WorldWideScience

Sample records for solute transport sand

  1. Oil sands market and transportation solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandahl, R.

    2004-01-01

    This presentation outlined the immense potential of the western Canadian oil sands reserves. Recoverable reserves have been estimated at 180 billion barrels, with production forecasts estimated at 5 million barrels per day by 2030. Resource development is occurring at a time when the world's largest oil importer is increasing supplies through concern for security of supply. The second and third largest oil importers in the world are experiencing economic and energy demand growth. These factors underscore the motivation for rapid growth of the Western Canadian Oil Sands reserves. One of the challenges that must be addressed is to ensure that incremental markets for the increased production are accessed. Another challenge is to ensure adequate infrastructure in terms of pipeline capacity to ensure deliverability of the product. tabs., figs

  2. Facilitated transport of Cu with hydroxyapatite nanoparticles in saturated sand: Effects of solution ionic strength and composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Column experiments were conducted to investigate the facilitated transport of Cu in association with hydroxyapatite nanoparticles (nHAP) in water-saturated quartz sand at different solution concentrations of NaCl (0 to 100 mM) or CaCl2 (0.1 to 1.0 mM). The experimental breakthrough curves and retent...

  3. Coupling Solute and Fine Particle Transport with Sand Bed Morphodynamics within a Field Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, C. B.; Ortiz, C. P.; Schumer, R.; Jerolmack, D. J.; Packman, A. I.

    2017-12-01

    Fine suspended particles are typically considered to pass through streams and rivers as wash load without interacting with the bed, however experiments have demonstrated that hyporheic flow causes advective exchange of fine particles with the stream bed, yielding accumulation of fine particle deposits within the bed. Ultimately, understanding river morphodynamics and ecosystem dynamics requires coupling both fine particle and solute transport with bed morphodynamics. To better understand the coupling between these processes we analyze a novel dataset from a controlled field experiment conducted on Clear Run, a 2nd order sand bed stream located within the North Carolina coastal plain. Data include concentrations of continuously injected conservative solutes and fine particulate tracers measured at various depths within the stream bed, overhead time lapse images of bed forms, stream discharge, and geomorphological surveys of the stream. We use image analysis of bed morphodynamics to assess exchange, retention, and remobilization of solutes and fine particles during constant discharge and a short duration experimental flood. From the images, we extract a time series of bedform elevations and scour depths for the duration of the experiment. The high-resolution timeseries of bed elevation enables us to assess coupling of bed morphodynamics with both the solute and fine particle flux during steady state mobile bedforms prior to the flood and to changing bedforms during the flood. These data allow the application of a stochastic modeling framework relating bed elevation fluctuations to fine particle residence times. This combined experimental and modeling approach ultimately informs our ability to predict not only the fate of fine particulate matter but also associated nutrient and carbon dynamics within streams and rivers.

  4. Numerical modeling of solute transport in a sand tank physical model under varying hydraulic gradient and hydrological stresses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atlabachew, Abunu; Shu, Longcang; Wu, Peipeng; Zhang, Yongjie; Xu, Yang

    2018-03-01

    This laboratory study improves the understanding of the impacts of horizontal hydraulic gradient, artificial recharge, and groundwater pumping on solute transport through aquifers. Nine experiments and numerical simulations were carried out using a sand tank. The variable-density groundwater flow and sodium chloride transport were simulated using the three-dimensional numerical model SEAWAT. Numerical modelling results successfully reproduced heads and concentrations observed in the sand tank. A higher horizontal hydraulic gradient enhanced the migration of sodium chloride, particularly in the groundwater flow direction. The application of constant artificial recharge increased the spread of the sodium chloride plume in both the longitudinal and lateral directions. In addition, groundwater pumping accelerated spreading of the sodium chloride plume towards the pumping well. Both higher hydraulic gradient and pumping rate generated oval-shaped plumes in the horizontal plane. However, the artificial recharge process produced stretched plumes. These effects of artificial recharge and groundwater pumping were greater under higher hydraulic gradient. The concentration breakthrough curves indicated that emerging solutions never attained the concentration of the originally injected solution. This is probably because of sorption of sodium chloride onto the silica sand and/or the exchange of sodium chloride between the mobile and immobile liquid domains. The fingering and protruding plume shapes in the numerical models constitute instability zones produced by buoyancy-driven flow. Overall, the results have substantiated the influences of hydraulic gradient, boundary condition, artificial recharge, pumping rate and density differences on solute transport through a homogeneous unconfined aquifer. The implications of these findings are important for managing liquid wastes.

  5. Sand transport, erosion and granular electrification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Merrison, J.P.

    2012-01-01

    is expanding our current understanding and outline the areas of advancement needed in the future. Presentation is made of current models for wind driven detachment/entrainment and the transport rates of sand and dust, including the effects of contact induced grain electrification. This ubiquitous phenomenon...... can affect grain transport through the generation of intense electric fields and processes of electrostatic assembly. Importantly the transport of sand is characterized by saltation, which is known to be an active process for erosion and therefore a source for dust and sand formation. Using novel...... erosion simulation techniques the link between grain transport rates and erosion rates has been quantified. Furthermore this can be linked to production rates for dust and has been associated with chemical and mineral alteration through a process of mechanical activation of fractured surfaces. This work...

  6. A Threshold Continuum for Aeolian Sand Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swann, C.; Ewing, R. C.; Sherman, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    The threshold of motion for aeolian sand transport marks the initial entrainment of sand particles by the force of the wind. This is typically defined and modeled as a singular wind speed for a given grain size and is based on field and laboratory experimental data. However, the definition of threshold varies significantly between these empirical models, largely because the definition is based on visual-observations of initial grain movement. For example, in his seminal experiments, Bagnold defined threshold of motion when he observed that 100% of the bed was in motion. Others have used 50% and lesser values. Differences in threshold models, in turn, result is large errors in predicting the fluxes associated with sand and dust transport. Here we use a wind tunnel and novel sediment trap to capture the fractions of sand in creep, reptation and saltation at Earth and Mars pressures and show that the threshold of motion for aeolian sand transport is best defined as a continuum in which grains progress through stages defined by the proportion of grains in creep and saltation. We propose the use of scale dependent thresholds modeled by distinct probability distribution functions that differentiate the threshold based on micro to macro scale applications. For example, a geologic timescale application corresponds to a threshold when 100% of the bed in motion whereas a sub-second application corresponds to a threshold when a single particle is set in motion. We provide quantitative measurements (number and mode of particle movement) corresponding to visual observations, percent of bed in motion and degrees of transport intermittency for Earth and Mars. Understanding transport as a continuum provides a basis for revaluating sand transport thresholds on Earth, Mars and Titan.

  7. Longshore sediment transport at Golden Sands (Bulgaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hristo Nikolov

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of studies on the qualitative and quantitative features of the littoral drift at Golden Sands (Bulgaria, carried out jointly by Polish and Bulgarian researchers. The mathematical modelling of physical coastal processes took wave transformation (wave diffraction and refraction; the effects of shoaling and wave breaking and longshore sediment transport into account. The computations were carried out for the mean statistical annual wave climate, determined on the basis of IO BAS wave data, simulated using the WAM method from long-term Black Sea wind data. The results of sediment transport computations clearly show that its direction off the Golden Sands shore is from north to south.

  8. Diffusive transport of strontium-85 in sand-bentonite mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillham, R.W.; Robin, M.J.L.; Dytynyshyn, D.J.

    1983-06-01

    Diffusion experiments have been used to determine the transport of 85 Sr in sand-bentonite mixtures. The diffusion experiments were performed on one natural soil (Chalk River sand) and on seven mixtures of bentonite and silica sand, containing from 0 percent to 100 percent bentonite. Two non-reactive solutes ( 36 Cl and 3 H) and one reactive solute ( 85 Sr) were used in the study. The experiments with non-reactive solutes yielded estimates of tortuosity factors. Retardation factors were obtained from experimental porosities, experimental bulk densities, and from batch distribution coefficients (Ksub(d)). These Ksub(d) values are a simple way of describing the solute/medium reaction, and are based on the assumption that the cation-exchange reaction may be described by a linear adsorption isotherm passing through the origin. The results demonstrate that, for practical purposes and for our experimental conditions, the use of the distribution coefficient provides a convenient means of calculating the effective diffusion coefficient for 85 Sr. The porosity and bulk density were also found to have a considerable influence on the effective diffusion coefficient, through the retardation factor. Mixtures containing 5-10 percent bentonite were found to be more effective in retarding 85 Sr than either sand alone, or mixtures containing more bentonite. In the soils of higher bentonite content, the effect of increased cation-exchange capacity was balanced by a decreasing ratio of bulk density to porosity

  9. Transport processes in intertidal sand flats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Christy

    2010-05-01

    Methane rich sulfate depleted seeps are observed along the low water line of the intertidal sand flat Janssand in the Wadden Sea. It is unclear where in the flat the methane is formed, and how it is transported to the edge of the sand flat where the sulfidic water seeps out. Methane and sulfate distributions in pore water were determined along transects from low water line toward the central area of the sand flat. The resulting profiles showed a zone of methane-rich and sulfate-depleted pore water below 2 m sediment depth. Methane production and sulfate reduction are monitored over time for surface sediments collected from the upper flat and seeping area. Both activities were at 22 C twice as high as at 15 C. The rates in sediments from the central area were higher than in sediments from the methane seeps. Methanogenesis occurred in the presence of sulfate, and was not significantly accelerated when sulfate was depleted. The observations show a rapid anaerobic degradation of organic matter in the Janssand. The methane rich pore water is obviously transported with a unidirectional flow from the central area of the intertidal sand flat toward the low water line. This pore water flow is driven by the pressure head caused by elevation of the pore water relative to the sea surface at low tide (Billerbeck et al. 2006a). The high methane concentration at the low water line accumulates due to a continuous outflow of pore water at the seepage site that prevents penetration of electron acceptors such as oxygen and sulfate to reoxidize the reduced products of anaerobic degradation (de Beer et al. 2006). It is, however, not clear why no methane accumulates or sulfate is depleted in the upper 2 m of the flats.

  10. Sand transportation and reverse patterns over leeward face of sand dune

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hong; Dun, Hongchao; Tong, Ding; Huang, Ning

    2017-04-01

    Sand saltation has complex interactions with turbulent flow and dune form. Most models of wind-blown sand consider ideal circumstances such as steady wind velocity and a flat surface, and the bulk of data on wind flow and sand transport over an individual dune has focused mostly on the influence of dune shape or inter-dune space on the wind flow, neglecting the effect of morphology on sand saltation, particularly airflow and sand transportation over the leeward slope. Wind flow structures over the leeward slope of sand dunes have a fundamental influence on the organization of sand dunes. In order to understand sand dune dynamics, lee face airflow and sediment transportation should be paid more attention. Previous field observations could not measure turbulent flow structure well because of the limited observation points and the influence of experiment structure on wind field. In addition, the reverse sand particles over leeward face could not be collected by sand trap in field. Numerous field observations could not measure turbulent flow structure because of the limited observation points and the influence of experimental structures on the wind field. In addition, the reverse transport of sand particles over leeward face could not be collected by sand traps in field. Therefore, this paper aims to investigate the turbulent flow structure and sand transport pattern over the leeward slope. A numerical model of sand saltation over slope terrain is constructed, which also considers the coupling effects between air flow and sand particles. The large eddy simulation method is used to model turbulent flow. Sand transport is simulated by tracking the trajectory of each sand particle. The results show that terrain significantly alters the turbulent air flow structure and wind-blown sand movement, especially over the leeward slope. Here, mass flux increases initially and then decreases with height in the reversed flow region in the direction of wind flow, and the mass flux

  11. Modeling sheet-flow sand transport under progressive surface waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kranenburg, Wouter

    2013-01-01

    In the near-shore zone, energetic sea waves generate sheet-flow sand transport. In present day coastal models, wave-induced sheet-flow sand transport rates are usually predicted with semi-empirical transport formulas, based on extensive research on this phenomenon in oscillatory flow tunnels.

  12. Sorption of europium by Haro river sand in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syed Moosa Hasany; Syed Javaid Khurshid

    1997-01-01

    The sorption of Eu(III) on Haro river sand has been investigated. Influences include composition of the sorptive medium, the concentration of sorbent and sorbate, and shaking time. Haro river sand can be exploited for the preconcentration and removal of europium from very dilute solutions, for the decontamination and treatment of radioactive waste water and effluents from nuclear installations. (Author)

  13. Sand transport in urbanized beaches - models and reality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pineiro, G.; Norbis, W.; Panario, D.

    2012-01-01

    The general objective is to quantify the wind transport of sand in the urbanized beaches. The specific objectives include testing and calibration of the wind velocity as well as the classification of the beaches according to the magnitude and the direction of sand transport

  14. Aeolian sand transport and aeolian deposits on Venus: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreslavsly, Mikhail A.; Bondarenko, Nataliya V.

    2017-06-01

    We review the current state of knowledge about aeolian sand transport and aeolian bedforms on planet Venus. This knowledge is limited by lack of observational data. Among the four planetary bodies of the Solar System with sufficient atmospheres in contact with solid surfaces, Venus has the densest atmosphere; the conditions there are transitional between those for terrestrial subaerial and subaqueous transport. The dense atmosphere causes low saltation threshold and short characteristic saltation length, and short scale length of the incipient dunes. A few lines of evidence indicate that the typical wind speeds exceed the saltation threshold; therefore, sand transport would be pervasive, if sand capable of saltation is available. Sand production on Venus is probably much slower than on the Earth; the major terrestrial sand sinks are also absent, however, lithification of sand through sintering is expected to be effective under Venus' conditions. Active transport is not detectable with the data available. Aeolian bedforms (transverse dunes) resolved in the currently available radar images occupy a tiny area on the planet; however, indirect observations suggest that small-scale unresolved aeolian bedforms are ubiquitous. Aeolian transport is probably limited by sand lithification causing shortage of saltation-capable material. Large impact events likely cause regional short-term spikes in aeolian transport by supplying a large amount of sand-size particles, as well as disintegration and activation of older indurated sand deposits. The data available are insufficient to understand whether the global aeolian sand transport occurs or not. More robust knowledge about aeolian transport on Venus is essential for future scientific exploration of the planet, in particular, for implementation and interpretation of geochemical studies of surface materials. High-resolution orbital radar imaging with local to regional coverage and desirable interferometric capabilities is the

  15. Production and global transport of Titan's sand particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Jason W.; Lorenz, Ralph D.; Radebaugh, Jani; Hayes, Alexander G.; Arnold, Karl; Chandler, Clayton

    2015-06-01

    Previous authors have suggested that Titan's individual sand particles form by either sintering or by lithification and erosion. We suggest two new mechanisms for the production of Titan's organic sand particles that would occur within bodies of liquid: flocculation and evaporitic precipitation. Such production mechanisms would suggest discrete sand sources in dry lakebeds. We search for such sources, but find no convincing candidates with the present Cassini Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer coverage. As a result we propose that Titan's equatorial dunes may represent a single, global sand sea with west-to-east transport providing sources and sinks for sand in each interconnected basin. The sand might then be transported around Xanadu by fast-moving Barchan dune chains and/or fluvial transport in transient riverbeds. A river at the Xanadu/Shangri-La border could explain the sharp edge of the sand sea there, much like the Kuiseb River stops the Namib Sand Sea in southwest Africa on Earth. Future missions could use the composition of Titan's sands to constrain the global hydrocarbon cycle.

  16. Solution weighting for the SAND-II Monte Carlo code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oster, C.A.; McElroy, W.N.; Simons, R.L.; Lippincott, E.P.; Odette, G.R.

    1976-01-01

    Modifications to the SAND-II Error Analysis Monte Carlo code to include solution weighting based on input data uncertainties have been made and are discussed together with background information on the SAND-II algorithm. The new procedure permits input data having smaller uncertainties to have a greater influence on the solution spectrum than do the data having larger uncertainties. The results of an indepth study to find a practical procedure and the first results of its application to three important Interlaboratory LMFBR Reaction Rate (ILRR) program benchmark spectra (CFRMF, ΣΣ, and 235 U fission) are discussed

  17. Solute transport in soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zee, van der S.E.A.T.M.; Leijnse, A.

    2013-01-01

    Solute transport is of importance in view of the movement of nutrient elements, e.g. towards the plant root system, and because of a broad range of pollutants. Pollution is not necessarily man induced, but may be due to geological or geohydrological causes, e.g. in the cases of pollution with

  18. Influence Of Carboxymethyl Cellulose For The Transport Of Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles In Clean Silica And Mineral-Coated Sands

    Science.gov (United States)

    The transport properties of titanium dioxide (anatase polymorph) nanoparticles encapsulated by carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) were evaluated as a function of changes in the solute chemical properties in clean quartz, amorphous aluminum and iron hydroxide-coated sands. While prist...

  19. Shifting sands - from descriptions to solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, R; Pettman, T L; Waters, E

    2014-06-01

    (effective solutions) was often described as a more daunting task. As a result, there was low awareness of, and competence with, Types 2 and 3 evidence. Organizational processes for using these types of evidence were almost non-existent. Applying this typology with stakeholders has allowed us to observe that it; (1) has been useful in conceptualizing useful evidence for public health, which has guided our work (2) has been useful in stakeholder interactions to introduce evidence, its definition and what it means to be 'evidence-informed' and (3) has identified 'faults' in the EIDM approach. The typology includes examples of common questions in public health, and suggestions of the types of evidence that may be useful to answer those questions. Findings that test the use of the typology have been synthesized. These have demonstrated inconsistencies in defining and applying evidence, and low awareness about what types of evidence are crucial to ensure that interventions are effective and minimize harm. Based upon these findings, the authors would argue that current investment in type 1 evidence (e.g. data repositories) shifts to make way for KT strategies, which facilitate the uptake of type 2 and 3 evidence (interventions and implementation guidance). Building a shared understanding of the types of evidence and their importance in public health decision-making is crucial if we wish to build a system that supports EIDM and results in effective interventions being delivered. There are a number of 'faults' in the system which the authors have illuminated through understanding the individual and organizational realities of evidence use. These faults could be addressed through KT strategies with the public health workforce, and development of organizational cultures and the broader system. Copyright © 2014 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Transport of citrate-coated silver nanoparticles in unsaturated sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumahor, Samuel; Hron, Pavel; Metreveli, George; Schaumann, Gabriele; Vogel, Hans-Jörg

    2015-04-01

    Chemical factors and physical constraints lead to coupled effects during particle transport in unsaturated porous media. Unlike for saturated transport, studies on unsaturated transport as typical for soil are currently scarce. We investigated the mobility of citrate-coated Ag NPs in unsaturated sand (grain diameter: 0.1-0.3 mm). For three flux rates and a given pore-water ionic strength (1 mM KNO3), the citrate-coated Ag NPs were less mobile at pH = 5 compared to pH = 9. The classic Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory suggests unfavorable deposition conditions at both, the air-water interface and solid-water interface. Breakthrough curves measured under quasi-steady state unsaturated flow showed retardation of the citrate-coated Ag NPs compared to inert solute (KBr). After flushing with nanoparticle-free 1 mM KNO3 solution (pH-adjusted), retention was much lower in deeper depths compared to the surface where the particles entered the flow field. The results show a non-linear dependence of nanoparticle (NP) mobility on flux rate and water content. Especially the observed retardation similar to equilibrium sorption is in contrast to observations under saturated flow conditions. A convection-dispersion and reaction model that combines a reversible equilibrium process and a non-equilibrium interaction process reproduced the measured breakthrough curves reasonably well. From comparison between saturated and unsaturated experiments we conclude that the air-water interface is responsible for the reversible equilibrium process while the water-solid interface accounts for irreversible soption.

  1. Transport of citrate-coated silver nanoparticles in unsaturated sand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumahor, Samuel K., E-mail: samuel.kumahor@ufz.de [Department of Soil Physics, Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research–UFZ, Theodor-Lieser-Strasse 4, 06120 Halle-Saale (Germany); Hron, Pavel, E-mail: pavel.hron@iwr.uni-heidelberg.de [Interdisciplinary Center for Scientific Computing, University of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 368, Raum 422, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Metreveli, George, E-mail: metreveli@uni-landau.de [Universität Koblenz-Landau, Institute for Environmental Sciences, Group of Environmental and Soil Chemistry, Fortstr. 7, D-76829 Landau (Germany); Schaumann, Gabriele E., E-mail: schaumann@uni-landau.de [Universität Koblenz-Landau, Institute for Environmental Sciences, Group of Environmental and Soil Chemistry, Fortstr. 7, D-76829 Landau (Germany); Vogel, Hans-Jörg, E-mail: hans-joerg.vogel@ufz.de [Department of Soil Physics, Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research–UFZ, Theodor-Lieser-Strasse 4, 06120 Halle-Saale (Germany); Institute of Soil Science and Plant Nutrition, Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Von-Seckendorff-Platz 3, 06120 Halle-Saale (Germany)

    2015-12-01

    Chemical factors and physical constraints lead to coupled effects during particle transport in unsaturated porous media. Studies on unsaturated transport as typical for soils are currently scarce. In unsaturated porous media, particle mobility is determined by the existence of an air–water interface in addition to a solid–water interface. To this end, we measured breakthrough curves and retention profiles of citrate-coated Ag nanoparticles in unsaturated sand at two pH values (5 and 9) and three different flow rates corresponding to different water contents with 1 mM KNO{sub 3} as background electrolyte. The classical DLVO theory suggests unfavorable deposition conditions at the air–water and solid–water interfaces. The breakthrough curves indicate modification in curve shapes and retardation of nanoparticles compared to inert solute. Retention profiles show sensitivity to flow rate and pH and this ranged from almost no retention for the highest flow rate at pH = 9 to almost complete retention for the lowest flow rate at pH = 5. Modeling of the breakthrough curves, thus, required coupling two parallel processes: a kinetically controlled attachment process far from equilibrium, responsible for the shape modification, and an equilibrium sorption, responsible for particle retardation. The non-equilibrium process and equilibrium sorption are suggested to relate to the solid–water and air–water interfaces, respectively. This is supported by the DLVO model extended for hydrophobic interactions which suggests reversible attachment, characterized by a secondary minimum (depth 3–5 kT) and a repulsive barrier at the air–water interface. In contrast, the solid–water interface is characterized by a significant repulsive barrier and the absence of a secondary minimum suggesting kinetically controlled and non-equilibrium interaction. This study provides new insights into particle transport in unsaturated porous media and offers a model concept representing the

  2. Proceedings of the Canadian Institute conference on maximizing oil sands growth : improving transportation logistics, labour supply and pipeline availability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    This conference focused on the development of a transportation infrastructure to accommodate oil sands growth, with particular reference to building a pipeline infrastructure to meet the delivery and supply requirements of oil sands producers. The need for transmission system upgrades and additions to meet the electric power requirements of the oil sands industry was also discussed. The transportation options and new proposed pipeline construction projects that will alleviate the current transportation challenges in the oil sands region were identified. These include the implementation of new infrastructure strategies based on current pipeline availability, Kyoto requirements and downstream market demands. The impact of labour shortages on the oil sands industry was reviewed along with solutions to prevent and overcome these shortages. The conference featured 15 presentations, of which 3 have been catalogued separately for inclusion in this database. tabs., figs

  3. experimental investigation of sand minimum transport velocity

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    The production of reservoir fluid through long tiebacks/pipelines has emerged as one of ... transport in multiphase flows, the investigation of the ... Nigerian Journal of Technology ... associated with water-gas-oil-solid flow in pipeline in ... The mixture was well agitated using a .... operational conditions the limit deposit velocity.

  4. Oblique second-order sand transport pathways on an intertidal sand flat in a natural tidal inlet system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ernstsen, Verner Brandbyge; Lefebvre, Alice; Kroon, Aart

    2013-01-01

    tide, sand is transported along ESE-oriented pathways across the intertidal flat towards the inner tidal basin. During the late stages of ebb tide, sand is transported in drainage channels (WSWoriented) from the intertidal flat towards the inlet channel. During storm events with winds from SW, wave...

  5. Solute carrier transporters: Pharmacogenomics research ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aghogho

    2010-12-27

    Dec 27, 2010 ... This paper reviews the solute carrier transporters and highlights the fact that there is much to be learnt from .... transporters, drug targets, effect or proteins and meta- ... basolateral or apical plasma membrane of polarized cells,.

  6. Influence of clay particles on the transport and retention of titanium dioxide nanoparticles in quartz sand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Li; Tong, Meiping; Wang, Xueting; Kim, Hyunjung

    2014-07-01

    This study investigated the influence of two representative suspended clay particles, bentonite and kaolinite, on the transport of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (nTiO2) in saturated quartz sand in both NaCl (1 and 10 mM ionic strength) and CaCl2 solutions (0.1 and 1 mM ionic strength) at pH 7. The breakthrough curves of nTiO2 with bentonite or kaolinite were higher than those without the presence of clay particles in NaCl solutions, indicating that both types of clay particles increased nTiO2 transport in NaCl solutions. Moreover, the enhancement of nTiO2 transport was more significant when bentonite was present in nTiO2 suspensions relative to kaolinite. Similar to NaCl solutions, in CaCl2 solutions, the breakthrough curves of nTiO2 with bentonite were also higher than those without clay particles, while the breakthrough curves of nTiO2 with kaolinite were lower than those without clay particles. Clearly, in CaCl2 solutions, the presence of bentonite in suspensions increased nTiO2 transport, whereas, kaolinite decreased nTiO2 transport in quartz sand. The attachment of nTiO2 onto clay particles (both bentonite and kaolinite) were observed under all experimental conditions. The increased transport of nTiO2 in most experimental conditions (except for kaolinite in CaCl2 solutions) was attributed mainly to the clay-facilitated nTiO2 transport. The straining of larger nTiO2-kaolinite clusters yet contributed to the decreased transport (enhanced retention) of nTiO2 in divalent CaCl2 solutions when kaolinite particles were copresent in suspensions.

  7. Sand Transport under Highly Turbulent Airflow on a Beach Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baas, A. C. W.; Jackson, D. W. T.; Cooper, J. A. G.; Lynch, K.; Delgado-Fernandez, I.; Beyers, J. H. M.

    2012-04-01

    The past decade has seen a growing body of research on the relation between turbulence in the wind and the resultant transport of sediment over active sand surfaces. Widespread use of sonic anemometry and high-frequency sand transport sensors and traps have facilitated recent field studies over dunes and beach surfaces, to move beyond monitoring of mean wind speed and bulk transport to more detailed measurements at much higher spatio-temporal resolutions. In this paper we present results of a field study conducted in the recirculation flow and re-attachment zone on a beach behind a foredune at Magilligan Strand, Northern Ireland. The offshore winds over the foredune at this site are associated with flow separation and reversal located over the beach surface in the lee of the dune row, often strong enough to induce sand transport toward the toe of the foredune ('against' the overall offshore flow). The re-attachment and recirculation zone are associated with strongly turbulent fluid flow and complex streamlines that do not follow the underlying topography. High frequency (25 Hz) wind and sand transport data were collected at a grid of point locations distributed over the beach surface between 35 m to 55 m distance from the 10 m high dune crest, using ultrasonic anemometers at 0.5 m height and co-located load cell traps and Safires at the bed surface. The wind data are used to investigate the role of Reynolds shear stresses and quadrant analysis techniques for identifying burst-sweep events in relation to sand transport events. This includes an assessment of the issues involved with data rotations for yaw, pitch, and roll corrections relative to complex flow streamlines, and the subsequently derived turbulence parameters based on fluctuating vector components (u', v', w'). Results illustrate how transport may exist under threshold mean velocities because of the role played by coherent flow structures, and the findings corroborate previous findings that shear velocity

  8. From oil sands to transportation fuels, to electricity, to hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yildirim, E.

    1993-01-01

    The Alberta Chamber of Resources programs and initiatives on oil sands and heavy oil, and strategies for revitalizing oilsands development in Alberta are described. The regional upgrader and satellite production facilities concept, and technology requirements for mineable oil sands by the year 2010 are discussed. Strategic alliances in furtherence of oil sands research and development and the National Task Force on Oil Sands Strategies are described. Changes in requirements for transportation fuels due to stricter regulations and environmental initiatives will cause a trend to lighter fuels with more hydrogen content, less aromatics, nitrogen, sulfur and metals. A preferred refinery configuration will be able to process heavier crudes and synthetic crudes, have no heavy fuel oil product, low sulfur products, low aromatics with high octane, and low operating cost. A regional or central facility that combines the processing capabilities of a bitumen upgrader with the process units of a refinery is preferred. Advantages of this concept are: value addition to the feedstock is maximized; dependence on refineries is eliminated; restriction on synthetic crude oil volumes due to capacity limitations at refineries is eliminated; directly marketable finished products are produced; more stringent quality specifications are satisfied; and the synergies between upgrading and refining improve overall economics of processing. It is recommended that the concept of regional upgraders be adopted for Alberta, strategic alliances be encouraged, incentives for bitumen production be provided, and a bitumen pipeline network be developed. 12 refs

  9. Study of transport in unsaturated sands using radioactive tracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merritt, W.F.; Pickens, J.F.; Allison, G.B.

    1979-01-01

    A laboratory experiment was conducted to investigate the mixing that occurs as a series of labelled pulses of water are transported by gravity drainage down through a sand filled column having a water table imposed at the bottom. It also demonstrated the utility of gamma-ray emitting radioactive tracers in studying transport in unsaturated or saturated porous media. The motivation for pursuing this topic was developed from observing that the content of oxygen-18, deuterium and tritium in rainwater shows marked temporal variations whereas their concentrations below the water table in shallow ground water flow systems are generally found to show much less variation. (auth)

  10. A new turbulence-based model for sand transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayaud, Jerome; Wiggs, Giles; Bailey, Richard

    2016-04-01

    Knowledge of the changing rate of sediment flux in space and time is essential for quantifying surface erosion and deposition in desert landscapes. While many aeolian studies have relied on time-averaged parameters such as wind velocity (U) and wind shear velocity (u*) to determine sediment flux, there is increasing evidence that high-frequency turbulence is an important driving force behind the entrainment and transport of sand. However, turbulence has yet to be incorporated into a functional sand transport model that can be used for predictive purposes. In this study we present a new transport model (the 'turbulence model') that accounts for high-frequency variations in the horizontal (u) and vertical (w) components of wind flow. The turbulence model is fitted to wind velocity and sediment transport data from a field experiment undertaken in Namibia's Skeleton Coast National Park, and its performance at three temporal resolutions (10 Hz, 1 Hz, 1 min) is compared to two existing models that rely on time-averaged wind velocity data (Radok, 1977; Dong et al., 2003). The validity of the three models is analysed under a variety of saltation conditions, using a 2-hour (1 Hz measurement resolution) dataset from the Skeleton Coast and a 5-hour (1 min measurement resolution) dataset from the southwestern Kalahari Desert. The turbulence model is shown to outperform the Radok and Dong models when predicting total saltation count over the three experimental periods. For all temporal resolutions presented in this study (10 Hz-10 min), the turbulence model predicted total saltation count to within at least 0.34%, whereas the Radok and Dong models over- or underestimated total count by up to 5.50% and 20.53% respectively. The strong performance of the turbulence model can be attributed to a lag in mass flux response built into its formulation, which can be adapted depending on the temporal resolution of investigation. This accounts for the inherent lag within the physical

  11. Computational fluid dynamics simulation of transport and retention of nanoparticle in saturated sand filters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, Ashraf Aly; Li, Zhen; Sahle-Demessie, Endalkachew; Sorial, George A.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Breakthrough curves used to study fate of NPs in slow sand filters (SSF). ► CFD simulate transport, attachment/detachment of NPs in SSFs. ► CFD predicted spatial and temporal changes for transient concentrations of NPs. ► CFD predicts low concentrations and steady NP influx would not be retained by SSFs. ► Pulse input is retained with outlet concentration of 0.2% of the inlet. -- Abstract: Experimental and computational investigation of the transport parameters of nanoparticles (NPs) flowing through porous media has been made. This work intends to develop a simulation applicable to the transport and retention of NPs in saturated porous media for investigating the effect of process conditions and operating parameters such, as ion strength, and filtration efficiency. Experimental data obtained from tracer and nano-ceria, CeO 2 , breakthrough studies were used to characterize dispersion of nanoparticle with the flow and their interaction with sand packed columns with different heights. Nanoparticle transport and concentration dynamics were solved using the Eulerian computational fluid dynamics (CFD) solver ANSYS/FLUENT ® based on a scaled down flow model. A numerical study using the Navier–Stokes equation with second order interaction terms was used to simulate the process. Parameters were estimated by fitting tracer, experimental NP transport data, and interaction of NP with the sand media. The model considers different concentrations of steady state inflow of NPs and different amounts of spike concentrations. Results suggest that steady state flow of dispersant-coated NPs would not be retained by a sand filter, while spike concentrations could be dampened effectively. Unlike analytical solutions, the CFD allows estimating flow profiles for structures with complex irregular geometry and uneven packing

  12. Computational fluid dynamics simulation of transport and retention of nanoparticle in saturated sand filters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassan, Ashraf Aly [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, National Risk Management Research Laboratory, 26 W. Martin Luther King Drive, Cincinnati, OH 45268 (United States); Li, Zhen [School of Energy, Environmental, Biological, and Medical Engineering, Environmental Engineering Program, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Sahle-Demessie, Endalkachew, E-mail: sahle-demessie.endalkachew@epa.gov [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, National Risk Management Research Laboratory, 26 W. Martin Luther King Drive, Cincinnati, OH 45268 (United States); Sorial, George A. [School of Energy, Environmental, Biological, and Medical Engineering, Environmental Engineering Program, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: ► Breakthrough curves used to study fate of NPs in slow sand filters (SSF). ► CFD simulate transport, attachment/detachment of NPs in SSFs. ► CFD predicted spatial and temporal changes for transient concentrations of NPs. ► CFD predicts low concentrations and steady NP influx would not be retained by SSFs. ► Pulse input is retained with outlet concentration of 0.2% of the inlet. -- Abstract: Experimental and computational investigation of the transport parameters of nanoparticles (NPs) flowing through porous media has been made. This work intends to develop a simulation applicable to the transport and retention of NPs in saturated porous media for investigating the effect of process conditions and operating parameters such, as ion strength, and filtration efficiency. Experimental data obtained from tracer and nano-ceria, CeO{sub 2}, breakthrough studies were used to characterize dispersion of nanoparticle with the flow and their interaction with sand packed columns with different heights. Nanoparticle transport and concentration dynamics were solved using the Eulerian computational fluid dynamics (CFD) solver ANSYS/FLUENT{sup ®} based on a scaled down flow model. A numerical study using the Navier–Stokes equation with second order interaction terms was used to simulate the process. Parameters were estimated by fitting tracer, experimental NP transport data, and interaction of NP with the sand media. The model considers different concentrations of steady state inflow of NPs and different amounts of spike concentrations. Results suggest that steady state flow of dispersant-coated NPs would not be retained by a sand filter, while spike concentrations could be dampened effectively. Unlike analytical solutions, the CFD allows estimating flow profiles for structures with complex irregular geometry and uneven packing.

  13. Characterization of sand lenses and their role for subsurface transport in low-permeability clay tills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessler, Timo Christian; Klint, K. E.; Nilsson, B.

    2011-01-01

    Glacial sediments dominate large parts of the geological topology in Denmark. They predominantly consist of lowpermeability tills, but fractures and sand-lenses constitute zones of enhanced permeability facilitating preferential flow. This study focuses on characterization of sand deposits with r...... the sand lenses in hydro-geological models to successfully characterize subsurface flow and transport, e.g. for remediation activities....

  14. Gravity flow and solute dispersion in variably saturated sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumahor, Samuel K.; de Rooij, Gerrit H.; Vogel, Hans-Joerg

    2014-05-01

    Solute dispersion in porous media depends on the structure of the velocity field at the pore scale. Hence, dispersion is expected to change with water content and with mean flow velocity. We performed laboratory experiments using a column of repacked fine-grained quartz sand (0.1-0.3 mm grain size) with a porous plate at the bottom to controle the water potential at the lower boundary. We established gravity flow conditions - i.e. constant matric potential and water content throughout the column - for a number of different irrigation rates. We measured breakthrough curves during unit gradient flow for an inert tracer which could be described by the convection-dispersion equation. As the soil water content decreased we observed an initially gradual increase in dispersivity followed by an abrupt increase below a threshold water content (0.19) and pressure head (-38 hPa). This phenomena can be explained by the geometry of phase distribution which was simulated based on Xray-CT images of the porous structure.

  15. Effects of water content on reactive transport of Sr in Chernobyl sand columns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szenknect, S.; Dewiere, L.; Ardois, C.; Gaudet, J.P.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: While transport of non-reactive solutes has been studied extensively in unsaturated porous media, much less is known about the factors that control the transport of sorbing solutes in unsaturated conditions. Three laboratory techniques were used to analyze the transport of Sr in the aeolian sand from Chernobyl Pilot Site [1] in both saturated and unsaturated flow conditions. Batch experiments were performed to study the chemical equilibrium state of the soil/solution system. Stirred flow-through reactor (SFTR) experiments were performed to study the kinetics and reversibility of sorption reactions at the surface of solid particles. Column experiments were also performed in saturated and unsaturated steady flow conditions. Experimental data pointed out a non-linear, instantaneous and reversible sorption process of Sr. A suitable cation-exchange model was used to describe the solute/soil reaction. The former model was coupled with transport models to describe behavior of Sr in saturated [2] and unsaturated flow conditions. Transport properties of sand packed columns have been determined with an inert tracer (HTO). BTCs obtained under saturated conditions exhibit a small amount of dispersion compared to those obtained under unsaturated conditions. Classical advection-dispersion model described successfully saturated tritium breakthrough curves (BTCs), whereas a mobile-immobile model (MIM) was required to described asymmetrical unsaturated BTCs. The MIM assumes that the porous medium contains a mobile water phase in which convective-dispersive transport occurs, and a immobile water phase with which solutes can exchange with a first order kinetic. In our experiments, transport by advection in the mobile phase is the predominant process whatever the flow conditions and mass transfer rate between the mobile and immobile regions is the predominant process for broadening the BTCs. Since dispersion is blurred by mass transfer resistance, the

  16. Facilitated transport of copper with hydroxyapatite nanoparticles in saturated sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saturated packed column experiments were conducted to investigate the facilitated transport of Cu with hydroxyapatite nanoparticles (nHAP) at different pore water velocities (0.22-2.2 cm min–1), solution pH (6.2-9.0), and fraction of Fe oxide coating on grain surfaces (', 0-0.36). The facilitated tr...

  17. Transport of reactive and nonreactive solutes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garabedian, S.P.; Leblanc, D.R.

    1990-01-01

    A natural-gradient tracer test was conducted on Cape Cod, Massachusetts, to examine the transport and dispersion of solutes in a sand and gravel aquifer. A nonreactive tracer, bromide, and two reactive tracers, lithium and molybdate, were injected as a pulse in July 1985 and monitored in three dimensions for 3 years as they moved 280 meters downgradient through an array of multilevel samplers. The tracer transport was quantified using spatial moments. The calculated total mass of bromide for each sampling date varied from 86 to 105 percent of the injected mass, and the center of mass moved at a nearly constant horizontal velocity of 0.42 meters per day. The bromide cloud also moved downward about 4 meters, probably because of density-induced sinking and accretion of areal recharge from precipitation. After 200 meters of transport, the bromide cloud was more than 80 meters long but only 14 meters wide and 6 meters thick. The change in longitudinal dispersivity had reached a constant value (0.96 meters). The transverse horizontal and transverse vertical dispersivities were much smaller (1.8 centimeters and 1.5 millimeters, respectively) than the longitudinal value. The lithium and molybdate clouds followed the same path as the bromide cloud, but a significant amount of their mass was adsorbed onto the aquifer sediments, and their rates of movement were retarded about 50 percent relative to the bromide movement. (Author) (5 figs., 23 refs.)

  18. Life cycle energy and greenhouse gas emissions from transportation of Canadian oil sands to future markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarnoczi, Tyler

    2013-01-01

    Oil sands transportation diversification is important for preventing discounted crude pricing. Current life cycle assessment (LCA) models that assess greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from crude oil transportation are linearly-scale and fail to account for project specific details. This research sets out to develop a detailed LCA model to compare the energy inputs and GHG emissions of pipeline and rail transportation for oil sands products. The model is applied to several proposed oils sands transportation routes that may serve as future markets. Comparison between transportation projects suggest that energy inputs and GHG emissions show a high degree of variation. For both rail and pipeline transportation, the distance over which the product is transported has a large impact on total emissions. The regional electricity grid and pump efficiency have the largest impact on pipeline emissions, while train engine efficiency and bitumen blending ratios have the largest impact on rail transportation emissions. LCA-based GHG regulations should refine models to account for the range of product pathways and focus efforts on cost-effective emission reductions. As the climate-change impacts of new oil sands transportation projects are considered, GHG emission boundaries should be defined according to operation control. -- Highlights: •A life cycle model is developed to compare transportation of oil sands products. •The model is applied to several potential future oil sands markets. •Energy inputs and GHG emissions are compared. •Model inputs are explored using sensitivity analysis. •Policy recommendations are provided

  19. Transport and Deposition of Suspended Soil-Colloids in Saturated Sand Columns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharma, Anu; Kawamoto, Ken; Møldrup, Per

    2011-01-01

    Understanding colloid mobilization, transport and deposition in the subsurface is a prerequisite for predicting colloid‐facilitated transport of strongly adsorbing contaminants and further developing remedial activities. This study investigated the transport behavior of soil‐colloids extracted from...... caused tailing of colloid BTCs with higher reversible entrapment and release of colloids than high flow velocity. The finer Toyoura sand retained more colloids than the coarser Narita sand at low pH conditions. The deposition profile and particle size distribution of colloids in the Toyoura sand clearly...

  20. Aeolian sand transport and its effects on the stability of Miramar-Caranzalem beach

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Reddy, G.V.; Sastry, J.S.

    Removal of sand by wind from the beach at Miramar-Caranzalem, Goa, has been found to effect its stability over a relatively longer time scale. This aeolian sand transport has been computed for this strip of the beach utilising the relation between...

  1. Database of full-scale laboratory experiments on wave-driven sand transport processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Werf, Jebbe J.; Schretlen, Johanna Lidwina Maria; Ribberink, Jan S.; O'Donoghue, Tom

    2009-01-01

    A new database of laboratory experiments involving sand transport processes over horizontal, mobile sand beds under full-scale non-breaking wave and non-breaking wave-plus-current conditions is described. The database contains details of the flow and bed conditions, information on which quantities

  2. Turbulence and sediment transport over sand dunes and ripples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennis, A.; Le Bot, S.; lafite, R.; Bonneton, P.; Ardhuin, F.

    2013-12-01

    Several bedforms are present near to the surfzone of natural beaches. Dunes and ripples are frequently observed. Understanding the turbulence over these forms is essential for the sediment transport. The turbulent flow and the suspended sand particles interact with each other. At the moment, the modelling strategy for turbulence is still a challenge. According to the spatial scales, some different methods to model the turbulence are employed, in particular the RANS (Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes) and the LES (Large Eddy Simulation). A hybrid method combining both RANS and LES is set up here. We have adapted this method, initially developed for atmospheric flow, to the oceanic flow. This new method is implemented inside the 3D hydrodynamic model, MARS 3D, which is forced by waves. LES is currently the best way to simulate turbulent flow but its higher cost prevents it from being used for large scale applications. So, here we use RANS near the bottom while LES is set elsewhere. It allows us minimize the computational cost and ensure a better accuracy of the results than with a fully RANS model. In the case of megaripples, the validation step was performed with two sets of field data (Sandy Duck'97 and Forsoms'13) but also with the data from Dune2D model which uses only RANS for turbulence. The main findings are: a) the vertical profiles of the velocity are similar throughout the data b) the turbulent kinetic energy, which was underestimated by Dune2D, is in line with the observations c) the concentration of the suspended sediment is simulated with a better accuracy than with Dune2D but this remains lower than the observations.

  3. A bright intra-dune feature on Titan and its implications for sand formation and transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKenzie, Shannon; Barnes, Jason W.; Rodriguez, Sebastien; Cornet, Thomas; Brossier, Jeremy; Soderblom, Jason M.; Le Mouélic, Stephane; Sotin, Christophe; Brown, Robert H.; Buratti, Bonnie J.; Clark, Roger Nelson; Nicholson, Philip D.; Baines, Kevin

    2017-10-01

    Organic sands cover much of Titan’s equatorial belt, gathered into longitudinal dunes about a kilometer wide and hundreds of kilometers long. At the end of the Cassini era, questions of how such a vast volume of saltable material is or was created on Titan remain unanswered. At least two possible mechanisms suggested for forming sand-sized particles involve liquids: (1) evaporite deposition and erosion and (2) flocculation of material within a lake. Transporting sand from the lakes and seas of Titan’s poles to the equatorial belt is not strongly supported by Cassini observations: the equatorial belt sits higher than the poles and no sheets or corridors of travelling sand have been identified. Thus, previous sites of equatorial surface liquids may be of interest for understanding sand formation, such as the suggested paleoseas Tui and Hotei Regio. A newly identified feature in the VIMS data sits within the Fensal dune field but is distinct from the surrounding sand. We investigate this Bright Fensal Feature (BFF) using data from Cassini VIMS and RADAR. Specifically, we find spectral similarities between the BFF and both sand and Hotei Regio. The RADAR cross sectional backscatter is similar to neighboring dark areas, perhaps sand covered interdunes. We use this evidence to constrain the BFF’s formation history and discuss how this intra-dune feature may contribute to the processes of sand transport and supply.

  4. Adsorption and transport of cadmium and rhodamine WT in pumice sand columns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pang, L.; Close, M.; Greenfield, H.; Stanton, G.

    2004-01-01

    The transport and attenuation of cadmium (Cd) and rhodamine WT (RWT) in a pumice sand aquifer media was investigated using column experiments to study a scenario of point-source contamination. A pore-water velocity of 1.7-1.8 m/day, which is a typical field groundwater velocity in a pumice sand aquifer system, was applied to triplicate columns. A pulse of a solution containing Cd and RWT, together with the conservative tracer tritiated water ( 3 H 2 O) at pH = 7, was introduced into the columns. Experimental results showed that concentration breakthrough curves (BTCs) of 3 H 2 O were symmetrical and fitted well into an equilibrium model. In contrast, BTCs of Cd and RWT were asymmetrical with significant tailings and fitted well with a two-site adsorption/desorption model. The symmetric 3 H 2 O BTCs suggest that physical non-equilibrium was absent in the experimental system, therefore the asymmetrical BTCs of Cd and RWT were attributed to chemical non-equilibrium. Modelling results showed that, in comparison with 3 H 2 O, Cd was apparently retarded by 101-108 times in pumice sand aquifer media (apparent adsorption coefficient 7.33-9.24 ml/g) and underwent a mass loss of 20-30% that was probably because of precipitation of CdCO 3 . As CdCO 3 is extremely insoluble, Cd precipitation would be irreversible and therefore it would not contribute to the tailing of the Cd BTCs. The experimental results suggest that the adsorption and desorption of Cd in pumice sand aquifer media in hydrodynamic conditions was a kinetic process. Cd desorption rates were two orders-of-magnitude slower than its adsorption rates. This resulted in a prolonged mean residence time for Cd in pumice sand aquifer media, which was 10-12 days in the 18-cm-long columns under a flow velocity of 1.7-1.8 m/day. Since the mean residence time is only indicative for the arrival of the central of mass in a contaminant BTC, the time required for the total disappearance of Cd will be much longer than the mean

  5. Sediment transport and mixing depth on a coral reef sand apron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vila-Concejo, Ana; Harris, Daniel L.; Power, Hannah E.; Shannon, Amelia M.; Webster, Jody M.

    2014-10-01

    This paper investigates the mechanics of sediment transport on a subtidal sand apron located on a coral reef environment. In this environment 100% of the sediment is carbonate bioclasts generated in situ. The sand apron is located on the back reef and only affected by waves during high tides. It is commonly accepted in the literature that sand aprons are features that prograde lagoonwards and that most of the progradation occurs during high-energy events. Measurements of water depths, waves, currents and near bed suspended sediment concentrations (all at 10 Hz) on the sand apron were undertaken over a nine day intensive field campaign over both spring and neap tides; waves and tides were also measured in the lagoon. The topography and bathymetry of the sand apron were measured and mixing depth was obtained on three transects using depth of disturbance rods. We found that sediment transport on sand aprons is not solely restricted to high-energy events but occurs on a daily basis during spring tides. The main factor controlling the sediment transport was the water depth above the bed, with depths of 2-2.3 m allowing waves to promote the most sediment transport. This corresponds to a depth over the reef crest of 1.6-1.9 m. The second most important control was waves; transport was observed when Hs on the apron was 0.1 m or greater. In contrast, current magnitude was not a controlling mechanism for sediment entrainment but did affect sediment transport. The morphology of the sand apron was shown to affect the direction of currents with the currents also expected to influence the morphology of the sand apron. The currents measured during this field campaign were aligned with a shallow channel in the sand apron. Mixing depths were small (< 2.5 cm) yet they were larger than the values predicted by empirical formulae for gentle siliciclastic ocean beaches.

  6. On the influence of suspended sediment transport on the generation of offshore sand waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sterlini-Van der Meer, Fenneke; Hulscher, Suzanne J.M.H.; van den Berg, J.; Geurts, Bernardus J.; Clercx, H.J.H.; Uijttewaal, Wim

    2007-01-01

    Sand waves are bed-forms occurring in shallow seas. Although their characteristics are mainly affected by bed load transport, during rough weather suspended sediment transport can influence their characteristics. As a first step to model these influences, we added suspended sediment transport to a

  7. Formulating Fine to Medium Sand Erosion for Suspended Sediment Transport Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    François Dufois

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The capacity of an advection/diffusion model to predict sand transport under varying wave and current conditions is evaluated. The horizontal sand transport rate is computed by vertical integration of the suspended sediment flux. A correction procedure for the near-bed concentration is proposed so that model results are independent of the vertical resolution. The method can thus be implemented in regional models with operational applications. Simulating equilibrium sand transport rates, when erosion and deposition are balanced, requires a new empirical erosion law that involves the non-dimensional excess shear stress and a parameter that depends on the size of the sand grain. Comparison with several datasets and sediment transport formulae demonstrated the model’s capacity to simulate sand transport rates for a large range of current and wave conditions and sand diameters in the range 100–500 μm. Measured transport rates were predicted within a factor two in 67% of cases with current only and in 35% of cases with both waves and current. In comparison with the results obtained by Camenen and Larroudé (2003, who provided the same indicators for several practical transport rate formulations (whose means are respectively 72% and 37%, the proposed approach gives reasonable results. Before fitting a new erosion law to our model, classical erosion rate formulations were tested but led to poor comparisons with expected sediment transport rates. We suggest that classical erosion laws should be used with care in advection/diffusion models similar to ours, and that at least a full validation procedure for transport rates involving a range of sand diameters and hydrodynamic conditions should be carried out.

  8. Peritoneal solute transport and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Simon J

    2014-12-01

    The speed with which small solutes cross the peritoneal membrane, termed peritoneal solute transport rate (PSTR), is a key measure of individual membrane performance. PSTR can be quantified easily by using the 4-hour dialysate to plasma creatinine ratio, which, although only an approximation to the diffusive characteristics of the membrane, has been well validated clinically in terms of its relationship to patient survival and changes in longitudinal membrane function. This has led to changes in peritoneal dialysis modality use and dialysis prescription. An important determinant of PSTR is intraperitoneal inflammation, as exemplified by local interleukin 6 production, which is largely independent of systemic inflammation and its relationship to comorbid conditions and increased mortality. There is no strong evidence to support the contention that the peritoneal membrane in some individuals with high PSTR is qualitatively different at the start of treatment; rather, it represents a spectrum that is determined in part by genetic factors. Both clinical and experimental evidence support the view that persistent intraperitoneal inflammation, detected as a continuously high or increasing PSTR, may predispose the membrane to progressive fibrosis. Copyright © 2014 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Experimental investigation on heat transport in gravel-sand materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maureschat, Gerald; Heller, Alfred

    1997-01-01

    in sand-gravel material, the storage media is to be water satured. In this case, handling of such material on site is rather complex. The conduction is highly dependent on the thermal properties of the storage media and so is the overall thermal performance of a storage applying such media. For sandy...... out in a small size experiment. The experiment consists of a highly insulated box filled with two kinds of sand material crossed by a plastic heat pipe. Heat transfer is measured under dry and water satured conditions in a cross-section.The conclusions are clear. To obtain necessary heat conduction...

  10. Potential of the application of the modified polysaccharides water solutions as binders of moulding sands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Kaczmarska

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The results of preliminary tests of selected properties of the moulding sands with the binder in the form of a 5 % water solution of the sodium salt of carboxymethyl starch (with a degree of substitution (DS of 0,2 and 0,87 arepresented in this study. The moulding sand properties such as permeability, abrasion resistance, tensile and bendingstrength - after curing - are shown in series of tests. The cure process was conducted in a field of electromagnetic radiation within the microwave range. The effect of the microwave treatment on the moulding sand was evaporating of water (solvent in a binder and cross-linking of the polymeric binder. As a result the cured moulding sands with particular properties, essential in the context of its application in the mould technology in the foundry industry, were obtained.

  11. Effect of moulding sand on statistically controlled hybrid rapid casting solution for zinc alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Rupinder [Guru Nanak Dev Engineering College, Ludhiana (India)

    2010-08-15

    The purpose of the present investigations is to study the effect of moulding sand on decreasing shell wall thickness of mould cavities for economical and statistically controlled hybrid rapid casting solutions (combination of three dimensional printing and conventional sand casting) for zinc alloys. Starting from the identification of component/ benchmark, technological prototypes were produced at different shell wall thicknesses supported by three different types of sands (namely: dry, green and molasses). Prototypes prepared by the proposed process are for assembly check purpose and not for functional validation of the parts. The study suggested that a shell wall with a less than recommended thickness (12mm) is more suitable for dimensional accuracy. The best dimensional accuracy was obtained at 3mm shell wall thickness with green sand. The process was found to be under statistical control

  12. A Wireless Sensor Network for the Real-Time Remote Measurement of Aeolian Sand Transport on Sandy Beaches and Dunes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozzebon, Alessandro; Cappelli, Irene; Mecocci, Alessandro; Bertoni, Duccio; Sarti, Giovanni; Alquini, Fernanda

    2018-03-08

    Direct measurements of aeolian sand transport on coastal dunes and beaches is of paramount importance to make correct decisions about coast management. As most of the existing studies are mainly based on a statistical approach, the solution presented in this paper proposes a sensing structure able to orient itself according to wind direction and directly calculate the amount of wind-transported sand by collecting it and by measuring its weight. Measurements are performed remotely without requiring human action because the structure is equipped with a ZigBee radio module, which periodically sends readings to a local gateway. Here data are processed by a microcontroller and then transferred to a remote data collection centre, through GSM technology. The ease of installation, the reduced power consumption and the low maintenance required, make the proposed solution able to work independently, limiting human intervention, for all the duration of the expected experimental campaign. In order to analyze the cause-effect relationship between the transported sand and the wind, the sensing structure is integrated with a multi-layer anemoscope-anemometer structure. The overall sensor network has been developed and tested in the laboratory, and its operation has been validated in field through a 48 h measurement campaign.

  13. A Wireless Sensor Network for the Real-Time Remote Measurement of Aeolian Sand Transport on Sandy Beaches and Dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappelli, Irene; Mecocci, Alessandro; Alquini, Fernanda

    2018-01-01

    Direct measurements of aeolian sand transport on coastal dunes and beaches is of paramount importance to make correct decisions about coast management. As most of the existing studies are mainly based on a statistical approach, the solution presented in this paper proposes a sensing structure able to orient itself according to wind direction and directly calculate the amount of wind-transported sand by collecting it and by measuring its weight. Measurements are performed remotely without requiring human action because the structure is equipped with a ZigBee radio module, which periodically sends readings to a local gateway. Here data are processed by a microcontroller and then transferred to a remote data collection centre, through GSM technology. The ease of installation, the reduced power consumption and the low maintenance required, make the proposed solution able to work independently, limiting human intervention, for all the duration of the expected experimental campaign. In order to analyze the cause-effect relationship between the transported sand and the wind, the sensing structure is integrated with a multi-layer anemoscope-anemometer structure. The overall sensor network has been developed and tested in the laboratory, and its operation has been validated in field through a 48 h measurement campaign. PMID:29518060

  14. Sorption behavior of Sn(II) onto Haro river sand from aqueous acidic solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasany, S.M.; Khurshid, S.J.

    1999-01-01

    The sorption behavior of Sn(II) onto Haro river sand has been examined with respect to nature of electrolyte, agitation time, dosage of sorbent and concentration of sorbate. Maximum sorption (95.5%) has been achieved from 0.034M hydrochloric acid solution after equilibrating sorbate (2 x 10 -5 M) and sorbent (50 mg) for 120 minutes at a V/W ratio of 90 cm 3 x g -1 . The kinetic data have been subjected to Morris-Weber and Lagergren equations. The kinetics of sorption proceeds a two stage process consisting of a relatively slow initial uptake followed by a much rapid increase in the sorption. The rate constant of intraparticle transport, K d , comes out to be 8.75 x 10 -8 mol x g -1 x min -1/2 and the first order rate constant for sorption is 0.0416 min -1 . The sorption data of Sn(II) onto Haro river sand followed Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) type isotherms. The Langmuir constant, Q, related to sorption capacity and, b, related to sorption energy are computed to be 10.6±1.1 μmol x g -1 and 1123±137 dm 3 x mol -1 , respectively. The D-R isotherm yields the values of C m = 348±151 μmol x g -1 and β = -0.01044±0.0008 mol 2 x kJ -2 and of E = 6.9±0.3 kJ x mol -1 . In all three isotherms correlation factor (γ) is ≥ 0.99. The influence of common anions and cations on the sorption has been investigated. Zn(II), Mg(II), oxalate, Pb(II), Mn(II) and tartrate reduce the sorption significantly whereas Fe(II) causes substantial increase in the sorption. (author)

  15. Advanced testing and characterization of transportation soils and bituminous sands

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Anochie-Boateng, Joseph

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available This research study was intended to develop laboratory test procedures for advance testing and characterization of fine-grained cohesive soils and oil sand materials. The test procedures are based on typical field loading conditions and the loading...

  16. Diffusive transport of radon in a homogeneous column of dry sand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Spoel, W.H.; van der Graaf, E.R.; de Meijer, R.J.

    To validate a model for radon transport in soil, measurements of diffusive radon transport under well-defined and controlled conditions have been made in a homogeneous column of dry sand with an air-filled volume on top. This volume simulates a crawl space. The measurements concern time-dependent

  17. Aggregation and transport of rutile titanium dioxide nanoparticles with montmorillonite and diatomite in the presence of phosphate in porous sand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Peng; Xu, Nan; Li, Duo; Huangfu, Xinxing; Li, Zuling

    2018-08-01

    Crop soil is inevitably contaminated by the excess of phosphate (P) fertilizers. A large amount of nanoparticle titanium dioxide (nTiO 2 ) entered soils as well due to the wide use of engineered nanomaterials. It is of great urgency and a high priority to investigate the mechanisms of nTiO 2 deposition with the presence of P in crop soils. This study investigated the transport behavior of (1.0 g L -1 ) rutile nTiO 2 with two representative clay particles (montmorillonite or diatomite) in the presence of P through the saturated quartz sand. In 10 mM NaCl electrolyte solution at pH 6.0, the recovery percentage of nTiO 2 was 36.3% from sand column. Nevertheless, it was reduced to 18.6% and 11.1% while montmorillonite and diatomite present in suspensions, respectively. Obviously, the improvement of nTiO 2 retention in sand was more pronounced by diatomite than montmorillonite. The likely mechanism for this result was that large aggregates were formed due to the attachment of nTiO 2 to montmorillonite and diatomite. Moreover, the surface of diatomite with the larger hydrodynamic radius was less negatively charged by comparison with montmorillonite. However, this phenomenon disappeared with the addition of P. P adsorption increases the repulsive force between particles and sand and the fast release of attached nTiO 2 -montmorillonite and diatomite from sand. The two-site kinetic retention model and the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory suggested that the combination of k 1/ k 1d , k 2 and secondary minimum energy can be used to accurately describe the attachment of nTiO 2 -montmorillonite and diatomite to sand in the presence of P. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Turbulent Flow and Sand Dune Dynamics: Identifying Controls on Aeolian Sediment Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, C. M.; Wiggs, G.

    2007-12-01

    Sediment transport models are founded on cubic power relationships between the transport rate and time averaged flow parameters. These models have achieved limited success and recent aeolian and fluvial research has focused on the modelling and measurement of sediment transport by temporally varying flow conditions. Studies have recognised turbulence as a driving force in sediment transport and have highlighted the importance of coherent flow structures in sediment transport systems. However, the exact mechanisms are still unclear. Furthermore, research in the fluvial environment has identified the significance of turbulent structures for bedform morphology and spacing. However, equivalent research in the aeolian domain is absent. This paper reports the findings of research carried out to characterise the importance of turbulent flow parameters in aeolian sediment transport and determine how turbulent energy and turbulent structures change in response to dune morphology. The relative importance of mean and turbulent wind parameters on aeolian sediment flux was examined in the Skeleton Coast, Namibia. Measurements of wind velocity (using sonic anemometers) and sand transport (using grain impact sensors) at a sampling frequency of 10 Hz were made across a flat surface and along transects on a 9 m high barchan dune. Mean wind parameters and mass sand flux were measured using cup anemometers and wedge-shaped sand traps respectively. Vertical profile data from the sonic anemometers were used to compute turbulence and turbulent stress (Reynolds stress; instantaneous horizontal and vertical fluctuations; coherent flow structures) and their relationship with respect to sand transport and evolving dune morphology. On the flat surface time-averaged parameters generally fail to characterise sand transport dynamics, particularly as the averaging interval is reduced. However, horizontal wind speed correlates well with sand transport even with short averaging times. Quadrant

  19. Influence of gravity on transport and retention of representative engineered nanoparticles in quartz sand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Li; Zhu, Jinghan; Hou, Yanglong; Tong, Meiping; Kim, Hyunjung

    2015-10-01

    Four types of NPs: carbon nanotubes and graphene oxide (carbon-based NPs), titanium dioxide and zinc oxide metal-oxide NPs, were utilized to systematically determine the influence of gravity on the transport of NPs in porous media. Packed column experiments for two types of carbon-based NPs were performed under unfavorable conditions in both up-flow (gravity-negative) and down-flow (gravity-positive) orientations, while for two types of metal-oxide NPs, experiments were performed under both unfavorable and favorable conditions in both up-flow and down-flow orientations. Both breakthrough curves and retained profiles of two types of carbon-based NPs in up-flow orientation were equivalent to those in down-flow orientation, indicating that gravity had negligible effect on the transport and retention of carbon-based NPs under unfavorable conditions. In contrast, under both unfavorable and favorable conditions, the breakthrough curves for two types of metal-oxide NPs in down-flow orientation were lower relative to those in up-flow orientation, indicating that gravity could decrease the transport of metal-oxide NPs in porous media. The distinct effect of gravity on the transport and retention of carbon-based and metal-oxide NPs was mainly attributed to the contribution of gravity to the force balance on the NPs in quartz sand. The contribution of gravity was determined by the interplay of the density and sizes of NP aggregates under examined solution conditions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Transport of nanoparticles with dispersant through biofilm coated drinking water sand filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhen; Aly Hassan, Ashraf; Sahle-Demessie, Endalkachew; Sorial, George A

    2013-11-01

    This article characterizes, experimentally and theoretically, the transport and retention of engineered nanoparticles (NP) through sand filters at drinking water treatment plants (DWTPs) under realistic conditions. The transport of four commonly used NPs (ZnO, CeO2, TiO2, and Ag, with bare surfaces and coating agents) through filter beds filled with sands from either acid washed and calcined, freshly acquired filter media, and used filter media from active filter media, were investigated. The study was conducted using water obtained upstream of the sand filter at DWTP. The results have shown that capping agents have a determinant importance in the colloidal stability and transport of NPs through the different filter media. The presence of the biofilm in used filter media increased adsorption of NPs but its effects in retaining capped NPs was less significant. The data was used to build a mathematical model based on the advection-dispersion equation. The model was used to simulate the performance of a scale-up sand filter and the effects on filtration cycle of traditional sand filtration system used in DWTPs. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Urban Transportation: Issue and Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haryati Shafii

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Generally, quality of life of urban population is heavily dependent on social facilities provided within the environment. One of the most important facilities is transportations. Study on transportation mode in an urban area is especially very important because for almost every individual living in a large and densely populated area, mobility is one of the most crucial issues in everyday life. Enhance mobility, faster journey to work and less pollution from petrol-propelled vehicles can increase the quality of life, which in turn lead to a sustainable urban living. The study present transportation mode usage issues faced by community related to quality of life in an urban area. This study identifies several issues of transportation mode in urban areas and its impact on the quality of life. The study areas are Putrajaya, Kuala Lumpur and Bandar Kajang, Selangor. The methodology used in this research is secondary and primary data. The questionnaires for the survey were distributed from May 2008 to Jun 2008. These researches were conducted on 144 respondents for to evaluate their perception of transportation mode correlated to the quality of life. The collected data were then analyzed using “Statistical Packages for the Social Science” (SPSS. The respondents comprise of 61 males and 84 females from the age group of 18 to 57 years. This study identifies the percentage of public transportation mode usage in urban area, such as buses (16.7%, train (ERL, monorail and commuter-6.4%; which is very low compared to owning personal car (45.8% and motorcycle (25.4%.The result shows owning personal car is the highest (45.8% in three study areas and monorail and taxi are the lowest (1.4%. The Chi Square Test shows that among the mode transportation with traffic jam is quite difference in Kuala Lumpur, Putrajaya and Kajang. Analysis of the Chi Square Test shows the result is 0.000 (two sides to respondent answering “yes” and analysis of Spearman

  2. Seabed Gradient Controlling Onshore Transport Rates of Surf Sand during Beach Retreat by Sea Level Rise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hee Jun; Yi, Hi-Il

    2018-03-01

    A simple relationship is proposed for the onshore transport rates of surf-zone sand to evaluate the beach retreat caused by sea level rise. It suggests that the preservation potential of surf sand is proportional inversely to the seabed gradient during beach retreat. According to this relationship, the erosional remnants of surf sand would be more readily developed on a gentler shelf collectively as transgressive sand sheets. This finding may explain the previous studies regarding the Korean shelves that proposed that the Holocene transgressive sand sheets (HTSS) occur not in the steep eastern shelf but in the gentle western shelf. In line with such presence/absence of the HTSS are the results from some coastal seismic profiles obtained in the present study. The profiles indicate that sand deposits are restricted within the nearshore in the eastern coast, whereas they are persistently traceable to the offshore HTSS in the western coast. Tide is proven to have a negligible influence on the total duration of surf-zone processes. This study may be useful in predicting the consequences of the beach retreat that takes place worldwide as sea levels rise as a result of global warming.

