah, A.; Zahardi

    1995-01-01

    Separation of uranium and rare-earth elements from Rirang ore leach solution was carried out through a two-step precipitation. Several condition affecting the separation processes were examined including solution pH, reagent concentration, and reaction prepitation time. Optimum conditions for the first and second precipitation steps include adjustment of precipitation pH to 1.3 and 2.3, respectively by the addition of 7.3% of NH 4 OH solution and allowing 60 minutes precipitation/reaction time. Based on the conditions, about 6% of Th, 3% of U, 0.9% of PO 4 3- , and none of RE were recovered in the first precipitation step meanwhile, about 99% of RE, 55% of U, 76% of PO 4 3- , and of the Th were recovered in the second step. (author). 3 refs. 4 tabs. 4 figs

  3. The Investigation of pH Variation of Water in Spray Tank on Glyphosate and Nicosulfuron Performance on Barnyardgrass and Velvetleaf Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Hajmohammadnia Ghalibaf

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Many factors affect the absorption, transport and performance of herbicides, include; physical factors (such as the orientation, shape, size, cuticle thickness, and its amount downy of the plant leaves, physiological factors (such as the growth stage and its succulence, environmental factors (like rainfall after spraying, relative humidity, wind, and temperature, as well as water quality in spray tank (32. The quality of natural water resources is very important, because the water passes through soil and rocks and dissolve natural salts and transfer them to groundwater reserves (12. pH is a chemical scale for measuring the concentration of hydrogen ions (H+ in the water (21. When pH of solution is less than herbicides pKa (ionic dissociation constant, increasing pH can increase the solubility of herbicides, especially when the absorption limitation of herbicide is because of its solubility (14. To investigate the effect of water pH in herbicide spray tank, testing the effectiveness of weed control is appropriate method. The different species of weeds may have different amounts of ions in the tissue that showed different responses to herbicide solution (14. Accordingly, these basic experiment conducted to study the pH variation of water in spray tank on glyphosate (Roundup® and nicosulfuron (Cruse® performance on barnyardgrass [Echinochloa crus-galli (L. P. Beauv.] and velvetleaf (Abutilon theophrasti Medicus. control in the greenhouse condition. Materials and Methods: Two separate experiments were performed as factorial arrangement of treatments 2×7 based on completely randomized design with six replications at Research Greenhouse of the Ferdowsi University of Mashhad in 2010. Factors included were: pH at 7 levels (4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, and 10 obtained by using buffer prepared solutions (+3 control pots for each pH level, and two weeds (barnyardgrass and velvetleaf. Glyphosate and nicosulfuron herbicides were applied post emergent

  4. Identification of a molecular pH sensor in coral.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barott, Katie L; Barron, Megan E; Tresguerres, Martin

    2017-11-15

    Maintaining stable intracellular pH (pHi) is essential for homeostasis, and requires the ability to both sense pH changes that may result from internal and external sources, and to regulate downstream compensatory pH pathways. Here we identified the cAMP-producing enzyme soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) as the first molecular pH sensor in corals. sAC protein was detected throughout coral tissues, including those involved in symbiosis and calcification. Application of a sAC-specific inhibitor caused significant and reversible pHi acidosis in isolated coral cells under both dark and light conditions, indicating sAC is essential for sensing and regulating pHi perturbations caused by respiration and photosynthesis. Furthermore, pHi regulation during external acidification was also dependent on sAC activity. Thus, sAC is a sensor and regulator of pH disturbances from both metabolic and external origin in corals. Since sAC is present in all coral cell types, and the cAMP pathway can regulate virtually every aspect of cell physiology through post-translational modifications of proteins, sAC is likely to trigger multiple homeostatic mechanisms in response to pH disturbances. This is also the first evidence that sAC modulates pHi in any non-mammalian animal. Since corals are basal metazoans, our results indicate this function is evolutionarily conserved across animals. © 2017 The Author(s).

  5. Umbilical Cord Blood pH in Intrapartum Hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perveen, Fouzia; Khan, Ayesha; Ali, Tahmina; Rabia, Syeda

    2015-09-01

    To determine the association of cord arterial blood pH with neonatal outcome in cases of intrapartum fetal hypoxia. Descriptive analytical study. Gynaecology Unit-II, Civil Hospital, Karachi, from September 2011 to November 2012. All singleton cephalic fetuses at term gestation were included in the study. Those with any anomaly, malpresentation, medical disorders, maternal age 7.25, neonatal outcome measures (healthy, NICU admission or neonatal death), color of liquor and mode of delivery recorded on predesigned proforma. Statistical analysis performed by SPSS 16 by using independent-t test or chi-square test and ANOVA test as needed. A total of 204 newborns were evaluated. The mean pH level was found to be significantly different (p=0.007) in two groups. The pH value 7.25 had significant association (p 7.25. Majority (63.6%) cases needed caesarean section as compared to 31.4% controls. There is a significant association of cord arterial blood pH at birth with neonatal outcome at pH 7.25; but below the level of pH 7.25 it is still inconclusive.

  6. Data collection and analysis strategies for phMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandeville, Joseph B; Liu, Christina H; Vanduffel, Wim; Marota, John J A; Jenkins, Bruce G

    2014-09-01

    Although functional MRI traditionally has been applied mainly to study changes in task-induced brain function, evolving acquisition methodologies and improved knowledge of signal mechanisms have increased the utility of this method for studying responses to pharmacological stimuli, a technique often dubbed "phMRI". The proliferation of higher magnetic field strengths and the use of exogenous contrast agent have boosted detection power, a critical factor for successful phMRI due to the restricted ability to average multiple stimuli within subjects. Receptor-based models of neurovascular coupling, including explicit pharmacological models incorporating receptor densities and affinities and data-driven models that incorporate weak biophysical constraints, have demonstrated compelling descriptions of phMRI signal induced by dopaminergic stimuli. This report describes phMRI acquisition and analysis methodologies, with an emphasis on data-driven analyses. As an example application, statistically efficient data-driven regressors were used to describe the biphasic response to the mu-opioid agonist remifentanil, and antagonism using dopaminergic and GABAergic ligands revealed modulation of the mesolimbic pathway. Results illustrate the power of phMRI as well as our incomplete understanding of mechanisms underlying the signal. Future directions are discussed for phMRI acquisitions in human studies, for evolving analysis methodologies, and for interpretative studies using the new generation of simultaneous PET/MRI scanners. This article is part of the Special Issue Section entitled 'Neuroimaging in Neuropharmacology'. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Enhancement of radiation-induced base release from nucleosides in alkaline solution: essential role of the O.- radical

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scholes, M.L.; Schuchmann, M.N.; Sonntag, C. von

    1992-01-01

    The effect of pH on base release in the γ-radiolysis of N 2 O-saturated solutions of a number of nucleosides (including uridine, 3-methyluridine, 2', 3' -O-isopropylidene-uridine, and adenosine) has been investigated. For all these nucleosides, independent of the base or sugar moiety, base release is very low at pH below 10 (G∼(0.3-0.7) x 10 -7 mol J -1 ), but increases drastically to G∼(3-4) x 10 -7 mol J -1 at pH ≥ 13. It is concluded that the increase in base release at high pH is caused by the increasing participation of O .- , which, unlike . OH, attacks the nucleosides preferentially at their sugar moieties, and is not due to an OH - -induced radical transfer from the base to the sugar moiety. (author)

  8. Bolting multicenter solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bena, Iosif [Institut de Physique Théorique, Université Paris Saclay, CEA, CNRS, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Bossard, Guillaume [Centre de Physique Théorique, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS, Université Paris-Saclay, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Katmadas, Stefanos; Turton, David [Institut de Physique Théorique, Université Paris Saclay, CEA, CNRS, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)

    2017-01-30

    We introduce a solvable system of equations that describes non-extremal multicenter solutions to six-dimensional ungauged supergravity coupled to tensor multiplets. The system involves a set of functions on a three-dimensional base metric. We obtain a family of non-extremal axisymmetric solutions that generalize the known multicenter extremal solutions, using a particular base metric that introduces a bolt. We analyze the conditions for regularity, and in doing so we show that this family does not include solutions that contain an extremal black hole and a smooth bolt. We determine the constraints that are necessary to obtain smooth horizonless solutions involving a bolt and an arbitrary number of Gibbons-Hawking centers.

  9. Formation of fine solid particles from aqueous solutions of sodium chloropalladate by gamma-ray irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatada, Motoyoshi; Fujita, Iwao; Korekawa, Kei-ichi.

    1994-10-01

    Studies have been carried out on the radiation chemical formation of palladium fine particles in argon saturated aqueous solutions of sodium chloropalladate without organic stabilizer. The solutions were irradiated with gamma-rays from a cobalt gamma-ray source and the irradiated solutions were subjected to the dynamic light scattering analysis for the particle diameter measurements, and to the UV-visible optical absorption spectroscopy for the measurements of turbidity (absorption at 700 nm) and remaining chloropalladate ion concentrations in the solution. In the solution of pH = 1.95 by HCl, the turbidity increased after the irradiation and then decreased with time. The concentration of remaining palladate ion in the solution decreased by the irradiation, but it gradually increased with time after the irradiation. These phenomena were qualitatively explained by the reaction scheme in that a precursor to the solid particles still exists in the solution after the irradiation was terminated, and that intermediates including the precursor reacted with chloride ion to re-form chloropalladate ions. The average diameter of the particles after the irradiation was ca. 20 nm and it increased with time to 40 nm at 2.75 kGy, and to 80 nm at 8.25 kGy absorption of radiation. The solution of pH = 0.65 by HCl was found to give lower yields of particles than those observed for the solution of pH = 1.95, and to give the particles of diameters about 150-200 nm. In the solution containing HClO 4 instead of HCl, palladium particles were also formed by the irradiation, whereas no backward reaction after the irradiation was observed due to the low concentration of chloride ion in the solution. The average diameter of the particles after the irradiation was about 300 nm and increased with time after the irradiation to a final values which was found to depend on pH of the solution and dose. (author)

  10. Addressing a Common Misconception: Ammonium Acetate as Neutral pH "Buffer" for Native Electrospray Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konermann, Lars

    2017-09-01

    Native ESI-MS involves the transfer of intact proteins and biomolecular complexes from solution into the gas phase. One potential pitfall is the occurrence of pH-induced changes that can affect the analyte while it is still surrounded by solvent. Most native ESI-MS studies employ neutral aqueous ammonium acetate solutions. It is a widely perpetuated misconception that ammonium acetate buffers the analyte solution at neutral pH. By definition, a buffer consists of a weak acid and its conjugate weak base. The buffering range covers the weak acid pKa ± 1 pH unit. NH4 + and CH3-COO- are not a conjugate acid/base pair, which means that they do not constitute a buffer at pH 7. Dissolution of ammonium acetate salt in water results in pH 7, but this pH is highly labile. Ammonium acetate does provide buffering around pH 4.75 (the pKa of acetic acid) and around pH 9.25 (the pKa of ammonium). This implies that neutral ammonium acetate solutions electrosprayed in positive ion mode will likely undergo acidification down to pH 4.75 ± 1 in the ESI plume. Ammonium acetate nonetheless remains a useful additive for native ESI-MS. It is a volatile electrolyte that can mimic the solvation properties experienced by proteins under physiological conditions. Also, a drop from pH 7 to around pH 4.75 is less dramatic than the acidification that would take place in pure water. It is hoped that the habit of referring to pH 7 solutions as ammonium acetate "buffer" will disappear from the literature. Ammonium acetate "solution" should be used instead. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  11. Reassessment of pH reference values with improved methodology for the evaluation of ionic strength

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lito, M.J. Guiomar H.M.; Camoes, M. Filomena G.F.C.

