WorldWideScience

Sample records for soluble organic compounds

  1. Binary systems solubilities of inorganic and organic compounds

    CERN Document Server

    Stephen, H

    1963-01-01

    Solubilities of Inorganic and Organic Compounds, Volume 1: Binary Systems, Part 1 is part of an approximately 5,500-page manual containing a selection from the International Chemical Literature on the Solubilities of Elements, Inorganic Compounds, Metallo-organic and Organic Compounds in Binary, Ternary and Multi-component Systems. A careful survey of the literature in all languages by a panel of scientists specially appointed for the task by the U.S.S.R. Academy of Sciences, Moscow, has made the compilation of this work possible. The complete English edition in five separately bound volumes w

  2. Bibliography on contaminants and solubility of organic compounds in oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordin, P. M. (Compiler)

    1975-01-01

    A compilation of a number of document citations is presented which contains information on contaminants in oxygen. Topics covered include contaminants and solubility of organic compounds in oxygen, reaction characteristics of organic compounds with oxygen, and sampling and detection limits of impurities. Each citation in the data bank contains many items of information about the document. Some of the items are title, author, abstract, corporate source, description of figures pertinent to hazards or safety, key references, and descriptors (keywords) by which the document can be retrieved. Each citation includes an evaluation of the technical contents as to being good/excellent, acceptable, or poor. The descriptors used to define the contents of the documents and subsequently used in the computerized search operations were developed for the cryogenic fluid safety by experts in the cryogenics field.

  3. (Solid + liquid) solubility of organic compounds in organic solvents – Correlation and extrapolation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svärd, Michael; Rasmuson, Åke C.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A novel, robust semi-empirical model for regression of solubility is presented. • The model fulfils thermodynamic boundary conditions at the melting point. • The activity coefficient is modelled with a scaled three-parameter Weibull function. • A three-parameter regression equation is derived from the semi-empirical model. • This equation provides good accuracy and robustness compared to standard models. - Abstract: A semi-empirical model is developed for the regression of (solid + liquid) solubility data with temperature. The model fulfils the required boundary conditions, allowing for robust extrapolation to higher and lower temperatures. The model combines a representation of the solid-state activity which accommodates a temperature-dependent heat capacity difference contribution with a scaled three-parameter Weibull function representing the temperature dependence of the solution activity coefficient at equilibrium. Evaluation of the model is based on previously published experimental calorimetric and solubility data of four organic compounds, fenoxycarb, fenofibrate, risperidone and butyl paraben, in five common organic solvents, methanol, ethyl acetate, acetone, acetonitrile, and toluene. The temperature dependence of the van’t Hoff enthalpy of solution and its components is analysed and discussed. Among the four compounds the influence of temperature on the enthalpy of fusion varies from moderate to substantial. Based on the semi-empirical model, a new equation containing three adjustable parameters is proposed for regression and extrapolation of solubility data for cases when only melting data and solubility data is available. The equation is shown to provide good accuracy and robustness when evaluated against the full semi-empirical model as well as against commonly used, more simple empirical equations. It is shown how such a model can be used to obtain an estimate of the heat capacity difference for cases where accurate

  4. Binary systems solubilities of inorganic and organic compounds, v.1 pt.2

    CERN Document Server

    Stephen, H

    2013-01-01

    Solubilities of Inorganic and Organic Compounds, Volume 1: Binary Systems, Part 1 is part of an approximately 5,500-page manual containing a selection from the International Chemical Literature on the Solubilities of Elements, Inorganic Compounds, Metallo-organic and Organic Compounds in Binary, Ternary and Multi-component Systems. A careful survey of the literature in all languages by a panel of scientists specially appointed for the task by the U.S.S.R. Academy of Sciences, Moscow, has made the compilation of this work possible. The complete English edition in five separately bound volumes w

  5. The solubilities of significant organic compounds in HLW tank supernate solutions -- FY 1995 progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barney, G.S.

    1996-01-01

    At the Hanford Site organic compounds were measured in tank supernate simulant solutions during FY 1995. This solubility information will be used to determine if these organic salts could exist in solid phases (saltcake or sludges) in the waste where they might react violently with the nitrate or nitrite salts present in the tanks. Solubilities of sodium glycolate, succinate, and caproate salts; iron and aluminum and butylphosphate salts; and aluminum oxalate were measured in simulated waste supernate solutions at 25 degree C, 30 degree C, 40 degree C, and 50 degree C. The organic compounds were selected because they are expected to exist in relatively high concentrations in the tanks. The solubilities of sodium glycolate, succinate, caproate, and butylphosphate in HLW tank supernate solutions were high over the temperature and sodium hydroxide concentration ranges expected in the tanks. High solubilities will prevent solid sodium salts of these organic acids from precipitating from tank supernate solutions. The total organic carbon concentrations (YOC) of actual tank supernates are generally much lower than the TOC ranges for simulated supernate solutions saturated (at the solubility limit) with the organic salts. This is so even if all the dissolved carbon in a given tank and supernate is due to only one of these eight soluble compounds (an unlikely situation). Metal ion complexes of and butylphosphate and oxalate in supernate solutions were not stable in the presence of the hydroxide concentrations expected in most tanks. Iron and aluminum dibutylphosphate compounds reacted with hydroxide to form soluble sodium dibutylphosphate and precipitated iron and aluminum hydroxides. Aluminum oxalate complexes were also not stable in the basic simulated supernate solutions. Solubilities of all the organic salts decrease with increasing sodium hydroxide concentration because of the common ion effect of Na+. Increasing temperatures raised the solubilities of the organic

  6. Evaluation of soluble organic compounds generated by radiological degradation of asphalt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukumoto, M.; Nishikawa, Y.; Kagawa, A.; Kawamura, K.

    2000-12-01

    The soluble organic compounds generated by radiological degradation of asphalt (γ ray) were confirmed as a part of influence of the bituminized waste degradation in the TRU waste repository. Especially, the influence of the nitrate was focused on. As a result, the concentration of the soluble organic compounds generated by radiological degradation of asphalt (10 MGy, γ ray which is correspond to absorbed dose of asphalt for 1,000,000 years) were lower (each formic acid: about 50 mg/dm 3 , acetic acid: about 30 mg/dm 3 and oxalic acid: about 2 mg/dm 3 ) than that of the formic acid, the acetic acid and the oxalic acid which Valcke et al. had shown (the influence of the organic at the solubility examination which uses Pu and Am). Moreover, the change in the concentration of TOC and the soluble organic compounds (formic acid, acetic acid and oxalic acid) is little under the existence of nitrate ion. That is, the formic acid and acetic acid which can be organic ligands were generated little by oxidative decomposition of asphalt in the process that nitrate ion becomes nitride ion by radiation. The influence of the soluble organic compounds by the radiological degradation of the asphalt (γ ray) on adsorption and solubility by the complexation of radionuclides in the performance assessment can be limited. (author)

  7. Estimation of the ideal solubility (crystal-liquid fugacity ratio) of organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalkowsky, Samuel H; Wu, Min

    2010-03-01

    Melting point, entropy of melting and heat capacity of melting are required for the calculation of the ideal solubility of a solid solute via the Clausius-Clapyron equation. This article reviews the published approximations of estimating entropy and heat capacity of melting. By comparing the available experimental results to calculated values the authors attempt to identify the best estimation of the ideal solubility and crystal-liquid fugacity ratio for organic compounds. 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association

  8. The solubilities of significant organic compounds in HLW tank supernate solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barney, G.S.

    1994-08-01

    Large quantities of organic chemicals used in reprocessing spent nuclear-fuels at the Hanford Site have accumulated in underground high-level radioactive waste tanks. The organic content of these tanks must he known so that the potential for hazardous reactions between organic components and sodium nitrate/nitrite salts in the waste can he evaluated. The solubilities of organic compounds described in this report will help determine if they are present in the solid phases (salt cake and sludges) as well as the liquid phase (interstitial liquor/supernate) in the tanks. The solubilities of five significant sodium salts of carboxylic acids and aminocarboxylic acids [sodium oxalate, formate, citrate, nitrilotriacetate (NTA) and ethylendiaminetetraacetate (EDTA)] were measured in a simulated supernate solution at 25 degrees C, 30 degrees C, 40 degrees C, and 50 degrees C

  9. Bismuth solubility through binding by various organic compounds and naturally occurring soil organic matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Tomoyoshi

    2010-01-01

    The present study was performed to examine the effects of soluble organic matter and pH on the solubility of Bi in relation to inference with the behavior of metallic Bi dispersed in soil and water environments using EDTA, citric acid, tartaric acid, L-cysteine, soil humic acids (HA), and dissolved organic matter (DOM) derived from the soil organic horizon. The solubility of Bi by citric acid, tartaric acid, L-cysteine, HA, and DOM showed pH dependence, while that by EDTA did not. Bi solubility by HA seemed to be related to the distribution of pKa (acid dissociation constant) values of acidic functional groups in their molecules. That is, HA extracted at pH 3.2 solubilized Bi preferentially in the acidic range, while HA extracted at pH 8.4 showed preferential solubilization at neutral and alkaline pH. This was related to the dissociation characteristics of functional groups, their binding capacity with Bi, and precipitation of Bi carbonate or hydroxides. In addition to the dissociation characteristics of functional groups, the unique structural configuration of the HA could also contribute to Bi-HA complex formation. The solubility of Bi by naturally occurring DOM derived from the soil organic horizon (Oi) and its pH dependence were different from those associated with HA and varied among tree species.

  10. The surface tension of aqueous solutions of some atmospheric water-soluble organic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuckermann, Rudolf; Cammenga, Heiko K.

    The surface tensions of aqueous solutions of levoglucosan, 3-hydroxybutanoic acid, 3-hydroxybenzoic acid, azelaic acid, pinonic acid, and humic acid have been measured. These compounds are suggested as model substances for the water-soluble organic compounds (WSOC) in atmospheric aerosols and droplets which may play an important role in the aerosol cycle because of their surface-active potentials. The reductions in surface tension induced by single and mixed WSOC in aqueous solution of pure water is remarkable. However, the results of this investigation cannot explain the strong reduction in surface tension in real cloud and fog water samples at concentrations of WSOC below 1 mg/mL.

  11. Organic compounds in hot-water-soluble fractions from water repellent soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atanassova, Irena; Doerr, Stefan

    2014-05-01

    Water repellency (WR) is a soil property providing hydrophobic protection and preventing rapid microbial decomposition of organic matter entering the soil with litter or plant residues. Global warming can cause changes in WR, thus influencing water storage and plant productivity. Here we assess two different approaches for analysis of organic compounds composition in hot water extracts from accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) of water repellent soils. Extracts were lyophilized, fractionated on SiO2 (sand) and SPE cartridge, and measured by GC/MS. Dominant compounds were aromatic acids, short chain dicarboxylic acids (C4-C9), sugars, short chain fatty acids (C8-C18), and esters of stearic and palmitic acids. Polar compounds (mainly sugars) were adsorbed on applying SPE clean-up procedure, while esters were highly abundant. In addition to the removal of polar compounds, hydrophobic esters and hydrocarbons (alkanes and alkenes particle wettability and C dynamics in soils. Key words: soil water repellency, hot water soluble carbon (HWSC), GC/MS, hydrophobic compounds

  12. The atmosphere can be a source of certain water soluble volatile organic compounds in urban streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenner, Scott J.; Bender, David A.; Zogorski, John S.; ,; James F. Pankow,

    2014-01-01

    Surface water and air volatile organic compound (VOC) data from 10 U.S. Geological Survey monitoring sites were used to evaluate the potential for direct transport of VOCs from the atmosphere to urban streams. Analytical results of 87 VOC compounds were screened by evaluating the occurrence and detection levels in both water and air, and equilibrium concentrations in water (Cws) based on the measured air concentrations. Four compounds (acetone, methyl tertiary butyl ether, toluene, and m- & p-xylene) were detected in more than 20% of water samples, in more than 10% of air samples, and more than 10% of detections in air were greater than long-term method detection levels (LTMDL) in water. Benzene was detected in more than 20% of water samples and in more than 10% of air samples. Two percent of benzene detections in air were greater than one-half the LTMDL in water. Six compounds (chloroform, p-isopropyltoluene, methylene chloride, perchloroethene, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, and trichloroethene) were detected in more than 20% of water samples and in more than 10% of air samples. Five VOCs, toluene, m- & p-xylene, methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), acetone, and benzene were identified as having sufficiently high concentrations in the atmosphere to be a source to urban streams. MTBE, acetone, and benzene exhibited behavior that was consistent with equilibrium concentrations in the atmosphere.

  13. High-field FT-ICR-MS and aromaticity equivalent approach for structural identification of water soluble organic compounds (WSOC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harir, Mourad; Yassine, Mahmoud M.; Dabek-Zlotorzynska, Ewa; Hertkorn, Norbert; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe

    2015-04-01

    Organic aerosol (OA) makes up a large and often dominant fraction, (20 to 90%) of the submicron atmospheric particulate mass, and its effects are becoming increasingly important in determining climatic and health effects of atmospheric aerosols. Despite the abundance of OA, our understanding of the sources, formation processes and atmospheric properties of OA is limited. Atmospheric OA has both primary (directly emitted) and secondary (formed in the atmosphere from precursor gases) sources, which can be natural (e.g. vegetation) and/or anthropogenic (e.g. fossil-based vehicle exhaust or biomass burning). A significant fraction of OA contains as much as 20-70% of water soluble organic compounds (WSOC). The WSOC fraction is a very complex mixture of low volatility, polyfunctional aliphatic and aromatic compounds containing carboxyl, alcohol, carbonyl, sulfo, nitro, and other functionalities. This high degree of chemical complexity of atmospheric organics has inspired a number of sophisticated approaches that are capable of identifying and detecting a variety of different analytes in OA. Accordingly, one of the most challenging areas of atmospheric particulate matter (PM) analysis is to comprehend the molecular complexity of the OA, especially WSOC fraction, a significant component of atmospheric fine PM (PM2.5). The sources of WSOC are not well understood, especially the relative contributions of primary vs. secondary organic aerosol. Therefore, the molecular characterization of WSOC is important because it allows gaining insight into aerosol sources and underlying mechanisms of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) formation and transformation. In this abstract, molecular characterization of WSOC was achieved using high-field mass spectrometry FT-ICR-MS and aromaticity equivalent approach. Aromaticity equivalent (Xc), defined recently as a new parameter calculated from the assigned molecular formulas (complementary to the aromaticity index [1]), is introduced to improve

  14. Investigation of molar volume and surfactant characteristics of water-soluble organic compounds in biomass burning aerosol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Asa-Awuku

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we characterize the CCN activity of the water-soluble organics in biomass burning aerosol. The aerosol after collection upon filters is dissolved in water using sonication. Hydrophobic and hydrophilic components are fractionated from a portion of the original sample using solid phase extraction, and subsequently desalted. The surface tension and CCN activity of these different samples are measured with a KSV CAM 200 goniometer and a DMT Streamwise Thermal Gradient CCN Counter, respectively. The measurements show that the strongest surfactants are isolated in the hydrophobic fraction, while the hydrophilics exhibit negligible surface tension depression. The presence of salts (primarily (NH42SO4 in the hydrophobic fraction substantially enhances surface tension depression; their synergistic effects considerably enhance CCN activity, exceeding that of pure (NH42SO4. From our analysis, average thermodynamic properties (i.e, molar volume are determined for samples using our newly developed Köhler Theory Analysis (KTA method. The molar mass of the hydrophilic and hydrophobic aerosol components is estimated to be 87±26 g mol−1 and 780±231 g mol−1, respectively. KTA also suggests that the relative proportion (in moles of hydrophobic to hydrophilic compounds in the original sample to be 1:3. For the first time, KTA is applied to an aerosol with this level of complexity and displays its potential for providing physically-based constraints for GCM parameterizations of the aerosol indirect effect.

  15. Soluble organic nutrient fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert G. Qualls; Bruce L. Haines; Wayne Swank

    2014-01-01

    Our objectives in this study were (i) compare fluxes of the dissolved organic nutrients dissolved organic carbon (DOC), DON, and dissolved organic phosphorus (DOP) in a clearcut area and an adjacent mature reference area. (ii) determine whether concentrations of dissolved organic nutrients or inorganic nutrients were greater in clearcut areas than in reference areas,...

  16. Solubility of crystalline organic compounds in high and low molecular weight amorphous matrices above and below the glass transition by zero enthalpy extrapolation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amharar, Youness; Curtin, Vincent; Gallagher, Kieran H; Healy, Anne Marie

    2014-09-10

    Pharmaceutical applications which require knowledge of the solubility of a crystalline compound in an amorphous matrix are abundant in the literature. Several methods that allow the determination of such data have been reported, but so far have only been applicable to amorphous polymers above the glass transition of the resulting composites. The current work presents, for the first time, a reliable method for the determination of the solubility of crystalline pharmaceutical compounds in high and low molecular weight amorphous matrices at the glass transition and at room temperature (i.e. below the glass transition temperature), respectively. The solubilities of mannitol and indomethacin in polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) K15 and PVP K25, respectively were measured at different temperatures. Mixtures of undissolved crystalline solute and saturated amorphous phase were obtained by annealing at a given temperature. The solubility at this temperature was then obtained by measuring the melting enthalpy of the crystalline phase, plotting it as a function of composition and extrapolating to zero enthalpy. This new method yielded results in accordance with the predictions reported in the literature. The method was also adapted for the measurement of the solubility of crystalline low molecular weight excipients in amorphous active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs). The solubility of mannitol, glutaric acid and adipic acid in both indomethacin and sulfadimidine was experimentally determined and successfully compared with the difference between their respective calculated Hildebrand solubility parameters. As expected from the calculations, the dicarboxylic acids exhibited a high solubility in both amorphous indomethacin and sulfadimidine, whereas mannitol was almost insoluble in the same amorphous phases at room temperature. This work constitutes the first report of the methodology for determining an experimentally measured solubility for a low molecular weight crystalline solute

  17. Organic Compounds in Carbonaceous Meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Grorge

    2001-01-01

    Carbonaceous meteorites are relatively enriched in soluble organic compounds. To date, these compounds provide the only record available to study a range of organic chemical processes in the early Solar System chemistry. The Murchison meteorite is the best-characterized carbonaceous meteorite with respect to organic chemistry. The study of its organic compounds has related principally to aqueous meteorite parent body chemistry and compounds of potential importance for the origin of life. Among the classes of organic compounds found in Murchison are amino acids, amides, carboxylic acids, hydroxy acids, sulfonic acids, phosphonic acids, purines and pyrimidines (Table 1). Compounds such as these were quite likely delivered to the early Earth in asteroids and comets. Until now, polyhydroxylated compounds (polyols), including sugars (polyhydroxy aldehydes or ketones), sugar alcohols, sugar acids, etc., had not been identified in Murchison. Ribose and deoxyribose, five-carbon sugars, are central to the role of contemporary nucleic acids, DNA and RNA. Glycerol, a three-carbon sugar alcohol, is a constituent of all known biological membranes. Due to the relative lability of sugars, some researchers have questioned the lifetime of sugars under the presumed conditions on the early Earth and postulated other (more stable) compounds as constituents of the first replicating molecules. The identification of potential sources and/or formation mechanisms of pre-biotic polyols would add to the understanding of what organic compounds were available, and for what length of time, on the ancient Earth.

  18. Effect of corn processing and wet distiller’s grains with solubles on odorous volatile organic compound emissions from urine and feces of beef cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wet distiller’s grains with solubles (WDGS) are a common feed ingredient in beef feedlot diets, but the excess nitrogen in these diets creates air quality issues, primarily due to the aromatic compounds emitted during fermentation of excreted protein. Use of high-moisture corn (HMC) instead of dry-r...

  19. Annual cycle and temperature dependence of pinene oxidation products and other water-soluble organic compounds in coarse and fine aerosol samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y.; Müller, L.; Winterhalter, R.; Moortgat, G. K.; Hoffmann, T.; Pöschl, U.

    2010-05-01

    Filter samples of fine and coarse particulate matter were collected over a period of one year and analyzed for water-soluble organic compounds, including the pinene oxidation products pinic acid, pinonic acid, 3-methyl-1,2,3-butanetricarboxylic acid (3-MBTCA) and a variety of dicarboxylic acids (C5-C16) and nitrophenols. Seasonal variations and other characteristic features are discussed with regard to aerosol sources and sinks and data from other studies and regions. The ratios of adipic acid (C6) and phthalic acid (Ph) to azelaic acid (C9) indicate that the investigated aerosols samples were mainly influenced by biogenic sources. An Arrhenius-type correlation was found between the 3-MBTCA concentration and inverse temperature. Model calculations suggest that the temperature dependence is largely due to enhanced emissions and OH radical concentrations at elevated temperatures, whereas the influence of gas-particle partitioning appears to play a minor role. Enhanced ratios of pinic acid to 3-MBTCA indicate strong chemical aging of the investigated aerosols in summer and spring. Acknowledgment: The authors would like to thank M. Claeys for providing synthetic 3-methyl-1,2,3-butanetricarboxylic acid standards for LC-MS analysis and J. Fröhlich for providing filter samples and related information.

  20. Investigating differences in the root to shoot transfer and xylem sap solubility of organic compounds between zucchini, squash and soybean using a pressure chamber method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvin, Naho; Doucette, William J; White, Jason C

    2015-07-01

    A pressure chamber method was used to examine differences in the root to shoot transfer and xylem sap solubility of caffeine (log Kow=-0.07), triclocarban (log Kow=3.5-4.2) and endosulfan (log Kow=3.8-4.8) for zucchini (cucurbita pepo ssp pepo), squash (cucurbita pepo ssp ovifera), and soybean (glycine max L.). Transpiration stream concentration factors (TSCF) for caffeine (TSCF=0.8) were statistically equivalent for all plant species. However, for the more hydrophobic endosulfan and triclocarban, the TSCF values for zucchini (TSCF=0.6 and 0.4, respectively) were 3 and 10 times greater than the soybean and squash (TSCF=0.2 and 0.05, respectively). The difference in TSCF values was examined by comparing the measured solubilities of caffeine, endosulfan and triclocarban in deionized water to those in soybean and zucchini xylem saps using a modified shake flask method. The measured solubility of organic contaminants in xylem sap has not previously been reported. Caffeine solubilities in the xylem saps of soybean and zucchini were statistically equal to deionized water (21500mgL(-1)) while endosulfan and triclocarban solubilities in the zucchini xylem sap were significantly greater (0.43 and 0.21mgL(-1), respectively) than that of the soybean xylem sap (0.31 and 0.11mgL(-1), respectively) and deionized water (0.34 and 0.11mgL(-1), respectively). This suggests that the enhanced root to shoot transfer of hydrophobic organics reported for zucchini is partly due to increased solubility in the xylem sap. Further xylem sap characterization is needed to determine the mechanism of solubility enhancement. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Extraterrestrial Organic Compounds in Meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botta, Oliver; Bada, Jeffrey L.; Meyer, Michael (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Many organic compounds or their precursors found in meteorites originated in the interstellar or circumstellar medium and were later incorporated into planetesimals during the formation of the solar system. There they either survived intact or underwent further processing to synthesize secondary products on the meteorite parent body. The most distinct feature of CI and CM carbonaceous chondrites, two types of stony meteorites, is their high carbon content (up to 3% of weight), either in the form of carbonates or of organic compounds. The bulk of the organic carbon consists of an insoluble macromolecular material with a complex structure. Also present is a soluble organic fraction, which has been analyzed by several separation and analytical procedures. Low detection limits can be achieved by derivatization of the organic molecules with reagents that allow for analysis by gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy and high performance liquid chromatography. The CM meteorite Murchison has been found to contain more than 70 extraterrestrial amino acids and several other classes of compounds including carboxylic acids, hydroxy carboxylic acids, sulphonic and phosphonic acids, aliphatic, aromatic and polar hydrocarbons, fullerenes, heterocycles as well as carbonyl compounds, alcohols, amines and amides. The organic matter was found to be enriched in deuterium, and distinct organic compounds show isotopic enrichments of carbon and nitrogen relative to terrestrial matter.

  2. Characterization of Soluble Organics in Produced Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bostick, D.T.

    2002-01-16

    Soluble organics in produced water and refinery effluents represent treatment problems for the petroleum industry. Neither the chemistry involved in the production of soluble organics nor the impact of these chemicals on total effluent toxicity is well understood. The U.S. Department of Energy provides funding for Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to support a collaborative project with Shell, Chevron, Phillips, and Statoil entitled ''Petroleum and Environmental Research Forum project (PERF 9844: Manage Water-Soluble Organics in Produced Water''). The goal of this project, which involves characterization and evaluation of these water-soluble compounds, is aimed at reducing the future production of such contaminants. To determine the effect that various drilling conditions might have on water-soluble organics (WSO) content in produced water, a simulated brine water containing the principal inorganic components normally found in Gulf of Mexico (GOM) brine sources was prepared. The GOM simulant was then contacted with as-received crude oil from a deep well site to study the effects of water cut, produced-water pH, salinity, pressure, temperature, and crude oil sources on the type and content of the WSO in produced water. The identities of individual semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) were determined in all as-received crude and actual produced water samples using standard USEPA Method (8270C) protocol. These analyses were supplemented with the more general measurements of total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) content in the gas (C{sub 6}-C{sub 10}), diesel (C{sub 10}-C{sub 20}), and oil (C{sub 20}-C{sub 28}) carbon ranges as determined by both gas chromatographic (GC) and infrared (IR) analyses. An open liquid chromatographic procedure was also used to differentiate the saturated hydrocarbon, aromatic hydrocarbon, and polar components within the extractable TPH. Inorganic constituents in the produced water were analyzed by ion

  3. A Colorful Solubility Exercise for Organic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shugrue, Christopher R.; Mentzen, Hans H., II; Linton, Brian R.

    2015-01-01

    A discovery chemistry laboratory has been developed for the introductory organic chemistry student to investigate the concepts of polarity, miscibility, solubility, and density. The simple procedure takes advantage of the solubility of two colored dyes in a series of solvents or solvent mixtures, and the diffusion of colors can be easily…

  4. Seasonal variations of stable carbon isotopic composition and biogenic tracer compounds of water-soluble organic aerosols in a deciduous forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Miyazaki

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the seasonal changes in biogenic water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC aerosols in a boreal forest, aerosol samples were collected continuously in the canopy of a deciduous forest in northern Japan during 2009–2010. Stable carbon isotopic composition of WSOC (δ13CWSOC in total suspended particulate matter (TSP exhibited a distinct seasonal cycle, with lower values from June through September (−25.5±0.5 ‰. This cycle follows the net CO2 exchange between the forest ecosystem and the atmosphere, indicating that δ13CWSOC likely reflects the biological activity at the forest site. WSOC concentrations showed the highest values in early summer and autumn. Positive matrix factorization (PMF analysis indicated that the factor in which biogenic secondary organic aerosols (BSOAs dominated accounted for ~40 % of the highest concentrations of WSOC, where BSOAs mostly consisted of α-/β-pinene SOA. In addition, primary biological aerosol particles (PBAPs made similar contributions (~57 % to the WSOC near the forest floor in early summer. This finding indicates that the production of both primary and secondary WSOC aerosols is important during the growing season in a deciduous forest. The methanesulfonic acid (MSA maximum was also found in early summer and had a distinct vertical gradient with larger concentrations near the forest floor. Together with the similar vertical gradients found for WSOC and δ13CWSOC as well as the α-/β-pinene SOA tracers, our results indicate that the forest floor, including ground vegetation and soil, acts as a significant source of WSOC in TSP within a forest canopy at the study site.

  5. A Combined Study Investigating the Insoluble and Soluble Organic Compounds in Category 3 Carbonaceous Itokawa Particles Recovered by the Hayabusa Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Q. H. S.; Zolensky, M.; Burton, A.; Clemett, S.; Fries, M.; Kebukawa, Y.

    2015-01-01

    At the 3rd International Announcement of Opportunity (AO), we have been approved for five Category 3 carbonaceous Itokawa particles (RA-QD02-0012, RA-QD02-0078, RB-CV-0029, RB-CV-0080 and RB-QD04-0052) recovered by the first Hayabusa mission of JAXA. In this investigation, we aim to provide a comprehensive study to characterize and account for the presence of carbon-bearing phases as suggested by the initial Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) analysis carried out by JAXA at the curation facility, and to describe the mineralogical components of the particles. The insoluble organic content of Itokawa particle has been investigated with the use of micro-Raman spectroscopy by Kitajima and co-workers [1]. The Raman spectra of Itokawa particles show broad G- and D-bands typical of low temperature material which offers an interesting contrast to the high metamorphic grade (LL4-6) of the Itokawa parent body. Amino acid analysis has been conducted by Naraoka et al. [2] to study the soluble organic component of Itokawa particles, but since it was a preliminary study and thus did not have the opportunity to target on Category 3 carbonaceous particles, only terrestrial contaminants were identified. The investigation will be carried out in the following order prioritized according to the progressive damage the analytical techniques can induce: (1) micro-Raman spectrometry, (2) two-step laser mass spectrometry (micro-L2MS), (3) ultra-high performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection and time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-FD/ToF-MS), and optimally if we can recover the particles after wet chemistry analysis, we will mount the samples and perform (4) electron beam microscopy (SEM, electron back-scattered diffraction [EBSD]) and (5) carbon X-ray absorption near edge structure spectroscopy (C-XANES). We will begin the analytical procedures upon receiving the samples in September/October. This work will provide us with an understanding of the variety and origins of

  6. Compostos orgânicos hidrossolúveis de resíduos vegetais e seus efeitos nos atributos químicos do solo Water-soluble organic compounds in plant residue and the effects on soil chemical properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Cátia Diehl

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Compostos orgânicos hidrossolúveis de resíduos vegetais depositados na superfície do solo podem melhorar a fertilidade do subsolo, pela neutralização da acidez e transporte de Ca e Mg. Com o objetivo de avaliar o efeito dos compostos orgânicos hidrossolúveis de materiais vegetais nos atributos químicos de um Latossolo Vermelho distroférrico, foi desenvolvido um experimento no Instituto Agronômico do Paraná (IAPAR, Londrina, com amostras de solo acondicionadas em colunas nas quais se aplicaram os tratamentos: água destilada, calcário incorporado na camada 0-5 cm de profundidade, calcário e percolação com extratos de nabo forrageiro, aveia preta, palha de trigo, milho e soja. No extrato percolado, foram determinados os teores de ligantes orgânicos hidrossolúveis (LOH por potenciometria com eletrodo seletivo de Cu2+; ácidos orgânicos tituláveis (AOT por titulação ácido-base e ânions orgânicos (AO pela soma de bases. As concentrações de AO e AOT variaram de 7,0 a 32,0 mmol L-1 e de LOH de 0,60 a 2,23 mmol L-1. Todos os extratos vegetais aumentaram o pH, os teores de Ca, Mg e K trocável e diminuíram a acidez potencial e o Al trocável até 15 cm de profundidade, enquanto o efeito da calagem sem extrato foi observado somente até 10 cm de profundidade. A concentração de compostos orgânicos solúveis oriundos dos materiais vegetais correlacionou-se com o pH, Al trocável, H+Al e V % do solo na camada de 0-20 cm, confirmando a participação destes na melhoria dos atributos químicos do solo e ação da calagem superficial quando o material vegetal está presente.The water-soluble organic compounds of plant residues released on the soil surface can improve the subsoil fertility, due to the neutralization of acidity and Ca and Mg transport. An experiment was conducted at the Instituto Agronomico do Parana (IAPAR, Londrina, to evaluate the effect of water-soluble organic compounds of plant extracts on the chemical

  7. Volatile organic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silseth, May Liss

    1998-01-01

    The goal is: Not more emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) than necessary. The items discussed in this presentation are the VOCs, how to calculate emission of VOCs, how to reduce or avoid them, and different recovery processes. The largest source of Norwegian emissions of non methane VOCs (NMVOCs) is offshore loading of raw petroleum. Emissions of VOCs should be reduced mainly for two reasons: (1) on sunny days NMVOCs may react with NOx to form ozon and smog close to the surface, (2) ozone and smog close to the surface may be harmful to plants and animals, and they are hazardous to human health. As for the calculation of VOC emissions, the VOCON project will release the calculation program HCGASS in 1999. This project is a cooperative project headed by SINTEF/Marintek

  8. Effect of composition of simulated intestinal media on the solubility of poorly soluble compounds investigated by design of experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Cecilie Maria; Feng, Kung-I; Leithead, Andrew

    2018-01-01

    The composition of the human intestinal fluids varies both intra- and inter-individually. This will influence the solubility of orally administered drug compounds, and hence, the absorption and efficacy of compounds displaying solubility limited absorption. The purpose of this study was to assess...... studies feasible compared to single SIF solubility studies. Applying this DoE approach will lead to a better understanding of the impact of intestinal fluid composition on the solubility of a given drug compound....

  9. Effect of composition of simulated intestinal media on the solubility of poorly soluble compounds investigated by design of experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Cecilie Maria; Feng, Kung-I; Leithead, Andrew; Canfield, Nicole; Jørgensen, Søren Astrup; Müllertz, Anette; Rades, Thomas

    2018-01-01

    The composition of the human intestinal fluids varies both intra- and inter-individually. This will influence the solubility of orally administered drug compounds, and hence, the absorption and efficacy of compounds displaying solubility limited absorption. The purpose of this study was to assess the influence of simulated intestinal fluid (SIF) composition on the solubility of poorly soluble compounds. Using a Design of Experiments (DoE) approach, a set of 24 SIF was defined within the known compositions of human fasted state intestinal fluid. The SIF were composed of phospholipid, bile salt, and different pH, buffer capacities and osmolarities. On a small scale semi-robotic system, the solubility of 6 compounds (aprepitant, carvedilol, felodipine, fenofibrate, probucol, and zafirlukast) was determined in the 24 SIF. Compound specific models, describing key factors influencing the solubility of each compound, were identified. Although all models were different, the level of phospholipid and bile salt, the pH, and the interactions between these, had the biggest influences on solubility overall. Thus, a reduction of the DoE from five to three factors was possible (11-13 media), making DoE solubility studies feasible compared to single SIF solubility studies. Applying this DoE approach will lead to a better understanding of the impact of intestinal fluid composition on the solubility of a given drug compound. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Connecting the solubility and CCN activation of complex organic aerosols: A theoretical study using the Solubility Basis Set (SBS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastak, Narges; Riipinen, Ilona; Pandis, Spyros

    2015-04-01

    INTRODUCTION Organic aerosol particles often consist of thousands of compounds with different properties. One of these properties is solubility, which affects the hygroscopic growth and CCN activation of the organic particles. Here we investigate the CCN activation behavior of complex organic aerosols accounting for the distribution of solubilities present in these mixtures. METHODS We considered a monodisperse population of spherical aerosol particles consisting of an internal mixture of organic compounds. When exposed to water vapor, these particles were assumed to grow reaching a thermodynamic equilibrium between the water vapor and the particle phase. The composition of the organic and aqueous phases was determined on one hand by the equilibrium between the aqueous phase and water vapor, and on the other hand by the equilibrium of the aqueous phase with the organic insoluble phase. We modelled the mixtures with the help of a solubility basis set (SBS, analogous to the volatility basis set VBS, Donahue et al. 2006, 2011, 2012), describing the mixture with n surrogate compounds with varying solubilities. We varied the range and shape of the solubility distribution, and the number of components n in the distribution, we also assumed two different kinds of interactions between the organic compounds in the insoluble phase 1) ideal mixture, where organics limit each other's dissolution; 2) unity activity, where organics behave as pure compounds and do not influence each other's dissolution. Critical supersaturations and the dissolution behavior at the point of CCN activation were calculated utilizing the Köhler theory for all organic mixtures (denoted here as the "full model"). The full model predictions were compared with the three simplified models: 1) assuming complete dissolution of all compounds; 2) treating the organic mixture solubility with the hygroscopicity parameter κ and 3) assuming a fixed soluble fraction ɛ for each mixture. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS

  11. Organic compounds in radiation fogs in Davis (California)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herckes, Pierre; Hannigan, Michael P.; Trenary, Laurie; Lee, Taehyoung; Collett, Jeffrey L.

    New stainless steel active fogwater collectors were designed and used in Davis (CA, USA) to collect fogwater for the speciation of organic matter. Organic compounds in fog samples were extracted by liquid-liquid extraction and analyzed by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. Numerous organic compounds, including various alkanes, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and alkanoic acids, have been identified in the fogwater samples. Higher molecular weight (MW) compounds are preferentially associated with an insoluble phase inside the fog drops, whereas lower molecular weight and more polar compounds are found predominantly in the dissolved phase. Concentrations in the dissolved phase were sometimes much higher than estimated by the compounds' aqueous solubilities.

  12. Students' Categorizations of Organic Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domin, Daniel S.; Al-Masum, Mohammad; Mensah, John

    2008-01-01

    Categorization is a fundamental psychological ability necessary for problem solving and many other higher-level cognitive tasks. In organic chemistry, students must establish groupings of different chemical compounds in order not only to solve problems, but also to understand course content. Classic models of categorization emphasize similarity as…

  13. Processes controlling the production of aromatic water-soluble organic matter during litter decomposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klotzbücher, T.; Kaiser, K.; Filley, T.R.; Kalbitz, K.

    2013-01-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) plays a fundamental role for many soil processes. For instance, production, transport, and retention of DOM control properties and long-term storage of organic matter in mineral soils. Production of water-soluble compounds during the decomposition of plant litter is a

  14. Effects of aqueous-soluble organic compounds on the removal of selected radionuclides from high-level waste part I: Distribution of Sr, Cs, and Tc onto 18 absorbers from an irradiated, organic-containing leachate simulant for Hanford Tank 101-SY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marsh, S.F. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Svitra, Z.V.; Bowen, S.M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1995-01-01

    Many of the radioactive waste storage tanks at U.S. Department of Energy facilities contain organic compounds that have been degraded by radiolysis and chemical reactions. In this investigation, we measured the effect of some aqueous-soluble organic compounds on the sorption of strontium, cesium, and technetium onto 18 absorbers that offer high sorption of strontium from organic-free solutions. For our test solution we used a leachate from a simulated slurry for Hanford Tank 101-SY that initially contained ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and then was gamma-irradiated to 34 Mrads. We measured distribution coefficients (Kds) for each element/absorber combination for dynamic contact periods of 30 min, 2 h, and 6 h to obtain information about sorption kinetics. To facilitate comparisons, we include Kd values for these same element/absorber combinations from three organic-free simulant solutions. The Kd values for strontium sorption from the simulant that contained the degraded organics usually decreased by large factors, whereas the Kd values for cesium and technetium sorption were relatively unaffected.

  15. [Lead compound optimization strategy (3)--Structure modification strategies for improving water solubility].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zeng; Wang, Jiang; Zhou, Yu; Liu, Hong

    2014-09-01

    Water solubility is an essential physical chemistry property of organic small molecule drug and is also a very important issue in drug discovery. Good water solubility often leads to a good drug potency and pleasant pharmacokinetic profiles. To improve water solubility, structure modification is a straight and effective way based on the theory of water solubility. This review summarized valid structure modification strategies for improving water solubility including salt formation, polar group introduction, liposolubility reduction, conformation optimization and prodrug.

  16. Enantiomeric and Isotopic Analysis of Organic Compounds in Carbonaceous Meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, George

    2004-01-01

    Carbonaceous meteorites are relatively enriched in soluble organic compounds. The Murchison and Murray meteorites contain numerous compounds of interest in the study of early solar system organic chemistry and organic compounds of potential importance for the origin of life. These include: amino acids, amides, carboxylic acids, and polyols. This talk will focus on the enantiomeric and isotopic analysis of individual meteoritic compounds - primarily polyol acids. The analyses will determine if, in addition to certain amino acids from Murchison, another potentially important class of prebiotic compounds also contains enantiomeric excesses, i.e., excesses that could have contributed to the current homochirality of life. Preliminary enantiomeric and isotopic (C- 13) measurements of Murchison glyceric acid show that it is indeed extraterrestrial. C-13 and D isotope analysis of meteoritic sugar alcohols (glycerol, threitol, ribitol, etc.) has shown that they are also indigenous to the meteorite.

  17. Solubility Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 106 IUPAC-NIST Solubility Database (Web, free access)   These solubilities are compiled from 18 volumes (Click here for List) of the International Union for Pure and Applied Chemistry(IUPAC)-NIST Solubility Data Series. The database includes liquid-liquid, solid-liquid, and gas-liquid systems. Typical solvents and solutes include water, seawater, heavy water, inorganic compounds, and a variety of organic compounds such as hydrocarbons, halogenated hydrocarbons, alcohols, acids, esters and nitrogen compounds. There are over 67,500 solubility measurements and over 1800 references.

  18. Cloud condensation nuclei activation of limited solubility organic aerosol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huff Hartz, Kara E.; Tischuk, Joshua E.; Chan, Man Nin; Chan, Chak K.; Donahue, Neil M.; Pandis, Spyros N.

    The cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activation of 19 organic species with water solubilities ( Csat) ranging from 10 -4 to 10 2 g solute 100 g -1 H 2O was measured. The organic particles were generated by nebulization of an aqueous or an alcohol solution. Use of alcohols as solvents enables the measurement of low solubility, non-volatile organic CCN activity and reduces the likelihood of residual water in the aerosol. The activation diameter of organic species with very low solubility in water ( Csatacid, aspartic acid, azelaic acid, glutamic acid, homophthalic acid, phthalic acid, cis-pinonic acid, and salicylic acid are highly CCN active in spite of their low solubility (0.3 g 100 g -1 H 2O< Csat<1 g 100 g -1 H 2O), and activate almost as if completely water soluble. The CCN activity of most species is reduced, if the particles are produced using non-aqueous solvents. The existence of the particles in a metastable state at low RH can explain the observed enhancement in CCN activity beyond the levels suggested by their solubility.

  19. Equilibrium solubility measurement of compounds with low dissolution rate by Higuchi's Facilitated Dissolution Method. A validation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takács-Novák, Krisztina; Urac, Maria; Horváth, Péter; Völgyi, Gergely; Anderson, Bradley D; Avdeef, Alex

    2017-08-30

    Incubation time plays a critical role in the accurate measurement of equilibrium solubility of compounds. Substances which dissolve very slowly generally need long incubation times (days or weeks) to reach equilibrium. However, long times may pose several problems, such as decomposition of solute, molding of buffer, and drifting of pH. Higuchi in 1979 proposed the Facilitated Dissolution Method (FDM) to dramatically reduce incubation time. It employs a small volume of water-immiscible organic solvent to partly solubilize the sample and thereby increase the surface area available for dissolution. The method has been used only rarely. In this study we performed a systematic validation of FDM using progesterone as model compound. The reference solubility value, 7.95±0.21μg/mL (pFDM approach under varied experimental conditions (e.g., type and volume of organic solvent, time of agitation, and amount of solid excess), and compared to the reference value. It was demonstrated that the small amount of organic solvent used in the FDM does not impact the measured solubility, compared to the reference value. Additionally, four compounds of low dissolution rate (dexamethasone, digoxin, haloperidol and cosalane) were used to demonstrate that FDM can reduce the long equilibration time to the standardized 24h (6h stirring and 18h sedimentation). The time dependence of solubility equilibrium was measured by SSF, and the results were compared with those obtained by FDM. Our study, based on >200 solubility experiments, supports the validity of Higuchi's method. In this study we propose a standardized protocol for the FDM, where 1% v/v of organic solvent is used. Octane (or isooctane) was found to be suitable for highly hydrophobic compounds. Alternatively, octanol or 1,2-dichloroethane can be used for less lipophilic compounds. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Mechanisms for oral absorption of poorly water-soluble compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lind, Marianne Ladegaard

    in the development of lipid-based formulations. However, in order for optimum formulations to be developed, knowledge of the mechanisms of absorption of poorly water-soluble drug substances is desired. Accordingly, the purpose of this PhD study was to study the effects of endogenous surfactants (bile salts......, phospholipids) and exogenous surfactants used in pharmaceutical formulations on the oral absorption of poorly water-soluble drug substances. Three different models were used for this purpose. The first model was the in vitro Caco-2 cell model. Simulated intestinal fluids which did not decrease cellular...... viability and monolayer integrity were developed. The effect of simulated intestinal fluids on the absorption of the poorly water-soluble drug substances, estradiol and diazepam, was studied. The flux of both drug substances across the Caco-2 cells was decreased when simulated intestinal fluids containing...

  1. Ceramic membrane ozonator for soluble organics removal from produced water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siagian, U. W. R.; Dwipramana, A. S.; Perwira, S. B.; Khoiruddin; Wenten, I. G.

    2018-01-01

    In this work, the performance of ozonation for degradation of soluble organic compounds in produced water was investigated. Tubular ceramic membrane diffuser (with and without a static mixer in the lumen side) was used to facilitate contact between ozone and produced water. The ozonation was conducted at ozone flow rate of 8 L.min-1, ozone concentration of 0.4 ppm, original pH of the solution, and pressure of 1.2 bar, while the flow rates of the produced water were varied (192, 378 and 830 mL.min-1). It was found that the reduction of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene were 85%, 99%, 85%, and 95%, respectively. A lower liquid flow rate in a laminar state showed a better component reduction due to the longer contacting time between the liquid and the gas phase. The introduction of the static mixer in the lumen side of the membrane as a turbulence promoter provided a positive effect on the performance of the membrane diffuser. The twisted static mixer exhibited the better removal rate than the spiral static mixer.

  2. Extraction optimization of soluble compounds of yerba maté

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César Sambiassi

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was the extraction optimization of water soluble compounds of yerba maté. Measures variables were extract concentration and weight of leaves and twigs. Controlled variables were time and temperature of extraction and water/solid relation. A surface response method of three variables was used as experimental design, with 20 experiences in each case. The range of each variable, defined in the experimental design, was: extraction time, 13.2 to 46.8 minutes; temperature, 48.2 to 81.8°C and water solid relation, 4.64 to 11.36 g water/100 g of dry solid. Extract weight varied from 13.14 to 29.56 g in leaves and 8.98 to 16.32 g in twigs (each one per 100 g of dry solid. Extract concentration varied between 2.17 and 3.43 g/100 ml in leaves and between 1.32 and 2.31 g/100 ml in twigs. The results were fit to a linear equation in each case.O objetivo desta pesquisa foi a otimização da extração aquosa da erva mate. As variáveis medidas foram a concentração do extrato e a massa das folhas e ramos. As variáveis controladas foram: o tempo e a temperatura de extração e a relação água/sólido. Como desenho experimental foi utilizado o método de resposta superficial de três variáveis, com vinte experiências em cada caso. A faixa de variação definida para as variáveis no desenho experimental foram: tempo de extração, de 13,2 a 46,8 minutos; temperatura, de 48,2 a 81,8 °C; relação água/sólido, de 4,64 a 11,36 gramas de água por gramas de sólido seco. A massa do extrato variou de 13,14 a 29,56 gramas para as folhas desramificadas e de 8,98 a 16,32 para os ramos (cada por 100 gramas de sólido seco. A concentração de extrato variou entre 2,17 a 3,43 g/ 100 ml nas folhas e entre 1,32 e 2,31 g/ 100 ml nos ramos. Os resultados foram, em ambos casos, ajustados para uma equação linear.

  3. Effect of atmospheric organic complexation on iron-bearing dust solubility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Paris

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies reported that the effect of organic complexation may be a potentially important process to be considered by models estimating atmospheric iron flux to the ocean. In this study, we investigated this process effect by a series of dissolution experiments on iron-bearing dust in the presence or the absence of various organic compounds (acetate, formate, oxalate, malonate, succinate, glutarate, glycolate, lactate, tartrate and humic acid as an analogue of humic like substances, HULIS typically found in atmospheric waters. Only 4 of tested organic ligands (oxalate, malonate, tartrate and humic acid caused an enhancement of iron solubility which was associated with an increase of dissolved Fe(II concentrations. For all of these organic ligands, a positive linear dependence of iron solubility to organic concentrations was observed and showed that the extent of organic complexation on iron solubility decreased in the following order: oxalate >malonate = tartrate > humic acid. This was attributed to the ability of electron donors of organic ligands and implies a reductive ligand-promoted dissolution. This study confirms that among the known atmospheric organic binding ligands of Fe, oxalate is the most effective ligand promoting dust iron solubility and showed, for the first time, the potential effect of HULIS on iron dissolution under atmospheric conditions.

  4. Bioautography and chemical characterization of antimicrobial compound(s) in commercial water-soluble annatto extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galindo-Cuspinera, Veronica; Rankin, Scott A

    2005-04-06

    Annatto preparations based on extracts of the seed of tropical bush Bixa orellana L consist of carotenoid-type pigments. Previous reports indicate that commercial annatto extracts have biological activities against microorganisms of significance to food fermentation, preservation, and safety. The objective of this study was to separate and identify the compound(s) responsible for the antimicrobial activity of annatto preparations. Commercial water-soluble annatto extracts were screened by thin-layer chromatography and bioautography followed by liquid chromatography/photodiode array/mass spectrometry (LC/PDA/MS) analysis of active fractions. Bioautography revealed two fractions with antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus. LC/PDA/MS analysis of both fractions revealed 9'-cis-norbixin (UV(max) 460 and 489 nm) and all-trans-norbixin (UV(max) 287, 470, and 494 nm) as the major components. Structure confirmation was achieved by (1)H NMR spectroscopy. Results indicate that 9'-cis-norbixin and all-trans-norbixin are responsible for the antimicrobial properties of annatto.

  5. Distribution of selected halogenated organic compounds among suspended particulate, colloid, and aqueous phases in the Mississippi River and major tributaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostad, C.E.; Daniel, S.R.

    2007-01-01

    Suspended particulate, colloid, and aqueous phases were separated and analyzed to determine spatial variation of specific organic compound transport associated with each phase in a dynamic river system. Sixteen sites along the Mississippi River and its major tributaries were sampled at low-flow conditions to maximize the possibility of equilibrium. Across the solubility range studied, the proportion transported by each phase depended on the compound solubility, with more water-soluble compounds (dacthal, trifluralin) transported predominantly in the aqueous phase and less-water soluble compounds (polychlorinated biphenyls, chlordane-related compounds) transported predominantly in the particulate and colloid phases. ?? 2007 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  6. Xenobiotic organic compounds in wastewater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Eva; Baun, Anders; Henze, Mogens

    2002-01-01

    hundred of XOCs, among them mainly originating from hygiene products: chlorophenols, detergents and phthalates. Several compounds not deriving from hygiene products were also identified e.g. flame-retardants and drugs. A environmental hazard identification showed that a large number of compounds with high...

  7. Mechanisms for oral absorption of poorly water-soluble compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lind, Marianne Ladegaard

    viability and monolayer integrity were developed. The effect of simulated intestinal fluids on the absorption of the poorly water-soluble drug substances, estradiol and diazepam, was studied. The flux of both drug substances across the Caco-2 cells was decreased when simulated intestinal fluids containing...... micelles were applied in the apical compartment. The flux of diazepam was further decreased when pharmaceutical surfactants (Labrafil, fatty acid ester of polyethylene glycol, Cremophor RH40, polysorbate 80 and Pluronic L81) were added to the medium. This was most likely caused by partial incorporation...... of the drug substances in the micelles, and accordingly the drug substances need to be released from the micelles before being absorbed. However, the solubility of estradiol and diazepam was higher in the simulated intestinal fluids, indicating that the presence of bile salts, phospholipids and lipolysis...

  8. Solubility Prediction of Active Pharmaceutical Compounds with the UNIFAC Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouar, Abderrahim; Benmessaoud, Ibtissem; Koutchoukali, Ouahiba; Koutchoukali, Mohamed Salah

    2016-03-01

    The crystallization from solution of an active pharmaceutical ingredient requires the knowledge of the solubility in the entire temperature range investigated during the process. However, during the development of a new active ingredient, these data are missing. Its experimental determination is possible, but tedious. UNIFAC Group contribution method Fredenslund et al. (Vapor-liquid equilibria using UNIFAC: a group contribution method, 1977; AIChE J 21:1086, 1975) can be used to predict this physical property. Several modifications on this model have been proposed since its development in 1977, modified UNIFAC of Dortmund Weidlich et al. (Ind Eng Chem Res 26:1372, 1987), Gmehling et al. (Ind Eng Chem Res 32:178, 1993), Pharma-modified UNIFAC Diedrichs et al. (Evaluation und Erweiterung thermodynamischer Modelle zur Vorhersage von Wirkstofflöslichkeiten, PhD Thesis, 2010), KT-UNIFAC Kang et al. (Ind Eng Chem Res 41:3260, 2002), ldots In this study, we used UNIFAC model by considering the linear temperature dependence of interaction parameters as in Pharma-modified UNIFAC and structural groups as defined by KT-UNIFAC first-order model. More than 100 binary datasets were involved in the estimation of interaction parameters. These new parameters were then used to calculate activity coefficient and solubility of some molecules in various solvents at different temperatures. The model gives better results than those from the original UNIFAC and shows good agreement between the experimental solubility and the calculated one.

  9. Trace organic compounds in wet atmospheric deposition: an overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinheimer, T.R.; Johnson, S.M.

    1987-01-01

    An overview of the occurrence of organic compounds in wet atmospheric deposition is given. Multiplicity of sources and problems associated with source identification are discussed. Available literature is reviewed by using citations from Chemical Abstracts and Water Resources Abstracts through June 1985 and includes reports published through December 1984 that summarize current knowledge. Approaches to the chemical determination of organic compounds in precipitation are examined in addition to aspects of sampling protocols. Best methods for sample collection and preparation for instrumental analysis continue to be discussed among various investigators. Automatic wet-deposition-only devices for collection and extraction are preferred. Classes of organic compounds that have been identified in precipitation include a spectrum of compounds with differing properties of acidity or basicity, polarity, and water solubility. Those compounds that have been reported in rainfall, snowfall, and ice include hydrocarbons (both aromatic and nonaromatic), chlorinated derivatives of these hydrocarbons, carbonyl compounds (both acidic and nonacidic), and carboxylic acids and esters. Formic and acetic are the most abundant organic acids present. Cloudwater, fogwater, and mist also have been collected and analyzed for organic composition.

  10. Solubility of Crystalline Nonelectrolyte Solutes in Organic Solvents ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    where CS and CW refer to the solute solubility in the organic solvent and water, respectively, CG is a gas phase concentration, E is the solute excess molar refraction, V is the McGowan volume of the solute, A and B are measures of the solute hydrogen-bond acidity and hydrogen-bond basicity, S denotes the solute ...

  11. Investigating water soluble organic aerosols: Sources and evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecobian, Arsineh N.

    Many studies are being conducted on the different properties of organic aerosols (OA-s) as it is first emitted into the atmosphere and the consequent changes in these characteristics as OA-s age and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is produced and in turn aged. This thesis attempts to address some of the significant and emerging issues that deal with the formation and transformation of water-soluble organic aerosols in the atmosphere. First, a proven method for the measurement of gaseous sulfuric acid, negative ion chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS), has been modified for fast and sensitive measurements of particulate phase sulfuric acid (i.e. sulfate). The modifications implemented on this system have also been the subject of preliminary verifications for measurements of aerosol phase oxalic acid (an organic acid). Second, chemical and physical characteristics of a wide range of biomass-burning plumes intercepted by the NASA DC-8 research aircraft during the three phases of the ARCTAS experiment are presented here. A statistical summary of the emission (or enhancement) ratios relative to carbon monoxide is presented for various gaseous and aerosol species. Extensive investigations of fire plume evolutions were undertaken during the second part of this field campaign. For four distinct Boreal fires, where plumes were intercepted by the aircraft over a wide range of down-wind distances, emissions of various compounds and the effect of aging on them were investigated in detail. No clear evidence of production of secondary compounds (e.g., WSOC and OA) was observed. High variability in emissions between the different plumes may have obscured any clear evidence of changes in the mass of various species with increasing plume age. Also, the lack if tropospheric oxidizing species (e.g., O3 and OH) may have contributed to the lack of SOA formation. Individual intercepts of smoke plumes in this study were segregated by source regions. The normalized excess mixing

  12. Organic halogen compounds in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-07-01

    There are 20 research reports on selected problems concerning the analysis, the occurence, and the behaviour of a wide spectrum of organic halogen compounds. The work was carried out in the framework of the project 'Organic Halogen Compounds in the Environment', financed by the BMFT, between 1975 and 1978. (orig.) [de

  13. Comparative toxicity and carcinogenicity of soluble and insoluble cobalt compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behl, Mamta; Stout, Matthew D; Herbert, Ronald A; Dill, Jeffrey A; Baker, Gregory L; Hayden, Barry K; Roycroft, Joseph H; Bucher, John R; Hooth, Michelle J

    2015-07-03

    Occupational exposure to cobalt is of widespread concern due to its use in a variety of industrial processes and the occurrence of occupational disease. Due to the lack of toxicity and carcinogenicity data following exposure to cobalt, and questions regarding bioavailability following exposure to different forms of cobalt, the NTP conducted two chronic inhalation exposure studies in rats and mice, one on soluble cobalt sulfate heptahydrate, and a more recent study on insoluble cobalt metal. Herein, we compare and contrast the toxicity profiles following whole-body inhalation exposures to these two forms of cobalt. In general, both forms were genotoxic in the Salmonella T98 strain in the absence of effects on micronuclei. The major sites of toxicity and carcinogenicity in both chronic inhalation studies were the respiratory tract in rats and mice, and the adrenal gland in rats. In addition, there were distinct sites of toxicity and carcinogenicity noted following exposure to cobalt metal. In rats, carcinogenicity was observed in the blood, and pancreas, and toxicity was observed in the testes of rats and mice. Taken together, these findings suggest that both forms of cobalt, soluble and insoluble, appear to be multi-site rodent carcinogens following inhalation exposure. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  14. Multi-Phase Equilibrium and Solubilities of Aromatic Compounds and Inorganic Compounds in Sub- and Supercritical Water: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qinli; Ding, Xin; Du, Bowen; Fang, Tao

    2017-11-02

    Supercritical water oxidation (SCWO), as a novel and efficient technology, has been applied to wastewater treatment processes. The use of phase equilibrium data to optimize process parameters can offer a theoretical guidance for designing SCWO processes and reducing the equipment and operating costs. In this work, high-pressure phase equilibrium data for aromatic compounds+water systems and inorganic compounds+water systems are given. Moreover, thermodynamic models, equations of state (EOS) and empirical and semi-empirical approaches are summarized and evaluated. This paper also lists the existing problems of multi-phase equilibria and solubility studies on aromatic compounds and inorganic compounds in sub- and supercritical water.