  3. Bed topography and sand transport responses to a step change in discharge and water depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ephemeral streams with sand and gravel beds may inherit bed topography caused by previous flow events, resulting in bed topography that is not in equilibrium with flow conditions, complicating the modeling of flow and sediment transport. Major flow events, resulting from rainfall with high intensity...

  4. Shoreline accretion and sand transport at groynes inside the Port of Richards Bay.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Schoonees, JS

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available on the accretion adjacent to two of the groynes and on the sediment transport rates at these groynes. Tides, beach slopes, winds, wave climate, current regime, and sand grain sizes were documented. The one site is “moderately protected” from wave action while...

  5. Modelling and measurements of sand transport processes over full-scale ripples in oscillatory flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Werf, Jebbe J.; Ribberink, Jan S.; O'Donoghue, Tom; Doucette, Jeffrey C.

    2006-01-01

    A new series of laboratory experiments was performed in the Aberdeen Oscillatory Flow Tunnel (AOFT) and the Large Oscillating Water Tunnel (LOWT) to investigate time-averaged suspended sand concentrations and transport rates over rippled beds in regular and irregular oscillatory flow. The

  6. Radiotracer study of sorption of europium on Gorleben sand from aqueous solutions containing humic substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benes, P.; Stamberg, K.; Siroky, L.; Mizera, J.

    2002-01-01

    The sorption of trace europium, as a trivalent actinide homologue, was studied in the system Gorleben sand - aqueous solution with the aim to elucidate its mechanism. Radiotracer method ( 152/154 Eu) and batch experiments were used. Simultaneously, the distribution of humic substances present in, or added to the system was measured. The evaluation of the sorption was complicated by the adsorption of Eu on the walls of polyethylene vials used for the experiments, which was rather high and had to be taken into consideration. It has been found that Eu sorption on Gorleben sand increases from pH 2 to pH 5-7 and then it decreases. The decrease is due to the complexation of Eu with humic substances leached from Gorleben sand at pH>7. The position of the sorption maximum depends on the composition of the solution and on the liquid-to-solid ratio. It is shifted to lower pH values in the presence of added humic acid (HA), which enhances Eu sorption at low PH values and suppresses it at pH values higher than 5. The regions of the enhancing/suppressing effects coincidence with the high/low adsorption of HA on Gorleben sand, respectively. The increasing ionic strength (from 0.01 to 0.1) and europium concentration (3.4 x 10 -8 to 9.3 x 10 -7 mol/l) suppress the relative sorption (expressed in %) at low pH values and enhance it at pH>6-8. Addition of carbonates (5 x 10 -3 mol/l) supports Eu sorption at pH>7.5 so that no decrease with pH is observed till pH 9. Alkaline leaching of the sand significantly changes most of the effects found. These results were qualitatively interpreted and conclusions were drawn on the mechanism of the sorption. (author)

  7. Transport and retention of strontium in surface-modified quartz sand with different wettability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yifei Li; Shuaihui Tian; Tianwei Qian

    2011-01-01

    Instead of radioactive 90 Sr, common strontium chloride was used to simulate the migration of radioactive strontium chloride in surface hydroxylated, silanized, and common quartz sand. The sorption and retardation characteristics of strontium (Sr 2+ ) in these surface modified quartz sands were studied by batch tests and column experiments. The equilibrium sorption data for Sr 2+ on different wettability sands were described by the Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models, and the Langmuir model has been found to provide better correlation for hydrophilic sand. The breakthrough curves (BTCs) of Sr 2+ in these media were analyzed with the equilibrium convection-dispersion equation (CDE) and a non-equilibrium two-region mobile-immobile model (TRM) using a nonlinear least square curve-fitting program CXTFIT. The TRM model showed better fit to the measured BTCs of Sr 2+ , and the parameters of the fraction of mobile water indicated that significant preferential flow effected the non-equilibrium transport of Sr 2+ . Although TRM model could not fit the Sr 2+ BTCs very well, the parameter estimated by TRM model may be more reliable than those obtained from batch experiments because the transport of Sr 2+ in these kind of sand is non-equilibrium processes. (author)

  8. Fixation of Cr(III) traces onto Haro river sand from acidic solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasany, S.M.; Chaudhry, M.H.

    1998-01-01

    The sorption of chromium(III) onto Haro river sand has been investigated as a function of sorptive solution composition, amounts of sorbent (10-500 mg) and sorbate (4.33 x 10 -8 -5.17 x 10 -6 M), shaking time (I-60 minutes) and temperature (15-35 deg C). Maximum sorption has been achieved from 0.001M HCl solution using 50 mg of the sand and 20 minutes shaking time. The sorption data followed Freundlich and D-R isotherms. The sorption capacity of 0.4 μmole x g -1 and of sorption energy of 9.9 kJ x mole -1 have been computed from D-R parameters. Thermodynamic parameters ΔH = 84.4 kJ x mole -1 , ΔS 284.5 J x mole -1 x K -1 and ΔG = -3.32 kJ x mole -1 at 298 K have been evaluated. Fe(II), Al(III), citrate, borate, oxalate, tartrate and carbonate ions reduce the sorption significantly. Under similar experimental conditions Tc(VII), Re(VII), Sb(V) and Co(II) have very low sorption (<1%) and trivalent Eu and Sm have large distribution ratios. Haro river sand can be used to preconcentrate or to remove micro or submicro amounts of Cr(III) from very dilute solution and for the separation of Tc, Re and Sb from Cr, Eu and Sm. (author)

  9. Practical technical solution for clay-contaminated sands used in concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estephane Pierre

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Sand, whether natural or manufactured, shows in many instances varying degrees of high levels of clay contamination. This fact is encountered in different parts of the globe and can lead to serious problems in adjusting concrete mix proportions and requiring high water to cement ratios and/or high dosages of superplasticizers without necessarily meeting the workability requirements, even when the sand is previously washed with fresh water. In this paper, different types of sand from the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC region are being screened, analysed for their clay contents and consequent effects on plastic concrete quality. A technical solution is being proposed based on engineered superplasticizers. A testing protocol has been established to verify the robustness of optimized mix designs demonstrating the performance of the admixture in terms of initial and extended workability. In particular, it will be demonstrated that the customized concrete admixtures constitute by themselves a stand-alone answer to the usage of clay-contaminated sands in concrete.

  10. Sand transport, shear stress, and the building of a delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, W.; Miller, K. L.; Hiatt, M. R.; Mohrig, D. C.

    2017-12-01

    River deltas distribute sediment to the coastal sea through a complex branching network of channels; however, the routing and storage of this sediment in and through the delta is poorly understood. We present results from field studies of the sediment and water transport through the branching Wax Lake Delta on the coast of Louisiana. Two channels studied, Main Pass and East Pass, maintain a near-equal total partitioning of flow and sediment. However, East Pass is narrower and has higher river velocities, lower tidal velocity fluctuations, less alluvial bed cover, and more sediment flux per unit width than Main Pass. We connect these differences to small differences in the geometry of the two channels and feedbacks between these differences. We link trends in measured sediment deposits to both measured and modeled shear velocities in Wax Lake Delta's channels and open water `islands' to understand how hydrologic processes shaped the sedimentary architecture of the delta. These connections define the sediment transport and deposition regimes in the WLD. We extend the results herein to suggest that the relationships between the available sediment and shear stress determines the basic planform of the Wax Lake Delta and cross-sectional geometries of its channels.

  11. The solute carrier 6 family of transporters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bröer, Stefan; Gether, Ulrik

    2012-01-01

    of these transporters is associated with a variety of diseases. Pharmacological inhibition of the neurotransmitter transporters in this family is an important strategy in the management of neurological and psychiatric disorders. This review provides an overview of the biochemical and pharmacological properties......The solute carrier 6 (SLC6) family of the human genome comprises transporters for neurotransmitters, amino acids, osmolytes and energy metabolites. Members of this family play critical roles in neurotransmission, cellular and whole body homeostasis. Malfunction or altered expression...... of the SLC6 family transporters....

  12. Mass transport in polyelectrolyte solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schipper, F. J. M.; Leyte, J. C.

    1999-02-01

    The self-diffusion coefficients of the three components of a salt-free heavy-water solution of polymethacrylic acid, completely neutralized with tetra-methylammonium hydroxide, were measured over a broad concentration range. Three concentration regions were observed for the self-diffusion of both the polyions and the counterions. At polyion concentrations below 0.01 mol monomer kg-1, the dilute concentration regime for the polymer, the polyion self-diffusion coefficient approaches the self-diffusion coefficient of a freely diffusing rod upon dilution. At polyelectrolyte concentrations above 0.1 mol monomer kg-1, the self-diffusion coefficients of the solvent, the counterions and the polymer decreased with concentration, suggesting that this decrease is due to a topological constraint on the motions of the components. In the intermediate-concentration region, the self-diffusion coefficients of the polyions and the counterions are independent of the concentration. The polyion dynamic behaviour is, in the intermediate- and high-concentration regions, reasonably well described by that of a hard sphere, with a radius of 3.7 nm. A correct prediction for the solvent dynamics is given by the obstruction effect of this hard sphere on the solvent. The relative counterion self-diffusion coefficient is predicted almost quantitatively over the entire concentration range with the Poisson-Boltzmann-Smoluchowski model for the spherical cell, provided that the sphere radius and the number of charges are chosen appropriately (approximately the number of charges in a persistence length). Using this model, the dependence of the counterion self-diffusion coefficient on the ionic strength, polyion concentration and counterion radius is calculated quantitatively over a large concentration range.

  13. Retention of silica nanoparticles on calcium carbonate sands immersed in electrolyte solutions

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Yan Vivian

    2014-12-01

    © 2014 Elsevier Inc. Understanding nanoparticle-surface adhesion is necessary to develop inert tracers for subsurface applications. Here we show that nanoparticles with neutral surface charge may make the best subsurface tracers, and that it may be possible to used SiO2 nanoparticle retention to measure the fraction of solid surface that has positive charge. We show that silica nanoparticles dispersed in NaCl electrolyte solutions are increasingly retained in calcium carbonate (calcite) sand-packed columns as the solution ionic strength increases, but are not retained if they are injected in pure water or Na2SO4 electrolyte solutions. The particles retained in the NaCl experiments are released when the column is flushed with pure water or Na2SO4 solution. AFM measurements on calcite immersed in NaCl solutions show the initial repulsion of a silica colloidal probe as the surface is approached is reduced as the solution ionic strength increases, and that at high ionic strengths it disappears entirely and only attraction remains. These AFM measurements and their interpretation with Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory shows the calcite surface charge is always negative for Na2SO4 solutions, but changes from negative to positive in a patchy fashion as the ionic strength of the NaCl solution increases. Since mixed-charge (patchy) surfaces may be common in the subsurface, nanoparticles with near-zero charge may make the best tracers.

  14. Turbulent flow structures and aeolian sediment transport over a barchan sand dune

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggs, G. F. S.; Weaver, C. M.

    2012-03-01

    The turbulent structure of airflow over a barchan sand dune is determined using quadrant analysis of wind velocity data derived from sonic anemometers. Results indicate an increased frequency of ejection and sweep events in the toe region of the dune, characteristic of the turbulent bursting process. In contrast, at the crest there was a significant increase in the occurrence of outward interactions. Combined with high frequency saltation data our analyses show that turbulent structures characterised by a positive streamwise fluctuating velocity (+u‧ sweeps at the toe and outward interactions at the crest) have a dominant influence on sand transport on the dune, together accounting for up to 83% and 95% of transporting events at the toe and crest respectively.

  15. Field testing, comparison, and discussion of five aeolian sand transport measuring devices operating on different measuring principles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goossens, Dirk; Nolet, Corjan; Etyemezian, Vicken; Duarte-campos, Leonardo; Bakker, Gerben; Riksen, Michel

    2018-01-01

    Five types of sediment samplers designed to measure aeolian sand transport were tested during a wind erosion event on the Sand Motor, an area on the west coast of the Netherlands prone to severe wind erosion. Each of the samplers operates on a different principle. The MWAC (Modified Wilson And

  16. Field testing, comparison, and discussion of five aeolian sand transport measuring devices operation on different measuring priciples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goossens, Dirk; Nolet, C.; Etyemezian, Vicken; Duarte-Campos, Leonardo; Bakker, G.; Riksen, M.J.P.M.

    2018-01-01

    Five types of sediment samplers designed to measure aeolian sand transport were tested during a wind erosion event on the Sand Motor, an area on the west coast of the Netherlands prone to severe wind erosion. Each of the samplers operates on a different principle. The MWAC (Modified Wilson And

  17. Batch and column studies of adsorption of Li, Ni and Br by a reference sand for contaminant transport experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seigel, M.D.; Ward, D.B.; Bryan, C.R.

    1995-09-01

    A processed quartz sand (Wedron 510), mined from the St. Peter sandstone, has been characterized by a variety of chemical and physical methods for use as a reference porous media in transport model validation experiments. Wedron 510 sand was used in an intermediate-scale experiment involving migration of Ni, Li and Br through a 6-m high x 3-m diameter caisson. Ni and Li adsorption/desorption, and Li/Ni site-competition experiments yielded information on the importance of the trace mineral phases to adsorption of Li and Ni by the sand. The presence of an iron hydroxide coating similar to goethite on the sand grains is suggested by visual observation and leaching experiments. Kaolinite was identified by SEM and XRD as a significant trace mineral phase in the sand and occurs as small particles coating the sand grains. Quartz, the predominant constituent of the sand by weight, does not appear to contribute significantly to the adsorption properties of the sand. Qualitatively, the adsorption properties of the sand can be adequately modeled as a two-mineral system (goethite and kaolinite). The studies described in this report should provide a basis for understanding transport of Ni, Li and Br through porous media similar to the reference sand. Techniques were developed for obtaining parameter values for surface complexation and kinetic adsorption models for the sand and its mineral components. These constants can be used directly in coupled hydrogeochemical transport codes. The techniques should be useful for characterization of other natural materials and elements in high-level nuclear waste in support of coupled hydrogeochemical transport calculations for Yucca Mountain

  18. Prediction of critical transport velocity for preventing sand deposition in gas-oil multiphase production and well systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bello, O.O.; Reinicke, K.M. [Technische Univ. Clausthal, Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany). Inst. of Petroleum Engineering; Teodoriu, C. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Petroleum Engineering

    2008-10-23

    The critical transport velocity is one of the key parameters for gas-oil-sand multiphase production and well system design and safe operation. Existing American Petroleum Institute Recommended Practice 14E (API RP 14E) for the sizing of multiphase flow systems suggests an equation to calculate threshold transport velocity. This equation only considers mixture density and does not account for factors such as fluid properties, gas-liquid flow patterns, sand loading, sand particle size, size distributions, shape factor and density. This work presents an improved computational methodology, which can be applied to estimate the critical transport velocity required to ensure efficient performance of gas-oil-sand multiphase production and well systems. The improved method is based on the modelling of three-phase gas-oil-sand pipe flow physics from first principle. Computations of the critical transport velocities show reasonable agreement with values calculated from mechanistic model (Danielson, 2007) for a relatively wide range of design and operating conditions. Compared with the mechanistic model (Danielson, 2007), the present method has no imposed limitations to the range of applicability. It is also takes into adequate account the effects of operating pressure, flow geometry, sand particle size, size distribution and shape factor, which have considerable influence on the critical transport velocity in gas-oil-sand multiphase production and well systems. (orig.)

  19. Khnifiss Beach's Black Sand: Provenance and Transport Pathways Investigation Using Heavy Minerals' Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adnani, M.; Elbelrhiti, H.; Ahmamou, M.; Masmoudi, L.

    2014-12-01

    Arid areas in south of Morocco suffer from silting problem causing destruction of villages infrastructure, roads, agriculture land and oasis heritage. Black sand on Khnifiss beach near Tarfaya city (S-W Morocco) is marked by enrichment of heavy minerals. This later is an important fraction that could help to assess the provenance and transport pathways of sediment. The sand's origin investigation could be useful to fight against erosion and silting problems from the source of supply, to this end, mineralogical analysis was carried out in Khnifiss beach's sand using Optic Microscope and Scanning Electronic Microscope with dispersive energy (SEM- EDS), in addition to physico-chemical analysis provided by Electronic Microprobe. The results revealed: (i) a high grade of oxides (Rutile, Ilmenite, Magnetite, Ulvöspinel) in samples, (ii) silicates (Quartz, Clinopyroxene, feldspar, Zircon), (iii) phosphate (apatite) and (iv) carbonate (calcite). The dominance of iron oxides justifies the black sand's colour. Then, the mineral composition supposes interference between different origins: proximal source (Calcareous cliff) for calcite, distal sources of oxides and silicates are supposed to be eroded and carried by Drâa valley from granite and igneous rocks in Anti-Atlasic field. Another source supposed might be a proximal volcanic island (Canaries island).

  20. Pollutant transport in clayey sands: reactive flows in saturated porous media and unsaturated flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadalen, Sebastien

    2008-01-01

    In the context of nuclear risk control associated to nuclear waste storage, the french nuclear agency plays an increasing role in terms of research and development in the area of subsurface contamination. This study focuses on an homogeneous porous media constituted of Fontainebleau sand and clay grains (illite) presenting sorption capacities. The modeling of the complex geometry and physical phenomena at different scales enables us to describe the average transport at Darcy's scale. The two main axes developed are the impact of an heterogeneous sorption on transport phenomena and the dispersivity of an unsaturated porous media. (author) [fr

  1. Barley root hair growth and morphology in soil, sand, and water solution media and relationship with nickel toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yanqing; Allen, Herbert E; Di Toro, Dominic M

    2016-08-01

    Barley, Hordeum vulgare (Doyce), was grown in the 3 media of soil, hydroponic sand solution (sand), and hydroponic water solution (water) culture at the same environmental conditions for 4 d. Barley roots were scanned, and root morphology was analyzed. Plants grown in the 3 media had different root morphology and nickel (Ni) toxicity response. Root elongations and total root lengths followed the sequence soil > sand > water. Plants grown in water culture were more sensitive to Ni toxicity and had greater root hair length than those from soil and sand cultures, which increased root surface area. The unit root surface area as root surface area per centimeter of length of root followed the sequence water > sand > soil and was found to be related with root elongation. Including the unit root surface area, the difference in root elongation and 50% effective concentration were diminished, and percentage of root elongations can be improved with a root mean square error approximately 10% for plants grown in different media. Because the unit root surface area of plants in sand culture is closer to that in soil culture, the sand culture method, not water culture, is recommended for toxicity parameter estimation. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:2125-2133. © 2016 SETAC. © 2016 SETAC.

  2. Humic acid facilitates the transport of ARS-labeled hydroxyapatite nanoparticles in iron oxyhydroxide-coated sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dengjun; Bradford, Scott A.; Harvey, Ronald W.; Gao, Bin; Cang, Long; Zhou, Dongmei

    2012-01-01

    Hydroxyapatite nanoparticles (nHAP) have been widely used to remediate soil and wastewater contaminated with metals and radionuclides. However, our understanding of nHAP transport and fate is limited in natural environments that exhibit significant variability in solid and solution chemistry. The transport and retention kinetics of Alizarin red S (ARS)-labeled nHAP were investigated in water-saturated packed columns that encompassed a range of humic acid concentrations (HA, 0–10 mg L–1), fractional surface coverage of iron oxyhydroxide coatings on sand grains (λ, 0–0.75), and pH (6.0–10.5). HA was found to have a marked effect on the electrokinetic properties of ARS-nHAP, and on the transport and retention of ARS-nHAP in granular media. The transport of ARS-nHAP was found to increase with increasing HA concentration because of enhanced colloidal stability and the reduced aggregate size. When HA = 10 mg L–1, greater ARS-nHAP attachment occurred with increasing λ because of increased electrostatic attraction between negatively charged nanoparticles and positively charged iron oxyhydroxides, although alkaline conditions (pH 8.0 and 10.5) reversed the surface charge of the iron oxyhydroxides and therefore decreased deposition. The retention profiles of ARS-nHAP exhibited a hyperexponential shape for all test conditions, suggesting some unfavorable attachment conditions. Retarded breakthrough curves occurred in sands with iron oxyhydroxide coatings because of time-dependent occupation of favorable deposition sites. Consideration of the above effects is necessary to improve remediation efficiency of nHAP for metals and actinides in soils and subsurface environments.

  3. Agglomeration of a comprehensive model for the wind-driven sand transport at the Belgian Coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strypsteen, Glenn; Rauwoens, Pieter

    2016-04-01

    Although a lot of research has been done in the area of Aeolian transport, it is only during the last years that attention has been drawn to Aeolian transport in coastal areas. In these areas, the physical processes are more complex, due to a large number of transport limiting parameters. In this PhD-project, which is now in its early stage, a model will be developed which relates the wind-driven sand transport at the Belgian coast with physical parameters such as the wind speed, humidity and grain size of the sand, and the slope of beach and dune surface. For the first time, the interaction between beach and dune dynamics is studied at the Belgian coast. The Belgian coastline is only 67km long, but densely populated and therefore subject to coastal protection and safety. The coast mostly consists of sandy beaches and dikes. Although, still 33km of dunes exist, whose dynamics are far less understood. The overall research approach consists of three pathways: (i) field measurements, (ii) physical model tests, and (iii) numerical simulations. Firstly and most importantly, several field campaigns will provide accurate data of meteo-marine conditions, morphology, and sand transport events on a wide beach at the Belgian Coastline. The experimental set-up consists of a monitoring station, which will provide time series of vegetation cover, shoreline position, fetch distances, surficial moisture content, wind speed and direction and transport processes. The horizontal and vertical variability of the event scale Aeolian sand transport is analyzed with 8 MWAC sand traps. Two saltiphones register the intensity and variations of grain impacts over time. Two meteo-masts, each with four anemometers and one wind vane, provide quantitative measurements of the wind flow at different locations on the beach. Surficial moisture is measured with a moisture sensor. The topography measurements are typically done with laser techniques. To start, two sites are selected for measurement

  4. Electrolyte solution transport in electropolar nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Jianbing; Culligan, Patricia J; Chen Xi; Qiao Yu; Zhou Qulan; Li Yibing; Tak, Moonho; Park, Taehyo

    2010-01-01

    Electrolyte transport in nanochannels plays an important role in a number of emerging areas. Using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) simulations, the fundamental transport behavior of an electrolyte/water solution in a confined model nanoenvironment is systematically investigated by varying the nanochannel dimension, solid phase, electrolyte phase, ion concentration and transport rate. It is found that the shear resistance encountered by the nanofluid strongly depends on these material/system parameters; furthermore, several effects are coupled. The mechanisms of the nanofluidic transport characteristics are explained by considering the unique molecular/ion structure formed inside the nanochannel. The lower shear resistance observed in some of the systems studies could be beneficial for nanoconductors, while the higher shear resistance (or higher effective viscosity) observed in other systems might enhance the performance of energy dissipation devices.

  5. Aeolian sand transport over complex intertidal bar-trough beach topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony, Edward J.; Ruz, Marie-Hélène; Vanhée, Stéphane

    2009-04-01

    Aeolian sand transport on macrotidal beaches with complex intertidal bar-trough topography (ridge-and-runnel beaches) was assessed from experiments in northern France that involved measurements of wind speed, saltation, surface moisture contents, and rates of sand trapping across surveyed portions of the upper beach profile. Beaches exhibiting intertidal bars and troughs are much more complex, topographically, than simple reflective or dissipative beaches. Furthermore, the intertidal bar-trough morphology commonly exhibits strong cross-shore variations in the moisture contents of the beach surface and in patterns of bedform development. The results of four 30-minute experiments, conducted along topographically surveyed portions of the upper beach-dune toe profile, show that troughs act as extremely efficient sand interceptors, because of their permanently saturated state, which also inhibits sand mobilisation. Troughs, thus, limit or segment the dry fetch during conditions of intermittent saltation. Flow lines, inferred from the wind profiles, suggest that complex interactions at the boundary layer are generated by the bar-trough topography. Troughs systematically appear to be characterised by air expansion, while bar faces generate ramp wind acceleration for onshore winds, and sometimes immediate downwind deceleration for offshore winds. These effects may also contribute to cross-shore variations in the rates of sand trapping. Finally, a simple conceptual model of effective fetch development, integrating the effects of the spring-neap tidal range and of gross bar-trough morphological variability over time, is proposed for bar-trough beaches. The model highlights the key theme of fetch segmentation induced by cross-shore differentiation in the moisture contents of the beach surface hinged on the complex topography of multiple bars and troughs.

  6. Reexamining ultrafiltration and solute transport in groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuzil, C. E.; Person, Mark

    2017-06-01

    Geologic ultrafiltration—slowing of solutes with respect to flowing groundwater—poses a conundrum: it is consistently observed experimentally in clay-rich lithologies, but has been difficult to identify in subsurface data. Resolving this could be important for clarifying clay and shale transport properties at large scales as well as interpreting solute and isotope patterns for applications ranging from nuclear waste repository siting to understanding fluid transport in tectonically active environments. Simulations of one-dimensional NaCl transport across ultrafiltering clay membrane strata constrained by emerging data on geologic membrane properties showed different ultrafiltration effects than have often been envisioned. In relatively high-permeability advection-dominated regimes, salinity increases occurred mostly within membrane units while their effluent salinity initially fell and then rose to match solute delivery. In relatively low-permeability diffusion-dominated regimes, salinity peaked at the membrane upstream boundary and effluent salinity remained low. In both scenarios, however, only modest salinity changes (up to ˜3 g L-1) occurred because of self-limiting tendencies; membrane efficiency declines as salinity rises, and although sediment compaction increases efficiency, it is also decreases permeability and allows diffusive transport to dominate. It appears difficult for ultrafiltration to generate brines as speculated, but widespread and less extreme ultrafiltration effects in the subsurface could be unrecognized. Conditions needed for ultrafiltration are present in settings that include topographically-driven flow systems, confined aquifer systems subjected to injection or withdrawal, compacting basins, and accretionary complexes.

  7. Alteration behavior of bentonite barrier of radioactive waste disposal by alkaline solutions. Part 2. Effect of type of alkaline solution on permeability of compacted bentonite-sand mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoyama, Shingo; Nakamura, Kunihiko; Tanaka, Yukihisa; Hironaga, Michihiko

    2011-01-01

    Permeability tests were carried out using compacted bentonite-sand mixture with initial dry density of 1.55 Mg/m 3 and alkaline solutions at 50degC for about two years to estimate the alteration behavior and the change in the permeability. Bentonite-sand mixtures which contain bentonites of 15wt% were made using Na-bentonite or Ca-exchanged bentonite. 0.3M-NaOH solution with pH 13.3 and 5mM-Ca(OH) 2 solution with pH 12.0 were used to the permeability tests of Na-bentonite-sand mixture and of Ca-exchanged bentonite-sand mixture, respectively. In the case of the permeability test conducted using NaOH solution, montmorillonite and other associated minerals were dissolved, and consequently, the dry density and effective montmorillonite density of Na-bentonite-sand mixture were decreased. Furthermore, the mineralogical feature of montmorillonite was changed (i.e. beidellitization and an increase in the layer charge). The permeability of Na-bentonite-sand mixture was increased 5.6 times by the end of permeability test as a result of above alteration. In the case of the permeability test conducted using Ca(OH) 2 solution, montmorillonite and other associated minerals were dissolved, and calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) was precipitated. Consequently, the dry density of Ca-exchanged bentonite-sand mixture was increased, while the effective montmorillonite density was decreased. The mineralogical feature of montmorillonite was changed (i.e. beidellitization and an increase in the layer charge). The permeability of Ca-exchange bentonite-sand mixture was decreased by more than two orders of magnitude due to fill the pore of Ca-exchange bentonite-sand mixture by the precipitation of C-S-H. From above results, the type of alkaline solution affects the mineralogical alteration behavior of the compacted bentonite-sand mixture, and consequently, affects the changing trend of permeability. In conclusion, it is important not only to consider the dissolution of montmorillonite, but

  8. Pathogen transport in groundwater systems: contrasts with traditional solute transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Randall J.; Johnson, William P.

    2017-06-01

    Water quality affects many aspects of water availability, from precluding use to societal perceptions of fit-for-purpose. Pathogen source and transport processes are drivers of water quality because they have been responsible for numerous outbreaks resulting in large economic losses due to illness and, in some cases, loss of life. Outbreaks result from very small exposure (e.g., less than 20 viruses) from very strong sources (e.g., trillions of viruses shed by a single infected individual). Thus, unlike solute contaminants, an acute exposure to a very small amount of contaminated water can cause immediate adverse health effects. Similarly, pathogens are larger than solutes. Thus, interactions with surfaces and settling become important even as processes important for solutes such as diffusion become less important. These differences are articulated in "Colloid Filtration Theory", a separate branch of pore-scale transport. Consequently, understanding pathogen processes requires changes in how groundwater systems are typically characterized, where the focus is on the leading edges of plumes and preferential flow paths, even if such features move only a very small fraction of the aquifer flow. Moreover, the relatively short survival times of pathogens in the subsurface require greater attention to very fast (solute transport mechanisms discussed here, a more encompassing view of water quality and source water protection is attained. With this more holistic view and theoretical understanding, better evaluations can be made regarding drinking water vulnerability and the relation between groundwater and human health.

  9. Sequential Subterranean Transport of Excavated Sand and Foraged Seeds in Nests of the Harvester Ant, Pogonomyrmex badius.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter R Tschinkel

    Full Text Available During their approximately annual nest relocations, Florida harvester ants (Pogonomyrmex badius excavate large and architecturally-distinct subterranean nests. Aspects of this process were studied by planting a harvester ant colony in the field in a soil column composed of layers of 12 different colors of sand. Quantifying the colors of excavated sand dumped on the surface by the ants revealed the progress of nest deepening to 2 m and enlargement to 8 L in volume. Most of the excavation was completed within about 2 weeks, but the nest was doubled in volume after a winter lull. After 7 months, we excavated the nest and mapped its structure, revealing colored sand deposited in non-host colored layers, especially in the upper 30 to 40 cm of the nest. In all, about 2.5% of the excavated sediment was deposited below ground, a fact of importance to sediment dating by optically-stimulated luminescence (OSL. Upward transport of excavated sand is carried out in stages, probably by different groups of ants, through deposition, re-transport, incorporation into the nest walls and floors and remobilization from these. This results in considerable mixing of sand from different depths, as indicated in the multiple sand colors even within single sand pellets brought to the surface. Just as sand is transported upward by stages, incoming seeds are transported downward to seed chambers. Foragers collect seeds and deposit them only in the topmost nest chambers from which a separate group of workers rapidly transports them downward in increments detectable as a "wave" of seeds that eventually ends in the seed chambers, 20 to 80 cm below the surface. The upward and downward transport is an example of task-partitioning in a series-parallel organization of work carried out by a highly redundant work force in which each worker usually completes only part of a multi-step process.

  10. Exact solution of the neutron transport equation in spherical geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anli, Fikret; Akkurt, Abdullah; Yildirim, Hueseyin; Ates, Kemal [Kahramanmaras Suetcue Imam Univ. (Turkey). Faculty of Sciences and Letters

    2017-03-15

    Solution of the neutron transport equation in one dimensional slab geometry construct a basis for the solution of neutron transport equation in a curvilinear geometry. Therefore, in this work, we attempt to derive an exact analytical benchmark solution for both neutron transport equations in slab and spherical medium by using P{sub N} approximation which is widely used in neutron transport theory.

  11. Transport of 152Eu colloids in a system of fine sand and water containing humic substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klotz, D.

    1995-01-01

    The migration of 152 Eu in a system of fine sand and water containing humic substances was investigated in a flow column system under realistic conditions. In this system, the trivalent Eu forms colloids with the water. These Eu humates are transported without retardation at recovery rates significantly below 100 per cent. Recovery is more or less a measure of the physical process of filtration of Eu bonded to particulates. In the range of natural filtering rates, the recovery rates decrease with decreasing filtering rate. (orig.) [de

  12. Transport and retention of 14C-perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) in saturated limestone and sand porous media: Effects of input concentration, ionic strength and cation type

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xueyan, L.; Gao, B.; Sun, Y.; Wu, J.

    2017-12-01

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) has been used in a wide variety of industrial and consumer product applications. PFOA has been detected around the world at ng/L to μg/L levels in groundwater, and at ng/g levels in soil.The physicochemical properties of porous media were proven to play pivotal roles in determining the transport behavior of various pollutants. It is anticipated that physicochemical properties of porous media will strongly influence the transport behavior of PFOA. In addition, previous investigations have revealed that input concentration significantly influence the transport behavior of nanoparticles and antibiotics. Thus, this study was designed experimentally and fundamentally to gain insight into transport and retention of PFOA in various porous medias at different input concentrations, solution IS and cation type. Unlike in quartz sand porous media, the BTCs in limestone porous media exhibited increasing retention rate and high degree of tailing in limestone porous media. Results showed that higher relative retention occurred in limestone porous media than in quartz sand porous media under the same solution chemistry. This result was attributed to the less negative zeta-potentials, rougher surface and larger specific surface area, and the presence of hydroxyl groups and organic matters of limestone grains. Higher ionic strength and Ca2+ had little impact on the mobility of PFOA in quartz sand porous media, but significantly enhanced the retention of PFOA in limestone porous media. The difference is likely due to the compression of the electrical double layer, and the surface-charge neutralization and cation-bridging effect of Ca2+. Higher input concentration resulted in lower relative PFOA retention in limestone porous media, but the influence were insignificant in quartz sand porous media. This effect is likely because attachment sites in limestone responced to the variety of input concentration differently than quartz.

  13. Nitrate-cancrinite precipitation on quartz sand in simulated Hanford tank solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickmore, B R; Nagy, K L; Young, J S; Drexler, J W

    2001-11-15

    Caustic NaNO3 solutions containing dissolved Al were reacted with quartz sand at 89 degrees C to simulate possible reactions between leaked nuclear waste and primary subsurface minerals at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford site in Washington. Nitrate-cancrinite began to precipitate onto the quartz after 2-10 days, cementing the grains together. Estimates of the equilibrium constant for the precipitation reaction differ for solutions with 0.1 or 1.0 m OH- (log Keq = 30.4 +/- 0.8 and 36.2 +/- 0.6, respectively). The difference in solubility may be attributable to more perfect crystallinity (i.e., fewer stacking faults) in the higher-pH cancrinite structure. This is supported by electron micrographs of crystal morphology and measured rates of Na volatilization under an electron beam. Precipitate crystallinity may affect radionuclide mobility, because stacking faults in the cancrinite structure can diminish its zeolitic cation exchange properties. The precipitation rate near the onset of nucleation depends on the total Al and Si concentrations in solution. The evolution of experimental Si concentrations was modeled by considering the dependence of quartz dissolution rate on AI(OH)4- activity, cancrinite precipitation, and the reduction of reactive surface area of quartz due to coverage by cancrinite.

  14. Colorado River sediment transport: 2. Systematic bed‐elevation and grain‐size effects of sand supply limitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topping, David J.; Rubin, David M.; Nelson, Jonathan M.; Kinzel, Paul J.; Corson, Ingrid C.

    2000-01-01

    The Colorado River in Marble and Grand Canyons displays evidence of annual supply limitation with respect to sand both prior to [Topping et al, this issue] and after the closure of Glen Canyon Dam in 1963. Systematic changes in bed elevation and systematic coupled changes in suspended‐sand concentration and grain size result from this supply limitation. During floods, sand supply limitation either causes or modifies a lag between the time of maximum discharge and the time of either maximum or minimum (depending on reach geometry) bed elevation. If, at a cross section where the bed aggrades with increasing flow, the maximum bed elevation is observed to lead the peak or the receding limb of a flood, then this observed response of the bed is due to sand supply limitation. Sand supply limitation also leads to the systematic evolution of sand grain size (both on the bed and in suspension) in the Colorado River. Sand input during a tributary flood travels down the Colorado River as an elongating sediment wave, with the finest sizes (because of their lower settling velocities) traveling the fastest. As the fine front of a sediment wave arrives at a given location, the bed fines and suspended‐sand concentrations increase in response to the enhanced upstream supply of finer sand. Then, as the front of the sediment wave passes that location, the bed is winnowed and suspended‐sand concentrations decrease in response to the depletion of the upstream supply of finer sand. The grain‐size effects of depletion of the upstream sand supply are most obvious during periods of higher dam releases (e.g., the 1996 flood experiment and the 1997 test flow). Because of substantial changes in the grain‐size distribution of the bed, stable relationships between the discharge of water and sand‐transport rates (i.e., stable sand rating curves) are precluded. Sand budgets in a supply‐limited river like the Colorado River can only be constructed through inclusion of the physical

  15. Purification and measurement of acid leachable europium in sands as an aid in the study of sediment transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ditchburn, R.G.; McCabe, W.J.

    1982-05-01

    The use of europium labelled sand as an aid in the study of sediment transport has been suggested. A method for the purification of acid leachable europium is described. The final measurement is made by flame emission spectrometry using a nitrous oxide-acetylene flame. The usefulness of the method is limited by the natural levels of europium which, in the sand studied, was around 0.3 ppm

  16. Count rate balance method of measuring sediment transport of sand beds by radioactive tracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauzay, G.

    1968-01-01

    Radioactive tracers are applied to the direct measurement of the sediment transport rate of sand beds. The theoretical measurement formula is derived: the variation of the count rate balance is inverse of that of the transport thickness. Simultaneously the representativeness of the tracer is critically studied. The minimum quantity of tracer which has to be injected in order to obtain a correct statistical definition of count rate given by a low number of grains 'seen' by the detector is then studied. A field experiment was made and has let to study the technological conditions for applying this method: only the treatment of results is new, the experiment itself is carried out with conventional techniques applied with great care. (author) [fr

  17. Reactive solute transport in acidic streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broshears, R.E.

    1996-01-01

    Spatial and temporal profiles of Ph and concentrations of toxic metals in streams affected by acid mine drainage are the result of the interplay of physical and biogeochemical processes. This paper describes a reactive solute transport model that provides a physically and thermodynamically quantitative interpretation of these profiles. The model combines a transport module that includes advection-dispersion and transient storage with a geochemical speciation module based on MINTEQA2. Input to the model includes stream hydrologic properties derived from tracer-dilution experiments, headwater and lateral inflow concentrations analyzed in field samples, and a thermodynamic database. Simulations reproduced the general features of steady-state patterns of observed pH and concentrations of aluminum and sulfate in St. Kevin Gulch, an acid mine drainage stream near Leadville, Colorado. These patterns were altered temporarily by injection of sodium carbonate into the stream. A transient simulation reproduced the observed effects of the base injection.

  18. Geomorphology and sediment transport on a submerged back-reef sand apron: One Tree Reef, Great Barrier Reef

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Daniel L.; Vila-Concejo, Ana; Webster, Jody M.

    2014-10-01

    Back-reef sand aprons are conspicuous and dynamic sedimentary features in coral reef systems. The development of these features influences the evolution and defines the maturity of coral reefs. However, the hydrodynamic processes that drive changes on sand aprons are poorly understood with only a few studies directly assessing sediment entrainment and transport. Current and wave conditions on a back-reef sand apron were measured during this study and a digital elevation model was developed through topographic and bathymetric surveying of the sand apron, reef flats and lagoon. The current and wave processes that may entrain and transport sediment were assessed using second order small amplitude (Stokes) wave theory and Shields equations. The morphodynamic interactions between current flow and geomorphology were also examined. The results showed that sediment transport occurs under modal hydrodynamic conditions with waves the main force entraining sediment rather than average currents. A morphodynamic relationship between current flow and geomorphology was also observed with current flow primarily towards the lagoon in shallow areas of the sand apron and deeper channel-like areas directing current off the sand apron towards the lagoon or the reef crest. These results show that the short-term mutual interaction of hydrodynamics and geomorphology in coral reefs can result in morphodynamic equilibrium.

  19. Transport of E. coli D21g with runoff water under different solution chemistry conditions and surface slopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracer and indicator microbe runoff experiments were conducted to investigate the influence of solution chemistry on the transport, retention, and release of Escherichia coli D21g. Experiments were conducted in a chamber (2.25 m long, 0.15 m wide, and 0.16 m high) packed with ultrapure quartz sand (...

  20. Correlation of aeolian sediment transport measured by sand traps and fluorescent tracers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, Laura L.; Alonso, Ignacio

    2010-03-01

    Two different methods, fluorescent tracers and vertical sand traps, were simultaneously used to carry out an aeolian sediment transport study designed to test the goodness of fluorescent tracers in aeolian environments. Field experiments were performed in a nebkha field close to Famara beach at Lanzarote Island (Canary Islands, Spain) in a sector where the dunes were between 0.5 and 0.8 m height and 1-2 m wide and the vegetal cover was approximately 22%. In this dune field the sediment supply comes from Famara beach and is blown by trade winds toward the south, where the vegetation acts as natural sediment traps. Wind data were obtained by means of four Aanderaa wind speed sensors and one Aanderaa vane, all them distributed in a vertical array from 0.1 to 4 m height for 27 h. The average velocity at 1 m height during the experiment was 5.26 m s - 1 with the wind direction from the north. The tracer was under wind influence for 90 min at midday. During this period two series of sand traps (T1 and T2) N, S, E and W oriented were used. Resultant transport rates were 0.0131 and 0.0184 kg m - 1 min - 1 respectively. Tracer collection was performed with a sticky tape to sample only surface sediments. Tagged grains were visually counted under UV light. The transport rate was computed from the centroid displacement, that moved 0.875 m southwards, and the depth of the active layer considered was the size of one single grain. Taking into account these data the transport rate was 0.0072 kg m - 1 min - 1 . The discrepancy in results between both methods is related to several factors, such as the thickness of the active layer and the grain size difference between the tagged and the native material.

  1. Numerical solution of the radionuclide transport equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadermann, J.; Roesel, F.

    1983-11-01

    A numerical solution of the one-dimensional geospheric radionuclide chain transport equation based on the pseudospectral method is developed. The advantages of this approach are flexibility in incorporating space and time dependent migration parameters, arbitrary boundary conditions and solute rock interactions as well as efficiency and reliability. As an application the authors investigate the impact of non-linear sorption isotherms on migration in crystalline rock. It is shown that non-linear sorption, in the present case a Freundlich isotherm, may reduce concentration at the geosphere outlet by orders of magnitude provided the migration time is comparable or larger than the half-life of the nuclide in question. The importance of fixing dispersivity within the continuum approach is stressed. (Auth.)

  2. Sand transport in a two pass internal cooling duct with rib turbulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Sukhjinder; Tafti, Danesh; Reagle, Colin; Delimont, Jacob; Ng, Wing; Ekkad, Srinath

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Highest particle impingement observed in the bend and first quarter of 2nd pass. • Average particle impingement per pitch is 28% higher in the second pass. • Rib faces are by far the most susceptible to particle impingement. • Particle impingement is sensitive to particle size. • Particle impingement is sensitive to wall collision model used. - Abstract: Jet engines often operate under dirty conditions where large amounts of particulate matter can be ingested, especially, sand, ash and dirt. Particulate matter in different engine components can lead to degradation in performance. The focus of this study is to investigate the sand transport and deposition in the internal cooling passages of turbine blades. A two pass stationary square duct with rib turbulators subjected to sand ingestion is studied using Large Eddy Simulations (LES). Each pass has ribs on two opposite walls and aligned normal to the main flow direction. The rib pitch to rib height (P/e) is 9.28, the rib height to channel hydraulic diameter (e/D h ) is 0.0625 and calculations have been carried out for a bulk Reynolds number of 25,000. Particle sizes in the range 0.5–25 μm are considered, with the same size distribution as found in Arizona Road Dust (medium). Large Eddy Simulation (LES) with a wall-model is used to model the flow and sand particles are modeled using a discrete Lagrangian framework. Results quantify the distribution of particle impingement density on all surfaces. Highest particle impingement density is found in the first quarter section of the second pass after the 180° turn, where the recorded impingement is more than twice that of any other region. It is also found that the average particle impingement per pitch is 28% higher in the second pass than the first pass. Results show lower particle tendency to impact the region immediately behind the rib in the first pass compared to the second pass where particle impingement is more uniform in the region

  3. Laboratory experiments on solute transport in bimodal porous media under cyclic precipitation-evaporation boundary conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremer, Clemens; Neuweiler, Insa

    2016-04-01

    Flow and solute transport in the shallow subsurface is strongly governed by atmospheric boundary conditions. Erratically varying infiltration and evaporation cycles lead to alternating upward and downward flow, as well as spatially and temporally varying water contents and associated hydraulic conductivity of the prevailing materials. Thus presenting a highly complicated, dynamic system. Knowledge of subsurface solute transport processes is vital to assess e.g. the entry of, potentially hazardous, solutes to the groundwater and nutrient uptake by plant roots and can be gained in many ways. Besides field measurements and numerical simulations, physical laboratory experiments represent a way to establish process understanding and furthermore validate numerical schemes. With the aim to gain a better understanding and to quantify solute transport in the unsaturated shallow subsurface under natural precipitation conditions in heterogeneous media, we conduct physical laboratory experiments in a 22 cm x 8 cm x 1 cm flow cell that is filled with two types of sand and apply cyclic infiltration-evaporation phases at the soil surface. Pressure at the bottom of the domain is kept constant. Following recent studies (Lehmann and Or, 2009; Bechtold et al., 2011a), heterogeneity is introduced by a sharp vertical interface between coarse and fine sand. Fluorescent tracers are used to i) qualitatively visualize transport paths within the domain and ii) quantify solute leaching at the bottom of the domain. Temporal and spatial variations in water content during the experiment are derived from x-ray radiographic images. Monitored water contents between infiltration and evaporation considerably changed in the coarse sand while the fine sand remained saturated throughout the experiments. Lateral solute transport through the interface in both directions at different depths of the investigated soil columns were observed. This depended on the flow rate applied at the soil surface and

  4. Coupled geochemical and solute transport code development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrey, J.R.; Hostetler, C.J.

    1985-01-01

    A number of coupled geochemical hydrologic codes have been reported in the literature. Some of these codes have directly coupled the source-sink term to the solute transport equation. The current consensus seems to be that directly coupling hydrologic transport and chemical models through a series of interdependent differential equations is not feasible for multicomponent problems with complex geochemical processes (e.g., precipitation/dissolution reactions). A two-step process appears to be the required method of coupling codes for problems where a large suite of chemical reactions must be monitored. Two-step structure requires that the source-sink term in the transport equation is supplied by a geochemical code rather than by an analytical expression. We have developed a one-dimensional two-step coupled model designed to calculate relatively complex geochemical equilibria (CTM1D). Our geochemical module implements a Newton-Raphson algorithm to solve heterogeneous geochemical equilibria, involving up to 40 chemical components and 400 aqueous species. The geochemical module was designed to be efficient and compact. A revised version of the MINTEQ Code is used as a parent geochemical code

  5. Computer Modeling of Sand Transport on Mars Using a Compart-Mentalized Fluids Algorithm (CFA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, J.; Stratton, D.

    1999-01-01

    It has been postulated that aeolian transport on Mars may be significantly different from that on Earth. From laboratory experiments simulating martian grain transport [2], it has been observed that (saltating) grains striking the bed can cause hundreds of secondary reptation trajectories when impact occurs at speeds postulated for Mars. Some of the ballistically induced trajectories "die ouf' and effectively join the ranks on the creep population that is merely nudged along by impact. Many of the induced reptation trajectories, however, are sufficiently high for the grains to become part of the saltation load (it is irrelevant to the boundary layer how a grain attained its initial lift force). When these grains, in turn, strike the surface, they too are capable of inducing more reptating grains. This cascading effect has been discussed in connection with terrestrial aeolian transport in an attempt to dispel the notion that sand motion is divisible only into creep and saltation loads. On Earth, only a few grains are splashed by impact. On Mars, it may be hundreds. We developed a computer model to address this phenomenon because there are some important ramifications: First, this ratio may mean that martian aeolian transport is dominated by reptation flux rather than saltation. On Earth, the flux would be a roughly balanced mixture between reptation/creep and saltation. On Venus, there would be no transport other than by saltation. In other words, an understanding of planetary aeolian processes may not be necessarily understood by extrapolating from the "Earth case", with only gravity and atmospheric density/viscosity being considered as variables. Second, the reptation flux on Mars may be self sustaining, so that little input is required by the wind once transport has been initiated. The number of grains saturating the boundary layer near the bed may mean that average grain speed on Mars might conceivably be less than that on Earth. This would say much for models

  6. Aeolian Sand Transport in the Planetary Context: Respective Roles of Aerodynamic and Bed-Dilatancy Thresholds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, J. R.; Borucki, J.; Bratton, C.

    1999-09-01

    The traditional view of aeolian sand transport generally estimates flux from the perspective of aerodynamic forces creating the airborne grain population, although it has been recognized that "reptation" causes a significant part of the total airborne flux; reptation involves both ballistic injection of grains into the air stream by the impact of saltating grains as well as the "nudging" of surface grains into a creeping motion. Whilst aerodynamic forces may initiate sand motion, it is proposed here that within a fully-matured grain cloud, flux is actually governed by two thresholds: an aerodynamic threshold, and a bed-dilatancy threshold. It is the latter which controls the reptation population, and its significance increases proportionally with transport energy. Because we only have experience with terrestrial sand transport, extrapolations of aeolian theory to Mars and Venus have adjusted only the aerodynamic factor, taking gravitational forces and atmospheric density as the prime variables in the aerodynamic equations, but neglecting reptation. The basis for our perspective on the importance of reptation and bed dilatancy is a set of experiments that were designed to simulate sand transport across the surface of a martian dune. Using a modified sporting crossbow in which a sand-impelling sabot replaced the bolt-firing mechanism, individual grains of sand were fired at loose sand targets with glancing angles typical of saltation impact; grains were projected at about 80 m/s to simulate velocities commensurate with those predicted for extreme martian aeolian conditions. The sabot impelling method permitted study of individual impacts without the masking effect of bed mobilization encountered in wind-tunnel studies. At these martian impact velocities, grains produced small craters formed by the ejection of several hundred grains from the bed. Unexpectedly, the craters were not elongated, despite glancing impact; the craters were very close to circular in planform

  7. Papers of the Canadian Institute's 3. annual conference : oil sands supply and infrastructure : labour supply, upgraders, transportation, pipelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    The focus of this conference was on the development of the oil sands industry, with specific reference to issues concerning supply and infrastructure. Energy source development and transmission issues were discussed, as well as transportation systems. The impact of increased oil sands development on pipelines was also examined. Various fuel options were discussed, including the use of hydrogen, natural gas and alternate fuels in manufacturing and processing plants. Economic drivers and the creation of new markets were examined, and various export opportunities were reviewed. The environmental impact of increased oil sands activity was discussed, with specific reference to the Boreal regions. Management challenges in the oil sands industry were also discussed along with issues concerning human resources, labour supply, training and education. The conference featured 15 presentations, of which 13 have been catalogued separately for inclusion in this database. refs., tabs., figs

  8. Experimental and simulated displacement of oil in sand berea cores using aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez, A.; Gonzalez, J.L.; Hernandez, F.; Hernandez, H.

    2009-01-01

    The development of a mathematical algorithm to simulate the displacement of a resident fluid using a displacing one in a saturated anisotropic porous media is shown in this work. The algorithm was included in the simulator developed by the present authors in previous works to represent the anisotropic distribution of the porous media properties and the fluid injection [Ramirez A et al. Mathematical simulation of oil reservoir properties. Chaos, solitons and Fractals 2008;38:778-88, Ramirez A et al. Simulation of uncompressible fluid flow through a porous media. Chaos, Solitons and Fractals 2009;39:1753-63] in a nested loop to analyze the participant nodes in the transport process and calculate the volumes of the resident and new fluids. The new routine developed takes in count the mobility of both fluids. Additionally experimental fluid displacement tests were done using heavy oil from Mexican reservoirs as a resident fluid in sand berea cores. The injection of new fluids in natural oil reservoirs is a part of the Enhanced oil recovery (EOR) methods used to improve the oil displacement and increase production after the primary stage of the oil recovery has been finished. Water is an available and economical resource to be used as a displacing fluid due to many of the producers (off-shores) of the oil industries are placed in the sea near the coast.

  9. Determination of the solid consumption in the transport of sands in sea beds with gold 198

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez A, G.

    1983-01-01

    The study of the movement of sediments in sea beds, is necessary when one plans to build a port. Among the techniques used for this studies, it is the radiotracer balance that gives an useful estimation of the quantity of sediment that it moves per day and by meter (perpendicular to the displacement). The main objectives of this work are: to) to present the characteristics of the obtaining of the used radiotracer, describing details those used safety measures, b) to describe the handling of the radiotracer and it radiological safety, during the transport and injection in the sea bottom, c) description of the detection way and the used equipment, d) to describe the information processing obtained in the field and finally, e) the estimate of the solid consumption and the determination of the direction and speed of displacement of those sediments in the sea bottom, in front of the Tabasco coast, to be used jointly with the information obtained by means of other techniques so that one can make a good planning of the operations of dredging during the construction and later on the maintenance of the Dos Bocas marine terminal. The first step is to obtain the radiotracer that in this case was sand of uniform grain metric, marked superficially with Gold-198. The second step is to transport the sand to the place of interest, to place it in the injection equipment and to deposit it in the sea bottom. The third step is to detect the radiotracer in the sea bed, from a craft that drags a sled, which takes mounted a scintillation detector of sodium iodide activated with thallium NaI(Tl) (probe). The fourth step is to process the field information and to obtain the corresponding results. (Author)

  10. Effects of Temperature on Solute Transport Parameters in Differently-Textured Soils at Saturated Condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamamoto, S.; Arihara, M.; Kawamoto, K.; Nishimura, T.; Komatsu, T.; Moldrup, P.

    2014-12-01

    Subsurface warming driven by global warming, urban heat islands, and increasing use of shallow geothermal heating and cooling systems such as the ground source heat pump, potentially causes changes in subsurface mass transport. Therefore, understanding temperature dependency of the solute transport characteristics is essential to accurately assess environmental risks due to increased subsurface temperature. In this study, one-dimensional solute transport experiments were conducted in soil columns under temperature control to investigate effects of temperature on solute transport parameters, such as solute dispersion and diffusion coefficients, hydraulic conductivity, and retardation factor. Toyoura sand, Kaolin clay, and intact loamy soils were used in the experiments. Intact loamy soils were taken during a deep well boring at the Arakawa Lowland in Saitama Prefecture, Japan. In the transport experiments, the core sample with 5-cm diameter and 4-cm height was first isotropically consolidated, whereafter 0.01M KCl solution was injected to the sample from the bottom. The concentrations of K+ and Cl- in the effluents were analyzed by an ion chromatograph to obtain solute breakthrough curves. The solute transport parameters were calculated from the breakthrough curves. The experiments were conducted under different temperature conditions (15, 25, and 40 oC). The retardation factor for the intact loamy soils decreased with increasing temperature, while water permeability increased due to reduced viscosity of water at higher temperature. Opposite, the effect of temperature on solute dispersivity for the intact loamy soils was insignificant. The effects of soil texture on the temperature dependency of the solute transport characteristics will be further investigated from comparison of results from differently-textured samples.

  11. Characteristics Of Basaltic Sand: Size, Shape, And Composition As A Function Of Transport Process And Distance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craddock, R. A.; Needell, Z. A.; Rose, T. R.

    2012-04-01

    quartz, feldspar, and heavy minerals commonly found in most terrestrial sedimentary deposits, basaltic sediments are composed of varying amounts of olivine, pyroxene, plagioclase, and vitric and lithic fragments. One of the few locations on Earth containing such material is the Ka'u Desert of Hawaii. This area is unique in that both eolian and fluvial sediment pathways occur in the same area, thus allowing a direct comparison of particles transported by different processes over identical distances (~20 km). We are currently documenting the physical and chemical changes that take place in basaltic sediments as they are transported by wind and water over increasing distances. This will result in an improvement in our understanding of traditional sedimentological concepts when applying them to Martian surface materials. Process: The Ka'u Desert is ~350 km2 and contains the largest basaltic dune fields on Earth. We have identified several different dune types located in various parts of the desert, including climbing and falling dunes, sand sheets, parabolic dunes (that were initially barchans), and crescentic dunes. Fluvial sediments occur as floodout deposits where ephemeral streams go from confined to unconfined flow outside the continuous Keanakako'i Formation [7]. There are also a number of sand bottom streams and playas that occur along a series of channels that extend from the Keanakako'i Formation ~20 km to the sea. We have collected samples from dunes and fluvial deposits at various locations in the Ka'u Desert, at varying distances from sources and subject to different environmental processes. In the lab, we have begun to use optical and scanning electron microscopic images to assess how grain size, shape, and angularity of individual particles change with increasing transport distances. We are also conducting point counts of particles contained within each sample to better understand how olivine, pyroxene, feldspar, and lithic and vitric fragments weather with

  12. One-dimensional spatially dependent solute transport in semi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Initially porous domain is considered solute free and the input source condition is ... parameters for description of solute transport in porous media. ... flow assuming uniform initial concentration with first and third type boundary conditions. Aral.

  13. Sand transport in the lower Mississippi River does not yield to dams: Applications for building deltaic land in Louisiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nittrouer, J. A.; Viparelli, E.

    2013-12-01

    The Mississippi Delta is presently undergoing a catastrophic drowning, whereby 5000 km2 of low-lying wetlands have converted to open water. This land loss is primarily the result of: a) relative sea-level rise, occurring due to the combined effect of rapid subsidence associated with subsurface fluids extraction and eustatic rise; b) leveeing and damming of the river and its tributaries, which restricts sediment delivery to and dispersal within the delta; and c) severe excavation of the delta for navigation channels. It has been argued that continued net land loss of the Mississippi Delta is inevitable due to declining measured total (sand and mud) suspended sediment loads over the past 6 decades. However, recent research has documented that the key to delta growth is deposition of sand, which accounts for ~50-70% of modern and ancient (up to 9 m.a.) Mississippi Delta deposits, but comprises only ~20% of the sampled portion of the total load. Here we present new analysis of existing data to show that sand transport has not diminished since dam construction. Furthermore, we produce a numerical model based on the mass balance of bed material loads over the lower 1600 km of the Mississippi River to show that mining of sand from the channel bed continues to replenish downstream sand loads. For example, our model results indicate that it requires approximately 240 years for a reduced sand load to reach the delta apex. Furthermore, our calculations indicate that sand load at the delta apex is reduced by a noticeable amount (17%) only after about 600 years. We also show how channel bed elevations are predicted to change over the lower 1600 km of the river channel due to channel mining. Channel-bed degradation is greatest at the upstream end of the study reach and decreases downstream. After 300 years the wave of significant degradation has just passed ~800 km downstream, or roughly half of our model domain. These results are in contrast to the measurements which concern

  14. A quasilinear model for solute transport under unsaturated flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houseworth, J.E.; Leem, J.

    2009-01-01

    We developed an analytical solution for solute transport under steady-state, two-dimensional, unsaturated flow and transport conditions for the investigation of high-level radioactive waste disposal. The two-dimensional, unsaturated flow problem is treated using the quasilinear flow method for a system with homogeneous material properties. Dispersion is modeled as isotropic and is proportional to the effective hydraulic conductivity. This leads to a quasilinear form for the transport problem in terms of a scalar potential that is analogous to the Kirchhoff potential for quasilinear flow. The solutions for both flow and transport scalar potentials take the form of Fourier series. The particular solution given here is for two sources of flow, with one source containing a dissolved solute. The solution method may easily be extended, however, for any combination of flow and solute sources under steady-state conditions. The analytical results for multidimensional solute transport problems, which previously could only be solved numerically, also offer an additional way to benchmark numerical solutions. An analytical solution for two-dimensional, steady-state solute transport under unsaturated flow conditions is presented. A specific case with two sources is solved but may be generalized to any combination of sources. The analytical results complement numerical solutions, which were previously required to solve this class of problems.

  15. Removal of nitrate, ammonia and phosphate from aqueous solutions in packed bed filter using biochar augmented sand media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El Hanandeh Ali

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nutrients from wastewater are a major source of pollution because they can cause significant impact on the ecosystem. Accordingly, it is important that the nutrient concentrations are kept to admissible levels to the receiving environment. Often regulatory limits are set on the maximum allowable concentrations in the effluent. Therefore, wastewater must be treated to meet safe levels of discharge. In this study, laboratory investigation of the efficiency of packed bed filters to remove nitrate, ammonium and phosphate from aqueous solutions were conducted. Sand and sand augmented with hydrochloric acid treated biochar (SBC were used as packing media. Synthetic wastewater solution was prepared with PO43−, NO3−, NH4+ concentrations 20, 10, 50 mg/L, respectively. Each experiment ran for a period of five days; samples from the effluent were collected on alternate days. All experiments were duplicated. Over the experiment period, the average removal efficiency of PO43−, NO3−, NH4+ were 99.2%, 72.9%, 96.7% in the sand packed columns and 99.2%, 82.3%, 97.4% in the SBC packed columns, respectively. Although, the presence of biochar in the packing media had little effect on phosphate and ammonium removal, it significantly improved nitrate removal.

  16. The Effect of Air Density on Sand Transport Structures and the Adobe Abrasion Profile: A Field Wind-Tunnel Experiment Over a Wide Range of Altitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Qingjie; Qu, Jianjun; Dong, Zhibao; Zu, Ruiping; Zhang, Kecun; Wang, Hongtao; Xie, Shengbo

    2014-02-01

    Aeolian sand transport results from interactions between the surface and the airflow above. Air density strongly constrains airflow characteristics and the resulting flow of sand, and therefore should not be neglected in sand transport models. In the present study, we quantify the influence of air density on the sand flow structure, sand transport rate, adobe abrasion profiles, and abrasion rate using a portable wind-tunnel in the field. For a given wind speed, the flow's ability to transport sand decreases at low air density, so total sand transport decreases, but the saltation height increases. Thus, the damage to human structures increases compared with what occurs at lower altitudes. The adobe abrasion rate by the cloud of blowing sand decreases exponentially with increasing height above the surface, while the wind erosion and dust emission intensity both increase with increasing air density. Long-term feedback processes between air density and wind erosion suggest that the development of low-altitude areas due to long-term deflation plays a key role in dust emission, and will have a profound significance for surface Aeolian processes and geomorphology.

  17. The vertical structure of airflow turbulence characteristics within a boundary layer during wind blown sand transport over a beach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Z. S.; Baas, A. C.; Jackson, D.; Cooper, J. A.; Lynch, K.; Delgado-Fernandez, I.; Beyers, M.