    2005-01-01

    The conflict between pH as empirical number in routine control and the pH value regarded as conveying some information concerning the effective concentration or activity of hydrogen ions, a H , has caused much confusion. There are, however, reasons to conclude that the overwhelming amount of thermodynamic data is not sufficiently accurate--either due to ignorance of metrological concepts or due to insufficiently specified measurement processes of fundamental chemical quantities pH. The commonly used seven reference buffer solutions to which primary pH values have been conventional assigned, represent a selection out of a more extensive list, recommended by NBS (now NIST) in 1962. From then onwards conventions concerning the Debye-Hueckel model of electrolyte solutions and ionic strength have been revised and the pH(S) values reassessed in conformity but only for these seven reference buffer solutions. The others have, so far remained unchanged, locking harmonisation of the conventionally assigned pH(S) values. In this work, ionic strength is calculated through complete equations derived from the acidity constants. Concentrations of the various species involved in the conventional assignment of pH and their corresponding activity coefficients are therefore, more rigorously known. The process proves particularly useful for poliprotic acids with overlapping acidity constants, where the ratio is less than 10 3 . As a consequence, conventionally assigned pH values of reference buffer solutions are recalculated and corrections are introduced as appropriate

  12. Dynamic regulation of gastric surface pH by luminal pH

    OpenAIRE

    Chu, Shaoyou; Tanaka, Shin; Kaunitz, Jonathan D.; Montrose, Marshall H.

    1999-01-01

    In vivo confocal imaging of the mucosal surface of rat stomach was used to measure pH noninvasively under the mucus gel layer while simultaneously imaging mucus gel thickness and tissue architecture. When tissue was superfused at pH 3, the 25 μm adjacent to the epithelial surface was relatively alkaline (pH 4.1 ± 0.1), and surface alkalinity was enhanced by topical dimethyl prostaglandin E2 (pH 4.8 ± 0.2). Luminal pH was changed from pH 3 to pH 5 to mimic the fasted-to-fed transition in intra...

  13. The potential of curcumin reagent as a natural pH indicator for the development of an optical pH sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosmawani Mohammad; Musa Ahmad; Jamaluddin Mohd Daud

    2007-01-01

    The potential of curcumin reagent as a natural pH indicator for the development of an optical pH sensor was discussed in this study. Curcumin has been chosen because it has never been reported before for use in the development of an optical pH sensor. Curcumin is a coloring constituent of turmeric that giving yellow pigmentation. Curcumin showed clear color changes, for example yellow in acidic and reddish-brown in basic solutions. The color change is fast for example within 5 seconds. Results from the study showed that a linear pH range for this reagent was observed at pH 8-12 (R 2 =0.9854). Curcumin has a good photo stability with RSD value of 1.42 % for a study period of 6 months. The RSD values of the reproducibility study were found to be 1.43 % and 0.37 % for pH 9 and pH 12, respectively. Characterisation of the immobilised curcumin reagent also showed promising results, hence a good potential for use as a sensing reagent for an optical pH sensor. (author)

  14. Electrodialysis operation with buffer solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hryn, John N [Naperville, IL; Daniels, Edward J [Orland Park, IL; Krumdick, Greg K [Crete, IL

    2009-12-15

    A new method for improving the efficiency of electrodialysis (ED) cells and stacks, in particular those used in chemical synthesis. The process entails adding a buffer solution to the stack for subsequent depletion in the stack during electrolysis. The buffer solution is regenerated continuously after depletion. This buffer process serves to control the hydrogen ion or hydroxide ion concentration so as to protect the active sites of electrodialysis membranes. The process enables electrodialysis processing options for products that are sensitive to pH changes.

  15. Effect of pH on structure, function, and stability of mitochondrial carbonic anhydrase VA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idrees, Danish; Shahbaaz, Mohd; Bisetty, Krishna; Islam, Asimul; Ahmad, Faizan; Hassan, Md Imtaiyaz

    2017-02-01

    Mitochondrial carbonic anhydrase VA (CAVA) catalyzes the hydration of carbon dioxide to produce proton and bicarbonate which is primarily expressed in the mitochondrial matrix of liver, and involved in numerous physiological processes including lipogenesis, insulin secretion from pancreatic cells, ureagenesis, gluconeogenesis, and neuronal transmission. To understand the effect of pH on the structure, function, and stability of CAVA, we employed spectroscopic techniques such as circular dichroism, fluorescence, and absorbance measurements in wide range of pH (from pH 2.0 to pH 11.5). CAVA showed an aggregation at acidic pH range from pH 2.0 to pH 5.0. However, it remains stable and maintains its secondary structure in the pH range, pH 7.0-pH 11.5. Furthermore, this enzyme has an appreciable activity at more than pH 7.0 (7.0 < pH ≤ 11.5) with maximum activity at pH 9.0. The maximal values of k cat and k cat /K m at pH 9.0 are 3.7 × 10 6  s -1 and 5.5 × 10 7  M -1  s -1 , respectively. However, this enzyme loses its activity in the acidic pH range. We further performed 20-ns molecular dynamics simulation of CAVA to see the dynamics at different pH values. An excellent agreement was observed between in silico and in vitro studies. This study provides an insight into the activity of CAVA in the pH range of subcellular environment.

  16. Fluorimetrich determination of uranium in mineral samples and phosphoric solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pupo Gonzales, I.; Cuevillas, J.; Estevez, J.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper an analytical technique for the determination of uranium in different cuban minerals and acid leaching liquors of phosphorites is proposed. The method used for solid samples includes their disolution and further dilution of the solution obtained. For liquid samples dilution is the only intermediate step used. A study of HNO3 concentration (pH) was made in fluorimetric measurements. The method was applied to the uranium analysis in two IAEA standard reference samples (phosphate base), in natural phosphorites and a synthetic one, in clays and phosphoric liquors. The results agree with those obtained by other methods

  17. Validation of a triangular quantum well model for GaN-based HEMTs used in pH and dipole moment sensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabbaa, S; Stiens, J

    2012-01-01

    Gallium nitride (GaN) is a relatively new semiconductor material that has the potential of replacing gallium arsenide (GaAs) in some of the more recent technological applications, for example chemical sensor applications. In this paper, we introduce a triangular quantum well model for an undoped AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) structure used as a chemical and biological sensor for pH and dipole moment measurements of polar liquids. We have performed theoretical calculations related to the HEMT characteristics and we have compared them with experimental measurements carried out in many previous papers. These calculations include the current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of the device, the surface potential, the change in the drain current with the dipole moment and the drain current as a function of pH. The results exhibit good agreement with experimental measurements for different polar liquids and electrolyte solutions. It is also found that the drain current of the device exhibits a large linear variation with the dipole moment, and that the surface potential and the drain current depend strongly on the pH. Therefore, it can distinguish molecules with slightly different dipole moments and solutions with small variations in pH. The ability of the device to sense biomolecules (such as proteins) with very large dipole moments is investigated.

  18. Unified pH values of liquid chromatography mobile phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suu, Agnes; Jalukse, Lauri; Liigand, Jaanus; Kruve, Anneli; Himmel, Daniel; Krossing, Ingo; Rosés, Martí; Leito, Ivo

    2015-03-03

    This work introduces a conceptually new approach of measuring pH of mixed-solvent liquid chromatography (LC) mobile phases. Mobile phase pH is very important in LC, but its correct measurement is not straightforward, and all commonly used approaches have deficiencies. The new approach is based on the recently introduced unified pH (pH(abs)) scale, which enables direct comparison of acidities of solutions made in different solvents based on chemical potential of the proton in the solutions. This work represents the first experimental realization of the pH(abs) concept using differential potentiometric measurement for comparison of the chemical potentials of the proton in different solutions (connected by a salt bridge), together with earlier published reference points for obtaining the pH(abs) values (referenced to the gas phase) or pH(abs)(H₂O) values (referenced to the aqueous solution). The liquid junction potentials were estimated in the framework of Izutsu's three-component method. pH(abs) values for a number of common LC and LC-MS mobile phases have been determined. The pH(abs) scale enables for the first time direct comparison of acidities of any LC mobile phases, with different organic additives, different buffer components, etc. A possible experimental protocol of putting this new approach into chromatographic practice has been envisaged and its applicability tested. It has been demonstrated that the ionization behavior of bases (cationic acids) in the mobile phases can be better predicted by using the pH(abs)(H₂O) values and aqueous pKa values than by using the alternative means of expressing mobile phase acidity. Description of the ionization behavior of acids on the basis of pH(abs)(H₂O) values is possible if the change of their pKa values with solvent composition change is taken into account.

  19. pH Sensing and Regulation in Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi eDamaghi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Cells maintain intracellular pH (pHi within a narrow range (7.1-7.2 by controlling membrane proton pumps and transporters whose activity is set by intra-cytoplasmic pH sensors. These sensors have the ability to recognize and induce cellular responses to maintain the intracellular pH, often at the expense of acidifying the extracellular pH. In turn, extracellular acidification impacts cells via specific acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs and proton-sensing G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs. In this review, we will discuss some of the major players in proton sensing at the plasma membrane and their downstream consequences in cancer cells and how these pH-mediated changes affect processes such as migration and metastasis. The complex mechanisms by which they transduce acid pH signals to the cytoplasm and nucleus are not well understood. However, there is evidence that expression of proton-sensing GPCRs such as GPR4, TDAG8, and OGR1 can regulate aspects of tumorigenesis and invasion, including colfilin and talin regulated actin (de-polymerization. Major mechanisms for maintenance of pHi homeostasis include monocarboxylate, bicarbonate and proton transporters. Notably, there is little evidence suggesting a link between their activities and those of the extracellular H+-sensors, suggesting a mechanistic disconnect between intra- and extra-cellular pH. Understanding the mechanisms of pH sensing and regulation may lead to novel and informed therapeutic strategies that can target acidosis, a common physical hallmark of solid tumors.

