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Sample records for solution 31p nuclear

  1. Characterization of phosphorus forms in lake macrophytes and algae by solution (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Weiying; Zhu, Yuanrong; Wu, Fengchang; Meng, Wei; Giesy, John P; He, Zhongqi; Song, Lirong; Fan, Mingle

    2016-04-01

    Debris from aquatic macrophytes and algae are important recycling sources of phosphorus (P), which can result in continuing blooms of algae by recycling bioavailable P in the eutrophic lakes. However, knowledge of forms of P in aquatic macrophytes and algae and their contribution to internal loads of P in lakes is limited. Without such knowledge, it is difficult to develop appropriate strategies to remediate and or restore aquatic ecosystems that have become eutrophic. Therefore, in this work, P was extracted from six types of aquatic macrophytes and algae collected from Tai Lake of China and characterized by use of solution (31)P-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. When extracted by 0.5 M NaOH-25 mM EDTA, extraction recovery of total P(TP) and organic P(Po) exceeded 90 %. Concentrations of Po in algae and aquatic macrophytes were 5552 mg kg(-1) and 1005 mg kg(-1) and accounted for 56.0 and 47.2 % of TP, respectively. When Po, including condensed P, was characterized by solution (31)P-NMR Po in algae included orthophosphate monoesters (79.8 %), pyrophosphate (18.2 %), and orthophosphate diester (2.0 %), and Po in aquatic macrophytes included orthophosphate monoesters (90.3 %), pyrophosphate (4.2 %), and orthophosphate diester (5.5 %). Additionally, orthophosphate monoesters in algal debris mainly included β-glycerophosphate (44.1 %), α-glycerophosphate (13.5 %), and glucose 6-phosphate (13.5 %). Orthophosphate monoesters in aquatic macrophytes mainly included β-glycerophosphate (27.9 %), α-glycerophosphate (24.6 %), and adenosine 5' monophosphate (8.2 %). Results derived from this study will be useful in better understanding nutrient cycling, relevant eutrophication processes, and pollution control for freshwater lakes.

  2. Forms and lability of phosphorus in algae and aquatic macrophytes characterized by solution 31P NMR coupled with enzymatic hydrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Increased information on forms and lability of phosphorus (P) in aquatic macrophytes and algae is crucial for better understanding of P biogeochemical cycling in eutrophic lakes. In this work, solution 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy coupled with enzymatic hydrolysis (EH) was used ...

  3. Monitoring of the insecticide trichlorfon by phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance (31P NMR) spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talebpour, Zahra; Ghassempour, Alireza; Zendehzaban, Mehdi; Bijanzadeh, Hamid Reza; Mirjalili, Mohammad Hossein

    2006-01-01

    Trichlorfon is an organophosphorus insecticide, which is extensively being used for protection of fruit crops. Trichlorfon is a thermal labile compound, which cannot be easily determined by gas chromatography (GC) and has no suitable group for sensitive detection by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). In this study, a 31 P nuclear magnetic resonance ( 31 P NMR) has been described for monitoring of trichlorfon without any separation step. The quantitative works of 31 P NMR spectroscopy has been performed in the presence of an internal standard (hexamethylphosphoramide). Limit of detection (LOD) for this method has been found to be 55 mg L -1 , without any sample preparation, and the linear working range was 150-5500 mg L -1 . Relative standard deviation (R.S.D.%) of the method for three replicates within and between days was obtained ≤9%. The average recovery efficiency was approximately 99-112%. This method was applied for monitoring trichlorfon in a commercial insecticide sample and tomato sample

  4. Forms and Lability of Phosphorus in Algae and Aquatic Macrophytes Characterized by Solution 31P NMR Coupled with Enzymatic Hydrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Weiying; Zhu, Yuanrong; Wu, Fengchang; He, Zhongqi; Zhang, Chen; Giesy, John P.

    2016-11-01

    Solution Phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance (31P NMR) spectroscopy coupled with enzymatic hydrolysis (EH) with commercially available phosphatases was used to characterize phosphorus (P) compounds in extracts of the dominant aquatic macrophytes and algae in a eutrophic lake. Total extractable organic P (Po) concentrations ranged from 504 to 1643 mg kg-1 and 2318 to 8395 mg kg-1 for aquatic macrophytes and algae, respectively. Using 31P NMR spectroscopy, 11 Po species were detected in the mono- and diester region. Additionally, orthophosphate, pyrophosphate and phosphonates were also detected. Using EH, phytate-like P was identified as the prevalent class of enzyme-labile Po, followed by labile monoester- and diester-P. Comparison of the NMR and EH data indicated that the distribution pattern of major P forms in the samples determined by the two methods was similar (r = 0.712, p < 0.05). Additional 31P NMR spectroscopic analysis of extracts following EH showed significant decreases in the monoester and pyrophosphate regions, with a corresponding increase in the orthophosphate signal, as compared to unhydrolyzed extracts. Based on these quantity and hydrolysis data, we proposed that recycling of Po in vegetative biomass residues is an important mechanism for long-term self-regulation of available P for algal blooming in eutrophic lakes.

  5. 1H and 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of erythrocyte extracts in myotonic muscular dystrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gadoth, N.; Grinblat, J.; Tel Aviv Univ.; Shvo, H.; Navon, G.

    1984-01-01

    Extracts freshly prepared from erythrocytes of patients with myotonic muscular dystrophy, their unaffected siblings, and normal control subjects were examined with both 1 H and 31 P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. A moderate variability was found in the relative amounts of various nonphosphorylated compounds among patients and control subjects; however, no significant differences were found between the groups. As for the phosphorylated compounds, the sum of ADP+ATP was found significantly elevated in the myotonic muscular dystrophy patients

  6. Erythrocytes in muscular dystrophy. Investigation with 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarpel, G.; Lubansky, H.J.; Danon, M.J.; Omachi, A.

    1981-01-01

    Phosphorus 31 nuclear magnetic resonance ( 31 P NMR) signals were recorded from intact human erythrocytes for 16 hours. Total phosphate concentration, which was estimated as the sum of the individual 31 P signals, was 25% lower in erythrocytes from men with myotonic dystrophy than in control erythrocytes. The inorganic-phosphate fraction contained the highest average phosphate concentration over the 16-hour period, and made the major contribution to the difference in total phosphate between the two groups. This result was not observed in erythrocytes from either women with myotonic dystrophy or patients with Duchenne's dystrophy and may be due to a change in cell membrane permeability to inorganic phosphate, which leads to lower steady-state concentrations of the intracellular phosphates

  7. Erythrocytes in muscular dystrophy. Investigation with 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarpel, G.; Lubansky, H.J.; Danon, M.J.; Omachi, A.

    1981-01-01

    Phosphorus 31 nuclear magnetic resonance (31P NMR) signals were recorded from intact human erythrocytes for 16 hours. Total phosphate concentration, which was estimated as the sum of the individual 31P signals, was 25% lower in erythrocytes from men with myotonic dystrophy than in control erythrocytes. The inorganic-phosphate fraction contained the highest average phosphate concentration over the 16-hour period, and made the major contribution to the difference in total phosphate between the two groups. This result was not observed in erythrocytes from either women with myotonic dystrophy or patients with Duchenne's dystrophy and may be due to a change in cell membrane permeability to inorganic phosphate, which lead to lower steady-state concentrations of the intracellular phosphates

  8. Radioimmunotherapy of human lymphoma in athymic, nude mice as monitored by 31P nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, D.A.; DeNardo, G.L.; DeNardo, S.J.; Matson, G.B.; Epstein, A.L.; Bradbury, E.M.

    1985-01-01

    Human B cell lymphoma (Raji) growing in athymic, nude mice has been successfully treated with a single pulse dose of 131 I-labeled monoclonal antibody (Lym-1) specific for this tumor. Sequential in vivo measurements of phosphate metabolites in the tumors by 31 P surface coil nuclear magnetic resonance showed a significant initial decrease of phosphocreatine following radioimmunotherapy. Diminution of relative ATP to Pi peak area ratio suggesting tissue damage occurred within 3-4 days. The sequence of alterations of nuclear magnetic resonance spectra from tumors of treated mice were strikingly different from sequential nuclear magnetic resonance spectra obtained from tumors of control mice. These observations lead us to conclude that 31 P surface coil nuclear magnetic resonance is a promising non-invasive method for assessing and predicting the efficacy of radioimmunotherapy. Further spatial discrimination of the region of tissue observed by the surface coil nuclear magnetic resonance experiment is under exploration in an effort to increase the utility of these methods

  9. Gated in vivo examination of cardiac metabolites with 31P nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kantor, H.L.; Briggs, R.W.; Metz, K.R.; Balaban, R.S.

    1986-01-01

    Phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance ( 31 P NMR) spectroscopy was used to study the temporal aspects of metabolism of canine heart in vivo. An NMR catheter coil was passed through the jugular vein of a dog into the apex of the right ventricle and spectra were recorded at four points in the cardiac cycle by triggering from the blood pressure trace of the animal. The 31 P spin-lattice relaxation times of phosphocreatine (PC) and the γ - ,α - , and β-phosphates of ATP at 1.89 Tesla are 4.4, 1.8, 1.7, and 1.6 s, respectively. The ratio of PC to ATP is 2.0. No changes in PC/ATP were noted in any of the four portions of the cardiac cycle examined, and difference spectra exhibited no observable signals, in contrast to previously reported results for glucose-perfused rat hearts. On the assumption that intracellular pH and the total creatine pool were constant, the expression for the creatine kinase reaction was used to deduce that free ADP concentrations were invariant throughout the cardiac cycle. This is in apparent disagreement with the proposed regulatory role for ADP in heart oxidative phosphorylation

  10. 31P nuclear magnetic resonance surface coil study of ischemic preconditioned isolated perfused rat heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Yongbin; Luo Xuechun; Zhang Riqing; Wang Xiaoyin; Zuo Lin; Liu Wei

    2000-01-01

    ischemic preconditioning (IPC) will protect the heart from the damage caused by a subsequent long ischemia period. 31 P spectra of isolated perfused rat heart measured by the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) surface coil technique can be used to continually, dynamically and noninvasively obtain metabolism information. This paper explores the IPC mechanisms by NMR. This study shows that IPC has no effect on enhancing the ATP and PCr levels during reperfusion but makes significantly slows and smooths the changes of intracellular pH and ATP during ischemia periods. The ATP and PCr recovery rate of the IPC group after ischemia is significantly higher than that of the control group. In conclusion, the above results support that IPC can protect the rat heart by reducing damage during the ischemia period

  11. Interleaved localized 1H/31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of skeletal muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyerspeer, M.

    2005-09-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has been used as a spectroscopic method in physics and chemistry before it was developed to become a diagnostic imaging tool in medicine. When NMR spectroscopy is applied to human tissue, metabolism can be studied in normal physiological and pathological states in vivo. Metabolite concentrations and rates can be monitored dynamically and with localization of a defined region of interest. The 'window' which is opened for observation, i.e. which quantities are measured, depends on the nucleus used for RF excitation. Mechanisms of adenosine tri-phosphate (ATP) resynthesis, as a direct source of energy for muscle contraction, are phosphocreatine (PCr) splitting, glycolysis, beta-oxidation and, finally, oxidative phosphorylation. Whilst the dependency of these processes' fractional contribution to muscular energy supply on exercise type and duration is well known, quantitative models of the regulating mechanisms involved are still subject of current research. A large fraction of the established knowledge about metabolism is based on biochemical analysis of tissue acquired invasively (e.g. microdialysis and open-flow microperfusion) or representing averaged metabolic concentrations for the whole body (via serum metabolites or gas exchange analysis). Localized NMR spectroscopy, however, is capable of non-invasively acquiring time-resolved data from a defined volume of interest, in vivo. In contrast to the vast majority of MRS studies investigating metabolism, where spectra of a single nucleus (commonly 1 H, 31 P or 13 C) were acquired or several MR spectra with different nuclei were measured in separate experiments, this work opens an additional 'window' on muscle metabolism by interleaved localized acquisition of 1 H and 31 P NMR spectra from human calf muscle in vivo, during rest, exercise and recovery, in a single experiment. Using this technique, the time courses of the concentrations of phosphocreatine, inorganic phosphate (Pi), ATP

  12. Assessment of preparation methods for organic phosphorus analysis in phosphorus-polluted Fe/Al-rich Haihe river sediments using solution 31P-NMR.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenqiang Zhang

    Full Text Available Fe/Al-rich river sediments that were highly polluted with phosphorus (P were used in tests to determine the optimum preparation techniques for measuring organic P (Po using solution (31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((31P-NMR. The optimum pre-treatment, extraction time, sediment to solution ratio and sodium hydroxide-ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (NaOH-EDTA extractant solution composition were determined. The total P and Po recovery rates were higher from freeze- and air-dried samples than from fresh samples. An extraction time of 16 h was adequate for extracting Po, and a shorter or longer extraction time led to lower recoveries of total P and Po, or led to the degradation of Po. An ideal P recovery rate and good-quality NMR spectra were obtained at a sediment:solution ratio of 1:10, showing that this ratio is ideal for extracting Po. An extractant solution of 0.25 M NaOH and 50 mM EDTA was found to be more appropriate than either NaOH on its own, or a more concentrated NaOH-EDTA mixture for (31P-NMR analysis, as this combination minimized interference from paramagnetic ions and was appropriate for the detected range of Po concentrations. The most appropriate preparation method for Po analysis, therefore, was to extract the freeze-dried and ground sediment sample with a 0.25 M NaOH and 50 mM EDTA solution at a sediment:solution ratio of 1:10, for 16 h, by shaking. As lyophilization of the NaOH-EDTA extracts proved to be an optimal pre-concentration method for Po analysis in the river sediment, the extract was lyophilized as soon as possible, and analyzed by (31P-NMR.

  13. 31P-nuclear magnetic resonance analysis of extracts of vascular smooth muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barron, J.T.; Messer, J.V.; Glonek, Thomas

    1986-01-01

    31 P-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to assess phosphate metabolites in perchloric acid extracts of rabbit aorta. In addition to the high energy phosphates, several other phosphorus compounds were detected and quantified. Most notable was the presence of a prominent phosphomonoester compound appearing at a chemical shift of 3.86 delta. This compound constituted 26% of the total extractable tissue phosphorus and is tentatively identified as ribose-5-phosphate, a pentose phosphate pathway intermediate. While ATP and phosphocreatine did not change during glucose and oxygen deprivation or during prolonged muscle contraction, the 3.86delta phosphate decreased significantly. Furthermore, theophylline, an agent that increases intracellular cAMP, also decreased the level of the 3.86 delta phosphate. These results are consistent with the concept that intermediate metabolism sustains high energy phosphate pools in vascular smooth muscle in the steady state under various conditions. The pentose phosphate pathway may play an important role in vascular smooth muscle metabolism. (author)

  14. The structure of phosphate glass biomaterials from neutron diffraction and 31P nuclear magnetic resonance data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pickup, D M; Ahmed, I; Guerry, P; Knowles, J C; Smith, M E; Newport, R J

    2007-01-01

    Neutron diffraction and 31 P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy were used to probe the structure of phosphate glass biomaterials of general composition (CaO) 0.5-x (Na 2 O) x (P 2 O 5 ) 0.5 (x = 0, 0.1 and 0.5). The results suggest that all three glasses have structures based on chains of Q 2 phosphate groups. Clear structural differences are observed between the glasses containing Na 2 O and CaO. The P-O bonds to bridging and non-bridging oxygens are less well resolved in the neutron data from the samples containing CaO, suggesting a change in the nature of the bonding as the field strength of the cation increases Na + → Ca 2+ . In the (CaO) 0.5 (P 2 O 5 ) 0.5 glass most of the Ca 2+ ions are present in isolated CaO x polyhedra whereas in the (Na 2 O) 0.5 (P 2 O 5 ) 0.5 glass the NaO x polyhedra share edges leading to a Na-Na correlation. The results of the structural study are related to the properties of the (CaO) 0.4 (Na 2 O) 0.1 (P 2 O 5 ) 0.5 biomaterial

  15. /sup 31/P nuclear-magnetic-resonance studies an the developing embryos of Xenopus laevis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gadian, D G [Oxford Univ. (UK). Dept. of Biochemistry; Colman, A [Oxford Univ. (UK). Dept. of Zoology

    1976-01-01

    The concentrations of nucleoside triphosphate, inorganic phosphate and yolk proteins, phosvitin and lipovitellin, have been monitored in living embryos of Xenopus laevis by /sup 31/P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The nucleoside triphosphate levels remain relatively constant at about 3.5 - 4.5 nmol/embryo at least until the 'spontaneous movement' stage of development. By the swimming tadpole stage an inorganic phosphate resonance representing about 30 nmol/embryo becomes evident in the NMR spectrum. Computer manipulation also shows such a resonance, although smaller, to be present at a somewhat earlier developmental stage; these findings are confirmed biochemically. The major contribution to the NMR spectrum of oocytes, unfertilized eggs and early embryos is the yolk phosphoprotein resonance. On isolation of the yolk from the embryos it is possible to quantify the contribution to the NMR spectrum from the lipid-phosphate and protein-phosphate moieties of the yolk proteins. During development, as the yolk is used up, it is found that the protein-phosphate resonance disappears at a greater rate than the lipid-phosphate peak. The total phosphorus content of the embryo (ca. 200 nmol/embryo) is shown biochemically to remain constant during development; however, the total amount of phosphorus observed by NMR decreases by about 40% during development. From the resonance positions of their ..cap alpha.., ..beta.. and ..gamma.. phosphate groups is is deduced that the nucleoside triphosphate molecules are liganded in vivo to a divalent cation which is not manganese, but could be either magnesium or calcium. From the position of the inorganic phosphate resonance it is deduced that the internal pH of embryos where this resonance is evident is 6.8 +- 0.2.

  16. Investigation of phosphorous in thin films using the {sup 31}P(α,p){sup 34}S nuclear reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitthan, E., E-mail: eduardo.pitthan@ufrgs.br [PGMICRO, UFRGS, 91509-900 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Gobbi, A.L. [Laboratório Nacional de Nanotecnologia, 13083-100 Campinas, SP (Brazil); Stedile, F.C. [PGMICRO, UFRGS, 91509-900 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Instituto de Química, UFRGS, 91509-900 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2016-03-15

    Phosphorus detection and quantification were obtained, using the {sup 31}P(α,p){sup 34}S nuclear reaction and Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry, in deposited silicon oxide films containing phosphorus and in carbon substrates implanted with phosphorus. It was possible to determine the total amount of phosphorus using the resonance at 3.640 MeV of the {sup 31}P(α,p){sup 34}S nuclear reaction in samples with phosphorus present in up to 23 nm depth. Phosphorous amounts as low as 4 × 10{sup 14} cm{sup −2} were detected. Results obtained by nuclear reaction were in good agreement with those from RBS measurements. Possible applications of phosphorus deposition routes used in this work are discussed.

  17. Simultaneous electromyography and 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy--with application to muscle fatigue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard-Poulsen, P; Thomsen, C; Sinkjaer, T

    1992-01-01

    changes in human muscle. The aim of this study was to develop a method by which EMG and NMR spectroscopy measurements could be performed simultaneously. All measurements were performed in a whole body 1.5 Tesla NMR scanner. A calf muscle ergometer, designed for use in a whole body NMR scanner, was used....... The subject had the left foot strapped to the ergometer. The anterior tibial EMG was recorded by bipolar surface electrodes. A surface coil was strapped to the anterior tibial muscle next to the EMG electrodes. Simultaneous measurements of surface EMG and surface coil 31P NMR spectroscopy were performed...

  18. Relationship between 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectra and pulmonary vasomotor tone in hypoxic pig lobes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buescher, P.; Pillain, R.; Pearse, D.; Eichhorn, G.; Sylvester, J.

    1986-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between lung tissue energy state and vasomotor tone, the authors measured 31 P NMR spectra during repeated exposures to hypoxia in 5 isolated degassed left lower lobes perfused with blood at a constant flow (500ml/min) and left atrial pressure ( 2 tension (PpO 2 ) was changed by varying the gas mixtures (40, 7, 0% O 2 ) flowing through a bubble oxygenator in the perfusion circuit. 31 P spectra obtained after stabilization of pulmonary artery pressure (Ppa) at each PpO 2 revealed peaks for ATP, inorganic phosphate (Pi) phosphomono and diesters (PME and PDE). During 7% O 2 , Ppa and ATP increased but Pi did not change suggesting that lung tissue energy state improved during hypoxic vasoconstriction. During 0% O 2 , there was a reversible deterioration of energy state (high Pi, low ATP). Thus, it appears that lung tissue energy state and vasomotor tone were related, but the precise nature of the relationship remains to be determined

  19. Cellular applications of 31P and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shulman, R.G.; Brown, T.R.; Ugurbil, K.; Ogawa, S.; Cohen, S.M.; den Hollander, J.A.

    1979-01-01

    High-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies of cells and purified mitochondria are discussed to show the kind of information that can be obtained in vivo. In suspensions of Escherichia coli both phosphorus-31 and carbon-13 NMR studies of glycolysis of bioenergetics are presented. In rat liver cells the pathways of gluconeogenesis from carbon-13-labeled glycerol are followed by carbon-13 NMR. In the intact liver cells cytosolic and mitochondrial pH's were separately measured by phosphorus-31 NMR. In purified mitochondria the internal and external concentrations of inorganic phosphate, adenosine diphosphate, and adenosine triphosphate were determined by phosphorus-31 while the pH difference across the membrane was measured simultaneously

  20. Structural characterization of chemical warfare agent degradation products in decontamination solutions with proton band-selective (1)H-(31)P NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskela, Harri; Hakala, Ullastiina; Vanninen, Paula

    2010-06-15

    Decontamination solutions, which are usually composed of strong alkaline chemicals, are used for efficient detoxification of chemical warfare agents (CWAs). The analysis of CWA degradation products directly in decontamination solutions is challenging due to the nature of the matrix. Furthermore, occasionally an unforeseen degradation pathway can result in degradation products which could be eluded to in standard analyses. Here, we present the results of the application of proton band-selective (1)H-(31)P NMR spectroscopy, i.e., band-selective 1D (1)H-(31)P heteronuclear single quantum coherence (HSQC) and band-selective 2D (1)H-(31)P HSQC-total correlation spectroscopy (TOCSY), for ester side chain characterization of organophosphorus nerve agent degradation products in decontamination solutions. The viability of the approach is demonstrated with a test mixture of typical degradation products of nerve agents sarin, soman, and VX. The proton band-selective (1)H-(31)P NMR spectroscopy is also applied in characterization of unusual degradation products of VX in GDS 2000 solution.

  1. Physiological effects of the form of nitrogen on corn root tips: a 31P nuclear magnetic resonance study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, F.H.; Anderson, I.C.

    1986-01-01

    Physiological effects of different N forms (NO − 3 , NH + 4 , or a combination of both) on corn (Zea mays L.) root tips and leaves were studied by following 31 P signals with a nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer. With root tips, both cytoplasmic and vacuolar pH could be measured, whereas with leaves, only vacuolar pH could be determined. The N treatments did not affect the cytoplasmic pH of corn root tips in contrast to proposals of previous workers. Leaf vacuolar pH was higher and root tip vacuolar pH lower with NO − 3 than with NH + 4 . Under anaerobic conditions, cytoplasmic pH was reduced because of lactic acid fermentation. Nitrate, an electron acceptor, delayed the acidification of the cytoplasm compartment because it represents an alternative way to reoxidize NADH. In conclusion, for the conditions of these experiments, the pH of the cytoplasm of corn root tips was not modified by the form of N absorbed; however, the pH of this compartment was affected by the form of N presented during development anaerobiosi. (author)

  2. Local anesthetics: interaction with human erythrocyte membranes as studied by 1H and 31P nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraceto, Leonardo Fernandes; Paula, Eneida de

    2004-01-01

    The literature carries many theories about the mechanism of action of local anesthetics (LA). We can highlight those focusing the direct effect of LA on the sodium channel protein and the ones that consider the interaction of anesthetic molecules with the lipid membrane phase. The interaction between local anesthetics and human erythrocyte membranes has been studied by 1 H and 31 P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. It was found that lidocaine (LDC) and benzocaine (BZC) bind to the membranes, increase the mobility of the protons of the phospholipids acyl chains, and decrease the mobility and/or change the structure of the polar head groups. The results indicate that lidocaine molecules are inserted across the polar and liquid interface of the membrane, establishing both electrostatic (charged form) and hydrophobic (neutral form) interactions. Benzocaine locates itself a little deeper in the bilayer, between the interfacial glycerol region and the hydrophobic core. These changes in mobility or conformation of membrane lipids could affect the Na + -channel protein insertion in the bilayer, stabilizing it in the inactivated state, thus causing anesthesia. (author)

  3. Centerband-only-detection-of-exchange (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance and phospholipid lateral diffusion: theory, simulation and experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Angel; Saleem, Qasim; Macdonald, Peter M

    2015-10-14

    Centerband-only-detection-of-exchange (CODEX) (31)P NMR lateral diffusion measurements were performed on dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) assembled into large unilamellar spherical vesicles. Optimization of sample and NMR acquisition conditions provided significant sensitivity enhancements relative to an earlier first report (Q. Saleem, A. Lai, H. Morales, and P. M. Macdonald, Chem. Phys. Lipids, 2012, 165, 721). An analytical description was developed that permitted the extraction of lateral diffusion coefficients from CODEX data, based on a Gaussian-diffusion-on-a-sphere model (A. Ghosh, J. Samuel, and S. Sinha, Europhys. Lett., 2012, 98, 30003-p1) as relevant to CODEX (31)P NMR measurements on a population of spherical unilamellar phospholipid bilayer vesicles displaying a distribution of vesicle radii.

  4. Measurement of adenosine triphosphate and 2,3-diphosphoglycerate in stored blood with 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambruso, D R; Hawkins, B; Johnson, D L; Fritzberg, A R; Klingensmith, W C; McCabe, E R

    1986-06-01

    Conditions for blood storage are chosen to assure adequate levels of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (2,3-DPG). Because of the invasive nature of the techniques, biochemical assays are not routinely used to measure levels of these compounds in stored blood. However, 31P NMR spectroscopy measures phosphorylated intermediates in intact cells and could be used without disruption of the storage pack. We compared levels of ATP and 2,3-DPG measured by 31P spectroscopy and standard enzyme-linked biochemical assays in whole blood (WB) and packed red blood cells (PRBCs) at weekly intervals during a 35-day storage period. NMR demonstrated a marked decrease in 2,3-DPG and an increase in inorganic phosphate after the first week of storage. No significant differences in ATP concentrations were seen in WB during the storage period, but a significant decrease in ATP in PRBCs was documented. There was good agreement in levels of ATP and 2,3-DPG measured by NMR and biochemical techniques. 31P NMR spectroscopy is a noninvasive technique for measuring ATP and 2,3-DPG which has a potential use in quality assurance of stored blood.

  5. In vivo 31P nuclear magnetic resonance saturation transfer measurements of phosphate exchange reactions in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, S.L.; Jones, K.A.; Schulman, R.G.

    1985-01-01

    31 P saturation transfer techniques have been used to measure phosphate kinetics in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The phosphate comsumption rate observed in acetate grown mid-log cells was combined with measurements of O 2 consumption to yield P/O ratios of 2.2 and 2.9, for cells respiring on glucose and ethanol, respectively. However, no phosphate consumption activity was observed in saturation transfer experiments on anaerobic glucose fed cells. The phosphate consumption rates measured by saturation transfer in cells respiring on glucose and ethanol was attributed to the unidirectional rates of mitochondrial ATP synthesis. (Auth.)

  6. Maintenance of high-energy brain phosphorous compounds during insulin-induced hypoglycemia in men. 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilsted, Jannik; Jensen, K E; Thomsen, C

    1988-01-01

    31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy allows noninvasive studies of cerebral energy-rich phosphorous compounds in humans. In an attempt to characterize the relationship between peripheral blood glucose concentrations and whole-brain phosphate metabolism during insulin......-induced hypoglycemia, 31P NMR spectra were obtained before and after intravenous injection of insulin (0.15 IU/kg body wt) in six men. Compared with prehypoglycemic measurements, no significant changes were found in brain content of Pi, sugar phosphates, phosphocreatine, phosphodiesters, and ATP, and brain pH remained...... constant during the experiment. These results show that the integrated brain profile of energy-rich phosphorous compounds is unaffected by experimental insulin-induced hypoglycemia in humans....

  7. "3"1P Nuclear Magnetic Resonance of Charge-Density-Wave Transition in a Single Crystal of RuP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Guo-Zhi; Luo Jian-Lin; Chen Rong-Yan; Wang Nan-Lin

    2015-01-01

    We perform "3"1P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements on a single crystal of RuP. The anomalies in resistivity at about T_A = 270 K and T_B = 330 K indicate that two phase transitions occur. The line shape of "3"1P NMR spectra in different temperature ranges is attributed to the charge density distribution. The Knight shift and spin-lattice relaxation rate 1/T_1T are measured from 10 K to 300 K. At about T_A = 270 K, they both decrease abruptly with the temperature reduction, which reveals the gap-opening behavior. Well below T_A, they act like the case of normal metal. Charge-density-wave phase transition is proposed to interpret the transition occurring at about T_A. (paper)

  8. pH homeostasis in Escherichia coli: measurement by 31P nuclear magnetic resonance of methylphosphonate and phosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slonczewski, J.L.; Rosen, B.P.; Alger, J.R.; Macnab, R.M.

    1981-01-01

    The intracellular pH of Escherichia coli cells, respiring on endogenous energy sources, was monitored continuously by 31 P NMR over an extracellular pH range between 5.5 and 9. pH homeostasis was found to be good over the entire range, with the data conforming to the simple relationship intracellular pH = 7.6 + 0.1(external pH - 7.6) so that the extreme values observed for intracellular pH were 7.4 and 7.8 external pH 5.5 and 9, respectively. As well as inorganic phosphate, we employed the pH-sensitive NMR probe methylphosphonate, which was taken up by glycerol-grown cells and was nontoxic; its pK/sub a/ of 7.65 made it an ideal probe for measurement of cytoplasmic pH and alkaline external pH

  9. ({sup 1} H, {sup 13} C and {sup 31} P) NMR of phosphonic acid derivatives; Ressonancia magnetica nuclear ({sup 1} H, {sup 13} C, {sup 31} P) de derivados do acido fosfonico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campos, Valdevino; Costa, Valentim E. Uberti [Rio Grande do Sul Univ., Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica

    1992-12-31

    In the last years the development of phosphates analogues in the medical and agricultural pesticides has being very expressive. {sup 1} H, {sup 13} C and mainly {sup 31} P NMR are used for stereochemical and conformational analysis, and reactivity studies on the compounds resulting from those chemical processes 2 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Dietary fat modulation of mammary tumor growth and metabolism demonstrated by 31P-nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erickson, K.L.; Buckman, D.K.; Hubbard, N.E.; Ross, B.

    1986-01-01

    The relationship of dietary fat concentration and saturation on the growth and metabolic activity of line 168 was studied using syngeneic mice fed 6 experimental diets before and during tumor growth. Tumor latency was significantly greater for mice fed a diet containing the minimum of essential fatty acids (EFA, 0.5% corn oil) or 8% coconut oil (SF) than for mice fed 8 or 20% safflower oil (PUF) or 20% SF. Changes in dietary fat resulted in alterations of tumor cell and serum fatty acid composition but not the number of inflammatory cells infiltrating the tumor. 31 P-surface coil NMR was used to measure possible changes in tumor metabolism in vivo. Although pH decreased from 7.2 to 6.6 as the tumor volume increased, there was no difference in pH among dietary groups. There was an inverse relationship between both sugar phosphate (SP)/Pi and ATP/Pi ratios and tumor volume; those ratios for mice fed an EFA deficient or minimal EFA diet decreased at a different rate than ratios for mice fed diets with additional fat. Tumors of mice fed diets containing no or a low level (0.3%) of 18:2 had higher SP/ATP ratios than mice fed diets containing a moderate level (∼ 4%) of 18:2. Thus, high levels of dietary fat had a significant effect on promotion of mammary tumors during early stages of tumor growth. Differences in tumor volume associated with dietary fat may be related to changes in the levels of high energy phosphate metabolites

  11. Characteristics and degradation of carbon and phosphorus from aquatic macrophytes in lakes: Insights from solid-state 13C NMR and solution 31P NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Shasha; Zhu, Yuanrong; Meng, Wei; He, Zhongqi; Feng, Weiying; Zhang, Chen; Giesy, John P.

    2016-01-01

    Water extractable organic matter (WEOM) derived from macrophytes plays an important role in biogeochemical cycling of nutrients, including carbon (C), nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) in lakes. However, reports of their composition and degradation in natural waters are scarce. Therefore, compositions and degradation of WEOM derived from six aquatic macrophytes species of Tai Lake, China, were investigated by use of solid-state 13 C NMR and solution 31 P NMR spectroscopy. Carbohydrates were the predominant constituents of WEOM fractions, followed by carboxylic acid. Orthophosphate (ortho-P) was the dominant form of P (78.7% of total dissolved P) in the water extracts, followed by monoester P (mono-P) (20.6%) and little diester P (0.65%). The proportion of mono-P in total P species increased with the percentage of O-alkyl and O–C–O increasing in the WEOM, which is likely due to degradation and dissolution of biological membranes and RNA from aquatic plants. Whereas the proportion of mono-P decreased with alkyl-C, NCH/OCH 3 and COO/N–C=O increasing, which may be owing to the insoluble compounds including C functional groups of alkyl-C, NCH/OCH 3 and COO/N–C=O, such as aliphatic biopolymers, lignin and peptides. Based on the results of this study and information in the literature about water column and sediment, we propose that WEOM, dominated by polysaccharides, are the most labile and bioavailable component in debris of macrophytes. Additionally, these WEOMs would also be a potential source for bioavailable organic P (e.g., RNA, DNA and phytate) for lakes. - Highlights: • WEOM derived from aquatic macrophytes was characterized. • C and P in WEOM were characterized by solid 13 C NMR and solution 31 P NMR. • Degradation and transformation of macrophyte-derived C and P were investigated. • Macrophyte-derived WEOM are important source for bioavailable nutrients in lakes.

  12. Phosphole complexes of Gold(I) halides: Comparison of solution and solid-state structures by a combination of solution and CP/MAS 31P NMR spectroscopy and x-ray crystallography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attar, S.; Nelson, J.H.; Bearden, W.H.; Alcock, N.W.; Alyea, E.C.

    1990-01-01

    A series of complexes of 1-phenyldibenzophosphole (DBP), 1-phenyl-3,4,-dimethylphosphole (DMPP), and triphenylphosphine of the type L n AuX (n = 1, L = DBP, DMPP, Ph 3 P, X = Cl, Br, I; n = 3, L = DBP, X = Cl, Br, I; n = 3, L = Ph 3 P, X = Cl; n = 4, L = DBP, DMPP, X = PF 6 ) have been prepared and characterized. The structures of (DBP)AuCl (1), (DBP) 3 AuCl (2), and (DMPP)AuCl (3) have been determined from three-dimensional x-ray data collected by counter methods. Crystal structure of the complexes is reported. The CP/MAS 31 P( 1 H) NMR spectrum of complex 1 shows two resonances in a 1:1 intensity ratio, and the CP/MAS 31 P( 1 H) NMR spectrum of complex 3 shows three resonances in a 1:1:1 intensity ratio for reasons that are not yet understood. Though the three phospholes are crystallographically inequivalent (d(AuP) = 2.359 (1), 2.382 (1), and 2.374 (2) angstrom) the molecule has effective C s symmetry as evidenced by the observation of two 31 P resonances in a 2:1 intensity ratio in its CP/MAS 31 P( 1 H) NMR spectrum. Variable-temperature 31 P( 1 H) NMR spectra obtained on solutions of LAuCl + L in various ratios were analyzed to determine the nature of the species present in solution and to gain information regarding their relative stabilities as a function of the nature of the phosphine. 79 refs., 8 figs., 9 tabs

  13. Characteristics and degradation of carbon and phosphorus from aquatic macrophytes in lakes: Insights from solid-state {sup 13}C NMR and solution {sup 31}P NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Shasha [College of Water Sciences, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); State Key Laboratory of Environment Criteria and Risk Assessment, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Zhu, Yuanrong, E-mail: zhuyuanrong07@mails.ucas.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Environment Criteria and Risk Assessment, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Meng, Wei, E-mail: mengwei@craes.org.cn [State Key Laboratory of Environment Criteria and Risk Assessment, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); He, Zhongqi [USDA-ARS Southern Regional Research Center, 1100 Robert E Lee Blvd, New Orleans, LA 70124 (United States); Feng, Weiying [College of Water Sciences, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); State Key Laboratory of Environment Criteria and Risk Assessment, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Zhang, Chen [State Key Laboratory of Environment Criteria and Risk Assessment, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Giesy, John P. [State Key Laboratory of Environment Criteria and Risk Assessment, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Department of Biomedical and Veterinary Biosciences and Toxicology Centre, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan (Canada)

    2016-02-01

    Water extractable organic matter (WEOM) derived from macrophytes plays an important role in biogeochemical cycling of nutrients, including carbon (C), nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) in lakes. However, reports of their composition and degradation in natural waters are scarce. Therefore, compositions and degradation of WEOM derived from six aquatic macrophytes species of Tai Lake, China, were investigated by use of solid-state {sup 13}C NMR and solution {sup 31}P NMR spectroscopy. Carbohydrates were the predominant constituents of WEOM fractions, followed by carboxylic acid. Orthophosphate (ortho-P) was the dominant form of P (78.7% of total dissolved P) in the water extracts, followed by monoester P (mono-P) (20.6%) and little diester P (0.65%). The proportion of mono-P in total P species increased with the percentage of O-alkyl and O–C–O increasing in the WEOM, which is likely due to degradation and dissolution of biological membranes and RNA from aquatic plants. Whereas the proportion of mono-P decreased with alkyl-C, NCH/OCH{sub 3} and COO/N–C=O increasing, which may be owing to the insoluble compounds including C functional groups of alkyl-C, NCH/OCH{sub 3} and COO/N–C=O, such as aliphatic biopolymers, lignin and peptides. Based on the results of this study and information in the literature about water column and sediment, we propose that WEOM, dominated by polysaccharides, are the most labile and bioavailable component in debris of macrophytes. Additionally, these WEOMs would also be a potential source for bioavailable organic P (e.g., RNA, DNA and phytate) for lakes. - Highlights: • WEOM derived from aquatic macrophytes was characterized. • C and P in WEOM were characterized by solid {sup 13}C NMR and solution {sup 31}P NMR. • Degradation and transformation of macrophyte-derived C and P were investigated. • Macrophyte-derived WEOM are important source for bioavailable nutrients in lakes.

  14. Quantitative imaging of brain energy metabolisms and neuroenergetics using in vivo X-nuclear 2H, 17O and 31P MRS at ultra-high field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiao-Hong; Lu, Ming; Chen, Wei

    2018-07-01

    Brain energy metabolism relies predominantly on glucose and oxygen utilization to generate biochemical energy in the form of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). ATP is essential for maintaining basal electrophysiological activities in a resting brain and supporting evoked neuronal activity under an activated state. Studying complex neuroenergetic processes in the brain requires sophisticated neuroimaging techniques enabling noninvasive and quantitative assessment of cerebral energy metabolisms and quantification of metabolic rates. Recent state-of-the-art in vivo X-nuclear MRS techniques, including 2 H, 17 O and 31 P MRS have shown promise, especially at ultra-high fields, in the quest for understanding neuroenergetics and brain function using preclinical models and in human subjects under healthy and diseased conditions. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. 1H and 31P nuclear magnetic resonance investigation of the interaction between 2,3-diphosphoglycerate and human normal adult hemoglobin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russu, I.M.; Wu, S.S.; Bupp, K.A.; Ho, N.T.; Ho, C.

    1990-01-01

    High-resolution 1 H and 31 P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy has been used to investigate the binding of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate to human normal adult hemoglobin and the molecular interactions involved in the allosteric effect of the 2,3-diphosphoglycerate molecule on hemoglobin. Individual hydrogen ion NMR titration curves have been obtained for 22-26 histidyl residues of hemoglobin and for each phosphate group of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate with hemoglobin in both the deoxy and carbonmonoxy forms. The results indicate that 2,3-diphosphoglycerate binds to deoxyhemoglobin at the central cavity between the two β chains and the binding involves the β2-histidyl residues. Moreover, the results suggest that the binding site of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate to carbonmonoxyhemoglobin contains the same (or at least some of the same) amino acid residues responsible for binding in the deoxy form. As a result of the specific interactions with 2,3-diphosphoglycerate, the β2-histidyl residues make a significant contribution to the alkaline Bohr effect under these experimental conditions. These results give the first experimental demonstration that long-range electrostatic and/or conformation effects of the binding could play an important role in the allosteric effect of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate on hemoglobin. The 31 P nuclear magnetic resonance titration data for each phosphate group of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate have been used to calculate the pK values of the phosphate groups in 2,3-diphosphoglycerate bound to deoxy- and carbon-monoxyhemoglobin and the proton uptake by 2,3-diphosphoglycerate upon ligand binding to hemoglobin

  16. 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy studies of tumor energy metabolism and its relationship to intracapillary oxyhemoglobin saturation status and tumor hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rofstad, E K; DeMuth, P; Fenton, B M; Sutherland, R M

    1988-10-01

    Relationships between tumor bioenergetic status on the one hand and intracapillary oxyhemoglobin (HbO2) saturation status and fraction of radiobiologically hypoxic cells on the other were studied using two murine sarcoma lines (KHT, RIF-1) and two human ovarian carcinoma xenograft lines (MLS, OWI). Tumor energy metabolism was studied in vivo by 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and the resonance area ratio (PCr + NTP beta)/Pi was used as parameter for bioenergetic status. Intracapillary HbO2 saturation status reflects the oxygen supply conditions in tumors and was measured in vitro using a cryospectrophotometric method. The KHT, RIF-1, and MLS lines showed decreasing bioenergetic status, i.e., decreasing PCr and NTP beta resonances and an increasing Pi resonance, with increasing tumor volume, whereas the OWI line showed no changes in these resonances during tumor growth. The volume-dependence of the HbO2 saturation status differed similarly among the tumor lines; HbO2 saturation status decreased with increasing tumor volume for the KHT, RIF-1, and MLS lines and was independent of tumor volume for the OWI line. Moreover, linear correlations were found between bioenergetic status and HbO2 saturation status for individual tumors of the KHT, RIF-1, and MLS lines. These observations together indicated a direct relationship between 31P-NMR spectral parameters and tumor oxygen supply conditions. However, this relationship was not identical for the different tumor lines, suggesting that it was influenced by intrinsic properties of the tumor cells such as rate of respiration and ability to survive under hypoxia. Similarly, there was no correlation between bioenergetic status and fraction of radiobiologically hypoxic cells across the four tumor lines. This indicates that 31P-NMR spectroscopy data have to be supplemented with other data, e.g., rate of oxygen consumption, cell survival time under hypoxic stress, and/or fraction of metabolically active

  17. Characteristics and degradation of carbon and phosphorus from aquatic macrophytes in lakes: Insights from solid-state (13)C NMR and solution (31)P NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shasha; Zhu, Yuanrong; Meng, Wei; He, Zhongqi; Feng, Weiying; Zhang, Chen; Giesy, John P

    2016-02-01

    Water extractable organic matter (WEOM) derived from macrophytes plays an important role in biogeochemical cycling of nutrients, including carbon (C), nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) in lakes. However, reports of their composition and degradation in natural waters are scarce. Therefore, compositions and degradation of WEOM derived from six aquatic macrophytes species of Tai Lake, China, were investigated by use of solid-state (13)C NMR and solution (31)P NMR spectroscopy. Carbohydrates were the predominant constituents of WEOM fractions, followed by carboxylic acid. Orthophosphate (ortho-P) was the dominant form of P (78.7% of total dissolved P) in the water extracts, followed by monoester P (mono-P) (20.6%) and little diester P (0.65%). The proportion of mono-P in total P species increased with the percentage of O-alkyl and O-C-O increasing in the WEOM, which is likely due to degradation and dissolution of biological membranes and RNA from aquatic plants. Whereas the proportion of mono-P decreased with alkyl-C, NCH/OCH3 and COO/N-C=O increasing, which may be owing to the insoluble compounds including C functional groups of alkyl-C, NCH/OCH3 and COO/N-C=O, such as aliphatic biopolymers, lignin and peptides. Based on the results of this study and information in the literature about water column and sediment, we propose that WEOM, dominated by polysaccharides, are the most labile and bioavailable component in debris of macrophytes. Additionally, these WEOMs would also be a potential source for bioavailable organic P (e.g., RNA, DNA and phytate) for lakes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Characteristics and degradation of carbon and phosphorus from aquatic macrophytes in lakes: Insights from solid-state 13C NMR and solution 31P NMR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    LIU, S. S.; Zhu, Y.; Meng, W.; Wu, F.

    2016-12-01

    Water extractable organic matter (WEOM) derived from macrophytes plays an important role in biogeochemical cycling of nutrients, including carbon (C), nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) in lakes. However, reports of their composition and degradation in natural waters are scarce. Therefore, compositions and degradation of WEOM derived from six aquatic macrophytes species of Tai Lake, China, were investigated by use of solid-state 13C NMR and solution 31P NMR spectroscopy. Carbohydrates were the predominant constituents of WEOM fractions, followed by carboxylic acid. Orthophosphate (ortho-P) was the dominant form of P (78.7% of total dissolved P) in the water extracts, followed by monoester P (mono-P) (20.6%) and little diester P (0.65%). The proportion of mono-P in total P species increased with the percentage of O-alkyl and O-C-O increasing in the WEOM, which is likely due to degradation and dissolution of biological membranes and RNA from aquatic plants. Whereas the proportion of mono-P decreased with alkyl-C, NCH/OCH3 and COO/N-C=O increasing, which may be owing to the insoluble compounds including C functional groups of alkyl-C, NCH/OCH3 and COO/N-C=O, such as aliphatic biopolymers, lignin and peptides. Based on the results of this study and information in the literature about water column and sediment, we propose that WEOM, dominated by polysaccharides, are the most labile and bioavailable component in debris of macrophytes. Additionally, these WEOMs would also be a potential source for bioavailable organic P (e.g., RNA, DNA and phytate) for lakes.

  19. Cooperation and competition between adenylate kinase, nucleoside diphosphokinase, electron transport, and ATP synthase in plant mitochondria studied by 31P-nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, J.K.M.; Aubert, S.; Gout, E.; Bligny, R.; Douce, R.

    1997-01-01

    Nucleotide metabolism in potato (Solanum tuberosum) mitochondria was studied using 31P-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and the O2 electrode. Immediately following the addition of ADP, ATP synthesis exceeded the rate of oxidative phosphorylation, fueled by succinate oxidation, due to mitochondrial adenylate kinase (AK) activity two to four times the maximum activity of ATP synthase. Only when the AK reaction approached equilibrium was oxidative phosphorylation the primary mechanism for net ATP synthesis. A pool of sequestered ATP in mitochondria enabled AK and ATP synthase to convert AMP to ATP in the presence of exogenous inorganic phosphate. During this conversion, AK activity can indirectly influence rates of oxidation of both succinate and NADH via changes in mitochondrial ATP. Mitochondrial nucleoside diphosphokinase, in cooperation with ATP synthase, was found to facilitate phosphorylation of nucleoside diphosphates other than ADP at rates similar to the maximum rate of oxidative phosphorylation. These results demonstrate that plant mitochondria contain all of the machinery necessary to rapidly regenerate nucleoside triphosphates from AMP and nucleoside diphosphates made during cellular biosynthesis and that AK activity can affect both the amount of ADP available to ATP synthase and the level of ATP regulating electron transport

  20. 31P-Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Determination of Phosphate Compartmentation in Leaves of Reproductive Soybeans (Glycine max L.) as Affected by Phosphate Nutrition 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauer, Michael J.; Blevins, Dale G.; Sierzputowska-Gracz, Hanna

    1989-01-01

    Most leaf phosphorus is remobilized to the seed during reproductive development in soybean. We determined, using 31P-NMR, the effect phosphorus remobilization has on vacuolar inorganic phosphate pool size in soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.) leaves with respect to phosphorus nutrition and plant development. Phosphate compartmentation between cytoplasmic and vacuolar pools was observed and followed in intact tissue grown hydroponically, at the R2, R4, and R6 growth stages. As phosphorus in the nutrient solution decreased from 0.45 to 0.05 millimolar, the vacuolar phosphate peak became less prominent relative to cytoplasmic phosphate and hexose monophosphate peaks. At a nutrient phosphate concentration of 0.05 millimolar, the vacuolar phosphate peak was not detectable. At higher levels of nutrient phosphate, as plants progressed from the R2 to the R6 growth stage, the vacuolar phosphate peak was the first to disappear, suggesting that storage phosphate was remobilized to a greater extent than metabolic phosphate. Under suboptimal phosphate nutrition (≤ 0.20 millimolar), the hexose monophosphate and cytoplasmic phosphate peaks declined earlier in reproductive development than when phosphate was present in optimal amounts. Under low phosphate concentrations (0.05 millimolar) cytoplasmic phosphate was greatly reduced. Carbon metabolism was coincidently disrupted under low phosphate nutrition as shown by the appearance of large, prominent starch grains in the leaves. Cytoplasmic phosphate, and leaf carbon metabolism dependent on it, are buffered by vacuolar phosphate until late stages of reproductive growth. Images Figure 4 PMID:16666705

  1. Solutions of nuclear pairing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balantekin, A. B.; Pehlivan, Y.

    2007-01-01

    We give the exact solution of orbit dependent nuclear pairing problem between two nondegenerate energy levels using the Bethe ansatz technique. Our solution reduces to previously solved cases in the appropriate limits including Richardson's treatment of reduced pairing in terms of rational Gaudin algebra operators

  2. Therapeutic effect of 15-deoxyspergualin on acute graft rejection detected by 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectrography, and its effect on rat heart transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, S.; Kanashiro, M.; Watanabe, H.; Amemiya, H.

    1988-01-01

    We investigated the effect of 15-deoxyspergualin (DSG) on graft rejection, starting administration at the onset of rejection and on the induction of immunologic unresponsiveness. Hearts from WKAH rats were transplanted into the neck of ACI rats. The energy metabolism of the grafted hearts was followed by 31 P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The day that energy metabolism started to fall was defined as the onset of rejection, and intraperitoneal administration of DSG was initiated at 5 mg/kg/day for 15 days from this day. The grafted heart arrested in 2 of 10 rats 9 and 11 days after transplantation, respectively, but the remaining 8 recovered from rejection and 5 of them showed evidence of immunologic unresponsiveness. Of 10 rats treated with DSG from the day of transplantation, only 1 rat showed evidence of unresponsiveness. The initiation of DSG treatment from the onset of rejection resulted in a higher percentage of induction of unresponsiveness. Therefore, DSG was considered to specifically inhibit lymphocyte clone expansion at the onset of rejection. Spleen cells obtained from recipients 7-10 days after the end of DSG treatment were administered to syngeneic ACI rats grafted with WKAH hearts. Graft survival was significantly prolonged, but long-term unresponsiveness could not be transferred. However, immunologic unresponsiveness could be adoptively transferred in 3 of 5 rats receiving spleen cells from syngeneic rats that had recovered from rejection after DSG treatment and had acquired long-term unresponsiveness. These results suggest that suppressor cells are resistant to DSG and are spared and participate in the maintenance of immunologic unresponsiveness

  3. 1H and 31P nuclear magnetic resonance investigation of the interaction between 2,3-diphosphoglycerate and human normal adult hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russu, I M; Wu, S S; Bupp, K A; Ho, N T; Ho, C

    1990-04-17

    High-resolution 1H and 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy has been used to investigate the binding of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate to human normal adult hemoglobin and the molecular interactions involved in the allosteric effect of the 2,3-diphosphoglycerate molecule on hemoglobin. Individual hydrogen ion NMR titration curves have been obtained for 22-26 histidyl residues of hemoglobin and for each phosphate group of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate with hemoglobin in both the deoxy and carbonmonoxy forms. The results indicate that 2,3-diphosphoglycerate binds to deoxyhemoglobin at the central cavity between the two beta chains and the binding involves the beta 2-histidyl residues. Moreover, the results suggest that the binding site of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate to carbonmonoxyhemoglobin contains the same (or at least some of the same) amino acid residues responsible for binding in the deoxy form. As a result of the specific interactions with 2,3-diphosphoglycerate, the beta 2-histidyl residues make a significant contribution to the alkaline Bohr effect under these experimental conditions (up to 0.5 proton/Hb tetramer). 2,3-Diphosphoglycerate also affects the individual hydrogen ion equilibria of several histidyl residues located away from the binding site on the surface of the hemoglobin molecule, and, possibly, in the heme pockets. These results give the first experimental demonstration that long-range electrostatic and/or conformational effects of the binding could play an important role in the allosteric effect of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate on hemoglobin.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry II. Purity of phosphorus-based agrochemicals glyphosate (N-(phosphonomethyl)-glycine) and profenofos (O-(4-bromo-2-chlorophenyl) O-ethyl S-propyl phosphorothioate) measured by 1H and 31P QNMR spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saed Al Deen, Tareq; Brynn Hibbert, D.; Hook, James M.; Wells, Robert J.

    2002-01-01

    The purities of the widely-used herbicide glyphosate (N-(phosphonomethyl)glycine), and the insecticide profenofos (O-(4-bromo-2-chlorophenyl) O-ethyl S-propyl phosphorothioate) were determined by 1 H and 31 P quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance (QNMR) spectrometry using an internal standard. QNMR does not need a standard reference of the same target analyte, in contrast to chromatographic methods, but only a compound containing the nucleus of interest. Sodium acetate and sodium phosphate of known purity were chosen as internal standards for 1 H NMR and 31 P NMR), respectively for the water soluble glyphosate and a single internal standard, trimethyl phosphate for both 1 H and 31 P NMR quantitative analysis of the organic soluble profenofos. These standards have NMR peaks that do not interfere with those of the analyte, they are chemically inert and are soluble in the deuterated solvent. The average purity of glyphosate obtained by 1 H NMR (97.07%, σ=0.68) agreed with that by 31 P NMR (96.53%, σ=0.90; ANOVA, P=0.074) for the five batches provided by the manufacturer according to the procedures for chemical registration in Australia. The standard deviations of seven independent analyses of a single batch by 1 H NMR and 31 P NMR were σ=0.24% and σ=0.33%, respectively, values which confirm the exceptional precision of the method. The purity of profenofos by 1 H NMR (94.63%, σ=0.14) also agreed with that by 31 P NMR (94.62%, σ=0.59; ANOVA, P=0.97). Uncertainty budgets for the measured purities of glyphosate and profenofos show that the uncertainty in the purity of the internal standard is a major contributor to the uncertainty of the result. NMR was also used to establish the impurity profile of both compounds, and quantify the impurities present

  5. Local anesthetics: interaction with human erythrocyte membranes as studied by {sup 1}H and {sup 31}P nuclear magnetic resonance; Anestesicos locais: interacao com membranas de eritrocitos de sangue humano, estudada por ressonancia magnetica nuclear de {sup 1}H e {sup 31}P

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraceto, Leonardo Fernandes; Paula, Eneida de [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Biologia. Dept. de Bioquimica]. E-mail: depaula@unicamp.br

    2004-02-01

    The literature carries many theories about the mechanism of action of local anesthetics (LA). We can highlight those focusing the direct effect of LA on the sodium channel protein and the ones that consider the interaction of anesthetic molecules with the lipid membrane phase. The interaction between local anesthetics and human erythrocyte membranes has been studied by {sup 1}H and {sup 31}P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. It was found that lidocaine (LDC) and benzocaine (BZC) bind to the membranes, increase the mobility of the protons of the phospholipids acyl chains, and decrease the mobility and/or change the structure of the polar head groups. The results indicate that lidocaine molecules are inserted across the polar and liquid interface of the membrane, establishing both electrostatic (charged form) and hydrophobic (neutral form) interactions. Benzocaine locates itself a little deeper in the bilayer, between the interfacial glycerol region and the hydrophobic core. These changes in mobility or conformation of membrane lipids could affect the Na{sup +}-channel protein insertion in the bilayer, stabilizing it in the inactivated state, thus causing anesthesia. (author)

  6. Identification of solution products of lanthanoid (3) diethyldithiocarbamatohexamethyl phosphotriamide compounds from IR, electron and sup 1 H, sup 13 C, sup 31 P NMR absorption spectra. Identifikatsiya produktov rastvoreniya diehtilditiokarbamatogeksametil fosfotriamidnykh soedinenij lantanoidov (3) po IK, ehlektronnym i YaMR sup 1 H, sup 13 C, sup 31 P spektram pogloshcheniya

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skopenko, V V; Savost' yanova, A F; Trachevskij, V V; Gorbalyuk, A D; Sukhan, T A [Kievskij Gosudarstvennyj Univ., Kiev (Ukrainian SSR)

    1991-01-01

    By the methods of conductometry, IR, electron and {sup 1}H, {sup 13}C, {sup 31}P NMR spectroscopy nonaqueous solutions of the compounds (La(S{sub 2}CNEt{sub 2})Hmpa{sub 5})(BPh{sub 4}){sub 2}, Hmpa=OP(NMe{sub 2}){sub 3}; (Ln(S{sub 2}CNEt{sub 2}){sub 2}Hmpa{sub 3})BPh{sub 4}, Ln=Y, La-Lu; (Ln(S{sub 2}CNEt{sub 2}){sub 3}Hmpa{sub 2}), Ln=La-Gd, have been investigated. It is ascertained that bis-dithiocarbamate compounds are dissolved in all the studied solvents with preservation of composition and structure of lanthanide (3) inner coordination sphere. Tris-dithiocarbamates in nonaqueous solutions are subjected to reactions of ligand redistribution according to schemes depending on the solvent nature. In the process of dissolving of lanthanum monodithiocarbamate bond isomerization of dithiocarbamate groups occurs, which is pronounced in splitting of {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR signals.

  7. Characterization of phosphorus forms in lake macrophytes and algae by solution 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquatic macrophytes and algae are important sources of phosphorus (P) in the lake environment that cause blooms of algae under certain biogeochemical conditions. However, the knowledge of forms of P in these plants and algae and their contribution to internal loads of lake P is very limited. Witho...

  8. Nuclear waste solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Darrel D.; Ebra, Martha A.

    1987-01-01

    High efficiency removal of technetium values from a nuclear waste stream is achieved by addition to the waste stream of a precipitant contributing tetraphenylphosphonium cation, such that a substantial portion of the technetium values are precipitated as an insoluble pertechnetate salt.

  9. An overview of the metabolic differences between Bradyrhizobium japonicum 110 bacteria and differentiated bacteroids from soybean (Glycine max) root nodules: an in vitro 13C- and 31P-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vauclare, Pierre; Bligny, Richard; Gout, Elisabeth; Widmer, Francois

    2013-01-01

    Bradyrhizobium japonicum is a symbiotic nitrogen-fixing soil bacteria that induce root nodules formation in legume soybean (Glycine max.). Using 13 C- and 31 P-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, we have analysed the metabolite profiles of cultivated B. japonicum cells and bacteroids isolated from soybean nodules. Our results revealed some quantitative and qualitative differences between the metabolite profiles of bacteroids and their vegetative state. This includes in bacteroids a huge accumulation of soluble carbohydrates such as trehalose, glutamate, myo-inositol and homo-spermidine as well as Pi, nucleotide pools and intermediates of the primary carbon metabolism. Using this novel approach, these data show that most of the compounds detected in bacteroids reflect the metabolic adaptation of rhizobia to the surrounding microenvironment with its host plant cells. (authors)

  10. Mechanism of the negative force-frequency relationship in physiologically intact rat ventricular myocardium. Studies by intracellular Ca2+ monitor with iodo-1 and by 31P-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morii, Isao; Kihara, Yasuki; Sasayama, Shigetake; Konishi, Takashi; Inubushi, Toshiro.

    1996-01-01

    We studied the subcellular mechanisms of the negative force-frequency relationship in rat myocardium by measuring intracellular Ca 2+ transients by indo-1 fluorometry and intracellular pH (pH i ) and phosphate compounds with 31 P-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The data were compared with those from guinea pig hearts, which show a positive force-frequency relationship. By increasing the pacing rate from 3 Hz to 5 Hz, the peak positive first derivative of left ventricular pressure (LVdP/dt) in rat heart decreased by 10±1% (n=6). In contrast to this negative inotropic response, simultaneously measured peak Ca 2+ transients increased by 6±1%. Guinea pig heart (n=6) showed an increase in peak positive LVdP/dt (33±1%) which was associated with an increase in peak Ca 2+ transients (8±1%). Under equivalent experimental conditions in an NMR spectrometer, this increase in the pacing rate did not affect intracellular levels of phosphate compounds in either rat (n=6) or guinea pig heart (n=6). In contrast, pH i showed a decrease of 0.031±0.006 pH units in rat heart, while no changes were observed in guinea pig heart. These results suggest that in physiological rat myocardium, pH i is susceptible to changes in the stimulus frequency and may affect the Ca 2+ -responsiveness of contractile proteins, which results in the negative force-frequency relationship. (author)

  11. Comparison of effects of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition with those of angiotensin II receptor antagonism on functional and metabolic recovery in postischemic working rat heart as studied by [31P] nuclear magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werrmann, J G; Cohen, S M

    1994-10-01

    To assess the role of angiotensin II (AII) in development of myocardial injury during ischemia and reperfusion, the effects of short-term treatment with the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor lisinopril were compared with the effects of short-term treatment with L-158,338, an AII antagonist, in isolated working rat heart. Myocardial function was assessed and correlated with simultaneous measurement of high-energy phosphate metabolism and intracellular pH by [31P] nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) before, during, and after global ischemia. Hearts from rats treated with 1 mg/kg lisinopril in vivo recovered substantially more function than those of controls (p effect on functional recovery. A dose-dependent increase in functional recovery was observed in rat heart treated with 0.3, 1, or 3 mg/kg L-158,338 in vivo (p energy phosphate metabolism was essentially unchanged by any treatment regimen. AII antagonism alone resulted in a degree of improvement in functional recovery comparable to that observed with oral ACE inhibitor treatment.

  12. Anestésicos locais: interação com membranas de eritrócitos de sangue humano, estudada por ressonância magnética nuclear de 1H e 31P

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fraceto Leonardo Fernandes

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The literature carries many theories about the mechanism of action of local anesthetics (LA. We can highlight those focusing the direct effect of LA on the sodium channel protein and the ones that consider the interaction of anesthetic molecules with the lipid membrane phase. The interaction between local anesthetics and human erythrocyte membranes has been studied by ¹H and 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. It was found that lidocaine (LDC and benzocaine (BZC bind to the membranes, increase the mobility of the protons of the phospholipid's acyl chains, and decrease the mobility and/or change the structure of the polar head groups. The results indicate that lidocaine molecules are inserted across the polar and liquid interface of the membrane, establishing both electrostatic (charged form and hydrophobic (neutral form interactions. Benzocaine locates itself a little deeper in the bilayer, between the interfacial glycerol region and the hydrophobic core. These changes in mobility or conformation of membrane lipids could affect the Na+-channel protein insertion in the bilayer, stabilizing it in the inactivated state, thus causing anesthesia.

  13. Ischemic stroke progress evaluation by {sup 31}P NMR-based metabonomic of human serum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grandizoli, Caroline W.P.S.; Barison, Andersson, E-mail: andernmr@ufpr.br [Universidade Federal do Parana (UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Departamento de Quimica. Centro de RMN; Lange, Marcos C.; Novak, Felipe T. M. [Universidade Federal do Parana (UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Hospital de Clínicas. Divisao de Neurologia; Campos, Francinete R. [Universidade Federal do Parana (UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Departmento de Farmacia

    2014-07-01

    In this work, chemometric analyses over {sup 31}P{"1"H} NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) spectra of human blood serum permitted to discriminated ischemic stroke patients from health individuals due to changes in the chemical composition of phosphorus-containing compounds. These results indicate that {sup 31}P NMR-based metabonomic allowed insights over the mechanism triggered by ischemic stroke. (author)

  14. Ischemic stroke progress evaluation by 31P NMR-based metabonomic of human serum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grandizoli, Caroline W.P.S.; Barison, Andersson; Lange, Marcos C.; Novak, Felipe T. M.; Campos, Francinete R.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, chemometric analyses over 31 P{ 1H } NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) spectra of human blood serum permitted to discriminated ischemic stroke patients from health individuals due to changes in the chemical composition of phosphorus-containing compounds. These results indicate that 31 P NMR-based metabonomic allowed insights over the mechanism triggered by ischemic stroke. (author)

  15. Quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry II. Purity of phosphorus-based agrochemicals glyphosate (N-(phosphonomethyl)-glycine) and profenofos (O-(4-bromo-2-chlorophenyl) O-ethyl S-propyl phosphorothioate) measured by {sup 1}H and {sup 31}P QNMR spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saed Al Deen, Tareq; Brynn Hibbert, D.; Hook, James M.; Wells, Robert J

    2002-12-09

    The purities of the widely-used herbicide glyphosate (N-(phosphonomethyl)glycine), and the insecticide profenofos (O-(4-bromo-2-chlorophenyl) O-ethyl S-propyl phosphorothioate) were determined by {sup 1}H and {sup 31}P quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance (QNMR) spectrometry using an internal standard. QNMR does not need a standard reference of the same target analyte, in contrast to chromatographic methods, but only a compound containing the nucleus of interest. Sodium acetate and sodium phosphate of known purity were chosen as internal standards for {sup 1}H NMR and {sup 31}P NMR), respectively for the water soluble glyphosate and a single internal standard, trimethyl phosphate for both {sup 1}H and {sup 31}P NMR quantitative analysis of the organic soluble profenofos. These standards have NMR peaks that do not interfere with those of the analyte, they are chemically inert and are soluble in the deuterated solvent. The average purity of glyphosate obtained by {sup 1}H NMR (97.07%, {sigma}=0.68) agreed with that by {sup 31}P NMR (96.53%, {sigma}=0.90; ANOVA, P=0.074) for the five batches provided by the manufacturer according to the procedures for chemical registration in Australia. The standard deviations of seven independent analyses of a single batch by {sup 1}H NMR and {sup 31}P NMR were {sigma}=0.24% and {sigma}=0.33%, respectively, values which confirm the exceptional precision of the method. The purity of profenofos by {sup 1}H NMR (94.63%, {sigma}=0.14) also agreed with that by {sup 31}P NMR (94.62%, {sigma}=0.59; ANOVA, P=0.97). Uncertainty budgets for the measured purities of glyphosate and profenofos show that the uncertainty in the purity of the internal standard is a major contributor to the uncertainty of the result. NMR was also used to establish the impurity profile of both compounds, and quantify the impurities present.

  16. 31-P NMR spectroscopy in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiricuta, I.C.; Schmitt, W.G.H.; Beyer, H.K.

    1987-01-01

    Results suggest 31-P NMR spectroscopy to allow a discrimination between good and bad blood supply to the tumour owing to different metabolic behaviour and to furnish important information on tumour response to radiotherapy just a few hours after the application of a relatively low dose. Spectroscopy showed the radiation-sensitive tumour cells to behave relatively uniformly after radiotherapy suggesting this behaviour to be interpreted as therapeutical effectiveness. (orig./SHA) [de

  17. Effects of 2-Deoxy-D-Glucose on Metabolic Status, Proliferative Capacity and Growth Rate of FSall Tumor: Observations made by In Vivo 31P-Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy and Flow Cytometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Hye Sook; Choi, Eun Kyung; Cho, Jeong Gill; Lim, Tae Hwan; Lee, Tae Keun; Yi, Yun; Cho, Young Joo; Kim, Gon Sup

    1991-01-01

    The effect of 2-deoxy-d-glucose (2-DDG) on C 3 H mouse fibrosarcoma (FSall) was studied. Metabolic status, especially for energy metabolism, was studied using in vivo 31 P-MRS, proliferative capacity was observed on flow cytometry (FC) and growth rate was measured after transplantation of 106 viable tumor cells in the dorsum of foot of C 3 Hf/Sed mice. One gram of 2-DDG per kg of body weight was injected intraperitoneally on 12th day of implantation. Average tumor size on 12th day of implantation was 250mm 3 . Growth rate of FSall tumor was measured by tumor doubling time between tumor age 5-12 days was 0.84 days with slope 0.828 and tumor doubling time between tumor age 13-28 days was 3.2 days with slope 0.218 in control group. After 2-DDG injection, tumor doubling time was elongated to 5.1 days with slope 0.136. The effect of 2-DDG studied in vivo 31 P-MRS suggested that the increase of phosphomonoester (PME) and inorganic phosphate (Pi) by increasing size of tumor, slowed down after 2-DDG injection. Flow cytometry showed significantly increased S-phase and G 2 +M phase fraction suggesting increased proliferative capacity of tumor cells in the presence of 2-DDG. Authors observed an interesting effect 2-DDG on FSall tumor and attempt to utilize as an adjunct for radiotherapy

  18. Nuclear power: obstacles and solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hart, R.S.

    2002-01-01

    Nuclear power has a history extending over more than 50 years; it has been pursued both for military power applications (primarily aircraft carrier and submarine propulsion) and for commercial power applications. Nuclear power has benefited from many hundreds of billions of dollars in research, development, design, construction, and operations expenditures, and has received substantial attention and support world-wide, having being implemented by most developed countries, including all of the G-7 countries, and several developing countries (for example, India, China, and Republic of Korea). In spite of this long history, massive development effort, and unprecedented financial commitment, nuclear power has failed to achieve commercial success, having captured less than 5% of the world's primary energy supply market. There are many factors contributing to the stagnation/decline of the commercial nuclear power business. These factors include: non competitive economics, lengthy construction schedules, large and demanding human resource requirements, safety concerns, proliferation concerns, waste management concerns, the high degree of government financial and political involvement necessary, and the incompatibility of the available nuclear power plant designs with most process heat applications due to their temperature limitations and/or large heat output. An examination of the obstacles to deployment of nuclear power plants of current design suggest a set of requirements for new nuclear power plants, which may overcome or circumvent these obstacles. These requirements include: inherent characteristics that will achieve reactor shutdown under any postulated accident condition; the removal of decay heat by natural and passive means; no safety dependence on operator actions and tolerant to operator error, and malicious or incompetent operator action; and, economic viability in relatively small unit sizes. Many innovative reactor technologies and concepts are under

  19. Nuclear power: obstacles and solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hart, R.S.

    2001-01-01

    Nuclear power has a history extending over more than 50 years; it has been pursued both for military power applications (primarily aircraft carrier and submarine propulsion) and for commercial power applications. Nuclear power has benefited from many hundreds of billions of dollars in research, development, design, construction, and operations expenditures, and has received substantial attention and support world-wide, having being implemented by most developed countries, including all of the G-7 countries, and several developing countries (for example, India, China, and Republic of Korea). In spite of this long history, massive development effort, and unprecedented financial commitment, nuclear power has failed to achieve commercial success, having captured less than 5% of the world's primary energy supply market. There are many factors contributing to the stagnation/decline of the commercial nuclear power business. These factors include: non competitive economics, lengthy construction schedules, large and demanding human resource requirements, safety concerns, proliferation concerns, waste management concerns, the high degree of government financial and political involvement necessary, and the incompatibility of the available nuclear power plant designs with most process heat applications due to their temperature limitations and/or large heat output. An examination of the obstacles to deployment of nuclear power plants of current design suggest a set of requirements for new nuclear power plants, which may overcome or circumvent these obstacles. These requirements include: inherent characteristics that will achieve reactor shutdown under any postulated accident condition; the removal of decay heat by natural and passive means; no safety dependence on operator actions and tolerant to operator error, and malicious or incompetent operator action; and, economic viability in relatively small unit sizes. Many innovative reactor technologies and concepts are under

  20. Nuclear proliferation: linkages and solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quester, G.H.

    1979-01-01

    Nuclear proliferation must be periodically re-examined as a moral as well as a practical foreign policy dilemma. The question is asked whether proliferation precludes a safe and peaceful world, or if a halt to proliferation is adequate without other arms control. The moral dilemma in foreign policy arises over the need to make practical choices which often serve one goal while sacrificing another. The ramifications of nuclear proliferation are examined and the conclusions reached that it is not an acceptable option. It is also decided that, because general disarmament steps will be more difficult to achieve, the world may have to accept a small number of nuclear arsenals as the price of state sovereignties. A high priority for making the effort to prevent proliferation is advised. 8 references

  1. Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance measurements of HIV fusion peptide 13CO to lipid 31P proximities support similar partially inserted membrane locations of the α helical and β sheet peptide structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrys, Charles M; Qiang, Wei; Sun, Yan; Xie, Li; Schmick, Scott D; Weliky, David P

    2013-10-03

    Fusion of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) membrane and the host cell membrane is an initial step of infection of the host cell. Fusion is catalyzed by gp41, which is an integral membrane protein of HIV. The fusion peptide (FP) is the ∼25 N-terminal residues of gp41 and is a domain of gp41 that plays a key role in fusion catalysis likely through interaction with the host cell membrane. Much of our understanding of the FP domain has been accomplished with studies of "HFP", i.e., a ∼25-residue peptide composed of the FP sequence but lacking the rest of gp41. HFP catalyzes fusion between membrane vesicles and serves as a model system to understand fusion catalysis. HFP binds to membranes and the membrane location of HFP is likely a significant determinant of fusion catalysis perhaps because the consequent membrane perturbation reduces the fusion activation energy. In the present study, many HFPs were synthesized and differed in the residue position that was (13)CO backbone labeled. Samples were then prepared that each contained a singly (13)CO labeled HFP incorporated into membranes that lacked cholesterol. HFP had distinct molecular populations with either α helical or oligomeric β sheet structure. Proximity between the HFP (13)CO nuclei and (31)P nuclei in the membrane headgroups was probed by solid-state NMR (SSNMR) rotational-echo double-resonance (REDOR) measurements. For many samples, there were distinct (13)CO shifts for the α helical and β sheet structures so that the proximities to (31)P nuclei could be determined for each structure. Data from several differently labeled HFPs were then incorporated into a membrane location model for the particular structure. In addition to the (13)CO labeled residue position, the HFPs also differed in sequence and/or chemical structure. "HFPmn" was a linear peptide that contained the 23 N-terminal residues of gp41. "HFPmn_V2E" contained the V2E mutation that for HIV leads to greatly reduced extent of fusion and

  2. Bilayers of phosphatidyldiacylglycerol and phosphatidylcholesterol give 31P-NMR spectra characteristic for hexagonal and isotropic phases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noggle, J.H.; Marecek, J.F.; Mandal, S.B.; Venetie, R. van; Rogers, J.; Jain, M.K.; Ramirez, F.