    2010-12-01

    Recent studies have suggested the significant role of boundary layer turbulence and coherent flow structures on sand transport by wind over beaches and desert dunes. Widespread use of sonic anemometry and high-frequency sand transport sensors and traps have facilitated a move beyond the basic monitoring of shear velocities and bulk sediment transport to more detailed measurements at much higher spatio-temporal resolutions. In this paper we present results of a small-scale point-location field study of boundary layer turbulence and shear stresses conducted under obliquely onshore winds over a beach at Magilligan Strand, Northern Ireland. High-frequency (25 Hz) 3D wind vector measurements were collected at five different heights between 0.13 and 1.67 metres above the bed using sonic anemometry for durations of several hours, and the associated sand transport response was measured using an array of Safires. The wind data are used to investigate the vertical structure of Reynolds shear stresses and burst-sweep event characteristics, as well as a comparison with the standard logarithmic (law-of-the-wall) wind profile. The study explores the identification and selection of a characteristic event duration based on integral time-scales as well as spectral analysis, and includes an assessment of the issues involved with data rotations for yaw, pitch, and roll corrections relative to flow streamlines, and the subsequently derived turbulence parameters based on fluctuating vector components (u’, v’, w’). Results show how the contributions to shear stress and the average pitch of bursts and sweeps changes as a function of height above the bed, indicating the transformation of top-down turbulent eddies as they travel toward the surface. A comparison between the turbulence data and the synchronous sand transport events, meanwhile, reveals the potential effects of enhanced saltation layer roughness feedback on eddies close to the bed.

  18. Stochastic dynamics modeling solute transport in porous media modeling solute transport in porous media

    CERN Document Server

    Kulasiri, Don

    2002-01-01

    Most of the natural and biological phenomena such as solute transport in porous media exhibit variability which can not be modeled by using deterministic approaches. There is evidence in natural phenomena to suggest that some of the observations can not be explained by using the models which give deterministic solutions. Stochastic processes have a rich repository of objects which can be used to express the randomness inherent in the system and the evolution of the system over time. The attractiveness of the stochastic differential equations (SDE) and stochastic partial differential equations (SPDE) come from the fact that we can integrate the variability of the system along with the scientific knowledge pertaining to the system. One of the aims of this book is to explaim some useufl concepts in stochastic dynamics so that the scientists and engineers with a background in undergraduate differential calculus could appreciate the applicability and appropriateness of these developments in mathematics. The ideas ...

  19. Impact of increasing freight loads on rail substructure from fracking sand transportation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    In this report the effect of surface infiltration of frac sand and heavy axle loads (HALs) were studied for their impact on the ballast layer. : Different combinations of ballast and fracking sand were constructed to observe long term trends of defor...

  20. Transport of Liquid Phase Organic Solutes in Liquid Crystalline Membranes

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Sangil

    2010-01-01

    Porous cellulose nitrate membranes were impregnated with 8CB and PCH5 LCs (liquid crystals) and separations of solutes dissolved in aqueous phases were performed while monitoring solute concentration via UV-VIS spectrometry. The diffusing organic solutes, which consist of one aromatic ring and various functional groups, were selected to exclude molecular size effects on the diffusion and sorption. We studied the effects on solute transport of solute intra-molecular hydrogen bonding and so...

  1. Ground-water solute transport modeling using a three-dimensional scaled model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crider, S.S.

    1987-01-01

    Scaled models are used extensively in current hydraulic research on sediment transport and solute dispersion in free surface flows (rivers, estuaries), but are neglected in current ground-water model research. Thus, an investigation was conducted to test the efficacy of a three-dimensional scaled model of solute transport in ground water. No previous results from such a model have been reported. Experiments performed on uniform scaled models indicated that some historical problems (e.g., construction and scaling difficulties; disproportionate capillary rise in model) were partly overcome by using simple model materials (sand, cement and water), by restricting model application to selective classes of problems, and by physically controlling the effect of the model capillary zone. Results from these tests were compared with mathematical models. Model scaling laws were derived for ground-water solute transport and used to build a three-dimensional scaled model of a ground-water tritium plume in a prototype aquifer on the Savannah River Plant near Aiken, South Carolina. Model results compared favorably with field data and with a numerical model. Scaled models are recommended as a useful additional tool for prediction of ground-water solute transport

  2. Modelling multicomponent solute transport in structured soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beinum, van G.W.

    2007-01-01

    The mobility of contaminants in soil is an important factor in determining their ability to spread into the wider environment. For non-volatile substances, transport within the soil is generally dominated by transport of dissolved fractions in the soil water phase, via either diffusion or

  3. Removal of COD and TSS From Dye Solution Using Sand Filtration and Adsorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heny Juniar

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This research was conducted in order to obtain proper compositions and the standard condition for the simple filtration equipments and optimum operational conditions in adsorption column. The research was carried out by analyzing parameters COD and TSS. The result showed that the process was able to reduced parameters observed from filtration step until the process in adsorptions column. The optimum conditions for sand filter equipment were 10 cm sand height, at least 7 cm fibers, 3-4 cm gravel. In the adsorption column, the optimum conditions for green waste water were flow rate at 40 ml/min 60 min adsorptions time, and 60 cm bed height. While purple for waste water; 20 mL/min of flowrate, 60 min of adsorption time, and the 60 cm of bed height

  4. A Mathematical Model of Solute Coupled Water Transport in Toad Intestine Incorporating Recirculation of the Actively Transported Solute

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Erik Hviid; Sørensen, Jakob Balslev; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2000-01-01

    those of tight junction and interspace basement membrane by convection-diffusion. With solute permeability of paracellular pathway large relative to paracellular water flow, the paracellular flux ratio of the solute (influx/outflux) is small (2-4) in agreement with experiments. The virtual solute......A mathematical model of an absorbing leaky epithelium is developed for analysis of solute coupled water transport. The non-charged driving solute diffuses into cells and is pumped from cells into the lateral intercellular space (lis). All membranes contain water channels with the solute passing...... increases with hydraulic conductance of the pathway carrying water from mucosal solution into lis. Uphill water transport is accomplished, but with high hydraulic conductance of cell membranes strength of transport is obscured by water flow through cells. Anomalous solvent drag occurs when back flux...

  5. Mass balance and isotope effects during nitrogen transport through septic tank systems with packed-bed (sand) filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinkle, S.R.; Böhlke, J.K.; Fisher, L.H.

    2008-01-01

    Septic tank systems are an important source of NO3- to many aquifers, yet characterization of N mass balance and isotope systematics following septic tank effluent discharge into unsaturated sediments has received limited attention. In this study, samples of septic tank effluent before and after transport through single-pass packed-bed filters (sand filters) were evaluated to elucidate mass balance and isotope effects associated with septic tank effluent discharge to unsaturated sediments. Chemical and isotopic data from five newly installed pairs and ten established pairs of septic tanks and packed-bed filters serving single homes in Oregon indicate that aqueous solute concentrations are affected by variations in recharge (precipitation, evapotranspiration), NH4+ sorption (primarily in immature systems), nitrification, and gaseous N loss via NH3 volatilization and(or) N2 or N2O release during nitrification/denitrification. Substantial NH4+ sorption capacity was also observed in laboratory columns with synthetic effluent. Septic tank effluent ??15N-NH4+ values were almost constant and averaged + 4.9??? ?? 0.4??? (1 ??). In contrast, ??15N values of NO3- leaving mature packed-bed filters were variable (+ 0.8 to + 14.4???) and averaged + 7.2??? ?? 2.6???. Net N loss in the two networks of packed-bed filters was indicated by average 10-30% decreases in Cl--normalized N concentrations and 2-3??? increases in ??15N, consistent with fractionation accompanying gaseous N losses and corroborating established links between septic tank effluent and NO3- in a local, shallow aquifer. Values of ??18O-NO3- leaving mature packed-bed filters ranged from - 10.2 to - 2.3??? (mean - 6.4??? ?? 1.8???), and were intermediate between a 2/3 H2O-O + 1/3 O2-O conceptualization and a 100% H2O-O conceptualization of ??18O-NO3- generation during nitrification.

  6. Transport of Organic Solutes in Clay Formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    The research is a pilot investigation for the SERDP (Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program, DoD) founded project, Impact of Clay-DNAPL Interactions on Transport and Storage of Chlorinated Solvents in Low Permeability Zones, from 2010-2012. The report tries to s...

  7. A variational solution of transport equation based on spherical geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Hui; Zhang Ben'ai

    2002-01-01

    A variational method with differential forms gives better precision for numerical solution of transport critical problem based on spherical geometry, and its computation seems simple than other approximate methods

  8. Separation of Ce and La from Synthetic Chloride Leach Solution of Monazite Sand by Precipitation and Solvent Extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banda, Raju; Jeon, Ho Seok; Lee, Man Seung

    2014-12-01

    Precipitation and solvent extraction experiments have been performed to recover light rare earths from simulated monazite sand chloride leach solutions. Precipitation conditions were obtained to recover Ce by adding NaClO as an oxidant. Among some cationic extractants (PC 88A, D2EHPA, Cyanex 272, LIX 63), PC 88A showed the best performance to separate La from the resulting chloride solution. Furthermore, the mixture of PC 88A with other solvating (TBP, TOPO) and amine extractants (Alamine 336, Aliquat 336) was tested to increase the separation factor of La from Pr and Nd. The use of mixed extractants greatly enhanced the separation of La from the two other metals. McCabe-Thiele diagrams for the extraction of Pr and Nd with the PC 88A/Alamine 336 mixture were constructed.

  9. Mathematical modeling of fluid and solute transport in peritoneal dialysis

    OpenAIRE

    Waniewski, Jacek

    2001-01-01

    Optimization of peritoneal dialysis schedule and dialysis fluid composition needs, among others, methods for quantitative assessment of fluid and solute transport. Furthermore, an integrative quantitative description of physiological processes within the tissue, which contribute to the net transfer of fluid and solutes, is necessary for interpretation of the data and for predictions of the outcome of possible intervention into the peritoneal transport system. The current pro...

  10. Evaluation of sorption affinity of cadmium(II) on Haro river sand from aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasany, S.M.; Chaudhary, M.H.

    2001-01-01

    The sorption of Cd(II) on Haro river sand from deionized water is reported. The sorption system obeyed according to the Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) isotherms. The Freundlich parameters 1/n = 0.67±0.05 and of A = 1.38±1.14 mmole x g -1 have been ascertained. D-R isotherm yields the values of β = -0.003741±0.000321 kJ 2 x mole -2 , X m = 0.23±0.21 μmole x g -1 and of E = 11.6±0.5 kJ x mole -1 . The influence of common anions and cations on the sorption was examined. Trivalent Bi enhances the sorption whereas Fe, Cr, Al and chromate ions reduce the sorption significantly. Hf(IV) and Ag(I) indicate substantial sorption (61-98%) whereas Gd(III), Re(VII) and Sc(III) show low sorption (<5%). The elements having low sorption can be separated from elements indicating higher sorption using Haro river sand column. (author)

  11. Retention of silica nanoparticles on calcium carbonate sands immersed in electrolyte solutions

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Yan Vivian; Cathles, Lawrence M.

    2014-01-01

    solution. AFM measurements on calcite immersed in NaCl solutions show the initial repulsion of a silica colloidal probe as the surface is approached is reduced as the solution ionic strength increases, and that at high ionic strengths it disappears entirely

  12. Mathematical modeling of solute transport in the subsurface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naymik, T.G.

    1987-01-01

    A review of key works on solute transport models indicates that solute transport processes with the exception of advection are still poorly understood. Solute transport models generally do a good job when they are used to test scientific concepts and hypotheses, investigate natural processes, systematically store and manage data, and simulate mass balance of solutes under certain natural conditions. Solute transport models generally are not good for predicting future conditions with a high degree of certainty, or for determining concentrations precisely. The mathematical treatment of solute transport far surpasses their understanding of the process. Investigations of the extent of groundwater contamination and methods to remedy existing problems show the along-term nature of the hazard. Industrial organic compounds may be immiscible in water, highly volatile, or complexed with inorganic as well as other organic compounds; many remain stable in nature almost indefinitely. In the worst case, future disposal of hazardous waste may be restricted to deep burial, as is proposed for radioactive wastes. For investigations pertinent to transport of radionuclides from a geologic repository, the process cannot be fully understood without adequate thermodynamic and kinetic data bases

  13. An Outflow Event on the Left Side of Harvey: Erosion of Barrier Sand and Seaward Transport Through Aransas Pass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goff, J.; Swartz, J. M.; Gulick, S. P. S.

    2017-12-01

    Barrier islands provide critical support and protection for coastal communities and ecosystems, but are potentially vulnerable to net losses of sand during major storms. Evidence from satellite imagery, ground observations and tide stations indicates that Hurricane Harvey in 2017 caused a large outflow event of waters moving from the bays out towards the sea in the Port Aransas, Texas region. Rather than just an ebb of a storm surge, this event may have been driven by seaward-directed winds on the left side of storm. Less than a month after landfall, we conducted a swath mapping and sampling survey in Lydia Ann Channel and Aransas Pass, where we had earlier mapped in 2009 and 2012 as part of the UT marine geology and geophysical field course. These waterways are important conduits linking Corpus Christi and Aransas bays to the Gulf of Mexico. This multi-year record allows us to gauge the impact of the outflow event on these waterways in the context of "normal" coastal processes. Both satellite imagery and sonar mapping reveal that the outflow event caused significant erosion, both on land and beneath the water, along the edges of Lydia Ann Channel and Corpus Christi ship channel. It also caused seaward-directed flow and erosion through breaches in the foredunes along southern San Jose Island, from waters that overtopped Lydia Ann Channel. Much of the sand that was transported seaward settled in Lydia Ann Channel and Aransas Pass (up to 6.5 m accumulation), possibly during the waning stages of the event. However, a likely large (but unknown) quantity of barrier and estuarine sand could have been transported well out to sea, beyond the jetties, at the peak of the event. If so, it would have resulted in a net loss of sand from the barrier island system.

  14. Solute transport across the articular surface of injured cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Hooi Chuan; Moeini, Mohammad; Quinn, Thomas M

    2013-07-15

    Solute transport through extracellular matrix (ECM) is important to physiology and contrast agent-based clinical imaging of articular cartilage. Mechanical injury is likely to have important effects on solute transport since it involves alteration of ECM structure. Therefore it is of interest to characterize effects of mechanical injury on solute transport in cartilage. Using cartilage explants injured by an established mechanical compression protocol, effective partition coefficients and diffusivities of solutes for transport across the articular surface were measured. A range of fluorescent solutes (fluorescein isothiocyanate, 4 and 40kDa dextrans, insulin, and chondroitin sulfate) and an X-ray contrast agent (sodium iodide) were used. Mechanical injury was associated with a significant increase in effective diffusivity versus uninjured explants for all solutes studied. On the other hand, mechanical injury had no effects on effective partition coefficients for most solutes tested, except for 40kDa dextran and chondroitin sulfate where small but significant changes in effective partition coefficient were observed in injured explants. Findings highlight enhanced diffusive transport across the articular surface of injured cartilage, which may have important implications for injury and repair situations. Results also support development of non-equilibrium methods for identification of focal cartilage lesions by contrast agent-based clinical imaging. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. dispersion equation parameters of solute transport in agricultural

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-08-31

    Aug 31, 2011 ... fields for predicting soil quality property. Key words: ... The classical approach of modeling solute transport in porous media uses the deterministic ... concentration of the solution in the liquid phase, u0 is the mean velocity and ...

  16. Temporal moment analysis of solute transport in a coupled fracture ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    by considering an inlet boundary condition of constant continuous source in a single fracture. The effect of various fracture-skin parameters like porosity, thickness and ... Study on fluid flow and transport of solute through fractures has been an .... of solutes is happening normal to the direction of flow due to the free molecular.

  17. Colloid transport in porous media: impact of hyper-saline solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magal, Einat; Weisbrod, Noam; Yechieli, Yoseph; Walker, Sharon L; Yakirevich, Alexander

    2011-05-01

    The transport of colloids suspended in natural saline solutions with a wide range of ionic strengths, up to that of Dead Sea brines (10(0.9) M) was explored. Migration of microspheres through saturated sand columns of different sizes was studied in laboratory experiments and simulated with mathematical models. Colloid transport was found to be related to the solution salinity as expected. The relative concentration of colloids at the columns outlet decreased (after 2-3 pore volumes) as the solution ionic strength increased until a critical value was reached (ionic strength > 10(-1.8) M) and then remained constant above this level of salinity. The colloids were found to be mobile even in the extremely saline brines of the Dead Sea. At such high ionic strength no energetic barrier to colloid attachment was presumed to exist and colloid deposition was expected to be a favorable process. However, even at these salinity levels, colloid attachment was not complete and the transport of ∼ 30% of the colloids through the 30-cm long columns was detected. To further explore the deposition of colloids on sand surfaces in Dead Sea brines, transport was studied using 7-cm long columns through which hundreds of pore volumes were introduced. The resulting breakthrough curves exhibited a bimodal shape whereby the relative concentration (C/C(0)) of colloids at the outlet rose to a value of 0.8, and it remained relatively constant (for the ∼ 18 pore volumes during which the colloid suspension was flushed through the column) and then the relative concentration increased to a value of one. The bimodal nature of the breakthrough suggests different rates of colloid attachment. Colloid transport processes were successfully modeled using the limited entrapment model, which assumes that the colloid attachment rate is dependent on the concentration of the attached colloids. Application of this model provided confirmation of the colloid aggregation and their accelerated attachment during

  18. Transport of titanium dioxide nanoparticles in saturated porous media under various solution chemistry conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yu; Gao Bin; Morales, Verónica L.; Tian Yuan; Wu Lei; Gao Jie; Bai Wei; Yang Liuyan

    2012-01-01

    Because of its wide applications, nanosized titanium dioxide may become a potential environmental risk to soil and groundwater system. It is therefore important to improve current understanding of the environmental fate and transport of titanium oxides nanoparticles (TONPs). In this work, the effect of solution chemistry (i.e., pH, ionic strength, and natural organic matter (NOM) concentration) on the deposition and transport of TONPs in saturated porous media was examined in detail. Laboratory columns packed with acid-cleaned quartz sand were used in the experiment as porous media. Transport experiments were conducted with various chemistry combinations, including four ionic strengths, three pH levels, and two NOM concentrations. The results showed that TONP mobility increased with increasing solution pH, but decreased with increasing solution ionic strength. It is also found that the presence of NOM in the system enhanced the mobility of TONPs in the saturated porous media. The Derjaguin–Landau–Verwey–Overbeek (DLVO) theory was used to justify the mobility trends observed in the experimental data. Predictions from the theory agreed excellently with the experimental data.

  19. Solutes transport in unsaturated double-porosity medium. Modelling by homogenization and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran Ngoc, T.D.

    2008-07-01

    This Ph.D thesis presents the development of the solute transport models in unsaturated double-porosity medium, by using the asymptotic homogenization method. The obtained macroscopic models concern diffusion, diffusion-convection and dispersion-convection, according to the transport regime which is characterized by the non-dimensional numbers. The models consist of two coupled equations that show the local non-equilibrium of concentrations. The double-porosity transport models were numerically implemented using the code COMSOL Multiphysics (finite elements method), and compared with the solution of the same problem at the fine scale. The implementation allows solving the coupled equations in the macro- and micro-porosity domains (two-scale computations). The calculations of the dispersion tensor as a solution of the local boundary value problems, were also conducted. It was shown that the dispersivity depends on the saturation, the physical properties of the macro-porosity domain and the internal structure of the double-porosity medium. Finally, two series of experiments were performed on a physical model of double-porosity that is composed of a periodic assemblage of sintered clay spheres in Hostun sand HN38. The first experiment was a drainage experiment, which was conducted in order to validate the unsaturated flow model. The second series was a dispersion experiment in permanent unsaturated water flow condition (water content measured by gamma ray attenuation technique). A good agreement between the numerical simulations and the experimental observations allows the validation of the developed models. (author)

  20. Sustainable freight transport in South Africa:Domestic intermodal solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan H. Havenga

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Due to the rapid deregulation of freight transport in South Africa two decades ago, and low historical investment in rail (with resultant poor service delivery, an integrated alternative to road and rail competition was never developed. High national freight logistics costs, significant road infrastructure challenges and environmental impact concerns of a road-dominated freight transport market have, however, fuelled renewed interest in intermodal transport solutions. In this article, a high-level business case for domestic intermodal solutions in South Africa is presented. The results demonstrate that building three intermodal terminals to connect the three major industrial hubs (i.e. Gauteng, Durban and Cape Town through an intermodal solution could reduce transport costs (including externalities for the identified 11.5 million tons of intermodalfriendly freight flows on the Cape and Natal corridors by 42% (including externalities.

  1. Determination of chemical solute transport parameters effecting radiostrontium interbed sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hemming, C.; Bunde, R.L.; Rosentreter, J.J.

    1993-01-01

    The extent to which radionuclides migrate in an aquifer system is a function of various physical, chemical, and biological processes. A measure of this migration rate is of primary concern when locating suitable storage sites for such species. Parameters including water-rock interactions, infiltration rates, chemical phase modification, and biochemical reactions all affect solute transport. While these different types of chemical reactions can influence solute transport in subsurface waters, distribution coefficients (Kd) can be send to effectively summarize the net chemical factors which dictate transport efficiency. This coefficient describes the partitioning of the solute between the solution and solid phase. Methodology used in determining and interpreting the distribution coefficient for radiostrontium in well characterized sediments will be presented

  2. Heterogeneity of Rapid Sand Filters and Its Effect on Contaminant Transport and Nitrification Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lopato, Laure Rose; Galaj, Zofia; Delpont, Sébastien

    2011-01-01

    Laboratory and full-scale experiments were conducted to investigate the development and effect of heterogeneity caused by filter media nonuniformity, biofilm, particles, precipitates, and gas bubbles in rapid sand filters used for drinking-water treatment. Salt tracer experiments were conducted...

  3. Assessment of existing sediment transport models for sand barrier dynamics under wave and currents

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Thuy, T.T.V.; Nghiem, L.T.; Jayakumar, S.; Nielsen, P.

    The paper summarizes morphology changes over rippled sand barriers under wave and wave combined current of 27 laboratorial experiments. Data of 4 wave conditions (H=10cm, T=1s; H=12cm, T=1s; H=12cm, T=1.5s; H=14cm, T=1.5s) and 6 currents (Q= 10, -10...

  4. Regional transport of a chemically distinctive dust: Gypsum from White Sands, New Mexico (USA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Warren H.; Hyslop, Nicole P.; Trzepla, Krystyna; Yatkin, Sinan; Rarig, Randy S.; Gill, Thomas E.; Jin, Lixin

    2015-03-01

    The White Sands complex, a National Monument and adjoining Missile Range in southern New Mexico, occupies the dry bed of an ice-age lake where an active gypsum dunefield abuts erodible playa sediments. Aerosols entrained from White Sands are sometimes visible on satellite images as distinct, light-colored plumes crossing the Sacramento Mountains to the east and northeast. The IMPROVE network (Interagency Monitoring of PROtected Visual Environments) operates long-term aerosol samplers at two sites east of the Sacramento range. In recent years a spring pulse of sulfate aerosol has appeared at these sites, eclipsing the regional summer peak resulting from atmospheric reactions of sulfur dioxide emissions. A significant fraction of this spring sulfate is contributed by gypsum and other salts from White Sands, with much of the sulfur in coarse particles and concentrations of calcium and strontium above regional levels. The increase in these gypsiferous species coincides with a drought following a period of above-average precipitation. White Sands and the IMPROVE samplers together provide a natural laboratory: a climatically sensitive dust source that is both well characterized and chemically distinct from its surroundings, with a signature that remains identifiable at long-term observatories 100-200 km downwind.

  5. Meeting the challenge - solutions for managing oil sands tailings: report of the fine tailings fundamentals consortium 1989-1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The development and demonstration of effective alternatives for the management of fine tailings in the oil sands industry were discussed in a report describing the work of the Fine Tailings Fundamentals Consortium during the period from 1989 to 1995. The final report of the Consortium is a four-volume publication entitled 'Advances in Oil Sands Tailings Research' which is the state-of-the-art reference to key issues in the reclamation of fine tailings. Government regulations now make it the responsibility of industry to integrate the fine tailings into reclaimed landscapes, so that the final landscape is equal in productive capability to the pre-disturbed state. Impressive progress has been made in understanding the formation of fine tailings and in characterizing their properties, much of it through the work of this Consortium. Fundamental research on the clay particles within fine tailings provides a better understanding of how to manage them. Although there is no 'magic bullet', research has demonstrated that an integrated approach incorporating fine tailings with a variety of elements, uplands, lakes and wetlands, offer the best hope for an environmentally sound solution. figs

  6. Chemical mass transport between fluid fine tailings and the overlying water cover of an oil sands end pit lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dompierre, Kathryn A.; Barbour, S. Lee; North, Rebecca L.; Carey, Sean K.; Lindsay, Matthew B. J.

    2017-06-01

    Fluid fine tailings (FFT) are a principal by-product of the bitumen extraction process at oil sands mines. Base Mine Lake (BML)—the first full-scale demonstration oil sands end pit lake (EPL)—contains approximately 1.9 × 108 m3 of FFT stored under a water cover within a decommissioned mine pit. Chemical mass transfer from the FFT to the water cover can occur via two key processes: (1) advection-dispersion driven by tailings settlement; and (2) FFT disturbance due to fluid movement in the water cover. Dissolved chloride (Cl) was used to evaluate the water cover mass balance and to track mass transport within the underlying FFT based on field sampling and numerical modeling. Results indicated that FFT was the dominant Cl source to the water cover and that the FFT is exhibiting a transient advection-dispersion mass transport regime with intermittent disturbance near the FFT-water interface. The advective pore water flux was estimated by the mass balance to be 0.002 m3 m-2 d-1, which represents 0.73 m of FFT settlement per year. However, the FFT pore water Cl concentrations and corresponding mass transport simulations indicated that advection rates and disturbance depths vary between sample locations. The disturbance depth was estimated to vary with location between 0.75 and 0.95 m. This investigation provides valuable insight for assessing the geochemical evolution of the water cover and performance of EPLs as an oil sands reclamation strategy.

  7. Sensitivity of growth characteristics of tidal sand ridges and long bed waves to formulations of bed shear stress, sand transport and tidal forcing : A numerical model study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yuan, Bing; de Swart, Huib E.; Panadès, Carles

    2016-01-01

    Tidal sand ridges and long bed waves are large-scale bedforms that are observed on continental shelves. They differ in their wavelength and in their orientation with respect to the principal direction of tidal currents. Previous studies indicate that tidal sand ridges appear in areas where tidal

  8. Modeling solute transport in a heterogeneous unsaturated porous medium under dynamic boundary conditions on different spatial scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremer, Clemens; Neuweiler, Insa; Bechtold, Michel

    2013-04-01

    Understanding transport of solutes/contaminants through unsaturated soil in the shallow subsurface is vital to assess groundwater quality, nutrient cycling or to plan remediation projects. Alternating precipitation and evaporation conditions causing upward and downward flux with differing flow paths, changes in saturation and related structural heterogeneity make the description of transport in the unsaturated zone near the soil-surface a complex problem. Preferential flow paths strongly depend, among other things, on the saturation of a medium. Recent studies (e.g. Bechtold et al., 2011) showed lateral flow and solute transport during evaporation conditions (upward flux) in vertically layered sand columns. Results revealed that during evaporation water and solute are redistributed laterally from coarse to fine media deeper in the soil, and towards zones of lowest hydraulic head near to the soil surface. These zones at the surface can be coarse or fine grained depending on saturation status and evaporation flux. However, if boundary conditions are reversed and precipitation is applied, the flow field is not reversed in the same manner, resulting in entirely different transport patterns for downward and upward flow. Therefore, considering net-flow rates alone is misleading when describing transport in the shallow unsaturated zone. In this contribution, we analyze transport of a solute in the shallow subsurface to assess effects resulting from the superposition of heterogeneous soil structures and dynamic flow conditions on various spatial scales. Two-dimensional numerical simulations of unsaturated flow and transport in heterogeneous porous media under changing boundary conditions are carried out using a finite-volume code coupled to a particle tracking algorithm to quantify solute transport and leaching rates. In order to validate numerical simulations, results are qualitatively compared to those of a physical experiment (Bechtold et al., 2011). Numerical

  9. Semianalytical Solutions of Radioactive or Reactive Transport in Variably-Fractured Layered Media: 1. Solutes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George J. Moridis

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, semianalytical solutions are developed for the problem of transport of radioactive or reactive solute tracers through a layered system of heterogeneous fractured media with misaligned fractures. The tracer transport equations in the non-flowing matrix account for (a) diffusion, (b) surface diffusion, (c) mass transfer between the mobile and immobile water fractions, (d) linear kinetic or equilibrium physical, chemical, or combined solute sorption or colloid filtration, and (e) radioactive decay or first-order chemical reactions. The tracer-transport equations in the fractures account for the same processes, in addition to advection and hydrodynamic dispersion. Any number of radioactive decay daughter products (or products of a linear, first-order reaction chain) can be tracked. The solutions, which are analytical in the Laplace space, are numerically inverted to provide the solution in time and can accommodate any number of fractured and/or porous layers. The solutions are verified using analytical solutions for limiting cases of solute and colloid transport through fractured and porous media. The effect of important parameters on the transport of 3 H, 237 Np and 239 Pu (and its daughters) is investigated in several test problems involving layered geological systems of varying complexity

  10. Quantifying the effects of European beach grass on aeolian sand transport over the last century: Bodega Marine Reserve, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesmat, R.; Werner, S.; Smith, M. E.; Riedel, T.; Best, R.; Olyarnik, S.

    2012-12-01

    Introduction of European beach grass (Ammophila arenaria) to coastal dune systems of western North America induced significant changes to the transport and storage of sediment, and consequently the nesting habitat of the western snowy plover (Charadrius alexandrinus nivosus). At the Bodega Marine Reserve and Sonoma Coast State Park, Ammophila was introduced within the ~0.5 km2 dune area in the 1920's to limit the flux of sand through Bodega Harbor and agricultural land. To assess the potential impact of restoration efforts (Ammophila removal) on aeolian sediment flux, we measured sediment flux as a function of wind speeds and ground cover, and used these measurements to parameterize a spatial model for historical sand deposition Fine- to coarse-grained lithic to sub-lithic sand is delivered to the Bodega dune system from Salmon Creek beach, the down-shore terminus of a littoral system fed by the 3846 km2 Russian River catchment, several small (Gaffney ridge) at the edge of the planted region. An average accumulation rate of ~4,000 m3/yr is indicated within the study swath by the preserved sediment volumes. Within the modern dune system, unvegetated areas exhibit 2-3 meter wavelength, ~1/2 meter amplitude mega-ripples, and the uppermost 2-10 cm consists of coarse-sand to granule-sized armor layer. In contrast, grain-sizes in vegetated areas are largely vertically homogenous. Open areas are typically 2-8 meters lower than adjacent vegetated areas, and show evidence for net lowering of the land surface (i.e., exposed fence posts, roots). Conversely, vegetated areas appear prone to sediment accumulation, particularly downwind of unvegetated areas. We measured sand transport using 0.5 m high traps deployed at 18 sites throughout the dune field, and used a linear mixed effects model to predict transport rate as a function of wind and ground cover class, taking into account random effects of sampling date and repeated measurements at each site. The analysis indicates up

  11. End-Member Formulation of Solid Solutions and Reactive Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lichtner, Peter C. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-09-01

    A model for incorporating solid solutions into reactive transport equations is presented based on an end-member representation. Reactive transport equations are solved directly for the composition and bulk concentration of the solid solution. Reactions of a solid solution with an aqueous solution are formulated in terms of an overall stoichiometric reaction corresponding to a time-varying composition and exchange reactions, equivalent to reaction end-members. Reaction rates are treated kinetically using a transition state rate law for the overall reaction and a pseudo-kinetic rate law for exchange reactions. The composition of the solid solution at the onset of precipitation is assumed to correspond to the least soluble composition, equivalent to the composition at equilibrium. The stoichiometric saturation determines if the solid solution is super-saturated with respect to the aqueous solution. The method is implemented for a simple prototype batch reactor using Mathematica for a binary solid solution. Finally, the sensitivity of the results on the kinetic rate constant for a binary solid solution is investigated for reaction of an initially stoichiometric solid phase with an undersaturated aqueous solution.

  12. Coupling between solute transport and chemical reactions models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samper, J.; Ajora, C.

    1993-01-01

    During subsurface transport, reactive solutes are subject to a variety of hydrodynamic and chemical processes. The major hydrodynamic processes include advection and convection, dispersion and diffusion. The key chemical processes are complexation including hydrolysis and acid-base reactions, dissolution-precipitation, reduction-oxidation, adsorption and ion exchange. The combined effects of all these processes on solute transport must satisfy the principle of conservation of mass. The statement of conservation of mass for N mobile species leads to N partial differential equations. Traditional solute transport models often incorporate the effects of hydrodynamic processes rigorously but oversimplify chemical interactions among aqueous species. Sophisticated chemical equilibrium models, on the other hand, incorporate a variety of chemical processes but generally assume no-flow systems. In the past decade, coupled models accounting for complex hydrological and chemical processes, with varying degrees of sophistication, have been developed. The existing models of reactive transport employ two basic sets of equations. The transport of solutes is described by a set of partial differential equations, and the chemical processes, under the assumption of equilibrium, are described by a set of nonlinear algebraic equations. An important consideration in any approach is the choice of primary dependent variables. Most existing models cannot account for the complete set of chemical processes, cannot be easily extended to include mixed chemical equilibria and kinetics, and cannot handle practical two and three dimensional problems. The difficulties arise mainly from improper selection of the primary variables in the transport equations. (Author) 38 refs

  13. Fluid transport with time on peritoneal dialysis: the contribution of free water transport and solute coupled water transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coester, Annemieke M.; Smit, Watske; Struijk, Dirk G.; Krediet, Raymond T.

    2009-01-01

    Ultrafiltration in peritoneal dialysis occurs through endothelial water channels (free water transport) and together with solutes across small pores: solute coupled water transport. A review is given of cross-sectional studies and on the results of longitudinal follow-up

  14. Phase transition behavior of sediment transport at the sand-mud interface, across scales from flumes to the large rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, H.; Nittrouer, J. A.; Wu, B.; Zhang, Y.; Mohrig, D. C.; Lamb, M. P.; Wang, Y.; Fu, X.; Moodie, A. J.; Naito, K.; Parker, G.

    2017-12-01

    Sediment dispersal and deposition creates deltaic landscapes, establishes coastlines, and produces fertile floodplains, all of which serve as critical landforms inhabited by a large proportion of humankind. If poorly managed, sediment loads in these environments can elevate and clog channels, thereby enhancing hazards such as severe flooding. Predictive descriptions of sediment loads, however, are not well constrained, especially for fine-grained (silt and very-fine sand) dispersal systems, which often include river deltas and coastlines. Here, we show efforts to collect and analyze an extensive sediment load database for fine-grained channels, spanning from small flume experiments to large rivers, in order to evaluate the nature of sediment flux. Our analyses determined that sediment transport exhibits two distinct transport phases, separated by a discontinuous transition, whereby sediment flux differs by one to two orders of magnitude. It is determined that the transition responds to the bed material grain size, and we propose a phase diagram based on this metric alone. These findings help elucidate why previous theories of sediment transport at the sand-silt interface, which are typically continuous, are not able to give satisfactory predictions across different scales and environments. Our work serves to help evaluate anthropic influences on rivers, deltas, and coastlines, and can be applied to better constrain sediment flux of paleo-fluvial systems found on Earth and Mars. For example, in situ measurements of sediment flux for the silty-sandy bed of the lower Yellow River, China, validate the aforementioned phase transition behavior, and illustrate that the channel resides near the transition of high to low efficiency transport modes. Recent dam construction and resulting downstream coarsening of the bed via armoring, however, might lead to the unintended consequence of enhancing flood risk by driving the system to a low efficiency transport mode with high

  15. Study of reactive solutes transport and PAH migration in unsaturated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gujisaite, V.; Simonnot, M.O.; Gujisaite, V.; Morel, J.L.; Ouvrard, S.; Simonnot, M.O.; Gaudet, J.P.

    2005-01-01

    -silty uncontaminated soil or a sand and a model porous medium constituted of sand in which coal tar particles are dispersed. In a second time, column experiments will be carried out with a PAH contaminated soil from a former coking plant and with a multi-polluted industrial soil (PAH, heavy metals) to study PAH migration. For each studied soil, we will also determine the water retention curve in order to find the best operating conditions for our experiments with unsaturated flow. Modelling of solutes transfer in soils is also needed to improve understanding of the fate of contaminants and for risk assessment. However, it is difficult to take into account at the same time flow and interactions in models. Different models and numerical codes have been developed for solute transport. We have chosen to use the CXTFIT code, in order to model our results. This code allows indeed modelling of reactive solute transport in unsaturated porous media as well as under saturated conditions. It is usually used to estimate solute transport parameters using a nonlinear least-squares parameter optimization method. It may be used to solve the inverse problem by fitting a variety of mathematical solutions of theoretical transport models, based upon the one-dimensional convection-dispersion equation (CDE), to experimental results. The program may also be used to solve the direct or forward problem to determine concentrations as a function of time and/or position. This study at a bench scale will enable us at first to develop a methodology under unsaturated conditions and also to better understand the dominating mechanisms which control PAH transfer and availability in natural soils, especially by quantifying the impact of parameters like soil water content, water flow or the presence of plants. This is a first step before the change of scale (lysimeter). Modelling of the observed processes will also enable us to predict long term fate of PAH in soils

  16. Field testing, comparison, and discussion of five aeolian sand transport measuring devices operating on different measuring principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goossens, Dirk; Nolet, Corjan; Etyemezian, Vicken; Duarte-Campos, Leonardo; Bakker, Gerben; Riksen, Michel

    2018-06-01

    Five types of sediment samplers designed to measure aeolian sand transport were tested during a wind erosion event on the Sand Motor, an area on the west coast of the Netherlands prone to severe wind erosion. Each of the samplers operates on a different principle. The MWAC (Modified Wilson And Cooke) is a passive segmented trap. The modified Leatherman sampler is a passive vertically integrating trap. The Saltiphone is an acoustic sampler that registers grain impacts on a microphone. The Wenglor sampler is an optical sensor that detects particles as they pass through a laser beam. The SANTRI (Standalone AeoliaN Transport Real-time Instrument) detects particles travelling through an infrared beam, but in different channels each associated with a particular grain size spectrum. A procedure is presented to transform the data output, which is different for each sampler, to a common standard so that the samplers can be objectively compared and their relative efficiency calculated. Results show that the efficiency of the samplers is comparable despite the differences in operating principle and the instrumental and environmental uncertainties associated to working with particle samplers in field conditions. The ability of the samplers to register the temporal evolution of a wind erosion event is investigated. The strengths and weaknesses of the samplers are discussed. Some problems inherent to optical sensors are looked at in more detail. Finally, suggestions are made for further improvement of the samplers.

  17. Mimicking Retention and Transport of Rotavirus and Adenovirus in Sand Media Using DNA-labeled, Protein-coated Silica Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Liping; Farkas, Kata; Bennett, Grant; Varsani, Arvind; Easingwood, Richard; Tilley, Richard; Nowostawska, Urszula; Lin, Susan

    2014-05-01

    Rotavirus (RoV) and adenovirus (AdV) are important viral pathogens for the risk analysis of drinking water. Despite this, little is known about their retention and transport behaviors in porous media (e.g. sand filtered used for water treatment and groundwater aquifers due to a lack of representative surrogates. In this study, we developed RoV and AdV surrogates by covalently coating 70-nm sized silica nanoparticles with specific proteins and a DNA marker for sensitive detection. Filtration experiments using beach sand columns demonstrated the similarity of the surrogates' concentrations, attachment, and filtration efficiencies to the target viruses. The surrogates showed the same magnitude of concentration reduction as the viruses. Conversely, MS2 phage (a traditional virus model) over predicted concentrations of AdV and RoV by 1- and 2-orders of magnitude, respectively. The surrogates remained stable in size, surface charge and DNA concentration for at least one year. They can be easily and rapidly detected at concentrations down to one particle per PCR reaction and are readily detectable in natural waters and even in effluent. With up-scaling validation in pilot trials, the surrogates can be a useful cost-effective new tool for studying virus retention and transport in porous media, e.g. for assessing filter efficiency in water and wastewater treatment, tracking virus migration in groundwater after effluent land disposal, and establishing safe setback distances for groundwater protection.

  18. Analytical solution to the hybrid diffusion-transport equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanneh, M.M.; Williams, M.M.R.

    1986-01-01

    A special integral equation was derived in previous work using a hybrid diffusion-transport theory method for calculating the flux distribution in slab lattices. In this paper an analytical solution of this equation has been carried out on a finite reactor lattice. The analytical results of disadvantage factors are shown to be accurate in comparison with the numerical results and accurate transport theory calculations. (author)

  19. Numerical investigations of solute transport in bimodal porous media under dynamic boundary conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremer, Clemens; Neuweiler, Insa; Bechtold, Michel; Vanderborght, Jan

    2016-04-01

    Quantification of flow and solute transport in the shallow subsurface adjacent to the atmosphere is decisive to prevent groundwater pollution and conserve groundwater quality, to develop successful remediation strategies and to understand nutrient cycling. In nature, due to erratic precipitation-evaporation patterns, soil moisture content and related hydraulic conductivity in the vadose zone are not only variable in space but also in time. Flow directions and flow paths locally change between precipitation and evaporation periods. This makes the identification and description of solute transport processes in the vadose zone a complex problem. Recent studies (Lehmann and Or, 2009; Bechtold et al., 2011a) focused on the investigation of upward transport of solutes during evaporation in heterogeneous soil columns, where heterogeneity was introduced by a sharp vertical material interface between two types of sand. Lateral solute transport through the interface in both (lateral) directions was observed at different depths of the investigated soil columns. Following recent approaches, we conduct two-dimensional numerical simulations in a similar setup which is composed of two sands with a sharp vertical material interface. The investigation is broadened from the sole evaporation to combined precipitation-evaporation cycles in order to quantify transport processes resulting from the combined effects of heterogeneous soil structure and dynamic flow conditions. Simulations are performed with a coupled finite volume and random walk particle tracking algorithm (Ippisch et al., 2006; Bechtold et al., 2011b). By comparing scenarios with cyclic boundary conditions and stationary counterparts with the same net flow rate, we found that duration and intensity of precipitation and evaporation periods potentially have an influence on lateral redistribution of solutes and thus leaching rates. Whether or not dynamic boundary conditions lead to significant deviations in the transport

  20. Composite Transport Model and Water and Solute Transport across Plant Roots: An Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yangmin X. Kim

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The present review examines recent experimental findings in root transport phenomena in terms of the composite transport model (CTM. It has been a well-accepted conceptual model to explain the complex water and solute flows across the root that has been related to the composite anatomical structure. There are three parallel pathways involved in the transport of water and solutes in roots – apoplast, symplast, and transcellular paths. The role of aquaporins (AQPs, which facilitate water flows through the transcellular path, and root apoplast is examined in terms of the CTM. The contribution of the plasma membrane bound AQPs for the overall water transport in the whole plant level was varying depending on the plant species, age of roots with varying developmental stages of apoplastic barriers, and driving forces (hydrostatic vs. osmotic. Many studies have demonstrated that the apoplastic barriers, such as Casparian bands in the primary anticlinal walls and suberin lamellae in the secondary cell walls, in the endo- and exodermis are not perfect barriers and unable to completely block the transport of water and some solute transport into the stele. Recent research on water and solute transport of roots with and without exodermis triggered the importance of the extension of conventional CTM adding resistances that arrange in series (epidermis, exodermis, mid-cortex, endodermis, and pericycle. The extension of the model may answer current questions about the applicability of CTM for composite water and solute transport of roots that contain complex anatomical structures with heterogeneous cell layers.

  1. Composite Transport Model and Water and Solute Transport across Plant Roots: An Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yangmin X; Ranathunge, Kosala; Lee, Seulbi; Lee, Yejin; Lee, Deogbae; Sung, Jwakyung

    2018-01-01

    The present review examines recent experimental findings in root transport phenomena in terms of the composite transport model (CTM). It has been a well-accepted conceptual model to explain the complex water and solute flows across the root that has been related to the composite anatomical structure. There are three parallel pathways involved in the transport of water and solutes in roots - apoplast, symplast, and transcellular paths. The role of aquaporins (AQPs), which facilitate water flows through the transcellular path, and root apoplast is examined in terms of the CTM. The contribution of the plasma membrane bound AQPs for the overall water transport in the whole plant level was varying depending on the plant species, age of roots with varying developmental stages of apoplastic barriers, and driving forces (hydrostatic vs. osmotic). Many studies have demonstrated that the apoplastic barriers, such as Casparian bands in the primary anticlinal walls and suberin lamellae in the secondary cell walls, in the endo- and exodermis are not perfect barriers and unable to completely block the transport of water and some solute transport into the stele. Recent research on water and solute transport of roots with and without exodermis triggered the importance of the extension of conventional CTM adding resistances that arrange in series (epidermis, exodermis, mid-cortex, endodermis, and pericycle). The extension of the model may answer current questions about the applicability of CTM for composite water and solute transport of roots that contain complex anatomical structures with heterogeneous cell layers.

  2. Nonrelativistic grey Sn-transport radiative-shock solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferguson, J. M.; Morel, J. E.; Lowrie, R. B.

    2017-01-01

    We present semi-analytic radiative-shock solutions in which grey Sn-transport is used to model the radiation, and we include both constant cross sections and cross sections that depend on temperature and density. These new solutions solve for a variable Eddington factor (VEF) across the shock domain, which allows for interesting physics not seen before in radiative-shock solutions. Comparisons are made with the grey nonequilibrium-diffusion radiative-shock solutions of Lowrie and Edwards [1], which assumed that the Eddington factor is constant across the shock domain. It is our experience that the local Mach number is monotonic when producing nonequilibrium-diffusion solutions, but that this monotonicity may disappear while integrating the precursor region to produce Sn-transport solutions. For temperature- and density-dependent cross sections we show evidence of a spike in the VEF in the far upstream portion of the radiative-shock precursor. We show evidence of an adaptation zone in the precursor region, adjacent to the embedded hydrodynamic shock, as conjectured by Drake [2, 3], and also confirm his expectation that the precursor temperatures adjacent to the Zel’dovich spike take values that are greater than the downstream post-shock equilibrium temperature. We also show evidence that the radiation energy density can be nonmonotonic under the Zel’dovich spike, which is indicative of anti-diffusive radiation flow as predicted by McClarren and Drake [4]. We compare the angle dependence of the radiation flow for the Sn-transport and nonequilibriumdiffusion radiation solutions, and show that there are considerable differences in the radiation flow between these models across the shock structure. Lastly, we analyze the radiation flow to understand the cause of the adaptation zone, as well as the structure of the Sn-transport radiation-intensity solutions across the shock structure.

  3. New numerical method for solving the solute transport equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, B.; Koplik, C.M.

    1978-01-01

    The solute transport equation can be solved numerically by approximating the water flow field by a network of stream tubes and using a Green's function solution within each stream tube. Compared to previous methods, this approach permits greater computational efficiency and easier representation of small discontinuities, and the results are easier to interpret physically. The method has been used to study hypothetical sites for disposal of high-level radioactive waste

  4. Efficient solution of a multi objective fuzzy transportation problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidhya, V.; Ganesan, K.

    2018-04-01

    In this paper we present a methodology for the solution of multi-objective fuzzy transportation problem when all the cost and time coefficients are trapezoidal fuzzy numbers and the supply and demand are crisp numbers. Using a new fuzzy arithmetic on parametric form of trapezoidal fuzzy numbers and a new ranking method all efficient solutions are obtained. The proposed method is illustrated with an example.

  5. Stable solutions of nonlocal electron heat transport equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, M.K.; Kershaw, D.S.

    1991-01-01

    Electron heat transport equations with a nonlocal heat flux are in general ill-posed and intrinsically unstable, as proved by the present authors [Phys. Fluids B 1, 2430 (1989)]. A straightforward numerical solution of these equations will therefore lead to absurd results. It is shown here that by imposing a minimal set of constraints on the problem it is possible to arrive at a globally stable, consistent, and energy conserving numerical solution

  6. Peritoneal fluid transport in CAPD patients with different transport rates of small solutes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobiecka, Danuta; Waniewski, Jacek; Weryński, Andrzej; Lindholm, Bengt

    2004-01-01

    Continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) patients with high peritoneal solute transport rate often have inadequate peritoneal fluid transport. It is not known whether this inadequate fluid transport is due solely to a too rapid fall of osmotic pressure, or if the decreased effectiveness of fluid transport is also a contributing factor. To analyze fluid transport parameters and the effectiveness of dialysis fluid osmotic pressure in the induction of fluid flow in CAPD patients with different small solute transport rates. 44 CAPD patients were placed in low (n = 6), low-average (n = 13), high-average (n = 19), and high (n = 6) transport groups according to a modified peritoneal equilibration test (PET). The study involved a 6-hour peritoneal dialysis dwell with 2 L 3.86% glucose dialysis fluid for each patient. Radioisotopically labeled serum albumin was added as a volume marker.The fluid transport parameters (osmotic conductance and fluid absorption rate) were estimated using three mathematical models of fluid transport: (1) Pyle model (model P), which describes ultrafiltration rate as an exponential function of time; (2) model OS, which is based on the linear relationship of ultrafiltration rate and overall osmolality gradient between dialysis fluid and blood; and (3) model G, which is based on the linear relationship between ultrafiltration rate and glucose concentration gradient between dialysis fluid and blood. Diffusive mass transport coefficients (K(BD)) for glucose, urea, creatinine, potassium, and sodium were estimated using the modified Babb-Randerson-Farrell model. The high transport group had significantly lower dialysate volume and glucose and osmolality gradients between dialysate and blood, but significantly higher K(BD) for small solutes compared with the other transport groups. Osmotic conductance, fluid absorption rate, and initial ultrafiltration rate did not differ among the transport groups for model OS and model P. Model G yielded

  7. Transport of microbial tracers in clean and organically contaminated silica sand in laboratory columns compared with their transport in the field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weaver, Louise; Sinton, Lester W.; Pang, Liping; Dann, Rod; Close, Murray

    2013-01-01

    Waste disposal on land and the consequent transport of bacterial and viral pathogens in soils and aquifers are of major concern worldwide. Pathogen transport can be enhanced in the presence of organic matter due to occupation of attachment sites in the aquifer materials thus preventing pathogen attachment leading to their faster transport for longer distances. Laboratory column studies were carried out to investigate the effect of organic matter, in the form of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), on the transport of Escherichia coli and MS2 phage in saturated clean silica sand. Transport rates of these microbial tracers were also studied in a contaminated field site. Laboratory column studies showed that low concentrations (0.17 mg L −1 ) of DOC had little effect on E. coli J6-2 removal and slightly reduced the attachment of MS2 phage. After progressive conditioning of the column with DOC (1.7 mg L −1 and 17 mg L −1 ), neither E. coli J6-2 nor MS2 phage showed any attachment and recovery rates increased dramatically (up to 100%). The results suggest that DOC can affect the transport rates of microbial contaminants. For E. coli J6-2 the predominant effect appeared to be an increase in the secondary energy minimum leading to an increase in E. coli attachment initially. However, after 17 mg L −1 DOC conditioning of the silica sand no attachment of E. coli was observed as the DOC took up attachment sites in the porous media. MS2 phage appeared to be affected predominantly by out-competition of binding sites in the clean silica sand and a steady reduction in attachment was observed as the DOC conditioning increased. Field study showed a high removal of both E. coli and MS2 phage, although E. coli was removed at a lower rate than MS2 phage. In the field it is likely that a combination of effects are seen as the aquifer material will be heterogeneous in its surface nanoscale properties, demonstrated by the differing removal of E. coli and MS2 phage compared to the

  8. Green transportation logistics: the quest for win-win solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    measures and speed and route optimization; Sulphur emissions; Lifecycle emissions; Green rail transportation; Green air transportation; Green inland navigation and possible areas for further research. Throughout, the book pursues the goal of “win-win” solutions and analyzes the phenomenon of “push......This book examines the state of the art in green transportation logistics from the perspective of balancing environmental performance in the transportation supply chain while also satisfying traditional economic performance criteria. Part of the book is drawn from the recently completed European...... Union project Super Green, a three-year project intended to promote the development of European freight corridors in an environmentally friendly manner. Additional chapters cover both the methodological base and the application context of green transportation logistics. Individual chapters look...

  9. Solute transport in aggregated and layered porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, S.

    1993-01-01

    This work is a contribution to research in soil physics dealing with solute transport in porous media. The influence of structural inhomogeneities on solute transport is investigated. Detailed experiments at the laboratory scale are used to enlighten distinct processes which cannot be studied separately at field scale. Two main aspects are followed up: (i) to show the influence of aggregation of a porous medium on breakthrough time and spreading of an inert tracer and consequences on the estimation of parameter values of models describing solute transport in aggregated systems, (ii) to investigate the influences on the dispersion process when stratification is perpendicular to the direction of flow. Several concepts of modelling solute transport in soil are discussed. Models based on the convection-dispersion equation (CDE) are emphasized because they are used here to model solute transport experiments conducted with aggregated porous media. Stochastic concepts are introduced to show the limitations of the deterministic CDE approaches. Experiments are done in columns containing two kinds of solid phases and were saturated with water. The solid phases are porous and solid glass beads exhibiting a distinctly unimodal or bimodal pore size distribution. Experimental breakthrough curves (BTCs) are modelled with the CDE, a bicontinuum model with a phenomenological mass transfer rate and a bicontinuum spherical diffusion model. Experiments are also done in columns that are unsaturated containing porous materials that are layered. Flow is made at a steady rate. It is shown that layer boundaries have a severe influence on lateral mixing. They may force streamlines to converge or cause a lateral redistribution of solutes. (author) figs., tabs., 122 refs

  10. Natural silica sand modified by calcium oxide as a new adsorbent for uranyl ions removal from aqueous solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elhefnawy, O.A.; Elabd, A.A. [Nuclear and Radiological Regulatory Authority (NRRA), Cairo (Egypt). Nuclear Safeguards and Physical Protection Dept.

    2017-07-01

    Calcium oxide modified El-Zafarana silica sand (CMZS) was prepared as a new adsorbent for U(VI) removal from aqueous solutions in a series of batch experiments. The new adsorbent CMZS was characterized by different analysis techniques SEM, EDX, XRD, and FTIR. The influence of many parameters on the removal process like; effect of pH, contact time, U(VI) initial concentration and temperature on U(VI) removal were investigated. Kinetic experiments showed that U(VI) removal on CMZS followed pseudo-second-order kinetics model appropriately and the equilibrium data agreed well with the Langmuir isotherm model. Kinetics and isothermal data reveal the chemisorption process of U(VI) on CMZS. The thermodynamic parameters (ΔH {sup circle}, ΔS {sup circle}, ΔG {sup circle}) were evaluated from temperature dependent adsorption data and the U(VI) removal on CMZS was found to be endothermic and spontaneous in nature. U(VI) desorption from CMZS was studied by a simple acid treatment. The results indicate that CMZS is an effective adsorbent for U(VI) from aqueous solutions.

  11. The future of public transport in light of solutions for sustainable transport development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazimierz LEJDA

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper highlights possible directions in the development of sustainable public transport solutions. When appropriately identified and implemented, such solutions can contribute to improved quality of urban life by reducing the adverse effects of transport on human health and the natural environment. The paper also raises questions about implementing pedestrian traffic zones, expanding the level of cycling, and introducing a workable parking policy, congestion charges, electromobility and intelligent systems for road traffic management in conurbations.

  12. Transport-constrained extensions of collision and track length estimators for solutions of radiative transport problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kong, Rong; Spanier, Jerome

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we develop novel extensions of collision and track length estimators for the complete space-angle solutions of radiative transport problems. We derive the relevant equations, prove that our new estimators are unbiased, and compare their performance with that of more conventional estimators. Such comparisons based on numerical solutions of simple one dimensional slab problems indicate the the potential superiority of the new estimators for a wide variety of more general transport problems

  13. Transport and mass exchange processes in sand and gravel aquifers (v.1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moltyaner, G.

    1990-01-01

    The objectives of this conference were to exchange information on promising field measurement techniques used for the characterization of spatial variability of geologic formations and on new methods used for quantifying the effect of spatial variability on groundwater flow and transport of materials; to discuss novel developments in the theory of transport processes and simulation methods; and to present views and opinions on future initiatives and directions in the design of large-scale field tracer experiments and the development of conceptual and mathematical models of transport and mass exchange processes. The 46 papers presented in these proceedings are divided into six sections: field studies of transport processes; groundwater tracers and novel field measurement techniques; promising methods and field measurement techniques for quantifying the effect of geological heterogeneities on groundwater flow and transport; novel developments in the theory of transport processes; numerical modelling of transport and mass exchange processes; and field and modelling studies of mass exchange processes. (L.L.)

  14. Scaling and predicting solute transport processes in streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. González-Pinzón; R. Haggerty; M. Dentz

    2013-01-01

    We investigated scaling of conservative solute transport using temporal moment analysis of 98 tracer experiments (384 breakthrough curves) conducted in 44 streams located on five continents. The experiments span 7 orders of magnitude in discharge (10-3 to 103 m3/s), span 5 orders of magnitude in...

  15. GRRR. The EXPECT groundwater model for transport of solutes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijers R; Sauter FJ; Veling EJM; van Grinsven JJM; Leijnse A; Uffink GJM; MTV; CWM; LBG

    1994-01-01

    In this report the design and first test results are presented of the EXPECT groundwater module for transport of solutes GRRR (GRoundwater source Receptor Relationships). This model is one of the abiotic compartment modules of the EXPECT model. The EXPECT model is a tool for scenario development

  16. Solute transport modelling with the variable temporally dependent ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Pintu Das

    2018-02-07

    Feb 7, 2018 ... in a finite domain with time-dependent sources and dis- tance-dependent dispersivities. Also, existing ... solute transport in multi-layered porous media using gen- eralized integral transform technique with .... methods for solving the fractional reaction-–sub-diffusion equation. To solve numerically the Eqs.

  17. Hyporheic less-mobile porosity and solute transport in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    MahmoodPoorDehkordy, F.; Briggs, M. A.; Day-Lewis, F. D.; Scruggs, C.; Singha, K.; Zarnetske, J. P.; Lane, J. W., Jr.; Bagtzoglou, A. C.

    2017-12-01

    Solute transport and reactive processes are strongly influenced by hydrodynamic exchange with the hyporheic zone. Contaminant transport and redox zonation in the hyporheic zone and near-stream aquifer can be impacted by the exchange between mobile and less-mobile porosity zones in heterogeneous porous media. Less-mobile porosity zones can be created by fine materials with tight pore throats (e.g. clay, organics) and in larger, well-connected pores down gradient of flow obstructions (e.g. sand behind cobbles). Whereas fluid sampling is primarily responsive to the more-mobile domain, tracking solute tracer dynamics by geoelectrical methods provides direct information about both more- and less-mobile zones. During tracer injection through porous media of varied pore connectivity, a lag between fluid and bulk electrical conductivity is observed, creating a hysteresis loop when plotted in conductivity space. Thus, the combination of simultaneous fluid and bulk electrical conductivity measurements enables a much improved quantification of less-mobile solute dynamics compared to traditional fluid-only sampling approaches. We have demonstrated the less-mobile porosity exchange in laboratory-scale column experiments verified by simulation models. The experimental approach has also been applied to streambed sediments in column and reach-scale field experiments and verified using numerical simulation. Properties of the resultant hysteresis loops can be used to estimate exchange parameters of less-mobile porosity. Our integrated approach combining field experiments, laboratory experiments, and numerical modeling provides new insights into the effect of less-mobile porosity on solute transport in the hyporheic zone.

  18. Win-Win transportation solutions price reforms with multiple benefits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litman, T.

    2001-01-01

    Reform strategies in the transportation market, such as the Win-Win Transportation Solutions, can provide several economic, social and environmental benefits. The strategies are cost effective, technically feasible reforms based on market principles which help create a more equitable and efficient transportation system that supports sustainable economic development. The benefits they provide include reduced traffic congestion, road and parking facility savings, consumer savings, equity, safety and environmental protection. They also increase economic productivity. If fully implemented, they could reduce motor vehicle impacts by 15 to 30 per cent and could help achieve the Kyoto emission reduction targets. Examples of Win-Win strategies at the federal level include: (1) removal of subsidies to oil production and internalized costs, and (2) tax exempt employer provided transfer benefits. Examples of Win-Win strategies at the state/provincial level include: (1) distance-based vehicle insurance and registration fees, (2) least-coast transportation planning and funding, (3) revenue-neutral tax shifting, (4) road pricing, (5) reform motor carrier regulations for competition and efficiency, (6) local and regional transportation demand management programs, (7) more efficient land use, (8) more flexible zoning requirements, (9) parking cash out, (10) transportation management associations, (11) location-efficient housing and mortgages, (12) school and campus trip management, (13) car sharing, (14) non-motorized transport improvements, and (15) traffic calming. It was noted that any market reform that leads to more efficient use of existing transportation systems can provide better economic development benefits. 9 refs., 1 tab., 1 fig

  19. Numerical solution of the transport equation describing the radon transport from subsurface soil to buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savovic, S.; Djordjevich, A.; Ristic, G.

    2012-01-01

    A theoretical evaluation of the properties and processes affecting the radon transport from subsurface soil into buildings is presented in this work. The solution of the relevant transport equation is obtained using the explicit finite difference method (EFDM). Results are compared with analytical steady-state solution reported in the literature. Good agreement is found. It is shown that EFDM is effective and accurate for solving the equation that describes radon diffusion, advection and decay during its transport from subsurface to buildings, which is especially important when arbitrary initial and boundary conditions are required. (authors)

  20. Transport of organic solutes through amorphous teflon AF films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hong; Zhang, Jie; Wu, Nianqiang; Zhang, Xu; Crowley, Katie; Weber, Stephen G

    2005-11-02

    Fluorous media have great potential for selective extraction (e.g., as applied to organic synthesis). Fluorous polymer films would have significant advantages in fluorous separations. Stable films of Teflon AF 2400 were cast from solution. Films appear defect-free (SEM; AFM). Rigid aromatic solutes are transported (from chloroform solution to chloroform receiving phase) in a size-dependent manner (log permeability is proportional to -0.0067 times critical volume). Benzene's permeability is about 2 orders of magnitude higher than in comparable gas-phase experiments. The films show selectivity for fluorinated solutes in comparison to the hydrogen-containing control. Transport rates are dependent on the solvent making up the source and receiving phases. The effect of solvent is, interestingly, not due to changes in partition ratio, but rather it is due to changes in the solute diffusion coefficient in the film. Solvents plasticize the films. A less volatile compound, -COOH-terminated poly(hexafluoropropylene oxide) (4), plasticizes the films (T(g) = -40 degrees C). Permeabilities are decreased in comparison to 4-free films apparently because of decreased diffusivity of solutes. The slope of dependence of log permeability on critical volume is not changed, however.

  1. Solute transport model for radioisotopes in layered soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Essel, P.

    2010-01-01

    The study considered the transport of a radioactive solute in solution from the surface of the earth down through the soil to the ground water when there is an accidental or intentional spillage of a radioactive material on the surface. The finite difference method was used to model the spatial and temporal profile of moisture content in a soil column using the θ-based Richard's equation leading to solution of the convective-dispersive equation for non-adsorbing solutes numerically. A matlab code has been generated to predict the transport of the radioactive contaminant, spilled on the surface of a vertically heterogeneous soil made up of two layers to determine the residence time of the solute in the unsaturated zone, the time it takes the contaminant to reach the groundwater and the amount of the solute entering the groundwater in various times and the levels of pollution in those times. The model predicted that, then there is a spillage of 7.2g of tritium, on the surface of the ground at the study area, it will take two years for the radionuclide to enter the groundwater and fifteen years to totally leave the unsaturated zone. There is therefore the need to try as much as possible to avoid intentional or accidental spillage of the radionuclide since it has long term effect. (au)

  2. Simulation of transportation of low enriched uranium solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hope, E.P.; Ades, M.J.