  20. Modeling pH variation in reverse osmosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nir, Oded; Bishop, Noga Fridman; Lahav, Ori; Freger, Viatcheslav

    2015-12-15

    The transport of hydronium and hydroxide ions through reverse osmosis membranes constitutes a unique case of ionic species characterized by uncommonly high permeabilities. Combined with electromigration, this leads to complex behavior of permeate pH, e.g., negative rejection, as often observed for monovalent ions in nanofiltration of salt mixtures. In this work we employed a rigorous phenomenological approach combined with chemical equilibrium to describe the trans-membrane transport of hydronium and hydroxide ions along with salt transport and calculate the resulting permeate pH. Starting from the Nernst-Planck equation, a full non-linear transport equation was derived, for which an approximate solution was proposed based on the analytical solution previously developed for trace ions in a dominant salt. Using the developed approximate equation, transport coefficients were deduced from experimental results obtained using a spiral wound reverse osmosis module operated under varying permeate flux (2-11 μm/s), NaCl feed concentrations (0.04-0.18 M) and feed pH values (5.5-9.0). The approximate equation agreed well with the experimental results, corroborating the finding that diffusion and electromigration, rather than a priori neglected convection, were the major contributors to the transport of hydronium and hydroxide. The approach presented here has the potential to improve the predictive capacity of reverse osmosis transport models for acid-base species, thereby improving process design/control. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. SWCNT-Based Biosensor Modelling for pH Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Javad Kiani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Different forms of CNT delivery have been discovered with several biomedical functions during past decades. The mechanisms of the cellular uptake of CNTs are mainly maintained due to the chemical nature, the cell type, and the features of the molecules, which are used to functionalize the nanotube exterior. Since single-wall carbon Nanotube (SWCNT has unique chemical and physical properties, it is a great applicant for pH sensing. In addition, ion sensitive FET (ISFET base on nanostructured SWCNT have covered a new method to help genetic investigators restructure metabolic pathways in cells, recognize the progression of disease, and expand diagnostics and therapeutics. Particularly, because PH sensing is very crucial for the constancy of enzymes, it is essential to extend the cost efficient types of this sensing. In this research, the conductance changes of the CNT-based ISFET device with different pH values can be modelled by ion concentration of the solution. In addition, the electrical current of channel is imagined as a function of pH levels, which can be controlled by a control factor (α. Thus, ISFET based nanostructured SWCNT is proposed focusing on the area of electrical detection of hydrogen ions of the electrolyte membrane. Besides, electrical detection of hydrogen ion applications is suggested to be used by modelling the delivery of SWCNT sheets. In the end, after comparing the proposed model and experimental data, it has been reported that there is a good compatibility between them.

  2. An Integrated Biochemistry Laboratory, Including Molecular Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Adele J. Wolfson Mona L.; Branham, Thomas R.

    1996-11-01

    for lysozyme activity and a colorimetric one for protein concentration. Familiarity with the assays is reinforced by an independently designed project to modify a variable in one of these assays. The assay for lysozyme activity is that of Shugar (6), based on hydrolysis of a cell-wall suspension from the bacterium Micrococcus lysodeikticus, a substrate that is particularly sensitive to lysozyme. As the cell walls are broken down by the enzyme, the turbidity of the sample decreases. This decrease can be conveniently measured by following the decrease in absorbance at a wavelength of 450 nm, using a spectrophotometer or other device for measuring light scattering. The Bradford method (7), a standard assay, is used to determine protein concentration. Using the data from both lysozyme activity assays and protein concentration assays, students can calculate the specific activity for commercial lysozyme and an egg- white solution. These calculations clearly demonstrate the increase in specific activity with increasing purity, since the purified (commercial) preparation has a specific activity approximately 20-fold higher than that of the crude egg-white solution. Lysozyme Purification by Ion-Exchange Chromatography (5 weeks) As suggested by Strang (8), students can design a rational purification of lysozyme using ion-exchange chromatography when presented with information on the isoelectric point of the enzyme and the properties of ion- exchange resins. One week is spent discussing protein purification and the relative advantages and disadvantages of different resins. Each group has a choice of anion-exchange (DEAE) or cation-exchange (CM) resins. Because lysozyme is positively charged below a pH of 11, it will not be adsorbed to an anion-exchange resin, but will be adsorbed to the cation-exchange resin. Therefore, for the cation-exchange protocols, there are further options for methods of collecting and eluting the desired protein. A purification table, including

  3. Biologically Pre-Treated Habitation Waste Water as a Sustainable Green Urine Pre-Treat Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, W. Andrew; Thompson, Bret; Sevanthi, Ritesh; Morse, Audra; Meyer, Caitlin; Callahan, Michael

    2017-01-01

    The ability to recover water from urine and flush water is a critical process to allow long term sustainable human habitation in space or bases on the moon or mars. Organic N present as urea or similar compounds can hydrolyze producing free ammonia. This reaction results in an increase in the pH converting ammonium to ammonia which is volatile and not removed by distillation. The increase in pH will also cause precipitation reactions to occur. In order to prevent this, urine on ISS is combined with a pretreat solution. While use of a pretreatment solution has been successful, there are numerous draw backs including: storage and use of highly hazardous solutions, limitations on water recovery (less than 85%), and production of brine with pore dewatering characteristics. We evaluated the use of biologically treated habitation wastewaters (ISS and early planetary base) to replace the current pretreat solution. We evaluated both amended and un-amended bioreactor effluent. For the amended effluent, we evaluated "green" pretreat chemicals including citric acid and citric acid amended with benzoic acid. We used a mock urine/air separator modeled after the urine collection assembly on ISS. The urine/air separator was challenged continually for >6 months. Depending on the test point, the separator was challenged daily with donated urine and flushed with amended or un-amended reactor effluent. We monitored the pH of the urine, flush solution and residual pH in the urine/air separator after each urine event. We also evaluated solids production and biological growth. Our results support the use of both un-amended and amended bioreactor effluent to maintain the operability of the urine /air separator. The ability to use bioreactor effluent could decrease consumable cost, reduce hazards associated with current pre-treat chemicals, allow other membrane based desalination processes to be utilized, and improve brine characteristics.

  4. Removal of radium from aqueous sulphate solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weir, D.R.; Masters, J.T.; Neven, M.

    1983-01-01

    Radium is often present in ores and an aqueous solution associated with the ore may consequently contain dissolved radium. It is frequently necessary to remove radium from such solutions to reduce the total radium content to a prescribed low level before the solution can be returned to the environment. The present invention is based on the discovery that the total radium content can be reduced to a satisfactory level within a reasonable time by adding a soluble barium salt to a radium-containing sulphate solution which also contains dissolved magnesium at a pH not greater than about 0 to precipitate radium as barium radium sulphate, raising the pH to at least 11 to precipitate an insoluble magnesium compound which collects the barium radium sulphate precipitate, and separating substantially all of the precipitates from the solution

  5. Characterisation and deployment of an immobilised pH sensor spot towards surface ocean pH measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Jennifer S; Achterberg, Eric P; Rérolle, Victoire M C; Abi Kaed Bey, Samer; Floquet, Cedric F A; Mowlem, Matthew C

    2015-10-15

    The oceans are a major sink for anthropogenic atmospheric carbon dioxide, and the uptake causes changes to the marine carbonate system and has wide ranging effects on flora and fauna. It is crucial to develop analytical systems that allow us to follow the increase in oceanic pCO2 and corresponding reduction in pH. Miniaturised sensor systems using immobilised fluorescence indicator spots are attractive for this purpose because of their simple design and low power requirements. The technology is increasingly used for oceanic dissolved oxygen measurements. We present a detailed method on the use of immobilised fluorescence indicator spots to determine pH in ocean waters across the pH range 7.6-8.2. We characterised temperature (-0.046 pH/°C from 5 to 25 °C) and salinity dependences (-0.01 pH/psu over 5-35), and performed a preliminary investigation into the influence of chlorophyll on the pH measurement. The apparent pKa of the sensor spots was 6.93 at 20 °C. A drift of 0.00014 R (ca. 0.0004 pH, at 25 °C, salinity 35) was observed over a 3 day period in a laboratory based drift experiment. We achieved a precision of 0.0074 pH units, and observed a drift of 0.06 pH units during a test deployment of 5 week duration in the Southern Ocean as an underway surface ocean sensor, which was corrected for using certified reference materials. The temperature and salinity dependences were accounted for with the algorithm, R=0.00034-0.17·pH+0.15·S(2)+0.0067·T-0.0084·S·1.075. This study provides a first step towards a pH optode system suitable for autonomous deployment. The use of a short duration low power illumination (LED current 0.2 mA, 5 μs illumination time) improved the lifetime and precision of the spot. Further improvements to the pH indicator spot operations include regular application of certified reference materials for drift correction and cross-calibration against a spectrophotometric pH system. Desirable future developments should involve novel

  6. Soil Solution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sonneveld, C.; Voogt, W.

    2009-01-01

    The characteristics of the soil solution in the root environment in the greenhouse industry differ much from those for field grown crops. This is caused firstly by the growing conditions in the greenhouse, which strongly differ from those in the field and secondly the function attributed to the soil

  7. Seeding Solutions

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The Crucible Group operates on the basis of good faith –– producing best effort non-consensus texts. ..... science and technology-based solutions to agricultural production constraints, it is ...... In 1997 researchers at Case Western Reserve Medical School in Ohio (US) ...... Is there a need to update the system-wide IP audit?

  8. Circular Solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Annevelink, E.; Bos, H.L.; Meesters, K.P.H.; Oever, van den M.J.A.; Haas, de W.; Kuikman, P.J.; Rietra, R.P.J.J.; Sikirica, N.

    2016-01-01

    The fifth part of this report on Circular Solutions is about the circular principle From Waste to Resource. The purpose of this study is to select promising options for the implementation of this circular principle and to elaborate these options further.

  9. Podcast solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Geoghegan, Michael W

    2005-01-01

    Podcasting is the art of recording radio show style audio tracks, then distributing them to listeners on the Web via podcasting software such as iPodder. From downloading podcasts to producing a track for fun or profit, ""Podcast Solutions"" covers the entire world of podcasting with insight, humor, and the unmatched wisdom of experience.

  10. Conductometry of electrolyte solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safonova, Lyubov P.; Kolker, Arkadii M.

    1992-09-01

    A review is given of the theories of the electrical conductance of electrolyte solutions of different ionic strengths and concentrations, and of the models of ion association. An analysis is made of the methods for mathematical processing of experimental conductometric data. An account is provided of various theories describing the dependence of the limiting value of the ionic electrical conductance on the properties of the solute and solvent. The bibliography includes 115 references.