    1982-01-01

    Aqueous dispersions of phosphatidyldiacylglycerol and phosphatidylcholesterol are shown to form bilayers by differential scanning calorimetry, diphenylhexatriene fluorescence polarization, and electron microscopy; however, 31P-nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of these dispersions are

  3. Nuclear power: no solution to climate change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, Jim

    2005-09-01

    Over the past years the nuclear power industry has once again tried to exploit concern about climate change to reverse its ongoing decline. One positive aspect of this debate is that it has highlighted the need for action to avert the adverse social and environmental impacts associated with climate change. The debate has shifted - the science has been accepted and we are now debating solutions

  4. Nuclear heating solutions. Realizations and projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumitrescu, Monica; Prisecaru, Ilie

    2009-01-01

    Considering the present situation of thermal energy in Romania and having in view the fact that Romania is a Kyoto protocol signatory state one estimates that the development of the nuclear energy will have a promising growth. According with the statement of the National Energetic Observer, Romania became a net energy resource importer for the past 30 years and the estimations about the future are not optimistic. The finite reserves of fossil fuel (coal and natural gas), the gradual reduction of their share in the national energy balance with a tendency to become insignificant after 2025, as well as the present situation of the thermal power plants which are already beyond their operation life, all these indicate the nuclear energy as being the most reliable and sustainable future source for thermal energy production. Having in view these circumstances the paper aims at a short presentation of the existing nuclear solutions for district heating. Also, reviewed are the reactor projects that are under different development stage in the world, as well as the best nuclear solutions to be possibly implemented in Romania. The article represents a synthesis of the documentation made by PhD student Monica Dumitrescu in her preparation stage. (authors)

  5. 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy of skeletal muscle in patients with fibromyalgia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Søren; Jensen, K E; Thomsen, C

    1992-01-01

    31Phosphorous nuclear magnetic resonance (31P NMR) spectroscopy of painful calf muscle was performed in 12 patients with fibromyalgia (FS) and 7 healthy subjects during rest, aerobic and anaerobic exercising conditions, and postexercise recovery. Ratios of inorganic phosphate and creatinine...

  6. 31P-NMR, 77Se-NMR AND MASS SPECTRAL STUDIES ON SOME ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The phosphorus chemical shifts largely depend on the nature, the ... reaction mixture was worked up as above to obtain the title phosphine, ..... Crutchfield, M.M.; Dungan, C.H.; Letcher, J.H.; Van Wazer, J.R. 31P Nuclear Magnetic. Resonance ...

  7. 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy of skeletal muscle in patients with fibromyalgia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Søren; Jensen, K E; Thomsen, C

    1992-01-01

    31Phosphorous nuclear magnetic resonance (31P NMR) spectroscopy of painful calf muscle was performed in 12 patients with fibromyalgia (FS) and 7 healthy subjects during rest, aerobic and anaerobic exercising conditions, and postexercise recovery. Ratios of inorganic phosphate and creatinine...... phosphate (Pi/PCr) and pH were calculated from the collected 31P NMR spectra. Resting values of Pi/PCr were normal in the patients. Patients delivered only 49% of the muscle power of the controls (p = 0.005). Patients and controls had similar rates of Pi/PCr and pH changes during work and recovery...

  8. Desalination of seawater: a nuclear solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basta, H.

    2003-01-01

    1,4 milliard human beings do not benefit of sufficient clean water supply. The desalting of seawater is a valid and tested solution in terms of technology but the 2 physical processes involved, evaporation and reverse osmosis are energy-greedy. Only rich countries like Kuwait or Saudi-Arabia can afford producing massive volumes of fresh water from seawater. Today the total world capacity of desalting reaches 30 milliard m 3 a day with 10.000 operating units, half of which installed in middle-east countries. The use of nuclear energy is a solution to lower costs. In Aktau (Kazakhstan) a BN-350 fast reactor has been producing a 135 MW electrical output and 80.000 m 3 of fresh water a day for 27 years. In Japan about 10 desalting units have been coupled to nuclear power plants. A company (Eskom) based in South-Africa is developing a new concept of high temperature reactor: the PBMR (pebble bed modular reactor). The suitability of this reactor has been assessed for desalting and it appears that its main assets are its size: 165 MW electrical output (400 MW thermal output) and its Brayton cycle. Other characteristics such as the coolant (helium), the type of fuel (8% enriched uranium encapsulated in carbon), the low design and maintenance costs, the short building time (2 years) are important when considering issues like nuclear safety, non-proliferation and profitability. (A.C.)

  9. NUKEM. Innovative solutions for nuclear engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheffler, Beate

    2011-01-01

    Management of radioactive waste, handling spent fuel elements, decommissioning of nuclear facilities, and engineering and consulting activities are services associated with the name of NUKEM all over the world. The company's scientists and engineers develop solution concepts combining the latest technologies with proven techniques and many years of experience. The company;s history and the services offered to the nuclear industry began more than 5 decades ago. The predecessor, NUKEM Nuklear-Chemie-Metallurgie, was founded in 1960 as one of the earliest nuclear companies in Germany. Originally, the firm produced fuel elements for a variety of reactor lines. As early as in the 1970s, logical extensions of these business activities were nuclear engineering and plant construction. In the meantime, NUKEM Technologies GmbH has developed a worldwide reputation for its activities. Numerous reference projects bear witness to optimum project management and customer satisfaction. Since 2009, NUKEM Technologies has been a wholly owned subsidiary of the Russian Atomstroyexport. NUKEM Technologies operates sales and project offices outside Germany, e.g. in Russia, China, Lithuania, France, and Bulgaria. In this way, the company is present in its target markets of Russia, Western and Eastern Europe as well as Asia, offering customers and partners fast and direct contacts. (orig.)

  10. Nuclear plant problem needs a federal solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zitser, B.S.

    1984-01-01

    Utilities presently committed to nuclear construction programs, regardless of their stage of completion, are experiencing a marked decline in financial health which the author of the following believes will be a long-term trend. Concerns over quality control, siting misgivings, cost underestimates, and consequential rate shock have increased pessimism on the part of investors, ratepayers, and regulators. The article describes the financial challenges facing one nuclear utility and discusses the factors contributing to widely disparate rate impact projections offered by utilities and regulators. The solution to financing difficulties imposed by cancellations and delays may lie with yet another player: the federal government. Outlining its potential advantages and problems, the author offers his proposal

  11. 31P-NMR differentiation between intracellular phosphate pools in Cosmarium (chlorophyta)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elgavish, A.; Elgavish, G.A.

    1980-01-01

    31 P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of intact Cosmarium sp. cells is presented as a suitable tool for the differentiation of intracellular accumulation pools of polyphosphates. The cold trichloroacetic acid (TCA) insoluble fraction is shown to contain most of the total cellular phosphate in the phosphate rich Cosmarium cells. Moreover, evidence from a 31 P-NMR study and electron microscopic observations of cold TCA treated Cosmarium cells indicate that this fraction consists mostly of polyphosphates which seem to retain the native morphological structure observed in the untreated cells. The determination of orthophosphate in the hot water extract of Cosmarium cells did not measure the polyphosphate pools. Determination of total phosphorus content in the hot water extract rendered a value three times higher than the frequently used orthophosphate determination procedure. However, as revealed by the 31 P-NMR spectra and the chemical analyses of the extract and of the treated cells, even total phosphorus in the extract measured only 30% of the total cellular phosphorus. 31 P-NMR enabled the unequivocal chemical identification of the major phosphate compounds in the hot water extract (Surplus P) as orthophosphate and polyphosphates of about 10 phosphate units chainlength. More than 70% of the accumulation pool of polyphosphates was still in the cells after extraction. However, the electron microscopy study revealed that the native granular structure of polyphosphates had been destroyed by the hot water extraction procedure

  12. 31P Solid-state MAS NMR spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grobet, P.J.; Geerts, H.; Martens, J.A.; Jacobs, P.A.

    1989-01-01

    The structures of the silicoaluminiophosphates MCM-1 and MCM9 were characterized by 27 Al and 31 P MAS NMR. The structural identity of MCM-1 and its silicon-free homologue AlPO 4 -H 3 is demonstrated. The presence of a structural mixture in MCM-9 is confirmed. 31 P MAS NMR spectra of MCM-9 could be interpreted as a superposition of spectra of VPI-5, AlPO 4 -H 3 and SAPO-11 phases. (author). 12 refs.; 3 figs.; 1 tab

  13. Scientific Solutions to Nuclear Waste Environmental Challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, Bradley R.

    2014-01-01

    The Hidden Cost of Nuclear Weapons The Cold War arms race drove an intense plutonium production program in the U.S. This campaign produced approximately 100 tons of plutonium over 40 years. The epicenter of plutonium production in the United States was the Hanford site, a 586 square mile reservation owned by the Department of Energy and located on the Colombia River in Southeastern Washington. Plutonium synthesis relied on nuclear reactors to convert uranium to plutonium within the reactor fuel rods. After a sufficient amount of conversion occurred, the rods were removed from the reactor and allowed to cool. They were then dissolved in an acid bath and chemically processed to separate and purify plutonium from the rest of the constituents in the used reactor fuel. The acidic waste was then neutralized using sodium hydroxide and the resulting mixture of liquids and precipitates (small insoluble particles) was stored in huge underground waste tanks. The byproducts of the U.S. plutonium production campaign include over 53 million gallons of high-level radioactive waste stored in 177 large underground tanks at Hanford and another 34 million gallons stored at the Savannah River Site in South Carolina. This legacy nuclear waste represents one of the largest environmental clean-up challenges facing the world today. The nuclear waste in the Hanford tanks is a mixture of liquids and precipitates that have settled into sludge. Some of these tanks are now over 60 years old and a small number of them are leaking radioactive waste into the ground and contaminating the environment. The solution to this nuclear waste challenge is to convert the mixture of solids and liquids into a durable material that won't disperse into the environment and create hazards to the biosphere. What makes this difficult is the fact that the radioactive half-lives of some of the radionuclides in the waste are thousands to millions of years long. (The half-life of a radioactive substance is the amount

  14. Nuclear energy, energy of the future or bad solution?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The document presents the speeches of the debate on the nuclear energy solution for the future, presented during the meeting of the 6 may in Rennes, in the framework of the National Debate on the energies. The debate concerns the risks assessment and control, the solutions for the radioactive wastes, the foreign examples and the future of the nuclear energy. (A.L.B.)

  15. Nuclear waste management. Pioneering solutions from Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasilainen, Kari

    2016-01-01

    Presentation outline: Background: Nuclear energy in Finland; Nuclear Waste Management (NWM) Experiences; Low and Intermediate Level Waste (LILW); High Level Waste - Deep Geological Repository (DGR); NWM cost estimate in Finland; Conclusions: World-leading expert services

  16. Nuclear energy–Any solution for sustainability and climate protection?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mez, Lutz

    2012-01-01

    For the future of nuclear power it will be decisive whether or not nuclear fission technologies offer a sustainable solution to global energy problems. The impressive expansion of nuclear reactors in the 1960s and 1970 slowed down after the meltdown in Harrisburg and the nuclear explosion in Chernobyl. Since the end of the 1980s installed nuclear capacity has stagnated, and in Europe declined. However, a nuclear revival or renaissance has been predicted for 30 years. This article reviews global scenarios and national nuclear programmes and analyses problems in the nuclear industry. Special attention is given to nuclear power and global warming and the nexus between nuclear power and nuclear proliferation. - Highlights: ► The status of nuclear programmes in the world is examined. ► Nuclear power has taken a nose-dive in Western industrialised countries. ► The nuclear renaissance has been announced since 1981 but never materialised. ► Share of nuclear power is 15.7% of global electricity but only 2.3% of global FEC. ► Nuclear energy is no sustainable solution and cannot avoid global warming.

  17. Nuclear power - a (too) pat solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vester, F.

    1979-01-01

    This popular book in 'window' form attempts to give a picture of the complex economic and social consequences of a further development of nuclear power utilisation. The advantages of nuclear power are listed, and a critical balance is established for the negative consequences of an all-nuclear energy use for economy, environment, and society. (UA) 891 UA/UA 892 MKO [de

  18. Supervision of nuclear safety - IAEA requirements, accepted solutions, trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jurkowski, M.

    2007-01-01

    Ten principles of the nuclear safety, based on the IAEA's standards are presented. Convention on Nuclear Safety recommends for nuclear safety landscape, the control transparency, culture safety, legal framework and knowledge preservation. Examples of solutions accepted in France, Finland, and Czech Republic are discussed. New trends in safety fundamentals and Integration Regulatory Review are presented

  19. Evaluation of phosphorus characterization in broiler ileal digesta, manure, and litter samples: (31)P-NMR vs. HPLC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leytem, A B; Kwanyuen, P; Plumstead, P W; Maguire, R O; Brake, J

    2008-01-01

    Using 31-phosphorus nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((31)P-NMR) to characterize phosphorus (P) in animal manures and litter has become a popular technique in the area of nutrient management. To date, there has been no published work evaluating P quantification in manure/litter samples with (31)P-NMR compared to other accepted methods such as high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). To evaluate the use of (31)P-NMR to quantify myo-inositol hexakisphosphate (phytate) in ileal digesta, manure, and litter from broilers, we compared results obtained from both (31)P-NMR and a more traditional HPLC method. The quantification of phytate in all samples was very consistent between the two methods, with linear regressions having slopes ranging from 0.94 to 1.07 and r(2) values of 0.84 to 0.98. We compared the concentration of total monoester P determined with (31)P-NMR with the total inositol P content determined with HPLC and found a strong linear relationship between the two measurements having slopes ranging from 0.91 to 1.08 and r(2) values of 0.73 to 0.95. This suggests that (31)P-NMR is a very reliable method for quantifying P compounds in manure/litter samples.

  20. Ab Initio Calculations of 31P NMR Chemical Shielding Anisotropy Tensors in Phosphates: Variations Due to Ring Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd M. Alam

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Ring formation in phosphate systems is expected to influence both the magnitude and orientation of the phosphorus (31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR chemical shielding anisotropy (CSA tensor. Ab initio calculations of the 31P CSA tensor in both cyclic and acyclic phosphate clusters were performed as a function of the number of phosphate tetrahedral in the system. The calculation of the 31P CSA tensors employed the GAUSSIAN 98 implementation of the gauge-including atomic orbital (GIAO method at the Hartree-Fock (HF level. It is shown that both the 31P CSA tensor anisotropy, and the isotropic chemical shielding can be used for the identification of cyclic phosphates. The differences between the 31P CSA tensor in acyclic and cyclic phosphate systems become less pronounced with increasing number of phosphate groups within the ring. The orientation of the principal components for the 31P CSA tensor shows some variation due to cyclization, most notably with the smaller, highly strained ring systems.

  1. Experimental Determination of pK[subscript a] Values and Metal Binding for Biomolecular Compounds Using [superscript 31]P NMR Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartz, Mason A.; Tubergen, Philip J.; Tatko, Chad D.; Baker, Rachael A.

    2018-01-01

    This lab experiment uses [superscript 31]P NMR spectroscopy of biomolecules to determine pK[subscript a] values and the binding energies of metal/biomolecule complexes. Solutions of adenosine nucleotides are prepared, and a series of [superscript 31]P NMR spectra are collected as a function of pH and in the absence and presence of magnesium or…

  2. Muscle metabolism of professional athletes using 31P-spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeurer, J.; Soellner, O.; Ehrenstein, T.; Knollmann, F.; Vogl, T.J.; Felix, R.; Konstanczak, P.; Wolff, R.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the study was to examine muscle metabolism in athletes by 31 P-spectroscopy (MRS) and to evaluate to what degree the respective resonance spectrum correlates with the kind of muscle exercise. Material and Methods: Twelve runners and 12 young ice skaters were studied by 31 P-spectroscopy of the gastrocnemic medialis muscle and the vastus medialis muscle using a surface coil at 1.5 T. Results: Sprinters displayed a higher phosphocreatinine/inorganic phosphate (PCr/Pi) and PCr/β-ATP ratios than marathon runners. The respective parameters for middle distance runners were in between. Ice skaters could prospectively be divided into sprint- and long-distance runners by our results which correlated with the athletes' training performance. Conclusion: 31 P-spectroscopy can evaluate the distribution of muscle fiber types. Thus, the athlete's potential for sprint- or long-distance running can be determined. Additional studies will have to demonstrate to what extent training may change muscle fiber distribution. (orig.)

  3. China sets sights on exporting an affordable nuclear solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalton, David [NucNet, Bruessel (Belgium)

    2016-03-15

    Since the Fukushima-Daiichi accident in 2011 few western countries have been building nuclear reactors. China, however, seems to be going on something of a spree, sensing a solution for pollution at home - and unprecedented commercial opportunities abroad. There might be a general feeling in the industry that nuclear energy is on the wane in the West, but the same industry is casting increasingly envious glances to the East. A minimum of 60 nuclear power reactors are expected to start up in China over the next decade. By 2050, nuclear power should exceed 350 GW in China, with about 400 new nuclear reactors and total nuclear investment of over a trillion dollars.

  4. The Bulgarians believe in a nuclear solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, George.

    1988-01-01

    Power consumption and power generation in Bulgaria are considered. Coal production is insufficient to supply all the expected demand. Hydroelectricity has suffered because of recent droughts and accounts for only 7% of capacity. The alternative is nuclear power and Bulgaria is committed to a programme of nuclear reactor building. By 1990 nuclear-generated electricity should make up 40% of the country's total requirement. There are plans to raise this to 60% by the year 2000. The reactors under construction or planned are discussed. Nuclear power is also being planned for district heating. Although Chernobyl has caused a move against nuclear power in the West the Bulgarians feel they have no choice but to extend its use. (U.K.)

  5. Differential cross sections measurement of {sup 31}P(p,pγ{sub 1}){sup 31}P reaction for PIGE applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jokar, A., E-mail: arezajokar@gmail.com; Kakuee, O.; Lamehi-Rachti, M.

    2016-09-15

    Differential cross sections of proton induced gamma-ray emission from the {sup 31}P(p,pγ{sub 1}){sup 31}P (E{sub γ} = 1266 keV) nuclear reaction were measured in the proton energy range of 1886–3007 keV at the laboratory angle of 90°. For these measurements a thin Zn{sub 3}P{sub 2} target evaporated onto a self-supporting C film was used. The gamma-rays and backscattered protons were detected simultaneously. An HPGe detector placed at an angle of 90° with respect to the beam direction was employed to collect gamma-rays while an ion implanted Si detector placed at a scattering angle of 165° was used to detect backscattered protons. Simultaneous collection of gamma-rays and RBS spectra is a great advantage of this approach which makes differential cross-section measurements independent on the collected beam charge. The obtained cross-sections were compared with the previously only measured data in the literature. The validity of the measured differential cross sections was verified through a thick target benchmarking experiment. The overall systematic uncertainty of cross section values was estimated to be better than ±9%.

  6. High pressure {sup 31}P NMR spectroscopy on guanine nucleotides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spoerner, Michael; Karl, Matthias; Lopes, Pedro; Hoering, Marcus; Loeffel, Karoline; Nuehs, Andrea; Adelsberger, Joseph; Kremer, Werner; Kalbitzer, Hans Robert, E-mail: hans-robert.kalbitzer@ur.de [University of Regensburg, Centre of Magnetic Resonance in Chemistry and Biomedicine, Institute of Biophysics and Physical Biochemistry (Germany)

    2017-01-15

    The {sup 31}P NMR pressure response of guanine nucleotides bound to proteins has been studied in the past for characterizing the pressure perturbation of conformational equilibria. The pressure response of the {sup 31}P NMR chemical shifts of the phosphate groups of GMP, GDP, and GTP as well as the commonly used GTP analogs GppNHp, GppCH{sub 2}p and GTPγS was measured in the absence and presence of Mg{sup 2+}-ions within a pressure range up to 200 MPa. The pressure dependence of chemical shifts is clearly non-linear. For all nucleotides a negative first order pressure coefficient B{sub 1} was determined indicating an upfield shift of the resonances with pressure. With exception of the α-phosphate group of Mg{sup 2+}·GMP and Mg{sup 2+}·GppNHp the second order pressure coefficients are positive. To describe the data of Mg{sup 2+}·GppCH{sub 2}p and GTPγS a Taylor expansion of 3rd order is required. For distinguishing pH effects from pressure effects a complete pH titration set is presented for GMP, as well as GDP and GTP in absence and presence of Mg{sup 2+} ions using indirect referencing to DSS under identical experimental conditions. By a comparison between high pressure {sup 31}P NMR data on free Mg{sup 2+}-GDP and Mg{sup 2+}-GDP in complex with the proto-oncogene Ras we demonstrate that pressure induced changes in chemical shift are clearly different between both forms.

  7. Nuclear power: a false solution to climate change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-08-01

    Confronted with the decline in nuclear power worldwide, nuclear industry leaders and their political and media allies are trying to impose the idea that this technology is an appropriate and indispensable solution to fight climate change. But how realistic are these assertions? Content: 1 - Climate preservation? Nuclear won't do: At best, nuclear power's contribution would be minor.. and definitely too late; A marginal form of energy in decline; Nuclear energy also produces greenhouse gas; Nuclear energy is too expensive; Nuclear energy is not adapted to a deteriorating climate; 2 - More nuclear dangers to avoid dangerous climate change?: Radioactivity and nuclear waste: more and more pollution; Major accidents: a disaster is possible; Proliferation: radiological terrorism, nuclear war; 3 - The true solutions for the climate: Saving energy: the most efficient, the least expensive; 100% renewables: yes we can; Break out of the nuclear and fossil fuel stranglehold; Energy transition: Germany shows the way; Job creation: far greater potential than nuclear

  8. Analytical solution of dispersion relations for the nuclear optical model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    VanderKam, J.M. [Center for Communications Research, Thanet Road, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States); Weisel, G.J. [Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, and Duke University, Box 90308, Durham, NC 27708-0308 (United States); Penn State Altoona, 3000 Ivyside Park, Altoona, PA 16601-3760 (United States); Tornow, W. [Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, and Duke University, Box 90308, Durham, NC 27708-0308 (United States)

    2000-12-01

    Analytical solutions of dispersion integral relations, linking the real and imaginary parts of the nuclear optical model, have been derived. These are displayed for some widely used forms of the volume- and surface-absorptive nuclear potentials. When the analytical solutions are incorporated into the optical-model search code GENOA, replacing a numerical integration, the code runs three and a half to seven times faster, greatly aiding the analysis of direct-reaction, elastic scattering data. (author)

  9. 31P-NMR studies on perfused mouse liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLaughlin, A.C.; Takeda, H.; Chance, B.

    1978-01-01

    From a metabolic viewpoint, the most important organ in the body is the liver. In contrast to more specialized organs such as heart and kidney which perform only one major function, the liver performs a number of major metabolic functions. Two of the most important functions are the catabolism and storage of foodstuffs (in the form of glycogen) and the control of most of the constituents of the blood (in particular, the blood glucose level). Most of these functions are localized within a single type of cell. One way that the liver is able to regulate these diverse reactions is by the control of the ATP level in the cell. Encouraged by the recent success of many groups in using 31 P-NMR to provide a continuous and non-destructive monitor of ATP levels in isolated cells, skeletal muscle, and perfused organs such as heart and kidney, 31 P-NMR was used to investigate ATP levels in perfused liver of mice

  10. Protein analysis by 31p NMR spectroscopy in ionic liquid: quantitative determination of enzymatically created cross-links.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monogioudi, Evanthia; Permi, Perttu; Filpponen, Ilari; Lienemann, Michael; Li, Bin; Argyropoulos, Dimitris; Buchert, Johanna; Mattinen, Maija-Liisa

    2011-02-23

    Cross-linking of β-casein by Trichoderma reesei tyrosinase (TrTyr) and Streptoverticillium mobaraense transglutaminase (Tgase) was analyzed by (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in ionic liquid (IL). According to (31)P NMR, 91% of the tyrosine side chains were cross-linked by TrTyr at high dosages. When Tgase was used, no changes were observed because a different cross-linking mechanism was operational. However, this verified the success of the phosphitylation of phenolics within the protein matrix in the IL. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) in solid state showed that disk-shaped nanoparticles were formed in the reactions with average diameters of 80 and 20 nm for TrTyr and Tgase, respectively. These data further advance the current understanding of the action of tyrosinases on proteins on molecular and chemical bond levels. Quantitative (31)P NMR in IL was shown to be a simple and efficient method for the study of protein modification.

  11. 31P-MRS study for the assessment of tumor response after radiotherapy and/or hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Hirohiko; Itho, Satoshi; Nakatsugawa, Sigekazu; Maeda, Masayuki; Iwasaki, Toshiko; Yamamoto, Kazutaka; Ishii, Yasushi

    1992-01-01

    The metabolic changes of human lung cancer implanted in nude mice were studied by the use of in vivo 31 P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ( 31 P-MRS) after radiotherapy, hyperthermia or the combined therapy of radiation and hyperthermia. 31 P-MRS of the tumors showed increased Pi/β-NTP ratio and acidic pH value on 1 day after hyperthermia, that indicated metabolic decline caused by hyperthermia. On the other hand, lower Pi/β-NTP ratios during 3 to 10 days after irradiation suggested metabolic activation of the tumors. In the tumors treated with the combined therapy, 31 P-MRS revealed increase of Pi/β-NTP ratio within 1 day and its decrease subsequent 6 to 10 days after treatment, that indicated additive bi-phasic changes induced by radiation and hyperthermia, respectively. Since Pi/β-NTP ratio had significant correlation to the tumor blood perfusion measured by hydrogen gas clearance studies, these bi-phasic changes were considered to correspond to two different physiological states, namely, ischemic and reperfused states. 31 P-MRS obtained from tumors could be useful to asses the physiological consequence following radiation, hyperthermia or the combined therapy. (author)

  12. Nuclear instrument maintenance - problems, solutions, and obstacles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vuister, P.H.

    1983-01-01

    In 200 laboratories of South-East Asia, Latin America and Africa a survey was made of the state of instrumentation for nuclear medicine. The principal cause of failures and defects was inadequate quality control and preventive maintenance. On the basis of the survey coordinated research programs were compiled for the maintenance of nuclear instruments. The four principal points of the programs are: to safeguard quality and stable electric power supplies for the instruments, to safeguard permanent temperature and humidity in the environment in which the equipment is operated, effective maintenance, and training of personnel. In the years 1981 and 1982, 14 local training courses were run in which emphasis was put on practicals and tests in mechanics and electronics

  13. Innovative health solutions using nuclear techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, Dale

    2013-01-01

    Australian nuclear medicine is currently amongst the highest standard of anywhere in the world. Its origins here are firmly entrenched in Internal Medicine, with its emphasis on physiology and function, unlike many other countries such as the USA where a Radiology orientation dominates. In addition, Australia has been well served by extremely competent and innovative physical scientists working in universities, government research facilities (e.g., AAEC, ANSTO) and tertiary referral hospitals who have established their main affiliations as being within the highly multidisciplinary nuclear medicine community. Nuclear medicine in the past 10-15 years has experienced a massive shift towards 'hybrid' imaging - where two (or more) complementary imaging modalities, such as X-ray CT and a Positron Emission Tomography (PET) or Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) scanner, are combined into a functionally single device which provides high resolution spatial anatomical (form, or structure) and radionuclide distribution (function) images. In addition, the nuclear imaging techniques maintain their quantitative characteristics and thus combined structure-function imaging results in a significant improvement in diagnostic capability - looking beyond simple forms to quantifying degree of disease, e.g., malignancy of a cancer. Recently, PET scanners have been combined with NMR Imaging (MRI) and these will provide new areas of application, especially in magnetic resonance spectroscopy and radionuclide imaging. The techniques are extremely valuable in monitoring response to treatment, allowing treatments to be changed if proving ineffective. In addition, new techniques are emerging using radionuclides for therapy, combined with the improvements in imaging. This permits exquisite targeting and optimal patient selection. This talk will highlight a number of these achievements and ask the question as to what is holding back developments in Australia at present.

  14. Nuclear medicine solutions in winter sports problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoeflin, F.G.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The diagnostic workup of acute Winter Sports injuries is done by Conventional X Ray, CT and MRI. Chronic injuries as stress reactions are best investigated by Nuclear Medicine procedures: Snow Boarding: In Snow-Boarding chronic injuries are mostly seen as local increased uptake laterally in the lower third of the Fibula of the front leg together with Tibial increase medially in the other leg. Skiing: Chronic Skiing injuries are less asymmetrical and mostly seen on the apex of the patella. Chronic Feet Problems: A different chronic problem is the reduced blood perfusion in the feet if hard, tightened boots are used for longer time by professional ski instructors and racers. Flow difference between the foot in the boot and the other without boot are dramatic as measured by Nuclear Medicine Procedures and MRI. Pulmonary Embolism: Acute pulmonary embolism caused by thrombi originating at the site of constant pressure on the back rim of ski boots is not uncommon in older skiers (seek and you will find), but never seen in the younger group of Snow-Boarders. Copyright (2002) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc

  15. Aqueous solutions/nuclear glasses interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delage, F.; Advocat, T.; Vernaz, E.; Crovisier, J.L.

    1991-01-01

    Interactions results of the borosilicate glass used in radioactive wastes confinement and aqueous solutions at various temperature and PH show that for the glass components: - the release rate evolution follows an Arrhenius law, - in acid PH, there is a selective dissolution, - in basic PH, there is a stoechiometric dissolution [fr

  16. Plight of China nuclear liability law and solutions of nuclear operating companies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su Guangchao; Wang Yonggang; Tang Yangyang

    2010-01-01

    With the development of nuclear use for peaceful purposes and the intensification of international cooperation in the field of nuclear energy, many countries attach more and more importance to legal risks of nuclear liability, and the companies in nuclear industry also enhance research on restrictive articles of nuclear liability in their international businesses. However, because China has neither signed any international convention on civil liability for nuclear damage nor adopted any law on atomic energy and on compensation for nuclear damage, many impediments often occur in international cooperation and trade. This essay is trying to outline the status and structure of international nuclear liability, analyze nuclear liabilities in international procurement for nuclear operating companies and respective solutions. (authors)

  17. Preparation of carrier-free Phosphorus-32 from 31P(n,γ )32P reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rafii, H.; Arbab Zavar, H.; Avaz Moghadam, S.

    1999-01-01

    The phosphorus-32 is a widely used radioisotope as as tracer or radioactive source in nuclear medicine, and in many other biotechnical applications. In this paper, preparation of carrier-free P-32 with a high specific activity was studied by 31 P(n, γ) 32 P reaction. The anhydrous KH 2 PO 4 , as a target material, was irradiated in Tehran Nuclear Research Reactor with a neutron flux of 2.5x10 13 n/cm 2 .sec. The P-32 produced as a result of Szilard-Chalmers effect was isolated from the target by a strong anion exchange resin, (Dowex - X 8). The quality control of the product shows a high chemical, and radiochemical purity (>98%) and the increase specific activity depends on the irradiation time

  18. Animal manure phosphorus characterization by sequential chemical fractionation, release kinetics and 31P-NMR analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tales Tiecher

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Phosphate release kinetics from manures are of global interest because sustainable plant nutrition with phosphate will be a major concern in the future. Although information on the bioavailability and chemical composition of P present in manure used as fertilizer are important to understand its dynamics in the soil, such studies are still scarce. Therefore, P extraction was evaluated in this study by sequential chemical fractionation, desorption with anion-cation exchange resin and 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (31P-NMR spectroscopy to assess the P forms in three different dry manure types (i.e. poultry, cattle and swine manure. All three methods showed that the P forms in poultry, cattle and swine dry manures are mostly inorganic and highly bioavailable. The estimated P pools showed that organic and recalcitrant P forms were negligible and highly dependent on the Ca:P ratio in manures. The results obtained here showed that the extraction of P with these three different methods allows a better understanding and complete characterization of the P pools present in the manures.

  19. 31P-NMR spectroscopy in measurements of physiological parameters and response to therapy of human melanoma xenografts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsen, Dag Rune

    1999-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate whether ''31P-NMR spectroscopy can be utilized in prediction and monitoring of response to therapy or tumours. The specific aims were: 1) To investigate possible correlations between on the one hand bio energetics status, phospholipids resonance ratios, intracellular pH and phosphorus T 1 s and on the other hand tumour blood supply and oxygenation, tumour proliferation and necrotic fraction across tumour lines. 2) Reveal possible correlations between changes in tumour bio energetics status and phosphorus T 1 s and the changes in tumour blood flow, tumour oxygenation and necrotic fraction. 3) To investigate whether irradiation and hyperthermia treatment of tumours affect bio energetics status and phosphorus T 1 s. 4) To identify the tumour physiological factors that is effected by the treatment and influence the bio energetics status and phosphorus T 1 s. The results are presented in 8 papers with titles: 1)''31P-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in vivo of six human melanoma zeno graft lines: Tumour bio energetic status and blood supply. 2) ''31P NMR spectroscopy studies of phospholipid metabolism in human melanoma xenograft lines differing in rate of tumour cell proliferation. 3) ''31P-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in vivo of four human melanoma xenograft lines: Spin-lattice relaxation times. 4) Effect of melanin on phosphorus T 1 s in human melanoma xenografts studied by ''31P MRS 5) Spin-lattice relaxation time of inorganic phosphate in human tumour xenografts measured in vivo by ''31P-magnetic resonance spectroscopy influence of oxygen tension. 6) Effects of hyperthermia on bio energetic status and phosphorus T 1 s in human melanoma xenografts monitored by ''31P-MRS. 7) Monitoring of tumour reoxygenation following irradiation by ''31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy an experimental study of human melanoma xenografts. 8) Radiation-induced changes in phosphorus T 1 values in human melanoma xenografts studied

  20. General solution of Bateman equations for nuclear transmutations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cetnar, Jerzy

    2006-01-01

    The paper concerns the linear chain method of solving Bateman equations for nuclear transmutation in derivation of the general solution for linear chain with repeated transitions and thus elimination of existing numerical problems. In addition, applications of derived equations for transmutation trajectory analysis method is presented

  1. High-fidelity adiabatic inversion of a {sup 31}P electron spin qubit in natural silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laucht, Arne, E-mail: a.laucht@unsw.edu.au; Kalra, Rachpon; Muhonen, Juha T.; Dehollain, Juan P.; Mohiyaddin, Fahd A.; Hudson, Fay; Dzurak, Andrew S.; Morello, Andrea [Centre for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology, School of Electrical Engineering and Telecommunications, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales 2052 (Australia); McCallum, Jeffrey C.; Jamieson, David N. [Centre for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology, School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia)

    2014-03-03

    The main limitation to the high-fidelity quantum control of spins in semiconductors is the presence of strongly fluctuating fields arising from the nuclear spin bath of the host material. We demonstrate here a substantial improvement in single-qubit inversion fidelities for an electron spin qubit bound to a {sup 31}P atom in natural silicon, by applying adiabatic sweeps instead of narrow-band pulses. We achieve an inversion fidelity of 97%, and we observe signatures in the spin resonance spectra and the spin coherence time that are consistent with the presence of an additional exchange-coupled donor. This work highlights the effectiveness of simple adiabatic inversion techniques for spin control in fluctuating environments.

  2. Application of 31P-NMR spectroscopy to the study of striated muscle metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, R.A.; Kushmerick, M.J.; Brown, T.R.

    1982-01-01

    This review presents the principles and limitations of phosphorus nuclear magnetic resonance ( 31 P-NMR) spectroscopy as applied to the study of striated muscle metabolism. Application of the techniques discussed include noninvasive measurement of high-energy phosphate, intracellular pH, intracellular free Mg 2+ , and metabolite compartmentation. In perfused cat biceps (fast-twitch) muscles, but not in soleus (slow-twitch), NMR spectra indicate a substantially lower (1 mM) free inorganic phosphate level than when measured chemically (6 mM). In addition, saturation and inversion spin-transfer methods that enable direct measurement of the unidirectional fluxes through creatine kinase are described. In perfused cat biceps muscle, results suggest that this enzyme and its substrates are in simple chemical equilibrium

  3. Generating highly polarized nuclear spins in solution using dynamic nuclear polarization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolber, J.; Ellner, F.; Fridlund, B.

    2004-01-01

    A method to generate strongly polarized nuclear spins in solution has been developed, using Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) at a temperature of 1.2K, and at a field of 3.354T, corresponding to an electron spin resonance frequency of 94GHz. Trityl radicals are used to directly polarize 13C...... and other low-γ nuclei. Subsequent to the DNP process, the solid sample is dissolved rapidly with a warm solvent to create a solution of molecules with highly polarized nuclear spins. Two main applications are proposed: high-resolution liquid state NMR with enhanced sensitivity, and the use...

  4. Two-dimensional 1H and 31P NMR spectra and restrained molecular dynamics structure of an extrahelical adenosine tridecamer oligodeoxyribonucleotide duplex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikonowicz, E.; Roongta, V.; Jones, C.R.; Gorenstein, D.G.

    1989-01-01

    Assignment of the 1H and 31P NMR spectra of an extrahelical adenosine tridecamer oligodeoxyribonucleotide duplex, d(CGCAGAATTCGCG)2, has been made by two-dimensional 1H-1H and heteronuclear 31P-1H correlated spectroscopy. The downfield 31P resonance previously noted by Patel et al. (1982) has been assigned by both 17O labeling of the phosphate as well as a pure absorption phase constant-time heteronuclear 31P-1H correlated spectrum and has been associated with the phosphate on the 3' side of the extrahelical adenosine. JH3'-P coupling constants for each of the phosphates of the tridecamer were obtained from the 1H-31P J-resolved selective proton-flip 2D spectrum. By use of a modified Karplus relationship the C4-C3'-O3-P torsional angles (epsilon) were obtained. There exists a good linear correlation between 31P chemical shifts and the epsilon torsional angle. The 31P chemical shifts and epsilon torsional angles follow the general observation that the more internal the phosphate is located within the oligonucleotide sequence, the more upfield the 31P resonance occurs. Because the extrahelical adenosine significantly distorts the deoxyribose phosphate backbone conformation even several bases distant from the extrahelical adenosine, 31P chemical shifts show complex site- and sequence-specific variations. Modeling and NOESY distance-restrained energy minimization and restrained molecular dynamics suggest that the extrahelical adenosine stacks into the duplex. However, a minor conformation is also observed in the 1H NMR, which could be associated with a structure in which the extrahelical adenosine loops out into solution

  5. Nuclear magnetic relaxation in aqueous praseodymium and europium solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, J.L.; Diaz, D.

    1991-01-01

    A general theory for the relaxation of the nuclear spin in paramagnetic complexes where the electronic spin is within a slow-movement regime was presented by Benetis et al. and applied to d-group elements (Ni 2+ , Co 2+ ). This paper show the possibility to apply such formalism to f-group elements and it was developed for S=3(Eu 3+ ). A group of magnitudes characterizing the microstructure and dynamics of these solutions is reported with the approximations used. The dispersion of the nuclear magnetic relaxation (NMRD) for the proton of the variable field was also assessed which had a similar behaviour to what was experimentally reported

  6. Solution of heat removal from nuclear reactors by natural convection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zitek Pavel

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper summarizes the basis for the solution of heat removal by natural convection from both conventional nuclear reactors and reactors with fuel flowing coolant (such as reactors with molten fluoride salts MSR.The possibility of intensification of heat removal through gas lift is focused on. It might be used in an MSR (Molten Salt Reactor for cleaning the salt mixture of degassed fission products and therefore eliminating problems with iodine pitting. Heat removal by natural convection and its intensification increases significantly the safety of nuclear reactors. Simultaneously the heat removal also solves problems with lifetime of pumps in the primary circuit of high-temperature reactors.

  7. Polyphosphates as a source of enhanced P fluxes in marine sediments overlain by anoxic waters: Evidence from 31P NMR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingall Ellery

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Sedimentary phosphorus (P composition was investigated in Effingham Inlet, a fjord located on the west coast of Vancouver Island in Barkley Sound. Solid-state 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy was applied to demineralized sediment samples from sites overlain by oxic and anoxic bottom waters. The two sites were similar in terms of key diagenetic parameters, including the mass accumulation rate, integrated sulfate reduction rate, and bulk sediment organic carbon content. In contrast, P benthic fluxes were much higher at the anoxic site. 31P NMR results show that P esters and phosphonates are the major organic P species present at the surface and at depth in sediments at both sites. Polyphosphates were only found in the surface sediment of the site overlain by oxic waters. The varying stability of polyphosphates in microorganisms under different redox conditions may, in part, explain their distribution as well as differences in P flux between the two sites.

  8. Dynamic nuclear-polarization studies of paramagnetic species in solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glad, W.E.

    1982-07-01

    Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) was used to measure the electron spin lattice relaxation times, T 1 , of transition metal ions in aqueous solution. Saturation which is induced in the electron spin system is transferred to the solvent proton spins by dipole-dipole interactions. The change in the polarization of the proton spins is much larger than it is in the electron spins. The change in proton polarization is easily measured by proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR). In one experimental arrangement the sample solution was continuously flowed through a microwave cavity to the NMR coil. The NMR was observed with a continuous wave NMR spectrometer. In a second arrangement the whole sample tube was moved from within the microwave cavity to the NMR coil in less than 40 ms by a blast of compressed air. The NMR was then observed with a pulse-Fourier-transform spectrometer. With the second arrangement a mean-square microwave magnetic field at the sample of more than 10 G 2 is obtainable with 14 W of microwave power. Measurements of DNP at 9 GHz were made on aqueous solutions of VO 2+ , Mn 2+ , Cr(CN) 6 3- , Cu 2+ and Cu(ethylenediamine) 2 (H 2 0) 2 2+ ions from 3 to 60 0 C. It was also possible to observe DNP on resolved proton resonances from mixed water-acetonitrile solutions of VO 2+ and Cr(CN) 6 3- ions

  9. Numerical solution for identification of feedback coefficients in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebizuka, Yoshie; Sakai, Hideo

    1975-01-01

    Quasilinearization technique was studied to determine the Kinetic parameters of nuclear reactors. The method of solution was generalized to the determination of the parameters contained in a nonlinear system with nonlinear boundary conditions. A computer program, SNR-3, was developed to solve the resulting nonlinear two-point boundary value equations with generalized boundary conditions. In this paper, the problem formulation and the method of solution are explained for a general type of time dependent problem. A flow chart shows the procedure of numerical solution. The method was then applied to the determination of the critical factor and the reactivity feedback coefficients of reactors to investigate the accuracy and the applicability of the present method. The results showed that the present method was considerably successful, but that the random observation error effected the results of the identification. (Aoki, K.)

  10. An innovative nuclear reactor as a solution to global warming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Robson Silva da; Sefidvash, Farhang

    2007-01-01

    The problem of global warming is no longer a philosophical discussion, but it is a fact seriously threatening the future of humanity. In this paper a practical solution to the problem of global warming resulting from the fossil fuelled energy suppliers is presented. The energy conservation and alternative forms of energy such as solar, wind, and bio even though having important roles, do not satisfy the energy demand generated by an increasing world population that desires to increase its standard of living. The fission process in the nuclear reactors does not produce greenhouse gases that cause global warming. The new paradigm in nuclear energy is the future innovative reactors that meet the new standards set by the INPRO Program of the IAEA. One such a reactor is presented in this paper, namely the Fixed Bed Nuclear Reactor (FBNR) that is supported by the International Atomic Energy (IAEA) in its program of Small Reactors Without On-Site Refuelling (SRWOSR), being one of the four water cooled reactors in this program. The other three reactor concepts are PFPWR50 of Japan, BWRPB of Russia and AFPR-100 of USA. It is shown that the nuclear energy of the future is totally different than what is today in respect to safety, economics, environmental impact and proliferation. In this manner, the public perception of nuclear energy will change and its acceptability is promoted. (author)

  11. Intracellular Redox State Revealed by In Vivo 31P MRS Measurement of NAD+ and NADH Contents in Brains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ming; Zhu, Xiao-Hong; Zhang, Yi; Chen, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD), in oxidized (NAD+) or reduced (NADH) form, plays key roles in cellular metabolism. Intracellular NAD+/NADH ratio represents the cellular redox state; however, it is difficult to measure in vivo. We report here a novel in vivo 31P MRS method for noninvasive measurement of intracellular NAD concentrations and NAD+/NADH ratio in the brain. Methods It uses a theoretical model to describe the NAD spectral patterns at a given field for quantification. Standard NAD solutions and independent cat brain measurements at 9.4 T and 16.4 T were used to evaluate this method. We also measured T1 values of brain NAD. Results Model simulation and studies of solutions and brains indicate that the proposed method can quantify submillimolar NAD concentrations with reasonable accuracy if adequate 31P MRS signal-to-noise ratio and linewidth were obtained. The NAD concentrations and NAD+/NADH ratio of cat brains measured at 16.4 T and 9.4 T were consistent despite the significantly different T1 values and NAD spectra patterns at two fields. Conclusion This newly established 31P MRS method makes it possible for the first time to noninvasively study the intracellular redox state and its roles in brain functions and diseases, and it can potentially be applied to other organs. PMID:23843330

  12. Evaluation of cerebro-circulatory metabolic conditions and prognosis in hypertensive putaminal hemorrhage by 31P-MRS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deguchi, Itaru

    2000-01-01

    Phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ( 31 P-MRS) provides a non-invasive means to obtain metabolic information. We studied cerebro-circulatory metabolic conditions in the subacute phase of hypertensive putaminal hemorrhage with 31 P-MRS and N-isopropyl-I-(123)-p-Iodoamphetamine single photon emission computed tomography ( 123 I-IMP SPECT). The subjects consisted of 33 cases of hypertensive putaminal hemorrhage. Upon evaluation of cerebral blood flow (CBF) around the ipsilateral frontal lobe cortex and examination by 123 I-IMP SPECT, they would broadly divided into the following three groups: (A) a group with high uptake on both the early image and delayed image, (B) a group with low uptake on the early image but with good redistribution, and (C) a group with low uptake on both images. In these groups 31 P-MRS in the ipsilateral frontal lobe cortex was measured for comparative analysis. In group A, the PCr/Pi ratio was 3.12±0.14 as opposed to 2.87±0.13 in group B, and the ratio was extremely depressed in group C, 1.96±0.16. These observations implied that a high level circulatory metabolic disorder was present in group C and that local viability or metabolic activity was relatively well maintained despite the low perfusion in group B with a satisfactory prognosis being expected due to their high functional level. (author)

  13. Analysis of monoglycerides, diglycerides, sterols, and free fatty acids in coconut (Cocos nucifera L.) oil by 31P NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayrit, Fabian M; Buenafe, Olivia Erin M; Chainani, Edward T; de Vera, Ian Mitchelle S

    2008-07-23

    Phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ( (31)P NMR) was used to differentiate virgin coconut oil (VCO) from refined, bleached, deodorized coconut oil (RCO). Monoglycerides (MGs), diglycerides (DGs), sterols, and free fatty acids (FFAs) in VCO and RCO were converted into dioxaphospholane derivatives and analyzed by (31)P NMR. On the average, 1-MG was found to be higher in VCO (0.027%) than RCO (0.019%). 2-MG was not detected in any of the samples down to a detection limit of 0.014%. On the average, total DGs were lower in VCO (1.55%) than RCO (4.10%). When plotted in terms of the ratio [1,2-DG/total DGs] versus total DGs, VCO and RCO samples grouped separately. Total sterols were higher in VCO (0.096%) compared with RCO (0.032%), and the FFA content was 8 times higher in VCO than RCO (0.127% vs 0.015%). FFA determination by (31)P NMR and titration gave comparable results. Principal components analysis shows that the 1,2-DG, 1,3-DG, and FFAs are the most important parameters for differentiating VCO from RCO.

  14. Nuclear energy, energy of the future or bad solution?; Energie nucleaire, energie d'avenir ou fausse solution?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    The document presents the speeches of the debate on the nuclear energy solution for the future, presented during the meeting of the 6 may in Rennes, in the framework of the National Debate on the energies. The debate concerns the risks assessment and control, the solutions for the radioactive wastes, the foreign examples and the future of the nuclear energy. (A.L.B.)

  15. Nuclear fuel technology - Determination of uranium in uranyl nitrate solutions of nuclear grade quality - Gravimetric method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    This International Standard specifies a precise and accurate gravimetric method for determining the mass fraction of uranium in uranyl nitrate solutions of nuclear grade quality containing more than 100 g/kg of uranium. Non-volatile impurities influence the accuracy of the method

  16. Preliminary observations on the correlation of proliferative phenomena with in vivo /sup 31/P NMR spectroscopy after tumor chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiffer, L.M.; Braunschweiger, P.G.; Glickson, J.D.; Evanochko, W.T.; Ng, T.C.

    1985-01-01

    In order to translate the concepts that have been developed in animal systems to human treatment programs, there is an urgent need for noninvasive techniques to study tumor cell biology. The characteristics of the ideal technique for the noninvasive monitoring of cell proliferation are truly imposing. The method should not require repeated biopsies; it should be amenable to repeated studies at frequent intervals without patient discomfort; it should monitor the proliferative response to the treatment modality; and it should not, in itself, perturb the tumor. Ideally, one would also like to be able to evaluate normal cell proliferation as well. It appears now that a new technique, /sup 31/P nuclear magnetic resonance (/sup 31/PNMR), may fulfill these rather rigid requirements. However, many studies in animal systems are necessary before it can be applied to the study of human tumors. The theory and mechanics of /sup 31/P NMR have been well described. Recently, its use as a noninvasive technique to study in vivo metabolic processes has become important. The authors presented a series of reports on the use of /sup 31/P NMR for the evaluation of tumor metabolism in animal systems under a variety of conditions. Studies of subcutaneously transplanted mouse tumors and human xenografts detected significant changes in nucleotide triphosphate (NTP), phosphocreatine, and inorganic phosphorus (Pi) as a result of tumor growth and perturbation with chemotherapeutic drugs, radiation, and hyperthermia. Their collabortive studies were designed to evaluate the changing effects of a noncurative single dose of cyclophosphamide on the /sup 31/P NMR resonances from the RIF-1 tumor, and to compare them with the proliferative changes that occur with time after drug administration. They were carried out in the hope of finding a noninvasive correlate with tumor cell proliferation

  17. 31P NMR Chemical Shifts of Phosphorus Probes as Reliable and Practical Acidity Scales for Solid and Liquid Catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Anmin; Liu, Shang-Bin; Deng, Feng

    2017-10-11

    Acid-base catalytic reaction, either in heterogeneous or homogeneous systems, is one of the most important chemical reactions that has provoked a wide variety of industrial catalytic processes for production of chemicals and petrochemicals over the past few decades. In view of the fact that the catalytic performances (e.g., activity, selectivity, and reaction mechanism) of acid-catalyzed reactions over acidic catalysts are mostly dictated by detailed acidic features, viz. type (Brønsted vs Lewis acidity), amount (concentration), strength, and local environments (location) of acid sites, information on and manipulation of their structure-activity correlation are crucial for optimization of catalytic performances as well as innovative design of novel effective catalysts. This review aims to summarize recent developments on acidity characterization of solid and liquid catalysts by means of experimental 31 P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy using phosphorus probe molecules such as trialkylphosphine (TMP) and trialkylphosphine oxides (R 3 PO). In particular, correlations between the observed 31 P chemical shifts (δ 31 P) of phosphorus (P)-containing probes and acidic strengths have been established in conjuction with density functional theory (DFT) calculations, rendering practical and reliable acidity scales for Brønsted and Lewis acidities at the atomic level. As illustrated for a variety of different solid and liquid acid systems, such as microporous zeolites, mesoporous molecular sieves, and metal oxides, the 31 P NMR probe approaches were shown to provide important acid features of various catalysts, surpassing most conventional methods such as titration, pH measurement, Hammett acidity function, and some other commonly used physicochemical techniques, such as calorimetry, temperature-programmed desorption of ammonia (NH 3 -TPD), Fourier transformed infrared (FT-IR), and 1 H NMR spectroscopies.

  18. In vivo measurement of intracellular pH in human brain during different tensions of carbon dioxide in arterial blood. A 31P-NMR study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, K E; Thomsen, C; Henriksen, O

    1988-01-01

    The effect of changes in carbon dioxide tension in arterial blood upon intracellular pH in brain tissue was studied in seven healthy volunteers, aged 22-45 years. The pH changes were monitored by use of 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, performed on a whole-body 1.5 Tesla Siemens imaging...

  19. Physical basis of the effect of hemoglobin on the 31P NMR chemical shifts of various phosphoryl compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirk, K.; Kuchel, P.W.

    1988-01-01

    The marked difference between the intra- and extracellular 31 P NMR chemical shifts of various phosphoryl compounds when added to a red cell suspension may be largely understood in terms of the effects of hemoglobin on the 31 P NMR chemical shifts. The presence of [oxy- or (carbonmonoxy)-] hemoglobin inside the red cell causes the bulk magnetic susceptibility of the cell cytoplasm to be significantly less than that of the external solution. This difference is sufficient to account for the difference in the intra- and extracellular chemical shifts of the two phosphate esters trimethyl phosphate and triethyl phosphate. However, in the case of the compounds dimethyl methylphosphonate, diethyl methylphosphonate, and trimethylphosphine oxide as well as the hypophosphite, phenylphosphinate, and diphenylphosphinate ions, hemoglobin exerts an additional, much larger, effect, causing the 31 P NMR resonances to shift to lower frequency in a manner that cannot be accounted for in terms of magnetic susceptibility. Lysozyme is a protein structurally unrelated to hemoglobin and was shown to cause similar shifts to lower frequency of the resonances of these six compounds; this suggests that the mechanism may involve a property of proteins in general and not a specific property of hemoglobin. The effect of different solvents on the chemical shifts of the eight phosphoryl compounds provided an insight into the possible physical basis of the effect. It is proposed that, in addition to magnetic susceptibility effects, hemoglobin exerts its influence on phosphoryl chemical shifts by disrupting the hydrogen bonding of the phosphoryl group to solvent water

  20. Investigation of sea microorganisms of the genus Alteromonas by 31P-NMR of high resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanova, E.P.; Isakov, V.V.; Mikhajlov, V.V.; Sokolova, S.V.; Gorshkova, N.M.; Fedosov, Yu.V.; Kiprianova, E.A.

    1993-01-01

    Comparative analysis of the 31 P-NMR spectra of intact cells of bacteria belonging to the genus Alteromonas, the producers of alkaline phosphatase was carried out. Differences in the content of phosphate-containing compounds were detected in individual species of the genus Alteromonas. By comparing the data on 31 P-NMR spectra, the electron micrographs and phosphatase activities, the possibility of revealing the presence of capsules was shown. Peculiar features of the 31 P-NMR spectra of alteromonades, as compared with other taxonomic groups of microorganisms, have been discussed

  1. Bone Mineral 31P and Matrix-Bound Water Densities Measured by Solid-State 1H and 31P MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Alan C.; Li, Cheng; Rajapakse, Chamith S.; Bashoor- Zadeh, Mahdieh; Bhagat, Yusuf A.; Wright, Alexander C.; Zemel, Babette S.; Zavaliangos, Antonios; Wehrli, Felix W.

    2014-01-01

    Bone is a composite material consisting of mineral and hydrated collagen fractions. MRI of bone is challenging due to extremely short transverse relaxation times, but solid-state imaging sequences exist that can acquire the short-lived signal from bone tissue. Previous work to quantify bone density via MRI used powerful experimental scanners. This work seeks to establish the feasibility of MRI-based measurement on clinical scanners of bone mineral and collagen-bound water densities, the latter as a surrogate of matrix density, and to examine the associations of these parameters with porosity and donors’ age. Mineral and matrix-bound water images of reference phantoms and cortical bone from 16 human donors, ages 27-97 years, were acquired by zero-echo-time 31P and 1H MRI on whole body 7T and 3T scanners, respectively. Images were corrected for relaxation and RF inhomogeneity to obtain density maps. Cortical porosity was measured by micro-CT, and apparent mineral density by pQCT. MRI-derived densities were compared to x-ray-based measurements by least-squares regression. Mean bone mineral 31P density was 6.74±1.22 mol/L (corresponding to 1129±204 mg/cc mineral), and mean bound water 1H density was 31.3±4.2 mol/L (corresponding to 28.3±3.7 %v/v). Both 31P and bound water (BW) densities were correlated negatively with porosity (31P: R2 = 0.32, p bone mineralization ratio (expressed here as the ratio of 31P density to bound water density), which is proportional to true bone mineralization, was found to be uncorrelated with porosity, age, or pQCT density. This work establishes the feasibility of image-based quantification of bone mineral and bound water densities using clinical hardware. PMID:24846186

  2. Investigation of uranium (VI) extraction mechanisms from phosphoric and sulfuric media by {sup 31}P-NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fries, B.; Marie, C.; Pacary, V.; Berthon, C.; Miguirditchian, M.; Charbonnel, M.C. [CEA, Centre de Marcoule, Nuclear Energy Divison, RadioChemistry and Processes Department - DRCP, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze (France); Mokhtari, H. [AREVA Mines, Process and Analysis Department - SEPA, F-87250 Bessines-sur-Gartempe (France)

    2016-07-01

    Phosphate rocks contain uranium (∼1000 ppm on average) and are considered as a secondary source for uranium production. Uranium extraction using DEHCNPB (butyl-1-[N,N-bis(2-ethylhexyl)carbamoyl]nonyl phosphonic acid, a bifunctional cationic extractant) has been studied to better understand mechanism differences depending on the original acidic solution (phosphoric or sulfuric). Solvent extraction batch experiments were carried out and the organic phases were probed using {sup 31}P-NMR. This technique enabled to demonstrate that phosphoric acid is poorly extracted by DEHCNPB ([H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}]{sub org} < 2 mM), using direct quantification in the organic phase by {sup 31}P-NMR spectra integration. Moreover, in the presence of uranium in the initial phosphoric acid solution, uranyl extraction by DEHCNPB competes with H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} extraction. Average stoichiometries of U(VI)-DEHCNPB complexes in organic phases were also determined using slope analysis on uranium distribution data. Uranium seems to be extracted from a phosphoric medium by two extractant molecules, whereas more than three DEHCNPB on average would be necessary to extract uranium from a sulfuric medium. Thus, uranium is extracted according to different mechanisms depending on the nature of the initial solution. (authors)

  3. Overview of PADC nuclear track readers. Recent trends and solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hulber, E.

    2009-01-01

    The development of automated track readers dates back to the first routine dosimetry applications of solid state nuclear track detectors. Many research-laboratory track readers and a few commercial systems were introduced in the past 25 years. The traditional application area for high-throughput track readers is radon testing in buildings and fast neutron dosimetry. The latter application, in particular, has considerably increased the need for efficient polyallyldiglycol carbonate (PADC) track reader systems with high throughput. The paper provides an overview of recent trends in the development of high-throughput PADC track readers and it gives a glimpse into the practice of designing this category of devices. A general overview is provided of the technical aspects relating to the optics, the hardware and the track recognition approaches. Ultimate theoretical limits in the performance as well as promising new approaches are addressed. Requirements and practical solutions are illustrated with reference to a commercially available system.

  4. 31P NMR study of phosphate metabolites in intact developing seeds of wheat, soybean and mustard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gambhir, P.N.; Pande, P.C.; Ratcliffe, R.G.

    1994-01-01

    The study of 31 P NMR spectra of intact developing seeds of wheat, soybean and mustard and its possible use for assessing the relative degree of hypoxia under in vivo conditions are reported. 7 refs., 2 figs

  5. Simultaneous 31P NMR spectroscopy and EMG in exercising and recovering human skeletal muscle: technical aspects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard-Poulsen, P; Thomsen, C; Sinkjaer, T

    1994-01-01

    The bioenergetics of human skeletal muscle can be studied by 31P NMR spectroscopy (31P-MRS) and by surface electromyography (SEMG). Simultaneous 31P-MRS and SEMG permit accurate and noninvasive studies of the correlation between metabolic and electrical changes in exercising and recovering human....... A nonmagnetic ergometer was used for ankle dorsiflexions that activated only the anterior tibial muscle as verified by post exercise imaging. The coil design and the adiabatic sech/tanh pulse improved sensitivity by 45% and 56% respectively, compared with standard techniques. Simultaneous electromyographic...... recordings did not deteriorate the NMR spectra. The VARPRO time domain fitting routine was very suitable for estimating 31P muscle spectra. With these methods it was possible to accurately estimate parameters describing metabolic and electrical changes during rest, exercise and the entire recovery period...

  6. 31P NMR imaging of solid bone with solid echoes combined with refocused gradients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, L.; Utah Univ., Salt Lake City, UT; Kruger, R.A.

    1990-01-01

    This note on 31 p NMR imaging presents some observations of the solid echoes acquired from solid bone and how the proposed solid echo imaging method can be employed to obtain the 31 images of solid bone. (UK)

  7. Parameters affecting level measurement interpretation of nuclear fuel solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, B.A.; Landat, D.A.

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes a level measurement technique commonly used in the measurement of radioactive liquids and equipment utilised by the inspectors for safeguards purposes. Some of the influencing parameters affecting the measurement results by this technique are characterised. An essential requisite for successful process operations in chemical facilities involving liquids generally require some physical measurements to be made in-line for both process and quality control in order to achieve the necessary final product specifications . In nuclear fuel reprocessing facilities, the same objectives apply coupled however with an additional requirement of achieving nuclear material accountancy and control. In view of the strategic importance of some of the process vessels in nuclear facilities, accountancy has to be supported by volume and density measurements of low uncertainty. Inspectors therefore require instruments which are at the very least as good as or better than operator's equipment. The classical measurement technique and most widely applied for process liquids in nuclear installations is the bubbler probe or dip-tube technique. Here a regulated flow of air passes through tubes inserted to various depths into the vessel and pressure readings are measured which are a function of the presence of liquid height and density of solution in the tank. These readings, taken together with a pre-determined calibration curve are sufficient for the volume and amount of liquor in a tank to be quantified. All measurement equipment and instrumentation are long distances from the tank environment. The key physical parameter to measure at this location is therefore pressure. Equipment designed developed, commissioned and tested in the tank measurement facilities at Ispra and in nuclear installations in Europe, Japan and the USA, house digital pressure transducer modules with manufacture's declared features of better than 0.01% accuracy and long term stability of 0.01% full

  8. 4+D TechnologyTM for nuclear systems soft solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suh, Kune Y.

    2010-10-01

    The signature in the proposal lies with the NSSS (Nuclear Systems Soft Solutions). NSSS proposed in the 3-dimensional space and time plus cost coordinates, i.e. 4 + dimensional technology, is the backbone of digital engineering in the nuclear system design and management. The NSSS is empowered by Janus (Junctional Analysis Neo dynamic Unit Soft Power), NOTUS (Neo systemic Optimization Technical Unit Soft Power), Venus (Virtual Engineering Neo cybernetic Unit Soft Power), EURUS (Engineering Utilities Research Unit Soft Power) and INUUS (Informative Neo graphic Utilities Unit Soft Power). Janus extracts the geometric data directly from the computer-aided design CAD files to import to multidimensional computational fluid and structural dynamics codes. Janus uses the joint-CAD analysis methods to eliminate the necessity of any pre- and post- processors. Starting from the 3-dimensional CAD, NOTUS contributes to reducing the construction cost of the nuclear power plants by optimizing the component manufacturing procedure and the plant construction process. Planning and scheduling construction projects can thus benefit greatly by integrating traditional management techniques with digital process simulation visualization. The 3-dimensional visualization of construction processes and resulting products intrinsically afford most of the advantages realized by the 4 + D technology. Problems with equipment positioning and manpower congestion in certain areas can readily be visualized prior to the actual operation, thus preventing accidents and safety problems such as collision between two machines and losses in productivity. Venus applied the virtual reality technology in nuclear industry. Virtual reality provides an interactive real time motion with sound and tactile and other forms of feedback. The management and workers can thus comprehend the work process crystal clear by visualizing precisely how activities relate to one another, whereby reducing conflicting

  9. Nuclear spin dynamics in soap solutions and related systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloom, M.

    1973-01-01

    Soap molecules consist of a hydrophilic head and a hydrophobic lipid tail. For example, potassium laureate, the soap molecule on which the most complete study of nuclear spin dynamics has been made has the chemical formula KCOO(CH 2 ) 10 CH 3 . High concentration (greater than or approximately equal to 20% soap molecules by weight) soap solutions in water form ordered, liquid crystal structures in which the polar heads are arranged on regular surfaces which define a lattice having long range order. The soap molecules diffuse very rapidly parallel to the surfaces and undergo rapid conformational changes. Studies of T 1 , Tsub(1p) and Tsub(D) have indicated a wide spectrum of correlation times associated with these changes. Because of the orientational order of the soap molecules, the dipolar interactions between nuclear spins on a single molecule are not averaged to zero by the molecular motions. Thus, it is possible to use NMR techniques normally applied to solids (i.e. transfer of Zeeman into dipolar order, etc.) to study their static and dynamical properties. These systems are unusual in that they are basically one-dimensional systems in which the effective, time-averaged, dipolar coupling constants become progressively stronger for protons closer to the polar heads ot the molecules. A review will be presented of the experimental and theoretical NMR work performed on such systems to date. (author)

  10. Two-dimensional 1H and 31P NMR spectra and restrained molecular dynamics structure of an oligodeoxyribonucleotide duplex refined via a hybrid relaxation matrix procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powers, R.; Jones, C.R.; Gorenstein, D.G.

    1990-01-01

    Assignment of the 1H and 31P resonances of a decamer DNA duplex, d(CGCTTAAGCG)2 was determined by two-dimensional COSY, NOESY and 1H-31P Pure Absorption phase Constant time (PAC) heteronuclear correlation spectroscopy. The solution structure of the decamer was calculated by an iterative hybrid relaxation matrix method combined with NOESY-distance restrained molecular dynamics. The distances from the 2D NOESY spectra were calculated from the relaxation rate matrix which were evaluated from a hybrid NOESY volume matrix comprising elements from the experiment and those calculated from an initial structure. The hybrid matrix-derived distances were then used in a restrained molecular dynamics procedure to obtain a new structure that better approximates the NOESY spectra. The resulting partially refined structure was then used to calculate an improved theoretical NOESY volume matrix which is once again merged with the experimental matrix until refinement is complete. JH3'-P coupling constants for each of the phosphates of the decamer were obtained from 1H-31P J-resolved selective proton flip 2D spectra. By using a modified Karplus relationship the C4'-C3'-O3'-P torsional angles were obtained. Comparison of the 31P chemical shifts and JH3'-P coupling constants of this sequence has allowed a greater insight into the various factors responsible for 31P chemical shift variations in oligonucleotides. It also provides an important probe of the sequence-dependent structural variation of the deoxyribose phosphate backbone of DNA in solution. These correlations are consistent with the hypothesis that changes in local helical structure perturb the deoxyribose phosphate backbone. The variation of the 31P chemical shift, and the degree of this variation from one base step to the next is proposed as a potential probe of local helical conformation within the DNA double helix

  11. Nuclear is part of the solution for fighting climate change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Ngoc, Boris; Langegger, Eileen; Janin, Denis

    2016-11-01

    Nuclear for Climate recognize the conclusions of Working Group I of the IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change), which states that human activity and greenhouse gas emissions are - with 95 percent certainty - the dominant cause of current climate change. We welcome the Paris Agreement which was adopted at the 21. Conference of the Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change - widely known as COP 21 - in December 2015 and has entered into force 4 November, just before the COP22. We support its main aim to keep global temperature increases this century well below 2 degrees Celsius, and drive efforts to limit temperature increases to below 1.5 degrees Celsius, which the UNFCCC says is a 'significantly safer' defense against the worst impacts of climate change. We believe that nuclear energy is a key part of the solution for limiting climate change, and that: 1. The world must increase the deployment of all low-carbon energy sources, including nuclear energy, if it is to limit climate change while still meeting development goals. The global challenge is immense: by 2050, according to the IPCC, 80 percent of global electricity will need to be produced with low-carbon technology (compared with 30 percent today) in order to contain climate change below 2 deg. C. During the same period, global demand for electricity should double to meet the basic needs of humanity in terms of population growth and development goals. Low-carbon electricity is expected to play a major role in de-carbonizing other sectors. This challenge requires the use of all low-carbon energy technologies: renewables, nuclear, and fossil fuels with carbon capture and sequestration, and underscores the need for large-scale low- or no-carbon electric generation options. The IPCC recognizes that 'The life cycle greenhouse gas emissions per kilowatt-hour from nuclear power plants are two orders of magnitude lower than those of fossil-fueled electricity generation and

  12. Nuclear Measurement Technologies and Solutions Implemented during Nuclear Accident at Fukushima

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morichi, M.; Toubon, H.; Bronson, Frazier; Venkataraman, Ram; Beaujoin, J.; Dubart, P.