    1996-01-01

    A simulation of the transportation by truck of low enriched uranium solutions has been completed for NEPA purposes at the Savannah River Site. The analysis involves three distinct source terms, and establishes the radiological risks of shipment to three possible destinations. Additionally, loading accidents were analyzed to determine the radiological consequences of mishaps during handling and delivery. Source terms were developed from laboratory measurements of chemical samples from low enriched uranium feed materials being stored at SRS facilities, and from manufacturer data on transport containers. The transportation simulations were accomplished over the INTERNET using the DOE TRANSNET system at Sandia National Laboratory. The HIGHWAY 3.3 code was used to analyze routing scenarios, and the RADTRAN 4 code was used to analyze incident free and accident risks of transporting radiological materials. Loading accidents were assessed using the Savannah River Site AXAIR89Q and RELEASE 2 codes

  3. Colloid mobilization and heavy metal transport in the sampling of soil solution from Duckum soil in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seyong; Ko, Il-Won; Yoon, In-Ho; Kim, Dong-Wook; Kim, Kyoung-Woong

    2018-03-24

    Colloid mobilization is a significant process governing colloid-associated transport of heavy metals in subsurface environments. It has been studied for the last three decades to understand this process. However, colloid mobilization and heavy metal transport in soil solutions have rarely been studied using soils in South Korea. We investigated the colloid mobilization in a variety of flow rates during sampling soil solutions in sand columns. The colloid concentrations were increased at low flow rates and in saturated regimes. Colloid concentrations increased 1000-fold higher at pH 9.2 than at pH 7.3 in the absence of 10 mM NaCl solution. In addition, those were fourfold higher in the absence than in the presence of the NaCl solution at pH 9.2. It was suggested that the mobility of colloids should be enhanced in porous media under the basic conditions and the low ionic strength. In real field soils, the concentrations of As, Cr, and Pb in soil solutions increased with the increase in colloid concentrations at initial momentarily changed soil water pressure, whereas the concentrations of Cd, Cu, Fe, Ni, Al, and Co lagged behind the colloid release. Therefore, physicochemical changes and heavy metal characteristics have important implications for colloid-facilitated transport during sampling soil solutions.

  4. The secret to successful solute-transport modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konikow, Leonard F.

    2011-01-01

    Modeling subsurface solute transport is difficult—more so than modeling heads and flows. The classical governing equation does not always adequately represent what we see at the field scale. In such cases, commonly used numerical models are solving the wrong equation. Also, the transport equation is hyperbolic where advection is dominant, and parabolic where hydrodynamic dispersion is dominant. No single numerical method works well for all conditions, and for any given complex field problem, where seepage velocity is highly variable, no one method will be optimal everywhere. Although we normally expect a numerically accurate solution to the governing groundwater-flow equation, errors in concentrations from numerical dispersion and/or oscillations may be large in some cases. The accuracy and efficiency of the numerical solution to the solute-transport equation are more sensitive to the numerical method chosen than for typical groundwater-flow problems. However, numerical errors can be kept within acceptable limits if sufficient computational effort is expended. But impractically long

  5. Water and solute transport across the peritoneal membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morelle, Johann; Devuyst, Olivier

    2015-09-01

    We review the molecular mechanisms of peritoneal transport and discuss how a better understanding of these mechanisms is relevant for dialysis therapy. Peritoneal dialysis involves diffusion and osmosis through the highly vascularized peritoneal membrane. Computer simulations, expression studies and functional analyses in Aqp1 knockout mice demonstrated the critical role of the water channel aquaporin-1 (AQP1) in water removal during peritoneal dialysis. Pharmacologic regulation of AQP1, either through increased expression or gating, is associated with increased water transport in rodent models of peritoneal dialysis. Water transport is impaired during acute peritonitis, despite unchanged expression of AQP1, resulting from the increased microvascular area that dissipates the osmotic gradient across the membrane. In long-term peritoneal dialysis patients, the fibrotic interstitium also impairs water transport, resulting in ultrafiltration failure. Recent data suggest that stroke and drug intoxications might benefit from peritoneal dialysis and could represent novel applications of peritoneal transport in the future. A better understanding of the regulation of osmotic water transport across the peritoneum offers novel insights into the role of water channels in microvascular endothelia, the functional importance of structural changes in the peritoneal interstitium and the transport of water and solutes across biological membranes in general.

  6. Stochastic analysis of transport of conservative solutes in caisson experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dagan, G.

    1995-01-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory has conducted in the past a series of experiments of transport of conservative and reactive solutes. The experimental setup and the experimental results are presented in a series of reports. The main aim of the experiments was to validate models of transport of solutes in unsaturated flow at the caisson intermediate scale, which is much larger than the one pertaining to laboratory columns. First attempts to analyze the experimental results were by one-dimensional convective-dispersion models. These models could not explain the observed solute breakthrough curves and particularly the large solute dispersion in the caisson effluent Since there were some question marks about the uniformity of water distribution at the caisson top, the transport experiments were repeated under conditions of saturated flow. In these experiments constant heads were applied at the top and the bottom of the caisson and the number of concentration monitoring stations was quadrupled. The analysis of the measurements by the same one-dimensional model indicated clearly that the fitted dispersivity is much larger than the pore-sole dispersivity and that it grows with the distance in an approximately linear fashion. This led to the conclusion, raised before, that transport in the caisson is dominated by heterogeneity effects, i.e. by spatial variability of the material Such effects cannot be captured by traditional one-dimensional models. In order to account for the effect of heterogeneity, the saturated flow experiments have been analyzed by using stochastic transport modeling. The apparent linear growth of dispersivity with distance suggested that the system behaves like a stratified one. Consequently, the model of Dagan and Bresier has been adopted in order to interpret concentration measurements. In this simple model the caisson is viewed as a bundle of columns of different permeabilities, which are characterized by a p.d.f. (probability denasity function)

  7. Solution of the transport equation with account for inelastic collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalashnikov, N.P.; Remizovich, V.S.; Ryazanov, M.I.

    1980-01-01

    The theory of charged particle scattering in a matter with account for inelastic collisions is considered. In ''directly-forward'' approximation the transport equation at the absence of elastic collisions is obtained. The solution of the transport equation is made without and with account for fluctuation of energy losses. Formulas for path-energy relation are given. Energy spectrum and distribution of fast charged particles with respect to paths are studied. The problem of quantum mechanical approach to the theory of multiple scattering of fast charged particles in a matter is discussed briefly

  8. From analytical solutions of solute transport equations to multidimensional time-domain random walk (TDRW) algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodin, Jacques

    2015-03-01

    In this study, new multi-dimensional time-domain random walk (TDRW) algorithms are derived from approximate one-dimensional (1-D), two-dimensional (2-D), and three-dimensional (3-D) analytical solutions of the advection-dispersion equation and from exact 1-D, 2-D, and 3-D analytical solutions of the pure-diffusion equation. These algorithms enable the calculation of both the time required for a particle to travel a specified distance in a homogeneous medium and the mass recovery at the observation point, which may be incomplete due to 2-D or 3-D transverse dispersion or diffusion. The method is extended to heterogeneous media, represented as a piecewise collection of homogeneous media. The particle motion is then decomposed along a series of intermediate checkpoints located on the medium interface boundaries. The accuracy of the multi-dimensional TDRW method is verified against (i) exact analytical solutions of solute transport in homogeneous media and (ii) finite-difference simulations in a synthetic 2-D heterogeneous medium of simple geometry. The results demonstrate that the method is ideally suited to purely diffusive transport and to advection-dispersion transport problems dominated by advection. Conversely, the method is not recommended for highly dispersive transport problems because the accuracy of the advection-dispersion TDRW algorithms degrades rapidly for a low Péclet number, consistent with the accuracy limit of the approximate analytical solutions. The proposed approach provides a unified methodology for deriving multi-dimensional time-domain particle equations and may be applicable to other mathematical transport models, provided that appropriate analytical solutions are available.

  9. Solute carrier transporters: potential targets for digestive system neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jing; Zhu, Xiao Yan; Liu, Lu Ming; Meng, Zhi Qiang

    2018-01-01

    Digestive system neoplasms are the leading causes of cancer-related death all over the world. Solute carrier (SLC) superfamily is composed of a series of transporters that are ubiquitously expressed in organs and tissues of digestive systems and mediate specific uptake of small molecule substrates in facilitative manner. Given the important role of SLC proteins in maintaining normal functions of digestive system, dysregulation of these protein in digestive system neoplasms may deliver biological and clinical significance that deserves systemic studies. In this review, we critically summarized the recent advances in understanding the role of SLC proteins in digestive system neoplasms. We highlighted that several SLC subfamilies, including metal ion transporters, transporters of glucose and other sugars, transporters of urea, neurotransmitters and biogenic amines, ammonium and choline, inorganic cation/anion transporters, transporters of nucleotide, amino acid and oligopeptide organic anion transporters, transporters of vitamins and cofactors and mitochondrial carrier, may play important roles in mediating the initiation, progression, metastasis, and chemoresistance of digestive system neoplasms. Proteins in these SLC subfamilies may also have diagnostic and prognostic values to particular cancer types. Differential expression of SLC proteins in tumors of digestive system was analyzed by extracting data from human cancer database, which revealed that the roles of SLC proteins may either be dependent on the substrates they transport or be tissue specific. In addition, small molecule modulators that pharmacologically regulate the functions of SLC proteins were discussed for their possible application in the treatment of digestive system neoplasms. This review highlighted the potential of SLC family proteins as drug target for the treatment of digestive system neoplasms.

  10. Sn approach applied to the solution of transport equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopes, J.P.

    1973-09-01

    In this work the origin of the Transport Theory is considered and the Transport Equation for the movement of the neutron in a system is established in its more general form, using the laws of nuclear physics. This equation is used as the starting point for development, under adequate assumptions, of simpler models that render the problem suitable for numerical solution. Representation of this model in different geometries is presented. The different processes of nuclear physics are introduced briefly and discussed. In addition, the boundary conditions for the different cases and a general procedure for the application of the Conservation Law are stated. The last chapter deals specifically with the S n method, its development, definitions and generalities. Computational schemes for obtaining the S n solution in spherical and cylindrical geometry, and convergence acceleration methods are also developed. (author)

  11. Geological entropy and solute transport in heterogeneous porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Marco; Pedretti, Daniele

    2017-06-01

    We propose a novel approach to link solute transport behavior to the physical heterogeneity of the aquifer, which we fully characterize with two measurable parameters: the variance of the log K values (σY2), and a new indicator (HR) that integrates multiple properties of the K field into a global measure of spatial disorder or geological entropy. From the results of a detailed numerical experiment considering solute transport in K fields representing realistic distributions of hydrofacies in alluvial aquifers, we identify empirical relationship between the two parameters and the first three central moments of the distributions of arrival times of solute particles at a selected control plane. The analysis of experimental data indicates that the mean and the variance of the solutes arrival times tend to increase with spatial disorder (i.e., HR increasing), while highly skewed distributions are observed in more orderly structures (i.e., HR decreasing) or at higher σY2. We found that simple closed-form empirical expressions of the bivariate dependency of skewness on HR and σY2 can be used to predict the emergence of non-Fickian transport in K fields considering a range of structures and heterogeneity levels, some of which based on documented real aquifers. The accuracy of these predictions and in general the results from this study indicate that a description of the global variability and structure of the K field in terms of variance and geological entropy offers a valid and broadly applicable approach for the interpretation and prediction of transport in heterogeneous porous media.

  12. Predictability of solute transport in diffusion-controlled hydrogeologic regimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillham, R.W.; Cherry, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    Hydrogeologic regimes that are favourable for the subsurface management of low-level radioactive wastes must have transport properties that will limit the migration velocity of contaminants to some acceptably low value. Of equal importance, for the purpose of impact assessment and licensing, is the need to be able to predict, with a reasonable degree of certainty and over long time periods, what the migration velocity of the various contaminants of interest will be. This paper presents arguments to show that in addition to having favourable velocity characteristics, transport in saturated, diffusion-controlled hydrogeologic regimes is considerably more predictable than in the most common alternatives. The classical transport models for unsaturated, saturated-advection-controlled and saturated-diffusion-controlled environments are compared, with particular consideration being given to the difficulties associated with the characterization of the respective transport parameters. Results are presented which show that the diffusion of non-reactive solutes and solutes that react according to a constant partitioning ratio (K/sub d/) are highly predictable under laboratory conditions and that the diffusion coefficients for the reactive solutes can be determined with a reasonable degree of accuracy from independent measurements of bulk density, porosity, distribution coefficient and tortuosity. Field evidence is presented which shows that the distribution of environmental isotopes and chloride in thick clayey deposits is consistent with a diffusion-type transport process in these media. These results are particularly important in that they not only demonstrate the occurrence of diffusion-controlled hydrogeologic regimes, but they also demonstrate the predictability of the migration characteristics over very long time periods

  13. Humic acid facilitates the transport of ARS-labeled hydroxyapatite nanoparticles in iron oxyhydroxide-coated sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hydroxyapatite nanoparticles (nHAP) have been widely used to remediate soil and wastewater contaminated with metals and radionuclides. However, our understanding of nHAP transport and fate is limited in natural environments that exhibit significant variability in solid and solution chemistry. The tr...

  14. A three-dimensional neutron transport benchmark solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganapol, B.D.; Kornreich, D.E.

    1993-01-01

    For one-group neutron transport theory in one dimension, several powerful analytical techniques have been developed to solve the neutron transport equation, including Caseology, Wiener-Hopf factorization, and Fourier and Laplace transform methods. In addition, after a Fourier transform in the transverse plane and formulation of a pseudo problem, two-dimensional (2-D) and three-dimensional (3-D) problems can be solved using the techniques specifically developed for the one-dimensional (1-D) case. Numerical evaluation of the resulting expressions requiring an inversion in the transverse plane have been successful for 2-D problems but becomes exceedingly difficult in the 3-D case. In this paper, we show that by using the symmetry along the beam direction, a 2-D problem can be transformed into a 3-D problem in an infinite medium. The numerical solution to the 3-D problem is then demonstrated. Thus, a true 3-D transport benchmark solution can be obtained from a well-established numerical solution to a 2-D problem

  15. A stochastic solution of the advective transport equation with uncertainty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, M.M.R.

    1991-01-01

    A model has been developed for calculating the transport of water-borne radionuclides through layers of porous materials, such as rock or clay. The model is based upon a purely advective transport equation, in which the fluid velocity is a random variable, thereby simulating dispersion in a more realistic manner than the ad hoc introduction of a dispersivity. In addition to a random velocity field, which is an observable physical phenomenon, allowance is made for uncertainty in our knowledge of the parameters which enter the equation, e.g. the retardation coefficient. This too, is assumed to be a random variable and contributes to the stochasticity of the resulting partial differential equation of transport. The stochastic differential equation can be solved analytically and then ensemble averages taken over the associated probability distribution of velocity and retardation coefficient. A method based upon a novel form of the central limit theorem of statistics is employed to obtain tractable solutions of a system consisting of many serial legs of varying properties. One interesting conclusion is that the total flux out of a medium is significantly underestimated by using the deterministic solution with an average transit time compared with that from the stochastically averaged solution. The theory is illustrated numerically for a number of physically relevant cases. (author) 8 figs., 4 tabs., 7 refs

  16. System for sampling active solutions in transport container; Systeme de prelevements de solutions actives sur les recipients de transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fradin, J.

    1958-12-03

    This report presents a system aimed at sampling active solution from a specific transport container (SCRGR model) while transferring this solution with a maximum safety. The sampling principle is described (a flexible tube connected to the receiving container, with a needle at the other end which goes through a rubber membrane and enters a plunger tube). Its benefits are outlined (operator protection, reduction of contamination risk; only the rubber membrane is removed and replaced). Some manufacturing details are described concerning the membrane and the cover.

  17. Hydrophilic solute transport across the rat blood-brain barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucchesi, K.J.

    1987-01-01

    Brain capillary permeability-surface area products (PS) of hydrophilic solutes ranging in size from 180 to 5,500 Daltons were measured in rats according to the method of Ohno, Pettigrew and Rapoport. The distribution volume of 70 KD dextran at 10 minutes after i.v. injection was also measured to determine the residual volume of blood in brain tissue at the time of sacrifice. Small test solutes were injected in pairs in order to elucidate whether their transfer into the brain proceeds by diffusion through water- or lipid-filled channels or by vesicular transport. This issue was examined in rats whose blood-brain barrier (BBB) was presumed to be intact (untreated) and in rats that received intracarotid infusions to open the BBB (isosmotic salt (ISS) and hyperosmolar arabinose). Ohno PS values of 3 H-inulin and 14 C-L-glucose in untreated rats were found to decrease as the labelling time was lengthened. This was evidence that a rapidly equilibrating compartment exists between blood and brain that renders the Ohno two-compartment model inadequate for computing true transfer rate constants. When the data were reanalyzed using a multi-compartment graphical analysis, solutes with different molecular radii were found to enter the brain at approximately equal rates. Furthermore, unidirectional transport is likely to be initiated by solute adsorption to a glycocalyx coat on the luminal surface of brain capillary endothelium. Apparently, more inulin than L-glucose was adsorbed, which may account for its slightly faster transfer across the BBB. After rats were treated with intracarotid infusions of ISS or hyperosmolar arabinose, solute PS values were significantly increased, but the ratio of PS for each of the solute pairs approached that of their free-diffusion coefficients

  18. How tides and waves enhance aeolian sediment transport at the sand motor mega-nourishment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoonhout, B.M.; Luijendijk, A.P.; de Vries, S.; Roelvink, D.; Aagaard, T.; Deigaard, R.; Fuhrman, D.

    2017-01-01

    Expanding knowledge concerning the close entanglement between subtidal and subaerial processes in coastal environments initiated the development of the open-source Windsurf modeling framework that enables us to simulate
    multi-fraction sediment transport due to subtidal and subaerial processes

  19. Transport of microbial tracers in clean and organically contaminated silica sand in laboratory columns compared with their transport in the field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weaver, Louise, E-mail: louise.weaver@esr.cri.nz; Sinton, Lester W.; Pang, Liping; Dann, Rod; Close, Murray

    2013-01-15

    Waste disposal on land and the consequent transport of bacterial and viral pathogens in soils and aquifers are of major concern worldwide. Pathogen transport can be enhanced in the presence of organic matter due to occupation of attachment sites in the aquifer materials thus preventing pathogen attachment leading to their faster transport for longer distances. Laboratory column studies were carried out to investigate the effect of organic matter, in the form of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), on the transport of Escherichia coli and MS2 phage in saturated clean silica sand. Transport rates of these microbial tracers were also studied in a contaminated field site. Laboratory column studies showed that low concentrations (0.17 mg L{sup −1}) of DOC had little effect on E. coli J6-2 removal and slightly reduced the attachment of MS2 phage. After progressive conditioning of the column with DOC (1.7 mg L{sup −1} and 17 mg L{sup −1}), neither E. coli J6-2 nor MS2 phage showed any attachment and recovery rates increased dramatically (up to 100%). The results suggest that DOC can affect the transport rates of microbial contaminants. For E. coli J6-2 the predominant effect appeared to be an increase in the secondary energy minimum leading to an increase in E. coli attachment initially. However, after 17 mg L{sup −1} DOC conditioning of the silica sand no attachment of E. coli was observed as the DOC took up attachment sites in the porous media. MS2 phage appeared to be affected predominantly by out-competition of binding sites in the clean silica sand and a steady reduction in attachment was observed as the DOC conditioning increased. Field study showed a high removal of both E. coli and MS2 phage, although E. coli was removed at a lower rate than MS2 phage. In the field it is likely that a combination of effects are seen as the aquifer material will be heterogeneous in its surface nanoscale properties, demonstrated by the differing removal of E. coli and MS2 phage

  20. Assessment of applications of transport models on regional scale solute transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Z.; Fogg, G. E.; Henri, C.; Pauloo, R.

    2017-12-01

    Regional scale transport models are needed to support the long-term evaluation of groundwater quality and to develop management strategies aiming to prevent serious groundwater degradation. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the capacity of previously-developed upscaling approaches to accurately describe main solute transport processes including the capture of late-time tails under changing boundary conditions. Advective-dispersive contaminant transport in a 3D heterogeneous domain was simulated and used as a reference solution. Equivalent transport under homogeneous flow conditions were then evaluated applying the Multi-Rate Mass Transfer (MRMT) model. The random walk particle tracking method was used for both heterogeneous and homogeneous-MRMT scenarios under steady state and transient conditions. The results indicate that the MRMT model can capture the tails satisfactorily for plume transported with ambient steady-state flow field. However, when boundary conditions change, the mass transfer model calibrated for transport under steady-state conditions cannot accurately reproduce the tailing effect observed for the heterogeneous scenario. The deteriorating impact of transient boundary conditions on the upscaled model is more significant for regions where flow fields are dramatically affected, highlighting the poor applicability of the MRMT approach for complex field settings. Accurately simulating mass in both mobile and immobile zones is critical to represent the transport process under transient flow conditions and will be the future focus of our study.

  1. Quantifying solute transport processes: are chemically "conservative" tracers electrically conservative?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singha, Kamini; Li, Li; Day-Lewis, Frederick D.; Regberg, Aaron B.

    2012-01-01

    The concept of a nonreactive or conservative tracer, commonly invoked in investigations of solute transport, requires additional study in the context of electrical geophysical monitoring. Tracers that are commonly considered conservative may undergo reactive processes, such as ion exchange, thus changing the aqueous composition of the system. As a result, the measured electrical conductivity may reflect not only solute transport but also reactive processes. We have evaluated the impacts of ion exchange reactions, rate-limited mass transfer, and surface conduction on quantifying tracer mass, mean arrival time, and temporal variance in laboratory-scale column experiments. Numerical examples showed that (1) ion exchange can lead to resistivity-estimated tracer mass, velocity, and dispersivity that may be inaccurate; (2) mass transfer leads to an overestimate in the mobile tracer mass and an underestimate in velocity when using electrical methods; and (3) surface conductance does not notably affect estimated moments when high-concentration tracers are used, although this phenomenon may be important at low concentrations or in sediments with high and/or spatially variable cation-exchange capacity. In all cases, colocated groundwater concentration measurements are of high importance for interpreting geophysical data with respect to the controlling transport processes of interest.

  2. Monte Carlo methods for flux expansion solutions of transport problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spanier, J.

    1999-01-01

    Adaptive Monte Carlo methods, based on the use of either correlated sampling or importance sampling, to obtain global solutions to certain transport problems have recently been described. The resulting learning algorithms are capable of achieving geometric convergence when applied to the estimation of a finite number of coefficients in a flux expansion representation of the global solution. However, because of the nonphysical nature of the random walk simulations needed to perform importance sampling, conventional transport estimators and source sampling techniques require modification to be used successfully in conjunction with such flux expansion methods. It is shown how these problems can be overcome. First, the traditional path length estimators in wide use in particle transport simulations are generalized to include rather general detector functions (which, in this application, are the individual basis functions chosen for the flus expansion). Second, it is shown how to sample from the signed probabilities that arise as source density functions in these applications, without destroying the zero variance property needed to ensure geometric convergence to zero error

  3. A Finite-Difference Solution of Solute Transport through a Membrane Bioreactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Godongwana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The current paper presents a theoretical analysis of the transport of solutes through a fixed-film membrane bioreactor (MBR, immobilised with an active biocatalyst. The dimensionless convection-diffusion equation with variable coefficients was solved analytically and numerically for concentration profiles of the solutes through the MBR. The analytical solution makes use of regular perturbation and accounts for radial convective flow as well as axial diffusion of the substrate species. The Michaelis-Menten (or Monod rate equation was assumed for the sink term, and the perturbation was extended up to second-order. In the analytical solution only the first-order limit of the Michaelis-Menten equation was considered; hence the linearized equation was solved. In the numerical solution, however, this restriction was lifted. The solution of the nonlinear, elliptic, partial differential equation was based on an implicit finite-difference method (FDM. An upwind scheme was employed for numerical stability. The resulting algebraic equations were solved simultaneously using the multivariate Newton-Raphson iteration method. The solution allows for the evaluation of the effect on the concentration profiles of (i the radial and axial convective velocity, (ii the convective mass transfer rates, (iii the reaction rates, (iv the fraction retentate, and (v the aspect ratio.

  4. Engineering solutions of traffic safety problems of road transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Bogdevičius

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available The authors of this paper focus on the simulation of the motor vehicle movement (taking into consideration motor vehicle dynamics, motor vehicle hydraulic brake system influence on motor vehicle movement, interaction between its wheels with road pavements, road guardrail characteristics, interaction between motor vehicle and road guardrail on a certain road section and propose their specific solution of this problem. The presented results, illustrating the motor vehicle movement trajectories (motor vehicle braking and interaction between motor vehicle and road guardrail at various initial conditions and at various certain pavement surface of the road section under investigation and work of a motor vehicle hydraulic brake system. Taking into consideration the presented general mathematical model and computer aided test results it is possible to investigate various road transport traffic situations as well as to investigate various transport traffic safety problems.

  5. Solute transport in fractured rock - applications to radionuclide waste repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neretnieks, I.

    1990-12-01

    Flow and solute transport in fractured rocks has been intensively studied in the last decade. The increased interest is mainly due to the plans in many countries to site repositories for high level nuclear waste in deep geologic formations. All investigated crystalline rocks have been found to be fractured and most of the water flows in the fractures and fracture zones. The water transports dissolved species and radionuclides. It is thus of interest to be able to understand and to do predictive modelling of the flowrate of water, the flowpaths and the residence times of the water and of the nuclides. The dissolved species including the nuclides will interact with the surrounding rock in different ways and will in many cases be strongly retarded relative to the water velocity. Ionic species may be ion exchanged or sorbed in the mineral surfaces. Charges and neutral species may diffuse into the stagnant waters in the rock matrix and thus be withdrawn from the mobile water. These effects will be strongly dependent on how much rock surface is in contact with the flowing water. It has been found in a set of field experiments and by other observations that not all fractures conduct water. Furthermore it is found that conductive fractures only conduct the water in a small part of the fracture in what is called channels or preferential flowpaths. This report summarizes the present concepts of water flow and solute transport in fractured rocks. The data needs for predictive modelling are discussed and both field and laboratory measurement which have been used to obtain data are described. Several large scale field experiments which have been specially designed to study flow and tracer transport in crystalline rocks are described. In many of the field experients new techniques have been developed and used. (81 refs.) (author)

  6. Soil properties and preferential solute transport at the field scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koestel, J K; Minh, Luong Nhat; Nørgaard, Trine

    An important fraction of water flow and solute transport through soil takes place through preferential flow paths. Although this had been already observed in the nineteenth century, it had been forgotten by the scientific community until it was rediscovered during the 1970s. The awareness...... of the relevance of preferential flow was broadly re-established in the community by the early 1990s. However, since then, the notion remains widespread among soil scientists that the occurrence and strength of preferential flow cannot be predicted from measurable proxy variables such as soil properties or land...

  7. Solute carrier transporters: potential targets for digestive system neoplasms

    OpenAIRE

    Xie, Jing; Zhu, Xiao Yan; Liu, Lu Ming; Meng, Zhi Qiang

    2018-01-01

    Jing Xie,1,2 Xiao Yan Zhu,1,2 Lu Ming Liu,1,2 Zhi Qiang Meng1,2 1Department of Integrative Oncology, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, 2Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Digestive system neoplasms are the leading causes of cancer-related death all over the world. Solute carrier (SLC) superfamily is composed of a series of transporters that are ubiquitously expressed in organs and tissues o...

  8. On the Solution of the Neutron Transport Equation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Depken, S

    1962-12-15

    The neutron transport equation has occupied the attention of many authors since Placzek, Wick and others made their first attempts to solve it, Even in the simple case of energy independent cross-sections, and disregarding the motion of the scattering nucleons, it is difficult to find a solution in an analytical form which is easily surveyable and fitted for numerical calculations. In Part I of this paper some new viewpoints will be introduced which enable the solution to be presented in its simplest possible form. Part II is devoted to an investigation of some functions introduced in Part I. In Part III the results are applied to the case of large energy lethargy, and the validity of derived formulas is discussed.

  9. Applications of stochastic models to solute transport in fractured rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelhar, L.W.

    1987-01-01

    A stochastic theory for flow and solute transport in a single variable aperture fracture bounded by sorbing porous matrix into which solutes may diffuse, is developed using a perturbation approximation and spectral solution techniques which assume local statistical homogeneity. The theory predicts that the effective aperture of the fracture for mean solute displacement will be larger than the aperture required to calculate the large-scale flow resistance of the fracture. This ratio of apertures is a function of the variance of the logarithm of the apertures. The theory also predicts the macrodispersion coefficient for large-scale transport in the fracture. The resulting macrodispersivity is proportional to the variance of the logaperture and to its correlation scale. When variable surface sorption is included, it is found that the macrodispersivity is increased significantly, in some cases more than an order of magnitude. It is also shown that the effective retardation coefficient for the sorptively heterogeneous fracture is found by simply taking the arithmetic mean of the local surface sorption coefficient. Matrix diffusion is also shown to increase the fracture macrodispesivity at very large times. A reexamination of the results of four different field tracer tests in crystalline rock in Sweden and Canada shows aperture ratios and dispersivities that are consistent with the stochastic theory. The variance of the natural logarithm of the aperture is found to be in the range of 3 to 6 and the correlation scales for logaperture ranges from .2 to 1.2 meters. Detailed recommendations for additional field investigations at scales ranging from a few meters up to a kilometer are presented. (orig.)

  10. Meta-analysis of the effects of soil properties, site factors and experimental conditions on solute transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. K. Koestel

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Preferential flow is a widespread phenomenon that is known to strongly affect solute transport in soil, but our understanding and knowledge is still poor of the site factors and soil properties that promote it. To investigate these relationships, we assembled a database from the peer-reviewed literature containing information on 733 breakthrough curve experiments under steady-state flow conditions. Most of the collected experiments (585 of the 733 datasets had been conducted on undisturbed soil columns, although some experiments on repacked soil, clean sands, and glass beads were also included. In addition to the apparent dispersivity, we focused our attention on three indicators of preferential solute transport: namely the 5%-arrival time, the holdback factor, and the ratio of piston-flow and average transport velocities. Our results suggest that, in contrast to the 5%-arrival time and the holdback factor, the piston-flow to transport velocity ratio is not related to preferential macropore transport but rather to the exclusion or retardation of the applied tracer. Confirming that the apparent longitudinal dispersivity is positively correlated with the travel distance of the tracer, our results also illustrate that this relationship is refined if the normalized 5%-tracer arrival time is also taken into account. In particular, we found that the degree of preferential solute transport increases with apparent dispersivity and decreases with travel distance. A similar but weaker relationship was observed between apparent dispersivity, 5%-tracer arrival time, and lateral observation scale, such that the degree of preferential transport increases with lateral observation scale. However, we also found that the travel distance and the lateral observation scale in the investigated dataset are correlated, which makes it difficult to distinguish their influence on these transport characteristics. We also found that the strength of preferential transport

  11. Solute transport with time-variable flow paths during upward and downward flux in a heterogeneous unsaturated porous medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremer, Clemens; Neuweiler, Insa; Bechtold, Michel; Vanderborght, Jan

    2014-05-01

    To acquire knowledge of solute transport through the unsaturated zone in the shallow subsurface is decisive to assess groundwater quality, nutrient cycling or to plan remediation strategies. The shallow subsurface is characterized by structural heterogeneity and strongly influenced by atmospheric conditions. This leads to changing flow directions, strong temporal changes in saturation and heterogeneous water fluxes during infiltration and evaporation events. Recent studies (e.g. Lehmann and Or, 2009; Bechtold et al.,2011) demonstrated the importance of lateral flow and solute transport during evaporation conditions (upward flux). The heterogeneous structure in these studies was constructed using two types of sand with strong material contrasts and arranged in parallel with a vertical orientation. Lateral transport and redistribution of solute from coarse to fine media was observed deeper in the soil column and from fine to coarse close to the soil surface. However, if boundary conditions are reversed due to precipitation, the flow field is not necessarily reversed in the same manner, resulting in entirely different transport patterns for downward and upward flow. Therefore, considering net-flow rates alone is misleading when describing transport under those conditions. In this contribution we analyze transport of a solute in the shallow subsurface to assess effects resulting from the temporal change of heterogeneous soil structures due to dynamic flow conditions. Two-dimensional numerical simulations of unsaturated flow and transport are conducted using a coupled finite volume and random walk particle tracking algorithm to quantify solute transport and leaching rates. Following previous studies (Lehmann and Or, 2009; Bechtold et al., 2011), the chosen domain is composed of two materials, coarse and fine sand, arranged in parallel with a vertical orientation. Hence, one sharp interface of strong material heterogeneity is induced. During evaporation both sands are

  12. TRANSPORT OF SOLUTES IN THE FIELD AS AFFECTED BY IRRIGATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Comegna

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available This study documents and compares the transport of a conservative solute in near saturated soil profiles under flood and sprinkler irrigation. The experiments were carried out on a clay Vertic-Usthortens soil located near Potenza (Italy. Two 2x2 m2 plots were clipped of their native grass vegetation. After spraying on the surface a Cl- pulse as KCl salt; water was applied in five increments over two months as flood irrigation on the first plot and as sprinkler irrigation on the second one. Chloride resident concentration Cr, was sampled by soil coring at four different days after chemical application. Cr(z,t profiles were analyzed by spatial moment method. The recovered mass of Cl- and location of center of mass were comparable for the two types of irrigation. The spread around the center of mass, however, was higher for the flood-irrigated plot. In the flood-irrigated plot, more mass leached below the depth of 90 cm. The velocity of the center of mass was consistently 10-20% larger than the piston displacement velocity. To evaluate the nature of transport, the Cr(z,t distributions were modelled using quasi-steady solution of convection-dispersion equation(CDE. At the scale of our experiments the profiles of Cl- resident concentration are well-simulated.

  13. Analysis of solute transport in plants using positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Partelova, D.

    2016-01-01

    In the first part of the work, geometrically and radiochemically characterized standards (phantoms) imitating the plant tissues and allowing the exact quantification of visualised radioindicator in plant tissues were designed and prepared within the study of visual and analytical characteristics of used positron emission tomograph (microPET system) commercially developed for animal objects at visualization of thin objects. Individual experiments carried out by exposure of excised leaves of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) or radish (Raphanus sativus L.) in solutions of 2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-glucose labelled with positron emitter 18 F (2-[ 18 F]FDG) containing 10-, 100-, or 1000-times higher concentrations of D-glucose (c glu ) in comparison with the original 2-[ 18 F]FDG solution showed that the significant changes in visualisation of 2-[ 18 F]FDG distribution as well as in chemical portion of 2-[ 18 F]FDG within the leaf blade were observed as result of increased c glu . In the experiments with the whole plants of tobacco or radish exposed in 2-[ 18 F]FDG solution through the root system, only minimal translocation of 18 F radioactivity into the above-ground parts of plants, also in the case of increased c glu , was observed, which suggest the role of root system as a selective barrier of 2-[ 18 F]FDG transport from roots to the above-ground parts. On the basis of mentioned knowledge and analytical approaches (application of prepared phantoms), the dynamic study of 2-[ 18 F]FDG uptake and transport within the excised leaf of tobacco or whole radish plant was carried out. The description of these processes was realized through the 3D PET images and through the quantification of 2-[ 18 F]FDG distribution within the chosen regions of interest from the point of view of accumulated 18 F radioactivity (in Bq) or amount of D-glucose (in μg) as well. Application of methods of multivariate analysis allows to found the similarities between studied objects mainly from the point

  14. Transport Visualization for Studying Mass Transfer and Solute Transport in Permeable Media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy Haggerty

    2004-01-01

    Understanding and predicting mass transfer coupled with solute transport in permeable media is central to several energy-related programs at the US Department of Energy (e.g., CO 2 sequestration, nuclear waste disposal, hydrocarbon extraction, and groundwater remediation). Mass transfer is the set of processes that control movement of a chemical between mobile (advection-dominated) domains and immobile (diffusion- or sorption-dominated) domains within a permeable medium. Consequences of mass transfer on solute transport are numerous and may include (1) increased sequestration time within geologic formations; (2) reduction in average solute transport velocity by as much as several orders of magnitude; (3) long ''tails'' in concentration histories during removal of a solute from a permeable medium; (4) poor predictions of solute behavior over long time scales; and (5) changes in reaction rates due to mass transfer influences on pore-scale mixing of solutes. Our work produced four principle contributions: (1) the first comprehensive visualization of solute transport and mass transfer in heterogeneous porous media; (2) the beginnings of a theoretical framework that encompasses both macrodispersion and mass transfer within a single set of equations; (3) experimental and analytical tools necessary for understanding mixing and aqueous reaction in heterogeneous, granular porous media; (4) a clear experimental demonstration that reactive transport is often not accurately described by a simple coupling of the convection-dispersion equation with chemical reaction equations. The work shows that solute transport in heterogeneous media can be divided into 3 regimes--macrodispersion, advective mass transfer, and diffusive mass transfer--and that these regimes can be predicted quantitatively in binary media. We successfully predicted mass transfer in each of these regimes and verified the prediction by completing quantitative visualization experiments in each of the regimes, the

  15. Particle and solute migration in porous media. Modeling of simultaneous transport of clay particles and radionuclides in a salinity gradient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faure, M.H.

    1994-03-01

    Understanding the mechanisms which control the transient transport of particles and radionuclides in natural and artificial porous media is a key problem for the assessment of safety of radioactive waste disposals. An experimental study has been performed to characterize the clayey particle mobility in porous media: a laboratory- made column, packed with an unconsolidated sand bentonite (5% weight) sample, is flushed with a salt solution. An original method of salinity gradient allowed us to show and to quantify some typical behaviours of this system: threshold effects in the peptization of particles, creation of preferential pathways, formation of immobile water zones induce solute-transfer limitation. The mathematical modelling accounts for a phenomenological law, where the distribution of particles between the stagnant water zone and the porous medium is a function of sodium chloride concentration. This distribution function is associated with a radionuclide adsorption model, and is included in a convective dispersive transport model with stagnant water zones. It allowed us to simulate the particle and solute transport when the salt environment is modified. The complete model has been validated with experiments involving cesium, calcium and neptunium in a sodium chloride gradient. (author). refs., figs., tabs

  16. Solutions to Improve Person Transport System in the Pitesti City by Analyzing Public Transport vs. Private Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihaela, Istrate; Alexandru, Boroiu; Viorel, Nicolae; Ionel, Vieru

    2017-10-01

    One of the major problems facing the Pitesti city is the road congestion that occurs in the central area of the city during the peak hours. With all the measures taken in recent years - the widening of road arteries, increasing the number of parking spaces, the creation of overground road passages - it is obvious that the problem can only be solved by a new philosophy regarding urban mobility: it is no longer possible to continue through solutions to increase the accessibility of the central area of the city, but it is necessary, on the contrary, to promote a policy of discouraging the penetration of vehicles in the city center, coupled with a policy of improving the connection between urban public transport and county public transport. This new approach is also proposed in the new Urban Mobility Plan of Pitesti city, under development. The most convincing argument for the necessity of this new orientation in the Pitesti city mobility plan is based on the analysis of the current situation of passenger transport on the territory of Pitesti city: the analysis of “public transport versus private transport” reveals a very low occupancy rate for cars and the fact that the road surface required for a passenger (the dynamic area) is much higher in the case of private transport than in the case of public transport. Measurements of passenger flows and vehicle flows on the 6 penetration ways in the city have been made and the calculations clearly demonstrate the benefits of an urban public transport system connected by “transshipment buses” to be made at the edge of the city, to the county public transport system. In terms of inter-county transport, it will continue to be connected to the urban public transport system by existing bus Station, within the city: South Bus Station and North Bus Station. The usefulness of the paper is that it identifies the solutions for sustainable mobility in Pitesti city and proposes concrete solutions for the development of the

  17. Approximate solutions for the two-dimensional integral transport equation. Solution of complex two-dimensional transport problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, Richard.

    1980-11-01

    This work is divided into two parts: the first part deals with the solution of complex two-dimensional transport problems, the second one (note CEA-N-2166) treats the critically mixed methods of resolution. A set of approximate solutions for the isotropic two-dimensional neutron transport problem has been developed using the interface current formalism. The method has been applied to regular lattices of rectangular cells containing a fuel pin, cladding, and water, or homogenized structural material. The cells are divided into zones that are homogeneous. A zone-wise flux expansion is used to formulate a direct collision probability problem within a cell. The coupling of the cells is effected by making extra assumptions on the currents entering and leaving the interfaces. Two codes have been written: CALLIOPE uses a cylindrical cell model and one or three terms for the flux expansion, and NAUSICAA uses a two-dimensional flux representation and does a truly two-dimensional calculation inside each cell. In both codes, one or three terms can be used to make a space-independent expansion of the angular fluxes entering and leaving each side of the cell. The accuracies and computing times achieved with the different approximations are illustrated by numerical studies on two benchmark problems and by calculations performed in the APOLLO multigroup code [fr

  18. Fontainebleau Sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth, Caspar Thrane

    2006-01-01

    The report is a summary of results from laboratory tests in the geotechncial research group on Fontainebleau sand.......The report is a summary of results from laboratory tests in the geotechncial research group on Fontainebleau sand....

  19. Multigroup adjoint transport solution using the method of cyclic characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assawaroongruengchot, M.; Marleau, G.

    2005-01-01

    The adjoint transport solution algorithm based on the method of cyclic characteristics (MOCC) is developed for the heterogeneous 2-dimensional geometries. The adjoint characteristics equation associated with a cyclic tracking line is formulated, then a closed form for adjoint angular flux can be determined. The acceleration techniques are implemented using the group-reduction and group-splitting techniques. To demonstrate the efficacy of the algorithm, the calculations are performed on the 17*17 PWR and Watanabe-Maynard benchmark problems. Comparisons of adjoint flux and k eff results obtained by MOCC and collision probability (CP) methods are performed. The mathematical relationship between pseudo-adjoint flux obtained by CP method and adjoint flux by MOCC method is presented. It appears that the pseudo-adjoint flux by CP method is equivalent to the adjoint flux by MOCC method and that the MOCC method requires lower computing time than the CP method for a single adjoint flux calculation

  20. Multigroup adjoint transport solution using the method of cyclic characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assawaroongruengchot, M.; Marleau, G. [Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, Institut de Genie Nucleaire, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    2005-07-01

    The adjoint transport solution algorithm based on the method of cyclic characteristics (MOCC) is developed for the heterogeneous 2-dimensional geometries. The adjoint characteristics equation associated with a cyclic tracking line is formulated, then a closed form for adjoint angular flux can be determined. The acceleration techniques are implemented using the group-reduction and group-splitting techniques. To demonstrate the efficacy of the algorithm, the calculations are performed on the 17*17 PWR and Watanabe-Maynard benchmark problems. Comparisons of adjoint flux and k{sub eff} results obtained by MOCC and collision probability (CP) methods are performed. The mathematical relationship between pseudo-adjoint flux obtained by CP method and adjoint flux by MOCC method is presented. It appears that the pseudo-adjoint flux by CP method is equivalent to the adjoint flux by MOCC method and that the MOCC method requires lower computing time than the CP method for a single adjoint flux calculation.

  1. The quasi-diffusive approximation in transport theory: Local solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Celaschi, M.; Montagnini, B.

    1995-01-01

    The one velocity, plane geometry integral neutron transport equation is transformed into a system of two equations, one of them being the equation of continuity and the other a generalized Fick's law, in which the usual diffusion coefficient is replaced by a self-adjoint integral operator. As the kernel of this operator is very close to the Green function of a diffusion equation, an approximate inversion by means of a second order differential operator allows to transform these equations into a purely differential system which is shown to be equivalent, in the simplest case, to a diffusion-like equation. The method, the principles of which have been exposed in a previous paper, is here extended and applied to a variety of problems. If the inversion is properly performed, the quasi-diffusive solutions turn out to be quite accurate, even in the vicinity of the interface between different material regions, where elementary diffusion theory usually fails. 16 refs., 3 tabs

  2. Approximate solution to neutron transport equation with linear anisotropic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coppa, G.; Ravetto, P.; Sumini, M.

    1983-01-01

    A method to obtain an approximate solution to the transport equation, when both sources and collisions show a linearly anisotropic behavior, is outlined and the possible implications for numerical calculations in applied neutronics as well as shielding evaluations are investigated. The form of the differential system of equations taken by the method is quite handy and looks simpler and more manageable than any other today available technique. To go deeper into the efficiency of the method, some typical calculations concerning critical dimension of multiplying systems are then performed and the results are compared with the ones coming from the classical Ssub(N) approximations. The outcome of such calculations leads us to think of interesting developments of the method which could be quite useful in alternative to other today widespread approximate procedures, for any geometry, but especially for curved ones. (author)

  3. Engineering charge transport by heterostructuring solution-processed semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voznyy, Oleksandr; Sutherland, Brandon R.; Ip, Alexander H.; Zhitomirsky, David; Sargent, Edward H.

    2017-06-01

    Solution-processed semiconductor devices are increasingly exploiting heterostructuring — an approach in which two or more materials with different energy landscapes are integrated into a composite system. Heterostructured materials offer an additional degree of freedom to control charge transport and recombination for more efficient optoelectronic devices. By exploiting energetic asymmetry, rationally engineered heterostructured materials can overcome weaknesses, augment strengths and introduce emergent physical phenomena that are otherwise inaccessible to single-material systems. These systems see benefit and application in two distinct branches of charge-carrier manipulation. First, they influence the balance between excitons and free charges to enhance electron extraction in solar cells and photodetectors. Second, they promote radiative recombination by spatially confining electrons and holes, which increases the quantum efficiency of light-emitting diodes. In this Review, we discuss advances in the design and composition of heterostructured materials, consider their implementation in semiconductor devices and examine unexplored paths for future advancement in the field.

  4. Coupling of solute transport and cell expansion in pea stems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmalstig, J. G.; Cosgrove, D. J.

    1990-01-01

    As cells expand and are displaced through the elongation zone of the epicotyl of etiolated pea (Pisum sativum L. var Alaska) seedlings, there is little net dilution of the cell sap, implying a coordination between cell expansion and solute uptake from the phloem. Using [14C] sucrose as a phloem tracer (applied to the hypogeous cotyledons), the pattern of label accumulation along the stem closely matched the growth rate pattern: high accumulation in the growing zone, little accumulation in nongrowing regions. Several results suggest that a major portion of phloem contents enters elongating cells through the symplast. We propose that the coordination between phloem transport and cell expansion is accomplished via regulatory pathways affecting both plasmodesmata conductivity and cell expansion.

  5. Fluid and solute transport in a network of channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreno, L.; Neretnieks, I.

    1991-09-01

    A three-dimensional channel network model is presented. The fluid flow and solute transport are assumed to take place through a network of connected channels. The channels are generated assuming that the conductances are lognormally distributed. The flow is calculated resolving the pressure distribution and the sole transport is calculated by using a particle tracking technique. The model includes diffusion into the rock matrix and sorption within the matrix in addition to advection along the channel network. Different approaches are used to describe the channel volume and its relation to the conductivity. To quantify the diffusion into the rock matrix the size of the flow wetted surface (contact surface between the channel and the rock) is needed in addition to the diffusion properties and the sorption capacity of the rock. Two different geometries were simulated: regional parallel flow and convergent flow toward a tunnel. In the generation of the channel network, it is found that its connectivity is reduced when the standard deviation in conductances is increased. For large standard deviations, the water conducting channels are found to be few. Standard deviations for the distribution of the effluent channel flowrates were calculated. Comparisons were made with experimental data from drifts and tunnels as well as boreholes as a means to validate the model. (au) (31 refs.)

  6. Improved parallel solution techniques for the integral transport matrix method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zerr, R. Joseph, E-mail: rjz116@psu.edu [Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA (United States); Azmy, Yousry Y., E-mail: yyazmy@ncsu.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering, North Carolina State University, Burlington Engineering Laboratories, Raleigh, NC (United States)

    2011-07-01

    Alternative solution strategies to the parallel block Jacobi (PBJ) method for the solution of the global problem with the integral transport matrix method operators have been designed and tested. The most straightforward improvement to the Jacobi iterative method is the Gauss-Seidel alternative. The parallel red-black Gauss-Seidel (PGS) algorithm can improve on the number of iterations and reduce work per iteration by applying an alternating red-black color-set to the subdomains and assigning multiple sub-domains per processor. A parallel GMRES(m) method was implemented as an alternative to stationary iterations. Computational results show that the PGS method can improve on the PBJ method execution time by up to 10´ when eight sub-domains per processor are used. However, compared to traditional source iterations with diffusion synthetic acceleration, it is still approximately an order of magnitude slower. The best-performing cases are optically thick because sub-domains decouple, yielding faster convergence. Further tests revealed that 64 sub-domains per processor was the best performing level of sub-domain division. An acceleration technique that improves the convergence rate would greatly improve the ITMM. The GMRES(m) method with a diagonal block pre conditioner consumes approximately the same time as the PBJ solver but could be improved by an as yet undeveloped, more efficient pre conditioner. (author)

  7. Improved parallel solution techniques for the integral transport matrix method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zerr, R. Joseph; Azmy, Yousry Y.

    2011-01-01

    Alternative solution strategies to the parallel block Jacobi (PBJ) method for the solution of the global problem with the integral transport matrix method operators have been designed and tested. The most straightforward improvement to the Jacobi iterative method is the Gauss-Seidel alternative. The parallel red-black Gauss-Seidel (PGS) algorithm can improve on the number of iterations and reduce work per iteration by applying an alternating red-black color-set to the subdomains and assigning multiple sub-domains per processor. A parallel GMRES(m) method was implemented as an alternative to stationary iterations. Computational results show that the PGS method can improve on the PBJ method execution time by up to 10´ when eight sub-domains per processor are used. However, compared to traditional source iterations with diffusion synthetic acceleration, it is still approximately an order of magnitude slower. The best-performing cases are optically thick because sub-domains decouple, yielding faster convergence. Further tests revealed that 64 sub-domains per processor was the best performing level of sub-domain division. An acceleration technique that improves the convergence rate would greatly improve the ITMM. The GMRES(m) method with a diagonal block pre conditioner consumes approximately the same time as the PBJ solver but could be improved by an as yet undeveloped, more efficient pre conditioner. (author)

  8. Solution processed metal oxide thin film hole transport layers for high performance organic solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steirer, K. Xerxes; Berry, Joseph J.; Chesin, Jordan P.; Lloyd, Matthew T.; Widjonarko, Nicodemus Edwin; Miedaner, Alexander; Curtis, Calvin J.; Ginley, David S.; Olson, Dana C.

    2017-01-10

    A method for the application of solution processed metal oxide hole transport layers in organic photovoltaic devices and related organic electronics devices is disclosed. The metal oxide may be derived from a metal-organic precursor enabling solution processing of an amorphous, p-type metal oxide. An organic photovoltaic device having solution processed, metal oxide, thin-film hole transport layer.

  9. Approximate and analytical solutions for solute transport from an injection well into a single fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, C.S.; Yates, S.R.

    1989-01-01

    In dealing with problems related to land-based nuclear waste management, a number of analytical and approximate solutions were developed to quantify radionuclide transport through fractures contained in the porous formation. It has been reported that by treating the radioactive decay constant as the appropriate first-order rate constant, these solutions can also be used to study injection problems of a similar nature subject to first-order chemical or biological reactions. The fracture is idealized by a pair of parallel, smooth plates separated by an aperture of constant thickness. Groundwater was assumed to be immobile in the underlying and overlying porous formations due to their low permeabilities. However, the injected radionuclides were able to move from the fracture into the porous matrix by molecular diffusion (the matrix diffusion) due to possible concentration gradients across the interface between the fracture and the porous matrix. Calculation of the transient solutions is not straightforward, and the paper documents a contained Fortran program, which computes the Stehfest inversion, the Airy functions, and gives the concentration distributions in the fracture as well as in the porous matrix for both transient and steady-state cases

  10. Saltation of non-spherical sand particles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengshi Wang

    Full Text Available Saltation is an important geological process and the primary source of atmospheric mineral dust aerosols. Unfortunately, no studies to date have been able to precisely reproduce the saltation process because of the simplified theoretical models used. For example, sand particles in most of the existing wind sand movement models are considered to be spherical, the effects of the sand shape on the structure of the wind sand flow are rarely studied, and the effect of mid-air collision is usually neglected. In fact, sand grains are rarely round in natural environments. In this paper, we first analyzed the drag coefficients, drag forces, and starting friction wind speeds of sand grains with different shapes in the saltation process, then established a sand saltation model that considers the coupling effect between wind and the sand grains, the effect of the mid-air collision of sand grains, and the effect of the sand grain shape. Based on this model, the saltation process and sand transport rate of non-spherical sand particles were simulated. The results show that the sand shape has a significant impact on the saltation process; for the same wind speed, the sand transport rates varied for different shapes of sand grains by as much as several-fold. Therefore, sand shape is one of the important factors affecting wind-sand movement.

  11. Product Lifecycle Management and the Quest for Sustainable Space Transportation Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruso, Pamela W.

    2009-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews NASA Marshall's effort to sustain space transportation solutions through product lines that include: 1) Propulsion and Transportation Systems; 2) Life Support Systems; and 3) and Earth and Space Science Spacecraft Systems, and Operations.

  12. Finite element based composite solution for neutron transport problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirza, A.N.; Mirza, N.M.

    1995-01-01

    A finite element treatment for solving neutron transport problems is presented. The employs region-wise discontinuous finite elements for the spatial representation of the neutron angular flux, while spherical harmonics are used for directional dependence. Composite solutions has been obtained by using different orders of angular approximations in different parts of a system. The method has been successfully implemented for one dimensional slab and two dimensional rectangular geometry problems. An overall reduction in the number of nodal coefficients (more than 60% in some cases as compared to conventional schemes) has been achieved without loss of accuracy with better utilization of computational resources. The method also provides an efficient way of handling physically difficult situations such as treatment of voids in duct problems and sharply changing angular flux. It is observed that a great wealth of information about the spatial and directional dependence of the angular flux is obtained much more quickly as compared to Monte Carlo method, where most of the information in restricted to the locality of immediate interest. (author)

  13. New constructive solutions for building of transport construction facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babayev Vladimir

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available New structural systems for civil and transport engineering were examined. The basis for the formation of the proposed reinforced concrete structures is the ideology of reducing its dead weight, with a given bearing capacity, the realization of which is accomplished by burial during concreting large-sized liners of a given shape and manufactured from lightweight, inexpensive composite materials. The process of erecting these systems is presented in two forms: for flat structures - using self-tightening concrete, and for curvilinear ones - by using shotcrete technologies. The second direction is presented by steel-reinforced concrete structures. These structural systems were created on the basis of innovative component and methods of rationalization of parameters. The basis of the above methods is a compiler which includes the finite element method, adaptive evolution method and special iterative procedures. Experimental verification of structural solutions and formation procedures for suggested systems was performed. Comparison between theoretical and experimental data is given. Suggested systems were implemented in a number of building companies.

  14. Control and optimization of solute transport in a thin porous tube

    KAUST Repository

    Griffiths, I. M.; Howell, P. D.; Shipley, R. J.

    2013-01-01

    differentials upon the dispersive solute behaviour are investigated. The model is used to explore the control of solute transport across the membrane walls via the membrane permeability, and a parametric expression for the permeability required to generate a

  15. Technology in rural transportation. Simple solution #6, traveler information on the internet

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    This application was identified as a promising rural Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) solution under a project sponsored by the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) and the ENTERPRISE program. This summary describes the solution as well as o...

  16. Solute transport with periodic input point source in one-dimensional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    JOY

    groundwater flow velocity is considered proportional to multiple of temporal function and ζ th ... One-dimensional solute transport through porous media with or without .... solute free. ... the periodic concentration at source of the boundary i.e.,. 0.

  17. Semianalytical solutions of radioactive or reactive tracer transport in layered fractured media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moridis, G.J.; Bodvarsson, G.S.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, semianalytical solutions are developed for the problem of transport of radioactive or reactive tracers (solutes or colloids) through a layered system of heterogeneous fractured media with misaligned fractures. The tracer transport equations in the matrix account for (a) diffusion, (b) surface diffusion (for solutes only), (c) mass transfer between the mobile and immobile water fractions, (d) linear kinetic or equilibrium physical, chemical, or combined solute sorption or colloid filtration, and (e) radioactive decay or first order chemical reactions. Any number of radioactive decay daughter products (or products of a linear, first-order reaction chain) can be tracked. The tracer-transport equations in the fractures account for the same processes, in addition to advection and hydrodynamic dispersion. Additionally, the colloid transport equations account for straining and velocity adjustments related to the colloidal size. The solutions, which are analytical in the Laplace space, are numerically inverted to provide the solution in time and can accommodate any number of fractured and/or porous layers. The solutions are verified using analytical solutions for limiting cases of solute and colloid transport through fractured and porous media. The effect of important parameters on the transport of 3 H, 237 Np and 239 Pu (and its daughters) is investigated in several test problems involving layered geological systems of varying complexity. 239 Pu colloid transport problems in multilayered systems indicate significant colloid accumulations at straining interfaces but much faster transport of the colloid than the corresponding strongly sorbing solute species

  18. Mathematical description of adsorption and transport of reactive solutes in soil: a review of selected literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Travis, C.C.

    1978-10-01

    This report reviews selected literature related to the mathematical description of the transport of reactive solutes through soil. The primary areas of the literature reviewed are (1) mathematical models in current use for description of the adsorption-desorption interaction between the soil solution and the soil matrix and (2) analytic solutions of the differential equations describing the convective-dispersive transport of reactive solutes through soil

  19. Modelling the effect of suspended load transport and tidal asymmetry on the equilibrium tidal sand wave height

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gerwen, W.; Borsje, Bastiaan Wijnand; Damveld, Johan Hendrik; Hulscher, Suzanne J.M.H.

    2018-01-01

    Tidal sand waves are rhythmic bed forms found in shallow sandy coastal seas, reaching heights up to ten meters and migration rates of several meters per year. Because of their dynamic behaviour, unravelling the physical processes behind the growth of these bed forms is of particular interest to

  20. Hydrogeochemistry and simulated solute transport, Piceance Basin, northwestern Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robson, S.G.; Saulnier, G.J.

    1981-01-01

    Oil-shale mining activities in Piceance basin in northwestern Colorado could adversely affect the ground- and surface-water quality in the basin. This study of the hydrology and geochemistry of the area used ground-water solute-transport-modeling techniques to investigate the possible impact of the mines on water quality. Maps of the extent and structure of the aquifer were prepared and show that a saturated thickness of 2,000 feet occurs in the northeast part of the basin. Ground-water recharge in the upland areas in the east, south, and west parts of the basin moves down into deeper zones in the aquifer and laterally to the discharge areas along Piceance and Yellow Creeks. The saline zone and the unsaturated zone provide the majority of the dissolved solids found in the ground water. Precipitation, ion-exchange, and oxidation-reduction reactions are also occuring in the aquifer. Model simulations of ground-water pumpage in tracts C-a and C-b indicate that the altered direction of ground-water movement near the pumped mines will cause an improvement in ground-water quality near the mines and a degradation of water quality downgradient from the tracts. Model simulations of mine leaching in tract C-a and C-b indicate that equal rates of mine leaching in the tracts will produce much different effects on the water quality in the basin. Tract C-a, by virtue of its remote location from perennial streams, will primarily degrade the ground-water quality over a large area to the northeast of the tract. Tract C-b, by contrast, will primarily degrade the surface-water quality in Piceance Creek, with only localized effects on the ground-water quality. (USGS)

  1. Peritoneal Fluid Transport rather than Peritoneal Solute Transport Associates with Dialysis Vintage and Age of Peritoneal Dialysis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Waniewski

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available During peritoneal dialysis (PD, the peritoneal membrane undergoes ageing processes that affect its function. Here we analyzed associations of patient age and dialysis vintage with parameters of peritoneal transport of fluid and solutes, directly measured and estimated based on the pore model, for individual patients. Thirty-three patients (15 females; age 60 (21–87 years; median time on PD 19 (3–100 months underwent sequential peritoneal equilibration test. Dialysis vintage and patient age did not correlate. Estimation of parameters of the two-pore model of peritoneal transport was performed. The estimated fluid transport parameters, including hydraulic permeability (LpS, fraction of ultrasmall pores (αu, osmotic conductance for glucose (OCG, and peritoneal absorption, were generally independent of solute transport parameters (diffusive mass transport parameters. Fluid transport parameters correlated whereas transport parameters for small solutes and proteins did not correlate with dialysis vintage and patient age. Although LpS and OCG were lower for older patients and those with long dialysis vintage, αu was higher. Thus, fluid transport parameters—rather than solute transport parameters—are linked to dialysis vintage and patient age and should therefore be included when monitoring processes linked to ageing of the peritoneal membrane.

  2. Peritoneal Fluid Transport rather than Peritoneal Solute Transport Associates with Dialysis Vintage and Age of Peritoneal Dialysis Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waniewski, Jacek; Antosiewicz, Stefan; Baczynski, Daniel; Poleszczuk, Jan; Pietribiasi, Mauro; Lindholm, Bengt; Wankowicz, Zofia

    2016-01-01

    During peritoneal dialysis (PD), the peritoneal membrane undergoes ageing processes that affect its function. Here we analyzed associations of patient age and dialysis vintage with parameters of peritoneal transport of fluid and solutes, directly measured and estimated based on the pore model, for individual patients. Thirty-three patients (15 females; age 60 (21–87) years; median time on PD 19 (3–100) months) underwent sequential peritoneal equilibration test. Dialysis vintage and patient age did not correlate. Estimation of parameters of the two-pore model of peritoneal transport was performed. The estimated fluid transport parameters, including hydraulic permeability (LpS), fraction of ultrasmall pores (α u), osmotic conductance for glucose (OCG), and peritoneal absorption, were generally independent of solute transport parameters (diffusive mass transport parameters). Fluid transport parameters correlated whereas transport parameters for small solutes and proteins did not correlate with dialysis vintage and patient age. Although LpS and OCG were lower for older patients and those with long dialysis vintage, αu was higher. Thus, fluid transport parameters—rather than solute transport parameters—are linked to dialysis vintage and patient age and should therefore be included when monitoring processes linked to ageing of the peritoneal membrane. PMID:26989432

  3. Development of solute transport models in YMPYRÄ framework to simulate solute migration in military shooting and training areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warsta, L.; Karvonen, T.

    2017-12-01

    There are currently 25 shooting and training areas in Finland managed by The Finnish Defence Forces (FDF), where military activities can cause contamination of open waters and groundwater reservoirs. In the YMPYRÄ project, a computer software framework is being developed that combines existing open environmental data and proprietary information collected by FDF with computational models to investigate current and prevent future environmental problems. A data centric philosophy is followed in the development of the system, i.e. the models are updated and extended to handle available data from different areas. The results generated by the models are summarized as easily understandable flow and risk maps that can be opened in GIS programs and used in environmental assessments by experts. Substances investigated with the system include explosives and metals such as lead, and both surface and groundwater dominated areas can be simulated. The YMPYRÄ framework is composed of a three dimensional soil and groundwater flow model, several solute transport models and an uncertainty assessment system. Solute transport models in the framework include particle based, stream tube and finite volume based approaches. The models can be used to simulate solute dissolution from source area, transport in the unsaturated layers to groundwater and finally migration in groundwater to water extraction wells and springs. The models can be used to simulate advection, dispersion, equilibrium adsorption on soil particles, solubility and dissolution from solute phase and dendritic solute decay chains. Correct numerical solutions were confirmed by comparing results to analytical 1D and 2D solutions and by comparing the numerical solutions to each other. The particle based and stream tube type solute transport models were useful as they could complement the traditional finite volume based approach which in certain circumstances produced numerical dispersion due to piecewise solution of the

  4. Demonstrations in Solute Transport Using Dyes: Part II. Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butters, Greg; Bandaranayake, Wije

    1993-01-01

    A solution of the convection-dispersion equation is used to describe the solute breakthrough curves generated in the demonstrations in the companion paper. Estimation of the best fit model parameters (solute velocity, dispersion, and retardation) is illustrated using the method of moments for an example data set. (Author/MDH)

  5. A single continuum approximation of the solute transport in fractured porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, J.T.; Lee, K.J.

    1992-01-01

    Solute transport in fractured porous media is described by the single continuum model, i.e., equivalent porous medium model. In this model, one-dimensional solute transport in the fracture and two-dimensional solute transport in the porous rock matrix is considered. The network of fractures embedded in the porous rock matrix is idealized as two orthogonally intersecting families of equally spaced, parallel fractures directed at 45 o to the regional groundwater flow direction. Governing equations are solved by the finite element method, and an upstream weighting technique is used in order to prevent the oscillation of the solution in the case of highly advection dominated transport. Breakthrough curves, similar to those of the one-dimensional solute transport problem in ordinary porous media, are obtained as a function of time according to volume or flux averaging of the concentration profile across the width of the flow region. The equivalent parameters, i.e., porosity and overall coefficient of longitudinal dispersivity, are obtained by a trial-and-error method. Analyses for the non-sorbing solute transport case show that within the range of considered parameters, and except for the region very close to the source, application of the single continuum model in the idealized fracture system is sufficient for modeling solute transport in fractured porous media. This numerical scheme is shown to be applicable to a sorbing solute and radionuclide transport. (author)

  6. New methods For Modeling Transport Of Water And Solutes In Soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møldrup, Per

    Recent models for water and solute transport in unsaturated soils have been mechanistically based but numerically very involved. This dissertation concerns the development of mechanistically-based but numerically simple models for calculating and analyzing transport of water and solutes in soil...