  15. OZONE TREATMENT OF SOLUBLE ORGANICS IN PRODUCED WATER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klasson, KT

    2002-03-14

    This project was an extension of previous research to improve the applicability of ozonation and will help address the petroleum-industry problem of treating produced water containing soluble organics. The goal of this project was to maximize oxidation of hexane-extractable organics during a single-pass operation. The project investigated: (1) oxidant production by electrochemical and sonochemical methods, (2) increasing the mass transfer rate in the reactor by forming microbubbles during ozone injection into the produced water, and (3) using ultraviolet irradiation to enhance the reaction if needed. Several types of methodologies for treatment of soluble organics in synthetic and actual produced waters have been performed. The technologies tested may be categorized as follows: (1) Destruction via sonochemical oxidation at different pH, salt concentration, ultraviolet irradiation, and ferrous iron concentrations. (2) Destruction via ozonation at different pH, salt concentration, hydrogen peroxide concentrations, ultraviolet irradiation, temperature, and reactor configurations.

  16. Methods of making organic compounds by metathesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Timothy W.; Kaido, Hiroki; Lee, Choon Woo; Pederson, Richard L.; Schrodi, Yann; Tupy, Michael John

    2015-09-01

    Described are methods of making organic compounds by metathesis chemistry. The methods of the invention are particularly useful for making industrially-important organic compounds beginning with starting compositions derived from renewable feedstocks, such as natural oils. The methods make use of a cross-metathesis step with an olefin compound to produce functionalized alkene intermediates having a pre-determined double bond position. Once isolated, the functionalized alkene intermediate can be self-metathesized or cross-metathesized (e.g., with a second functionalized alkene) to produce the desired organic compound or a precursor thereto. The method may be used to make bifunctional organic compounds, such as diacids, diesters, dicarboxylate salts, acid/esters, acid/amines, acid/alcohols, acid/aldehydes, acid/ketones, acid/halides, acid/nitriles, ester/amines, ester/alcohols, ester/aldehydes, ester/ketones, ester/halides, ester/nitriles, and the like.

  17. Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, L.A. Jr.

    1989-07-18

    Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C[sub 2] to C[sub 10] olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80 C to 500 C, using as the catalyst a mole sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene below the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms. 1 fig.

  18. Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A.

    1989-01-01

    Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C.sub.2 to C.sub.10 olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80.degree. C. to 500.degree. C., using as the catalyst a mole sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene below the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms.

  19. Synthesis of a Water-soluble Metal-Organic Complex Array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Purnandhu; Sukul, Pradip K; Yaghi, Omar M; Tashiro, Kentaro

    2016-10-08

    We demonstrate a method for the synthesis of a water-soluble multimetallic peptidic array containing a predetermined sequence of metal centers such as Ru(II), Pt(II), and Rh(III). The compound, named as a water-soluble metal-organic complex array (WSMOCA), is obtained through 1) the conventional solution-chemistry-based preparation of the corresponding metal complex monomers having a 9-fluorenylmethyloxycarbonyl (Fmoc)-protected amino acid moiety and 2) their sequential coupling together with other water-soluble organic building units on the surface-functionalized polymeric resin by following the procedures originally developed for the solid-phase synthesis of polypeptides, with proper modifications. Traces of reactions determined by mass spectrometric analysis at the representative coupling steps in stage 2 confirm the selective construction of a predetermined sequence of metal centers along with the peptide backbone. The WSMOCA cleaved from the resin at the end of stage 2 has a certain level of solubility in aqueous media dependent on the pH value and/or salt content, which is useful for the purification of the compound.

  20. Organic electronic devices using phthalimide compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Azad M.; Thompson, Mark E.

    2010-09-07

    Organic electronic devices comprising a phthalimide compound. The phthalimide compounds disclosed herein are electron transporters with large HOMO-LUMO gaps, high triplet energies, large reduction potentials, and/or thermal and chemical stability. As such, these phthalimide compounds are suitable for use in any of various organic electronic devices, such as OLEDs and solar cells. In an OLED, the phthalimide compounds may serve various functions, such as a host in the emissive layer, as a hole blocking material, or as an electron transport material. In a solar cell, the phthalimide compounds may serve various functions, such as an exciton blocking material. Various examples of phthalimide compounds which may be suitable for use in the present invention are disclosed.

  1. Comparison of volatile compounds in water- and oil-soluble annatto (Bixa orellana L.) extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galindo-Cuspinera, Verónica; Lubran, Meryl B; Rankin, Scott A

    2002-03-27

    Annatto is a natural food colorant extracted from the seeds of the Bixa orellana L. plant. Annatto is used in Latin American cuisine to add a deep red color as well as distinctive flavor notes to fish, meat, and rice dishes. In the United States, annatto extracts are primarily used to impart orange/yellow hues to cheese and other dairy foods. The objective of this study was to identify and compare volatile compounds present in water- and oil-soluble annatto extracts. Volatile compounds were recovered using dynamic headspace-solvent desorption sampling and analyzed using GC-MS. Compounds were identified by comparison to a mass spectral database, Kovats indexes, and retention times of known standards. Of the 107 compounds detected, 56 compounds were tentatively identified and 51 were positively identified. Volatile profile differences exist between water- and oil- soluble extracts, and annatto extracts contain odorants with the potential to influence food aroma.

  2. Atmospheric Chemistry of Micrometeoritic Organic Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kress, M. E.; Belle, C. L.; Pevyhouse, A. R.; Iraci, L. T.

    2011-01-01

    Micrometeorites approx.100 m in diameter deliver most of the Earth s annual accumulation of extraterrestrial material. These small particles are so strongly heated upon atmospheric entry that most of their volatile content is vaporized. Here we present preliminary results from two sets of experiments to investigate the fate of the organic fraction of micrometeorites. In the first set of experiments, 300 m particles of a CM carbonaceous chondrite were subject to flash pyrolysis, simulating atmospheric entry. In addition to CO and CO2, many organic compounds were released, including functionalized benzenes, hydrocarbons, and small polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. In the second set of experiments, we subjected two of these compounds to conditions that simulate the heterogeneous chemistry of Earth s upper atmosphere. We find evidence that meteor-derived compounds can follow reaction pathways leading to the formation of more complex organic compounds.

  3. Microbial degradation of water-insoluble organic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, J.M.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of solubilization on biodegradation of water-insoluble organic compounds was investigated. The effect of particle size on solubilization and degradation of 4-chlorobiphenyl (4-CB) and naphthalene by a microbial mixture was determined. The concentration of soluble compound was determined using gas-liquid chromatography. The rates of solubilization were inversely related to particle size for both compounds. The rates of mineralization of 14 C-labeled palmitic acid, octadecane, di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP), and Sevin (1-naphthyl N-methylcarbamate) by microbial mixtures were determined by trapping the 14 CO 2 formed, and those rates were compared to solubilization rates determined by periodically filtering sterile MS amended with one of the compounds. Mineralization and colonization of the surface of 10 μg palmitic acid per 10 ml MS by Pseudomonas pseudoflava was determined by trapping 14 CO 2 and epifluorescence microscopy. Mineralization began before colonization and was initially exponential, but the rate then declined. The rate of mineralization at the end of the exponential phase approximated the rate of solubilization. The surface was completely covered about the time mineralization stopped. Unbound cells grew exponentially before colonization was detected; however, colonization of the surface was complete after the number of free cells stopped increasing. The data suggest that soluble palmitic acid is utilized before the insoluble phase but colonization is important in the mineralization of palmitic acid when solubilization becomes rate limiting

  4. INFLUENCE OF WATER-SOLUBLE COMPOUNDS OF RESTORED SULFUR ONTO TOXIC PROPERTIES OF NATURAL AND WASTE WATERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frog Boris Nikolaevich

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Whenever environmental pollution by sulphur compounds is under discussion, the latter contemplate those compounds that may be subjected to consideration through the employment of methods of analytical control. First of all, sulphates and volatile compounds of partially or completely restored sulphur, such as SO2, H2S, methyl sulphur compounds (merkaptans, dimethyl sulphide, dimethyl disulphide and others may be subjected to control. Elementary sulphur that is contained in the water is difficult to analyze. At the same time, an extensive group of water-soluble compounds of restored sulphur is not considered by numerous nature protection organizations. As a rule, they do not possess distinct analytical properties. The latter include any organic and inorganic thio-acids and their combinations with ions of transitive metals, in particular, with ions of monovalent copper. Microcolloidal (nano- particles of FeS may also be included into this group of compounds. The objective of the article is to generate the awareness of those compounds of reduced sulphur that are out of control. By virtue of this article, the authors apply to specialists in water treatment, water conditioning and water quality regulation.

  5. Water Solubility of Plutonium and Uranium Compounds and Residues at TA-55

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reilly, Sean Douglas [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States; Smith, Paul Herrick [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States; Jarvinen, Gordon D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States; Prochnow, David Adrian [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States; Schulte, Louis D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States; DeBurgomaster, Paul Christopher [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States; Fife, Keith William [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States; Rubin, Jim [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States; Worl, Laura Ann [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States

    2016-06-13

    Understanding the water solubility of plutonium and uranium compounds and residues at TA-55 is necessary to provide a technical basis for appropriate criticality safety, safety basis and accountability controls. Individual compound solubility was determined using published solubility data and solution thermodynamic modeling. Residue solubility was estimated using a combination of published technical reports and process knowledge of constituent compounds. The scope of materials considered includes all compounds and residues at TA-55 as of March 2016 that contain Pu-239 or U-235 where any single item in the facility has more than 500 g of nuclear material. This analysis indicates that the following materials are not appreciably soluble in water: plutonium dioxide (IDC=C21), plutonium phosphate (IDC=C66), plutonium tetrafluoride (IDC=C80), plutonium filter residue (IDC=R26), plutonium hydroxide precipitate (IDC=R41), plutonium DOR salt (IDC=R42), plutonium incinerator ash (IDC=R47), uranium carbide (IDC=C13), uranium dioxide (IDC=C21), U3O8 (IDC=C88), and uranium filter residue (IDC=R26). This analysis also indicates that the following materials are soluble in water: plutonium chloride (IDC=C19) and uranium nitrate (IDC=C52). Equilibrium calculations suggest that PuOCl is water soluble under certain conditions, but some plutonium processing reports indicate that it is insoluble when present in electrorefining residues (R65). Plutonium molten salt extraction residues (IDC=R83) contain significant quantities of PuCl3, and are expected to be soluble in water. The solubility of the following plutonium residues is indeterminate due to conflicting reports, insufficient process knowledge or process-dependent composition: calcium salt (IDC=R09), electrorefining salt (IDC=R65), salt (IDC=R71), silica (IDC=R73) and sweepings/screenings (IDC=R78). Solution thermodynamic modeling also indicates that fire suppression water buffered with a

  6. Method for spiking soil samples with organic compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brinch, Ulla C; Ekelund, Flemming; Jacobsen, Carsten S

    2002-01-01

    We examined the harmful side effects on indigenous soil microorganisms of two organic solvents, acetone and dichloromethane, that are normally used for spiking of soil with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons for experimental purposes. The solvents were applied in two contamination protocols to either...... higher than in control soil, probably due mainly to release of predation from indigenous protozoa. In order to minimize solvent effects on indigenous soil microorganisms when spiking native soil samples with compounds having a low water solubility, we propose a common protocol in which the contaminant...

  7. COPPER RESISTANT STRAIN CANDIDA TROPICALIS RomCu5 INTERACTION WITH SOLUBLE AND INSOLUBLE COPPER COMPOUNDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ie. P. Prekrasna

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The focus of the study was interaction of Candida tropicalis RomCu5 isolated from highland Ecuador ecosystem with soluble and insoluble copper compounds. Strain C. tropicalis RomCu5 was cultured in a liquid medium of Hiss in the presence of soluble (copper citrate and CuCl2 and insoluble (CuO and CuCO3 copper compounds. The biomass growth was determined by change in optical density of culture liquid, composition of the gas phase was measured on gas chromatograph, redox potential and pH of the culture fluid was defined potentiometrically. The concentration of soluble copper compounds was determined colorimetrically. Maximal permissible concentration of Cu2+ for C. tropicalis RomCu5 was 30 000 ppm of Cu2+ in form of copper citrate and 500 ppm of Cu2+ in form of CuCl2. C. tropicalis was metabolically active at super high concentrations of Cu2+, despite the inhibitory effect of Cu2+. C. tropicalis immobilized Cu2+ in the form of copper citrate and CuCl2 by it accumulation in the biomass. Due to medium acidification C. tropicalis dissolved CuO and CuCO3. High resistance of C. tropicalis to Cu2+ and ability to interact with soluble and insoluble copper compounds makes it biotechnologically perspective.

  8. Synthesis of phthalocyanines-ALA conjugates: water-soluble compounds with low aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Kleber T; de Assis, Francisco F; Ribeiro, Anderson O; Neri, Claudio R; Fernandes, Adjaci U; Baptista, Mauricio S; Lopes, Norberto P; Serra, Osvaldo A; Iamamoto, Yassuko

    2009-10-16

    Syntheses of two water-soluble phthalocyanines (Pc) containing 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) linked to the core structure are described. These compounds were prepared by using original functionalizations, and they present remarkable structural and photophysical features, indicating that they could be applied to photodynamic therapy (PDT).

  9. Aqueous solubility of Cr(VI) compounds in ferrochrome bag filter ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-04-02

    Apr 2, 2017 ... pH ≤ 9) only effectively extract and treat the water-soluble Cr(VI) compounds, which merely represented approximately 31% of the total Cr(VI) ... extraction buffer, to quantitatively extract all Cr(VI) in the BFD samples, including ..... magnesium (Mg), aluminium (Al), silicon (Si) and zinc (Zn), were present in ...

  10. Reflectance spectroscopy of organic compounds: 1. Alkanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, R.N.; Curchin, J.M.; Hoefen, T.M.; Swayze, G.A.

    2009-01-01

    Reflectance spectra of the organic compounds comprising the alkane series are presented from the ultraviolet to midinfrared, 0.35 to 15.5 /??m. Alkanes are hydrocarbon molecules containing only single carbon-carbon bonds, and are found naturally on the Earth and in the atmospheres of the giant planets and Saturn's moon, Titan. This paper presents the spectral properties of the alkanes as the first in a series of papers to build a spectral database of organic compounds for use in remote sensing studies. Applications range from mapping the environment on the Earth, to the search for organic molecules and life in the solar system and throughout the. universe. We show that the spectral reflectance properties of organic compounds are rich, with major diagnostic spectral features throughout the spectral range studied. Little to no spectral change was observed as a function of temperature and only small shifts and changes in the width of absorption bands were observed between liquids and solids, making remote detection of spectral properties throughout the solar system simpler. Some high molecular weight organic compounds contain single-bonded carbon chains and have spectra similar to alkanes even ' when they fall into other families. Small spectral differences are often present allowing discrimination among some compounds, further illustrating the need to catalog spectral properties for accurate remote sensing identification with spectroscopy.

  11. Nanosizing of poorly water soluble compounds using rotation/revolution mixer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takatsuka, Takayuki; Endo, Tomoko; Jianguo, Yao; Yuminoki, Kayo; Hashimoto, Naofumi

    2009-10-01

    In this study, nanoparticles of various poorly water soluble compounds were prepared by wet milling that was carried out using a rotation/revolution mixer and zirconia balls. To be compared with Beads mill, rotation/revolution mixer has superior in very quick process (5 min) and needs very few amounts of zirconia balls (2.4 g) for pulverizing drugs to nanometer range. Phenytoin, indomethacin, nifedipine, danazol, and naproxen were selected as the standard poorly water soluble compounds. Various parameters of the rotation/revolution mixer were studied to decide the optimal pulverization conditions for the production of nanoparticles of the abovementioned compounds. The rotation/revolution speed, shape of the mixing vessel, amount of zirconia balls, and volume of the vehicle (methylcellulose solution) mainly affected the pulverization of the compounds. Using the mixer, phenytoin could be pulverized to nanoparticles within a few minutes. The particle size was confirmed by using a scanning electron microscope and a particle size analyzer. The crystallinity of the pulverized phenytoin particles was confirmed by X-ray diffractometry (XRD) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). It was observed that the pulverized phenytoin particles retained their crystallinity, and amorphous phenytoin was not detected. Particles of other poorly water soluble compounds were also reduced to the nanometer range by using this method.

  12. The speciation of soluble sulphur compounds in bacterial culture fluids by X-ray absorption near edge structure spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, Bettina; Lichtenberg, Henning; Hormes, Josef; Dahl, Christiane; Prange, Alexander

    2009-11-01

    Over the last decade X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy has been used in an increasing number of microbiological studies. In addition to other applications it has served as a valuable tool for the investigation of the sulphur globules deposited intra- or extracellularly by certain photo- and chemotrophic sulphur-oxidizing (Sox) bacteria. For XANES measurements, these deposits can easily be concentrated by filtration or sedimentation through centrifugation. However, during oxidative metabolism of reduced sulphur compounds, such as sulphide or thiosulphate, sulphur deposits are not the only intermediates formed. Soluble intermediates such as sulphite may also be produced and released into the medium. In this study, we explored the potential of XANES spectroscopy for the detection and speciation of sulphur compounds in culture supernatants of the phototrophic purple sulphur bacterium Allochromatium vinosum. More specifically, we investigated A. vinosum DeltasoxY, a strain with an in frame deletion of the soxY gene. This gene encodes an essential component of the thiosulphate-oxidizing Sox enzyme complex. Improved sample preparation techniques developed for the DeltasoxY strain allowed for the first time not only the qualitative but also the quantitative analysis of bacterial culture supernatants by XANES spectroscopy. The results thus obtained verified and supplemented conventional HPLC analysis of soluble sulphur compounds. Sulphite and also oxidized organic sulphur compounds were shown by XANES spectroscopy to be present, some of which were not seen when standard HPLC protocols were used.

  13. Impact of fog processing on water soluble organic aerosols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, S. N.; Chakraborty, A.; Gupta, T.

    2017-12-01

    Fog is a natural meteorological phenomenon that occurs all around the world, and contains a substantial quantity of liquid water. Fog is generally seen as a natural cleansing agent but can also form secondary organic aerosols (SOA) via aqueous processing of ambient organics. Few field studies have reported elevated O/C ratio and SOA mass during or after fog events. However, mechanism behind aqueous SOA formation and its contribution to total organic aerosols (OA) still remains unclear. In this study we have tried to explore the impact of fog/aqueous processing on the characteristics of water soluble organic aerosols (WSOC), which to our knowledge has not been studied before. To assess this, both online (using HR-ToF-AMS) and offline (using a medium volume PM2.5 sampler and quartz filter) aerosol sampling were carried out at Kanpur, India from 15 December 2014 - 10 February 2015. Further, offline analysis of the aqueous extracts of the collected filters were carried out by AMS to characterize the water soluble OA (WSOA). Several (17) fog events occurred during the campaign and high concentrations of OA (151 ± 68 µg/m3) and WSOA (47 ± 19 µg/m3) were observed. WSOA/OA ratios were similar during fog (0.36 ± 0.14) and nofog (0.34 ± 0.15) periods. WSOA concentrations were also similar (slightly higher) during foggy (49 ± 18 µg/m3) and non-foggy periods (46 ± 20 µg/m3), in spite of fog scavenging. However, WSOA was more oxidized during foggy period (average O/C = 0.81) than non foggy periods (average O/C = 0.70). Like WSOA, OA was also more oxidized during foggy periods (average O/C = 0.64) than non foggy periods (average O/C = 0.53). During fog, WSOA to WIOA (water insoluble OA) ratios were higher (0.65 ± 0.16) compared to non foggy periods (0.56 ± 0.15). These observations clearly showed that WSOA become more dominant and processed during fog events, possibly due to the presence of fog droplets. This study highlights that fog processing of soluble organics

  14. Atmospheric transformation of volatile organic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henley, Michael V.; Bradley, William R.; Wyatt, Sheryl E.; Graziano, G. M.; Wells, J. R.

    2000-07-01

    To be able to understand and predict the concentration of a target compound in the atmosphere one must understand the atmospheric chemistry involved. The transformation of volatile organic compounds in the troposphere is predominantly driven by the interaction with the hydroxyl and nitrate radicals. The hydroxyl radical exists in daylight conditions and its reaction rate constant with an organic compound is typically very fast. The nitrate radical drives the nighttime chemistry. These radicals can scavenge hydrogen from an organic molecule generating secondary products that are often overlooked in detection schemes. Secondary products can be more stable and serve as a better target compound in detection schemes. The gas phase reaction of the hydroxyl radical (OH) with cyclohexanol (COL) has been studied. The rate coefficient was determined to be (19.0 +/- 4.8) X 10-12 cm3 molecule-1 s-1 (at 297 +/- 3 K and 1 atmosphere total pressure) using the relative rate technique with pentanal, decane, and tridecane as the reference compounds. Assuming an average OH concentration of 1 X 106 molecules cm-3, an atmospheric lifetime of 15 h is calculated for cyclohexanol. Products of the OH + COL reaction were determined to more clearly define cyclohexanol's atmospheric degradation mechanism. The observed products were: cyclohexanone, hexanedial, 3- hydroxycyclohexanone, and 4-hydroxycyclohexanone. Consideration of the potential reaction pathways suggest that each of these products is formed via hydrogen abstraction at a different site on the cyclohexanol ring.

  15. Chlorinated organic compounds in urban river sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soma, Y.; Shiraishi, H.; Inaba, K. [National Inst. of Environmental Studies, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1995-12-31

    Among anthropogenic chemicals, many chlorinated organic compounds have been used as insecticides and detected frequently as contaminants in urban river sediments so far. However, the number and total amount of chemicals produced commercially and used are increasing year by year, though each amount of chemicals is not so high. New types of contaminants in the environment may be detected by the use of newly developed chemicals. Chlorinated organic compounds in the urban river sediments around Tokyo and Kyoto, large cities in Japan, were surveyed and recent trends of contaminants were studied. Contaminants of the river sediments in industrial areas had a variety, but PCB (polychlorinated biphenyls) was detected in common in industrial areas. Concentration of PCB related well to the number of factories on both sides of rivers, although the use of PCB was stopped 20 years ago. In domestic areas, Triclosan (5-chloro-2-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy)-phenol) and Triclocarban (3,4,4{prime}-trichlorocarbanilide)(both are contained in soap or shampoo for fungicides), p-dichlorobenzene (insecticides for wears) and TCEP(tris-chloroethyl phosphate) were detected. EOX(extracted organic halogen) in the sediments was 5 to 10 times of chlorinated organic compounds detected by GC/MS. Major part of organic halogen was suggested to be included in chlorinated organics formed by bleaching or sterilization.

  16. Integrated modelling of two xenobiotic organic compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindblom, Erik Ulfson; Gernaey, K.V.; Henze, Mogens

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a dynamic mathematical model that describes the fate and transport of two selected xenobiotic organic compounds (XOCs) in a simplified representation. of an integrated urban wastewater system. A simulation study, where the xenobiotics bisphenol A and pyrene are used as reference...

  17. Characterisation of selected volatile organic compounds in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    kshale

    2013-05-15

    May 15, 2013 ... compounds play an important role as they provide relative information on the product quality and enhance product ... beer samples were collected from a local market in Kigali, Rwanda; and were analyzed for volatile organic ... and enhance consumer acceptance (Guillaume et al.,. 2009; Lui et al., 2005).

  18. Adsorption of Organic Compounds to Building Products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Ulla Dorte

    The presence of VOCs (Volatile Organic Compounds) in the indoor air may be a contributory cause of complaints about irritation of mucous membranes in eyes, nose and throat, difficulty in breathing, frequent airway inflammation, skin irritation, fatigue, concentration difficulty, dizziness and hea...

  19. Adsorption -capacity data for 283 organic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaws, C.L.; Bu, L.; Nijhawan, S. [Lamar Univ., Beaumont, TX (United States)

    1995-05-01

    Adsorption on activated carbon is a widely used method for removing volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from gases and other exhaust streams. This article presents a compilation of adsorption-capacity data as a function of the VOC concentration in the gas. The results are useful in engineering and environmental studies, and in the design of carbon-based adsorption systems to remove unwanted organic pollutants from gases. For vapor control, carbon-based systems typically combine a carbon-adsorption unit with a secondary control method to reclaim or destroy the vapors desorbed during carbon-bed regeneration. To remove organics dissolved in wastewater, air stripping is typically used to transfer the organics to a vapor stream. Carbon adsorption is then used to separate the organics from the stripper exhaust. Collected vapors can be recovered for reuse or destroyed, depending on their value.

  20. Degradation of air polluted by organic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santoyo O, E.L.; Lizama S, B.E.; Vazquez A, O.; Luna C, P.C.; Arredondo H, S.

    1999-01-01

    According to the Mexican standard NOM-010-STPS-1994 it has been established concentrations of maximum permissible levels in workable air for styrene in the range 420-1710 mg/m 3 and for xylene between 218-870 mg/m 3 . In this work it is studied a biological treatment (bio filtration) for air polluted by xylene and styrene where the microorganisms are adhered at synthetic fiber, these degrade to the organic compounds that across in gaseous state and they are mineralized toward CO 2 and H 2 O. The characteristics of temperature, p H, concentration of organic compound and mineral parameters, as well as, the biomass quantity have been optimized for that bio filters efficiency were greater than those reported in other works. (Author)

  1. Measurement and ANN prediction of pH-dependent solubility of nitrogen-heterocyclic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Feifei; Yu, Qingni; Zhu, Jingke; Lei, Lecheng; Li, Zhongjian; Zhang, Xingwang

    2015-09-01

    Based on the solubility of 25 nitrogen-heterocyclic compounds (NHCs) measured by saturation shake-flask method, artificial neural network (ANN) was employed to the study of the quantitative relationship between the structure and pH-dependent solubility of NHCs. With genetic algorithm-multivariate linear regression (GA-MLR) approach, five out of the 1497 molecular descriptors computed by Dragon software were selected to describe the molecular structures of NHCs. Using the five selected molecular descriptors as well as pH and the partial charge on the nitrogen atom of NHCs (QN) as inputs of ANN, a quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) model without using Henderson-Hasselbalch (HH) equation was successfully developed to predict the aqueous solubility of NHCs in different pH water solutions. The prediction model performed well on the 25 model NHCs with an absolute average relative deviation (AARD) of 5.9%, while HH approach gave an AARD of 36.9% for the same model NHCs. It was found that QN played a very important role in the description of NHCs and, with QN, ANN became a potential tool for the prediction of pH-dependent solubility of NHCs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. One-pot synthesis and control of aqueous soluble and organic soluble carbon dots from a designable waterborne polyurethane emulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Jiangjiang; Hu, Donghua; Huang, Jin; Huang, Xin; Zhang, Qiuhong; Jia, Xudong; Xi, Kai

    2016-02-01

    Carbon dots (CDs) have a wide range of applications and have drawn great interest in the recent decade. The fabrication and control of CDs with different solubilities are still urgent problems for their practical use. In this paper, aqueous soluble and organic soluble CDs (ACDs, OCDs) were produced by one-pot hydrothermal treatment of a designable waterborne polyurethane (WPU) emulsion. The difference in the solubility and fluorescence of these two kinds of CDs was attributed to the various functional groups on the surface, which were derived from the different segment fragments formed by hydrothermal treatment of a block polymer. It was found that the yields of the ACDs and OCDs could be regulated by means of selecting different soft segments in WPU. The more hydrophobic soft segments could result in an increase of the OCDs and a decrease of the ACDs. While the soft segments were hydrophilic or hydrolysable under hydrothermal conditions, only ACDs were obtained. The ACDs had good fluorescence and showed low cytotoxicity for use in multicolour bio-imaging. The OCDs processed good solubility in a wide range of organic solvents and were suitable for preparing fluorescent composite films with polymers.Carbon dots (CDs) have a wide range of applications and have drawn great interest in the recent decade. The fabrication and control of CDs with different solubilities are still urgent problems for their practical use. In this paper, aqueous soluble and organic soluble CDs (ACDs, OCDs) were produced by one-pot hydrothermal treatment of a designable waterborne polyurethane (WPU) emulsion. The difference in the solubility and fluorescence of these two kinds of CDs was attributed to the various functional groups on the surface, which were derived from the different segment fragments formed by hydrothermal treatment of a block polymer. It was found that the yields of the ACDs and OCDs could be regulated by means of selecting different soft segments in WPU. The more

  3. Overcoming instability and low solubility of new cytostatic compounds: A comparison of two approaches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    di Cagno, M.; Stein, P. C.; Styskala, J.

    2012-01-01

    The pharmaceutical use of some 3-hydroxyquinolinone derivatives with high cytotoxic and cytostatic activities (under in vitro conditions) as well as potential immunosuppressive properties is seriously limited by their low solubility in water accompanied by instability in oxidative environment, like...... methods is the focus of this work, as well as the investigation of some physicochemical properties of the micellar aqueous dispersions. Antioxidant micellar dispersions appear to be suitable for increasing the apparent solubility and stability for all the compounds studied, most probably because...... of the antioxidant activity of the specific surfactant used, combined with the low amount of water present in the center of the micelles. On this regard, H-1 NMR and UV-vis spectroscopy result as efficient tools to verify that the drug molecules are indeed placed in the core of the micelles. Moreover, freeze...

  4. Using the properties of organic compounds to help design a treatment system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyer, E.; Boettcher, G.; Morello, B.

    1991-01-01

    The author provides the physical/chemical and treatability properties of 50 organic compounds. The physical/chemical parameters of the compounds can be used to help evaluate data generated during remedial investigations. The treatability parameters can be used as a basis for the preliminary design of a treatment system that will remove organic compounds from ground water. The main physical/chemical properties that should be evaluated prior to design are solubility, specific gravity, and octanol/water coefficient. Based on this determination, the treatability is determined for carbon adsorption and biodegradability

  5. Sono-catalytic degradation of organic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navarro, N.

    2012-01-01

    Unlike aqueous effluents from the PUREX process, aqueous effluents from advanced separation processes developed to separate the minor actinides (Am, Cm) contain organic reagents in large amounts. To minimize the impact of these organic compounds on the next steps of the process, and to respect standard discharges, it is necessary to develop new techniques of degradation of organic compounds. Sono-chemistry appears as a very promising solution to eliminate organic species in aqueous nuclear effluents. Indeed, the propagation of an ultrasonic wave in a liquid medium induces the appearance of cavitation bubbles which will quickly grow and implode, causing local conditions and extreme temperatures and pressures. Each cavitation bubble can then be considered as a microreactor at high temperature and high pressure able to destroy organic molecules without the addition of specific reagents. The first studies on the effect of ultrasonic frequency on sono-luminescence and sono-lysis of formic acid have shown that the degradation of formic acid occurs at the bubble/liquid interface. The most striking difference between low-frequency and high-frequency ultrasound is that the sono-lysis of HCOOH at high ultrasonic frequencies initiates secondary reactions not observed at 20 kHz. However, despite a much higher sono-chemical activity at high frequency, highly concentrated carboxylic acids in the aqueous effluents from advanced separation processes cannot be destroyed by ultrasound alone. To increase the efficiency of sono-chemical reactions, the addition of supported platinum catalysts has been studied. In these conditions, an increase of the kinetics of destruction of carboxylic acids such as oxalic acid is observed. (author) [fr

  6. Organic vs. Conventional Milk: Some Considerations on Fat-Soluble Vitamins and Iodine Content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela Manzi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The organic food market is considerably expanding all over the world, and the related dairy market represents its third most important sector. The reason lies in the fact that consumers tend to associate organic dairy products with positive perceptions: organic milk is eco- and animal-friendly, is not produced with antibiotics or hormones, and according to general opinion, provides additional nutrients and beneficial properties. These factors justify its higher cost. These are the reasons that explain extensive research into the comparison of the differences in the amount of chemical compounds between organic and conventional milk. However, it is not simple to ascertain the potential advantage of organic food from the nutritional point of view, because this aspect should be determined within the context of the total diet. Thus, considering all the factors described above, the purpose of this work is to compare the amount of selected nutrients (i.e., iodine and the fat-soluble vitamins such as alfa-tocopherol and beta-carotene in organic and conventional milk, expressed as the percentage of recommended daily intakes in one serving. In detail, in order to establish the real share of these biologically active compounds to the total diet, their percent contribution was calculated using the Dietary Reference Values for adults (both men and women adopted by the European Food Safety Authority. According to these preliminary considerations, the higher cost of organic milk can mainly be explained by the high costs of the management of specific farms and no remarkable or substantial benefits in human health can be ascribed to the consumption of organic milk. In this respect, this paper wants to make a small contribution to the estimation of the potential value and nutritional health benefits of organic food, even though further studies are needed.

  7. The fight against Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    This paper strikes the balance of the fight against organic volatile compounds emissions in France and in Europe. The first part describes the influence of VOC on production of Ozone in troposphere and gives numerical data on permissive emission values in atmosphere. The second part describes french and european policy and regulations. The third part gives the principle methods and devices for COV measurement in the atmosphere. In the last part, effluents treatment is given: thermal incineration, catalytic incineration, adsorption on active carbon, biologic purification, condensation and separative processes on membrane

  8. Biogenic volatile organic compounds - small is beautiful

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, S. M.; Asensio, D.; Li, Q.; Penuelas, J.

    2012-12-01

    While canopy and regional scale flux measurements of biogenic volatile organic compounds (bVOCs) are essential to obtain an integrated picture of total compound reaching the atmosphere, many fascinating and important emission details are waiting to be discovered at smaller scales, in different ecological and functional compartments. We concentrate on bVOCs below ground to soil surfaces are small, bVOCs are exuded by roots of some plant species, and can be extracted from decaying litter. Naturally occurring monoterpenes in the rhizosphere provide a specialised carbon source for micro-organisms, helping to define the micro-organism community structure, and impacting on nutrient cycles which are partly controlled by microorganisms. Naturally occurring monoterpenes in the soil system could also affect the aboveground structure of ecosystems because of their role in plant defence strategies and as mediating chemicals in allelopathy. A gradient of monoterpene concentration was found in soil around Pinus sylvestris and Pinus halepensis, decreasing with distance from the tree. Some compounds (α-pinene, sabinene, humulene and caryophyllene) in mineral soil were linearly correlated with the total amount of each compound in the overlying litter, indicating that litter might be the dominant source of these compounds. However, α-pinene did not fall within the correlation, indicating a source other than litter, probably root exudates. We also show that rhizosphere bVOCs can be a carbon source for soil microbes. In a horizontal gradient from Populus tremula trees, microbes closest to the tree trunk were better enzymatically equipped to metabolise labeled monoterpene substrate. Monoterpenes can also increase the degradation rate in soil of the persistant organic pollutants, likely acting as analogues for the cometabo-lism of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) Flowers of a ginger species (Alpinia kwangsiensis) and a fig species (Ficus hispida) showed different bVOC signals pre- and

  9. Predicting Melting Points of Organic Molecules: Applications to Aqueous Solubility Prediction Using the General Solubility Equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonagh, J L; van Mourik, T; Mitchell, J B O

    2015-11-01

    In this work we make predictions of several important molecular properties of academic and industrial importance to seek answers to two questions: 1) Can we apply efficient machine learning techniques, using inexpensive descriptors, to predict melting points to a reasonable level of accuracy? 2) Can values of this level of accuracy be usefully applied to predicting aqueous solubility? We present predictions of melting points made by several novel machine learning models, previously applied to solubility prediction. Additionally, we make predictions of solubility via the General Solubility Equation (GSE) and monitor the impact of varying the logP prediction model (AlogP and XlogP) on the GSE. We note that the machine learning models presented, using a modest number of 2D descriptors, can make melting point predictions in line with the current state of the art prediction methods (RMSE≥40 °C). We also find that predicted melting points, with an RMSE of tens of degrees Celsius, can be usefully applied to the GSE to yield accurate solubility predictions (log10 S RMSE<1) over a small dataset of drug-like molecules. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Application of Quantum Chemical Approximations to Environmental Problems: Prediction of Water Solubility for Nitro Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-11-10

    the same study this method was adapted for solid at given temperature solutes and tested on drugs and pesticides . The intrinsic error of ca. 0.5 LU...the ∆Gfus and solubility values of 53 drugs and pesticides collected from the literature (28, 44, 45) plus five nitro compounds: TNB, TNT, 4-Am- 2,6...230–237. (12) Hawari, J.; Halasz, A.; Groom, C.; Deschamps, S.; Paquet, L.; Beaulieu, C.; Corriveau, A. Photodegradation of RDX in aqueous solution: A

  11. Special syntheses of certain organic iodine compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henry, R.; Debuchy, D.; Junod, E.

    1960-01-01

    The technical difficulties encountered in working on radioactive products force us to choose the simplest methods of chemical synthesis possible. For iodine compounds, two special methods have been chosen: - by using fission recoil, we can prepare simple iodine compounds such as iodobenzene or methyl iodide in high yields and having a good degree of purity. The method consists in the irradiation of mixtures of uranium oxide and benzoic acid or ammonium acetate. The iodised product is separated by distillation, after dissolving the recoil medium in a solvent. - by isotopic exchange between the inorganic iodine of different valencies and complex molecules such as Bengal pink, and diodone, it is also possible to obtain satisfactory labelling yields. These reactions have been adapted so as to give a minimum time for isotopic exchange. In the case of Bengal pink, we have found a yield of 90 per cent after 60 minutes by exchange between Nal and the organic molecule in aqueous solution in presence of hydrogen peroxide. For diodone the method proposed by Liebster has been modified so as to reduce losses during purification. The analytical methods adopted for these different compounds are described. (author) [fr

  12. Volatile Organic Compound Analysis in Istanbul

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ćapraz, Ö.; Deniz, A.; Öztürk, A.; Incecik, S.; Toros, H.; Coşkun, M.

    2012-04-01

    Volatile Organic Compound Analysis in Istanbul Ö. Çapraz1, A. Deniz1,3, A. Ozturk2, S. Incecik1, H. Toros1 and, M. Coskun1 (1) Istanbul Technical University, Faculty of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Department of Meteorology, 34469, Maslak, Istanbul, Turkey. (2) Istanbul Technical University, Faculty of Chemical and Metallurgical, Chemical Engineering, 34469, Maslak, Istanbul, Turkey. (3) Marmara Clean Air Center, Ministry of Environment and Urbanization, Nişantaşı, 34365, İstanbul, Turkey. One of the major problems of megacities is air pollution. Therefore, investigations of air quality are increasing and supported by many institutions in recent years. Air pollution in Istanbul contains many components that originate from a wide range of industrial, heating, motor vehicle, and natural emissions sources. VOC, originating mainly from automobile exhaust, secondhand smoke and building materials, are one of these compounds containing some thousands of chemicals. In spite of the risks to human health, relatively little is known about the levels of VOC in Istanbul. In this study, ambient air quality measurements of 32 VOCs including hydrocarbons, halogenated hydrocarbons and carbonyls were conducted in Kağıthane (Golden Horn) region in Istanbul during the winter season of 2011 in order to develop the necessary scientific framework for the subsequent developments. Kağıthane creek valley is the source part of the Golden Horn and one of the most polluted locations in Istanbul due to its topographical form and pollutant sources in the region. In this valley, horizontal and vertical atmospheric motions are very weak. The target compounds most commonly found were benzene, toluene, xylene and ethyl benzene. Concentrations of total hydrocarbons ranged between 1.0 and 10.0 parts per billion, by volume (ppbv). Ambient air levels of halogenated hydrocarbons appeared to exhibit unique spatial variations and no single factor seemed to explain trends for this group of

  13. Palladium catalyzed hydrogenation of bio-oils and organic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Douglas C [Richland, WA; Hu, Jianli [Kennewick, WA; Hart, Todd R [Kennewick, WA; Neuenschwander, Gary G [Burbank, WA

    2008-09-16

    The invention provides palladium-catalyzed hydrogenations of bio-oils and certain organic compounds. Experimental results have shown unexpected and superior results for palladium-catalyzed hydrogenations of organic compounds typically found in bio-oils.

  14. Soluble antioxidant compounds regenerate the antioxidants bound to insoluble parts of foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çelik, Ecem Evrim; Gökmen, Vural; Fogliano, Vincenzo

    2013-10-30

    This study aimed to investigate the regeneration potential of antioxidant capacity of an insoluble food matrix. Investigations were performed in vitro with several food matrices rich in dietary fiber (DF) and bound antioxidants. After removal of the soluble fraction, the antioxidant capacity (AC) of the insoluble fraction was measured by the QUENCHER procedure using ABTS(•+) or DPPH(•) radicals. After measurement, the insoluble residue was washed out to remove the excess of radicals and treated with pure antioxidant solution or antioxidant-rich beverage to regenerate depleted antioxidants on the fiber. Results revealed that the antioxidant capacity of compounds chemically bound to the insoluble moiety could be reconstituted in the presence of other hydrogen-donating substances in the liquid phase. Regeneration efficiency was found to range between 21.5 and 154.3% depending on the type of insoluble food matrix and regeneration agent. Among the food matrices studied, cereal products were found to have slightly higher regeneration efficiency, whereas antioxidant-rich beverages were more effective than pure antioxidants as regeneration agents. Taking wheat bran as reference insoluble material, the regeneration abilities of beverages were in the following order: green tea > espresso coffee > black tea > instant coffee > orange juice > red wine. These results highlighted the possible physiological relevance of antioxidants bound to the insoluble food material in the gastrointestinal tract. During the digestion process they could react with the free radicals and at the same time they can be regenerated by other soluble antioxidant compounds present in the meal.

  15. Natural attenuation of organic compounds in the unsaturated zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grathwohl, P.; Halm, D.; Maier, U.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Contaminated land poses a serious problem with respect to soil quality and the risk of spreading of pollutants into other compartments of the environment. A major concern at most contaminated sites is the risk of groundwater pollution by organic and inorganic compounds. Since the remediation of all of the contaminated sites is economically not feasible in many countries, groundwater risk assessment procedures are needed for the ranking of sites, decision making on further use and remedial actions. Recently 'Natural Attenuation' of organic pollutants received much interest as a remediation strategy in groundwater. Studies on natural attenuation in the unsaturated zone, however, are very limited although processes like aerobic degradation and volatilization of organic compounds are very likely more efficient than in the water saturated zone. This contribution presents results on scenario-specific modelling of natural attenuation of petroleum hydrocarbons volatilizing from complex organic mixtures ('fuels') in the unsaturated zone. The model is validated with data from a unique field experiment conducted at a Airforce base in Denmark. Hydrocarbons can reach the groundwater by transport with seepage water and by spreading in the soil-gas. Degradation processes can limit the spreading in the unsaturated soil zone and - in the best case - restrict the contamination to the unsaturated zone. The objective of this study was to use numerical simulations to elucidate the processes/parameters which are relevant in contaminant spreading and thus for groundwater risk assessment. The modelling results compare well to data from the well-controlled field test with an emplaced kerosene source. Sensitivity analyses were performed accounting for physical-chemical properties of fuel constituents and soil properties. Scenario-specific numerical simulations illustrate that the overall biodegradation rates depend mainly on properties of the organic

  16. Organic compounds as indicators of air pollution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølhave, Lars

    2003-01-01

    ) is an indicatorfor the presence of VOC indoors. The TVOC indicator can be used in relation toexposure characterization and source identification but for VOCs only, not as anindictor of other pollutants and their health effects. In risk assessment the TVOCindicator can only be used as a screening tool and only......The most important indoor air pollutants have already been addressedwith individual national guidelines or recommendations. However, an interna-tional set of guidelines or recommendations for indoor air quality (IAQ) isneeded for these pollutants based on general and uniform rules for setting...... suchstandards. A major research need exist on the less adverse pollutants beforerecommendations or guidelines can be established. In the interim period a pre-caution principle should lead to an ALARA principle for these secondary cau-salities. It should be noted that volatile organic compound (VOC...

  17. Simulations of charge transport in organic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vehoff, Thorsten

    2010-05-05

    We study the charge transport properties of organic liquid crystals, i.e. hexabenzocoronene and carbazole macrocycle, and single crystals, i.e. rubrene, indolocarbazole and benzothiophene derivatives (BTBT, BBBT). The aim is to find structure-property relationships linking the chemical structure as well as the morphology with the bulk charge carrier mobility of the compounds. To this end, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are performed yielding realistic equilibrated morphologies. Partial charges and molecular orbitals are calculated based on single molecules in vacuum using quantum chemical methods. The molecular orbitals are then mapped onto the molecular positions and orientations, which allows calculation of the transfer integrals between nearest neighbors using the molecular orbital overlap method. Thus we obtain realistic transfer integral distributions and their autocorrelations. In case of organic crystals the differences between two descriptions of charge transport, namely semi-classical dynamics (SCD) in the small polaron limit and kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) based on Marcus rates, are studied. The liquid crystals are investigated solely in the hopping limit. To simulate the charge dynamics using KMC, the centers of mass of the molecules are mapped onto lattice sites and the transfer integrals are used to compute the hopping rates. In the small polaron limit, where the electronic wave function is spread over a limited number of neighboring molecules, the Schroedinger equation is solved numerically using a semi-classical approach. The carbazole macrocycles form columnar structures arranged on a hexagonal lattice with side chains facing inwards, so columns can closely approach each other allowing inter-columnar and thus three-dimensional transport. We are able to show that, on the time-scales of charge transport, static disorder due to slow side chain motions is the main factor determining the mobility. The high mobility of rubrene is explained by two main

  18. Water soluble organic aerosols in the Colorado Rocky Mountains, USA: composition, sources and optical properties

    OpenAIRE

    Xie, Mingjie; Mladenov, Natalie; Williams, Mark W.; Neff, Jason C.; Wasswa, Joseph; Hannigan, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosols have been shown to be an important input of organic carbon and nutrients to alpine watersheds and influence biogeochemical processes in these remote settings. For many remote, high elevation watersheds, direct evidence of the sources of water soluble organic aerosols and their chemical and optical characteristics is lacking. Here, we show that the concentration of water soluble organic carbon (WSOC) in the total suspended particulate (TSP) load at a high elevation site in...

  19. Characterisation of selected volatile organic compounds in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GCMS), was used to identify volatile compounds at three different temperatures. Fifty volatile compounds, inclusive of 14 acids, 14 alcohols, and 22 esters were identified and quantified in the two brands of indigenous banana beer samples. Only 12 ...

  20. New uranium compounds preparation and use as catalyst for hydrogenation of non-saturated organic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnaudet, L.; Folcher, G.

    1985-01-01

    Preparation of new organic uranium compounds and their use as catalysts for hydrogenation of non-saturated organic compounds are described. These compounds include Uranium III, a cyclopentadienic group, an alkyl group and an acetylenic derivative C 6 H 5 C triple bonds CR fixed by a π bond. Catalysts can be prepared with depleted uanium for hydrogenation of olefins for example [fr

  1. Solubility of daidzin in different organic solvents and (ethyl alcohol + water) mixed solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, Jie-Ping; Yang, Dan; Xu, Xiao-Kang; Guo, Xiao-Jie; Zhang, Xue-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The solubilities of daidzin were measured in various solvents. • The solubility data were correlated by three models. • The thermodynamic properties of the dissolution process were also determined. - Abstract: The solubility of daidzin in different organic solvents and (ethyl alcohol + water) mixed solvents was measured by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis method from T = (283.2 to 323.2) K at atmosphere pressure. The results show that at higher temperature more daidzin dissolves, and moreover, the solubility increases with the ethyl alcohol mole fraction increase in the (ethyl alcohol + water) mixed solvents. The experimental solubility values were correlated by a simplified thermodynamic equation, λh equation and modified Apelblat equation. Based on the solubility of daidzin, the enthalpy and entropy of solution were also evaluated by van’t Hoff equation. The results illustrated that the dissolution process of daidzin is endothermic and entropy driven

  2. Organic compounds in concrete from demolition works.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Praagh, M; Modin, H; Trygg, J

    2015-11-01

    This study aims to verify the effect of physically removing the outer surface of contaminated concrete on total contents and on potential mobility of pollutants by means of leaching tests. Reclaimed concrete from 3 industrial sites in Sweden were included: A tar impregnated military storage, a military tar track-depot, as well as concrete constructions used for disposing of pesticide production surplus and residues. Solid materials and leachates from batch and column leaching tests were analysed for metals, Cl, F, SO4, DOC and contents of suspected organic compounds (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, PAH, and pesticides/substances for pesticide production such as phenoxy acids, chlorophenols and chlorocresols, respectively). In case of PAH contaminated concrete, results indicate that removing 1 or 5 mm of the surface lead to total concentrations below the Swedish guidelines for recycling of aggregates and soil in groundwork constructions. 3 out of 4 concrete samples contaminated with pesticides fulfilled Swedish guidelines for contaminated soil. Results from batch and column leaching tests indicated, however, that concentrations above environmental quality standards for certain PAH and phenoxy acids, respectively, might occur at site when the crushed concrete is recycled in groundwork constructions. As leaching tests engaged in the study deviated from leaching test standards with a limited number of samples, the potential impact of the leaching tests' equipment on measured PAH and pesticide leachate concentrations has to be evaluated in future work. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. FIELD SCREENING FOR HALOGENATED VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John F. Schabron; Joseph F. Rovani Jr.; Theresa M. Bomstad

    2002-06-01

    Western Research Institute (WRI) initiated exploratory work towards the development of new field screening methodology and a test kit to measure halogenated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the field. Heated diode and corona discharge sensors are commonly used to detect leaks of refrigerants from air conditioners, freezers, and refrigerators. They are both selective to the presence of carbon-halogen bonds. Commercially available heated diode and corona discharge leak detectors were procured and evaluated for halogenated VOC response. The units were modified to provide a digital readout of signal related to VOC concentration. Sensor response was evaluated with carbon tetrachloride and tetrachloroethylene (perchloroethylene, PCE), which represent halogenated VOCs with and without double bonds. The response characteristics were determined for the VOCs directly in headspace in Tedlar bag containers. Quantitation limits in air were estimated. Potential interferences from volatile hydrocarbons, such as toluene and heptane, were evaluated. The effect of humidity was studied also. The performance of the new devices was evaluated in the laboratory by spiking soil samples and monitoring headspace for halogenated VOCs. A draft concept of the steps for a new analytical method was outlined. The results of the first year effort show that both devices show potential utility for future analytical method development work towards the goal of developing a portable test kit for screening halogenated VOCs in the field.

  4. Extraction of organic compounds from brown coal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slavomír Hredzák

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the study on the extraction of organic compounds (low-molecular weight - diterpenes, high-molecular weight - fullerenes and humic acids from Handlová brown coal and pyrolytic soot. It was confirmed that the coal extract with a diterpene content - 16 β (H kaurene was obtained by the supercritical fluid extraction (using CO2 and modificator - tetrahydrofurane/acetone, 8:2 w/w at T = 90 oC and p = 30 MPa. The occurrence of fullerenes in the toluene extract of solid carbon product has confirmed by the MALDI - TOF - MS and UV-VIS spectroscopy. In the extraction process of GACL (Grinding Aqueous Caustic Leaching at the concentration of 0.1 % NaOH, the content of humic acids (HK in the physically untreated and pretreated sample increased by 6.09 and 4.57 times, respectively. In the case of higher leaching agent concentration (2 % NaOH, the content of HK in the physically untreated and pretreated sample increased by 8,67 and 8,21 times, respectively.

  5. Water uptake by fresh Indonesian peat burning particles is limited by water-soluble organic matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing; Hapsari Budisulistiorini, Sri; Itoh, Masayuki; Lee, Wen-Chien; Miyakawa, Takuma; Komazaki, Yuichi; Qing Yang, Liu Dong; Kuwata, Mikinori

    2017-09-01

    The relationship between hygroscopic properties and chemical characteristics of Indonesian biomass burning (BB) particles, which are dominantly generated from peatland fires, was investigated using a humidified tandem differential mobility analyzer. In addition to peat, acacia (a popular species at plantation) and fern (a pioneering species after disturbance by fire) were used for experiments. Fresh Indonesian peat burning particles are almost non-hygroscopic (mean hygroscopicity parameter, κ stresses the importance of both the WSOC fraction and κ of the water-soluble fraction in determining the hygroscopicity of organic aerosol particles. Values of κ correlate positively (R = 0.89) with the fraction of m/z 44 ion signal quantified using a mass spectrometric technique, demonstrating the importance of highly oxygenated organic compounds to the water uptake by Indonesian BB particles. These results provide an experimentally validated reference for hygroscopicity of organics-dominated particles, thus contributing to more accurate estimation of environmental and climatic impacts driven by Indonesian BB particles on both regional and global scales.

  6. Adsorption of Volatile Organic Compounds from Aqueous Solution by Granular Activated Carbon in Batch System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeinali, F.; Ghoreyshi, A. A.; Najafpour, G.

    2011-01-01

    Chlorinated hydrocarbons and aromatics are the major volatile organic compounds that contaminate the ground water and industrial waste waters. The best way to overcome this problem is to recover the dissolved compounds in water. In order to evaluate the potential ability of granular activated carbon for recovery of volatile organic compounds from water, the equilibrium adsorption was investigated. This study deals with the adsorption of dichloromethane as a typical chlorinated volatile organic compound and toluene as the representative of aromatic volatile organic compounds on a commercial granular activated carbon. The adsorption isotherms of these two volatile organic compounds on granular activated carbon were measured at three different temperatures, toluene at 293, 303 and 313 K and dichloromethane at 298, 303 and 313 K within their solubility concentration range in water. The maximum adsorption capacity of dichloromethane and toluene adsorption by granular activated carbon was 4 and 0.2 mol/Kg-1, respectively. The experimental data obtained were correlated with different adsorption isotherm models. The Langmuir model was well adapted to the description of dichloromethane adsorption on granular activated carbon at all three temperatures, while the adsorption of toluene on granular activated carbon was found to be well described by the Langmuir-BET hybrid model at all three temperatures. The heat of adsorption was also calculated based on the thermodynamic equation of Clausius Clapeyron, which indicates the adsorption process is endothermic for both compounds.

  7. Investigation of the chemical identity of soluble organophosphorus compounds found in natural waters. Research report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minear, R.A.

    1978-04-01

    Four algal species (Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, Chlorella pyrenoidosa, Anacystis nidulans, and Anabaena flos-aquae) were grown in batch culture on 32 P labelled media to yield dissolved organic phosphorus (DOP) compounds containing a radioactive tag. The DOP compounds of filtered culture solutions were characterized by Sephadex gel filtration and thin layer chromatography (TLC) as a function of culture age. Additional TLC of individual Sephadex fractions was conducted. Time, culture and known compounds (inositol mono- and hexaphosphate) comparisons were made. High performance liquid chromatography was used to separate inositol mono- and hexaphosphates and to compare the DOP components of one algal species (C. reinhardtii) with inositol phosphates. Combinations of alkaline bromination and Sephadex pretreatment were examined

  8. Mechanochemical synthesis of organic compounds and composites with their participation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyakhov, Nikolai Z; Grigorieva, Tatiana F; Barinova, Antonina P; Vorsina, I A

    2010-01-01

    The results of experimental studies in the mechanochemical synthesis of organic compounds and composites with their participation published over the last 15 years are described systematically. The key reactions of organic compounds are considered: synthesis of the salts of organic acids, acylation, substitution, dehalogenation, esterification, hydrometallation and other reactions. Primary attention is devoted to systems and compounds that cannot be obtained by traditional chemistry methods.

  9. Oceanic protection of prebiotic organic compounds from UV radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleaves, H J; Miller, S L

    1998-06-23

    It is frequently stated that UV light would cause massive destruction of prebiotic organic compounds because of the absence of an ozone layer. The elevated UV flux of the early sun compounds this problem. This applies to organic compounds of both terrestrial and extraterrestrial origin. Attempts to deal with this problem generally involve atmospheric absorbers. We show here that prebiotic organic polymers as well as several inorganic compounds are sufficient to protect oceanic organic molecules from UV degradation. This aqueous protection is in addition to any atmospheric UV absorbers and should be a ubiquitous planetary phenomenon serving to increase the size of planetary habitable zones.

  10. Oceanic protection of prebiotic organic compounds from UV radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleaves, H. J.; Miller, S. L.; Bada, J. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    It is frequently stated that UV light would cause massive destruction of prebiotic organic compounds because of the absence of an ozone layer. The elevated UV flux of the early sun compounds this problem. This applies to organic compounds of both terrestrial and extraterrestrial origin. Attempts to deal with this problem generally involve atmospheric absorbers. We show here that prebiotic organic polymers as well as several inorganic compounds are sufficient to protect oceanic organic molecules from UV degradation. This aqueous protection is in addition to any atmospheric UV absorbers and should be a ubiquitous planetary phenomenon serving to increase the size of planetary habitable zones.

  11. [Determination of organotin compounds in water soluble paints and adhesives by GC-MS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakami, Tsuyoshi; Isama, Kazuo; Nakashima, Harunobu; Ooshima, Tomoko; Tsuchiya, Toshie; Matsuoka, Atsuko

    2010-02-01

    The use of tributyltin (TBT) and triphenyltin (TPT) in some household products are prohibited by "Act on the Control of Household Products Containing Harmful Substances" in Japan. In this study, methods for determination of TBT and TPT in water soluble paints and adhesives were developed by GC-MS. These compounds in paints and adhesives, which were mainly composed of vinyl acetate, urethane and acryl resins, and chloroprene rubber, were firstly extracted with HCl-acetone, and then extracted with hexane. On the other hand, the adhesive composed of natural rubber was firstly dispersed in water before acidification. The organotins were extracted with hexane from this solution and then these compounds were extracted with acetonitrile from hexane extract. These extracts were purified by a florisil cartridge column after ethyl-derivation with sodium tetraethylborate, and analyzed by GC-MS. The quantifications using deuterated compound of both organotins as surrogate standard were conducted, and good results were obtained. The recoveries were 81 to 118% and the coefficients of variation were 0.83 to 4.3% (TBT and TPT added; 5 microg/g). The method quantification limits were 0.0090 to 0.025 microg/g, which were lower than those of an official method. These methods were applied to monobutyltin (MBT), dibutyltin (DBT), monophenyltin (MPT), and diphenyltin (DPT). DBT and DPT in paints and adhesives were quantified, except for DPT in natural rubber. These methods were applied to commercial products. DBT was detected at low concentrations (t.r.-0.19 microg/g) in some paint samples, while TBT and TPT were not detected in all samples.