    2013-06-01

    Fukushima accident imposed a stretch to nuclear measurement operational approach requiring in such emergency situation: fast concept development, fast system integration, deployment and start-up in a very short time frame. This paper is describing the Nuclear Measurement that AREVA-BUNM (CANBERRA) has realized and foresight at Fukushima accident site describing the technical solution conceived developed and deployed at Fukushima NPP for the process control of the treatment system of contaminated water. A detailed description of all levels design choices, from detection technologies to system architecture is offer in the paper as well as the read-out and global data management system. This paper describes also the technical choices executed and put in place to overcome the challenges related to the high radiological contamination on site. (authors)

  13. Advancement of 31P Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Using GRAPPA Reconstruction on a 3D Volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clevenger, Tony

    The overall objective of this research is to improve currently available metabolic imaging techniques for clinical use in monitoring and predicting treatment response to radiation therapy in liver cancer. Liver metabolism correlates with inflammatory and neoplastic liver diseases, which alter the intracellular concentration of phosphorus- 31 (31P) metabolites [1]. It is assumed that such metabolic changes occur prior to physical changes of the tissue. Therefore, information on regional changes of 31P metabolites in the liver, obtained by Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging (MRSI) [1,2], can help in diagnosis and follow-up of various liver diseases. Specifically, there appears to be an immediate need of this technology for both the assessment of tumor response in patients with Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC) treated with Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) [3--5], as well as assessment of radiation toxicity, which can result in worsening liver dysfunction [6]. Pilot data from our lab has shown that 31P MRSI has the potential to identify treatment response five months sooner than conventional methods [7], and to assess the biological response of liver tissue to radiation 24 hours post radiation therapy [8]. While this data is very promising, commonly occurring drawbacks for 31P MRSI are patient discomfort due to long scan times and prone positioning within the scanner, as well as reduced data quality due to patient motion and respiration. To further advance the full potential of 31P MRSI as a clinical diagnostic tool in the management of liver cancer, this PhD research project had the following aims: I) Reduce the long acquisition time of 3D 31P MRS by formulating and imple- menting an appropriate GRAPPA undersampling scheme and reconstruction on a clinical MRI scanner II) Testing and quantitative validation of GRAPPA reconstruction on 3D 31P MRSI on developmental phantoms and healthy volunteers At completion, this work should considerably advance 31P MRSI

  14. Metabolic engineering applications of in vivo 31P and 13C NMR studies of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shanks, J.V.

    1989-01-01

    With intent to quantify NMR measurements as much as possible, analysis techniques of the in vivo 31 P NMR spectrum are developed. A systematic procedure is formulated for estimating the relative intracellular concentrations of the sugar phosphates in S. cerevisiae from the 31 P NMR spectrum. In addition, in vivo correlation of inorganic phosphate chemical shift with the chemical shifts of 3-phosphoglycerate, β-fructose 1,6-diphosphate, fructose 6-phosphate, and glucose 6-phosphate are determined. Also, a method was developed for elucidation of the cytoplasmic and vacuolar components of inorganic phosphate in the 31 P NMR spectrum of S. cerevisiae. An in vivo correlation relating the inorganic phosphate chemical shift of the vacuole with the chemical shift of the resonance for pyrophosphate and the terminal phosphate of polyphosphate (PP 1 ) is established. Transient measurements provided by 31 P NMR are applied to reg1 mutant and standard strains. 31 P and 13 C NMR measurements are used to analyze the performance of recombinant strains in which the glucose phosphorylation step had been altered

  15. Intracellular pH and inorganic phosphate content of heart in vivo: A 31P-NMR study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katz, L.A.; Swain, J.A.; Portman, M.A.; Balaban, R.S.

    1988-01-01

    Studies were performed to determine the contribution of red blood cells to the 31 P-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrum of the canine heart in vivo and the feasibility of measuring myocardial intracellular phosphate and pH. This was accomplished by replacing whole blood with a perfluorochemical perfusion emulsion blood substitute, Oxypherol, and noting the difference in the 31 P-NMR spectrum of the heart. NMR data were collected with a NMR transmitter-receiver coil on the surface of the distal portion of the left ventricle. These studies demonstrated that a small contribution from 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (2,3-DPG) and phosphodiesters in the blood could be detected. The magnitude and shift of these blood-borne signals permitted the relative quantification of intracellular inorganic phosphate (P i ) content as well as intracellular pH. Under resting conditions, the intracellular ATP/P i was 7.0 ± 0.08. This corresponds to a free intracellular P 1 content of ∼ 0.8 μmol./g wet wt. The intracellular pH was 7.10 ± 0.01. Acute respiratory alkalosis and acidosis, with the arterial pH ranging from ∼7.0 to 7.7, resulted in only small changes in the intracellular pH. These latter results demonstrate an effective myocardial intracellular proton-buffering mechanism in vivo

  16. New sorbents and ion exchangers for nuclear waste solution remediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clearfield, A.; Peng, G.Z.; Cahill, R.A.; Bellinghausen, P.; Aly, H.I.; Scott, K.; Wang, J.D.

    1993-01-01

    There is now a concerted effort underway to clean up the accumulated nuclear wastes as the major sites around the country. Because of the complexity of the mixtures in the holding tanks highly specific exchangers are required to fulfill a multitude of desired tasks. These include removal of Cs + , Sr 2+ , Tc, Actinides and possible recovery of rare and precious metals. No one exchanger or sequestrant can accomplish these tasks and a variety of exchangers in a multistep process will be required. The behavior of a number of inorganic ion exchangers in a multistep process will be required. The behavior of a number of inorganic ion exchangers and new organo-inorganic exchangers towards Cs + , Sr 2+ and rare-earth ions in acid and basic media will be described. Preliminary data on the effect of high levels of sodium nitrate on the uptake of these ions will also be presented, as well as the changes observed in selectivity in simulated waste solutions. A possible separation scheme based on these data will be described

  17. Physically - engineering problems of the Salaspils Nuclear reactor: Solutions and their topicality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mozgirs, Z.V.

    2005-01-01

    The paper generalizes technical solutions of physically-engineering problems of the Salaspils nuclear research reactor, experience of its modernization and exploitation. New equipment and the related technical solutions have been tested at the Salaspils reactor during its operation time and are now recommended for further use at nuclear reactors. (author)

  18. A compilation of information on the {sup 31}P(p,{alpha}){sup 28}Si reaction and properties of excited levels in the compound nucleus {sup 32}S

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, R.E.; Smith, D.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Technology Development Div.

    1997-11-01

    This report documents a survey of the literature, and provides a compilation of data contained therein, for the {sup 31}P(p,{alpha}){sup 28}Si reaction. Attention is paid here to resonance states in the compound-nuclear system {sup 32}S formed by {sup 31}P + p, with emphasis on the alpha-particle decay channels, {sup 28}Si + {alpha} which populate specific levels in {sup 28}Si. The energy region near the proton separation energy for {sup 32}S is especially important in this context for applications in nuclear astrophysics. Properties of the excited states in {sup 28}Si are also considered. Summaries of all the located references are provided and numerical data contained in them are compiled in EXFOR format where applicable.

  19. Phosphatidylcholine contributes to in vivo 31P MRS signal from the human liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chmelik, Marek; Bogner, Wolfgang; Gajdosik, Martin; Gruber, Stephan; Trattnig, Siegfried; Valkovic, Ladislav; Wolf, Peter; Krebs, Michael; Halilbasic, Emina; Trauner, Michael; Krssak, Martin

    2015-01-01

    To demonstrate the overlap of the hepatic and bile phosphorus ( 31 P) magnetic resonance (MR) spectra and provide evidence of phosphatidylcholine (PtdC) contribution to the in vivo hepatic 31 P MRS phosphodiester (PDE) signal, suggested in previous reports to be phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP). Phantom measurements to assess the chemical shifts of PEP and PtdC signals were performed at 7 T. A retrospective analysis of hepatic 3D 31 P MR spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) data from 18 and five volunteers at 3 T and 7 T, respectively, was performed. Axial images were inspected for the presence of gallbladder, and PDE signals in representative spectra were quantified. Phantom experiments demonstrated the strong pH-dependence of the PEP chemical shift and proved the overlap of PtdC and PEP (∝2 ppm relative to phosphocreatine) at hepatic pH. Gallbladder was covered in seven of 23 in vivo 3D-MRSI datasets. The PDE gall /γ-ATP liver ratio was 4.8-fold higher (p = 0.001) in the gallbladder (PDE gall /γ-ATP liver = 3.61 ± 0.79) than in the liver (PDE liver /γ-ATP liver = 0.75 ± 0.15). In vivo 7 T 31 P MRSI allowed good separation of PDE components. The gallbladder is a strong source of contamination in adjacent 31 P MR hepatic spectra due to biliary phosphatidylcholine. In vivo 31 P MR hepatic signal at 2.06 ppm may represent both phosphatidylcholine and phosphoenolpyruvate, with a higher phosphatidylcholine contribution due to its higher concentration. (orig.)

  20. Phosphatidylcholine contributes to in vivo {sup 31}P MRS signal from the human liver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chmelik, Marek; Bogner, Wolfgang; Gajdosik, Martin; Gruber, Stephan; Trattnig, Siegfried [Medical University of Vienna, MR Centre of Excellence, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Valkovic, Ladislav [Medical University of Vienna, MR Centre of Excellence, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Institute of Measurement Science, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Department of Imaging Methods, Bratislava (Slovakia); Wolf, Peter; Krebs, Michael [Medical University of Vienna, Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine III, Vienna (Austria); Halilbasic, Emina; Trauner, Michael [Medical University of Vienna, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Internal Medicine III, Vienna (Austria); Krssak, Martin [Medical University of Vienna, MR Centre of Excellence, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Medical University of Vienna, Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine III, Vienna (Austria)

    2015-07-15

    To demonstrate the overlap of the hepatic and bile phosphorus ({sup 31}P) magnetic resonance (MR) spectra and provide evidence of phosphatidylcholine (PtdC) contribution to the in vivo hepatic {sup 31}P MRS phosphodiester (PDE) signal, suggested in previous reports to be phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP). Phantom measurements to assess the chemical shifts of PEP and PtdC signals were performed at 7 T. A retrospective analysis of hepatic 3D {sup 31}P MR spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) data from 18 and five volunteers at 3 T and 7 T, respectively, was performed. Axial images were inspected for the presence of gallbladder, and PDE signals in representative spectra were quantified. Phantom experiments demonstrated the strong pH-dependence of the PEP chemical shift and proved the overlap of PtdC and PEP (∝2 ppm relative to phosphocreatine) at hepatic pH. Gallbladder was covered in seven of 23 in vivo 3D-MRSI datasets. The PDE{sub gall}/γ-ATP{sub liver} ratio was 4.8-fold higher (p = 0.001) in the gallbladder (PDE{sub gall}/γ-ATP{sub liver} = 3.61 ± 0.79) than in the liver (PDE{sub liver}/γ-ATP{sub liver} = 0.75 ± 0.15). In vivo 7 T {sup 31}P MRSI allowed good separation of PDE components. The gallbladder is a strong source of contamination in adjacent {sup 31}P MR hepatic spectra due to biliary phosphatidylcholine. In vivo {sup 31}P MR hepatic signal at 2.06 ppm may represent both phosphatidylcholine and phosphoenolpyruvate, with a higher phosphatidylcholine contribution due to its higher concentration. (orig.)

  1. Estudo do metabolismo energético muscular em atletas por 31P-ERM Muscular energetic metabolism study in athletes by 31P-MRS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Gisele dos Santos

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Caracterizar as reservas energéticas de metabólitos fosforilados no músculo esquelético de atletas mediante 31P-ERM. MÉTODOS: Amostra deste estudo foi formada por 14 atletas de alto nível do Centro de Alto Rendimento Esportivo (CAR, Sant Cugat del Vallés, Espanha. O padrão de metabólitos fosforilados foi medido no músculo vasto medial por 31P-ERM. A suplementação oral foi realizada durante 14 dias, na forma de 20g de monohidrato de creatina. Os atletas foram determinados conforme as suas características físicas (peso, altura, índice de massa corporal (IMC, consumo máximo de oxigênio (VO2 Max. em dois grupos: placebo (maltodextrina e suplementação com creatina. O protocolo de exercício foi realizado no interior do túnel de ressonância (160 x 52 cm, a 60 ciclos por minuto para ambas as pernas. RESULTADOS: Os resultados demonstraram um aumento significativo da fosfocreatina (PCr durante o exercício, após o período de suplementação, denotando uma redução do seu consumo no grupo que recebeu suplementação com creatina; não houve diminuição significativa do pH intracelular e fosfato inorgânico após a suplementação. CONCLUSÃO: O protocolo de exercício realizado pelos fundistas no Centro de Diagnóstico de Pedralbes permitiu detectar mediante 31P-ERM, no grupo que foi suplementado com creatina, uma diminuição do consumo de PCr durante os períodos de exercício.BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to characterize the muscular reservoirs of phosphorilated energetic components of athletes using 31P-MRS. METHODS: The sample was formed by 14 elite athletes from the Center for High Sportive Performance (CAR, Sant Cugat del Vallés, Spain. The pattern of the phosphorilated metabolites was measured from the muscle vastus medialis by 31P-MRS. Oral supplementation of 20 g of Creatine monohydrate was given during 14 days. Two groups of athletes were formed according to their physical characteristics (weight

  2. Quantitation of movement of the phosphoryl group during catalytic transfer in the arginine kinase reaction: {sup 31}P relaxation measurements on enzyme-bound equilibrium mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ray, Bruce D. [Indiana University, Purdue University at Indianapolis (IUPUI), Department of Physics (United States); Jarori, Gotam K. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research (India); Nageswara Rao, B.D. [Indiana University, Purdue University at Indianapolis (IUPUI), Department of Physics (United States)], E-mail: brao@iupui.edu

    2002-05-15

    {sup 31}P nuclear spin relaxation measurements have been made on enzyme-bound equilibrium mixtures of lobster-muscle arginine kinase in the presence of substituent activating paramagnetic cation Co(II) (in place of Mg(II)), i.e., on samples in which the reaction, E{center_dot}CoATP{center_dot}arginine {r_reversible} E{center_dot}CoADP{center_dot}P-arginine, is in progress. The results have been analyzed on the basis of a previously published theory (Nageswara Rao, B.D. (1995) J. Magn. Reson., B108, 289-293) to determine the structural changes in the reaction complex accompanying phosphoryl transfer. The analysis enables the determination of the change in the Co(II)-{sup 31}P ({gamma}-P(ATP)) vector as the transferable phosphoryl group moves over and attaches to arginine to form P-arginine. It is shown that the Co(II)-{sup 31}P distance of {approx}3.0 A, representing direct coordination of Co(II) to {gamma}-P(ATP), changes to {approx}4.0 A when P-arginine is formed in the enzyme-bound reaction complex. This elongation of the Co(II)-{sup 31}P vector implies an excursion of at least 1.0 A for the itinerant phosphoryl group on the surface of the enzyme.

  3. Quantitation of movement of the phosphoryl group during catalytic transfer in the arginine kinase reaction: 31P relaxation measurements on enzyme-bound equilibrium mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ray, Bruce D.; Jarori, Gotam K.; Nageswara Rao, B.D.

    2002-01-01

    31 P nuclear spin relaxation measurements have been made on enzyme-bound equilibrium mixtures of lobster-muscle arginine kinase in the presence of substituent activating paramagnetic cation Co(II) (in place of Mg(II)), i.e., on samples in which the reaction, E·CoATP·arginine ↔ E·CoADP·P-arginine, is in progress. The results have been analyzed on the basis of a previously published theory (Nageswara Rao, B.D. (1995) J. Magn. Reson., B108, 289-293) to determine the structural changes in the reaction complex accompanying phosphoryl transfer. The analysis enables the determination of the change in the Co(II)- 31 P (γ-P(ATP)) vector as the transferable phosphoryl group moves over and attaches to arginine to form P-arginine. It is shown that the Co(II)- 31 P distance of ∼3.0 A, representing direct coordination of Co(II) to γ-P(ATP), changes to ∼4.0 A when P-arginine is formed in the enzyme-bound reaction complex. This elongation of the Co(II)- 31 P vector implies an excursion of at least 1.0 A for the itinerant phosphoryl group on the surface of the enzyme

  4. Levels of 31P from [alpha]-particle capture in 27Al

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voigt, M.J.A. de; Regenboog, D.A.; Grootenhuis, J.; Leun, C. van der

    1971-01-01

    Resonance energies, strengths and decay schemes have been determined for seventeen 27Al(α, γ)31P resonances in the range Eα = 2.3–3.3 MeV. New levels of 31P are reported at Ex = 6503±3, 6792±3, 7117.7±1.0, 7441.4±1.0 and 8345.5±1.5 keV. The reaction Q-value is found as 9665.1 ±1.3 keV. Doppler-shift

  5. 31-P Relaxation times of metabolic compounds in tumors grafted in nude mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remy, C.; Benabid, A.L.; Jacrot, M.; Riondel, J.; Albrand, J.P.; Decorps, M.

    1985-08-01

    The observation that water proton relaxation rates were longer in tumors than in normal tissues provided a basis for the detection of human tumors by the NMR imaging technique. To evaluate the potentiality of 31-P NMR spectroscopy as a diagnostic tool of the pathological state of tissues, T1 and T2 relaxation times have been measured for the phosphates of ATP, inorganic phosphate (Pi), phosphomonoesters (PME) and phosphocreatine (PCr) in the 31-P NMR spectra obtained in vivo for normal rat brain and rat brain tumors implanted in nude mice

  6. Simultaneous 31P-NMR spectroscopy and EMG in exercising and recovering human skeletal muscle: a correlation study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard-Poulsen, P; Thomsen, C; Sinkjaer, T

    1995-01-01

    A large number of studies have shown amplitude and spectral changes of the electromyogram during exercise, leading to several theories of how these changes might be related to the underlying metabolic changes. The amplitude and spectral changes are generally interpreted as changes in motor unit...... of the muscle. Simultaneous 31P-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and surface electromyography were performed during sustained static exercise and recovery in healthy volunteers and a patient with McArdle's disease. A clear dissociation between the median power frequency of the surface electromyogram...... and pH was seen in the healthy volunteers during recovery and during exercise in the patient with McArdle's disease. The results indicate that proton or lactate accumulation is not primarily responsible for the spectral changes of the surface electromyogram as previously suggested. The motor unit...

  7. Izolace humusových kyselin pro 31P NMR spektroskopii

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Novák, František; Hrabal, R.; Kalousková, Nataša

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 97, - (2003), s. 621-622 ISSN 0009-2770 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA206/02/1504 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6066911 Keywords : 31P NMR * humic acid * phosphorus transformation Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 0.345, year: 2003

  8. Quantification of skeletal muscle mitochondrial function by 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy techniques : A quantitative review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kemp, G.J.; Ahmad, R.E.; Nicolay, K.; Prompers, J.J.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) can give information about cellular metabolism in vivo which is difficult to obtain in other ways. In skeletal muscle, non-invasive 31P MRS measurements of the post-exercise recovery kinetics of pH, [PCr], [Pi] and [ADP] contain valuable information about muscle

  9. 31P NMR studies of pH homeostasis in intact adult Fasciola hepatica

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tielens, A.G.M.; Nicolaij, K.; Bergh, van S.G.

    1982-01-01

    31P NMR was used to measure the intracellular pH in live adult Fasciola hepatica. The results demonstrate that at external pH values above 7.0, pH homeostasis keeps the intracellular pH at 7.0. At external pH values below 7.0 the intracellular pH is less strictly regulated.

  10. Kvantitativní 31P NMR spektroskopie huminových kyselin

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Novák, František; Hrabal, R.; Bartošová, I.; Kalčík, Jiří

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 99, - (2005), s. 236-245 ISSN 0009-2770 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA206/02/1504 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6066911 Keywords : 31P NMR spectroscopy * humic acids Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 0.445, year: 2005

  11. Gamma rays from the 31P(n, γ)32P reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middelkoop, G. van

    1967-01-01

    The 31P(n, γ)32P reaction is studied with a 5 cm3 Ge(Li) counter. Altogether, 54 γ-rays are detected with experimental energy errors between 0.4 and 3.0 keV. The Q-value of the reaction is determined as Q = 7936.8±0.8 keV.

  12. (1 H, 13 C and 31 P) NMR of phosphonic acid derivatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos, Valdevino; Costa, Valentim E. Uberti

    1991-01-01

    In the last years the development of phosphates analogues in the medical and agricultural pesticides has being very expressive. 1 H, 13 C and mainly 31 P NMR are used for stereochemical and conformational analysis, and reactivity studies on the compounds resulting from those chemical processes

  13. New methods for the correction of 31P NMR spectra in in vivo NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starcuk, Z.; Bartusek, K.; Starcuk, Z. jr.

    1994-01-01

    The new methods for the correction of 31 P NMR spectra in vivo NMR spectroscopy have been performed. A method for the baseline correction of the spectra which represents a combination of time-domain and frequency-domain has been discussed.The method is very fast and efficient for minimization of base line artifacts of biological tissues impact

  14. Structure and motion of phospholipids in human plasma lipoproteins. A 31P NMR study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenske, D.B.; Chana, R.S.; Parmar, Y.I.; Treleaven, W.D.; Cushley, R.J.

    1990-01-01

    The structure and motion of phospholipids in human plasma lipoproteins have been studied by using 31 P NMR. Lateral diffusion coefficients, D T , obtained from the viscosity dependence of the 31 P NMR line widths, were obtained for very low density lipoprotein (VLDL), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), high-density lipoproteins (HDL 2 , HDL 3 ), and egg PC/TO microemulsions at 25 degree C, for VLDL at 40 degree C, and for LDL at 45 degree C. In order to prove the orientation and/or order of the phospholipid head-group, estimates of the residual chemical shift anistropy, Δσ, have been obtained for all the lipoproteins and the microemulsions from the viscosity and field dependence for the 31 P NMR line widths. These results suggest differences in the orientation and/or ordering of the head-group in the HDLs. The dynamic behavior of the phosphate moiety in LDL and HDL 3 has been obtained from the temperature dependence of the 31 P spin-lattice relaxation rates. Values of the correlation time for phosphate group reorientation and the activation energy for the motion are nearly identical in LDL and HDL 3 and are similar to values obtained for phospholipid bilayers. This argues against long-lived protein-lipid interactions being the source of either the slow diffusion in LDL or the altered head-group orientation in the HDLs

  15. The nuclear contribution to the solution of Brazilian energy problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This report presents the justifying of Brazilian Nuclear Programme. Due to the demand increasing of electric energy in Brazil, the government decided to an alternative source. Although the brazilian electric power program continue basically hydroelectric, the nuclear power plants began to be constructed. The strategy adopted, the prospection of uranium enrichment, the project and construction of nuclear power plants, the responsibilities of Nuclebras and Nuclen and several stages of this program are described. (C.M.)

  16. Nuclear power plants - a solution for the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinn, D.

    1978-01-01

    This book is not written for experts, but for interested laymen. The arguments in favour of nuclear power plants are presented in an intelligible and critical manner. The problem of nuclear power is reviewed at a moment where the nuclear controversy has even led to lawsuits. Still, there is hope for a secure energy supply - and fear of the risks that the future might bring and which may even endanger our lives. (GL) [de

  17. 13C and 31P NMR [Nuclear Magnetic Resonance] studies of prostate tumor metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sillerud, L.O.; Halliday, K.R.; Freyer, J.P; Griffey, R.H.; Fenoglio-Preiser, C.

    1989-01-01

    The current research on prostate cancer by NMR spectroscopy and microscopy will most significantly contribute to tumor diagnosis and characterization only if sound biochemical models of tumor metabolism are established and tested. Prior searches focused on universal markers of malignancy, have to date, revealed no universal markers by any method. It is unlikely that NMRS will succeed where other methods have failed, however, NMR spectroscopy does provide a non-invasive means to analyze multiple compounds simultaneously in vivo. In order to fully evaluate the ability of NMRS to differentiate non-malignant from malignant tissues it is necessary to determine sufficient multiple parameters from specific, well-diagnosed, histological tumor types that, in comparison to normal tissue and non-neoplastic, non-normal pathologies from which the given neoplasm must be differentiated, one has enough degrees of freedom to make a mathematically and statistically significant determination. Confounding factors may consist of tumor heterogeneity arising from regional variations in differentiation, ischemia, necrosis, hemorrhage, inflammation and the presence of intermingled normal tissue. One related aspect of our work is the development of { 13 C}- 1 H metabolic imaging of 13 C for metabolic characterization, with enhanced spatial localization (46). This should markedly extend the range of potential clinical NMR uses because the spatial variation in prostate metabolism may prove to be just as important in tumor diagnoses as bulk (volume-averaged) properties themselves. It is our hope that NMRS and spectroscopic imaging will reveal a sound correlation between prostate metabolism and tumor properties that will be clinically straightforward and useful for diagnosis

  18. {sup 31}P-MR spectroscopy in children and adolescents with a familial risk of schizophrenia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rzanny, R.; Reichenbach, J.R.; Pfleiderer, S.O.R.; Kaiser, W.A. [Institut fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, Abteilung MT, Klinikum der Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena, Philosophenweg 3, 07741 Jena (Germany); Klemm, S.; Blanz, B. [Klinik fuer Kinder- und Jugendpsychiatrie, Klinikum der Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena, Bachstrasse 18, 07741 Jena (Germany); Schmidt, B.; Volz, H.-P. [Klinik fuer Psychiatrie, Klinikum der Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena, Bachstrasse 18, 07741 Jena (Germany)

    2003-04-01

    Based on a previous report [9] on alterations of membrane phosphorus metabolism in asymptomatic family members of schizophrenic patients, the aim of the present study was to extend and improve the evaluation and data processing of {sup 31}P spectroscopic data obtained from a larger study population by including an analysis of the broad spectral component (BC) of membrane phospholipids (PL). Eighteen children and siblings of patients with schizophrenia and a gender- and age-matched control group of 18 healthy subjects without familial schizophrenia were investigated with phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy ({sup 31}P-MRS) by using image selected in vivo spectroscopy (ISIS) in the dorsolateral prefrontal regions (DLPFR) of the brain. Spectral analysis was performed by using both the full and truncated FID to estimate metabolic peak ratios of different {sup 31}P metabolites and the intensity and linewidth of the broad component. A significantly higher PDE level (p<0.01) and increased linewidth of the PDE components were observed for the high-risk group compared with the control group (p=0.02). No significant differences were observed for PME as well as for other {sup 31}P-metabolites. No differences were observed between the left and right hemispheres for different normalised {sup 31}P-metabolic levels. Decreased intensities (p=0.03) and smaller linewidths (p=0.01) were obtained for the broad component in the high-risk group. Impairments of membrane metabolism that are typical for schizophrenic patients are partially observed in adolescent asymptomatic family members of schizophrenics, including increased levels of low molecular PDE compounds indicating increased membrane degradation processes, no changes for PME, and decreased intensities and linewidths of the BC indicating changes in the composition and fluidity of membrane phospholipids. Despite limitations to completely suppress fast-relaxing components by dismissing initial FID data points, the

  19. 31P-MR spectroscopy in children and adolescents with a familial risk of schizophrenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rzanny, R.; Reichenbach, J.R.; Pfleiderer, S.O.R.; Kaiser, W.A.; Klemm, S.; Blanz, B.; Schmidt, B.; Volz, H.-P.

    2003-01-01

    Based on a previous report [9] on alterations of membrane phosphorus metabolism in asymptomatic family members of schizophrenic patients, the aim of the present study was to extend and improve the evaluation and data processing of 31 P spectroscopic data obtained from a larger study population by including an analysis of the broad spectral component (BC) of membrane phospholipids (PL). Eighteen children and siblings of patients with schizophrenia and a gender- and age-matched control group of 18 healthy subjects without familial schizophrenia were investigated with phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy ( 31 P-MRS) by using image selected in vivo spectroscopy (ISIS) in the dorsolateral prefrontal regions (DLPFR) of the brain. Spectral analysis was performed by using both the full and truncated FID to estimate metabolic peak ratios of different 31 P metabolites and the intensity and linewidth of the broad component. A significantly higher PDE level (p 31 P-metabolites. No differences were observed between the left and right hemispheres for different normalised 31 P-metabolic levels. Decreased intensities (p=0.03) and smaller linewidths (p=0.01) were obtained for the broad component in the high-risk group. Impairments of membrane metabolism that are typical for schizophrenic patients are partially observed in adolescent asymptomatic family members of schizophrenics, including increased levels of low molecular PDE compounds indicating increased membrane degradation processes, no changes for PME, and decreased intensities and linewidths of the BC indicating changes in the composition and fluidity of membrane phospholipids. Despite limitations to completely suppress fast-relaxing components by dismissing initial FID data points, the spectroscopic results indicate additional changes in the membrane metabolism of high-risk subjects beyond changes of synthesis and degradation. (orig.)

  20. Determination of basicity of neutral organic phosphorus extractants in nonpolar solvents by the 31P NMR method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yakshin, V.V.; Meshcheryakov, N.M.; Il'in, E.G.; Ignatov, M.E.; Laskorin, B.N.

    1984-01-01

    The variant of the NMR method application is developed for quantitative description of acidic-basic properties of neutral organic phosphorus extractants, R 3 P--O (NPE), in non-polar organic solvents. For the NPE basicity determination the dependence of the chemical shift value in NMR 31 P spectra of 0.1 M NPE solutions in the dodecane on sulfuric acid acitivity in aqueous phase at 0-12 M acidity is studied. The linear equation relating NPE basicity and electronic structure of these compounds expressed through the sum: of Kabachnik reaction constants is derived. Linear dependences between the NPE basicity value in dodecane and NPE basicity in nitromethane as well as enthalpies of complexes formation with charge transport with standard acid-iodine in heptane, enthalpies of hydrogen complexes formation with phenol and water have been found

  1. In vivo 31 P NMR Spectroscopy for the study of P Pools and their Dynamics in Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viereck, Nanna

    large amounts and is often limiting to plant growth. The availability of P is limited by the slow rate of diffusion of inorganic orthopliospliate (Pi) through the soil. As plants remove Pi from the soil solution close to the root an area suii-ounding the root drained for soluble Pi may be formed (the P...... an important role in tbe Pi trauslocation process. However, the amount, size and other roles of polyp present in .the extraradical and intraradical mycelium is a matter of debate. invasive methods have commonly been used to identify polyp and therefore artifacts of specirnen preparation could possibly have...... interfered with tbe polyp chain length. More detailed information of P pools and polyp accumulation would benefit from non-invasive and non-destructive measureinents of the dynamic incorporation of Pi into various P pools witliin extraradical mycelium and mycorrhizal roots. In viv0 31P NMR spectroscopy...

  2. Method for recovering palladium and technetium values from nuclear fuel reprocessing waste solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwitz, E. Philip; Delphin, Walter H.

    1979-07-24

    A method for recovering palladium and technetium values from nuclear fuel reprocessing waste solutions containing these and other values by contacting the waste solution with an extractant of tricaprylmethylammonium nitrate in an inert hydrocarbon diluent which extracts the palladium and technetium values from the waste solution. The palladium and technetium values are recovered from the extractant and from any other coextracted values with a strong nitric acid strip solution.

  3. Nuclear Data for Astrophysics: Resources, Challenges, Strategies, and Software Solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Michael Scott; Lingerfelt, Eric J.; Nesaraja, Caroline D.; Hix, William Raphael; Roberts, Luke F.; Koura, Hiroyuki; Fuller, George M.; Tytler, David

    2008-01-01

    One of the most exciting utilizations of nuclear data is to help unlock the mysteries of the Cosmos -- the creation of the chemical elements, the evolution and explosion of stars, and the origin and fate of the Universe. There are now many nuclear data sets, tools, and other resources online to help address these important questions. However, numerous serious challenges make it important to develop strategies now to ensure a sustainable future for this work. A number of strategies are advocated, including: enlisting additional manpower to evaluate the newest data; devising ways to streamline evaluation activities; and improving communication and coordination between existing efforts. Software projects are central to some of these strategies. Examples include: creating a virtual 'pipeline' leading from the nuclear laboratory to astrophysics simulations; improving data visualization and management to get the most science out of the existing datasets; and creating a nuclear astrophysics data virtual (online) community. Recent examples will be detailed, including the development of two first-generation software pipelines, the Computational Infrastructure for Nuclear Astrophysics for stellar astrophysics and the bigbangonline suite of codes for cosmology, and the coupling of nuclear data to sensitivity studies with astrophysical simulation codes to guide future research.

  4. Nuclear data for astrophysics: resources, challenges, strategies, and software solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, M.S.; Lingerfelt, E.J.; Nesaraja, C.D.; Raphael Hix, W.; Roberts, L.F.; Hiroyuki, Koura; Fuller, G.M.; Tytler, D.

    2008-01-01

    One of the most exciting utilizations of nuclear data is to help unlock the mysteries of the Cosmos - the creation of the chemical elements, the evolution and explosion of stars, and the origin and fate of the Universe. There are now many nuclear data sets, tools, and other resources online to help address these important questions. However, numerous serious challenges make it important to develop strategies now to ensure a sustainable future for this work. A number of strategies are advocated, including: enlisting additional manpower to evaluate the newest data; devising ways to streamline evaluation activities; and improving communication and coordination between existing efforts. Software projects are central to some of these strategies. Examples include: creating a virtual - pipeline - leading from the nuclear laboratory to astrophysics simulations; improving data visualization and management to get the most science out of the existing datasets; and creating a nuclear astrophysics data virtual (online) community. Recent examples will be detailed, including the development of two first-generation software pipelines, the Computational Infrastructure for Nuclear Astrophysics for stellar astrophysics and the Bigbangonline suite of codes for cosmology, and the coupling of nuclear data to sensitivity studies with astrophysical simulation codes to guide future research. (authors)

  5. Nuclear energy - the global solution for sustainable development in Romania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorea, Valica; Popescu, Dan; Cristescu, Catalin

    2006-01-01

    The global population growth of the planet during the next 50 years will be accompanied by a dramatic increase in the demand for energy. Almost two-thirds of the world's population today has no access to electricity in developing countries. Without energy, the entire infrastructure would collapse: agriculture, transportation, waste collection. Developing and industrialized nations alike must address - both individually and collectively - how they can achieve sustainable growth. To date about 16 % of the world's electricity is produced by 443 reactors in 31 countries. They have a combined total capacity of 362 GW of electricity and produced a combined total of 2618 TWh in 2004, according to the International Atomic Energy Agency statistics. These reactors produce electricity for their respective countries safely, reliably and with the lowest environmental impact of any major energy source. Nuclear power provides steady energy at a consistent price without competing for resources from other countries. Some deficient in fossil fuels large countries (like France) rely on nuclear power up to about 80 % of their power necessities. United States (US) has the greatest number of commercial reactors in operation, but the share of nuclear power doesn't exceed 20 %, because of their abundant oil resources. On a percentage basis, Romania is one of the smaller users of nuclear energy. In Romania, according to the official data of the Romanian Ministry of Economy and Trade, nuclear energy share is only 10% of the gross power generation structure, with 5.560 GWh during the year 2004. Construction of the first unit of the Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) Cernavoda started in 1980 and of units 2-5 in 1982. Unit 1 was connected to the grid in mid of 1996 and entered commercial operation in December 1996. The state nuclear power corporation, Societatea Nationala Nuclearelectrica (SNN), established in 1998, operates Cernavoda NPP. Its capacity factor has averaged over 86 % so far and

  6. 31P-NMR study of human pyrimidine 5'-nucleotidase deficient erythrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higaki, Tsuyoshi; Kagimoto, Tadashi; Nagata, Koichi; Tanase, Sumio; Morino, Yoshimasa; Takatsuki, Kiyoshi

    1982-01-01

    Metabolic disorder of nucleotides in human pyrimidine 5'-nucleotidase (P5N) deficient erythrocytes was studied by 31 P-NMR with high resolution. Identification by combination of high-speed liquid chromatography revealed two-fold increases from the normal in the spectra in the α-, β- and γ-zones of nucleoside triphosphates of P5N deficient erythrocytes, 2,3-diphosphoglycerate shifted to the 0.3 ppm low magnetic field and signals of NAD and UDP-sugars(s) in the diphosphodiester zone. These results were obtained from the 31 P-NMR spectrum about one hour after blood sampling, indicating the high utility of this NMR for the diagnosis of P5N deficiency. (Chiba, N.)

  7. Wilson's disease: 31P and 1H MR spectroscopy and clinical correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinha, Sanjib; Taly, A.B.; Prashanth, L.K.; Ravishankar, S.; Vasudev, M.K.

    2010-01-01

    Proton ( 1 H) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) changes are noted in Wilson's disease (WD). However, there are no studies regarding membrane phospholipid abnormality using 31 P MRS in these patients. We aimed to analyze the striatal spectroscopic abnormalities using 31 P and 1 H MRS in WD. Forty patients of WD (treated, 29; untreated,11) and 30 controls underwent routine MR image sequences and in vivo 2-D 31 P and 1 H MRS of basal ganglia using an image-selected technique on a 1.5-T MRI scanner. Statistical analysis was done using Student's t test. The mean durations of illness and treatment were 6.2 ± 7.4 and 4.8 ± 5.9 years, respectively. MRI images were abnormal in all the patients. 1 H MRS revealed statistically significant reduction of N-acetyl aspartate (NAA)/choline (Cho) and NAA/creatine ratios in striatum ( 1 H MRS) of treated patients compared to controls. The mean values of phosphomonoesters (PME) (p 31 P MRS study. The duration of illness correlated well with increased PME/PDE [p < 0.001], PME/TPh [p < 0.05], and PDE/TPh [p < 0.05] and decreased NAA/Cho [p < 0.05] ratios. There was correlation of MRI score and reduced NAA/Cho ratio with disease severity. The PME/PDE ratio (right) was elevated in the treated group [p < 0.001] compared to untreated group. There is reduced breakdown and/or increased synthesis of membrane phospholipids and increased neuronal damage in basal ganglia in patients with WD. (orig.)

  8. 31P NMR spectroscopy of tumors in the evaluation of response to therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sijens, P.E.

    1988-01-01

    In this thesis the effects of different kinds of therapy on tumour metabolism were investigated by in vivo 31P NMR spectroscopy. From the first five chapters (laboratory-animal studies) it turns out that after radiotherapy as well as after hyperthermy or chemoterapy changes can be observed in the 31P NMR spectra of tumours. In a number of cases a durable decline occurred in the ratio of the high-energetic adenosinephosphate (ATP) and the low-energeic anorganic phosphate, cuased by the mortification of tumourcells. On the other hand, tumour regression after effective chemotherapy resulted in a growth of the ATP/Pi ratio. In one case a temporary drop occurred which could be related to a temporary decrease in tumour perfusion. In anoter case a temporary drop of the ATP/Pi ratio correlated with resistence against treatment with cis-diaminodichoroplatina. In contrast with the changes in ATP/Pi ratio, the changes, after (chemo)therapy, in tumour pH do not seem to be related with the respons of the tumour. The results of the laboratory-animal experiments indicate that in vivo 31P NMR spectroscopy could be applied in the clinic in order to establish betime the response of tumours on therapy. In ch. 6 initial experiences with clinical NMR spectroscopy of human breast cancer are described. The results indicate that by 31P NMR spectroscopy malignant breast tissues can be discerned from normal breast tissues, following radiotherapy and subsequent tumour regression, in the spectrum of the tumorous region an intense PCr signal developed which appeared to reflect a metabolic change in the tumous itself. 177 refs.; 27 figs.; 6 tabs

  9. In vivo 31P MR spectroscopy of breast tumors: preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choe, Bo Young; Kim, Hak Hee; Suh, Tae Suk; Shinn, Kyung Sub; Jung, Sang Seol

    1995-01-01

    To evaluate the various phosphorus metabolism of breast tumors with use of in vivo phosphorus-31 ( 31 P) MR spectroscopy (MRS). Five patients with breast tumor (benign in two, malignant in three) and three normal healthy volunteers participated in this study. All in vivo 31 P MRS examinations were performed on 1.5T whole-body MRI/MRS system by using a Free Induction Decay (FID) pulse sequence. T1-weighted MR images were used for localization of tumors. Peak areas for each phosphorus metabolite were measured using a Marquart algorithm. Breast carcinoma had a substantially larger phosphomonoester (PME) and a smaller phosphocreatine (PCr) peak intensity than normal breast tissue. This was reflected in the relatively higher PME/PCr ratio of breast carcinomas as well as phosphodiester (PDE)/PCr, inorganic phosphate (Pi)/PCr, and adenosine triphosphate (ATP)/PCr ratios, compared with normal controls. The mean pH value of breast tumor demonstrating the alkaline nature was higher than that of normal controls. Spectral patterns between benign breast disease and normal breast tissue were quite similar, and differentiation was not established. Our preliminary study suggests that in vivo 31 P MRS is a noninvasive examination which may be useful in the early differentiation of malignant breast tumors from normal and benign conditions. However, normal control and benign conditions could not be characterized on the basis of the phosphorus metabolite ratios

  10. Climate change sheet no. 01. The nuclear: a solution for the greenhouse effect?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The electric power production by the nuclear energy is often proposed as a solution to the climatic change problem. This document takes stock on this option with a state of the art, a technical and economical analysis. It concludes that the nuclear energy is not the energy of the sustainable development. (A.L.B.)

  11. Education - path towards solution regarding disposal of spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, D.E.

    1991-01-01

    Education, not emotional reaction, is the path to take in the safe disposal of spent nuclear fuel. Education is needed at all levels: Elementary schools, secondary schools, two-year colleges, four-year colleges, graduate schools, and adult education. The Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) should not be expected to tackle this problem alone. Assistance is needed from local communities, schools, and state and federal governments. However, OCRWM can lay the foundation for a comprehensive educational plan directed specifically at educating the public on the spent nuclear fuel issue and OCRWM can begin the implementation of this plan

  12. Digital solutions of some problems bordering on nuclear engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldstein, S.

    1974-01-01

    The essential features of the PASTEL code, developed at the Saclay nuclear Research Centre and using the method of finite elements in bidimensional geometry, are outlined. Some examples of application are given development of stresses in a graphite block of an HTR reactor; creep in fast reactor vessel; shock between two blocks of graphite; thermoplastic cycle [fr

  13. Chemical, mass spectrometric, spectrochemical, nuclear, and radiochemical analysis of nuclear-grade uranyl nitrate solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    The standard covers analytical procedures to determine compliance of nuclear-grade uranyl nitrate solution to specifications. The following methods are described in detail: uranium by ferrous sulfate reduction-potassium dichromate titrimetry and by ignition gravimetry; specific gravity by pycnometry; free acid by oxalate complexation; thorium by the Arsenazo(III) (photometric) method; chromium by the diphenylcarbazide (photometric) method; molybdenum by the thiocyanate (photometric) method; halogens separation by steam distillation; fluorine by specific ion electrode; halogen distillate analysis: chloride, bromide and iodide by amperometric microtitrimetry; bromine by the fluorescein (photometric) method; sulfate sulfur by (photometric) turbidimetry; phosphorus by the molybdenum blue (photometric) method; silicon by the molybdenum blue (photometric) method; carbon by persulfate oxidation-acid titrimetry; nonvolatile impurities by spectrography; volatile impurities by rotating-disk spark spectrography; boron by emission spectrography; impurity elements by spark source mass spectrography; isotopic composition by multiple filament surface-ionization mass spectrometry; uranium-232 by alpha spectrometry; total alpha activity by direct alpha counting; fission product activity by beta and gamma counting; entrained organic matter by infrared spectrophotometry

  14. Bio dosimetry- present situation and solution for application at Dalat Nuclear Research Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran Que; Hoang Hung Tien; Hoang Van Nguyen

    2000-01-01

    Studies on using technique of chromosome aberration analysis of Human lymphocytes for biodosimetry included the study on spontaneous frequencies of chromosome aberrations (background), the study on dosimetric calibrations, and the study on the solutions for personal biodosimetry at Dalat Nuclear Reactor. The results of these studies were published and the solutions for personal biodosimetry were recommended. (author)

  15. Fast reactors as a solution for future small-scale nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudryavtseva, A.; Danilenko, K.; Dorofeev, K.

    2013-01-01

    Small nuclear power plants can provide a future platform for decentralized energy supply providing better levels of accessibility, safety and environmental friendliness. The optimal solution for SMR deployment is fast reactors with inherent safety. To compete alternative solutions SMRs must exhibit some evident advantages in: safety, technology, and economic. Small modular reactors with lead-bismuth coolant (SVBR-100) under development in Russia can be a prospective solution for future small and decentralized energy

  16. Physical protection solutions for security problems at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darby, J.L.; Jacobs, J.

    1980-09-01

    Under Department of Energy sponsorship, Sandia National Laboratories has developed a broad technological base of components and integrated systems to address security concerns at facilities of importance, including nuclear reactors. The primary security concern at a light water reactor is radiological sabotage, a deliberate set of actions at a plant which could expose the public to a significant amount of radiation (on the order of 10 CFR 100 limits)

  17. Human Cardiac 31P-MR Spectroscopy at 3 Tesla Cannot Detect Failing Myocardial Energy Homeostasis during Exercise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakermans, Adrianus J.; Bazil, Jason N.; Nederveen, Aart J.; Strijkers, Gustav J.; Boekholdt, S. Matthijs; Beard, Daniel A.; Jeneson, Jeroen A. L.

    2017-01-01

    Phosphorus-31 magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P-MRS) is a unique non-invasive imaging modality for probing in vivo high-energy phosphate metabolism in the human heart. We investigated whether current 31P-MRS methodology would allow for clinical applications to detect exercise-induced changes in

  18. In vivo magnetic resonance imaging and 31P spectroscopy of large human brain tumours at 1.5 tesla

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, C; Jensen, K E; Achten, E

    1988-01-01

    31P MR spectroscopy of human brain tumours is one feature of magnetic resonance imaging. Eight patients with large superficial brain tumours and eight healthy volunteers were examined with 31P spectroscopy using an 8 cm surface coil for volume selection. Seven frequencies were resolved in our spe...

  19. An interstitial miniature antenna for localized in vivo 31P spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hentschel, M.; Wust, P.; Faehling, H.; Richter, R.; Vogl, T.; Semmler, W.; Wolf, K.J.; Felix, R.

    1996-01-01

    Phosphorus spectroscopy can be used to assess response in tumor therapy and to monitor response. Methodical problems of localisation and contamination make it more difficult to interpret and reproduce the spectra. Interstitial and endoluminal spectroscopy antennas placed directly within or close to the tumor could provide help in this problem. We developed an interstitial 31 P MRS antenna together with a tuning network which can be used in thermometry catheters for hyperthermia within an internal lumen of 1.1 mm in diameter. A prototype of this type of miniature antenna suitable for use in Siemens MRI scanners at 1.5 T was described spectroscopically with regard to excitation profile, range and SNR. Results: In terms of quality, the excitation profiles of the interstitial antennas in relation to orientation correspond to those of comparable but considerably larger endocavitary antennas and catheter coils for MR imaging and spectroscopy. Maximum sensitivity was achieved by aligning the coil normal perpendicular to the B 0 field. Signal losses of up to 50% have to be reckoned with when using other orientations. The maximum range of the interstitial antenna was determined using spectroscopy and was found to be 5 mm, i.e. 9 times coil radius. The sensitivity of the studied type of interstitial antenna allows in vivo 31 P spectroscopy to be performed despite the unusually low axial dimension (coil radius r=0.55 mm). The prototype of the described interstitial antenna was used to measure an in vivo spectrum from the back muscle of a rabbit in 10 min. Nevertheless, the detection volume of at least some ml necessary for 31 P spectroscopy results mainly from the large antenna length. Conclusion: The sensitivity of the interstitial antenna needs to be further improved in order to assess treatment response in patients. (orig./MG) [de

  20. Human in-vivo 31P MR spectroscopy of benign and malignant breast tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jeong Mi; Park, Jae Hyung

    2001-01-01

    To assess the potential clinical utility of in-vivo 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) in patients with various malignant and benign breast lesions. Seventeen patients with untreated primary malignant breast lesions (group I), eight patients with untreated benign breast lesions (group II) and seven normal breasts (group III) were included in this study. In-vivo 31P MRS was performed using a 1.5 Tesla MR scanner. Because of the characteristics of the coil, the volume of the tumor had to exceed 12 cc (3x2x2 cm), with a superoinferior diameter at least 3 cm. Mean and standard deviations of each metabolite were calculated and metabolite ratios, such as PME/PCr, PDE/PCr, T-ATP/PCr and PCr/T-ATP were calculated and statistically analyzed. Significant differences in PME were noted between groups I and III (p=0.0213), and between groups II and III (p=0.0213). The metabolite ratios which showed significant differences were PME/PCr (between groups II and III) (p=0.0201), PDE/PCr (between groups I and III, and between groups II and III) (p=0.0172), T-ATP/PCr (between groups II and III) (p=0.0287), and PCr/T-ATP (between groups II and III) (p=0.0287). There were no significant parameters between groups I and II. In-vivo 31P MRS is not helpful for establishing a differential diagnosis between benign and malignant breast lesions, at least with relatively large lesions greater than 3 cm in one or more dimensions

  1. Training Solutions to the Global Challenges of a Nuclear Renaissance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garces, M.; Chan, S.; Leo, C.; Garcia, S.; Vidal, B.

    2010-07-01

    From East Asia to the United States and all over Europe, the nuclear re-birth is generating demands the training simulation vendors had not faced before. Companies involved in the planning, design, construction and operation of new plants increasingly require simulation tools to satisfy very different needs, all of them on a large scale: education and support of inexperienced newcomer staff, human factors analysis and control room design, e-learning, verification and validation of I and C systems or training and licensing of crews before the actual installations are complete. There is a full set of applications already available to the whole industry to satisfy these needs. End-user friendly Thunder Real-Time Executive (T-REX), poised to become the standard simulation platform for U.S. plants, makes it possible to provide full-scope simulator and simulator exercises to students and others on a memory stick or over the internet. AREVA EPR full-scope training simulator, based on the ALICES integrated object-oriented simulation environment, becomes an engineering simulator for the Flamanville 3 plant under construction in Normandy; the same will happen to the Taishan 1 and 2 simulators in Guangdong (China) while UniStar plans to apply this approach to the future EPR's to be built in the United States. SIREP PWR Basic Principle Simulator, with simplified models which can run on an ordinary PC, is used at GDF SUEZ offices in Brussels to implement their Nuclear Trainees Program. EDF Training Department chooses On-line Micro Simulation (MicroSel), which can be managed with Learning Management Systems, for classroom and stand-alone learning of the basic characteristics of French reactors. All these are examples of how extensive R and D and innovation programs implemented by the simulator providers, some of them under way here in Spain, will help to overcome some of the challenges of the current nuclear expansion.

  2. Training Solutions to the Global Challenges of a Nuclear Renaissance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garces, M.; Chan, S.; Leo, C.; Garcia, S.; Vidal, B.

    2010-01-01

    From East Asia to the United States and all over Europe, the nuclear re-birth is generating demands the training simulation vendors had not faced before. Companies involved in the planning, design, construction and operation of new plants increasingly require simulation tools to satisfy very different needs, all of them on a large scale: education and support of inexperienced newcomer staff, human factors analysis and control room design, e-learning, verification and validation of I and C systems or training and licensing of crews before the actual installations are complete. There is a full set of applications already available to the whole industry to satisfy these needs. End-user friendly Thunder Real-Time Executive (T-REX), poised to become the standard simulation platform for U.S. plants, makes it possible to provide full-scope simulator and simulator exercises to students and others on a memory stick or over the internet. AREVA EPR full-scope training simulator, based on the ALICES integrated object-oriented simulation environment, becomes an engineering simulator for the Flamanville 3 plant under construction in Normandy; the same will happen to the Taishan 1 and 2 simulators in Guangdong (China) while UniStar plans to apply this approach to the future EPR's to be built in the United States. SIREP PWR Basic Principle Simulator, with simplified models which can run on an ordinary PC, is used at GDF SUEZ offices in Brussels to implement their Nuclear Trainees Program. EDF Training Department chooses On-line Micro Simulation (MicroSel), which can be managed with Learning Management Systems, for classroom and stand-alone learning of the basic characteristics of French reactors. All these are examples of how extensive R and D and innovation programs implemented by the simulator providers, some of them under way here in Spain, will help to overcome some of the challenges of the current nuclear expansion.

  3. Sustainable Solutions for Nuclear used Fuels Interim Storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arslan, Marc; Favet, Dominique; Issard, Herve; Le Jemtel, Amaury; Drevon, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    AREVA has a unique experience in providing sustainable solutions for used fuel management, fitted with the needs of different customers in the world and with regulation in different countries. These solutions entail both recycling and interim storage technologies. In a first part, we will describe the various types of solutions for Interim Storage of UNF that have been implemented around the world for interim storage at reactor or centralized Pad solution in canisters dry storage, vault type storages for dry storage, dry storage of transportation casks (dual purpose) pools for wet storage, The experience for all these different families of interim storages in which AREVA is involved is extensive and will be discussed with respect to the new challenges: increase of the duration of the interim storage (long term interim storage) increase of burn up of the fuels In a second part of the presentation, special recycling features will be presented. In that case, interim storage of the used fuels is ensured in pools. This provides in the long term good conditions for the behaviour of the fuel and its retrievability. With recycling, the final waste (Universal Canister of vitrified fission products and compacted hulls and end pieces): is stable and licensed in many countries for the final disposal (France, UK, Belgium, NL, Switzerland, Germany, Japan, upcoming: Spain, Australia, Italy). Presents neither safety criticality risks nor proliferation risks (AREVA conditioned HLW and LL-ILW are free of IAEA safeguard constraints thanks to AREVA process high recovery and purification yields). It can therefore be safely stored in interim storage for more than 100 years before final disposal. Some economic considerations will also be discussed. In particular, in the case of long term interim storage of used fuels, there are growing uncertainties regarding the future needs of repackaging and transportation, which can result in future cost overruns. Meanwhile, in the recycling policy

  4. Limitations in determining enantiomeric excess of alcohols by 31 P-NMR of the phosphonate derivatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laverde Junior, Antonio; Conceicao, Jelson J.A. da; Pilli, Ronaldo A.; Marsaioli, Anita J.; Miranda, Domingos S. de; Schirmer, Heiko; Meijere, Armin de

    1999-01-01

    The use of diastereomeric alcohol dialkyl-phosphonate derivatives to determine the enantiomeric excesses via 31 P-NMR signal ratios of anisochronous meso and threo isomers was successfully applied to secondary alcohols (Feringa's method). Expansion of the methodology to primary alcohols processing the hydroxyl groups tethered to the stereogenic centers by two or more methylene groups proved the method to be inefficient. The comparison between the coupled and decoupled spectra is important in order to identify the signals corresponding to the dialkyl-phosphonates. Nevertheless the methodology should be applied whenever the amount of the alcohol and its structure are not the limiting factors. (author)

  5. Oxidative stress-induced metabolic changes in mouse C2C12 myotubes studied with high-resolution 13C, 1H, and 31P NMR spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Straadt, Ida K; Young, Jette F; Petersen, Bent O

    2010-01-01

    In this study, stress in relation to slaughter was investigated in a model system by the use of (13)C, (1)H, and (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy for elucidating changes in the metabolites in C2C12 myotubes exposed to H(2)O(2)-induced stress. Oxidative stress resulted in lower...... to lower levels of the unlabeled ((12)C) lactate were identified in the (1)H spectra after stress exposure. These data indicate an increase in de novo synthesis of alanine, concomitant with a release of lactate from the myotubes to the medium at oxidative stress conditions. The changes in the metabolite...

  6. Inhibition of nuclear waste solutions containing multiple aggressive anions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Congdon, J.W.

    1987-01-01

    The inhibition of localized corrosion of carbon steel in caustic, high-level radioactive waste solutions was studied using cyclic potentiodynamic polarization scans, supplemented by partially immersed coupon tests. The electrochemical tests provided a rapid and accurate means of determining the relationship between the minimum inhibitor requirements and the concentration of the aggressive anions in this system. Nitrate, sulfate, chloride, and fluoride were identified as aggressive anions, however, no synergistic effects were observed between these anions. This observation may have important theoretical implications because it tends to contradict the behavior of aggressive anions as predicted by existing theories for localized corrosion. 10 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  7. Using a third party for nuclear plant civil works, one of a solution for nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandeze, A.

    2010-01-01

    Issues that may happen during the construction of civil works of a nuclear power plant are numerous: concrete, reinforcement bars positioning, welding of the liner... On top of the above, quality and nuclear safety assurance is increasingly required by nuclear authorities to keep the current nuclear renaissance steady regarding public opinion. The speaker will present the benefits of using a third party during these civil works phases and about the value created for the circle of actors through a risk based inspection program. Going through the main stages of design and construction of civil works of a nuclear power plant, the main actors involved, their positioning and the role of a voluntary independent third party inspection body, the speaker demonstrates that an independent third party, voluntarily chosen by a Utility and nuclear power plant engineering company, may give confidence to each party. (authors)

  8. Nuclear energy - a green energy solution to global warming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malhotra, S.K.

    2013-01-01

    The manner in which the world has conducted itself in exploiting energy resources so far particularly in the post industrial revolution period, is now looming as one of the greatest challenges to the sustainability of development or even sustainability of life. Global climate change is no more a perceived threat, it is now a reality and we are not in a position to engage ourselves to debate on the issue. It is in fact a little late in taking the right corrective action if we have any concern for our future generations. The efforts of the scientists and engineers are to gradually replace the energy from burning of carbonaceous material to clean and intense source of energy i.e. nuclear fission and fusion

  9. Nuclear Physics Solutions to the Primordial Lithium Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams E.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The primordial lithium problem is one of the major outstanding issues in the standard model of the Big Bang. Measurements of the baryon to photon ratio in the cosmic microwave background constrain model predictions, giving abundances of 7Li two to four times larger than observed via spectroscopic measurements of metal-poor stars. In an attempt to reconcile this discrepancy, significant effort has been directed at measuring reaction cross sections of light nuclei at astrophysically relevant energies. However, there remain reaction cross sections with large uncertainties, and some that have not yet been measured. Particularly relevant are those involving the destruction of 7Be, a progenitor of 7Li. Key issues that can be improved by nuclear physics input will be highlighted, and the applicability of detectors and event reconstruction techniques recently developed at the ANU will be discussed.

  10. Determination of plutonium 241 in solutions of nuclear wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raymond, A.; Bilcot, J.B.; Poletiko, C.

    1990-09-01

    Determination of plutonium 241 in nuclear wastes is important because of long period and high energy of some daughter products. In this report are presented two quantitative analysis methods using both scintillation techniques: A complete method, in any case, by selective extraction of plutonium on an anionic resin allowing simultaneous determination of Pu 241 and the sum of other plutonium isotopes; a simplified method when alpha activity is higher than beta/gamma activity by liquid extraction with TTA. These methods are applied for analysis of 4 waste types: cement encapsulated wastes, bitumen encapsulated wastes, incineration ashes, leaching of encapsulated incineration ashes. In these 4 examples, Pu 241 activity is equal or higher than the sum of alpha plutonium isotope activity. Separation efficiency, measured from Pu 239 or with Pu 236 as tracer, is between 90 and 99% [fr

  11. Is nuclear power part of Australia's global warming solutions?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowe, I.

    2007-01-01

    Forty years ago, I was preparing for my final exams. Having studied electrical engineering and science part-time for seven years at the University of New South Wales, I did well enough to spend the following year doing honours in physics. I then went to the United Kingdom for doctoral studies at the University of York, supported by the UK Atomic Energy Authority. At the time, like most young physicists, I saw nuclear power as the clean energy source of the future. Here, I want to tell you why my professional experience has led me to reject that view. There is no serious doubt that climate change is real, it is happening now and its effects are accelerating. It is already causing serious economic impacts: reduced agricultural production, increased costs of severe events like fires and storms, and the need to consider radical, energy-intensive and costly water supply measures such as desalination plants. The alarming consequences of climate change have driven distinguished scientists like James Lovelock to conclude that the situation is desperate enough to reconsider our attitude to nuclear power. I agree with Lovelock about the urgency of the situation, but not about the response. The science is very clear. We need to reduce global greenhouse pollution by about 60%, ideally by 2050. To achieve that global target, allowing for the legitimate material expectations of poorer countries, Australia's quota will need to be at least as strong as the UK's goal of 60% by 2050 and preferably stronger. Our eventual goal will probably be to reduce our greenhouse pollution by 80-90%. How can we reach this ambitious target?

  12. Synthesis of prostanoids; enantiomeric purity of alcohols by a 31P NMR technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penning, T.D.

    1985-01-01

    The enone, 2,2-diemthyl-3aβ, 6aβ-dihydro-4H-cyclopenta-1,3-dioxol-4-one, has been synthesized in six steps from cyclopentadiene, resolved using sulfoximine chemistry, and converted into (-)-prostaglandin E 2 methyl ester in three steps. Introduction of the optically pure omega side-chain using a conjugate addition of a stabilized organocopper reagent, followed by direct alkylation of the enolate with the α side-chain allylic iodide in the presence of hexamethylphosphoramide, afforded a trans, vicinally disubstituted cyclopentanone. Deprotection of the C-15 alcohol, followed by aluminum amalgam reduction of the C-10/oxygen bond, provided (-)-PGE 2 methyl ester in 47% overall yield from the enone. In an extension of previously described work, 2-chloro-3,4-dimethyl-5-phenyl-1,3,2-oxazaphospholidine 2-sulfide, prepared from l-ephedrine and thiophosphoryl chloride, was used to determine the enantiomeric excess of chiral alcohols in conjunction with 31 P NMR. Chiral primary and secondary alcohols added quantitatively to the phospholidine to give diastereomers which could be analyzed by 31 P NMR and HPLC. A number of other phosphorus heterocycles were also explored as potential chiral derivatizing reagents

  13. Fructose-induced aberration of metabolism in familial gout identified by 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seegmiller, J.E.; Dixon, R.M.; Kemp, G.J.; Rajagopalan, B.; Radda, G.K.; Angus, P.W.; McAlindon, T.E.; Dieppe, P.

    1990-01-01

    The hyperuricemia responsible for the development of gouty arthritis results from a wide range of environmental factors and underlying genetically determined aberrations of metabolism. 31 P magnetic resonance spectroscopy studies of children with hereditary fructose intolerance revealed a readily detectable rise in phosphomonoesters with a marked fall in inorganic phosphate in their liver in vivo and a rise in serum urate in response to very low doses of oral fructose. Parents and some family members heterozygous for this enzyme deficiency showed a similar pattern when given a substantially larger dose of fructose. Three of the nine heterozygotes thus identified also had clinical gout, suggesting the possibility of this defect being a fairly common cause of gout. In the present study this same noninvasive technology was used to identify the same spectral pattern in 2 of the 11 families studied with hereditary gout. In one family, the index patient's three brothers and his mother all showed the fructose-induced abnormality of metabolism, in agreement with the maternal inheritance of metabolism, in agreement with the maternal inheritance of the gout in this family group. The test dose of fructose used produced a significantly larger increment in the concentration of serum urate in the patients showing the changes in 31 P magnetic resonance spectra than in the other patients with familial gout or in nonaffected members, thus suggesting a simpler method for initial screening for the defect

  14. 31P-NMR studies on turnover rates of phosphocreatine in superfused cerebral tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bachelard, H.S.; Cox, D.W.G.; Morris, P.G.; Feeney, J.

    1986-01-01

    The spectra obtained using 31 P-NMR on superfused cerebral cortex preparations in vitro are comparable with those reported for in vivo studies. The rate constants for creatine kinase, measured by saturation transfer techniques, were 0.23s -1 for the forward reaction (transfer of phosphate from creatine phosphate to ADP) and 0.55s -1 for the reverse reaction. Calculated flux rates were similar for the two reactions, at ca 0.7 μmol s -1 g -1 . Mild hypoxia caused a 30 to 50% decrease in creatine phosphate without detectable change in ATP;the rate constant for the forward reaction was increased by about 50%. The sensitivity of the energy state was similar to that found in parallel experiments for synaptic function. In contrast, lowering the glucose to 0.5 mM had no effect on the 31 P-NMR spectrum, so confirming that the energy state is far less sensitive to hypoglycaemia than synaptic function (which becomes impaired below 2mM glucose). Further lowering of the glucose to 0.2mM caused a 30% decrease in creatine phosphate, and unlike hypoxia, the ATP also fell by 30%. No change was detected in the rate constant. The results of preliminary experiments on even lower glucose (0.1mM) suggest that the rate constant may increase under these conditions but this needs confirmation from further experiments

  15. Nuclear waste disposal: Can there be a resolution? Past problems and future solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahearne, J [Scientific Research Society, Sigma Xi, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

    1990-07-01

    Why does the high level waste problem have to be solved now? There are perhaps three answers to that question. First, to have a recovery of nuclear power. But a lack of resolution of the high level waste problem is not the principal reason that nuclear power has foundered and, consequently, solving it will not automatically revive nuclear power. However, if the nuclear industry is adamantly convinced that this is the key to reviving nuclear power, then the nuclear industry should demonstrate its conviction by putting much greater effort into resolving the high level waste problem technically, not through public relations. For example, a substantial effort on the actinide burning approach might demonstrate, in the old American phrase, 'putting your money where your mouth is'. Second, the high level waste problem must be solved now because it is a devil's brew. However, chemical wastes last longer, as we all know, than do the radioactive wastes. As one expert has noted: 'There is real risk in nuclear power, just as there is real risk in coal power.... For some of [these risks], like the greenhouse effect, the potential damage is devastating. While for others, like nuclear accidents, the risk is limited, but imaginations are not. For still others, like the risk posed by a high-level waste repository, there is essentially nothing outside the imagination of the gullible.' Furthermore, any technical solution or any solution to a risky problem requires one to think carefully. It is often better to do it right than quickly. A third reason for requiring it to be solved right now is that HLW disposal is a major technical problem blocking a potentially valuable energy source. But we need a new solution. The current solutions are not working. I believe that we ought to recognize the failure of the geologic repository approach. I believe the federal government should identify, with industry's assistance, the best techniques for surface storage. Some federal locations should be

  16. Nuclear waste disposal: Can there be a resolution? Past problems and future solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahearne, J.

    1990-01-01

    Why does the high level waste problem have to be solved now? There are perhaps three answers to that question. First, to have a recovery of nuclear power. But a lack of resolution of the high level waste problem is not the principal reason that nuclear power has foundered and, consequently, solving it will not automatically revive nuclear power. However, if the nuclear industry is adamantly convinced that this is the key to reviving nuclear power, then the nuclear industry should demonstrate its conviction by putting much greater effort into resolving the high level waste problem technically, not through public relations. For example, a substantial effort on the actinide burning approach might demonstrate, in the old American phrase, 'putting your money where your mouth is'. Second, the high level waste problem must be solved now because it is a devil's brew. However, chemical wastes last longer, as we all know, than do the radioactive wastes. As one expert has noted: 'There is real risk in nuclear power, just as there is real risk in coal power.... For some of [these risks], like the greenhouse effect, the potential damage is devastating. While for others, like nuclear accidents, the risk is limited, but imaginations are not. For still others, like the risk posed by a high-level waste repository, there is essentially nothing outside the imagination of the gullible.' Furthermore, any technical solution or any solution to a risky problem requires one to think carefully. It is often better to do it right than quickly. A third reason for requiring it to be solved right now is that HLW disposal is a major technical problem blocking a potentially valuable energy source. But we need a new solution. The current solutions are not working. I believe that we ought to recognize the failure of the geologic repository approach. I believe the federal government should identify, with industry's assistance, the best techniques for surface storage. Some federal locations should be

  17. Malonamides as new extractants for nuclear waste solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuillerdier, C.; Musikas, C.; Hoel, P.; Nigond, L.; Vitart, X.

    1989-01-01

    Substituted malonamides are able to extract α emitters from radioactive solutions in nitric acid, all the actinides (III, IV, VI) are well extracted and can be easily back extracted. Some problems remain with neptunium and technetium. These solvents are not expensive. For an industrial purpose, synthesis has been optimized, and a proper choice of commercial basic products can decrease the cost. The solvent obtained on a pilot scale (1 kg) was found to be pure enough, it didn't need any additional treatment. Degradation under hydrolysis or radiolysis is not important in the conditions of practical experiment (t 0 C). Degradation products can be washed with NaOH (carboxylic acids) they don't give precipitates or emulsions. Efficiency of the solvent is good compared to CMPO, taking into account the lack of extensive industrial development. Further researches are undertaken in two main directions: optimizing the synthesis and use of aliphatic diluents

  18. Nuclear magnetic relaxation in picolines solutions in carbon tetrachloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jurga, J.; Pajak, Z.; Jurga, K.; Jurga, S.

    1973-01-01

    Spin-lattice relaxation times of the ring and CH 3 group have been measured in order to establish the temperature dependence of the longitudinal relaxation times for picolins in carbon tetrachloride solutions. The information concerning the intramolecular contribution to the relaxation times have been obtained. The high resolution NPR spectrometer operating at 25 MHz has been used. The measurements have been performed in the temperature range from -60degC to 80degC. The experimental results are compared to the predictions given by the Nora Hill and Debye models and it has been found that the Nora Hill model fits the experimental data better than the Debye model. (S.B.)