  7. Solute transport by groundwater flow to wetland ecosystems : the environmental impact of human activities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schot, P.P.

    1991-01-01

    This thesis deals with solute transport by groundwater flow and the way in which solute transport is affected by human activities. This in relation to wetland ecosystems. Wetlands in the eastern part of the Vecht river plain in The Netherlands are historically renown for their great variety of

  8. Comparison of analytical transport and stochastic solutions for neutron slowing down in an infinite medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jahshan, S.N.; Wemple, C.A.; Ganapol, B.D.

    1993-01-01

    A comparison of the numerical solutions of the transport equation describing the steady neutron slowing down in an infinite medium with constant cross sections is made with stochastic solutions obtained from tracking successive neutron histories in the same medium. The transport equation solution is obtained using a numerical Laplace transform inversion algorithm. The basis for the algorithm is an evaluation of the Bromwich integral without analytical continuation. Neither the transport nor the stochastic solution is limited in the number of scattering species allowed. The medium may contain an absorption component as well. (orig.)

  9. Isolated effects of external bath osmolality, solute concentration, and electrical charge on solute transport across articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouran, Behdad; Arbabi, Vahid; Zadpoor, Amir A; Weinans, Harrie

    2016-12-01

    The metabolic function of cartilage primarily depends on transport of solutes through diffusion mechanism. In the current study, we use contrast enhanced micro-computed tomography to determine equilibrium concentration of solutes through different cartilage zones and solute flux in the cartilage, using osteochondral plugs from equine femoral condyles. Diffusion experiments were performed with two solutes of different charge and approximately equal molecular weight, namely iodixanol (neutral) and ioxaglate (charge=-1) in order to isolate the effects of solute's charge on diffusion. Furthermore, solute concentrations as well as bath osmolality were changed to isolate the effects of steric hindrance on diffusion. Bath concentration and bath osmolality only had minor effects on the diffusion of the neutral solute through cartilage at the surface, middle and deep zones, indicating that the diffusion of the neutral solute was mainly Fickian. The negatively charged solute diffused considerably slower through cartilage than the neutral solute, indicating a large non-Fickian contribution in the diffusion of charged molecules. The numerical models determined maximum solute flux in the superficial zone up to a factor of 2.5 lower for the negatively charged solutes (charge=-1) as compared to the neutral solutes confirming the importance of charge-matrix interaction in diffusion of molecules across cartilage. Copyright © 2016 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Particles and solutes migration in porous medium : radionuclides and clayey particles simultaneous transport under the effect of a salinity gradient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faure, M.H.

    1994-01-01

    This work deals with the radiation protection of high-level and long-life radioactive waste storages. The colloids presence in ground waters can accelerate the radionuclides migration in natural geological deposits. The aim of this thesis is then to control particularly the particles motion in porous medium in order to anticipate quantitatively their migration. Liquid chromatography columns are filled with a clayey sand and fed with a decreasing concentration sodium chloride solution in order to study the particles outlet under a salinity gradient. When the porous medium undergoes a decrease of salinity it deteriorates. The adsorption of the cations : sodium 22, calcium 45, cesium 137 and neptunium 237 is then studied by the ions exchange method. The radionuclide solution is injected before the decrease of the feed solution salinity. The decrease of the sodium chloride concentration leads to the decrease of the radionuclides concentration because the adsorption competition between the sodium ion and the injected cation is lower. The particles transport, without fouling of the porous medium, is carried out in particular physical and chemical conditions which are described. (O.L.). 71 refs., 105 figs., 26 tabs

  11. Numerical simulation of fly-ash transport in three sands of different particle-size distributions using HYDRUS-1D

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kodešová, R.; Kapička, Aleš; Lebeda, J.; Grison, Hana; Kočárek, M.; Petrovský, Eduard

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 59, č. 3 (2011), s. 206-216 ISSN 0042-790X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA300120701 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30120515 Keywords : sand * fly-ash migration * magnetic susceptibility * numerical simulation * attachment /detachment concept * filtration theory Subject RIV: DK - Soil Contamination ; De-contamination incl. Pesticides Impact factor: 0.340, year: 2011

  12. Effects of turbulent hyporheic mixing on reach-scale solute transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, K. R.; Li, A.; Packman, A. I.

    2017-12-01

    Turbulence rapidly mixes solutes and fine particles into coarse-grained streambeds. Both hyporheic exchange rates and spatial variability of hyporheic mixing are known to be controlled by turbulence, but it is unclear how turbulent mixing influences mass transport at the scale of stream reaches. We used a process-based particle-tracking model to simulate local- and reach-scale solute transport for a coarse-bed stream. Two vertical mixing profiles, one with a smooth transition from in-stream to hyporheic transport conditions and a second with enhanced turbulent transport at the sediment-water interface, were fit to steady-state subsurface concentration profiles observed in laboratory experiments. The mixing profile with enhanced interfacial transport better matched the observed concentration profiles and overall mass retention in the streambed. The best-fit mixing profiles were then used to simulate upscaled solute transport in a stream. Enhanced mixing coupled in-stream and hyporheic solute transport, causing solutes exchanged into the shallow subsurface to have travel times similar to the water column. This extended the exponential region of the in-stream solute breakthrough curve, and delayed the onset of the heavy power-law tailing induced by deeper and slower hyporheic porewater velocities. Slopes of observed power-law tails were greater than those predicted from stochastic transport theory, and also changed in time. In addition, rapid hyporheic transport velocities truncated the hyporheic residence time distribution by causing mass to exit the stream reach via subsurface advection, yielding strong exponential tempering in the in-stream breakthrough curves at the timescale of advective hyporheic transport through the reach. These results show that strong turbulent mixing across the sediment-water interface violates the conventional separation of surface and subsurface flows used in current models for solute transport in rivers. Instead, the full distribution of

  13. Affordable Freight Logistics Transport Information Management Optimisation and Asset Tracking Solution Using Smartphone GPS Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muna, Joseph T.; Prescott, Kevin

    2011-08-01

    Traditionally, freight transport and telematics solutions that exploit the GPS capabilities of in- vehicle devices to provide innovative Location Based Services (LBS) including track and trace transport systems have been the preserve of a select cluster of transport operators and organisations with the financial resources to develop the requisite custom software and hardware on which they are deployed. The average cost of outfitting a typical transport vehicle or truck with the latest Intelligent Transport System (ITS) increases the cost of the vehicle by anything from a couple to several thousand Euros, depending on the complexity and completeness of the solution. Though this does not generally deter large fleet transport owners since they typically get Return on Investment (ROI) based on economies of scale, it presents a barrier for the smaller independent entities that constitute the majority of freight transport operators [1].The North Sea Freight Intelligent Transport Solution (NS FRITS), a project co-funded by the European Commission Interreg IVB North Sea Region Programme, aims to make acquisition of such transport solutions easier for those organisations that cannot afford the expensive, bespoke systems used by their larger competitors.The project addresses transport security threats by developing a system capable of informing major actors along the freight logistics supply chain, of changing circumstances within the region's major transport corridors and between transport modes. The project also addresses issues of freight volumes, inter-modality, congestion and eco-mobility [2].

  14. Fluid flow and convective transport of solutes within the intervertebral disc

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferguson, S.J.; Ito, K.; Nolte, L.P.

    2004-01-01

    Previous experimental and analytical studies of solute transport in the intervertebral disc have demonstrated that for small molecules diffusive transport alone fulfils the nutritional needs of disc cells. It has been often suggested that fluid flow into and within the disc may enhance the transport

  15. Water flow and solute transport in floating fen root mats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stofberg, Sija F.; EATM van der Zee, Sjoerd

    2015-04-01

    be very similar and likely functionally related. Our experimental field data were used for modelling water flow and solute transport in floating fens, using HYDRUS 2D. Fluctuations of surface water and root mat, as well as geometry and unsaturated zone parameters can have a major influence on groundwater fluctuations and the exchange between rain and surface water and the water in the root mats. In combination with the duration of salt pulses in surface water, and sensitivity of fen plants to salinity (Stofberg et al. 2014, submitted), risks for rare plants can be anticipated.

  16. New diffusion-like solutions of one-speed transport equations in spherical geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahni, D.C.

    1988-01-01

    Stationary, one-speed, spherically symmetric transport equations are considered in a conservative medium. Closed-form expressions are obtained for the angular flux ψ(r, μ) that yield a total flux varying as 1/r by using Sonine transforms. Properties of this solution are studied and it is shown that the solution can not be identified as a diffusion mode solution of the transport equation. Limitations of the Sonine transform technique are noted. (author)

  17. A biomechanical triphasic approach to the transport of nondilute solutions in articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abazari, Alireza; Elliott, Janet A W; Law, Garson K; McGann, Locksley E; Jomha, Nadr M

    2009-12-16

    Biomechanical models for biological tissues such as articular cartilage generally contain an ideal, dilute solution assumption. In this article, a biomechanical triphasic model of cartilage is described that includes nondilute treatment of concentrated solutions such as those applied in vitrification of biological tissues. The chemical potential equations of the triphasic model are modified and the transport equations are adjusted for the volume fraction and frictional coefficients of the solutes that are not negligible in such solutions. Four transport parameters, i.e., water permeability, solute permeability, diffusion coefficient of solute in solvent within the cartilage, and the cartilage stiffness modulus, are defined as four degrees of freedom for the model. Water and solute transport in cartilage were simulated using the model and predictions of average concentration increase and cartilage weight were fit to experimental data to obtain the values of the four transport parameters. As far as we know, this is the first study to formulate the solvent and solute transport equations of nondilute solutions in the cartilage matrix. It is shown that the values obtained for the transport parameters are within the ranges reported in the available literature, which confirms the proposed model approach.

  18. One-dimensional spatially dependent solute transport in semi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Space dependent retardation factor is also taken. The nature of porous media and solute pollutant are considered chemically non-reactive. Initially porous domain is considered solute free and the input source condition is considered uniformly continuous. A new transformation is introduced to solve the advection dispersion ...

  19. UrbanTransport Solution An Experience From Prague

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    unique firstlady

    Based on the result of the research ... associated with road transport like its impact on environment ..... Prague is utilizing a variety of marketing strategies used for many years in ... at strategic metro stations providing customers with maps , time ...

  20. Compaction creep of quartz sand at 400-600°C: Experimental evidence for dissolution-controlled pressure solution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niemeijer, A.; Spiers, C.J.; Bos, B.

    2002-01-01

    Intergranular pressure solution (IPS) is an important compaction and deformation mechanism in quartzose rocks, but the kinetics and rate-controlling process remain unclear. The aim of the present study is to test microphysical models for compaction creep by IPS against isostatic hot pressing

  1. Sand Dunes with Frost

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    9 May 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a suite of frost-covered sand dunes in the north polar region of Mars in early spring, 2004. The dunes indicate wind transport of sand from left to right (west to east). These landforms are located near 78.1oN, 220.8oW. This picture is illuminated by sunlight from the lower left and covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) across.

  2. Late Pleistocene shallow water sand transported to the slope at IODP Sites U1484 and U1485 off the north coast of Papua New Guinea: how, when and why?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mountain, G. S.; Browning, J. V.; Bova, S. C.

    2017-12-01

    IODP Exp 363 drilled two sites on a gently seaward-dipping terrace 18 and 21 km north of Papua New Guinea, enabling the study of mechanisms that bring shallow water sediment to the deep sea. We expect past changes in sea level and precipitation / fluvial run-off dominated this record, but additional processes may have been important. We examined Hole U1484B (1031 m water depth; 223 m drilled; 99.8% recovered) and detected 339 sharp-based sand layers 0.5 cm or more thick. In contrast to the background hemipelagic nanno-bearing silty clay, sand layers are graded or massive turbidites containing detrital grains, shallow-water benthic foraminifera, shell fragments and/or wood. δ18O values of Globigerinoides ruber tied to the isotopic curve of Lisiecki and Raymo (2004) show the densest concentration of sand layers in the last 310 ka occurred during the cooling trend of MIS stage 6. Stage 2 contains significantly fewer discrete sand beds, even during the coldest part of the LGM. Other times of glacial intensification show a similarly modest correlation to peak sand deposition. Sand layers strongly correlate with high values of magnetic susceptibility (MS) measured on unsplit cores, and when mapped to the MIS time scale, MS increases match times of ice growth / falling sea level more consistently than does the density of sand layers. We attribute this to reworking of discrete sand layers by bioturbation, indicating the need for caution tying the absence of sharp-based sands to times of transgression or low precipitation / fluvial run-off. Packages of especially thick and closely-spaced sharp-based sands match seismic reflections at Site U1484. Tracing these reflections throughout the grid of hi-res MCS site survey profiles reveals the areal distribution and transport path of sand as well as a direct tie to similar sharp-based sands in the more distal Hole U1485A (1145 m water depth; 301 m drilled; 103.8% recovered.) The distribution of sands through time might be

  3. The in-situ decontamination of sand and gravel aquifers by chemically enhanced solubilization of multiple-component DNAPLS with surfactant solutions. Topical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-01-01

    Laboratory, numerical simulation, and field studies have been conducted to assess the potential use of micellar-surfactant solutions to solubilize chlorinated solvents contaminating sand and gravel aquifers. Laboratory studies were conducted at the State University of New York at Buffalo (SUNY) while numerical simulation and field work were undertaken by INTERA Inc. in collaboration with Martin Marietta Energy Systems Inc. at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) in Kentucky. Ninety-nine surfactants were screened for their ability to solubilize trichloroethene (TCE), perchloroethylene (PCE), and carbon tetrachloride (CTET). Ten of these were capable of solubilizing TCE to concentrations greater than 15,000 mg/L, compared to its aqueous solubility of 1,100 mg/L. Four surfactants were identified as good solubilizers of all three chlorinated solvents. Of these, a secondary alcohol ethoxylate was the first choice for in situ testing because of its excellent solubilizing ability and its low propensity to sorb. However, this surfactant did not meet the Commonwealth of Kentucky`s acceptance criteria. Consequently, it was decided to use a surfactant approved for use by the Food and Drug Administration as a food-grade additive. As a 1% micellar-surfactant solution, this sorbitan monooleate has a solubilization capacity of 16,000 mg TCE/L, but has a higher propensity to sorb to clays than has the alcohol ethoxylate.

  4. Light-driven solute transport in Halobacterium halobium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanyi, J. K.

    1979-01-01

    The cell membrane of Halobacterium halobium exhibits differential regions which contain crystalline arrays of a single kind of protein, termed bacteriorhodopsin. This bacterial retinal-protein complex resembles the visual pigment and, after the absorption of protons, translocates H(+) across the cell membrane, leading to an electrochemical gradient for protons between the inside and the outside of the cell. Thus, light is an alternate source of energy in these bacteria, in addition to terminal oxidation. The paper deals with work on light-driven transport in H. halobium with cell envelope vesicles. The discussion covers light-driven movements of H(+), Na(+), and K(+); light-driven amino acid transport; and apparent allosteric control of amino acid transport. The scheme of energy coupling in H. halobium vesicles appears simple, its quantitative details are quite complex and reveal regulatory phenomena. More knowledge is required of the way the coupling components are regulated by the ion gradients present.

  5. Brine transport in porous media self-similar solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.J. van Duijn (Hans); L.A. Peletier (Bert); R.J. Schotting (Ruud)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractIn this paper we analyze a model for brine transport in porous media, which includes a mass balance for the fluid, a mass balance for salt, Darcy's law and an equation of state, which relates the fluid density to the salt mass fraction. This model incorporates the effect of local volume

  6. UrbanTransport Solution An Experience From Prague | Jeremiah ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper examines the urban transport problems in Prague in Czech Republic. Based on the result of the research conducted, it was found that with the collapsed of Communism in Czech Republic, there was an upsurge in the use of private cars which was not possible during communism because the law does not ...

  7. Solute transport through porous media using asymptotic dispersivity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ber of processes and porous media properties including convective transport .... existence of regions within the porous medium in which there is minimum advective flow. .... concentration at x = L. The initial and the exit boundary conditions can be .... rial was cleaned, washed and dried to ensure that the material free from ...

  8. Reactive solute transport in an asymmetrical fracture-rock matrix system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Renjie; Zhan, Hongbin

    2018-02-01

    The understanding of reactive solute transport in a single fracture-rock matrix system is the foundation of studying transport behavior in the complex fractured porous media. When transport properties are asymmetrically distributed in the adjacent rock matrixes, reactive solute transport has to be considered as a coupled three-domain problem, which is more complex than the symmetric case with identical transport properties in the adjacent rock matrixes. This study deals with the transport problem in a single fracture-rock matrix system with asymmetrical distribution of transport properties in the rock matrixes. Mathematical models are developed for such a problem under the first-type and the third-type boundary conditions to analyze the spatio-temporal concentration and mass distribution in the fracture and rock matrix with the help of Laplace transform technique and de Hoog numerical inverse Laplace algorithm. The newly acquired solutions are then tested extensively against previous analytical and numerical solutions and are proven to be robust and accurate. Furthermore, a water flushing phase is imposed on the left boundary of system after a certain time. The diffusive mass exchange along the fracture/rock matrixes interfaces and the relative masses stored in each of three domains (fracture, upper rock matrix, and lower rock matrix) after the water flushing provide great insights of transport with asymmetric distribution of transport properties. This study has the following findings: 1) Asymmetric distribution of transport properties imposes greater controls on solute transport in the rock matrixes. However, transport in the fracture is mildly influenced. 2) The mass stored in the fracture responses quickly to water flushing, while the mass stored in the rock matrix is much less sensitive to the water flushing. 3) The diffusive mass exchange during the water flushing phase has similar patterns under symmetric and asymmetric cases. 4) The characteristic distance

  9. The effect of low-GDP solution on ultrafiltration and solute transport in continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Kyu-Hyang; Do, Jun-Young; Park, Jong-Won; Yoon, Kyung-Woo; Kim, Yong-Lim

    2013-01-01

    Several studies have reported benefits for human peritoneal mesothelial cell function of a neutral-pH dialysate low in glucose degradation products (GDPs). However, the effects of low-GDP solution on ultrafiltration (UF), transport of solutes, and control of body water remain elusive. We therefore investigated the effect of low-GDP solution on UF, solute transport, and control of body water. Among 79 new continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) patients, 60 completed a 12-month protocol (28 in a lactate-based high-GDP solution group, 32 in a lactate-based low-GDP solution group). Clinical indices--including 24-hour UF volume (UFV), 24-hour urine volume (UV), residual renal function, and dialysis adequacy--were measured at months 1, 6, and 12. At months 1, 6, and 12, UFV, glucose absorption, 4-hour dialysate-to-plasma (D/P) creatinine, and 1-hour D/P Na(+) were assessed during a modified 4.25% peritoneal equilibration test (PET). Body composition by bioelectric impedance analysis was measured at months 1 and 12 in 26 CAPD patients. Daily UFV was lower in the low-GDP group. Despite similar solute transport and aquaporin function, the low-GDP group also showed lower UFV and higher glucose absorption during the PET. Factors associated with UFV during the PET were lactate-based high-GDP solution and 1-hour D/P Na(+). No differences in volume status and obesity at month 12 were observed, and improvements in hypervolemia were equal in both groups. Compared with the high-GDP group, the low-GDP group had a lower UFV during a PET and a lower daily UFV during the first year after peritoneal dialysis initiation. Although the low-GDP group had a lower daily UFV, no difficulties in controlling edema were encountered.

  10. Diverging diamond interchange, results from the right transportation solution survey : staff summary, January 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Based on the results from this research, MoDOT can confidently state that the diverging diamond was the right transportation solution for the Interstate 44 and Route 13 intersection. The overall results show: Most Springfield area residents were ...

  11. Exact and Numerical Solutions of a Spatially-Distributed Mathematical Model for Fluid and Solute Transport in Peritoneal Dialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Cherniha

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The nonlinear mathematical model for solute and fluid transport induced by the osmotic pressure of glucose and albumin with the dependence of several parameters on the hydrostatic pressure is described. In particular, the fractional space available for macromolecules (albumin was used as a typical example and fractional fluid void volume were assumed to be different functions of hydrostatic pressure. In order to find non-uniform steady-state solutions analytically, some mathematical restrictions on the model parameters were applied. Exact formulae (involving hypergeometric functions for the density of fluid flux from blood to tissue and the fluid flux across tissues were constructed. In order to justify the applicability of the analytical results obtained, a wide range of numerical simulations were performed. It was found that the analytical formulae can describe with good approximation the fluid and solute transport (especially the rate of ultrafiltration for a wide range of values of the model parameters.

  12. Analysis of the Sodium Recirculation Theory of Solute Coupled Water Transport in Small Intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, E. H.; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær; Sørensen, J. B.

    2002-01-01

    Our previous mathematical model of solute-coupled water transport through the intestinal epithelium is extended for dealing with electrolytes rather than electroneutral solutes. A 3Na+-2K+ pump in the lateral membranes provides the energy-requiring step for driving transjunctional and translateral......, computations predict that the concentration differences between lis and bathing solutions are small for all three ions. Nevertheless, the diffusion fluxes of the ions out of lis significantly exceed their mass transports. It is concluded that isotonic transport requires recirculation of all three ions....... The computed sodium recirculation flux that is required for isotonic transport corresponds to that estimated in experiments on toad small intestine. This result is shown to be robust and independent of whether the apical entrance mechanism for the sodium ion is a channel, a SGLT1 transporter driving inward...

  13. Brain washing : Transport of cerebral extracellular fluids and solutes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bedussi, B.

    2017-01-01

    Regulation of extracellular volume and fluid composition provides a robust microenvironment for brain cells. In peripheral tissue, fluid surplus and solutes are removed from the interstitium via drainage into lymphatic channels. Since the central nervous system lacks a proper lymphatic vasculature,

  14. A compartmentalized solute transport model for redox zones in contaminated aquifers: 1. Theory and development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams , Robert H.; Loague, Keith

    2000-01-01

    This paper, the first of two parts [see Abrams and Loague, this issue], takes the compartmentalized approach for the geochemical evolution of redox zones presented by Abrams et al. [1998] and embeds it within a solute transport framework. In this paper the compartmentalized approach is generalized to facilitate the description of its incorporation into a solute transport simulator. An equivalent formulation is developed which removes any discontinuities that may occur when switching compartments. Rate‐limited redox reactions are modeled with a modified Monod relationship that allows either the organic substrate or the electron acceptor to be the rate‐limiting reactant. Thermodynamic constraints are used to inhibit lower‐energy redox reactions from occurring under infeasible geochemical conditions without imposing equilibrium on the lower‐energy reactions. The procedure used allows any redox reaction to be simulated as being kinetically limited or thermodynamically limited, depending on local geochemical conditions. Empirical reaction inhibition methods are not needed. The sequential iteration approach (SIA), a technique which allows the number of solute transport equations to be reduced, is adopted to solve the coupled geochemical/solute transport problem. When the compartmentalized approach is embedded within the SIA, with the total analytical concentration of each component as the dependent variable in the transport equation, it is possible to reduce the number of transport equations even further than with the unmodified SIA. A one‐dimensional, coupled geochemical/solute transport simulation is presented in which redox zones evolve dynamically in time and space. The compartmentalized solute transport (COMPTRAN) model described in this paper enables the development of redox zones to be simulated under both kinetic and thermodynamic constraints. The modular design of COMPTRAN facilitates the use of many different, preexisting solute transport and

  15. Fluid flow and convective transport of solutes within the intervertebral disc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Stephen J; Ito, Keita; Nolte, Lutz P

    2004-02-01

    Previous experimental and analytical studies of solute transport in the intervertebral disc have demonstrated that for small molecules diffusive transport alone fulfils the nutritional needs of disc cells. It has been often suggested that fluid flow into and within the disc may enhance the transport of larger molecules. The goal of the study was to predict the influence of load-induced interstitial fluid flow on mass transport in the intervertebral disc. An iterative procedure was used to predict the convective transport of physiologically relevant molecules within the disc. An axisymmetric, poroelastic finite-element structural model of the disc was developed. The diurnal loading was divided into discrete time steps. At each time step, the fluid flow within the disc due to compression or swelling was calculated. A sequentially coupled diffusion/convection model was then employed to calculate solute transport, with a constant concentration of solute being provided at the vascularised endplates and outer annulus. Loading was simulated for a complete diurnal cycle, and the relative convective and diffusive transport was compared for solutes with molecular weights ranging from 400 Da to 40 kDa. Consistent with previous studies, fluid flow did not enhance the transport of low-weight solutes. During swelling, interstitial fluid flow increased the unidirectional penetration of large solutes by approximately 100%. Due to the bi-directional temporal nature of disc loading, however, the net effect of convective transport over a full diurnal cycle was more limited (30% increase). Further study is required to determine the significance of large solutes and the timing of their delivery for disc physiology.

  16. TLC scheme for numerical solution of the transport equation on equilateral triangular meshes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walters, W.F.

    1983-01-01

    A new triangular linear characteristic TLC scheme for numerically solving the transport equation on equilateral triangular meshes has been developed. This scheme uses the analytic solution of the transport equation in the triangle as its basis. The data on edges of the triangle are assumed linear as is the source representation. A characteristic approach or nodal approach is used to obtain the analytic solution. Test problems indicate that the new TLC is superior to the widely used DITRI scheme for accuracy

  17. Water flow and solute transport through fractured rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolt, J.E.; Bourke, P.J.; Pascoe, D.M.; Watkins, V.M.B.; Kingdon, R.D.

    1990-09-01

    In densely fractured slate at the Nirex research site in Cornwall, the positions, orientations and hydraulic conductivities of the 380 fractures intersecting a drill hole between 9 and 50 m depth have been individually measured. These data have been used: to determine the dimensions of statistically representative volumes of the network of fractures and to predict, using discrete flow path modelling and the NAPSAC code, the total flows into the fractures when large numbers are simultaneously pressurised along various lengths of the hole. Corresponding measurements, which validated the NAPSAC code to factor of two accuracy for the Cornish site, are reported. Possibilities accounting for this factor are noted for experimental investigation, and continuing, more extensive, inter hole flow and transport measurements are outlined. The application of this experimental and theoretical approach for calculating radionuclide transport in less densely fractured rock suitable for waste disposal is discussed. (Author)

  18. Water flow and solute transport through fractured rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourke, P.J.; Kingdon, R.D.; Bolt, J.E.; Pascoe, D.M.; Watkins, V.M.B.

    1991-01-01

    In densely fractured slate at the Nirex research site in Cornwall, the positions, orientations and hydraulic conductivities of the 380 fractures intersecting a drill hole between 9 and 50 m depths have been individually measured. These data have been used: - to determine the dimensions of statistically representative volumes of the sheetwork of fractures; - to predict; using discrete flowpath modelling and the NAPSAC code; the total flows into the fractures when large numbers are simultaneously pressurised along various lengths of the hole; Corresponding measurements, which proved the modelling and validated the code to factor of two accuracy, are reported. Possibilities accounting for this factor are noted for experimental investigation, and continuing, more extensive inter-hole flow and transport measurements are outlined. The application of this experimental and theoretical approach for calculating radionuclide transport in less densely fractured rock suitable for waste disposal is discussed. 7 figs., 9 refs

  19. A transportronic solution to the problem of interorbital transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, William C.

    1992-01-01

    An all-electronic transportation system described by the term 'transportronics' is examined as a means of solving the current problem of the high cost of transporting material from low-Earth orbit (LEO) to geostationary orbit (GEO). In this transportation system, low cost electric energy at the surface of the Earth is efficiently converted into microwave power which is then efficiently formed into a narrow beam which is kept incident upon the orbital transfer vehicles (OTV's) by electronic tracking. The incident beam is efficiently captured and converted into DC power by a device which has a very high ratio of DC power output to its mass. Because the mass of the electric thruster is also low, the resulting acceleration is unprecedented for electric-propelled vehicles. However, the performance of the system in terms of transit times from LEO to GEO is penalized by the short time of contact between the beam and the vehicle in low-Earth orbits. This makes it necessary to place the Earth based transmitters and the vehicles in the equatorial plane thus introducing many geopolitical factors. Technically, however, such a system as described in the report may out-perform any other approach to transportation in the LEO to GEO regime. The report describes and analyzes all portions of the beamed microwave power transmission system in considerable detail. An economic analysis of the operating and capital costs is made with the aid of a reference system capable of placing about 130,000 kilograms of payload into GEO each year. More mature states of the system are then examined, to a level in which 60,000 metric tons per year could be placed into GEO.

  20. Numerical fluid solutions for nonlocal electron transport in hot plasmas: Equivalent diffusion versus nonlocal source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colombant, Denis; Manheimer, Wallace

    2010-01-01

    Flux limitation and preheat are important processes in electron transport occurring in laser produced plasmas. The proper calculation of both of these has been a subject receiving much attention over the entire lifetime of the laser fusion project. Where nonlocal transport (instead of simple single flux limit) has been modeled, it has always been with what we denote the equivalent diffusion solution, namely treating the transport as only a diffusion process. We introduce here a new approach called the nonlocal source solution and show it is numerically viable for laser produced plasmas. It turns out that the equivalent diffusion solution generally underestimates preheat. Furthermore, the advance of the temperature front, and especially the preheat, can be held up by artificial 'thermal barriers'. The nonlocal source method of solution, on the other hand more accurately describes preheat and can stably calculate the solution for the temperature even if the heat flux is up the gradient.

  1. Mass Transfer Behavior of Perfluorinated Chemicals in Saturated Clay-rich Sands: A Laboratory-based Study on Fate and Transport in Groundwater and Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, R. R.; Tick, G. R.; Abbott, J. B., III; Carroll, K. C.

    2017-12-01

    Perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) are a class of emerging contaminants that pose a threat to the human health and the quality of groundwater, surface water, and drinking water supplies. This study aims to elucidate the primary physicochemical factors controlling the fate and transport of the PFAS contaminants, perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS), in groundwater. Physicochemical processes of intercalation, adsorption, and desorption were investigated for the retention of PFAS at different initial aqueous-phase concentrations in modified-natural sediments composed of sand (40/50 accusand; foc = 0.04% unmodified) with low, medium, and high organic carbon contents (foc = 10, 20, and 50%) and various pre-conditioned clay-fractions. Diffusional mass-transfer limitations were evaluated based on initial PFAS concentration, specific clay structure, and resulting contaminant intercalation (d-spacing changes). A series of short- (48 hr), medium- (7 day) and long-term (30 day) batch and column experiments were conducted to determine physicochemical processes as a function of compound chemistry, sediment geochemistry, sorbent crystalline structure, and contaminant/sediment contact-time. Physicochemical parameters, PFAS concentrations, and sediment characterization were conducted using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and furnace combustion analytical techniques. The results of PFAS contaminant transport, under the different conditions tested, provide a scientific contribution with application to the development of improved risk assessments, predictions of fate and transport, and more effective remediation strategies for emerging perfluorinated contaminants in soil and groundwater.

  2. The Governor's Challenge: "Building a Stronger Virginia Today": Transportation Visions and Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Susan

    2008-01-01

    Using STM(Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) education, this emerging workforce will have the chance to creatively solve one of Virginia's biggest challenges: TRANSPORTATION. - Students will be asked to develop alternative transportation systems for the state. This competition will enable teams to work with business mentors to design creative solutions for regional gridlocks and develop other transportation systems to more easily and expediently reach all parts of the Commonwealth.

  3. New solution for transport and industrial noise protection through reflective noise barriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kralov Ivan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A new solution for protection of transportation and industrial noise through reflective noise barriers is proposed and investigated in this study. The new solution combines the advantages of the known barriers and has its own advantages in addition. The preliminary results show a very good level of noise reduction for this type of barriers.

  4. Large time behaviour of oscillatory nonlinear solute transport in porous media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duijn, van C.J.; Zee, van der S.E.A.T.M.

    2018-01-01

    Oscillations in flow occur under many different situations in natural porous media, due to tidal, daily or seasonal patterns. In this paper, we investigate how such oscillations in flow affect the transport of an initially sharp solute front, if the solute undergoes nonlinear sorption and,

  5. Reactive silica transport in fractured porous media: Analytical solutions for a system of parallel fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jianwen

    2012-04-01

    A general analytical solution is derived by using the Laplace transformation to describe transient reactive silica transport in a conceptualized 2-D system involving a set of parallel fractures embedded in an impermeable host rock matrix, taking into account of hydrodynamic dispersion and advection of silica transport along the fractures, molecular diffusion from each fracture to the intervening rock matrix, and dissolution of quartz. A special analytical solution is also developed by ignoring the longitudinal hydrodynamic dispersion term but remaining other conditions the same. The general and special solutions are in the form of a double infinite integral and a single infinite integral, respectively, and can be evaluated using Gauss-Legendre quadrature technique. A simple criterion is developed to determine under what conditions the general analytical solution can be approximated by the special analytical solution. It is proved analytically that the general solution always lags behind the special solution, unless a dimensionless parameter is less than a critical value. Several illustrative calculations are undertaken to demonstrate the effect of fracture spacing, fracture aperture and fluid flow rate on silica transport. The analytical solutions developed here can serve as a benchmark to validate numerical models that simulate reactive mass transport in fractured porous media.

  6. Dissolution enhancement and mathematical modeling of removal of residual trichloroethene in sands by ozonation during flushing with micro-nano-bubble solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Menghau; Teng, Chun-Hao; Yang, Tsung-Hsien

    2017-07-01

    Soil flushing using micro-nano-sized bubbles (MNB) in water as the flushing solution was tested in laboratory sand columns for the cleanup of residual trichloroethene (TCE) non-aqueous-phase-liquid (NAPL). Experiments considering flushing with MNB as well as ozone MNB (OZMNB) in water to treat soils contaminated with residual TCE liquid were conducted to examine effects of ozone on dissolution enhancement. The degrees of residual TCE saturation in soils, ranging from 0.44% to 7.6%, were tested. During flushings, aqueous TCE concentrations at the column exit were monitored and TCE masses remained in the columns after flushing were determined. Experimental results between runs with MNB and OZMNB in water revealed that dissolution enhancement was dependent on residual saturation conditions, and the maximum enhancement was around 9%. Governing equations consisting of three coupled partial differential equations (PDEs) were developed to model the system, and high-order finite difference (HOFD) method was employed to solve these PDEs. From mathematical modeling of reactive mass transfer under low residual saturation conditions (0.44% and 1.9%), experimental data were simulated and important controlling mechanisms were identified. It was concluded that a specific parameter pertinent to NAPL-water interfacial area in the Sherwood number had to be modified to satisfactorily describe the dissolution of TCE in the presence of MNB in water.

  7. Prolonged river water pollution due to variable-density flow and solute transport in the riverbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Guangqiu; Tang, Hongwu; Li, Ling; Barry, D. A.

    2015-04-01

    A laboratory experiment and numerical modeling were used to examine effects of density gradients on hyporheic flow and solute transport under the condition of a solute pulse input to a river with regular bed forms. Relatively low-density gradients due to an initial salt pulse concentration of 1.55 kg m-3 applied in the experiment were found to modulate significantly the pore-water flow and solute transport in the riverbed. Such density gradients increased downward flow and solute transport in the riverbed by factors up to 1.6. This resulted in a 12.2% increase in the total salt transfer from the water column to the riverbed over the salt pulse period. As the solute pulse passed, the effect of the density gradients reversed, slowing down the release of the solute back to the river water by a factor of 3.7. Numerical modeling indicated that these density effects intensified as salt concentrations in the water column increased. Simulations further showed that the density gradients might even lead to unstable flow and result in solute fingers in the bed of large bed forms. The slow release of solute from the bed back to the river led to a long tail of solute concentration in the river water. These findings have implications for assessment of impact of pollution events on river systems, in particular, long-term effects on both the river water and riverbed due to the hyporheic exchange.

  8. Integrated compartmental model for describing the transport of solute in a fractured porous medium. [FRACPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeAngelis, D.L.; Yeh, G.T.; Huff, D.D.

    1984-10-01

    This report documents a model, FRACPORT, that simulates the transport of a solute through a fractured porous matrix. The model should be useful in analyzing the possible transport of radionuclides from shallow-land burial sites in humid environments. The use of the model is restricted to transport through saturated zones. The report first discusses the general modeling approach used, which is based on the Integrated Compartmental Method. The basic equations of solute transport are then presented. The model, which assumes a known water velocity field, solves these equations on two different time scales; one related to rapid transport of solute along fractures and the other related to slower transport through the porous matrix. FRACPORT is validated by application to a simple example of fractured porous medium transport that has previously been analyzed by other methods. Then its utility is demonstrated in analyzing more complex cases of pulses of solute into a fractured matrix. The report serves as a user's guide to FRACPORT. A detailed description of data input, along with a listing of input for a sample problem, is provided. 16 references, 18 figures, 3 tables.

  9. Experimental observations of Lagrangian sand grain kinematics under bedload transport: statistical description of the step and rest regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guala, M.; Liu, M.

    2017-12-01

    The kinematics of sediment particles is investigated by non-intrusive imaging methods to provide a statistical description of bedload transport in conditions near the threshold of motion. In particular, we focus on the cyclic transition between motion and rest regimes to quantify the waiting time statistics inferred to be responsible for anomalous diffusion, and so far elusive. Despite obvious limitations in the spatio-temporal domain of the observations, we are able to identify the probability distributions of the particle step time and length, velocity, acceleration, waiting time, and thus distinguish which quantities exhibit well converged mean values, based on the thickness of their respective tails. The experimental results shown here for four different transport conditions highlight the importance of the waiting time distribution and represent a benchmark dataset for the stochastic modeling of bedload transport.

  10. Mass transfer processes and field-scale transport of organic solutes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brusseau, M.L.

    1990-01-01

    The influence of mass transfer processes, such as sorption/desorption and mass transfer between immiscible liquids and water, on the transport of organic solutes is discussed. Rate-limited sorption of organic solutes caused by a diffusion-constrained mechanism is shown to be significant under laboratory conditions. The significance of the impact of nonequilibrium sorption on field-scale transport is scale dependent. The impact of organic liquids on mass transfer and transport of organic solutes depends upon the nature of the solute and the nature and form of the organic liquid. For example, while retardation of nonionic solutes is decreased in mixed-solvent systems, (i.e. systems comprised of water and a miscible organic liquid or an immiscible liquid present in concentrations below phase separation), the retardation of organic acids may, in some cases, increase with addition of a cosolvent. While the presence of an immiscible liquid existing as a mobile phase will reduce retention of organic solutes, the presence of residual saturation of an immiscible liquid can significantly increase retention. A model is presented that incorporates the effects of retention resulting from residual saturation, as well as nonequilibrium sorption, on the transport of organic solutes. (Author) (70 refs., 3 figs.)

  11. The separation of radionuclide migration by solution and particle transport in LLRW repository buffer material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torok, J.; Buckley, L.P.; Woods, B.L.

    1989-01-01

    Laboratory-scale lysimeter experiments were performed with simulated waste forms placed in candidate buffer materials which have been chosen for a low-level radioactive waste repository. Radionuclide releases into the effluent water and radionuclide capture by the buffer material were determined. The results could not be explained by traditional solution transport mechanisms, and transport by particles released from the waste form and/or transport by buffer particles were suspected as the dominant mechanism for radionuclide release from the lysimeters. To elucidate the relative contribution of particle and solution transport, the waste forms were replaced by a wafer of neutron-activated buffer soaked with selected soluble isotopes. Particle transport was determined by the movement of gamma-emitting neutron-activation products through the lysimeter. Solution transport was quantified by comparing the migration of soluble radionuclides relative to the transport of neutron activation products. The new approach for monitoring radionuclide migration in soil is presented. It facilitates the determination of most of the fundamental coefficients required to model the transport process

  12. VS2DRTI: Simulating Heat and Reactive Solute Transport in Variably Saturated Porous Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, Richard W; Haile, Sosina S; Parkhurst, David L; Charlton, Scott R

    2018-01-29

    Variably saturated groundwater flow, heat transport, and solute transport are important processes in environmental phenomena, such as the natural evolution of water chemistry of aquifers and streams, the storage of radioactive waste in a geologic repository, the contamination of water resources from acid-rock drainage, and the geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide. Up to now, our ability to simulate these processes simultaneously with fully coupled reactive transport models has been limited to complex and often difficult-to-use models. To address the need for a simple and easy-to-use model, the VS2DRTI software package has been developed for simulating water flow, heat transport, and reactive solute transport through variably saturated porous media. The underlying numerical model, VS2DRT, was created by coupling the flow and transport capabilities of the VS2DT and VS2DH models with the equilibrium and kinetic reaction capabilities of PhreeqcRM. Flow capabilities include two-dimensional, constant-density, variably saturated flow; transport capabilities include both heat and multicomponent solute transport; and the reaction capabilities are a complete implementation of geochemical reactions of PHREEQC. The graphical user interface includes a preprocessor for building simulations and a postprocessor for visual display of simulation results. To demonstrate the simulation of multiple processes, the model is applied to a hypothetical example of injection of heated waste water to an aquifer with temperature-dependent cation exchange. VS2DRTI is freely available public domain software. © 2018, National Ground Water Association.

  13. Optimal solution of full fuzzy transportation problems using total integral ranking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sam’an, M.; Farikhin; Hariyanto, S.; Surarso, B.

    2018-03-01

    Full fuzzy transportation problem (FFTP) is a transportation problem where transport costs, demand, supply and decision variables are expressed in form of fuzzy numbers. To solve fuzzy transportation problem, fuzzy number parameter must be converted to a crisp number called defuzzyfication method. In this new total integral ranking method with fuzzy numbers from conversion of trapezoidal fuzzy numbers to hexagonal fuzzy numbers obtained result of consistency defuzzyfication on symmetrical fuzzy hexagonal and non symmetrical type 2 numbers with fuzzy triangular numbers. To calculate of optimum solution FTP used fuzzy transportation algorithm with least cost method. From this optimum solution, it is found that use of fuzzy number form total integral ranking with index of optimism gives different optimum value. In addition, total integral ranking value using hexagonal fuzzy numbers has an optimal value better than the total integral ranking value using trapezoidal fuzzy numbers.

  14. Global stability and exact solution of an arbitrary-solute nonlinear cellular mass transport system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, James D

    2014-12-01

    The prediction of the cellular state as a function of extracellular concentrations and temperatures has been of interest to physiologists for nearly a century. One of the most widely used models in the field is one where mass flux is linearly proportional to the concentration difference across the membrane. These fluxes define a nonlinear differential equation system for the intracellular state, which when coupled with appropriate initial conditions, define the intracellular state as a function of the extracellular concentrations of both permeating and nonpermeating solutes. Here we take advantage of a reparametrization scheme to extend existing stability results to a more general setting and to a develop analytical solutions to this model for an arbitrary number of extracellular solutes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Approximate solution of the transport equation by methods of Galerkin type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitkaranta, J.

    1977-01-01

    Questions of the existence, uniqueness, and convergence of approximate solutions of transport equations by methods of the Galerkin type (where trial and weighting functions are the same) are discussed. The results presented do not exclude the infinite-dimensional case. Two strategies can be followed in the variational approximation of the transport operator: one proceeds from the original form of the transport equation, while the other is based on the partially symmetrized equation. Both principles are discussed in this paper. The transport equation is assumed in a discretized multigroup form

  16. SOLUTIONS AND MEANS OF ALTERNATIVE TRANSPORT IN THE CONCEPT OF SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CATALIN POPESCU

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper aims to achieve an overview of innovative initiatives on alternative transport in recent years in the context of increasing emissions of greenhouse gases. In this context are presented the main problems caused by motorized traffic in the urban agglomerations. Also, there are mentioned measures that could be implemented in busy urban areas. On this occasion are mentioned both new technical solutions and new means of alternative transport type. Additional, specific projects and programs are highlighted using bicycle transportation. There are mentioned initiatives regarding urban transportation completed in European projects such as: CIVITAS, EFFECTS etc. The examples and figures are mainly focused on Romania.

  17. Predation and transport of persistent pathogens in GAC and slow sand filters: a threat to drinking water safety?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bichai, Françoise; Dullemont, Yolanda; Hijnen, Wim; Barbeau, Benoit

    2014-11-01

    Zooplankton has been shown to transport internalized pathogens throughout engineered drinking water systems. In this study, experimental measurements from GAC and SSF filtration tests using high influent concentrations of Cryptosporidium (1.3 × 10(6) and 3.3 × 10(4) oocysts L(-1)) and Giardia (4.8 × 10(4) cysts L(-1)) are presented and compared. A predation and transport conceptual model was developed to extrapolate these results to environmental conditions of typical (oo)cyst concentrations in surface water in order to predict concentrations of internalized (oo)cysts in filtered water. Pilot test results were used to estimate transport and survival ratios of internalized (oo)cysts following predation by rotifers in the filter beds. Preliminary indications of lower transport and survival ratios in SSF were found as compared with GAC filters. A probability of infection due to internalized (oo)cysts in filtered water was calculated under likeliest environmental conditions and under a worst-case scenario. Estimated risks under the likeliest environmental scenario were found to fall below the tolerable risk target of 10(-4) infections per person per year. A discussion is presented on the health significance of persistent pathogens that are internalized by zooplankton during granular filtration processes and released into treated water. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Sand consolidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spain, H H

    1965-01-21

    In a sand consolidation method in which there is injected a mixture of resin-forming liquids comprising an aryl-hydroxy low molecular weight compound, a water- soluble aldehyde, and a catalyst, an improvement is claimed which comprises diluting the resin-forming liquids with a diluent and with water so that the yield of the resin is sufficient to consolidate the sand particles with the minimum desirable pressure. The diluent may be mutually soluble in water and in the resin-forming liquids, and does not affect the setting time of the polymer. The aldehyde and the aryl-hydroxy compound may be in ratio of 5:1, and the diluent, methyl alcohol, is present in a ratio of 2:1 with reference to the water.

  19. Stochastic models of solute transport in highly heterogeneous geologic media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Semenov, V.N.; Korotkin, I.A.; Pruess, K.; Goloviznin, V.M.; Sorokovikova, O.S.

    2009-09-15

    A stochastic model of anomalous diffusion was developed in which transport occurs by random motion of Brownian particles, described by distribution functions of random displacements with heavy (power-law) tails. One variant of an effective algorithm for random function generation with a power-law asymptotic and arbitrary factor of asymmetry is proposed that is based on the Gnedenko-Levy limit theorem and makes it possible to reproduce all known Levy {alpha}-stable fractal processes. A two-dimensional stochastic random walk algorithm has been developed that approximates anomalous diffusion with streamline-dependent and space-dependent parameters. The motivation for introducing such a type of dispersion model is the observed fact that tracers in natural aquifers spread at different super-Fickian rates in different directions. For this and other important cases, stochastic random walk models are the only known way to solve the so-called multiscaling fractional order diffusion equation with space-dependent parameters. Some comparisons of model results and field experiments are presented.

  20. Molecular cell biology and physiology of solute transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplan, Michael J.; Seo-Mayer, Patricia; Zhang, Li

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of review An enormous body of research has been focused on exploring the mechanisms through which epithelial cells establish their characteristic polarity. It is clear that under normal circumstances cell–cell contacts mediated by the calcium-dependent adhesion proteins of the intercellular adhesion junctions are required to initiate complete polarization. Furthermore, formation of the tight, or occluding, junctions that limit paracellular permeability has long been thought to help to establish polarity by preventing the diffusion of membrane proteins between the two plasmalemmal domains. This review will discuss several selected kinases and protein complexes and highlight their relevance to transporting epithelial cell polarization. Recent findings Recent work has shed new light on the roles of junctional complexes in establishing and maintaining epithelial cell polarity. In addition, work from several laboratories, suggests that the formation of these junctions is tied to processes that regulate cellular energy metabolism. Summary Junctional complexes and energy sensing kinases constitute a novel class of machinery whose capacity to generate and modulate epithelial cell polarity is likely to have wide ranging and important physiological ramifications. PMID:18695392

  1. ORGANIZATIONAL STRESS SOURCES AND SOLUTION PROPOSALS IN PUBLIC TRANSPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Zennur GÜRBÜZ

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Organizational stress is a concept which can have negative effects for both the workers and the organizations. The purpose of this study is to determine and classify the organizational stress sources that public transportation are exposed to, and to provide suggestions for managing these stress factors. A comprehensive literature survey is made in organizational stress factors and the following classes are identified: work structure, organizational structure, organizational policy, within-company relations and physical conditions. A questionnaire is developed forAnkara EGO General Directorate; applied to 2.137 drivers in Ankara in 2016 with a meaningful return of 1.554 data sets, representing 72% of the population and results are statistically analysed. Descriptive statistics, factor analysis and related validity and regional variance analyses are performed by SPSS (22.0 software. The study revealed that: drivers are exposed to mid-level stess; and most critical stress causes are “injustice and/or insufficiency of salaries”, “aggresive, violent behavior and verbal abuse of passengers towards drivers”, “fear of losing jobs or renewal of the contract”. A significant level of variation in stres levels are identified with respect to different regions of Ankara where drivers are assigned.  Suggestions are made in relation to different stres causes to lower the stress levels exposed.

  2. Generalizing Source Geometry of Site Contamination by Simulating and Analyzing Analytical Solution of Three-Dimensional Solute Transport Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingwei Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the uneven distribution of pollutions and blur edge of pollutant area, there will exist uncertainty of source term shape in advective-diffusion equation model of contaminant transport. How to generalize those irregular source terms and deal with those uncertainties is very critical but rarely studied in previous research. In this study, the fate and transport of contaminant from rectangular and elliptic source geometry were simulated based on a three-dimensional analytical solute transport model, and the source geometry generalization guideline was developed by comparing the migration of contaminant. The result indicated that the variation of source area size had no effect on pollution plume migration when the plume migrated as far as five times of source side length. The migration of pollution plume became slower with the increase of aquifer thickness. The contaminant concentration was decreasing with scale factor rising, and the differences among various scale factors became smaller with the distance to field increasing.

  3. Modeling and sensitivity analysis on the transport of aluminum oxide nanoparticles in saturated sand: effects of ionic strength, flow rate, and nanoparticle concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Tanzina; Millwater, Harry; Shipley, Heather J

    2014-11-15

    Aluminum oxide nanoparticles have been widely used in various consumer products and there are growing concerns regarding their exposure in the environment. This study deals with the modeling, sensitivity analysis and uncertainty quantification of one-dimensional transport of nano-sized (~82 nm) aluminum oxide particles in saturated sand. The transport of aluminum oxide nanoparticles was modeled using a two-kinetic-site model with a blocking function. The modeling was done at different ionic strengths, flow rates, and nanoparticle concentrations. The two sites representing fast and slow attachments along with a blocking term yielded good agreement with the experimental results from the column studies of aluminum oxide nanoparticles. The same model was used to simulate breakthrough curves under different conditions using experimental data and calculated 95% confidence bounds of the generated breakthroughs. The sensitivity analysis results showed that slow attachment was the most sensitive parameter for high influent concentrations (e.g. 150 mg/L Al2O3) and the maximum solid phase retention capacity (related to blocking function) was the most sensitive parameter for low concentrations (e.g. 50 mg/L Al2O3). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Parallel computing solution of Boltzmann neutron transport equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ansah-Narh, T.

    2010-01-01

    The focus of the research was on developing parallel computing algorithm for solving Eigen-values of the Boltzmam Neutron Transport Equation (BNTE) in a slab geometry using multi-grid approach. In response to the problem of slow execution of serial computing when solving large problems, such as BNTE, the study was focused on the design of parallel computing systems which was an evolution of serial computing that used multiple processing elements simultaneously to solve complex physical and mathematical problems. Finite element method (FEM) was used for the spatial discretization scheme, while angular discretization was accomplished by expanding the angular dependence in terms of Legendre polynomials. The eigenvalues representing the multiplication factors in the BNTE were determined by the power method. MATLAB Compiler Version 4.1 (R2009a) was used to compile the MATLAB codes of BNTE. The implemented parallel algorithms were enabled with matlabpool, a Parallel Computing Toolbox function. The option UseParallel was set to 'always' and the default value of the option was 'never'. When those conditions held, the solvers computed estimated gradients in parallel. The parallel computing system was used to handle all the bottlenecks in the matrix generated from the finite element scheme and each domain of the power method generated. The parallel algorithm was implemented on a Symmetric Multi Processor (SMP) cluster machine, which had Intel 32 bit quad-core x 86 processors. Convergence rates and timings for the algorithm on the SMP cluster machine were obtained. Numerical experiments indicated the designed parallel algorithm could reach perfect speedup and had good stability and scalability. (au)

  5. Explicit finite-difference solution of two-dimensional solute transport with periodic flow in homogenous porous media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djordjevich Alexandar

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The two-dimensional advection-diffusion equation with variable coefficients is solved by the explicit finitedifference method for the transport of solutes through a homogenous two-dimensional domain that is finite and porous. Retardation by adsorption, periodic seepage velocity, and a dispersion coefficient proportional to this velocity are permitted. The transport is from a pulse-type point source (that ceases after a period of activity. Included are the firstorder decay and zero-order production parameters proportional to the seepage velocity, and periodic boundary conditions at the origin and at the end of the domain. Results agree well with analytical solutions that were reported in the literature for special cases. It is shown that the solute concentration profile is influenced strongly by periodic velocity fluctuations. Solutions for a variety of combinations of unsteadiness of the coefficients in the advection-diffusion equation are obtainable as particular cases of the one demonstrated here. This further attests to the effectiveness of the explicit finite difference method for solving two-dimensional advection-diffusion equation with variable coefficients in finite media, which is especially important when arbitrary initial and boundary conditions are required.

  6. Efflux of drugs and solutes from brain: the interactive roles of diffusional transcapillary transport, bulk flow and capillary transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groothuis, Dennis R; Vavra, Michael W; Schlageter, Kurt E; Kang, Eric W-Y; Itskovich, Andrea C; Hertzler, Shannon; Allen, Cathleen V; Lipton, Howard L

    2007-01-01

    We examined the roles of diffusion, convection and capillary transporters in solute removal from extracellular space (ECS) of the brain. Radiolabeled solutes (eight with passive distribution and four with capillary or cell transporters) were injected into the brains of rats (n=497) and multiple-time point experiments measured the amount remaining in brain as a function of time. For passively distributed compounds, there was a relationship between lipid:water solubility and total brain efflux:diffusional efflux, which dominated when k(p), the transcapillary efflux rate constant, was >10(0) h(-1); when 10(-1)transporters. The total efflux rate constant, k(eff), was the sum of a passive component (k(p)=0.0018 h(-1)), a convective component (k(csf)=0.2 h(-1)), and a variable, concentration-dependent component (k(x)=0 to 0.45 h(-1)). Compounds with cell membrane transporters had longer clearance half times as did an oligonucleotide, which interacted with cell surface receptors. Manipulation of physiologic state (n=35) did not affect efflux, but sucrose efflux half time was longer with pentobarbital anesthesia (24 h) than with no anesthesia or ketamine-xylazine anesthesia (2 to 3 h). These results show that solute clearance from normal brain ECS may involve multiple physiologic pathways, may be affected by anesthesia, and suggests that convection-mediated efflux may be manipulated to increase or decrease drug clearance from brain.

  7. Semianalytical solutions for contaminant transport under variable velocity field in a coastal aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koohbor, Behshad; Fahs, Marwan; Ataie-Ashtiani, Behzad; Simmons, Craig T.; Younes, Anis

    2018-05-01

    Existing closed-form solutions of contaminant transport problems are limited by the mathematically convenient assumption of uniform flow. These solutions cannot be used to investigate contaminant transport in coastal aquifers where seawater intrusion induces a variable velocity field. An adaptation of the Fourier-Galerkin method is introduced to obtain semi-analytical solutions for contaminant transport in a confined coastal aquifer in which the saltwater wedge is in equilibrium with a freshwater discharge flow. Two scenarios dealing with contaminant leakage from the aquifer top surface and contaminant migration from a source at the landward boundary are considered. Robust implementation of the Fourier-Galerkin method is developed to efficiently solve the coupled flow, salt and contaminant transport equations. Various illustrative examples are generated and the semi-analytical solutions are compared against an in-house numerical code. The Fourier series are used to evaluate relevant metrics characterizing contaminant transport such as the discharge flux to the sea, amount of contaminant persisting in the groundwater and solute flux from the source. These metrics represent quantitative data for numerical code validation and are relevant to understand the effect of seawater intrusion on contaminant transport. It is observed that, for the surface contamination scenario, seawater intrusion limits the spread of the contaminant but intensifies the contaminant discharge to the sea. For the landward contamination scenario, moderate seawater intrusion affects only the spatial distribution of the contaminant plume while extreme seawater intrusion can increase the contaminant discharge to the sea. The developed semi-analytical solution presents an efficient tool for the verification of numerical models. It provides a clear interpretation of the contaminant transport processes in coastal aquifers subject to seawater intrusion. For practical usage in further studies, the full

  8. Water flow and solute transport using environmental isotopes and modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussein, M.F.

    2001-01-01

    The deep unsaturated zone may be a useful hydrological archive in desert environments characterized by scant or sporadic rainfall and slow percolation of rainwater over decades or even centuries. This moisture archive provides a useful way to distinguish the net downward flow of recharge water, whereas the isotopic composition and concentration of the conservative solutes of the preserved moisture could be used to reconstruct the history of recharge under the prevailing deficient water balance. The major advantage of such coupled approach is to obtain independent estimates of groundwater recharge rates which are normally difficult to evaluate using the hydrological methods applied in the temperate zones. The study was conducted in the Shiekh-Zoweid/Raffa area in the northeastern coastal strip of Sinai Peninsula. Bore-holes were dry-drilled in a line perpendicular to the sea shoreline (using an 8-inch diameter hand-operated rotary rig) for the unsaturated sediment collection from successive 0.5m thick layers down to a depth of 20m. Samples were investigated for the moisture contents and the chemical and isotope composition of this moisture was determined. Physical parameters were also assessed including porosity and volumetric moisture content. Chloride mass-balance was used to calculate recharge rates through the unsaturated zone by predicting the position of the 1963-Tritium peak in the unsaturated column. Analysis of moisture, chloride and deuterium profiles showed three principle peaks (along with minor ones) in Karafin site indicating few major recharge events that have taken place during the last few decades. Adjustment of these episodes has also been attempted using two historical major rainfall events (known from nearby meteorological stations). Application of the methodology in water resources management in arid regions is discussed. (author)

  9. Chlorovirus-mediated membrane depolarization of Chlorella alters secondary active transport of solutes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarkova, Irina; Dunigan, David; Gurnon, James; Greiner, Timo; Barres, Julia; Thiel, Gerhard; Van Etten, James L

    2008-12-01

    Paramecium bursaria chlorella virus 1 (PBCV-1) is the prototype of a family of large, double-stranded DNA, plaque-forming viruses that infect certain eukaryotic chlorella-like green algae from the genus Chlorovirus. PBCV-1 infection results in rapid host membrane depolarization and potassium ion release. One interesting feature of certain chloroviruses is that they code for functional potassium ion-selective channel proteins (Kcv) that are considered responsible for the host membrane depolarization and, as a consequence, the efflux of potassium ions. This report examines the relationship between cellular depolarization and solute uptake. Annotation of the virus host Chlorella strain NC64A genome revealed 482 putative transporter-encoding genes; 224 are secondary active transporters. Solute uptake experiments using seven radioactive compounds revealed that virus infection alters the transport of all the solutes. However, the degree of inhibition varied depending on the solute. Experiments with nystatin, a drug known to depolarize cell membranes, produced changes in solute uptake that are similar but not identical to those that occurred during virus infection. Therefore, these studies indicate that chlorovirus infection causes a rapid and sustained depolarization of the host plasma membrane and that this depolarization leads to the inhibition of secondary active transporters that changes solute uptake.

  10. Continuous time random walk analysis of solute transport in fractured porous media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cortis, Andrea; Cortis, Andrea; Birkholzer, Jens

    2008-06-01

    The objective of this work is to discuss solute transport phenomena in fractured porous media, where the macroscopic transport of contaminants in the highly permeable interconnected fractures can be strongly affected by solute exchange with the porous rock matrix. We are interested in a wide range of rock types, with matrix hydraulic conductivities varying from almost impermeable (e.g., granites) to somewhat permeable (e.g., porous sandstones). In the first case, molecular diffusion is the only transport process causing the transfer of contaminants between the fractures and the matrix blocks. In the second case, additional solute transfer occurs as a result of a combination of advective and dispersive transport mechanisms, with considerable impact on the macroscopic transport behavior. We start our study by conducting numerical tracer experiments employing a discrete (microscopic) representation of fractures and matrix. Using the discrete simulations as a surrogate for the 'correct' transport behavior, we then evaluate the accuracy of macroscopic (continuum) approaches in comparison with the discrete results. However, instead of using dual-continuum models, which are quite often used to account for this type of heterogeneity, we develop a macroscopic model based on the Continuous Time Random Walk (CTRW) framework, which characterizes the interaction between the fractured and porous rock domains by using a probability distribution function of residence times. A parametric study of how CTRW parameters evolve is presented, describing transport as a function of the hydraulic conductivity ratio between fractured and porous domains.

  11. Pore connectivity effects on solute transport in rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Qinhong; Ewing, Robert P.

    2001-01-01

    Retardation of nuclear contaminants in rock matrices can lead to long retention times, allowing substantial radionuclide decay prior to eventual release. Imbibition and diffusion into the rock matrix can move contaminants away from an active fracture, thereby contributing to their retardation. However, diffusive transport in some rocks may behave anomalously because of their sparsely connected porespace, in contrast to diffusion in rocks with denser pore connections. We examined imbibition of weakly sorbing tracers into welded tuff and Indiana sandstone, and water imbibition into metagraywacke and Berea sandstone. Tuff samples were initially equilibrated to 12% and 76% water (v/v) within controlled humidity chambers, while the other rocks were air-dried. For imbibition, one face was exposed to water, with or without tracer, and uptake was measured over time. Following imbibition, tracer concentration measurements were made at fine (1 mm) increments. Three anomalous results were observed: (1) Indiana sandstone and metagraywacke showed mass of imbibed water scaling as time 0.26 , while tuff and Berea sandstone showed the more classical scaling with time 0.5 ; (2) tracer movement into dry (2% initial saturation) Indiana sandstone showed a dispersion pattern similar to that expected during tracer movement into moist (76% initial saturation) tuff; and (3) tracer concentrations at the inlet face of the tuff sample were approximately twice those deeper inside the sample. The experiment was then modeled using random walk methods on a 3-D lattice with different values of pore coordination. Network model simulations that used a pore coordination of 1.49 for Indiana sandstone and 1.56 for metagraywacke showed similar temporal scaling, a result of their porespace being close to the percolation threshold. Tracer concentration profiles in Indiana sandstone and tuff were closely matched by simulations that used pore coordinations of 1.49 and 1.68, respectively, because of how low

  12. Pore Connectivity Effects on Solute Transport in Rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oinhong Hu

    2001-01-01

    Retardation of nuclear contaminants in rock matrices can lead to long retention times, allowing substantial radionuclide decay prior to eventual release. Imbibition and diffusion into the rock matrix can move contaminants away from an active fracture, thereby contributing to their retardation. However, diffusive transport in some rocks may behave anomalously because of their sparsely connected porespace, in contrast to diffusion in rocks with denser pore connections. We examined imbibition of weakly sorbing tracers into welded tuff and Indiana sandstone, and water imbibition into metagraywacke and Berea sandstone. Tuff samples were initially equilibrated to 12% and 76% water (v/v) within controlled humidity chambers, while the other rocks were air-dried. For imbibition, one face was exposed to water, with or without tracer, and uptake was measured over time. Following imbibition, tracer concentration measurements were made at fine (1 mm) increments. Three anomalous results were observed: (1) Indiana sandstone and metagraywacke showed mass of imbibed water scaling as time 0.26 , while tuff and Berea sandstone showed the more classical scaling with time 0.05 ; (2) tracer movement into dry (2% initial saturation) Indiana sandstone showed a dispersion pattern similar to that expected during tracer movement into moist (76% initial saturation) tuft and (3) tracer concentrations at the inlet face of the tuff sample were approximately twice those deeper inside the sample. The experiment was then modeled using random walk methods on a 3-D lattice with different values of pore coordination. Network model simulations that used a pore coordination of 1.49 for Indiana sandstone and 1.56 for metagraywacke showed similar temporal scaling, a result of their porespace being close to the percolation threshold. Tracer concentration profiles in Indiana sandstone and tuff were closely matched by simulations that used pore coordinations of 1.49 and 1.68, respectively, because of how low

  13. Analytical solutions of a fractional diffusion-advection equation for solar cosmic-ray transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litvinenko, Yuri E.; Effenberger, Frederic

    2014-01-01

    Motivated by recent applications of superdiffusive transport models to shock-accelerated particle distributions in the heliosphere, we analytically solve a one-dimensional fractional diffusion-advection equation for the particle density. We derive an exact Fourier transform solution, simplify it in a weak diffusion approximation, and compare the new solution with previously available analytical results and with a semi-numerical solution based on a Fourier series expansion. We apply the results to the problem of describing the transport of energetic particles, accelerated at a traveling heliospheric shock. Our analysis shows that significant errors may result from assuming an infinite initial distance between the shock and the observer. We argue that the shock travel time should be a parameter of a realistic superdiffusive transport model.