  12. An estimation of influence of humic acid and organic matter originated from bentonite on samarium solubility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanaji, Mariko; Sato, Haruo; Sasahira, Akira

    1999-10-01

    Organic acids in groundwater are considered to form complexes and increase the solubility of radionuclides released from vitrified waste in a high-level radioactive waste (HLW) repository. To investigate whether the solubility of samarium (Sm) is influenced by organic substances, we measured Sm solubility in the presence of different organic substances and compared those values with results from thermodynamic predictions. Humic acid (Aldrich) is commercially available and soluble organic matter originated from bentonite were used as organic substances in this study. Consequently, the solubility of Sm showed a tendency to apparently increase with increasing the concentration of humic acid, but in the presence of carbonate, thermodynamic predictions suggested that the dominant species are carbonate complexes and that the effect of organic substances are less than that of carbonate. Based on total organic carbon (TOC), the increase of Sm solubility measured with humic acid (Aldrich) was more significant than that in the case with soluble organic matter originated from bentonite. Since bentonite is presumed to include also simple organic matters of which stability constant for forming complexes is low, the effect of soluble organic matter originated from bentonite on the solubility of Sm is considered to be less effective than that of humic acid (Aldrich). Experimental values were compared with model prediction, proposed by Kim, based on data measured in a low pH region. Tentatively we calculated the increase in Sm solubility assuming complexation with humic acid. Trial calculations were carried out on the premise that the complexation reaction of metal ion with humic acid is based on neutralization process by 1-1 complexation. In this process, it was assumed that one metal ion coordinates with one unit of complexation sites which number of proton exchange sites is equal to ionic charge. Consequently, Kim's model indicated that carbonate complexes should be dominant

  13. Surfactant effects on desorption rate of nonionic organic compounds from soils to water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesare, David Di; Smith, James A.

    1994-01-01

    The widespread occurrence of organic contamination in groundwater systems has become an important environmental concern. Of particular interest are nonionic organic compounds, which sorb strongly to natural soil as a result of their characteristic low aqueous solubilities and hydrophobic nature. Consequently, the remediation of nonionic organic contamination in groundwater systems is often highly dependent on contaminant desorption from the sorbed to aqueous phase. The kinetics of desorption will significantly influence the extraction efficiency of pump-and-treat remedial methods that are capable of removing only dissolved phase contaminants.

  14. 2,6-Bis(benzo[b]thiophen-2-yl-3,7-dipentadecyltetrathienoacene (DBT-TTAR2 as an Alternative of Highly Soluble p-type Organic Semiconductor for Organic Thin Film Transistor (OTFT Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mery B. Supriadi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available A new compound of organic semiconductor based on tetrathienoacene (TTA derivatives, DBT-TTAR2 was synthesized and characterized. The corporation of dibenzo[b,d]thiophene (DBT group and alkyl substituent in both ends of TTA core have a significant effect on their π-π molecular conjugation length, energy gaps value and solubility properties. DBT-TTAR2 is fabricated as p-type organic semiconductor of organic thin film transistor (OTFT by solution process at Industrial Technology Research Institute, Taiwan. A good optical, electrochemical, and thermal properties of DBT-TTAR2 showed that its exhibits a better performance as highly soluble p-type organic semiconductor.

  15. The effect of cyclodextrin complexation on the solubility and photostability of nerolidol as pure compound and as main constituent of cabreuva essential oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joyce Azzi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Nerolidol (Ner, a major component of many plant essential oils, is known for its various biological properties. However, the low solubility of Ner in water and its susceptibility to degradation limit its application. The aim of our study was to improve the solubility and photostability of Ner through its encapsulation in different cyclodextrins (CDs. The formation constants of cis-, trans-Ner and their commercial mixture with various CDs (α-CD, β-CD, γ-CD, HP-β-CD, RAMEB, CRYSMEB and SBE-β-CD were determined by phase solubility studies and confirmed by the spectral displacement UV-visible method. The solubility of cabreuva essential oil (EO rich in trans-Ner was also evaluated by total organic carbon (TOC analysis. The encapsulation efficiency (EE % of Ner in HP-β-CD solid complexes was assessed by HPLC. The structural characterization of CD/trans-Ner inclusion complex was then conducted by NMR spectroscopy followed by molecular modelling studies. The effect of encapsulation on the Ner photostability was also carried out over time under UVB irradiation. AL-type phase-solubility diagrams were obtained, suggesting the formation of 1:1 CD/Ner inclusion complexes. The solubility of Ner was enhanced by approximately 70-fold in the presence of 10 mM HP-β-CD. Moreover, high EE % values were obtained for 5:1 and 10:1 HP-β-CD:Ner molar ratios. NMR and molecular modelling studies revealed the most stable structure for trans-Ner inside the CD cavity with the OH group oriented towards the wider rim of the CD. Finally, CD encapsulation of Ner as pure compound or as main component of the cabreuva EO, protected it from degradation. This effect was more pronounced as the concentration of CD increased. These findings suggested that CDs are promising encapsulating carriers for Ner by enhancing its solubility and stability and thereby its application in food industry.

  16. Solubility and solution thermodynamics of sorbic acid in eight pure organic solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, Jing; Zhang, Meijing; Zhu, Peipei; Ouyang, Jinbo; Gong, Junbo; Chen, Wei; Xu, Fengxia

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The solubility of sorbic acid in eight pure organic solvents was experimentally determined. • Several solution thermodynamic properties of sorbic acid in eight pure organic solvents were calculated. • The experimental solubility data were correlated by five models. • The COSMO-RS model was employed to predict the solubility of sorbic acid in eight pure organic solvents. - Abstract: By the gravimetric method, the solubility of sorbic acid in eight solvents including ethanol, 2-propanol, methanol, 1-butanol, ethyl acetate, methyl tert-butyl ether, acetone and acetonitrile was determined over a temperature range from 285.15 to K at atmospheric pressure. For the temperature range investigated, the solubility of sorbic acid in the solvents increased with increasing temperature. The experimental values were correlated with the linear solvation energy relationship, modified Apelblat equation, λh equation, non-random two-liquid (NRTL) model, and Wilson model. On the other hand, the enthalpy, entropy and Gibbs free energy of dissolution were obtained from these solubility values by using the van’t Hoff and Gibbs equations. The excess enthalpy of solution was estimated on the basis of λh equation. Furthermore, the a priori predictive model COSMO-RS was employed to predict the solubility of sorbic acid in selected solvents and reasonable agreement with experimental values is achieved

  17. Relative Stabilities of Organic Compounds Using Benson's Additivity Rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitale, Dale E.

    1986-01-01

    Shows how the structure-energy principle can be presented in organic chemistry (without having to resort to quantum mechanics) by use of Benson's Additive Rules. Examples of the application to several major classes of organic compounds are given.

  18. Impact of sorghum processing on phytate, phenolic compounds and in vitro solubility of iron and zinc in thick porridges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kayodé, A.P.P.; Linnemann, A.R.; Nout, M.J.R.; Boekel, van M.A.J.S.

    2007-01-01

    This study focussed on the impact of process variables on levels of phytate and phenolic compounds, and in vitro solubility of iron (Fe) and zinc (Zn) in sorghum porridges, a major staple in semi-arid tropics. The aim was to identify practices that enhance the mineral availability in this type of

  19. Spatial variation of volatile organic compounds and carbon ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study focused on methane volatile organic compounds and non-methane volatile compounds besides carbon monoxide. Results of the analysis showed that non-methane volatile compound levels were highest at public bus terminuses with 12.40 ± 0.83 ppm, and lowest for industrial locations (2.16 ± 0.09 ppm).

  20. FIELD SCREENING FOR HALOGENATED VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John F. Schabron; Joseph F. Rovani, Jr.; Theresa M. Bomstad

    2003-07-01

    Western Research Institute (WRI) is continuing work toward the development of new screening methodology and a test kit to measure halogenated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the field. Heated diode and corona discharge sensors are commonly used to detect leaks of refrigerants from air conditioners, freezers, and refrigerators. They are both selective to the presence of halogens. In prior work, the devices were tested for response to carbon tetrachloride, heptane, toluene, and water vapors. In the current work, sensor response was evaluated with sixteen halogenated VOCs relative to carbon tetrachloride. The results show that the response of the various chlorinated VOCs is within an order of magnitude of the response to carbon tetrachloride for each of the sensors. Thus, for field screening a single response factor can be used. Both types of leak detectors are being further modified to provide an on-board LCD signal readout, which is related to VOC concentration. The units will be fully portable and will operate with 115-V line or battery power. Signal background, noise level, and response data on the Bacharach heated diode detector and the TIF corona discharge detector show that when the response curves are plotted against the log of concentration, the plot is linear to the upper limit for the particular unit, with some curvature at lower levels. When response is plotted directly against concentration, the response is linear at the low end and is curved at the high end. The dynamic ranges for carbon tetrachloride of the two devices from the lower detection limit (S/N=2) to signal saturation are 4-850 vapor parts per million (vppm) for the corona discharge unit and 0.01-70 vppm for the heated diode unit. Additional circuit modifications are being made to lower the detection limit and increase the dynamic response range of the corona discharge unit. The results indicate that both devices show potential utility for future analytical method development work toward

  1. Retenation of soluble organic nutrients by a forested ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    R.G. Qualls; B.L. Haines; Wayne T. Swank; S.W. Tyler

    2002-01-01

    We document an example of a forested watershed at the Coweeta Hydrologic Laboratory with an extraordinary tendency to retain dissolved organic matter (DOM) generated in large quantities within the ecosystem. Our objectives were to determine fluxes of dissolved organic C, N, and P (DOC,D ON, DOP, respectively), in water draining through each stratum of the ecosystem and...

  2. Solubility modelling and thermodynamic dissolution functions of phthalimide in ten organic solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Renjie; Wang, Jian; Han, Shuo; Du, Cunbin; Meng, Long; Zhao, Hongkun

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The solubility of phthalimide in ten organic solvents were determined. • The solubility were correlated with four thermodynamic models. • The dissolution thermodynamic properties of solution were obtained. - Abstract: In this work, a high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was employed to determine the solubilities of phthalimide in methanol, isopropanol, n-propanol, ethyl acetate, acetonitrile, i-butanol, n-butanol, toluene, acetone and ethanol at temperatures ranging from (283.15 to 318.15) K under 0.1 MPa. The solubility of phthalimide in a fixed solvent increases with an increase in temperature. At a certain temperature, the solubility in different solvents decreases according to the following order: acetone > ethyl acetate > (methanol, isopropanol, n-propanol, acetonitrile, i-butanol, n-butanol, ethanol) > toluene. Four models, modified Apelblat equation, λh equation, Wilson model and NRTL model were employed to correlate the solubility of phthalimide in the solvents studied. The evaluated solubilities provide better agreement with the modified Apelblat equation than the other three models. The four thermodynamic models are all acceptable for correlating the solubility of phthalimide in the solvents studied. Furthermore, the standard dissolution enthalpy and excess enthalpy of the solutions were obtained. The dissolution process of phthalimide in the selected solvents is discussed.

  3. Measurement and correlation of solubility of ciclesonide in seven pure organic solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Lina; Yin, Qiuxiang; Guo, Zhiqiang; Lu, Haijiao; Liu, Mingyan; Chen, Wei; Hou, Baohong

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • The solubility of ciclesonide in seven pure organic solvents was determined by gravimetric method. • The solubility order was interpreted by virtue of density function theory (DFT). • The experimental solubility of ciclesonide was correlated by four thermodynamic models. • Mixing thermodynamic properties of ciclesonide were calculated and discussed. - Abstract: The solubility of ciclesonide in seven organic solvents (ethanol, 2-propanol, 1-propanol, 1-butanol, acetonitrile, toluene and ethyl acetate) in the temperature range from 278.15 K to 313.15 K was measured by gravimetrical method under atmospheric pressure. The results indicate that the solubility of ciclesonide increases with elevating temperature in all investigated solvents. The solubility order in different solvents was interpreted through comparing interaction force between solute and solvent molecules by virtue of density function theory (DFT). Thermodynamic equations including the modified Apelblat equation, λh equation, Wilson equation and NRTL equation are all suitable to correlate the solubility results. Based on the Wilson equation, the thermodynamic parameters from the mixing process are calculated, and the results indicate the mixing process of ciclesonide in the selected pure solvents is spontaneous and entropy-driven.

  4. Quantifying commuter exposures to volatile organic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayne, Ashleigh

    Motor-vehicles can be a predominant source of air pollution in cities. Traffic-related air pollution is often unavoidable for people who live in populous areas. Commuters may have high exposures to traffic-related air pollution as they are close to vehicle tailpipes. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are one class of air pollutants of concern because exposure to VOCs carries risk for adverse health effects. Specific VOCs of interest for this work include benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX), which are often found in gasoline and combustion products. Although methods exist to measure time-integrated personal exposures to BTEX, there are few practical methods to measure a commuter's time-resolved BTEX exposure which could identify peak exposures that could be concealed with a time-integrated measurement. This study evaluated the ability of a photoionization detector (PID) to measure commuters' exposure to BTEX using Tenax TA samples as a reference and quantified the difference in BTEX exposure between cyclists and drivers with windows open and closed. To determine the suitability of two measurement methods (PID and Tenax TA) for use in this study, the precision, linearity, and limits of detection (LODs) for both the PID and Tenax TA measurement methods were determined in the laboratory with standard BTEX calibration gases. Volunteers commuted from their homes to their work places by cycling or driving while wearing a personal exposure backpack containing a collocated PID and Tenax TA sampler. Volunteers completed a survey and indicated if the windows in their vehicle were open or closed. Comparing pairs of exposure data from the Tenax TA and PID sampling methods determined the suitability of the PID to measure the BTEX exposures of commuters. The difference between BTEX exposures of cyclists and drivers with windows open and closed in Fort Collins was determined. Both the PID and Tenax TA measurement methods were precise and linear when evaluated in the

  5. Soluble organic carbon and pH of organic amendments affect metal mobility and chemical speciation in mine soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Esteban, Javier; Escolástico, Consuelo; Masaguer, Alberto; Vargas, Carmen; Moliner, Ana

    2014-05-01

    We evaluated the effects of pH and soluble organic carbon affected by organic amendments on metal mobility to find out the optimal conditions for their application in the stabilization of metals in mine soils. Soil samples (pH 5.5-6.2) were mixed with 0, 30 and 60 th a(-1) of sheep-horse manure (pH 9.4) and pine bark compost (pH 5.7). A single-step extraction procedure was performed using 0.005 M CaCl2 adjusted to pH 4.0-7.0 and metal speciation in soil solution was simulated using NICA-Donnan model. Sheep-horse manure reduced exchangeable metal concentrations (up to 71% Cu, 75% Zn) due to its high pH and degree of maturity, whereas pine bark increased them (32% Cu, 33% Zn). However, at increasing dose and hence pH, sheep-horse manure increased soluble Cu because of higher soluble organic carbon, whereas soluble Cu and organic carbon increased at increasing dose and correspondingly decreasing pH in pine bark and non-amended treatments. Near the native pH of these soils (at pH 5.8-6.3), with small doses of amendments, there was minimum soluble Cu and organic carbon. Pine bark also increased Zn solubility, whereas sheep-horse manure reduced it as soluble Zn always decreased with increasing pH. Sheep-horse manure also reduced the proportion of free metals in soil solution (from 41% to 4% Cu, from 97% to 94% Zn), which are considered to be more bioavailable than organic species. Sheep-horse manure amendment could be efficiently used for the stabilization of metals with low risk of leaching to groundwater at low doses and at relatively low pH, such as the native pH of mine soils. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Atmospheric degradation mechanism of organic sulfur compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benter, T.; Arsene, C.

    2002-02-01

    In the present work a detailed product study has been performed on the OH radical initiated oxidation of dimethyl sulphide and dimethyl sulphoxide, under different conditions of temperature, partial pressure of oxygen and NO{sub x} concentration, in order to better define the degradation mechanism of the above compounds under conditions which prevail in the atmosphere. (orig.)

  7. using stereochemistry models in teaching organic compounds

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    (Stereochemistry Model); the treatment had significant effect: students taught using. Stereochemistry Models ... ISSN 2227-5835. 93. Apart from the heavy conceptual demand on the memory capacity required of the ..... colors and sizes compared with the sketches on the chart that appear to be mock forms of the compounds.

  8. Fragmentation analysis of water-soluble atmospheric organic matter using ultrahigh-resolution FT-ICR mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclair, Jeffrey P; Collett, Jeffrey L; Mazzoleni, Lynn R

    2012-04-17

    Isolated water-soluble atmospheric organic matter (AOM) analytes extracted from radiation fogwater samples were analyzed using collision induced dissociation with ultrahigh-resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS). Tandem mass analysis was performed on several mass ranges between 100 and 400 Da to characterize the functional groups of AOM species. Compounds containing nitrogen and/or sulfur were targeted because of the high number of oxygen atoms contained in their molecular formulas. Due to the large number of isobaric ions in the precursor isolation ranges, large numbers of product ions resulted from collision induced dissociation. Common neutral losses were assigned by matching the molecular formulas of the expected product ions with the detected product ions within the appropriate mass spectra. Since polar functional groups are expected to affect the hygroscopic properties of aerosols, the losses of H(2)O, CO(2), CH(3)OH, HNO(3), CH(3)NO(3), SO(3), SO(4) and combinations of these were specifically targeted. Among the 421 compounds studied, the most frequently observed neutral losses were CO(2) (54%), H(2)O (43%) and CH(3)OH (40%). HNO(3) losses were observed for 63% of the studied nitrogen containing compounds and 33% of the studied compounds containing both nitrogen and sulfur. SO(3) losses were observed for 85% of the studied sulfur containing compounds and 42% of studied compounds containing both nitrogen and sulfur. A number of molecular formulas matching those of monoterpene ozonolysis SOA were observed; they include organonitrates, organosulfates, and nitroxy-organosulfates. Overall, the results of fragmentation analysis of 400+ individual molecular precursors elucidate the complexity and multifunctional nature of the isolated water-soluble AOM.

  9. Synthesis of organic compounds 15 N enriched

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Claudineia Raquel de; Bendassolli, Jose Albertino; Prestes, Clelber Vieira; Tavares, Glauco Arnold

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this work was to develop urea- 15 N and glycine- 15 N synthesis for agronomic and biological studies. The production of these compounds was evaluated due to the fact of increasing use of urea, comparing to others solid fertilizers and the importance of glycine in the studies of protein metabolism. A non-conventional method was carried out to synthesize urea. The process involved reaction among Co, NH 3 anidrid and S at low temperature (100 deg C) and of pressure (0,81 mPa) compared to the conventional method. Monolise halets reaction was carried out for glycine synthesis with chloroacetic and ammonia 2 deg C. Both compounds are economic viable, they can be produced at a lower price than the trade market one. (author)

  10. Spectroscopic evidence of xanthine compounds fluorescence quenching effect on water-soluble porphyrins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarska-Bialokoz, Magdalena

    2015-02-01

    The formation of π-stacked complexes between water-soluble porphyrins: 4,4‧,4″,4″‧-(21H,23H-porphine-5,10,15,20-tetrayl)tetrakis-(benzoic acid) (H2TCPP), 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(4-sulfonatophenyl)-21H,23H-porphine (H2TPPS4), 5,10,15,20-tetrakis[4-(trimethylammonio)phenyl]-21H,23H-porphine tetra-p-tosylate (H2TTMePP), 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(1-methyl-4-pyridyl)-21H,23H-porphine tetra-p-tosylate (H2TMePyP), the Cu(II) complexes of H2TTMePP and H2TMePyP, as well as chlorophyll a with xanthine, theophylline (1,3-dimethylxanthine) and theobromine (3,7-dimethylxanthine) has been studied analysing their absorption and steady-state fluorescence spectra in aqueous (or acetone in case of chlorophyll a) solution. During titration by the compounds from xanthine group the bathochromic effect in the porphyrin absorption spectra as well as the hypochromicity of the porphyrin Soret maximum can be noticed. The fluorescence quenching effect observed during interactions in the systems examined suggests the process of static quenching. The association and fluorescence quenching constants are of the order of magnitude of 103 - 102 mol-1. The results obtained show that xanthine and its derivatives can quench the fluorescence of the porphyrins according to the number of methyl groups in the molecule of quencher.

  11. Alleviating soil acidity through plant organic compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meda Anderson R.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available A laboratory experiment was conducted to evaluate the effects of water soluble plant extracts on soil acidity. The plant materials were: black oat, oil seed radish, white and blue lupin, gray and dwarf mucuna, Crotalaria spectabilis and C. breviflora, millet, pigeon pea, star grass, mato grosso grass, coffee leaves, sugar cane leaves, rice straw, and wheat straw. Plant extracts were added on soil surface in a PVC soil column at a rate of 1.0 ml min-1. Both soil and drainage water were analyzed for pH, Ca, Al, and K. Plant extracts applied on the soil surface increased soil pH, exchangeable Ca ex and Kex and decreased Al ex. Oil seed radish, black oat, and blue lupin were the best and millet the worst materials to alleviate soil acidity. Oil seed radish markedly increased Al in the drainage water. Chemical changes were associated with the concentrations of basic cations in the plant extract: the higher the concentration the greater the effects in alleviating soil acidity.

  12. Solubility studies of inorganic–organic hybrid nanoparticle photoresists with different surface functional groups

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Li

    2016-01-01

    © 2016 The Royal Society of Chemistry. The solubility behavior of Hf and Zr based hybrid nanoparticles with different surface ligands in different concentrations of photoacid generator as potential EUV photoresists was investigated in detail. The nanoparticles regardless of core or ligand chemistry have a hydrodynamic diameter of 2-3 nm and a very narrow size distribution in organic solvents. The Hansen solubility parameters for nanoparticles functionalized with IBA and 2MBA have the highest contribution from the dispersion interaction than those with tDMA and MAA, which show more polar character. The nanoparticles functionalized with unsaturated surface ligands showed more apparent solubility changes after exposure to DUV than those with saturated ones. The solubility differences after exposure are more pronounced for films containing a higher amount of photoacid generator. The work reported here provides material selection criteria and processing strategies for the design of high performance EUV photoresists.

  13. Hammerhead ribozyme activity and oligonucleotide duplex stability in mixed solutions of water and organic compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-ichi Nakano

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nucleic acids are useful for biomedical targeting and sensing applications in which the molecular environment is different from that of a dilute aqueous solution. In this study, the influence of various types of mixed solutions of water and water-soluble organic compounds on RNA was investigated by measuring the catalytic activity of the hammerhead ribozyme and the thermodynamic stability of an oligonucleotide duplex. The compounds with a net neutral charge, such as poly(ethylene glycol, small primary alcohols, amide compounds, and aprotic solvent molecules, added at high concentrations changed the ribozyme-catalyzed RNA cleavage rate, with the magnitude of the effect dependent on the NaCl concentration. These compounds also changed the thermodynamic stability of RNA base pairs of an oligonucleotide duplex and its dependence on the NaCl concentration. Specific interactions with RNA molecules and reduced water activity could account for the inhibiting effects on the ribozyme catalysis and destabilizing effects on the duplex stability. The salt concentration dependence data correlated with the dielectric constant, but not with water activity, viscosity, and the size of organic compounds. This observation suggests the significance of the dielectric constant effects on the RNA reactions under molecular crowding conditions created by organic compounds.

  14. Organic compounds in hydraulic fracturing fluids and wastewaters: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luek, Jenna L; Gonsior, Michael

    2017-10-15

    High volume hydraulic fracturing (HVHF) of shale to stimulate the release of natural gas produces a large quantity of wastewater in the form of flowback fluids and produced water. These wastewaters are highly variable in their composition and contain a mixture of fracturing fluid additives, geogenic inorganic and organic substances, and transformation products. The qualitative and quantitative analyses of organic compounds identified in HVHF fluids, flowback fluids, and produced waters are reviewed here to communicate knowledge gaps that exist in the composition of HVHF wastewaters. In general, analyses of organic compounds have focused on those amenable to gas chromatography, focusing on volatile and semi-volatile oil and gas compounds. Studies of more polar and non-volatile organic compounds have been limited by a lack of knowledge of what compounds may be present as well as quantitative methods and standards available for analyzing these complex mixtures. Liquid chromatography paired with high-resolution mass spectrometry has been used to investigate a number of additives and will be a key tool to further research on transformation products that are increasingly solubilized through physical, chemical, and biological processes in situ and during environmental contamination events. Diverse treatments have been tested and applied to HVHF wastewaters but limited information has been published on the quantitative removal of individual organic compounds. This review focuses on recently published information on organic compounds identified in flowback fluids and produced waters from HVHF. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Mass absorption efficiency of elemental carbon and water-soluble organic carbon in Beijing, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Y.; He, K.-B.; Zheng, M.; Duan, F.-K.; Du, Z.-Y.; Ma, Y.-L.; Tan, J.-H.; Yang, F.-M.; Liu, J.-M.; Zhang, X.-L.; Weber, R. J.; Bergin, M. H.; Russell, A. G.

    2011-11-01

    The mass absorption efficiency (MAE) of elemental carbon (EC) in Beijing was quantified using a thermal-optical carbon analyzer. The MAE measured at 632 nm was 8.45±1.71 and 9.41±1.92 m2 g-1 during winter and summer respectively. The daily variation of MAE was found to coincide with the abundance of organic carbon (OC), especially the OC to EC ratio, perhaps due to the enhancement by coating with organic aerosol (especially secondary organic aerosol, SOA) or the artifacts resulting from the redistribution of liquid-like organic particles during the filter-based absorption measurements. Using a converting approach that accounts for the discrepancy caused by measurements methods of both light absorption and EC concentration, previously published MAE values were converted to the equivalent-MAE, which is the estimated value if using the same measurement methods as used in this study. The equivalent-MAE was found to be much lower in the regions heavily impacted by biomass burning (e.g., below 2.7 m2 g-1 for two Indian cities). Results from source samples (including diesel exhaust samples and biomass smoke samples) also demonstrated that emissions from biomass burning would decrease the MAE of EC. Moreover, optical properties of water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) in Beijing were presented. Light absorption by WSOC exhibited strong wavelength (λ) dependence such that absorption varied approximately as λ-7, which was characteristic of the brown carbon spectra. The MAE of WSOC (measured at 365 nm) was 1.79±0.24 and 0.71±0.20 m2 g-1 during winter and summer respectively. The large discrepancy between the MAE of WSOC during winter and summer was attributed to the difference in the precursors of SOA such that anthropogenic volatile organic compounds (AVOCs) should be more important as the precursors of SOA in winter. The MAE of WSOC in Beijing was much higher than results from the southeastern United States which were obtained using the same method as used in this study

  16. What Aerosol Water do Organic Compounds See?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Large amounts of aerosol water are associated with inorganic salts such as ammonium sulfate with generally smaller but important contributions from hydrophilic organics. Ambient aerosols can be externally or internally mixed in addition to containing one or multiple phases. The d...

  17. Volatile and semivolatile organic compounds in laboratory peat fire emissions

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Supporting information Tables S3 and S4 list emission factors in g/kg of speciated volatile and particulate organic compounds emitted from peat burning. Peat samples...

  18. Synthesis of fluorinated organic compounds using oxygen difluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toy, M. S.

    1971-01-01

    Oxygen difluoride synthesis is a much simpler, higher-yield procedure than reactions originally followed to synthesize various fluorinated organic compounds. Extreme care is taken in working with oxygen difluoride as its reactions present severe explosion hazard.

  19. Variability of volatile organic compounds emitted by seedlings of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Variability of volatile organic compounds emitted by seedlings of seven African maize varieties when infested by adult Cicadulina storeyi China leafhopper vectors of maize streak virus. S Oluwafemi, MA Birkett, J Caulfield, JA Pickett ...

  20. Green chemistry principles in organic compound synthesis and analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Ruchi Verma; Lalit Kumar; Vijay Bhaskar Kurba

    2014-01-01

    The present review focus on various green chemistry approaches which could be utilized in the organic compounds in practical classes for undergraduate level in comparison of conventional methods. These methods avoid the usage of hazardous substances and are environmental friendly.

  1. Nano-pulverization of poorly water soluble compounds with low melting points by a rotation/revolution pulverizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuminoki, K; Takeda, M; Kitamura, K; Numata, S; Kimura, K; Takatsuka, T; Hashimoto, N

    2012-08-01

    We report a method for pulverizing poorly water soluble compounds with low melting points to nanoparticles without producing an amorphous phase using a rotation/revolution pulverizer. Fenofibrate, flurbiprofen, and probucol were used as crystalline model compounds. They were suspended in a methylcellulose aqueous solution and pulverized with zirconia balls by the rotation/revolution pulverizer. Beeswax, an amorphous compound, was also examined to investigate whether nano-pulverization of a compound with a low melting point was possible. Beeswax was suspended in ethyl alcohol cooled with liquid nitrogen and pulverized with zirconia balls by the rotation/revolution pulverizer. By optimizing the pulverization parameters, nanoparticles (D50 revolution speed of 1000 rpm and a rotation/revolution ratio of 1.0 when the vessel was 0 degrees C. Amorphous fenofibrate and flurbiprofen were not detected by differential scanning calorimetry or powder X-ray diffraction, whereas small amounts of amorphous probucol were detected. Beeswax was pulverized to nanoparticles (D50 = 0.14 microm) with ethyl alcohol cooled with liquid nitrogen. Fine nanoparticles of these poorly water soluble compounds with low melting points were obtained by controlling the rotation/revolution speed and reducing the vessel temperature.

  2. Induction of caspase 8 and reactive oxygen species by ruthenium-derived anticancer compounds with improved water solubility and cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidimar, Vania; Meng, Xiangjun; Klajner, Marcelina; Licona, Cynthia; Fetzer, Ludivine; Harlepp, Sébastien; Hébraud, Pascal; Sidhoum, Marjorie; Sirlin, Claude; Loeffler, Jean-Philippe; Mellitzer, Georg; Sava, Gianni; Pfeffer, Michel; Gaiddon, Christian

    2012-12-01

    Organometallic compounds which contain metals, such as ruthenium or gold, have been investigated as a replacement for platinum-derived anticancer drugs. They often show good antitumor effects, but the identification of their precise mode of action or their pharmacological optimization is still challenging. We have previously described a class of ruthenium(II) compounds with interesting anticancer properties. In comparison to cisplatin, these molecules have lower side effects, a reduced ability to interact with DNA, and they induce cell death in absence of p53 through CHOP/DDIT3. We have now optimized these molecules by improving their cytotoxicity and their water solubility. In this article, we demonstrate that by changing the ligands around the ruthenium we modify the ability of the compounds to interact with DNA. We show that these optimized molecules reduce tumor growth in different mouse models and retain their ability to induce CHOP/DDIT3. However, they are more potent inducers of cancer cell death and trigger the production of reactive oxygen species and the activation of caspase 8. More importantly, we show that blocking reactive oxygen species production or caspase 8 activity reduces significantly the activity of the compounds. Altogether our data suggest that water-soluble ruthenium(II)-derived compounds represent an interesting class of molecules that, depending on their structures, can target several pro-apoptotic signaling pathways leading to reactive oxygen species production and caspase 8 activation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Thermodynamic properties of organic compounds estimation methods, principles and practice

    CERN Document Server

    Janz, George J

    1967-01-01

    Thermodynamic Properties of Organic Compounds: Estimation Methods, Principles and Practice, Revised Edition focuses on the progression of practical methods in computing the thermodynamic characteristics of organic compounds. Divided into two parts with eight chapters, the book concentrates first on the methods of estimation. Topics presented are statistical and combined thermodynamic functions; free energy change and equilibrium conversions; and estimation of thermodynamic properties. The next discussions focus on the thermodynamic properties of simple polyatomic systems by statistical the

  4. Metal organic frameworks for removal of compounds from a fluid

    KAUST Repository

    Eddaoudi, Mohamed

    2016-03-03

    Embodiments provide a method of compound removal from a fluid. The method includes contacting one or more metal organic framework (MOF) compositions with a fluid and sorbing one or more compounds, such as CO2, H2S and condensable hydrocarbons. One or more of CO2, H2S and condensable hydrocarbons can be sorbed simultaneously or in series. The metal organic framework can be an M-soc-MOF.

  5. Reverse Osmosis Processing of Organic Model Compounds and Fermentation Broths

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-04-01

    key species found in the fermentation broth: ethanol, butanol, acetic acid, oxalic acid, lactic acid, and butyric acid. Correlations of the rejection...AFRL-ML-TY-TP-2007-4545 POSTPRINT REVERSE OSMOSIS PROCESSING OF ORGANIC MODEL COMPOUNDS AND FERMENTATION BROTHS Robert Diltz...TELEPHONE NUMBER (Include area code) Bioresource Technology 98 (2007) 686–695Reverse osmosis processing of organic model compounds and fermentation broths

  6. Theoretical design of near - infrared organic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brymora, Katarzyna; Ducasse, Laurent; Dautel, Olivier; Lartigau-Dagron, Christine; Castet, FréDéRic

    The world follows the path of digital development faster than ever before. In consequence, the Human Machine Interfaces (HMI) market is growing as well and it requires some innovations. The goal of our work is to achieve an organic Infra-Red (IR) photodetectors hitting the performance requirements for HMI applications. The quantum chemical calculations are used to guide the synthesis and technology development. In this work, in the framework of density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT), we consider a large variety of materials exploring small donor-acceptor-donor molecules and copolymers alternating donor and acceptor monomers. We provide a structure-property relationship in view of designing new Near-Infrared (NIR) absorbing organic molecules and polymers.

  7. Preparation of radioactive labelled compounds Pt.1. 82Br labelled organic bromine compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otto, R.

    1988-05-01

    A simple method allowing the preparation of 82 Br labelled organic bromine compounds from olefins with chemical and radiochemical yields between 75 and 95% and the specific activities required, is described [fr

  8. Algae form brominated organic compounds in surface waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huetteroth, A.; Putschew, A.; Jekel, M. [Tech. Univ. Berlin (Germany)

    2004-09-15

    Monitoring of organic halogen compounds, measured as adsorbable organic bromine (AOBr) revealed seasonal high concentrations of organic bromine compounds in a surface water (Lake Tegel, Berlin, Germany). Usually, in late summer, concentrations are up to five times higher than during the rest of the year. The AOBr of the lake inflows (throughout the year less then 6 {mu}g/L) were always lower then those in the lake, which indicates a production of AOBr in the lake. A correlation of the AOBr and chlorophyll-a concentration (1) in the lake provides first evidence for the influence of phototrophic organisms. The knowledge of the natural production of organohalogens is relatively recent. Up to now there are more then 3800 identified natural organohalogen compounds that have been detected in marine plants, animals, and bacteria and also in terrestrial plants, fungi, lichen, bacteria, insects, some higher animals, and humans. Halogenated organic compounds are commonly considered to be of anthropogenic origin; derived from e.g. pharmaceuticals, herbicides, fungicides, insecticides, flame retardants, intermediates in organic synthesis and solvents. Additionally they are also produced as by-products during industrial processes and by waste water and drinking water disinfection. Organohalogen compounds may be toxic, persistent and/or carcinogenic. In order to understand the source and environmental relevance of naturally produced organobromine compounds in surface waters, the mechanism of the formation was investigated using batch tests with lake water and algae cultures.

  9. Porous calcium carbonate as a carrier material to increase the dissolution rate of poorly soluble flavouring compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundin Johnson, Maria; Noreland, David; Gane, Patrick; Schoelkopf, Joachim; Ridgway, Cathy; Millqvist Fureby, Anna

    2017-04-19

    Two different food grade functionalised porous calcium carbonates (FCC), with different pore size and pore size distributions, were characterised and used as carrier materials to increase the dissolution rate of poorly soluble flavouring compounds in aqueous solution. The loading level was varied between 1.3% by weight (wt%) and 35 wt%, where the upper limit of 35 wt% was the total maximum loading capacity of flavouring compound in FCC based on the fraction of the total weight of FCC plus flavouring compound. Flavouring compounds (l-carvone, vanillin, and curcumin) were selected based on their difference in hydrophilicity and capacity to crystallise. Release kinetic studies revealed that all flavouring compounds showed an accelerated release when loaded in FCC compared to dissolution of the flavouring compound itself in aqueous medium. The amorphous state and/or surface enlargement of the flavouring compound inside or on FCC explains the faster release. The flavouring compounds capable of crystallising (vanillin and curcumin) were almost exclusively amorphous within the porous FCC material as determined by X-ray powder diffraction one week after loading and after storing the loaded FCC material for up to 9 months at room temperature. A small amount of crystalline vanillin and curcumin was detected in the FCC material with large pores and high flavouring compound loading (≥30 wt%). Additionally, two different loading strategies were evaluated, loading by dissolving the flavouring compound in acetone or loading by a hot melt method. Porosimetry data showed that the melt method was more efficient in filling the smallest pores (<100 nm). The main factor influencing the release rate appears to be the amorphous state of the flavouring compound and the increase in exposed surface area. The confinement in small pores prevents crystallisation of the flavouring compounds during storage, providing a stable amorphous form retaining high release rate also after storage.

  10. Thermodynamics of Organic Compound Alteration in Hydrothermal Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shock, E. L.

    2005-12-01

    Organic compounds enter hydrothermal systems through infiltrating surface waters, zones of microbial productivity in the subsurface, extracts of organic matter in surrounding host rocks, and abiotic synthesis. Owing to variations in pH, oxidation state, composition, temperature, and pressure throughout the changing pathways of fluid migration over the duration of the system, organic compounds from all of these sources are introduced to conditions where their relative stabilities and reactivities can be dramatically transformed. If those transformations were predictable, then the extent to which organic alteration reactions have occurred could be used to reveal flowpaths and histories of hydrothermal systems. Speciation and mass transfer calculations permit some insight into the underlying thermodynamic driving forces that result in organic compound alteration. As an example, the speciation of many geochemist's canonical organic matter: CH2O depends strongly on oxidation state, temperature, and total concentration of dissolved organic matter. Calculations show that at oxidation states buffered by iron-bearing mineral assemblages, organic acids dominate the speciation of CH2O throughout hydrothermal systems, with acetic acid (itself equivalent to 2 CH2O by bulk composition) and propanoic acid generally the most abundant compounds. However, at more reduced conditions, which may prevail in organic-rich iron-poor sediments, the drive is to form ketones and especially alcohols at the expense of organic acids. The distribution of organic carbon among the various members of these compound classes is strongly dependent on the total concentration of dissolved organic matter. As an example, at a bulk concentration equivalent to average dissolved organic matter in seawater (45μm), the dominant alcohols at 100°C are small compounds like ethanol and 1-propanol. In contrast, at a higher bulk concentration of 500μm, there is a drive to shift large percentages of dissolved

  11. Molecular characterization of water soluble organic nitrogen in marine rainwater by ultra-high resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altieri, K. E.; Hastings, M. G.; Peters, A. J.; Sigman, D. M.

    2012-04-01

    Atmospheric water soluble organic nitrogen (WSON) is a subset of the complex organic matter in aerosols and rainwater, which impacts cloud condensation processes and aerosol chemical and optical properties and may play a significant role in the biogeochemical cycle of N. However, its sources, composition, connections to inorganic N, and variability are largely unknown. Rainwater samples were collected on the island of Bermuda (32.27° N, 64.87° W), which experiences both anthropogenic and marine influenced air masses. Samples were analyzed by ultra-high resolution electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry to chemically characterize the WSON. Elemental compositions of 2281 N containing compounds were determined over the mass range m/z+ 50 to 500. The five compound classes with the largest number of elemental formulas identified, in order from the highest number of formulas to the lowest, contained carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen (CHON+), CHON compounds that contained sulfur (CHONS+), CHON compounds that contained phosphorus (CHONP+), CHON compounds that contained both sulfur and phosphorus (CHONSP+), and compounds that contained only carbon, hydrogen, and nitrogen (CHN+). Compared to rainwater collected in the continental USA, average O:C ratios of all N containing compound classes were lower in the marine samples whereas double bond equivalent values were higher, suggesting a reduced role of secondary formation mechanisms. Despite their prevalence in continental rainwater, no organonitrates or nitrooxy-organosulfates were detected, but there was an increased presence of organic S and organic P containing compounds in the marine rainwater. Cluster analysis showed a clear chemical distinction between samples collected during the cold season (October to March) which have anthropogenic air mass origins and samples collected during the warm season (April to September) with remote marine air mass origins. This, in

  12. Refuse derived soluble bio-organics enhancing tomato plant growth and productivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sortino, Orazio; Dipasquale, Mauro; Montoneri, Enzo; Tomasso, Lorenzo; Perrone, Daniele G.; Vindrola, Daniela; Negre, Michele; Piccone, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Municipal bio-wastes are a sustainable source of bio-based products. ► Refuse derived soluble bio-organics promote chlorophyll synthesis. ► Refuse derived soluble bio-organics enhance plant growth and fruit ripening rate. ► Sustainable chemistry exploiting urban refuse allows sustainable development. ► Chemistry, agriculture and the environment benefit from biowaste technology. - Abstract: Municipal bio-refuse (CVD), containing kitchen wastes, home gardening residues and public park trimmings, was treated with alkali to yield a soluble bio-organic fraction (SBO) and an insoluble residue. These materials were characterized using elemental analysis, potentiometric titration, and 13C NMR spectroscopy, and then applied as organic fertilizers to soil for tomato greenhouse cultivation. Their performance was compared with a commercial product obtained from animal residues. Plant growth, fruit yield and quality, and soil and leaf chemical composition were the selected performance indicators. The SBO exhibited the best performance by enhancing leaf chlorophyll content, improving plant growth and fruit ripening rate and yield. No product performance-chemical composition relationship could be assessed. Solubility could be one reason for the superior performance of SBO as a tomato growth promoter. The enhancement of leaf chlorophyll content is discussed to identify a possible link with the SBO photosensitizing properties that have been demonstrated in other work, and thus with photosynthetic performance.

  13. Complexation with dissolved organic matter and solubility control of heavy metals in sandy soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weng, L.; Temminghoff, E.J.M.; Lofts, S.; Tipping, E.; Riemsdijk, van W.H.

    2002-01-01

    The complexation of heavy metals with dissolved organic matter (DOM) in the environment influences the solubility and mobility of these metals. In this paper, we measured the complexation of Cu, Cd, Zn, Ni, and Pb with DOM in the soil solution at pH 3.7-6.1 using a Donnan membrane technique. The

  14. Soluble organic carbon and carbon dioxide fluxes in maize fields receiving spring-applied manure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gregorich, E.G.; Rochette, P.; McGuire, S.; Liang, B.C.; Lessard, R.

    1998-01-01

    More than 19 million Mg of dairy manure are produced annually in the Canadian provinces of Quebec and Ontario, and most of it is spread on agricultural fields. Quantitative information on the impact of manure management practices on levels of soluble organic carbon (SOC) and emissions of CO 2 is

  15. Refuse derived soluble bio-organics enhancing tomato plant growth and productivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sortino, Orazio [Dipartimento di Scienze Agronomiche Agrochimiche e delle Produzioni Animali, Universita degli Studi di Catania, Via Valdisavoia 5, 95123 Catania (Italy); Dipasquale, Mauro [Dipartimento di Chimica, Universita di Torino, Via P. Giuria 7, 10125 Torino (Italy); Montoneri, Enzo, E-mail: enzo.montoneri@unito.it [Dipartimento di Chimica, Universita di Torino, Via P. Giuria 7, 10125 Torino (Italy); Tomasso, Lorenzo; Perrone, Daniele G. [Dipartimento di Chimica, Universita di Torino, Via P. Giuria 7, 10125 Torino (Italy); Vindrola, Daniela; Negre, Michele; Piccone, Giuseppe [Dipartimento di Valorizzazione e Protezione delle Risorse Agroforestali, Universita di Torino, Via L. da Vinci 44, 10095 Grugliasco (Italy)

    2012-10-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Municipal bio-wastes are a sustainable source of bio-based products. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Refuse derived soluble bio-organics promote chlorophyll synthesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Refuse derived soluble bio-organics enhance plant growth and fruit ripening rate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sustainable chemistry exploiting urban refuse allows sustainable development. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chemistry, agriculture and the environment benefit from biowaste technology. - Abstract: Municipal bio-refuse (CVD), containing kitchen wastes, home gardening residues and public park trimmings, was treated with alkali to yield a soluble bio-organic fraction (SBO) and an insoluble residue. These materials were characterized using elemental analysis, potentiometric titration, and 13C NMR spectroscopy, and then applied as organic fertilizers to soil for tomato greenhouse cultivation. Their performance was compared with a commercial product obtained from animal residues. Plant growth, fruit yield and quality, and soil and leaf chemical composition were the selected performance indicators. The SBO exhibited the best performance by enhancing leaf chlorophyll content, improving plant growth and fruit ripening rate and yield. No product performance-chemical composition relationship could be assessed. Solubility could be one reason for the superior performance of SBO as a tomato growth promoter. The enhancement of leaf chlorophyll content is discussed to identify a possible link with the SBO photosensitizing properties that have been demonstrated in other work, and thus with photosynthetic performance.

  16. Consumption of a dietary portfolio of cholesterol lowering foods improves blood lipids without affecting concentrations of fat soluble compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramprasath, Vanu R; Jenkins, David J A; Lamarche, Benoit; Kendall, Cyril W C; Faulkner, Dorothea; Cermakova, Luba; Couture, Patrick; Ireland, Chris; Abdulnour, Shahad; Patel, Darshna; Bashyam, Balachandran; Srichaikul, Korbua; de Souza, Russell J; Vidgen, Edward; Josse, Robert G; Leiter, Lawrence A; Connelly, Philip W; Frohlich, Jiri; Jones, Peter J H

    2014-10-18

    Consumption of a cholesterol lowering dietary portfolio including plant sterols (PS), viscous fibre, soy proteins and nuts for 6 months improves blood lipid profile. Plant sterols reduce blood cholesterol by inhibiting intestinal cholesterol absorption and concerns have been raised whether PS consumption reduces fat soluble vitamin absorption. The objective was to determine effects of consumption of a cholesterol lowering dietary portfolio on circulating concentrations of PS and fat soluble vitamins. Using a parallel design study, 351 hyperlipidemic participants from 4 centres across Canada were randomized to 1 of 3 groups. Participants followed dietary advice with control or portfolio diet. Participants on routine and intensive portfolio involved 2 and 7 clinic visits, respectively, over 6 months. No changes in plasma concentrations of α and γ tocopherol, lutein, lycopene and retinol, but decreased β-carotene concentrations were observed with intensive (week 12: p = 0.045; week 24: p = 0.039) and routine (week 12: p = 0.031; week 24: p = 0.078) portfolio groups compared to control. However, cholesterol adjusted β-carotene and fat soluble compound concentrations were not different compared to control. Plasma PS concentrations were increased with intensive (campesterol:p = 0.012; β-sitosterol:p = 0.035) and routine (campesterol: p = 0.034; β-sitosterol: p = 0.080) portfolio groups compared to control. Plasma cholesterol-adjusted campesterol and β-sitosterol concentrations were negatively correlated (p portfolio diet reduces serum total and LDL-C levels while increasing PS values, without altering fat soluble compounds concentrations. The extent of increments of PS with the current study are not deleterious and also maintaining optimum levels of fat soluble vitamins are of paramount necessity to maintain overall metabolism and health. Results indicate portfolio diet as one of the best options for CVD risk reduction

  17. Water-soluble atmospheric organic matter in fog: exact masses and chemical formula identification by ultrahigh-resolution fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzoleni, Lynn R; Ehrmann, Brandie M; Shen, Xinhua; Marshall, Alan G; Collett, Jeffrey L

    2010-05-15

    The detailed molecular composition of water-soluble atmospheric organic matter (AOM) contained in fog water was studied by use of electrospray ionization ultrahigh-resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. We identified 1368 individual molecular masses in the range of 100-400 Da from negative-ion spectra obtained after reversed-phase extraction with a hydrophilic solid phase sorbent. The detected organic anions are multifunctional with a variety of oxygenated functional groups. We observe organic nitrogen, organic sulfur, and organic nitrogen-sulfur compounds as well as many species with only C, H, and O elemental composition. Analysis of the double bond equivalents (DBE = the number of rings plus the number of double bonds to carbon) suggests that these compound structures range from highly aliphatic to aromatic with DBE values of 1-11. The compounds range in their extent of oxidation with oxygen to carbon ratios from 0.2 to 2 with an average value of 0.43. Several homologous series of compounds and multifunctional oligomers were identified in this AOM. The high extent of homologous series of compounds likely originates from primary components that have become oxidized. The multifunctional oligomers appear to represent atmospheric processing of primary and secondary compounds. The isolated water-soluble components identified here are amphiphilic, meaning that they contain both hydrophilic oxygenated functional groups and hydrophobic aliphatic and aromatic structural moieties. Despite the high number of compounds with very high oxygen content, 60% of assigned chemical formulas have measured organic mass-to-organic carbon ratios

  18. Description, Properties, and Degradation of Selected Volatile Organic Compounds Detected in Ground Water--A Review of Selected Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Stephen J.

    2006-01-01

    This report provides abridged information describing the most salient properties and biodegradation of 27 chlorinated volatile organic compounds detected during ground-water studies in the United States. This information is condensed from an extensive list of reports, papers, and literature published by the U.S. Government, various State governments, and peer-reviewed journals. The list includes literature reviews, compilations, and summaries describing volatile organic compounds in ground water. This report cross-references common names and synonyms associated with volatile organic compounds with the naming conventions supported by the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry. In addition, the report describes basic physical characteristics of those compounds such as Henry's Law constant, water solubility, density, octanol-water partition (log Kow), and organic carbon partition (log Koc) coefficients. Descriptions and illustrations are provided for natural and laboratory biodegradation rates, chemical by-products, and degradation pathways.

  19. Size distributions and chemical characterization of water-soluble organic aerosols over the western North Pacific in summer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Yuzo; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Sawano, Maki

    2010-12-01

    Size-segregated aerosol samples were collected over the western North Pacific in summer 2008 to investigate marine biological contribution to organic aerosols. The samples were analyzed for organic carbon (OC), water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC), and water-soluble organic compounds including diacids (C2-C9), ω-oxocarboxylic acids, and α-dicarbonyls as well as methanesulfonic acid (MSA). The average concentrations of OC and oxalic acid (C2) were approximately two to three times larger in marine biologically more influenced aerosols, defined by the concentrations of MSA and azelaic acid (C9), than in less influenced aerosols. WSOC, which showed a statistically significant correlation with MSA, accounted for 15-21% of total mass of the components determined in the submicrometer range of biologically more influenced aerosols. These values are comparable to those of water-insoluble organic carbon (WIOC) (˜14-23%), suggesting that organic aerosols in this region are enriched in secondary organic aerosols (SOA) linked to oceanic biological activity. In these aerosols, substantial fractions of C2-C4 diacids were found in the submicrometer size range. Positive correlations of oxalic acid with C3-C5 diacids and glyoxylic acid suggest that secondary production of oxalic acid occurs possibly in the aqueous aerosol phase via the oxidation of longer-chain diacids and glyoxylic acid in the oceanic region with higher biological productivity. We found similar concentration levels and size distributions of methylglyoxal between the two types of aerosols, suggesting that formation of oxalic acid via the oxidation of methylglyoxal from marine isoprene is insignificant in the study region.

  20. Organic radionuclide compounds in soil solutions and their role in elements absorption in plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agapkin, G.I.; Tikhomirov, F.A.

    1991-01-01

    The results of reference experiments with introduction of radioactive labels ( 35 S, 45 Ca, 59 Fe, 85 , 125 I) into 5 types of climatophytic soils by the method of radiogel-chromatography allow to ascertain that in soil solutions 59 Fe and 125 I incorporate completely and 35 S, 45 Ca and 85 Sr incorporate by 60-90 % into the composition of one of three fractions of organic compounds with molecular masses of 4x10 2 -6x10 4 . It is shown that significant variations between soils in the absorption of such radionuclides as 4 5 Ca, 58 Fe, 85 Sr and 125 I are celated to a different degree of their transport into soil solutions as well as to differencies in their distribution by molecular-mass fractions of water-soluble organic compounds

  1. Water-soluble phenolic compounds produced from extractive ammonia pretreatment exerted binary inhibitory effects on yeast fermentation using synthetic hydrolysate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Saisi; Jones, A. Daniel; Sousa, Leonardo; Piotrowski, Jeff; Jin, Mingjie; Sarks, Cory; Dale, Bruce E.

    2018-01-01

    Biochemical conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to liquid fuels requires pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis of the biomass to produce fermentable sugars. Degradation products produced during thermochemical pretreatment, however, inhibit the microbes with regard to both ethanol yield and cell growth. In this work, we used synthetic hydrolysates (SynH) to study the inhibition of yeast fermentation by water-soluble components (WSC) isolated from lignin streams obtained after extractive ammonia pretreatment (EA). We found that SynH with 20g/L WSC mimics real hydrolysate in cell growth, sugar consumption and ethanol production. However, a long lag phase was observed in the first 48 h of fermentation of SynH, which is not observed during fermentation with the crude extraction mixture. Ethyl acetate extraction was conducted to separate phenolic compounds from other water-soluble components. These phenolic compounds play a key inhibitory role during ethanol fermentation. The most abundant compounds were identified by Liquid Chromatography followed by Mass Spectrometry (LC-MS) and Gas Chromatography followed by Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS), including coumaroyl amide, feruloyl amide and coumaroyl glycerol. Chemical genomics profiling was employed to fingerprint the gene deletion response of yeast to different groups of inhibitors in WSC and AFEX-Pretreated Corn Stover Hydrolysate (ACSH). The sensitive/resistant genes cluster patterns for different fermentation media revealed their similarities and differences with regard to degradation compounds. PMID:29543873

  2. Thin films of metal-organic compounds and metal nanoparticle

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Thin films of metal-organic compounds and metal nanoparticle-embedded polymers for nonlinear optical applications. S Philip Anthony Shatabdi Porel D ... Thin films based on two very different metal-organic systems are developed and some nonlinear optical applications are explored. A family of zinc complexes which ...

  3. On the enrichment of hydrophobic organic compounds in fog droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valsaraj, K. T.; Thoma, G. J.; Reible, D. D.; Thibodeaux, L. J.

    The unusual degree of enrichment of hydrophobic organics in fogwater droplets reported by several investigators can be interpreted as a result of (a) the effects of temperature correction on the reported enrichment factors, (b) the effects of colloidal organic matter (both filterable and non-filterable) in fog water and (c) the effects of the large air-water interfacial adsorption of neutral hydrophobic organics on the tiny fog droplets. The enrichment factor was directly correlated to the hydrophobicity (or the activity coefficient in water) of the compounds, as indicated by their octanol-water partition constants. Compounds with large octanol-water partition coefficients (high activity coefficients in water) showed the largest enrichment. Available experimental data on the adsorption of hydrophobic compounds at the air-water interface and on colloidal organic carbon were used to show that the large specific air-water interfacial areas of fog droplets contribute significantly to the enrichment factor.

  4. Inherent organic compounds in biochar--Their content, composition and potential toxic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buss, Wolfram; Mašek, Ondřej; Graham, Margaret; Wüst, Dominik

    2015-06-01

    Pyrolysis liquids consist of thermal degradation products of biomass in various stages of its decomposition. Therefore, if biochar gets affected by re-condensed pyrolysis liquids it is likely to contain a huge variety of organic compounds. In this study the chemical composition of such compounds associated with two contaminated, high-volatile organic compound (VOC) biochars were investigated and compared with those for a low-VOC biochar. The water-soluble organic compounds with the highest concentrations in the two high-VOC biochars were acetic, formic, butyric and propionic acids; methanol, phenol, o-, m- and p-cresol, and 2,4-dimethylphenol, all with concentrations over 100 μg g(-1). The concentrations of 16 US EPA PAHs determined by 36 h toluene extractions were 6.09 μg g(-1) for the low-VOC biochar. For high-VOC biochar the total concentrations were 53.42 μg g(-1) and 27.89 μg g(-1), while concentrations of water-soluble PAHs ranged from 1.5 to 2 μg g(-1). Despite the concentrations of PAHs exceeding biochar guideline values, it was concluded that, for these particular biochars, the biggest concern for application to soil would be the co-occurrence of VOCs such as low molecular weight (LMW) organic acids and phenols, as these can be highly mobile and have a high potential to cause phytotoxic effects. Therefore, based on results of this study we strongly suggest for VOCs to be included among criteria for assessment of biochar quality. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Levels of Organic Compounds, Number of Microorganisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majewska, Małgorzata; Słomka, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the microbiological, biochemical and physiological aspects of phytoremediation of soil and water environments polluted to different degrees with heavy metals has very important theoretical and practical implications. In this study, a comparison was made between total cadmium concentration in root and shoot tissues as well as concentrations of particular fractions of Cd immobilized by roots of Festuca ovina (Sheep’s fescue) hydroponically cultivated in nutrient solutions supplemented with 1 μg Cd ml(–1) and those cultivated at 10 μg Cd ml(–1). After three weeks of F. ovina cultivation, the number of bacterial CFU and the amounts of organic chelators, siderophores, proteins and reducing sugars in the growth medium and on the root surface were higher at 10 than at 1 μg Cd ml(–1). The grass also reacted to the high Cd concentration by a decrease in plant growth and dehydrogenase activity in root tissues. The concentration of Cd determined in fractions bound with different strength in roots was significantly dependent on Cd concentration in the growth medium. When the plants were grown at 1 μg Cd ml(–1), 9% of the immobilized cadmium was loosely bound to the root surface, 20% was exchangeable adsorbed, and 28% was bound by chelation; at 10 μg Cd ml(–1), the respective values were 12%, 25%, and 20%. About 43% of the immobilized cadmium remained in roots after sequential extraction, and bioaccumulation factors in shoots had the same values independently of Cd concentration. At both Cd concentrations, the cadmium translocation index for F. ovina was low (< 1), which is why this grass can be recommended for phytostabilization of the metal under study.

  6. A framework for API solubility modelling

    OpenAIRE

    Conte, Elisa; Gani, Rafiqul; Crafts, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The solubility of solid organic compounds in water and organic solvents is a fundamental thermodynamic property for many purposes such as product-process design and optimization, for the chemical and pharmaceutical industry. Experimental literature solubility data are usually scarce and temperature-dependent measurements are expensive in terms of time and resources. The few available data are badly organized and difficult to use for fast solubility calculations and solvent screening. Availabl...