  19. Removal of radioactive ions from nuclear waste solutions by electrodialysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugimoto, S [Radia Industries Co. Ltd., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan)

    1978-10-01

    Removal of radioactive ions was studied from low and medium level radioactive waste solutions by electrodialysis using ion exchange membranes. The test solutions contained /sup 137/Cs/sup +/, /sup 106/Ru/sup 3 +/ or fission products (F.P.) as active ions and NaCl, Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ or Ca(NO/sub 3/)/sub 2/ as inactive coexisting salts. The decontamination factor of the active ions was in the order: /sup 137/Cs/sup +/ (greater than 99%) > /sup 90/Sr/sup 2 +/ > F.P. > /sup 106/Ru/sup 3 +/. The dialysis time required to attain the saturation was the shortest for monovalent cations K/sup +/, Cs/sup +/ and Na/sup +/, intermediate for divalent cation Sr/sup 2 +/, and the longest for trivalent cation Ru/sup 3 +/. The ratio of the decontamination factor of an active ion eta sub( a) to the desalination factor of an inactive ion eta sub( b) was nearly equal to unity for /sup 24/Na, /sup 42/K, /sup 137/Cs and /sup 90/Sr. On the other hand, the apparent selective permeability of an active ion (A/sup +/) against Na/sup +/ ion, T sub(Na/sup +/) sup( a) was higher than unity for all the active ions tested, and was in the order of /sup 137/Cs > /sup 90/Sr > /sup 42/K > /sup 24/Na, where T sub(Na/sup +/) sup( a) is defined by the ratio of ..gamma..sub( a) to ..gamma..sub(Na/sup +/) with ..gamma..sub( a) being the ratio of dilution of A in the diluate the ..gamma..sub(Na/sup +/) being that of Na/sup +/ in the same diluate. The decontamination factor of the active ions did not depend significantly on the species and concentration of the coexistent salts or on the concentration of the active ions.

  20. Nuclear energy - The only solution to climate change?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barker, D.

    2005-01-01

    The author defines 'global dimming' and explains that the cooling effects of this are masking the effects of 'global warming' such that, by the next century, the UK will have a climate similar to that of North Africa with many parts of the world completely uninhabitable. If it is accepted that global dimming exists then we would no longer have the luxury of a gradual transition to a low carbon future; the bulk of carbon emission sources would have to be removed or replaced within the next ten to twenty years. This urgency would mean that the choices open to mankind would be severely limited. Of course, global dimming can be dealt with by cleaning-up emissions. However, if the causes of global dimming are addressed in isolation then the effects of global warming will increase even more. This has already happened in Europe, to a large extent, with the 'greening' of industry in the late-1980s and 1990s. Removal of global dimming continues to expose Europe to the increasing effects of global warming and the extremes of weather such as the heat wave in 2003, which killed thousands in France, forest fires in Portugal and flooding in central Europe. Under a global dimming scenario, all indications point to nuclear power being the answer with renewables playing an increasing role over time as technology and society develops towards a renewable-led future. (author)

  1. Application of digital solutions to help the safe and efficient operation of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortega P, F.; Fernandez F, S.

    2017-09-01

    In the search for excellence, the emergence of solutions to digitize nuclear power plants is an opportunity to optimize the operation and safety of them. The new technologies available today in the market, applied under a global vision of the operation, can contribute to the excellent operation of nuclear power plants in terms of efficiency and effectiveness. Tecnatom has a long experience in various areas related to the operation of the plants, giving the aforementioned global vision, essential to develop global solutions that pursue the safe and efficient operation of the operation. (Author)

  2. First start-up of nuclear criticality safety experiment facility for uranyl nitrate solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Qingfu; Shi Yongqian; Shen Leisheng; Hu Dingsheng; Zhao Shouzhi; He Tao; Sun Zheng; Lin Shenghuo; Yao Shigui

    2005-01-01

    The uranyl nitrate solution experiment facility for the research on nuclear criticality safety is described. The nuclear fuel loading steps in the first start-up for water-reflected core are presented. During the experiments, the critical volume of uranyl nitrate solution was determined as 20479.62 mL with count rate inverse extrapolation method, reactivity interpolation method, and steady power method. By calculation, critical mass of 235 U was derived as 1579.184 g from experimental data. The worth of control rods was also calibrated in the first start-up of the facility. (authors)

  3. Exact solutions to a schematic nuclear quark model and colorless superconductivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Henrik; da Providencia, Joao

    2008-01-01

    Exact solutions are found to the equations of a standard nuclear quark model exemplified by the Bonn model which is defined in terms of an effective pairing force. We show, by symmetry arguments, that, in general, the ground state of this model is not color neutral. In particular, color-neutral s......Exact solutions are found to the equations of a standard nuclear quark model exemplified by the Bonn model which is defined in terms of an effective pairing force. We show, by symmetry arguments, that, in general, the ground state of this model is not color neutral. In particular, color...

  4. Nuclear inelastic scattering of synchrotron radiation on solutions of 57Fe complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanko, Gy.; Vertes, A.; Bottyan, L.; Nagy, D.L.; Szilagyi, E.

    2000-01-01

    Nuclear inelastic resonant scattering of synchrotron radiation was applied to the study solutions of 57 Fe complexes. In order to reveal different inelastic contributions solutions of two different 57 Fe complexes of different molecular dimensions with solvents of substantially different viscosities were studied. We argue that the only former experiment available in the literature overestimates the role of the diffusivity in affecting the spectrum. The first direct observation of an intramolecular vibrational transition assisting the nuclear resonance absorption in a liquid is reported. (author)

  5. Constants of hyperfine interaction of lanthanoid-phosphorus for [LnCl2Hmpa4]BPh4 composition compounds from data on 1H and 31P NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skopenko, V.V.; Amirkhanov, V.M.; Turov, A.V.; Trachevskij, V.V.

    1991-01-01

    By the method of 1 H and 31 P NMR at 233 and 298 K acetone solutions of lanthanide complexes of the composition [LnCl 2 Hmpa 4 ]BPh 4 (Hmpa=OP[N(CH 3 ) 2 ] 3 , Ln=La, Ce-Lu) have been considered. Two series of complexes having similar structure of coordination sphere (Ln=Pr-Ho and Ln=Er-Yb) are revealed and for each series the values of hyperfine interaction constants, which are 0.49 and 0.28 MHz respectively, have been determined

  6. 31P MR spectroscopic measurement of intracellular pH in normal human hearts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Jae Hyun; Lee, Hui Joong; Jang, Yong Min

    2002-01-01

    To assess the usefulness of intracellular pH (pHi), calculated by determining the shift of a high-energy metabolite such as inorganic phosphate (Pi) of γ-ATP after performing MRS with ECG-gated two-dimensional 31 P CSI (chemical shift imaging), as a parameter for the overall state of the intracellular milieu. Proto decoupled 31 P CSI was performed on a 1.5-T scanner using a 1 H 31 P dual-tuned surface coil. Cardiac MRS data were obtained from eight normal volunteers aged 24-32 years with no history of heart disease. From the spectra obtained from several regions of the heart, peack position and peak area were estimated. The metabolic ratios of α-, β-, γ-ATP, PCr, Pi, phosphodiester and diphosphoglycerate were calculated, and pHi was estimated from the chemical shift of Pi and γ-ATP resonance. We then compared the data for the anterior myocardium with those previously published. The major phosphorous metabolites identified in these human hearts were as follows: PCr, at -0.1 to +0.1 ppm; three phosphate peaks from ATP, with a chemical shift centered at about -2.7 ppm (γ-ATP), -7.8 ppm (α-ATP), and -16.3 ppm (β-ATP); and phosphodiester (PDE) at 2-3 ppm, inorganic phosphate (Pi) at 4.5-5.4 ppm, and diphosphoglycerate (DPG) at 5.4-6.3 ppm. The PCr/β-ATP ratio was 2.20±0.17 and the PDE/β-ATP ratio, 1.04±0.09 pHi readings were 7.31±0.23 (calculated by the shift of Pi) and 6.81±0.20 (calculated by the shift of γ-ATP). Pi/PCR was 0.539, a ratio higher than that mentioned in previously published reports. The measurement of intracellular metabolism was affected by various kinds of factors. We believe, however, that pHi readings indicate the overall state of the cardiac intracellular milieu. An unexpected pHi readings, seen at MRS, may reflect errors in the MR procedure itself and, or in the analytical method

  7. {sup 31}P MR spectroscopic measurement of intracellular pH in normal human hearts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Jae Hyun; Lee, Hui Joong; Jang, Yong Min [Kyungpook National Univ., Taegu (Korea, Republic of)] [and others

    2002-05-01

    To assess the usefulness of intracellular pH (pHi), calculated by determining the shift of a high-energy metabolite such as inorganic phosphate (Pi) of {gamma}-ATP after performing MRS with ECG-gated two-dimensional {sup 31}P CSI (chemical shift imaging), as a parameter for the overall state of the intracellular milieu. Proto decoupled {sup 31}P CSI was performed on a 1.5-T scanner using a {sup 1}H{sup 31}P dual-tuned surface coil. Cardiac MRS data were obtained from eight normal volunteers aged 24-32 years with no history of heart disease. From the spectra obtained from several regions of the heart, peack position and peak area were estimated. The metabolic ratios of {alpha}-, {beta}-, {gamma}-ATP, PCr, Pi, phosphodiester and diphosphoglycerate were calculated, and pHi was estimated from the chemical shift of Pi and {gamma}-ATP resonance. We then compared the data for the anterior myocardium with those previously published. The major phosphorous metabolites identified in these human hearts were as follows: PCr, at -0.1 to +0.1 ppm; three phosphate peaks from ATP, with a chemical shift centered at about -2.7 ppm ({gamma}-ATP), -7.8 ppm ({alpha}-ATP), and -16.3 ppm ({beta}-ATP); and phosphodiester (PDE) at 2-3 ppm, inorganic phosphate (Pi) at 4.5-5.4 ppm, and diphosphoglycerate (DPG) at 5.4-6.3 ppm. The PCr/{beta}-ATP ratio was 2.20{+-}0.17 and the PDE/{beta}-ATP ratio, 1.04{+-}0.09 pHi readings were 7.31{+-}0.23 (calculated by the shift of Pi) and 6.81{+-}0.20 (calculated by the shift of {gamma}-ATP). Pi/PCR was 0.539, a ratio higher than that mentioned in previously published reports. The measurement of intracellular metabolism was affected by various kinds of factors. We believe, however, that pHi readings indicate the overall state of the cardiac intracellular milieu. An unexpected pHi readings, seen at MRS, may reflect errors in the MR procedure itself and, or in the analytical method.

  8. Solution in Cuba to ensuring the radiological protection in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bentancourt, L.A.; Quevedo, J.R.; La Fuente, A. de

    1996-01-01

    In the middle of the 80's in Cuba takes place a widespread use of nuclear techniques in the national economy, particularly in nuclear medicine practice. In order to harmonize the constructive projects of the nuclear medical facilities, the National Regulatory Authority for Radiation Protection assessed the requirements to be adopted for the purpose of ensuring the optimum fulfillment of the radiation protection regulations in force in the country. As a result of this work a functional solution was developed for the distribution of the sites for the storage, dosage and handling of radioactive substances and the temporary deposit of the radioactive wastes produced. (authors). 4 refs., 1 tab

  9. Nuclear energy is part of the solution to meet the challenge of climate change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faudon, Valerie; Jouette, Isabelle; Le Ngoc, Boris

    2015-01-01

    Published at the initiative of three scientific associations (the French, American, and European Nuclear Society), this report outlines that all low carbon energies, nuclear energy included, will be needed to struggle against climate change and to ensure the development of emerging countries. It also outlines that urgent measures are required to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and that nuclear energy is a proven low carbon solution which is now available at large scale. It finally outlines that every country has the right to access the largest possible portfolio of low carbon technologies to reduce CO 2 emissions while reaching its objectives in terms of energy and development

  10. Ion chromatographic separation for analysis of radiostrontium in nuclear reprocessing solutions of high ionic strength

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamb, J.D.; Nordmeyer, F.R.; Drake, P.A.; Elder, M.P.; Miles, R.W.

    1989-01-01

    An ion chromatography (IC)-based method was developed for Sr 2+ concentration and separation showing high recoveries of strontium. This procedure permits complete automation. One of the potential weaknesses of the IC approach to sample preconcentration, i.e. sensitivity to solutions of high acid content, common in nuclear reprocessing solution, has been overcome by a novel application of acid suppression technology. (author) 12 refs.; 8 figs.; 3 tabs

  11. Volumetric determination of hydroxide, aluminate, and carbonate in alkaline solutions of nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumann, E.W.

    1975-06-01

    An integrated procedure was developed for determining OH - , Al(OH) 4 - , and CO 3 2- in alkaline nuclear waste. The free alkali, the hydroxide released when Al(OH) 3 is complexed with oxalate, and the precipitated BaCO 3 were determined by acidimetric titration. With a 50-μl sample, the relative standard deviations were 1 to 2 percent for nonradioactive test solutions and 2 to 5 percent for radioactive process solutions. (U.S.)

  12. Nuclear energy is part of the solution to struggle against climate change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faudon, Valerie; Jouette, Isabelle; Le Ngoc, Boris

    2015-01-01

    This document is the contribution of the SFEN to the preparation of the Paris Conference on Climate (COP21). It is based on various scenarios proposed by the IEA and assessments made by different work groups of the IPCC. This contribution outlines that the world will need all low-carbon energies, notably nuclear energy. It outlines that, in 35 years of time, 80 pc of electricity will have to be low-carbon electricity, that the situation is complex as CO 2 emission must be decreased while facing basic needs of humanity, that the IPCC identifies three types of low-carbon electricity (renewable, nuclear and CCS for carbon capture and sequestration), and that the electrification of uses is an efficient vector for de-carbonation. It also outlines that we must at once use available low-carbon energies: 70 pc of the carbon budget has already been spent; nuclear energy is an industrial, available, low-carbon and efficient solution; nuclear energy is the first low-carbon electricity source in OECD countries; nuclear energy is a solution to support growth in emerging countries; nuclear energy will keep on being an asset to reduce CO 2 emissions. The last part outlines that every country should be able to access an as large as possible portfolio of low-carbon technologies, and that nuclear energy is an opportunity to meet this challenge

  13. Selective separation of radionuclides from nuclear waste solutions with inorganic ion exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehto, J.; Harjula, R.

    1999-01-01

    Nuclear industry produces and stores large volumes of radioactive waste solutions. Removal of radionuclides from the solutions is an important and challenging task for two main reasons: reductions in the volumes of solidified waste, which have to be disposed of, and reductions in the radioactive discharges into the environment. Since the radioactive elements in most waste solutions are in trace concentrations and the waste solutions contain large excesses of inactive metal ions, highly selective separation methods are needed for the removal of radionuclides. A number of inorganic ion exchange materials are very selective to key radionuclides and they can play an important role in solving these problems. The spectrum of nuclear waste solutions is rather wide considering their radionuclide contents, concentrations of interfering salts and acidity/alkalinity. Therefore, several inorganic ions exchangers are needed for the removal of most harmful radionuclides from a variety of solutions. This paper discusses the use and requirements of inorganic ion exchange materials in nuclear waste management. Special attention is paid to the novel ion exchange materials developed in the Laboratory of Radiochemistry, University of Helsinki. (orig.)

  14. 31P saturation transfer and phosphocreatine imaging in the monkey brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mora, B.; Narasimhan, P.T.; Ross, B.D.; Allman, J.; Barker, P.B.

    1991-01-01

    31 P magnetic resonance imaging with chemical-shift discrimination by selective excitation has been employed to determine the phosphocreatine (PCr) distribution in the brains of three juvenile macaque monkeys. PCr images were also obtained while saturating the resonance of the γ-phosphate of ATP, which allowed the investigation of the chemical exchange between PCr and the γ-phosphate of ATP catalyzed by creatine kinase. Superposition of the PCr images over the proton image of the same monkey brain revealed topological variations in the distribution of PCr and creatine kinase activity. PCr images were also obtained with and without visual stimulation. In two out of four experiments, an apparently localized decrease in PCr concentration was noted in visual cortex upon visual stimulation. This result is interpreted in terms of a possible role for the local ADP concentration in stimulating the accompanying metabolic response

  15. Experimental study of 31P MR spectroscopy in vitro canine myocardium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Fabao; Zhao Haitao; Suo Liping; Zhang Yushun; Fang Hong; Huang Zhilan

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To conduct a dynamic survey of the metabolism of high-energy phosphates in myocardium in order to define, the relationship between the changes in myocardial energy metabolism and the duration of ischemia. Methods: A dynamic survey of isolated heart of 8 dogs was done with the use of 31 P MRS. Results: Myocardial PCr level decreased rapidly after the heart was isolated and was reduced to zero in 2-3 hours. ATP level diminished progressively to its depletion at 6 hours following isolation. Conclusions: After the heart was isolated, the PCr level rapidly decreased and was reduced to zero in 2-3 hours whereas ATP was not depleted until 4-6 hours after isolation. The ATP level remained within normal limits as long as PCr had not been depleted

  16. 31P magnetization transfer measurements of Pi→ATP flux in exercising human muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleigh, Alison; Savage, David B; Williams, Guy B; Porter, David; Carpenter, T Adrian; Brindle, Kevin M; Kemp, Graham J

    2016-03-15

    Fundamental criticisms have been made over the use of (31)P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) magnetization transfer estimates of inorganic phosphate (Pi)→ATP flux (VPi-ATP) in human resting skeletal muscle for assessing mitochondrial function. Although the discrepancy in the magnitude of VPi-ATP is now acknowledged, little is known about its metabolic determinants. Here we use a novel protocol to measure VPi-ATP in human exercising muscle for the first time. Steady-state VPi-ATP was measured at rest and over a range of exercise intensities and compared with suprabasal oxidative ATP synthesis rates estimated from the initial rates of postexercise phosphocreatine resynthesis (VATP). We define a surplus Pi→ATP flux as the difference between VPi-ATP and VATP. The coupled reactions catalyzed by the glycolytic enzymes GAPDH and phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) have been shown to catalyze measurable exchange between ATP and Pi in some systems and have been suggested to be responsible for this surplus flux. Surplus VPi-ATP did not change between rest and exercise, even though the concentrations of Pi and ADP, which are substrates for GAPDH and PGK, respectively, increased as expected. However, involvement of these enzymes is suggested by correlations between absolute and surplus Pi→ATP flux, both at rest and during exercise, and the intensity of the phosphomonoester peak in the (31)P NMR spectrum. This peak includes contributions from sugar phosphates in the glycolytic pathway, and changes in its intensity may indicate changes in downstream glycolytic intermediates, including 3-phosphoglycerate, which has been shown to influence the exchange between ATP and Pi catalyzed by GAPDH and PGK. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  17. Comparing localized and nonlocalized dynamic 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy in exercising muscle at 7T

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyerspeer, Martin; Robinson, Simon; Nabuurs, Christine I; Scheenen, Tom; Schoisengeier, Adrian; Unger, Ewald; Kemp, Graham J; Moser, Ewald

    2012-01-01

    By improving spatial and anatomical specificity, localized spectroscopy can enhance the power and accuracy of the quantitative analysis of cellular metabolism and bioenergetics. Localized and nonlocalized dynamic 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy using a surface coil was compared during aerobic exercise and recovery of human calf muscle. For localization, a short echo time single-voxel magnetic resonance spectroscopy sequence with adiabatic refocusing (semi-LASER) was applied, enabling the quantification of phosphocreatine, inorganic phosphate, and pH value in a single muscle (medial gastrocnemius) in single shots (TR = 6 s). All measurements were performed in a 7 T whole body scanner with a nonmagnetic ergometer. From a series of equal exercise bouts we conclude that: (a) with localization, measured phosphocreatine declines in exercise to a lower value (79 ± 7% cf. 53 ± 10%, P = 0.002), (b) phosphocreatine recovery shows shorter half time (t1/2 = 34 ± 7 s cf. t1/2 = 42 ± 7 s, nonsignificant) and initial postexercise phosphocreatine resynthesis rate is significantly higher (32 ± 5 mM/min cf. 17 ± 4 mM/min, P = 0.001) and (c) in contrast to nonlocalized 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy, no splitting of the inorganic phosphate peak is observed during exercise or recovery, just an increase in line width during exercise. This confirms the absence of contaminating signals originating from weaker-exercising muscle, while an observed inorganic phosphate line broadening most probably reflects variations across fibers in a single muscle. Magn Reson Med, 2012. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:22334374

  18. 31P MRSI and 1H MRS at 7 T: initial results in human breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klomp, Dennis W J; van de Bank, Bart L; Raaijmakers, Alexander; Korteweg, Mies A; Possanzini, Cecilia; Boer, Vincent O; van de Berg, Cornelius A T; van de Bosch, Maurice A A J; Luijten, Peter R

    2011-12-01

    This study demonstrates the feasibility of the noninvasive determination of important biomarkers of human (breast) tumor metabolism using high-field (7-T) MRI and MRS. (31) P MRSI at this field strength was used to provide a direct method for the in vivo detection and quantification of endogenous biomarkers. These encompass phospholipid metabolism, phosphate energy metabolism and intracellular pH. A double-tuned, dual-element transceiver was designed with focused radiofrequency fields for unilateral breast imaging and spectroscopy tuned for optimized sensitivity at 7 T. T(1) -weighted three-dimensional MRI and (1) H MRS were applied for the localization and quantification of total choline compounds. (31) P MRSI was obtained within 20 min per subject and mapped in three dimensions over the breast with pixel volumes of 10 mL. The feasibility of monitoring in vivo metabolism was demonstrated in two patients with breast cancer during neoadjuvant chemotherapy, validated by ex vivo high-resolution magic angle spinning NMR and compared with data from an age-matched healthy volunteer. Concentrations of total choline down to 0.4 mM could be detected in the human breast in vivo. Levels of adenosine and other nucleoside triphosphates, inorganic phosphate, phosphocholine, phosphoethanolamine and their glycerol diesters detected in glandular tissue, as well as in tumor, were mapped over the entire breast. Altered levels of these compounds were observed in patients compared with an age-matched healthy volunteer; modulation of these levels occurred in breast tumors during neoadjuvant chemotherapy. To our knowledge, this is the first comprehensive MRI and MRS study in patients with breast cancer, which reveals detailed information on the morphology and phospholipid metabolism from volumes as small as 10 mL. This endogenous metabolic information may provide a new method for the noninvasive assessment of prognostic and predictive biomarkers in breast cancer treatment. Copyright

  19. Early radiation effects in highly apoptotic murine lymphoma xenografts monitored by 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, Hideyuki; Mitsuhashi, Norio; Murata, Osamu; Kitamoto, Yoshizumi; Saito, Yoshihiro; Hasegawa, Masatoshi; Akimoto, Tetsuo; Takahashi, Takeo; Nasu, Sachiko; Niibe, Hideo

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: Phosphorus-31 magnetic resonance spectra ( 31 P-MRS) were obtained from highly apoptotic murine lymphoma xenografts before and up to 24 hr following graded doses of radiation ranging from 2 to 30 Gy. Radiation-induced apoptosis was also estimated up to 24 hr by scoring apoptotic cells in tumor tissue. Methods and Materials: Highly apoptotic murine lymphoma cells, EL4, were subcutaneously transplanted into C57/BL mice. At 7 days after transplantation, radiation was given to the tumor with a single dose at 3, 10, and 30 Gy. The β-ATP/Pi, PME/Pi, and β-ATP/PME values were calculated from the peak area of each spectrum. Radiation-induced apoptosis was scored with counting apoptotic cells on hematoxylin and eosin stained specimens (%apoptosis). Results: The values of % apoptosis 4, 8, and 24 hr after radiation were 21.8, 19.6, and 4.6% at 3 Gy, 35.1, 25.6, and 14.8% at 10 Gy, 38.4, 38.0, and 30.6% at 30 Gy, respectively (cf. 4.4% in control). There was no correlation between early change in β-ATP/Pi and % apoptosis at 4 hr after radiation when most of the apoptosis occurred. An early decrease in PME/Pi was observed at 4 hr after radiation dose at 30 Gy. For each dose, the values of β-ATP/Pi 24 hr after radiation were inversely related to radiation dose. Conclusion: The increase in β-ATP/Pi observed by 31 P-MRS was linked to the degree of histological recovery from radiation-induced apoptosis

  20. Standard test methods for chemical, mass spectrometric, spectrochemical, nuclear, and radiochemical analysis of nuclear-grade plutonium nitrate solutions

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 These test methods cover procedures for the chemical, mass spectrometric, spectrochemical, nuclear, and radiochemical analysis of nuclear-grade plutonium nitrate solutions to determine compliance with specifications. 1.2 The analytical procedures appear in the following order: Sections Plutonium by Controlled-Potential Coulometry Plutonium by Amperometric Titration with Iron(II) Plutonium by Diode Array Spectrophotometry Free Acid by Titration in an Oxalate Solution 8 to 15 Free Acid by Iodate Precipitation-Potentiometric Titration Test Method 16 to 22 Uranium by Arsenazo I Spectrophotometric Test Method 23 to 33 Thorium by Thorin Spectrophotometric Test Method 34 to 42 Iron by 1,10-Phenanthroline Spectrophotometric Test Method 43 to 50 Impurities by ICP-AES Chloride by Thiocyanate Spectrophotometric Test Method 51 to 58 Fluoride by Distillation-Spectrophotometric Test Method 59 to 66 Sulfate by Barium Sulfate Turbidimetric Test Method 67 to 74 Isotopic Composition by Mass Spectrom...

  1. Study by 31P NMR spectroscopy of the triacylglycerol degradation processes in olive oil with different heat-transfer mechanisms.

    OpenAIRE

    Lucas Torres, Covadonga; Pérez Martínez, Angel; Cabañas Galán, Beatriz; Moreno Moreno, Andrés

    2014-01-01

    The thermal degradation of olive oil using conventional and microwave heating under the same experimental conditions were compared. A powerful identification and quantification technique based on 31P NMR has been developed to characterise the differences between the minor components including diacylglycerol and free fatty acids in the heated samples. The 31P NMR spectra of the degraded olive oils, which contain single bondOH groups derivatised with a phosphorus reagent, showed that convention...

  2. The role of reversed kinematics and double kinematic solutions in nuclear reactions studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaplan, M.; Parker, W.E.; Moses, D.J.; Lacey, R.; Alexander, J.M.

    1993-01-01

    The advantages of reversed kinematics in nuclear reactions studies are discussed, with particular emphasis on the origin of double solutions in the reaction kinematics. This possibility for double solutions does not exist in normal kinematics, and provides the basis for a new method of imposing important experimental constraints on the uniqueness of fitting complex observations. By gating on one or the other of the two solutions, light particle kinematics can be greatly influenced in coincidence measurements. The power of the method is illustrated with data for the reaction 1030 MeV 121 Sb+ 27 Al, where charged particle emissions arise from several different sources. (orig.)

  3. Treatment of nuclear waste solutions using a new class of extractants: pentaalkyl propane diamides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuillerdier, C.; Musikas, C.; Hoel, P.

    1990-01-01

    A new class of bifunctional extractants pentaalkyl propane diamides is studied in order to extract trivalent cations (Am 3+ , Cm 3+ ...) and other actinides contained in waste solutions of nuclear industry. These solvents are completely incinerable and don't produce harmfull degradation products. Their main chemicals properties are reviewed. The results of a mixer-settler battery experiment are given

  4. From nuclear steam to electricity solutions for Indian nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chardon, Guy

    2009-01-01

    A renewed interest in Nuclear Energy is visible worldwide. During the last 15 Years, 62 nuclear units have been put in operation, 2/3rd of them in Asia. The same numbers of units are presently under construction, also dominated by Asian countries, but Europe and the USA have both taken accelerated steps to develop new fleets of units. Few projects are officially postponed due to financial crisis. The crisis will slow and reduce investments-but the infrastructure needs, particularly the nuclear ones, still exist. In the short term, the risk for projects to be postponed is realistic depending on countries and government's role. In the long term, reactor projects backed by sound companies and by governments desire to have a balanced mix of energy sources and cut CO 2 emissions will go forward

  5. Gamma ray measurements in the reactions 23Na(p,γ)24Mg and 31P(p,γ)32S

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boydell, S.G.

    1974-01-01

    Accurate branching ratio values for twenty-two resonances in the reaction 23 Na(p,γ) 24 Mg and twenty-five resonances in the reaction 31 P(p,γ) 32 S have been measured with Ge(Li) spectrometers. The values were necessary for the accurate analysis of work of astrophysical interest, and also used for the assignment of possible Jsupπ values to nuclear levels. The two spectrometers used were calibrated for relative peak efficiency independently of previous Ge(Li) work; the calibrations were accurate to 6% and 10%. Extensive calculations were made of the finite solid angle effects of the detector on anisotropic gamma rays; the calculations were valid for geometries where the source did not lie on the detector axis. Work was carried out at the Australian Atomic Energy Commission; this was made possible by the assistance of the Australian Institute of Nuclear Science and Engineering. (author)

  6. Nuclear energy as a contribution to the solution of energetic and environmental global problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huttl, A.

    1993-01-01

    The sharp population growth has turned energy and environment problems into global problems. The yearly consumption of primary energy in the world is currently 11 billion TCE (Tons of Coal Equivalent). At the present time 88.1% of energy supply is produced by fossil fuels and nuclear only 5.2%. Fossil fuels are responsible for air pollutants like SO 2 , NO, NO 2 , CO 2 , and VOC. Most of them are responsible of the Greenhouse effect and global warming. Only two solutions may avoid this situation: Renewable energies (sun, water and wind) and Nuclear Energy. At the end of 1990 there were 424 nuclear power plants in the world with 1800 million Tu/year of CO 2 avoided (8% of the total emitted). New future scenarios of CO 2 avoided may only be reached with nuclear power contribution

  7. Analytic solutions of QCD evolution equations for parton cascades inside nuclear matter at small x

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geiger, K.

    1994-01-01

    An analytical method is presented to solve generalized QCD evolution equations for the time development of parton cascades in a nuclear environment. In addition to the usual parton branching processes in vacuum, these evolution equations provide a consistent description of interactions with the nuclear medium by accounting for stimulated branching processes, fusion, and scattering processes that are specific to QCD in a medium. Closed solutions for the spectra of produced partons with respect to the variables time, longitudinal momentum, and virtuality are obtained under some idealizing assumptions about the composition of the nuclear medium. Several characteristic features of the resulting parton distributions are discussed. One of the main conclusions is that the evolution of a parton shower in a medium is dilated as compared to free space and is accompanied by an enhancement of particle production. These effects become stronger with increasing nuclear density

  8. 31 P magnetic resonance fingerprinting for rapid quantification of creatine kinase reaction rate in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Charlie Y; Liu, Yuchi; Huang, Shuying; Griswold, Mark A; Seiberlich, Nicole; Yu, Xin

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this work was to develop a 31 P spectroscopic magnetic resonance fingerprinting (MRF) method for fast quantification of the chemical exchange rate between phosphocreatine (PCr) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) via creatine kinase (CK). A 31 P MRF sequence (CK-MRF) was developed to quantify the forward rate constant of ATP synthesis via CK ( kfCK), the T 1 relaxation time of PCr ( T1PCr), and the PCr-to-ATP concentration ratio ( MRPCr). The CK-MRF sequence used a balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP)-type excitation with ramped flip angles and a unique saturation scheme sensitive to the exchange between PCr and γATP. Parameter estimation was accomplished by matching the acquired signals to a dictionary generated using the Bloch-McConnell equation. Simulation studies were performed to examine the susceptibility of the CK-MRF method to several potential error sources. The accuracy of nonlocalized CK-MRF measurements before and after an ischemia-reperfusion (IR) protocol was compared with the magnetization transfer (MT-MRS) method in rat hindlimb at 9.4 T (n = 14). The reproducibility of CK-MRF was also assessed by comparing CK-MRF measurements with both MT-MRS (n = 17) and four angle saturation transfer (FAST) (n = 7). Simulation results showed that CK-MRF quantification of kfCK was robust, with less than 5% error in the presence of model inaccuracies including dictionary resolution, metabolite T 2 values, inorganic phosphate metabolism, and B 1 miscalibration. Estimation of kfCK by CK-MRF (0.38 ± 0.02 s -1 at baseline and 0.42 ± 0.03 s -1 post-IR) showed strong agreement with MT-MRS (0.39 ± 0.03 s -1 at baseline and 0.44 ± 0.04 s -1 post-IR). kfCK estimation was also similar between CK-MRF and FAST (0.38 ± 0.02 s -1 for CK-MRF and 0.38 ± 0.11 s -1 for FAST). The coefficient of variation from 20 s CK-MRF quantification of kfCK was 42% of that by 150 s MT-MRS acquisition and was 12% of that by 20 s FAST

  9. Phosphodiester content measured in human liver by in vivo 31 P MR spectroscopy at 7 tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purvis, Lucian A B; Clarke, William T; Valkovič, Ladislav; Levick, Christina; Pavlides, Michael; Barnes, Eleanor; Cobbold, Jeremy F; Robson, Matthew D; Rodgers, Christopher T

    2017-12-01

    Phosphorus ( 31 P) metabolites are emerging liver disease biomarkers. Of particular interest are phosphomonoester and phosphodiester (PDE) "peaks" that comprise multiple overlapping resonances in 31 P spectra. This study investigates the effect of improved spectral resolution at 7 Tesla (T) on quantifying hepatic metabolites in cirrhosis. Five volunteers were scanned to determine metabolite T 1 s. Ten volunteers and 11 patients with liver cirrhosis were scanned at 7T. Liver spectra were acquired in 28 min using a 16-channel 31 P array and 3D chemical shift imaging. Concentrations were calculated using γ-adenosine-triphosphate (γ-ATP) = 2.65 mmol/L wet tissue. T 1 means ± standard deviations: phosphatidylcholine 1.05 ± 0.28 s, nicotinamide-adenine-dinucleotide (NAD + ) 2.0 ± 1.0 s, uridine-diphosphoglucose (UDPG) 3.3 ± 1.4 s. Concentrations in healthy volunteers: α-ATP 2.74 ± 0.11 mmol/L wet tissue, inorganic phosphate 2.23 ± 0.20 mmol/L wet tissue, glycerophosphocholine 2.34 ± 0.46 mmol/L wet tissue, glycerophosphoethanolamine 1.50 ± 0.28 mmol/L wet tissue, phosphocholine 1.06 ± 0.16 mmol/L wet tissue, phosphoethanolamine 0.77 ± 0.14 mmol/L wet tissue, NAD + 2.37 ± 0.14 mmol/L wet tissue, UDPG 2.00 ± 0.22 mmol/L wet tissue, phosphatidylcholine 1.38 ± 0.31 mmol/L wet tissue. Inorganic phosphate and phosphatidylcholine concentrations were significantly lower in patients; glycerophosphoethanolamine concentrations were significantly higher (P < 0.05). We report human in vivo hepatic T 1 s for phosphatidylcholine, NAD + , and UDPG for the first time at 7T. Our protocol allows high signal-to-noise, repeatable measurement of metabolite concentrations in human liver. The splitting of PDE into its constituent peaks at 7T may allow more insight into changes in metabolism. Magn Reson Med 78:2095-2105, 2017. © 2017 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on

  10. Nuclear energy is part of the solution to struggle against climate change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-05-01

    This document is a contribution to the preparation of the Paris COP21 conference. It recalls the main objectives of the Kyoto Protocol, and then states and discusses three main issues to reach these objectives: the world will need all low-carbon energies including nuclear energy (80 per cent of electricity must be low-carbon within 35 years; CO 2 emissions must be reduced while meeting humanity basic needs; the IPCC has identified three types of low-carbon electricity: renewable, nuclear, and based on carbon capture and sequestration; the electrification of uses is an efficient vector of de-carbonation), it is urgent to use available low-carbon energies right now (70 per cent of the carbon budget has already been consumed; nuclear energy is an available industrial low-carbon solution; nuclear energy is the first source of low-carbon electricity in OECD countries and this is an asset to be preserved to meet climate objectives; nuclear energy is a solution to support a low-carbon growth in emerging countries; nuclear energy will remain a stake to reduce CO 2 emissions), and each country should have access to the larger as possible portfolio of low-carbon technologies (very few scenarios succeed in remaining under the 2 degree C limit without nuclear; all national objectives and peculiarities must be integrated for each country joining the struggle against climate change; nuclear energy allows the reduction of CO 2 emissions while strengthening supply safety and economic safety; within 35 years, the technology portfolio will be larger due to the development of energy storage systems, renewable energies and fourth-generation reactors)

  11. On Neglecting Chemical Exchange Effects When Correcting in Vivo 31P MRS Data for Partial Saturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouwerkerk, Ronald; Bottomley, Paul A.

    2001-02-01

    Signal acquisition in most MRS experiments requires a correction for partial saturation that is commonly based on a single exponential model for T1 that ignores effects of chemical exchange. We evaluated the errors in 31P MRS measurements introduced by this approximation in two-, three-, and four-site chemical exchange models under a range of flip-angles and pulse sequence repetition times (TR) that provide near-optimum signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). In two-site exchange, such as the creatine-kinase reaction involving phosphocreatine (PCr) and γ-ATP in human skeletal and cardiac muscle, errors in saturation factors were determined for the progressive saturation method and the dual-angle method of measuring T1. The analysis shows that these errors are negligible for the progressive saturation method if the observed T1 is derived from a three-parameter fit of the data. When T1 is measured with the dual-angle method, errors in saturation factors are less than 5% for all conceivable values of the chemical exchange rate and flip-angles that deliver useful SNR per unit time over the range T1/5 ≤ TR ≤ 2T1. Errors are also less than 5% for three- and four-site exchange when TR ≥ T1*/2, the so-called "intrinsic" T1's of the metabolites. The effect of changing metabolite concentrations and chemical exchange rates on observed T1's and saturation corrections was also examined with a three-site chemical exchange model involving ATP, PCr, and inorganic phosphate in skeletal muscle undergoing up to 95% PCr depletion. Although the observed T1's were dependent on metabolite concentrations, errors in saturation corrections for TR = 2 s could be kept within 5% for all exchanging metabolites using a simple interpolation of two dual-angle T1 measurements performed at the start and end of the experiment. Thus, the single-exponential model appears to be reasonably accurate for correcting 31P MRS data for partial saturation in the presence of chemical exchange. Even in systems where

  12. Brain oxidative metabolism of the newborn dog: correlation between 31P NMR spectroscopy and pyridine nucleotide redox state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayevsky, A; Nioka, S; Subramanian, V H; Chance, B

    1988-04-01

    The effects of both anoxia and short- and long-term hypoxia on brain oxidative metabolism were studied in newborn dogs. Oxidative metabolism was evaluated by two independent measures: in vivo continuous monitoring of mitochondrial NADH redox state and energy stores as calculated from the phosphocreatine (PCr)/Pi levels measured by 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The hemodynamic response to low oxygen supply was further evaluated by measuring the changes in the reflected light intensity at 366 nm (the excitation wavelength for NADH). The animal underwent surgery and was prepared for monitoring of the two signals (NADH and PCr/Pi). It was then placed inside a Phosphoenergetics 260-80 NMR spectrometer magnet with a 31-cm bore. Each animal (1-21 days old) was exposed to short-term anoxia or hypoxia as well as to long-term hypoxia (1-2 h). The results can be summarized as follow: (a) In the normoxic brain, the ratio between PCr and Pi was greater than 1 (1.2-1.4), while under hypoxia or asphyxia a significant decrease that was correlated to the FiO2 levels was recorded. (b) A clear correlation was found between the decrease in PCr/Pi values and the increased NADH redox state developed under decreased O2 supply to the brain. (c) Exposing the animal to moderately long-term hypoxia led to a stabilized low-energy state of the brain with a good recovery after rebreathing normal air. (d) Under long-term and severe hypoxia, the microcirculatory autoregulatory mechanism was damaged and massive vasoconstriction was optically recorded simultaneously with a significant decrease in PCr/Pi values.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. 76 FR 72007 - ZionSolutions, LLC; Zion Nuclear Power Station, Units 1 and 2; Exemption From Certain Security...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-21

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [Docket Nos. 50-295 and 50-304; NRC-2011-0244] ZionSolutions, LLC; Zion Nuclear Power Station, Units 1 and 2; Exemption From Certain Security Requirements 1.0 Background Zion Nuclear Power Station (ZNPS or Zion), Unit 1, is a Westinghouse 3250 MWt Pressurized Water Reactor...

  14. Quantitative analysis of energy metabolism in human muscle using SLOOP 31P-MR-spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beer, M.; Koestler, H.; Buchner, S.; Sandstede, J.; Hahn, D.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: Energy metabolism is vital for regular muscle function. In humans, in vivo analysis using 31 P-MR-spectroscopy (MRS) is mostly restricted to semiquantitative parameters due to technical demands. We applied spatial localization with optimal pointspread function (SLOOP) for quantification in human skeletal and cardiac muscle. Subjects/Methods: 10 healthy volunteers and 4 patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1 were examined using a 1.5 T system (Magnetom VISION) and chemical shift imaging (CSI) for data collection. Concentrations of PCr, ATP and P i as well as PCr/ATP ratios were calculated by SLOOP. Results: Concentrations of PCr, ATP and P i were 29.9±3.4, 7.1±0.9 and 5.7±1.2 [mmol/kg] in normal skeletal muscle, corresponding to previously published studies. Two of the patients with a duration of disease longer than 10 years and a pronounced muscle weakness showed a significant decrease of PCr and ATP in skeletal muscle below 10 and 5 mmol/kg. One of these patients had an additional reduction of PCr in cardiac muscle. (orig.) [de

  15. Localized 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy of large pediatric brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutton, L.N.; Lenkinski, R.E.; Cohen, B.H.; Packer, R.J.; Zimmerman, R.A.

    1990-01-01

    Fourteen children aged 1 week to 16 years, with a variety of large or superficial brain tumors, underwent localized in vivo 31 P magnetic resonance spectroscopy of their tumor. Quantitative spectral analysis was performed by measuring the area under individual peaks using a computer algorithm. In eight patients with histologically benign tumors the spectra were considered to be qualitatively indistinguishable from normal brain. The phosphocreatine/inorganic phosphate ratio (PCr/Pi) averaged 2.0. Five patients had histologically malignant tumors; qualitatively, four of these were considered to have abnormal spectra, showing a decrease in the PCr peak. The PCr/Pi ratio for this group averaged 0.85, which was significantly lower than that seen in the benign tumor group (p less than 0.05). No difference between the two groups was seen in adenosine triphosphate or phosphomonoesters. It is concluded that a specific metabolic fingerprint for childhood brain tumors may not exist, but that some malignant tumors show a pattern suggestive of ischemia

  16. Relation of cardiac energy metabolism to workload studied with 31P NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ligeti, L.; Osbakken, M.; Clark, B.J.; Schnall, M.; Bolinger, L.; Subramanian, H.; Leigh, J.S.; Chance, B.

    1986-01-01

    The relationship between myocardial work and concentration of mediators of oxidative phosphorylation (ATP, PCr, Pi) was studied in vivo in 6 dogs and 4 cats with 31 P NMR. The heart was exposed via thoracotomy for placement of surface coils and pacing electrodes. Work (defined as heart rate X blood pressure product) was increased by pacing the heart from 2Hz (rest) to 5Hz. In cats, an increase in work from 1.9 x 10 4 +/- .32 to 2.4 x 10 4 +/- .08 was associated with an increase in Pi/PCr ratio from .29 +/- .08 to .68 +/- .33; in dogs, work increase from 1.74 x 10 4 .82 to 3.4 x 10 4 +/- .84 did not cause significant change in Pi/PCr (.29 +/- .15 to .30 +/- .17). If these data are analyzed via the Michaelis-Menten algorithm, the cat heart can be considered to be set closer to V/sub max/ and the dog heart set closer to V/sub o/ (i.e. having a larger metabolic reserve). The difference between the 2 species could be due to microvascular and/or metabolic control mechanisms. Delineation of the different metabolic responses to work in these animal models may be helpful in understanding the physiological basis of heart disease

  17. Analysis of cardiac energy metabolism in valve disease using 31P-MR-spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beer, M.; Viehrig, M.; Seyfarth, T.; Sandstede, J.; Lipke, C.; Pabst, T.; Kenn, W.; Hahn, D.; Harre, K.; Horn, M.; Neubauer, S.; Landschuetz, W.; Kienlin, M. von

    2000-01-01

    Patients and methods: 10 healthy volunteers and 10 patients with aortic stenosis (pressure gradients >60 mmHg) were included. For assessment of energy metabolism, 31 P-MR spectra were obtained with a double oblique 3D-CSI technique (voxel size 25 cm 3 ). In 5 of 10 patients, follow-up examination was performed 3 months after surgical valve replacement (SVR). Left ventricular (LV) function was analyzed by cine MRI. Results: Before SVR the myocardial phosphocreatine to adenosinetriphosphate (PCr-ATP) ratio was significantly (p=0.0002) reduced to 0.80±0.25 in patients compared to 1.65±0.21 in volunteers. 3 months after SVR, LV mass had significantly (p=0.04) decreased from 238±33 g to 206±47 g. At the same time a significant (p=0.04) increase of the PCr-ATP ratio from 0.80±0.25 to 1.28±0.22 was observed. A slight, but not significant, reduction of the phosphodiester ATP ratio was observed before SVR, with a trend towards normalization after SVR. (orig.) [de

  18. Respiratory control in the glucose perfused heart. A /sup 31/P NMR and NADH fluorescence study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katz, L A; Koretsky, A P; Balaban, R S

    1987-09-14

    The phosphate metabolites, adenosine diphosphate (ADP), inorganic phosphate (P/sub i/), and adenosine triphosphate (ATP), are potentially important regulators of mitochondrial respiration in vivo. However, previous studies on the heart in vivo and in vitro have not consistently demonstrated an appropriate correlation between the concentration of these phosphate metabolites and moderate changes in work and respiration. Recently, mitochondrial NAD(P)H levels have been proposed as a potential regulator of cardiac respiration during alterations in work output. In order to understand better the mechanism of respiratory control under these conditions, we investigated the relationship between the phosphate metabolites, the NAD(P)H levels, and oxygen consumption (Q/sub O(sub 2)/) in the isovolumic perfused rat heart during alterations in work output with pacing. ATP, creatine phosphate (CrP), P/sub i/ and intracellular pH were measured using /sup 31/P NMR. Mitochondrial NAD(P)H levels were monitored using spectrofluorometric techniques. 33 refs.; 3 figs.; 2 tabs.

  19. /sup 31/P-NMR studies of a case of type III glycogenosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawai, Mitsuru; Aizawa, Hitoshi; Itoh, Masamitsu; Yoshikawa, Kohki; Murase, Toshio

    1988-05-01

    /sup 31/P-NMR spectra of skeletal muscles were obtained from a patient of type III glycogenosis (33 y.o. man, reported by one of the authors, T. Murase, in 1973) and the control subject (32 y.o. man), using a superconducting whole body MR (Magnetom, Siemens). Two parameters, 1. muscle pH calculated from the chemical shift of Pi (inorganic phosphate) and PCr (creatine phosphate) and 2. PCr/Pi ratio were monitored before and after the aerobic or ischemic exercise. In resting state, the spectra were normal except for the muscle pH of thigh extensors (7.3), which was obviously higher than that of the control subject (7.0). Significant reduction of PCr/Pi ratio (from 7.0 to 4.1) was observed after the aerobic exercise in thigh extensors. Such a reduction was not recognized in the control subject. The ischemic exercise of forearm muscles revealed slight decrease in muscle pH (from 7.1 to 6.9), which was less prominent than that of the control subject. These results were compatible with the abnormality in the energy metabolism of this disorder, the block in the pathway of glycogenolysis.

  20. 31P NMR characterization of graded traumatic brain injury in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vink, R.; McIntosh, T.K.; Yamakami, I.; Faden, A.I.

    1988-01-01

    Irreversible tissue injury following central nervous system trauma is believed to result from both mechanical disruption at the time of primary insult, and more delayed autodestructive processes. These delayed events are associated with various biochemical changes, including alterations in phosphate energy metabolism and intracellular pH. Using 31 P NMR, we have monitored the changes in phosphorus energy metabolism and intracellular pH in a single hemisphere of the rat brain over an 8-h period following graded, traumatic, fluid percussion-induced brain injury. Following trauma the ratio of phosphocreatine to inorganic phosphate (PCr/Pi) declined in each injury group. This decline was transitory with low injury (1.0 +/- 0.5 atm), biphasic with moderate (2.1 +/- 0.4 atm) and high (3.9 +/- 0.9 atm) injury, and sustained following severe injury (5.9 +/- 0.7 atm). The initial PCr/Pi decline in the moderate and high injury groups was associated with intracellular acidosis; however, the second decline occurred in the absence of any pH changes. Alterations in ATP occurred only in severely injured animals and such changes were associated with marked acidosis and 100% mortality rate. After 4h, the posttraumatic PCr/Pi ratio correlated linearly with the severity of injury. We suggest that a reduced posttraumatic PCr/Pi ratio may be indicative of altered mitochondrial energy production and may predict a reduced capacity of the cell to recover from traumatic injury

  1. A study of fatigue in rabbit skeletal muscle by in vivo 31P MRS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koga, Keiko; Miura, Iwao

    1989-01-01

    Energy metabolism during exercise and recovery process of rabbit skeletal muscle was obserbed by in vivo 31 P MRS. The small value of the ratio of the intensities between inorganic phosphate and phosphocreatine at rest indicated that the observed moiety of muscle had high fast-twitch fiber content. More than half of ATP and almost all of phosphocreatine were depleted by electric stimulation at 4Hz. The extreme intracellular pH was 5.9. The recovery from this metabolic state was very slow, and only a small amount of ATP was resynthesized after 40 minutes of recovery. These phenomena show the characteristic features of the energy metabolism in the fatigue of fast-twitch muscle. The metabolic state as indicated by the intensity of phosphocreatine and intracellular pH during exercise was not always parallel to contraction power measured by straingauge. Two inorganic phosphate peaks were observed, which are regarded as the signals from fast-twitch fiber and slow-twitch fiber from their pH values. The ratios of these two peaks were different between 1Hz, 2Hz, and 4Hz electric stimulation. We conclude that we are observing the different recruitment of fiber types at different exercise level in vivo. (author)

  2. Molybdenum modified phosphate glasses studied by 31P MAS NMR and Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szumera, Magdalena

    2015-02-25

    Glasses have been synthesized in the system P2O5-SiO2-K2O-MgO-CaO modified by addition of MoO3. Glasses were prepared by conventional fusion method from 40 g batches. The influence of Mo-cations on the analysed glass structure was investigated by means of Raman and (31)P MAS-NMR techniques. It has been found that molybdate units can form Mo[MoO4/MoO6]-O-P and/or Mo[MoO4/MoO6]-O-Si bonds with non-bridging oxygens atoms of Q2 methaphosphate units, resulting in the transformation of chain methaphosphate structure into pyrophosphate and finally into orthophosphate structure. It has been also found that increasing amount of MoO3 in the structure of investigated glasses causes their gradual depolymerization and molybdenum ions in the analysed glass matrix act as modifying cations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. 31P-NMR studies of a case of type III glycogenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawai, Mitsuru; Aizawa, Hitoshi; Itoh, Masamitsu; Yoshikawa, Kohki; Murase, Toshio

    1988-01-01

    31 P-NMR spectra of skeletal muscles were obtained from a patient of type III glycogenosis (33 y.o. man, reported by one of the authors, T. Murase, in 1973) and the control subject (32 y.o. man), using a superconducting whole body MR (Magnetom, Siemens). Two parameters, 1. muscle pH calculated from the chemical shift of Pi (inorganic phosphate) and PCr (creatine phosphate) and 2. PCr/Pi ratio were monitored before and after the aerobic or ischemic exercise. In resting state, the spectra were normal except for the muscle pH of thigh extensors (7.3), which was obviously higher than that of the control subject (7.0). Significant reduction of PCr/Pi ratio (from 7.0 to 4.1) was observed after the aerobic exercise in thigh extensors. Such a reduction was not recognized in the control subject. The ischemic exercise of forearm muscles revealed slight decrease in muscle pH (from 7.1 to 6.9), which was less prominent than that of the control subject. These results were compatible with the abnormality in the energy metabolism of this disorder, the block in the pathway of glycogenolysis. (author)

  4. The effect of sodium bicarbonate on intracellular pH using 31P-MR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakashima, Kazuya; Kashiwagi, Shiro; Ito, Haruhide; Yamashita, Tetsuo; Kitahara, Tetsuhiro; Nakayama, Naoto; Saito, Kennichi

    1997-01-01

    This report deals with the effects of sodium bicarbonate on the intracellular pH of the brain and cerebral blood flow (CBF); five normal volunteers were studied. Intracellular pH and CBF were measured by phosphorus 31 magnetic resonance spectroscopy ( 31 P-MRS) and stable xenon computed tomography (Xe-CT), respectively. Each individual received 7% sodium bicarbonate (3.5 ml/kg body weight), infused intravenously over a 15-min period. Intracellular pH, CBF, and physiological parameters were determined before and after the injection. Intracellular pH was significantly decreased and CBF was increased. Among the physiological parameters, the hematocrit was significantly decreased and arterial pressure of carbon dioxide (PaCO 2 ), increased. These results suggest that increasing CO 2 contributes to the decrease in intracellular pH. In conclusion, three factors increase CBF during the administration of sodium bicarbonate to humans: arterial dilatation in response to carbon dioxide; decrease of the hematocrit, and intracellular cerebral acidosis. (author)

  5. Incorporation of phosphorus guest ions in the calcium silicate phases of Portland cement from 31P MAS NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulsen, Søren L; Jakobsen, Hans J; Skibsted, Jørgen

    2010-06-21

    Portland cements may contain small quantities of phosphorus (typically below 0.5 wt % P(2)O(5)), originating from either the raw materials or alternative sources of fuel used to heat the cement kilns. This work reports the first (31)P MAS NMR study of anhydrous and hydrated Portland cements that focuses on the phase and site preferences of the (PO(4))(3-) guest ions in the main clinker phases and hydration products. The observed (31)P chemical shifts (10 to -2 ppm), the (31)P chemical shift anisotropy, and the resemblance of the lineshapes in the (31)P and (29)Si MAS NMR spectra strongly suggest that (PO(4))(3-) units are incorporated in the calcium silicate phases, alite (Ca(3)SiO(5)) and belite (Ca(2)SiO(4)), by substitution for (SiO(4))(4-) tetrahedra. This assignment is further supported by a determination of the spin-lattice relaxation times for (31)P in alite and belite, which exhibit the same ratio as observed for the corresponding (29)Si relaxation times. From simulations of the intensities, observed in inversion-recovery spectra for a white Portland cement, it is deduced that 1.3% and 2.1% of the Si sites in alite and belite, respectively, are replaced by phosphorus. Charge balance may potentially be achieved to some extent by a coupled substitution mechanism where Ca(2+) is replaced by Fe(3+) ions, which may account for the interaction of the (31)P spins with paramagnetic Fe(3+) ions as observed for the ordinary Portland cements. A minor fraction of phosphorus may also be present in the separate phase Ca(3)(PO(4))(2), as indicated by the observation of a narrow resonance at delta((31)P) = 3.0 ppm for two of the studied cements. (31)P{(1)H} CP/MAS NMR spectra following the hydration of a white Portland cement show that the resonances from the hydrous phosphate species fall in the same spectral range as observed for (PO(4))(3-) incorporated in alite. This similarity and the absence of a large (31)P chemical shift ansitropy indicate that the hydrous (PO(4

  6. The use of engineering features and schematic solutions of propulsion nuclear steam supply systems for floating nuclear power plant design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Achkasov, A.N.; Grechko, G.I.; Pepa, V.N.; Shishkin, V.A.

    2000-01-01

    In recent years many countries and the international community represented by the IAEA have shown a notable interest in designing small and medium size nuclear power plants intended for electricity and heat generation for remote areas. These power plants can be also used for desalination purposes. As these nuclear plants are planned for use in areas without a well-developed power grid, the design shall account for their transportation to the site in complete preparedness for operation. Since the late 80s, the Research and Development Institute of Power Engineering (RDIPE) has carried out active efforts in designing reactor facilities for floating nuclear power plants. This work relies on the long-term experience of RDIPE engineers in designing the propulsion NSSS. Advantages can be gained from the specific engineering solutions that are already applied in the design of propulsion Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) or from development of new designs based on the proven technologies. Successful implementation of the experience has been made easier owing to rather similar design requirements prescribed to ship-mounted NSSS and floating NPP. The common design targets are, in particular, minimization of mass and dimensions, resistance to such external impacts as rolling, heel and trim, operability in case of running aground or collision with other ships, etc. (author)

  7. On the use of 31P NMR for the quantification of hydrosoluble phosphorus-containing compounds in coral host tissues and cultured zooxanthellae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godinot, Claire; Gaysinski, Marc; Thomas, Olivier P.; Ferrier-Pagès, Christine; Grover, Renaud

    2016-02-01

    31P Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) was assessed to investigate the phosphorus-containing compounds present in the tissues of the scleractinian coral Stylophora pistillata as well as of cultured zooxanthellae (CZ). Results showed that phosphorus-containing compounds observed in CZ were mainly phosphate and phosphate esters. Phosphate accounted for 19 ± 2% of the total phosphorus compounds observed in CZ maintained under low P-levels (0.02 μM). Adding 5 mM of dissolved inorganic phosphorus (KH2PO4) to the CZ culture medium led to a 3.1-fold increase in intracellular phosphate, while adding 5 mM of dissolved organic phosphorus led to a reduction in the concentration of phosphorus compounds, including a 2.5-fold intracellular phosphate decrease. In sharp contrast to zooxanthellae, the host mainly contained phosphonates, and to a lesser extent, phosphate esters and phosphate. Two-months of host starvation decreased the phosphate content by 2.4 fold, while bleaching of fed corals did not modify this content. Based on 31P NMR analyses, this study highlights the importance of phosphonates in the composition of coral host tissues, and illustrates the impact of phosphorus availability on the phosphorus composition of host tissues and CZ, both through feeding of the host and inorganic phosphorus enrichment of the CZ.

  8. Phosphorus in chronosequence of burnt sugar cane in Brazilian cerrado: humic acid analysis by {sup 31}P NMR; Fosforo em cronossequencia de cana-de-acucar queimada no cerrado goiano: analise de acidos humicos por RMN de {sup 31}P

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossi, Celeste Q.; Pereira, Marcos G.; Garcia, Andreas C., E-mail: mgervasiopereira@gmail.com [Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro (UFRRJ), Seropedica, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Solos; Perin, Adriano; Gazolla, Paulo R. [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia Goiano, Rio Verde, GO (Brazil); Gonzalez, Antonio P. [Universidade de Coruna, ES (Spain). Faculdad de Ciencias

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study was to identify, with the use of {sup 31}P NMR spectroscopy, organic P species in humic acids (HA) in samples from Oxisol cultivated in chronosequence with sugar cane, pasture and Cerrado. The main forms of P-type found were orthophosphate, monoester-P (phosphate sugars) and P-diester (orthophosphate). The {sup 31}P NMR technique proved capable of identifying changes in the areas studied as a function of sugar cane burning time. In areas with 1 and 5 years of burnt cane, a decrease in recalcitrant organic P in humic acids indicated the need for use of P-humic substances for plant nutrition (author)

  9. Standard test methods for chemical, mass spectrometric, spectrochemical, nuclear, and radiochemical analysis of nuclear-grade uranyl nitrate solutions

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1999-01-01

    1.1 These test methods cover procedures for the chemical, mass spectrometric, spectrochemical, nuclear, and radiochemical analysis of nuclear-grade uranyl nitrate solution to determine compliance with specifications. 1.2 The analytical procedures appear in the following order: Sections Determination of Uranium 7 Specific Gravity by Pycnometry 15-20 Free Acid by Oxalate Complexation 21-27 Determination of Thorium 28 Determination of Chromium 29 Determination of Molybdenum 30 Halogens Separation by Steam Distillation 31-35 Fluoride by Specific Ion Electrode 36-42 Halogen Distillate Analysis: Chloride, Bromide, and Iodide by Amperometric Microtitrimetry 43 Determination of Chloride and Bromide 44 Determination of Sulfur by X-Ray Fluorescence 45 Sulfate Sulfur by (Photometric) Turbidimetry 46 Phosphorus by the Molybdenum Blue (Photometric) Method 54-61 Silicon by the Molybdenum Blue (Photometric) Method 62-69 Carbon by Persulfate Oxidation-Acid Titrimetry 70 Conversion to U3O8 71-74 Boron by ...

  10. A numerical technique for enhanced efficiency and stability for the solution of the nuclear reactor equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khotylev, V.A.; Hoogenboom, J.E.

    1996-01-01

    The paper presents new techniques for the solution of the nuclear reactor equation in diffusion approximation, that has enhanced efficiency and stability. The code system based on the new technique solves a number of steady-state and/or transient problems with coupled thermal hydraulics in one-, two-, or three dimensional geometry with reduced CPU time as compared to similar code systems of previous generations if well-posed neutronics problems are considered. Automated detection of ill-posed problem and selection of the appropriate numerical method makes the new code system capable of yielding a correct solution for wider range of problems without user intervention. (author)

  11. A numerical technique for enhanced efficiency and stability for the solution of the nuclear reactor equation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khotylev, V.A.; Hoogenboom, J.E. [Delft Univ. of Technology, Interfaculty Reactor Inst., Delft (Netherlands)

    1996-07-01

    The paper presents new techniques for the solution of the nuclear reactor equation in diffusion approximation, that has enhanced efficiency and stability. The code system based on the new technique solves a number of steady-state and/or transient problems with coupled thermal hydraulics in one-, two-, or three dimensional geometry with reduced CPU time as compared to similar code systems of previous generations if well-posed neutronics problems are considered. Automated detection of ill-posed problem and selection of the appropriate numerical method makes the new code system capable of yielding a correct solution for wider range of problems without user intervention. (author)

  12. Dynamic nuclear polarization methods in solids and solutions to explore membrane proteins and membrane systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chi-Yuan; Han, Songi

    2013-01-01

    Membrane proteins regulate vital cellular processes, including signaling, ion transport, and vesicular trafficking. Obtaining experimental access to their structures, conformational fluctuations, orientations, locations, and hydration in membrane environments, as well as the lipid membrane properties, is critical to understanding their functions. Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) of frozen solids can dramatically boost the sensitivity of current solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance tools to enhance access to membrane protein structures in native membrane environments. Overhauser DNP in the solution state can map out the local and site-specific hydration dynamics landscape of membrane proteins and lipid membranes, critically complementing the structural and dynamics information obtained by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. Here, we provide an overview of how DNP methods in solids and solutions can significantly increase our understanding of membrane protein structures, dynamics, functions, and hydration in complex biological membrane environments.

  13. Billion-Fold Enhancement in Sensitivity of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy for Magnesium Ions in Solution

    CERN Document Server

    Gottberg, Alexander; Kowalska, Magdalena; Bissell, Mark L; Arcisauskaite, Vaida; Blaum, Klaus; Helmke, Alexander; Johnston, Karl; Kreim, Kim; Larsen, Flemming H; Neugart, Rainer; Neyens, Gerda; Garcia Ruiz, Ronald F; Szunyogh, Daniel; Thulstrup, Peter W; Yordanov, Deyan T; Hemmingsen, Lars

    2014-01-01

    β-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is highly sensitive compared to conventional NMR spectroscopy, and may be applied for several elements across the periodic table. β-NMR has previously been successfully applied in the fields of nuclear and solid-state physics. In this work, β-NMR is applied, for the first time, to record an NMR spectrum for a species in solution. 31Mg β-NMR spectra are measured for as few as 107 magnesium ions in ionic liquid (EMIM-Ac) within minutes, as a prototypical test case. Resonances are observed at 3882.9 and 3887.2 kHz in an external field of 0.3 T. The key achievement of the current work is to demonstrate that β-NMR is applicable for the analysis of species in solution, and thus represents a novel spectroscopic technique for use in general chemistry and potentially in biochemistry.

  14. A nuclear magnetic relaxation study on internal motion of polyelectrolytes in solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schriever, J.

    1977-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to investigate the significance and the amount of information which can be extracted from the study of frequency dependence of magnetic relaxation rates in solutions of a synthetic macromolecule. Solutions of poly(methacrylic acid), PMA, in water were chosen as the object of the present work. A short survey of nuclear magnetic relaxation in solutions of simple macromolecules is presented. Results obtained by continuous wave experiments on PMA solutions are shown (viz. the information about the transverse relaxation from line width analysis of 60 MHz proton spectra). Water enriched in 17 O is used in magnetic relaxation studies; the results of the determination of hydrogen lifetimes in aqueous solutions of acetic acid and poly(methacrylic acid) are given. The possibility of obtaining information about the dynamics of deuterons in the acid side groups of weak polyacids by measuring deuteron relaxation in heavy water solutions of those acids is considered. The use of deuteron relaxation rate experiments on solutions of selectively methylene deuterated poly(methacrylic acid), [-CD 2 -CCH 3 COOH-]n, is demonstrated and the backbone methylene C-atom motion is charachterized. The magne-tic relaxation of nuclei in the side groups of methylene deuterated PMA, viz. protons in the methyland deuterons in the acid side groups is presented

  15. Two-dimensional analytical solution for nodal calculation of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Adilson C.; Pessoa, Paulo O.; Silva, Fernando C.; Martinez, Aquilino S.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A proposal for a coarse mesh nodal method is presented. • The proposal uses the analytical solution of the two-dimensional neutrons diffusion equation. • The solution is performed homogeneous nodes with dimensions of the fuel assembly. • The solution uses four average fluxes on the node surfaces as boundary conditions. • The results show good accuracy and efficiency. - Abstract: In this paper, the two-dimensional (2D) neutron diffusion equation is analytically solved for two energy groups (2G). The spatial domain of reactor core is divided into a set of nodes with uniform nuclear parameters. To determine iteratively the multiplication factor and the neutron flux in the reactor we combine the analytical solution of the neutron diffusion equation with an iterative method known as power method. The analytical solution for different types of regions that compose the reactor is obtained, such as fuel and reflector regions. Four average fluxes in the node surfaces are used as boundary conditions for analytical solution. Discontinuity factors on the node surfaces derived from the homogenization process are applied to maintain averages reaction rates and the net current in the fuel assembly (FA). To validate the results obtained by the analytical solution a relative power density distribution in the FAs is determined from the neutron flux distribution and compared with the reference values. The results show good accuracy and efficiency.

  16. 31P NMR spectroscopy studies of phospholipid metabolism in human melanoma xenograft lines differing in rate of tumour cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyng, H; Olsen, D R; Petersen, S B; Rofstad, E K

    1995-04-01

    The concentration of phospholipid metabolites in tumours has been hypothesized to be related to rate of cell membrane turnover and may reflect rate of cell proliferation. The purpose of the study reported here was to investigate whether 31P NMR resonance ratios involving the phosphomonoester (PME) or phosphodiester (PDE) resonance are correlated to fraction of cells in S-phase or volume-doubling time in experimental tumours. Four human melanoma xenograft lines (BEX-t, HUX-t, SAX-t, WIX-t) were included in the study. The tumours were grown subcutaneously in male BALB/c-nu/nu mice. 31P NMR spectroscopy was performed at a magnetic field strength of 4.7 T. Fraction of cells in S-phase was measured by flow cytometry. Tumour volume-doubling time was determined by Gompertzian analysis of volumetric growth data. BEX-t and SAX-t tumours differed in fraction of cells in S-phase and volume-doubling time, but showed similar 31P NMR resonance ratios. BEX-t and WIX-t tumours showed significantly different 31P NMR resonance ratios but similar fractions of cells in S-phase. The 31P NMR resonance ratios were significantly different for small and large HUX-t tumours even though fraction of cells in S-phase and volume-doubling time did not differ with tumour volume. None of the 31P NMR resonance ratios showed significant increase with increasing fraction of cells in S-phase or significant decrease with increasing tumour volume-doubling time across the four xenograft lines.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. A 13C{31P} REDOR NMR Investigation of the Role of Glutamic Acid Residues in Statherin-Hydroxyapatite Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndao, Moise; Ash, Jason T.; Breen, Nicholas F.; Goobes, Gil; Stayton, Patrick S.; Drobny, Gary P.

    2011-01-01

    The side chain carboxyl groups of acidic proteins found in the extra-cellular matrix (ECM) of mineralized tissues play a key role in promoting or inhibiting the growth of minerals such as hydroxyapatite (HAP), the principal mineral component of bone and teeth. Among the acidic proteins found in the saliva is statherin, a 43-residue tyrosine-rich peptide that is a potent lubricant in the salivary pellicle and an inhibitor of both HAP crystal nucleation and growth. Three acidic amino acids – D1, E4, and E5 – are located in the N-terminal 15 amino acid segment, with a fourth amino acid, E26, located outside the N-terminus. We have utilized 13C{31P} REDOR NMR to analyze the role played by acidic amino acids in the binding mechanism of statherin to the HAP surface by measuring the distance between the δ-carboxyl 13C spins of the three glutamic acid side chains of statherin (residues E4, E5, E26) and 31P spins of the phosphate groups at the HAP surface. 13C{31P} REDOR studies of glutamic-5-13C acid incorporated at positions E4 and E26 indicate a 13C–31P distance of more than 6.5 Å between the side chain carboxyl 13C spin of E4 and the closest 31P in the HAP surface. In contrast, the carboxyl 13C spin at E5 has a much shorter 13C–31P internuclear distance of 4.25±0.09 Å, indicating that the carboxyl group of this side chain interacts directly with the surface. 13C T1ρ and slow-spinning MAS studies indicate that the motions of the side chains of E4 and E5 are more restricted than that of E26. Together, these results provide further insight into the molecular interactions of statherin with HAP surfaces. PMID:19678690

  18. Hyperthyroidism results in increased glycolytic capacity in the rat heart. A 31P-NMR study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seymour, A M; Eldar, H; Radda, G K

    1990-11-12

    We have investigated the metabolic adaptations that occur in the thyroxine-treated rat heart. Rats were made hyperthyroid by daily intra-peritoneal injections of thyroxine (35 micrograms/100 g body weight) over seven days. 31P-NMR investigations of isolated glucose-perfused isometric hearts showed that thyroxine treatment caused an increase in Pi (from 4.9 mumols.(g dry wt.)-1 in control hearts to 11.7 mumols.(g dry wt.)-1 in hyperthyroid hearts), a decrease in phosphocreatine (from 36.5 mumols.(g dry wt.)-1 to 21.8 mumols.(g dry wt.)-1) with no change in ATP or ADP concentrations under the same conditions of cardiac work. The unidirectional exchange flux Pi----ATP was measured by saturation transfer NMR in hyperthyroid rat hearts. This exchange (which has been shown to contain a significant glycolytic component) increased by 2.2-fold in thyroxine-treated hearts in comparison to control hearts (to 3.6 mumols.(g dry wt.)-1.s-1, from 1.6 mumols.(g dry wt.)-1.s-1). In parallel experiments, NMR analysis of extracts from hyperthyroid rat hearts showed significantly elevated levels of glucose 6-phosphate, and fructose 6-phosphate. Measurements of enzyme activities isolated from hyperthyroid and control tissue showed a 40% increase in phosphofructokinase activity. These data together with the increased concentration of Pi show that both glycolytic and glycogenolytic fluxes are increased in the hyperthyroid rat heart. This metabolic adaptation may be necessary to cope with the increased number and activity of Na+/K(+)-ATPase pumps that occur in response to thyroxine treatment.

  19. Relation Between Acid and Catalytic Properties of Chlorinated Gamma-Alumina. a 31p Mas Nmr and Ftir Investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume D.