  11. Control of As and Ni releases from a uranium mill tailings neutralization circuit: Solution chemistry, mineralogy and geochemical modeling of laboratory study results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahoney, John [MWH Americas, Inc., 1801 California Street, Denver, CO 80202 (United States)], E-mail: john.j.mahoney@mwhglobal.com; Slaughter, Maynard [Earth Science, University of Northern Colorado, Greeley, CO 80639 (United States); Langmuir, Donald [Hydrochem Systems Corp., P.O. Box 23257, Silverthorne, CO 80498 (United States); Rowson, John [AREVA Resources Canada Inc., P.O. Box 9204, Saskatoon, SK, S7K 3X5 (Canada)

    2007-12-15

    Processing U ores in the JEB Mill of the McClean Lake Operation in northern Saskatchewan produces spent leaching solutions (raffinates) with pH {<=} 1.5, and As and Ni concentrations up to 6800 and 5200 mg L{sup -1}, respectively. Bench-scale neutralization experiments (pH 2-8) were performed to help optimize the design of mill processes for reducing As and Ni concentrations in tailings and raffinates to {<=}1 mg L{sup -1} prior to their disposal. Precipitate mineralogy determined by chemical analysis, XRD, SEM, EM, XM and EXAFS methods, included gypsum (the dominant precipitate), poorly crystalline scorodite (precipitated esp. from pH 2-4), annabergite, hydrobasaluminite, ferrihydrite, green rust II and theophrastite. The As was mostly in scorodite with smaller amounts in annabergite and trace As adsorbed and/or co-precipitated, probably by ferrihydrite. Geochemical modeling indicated that above pH 2, the ion activity product (IAP) of scorodite lies between the solubility products of amorphous and crystalline phases (log K{sub sp} = -23.0 and -25.83, respectively). The IAP decreases with increasing pH, suggesting that the crystallinity of the scorodite increases with pH. Forward geochemical models support the assumption that during neutralization, particles of added base produce sharp local pH gradients and disequilibrium with bulk solutions, facilitating annabergite and theophrastite precipitation.

  12. Impact of pH on hydrogen oxidizing redox processes in aquifers due to gas intrusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzgen, Adrian; Berta, Marton; Dethlefsen, Frank; Ebert, Markus; Dahmke, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    Hydrogen production from excess energy and its storage can help increasing the efficiency of solar and wind in the energy mix. Therefore, hydrogen needs large-scale intermediate storage independent of the intended later use as hydrogen gas or as reactant to produce methane in the Sabatier process. A possible storage solution is using the geological subsurface such as caverns built in salt deposits or aquifers that are not used for drinking water production. However, underground storage of hydrogen gas potentially leads to accidental gas leakages into near-surface potable aquifers triggering subsequent geochemical processes. These leakages pose potential risks that are currently not sufficiently understood. To close this gap in knowledge, a high-pressure laboratory column system was used to simulate a hydrogen gas intrusion into a shallow aquifer. Water and sediment were gained from a sandy Pleistocene aquifer near Neumünster, Germany. In the first stage of the experiment, 100% hydrogen gas was used to simulate dissolved hydrogen concentrations between 800 and 4000 µM by varying pH2 between 2 and 15 bars. pH values rose to between 7.9 and 10.4, partly due to stripping CO2 from the groundwater used during H2 gas addition. In a second stage, the pH was regulated in a range of 6.7 to 7.9 by using a gas mixture of 99% H2 and 1% CO2 at 5 bars of total gas pressure. Observed processes included hydrogen oxidation, sulfate reduction, acetogenesis, formate production, and methanogenesis, which were independent of the hydrogen concentration. Hydrogen oxidation and sulfate reduction showed zeroth order reaction rates and rate constants (106 to 412 µM/h and 12 to 33 µM/h, respectively) in the pH range between 8 and 10. At pH levels between 7 and 8, both reactions started out faster near the column's inflow but then seemed limited towards the columns outflow, suggesting the dependence of sulfate reduction on the pH-value. Acetogenesis dominated the pH range between 8 and 10

  13. The pH behavior of a 2-aminoethyl dihydrogen phosphate zwitterion studied with NMR-titrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myller, A. T.; Karhe, J. J.; Haukka, M.; Pakkanen, T. T.

    2013-02-01

    In this study a bifunctional 2-aminoethyl dihydrogen phosphate (AEPH2) was 1H and 31P NMR characterized in a pH range of 1-12 in order to determine the zwitterion properties in different pH regions in H2O and D2O solutions. NMR was also used to determine the pH range where AEPH2 exists as a zwitterion. The phosphate group has two deprotonation points, around pH 1 and 6, while the amino group deprotonates at pH 11. The zwitterion form of AEPH2 (NH3+sbnd CHsbnd CHsbnd OPOH) exists as the main ion between pH 1 and 6 in water solutions and also in the solid state.

  14. PH5 for integrating and archiving different data types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azevedo, Steve; Hess, Derick; Beaudoin, Bruce

    2016-04-01

    PH5 is IRIS PASSCAL's file organization of HDF5 used for seismic data. The extensibility and portability of HDF5 allows the PH5 format to evolve and operate on a variety of platforms and interfaces. To make PH5 even more flexible, the seismic metadata is separated from the time series data in order to achieve gains in performance as well as ease of use and to simplify user interaction. This separation affords easy updates to metadata after the data are archived without having to access waveform data. To date, PH5 is currently used for integrating and archiving active source, passive source, and onshore-offshore seismic data sets with the IRIS Data Management Center (DMC). Active development to make PH5 fully compatible with FDSN web services and deliver StationXML is near completion. We are also exploring the feasibility of utilizing QuakeML for active seismic source representation. The PH5 software suite, PIC KITCHEN, comprises in-field tools that include data ingestion (e.g. RefTek format, SEG-Y, and SEG-D), meta-data management tools including QC, and a waveform review tool. These tools enable building archive ready data in-field during active source experiments greatly decreasing the time to produce research ready data sets. Once archived, our online request page generates a unique web form and pre-populates much of it based on the metadata provided to it from the PH5 file. The data requester then can intuitively select the extraction parameters as well as data subsets they wish to receive (current output formats include SEG-Y, SAC, mseed). The web interface then passes this on to the PH5 processing tools to generate the requested seismic data, and e-mail the requester a link to the data set automatically as soon as the data are ready. PH5 file organization was originally designed to hold seismic time series data and meta-data from controlled source experiments using RefTek data loggers. The flexibility of HDF5 has enabled us to extend the use of PH5 in several

  15. Antimicrobial activity and pH of a endodontic sealer containing MTA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maliza, Amanda GA; de Andrade, Flaviana Bombarda; Arias, Marcela C

    Objective: To investigate the antimicrobial activity, calcium release, and pH of a new mineral trioxide aggregate endodontic sealer when compared to endodontic sealers containing calcium hydroxide and/or epoxy resin. Method: Specimens were fabricated from MTA Fillapex, Sealer 26, Sealapex, and AH...... Plus immediately, 24 or 48 hours prior to the tests. The antimicrobial activity against Enterococcus faecalis and Candida albicans was evaluated by the direct contact and the agar diffusion methods. Calcium release was determined by atomic absorption spectrometry. The pH from solutions containing...... in solution with an alkaline pH. Conclusion: The new mineral trioxide aggregate endodontic sealer presented higher antimicrobial activity when compared to the sealers containing calcium hydroxide and/or epoxy resin. As for pH and calcium release, the sealers containing calcium hydroxide resulted in presented...

  16. Influences of salt concentration, loading and pH on strontium adsorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atun, G.; Kaplan, Z.

    1996-01-01

    The adsorption of Sr on clay with contains zeolites and montmorillonite mixtures was investigated in solutions of NaCl by means of a batch technique. Sr retention was reduced with increasing NaCl concentration from 5*10 -4 to 5*10 -1 M. Distribution coefficients (K d ) linearly increased with pH in the acidic region but they were almost independent of pH in neutral and alkaline solutions. By fitting the data of the Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) isotherm, the mean energies of adsorption and adsorption capacities of Sr at different pH values were calculated. The results showed that the mode of adsorption below pH 4.5 is ion exchange, while above that value a multilayer adsorption occurs. Adsorption data were fitted to the Freundlich isotherm and from empirical Freundlich parameters a site distribution function was calculated. (author)

  17. Recent Developments in R.F. Magnetron Sputtered Thin Films for pH Sensing Applications—An Overview

    OpenAIRE

    D. K. Maurya; A. Sardarinejad; K. Alameh

    2014-01-01

    pH sensors are widely used in chemical and biological applications. Metal oxides-based pH sensors have many attractive features including insolubility, stability, mechanical strength, electrocatalyst and manufacturing technology. Various metal oxide thin films prepared by radio frequency (R.F.) magnetron sputtering have attractive features, including high pH sensitivity, fast response, high resolution, good stability and reversibility as well as potential for measuring pH under conditions th...

  18. Treatment for hydrazine-containing waste water solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yade, N.

    1986-01-01

    The treatment for waste solutions containing hydrazine is presented. The invention attempts oxidation and decomposition of hydrazine in waste water in a simple and effective processing. The method adds activated charcoal to waste solutions containing hydrazine while maintaining a pH value higher than 8, and adding iron salts if necessary. Then, the solution is aerated.

  19. Effect of pH on saturated hydraulic conductivity and soil dispersion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suarez, D.L.; Roades, J.D.; Lavado, R.; Grieve, C.M.

    The adverse effects of exchangeable sodium on soil hydraulic conductivity (K) are well known, but at present only sodicity and total electrolyte concentration are used in evaluating irrigation water suitability. In arid areas, high sodicity is often associatd with high dissolved carbonate and thus high pH, but in humid areas high sodicity may be associated with low pH. To evaluate the effect of pH (as an independent variable) on K, solutions with the same SAR and electrolyte level were prepared at pH 6, 7, 8, and 9. Saturated K values were determined at constant flux in columns packed at a bulk density of 1.5 Mg m/sup -3/. At pH 9, saturated K values were lower than at pH 6 for a montmorillonitic and kaolinitic soil. For a vermiculitic soil with lower organic carbon and higher silt content, pH changes did not cause large K differences. Decreases in K were not reversible on application of waters with higher electrolyte levels. The results from the K experiments were generally consistent with optical transmission measurements of dispersion. Although anion adsorption was at or below detection limits and cation exchange capacity (CEC) was only slightly dependent on pH, differences in pH effects on K among soils are likely due to differences in quantities of variable-charge minerals and organic matter.

  20. Structure of PIN-domain protein PH0500 from Pyrococcus horikoshii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeyakanthan, Jeyaraman; Inagaki, Eiji; Kuroishi, Chizu; Tahirov, Tahir H.

    2005-01-01

    The structure of P. horikoshii OT3 protein PH0500 was determined by the multiple anomalous dispersion method and refined in two crystal forms. The protein is a dimer and has a PIN-domain fold. The Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3 protein PH0500 is highly conserved within the Pyrococcus genus of hyperthermophilic archaea and shows low amino-acid sequence similarity with a family of PIN-domain proteins. The protein has been expressed, purified and crystallized in two crystal forms: PH0500-I and PH0500-II. The structure was determined at 2.0 Å by the multiple anomalous dispersion method using a selenomethionyl derivative of crystal form PH0500-I (PH0500-I-Se). The structure of PH0500-I has been refined at 1.75 Å resolution to an R factor of 20.9% and the structure of PH0500-II has been refined at 2.0 Å resolution to an R factor of 23.4%. In both crystal forms as well as in solution the molecule appears to be a dimer. Searches of the databases for protein-fold similarities confirmed that the PH0500 protein is a PIN-domain protein with possible exonuclease activity and involvement in DNA or RNA editing

  1. Compacton solutions and multiple compacton solutions for a continuum Toda lattice model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Xinghua; Tian Lixin

    2006-01-01

    Some special solutions of the Toda lattice model with a transversal degree of freedom are obtained. With the aid of Mathematica and Wu elimination method, more explicit solitary wave solutions, including compacton solutions, multiple compacton solutions, peakon solutions, as well as periodic solutions are found in this paper

  2. pH distribution in human tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thistlethwaite, A.J.; Leeper, D.B.; Moylan, D.J.; Nerlinger, R.E.