  7. Hygroscopic growth of water soluble organic carbon isolated from atmospheric aerosol collected at US national parks and Storm Peak Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Nathan F.; Collins, Don R.; Lowenthal, Douglas H.; McCubbin, Ian B.; Gannet Hallar, A.; Samburova, Vera; Zielinska, Barbara; Kumar, Naresh; Mazzoleni, Lynn R.

    2017-02-01

    Due to the atmospheric abundance and chemical complexity of water soluble organic carbon (WSOC), its contribution to the hydration behavior of atmospheric aerosol is both significant and difficult to assess. For the present study, the hygroscopicity and CCN activity of isolated atmospheric WSOC particulate matter was measured without the compounding effects of common, soluble inorganic aerosol constituents. WSOC was extracted with high purity water from daily high-volume PM2.5 filter samples and separated from water soluble inorganic constituents using solid-phase extraction. The WSOC filter extracts were concentrated and combined to provide sufficient mass for continuous generation of the WSOC-only aerosol over the combined measurement time of the tandem differential mobility analyzer and coupled scanning mobility particle sizer-CCN counter used for the analysis. Aerosol samples were taken at Great Smoky Mountains National Park during the summer of 2006 and fall-winter of 2007-2008; Mount Rainier National Park during the summer of 2009; Storm Peak Laboratory (SPL) near Steamboat Springs, Colorado, during the summer of 2010; and Acadia National Park during the summer of 2011. Across all sampling locations and seasons, the hygroscopic growth of WSOC samples at 90 % RH, expressed in terms of the hygroscopicity parameter, κ, ranged from 0.05 to 0.15. Comparisons between the hygroscopicity of WSOC and that of samples containing all soluble materials extracted from the filters implied a significant modification of the hydration behavior of inorganic components, including decreased hysteresis separating efflorescence and deliquescence and enhanced water uptake between 30 and 70 % RH.

  8. Improving rubber concrete by waste organic sulfur compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Liang-Hisng; Lin, Chun-Nan; Lu, Chun-Ku; Lee, Cheng-Haw; Lee, Maw-Tien

    2010-01-01

    In this study, the use of crumb tyres as additives to concrete was investigated. For some time, researchers have been studying the physical properties of concrete to determine why the inclusion of rubber particles causes the concrete to degrade. Several methods have been developed to improve the bonding between rubber particles and cement hydration products (C-S-H) with the hope of creating a product with an improvement in mechanical strength. In this study, the crumb tyres were treated with waste organic sulfur compounds from a petroleum refining factory in order to modify their surface properties. Organic sulfur compounds with amphiphilic properties can enhance the hydrophilic properties of the rubber and increase the intermolecular interaction forces between rubber and C-S-H. In the present study, a colloid probe of C-S-H was prepared to measure these intermolecular interaction forces by utilizing an atomic force microscope. Experimental results showed that rubber particles treated with waste organic sulfur compounds became more hydrophilic. In addition, the intermolecular interaction forces increased with the adsorption of waste organic sulfur compounds on the surface of the rubber particles. The compressive, tensile and flexural strengths of concrete samples that included rubber particles treated with organic sulfur compound also increased significantly.

  9. Partition coefficients of organic compounds in lipid-water systems and correlations with fish bioconcentration factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiou, C.T.

    1985-01-01

    Triolein-water partition coefficients (KtW) have been determined for 38 slightly water-soluble organic compounds, and their magnitudes have been compared with the corresponding octanol-water partition coefficients (KOW). In the absence of major solvent-solute interaction effects in the organic solvent phase, the conventional treatment (based on Raoult's law) predicts sharply lower partition coefficients for most of the solutes in triolein because of its considerably higher molecular weight, whereas the Flory-Huggins treatment predicts higher partition coefficients with triolein. The data are in much better agreement with the Flory-Huggins model. As expected from the similarity in the partition coefficients, the water solubility (which was previously found to be the major determinant of the KOW) is also the major determinant for the Ktw. When the published BCF values (bioconcentration factors) of organic compounds in fish are based on the lipid content rather than on total mass, they are approximately equal to the Ktw, which suggests at least near equilibrium for solute partitioning between water and fish lipid. The close correlation between Ktw and Kow suggests that Kow is also a good predictor for lipid-water partition coefficients and bioconcentration factors.

  10. Use of Bromine and Bromo-Organic Compounds in Organic Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saikia, Indranirekha; Borah, Arun Jyoti; Phukan, Prodeep

    2016-06-22

    Bromination is one of the most important transformations in organic synthesis and can be carried out using bromine and many other bromo compounds. Use of molecular bromine in organic synthesis is well-known. However, due to the hazardous nature of bromine, enormous growth has been witnessed in the past several decades for the development of solid bromine carriers. This review outlines the use of bromine and different bromo-organic compounds in organic synthesis. The applications of bromine, a total of 107 bromo-organic compounds, 11 other brominating agents, and a few natural bromine sources were incorporated. The scope of these reagents for various organic transformations such as bromination, cohalogenation, oxidation, cyclization, ring-opening reactions, substitution, rearrangement, hydrolysis, catalysis, etc. has been described briefly to highlight important aspects of the bromo-organic compounds in organic synthesis.

  11. Host compounds for red phosphorescent OLEDs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, Chuanjun; Cheon, Kwang -Ohk

    2015-08-25

    Novel compounds containing a triphenylene moiety linked to an .alpha..beta. connected binaphthyl ring system are provided. These compounds have surprisingly good solubility in organic solvents and are useful as host compounds in red phosphorescent OLEDs.

  12. A method for separating water soluble organics from a process stream by aqueous biphasic extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaiko, David J.; Mego, William A.

    1997-12-01

    The present invention relates to a method for separating water-miscible organic species from a process stream by aqueous biphasic extraction. In particular, the method includes extracting the organic species into a polymer-rich phase of an aqueous biphase system in which the process stream comprises the salt-rich phase, and, next, separating the polymer from the extracted organic species by contacting the loaded, polymer-rich phase with a water-immiscible organic phase. Alternatively, the polymer can be separated from the extracted organic species by raising the temperature of the loaded, polymer-rich phase above the cloud point, such that the polymer and the water-soluble organic species separate into two distinct aqueous phases. In either case, a substantially salt-free, concentrated aqueous solution containing the organic species is recovered.

  13. Solubility measurement of iron-selenium compounds under reducing conditions. Research document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitamura, Akira; Shibata, Masahiro

    2003-03-01

    Chemical behavior of selenium (Se), which was one of the important elements for performance assessment of geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste, was investigated under reducing and iron-containing conditions. A washing method for an iron diselenide (FeSe 2 (cr)) reagent with acidic and basic solutions (0.1 and 1 M HCl and 1 M NaOH) was carried out for the purification of FeSe 2 reagent, which was considered to be a solubility limiting solid for Se under the geological disposal conditions. Furthermore, solubility of FeSe 2 (cr) was measured in alkaline solution (pH: 11 - 13) under reducing conditions (E h vs SHE: -0.4 - 0 V), and thermodynamic data on equilibrium reactions between Se in solution and Se precipitate were obtained. The dependencies of solubility values on pH and redox potential (E h : vs. standard hydrogen electrode) were best interpreted that the solubility limiting solid was not FeSe 2 (cr) but Se(cr) and the aqueous species was SeO 3 2- in the present experimental conditions. The equilibrium constant between Se(cr) and SeO 3 2- at zero ionic strength was determined and compared with literature values. The chemical behavior of Se under geological disposal conditions was discussed. (author)

  14. Soluble Antioxidant Compounds Regenerate the Antioxidants Bound to Insoluble Parts of Foods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Celik, E.E.; Gökmen, V.; Fogliano, V.

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the regeneration potential of antioxidant capacity of an insoluble food matrix. Investigations were performed in vitro with several food matrices rich in dietary fiber (DF) and bound antioxidants. After removal of the soluble fraction, the antioxidant capacity (AC) of

  15. Organic compounds in the particulate matter from burning organic soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles K. McMahon; Jerry D. White; Skevos N. Tsoukalas

    1985-01-01

    This paper is directed to people interested in the environmental impact of natural emissions. Natural emissions are common and contribute significantly to tropospheric background levels. Several million hectares of the United States are covered by organic soils. During droughts, these soils can ignite and support slow combustion which often persists for weeks causing...

  16. Organic compounds inhibiting S. epidermidis adhesion and biofilm formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qin, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Jingdong; Hu, Yifan

    2009-01-01

    . epidermidis infections by preventing or eradicating biofilm formation of the bacterium is therefore a medically important challenge. We report here a study of biofilm formation of S. epidermidis on solid surfaces using a combination of confocal laser scanning (CLSM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) in both...... air and aqueous environments. We have investigated the inhibitory effects of surfaces treated with four organic compounds, two benzoate derivatives denoted as compound 59 and 75 and two carboxamicle derivatives denoted as compound 47 and 73, on S. epidermidis adhesion and biofilm formation. All four...

  17. Nonspecific organic compounds in peat soils of the Subpolar Urals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nizovtsev, N. A.; Kholodov, V. A.; Ivanov, V. A.; Farkhodov, Yu. R.; Dymov, A. A.

    2017-09-01

    Specific features of organic matter, molecular composition and distribution of oxygen-containing nonspecific organic compounds (fatty acids, long-chain aliphatic alcohols, and ketones) were revealed in two peat soils on slopes of the Subpolar Urals: the eutrophic peat soil of the spring mire (Hemic Histosols) and the peat soil of a slope mire (Fibric Histosols). Compounds that can serve as molecular markers for some evolutionary stages of peats were determined for this area. Based on the data obtained, the most probable causes of differences in the composition of organic compounds in the peats studied were found to be the following: environmental conditions, water and mineral regime of bog, and differences in the composition of peat-forming plants.

  18. Environmentally friendly synthesis of organic-soluble silver nanoparticles for printed electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kwi Jong; Jun, Byung Ho; Choi, Junrak; Lee, Young Il; Joung, Jaewoo; Oh, Yong Soo

    2007-01-01

    In this study, we attempted to synthesize organic-soluble silver nanoparticles in the concentrated organic phase with an environmentally friendly method. The fully organic phase system contains silver acetate as a silver precursor, oleic acid as both a medium and a capping molecule, and tin acetate as a reducing agent. Monodisperse silver nanoparticles with average diameters of ca. 5 nm can be easily synthesized at large scale. Only a small usage of tin acetate ( 90%). Also, it was investigated that the residual tin atom does not exist in the synthesized silver nanoparticles. This implied that tin acetate acts as a reducing catalyst

  19. Radiolytic formation of organic iodides from organic compounds released from ripolin paint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attia, S.; Evans, G.J.

    2002-01-01

    The impact of a serious nuclear reactor accident is governed to a large extent by the possible release of airborne organic iodides to the environment. This research examines the identification and behavior of organic iodides formed in the containment due to the release of organic compounds from Ripolin paint, into the aqueous phase, following a nuclear reactor accident. A bench scale apparatus installed in the irradiation chamber of a Gammacell was used to analyze the formation of organic iodides. Iodo-organics, transferred to the gas phase above irradiated aqueous samples, were analyzed using a Thermal Desorption method coupled with gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. Detailed studies of the identity of the organic compounds released and the organic iodides formed were conducted. The effects of parameters such as irradiation dose were also examined. All the organic iodides formed, under radiolytic conditions, were identified as iodo-alkanes. The organic compounds that were released from the Ripolin paint, such as methyl isobutyl ketone, were found to decompose, by a series of reactions, to produce the organic iodides. The precursor organic compounds and the organic iodides formed were observed to consist of the same alkyl group. These results indicate that organic compounds released from surface paints directly influence the formation of radiolytic organic iodide. (author)

  20. Hygroscopic growth and critical supersaturations for mixed aerosol particles of inorganic and organic compounds of atmospheric relevance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Svenningsson

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The organic fraction of atmospheric aerosols contains a multitude of compounds and usually only a small fraction can be identified and quantified. However, a limited number of representative organic compounds can be used to describe the water-soluble organic fraction. In this work, initiated within the EU 5FP project SMOCC, four mixtures containing various amounts of inorganic salts (ammonium sulfate, ammonium nitrate, and sodium chloride and three model organic compounds (levoglucosan, succinic acid and fulvic acid were studied. The interaction between water vapor and aerosol particles was studied at different relative humidities: at subsaturation using a hygroscopic tandem differential mobility analyzer (H-TDMA and at supersaturation using a cloud condensation nuclei spectrometer (CCN spectrometer. Surface tensions as a function of carbon concentrations were measured using a bubble tensiometer. Parameterizations of water activity as a function of molality, based on hygroscopic growth, are given for the pure organic compounds and for the mixtures, indicating van't Hoff factors around 1 for the organics. The Zdanovskii-Stokes-Robinson (ZSR mixing rule was tested on the hygroscopic growth of the mixtures and it was found to adequately explain the hygroscopic growth for 3 out of 4 mixtures, when the limited solubility of succinic acid is taken into account. One mixture containing sodium chloride was studied and showed a pronounced deviation from the ZSR mixing rule. Critical supersaturations calculated using the parameterizations of water activity and the measured surface tensions were compared with those determined experimentally.

  1. Volatile organic compounds and oxides of nitrogen. Further emission reductions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Froste, H. [comp.

    1996-12-31

    This report presents the current status in relation to achievement of the Swedish Environmental target set by Parliament to reduce emission of volatile organic compounds by 50 per cent between 1988 and 2000. It also instructed the Agency to formulate proposed measures to achieve a 50 per cent reduction of emission of nitrogen oxides between 1985 and 2005. The report presents an overall account of emission trends for volatile organic compounds (from all sectors) and nitrogen oxides (from the industry sector) and steps proposed to achieve further emission reductions. 43 refs

  2. Inventory of volatile organic compound emissions in Finland, 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mroueh, U.M.

    1988-01-01

    The aim of the study was to compile an inventory of the emissions of volatile organic compounds in Finland for the year 1985. The report was prepared for the ECE Task Force on Emissions of Volatile Organic Compounds from Stationary Sources according to the classification given by the Task Force. It considers anthropogenic as well as natural sources. Mobile sources are excluded. The quantities as well as the main components are listed, as far as possible. The values given exclude methane which according to the present understanding is regarded as unreactive

  3. Removal of organic pollutants by surfactant modified zeolite: Comparison between ionizable phenolic compounds and non-ionizable organic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Jie; Meng, Wenna [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, No. 800, Dongchuan Rd., Shanghai 200240 (China); Wu, Deyi, E-mail: dywu@sjtu.edu.cn [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, No. 800, Dongchuan Rd., Shanghai 200240 (China); Zhang, Zhenjia; Kong, Hainan [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, No. 800, Dongchuan Rd., Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Surfactant modified zeolite could greatly retain organic pollutants. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Uptake of organic compounds was due to the loaded surfactant. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer k{sub ow} is crucial for the uptake of both ionizable and non-ionizable organic solutes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer pK{sub a} is another factor affecting adsorption process of ionizable organic pollutants. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adsorption mechanisms of the two kinds of organic pollutants were proposed. - Abstract: The aim of this study was to examine the adsorption capability and mechanism of hexadecyltrimethylammonium modified zeolite, which was synthesized from coal fly ash, for the removal of ionizable phenolic compounds (phenol, p-chlorophenol and bisphenol A, with different pK{sub a}) and non-ionizable organic compounds (aniline, nitrobenzene, and naphthalene, with different hydrophobicity). The obtained zeolite was identified as type Na-P1 (Na{sub 6}Al{sub 6}Si{sub 10}O{sub 32}{center_dot}12H{sub 2}O, JCPDS code 39-0219), which is classified into the gismondine group with a pore size of 3.1 Angstrom-Sign Multiplication-Sign 4.5 Angstrom-Sign [1 0 0] and 2.8 Angstrom-Sign Multiplication-Sign 4.8 Angstrom-Sign [1 0 1]. The adsorption of the two kinds of organic compounds was due to loaded surfactant bilayer because modified zeolite showed great ability for the removal of organic chemicals while little adsorption by zeolite was observed. The isotherm data of ionizable compounds fitted well to the Langmuir model but those of non-ionizable chemicals followed a linear equation. Uptake of ionizable compounds depended greatly on pH, increasing at alkaline pH conditions. In contrary, adsorption of non-ionizable chemicals was essentially the same at all pH levels studied. The adsorption of both kinds of organic compounds correlated well to k{sub ow} value, suggesting that more hydrophobic organic contaminants are more easily retained

  4. Determination of the solubility of Np(IV), Pu(III) - (VI),Am(III) - (VI), and Te(IV), (V) hydroxo compounds in 0.5 - 14 M NaOH solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delegard, C.H.

    1996-09-24

    The solubilities of Am(III), Np(IV), Pu(IV), Tc(IV), Np(V), Pu(V), Am(V), and Tc(V) hydroxo compounds were studied in 0.5 to 14 M NaOH solutions at 25{+-}2 {degrees}C. The effects of fluoride, phosphate, carbonate, oxalate, and some other organic complexing agents on the solubilities of Np(IV), Pu(IV), and TC(IV) hydroxides were investigated at 1.0 and 4.0 M NAOH. Some predictions were made on the dissolved (I.V) and (V) species present in alkali solutions.

  5. Effects of organic matters coming from Chinese tea on soluble copper release from copper teapot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ni Lixiao; Li Shiyin

    2008-01-01

    The morphology and elemental composition of the corrosion products of copper teapot's inner-surface were characterized by the scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray surface analysis (SEM/EDS), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photon spectroscopy (XPS) analysis. It was revealed that Cu, Fe, Ca, P, Si and Al were the main elements of corrosion by-products, and the α-SiO 2 , Cu 2 O and CaCO 3 as the main mineral components on the inner-surface of copper teapot. The effects of organic matters coming from Chinese tea on soluble copper release from copper teapots in tap water were also investigated. The results showed that the doses of organic matter (as TOC), temperate and stagnation time have significant effects on the concentration of soluble copper released from copper teapots in tap water

  6. Removal of organic pollutants by surfactant modified zeolite: comparison between ionizable phenolic compounds and non-ionizable organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jie; Meng, Wenna; Wu, Deyi; Zhang, Zhenjia; Kong, Hainan

    2012-09-15

    The aim of this study was to examine the adsorption capability and mechanism of hexadecyltrimethylammonium modified zeolite, which was synthesized from coal fly ash, for the removal of ionizable phenolic compounds (phenol, p-chlorophenol and bisphenol A, with different pK(a)) and non-ionizable organic compounds (aniline, nitrobenzene, and naphthalene, with different hydrophobicity). The obtained zeolite was identified as type Na-P1 (Na(6)Al(6)Si(10)O(32)·12H(2)O, JCPDS code 39-0219), which is classified into the gismondine group with a pore size of 3.1 Å × 4.5 Å [100] and 2.8 Å × 4.8 Å [101]. The adsorption of the two kinds of organic compounds was due to loaded surfactant bilayer because modified zeolite showed great ability for the removal of organic chemicals while little adsorption by zeolite was observed. The isotherm data of ionizable compounds fitted well to the Langmuir model but those of non-ionizable chemicals followed a linear equation. Uptake of ionizable compounds depended greatly on pH, increasing at alkaline pH conditions. In contrary, adsorption of non-ionizable chemicals was essentially the same at all pH levels studied. The adsorption of both kinds of organic compounds correlated well to k(ow) value, suggesting that more hydrophobic organic contaminants are more easily retained by modified zeolite. Based on the different adsorption behavior, the uptake of non-ionizable pollutants was thought to be a single partitioning process into the surfactant bilayer. For ionizable compounds, however, interaction of the phenol group(s) with the positively charged "head" of surfactant additionally functions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Potential influence of organic compounds on the transport of radionuclides from a geologic repository. Assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silviera, D.J.

    1981-03-01

    This study identifies organic compounds that may be present in a repository and outlines plausible interactions and mechanisms that may influence the forms and chemical behavior of these compounds. A review of the literature indicates that large quantities of organic radioactive wastes are generated by the nuclear industry and if placed in a repository could increase or decrease the leach rate and sorption characteristics of waste radionuclides. The association of radionuclides with organic matter can render the nuclides soluble or insoluble depending on the particular nuclide and such parameters as the pH, Eh, and temperature of the hydrogeologic system as well as the properties of the organic compounds themselves. 44 references.

  8. Potential influence of organic compounds on the transport of radionuclides from a geologic repository. Assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silviera, D.J.

    1981-03-01

    This study identifies organic compounds that may be present in a repository and outlines plausible interactions and mechanisms that may influence the forms and chemical behavior of these compounds. A review of the literature indicates that large quantities of organic radioactive wastes are generated by the nuclear industry and if placed in a repository could increase or decrease the leach rate and sorption characteristics of waste radionuclides. The association of radionuclides with organic matter can render the nuclides soluble or insoluble depending on the particular nuclide and such parameters as the pH, Eh, and temperature of the hydrogeologic system as well as the properties of the organic compounds themselves. 44 references

  9. Solubility and solution thermodynamics of 2-methyl-6-nitroaniline in ten organic solvents at elevated temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cong, Yang; Wang, Jian; Du, Cunbin; Han, Shuo; Zhao, Hongkun

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Solubility of 2-methyl-6-nitroaniline in ten solvents were determined. • The solubility were correlated with four thermodynamic models. • Standard dissolution enthalpy and excess enthalpy of the solutions were computed. - Abstract: Knowledge of solubility for 2-methyl-6-nitroaniline in different solvents is essential for its purification and further theoretical studies. In this paper, the solid-liquid equilibrium for 2-methyl-6-nitroaniline in ten pure organic solvents (methanol, ethanol, n-propanol, isopropanol, toluene, ethyl acetate, acetonitrile, acetone, cyclohexane and 1,4-dioxane) was established using the isothermal saturation method at temperatures T = (278.15–313.15) K under pressure of 101.2 kPa, and the solubility of 2-methyl-6-nitroaniline in these solvents were determined by a high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). In general, the mole fraction solubility followed the following order from high to low in different solvents: 1,4-dioxane (0.1799–0.3390) > acetone (0.1128–0.3010) > ethyl acetate (0.08414–0.2654) > acetonitrile (0.04179–0.2027) > toluene (0.02367–0.1104) > n-propanol (0.01080–0.04514) > ethanol (0.01020–0.04202) > isopropanol (0.008595–0.03763) > methanol (0.007391–0.03198) > cyclohexane (0.001027–0.005617). The modified Apelblat equation, λh equation, Wilson model and NRTL model were employed to correlate the measured solubility data of 2-methyl-6-nitroaniline in the selected solvents. Results indicated that the largest values of RAD and RMSD acquired by the four models were less than 0.76% and 9.13 × 10 −4 , respectively. The modified Apelblat equation provided better results than the other three models. Furthermore, the standard dissolution enthalpy and excess enthalpy of the solutions were computed from the solubility values. The standard dissolution enthalpies vary within the range from (14.88 to 45.57) kJ·mol −1 and are all positive, the dissolution process of 2-methyl-6

  10. Analysis of Organic Compounds in Mars Analog Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahaffy, P. R.; Brinckerhoff, W. B.; Buch, A.; Cabane, M.; Coll, P.; Demick, J.; Glavin, D. P.

    2004-01-01

    The detailed characterization of organic compounds that might be preserved in rocks, ices, or sedimentary layers on Mars would be a significant step toward resolving the question of the habitability and potential for life on that planet. The fact that the Viking gas chromatograph mass spectrometer (GCMS) did not detect organic compounds should not discourage further investigations since (a) an oxidizing environment in the near surface fines analyzed by Viking is likely to have destroyed many reduced carbon species; (b) there are classes of refractory or partially oxidized species such as carboxylic acids that would not have been detected by the Viking GCMS; and (c) the Viking landing sites are not representative of Mars overall. These factors motivate the development of advanced in situ analytical protocols to carry out a comprehensive survey of organic compounds in martian regolith, ices, and rocks. We combine pyrolysis GCMS for analysis of volatile species, chemical derivatization for transformation of less volatile organics, and laser desorption mass spectrometry (LDMS) for analysis of elements and more refractory, higher-mass organics. To evaluate this approach and enable a comparison with other measurement techniques we analyze organics in Mars simulant samples.

  11. Organic phenyl arsonic acid compounds with potent antileukemic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xing-Ping; Narla, Rama Krishna; Uckun, Fatih M

    2003-02-10

    A series of 12 organic arsonic acid compounds has been synthesized and evaluated against human B-lineage (NALM-6) and T-lineage (MOLT-3) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cell lines. The lead compounds 2-trichloromethyl-4-[4'-(4"-phenylazo)phenylarsonic acid]aminoquinazoline (compound 19, PHI-P518; IC(50)=1.1+/-0.5 microM against NALM-6 and 2.0+/-0.8 microM against MOLT-3) and 2-methylthio-4-(2'-phenylarsonic acid)aminopyrimidine (compound 15, PHI-P381; IC(50)=1.5+/-0.3 microM against NALM-6 and 2.3+/-0.5 microM against MOLT-3) exhibited potent antileukemic activity at low micromolar concentrations.

  12. Organic compounds with high Ni content: Effects on soil and strawberry production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís F. Roveda

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The use of organic residues can improve soil chemical and physical conditions and plant growth. However, these residues often contain heavy metals that can interfere with growth. Here, a pot experiment was performed to compare the effects of organic compound (OC containing a high nickel (Ni load with those of a mineral Ni source (NiCl2, a soluble salt on the production, quality and nutritional status of strawberry and on soil chemistry. Six dosages of Ni (0, 9, 18, 36, 72 and 144 mg kg-1 were added to the soil using both OC and NiCl2. The use of high-Ni OC resulted in increased productivity and fruit weight, whereas the soluble NiCl2 salt caused reduction in fruit weight. Application of NiCl2 at concentrations >18 mg kg-1 also caused internerval chlorosis on leaves, suggesting that strawberry is highly sensitive to Ni. The mineral Ni source was almost 15-fold more effective than the organic source at increasing leaf Ni content. Application of OC caused an increase of organic matter, Ca, sum of bases, cation exchange capacity, base saturation, Zn, Mn, and Cu, but reduced the levels of Mg in soil.

  13. Airborne concentrations of volatile organic compounds in neonatal incubators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prazad, P; Cortes, D R; Puppala, B L; Donovan, R; Kumar, S; Gulati, A

    2008-08-01

    To identify and quantify airborne volatile organic compounds (VOCs) inside neonatal incubators during various modes of operation within the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) environment. Air samples were taken from 10 unoccupied incubators in four operational settings along with ambient air samples using air sampling canisters. The samples were analyzed following EPA TO-15 using a Tekmar AutoCan interfaced to Agilent 6890 Gas Chromatograph with a 5973 Mass Spectrometer calibrated for 60 EPA TO-15 method target compounds. Non-target compounds were tentatively identified using mass spectral interpretation and with a mass spectral library created by National Institute for Standards and Technology. Two non-target compounds, 2-heptanone and n-butyl acetate, were found at elevated concentrations inside the incubators compared with ambient room air samples. Increase in temperature and addition of humidity produced further increased concentrations of these compounds. Their identities were verified by mass spectra and relative retention times using authentic standards. They were quantified using vinyl acetate and 2-hexanone as surrogate standards. The emission pattern of these two compounds and background measurements indicate that they originate inside the incubator. There is evidence that exposure to some VOCs may adversely impact the fetal and developing infants' health. Currently, as there is no definitive information available on the effects of acute or chronic low-level exposure to these compounds in neonates, future studies evaluating the health effects of neonatal exposure to these VOCs are needed.

  14. Spatial variation of volatile organic compounds and carbon ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GREG

    2013-05-12

    May 12, 2013 ... carbon monoxide in Blantyre City, Malawi. Mapoma, H. W. T.1*, Zimba J. J. 2, Utembe ... This study assessed variations of ambient volatile organic compounds and carbon monoxide (CO) levels in Blantyre City, Malawi. .... the ground to capture maximum emissions from both vehicles and industrial sources.

  15. Organochlorine pesticide compounds in organisms from the Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Shailaja, M.S.; Singbal, S.Y.S.

    in relation to the distribution of the compounds in different fish tissues, differences in the proportion of DDT and its metabolities DDW and DDD in the various organisms and the possible influence of suspended particulate matter on the availability of DDT...

  16. The growth of bacteria on organic compounds in drinking water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooij, van der D.

    1984-01-01

    Growth ("regrowth") of bacteria In drinking water distribution systems results in a deterioration of the water quality. Regrowth of chemoheterotrophic bacteria depends on the presence of organic. compounds that serve as a nutrient source for these bacteria. A batch-culture technique was

  17. Green chemistry principles in organic compound synthesis and analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruchi Verma

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The present review focus on various green chemistry approaches which could be utilized in the organic compounds in practical classes for undergraduate level in comparison of conventional methods. These methods avoid the usage of hazardous substances and are environmental friendly.

  18. Determination of hydrogen isotope composition in organic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ordzhonikidze, K.G.; Parulava, L.P.; Vakhaniya, G.V.; Tarielashvili, V.O.

    1989-01-01

    method for determination of hydrogen isotope composition just in organic compounds using mass-spectrometer of the second class is suggested. The method enables to determine atomic fraction of hydrogen without multiplet separation. The accuracy of determination of deuterium atomic fraction in acetone in 1-99% range was equal to 3-0.2% respectively

  19. Radiation-induced nitration of organic compounds in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ershov, B.G.; Gordeev, A.V.; Bykov, G.L.

    2009-01-01

    Radiation-induced nitration of organic compounds in aqueous solutions was studied. It was found that γ-irradiation of solutions containing acetic and nitric acid and/or their salts gives nitromethane. Dependences of the product yield on the absorbed dose and the contents of components were established. The mechanism of radiation nitration involving radicals is discussed. (author)

  20. Synthesis of tritium-labeled nitrogen-containing organic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shevchenko, V.P.; Nagaev, I.Yu.; Potapova, A.V.

    1995-01-01

    Conditions of tritium labeling of certain nitrogen-containing organic compounds have been determined. Combination of isotope exchange or hydrogenation with gaseous tritium and chemical synthesis allowed preparation of N-oleyldihydrosphingosine (I) and spermine with molar radioactivities of 200-210 and 23-25 Ci mmol -1 respectively

  1. ambient volatile organic compounds pollution and ozone formation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    OLUMAYEDE

    2013-08-01

    Aug 1, 2013 ... Volatile organic compound (VOC) species react at different rate and exhibit differences in reactivity with respect to ozone formation in polluted urban atmosphere. To assess this, the variations pattern, reactivity relative to OH radical and ozone creation potential of ambient VOCs were investigated in field.

  2. Novel collection method for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Host derived chemical cues are an important aspect of arthropod attraction to potential hosts. Host cues that act over longer distances include CO2, heat, and water vapor, while cues such as volatile organic compounds (VOCs) act over closer distances. Domestic dogs are important hosts for disease cy...

  3. Total volatile organic compounds (TVOC) in indoor air quality investigations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølhave, L.; Clausen, Geo; Berglund, B.

    1997-01-01

    The amount of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in indoor air, usually called TVOC (total volatile organic compounds), has been measured using different definitions and techniques which yield different results. This report recommends a definition of TVOC referring to a specified range of VOCs and...... for characterizing indoor pollution and for improving source control as required from the points of view of health, comfort, energy efficiency and sustainability. (C) Indoor Air (1997)....... the TVOC value. The report reviews the TVOC concept with respect to its usefulness for exposure assessment and control and for the prediction of health or comfort effects. Although the report concludes that at present it is not possible to use TVOC as an effect predictor, it affirms the usefulness of TVOC......The amount of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in indoor air, usually called TVOC (total volatile organic compounds), has been measured using different definitions and techniques which yield different results. This report recommends a definition of TVOC referring to a specified range of VOCs...

  4. Ultrasound: A Boon in the Synthesis of Organic Compounds

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ultrasound: A Boon in the Synthesis of Organic Compounds. Vasundhara Singh Kanwal Preet Kaur Anupam Khurana G L Kad. General Article Volume 3 Issue 9 September 1998 pp 56-60. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/003/09/0056-0060. Author Affiliations.

  5. Remediation of soil contaminated with toxic organic compounds ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Microorganisms, especially genetically modified microorganisms have continued to attract attention as a safer and environmentally friendly alternative in the bioremediation of contaminated environments such as soil and water bodies. Soil pollution by organic compounds such as pesticides, industrial and agricultural ...

  6. 40 CFR 60.542 - Standards for volatile organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Rubber Tire Manufacturing Industry § 60.542 Standards for volatile organic compounds. (a) On and after... cementing operation: Discharge into the atmosphere no more than 10 grams (0.022 lb) of VOC per tire cemented... grams (0.011 lb) of VOC per bead cemented for each month. (5) For each green tire spraying operation...

  7. Instrument for Analysis of Organic Compounds on Other Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daulton, Riley M.; Hintze, Paul E.

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this project is to develop the Instrument for Solvent Extraction and Analysis of Extraterrestrial Bodies using In Situ Resources (ISEE). Specifically, ISEE will extract and characterize organic compounds from regolith which is found on the surface of other planets or asteroids. The techniques this instrument will use are supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) and supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC). ISEE aligns with NASA's goal to expand the frontiers of knowledge, capability, and opportunities in space in addition to supporting NASA's aim to search for life elsewhere by characterizing organic compounds. The outcome of this project will be conceptual designs of 2 components of the ISEE instrument as well as the completion of proof-of-concept extraction experiments to demonstrate the capabilities of SFE. The first conceptual design is a pressure vessel to be used for the extraction of the organic compounds from the regolith. This includes a comparison of different materials, geometry's, and a proposition of how to insert the regolith into the vessel. The second conceptual design identifies commercially available fluid pumps based on the requirements needed to generate supercritical CO2. The proof-of-concept extraction results show the percent mass lost during standard solvent extractions of regolith with organic compounds. This data will be compared to SFE results to demonstrate the capabilities of ISEE's approach.

  8. air quality status of volatile organic compounds in health and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BARTH EKWUEME

    Volatile organic compounds are considered to be air toxins that affect human health. They have great influence on the troposphere because they affect the formation of ozone. Ambient air samples were collected from indoor and outdoor of five health and financial institution microenvironments. Passive sampling method with ...

  9. Nitrosonium complexes of organic compounds. Structure and reactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borodkin, Gennady I; Shubin, Vyacheslav G

    2001-01-01

    Data on the structures and reactivities of nitrosonium complexes of organic compounds are systematised and generalised. The characteristic features of the electronic structure of the NO + cation are responsible for a wide structural variety of nitrosonium complexes. Reactions of nitrosonium complexes are described. The bibliography includes 172 references.

  10. Semi-empirical estimation of organic compound fugacity ratios at environmentally relevant system temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Noort, Paul C M

    2009-06-01

    Fugacity ratios of organic compounds are used to calculate (subcooled) liquid properties, such as solubility or vapour pressure, from solid properties and vice versa. They can be calculated from the entropy of fusion, the melting temperature, and heat capacity data for the solid and the liquid. For many organic compounds, values for the fusion entropy are lacking. Heat capacity data are even scarcer. In the present study, semi-empirical compound class specific equations were derived to estimate fugacity ratios from molecular weight and melting temperature for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and polychlorinated benzenes, biphenyls, dibenzo[p]dioxins and dibenzofurans. These equations estimate fugacity ratios with an average standard error of about 0.05 log units. In addition, for compounds with known fusion entropy values, a general semi-empirical correction equation based on molecular weight and melting temperature was derived for estimation of the contribution of heat capacity differences to the fugacity ratio. This equation estimates the heat capacity contribution correction factor with an average standard error of 0.02 log units for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated benzenes, biphenyls, dibenzo[p]dioxins and dibenzofurans.

  11. Hygroscopic properties of potassium chloride and its internal mixtures with organic compounds relevant to biomass burning aerosol particles

    OpenAIRE

    Jing, Bo; Peng, Chao; Wang, Yidan; Liu, Qifan; Tong, Shengrui; Zhang, Yunhong; Ge, Maofa

    2017-01-01

    While water uptake of aerosols exerts considerable impacts on climate, the effects of aerosol composition and potential interactions between species on hygroscopicity of atmospheric particles have not been fully characterized. The water uptake behaviors of potassium chloride and its internal mixtures with water soluble organic compounds (WSOCs) related to biomass burning aerosols including oxalic acid, levoglucosan and humic acid at different mass ratios were investigated using a hygroscopici...

  12. Preparation of radioactive labelled compounds. Pt. 2. 82Br labelled organic bromine compounds by isotopic exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otto, R.

    1988-05-01

    Studies on isotopic exchange between organic bromine compounds and 82 Br labelled dioxane dibromide in the presence of AlCl 3 are described. The results obtained enable to develop a simple and quick preparation method for the labelling with 82 Br [fr

  13. A Water-Soluble Polythiophene for Organic Field-Effect Transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shao, Ming [ORNL; He, Youjun [ORNL; Hong, Kunlun [ORNL; Rouleau, Christopher M [ORNL; Geohegan, David B [ORNL; Xiao, Kai [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    Synthesis of a non-ionic, water-soluble poly(thiophene) (PT) derivative, poly(3-(2-(2-methoxyethoxy) ethoxy)ethoxy) methylthiophene) (P3TEGT) with a hydrophilic tri-ethylene glycol side group, is reported and thin films of the polymer suitable for organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) are characterized by combining analysis techniques that include UV-Vis absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, and atomic force microscopy. After thermal annealing, P3TEGT films exhibit a well-organized nanofibrillar lamellar nanostructure that originates from the strong - stacking of the thiophene backbones. P-type organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) with hole mobilities of 10-5 cm2V-1s-1 were fabricated from this water-soluble poly(thiophene) derivative, demonstrating the possibility that environmentally-friendly solvents may be promising alternatives for the low-cost, green solution-based organic electronic device manufacturing of OFETs, organic photovoltaics (OPVs), and biosensors.

  14. Determination of organic compounds in water using ultraviolet LED

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chihoon; Ji, Taeksoo; Eom, Joo Beom

    2018-04-01

    This paper describes a method of detecting organic compounds in water using an ultraviolet LED (280 nm) spectroscopy system and a photodetector. The LED spectroscopy system showed a high correlation between the concentration of the prepared potassium hydrogen phthalate and that calculated by multiple linear regression, indicating an adjusted coefficient of determination ranging from 0.953-0.993. In addition, a comparison between the performance of the spectroscopy system and the total organic carbon analyzer indicated that the difference in concentration was small. Based on the close correlation between the spectroscopy and photodetector absorbance values, organic measurement with a photodetector could be configured for monitoring.

  15. Charge-density matching in organic-inorganic uranyl compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krivovichev, S.V.; Krivovichev, S.V.; Tananaev, I.G.; Myasoedov, B.F.

    2007-01-01

    Single crystals of [C 10 H 26 N 2 ][(UO 2 )(SeO 4 ) 2 (H 2 O)](H 2 SeO 4 ) 0.85 (H 2 O) 2 (1), [C 10 H 26 N 2 ][(UO 2 )(SeO 4 ) 2 ] (H 2 SeO 4 ) 0.50 (H 2 O) (2), and [C 8 H 20 N] 2 [(UO 2 )(SeO 4 ) 2 (H 2 O)] (H 2 O) (3) were prepared by evaporation from aqueous solution of uranyl nitrate, selenic acid and the respective amines. The structures of the compounds have been solved by direct methods and structural models have been obtained. The structures of the compounds 1, 2, and 3 contain U and Se atoms in pentagonal bipyramidal and tetrahedral coordinations, respectively. The UO 7 and SeO 4 polyhedra polymerize by sharing common O atoms to form chains (compound 1) or sheets (compounds 2 and 3). In the structure of 1, the layers consisting of hydrogen-bonded [UO 2 (SeO 4 ) 2 (H 2 O)] 2- chains are separated by mixed organic-inorganic layers comprising from [NH 3 (CH 2 ) 10 NH 3 ] 2+ molecules, H 2 O molecules, and disordered electroneutral (H 2 SeO 4 ) groups. The structure of 2 has a similar architecture but a purely inorganic layer is represented by a fully connected [UO 2 (SeO 4 ) 2 ] 2- sheet. The structure of 3 does not contain disordered (H 2 SeO 4 ) groups but is based upon alternating [UO 2 (SeO 4 ) 2 (H 2 O)] 2- sheets and 1.5-nm-thick organic blocks consisting of positively charged protonated octylamine molecules, [NH 3 (CH 2 ) 7 CH 3 ] + . The structures may be considered as composed of anionic inorganic sheets (2D blocks) and cationic organic blocks self-organized according to competing hydrophilic-hydrophobic interactions. Analysis of the structures allows us to conclude that the charge-density matching principle is observed in uranyl compounds. In order to satisfy some basic peculiarities of uranyl (in general, actinyl) chemistry, it requires specific additional mechanisms: (a) in long-chain-amine-templated compounds, protonated amine molecules inter-digitate; (b) in long-chain-diamine-templated compounds, incorporation of acid-water interlayers into

  16. Determination of fluorine in organic compounds: Microcombustion method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, H.S.

    1951-01-01

    A reliable and widely applicable means of determining fluorine in organic compounds has long been needed. Increased interest in this field of research in recent years has intensified the need. Fluorine in organic combinations may be determined by combustion at 900?? C. in a quartz tube with a platinum catalyst, followed by an acid-base titration of the combustion products. Certain necessary precautions and known limitations are discussed in some detail. Milligram samples suffice, and the accuracy of the method is about that usually associated with the other halogen determinations. Use of this method has facilitated the work upon organic fluorine compounds in this laboratory and it should prove to be equally valuable to others.

  17. Mechanochemical synthesis and characterisation of cocrystals and metal organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tröbs, L; Emmerling, F

    2014-01-01

    The mechanochemical synthesis of two model compounds, a metal organic framework (H2Im)[Bi(1,4-bdc)2] (bdc = benzene dicarboxylate, H2Im = imidazole cation)) and a cocrystal (carbamazepine : indometacin 1 : 1) were followed ex situ using a combination of two analytical methods. Powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopy data were evaluated for the synthesis of the metal organic framework. The XRD measurements and REM images were analysed for the synthesis of the cocrystal. The measurements revealed that both model compounds were synthesised within minutes. The metal organic framework (H2Im)[Bi(1,4-bdc)2] is synthesised via an intermediate structure. The cocrystal carbamazepine : indometacin 1 : 1 is formed within a few seconds. The crystallite size decreases during the further milling treatment.

  18. Determination of Volatile Organic Compounds in Selected Strains of Cyanobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Milovanović

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Microalgal biomass can be used in creating various functional food and feed products, but certain species of microalgae and cyanobacteria are known to produce various compounds causing off-flavour. In this work, we investigated selected cyanobacterial strains of Spirulina, Anabaena, and Nostoc genera originating from Serbia, with the aim of determining the chemical profile of volatile organic compounds produced by these organisms. Additionally, the influence of nitrogen level during growth on the production of volatile compounds was investigated for Nostoc and Anabaena strains. In addition, multivariate techniques, namely, principal component analysis (PCA and hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA, were used for making distinction among different microalgal strains. The results show that the main volatile compounds in these species are medium chain length alkanes, but other odorous compounds such as 2-methylisoborneol (0.51–4.48%, 2-pentylfuran (0.72–8.98%, β-cyclocitral (0.00–1.17%, and β-ionone (1.15–2.72% were also detected in the samples. Addition of nitrogen to growth medium was shown to negatively affect the production of 2-methylisoborneol, while geosmin was not detected in any of the analyzed samples, which indicates that the manipulation of growth conditions may be useful in reducing levels of some unwanted odor-causing components.

  19. The dynamics of acid-soluble phosphorus compounds in the course of winter and spring wheat germination under various thermic conditions. Part II. Labile phosphorus after hydrolysis of the acid-soluble fraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Barbaro

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The changes in labile phosphorus compounds content during germination of wheat were investigated. These compounds were determined in acid-soluble germ extracts separated into fractions according to the solubility of their barium salts. Low germination temperature was found to raise the labile phosphorus content in the fraction of insoluble barium salts. If we assume that labile P of this fraction consisted mainly of adenosinedi- and triphosphates, it would seem that the rise, in the ATP and ADP level under the influence of low temperature may be essential for initiating flowering in winter varieties.

  20. Temperature sensitivity of organic compound destruction in SCWO process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yaqin; Shen, Zhemin; Guo, Weimin; Ouyang, Chuang; Jia, Jinping; Jiang, Weili; Zhou, Haiyun

    2014-03-01

    To study the temperature sensitivity of the destruction of organic compounds in supercritical water oxidation process (SCWO), oxidation effects of twelve chemicals in supercritical water were investigated. The SCWO reaction rates of different compounds improved to varying degrees with the increase of temperature, so the highest slope of the temperature-effect curve (imax) was defined as the maximum ratio of removal ratio to working temperature. It is an important index to stand for the temperature sensitivity effect in SCWO. It was proven that the higher imax is, the more significant the effect of temperature on the SCWO effect is. Since the high-temperature area of SCWO equipment is subject to considerable damage from fatigue, the temperature is of great significance in SCWO equipment operation. Generally, most compounds (imax > 0.25) can be completely oxidized when the reactor temperature reaches 500°C. However, some compounds (imax > 0.25) need a higher temperature for complete oxidation, up to 560°C. To analyze the correlation coefficients between imax and various molecular descriptors, a quantum chemical method was used in this study. The structures of the twelve organic compounds were optimized by the Density Functional Theory B3LYP/6-311G method, as well as their quantum properties. It was shown that six molecular descriptors were negatively correlated to imax while other three descriptors were positively correlated to imax. Among them, dipole moment had the greatest effect on the oxidation thermodynamics of the twelve organic compounds. Once a correlation between molecular descriptors and imax is established, SCWO can be run at an appropriate temperature according to molecular structure. Copyright © 2014 The Research Centre for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Extraction of soluble substances from organic solid municipal waste to increase methane production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campuzano, Rosalinda; González-Martínez, Simón

    2015-02-01

    This work deals with the analysis of the methane production from Mexico City's urban organic wastes after separating soluble from suspended substances. Water was used to extract soluble substances under three different water to waste ratios and after three extraction procedures. Methane production was measured at 35 °C during 21 days using a commercial methane potential testing device. Results indicate that volatile solids extraction increases with dilution rate to a maximum of 40% at 20 °C and to 43% at 93 °C. The extracts methane production increases with the dilution rate as a result of enhanced dissolved solids extraction. The combined (extract and bagasse) methane production reached, in 6 days, 66% of the total methane produced in 21 days. The highest methane production rates were measured during the first six days. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Highly water-soluble ruthenium(II terpyridine coordination compounds form stable adducts with blood-borne metal transporting proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Nišavić

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Three coordination compounds of ruthenium(II, belonging to a recently synthesised series of water-soluble compounds of general formula mer-[Ru(L3(N-NCl]Cl, where L3 = 4'-chloro-2,2':6',2″-terpyridine (Cl-tpy, N-N = ethylenediamine (en, 1,2-diaminocyclohexane (dach or 2,2'-bipyridine (bpy, have shown strong binding to calf thymus DNA and moderate in vitro cytotoxicity towards cancer cell lines. Knowing that serum proteins play a crucial role in the transport and deactivation of ruthenium drugs, we have conducted a detailed study of their interactions with two major metal-transporting serum proteins, albumin and transferrin, and it is presented herein. Ruthenated protein adducts were formed with various concentrations of the three compounds and then separated from the unbound portions by ultrafiltration through 10 kDa cut-off centrifugal filter units. The stoichiometry of binding was determined using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry. One mol of albumin bound up to 7, 8.5 and 1.5 mol of compound 1 ([Ru(Cl-tpy(enCl][Cl], 2 ([Ru(Cl-tpy(dachCl][Cl] and 3 ([Ru(Cl-tpy(bpyCl][Cl], respectively. One mol of transferrin bound up to 3, 3.5 and 0.4 mol of 1, 2 and 3, respectively. The affinity of albumin and transferrin for the three ruthenium compounds was evaluated using fluorescence quenching. The binding constants for 1 and 2 lay within the range 104–105 M−1, suggesting moderate-to-strong attachment to albumin. Both compounds showed much lower affinity for transferrin (102–103 M−1. Compound 3 bound weakly to each studied protein. High resolution ESI qTOF mass spectra of albumin before and after binding of 1 revealed the high stoichiometry of binding. Although the binding of the compounds 1–3 to albumin and transferrin did not affect proteins’ secondary structure much, their tertiary structures underwent some alterations, as deduced from the circular dichroism study. Changes in the stability of albumin, after

  3. H-1 NMR of compounds with low water solubility in the presence of erythrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Poul Erik; Skibsted, U.; Nissen, J.

    2001-01-01

    When lipophilic compounds like diethyl phthalate (DEP) were added to water, two sets of resonances appeared in the 1H NMR spectrum, whereas when added in concentrations above ~3.5 mM to erythrocytes in a high haematocrit suspension, only one set of resonances was observed at the low-frequency pos...

  4. Solubility and leaching risks of organic carbon in paddy soils as affected by irrigation managements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Junzeng; Yang, Shihong; Peng, Shizhang; Wei, Qi; Gao, Xiaoli

    2013-01-01

    Influence of nonflooding controlled irrigation (NFI) on solubility and leaching risk of soil organic carbon (SOC) were investigated. Compared with flooding irrigation (FI) paddies, soil water extractable organic carbon (WEOC) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in NFI paddies increased in surface soil but decreased in deep soil. The DOC leaching loss in NFI field was 63.3 kg C ha⁻¹, reduced by 46.4% than in the FI fields. It indicated that multi-wet-dry cycles in NFI paddies enhanced the decomposition of SOC in surface soils, and less carbon moved downward to deep soils due to less percolation. That also led to lower SOC in surface soils in NFI paddies than in FI paddies, which implied that more carbon was released into the atmosphere from the surface soil in NFI paddies. Change of solubility of SOC in NFI paddies might lead to potential change in soil fertility and sustainability, greenhouse gas emission, and bioavailability of trace metals or organic pollutants.

  5. Addition of calcium compounds to reduce soluble oxalate in a high oxalate food system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bong, Wen-Chun; Vanhanen, Leo P; Savage, Geoffrey P

    2017-04-15

    Spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) is often used as a base vegetable to make green juices that are promoted as healthy dietary alternatives. Spinach is known to contain significant amounts of oxalates, which are toxic and, if consumed regularly, can lead to the development of kidney stones. This research investigates adding 50-500mg increments of calcium carbonate, calcium chloride, calcium citrate and calcium sulphate to 100g of raw homogenates of spinach to determine whether calcium would combine with the soluble oxalate present in the spinach. Calcium chloride was the most effective additive while calcium carbonate was the least effective. The formation of insoluble oxalate after incubation at 25°C for 30min is a simple practical step that can be incorporated into the juicing process. This would make the juice considerably safer to consume on a regular basis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Emissions of carbon species, organic polar compounds, potassium, and mercury from prescribed burning activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y.; Obrist, D.; Zielinska, B.; Gerler, A.

    2012-04-01

    Biomass burning is an important emission source of pollutants to the atmosphere, but few studies have focused on the chemical composition of emissions from prescribed burning activities. Here we present results from a sampling campaign to quantify particulate-phase emissions from various types of prescribed fires including carbon species (Elemental Carbon: EC; Organic Carbon: OC; and Total Carbon: TC); polar organic compounds (12 different compounds and four functional classes); water-soluble potassium (K+); and mercury (Hg). We measured emissions from the following types of prescribed biomass burning in the Lake Tahoe basin located on the California/Nevada border: (i) log piles stacked and dried in the field; (ii) log piles along with green understory vegetation; and (iii) understory green vegetation and surface litter; further emissions were collected from burns conducted in a wood stove: (iv) dried wooden logs; (v) green foliage of understory vegetation collected from the field; and (vi) surface organic litter collected from the field; finally, samples were also taken from (vii) ambient air in residential areas during peak domestic wood combustion season. Results show that OC/EC ratios of prescribed burns in the field ranged from 4 to 10, but lower values (around 1) were observed in controlled stove fires. These results are consistent with an excess of OC emissions over EC found in wildfires. OC/EC ratios, however, showed clear separations between controlled wood stove combustion (higher EC) and prescribed burns in the field (lower EC). We attribute this difference to a higher combustion temperatures and dominance of flaming combustion in wood stove fires. OC positively and linearly correlated to the sum of polar organic compounds across all burn types (r2 of 0.82). The most prevalent group of polar compounds emitted during prescribed fires was resin acids (dehydroabietic, pimaric, and abietic acids), followed by levoglucosan plus mannositol. Negligible

  7. A Review of the Tissue Residue Approach for Organic and Organometallic Compounds in Aquatic Organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper reviews the tissue residue approach (TRA) for toxicity assessment as it applies to organic chemicals and some organometallic compounds (tin, mercury, and lead). Specific emphasis was placed on evaluating key factors that influence interpretation of critical body resid...

  8. Extending the applicability of pressurized hot water extraction to compounds exhibiting limited water solubility by pH control: curcumin from the turmeric rhizome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Euterpio, Maria Anna; Cavaliere, Chiara; Capriotti, Anna Laura; Crescenzi, Carlo

    2011-11-01

    Pressurized hot water extraction (PHWE, also known as subcritical water extraction) is commonly considered to be an environmentally friendly extraction technique that could potentially replace traditional methods that use organic solvents. Unfortunately, the applicability of this technique is often limited by the very low water solubility of the target compounds, even at high temperatures. In this paper, the scope for broadening the applicability of PHWE by adjusting the pH of the water used in the extraction is demonstrated in the extraction of curcumin (which exhibits very limited water solubility) from untreated turmeric (Curcuma longa L.) rhizomes. Although poor extraction yields were obtained, even at high temperatures when using degassed water or neutral phosphate buffer as the extraction medium, yields exceeding those obtained by Soxhlet extraction were achieved using highly acidic pH buffers due to curcumin protonation. The influence of the temperature, pH, and buffer concentration on the extraction yield were investigated in detail by means of a series of designed experiments. Optimized conditions for the extraction of curcumin from turmeric by PHWE were estimated at 197 °C using 62 g/L buffer concentration at pH 1.6. The relationships between these variables were subjected to statistical analysis using response surface methodology.

  9. Elevated temperature altered photosynthetic products in wheat seedlings and organic compounds and biological activity in rhizopshere soil under cadmium stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Xia; Zhao, YongHua; Wang, WenKe; He, Yunhua

    2015-09-23

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of slightly elevated atmospheric temperature in the spring on photosynthetic products in wheat seedlings and on organic compounds and biological activity in rhizosphere soil under cadmium (Cd) stress. Elevated temperature was associated with increased soluble sugars, reducing sugars, starch, and total sugars, and with decreased amino acids in wheat seedlings under Cd stress. Elevated temperature improved total soluble sugars, free amino acids, soluble phenolic acids, and organic acids in rhizosphere soil under Cd stress. The activity of amylase, phenol oxidase, invertase, β-glucosidase, and l-asparaginase in rhizosphere soil was significantly improved by elevated temperature under Cd stress; while cellulase, neutral phosphatase, and urease activity significantly decreased. Elevated temperature significantly improved bacteria, fungi, actinomycetes, and total microorganisms abundance and fluorescein diacetate activity under Cd stress. In conclusion, slightly elevated atmospheric temperature in the spring improved the carbohydrate levels in wheat seedlings and organic compounds and biological activity in rhizosphere soil under Cd stress in the short term. In addition, elevated atmospheric temperature in the spring stimulated available Cd by affecting pH, DOC, phenolic acids, and organic acids in rhizosphere soil, which resulted in the improvement of the Cd uptake by wheat seedlings.

  10. Sorption kinetics of selected volatile organic compounds in humin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Yang-Hsin; Wu, Shian-Chee

    2002-10-01

    Each component of the chemically heterogeneous soil exhibits a unique sorption behavior toward organic sorbates. The sorption kinetics of some volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in pressed humin disks was investigated by tracking the weight change of the disks with a microbalance. Higher sorbing capacity for more polar VOCs as well as C13 nuclear magnetic resonance data indicates that humin was more hydrophilic than Aldrich humic acid (Milwaukee, WI, USA). The apparent diffusivity of acetone, toluene, and hexane in the disks ranged from 10(-8) to 10(-10) cm2/s. The sorbed toluene in humin does not seem persistent to desorption; however, acetone and hexane, either as polar or linear compounds in humin, show persistence against desorption. On completion of the desorption experiments, there were approximately 35 and 20% sorbate residue for acetone and hexane, respectively.

  11. Nonlinear Laser Fluorescence Spectroscopy of Natural Organic Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadeev, Victor V.; Shirshin, Evgeny A.

    Principles of nonlinear laser fluorescence spectroscopy of complicated organic compounds and of the method capable of determining photophysical parameters are considered in this chapter. Special attention is paid to the peculiarities of the method connected with specific photophysical processes in natural organic compounds, especially in proteins, and to the major role of intramolecular energy transfer and presence of localized donor-acceptor pairs (LDAP) of fluorophores within single macromolecules. These facts stimulated the development of models based on the collective states formalism describing fluorescent response of LDAP to pulsed laser excitation. Unique features of the method are illustrated by the example of proteins (proteins with intrinsic fluorescence (HSA, BSA) and fluorescent protein mRFP1) that can be used as fluorescent tags of intracellular processes while their photophysical parameters can be used as the information channel.

  12. Microstructural control over soluble pentacene deposited by capillary pen printing for organic electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wi Hyoung; Min, Honggi; Park, Namwoo; Lee, Junghwi; Seo, Eunsuk; Kang, Boseok; Cho, Kilwon; Lee, Hwa Sung

    2013-08-28

    Research into printing techniques has received special attention for the commercialization of cost-efficient organic electronics. Here, we have developed a capillary pen printing technique to realize a large-area pattern array of organic transistors and systematically investigated self-organization behavior of printed soluble organic semiconductor ink. The capillary pen-printed deposits of organic semiconductor, 6,13-bis(triisopropylsilylethynyl) pentacene (TIPS_PEN), was well-optimized in terms of morphological and microstructural properties by using ink with mixed solvents of chlorobenzene (CB) and 1,2-dichlorobenzene (DCB). Especially, a 1:1 solvent ratio results in the best transistor performances. This result is attributed to the unique evaporation characteristics of the TIPS_PEN deposits where fast evaporation of CB induces a morphological evolution at the initial printed position, and the remaining DCB with slow evaporation rate offers a favorable crystal evolution at the pinned position. Finally, a large-area transistor array was facilely fabricated by drawing organic electrodes and active layers with a versatile capillary pen. Our approach provides an efficient printing technique for fabricating large-area arrays of organic electronics and further suggests a methodology to enhance their performances by microstructural control of the printed organic semiconducting deposits.