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we have studied the effect of chlorine on the surface properties of gamma-alumina, especially on their acid properties. The use of FTIR spectroscopy and 31P MAS NMR of adsorbed trimethylphosphine allows to propose a chlorination mechanism. To correlate the surface properties of these chlorinated gamma-alumina with their catalytic properties, we have used a model reaction, the cracking of n-heptane under reforming conditions. The analysis of the correlation between acid properties determined by 31P MAS NMR and the catalytic results (in terms of activities and selectivities allows to identify which sites are involved in the cracking reaction.

  20. Safety of interim storage solutions of used nuclear fuel during extended term

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shelton, C.; Bader, S.; Issard, H.; Arslan, M. [AREVA, 7135 Minstrel Way, Suite 300 Columbia, MD 21045 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    In 2013, the total amount of stored used nuclear fuel (UNF) in the world will reach 225,000 T HM. The UNF inventory in wet storage will take up over 80% of the available total spent fuel pool (SFP) capacity. Interim storage solutions are needed. They give flexibility to the nuclear operators and ensure that nuclear reactors continue to operate. However, we need to keep in mind that they are also an easy way to differ final decision and implementation of a UNF management approach (recycling or final disposal). In term of public perception, they can have a negative impact overtime as it may appear that nuclear industry may have significant issues to resolve. In countries lacking an integrated UNF management approach, the UNF are being discharged from the SFPs to interim storage (mostly to dry storage) at the same rate as UNF is being discharged from reactors, as the SFPs at the reactor sites are becoming full. This is now the case in USA, Taiwan, Switzerland, Spain, South Africa and Germany. For interim storage, AREVA has developed different solutions in order to allow the continued operation of reactors while meeting the current requirements of Safety Authorities: -) Dry storage canisters on pads, -) Dual-purpose casks (dry storage and transportation), -) Vault dry storage, and -) Centralized pool storage.

  1. Chemical, mass spectrometric, spectrochemical, nuclear, and radiochemical analysis of nuclear-grade plutonium nitrate solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    These analytical procedures are designed to show whether a given material meets the purchaser's specifications as to plutonium content, effective fissile content, and impurity content. The following procedures are described in detail: plutonium by controlled-potential coulometry; plutonium by amperometric titration with iron(II); free acid by titration in an oxalate solution; free acid by iodate precipitation-potentiometric titration method; uranium by Arsenazo I spectrophotometric method; thorium by thorin spectrophotometric method; iron by 1,10-phenanthroline spectrophotometric method; chloride by thiocyanate spectrophotometric method; fluoride by distillation-spectrophotometric method; sulfate by barium sulfate turbidimetric method; isotopic composition by mass spectrometry; americium-241 by extraction and gamma counting; americium-241 by gamma counting; gamma-emitting fission products, uranium, and thorium by gamma-ray spectroscopy; rare earths by copper spark spectrochemical method; tungsten, niobium (columbium), and tantalum by spectrochemical method; simple preparation by spectrographic analysis for general impurities

  2. In vivo 31P NMR studies on the role of the vacuole in phosphate metabolism in yeasts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nicolaij, K.; Scheffers, W.A.; Bruinenberg, P.M.; Kaptein, R.

    1983-01-01

    31P NMR was used to study the dynamics of phosphate pools during substrate utilization by aerobic and anaerobic suspensions of the yeast Candida utilis and by aerobic suspensions of the yeast Brettanomyces intermedius. In both yeast, the cytoplasmic pH was monitored; in C. utilis also the vacuolar

  3. Study of kinetics of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate degradation by 31P-NMR technique in depleted human erythrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ataullakhanov, F.I.; Vitvitskii, V.M.; Dubinskaya, E.I.; Dubinskii, V.Z.

    1986-01-01

    The kinetics of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate degradation in depleted human erythrocytes was studied by the high-resolution 31 P-NMR technique. A plateau was found on the kinetic curve in the first 1.5-2 h after the beginning of depletion. The mechanisms that may be responsible for the existence of such a plateau are discussed

  4. Evaluation of skeletal muscle during calf exercise by 31P MR spectroscopy in patients on statin medications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buettner, Catherine; Smithline, Howard; Ngo, Long H; Greenman, Robert L.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Muscle pain is a common side effect of statin medications, however, the cause is poorly understood. Methods We characterized phosphocreatine (PCr) exercise recovery kinetics in 10 patients with hypercholesterolemia before and after a 4 week regimen of statin therapy using 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P-MRS). 31P spectra were obtained before, during, and following exercise on a calf flexion pedal ergometer. Creatine kinase (CK) serum levels were drawn before and after statin therapy. Results The mean metabolic recovery time constant in subjects increased from 28.1s (SE=6.5s) to 55.4s (SE=7.4s) following statin therapy. The unweighted mean of the pre-post recovery time difference was -27.3s (SE=12.4s); (p-value = 0.02). Pre- and post-therapy CK levels were not significantly different (p-value = 0.50). Discussion Metabolic recovery time in the calf is prolonged in patients following statin use. This suggests that statins impair mitochondrial oxidative function, and 31P –MRS is a potential study model for statin-associated myopathy. PMID:21171098

  5. Lipid Dynamics Studied by Calculation of 31P Solid-State NMR Spectra Using Ensembles from Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Sara Krogh; Vestergaard, Mikkel; Thøgersen, Lea

    2014-01-01

    , for example, order parameters. Therefore, valuable insight into the dynamics of biomolecules may be achieved by the present method. We have applied this method to study the dynamics of lipid bilayers containing the antimicrobial peptide alamethicin, and we show that the calculated 31P spectra obtained...

  6. INVIVO 31P MAGNETIC-RESONANCE SPECTROSCOPY (MRS) OF TENDER POINTS IN PATIENTS WITH PRIMARY FIBROMYALGIA SYNDROME

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEBLECOURT, AC; WOLF, RF; VANRIJSWIJK, MH; KAMMAN, RL; KNIPPING, AA; MOOYAART, EL

    1991-01-01

    31P Magnetic Resonance-Spectroscopy was performed at the site of tender points in the trapezius muscle of patients with primary fibromyalgia syndrome. Earlier, in vitro studies have reported changes in the high energy phosphate-metabolism in biopsies taken from tender points of fibromyalgia

  7. Investigation of the reactions 31P(n, γ)32P and 32S(n, γ)33S

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middelkoop, G. van; Spilling, P.

    1965-01-01

    The γ radiation following capture of thermal neutrons in 31P and 32S was investigated with scintillation-spectrometer techniques. Measurements of single and coincidence spectra and of γ-γ angular correlations yield the following spins in 32P: J(0.52) = 0, J(1.32) = (2), J(4.04) = 1, J(4.88) = 1,

  8. In vivo measurements of T1 relaxation times of 31P-metabolites in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, C; Jensen, K E; Henriksen, O

    1989-01-01

    The T1 relaxation times were estimated for 31P-metabolites in human skeletal muscle. Five healthy volunteers were examined in a 1.5 Tesla wholebody imaging system using an inversion recovery pulse sequence. The calculated T1 relaxation times ranged from 5.517 sec for phosphocreatine to 3.603 sec...

  9. Human Cardiac 31P-MR Spectroscopy at 3 Tesla Cannot Detect Failing Myocardial Energy Homeostasis during Exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrianus J. Bakermans

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Phosphorus-31 magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P-MRS is a unique non-invasive imaging modality for probing in vivo high-energy phosphate metabolism in the human heart. We investigated whether current 31P-MRS methodology would allow for clinical applications to detect exercise-induced changes in (patho-physiological myocardial energy metabolism. Hereto, measurement variability and repeatability of three commonly used localized 31P-MRS methods [3D image-selected in vivo spectroscopy (ISIS and 1D ISIS with 1D chemical shift imaging (CSI oriented either perpendicular or parallel to the surface coil] to quantify the myocardial phosphocreatine (PCr to adenosine triphosphate (ATP ratio in healthy humans (n = 8 at rest were determined on a clinical 3 Tesla MR system. Numerical simulations of myocardial energy homeostasis in response to increased cardiac work rates were performed using a biophysical model of myocardial oxidative metabolism. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy was modeled by either inefficient sarcomere ATP utilization or decreased mitochondrial ATP synthesis. The effect of creatine depletion on myocardial energy homeostasis was explored for both conditions. The mean in vivo myocardial PCr/ATP ratio measured with 3D ISIS was 1.57 ± 0.17 with a large repeatability coefficient of 40.4%. For 1D CSI in a 1D ISIS-selected slice perpendicular to the surface coil, the PCr/ATP ratio was 2.78 ± 0.50 (repeatability 42.5%. With 1D CSI in a 1D ISIS-selected slice parallel to the surface coil, the PCr/ATP ratio was 1.70 ± 0.56 (repeatability 43.7%. The model predicted a PCr/ATP ratio reduction of only 10% at the maximal cardiac work rate in normal myocardium. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy led to lower PCr/ATP ratios for high cardiac work rates, which was exacerbated by creatine depletion. Simulations illustrated that when conducting cardiac 31P-MRS exercise stress testing with large measurement error margins, results obtained under pathophysiologic

  10. Human Cardiac 31P-MR Spectroscopy at 3 Tesla Cannot Detect Failing Myocardial Energy Homeostasis during Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakermans, Adrianus J.; Bazil, Jason N.; Nederveen, Aart J.; Strijkers, Gustav J.; Boekholdt, S. Matthijs; Beard, Daniel A.; Jeneson, Jeroen A. L.

    2017-01-01

    Phosphorus-31 magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P-MRS) is a unique non-invasive imaging modality for probing in vivo high-energy phosphate metabolism in the human heart. We investigated whether current 31P-MRS methodology would allow for clinical applications to detect exercise-induced changes in (patho-)physiological myocardial energy metabolism. Hereto, measurement variability and repeatability of three commonly used localized 31P-MRS methods [3D image-selected in vivo spectroscopy (ISIS) and 1D ISIS with 1D chemical shift imaging (CSI) oriented either perpendicular or parallel to the surface coil] to quantify the myocardial phosphocreatine (PCr) to adenosine triphosphate (ATP) ratio in healthy humans (n = 8) at rest were determined on a clinical 3 Tesla MR system. Numerical simulations of myocardial energy homeostasis in response to increased cardiac work rates were performed using a biophysical model of myocardial oxidative metabolism. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy was modeled by either inefficient sarcomere ATP utilization or decreased mitochondrial ATP synthesis. The effect of creatine depletion on myocardial energy homeostasis was explored for both conditions. The mean in vivo myocardial PCr/ATP ratio measured with 3D ISIS was 1.57 ± 0.17 with a large repeatability coefficient of 40.4%. For 1D CSI in a 1D ISIS-selected slice perpendicular to the surface coil, the PCr/ATP ratio was 2.78 ± 0.50 (repeatability 42.5%). With 1D CSI in a 1D ISIS-selected slice parallel to the surface coil, the PCr/ATP ratio was 1.70 ± 0.56 (repeatability 43.7%). The model predicted a PCr/ATP ratio reduction of only 10% at the maximal cardiac work rate in normal myocardium. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy led to lower PCr/ATP ratios for high cardiac work rates, which was exacerbated by creatine depletion. Simulations illustrated that when conducting cardiac 31P-MRS exercise stress testing with large measurement error margins, results obtained under pathophysiologic conditions may

  11. Separation of lanthanum from nuclear fuel solutions by high performance liquid chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazar, G. C.; Petre, M.; Androne, G.; Benga, A.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the separation of uranium, praseodymium and lanthanum from nuclear fuel solutions by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The aim of this study is to establish a minimum concentration of lanthanum which can be analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography, and also to study the effect of uranium concentration on the separation of praseodymium and lanthanum. Optimum gradient mode was established for mixture standard stoc solutions with uranium in a concentration of 1 mg/ml, praseodymium and lanthanum in a concentration range of 1-5 μg/ml from each element. These conditions were applied for the separation of lanthanum from a nuclear fuel solution in which praseodymium and lanthanum were added in a concentration of 3 μg/ml from each element. The elution behavior of lanthanum as a function of the pH and the concentration of the mobile phase, using a mixture of 1-octanesulfonic acid sodium salt with a-hidroxyisobutiric acid is presented. (authors)

  12. Flexible solution of linear program with an application to decommissioning planning of nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Yoshiaki

    1988-01-01

    Due to the simplicity and effectiveness, linear program has been popular in the actual optimization in various fields. In the previous study, the uncertainty involved in the model at the different stage of optimization was dealt with by post-optimizing analysis. But it often becomes insufficient to make a decision how to deal with an uncertain system especially suffering large parameter deviation. Recently in the field of processing systems, it is desired to obtain a flexible solution which can present the counterplan to a deviating system from a practical viewpoint. The scope of this preliminary note presents how to apply a methodology development to obtain the flexible solution of a linear program. For this purpose, a simple example associated with nuclear reactor decommissioning is shown. The problem to maximize a system performance given as an objective function under the constraint of the static behavior of the system is considered, and the flexible solution is determined. In Japan, the decommissioning of commercial nuclear power plants will being in near future, and the study using the retired research reactor JPDR is in progress. The planning of decontamination and the reuse of wastes is taken as the example. (Kako, I.)

  13. NUKEM. Innovative solutions for nuclear engineering; Innovative Loesungen rund um nukleares Engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheffler, Beate [NUKEM Technologies GmbH, Alzenau (Germany)

    2011-03-15

    Management of radioactive waste, handling spent fuel elements, decommissioning of nuclear facilities, and engineering and consulting activities are services associated with the name of NUKEM all over the world. The company's scientists and engineers develop solution concepts combining the latest technologies with proven techniques and many years of experience. The company;s history and the services offered to the nuclear industry began more than 5 decades ago. The predecessor, NUKEM Nuklear-Chemie-Metallurgie, was founded in 1960 as one of the earliest nuclear companies in Germany. Originally, the firm produced fuel elements for a variety of reactor lines. As early as in the 1970s, logical extensions of these business activities were nuclear engineering and plant construction. In the meantime, NUKEM Technologies GmbH has developed a worldwide reputation for its activities. Numerous reference projects bear witness to optimum project management and customer satisfaction. Since 2009, NUKEM Technologies has been a wholly owned subsidiary of the Russian Atomstroyexport. NUKEM Technologies operates sales and project offices outside Germany, e.g. in Russia, China, Lithuania, France, and Bulgaria. In this way, the company is present in its target markets of Russia, Western and Eastern Europe as well as Asia, offering customers and partners fast and direct contacts. (orig.)

  14. The technology for safety I and C systems in nuclear power plants: the SPINLINE 3 solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebreyend, P.; Burel, J.-P.

    2000-01-01

    The SPINLINE 3 technology is the latest digital technology produced by Schneider to offer the most adequate solution to safety I and C systems, particularly for modernisation of VVER reactors. This technology developed in co-operation with FRAMATOME has the great advantage of more than 200 reactors x years of cumulated experience in the field of digital safety systems. The design criteria mainly devoted to achieve the most stringent safety requirement are also combined with the economic objectives in term of investment, maintenance and long term operation. The SPINLINE 3 technology is fully supported by the activity on the French Nuclear Program with 59 NPPs in operation. (author)

  15. Numerical Solution of Fractional Neutron Point Kinetics Model in Nuclear Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nowak Tomasz Karol

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents results concerning solutions of the fractional neutron point kinetics model for a nuclear reactor. Proposed model consists of a bilinear system of fractional and ordinary differential equations. Three methods to solve the model are presented and compared. The first one entails application of discrete Grünwald-Letnikov definition of the fractional derivative in the model. Second involves building an analog scheme in the FOMCON Toolbox in MATLAB environment. Third is the method proposed by Edwards. The impact of selected parameters on the model’s response was examined. The results for typical input were discussed and compared.

  16. Determination of uranium in uranyl nitrate solutions of nuclear grade quality - Gravimetric method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This international Standard specifies a precise and accurate gravimetric method for determining the uranium content in uranyl nitrate product solutions of nuclear grade quality at concentrations above 100 g/l of uranium. Non-volatile impurities influence the accuracy of the method. Uranyl nitrate is converted into uranium octoxide (U 3 O 8 ) by ignition in air to constant mass at 900 deg. C ± 10 deg. C. Calculation of the uranium content in the sample using a gravimetric conversion factor which depends on the isotopic composition of the uranium. The isotopic composition is determined by mass spectrometry

  17. Molecular theory for nuclear magnetic relaxation in protein solutions and tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimmich, R.; Nusser, W.; Gneiting, T.

    1990-01-01

    A model theory is presented explaining a series of striking phenomena observed with nuclear magnetic relaxation in protein systems such as solutions or tissue. The frequency, concentration and temperature dependences of proton or deuteron relaxation times of protein solutions and tissue are explained. It is concluded that the translational diffusion of water molecules along the rugged surfaces of proteins and, to a minor degree, protein backbone fluctuations are crucial processes. The rate limiting factor of macromolecular tumbling is assumed to be given by the free water content in a certain analogy to the free-volume model of Cohen ad Turnbull. There are two characteristic water mass fractions indicating the saturation of the hydration shells and the onset of protein tumbling. A closed and relatively simple set of relaxation formulas is presented. The potentially fractal nature of the diffusion of water molecules on the protein surface is discussed. (author). 43 refs.; 4 figs

  18. Interactions of hydrazine, ferrous sulfamate, sodium nitrite, and nitric acid in nuclear fuel processing solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, L.W.

    1977-03-01

    Hydrazine and ferrous sulfamate are used as reductants in a variety of nuclear fuel processing solutions. An oxidant, normally sodium nitrite, must frequently be added to these nitric acid solutions before additional processing can proceed. The interactions of these four chemicals have been studied under a wide variety of conditions using a 2/sup p/ factorial experimental design to determine relative reaction rates for desired reactions and side reactions. Evidence for a hydrazine-stabilized, sulfamic acid--nitrous acid intermediate was obtained; this intermediate can hydrolyze to ammonia or decompose to nitrogen. The oxidation of Fe 2+ by NO 2 - was shown to proceed at about the same rate as the scavenging of NO 2 - by sulfamic acid. Various side reactions are discussed

  19. Fósforo num Cambissolo cultivado com cana-de-açúcar por longo tempo: II - análise de ácidos húmicos por RMN 31P Phosphorus in an Inceptsoil under long-term sugarcane: II - humic acid analysis by NMR 31P

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jader Galba Busato

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Sistemas de manejo da lavoura de cana-de-açúcar que favoreçam a matéria orgânica do solo podem aumentar o conteúdo de nutrientes disponíveis e diminuir a necessidade de aplicação de fertilizantes industriais. Apesar da importância dos componentes orgânicos no fornecimento de P, pouco se conhece sobre a sua dinâmica em ambientes tropicais. O objetivo deste trabalho foi identificar, por meio da ressonância magnética nuclear (RMN 31P, as espécies de P nos ácidos húmicos de um Cambissolo Háplico Ta eutrófico vértico, localizado no Município de Campos dos Goytacazes, norte do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, e cultivado com cana-de-açúcar com preservação do palhiço e adição de vinhaça por longo tempo. Por meio da análise de RMN 31P foi possível observar acúmulo de P orgânico em formas mais facilmente mineralizadas nas áreas com preservação de matéria orgânica, tal como P em ligações diésteres. Nas áreas de cana queimada, houve maior participação de espécies orgânicas mais estáveis, como o ortofosfato em ligações monoésteres. Os resultados da espectroscopia de RMN 31P mostram que, nas áreas com maior aporte de resíduo orgânico (i.e., cana crua e cana queimada com adição de vinhaça, os ácidos húmicos constituem uma reserva importante de P orgânico prontamente disponível. Já, nas áreas de cana queimada, o acúmulo de P orgânico recalcitrante nos ácidos húmicos indica utilização do P-lábil das substâncias húmicas como fonte importante para nutrição das plantas.Crop management systems that favor soil organic matter can improve the available nutrient content for plants and reduce the use of industrial fertilizer. Despite the importance of organic compounds as a P source, little is known about its dynamics in tropical environments. The objective of this study was to identify organic P species present in humic acids by NMR 31P analysis in a fine clay Fluventic Eutrochrepts in Campos dos

  20. Technetium99m shortage: Practical solutions to manage lack of the radio-isotope in nuclear medicine departments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biechlin-Chassel, M.L.; Francois-Joubert, A.; Bolot, C.; Desruet, M.D.; Bourrel, F.; Pelegrin, M.; Couret, I.; Lao, S.; Quelven, I.

    2010-01-01

    Technetium 99m ( 99m Tc) shortage crisis regularly affect nuclear medicine activity and oblige the community to find solutions in order to perform most of the prescribed exams and avoid systematic substitutions by other non-nuclear medicine techniques. Firstly, some practical solutions can be set up in radiopharmacy departments such as using more than two generators together, realizing fractionated elutions, preparing radiopharmaceuticals with elutions providing from different generators.. Then, it could be interesting to have a reflexion in nuclear medicine departments to convene patients the days when 99m Tc supply is sufficient, to pool some exams or to make substitutions with more available isotopes. (authors)

  1. Study of the muscular metabolism using Phosphorus 31 Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (31P-MRS) in normal subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batista, T.S.; Salmon, C.E.G.; Santos, A.C.

    2008-01-01

    Phosphorus 31 Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy ( 31 P-MRS) is a powerful technique for evaluating human muscular metabolism. Some reports indicated the behavior of phosphorylated metabolites (PCr, ADP and Pi) and other indirect parameters (intracellular pH and [Mg 2+ ]) in muscles at rest and after an exercise load. The aim of this work is a quantitative study of the phosphorylated metabolite levels in the calf muscle of normal subjects at rest and post-exercise, in order to create a normal control database. 31 P spectra of seven volunteers were acquired in both conditions. Firstly, different quantification methodologies were evaluated to use the more reliable. The P Cr metabolite was the more stable at rest and it had mono-exponential behavior after exercise. The Pi was the more sensible indicator of the physical activities. The time constants of the recuperation process are report for all the evaluated metabolites and parameters. Finally, the temporal behavior of phospho monoesters was quantified. (author)

  2. Solutions obtained to international heat transfer benchmarking problems for nuclear fuel casks using Q/TRAN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, L.C.

    1987-02-01

    In 1985 Sandia National Laboratories participated in the Nuclear Energy Agency Committee on Reactor Physics (NEACRP) Specialists' Meeting on Heat Transfer Assessment of Transportation Packages. The objective of the meeting was to establish a set of model problems for use in comparing the performance of thermal analysis computer codes that may be used in the design of nuclear fuel shipping casks. The selected problems are to be used to compare code results for the thermal phenomena of conduction, convection, and radiation in cask-like problems. Two model problems were used in this study. The first problem required the determination of the steady-state temperatures of a 16 x 16 array of heated and unheated pins (representing fuel and control rod positions) of a simulated PWR fuel assembly. The second problem required the determination of transient temperatures of a finned surface (representing the external surface of a cask) subjected to an internal heat flux and to an external engulfing fire. Solutions to the problems were obtained with the code ''Q/TRAN.'' Solutions and descriptions of the necessary modeling techniques are given in this report

  3. Underestimation of nuclear fuel burnup – theory, demonstration and solution in numerical models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gajda Paweł

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Monte Carlo methodology provides reference statistical solution of neutron transport criticality problems of nuclear systems. Estimated reaction rates can be applied as an input to Bateman equations that govern isotopic evolution of reactor materials. Because statistical solution of Boltzmann equation is computationally expensive, it is in practice applied to time steps of limited length. In this paper we show that simple staircase step model leads to underprediction of numerical fuel burnup (Fissions per Initial Metal Atom – FIMA. Theoretical considerations indicates that this error is inversely proportional to the length of the time step and origins from the variation of heating per source neutron. The bias can be diminished by application of predictor-corrector step model. A set of burnup simulations with various step length and coupling schemes has been performed. SERPENT code version 1.17 has been applied to the model of a typical fuel assembly from Pressurized Water Reactor. In reference case FIMA reaches 6.24% that is equivalent to about 60 GWD/tHM of industrial burnup. The discrepancies up to 1% have been observed depending on time step model and theoretical predictions are consistent with numerical results. Conclusions presented in this paper are important for research and development concerning nuclear fuel cycle also in the context of Gen4 systems.

  4. Preliminary clinical experience using the method of 31P MR spectroscopy in investigations of neuromuscular diseases in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hajek, M.; Horska, A.; Grosmanova, A.; Urban, P.; Suchanek, M.; Jirasek, A.

    1990-01-01

    31 P MR spectroscopy was used to investigate neuromuscular diseases of various origin in 35 patients, mostly children. In devising the procedure of MR examination and of evaluation of results, pattern recognition analysis was used. According to the results of 31 P MR spectroscopy, the patients can be divided into three groups. Group A comprises patients with severe muscular lesions such as Duchenne dystrophy. The second, B group is characterized by milder atrophic changes of muscle fibres. The third group comprises dubious cases. The 31 P MRS method was also used for investigating the development of the disease in time - a decrease in parameter P CR /P i (P CR is an indicator of phosphocreatinine and P i an indicator of inorganic phosphate) corresponds to a deterioration of the clinical condition of patients from group one. In group B fairly stable values of the parameter were observed. An increase in P CR /P i was also observed during administration of Prednisone in a patient with child polymyositis. 3 figs., 3 tabs., 23 refs

  5. Crystallinity and compositional changes in carbonated apatites: Evidence from 31P solid-state NMR, Raman, and AFM analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElderry, John-David P.; Zhu, Peizhi; Mroue, Kamal H.; Xu, Jiadi; Pavan, Barbara; Fang, Ming; Zhao, Guisheng; McNerny, Erin; Kohn, David H.; Franceschi, Renny T.; Holl, Mark M. Banaszak; Tecklenburg, Mary M. J.; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy; Morris, Michael D.

    2013-10-01

    Solid-state (magic-angle spinning) NMR spectroscopy is a useful tool for obtaining structural information on bone organic and mineral components and synthetic model minerals at the atomic-level. Raman and 31P NMR spectral parameters were investigated in a series of synthetic B-type carbonated apatites (CAps). Inverse 31P NMR linewidth and inverse Raman PO43-ν1 bandwidth were both correlated with powder XRD c-axis crystallinity over the 0.3-10.3 wt% CO32- range investigated. Comparison with bone powder crystallinities showed agreement with values predicted by NMR and Raman calibration curves. Carbonate content was divided into two domains by the 31P NMR chemical shift frequency and the Raman phosphate ν1 band position. These parameters remain stable except for an abrupt transition at 6.5 wt% carbonate, a composition which corresponds to an average of one carbonate per unit cell. This near-binary distribution of spectroscopic properties was also found in AFM-measured particle sizes and Ca/P molar ratios by elemental analysis. We propose that this transition differentiates between two charge-balancing ion-loss mechanisms as measured by Ca/P ratios. These results define a criterion for spectroscopic characterization of B-type carbonate substitution in apatitic minerals.

  6. A comparison of MR elastography and {sup 31}P MR spectroscopy with histological staging of liver fibrosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godfrey, Edmund M. [St James' Hospital, Leeds (United Kingdom); St James' Hospital, Department of Radiology, Leeds (United Kingdom); Patterson, Andrew J.; Priest, Andrew N.; Davies, Susan E.; Joubert, Ilse; Krishnan, Anant S.; Shaw, Ashley S.; Alexander, Graeme J.; Allison, Michael E.; Griffiths, William J.H.; Gimson, Alexander E.S. [Addenbrooke' s Hospital, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Griffin, Nyree [St Thomas' s Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Lomas, David J. [University of Cambridge, Department of Radiology, Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2012-12-15

    Conventional imaging techniques are insensitive to liver fibrosis. This study assesses the diagnostic accuracy of MR elastography (MRE) stiffness values and the ratio of phosphomonoesters (PME)/phosphodiesters (PDE) measured using {sup 31}P spectroscopy against histological fibrosis staging. The local research ethics committee approved this prospective, blinded study. A total of 77 consecutive patients (55 male, aged 49 {+-} 11.5 years) with a clinical suspicion of liver fibrosis underwent an MR examination with a liver biopsy later the same day. Patients underwent MRE and {sup 31}P spectroscopy on a 1.5 T whole body system. The liver biopsies were staged using an Ishak score for chronic hepatitis or a modified NAS fibrosis score for fatty liver disease. MRE increased with and was positively associated with fibrosis stage (Spearman's rank = 0.622, P < 0.001). PME/PDE was not associated with fibrosis stage (Spearman's rank = -0.041, p = 0.741). Area under receiver operating curves for MRE stiffness values were high (range 0.75-0.97). The diagnostic utility of PME/PDE was no better than chance (range 0.44-0.58). MRE-estimated liver stiffness increases with fibrosis stage and is able to dichotomise fibrosis stage groupings. We did not find a relationship between {sup 31}P MR spectroscopy and fibrosis stage. circle Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) and MR spectroscopy can both assess the liver. (orig.)

  7. A clinical application of {sup 31}P and {sup 1}H-MR spectroscopy in cerebrovascular disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchimura, Koichi; Asakura, Tetsuhiko; Kadota, Koki; Niiro, Masaki; Terada, Kousaku; Hirakawa, Wataru [Kagoshima Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine; Haruzono, Akihiro

    1995-12-01

    Due to the development of non-invasive magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) techniques, metabolic and functional data on the ischemic human brain have been obtained. We serially evaluated patients with cerebral infarction 5 hours-5 years after the onset by {sup 31}P and {sup 1}H-MRS. {sup 31}P-MRS in patients with acute cerebral infarction showed a marked increase in inorganic phosphate (Pi), decreases in phosphocreatine (PCr) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP), and a decrease in intracellular pH. On the other hand, {sup 1}H-MRS revealed an increase in lactate and a decrease in N-acetyl aspartate (NAA). Since these changes could be detected 5 hours after the onset, MRS is useful for the early diagnosis of cerebral infarction. {sup 123}I-IMP SPECT and {sup 31}P-MRS were performed before and after acetazolamide administration in 10 patients with occlusion of the main trunk or marked stenosis without extensive infarction in its perfusion area on MRI. In the group showing a decrease in cerebral blood flow after acetazolamide administration, intracellular pH also significantly decreased. These results suggest that MRS is also useful for evaluating the reserve capacity of cerebral blood flow and metabolism in chronically ischemic areas. (author).

  8. Reproducibility and influencing factors of 31P MR spectroscopy in rabbit liver with two-dimensional chemical shift imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Risheng; Sun Jianzhong; Ding Wenhong; Xu Xiufang; Wang Zhikang

    2009-01-01

    .05). Conclusions: The relative quantification of hepatic β-ATP may be most reliable among the phosphorus metabolites for rabbit liver because of its good reproducibility and small CV. The quantification of phosphorus metabolites by 31 P MRS with 2D CSI in rabbit liver is affected by many factors. (authors)

  9. Chemical effects associated to (n, γ) nuclear reactions in diluted aqueous solutions of liquid or frozen organic halogenides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bermudez Rodriguez, I.M.

    1985-09-01

    Chemical effects associated to nuclear transformation 37 Cl (n, γ) 38 Cl or 127 I (n, γ) 128 I in solid or liquid aqueous solutions of ethyl iodide, trichloro-ethylene, thyroxine or DDT irradiated in a nuclear reactor are studied. The retention of radiohalogen under its initial chemical shape decrease with solute concentration in liquid phase but is almost constant with solute dilution in the solid phase. Potential applications in neutron activation analysis evidencing halogenated molecules in irradiated media are discussed. 57 refs [fr

  10. Transport and compartmentation of phosphite in higher plant cells - kinetic and 31P nuclear magnetic resonance studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Danova-Alt, R.; Dijkema, C.; Waard, de P.; Köck, M.

    2008-01-01

    Phosphite (Phi, H(2)PO(3)(-)), being the active part of several fungicides, has been shown to influence not only the fungal metabolism but also the development of phosphate-deficient plants. However, the mechanism of phosphite effects on plants is still widely unknown. In this paper we analysed

  11. 31P Nuclear Magnetic Resonance of Charge-Density-Wave Transition in a Single Crystal of RuP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Guo-Zhi; Chen, Rong-Yan; Wang, Nan-Lin; Luo, Jian-Lin

    2015-07-01

    Not Available Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant No 11025422, the National Basic Research Program of China under Grant Nos 2011CB921700 and 2015CB921300, and the Strategic Priority Research Program of the Chinese Academy of Sciences under Grant No XDB07020200.

  12. A genetic algorithm solution for combinatorial problems - the nuclear core reload example

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schirru, R.; Silva, F.C. [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia; Pereira, C.M.N.A. [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Chapot, J.L.C. [FURNAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    1997-12-01

    This paper presents a solution to Traveling Salesman Problem based upon genetic algorithms (GA), using the classic crossover, but avoiding the feasibility problem in offspring individuals, allowing the natural evolution of the GA without introduction of heuristics in the genetic crossover operator. The genetic model presented, that we call the List Model (LM) is based on the encoding and decoding genotype in the way to always generate a phenotype that has a valid structure, over which will be applied the fitness, represented by the total distance. The main purpose of this work was to develop the basis for a new genetic model to be used in the reload of nuclear core of a PWR. In a generic way, this problem can be interpreted as a a search of the optimal combination of N different fuel elements in N nuclear core `holes`, where each combination or load pattern, determines the neutron flux shape and its associate peak factor. The goal is to find out the load pattern that minimizes the peak factor and consequently maximize the useful life of the nuclear fuel. The GA with the List Model was applied to the Angra-1 PWR reload problem and the results are remarkably better than the ones used in the last fuel cycle. (author). 12 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Analytical solution of point kinetics equations for linear reactivity variation during the start-up of a nuclear reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palma, Daniel A.P. [CEFET QUIMICA de Nilopolis/RJ, 21941-914 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)], E-mail: agoncalves@con.ufrj.br; Martinez, Aquilino S.; Goncalves, Alessandro C. [COPPE/UFRJ - Programa de Engenharia Nuclear, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2009-09-15

    The analytical solution of point kinetics equations with a group of delayed neutrons is useful in predicting the variation of neutron density during the start-up of a nuclear reactor. In the practical case of an increase of nuclear reactor power resulting from the linear insertion of reactivity, the exact analytical solution cannot be obtained. Approximate solutions have been obtained in previous articles, based on considerations that need to be verifiable in practice. In the present article, an alternative analytic solution is presented for point kinetics equations in which the only approximation consists of disregarding the term of the second derivative for neutron density in relation to time. The results proved satisfactory when applied to practical situations in the start-up of a nuclear reactor through the control rods withdraw.

  14. Analytical solution of point kinetics equations for linear reactivity variation during the start-up of a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palma, Daniel A.P.; Martinez, Aquilino S.; Goncalves, Alessandro C.

    2009-01-01

    The analytical solution of point kinetics equations with a group of delayed neutrons is useful in predicting the variation of neutron density during the start-up of a nuclear reactor. In the practical case of an increase of nuclear reactor power resulting from the linear insertion of reactivity, the exact analytical solution cannot be obtained. Approximate solutions have been obtained in previous articles, based on considerations that need to be verifiable in practice. In the present article, an alternative analytic solution is presented for point kinetics equations in which the only approximation consists of disregarding the term of the second derivative for neutron density in relation to time. The results proved satisfactory when applied to practical situations in the start-up of a nuclear reactor through the control rods withdraw.

  15. Solution standards for quality control of nuclear-material analytical measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, J.P.

    1981-01-01

    Analytical chemistry measurement control depends upon reliable solution standards. At the Savannah River Plant Control Laboratory over a thousand analytical measurements are made daily for process control, product specification, accountability, and nuclear safety. Large quantities of solution standards are required for a measurement quality control program covering the many different analytical chemistry methods. Savannah River Plant produced uranium, plutonium, neptunium, and americium metals or oxides are dissolved to prepare stock solutions for working or Quality Control Standards (QCS). Because extensive analytical effort is required to characterize or confirm these solutions, they are prepared in large quantities. These stock solutions are diluted and blended with different chemicals and/or each other to synthesize QCS that match the matrices of different process streams. The target uncertainty of a standard's reference value is 10% of the limit of error of the methods used for routine measurements. Standard Reference Materials from NBS are used according to special procedures to calibrate the methods used in measuring the uranium and plutonium standards so traceability can be established. Special precautions are required to minimize the effects of temperature, radiolysis, and evaporation. Standard reference values are periodically corrected to eliminate systematic errors caused by evaporation or decay products. Measurement control is achieved by requiring analysts to analyze a blind QCS each shift a measurement system is used on plant samples. Computer evaluation determines whether or not a measurement is within the +- 3 sigma control limits. Monthly evaluations of the QCS measurements are made to determine current bias correction factors for accountability measurements and detect significant changes in the bias and precision statistics. The evaluations are also used to plan activities for improving the reliability of the analytical chemistry measurements

  16. Homogeneous aqueous solution nuclear reactors for the production of Mo-99 and other short lived radioisotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-09-01

    Technetium-99m ( 99m Tc), the daughter of Molybdenum-99 ( 99 Mo), is the most commonly used medical radioisotope in the world. It accounts for over twenty-five million medical procedures each year worldwide, comprising about 80% of all radiopharmaceutical procedures. 99 Mo is mostly prepared by the fission of uranium-235 targets in a nuclear reactor with a fission yield of about 6.1%. Currently over 95% of the fission product 99 Mo is obtained using highly enriched uranium (HEU) targets. Smaller scale producers use low enriched uranium (LEU) targets. Small quantities of 99 Mo are also produced by neutron activation through the use of the (n, γ) reaction. The concept of a compact homogeneous aqueous reactor fuelled by a uranium salt solution with off-line separation of radioisotopes of interest ( 99 Mo, 131 I) from aliquots of irradiated fuel solution has been cited in a few presentations in the series of International Conference on Isotopes (ICI) held in Vancouver (2000), Cape Town (2003) and Brussels (2005) and recently some corporate interest has also been noticeable. Calculations and some experimental research have shown that the use of aqueous homogeneous reactors (AHRs) could be an efficient technology for fission radioisotope production, having some prospective advantages compared with traditional technology based on the use of solid uranium targets irradiated in research reactors. This review of AHR status and prospects by a team of experts engaged in the field of homogeneous reactors and radioisotope producers yields an objective evaluation of the technological challenges and other relevant implications. The meeting to develop this report facilitated the exchange of information on the 'state of the art' of the technology related to homogeneous aqueous solution nuclear reactors, especially in connection with the production of radioisotopes. This publication presents a summary of discussions of a consultants meeting which is followed by the technical

  17. Problems and solutions of the spent nuclear fuel (SNF) at Kozloduy NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordanov, J.

    2003-01-01

    There are two options concerning spent nuclear fuel: to return it back to Russia for reprocessing or to store it on the site until we decide what to do with it. In both options prior to the shutting down of each reactor the Spent Fuel Pool thereto should be vacated (the filling in of the equipment at present is illustrated) and the Spent Fuel Storage Facility (SFSF) should also be vacated after the stop of the last nuclear facility on the site in order to be reequipped for permanent storage of the highly active wastes which will be returned in the country, if we submit the fuel for reprocessing; or of SNF, if we decide to leave them ultimately in Bulgaria. The difference is mainly in the quantities which will permanently remain here, respectively the volumes required for their storage and the funds necessary for the implementation of the processes. The pool volumes filling in both variants is also illustrated and the SFSF will be filled by 2008, if no fuel is transported.Costs of the SNF transport to Russia and investment costs of dry storage of SNF from pools 1 - 4 are present. The costs are visibly lower compared to those in the case of return of the fuel. However, these are only investments for construction and equipment of the buildings and storage containers. The costs related to their servicing are not included, and it should be taken into account that in approximately 50 years we will have to seek solution for their permanent storage. Despite the material costs to be incurred now for the implementation of the option with the return of the fuel, this is the more worthy way to resolve the problem. In accordance with the ethic principles in the nuclear energy, the burdens arising as a result of the use of nuclear facilities should be covered by the generation consuming the benefits from it

  18. Spatial heterogeneity of metabolism in skeletal muscle in vivo studied by 31P-NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Challiss, R.A.J.; Blackledge, M.J.; Radda, G.K.

    1988-01-01

    Phase modulated rotating-frame imaging, a localization technique for phosphorus nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, has been applied to obtain information on heterogeneity of phosphorus-containing metabolites in skeletal muscle of the rat in vivo. The distal muscles of the rat hindlimb have been studied at rest and during steady-state isometric twitch contraction; the use of a transmitter surface coil and an electrically isolated, orthogonal receiver Helmholtz coil ensure accurate spatial assignment (1 mm resolution). At rest, intracellular pH was higher and PCr/(PCr + P i ) was lower in deeper muscle compared with superficial muscle of the distal hindlimb. Upon steady-state stimulation, the relatively more alkaline pH of deep muscle was maintained, whereas greater changes in PCr/(PCr + P i ) and P i /ATP occurred in the superficial muscle layer. This method allows rapid (75 min for each spectral image) acquisition of quantitative information on metabolic heterogeneity in vivo

  19. Different early effect of irradiation in brain and small cell lung cancer examined by in vivo 31P-magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristjansen, P E; Pedersen, A G; Quistorff, B

    1992-01-01

    Early effects of irradiation were evaluated by non-invasive in vivo 31P-magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P-MRS) of two small cell lung cancer (SCLC) tumor lines CPH SCCL 54A and 54B, in nude mice. The tumors were originally derived from the same patient and have similar morphology and growth...

  20. (31) P MR spectroscopic imaging combined with (1) H MR spectroscopic imaging in the human prostate using a double tuned endorectal coil at 7T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luttje, Mariska P; Italiaander, Michel G M; Arteaga de Castro, Catalina S; van der Kemp, Wybe J M; Luijten, Peter R; van Vulpen, Marco; van der Heide, Uulke A; Klomp, Dennis W J

    2014-12-01

    Improved diagnostic sensitivity could be obtained in cancer detection and staging when individual compounds of the choline pool can be detected. Therefore, a novel coil design is proposed, providing the ability to acquire both (1) H and (31) P magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) in patients with prostate cancer. A two-element (1) H/(31) P endorectal coil was designed by adjusting a commercially available 3T endorectal coil. The two-element coil setup was interfaced as a transceiver to a whole body 7T MR scanner. Simulations and phantom measurements were performed to compare the efficiency of the coil. (1) H MRSI and (31) P MRSI were acquired in vivo in prostate cancer patients. The efficiency of the (1) H/(31) P coil is comparable to the dual channel (1) H coil previously published. Individually distinguishable phospholipid metabolites in the in vivo (31) P spectra were: phosphoethanolamine, phosphocholine, phosphate, glycerophosphoethanolamine, glycerophosphocholine, phosphocreatine, and adenosine triposphate. (1) H MRSI was performed within the same scan session, visualizing choline, polyamines, creatine, and citrate. (1) H MRSI and (31) P MRSI can be acquired in the human prostate at 7T within the same scan session using an endorectal coil matched and tuned for (1) H (quadrature) and (31) P (linear) without the need of cable traps and with negligible efficiency losses in the (1) H and (31) P channel. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. A nuclear waste deposit in space - the ultimate solution for low-cost and safe disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruppe, H.O.; Hayn, D.; Braitinger, M.; Schmucker, R.H.

    1980-01-01

    The disposal of nuclear high-active waste (HAW) is representative for the problem of burdening the environment with highly active or toxic waste products at present and in the future. Safe disposal methods on Earth are technically very difficult to achieve and the costs of establishment and maintenance of such plants are extremely high. Furthermore the emotionally based rejection by a wide sector of the population gives sufficient reason to look for new solutions. Here, space technology can offer a real alternative - a waste deposit in space. With the Space Transportation System, which shall soon be operative, and the resulting high flight frequencies it will be possible to transport all future HAW into space at economical casts. (orig.) [de

  2. Energies and transition probabilities from the full solution of nuclear quadrupole-octupole model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strecker, M.; Lenske, H.; Minkov, N.

    2013-01-01

    A collective model of nuclear quadrupole-octupole vibrations and rotations, originally restricted to a coherent interplay between quadrupole and octupole modes, is now developed for application beyond this restriction. The eigenvalue problem is solved by diagonalizing the unrestricted Hamiltonian in the basis of the analytic solution obtained in the case of the coherent-mode assumption. Within this scheme the yrast alternating-parity band is constructed by the lowest eigenvalues having the appropriate parity at given angular momentum. Additionally we include the calculation of transition probabilities which are fitted with the energies simultaneously. As a result we obtain a unique set of parameters. The obtained model parameters unambiguously determine the shape of the quadrupole-octupole potential. From the resulting wave functions quadrupole deformation expectation values are calculated which are found to be in agreement with experimental values. (author)

  3. The waste management program VUB-AZ: An integrated solution for nuclear biomedical waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Covens, P.; Sonck, M.; Eggermont, G.; Meert, D.

    2001-01-01

    unit will be compared with the MDA obtained by different handheld monitors. All results will be finally correlated to the different proposed clearance levels. These clearance levels can easily be met through on-site storage for radionuclides with half-life less than 1 year. For a waste stream of 1000 packages or more a year, a management software is indispensable. The software 'WasteMan' was developed on-site. This user-friendly software takes care of the entire storage procedure and allows a complete bookkeeping of the daily nuclear waste streams. Based on the sophisticated waste collection procedure, the WasteMan software allows both a complete inventory of the storage facility and a full traceability of all waste packages from production to either clearance or disposal. At the same time all necessary documents for either clearance or disposal are generated automatically. The data-exchange between several interfaces enables timesaving administration. In addition to these technical aspects a general analysis of the economic impact of such an on- site decay program will be made for a medium sized university with hospital, yielding a serious reduction of waste handling costs. This waste storage program, including the complete measurement set-up and the necessary management software, was recently installed in a second university, proving the general applicability of the whole concept for biomedical nuclear waste. Many hospitals and other biomedical centres however produce small quantities of nuclear waste for which investments, like measurement equipment and decay rooms, are not cost-effective. The installation of a regional centre for nuclear biomedical waste will be presented here as an alternative solution for this problem

  4. In vivo effects of photosynthesis inhibitors in Synechococcus as determined by 31P NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thoma, W.J.; Gleason, F.K.

    1987-01-01

    Phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance spectra were obtained from darkened cells of the unicellular cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. Resonance peaks were assigned to intracellular pools of sugar-phosphates, inorganic phosphate (P/sub i/), nucleotides, and polyphosphate. An internal pH of 7.2 was estimated from the chemical shift of the P/sub i/ resonance. Cells were then illuminated at 1600 μE m -2 s -1 photosynthetically active radiation by a fiber optic cable immersed in the cell sample. Spectra obtained after approximately 15 min of illumination showed an increase in nucleotide pools and an increase in the cytoplasmic pH to 7.6. In the presence of 0.3 mM dinitrophenol (DNP), an uncoupler of phosphorylation, spectra of illuminated cells showed an immediate decline in nucleotide pools while sugar-phosphate levels remained constant. Addition of the photosystem II (PS II) electron-transport inhibitor 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU) (7.2 μM) did not affect nucleotide levels in the cells during the time course of the experiment (15-30 min). However, an abrupt rise in the resonance in the sugar-phosphate region was noted. Spectra of DCMU-treated cells extracts indicated that one metabolite was principally responsible for the change in pool size. The metabolite was identified as 3-phosphoglyceric acid. Spectra of illuminated cells were also obtained in the presence of the natural herbicide cyanobacterin. Unlike results obtained with DNP or DCMU, spectra of cyanobacterin-treated cells showed no major changes in nucleotide or sugar-phosphate resonances. A slow decline in cytoplasmic pH was seen in the presence of cyanobacterin, indicating that the natural product affects the proton pumping mechanism in PS II

  5. 31P-magnetic resonance spectroscopy: Impaired energy metabolism in latent hyperthyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theissen, P.; Kaldewey, S.; Moka, D.; Bunke, J.; Voth, E.; Schicha, H.

    1993-01-01

    31 Phosphorous magnetic resonance spectroscopy allows an in vivo examination of energy metabolism. The present study was designed to evaluate whether in patients with latent hyperthyroidism alterations of muscle energy metabolism could be found similar to those observed in patients with overt hyperthyroidism. In 10 patients with overt hyperthyroidism before therapy and 20 with latent hyperthyroidism (also without therapy) and in 24 healthy volunteers magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the calf muscle was performed within a 1.5-Tesla magnet. Muscle concentrations of phosphocreatine, inorganic phosphate, and ATP were quantified compared to an external standard solution of K 2 HPO 4 . In the patients with overt hyperthyroidism and with latent hyperthyroidism a significant decrease of phosphocreatine was found. Further, the ATP concentration in patients with latent and manifest hyperthyroidism tended towards lower values. There were no significant differences in the decrease of phosphocreatine and ATP between both patient groups. Therefore, this study for the first time shows that alterations of energy metabolism in latent hyperthyroidism can be measured and that they are similar to those observed in overt hyperthyroidism. (orig.) [de

  6. Intracellular pH determination by a 31P-NMR technique. The second dissociation constant of phosphoric acid in a biological system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Y; Murakami, M; Watari, H; Imai, Y; Yoshizaki, K; Nishikawa, H; Morimoto, T

    1983-09-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of pH determination by 31P-NMR, factors which influence the pK value of phosphate were appraised on the basis of the titration of 1 mM phosphate buffer solution. When the method is used for the determination of cytoplasmic pH, ionic strength is the major factor causing shifts of apparent pK (pK') value, and the magnitude of the shift can be predicted from the ionic strength calculated by means of the Debye-Hückel equation. Ions (Na+, K+, Mg2+, and Ca2+) and salivary protein affected the pK' value by 0.1 to 0.3 units in solution with a given ionic strength depending on the species of ion. The form of the titration curve varied with temperature. Based on these results, the value of 6.75 was obtained with the uncertainty of 0.12 for the intracellular pK' of frog muscle at 24 degrees C.

  7. 31P NMR spectroscopy and HbO2 cryospectrophotometry in prediction of tumor radioresistance caused by hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rofstad, E K; DeMuth, P; Fenton, B M; Ceckler, T L; Sutherland, R M

    1989-04-01

    The aim of this study was to search for possible relationships between the fraction of radiobiologically hypoxic cells in tumors and their 31P NMR spectral parameters and intracapillary HbO2 saturations. Four different tumor lines, two murine sarcomas (KHT, RIF-1) and two human ovarian carcinoma xenografts (MLS, OWI), were used. When tumor volume increased from about 200 mm3 to about 2000 mm3, hypoxic fraction increased from 12 to 23% for the KHT line, from 0.9 to 1.7% for the RIF-1 line, and from 9 to 28% for the MLS line. The OWI line showed similar hypoxic fractions at 200 (17%) and 2000 mm3 (15%). Tumor bioenergetic status decreased, that is, the inorganic phosphate (Pi) resonance increased and the phosphocreatine (PCr) and nucleoside triphosphate beta (NTP beta) resonances decreased, with increasing tumor volume for the KHT, RIF-1, and MLS lines, whereas the OWI line did not show any changes in the 31P NMR spectral parameters during tumor growth. Similarly, tumor HbO2 saturation status, that is, the fraction of vessels with HbO2 saturation above 30%, decreased with increasing tumor volume for the KHT, RIF-1, and MLS lines, but remained unchanged during tumor growth for the OWI line. Although the data indicated a relationship between hypoxic fraction and tumor bioenergetic status as well as tumor HbO2 saturation status within a specific line during tumor growth, there was no correlation between hypoxic fraction and tumor bioenergetic status or tumor HbO2 saturation status across the four tumor lines. This may have occurred because cell survival time under hypoxic stress as well as fraction of non-clonogenic, but metabolically active hypoxic cells differed among the tumor lines. This indicates that 31P NMR spectroscopy and HbO2 cryospectrophotometry data have to be supplemented with other data to be useful in prediction of tumor radioresistance caused by hypoxia.

  8. Exertional muscle pain in familial Mediterranean fever patients evaluated by MRI and 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kushnir, T.; Eshed, I.; Heled, Y.; Livneh, A.; Langevitz, P.; Ben Zvi, I.; Konen, E.; Lidar, M.

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the effect of physical activity on the structural, morphological, and metabolic characteristics of the gastrocnemius muscle in familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) patients, utilizing quantitative 31 P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), in order to elucidate the mechanism of their exertional leg pain. Materials and methods: Eleven FMF patients suffering from exertional leg pain (eight male, three female; mean age 33 years) and six healthy individuals (three male, three female; mean age 39 years) constituted the control group. All of the participants underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and non-selective 31 P MRS (3 T) of the leg muscles before and after graded exercise on a treadmill. Phosphocreatine (PCr):inorganic phosphate (Pi), PCr:adenosine triphosphate (ATP) ratios and the intracellular pH of the leg muscles were measured using 31 P MRS. Results: For both groups, normal muscle mass with no signal alterations was observed on the MRI images after exercise. The normal range of pre- and post- exercise MRS muscle parameters was observed in both groups. However, the intracellular pH post-exercise, was significantly higher (less acidic) in the FMF group compared to the control group [pH (FMF) = 7.03 ± 0.02; pH (control) 7.00 ± 0.02; p < 0.0006]. Conclusions: The finding of a less prominent, post-exercise acidification of the gastrocnemius muscle in this FMF patient group suggests a forme fruste of glycogenosis. This preliminary observation should be further investigated in a future, larger-scale study

  9. Collaborative machining solution extends the operating life of a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilmore, Geoff; Becker, Andrew; Vandenberg, James

    2007-01-01

    Examination of a CANDU 6 nuclear power plant's steam generators during a scheduled maintenance outage revealed that the manway ports, part of the ASME Section III, Class 1 pressure boundary, needed repair. The port's inner cover gasket was not seating properly. Integrity was at risk. It was determined that this operation would required a specialized machine to successfully repair the manway port. The solution included the modification of a standard portable boring machine with a custom mounting option to enlarge the counterbore in the primary head shell from a round shape to an obround shape (76 mm of shell thickness, 16 mm radially). The shape change was needed to accommodate the new obround cover and gasket seal design. Once the new major shape was machined, the repair was finished with a Computer Numerically Controlled (CNC) machine developed by the service team to achieve the necessary gasket face location and sizing. The final result met all of the plant's expectations and was completed well within the time allotted during the maintenance shut down. This success was due to the positive partnership and collaboration of the service team and the machine tool manufacture working together to successfully extend the operating life of the nuclear power plant. (author)

  10. Silver iodide reduction in aqueous solution: application to iodine enhanced separation during spent nuclear fuels reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badie, Jerome

    2002-01-01

    Silver iodide is a key-compound in nuclear chemistry either in accidental conditions or during the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel. In that case, the major part of iodine is released in molecular form into the gaseous phase at the time of dissolution in nitric acid. In French reprocessing plants, iodine is trapped in the dissolver off-gas treatment unit by two successive steps: the first consists in absorption by scrubbing with a caustic soda solution and in the second, residual iodine is removed from the gaseous stream before the stack by chemisorption on mineral porous traps made up of beds of amorphous silica or alumina porous balls impregnated with silver nitrate. Reactions of iodine species with the impregnant are assumed to lead to silver iodide and silver iodate. Enhanced separation policy would make necessary to recover iodine from the filters by silver iodide dissolution during a reducing treatment. After a brief silver-iodine chemical bibliographic review, the possible reagents listed in the literature were studied. The choice has been made to use ascorbic acid and hydroxylamine. An experimental work on silver iodide reduction by this two compounds allowed us to determinate reaction products, stoichiometry and kinetics parameters. Finally, the process has been initiated on stable iodine loaded filters samples. (author) [fr

  11. Analysis of M1 transitions of the analog-antianalog type in 27Al and 31P nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopanets, E.G.; Inopin, E.V.; Korda, L.P.; Kostin, V.Ya.; Kobal', A.A.

    1977-01-01

    The study has been continued of the isobaric analog state (IAS)- isobaric antianalog state (IAAS) transitions. The probabilities have been analyzed of MI-transitions between IAS and IAAS of 27 Al nucleus and of a 31 P nucleus. An analysis of the range of coincidences of theoretical and experimental values for the probabilities of MI-transitions between IAS and IAAS has shown that the coincidence can take place only in the assumption that the equilibrium deformations of initial and final state nuclei under consideration are different

  12. 31P-NMR measurements of ATP, ADP, 2,3-diphosphoglycerate and Mg2+ in human erythrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, A; Kristensen, S R; Jacobsen, J P; Hørder, M

    1990-08-17

    Absolute 31P-NMR measurements of ATP, ADP and 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (2,3-DPG) in oxygenated and partly deoxygenated human erythrocytes, compared to measurements by standard assays after acid extraction, show that ATP is only 65% NMR visible, ADP measured by NMR is unexpectedly 400% higher than the enzymatic measurement and 2,3-DPG is fully NMR visible, regardless of the degree of oxygenation. These results show that binding to hemoglobin is unlikely to cause the decreased visibility of ATP in human erythrocytes as deoxyhemoglobin binds the phosphorylated metabolites more tightly than oxyhemoglobin. The high ADP visibility is unexplained. The levels of free Mg2+ [( Mg2+]free) in human erythrocytes are 225 mumol/l at an oxygen saturation of 98.6% and instead of the expected increase, the level decreased to 196 mumol/l at an oxygen saturation of 38.1% based on the separation between the alpha- and beta-ATP peaks. [Mg2+]free in the erythrocytes decreased to 104 mumol/l at a high 2,3-DPG concentration of 25.4 mmol/l red blood cells (RBC) and a normal ATP concentration of 2.05 mmol/l RBC. By increasing the ATP concentration to 3.57 mmol/l RBC, and with a high 2,3-DPG concentration of 24.7 mmol/l RBC, the 31P-NMR measured [Mg2+]free decreased to 61 mumol/l. These results indicate, that the 31P-NMR determined [Mg2+]free in human erythrocytes, based solely on the separation of the alpha- and beta-ATP peaks, does not give a true measure of intracellular free Mg2+ changes with different oxygen saturation levels. Furthermore the measurement is influenced by the concentration of the Mg2+ binding metabolites ATP and 2,3-DPG. Failure to take these factors into account when interpreting 31P-NMR data from human erythrocytes may explain some discrepancies in the literature regarding [Mg2+]free.

  13. Assessment of membrane protection by 31P-NMR effects of lidocaine on calcium-paradox in myocardium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, Hirosumi; Yoshiyama, Minoru; Teragaki, Masakazu; Takeuchi, Kazuhide; Takeda, Takeda; Ikata, Mari; Ishikawa, Makoto; Miura, Iwao

    1989-01-01

    In studying calcium paradox, perfused rat hearts were used to investigate the myocardial protective effects of lidocaine. Intracellular contents of phosphates were measured using the 31 P-NMR method. In hearts reexposed to calcium, following 3 minute calcium-free perfusion, a rapid contracture occurred, followed by rapid and complete disappearance of intracellular phosphates with no resumption of cardiac function. In hearts where lidocaine was administered from the onset of the calcium-free perfusion until 2 minutes following the onset of reexposure to calcium, both intracellular phosphates and cardiac contractility were maintained. Therefore, it can be said that cell membranes were protected by lidocaine

  14. Wilson's disease: {sup 31}P and {sup 1}H MR spectroscopy and clinical correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinha, Sanjib; Taly, A.B.; Prashanth, L.K. [National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences (NIMHANS), Department of Neurology, Bangalore (India); Ravishankar, S.; Vasudev, M.K. [National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences (NIMHANS), Department of Neuroimaging and Interventional Radiology, Bangalore (India)

    2010-11-15

    Proton ({sup 1}H) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) changes are noted in Wilson's disease (WD). However, there are no studies regarding membrane phospholipid abnormality using {sup 31}P MRS in these patients. We aimed to analyze the striatal spectroscopic abnormalities using {sup 31}P and {sup 1}H MRS in WD. Forty patients of WD (treated, 29; untreated,11) and 30 controls underwent routine MR image sequences and in vivo 2-D {sup 31}P and {sup 1}H MRS of basal ganglia using an image-selected technique on a 1.5-T MRI scanner. Statistical analysis was done using Student's t test. The mean durations of illness and treatment were 6.2 {+-} 7.4 and 4.8 {+-} 5.9 years, respectively. MRI images were abnormal in all the patients. {sup 1}H MRS revealed statistically significant reduction of N-acetyl aspartate (NAA)/choline (Cho) and NAA/creatine ratios in striatum ({sup 1}H MRS) of treated patients compared to controls. The mean values of phosphomonoesters (PME) (p < 0.0001), phosphodiesters (PDE) (p < 0.0001), and total phosphorus (TPh) (p < 0.0001) were elevated in patients compared to controls. Statistically significant elevated levels of ratio of PME/PDE (p = 0.05) observed in the striatum were noted in treated patients as compared to controls in the {sup 31}P MRS study. The duration of illness correlated well with increased PME/PDE [p < 0.001], PME/TPh [p < 0.05], and PDE/TPh [p < 0.05] and decreased NAA/Cho [p < 0.05] ratios. There was correlation of MRI score and reduced NAA/Cho ratio with disease severity. The PME/PDE ratio (right) was elevated in the treated group [p < 0.001] compared to untreated group. There is reduced breakdown and/or increased synthesis of membrane phospholipids and increased neuronal damage in basal ganglia in patients with WD. (orig.)

  15. Recent Advances in Characterization of Lignin Polymer by Solution-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR Methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Run-Cang Sun

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The demand for efficient utilization of biomass induces a detailed analysis of the fundamental chemical structures of biomass, especially the complex structures of lignin polymers, which have long been recognized for their negative impact on biorefinery. Traditionally, it has been attempted to reveal the complicated and heterogeneous structure of lignin by a series of chemical analyses, such as thioacidolysis (TA, nitrobenzene oxidation (NBO, and derivatization followed by reductive cleavage (DFRC. Recent advances in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR technology undoubtedly have made solution-state NMR become the most widely used technique in structural characterization of lignin due to its versatility in illustrating structural features and structural transformations of lignin polymers. As one of the most promising diagnostic tools, NMR provides unambiguous evidence for specific structures as well as quantitative structural information. The recent advances in two-dimensional solution-state NMR techniques for structural analysis of lignin in isolated and whole cell wall states (in situ, as well as their applications are reviewed.

  16. Training Course of Experimental Chemistry in the Nuclear Fuel Cycle: Solid State and Solution Chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ju hyeong; Park, Kwangheon; Kim, Tae hoon; Park, Hyoung gyu; Kim, Jisu [Kyunghee University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Song, Hyuk jin [Dongguk University, Gyeongju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Chan ki; Kang, Do kyu; Jeong, Hyeon jun [UNIST, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    In this experimental study program in Tohoku University, basic experiments were done by the participants. First one is the hydrogen reduction experiment of the mixture of UO{sub 2} and ZrO{sub 2}. Second one is to observe microscopic structure of solid solution of UO{sub 2} and ZrO{sub 2} using SEM/EDX and XRD system, simulated fuel debris. Third one is milking process of {sup 239}Np from {sup 243}Am by solvent extraction using Tri-n-Octylamine (TOA). Last one is solvent extraction in PUREX by the simulated mixed aqueous solution of U, {sup 85}Sr and {sup 239}Np which is represented minor actinide elements included in the spent nuclear fuel. Uranium is separated from aqueous phase to organic phase during solvent extraction procedure using TBP and dodecane. Also, neptunium can be extracted to organic phase as nitric acid concentration change. The extraction behavior of neptunium is different by oxidation state in aqueous phase. The behavior of neptunium is represented as a combined form of these oxidation states in experiment. Therefore, because the oxidation states of neptunium can be controlled by controlling the concentration of nitric acid, the extractability of neptunium can be controlled.

  17. Phosphorus-doped thin silica films characterized by magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, H.J.; Skibsted, J.; Kristensen, Martin

    2001-01-01

    Magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of 31P and 29Si have been achieved for a thin silica film doped with only 1.8% 31P and deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition on a pure silicon wafer. The observation of a symmetric 31P chemical shift tensor is consistent...

  18. Defective mitochondrial function in vivo in skeletal muscle in adults with Down's syndrome: a 31P-MRS study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander C Phillips

    Full Text Available Down's syndrome (DS is a developmental disorder associated with intellectual disability (ID. We have previously shown that people with DS engage in very low levels of exercise compared to people with ID not due to DS. Many aspects of the DS phenotype, such as dementia, low activity levels and poor muscle tone, are shared with disorders of mitochondrial origin, and mitochondrial dysfunction has been demonstrated in cultured DS tissue. We undertook a phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((31P-MRS study in the quadriceps muscle of 14 people with DS and 11 non-DS ID controls to investigate the post-exercise resynthesis kinetics of phosphocreatine (PCr, which relies on mitochondrial respiratory function and yields a measure of muscle mitochondrial function in vivo. We found that the PCr recovery rate constant was significantly decreased in adults with DS compared to non-DS ID controls (1.7 ± 0.1 min(-1 vs 2.1 ± 0.1 min(-1 respectively who were matched for physical activity levels, indicating that muscle mitochondrial function in vivo is impaired in DS. This is the first study to investigate mitochondrial function in vivo in DS using (31P-MRS. Our study is consistent with previous in vitro studies, supporting a theory of a global mitochondrial defect in DS.

  19. Non-invasive determination of metabolite concentrations in human transplanted kidney in vivo by 31P MR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kugel, H.; Wittsack, H.J.; Wenzel, F.; Heindel, W.; Lackner, K.; Stippel, D.

    2000-01-01

    To investigate concentrations of phosphorus-containing metabolites in human transplanted kidney in vivo by quantitative 31 P MR spectroscopy (MRS) using surface coils and to compare the obtained values with previous data. Material and Methods: In 5 patients with well-functioning transplanted kidneys, 31 P spectra were obtained with the three-dimensional localization image-selected in vivo spectroscopy technique applying a protocol for quantitative spectroscopy using surface coils. Relaxation corrected signal intensities determined by time domain fitting were used to derive absolute molar concentrations for phosphate-containing metabolites. Results: Little or no phosphocreatine in all spectra verified the absence of muscle contamination, confirming proper volume localization. The mean concentrations in the transplanted kidneys were as follows: ATP 1.60±0.26 mmol/l, PDE 2.14±0.91 mmol/l, Pi 0.66±0.25 mmol/l, PME 2.32±0.50 mmol/l. These values are consistent with previously reported values determined by other techniques. Conclusion: The non-invasive determination of absolute metabolite concentrations in human kidney using MRS supplements the use of signal intensity ratios to detect pathologic changes in the energy metabolism of transplanted kidneys

  20. 31P NMR examination of a case of progressive external ophthalmoplegia with focal cytochrome c oxidase deficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okazawa, Hitoshi; Sakuta, Manabu; Kawai, Mitsuru; Itoh, Masamitsu; Motoyoshi, Yasufumi.

    1988-01-01

    A 30-year-old man of histochemically confirmed focal cytochrome c oxidase deficiency (FCCOD) with chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia and mild weakness of upper extremities was examined by 31 P NMR spectroscopy using whole body MR. The activities of enzymes of respiratory chain ; complex I-III, complex II-III and complex IV, in mitochondrial fraction of biopsied muscle were all normal. At rest, the ratio of phosphocreatine (PCr) to inorganic phosphate (Pi) was normal value of 7.0. After the exercise of 90 watt for 3 minutes using ergometer, PCr/Pi ratio dropped to 2.6 and the recovery of the ratio prolonged for 8 minutes. We could not decide cytoplasmic pH because the peak of Pi at rest was relatively obscure. These results confirmed the existance of impairment of ATP production in our case, though the decreased activities of enzymes could not be shown by the biochemical analysis. We would like to stress the diagnostic importance of 31 P NMR spectroscopy in mitochondrial cytopathy whose chemical abnormalities are not always easy to find out. (author)

  1. Noninvasive measurements of cardiac high-energy phosphate metabolites in dilated cardiomyopathy by using 31P spectroscopic chemical shift imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansch, A.; Rzanny, R.; Heyne, J.-P.; Reichenbach, J.R.; Kaiser, W.A.; Leder, U.

    2005-01-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is accompanied by an impaired cardiac energy metabolism. The aim of this study was to investigate metabolic ratios in patients with DCM compared to controls by using spectroscopic two-dimensional chemical shift imaging (2D-CSI). Twenty volunteers and 15 patients with severe symptoms (left ventricular ejection fraction, LVEF 30%) of DCM were investigated. Cardiac 31 P MR 2D-CSI measurements (voxel size: 40 x 40 x 100 mm 3 ) were performed with a 1.5 T whole-body scanner. Measurement time ranged from 15 min to 30 min. Peak areas and ratios of different metabolites were evaluated, including high-energy phosphates (PCr, ATP), 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (2,3-DPG) and phosphodiesters (PDE). In addition, we evaluated how PCr/ATP ratios correlate with LVEF as an established prognostic factor of heart failure. The PCr/γ-ATP ratio was significantly decreased in patients with moderate and severe DCM and showed a linear correlation with reduced LVEFs. PDE/ATP ratios were significantly increased only in patients with severe DCM as compared to volunteers. Applying 31 P MRS with commonly-available 2D-CSI sequences is a valuable technique to evaluate DCM by determining PCr/ATP ratios noninvasively. In addition to reduced PCr/ATP ratios observed in patients suffering from DCM, significantly-increased PDE/ATP ratios were found in patients with severe DCM. (orig.)

  2. 2D {sup 31}P solid state NMR spectroscopy, electronic structure and thermochemistry of PbP{sub 7}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benndorf, Christopher [Institut für Anorganische und Analytische Chemie, Universität Münster, Corrensstraße 30, 48149 Münster (Germany); Institut für Physikalische Chemie, Universität Münster, Corrensstraße 30, 48149 Münster (Germany); Hohmann, Andrea; Schmidt, Peer [Brandenburgische Technische Universität Cottbus-Senftenberg, Fakultät für Naturwissenschaften, Postfach 101548, 01958 Senftenberg (Germany); Eckert, Hellmut, E-mail: eckerth@uni-muenster.de [Institut für Physikalische Chemie, Universität Münster, Corrensstraße 30, 48149 Münster (Germany); Instituto de Física de Sao Carlos, Universidade de Sao Paulo, CEP 369, Sao Carlos, SP 13560-590 (Brazil); Johrendt, Dirk [Department Chemie, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, Butenandtstraße 5-13, D-81377 München (Germany); and others

    2016-03-15

    Phase pure polycrystalline PbP{sub 7} was prepared from the elements via a lead flux. Crystalline pieces with edge-lengths up to 1 mm were obtained. The assignment of the previously published {sup 31}P solid state NMR spectrum to the seven distinct crystallographic sites was accomplished by radio-frequency driven dipolar recoupling (RFDR) experiments. As commonly found in other solid polyphosphides there is no obvious correlation between the {sup 31}P chemical shift and structural parameters. PbP{sub 7} decomposes incongruently under release of phosphorus forming liquid lead as remainder. The thermal decomposition starts at T>550 K with a vapor pressure almost similar to that of red phosphorus. Electronic structure calculations reveal PbP{sub 7} as a semiconductor according to the Zintl description and clearly shows the stereo-active Pb-6s{sup 2} lone pairs in the electron localization function ELF. - Graphical abstract: Coordination of the lead atoms in PbP{sub 7}.