    1984-01-01

    pH distribution in human tumors is being determined to evaluate this parameter as a prognostic indicator of hyperthermia response. pH is measured by a modified glass pH electrode (21g, model MI 408, Microelectrodes, Inc., Londonderry, NH) inserted through an 18g open-ended Angiocath. Eight tumors have been evaluated to date; and of those, 3 were also assayed after the first heat treatment coincident with determination of blood flow. Tumors were between 2-5 cm, of various histologies, and of primary, recurrent, or metastatic origin. 2-4 measurements were made per tumor. Pretreatment readings were between 6.4 and 7.2 pH units. As tumor blood flow increased after 1 hr heating (41.5 - 43 0 ) pH rose 0.1 - 0.3 units. Normal rat muscle yields pH readings of 7.35 - 7.45. Although there was considerable heterogeneity of pH within tumors, accuracy and drift were not a problem. 5-15 min were required for pH stabilization after catheter insertion and <5 min after electrode insertion. A saline wheal was used for anesthesia to preclude modification of pH by anesthetics. Patient tolerance has not been a problems. This study suggests that human tumor tissue has a preponderance of areas more acidic than normal tissue. This may serve to sensitize tumor cells to hyperthermia and provide a prognostic indicator of tumor response

  3. Study on pH Effect in Process of an Entero-gastric Fiber-optic Sensor Design

    OpenAIRE

    Guo-ping, Chen; Rong-min, Xia; Jun, Gong; Wen-de, Shou

    2002-01-01

    The pH effect on design of a fiber optic sensor newly developed for monitoring entero-gastric reflux is investigated. The research has been carried out by utilizing the sensor to measure characteristic absorption of bilirubin standard solution (used as a calibrator) at different pH values from about 1 to 8. The results show explicitly that the estimation error according to the calibration curves with pH

  4. pH dependent green synthesis of gold nanoparticles by completely C6-carboxylated curdlan under high temperature and various pH conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Wen-Yi; Wang, Kai; Wang, Yao-Yao; Ding, Zhi-Chao; Wu, Li-Xia; Cai, Wu-Dan; Yan, Jing-Kun

    2018-01-01

    A C6-carboxylated curdlan (C6-Cc) obtained from 4-acetamido-TEMPO-mediated oxidation of curdlan was used both as a reducing and stabilizing agent for green synthesis of pH-responsive AuNPs, which was carried out by controlling the pH of the C6-Cc solution at a high temperature (100°C). C6-Cc presented a semi-flexible random coil chain in the aqueous medium at pH 5.5 and became more expanded and rigid in alkaline conditions (pH 7.1-12.0), though the primary chemical structure of C6-Cc was virtually unchanged with the pH variation. The AuNPs prepared with C6-Cc at various pHs were characterized by various instrumental measurements. The shapes and sizes of AuNPs were found to be strongly dependent on the pH of the C6-Cc solution. The C6-Cc-decorated AuNPs exhibited a more well-dispersed spherical morphology with smaller particle sizes under alkaline conditions (pH 7.1-12.0). Through this study, a facile, simple, and green method has been demonstrated for preparation of stimuli-sensitive AuNPs using biocompatible polyanionic polysaccharides. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Solution Prototype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Efeoglu, Arkin; Møller, Charles; Serie, Michel

    2013-01-01

    This paper outlines an artifact building and evaluation proposal. Design Science Research (DSR) studies usually consider encapsulated artifact that have relationships with other artifacts. The solution prototype as a composed artifact demands for a more comprehensive consideration in its systematic...... environment. The solution prototype that is composed from blending product and service prototype has particular impacts on the dualism of DSR’s “Build” and “Evaluate”. Since the mix between product and service prototyping can be varied, there is a demand for a more agile and iterative framework. Van de Ven......’s research framework seems to fit this purpose. Van de Ven allows for an iterative research approach to problem solving with flexible starting point. The research activity is the result between the iteration of two dimensions. This framework focuses on the natural evaluation, particularly on ex...

  6. Digestion products of the PH20 hyaluronidase inhibit remyelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, Marnie; Gong, Xi; Su, Weiping; Matsumoto, Steven G; Banine, Fatima; Winkler, Clayton; Foster, Scott; Xing, Rubing; Struve, Jaime; Dean, Justin; Baggenstoss, Bruce; Weigel, Paul H; Montine, Thomas J; Back, Stephen A; Sherman, Larry S

    2013-02-01

    Oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) recruited to demyelinating lesions often fail to mature into oligodendrocytes (OLs) that remyelinate spared axons. The glycosaminoglycan hyaluronan (HA) accumulates in demyelinating lesions and has been implicated in the failure of OPC maturation and remyelination. We tested the hypothesis that OPCs in demyelinating lesions express a specific hyaluronidase, and that digestion products of this enzyme inhibit OPC maturation. Mouse OPCs grown in vitro were analyzed for hyaluronidase expression and activity. Gain of function studies were used to define the hyaluronidases that blocked OPC maturation. Mouse and human demyelinating lesions were assessed for hyaluronidase expression. Digestion products from different hyaluronidases and a hyaluronidase inhibitor were tested for their effects on OPC maturation and functional remyelination in vivo. OPCs demonstrated hyaluronidase activity in vitro and expressed multiple hyaluronidases, including HYAL1, HYAL2, and PH20. HA digestion by PH20 but not other hyaluronidases inhibited OPC maturation into OLs. In contrast, inhibiting HA synthesis did not influence OPC maturation. PH20 expression was elevated in OPCs and reactive astrocytes in both rodent and human demyelinating lesions. HA digestion products generated by the PH20 hyaluronidase but not another hyaluronidase inhibited remyelination following lysolecithin-induced demyelination. Inhibition of hyaluronidase activity lead to increased OPC maturation and promoted increased conduction velocities through lesions. We determined that PH20 is elevated in demyelinating lesions and that increased PH20 expression is sufficient to inhibit OPC maturation and remyelination. Pharmacological inhibition of PH20 may therefore be an effective way to promote remyelination in multiple sclerosis and related conditions. Copyright © 2012 American Neurological Association.

  7. Soil solution dynamics of Cu and Zn in a Cu- and Zn-polluted soil as influenced by gamma-irradiation and Cu-Zn interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Y M; Yan, W D; Christie, P

    2001-01-01

    A pot experiment was conducted to study soil solution dynamics of Cu and Zn in a Cu/Zn-polluted soil as influenced by gamma-irradiation and Cu-Zn interaction. A slightly acid sandy loam was amended with Cu and Zn (as nitrates) either singly or in combination (100 mg Cu and 150 mg Zn kg(-1) soil) and was then gamma-irradiated (10 kGy). Unamended and unirradiated controls were included, and spring barley (Hordeum vulgare L. cv. Forrester) was grown for 50 days. Soil solution samples obtained using soil moisture samplers immediately before transplantation and every ten days thereafter were used directly for determination of Cu, Zn, pH and absorbance at 360 nm (A360). Cu and Zn concentrations in the solution of metal-polluted soil changed with time and were affected by gamma-irradiation and metal interaction. gamma-Irradiation raised soil solution Cu substantially but generally decreased soil solution Zn. These trends were consistent with increased dissolved organic matter (A360) and solution pH after gamma-irradiation. Combined addition of Cu and Zn usually gave higher soil solution concentrations of Cu or Zn compared with single addition of Cu or Zn in gamma-irradiated and non-irradiated soils, indicating an interaction between Cu and Zn. Cu would have been organically complexed and consequently maintained a relatively high concentration in the soil solution under higher pH conditions. Zn tends to occur mainly as free ion forms in the soil solution and is therefore sensitive to changes in pH. The extent to which gamma-irradiation and metal interaction affected solubility and bioavailability of Cu and Zn was a function of time during plant growth. Studies on soil solution metal dynamics provide very useful information for understanding metal mobility and bioavailability.

  8. Removal of fluoride ions from aqueous solution by waste mud

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kemer, Baris; Ozdes, Duygu; Gundogdu, Ali; Bulut, Volkan N.; Duran, Celal; Soylak, Mustafa

    2009-01-01

    The present study was carried out to assess the ability of original waste mud (o-WM) and different types of activated waste mud which are acid-activated (a-WM) and precipitated waste mud (p-WM), in order to remove excess of fluoride from aqueous solution by using batch technique. The p-WM exhibited greater performance than the others. Adsorption studies were conducted as a function of pH, contact time, initial fluoride concentration, adsorbent concentration, temperature, etc. Studies were also performed to understand the effect of some co-existing ions present in aqueous solutions. Adsorption process was found to be almost independent of pH for all types of waste mud. Among the kinetic models tested for p-WM, pseudo-second-order model fitted the kinetic data well with a perfect correlation coefficient value of 1.00. It was found that the adequate time for the adsorption equilibrium of fluoride was only 1 h. Thermodynamic parameters including the Gibbs free energy (ΔG o ), enthalpy (ΔH o ), and entropy (ΔS o ) revealed that adsorption of fluoride ions on the p-WM was feasible, spontaneous and endothermic in the temperature range of 0-40 deg. C. Experimental data showed a good fit with the Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherm models. Results of this study demonstrated the effectiveness and feasibility of WM for removal of fluoride ions from aqueous solution.

  9. Removal of fluoride ions from aqueous solution by waste mud

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kemer, Baris; Ozdes, Duygu; Gundogdu, Ali; Bulut, Volkan N.; Duran, Celal [Karadeniz Technical University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Department of Chemistry, 61080 Trabzon (Turkey); Soylak, Mustafa, E-mail: soylak@erciyes.edu.tr [Erciyes University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Department of Chemistry, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey)

    2009-09-15

    The present study was carried out to assess the ability of original waste mud (o-WM) and different types of activated waste mud which are acid-activated (a-WM) and precipitated waste mud (p-WM), in order to remove excess of fluoride from aqueous solution by using batch technique. The p-WM exhibited greater performance than the others. Adsorption studies were conducted as a function of pH, contact time, initial fluoride concentration, adsorbent concentration, temperature, etc. Studies were also performed to understand the effect of some co-existing ions present in aqueous solutions. Adsorption process was found to be almost independent of pH for all types of waste mud. Among the kinetic models tested for p-WM, pseudo-second-order model fitted the kinetic data well with a perfect correlation coefficient value of 1.00. It was found that the adequate time for the adsorption equilibrium of fluoride was only 1 h. Thermodynamic parameters including the Gibbs free energy ({Delta}G{sup o}), enthalpy ({Delta}H{sup o}), and entropy ({Delta}S{sup o}) revealed that adsorption of fluoride ions on the p-WM was feasible, spontaneous and endothermic in the temperature range of 0-40 deg. C. Experimental data showed a good fit with the Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherm models. Results of this study demonstrated the effectiveness and feasibility of WM for removal of fluoride ions from aqueous solution.