  13. New biodegradable organic-soluble chelating agents for simultaneous removal of heavy metals and organic pollutants from contaminated media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ullmann, Amos; Brauner, Neima; Vazana, Shlomi; Katz, Zhanna; Goikhman, Roman; Seemann, Boaz; Marom, Hanit; Gozin, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • New soil remediation process using phase transition of partially miscible solvents. • Design and synthesis of new bio-degradable, organic soluble chelating agents. • Feasibility tests of the process on authentically polluted sediments and sludge. • Simultaneous removal of toxic metals and organic pollutants was demonstrated. -- Abstract: Advanced biodegradable and non-toxic organic chelators, which are soluble in organic media, were synthesized on the basis of the S,S-ethylenediamine-disuccinate (S,S-EDDS) ligand. The modifications suggested in this work include attachment of a lipophilic hydrocarbon chain (“tail”) to one or both nitrogen atoms of the S,S-EDDS. The new ligands were designed and evaluated for application in the Sediments Remediation Phase Transition Extraction (SR-PTE) process. This novel process is being developed for the simultaneous removal of both heavy metals and organic pollutants from contaminated soils, sediments or sludge. The new chelators were designed to bind various target metal ions, to promote extraction of these ions into organic solvents. Several variations of attached tails were synthesized and tested. The results for one of them, N,N′-bis-dodecyl-S,S-EDDS (C24-EDDS), showed that the metal-ligand complexes are concentrated in the organic-rich phase in the Phase Transition Extraction process (more than 80%). Preliminary applications of the SR-PTE process with the C24-EDDS ligand were conducted also on actually contaminated sludge (field samples). The extraction of five toxic metals, namely, Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn was examined. In general, the extraction performance of the new ligand was not less than that of S,S-EDDS when a sufficient ligand-to-extracted ion ratio (about 4:1 was applied

  14. Chloroaluminate ionic liquids as reagents for isolating soluble hexanuclear zirconium halide cluster compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, D; Hughbanks, T

    2000-05-01

    Ambient-temperature chloroaluminate molten salts, mixtures of aluminum trichloride (AlCl3) and 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (ImCl), have been used as solvents to excise and isolate centered hexanuclear zirconium halide clusters from their solid-state precursors. Cluster compounds synthesized via high-temperature reactions, KZr6CCl15 and Li2Zr6MnCl15, were dissolved into basic molten salts at 100-110 degrees C. The C-centered cluster compound, Im4Zr6CCl18, was isolated in 70% yield, and the Mn-centered cluster compound, Im5Zr6MnCl18.C7H(8).2CH3CN, was isolated in 54% yield. Im5Zr6BCl18 is efficiently oxidized by ferrocenium tetrafluoroborate, and one-electron-oxidized B-centered cluster, [(Zr6B)Cl18]4-, was isolated in 90% yield as the salt Im4Zr6BCl18.

  15. The neutral oil in commercial linear alkylbenzenesulfonate and its effect on organic solute solubility in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiou, C.T.; Kile, D.E.; Rutherford, D.W.

    1991-01-01

    Apparent water solubilities of 1,1-bis(p-chlorophenyl)-2,2,2-trichloroethane (DDT), 2,4,5,2???,5???-penta-chlorobiphenyl (PCB), and 1,2,3-trichlorobenzene (TCB) were determined at room temperature in aqueous solutions of commercial linear alkylbenzenesulfonate (LAS), oil-free (solvent-extracted) LAS, and single-molecular 4-dodecyl-benzenesulfonate. The extent of solute solubility enhancement by commercial LAS is markedly greater than that by other ionic surfactants below the measured critical micelle concentration (CMC); above the CMC, the enhancement data with LAS are comparable with other surfactants as micelles. The small amount of neutral oils in commercial LAS (1.7%), comprising linear alkylbenzenes (LABs) and bis(alkylphenyl) sulfones, contributes significantly to the enhanced solubility of DDT and PCB below the CMC; the effect is ascribed to formation of oil-surfactant emulsions. The oil-surfactant emulsion formed corresponds to ???9-10% of the commercial LAS below the CMC. The data suggest that discharge of wastewater containing a significant level of oils and surface-active agents could lead to potential mobilization of organic pollutants and LABs in aquatic environments.

  16. Volatile organic compound optical fiber sensors: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Elosúa Aguado, César; Matías Maestro, Ignacio; Bariáin Aisa, Cándido; Arregui San Martín, Francisco Javier

    2006-01-01

    Volatile organic compound (VOC) detection is a topic of growing interest with applications in diverse fields, ranging from environmental uses to the food or chemical industries. Optical fiber VOC sensors offering new and interesting properties which overcame some of the inconveniences found on traditional gas sensors appeared over two decades ago. Thanks to its minimum invasive nature and the advantages that optical fiber offers such as light weight, passive nature, low attenuation and the...

  17. Beyond the network of plants volatile organic compounds

    OpenAIRE

    Vivaldo, Gianna; Masi, Elisa; Taiti, Cosimo; Caldarelli, Guido; Mancuso, Stefano

    2017-01-01

    Plants emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) is involved in a wide class of ecological functions, as VOCs play a crucial role in plants interactions with biotic and abiotic factors. Accordingly, they vary widely across species and underpin differences in ecological strategy. In this paper, VOCs spontaneously emitted by 109 plant species (belonging to 56 different families) have been qualitatively and quantitatively analysed in order to classify plants species. By using bipartite netwo...

  18. Marine Vibrio Species Produce the Volatile Organic Compound Acetone

    OpenAIRE

    Nemecek-Marshall, M.; Wojciechowski, C.; Kuzma, J.; Silver, G. M.; Fall, R.

    1995-01-01

    While screening aerobic, heterotrophic marine bacteria for production of volatile organic compounds, we found that a group of isolates produced substantial amounts of acetone. Acetone production was confirmed by gas chromatography, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and high-performance liquid chromatography. The major acetone producers were identified as nonclinical Vibrio species. Acetone production was maximal in the stationary phase of growth and was stimulated by addition of l-leucine...

  19. Relationships between melting point and boiling point of organic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yalkowsky, S.H.; Krzyzaniak, J.F.; Myrdal, P.B. (Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). College of Pharmacy)

    1994-07-01

    Relationships between melting point and boiling point are shown to be dependent upon the molecular symmetry number and a modified count of the total number of atoms in the molecule. Using the above relationships, the boiling and melting points of nearly 1,000 non-hydrogen-bonding organic compounds have been correlated. The correlations for boiling point and melting point have root mean square errors of 28 and 36 C, respectively.

  20. Production of fungal volatile organic compounds in bedding materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. LAPPALAINEN

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The high relative humidity of the air and many potential growth media, such as bedding materials, hay and grains in the horse stable, for example, provide suitable conditions for fungal growth. Metabolic activity of four common agricultural fungi incubated in peat and wood shavings at 25°C and 4°C was characterized in this study using previously specified volatile metabolites of micro-organisms and CO 2 production as indicators. The volatile organic compounds were collected into Tenax resin and analysed by gas chromatography. Several microbial volatile organic compounds (MVOCs, e.g. 1-butanol, 2-hexanone, 2-heptanone, 3-octanone, 1-octen-3-ol and 1-octanol were detected in laboratory experiments; however, these accounted for only 0.08-1.5% of total volatile organic com-pounds (TVOCs. Emission rates of MVOCs were 0.001-0.176 mg/kg of bedding materials per hour. Despite some limitations of the analytical method, certain individual MVOCs, 2-hexanone, 2-hep-tanone and 3-octanone, were also detected in concentrations of less than 4.6 mg/m 3 (0.07-0.31% of TVOC in a horse stable where peat and shavings were used as bedding materials. MVOC emission rate was estimated to be 0.2-2.0 mg/kg ´ h -1 from bedding materials in the stable, being about ten times higher than the rates found in the laboratory experiments. Some compounds, e.g. 3-octanone and 1-octen-3-ol, can be assumed to originate mainly from microbial metabolisms.;

  1. Hot cell for the synthesis of labelled organic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fowler, J.S.; Karlstrom, K.; Koehler, C.; Lambrecht, R.M.; MacGregor, R.R.; Ruth, T.J.; Sceviour, W.; Wolf, A.P.

    1979-01-01

    The design of a hot cell for use in labelling organic compounds is described. Versatility has been incorporated so that the cell can be used with a wide variety of organic syntheses as well as a large dynamic range of radioactivity (from ..mu..Ci to Ci levels). This is made possible by having the large work area easily accessible from the front which can be opened or closed and a small sliding lead glass window and master slave manipulator. A variety of syntheses setups which have been modified for use in such a cell are described.

  2. Production of fungal volatile organic compounds in bedding materials

    OpenAIRE

    S. LAPPALAINEN; A. PASANEN; P. PASANEN

    2008-01-01

    The high relative humidity of the air and many potential growth media, such as bedding materials, hay and grains in the horse stable, for example, provide suitable conditions for fungal growth. Metabolic activity of four common agricultural fungi incubated in peat and wood shavings at 25°C and 4°C was characterized in this study using previously specified volatile metabolites of micro-organisms and CO 2 production as indicators. The volatile organic compounds were collected into Tenax resin a...

  3. Temporal dynamics of halogenated organic compounds in Marcellus Shale flowback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luek, Jenna L; Harir, Mourad; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Mouser, Paula J; Gonsior, Michael

    2018-06-01

    The chemistry of hydraulic fracturing fluids and wastewaters is complex and is known to vary by operator, geologic formation, and fluid age. A time series of hydraulic fracturing fluids, flowback fluids, and produced waters was collected from two adjacent Marcellus Shale gas wells for organic chemical composition analyses using ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry. Hierarchical clustering was used to compare and extract ions related to different fluid ages and many halogenated organic molecular ions were identified in flowback fluids and early produced waters based on exact mass. Iodinated organic compounds were the dominant halogen class in these clusters and were nearly undetectable in hydraulic fracturing fluid prior to injection. The iodinated ions increased in flowback and remained elevated after ten months of well production. We suggest that these trends are mainly driven by dissolved organic matter reacting with reactive halogen species formed abiotically through oxidizing chemical additives applied to the well and biotically via iodide-oxidizing bacteria. Understanding the implications of these identified halogenated organic compounds will require future investigation in to their structures and environmental fate. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Engineering biosynthesis of high-value compounds in photosynthetic organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Ellis C; Kelly, Steven

    2017-09-01

    The photosynthetic, autotrophic lifestyle of plants and algae position them as ideal platform organisms for sustainable production of biomolecules. However, their use in industrial biotechnology is limited in comparison to heterotrophic organisms, such as bacteria and yeast. This usage gap is in part due to the challenges in generating genetically modified plants and algae and in part due to the difficulty in the development of synthetic biology tools for manipulating gene expression in these systems. Plant and algal metabolism, pre-installed with multiple biosynthetic modules for precursor compounds, bypasses the requirement to install these pathways in conventional production organisms, and creates new opportunities for the industrial production of complex molecules. This review provides a broad overview of the successes, challenges and future prospects for genetic engineering in plants and algae for enhanced or de novo production of biomolecules. The toolbox of technologies and strategies that have been used to engineer metabolism are discussed, and the potential use of engineered plants for industrial manufacturing of large quantities of high-value compounds is explored. This review also discusses the routes that have been taken to modify the profiles of primary metabolites for increasing the nutritional quality of foods as well as the production of specialized metabolites, cosmetics, pharmaceuticals and industrial chemicals. As the universe of high-value biosynthetic pathways continues to expand, and the tools to engineer these pathways continue to develop, it is likely plants and algae will become increasingly valuable for the biomanufacturing of high-value compounds.

  5. Soluble dendrimers europium(III) β-diketonate complex for organic memory devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Binbin; Fang Junfeng; Li Bin; You Han; Ma Dongge; Hong Ziruo; Li Wenlian; Su Zhongmin

    2008-01-01

    We report the synthesis of a soluble dendrimers europium(III) complex, tris(dibenzoylmethanato)(1,3,5-tris[2-(2'-pyridyl) benzimidazoly]methylbenzene)-europium(III), and its application in organic electrical bistable memory device. Excellent stability that ensured more than 10 6 write-read-erase-reread cycles has been performed in ambient conditions without current-induced degradation. High-density, low-cost memory, good film-firming property, fascinating thermal and morphological stability allow the application of the dendrimers europium(III) complex as an active medium in non-volatile memory devices

  6. Solubilities of selected organic electronic materials in pressurized hot water and estimations of aqueous solubilities at 298.15 K

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Karásek, Pavel; Hohnová, Barbora; Planeta, Josef; Šťavíková, Lenka; Roth, Michal

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 90, č. 6 (2013), s. 2035-2040 ISSN 0045-6535 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP206/11/0138; GA ČR(CZ) GPP503/11/P523; GA ČR(CZ) GAP106/12/0522 Institutional support: RVO:68081715 Keywords : solubility * pressurized hot water * hole transport materials Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 3.499, year: 2013

  7. Scaling up nano-milling of poorly water soluble compounds using a rotation/revolution pulverizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuminoki, K; Tachibana, S; Nishimura, Y; Mori, H; Takatsuka, T; Hashimoto, N

    2016-02-01

    We previously reported that a rotation/revolution pulverizer (NP-100) could mill a small amount of a drug (0.1 g) into nanoparticles in several minutes. In this investigation, scale up from the milligram to the kilogram scale of the nano-milling process by the rotation/revolution pulverizer was studied. Phenytoin was used as a model drug with low solubility in water. After confirming the improvement of the phenytoin bioavailability by milling to nanoparticles using NP-100, scaling parameters were evaluated using NP-100 and the middle scale model of NP-100 (ARV-3000T). A theoretical equation for the specific collisional energy was adapted for wet milling; this suggested that the relative centrifugal acceleration of revolution (revolution G) and the drug concentration in the suspension were the two most important parameters. The results obtained using NP-100 and ARV-3000T correlated well when these two parameters were identical. These results were applied to the large scale model of NP-100 (ARV-10KT), where 2 kg (1 kg x 2) of phenytoin nanoparticles were obtained in 60 min. The results from PXRD and DSC indicated that the milled phenytoin by ARV-3000T and ARV-10KT maintained its crystallinity. These results suggest nano-milling using a rotation/revolution pulverizer will be widely applicable to the development of nano-medicine.

  8. Extending the analytical window for water-soluble organic matter in sediments by aqueous Soxhlet extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Frauke; Koch, Boris P.; Witt, Matthias; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe

    2014-09-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) in marine sediments is a complex mixture of thousands of individual constituents that participate in biogeochemical reactions and serve as substrates for benthic microbes. Knowledge of the molecular composition of DOM is a prerequisite for a comprehensive understanding of the biogeochemical processes in sediments. In this study, interstitial water DOM was extracted with Rhizon samplers from a sediment core from the Black Sea and compared to the corresponding water-extractable organic matter fraction (Soxhlet extraction, which mobilizes labile particulate organic matter and DOM. After solid phase extraction (SPE) of DOM, samples were analyzed for the molecular composition by Fourier Transform Ion-Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) with electrospray ionization in negative ion mode. The average SPE extraction yield of the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in interstitial water was 63%, whereas less than 30% of the DOC in Soxhlet-extracted organic matter was recovered. Nevertheless, Soxhlet extraction yielded up to 4.35% of the total sedimentary organic carbon, which is more than 30-times the organic carbon content of the interstitial water. While interstitial water DOM consisted primarily of carbon-, hydrogen- and oxygen-bearing compounds, Soxhlet extracts yielded more complex FT-ICR mass spectra with more peaks and higher abundances of nitrogen- and sulfur-bearing compounds. The molecular composition of both sample types was affected by the geochemical conditions in the sediment; elevated concentrations of HS- promoted the early diagenetic sulfurization of organic matter. The Soxhlet extracts from shallow sediment contained specific three- and four-nitrogen-bearing molecular formulas that were also detected in bacterial cell extracts and presumably represent proteinaceous molecules. These compounds decreased with increasing sediment depth while one- and two-nitrogen-bearing molecules increased, resulting in a higher

  9. Characteristics of the volatile organic compounds -- Arid Integrated Demonstration Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Last, G.V.; Lenhard, R.J.; Bjornstad, B.N.; Evans, J.C.; Roberson, K.R.; Spane, F.A.; Amonette, J.E.; Rockhold, M.L.

    1991-10-01

    The Volatile Organic Compounds -- Arid Integrated Demonstration Program (VOC-Arid ID) is targeted at demonstration and testing of technologies for the evaluation and cleanup of volatile organic compounds and associated contaminants at arid DOE sites. The initial demonstration site is an area of carbon tetrachloride (CCl 4 ) contamination located near the center of the Hanford Site. The movement of CCl 4 and other volatile organic contaminants in the subsurface is very complex. The problem at the Hanford Site is further complicated by the concurrent discharge of other waste constituents including acids, lard oil, organic phosphates, and transuranic radionuclides. In addition, the subsurface environment is very complex, with large spatial variabilities in hydraulic properties. A thorough understanding of the problem is essential to the selection of appropriate containment, retrieval, and/or in situ remedial technologies. The effectiveness of remedial technologies depends on knowing where the contaminants are, how they are held up in a given physical and chemical subsurface environment; and knowing the physical, chemical, and microbiological changes that are induced by the various remedial technologies

  10. Global simulation of aromatic volatile organic compounds in the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera Perez, David; Taraborrelli, Domenico; Pozzer, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    Among the large number of chemical compounds in the atmosphere, the organic group plays a key role in the tropospheric chemistry. Specifically the subgroup called aromatics is of great interest. Aromatics are the predominant trace gases in urban areas due to high emissions, primarily by vehicle exhausts and fuel evaporation. They are also present in areas where biofuel is used (i.e residential wood burning). Emissions of aromatic compounds are a substantial fraction of the total emissions of the volatile organic compounds (VOC). Impact of aromatics on human health is very important, as they do not only contribute to the ozone formation in the urban environment, but they are also highly toxic themselves, especially in the case of benzene which is able to trigger a range of illness under long exposure, and of nitro-phenols which cause detrimental for humans and vegetation even at very low concentrations. The aim of this work is to assess the atmospheric impacts of aromatic compounds on the global scale. The main goals are: lifetime and budget estimation, mixing ratios distribution, net effect on ozone production and OH loss for the most emitted aromatic compounds (benzene, toluene, xylenes, ethylbenzene, styrene and trimethylbenzenes). For this purpose, we use the numerical chemistry and climate simulation ECHAM/MESSy Atmospheric Chemistry (EMAC) model to build the global atmospheric budget for the most emitted and predominant aromatic compounds in the atmosphere. A set of emissions was prepared in order to include biomass burning, vegetation and anthropogenic sources of aromatics into the model. A chemical mechanism based on the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM) was developed to describe the chemical oxidation in the gas phase of these aromatic compounds. MCM have been reduced in terms of number of chemical equation and species in order to make it affordable in a 3D model. Additionally other features have been added, for instance the production of HONO via ortho

  11. Advanced Characterization of Semivolatile Organic Compounds Emitted from Biomass Burning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatch, L. E.; Liu, Y.; Rivas-Ubach, A.; Shaw, J. B.; Lipton, M. S.; Barsanti, K. C.

    2017-12-01

    Biomass burning (BB) emits large amounts of non-methane organic gases (NMOGs) and primary (directly emitted) particulate matter (PM). NMOGs also react in plume to form secondary PM (i.e., SOA) and ozone. BB-PM has been difficult to represent accurately in models used for chemistry and climate predictions, including for air quality and fire management purposes. Much recent research supports that many previously unconsidered SOA precursors exist, including oxidation of semivolatile compounds (SVOCs). Although many recent studies have characterized relatively volatile BB-derived NMOGs and relatively non-volatile particle-phase organic species, comparatively few studies have performed detailed characterization of SVOCs emitted from BB. Here we present efforts to expand the volatility and compositional ranges of compounds measured in BB smoke. In this work, samples of SVOCs in gas and particle phases were collected from 18 fires representing a range of fuel types during the 2016 FIREX fire laboratory campaign; samples were analyzed by two-dimensional gas chromatography with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GCxGC-TOFMS) and Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS). Hundreds of compounds were detectable in both gas and particle phases by GCxGC-TOFMS whereas thousands of peaks were present in the FTICR mass spectra. Data from both approaches highlight that chemical fingerprints of smoke are fuel/burn-dependent. These efforts support our continued research in building the understanding and model representation of BB emissions and BB-derived SOA.

  12. Some methods for labelling organic compounds by deuterium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moustapha, C.

    1988-01-01

    The rapid growth of knowledge in the fields of biochemistry, physiology, and molecular biology reflects to a considerable degree the utilization of stable isotopes (specially deuterium) in the study of chemical reactions and fragmentation mechanisms in mass spectrometry, as well as in the pharmacological and biological studies. Organic compounds maybe labelled by deuterium through classic organic reactions by using special deuterated solvents and reagents. This article discusses some reactions, with examples on how to prepare labelled compounds with high isotopic purety. These reactions are: exchange reactions in acid and alkaline media (the exchange in the chromatographic column in liquid and gas phases, the exchange in homogenous medium), reduction reactions of functional groups as well as saturation of the double bounds by deuterium using hydrogenation catalystes, electrochemical reactions using KOLBE, and photochemical reactions. This article also deals with spectroscopic properties of deuterium and the methods which are used to identify its compounds such as infrared, nuclear magnetic resonance, and mass spectroscopy. 37 refs., 2 figs

  13. Catalytic oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) - A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal, Muhammad Shahzad; Razzak, Shaikh A.; Hossain, Mohammad M.

    2016-09-01

    Emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) is one of the major contributors to air pollution. The main sources of VOCs are petroleum refineries, fuel combustions, chemical industries, decomposition in the biosphere and biomass, pharmaceutical plants, automobile industries, textile manufacturers, solvents processes, cleaning products, printing presses, insulating materials, office supplies, printers etc. The most common VOCs are halogenated compounds, aldehydes, alcohols, ketones, aromatic compounds, and ethers. High concentrations of these VOCs can cause irritations, nausea, dizziness, and headaches. Some VOCs are also carcinogenic for both humans and animals. Therefore, it is crucial to minimize the emission of VOCs. Among the available technologies, the catalytic oxidation of VOCs is the most popular because of its versatility of handling a range of organic emissions under mild operating conditions. Due to that fact, there are numerous research initiatives focused on developing advanced technologies for the catalytic destruction of VOCs. This review discusses recent developments in catalytic systems for the destruction of VOCs. Review also describes various VOCs and their sources of emission, mechanisms of catalytic destruction, the causes of catalyst deactivation, and catalyst regeneration methods.

  14. Effects of organic compounds on actinoid transfer in natural environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiraki, Keizo; Nakaguchi, Yuzuru; Suzuki, Yasuhiro [Kinki Univ., Higashi-Osaka, Osaka (Japan). Faculty of Science and Technology; Senoo, Muneaki; Nagao, Seiya; Sakamoto, Yoshiaki

    1996-01-01

    For safety evaluation of geological disposal of radioactive wastes, it seems necessary to elucidate the geological transfer of radioactive nuclides in the soil and the undersea sediments. It has been known that there exist various organic compounds highly potential to form a complex with TRU elements, uranium, copper etc. in the soil and the sediments and those compounds may play an important role for geological transfer of nuclides. In this study, fluorescent substances contained in underground and river water were focused as the measures to identify the molecular species of organic compounds in natural water and their interactions with radionuclides and minor metals, and their geological transfers were investigated. Spectrophotometric properties of humic acid obtained in the market were examined. Its fluorescent intensity was strongest at pH 10 and stable for 2 weeks or more. Then, highly polluted river water was taken from Yamato river to determine the contents of humic acid and other fluorescent substances. Further, the effects of the additions of Cu and Fe on the fluorescent intensity were examined. (M.N.)

  15. Radiocatalytic degradation of dissolved organic compounds in wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiménez-Becerril Jaime

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Wastewater containing a high concentration of organic substances was exposed to gamma radiolysis in the presence and absence of a catalyst (TiO2; radiolysis and radiocatalysis were performed by means of continuous and discontinuous irradiation. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC was the parameter used to estimate the concentration of organic compounds without interference by the high mineral content. The data was well fitted to the pseudo-first-order kinetic model of Langmuir-Hinshelwood. From a [DOC]0 = 140 ± 7 mg/L, the higher DOC degradation (74% and apparent rate constant (Kapp = 0.083 h-1 were found using discontinuous radiocatalysis. This process could be an alternative method of treatment of industrial or municipal wastewater

  16. Charge-density matching in organic-inorganic uranyl compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krivovichev, S.V. [Saint Petersburg State Univ., Dept. of Crystallography, Faculty of Geology (Russian Federation); Krivovichev, S.V.; Tananaev, I.G.; Myasoedov, B.F. [Russian Academy of Sciences, A.N. Frumkin Institute of Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2007-10-15

    Single crystals of [C{sub 10}H{sub 26}N{sub 2}][(UO{sub 2})(SeO{sub 4}){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O)](H{sub 2}SeO{sub 4}){sub 0.85}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2} (1), [C{sub 10}H{sub 26}N{sub 2}][(UO{sub 2})(SeO{sub 4}){sub 2}] (H{sub 2}SeO{sub 4}){sub 0.50}(H{sub 2}O) (2), and [C{sub 8}H{sub 20}N]{sub 2}[(UO{sub 2})(SeO{sub 4}){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O)] (H{sub 2}O) (3) were prepared by evaporation from aqueous solution of uranyl nitrate, selenic acid and the respective amines. The structures of the compounds have been solved by direct methods and structural models have been obtained. The structures of the compounds 1, 2, and 3 contain U and Se atoms in pentagonal bipyramidal and tetrahedral coordinations, respectively. The UO{sub 7} and SeO{sub 4} polyhedra polymerize by sharing common O atoms to form chains (compound 1) or sheets (compounds 2 and 3). In the structure of 1, the layers consisting of hydrogen-bonded [UO{sub 2}(SeO{sub 4}){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O)]{sup 2-} chains are separated by mixed organic-inorganic layers comprising from [NH{sub 3}(CH{sub 2}){sub 10}NH{sub 3}]{sup 2+} molecules, H{sub 2}O molecules, and disordered electroneutral (H{sub 2}SeO{sub 4}) groups. The structure of 2 has a similar architecture but a purely inorganic layer is represented by a fully connected [UO{sub 2}(SeO{sub 4}){sub 2}]{sup 2-} sheet. The structure of 3 does not contain disordered (H{sub 2}SeO{sub 4}) groups but is based upon alternating [UO{sub 2}(SeO{sub 4}){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O)]{sup 2-} sheets and 1.5-nm-thick organic blocks consisting of positively charged protonated octylamine molecules, [NH{sub 3}(CH{sub 2}){sub 7}CH{sub 3}]{sup +}. The structures may be considered as composed of anionic inorganic sheets (2D blocks) and cationic organic blocks self-organized according to competing hydrophilic-hydrophobic interactions. Analysis of the structures allows us to conclude that the charge-density matching principle is observed in uranyl compounds. In order to satisfy some basic peculiarities of uranyl (in

  17. Epidemiological study of workers employed in the French nuclear fuel industry and analysis of the health effects of uranium compounds according to their solubility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhivin, Sergey

    2015-01-01

    with any cause of mortality in log-linear and linear excess relative risk models. A monotonic decreasing trend was observed for lung and lympho-hematopoietic cancers across uranium exposure categories. Previous analysis of a cohort of AREVA NC Pierrelatte uranium processing workers suggested that exposure to uranium may increase CSD mortality. A nested case-control study was set up to analyze the dose-response relationship and adjust for major CSD risk factors (smoking, blood pressure, body mass index, total cholesterol, and glycaemia) collected from medical files. The study included 102 CSD cases and 416 controls matched on attained age, gender, birth cohort, and socio-professional status. Absorbed dose was calculated taking into account the solubility of uranium compounds extracted from the JEM. CSD risk was analyzed by conditional logistic regression. A positive but imprecise association was observed (excess odds ratio per mGy 0.2, 95% CI 0.004 to 0.5). None of the considered CSD risk factor confounded this association. Compared to previous studies, our work provided important methodological improvements: consideration of specific uranium PCP, calculation of uranium organ doses, and adjustment on potential confounding factors (nonradiological exposures and CSD risk factors). The absence of association between exposure to rapidly soluble uranium compounds and mortality in the cohort of uranium enrichment workers may be indicative of the effective elimination of uranium from the human body. Analysis within the nested case-control study confirmed an association between uranium exposure and CSD mortality, not confounded by CSD risk factors. Our results should be confirmed in further studies. Future work should focus on uncertainties associated with internal uranium dose estimation, on nature of association with CSD mortality, and on temporal relationships between radiation and CSD risk factors. (author)

  18. Biodesulfurization of refractory organic sulfur compounds in fossil fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soleimani, Mehran; Bassi, Amarjeet; Margaritis, Argyrios

    2007-01-01

    The stringent new regulations to lower sulfur content in fossil fuels require new economic and efficient methods for desulfurization of recalcitrant organic sulfur. Hydrodesulfurization of such compounds is very costly and requires high operating temperature and pressure. Biodesulfurization is a non-invasive approach that can specifically remove sulfur from refractory hydrocarbons under mild conditions and it can be potentially used in industrial desulfurization. Intensive research has been conducted in microbiology and molecular biology of the competent strains to increase their desulfurization activity; however, even the highest activity obtained is still insufficient to fulfill the industrial requirements. To improve the biodesulfurization efficiency, more work is needed in areas such as increasing specific desulfurization activity, hydrocarbon phase tolerance, sulfur removal at higher temperature, and isolating new strains for desulfurizing a broader range of sulfur compounds. This article comprehensively reviews and discusses key issues, advances and challenges for a competitive biodesulfurization process.

  19. Atmospheric PM and volatile organic compounds released from Mediterranean shrubland wildfires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Hurtado, Elisa; Pey, Jorge; Borrás, Esther; Sánchez, Pilar; Vera, Teresa; Carratalá, Adoración; Alastuey, Andrés; Querol, Xavier; Vallejo, V. Ramon

    2014-06-01

    Wildfires produce a significant release of gases and particles affecting climate and air quality. In the Mediterranean region, shrublands significantly contribute to burned areas and may show specific emission profiles. Our objective was to depict and quantify the primary-derived aerosols and precursors of secondary particulate species released during shrubland experimental fires, in which fire-line intensity values were equivalent to those of moderate shrubland wildfires, by using a number of different methodologies for the characterization of organic and inorganic compounds in both gas-phase and particulate-phase. Emissions of PM mass, particle number concentrations and organic and inorganic PMx components during flaming and smouldering phases were characterized in a field shrubland fire experiment. Our results revealed a clear prevalence of K+ and SO42- as inorganic ions released during the flaming-smouldering processes, accounting for 68-80% of the inorganic soluble fraction. During the residual-smouldering phases, in addition to K+ and SO42-, Ca2+ was found in significant amounts probably due the predominance of re-suspension processes (ashes and soil dust) over other emission sources during this stage. Concerning organic markers, the chromatograms were dominated by phenols, n-alkanals and n-alkanones, as well as by alcohol biomarkers in all the PMx fractions investigated. Levoglucosan was the most abundant degradation compound with maximum emission factors between 182 and 261 mg kg-1 in PM2.5 and PM10 respectively. However, levoglucosan was also observed in significant amounts in the gas-phase. The most representative organic volatile constituents in the smoke samples were alcohols, carbonyls, acids, monocyclic and bicyclic arenes, isoprenoids and alkanes compounds. The emission factors obtained in this study may contribute to the validation and improvement of national and international emission inventories of this intricate and diffuse emission source.

  20. Seeking organic compounds on Mars : in situ analysis of organic compounds by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry on MOMA experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buch, A.; Freissinet, C.; Sternberg, R.; Pinnick, V.; Szopa, C.; Coll, P. J.; Rodier, C.; Garnier, C.; Steininger, H.; Moma Team

    2010-12-01

    The search for signs of past or present life is one of the primary goals of future Mars exploratory missions. The Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) experiment of the ExoMars mission (set to launch 2016-2018) is a joint venture by the European Space Agency and NASA to develop a sensitive detector for organics on Mars. MOMA will be one of the main analytical instruments aboard the ExoMars Rover aimed at characterizing possible “signs-of-life molecules” in the Martian environment such as amino acids, carboxylic acids, nucleobases or polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). With the aim to separate and detect organic compounds from Martian soil, the French MOMA team has built a gas chromatograph able to work in standalone mode by using a TCD detector. The gas chromatograph can also be coupled with an ion trap mass spectrometer developed by the US MOMA team. Moreover, a GC-MS compatible sample processing system (SPS) allowing the extraction and the chemical transformation of the organic compounds from the soil, that fits within space flight conditions, has also been developed. The sample processing is performed in an oven, dedicated to the MOMA experiment containing the solid sample (50-100mg). The internal temperature of oven can be ranged from 20 to 1000 °C which allows for pyrolysis, thermochemolysis or derivatization. The organic extraction step is achieved by using thermodesorption in the range of 100 to 300°C for 0.5 to 5 min. Then, the chemical derivatization and/or thermochemolysis of the extracted compounds is performed directly on the soil with a mixture of MTBSTFA-DMF, TMAH or DMF-DMA solution when enantiomeric separation is required. By decreasing the polarity of the target molecules, this step allows for their volatilization at a temperature below 250°C without any chemical degradation. Once derivatized, the volatile target molecules are trapped in a cold chemical trap and promptly desorbed into the gas chromatograph coupled to the mass

  1. Characterization of soluble microbial products (SMPs) in a membrane bioreactor (MBR) treating synthetic wastewater containing pharmaceutical compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dongqing; Trzcinski, Antoine Prandota; Kunacheva, Chinagarn; Stuckey, David C; Liu, Yu; Tan, Soon Keat; Ng, Wun Jern

    2016-10-01

    This study investigated the behaviour and characteristics of soluble microbial products (SMP) in two anoxic-aerobic membrane bioreactors (MBRs): MBRcontrol and MBRpharma, for treating municipal wastewater. Both protein and polysaccharides measured exhibited higher concentrations in the MBRpharma than the MBRcontrol. Molecular weight (MW) distribution analysis revealed that the presence of pharmaceuticals enhanced the accumulation of SMPs with macro- (13,091 kDa and 1587 kDa) and intermediate-MW (189 kDa) compounds in the anoxic MBRpharma, while a substantial decrease was observed in both MBR effluents. Excitation emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence contours indicated that the exposure to pharmaceuticals seemed to stimulate the production of aromatic proteins containing tyrosine (10.1-32.6%) and tryptophan (14.7-43.1%), compared to MBRcontrol (9.9-29.1% for tyrosine; 11.8-42.5% for tryptophan). Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis revealed aromatics, long-chain alkanes and esters were the predominant SMPs in the MBRs. More peaks were present in the aerobic MBRpharma (196) than anoxic MBRpharma (133). The SMPs identified exhibited both biodegradability and recalcitrance in the MBR treatment processes. Only 8 compounds in the MBRpharma were the same as in the MBRcontrol. Alkanes were the most dominant SMPs (51%) in the MBRcontrol, while aromatics were dominant (40%) in the MBRpharma. A significant decrease in aromatics (from 16 to 7) in the MBRpharma permeate was observed, compared to the aerobic MBRpharma. Approximately 21% of compounds in the aerobic MBRcontrol were rejected by membrane filtration, while this increased to 28% in the MBRpharma. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Volatile organic compounds in the unsaturated zone from radioactive wastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Ronald J.; Andraski, Brian J.; Stonestrom, David A.; Luo, Wentai

    2012-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are often comingled with low-level radioactive wastes (LLRW), but little is known about subsurface VOC emanations from LLRW landfills. The current study systematically quantified VOCs associated with LLRW over an 11-yr period at the USGS Amargosa Desert Research Site (ADRS) in southwestern Nevada. Unsaturated-zone gas samples of VOCs were collected by adsorption on resin cartridges and analyzed by thermal desorption and GC/MS. Sixty of 87 VOC method analytes were detected in the 110-m-thick unsaturated zone surrounding a LLRW disposal facility. Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) were detected in 100% of samples collected. Chlorofluorocarbons are powerful greenhouse gases, deplete stratospheric ozone, and are likely released from LLRW facilities worldwide. Soil-gas samples collected from a depth of 24 m and a horizontal distance 100 m south of the nearest waste-disposal trench contained >60,000 ppbv total VOCs, including >37,000 ppbv CFCs. Extensive sampling in the shallow unsaturated zone (0–2 m deep) identified areas where total VOC concentrations exceeded 5000 ppbv at the 1.5-m depth. Volatile organic compound concentrations exceeded background levels up to 300 m from the facility. Maximum vertical diffusive fluxes of total VOCs were estimated to be 1 g m-2 yr-1. Volatile organic compound distributions were similar but not identical to those previously determined for tritium and elemental mercury. To our knowledge, this study is the first to characterize the unsaturated zone distribution of VOCs emanating from a LLRW landfill. Our results may help explain anomalous transport of radionuclides at the ADRS and elsewhere.

  3. New biodegradable organic-soluble chelating agents for simultaneous removal of heavy metals and organic pollutants from contaminated media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullmann, Amos; Brauner, Neima; Vazana, Shlomi; Katz, Zhanna; Goikhman, Roman; Seemann, Boaz; Marom, Hanit; Gozin, Michael

    2013-09-15

    Advanced biodegradable and non-toxic organic chelators, which are soluble in organic media, were synthesized on the basis of the S,S-ethylenediamine-disuccinate (S,S-EDDS) ligand. The modifications suggested in this work include attachment of a lipophilic hydrocarbon chain ("tail") to one or both nitrogen atoms of the S,S-EDDS. The new ligands were designed and evaluated for application in the Sediments Remediation Phase Transition Extraction (SR-PTE) process. This novel process is being developed for the simultaneous removal of both heavy metals and organic pollutants from contaminated soils, sediments or sludge. The new chelators were designed to bind various target metal ions, to promote extraction of these ions into organic solvents. Several variations of attached tails were synthesized and tested. The results for one of them, N,N'-bis-dodecyl-S,S-EDDS (C24-EDDS), showed that the metal-ligand complexes are concentrated in the organic-rich phase in the Phase Transition Extraction process (more than 80%). Preliminary applications of the SR-PTE process with the C24-EDDS ligand were conducted also on actually contaminated sludge (field samples). The extraction of five toxic metals, namely, Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn was examined. In general, the extraction performance of the new ligand was not less than that of S,S-EDDS when a sufficient ligand-to-extracted ion ratio (about 4:1 was applied. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Volatile organic compounds emissions from gasoline and diesel powered vehicle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mugica, V [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Vega, E; Sanchez, G; Reyes, E; Arriaga, J. L [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Chow, J; Watson, J; Egami, R [Desert Research Institute, Reno, NV (United States)

    2001-01-01

    In this research, volatile organic compound emissions were characterized from gasoline and diesel vehicles. Sampling campaigns in the Metropolitan Area of Mexico City were designed and carried out in tunnels, crossroads, and truck and bus terminals. The samples were analyzed with gas chromatography getting more than 250 different compounds, being more or less 60 of them the 80% of all the emissions. The most abundant are the two carbon compounds, as a result of the combustion, and compounds related to fuels compositions, like isopentane, xylenes, toluene among others. The profiles obtained in tunnels and crossroads were very similar with the exception of the 3 and 4 carbon compounds, which were found in bigger proportion in the profiles at crossroads. This may probably be due to the blend with the ambient air. The profiles corresponding to trucks and buses have a smaller content of two carbon compounds and a bigger content of xylenes, toluene and ethylbenzene. The variations in the proportions of the compounds allow differentiating the profiles of vehicles using gasoline and diesel. [Spanish] En este trabajo se caracterizaron las emisiones de compuestos organicos volatiles provenientes de vehiculos a gasolina y a diesel. Para ello, se disenaron diversas campanas de muestreo en la zona Metropolitana de la Ciudad de Mexico, en tuneles, cruceros y estaciones de camiones de carga y autobuses. Las muestras se analizaron con cromatografia, de gases obteniendose mas de 250 compuestos distintos, de los cuales aproximadamente 60 corresponden a mas del 80% de las emisiones. Los compuestos mas abundantes son los de dos carbonos, resultado de la combustion, y 4 carbonos que se encontraron en mayor proporcion en los perfiles de cruceros, lo cual se debe probablemente a la mezcla con el aire ambiente. Los perfiles correspondientes a camiones de carga y autobuses tienen un menor contenido de compuestos de dos carbonos y un mayor contenido de xilenos, tolueno y etilbenceno. Estas

  5. Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes and Volatile Organic Compounds Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sobri S.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the adsorption effect of volatile organic compounds (chloroacetophenone, acetonitrile and hexane towards the change of resistance of CNTs pellet as sensor signal was investigated. CNTs used in this research were synthesized using Floating Catalyst – Chemical Vapor Deposition (FC-CVD method in optimum condition. The synthesized CNTs were characterized using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM, Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM and Raman Spectroscopy. The variation of resistance changes towards the tested gases were recorded using a multimeter. CNTs sensor pellet showed good responses towards the tested gases, however, the sensitivity, response time and recovery time of sensor pellet need to be optimized.

  6. Electron beam treatment of toxic volatile organic compounds and dioxins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kojima, Takuji

    2006-01-01

    Considerations of wastes based on the reduction, reuse and recycle in daily life are primary measures to conserve our environment, but the control technology is necessary to support these measures. The electron beam (EB) process is promising as an advanced purification process having advantages such as a quick treatment of big volume gas, applicability even for very low concentration pollutants as the further purification at the downstream of existing process, and decomposition of pollutants into non-toxic substances by one process. The EB technology has been developed for treatment of toxic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in ventilation gas and dioxins in solid waste incineration flue gas. (author)

  7. Organic compounds used in animal husbandry: Chapter 13

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wershaw, Robert L.; Shore, Laurence S.; Pruden, Amy; Shore, Laurence S.

    2009-01-01

    Although in general, the same drugs are used by humans as for animal husbandry, some compounds are unique to CAFOs. In raising and fattening steers, anabolic steroids are widely used in the US. In the cattle industry, large use is made of the acaricides, avermectins, and the cypermethrins as well as juvenile growth hormone inhibitor for fly and tick control that could affect soil fauna in very small quantities as they reach the environment without any modification. In poultry, the organic arsenides have been widely used for decades to control coccidiosis and increase growth. The environmental fate of the arsenic excreted in the poultry feces is therefore been an area of concern.

  8. Nanostructured Polypyrrole-Based Ammonia and Volatile Organic Compound Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milena Šetka

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this review is to summarize the recent progress in the fabrication of efficient nanostructured polymer-based sensors with special focus on polypyrrole. The correlation between physico-chemical parameters, mainly morphology of various polypyrrole nanostructures, and their sensitivity towards selected gas and volatile organic compounds (VOC is provided. The different approaches of polypyrrole modification with other functional materials are also discussed. With respect to possible sensors application in medicine, namely in the diagnosis of diseases via the detection of volatile biomarkers from human breath, the sensor interaction with humidity is described as well. The major attention is paid to analytes such as ammonia and various alcohols.

  9. Spatial arrangement of organic compounds on a model mineral surface: implications for soil organic matter stabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petridis, Loukas; Ambaye, Haile; Jagadamma, Sindhu; Kilbey, S Michael; Lokitz, Bradley S; Lauter, Valeria; Mayes, Melanie A

    2014-01-01

    The complexity of the mineral-organic carbon interface may influence the extent of stabilization of organic carbon compounds in soils, which is important for global climate futures. The nanoscale structure of a model interface was examined here by depositing films of organic carbon compounds of contrasting chemical character, hydrophilic glucose and amphiphilic stearic acid, onto a soil mineral analogue (Al2O3). Neutron reflectometry, a technique which provides depth-sensitive insight into the organization of the thin films, indicates that glucose molecules reside in a layer between Al2O3 and stearic acid, a result that was verified by water contact angle measurements. Molecular dynamics simulations reveal the thermodynamic driving force behind glucose partitioning on the mineral interface: The entropic penalty of confining the less mobile glucose on the mineral surface is lower than for stearic acid. The fundamental information obtained here helps rationalize how complex arrangements of organic carbon on soil mineral surfaces may arise.

  10. Water soluble organic aerosols in indo gangetic plain (IGP): Insights from aerosol mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Abhishek; Rajeev, Pradhi; Rajput, Prashant; Gupta, Tarun

    2017-12-01

    Filter samples collected during winter of 2015-16 from two polluted urban locations (Allahabad and Kanpur) residing within Indo-Gangetic plain (IGP) showed high levels of water-soluble organic aerosols (WSOA). Total organic aerosols (OA) in submicron fraction, measured at Kanpur in real time via Aerosol Mass Spectrometer also showed substantially high concentration levels. WSOA to OA contribution in Kanpur was found to be very high (around 55%) indicating significant contributions from secondary OA (SOA). On average, WSOA oxidation ratio (O/C) was found to be higher (15-20%) in Kanpur than at Allahabad. WSOA from Allahabad was found to be following a much shallower slope (-0.38) in Van Krevelen diagram (H/C vs O/C plot) than Kanpur (-0.58). These differences suggest different composition and chemistry of WSOA at these two different locations. O/C ratios of WSOA were found to be much higher (~40%) than that of OA and independent of WSOA loading. Higher OA loadings were found to be associated with less oxidized primary OAs (POA) and culminated into lower WSOA/OA ratios. The presence of organo sulfate in filter samples from both locations indicate a significant amount of aqueous processing of organics. Concentrations and characteristics of water insoluble OA (WIOA) in Kanpur revealed that although they are present in significant quantity, their oxidation levels are much (almost 3 times) lower than that of WSOA. This finding indicates that less oxidized OAs are less soluble in line with the conventional wisdom. This study provides the first insight into oxidation levels and evolution of WSOA from India and also explores the interplay between WSOA and OA characteristics based on AMS measurements. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Enhancement of water soluble wheat bran polyphenolic compounds using different steviol glucosides prepared by thermostable β-galactosidase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hee-jung Lim

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Production of wheat bran (WB for human consumption is estimated to be about 90 million tons per year. WB contains an abundant source of dietary fiber, minerals, vitamins, and bioactive compounds. WB is a by-product of milling and contains an abundant source of carbohydrate (60%, protein (12%, fat (0.5%, minerals (2%, and bioactive compounds such as phenolic acids, arabinoxylans, flavonoids, caroteinoids alkylresorcinol and phytosterols. These are known for health promoting properties such as controlling glycemic index, reducing plasma cholesterol level, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anticarcinogenic activities. Several terpene glycosides such as mogroside V, paenoiflorin, geniposide, rubusoside (Ru, stevioside (Ste, rebaudioside A (RebA, steviol monoside, and stevioside glucoside have been discovered to enhance the solubility of a number of pharmaceutically and medically important compounds that normally show poor solubility in water. Context and purpose of this study: In this study, in order to increase soluble extraction of polyphenol compounds of WB using Ru, the expression of β-galactosidase from Thermus thermophilus (T. thermophilus was optimized using different E. coli hosts and a different concentration of lactose inducer rather than of isopropyl-1- thio-β-D-galactopyranoside (IPTG for industrial production. Additionally, the effect of different steviol glucosides (Ru, Ste, RebA, and SG on the enhancement of polyphenol compounds extraction from wheat bran was studied. Results: β-galactosidase from T. thermophilus was used for the specific conversion of stevioside (Ste to rubusoside (Ru with 92% productivity. The enzyme was optimized to be expressed in E. coli. With 7 mM lactose, the β-galactosidase activity expressed was 34.3, 14.2, or 34.4 ± 0.5 U/mL in E. coli BL21(DE3pLysS, Rosetta(DE3pLysS, or BL21(DE3 at 37°C, and 9.8 ± 0.2, 7.0 ± 0.5, or 7.4 ± 0.2 U/mL at 28°C respectively. The expression of

  12. Emission of Biogenic Volatile Organic Compounds in the Arctic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindwall, Frida

    , emitted in order to communicate within and between trophic levels and as protection against biotic and abiotic stresses, or as byproducts. Some BVOCs are very reactive, and when entering the atmosphere they rapidly react with for example hydroxyl radicals and ozone, affecting the oxidative capacity......Emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) from arctic ecosystems are scarcely studied and the effect of climate change on BVOC emissions even less so. BVOCs are emitted from all living organisms and play a role for atmospheric chemistry. The major part of BVOCs derives from plants...... dependent and the emissions will increase in a future warmer climate. The aims of this dissertation were to study BVOC emission rates and blends from arctic ecosystems and to reveal the effect of climate change on BVOC emissions from the Arctic. BVOC emissions were measured in ambient and modified...

  13. Are Some Fungal Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs Mycotoxins?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan W. Bennett

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Volatile organic compounds (VOCs are carbon-compounds that easily evaporate at room temperature. Toxins are biologically produced poisons; mycotoxins are those toxins produced by microscopic fungi. All fungi emit blends of VOCs; the qualitative and quantitative composition of these volatile blends varies with the species of fungus and the environmental situation in which the fungus is grown. These fungal VOCs, produced as mixtures of alcohols, aldehydes, acids, ethers, esters, ketones, terpenes, thiols and their derivatives, are responsible for the characteristic moldy odors associated with damp indoor spaces. There is increasing experimental evidence that some of these VOCs have toxic properties. Laboratory tests in mammalian tissue culture and Drosophila melanogaster have shown that many single VOCs, as well as mixtures of VOCs emitted by growing fungi, have toxic effects. This paper describes the pros and cons of categorizing toxigenic fungal VOCs as mycotoxins, uses genomic data to expand on the definition of mycotoxin, and summarizes some of the linguistic and other conventions that can create barriers to communication between the scientists who study VOCs and those who study toxins. We propose that “volatoxin” might be a useful term to describe biogenic volatile compounds with toxigenic properties.

  14. Dynamic behavior of semivolatile organic compounds in indoor air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loy, Michael David Van [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1998-12-09

    Exposures to a wide range of air pollutants are often dominated by those occurring in buildings because of three factors: 1) most people spend a large fraction of their time indoors, 2) many pollutants have strong indoor sources, and 3) the dilution volume in buildings is generally several orders of magnitude smaller than that of an urban airshed. Semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCS) are emitted by numerous indoor sources, including tobacco combustion, cooking, carpets, paints, resins, and glues, so indoor gasphase concentrations of these compounds are likely to be elevated relative to ambient levels. The rates of uptake and release of reversibly sorbing SVOCS by indoor materials directly affect both peak concentrations and persistence of the pollutants indoors after source elimination. Thus, accurate predictions of SVOC dynamics in indoor air require an understanding of contaminant sorption on surface materials such as carpet and wallboard. The dynamic behaviors of gas-phase nicotine and phenanthrene were investigated in a 20 ms stainless steel chamber containing carpet and painted wallboard. Each compound was studied independently, first in the empty chamber, then with each sorbent individually, and finally with both sorbents in the chamber.

  15. Emission and role of biogenic volatile organic compounds in biosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saleem, A.R.

    2013-01-01

    Plants are an essential part of the biosphere. Under the influence of climate change, plants respond in multiple ways within the ecosystem. One such way is the release of assimilated carbon back to the atmosphere in form of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs), which are produced by plants and are involved in plant growth, reproduction, defense and other . These compounds are emitted from vegetation into the atmosphere under different environmental situations. Plants produce an extensive range of BVOCs, including isoprenoids, sequisterpenes, aldehydes, alcohols and terpenes in different tissues above and below the ground. The emission rates vary with various environmental conditions and the plant growth stage in its life span.BVOCs are released under biotic and abiotic stress changes, like heat, drought, land-use changes, higher atmospheric CO concentrations, increased UV radiation and insect or disease attack. Plants emit BVOCs in atmosphere in order to avoid stress, and adapt to harsh circumstances. These compounds also have a significant role in plant-plant interaction, communication and competition. BVOCs have the ability to alter atmospheric chemistry; they readily react with atmospheric pollutant gases under high temperature and form tropospheric ozone, which is a potent air pollutant for global warming and disease occurrence. BVOCs may be a cause of photochemical smog and increase the stay of other GHGs in the atmosphere. Therefore, further study is required to assess the behavior of BVOCs in the biosphere as well as the atmosphere. (author)

  16. Hygroscopic behavior of atmospheric aerosols containing nitrate salts and water-soluble organic acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Jing

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available While nitrate salts have critical impacts on environmental effects of atmospheric aerosols, the effects of coexisting species on hygroscopicity of nitrate salts remain uncertain. The hygroscopic behaviors of nitrate salt aerosols (NH4NO3, NaNO3, Ca(NO32 and their internal mixtures with water-soluble organic acids were determined using a hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer (HTDMA. The nitrate salt ∕ organic acid mixed aerosols exhibit varying phase behavior and hygroscopic growth depending upon the type of components in the particles. Whereas pure nitrate salt particles show continuous water uptake with increasing relative humidity (RH, the deliquescence transition is still observed for ammonium nitrate particles internally mixed with organic acids such as oxalic acid and succinic acid with a high deliquescence point. The hygroscopicity of submicron aerosols containing sodium nitrate and an organic acid is also characterized by continuous growth, indicating that sodium nitrate tends to exist in a liquid-like state under dry conditions. It is observed that in contrast to the pure components, the water uptake is hindered at low and moderate RH for calcium nitrate particles containing malonic acid or phthalic acid, suggesting the potential effects of mass transfer limitation in highly viscous mixed systems. Our findings improve fundamental understanding of the phase behavior and water uptake of nitrate-salt-containing aerosols in the atmospheric environment.

  17. Quantitative approaches for the description of solubilities of inorganic compounds in near-critical and supercritical water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leusbrock, Ingo; Metz, S.J.; Rexwinkel, Glenn; Versteeg, Geert

    2008-01-01

    The decreased solubility of salts in supercritical water is of great interest for industrial applications and scientific work. Several methods to quantify this decreased solubility are described and reviewed by applying them on experimental solubility data. The salts used for comparison are NaCl,

  18. Anti-photoaging and Photoprotective Compounds Derived from Marine Organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallela, Ramjee; Na-Young, Yoon; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2010-01-01

    Marine organisms form a prominent component of the oceanic population, which significantly contribute in the production of cosmeceutical and pharmaceutical molecules with biologically efficient moieties. In addition to the molecules of various biological activities like anti-bacterial, anti-cancerous, anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative etc., these organisms also produce potential photoprotective or anti-photoaging agents, which are attracting present day researchers. Continuous exposure to UV irradiation (both UV-A and UV-B) leads to the skin cancer and other photoaging complications, which are typically mediated by the reactive oxygen species (ROS), generated in the oxidative pathways. Many of the anti-oxidative and anti-photoaging compounds have been identified previously, which work efficiently against photodamage of the skin. Recently, marine originated photoprotective or anti-photoaging behavior was observed in the methanol extracts of Corallina pilulifera (CPM). These extracts were found to exert potent antioxidant activity and protective effect on UV-A-induced oxidative stress in human dermal fibroblast (HDF) cells by protecting DNA and also by inhibiting matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), a key component in photoaging of the skin due to exposure to UV-A. The present review depicts various other photoprotective compounds from algae and other marine sources for further elaborative research and their probable use in cosmeceutical and pharmaceutical industries. PMID:20479974

  19. Anti-photoaging and Photoprotective Compounds Derived from Marine Organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramjee Pallela

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Marine organisms form a prominent component of the oceanic population, which significantly contribute in the production of cosmeceutical and pharmaceutical molecules with biologically efficient moieties. In addition to the molecules of various biological activities like anti-bacterial, anti-cancerous, anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative etc., these organisms also produce potential photoprotective or anti-photoaging agents, which are attracting present day researchers. Continuous exposure to UV irradiation (both UV-A and UV-B leads to the skin cancer and other photoaging complications, which are typically mediated by the reactive oxygen species (ROS, generated in the oxidative pathways. Many of the anti-oxidative and anti-photoaging compounds have been identified previously, which work efficiently against photodamage of the skin. Recently, marine originated photoprotective or anti-photoaging behavior was observed in the methanol extracts of Corallina pilulifera (CPM. These extracts were found to exert potent antioxidant activity and protective effect on UV-A-induced oxidative stress in human dermal fibroblast (HDF cells by protecting DNA and also by inhibiting matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs, a key component in photoaging of the skin due to exposure to UV-A. The present review depicts various other photoprotective compounds from algae and other marine sources for further elaborative research and their probable use in cosmeceutical and pharmaceutical industries.

  20. Formation of highly oxygenated organic molecules from aromatic compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Molteni

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Anthropogenic volatile organic compounds (AVOCs often dominate the urban atmosphere and consist to a large degree of aromatic hydrocarbons (ArHCs, such as benzene, toluene, xylenes, and trimethylbenzenes, e.g., from the handling and combustion of fuels. These compounds are important precursors for the formation of secondary organic aerosol. Here we show that the oxidation of aromatics with OH leads to a subsequent autoxidation chain reaction forming highly oxygenated molecules (HOMs with an O : C ratio of up to 1.09. This is exemplified for five single-ring ArHCs (benzene, toluene, o-/m-/p-xylene, mesitylene (1,3,5-trimethylbenzene and ethylbenzene, as well as two conjugated polycyclic ArHCs (naphthalene and biphenyl. We report the elemental composition of the HOMs and show the differences in the oxidation patterns of these ArHCs. A potential pathway for the formation of these HOMs from aromatics is presented and discussed. We hypothesize that AVOCs may contribute substantially to new particle formation events that have been detected in urban areas.

  1. Formation of highly oxygenated organic molecules from aromatic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molteni, Ugo; Bianchi, Federico; Klein, Felix; El Haddad, Imad; Frege, Carla; Rossi, Michel J.; Dommen, Josef; Baltensperger, Urs

    2018-02-01

    Anthropogenic volatile organic compounds (AVOCs) often dominate the urban atmosphere and consist to a large degree of aromatic hydrocarbons (ArHCs), such as benzene, toluene, xylenes, and trimethylbenzenes, e.g., from the handling and combustion of fuels. These compounds are important precursors for the formation of secondary organic aerosol. Here we show that the oxidation of aromatics with OH leads to a subsequent autoxidation chain reaction forming highly oxygenated molecules (HOMs) with an O : C ratio of up to 1.09. This is exemplified for five single-ring ArHCs (benzene, toluene, o-/m-/p-xylene, mesitylene (1,3,5-trimethylbenzene) and ethylbenzene), as well as two conjugated polycyclic ArHCs (naphthalene and biphenyl). We report the elemental composition of the HOMs and show the differences in the oxidation patterns of these ArHCs. A potential pathway for the formation of these HOMs from aromatics is presented and discussed. We hypothesize that AVOCs may contribute substantially to new particle formation events that have been detected in urban areas.