  3. Biochemical metabolic changes assessed by 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy after radiation-induced hepatic injury in rabbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ri-Sheng; Hao, Liang; Dong, Fei; Mao, Jian-Shan; Sun, Jian-Zhong; Chen, Ying; Lin, Min; Wang, Zhi-Kang; Ding, Wen-Hong

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To compare the features of biochemical metabolic changes detected by hepatic phosphorus-31 magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P MRS) with the liver damage score (LDS) and pathologic changes in rabbits and to investigate the diagnostic value of 31P MRS in acute hepatic radiation injury. METHODS: A total of 30 rabbits received different radiation doses (ranging 5-20 Gy) to establish acute hepatic injury models. Blood biochemical tests, 31P MRS and pathological examinations were carried out 24 h after irradiation. The degree of injury was evaluated according to LDS and pathology. Ten healthy rabbits served as controls. The MR examination was performed on a 1.5 T imager using a 1H/31P surface coil by the 2D chemical shift imaging technique. The relative quantities of phosphomonoesters (PME), phosphodiesters (PDE), inorganic phosphate (Pi) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) were measured. The data were statistically analyzed. RESULTS: (1) Relative quantification of phosphorus metabolites: (a) ATP: there were significant differences (P < 0.05) (LDS-groups: control group vs mild group vs moderate group vs severe group, 1.83 ± 0.33 vs 1.55 ± 0.24 vs 1.27 ± 0.09 vs 0.98 ± 0.18; pathological groups: control group vs mild group vs moderate group vs severe group, 1.83 ± 0.33 vs 1.58 ± 0.25 vs 1.32 ± 0.07 vs 1.02 ± 0.18) of ATP relative quantification among control group, mild injured group, moderate injured group, and severe injured group according to both LDS grading and pathological grading, respectively, and it decreased progressively with the increased degree of injury (r = -0.723, P = 0.000). (b) PME and Pi; the relative quantification of PME and Pi decreased significantly in the severe injured group, and the difference between the control group and severe injured group was significant (P < 0.05) (PME: LDS-control group vs LDS-severe group, 0.86 ± 0.23 vs 0.58 ± 0.22, P = 0.031; pathological control group vs pathological severe group, 0.86 ± 0.23 vs 0.60

  4. Studies of vanadium-phosphorus-oxygen selective oxidation catalysts by sup 31 P and sup 51 V NMR spin-echo and volume susceptibility measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Juan.

    1991-10-01

    The purpose of this work is to characterize the vanadium-phosphorous oxide (V-P-O) catalysts for the selective oxidation of n-butane and 1-butene to maleic anhydride. The utility of solid state nuclear magnetic resonance as an analytical tool in this investigation lies in its sensitivity to the electronic environment surrounding the phosphorous and vanadium nuclei, and proximity of paramagnetic species. Spin-echo mapping NMR of {sup 31}p and {sup 51}v and volume magnetic susceptibility measurements were used as local microscopic probes of the presence of V{sup 5+}, V{sup 4+}, V{sup 3+} species in the model compounds: {beta}-VOPO{sub 4}, {beta}-VOPO{sub 4} treated with n-butane/1-butene, (VO){sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 7} treated with n-butane/1-butene; and industrial catalysts with P/V (phosphorus to vanadium) ratio of 0.9, 1.0 and 1.1, before and after treatment with n-butane and 1-butene. The NMR spectra provide a picture of how the oxidation states of vanadium are distributed in these catalysts. 73 refs., 32 figs., 8 tabs.

  5. Intra- and extracellular pH of the brain in vivo studied by 31P-NMR during hyper- and hypocapnia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Portman, M A; Lassen, N A; Cooper, T G

    1991-01-01

    Studies were performed to determine the pH relationships among the extracellular, intracellular, and arterial blood compartments in the brain in vivo. Resolution of the extracellular monophosphate resonance peak from the intracellular peak in 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of sheep...... brain with the calvarium intact enabled pH measurement in these respective compartments. Sheep were then subjected to both hyper- and hypoventilation, which resulted in a wide range of arterial PCO2 and pH values. Linear regression analysis of pH in these compartments yielded slopes of 0.56 +/- 0.......05 for extracellular pH (pHe) vs. arterial pH, 0.43 +/- 0.078 for intracellular pH (pHi) vs. pHe, and 0.23 +/- 0.056 for pHi vs. arterial pH. These data indicate that CO2 buffering capacity is different and decreases from the intracellular to extracellular to arterial blood compartments. Separation...

  6. Importance of the 31-p-nmr-spectroscopy for prediction and early detection of coronary heart disease in patients with diabetes mellitus type I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinboeck, P.

    2001-06-01

    Microvascular abnormalities and dysfunction via thickening of the basement membrane are known to occur in diabetic patients. Myocardial high energy phosphates have been shown to be reduced by ischemia and alterations of the cardiac metabolism are the primary consequence of myocardial ischemia. The present study involved 30 male patients with diabetes mellitus type I and 36 healthy male volunteers as age-matched controls. Phosphorus-31-P-nuclear-magnetic-resonance-spectroscopic-imaging of the heart was performed in all subjects using a 1.5 Tesla whole-body-magnetic-resonance-scanner. The ratios of phosphocreatinine (PCr) to adenosine-triphosphate (ATP) were calculated. Moreover, echocardiographic evaluation and stress tests were performed in all individuals. The myocardium of patients with diabetes mellitus type I showed significantly decreased ratios of PCr/ATP compared with healthy controls. This study demonstrates for the first time a decreased ratio of PCr/ATP in the myocardium of patients with diabetes mellitus type I without a known history of coronary heart disease. (author)

  7. Effects of hypo- und hyperthyroidism on skeletal muscle metabolism. A sup 31 P magnetic resonance spectroscopy study. Einfluss von Hyper- und Hypothyreose auf den Energiestoffwechsel der Skelettmuskulatur. Eine Untersuchung mit sup 31 P-Kernspinspektroskopie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moka, D.; Theissen, P.; Linden, A.; Waters, W.; Schicha, H. (Koeln Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin)

    1991-06-01

    {sup 31}P magnetic resonance spectroscopy allows non-invasive evaluation of phosphorus metabolism in man. The purpose of the present study was to assess the influence of hyper- and hypothyroidism on the metabolism of resting human skeletal muscle. The present data show that quantitative measurement of phosphate metabolism by NMR is possible as also demonstrated by other studies. Using a quantitative evaluation method with an external standard, significant differences in the levels of phosphocreatine, adenosintriphosphate, and phosphodiesters were found. In hypothyroid patients a TSH-dependent increase in phosphodiesters and a decrease in adenosintriphosphate and phosphocreatine was observed. In hyperthyroidism a similar decrease in adenosintriphosphate but a considerably higher decrease in phosphocreatine occurred. In the light of the results of other studies of muscle matabolism, these changes appear to be non-specific so that further studies are required to assess the clinical value of such measurements. (orig.).

  8. Determination of boron in aqueous solutions by solid state nuclear track detectors technique, using a filtered neutron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moraes, M.A.P.V. de; Pugliesi, R.; Khouri, M.T.F.C.

    1985-11-01

    The solid state nuclear track detectors technique has been used for determination of boron in aqueous solutions, using a filtered neutron beam. The particles tracks from the 10 B(n,α)Li 7 reaction were registered in the CR-39 film, chemically etched in a (30%) KOH solution 70 0 C during 90 minutes. The obtained results showed the usefulness of this technique for boron determination in the ppm range. The inferior detectable limit was 9 ppm. The combined track registration efficiency factor K has been evaluated in the solutions, for the CR-39 detector and its values is K= (4,60 - + 0,06). 10 -4 cm. (Author) [pt

  9. Study On Analytical Methods Of Tellurium Content In Natriiodide (Na131I) Radiopharmaceutical Solution Produced In The Dalat Nuclear Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vo Thi Cam Hoa; Duong Van Dong; Nguyen Thi Thu; Chu Van Khoa

    2007-01-01

    This report describes the practical methods for analyzing of Tellurium content in Na 131 I solution produced at the Dalat Nuclear Research Institute. We studied analytical methods to control Tellurium content in final Na 131 I solution product used in medical purposes by three methods such as: spot test, gamma spectrometric and spectrophotometric methods. These investigation results are shown that the spot test method is suitable for controlling Tellurium trace in the final product. This spot test can be determinate Tellurium trace less than 10 ppm and are used to quality control of Na 131 I solution using in medical application. (author)

  10. A method for recovering and separating palladium, technetium, rhodium and ruthenium contained in solutions resulting from nuclear fuel recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, R.H.

    1974-01-01

    The invention relates to a method for recovering and separating technetium and metals of the platinum group, i.e. palladium, rhodium and ruthenium existing as fission products. The method according to the invention is characterized by contacting a residuary acid aqueous solution provided by nuclear fuel recycling with successive carbon beds which have adsorbed different chelating agents specific for the metals to be recovered in order that said metals be selectively chelated and extracted from the solution. This method is suitable for recovering the above metals from solutions provided by reprocessing spent fuels [fr

  11. 78 FR 29158 - In the Matter of Zion Solutions, LLC; Zion Nuclear Power Station, Units 1 and 2; Order Approving...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-17

    ... and DPR-48] In the Matter of Zion Solutions, LLC; Zion Nuclear Power Station, Units 1 and 2; Order... formed for the purpose of acquiring ES, Inc. and is held by certain investment fund entities organized by... Environmental Management Programs, in writing, of such receipt no later than one (1) business day prior to the...

  12. Modeling Solute Thermokinetics in LiCI-KCI Molten Salt for Nuclear Waste Separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan, Dane; Eapen, Jacob

    2013-10-01

    Recovery of actinides is an integral part of a closed nuclear fuel cycle. Pyrometallurgical nuclear fuel recycling processes have been developed in the past for recovering actinides from spent metallic and nitride fuels. The process is essentially to dissolve the spent fuel in a molten salt and then extract just the actinides for reuse in a reactor. Extraction is typically done through electrorefining, which involves electrochemical reduction of the dissolved actinides and plating onto a cathode. Knowledge of a number of basic thermokinetic properties of salts and salt-fuel mixtures is necessary for optimizing present and developing new approaches for pyrometallurgical waste processing. The properties of salt-fuel mixtures are presently being studied, but there are so many solutes and varying concentrations that direct experimental investigation is prohibitively time consuming and expensive (particularly for radioactive elements like Pu). Therefore, there is a need to reduce the number of required experiments through modeling of salt and salt-fuel mixture properties. This project will develop first-principles-based molecular modeling and simulation approaches to predict fundamental thermokinetic properties of dissolved actinides and fission products in molten salts. The focus of the proposed work is on property changes with higher concentrations (up to 5 mol%) of dissolved fuel components, where there is still very limited experimental data. The properties predicted with the modeling will be density, which is used to assess the amount of dissolved material in the salt; diffusion coefficients, which can control rates of material transport during separation; and solute activity, which determines total solubility and reduction potentials used during electrorefining. The work will focus on La, Sr, and U, which are chosen to include the important distinct categories of lanthanides, alkali earths, and actinides, respectively. Studies will be performed using LiCl-KCl salt

  13. The nuclear in debate: don't we have time to develop acceptable solutions?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The contributions discuss different issues related to the future of nuclear energy: the nuclear energy in the long term, the possible new options for the fuel cycle, the relationship between nuclear energy and greenhouse effect according to scenarios for the period 2010-2020, how to avoid the nuclear energy technology decline, the way out from nuclear in Germany, and the world electricity production market trends

  14. The value of MRI and 31P MRS in differential diagnosis of bone and soft tissue tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Hongwei; Yang Zhenzhen; Li Chuanting; Lv Yubo

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To explore the value of MRI and 31 P MRS in differential diagnosis of bone and soft tissue tumors. Methods: MRI and 31 P MRS were performed in 35 bone and soft tissue tumor patients and 16 healthy volunteers at 1.5 T. The areas under the peak of various metabolite in spectra were measured. The spectra were analyzed by taking peak areas relative to peak area of β-ATP and by calculating the pH from the Pi shift relative to PCr. Results: The differences of the size, signal intensity homogeneity, border and involvement of surround structure between benign and malignant lesions had no statistically significant differences (P>0.05). There was great overlap in the MR imaging characteristics of benign and malignant lesions. The mean peak area rations of PME/β-ATP, PDE/β-ATP, LEP/β-ATP, PCr/β-ATP, intracellular pH in control group were 0.33±0.21, 0.64±0.27, 1.62±0.67, 3.12±0.78, 7.08±0.16. The mean peak area rations of PME/β-ATP, PDE/β-ATP, LEP/β-ATP, PCr/β-ATP, intracellular pH in benign group were 0.55±0.31, 0.81±0.31, 2.03±0.87, 1.65±0.65, 7.18±0.23. The mean peak area rations of PME/β-ATP, PDE/β-ATP, LEP/β-ATP, PCr/β-ATP, intracellular pH in malignant group were 1.73±0.40, 1.73±0.45, 4.31±1.18, 1.44±0.54, 7.32±0.29. Compared with control group, the mean peak area rations of PME/β-ATP (P 0.05). The mean peak area rations of PME/β-ATP, PDE/β-ATP,LEP/β-ATP in malignant group were significantly higher than that in benign group (P 0.05). If we set a standard at 1.8 time of the mean of the PME/β-ATP ration in the benign group, then the sensitivity of this discrimination for diagnosing a malignancy was 88.89% and the specificity was 94.12%. Conclusion: 31 P MRS has important value in diagnosis and differential diagnosis of bone and soft tissue tumors. It should be a simple, non-invasively, effective diagnostic method. (authors)

  15. Optimization of the test intervals of a nuclear safety system by genetic algorithms, solution clustering and fuzzy preference assignment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zio, E.; Bazzo, R.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, a procedure is developed for identifying a number of representative solutions manageable for decision-making in a multiobjective optimization problem concerning the test intervals of the components of a safety system of a nuclear power plant. Pareto Front solutions are identified by a genetic algorithm and then clustered by subtractive clustering into 'families'. On the basis of the decision maker's preferences, each family is then synthetically represented by a 'head of the family' solution. This is done by introducing a scoring system that ranks the solutions with respect to the different objectives: a fuzzy preference assignment is employed to this purpose. Level Diagrams are then used to represent, analyze and interpret the Pareto Fronts reduced to the head-of-the-family solutions

  16. 1H and 31P resonance assignments and secondary structure of hairpin conformer of IA mismatched oligonucleotide d-GGTACIAGTACC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chary, K.V.R.; Rastogi, V.K.; Govil, Girjesh

    1994-01-01

    Almost complete 1 H and 31 P resonance assignments of two coexisting conformers, duplex and an hairpin, of d-GGTACIAGTACC at 1.25mM concentration and 305 K have been achieved. The results demonstrate that the hairpin conformer has a structure with two purines I6 and A7 forming a two-base loop on a B-DNA stem. Stacking is continued on the 5'-side of the loop, with the I6 stacked upon C5. The base A7, on the 3'-side of the loop stacks partially with I6. The glycosidic angle for G8 is in the anti domain and it maintains normal Watson-Crick base-pairing with the opposite C5. (author). 28 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  17. 31P NMR measurements of the ADP concentration in yeast cells genetically modified to express creatine kinase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brindle, K.; Braddock, P.; Fulton, S.

    1990-01-01

    Rabbit muscle creatine kinase has been introduced into the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae by transforming cells with a multicopy plasmid containing the coding sequence for the enzyme under the control of the yeast phosphoglycerate kinase promoter. The transformed cells showed creating kinase activities similar to those found in mammalian heart muscle. 31 P NMR measurements of the near-equilibrium concentrations of phosphocreatine and cellular pH together with measurements of the total extractable concentrations of phosphocreatine and creatine allowed calculation of the free ADP/ATP ratio in the cell. The calculated ratio of approximately 2 was considerably higher than the ratio of between 0.06 and 0.1 measured directly in cell extracts

  18. AREVA advanced safety IC solutions and licensing experience for new nuclear builds and modernization projects - 15545

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fourestie, B.; Pickelmann, J.; Richter, S.; Hilsenkopf, P.; Paris, P.

    2015-01-01

    Regulatory requirements for the Instrumentation and Control (IC) for Nuclear Power Plants have become significantly more stringent during the last 10 years in the areas of software development and qualification, traceability, diversity, or seismic requirements for instance, and with the introduction of new standards (such as the IEC 62566, or the IEC 62003). Based on a large and comprehensive experience gained from projects in several regulatory environments and different plant types (including non-OEM plants), AREVA has developed and adapted its processes and products to provide state-of-the-art IC solutions in full compliance with the regulatory demands and requirements in terms of robustness (independence, defense-in-depth, diversity and cyber-security). In this paper we present the safety IC platforms developed by AREVA. These platforms include TELEPERM XS as the computerized safety IC platform for class 1 system implementation, the Qualified Display System (QDS) for safety classified screen-based interface, and UNICORN as fully diverse analog safety IC platform for backup systems

  19. Numerical solutions of the aerosol general dynamic equation for nuclear reactor safety studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, J.W.

    1988-01-01

    Methods and approximations inherent in modeling of aerosol dynamics and evolution for nuclear reactor source term estimation have been investigated. Several aerosol evolution problems are considered to assess numerical methods of solving the aerosol dynamic equation. A new condensational growth model is constructed by generalizing Mason's formula to arbitrary particle sizes, and arbitrary accommodation of the condensing vapor and background gas at particle surface. Analytical solution is developed for the aerosol growth equation employing the new condensation model. The space-dependent aerosol dynamic equation is solved to assess implications of spatial homogenization of aerosol distributions. The results of our findings are as follows. The sectional method solving the aerosol dynamic equation is quite efficient in modeling of coagulation problems, but should be improved for simulation of strong condensation problems. The J-space transform method is accurate in modeling of condensation problems, but is very slow. For the situation considered, the new condensation model predicts slower aerosol growth than the corresponding isothermal model as well as Mason's model, the effect of partial accommodation is considerable on the particle evolution, and the effect of the energy accommodation coefficient is more pronounced than that of the mass accommodation coefficient. For the initial conditions considered, the space-dependent aerosol dynamics leads to results that are substantially different from those based on the spatially homogeneous aerosol dynamic equation

  20. Dynamic 31P-MR-spectroscopy of the quadriceps muscle. Influence of sex and age on spectroscopic results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schunk, K.; Romaneehsen, B.; Kessler, S.; Schadmand-Fischer, S.; Thelen, M.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: 31 P-MRS is used to assess the influence of sex and age on quadriceps muscle metabolism before and after exercise. Materials and Methods: 32 healthy volunteers (15 women, 17 men; mean age: 38±17 yrs.) were examined by dynamic phosphorus-31 ( 31 P) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). In the magnet, the quadriceps muscle was stressed by an isometric and an isotonic form of exercise until exhaustion, respectively. Results: Resting conditions: With increasing subjects' age, the ratio β-adenosine triphosphate/total phosphate decreased (r=-0.37; p=0.02). With increasing subjects' age, the ratios inorganic phosphate/phosphocreatine (r=0.79; p=5x10 -8 ), phosphomonoester/β-adenosine triphosphate (r=0.74; p=10 -6 ) and phosphodiester/β-adenosine triphosphate (r=0.62; p=10 -4 ) increased. The pH was the only one of the evaluated spectroscopic parameters which showed a sex-dependence: Female subjects had a significantly lower pH (7.03±0.02) than male subjects (7.05±0.03; p=0,01). Exercise: With increasing age, the maxima of inorganic phosphate/phosphocreatine were less extreme during both of the exercises (r=-0.42; p=0.0005). Likewise, the exercise-induced acidosis was less severe with increasing age (r=0.53; p=6x10 -6 ). After the end of the exercise, the times of half recovery of inorganic phosphate/phosphocreatine and the pH correlated neither with the subjects' age nor with sex or cross-sectional area of the quadriceps muscle. Conclusion: Sex and age of volunteers affect spectroscopic results. This influence has to be considered in the interpretation of spectroscopic studies. (orig.) [de

  1. Nuclear Energy - a Part of a Solution to Generate Electric Power in Croatia?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikulicic, V.; Simic, Z.

    1998-01-01

    The growth in Croatian energy, particularly electricity, demand together with growing environmental considerations is such that Croatia needs to have flexibility to respond, by having the option of expanding the nuclear sector. This paper deals with nuclear energy as an option for sustainable Croatian economic development, and with the nuclear power controversy. The conclusion is that there is a necessity for extended use of nuclear energy in Croatia. Most certainly the nuclear technology can provide the energy necessary to sustain progress and, as a country without coal, Croatia should favour nuclear power utilisation as the lowest cost option for base-load electricity generation. (author)

  2. 31P NMR saturation-transfer measurements in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: characterization of phosphate exchange reactions by iodoacetate and antimycin A inhibition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell-Burk, S.L.; Jones, K.A.; Shulman, R.G.

    1987-01-01

    31 P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) saturation-transfer (ST) techniques have been used to measure steady-state flows through phosphate-adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) exchange reactions in glucose-grown derepressed yeast. The results have revealed that the reactions catalyzed by glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase/phosphoglycerate kinase (GAPDH/PGK) and by the mitochondrial ATPase contribute to the observed ST. Contributions from these reactions were evaluated by performing ST studies under various metabolic conditions in the presence and absence of either iodoacetate, a specific inhibitor of GAPDH, or the respiratory chain inhibitor antimycin A. Intracellular phosphate (P/sub i/) longitudinal relaxation times were determined by performing inversion recovery experiments during steady-state ATP/sub λ/ saturation and were used in combination with ST data to determine P/sub i/ consumption rates. 13 C NMR and O 2 electrode measurements were also conducted to monitor changes in rates of glucose consumption and O 2 consumption, respectively, under the various metabolic conditions examined. The results suggest that GAPDH/PGK-catalyzed P/sub i/-ATP exchange is responsible for antimycin-resistant saturation transfer observed in anaerobic and aerobic glucose-fed yeast. Kinetics through GAPDH/PGK were found to depend on metabolic conditions. The coupled system appears to operate in a unidirectional manner during anaerobic glucose metabolism and bidirectionally when the cells are respiring on exogenously supplied ethanol. Additionally, mitochondrial ATPase activity appears to be responsible for the transfer observed in iodoacetate-treated aerobic cells supplied with either glucose or ethanol, with synthesis of ATP occurring unidirectionally

  3. Solution of the Lambda modes problem of a nuclear power reactor using an h–p finite element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vidal-Ferrandiz, A.; Fayez, R.; Ginestar, D.; Verdú, G.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • An hp finite element method is proposed for the Lambda modes problem of a nuclear reactor. • Different strategies can be implemented for increasing the accuracy of the solutions. • 2D and 3D benchmarks have been studied obtaining accurate results. - Abstract: Lambda modes of a nuclear power reactor have interest in reactor physics since they have been used to develop modal methods and to study BWR reactor instabilities. An h–p-Adaptation finite element method has been implemented to compute the dominant modes the fundamental mode and the next subcritical modes of a nuclear reactor. The performance of this method has been studied in three benchmark problems, a homogeneous 2D reactor, the 2D BIBLIS reactor and the 3D IAEA reactor

  4. 31P NMR study of the interaction of inorganic phosphate with bovine copper-zinc superoxide dismutase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    de Freitas, D.M.; Luchinat, C.; Banci, L.; Bertini, I.; Valentine, J.S.

    1987-01-01

    Paramagnetic effect of 31 P phosphate resonances caused by Cu(II) ions in native and phenylglyoxal-modified bovine Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase have been used to monitor the interaction of phosphate with these proteins. T 2 values are found to be 70 times smaller than T 1 , indicating that some mechanisms, as yet undefined, contribute to the line width. Using T 1 measurements, it was determined that the affinity constants for phosphate binding to the native protein are 20 +/- 4 and 34 +/- 3 M -1 at pH 8.0 and 7.0 respectively, and that the Cu(II)-phosphate distance 5.3 A. At pH 6.3, two binding sites are observed, one at a distance >7 A with an affinity constant >100 M -1 and another at approximately 5 A with an affinity constant of 10 M -1 . Modification of the protein with phenylglyoxal causes the affinity of phosphate for the same sites to decrease by a factor of 3 at pH 6.3. These results indicate that phosphate does not bind directly to Cu(II) but to a site close by. It was concluded that the site of phosphate binding is Arg-141, which in known from X-ray structural evidence to be located approximately 5 Angstrom form the copper center. 26 references, 4 figures

  5. {sup 1}H and {sup 31}P magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging of white matter signal hyperintensity areas in elderly subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Constans, J M [Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center and University of California Magnetic Resonance Unit, San Francisco, CA (United States); [California Univ., San Francisco, CA (United States). Dept. of Radiology; Meyerhoff, D J [Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center and University of California Magnetic Resonance Unit, San Francisco, CA (United States); [California Univ., San Francisco, CA (United States). Dept. of Radiology; Norman, D [California Univ., San Francisco, CA (United States). Dept. of Radiology; Fein, G [Department of Veterans Affairs Psychiatry Service, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States); [University of California, San Francisco, CA (United States). Dept. of Psychiatry; Weiner, M W [Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center and University of California Magnetic Resonance Unit, San Francisco, CA (United States); [California Univ., San Francisco, CA (United States). Dept. of Radiology; [California Univ., San Francisco, CA (United States). Dept. of Medicine; [DVA Medical Center, Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Unit, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1995-11-01

    White matter signal hyperintensities (WMSH) are commonly seen on MRI of elderly subjects. The purpose of this study was to characterize metabolic changes in the white matter of elderly subjects with extensive WMSH. We used water-suppressed proton ({sup 1}H) magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) to compare six subjects with extensive WMSH with eight age-matched elderly subjects with minimal or absent WMSH, and phosphorus ({sup 31}P) MRSI to compare nine subjects with extensive WMSH and seven age-matched elderly subjects without extensive WMSH. Relative to region-matched tissue in elderly controls, extensive WMSH were associated with increased signal from choline-containing metabolites, no significant change of signal from N-acetylaspartate, and a trend to a decreased phosphomonoester (PME) resonance. These findings suggest that WMSH may be associated with an alteration of brain myelin phospholipids in the absence of axonal damage. There were no differences in energy phosphates, consistent with lack of ongoing brain ischemia. Within the group with extensive WMSH, PME resonance measures were significantly lower in WMSH than in contralateral normal-appearing white matter. These results provide information on pathophysiology of WMSH and a basis for comparison with WMSH in Alzheimer`s disease, vascular dementia, multiple sclerosis, and other diseases. (orig.). With 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  6. Spectroscopic quantification of soil phosphorus forms by {sup 31}P-NMR after nine years of organic or mineral fertilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gatiboni, Luciano Colpo, E-mail: gatiboni@cav.udesc.br [Universidade Estadual de Santa Catarina (UDESC), Lages, SC (Brazil); Brunetto, Gustavo; Rheinheimer, Danilo dos Santos; Kaminski, Joao; Flores, Alex Fabiani Claro; Lima, Maria Angelica Silveira; Girotto, Eduardo; Copetti, Andre Carlos Cruz, E-mail: danilo.rheinheimer@pq.cnpq.br, E-mail: joao.kaminski@gmail.com, E-mail: acflores@quimica.ufsm.br, E-mail: masl32003@gmail.com, E-mail: girottosolos@gmail.com, E-mail: andrecopetti@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Federal de Santa Maria (UFSM), RS (Brazil); Pandolfo, Carla Maria; Veiga, Milton, E-mail: pandolfo@epagri.sc.gov.br, E-mail: milveiga@epagri.sc.gov.br [Empresa de Pesquisa Agropecuaria e Extensao Rural de Santa Catarina (EPAGRI), Campos Novos, SC (Brazil)

    2013-05-15

    Long-standing applications of mineral fertilizers or types of organic wastes such as manure can cause phosphorus (P) accumulation and changes in the accumulated P forms in the soil. The objective of this research was to evaluate the forms of P accumulated in soils treated with mineral fertilizer or different types of manure in a long-term experiment. Soil was sampled from the 0-5 cm layer of plots fertilized with five different nutrient sources for nine years: 1) control without fertilizer; 2) mineral fertilizer at recommended rates for local conditions; 3) 5 t ha{sup -1} year{sup -1} of moist poultry litter; 4) 60 m{sup 3} ha{sup -1} year{sup -1} of liquid cattle manure and 5) 40 m{sup 3} ha{sup -1} year{sup -1} of liquid swine manure. The {sup 31}P-NMR spectra of soil extracts detected the following P compounds: orthophosphate, pyrophosphate, inositol phosphate, glycerophosphate, and DNA. The use of organic or mineral fertilizer over nine years did not change the soil P forms but influenced their concentration. Fertilization with mineral or organic fertilizers stimulated P accumulation in inorganic forms. Highest inositol phosphate levels were observed after fertilization with any kind of manure and highest organic P concentration in glycerophosphate form in after mineral or no fertilization. (author)

  7. Action of iloprost and PGE1 on global ischemic and reperfused myocardium: a 31P-NMR-study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pissarek, M; Gründer, W; Keller, T; Goos, H; Mest, H J; Krause, E G

    1988-01-01

    The influence of iloprost, PGE1 and of the combined application of iloprost and PGE1 on high energy phosphate contents was investigated in isolated rat hearts perfused aerob at 37 degrees C in Langendorff mode. Changes in creatine phosphate, ATP and inorganic phosphate were registered during 20 minutes of global ischemia and 56 minutes of reperfusion with 31P-NMR-spectroscopic methods starting drug application prior to ischemia simultaneously with onset of heart perfusion. Most effective in preservation of high energy phosphates was the combined application of PGE1 and iloprost resulting in a creatine phosphate/inorganic phosphate ratio of 103.2 +/- 30.9% of pre-ischemia values compared to 52.5 +/- 6.1% in control group without drug application 0-5 minutes after onset of reperfusion, 148.8 +/- 24.8% vs 78.8 +/- 15.2% at 6-11 minutes of reperfusion and 116.6 +/- 16% vs 68.9 +/- 12.7% at 12-17 minutes of reperfusion. The same trend was observed employing ATP/inorganic phosphate ratio. The improved energy state in reperfused hearts following application of PGE1 and iloprost in combination is presumed to be supported by a reduction of the loss of high energy phosphates (HEP) during global ischemia and by a cytoprotective effect of iloprost immediately after starting reperfusion.

  8. Spectroscopic quantification of soil phosphorus forms by 31P-NMR after nine years of organic or mineral fertilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gatiboni, Luciano Colpo; Brunetto, Gustavo; Rheinheimer, Danilo dos Santos; Kaminski, Joao; Flores, Alex Fabiani Claro; Lima, Maria Angelica Silveira; Girotto, Eduardo; Copetti, Andre Carlos Cruz; Pandolfo, Carla Maria; Veiga, Milton

    2013-01-01

    Long-standing applications of mineral fertilizers or types of organic wastes such as manure can cause phosphorus (P) accumulation and changes in the accumulated P forms in the soil. The objective of this research was to evaluate the forms of P accumulated in soils treated with mineral fertilizer or different types of manure in a long-term experiment. Soil was sampled from the 0-5 cm layer of plots fertilized with five different nutrient sources for nine years: 1) control without fertilizer; 2) mineral fertilizer at recommended rates for local conditions; 3) 5 t ha -1 year -1 of moist poultry litter; 4) 60 m 3 ha -1 year -1 of liquid cattle manure and 5) 40 m 3 ha -1 year -1 of liquid swine manure. The 31 P-NMR spectra of soil extracts detected the following P compounds: orthophosphate, pyrophosphate, inositol phosphate, glycerophosphate, and DNA. The use of organic or mineral fertilizer over nine years did not change the soil P forms but influenced their concentration. Fertilization with mineral or organic fertilizers stimulated P accumulation in inorganic forms. Highest inositol phosphate levels were observed after fertilization with any kind of manure and highest organic P concentration in glycerophosphate form in after mineral or no fertilization. (author)

  9. 31P NMR saturation-transfer study of the in situ kinetics of the mitochondrial adenine nucleotide translocase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masiakos, P.T.; Williams, G.D.; Berkich, D.A.; Smith, M.B.; LaNoue, K.F.

    1991-01-01

    The exchange of intramitochondrial ATP (ATP in ) for extramitochondrial ATP (ATP out ) was measured by using 31 P NMR spectroscopy over a range of temperatures in isolated rat liver mitochondria oxidizing glutamate and succinate in the presence of external ATP but no added ADP (state 4). The rate of this exchange is more than an order of magnitude faster than rates reported previously that were determined by using isotopic techniques in the presence of oligomycin, the potent ATPase inhibitor. Differences are ascribed in part to the low levels of matrix ATP present in oligomycin-treated mitochondrial. Intramitochondrial ATP content regulates the rate of the ATP in /ATP out exchange. At 18C, the concentration of internal ATP that produces half-maximal transport rate is 6.6±0.12 nmol/mg of mitochondrial protein. The relationship between substrate concentration and flux is sigmoidal and is 90% saturated at 11.3±0.18 nmol/mg of mitochondrial protein. Since the measured rates of exchange of ATP in for ATP out are almost 10 times faster than the ATP synthase (ATP/P i ) exchange rates, the translocase cannot limit net ATP/P i exchange in state 4. It may, nonetheless, limit net synthesis of ATP under other conditions when matrix ATP concentration is lower than in state 4 and when external ADP is present at higher concentrations than in these experiments

  10. The effect of sodium bicarbonate on intracellular pH using {sup 31}P-MR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakashima, Kazuya; Kashiwagi, Shiro; Ito, Haruhide [Yamaguchi Univ., Ube (Japan). School of Medicine; Yamashita, Tetsuo; Kitahara, Tetsuhiro; Nakayama, Naoto; Saito, Kennichi

    1997-03-01

    This report deals with the effects of sodium bicarbonate on the intracellular pH of the brain and cerebral blood flow (CBF); five normal volunteers were studied. Intracellular pH and CBF were measured by phosphorus 31 magnetic resonance spectroscopy ({sup 31}P-MRS) and stable xenon computed tomography (Xe-CT), respectively. Each individual received 7% sodium bicarbonate (3.5 ml/kg body weight), infused intravenously over a 15-min period. Intracellular pH, CBF, and physiological parameters were determined before and after the injection. Intracellular pH was significantly decreased and CBF was increased. Among the physiological parameters, the hematocrit was significantly decreased and arterial pressure of carbon dioxide (PaCO{sub 2}), increased. These results suggest that increasing CO{sub 2} contributes to the decrease in intracellular pH. In conclusion, three factors increase CBF during the administration of sodium bicarbonate to humans: arterial dilatation in response to carbon dioxide; decrease of the hematocrit, and intracellular cerebral acidosis. (author)

  11. Detection and assignment of phosphoserine and phosphothreonine residues by {sup 13}C-{sup 31}P spin-echo difference NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McIntosh, Lawrence P., E-mail: mcintosh@chem.ubc.ca; Kang, Hyun-Seo; Okon, Mark [University of British Columbia, Department of Biochemistry (Canada); Nelson, Mary L.; Graves, Barbara J. [University of Utah, Department of Oncological Sciences, Huntsman Cancer Institute (United States); Brutscher, Bernhard [CNRS, CEA, UJF, Institut de Biologie Structurale Jean-Pierre Ebel (France)], E-mail: bernhard.brutscher@ibs.fr

    2009-01-15

    A simple NMR method is presented for the identification and assignment of phosphorylated serine and threonine residues in {sup 13}C- or {sup 13}C/{sup 15}N-labeled proteins. By exploiting modest ({approx}5 Hz) 2- and 3-bond {sup 13}C-{sup 31}P scalar couplings, the aliphatic {sup 1}H-{sup 13}C signals from phosphoserines and phosphothreonines can be detected selectively in a {sup 31}P spin-echo difference constant time {sup 1}H-{sup 13}C HSQC spectrum. Inclusion of the same {sup 31}P spin-echo element within the {sup 13}C frequency editing period of an intraHNCA or HN(CO)CA experiment allows identification of the amide {sup 1}H{sup N} and {sup 15}N signals of residues (i) for which {sup 13}C{sup {alpha}}(i) or {sup 13}C{sup {alpha}}(i - 1), respectively, are coupled to a phosphate. Furthermore, {sup 31}P resonance assignments can be obtained by applying selective low power cw {sup 31}P decoupling during the spin-echo period. The approach is demonstrated using a PNT domain containing fragment of the transcription factor Ets-1, phosphorylated in vitro at Thr38 and Ser41 with the MAP kinase ERK2.

  12. Nuclear accident response and population protection in The Netherlands: philosophy, solutions, and problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baas, J.L.; Bosnjakovic, B.F.M.

    1981-01-01

    The subject is dealt with under the headings: nuclear energy in the Netherlands; the philosophy underlying the existing organization of response to nuclear accidents and population protection; practical experiences and recent developments; dose estimates; data transmission and lines of communication; international cooperation. (U.K.)

  13. Finnish solution to increased basic professional training needs in nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kyrki-Ramaeki, R.; Koskinen, K.

    2008-01-01

    The Finnish nuclear energy organizations have in cooperation arranged basic professional training courses on nuclear safety due to fast increased education needs. Especially the new nuclear power plant construction project turned the situation acute, but there was also a need to preserve the tacit knowledge of many nuclear experts retiring within the next ten years. From 2003, the YK courses have been arranged five times with altogether 270 participants. The need of this kind of complementary education is still seen high in Finland, and the YK6 course is to be arranged during the next winter. There has not been seen to be legal incompetence due to the likelihood of bias in the education even that the participating organizations have differing and/or opposing roles. It is seen that a real safety culture presumes that nuclear safety is a common goal, and even the competition for market shares is no obstacle for cooperation. (authors)

  14. Study of the confined solutions properties: case of gel formed during nuclear glass alteration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matar-Briman, I.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we have investigated the thermodynamic properties, the structure and the dynamics of confined solutions in model gels and in a gel coming from glass alteration. The first step was to determine the structure and the dynamics of pure confined water in porous materials by using nuclear magnetic resonance and neutron scattering. Meso-porous silica was elaborated and grafted by sol-gel route to decrease the pore sizes from 2.7 to 2 nm and to modify pore surfaces to have Si-OH, Zr-OH and Al-OH. The second step involved determining the dynamics of water in leachate confined in the model gels and in the gel of altered glass by using neutron scattering. In the model gels and at a 10 -12 -10 -9 second timescale, two kinds of waters were highlighted: first, an interfacial water linked to the pore surfaces and second, a free water in the pore core. Their ratio depends on the pore size and pore surface composition. Whatever the pore surface, when the pore size decreases the free water ratio in the pore center also decreases. For pores smaller than 2.3 nm and pore surfaces with Zr-OH or Al-OH surfaces, water is strongly linked to the surface and few water molecules are mobile. This is due to the ability of alumina and zirconia to immobilize water molecules through chemical coordination bonds stronger than the physical bonds established between silica and water. The result also highlight that pore surface composition could be the predominant parameter affecting the fixed proton content. Moreover, the mobility of water confined in a leachate is not modified. The study of the water dynamics in a gel formed during alteration of glass constituted of SiO 2 , Al 2 O 3 and CaO, and having a porosity between 2 and 7 nm showed the same behavior as water confined in pores presenting an Al-OH surface. (author) [fr

  15. 31P NMR Spectroscopy Revealed Adenylate kinase-like Activity and Phosphotransferase-like Activity from F1-ATPase of Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyun Won

    2011-01-01

    Adenylate kinase-like activity and phosphotransferase-like activity from F 1 -ATPase of Escherichia coli was revealed by 31 P NMR spectroscopy. Incubation of F 1 -ATPase with ADP in the presence of Mg 2+ shows the appearance of 31 P resonances from AMP and Pi, suggesting generation of AMP and ATP by adenylate kinase-like activity and the subsequent hydrolysis to Pi. Incubation of F1-ATPase with ADP in the presence of methanol shows additional peak from methyl phosphate, suggesting phosphotransferase-like activity of F 1 -ATPase. Both adenylate kinase-like activity and phosphotransferase-like activity has not been reported from F 1 -ATPase of Escherichia coli. 31 P NMR could be a valuable tool for the investigation of phosphorous related enzyme

  16. Determination of trace amounts of chemical warfare agent degradation products in decontamination solutions with NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskela, Harri; Rapinoja, Marja-Leena; Kuitunen, Marja-Leena; Vanninen, Paula

    2007-12-01

    Decontamination solutions are used for an efficient detoxification of chemical warfare agents (CWAs). As these solutions can be composed of strong alkaline chemicals with hydrolyzing and oxidizing properties, the analysis of CWA degradation products in trace levels from these solutions imposes a challenge for any analytical technique. Here, we present results of application of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for analysis of trace amounts of CWA degradation products in several untreated decontamination solutions. Degradation products of the nerve agents sarin, soman, and VX were selectively monitored with substantially reduced interference of background signals by 1D 1H-31P heteronuclear single quantum coherence (HSQC) spectrometry. The detection limit of the chemicals was at the low part-per-million level (2-10 microg/mL) in all studied solutions. In addition, the concentration of the degradation products was obtained with sufficient confidence with external standards.

  17. Climate change sheet no. 01. The nuclear: a solution for the greenhouse effect?; Fiche changement climatique no. 01. Le nucleaire: une solution a l'effet de serre?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-01-01

    The electric power production by the nuclear energy is often proposed as a solution to the climatic change problem. This document takes stock on this option with a state of the art, a technical and economical analysis. It concludes that the nuclear energy is not the energy of the sustainable development. (A.L.B.)

  18. Specific transport and storage solutions: Waste management facing current and future stakes of the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deniau, Helene; Gagner, Laurent; Gendreau, Francoise; Presta, Anne

    2006-01-01

    With major projects ongoing or being planned, and also with the daily management of radioactive waste from nuclear facilities, the role of transport and/or storage packaging has been often overlooked. Indeed, the packaging development process and transport solutions implemented are a key part of the waste management challenge: protection of people and environment. During over four decades, the AREVA Group has developed a complete and coherent system for the transport of waste produced by nuclear industries. The transport solutions integrate the factors to consider, as industrial transportation needs, various waste forms, associated hazards and current regulations. Thus, COGEMA LOGISTICS has designed, licensed and manufactured a large number of different transport, storage and dual purpose cask models for residues and all kinds of radioactive wastes. The present paper proposes to illustrate how a company acting both as a cask designer and a carrier is key to the waste management issue and how it can support the waste management policy of nuclear producers through their operational choices. We will focus on the COGEMA LOGISTICS technical solutions implemented to guarantee safe and secure transportation and storage solutions. We will describe different aspects of the cask design process, insisting on how it enables to fulfill both customer needs and regulation requirements. We will also mention the associated services developed by the AREVA Business Unit Logistics (COGEMA LOGISTICS, TRANSNUCLEAR, MAINCO, and LEMARECHAL CELESTIN) in order to manage transportation of liquid and solid waste towards interim or final storage sites. The paper has the following contents: About radioactive waste; - Radioactive waste classification; - High level activity waste and long-lived intermediate level waste; - Long-lived low level waste; - Short-lived low- and intermediate level waste; - Very low level waste; - The radioactive waste in nuclear fuel cycle; - Packaging design and

  19. Nuclear energy socially acceptable as a possible solution for the Brazilian energy demand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milanez, Jimes Vasco; Almeida, Ricardo Dias; Carmo, Fausto Silva do

    2006-01-01

    In this work we try to investigate the potential, with emphasis on Brazil, of new nuclear power technologies in development related to estimated growth of energy demand in comparison to traditional nuclear power and others alternatives generation, under criteria such as technical and economic viability, respect to the environmental and particularly acceptability of the society. It is demonstrated that fourth generation of nuclear power shows an option to be considered in the medium and long-term for energy generation significantly clean, efficient and safe, should be, therefore, better investigated, mainly focusing on accelerator driven systems

  20. Metabolic changes of masseter muscle in experimental unilateral bite-raised rat determined by 31P-MRS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishide, Naoto

    1997-01-01

    Occlusal interference is known to alter the functional activity of masticatory muscle, but no alteration of the energy metabolism of masticatory muscle which has gone occlusal interference has been reported. The purpose of this study was to investigate the energy metabolism in rat masseter muscle during masticatory movements following unilateral bite-raising. A bite-raising splint (1 mm) was fixed on the unilateral upper molar of experimental rats, and after 2, 4 and 6 weeks, the rats were anesthetized and masticatory movements were induced by electrical stimulation applied to the masseter muscle (with a biting force of 40 g, a frequency of 5 Hz and a stimulation time of 32 min). 31 P Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of the masseter muscle were recorded during a sequence of rest, stimulation and recovery periods, and the resonance signal area ratio of PCr and Pi ((PCr)/(PCr + Pi)) and the muscle pH were determined. After 4 and 6 weeks following the bite-raising, the masseter of the bite-raised side showed a decrease in the (PCr)/(PCr + Pi) ratio compared with a control group during stimulation (p<0.05). Neither the bite-raised side masseter at 2 weeks and the contralateral side at 4 weeks showed any differences compared with the control. The muscle pH during stimulation was similar in both the control and the bite-raised groups of rats. These findings suggest that the occlusal alteration induced by unilateral bite-raising reduces the masseter energy level during mastication. (author)

  1. Mitochondrial NAD(PH in vivo: identifying natural indicators of oxidative phosphorylation in the 31P magnetic resonance spectrum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin eConley

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Natural indicators provide intrinsic probes of metabolism, biogenesis and oxidative protection. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide metabolites (NAD(P are one class of indicators that have roles as co-factors in oxidative phosphorylation, glycolysis and anti-oxidant protection, as well as signaling in the mitochondrial biogenesis pathway. These many roles are made possible by the distinct redox states (NAD(P+ and NAD(PH, which are compartmentalized between cell and mitochondria. Here we provide evidence for detection of NAD(P+ and NAD(PH in separate mitochondrial and cell pools in vivo in human tissue by phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P MRS. These NAD(P pools are identified by chemical standards (NAD+, NADP+ and NADH and by physiological tests. A unique resonance reflecting mitochondrial NAD(PH is revealed by the changes elicited by elevation of mitochondrial oxidation. The decline of NAD(PH with oxidation is matched by a stoichiometric rise in the NAD(P+ peak. This unique resonance also provides a measure of the improvement in mitochondrial oxidation that parallels the greater phosphorylation found after exercise training in these elderly subjects. The implication is that the dynamics of the mitochondrial NAD(PH peak provides an intrinsic probe of the reversal of mitochondrial dysfunction in elderly muscle. Thus non-invasive detection of NAD(P+ and NAD(PH in cell vs. mitochondria yield natural indicators of redox compartmentalization and sensitive intrinsic probes of the improvement of mitochondrial function with an intervention in human tissues in vivo. These natural indicators hold the promise of providing mechanistic insight into metabolism and mitochondrial function in vivo in a range of tissues in health, disease and with treatment.

  2. Metabolic changes of masseter muscle in experimental unilateral bite-raised rat determined by {sup 31}P-MRS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishide, Naoto [Kyoto Prefectural Univ. of Medicine (Japan)

    1997-05-01

    Occlusal interference is known to alter the functional activity of masticatory muscle, but no alteration of the energy metabolism of masticatory muscle which has gone occlusal interference has been reported. The purpose of this study was to investigate the energy metabolism in rat masseter muscle during masticatory movements following unilateral bite-raising. A bite-raising splint (1 mm) was fixed on the unilateral upper molar of experimental rats, and after 2, 4 and 6 weeks, the rats were anesthetized and masticatory movements were induced by electrical stimulation applied to the masseter muscle (with a biting force of 40 g, a frequency of 5 Hz and a stimulation time of 32 min). {sup 31}P Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of the masseter muscle were recorded during a sequence of rest, stimulation and recovery periods, and the resonance signal area ratio of PCr and Pi ((PCr)/(PCr + Pi)) and the muscle pH were determined. After 4 and 6 weeks following the bite-raising, the masseter of the bite-raised side showed a decrease in the (PCr)/(PCr + Pi) ratio compared with a control group during stimulation (p<0.05). Neither the bite-raised side masseter at 2 weeks and the contralateral side at 4 weeks showed any differences compared with the control. The muscle pH during stimulation was similar in both the control and the bite-raised groups of rats. These findings suggest that the occlusal alteration induced by unilateral bite-raising reduces the masseter energy level during mastication. (author)

  3. Interaction Study of an Amorphous Solid Dispersion of Cyclosporin A in Poly-Alpha-Cyclodextrin with Model Membranes by 1H-, 2H-, 31P-NMR and Electron Spin Resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Claude Debouzy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The properties of an amorphous solid dispersion of cyclosporine A (ASD prepared with the copolymer alpha cyclodextrin (POLYA and cyclosporine A (CYSP were investigated by 1H-NMR in solution and its membrane interactions were studied by 1H-NMR in small unilamellar vesicles and by 31P 2H NMR in phospholipidic dispersions of DMPC (dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine in comparison with those of POLYA and CYSP alone. 1H-NMR chemical shift variations showed that CYSP really interacts with POLYA, with possible adduct formation, dispersion in the solid matrix of the POLYA, and also complex formation. A coarse approach to the latter mechanism was tested using the continuous variations method, indicating an apparent 1 : 1 stoichiometry. Calculations gave an apparent association constant of log Ka = 4.5. A study of the interactions with phospholipidic dispersions of DMPC showed that only limited interactions occurred at the polar head group level (31P. Conversely, by comparison with the expected chain rigidification induced by CYSP, POLYA induced an increase in the fluidity of the layer while ASD formation led to these effects almost being overcome at 298 K. At higher temperature, while the effect of CYSP seems to vanish, a resulting global increase in chain fluidity was found in the presence of ASD.

  4. Model calculation of neutron reaction data for 31P in the energy range from 0.1 to 20 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jiangting; Ge Zhigang; Sun Xiuquan

    2006-01-01

    The neutron data calculation of 31 P in the energy range from 0.1 to 20 MeV was carried out. The neutron optical potential parameters for 31 P in energy range from O.1 to 20 MeV were obtained, based on the fitting of the available neutron experimental data with the code APOM94. The DWUCK4 code was used to investigate the cross section for neutron direct inelastic scattering. The re-evaluated neutron data is based on the available measured data by using the UNF code. The theoretical results reproduce the experimental data well, and the results were given in ENDF/B-6 format. (authors)

  5. 31P MR spectroscopic imaging in preoperative embolization therapy of meningiomas; Phosphor-31-MR-spektroskopische Bildgebung bei praeoperativer Embolisationstherapie von Meningeomen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blankenhorn, M. [Psychiatrische Universitaetsklinik, Ulm (Germany). Abteilung III; Bachert, P.; Kaick, G. van [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum Heidelberg (Germany). Forschungsschwerpunkt Radiologische Diagnostik; Semmler, W. [Freie Univ. Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Diagnostikforschung; Ende, G. [Zentralinstitut fuer Seelische Gesundheit, Mannheim (Germany). NMR-Forschung in der Psychiatrie; Tronnier, V. [Neurochirurgische Klinik, Klinikum der Universitaet, Heidelberg (Germany); Sartor, K. [Neurologische Klinik, Klinikum der Universitaet, Heidelberg (Germany). Abt. Neuroradiologie

    1999-06-01

    Purpose: {sup 31}P MR spectroscopic imaging ({sup 31}P SI) was evaluated in a clinical study as a method for monitoring presurgical devascularization of meningiomas. The aim was to assess noninvasively metabolic alterations in tumor and in healthy brain tissue before and after embolization. Methods: Localized {sup 31}P MR spectra of the brain were obtained by means of 2D-SI (voxel size: 36 cm{sup 3}) using a 1,5-T whole-body MR tomograph. Results: Eleven of 19 patients with intracranial meningiomas examined in this study underwent preoperative embolization therapy; eight patients were examined before and after treatment. After embolization, alterations of pH and of the concentrations of high-energy phosphates (nucleoside-5`triphosphate=NTP, phosphocreatine=PCr), inorganic phosphate (P{sub i}), and membrane constituents were observed in the tumors. A tendency of [P{sub i}] increase and decrease of [NTP], [PCr], and pH predominated, which is explained by ischemic processes after tumor devascularization. Conclusion: {sup 31}P SI is applicable in clinical studies and detects alterations of phosphate metabolism in a meningioma after embolization. (orig.) [Deutsch] Ziel: Die {sup 31}P-MR-spektroskopische Bildgebung ({sup 31}P-SI) wurde im Rahmen der praeoperativen Embolisationstherapie von Patienten mit Meningeomen als Methode zur Therapieverlaufskontrolle klinisch geprueft. Ziel der Studie war die nichtinvasive Erfassung von Veraenderungen im Metabolismus der Tumoren vor und nach Embolisation im Vergleich zum gesunden Hirngewebe. Methoden: Lokalisierte {sup 31}P-MR-Spektren des Gehirns wurden mit 2D-SI (Voxelgroesse: 36 cm{sup 3}) an einem 1,5-T-Ganzkoerper-MR-Tomographen aufgenommen. Ergebnisse: Elf von insgesamt 19 untersuchten Patienten unterzogen sich einer praeoperativen Embolisation, bei acht Patienten konnte eine Verlaufskontrolle durchgefuehrt werden. Nach Embolisation wurden Veraenderungen des pH und der Konzentrationen von energiereichen Phosphaten (Nukleosid

  6. Innovative automation solutions applied to nuclear fuel production and inspection processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vas, Ananth

    2012-01-01

    The nuclear industry in India is slated for fast paced growth in the coming years, with a great focus on increasing the capacity for producing, inspecting and finally reprocessing of nuclear fuel. Modern techniques of industrial automation such as robotics, machine vision and laser based systems have been deployed extensively to improve the productivity and output of existing and future installations, particularly for the fuel handling stages mentioned

  7. On the advisability of nuclear power plant construction and some solutions on their safety increase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolov, I.N.

    1989-01-01

    Neccesity in a further development of nuclear power in the USSR is proved. Specific features of layouts of nuclear heat supplying plants with increased safety including WWER-440, WWER-1000 and VK-50 reactors are considered. It is stressed that even under the most incredible accidents referring to the class of hypothetic ones, radioactive effect on the population, according to evaluations by experts, whould be much lower than maximum admissible one according to the existing standards

  8. Initiation of nuclear reactions under laser irradiation of Au nanoparticles in the aqueous solution of Uranium salt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simakin, A.V.; Shafeev, G.A. [Wave Research Center of A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2010-10-15

    Laser exposure of a suspension of either gold or palladium nanoparticles in aqueous solutions of UO{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} of natural isotope abundance was experimentally studied. Picosecond Nd:YAG lasers at peak power of 10{sup 11}-10{sup 13} W/cm{sup 2} at the wavelength of 1.06-0.355 {mu}m were used as well as a visible-range Cu vapor laser at a peak power of 10{sup 10} W/cm{sup 2}. The composition of colloidal solutions before and after laser exposure was analyzed using atomic absorption and gamma spectroscopy in the 0.06-1 MeV range of photon energy. Real-time gamma spectroscopy was used to characterize the kinetics of nuclear reactions during laser exposure. It was found that laser exposure initiated nuclear reactions involving both {sup 238}U and {sup 235}U nuclei via different channels in H{sub 2}O and D{sub 2}O. The influence of saturation of both the liquid and nanoparticles by gaseous H{sub 2} and D{sub 2} on the kinetics of nuclear transformations was found. Possible mechanisms of observed processes are discussed. (orig.)

  9. Geologic disposal as optimal solution of managing the spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilie, P.; Didita, L.; Ionescu, A.; Deaconu, V.

    2002-01-01

    To date there exist three alternatives for the concept of geological disposal: 1. storing the high-level waste (HLW) and spent nuclear fuel (SNF) on ground repositories; 2. solutions implying advanced separation processes including partitioning and transmutation (P and T) and eventual disposal in outer space; 3. geological disposal in repositories excavated in rocks. Ground storing seems to be advantageous as it ensures a secure sustainable storing system over many centuries (about 300 years). On the other hand ground storing would be only a postponement in decision making and will be eventually followed by geological disposal. Research in the P and T field is expected to entail a significant reduction of the amount of long-lived radioactive waste although the long term geological disposal will be not eliminated. Having in view the high cost, as well as the diversity of conditions in the countries owning power reactors it appears as a reasonable regional solution of HLW disposal that of sharing a common geological disposal. In Romania legislation concerning of radioactive waste is based on the Law concerning Spent Nuclear Fuel and Radioactive Waste Management in View of Final Disposal. One admits at present that for Romania geological disposal is not yet a stressing issue and hence intermediate ground storing of SNF will allow time for finding a better final solution

  10. A nuclear gas turbine perspective: The indirect cycle (IDC) offers a practical solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, C.F.

    1996-01-01

    The current generation of nuclear power plants are based on light water reactors and steam cycle power conversion systems. This coupling yields a power plant efficiency of less than 30% when dry-cooled. By utilizing a higher temperature heat source, and a more efficient prime-mover, the next generation of nuclear power plants have the potential for an efficiency of close to 50%, with attendant fuel savings and reduced heat rejection to the environment. The nuclear closed Brayton cycle (NCBC) gas turbine plant involves the coupling of a high temperature reactor (HTR) and a high efficiency helium gas turbine. Studies over many years have shown the merits of an indirect cycle (IDC) approach in which an intermediate heat exchanger is used to transfer the reactor thermal energy to the prime-mover. The major advantages of this include the following: (1) multipurpose nuclear heat source; (2) gas turbine operation in a clean non-nuclear environment; (3) power conversion system simplicity; and (4) maximum utilization of existing technology. An additional factor, which may dominate the above is that the IDC approach is in concert with the only active gas-cooled reactor program remaining in the world, namely a high temperature test reactor (HTTR) under construction in Japan, the culmination of which will be the demonstration of a viable high temperature nuclear heat source. The major theme of this paper is that the IDC nuclear gas turbine offers a practical NCBC power plant concept for operation in the second or third decades of the 21st century

  11. To dare nuclear energy to find the solution of the climate issue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    This report first briefly recalls the IPCC reference scenarios which allow the global temperature increase to be limited to 2 degrees (Representative Concentration Pathway 2.6), and rely on a massive CO 2 capture and storage. Two categories of scenarios have been proposed: IMAGE by the Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency, and MESSAGE by the Austrian International Institute for Applied System Analysis. But only the MESSAGE category limits CO 2 storage to 24 billions of tons by means of a massive development of nuclear energy between 2060 and 2100 or of a drastic decrease of energy consumption. Each category comprises three scenarios: a Supply scenario which authorizes high energy consumption, an Efficiency scenario which is also a phasing out nuclear scenario with a 45 per cent reduction of energy consumption, and an intermediate Mix scenario. This study proposes nuclear variations of the Mix and Supply scenarios, with a strong development of nuclear energy from 2020 rather than from 2060, and with a share of 60 per cent for the nuclear energy. It is then possible to considerably reduce the role of CO 2 storage

  12. Climate change and the role of nuclear power - contributions to a global solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKechnie, A.J.

    1990-01-01

    The threat of global climate change is a challenge to those who decide on energy policy. If we are complacent and the worst case scenario materializes, our descendants could be faced with unprecedented problems that would impose massive costs. On the other hand, it is our generation which would suffer if substantial resources were devoted to addressing a problem that did not turn out to be serious. Fortunately, the choice is not a stark as this. There are options such as increased energy efficiency and clean fuels that are economically justified before their environmental benefits are considered. These options are the first priority for addressing climate change. What will be the contribution of nuclear energy? In developing countries it is likely to be small. In the industrialized world, where the cost of capital is lower, the role of nuclear will depend on construction and operating performance of the industry, and the level of public confidence. New nuclear technologies that are inherently safe and small modular designs could transform the nuclear option if costs are competitive with other energy sources. The nuclear option is one that should be kept alive in case a global environmental crisis is forced upon us. (orig.)

  13. Polarographic determination of Iodide and Iodate, in Solutions Coming from Aerosols in Fission Products Containment Studies in Nuclear Power Stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, M.; Ballesteros, O.; Fernandez, M.; Clavero, M.A.; Gonzalez, A.M.

    2000-01-01

    A polarographic method is described for the iodine species determination, iodide and iodate in water solutions. the iodate can be determined by differential pulse polarography. Calibration curves and the detection and determination limits have been obtained. Iodides is oxidized to iodate with sodium hypochlorite and the excess of oxidizing agent is destroyed with sodium sulphide. The concentration of iodide is calculated as the difference between the concentration of iodate in the sample before and after the oxidation. As an application, species of iodine in samples coming from the experimental plants GIRS (Gaseous Iodine Removal by Sprays) of Nuclear Fission Department of the CIEMAT, dedicated to fission products containment studies in nuclear power station, were determined. (Author) 10 refs

  14. Nuclear energy, a solution in the struggle against global warming in quest of recognition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faudon, Valerie

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the author first comments assessments of the continuous increase of greenhouse gas emissions as they appear in the IPCC report of September 2013 and in the results published by the Global Carbon Project. She also evokes the commitments in emission reductions in compliance with the Kyoto Protocol and some dramatic consequences global warming may have according to the IPCC scenarios. Then, she addresses the share of nuclear energy in energy production and outlines its stakes and benefits in terms of greenhouse gas emissions. She notices that international bodies (European Commission, World Bank) do not mention nuclear energy in their plan for energy production development, but mainly rely on the development of renewable energies. The author then outlines the reasons why the development of renewable energies does not necessarily goes with the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. She also notices that a new generation of ecologists considers nuclear energy as a tool to struggle against climate warming

  15. Accelerator-driven transmutation technology: a high-tech solution to some nuclear waste problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hechanova, A.E.

    2001-01-01

    This paper discusses current technical and non-technical issues regarding the innovative concept of using accelerator-driven transmutation processes for nuclear waste management. Two complex and related issues are addressed. First, the evolution of the current U.S. conceptual design is identified to indicate that there has been sufficient technological advancement with regard to a 1991 scientific peer review to warrant the advent of a large-scale national research and development program. Second, the economics and politics of the transmutation system are examined to identify non-technical barriers to the implementation of the program. Although a number of key challenges are identified in this paper, the benefits of the research and development effort and the potential paradigm shift in attitude toward resource stewardship could greatly enhance public confidence in nuclear waste management that will have rapid positive repercussions on nuclear technology research and commercial applications. (author)

  16. The conceptual solutions concerning decommissioning and dismantling of Russian civil nuclear powered ships

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulikov, Konstantin N.; Nizamutdinov, Rinat A.; Abramov, Andrey N.

    2013-01-01

    From 1959 up to 1991 nine civil nuclear powered ships were built in Russia: eight ice-breakers and one lash lighter carrier (cargo ship). At the present time three of them were taking out of service: ice-breaker 'Lenin' is decommissioned as a museum and is set for storage in the port of Murmansk, nuclear ice-breakers 'Arktika' and 'Sibir' are berthing. The ice-breakers carrying rad-wastes appear to be a possible source of radiation contamination of Murmansk region and Kola Bay because the ship long-term storage afloat has the negative effect on hull's structures. As the result of this under the auspices of the Federal Targeted Program 'Nuclear and Radiation Safety of Russia for 2008 and the period until 2015' the conception and projects of decommissioning of nuclear-powered ships are developed by the State corporation Rosatom with the involvement of companies of United Shipbuilding Corporation. In developing the principal provisions of conception of decommissioning and dismantling of icebreakers the technical and economic assessment of dismantling options in ship-repairing enterprises of North-West of Russia was performed. The paper contains description of options, research procedure, analysis of options of decommissioning and dismantling of nuclear ice-breakers, taking into account the principle of optimization of potential radioactive effect to personnel, human population and environment. The report's conclusions contain the recommendations for selection of option for development of nuclear icebreaker decommissioning and dismantling projects. (authors)

  17. Different energy metabolism in two human small cell lung cancer subpopulations examined by 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy and biochemical analysis in vivo and in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristjansen, P E; Spang-Thomsen, M; Quistorff, B

    1991-01-01

    Two human small cell lung cancer tumor lines, maintained as solid tumor xenografts on nude mice and as in vitro cell cultures, were studied by in vivo 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy and by biochemical analysis of extracts of solid tumors and cell cultures. The tumor lines CPH SCCL 54A and CPH...

  18. Phosphorolytic activity of Escherichia coli glycyl-tRNA synthetase towards its cognate aminoacyl adenylate detected by 31P-NMR spectroscopy and thin-layer chromatography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Led, Jens Jørgen; Switon, Werner K.; Jensen, Kaj Frank

    1983-01-01

    The catalytic activity of highly purified Escherichia coli glycyl-tRNA synthetase has been studied by 31P-NMR spectroscopy and thin-layer chromatography on poly(ethyleneimine)-cellulose. It was found that this synthetase, besides the activation of its cognate amino acid and the syntheses...

  19. 2D AMESING multi-echo (31)P-MRSI of the liver at 7T allows transverse relaxation assessment and T2-weighted averaging for improved SNR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Runge, Jurgen Henk; van der Kemp, Wybe J M; Klomp, DWJ; Luijten, Peter R; Nederveen, Aart J; Stoker, Jaap

    PURPOSE: Liver diseases are a major global health concern often requiring invasive assessment by needle biopsy. (31)P magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) allows non-invasive probing of important liver metabolites. Recently, the adiabatic multi-echo spectroscopic imaging sequence with

  20. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation: Estimation of total phenol concentrations in coal liquefaction resids by {sup 31}P NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohan, J.T.; Verkade, J.G. [Ames Lab., IA (United States)

    1992-11-01

    In this study, Iowa State University researchers used {sub 31}P-tagged reagents to derivatize the labile hydrogen functional groups in the THF-soluble portion of 850{degrees}F{sup +} distillation resid materials and the THF-soluble portion of process oils derived from direct coal liquefaction.{sup 31}P-NMR was used to analyze the derivatized samples. NMR peak assignments can be made by comparison to model compounds similarly derivatized. Species can be quantified by integration of the NMR signals. Different {sup 31}P-NMR tagged reagents can be used to produce different degrees of peak resolution in the NMR spectrum. This, in turn, partially dictates the degree of speciation and/or quantification of species, or classes of compounds, that can be accomplished. Iowa State chose a {sup 31}P-tagged reagent (ClPOCMe{sub 2}CMe{sub 2}O) which was shown previously to be particularly useful in the derivatization of phenols. The derivatized samples all exhibited a small group of peaks attributed to amines and a broad group of peaks in the phenol region. The presence of paramagnetic species in the samples caused the NMR signals to broaden. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra confirmed the presence of paramagnetic organic free radicals in selected samples. Various methods were employed to process the NMR data. The complexity and broadness of the phenol peak, however, made speciation of the phenols impractical.

  1. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation: Estimation of total phenol concentrations in coal liquefaction resids by [sup 31]P NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohan, J.T.; Verkade, J.G. (Ames Lab., IA (United States))

    1992-11-01

    In this study, Iowa State University researchers used [sub 31]P-tagged reagents to derivatize the labile hydrogen functional groups in the THF-soluble portion of 850[degrees]F[sup +] distillation resid materials and the THF-soluble portion of process oils derived from direct coal liquefaction.[sup 31]P-NMR was used to analyze the derivatized samples. NMR peak assignments can be made by comparison to model compounds similarly derivatized. Species can be quantified by integration of the NMR signals. Different [sup 31]P-NMR tagged reagents can be used to produce different degrees of peak resolution in the NMR spectrum. This, in turn, partially dictates the degree of speciation and/or quantification of species, or classes of compounds, that can be accomplished. Iowa State chose a [sup 31]P-tagged reagent (ClPOCMe[sub 2]CMe[sub 2]O) which was shown previously to be particularly useful in the derivatization of phenols. The derivatized samples all exhibited a small group of peaks attributed to amines and a broad group of peaks in the phenol region. The presence of paramagnetic species in the samples caused the NMR signals to broaden. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra confirmed the presence of paramagnetic organic free radicals in selected samples. Various methods were employed to process the NMR data. The complexity and broadness of the phenol peak, however, made speciation of the phenols impractical.

  2. Sustainable training for customs officer involved in illicit nuclear trafficking detection: national solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paredes Gilisman, Jorge Luis; Lopez Forteza, Yamil

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The illicit nuclear trafficking detection capabilities demand adequate training, cooperation and equipment. Often customs personnel changing takes place in our countries. A sustainable training strategy should be implemented for avoiding forfeit on detection capabilities. Cuba, not excluded from this particular, designed an Action Plan to provide Customs authorities with basic tools for their own training. The Nuclear Regulatory Authority developed three main addresses: initial training, development of e-tools and preparation of train-of-trainers. Experiences, outcomes and challenges are shown in the present paper. In a simple, quick and not expensive way answer has been given to a national sustainable training strategy. (author)

  3. Optical absorption, {sup 31}P NMR, and photoluminescence spectroscopy study of copper and tin co-doped barium–phosphate glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiménez, J.A., E-mail: jose.jimenez@unf.edu; Zhao, C.

    2014-10-15

    The optical and structural properties of 50P{sub 2}O{sub 5}:50BaO glasses prepared by melting have been investigated for additive concentrations of 10 and 1 mol% of CuO and SnO dopants. Absorption and photoluminescence spectroscopies were employed in the optical characterization, whereas structural properties were assessed by {sup 31}P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Residual Cu{sup 2+} was detectable by absorption spectroscopy for the highest concentration of CuO and SnO. More prominently, the optical data suggests contributions from both twofold-coordinated Sn centers and Cu{sup +} ions to light absorption and emission in the glasses. The luminescence depends strongly on excitation wavelength for the highest concentration of dopants where a blue–white emission is observed under short-wavelength excitation (e.g., 260 nm) largely due to tin, while an orange luminescence is exhibited for longer excitation wavelengths (e.g., 360 nm) essentially due to Cu{sup +} ions. On the other hand, dissimilar luminescent properties were observed in connection to Cu{sup +} ions for the lowest concentration studied, as the copper ions were preferentially excited in a narrower range at shorter wavelengths near tin centers absorption. The structural analyses revealed the glass matrix to be composed essentially of Q{sup 2} (two bridging oxygens) and Q{sup 1} (one bridging oxygen) phosphate tetrahedra. A slight increase in the Q{sup 1}/Q{sup 2} ratio reflected upon SnO doping alone suggests a major incorporation of tin into the glass network via P–O–Sn bonds, compatible with the 2-coordinated state attributed to the luminescent Sn centers. However, a significant increase in the Q{sup 1}/Q{sup 2} ratio was indicated with the incorporation of copper at the highest concentration, consistent with a key role of the metal ions as network modifiers. Thus, the change in Cu{sup +} optical properties concurs with different distributions of local environments around the

  4. Molecular theory for nuclear magnetic relaxation in protein solutions and tissue; Surface diffusion and free-volume analogy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimmich, R; Nusser, W; Gneiting, T [Ulm Universitaet (Federal Republic of Germany). Sektion Kernresonanzspektroskopie

    1990-04-01

    A model theory is presented explaining a series of striking phenomena observed with nuclear magnetic relaxation in protein systems such as solutions or tissue. The frequency, concentration and temperature dependences of proton or deuteron relaxation times of protein solutions and tissue are explained. It is concluded that the translational diffusion of water molecules along the rugged surfaces of proteins and, to a minor degree, protein backbone fluctuations are crucial processes. The rate limiting factor of macromolecular tumbling is assumed to be given by the free water content in a certain analogy to the free-volume model of Cohen ad Turnbull. There are two characteristic water mass fractions indicating the saturation of the hydration shells and the onset of protein tumbling. A closed and relatively simple set of relaxation formulas is presented. The potentially fractal nature of the diffusion of water molecules on the protein surface is discussed. (author). 43 refs.; 4 figs.