  14. Effects of sorption and temperature on solute transport in unsaturated steady flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuentes, H.R.; Polzer, W.L.; Essington, E.H.

    1986-01-01

    It is known that temperature affects physical and chemical processes and that these processes may alter the transport of solutes in the environment. Laboratory column studies were performed in unsaturated flow conditions with a composite pulse containing iodide, cobalt, cesium and strontium each at 10 -3 M. The experiments were performed with Bandelier Tuff and produced breakthrough curves that indicate significant changes in transport due to a temperature change from 25 0 C to 5 0 C for nonconservative solutes. Also, the interpretation of the temperature and sorption data suggest that the differences in transport between 5 0 C and 25 0 C for nonconservative solutes may be predicted in a qualitative manner from batch equilibrium and nonequilibrium sorption data and the theory of sorption used in deriving the modified Freundlich isotherm equation. These effects should be of concern in modeling and management of spills and waste disposal within this range of environmental temperatures

  15. Numerical modelling of coupled fluid, heat, and solute transport in deformable fractured rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, T.; Reid, J.A.K.

    1987-01-01

    This paper reports on a three-dimensional (3D) finite-element code, MOTIF (model of transport in fractured/porous media), developed to model the coupled processes of groundwater flow, heat transport, brine transport, and one-species radionuclide transport in geological media. Three types of elements are available: a 3D continuum element, a planar fracture element that can be oriented in any arbitrary direction in 3D space or pipe flow in 3D space, and a line element for simulating fracture flow in 2D space or pipe flow in 3D space. As a quality-assurance measure, the MOTIF code was verified by comparison of its results with analytical solutions and other published numerical solutions

  16. Fluctuation theorem for channel-facilitated membrane transport of interacting and noninteracting solutes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berezhkovskii, Alexander M; Bezrukov, Sergey M

    2008-05-15

    In this paper, we discuss the fluctuation theorem for channel-facilitated transport of solutes through a membrane separating two reservoirs. The transport is characterized by the probability, P(n)(t), that n solute particles have been transported from one reservoir to the other in time t. The fluctuation theorem establishes a relation between P(n)(t) and P-(n)(t): The ratio P(n)(t)/P-(n)(t) is independent of time and equal to exp(nbetaA), where betaA is the affinity measured in the thermal energy units. We show that the same fluctuation theorem is true for both single- and multichannel transport of noninteracting particles and particles which strongly repel each other.

  17. Identification of key target markets for intermodal freight transport solutions in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joubert van Eeden

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The Accelerated and Shared Growth Initiative for South Africa (AsgiSA identified South Africa's freight logistics challenges as among the key binding constraints on the country's growth aspirations. The research presented here points to the structural imbalance between road and rail freight transport as one of the key contributors to this state of affairs. Most long-distance corridor transport has been captured by road. However, long-distance transport is a market segment that is very suitable for intermodal transportation : rail is utilised for the high-density, long-distance component and road for the feeder and distribution services at the corridor end points. A market segmentation approach is developed to identify the corridors and industries that are natural candidates for such solutions, thereby paving the way for role-players and stakeholders to initiate a dialogue on the development of appropriate solutions.

  18. Modeling of water and solute transport under variably saturated conditions: state of the art

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lappala, E.G.

    1980-01-01

    This paper reviews the equations used in deterministic models of mass and energy transport in variably saturated porous media. Analytic, quasi-analytic, and numerical solution methods to the nonlinear forms of transport equations are discussed with respect to their advantages and limitations. The factors that influence the selection of a modeling method are discussed in this paper; they include the following: (1) the degree of coupling required among the equations describing the transport of liquids, gases, solutes, and energy; (2) the inclusion of an advection term in the equations; (3) the existence of sharp fronts; (4) the degree of nonlinearity and hysteresis in the transport coefficients and boundary conditions; (5) the existence of complex boundaries; and (6) the availability and reliability of data required by the models

  19. Simulation of unsaturated flow and nonreactive solute transport in a heterogeneous soil at the field scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rockhold, M.L.

    1993-02-01

    A field-scale, unsaturated flow and solute transport experiment at the Las Cruces trench site in New Mexico was simulated as part of a ''blind'' modeling exercise to demonstrate the ability or inability of uncalibrated models to predict unsaturated flow and solute transport in spatially variable porous media. Simulations were conducted using a recently developed multiphase flow and transport simulator. Uniform and heterogeneous soil models were tested, and data from a previous experiment at the site were used with an inverse procedure to estimate water retention parameters. A spatial moment analysis was used to provide a quantitative basis for comparing the mean observed and simulated flow and transport behavior. The results of this study suggest that defensible predictions of waste migration and fate at low-level waste sites will ultimately require site-specific data for model calibration

  20. Container transport direct call – logistic solution to container transport via Estonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Tolli

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Container transport in the world grows up to 12 % every year. Chinese container transport contributes majority of container flows in international container transport. Many world seaports compete for Chinese container flows and make eff orts to get investments and direct calls from China to their ports. Estonia has a possibility to decrease its large dependence and risks due to the transit of oil and oil products and coal with the help of container flows from China. In addition to a favorable geographical location Estonia has several other important arguments, like suffi cient land in the harbours for developing a container terminal to launch extensive container transport transit from China. Port of St. Petersburg, container transport port closest to Estonia by the Baltic Sea, is overloaded. Estonia can compete for container flows directed to Moscow, Nizhniy Novgorod, Kazan and Kaluga. Construction of an international high-tech container terminal in Port of Tallinn serves as one important precondition for directing Russian transit container flows through Estonia. Such a container terminal could service also larger vessels and container flows from China. Container lines and container terminals operating as alliances are jointly able to substantially increase container flows through countries.

  1. Effect of concentration gradients on biodegradation in bench-scale sand columns with HYDRUS modeling of hydrocarbon transport and degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horel, Agota; Schiewer, Silke; Misra, Debasmita

    2015-09-01

    The present research investigated to what extent results obtained in small microcosm experiments can be extrapolated to larger settings with non-uniform concentrations. Microbial hydrocarbon degradation in sandy sediments was compared for column experiments versus homogenized microcosms with varying concentrations of diesel, Syntroleum, and fish biodiesel as contaminants. Syntroleum and fish biodiesel had higher degradation rates than diesel fuel. Microcosms showed significantly higher overall hydrocarbon mineralization percentages (p transport and degradation of the investigated fuels in vadose zone conditions similar to those in laboratory column experiments. The numerical model was used to evaluate the impact of different degradation rate constants from microcosm versus column experiments.

  2. Spatial model of convective solute transport in brain extracellular space does not support a "glymphatic" mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Byung-Ju; Smith, Alex J; Verkman, Alan S

    2016-12-01

    A "glymphatic system," which involves convective fluid transport from para-arterial to paravenous cerebrospinal fluid through brain extracellular space (ECS), has been proposed to account for solute clearance in brain, and aquaporin-4 water channels in astrocyte endfeet may have a role in this process. Here, we investigate the major predictions of the glymphatic mechanism by modeling diffusive and convective transport in brain ECS and by solving the Navier-Stokes and convection-diffusion equations, using realistic ECS geometry for short-range transport between para-arterial and paravenous spaces. Major model parameters include para-arterial and paravenous pressures, ECS volume fraction, solute diffusion coefficient, and astrocyte foot-process water permeability. The model predicts solute accumulation and clearance from the ECS after a step change in solute concentration in para-arterial fluid. The principal and robust conclusions of the model are as follows: (a) significant convective transport requires a sustained pressure difference of several mmHg between the para-arterial and paravenous fluid and is not affected by pulsatile pressure fluctuations; (b) astrocyte endfoot water permeability does not substantially alter the rate of convective transport in ECS as the resistance to flow across endfeet is far greater than in the gaps surrounding them; and (c) diffusion (without convection) in the ECS is adequate to account for experimental transport studies in brain parenchyma. Therefore, our modeling results do not support a physiologically important role for local parenchymal convective flow in solute transport through brain ECS. © 2016 Jin et al.

  3. TRACKING AND TRACING SOLUTION FOR DANGEROUS GOODS CARRIED BY INTERMODAL TRANSPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Kvet

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the problem of designing a complex tracking and tracing solution for dangerous goods transportation with the support of modern information technologies. This research activity presents a part of the “ChemLogTT” [2] project solved at the University of Žilina. The main goal of our contribution is to present basic conception of a complex developed software tool for monitoring and analyzing mentioned dangerous goods transportation.

  4. Influence of pore structure on solute transport in degraded and undegraded fen peat soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Kleimeier

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In peat soils, decomposition and degradation reduce the proportion of large pores by breaking down plant debris into smaller fragments and infilling inter-particle pore spaces. This affects water flow and solute migration which, in turn, influence reactive transport processes and biogeochemical functions. In this study we conducted flow-through reactor experiments to investigate the interplay between pore structure and solute transport in samples of undegraded and degraded peat collected in Canada and Germany, respectively. The pore size distributions and transport parameters were characterised using the breakthrough curve and two-region non-equilibrium transport model analyses for a non-reactive solute. The results of transport characterisation showed a higher fraction of immobile pores in the degraded peat with higher diffusive exchanges of solutes between the mobile and immobile pores associated with the dual-porosity structure. The rates of steady-state potential nitrate reduction were compared with pore fractions and exchange coefficients to investigate the influence of pore structure on the rates of nitrate reduction. The results indicated that the degraded peat has potential to provide the necessary boundary conditions to support nitrate removal and serves as a favourable substrate for denitrification, due to the nature of its pore structure and its lower organic carbon content compared to undegraded peat.

  5. Ion Transport in Organic Electrolyte Solution through the Pore Channels of Anodic Nanoporous Alumina Membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukutsuka, Tomokazu; Koyamada, Kohei; Maruyama, Shohei; Miyazaki, Kohei; Abe, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Ion transport in organic electrolyte solution in macro- and meso-pores was focused. • Anodic nanoporous alumina membrane was used as a porous material. • The specific ion conductivities drastically decreased in macro- and meso-pores. - Abstract: For the development of high energy density lithium-ion batteries with the high rate performance, the enhancement of the ion transport in the electrolyte solutions impregnated in the porous electrodes is a key. To study the ion transport in porous electrodes, anodic nanoporous alumina (APA) self-standing membranes with macro- or meso-pores were used as model porous materials. These membranes had nearly spherical pore channels of discrete 20–68 nm in diameters. By using the geometric shape of the pores, we attempted to evaluate the specific ion conductivities of the organic electrolyte solution dissolving lithium salt simply. AC impedance spectroscopy measurement of a four-electrode cell with membranes showed one depressed semi-circle in the Nyquist plots and this semi-circle can be assigned as the ion transport resistance in the pores. The specific ion conductivities evaluated from the ion transport resistances and the geometric parameters showed very small values, even in the macro-pores, as compared with that of the bulk electrolyte solution.

  6. The simulation of solute transport: An approach free of numerical dispersion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrera, J.; Melloni, G.

    1987-01-01

    The applicability of most algorithms for simulation of solute transport is limited either by instability or by numerical dispersion, as seen by a review of existing methods. A new approach is proposed that is free of these two problems. The method is based on the mixed Eulerian-Lagrangian formulation of the mass-transport problem, thus ensuring stability. Advection is simulated by a variation of reverse-particle tracking that avoids the accumulation of interpolation errors, thus preventing numerical dispersion. The algorithm has been implemented in a one-dimensional code. Excellent results are obtained, in comparison with an analytical solution. 36 refs., 14 figs., 1 tab

  7. Verification of T2VOC using an analytical solution for VOC transport in vadose zone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shan, C. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1995-03-01

    T2VOC represents an adaption of the STMVOC to the TOUGH2 environment. In may contaminated sites, transport of volatile organic chemicals (VOC) is a serious problem which can be simulated by T2VOC. To demonstrate the accuracy and robustness of the code, we chose a practical problem of VOC transport as the test case, conducted T2VOC simulations, and compared the results of T2VOC with those of an analytical solution. The agreements between T2VOC and the analytical solutions are excellent. In addition, the numerical results of T2VOC are less sensitive to grid size and time step to a certain extent.

  8. Preliminary modeling for solute transport in a fractured zone at the Korea underground research tunnel (KURT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Chung Kyun; Lee, Jaek Wang; Baik, Min Hoon; Jeong, Jong Tae [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-02-15

    Migration tests were performed with conservative tracers in a fractured zone that had a single fracture of about 2.5 m distance at the KURT. To interpret the migration of the tracers in the fractured rock, a solute transport model was developed. A two dimensional variable aperture channel model was adopted to describe the fractured path and hydrology, and a particle tracking method was used for solute transport. The simulation tried not only to develop a migration model of solutes for open flow environments but also to produce ideas for a better understanding of solute behaviours in indefinable fracture zones by comparing them to experimental results. The results of our simulations and experiments are described as elution and breakthrough curves, and are quantified by momentum analysis. The main retardation mechanism of nonsorbing tracers, including matrixdiffusion, was investigated.

  9. Limit Theorems and Their Relation to Solute Transport in Simulated Fractured Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, D. M.; Benson, D. A.; Meerschaert, M. M.

    2003-12-01

    Solute particles that travel through fracture networks are subject to wide velocity variations along a restricted set of directions. This may result in super-Fickian dispersion along a few primary scaling directions. The fractional advection-dispersion equation (FADE), a modification of the original advection-dispersion equation in which a fractional derivative replaces the integer-order dispersion term, has the ability to model rapid, non-Gaussian solute transport. The FADE assumes that solute particle motions converge to either α -stable or operator stable densities, which are modeled by spatial fractional derivatives. In multiple dimensions, the multi-fractional dispersion derivative dictates the order and weight of differentiation in all directions, which correspond to the statistics of large particle motions in all directions. This study numerically investigates the presence of super- Fickian solute transport through simulated two-dimensional fracture networks. An ensemble of networks is gen

  10. Mineral sands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents an outlook of the Australian mineral sand industry and covers the major operators. It is shown that conscious of an environmentally minded public, the Australian miners have led the way in the rehabilitation of mined areas. Moreover the advanced ceramic industry is generating exciting new perspectives for zircon producers and there is a noticeable growth in the electronic market for rare earths, but in long term the success may depend as much on environmental management and communication skills as on mining and processing skills

  11. Analytical solution of electrohydrodynamic flow and transport in rectangular channels: inclusion of double layer effects

    KAUST Repository

    Joekar-Niasar, V.

    2013-01-25

    Upscaling electroosmosis in porous media is a challenge due to the complexity and scale-dependent nonlinearities of this coupled phenomenon. "Pore-network modeling" for upscaling electroosmosis from pore scale to Darcy scale can be considered as a promising approach. However, this method requires analytical solutions for flow and transport at pore scale. This study concentrates on the development of analytical solutions of flow and transport in a single rectangular channel under combined effects of electrohydrodynamic forces. These relations will be used in future works for pore-network modeling. The analytical solutions are valid for all regimes of overlapping electrical double layers and have the potential to be extended to nonlinear Boltzmann distribution. The innovative aspects of this study are (a) contribution of overlapping of electrical double layers to the Stokes flow as well as Nernst-Planck transport has been carefully included in the analytical solutions. (b) All important transport mechanisms including advection, diffusion, and electromigration have been included in the analytical solutions. (c) Fully algebraic relations developed in this study can be easily employed to upscale electroosmosis to Darcy scale using pore-network modeling. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.

  12. Analytical solution of electrohydrodynamic flow and transport in rectangular channels: inclusion of double layer effects

    KAUST Repository

    Joekar-Niasar, V.; Schotting, R.; Leijnse, A.

    2013-01-01

    Upscaling electroosmosis in porous media is a challenge due to the complexity and scale-dependent nonlinearities of this coupled phenomenon. "Pore-network modeling" for upscaling electroosmosis from pore scale to Darcy scale can be considered as a promising approach. However, this method requires analytical solutions for flow and transport at pore scale. This study concentrates on the development of analytical solutions of flow and transport in a single rectangular channel under combined effects of electrohydrodynamic forces. These relations will be used in future works for pore-network modeling. The analytical solutions are valid for all regimes of overlapping electrical double layers and have the potential to be extended to nonlinear Boltzmann distribution. The innovative aspects of this study are (a) contribution of overlapping of electrical double layers to the Stokes flow as well as Nernst-Planck transport has been carefully included in the analytical solutions. (b) All important transport mechanisms including advection, diffusion, and electromigration have been included in the analytical solutions. (c) Fully algebraic relations developed in this study can be easily employed to upscale electroosmosis to Darcy scale using pore-network modeling. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.

  13. Used Fuel Logistics: Decades of Experience with transportation and Interim storage solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orban, G.; Shelton, C.

    2015-07-01

    Used fuel inventories are growing worldwide. While some countries have opted for a closed cycle with recycling, numerous countries must expand their interim storage solutions as implementation of permanent repositories is taking more time than foreseen. In both cases transportation capabilities will have to be developed. AREVA TN has an unparalleled expertise with transportation of used fuel. For more than 50 years AREVA TN has safely shipped more than 7,000 used fuel transport casks. The transportation model that was initially developed in the 1970s has been adapted and enhanced over the years to meet more restrictive regulatory requirements and evolving customer needs, and to address public concerns. The numerous “lessons learned” have offered data and guidance that have allowed for also efficient and consistent improvement over the decades. AREVA TN has also an extensive experience with interim dry storage solutions in many countries on-site but also is working with partners to developed consolidated interim storage facility. Both expertise with storage and transportation contribute to safe, secure and smooth continuity of the operations. This paper will describe decades of experience with a very successful transportation program as well as interim storage solutions. (Author)

  14. Anomalous solute transport in saturated porous media: Relating transport model parameters to electrical and nuclear magnetic resonance properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Ryan D; Binley, Andrew; Keating, Kristina; France, Samantha; Osterman, Gordon; Day-Lewis, Frederick D.; Singha, Kamini

    2015-01-01

    The advection-dispersion equation (ADE) fails to describe commonly observed non-Fickian solute transport in saturated porous media, necessitating the use of other models such as the dual-domain mass-transfer (DDMT) model. DDMT model parameters are commonly calibrated via curve fitting, providing little insight into the relation between effective parameters and physical properties of the medium. There is a clear need for material characterization techniques that can provide insight into the geometry and connectedness of pore spaces related to transport model parameters. Here, we consider proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), direct-current (DC) resistivity, and complex conductivity (CC) measurements for this purpose, and assess these methods using glass beads as a control and two different samples of the zeolite clinoptilolite, a material that demonstrates non-Fickian transport due to intragranular porosity. We estimate DDMT parameters via calibration of a transport model to column-scale solute tracer tests, and compare NMR, DC resistivity, CC results, which reveal that grain size alone does not control transport properties and measured geophysical parameters; rather, volume and arrangement of the pore space play important roles. NMR cannot provide estimates of more-mobile and less-mobile pore volumes in the absence of tracer tests because these estimates depend critically on the selection of a material-dependent and flow-dependent cutoff time. Increased electrical connectedness from DC resistivity measurements are associated with greater mobile pore space determined from transport model calibration. CC was hypothesized to be related to length scales of mass transfer, but the CC response is unrelated to DDMT.

  15. Transcellular movement of hydroxyurea is mediated by specific solute carrier transporters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Aisha L.; Franke, Ryan M.; Sparreboom, Alex; Ware, Russell E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Hydroxyurea has proven laboratory and clinical therapeutic benefits for sickle cell anemia (SCA) and other diseases, yet many questions remain regarding its in vivo pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles. Previous reports suggest that hydroxyurea passively diffuses across cells, but its observed rapid absorption and distribution are more consistent with facilitated or active transport. We investigated the potential role of solute carrier (SLC) transporters in cellular uptake and accumulation of hydroxyurea. Materials and Methods Passive diffusion of hydroxyurea across cell membranes was determined using the parallel artificial membrane permeability assay. SLC transporter screens were conducted using in vitro intracellular drug accumulation and transcellular transport assays in cell lines and oocytes overexpressing SLC transporters. Gene expression of SLC transporters was measured by real-time PCR in human tissues and cell lines. Results Hydroxyurea had minimal diffusion across a lipid bilayer but was a substrate for 5 different SLC transporters belonging to the OCTN and OATP families of transporters and urea transporters A and B. Further characterization of hydroxyurea transport revealed that cellular uptake by OATP1B3 is time and temperature dependent and inhibited by known substrates of OATP1B3. Urea transporters A and B are expressed differentially in human tissues and erythroid cells, and transport hydroxyurea bidirectionally via facilitated diffusion. Conclusions These studies provide new insight into drug transport proteins that may be involved in the in vivo absorption, cellular distribution, and elimination of hydroxyurea. Elucidation of hydroxyurea transcellular movement should improve our understanding of its pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, and may help explain some of the inter-patient drug variability observed in patients with SCA. PMID:21256917

  16. An Experimental Study on Solute Transport in One-Dimensional Clay Soil Columns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Zaheer

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Solute transport in low-permeability media such as clay has not been studied carefully up to present, and we are often unclear what the proper governing law is for describing the transport process in such media. In this study, we composed and analyzed the breakthrough curve (BTC data and the development of leaching in one-dimensional solute transport experiments in low-permeability homogeneous and saturated media at small scale, to identify key parameters controlling the transport process. Sodium chloride (NaCl was chosen to be the tracer. A number of tracer tests were conducted to inspect the transport process under different conditions. The observed velocity-time behavior for different columns indicated the decline of soil permeability when switching from tracer introducing to tracer flushing. The modeling approaches considered were the Advection-Dispersion Equation (ADE, Two-Region Model (TRM, Continuous Time Random Walk (CTRW, and Fractional Advection-Dispersion Equation (FADE. It was found that all the models can fit the transport process very well; however, ADE and TRM were somewhat unable to characterize the transport behavior in leaching. The CTRW and FADE models were better in capturing the full evaluation of tracer-breakthrough curve and late-time tailing in leaching.

  17. Quantifying the relative contributions of different solute carriers to aggregate substrate transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taslimifar, Mehdi; Oparija, Lalita; Verrey, Francois; Kurtcuoglu, Vartan; Olgac, Ufuk; Makrides, Victoria

    2017-01-01

    Determining the contributions of different transporter species to overall cellular transport is fundamental for understanding the physiological regulation of solutes. We calculated the relative activities of Solute Carrier (SLC) transporters using the Michaelis-Menten equation and global fitting to estimate the normalized maximum transport rate for each transporter (Vmax). Data input were the normalized measured uptake of the essential neutral amino acid (AA) L-leucine (Leu) from concentration-dependence assays performed using Xenopus laevis oocytes. Our methodology was verified by calculating Leu and L-phenylalanine (Phe) data in the presence of competitive substrates and/or inhibitors. Among 9 potentially expressed endogenous X. laevis oocyte Leu transporter species, activities of only the uniporters SLC43A2/LAT4 (and/or SLC43A1/LAT3) and the sodium symporter SLC6A19/B0AT1 were required to account for total uptake. Furthermore, Leu and Phe uptake by heterologously expressed human SLC6A14/ATB0,+ and SLC43A2/LAT4 was accurately calculated. This versatile systems biology approach is useful for analyses where the kinetics of each active protein species can be represented by the Hill equation. Furthermore, its applicable even in the absence of protein expression data. It could potentially be applied, for example, to quantify drug transporter activities in target cells to improve specificity. PMID:28091567

  18. Test of the 'glymphatic' hypothesis demonstrates diffusive and aquaporin-4-independent solute transport in rodent brain parenchyma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Alex J; Yao, Xiaoming; Dix, James A; Jin, Byung-Ju; Verkman, Alan S

    2017-08-21

    Transport of solutes through brain involves diffusion and convection. The importance of convective flow in the subarachnoid and paravascular spaces has long been recognized; a recently proposed 'glymphatic' clearance mechanism additionally suggests that aquaporin-4 (AQP4) water channels facilitate convective transport through brain parenchyma. Here, the major experimental underpinnings of the glymphatic mechanism were re-examined by measurements of solute movement in mouse brain following intracisternal or intraparenchymal solute injection. We found that: (i) transport of fluorescent dextrans in brain parenchyma depended on dextran size in a manner consistent with diffusive rather than convective transport; (ii) transport of dextrans in the parenchymal extracellular space, measured by 2-photon fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, was not affected just after cardiorespiratory arrest; and (iii) Aqp4 gene deletion did not impair transport of fluorescent solutes from sub-arachnoid space to brain in mice or rats. Our results do not support the proposed glymphatic mechanism of convective solute transport in brain parenchyma.

  19. Transport of Phanerochaete chrysosporium and Mucor hiemalis f. irnsingii spores through water-saturated quartz sands; Transport von Phanerochaete chrysosporium- und Mucor hiemalis f. irnsingii-Sporen durch wassergesaettigten Quarzsand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoque, E.; Klotz, D.; Teichmann, G.; Lang, H.; Wolf, M. [GSF - Forschungszentrum fuer Umwelt und Gesundheit GmbH, Neuherberg (Germany). Inst. fuer Hydrologie; Beisker, W. [GSF, Inst. fuer Pathologie (Germany)

    2001-11-01

    Just as bacteria so can aquatic fungi contribute effectively to pollutant elimination, at least in superficial groundwaters. However, very little is known about this. Nor is it known whether fungal spores are capable of being transported through sedimentary cavities. At least fungal spores are for some part of similar size as bacteria. We here report for the first time on a demonstration of the migration through quartz sand of spores of the two fungal species Phanerochaete chrysosporium and Mucor hiemalis f. irnsingii. [German] Neben Bakterien koennen auch aquatische Pilze, zumindest im oberflaechennahen Grundwasser, effiziente Beitraege zur Schadstoffentgiftung leisten. Darueber ist aber sehr wenig bekannt. Es ist auch nicht bekannt, ob ueberhaupt Pilzsporen durch Sedimenthohlraeume transportiert werden koennen, obwohl die Pilzsporen z.T. aehnliche Abmessungen wie Bakterien haben. Hier berichten wir erstmalig ueber den Nachweis der Migration von Sporen der beiden Pilzarten Phanerochaete chrysosporium und Mucor hiemalis f. irnsingii durch Quarzsand. (orig.)

  20. Modeling variably saturated subsurface solute transport with MODFLOW-UZF and MT3DMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morway, Eric D.; Niswonger, Richard G.; Langevin, Christian D.; Bailey, Ryan T.; Healy, Richard W.

    2013-01-01

    The MT3DMS groundwater solute transport model was modified to simulate solute transport in the unsaturated zone by incorporating the unsaturated-zone flow (UZF1) package developed for MODFLOW. The modified MT3DMS code uses a volume-averaged approach in which Lagrangian-based UZF1 fluid fluxes and storage changes are mapped onto a fixed grid. Referred to as UZF-MT3DMS, the linked model was tested against published benchmarks solved analytically as well as against other published codes, most frequently the U.S. Geological Survey's Variably-Saturated Two-Dimensional Flow and Transport Model. Results from a suite of test cases demonstrate that the modified code accurately simulates solute advection, dispersion, and reaction in the unsaturated zone. Two- and three-dimensional simulations also were investigated to ensure unsaturated-saturated zone interaction was simulated correctly. Because the UZF1 solution is analytical, large-scale flow and transport investigations can be performed free from the computational and data burdens required by numerical solutions to Richards' equation. Results demonstrate that significant simulation runtime savings can be achieved with UZF-MT3DMS, an important development when hundreds or thousands of model runs are required during parameter estimation and uncertainty analysis. Three-dimensional variably saturated flow and transport simulations revealed UZF-MT3DMS to have runtimes that are less than one tenth of the time required by models that rely on Richards' equation. Given its accuracy and efficiency, and the wide-spread use of both MODFLOW and MT3DMS, the added capability of unsaturated-zone transport in this familiar modeling framework stands to benefit a broad user-ship.

  1. User's guide to revised method-of-characteristics solute-transport model (MOC--version 31)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konikow, Leonard F.; Granato, G.E.; Hornberger, G.Z.

    1994-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey computer model to simulate two-dimensional solute transport and dispersion in ground water (Konikow and Bredehoeft, 1978; Goode and Konikow, 1989) has been modified to improve management of input and output data and to provide progressive run-time information. All opening and closing of files are now done automatically by the program. Names of input data files are entered either interactively or using a batch-mode script file. Names of output files, created automatically by the program, are based on the name of the input file. In the interactive mode, messages are written to the screen during execution to allow the user to monitor the status and progress of the simulation and to anticipate total running time. Information reported and updated during a simulation include the current pumping period and time step, number of particle moves, and percentage completion of the current time step. The batch mode enables a user to run a series of simulations consecutively, without additional control. A report of the model's activity in the batch mode is written to a separate output file, allowing later review. The user has several options for creating separate output files for different types of data. The formats are compatible with many commercially available applications, which facilitates graphical postprocessing of model results. Geohydrology and Evaluation of Stream-Aquifer Relations in the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint River Basin, Southeastern Alabama, Northwestern Florida, and Southwestern Georgia By Lynn J. Torak, Gary S. Davis, George A. Strain, and Jennifer G. Herndon Abstract The lower Apalachieola-Chattahoochec-Flint River Basin is underlain by Coastal Plain sediments of pre-Cretaceous to Quaternary age consisting of alternating units of sand, clay, sandstone, dolomite, and limestone that gradually thicken and dip gently to the southeast. The stream-aquifer system consism of carbonate (limestone and dolomite) and elastic sediments

  2. Determination of the solid consumption in the transport of sands in sea beds with gold 198; Determinacion del gasto solido en el transporte de arenas en lechos marinos con oro 198

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez A, G

    1983-07-01

    The study of the movement of sediments in sea beds, is necessary when one plans to build a port. Among the techniques used for this studies, it is the radiotracer balance that gives an useful estimation of the quantity of sediment that it moves per day and by meter (perpendicular to the displacement). The main objectives of this work are: to) to present the characteristics of the obtaining of the used radiotracer, describing details those used safety measures, b) to describe the handling of the radiotracer and it radiological safety, during the transport and injection in the sea bottom, c) description of the detection way and the used equipment, d) to describe the information processing obtained in the field and finally, e) the estimate of the solid consumption and the determination of the direction and speed of displacement of those sediments in the sea bottom, in front of the Tabasco coast, to be used jointly with the information obtained by means of other techniques so that one can make a good planning of the operations of dredging during the construction and later on the maintenance of the Dos Bocas marine terminal. The first step is to obtain the radiotracer that in this case was sand of uniform grain metric, marked superficially with Gold-198. The second step is to transport the sand to the place of interest, to place it in the injection equipment and to deposit it in the sea bottom. The third step is to detect the radiotracer in the sea bed, from a craft that drags a sled, which takes mounted a scintillation detector of sodium iodide activated with thallium NaI(Tl) (probe). The fourth step is to process the field information and to obtain the corresponding results. (Author)

  3. Inverse Porosity-Hydraulic Conductivity Relationship in Sand-and-Gravel Aquifers Determined From Analysis of Geophysical Well Logs: Implications for Transport Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, R. H.

    2004-05-01

    It is intuitive to think of hydraulic conductivity K as varying directly and monotonically with porosity P in porous media. However, laboratory studies and field observations have documented a possible inverse relationship between these two parameters in unconsolidated deposits under certain grain-size distributions and packing arrangements. This was confirmed at two sites in sand-and-gravel aquifers on Cape Cod, Massachusetts, where sets of geophysical well logs were used to examine the interdependence of several aquifer properties. Along with K and P, the resistivity R and the natural-gamma activity G of the surrounding sediments were measured as a function of depth. Qualitative examination of field results from the first site was useful in locating a contaminant plume and inferred an inverse relation between K and P; this was substantiated by a rigorous multivariate analysis of log data collected from the second site where K and P were determined to respond in a bipolar manner among the four independent variables. Along with this result come some implications regarding our conceptual understanding of contaminant transport processes in the shallow subsurface. According to Darcy's law, the interstitial fluid velocity V is proportional to the ratio K/P and, consequently, a general inverse K-P relationship implies that values of V can extend over a much wider range than conventionally assumed. This situation introduces a pronounced flow stratification within these granular deposits that can result in large values of longitudinal dispersivity; faster velocities occur in already fast zones and slower velocities in already slow zones. An inverse K-P relationship presents a new perspective on the physical processes associated with groundwater flow and transport. Although the results of this study apply strictly to the Cape Cod aquifers, they may merit a re-evaluation of modeling approaches undertaken at other locations having similar geologic environments.

  4. Solution of the neutron transport problem with anisotropic scattering in cylindrical geometry by the decomposition method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncalves, G.A.; Bogado Leite, S.Q.; Vilhena, M.T. de

    2009-01-01

    An analytical solution has been obtained for the one-speed stationary neutron transport problem, in an infinitely long cylinder with anisotropic scattering by the decomposition method. Series expansions of the angular flux distribution are proposed in terms of suitably constructed functions, recursively obtainable from the isotropic solution, to take into account anisotropy. As for the isotropic problem, an accurate closed-form solution was chosen for the problem with internal source and constant incident radiation, obtained from an integral transformation technique and the F N method

  5. Numerical Solution of the Electron Transport Equation in the Upper Atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woods, Mark Christopher [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Holmes, Mark [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States); Sailor, William C [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-07-01

    A new approach for solving the electron transport equation in the upper atmosphere is derived. The problem is a very stiff boundary value problem, and to obtain an accurate numerical solution, matrix factorizations are used to decouple the fast and slow modes. A stable finite difference method is applied to each mode. This solver is applied to a simplifieed problem for which an exact solution exists using various versions of the boundary conditions that might arise in a natural auroral display. The numerical and exact solutions are found to agree with each other to at least two significant digits.

  6. Particle and solute migration in porous media. Modeling of simultaneous transport of clay particles and radionuclides in a salinity gradient; Migration de particules et de solutes en milieu poreux. Modelisation du transport simultane de particules argileuses et de radionucleides sous l`effet d`un gradient de salinite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faure, M H

    1994-03-01

    Understanding the mechanisms which control the transient transport of particles and radionuclides in natural and artificial porous media is a key problem for the assessment of safety of radioactive waste disposals. An experimental study has been performed to characterize the clayey particle mobility in porous media: a laboratory- made column, packed with an unconsolidated sand bentonite (5% weight) sample, is flushed with a salt solution. An original method of salinity gradient allowed us to show and to quantify some typical behaviours of this system: threshold effects in the peptization of particles, creation of preferential pathways, formation of immobile water zones induce solute-transfer limitation. The mathematical modelling accounts for a phenomenological law, where the distribution of particles between the stagnant water zone and the porous medium is a function of sodium chloride concentration. This distribution function is associated with a radionuclide adsorption model, and is included in a convective dispersive transport model with stagnant water zones. It allowed us to simulate the particle and solute transport when the salt environment is modified. The complete model has been validated with experiments involving cesium, calcium and neptunium in a sodium chloride gradient. (author). refs., figs., tabs.

  7. Analytic solutions for colloid transport with time- or depth-dependent retention in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elucidating and quantifying the transport of industrial nanoparticles (e.g. silver, carbon nanotubes, and graphene oxide) and other colloid-size particles such as viruses and bacteria is important to safeguard and manage the quality of the subsurface environment. Analytic solutions were derived for...

  8. Semianalytical Solutions for Transport in Aquifer and Fractured Clay Matrix System

    Science.gov (United States)

    A three-dimensional mathematical model that describes transport of contaminant in a horizontal aquifer with simultaneous diffusion into a fractured clay formation is proposed. A group of analytical solutions is derived based on specific initial and boundary conditions as well as ...

  9. Determination of a closed-form solution for the multidimensional transport equation using a fractional derivative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zabadal, J.; Vilhena, M.T.; Segatto, C.F.; Pazos, R.P.Ruben Panta.

    2002-01-01

    In this work we construct a closed-form solution for the multidimensional transport equation rewritten in integral form which is expressed in terms of a fractional derivative of the angular flux. We determine the unknown order of the fractional derivative comparing the kernel of the integral equation with the one of the Riemann-Liouville definition of fractional derivative. We report numerical simulations

  10. Determination of a closed-form solution for the multidimensional transport equation using a fractional derivative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zabadal, J. E-mail: jorge.zabadal@ufrgs.br; Vilhena, M.T. E-mail: vilhena@mat.ufrgs.br; Segatto, C.F. E-mail: cynthia@mat.ufrgs.br; Pazos, R.P.Ruben Panta. E-mail: rpp@mat.pucrgs.br

    2002-07-01

    In this work we construct a closed-form solution for the multidimensional transport equation rewritten in integral form which is expressed in terms of a fractional derivative of the angular flux. We determine the unknown order of the fractional derivative comparing the kernel of the integral equation with the one of the Riemann-Liouville definition of fractional derivative. We report numerical simulations.

  11. Positive solution of a time and energy dependent neutron transport problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pao, C.V.

    1975-01-01

    A constructive method is given for the determination of a solution and an existence--uniqueness theorem for some nonlinear time and energy dependent neutron transport problems, including the linear transport system. The geometry of the medium under consideration is allowed to be either bounded or unbounded which includes the geometry of a finite or infinite cylinder, a half-space and the whole space R/subm/ (m=1,2,center-dotcenter-dotcenter-dot). Our approach to the problem is by successive approximation which leads to various recursion formulas for the approximations in terms of explicit integrations. It is shown under some Lipschitz conditions on the nonlinear functions, which describe the process of neutrons absorption, fission, and scattering, that the sequence of approximations converges to a unique positive solution. Since these conditions are satisfied by the linear transport equation, all the results for the nonlinear system are valid for the linear transport problem. In the general nonlinear problem, the existence of both local and global solutions are discussed, and an iterative process for the construction of the solution is given

  12. Relationship between application scale and maximum time latency in intelligent transport solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knoop, V.; Lint, J. van; Vries, J.; Kester, L.J.H.M.; Passchier, I.

    2013-01-01

    Congestion is a major problem in large, urbanized areas. Intelligent transport solutions aim to reduce this problem. In general, traffic is monitored with the use of sensors, the resulting data are processed, a traffic state is estimated, and a control measure is computed and implemented. The

  13. Direct interaction between linear electron transfer chains and solute transport systems in bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elferink, Marieke G.L.; Hellingwerf, Klaas J.; Belkum, Marco J. van; Poolman, Bert; Konings, Wil N.

    1984-01-01

    In studies on alanine and lactose transport in Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides we have demonstrated that the rate of solute uptake in this phototrophic bacterium is regulated by the rate of light-induced cyclic electron transfer. In the present paper the interaction between linear electron transfer

  14. Application of finite element method in the solution of transport equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maiorino, J.R.; Vieira, W.J.

    1985-01-01

    It is presented the application of finite element method in the solution of second order transport equation (self-adjoint) for the even parity flux. The angular component is treated by expansion in Legendre polinomials uncoupled of the spatial component, which is approached by an expansion in base functions, interpolated in each spatial element. (M.C.K.) [pt

  15. MaSTiS, microorganism and solute transport in streams, model documentation and user manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    In-stream fate and transport of solutes and microorganisms need to be understood to evaluate suitability of waters for agricultural, recreational, and household uses and eventually minimize surface water contamination. Concerns over safety of this water resulted in development of predictive models f...

  16. Effects of two Asian sand dusts transported from the dust source regions of Inner Mongolia and northeast China on murine lung eosinophilia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Miao, E-mail: hemiao.cmu@gmail.com [Environment and Chronic Non-communicable Disease Research Center, College of Public Health, China Medical University, 11001 Shenyang (China); Department of Health Sciences, Oita University of Nursing and Health Sciences, 870-1201 Oita (Japan); Ichinose, Takamichi, E-mail: ichinose@oita-nhs.ac.jp [Department of Health Sciences, Oita University of Nursing and Health Sciences, 870-1201 Oita (Japan); Song, Yuan, E-mail: freude@med.uoeh-u.ac.jp [Department of Immunology and Parasitology, School of Medicine, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Iseigaoka, Yahata-nishi-ku, Kitakyushu, 807-8555 Fukuoka (Japan); Yoshida, Yasuhiro, E-mail: songyuan1107@163.com [Department of Immunology and Parasitology, School of Medicine, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Iseigaoka, Yahata-nishi-ku, Kitakyushu, 807-8555 Fukuoka (Japan); Arashidani, Keiichi, E-mail: arashi@snow.ocn.ne.jp [Department of Immunology and Parasitology, School of Medicine, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Iseigaoka, Yahata-nishi-ku, Kitakyushu, 807-8555 Fukuoka (Japan); Yoshida, Seiichi, E-mail: syoshida@oita-nhs.ac.jp [Department of Health Sciences, Oita University of Nursing and Health Sciences, 870-1201 Oita (Japan); Liu, Boying, E-mail: boyingliu321@gmail.com [Environment and Chronic Non-communicable Disease Research Center, College of Public Health, China Medical University, 11001 Shenyang (China); Department of Health Sciences, Oita University of Nursing and Health Sciences, 870-1201 Oita (Japan); Nishikawa, Masataka, E-mail: mnishi@nies.go.jp [Environmental Chemistry Division, National Institute for Environmental Studies, 305-8506 Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Takano, Hirohisa, E-mail: htakano@health.env.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Environmental Health Division, Department of Environmental Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto daigaku-Katsura, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8530 (Japan); and others

    2013-11-01

    The quality and quantity of toxic materials adsorbed onto Asian sand dust (ASD) are different based on dust source regions and passage routes. The aggravating effects of two ASDs (ASD1 and ASD2) transported from the source regions of Inner Mongolia and northeast China on lung eosinophilia were compared to clarify the role of toxic materials in ASD. The ASDs contained different amounts of lipopolysaccharides (LPS) and β-glucan (ASD1 < ASD2) and SiO{sub 2} (ASD1 > ASD2). CD-1 mice were instilled intratracheally with ASD1, ASD2 and/or ovalbumin (OVA) four times at 2-week intervals. ASD1 and ASD2 enhanced eosinophil recruitment induced by OVA in the submucosa of the airway, with goblet cell proliferation in the bronchial epithelium. ASD1 and ASD2 synergistically increased OVA-induced eosinophil-relevant cytokines interleukin-5 (IL-5), IL-13 (ASD1 < ASD2) and chemokine eotaxin (ASD1 > ASD2) in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. ASD2 aggravating effects on lung eosinophilia were greater than ASD1. The role of LPS and β-glucan in ASD2 on the production of pro-inflammatory mediators was assessed using in vitro bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) from wild type, Toll-like receptor 2-deficient (TLR2 −/−), TLR4 −/−, and MyD88 −/− mice (on Balb/c background). ASD2-stimulated TLR2 −/− BMDMs enhanced IL-6, IL-12, TNF-α, MCP-1 and MIP-1α secretion compared with ASD2-stimulated TLR4 −/− BMDMs. Protein expression from ASD2-stimulated MyD88 −/− BMDM were very low or undetectable. The in vitro results indicate that lung eosinophilia caused by ASD is TLR4 dependent. Therefore, the aggravation of OVA-related lung eosinophilia by ASD may be dependent on toxic substances derived from microbes, such as LPS, rather than SiO{sub 2}. - Highlights: • Asian sand dust (ASD) from the deserts of China causes serious respiratory problems. • The aggravating effects of two ASDs on lung eosinophilia were compared. • The ASDs contained different LPS and β-glucan (ASD1

  17. Effects of two Asian sand dusts transported from the dust source regions of Inner Mongolia and northeast China on murine lung eosinophilia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Miao; Ichinose, Takamichi; Song, Yuan; Yoshida, Yasuhiro; Arashidani, Keiichi; Yoshida, Seiichi; Liu, Boying; Nishikawa, Masataka; Takano, Hirohisa

    2013-01-01

    The quality and quantity of toxic materials adsorbed onto Asian sand dust (ASD) are different based on dust source regions and passage routes. The aggravating effects of two ASDs (ASD1 and ASD2) transported from the source regions of Inner Mongolia and northeast China on lung eosinophilia were compared to clarify the role of toxic materials in ASD. The ASDs contained different amounts of lipopolysaccharides (LPS) and β-glucan (ASD1 2 (ASD1 > ASD2). CD-1 mice were instilled intratracheally with ASD1, ASD2 and/or ovalbumin (OVA) four times at 2-week intervals. ASD1 and ASD2 enhanced eosinophil recruitment induced by OVA in the submucosa of the airway, with goblet cell proliferation in the bronchial epithelium. ASD1 and ASD2 synergistically increased OVA-induced eosinophil-relevant cytokines interleukin-5 (IL-5), IL-13 (ASD1 ASD2) in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. ASD2 aggravating effects on lung eosinophilia were greater than ASD1. The role of LPS and β-glucan in ASD2 on the production of pro-inflammatory mediators was assessed using in vitro bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) from wild type, Toll-like receptor 2-deficient (TLR2 −/−), TLR4 −/−, and MyD88 −/− mice (on Balb/c background). ASD2-stimulated TLR2 −/− BMDMs enhanced IL-6, IL-12, TNF-α, MCP-1 and MIP-1α secretion compared with ASD2-stimulated TLR4 −/− BMDMs. Protein expression from ASD2-stimulated MyD88 −/− BMDM were very low or undetectable. The in vitro results indicate that lung eosinophilia caused by ASD is TLR4 dependent. Therefore, the aggravation of OVA-related lung eosinophilia by ASD may be dependent on toxic substances derived from microbes, such as LPS, rather than SiO 2 . - Highlights: • Asian sand dust (ASD) from the deserts of China causes serious respiratory problems. • The aggravating effects of two ASDs on lung eosinophilia were compared. • The ASDs contained different LPS and β-glucan (ASD1 2 (ASD1 > ASD2). • The ASD2 aggravating effects on lung

  18. Field-scale water flow and solute transport : SWAP model concepts, parameter estimation and case studies = [Waterstroming en transport van opgeloste stoffen op veldschaal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dam, van J.C.

    2000-01-01

    Water flow and solute transport in top soils are important elements in many environmental studies. The agro- and ecohydrological model SWAP (Soil-Water-Plant-Atmosphere) has been developed to simulate simultaneously water flow, solute transport, heat flow and crop growth at field scale

  19. Shelter Index and a simple wind speed parameter to characterize vegetation control of sand transport threshold and Flu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillies, J. A.; Nield, J. M.; Nickling, W. G.; Furtak-Cole, E.

    2014-12-01

    Wind erosion and dust emissions occur in many dryland environments from a range of surfaces with different types and amounts of vegetation. Understanding how vegetation modulates these processes remains a research challenge. Here we present results from a study that examines the relationship between an index of shelter (SI=distance from a point to the nearest upwind vegetation/vegetation height) and particle threshold expressed as the ratio of wind speed measured at 0.45 times the mean plant height divided by the wind speed at 17 m when saltation commences, and saltation flux. The results are used to evaluate SI as a parameter to characterize the influence of vegetation on local winds and sediment transport conditions. Wind speed, wind direction, saltation activity and point saltation flux were measured at 35 locations in defined test areas (~13,000 m2) in two vegetation communities: mature streets of mesquite covered nebkhas and incipient nebkhas dominated by low mesquite plants. Measurement positions represent the most open areas, and hence those places most susceptible to wind erosion among the vegetation elements. Shelter index was calculated for each measurement position for each 10° wind direction bin using digital elevation models for each site acquired using terrestrial laser scanning. SI can show the susceptibility to wind erosion at different time scales, i.e., event, seasonal, or annual, but in a supply-limited system it can fail to define actual flux amounts due to a lack of knowledge of the distribution of sediment across the surface of interest with respect to the patterns of SI.

  20. Initial transport and retention behaviors of ZnO nanoparticles in quartz sand porous media coated with Escherichia coli biofilm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Xujia; Wang, Xueting; Tong, Meiping; Kim, Hyunjung

    2013-01-01

    The significance of biofilm on the transport and deposition behaviors of ZnO nanoparticles were examined under a series of environmentally relevant ionic strength at two fluid velocities of 4 m-d −1 and 8 m-d −1 . Biofilm enhanced nanoparticles retention in porous media under all examined conditions. The greater deposition was also observed in extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) coated surfaces by employment of quartz microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) system. Derjaguin–Landau–Verwey–Overbeek (DLVO) failed to interpret more ZnO nanoparticles deposition on biofilm (EPS) coated silica surfaces. Chemical interaction and physical morphology of biofilm contributed to this greater deposition (retention). Biofilm affected the spacial distribution of retained ZnO nanoparticles as well. Relatively steeper slope of retained profiles were observed in the presence of biofilm, corresponding to the greater deviation from colloid filtration theory (CFT). Pore space constriction via biofilm induced more nanoparticle trapped in the column inlet, leading to greater deviations (σln k f ) from the CFT. Highlights: ► Biofilm reduced the mobility of ZnO nanoparticles in column. ► DLVO and non-DLVO interactions contributed the more nanoparticles deposition. ► Biofilm also affected the spacial distribution of ZnO nanoparticles in column. ► Greater deviation from classic filtration theory was observed with biofilm. ► Physical structure of biofilm induced greater deviation from log-linear prediction. -- Biofilm enhanced ZnO nanoparticle deposition and altered spacial distribution in porous media

  1. Modeling study of solute transport in the unsaturated zone. Information and data sets. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polzer, W.L.; Fuentes, H.R.; Springer, E.P.; Nyhan, J.W.

    1986-05-01

    The Environmental Science Group (HSE-12) is conducting a study to compare various approaches of modeling water and solute transport in porous media. Various groups representing different approaches will model a common set of transport data so that the state of the art in modeling and field experimentation can be discussed in a positive framework with an assessment of current capabilities and future needs in this area of research. This paper provides information and sets of data that will be useful to the modelers in meeting the objectives of the modeling study. The information and data sets include: (1) a description of the experimental design and methods used in obtaining solute transport data, (2) supporting data that may be useful in modeling the data set of interest, and (3) the data set to be modeled

  2. Solution to the monoenergetic time-dependent neutron transport equation with a time-varying source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganapol, B.D.

    1986-01-01

    Even though fundamental time-dependent neutron transport problems have existed since the inception of neutron transport theory, it has only been recently that a reliable numerical solution to one of the basic problems has been obtained. Experience in generating numerical solutions to time-dependent transport equations has indicated that the multiple collision formulation is the most versatile numerical technique for model problems. The formulation coupled with a moment reconstruction of each collided flux component has led to benchmark-quality (four- to five-digit accuracy) numerical evaluation of the neutron flux in plane infinite geometry for any degree of scattering anisotropy and for both pulsed isotropic and beam sources. As will be shown in this presentation, this solution can serve as a Green's function, thus extending the previous results to more complicated source situations. Here we will be concerned with a time-varying source at the center of an infinite medium. If accurate, such solutions have both pedagogical and practical uses as benchmarks against which other more approximate solutions designed for a wider class of problems can be compared

  3. A nonequilibrium model for reactive contaminant transport through fractured porous media: Model development and semianalytical solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Nitin; Ojha, C. S. P.; Sharma, P. K.

    2012-10-01

    In this study a conceptual model that accounts for the effects of nonequilibrium contaminant transport in a fractured porous media is developed. Present model accounts for both physical and sorption nonequilibrium. Analytical solution was developed using the Laplace transform technique, which was then numerically inverted to obtain solute concentration in the fracture matrix system. The semianalytical solution developed here can incorporate both semi-infinite and finite fracture matrix extent. In addition, the model can account for flexible boundary conditions and nonzero initial condition in the fracture matrix system. The present semianalytical solution was validated against the existing analytical solutions for the fracture matrix system. In order to differentiate between various sorption/transport mechanism different cases of sorption and mass transfer were analyzed by comparing the breakthrough curves and temporal moments. It was found that significant differences in the signature of sorption and mass transfer exists. Applicability of the developed model was evaluated by simulating the published experimental data of Calcium and Strontium transport in a single fracture. The present model simulated the experimental data reasonably well in comparison to the model based on equilibrium sorption assumption in fracture matrix system, and multi rate mass transfer model.

  4. Lateral transport of solutes in microfluidic channels using electrochemically generated gradients in redox-active surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoyang; Abbott, Nicholas L

    2011-04-15

    We report principles for a continuous flow process that can separate solutes based on a driving force for selective transport that is generated by a lateral concentration gradient of a redox-active surfactant across a microfluidic channel. Microfluidic channels fabricated with gold electrodes lining each vertical wall were used to electrochemically generate concentration gradients of the redox-active surfactant 11-ferrocenylundecyl-trimethylammonium bromide (FTMA) in a direction perpendicular to the flow. The interactions of three solutes (a hydrophobic dye, 1-phenylazo-2-naphthylamine (yellow AB), an amphiphilic molecule, 2-(4,4-difluoro-5,7-dimethyl-4-bora-3a,4a-diaza-s-indacene-3-pentanoyl)-1-hexadecanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (BODIPY C(5)-HPC), and an organic salt, 1-methylpyridinium-3-sulfonate (MPS)) with the lateral gradients in surfactant/micelle concentration were shown to drive the formation of solute-specific concentration gradients. Two distinct physical mechanisms were identified to lead to the solute concentration gradients: solubilization of solutes by micelles and differential adsorption of the solutes onto the walls of the microchannels in the presence of the surfactant concentration gradient. These two mechanisms were used to demonstrate delipidation of a mixture of BODIPY C(5)-HPC (lipid) and MPS and purification of BODIPY C(5)-HPC from a mixture of BODIPY C(5)-HPC and yellow AB. Overall, the results of this study demonstrate that lateral concentration gradients of redox-active surfactants formed within microfluidic channels can be used to transport solutes across the microfluidic channels in a solute-dependent manner. The approach employs electrical potentials (solutions having high ionic strength (>0.1M), and offers the basis of continuous processes for the purification or separation of solutes in microscale systems. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  5. A numerical solution of the coupled proton-H atom transport equations for the proton aurora

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basu, B.; Jasperse, J.R.; Grossbard, N.J.

    1990-01-01

    A numerical code has been developed to solve the coupled proton-H atom linear transport equations for the proton aurora. The transport equations have been simplified by using plane-parallel geometry and the forward-scattering approximations only. Otherwise, the equations and their numerical solutions are exact. Results are presented for the particle fluxes and the energy deposition rates, and they are compared with the previous analytical results that were obtained by using additional simplifying approximations. It is found that although the analytical solutions for the particle fluxes differ somewhat from the numerical solutions, the energy deposition rates calculated by the two methods agree to within a few percent. The accurate particle fluxes given by the numerical code are useful for accurate calculation of the characteristic quantities of the proton aurora, such as the ionization rates and the emission rates

  6. A Review of Darcy's Law: Limitations and Alternatives for Predicting Solute Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steenhuis, Tammo; Kung, K.-J. Sam; Jaynes, Dan; Helling, Charles S.; Gish, Tim; Kladivko, Eileen

    2016-04-01

    Darcy's Law that was derived originally empirically 160 years ago, has been used successfully in calculating the (Darcy) flux in porous media throughout the world. However, field and laboratory experiments have demonstrated that the Darcy flux employed in the convective disperse equation could only successfully predict solute transport under two conditions: (1) uniformly or densely packed porous media; and (2) field soils under relatively dry condition. Employing the Darcy flux for solute transport in porous media with preferential flow pathways was problematic. In this paper we examine the theoretical background behind these field and laboratory observations and then provide an alternative to predict solute movement. By examining the characteristics of the momentum conservation principles on which Darcy's law is based, we show under what conditions Darcy flux can predict solute transport in porous media of various complexity. We find that, based on several case studies with capillary pores, Darcy's Law inherently merges momentum and in that way erases information on pore-scale velocities. For that reason the Darcy flux cannot predict flow in media with preferential flow conduits where individual pore velocities are essential in predicting the shape of the breakthrough curve and especially "the early arrival" of solutes. To overcome the limitations of the assumption in Darcy's law, we use Jury's conceptualization and employ the measured chemical breakthrough curve as input to characterize the impact of individual preferential flow pathways on chemical transport. Specifically, we discuss how best to take advantage of Jury's conceptualization to extract the pore-scale flow velocity to accurately predict chemical transport through soils with preferential flow pathways.

  7. Modeling water flow and solute transport in unsaturated zone inside NSRAWD project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constantin, A.; Diaconu, D.; Bucur, C.; Genty, A.

    2015-01-01

    The NSRAWD project (2010-2013) - Numerical Simulations for Radioactive Waste Disposal was initiated under a collaboration agreement between the Institute for Nuclear Research and the French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (CEA). The context of the project was favorable to combine the modeling activities with an experimental part in order to improve and validate the numerical models used so far to simulate water flow and solute transport at Saligny site, Romania. The numerical models developed in the project were refined and validated on new hydrological data gathered between 2010-2012 by a monitoring station existent on site which performs automatic determination of soil water content and matrix potential, as well as several climate parameters (wind, temperature and precipitations). Water flow and solute transport was modeled in transient conditions, by taking into consideration, as well as neglecting the evapotranspiration phenomenon, on the basis of a tracer test launched on site. The determination of dispersivities for solute transport was targeted from the solute plume. The paper presents the main results achieved in the NSRAWD project related to water flow and solute transport in the unsaturated area of the Saligny site. The results indicated satisfactory predictions for the simulation of water flow in the unsaturated area, in steady state and transient conditions. In the case of tracer transport modeling, dispersivity coefficients could not be finally well fitted for the data measured on site and in order to obtain a realistic preview over the values of these parameters, further investigations are recommended. The article is followed by the slides of the presentation

  8. A complete NUHOMS {sup registered} solution for storage and transport of high burnup spent fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bondre, J. [Transnuclear, Inc. (AREVA Group), Fremont, CA (United States)

    2004-07-01

    The discharge burnups of spent fuel from nuclear power plants keep increasing with plants discharging or planning to discharge fuel with burnups in excess of 60,000 MWD/MTU. Due to limited capacity of spent fuel pools, transfer of older cooler spent fuel from fuel pool to dry storage, and very limited options for transport of spent fuel, there is a critical need for dry storage of high burnup, higher heat load spent fuel so that plants could maintain their full core offload reserve capability. A typical NUHOMS {sup registered} solution for dry spent fuel storage is shown in the Figure 1. Transnuclear, Inc. offers two advanced NUHOMS {sup registered} solutions for the storage and transportation of high burnup fuel. One includes the NUHOMS {sup registered} 24PTH system for plants with 90.7 Metric Ton (MT) crane capacity; the other offers the higher capacity NUHOMS {sup registered} 32PTH system for higher crane capacity. These systems include NUHOMS {sup registered} - 24PTH and -32PTH Transportable Canisters stored in a concrete storage overpack (HSM-H). These canisters are designed to meet all the requirements of both storage and transport regulations. They are designed to be transported off-site either directly from the spent fuel pool or from the storage overpack in a suitable transport cask.

  9. Analytical solution and simplified analysis of coupled parent-daughter steady-state transport with multirate mass transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. Haggerty

    2013-01-01

    In this technical note, a steady-state analytical solution of concentrations of a parent solute reacting to a daughter solute, both of which are undergoing transport and multirate mass transfer, is presented. Although the governing equations are complicated, the resulting solution can be expressed in simple terms. A function of the ratio of concentrations, In (daughter...

  10. Oil sands tailings management project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godwalt, C. [Alberta WaterSMART, Calgary, AB (Canada); Kotecha, P. [Suncor Energy Inc, Calgary, AB (Canada); Aumann, C. [Alberta Innovates - Technology Futures, Alberta Governement, AB (Canada)

    2010-11-15

    The Oil sands leadership initiative (OSLI) works with the Government of Alberta on the development of the oil sands industry, considering environmental, economical and social aspects. Water management was identified as one of most important areas to focus on. Alberta WaterSMART was requested to support the development and the management of projects resulting from the work done or underway in this field. The development of a regional water management solution stood out as the most interesting solution to obtain significant results. In the Athabasca Region, oil sands producers work independently on their water sourcing and disposal with particular attention to fresh water conservation and economics. The Athabasca River represents a source for mines and distant saline aquifers are the target of steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) operators. As part of a four-phase project aiming to study the environmental and economic footprint (EEF) benefit of alternatives for Athabasca oil sands production water supply and disposal, the purpose of the tailings water management project was to identify tailings treatment technologies that are ready to be implemented, and to design and evaluate solutions in order to improve regional oil sands production water sourcing and disposal. Alternatives were evaluated based on their total EEF, applying a lifecycle assessment methodology with a particular attention on the quantification of important performance indicators. 25 refs., 8 tabs., 40 figs.

  11. Oil sands tailings management project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godwalt, C.; Kotecha, P.; Aumann, C.

    2010-11-01

    The Oil sands leadership initiative (OSLI) works with the Government of Alberta on the development of the oil sands industry, considering environmental, economical and social aspects. Water management was identified as one of most important areas to focus on. Alberta WaterSMART was requested to support the development and the management of projects resulting from the work done or underway in this field. The development of a regional water management solution stood out as the most interesting solution to obtain significant results. In the Athabasca Region, oil sands producers work independently on their water sourcing and disposal with particular attention to fresh water conservation and economics. The Athabasca River represents a source for mines and distant saline aquifers are the target of steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) operators. As part of a four-phase project aiming to study the environmental and economic footprint (EEF) benefit of alternatives for Athabasca oil sands production water supply and disposal, the purpose of the tailings water management project was to identify tailings treatment technologies that are ready to be implemented, and to design and evaluate solutions in order to improve regional oil sands production water sourcing and disposal. Alternatives were evaluated based on their total EEF, applying a lifecycle assessment methodology with a particular attention on the quantification of important performance indicators. 25 refs., 8 tabs., 40 figs.

  12. Control and optimization of solute transport in a thin porous tube

    KAUST Repository

    Griffiths, I. M.

    2013-03-01

    Predicting the distribution of solutes or particles in flows within porous-walled tubes is essential to inform the design of devices that rely on cross-flow filtration, such as those used in water purification, irrigation devices, field-flow fractionation, and hollow-fibre bioreactors for tissue-engineering applications. Motivated by these applications, a radially averaged model for fluid and solute transport in a tube with thin porous walls is derived by developing the classical ideas of Taylor dispersion. The model includes solute diffusion and advection via both radial and axial flow components, and the advection, diffusion, and uptake coefficients in the averaged equation are explicitly derived. The effect of wall permeability, slip, and pressure differentials upon the dispersive solute behaviour are investigated. The model is used to explore the control of solute transport across the membrane walls via the membrane permeability, and a parametric expression for the permeability required to generate a given solute distribution is derived. The theory is applied to the specific example of a hollow-fibre membrane bioreactor, where a uniform delivery of nutrient across the membrane walls to the extra-capillary space is required to promote spatially uniform cell growth. © 2013 American Institute of Physics.

  13. Non-cooperative and cooperative solutions of government subsidy on public transportation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Husniah Hennie

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with two models of government subsidy given to a public transport operator: (i the subsidy for buying bus from an appointed public transport manufacturer, and (ii the subsidy for reimbursing reduced ticket price for passengers. The models are developed to determine the maximum profit for both the public transport operator and the manufacturer. Since we consider two parties – the public transport operator and the manufacturer of the bus, then we use game theoretical approach by considering non-cooperative and cooperative solutions. Furthermore, since the bus is repairable we consider virtual age to model the preventive maintenance and we consider minimal repair to model the corrective maintenance. We analyse both type of subsidy models and give some numerical examples which show the effects of different subsidies to the profit of operator and manufacturer. The result of the numerical examples indicates that reducing ticket price would give a higher profit both to the operator and the manufacturer.

  14. Modeling of water flow and solute transport in unsaturated heterogeneous fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bresler, E.; Dagan, G.