  10. Ionically cross-linked poly(allylamine) as a stimulus-responsive underwater adhesive: ionic strength and pH effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Patrick G; Lapitsky, Yakov

    2015-02-03

    Gel-like coacervates that adhere to both hydrophilic and hydrophobic substrates under water have recently been prepared by ionically cross-linking poly(allylamine) (PAH) with pyrophosphate (PPi) and tripolyphosphate (TPP). Among the many advantages of these underwater adhesives (which include their simple preparation and low cost) is their ability to dissolve on demand when exposed to high or low pH. To further analyze their stimulus-responsive properties, we have investigated the pH and ionic strength effects on the formation, rheology and adhesion of PAH/PPi and PAH/TPP complexes. The ionic cross-linker concentrations needed to form these adhesives decreased with increasing pH and ionic strength (although the complexes ceased to form when the parent solution pH exceeded ca. 8.5; i.e., the effective pKa of PAH). Once formed, their ionic cross-links were most stable (as inferred from their relaxation times) at near-neutral or slightly alkaline pH values (of roughly 6.5-9) and at low ionic strengths. The decrease in ionic cross-link stability within complexes prepared at other pH values and at elevated (150-300 mM) NaCl concentrations diminished both the strength and longevity of adhesion (although, under most conditions tested, the short-term tensile adhesion strengths remained above 10(5) Pa). Additionally, the sensitivity of PAH/PPi and PAH/TPP complexes to ionic strength was demonstrated as a potential route to injectable adhesive design (where spontaneous adhesive formation was triggered via injection of low-viscosity, colloidal PAH/TPP dispersions into phosphate buffered saline). Thus, while the sensitivity of ionically cross-linked PAH networks to pH and ionic strength can weaken their adhesion, it can also impart them with additional functionality, such as minimally invasive, injectable delivery, and ability to form and dissolve their bonds on demand.

  11. Dielectrophoresis Aligned Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes as pH Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Xue

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Here we report the fabrication and characterization of pH sensors using aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs. The SWNTs are dispersed in deionized (DI water after chemical functionalization and filtration. They are deposited and organized on silicon substrates with the dielectrophoresis process. Electrodes with “teeth”-like patterns—fabricated with photolithography and wet etching—are used to generate concentrated electric fields and strong dielectrophoretic forces for the SWNTs to deposit and align in desired locations. The device fabrication is inexpensive, solution-based, and conducted at room temperature. The devices are used as pH sensors with the electrodes as the testing pads and the dielectrophoretically captured SWNTs as the sensing elements. When exposed to aqueous solutions with various pH values, the SWNTs change their resistance accordingly. The SWNT-based sensors demonstrate a linear relationship between the sensor resistance and the pH values in the range of 5–9. The characterization of multiple sensors proves that their pH sensitivity is highly repeatable. The real-time data acquisition shows that the sensor response time depends on the pH value, ranging from 2.26 s for the pH-5 solution to 23.82 s for the pH-9 solution. The long-term stability tests illustrate that the sensors can maintain their original sensitivity for a long period of time. The simple fabrication process, high sensitivity, and fast response of the SWNT-based sensors facilitate their applications in a wide range of areas.

  12. Dielectrophoresis Aligned Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes as pH Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pengfei; Martin, Caleb M; Yeung, Kan Kan; Xue, Wei

    2011-01-31

    Here we report the fabrication and characterization of pH sensors using aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). The SWNTs are dispersed in deionized (DI) water after chemical functionalization and filtration. They are deposited and organized on silicon substrates with the dielectrophoresis process. Electrodes with "teeth"-like patterns-fabricated with photolithography and wet etching-are used to generate concentrated electric fields and strong dielectrophoretic forces for the SWNTs to deposit and align in desired locations. The device fabrication is inexpensive, solution-based, and conducted at room temperature. The devices are used as pH sensors with the electrodes as the testing pads and the dielectrophoretically captured SWNTs as the sensing elements. When exposed to aqueous solutions with various pH values, the SWNTs change their resistance accordingly. The SWNT-based sensors demonstrate a linear relationship between the sensor resistance and the pH values in the range of 5-9. The characterization of multiple sensors proves that their pH sensitivity is highly repeatable. The real-time data acquisition shows that the sensor response time depends on the pH value, ranging from 2.26 s for the pH-5 solution to 23.82 s for the pH-9 solution. The long-term stability tests illustrate that the sensors can maintain their original sensitivity for a long period of time. The simple fabrication process, high sensitivity, and fast response of the SWNT-based sensors facilitate their applications in a wide range of areas.

  13. Measurement of pH micro-heterogeneity in natural cheese matrices by fluorescence lifetime imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Zuzana eBurdikova; Zdenek eSvindrych; Jan ePala; Cian eHickey; Martin G. Wilkinson; Jiri ePanek; Mark A. E. Auty; Ammasi ePeriasamy; Jeremiah J. Sheehan

    2015-01-01

    Cheese, a product of microbial fermentation may be defined as a protein matrix entrapping fat, moisture, minerals and solutes as well as dispersed bacterial colonies. The growth and physiology of bacterial cells in these colonies may be influenced by the microenvironment around the colony, or alternatively the cells within the colony may modify the microenvironment (e.g., pH, redox potential) due to their metabolic activity. While cheese pH may be measured at macro level there remains a signi...

  14. Measurement of pH micro-heterogeneity in natural cheese matrices by flourescence lifetime imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Burdikova, Suzana; Svindrych, Zdenek; Pala, Jan; Hickey, Cian D; Wilkinson, Martin G.; Panek, Jiri; Auty, Mark A.E.; Periasamy, Ammasi; Sheehan, Jeremiah J.

    2015-01-01

    peer-reviewed Cheese, a product of microbial fermentation may be defined as a protein matrix entrapping fat, moisture, minerals and solutes as well as dispersed bacterial colonies. The growth and physiology of bacterial cells in these colonies may be influenced by the microenvironment around the colony, or alternatively the cells within the colony may modify the microenvironment (e.g., pH, redox potential) due to their metabolic activity. While cheese pH may be measured at macro level ther...

  15. A review of sample preparation and its influence on pH determination in concrete samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manso, S.; Aguado, A.

    2017-01-01

    If we are to monitor the chemical processes in cementitious materials, then pH assays in the pore solutions of cement pastes, mortars, and concretes are of key importance. However, there is no standard method that regulates the sample-preparation method for pH determination. The state-of-the-art of different methods for pH determination in cementitious materials is presented in this paper and the influence of sample preparation in each case. Moreover, an experimental campaign compares three different techniques for pH determination. Its results contribute to establishing a basic criterion to help researchers select the most suitable method, depending on the purpose of the research. A simple tool is described for selecting the easiest and the most economic pH determination method, depending on the objective; especially for researchers and those with limited experience in this field.

  16. Determination of the intracellular pH of intact erythrocytes by 1H NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabenstein, D.L.; Isab, A.A.

    1982-01-01

    A method is described for determining the intracellular pH of intact erythrocytes by 1 H NMR. The determination is based on the pH dependence of the chemical shifts of resonances for carbon-bounded protons of an indicator molecule (imidazole) in intact cells. The imidazole is introduced into the erythrocytes by incubation in an isotonic saline solution of the indicator. The pH dependence of the chemical shifts of the imidazole resonances is calibrated from 1 H NMR spectra of the imidazole-containing red cell lysates whose pH is varied by the addition of acid or base and measured directly with a pH electrode. To reduce in intensity or eliminate the much more intense envelope of resonances from the hemoglobin, the 1 H NMR measurements are made by either the spin-echo Fourier transform technique or by the transfer-or-saturation by cross-relaxation method

  17. A review of sample preparation and its influence on pH determination in concrete samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Manso

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available If we are to monitor the chemical processes in cementitious materials, then pH assays in the pore solutions of cement pastes, mortars, and concretes are of key importance. However, there is no standard method that regulates the sample-preparation method for pH determination. The state-of-the-art of different methods for pH determination in cementitious materials is presented in this paper and the influence of sample preparation in each case. Moreover, an experimental campaign compares three different techniques for pH determination. Its results contribute to establishing a basic criterion to help researchers select the most suitable method, depending on the purpose of the research. A simple tool is described for selecting the easiest and the most economic pH determination method, depending on the objective; especially for researchers and those with limited experience in this field.

  18. The role of Eh and pH in leaching Saskatchewan uranium ores with chloride and nitrate leaching systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nirdosh, I.; Muthuswami, S.V.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of solution E h and pH on the extractions of U, 230 Th, 226 Ra, As and Ni from two typical uranium ores from the province of Saskatchewan in Canada are discussed for the leachants ferric chloride, ferric nitrate, nitric acid and hydrochloric acid. It is concluded that E h > 700 mV and pH 230 Th extraction is more sensitive to solution pH than to E h whereas Ni extraction is sensitive mainly to the solution E h . Arsenic extraction is very sensitive to solution E h , and for a given E h , is high at pH 1.3. (orig.) [de

  19. Electrical Conductivity and Chemical Composition of Soil Solution: Comparison of Solution Samplers in Tropical Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davi Lopes do Carmo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Soil solution samplers may have the same working principle, but they differ in relation to chemical and physical characteristics, cost and handling, and these aspects exert influence on the chemical composition of the soil solution obtained. This study was carried out to evaluate, over time, the chemical composition of solutions extracted by Suolo Acqua, with the hydrophilic membrane (HM as a standard, using soils with contrasting characteristics, and to determine the relationship between electrical conductivity (EC and concentration of ions and pH of soil solution samples. This study was carried out under laboratory conditions, using three soils samples with different clay and organic matter (OM contents. Soil solution contents of F−, Cl−, NO−3, Br−, SO42−, Na+, NH4+, K+, Mg2+, Ca2+, were analyzed, as well as inorganic, organic, and total C contents, pH, and EC, in four successive sampling times. Soil solution chemical composition extracted by the Suolo Acqua sampler is similar to that collected by the HM, but the Suolo Acqua extracted more Na+ and soluble organic C than the HM solution. Solution EC, cation and anion concentrations, and soluble C levels are higher in the soil with greater clay and OM contents (Latossolo and Cambissolo in this case. Soil solution composition varied over time, with considerable changes in pH, EC, and nutrient concentrations, especially associated with soil OM. Thus, single and isolated sampling of the soil solution must be avoided, otherwise composition of the soil solution may not be correctly evaluated. Soil solution EC was regulated by pH, as well as the sum of cation and anion concentrations, and the C contents determined in the soil liquid phase.

  20. Dissolution kinetics of heulandite at pH 2--12 and 25 degrees C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ragnarsdottir, K.V.