  5. Suppression of skeletal muscle signal using a crusher coil: A human cardiac (31) p-MR spectroscopy study at 7 tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaller, Benoit; Clarke, William T; Neubauer, Stefan; Robson, Matthew D; Rodgers, Christopher T

    2016-03-01

    The translation of sophisticated phosphorus MR spectroscopy ((31)P-MRS) protocols to 7 Tesla (T) is particularly challenged by the issue of radiofrequency (RF) heating. Legal limits on RF heating make it hard to reliably suppress signals from skeletal muscle that can contaminate human cardiac (31)P spectra at 7T. We introduce the first surface-spoiling crusher coil for human cardiac (31)P-MRS at 7T. A planar crusher coil design was optimized with simulations and its performance was validated in phantoms. Crusher gradient pulses (100 μs) were then applied during human cardiac (31)P-MRS at 7T. In a phantom, residual signals were 50 ± 10% with BISTRO (B1 -insensitive train to obliterate signal), and 34 ± 8% with the crusher coil. In vivo, residual signals in skeletal muscle were 49 ± 4% using BISTRO, and 24 ± 5% using the crusher coil. Meanwhile, in the interventricular septum, spectral quality and metabolite quantification did not differ significantly between BISTRO (phosphocreatine/adenosine triphosphate [PCr/ATP] = 2.1 ± 0.4) and the crusher coil (PCr/ATP = 1.8 ± 0.4). However, the specific absorption rate (SAR) decreased from 96 ± 1% of the limit (BISTRO) to 16 ± 1% (crusher coil). A crusher coil is an SAR-efficient alternative for selectively suppressing skeletal muscle during cardiac (31)P-MRS at 7T. A crusher coil allows the use of sequence modules that would have been SAR-prohibitive, without compromising skeletal muscle suppression. © 2015 The Authors. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society of Medicine in Resonance.

  6. Precipitation process for the removal of technetium values from nuclear waste solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, D.D.; Ebra, M.A.

    1985-11-21

    High efficiency removal of techetium values from a nuclear waste stream is achieved by addition to the waste stream of a precipitant contributing tetraphenylphosphonium cation, such that a substantial portion of the technetium values are precipitated as an insoluble pertechnetate salt.

  7. XML: Solution for the integration of nuclear power plant data and technical documents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordillo, F.

    2000-01-01

    Assuring proper operation of the systems that make up a nuclear power plant requires handling a massive amount of technical documents. This technical documentation, consisting mainly of system descriptions, operating and maintenance procedures, safety procedures, etc, presents particular characteristics, mainly: Great volume of information. High contents in figures and graphics. High reliability required. Multiple cross-references among documents. (Author)

  8. Solution and implementation of project ''Simulator of WWER-440 nuclear power plant''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koukal, V.

    1985-01-01

    The time data are given of the development and construction of the simulator of a WWER-440 nuclear power plant unit. The individual tasks are summed up which are related to the project implementation, and cooperating institutions and enterprises are listed. (J.C.)

  9. Outsourcing of nuclear energy. The solution of the NIMBY-problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van der Zon, C.

    2006-01-01

    March 2006 the president of the USA came to an agreement with India about a cooperative on the civil use of nuclear energy. According to the use the cooperation has a strategic importance, it improves international safety, contributes to energy supply security and environmental protection. Also, economic and technological developments will be stimulated as a result of the agreement [nl

  10. The system of physical protection of nuclear materials in the Republic of Belarus: problems and solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piotukh, V.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: It is a matter of common knowledge, that the responsibility for establishing and operating a comprehensive physical protection system for nuclear material and facilities within a state shall rest entirely with the Government of that state. In Belarus all nuclear materials, including HEU, are located at the Center of Nuclear Technologies of the Belarus National Academy of Sciences 'Sosny'. Through regulatory resolution on measures for physical protection of nuclear materials issued by the Council of Ministers of the Republic of Belarus in 1993, the committee for Supervision of Industrial and Nuclear Safety (Promatomnadzor) was appointed as the authority responsible for ensuring physical protection of nuclear materials and facilities and was tasked to develop and approve relevant normative documents. In 1994 Promatomnadzor issued the order on ensuring physical protection of nuclear materials during use, storage and transportation that was in line with then relevant IAEA recommendations. Since September 2001 Promatomnadzor has been a department of the Ministry for Emergencies of the Republic of Belarus. The system of physical protection at 'Sosny' includes elements of the 'old' system set up in 1984, and the 'new' one installed in 1996 as a result of a multilateral co-operative effort between Belarus, Sweden, Japan and USA. The main technical components of the system are: detection system including magnetic, microwave and infrared sensors; video-surveillance system; system of access delay including electronic blocking devices; system of authorized access including magnetic cards; system of computerized control over all components and communication system. Discussions between potential donor states are taking place regarding various security upgrades, particularly to the protected area where main security sensitive buildings are located. In 2000 Promatomnadzor requested an international physical protection advisory service (IPPAS) mission from the IAEA. The

  11. Study of semi-conductor spectrometers for high counting rates. Application to the study of the reaction {sup 31}P (p, {alpha}{sub 0}): E{sub p} < 2 MeV; Etude de spectrometres a semi-conducteurs pour forts taux de comptage application a l'etude de la reaction {sup 31}P (p, {alpha}0): E{sub p} < 2 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ligeon, E [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, 38 - Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1967-10-01

    The study of nuclear reactions involving particles of low charge (E < 2 MeV) calls for spectrometers of high resolving power. In many experiments however, the counting rate is high because of Coulomb scattering at the target: this results in a distortion of the experimental spectra and a loss of resolving power in the detection equipment. The first part of the work is devoted to an evaluation of the resolving power obtained with silicon-detector spectrometers. A study of the elastic scattering of protons by {sup 31}P shows which are the factors limiting the resolving power. In the second part we examine the various types of spectrometer which can be used in the case of a high count-rate. We have built an apparatus which can be used for carrying out spectrometry on particles produced by nuclear reactions, for a total, count-rate of 10{sup 5} counts/sec. (author) [French] L'etude des reactions nucleaires avec particules chargees a basse energie (E < 2 MeV) exige des spectrometres de haute resolution. Cependant, dans de nombreuses experiences le taux de comptage est eleve, par suite de la diffusion coulombienne sur la cible; on observe alors une distorsion des spectres experimentaux et une perte de resolution de l'ensemble de detection. La premiere partie de ce travail est consacree a l'evaluation de la resolution obtenue avec des spectrometres utilisant des detecteurs au silicium. L'etude de la diffusion elastique des protons sur le {sup 31}P montre quels sont les facteurs qui limitent la resolution. Dans une deuxieme partie, nous etudions les differents types de spectrometres que l'on peut utiliser dans le cas d'un taux de comptage eleve. Nous avons construit un appareil qui permet de faire la spectrometrie de particules, provenant de reactions nucleaires, pour un taux de comptage total de 10{sup 5} c/s. (auteur)

  12. Study of semi-conductor spectrometers for high counting rates. Application to the study of the reaction {sup 31}P (p, {alpha}{sub 0}): E{sub p} < 2 MeV; Etude de spectrometres a semi-conducteurs pour forts taux de comptage application a l'etude de la reaction {sup 31}P (p, {alpha}0): E{sub p} < 2 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ligeon, E. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, 38 - Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1967-10-01

    The study of nuclear reactions involving particles of low charge (E < 2 MeV) calls for spectrometers of high resolving power. In many experiments however, the counting rate is high because of Coulomb scattering at the target: this results in a distortion of the experimental spectra and a loss of resolving power in the detection equipment. The first part of the work is devoted to an evaluation of the resolving power obtained with silicon-detector spectrometers. A study of the elastic scattering of protons by {sup 31}P shows which are the factors limiting the resolving power. In the second part we examine the various types of spectrometer which can be used in the case of a high count-rate. We have built an apparatus which can be used for carrying out spectrometry on particles produced by nuclear reactions, for a total, count-rate of 10{sup 5} counts/sec. (author) [French] L'etude des reactions nucleaires avec particules chargees a basse energie (E < 2 MeV) exige des spectrometres de haute resolution. Cependant, dans de nombreuses experiences le taux de comptage est eleve, par suite de la diffusion coulombienne sur la cible; on observe alors une distorsion des spectres experimentaux et une perte de resolution de l'ensemble de detection. La premiere partie de ce travail est consacree a l'evaluation de la resolution obtenue avec des spectrometres utilisant des detecteurs au silicium. L'etude de la diffusion elastique des protons sur le {sup 31}P montre quels sont les facteurs qui limitent la resolution. Dans une deuxieme partie, nous etudions les differents types de spectrometres que l'on peut utiliser dans le cas d'un taux de comptage eleve. Nous avons construit un appareil qui permet de faire la spectrometrie de particules, provenant de reactions nucleaires, pour un taux de comptage total de 10{sup 5} c/s. (auteur)

  13. Solution Structure of LXXLL-related Cofactor Peptide of Orphan Nuclear Receptor FTZ-F1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Ji Hye; Lee, Chul Jin; Jung, Jin Won; Lee, Weon Tae [Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-02-15

    Functional interaction between Drosophila orphan receptor FTZ-F1 (NR5A3) and a segmentation gene product fushi tarazu (FTZ) is crucial for regulating genes related to define the identities of alternate segmental regions in the Drosophila embryo. FTZ binding to the ligand-binding domain (LBD) of FTZ-F1 is of essence in activating its transcription process. We determined solution structures of the cofactor peptide (FTZ{sup PEP}) derived from FTZ by NMR spectroscopy. The cofactor peptide showed a nascent helical conformation in aqueous solution, however, the helicity was increased in the presence of TFE. Furthermore, FTZ{sup PEP} formed α- helical conformation upon FTZ-F1 binding, which provides a receptor bound structure of FTZ{sup PEP}. The solution structure of FTZ{sup PEP} in the presence of FTZ-F1 displays a long stretch of the α-helix with a bend in the middle of helix.

  14. Solution Structure of LXXLL-related Cofactor Peptide of Orphan Nuclear Receptor FTZ-F1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, Ji Hye; Lee, Chul Jin; Jung, Jin Won; Lee, Weon Tae

    2012-01-01

    Functional interaction between Drosophila orphan receptor FTZ-F1 (NR5A3) and a segmentation gene product fushi tarazu (FTZ) is crucial for regulating genes related to define the identities of alternate segmental regions in the Drosophila embryo. FTZ binding to the ligand-binding domain (LBD) of FTZ-F1 is of essence in activating its transcription process. We determined solution structures of the cofactor peptide (FTZ PEP ) derived from FTZ by NMR spectroscopy. The cofactor peptide showed a nascent helical conformation in aqueous solution, however, the helicity was increased in the presence of TFE. Furthermore, FTZ PEP formed α- helical conformation upon FTZ-F1 binding, which provides a receptor bound structure of FTZ PEP . The solution structure of FTZ PEP in the presence of FTZ-F1 displays a long stretch of the α-helix with a bend in the middle of helix

  15. Studies and solutions of steam turbines for nuclear heating power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drahy, J.

    1979-01-01

    The possibilities of combined generation of heat and electric power and special features of the corresponding equipment for WWER type reactors are considered. Condensing steam turbines with bled steam points and the constructional solution of bled points are presented for heating the network water to 110 0 C, 120 0 C, and 160 0 C, respectively. The dimensions of the low pressure final stage of the turbine are given. Problems concerning condensing and bleeding turbines and combination types of back-pressure and condensing turbines as well as solutions to the design of 250 MW and 500 MW turbines are discussed

  16. Organizational factors in design and implementation of technological and organizational solutions in the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macchi, L.; Reiman, T.; Savioja, P.; Kahlbom, U.; Rollenhagen, C.

    2012-02-01

    Design is often found as one of the contributing factors in accident in the nuclear industry. The design of new technological systems and organisational structures has to take into account and be driven by the future users' needs and has to consider how their role and work practices within the organisation will be affected. The SADE project explores to which extend the concepts of safety culture and resilience engineering can contribute to the prevention of design errors when no hindsight data are available. In 2011, the SADE project focused on gathering experience and clarifying the current issues and challenges related to the design process. During 2011 seventeen interviews have been conducted in Finland and Sweden to identify some of the major challenges the nuclear industry is currently facing. At the same time a literature review has been conducted to establish a sound common theoretical ground. This progress report presents some of the relevant theoretical findings and preliminary results from the interviews. (Author)

  17. Dismantling of civilian nuclear powered fleet technical support vessels. engineering solutions - 59386

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulikov, Konstantin N.; Nizamutdinov, Rinat A.; Abramov, Andrey N.

    2012-01-01

    At the present time six nuclear technical support vessels are operated and maintained by Atomflot. Two of them (Volodarsky FTB (floating technical base) and Lepse FTB) were taken out of service for decommissioning and are stored afloat. One more vessel Lotta FTB should be decommissioned during next two years. The nuclear technological support ships carrying spent nuclear fuel (SNF), liquid and solid radioactive wastes (LRW and SRW) appear to be a possible radiation contamination of Murmansk region and Kola Bay because the Ship long-term storage afloat has the negative effect on hull's structures technical condition. As a result of this in the context of the Federal Program 'Nuclear and Radiation Safety' (2008-2015) NIPTB Onega OAO was engaged by state corporation Rosatom to develop the dismantling procedure for Volodarsky FTB and Lotta FTB. Before developing of nuclear technological support ships decommissioning projects the technical and economic assessment of decommissioning/dismantling was carried out. The following options were examined: - formation of module as one-piece Ship's hull for long-term storage at Saida Bay; - formation of separated modules for long-term storage at Saida Bay; - complete dismantling of hull's structures, systems and equipment with packing all generated SRW into certified long-term storage containers. This paper contains description of options, research procedure, comparative analysis of options of decommissioning and dismantling (D and D) of nuclear technological support ships and its difference with dismantling of nuclear submarine. On the basis of the technical and economic assessment of FTB D and D options the least expensive on the first D and D stage and the least duration option is the option 1 (Formation of module as one-piece Ship's hull for long-term storage at Saida Bay). By the implementation of the given option there will be the need of large areas for modules storage at Saida Bay. It was not considered while working out

  18. Westinghouse and nuclear renaissance. The Westinghouse AP1000 - a technology solution for Slovakia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirst, M.

    2009-01-01

    The Westinghouse AP1000 nuclear reactor design has been chosen by both China and the United States as the preferred technology in their new reactor programs. With four reactors in China and six in the United States under contract, in addition to the only Generation III+ design with NRC certification as well as the European Utility Requirements certification, the AP1000 has both a strong global customer base and regulatory certainty to facilitate its adoption in the Slovak Republic. (author)

  19. Neutron dosimetry in French nuclear power plants. Problems and their solutions in 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guibbaud, Y.; Dollo, R.; Rannou, A.

    1996-01-01

    Exposure to neutron radiation in the nuclear industry is normally limited to a small number of workers essentially EDF employees operating in specific areas. Operational collective dose due to neutron exposure is almost negligible compared to the rest of the external doses (less than 2 % in the collective dose equivalent). But this risk represents a significant fraction of the annual dose equivalent of those exposed. Suggest specifications for individual dosemeters which would ideally meet both technical and practical requirements. (author)

  20. Nuclear liability claims handling and costs - Germany and some comparative solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harbruecker, D.

    2000-01-01

    Comparison of legal status in Central Europe: coverage by insurance and State intervention, coverage of legal expenses and interests on awards technical problems of claims handing after a nuclear incident: guidelines to be prepared by insurer before and not after an incident occurred, demands on provider of financial security claims handling for part guaranteed by State to be transferred to insurer, necessary regulations of such arrangements (author)

  1. Centrifugal separation for miscible solutions: Fundamentals and applications to separation of molten salt nuclear material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ning Li; Camassa, R.; Ecke, R.E.

    1995-01-01

    The authors report on the physical separation of dilute solutions using centrifugal techniques. They use numerical simulations of the diffusion and sedimentation dynamics of centrifugation to model the approach to an equilibrium concentration profile. They verify experimentally the equilibrium profiles for aqueous solutions of different salts under rotation at 25000 rpm corresponding to centrifugal accelerations of about 57,000 g and 75,000 g in two different commercial centrifuges. These measurements provide ratios of sedimentation and diffusion coefficients. The authors show experimental results for the dynamics of separation that confirm the predictions of the theoretical model. They also measure the mass diffusion coefficient for several solutions. Although the relaxation to equilibrium is long, they have determined a method for efficiently extracting enriched components from a ternary mixture based on fast dynamics at early times. These dynamics are modeled in numerical simulations with realistic fluid parameters. Based on these studies the authors show that a multistage centrifugal separation process could provide efficient physical separation of actinides and fission products from a molten-salt solution in proposed transmutation/energy-production systems. The authors consider technical issues in the design of such a separation system

  2. Centrifugal separation for miscible solutions: Fundamentals and applications to separation of molten salt nuclear material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Ning; Camassa, Roberto; Ecke, Robert E.; Venneri, Francesco

    1995-01-01

    We report on the physical separation of dilute solutions using centrifugal techniques. We use numerical simulations of the diffusion and sedimentation dynamics of centrifugation to model the approach to an equilibrium concentration profile. We verify experimentally the equilibrium profiles for aqueous solutions of different salts under rotation at 25000 rpm corresponding to centrifugal accelerations of about 57,000 g and 75,000 g in two different commercial centrifuges. These measurements provide ratios of sedimentation and diffusion coefficients. We show experimental results for the dynamics of separation that confirm the predictions of the theoretical model. We also measure the mass diffusion coefficient for several solutions. Although the relaxation to equilibrium is long, we have determined a method for efficiently extracting enriched components from a ternary mixture based on fast dynamics at early times. These dynamics are modeled in numerical simulations with realistic fluid parameters. Based on these studies we show that a multistage centrifugal separation process could provide efficient physical separation of actinides and fission products from a molten-salt solution in proposed transmutation/energy-production systems. We consider technical issues in the design of such a separation system

  3. Centrifugal separation for miscible solutions: Fundamentals and applications to separation of molten salt nuclear material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ning Li; Camassa, R.; Ecke, R.E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    The authors report on the physical separation of dilute solutions using centrifugal techniques. They use numerical simulations of the diffusion and sedimentation dynamics of centrifugation to model the approach to an equilibrium concentration profile. They verify experimentally the equilibrium profiles for aqueous solutions of different salts under rotation at 25000 rpm corresponding to centrifugal accelerations of about 57,000 g and 75,000 g in two different commercial centrifuges. These measurements provide ratios of sedimentation and diffusion coefficients. The authors show experimental results for the dynamics of separation that confirm the predictions of the theoretical model. They also measure the mass diffusion coefficient for several solutions. Although the relaxation to equilibrium is long, they have determined a method for efficiently extracting enriched components from a ternary mixture based on fast dynamics at early times. These dynamics are modeled in numerical simulations with realistic fluid parameters. Based on these studies the authors show that a multistage centrifugal separation process could provide efficient physical separation of actinides and fission products from a molten-salt solution in proposed transmutation/energy-production systems. The authors consider technical issues in the design of such a separation system.

  4. Study of source term evaluation from fuel solution under simulated nuclear criticality accident in TRACY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Hitoshi; Tashiro, Shinsuke; Nagai, Hitoshi; Koike, Tadao; Okagawa, Seigo; Murata, Mikio

    1999-01-01

    In a accident at the dissolver in a reprocessing plant, various fission products and radiolysis gases will be produced in the fuel solution and volatile radioactive nuclides and radiolysis gases and nitrogen oxide will be released into vent-gas spontaneously. Moreover other on-volatile nuclide will be releases as radioactive aerosol (mist) with bursting bubbles at surface of the solution. Therefore quantitative estimation of release and transport behavior of the radioactive material from solution as source term is very important. TRACY is a transient criticality experimental facility for studying the transient criticality characteristics of low enriched uranium. In this paper, experiment methods and results about the release behavior of the hydrogen, radioactive aerosol and iodine species from the fuel solutions are reported. As the results of the experiments, release patterns of H 2 , 140 Ba and 131 I could be grasped. Concentrations of H 2 in the vent-gas and 140 Ba in the gas phase in the core tank attained to the peak just after the transient criticality and decreased exponentially with time. On the other hand, concentrations of 131 I in the gas phase of the tank began to increase with a time lag of several minutes from the transient criticality and attained approximately constant values. (J.P.N.)

  5. Computer monitoring system for pilot plant nuclear criticality facility (solution ZPR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hua Xiaokang; Liang Huiping

    1999-01-01

    The system is used for the Solution Zero Power Reactor physics measurement and safety monitoring. Its software modularization design enables multi-task real-time monitoring and off-time data processing. The system is labor/time saving to experimenters and will enhance the experiment precision and the reactor operation safety performance

  6. A new paradigm for core design aimed at the sustainability of nuclear energy: The solution of the extended equilibrium state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artioli, Carlo; Grasso, Giacomo; Petrovich, Carlo

    2010-01-01

    The future expansion of nuclear energy, a technology identified as one of the main candidates for reducing the world's dependence on fossil fuels, requires a thorough analysis of the sustainability of this energy source for long-term supply. Generation-IV nuclear systems could represent a turning point for energy production by minimizing the environmental footprint of the fuel cycle. A new paradigm is thus required for reactor design, focusing, at the core design level, on both the closure of the fuel cycle and the effective utilization of natural resources. Within this framework, the so-called 'adiabatic core' concept represents a particularly interesting solution. It is based on the idea of ensuring by design a condition of equilibrium in the fuel cycle (i.e., an equilibrium 'fuel vector'), foreseeing nuclear power systems able to maintain a constant total amount of both plutonium and minor actinides (TRU), consuming only uranium (either natural or depleted), while discharging to the environment only fission products and reprocessing losses. Under such a hypothesis, all actinides can be continuously recycled in the same system, reducing both the waste volume and its long-term radiotoxicity, as well as utilizing effectively uranium resources. Two mathematical approaches have been devised to find the 'extended' equilibrium solution for the fuel vector. These methods are compared, validated with the codes MCNPX and FISPACT and applied to the European lead-cooled fast reactor ELSY, confirming the potential of this approach (e.g., a reduction by two orders of magnitude of the TRU mass in the final waste in comparison with the fuel cycle of Light Water Reactors operated in a once-through scenario).

  7. Comparison of (31)P saturation and inversion magnetization transfer in human liver and skeletal muscle using a clinical MR system and surface coils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buehler, Tania; Kreis, Roland; Boesch, Chris

    2015-02-01

    (31)P MRS magnetization transfer ((31)P-MT) experiments allow the estimation of exchange rates of biochemical reactions, such as the creatine kinase equilibrium and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthesis. Although various (31)P-MT methods have been successfully used on isolated organs or animals, their application on humans in clinical scanners poses specific challenges. This study compared two major (31)P-MT methods on a clinical MR system using heteronuclear surface coils. Although saturation transfer (ST) is the most commonly used (31)P-MT method, sequences such as inversion transfer (IT) with short pulses might be better suited for the specific hardware and software limitations of a clinical scanner. In addition, small NMR-undetectable metabolite pools can transfer MT to NMR-visible pools during long saturation pulses, which is prevented with short pulses. (31)P-MT sequences were adapted for limited pulse length, for heteronuclear transmit-receive surface coils with inhomogeneous B1 , for the need for volume selection and for the inherently low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) on a clinical 3-T MR system. The ST and IT sequences were applied to skeletal muscle and liver in 10 healthy volunteers. Monte-Carlo simulations were used to evaluate the behavior of the IT measurements with increasing imperfections. In skeletal muscle of the thigh, ATP synthesis resulted in forward reaction constants (k) of 0.074 ± 0.022 s(-1) (ST) and 0.137 ± 0.042 s(-1) (IT), whereas the creatine kinase reaction yielded 0.459 ± 0.089 s(-1) (IT). In the liver, ATP synthesis resulted in k = 0.267 ± 0.106 s(-1) (ST), whereas the IT experiment yielded no consistent results. ST results were close to literature values; however, the IT results were either much larger than the corresponding ST values and/or were widely scattered. To summarize, ST and IT experiments can both be implemented on a clinical body scanner with heteronuclear transmit-receive surface coils; however, ST results are

  8. Safety substantiation for underground isolation of spent nuclear fuel or spent nuclear materials as a basis to develop reliable technological solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupalo, T.A.; Beygul, V.P.; Gupalo, M.S.; Kudinov, K.G.

    2000-01-01

    Major issues of the technique for mining and ecological safety substantiation of multi-barrier systems for long-term underground isolation of spent nuclear materials and solidified wastes containing long-lived radionuclides have been presented. The experience with the use of this technique for assessment of ecological safety for the long-term storage of plutonium-containing intermediate level wastes in underground facilities existing in the crystalline rock mass has been considered. The probabilistic evaluations of events of the emergency sequences of abnormal situations are based on the results of 40-year in-situ investigations in the rock mass. Feasibility of optimization has been shown for technological design solutions on storage facilities by the ''risk-costs'' principle. (authors)

  9. cap alpha. -transfer reactions /sup 27/Al(/sup 6/Li, d)/sup 31/P, /sup 29/Si(/sup 6/Li, d)/sup 33/S and /sup 31/P(/sup 6/Li, d)/sup 35/Cl at 36 MeV. [Angular distributions, EFR DWBA, spectroscopic strengths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eswaran, M A; Gove, H E; Cook, R; Sikora, B [Rochester Univ., NY (USA). Nuclear Structure Research Lab.

    1979-08-13

    The ..cap alpha..-transfer reactions /sup 27/Al(/sup 6/Li,d)/sup 31/P,/sup 29/Si(/sup 6/Li,d) /sup 33/S and /sup 31/P(Li,d)/sup 35/Cl have been studied at a /sup 6/Li energy of 36 MeV. Absolute cross sections and angular distributions have been measured and an exact finite-range distorted-wave Born approximation analysis assuming a direct cluster transfer has been used to extract from the data ..cap alpha..-particle spectroscopic strengths for levels populated in /sup 31/P, /sup 33/S and /sup 35/Cl in three reactions respectively. The results show that in the case of most of the low-lying excited states of /sup 31/P a single value of L of the transferred ..cap alpha..-particle contributes, though a multiplicity of L-values are allowed by angular momentum selection rules. It is also found that the ..cap alpha..-particle spectroscopic strength of the ground state of /sup 31/P is a factor of 2 more than the strengths of the ground states of /sup 33/S and /sup 35/Cl. The ..cap alpha..-spectroscopic strengths of ground states of these, as well as other odd-A s-d shell nuclei, are compared with the presently available shell model calculations.

  10. Solution of safety problems for nuclear power plants with WWER-440 reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krett, V.; Pernitsa, R.; Pfann, Ya.; Zbeglik, J.

    1982-01-01

    Institute of nuclear research (INR) of Czechoslovakian Atomic Energy Commission isto fulfil the supervision functions within the field of nuclear power research and development. The problems of safe operation ensurance for the nuclear power plants (NPP) with WWER-440 reactors are studied within the frame of sever major issues: code standardization and devolopment of guiding materials for the state supervision; neutronic and thermohydrolic data processing for the accident analysis; operation reliability studies of the safety systems and estimates of separate component failure importance; assessment of the accidents resulting from the equipment misfunctioning and component failures; development of a controlled reliability program; evaluation of the atomic installationsimpact on the environment; ensurence of the reactor vessel reliability and durability under irradiation. The NPP safety analysis incorporates the calculations of transient and accidental regimes for the core, the primary loop and the entire plant. A number of codes has been produced which allow to determine the state of fuel elements during operation just before the accidents assessed, thermohydrolic conditions in the coolant and the temperature distribution within the fuel both for the stationary reactor conditions and for transient regimes. A mathematical model has been deveoloped, including the description of all the primary loop major components. The Soviet code DYNAMIKA has been adopted and adjusted for EC-1040 computer, there by the accident analysis for the entire NPP has been made possible. On the basis of american SAFTE code a faster SAFEDO-2 code has been developed employing the Monte Carlo method for the accident analysis of a complex system described by means of a failure tree. The discussed codes are used at the data assessment for the accident analysis part of the safety reports as well as for the reliability evaluation of the emergency core cooling system [ru

  11. Acidity and Structure of Isosaccharinate in Aqueous Solution: A Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Herman M.; Rai, Dhanpat; Hess, Nancy J.; Xia, Yuanxian; Rao, Linfeng

    2003-01-01

    Dilute aqueous solutions of the calcium and sodium salts of -D-isosaccharinate (ISA) have been analyzed by 13C and 1H NMR spectroscopy. The positions of the six 13C ISA NMR lines show a pH dependence that can be used to infer that the most acidic proton is the one associated with the carboxylate group, with a log k0 of -3.27 - -3.36 for the reaction H(ISA) H+ K ISA-

  12. Analysis and solution of spike current of intermediate range for nuclear instrumentation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xingqiang; Xiao Yu; Xue Bin; Wang Yinli

    2015-01-01

    During the initial start-up of HYH NPP unit 1, spike currents occurred in intermediate range channel of RPN system and reactor trip was triggered. After analyzing the operation principle of intermediate range channel and site inspection, and doing simulating test, the root cause was fixed on the bug of range switching of intermediate range channel. Then a solution based on parameters optimizing was made and executed on site. (authors)

  13. Integral solution of equiaxed solidification with an interface kinetics model for nuclear waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naterer, G.F.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper, a one-dimensional analysis of energy and species transport during binary dendritic solidification is presented and compared to experimental results. The paper's objective is a continuation of previous studies of solidification control for the waste management of nuclear materials in the underground disposal concept. In the present analysis, interface kinetics at the solid - liquid interface accounts for recalescent thermal behaviour during solidification. The theoretical results were compared to available experimental results and the agreement appears fair although some discrepancies have been attributed to uncertainties with thermophysical properties. (author)

  14. Influence of microstructure on stress corrosion cracking of mild steel in synthetic caustic-nitrate nuclear waste solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarafian, P.G.

    1975-12-01

    The influence of alloy microstructure on stress corrosion cracking of mild steel in caustic-nitrate synthetic nuclear waste solutions was studied. An evaluation was made of the effect of heat treatment on a representative material (ASTM A 516 Grade 70) used in the construction of high activity radioactive waste storage tanks at Savannah River Plant. Several different microstructures were tested for susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking. Precracked fracture specimens loaded in either constant load or constant crack opening displacement were exposed to a variety of caustic-nitrate and nitrate solutions. Results were correlated with the mechanical and corrosion properties of the microstructures. Crack velocity and crack arrest stress intensity were found to be related to the yield strength of the steel microstructures. Fractographic evidence indicated pH depletion and corrosive crack tip chemistry conditions even in highly caustic solutions. Experimental results were compatible with crack growth by a strain-assisted anodic dissolution mechanism; however, hydrogen embrittlement also was considered possible

  15. Application of COMSOL in the solution of the neutron diffusion equations for fast nuclear reactors in stationary state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva A, L.; Del Valle G, E.

    2012-10-01

    This work shows an application of the program COMSOL Multi physics Ver. 4.2a in the solution of the neutron diffusion equations for several energy groups in nuclear reactors whose core is formed by assemblies of hexagonal transversal cut as is the cas of fast reactors. A reference problem of 4 energy groups is described of which takes the cross sections which are processed by means of a program that prepares the definition of the constants utilized in COMSOL for the generic partial differential equations that this uses. The considered solution domain is the sixth part of the core which is applied frontier conditions of reflection and incoming flux zero. The discretization mesh is elaborated in automatic way by COMSOL and the solution method is one of finite elements of Lagrange grade two. The reference problem is known as the Knk with and without control rod which led to propose the calculation of the effective multiplication factor in function of the control rod fraction from a value 0 (completely inserted control rod) until the value 1 (completely extracted control rod). Besides this the reactivity was determined as well as the change of this in function of control rod fraction. The neutrons scalar flux for each energy group with and without control rod is proportioned. The reported results show a behavior similar to the one reported in other works but using the discreet ordinates S 2 approximation. (Author)

  16. Organizational factors in design and implementation of technological and organizational solutions in the nuclear industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macchi, L.; Reiman, T.; Savioja, P. (VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland (Finland)); Kahlbom, U. (Risk Pilot AB, Stockholm (Sweden)); Rollenhagen, C. (Vattenfall (Sweden))

    2012-03-15

    Design is often found as one of the contributing factors in accident in the nuclear industry. The design of new technological systems and organisational structures has to take into account and be driven by the future users' needs and has to consider how their role and work practices within the organisation will be affected. The SADE project explores to which extend the concepts of safety culture and resilience engineering can contribute to the prevention of design errors when no hindsight data are available. In 2011, the SADE project focused on gathering experience and clarifying the current issues and challenges related to the design process. During 2011 seventeen interviews have been conducted in Finland and Sweden to identify some of the major challenges the nuclear industry is currently facing. At the same time a literature review has been conducted to establish a sound common theoretical ground. This progress report presents some of the relevant theoretical findings and preliminary results from the interviews. (Author)

  17. Accelerator-driven transmutation: a high-tech solution to some nuclear waste problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hechanova, A.E.

    2000-01-01

    This paper discusses current technical and political issues regarding the innovative concept of using accelerator-driven transmutation processes for nuclear waste management. Two complex and related issues are addressed. First, the evolution and improvements of the design technologies are identified to indicate that there has been sufficient technological advancement with regard to a 1991 scientific peer review to warrant the advent of a large-scale national research and development program. Second, the economics and politics of the transmutation system are examined to identify non-technical barriers to the implementation of the program. Transmutation of waste has been historically viewed by nuclear engineers as one of those technologies that is too good to be true and probably too expensive to be feasible. The concept discussed in the present paper uses neutrons ( which result from protons accelerated into spallation targets)to transmute the major very long-lived hazardous materials such as the radioactive isotopes of technetium, iodine, neptunium, plutonium, americium, and curium. Although not a new concept, accelerator-driven transmutation technology (ADTT) lead by a team at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has made some significant advances which are discussed in the present paper. (authors)

  18. A systematic approach to human performance improvement in nuclear power plants: Training solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-03-01

    In 1996, the IAEA published Technical Reports Series No. 380, Nuclear Power Plant Personnel Training and its Evaluation: A Guidebook. This publication provides guidance with respect to development, implementation and evaluation of training programmes for all NPP personnel. The IAEA International Working Group on Training and Qualification of Nuclear Power Plant Personnel recommended that an additional publication be prepared that provided further details concerning the training of NPP personnel on non-technical or soft skills. This report has been prepared in response to that recommendation. In the past, much of the focus of formal NPP training and development programmes was on the technical skills of NPP personnel, particularly those of control room operators. The environment in which NPPs operate is continually changing, placing new demands on NPP personnel to work more efficiently and effectively while continuing to maintain the high levels of safety required of NPPs. In this report, an integrated approach that considers training along with other ways to achieve desired levels of human performance is suggested

  19. A multilateral enrichment facility in Iran as a solution to the nuclear crisis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forden, G.; Thomson, J.

    2006-01-01

    A little known report issued in early 2005 by a group of experts might contain the seeds for solving the current Iranian crisis. The group, convened by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), examined the technical aspects of a number of options for multinationalizing the nuclear fuel cycle as a way of assuring all countries in good standing with the Nonproliferation Treaty access to peaceful nuclear technology. One option examined in general by the IAEA experts group could be used to guarantee Iran's future nuclearfuel supply and prevent its abuse for military purposes. We examine this option in detail for the case of Iran. It could be used to solve the Iranian crisis by constructing an enrichment facility on Iranian soil jointly owned and operated by Iran and Western governments. As a condition for this plant being built, Iran would pledge--and undertake additional safeguard requirements to verify--that it is not engaging in enrichment activities anywhere else; a pledge other countries have made under similar circumstances when they joined URENCO, a European enrichment consortium. Furthermore, the very nature of the joint venture would guarantee that Iran could not covertly divert any of the LEU or the plant's enrichment capabilities for military purposes. Western technicians would be present at, and in fact jointly operate, the facility 24-hours per day, seven days per week; Western accountants would be monitoring all the business activities of the venture; and Western managers would be involved in all operating decisions. (authors)

  20. A systematic approach to human performance improvement in nuclear power plants: Training solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    In 1996, the IAEA published Technical Reports Series No. 380, Nuclear Power Plant Personnel Training and its Evaluation: A Guidebook. This publication provides guidance with respect to development, implementation and evaluation of training programmes for all NPP personnel. The IAEA International Working Group on Training and Qualification of Nuclear Power Plant Personnel recommended that an additional publication be prepared that provided further details concerning the training of NPP personnel on non-technical or soft skills. This report has been prepared in response to that recommendation. In the past, much of the focus of formal NPP training and development programmes was on the technical skills of NPP personnel, particularly those of control room operators. The environment in which NPPs operate is continually changing, placing new demands on NPP personnel to work more efficiently and effectively while continuing to maintain the high levels of safety required of NPPs. In this report, an integrated approach that considers training along with other ways to achieve desired levels of human performance is suggested.

  1. Electron spray ionization mass spectrometry and 2D 31P NMR for monitoring 18O/16O isotope exchange and turnover rates of metabolic oligophosphates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemutlu, Emirhan; Juranic, Nenad; Macura, Slobodan; Zhang, Song; Terzic, Andre; Dzeja, Petras P.; Ward, Lawrence E.; Dutta, Tumpa; Nair, K.S.

    2012-01-01

    A new method was here developed for the determination of 18 O-labeling ratios in metabolic oligophosphates, such as ATP, at different phosphoryl moieties (α-, β-, and γ-ATP) using sensitive and rapid electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). The ESI-MS-based method for monitoring of 18 O/ 16 O exchange was validated with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and 2D 31 P NMR correlation spectroscopy, the current standard methods in labeling studies. Significant correlation was found between isotopomer selective 2D 31 P NMR spectroscopy and isotopomer less selective ESI-MS method. Results demonstrate that ESI-MS provides a robust analytical platform for simultaneous determination of levels, 18 O-labeling kinetics and turnover rates of α-, β-, and γ-phosphoryls in ATP molecule. Such method is advantageous for large scale dynamic phosphometabolomic profiling of metabolic networks and acquiring information on the status of probed cellular energetic system. (orig.)

  2. Ionization behavior of polyphosphoinositides determined via the preparation of pH titration curves using solid-state 31P NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graber, Zachary T; Kooijman, Edgar E

    2013-01-01

    Detailed knowledge of the degree of ionization of lipid titratable groups is important for the evaluation of protein-lipid and lipid-lipid interactions. The degree of ionization is commonly evaluated by acid-base titration, but for lipids localized in a multicomponent membrane interface this is not a suitable technique. For phosphomonoester-containing lipids such as the polyphosphoinositides, phosphatidic acid, and ceramide-1-phosphate, this is more conveniently accomplished by (31)P NMR. Here, we describe a solid-state (31)P NMR procedure to construct pH titration curves to determine the degree of ionization of phosphomonoester groups in polyphosphoinositides. This procedure can also be used, with suitable sample preparation conditions, for other important signaling lipids. Access to a solid-state, i.e., magic angle spinning, capable NMR spectrometer is assumed. The procedures described here are valid for a Bruker instrument, but can be adapted for other spectrometers as needed.

  3. Model calculation of neutron reaction data for {sup 31}P in the energy range from 0.1 to 20 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiangting, Li [Physics Department, Northwest Univ., Xi' an (China); Zhigang, Ge [China Nuclear Data Center, China Inst. of Atomic Energy, Beijing (China); Xiuquan, Sun [Engineering and Technology Department, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen (China)

    2006-07-15

    The neutron data calculation of {sup 31}P in the energy range from 0.1 to 20 MeV was carried out. The neutron optical potential parameters for {sup 31}P in energy range from O.1 to 20 MeV were obtained, based on the fitting of the available neutron experimental data with the code APOM94. The DWUCK4 code was used to investigate the cross section for neutron direct inelastic scattering. The re-evaluated neutron data is based on the available measured data by using the UNF code. The theoretical results reproduce the experimental data well, and the results were given in ENDF/B-6 format. (authors)

  4. In vivo (31) P MRS assessment of intracellular NAD metabolites and NAD(+) /NADH redox state in human brain at 4 T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ming; Zhu, Xiao-Hong; Chen, Wei

    2016-07-01

    NAD(+) and NADH play key roles in cellular respiration. Intracellular redox state defined by the NAD(+) /NADH ratio (RX) reflects the cellular metabolic and physiopathological status. By taking advantage of high/ultrahigh magnetic field strengths, we have recently established a novel in vivo (31) P MRS-based NAD assay for noninvasive and quantitative measurements of intracellular NAD concentrations and redox state in animal and human brains at 16.4 T, 9.4 T and 7 T. To explore its potential for clinical application, in this study we investigated the feasibility of assessing the NAD metabolism and redox state in human brain at a lower field of 4 T by incorporating the (1) H-decoupling technique with the in vivo (31) P NAD assay. The use of (1) H decoupling significantly narrowed the linewidths of NAD and α-ATP resonances, resulting in higher sensitivity and better spectral resolution as compared with the (1) H-coupled (31) P spectrum. These improvements made it possible to reliably quantify cerebral NAD concentrations and RX, consistent with previously reported results obtained from similar age human subjects at 7 T. In summary, this work demonstrates the capability and utility of the (1) H-decoupled (31) P MRS-based NAD assay at lower field strength; thus, it opens new opportunities for studying intracellular NAD metabolism and redox state in human brain at clinical settings. This conclusion is supported by the simulation results, indicating that similar performance and reliability as observed at 4T can be achieved at 3 T with the same signal-to-noise ratio. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. The cerebroprotective effect of dextromethorphan assessed by 1H and 31P NMR spectroscopy during global forebrain ischemia in the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tulleken, C.A.F.; Rijen, P.C. van; Berkelbach van der Sprenkel, J.W.; Verheul, H.B.; Echteld, C.J.A. van; Balasz, R.; Lewis, P.

    1991-01-01

    Global forebrain ischemia was induced in the rat model by occlusion of both carotid arteries and subsequent lowering of the blood pressure. After 30 minutes of ischemia reperfusion was established. Using 1H and 31P NMR spectroscopy tissue pH values, lactate production, cellular energy index and N-acetyl-aspartate content were determined. The survival rates and histological damage were counted. (author)

  6. Cyclohexanone solvent extraction of 99TcO4 from alkaline nuclear waste solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, W.W.

    1980-01-01

    Although the 99 Tc cyclohexanone solvent extraction process is still in the bench-scale development stage, the process appears well suited for engineering-scale removal of 99 Tc from alkaline Hanford waste solutions. The most pressing process development need is to resolve the phase disengaging problems encountered during water stripping operations. Stripping tests in pulse columns and/or centrifugal contactors are particularly needed to determine the magnitude of the phase disengaging problem in engineering-scale equipment and to find suitable remedies. 5 figures, 7 tables

  7. EXTREMUS - the German solution for act of terrorism - non-nuclear risks coverage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harbrucker, D.

    2004-01-01

    As a consequence of the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001 and the withdraw of reinsurance capacity worldwide for terrorism coverage under material damage policies EXTREMUS was founded on September 2nd, 2002 by the German insurance industry (shareholders are 16 (re) insurance groups operating in the country). EXTREMUS offers a maximum limit per insured of Euro 1,5 bn. and enjoys a warranty of the German Government to cover accumulation losses in xs of Euro 2.0 bn. up to Euro 10 bn. EXTREMUS only intervenes for policies exceeding Euro 25 mio. due to a self obligation of the primary market to maintain full coverage for smaller risks. Due to the demand of reinsurers losses caused by a b c weapons are excluded. Coverage is not available for nuclear power plants. The paper aims to deals with these issues in more details.(author)

  8. Informatics for the solution of health physics problems in nuclear medicine laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Rossi, G.; Montesanti, M.I.

    1984-01-01

    As the use of 'in vitro' and 'in vivo' radioisotope studies spreads more and more, many organizational and management problems arise. Hence an exact evaluation of current contamination levels and protection standards is very important for radiation-protection purposes. Environmental and personnel contamination levels in Nuclear Medicine Laboratories were recorded for four years and the results were evaluated by a computer-assisted method which furnished parameters such as the maximum permissible level of radioactivity at different timeintervals. They allow the health physicist to assess laboratory contamination levels as well as to classify radiation workers and places. A continuous 'monitoring' of radiation safety is possible in order to modify worker and/or laboratory classification as soon as possible, in close connection with possible changes in radiation hazards. This computer program applies equally well to other fields involving radioisotope use, such as industry, agriculture, etc. (Author)

  9. A market-based solution to the problem of nuclear and toxic waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inhaber, H.

    1991-01-01

    Siting new low-level and high-level nuclear waste sites and other hazardous facilities has been difficult, if not impossible, in recent years. Experts claim that the physical and biological risks associated with these sites are extremely low, but the public often does not believe these assertions. Psychological costs are high because large risks are perceived. Compensation methods for residents near a potential site have been suggested. However, when this technique has been attached to present programs for site selection, perspective site neighbors viewed it as coercive. A reverse Dutch auction would eliminate these objections and generate a volunteer political jurisdiction, removing the element of coercion. Residents of a volunteer area would set their own price for psychological compensation. The Dutch auction feature would set a limit on this price, however, The reverse Dutch auction in effect sets the true social cost of hazardous waste sites, but retains environmental safeguards

  10. A genetic algorithm solution for a nuclear power plant risk-cost maintenance model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tong Jiejuan; Mao Dingyuan; Xue Dazhi

    2004-01-01

    Reliability Centered Maintenance (RCM) is one of the popular maintenance optimization methods according to certain kinds of priorities. Traditional RCM usually analyzes and optimizes the maintenance strategy from the viewpoint of component instead of the whole maintenance program impact. Research presented in this paper is a pilot study using PSA techniques in RCM. How to reflect the effect on component unavailability by the maintenance activities such as surveillance testing and preventive maintenance in PSA model is discussed firstly. Based on the discussion, a maintenance risk-cost model is established for global maintenance optimization in a nuclear power plant, and a genetic algorithm (GA) is applied to solve such a model to get the global optimized maintenance strategy. Finally, the result got from a simple test case based on a risk-cost model consisting of 10 components is presented

  11. A numerical solution model of the rewetting of a nuclear fuel rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braz Filho, F.A.

    1984-01-01

    The study of thermal behaviour of a nuclear reactor fuel rod during the reflooding phase of the loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) is presented. A mathematical model and a numerical scheme were proposed in order to solve the bidimensional heat conduction equation in cylindrical coordinates. The phenomenon of reflooding is not completely understood. One of the main difficulties is to estimate the heat transfer coefficient (h). For this reason two different models were elaborated: in the first three regions are considered and in each region h is considered constant; in the second the h profile is adjusted according to the boiling curve. The three region model yields satisfactory results at high and low mass flows while the 'boiling curve' model yields reasonable at low flows. (Author) [pt

  12. Quality control test solutions for diagnostic radiology, nuclear medicine and health physics with PTW equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Froescher, Olga

    2007-01-01

    Complete test of publication follows. In 1922 PTW-Freiburg was founded to produce and market a revolutionary new electromechanical component for measuring very small electrical charges. Today PTW is the specialist and one of the global market leaders for manufacturing and supplying high-quality products in diagnostic radiology, nuclear medicine, radiation therapy and health physics. The quality control of X-ray images is influenced by a number of parameters. To maintain a consistent performance of X-ray installations, quality checks have to be conducted regularly. PTW offers a variety of diagnostic test tools for different X-ray devices, and therefore to reduce patient exposure and costs for X-ray departments. PTW's 'Code of Practice' defines in an easy and compact way how to perform quality control measurements on different diagnostic X-ray installations. The necessary equipment for measuring main parameters as well as acceptable limits are mentioned accordingly. The 'Code of Practice' bases on actual standards.

  13. Main ways for solution of nuclear power plant safety in the USSR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sidorenko, V.A.; Kovalevich, O.M.; Kramerov, A.Ya.; Bagdasarov, Yu.E.

    1977-01-01

    In this paper the principles of provisions of nuclear power plant (NPP) safety in the USSR based on the accumulated scientific and engineering experience of design, construction and operating of NPP are discussed. Methods for the decision of the problem were different in various stages of development of nuclear energy and they will be changed in the light of future experience and when the scope of NPP utilization will be broadened. It was formulated the complex of means and ways for providing the real safety of NPP. It includes both the technical and organizing measures and all they are important to solve the NPP safety problem. The first two of these conditions of providing the safety - the high quality of NPP equipment and its constant control during the whole operation of NPP - have to minimize possible failures of power plant elements capable of resulting in an accident conditions. Design and utilization of effective safety systems at NPP and localization systems - these are the next two conditions to provide the safety called upon either to exclude or to attenuate up to the reasonable level the radioactive product yield outside the determined boundaries. The normalization of safety problems and the effective state inspection after keeping the required actions are the next necessary links of this complex called upon to ensure the fulfillment of all safety requirements. The report concerns the realization of formulated procedure to the provision of NPP safety with reactors of WWER and RBM-K types are being put into operation in the Soviet Union. The versatility of approach to the safety provision allows to attain the required safety by various means depending on the type of reactor, its siting and other features concentrating attention to one or another factors. Alongside with the above-mentioned, the paper considers the special requirements and safety measures regarding reactors of next generation such as liquid metal breeders of BN-type and other systems [ru

  14. Relaxation processes in aqueous solutions upon X-ray exposure. Entanglement of electronic and nuclear dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unger, Isaak

    2017-07-01

    About a decade ago new types of electronic non-radiative relaxation processes, involving the environment of an electronically excited or ionized monomer, have been predicted for van der Waals clusters and these were also the first systems where such processes have been detected experimentally. These new autoionization channels encompass the recombination of an electron and a hole, and the energy transfer to a neighboring atom or molecule. Two processes can be distinguished here. In the intermolecular Coulombic decay (ICD) the hole created upon ionization of a monomer is filled by a valence electron of the same species, and the energy released in this electron-hole recombination is used to ionize a neighboring species. In the electron transfer mediated decay (ETMD) the initial hole is filled by an electron from a neighboring species, and the energy released by this recombination is either used to ionize the same neighbor species, or to ionize a third monomer. In more recent experiments on liquid water it has been discovered that these non- local autoionization processes are strongly coupled with ultrafast nuclear dynamics. The core ionization initiates proton motion along a hydrogen donor-bond of the electronically excited water cation. This nuclear dynamics leads to the formation of transient cationic species where a proton is shared by two neighboring water molecules. Subsequent autoionization, either via Auger decay, ICD or ETMD, then occurs from any of such structure transients. This relaxation process is termed proton transfer mediated charge separation, PTM-CS. It has been found in a number of experiments that the probability of PTM-CS to occur depends on the hydrogen-bond strength between the core-ionized molecule and solvent molecules.

  15. Substitution of chlorinated and fluorinated solvents by biodegradable detergent solution in components cleaning of nuclear fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, Andre Luiz Pinto da Silva

    2000-01-01

    As the auxiliary oils used in machining evolved from integral into aqueous emulsion, and later on into aqueous-solution synthetic oils, the components cleaning process with organic solvents, originally adopted at the Fuel Element Factory (FEC), Industrias Nucleares do Brasil S.A. (INB) began to present problems in removing oil residues from machined components, due to the incompatibility between aqueous and organic media. In order to eliminate such incompatibility and adapt the process to the environmental laws restricting production and use of chlorinated or fluorinated solvents as a measure for preserving the atmosphere's ozone layer, in 1995 INB initiated the development of a components cleaning process using biodegradable aqueous detergent. The effort was completed in 2000 with the construction of a machine in keeping with the specific geometry of the fuel-assembly components and the operating conditions required for working with the new process. (author)

  16. Toxic actions of dinoseb in medaka (Oryzias latipes) embryos as determined by in vivo 31P NMR, HPLC-UV and 1H NMR metabolomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viant, Mark R; Pincetich, Christopher A; Hinton, David E; Tjeerdema, Ronald S

    2006-03-10

    Changes in metabolism of Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) embryos exposed to dinoseb (2-sec-butyl-4,6-dinitrophenol), a substituted dinitrophenol herbicide, were determined by in vivo (31)P NMR, high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC)-UV, and (1)H NMR metabolomics. ATP and phosphocreatine (PCr) metabolism were characterized within intact embryos by in vivo (31)P NMR; concentrations of ATP, GTP, ADP, GDP, AMP and PCr were determined by HPLC-UV; and changes in numerous polar metabolites were characterized by (1)H NMR-based metabolomics. Rangefinding exposures determined two sublethal doses of dinoseb, 50 and 75 ppb, in which embryos survived from 1-day post fertilization (DPF) through the duration of embryogenesis. In vivo (31)P NMR data were acquired from 900 embryos in 0, 50, and 75 ppb dinoseb at 14, 62, and 110 h (n = 6 groups) after initiation of exposure. After 110 h, embryos were observed for normal development and hatching success, then either preserved in 10% formalin for growth analysis or flash frozen and extracted for HPLC-UV and (1)H NMR analysis. Dinoseb exposure at both concentrations resulted in significant declines in [ATP] and [PCr] at 110 h as measured by in vivo (31)P NMR (p fashion. Metabolic effects measured by in vivo (31)P NMR showed a significant increase in orthophosphate levels (P(i); p < 0.05), and significant decreases in [ATP], [PCr] and the PCr/P(i) ratio (p < 0.05). Metabolomics revealed a dose-response relationship between dinoseb and endogenous metabolite changes, with both dinoseb concentrations producing significantly different metabolic profiles from controls (p < 0.05). Metabolic changes included decreased concentrations of ATP, PCr, alanine and tyrosine, and increased concentrations of lactate with medaka embryotoxicity. This study demonstrated that medaka embryos respond to dinoseb with significant changes in metabolism, reduced growth and heart rates, and increased abnormal development and post-exposure mortality. All

  17. The continual innovation of commercial PET/CT solutions in nuclear cardiology: Siemens Healthineers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendriem, Bernard; Reed, Jessie; McCullough, Kathryn; Khan, Mohammad Raza; Smith, Anne M; Thomas, Damita; Long, Misty

    2018-04-10

    Cardiac PET/CT is an evolving, non-invasive imaging modality that impacts patient management in many clinical scenarios. Beyond offering the capability to assess myocardial perfusion, inflammatory cardiac pathologies, and myocardial viability, cardiac PET/CT also allows for the non-invasive quantitative assessment of myocardial blood flow (MBF) and myocardial flow reserve (MFR). Recognizing the need for an enhanced comprehension of coronary physiology, Siemens Healthineers implemented a sophisticated solution for the calculation of MBF and MFR in 2009. As a result, each aspect of their innovative scanner and image-processing technology seamlessly integrates into an efficient, easy-to-use workflow for everyday clinical use that maximizes the number of patients who potentially benefit from this imaging modality.

  18. Abstract of programs for nuclear reactor calculation and kinetic equations solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marakazov, A.A.

    1977-01-01

    The collection includes about 50 annotations of programmes,developed in the Kurchatov Atomic Energy Institute in 1971-1976. The programmes are intended for calculating the neutron flux, for solving systems of multigroup equations in P 3 approximation, for calculating the reactor cell, for analysing the system stability, breeding ratio etc. The programme annotations are compiled according to the following diagram: 1.Programme title. 2.Computer type. 3.Physical problem. 4.Solution method. 5.Calculation limitations. 6.Characteristic computer time. 7.Programme characteristic features. 8.Bound programmes. 9.Programme state. 10.Literature allusions in the programme. 11.Required memory resourses. 12.Programming language. 13.Operation system. 14.Names of authors and place of programme adjusting

  19. Solution structure of apamin determined by nuclear magnetic resonance and distance geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pease, J.H.B.; Wemmer, D.E.

    1988-11-01

    The solution structure of the bee venom neurotoxin apamin has been determined with a distance geometry program using distance constraints derived from NMR. Twenty embedded structures were generated and refined by using the program DSPACE. After error minimization using both conjugate gradient and dynamics algorithms, six structures had very low residual error. Comparisons of these show that the backbone of the peptide is quite well-defined with the largest rms difference between backbone atoms in these structures of 1.34 /Angstrom/. The side chains have far fewer constraints and show greater variability in their positions. The structure derived here is generally consistent with the qualitative model previously described, with most differences occurring in the loop between the ..beta..-turn (residues 2-5) and the C-terminal ..cap alpha..-helix (residues 9-17). Comparisons are made with previously derived models from NMR data and other methods.

  20. Solution structure of apamin determined by nuclear magnetic resonance and distance geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pease, J.H.B.; Wemmer, D.E.

    1988-01-01

    The solution structure of the bee venom neurotoxin apamin has been determined with a distance geometry program using distance constraints derived from NMR. Twenty embedded structures were generated and refined by using the program DSPACE. After error minimization using both conjugate gradient and dynamics algorithms, six structures had very low residual error. Comparisons of these show that the backbone of the peptide is quite well-defined with the largest rms difference between backbone atoms in these structures of 1.34 /Angstrom/. The side chains have far fewer constraints and show greater variability in their positions. The structure derived here is generally consistent with the qualitative model previously described, with most differences occurring in the loop between the β-turn (residues 2-5) and the C-terminal α-helix (residues 9-17). Comparisons are made with previously derived models from NMR data and other methods

  1. Mechanistic studies of the oxidation of soluble species of ruthenium in nitric acid solutions. Application to the removal of ruthenium from nuclear fuel dissolution solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carron, V.

    2001-01-01

    Ruthenium is one of the most troublesome fission products during nuclear fuel reprocessing. His removal from nitric acid fuel dissolution solutions, above the PUREX process, is under consideration. Electro-volatilization could be a possible way to eliminate this element. It consists in the oxidation of soluble ruthenium species coupled with the volatilization of formed RuO 4 . Soluble species are nitrate and nitro complexes of nitrosyl ruthenium RuNO 3+ . The first part of this work deals with the direct oxidation of RuNO 3+ at a golden or a platinum anode. It has been investigated by cyclic voltammetry and infrared and UV-visible reflectance spectroscopy. The oxidation of RuNO 3+ begins with an adsorption step, which precedes the formation of RuO 4 . Then a reaction between RuO 4 and RuNO 3+ occurs to produce a Ru IV compound, which is also electro-oxidized to RuO 4 . The second part concerns potentiostatic electro-volatilization experiences. The rate of electro-volatilization decreases with increasing HNO 3 concentration. At low concentrations, kinetic is controlled by the volatilization of RuO 4 . The rate-determining step is the oxidation of RuNO 3+ at concentrations higher than 1 M. In HNO 3 4 M, the addition of AgNO 3 is required to accelerate the oxidation of RuNO 3+ . The last part is devoted to the study of the indirect oxidation of RuNO 3+ . The electrocatalytic power of electro-generated Ag II is illustrated by voltammetric techniques and potentiostatic electrolysis. The existence of a limit concentration of AgNO 3 is shown (which value depends on experimental conditions) beyond which kinetic is controlled by the RuO 4 volatilization step. These results indicate that the electro-volatilization kinetic could be increased by optimizing the volatilization conditions. (author)

  2. Bioprospecting of gum kondagogu (Cochlospermum gossypium) for bioremediation of uranium (VI) from aqueous solution and synthetic nuclear power reactor effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sashidhar, R.B.; Selvi, S. Kalaignana; Vinod, V.T.P.; Kosuri, Tanuja; Raju, D.; Karuna, R.

    2015-01-01

    An ecofriendly green chemistry method using a natural biopolymer, Gum Kondagogu (GK) for the removal of U (VI) from aqueous, simulated nuclear effluents was studied. The adsorption characteristic of GK towards U (VI) from aqueous solution was studied at varied pH, contact time, adsorbent dose, initial U (VI) concentration and temperature using UV–Visible spectroscopy and ICP-MS. Maximum adsorption was seen at pH 4, 0.1% GK with 60 min contact time at room temperature. The GK- U (VI) composite was characterized by FT-IR, zeta potential, TEM and SEM-EDAX. The Langmuir isotherm was found to be 487 mg of U (VI) g −1 of GK. The adsorption capacity and (%) of U (VI) was found to be 490 ± 5.4 mg g −1 and 98.5%. Moreover adsorption of U (VI) by GK was not influenced by other cations present in the simulated effluents. The adsorbed U (VI) was efficiently stripped from composite using 1 M HCl. - Highlights: • An eco-friendly method for removal of U (VI) from simulated nuclear effluents by Gum Kondagogu. • The Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm indicated favourable adsorption. • The adsorption (%) of U (VI) by GK was found to be 98.5%. • Desorption studies on biosorbed metal ions showed that HCl was a good eluent

  3. Particle Swarm Optimization applied to combinatorial problem aiming the fuel recharge problem solution in a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meneses, Anderson Alvarenga de Moura; Schirru, Roberto

    2005-01-01

    This work focuses on the usage the Artificial Intelligence technique Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) to optimize the fuel recharge at a nuclear reactor. This is a combinatorial problem, in which the search of the best feasible solution is done by minimizing a specific objective function. However, in this first moment it is possible to compare the fuel recharge problem with the Traveling Salesman Problem (TSP), since both of them are combinatorial, with one advantage: the evaluation of the TSP objective function is much more simple. Thus, the proposed methods have been applied to two TSPs: Oliver 30 and Rykel 48. In 1995, KENNEDY and EBERHART presented the PSO technique to optimize non-linear continued functions. Recently some PSO models for discrete search spaces have been developed for combinatorial optimization. Although all of them having different formulation from the ones presented here. In this paper, we use the PSO theory associated with to the Random Keys (RK)model, used in some optimizations with Genetic Algorithms. The Particle Swarm Optimization with Random Keys (PSORK) results from this association, which combines PSO and RK. The adaptations and changings in the PSO aim to allow the usage of the PSO at the nuclear fuel recharge. This work shows the PSORK being applied to the proposed combinatorial problem and the obtained results. (author)

  4. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA interactions in solution studied by NMR.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo De Biasio

    Full Text Available PCNA is an essential factor for DNA replication and repair. It forms a ring shaped structure of 86 kDa by the symmetric association of three identical protomers. The ring encircles the DNA and acts as a docking platform for other proteins, most of them containing the PCNA Interaction Protein sequence (PIP-box. We have used NMR to characterize the interactions of PCNA with several other proteins and fragments in solution. The binding of the PIP-box peptide of the cell cycle inhibitor p21 to PCNA is consistent with the crystal structure of the complex. A shorter p21 peptide binds with reduced affinity but retains most of the molecular recognition determinants. However the binding of the corresponding peptide of the tumor suppressor ING1 is extremely weak, indicating that slight deviations from the consensus PIP-box sequence dramatically reduce the affinity for PCNA, in contrast with a proposed less stringent PIP-box sequence requirement. We could not detect any binding between PCNA and the MCL-1 or the CDK2 protein, reported to interact with PCNA in biochemical assays. This suggests that they do not bind directly to PCNA, or they do but very weakly, with additional unidentified factors stabilizing the interactions in the cell. Backbone dynamics measurements show three PCNA regions with high relative flexibility, including the interdomain connector loop (IDCL and the C-terminus, both of them involved in the interaction with the PIP-box. Our work provides the basis for high resolution studies of direct ligand binding to PCNA in solution.

  5. Hepatic lipid profiling of deer mice fed ethanol using 1H and 31P NMR spectroscopy: A dose-dependent subchronic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernando, Harshica; Bhopale, Kamlesh K.; Boor, Paul J.; Ansari, G.A. Shakeel; Kaphalia, Bhupendra S.

    2012-01-01

    Chronic alcohol abuse is a 2nd major cause of liver disease resulting in significant morbidity and mortality. Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is characterized by a wide spectrum of pathologies starting from fat accumulation (steatosis) in early reversible stage to inflammation with or without fibrosis and cirrhosis in later irreversible stages. Previously, we reported significant steatosis in the livers of hepatic alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH)-deficient (ADH − ) vs. hepatic ADH-normal (ADH + ) deer mice fed 4% ethanol daily for 2 months [Bhopale et al., 2006, Alcohol 39, 179–188]. However, ADH − deer mice fed 4% ethanol also showed a significant mortality. Therefore, a dose-dependent study was conducted to understand the mechanism and identify lipid(s) involved in the development of ethanol-induced fatty liver. ADH − and ADH + deer mice fed 1, 2 or 3.5% ethanol daily for 2 months and fatty infiltration in the livers were evaluated by histology and by measuring dry weights of extracted lipids. Lipid metabolomic changes in extracted lipids were determined by proton ( 1 H) and 31 phosphorus ( 31 P) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The NMR data was analyzed by hierarchical clustering (HC) and principle component analysis (PCA) for pattern recognition. Extensive vacuolization by histology and significantly increased dry weights of total lipids found only in the livers of ADH − deer mice fed 3.5% ethanol vs. pair-fed controls suggest a dose-dependent formation of fatty liver in ADH − deer mouse model. Analysis of NMR data of ADH − deer mice fed 3.5% ethanol vs. pair-fed controls shows increases for total cholesterol, esterified cholesterol, fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs), triacylglycerides and unsaturation, and decreases for free cholesterol, phospholipids and allylic and diallylic protons. Certain classes of neutral lipids (cholesterol esters, fatty acyl chain (-COCH 2 -) and FAMEs) were also mildly increased in ADH − deer mice fed 1 or 2

  6. Hepatic lipid profiling of deer mice fed ethanol using {sup 1}H and {sup 31}P NMR spectroscopy: A dose-dependent subchronic study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernando, Harshica; Bhopale, Kamlesh K.; Boor, Paul J.; Ansari, G.A. Shakeel; Kaphalia, Bhupendra S., E-mail: bkaphali@utmb.edu

    2012-11-01

    Chronic alcohol abuse is a 2nd major cause of liver disease resulting in significant morbidity and mortality. Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is characterized by a wide spectrum of pathologies starting from fat accumulation (steatosis) in early reversible stage to inflammation with or without fibrosis and cirrhosis in later irreversible stages. Previously, we reported significant steatosis in the livers of hepatic alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH)-deficient (ADH{sup −}) vs. hepatic ADH-normal (ADH{sup +}) deer mice fed 4% ethanol daily for 2 months [Bhopale et al., 2006, Alcohol 39, 179–188]. However, ADH{sup −} deer mice fed 4% ethanol also showed a significant mortality. Therefore, a dose-dependent study was conducted to understand the mechanism and identify lipid(s) involved in the development of ethanol-induced fatty liver. ADH{sup −} and ADH{sup +} deer mice fed 1, 2 or 3.5% ethanol daily for 2 months and fatty infiltration in the livers were evaluated by histology and by measuring dry weights of extracted lipids. Lipid metabolomic changes in extracted lipids were determined by proton ({sup 1}H) and {sup 31}phosphorus ({sup 31}P) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The NMR data was analyzed by hierarchical clustering (HC) and principle component analysis (PCA) for pattern recognition. Extensive vacuolization by histology and significantly increased dry weights of total lipids found only in the livers of ADH{sup −} deer mice fed 3.5% ethanol vs. pair-fed controls suggest a dose-dependent formation of fatty liver in ADH{sup −} deer mouse model. Analysis of NMR data of ADH{sup −} deer mice fed 3.5% ethanol vs. pair-fed controls shows increases for total cholesterol, esterified cholesterol, fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs), triacylglycerides and unsaturation, and decreases for free cholesterol, phospholipids and allylic and diallylic protons. Certain classes of neutral lipids (cholesterol esters, fatty acyl chain (-COCH{sub 2}-) and FAMEs) were

  7. 5 steps to delivering safe, secure and reliable rail solutions for the nuclear industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Connelly, C. [Direct Rail Services, Warrington (United Kingdom)

    2004-07-01

    Direct Rail Services (DRS) has been operating since October 1995, following the decision by parent company, British Nuclear Fuels (BNFL), to create a strategic rail transport service. The decision came after the privatisation of the rail network in the UK, when the former British Rail was superseded by a range of private organisations responsible for separate areas of the industry. Individual companies became responsible for aspects such as the operation and maintenance of the network infrastructure and for passenger and freight train services. Rather than enter into contractual arrangements with third party contractors, DRS was formed - securing both the access and reliability of transport routes and availability of the rail network, providing greater guarantees about the levels of service delivery. The strategy of bringing this area of transport in house was concurrent with that of international transport, utilising its own fleet of ships for overseas fuel movements. Freight operations began in October 1995, with the first services operating between Sellafield and the low level radioactive waste facility at Drigg.

  8. Real time analysis by in line spectrophotometry using optical fibre: application to nuclear fuel reprocessing solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pouyat, D.; Couston, L.; Noire, M.H.; Davin, T.; Delage, J.; Bouzon, C.; Goutier, J.; Marty, P.

    1998-01-01

    In nuclear fuel reprocessing factories, an in line determination of actinides and acidity is useful to control the efficiency of the liquid-liquid extraction steps. Although molecular absorptiometric methods are very efficient at the laboratory scale, in-line analysis require to develop passive optical fibre sensor, spectral treatment, and optical fibre active sensors for ions or molecule without optical property such H + . In the first case, a specific optical fibre sensor has been developed to reduce radiological or optical contamination, and to remove the hydraulic perturbations of an intrusive technology. The optical spectrum is directly measured- through a Teflon-PFA tube. Five determination (U IV , U VI , Pu III , Pu IV and HNO 2 ) on eight different process point are achieved every 3 seconds, by using Partial Least Square (PLS) multivariate treatment based on a standards data base. For non linear interference, such as matrix effects on U VI spectrum in nitric acid media, PLS is not very efficient. A physical-chemical model is then required to get a linear relationship. For acidity measurements, an acid-sensitive dye is coated on the core of an optical fiber by the Sol-Gel process. The sensor response, proportional to the indicator protonation, is based on the evanescent wave absorption. This system is free from spectral interference, the response time is fast and measurements are reversible, even with Pu IV at 4 g/l. (author)

  9. 5 steps to delivering safe, secure and reliable rail solutions for the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connelly, C.