  2. Biogenic volatile organic compound emissions from vegetation fires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciccioli, Paolo; Centritto, Mauro; Loreto, Francesco

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this paper was to provide an overview of the current state of the art on research into the emission of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) from vegetation fires. Significant amounts of VOCs are emitted from vegetation fires, including several reactive compounds, the majority belonging to the isoprenoid family, which rapidly disappear in the plume to yield pollutants such as secondary organic aerosol and ozone. This makes determination of fire-induced BVOC emission difficult, particularly in areas where the ratio between VOCs and anthropogenic NOx is favourable to the production of ozone, such as Mediterranean areas and highly anthropic temperate (and fire-prone) regions of the Earth. Fire emissions affecting relatively pristine areas, such as the Amazon and the African savannah, are representative of emissions of undisturbed plant communities. We also examined expected BVOC emissions at different stages of fire development and combustion, from drying to flaming, and from heatwaves coming into contact with unburned vegetation at the edge of fires. We conclude that forest fires may dramatically change emission factors and the profile of emitted BVOCs, thereby influencing the chemistry and physics of the atmosphere, the physiology of plants and the evolution of plant communities within the ecosystem. © 2014 The Authors. Plant, Cell & Environment published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Organic matrix effects on the formation of light-absorbing compounds from α-dicarbonyls in aqueous salt solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drozd, Greg T; McNeill, V Faye

    2014-04-01

    Aqueous-phase reactions of organic compounds are of general importance in environmental systems. Reactions of α-dicarbonyl compounds in the aqueous phase of atmospheric aerosols can impact their climate-relevant physical properties including hygroscopicity and absorption of light. Less-reactive water-soluble organic compounds may contribute an organic matrix component to the aqueous environment, potentially impacting the reaction kinetics. In this work we demonstrate the effects of organic matrices on the self-reactions of glyoxal (Gly) and methylglyoxal (mGly) in aqueous solutions containing ammonium sulfate. At an organic-to-sulfate mass ratio of 2 : 1, carbohydrate-like matrices resembling oxidized organic aerosol material reduce the rate of formation of light-absorbing products by up to an order of magnitude. The greatest decreases in the reaction rates were observed for organic matrices with smaller, more linear molecular structures. Initial UV-Vis spectra, product studies, relative rate data, acidity changes, and viscosity measurements suggest that shifts in carbonyl equilibria, due in part to (hemi)acetal formation with the matrix, reduce the rate of formation of light-absorbing imidazole and oligomer species.

  4. In-depth compositional analysis of water-soluble and -insoluble organic substances in fine (PM2.5) airborne particles using ultra-high-resolution 15T FT-ICR MS and GC×GC-TOFMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jung Hoon; Ryu, Jijeong; Jeon, Sodam; Seo, Jungju; Yang, Yung-Hun; Pack, Seung Pil; Choung, Sungwook; Jang, Kyoung-Soon

    2017-06-01

    Airborne particulate matter consisting of ionic species, salts, heavy metals and carbonaceous material is one of the most serious environmental pollutants owing to its impacts on the environment and human health. Although elemental and organic carbon compounds are known to be major components of aerosols, information on the elemental composition of particulate matter remains limited because of the broad range of compounds involved and the limits of analytical instruments. In this study, we investigated water-soluble and -insoluble organic compounds in fine (PM 2.5 ) airborne particles collected during winter in Korea to better understand the elemental compositions and distributions of these compounds. To collect ultra-high-resolution mass profiles, we analyzed water-soluble and -insoluble organic compounds, extracted with water and dichloromethane, respectively, using an ultra-high-resolution 15 T Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (15T FT-ICR) mass spectrometer in positive ion mode (via both electrospray ionization [ESI] and atmospheric pressure photoionization [APPI] for water-extracts and via APPI for dichloromethane-extracts). In conjunction with the FT-ICR mass spectrometry (MS) data, subsequent two-dimensional gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC×GC-TOFMS) data were used to identify potentially hazardous organic components, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. This analysis provided information on the sources of ambient particles collected during winter season and partial evidence of contributions to the acidity of organic content in PM 2.5 particles. The compositional and structural features of water-soluble and -insoluble organic compounds from PM 2.5 particles are important for understanding the potential impacts of aerosol-carried organic substances on human health and global ecosystems in future toxicological studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. THE RELATION OF INFLAMMATION TO THE MOLECULAR STRUCTURE OF CARBON COMPOUNDS SOLUBLE IN THE FLUIDS OF THE BODY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opie, Eugene L.

    1965-01-01

    The peritoneal, like the pleural cavity, gives opportunity to measure with adequate accuracy the activity of inflammatory reactions defined by movement of fluid within the cavity, by migration of leucocytes into it, and by exudation of proteins from the plasma. The activity of inflammatory reactions caused by saccharides or by alcohols that were tested varied in accord with their molecular weight, the osmotic pressure maintained by solutions of corresponding concentration, their boiling point, or by other colligative properties. Blood serum or globulin in the concentration with which it occurs in blood serum injected into the peritoneal cavity caused changes which differed little from those caused by physiological salt solution. Protein with molecular weight as low as that of cytochrome C (12,000) or ovalbumin (45,000) when in dilute solution (1 per cent) were rapidly absorbed, whereas trypsin and chymotrypsin under the same conditions caused very active inflammatory reactions because they set free amino acids and perhaps polypeptides with amino acids in short chains. The activity of inflammatory reactions caused by carbon compounds soluble in body fluids varied in accord with their colligative properties. PMID:14276772

  6. An automated analyzer to measure surface-atmosphere exchange fluxes of water soluble inorganic aerosol compounds and reactive trace gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Rick M; Trebs, Ivonne; Otjes, René; Jongejan, Piet A C; Ten Brink, Harry; Phillips, Gavin; Kortner, Michael; Meixner, Franz X; Nemitz, Eiko

    2009-03-01

    Here, we present a new automated instrument for semicontinuous gradient measurements of water-soluble reactive trace gas species (NH3, HNO3, HONO, HCl, and SO2) and their related aerosol compounds (NH4+, NO3-, Cl-, SO4(2-)). Gas and aerosol samples are collected simultaneously at two heights using rotating wet-annular denuders and steam-jet aerosol collectors, respectively. Online (real-time) analysis using ion chromatography (IC) for anions and flow injection analysis (FIA) for NH4+ and NH3 provide a half-hourly averaged gas and aerosol gradients within each hour. Through the use of syringe pumps, IC preconcentration columns, and high-quality purified water, the system achieves detection limits (3sigma-definition) under field conditions of typically: 136/207,135/114, 29/ 22,119/92, and 189/159 ng m(-3) for NH3/NH4+, HNO3/NO3-, HONO/ NO2-, HCl/Cl- and SO2/SO4(2-), respectively. The instrument demonstrates very good linearity and accuracy for liquid and selected gas phase calibrations over typical ambient concentration ranges. As shown by examples from field experiments, the instrument provides sufficient precision (3-9%), even at low ambient concentrations, to resolve vertical gradients and calculate surface-atmosphere exchange fluxes undertypical meteorological conditions of the atmospheric surface layer using the aerodynamic gradient technique.

  7. Volatile organic compound emissions from Larrea tridentata (creosotebush)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jardine, K.; Abrell, L.; Kurc, S. A.; Huxman, T.; Ortega, J.; Guenther, A.

    2010-12-01

    We present results from the CREosote ATmosphere Interactions through Volatile Emissions (CREATIVE 2009) field study in southern Arizona aimed at quantifying emission rates of VOCs from creosotebush (Larrea tridentata) during the summer 2009 monsoon season. This species was chosen because of its vast distribution in North and South American deserts and because its resins have been reported to contain a rich set of volatile organic compounds (VOC). While a variety of ecosystems have been investigated for VOC emissions, deserts remain essentially unstudied, partially because of their low biomass densities and water limitations. However, during the North American monsoon, a pronounced increase in rainfall from an extremely dry June (80 mm) occurs over large areas of the Sonoran desert in the southwestern United States and northwestern Mexico. We observed a strong diurnal pattern of branch emissions and ambient concentrations of an extensive suite of VOCs with maxima in early afternoon. These include VOCs typically observed in forest sites (oxygenated VOCs and volatile isoprenoids) as well as a large number of other compounds, some of which have not been previously described from any plant including 1-chloro-2-methoxy-benzene and isobutyronitrile. Although generally considered to be derived from anthropogenic sources, we observed emissions of aromatic compounds including benzene, and a broad range of phenolics. Dimethyl sulfide emissions from creosotebush were higher than reported from any previously studied plant suggesting that terrestrial ecosystems should be reconsidered as an important source of this climatically important gas. We also present direct, primary emission measurements of isoprene and its apparent oxidation products methyl vinyl ketone, methacrolein, and 3-methyl furan (the later three compounds are typically assumed to form from secondary reactions within the atmosphere), as well as a group of compounds considered to be fatty acid oxidation products

  8. Volatile organic compound emissions from Larrea tridentata (creosotebush

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Guenther

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available We present results from the CREosote ATmosphere Interactions through Volatile Emissions (CREATIVE 2009 field study in southern Arizona aimed at quantifying emission rates of VOCs from creosotebush (Larrea tridentata during the summer 2009 monsoon season. This species was chosen because of its vast distribution in North and South American deserts and because its resins have been reported to contain a rich set of volatile organic compounds (VOC. While a variety of ecosystems have been investigated for VOC emissions, deserts remain essentially unstudied, partially because of their low biomass densities and water limitations. However, during the North American monsoon, a pronounced increase in rainfall from an extremely dry June (80 mm occurs over large areas of the Sonoran desert in the southwestern United States and northwestern Mexico. We observed a strong diurnal pattern of branch emissions and ambient concentrations of an extensive suite of VOCs with maxima in early afternoon. These include VOCs typically observed in forest sites (oxygenated VOCs and volatile isoprenoids as well as a large number of other compounds, some of which have not been previously described from any plant including 1-chloro-2-methoxy-benzene and isobutyronitrile. Although generally considered to be derived from anthropogenic sources, we observed emissions of aromatic compounds including benzene, and a broad range of phenolics. Dimethyl sulfide emissions from creosotebush were higher than reported from any previously studied plant suggesting that terrestrial ecosystems should be reconsidered as an important source of this climatically important gas. We also present direct, primary emission measurements of isoprene and its apparent oxidation products methyl vinyl ketone, methacrolein, and 3-methyl furan (the later three compounds are typically assumed to form from secondary reactions within the atmosphere, as well as a group of compounds considered to be fatty acid

  9. Comparative transcriptome analysis reveals key genes potentially related to soluble sugar and organic acid accumulation in watermelon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Lei; Zhao, Shengjie; Lu, Xuqiang; He, Nan; Zhu, Hongju; Dou, Junling

    2018-01-01

    Soluble sugars and organic acids are important components of fruit flavor and have a strong impact on the overall organoleptic quality of watermelon (Citrullus lanatus) fruit. Several studies have analyzed the expression levels of the genes related to soluble sugar accumulation and the dynamic changes in their content during watermelon fruit development and ripening. Nevertheless, to date, there have been no reports on the organic acid content in watermelon or the genes regulating their synthesis. In this study, the soluble sugars and organic acids in watermelon were measured and a comparative transcriptome analysis was performed to identify the key genes involved in the accumulation of these substances during fruit development and ripening. The watermelon cultivar ‘203Z’ and its near-isogenic line (NIL) ‘SW’ (in the ‘203Z’ background) were used as experimental materials. The results suggested that soluble sugar consist of fructose, glucose and sucrose while malic-, citric-, and oxalic acids are the primary organic acids in watermelon fruit. Several differentially expressed genes (DEGs) related to soluble sugar- and organic acid accumulation and metabolism were identified. These include the DEGs encoding raffinose synthase, sucrose synthase (SuSy), sucrose-phosphate synthase (SPSs), insoluble acid invertases (IAI), NAD-dependent malate dehydrogenase (NAD-cyt MDH), aluminum-activated malate transporter (ALMT), and citrate synthase (CS). This is the first report addressing comparative transcriptome analysis via NILs materials in watermelon fruit. These findings provide an important basis for understanding the molecular mechanism that leads to soluble sugar and organic acid accumulation and metabolism during watermelon fruit development and ripening. PMID:29324867

  10. Comparative transcriptome analysis reveals key genes potentially related to soluble sugar and organic acid accumulation in watermelon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Lei; Zhao, Shengjie; Lu, Xuqiang; He, Nan; Zhu, Hongju; Dou, Junling; Liu, Wenge

    2018-01-01

    Soluble sugars and organic acids are important components of fruit flavor and have a strong impact on the overall organoleptic quality of watermelon (Citrullus lanatus) fruit. Several studies have analyzed the expression levels of the genes related to soluble sugar accumulation and the dynamic changes in their content during watermelon fruit development and ripening. Nevertheless, to date, there have been no reports on the organic acid content in watermelon or the genes regulating their synthesis. In this study, the soluble sugars and organic acids in watermelon were measured and a comparative transcriptome analysis was performed to identify the key genes involved in the accumulation of these substances during fruit development and ripening. The watermelon cultivar '203Z' and its near-isogenic line (NIL) 'SW' (in the '203Z' background) were used as experimental materials. The results suggested that soluble sugar consist of fructose, glucose and sucrose while malic-, citric-, and oxalic acids are the primary organic acids in watermelon fruit. Several differentially expressed genes (DEGs) related to soluble sugar- and organic acid accumulation and metabolism were identified. These include the DEGs encoding raffinose synthase, sucrose synthase (SuSy), sucrose-phosphate synthase (SPSs), insoluble acid invertases (IAI), NAD-dependent malate dehydrogenase (NAD-cyt MDH), aluminum-activated malate transporter (ALMT), and citrate synthase (CS). This is the first report addressing comparative transcriptome analysis via NILs materials in watermelon fruit. These findings provide an important basis for understanding the molecular mechanism that leads to soluble sugar and organic acid accumulation and metabolism during watermelon fruit development and ripening.

  11. Energy dependence of radiation interaction parameters of some organic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Mohinder; Tondon, Akash; Sandhu, B. S.; Singh, Bhajan

    2018-04-01

    Gamma rays interact with a material through photoelectric absorption, Compton scattering, Rayleigh scattering and Pair production in the intermediate energy range. The probability of occurrence of a particular type of process depends on the energy of incident gamma rays, atomic number of the material, scattering angle and geometrical conditions. Various radiological parameters for organic compounds, namely ethylene glycol (C2H6O2), propylene glycol (C3H8O2), glycerin (C3H8O3), isoamyl alcohol (C5H12O), butanone (C4H8O), acetophenone (C8H8O2), cyclohexanone (C6H10O), furfural (C5H4O2), benzaldehyde (C7H6O), cinnamaldehyde (C9H8O), glutaraldehyde (C5H8O2), aniline (C6H7N), benzyl amine (C6H7N), nitrobenzene (C6H5NO2), ethyl benzene (C8H10), ethyl formate (C3H6O2) and water (H2O) are presented at 81, 122, 356 and 511 keV energies employing NaI(Tl) scintillation detector in narrow-beam transmission geometry. The radiation interaction parameters such as mass attenuation, molar extinction and mass energy absorption coefficients, half value layer, total atomic and effective electronic cross-sections and CT number have been evaluated for these organic compounds. The general trend of values of mass attenuation coefficients, half value layer, molar extinction coefficients, total atomic and effective electronic cross-sections and mass energy absorption coefficients shows a decrease with increase in incident gamma photon energy. The values of CT number are found to increases linearly with increase of effective atomic number (Zeff). The variation in CT number around Zeff ≈ 3.3 shows the peak like structure with respect to water and the correlation between CT number and linear attenuation coefficient is about 0.99. Appropriate equations are fitted to these experimentally determined parameters for the organic compounds at incident photon energy ranging from 81 keV to 511 keV used in the present study. Experimental values are compared with the theoretical data obtained using Win

  12. Preparation of free, soluble conjugate, and insoluble-bound phenolic compounds from peels of rambutan (Nephelium lappaceum) and evaluation of antioxidant activities in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Liping; Zhang, Huilin; Zhuang, Yongliang

    2012-02-01

    The soluble phenolic compounds of rambutan peels (RP) were extracted by microwave-assisted extraction (MAE) and the operating parameters were optimized. The optimal conditions obtained were ethanol concentration of 80.85%, extraction time of 58.39 s, and the ratio of liquid to solid of 24.51:1. The soluble phenolic content by MAE was 213.76 mg GAE/g DW. The free, soluble conjugate, and insoluble-boaund phenolic compounds were prepared by alkaline hydrolysis, and the contents of 3 fractions were 185.12, 27.98 and 9.37 mg GAE/g DW, respectively. The contents of syringic acid and p-coumaric acid were high in the free fraction, showing 16.86 and 19.44 mg/g DW, and the soluble conjugate and insoluble-bound phenolics were mainly composed of gallic acid and caffeic acid. Furthermore, the antioxidant activities of 3 fractions were evaluated in 5 model systems. Results indicated that the free fraction had high antioxidant activities, compared with the soluble conjugate and insoluble-bound fractions. © 2012 Institute of Food Technologists®

  13. Removal of gasoline volatile organic compounds via air biofiltration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, R.S.; Saberiyan, A.G.; Esler, C.T.; DeSantis, P.; Andrilenas, J.S.

    1995-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) generated by vapor extraction and air-stripping systems can be biologically treated in an air biofiltration unit. An air biofilter consists of one or more beds of packing material inoculated with heterotrophic microorganisms capable of degrading the organic contaminant of concern. Waste gases and oxygen are passed through the inoculated packing material, where the microorganisms will degrade the contaminant and release CO 2 + H 2 O. Based on data obtained from a treatability study, a full-scale unit was designed and constructed to be used for treating gasoline vapors generated by a vapor-extraction and groundwater-treatment system at a site in California. The unit is composed of two cylindrical reactors with a total packing volume of 3 m 3 . Both reactors are packed with sphagnum moss and inoculated with hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms of Pseudomonas and Arthrobacter spp. The two reactors are connected in series for air-flow passage. Parallel lines are used for injection of water, nutrients, and buffer to each reactor. Data collected during the startup program have demonstrated an air biofiltration unit with high organic-vapor-removal efficiency

  14. The subcommissural organ of the rat secretes Reissner's fiber glycoproteins and CSF-soluble proteins reaching the internal and external CSF compartments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vio, Karin; Rodríguez, Sara; Yulis, Carlos R; Oliver, Cristian; Rodríguez, Esteban M

    2008-01-24

    The subcommissural organ (SCO) is a highly conserved brain gland present throughout the vertebrate phylum; it secretes glycoproteins into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), where they aggregate to form Reissner's fiber (RF). SCO-spondin is the major constituent protein of RF. Evidence exists that the SCO also secretes proteins that remain soluble in the CSF. The aims of the present investigation were: (i) to identify and partially characterize the SCO-secretory compounds present in the SCO gland itself and in the RF of the Sprague-Dawley rat and non-hydrocephalic hyh mouse, and in the CSF of rat; (ii) to make a comparative analysis of the proteins present in these three compartments; (iii) to identify the proteins secreted by the SCO into the CSF at different developmental periods. The proteins of the SCO secreted into the CSF were studied (i) by injecting specific antibodies into ventricular CSF in vivo; (ii) by immunoblots of SCO, RF and CSF samples, using specific antibodies against the SCO secretory proteins (AFRU and anti-P15). In addition, the glycosylated nature of SCO-compounds was analysed by concanavalin A and wheat germ agglutinin binding. To analyse RF-glycoproteins, RF was extracted from the central canal of juvenile rats and mice; to investigate the CSF-soluble proteins secreted by the SCO, CSF samples were collected from the cisterna magna of rats at different stages of development (from E18 to PN30). Five glycoproteins were identified in the rat SCO with apparent molecular weights of 630, 450, 390, 320 and 200 kDa. With the exception of the 200-kDa compound, all other compounds present in the rat SCO were also present in the mouse SCO. The 630 and 390 kDa compounds of the rat SCO have affinity for concanavalin A but not for wheat germ agglutinin, suggesting that they correspond to precursor forms. Four of the AFRU-immunoreactive compounds present in the SCO (630, 450, 390, 320 kDa) were absent from the RF and CSF. These may be precursor and/or partially

  15. The subcommissural organ of the rat secretes Reissner's fiber glycoproteins and CSF-soluble proteins reaching the internal and external CSF compartments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodríguez Esteban M

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The subcommissural organ (SCO is a highly conserved brain gland present throughout the vertebrate phylum; it secretes glycoproteins into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF, where they aggregate to form Reissner's fiber (RF. SCO-spondin is the major constituent protein of RF. Evidence exists that the SCO also secretes proteins that remain soluble in the CSF. The aims of the present investigation were: (i to identify and partially characterize the SCO-secretory compounds present in the SCO gland itself and in the RF of the Sprague-Dawley rat and non-hydrocephalic hyh mouse, and in the CSF of rat; (ii to make a comparative analysis of the proteins present in these three compartments; (iii to identify the proteins secreted by the SCO into the CSF at different developmental periods. Methods The proteins of the SCO secreted into the CSF were studied (i by injecting specific antibodies into ventricular CSF in vivo; (ii by immunoblots of SCO, RF and CSF samples, using specific antibodies against the SCO secretory proteins (AFRU and anti-P15. In addition, the glycosylated nature of SCO-compounds was analysed by concanavalin A and wheat germ agglutinin binding. To analyse RF-glycoproteins, RF was extracted from the central canal of juvenile rats and mice; to investigate the CSF-soluble proteins secreted by the SCO, CSF samples were collected from the cisterna magna of rats at different stages of development (from E18 to PN30. Results Five glycoproteins were identified in the rat SCO with apparent molecular weights of 630, 450, 390, 320 and 200 kDa. With the exception of the 200-kDa compound, all other compounds present in the rat SCO were also present in the mouse SCO. The 630 and 390 kDa compounds of the rat SCO have affinity for concanavalin A but not for wheat germ agglutinin, suggesting that they correspond to precursor forms. Four of the AFRU-immunoreactive compounds present in the SCO (630, 450, 390, 320 kDa were absent from the RF and

  16. Covalent Organic Frameworks and Cage Compounds: Design and Applications of Polymeric and Discrete Organic Scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beuerle, Florian; Gole, Bappaditya

    2017-12-05

    Porous organic materials are an emerging class of functional nanostructures with unprecedented properties. Dynamic covalent assembly of small organic building blocks under thermodynamic control is utilized for the intriguingly simple formation of complex molecular architectures in one-pot procedures. In this review, we aim to analyze the basic design principles that govern the formation of either covalent organic frameworks as crystalline porous polymers or covalent organic cage compounds as shape-persistent molecular objects. Common synthetic protocols and characterization techniques will be discussed besides more advanced strategies such as postsynthetic modification or self-sorting. When appropriate, healthy comparisons are drawn between polymeric frameworks and discrete organic cages considering their underlying properties. Furthermore, we highlight the potential of these materials for applications ranging from gas storage to catalysis or organic electronics. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Selective Organic and Organometallic Reactions in Water-Soluble Host-Guest Supramolecular Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pluth, Michael D.; Raymond, Kenneth N.; Bergman, Robert G.

    2008-02-16

    Inspired by the efficiency and selectivity of enzymes, synthetic chemists have designed and prepared a wide range of host molecules that can bind smaller molecules with their cavities; this area has become known as 'supramolecular' or 'host-guest' chemistry. Pioneered by Lehn, Cram, Pedersen, and Breslow, and followed up by a large number of more recent investigators, it has been found that the chemical environment in each assembly - defined by the size, shape, charge, and functional group availability - greatly influences the guest-binding characteristics of these compounds. In contrast to the large number of binding studies that have been carried out in this area, the exploration of chemistry - especially catalytic chemistry - that can take place inside supramolecular host cavities is still in its infancy. For example, until the work described here was carried out, very few examples of organometallic reactivity inside supramolecular hosts were known, especially in water solution. For that reason, our group and the group directed by Kenneth Raymond decided to take advantage of our complementary expertise and attempt to carry out metal-mediated C-H bond activation reactions in water-soluble supramolecular systems. This article begins by providing background from the Raymond group in supramolecular coordination chemistry and the Bergman group in C-H bond activation. It goes on to report the results of our combined efforts in supramolecular C-H activation reactions, followed by extensions of this work into a wider range of intracavity transformations.

  18. Preliminary quantification of the permeability, solubility and diffusion coefficients of major aroma compounds present in herbs through various plastic packaging materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leelaphiwat, Pattarin; Auras, Rafael A; Burgess, Gary J; Harte, Janice B; Chonhenchob, Vanee

    2018-03-01

    Aroma permeation through packaging material is an important factor when designing a package for food products. The masses of aroma compounds permeating through films over time were measured at 25 °C using a quasi-isostatic system. A model was proposed for estimating the permeability coefficients (P) of key aroma compounds present in fresh herbs (i.e. eucalyptol, estragole, linalool and citral) through major plastic films used by the food industry [i.e. low-density polyethylene (LDPE), polypropylene (PP), nylon (Nylon), polyethylene terephthalate (PET), metalised-polyethylene terephthalate (MPET) and poly(lactic acid) (PLA)]. Solubility coefficients (S) were estimated from the amount of aroma compound sorbed in the films. Diffusion coefficients (D) were estimated following from the relation P = D*S. P and D for all four aroma compounds were highest in LDPE, except for eucalyptol, which P was slightly higher in PLA. The solubility coefficients and contact angles were highest in PLA suggesting the highest affinity of PLA to these aroma compounds. The theoretical solubility parameters were correlated with the solubility coefficients for estragole and citral, but not for eucalyptol and linalool. The preliminary P, D and S of eucalyptol, estragole, linalool and citral through LDPE, PP, Nylon, PET, MPET and PLA can be useful in selecting the proper packaging material for preserving these specific aroma compounds in food products and can potentially be used for estimating the shelf life of food products based on aroma loss. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  19. Qualitative analysis of volatile organic compounds on biochar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spokas, Kurt A; Novak, Jeffrey M; Stewart, Catherine E; Cantrell, Keri B; Uchimiya, Minori; Dusaire, Martin G; Ro, Kyoung S

    2011-10-01

    Qualitative identification of sorbed volatile organic compounds (VOCs) on biochar was conducted by headspace thermal desorption coupled to capillary gas chromatographic-mass spectrometry. VOCs may have a mechanistic role influencing plant and microbial responses to biochar amendments, since VOCs can directly inhibit/stimulate microbial and plant processes. Over 70 biochars encompassing a variety of parent feedstocks and manufacturing processes were evaluated and were observed to possess diverse sorbed VOC composition. There were over 140 individual chemical compounds thermally desorbed from some biochars, with hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) and fast pyrolysis biochars typically possessing the greatest number of sorbed volatiles. In contrast, gasification, thermal or chemical processed biochars, soil kiln mound, and open pit biochars possessed low to non-detectable levels of VOCs. Slow pyrolysis biochars were highly variable in terms of their sorbed VOC content. There were no clear feedstock dependencies to the sorbed VOC composition, suggesting a stronger linkage with biochar production conditions coupled to post-production handling and processing. Lower pyrolytic temperatures (⩽350°C) produced biochars with sorbed VOCs consisting of short carbon chain aldehydes, furans and ketones; elevated temperature biochars (>350°C) typically were dominated by sorbed aromatic compounds and longer carbon chain hydrocarbons. The presence of oxygen during pyrolysis also reduced sorbed VOCs. These compositional results suggest that sorbed VOCs are highly variable and that their chemical dissimilarity could play a role in the wide variety of plant and soil microbial responses to biochar soil amendment noted in the literature. This variability in VOC composition may argue for VOC characterization before land application to predict possible agroecosystem effects. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Volatile organic compounds from native potato-associated Pseudomonas as potential anti-oomycete agents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mout eDeVrieze

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The plant kingdom represents a prominent biodiversity island for microbes that associate with the below- or aboveground organs of vegetal species. Both the root and the leaf represent interfaces where dynamic biological interactions influence plant life. Beside well-studied communication strategies based on soluble compounds and protein effectors, bacteria were recently shown to interact both with host plants and other microbial species through the emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs. Focusing on the potato late blight-causing agent Phytophthora infestans, this work addresses the potential role of the bacterial volatilome in suppressing plant diseases. In a previous study, we isolated and identified a large collection of strains with anti-Phytophthora potential from both the phyllosphere and the rhizosphere of potato. Here we report the characterization and quantification of their emissions of biogenic volatiles, comparing 16 Pseudomonas strains differing in i origin of isolation (phyllosphere vs. rhizosphere, ii in vitro inhibition of P. infestans growth and sporulation behavior, and iii protective effects against late blight on potato leaf discs. We systematically tested the pharmacological inhibitory activity of core and strain-specific single compounds against P. infestans mycelial growth and sporangial behavior in order to identify key effective candidate molecules present in the complex natural VOCs blends. We envisage the plant bacterial microbiome as a reservoir for functional VOCs and establish the basis for finding the primary enzymatic toolset that enables the production of active components of the volatile bouquet in plant-associated bacteria. Comprehension of these functional interspecies interactions will open perspectives for the sustainable control of plant diseases in forthcoming agriculture.

  1. Volatile Organic Compounds from Native Potato-associated Pseudomonas as Potential Anti-oomycete Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vrieze, Mout; Pandey, Piyush; Bucheli, Thomas D.; Varadarajan, Adithi R.; Ahrens, Christian H.; Weisskopf, Laure; Bailly, Aurélien

    2015-01-01

    The plant kingdom represents a prominent biodiversity island for microbes that associate with the below- or aboveground organs of vegetal species. Both the root and the leaf represent interfaces where dynamic biological interactions influence plant life. Beside well-studied communication strategies based on soluble compounds and protein effectors, bacteria were recently shown to interact both with host plants and other microbial species through the emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Focusing on the potato late blight-causing agent Phytophthora infestans, this work addresses the potential role of the bacterial volatilome in suppressing plant diseases. In a previous study, we isolated and identified a large collection of strains with anti-Phytophthora potential from both the phyllosphere and the rhizosphere of potato. Here we report the characterization and quantification of their emissions of biogenic volatiles, comparing 16 Pseudomonas strains differing in (i) origin of isolation (phyllosphere vs. rhizosphere), (ii) in vitro inhibition of P. infestans growth and sporulation behavior, and (iii) protective effects against late blight on potato leaf disks. We systematically tested the pharmacological inhibitory activity of core and strain-specific single compounds against P. infestans mycelial growth and sporangial behavior in order to identify key effective candidate molecules present in the complex natural VOCs blends. We envisage the plant bacterial microbiome as a reservoir for functional VOCs and establish the basis for finding the primary enzymatic toolset that enables the production of active components of the volatile bouquet in plant-associated bacteria. Comprehension of these functional interspecies interactions will open perspectives for the sustainable control of plant diseases in forthcoming agriculture. PMID:26635763

  2. Production of volatile organic sulfur compounds (VOSCs) by basidiomycetous yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzzini, Pietro; Romano, Sergio; Turchetti, Benedetta; Vaughan, Ann; Pagnoni, Ugo Maria; Davoli, Paolo

    2005-02-01

    Thirty-seven basidiomycetous yeasts belonging to 30 species of seven genera were grown on media containing l-cysteine or l-methionine as sole nitrogen sources with the objective of evaluating volatile organic sulfur compound (VOSC) production. The headspace of yeast cultures was analyzed by the solid-phase microextraction (SPME) sampling method, and volatile compounds were quantified and identified by GC-MS techniques. Ten strains assimilating L-methionine produced the following VOSCs: 3-(methylthio)-1-propanol, methanethiol, S-methyl thioacetate, dimethyl disulfide, dimethyl trisulfide, allyl methyl sulphide and 4,5-dihydro-3(2H)-thiophenone. Production was amyl alcohol) and esters (ethyl acetate, ethyl propionate, n-propyl acetate, isobutyl acetate, n-propyl propionate, n-butyl acetate, isoamyl acetate, amyl acetate, isoamyl propionate, amyl propionate and 2-phenylmethyl acetate) were also sporadically produced. This is the first report of VOSCs production by basidiomycetous yeasts. Consequently, basidiomycetous yeasts may be considered an interesting new group of microbial VOSCs producers for the flavor industry.

  3. Constituents of volatile organic compounds of evaporating essential oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Hua-Hsien; Chiang, Hsiu-Mei; Lo, Cho-Ching; Chen, Ching-Yen; Chiang, Hung-Lung

    2009-12-01

    Essential oils containing aromatic compounds can affect air quality when used indoors. Five typical and popular essential oils—rose, lemon, rosemary, tea tree and lavender—were investigated in terms of composition, thermal characteristics, volatile organic compound (VOC) constituents, and emission factors. The activation energy was 6.3-8.6 kcal mol -1, the reaction order was in the range of 0.6-0.8, and the frequency factor was 0.01-0.24 min -1. Toluene, 1,2,3-trimethylbenzene, 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene, n-undecane, p-diethylbenzene and m-diethylbenzene were the predominant VOCs of evaporating gas of essential oils at 40 °C. In addition, n-undecane, p-diethylbenzene, 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene, m-diethylbenzene, and 1,2,3-trimethylbenzene revealed high emission factors during the thermogravimetric (TG) analysis procedures. The sequence of the emission factors of 52 VOCs (137-173 mg g -1) was rose ≈ rosemary > tea tree ≈ lemon ≈ lavender. The VOC group fraction of the emission factor of aromatics was 62-78%, paraffins were 21-37% and olefins were less than 1.5% during the TG process. Some unhealthy VOCs such as benzene and toluene were measured at low temperature; they reveal the potential effect on indoor air quality and human health.

  4. [Definition and Control Indicators of Volatile Organic Compounds in China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Mei; Zou, Lan; Li, Xiao-qian; Che, Fei; Zhao, Guo-hua; Li, Gang; Zhang, Guo-ning

    2015-09-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are the most complex of a wide range of pollutants that harms human health and ecological environment. However, various countries around the world differ on its definition and control indicators. Its definition, control indicators and monitoring methods of our country and local standards were also different. Based on detailed analysis of the definitions and control indicators of VOCs, the recommendations were proposed: the definition of VOCs should be different according to the different concerns between "air quality management" and "pollution emissions management"; base on different control way from production source, technological process, terminal emission, total discharge control, the control indicators system consists of 10 indicators; to formulate industry VOCs emissions standards, the most effective control way and indicators should be chosen according to characteristics of production process, way of VOCs emissions and possible control measures, etc.

  5. Imaging subsurface geology and volatile organic compound plumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qualheim, B.J.; Daley, P.F.; Johnson, V.; McPherrin, R.V.; Laguna, G.

    1992-03-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) (Fig. 1) is in the final stages of the Superfund decisionmaking process for site remediation and restoration. In the process of characterizing the subsurface of the LLNL site, we have developed unique methods of collecting, storing, retrieving, and imaging geologic and chemical data from more than 350 drill holes. The lateral and vertical continuity of subsurface paleostream channels were mapped for the entire LLNL site using geologic descriptions from core samples, cuttings, and interpretations from geophysical logs. A computer-aided design and drafting program, SLICE, written at LLNL, was used to create two-dimensional maps of subsurface sediments, and state-of-the-art software produced three-dimensional images of the volatile organic compound (VOC) plumes using data from water and core fluid analyses

  6. Detection of volatile organic compounds using surface enhanced Raman scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, A S; Maiti, A; Ileri, N; Bora, M; Larson, C C; Britten, J A; Bond, T C

    2012-03-22

    The authors present the detection of volatile organic compounds directly in their vapor phase by surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates based on lithographically-defined two-dimensional rectangular array of nanopillars. The type of nanopillars is known as the tapered pillars. For the tapered pillars, SERS enhancement arises from the nanofocusing effect due to the sharp tip on top. SERS experiments were carried out on these substrates using various concentrations of toluene vapor. The results show that SERS signal from a toluene vapor concentration of ppm level can be achieved, and the toluene vapor can be detected within minutes of exposing the SERS substrate to the vapor. A simple adsorption model is developed which gives results matching the experimental data. The results also show promising potential for the use of these substrates in environmental monitoring of gases and vapors.

  7. DENITRATION OF WASTEWATER GENERATED BY NITROSATION OF ORGANIC COMPOUNDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BORIS M. LASKIN

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Subject of the article was to study the method aimed at denitration of liquid wastes that appear during the nitrosation of organic compounds. Liquid waste represents an aqueous solution of sodium sulfate with sodium nitrate and nitrite as admixtures. The method involves addition of sulfuric acid to the wastes followed by drying and thermal treatment of a salt mixture at temperature above 150 °C. Experimental study revealed that sodium nitrite fully decomposes in the solution during the drying resulting in formation of sodium sulfate, nitrogen oxide, and nitrogen dioxide. Solid-phase interaction of sodium hydrogen sulfate and sodium nitrate was investigated by combined DSC-TG technique in the temperature range 100 - 270 °C. The mixture of salts was obtained by drying the aqueous solution. It was shown that the reaction rate is defined by the removal rate of vapors formed nitric acid.

  8. Fruit tree model for uptake of organic compounds from soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trapp, Stefan; Rasmussen, D.; Samsoe-Petersen, L.

    2003-01-01

    rences: 20 [ view related records ] Citation Map Abstract: Apples and other fruits are frequently cultivated in gardens and are part of our daily diet. Uptake of pollutants into apples may therefore contribute to the human daily intake of toxic substances. In current risk assessment of polluted...... soils, regressions or models are in use, which were not intended to be used for tree fruits. A simple model for uptake of neutral organic contaminants into fruits is developed. It considers xylem and phloem transport to fruits through the stem. The mass balance is solved for the steady......-state, and an example calculation is given. The Fruit Tree Model is compared to the empirical equation of Travis and Arms (T&A), and to results from fruits, collected in contaminated areas. For polar compounds, both T&A and the Fruit Tree Model predict bioconcentration factors fruit to soil (BCF, wet weight based...

  9. Hybrid energy storage systems utilizing redox active organic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Xu, Wu; Li, Liyu; Yang, Zhenguo

    2015-09-08

    Redox flow batteries (RFB) have attracted considerable interest due to their ability to store large amounts of power and energy. Non-aqueous energy storage systems that utilize at least some aspects of RFB systems are attractive because they can offer an expansion of the operating potential window, which can improve on the system energy and power densities. One example of such systems has a separator separating first and second electrodes. The first electrode includes a first current collector and volume containing a first active material. The second electrode includes a second current collector and volume containing a second active material. During operation, the first source provides a flow of first active material to the first volume. The first active material includes a redox active organic compound dissolved in a non-aqueous, liquid electrolyte and the second active material includes a redox active metal.

  10. Volatile organic compound emission profiles of four common arctic plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vedel-Petersen, Ida; Schollert, Michelle; Nymand, Josephine

    2015-01-01

    The biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emissions from plants impact atmosphere and climate. The species-specific emissions, and thereby the atmospheric impact, of many plant species are still unknown. Knowledge of BVOC emission from arctic plants is particularly limited. The vast area...... and relatively high leaf temperature give the Arctic potential for emissions that cannot be neglected. This field study aimed to elucidate the BVOC emission profiles for four common arctic plant species in their natural environment during the growing season. BVOCs were sampled from aboveground parts of Empetrum...... emitted the least BVOCs, dominated by sesquiterpenes (SQTs) and non-isoprenoid BVOCs. The Salix spp. emitted the most, dominated by isoprene. The emissions of B. nana were composed of about two-thirds non-isoprenoid BVOCs, with moderate amounts of monoterpenes (MTs) and SQTs. The total B. nana emissions...

  11. Investigation of michelson interferometer for volatile organic compound sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marzuarman; Rivai, Muhammad; Sardjono, Tri Arief; Purwanto, Djoko

    2017-01-01

    The sensor device is required to monitor harmful gases in the environments and industries. Many volatile organic compounds adsorbed on the sensor material will result in changes of the optical properties including the refractive index and the film thickness. This study designed and realized a vapor detection device using the principle of Michelson Interferometer. The laser light beamed with a wavelength of 620 nm was divided by using a beam splitter. Interference occurredwhen the two separated lights were recombined. The phase difference between the two beams determined whether the interference would destruct or construct each other to produce the curved fringes. The vapor samples used in these experiments were ethanol and benzene. The results showed that the ethanol concentration of 1611-32210 ppm produced a fringe shift of 197 pixels, while the concentration of benzene of 964-19290 ppm produced a fringe shift of 273 pixels. (paper)

  12. Organic waste compounds as contaminants in Milwaukee-area streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Austin K.; Corsi, Steven R.; Magruder, Christopher; Magruder, Matthew; Bruce, Jennifer L.

    2015-09-22

    Organic waste compounds (OWCs) are ingredients and by-products of common agricultural, industrial, and household substances that can contaminate our streams through sources like urban runoff, sewage overflows, and leaking septic systems. To better understand how OWCs are affecting Milwaukee-area streams, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Milwaukee Metropolitan Sewerage District, conducted a three-year study to investigate the presence and potential toxicity of 69 OWCs in base flow, stormflow, pore water, and sediment at 14 stream sites and 3 Milwaukee harbor locations. This fact sheet summarizes the major findings of this study, including detection frequencies and concentrations, potential toxicity, the prevalence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and the influence of urbanization.

  13. [Composition of organic carbon/elemental carbon and water-soluble ions in rice straw burning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Lei; Liu, Gang; Yang, Meng; Xu, Hui; Li, Jiu-hai; Chen, Hui-yu; Huang, Ke; Yang, Wei-zong; Wu, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Six types of rice straw were selected in China in this paper, the homemade biomass combustion devices were used to simulate the outdoor burning. The concentrations of organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon (C) and water-soluble ions in particular matter produced by the flaming and smoldering were analyzed using Thermal Optical Carbon Analyzer (Model 2001A) and Ion Chromatography(ISC 2000/ISC 3000). The results showed that the mean value of OC (EFoc) and EC (EFEC) emission factors were (6.37 +/- 1.86) g x kg(-1) and (1.07 +/- 0.30) g x kg(-1) under the flaming conditions, respectively, while under the smoldering conditions the two mean values were (37.63 +/- 6.26) g x kg(-1) and (4.98 x 1.42) g x kg(-1). PM, OC and EC emitted from the same kind of rice straw had similar change trends. The average values of OC/EC under flaming and smoldering were 5.96 and 7.80, and the value of OC/PM was almost unchanged along with the combustion state. Nevertheless, the values of EC/PM under flaming and smoldering were 0.06-0.08 and 0.08-0.11, respectively. The trend of combustion state could be determined using the ratio of EC/PM and the RZ of emitted OC and EC through those two types of combustion reached 0. 97, which was significantly correlated at the 0. 01 level. Among the anions, Cl- showed the highest concentration, the results indicated that the average value of of Cl- emission factor was (0.246 +/- 0.150) g x kg(-1) under flaming, while it was (0.301 +/- 0.274) g x kg(-1) under smoldering. However, A big difference between flaming and smoldering was found in the average value of K+ emission factor, where (0.118 +/- 0.051) g x kg(-1) of the former was significantly higher than the latter (0.053 +/- 0.031) g x kg(-1). When it came to Na, the result of smoldering was significantly higher than that of flaming. The correlation between water-soluble ions in flaming was more significant than smoldering. Rice straw burning could be distinguished from fossil fuels and some other

  14. Emission of the main biogenic volatile organic compounds in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luchetta, L.; Simon, V.; Torres, L.

    2000-01-01

    An estimation of biogenic emissions of the main non-methanic Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) due to the forest cover in France has been realized. 32 species representing 98% of French forest have been considered for the estimation. The latter dealt on a net made of 93 irregular spatial grids (Departments) with an average size of 75 km x 75 km. We assigned emission rates and foliar biomass densities specific to each of the 32 species. The environmental variables (temperature, light intensity) have been collected for the whole of French Departments. A special effort was extended so as to use ''Guenther's'' calculation algorithms, and specific emitting factors to species growing in France or in bordering countries. Along the way of the five years (1994-1998) of the study we have calculated the yearly mean of isoprene, mono-terpenes and Other Volatile Organic Compounds (OVOCs) emissions on the scale of the French Departments. At the national level isoprene emission is reckoned at 457 kt yr -1 and represents nearly 49% of the total emission, whereas mono-terpenes with 350 kt yr -1 and OVOCs with 129 kt yr -1 represent respectively 37% and 14% of the total. The yearly biogenic emission of VOCs in France represents virtually half the anthropic source. However in some regions (Mediterranean area) natural emissions can widely exceed anthropic emissions during certain periods. Let's note the whole of our results remains tinged with a great uncertainty because the estimations carried out are presented with correction factors that can reach values comprised between 4 and 7. (author)

  15. Measurement of loss rates of organic compounds in snow using in situ experiments and isotopically labelled compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika von Schneidemesser

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Organic molecular marker compounds are widely used to identify emissions from anthropogenic and biogenic air pollution sources in atmospheric samples and in deposition. Specific organic compounds have been detected in polar regions, but their fate after deposition to snow is poorly characterized. Within this context, a series of exposure experiments were carried out to observe the post-depositional processing of organic compounds under real-world conditions in snow on the surface of the Greenland Ice Sheet, at the Summit research station. Snow was prepared from water spiked with isotopically labelled organic compounds, representative of typical molecular marker compounds emitted from anthropogenic activities. Reaction rate constants and reaction order were determined based on a decrease in concentration to a stable, non-zero, threshold concentration. Fluoranthene-d10, docosane-d46, hexadecanoic acid-d31, docosanoic acid-d43 and azelaic acid-d14 were estimated to have first order loss rates within surface snow with reaction rate constants of 0.068, 0.040, 0.070, 0.067 and 0.047 h−1, respectively. No loss of heptadecane-d36 was observed. Overall, these results suggest that organic contaminants are archived in polar snow, although significant post-depositional losses of specific organic compounds occur. This has implications for the environmental fate of organic contaminants, as well as for ice-core studies that seek to use organic molecular markers to infer past atmospheric loadings, and source emissions.

  16. Comparison of the neurotoxicities between volatile organic compounds and fragrant organic compounds on human neuroblastoma SK-N-SH cells and primary cultured rat neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Yasue Yamada; Kohei Ohtani; Akinori Imajo; Hanae Izu; Hitomi Nakamura; Kohei Shiraishi

    2015-01-01

    These are many volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that are synthesized, produced from petroleum or derived from natural compounds, mostly plants. Fragrant and volatile organic compounds from plants have been used as food additives, medicines and aromatherapy. Several clinical and pathological studies have shown that chronic abuse of VOCs, mainly toluene, causes several neuropsychiatric disorders. Little is known about the mechanisms of neurotoxicity of the solvents. n-Octanal, nonanal, and 2-e...

  17. Exchange of volatile organic compounds in the boreal forest floor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaltonen, Hermanni; Bäck, Jaana; Pumpanen, Jukka; Pihlatie, Mari; Hakola, Hannele; Hellén, Heidi; Aalto, Juho; Heinonsalo, Jussi; Kajos, Maija K.; Kolari, Pasi; Taipale, Risto; Vesala, Timo

    2013-04-01

    Terrestrial ecosystems, mainly plants, emit large amounts of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) into the atmosphere. In addition to plants, VOCs also have less-known sources, such as soil. VOCs are a very diverse group of reactive compounds, including terpenoids, alcohols, aldehydes and ketones. Due to their high reactivity, VOCs take part in formation and growth of secondary organic aerosols in the atmosphere and thus affect also Earth's radiation balance (Kulmala et al. 2004). We have studied boreal soil and forest floor VOC fluxes with chamber and snow gradient techniques we were developed. Spatial and temporal variability in VOC fluxes was studied with year-round measurements in the field and the sources of boreal soil VOCs in the laboratory with fungal isolates. Determination of the compounds was performed mass spectrometrically. Our results reveal that VOCs from soil are mainly emitted by living roots, above- and belowground litter and microbes. The strongest source appears to be litter, in which both plant residuals and decomposers play a role in the emissions. Soil fungi showed high emissions of lighter VOCs, like acetone, acetaldehyde and methanol, from isolates. Temperature and moisture are the most critical physical factors driving VOC fluxes. Since the environment in boreal forests undergoes strong seasonal changes, the VOC flux strength of the forest floor varies markedly during the year, being highest in spring and autumn. The high spatial heterogeneity of the forest floor was also clearly visible in VOC fluxes. The fluxes of other trace gases (CO2, CH4 and N2O) from soil, which are also related to the soil biological activity and physical conditions, did not show correlations with the VOC fluxes. These results indicate that emissions of VOCs from the boreal forest floor account for as much as several tens of percent, depending on the season, of the total forest ecosystem VOC emissions. This emphasises that forest floor compartment should be taken into

  18. Treatment of trace organic compounds in common onsite wastewater systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert Siegrist,; Conn, Kathleen E.

    2015-01-01

    Onsite wastewater systems (OWS) have historically been relied on to treat conventional pollutants and pathogens in a fashion similar to that expected from centralized wastewater systems. However, based on the occurrence of, and potential effects from, contaminants of emerging concern in wastewaters, OWS as well as centralized systems need to account for these compounds in system design and use. One group of contaminants involves organic compounds such as those associated with consumer product chemicals and pharmaceuticals, which are collectively referred to as trace organic compounds (TOrCs) due to their very low levels (e.g., ng/L to ug/L) relative to other pollutants. The question being confronted today is how best to account for TOrCs in onsite system design and use while also achieving other goals such as system simplicity, limited operation and maintenance requirements, low cost, and sustainability. In contrast to conventional pollutants such as nutrients and pathogens which have specific and achievable treatment goals, there are currently no enforceable treatment standards for TOrCs, which often have non-traditional toxicological endpoints (i.e. endocrine disruption). As highlighted in this paper, there are a large number of TOrCs that can be present in OWS and they have different properties, can be present at different frequencies of occurrence and concentrations, and have different susceptibilities to treatment in OWS. In general, based on the studies summarized in this paper, TOrCs normally should not require additional considerations beyond those for conventional pollutants and pathogens (e.g., nitrogen or bacteria and virus) during design and use of OWS. That said, there are situations where TOrCs could be a serious concern warranting special consideration in system design and use. In this paper, the frequency of occurrence of TOrCs and the range of concentrations encountered are highlighted. An evolving approach is outlined that could help assess the

  19. A fugacity approach for assessing the bioaccumulation of hydrophobic organic compounds from estuarine sediment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golding, Christopher J; Gobas, Frank A P C; Birch, Gavin F

    2008-05-01

    The bioavailability of four sediment-spiked hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs; chrysene, benzo[a]pyrene, chlordane, and Aroclor 1254) was investigated by comparing bioaccumulation by the amphipod Corophium colo with uptake into a thin film of ethylene/vinyl acetate (EVA) copolymer. The EVA thin film is a solid-phase extraction medium previously identified as effective at measuring the bioavailable contaminant fraction in sediment. The present study presents the results of 11 separate treatments in which chemical uptake into EVA closely matched uptake into lipid over 10 d. For all compounds, the concentration in EVA was a good approximation for the concentration in lipid, suggesting that this medium would be an appropriate biomimetic medium for assessing the bioaccumulation of HOCs during risk assessment of contaminated sediment. For chrysene and benzo[a]pyrene, limitations on bioaccumulation and toxicity because of low aqueous solubility were observed. The fugacity of the compounds in lipid (flip) and in the EVA thin film (fEVA) also was determined. The ratio of flip to fEVA was greater than one for all chemicals, indicating that all chemicals biomagnified over the duration of the exposure and demonstrating the potential for EVA thin-film extraction to assess trophic transfer of HOCs.

  20. Soluble carbon in oxisol under the effect of organic residue rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Lúcia Pinheiro

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The application of organic residues to the soil can increase soluble organic carbon (SOC and affect the pH and electrolytic conductivity (EC of the soil. However, the magnitude of these changes depends on the type of residue and the applied dose. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of increasing C rates contained in organic residue on the pH, EC, water-extractable total carbon (WETC, water-extractable organic carbon (WEOC, and water-extractable inorganic carbon (WEIC in soil treated with manure (chicken, swine, and quail, sawdust, coffee husk, and sewage sludge. The levels of total C (TC- KH2PO4, organic carbon (OC- KH2PO4, and inorganic C (IC- KH2PO4 extractable by a 0.1 mol L-1 KH2PO4 solution were also quantified in soil under the effect of increasing rates of chicken and quail manures. The following rates of organic residue C were applied to a dystrophic Red Latosol (Oxisol sample: 0, 2,000, 5,000, 10,000, and 20,000 mg kg-1. The addition of organic residues to the soil increased pH, except in the case of sewage sludge, which acidified the soil. The acidity correction potential of chicken and quail manure was highest, dependent on the manure rate applied; regardless of the dose used, sawdust barely alters the soil pH. At all tested rates, the EC of the soil treated with swine manure, coffee husk, and sawdust remained below 2.0 dS m-1, which is a critical level for salinity-sensitive crops. However, the application of chicken or quail manure and sewage sludge at certain rates increased the EC to values above this threshold level. Highest levels of WETC, WEOC, and WEIC were obtained when chicken and quail manure and coffee husk were applied to the Oxisol. The quantities of SOC extracted by KH2PO4 were higher than the quantities extracted by water, demonstrating the ability of soil to adsorb C into its colloids.

  1. Influence of iron solubility and charged surface-active compounds on lipid oxidation in fatty acid ethyl esters containing association colloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homma, Rika; Johnson, David R; McClements, D Julian; Decker, Eric A

    2016-05-15

    The impact of iron compounds with different solubilities on lipid oxidation was studied in the presence and absence of association colloids. Iron (III) sulfate only accelerated lipid oxidation in the presence of association colloids while iron (III) oleate accelerated oxidation in the presence and absence of association colloids. Further, iron (III) oxide retarded lipid oxidation both with and without association colloids. The impact of charged association colloids on lipid oxidation in ethyl oleate was also investigated. Association colloids consisting of the anionic surface-active compound dodecyl sulphosuccinate sodium salt (AOT), cationic surface-active compound hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), and nonionic surface-active compound 4-(1,1,3,3-tetramethylbutyl)phenyl-polyethylene glycol (Triton X-100) retarded, promoted, and had no effect on lipid oxidation rates, respectively. These results indicate that the polarity of metal compounds and the charge of association colloids play a big role in lipid oxidation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Volatile Organic Compounds: Characteristics, distribution and sources in urban schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Nitika; Bartsch, Jennifer; Ayoko, Godwin A.; Salthammer, Tunga; Morawska, Lidia

    2015-04-01

    Long term exposure to organic pollutants, both inside and outside school buildings may affect children's health and influence their learning performance. Since children spend significant amount of time in school, air quality, especially in classrooms plays a key role in determining the health risks associated with exposure at schools. Within this context, the present study investigated the ambient concentrations of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) in 25 primary schools in Brisbane with the aim to quantify the indoor and outdoor VOCs concentrations, identify VOCs sources and their contribution, and based on these; propose mitigation measures to reduce VOCs exposure in schools. One of the most important findings is the occurrence of indoor sources, indicated by the I/O ratio >1 in 19 schools. Principal Component Analysis with Varimax rotation was used to identify common sources of VOCs and source contribution was calculated using an Absolute Principal Component Scores technique. The result showed that outdoor 47% of VOCs were contributed by petrol vehicle exhaust but the overall cleaning products had the highest contribution of 41% indoors followed by air fresheners and art and craft activities. These findings point to the need for a range of basic precautions during the selection, use and storage of cleaning products and materials to reduce the risk from these sources.

  3. Adverse effects of organic arsenical compounds towards Vibrio fischeri bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulladosa, Elena; Murat, Jean-Claude; Bollinger, Jean-Claude; Villaescusa, Isabel

    2007-05-15

    The most frequently encountered forms of organic arsenic, namely, dimethylarsinic acid, monomethylarsonic acid, arsenobetaine, arsenocholine and Roxarsone (4-hydroxy-3-nitrobenzene arsonic acid) were tested for toxicity either by using the Microtox bioassay, based on the rapid (within 15 min) fading of luminescence emitted by Vibrio fischeri marine bacteria, or by monitoring growth rate of the same bacteria for 3 days. Organic arsenic was generally found to be less toxic to these biological models than inorganic arsenic. In many cases, EC50 values for DMA, MMA or HNAA when using luminescence or growth inhibition assays could not be determined because of the low toxicity of the compounds. Nevertheless, results from the luminescence inhibition assay, which was found to be more sensitive than the growth inhibition assay, allowed to rank toxicity as follows: arsenate at pH 8>HNAA at pH 5>arsenate at pH 5>MMA at pH 5>HNAA at pH 8>DMA at pH 5. Arsenobetaine and monomethylarsonic acid were unexpectedly found to stimulate bacterial growth (hormesis effect). pH was found to have a strong influence on the observed toxicity as a consequence of the pH-induced changes in the chemical speciation of the tested molecules. In most cases it appeared that negatively charged forms were less toxic than the uncharged ones.

  4. Influence of Sensory Stimulation on Exhaled Volatile Organic Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzatenta, A; Pokorski, M; Di Tano, A; Cacchio, M; Di Giulio, C

    2016-01-01

    The real-time exhaled volatile organic compounds (VOCs) have been suggested as a new biomarker to detect and monitor physiological processes in the respiratory system. The VOCs profile in exhaled breath reflects the biochemical alterations related to metabolic changes, organ failure, and neuronal activity, which are, at least in part, transmitted via the lungs to the alveolar exhaled breath. Breath analysis has been applied to investigate cancer, lung failure, and neurodegenerative diseases. There are by far no studies on the real-time monitoring of VOCs in sensory stimulation in healthy subjects. Therefore, in this study we investigated the breath parameters and exhaled VOCs in humans during sensory stimulation: smell, hearing, sight, and touch. Responses sensory stimulations were recorded in 12 volunteers using an iAQ-2000 sensor. We found significant effects of sensory stimulation. In particular, olfactory stimulation was the most effective stimulus that elicited the greatest VOCs variations in the exhaled breath. Since the olfactory pathway is distinctly driven by the hypothalamic and limbic circuitry, while other senses project first to the thalamic area and then re-project to other brain areas, the findings suggest the importance of olfaction and chemoreception in the regulation lung gas exchange. VOCs variations during sensory activation may become putative indicators of neural activity.