    1982-01-01

    A comprehensive model which considers dispersive solute transport, nonsteady moisture flow regimes and complex boundary conditions is described. The main assumptions are: vertical flow; spatial variability which is associated with the saturated hydraulic conductivity K/sub s/ occurs in the horizontal plane, but is constant in the profile, and has a lognormal probability distribution function (PDF); deterministic recharge and solute concentration are applied during infiltration; the soil is at uniform water content and salt concentration prior to infiltration. The problem is to solve, for arbitrary K/sub s/, the Richards' equation of flow simultaneously with the diffusion-convection equation for salt transport, with the boundary and initial conditions appropriate to infiltration-redistribution. Once this is achieved, the expectation and variance of various quantities of interest (solute concentration, moisture content) are obtained by using the statistical averaging procedure and the given PDF of K/sub s/. Since the solution of Richards' equation for the infiltration-redistribution cycle is extremely difficult (for a given K/sub s/), an approxiate solution is derived by using the concept of piston flow type wetting fronts. Similarly, accurate numerical solutions are used as input for the same statistical averaging procedure. The stochastic model is applied to two spatially variable soils by using both accurate numerical solutions and the simplified water and salt transport models. A comparison between the results shows that the approximate simplified models lead to quite accurate values of the expectations and variances of the flow variables for the entire field. It is suggested that in spatially variable fields, stochastic modeling represents the actual flow phenomena realistically, and provides the main statistical moments by using simplified flow models which can be used with confidence in applications

  15. Oil sands supply outlook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunbar, R.

    2004-01-01

    In March 2004, The Canadian Energy Research Institute released a report on the expected future supply from Alberta's oil sands. The report indicates that the future for the already well-established oil sands industry is promising, particularly given the outlook for oil prices. The challenges facing the industry include higher industry supply costs and the need for innovative commercial and technological solutions to address the risks of irregularities and changes in crude oil prices. In 2003, the industry produced 874 thousand barrels per day of synthetic crude oil and unprocessed crude bitumen. This represents 35 per cent of Canada's total oil production. Current production capacity has increased to 1.0 million barrels per day (mbpd) due to new projects. This number may increase to 3.5 mbpd by 2017. Some new projects may be deferred due to the higher raw bitumen and synthetic crude oil supply costs. This presentation provided supply costs for a range of oil sands recovery technologies and production projections under various business scenarios. tabs., figs

  16. Solute transport on the sub 100 ms scale across the lipid bilayer membrane of individual proteoliposomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohlsson, Gabriel; Tabaei, Seyed R; Beech, Jason; Kvassman, Jan; Johanson, Urban; Kjellbom, Per; Tegenfeldt, Jonas O; Höök, Fredrik

    2012-11-21

    Screening assays designed to probe ligand and drug-candidate regulation of membrane proteins responsible for ion-translocation across the cell membrane are wide spread, while efficient means to screen membrane-protein facilitated transport of uncharged solutes are sparse. We report on a microfluidic-based system to monitor transport of uncharged solutes across the membrane of multiple (>100) individually resolved surface-immobilized liposomes. This was accomplished by rapidly switching (solution above dye-containing liposomes immobilized on the floor of a microfluidic channel. With liposomes encapsulating the pH-sensitive dye carboxyfluorescein (CF), internal changes in pH induced by transport of a weak acid (acetic acid) could be measured at time scales down to 25 ms. The applicability of the set up to study biological transport reactions was demonstrated by examining the osmotic water permeability of human aquaporin (AQP5) reconstituted in proteoliposomes. In this case, the rate of osmotic-induced volume changes of individual proteoliposomes was time resolved by imaging the self quenching of encapsulated calcein in response to an osmotic gradient. Single-liposome analysis of both pure and AQP5-containing liposomes revealed a relatively large heterogeneity in osmotic permeability. Still, in the case of AQP5-containing liposomes, the single liposome data suggest that the membrane-protein incorporation efficiency depends on liposome size, with higher incorporation efficiency for larger liposomes. The benefit of low sample consumption and automated liquid handling is discussed in terms of pharmaceutical screening applications.

  17. Analytical solution for the transport equation for neutral particles in cylindrical and Cartesian geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncalves, Glenio Aguiar

    2003-01-01

    In this work, we are reported analytical solutions for the transport equation for neutral particles in cylindrical and cartesian geometry. For the cylindrical geometry, it is applied the Hankel transform of order zero in the S N approximation of the one-dimensional cylindrical transport equation, assuming azimuthal symmetry and isotropic scattering. This procedure is coined HTSN method. The anisotropic problem is handled using the decomposition method, generating a recursive approach, which the HTSN solution is used as initial condition. For cartesian geometry, the one and two dimensional transport equation is derived in the angular variable as many time as the degree of the anisotropic scattering. This procedure leads to set of integro-differential plus one differential equation that can be really solved by the variable separation method. Following this procedure, it was possible to come out with the Case solution for the one-dimensional problem. Numerical simulations are reported for the cylindrical transport problem both isotropic and anisotropic case of quadratic degree. (author)

  18. Modelling offshore sand wave evolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nemeth, Attila; Hulscher, Suzanne J.M.H.; van Damme, Rudolf M.J.

    2007-01-01

    We present a two-dimensional vertical (2DV) flow and morphological numerical model describing the behaviour of offshore sand waves. The model contains the 2DV shallow water equations, with a free water surface and a general bed load formula. The water movement is coupled to the sediment transport

  19. Mathematical model formulation and validation of water and solute transport in whole hamster pancreatic islets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, James D; Benson, Charles T; Critser, John K

    2014-08-01

    Optimization of cryopreservation protocols for cells and tissues requires accurate models of heat and mass transport. Model selection often depends on the configuration of the tissue. Here, a mathematical and conceptual model of water and solute transport for whole hamster pancreatic islets has been developed and experimentally validated incorporating fundamental biophysical data from previous studies on individual hamster islet cells while retaining whole-islet structural information. It describes coupled transport of water and solutes through the islet by three methods: intracellularly, intercellularly, and in combination. In particular we use domain decomposition techniques to couple a transmembrane flux model with an interstitial mass transfer model. The only significant undetermined variable is the cellular surface area which is in contact with the intercellularly transported solutes, Ais. The model was validated and Ais determined using a 3×3 factorial experimental design blocked for experimental day. Whole islet physical experiments were compared with model predictions at three temperatures, three perfusing solutions, and three islet size groups. A mean of 4.4 islets were compared at each of the 27 experimental conditions and found to correlate with a coefficient of determination of 0.87±0.06 (mean ± SD). Only the treatment variable of perfusing solution was found to be significant (p<0.05). We have devised a model that retains much of the intrinsic geometric configuration of the system, and thus fewer laboratory experiments are needed to determine model parameters and thus to develop new optimized cryopreservation protocols. Additionally, extensions to ovarian follicles and other concentric tissue structures may be made. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. THE IMPORTANCE OF LIMIT SOLUTIONS & TEMPORAL AND SPATIAL SCALES IN THE TEACHING OF TRANSPORT PHENOMENA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SÁVIO LEANDRO BERTOLI

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In the engineering courses the field of Transport Phenomena is of significant importance and it is in several disciplines relating to Fluid Mechanics, Heat and Mass Transfer. In these disciplines, problems involving these phenomena are mathematically formulated and analytical solutions are obtained whenever possible. The aim of this paper is to emphasize the possibility of extending aspects of the teaching-learning in this area by a method based on time scales and limit solutions. Thus, aspects relative to the phenomenology naturally arise during the definition of the scales and / or by determining the limit solutions. Aspects concerning the phenomenology of the limit problems are easily incorporated into the proposed development, which contributes significantly to the understanding of physics inherent in the mathematical modeling of each limiting case studied. Finally the study aims to disseminate the use of the limit solutions and of the time scales in the general fields of engineering.

  1. Exact solutions of Fisher and Burgers equations with finite transport memory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kar, Sandip; Banik, Suman Kumar; Ray, Deb Shankar

    2003-01-01

    The Fisher and Burgers equations with finite memory transport, describing reaction-diffusion and convection-diffusion processes, respectively have recently attracted a lot of attention in the context of chemical kinetics, mathematical biology and turbulence. We show here that they admit exact solutions. While the speed of the travelling wavefront is dependent on the relaxation time in the Fisher equation, memory effects significantly smoothen out the shock wave nature of the Burgers solution, without any influence on the corresponding wave speed. We numerically analyse the ansatz for the exact solution and show that for the reaction-diffusion system the strength of the reaction term must be moderate enough not to exceed a critical limit to allow a travelling wave solution to exist for appreciable finite memory effect

  2. Exact solutions of Fisher and Burgers equations with finite transport memory

    CERN Document Server

    Kar, S; Ray, D S

    2003-01-01

    The Fisher and Burgers equations with finite memory transport, describing reaction-diffusion and convection-diffusion processes, respectively have recently attracted a lot of attention in the context of chemical kinetics, mathematical biology and turbulence. We show here that they admit exact solutions. While the speed of the travelling wavefront is dependent on the relaxation time in the Fisher equation, memory effects significantly smoothen out the shock wave nature of the Burgers solution, without any influence on the corresponding wave speed. We numerically analyse the ansatz for the exact solution and show that for the reaction-diffusion system the strength of the reaction term must be moderate enough not to exceed a critical limit to allow a travelling wave solution to exist for appreciable finite memory effect.

  3. Exact solutions of the population balance equation including particle transport, using group analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Fubiao; Meleshko, Sergey V.; Flood, Adrian E.

    2018-06-01

    The population balance equation (PBE) has received an unprecedented amount of attention in recent years from both academics and industrial practitioners because of its long history, widespread use in engineering, and applicability to a wide variety of particulate and discrete-phase processes. However it is typically impossible to obtain analytical solutions, although in almost every case a numerical solution of the PBEs can be obtained. In this article, the symmetries of PBEs with homogeneous coagulation kernels involving aggregation, breakage and growth processes and particle transport in one dimension are found by direct solving the determining equations. Using the optimal system of one and two-dimensional subalgebras, all invariant solutions and reduced equations are obtained. In particular, an explicit analytical physical solution is also presented.

  4. Water and Solute Transport in Arid Vadose Zones: Innovations in Measurement and Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyler, S W.; Scanlon, Bridget R.; Gee, Glendon W.; Allison, G B.; Parlange, M. B.; Hopmans, J. W.

    1999-01-01

    Understanding the physics of flow and transport through the vadose zone has advanced significantly in the last three decades. These advances have been made primarily in humid regions or in irrigated agricultural settings. While some of the techniques are useful, many are not suited to arid regions. The fluxes of water and solutes typically found in arid regions are often orders of magnitude smaller than those found in agricultural settings, while the time scales for transport can be orders of magnitude larger. The depth over which transport must be characterized is also often much greater than in humid regions. Rather than relying on advances in applied tracers, arid-zone researchers have developed natural tracer techniques that are capable of quantifying transport over tens to thousands of years. Techniques have been developed to measure the hydraulic properties of sediments at all water contents, including the very dry range and at far greater depths. As arid and semiarid regions come under increased development pressures for such activities as hazardous- and radioactive-waste disposal, the development of techniques and the understanding of water and solute transport have become crucial components in defining the environmental impacts of activities at the landsurface

  5. CFEST Coupled Flow, Energy & Solute Transport Version CFEST005 User’s Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freedman, Vicky L.; Chen, Yousu; Gilca, Alex; Cole, Charles R.; Gupta, Sumant K.

    2006-07-20

    The CFEST (Coupled Flow, Energy, and Solute Transport) simulator described in this User’s Guide is a three-dimensional finite-element model used to evaluate groundwater flow and solute mass transport. Confined and unconfined aquifer systems, as well as constant and variable density fluid flows can be represented with CFEST. For unconfined aquifers, the model uses a moving boundary for the water table, deforming the numerical mesh so that the uppermost nodes are always at the water table. For solute transport, changes in concentra¬tion of a single dissolved chemical constituent are computed for advective and hydrodynamic transport, linear sorption represented by a retardation factor, and radioactive decay. Although several thermal parameters described in this User’s Guide are required inputs, thermal transport has not yet been fully implemented in the simulator. Once fully implemented, transport of thermal energy in the groundwater and solid matrix of the aquifer can also be used to model aquifer thermal regimes. The CFEST simulator is written in the FORTRAN 77 language, following American National Standards Institute (ANSI) standards. Execution of the CFEST simulator is controlled through three required text input files. These input file use a structured format of associated groups of input data. Example input data lines are presented for each file type, as well as a description of the structured FORTRAN data format. Detailed descriptions of all input requirements, output options, and program structure and execution are provided in this User’s Guide. Required inputs for auxillary CFEST utilities that aide in post-processing data are also described. Global variables are defined for those with access to the source code. Although CFEST is a proprietary code (CFEST, Inc., Irvine, CA), the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory retains permission to maintain its own source, and to distribute executables to Hanford subcontractors.

  6. Multiscale Roughness Influencing on Transport Behavior of Passive Solute through a Single Self-affine Fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Z.

    2017-12-01

    In this study, the influence of multi-scale roughness on transport behavior of the passive solute through the self-affine fracture was investigated. The single self-affine fracture was constructed by the successive random additions (SRA) and the fracture roughness was decomposed into two different scales (i.e. large-scale primary roughness and small-scale secondary roughness) by the Wavelet analysis technique. The fluid flow in fractures, which was characterized by the Forchheimer's law, showed the non-linear flow behaviors such as eddies and tortuous streamlines. The results indicated that the small-scale secondary roughness was primarily responsible for the non-linear flow behaviors. The direct simulations of asymptotic passive solute transport represented the Non-Fickian transport characteristics (i.e. early arrivals and long tails) in breakthrough curves (BTCs) and residence time distributions (RTDs) with and without consideration of the secondary roughness. Analysis of multiscale BTCs and RTDs showed that the small-scale secondary roughness played a significant role in enhancing the Non-Fickian transport characteristics. We found that removing small-scale secondary roughness led to the lengthening arrival and shortening tail. The peak concentration in BTCs decreased as the secondary roughness was removed, implying that the secondary could also enhance the solute dilution. The estimated BTCs by the Fickian advection-dispersion equation (ADE) yielded errors which decreased with the small-scale secondary roughness being removed. The mobile-immobile model (MIM) was alternatively implemented to characterize the Non-Fickian transport. We found that the MIM was more capable of estimating Non-Fickian BTCs. The small-scale secondary roughness resulted in the decreasing mobile domain fraction and the increasing mass exchange rate between immobile and mobile domains. The estimated parameters from the MIM could provide insight into the inherent mechanism of roughness

  7. Study of Black Sand Particles from Sand Dunes in Badr, Saudi Arabia Using Electron Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haider Abbas Khwaja

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Particulate air pollution is a health concern. This study determines the microscopic make-up of different varieties of sand particles collected at a sand dune site in Badr, Saudi Arabia in 2012. Three categories of sand were studied: black sand, white sand, and volcanic sand. The study used multiple high resolution electron microscopies to study the morphologies, emission source types, size, and elemental composition of the particles, and to evaluate the presence of surface “coatings or contaminants” deposited or transported by the black sand particles. White sand was comprised of natural coarse particles linked to wind-blown releases from crustal surfaces, weathering of igneous/metamorphic rock sources, and volcanic activities. Black sand particles exhibited different morphologies and microstructures (surface roughness compared with the white sand and volcanic sand. Morphological Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM and Laser Scanning Microscopy (LSM analyses revealed that the black sand contained fine and ultrafine particles (50 to 500 nm ranges and was strongly magnetic, indicating the mineral magnetite or elemental iron. Aqueous extracts of black sands were acidic (pH = 5.0. Fe, C, O, Ti, Si, V, and S dominated the composition of black sand. Results suggest that carbon and other contaminant fine particles were produced by fossil-fuel combustion and industrial emissions in heavily industrialized areas of Haifa and Yanbu, and transported as cloud condensation nuclei to Douf Mountain. The suite of techniques used in this study has yielded an in-depth characterization of sand particles. Such information will be needed in future environmental, toxicological, epidemiological, and source apportionment studies.

  8. Galveston Island, Texas, Sand Management Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    billion m3 of beach quality sand . However, Texas projects to date have not utilized these sources because of transportation costs. The lack of nearby...estimate that the San Luis Pass flood shoal contains approximately 11.8 million yd3 of beach quality sand . However, it is expected that if permits...a source of beach- quality sand . 2. Sand could be intercepted before it reaches the present dry beach. ERDC/CHL TR-16-13 55 3. The volume of

  9. Implementation of Solute Transport in the Vadose Zone into the `HYDRUS Package for MODFLOW'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simunek, J.; Beegum, S.; Szymkiewicz, A.; Sudheer, K. P.

    2017-12-01

    The 'HYDRUS package for MODFLOW' was developed by Seo et al. (2007) and Twarakavi et al. (2008) to simultaneously evaluate transient water flow in both unsaturated and saturated zones. The package, which is based on the HYDRUS-1D model (Šimůnek et al., 2016) simulating unsaturated water flow in the vadose zone, was incorporated into MODFLOW (Harbaugh et al., 2000) simulating saturated groundwater flow. The HYDRUS package in the coupled model can be used to represent the effects of various unsaturated zone processes, including infiltration, evaporation, root water uptake, capillary rise, and recharge in homogeneous or layered soil profiles. The coupled model is effective in addressing spatially-variable saturated-unsaturated hydrological processes at the regional scale, allowing for complex layering in the unsaturated zone, spatially and temporarily variable water fluxes at the soil surface and in the root zone, and with alternating recharge and discharge fluxes (Twarakavi et al., 2008). One of the major limitations of the coupled model was that it could not be used to simulate at the same time solute transport. However, solute transport is highly dependent on water table fluctuations due to temporal and spatial variations in groundwater recharge. This is an important concern when the coupled model is used for analyzing groundwater contamination due to transport through the unsaturated zone. The objective of this study is to integrate the solute transport model (the solute transport part of HYDRUS-1D for the unsaturated zone and MT3DMS (Zheng and Wang, 1999; Zheng, 2009) for the saturated zone) into an existing coupled water flow model. The unsaturated zone component of the coupled model can consider solute transport involving many biogeochemical processes and reactions, including first-order degradation, volatilization, linear or nonlinear sorption, one-site kinetic sorption, two-site sorption, and two-kinetic sites sorption (Šimůnek and van Genuchten, 2008

  10. The use of non-dimensional representation of the solute transport equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laurens, J.-M.

    1988-07-01

    This report presents the results obtained in a pilot investigation into the use of non-dimensional representations of the solute transport equations, so as to improve the efficiency of the PRA codes used by the DoE and its contractors. A reduced set of parameters was obtained for a single layer transport model. As expected, the response was shown to be highly sensitive on the new parameters. A faster convergence of the system was observed when the sampling technique used was changed to take into account the properties of the new parameters, such that uniform coverage of the reduced parameter hyperspace was achieved. (author)

  11. Approximate solutions for the two-dimensional integral transport equation. The critically mixed methods of resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, Richard.

    1980-11-01

    This work is divided into two part the first part (note CEA-N-2165) deals with the solution of complex two-dimensional transport problems, the second one treats the critically mixed methods of resolution. These methods are applied for one-dimensional geometries with highly anisotropic scattering. In order to simplify the set of integral equation provided by the integral transport equation, the integro-differential equation is used to obtain relations that allow to lower the number of integral equation to solve; a general mathematical and numerical study is presented [fr

  12. Modeling particle-facilitated solute transport using the C-Ride module of HYDRUS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simunek, Jiri; Bradford, Scott A.

    2017-04-01

    Strongly sorbing chemicals (e.g., heavy metals, radionuclides, pharmaceuticals, and/or explosives) in soils are associated predominantly with the solid phase, which is commonly assumed to be stationary. However, recent field- and laboratory-scale observations have shown that, in the presence of mobile colloidal particles (e.g., microbes, humic substances, clays and metal oxides), the colloids could act as pollutant carriers and thus provide a rapid transport pathway for strongly sorbing contaminants. Such transport can be further accelerated since these colloidal particles may travel through interconnected larger pores where the water velocity is relatively high. Additionally, colloidal particles have a considerable adsorption capacity for other species present in water because of their large specific surface areas and their high concentrations in soil-water and groundwater. As a result, the transport of contaminants can be significantly, sometimes dramatically, enhanced when they are adsorbed to mobile colloids. To address this problem, we have developed the C-Ride module for HYDRUS-1D. This one-dimensional numerical module is based on the HYDRUS-1D software package and incorporates mechanisms associated with colloid and colloid-facilitated solute transport in variably saturated porous media. This numerical model accounts for both colloid and solute movement due to convection, diffusion, and dispersion in variably-saturated soils, as well as for solute movement facilitated by colloid transport. The colloids transport module additionally considers processes of attachment/detachment to/from the solid phase, straining, and/or size exclusion. Various blocking and depth dependent functions can be used to modify the attachment and straining coefficients. The module additionally considers the effects of changes in the water content on colloid/bacteria transport and attachment/detachment to/from solid-water and air-water interfaces. For example, when the air

  13. Spatially distributed characterization of hyporheic solute transport during baseflow recession in a headwater mountain stream using electrical geophysical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam S. Ward; Michael N. Gooseff; Michael Fitzgerald; Thomas J. Voltz; Kamini Singha

    2014-01-01

    The transport of solutes along hyporheic flowpaths is recognized as central to numerous biogeochemical cycles, yet our understanding of how this transport changes with baseflow recession, particularly in a spatially distributed manner, is limited. We conducted four steady-state solute tracer injections and collected electrical resistivity data to characterize hyporheic...

  14. A multi scale approximation solution for the time dependent Boltzmann-transport equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merk, B.

    2004-03-01

    The basis of all transient simulations for nuclear reactor cores is the reliable calculation of the power production. The local power distribution is generally calculated by solving the space, time, energy and angle dependent neutron transport equation known as Boltzmann equation. The computation of exact solutions of the Boltzmann equation is very time consuming. For practical numerical simulations approximated solutions are usually unavoidable. The objective of this work is development of an effective multi scale approximation solution for the Boltzmann equation. Most of the existing methods are based on separation of space and time. The new suggested method is performed without space-time separation. This effective approximation solution is developed on the basis of an expansion for the time derivative of different approximations to the Boltzmann equation. The method of multiple scale expansion is used for the expansion of the time derivative, because the problem of the stiff time behaviour can't be expressed by standard expansion methods. This multiple scale expansion is used in this work to develop approximation solutions for different approximations of the Boltzmann equation, starting from the expansion of the point kinetics equations. The resulting analytic functions are used for testing the applicability and accuracy of the multiple scale expansion method for an approximation solution with 2 delayed neutron groups. The results are tested versus the exact analytical results for the point kinetics equations. Very good agreement between both solutions is obtained. The validity of the solution with 2 delayed neutron groups to approximate the behaviour of the system with 6 delayed neutron groups is demonstrated in an additional analysis. A strategy for a solution with 4 delayed neutron groups is described. A multiple scale expansion is performed for the space-time dependent diffusion equation for one homogenized cell with 2 delayed neutron groups. The result is

  15. Eutectic fusion used for the survey of transport of mass in metallic solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savane, Y.S.; Katty, S.; Balde, M.L.; Cisse, S.; Rogov, V.I.

    1997-09-01

    The phenomenon of eutectic fusion could be used for the survey of transport of mass in metallic solutions, which allows to determine the part of the ionic conductibility in the solutions. The survey done in the system In 2 Bi Bi-In at a temperature of 72 deg. C with a current of 4A allowed to find a ionic current of 2,6.10 -3 which constitutes about 0,07% of the total current. So the part of ionic conductibility in the eutectic fusion of the system In 2 Bi Bi-In is of 0,07%. (author)

  16. Solution of charged particle transport equation by Monte-Carlo method in the BRANDZ code system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artamonov, S.N.; Androsenko, P.A.; Androsenko, A.A.

    1992-01-01

    Consideration is given to the issues of Monte-Carlo employment for the solution of charged particle transport equation and its implementation in the BRANDZ code system under the conditions of real 3D geometry and all the data available on radiation-to-matter interaction in multicomponent and multilayer targets. For the solution of implantation problem the results of BRANDZ data comparison with the experiments and calculations by other codes in complexes systems are presented. The results of direct nuclear pumping process simulation for laser-active media by a proton beam are also included. 4 refs.; 7 figs

  17. Solution of stochastic media transport problems using a numerical quadrature-based method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pautz, S. D.; Franke, B. C.; Prinja, A. K.; Olson, A. J.

    2013-01-01

    We present a new conceptual framework for analyzing transport problems in random media. We decompose such problems into stratified subproblems according to the number of material pseudo-interfaces within realizations. For a given subproblem we assign pseudo-interface locations in each realization according to product quadrature rules, which allows us to deterministically generate a fixed number of realizations. Quadrature integration of the solutions of these realizations thus approximately solves each subproblem; the weighted superposition of solutions of the subproblems approximately solves the general stochastic media transport problem. We revisit some benchmark problems to determine the accuracy and efficiency of this approach in comparison to randomly generated realizations. We find that this method is very accurate and fast when the number of pseudo-interfaces in a problem is generally low, but that these advantages quickly degrade as the number of pseudo-interfaces increases. (authors)

  18. Chain segmentation for the Monte Carlo solution of particle transport problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ragheb, M.M.H.

    1984-01-01

    A Monte Carlo approach is proposed where the random walk chains generated in particle transport simulations are segmented. Forward and adjoint-mode estimators are then used in conjunction with the firstevent source density on the segmented chains to obtain multiple estimates of the individual terms of the Neumann series solution at each collision point. The solution is then constructed by summation of the series. The approach is compared to the exact analytical and to the Monte Carlo nonabsorption weighting method results for two representative slowing down and deep penetration problems. Application of the proposed approach leads to unbiased estimates for limited numbers of particle simulations and is useful in suppressing an effective bias problem observed in some cases of deep penetration particle transport problems

  19. Three-dimensional transport theory: An analytical solution of an internal beam searchlight problem-I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, M.M.R.

    2009-01-01

    We describe a number of methods for obtaining analytical solutions and numerical results for three-dimensional one-speed neutron transport problems in a half-space containing a variety of source shapes which emit neutrons mono-directionally. For example, we consider an off-centre point source, a ring source and a disk source, or any combination of these, and calculate the surface scalar flux as a function of the radial and angular co-ordinates. Fourier transforms in the transverse directions are used and a Laplace transform in the axial direction. This enables the Wiener-Hopf method to be employed, followed by an inverse Fourier-Hankel transform. Some additional transformations are introduced which enable the inverse Hankel transforms involving Bessel functions to be evaluated numerically more efficiently. A hybrid diffusion theory method is also described which is shown to be a useful guide to the general behaviour of the solutions of the transport equation.

  20. DRAGON solutions to the 3D transport benchmark over a range in parameter space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, Nicolas; Hebert, Alain; Marleau, Guy

    2010-01-01

    DRAGON solutions to the 'NEA suite of benchmarks for 3D transport methods and codes over a range in parameter space' are discussed in this paper. A description of the benchmark is first provided, followed by a detailed review of the different computational models used in the lattice code DRAGON. Two numerical methods were selected for generating the required quantities for the 729 configurations of this benchmark. First, S N calculations were performed using fully symmetric angular quadratures and high-order diamond differencing for spatial discretization. To compare S N results with those of another deterministic method, the method of characteristics (MoC) was also considered for this benchmark. Comparisons between reference solutions, S N and MoC results illustrate the advantages and drawbacks of each methods for this 3-D transport problem.

  1. Compilation of field-scale caisson data on solute transport in the unsaturated zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polzer, W.L.; Essington, E.H.; Fuentes, H.R.; Nyhan, J.W.

    1986-11-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has conducted technical support studies to assess siting requirements mandated by Nuclear Regulatory Commission in 10 CFR Part 61. Field-scale transport studies were conducted under unsaturated moisture conditions and under steady and unsteady flow conditions in large caissons located and operated in a natural (field) environment. Moisture content, temperature, flow rate, base-line chemical, tracer influent, and tracer breakthrough data collected during tracer migration studies in the caisson are compiled in tables and graphs. Data suggest that the imposition of a period of drainage (influent solution flow was stopped) may cause an increase in tracer concentration in the soil solution at various sampling points in the caisson. Evaporation during drainage and diffusion of the tracers from immobile to mobile water are two phenomena that could explain the increase. Data also suggest that heterogeneity of sorption sites may increase the variability in transport of sorbing tracers compared with nonsorbing tracers

  2. Presentation of some methods for the solution of the monoenergetic neutrons transport equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valle G, E. del.

    1978-01-01

    The neutrons transport theory problems whose solution has been reached were collected in order to show that the transport equation is so complicated that different techniques were developed so as to give approximative numerical solutions to problems concerning the practical application. Such a technique, which had not been investigated in the literature dealing with these problems, is described here. The results which were obtained through this technique in undimensional problems of criticity are satisfactory and speaking in a conceptual way this method is extremely simple because it times. There is no limitation to deal with problems related neutrons sources with an arbitrary distribution and in principle the application of this technique can be extended to unhomogeneous environments. (author)

  3. Hydro-dynamic Solute Transport under Two-Phase Flow Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karadimitriou, Nikolaos K; Joekar-Niasar, Vahid; Brizuela, Omar Godinez

    2017-07-26

    There are abundant examples of natural, engineering and industrial applications, in which "solute transport" and "mixing" in porous media occur under multiphase flow conditions. Current state-of-the-art understanding and modelling of such processes are established based on flawed and non-representative models. Moreover, there is no direct experimental result to show the true hydrodynamics of transport and mixing under multiphase flow conditions while the saturation topology is being kept constant for a number of flow rates. With the use of a custom-made microscope, and under well-controlled flow boundary conditions, we visualized directly the transport of a tracer in a Reservoir-on-Chip (RoC) micromodel filled with two immiscible fluids. This study provides novel insights into the saturation-dependency of transport and mixing in porous media. To our knowledge, this is the first reported pore-scale experiment in which the saturation topology, relative permeability, and tortuosity were kept constant and transport was studied under different dynamic conditions in a wide range of saturation. The critical role of two-phase hydrodynamic properties on non-Fickian transport and saturation-dependency of dispersion are discussed, which highlight the major flaws in parametrization of existing models.

  4. Coupled Spatio-Temporal Patterns of Solute Transport, Metabolism and Nutrient Uptake in Streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurz, M. J.; Schmidt, C.

    2017-12-01

    Slower flow velocities and longer residence times within stream transient storage (TS) zones facilitate interaction between solutes and microbial communities, potentially increasing local rates of metabolic activity. Multiple factors, including channel morphology and substrate, variable hydrology, and seasonal changes in biological and physical parameters, result in changes in the solute transport dynamics and reactivity of TS zones over time and space. These changes would be expected to, in turn, influence rates of whole-stream ecosystem functions such as metabolism and nutrient uptake. However, the linkages between solute transport and ecosystem functioning within TS zones, and the contribution of TS zones to whole-stream functioning, are not always so straight forward. This may be due, in part, to methodological challenges. In this study we investigated the influence of stream channel hydro-morphology and substrate type on reach (103 m) and sub-reach (102 m) scale TS and ecosystem functioning. Patterns in solute transport, metabolism and nitrate uptake were tracked from April through October in two contrasting upland streams using several methods. The two streams, located in the Harz Mountains, Germany, are characterized by differing size (0.02 vs. 0.3 m3/s), dominant stream channel substrate (bedrock vs. alluvium) and sub-reach morphology (predominance of pools, riffles and glides). Solute transport parameters and respiration rates at the reach and sub-reach scale were estimated monthly from coupled pulse injections of the reactive tracer resazurin (Raz) and conservative tracers uranine and salt. Raz, a weakly fluorescent dye, irreversibly transforms to resorufin (Rru) under mildly reducing conditions, providing a proxy for aerobic respiration. Daily rates of primary productivity, respiration and nitrate retention at the reach scale were estimated using the diel cycles in dissolved oxygen and nitrate concentrations measured by in-situ sensors. Preliminary

  5. Magnetic Modulation of the Transport of Organophilic Solutes through Supported Magnetic Ionic Liquid Membranes.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Daniel, C.L.; Rubio, A.M.; Sebastião, P.J.; Afonso, C.A.M.; Storch, Jan; Izák, Pavel; Portugal, C.A.M.; Crespo, J.G.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 505, MAY 1 (2016), s. 36-43 ISSN 0376-7388 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP106/12/0569 Grant - others:ERANET(PT) ERA-CHEM/0001/2008; EUI(ES) 2008- 03857; FCT-MCTES(PT) SFRH/BD/81552/2011 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : magnetic ionic liquids (MILs) * solute transport modulation * magnetic field Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 6.035, year: 2016

  6. Bounds and maximum principles for the solution of the linear transport equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsen, E.W.

    1981-01-01

    Pointwise bounds are derived for the solution of time-independent linear transport problems with surface sources in convex spatial domains. Under specified conditions, upper bounds are derived which, as a function of position, decrease with distance from the boundary. Also, sufficient conditions are obtained for the existence of maximum and minimum principles, and a counterexample is given which shows that such principles do not always exist

  7. Diffusion Dominant Solute Transport Modelling In Deep Repository Under The Effect of Emplacement Media Degradation - 13285

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwong, S.; Jivkov, A.P.

    2013-01-01

    Deep geologic disposal of high activity and long-lived radioactive waste is being actively considered and pursued in many countries, where low permeability geological formations are used to provide long term waste contaminant with minimum impact to the environment and risk to the biosphere. A multi-barrier approach that makes use of both engineered and natural barriers (i.e. geological formations) is often used to further enhance the containment performance of the repository. As the deep repository system subjects to a variety of thermo-hydro-chemo-mechanical (THCM) effects over its long 'operational' lifespan (e.g. 0.1 to 1.0 million years, the integrity of the barrier system will decrease over time (e.g. fracturing in rock or clay)). This is broadly referred as media degradation in the present study. This modelling study examines the effects of media degradation on diffusion dominant solute transport in fractured media that are typical of deep geological environment. In particular, reactive solute transport through fractured media is studied using a 2-D model, that considers advection and diffusion, to explore the coupled effects of kinetic and equilibrium chemical processes, while the effects of degradation is studied using a pore network model that considers the media diffusivity and network changes. Model results are presented to demonstrate the use of a 3D pore-network model, using a novel architecture, to calculate macroscopic properties of the medium such as diffusivity, subject to pore space changes as the media degrade. Results from a reactive transport model of a representative geological waste disposal package are also presented to demonstrate the effect of media property change on the solute migration behaviour, illustrating the complex interplay between kinetic biogeochemical processes and diffusion dominant transport. The initial modelling results demonstrate the feasibility of a coupled modelling approach (using pore-network model and reactive

  8. [Changes induced by hypertonic solutions in the transportation of calcium by the cardiac reticular sarcoplasma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra, M; Holguín, J A

    1979-01-01

    In the sarcoplasmic reticulum of the myocardium, celular organell which function is to regulate the cytoplasmic concentration of calcium in contraction and relaxation, we have studied the effect of hypertonic solutions of sucrose between 1 and 6.96 times the normal tonicity in order to observe the behavior of the internal linked or free calcium of this structure, as well as to prove the hypothesis that hypertonic solutions encourage the calcium exit of the sarcoplasmatic reticulum with the resulting signs of contractures. The following results were obtained: 1. The ATP hydrolisis and calcium transport rate are 14% and 90% respectively of the maximum speeds of 10(-5) M in calcium, while for concentrations of 10(-7) M or ess of the said cation, the transport rates and the ATPase do not reach 5% of the maximum values. 2. Between 1 and 2.54 times of the normal tonicity the calcium uptake remains between 400 and 500 nmoles of calcium/mg protein/min, the transported amount of calcium varies between 14 and 16 nmoles/mg protein and the rate of the ATP hydrolysis increases a 37% to 0.4 M in sucrose. 3. Between 0.4 and 1.2 M in sucrose of 2.54 to 6.96 times the isotonicity, the calcium transport rate velocity as well as the ATP hydrolisis are strongly inhibited. The vesicles volume minimizes and the amount of linked calcium remains within the control values, proving that the capacity of linking this cathion is independent from sarcoplasmic reticulum volume. These results show that the sarcoplasmic reticulum is involved in the contractures induced by hypertonic solutions in intact cells, since the osmolarity increase produces changes of volume which results in a decrease of the calcium transportation velocity or in an increase of the exit of said cathion.

  9. Electric conductivity for laboratory and field monitoring of induced partial saturation (IPS) in sands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemiroodsari, Hadi

    Liquefaction is loss of shear strength in fully saturated loose sands caused by build-up of excess pore water pressure, during moderate to large earthquakes, leading to catastrophic failures of structures. Currently used liquefaction mitigation measures are often costly and cannot be applied at sites with existing structures. An innovative, practical, and cost effective liquefaction mitigation technique titled "Induced Partial Saturation" (IPS) was developed by researchers at Northeastern University. The IPS technique is based on injection of sodium percarbonate solution into fully saturated liquefaction susceptible sand. Sodium percarbonate dissolves in water and breaks down into sodium and carbonate ions and hydrogen peroxide which generates oxygen gas bubbles. Oxygen gas bubbles become trapped in sand pores and therefore decrease the degree of saturation of the sand, increase the compressibility of the soil, thus reduce its potential for liquefaction. The implementation of IPS required the development and validation of a monitoring and evaluation technique that would help ensure that the sands are indeed partially saturated. This dissertation focuses on this aspect of the IPS research. The monitoring system developed was based on using electric conductivity fundamentals and probes to detect the transport of chemical solution, calculate degree of saturation of sand, and determine the final zone of partial saturation created by IPS. To understand the fundamentals of electric conductivity, laboratory bench-top tests were conducted using electric conductivity probes and small specimens of Ottawa sand. Bench-top tests were used to study rate of generation of gas bubbles due to reaction of sodium percarbonate solution in sand, and to confirm a theory based on which degree of saturation were calculated. In addition to bench-top tests, electric conductivity probes were used in a relatively large sand specimen prepared in a specially manufactured glass tank. IPS was

  10. Upscaling solute transport in naturally fractured porous media with the continuous time random walk method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geiger, S.; Cortis, A.; Birkholzer, J.T.

    2010-04-01

    Solute transport in fractured porous media is typically 'non-Fickian'; that is, it is characterized by early breakthrough and long tailing and by nonlinear growth of the Green function-centered second moment. This behavior is due to the effects of (1) multirate diffusion occurring between the highly permeable fracture network and the low-permeability rock matrix, (2) a wide range of advection rates in the fractures and, possibly, the matrix as well, and (3) a range of path lengths. As a consequence, prediction of solute transport processes at the macroscale represents a formidable challenge. Classical dual-porosity (or mobile-immobile) approaches in conjunction with an advection-dispersion equation and macroscopic dispersivity commonly fail to predict breakthrough of fractured porous media accurately. It was recently demonstrated that the continuous time random walk (CTRW) method can be used as a generalized upscaling approach. Here we extend this work and use results from high-resolution finite element-finite volume-based simulations of solute transport in an outcrop analogue of a naturally fractured reservoir to calibrate the CTRW method by extracting a distribution of retention times. This procedure allows us to predict breakthrough at other model locations accurately and to gain significant insight into the nature of the fracture-matrix interaction in naturally fractured porous reservoirs with geologically realistic fracture geometries.

  11. An Overview of Problems and Solutions for Urban Freight Transport in Brazilian Cities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leise K. Oliveira

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Urban freight transport is a challenge for Brazilian cities due to the lack of adequate planning for freight flow movement. Public managers also show negligence and a lack of awareness when dealing with urban logistics. Decision-support data on urban freight transport are still scarce, despite being of fundamental value to economic development. With this in mind, this paper presents problems and solutions regarding urban freight transport in Brazilian cities. Data were obtained through a survey conducted in nine cities and analysed by means of descriptive statistics and the successive intervals method. Additionally, a cluster analysis was performed to identify patterns regarding the typical characteristics of each city in order to compare and generalise the perception of retailers regarding problems and solutions at the national level. The results indicate divergent opinions among retailers from different cities, even from cities with similar socioeconomic profiles and urban dynamics. The municipalities which demonstrated the most similarities were (i Betim and Niteroi, in the Southeast of Brazil; (ii Palmas and Quixada, in the North and Northeast, respectively; and (iii Palmas and Caruaru, also in the North and Northeast. The results reinforce the importance of studying the local context and involving stakeholders in the process of planning urban logistics solutions.

  12. Regional flow and solute transport modeling for site suitability. Part I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowe, J.; Miller, I.

    1979-12-01

    The nature of regional flow systems in large sedimentary basins will largely determine the effectiveness of regional flow as a barrier to radionuclide escape from deep geologic repositories. The purpose of the work reported herein and the proposed future work is to develop a methodology for evaluating regional flow barriers by using numerical models. The Williston Basin was chosen as an archetype case for the regional modeling study. However, due to the simplified nature of the study, the results are not meant to represent the behavior of a repository actually placed within the Williston Basin. The major components of this Phase I study are: (1) assembly and reduction of available data; (2) formulation of a simplified geohydrologic model; (3) computer simulation of fluid flow; and (4) computer simulation of solute transport. As of this report, the first two items are essentially completed. Computer simulation of fluid flow will require some revision and further study, which will be done in the second phase of this study. Computer simulation of solute transport has been considered only on a very preliminary basis. Important conclusions of this Phase I study are as follows. Assembly and reduction of data require an extensive work effort. Generally, the parameters describing fluid flow are poorly known on a regional basis and those describing solute transport are unknown

  13. Regional flow and solute transport modeling for site suitability. Part I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowe, J.; Miller, I.

    1979-12-01

    The nature of regional flow systems in large sedimentary basins will largely determine the effectiveness of regional flow as a barrier to radionuclide escape from deep geologic repositories. The purpose of the work reported herein and the proposed future work is to develop a methodology for evaluating regional flow barriers by using numerical models. The Williston Basin was chosen as an archetype case for the regional modeling study. However, due to the simplified nature of the study, the results are not meant to represent the behavior of a repository actually placed within the Williston Basin. The major components of this Phase I study are: (1) assembly and reduction of available data; (2) formulation of a simplified geohydrologic model; (3) computer simulation of fluid flow; and (4) computer simulation of solute transport. As of this report, the first two items are essentially completed. Computer simulation of fluid flow will require some revision and further study, which will be done in the second phase of this study. Computer simulation of solute transport has been considered only on a very preliminary basis. Important conclusions of this Phase I study are as follows. Assembly and reduction of data require an extensive work effort. Generally, the parameters describing fluid flow are poorly known on a regional basis and those describing solute transport are unknown.

  14. Solution and study of nodal neutron transport equation applying the LTSN-DiagExp method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauser, Eliete Biasotto; Pazos, Ruben Panta; Vilhena, Marco Tullio de; Barros, Ricardo Carvalho de

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we report advances about the three-dimensional nodal discrete-ordinates approximations of neutron transport equation for Cartesian geometry. We use the combined collocation method of the angular variables and nodal approach for the spatial variables. By nodal approach we mean the iterated transverse integration of the S N equations. This procedure leads to the set of one-dimensional averages angular fluxes in each spatial variable. The resulting system of equations is solved with the LTS N method, first applying the Laplace transform to the set of the nodal S N equations and then obtained the solution by symbolic computation. We include the LTS N method by diagonalization to solve the nodal neutron transport equation and then we outline the convergence of these nodal-LTS N approximations with the help of a norm associated to the quadrature formula used to approximate the integral term of the neutron transport equation. (author)

  15. Application of multiphysics models to efficient design of experiments of solute transport across articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouran, Behdad; Arbabi, Vahid; Weinans, Harrie; Zadpoor, Amir A

    2016-11-01

    Transport of solutes helps to regulate normal physiology and proper function of cartilage in diarthrodial joints. Multiple studies have shown the effects of characteristic parameters such as concentration of proteoglycans and collagens and the orientation of collagen fibrils on the diffusion process. However, not much quantitative information and accurate models are available to help understand how the characteristics of the fluid surrounding articular cartilage influence the diffusion process. In this study, we used a combination of micro-computed tomography experiments and biphasic-solute finite element models to study the effects of three parameters of the overlying bath on the diffusion of neutral solutes across cartilage zones. Those parameters include bath size, degree of stirring of the bath, and the size and concentration of the stagnant layer that forms at the interface of cartilage and bath. Parametric studies determined the minimum of the finite bath size for which the diffusion behavior reduces to that of an infinite bath. Stirring of the bath proved to remarkably influence neutral solute transport across cartilage zones. The well-stirred condition was achieved only when the ratio of the diffusivity of bath to that of cartilage was greater than ≈1000. While the thickness of the stagnant layer at the cartilage-bath interface did not significantly influence the diffusion behavior, increase in its concentration substantially elevated solute concentration in cartilage. Sufficient stirring attenuated the effects of the stagnant layer. Our findings could be used for efficient design of experimental protocols aimed at understanding the transport of molecules across articular cartilage. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Thermally Cross-Linkable Hole Transport Materials for Solution Processed Phosphorescent OLEDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Beom Seok; Kim, Ohyoung; Chin, Byung Doo; Lee, Chil Won

    2018-04-01

    Materials for unique fabrication of a solution-processed, multi-layered organic light-emitting diode (OLED) were developed. Preparation of a hole transport layer with a thermally cross-linkable chemical structure, which can be processed to form a thin film and then transformed into an insoluble film by using an amine-alcohol condensation reaction with heat treatment, was investigated. Functional groups, such as triplenylamine linked with phenylcarbazole or biphenyl, were employed in the chemical structure of the hole transport layer in order to maintain high triplet energy properties. When phenylcarbazole or biphenyl compounds continuously react with triphenylamine under acid catalysis, a chemically stable thin film material with desirable energy-level properties for a blue OLED could be obtained. The prepared hole transport materials showed excellent surface roughness and thermal stability in comparison with the commercial reference material. On the solution-processed model hole transport layer, we fabricated a device with a blue phosphorescent OLED by using sequential vacuum deposition. The maximum external quantum, 19.3%, was improved by more than 40% over devices with the commercial reference material (11.4%).

  17. Finite element simulation of moisture movement and solute transport in a large caisson

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huyakorn, P.S.; Jones, B.G.; Parker, J.C.; Wadsworth, T.D.; White, H.O. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The results of the solute transport experiments performed on compacted, crushed Bandelier Tuff in caisson B of the experimental cluster described by DePoorter (1981) are simulated. Both one- and three-dimensional simulations of solute transport have been performed using two selected finite element codes. Results of bromide and iodide tracer experiments conducted during near-steady flow conditions have been analyzed for pulse additions made on December 6, 1984, and followed over a period of up to 60 days. In addition, a pulse addition of nonconservative strontium tracer on September 28, 1984, during questionably steady flow conditions has been analyzed over a period of 240 days. One-dimensional finite element flow and transport simulations were carried out assuming the porous medium to be homogeneous and the injection source uniformly distributed. To evaluate effects of the nonuniform source distribution and also to investigate effects of inhomogeneous porous medium properties, three dimensional finite element analyses of transport were carried out. Implications of the three-dimensional effects for the design and analysis of future tracer studies are discussed

  18. Dewatering Behaviour of Fine Oil Sands Tailings : An Experimental Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yao, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Oil sands tailings are a warm aqueous suspension of sand, silt, clay, residual bitumen and naphtha. The tailings are hydraulically transported and stored in tailing ponds where they segregate, with the sand settling from suspension forming beaches and the remaining tailings flowing to the middle of

  19. Representing solute transport through the multi-barrier disposal system by simplified concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poteri, A.; Nordman, H.; Pulkkanen, V-M.; Kekaelaeinen, P.; Hautojaervi, A.

    2012-02-01

    The repository system chosen in Finland for spent nuclear fuel is composed of multiple successive transport barriers. If a waste canister is leaking, this multi-barrier system retards and limits the release rates of radionuclides into the biosphere. Analysis of radionuclide migration in the previous performance assessments has largely been based on numerical modelling of the repository system. The simplified analytical approach introduced here provides a tool to analyse the performance of the whole system using simplified representations of the individual transport barriers. This approach is based on the main characteristics of the individual barriers and on the generic nature of the coupling between successive barriers. In the case of underground repository the mass transfer between successive transport barriers is strongly restricted by the interfaces between barriers leading to well-mixed conditions in these barriers. The approach here simplifies the barrier system so that it can be described with a very simple compartment model, where each barrier is represented by a single, or in the case of buffer, by not more than two compartments. This system of compartments could be solved in analogy with a radioactive decay chain. The model of well mixed compartments lends itself to a very descriptive way to represent and analyse the barrier system because the relative efficiency of the different barriers in hindering transport of solutes can be parameterised by the solutes half-times in the corresponding compartments. In a real repository system there will also be a delay between the start of the inflow and the start of the outflow from the barrier. This delay can be important for the release rates of the short lived and sorbing radionuclides, and it was also included in the simplified representation of the barrier system. In a geological multi-barrier system, spreading of the outflowing release pulse is often governed by the typical behaviour of one transport barrier

  20. Representing solute transport through the multi-barrier disposal system by simplified concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poteri, A.; Nordman, H.; Pulkkanen, V-M. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland); Kekaelaeinen, P. [Jyvaeskylae Univ. (Finland). Dept. pf Physics; Hautojaervi, A.

    2012-02-15

    The repository system chosen in Finland for spent nuclear fuel is composed of multiple successive transport barriers. If a waste canister is leaking, this multi-barrier system retards and limits the release rates of radionuclides into the biosphere. Analysis of radionuclide migration in the previous performance assessments has largely been based on numerical modelling of the repository system. The simplified analytical approach introduced here provides a tool to analyse the performance of the whole system using simplified representations of the individual transport barriers. This approach is based on the main characteristics of the individual barriers and on the generic nature of the coupling between successive barriers. In the case of underground repository the mass transfer between successive transport barriers is strongly restricted by the interfaces between barriers leading to well-mixed conditions in these barriers. The approach here simplifies the barrier system so that it can be described with a very simple compartment model, where each barrier is represented by a single, or in the case of buffer, by not more than two compartments. This system of compartments could be solved in analogy with a radioactive decay chain. The model of well mixed compartments lends itself to a very descriptive way to represent and analyse the barrier system because the relative efficiency of the different barriers in hindering transport of solutes can be parameterised by the solutes half-times in the corresponding compartments. In a real repository system there will also be a delay between the start of the inflow and the start of the outflow from the barrier. This delay can be important for the release rates of the short lived and sorbing radionuclides, and it was also included in the simplified representation of the barrier system. In a geological multi-barrier system, spreading of the outflowing release pulse is often governed by the typical behaviour of one transport barrier

  1. The Method of Manufactured Solutions for RattleSnake A SN Radiation Transport Solver Inside the MOOSE Framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yaqi

    2012-01-01

    The Method of Manufactured Solutions (MMS) is an accepted technique to verify that a numerical discretization for the radiation transport equation has been implemented correctly. This technique offers a few advantages over other methods such as benchmark problems or analytical solutions. The solution can be manufactured such that properties for the angular flux are either stressed or preserved. For radiation transport, these properties can include desired smoothness, positiveness and arbitrary order of anisotropy in angle. Another advantage is that the angular flux solution can be manufactured for multidimensional problems where analytical solutions are difficult to obtain in general.

  2. Evaluation of automatic vacuum- assisted compaction solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Brzeziński

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently on the mould-making machines market the companies like: DiSA, KUENKEL WAGNER, HAFLINGER, HEINRICH WAGNER SINTO, HUNTER, SAVELLI AND TECHNICAL play significant role. These companies are the manufacturers of various solutions in machines and instalations applied in foundry engineering. Automatic foundry machines for compaction of green sand have the major role in mechanisation and automation processes of making the mould. The concept of operation of automatic machines is based on the static and dynamic methods of compacting the green sand. The method which gains the importance is the compacting method by using the energy of the air pressure. It's the initial stage or the supporting process of compacting the green sand. However in the automatic mould making machines using this method it's essential to use the additional compaction of the mass in order to receive the final parameters of the form. In the constructional solutions of the machines there is the additional division which concerns the method of putting the sand into the mould box. This division distinquishes the transport of the sand with simultaneous compaction or the putting of the sand without the pre-compaction. As the solutions of the major manufacturers are often the subject for application in various foundries, the authors of the paper would like/have the confidence to present their own evaluation process confirmed by their own researches and independent analysis of the producers' solutions.

  3. Mechanisms to explain the reverse perivascular transport of solutes out of the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schley, D; Carare-Nnadi, R; Please, C P; Perry, V H; Weller, R O

    2006-02-21

    Experimental studies and observations in the human brain indicate that interstitial fluid and solutes, such as amyloid-beta (Abeta), are eliminated from grey matter of the brain along pericapillary and periarterial pathways. It is unclear, however, what constitutes the motive force for such transport within blood vessel walls, which is in the opposite direction to blood flow. In this paper the potential for global pressure differences to achieve such transport are considered. A mathematical model is constructed in order to test the hypothesis that perivascular drainage of interstitial fluid and solutes out of brain tissue is driven by pulsations of the blood vessel walls. Here it is assumed that drainage occurs through a thin layer between astrocytes and endothelial cells or between smooth muscle cells. The model suggests that, during each pulse cycle, there are periods when fluid and solutes are driven along perivascular spaces in the reverse direction to the flow of blood. It is shown that successful drainage may depend upon some attachment of solutes to the lining of the perivascular space, in order to produce a valve-like effect, although an alternative without this requirement is also postulated. Reduction in pulse amplitude, as in ageing cerebral vessels, would prolong the attachment time, encourage precipitation of Abeta peptides in vessel walls, and impair elimination of Abeta from the brain. These factors may play a role in the pathogenesis of cerebral amyloid angiopathy and in the accumulation of Abeta in the brain in Alzheimer's disease.

  4. A lattice Boltzmann model for solute transport in open channel flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongda; Cater, John; Liu, Haifei; Ding, Xiangyi; Huang, Wei

    2018-01-01

    A lattice Boltzmann model of advection-dispersion problems in one-dimensional (1D) open channel flows is developed for simulation of solute transport and pollutant concentration. The hydrodynamics are calculated based on a previous lattice Boltzmann approach to solving the 1D Saint-Venant equations (LABSVE). The advection-dispersion model is coupled with the LABSVE using the lattice Boltzmann method. Our research recovers the advection-dispersion equations through the Chapman-Enskog expansion of the lattice Boltzmann equation. The model differs from the existing schemes in two points: (1) the lattice Boltzmann numerical method is adopted to solve the advection-dispersion problem by meso-scopic particle distribution; (2) and the model describes the relation between discharge, cross section area and solute concentration, which increases the applicability of the water quality model in practical engineering. The model is verified using three benchmark tests: (1) instantaneous solute transport within a short distance; (2) 1D point source pollution with constant velocity; (3) 1D point source pollution in a dam break flow. The model is then applied to a 50-year flood point source pollution accident on the Yongding River, which showed good agreement with a MIKE 11 solution and gauging data.

  5. Benchmarking the invariant embedding method against analytical solutions in model transport problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malin, Wahlberg; Imre, Pazsit

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the use of the invariant embedding method in a series of model transport problems, for which it is also possible to obtain an analytical solution. Due to the non-linear character of the embedding equations, their solution can only be obtained numerically. However, this can be done via a robust and effective iteration scheme. In return, the domain of applicability is far wider than the model problems investigated in this paper. The use of the invariant embedding method is demonstrated in three different areas. The first is the calculation of the energy spectrum of reflected (sputtered) particles from a multiplying medium, where the multiplication arises from recoil production. Both constant and energy dependent cross sections with a power law dependence were used in the calculations. The second application concerns the calculation of the path length distribution of reflected particles from a medium without multiplication. This is a relatively novel and unexpected application, since the embedding equations do not resolve the depth variable. The third application concerns the demonstration that solutions in an infinite medium and a half-space are interrelated through embedding-like integral equations, by the solution of which the reflected flux from a half-space can be reconstructed from solutions in an infinite medium or vice versa. In all cases the invariant embedding method proved to be robust, fast and monotonically converging to the exact solutions. (authors)

  6. On the spectral analysis of iterative solutions of the discretized one-group transport equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, Richard

    2004-01-01

    We analyze the Fourier-mode technique used for the spectral analysis of iterative solutions of the one-group discretized transport equation. We introduce a direct spectral analysis for the iterative solution of finite difference approximations for finite slabs composed of identical layers, providing thus a complementary analysis that is more appropriate for reactor applications. Numerical calculations for the method of characteristics and with the diamond difference approximation show the appearance of antisymmetric modes generated by the iteration on boundary data. We have also utilized the discrete Fourier transform to compute the spectrum for a periodic slab containing N identical layers and shown that at the limit N → ∞ one obtains the familiar Fourier-mode solution

  7. Effects of reservoir heterogeneity on scaling of effective mass transfer coefficient for solute transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Juliana Y.; Srinivasan, Sanjay

    2016-09-01

    Modeling transport process at large scale requires proper scale-up of subsurface heterogeneity and an understanding of its interaction with the underlying transport mechanisms. A technique based on volume averaging is applied to quantitatively assess the scaling characteristics of effective mass transfer coefficient in heterogeneous reservoir models. The effective mass transfer coefficient represents the combined contribution from diffusion and dispersion to the transport of non-reactive solute particles within a fluid phase. Although treatment of transport problems with the volume averaging technique has been published in the past, application to geological systems exhibiting realistic spatial variability remains a challenge. Previously, the authors developed a new procedure where results from a fine-scale numerical flow simulation reflecting the full physics of the transport process albeit over a sub-volume of the reservoir are integrated with the volume averaging technique to provide effective description of transport properties. The procedure is extended such that spatial averaging is performed at the local-heterogeneity scale. In this paper, the transport of a passive (non-reactive) solute is simulated on multiple reservoir models exhibiting different patterns of heterogeneities, and the scaling behavior of effective mass transfer coefficient (Keff) is examined and compared. One such set of models exhibit power-law (fractal) characteristics, and the variability of dispersion and Keff with scale is in good agreement with analytical expressions described in the literature. This work offers an insight into the impacts of heterogeneity on the scaling of effective transport parameters. A key finding is that spatial heterogeneity models with similar univariate and bivariate statistics may exhibit different scaling characteristics because of the influence of higher order statistics. More mixing is observed in the channelized models with higher-order continuity. It

  8. High temperature thermal energy storage in moving sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, R. H.; Awaya, H. I.

    1978-01-01

    Several high-temperature (to 500 C) heat-storage systems using sand as the storage medium are described. The advantages of sand as a storage medium include low cost for sand, widespread availability, non-toxicity, non-degradation characteristics, easy containment, and safety. The systems considered include: stationary sand with closely spaced tubes throughout the volume, the use of a fluidized bed, use of conveyor belt transporter, and the use of a blower rapid transport system. For a stationary sand bed, very close spacing of heat transfer tubes throughout the volume is required, manifesting as high power related system cost. The suggestion of moving sand past or around pipes is intended to reduce the power related costs at the penalty of added system complexity. Preliminary system cost estimates are offered. These rough calculations indicate that mobile sand heat storage systems cost less than the stationary sand approach.

  9. The composite water and solute transport of barley (Hordeum vulgare) roots: effect of suberized barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranathunge, Kosala; Kim, Yangmin X; Wassmann, Friedrich; Kreszies, Tino; Zeisler, Viktoria; Schreiber, Lukas

    2017-03-01

    Roots have complex anatomical structures, and certain localized cell layers develop suberized apoplastic barriers. The size and tightness of these barriers depend on the growth conditions and on the age of the root. Such complex anatomical structures result in a composite water and solute transport in roots. Development of apoplastic barriers along barley seminal roots was detected using various staining methods, and the suberin amounts in the apical and basal zones were analysed using gas chromatography-mass spectometry (GC-MS). The hydraulic conductivity of roots ( Lp r ) and of cortical cells ( Lp c ) was measured using root and cell pressure probes. When grown in hydroponics, barley roots did not form an exodermis, even at their basal zones. However, they developed an endodermis. Endodermal Casparian bands first appeared as 'dots' as early as at 20 mm from the apex, whereas a patchy suberin lamellae appeared at 60 mm. The endodermal suberin accounted for the total suberin of the roots. The absolute amount in the basal zone was significantly higher than in the apical zone, which was inversely proportional to the Lp r . Comparison of Lp r and Lp c suggested that cell to cell pathways dominate for water transport in roots. However, the calculation of Lp r from Lp c showed that at least 26 % of water transport occurs through the apoplast. Roots had different solute permeabilities ( P sr ) and reflection coefficients ( σ sr ) for the solutes used. The σ sr was below unity for the solutes, which have virtually zero permeability for semi-permeable membranes. Suberized endodermis significantly reduces Lp r of seminal roots. The water and solute transport across barley roots is composite in nature and they do not behave like ideal osmometers. The composite transport model should be extended by adding components arranged in series (cortex, endodermis) in addition to the currently included components arranged in parallel (apoplastic, cell to cell pathways). © The

  10. Sulphur extended oil sand mix : paving material for lower transport cost and CO{sub 2} reduction : ASRL Syncrude research project 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aquin d' , G. [Con-Sul Inc., Missoula, MT (United States)

    2010-07-01

    This power point presentation discussed the use of sulphur-enhanced oil sands (SEOS) as a paving mixture. Sulphur has been added to asphaltic bitumen paving processes since the 1850s. Research into sulphur additions has been conducted by various Canadian industry members and institutions. A study in 1995 investigated the use of SEOS as a temporary paving material. The benefits of using SEOS included lower capital costs and lower greenhouse gas (GHG) impacts. Increases in equipment efficiency were also observed. Researchers are now developing mixing protocols and testing various paving materials in relation to temperature regimes and percentages of sulphur. Sand, limestone, coke, and rubber additions are also being evaluated, as well as the behaviour of SEOS in freeze-thaw cycles. To date, the studies have indicated that a 30 percent sulphur, 10 percent sand, and 60 percent oil sand mixture provides optimal compression and behaviour under freeze-thaw conditions. The use of SEOS paving at oil sands mine sites will reduce truck and road maintenance as well as reduce fuel emissions and consumption rates. tabs., figs.

  11. Cadmium uptake from solution by plants and its transport from roots to shoots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarvis, S.C.; Jones, L.H.P.; Hopper, M.J.

    1976-02-01

    The uptake of cadmium by the roots of plants, and its transport to shoots was examined using solution culture. Uptake by the roots of perennial ryegrass over a period of 4 hours from an aqueous solution containing 0.25 ppm cadmium as CdCl/sub 2/ was (i) enhanced by killing the roots and (ii) depressed when Ca/sup 2 +/, Mn/sup 2 +/ or Zn/sup 2 +/ were added to the solution. The distribution of cadmium between the roots and shoots of 23 species was examined at 4 days after a single, 3-day exposure to a nutrient solution containing 0.01 ppm added Cd. In all except 3 species, i.e. kale, lettuce and watercress, more than 50% of that taken up was retained in the shoot, and in fibrous roots of fodder beet, parsnip, carrot and radish it was greater than in the swollen storage roots. When perennial ryegrass was similarly exposed to solutions containing 0.01, 0.05, and 0.25 ppm added cadmium, uptake, as measured at 3 days after adding cadmium, increased with increasing rates of addition, but the proportion retained in the roots was constant (approximately 88%). There was no further transport from roots to shoots during the next 21 days, with the result that the concentration in the shoots decreased progressively with increasing growth. It is concluded that although the roots of several species can take up large quantities of cadmium from solution there are mechanisms which may restrict the movement of cadmium through plants, and thus to animals. 21 references, 7 tables.

  12. Fibrin structural and diffusional analysis suggests that fibers are permeable to solute transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonidakis, Kimon Alexandros; Bhattacharya, Pinaki; Patterson, Jennifer; Vos, Bart E; Koenderink, Gijsje H; Vermant, Jan; Lambrechts, Dennis; Roeffaers, Maarten; Van Oosterwyck, Hans

    2017-01-01

    Fibrin hydrogels are promising carrier materials in tissue engineering. They are biocompatible and easy to prepare, they can bind growth factors and they can be prepared from a patient's own blood. While fibrin structure and mechanics have been extensively studied, not much is known about the relation between structure and diffusivity of solutes within the network. This is particularly relevant for solutes with a size similar to that of growth factors. A novel methodological approach has been used in this study to retrieve quantitative structural characteristics of fibrin hydrogels, by combining two complementary techniques, namely confocal fluorescence microscopy with a fiber extraction algorithm and turbidity measurements. Bulk rheological measurements were conducted to determine the impact of fibrin hydrogel structure on mechanical properties. From these measurements it can be concluded that variations in the fibrin hydrogel structure have a large impact on the rheological response of the hydrogels (up to two orders of magnitude difference in storage modulus) but only a moderate influence on the diffusivity of dextran solutes (up to 25% difference). By analyzing the diffusivity measurements by means of the Ogston diffusion model we further provide evidence that individual fibrin fibers can be semi-permeable to solute transport, depending on the average distance between individual protofibrils. This can be important for reducing mass transport limitations, for modulating fibrinolysis and for growth factor binding, which are all relevant for tissue engineering. Fibrin is a natural biopolymer that has drawn much interest as a biomimetic carrier in tissue engineering applications. We hereby use a novel combined approach for the structural characterization of fibrin networks based on optical microscopy and light scattering methods that can also be applied to other fibrillar hydrogels, like collagen. Furthermore, our findings on the relation between solute transport

  13. Solutions for the disposal of industrial and rain wastewater of transport enterprises in Moscow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varyushina Galina

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The article gives results of the surveys water management systems, auto repair companies, bus compamies, taxis, fleets of trucks, production and technical enterprises. Studied technological processes of primary production: cleaning engines, flushing of radiators and parts of batteries, testing of fuel tanks, cleaning of parts and units, exterior washing and painting of motor vehicles. There were carried out field examinations of local industrial wastewater treatment facilities industrial wastewater and onsite construction runoff, the laboratory-production work to identify quantitative and qualitative indicators of the incoming and treated effluents, including petroleum products, suspended matter, salinity, synthetic surfactants, heavy metals etc. Proposed sustainable solutions for the improvement of the work of treatment facilities of rain sewage by mechanical and physical and chemical methods, including horizontal sand catchers, septic tanks – oil separator, a cascade of pressure filters with granular mineral over-loading and high-performance sorption materials, the effectiveness of treatment meets the requirements of water for its re-use for technical needs, and discharge to water bodies.