    1993-01-01

    Because of their favourable cation exchange reactions, heulandite and clinoptilolite have been suggested as being capable of immobilizing radionuclides and therefore could possibly act as an important barrier for nuclear waste. Recent studies of laboratory-reacted minerals indicate, however, that hydrated surface layers tend to accumulate highly hydrolyzable heavy elements. These hydrated layers may therefore be the most important retardants for radionuclides. The dissolution rate of heulandite depends strongly on pH. Based on silica release, the logarithm of the steady-state dissolution rate at pH 2 is -13.1 mol cm -2 s -1 . The logarithm of the rate decreases to -15.8 mol cm -2 s -1 at pH 7.2 and increases again to -14.6 mol cm -2 s -1 at pH 12.2. At low pH, Al is released preferentially to silica; but at intermediate and high pH, the release of silica appears to be congruent relative to Al. The change in dissolution rate with pH indicates that at low pH, the dissolution mechanism is controlled by the detachment of a positively charged Al species, >Al-OH 2 + . Below pH 5, however, a silica-rich surface layer is formed requiring diffusion through the layer. At intermediate and high pH, it is likely that the dissolution rate is controlled by the detachment of a negatively charged silica species, >Si - O - . The reaction order of the hydrogen ion under low pH conditions is 0.7, and the reaction order of the OH - ion is 0.3 at high pH. The measured dissolution rates indicate that a 1 mm heulandite crystal would dissolve in 300,000 yrs if the solution composition is maintained undersaturated. 75 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs

  1. [Molecular genetics in chronic myeloid leukemia with variant Ph translocation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wei; Li, Jian-yong; Zhu, Yu; Qiu, Hai-rong; Pan, Jin-lan; Xu, Wei; Chen, Li-juan; Shen, Yun-feng; Xue, Yong-quan

    2007-08-01

    To explore the value of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and multiplex fluorescence in situ hybridization (M-FISH) techniques in the detection of genetic changes in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) with variant Philadelphia translocation (vPh). Cytogenetic preparations from 10 CML patients with vPh confirmed by R banding were assayed with dual color dual fusion FISH technique. If only one fusion signal was detected in interphase cells, metaphase cells were observed to determine if there were derivative chromosome 9[der (9)] deletions. Meanwhile, the same cytogenetic preparations were assayed with M-FISH technique. Of the 10 CML patients with vPh, 5 were detected with der (9) deletions by FISH technique. M-FISH technique revealed that besides the chromosome 22, chromosomes 1, 3, 5, 6, 8, 10, 11 and 17 were also involved in the vPh. M-FISH technique also detected the abnormalities which were not found with conventional cytogenetics (CC), including two never reported abnormalities. The combination of CC, FISH and M-FISH technique could refine the genetic diagnosis of CML with vPh.

  2. Proceedings of the ICTSS 2012 PhD Workshop - Preface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Brian; Weise, Carsten

    2012-01-01

    and their thesis work and receive constructive feedback from experts in the field as well as from peers. Also it is an opportunity for researchers to get an insight into new research topics in the field. Ph.D. students at any stage of their doctoral studies may participate. Seven abstracts were submitted......This technical report contains the proceedings of the Ph.D. Workshop held in conjunction with the The 24th IFIP Int. Conference on Testing Software and Systems (ICTSS'12) in Aalborg, Denmark, November 19, 2012. The well‐established ICTSS series of international conferences addresses the conceptual......, theoretic, and practical challenges of testing software systems, including communication protocols, services, distributed platforms, middleware, embedded systems, and security infrastructures. The aims of the ICTSS Doctoral Workshop is to provide a forum for PhD students to present preliminary results...

  3. Motion-Based pH Sensing Based on the Cartridge-Case-like Micromotor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yajun; Ge, Ya; Liu, Limei; Zhang, Lina; Liu, Mei; Sun, Yunyu; Zhang, Hui; Dong, Bin

    2016-02-17

    In this paper, we report a novel cartridge-case-like micromotor. The micromotor, which is fabricated by the template synthesis method, consists of a gelatin shell with platinum nanoparticles decorating its inner surface. Intriguingly, the resulting cartridge-case-like structure exhibits a pH-dependent "open and close" feature, which originates from the pH responsiveness of the gelatin material. On the basis of the catalytic activity of the platinum nanoparticle inside the gelatin shell, the resulting cartridge-case-like structure is capable of moving autonomously in the aqueous solution containing the hydrogen peroxide fuel. More interestingly, we find out that the micromotor can be utilized as a motion-based pH sensor over the whole pH range. The moving velocity of the micromotor increases monotonically with the increase of pH of the analyte solution. Three different factors are considered to be responsible for the proportional relation between the motion speed and pH of the analyte solution: the peroxidase-like and oxidase-like catalytic behavior of the platinum nanoparticle at low and high pH, the volumetric decomposition of the hydrogen peroxide under the basic condition and the pH-dependent catalytic activity of the platinum nanoparticle caused by the swelling/deswelling behavior of the gelatin material. The current work highlights the impact of the material properties on the motion behavior of a micromotor, thus paving the way toward its application in the motion-based sensing field.

  4. Densities and apparent molar volumes of atmospherically important electrolyte solutions. 1. The solutes H2SO4, HNO3, HCl, Na2SO4, NaNO3, NaCl, (NH4)2SO4, NH4NO3, and NH4Cl from 0 to 50 °C, including extrapolations to very low temperature and to the pure liquid state, and NaHSO4, NaOH, and NH3 at 25 °C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clegg, S L; Wexler, A S

    2011-04-21

    Calculations of the size and density of atmospheric aerosols are complicated by the fact that they can exist at concentrations highly supersaturated with respect to dissolved salts and supercooled with respect to ice. Densities and apparent molar volumes of solutes in aqueous solutions containing the solutes H(2)SO(4), HNO(3), HCl, Na(2)SO(4), NaNO(3), NaCl, (NH(4))(2)SO(4), NH(4)NO(3), and NH(4)Cl have been critically evaluated and represented using fitted equations from 0 to 50 °C or greater and from infinite dilution to concentrations saturated or supersaturated with respect to the dissolved salts. Using extrapolated densities of high-temperature solutions and melts, the relationship between density and concentration is extended to the hypothetical pure liquid solutes. Above a given reference concentration of a few mol kg(-1), it is observed that density increases almost linearly with decreasing temperature, and comparisons with available data below 0 °C suggest that the fitted equations for density can be extrapolated to very low temperatures. As concentration is decreased below the reference concentration, the variation of density with temperature tends to that of water (which decreases as temperature is reduced below 3.98 °C). In this region below the reference concentration, and below 0 °C, densities are calculated using extrapolated apparent molar volumes which are constrained to agree at the reference concentrations with an equation for the directly fitted density. Calculated volume properties agree well with available data at low temperatures, for both concentrated and dilute solutions. Comparisons are made with literature data for temperatures of maximum density. Apparent molar volumes at infinite dilution are consistent, on a single ion basis, to better than ±0.1 cm(3) mol(-1) from 0 to 50 °C. Volume properties of aqueous NaHSO(4), NaOH, and NH(3) have also been evaluated, at 25 °C only. In part 2 of this work (ref 1 ) an ion interaction (Pitzer

  5. Method of continuously regenerating decontaminating electrolytic solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Takashi; Kobayashi, Toshio; Wada, Koichi.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To continuously recover radioactive metal ions from the electrolytic solution used for the electrolytic decontamination of radioactive equipment and increased with the radioactive dose, as well as regenerate the electrolytic solution to a high concentration acid. Method: A liquid in an auxiliary tank is recycled to a cathode chamber containing water of an electro depositing regeneration tank to render pH = 2 by way of a pH controller and a pH electrode. The electrolytic solution in an electrolytic decontaminating tank is introduced by way of an injection pump to an auxiliary tank and, interlocking therewith, a regenerating solution is introduced from a regenerating solution extracting pump by way of a extraction pipeway to an electrolytic decontaminating tank. Meanwhile, electric current is supplied to the electrode to deposit radioactive metal ions dissolved in the cathode chamber on the capturing electrode. While on the other hand, anions are transferred by way of a partition wall to an anode chamber to regenerate the electrolytic solution to high concentration acid solution. While on the other hand, water is supplied by way of an electromagnetic valve interlocking with the level meter to maintain the level meter constant. This can decrease the generation of the liquid wastes and also reduce the amount of the radioactive secondary wastes. (Horiuchi, T.)

  6. pH effect on structural and optical properties of nanostructured zinc oxide thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munef, R. A. [Kirkuk Iraq, Kirkuk university, college of science physics department, phone: 009647702180337, Iraq Rafeamonef@yahoo.com (Iraq)

    2015-03-30

    ZnO nanostructures were Deposited on Objekttrager glasses for various pH values by chemical bath deposition method using Zn (NO3)2·6H2O (zinc nitrate hexahydrate) solution at 75°C reaction temperature without any posterior treatments. The ZnO nanostructures obtained were characterized by X-ray Diffraction (XRD, UV). The structure was hexagonal and it was found that some peaks disappear with various pH values. The grain sizes of ZnO films increases from 22-to-29nm with increasing pH. The transmission of the films was (85-95%)

  7. Fiber Optic pH Sensor with Self-Assembled Polymer Multilayer Nanocoatings

    OpenAIRE

    Shao, Li-Yang; Yin, Ming-Jie; Tam, Hwa-Yaw; Albert, Jacques

    2013-01-01

    A fiber-optic pH sensor based on a tilted fiber Bragg grating (TFBG) with electrostatic self-assembly multilayer sensing film is presented. The pH sensitive polymeric film, poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA) and poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) was deposited on the circumference of the TFBG with the layer-by-layer (LbL) electrostatic self-assembly technique. The PDDA/PAA film exhibits a reduction in refractive index by swelling in different pH solutions. This effect results in wavelength s...

  8. Optical Sensing Material for pH Detection based on the Use of Roselle Extract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nurul Huda Abd Karim; Musa Ahmad; Mohammad Osman Herman; Ahmad Mahir Mokhtar

    2008-01-01

    This research assessed the potential of natural colour extract of Hibiscus Sabdariffa L. (roselle) as sensing material.The pH sensor was developed based on the use of natural reddish colour in roselle calyx, delphinidin-3-sambubioside immobilised in a glass fibre filter paper. In free solution, roselle extract was characterised by using UV-visible spectrophotometer to study the effect of pH, extract concentration, response time, repeatability and photo stability. The study showed that natural colour extract can be used as sensing material for the development of an optical pH sensor. (author)

  9. RuO2 pH Sensor with Super-Glue-Inspired Reference Electrode

    OpenAIRE

    Lonsdale, Wade; Wajrak, Magdalena; Alameh, Kamal

    2017-01-01

    A pH-sensitive RuO2 electrode coated in a commercial cyanoacrylate adhesive typically exhibits very low pH sensitivity, and could be paired with a RuO2 working electrode as a differential type pH sensor. However, such sensors display poor performance in real sample matrices. A pH sensor employing a RuO2 pH-sensitive working electrode and a SiO2-PVB junction-modified RuO2 reference electrode is developed as an alternative high-performance solution. This sensor exhibits a performance similar to...