  5. Investigation of water-soluble organic matter extracted from shales during leaching experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yaling; Vieth-Hillebrand, Andrea; Wilke, Franziska D. H.; Horsfield, Brian

    2017-04-01

    The huge volumes and unknown composition of flowback and produced waters cause major public concerns about the environmental and social compatibility of hydraulic fracturing and the exploitation of gas from unconventional reservoirs. Flowback and produced waters contain not only residues of fracking additives but also chemical species that are dissolved from the shales themselves during fluid-rock interaction. Knowledge of the composition, size and structure of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) as well as the main controls on the release of DOC are a prerequisite for a better understanding of these interactions and its effects on composition of flowback and produced water. Black shales from four different geological settings and covering a maturity range Ro = 0.3-2.6% were extracted with deionized water. The DOC yields were found to decrease rapidly with increasing diagenesis and remain low throughout catagenesis. Four DOC fractions have been qualitatively and quantitatively characterized using size-exclusion chromatography. The concentrations of individual low molecular weight organic acids (LMWOA) decrease with increasing maturity of the samples except for acetate extracted from the overmature Posidonia shale, which was influenced by hydrothermal brines. The oxygen content of the shale organic matter also shows a significant influence on the release of organic acids, which is indicated by the positive trend between oxygen index (OI) and the concentrations of formate and acetate. Based on our experiments, both the properties of the organic matter source and the thermal maturation progress of the shale organic matter significantly influence the amount and quality of extracted organic compounds during the leaching experiments.

  6. Efficient red luminescence from organic-soluble Au25 clusters by ligand structure modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Ammu; Varghese, Elizabeth; Choudhury, Susobhan; Pal, Samir Kumar; Pradeep, T.

    2015-08-01

    An efficient method to enhance visible luminescence in a visibly non-luminescent organic-soluble 4-(tert butyl)benzyl mercaptan (SBB)-stabilized Au25 cluster has been developed. This method relies mainly on enhancing the surface charge density on the cluster by creating an additional shell of thiolate on the cluster surface, which enhances visible luminescence. The viability of this method has been demonstrated by imparting red luminescence to various ligand-protected quantum clusters (QCs), observable to the naked eye. The bright red luminescent material derived from Au25SBB18 clusters was characterized using UV-vis and luminescence spectroscopy, TEM, SEM/EDS, XPS, TG, ESI and MALDI mass spectrometry, which collectively proposed an uncommon molecular formula of Au29SBB24S, suggested to be due to different stapler motifs protecting the Au25 core. The critical role of temperature on the emergence of luminescence in QCs has been studied. The restoration of the surface ligand shell on the Au25 cluster and subsequent physicochemical modification to the cluster were probed by various mass spectral and spectroscopic techniques. Our results provide fundamental insights into the ligand characteristics determining luminescence in QCs.An efficient method to enhance visible luminescence in a visibly non-luminescent organic-soluble 4-(tert butyl)benzyl mercaptan (SBB)-stabilized Au25 cluster has been developed. This method relies mainly on enhancing the surface charge density on the cluster by creating an additional shell of thiolate on the cluster surface, which enhances visible luminescence. The viability of this method has been demonstrated by imparting red luminescence to various ligand-protected quantum clusters (QCs), observable to the naked eye. The bright red luminescent material derived from Au25SBB18 clusters was characterized using UV-vis and luminescence spectroscopy, TEM, SEM/EDS, XPS, TG, ESI and MALDI mass spectrometry, which collectively proposed an uncommon

  7. Early outgrowth cells release soluble endocrine antifibrotic factors that reduce progressive organ fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, Darren A; Connelly, Kim A; Zhang, Yanling; Advani, Suzanne L; Thai, Kerri; Kabir, Golam; Kepecs, David; Spring, Christopher; Smith, Christopher; Batruch, Ihor; Kosanam, Hari; Advani, Andrew; Diamandis, Eleftherios; Marsden, Philip A; Gilbert, Richard E

    2013-11-01

    Adult bone marrow-derived cells can improve organ function in chronic disease models, ostensibly by the release of paracrine factors. It has, however, been difficult to reconcile this prevailing paradigm with the lack of cell retention within injured organs and their rapid migration to the reticuloendothelial system. Here, we provide evidence that the salutary antifibrotic effects of bone marrow-derived early outgrowth cells (EOCs) are more consistent with an endocrine mode of action, demonstrating not only the presence of antifibrotic factors in the plasma of EOC-treated rats but also that EOC conditioned medium (EOC-CM) potently attenuates both TGF-β- and angiotensin II-induced fibroblast collagen production in vitro. To examine the therapeutic relevance of these findings in vivo, 5/6 subtotally nephrectomized rats, a model of chronic kidney and heart failure characterized by progressive fibrosis of both organs, were randomized to receive i.v. injections of EOC-CM, unconditioned medium, or 10(6) EOCs. Rats that received unconditioned medium developed severe kidney injury with cardiac diastolic dysfunction. In comparison, EOC-CM-treated rats demonstrated substantially improved renal and cardiac function and structure, mimicking the changes found in EOC-treated animals. Mass spectrometric analysis of EOC-CM identified proteins that regulate cellular functions implicated in fibrosis. These results indicate that EOCs secrete soluble factor(s) with highly potent antifibrotic activity, that when injected intravenously replicate the salutary effects of the cells themselves. Together, these findings suggest that an endocrine mode of action may underlie the effectiveness of cell therapy in certain settings and portend the possibility for systemic delivery of cell-free therapy. © AlphaMed Press.

  8. Large contribution of fossil fuel derived secondary organic carbon to water soluble organic aerosols in winter haze in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.-L. Zhang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC is a large fraction of organic aerosols (OA globally and has significant impacts on climate and human health. The sources of WSOC remain very uncertain in polluted regions. Here we present a quantitative source apportionment of WSOC, isolated from aerosols in China using radiocarbon (14C and offline high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer measurements. Fossil emissions on average accounted for 32–47 % of WSOC. Secondary organic carbon (SOC dominated both the non-fossil and fossil derived WSOC, highlighting the importance of secondary formation to WSOC in severe winter haze episodes. Contributions from fossil emissions to SOC were 61 ± 4 and 50 ± 9 % in Shanghai and Beijing, respectively, significantly larger than those in Guangzhou (36 ± 9 % and Xi'an (26 ± 9 %. The most important primary sources were biomass burning emissions, contributing 17–26 % of WSOC. The remaining primary sources such as coal combustion, cooking and traffic were generally very small but not negligible contributors, as coal combustion contribution could exceed 10 %. Taken together with earlier 14C source apportionment studies in urban, rural, semi-urban and background regions in Asia, Europe and the USA, we demonstrated a dominant contribution of non-fossil emissions (i.e., 75 ± 11 % to WSOC aerosols in the Northern Hemisphere; however, the fossil fraction is substantially larger in aerosols from East Asia and the eastern Asian pollution outflow, especially during winter, due to increasing coal combustion. Inclusion of our findings can improve a modelling of effects of WSOC aerosols on climate, atmospheric chemistry and public health.

  9. Large contribution of fossil fuel derived secondary organic carbon to water soluble organic aerosols in winter haze in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan-Lin; El-Haddad, Imad; Huang, Ru-Jin; Ho, Kin-Fai; Cao, Jun-Ji; Han, Yongming; Zotter, Peter; Bozzetti, Carlo; Daellenbach, Kaspar R.; Slowik, Jay G.; Salazar, Gary; Prévôt, André S. H.; Szidat, Sönke

    2018-03-01

    Water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) is a large fraction of organic aerosols (OA) globally and has significant impacts on climate and human health. The sources of WSOC remain very uncertain in polluted regions. Here we present a quantitative source apportionment of WSOC, isolated from aerosols in China using radiocarbon (14C) and offline high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer measurements. Fossil emissions on average accounted for 32-47 % of WSOC. Secondary organic carbon (SOC) dominated both the non-fossil and fossil derived WSOC, highlighting the importance of secondary formation to WSOC in severe winter haze episodes. Contributions from fossil emissions to SOC were 61 ± 4 and 50 ± 9 % in Shanghai and Beijing, respectively, significantly larger than those in Guangzhou (36 ± 9 %) and Xi'an (26 ± 9 %). The most important primary sources were biomass burning emissions, contributing 17-26 % of WSOC. The remaining primary sources such as coal combustion, cooking and traffic were generally very small but not negligible contributors, as coal combustion contribution could exceed 10 %. Taken together with earlier 14C source apportionment studies in urban, rural, semi-urban and background regions in Asia, Europe and the USA, we demonstrated a dominant contribution of non-fossil emissions (i.e., 75 ± 11 %) to WSOC aerosols in the Northern Hemisphere; however, the fossil fraction is substantially larger in aerosols from East Asia and the eastern Asian pollution outflow, especially during winter, due to increasing coal combustion. Inclusion of our findings can improve a modelling of effects of WSOC aerosols on climate, atmospheric chemistry and public health.

  10. The Changes in Color, Soluble Sugars, Organic Acids, Anthocyanins and Aroma Components in “Starkrimson” during the Ripening Period in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulian Liu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available “Starkrimson” is a traditional apple cultivar that was developed a long time ago and was widely cultivated in the arid region of the northern Wei River of China. However, little information regarding the quality characteristics of “Starkrimson” fruit has been reported in this area. To elucidate these characteristics, the color, soluble sugars, organic acids, anthocyanins and aroma components were measured during the ripening period through the use of high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS. The results indicated that the changes in anthocyanin contents took place later than the changes in the Commission International Eclairage (CIE parameters. Meanwhile, cyanidin 3-galactoside (cy3-gal, fructose, sucrose, glucose and malic acid were the primary organic compounds, and 1-butanol-2-methyl-acetate, 2-hexenal and 1-hexanol were the most abundant aroma components in the skin. Furthermore, rapidly changing soluble sugars and organic acid synchronization took place in the early ripening period, while rapidly changing aroma components occurred later, on the basis of fresh weight. This result suggested that the production of aroma components might be a useful index of apple maturity.

  11. Urinary Volatile Organic Compounds for the Detection of Prostate Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanzeela Khalid

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to investigate volatile organic compounds (VOCs emanating from urine samples to determine whether they can be used to classify samples into those from prostate cancer and non-cancer groups. Participants were men referred for a trans-rectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy because of an elevated prostate specific antigen (PSA level or abnormal findings on digital rectal examination. Urine samples were collected from patients with prostate cancer (n = 59 and cancer-free controls (n = 43, on the day of their biopsy, prior to their procedure. VOCs from the headspace of basified urine samples were extracted using solid-phase micro-extraction and analysed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Classifiers were developed using Random Forest (RF and Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA classification techniques. PSA alone had an accuracy of 62-64% in these samples. A model based on 4 VOCs, 2,6-dimethyl-7-octen-2-ol, pentanal, 3-octanone, and 2-octanone, was marginally more accurate 63-65%. When combined, PSA level and these four VOCs had mean accuracies of 74% and 65%, using RF and LDA, respectively. With repeated double cross-validation, the mean accuracies fell to 71% and 65%, using RF and LDA, respectively. Results from VOC profiling of urine headspace are encouraging and suggest that there are other metabolomic avenues worth exploring which could help improve the stratification of men at risk of prostate cancer. This study also adds to our knowledge on the profile of compounds found in basified urine, from controls and cancer patients, which is useful information for future studies comparing the urine from patients with other disease states.

  12. Selective Sorption of Dissolved Organic Carbon Compounds by Temperate Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagadamma, Sindhu; Mayes, Melanie A.; Phillips, Jana R.

    2012-01-01

    Background Physico-chemical sorption onto soil minerals is one of the major processes of dissolved organic carbon (OC) stabilization in deeper soils. The interaction of DOC on soil solids is related to the reactivity of soil minerals, the chemistry of sorbate functional groups, and the stability of sorbate to microbial degradation. This study was conducted to examine the sorption of diverse OC compounds (D-glucose, L-alanine, oxalic acid, salicylic acid, and sinapyl alcohol) on temperate climate soil orders (Mollisols, Ultisols and Alfisols). Methodology Equilibrium batch experiments were conducted using 0–100 mg C L−1 at a solid-solution ratio of 1∶60 for 48 hrs on natural soils and on soils sterilized by γ-irradiation. The maximum sorption capacity, Qmax and binding coefficient, k were calculated by fitting to the Langmuir model. Results Ultisols appeared to sorb more glucose, alanine, and salicylic acid than did Alfisols or Mollisols and the isotherms followed a non-linear pattern (higher k). Sterile experiments revealed that glucose and alanine were both readily degraded and/or incorporated into microbial biomass because the observed Qmax under sterile conditions decreased by 22–46% for glucose and 17–77% for alanine as compared to non-sterile conditions. Mollisols, in contrast, more readily reacted with oxalic acid (Qmax of 886 mg kg−1) and sinapyl alcohol (Qmax of 2031 mg kg−1), and no degradation was observed. The reactivity of Alfisols to DOC was intermediate to that of Ultisols and Mollisols, and degradation followed similar patterns as for Ultisols. Conclusion This study demonstrated that three common temperate soil orders experienced differential sorption and degradation of simple OC compounds, indicating that sorbate chemistry plays a significant role in the sorptive stabilization of DOC. PMID:23209742

  13. Urinary Volatile Organic Compounds for the Detection of Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalid, Tanzeela; Aggio, Raphael; White, Paul; De Lacy Costello, Ben; Persad, Raj; Al-Kateb, Huda; Jones, Peter; Probert, Chris S; Ratcliffe, Norman

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emanating from urine samples to determine whether they can be used to classify samples into those from prostate cancer and non-cancer groups. Participants were men referred for a trans-rectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy because of an elevated prostate specific antigen (PSA) level or abnormal findings on digital rectal examination. Urine samples were collected from patients with prostate cancer (n = 59) and cancer-free controls (n = 43), on the day of their biopsy, prior to their procedure. VOCs from the headspace of basified urine samples were extracted using solid-phase micro-extraction and analysed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Classifiers were developed using Random Forest (RF) and Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) classification techniques. PSA alone had an accuracy of 62-64% in these samples. A model based on 4 VOCs, 2,6-dimethyl-7-octen-2-ol, pentanal, 3-octanone, and 2-octanone, was marginally more accurate 63-65%. When combined, PSA level and these four VOCs had mean accuracies of 74% and 65%, using RF and LDA, respectively. With repeated double cross-validation, the mean accuracies fell to 71% and 65%, using RF and LDA, respectively. Results from VOC profiling of urine headspace are encouraging and suggest that there are other metabolomic avenues worth exploring which could help improve the stratification of men at risk of prostate cancer. This study also adds to our knowledge on the profile of compounds found in basified urine, from controls and cancer patients, which is useful information for future studies comparing the urine from patients with other disease states.

  14. Attenuation of trace organic compounds (TOrCs) inbioelectrochemical systems

    KAUST Repository

    Werner, Craig M.

    2015-04-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) and microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) are two types of microbial bioelectrochemical systems (BESs) that use microorganisms to convert chemical energy in wastewaters into useful energy products such as (bio)electricity (MFC) or hydrogen gas (MEC). These two systems were evaluated for their capacity to attenuate trace organic compounds (TOrCs), commonly found in municipal wastewater, under closed circuit (current generation) and open circuit (no current generation) conditions, using acetate as the carbon source. A biocide was used to evaluate attenuation in terms of biotransformation versus sorption. The difference in attenuation observed before and after addition of the biocide represented biotransformation, while attenuation after addition of a biocide primarily indicated sorption. Attenuation of TOrCs was similar in MFCs and MECs for eight different TOrCs, except for caffeine and trimethoprim where slightly higher attenuation was observed in MECs. Electric current generation did not enhance attenuation of the TOrCs except for caffeine, which showed slightly higher attenuation under closed circuit conditions in both MFCs and MECs. Substantial sorption of the TOrCs occurred to the biofilm-covered electrodes, but no consistent trend could be identified regarding the physico-chemical properties of the TOrCs tested and the extent of sorption. The octanol-water distribution coefficient at pH 7.4 (log DpH 7.4) appeared to be a reasonable predictor for sorption of some of the compounds (carbamazepine, atrazine, tris(2-chloroethyl) phosphate and diphenhydramine) but not for others (N,N-Diethyl-meta-toluamide). Atenolol also showed high levels of sorption despite being the most hydrophilic in the suite of compounds studied (log DpH 7.4=-1.99). Though BESs do not show any inherent advantages over conventional wastewater treatment, with respect to TOrC removal, overall removals in BESs are similar to that reported for conventional wastewater

  15. Exposure to volatile organic compounds: Comparison among different transportation modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Duc Hoai; Van Langenhove, Herman; Chigbo, Stephen Izuchukwu; Amare, Abebech Nuguse; Demeestere, Kristof; Walgraeve, Christophe

    2014-09-01

    The increasing trend of promoting public transportation (bus tram, metro, train) and more environmental friendly and sustainable non fossil-fuel alternatives (walking, cycling etc) as substitutes for auto vehicles brings forward new questions with regard to pollutant levels to which commuters are exposed. In this study, three transportation modes (tram, auto vehicle and bicycle) are studied and concentration levels of 84 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) (hydrocarbons, aromatic hydrocarbons, oxygen containing hydrocarbons, terpenes and halogenated compounds) are measured along a route in the city of Ghent, Belgium. The concentration levels are obtained by active sampling on Tenax TA sorbent tubes followed by thermal desorption gas chromatography mass spectrometry (TD-GC-MS) using deuterated toluene as an internal standard. The median total VOC concentrations for the tram mode (33 μg/m³) is 1.7 times higher than that of the bicycle mode (20 μg/m³) and 1.5 times higher than for the car mode (22 μg/m³). It is found that aromatic hydrocarbons account for a significant proportion in the total VOCs concentration (TVOCs) being as high as 41-57%, 59-72% and 58-72% for the tram, car and bicycle respectively. In all transportation modes, there was a high (r > 0.6) degree of correlation between BTEX compounds, isopropylbenzene, n-propylbenzene, 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene and 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene. When comparing time weighed average concentrations along a fixed route in Ghent, it is found that commuters using the tram mode experience the highest TVOCs concentration levels. However, next to the concentration level to which commuters are exposed, the physical activity level involving the mode of transportation is important to assess the exposure to toxic VOCs. It is proven that the commuter using a bicycle (4.3 ± 1.5 μg) inhales seven and nine times more benzene compared to the commuter using the car and tram respectively, when the same route is followed.

  16. Aqueous processing of organic compounds in carbonaceous asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trigo-Rodríguez, Josep Maria; Rimola, Albert; Martins, Zita

    2015-04-01

    There is growing evidence pointing towards a prebiotic synthesis of complex organic species in water-rich undifferentiated bodies. For instance, clays have been found to be associated with complex organic compounds (Pearson et al. 2002; Garvie & Buseck 2007; Arteaga et al. 2010), whereas theoretical calculations have studied the interaction between the organic species and surface minerals (Rimola et al., 2013) as well as surface-induced reactions (Rimola at al. 2007). Now, we are using more detailed analytical techniques to study the possible processing of organic molecules associated with the mild aqueous alteration in CR, CM and CI chondrites. To learn more about these processes we are studying carbonaceous chondrites at Ultra High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (UHR-TEM). We are particularly interested in the relationship between organics and clay minerals in carbonaceous chondrites (CCs) matrixes (Trigo-Rodríguez et al. 2014, 2015).We want to address two goals: i) identifying the chemical steps in which the organic molecules could have increased their complexity (i.e., surface interaction and catalysis); and ii) studying if the organic matter present in CCs experienced significant processing concomitant to the formation of clays and other minerals at the time in which these planetary bodies experienced aqueous alteration. Here, these two points are preliminarily explored combing experimental results with theoretical calculations based on accurate quantum mechanical methods. References Arteaga O, Canillas A, Crusats J, El-Hachemi Z, Jellison GE, Llorca J, Ribó JM (2010) Chiral biases in solids by effect of shear gradients: a speculation on the deterministic origin of biological homochirality. Orig Life Evol Biosph 40:27-40. Garvie LAJ, Buseck PR (2007) Prebiotic carbon in clays from Orgueil and Ivuna (CI) and Tagish lake (C2 ungrouped) meteorites. Meteorit Planet Sci 42:2111-2117. Pearson VK, Sephton MA, Kearsley AT, Bland AP, Franchi IA, Gilmour

  17. Compositing water samples for analysis of volatile organic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, T.J.; Fallon, J.D.; Maluk, T.L.

    2000-01-01

    Accurate mean concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) can easily and economically be obtained from a single VOC analysis by using proven methods of collecting representative, discrete water samples and compositing them with a gas-tight syringe. The technique can be used in conjunction with chemical analysis by a conventional laboratory, field-portable equipment, or a mobile laboratory. The type of mean concentration desired depends on the objectives of monitoring. For example, flow-weighted mean VOC concentrations can be used to estimate mass loadings in wastewater and urban storm water, and spatially integrated mean VOC concentrations can be used to assess sources of drinking water (e.g., reservoirs and rivers). The mean error in a discrete sample due to compositing is about 2% for most VOC concentrations greater than 0.1 ??g/L. The total error depends on the number of discrete samples comprising the composite sample and precision of the chemical analysis.Accurate mean concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) can easily and economically be obtained from a single VOC analysis by using proven methods of collecting representative, discrete water samples and compositing them with a gas-tight syringe. The technique can be used in conjunction with chemical analysis by a conventional laboratory, field-portable equipment, or a mobile laboratory. The type of mean concentration desired depends on the objectives of monitoring. For example, flow-weighted mean VOC concentrations can be used to estimate mass loadings in wastewater and urban storm water, and spatially integrated mean VOC concentrations can be used to assess sources of drinking water (e.g., reservoirs and rivers). The mean error in a discrete sample due to compositing is about 2% for most VOC concentrations greater than 0.1 ??g/L. The total error depends on the number of discrete samples comprising the composite sample and precision of the chemical analysis.Researchers are able to derive

  18. The seasonal variation in bioactive compounds content in juice from organic and non-organic tomatoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallmann, Ewelina; Lipowski, Janusz; Marszałek, Krystian; Rembiałkowska, Ewa

    2013-06-01

    A specific objective of this paper was to evaluate seasonal changes in bioactive compounds level (carotenoids and polyphenols) in juice prepared from organic and non-organic tomatoes in Poland. In the examined tomato juice, the content of dry matter, vitamin C, carotenoids as well as polyphenols (by HPLC method) has been measured. The presented results indicate the impact of the growing system and the year of production on the composition of tomato juice. The organic tomato juice contained significantly more beta-carotene, chlorogenic acid, rutin as well as more total phenolic acids, gallic acid, p-coumaric acid, total flavonoids, quercetin-3-O-glucoside and quercetin in comparison with the non-organic. The tomato juice from 2008 contained significantly more carotenoids and some flavonoids compared to the one produced in 2009, which contained significantly more dry matter, vitamin C, as well as quercetin and it derivatives.

  19. Chronic exposure to uranium compounds: medical surveillance problems related to their physico-chemical properties and their solubility: actual data and future prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ansoborlo, E.; Chalabreysse, J.C.

    1988-01-01

    A method was developped to assess uranium exposure hazards at work stations based on industrial experience acquired in Comurhex Malvesi at Narbonne. Applied to uranium tetrafluoride (UF4), the method involves five steps: 1/ Characterization of the industrial compound, including physico-chemical properties (density, surface area, X-ray spectrum and uranium enrichment). 2/ In vitro biological solubility with different synthetic fluids like Gamble solution added with differents gaz or compounds (Oxygen or hydrogen peroxyde), in order to determine the solubility class D, W or Y. 3/ Assessment of work station concentration in Bq m -3 and particle size distribution (AMAD). 4/ Monitoring workers by routine urinary excretion completed, if necessary, by fecal excretion and γ spectrometry. 5/ Use of individual protection filters or masks. Results and actual data on UF4 are presented and future prospects of studies on calcinated uranates are dealed with [fr

  20. Secondary organic aerosol formation from a large number of reactive man-made organic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derwent, Richard G.; Jenkin, Michael E.; Utembe, Steven R.; Shallcross, Dudley E.; Murrells, Tim P.; Passant, Neil R.

    2010-01-01

    A photochemical trajectory model has been used to examine the relative propensities of a wide variety of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted by human activities to form secondary organic aerosol (SOA) under one set of highly idealised conditions representing northwest Europe. This study applied a detailed speciated VOC emission inventory and the Master Chemical Mechanism version 3.1 (MCM v3.1) gas phase chemistry, coupled with an optimised representation of gas-aerosol absorptive partitioning of 365 oxygenated chemical reaction product species. In all, SOA formation was estimated from the atmospheric oxidation of 113 emitted VOCs. A number of aromatic compounds, together with some alkanes and terpenes, showed significant propensities to form SOA. When these propensities were folded into a detailed speciated emission inventory, 15 organic compounds together accounted for 97% of the SOA formation potential of UK man made VOC emissions and 30 emission source categories accounted for 87% of this potential. After road transport and the chemical industry, SOA formation was dominated by the solvents sector which accounted for 28% of the SOA formation potential.

  1. Secondary organic aerosol formation from a large number of reactive man-made organic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derwent, Richard G., E-mail: r.derwent@btopenworld.com [rdscientific, Newbury, Berkshire (United Kingdom); Jenkin, Michael E. [Atmospheric Chemistry Services, Okehampton, Devon (United Kingdom); Utembe, Steven R.; Shallcross, Dudley E. [School of Chemistry, University of Bristol, Bristol (United Kingdom); Murrells, Tim P.; Passant, Neil R. [AEA Environment and Energy, Harwell International Business Centre, Oxon (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-15

    A photochemical trajectory model has been used to examine the relative propensities of a wide variety of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted by human activities to form secondary organic aerosol (SOA) under one set of highly idealised conditions representing northwest Europe. This study applied a detailed speciated VOC emission inventory and the Master Chemical Mechanism version 3.1 (MCM v3.1) gas phase chemistry, coupled with an optimised representation of gas-aerosol absorptive partitioning of 365 oxygenated chemical reaction product species. In all, SOA formation was estimated from the atmospheric oxidation of 113 emitted VOCs. A number of aromatic compounds, together with some alkanes and terpenes, showed significant propensities to form SOA. When these propensities were folded into a detailed speciated emission inventory, 15 organic compounds together accounted for 97% of the SOA formation potential of UK man made VOC emissions and 30 emission source categories accounted for 87% of this potential. After road transport and the chemical industry, SOA formation was dominated by the solvents sector which accounted for 28% of the SOA formation potential.

  2. Soluble organic additive effects on stress development during drying of calcium carbonate suspensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedin, Pär; Lewis, Jennifer A; Bergström, Lennart

    2005-10-01

    The effect of polymer, plasticizer, and surfactant additives on stress development during drying of calcium carbonate particulate coatings was studied using a controlled-environment apparatus that simultaneously monitors drying stress, weight loss, and relative humidity. We found that the calcium carbonate coatings display a drying stress evolution typical of granular films, which is characterized by a sharp capillary-induced stress rise followed by a rapid stress relaxation. The addition of a soluble polymer to the CaCO3 suspension resulted in a two-stage stress evolution process. The initial stress rise stems from capillary-pressure-induced stresses within the film, while the second, larger stress rise occurs due to solidification and shrinkage of the polymeric species. Measurements on the corresponding pure polymer solutions established a clear correlation between the magnitude of residual stress in both the polymer and CaCO3-polymer films to the physical properties of the polymer phase, i.e. its glass transition temperature, T(g), and Young's modulus. The addition of small organic molecules can reduce the residual stress observed in the CaCO3-polymer films; e.g., glycerol, which acts as a plasticizer, reduces the drying stress by lowering T(g), while surfactant additions reduce the surface tension of the liquid phase, and, hence, the magnitude of the capillary pressure within the film.

  3. Soluble Flavanthrone Derivatives: Synthesis, Characterization, and Application to Organic Light-Emitting Diodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotwica, Kamil; Bujak, Piotr; Data, Przemyslaw; Krzywiec, Wojciech; Wamil, Damian; Gunka, Piotr A; Skorka, Lukasz; Jaroch, Tomasz; Nowakowski, Robert; Pron, Adam; Monkman, Andrew

    2016-06-01

    Simple modification of benzo[h]benz[5,6]acridino[2,1,9,8-klmna]acridine-8,16-dione, an old and almost-forgotten vat dye, by reduction of its carbonyl groups and subsequent O-alkylation, yields solution-processable, electroactive, conjugated compounds of the periazaacene type, suitable for the use in organic electronics. Their electrochemically determined ionization potential and electron affinity of about 5.2 and -3.2 eV, respectively, are essentially independent of the length of the alkoxyl substituent and in good agreement with DFT calculations. The crystal structure of 8,16-dioctyloxybenzo[h]benz[5,6]acridino[2,1,9,8-klmna]acridine (FC-8), the most promising compound, was solved. It crystallizes in space group P1‾ and forms π-stacked columns held together in the 3D structure by dispersion forces, mainly between interdigitated alkyl chains. Molecules of FC-8 have a strong tendency to self-organize in monolayers deposited on a highly oriented pyrolytic graphite surface, as observed by STM. 8,16-Dialkoxybenzo[h]benz[5,6]acridino[2,1,9,8-klmna]acridines are highly luminescent, and all have photoluminescence quantum yields of about 80 %. They show efficient electroluminescence, and can be used as guest molecules with a 4,4'-bis(N-carbazolyl)-1,1'-biphenyl host in guest/host-type organic light-emitting diodes. The best fabricated diodes showed a luminance of about 1900 cd m(-12) , a luminance efficiency of about 3 cd A(-1) , and external quantum efficiencies exceeding 0.9 %. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Reactivity of group IV (100) semiconductor surfaces towards organic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, George T.

    The reactions of simple and multifunctional organic compounds with the clean silicon, germanium, and diamond (100)-2 x 1 semiconductor surfaces have been investigated using a combination of multiple internal reflection infrared spectroscopy and quantum chemistry density functional theory calculations. From these studies, an improved understanding of the atomic level reactivity of these semiconductor surfaces has been obtained, along with insights into how to achieve their selective coupling with organics of desired and varied functionality. In addition to the Si(100) and Ge(100) surfaces, our results show that cycloaddition chemistry can also be extended to the diamond (100) surface. At room temperature, 1,3-butadiene was found to form a Diels-Alder product with the diamond (100) surface, as evidenced by isotopic substitution experiments and comparison of the surface adduct with its direct molecular analogue, cyclohexene. The reactions of other classes of molecules in addition to alkenes on the Si(100) and Ge(100) surfaces, including a series of five-membered cyclic amines, were also examined. For tertiary aliphatic amines on Si(100) and both secondary and tertiary aliphatic amines on Ge(100), a majority of the molecules were observed to become stably trapped in dative-bonded precursor states rather than form energetically favorable dissociation products. For pyrrole, aromaticity was found to play a defining role in its reactivity, and a comparison of its molecular and surface reactivity reveals interesting similarities. To probe the factors controlling the selectivity of organic reactions on clean semiconductor surfaces, the adsorption of acetone and a series of unsaturated ketones was also investigated. The reaction of acetone on Ge(100) was found to be under thermodynamic control at room temperature, resulting in the formation of an "ene" product rather than the kinetically favored [2+2] C=O cycloaddition product previously observed on the Si(100) surface. In

  5. On the effects of organic matter and sulphur-containing compounds on the CCN activation of combustion particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Petzold

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The European PartEmis project (Measurement and prediction of emissions of aerosols and gaseous precursors from gas turbine engines was focussed on the characterisation and quantification of exhaust emissions from a gas turbine engine. The combustion aerosol characterisation included on-line measurements of mass and number concentration, size distribution, mixing state, thermal stability of internally mixed particles, hygroscopicity, cloud condensation nuclei (CCN activation potential, and off-line analysis of chemical composition. Based on this extensive data set, the role of sulphuric acid coating and of the organic fraction of the combustion particles for the CCN activation was investigated. Modelling of CCN activation was conducted using microphysical and chemical properties obtained from the measurements as input data. Coating the combustion particles with water-soluble sulphuric acid, increases the potential CCN activation, or lowers the activation diameter, respectively. The adaptation of a Köhler model to the experimental data yielded coatings from 0.1 to 3 vol-% of water-soluble matter, which corresponds to an increase in the fraction of CCN-activated combustion particles from ≤10−4 to ≌10−2 at a water vapour saturation ratio Sw=1.006. Additional particle coating by coagulation of combustion particles and aqueous sulphuric acid particles formed by nucleation further reduces the CCN activation diameter. In contrast, particles containing a large fraction of non-volatile organic compounds grow significantly less at high relative humidity than particles with a lower content of non-volatile OC. The resulting reduction in the potential CCN activation with an increasing fraction of non-volatile OC becomes visible as a trend in the experimental data. While a coating of water-soluble sulphuric acid increases the potential CCN activation, or lowers the activation diameter, respectively, the non-volatile organic compounds, mainly found at

  6. Short communication: Identification of the aroma compounds responsible for the floral/rose flavor in water-soluble fractions of Manchego cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Soto-Yarritu, P; Amigo, L; Taborda, G; Martínez-Castro, I; Gómez-Ruiz, J A

    2007-11-01

    Water-soluble fractions from Protected Denomination of Origin Manchego cheese, with molecular weight <1,000 Da, were fractionated using gel permeation chromatography and studied using both instrumental and sensorial analysis. In 2 of the fractions, panelists detected a floral, rose-like flavor. Analysis of these fractions by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry after simultaneous distillation extraction with dichloromethane identified 2-phenylethanol and phenylacetaldehyde as the compounds responsible for this flavor.

  7. Organolithium and organomagnesium compounds of the naphthalene series in organic synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pozharskii, Alexander F; Ryabtsova, Oksana V

    2006-01-01

    The review summarises procedures for the synthesis of organolithium and organomagnesium compounds of the naphthalene series, including binaphthyls, the properties of these compounds and their use in organic synthesis.

  8. Factors affecting the volatilization of volatile organic compounds from wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junya Intamanee

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to understand the influence of the wind speed (U10cm, water depth (h and suspended solids (SS on mass transfer coefficient (KOLa of volatile organic compounds (VOCs volatilized from wastewater. The novelty of this work is not the method used to determine KOLa but rather the use of actual wastewater instead of pure water as previously reported. The influence of U10cm, h, and SS on KOLa was performed using a volatilization tank with the volume of 100-350 L. Methyl Ethyl Ketone (MEK was selected as a representative of VOCs investigated here in. The results revealed that the relationship between KOLa and the wind speeds falls into two regimes with a break at the wind speed of 2.4 m/s. At U10cm 2.4 m/s, KOLa increased more rapidly. The relationship between KOLa and U10cm was also linear but has a distinctly higher slope. For the KOLa dependency on water depth, the KOLa decreased significantly with increasing water depth up to a certain water depth after that the increase in water depth had small effect on KOLa. The suspended solids in wastewater also played an important role on KOLa. Increased SS resulted in a significant reduction of KOLa over the investigated range of SS. Finally, the comparison between KOLa obtained from wastewater and that of pure water revealed that KOLa from wastewater were much lower than that of pure water which was pronounced at high wind speed and at small water depth. This was due the presence of organic mass in wastewater which provided a barrier to mass transfer and reduced the degree of turbulence in the water body resulting in low volatilization rate and thus KOLa. From these results, the mass transfer model for predicting VOCs emission from wastewater should be developed based on the volatilization of VOCs from wastewater rather than that from pure water.

  9. Identification of water soluble and particle bound compounds causing sublethal toxic effects. A field study on sediments affected by a chlor-alkali industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosch, Carme; Olivares, Alba; Faria, Melissa [Department of Environmental Chemistry, IDAEA-CSIC, Jordi Girona 18, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); Navas, Jose M.; Olmo, Ivan del [INIA Dpto. Medio Ambiente, Laboratorio de Ecotoxicologia, Ctra de la Coruna Km 7.5, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Grimalt, Joan O.; Pina, Benjamin [Department of Environmental Chemistry, IDAEA-CSIC, Jordi Girona 18, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); Barata, Carlos, E-mail: cbmqam@cid.csic.es [Department of Environmental Chemistry, IDAEA-CSIC, Jordi Girona 18, 08034 Barcelona (Spain)

    2009-08-13

    A combination of cost effective sublethal Daphnia magna feeding tests, yeast- and cell culture-based bioassays and Toxicity Identification Evaluation (TIE) procedures was used to characterize toxic compounds within sediments collected in a river area under the influence of the effluents from a chlor-alkali industry (Ebro River, NE Spain). Tests were designed to measure and identify toxic compounds in the particulate and filtered water fractions of sediment elutriates. The combined use of bioassays responding to elutriates and dioxin-like compounds evidenced the existence of three major groups of hazardous contaminants in the most contaminated site: (A) metals such as cadmium and mercury bound to sediment fine particles that could be easily resuspended and moved downstream, (B) soluble compounds (presumably, lye) able to alkalinize water to toxic levels, and (C) organochlorine compounds with high dioxin-like activity. These results provided evidence that elutriate D. magna feeding responses can be used as surrogate assays for more tedious chronic whole sediment tests, and that the incorporation of such tests in sediment TIE procedures may improve the ability to identify the toxicity of particle-bound and water-soluble contaminants in sediments.

  10. Identification of water soluble and particle bound compounds causing sublethal toxic effects. A field study on sediments affected by a chlor-alkali industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch, Carme; Olivares, Alba; Faria, Melissa; Navas, Jose M; del Olmo, Iván; Grimalt, Joan O; Piña, Benjamín; Barata, Carlos

    2009-08-13

    A combination of cost effective sublethal Daphnia magna feeding tests, yeast- and cell culture-based bioassays and Toxicity Identification Evaluation (TIE) procedures was used to characterize toxic compounds within sediments collected in a river area under the influence of the effluents from a chlor-alkali industry (Ebro River, NE Spain). Tests were designed to measure and identify toxic compounds in the particulate and filtered water fractions of sediment elutriates. The combined use of bioassays responding to elutriates and dioxin-like compounds evidenced the existence of three major groups of hazardous contaminants in the most contaminated site: (A) metals such as cadmium and mercury bound to sediment fine particles that could be easily resuspended and moved downstream, (B) soluble compounds (presumably, lye) able to alkalinize water to toxic levels, and (C) organochlorine compounds with high dioxin-like activity. These results provided evidence that elutriate D. magna feeding responses can be used as surrogate assays for more tedious chronic whole sediment tests, and that the incorporation of such tests in sediment TIE procedures may improve the ability to identify the toxicity of particle-bound and water-soluble contaminants in sediments.

  11. Identification of water soluble and particle bound compounds causing sublethal toxic effects. A field study on sediments affected by a chlor-alkali industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bosch, Carme; Olivares, Alba; Faria, Melissa; Navas, Jose M.; Olmo, Ivan del; Grimalt, Joan O.; Pina, Benjamin; Barata, Carlos

    2009-01-01

    A combination of cost effective sublethal Daphnia magna feeding tests, yeast- and cell culture-based bioassays and Toxicity Identification Evaluation (TIE) procedures was used to characterize toxic compounds within sediments collected in a river area under the influence of the effluents from a chlor-alkali industry (Ebro River, NE Spain). Tests were designed to measure and identify toxic compounds in the particulate and filtered water fractions of sediment elutriates. The combined use of bioassays responding to elutriates and dioxin-like compounds evidenced the existence of three major groups of hazardous contaminants in the most contaminated site: (A) metals such as cadmium and mercury bound to sediment fine particles that could be easily resuspended and moved downstream, (B) soluble compounds (presumably, lye) able to alkalinize water to toxic levels, and (C) organochlorine compounds with high dioxin-like activity. These results provided evidence that elutriate D. magna feeding responses can be used as surrogate assays for more tedious chronic whole sediment tests, and that the incorporation of such tests in sediment TIE procedures may improve the ability to identify the toxicity of particle-bound and water-soluble contaminants in sediments.

  12. Detection of semi-volatile organic compounds in permeable ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract The Edison Environmental Center (EEC) has a research and demonstration permeable parking lot comprised of three different permeable systems: permeable asphalt, porous concrete and interlocking concrete permeable pavers. Water quality and quantity analysis has been ongoing since January, 2010. This paper describes a subset of the water quality analysis, analysis of semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) to determine if hydrocarbons were in water infiltrated through the permeable surfaces. SVOCs were analyzed in samples collected from 11 dates over a 3 year period, from 2/8/2010 to 4/1/2013.Results are broadly divided into three categories: 42 chemicals were never detected; 12 chemicals (11 chemical test) were detected at a rate of less than 10% or less; and 22 chemicals were detected at a frequency of 10% or greater (ranging from 10% to 66.5% detections). Fundamental and exploratory statistical analyses were performed on these latter analyses results by grouping results by surface type. The statistical analyses were limited due to low frequency of detections and dilutions of samples which impacted detection limits. The infiltrate data through three permeable surfaces were analyzed as non-parametric data by the Kaplan-Meier estimation method for fundamental statistics; there were some statistically observable difference in concentration between pavement types when using Tarone-Ware Comparison Hypothesis Test. Additionally Spearman Rank order non-parame

  13. Advances in Biodegradation of Multiple Volatile Organic Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, M.; Yoshikawa, M.

    2017-12-01

    Bioremediation of soil and groundwater containing multiple contaminants remains a challenge in environmental science and engineering because complete biodegradation of all components is necessary but very difficult to accomplish in practice. This presentation provides a brief overview on advances in biodegradation of multiple volatile organic compounds (VOCs) including chlorinated ethylenes, benzene, toluene and dichloromethane (DCM). Case studies on aerobic biodegradation of benzene, toluene and DCM, and integrated anaerobic-aerobic biodegradation of 7 contaminants, specifically, tetrachloroethylene (PCE), trichloroethylene (TCE), cis-dichloroethylene (cis-DCE), vinyl chloride (VC), DCM, benzene and toluene will be provided. Recent findings based on systematic laboratory experiments indicated that aerobic toluene degradation can be enhanced by co-existence of benzene. Propioniferax, not a known benzene, toluene and DCM degrader can be a key microorganism that involves in biodegradation when the three contaminants co-exist. Integrated anaerobic-aerobic biodegradation is capable of completely degrading the seven VOCs with initial concentrations less than 30 mg/L. Dehalococcoides sp., generally considered sensitive to oxygen, can survive aerobic conditions for at least 28 days, and can be activated during the subsequent anaerobic biodegradation. This presentation may provide a systematic information about biodegradation of multiple VOCs, and a scientific basis for the complete bioremediation of multiple contaminants in situ.

  14. [Determination of volatile organic compounds in atmospheric environment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, H W; Li, G K; Li, H; Zhang, Z X; Wang, B G; Li, T; Luo, H K

    2001-11-01

    It is well known that volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are the main photochemical pollutants and ozone precursors of the photochemical smog. Investigation of photochemical pollution in the ambient air must focus on VOCs, but the concentration of VOCs in ambient air is in a very low level (10(-9)-10(-12), volume fraction), so there are difficulties in the determination of VOCs. In this work, based on the TO14A and TO15 methods recommended by the Environmental Protection Agency of United States, an improved method for the determination of fifty-six VOCs, mainly O3 precursors, in atmospheric environment was developed. Operating conditions of VOCs preconcentrator, gas chromatography (GC) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) were optimized. Air sample was first frozen by liquid nitrogen, and then H2O and CO2 were eliminated in the VOCs preconcentrator. The preconcentrated VOCs sample was injected to GC and detected by MS or hydrogen flame ionization detector (FID). The C2-C10 hydrocarbons were separated effectively in capillary columns under the high concentration of CO2. The detection limits were 0.1 microgram.m-3 and the relative standard deviations were in the range from 2.57% to 9.82%. This method has been used for the determination of VOCs in real samples. The results were satisfactory.

  15. Emission of volatile organic compounds from Portuguese eucalyptus forests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nunes, T.V.; Pio, C.A. [Universidade de Aveiro (Portugal). Dept. de Ambiente e Ordenamento

    2001-07-01

    Emission to the atmosphere of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) by Eucalyptus globulus was studied in the laboratory with young specimen, and in the field with adult trees. Eucalyptus emits both monoterpenes and isoprene. The leaves of young trees emit at higher rates than the leaves of adult trees. The emission of isoprene is highly predominant during the day. The emission of isoprene is dependent on temperature and solar radiation. The emission rate follows the Guenther algorithm if a based emission factor of 32 {mu}gg{sub dw} {sup -1}h{sup -1} is used, increasing with temperature, to a maximum at 40{sup o}C. At higher temperatures there is a decrease in the emission rate. The main C{sub 10} emitted is 1,8-cineol. Cineol emissions increase exponentially with temperature, and are also seasonally dependent. Application of the emission algorithm to the Portuguese eucalyptus forests shows that during summer isoprene and monoterpene emissions by eucalyptus are of the same order of anthropogenic VOC production. Furthermore, in certain regions, in the center-north of Portugal, where eucalyptus forests are predominant, isoprene emissions can reach an order of magnitude higher than anthropogenic production of VOCs during daytime periods in July and August. (Author)

  16. Personal exposure to volatile organic compounds in the Czech Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svecova, Vlasta; Topinka, Jan; Solansky, Ivo; Sram, Radim J

    2012-09-01

    Personal exposures to volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were measured in the three industrial cities in the Czech Republic, Ostrava, Karvina and Havirov, while the city of Prague served as a control in a large-scale molecular epidemiological study identifying the impacts of air pollution on human health. Office workers from Ostrava and city policemen from Karvina, Havirov and Prague were monitored in the winter and summer of 2009. Only adult non-smokers participated in the study (N=160). Radiello-diffusive passive samplers were used to measure the exposure to benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, meta- plus para-xylene and ortho-xylene (BTEX). All participants completed a personal questionnaire and a time-location-activity diary (TLAD). The average personal BTEX exposure levels in both seasons were 7.2/34.3/4.4/16.1 μg/m(3), respectively. The benzene levels were highest in winter in Karvina, Ostrava and Prague: 8.5, 7.2 and 5.3 μg/m(3), respectively. The personal exposures to BTEX were higher than the corresponding stationary monitoring levels detected in the individual localities (Pfireplace or gas stove, automobile use and being in a restaurant were important predictors for benzene personal exposure. Ostrava's outdoor benzene pollution was a significant factor increasing the exposure of the Ostrava study participants in winter (P<0.05).

  17. [Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from large furniture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka-Kagawa, Toshiko; Furuta, Mitsuko; Shibatsuji, Masayoshi; Jinno, Hideto; Nishimura, Tetsuji

    2011-01-01

    Indoor air pollution by volatile organic compounds (VOCs), which may cause a hazardous influence on human being such as sick building (sick house) syndrome, has become a serious problem. In this study, VOCs emitted from nine pieces of home furniture, three sets of dining tables, three sets of chest of drawers and three sofas, were analyzed as potential sources of indoor air pollution by large chamber test method (JIS A 1911). Based on the emission rates of total VOC (TVOC), the impacts on the indoor TVOC was estimated by the sample model with a volume of 20 m3 and ventilation frequency of 0.5 times/h. The estimated TVOC increment values were exceeded the provisional target value for indoor air (400 microg/m3) in three sets of dining tables, one set of chest of drawer and one sofa. The estimated increment of formaldehyde were exceeded the guideline value (100 microg/m3) in one set of dining table, two sets of chest of drawers and one sofa. These results revealed that VOC emissions from furniture may influence significantly indoor air quality. Also, in this study, to establish the alternative method for large chamber test methods, emission rates from representative three parts of furniture unit were evaluated using the small chamber and emission rate from full-sized furniture was predicted. Emission rates of TVOC and formaldehyde predicted by small chamber test were 3-46% and 6-252% of the data obtained using large chamber test, respectively.

  18. First Characterisation of Volatile Organic Compounds Emitted by Banana Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berhal, Chadi; De Clerck, Caroline; Fauconnier, Marie-Laure; Levicek, Carolina; Boullis, Antoine; Kaddes, Amine; Jijakli, Haïssam M; Verheggen, François; Massart, Sébastien

    2017-05-16

    Banana (Musa sp.) ranks fourth in term of worldwide fruit production, and has economical and nutritional key values. The Cavendish cultivars correspond to more than 90% of the production of dessert banana while cooking cultivars are widely consumed locally around the banana belt production area. Many plants, if not all, produce Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) as a means of communication with their environment. Although flower and fruit VOCs have been studied for banana, the VOCs produced by the plant have never been identified despite their importance in plant health and development. A volatile collection methodology was optimized to improve the sensitivity and reproducibility of VOCs analysis from banana plants. We have identified 11 VOCs for the Cavendish, mainly (E,E)-α-farnesene (87.90 ± 11.28 ng/μl), methyl salicylate (33.82 ± 14.29) and 6-methyl-5-hepten-2-one (29.60 ± 11.66), and 14 VOCs for the Pacific Plantain cultivar, mainly (Z,E)-α-farnesene (799.64 ± 503.15), (E,E)-α-farnesene (571.24 ± 381.70) and (E) β ocimene (241.76 ± 158.49). This exploratory study paves the way for an in-depth characterisation of VOCs emitted by Musa plants.

  19. Prediction of boiling points of organic compounds by QSPR tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Yi-min; Zhu, Zhi-ping; Cao, Zhong; Zhang, Yue-fei; Zeng, Ju-lan; Li, Xun

    2013-07-01

    The novel electro-negativity topological descriptors of YC, WC were derived from molecular structure by equilibrium electro-negativity of atom and relative bond length of molecule. The quantitative structure-property relationships (QSPR) between descriptors of YC, WC as well as path number parameter P3 and the normal boiling points of 80 alkanes, 65 unsaturated hydrocarbons and 70 alcohols were obtained separately. The high-quality prediction models were evidenced by coefficient of determination (R(2)), the standard error (S), average absolute errors (AAE) and predictive parameters (Qext(2),RCV(2),Rm(2)). According to the regression equations, the influences of the length of carbon backbone, the size, the degree of branching of a molecule and the role of functional groups on the normal boiling point were analyzed. Comparison results with reference models demonstrated that novel topological descriptors based on the equilibrium electro-negativity of atom and the relative bond length were useful molecular descriptors for predicting the normal boiling points of organic compounds. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Predicting flammability of gas mixtures containing volatile organic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liekhus, K.

    1997-01-01

    One requirement regarding the transportation of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste containers currently limits the total concentration of potentially flammable volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and flammable gases in the headspace of the waste container. Typical VOCs observed in the drums include aromatic hydrocarbons, ketones, alcohols, cyclohexane, as well as chlorinated hydrocarbons (alkanes and alkenes). Flammable gases, such as hydrogen and methane, may be generated in the containers by radiation-induced decomposition (radiolysis) of water and hydrocarbon waste forms. An experimental program was initiated to identify an accurate means for predicting flammability for gas mixtures containing one or more of the following species: hydrogen, carbon tetrachloride, 1,2-dichloroethane, toluene, or 2-butanone. The lower flammability limits (LFL) of gas mixtures containing equimolar quantity for each species were determined in a 19-liter laboratory flammability chamber using a strong spark ignition source. The group factor contribution method was determined to be more accurate than the LeChatelier method for estimating the LFL for these gas mixtures

  1. Volatile organic compounds in the atmosphere of Mexico City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garzón, Jessica P.; Huertas, José I.; Magaña, Miguel; Huertas, María E.; Cárdenas, Beatriz; Watanabe, Takuro; Maeda, Tsuneaki; Wakamatsu, Shinji; Blanco, Salvador

    2015-10-01

    The Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) is one of the most polluted megacities in North America. Therefore, it is an excellent benchmark city to understand atmospheric chemistry and to implement pilot countermeasures. Air quality in the MCMA is not within acceptable levels, mainly due to high ground levels of ozone (O3). Tropospheric O3 is a secondary pollutant formed from the oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the presence of nitrogen oxides and sunlight. To gain a better understanding of O3 formation in megacities, evaluate the effectiveness of already-implemented countermeasures, and identify new cost-effective alternatives to reduce tropospheric O3 concentrations, researchers and environmental authorities require updated concentrations for a broader range of VOCs. Moreover, in an effort to protect human health and the environment, it is important to understand which VOCs exceed reference safe values or most contribute to O3 formation, as well as to identify the most probable emission sources of those VOCs. In this work, 64 VOCs, including 36 toxic VOCs, were measured at four sites in the MCMA during 2011-2012. VOCs related to liquefied petroleum gas leakages exhibited the highest concentrations. Toxic VOCs with the highest average concentrations were acetone and ethanol. The toxic VOC benzene represented the highest risk to Mexican citizens, and toluene contributed the most to O3 formation. Correlation analysis indicated that the measured VOCs come from vehicular emissions and solvent-related industrial sources.

  2. Remediation of ground water containing volatile organic compounds and tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shukla, S.N.; Folsom, E.N.

    1994-03-01

    The Trailer 5475 (T-5475) East Taxi Strip Area at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, California was used as a taxi strip by the US Navy to taxi airplanes to the runway from 1942 to 1947. Solvents were used in some unpaved areas adjacent to the East Taxi Strip for cleaning airplanes. From 1953 through 1976, the area was used to store and treat liquid waste. From 1962 to 1976 ponds were constructed and used for evaporation of liquid waste. As a result, the ground water in this area contains volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and tritium. The ground water in this area is also known to contain hexavalent chromium that is probably naturally occurring. Therefore, LLNL has proposed ''pump-and-treat'' technology above grade in a completely closed loop system. The facility will be designed to remove the VOCs and hexavalent chromium, if any, from the ground water, and the treated ground water containing tritium will be reinjected where it will decay naturally in the subsurface. Ground water containing tritium will be reinjected into areas with equal or higher tritium concentrations to comply with California regulations

  3. Biogenic volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from forests in Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindfors, V.; Laurila, T.

    2000-01-01

    We present model estimates of biogenic volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from the forests in Finland. The emissions were calculated for the years 1995-1997 using the measured isoprene and monoterpene emission factors of boreal tree species together with detailed satellite land cover information and meteorological data. The three-year average emission is 319 kilotonnes per annum, which is significantly higher than the estimated annual anthropogenic VOC emissions of 193 kilotonnes. The biogenic emissions of the Finnish forests are dominated by monoterpenes, which contribute approximately 45% of the annual total. The main isoprene emitter is the Norway spruce (Picea abies) due to its high foliar biomass density. Compared to the monoterpenes, however, the total isoprene emissions are very low, contributing only about 7% of the annual forest VOC emissions. The isoprene emissions are more sensitive to the meteorological conditions than the monoterpene emissions, but the progress of the thermal growing season is clearly reflected in all biogenic emission fluxes. The biogenic emission densities in northern Finland are approximately half of the emissions in the southern parts of the country. (orig.)

  4. Volatile organic compounds adsorption using different types of adsorbent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pimanmes Chanayotha

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Adsorbents were synthesized from coconut shell, coal and coke by pyrolysis followed by chemical activation process. These synthesized materials were used as adsorbents in adsorption test to determine the amount of volatile organic compounds (VOCs namely, 2-Hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA, Octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane and Alkanes standard solution (C8-C20. The adsorption capacities of both synthesized adsorbents and commercial grade adsorbents (Carbotrap™ B and Carbotrap™ C were also compared. It was found that adsorbent A402, which was produced from coconut shell, activated with 40% (wt. potassium hydroxide and at activating temperature of 800°C for 1 hr, could adsorb higher amount of both HEMA and Octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane than other synthesized adsorbents. The maximum adsorption capacity of adsorbent A402 in adsorbing HEMA and Octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane were 77.87% and 50.82% respectively. These adsorption capabilities were 79.73% and 70.07% of the adsorption capacity of the commercial adsorbent Carbotrap™ B respectively. All three types of the synthesized adsorbent (A402, C302, C402 showed the capability to adsorb alkanes standard solution through the range of C8-C20 . However, their adsorption capacities were high in a specific range of C10-C11. The result from the isotherm plot was indicated that surface adsorption of synthesized adsorbent was isotherm type I while the surface adsorption of commercial adsorbent was isotherm type III.

  5. Datasets used in the manuscript titled "Nitrate radicals and biogenic volatile organic compounds: oxidation, mechanisms and organic aerosol"

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This dataset documents that all of the data used in the manuscript "Nitrate radicals and biogenic volatile organic compounds: oxidation, mechanisms, and organic...

  6. Volatile organic compounds in emissions from brown-coal-fired residential stoves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engewald, W.; Knobloch, T.; Efer, J.

    1993-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds were determined in stack-gas emissions from the residential burning of brown-coal briquets using adsorptive enrichment on hydrophobic adsorbents, thermal desorption and capillary-gas chromatographic analysis. 152 compounds were identified and quantified. Quantitative emission factors of the identified individual compounds were determined in relation to the amount of the fuel used. These factors permit assessment of the pollution of the city of Leipzig with volatile organic compounds resulting from the burning of indigenous lignite. (orig.) [de

  7. Identification of residual non-biodegradable organic compounds in wastewater effluent after two-stage biochemical treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuqing Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The main non-biodegradable compounds (soluble microbial product – SMP of wastewater from the Maotai aromatic factories, located in the Chishui river region, were analyzed by UV spectroscopy, and by solid-phase extraction followed by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry, after a two-stage biochemical treatment. The UV-Vis spectra revealed that the wastewater contained two double-bonds in conjugated systems (conjugated diene or α, β- unsaturated ketone, etc. and simple non-conjugated chromophores containing n electrons from carbonyl groups or the like. The residual organic non-biodegradable substances were identified using SPE-GC/MS analysis as complex polymers containing hydroxyl, carbonyl, and carboxyl functional groups with multiple connections to either benzene rings or heterocyclic rings. As these compounds are difficult to remove by conventional biochemical treatments, our findings provide a scientific basis for the design of efficient new strategies to remove SMP from wastewater.

  8. alpha-diazo carbonyl compounds: an atractive estrategy in organic synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreira, Vítor F.; Pereira, Letícia O. R.; Souza, Maria Cecília B. V. de; Cunha, Anna C.

    2001-01-01

    Diazocarbonyl compounds are a very important class of organic substances which have a long history of useful aplications in organic chemistry. The focus of this report deals with the use of diazocarbonyl compounds in a ariety of important reactions and their application in organic synthesis. These reactions are briefly summarized showing their broad scope.