  14. Modelling transport of water and solutes in future wetlands in Forsmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vikstroem, Maria; Gustafsson, Lars-Goeran [DHI Water and Environment AB, Vaexjoe (Sweden)

    2006-03-15

    been analyzed. Results from the transport modelling show that a solute in the bedrock is transported quickly towards the peat surface in discharge areas for Bolundsfjaerden. After around 10 years, a stationary condition is reached. For the recharge area that develops in large parts of the mire, the solute is transported through horizontal dispersion, which results in much lower concentrations. The solute concentration is at the lowest where the overland water pressure is at the highest close to the south western inlet. Puttan has a vertical flow pattern that differs from Bolundsfjaerden. The pressure from water on the peat surface is considerably lower and for a major part of the year Puttan is a discharge area with an upwards flow direction. The spatial distribution of solutes is more even over the surface than for Bolundsfjaerden, but higher concentrations are found around today's shoreline. A solute reaching the wetland through surface runoff is transported relatively slow through the mire at Bolundsfjaerden. Due to the recharge conditions, the solute is spread to the underlying soil layers. The vertical solute transport follows the discharge and recharge areas, where high concentrations, up to the source strength, are reached in major parts of the formation, while lower concentrations are reached in the discharge areas and underneath clay sediment.

  15. Modelling transport of water and solutes in future wetlands in Forsmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vikstroem, Maria; Gustafsson, Lars-Goeran

    2006-03-01

    analyzed. Results from the transport modelling show that a solute in the bedrock is transported quickly towards the peat surface in discharge areas for Bolundsfjaerden. After around 10 years, a stationary condition is reached. For the recharge area that develops in large parts of the mire, the solute is transported through horizontal dispersion, which results in much lower concentrations. The solute concentration is at the lowest where the overland water pressure is at the highest close to the south western inlet. Puttan has a vertical flow pattern that differs from Bolundsfjaerden. The pressure from water on the peat surface is considerably lower and for a major part of the year Puttan is a discharge area with an upwards flow direction. The spatial distribution of solutes is more even over the surface than for Bolundsfjaerden, but higher concentrations are found around today's shoreline. A solute reaching the wetland through surface runoff is transported relatively slow through the mire at Bolundsfjaerden. Due to the recharge conditions, the solute is spread to the underlying soil layers. The vertical solute transport follows the discharge and recharge areas, where high concentrations, up to the source strength, are reached in major parts of the formation, while lower concentrations are reached in the discharge areas and underneath clay sediment

  16. Characterization of a novel organic solute transporter homologue from Clonorchis sinensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanyan Lu

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Clonorchis sinensis is a liver fluke that can dwell in the bile ducts of mammals. Bile acid transporters function to maintain the homeostasis of bile acids in C. sinensis, as they induce physiological changes or have harmful effects on C. sinensis survival. The organic solute transporter (OST transports mainly bile acid and belongs to the SLC51 subfamily of solute carrier transporters. OST plays a critical role in the recirculation of bile acids in higher animals. In this study, we cloned full-length cDNA of the 480-amino acid OST from C. sinensis (CsOST. Genomic analysis revealed 11 exons and nine introns. The CsOST protein had a 'Solute_trans_a' domain with 67% homology to Schistosoma japonicum OST. For further analysis, the CsOST protein sequence was split into the ordered domain (CsOST-N at the N-terminus and disordered domain (CsOST-C at the C-terminus. The tertiary structure of each domain was built using a threading-based method and determined by manual comparison. In a phylogenetic tree, the CsOST-N domain belonged to the OSTα and CsOST-C to the OSTβ clade. These two domains were more highly conserved with the OST α- and β-subunits at the structure level than at sequence level. These findings suggested that CsOST comprised the OST α- and β-subunits. CsOST was localized in the oral and ventral suckers and in the mesenchymal tissues abundant around the intestine, vitelline glands, uterus, and testes. This study provides fundamental data for the further understanding of homologues in other flukes.

  17. Characterization of a novel organic solute transporter homologue from Clonorchis sinensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Fuhong; Lee, Ji-Yun; Pak, Jhang Ho; Sohn, Woon-Mok

    2018-01-01

    Clonorchis sinensis is a liver fluke that can dwell in the bile ducts of mammals. Bile acid transporters function to maintain the homeostasis of bile acids in C. sinensis, as they induce physiological changes or have harmful effects on C. sinensis survival. The organic solute transporter (OST) transports mainly bile acid and belongs to the SLC51 subfamily of solute carrier transporters. OST plays a critical role in the recirculation of bile acids in higher animals. In this study, we cloned full-length cDNA of the 480-amino acid OST from C. sinensis (CsOST). Genomic analysis revealed 11 exons and nine introns. The CsOST protein had a ‘Solute_trans_a’ domain with 67% homology to Schistosoma japonicum OST. For further analysis, the CsOST protein sequence was split into the ordered domain (CsOST-N) at the N-terminus and disordered domain (CsOST-C) at the C-terminus. The tertiary structure of each domain was built using a threading-based method and determined by manual comparison. In a phylogenetic tree, the CsOST-N domain belonged to the OSTα and CsOST-C to the OSTβ clade. These two domains were more highly conserved with the OST α- and β-subunits at the structure level than at sequence level. These findings suggested that CsOST comprised the OST α- and β-subunits. CsOST was localized in the oral and ventral suckers and in the mesenchymal tissues abundant around the intestine, vitelline glands, uterus, and testes. This study provides fundamental data for the further understanding of homologues in other flukes. PMID:29702646

  18. Groundwater and solute transport modeling at Hyporheic zone of upper part Citarum River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iskandar, Irwan; Farazi, Hendy; Fadhilah, Rahmat; Purnandi, Cipto; Notosiswoyo, Sudarto

    2017-06-01

    Groundwater and surface water interaction is an interesting topic to be studied related to the water resources and environmental studies. The study of interaction between groundwater and river water at the Upper Part Citarum River aims to know the contribution of groundwater to the river or reversely and also solute transport of dissolved ions between them. Analysis of drill logs, vertical electrical sounding at the selected sections, measurement of dissolved ions, and groundwater modeling were applied to determine the flow and solute transport phenomena at the hyporheic zone. It showed the hyporheic zone dominated by silt and clay with hydraulic conductivity range from 10-4∼10-8 m/s. The groundwater flowing into the river with very low gradient and it shows that the Citarum River is a gaining stream. The groundwater modeling shows direct seepage of groundwater into the Citarum River is only 186 l/s, very small compared to the total discharge of the river. Total dissolved ions of the groundwater ranged from 200 to 480 ppm while the river water range from 200 to 2,000 ppm. Based on solute transport modeling it indicates dissolved ions dispersion of the Citarum River into groundwater may occur in some areas such as Bojongsoang-Dayeuh Kolot and Nanjung. This situation would increase the dissolved ions in groundwater in the region due to the contribution of the Citarum River. The results of the research can be a reference for further studies related to the mechanism of transport of the pollutants in the groundwater around the Citarum River.

  19. Capillary-Driven Solute Transport and Precipitation in Porous Media during Dry-Out

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Holger; Andrew, Matthew; Blunt, Martin; Snippe, Jeroen

    2014-05-01

    The injection of dry or under-saturated gases or supercritical (SC) fluids into water bearing formations might lead to a formation dry-out in the vicinity of the injection well. The dry-out is caused by the evaporation/dissolution of formation water into the injected fluid and the subsequent transport of dissolved water in the injected fluid away from the injection well. Dry-out results in precipitation from solutes of the formation brine and consequently leads to a reduction of the rock's pore space (porosity) and eventually to a reduction of permeability near the injection well, or even to the loss of injectivity. Recently evidence has been found that the complexity of the pore space and the respective capillary driven solute transport plays a key role. While no effective-permeability (Keff) reduction was observed in a single-porosity sandstone, multi porosity carbonate rocks responded to precipitation with a strong reduction of Keff. The reason for the different response of Keff to salt precipitation is suspected to be in the exact location of the precipitate (solid salt) in the pore space. In this study, we investigate dry-out and salt precipitation due to supercritical CO2 injection in single and multi-porosity systems under near well-bore conditions. We image fluid saturation changes by means of μCT scanning during desaturation. We are able to observe capillary driven transport of the brine phase and the respective transport of solutes on the rock's pore scale. Finally we have access to the precipitated solid-salt phase and their distribution. The results can proof the thought models behind permeability porosity relationships K(φ) for injectivity modeling. The topic and the mechanisms we show are of general interest for drying processes in porous material such as soils and paper.

  20. Diffusion Dominant Solute Transport Modelling in Fractured Media Under Deep Geological Environment - 12211

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwong, S. [National Nuclear Laboratory (United Kingdom); Jivkov, A.P. [Research Centre for Radwaste and Decommissioning and Modelling and Simulation Centre, University of Manchester (United Kingdom)

    2012-07-01

    Deep geologic disposal of high activity and long-lived radioactive waste is gaining increasing support in many countries, where suitable low permeability geological formation in combination with engineered barriers are used to provide long term waste contaminant and minimise the impacts to the environment and risk to the biosphere. This modelling study examines the solute transport in fractured media under low flow velocities that are relevant to a deep geological environment. In particular, reactive solute transport through fractured media is studied using a 2-D model, that considers advection and diffusion, to explore the coupled effects of kinetic and equilibrium chemical processes. The effects of water velocity in the fracture, matrix porosity and diffusion on solute transport are investigated and discussed. Some illustrative modelled results are presented to demonstrate the use of the model to examine the effects of media degradation on solute transport, under the influences of hydrogeological (diffusion dominant) and microbially mediated chemical processes. The challenges facing the prediction of long term degradation such as cracks evolution, interaction and coalescence are highlighted. The potential of a novel microstructure informed modelling approach to account for these effects is discussed, particularly with respect to investigating multiple phenomena impact on material performance. The GRM code is used to examine the effects of media degradation for a geological waste disposal package, under the combined hydrogeological (diffusion dominant) and chemical effects in low groundwater flow conditions that are typical of deep geological disposal systems. An illustrative reactive transport modelling application demonstrates the use of the code to examine the interplay of kinetic controlled biogeochemical reactive processes with advective and diffusive transport, under the influence of media degradation. The initial model results are encouraging which show the

  1. Solute transport in aquifers: The comeback of the advection dispersion equation and the First Order Approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiori, A.; Zarlenga, A.; Jankovic, I.; Dagan, G.

    2017-12-01

    Natural gradient steady flow of mean velocity U takes place in heterogeneous aquifers of random logconductivity Y = lnK , characterized by the normal univariate PDF f(Y) and autocorrelation ρY, of variance σY2 and horizontal integral scale I. Solute transport is quantified by the Breakthrough Curve (BTC) M at planes at distance x from the injection plane. The study builds on the extensive 3D numerical simulations of flow and transport of Jankovic et al. (2017) for different conductivity structures. The present study further explores the predictive capabilities of the Advection Dispersion Equation (ADE), with macrodispersivity αL given by the First Order Approximation (FOA), by checking in a quantitative manner its applicability. After a discussion on the suitable boundary conditions for ADE, we find that the ADE-FOA solution is a sufficiently accurate predictor for applications, the many other sources of uncertainty prevailing in practice notwithstanding. We checked by least squares and by comparison of travel time of quantiles of M that indeed the analytical Inverse Gaussian M with αL =σY2 I , is able to fit well the bulk of the simulated BTCs. It tends to underestimate the late arrival time of the thin and persistent tail. The tail is better reproduced by the semi-analytical MIMSCA model, which also allows for a physical explanation of the success of the Inverse Gaussian solution. Examination of the pertinent longitudinal mass distribution shows that it is different from the commonly used Gaussian one in the analysis of field experiments, and it captures the main features of the plume measurements of the MADE experiment. The results strengthen the confidence in the applicability of the ADE and the FOA to predicting longitudinal spreading in solute transport through heterogeneous aquifers of stationary random structure.

  2. Immunohistochemical expression profiles of solute carrier transporters in alpha-fetoprotein-producing gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimakata, Takaaki; Kamoshida, Shingo; Kawamura, Jumpei; Ogane, Naoki; Kameda, Yoichi; Yanagita, Emmy; Itoh, Tomoo; Takeda, Risa; Naka, Ayano; Sakamaki, Kuniko; Hayashi, Yurie; Kuwao, Sadahito

    2016-11-01

    Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP)-producing gastric cancer (GC) is an aggressive tumour with high rates of liver metastasis and poor prognosis, and for which a validated chemotherapy regimen has not been established. Drug uptake by solute carrier (SLC) transporters is proposed as one of the mechanisms involved in sensitivity to chemotherapy. In this study, we aimed to develop important insights into effective chemotherapeutic regimens for AFP-producing GC. We evaluated immunohistochemically the expression levels of a panel of SLC transporters in 20 AFP-producing GCs and 130 conventional GCs. SLC transporters examined were human equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 (hENT1), organic anion transporter 2 (OAT2), organic cation transporter (OCT) 2, OCT6 and organic anion-transporting polypeptide 1B3 (OATP1B3). The rates of high expression levels of hENT1 (hENT1 high ) and OAT2 (OAT2 high ) were statistically higher in AFP-producing GC, compared with conventional GC. When analysing hENT1 and OAT2 in combination, hENT1 high /OAT2 high was the most particular expression profile for AFP-producing GC, with a greater significance than hENT1 or OAT2 alone. However, no significant differences in OCT2, OCT6 or OATP1B3 levels were detected between AFP-producing and conventional GCs. However, immunoreactivity for hENT1, OAT2 and OCT6 tended to be increased in GC tissues compared with non-neoplastic epithelia. Because hENT1 and OAT2 are crucial for the uptake of gemcitabine and 5-fluorouracil, respectively, our results suggest that patients with AFP-producing GC could potentially benefit from gemcitabine/fluoropyrimidine combination chemotherapy. Increased expression of hENT1, OAT2 and OCT6 may also be associated with the progression of GC. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Modeling variably saturated multispecies reactive groundwater solute transport with MODFLOW-UZF and RT3D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Ryan T.; Morway, Eric D.; Niswonger, Richard G.; Gates, Timothy K.

    2013-01-01

    A numerical model was developed that is capable of simulating multispecies reactive solute transport in variably saturated porous media. This model consists of a modified version of the reactive transport model RT3D (Reactive Transport in 3 Dimensions) that is linked to the Unsaturated-Zone Flow (UZF1) package and MODFLOW. Referred to as UZF-RT3D, the model is tested against published analytical benchmarks as well as other published contaminant transport models, including HYDRUS-1D, VS2DT, and SUTRA, and the coupled flow and transport modeling system of CATHY and TRAN3D. Comparisons in one-dimensional, two-dimensional, and three-dimensional variably saturated systems are explored. While several test cases are included to verify the correct implementation of variably saturated transport in UZF-RT3D, other cases are included to demonstrate the usefulness of the code in terms of model run-time and handling the reaction kinetics of multiple interacting species in variably saturated subsurface systems. As UZF1 relies on a kinematic-wave approximation for unsaturated flow that neglects the diffusive terms in Richards equation, UZF-RT3D can be used for large-scale aquifer systems for which the UZF1 formulation is reasonable, that is, capillary-pressure gradients can be neglected and soil parameters can be treated as homogeneous. Decreased model run-time and the ability to include site-specific chemical species and chemical reactions make UZF-RT3D an attractive model for efficient simulation of multispecies reactive transport in variably saturated large-scale subsurface systems.

  4. Sand dune tracking from satellite laser altimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabboor, Mohammed

    Substantial problems arise from sand movement in arid and semi-arid countries. Sand poses a threat to infrastructure, agricultural and urban areas. These issues are caused by the encroachment of sand on roads and railway tracks, farmland, towns and villages, and airports, to name a few. Sand movement highly depends on geomorphology including vegetation cover, shape and height of the terrain, and grain size of the sand. However, wind direction and speed are the most important factors that affect efficient sand movement. The direction of the movement depends on the main direction of the wind, but it has been shown that a minimum wind speed is required, e.g. wind gusts, to initiate sand transport. This fact prevents a simple calculation of sand transport from conventional wind data as wind records rarely contain sub-minute intervals masking out any wind gusts. An alternative of predicting sand transport is the direct observation of sand advance by in situ measurements or via satellite. Until recently, satellite imagery was the only means to compare dune shape and position for predicting dune migration over several years. In 2003, the NASA laser altimetry mission ICESat became operational and monitors elevations over all surface types including sand dunes with an accuracy of about 10-20 cm. In this study, ICESat observations from repeat tracks (tracks overlapping eachother within 50 m) are used to derive sand dune advance and direction. The method employs a correlation of the elevation profiles over several dunes and was sucessfully validated with synthetic data. The accuracy of this method is 5 meters of dune advance. One of the most active areas exhibiting sand and dune movement is the area of the Arabian Peninsula. Approximately one-third of the Arabian Peninsula is covered by sand dunes. Different wind regimes (Shamal, Kaus) cause sand dune movement in the selected study area in the eastern part of the Arabian Peninsula between 20-25 degrees North and 45-55 degrees

  5. A computational model for simulating solute transport and oxygen consumption along the nephrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallon, Volker; Edwards, Aurélie

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate water and solute transport, with a focus on sodium transport (TNa) and metabolism along individual nephron segments under differing physiological and pathophysiological conditions. To accomplish this goal, we developed a computational model of solute transport and oxygen consumption (QO2) along different nephron populations of a rat kidney. The model represents detailed epithelial and paracellular transport processes along both the superficial and juxtamedullary nephrons, with the loop of Henle of each model nephron extending to differing depths of the inner medulla. We used the model to assess how changes in TNa may alter QO2 in different nephron segments and how shifting the TNa sites alters overall kidney QO2. Under baseline conditions, the model predicted a whole kidney TNa/QO2, which denotes the number of moles of Na+ reabsorbed per moles of O2 consumed, of ∼15, with TNa efficiency predicted to be significantly greater in cortical nephron segments than in medullary segments. The TNa/QO2 ratio was generally similar among the superficial and juxtamedullary nephron segments, except for the proximal tubule, where TNa/QO2 was ∼20% higher in superficial nephrons, due to the larger luminal flow along the juxtamedullary proximal tubules and the resulting higher, flow-induced transcellular transport. Moreover, the model predicted that an increase in single-nephron glomerular filtration rate does not significantly affect TNa/QO2 in the proximal tubules but generally increases TNa/QO2 along downstream segments. The latter result can be attributed to the generally higher luminal [Na+], which raises paracellular TNa. Consequently, vulnerable medullary segments, such as the S3 segment and medullary thick ascending limb, may be relatively protected from flow-induced increases in QO2 under pathophysiological conditions. PMID:27707705

  6. Anisotropic surface hole-transport property of triphenylamine-derivative single crystal prepared by solution method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Umeda, Minoru, E-mail: mumeda@vos.nagaokaut.ac.jp [Nagaoka University of Technology, Kamitomioka, Nagaoka, Niigata 940-2188 (Japan); Katagiri, Mitsuhiko; Shironita, Sayoko [Nagaoka University of Technology, Kamitomioka, Nagaoka, Niigata 940-2188 (Japan); Nagayama, Norio [Nagaoka University of Technology, Kamitomioka, Nagaoka, Niigata 940-2188 (Japan); Ricoh Company, Ltd., Nishisawada, Numazu, Shizuoka 410-0007 (Japan)

    2016-12-01

    Highlights: • A hole transport molecule was investigated based on its electrochemical redox characteristics. • The solubility and supersolubility curves of the molecule were measured in order to prepare a large crystal. • The polarization micrograph and XRD results revealed that a single crystal was obtained. • An anisotropic surface conduction, in which the long-axis direction exceeds that of the amorphous layer, was observed. • The anisotropic surface conduction was well explained by the molecular stacked structure. - Abstract: This paper reports the anisotropic hole transport at the triphenylamine-derivative single crystal surface prepared by a solution method. Triphenylamine derivatives are commonly used in a hole-transport material for organic photoconductors of laser-beam printers, in which the materials are used as an amorphous form. For developing organic photovoltaics using the photoconductor’s technology, preparation of a single crystal seems to be a specific way by realizing the high mobility of an organic semiconductor. In this study, a single crystal of 4-(2,2-diphenylethenyl)-N,N-bis(4-methylphenyl)-benzenamine (TPA) was prepared and its anisotropic hole-transport property measured. First, the hole-transport property of the TPA was investigated based on its chemical structure and electrochemical redox characteristics. Next, a large-scale single crystal formation at a high rate was developed by employing a solution method based on its solubility and supersolubility curves. The grown TPA was found to be a single crystal based on the polarization micrograph observation and crystallographic analysis. For the TPA single crystal, an anisotropic surface conduction was found, which was well explained by its molecular stack structure. The measured current in the long-axis direction is one order of magnitude greater than that of amorphous TPA.

  7. All-solution processed composite hole transport layer for quantum dot light emitting diode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xiaoli [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Low Dimensional Materials Physics and Preparing Technology, School of Science, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Synergetic Innovation Center of Chemical Science and Engineering, Tianjin (China); Dai, Haitao, E-mail: htdai@tju.edu.cn [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Low Dimensional Materials Physics and Preparing Technology, School of Science, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Zhao, Junliang; Wang, Shuguo [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Low Dimensional Materials Physics and Preparing Technology, School of Science, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Sun, Xiaowei [Department of Electrical & Electronic Engineering, South University of Science and Technology of China, Tangchang Road 1088, Shenzhen, Guangdong 518055 (China)

    2016-03-31

    In the present work, poly-TPD and TCTA composite hole transport layer (HTL) was employed in solution processed CdSe/ZnS quantum dot light emitting diodes (QLEDs). As the doping level of TCTA can determine the carriers transport efficiency of HTL, the proper mixing ratio of TCTA and poly-TPD should be found to optimize the performance of composite HTL for QLEDs. The doping of poly-TPD by low TCTA content can make its HOMO level lower and then reduce the energy barrier height from HTL to quantum dots (QDs), whereas the doping of poly-TPD by the concentrated TCTA results in the degraded performance of QLEDs due to its decreased hole transport mobility. By using the optimized composition with poly-TPD:TCTA (3:1) as the hole transport layer, the luminescence of the device exhibits about double enhancement compared with that of poly-TPD based device. The improvement of luminescence is mainly attributed to the lower energy barrier of hole injection. The Förster resonant energy transfer (FRET) mechanism in the devices was investigated through theoretical and experimental analysis and the results indicate that the TCTA doping makes no difference on FRET. Therefore, the charge injection mechanism dominates the improved performance of the devices. - Highlights: • Quantum dot light emitting diodes (QLEDs) were fabricated by all solution method. • The performance of QLEDs was optimized by varying the composite hole transport layer. • The blend HTL could promote hole injection by optimizing HOMO levels. • The energy transfer mechanism was analyzed by studying Förster resonant energy transfer process.

  8. Reactive solute transport in streams: A surface complexation approach for trace metal sorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runkel, Robert L.; Kimball, Briant A.; McKnight, Diane M.; Bencala, Kenneth E.

    1999-01-01

    A model for trace metals that considers in-stream transport, metal oxide precipitation-dissolution, and pH-dependent sorption is presented. Linkage between a surface complexation submodel and the stream transport equations provides a framework for modeling sorption onto static and/or dynamic surfaces. A static surface (e.g., an iron- oxide-coated streambed) is defined as a surface with a temporally constant solid concentration. Limited contact between solutes in the water column and the static surface is considered using a pseudokinetic approach. A dynamic surface (e.g., freshly precipitated metal oxides) has a temporally variable solid concentration and is in equilibrium with the water column. Transport and deposition of solute mass sorbed to the dynamic surface is represented in the stream transport equations that include precipitate settling. The model is applied to a pH-modification experiment in an acid mine drainage stream. Dissolved copper concentrations were depressed for a 3 hour period in response to the experimentally elevated pH. After passage of the pH front, copper was desorbed, and dissolved concentrations returned to ambient levels. Copper sorption is modeled by considering sorption to aged hydrous ferric oxide (HFO) on the streambed (static surface) and freshly precipitated HFO in the water column (dynamic surface). Comparison of parameter estimates with reported values suggests that naturally formed iron oxides may be more effective in removing trace metals than synthetic oxides used in laboratory studies. The model's ability to simulate pH, metal oxide precipitation-dissolution, and pH-dependent sorption provides a means of evaluating the complex interactions between trace metal chemistry and hydrologic transport at the field scale.

  9. Indirect estimation of the Convective Lognormal Transfer function model parameters for describing solute transport in unsaturated and undisturbed soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Mohammad Hossein; Vanclooster, Marnik

    2012-05-01

    Solute transport in partially saturated soils is largely affected by fluid velocity distribution and pore size distribution within the solute transport domain. Hence, it is possible to describe the solute transport process in terms of the pore size distribution of the soil, and indirectly in terms of the soil hydraulic properties. In this paper, we present a conceptual approach that allows predicting the parameters of the Convective Lognormal Transfer model from knowledge of soil moisture and the Soil Moisture Characteristic (SMC), parameterized by means of the closed-form model of Kosugi (1996). It is assumed that in partially saturated conditions, the air filled pore volume act as an inert solid phase, allowing the use of the Arya et al. (1999) pragmatic approach to estimate solute travel time statistics from the saturation degree and SMC parameters. The approach is evaluated using a set of partially saturated transport experiments as presented by Mohammadi and Vanclooster (2011). Experimental results showed that the mean solute travel time, μ(t), increases proportionally with the depth (travel distance) and decreases with flow rate. The variance of solute travel time σ²(t) first decreases with flow rate up to 0.4-0.6 Ks and subsequently increases. For all tested BTCs predicted solute transport with μ(t) estimated from the conceptual model performed much better as compared to predictions with μ(t) and σ²(t) estimated from calibration of solute transport at shallow soil depths. The use of μ(t) estimated from the conceptual model therefore increases the robustness of the CLT model in predicting solute transport in heterogeneous soils at larger depths. In view of the fact that reasonable indirect estimates of the SMC can be made from basic soil properties using pedotransfer functions, the presented approach may be useful for predicting solute transport at field or watershed scales. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Difference in the wind speeds required for initiation versus continuation of sand transport on mars: implications for dunes and dust storms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kok, Jasper F

    2010-02-19

    Much of the surface of Mars is covered by dunes, ripples, and other features formed by the blowing of sand by wind, known as saltation. In addition, saltation loads the atmosphere with dust aerosols, which dominate the Martian climate. We show here that saltation can be maintained on Mars by wind speeds an order of magnitude less than required to initiate it. We further show that this hysteresis effect causes saltation to occur for much lower wind speeds than previously thought. These findings have important implications for the formation of dust storms, sand dunes, and ripples on Mars.

  11. A cell transportation solution that preserves live circulating tumor cells in patient blood samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefansson, Steingrimur; Adams, Daniel L; Ershler, William B; Le, Huyen; Ho, David H

    2016-05-06

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are typically collected into CellSave fixative tubes, which kills the cells, but preserves their morphology. Currently, the clinical utility of CTCs is mostly limited to their enumeration. More detailed investigation of CTC biology can be performed on live cells, but obtaining live CTCs is technically challenging, requiring blood collection into biocompatible solutions and rapid isolation which limits transportation options. To overcome the instability of CTCs, we formulated a sugar based cell transportation solution (SBTS) that stabilizes cell viability at ambient temperature. In this study we examined the long term viability of human cancer cell lines, primary cells and CTCs in human blood samples in the SBTS for transportation purposes. Four cell lines, 5 primary human cells and purified human PBMCs were tested to determine the viability of cells stored in the transportation solution at ambient temperature for up to 7 days. We then demonstrated viability of MCF-7 cells spiked into normal blood with SBTS and stored for up to 7 days. A pilot study was then run on blood samples from 3 patients with metastatic malignancies stored with or without SBTS for 6 days. CTCs were then purified by Ficoll separation/microfilter isolation and identified using CTC markers. Cell viability was assessed using trypan blue or CellTracker™ live cell stain. Our results suggest that primary/immortalized cell lines stored in SBTS remain ~90% viable for > 72 h. Further, MCF-7 cells spiked into whole blood remain viable when stored with SBTS for up to 7 days. Finally, live CTCs were isolated from cancer patient blood samples kept in SBTS at ambient temperature for 6 days. No CTCs were isolated from blood samples stored without SBTS. In this proof of principle pilot study we show that viability of cell lines is preserved for days using SBTS. Further, this solution can be used to store patient derived blood samples for eventual isolation of viable CTCs after

  12. A cell transportation solution that preserves live circulating tumor cells in patient blood samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefansson, Steingrimur; Adams, Daniel L.; Ershler, William B.; Le, Huyen; Ho, David H.

    2016-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are typically collected into CellSave fixative tubes, which kills the cells, but preserves their morphology. Currently, the clinical utility of CTCs is mostly limited to their enumeration. More detailed investigation of CTC biology can be performed on live cells, but obtaining live CTCs is technically challenging, requiring blood collection into biocompatible solutions and rapid isolation which limits transportation options. To overcome the instability of CTCs, we formulated a sugar based cell transportation solution (SBTS) that stabilizes cell viability at ambient temperature. In this study we examined the long term viability of human cancer cell lines, primary cells and CTCs in human blood samples in the SBTS for transportation purposes. Four cell lines, 5 primary human cells and purified human PBMCs were tested to determine the viability of cells stored in the transportation solution at ambient temperature for up to 7 days. We then demonstrated viability of MCF-7 cells spiked into normal blood with SBTS and stored for up to 7 days. A pilot study was then run on blood samples from 3 patients with metastatic malignancies stored with or without SBTS for 6 days. CTCs were then purified by Ficoll separation/microfilter isolation and identified using CTC markers. Cell viability was assessed using trypan blue or CellTracker™ live cell stain. Our results suggest that primary/immortalized cell lines stored in SBTS remain ~90 % viable for > 72 h. Further, MCF-7 cells spiked into whole blood remain viable when stored with SBTS for up to 7 days. Finally, live CTCs were isolated from cancer patient blood samples kept in SBTS at ambient temperature for 6 days. No CTCs were isolated from blood samples stored without SBTS. In this proof of principle pilot study we show that viability of cell lines is preserved for days using SBTS. Further, this solution can be used to store patient derived blood samples for eventual isolation of viable CTCs

  13. PHAST--a program for simulating ground-water flow, solute transport, and multicomponent geochemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkhurst, David L.; Kipp, Kenneth L.; Engesgaard, Peter; Charlton, Scott R.

    2004-01-01

    The computer program PHAST simulates multi-component, reactive solute transport in three-dimensional saturated ground-water flow systems. PHAST is a versatile ground-water flow and solute-transport simulator with capabilities to model a wide range of equilibrium and kinetic geochemical reactions. The flow and transport calculations are based on a modified version of HST3D that is restricted to constant fluid density and constant temperature. The geochemical reactions are simulated with the geochemical model PHREEQC, which is embedded in PHAST. PHAST is applicable to the study of natural and contaminated ground-water systems at a variety of scales ranging from laboratory experiments to local and regional field scales. PHAST can be used in studies of migration of nutrients, inorganic and organic contaminants, and radionuclides; in projects such as aquifer storage and recovery or engineered remediation; and in investigations of the natural rock-water interactions in aquifers. PHAST is not appropriate for unsaturated-zone flow, multiphase flow, density-dependent flow, or waters with high ionic strengths. A variety of boundary conditions are available in PHAST to simulate flow and transport, including specified-head, flux, and leaky conditions, as well as the special cases of rivers and wells. Chemical reactions in PHAST include (1) homogeneous equilibria using an ion-association thermodynamic model; (2) heterogeneous equilibria between the aqueous solution and minerals, gases, surface complexation sites, ion exchange sites, and solid solutions; and (3) kinetic reactions with rates that are a function of solution composition. The aqueous model (elements, chemical reactions, and equilibrium constants), minerals, gases, exchangers, surfaces, and rate expressions may be defined or modified by the user. A number of options are available to save results of simulations to output files. The data may be saved in three formats: a format suitable for viewing with a text editor; a

  14. Heterogeneous nucleation promotes carrier transport in solution-processed organic field-effect transistors

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Ruipeng

    2012-09-04

    A new way to investigate and control the growth of solution-cast thin films is presented. The combination of in situ quartz crystal microbalance measurements with dissipation capabilities (QCM-D) and in situ grazing-incidence wide-angle X-ray scattering (GIWAXS) in an environmental chamber provides unique quantitative insights into the time-evolution of the concentration of the solution, the onset of nucleation, and the mode of growth of the organic semiconductor under varied drying conditions. It is demonstrated that careful control over the kinetics of solution drying enhances carrier transport significantly by promoting phase transformation predominantly via heterogeneous nucleation and sustained surface growth of a highly lamellar structure at the solid-liquid interface at the expense of homogeneous nucleation. A new way to investigate and control the growth of drop-cast thin films is presented. The solution-processing of small-molecule thin films of TIPS-pentacene is investigated using time-resolved techniques to reveal the mechanisms of nucleation and growth leading to solid film formation. By tuning the drying speed of the solution, the balance between surface and bulk growth modes is altered, thereby controlling the lamellar formation and tuning the carrier mobility in organic field-effect transistors Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. PHAST Version 2-A Program for Simulating Groundwater Flow, Solute Transport, and Multicomponent Geochemical Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkhurst, David L.; Kipp, Kenneth L.; Charlton, Scott R.

    2010-01-01

    The computer program PHAST (PHREEQC And HST3D) simulates multicomponent, reactive solute transport in three-dimensional saturated groundwater flow systems. PHAST is a versatile groundwater flow and solute-transport simulator with capabilities to model a wide range of equilibrium and kinetic geochemical reactions. The flow and transport calculations are based on a modified version of HST3D that is restricted to constant fluid density and constant temperature. The geochemical reactions are simulated with the geochemical model PHREEQC, which is embedded in PHAST. Major enhancements in PHAST Version 2 allow spatial data to be defined in a combination of map and grid coordinate systems, independent of a specific model grid (without node-by-node input). At run time, aquifer properties are interpolated from the spatial data to the model grid; regridding requires only redefinition of the grid without modification of the spatial data. PHAST is applicable to the study of natural and contaminated groundwater systems at a variety of scales ranging from laboratory experiments to local and regional field scales. PHAST can be used in studies of migration of nutrients, inorganic and organic contaminants, and radionuclides; in projects such as aquifer storage and recovery or engineered remediation; and in investigations of the natural rock/water interactions in aquifers. PHAST is not appropriate for unsaturated-zone flow, multiphase flow, or density-dependent flow. A variety of boundary conditions are available in PHAST to simulate flow and transport, including specified-head, flux (specified-flux), and leaky (head-dependent) conditions, as well as the special cases of rivers, drains, and wells. Chemical reactions in PHAST include (1) homogeneous equilibria using an ion-association or Pitzer specific interaction thermodynamic model; (2) heterogeneous equilibria between the aqueous solution and minerals, ion exchange sites, surface complexation sites, solid solutions, and gases; and

  16. Solute transport and storage mechanisms in wetlands of the Everglades, south Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Judson W.; Saiers, James E.; Newlin, Jessica T.

    2005-01-01

    Solute transport and storage processes in wetlands play an important role in biogeochemical cycling and in wetland water quality functions. In the wetlands of the Everglades, there are few data or guidelines to characterize transport through the heterogeneous flow environment. Our goal was to conduct a tracer study to help quantify solute exchange between the relatively fast flowing water in the open part of the water column and much more slowly moving water in thick floating vegetation and in the pore water of the underlying peat. We performed a tracer experiment that consisted of a constant‐rate injection of a sodium bromide (NaBr) solution for 22 hours into a 3 m wide, open‐ended flume channel in Everglades National Park. Arrival of the bromide tracer was monitored at an array of surface water and subsurface samplers for 48 hours at a distance of 6.8 m downstream of the injection. A one‐dimensional transport model was used in combination with an optimization code to identify the values of transport parameters that best explained the tracer observations. Parameters included dimensions and mass transfer coefficients describing exchange with both short (hours) and longer (tens of hours) storage zones as well as the average rates of advection and longitudinal dispersion in the open part of the water column (referred to as the “main flow zone”). Comparison with a more detailed set of tracer measurements tested how well the model's storage zones approximated the average characteristics of tracer movement into and out of the layer of thick floating vegetation and the pore water in the underlying peat. The rate at which the relatively fast moving water in the open water column was exchanged with slowly moving water in the layer of floating vegetation and in sediment pore water amounted to 50 and 3% h−1, respectively. Storage processes decreased the depth‐averaged velocity of surface water by 50% relative to the water velocity in the open part of the water

  17. Effects of Pisha sandstone content on solute transport in a sandy soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen, Qing; Zheng, Jiyong; He, Honghua; Han, Fengpeng; Zhang, Xingchang

    2016-02-01

    In sandy soil, water, nutrients and even pollutants are easily leaching to deeper layers. The objective of this study was to assess the effects of Pisha sandstone on soil solute transport in a sandy soil. The miscible displacement technique was used to obtain breakthrough curves (BTCs) of Br(-) as an inert non-adsorbed tracer and Na(+) as an adsorbed tracer. The incorporation of Pisha sandstone into sandy soil was able to prevent the early breakthrough of both tracers by decreasing the saturated hydraulic conductivity compared to the controlled sandy soil column, and the impeding effects increased with Pisha sandstone content. The BTCs of Br(-) were accurately described by both the convection-dispersion equation (CDE) and the two-region model (T-R), and the T-R model fitted the experimental data slightly better than the CDE. The two-site nonequilibrium model (T-S) accurately fit the Na(+) transport data. Pisha sandstone impeded the breakthrough of Na(+) not only by decreasing the saturated hydraulic conductivity but also by increasing the adsorption capacity of the soil. The measured CEC values of Pisha sandstone were up to 11 times larger than those of the sandy soil. The retardation factors (R) determined by the T-S model increased with increasing Pisha sandstone content, and the partition coefficient (K(d)) showed a similar trend to R. According to the results of this study, Pisha sandstone can successfully impede solute transport in a sandy soil column. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. External intermittency prediction using AMR solutions of RANS turbulence and transported PDF models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivieri, D. A.; Fairweather, M.; Falle, S. A. E. G.

    2011-12-01

    External intermittency in turbulent round jets is predicted using a Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes modelling approach coupled to solutions of the transported probability density function (pdf) equation for scalar variables. Solutions to the descriptive equations are obtained using a finite-volume method, combined with an adaptive mesh refinement algorithm, applied in both physical and compositional space. This method contrasts with conventional approaches to solving the transported pdf equation which generally employ Monte Carlo techniques. Intermittency-modified eddy viscosity and second-moment turbulence closures are used to accommodate the effects of intermittency on the flow field, with the influence of intermittency also included, through modifications to the mixing model, in the transported pdf equation. Predictions of the overall model are compared with experimental data on the velocity and scalar fields in a round jet, as well as against measurements of intermittency profiles and scalar pdfs in a number of flows, with good agreement obtained. For the cases considered, predictions based on the second-moment turbulence closure are clearly superior, although both turbulence models give realistic predictions of the bimodal scalar pdfs observed experimentally.

  19. Nonpoint source solute transport normal to aquifer bedding in heterogeneous, Markov chain random fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hua; Harter, Thomas; Sivakumar, Bellie

    2006-06-01

    Facies-based geostatistical models have become important tools for analyzing flow and mass transport processes in heterogeneous aquifers. Yet little is known about the relationship between these latter processes and the parameters of facies-based geostatistical models. In this study, we examine the transport of a nonpoint source solute normal (perpendicular) to the major bedding plane of an alluvial aquifer medium that contains multiple geologic facies, including interconnected, high-conductivity (coarse textured) facies. We also evaluate the dependence of the transport behavior on the parameters of the constitutive facies model. A facies-based Markov chain geostatistical model is used to quantify the spatial variability of the aquifer system's hydrostratigraphy. It is integrated with a groundwater flow model and a random walk particle transport model to estimate the solute traveltime probability density function (pdf) for solute flux from the water table to the bottom boundary (the production horizon) of the aquifer. The cases examined include two-, three-, and four-facies models, with mean length anisotropy ratios for horizontal to vertical facies, ek, from 25:1 to 300:1 and with a wide range of facies volume proportions (e.g., from 5 to 95% coarse-textured facies). Predictions of traveltime pdfs are found to be significantly affected by the number of hydrostratigraphic facies identified in the aquifer. Those predictions of traveltime pdfs also are affected by the proportions of coarse-textured sediments, the mean length of the facies (particularly the ratio of length to thickness of coarse materials), and, to a lesser degree, the juxtapositional preference among the hydrostratigraphic facies. In transport normal to the sedimentary bedding plane, traveltime is not lognormally distributed as is often assumed. Also, macrodispersive behavior (variance of the traveltime) is found not to be a unique function of the conductivity variance. For the parameter range

  20. Solute transport in coupled inland-coastal water systems. General conceptualisation and application to Forsmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarsjoe, Jerker; Destouni, Georgia; Persson, Klas; Prieto, Carmen

    2007-12-01

    We formulate a general theoretical conceptualisation of solute transport from inland sources to downstream recipients, considering main recipient load contributions from all different nutrient and pollutant sources that may exist within any catchment. Since the conceptualisation is model independent, its main hydrological factors and mass delivery factors can be quantified on the basis of inputs to and outputs from any considered analytical or numerical model. Some of the conceptually considered source contribution and transport pathway combinations are however commonly neglected in catchment-scale solute transport and attenuation modelling, in particular those related to subsurface sources, diffuse sources at the land surface and direct groundwater transport into the recipient. The conceptual framework provides a possible tool for clarification of underlying and often implicit model assumptions, which can be useful for e.g. inter-model comparisons. In order to further clarify and explain research questions that may be of particular importance for transport pathways from deep groundwater surrounding a repository, we concretise and interpret some selected transport scenarios for model conditions in the Forsmark area. Possible uncertainties in coastal discharge predictions, related to uncertain spatial variation of evapotranspiration within the catchment, were shown to be small for the relatively large, focused surface water discharges from land to sea, because local differences were averaged out along the length of the main water flow paths. In contrast, local flux values within the diffuse groundwater flow field from land to sea are more uncertain, although estimates of mean values and total sums of submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) along some considerable coastline length may be robust. The present results show that 80% to 90% of the total coastal discharge of Forsmark occurred through focused flows in visible streams, whereas the remaining 10% to 20% was

  1. Improved performance of organic solar cells with solution processed hole transport layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhargav, Ranoo; Gairola, S. P.; Patra, Asit; Naqvi, Samya; Dhawan, S. K.

    2018-06-01

    This work is based on Cobalt Oxide as solution processed, inexpensive and effective hole transport layer (HTL) for efficient organic photovoltaic applications (OPVs). In Organic solar cell (OSC) devices ITO coated glass substrate used as a transparent anode electrode for light incident, HTL material Co3O4 dissolve in DMF solvent deposited on anode electrode, after that active layer material (donor/acceptor) deposited on to HTL and finally Al were deposited by thermal evaporation used as cathode electrode. These devices were fabricated with PCDTBT well known low band gap donor material in OSCs and blended with PC71BM as an acceptor material using simplest device structure ITO/Co3O4/active layer/Al at ambient conditions. The power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) based on Co3O4 and PEDOT:PSS have been achieved to up to 3.21% and 1.47% with PCDTBT respectively. In this study we reported that the devices fabricated with Co3O4 showed better performance as compare to the devices fabricated with well known and most studied solution processed HTL material PEDOT:PSS under identical environmental conditions. The surface morphology of the HTL film was characterized by (AFM). Lastly, we have provided Co3O4 as an efficient hole transport material HTL for solution processed organic photovoltaic applications.

  2. Assessment of assembly homogenized two-steps core dynamic calculations using direct whole core transport solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hursin, Mathieu; Downar, Thomas J.; Yoon, Joo Il; Joo, Han Gyu

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Reactivity initiated accident analysis with direct whole core transient transport code. • Comparison with usual “two steps” procedure. • Effect of effective delayed neutron fraction definition on energy deposition in the fuel. • Effect of homogenized few-group cross sections generation at the assembly level on energy deposition in the fuel. • Effect of effective fuel temperature definition on energy deposition in the fuel. - Abstract: The impact of the approximations in the “two-steps” procedure used in the current generation of nodal simulators for core transient calculations is assessed by using a higher order solution obtained from a direct, whole core, transient transport calculation. A control rod ejection accident in an idealized minicore is analyzed with PARCS, which uses the two-steps procedure and DeCART which provides the higher order solution. DeCART is used as lattice code to provide the homogenized cross sections and kinetics parameters to PARCS. The approximations made by using (1) the homogenized few-group cross sections and kinetic parameters generated at the assembly level, (2) an effective delayed neutrons fraction, (3) an effective fuel temperature and (4) the few-group formulation are investigated in terms of global and local core power behavior. The results presented in the paper show that the current two-steps procedure produces sufficiently accurate transient results with respect to the direct whole core calculation solution, provided that its parameters are carefully generated using the prescriptions described in the present article.

  3. METHOD OF PROCESSING MONAZITE SAND

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welt, M.A.; Smutz, M.

    1958-08-26

    A process is described for recovering thorium, uranium, and rare earth values from monazite sand. The monazite sand is first digested with sulfuric acid and the resulting "monazite sulfate" solution is adjusted to a pH of between 0.4 and 3.0, and oxalate anions are added causing precipitation of the thorium and the rare earths as the oxalates. The oxalate precipitate is separated from the uranium containing supernatant solution, and is dried and calcined to the oxides. The thorium and rare earth oxides are then dissolved in nitric acid and the solution is contacted with tribntyl phosphate whereby an organic extract phase containing the cerium and thorium values is obtained, together with an aqueous raffinate containing the other rare earth values. The organic phase is then separated from the aqueous raffinate and the cerium and thorium are back extracted with an aqueous medium.

  4. FASTREACT – An efficient numerical framework for the solution of reactive transport problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trinchero, Paolo; Molinero, Jorge; Román-Ross, Gabriela; Berglund, Sten; Selroos, Jan-Olof

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We present a tool for the efficient solution of reactive transport problems. • The tool is used to simulate radionuclide transport in a two-dimensional medium. • The results are successfully compared with those obtained using an Eulerian approach. • A large-scale application example is also solved. • The results show that the proposed tool can efficiently solve large-scale models. - Abstract: In the framework of safety assessment studies for geological disposal, large scale reactive transport models are powerful inter-disciplinary tools aiming at supporting regulatory decision making as well as providing input to repository engineering activities. Important aspects of these kinds of models are their often very large temporal and spatial modelling scales and the need to integrate different non-linear processes (e.g., mineral dissolution and precipitation, adsorption and desorption, microbial reactions and redox transformations). It turns out that these types of models may be computationally highly demanding. In this work, we present a Lagrangian-based framework, denoted as FASTREACT, that aims at solving multi-component-reactive transport problems with a computationally efficient approach allowing complex modelling problems to be solved in large spatial and temporal scales. The tool has been applied to simulate radionuclide migration in a synthetic heterogeneous transmissivity field and the results have been successfully compared with those obtained using a standard Eulerian approach. Finally, the same geochemical model has been coupled to an ensemble of realistic three-dimensional transport pathways to simulate the migration of a set of radionuclides from a hypothetical repository for spent nuclear fuel to the surface. The results of this modelling exercise, which includes key processes such as the exchange of mass between the conductive fractures and the matrix, show that FASTREACT can efficiently solve large-scale reactive transport models

  5. Application of preconditioned GMRES to the numerical solution of the neutron transport equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patton, B.W.; Holloway, J.P.

    2002-01-01

    The generalized minimal residual (GMRES) method with right preconditioning is examined as an alternative to both standard and accelerated transport sweeps for the iterative solution of the diamond differenced discrete ordinates neutron transport equation. Incomplete factorization (ILU) type preconditioners are used to determine their effectiveness in accelerating GMRES for this application. ILU(τ), which requires the specification of a dropping criteria τ, proves to be a good choice for the types of problems examined in this paper. The combination of ILU(τ) and GMRES is compared with both DSA and unaccelerated transport sweeps for several model problems. It is found that the computational workload of the ILU(τ)-GMRES combination scales nonlinearly with the number of energy groups and quadrature order, making this technique most effective for problems with a small number of groups and discrete ordinates. However, the cost of preconditioner construction can be amortized over several calculations with different source and/or boundary values. Preconditioners built upon standard transport sweep algorithms are also evaluated as to their effectiveness in accelerating the convergence of GMRES. These preconditioners show better scaling with such problem parameters as the scattering ratio, the number of discrete ordinates, and the number of spatial meshes. These sweeps based preconditioners can also be cast in a matrix free form that greatly reduces storage requirements

  6. Modeling study of solute transport in the unsaturated zone: Workshop proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Springer, E.P.; Fuentes, H.R.

    1987-04-01

    Issues addressed were the adequacy of the data for the various models, effectiveness of the models to represent the data, particular information provided by the models, the role of caisson experiments in providing fundamental knowledge of porous-media water flow and solute transport, and the importance of geochemistry to the transport of nonconservative tracers. These proceedings include the presentations made by each of the modelers; the summary document written by the panel; and a transcript of the discussions, both the discussions that followed individual presentations and the general discussion held on the second day. This publication completes the series on the workshop. Volume I in the series (NUREG/CR-4615, Vol. I) contains background information and the data sets provided each modeler

  7. PARTRACK - A particle tracking algorithm for transport and dispersion of solutes in a sparsely fractured rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svensson, Urban

    2001-04-01

    A particle tracking algorithm, PARTRACK, that simulates transport and dispersion in a sparsely fractured rock is described. The main novel feature of the algorithm is the introduction of multiple particle states. It is demonstrated that the introduction of this feature allows for the simultaneous simulation of Taylor dispersion, sorption and matrix diffusion. A number of test cases are used to verify and demonstrate the features of PARTRACK. It is shown that PARTRACK can simulate the following processes, believed to be important for the problem addressed: the split up of a tracer cloud at a fracture intersection, channeling in a fracture plane, Taylor dispersion and matrix diffusion and sorption. From the results of the test cases, it is concluded that PARTRACK is an adequate framework for simulation of transport and dispersion of a solute in a sparsely fractured rock

  8. Modeling of amorphous pocket formation in silicon by numerical solution of the heat transport equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovac, D.; Otto, G.; Hobler, G.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we present a model of amorphous pocket formation that is based on binary collision simulations to generate the distribution of deposited energy, and on numerical solution of the heat transport equation to describe the quenching process. The heat transport equation is modified to consider the heat of melting when the melting temperature is crossed at any point in space. It is discretized with finite differences on grid points that coincide with the crystallographic lattice sites, which allows easy determination of molten atoms. Atoms are considered molten if the average of their energy and the energy of their neighbors meets the melting criterion. The results obtained with this model are in good overall agreement with published experimental data on P, As, Te and Tl implantations in Si and with data on the polyatomic effect at cryogenic temperature

  9. Transport and dosimetric solutions for the ELIMED laser-driven beam line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cirrone, G.A.P. [INFN-LNS, Via S. Sofia 62 - 95125 Catania (Italy); Romano, F. [INFN-LNS, Via S. Sofia 62 - 95125 Catania (Italy); Medical Physics School, University of Catania, Via S. Sofia 64 - 95125 Catania (Italy); Scuderi, V. [INFN-LNS, Via S. Sofia 62 - 95125 Catania (Italy); Institute of Physics ASCR, v.v.i. (FZU), ELI-Beamlines Project, Na Slovance 2, 182 21 Prague (Czech Republic); Amato, A. [INFN-LNS, Via S. Sofia 62 - 95125 Catania (Italy); Candiano, G. [INFN-LNS, Via S. Sofia 62 - 95125 Catania (Italy); Medical Physics School, University of Catania, Via S. Sofia 64 - 95125 Catania (Italy); Cuttone, G. [INFN-LNS, Via S. Sofia 62 - 95125 Catania (Italy); Giove, D. [INFN Sezione di Milano, Via Celoria 16, Milano (Italy); Korn, G.; Krasa, J. [Institute of Physics ASCR, v.v.i. (FZU), ELI-Beamlines Project, Na Slovance 2, 182 21 Prague (Czech Republic); Leanza, R. [INFN-LNS, Via S. Sofia 62 - 95125 Catania (Italy); Universitá degli Studi di Catania, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Via S. Sofia 64, Catania (Italy); Manna, R. [INFN-LNS, Via S. Sofia 62 - 95125 Catania (Italy); Maggiore, M. [INFN-LNL, Viale dell' Universitá 2 - 35020 Legnaro (PD) (Italy); Marchese, V. [INFN-LNS, Via S. Sofia 62 - 95125 Catania (Italy); Margarone, D. [Institute of Physics ASCR, v.v.i. (FZU), ELI-Beamlines Project, Na Slovance 2, 182 21 Prague (Czech Republic); Milluzzo, G. [INFN-LNS, Via S. Sofia 62 - 95125 Catania (Italy); Universitá degli Studi di Catania, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Via S. Sofia 64, Catania (Italy); Petringa, G. [INFN-LNS, Via S. Sofia 62 - 95125 Catania (Italy); Sabini, M.G. [INFN-LNS, Via S. Sofia 62 - 95125 Catania (Italy); Azienda Ospedaliera Cannizzaro, Via Messina 829 - 95100 Catania (Italy); Schillaci, F. [INFN-LNS, Via S. Sofia 62 - 95125 Catania (Italy); Medical Physics School, University of Catania, Via S. Sofia 64 - 95125 Catania (Italy); and others

    2015-10-01

    Within 2017, the ELIMED (ELI-Beamlines MEDical applications) transport beam-line and dosimetric systems for laser-generated beams will be installed at the ELI-Beamlines facility in Prague (CZ), inside the ELIMAIA (ELI Multidisciplinary Applications of laser–Ion Acceleration) interaction room. The beam-line will be composed of two sections: one in vacuum, devoted to the collecting, focusing and energy selection of the primary beam and the second in air, where the ELIMED beam-line dosimetric devices will be located. This paper briefly describes the transport solutions that will be adopted together with the main dosimetric approaches. In particular, the description of an innovative Faraday Cup detector with its preliminary experimental tests will be reported.

  10. Method of model reduction and multifidelity models for solute transport in random layered porous media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Zhijie; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.

    2017-09-01

    This work presents a hierarchical model for solute transport in bounded layered porous media with random permeability. The model generalizes the Taylor-Aris dispersion theory to stochastic transport in random layered porous media with a known velocity covariance function. In the hierarchical model, we represent (random) concentration in terms of its cross-sectional average and a variation function. We derive a one-dimensional stochastic advection-dispersion-type equation for the average concentration and a stochastic Poisson equation for the variation function, as well as expressions for the effective velocity and dispersion coefficient. We observe that velocity fluctuations enhance dispersion in a non-monotonic fashion: the dispersion initially increases with correlation length λ, reaches a maximum, and decreases to zero at infinity. Maximum enhancement can be obtained at the correlation length about 0.25 the size of the porous media perpendicular to flow.

  11. Solute transport in a well under slow-purge and no-purge conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plummer, M. A.; Britt, S. L.; Martin-Hayden, J. M.

    2010-12-01

    Non-purge sampling techniques, such as diffusion bags and in-situ sealed samplers, offer reliable and cost-effective groundwater monitoring methods that are a step closer to the goal of real-time monitoring without pumping or sample collection. Non-purge methods are, however, not yet completely accepted because questions remain about how solute concentrations in an unpurged well relate to concentrations in the adjacent formation. To answer questions about how undisturbed well water samples compare to formation concentrations, and to provide the information necessary to interpret results from non-purge monitoring systems, we have conducted a variety of physical experiments and numerical simulations of flow and transport in and through monitoring wells under low-flow and ambient flow conditions. Previous studies of flow and transport in wells used a Darcy’s law - based continuity equation for flow, which is often justified under the strong, forced-convection flow caused by pumping or large vertical hydraulic potential gradients. In our study, we focus on systems with weakly forced convection, where density-driven free convection may be of similar strength. We therefore solved Darcy’s law for porous media domains and the Navier Stokes equations for flow in the well, and coupled solution of the flow equations to that of solute transport. To illustrate expected in-well transport behavior under low-flow conditions, we present results of three particular studies: (1) time-dependent effluent concentrations from a well purged at low-flow pumping rates, (2) solute-driven density effects in a well under ambient horizontal flow and (3) temperature-driven mixing in a shallow well subject to seasonal temperature variations. Results of the first study illustrate that assumptions about the nature of in-well flow have a significant impact on effluent concentration curves even during pumping, with Poiseuille-type flow producing more rapid removal of concentration differences

  12. Solution-grown organic single-crystalline p-n junctions with ambipolar charge transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Congcheng; Zoombelt, Arjan P; Jiang, Hao; Fu, Weifei; Wu, Jiake; Yuan, Wentao; Wang, Yong; Li, Hanying; Chen, Hongzheng; Bao, Zhenan

    2013-10-25

    Organic single-crystalline p-n junctions are grown from mixed solutions. First, C60 crystals (n-type) form and, subsequently, C8-BTBT crystals (p-type) nucleate heterogeneously on the C60 crystals. Both crystals continue to grow simultaneously into single-crystalline p-n junctions that exhibit ambipolar charge transport characteristics. This work provides a platform to study organic single-crystalline p-n junctions. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Global existence of weak solutions to dissipative transport equations with nonlocal velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Hantaek; Granero-Belinchón, Rafael; Lazar, Omar

    2018-04-01

    We consider 1D dissipative transport equations with nonlocal velocity field: where is a nonlocal operator given by a Fourier multiplier. We especially consider two types of nonlocal operators: (1) , the Hilbert transform, (2) . In this paper, we show several global existence of weak solutions depending on the range of γ, δ and α. When , we take initial data having finite energy, while we take initial data in weighted function spaces (in the real variables or in the Fourier variables), which have infinite energy, when .

  14. Solution methods for compartment models of transport through the environment using numerical inversion of Laplace transforms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garratt, T.J.

    1989-05-01

    Compartment models for the transport of radionuclides in the biosphere are conventionally solved using a numerical time-stepping procedure. This report examines an alternative method based on the numerical inversion of Laplace transforms, which is potentially more efficient and accurate for some classes of problem. The central problem considered is the most efficient and robust technique for solving the Laplace-transformed rate equations. The conclusion is that Gaussian elimination is the most efficient and robust solution method. A general compartment model has been implemented on a personal computer and used to solve a realistic case including radionuclide decay chains. (author)

  15. WAP Based An Alternative Solution for Traffic Transportation Problem in Sidoarjo Surrounding Area Using AHP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arna Fariza

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available In line with the increasing interest on Lapindo mud disaster which causes several roadway covered by mud, there is a need to give an alternative solution for traffic transportation problem in surrounding area. The possible criteria for the solution of this road way are length, surface, traffic, and width of the road. Types of vehicle across the road also give a contribution to the criteria. By using Geography Information System (GIS, it is easy to all drivers to take decision which way has to be chosen based on the real condition. GIS is used to visualize the alternative road, which is possible to take. Analytic Hierarchy Processing (AHP is a decision method which is based on many criteria and alternatives. The input of AHP can be a preference or real value. Applied AHP to decide value of each alternative is based on application of Wireless Application Protocol (WAP assessment.

  16. Water and solute transport in agricultural soils predicted by volumetric clay and silt contents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karup, Dan; Møldrup, Per; Paradelo Pérez, Marcos

    2016-01-01

    tracer mass could be well fitted to an analytical solution to the classical convection-dispersion equation. Both cumulative tracer mass and concentration as a function of time were hereby reasonable well predicted from the simple inputs of bulk density, clay and silt contents, and applied tracer mass......Solute transport through the soil matrix is heterogeneous and greatly affected by soil texture, soil structure, and macropore networks. This study examined the relationship between tracer breakthrough characteristics, soil hydraulic properties, and basic soil properties. Hundred...... of the soil structure rather than the actual formation of macropores causing preferential flow. The arrival times of 5 % and up to 50 % of the tracer mass were found to be strongly correlated with volumetric fines content. The hereby predicted tracer concentration breakthrough points up to 50% of applied...

  17. The solution of the multigroup neutron transport equation using spherical harmonics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fletcher, K.

    1981-01-01

    A solution of the multi-group neutron transport equation in up to three space dimensions is presented. The flux is expanded in a series of unnormalised spherical harmonics. Using the various recurrence formulae a linked set of first order differential equations is obtained for the moments psisup(g)sub(lm)(r), γsup(g)sub(lm)(r). Terms with odd l are eliminated resulting in a second order system which is solved by two methods. The first is a finite difference formulation using an iterative procedure, secondly, in XYZ and XY geometry a finite element solution is given. Results for a test problem using both methods are exhibited and compared. (orig./RW) [de

  18. Matrix-oriented implementation for the numerical solution of the partial differential equations governing flows and transport in porous media

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Shuyu; Salama, Amgad; El-Amin, Mohamed

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we introduce a new technique for the numerical solution of the various partial differential equations governing flow and transport phenomena in porous media. This method is proposed to be used in high level programming languages like

  19. Correlation of Aquaporins and Transmembrane Solute Transporters Revealed by Genome-Wide Analysis in Developing Maize Leaf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xun Yue

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aquaporins are multifunctional membrane channels that facilitate the transmembrane transport of water and solutes. When transmembrane mineral nutrient transporters exhibit the same expression patterns as aquaporins under diverse temporal and physiological conditions, there is a greater probability that they interact. In this study, genome-wide temporal profiling of transcripts analysis and coexpression network-based approaches are used to examine the significant specificity correlation of aquaporins and transmembrane solute transporters in developing maize leaf. The results indicate that specific maize aquaporins are related to specific transmembrane solute transporters. The analysis demonstrates a systems-level correlation between aquaporins, nutrient transporters, and the homeostasis of mineral nutrients in developing maize leaf. Our results provide a resource for further studies into the physiological function of these aquaporins.

  20. Transport of neutral solute across articular cartilage: the role of zonal diffusivities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbabi, V; Pouran, B; Weinans, H; Zadpoor, A A

    2015-07-01

    Transport of solutes through diffusion is an important metabolic mechanism for the avascular cartilage tissue. Three types of interconnected physical phenomena, namely mechanical, electrical, and chemical, are all involved in the physics of transport in cartilage. In this study, we use a carefully designed experimental-computational setup to separate the effects of mechanical and chemical factors from those of electrical charges. Axial diffusion of a neutral solute Iodixanol into cartilage was monitored using calibrated microcomputed tomography micro-CT images for up to 48 hr. A biphasic-solute computational model was fitted to the experimental data to determine the diffusion coefficients of cartilage. Cartilage was modeled either using one single diffusion coefficient (single-zone model) or using three diffusion coefficients corresponding to superficial, middle, and deep cartilage zones (multizone model). It was observed that the single-zone model cannot capture the entire concentration-time curve and under-predicts the near-equilibrium concentration values, whereas the multizone model could very well match the experimental data. The diffusion coefficient of the superficial zone was found to be at least one order of magnitude larger than that of the middle zone. Since neutral solutes were used, glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content cannot be the primary reason behind such large differences between the diffusion coefficients of the different cartilage zones. It is therefore concluded that other features of the different cartilage zones such as water content and the organization (orientation) of collagen fibers may be enough to cause large differences in diffusion coefficients through the cartilage thickness.

  1. Transport of fluid and solutes in the body II. Model validation and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyenge, C C; Bowen, B D; Reed, R K; Bert, J L

    1999-09-01

    A mathematical model of short-term whole body fluid, protein, and ion distribution and transport developed earlier [see companion paper: C. C. Gyenge, B. D. Bowen, R. K. Reed, and J. L. Bert. Am. J. Physiol. 277 (Heart Circ. Physiol. 46): H1215-H1227, 1999] is validated using experimental data available in the literature. The model was tested against data measured for the following three types of experimental infusions: 1) hyperosmolar saline solutions with an osmolarity in the range of 2,000-2,400 mosmol/l, 2) saline solutions with an osmolarity of approximately 270 mosmol/l and composition comparable with Ringer solution, and 3) an isosmotic NaCl solution with an osmolarity of approximately 300 mosmol/l. Good agreement between the model predictions and the experimental data was obtained with respect to the trends and magnitudes of fluid shifts between the intra- and extracellular compartments, extracellular ion and protein contents, and hematocrit values. The model is also able to yield information about inaccessible or difficult-to-measure system variables such as intracellular ion contents, cellular volumes, and fluid fluxes across the vascular capillary membrane, data that can be used to help interpret the behavior of the system.

  2. Water, solute and heat transport in the soil: the Australian connection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, John

    2016-04-01

    The interest of Peter Raats in water, solute and heat transport in the s