  10. A Flexible Optical pH Sensor Based on Polysulfone Membranes Coated with pH-Responsive Polyaniline Nanofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Thabit, Nedal; Umar, Yunusa; Ratemi, Elaref; Ahmad, Ayman; Ahmad Abuilaiwi, Faraj

    2016-06-27

    A new optical pH sensor based on polysulfone (PSU) and polyaniline (PANI) was developed. A transparent and flexible PSU membrane was employed as a support. The electrically conductive and pH-responsive PANI was deposited onto the membrane surface by in situ chemical oxidative polymerization (COP). The absorption spectra of the PANI-coated PSU membranes exhibited sensitivity to pH changes in the range of 4-12, which allowed for designing a dual wavelength pH optical sensor. The performance of the membranes was assessed by measuring their response starting from high pH and going down to low pH, and vice versa. It was found that it is necessary to precondition the sensor layers before each measurement due to the slight hysteresis observed during forward and backward pH titrations. PSU membranes with polyaniline coating thicknesses in the range of ≈100-200 nm exhibited fast response times of pH sensor was characterized by a sigmoidal response (R² = 0.997) which allows for pH determination over a wide dynamic range. All membranes were stable for a period of more than six months when stored in 1 M HCl solution. The reproducibility of the fabricated optical pH sensors was found to be pH sensor was tested and the obtained pH values were compared with the results obtained using a pH meter device.

  11. Shelf-Life of Chlorine Solutions Recommended in Ebola Virus Disease Response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qais Iqbal

    Full Text Available In Ebola Virus Disease (EVD outbreaks, it is widely recommended to wash living things (handwashing with 0.05% (500 mg/L chlorine solution and non-living things (surfaces, personal protective equipment, dead bodies with 0.5% (5,000 mg/L chlorine solution. Chlorine solutions used in EVD response are primarily made from powdered calcium hypochlorite (HTH, granular sodium dichloroisocyanurate (NaDCC, and liquid sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl, and have a pH range of 5-11. Chlorine solutions degrade following a reaction highly dependent on, and unusually sensitive to, pH, temperature, and concentration. We determined the shelf-life of 0.05% and 0.5% chlorine solutions used in EVD response, including HTH, NaDCC, stabilized NaOCl, generated NaOCl, and neutralized NaOCl solutions. Solutions were stored for 30 days at 25, 30, and 35°C, and tested daily for chlorine concentration and pH. Maximum shelf-life was defined as days until initial concentration fell to 30 days. Models were developed for solutions with maximum shelf-lives between 1-30 days. Extrapolating to 40°C, the maximum predicted shelf-life for 0.05% and 0.5% NaDCC solutions were 0.38 and 0.82 hours, respectively; predicted shelf-life for 0.05% and 0.5% generated NaOCl solutions were >30 and 5.4 days, respectively. Each chlorine solution type offers advantages and disadvantages to responders, as: NaDCC is an easy-to-import high-concentration effervescent powder; HTH is similar, but forms a precipitate that may clog pipes; and, NaOCl solutions can be made locally, but are difficult to transport. We recommend responders chose the most appropriate source chlorine compound for their use, and ensure solutions are stored at appropriate temperatures and used or replaced before expiring.

  12. Changes of organic acid exudation and rhizosphere pH in rice plants under chromium stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng Fanrong; Chen Song; Miao Ying; Wu Feibo; Zhang Guoping

    2008-01-01

    The effect of chromium (Cr) stress on the changes of rhizosphere pH, organic acid exudation, and Cr accumulation in plants was studied using two rice genotypes differing in grain Cr accumulation. The results showed that rhizosphere pH increased with increasing level of Cr in the culture solution and with an extended time of Cr exposure. Among the six organic acids examined in this experiment, oxalic and malic acid contents were relatively higher, and had a significant positive correlation with the rhizosphere pH, indicating that they play an important role in changing rhizosphere pH. The Cr content in roots was significantly higher than that in stems and leaves. Cr accumulation in plants was significantly and positively correlated with rhizosphere pH, and the exudation of oxalic, malic and citric acids, suggesting that an increase in rhizosphere pH, and exudation of oxalic, malic and citric acid enhances Cr accumulation in rice plants. - Rhizosphere pH and organic acid exudation of rice roots are markedly affected by chromium level in culture solution

  13. Adsorption of tannic acid from aqueous solution onto surfactant-modified zeolite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Jianwei, E-mail: jwlin@shou.edu.cn [College of Marine Science, Shanghai Ocean University, No. 999 Hucheng Huan Road, Pudong District, Shanghai 201306 (China); Zhan, Yanhui; Zhu, Zhiliang [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Xing, Yunqing [College of Marine Science, Shanghai Ocean University, No. 999 Hucheng Huan Road, Pudong District, Shanghai 201306 (China)

    2011-10-15

    capacity for SMZ-CBC was relatively high at solution pH 4.0-7.0, and decreased with an increase in solution pH from 7.0 to 8.5. The mechanisms controlling TA adsorption onto SMZ-CBC at solution pH 5.5 include electrostatic attraction, hydrogen bonding and organic partitioning.

  14. pH sensing and regulation in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damaghi, Mehdi; Wojtkowiak, Jonathan W; Gillies, Robert J

    2013-12-17

    Cells maintain intracellular pH (pHi) within a narrow range (7.1-7.2) by controlling membrane proton pumps and transporters whose activity is set by intra-cytoplasmic pH sensors. These sensors have the ability to recognize and induce cellular responses to maintain the pHi, often at the expense of acidifying the extracellular pH. In turn, extracellular acidification impacts cells via specific acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) and proton-sensing G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). In this review, we will discuss some of the major players in proton sensing at the plasma membrane and their downstream consequences in cancer cells and how these pH-mediated changes affect processes such as migration and metastasis. The complex mechanisms by which they transduce acid pH signals to the cytoplasm and nucleus are not well understood. However, there is evidence that expression of proton-sensing GPCRs such as GPR4, TDAG8, and OGR1 can regulate aspects of tumorigenesis and invasion, including cofilin and talin regulated actin (de-)polymerization. Major mechanisms for maintenance of pHi homeostasis include monocarboxylate, bicarbonate, and proton transporters. Notably, there is little evidence suggesting a link between their activities and those of the extracellular H(+)-sensors, suggesting a mechanistic disconnect between intra- and extracellular pH. Understanding the mechanisms of pH sensing and regulation may lead to novel and informed therapeutic strategies that can target acidosis, a common physical hallmark of solid tumors.

  15. Zirconium oxide crystal phase: The role of the pH and time to attain the final pH for precipitation of the hydrous oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivasan, R.; Harris, M.B.; Simpson, S.F.; De Angelis, R.J.; Davis, B.H.

    1988-01-01

    Precipitated hydrous zirconium oxide can be calcined to produce either a monoclinic or tetragonal product. It has been observed that the time taken to attain the final pH of the solution in contact with the precipitate plays a dominant role in determining the crystal structure of the zirconium oxide after calcination at 500 0 C. The dependence of crystal structure on the rate of precipitation is observed only in the pH range 7--11. Rapid precipitation in this pH range yields predominately monoclinic zirconia, whereas slow (8 h) precipitation produces the tetragonal phase. At pH of approximately 13.0, only the tetragonal phase is formed from both slowly and rapidly precipitated hydrous oxide. The present results, together with earlier results, show that both the pH of the supernatant liquid and the time taken to attain this pH play dominant roles in determining the crystal structure of zirconia that is formed after calcination of the hydrous oxide. The factors that determine the crystal phase are therefore imparted in a mechanism of precipitation that depends upon the pH, and it is inferred that it is the hydroxyl concentration that is the dominant factor

  16. Coaching af ph.d.-studerende

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Godskesen, Mirjam Irene

    Rapporten danner grundlag for at etablere et koncept for ph.d.-coaching. Erfaringerne fra et 2-årigt projekt om ph.d.-coaching i SCKK regi beskrives. De centrale temaer er tilrettelæggelse af den individuelle coaching, typiske temaer i coachingen og arbejdsdeling mellem coach og vejleder. Der er...

  17. Salivary pH: A diagnostic biomarker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharmila Baliga

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Saliva contains a variety of host defense factors. It influences calculus formation and periodontal disease. Different studies have been done to find exact correlation of salivary biomarkers with periodontal disease. With a multitude of biomarkers and complexities in their determination, the salivary pH may be tried to be used as a quick chairside test. The aim of this study was to analyze the pH of saliva and determine its relevance to the severity of periodontal disease. Study Design: The study population consisted of 300 patients. They were divided into three groups of 100 patients each: Group A had clinically healthy gingiva, Group B who had generalized chronic gingivitis and Group C who had generalized chronic periodontitis. The randomized unstimulated saliva from each patient was collected and pH was tested. Data was analyzed statistically using analysis of variance technique. Results: The salivary pH was more alkaline for patients with generalized chronic gingivitis as compared with the control group (P = 0.001 whereas patients with generalized chronic periodontitis had more acidic pH as compared with the control group (P = 0.001. Conclusion: These results indicate a significant change in the pH depending on the severity of the periodontal condition. The salivary pH shows significant changes and thus relevance to the severity of periodontal disease. Salivary pH may thus be used as a quick chairside diagnostic biomarker.

  18. Salivary pH: A diagnostic biomarker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baliga, Sharmila; Muglikar, Sangeeta; Kale, Rahul

    2013-07-01

    Saliva contains a variety of host defense factors. It influences calculus formation and periodontal disease. Different studies have been done to find exact correlation of salivary biomarkers with periodontal disease. With a multitude of biomarkers and complexities in their determination, the salivary pH may be tried to be used as a quick chairside test. The aim of this study was to analyze the pH of saliva and determine its relevance to the severity of periodontal disease. The study population consisted of 300 patients. They were divided into three groups of 100 patients each: Group A had clinically healthy gingiva, Group B who had generalized chronic gingivitis and Group C who had generalized chronic periodontitis. The randomized unstimulated saliva from each patient was collected and pH was tested. Data was analyzed statistically using analysis of variance technique. The salivary pH was more alkaline for patients with generalized chronic gingivitis as compared with the control group (P = 0.001) whereas patients with generalized chronic periodontitis had more acidic pH as compared with the control group (P = 0.001). These results indicate a significant change in the pH depending on the severity of the periodontal condition. The salivary pH shows significant changes and thus relevance to the severity of periodontal disease. Salivary pH may thus be used as a quick chairside diagnostic biomarker.

  19. Ph og børnenes rum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Coninck-Smith, Ning

    2008-01-01

    Arkiteten og kulturkritikeren PH tegnede to bygninger til børn, nemlig fabriksbørnehaven ved Dehns Vaskeri fra 1948 og det ombyggede børnehjem Mindet fra 1954. Bidraget diskuterer PH's særlige greb om arkitektur til børn og placerer det ind i samtidens diskussion om børn, deres udvikling og behov....

  20. PER PhDs & Bachelor's Degrees

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Susan C.

    2017-01-01

    Recently, the editor remarked to me that physics departments that offered a PhD with a specialization in Physics Education Research (PER) seemed to graduate more bachelor's degree recipients than those physics PhD departments that did not have the specialization. I was not convinced. That led to quite a bit of discussion between us. He compiled a…