    2004-01-01

    Direct Rail Services (DRS) has been operating since October 1995, following the decision by parent company, British Nuclear Fuels (BNFL), to create a strategic rail transport service. The decision came after the privatisation of the rail network in the UK, when the former British Rail was superseded by a range of private organisations responsible for separate areas of the industry. Individual companies became responsible for aspects such as the operation and maintenance of the network infrastructure and for passenger and freight train services. Rather than enter into contractual arrangements with third party contractors, DRS was formed - securing both the access and reliability of transport routes and availability of the rail network, providing greater guarantees about the levels of service delivery. The strategy of bringing this area of transport in house was concurrent with that of international transport, utilising its own fleet of ships for overseas fuel movements. Freight operations began in October 1995, with the first services operating between Sellafield and the low level radioactive waste facility at Drigg

  10. Adsorption of lanthanides in aqueous solution aiming to study of nuclear wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belline, Jean de Brito

    2009-01-01

    The problem of radioactive wastes is a concern of world-wide scope, a time that does not still have a defined local for the construction of a repository for radioactive wastes of high level. One of the preliminary stages for the choice of the place more appropriate is the geologic study associated to the experimental studies of adsorption of the involved chemical species in the process. In this work, a sample of basaltic rock was used, of the South Region of the Formation Serra Geral, collected in Frederico Westphalen Town (RS), that it will be probably a candidate to the rock hostess for location of radioactive wastes. Two experiments have been carried out through, namely: 'Test Batch' and Percolating, both under atmospheric pressure, at the ambient temperature of 25 deg C, with the purpose to study the capacity of sorption of the rare earth elements - REE. The REE are used in this work in function of its analogy with the actinides, aiming at to investigate the chemistry behavior and the speciation of the same in natural waters, searching the possibility of geologic storage of radioactive wastes, a time that the adsorption of the REE depends on variables of the environment as pH, ionic strength, temperature and presence of ligands, as carbonates and constituent of surfaces of minerals. Experiment of percolating of the REE was carried through, 100ppb, in the basalt (with 80 mesh) in solutions with ionic strength 1= 0,025 M and 1=0,5 M of NaCl. pH was controlled in a range of 5,6 the 7,6 with HNO 3 addition. The concentrations were analyzed by ICP-MS. The 'Batch Test' is an efficient form of studying sorption/desorption isotherms, beyond values of the reason between the distributions solid/solution and estimation of the solubility. The percolating experiment, was carried through under pH controlled around 6, and allowed to verify the behaviour of heavy REE in comparison with the light REE. (author)

  11. All 36 exactly solvable solutions of eigenvalues for nuclear electric quadrupole interaction Hamiltonian and equivalent rigid asymmetric rotor with expanded characteristic equation listing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menke, Lorenz Harry, E-mail: lnz2004@mindspring.com [University of Pittsburgh (United States)

    2012-05-15

    This paper derives all 36 analytical solutions of the energy eigenvalues for nuclear electric quadrupole interaction Hamiltonian and equivalent rigid asymmetric rotor for polynomial degrees 1 through 4 using classical algebraic theory. By the use of double-parameterization the full general solution sets are illustrated in a compact, symmetric, structural, and usable form that is valid for asymmetry parameter {eta} is an element of (- {infinity}, + {infinity}). These results are useful for code developers in the area of Perturbed Angular Correlation (PAC), Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) and rotational spectroscopy who want to offer exact solutions whenever possible, rather that resorting to numerical solutions. In addition, by using standard linear algebra methods, the characteristic equations of all integer and half-integer spins I from 0 to 15, inclusive are represented in a compact and naturally parameterized form that illustrates structure and symmetries. This extends Nielson's listing of characteristic equations for integer spins out to I = 15, inclusive.

  12. A note on the assay of special nuclear materials in solution by x-ray fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canada, T.R.; Hsue, S.T.

    1982-01-01

    Presents a formulation that allows empirical results of the ''internal standard'' approach to be understood in a quantifiable manner, and suggests an alternative measurement procedure that removes many of the technique's undesirable features while maintaining those that add to instrumental accuracy. Assumes that the reader is familiar with x-ray fluorescence (XRF) technology. Promises a more detailed presentation, including proof-of-principle experimental results, in the future. Points out that practical applications of this approach may be achieved with both K- and L-x-ray fluorescence. Concludes that the formulation and alternative measurement procedure suggested indicates that the ''internal standard'' approach may be improved by making measurements at one or more additional x-ray energies of the element to be assayed. Effects of solution acidity variations and the relative concentrations of plutonium and uranium may be avoided. Because of the inherent stability of ratio techniques, little or no modification to this formulation is anticipated for cylindrical near-field geometries

  13. Removal of actinides from nuclear fuel reprocessing waste solutions with bidentate organophosphorus extractants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, W.W.; McIsaac, L.D.

    1975-08-01

    The neutral bidentate organophosphorus reagents DBDECMP (dibutyl-N,N-diethylcarbamylmethylenephosphonate) and its dihexyl analogue DHDECMP are candidate extractants for removal of actinides from certain acidic waste streams produced at the U. S. ERDA Hanford and Idaho Falls sites. Various chemical and physical properties including availability, cost, purification, alpha radiolysis, and aqueous phase solubility of DBDECMP and DHDECMP are reviewed. A conceptual flowsheet employing a 15 percent DBDECMP (or DHDECMP)--CCl 4 extractant for removal (and recovery) of Am and Pu from Hanford's Plutonium Reclamation Facility acid waste stream (CAW solution) was successfully demonstrated in laboratory-scale mixer-settler tests; this extraction scheme can be used to produce an actinide-free waste. A 30 percent DBDECMP-xylene flowsheet is being tested at the Idaho Falls site for removal of U, Np, Pu, and Am from Idaho Chemical Processing Plant first-cycle high-level raffinate to produce an actinide-free (less than 10 nCi alpha activity/gram) waste. (auth)

  14. Chemical aspects of the precise and accurate determination of uranium and plutonium from nuclear fuel solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinonen, O.J.

    1981-01-01

    A method for the simultaneous or separate determination of uranium and plutonium has been developed. The method is based on the sorption of uranium and plutonium as their chloro complexes on Dowex 1x10 column. When separate uranium and plutonium fractions are desired, plutonium ions are reduced to Pu (III) and eluted, after which the uranium ions are eluted with dilute HCl. Simultaneous stripping of a mass ratio U/Pu approximately 1 fraction for mass spectrometric measurements is achieved by proper choice of eluant HC1 concentration. Special attention was paid to the obtaining of americium free plutonium fractions. The distribution coefficient measurements showed that at 12.5-M HCl at least 30 % of americium ions formed anionic chloro complexes. The chemical aspects of isotopic fractionation in a multiple filament thermal ionization source were also investigated. Samples of uranium were loaded as nitrates, chlorides, and sulphates and the dependence of the measured uranium isotopic ratios on the chemical form of the loading solution as well as on the filament material was studied. Likewise the dependence of the formation of uranium and its oxide ions on various chemical and instrumental conditions was investigated using tungsten and rhenium filaments. Systematic errors arising from the chemical conditions are compared with errors arising from the automatic evaluation of of spectra. (author)

  15. New Solutions For Increasing Environmental Protection During Severe Accidents At Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulyukhin, Sergei A.; Mikheev, Nikolai B.; Falkovskii, Leo N.; Reshetov, Leo A.; Zvetkova, Marianna Ya.; Yagodkin, Ivan V.; Osipov, Viktor P.; Skvortsov, Sergei S.; Berkovich, Viktor M.; Taranov, Gennadii S.; Grigor'ev, Mikhail M.; Meshkov, Vladimir M.; Noskov, Andrei A.; Mitrofanov, Mikhail I.

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports new solutions for increasing environmental protection during severe accidents at NPPs. For NPPs with two protective shells and pressure release system such as WWER-1000 we suggest a new comprehensive, passive-mode environmental protection system of decontamination of the radioactive air-steam mixture from the containment and the inter-containment area, which includes the 'wet' stage (scrubbers, etc.), the 'dry' stage (sorption module), and also an ejector, which in a passive mode is capable of solving the multi-purpose task of decontamination of the air-steam mixture. For Russian WWER-440/230 NPPs we suggest three protection levels: 1) a jet-vortex condenser; 2) the spray system; 3) a sorption module. For modern designs of new generation NPPs, which do not provide for pressure release systems, we proposed a new passive filtering system together with the passive heat-removal system, which can be used during severe accidents in case all power supply units become unavailable. (authors)

  16. New Solutions For Increasing Environmental Protection During Severe Accidents At Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulyukhin, Sergei A.; Mikheev, Nikolai B. [Institute of Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Falkovskii, Leo N.; Reshetov, Leo A.; Zvetkova, Marianna Ya. [All-Russian Research Institute of Atomic Machine-Building, Moscow, Russia (Russian Federation); Yagodkin, Ivan V.; Osipov, Viktor P.; Skvortsov, Sergei S. [Institute of Physics and Power Engineering, Obninsk (Russian Federation); Berkovich, Viktor M.; Taranov, Gennadii S.; Grigor' ev, Mikhail M. [Institute ' Atomenergoproekt' , Moscow (Russian Federation); Meshkov, Vladimir M.; Noskov, Andrei A.; Mitrofanov, Mikhail I. [ROSENERGOATOM Concern, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2008-07-01

    This paper reports new solutions for increasing environmental protection during severe accidents at NPPs. For NPPs with two protective shells and pressure release system such as WWER-1000 we suggest a new comprehensive, passive-mode environmental protection system of decontamination of the radioactive air-steam mixture from the containment and the inter-containment area, which includes the 'wet' stage (scrubbers, etc.), the 'dry' stage (sorption module), and also an ejector, which in a passive mode is capable of solving the multi-purpose task of decontamination of the air-steam mixture. For Russian WWER-440/230 NPPs we suggest three protection levels: 1) a jet-vortex condenser; 2) the spray system; 3) a sorption module. For modern designs of new generation NPPs, which do not provide for pressure release systems, we proposed a new passive filtering system together with the passive heat-removal system, which can be used during severe accidents in case all power supply units become unavailable. (authors)

  17. Nuclear magnetic resonance study of naproxen and ibuprofen interaction with β - cyclodextrin in solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogdan, M.; Farcas, S.I.; Bojita, M.

    1999-01-01

    Modern biomedical research leads to revealing insights into the molecular activity of many therapeutic molecules. An interesting activity at the organ or cellular level, however, is not sufficient to turn a molecule into an usable drug. Problems such as limited solubility or stability can make impossible to transpose interesting in vitro properties of an experimental compound to an in vivo situation. Various physico - chemical methods have been used to improve aqueous solubility of poorly soluble drugs and to increase the life of unstable drugs, such as adjustment of pH of the aqueous solution, the complexation of drugs with various cyclodextrins and the formation of gels or emulsions. In this paper, we report a 1 H NMR study of the complex formed between naproxen and ibuprofen with β - cyclodextrin in aqueous medium. Our results confirm that inclusion occurs. Analysis of our data by the continuous variation method shows that the complexes have 1 : 1 stoichiometry. The association constants for the 1 : 1 complexes were calculated at different temperatures by non - linear least squares regression analysis of the observed changes in the chemical shifts of the drugs and β - cyclodextrin 1 H NMR lines as a function of β - cyclodextrin concentration. Thermodynamic parameters were obtained by using the temperature dependence of the association constants. Finally, based on the experimentally obtained data, the most probable structure of the investigated complexes is discussed. (authors)

  18. Collaborative ReTek exchange - An innovative solution to the skills and resource shortage in the nuclear industry - 16396

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parr, Corhyn

    2009-01-01

    A Different Approach to the Skills and Resource Shortage The Nuclear Industry has for many years been concerned about a skills and resource shortage. This has been due to a poor perception of the industry by those on the outside, highly competitive industries vying for the same resource pool, a steep retirement curve for highly qualified staff and a lack of graduates entering industry. Here in the UK the creation of the National Skill Academy for Nuclear (NSAN) has put in place a framework to record skills and look to accredit the training providers in the nuclear industry to ensure that the correct skills for the future are available. This has gone some way to solving the skills problem and developing a well recognised accredited system but what about resource - where are the additional qualified resources going to be found? Part of the Solution - A Resource Exchange. How do we solve the skills shortage? We come together as an industry and share the available resource through a collaborative resource exchange. It has been done before in the IT industry when rates for specialists hit Pounds 1500 per day and recruitment agencies were charging extortionate fees for providing temporary resource. ReTek Consulting have developed the ReTek Resource Exchange to provide a neutral collaborative platform across the supply chain; from large scale infrastructure companies and joint venture platforms through to small companies and independent consultants. Using the ReTek Exchange permanent staff are made available to work for others during periods of under-utilisation. Links with similar highly regulated industries enable further management of peaks and troughs and a growth in experienced nuclear professionals through focused training and development. The Benefits of the ReTek Exchange are: - Increased utilisation of your current workforce. - Shared cost of permanent staff. - Speedy access to staff available in your region. - Reduced need for contract or agency staff. - Access

  19. Application of digital solutions to help the safe and efficient operation of nuclear power plants; Aplicacion de soluciones digitales para la ayuda a la operacion segura y eficiente de las centrales nucleares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortega P, F.; Fernandez F, S., E-mail: fortega@tecnatom.es [Tecnatom S. A., Av. Montes de Oca 1, 28703 San Sebastian de los Reyes, Madrid (Spain)

    2017-09-15

    In the search for excellence, the emergence of solutions to digitize nuclear power plants is an opportunity to optimize the operation and safety of them. The new technologies available today in the market, applied under a global vision of the operation, can contribute to the excellent operation of nuclear power plants in terms of efficiency and effectiveness. Tecnatom has a long experience in various areas related to the operation of the plants, giving the aforementioned global vision, essential to develop global solutions that pursue the safe and efficient operation of the operation. (Author)

  20. Early Detection of Myocardial Bioenergetic Deficits: A 9.4 Tesla Complete Non Invasive 31P MR Spectroscopy Study in Mice with Muscular Dystrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weina Cui

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is the most common fatal form of muscular dystrophy characterized by striated muscle wasting and dysfunction. Patients with DMD have a very high incidence of heart failure, which is increasingly the cause of death in DMD patients. We hypothesize that in the in vivo system, the dystrophic cardiac muscle displays bioenergetic deficits prior to any functional or structural deficits. To address this we developed a complete non invasive 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P MRS approach to measure myocardial bioenergetics in the heart in vivo.Six control and nine mdx mice at 5 months of age were used for the study. A standard 3D -Image Selected In vivo Spectroscopy (3D-ISIS sequence was used to provide complete gradient controlled three-dimensional localization for heart 31P MRS. These studies demonstrated dystrophic hearts have a significant reduction in PCr/ATP ratio compare to normal (1.59±0.13 vs 2.37±0.25, p<0.05.Our present study provides the direct evidence of significant cardiac bioenergetic deficits in the in vivo dystrophic mouse. These data suggest that energetic defects precede the development of significant hemodynamic or structural changes. The methods provide a clinically relevant approach to use myocardial energetics as an early marker of disease in the dystrophic heart. The new method in detecting the in vivo bioenergetics abnormality as an early non-invasive marker of emerging dystrophic cardiomyopathy is critical in management of patients with DMD, and optimized therapies aimed at slowing or reversing the cardiomyopathy.

  1. 13C and 31P NMR study of gluconeogenesis: utilization of 13C-labeled substrates by perfused liver from streptozotocin-diabetic and untreated rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, S.M.

    1987-01-01

    The metabolism of 13 C-labeled substrates was followed by 13 C and 31 P NMR in perfused liver from the streptozotocin-treated rat model of insulin-dependent diabetes. Comparison was made with perfused liver from untreated littermates, fasted either 24 or 12 h. The major routes of pyruvate metabolism were followed by a 13 C NMR approach that provided for the determination of the metabolic fate of several substances simultaneously. The rate of gluconeogenesis was 2-4-fold greater and β-hydroxybutyrate production was 50% greater in liver from the chronically diabetic rats as compared with the control groups. Large differences in the distribution of 13 C label in hepatic alanine were measured between diabetic and control groups. The biosyntheses of 13 C-labeled glutathione and N-carbamoylaspartate were monitored in time-resolved 13 C NMR spectra of perfused liver. Assignments for the resonances of glutathione and N-carbamoylaspartate were made with the aid of 13 C NMR studies of perchloric acid extracts of the freeze-clamped livers. 13 C NMR spectroscopy of the perfusates provided a convenient, rapid assay of the rate of oxidation of [2- 13 C]ethanol, the hepatic output of [2- 13 ]acetaldehyde, and the accumulation of [2- 13 C]acetate in the perfusate. By 31 P NMR spectroscopy, carbamoyl phosphate was measured in all diabetic livers and an unusual P,P'-diesterified pyrophosphate was observed in one-fourth of the diabetic livers examined. Neither of these phosphorylated metabolites was detected in control liver. Both 13 C and 31 P NMR were useful in defining changes in hepatic metabolism in experimental diabetes

  2. Using a whole-body 31P birdcage transmit coil and 16-element receive array for human cardiac metabolic imaging at 7T.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladislav Valkovič

    Full Text Available Cardiac phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P-MRS provides unique insight into the mechanisms of heart failure. Yet, clinical applications have been hindered by the restricted sensitivity of the surface radiofrequency-coils normally used. These permit the analysis of spectra only from the interventricular septum, or large volumes of myocardium, which may not be meaningful in focal disease. Löring et al. recently presented a prototype whole-body (52 cm diameter transmit/receive birdcage coil for 31P at 7T. We now present a new, easily-removable, whole-body 31P transmit radiofrequency-coil built into a patient-bed extension combined with a 16-element receive array for cardiac 31P-MRS.A fully-removable (55 cm diameter birdcage transmit coil was combined with a 16-element receive array on a Magnetom 7T scanner (Siemens, Germany. Electro-magnetic field simulations and phantom tests of the setup were performed. In vivo maps of B1+, metabolite signals, and saturation-band efficiency were acquired across the torsos of eight volunteers.The combined (volume-transmit, local receive array setup increased signal-to-noise ratio 2.6-fold 10 cm below the array (depth of the interventricular septum compared to using the birdcage coil in transceiver mode. The simulated coefficient of variation for B1+ of the whole-body coil across the heart was 46.7% (surface coil 129.0%; and the in vivo measured value was 38.4%. Metabolite images of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate clearly resolved the ventricular blood pools, and muscle tissue was visible in phosphocreatine (PCr maps. Amplitude-modulated saturation bands achieved 71±4% suppression of phosphocreatine PCr in chest-wall muscles. Subjects reported they were comfortable.This easy-to-assemble, volume-transmit, local receive array coil combination significantly improves the homogeneity and field-of-view for metabolic imaging of the human heart at 7T.

  3. High-Resolution Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Determination of Transfer RNA Tertiary Base Pairs in Solution. 2. Species Containing a Large Variable Loop

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HURD, RE; ROBILLARD, GT; REID, BR

    1977-01-01

    The number of base pairs in the solution structure of several class III D3VN tRNA species from E. coli has been determined by analyzing the number of low-field (-15 to -11 ppm) proton resonances in their nuclear magnetic resonance spectra at 360 MHz. Contrary to previous reports indicating the

  4. Myocardial energy metabolism during global ischemia and reperfusion in SHR hypertrophic rat heart assessed by 31P-NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirotani, Hitoshi; Oka, Hiroshi; Katayama, Osamu; Nishioka, Takazumi; Oku, Hidetaka

    1983-01-01

    An experiment regarding myocardial ischemia and reperfusion was performed under various conditions in SHR hypertrophic and WKY non-hypertrophic rat hearts. An effect of cardioplegia was evaluated in the following 4 conditions, that is, Group 1: hypothermia only, Group 2: hypothermia with intermittent infusion of GIK solution, Group 3: hypothermia with intermittent infusion of cold blood cardioplegia, Group 4: hypothermia with intermittent infusion of cold blood cardioplegia and administration of coenzyme Q 10 prior to isolation of the heart. 1) In WKY heart, ATP contents after 90 minutes myocardial ischemia at 15 0 C decreased to 25% in Group 1,42% in Group 2,52% in Group 3 and 62% in Group 4, and the contents after 30 minutes reperfusion increased to 42, 50, 60 and 75%, respectively. On the other hand, in SHR heart, ATP contents decreased to 22, 38, 40 and 41% but no trend of recovery was present. 2) Creatine phosphate content in SHR heart was 50% of that in WKY heart during isolated perfusion. Creatine phosphate decreased to zero after 30 minutes myocardial ischemia. In WKY heart, the content was recovered to over 100% by 30 minutes reperfusion after 90 minutes myocardial ischemia in all groups. On the contrary, in SHR heart, the contents increased to only 10, 15, 22 and 41%, in 4 groups, respectively. 3) In WKY heart, pH fell to 6.2, 6.7, 6.8 and 6.8, in 4 groups, respectively, a fter 90 minutes myocardial ischemia, and returned to the preischemic value of 7.2 after 30 minutes reperfusion in all groups. In SHR heart, pH fell to 6.1 in group 1, 6.3 in group 2, 6.4 in group 3 and 6.7 in group 4 after 90 minutes myocardial ischemia and the values returned to 6.5, 6.6, 6.7 and 6.8, respectively, after 30 minutes reperfusion. The latter values were lower than preischemic value of 7.0. (J.P.N.)

  5. Myocardial energy metabolism during global ischemia and reperfusion in SHR hypertrophic rat heart assessed by /sup 31/P-NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirotani, Hitoshi; Oka, Hiroshi; Katayama, Osamu; Nishioka, Takazumi; Oku, Hidetaka [Kinki Univ., Higashi-Osaka, Osaka (Japan)

    1983-12-01

    An experiment regarding myocardial ischemia and reperfusion was performed under various conditions in SHR hypertrophic and WKY non-hypertrophic rat hearts. An effect of cardioplegia was evaluated in the following 4 conditions, that is, Group 1: hypothermia only, Group 2: hypothermia with intermittent infusion of GIK solution, Group 3: hypothermia with intermittent infusion of cold blood cardioplegia, Group 4: hypothermia with intermittent infusion of cold blood cardioplegia and administration of coenzyme Q/sub 10/ prior to isolation of the heart. 1) In WKY heart, ATP contents after 90 minutes myocardial ischemia at 15/sup 0/ C decreased to 25% in Group 1,42% in Group 2,52% in Group 3 and 62% in Group 4, and the contents after 30 minutes reperfusion increased to 42, 50, 60 and 75%, respectively. On the other hand, in SHR heart, ATP contents decreased to 22, 38, 40 and 41% but no trend of recovery was present. 2) Creatine phosphate content in SHR heart was 50% of that in WKY heart during isolated perfusion. Creatine phosphate decreased to zero after 30 minutes myocardial ischemia. In WKY heart, the content was recovered to over 100% by 30 minutes reperfusion after 90 minutes myocardial ischemia in all groups. On the contrary, in SHR heart, the contents increased to only 10, 15, 22 and 41%, in 4 groups, respectively. 3) In WKY heart, pH fell to 6.2, 6.7, 6.8 and 6.8, in 4 groups, respectively, a fter 90 minutes myocardial ischemia, and returned to the preischemic value of 7.2 after 30 minutes reperfusion in all groups. In SHR heart, pH fell to 6.1 in group 1, 6.3 in group 2, 6.4 in group 3 and 6.7 in group 4 after 90 minutes myocardial ischemia and the values returned to 6.5, 6.6, 6.7 and 6.8, respectively, after 30 minutes reperfusion. The latter values were lower than preischemic value of 7.0.

  6. Molecular Nickel Phosphide Carbonyl Nanoclusters: Synthesis, Structure, and Electrochemistry of [Ni11P(CO)18]3- and [H6-nNi31P4(CO)39]n- (n = 4 and 5).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capacci, Chiara; Ciabatti, Iacopo; Femoni, Cristina; Iapalucci, Maria Carmela; Funaioli, Tiziana; Zacchini, Stefano; Zanotti, Valerio

    2018-02-05

    The reaction of [NEt 4 ] 2 [Ni 6 (CO) 12 ] in thf with 0.5 equiv of PCl 3 affords the monophosphide [Ni 11 P(CO) 18 ] 3- that in turn further reacts with PCl 3 resulting in the tetra-phosphide carbonyl cluster [HNi 31 P 4 (CO) 39 ] 5- . Alternatively, the latter can be obtained from the reaction of [NEt 4 ] 2 [Ni 6 (CO) 12 ] in thf with 0.8-0.9 equiv of PCl 3 . The [HNi 31 P 4 (CO) 39 ] 5- penta-anion is reversibly protonated by strong acids leading to the [H 2 Ni 31 P 4 (CO) 39 ] 4- tetra-anion, whereas deprotonation affords the [Ni 31 P 4 (CO) 39 ] 6- hexa-anion. The latter is reduced with Na/naphthalene yielding the [Ni 31 P 4 (CO) 39 ] 7- hepta-anion. In order to shed light on the polyhydride nature and redox behavior of these clusters, electrochemical and spectroelectrochemical studies were carried out on [Ni 11 P(CO) 18 ] 3- , [HNi 31 P 4 (CO) 39 ] 5- , and [H 2 Ni 31 P 4 (CO) 39 ] 4- . The reversible formation of the stable [Ni 11 P(CO) 18 ] 4- tetra-anion is demonstrated through the spectroelectrochemical investigation of [Ni 11 P(CO) 18 ] 3- . The redox changes of [HNi 31 P 4 (CO) 39 ] 5- show features of chemical reversibility and the vibrational spectra in the ν CO region of the nine redox states of the cluster [HNi 31 P 4 (CO) 39 ] n- (n = 3-11) are reported. The spectroelectrochemical investigation of [H 2 Ni 31 P 4 (CO) 39 ] 4- revealed the presence of three chemically reversible reduction processes, and the IR spectra of [H 2 Ni 31 P 4 (CO) 39 ] n- (n = 4-7) have been recorded. The different spectroelectrochemical behavior of [HNi 31 P 4 (CO) 39 ] 5- and [H 2 Ni 31 P 4 (CO) 39 ] 4- support their formulations as polyhydrides. Unfortunately, all the attempts to directly confirm their poly hydrido nature by 1 H NMR spectroscopy failed, as previously found for related large metal carbonyl clusters. Thus, the presence and number of hydride ligands have been based on the observed protonation/deprotonation reactions and the spectroelectrochemical

  7. Anomalous solute transport in saturated porous media: Relating transport model parameters to electrical and nuclear magnetic resonance properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Ryan D; Binley, Andrew; Keating, Kristina; France, Samantha; Osterman, Gordon; Day-Lewis, Frederick D.; Singha, Kamini

    2015-01-01

    The advection-dispersion equation (ADE) fails to describe commonly observed non-Fickian solute transport in saturated porous media, necessitating the use of other models such as the dual-domain mass-transfer (DDMT) model. DDMT model parameters are commonly calibrated via curve fitting, providing little insight into the relation between effective parameters and physical properties of the medium. There is a clear need for material characterization techniques that can provide insight into the geometry and connectedness of pore spaces related to transport model parameters. Here, we consider proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), direct-current (DC) resistivity, and complex conductivity (CC) measurements for this purpose, and assess these methods using glass beads as a control and two different samples of the zeolite clinoptilolite, a material that demonstrates non-Fickian transport due to intragranular porosity. We estimate DDMT parameters via calibration of a transport model to column-scale solute tracer tests, and compare NMR, DC resistivity, CC results, which reveal that grain size alone does not control transport properties and measured geophysical parameters; rather, volume and arrangement of the pore space play important roles. NMR cannot provide estimates of more-mobile and less-mobile pore volumes in the absence of tracer tests because these estimates depend critically on the selection of a material-dependent and flow-dependent cutoff time. Increased electrical connectedness from DC resistivity measurements are associated with greater mobile pore space determined from transport model calibration. CC was hypothesized to be related to length scales of mass transfer, but the CC response is unrelated to DDMT.

  8. Evolution of the feedback from experience on degradations of French nuclear power plants condensers and foreseen solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayos, M.; Chanel, F.; Copin, E.; Carlier, L. [EDF/DIN/CEIDRE, Saint-Denis (France); Coquio, N.; Garbay, E. [EDF/DIN/CEIDRE, Avoine (France); Bastian, C. [EDF/DPN/UNIE, Saint-Denis (France)

    2011-07-01

    The materials constituting the condenser tubes of French nuclear power plants display a great diversity and are subject to different degradations, known from the operational feedback from experience. Copper alloys (mainly brass), which were bound to disappear in renovated condensers, are still significantly present, due to their unique bacteriostatic ability. Brass tubes lifetime is still governed in general by steady abrasion, as evaluated by eddy current nondestructive testing. However, an atypical NDE (non-destructive evaluation) behavior has led to spot a new damage: localized under-deposit pitting corrosion on the raw water side, caused by the particular quality of water chemistry and heavy scaling of the tube surface. This damage is likely to overcome steady abrasion for tube life prediction. Prevention includes a tighter look at NDE indications and improved descaling solutions (chemical or mechanical). Other specific damages have been reported from operation feedback: the main one was accidental stress corrosion cracking, which has occurred on some recently renovated brass condenser tube bundles. Thanks to a metallurgical and mechanical study, its cause was found in the manufacturing process. This experience has resulted in tightened specifications for brass tubes manufacturing. Stainless steel and titanium still appear more damage-resistant and represent a safe solution when no microorganism issue is present. The degradation feedback, confirmed by NDE inspections, is very low in French power plants. However, titanium hydriding still represents an issue when cathodic protection is present. Furthermore, some other damages have been reported on titanium, like isolated steam erosion. Vibration fatigue damage has been observed on stainless steel tubes, but it is more in relationship with the condenser design than with the material itself. (authors)

  9. Comparison of the clinical state and its changes in patients with Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy with results of in vivo 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hajek, M.; Grosmanova, A.; Horska, A.; Urban, P.

    1993-01-01

    A total of 14 boys with the Duchenne and Becker forms of muscular dystrophy (DMD, BMD) were examined using 31 P magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy; 12 boys were examined repeatedly. The results were correlated with clinical findings (including those of genetic tests) and with data obtained from examinations of an age-matched control group. Evaluation of results using principal component analysis revealed maximum variability in the following ratios: phosphocreatine/inorganic phosphate (PCr/Pi), phosphocreatine/phosphodiesters (PCr/PDe) and phosphocreatine/phosphomonoesters (PCr/PMe). A decrease in PCr/Pi correlates with weakness of the hip girdle and of the lower part of the shoulder girdle in DMD/BMD patients. The values of all ratios in the group of patients with the DMD phenotype differ significantly from results obtained in the group with the BMD phenotype. Continuous follow-up of patients using 31 P MR spectroscopy revealed a marked decrease in PCr/Pi in DMD/BMD patients at an age that could be expected in subjects with a typical clinical course of DMD/BMD. An attempt to manage a concomitant disease with prednisone and carnitene was followed by an increase in PCr/Pi in 3 cases. A rise in the PCr/Pi ratio signalled clinical improvement in the patients. A decrease in PCr/Pi was found after controlled physical training, a finding consistent with data obtained from clinical observations describing an adverse effect of physical stress on the dystrophic process. (orig.)

  10. Comparison of the clinical state and its changes in patients with Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy with results of in vivo {sup 31}P magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hajek, M [MR Unit, Inst. for Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Prague (Czech Republic); Grosmanova, A [Dept. of Neuropediatrics, Thomayer` s Hospital, Prague (Czech Republic); Horska, A [MR Unit, Inst. for Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Prague (Czech Republic); Urban, P [Dept. of Analytical Chemistry, Prague Inst. of Chemical Technology (Czech Republic)

    1993-12-01

    A total of 14 boys with the Duchenne and Becker forms of muscular dystrophy (DMD, BMD) were examined using {sup 31}P magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy; 12 boys were examined repeatedly. The results were correlated with clinical findings (including those of genetic tests) and with data obtained from examinations of an age-matched control group. Evaluation of results using principal component analysis revealed maximum variability in the following ratios: phosphocreatine/inorganic phosphate (PCr/Pi), phosphocreatine/phosphodiesters (PCr/PDe) and phosphocreatine/phosphomonoesters (PCr/PMe). A decrease in PCr/Pi correlates with weakness of the hip girdle and of the lower part of the shoulder girdle in DMD/BMD patients. The values of all ratios in the group of patients with the DMD phenotype differ significantly from results obtained in the group with the BMD phenotype. Continuous follow-up of patients using {sup 31}P MR spectroscopy revealed a marked decrease in PCr/Pi in DMD/BMD patients at an age that could be expected in subjects with a typical clinical course of DMD/BMD. An attempt to manage a concomitant disease with prednisone and carnitene was followed by an increase in PCr/Pi in 3 cases. A rise in the PCr/Pi ratio signalled clinical improvement in the patients. A decrease in PCr/Pi was found after controlled physical training, a finding consistent with data obtained from clinical observations describing an adverse effect of physical stress on the dystrophic process. (orig.)

  11. Reconstitution of FMN-free NADPH-cytochrome P-450 reductase with a phosphorothioate analog of FMN: 31P NMR studies of the reconstituted protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krum, D.P.; Otvos, J.D.; Calhoun, J.P.; Miziorko, H.M.; Masters, B.S.S.

    1987-01-01

    A phosphorothioate analog of FMN (FMNS) has been synthesized and shown to be completely competent in reconstituting the FMN-free form of NADPH-cytochrome P-450 reductase as evidenced by flavin determinations and cytochrome c reductase activity assays. The FMNS-reconstituted FMN-free reductase gives rise to an air-stable semiquinone, and the fluorescence of FMNS is quenched upon addition of FMN-free reductase. 31 P NMR spectra of the FMN-free reductase reveal only two resonances (-7.3 and -11.3 ppm), which are attributable to FAD. This result confirms the assignments of Otvos et al, and demonstrates unequivocally that there are no phosphate residues other than those of FMN and FAD attached to the steapsin-solubilized reductase. The addition of FMN to the FMN-free reductase resulted in the appearance of one additional resonance at 3.9 ppm. Addition of FMNS to the FMN-free reductase caused no change, surprisingly, in the 31 P NMR spectrum until Mn(II) was added, after which a peak centered at ∼ 45 ppm was observed. This unexpected result may be explained if the T 1 for the phosphate of FMNS is significantly longer than that of FMN, and suggests that the sulfur atom of FMNS may perturb the interaction of the phosphate with its protein environment. These results demonstrate the utility of phosphorothioate analogs as mechanistic probes for proteins containing nucleotide cofactors

  12. Certified Reference Material for Use in 1H, 31P, and 19F Quantitative NMR, Ensuring Traceability to the International System of Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigger, Romana; Rück, Alexander; Hellriegel, Christine; Sauermoser, Robert; Morf, Fabienne; Breitruck, KathrinBreitruck; Obkircher, Markus

    2017-09-01

    In recent years, quantitative NMR (qNMR) spectroscopy has become one of the most important tools for content determination of organic substances and quantitative evaluation of impurities. Using Certified Reference Materials (CRMs) as internal or external standards, the extensively used qNMR method can be applied for purity determination, including unbroken traceability to the International System of Units (SI). The implementation of qNMR toward new application fields, e.g., metabolomics, environmental analysis, and physiological pathway studies, brings along more complex molecules and systems, thus making use of 1H qNMR challenging. A smart workaround is possible by the use of other NMR active nuclei, namely 31P and 19F. This article presents the development of three classes of qNMR CRMs based on different NMR active nuclei (1H, 31P, and 19F), and the corresponding approaches to establish traceability to the SI through primary CRMs from the National Institute of Standards and Technology and the National Metrology Institute of Japan. These TraceCERT® qNMR CRMs are produced under ISO/IEC 17025 and ISO Guide 34 using high-performance qNMR.

  13. Bioenergetics of the calf muscle in Friedreich ataxia patients measured by 31P-MRS before and after treatment with recombinant human erythropoietin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang Nachbauer

    Full Text Available Friedreich ataxia (FRDA is caused by a GAA repeat expansion in the FXN gene leading to reduced expression of the mitochondrial protein frataxin. Recombinant human erythropoietin (rhuEPO is suggested to increase frataxin levels, alter mitochondrial function and improve clinical scores in FRDA patients. Aim of the present pilot study was to investigate mitochondrial metabolism of skeletal muscle tissue in FRDA patients and examine effects of rhuEPO administration by phosphorus 31 magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P MRS. Seven genetically confirmed FRDA patients underwent 31P MRS of the calf muscles using a rest-exercise-recovery protocol before and after receiving 3000 IU of rhuEPO for eight weeks. FRDA patients showed more rapid phosphocreatine (PCr depletion and increased accumulation of inorganic phosphate (Pi during incremental exercise as compared to controls. After maximal exhaustive exercise prolonged regeneration of PCR and slowed decline in Pi can be seen in FRDA. PCr regeneration as hallmark of mitochondrial ATP production revealed correlation to activity of complex II/III of the respiratory chain and to demographic values. PCr and Pi kinetics were not influenced by rhuEPO administration. Our results confirm mitochondrial dysfunction and exercise intolerance due to impaired oxidative phosphorylation in skeletal muscle tissue of FRDA patients. MRS did not show improved mitochondrial bioenergetics after eight weeks of rhuEPO exposition in skeletal muscle tissue of FRDA patients.EU Clinical Trials Register2008-000040-13.

  14. 31P-MR-spectroscopy of the skeletal muscles under load: demonstration of normal energy metabolism compared to different neuromuscular diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Block, W.; Traeber, F.; Kuhl, C.K.; Keller, E.; Rink, H.; Schild, H.H.; Karitzky, J.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: 31 P-MR spectroscopy of skeletal muscle under ecercise was used to obtain the range of normal variation and comparison was made for different neuromascular diseases. Methods: 41 examinations of 24 volunteers and 41 investigations in 35 patients were performed on 1.5 T MR systems (Gyroscan S15 und S15/ACSII, Philips). Localised 31 P-MR spectra of the calf muscle were obtained in time series with a resolution of 12 s. Results: Two types of muscle energy metabolism were identified from the pattern of spectroscopic time course in volunteers: While the first group was characterised by a remarkable decline to lower pH values during exercise, the second group showed only small pH shifts (minimum pH: 6.48±0.13 vs 6.87±0.07, p -6 ) although comparable workload conditions were maintained. The pH-values correlated well with blood lactate analysis. Patients with metabolic disorders and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) showed decreased resting values of PCr/(PCr+P i ) and increased pH levels during exercise. PCr recovery was significantly delayed (0.31 vs 0.65 min -1 , p i ), altered pH time courses, and decreased PCr recovery seem to be helpful indicators for diagnosis of metabolic muscle disorders. (orig./MG) [de

  15. Gray matter-specific changes in brain bioenergetics after acute sleep deprivation: a 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy study at 4 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plante, David T; Trksak, George H; Jensen, J Eric; Penetar, David M; Ravichandran, Caitlin; Riedner, Brady A; Tartarini, Wendy L; Dorsey, Cynthia M; Renshaw, Perry F; Lukas, Scott E; Harper, David G

    2014-12-01

    A principal function of sleep may be restoration of brain energy metabolism caused by the energetic demands of wakefulness. Because energetic demands in the brain are greater in gray than white matter, this study used linear mixed-effects models to examine tissue-type specific changes in high-energy phosphates derived using 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) after sleep deprivation and recovery sleep. Experimental laboratory study. Outpatient neuroimaging center at a private psychiatric hospital. A total of 32 MRS scans performed in eight healthy individuals (mean age 35 y; range 23-51 y). Phosphocreatine (PCr) and β-nucleoside triphosphate (NTP) were measured using 31P MRS three dimensional-chemical shift imaging at high field (4 Tesla) after a baseline night of sleep, acute sleep deprivation (SD), and 2 nights of recovery sleep. Novel linear mixed-effects models were constructed using spectral and tissue segmentation data to examine changes in bioenergetics in gray and white matter. PCr increased in gray matter after 2 nights of recovery sleep relative to SD with no significant changes in white matter. Exploratory analyses also demonstrated that increases in PCr were associated with increases in electroencephalographic slow wave activity during recovery sleep. No significant changes in β-NTP were observed. These results demonstrate that sleep deprivation and subsequent recovery-induced changes in high-energy phosphates primarily occur in gray matter, and increases in PCr after recovery sleep may be related to sleep homeostasis. © 2014 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  16. Non-invasive assessment of phosphate metabolism and oxidative capacity in working skeletal muscle in healthy young Chinese volunteers using 31P Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Li

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background. Generally, males display greater strength and muscle capacity than females while performing a task. Muscle biopsy is regarded as the reference method of evaluating muscle functions; however, it is invasive and has sampling errors, and is not practical for longitudinal studies and dynamic measurement during excise. In this study, we built an in-house force control and gauge system for quantitatively applying force to quadriceps while the subjects underwent 31P Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (31P-MRS; our aim was to investigate if there is a sex difference of phosphate metabolite change in working muscles in young heathy Chinese volunteers. Methods. Volunteers performed knee-extending excises using a force control and gauge system while lying prone in a Philips 3T Magnetic Resonance (MR scanner. The 31P-MRS coil was firmly placed under the middle of the quadriceps . 31P-MRS measurements of inorganic phosphate (Pi, phosphocreatine (PCr and adenosine triphosphate (ATP were acquired from quadriceps while subjects were in a state of pre-, during- and post-exercise. The PCr, Pi, PCr/Pi, PCr/ATP, pH, work/energy cost ratio (WE, kPCr and oxidative capacity were compared between males and females. Results. A total of 17 volunteers underwent the study. Males: N = 10, age = 23.30 ± 1.25years; females: N = 7, age = 23.57 ± 0.79 years. In this study, males had significantly greater WE (16.33 ± 6.46 vs. 7.82 ± 2.16, p = 0.002 than females. Among PCr, Pi, PCr/Pi, PCr/ATP, pH, kPCr and oxidative capacity at different exercise status, only PCr/Pi (during-exercise, males = 5.630 ± 1.647, females = 4.014 ± 1.298, p = 0.047, PCr/ATP (during-exercise, males =1.273 ± 0.219, females = 1.523 ± 0.167, p = 0.025, and ATP (post-exercise, males = 24.469 ± 3.911 mmol/kg, females = 18.353 ± 4.818 mmol/kg, p = 0.035 had significant sex differences. Males had significantly greater PCr/Pi, but less PCr/ATP than females during exercise, suggesting males had

  17. Bioprospecting of gum kondagogu (Cochlospermum gossypium) for bioremediation of uranium (VI) from aqueous solution and synthetic nuclear power reactor effluents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sashidhar, R B; Selvi, S Kalaignana; Vinod, V T P; Kosuri, Tanuja; Raju, D; Karuna, R

    2015-10-01

    An ecofriendly green chemistry method using a natural biopolymer, Gum Kondagogu (GK) for the removal of U (VI) from aqueous, simulated nuclear effluents was studied. The adsorption characteristic of GK towards U (VI) from aqueous solution was studied at varied pH, contact time, adsorbent dose, initial U (VI) concentration and temperature using UV-Visible spectroscopy and ICP-MS. Maximum adsorption was seen at pH 4, 0.1% GK with 60 min contact time at room temperature. The GK- U (VI) composite was characterized by FT-IR, zeta potential, TEM and SEM-EDAX. The Langmuir isotherm was found to be 487 mg of U (VI) g(-1) of GK. The adsorption capacity and (%) of U (VI) was found to be 490 ± 5.4 mg g(-1) and 98.5%. Moreover adsorption of U (VI) by GK was not influenced by other cations present in the simulated effluents. The adsorbed U (VI) was efficiently stripped from composite using 1 M HCl. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Separation of the noble metals ruthenium and palladium from nitric acid solution of the nuclear fuel reprocessing containing complexing agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghafourian, H.

    1989-06-01

    Two extraction chromatographic techniques have been developed. N'N diethylthiourea (DETU), which forms complexes with ruthenium that can be retained on an AG50W-X2 ion exchanger, has proved to be a suitable reagent. The structures of these complexes were elucidated by electrophoresis, ion exchange and IR spectroscopy. Under the same conditions Pd forms an insoluble DETU-complex of the formula [Pd(DETU) 4 ] 2+ , which allows the separation of this metal quantitatively. With regard to the application of the developed technique for recovery of the mentioned noble metals from dissolver residues of the nuclear fuel reprocessing, comparative studies were carried out for accompanying fission product nuclides and actinides such as Mo, Tc, Zr, Ce, U and Pu. It was found out that no complex between diethylthiourea and the fission products zirconium, molybdenum and cerium and the actinides uranium, plutonium and americium were formed. Technetium, which was originally present as pertechnetate, is reduced to Tc(IV) and retained on the cation exchanger together with ruthenium. Ruthenium was eluted with 6 M HNO 3 . The efficiency of the developed process has been demonstrated with simulated solutions. The achieved decontamination factors ranged from 10 2 to 10 6 depending on the nuclide. (orig./RB) [de

  19. Theoretical Derivation of Simplified Evaluation Models for the First Peak of a Criticality Accident in Nuclear Fuel Solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, Yasushi

    2000-01-01

    In a reprocessing facility where nuclear fuel solutions are processed, one could observe a series of power peaks, with the highest peak right after a criticality accident. The criticality alarm system (CAS) is designed to detect the first power peak and warn workers near the reacting material by sounding alarms immediately. Consequently, exposure of the workers would be minimized by an immediate and effective evacuation. Therefore, in the design and installation of a CAS, it is necessary to estimate the magnitude of the first power peak and to set up the threshold point where the CAS initiates the alarm. Furthermore, it is necessary to estimate the level of potential exposure of workers in the case of accidents so as to decide the appropriateness of installing a CAS for a given compartment.A simplified evaluation model to estimate the minimum scale of the first power peak during a criticality accident is derived by theoretical considerations only for use in the design of a CAS to set up the threshold point triggering the alarm signal. Another simplified evaluation model is derived in the same way to estimate the maximum scale of the first power peak for use in judging the appropriateness for installing a CAS. Both models are shown to have adequate margin in predicting the minimum and maximum scale of criticality accidents by comparing their results with French CRiticality occurring ACcidentally (CRAC) experimental data

  20. A parallel multi-domain solution methodology applied to nonlinear thermal transport problems in nuclear fuel pins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philip, Bobby, E-mail: philipb@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, One Bethel Valley Road, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Berrill, Mark A.; Allu, Srikanth; Hamilton, Steven P.; Sampath, Rahul S.; Clarno, Kevin T. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, One Bethel Valley Road, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Dilts, Gary A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, PO Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2015-04-01

    This paper describes an efficient and nonlinearly consistent parallel solution methodology for solving coupled nonlinear thermal transport problems that occur in nuclear reactor applications over hundreds of individual 3D physical subdomains. Efficiency is obtained by leveraging knowledge of the physical domains, the physics on individual domains, and the couplings between them for preconditioning within a Jacobian Free Newton Krylov method. Details of the computational infrastructure that enabled this work, namely the open source Advanced Multi-Physics (AMP) package developed by the authors is described. Details of verification and validation experiments, and parallel performance analysis in weak and strong scaling studies demonstrating the achieved efficiency of the algorithm are presented. Furthermore, numerical experiments demonstrate that the preconditioner developed is independent of the number of fuel subdomains in a fuel rod, which is particularly important when simulating different types of fuel rods. Finally, we demonstrate the power of the coupling methodology by considering problems with couplings between surface and volume physics and coupling of nonlinear thermal transport in fuel rods to an external radiation transport code.

  1. Sound velocities of skiagite-iron-majorite solid solution to 56 GPa probed by nuclear inelastic scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasiukov, D. M.; Ismailova, L.; Kupenko, I.; Cerantola, V.; Sinmyo, R.; Glazyrin, K.; McCammon, C.; Chumakov, A. I.; Dubrovinsky, L.; Dubrovinskaia, N.

    2018-05-01

    High-pressure experimental data on sound velocities of garnets are used for interpretation of seismological data related to the Earth's upper mantle and the mantle transition zone. We have carried out a Nuclear Inelastic Scattering study of iron-silicate garnet with skiagite (77 mol%)-iron-majorite composition in a diamond anvil cell up to 56 GPa at room temperature. The determined sound velocities are considerably lower than sound velocities of a number of silicate garnet end-members, such as grossular, pyrope, Mg-majorite, andradite, and almandine. The obtained sound velocities have the following pressure dependencies: V p [km/s] = 7.43(9) + 0.039(4) × P [GPa] and V s [km/s] = 3.56(12) + 0.012(6) × P [GPa]. We estimated sound velocities of pure skiagite and khoharite, and conclude that the presence of the iron-majorite component in skiagite strongly decreases V s . We analysed the influence of Fe3+ on sound velocities of garnet solid solution relevant to the mantle transition zone and consider that it may reduce sound velocities up to 1% relative to compositions with only Fe2+ in the cubic site.

  2. Two-dimensional 1H and 31P NMR spectra of a decamer oligodeoxyribonucleotide duplex and a quinoxaline ([MeCys3, MeCys7]TANDEM) drug duplex complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powers, R.; Olsen, R.K.; Gorenstein, D.G.

    1989-01-01

    Assignment of the 1H and 31P NMR spectra of a decamer oligodeoxyribonucleotide duplex, d(CCCGATCGGG), and its quinoxaline ([MeCys3, MeCys7]TANDEM) drug duplex complex has been made by two-dimensional 1H-1H and heteronuclear 31P-1H correlated spectroscopy. The 31P chemical shifts of this 10 base pair oligonucleotide follow the general observation that the more internal the phosphate is located within the oligonucleotide sequence, the more upfield the 31P resonance occurs. While the 31P chemical shifts show sequence-specific variations, they also do not generally follow the Calladine rules previously demonstrated. 31P NMR also provides a convenient monitor of the phosphate ester backbone conformational changes upon binding of the drug to the duplex. Although the quinoxaline drug, [MeCys3, MeCys7]TANDEM, is generally expected to bind to duplex DNA by bis-intercalation, only small 31P chemical shift changes are observed upon binding the drug to duplex d(CCCGATCGGG). Additionally, only small perturbations in the 1H NMR and UV spectra are observed upon binding the drug to the decamer, although association of the drug stabilizes the duplex form relative to the other states. These results are consistent with a non-intercalative mode of association of the drug. Modeling and molecular mechanics energy minimization demonstrate that a novel structure in which the two quinoxaline rings of the drug binds in the minor groove of the duplex is possible

  3. 1H, 13C and 31P-NMR spectroscopic study of glucose metabolism of muscle larva Trichinella spiralis (U.S.A. strain), and the effects of the end-products on the host (mouse)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishina, Masami

    1988-01-01

    1 H- and 13 C-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was used to identify and quantitate metabolites excreted by muscle larva Trichinella spiralis maintained aerobically in the presence of D- ( 13 C 6 ) glucose and (1, 1'- 13 C 2 ) succinate. End-products of glucose metabolism studied by 1 H-NMR were lactate, acetate, succinate, proionate, n-valerate and alanine, at the molar ratio of 1:2:1:0.6:0.5:0.6. 13 C-NMR measurement proved that all the products originated from the glucose in the medium via the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase-succinate pathway and the tricarboxylic acid cycle. In vivo 31 P-NMR spectra were also taken by the surface coil method from the leg muscle of mice which had been infected with T. spiralis. Intracelluar pH and relative amount of ATP in the leg muscle of the infected mice were found to decrease significantly as compared with that of control mice. (author)

  4. /sup 1/H, /sup 13/C and /sup 31/P-NMR spectroscopic study of glucose metabolism of muscle larva Trichinella spiralis (U. S. A. strain), and the effects of the end-products on the host (mouse)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishina, Masami

    1988-11-01

    /sup 1/H- and /sup 13/C-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was used to identify and quantitate metabolites excreted by muscle larva Trichinella spiralis maintained aerobically in the presence of D- (/sup 13/C/sub 6/) glucose and (1, 1'-/sup 13/C/sub 2/) succinate. End-products of glucose metabolism studied by /sup 1/H-NMR were lactate, acetate, succinate, proionate, n-valerate and alanine, at the molar ratio of 1:2:1:0.6:0.5:0.6. /sup 13/C-NMR measurement proved that all the products originated from the glucose in the medium via the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase-succinate pathway and the tricarboxylic acid cycle. In vivo /sup 31/P-NMR spectra were also taken by the surface coil method from the leg muscle of mice which had been infected with T. spiralis. Intracelluar pH and relative amount of ATP in the leg muscle of the infected mice were found to decrease significantly as compared with that of control mice.

  5. Early response of plant cell to carbon deprivation: in vivo 31P-NMR spectroscopy shows a quasi-instantaneous disruption on cytosolic sugars, phosphorylated intermediates of energy metabolism, phosphate partitioning, and intracellular pHs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gout, Elisabeth; Bligny, Richard; Douce, Roland; Boisson, Anne-Marie; Rivasseau, Corinne

    2011-01-01

    • In plant cells, sugar starvation triggers a cascade of effects at the scale of 1-2 days. However, very early metabolic response has not yet been investigated. • Soluble phosphorus (P) compounds and intracellular pHs were analysed each 2.5 min intervals in heterotrophic sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus) cells using in vivo phosphorus nuclear magnetic resonance ((31)P-NMR). • Upon external-sugar withdrawal, the glucose 6-P concentration dropped in the cytosol, but not in plastids. The released inorganic phosphate (Pi) accumulated transiently in the cytosol before influx into the vacuole; nucleotide triphosphate concentration doubled, intracellular pH increased and cell respiration decreased. It was deduced that the cytosolic free-sugar concentration was low, corresponding to only 0.5 mM sucrose in sugar-supplied cells. • The release of sugar from the vacuole and from plastids is insufficient to fully sustain the cell metabolism during starvation, particularly in the very short term. Similarly to Pi-starvation, the cell's first response to sugar starvation occurs in the cytosol and is of a metabolic nature. Unlike the cytoplasm, cytosolic homeostasis is not maintained during starvation. The important metabolic changes following cytosolic sugar exhaustion deliver early endogenous signals that may contribute to trigger rescue metabolism. © The Authors (2010). Journal compilation © New Phytologist Trust (2010).

  6. Interaction of berenil with the EcoRI dodecamer d(CGCGAATTCGCG)2 in solution studied by NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lane, A.N.; Jenkins, T.C.; Neidle, S.; Brown, T.

    1991-01-01

    The conformation of the EcoRI dodecamer d(CGCGAATTCGCG) 2 has been examined in solution by 1 H and 31 P NMR. Spin-spin coupling constants and nuclear Overhauser (NOE) enhancement spectroscopy show that all deoxyriboses lie in the south domain, with a small admixture of the north conformation (0-20%). The time dependence of the nuclear Overhauser enhancements also reveals a relatively uniform conformation at the glycosidic bonds. The average helical twist is 36.5. Tilt angles are small, and roll angles are poorly determined. Both the NOE intensities and 31 P relaxation data imply conformational anomalies at the C3-G4/C9-G10 and the A5-A6/T7-T8 steps. Berenil binds in 1:1 stoichiometry to the dodecamer with high affinity and causes substantial changes in chemical shifts of the sugar protons of nucleotides Ado 5-Cyt 9 and of the H2 resonances of the two Ado residues. NOEs are observed between the aromatic protons of berenil and the H1' of both Thy 7 and Thy 8, as well as to Ado 5 and Ado 6 H2. These results firmly establish that berenil binds via the minor groove and closely approaches the nucleotides Ado 6, Thy 7, and Thy 8. Using the observed NOEs between the ligand and the DNA together with the derived glycosidic torsion angles, the authors have built models that satisfy all of the available solution data

  7. Nuclear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    This document proposes a presentation and discussion of the main notions, issues, principles, or characteristics related to nuclear energy: radioactivity (presence in the environment, explanation, measurement, periods and activities, low doses, applications), fuel cycle (front end, mining and ore concentration, refining and conversion, fuel fabrication, in the reactor, back end with reprocessing and recycling, transport), the future of the thorium-based fuel cycle (motivations, benefits and drawbacks), nuclear reactors (principles of fission reactors, reactor types, PWR reactors, BWR, heavy-water reactor, high temperature reactor of HTR, future reactors), nuclear wastes (classification, packaging and storage, legal aspects, vitrification, choice of a deep storage option, quantities and costs, foreign practices), radioactive releases of nuclear installations (main released radio-elements, radioactive releases by nuclear reactors and by La Hague plant, gaseous and liquid effluents, impact of releases, regulation), the OSPAR Convention, management and safety of nuclear activities (from control to quality insurance, to quality management and to sustainable development), national safety bodies (mission, means, organisation and activities of ASN, IRSN, HCTISN), international bodies, nuclear and medicine (applications of radioactivity, medical imagery, radiotherapy, doses in nuclear medicine, implementation, the accident in Epinal), nuclear and R and D (past R and D programmes and expenses, main actors in France and present funding, main R and D axis, international cooperation)

  8. Nuclear Power: A Solution for the Future or from the Past?; Le nucleaire, solution d'avenir ou du passe?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lepage, C.

    2011-07-15

    On 11 March 2011 Japan suffered an earthquake of very great magnitude, followed by a tsunami that killed thousands in the Sendai region and, most importantly, led to a major nuclear disaster at the Fukushima power station. This nuclear accident ranked at the highest level of severity on the international scale of nuclear events, making it the biggest since Chernobyl in 1986. It is still impossible to gauge the precise scope of the economic, health and human consequences of this disaster, but it is clear that it has triggered most intense debates on the nuclear issue once again. Even if nuclear disasters of this severity are relatively rare, are we justified, given the consequences that follow, in continuing to resort to this energy source which, though admittedly it emits little 'greenhouse' gas, produces much highly dangerous waste that often remains toxic for more than a century? In this summer issue devoted entirely to energy questions, Futuribles raises this question in its 'Forum' column. Corinne Lepage, a specialist in environmental questions and former French environment minister, offers us her point of view here, in substance taking the view that the human, ecological and financial dangers are much too great to be risked, particularly in a world where sources of renewable energy can now largely meet the energy and climate challenges with which we must contend. (author)

  9. Nuclear power - a (too) pat solution. An energy picture book. Das faule Ei des Kolumbus. Ein Energiebilderbuch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vester, F

    1979-01-01

    This popular book in 'window' form attempts to give a picture of the complex economic and social consequences of a further development of nuclear power utilisation. The advantages of nuclear power are listed, and a critical balance is established for the negative consequences of an all-nuclear energy use for economy, environment, and society.

  10. Electrodriven selective transport of Cs+ using chlorinated cobalt dicarbollide in polymer inclusion membrane: a novel approach for cesium removal from simulated nuclear waste solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhury, Sanhita; Bhattacharyya, Arunasis; Goswami, Asok

    2014-11-04

    The work describes a novel and cleaner approach of electrodriven selective transport of Cs from simulated nuclear waste solutions through cellulose tri acetate (CTA)/poly vinyl chloride (PVC) based polymer inclusion membrane. The electrodriven cation transport together with the use of highly Cs+ selective hexachlorinated derivative of cobalt bis dicarbollide, allows to achieve selective separation of Cs+ from high concentration of Na+ and other fission products in nuclear waste solutions. The transport selectivity has been studied using radiotracer technique as well as atomic emission spectroscopic technique. Transport studies using CTA based membrane have been carried out from neutral solution as well as 0.4 M HNO3, while that with PVC based membrane has been carried out from 3 M HNO3. High decontamination factor for Cs+ over Na+ has been obtained in all the cases. Experiment with simulated high level waste solution shows selective transport of Cs+ from most of other fission products also. Significantly fast Cs+ transport rate along with high selectivity is an interesting feature observed in this membrane. The current efficiency for Cs+ transport has been found to be ∼100%. The promising results show the possibility of using this kind of electrodriven membrane transport methods for nuclear waste treatment.

  11. Correcting human heart 31P NMR spectra for partial saturation. Evidence that saturation factors for PCr/ATP are homogeneous in normal and disease states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottomley, Paul A.; Hardy, Christopher J.; Weiss, Robert G.

    Heart PCr/ATP ratios measured from spatially localized 31P NMR spectra can be corrected for partial saturation effects using saturation factors derived from unlocalized chest surface-coil spectra acquired at the heart rate and approximate Ernst angle for phosphor creatine (PCr) and again under fully relaxed conditions during each 31P exam. To validate this approach in studies of normal and disease states where the possibility of heterogeneity in metabolite T1 values between both chest muscle and heart and normal and disease states exists, the properties of saturation factors for metabolite ratios were investigated theoretically under conditions applicable in typical cardiac spectroscopy exams and empirically using data from 82 cardiac 31P exams in six study groups comprising normal controls ( n = 19) and patients with dilated ( n = 20) and hypertrophic ( n = 5) cardiomyopathy, coronary artery disease ( n = 16), heart transplants ( n = 19), and valvular heart disease ( n = 3). When TR ≪ T1,(PCr), with T1(PCr) ⩾ T1(ATP), the saturation factor for PCr/ATP lies in the range 1.5 ± 0.5, regardless of the T1 values. The precise value depends on the ratio of metabolite T1 values rather than their absolute values and is insensitive to modest changes in TR. Published data suggest that the metabolite T1 ratio is the same in heart and muscle. Our empirical data reveal that the saturation factors do not vary significantly with disease state, nor with the relative fractions of muscle and heart contributing to the chest surface-coil spectra. Also, the corrected myocardial PCr/ATP ratios in each normal or disease state bear no correlation with the corresponding saturation factors nor the fraction of muscle in the unlocalized chest spectra. However, application of the saturation correction (mean value, 1.36 ± 0.03 SE) significantly reduced scatter in myocardial PCr/ATP data by 14 ± 11% (SD) ( p ⩽ 0.05). The findings suggest that the relative T1 values of PCr and ATP are

  12. In vivo 31P and 1H NMR studies of rat brain tumor pH and blood flow during acute hyperglycemia: Differential effects between subcutaneous and intracerebral locations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, B.D.; Mitchell, S.L.; Merkle, H.; Garwood, M.

    1989-01-01

    Surface coil NMR spectroscopy was used to monitor the hyperglycemia-induced alterations in pH and blood flow in vivo in C6 gliomas implanted both subcutaneously and intracerebrally in rats. Tumor pH was calculated from the chemical shift difference between PCr and Pi in the 31 P NMR spectra. Subcutaneous glioma pH decreased 0.8 units by 1 h after intraperitoneal administration of an aqueous 50% glucose solution (6 g glucose per kg body weight). In contrast, hyperglycemia failed to significantly alter the pH of intracerebral gliomas which were monitored for 90 min following administration of glucose. Tumor blood flow (TBF) was determined both pre- and post-glucose administration using deuterium NMR by monitoring the time course of D2O washout following intratumoral injection of saline D2O. Subcutaneous and intracerebral TBF were found to have an average change of -78.1% (range -47.4 to -93.3%, n = 5) and -21.1% (range +6.0 to -37.8%, n = 9), respectively. In addition, laser Doppler blood flow measurements of rat skin and subcutaneous glioma revealed a dramatic reduction in blood flow in both tissues following glucose administration. These results indicate that the effects of acute hyperglycemia are site dependent and that hyperglycemia alone is not beneficial for inducing intracellular acidosis in intracerebral tumors

  13. 15N and 31P solid-state NMR study of transmembrane domain alignment of M2 protein of influenza A virus in hydrated cylindrical lipid bilayers confined to anodic aluminum oxide nanopores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chekmenev, Eduard Y; Hu, Jun; Gor'kov, Peter L; Brey, William W; Cross, Timothy A; Ruuge, Andres; Smirnov, Alex I

    2005-04-01

    This communication reports the first example of a high resolution solid-state 15N 2D PISEMA NMR spectrum of a transmembrane peptide aligned using hydrated cylindrical lipid bilayers formed inside nanoporous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) substrates. The transmembrane domain SSDPLVVA(A-15N)SIIGILHLILWILDRL of M2 protein from influenza A virus was reconstituted in hydrated 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine bilayers that were macroscopically aligned by a conventional micro slide glass support or by the AAO nanoporous substrate. 15N and 31P NMR spectra demonstrate that both the phospholipids and the protein transmembrane domain are uniformly aligned in the nanopores. Importantly, nanoporous AAO substrates may offer several advantages for membrane protein alignment in solid-state NMR studies compared to conventional methods. Specifically, higher thermal conductivity of aluminum oxide is expected to suppress thermal gradients associated with inhomogeneous radio frequency heating. Another important advantage of the nanoporous AAO substrate is its excellent accessibility to the bilayer surface for exposure to solute molecules. Such high accessibility achieved through the substrate nanochannel network could facilitate a wide range of structure-function studies of membrane proteins by solid-state NMR.

  14. 31P-MR spectroscopy of the brain in patients with anorexia nervosa: characteristic differences in the spectra between patients and healthy control subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rzanny, R.; Reichenbach, J.R.; Mentzel, H.J.; Pfleiderer, S.O.R.; Kaiser, W.A.; Freesmeyer, D.; Klemm, S.; Gerhard, U.J.; Blanz, B.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether 31 P-MR spectroscopy can detect reduced concentrations of high-energy phosphates, like PCr and NTP, caused by decreased metabolic activity in the brain of patients with anorexia nervosa (AN) and, furthermore, whether any impairment of the cerebral membrane metabolism can be derived from the spectra. Material and Methods: 10 female patients, age range 12 - 20 years and mean BMI (body mass index) of 14.8 ± 1.6 kg/m 2 , with clinically diagnosed AN (ICD-10, F50.0) and 10 healthy control subjects, age range 12 - 21 years and mean BMI 19.0 ± 2.1 kg/m 2 , without nutritional disturbances: were investigated. 31 P-MR spectroscopy was performed with a 1.5 T MRI unit using single volume selection in the frontal/prefrontal region of brain. Relative metabolic concentrations were quantified by normalizing the peak areas of the metabolites with the total area of the complete phosphorous spectrum, P tot , as well as with the peak area of β;-NTP. Results: Significant differences between the two groups were observed for the metabolic ratios PDE/P tot , PDE/β;-NTP and α-NTP/P tot which were lower in the patient group except for α-NTP/P tot . These ratios also revealed a statistically significant correlation with the BMI (r PDE/Ptot = 0.747, r PDE/β;-NTP = 0.57, r α-NTP/Ptot = -0.56; p ≤ 0.1). Reduced relative concentrations of PCr/P tot , β;-NTP/P tot or Pi/P tot were not encountered. Conclusion: The lowered PDE/P tot ratio for patients with AN and its correlation with BMI suggests that decreased BMI induces compositional changes of the phospholipids in the brain, which decrease the fraction of mobile phospholipids. (orig.) [de

  15. 31P-MR spectroscopy of all regions of the human heart at 1.5 T with acquisition-weighted chemical shift imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koestler, H.; Beer, M.; Buchner, S.; Sandstede, J.; Pabst, T.; Kenn, W.; Hahn, D.

    2001-01-01

    Aim: Aim of this study was to show whether or not acquisition-weighted chemical shift imaging (AW-CSI) allows the determination of PCr and ATP in the lateral and posterior wall of the human heart at 1.5 T. Methods: 12 healthy volunteers were examined using a conventional chemical shift imaging (CSI) and an AW-CSI. The sequences differed only in the number of repetitions for each point in k space. A hanning function was used as filter function leading to 7 repetitions in the center of the k space and 0 in the corners. Thus, AW-CSI had the same resolution as the CSI sequence. The results for both sequences were analyzed using identically positioned voxels in the septal, anterior, lateral and posterior wall. Results: The determined averaged AW-CSI signal to noise ratios were higher for PCr by a factor of 1.3 and for ATP by 1.4 than those of CSI. The PCr/ATP ratios were higher by a factor of 1.2 - 1.3 and showed a smaller standard deviation in all locations for AW-CSI. The mean PCr/ATP ratios determined by AW-CSI of septal, lateral and posterior wall were almost identical (1.72 - 1.76), while it was higher in the anterior wall (1.9). Conclusions: The reduced contamination in AW-CSI improves the signal to noise ratio and the determination of the PCr/ATP ratio in cardiac 31 P spectroscopy compared to CSI with the same resolution. The results in volunteers indicate that AW-CSI renders 31 P spectroscopy of the lateral and posterior wall of the human heart feasible for patient studies at 1.5 T. (orig.) [de

  16. on the properties of solutions and some applications on the TOV differential equation with a model of nuclear equation of state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esmail, S.F.H.

    2006-01-01

    the mathematical formulation of numerous physical problems results in differential equations actually non-linear differential equations . in our study we are interested in solutions of differential equations which describe the structure of neutron star in non-relativistic and relativistic cases. the aim of this work is to determine the mass and the radius of a neutron star, by solving the tolmann-oppenheimer-volkoff (TOV) differential equation using different models of the nuclear equation of state (EOS). analytically solutions are obtained for a simple form of the nuclear equation of state of Clayton model and poly trope model. for a more realistic equation of state the TOV differential equation is solved numerically using rung -Kutta method

  17. 47{sup th} Annual meeting on nuclear technology (AMNT 2016). Key Topics / Enhanced safety and operation excellence and decommissioning experience and Waste management solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salnikova, Tatiana [AREVA GmbH, Erlangen (Germany); Schaffrath, Andreas [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) gGmbH, Garching (Germany)

    2016-10-15

    Summary report on the Key Topics ''Enhanced Safety and Operation Excellence'' and ''Decommissioning Experience and Waste Management Solutions'' of the 47{sup th} Annual Conference on Nuclear Technology (AMNT 2016) held in Hamburg, 10 to 12 May 2016. Other Sessions of AMNT 2016 have been and will be covered in further issues of atw.

  18. Development of a novel solvent for the simultaneous separation of strontium and cesium from dissolved Spent Nuclear Fuel solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catherine L. Riddle; John D. Baker; Jack D. Law; Christopher A. McGrath; David H. Meikrantz; Bruce J. Mincher; Dean R. Peterman; Terry A. Todd

    2004-01-01

    The recovery of Cs and Sr from acidic solutions by solvent extraction has been investigated. The goal of this project was to develop an extraction process to remove Cs and Sr from high-level waste in an effort to reduce the heat loading in storage. Solvents for the extraction of Cs and Sr separately have been used on both caustic and acidic spent nuclear fuel waste in the past. The objective of this research was to find a suitable solvent for the extraction of both Cs and Sr simultaneously from acidic nitrate media. The solvents selected for this research possess good stability and extraction behavior when mixed together. The extraction experiments were performed with 4,4,(5)-Di-(tbutyldicyclohexano)-18-crown-6 (DtBuCH18C6), Calix[4]arene-bis-(tert-octylbenzocrown-6) (BOBCalixC6) and 1-(2,2,3,3-tetrafluoropropoxy)-3-(4-sec-butylphenoxy)-2-propanol (Cs-7SB modifier) in a branched aliphatic kerosene (Isopar L). The BOBCalixC6 and Cs-7SB modifier were developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) by Bonnesen et al. [1]. The values obtained from the SREX solvent for DSr in 1 M nitric acid ranged from 0.7 to 2.2 at 25 C and 10 C respectively. The values for DCs in 1 M nitric acid with the CSSX solvent ranged from 8.0 to 46.0 at 25 C and 10 C respectively. A new mixed solvent, developed at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) by Riddle et al. [2], showed distributions for Sr ranging from 8.8 to 17.4 in 1 M nitric acid at 25 C and 10 C respectively. The DCs for the mixed solvent ranged from 7.7 to 20.2 in 1 M nitric acid at 25 C to 10 C respectively. The unexpectedly high distributions for Sr at both 25 C and 10 C show a synergy in the mixed solvent. The DCs, although lower than with CSSX solvent, still showed good extraction behavior

  19. Improved solution for ill-posed linear systems using a constrained optimization ruled by a penalty: evaluation in nuclear medicine tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walrand, Stephan; Jamar, François; Pauwels, Stanislas

    2009-01-01

    Ill-posed linear systems occur in many different fields. A class of regularization methods, called constrained optimization, aims to determine the extremum of a penalty function whilst constraining an objective function to a likely value. We propose here a novel heuristic way to screen the local extrema satisfying the discrepancy principle. A modified version of the Landweber algorithm is used for the iteration process. After finding a local extremum, a bound is performed to the 'farthest' estimate in the data space still satisfying the discrepancy principle. Afterwards, the modified Landweber algorithm is again applied to find a new local extremum. This bound-iteration process is repeated until a satisfying solution is reached. For evaluation in nuclear medicine tomography, a novel penalty function that preserves the edge steps in the reconstructed solution was evaluated on Monte Carlo simulations and using real SPECT acquisitions as well. Surprisingly, the first bound always provided a significantly better solution in a wide range of statistics

  20. Experimental alteration of R7T7 nuclear model glass in solutions with different salinities (90/sup 0/C, 1 bar): implications for the selection of geological repositories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godon, N.; Thomassin, J.H.; Touray, J.C.; Vernaz, E.

    1988-01-01

    In order to simulate the leaching of nuclear wastes in repositories percolated by solutions of variable salinity, leaching tests of R7T7 glass in sol