  9. Volatile organic compounds and secondary organic aerosol in the Earth's atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galbally, Ian

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Recent research, when considered as a whole, suggests that a substantial fraction of both gas-phase and aerosol atmospheric organics have not been, or have very rarely been, directly measured. A review of the global budget for organic gases shows that we cannot account for the loss of approximately half the non-methane organic carbon entering the atmosphere. We suggest that this unaccounted-for loss most likely occurs through formation of secondary organic aerosols (SOAs), indicating that the source for these aerosols is an order of magnitude larger than current estimates. There is evidence that aged secondary organic aerosol can participate in both direct and indirect (cloud modifying) radiative forcing and that this influence may change with other global climate change. Even though our knowledge of the organic composition of the atmosphere is limited, these compounds clearly influence the reactive chemistry of the atmosphere and the formation, composition, and climate impact of aerosols A major challenge in the coming decade of atmospheric chemistry research will be to elucidate the sources, structure, chemistry, fate and influences of these clearly ubiquitous yet poorly constrained organic atmospheric constituents

  10. High mobility organic field-effect transistor based on water-soluble deoxyribonucleic acid via spray coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Wei; Han, Shijiao; Huang, Wei; Yu, Junsheng, E-mail: jsyu@uestc.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices, School of Optoelectronic Information, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China (UESTC), Chengdu 610054 (China)

    2015-01-26

    High mobility organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) by inserting water-soluble deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) buffer layer between electrodes and pentacene film through spray coating process were fabricated. Compared with the OFETs incorporated with DNA in the conventional organic solvents of ethanol and methanol: water mixture, the water-soluble DNA based OFET exhibited an over four folds enhancement of field-effect mobility from 0.035 to 0.153 cm{sup 2}/Vs. By characterizing the surface morphology and the crystalline structure of pentacene active layer through atomic force microscope and X-ray diffraction, it was found that the adoption of water solvent in DNA solution, which played a key role in enhancing the field-effect mobility, was ascribed to both the elimination of the irreversible organic solvent-induced bulk-like phase transition of pentacene film and the diminution of a majority of charge trapping at interfaces in OFETs.

  11. Emission of volatile organic compounds from silage: Compounds, sources, and implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafner, Sasha D.; Howard, Cody; Muck, Richard E.; Franco, Roberta B.; Montes, Felipe; Green, Peter G.; Mitloehner, Frank; Trabue, Steven L.; Rotz, C. Alan

    2013-10-01

    Silage, fermented cattle feed, has recently been identified as a significant source of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) to the atmosphere. A small number of studies have measured VOC emission from silage, but not enough is known about the processes involved to accurately quantify emission rates and identify practices that could reduce emissions. Through a literature review, we have focused on identifying the most important compounds emitted from corn silage (the most common type of silage in the US) and the sources of these compounds by quantifying their production and emission potential in silage and describing production pathways. We reviewed measurements of VOC emission from silage and assessed the importance of individual silage VOCs through a quantitative analysis of VOC concentrations within silage. Measurements of VOC emission from silage and VOCs present within silage indicated that alcohols generally make the largest contribution to emission from corn silage, in terms of mass emitted and potential ozone formation. Ethanol is the dominant alcohol in corn silage; excluding acids, it makes up more than half of the mean mass of VOCs present. Acids, primarily acetic acid, may be important when emission is high and all VOCs are nearly depleted by emission. Aldehydes and esters, which are more volatile than acids and alcohols, are important when exposure is short, limiting emission of more abundant but less volatile compounds. Variability in silage VOC concentrations is very high; for most alcohols and acids, tolerance intervals indicate that 25% of silages have concentrations a factor of two away from median values, and possibly much further. This observation suggests that management practices can significantly influence VOC concentrations. Variability also makes prediction of emissions difficult. The most important acids, alcohols, and aldehydes present in silage are probably produced by bacteria (and, in the case of ethanol, yeasts) during fermentation and

  12. Fermentation of calcium-fortified soymilk with Lactobacillus: effects on calcium solubility, isoflavone conversion, and production of organic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, A L; Shah, N P; Wilcox, G; Walker, K Z; Stojanovska, L

    2007-11-01

    The objective of this study was to enhance calcium solubility and bioavailability from calcium-fortified soymilk by fermentation with 7 strains of Lactobacillus, namely, L. acidophilus ATCC 4962, ATCC33200, ATCC 4356, ATCC 4461, L. casei ASCC 290, L. plantarum ASCC 276, and L. fermentum VRI-003. The parameters that were used are viability, pH, calcium solubility, organic acid, and biologically active isoflavone aglycone content. Calcium-fortified soymilk made from soy protein isolate was inoculated with these probiotic strains, incubated for 24 h at 37 degrees C, then stored for 14 d at 4 degrees C. Soluble calcium was measured using atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AA). Organic acids and bioactive isoflavone aglycones, including diadzein, genistein, and glycetein, were measured using HPLC. Viability of the strains in the fermented calcium-fortified soymilk was > 8.5 log(10) CFU/g after 24 h fermentation and this was maintained for 14-d storage at 4 degrees C. After 24 h, there was a significant increase (P casei ASCC 290 demonstrated the highest increase with 89.3% and 87.0% soluble calcium after 24 h, respectively. The increase in calcium solubility observed was related to lowered pH associated with production of lactic and acetic acids. Fermentation significantly increased (P < 0.05) the level of conversion of isoflavones into biologically active aglycones, including diadzein, genistein, and glycetein. Our results show that fermenting calcium-fortified soymilk with the selected probiotics can potentially enhance the calcium bioavailability of calcium-fortified soymilk due to increased calcium solubility and bioactive isoflavone aglycone enrichment.

  13. Impact of phosphorus and water-soluble organic carbon in cattle and swine manure composts on lead immobilization in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katoh, Masahiko; Wang, Yan; Kitahara, Wataru; Sato, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we aimed to understand how amelioration of animal manure compost (AMC) with high phosphorus and low water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) contents can simultaneously immobilize lead and reduce lead mobility and bioavailability in soil irrespective of the animal source. The amount of water-soluble lead in the soil amended with swine compost (SC) was not suppressed as compared with that in the soil without compost, whereas it was suppressed in the case of the soil amended with cattle compost (CC). The lead phases in the soil amended with SC became less soluble; however, those in the soil amended with CC were equivalent to those in the soil without compost. The ameliorated cattle and SCs with high phosphorus and low WSOC contents simultaneously induced a significant reduction in the concentration of water-soluble lead and ensured the formation of higher concentrations of insoluble lead phases. The microbial enzyme activities in the soil amended with the ameliorated compost were lower than those in the soil amended with the SC. This study suggests that ameliorated AMC can alter lead phases to insoluble forms and suppress the level of water-soluble lead, simultaneously. Therefore, such ameliorated AMC with high phosphorus and low WSOC contents would be suitable as a lead immobilization material.

  14. Collapsing aged culture of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus produces compound(s toxic to photosynthetic organisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Assaf Cohen

    Full Text Available Phytoplankton mortality allows effective nutrient cycling, and thus plays a pivotal role in driving biogeochemical cycles. A growing body of literature demonstrates the involvement of regulated death programs in the abrupt collapse of phytoplankton populations, and particularly implicates processes that exhibit characteristics of metazoan programmed cell death. Here, we report that the cell-free, extracellular fluid (conditioned medium of a collapsing aged culture of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus is toxic to exponentially growing cells of this cyanobacterium, as well as to a large variety of photosynthetic organisms, but not to eubacteria. The toxic effect, which is light-dependent, involves oxidative stress, as suggested by damage alleviation by antioxidants, and the very high sensitivity of a catalase-mutant to the conditioned medium. At relatively high cell densities, S. elongatus cells survived the deleterious effect of conditioned medium in a process that required de novo protein synthesis. Application of conditioned medium from a collapsing culture caused severe pigment bleaching not only in S. elongatus cells, but also resulted in bleaching of pigments in a cell free extract. The latter observation indicates that the elicited damage is a direct effect that does not require an intact cell, and therefore, is mechanistically different from the metazoan-like programmed cell death described for phytoplankton. We suggest that S. elongatus in aged cultures are triggered to produce a toxic compound, and thus, this process may be envisaged as a novel regulated death program.

  15. Modeling secondary organic aerosol formation through cloud processing of organic compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Chen

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Interest in the potential formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA through reactions of organic compounds in condensed aqueous phases is growing. In this study, the potential formation of SOA from irreversible aqueous-phase reactions of organic species in clouds was investigated. A new proposed aqueous-phase chemistry mechanism (AqChem is coupled with the existing gas-phase Caltech Atmospheric Chemistry Mechanism (CACM and the Model to Predict the Multiphase Partitioning of Organics (MPMPO that simulate SOA formation. AqChem treats irreversible organic reactions that lead mainly to the formation of carboxylic acids, which are usually less volatile than the corresponding aldehydic compounds. Zero-dimensional model simulations were performed for tropospheric conditions with clouds present for three consecutive hours per day. Zero-dimensional model simulations show that 48-h average SOA formation is increased by 27% for a rural scenario with strong monoterpene emissions and 7% for an urban scenario with strong emissions of aromatic compounds, respectively, when irreversible organic reactions in clouds are considered. AqChem was also incorporated into the Community Multiscale Air Quality Model (CMAQ version 4.4 with CACM/MPMPO and applied to a previously studied photochemical episode (3–4 August 2004 focusing on the eastern United States. The CMAQ study indicates that the maximum contribution of SOA formation from irreversible reactions of organics in clouds is 0.28 μg m−3 for 24-h average concentrations and 0.60 μg m−3 for one-hour average concentrations at certain locations. On average, domain-wide surface SOA predictions for the episode are increased by 9% when irreversible, in-cloud processing of organics is considered. Because aldehydes of carbon number greater than four are assumed to convert fully to the corresponding carboxylic acids upon reaction with OH in cloud droplets and this assumption may overestimate

  16. Water soluble organic carbon in aerosols (PM1, PM2.5, PM10) and various precipitation forms (rain, snow, mixed) over the southern Baltic Sea station.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witkowska, Agnieszka; Lewandowska, Anita U

    2016-12-15

    In the urbanized coastal zone of the Southern Baltic, complex measurements of water soluble organic carbon (WSOC) were conducted between 2012 and 2015, involving atmospheric precipitation in its various forms (rain, snow, mixed) and PM1, PM2.5 and PM10 aerosols. WSOC constituted about 60% of the organic carbon mass in aerosols of various sizes. The average concentration of WSOC was equal to 2.6μg∙m -3 in PM1, 3.6μg∙m -3 in PM2.5 and 4.4μg∙m -3 in PM10. The lowest concentration of WSOC was noted in summer as a result of effective removal of this compound with rainfall. The highest WSOC concentrations in PM2.5 and PM10 aerosols were measured in spring, which should be associated with developing vegetation on land and in the sea. On the other hand, the highest WSOC concentrations in PM1 occurred in winter at low air temperatures and greatest atmospheric stability, when there were increased carbon emissions from fuel combustion in the communal-utility sector and from transportation. WSOC concentrations in precipitation were determined by its form. Mixed precipitation turned out to be the richest in soluble organic carbon (5.1mg·dm -3 ), while snow contained the least WSOC (1.7mg·dm -3 ). Snow and rain cleaned carbon compounds from the atmosphere more effectively when precipitation lasted longer than 24h, while in the case of mixed precipitation WSOC was removed most effectively within the first 24h. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Optical properties of elemental carbon and water-soluble organic carbon in Beijing, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Y.; He, K.-B.; Zheng, M.; Duan, F.-K.; Ma, Y.-L.; Du, Z.-Y.; Tan, J.-H.; Liu, J.-M.; Zhang, X.-L.; Weber, R. J.; Bergin, M. H.; Russell, A. G.

    2011-02-01

    The mass absorption cross-section (MAC) of elemental carbon (EC) in Beijing was quantified using a thermal-optical carbon analyzer and the influences of mixing state and sources of carbonaceous aerosol were investigated. The MAC measured at 632 nm was 29.0 and 32.0 m2 g-1 during winter and summer respectively. MAC correlated well with the organic carbon (OC) to EC ratio (R2 = 0.91) which includes important information about the extent of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) production, indicating the enhancement of MAC by coating with SOA. The extrapolated MAC value was 10.5 m2 g-1 when the OC to EC ratio is zero, which was 5.6 m2 g-1 after correction by the enhancement factor (1.87) caused by the artifacts associated with the "filter-based" methods. The MAC also increased with sulphate (R2 = 0.84) when the sulphate concentration was below 10 μg m-3, whereas MAC and sulphate were only weekly related when the sulphate concentration was above 10 μg m-3, indicating the MAC of EC was also enhanced by coating with sulphate. Based on a converting approach that accounts for the discrepancy caused by measurements methods of both light absorption and EC concentration, previously published MAC values were converted to the "equivalent MAC", which is the estimated value if using the same measurement methods as used in this study. The "equivalent MAC" was found to be much lower in the regions heavily impacted by biomass burning (e.g., India), probably due to the influence of brown carbon. Optical properties of water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) in Beijing were also presented. Light absorption by WSOC exhibited strong wavelength (λ) dependence such that absorption varied approximately as λ-7, which was characteristic of the brown carbon spectra. The mass absorption efficiency (σabs) of WSOC (measured at 365 nm) was 1.83 and 0.70 m2 g-1 during winter and summer respectively. The seasonal pattern of σabs was attributed to the difference in the precursors of SOA, because WSOC in

  18. Delivery of complex organic compounds from evolved stars to the solar system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwok, Sun

    2011-12-01

    Stars in the late stages of evolution are able to synthesize complex organic compounds with aromatic and aliphatic structures over very short time scales. These compounds are ejected into the interstellar medium and distributed throughout the Galaxy. The structures of these compounds are similar to the insoluble organic matter found in meteorites. In this paper, we discuss to what extent stellar organics has enriched the primordial Solar System and possibly the early Earth.

  19. Thermodynamic properties of solubility of 2-methyl-5-arylfuran-3-carboxylic acids in organic solvents

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sobechko, I.; Dibrivnyi, V.; Horak, Y.; Velychkivska, Nadiia; Kochubei, V.; Obushak, M.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 4 (2017), s. 397-404 ISSN 1996-4196 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : enthalpy * entropy * Gibbs energy of solubility Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry OBOR OECD: Polymer science

  20. Precipitate hydrolysis process for the removal of organic compounds from nuclear waste slurries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, J.P.; Marek, J.C.

    1987-02-25

    A process for removing organic compounds from a nuclear waste slurry comprising reacting a mixture of radioactive waste precipitate slurry and an acid in the presence of a catalytically effective amount of a copper(II) catalyst whereby the organic compounds in the precipitate slurry are hydrolyzed to form volatile organic compounds which are separated from the reacting mixture. The resulting waste slurry, containing less than 10 percent of the original organic compounds, is subsequently blended with high level radioactive sludge land transferred to a vitrification facility for processing into borosilicate glass for long-term storage. 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Correlations between water-soluble organic aerosol and water vapor: a synergistic effect from biogenic emissions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennigan, Christopher J; Bergin, Michael H; Weber, Rodney J

    2008-12-15

    Ground-based measurements of meteorological parameters and water-soluble organic carbon in the gas(WSOCg) and particle (WSOCp) phases were carried out in Atlanta, Georgia, from May to September 2007. Fourteen separate events were observed throughout the summer in which WSOCp and water vapor concentrations were highly correlated (average WSOCp-water vapor r = 0.92); however, for the entire summer, no well-defined relationship existed between the two. The correlation events, which lasted on average 19 h, were characterized by a wide range of WSOCp and water vapor concentrations. Several hypotheses for the correlation are explored, including heterogeneous liquid phase SOA formation and the co-emission of biogenic VOCs and water vapor. The data provide supporting evidence for contributions from both and suggest the possibility of a synergistic effect between the co-emission of water vapor and VOCs from biogenic sources on SOA formation. Median WSOCp concentrations were also correlated with elemental carbon (EC), although this correlation extended over the entire summer. Despite the emission of water vapor from anthropogenic mobile sources and the WSOCp-EC correlation, mobile sources were not considered a potential cause for the WSOCp-water vapor correlations because of their low contribution to the water vapor budget. Meteorology could perhaps have influenced the WSOCp-EC correlation, but other factors are implicated as well. Overall, the results suggest that the temperature-dependent co-emission of water vapor through evapotranspiration and SOA precursor-VOCs by vegetation may be an important process contributing to SOA in some environments.

  2. Transport of volatile organic compounds across the capillary fringe

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Kathleen A.; Johnson, Richard L.

    1993-01-01

    Physical experiments were conducted to investigate the transport of a dissolved volatile organic compound (trichloroethylene, TCE) from shallow groundwater to the unsaturated zone under a variety of conditions including changes in the soil moisture profile and water table position. Experimental data indicated that at moderate groundwater velocities (0.1 m/d), vertical mechanical dispersion was negligible and molecular diffusion was the dominant vertical transport mechanism. Under these conditions, TCE concentrations decreased nearly 3 orders of magnitude across the capillary fringe and soil gas concentrations remained low relative to those of underlying groundwater. Data collected during a water table drop showed a short-term increase in concentrations throughout most of the unsaturated zone, but these concentrations quickly declined and approached initial values after the water table was returned to its original level. In the deep part of the unsaturated zone, the water table drop resulted in a long-term decrease in concentrations, illustrating the effects of hysteresis in the soil moisture profile. A two-dimensional random walk advection-diffusion model was developed to simulate the experimental conditions, and numerical simulations agreed well with experimental data. A simpler, one-dimensional finite-difference diffusion-dispersion model was also developed. One-dimensional simulations based on molecular diffusion also agreed well with experimental data. Simulations which incorporated mechanical dispersion tended to overestimate flux across the capillary fringe. Good agreement between the one- and two-dimensional models suggested that a simple, one-dimensional approximation of vertical transport across the capillary fringe can be useful when conditions are appropriate.

  3. Passive remediation of chlorinated volatile organic compounds using barometric pumping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossabi, J.; Looney, B.B.; Dilek, C.A.E.; Riha, B.; Rohay, V.J.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of the Savannah River Integrated Demonstration Program, sponsored by the Department of Energy, is to demonstrate new subsurface characterization, monitoring, and remediation technologies. The interbedded clay and sand layers at the Integrated Demonstration Site (IDS) are contaminated with chlorinated volatile organic compounds (CVOCs). Characterization studies show that the bulk of the contamination is located in the approximately 40 m thick vadose zone. The most successful strategy for removing contaminants of this type from this environment is vapor extraction alone or in combination with other methods such as air sparging or enhanced bioremediation. Preliminary work at the IDS has indicated that natural pressure differences between surface and subsurface air caused by surface barometric fluctuations can produce enough gas flow to make barometric pumping a viable method for subsurface remediation. Air flow and pressure were measured in wells that are across three stratigraphic intervals in the vadose zone' The subsurface pressures were correlated to surface pressure fluctuations but were damped and lagging in phase corresponding to depth and stratum permeability. Piezometer wells screened at lower elevations exhibited a greater phase lag and damping than wells screened at higher elevations where the pressure wave from barometric fluctuations passes through a smaller number of low permeable layers. The phase lag between surface and subsurface pressures results in significant fluxes through these wells. The resultant air flows through the subsurface impacts CVOC fate and transport. With the appropriate controls (e.g. solenoid valves) a naturally driven vapor extraction system can be implemented requiring negligible operating costs yet capable of a large CVOC removal rate (as much as 1--2 kg/day in each well at the IDS)

  4. Passive remediation of chlorinated volatile organic compounds using barometric pumping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossabi, J.; Looney, B.B.; Dilek, C.A.E.; Riha, B.; Rohay, V.J.

    1993-12-31

    The purpose of the Savannah River Integrated Demonstration Program, sponsored by the Department of Energy, is to demonstrate new subsurface characterization, monitoring, and remediation technologies. The interbedded clay and sand layers at the Integrated Demonstration Site (IDS) are contaminated with chlorinated volatile organic compounds (CVOCs). Characterization studies show that the bulk of the contamination is located in the approximately 40 m thick vadose zone. The most successful strategy for removing contaminants of this type from this environment is vapor extraction alone or in combination with other methods such as air sparging or enhanced bioremediation. Preliminary work at the IDS has indicated that natural pressure differences between surface and subsurface air caused by surface barometric fluctuations can produce enough gas flow to make barometric pumping a viable method for subsurface remediation. Air flow and pressure were measured in wells that are across three stratigraphic intervals in the vadose zone` The subsurface pressures were correlated to surface pressure fluctuations but were damped and lagging in phase corresponding to depth and stratum permeability. Piezometer wells screened at lower elevations exhibited a greater phase lag and damping than wells screened at higher elevations where the pressure wave from barometric fluctuations passes through a smaller number of low permeable layers. The phase lag between surface and subsurface pressures results in significant fluxes through these wells. The resultant air flows through the subsurface impacts CVOC fate and transport. With the appropriate controls (e.g. solenoid valves) a naturally driven vapor extraction system can be implemented requiring negligible operating costs yet capable of a large CVOC removal rate (as much as 1--2 kg/day in each well at the IDS).

  5. Diagnosing Tibetan pollutant sources via volatile organic compound observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongyan; He, Qiusheng; Song, Qi; Chen, Laiguo; Song, Yongjia; Wang, Yuhang; Lin, Kui; Xu, Zhencheng; Shao, Min

    2017-10-01

    Atmospheric transport of black carbon (BC) from surrounding areas has been shown to impact the Tibetan environment, and clarifying the geographical source and receptor regions is crucial for providing guidance for mitigation actions. In this study, 10 trace volatile organic compounds (VOCs) sampled across Tibet are chosen as proxies to diagnose source regions and related transport of pollutants to Tibet. The levels of these VOCs in Tibet are higher than those in the Arctic and Antarctic regions but much lower than those observed at many remote and background sites in Asia. The highest VOC level is observed in the eastern region, followed by the southern region and the northern region. A positive matrix factorization (PMF) model found that three factors-industry, biomass burning, and traffic-present different spatial distributions, which indicates that different zones of Tibet are influenced by different VOC sources. The average age of the air masses in the northern and eastern regions is estimated to be 3.5 and 2.8 days using the ratio of toluene to benzene, respectively, which indicates the foreign transport of VOC species to those regions. Back-trajectory analyses show that the Afghanistan-Pakistan-Tajikistan region, Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP), and Meghalaya-Myanmar region could transport industrial VOCs to different zones of Tibet from west to east. The agricultural bases in northern India could transport biomass burning-related VOCs to the middle-northern and eastern zones of Tibet. High traffic along the unique national roads in Tibet is associated with emissions from local sources and neighboring areas. Our study proposes international joint-control efforts and targeted actions to mitigate the climatic changes and effects associated with VOCs in Tibet, which is a climate sensitive region and an important source of global water.

  6. Methods for calculation of engineering parameters for gas separation. [vapor pressure and solubility of gases in organic liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, D. D.

    1979-01-01

    A group additivity method is generated which allows estimation, from the structural formulas alone, of the energy of vaporization and the molar volume at 25 C of many nonpolar organic liquids. Using these two parameters and appropriate thermodynamic relations, the vapor pressure of the liquid phase and the solubility of various gases in nonpolar organic liquids are predicted. It is also possible to use the data to evaluate organic and some inorganic liquids for use in gas separation stages or liquids as heat exchange fluids in prospective thermochemical cycles for hydrogen production.

  7. Reproducing the organic matter model of anthropogenic dark earth of Amazonia and testing the ecotoxicity of functionalized charcoal compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Rodrigues Linhares

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to obtain organic compounds similar to the ones found in the organic matter of anthropogenic dark earth of Amazonia (ADE using a chemical functionalization procedure on activated charcoal, as well as to determine their ecotoxicity. Based on the study of the organic matter from ADE, an organic model was proposed and an attempt to reproduce it was described. Activated charcoal was oxidized with the use of sodium hypochlorite at different concentrations. Nuclear magnetic resonance was performed to verify if the spectra of the obtained products were similar to the ones of humic acids from ADE. The similarity between spectra indicated that the obtained products were polycondensed aromatic structures with carboxyl groups: a soil amendment that can contribute to soil fertility and to its sustainable use. An ecotoxicological test with Daphnia similis was performed on the more soluble fraction (fulvic acids of the produced soil amendment. Aryl chloride was formed during the synthesis of the organic compounds from activated charcoal functionalization and partially removed through a purification process. However, it is probable that some aryl chloride remained in the final product, since the ecotoxicological test indicated that the chemical functionalized soil amendment is moderately toxic.

  8. Spectroscopic study of the water-soluble organic matter isolated from atmospheric aerosols collected under different atmospheric conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duarte, Regina M.B.O.; Pio, Casimiro A.; Duarte, Armando C.

    2005-01-01

    The composition of the water-soluble organic matter from fine aerosols collected in a rural location during two different meteorological conditions (summer and autumn) was investigated by UV-vis, synchronous fluorescence (with Δλ = 20 nm), FT-IR and CPMAS- 13 C NMR spectroscopies. A seasonal variation in the concentration of total carbon, organic carbon and water-soluble organic carbon was confirmed, with higher values during the autumn and lower values during the summer season. The chemical characterisation of the water-soluble organic matter showed that both samples are dominated by a high content of aliphatic structures, carboxyl groups and aliphatic carbons single bonded to one oxygen or nitrogen atom. However, the autumn sample exhibits a higher aromatic content than the summer sample, plus signals due to carbons of phenol, ketones and methoxyl groups. These signals were attributed to lignin breakdown products which are likely to be released during wood combustion processes. The obtained results put into evidence the major contribution of biomass burning processes in domestic fireplaces during low temperature conditions into both the concentration and the bulk chemical properties of the WSOC from fine aerosols

  9. Functional Groups and Structural Insights of Water-Soluble Organic Carbon using Ultrahigh Resolution FT-ICR Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzoleni, L. R.; Habib, D.; Zhao, Y.; Dalbec, M.; Samburova, V.; Hallar, G.; Zielinska, B.; Lowenthal, D.

    2013-12-01

    Water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) is a complex mixture of thousands of organic compounds which may have significant influence on the climate-relevant properties of atmospheric aerosols. An improved understanding of the molecular composition of WSOC is needed to evaluate the effect of aerosol composition upon aerosol physical properties. Products of gas phase, aqueous phase and particle phase reactions contribute to pre-existing aerosol organic mass or nucleate new aerosol particles. Thus, ambient aerosols carry a complex array of WSOC components with variable chemical signatures depending upon its origin and aerosol life-cycle processes. In this work, ultrahigh resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) was used to characterize aerosol WSOC collected during the summer of 2010 at the Storm Peak Laboratory (3210 m a.s.l.) near Steamboat Springs, CO. Approximately 4000 molecular formulas were assigned in the mass range of m/z 100-800 after negative-ion electrospray ionization. The observed trends indicate significant non-oxidative accretion reaction pathways for the formation of high molecular weight WSOC components closely associated with terpene ozonolysis secondary organic aerosol (SOA). The aerosol WSOC was further characterized using ultrahigh resolution tandem MS analysis with infrared multiphoton dissociation to determine the functional groups and structural properties of 1700 WSOC species up to m/z 600. Due to the complex nature of the WSOC, multiple precursor ions were simultaneously fragmented. The exact mass measurements of the precursor and product ions facilitated molecular formula assignments and matching of neutral losses. The most important neutral losses are CO2, H2O, CH3OH, HNO3, CH3NO3, SO3 and SO4. The presence and frequency of these losses indicate the type of functional groups contained in the precursor structures. Consistent with the acidic nature of WSOC compounds, the most frequently observed losses

  10. Effectiveness of Liquid-Liquid Extraction, Solid Phase Extraction, and Headspace Technique for Determination of Some Volatile Water-Soluble Compounds of Rose Aromatic Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canbay, Hale Seçilmiş

    2017-01-01

    Steam distillation is used to isolate scent of rose flowers. Rose aromatic water is commonly used in European cuisine and aromatherapy besides its use in cosmetic industry for its lovely scent. In this study, three different sampling techniques, liquid-liquid extraction (LLE), headspace technique (HS), and solid phase extraction (SPE), were compared for the analysis of volatile water-soluble compounds in commercial rose aromatic water. Some volatile water-soluble compounds of rose aromatic water were also analyzed by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS). In any case, it was concluded that one of the solid phase extraction methods led to higher recoveries for 2-phenylethyl alcohol (PEA) in the rose aromatic water than the liquid-liquid extraction and headspace technique. Liquid-liquid extraction method provided higher recovery ratios for citronellol, nerol, and geraniol than others. Ideal linear correlation coefficient values were observed by GCMS for quantitative analysis of volatile compounds ( r 2 ≥ 0.999). Optimized methods showed acceptable repeatability (RSDs 95%). For compounds such as α -pinene, linalool, β -caryophyllene, α -humulene, methyl eugenol, and eugenol, the best recovery values were obtained with LLE and SPE.

  11. Effectiveness of Liquid-Liquid Extraction, Solid Phase Extraction, and Headspace Technique for Determination of Some Volatile Water-Soluble Compounds of Rose Aromatic Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hale Seçilmiş Canbay

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Steam distillation is used to isolate scent of rose flowers. Rose aromatic water is commonly used in European cuisine and aromatherapy besides its use in cosmetic industry for its lovely scent. In this study, three different sampling techniques, liquid-liquid extraction (LLE, headspace technique (HS, and solid phase extraction (SPE, were compared for the analysis of volatile water-soluble compounds in commercial rose aromatic water. Some volatile water-soluble compounds of rose aromatic water were also analyzed by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS. In any case, it was concluded that one of the solid phase extraction methods led to higher recoveries for 2-phenylethyl alcohol (PEA in the rose aromatic water than the liquid-liquid extraction and headspace technique. Liquid-liquid extraction method provided higher recovery ratios for citronellol, nerol, and geraniol than others. Ideal linear correlation coefficient values were observed by GCMS for quantitative analysis of volatile compounds (r2≥0.999. Optimized methods showed acceptable repeatability (RSDs 95%. For compounds such as α-pinene, linalool, β-caryophyllene, α-humulene, methyl eugenol, and eugenol, the best recovery values were obtained with LLE and SPE.

  12. Photoautotrophic Production of Biomass, Laurate, and Soluble Organics by Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Binh Thanh

    Photosynthesis converts sunlight to biomass at a global scale. Among the photosynthetic organisms, cyanobacteria provide an excellent model to study how photosynthesis can become a practical platform of large-scale biotechnology. One novel approach involves metabolically engineering the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 to excrete laurate, which is harvested directly. This work begins by defining a working window of light intensity (LI). Wild-type and laurate-excreting Synechocystis required an LI of at least 5 muE/m2-s to sustain themselves, but are photo-inhibited by LI of 346 to 598 muE/m2-s. Fixing electrons into valuable organic products, e.g., biomass and excreted laurate, is critical to success. Wild-type Synechocystis channeled 75% to 84% of its fixed electrons to biomass; laurate-excreting Synechocystis fixed 64 to 69% as biomass and 6.6% to 10% as laurate. This means that 16 to 30% of the electrons were diverted to non-valuable soluble products, and the trend was accentuated with higher LI. How the Ci concentration depended on the pH and the nitrogen source was quantified by the proton condition and experimentally validated. Nitrate increased, ammonium decreased, but ammonium nitrate stabilized alkalinity and Ci. This finding provides a mechanistically sound tool to manage Ci and pH independently. Independent evaluation pH and Ci on the growth kinetics of Synechocystis showed that pH 8.5 supported the fastest maximum specific growth rate (mumax): 2.4/day and 1.7/day, respectively, for the wild type and modified strains with LI of 202 muE/m2-s. Half-maximum-rate concentrations (KCi) were less than 0.1 mM, meaning that Synechocystis should attain its mumax with a modest Ci concentration (≥1.0 mM). Biomass grown with day-night cycles had a night endogenous decay rate of 0.05-1.0/day, with decay being faster with higher LI and the beginning of dark periods. Supplying light at a fraction of daylight reduced dark decay rate and improved overall

  13. Graphene and poly(methyl methacrylate) composite laminates on flexible substrates for volatile organic compound detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattanabut, Chanoknan; Wongwiriyapan, Winadda; Muangrat, Worawut; Bunjongpru, Win; Phonyiem, Mayuree; Song, Young Jae

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, we present a gas sensor for volatile organic compound (VOC) detection based on graphene and poly(methyl methacrylate) (GR/PMMA) composite laminates fabricated using CVD-grown graphene. Graphene was transferred to a poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) substrate by PMMA-supported wet transfer process without PMMA removal in order to achieve the deposition of GR/PMMA composite laminates on PET. The GR/PMMA and graphene sensors show completely different sensitivities to VOC vapors. The GR/PMMA and graphene sensors showed the highest sensitivities to dichloromethane (DCM). The response of the GR/PMMA sensor to DCM was 3 times higher than that of the graphene sensor but the GR/PMMA sensor hardly responded to acetone, chloroform, or benzene. The sensing mechanism of the graphene sensor can be based on the dielectric constant of VOCs, the size of VOC molecule, and electron hopping effects on defect graphene, while that of the GR/PMMA sensor can be explained in terms of the polymer swelling owing to the Hansen solubility parameter.

  14. Distribution of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in surface water, soil, and groundwater within a chemical industry park in Eastern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Benhua; Chen, Liang; Huang, Linxian; Wang, Yongseng; Li, Yuehua

    2015-01-01

    This paper focuses on the distribution of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the surface water, soil, and groundwater within a chemical industry park in Eastern China. At least one VOC was detected in each of the 20 sampling sites, and the maximum number of VOCs detected in the surface water, groundwater, and soil were 13, 16, and 14, respectively. Two of the 10 VOCs with elevated concentrations detected in surface water, groundwater, and soil were chloroform and 1,2-dichloroethane. The characteristics of VOCs, which include volatility, boiling point, and solubility, could significantly affect their distribution in surface water, soil, and groundwater. However, due to the direct discharging of chemical industry wastewater into surface water, higher concentrations of VOCs (except chloroform) were detected in surface water than in soil and groundwater. Fortunately, the higher volatility of VOCs prevents the VOCs from impacting groundwater, which helps to maintain a lower concentration of VOCs in the groundwater than in both surface water and soil. This is because pollutants with relatively higher boiling points and lower solubilities have higher detection frequencies in soil, and contaminants with relatively lower boiling points and higher solubilities have higher detection frequencies in water, notably in surface water.

  15. A curved multi-component aerosol hygroscopicity model framework: Part 2 – Including organic compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. O. Topping

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the inclusion of organic particulate material within the Aerosol Diameter Dependent Equilibrium Model (ADDEM framework described in the companion paper applied to inorganic aerosol components. The performance of ADDEM is analysed in terms of its capability to reproduce the behaviour of various organic and mixed inorganic/organic systems using recently published bulk data. Within the modelling architecture already described two separate thermodynamic models are coupled in an additive approach and combined with a method for solving the Kohler equation in order to develop a tool for predicting the water content associated with an aerosol of known inorganic/organic composition and dry size. For development of the organic module, the widely used group contribution method UNIFAC is employed to explicitly deal with the non-ideality in solution. The UNIFAC predictions for components of atmospheric importance were improved considerably by using revised interaction parameters derived from electro-dynamic balance studies. Using such parameters, the model was found to adequately describe mixed systems including 5–6 dicarboxylic acids, down to low relative humidity conditions. By comparison with electrodynamic balance data, it was also found that the model was capable of capturing the behaviour of aqueous aerosols containing Suwannee River Fulvic acid, a structure previously used to represent the functionality of complex oxidised macromolecules often found in atmospheric aerosols. The additive approach for modelling mixed inorganic/organic systems worked well for a variety of mixtures. As expected, deviations between model predictions and measurements increase with increasing concentration. Available surface tension models, used in evaluating the Kelvin term, were found to reproduce measured data with varying success. Deviations from experimental data increased with increased organic compound complexity. For components only slightly

  16. A curved multi-component aerosol hygroscopicity model framework: Part 2 Including organic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topping, D. O.; McFiggans, G. B.; Coe, H.

    2005-05-01

    This paper describes the inclusion of organic particulate material within the Aerosol Diameter Dependent Equilibrium Model (ADDEM) framework described in the companion paper applied to inorganic aerosol components. The performance of ADDEM is analysed in terms of its capability to reproduce the behaviour of various organic and mixed inorganic/organic systems using recently published bulk data. Within the modelling architecture already described two separate thermodynamic models are coupled in an additive approach and combined with a method for solving the Kohler equation in order to develop a tool for predicting the water content associated with an aerosol of known inorganic/organic composition and dry size. For development of the organic module, the widely used group contribution method UNIFAC is employed to explicitly deal with the non-ideality in solution. The UNIFAC predictions for components of atmospheric importance were improved considerably by using revised interaction parameters derived from electro-dynamic balance studies. Using such parameters, the model was found to adequately describe mixed systems including 5-6 dicarboxylic acids, down to low relative humidity conditions. By comparison with electrodynamic balance data, it was also found that the model was capable of capturing the behaviour of aqueous aerosols containing Suwannee River Fulvic acid, a structure previously used to represent the functionality of complex oxidised macromolecules often found in atmospheric aerosols. The additive approach for modelling mixed inorganic/organic systems worked well for a variety of mixtures. As expected, deviations between model predictions and measurements increase with increasing concentration. Available surface tension models, used in evaluating the Kelvin term, were found to reproduce measured data with varying success. Deviations from experimental data increased with increased organic compound complexity. For components only slightly soluble in water

  17. Application of ion chromatography to the determination of water-soluble inorganic and organic ions in atmospheric aerosols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xue-Chun; He, Ke-Bin; Ma, Yong-Liang; Yang, Fu-Mo; Duan, Feng-Kui; Zheng, Ai-Hua; Zhao, Cheng-Yi

    2004-01-01

    A simple, sensitive and convenient ion chromatography(IC) method was established for the simultaneous determination of twelve water-soluble inorganic anions(F- , Cl- , NO2(-), NO3(-), SO3(2-), SO4(2-) , PO4(3-)), and fifteen water-soluble organic ions(formate, acetate, MSA, oxalate, malonate, succinate, phthalates, etc.) in atmospheric aerosols. The linear concentrations ranged from 0.005 microg/m3 to 500 microg/m3 ( r = 0.999-0.9999). The relative standard deviation (RSD) were 0.43%-2.00% and the detection limits were from 2.7 ng/m3 to 88 ng/m3. The proposed method was successfully applied to the simultaneous determination of those inorganic ions and organic ions in PM2.5 of Beijing.

  18. A chromatographic method to analyze products from photo-oxidation of anthropogenic and biogenic mixtures of volatile organic compounds in smog chambers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pindado Jiménez, Oscar; Pérez Pastor, Rosa M; Vivanco, Marta G; Santiago Aladro, Manuel

    2013-03-15

    A method for quantifying secondary organic aerosol compounds (SOA) and water soluble secondary organic aerosol compounds (WSOA) produced from photo-oxidation of complex mixtures of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in smog chambers by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) has been developed. This method employs a double extraction with water and methanol jointly to a double derivatization with N,O-bis (trimethylsilil) trifluoroacetamide (BSTFA) and O-(2,3,4,5,6)-pentafluorobenzyl-hydroxylamine hydrochloride (PFBHA) followed by an analysis performed by GC/MS. The analytical procedure complements other methodologies because it can analyze SOA and WSOA compounds simultaneously at trace levels. As application, the methodology was employed to quantify the organic composition of aerosols formed in a smog chamber as a result of photo-oxidation of two different mixtures of volatile organic compounds: an anthropogenic mixture and a biogenic mixture. The analytical method allowed us to quantify up to 17 SOA compounds at levels higher than 20 ng m(-3) with reasonable recovery and a precision below 11%. Values found for applicability, selectivity, linearity, precision, recovery, detection limit, quantification limit and sensitivity demonstrated that the methodology can be satisfactorily applied to quantify SOA and WSOA. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Neutron diffraction by monocrystals of inorganic and elementary organic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, G.; Hauser, H.D.

    1992-01-01

    The phase of preparation and X-ray structural analysis of the compounds has been completed following the synthetical preparation of compounds sensitive to oxidation and pyrolysis, in this case: phosphonic acid, potassium silanide, lithium dihydrogenphosphide * DME, bis[lithium-tri(tert.butyl)alanate], dibromophenylbismuthate, potassium tetrahydride aluminate, and phosphinic acid. The work was started is neutron diffraction experiments for detecting the positions of the hydrogen and carbon atoms, in order to analyse space group problems. (BBR) [de

  20. Volatile Organic Compound Investigation Results, 300 Area, Hanford Site, Washington

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, Robert E.; Williams, Bruce A.; Smith, Ronald M.

    2008-07-07

    Unexpectedly high concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOC) were discovered while drilling in the unconfined aquifer beneath the Hanford Site’s 300 Area during 2006. The discovery involved an interval of relatively finer-grained sediment within the unconfined aquifer, an interval that is not sampled by routine groundwater monitoring. Although VOC contamination in the unconfined aquifer has been identified and monitored, the concentrations of newly discovered contamination are much higher than encountered previously, with some new results significantly higher than the drinking water standards. The primary contaminant is trichloroethene, with lesser amounts of tetrachloroethene. Both chemicals were used extensively as degreasing agents during the fuels fabrication process. A biological degradation product of these chemicals, 1,2-dichloroethene, was also detected. To further define the nature and extent of this contamination, additional characterization drilling was undertaken during 2007. Four locations were drilled to supplement the information obtained at four locations drilled during the earlier investigation in 2006. The results of the combined drilling indicate that the newly discovered contamination is limited to a relatively finer-grained interval of Ringold Formation sediment within the unconfined aquifer. The extent of this contamination appears to be the area immediately east and south of the former South Process Pond. Samples collected from the finer-grained sediment at locations along the shoreline confirm the presence of the contamination near the groundwater/river interface. Contamination was not detected in river water that flows over the area where the river channel potentially incises the finer-grained interval of aquifer sediment. The source for this contamination is not readily apparent. A search of historical documents and the Hanford Waste Information Data System did not provide definitive clues as to waste disposal operations and

  1. Source apportionment of volatile organic compounds measured in Edmonton, Alberta

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Michael C.; Aklilu, Yayne-Abeba; Brown, Steven G.; Lyder, David A.

    2013-12-01

    From 2003 to 2009, whole air samples were collected at two sites in Edmonton and analyzed for over 77 volatile organic compounds (VOCs). VOCs were sampled in the downtown area (Central site) and an industrial area on the eastern side of the city (East site). Concentrations of most VOCs were highest at the East site, with an average total VOC mass concentration of 221 μg m-3. The average total VOC mass concentration at the Central site was 65 μg m-3. The United States Environmental Protection Agency's positive matrix factorization receptor model (EPA PMF) was used to apportion ambient concentrations of VOCs into eleven factors, which were associated with emissions sources. On average, 94 and 99% of the measured mass were apportioned by PMF at the East and Central site, respectively. Factors include transportation combustion (gasoline and diesel), industrial sources (industrial evaporative, industrial feedstock, gasoline production/storage, industrial chemical use), mixed mobile and industrial (gasoline evaporative, fugitive butane), a biogenic source, a natural gas related source, and a factor that was associated with global background pollutants transported into the area. Transportation sources accounted for more than half of the reconstructed VOC mass concentration at the Central site, but less than 10% of the reconstructed mass concentration at the East site. By contrast, industrial sources accounted for ten times more of the reconstructed VOC mass concentration at the East site than at the Central site and were responsible for approximately 75% of the reconstructed VOC mass concentration observed at the East site. Of the six industrial factors identified at the East site, four were linked to petrochemical industry production and storage. The two largest contributors to the reconstructed VOC mass concentration at the East site were associated with fugitive emissions of volatile species (butanes, pentanes, hexane, and cyclohexane); together, these two factors

  2. Effects of trace volatile organic compounds on methane oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilai Chiemchaisri

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available The effects of volatile organic compounds (VOCs on methane oxidation in landfill cover soils were examined. The batch experiments were conducted using single and mixed VOCs, such as, dichloromethane (DCM, trichloroethylene (TCE, tetrachloroethylene (PCE, and benzene. The results from all combinations showed a decrease in methane oxidation rate with increase in VOC concentrations. Moreover, inhibition effects of TCE and DCM were found higher than benzene and PCE. The reduction of methane oxidation by benzene and PCE could be attributed to the toxicity effect, whereas TCE and DCM were found to exhibit the competitive-inhibition effect. When the soil was mixed with DCM, no methane oxidation was found. Damage to the cell’s internal membrane was found in a methanotrophic culture exposed to VOC gases which is the attachment site of a key enzyme needed for methane oxidationOs efeitos dos compostos orgânicos voláteis (VOCs na oxidação do metano em camadas superficiais do solo. Os experimentos foram conduzidos usando somente VOCs ou mistura do mesmo, como, diclorometano (DCM, tricloroetileno (TCE, tetracloroetileno (PCE, e benzeno. Os resultados de todas as combinações mostraram uma diminuição na taxa da oxidação do metano com aumento nas concentrações de VOC. Além disso, os efeitos da inibição de TCE e de DCM foram mais elevados do que do benzeno e PCE. A redução da oxidação do metano pelo benzeno e PCE poderia ser atribuída ao efeito da toxicidade, visto que TCE e DCM exibiram o efeito de competição-inibição. Quando o solo foi misturado com o DCM, nenhuma oxidação do metano foi encontrada. Os danos à membrana interna celular foi observada em uma cultura metanotrófica exposta aos gases de VOC que é o local de ligação de uma enzima chave necessário para a oxidação do metano.

  3. A framework for API solubility modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conte, Elisa; Gani, Rafiqul; Crafts, Peter

    The solubility of solid organic compounds in water and organic solvents is a fundamental thermodynamic property for many purposes such as product-process design and optimization, for the chemical and pharmaceutical industry. Experimental literature solubility data are usually scarce and temperature......-dependent measurements are expensive in terms of time and resources. The few available data are badly organized and difficult to use for fast solubility calculations and solvent screening. Available models often require time consuming and complex implementation together with a good user expertise for their efficient use....... In addition, most of the models are not predictive and requires experimental data for the calculation of the needed parameters. This work aims at developing an efficient framework for the solubility modelling of Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients (API) in water and organic solvents. With this framework...

  4. Characterization of microbial and chemical composition of shuttle wet waste with permanent gas and volatile organic compound analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, B. V.; Hummerick, M.; Roberts, M. S.; Krumins, V.; Kish, A. L.; Garland, J. L.; Maxwell, S.; Mills, A.

    2004-01-01

    Solid-waste treatment in space for Advanced Life Support, ALS, applications requires that the material can be safely processed and stored in a confined environment. Many solid-wastes are not stable because they are wet (40-90% moisture) and contain levels of soluble organic compounds that can contribute to the growth of undesirable microorganisms with concomitant production of noxious odors. In the absence of integrated Advanced Life Support systems on orbit, permanent gas, trace volatile organic and microbiological analyses were performed on crew refuse returned from the volume F "wet" trash of three consecutive Shuttle missions (STS-105, 109, and 110). These analyses were designed to characterize the short-term biological stability of the material and assess potential crew risks resulting from microbial decay processes during storage. Waste samples were collected post-orbiter landing and sorted into packaging material, food waste, toilet waste, and bulk liquid fractions deposited during flight in the volume F container. Aerobic and anaerobic microbial loads were determined in each fraction by cultivation on R2A and by acridine orange direct count (AODC). Dry and ash weights were performed to determine both water and organic content of the materials. Experiments to determine the aerobic and anaerobic biostability of refuse stored for varying periods of time were performed by on-line monitoring of CO2 and laboratory analysis for production of hydrogen sulfide and methane. Volatile organic compounds and permanent gases were analyzed using EPA Method TO15 by USEPA et al. [EPA Method TO15, The Determination of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) in Ambient Air using SUMMA, Passivated Canister Sampling and Gas Chromatographic Analysis,1999] with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and by gas chromatography with selective detectors. These baseline measures of waste stream content, labile organics, and microbial load in the volume F Shuttle trash provide data for waste

  5. Characterization of microbial and chemical composition of shuttle wet waste with permanent gas and volatile organic compound analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, B. V.; Hummerick, M.; Roberts, M. S.; Krumins, V.; Kish, A. L.; Garland, J. L.; Maxwell, S.; Mills, A.

    2004-01-01

    Solid-waste treatment in space for Advanced Life Support, ALS, applications requires that the material can be safely processed and stored in a confined environment. Many solid-wastes are not stable because they are wet (40-90% moisture) and contain levels of soluble organic compounds that can contribute to the growth of undesirable microorganisms with concomitant production of noxious odors. In the absence of integrated Advanced Life Support systems on orbit, permanent gas, trace volatile organic and microbiological analyses were performed on crew refuse returned from the volume F "wet" trash of three consecutive Shuttle missions (STS-105, 109, and 110). These analyses were designed to characterize the short-term biological stability of the material and assess potential crew risks resulting from microbial decay processes during storage. Waste samples were collected post-orbiter landing and sorted into packaging material, food waste, toilet waste, and bulk liquid fractions deposited during flight in the volume F container. Aerobic and anaerobic microbial loads were determined in each fraction by cultivation on R2A and by acridine orange direct count (AODC). Dry and ash weights were performed to determine both water and organic content of the materials. Experiments to determine the aerobic and anaerobic biostability of refuse stored for varying periods of time were performed by on-line monitoring of CO 2 and laboratory analysis for production of hydrogen sulfide and methane. Volatile organic compounds and permanent gases were analyzed using EPA Method TO15 by USEPA et al. [EPA Method TO15, The Determination of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) in Ambient Air using SUMMA, Passivated Canister Sampling and Gas Chromatographic Analysis, 1999] with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and by gas chromatography with selective detectors. These baseline measures of waste stream content, labile organics, and microbial load in the volume F Shuttle trash provide data for waste

  6. Measurement and correlation of solubility of pronamide in five organic solvents at (278.15–323.15) K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Huai; Song, Liangcheng; Zhu, Chongqiang; Wu, Di; Yang, Chunhui

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The solubility of pronamide in five typical solvents was determined by a dynamic equilibrium method. • The experimental solubility data were correlated by the Apelblat equation with a good fitting result. • The pronamide dissolving process in each solvent involved was endothermic, entropy-driven and non-spontaneous. • The main contributor to dissolving Gibbs free energy of pronamide was enthalpy. - Abstract: The solubility of pronamide in five organic solvents (ethanol, methanol, isopropanol, toluene and cyclohexane) at the temperature range from (278.15 to 323.15) K was measured by a dynamic equilibrium method. The results showed that the solubility of pronamide increased with the increasing temperature in all the solvents involved. The experimental values were correlated by the Apelblat equation, and a good fitting result was confirmed by the low level of root-mean-square deviations (<4.0 × 10 −4 ). Moreover, the apparent dissolving enthalpies and entropies, were derived from simplified van’t Hoff equation. The positive values of enthalpies and entropies revealed that the dissolution of pronamide in the selected solvents was an endothermic and entropy-driven process.

  7. Profiling contents of water-soluble metabolites and mineral nutrients to evaluate the effects of pesticides and organic and chemical fertilizers on tomato fruit quality

    OpenAIRE

    WATANABE, Masami; Ohta, Yuko; SUN, Li-Cang; Motoyama, Naoki; Kikuchi, Jun

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the contents of water-soluble metabolites and mineral nutrients were measured in tomatoes cultured using organic and chemical fertilizers, with or without pesticides. Mineral nutrients and water-soluble metabolites were determined by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry, respectively, and results were analyzed by principal components analysis (PCA). The mineral nutrient and water-soluble metabolite profiles diffe...

  8. Potential of aerobic bacteria use for remediation of groundwater of Pavlodar outskirt contaminated with soluble mercury compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the Republic of Kazakhstan there are some regions contaminated with mercury as a result of technogenic releases from industrial enterprises. The mercury ingress into the environment has resulted in significant pollution of groundwater and surface water with soluble mercury com...

  9. 78 FR 78726 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Indiana; Volatile Organic Compound...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-27

    ... request from the Indiana Department of Environmental Management to revise its volatile organic compound... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 [EPA-R05-OAR-2012-0453; FRL-9904-35-Region 5] Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Indiana; Volatile Organic Compound Emission...

  10. Differential effects of organic compounds on cucumber damping-off and biocontrol activity of antagonistic bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Bin; Ravnskov, Sabine; Guanlin, X.

    2011-01-01

    showed that the organic compounds differentially affected both pathogen and BCAs. Tryptic soy broth, glucose and chitosan increased Pythium damping-off of cucumber, compared to the control treatment without organic compounds, whereas cellulose had no effect. Both Paenibacillus species had biocontrol...

  11. Study on the local atomic structure of germanium in organic germanium compounds by EXAFS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yin-song; Wu, Zhong-hua; Shi, Yun-tian; Wang, Yong-jie

    1999-04-01

    Organic germanium compounds have been extensively applied in medicine as tonics. In this paper, the local structures of two organic germanium compounds, carboxyethylgermanium sesquioxide and polymeric germanium glutamate, were determined by EXAFS. The structure parameters including coordination numbers and bond lengths were reported, and possible structure patterns were discussed.

  12. Indoor/outdoor connections exemplified by processes that depend on an organic compound's saturation vapor pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weschler, Charles J.

    2003-01-01

    studied extensively outdoors, but sparingly indoors. Gas/surface partitioning occurs primarily indoors while gas/filter partitioning occurs at the interface between outdoors and indoors. Activation of trigeminal nerve receptors occurs at the human interface. The logarithm of an organic compound...... distributions outdoors, an organic compound's indoor lifetime, fate and even health impacts depend on its distribution between phases and among surfaces....

  13. Natural and synthetic organic compounds in the environment - a symposium report.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ariese, F.; Ernst, W.H.O.; Sijm, D.T.H.M.

    2001-01-01

    In March 2000, an international two-day symposium was organized in Noordwijkerhout, The Netherlands, on 'Natural and synthetic organic compounds in the environment'. The emphasis of the symposium was on the following classes of compounds: polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, xeno-estrogens,

  14. 78 FR 11101 - Air Quality: Revision to Definition of Volatile Organic Compounds-Exclusion of trans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-15

    ... those organic compounds of carbon that form ozone through atmospheric photochemical reactions. Different... pollution episodes. It has been the EPA's policy that organic compounds with a negligible level of... still, Solstice\\TM\\ 1233zd(E) is above the ethane benchmark. The overall atmospheric reactivity of...

  15. Method of determining the efficiency of air sampling traps to collect and release volatile organic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cucco, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    A new method is described that facilitates determining the efficiency of air sampling traps to adsorb and thermally desorb volatile organic compounds. A known volume of a liquid standard of volatile organic compounds is vaporized into an air stream, a fraction of which is collected on an air sampling trap. This trap is subsequently thermally desorbed and analyzed using a GC/FID. The efficiency of the trap to adsorb and thermally desorb each compound tested is calculated.

  16. Nitrate radicals and biogenic volatile organic compounds: oxidation, mechanisms, and organic aerosol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, Nga Lee; Brown, Steven S.; Archibald, Alexander T.; Atlas, Elliot; Cohen, Ronald C.; Crowley, John N.; Day, Douglas A.; Donahue, Neil M.; Fry, Juliane L.; Fuchs, Hendrik; Griffin, Robert J.; Guzman, Marcelo I.; Herrmann, Hartmut; Hodzic, Alma; Iinuma, Yoshiteru; Jimenez, José L.; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid; Lee, Ben H.; Luecken, Deborah J.; Mao, Jingqiu; McLaren, Robert; Mutzel, Anke; Osthoff, Hans D.; Ouyang, Bin; Picquet-Varrault, Benedicte; Platt, Ulrich; Pye, Havala O. T.; Rudich, Yinon; Schwantes, Rebecca H.; Shiraiwa, Manabu; Stutz, Jochen; Thornton, Joel A.; Tilgner, Andreas; Williams, Brent J.; Zaveri, Rahul A.

    2017-01-01

    Oxidation of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) by the nitrate radical (NO3) represents one of the important interactions between anthropogenic emissions related to combustion and natural emissions from the biosphere. This interaction has been recognized for more than 3 decades, during which time a large body of research has emerged from laboratory, field, and modeling studies. NO3-BVOC reactions influence air quality, climate and visibility through regional and global budgets for reactive nitrogen (particularly organic nitrates), ozone, and organic aerosol. Despite its long history of research and the significance of this topic in atmospheric chemistry, a number of important uncertainties remain. These include an incomplete understanding of the rates, mechanisms, and organic aerosol yields for NO3-BVOC reactions, lack of constraints on the role of heterogeneous oxidative processes associated with the NO3 radical, the difficulty of characterizing the spatial distributions of BVOC and NO3 within the poorly mixed nocturnal atmosphere, and the challenge of constructing appropriate boundary layer schemes and non-photochemical mechanisms for use in state-of-the-art chemical transport and chemistry–climate models.

    This review is the result of a workshop of the same title held at the Georgia Institute of Technology in June 2015. The first half of the review summarizes the current literature on NO3-BVOC chemistry, with a particular focus on recent advances in instrumentation and models, and in organic nitrate and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation chemistry. Building on this current understanding, the second half of the review outlines impacts of NO3-BVOC chemistry on air quality and climate, and suggests critical research needs to better constrain this interaction to improve the predictive capabilities of atmospheric models.

  17. Cloud processing of organic compounds: Secondary organic aerosol and nitrosamine formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchings, James W., III

    Cloud processing of atmospheric organic compounds has been investigated through field studies, laboratory experiments, and numerical modeling. Observational cloud chemistry studies were performed in northern Arizona and fog studies in central Pennsylvania. At both locations, the cloud and fogs showed low acidity due to neutralization by soil dust components (Arizona) and ammonia (Pennsylvania). The field observations showed substantial concentrations (20-5500 ng•L -1) of volatile organic compounds (VOC) in the cloud droplets. The potential generation of secondary organic aerosol mass through the processing of these anthropogenic VOCs was investigated through laboratory and modeling studies. Under simulated atmospheric conditions, in idealized solutions, benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (BTEX) degraded quickly in the aqueous phase with half lives of approximately three hours. The degradation process yielded less volatile products which would contribute to new aerosol mass upon cloud evaporation. However, when realistic cloud solutions containing natural organic matter were used in the experiments, the reaction kinetics decreased with increasing organic carbon content, resulting in half lives of approximately 7 hours. The secondary organic aerosol (SUA) mass formation potential of cloud processing of BTEX was evaluated. SOA mass formation by cloud processing of BTEX, while strongly dependent on the atmospheric conditions, could contribute up to 9% of the ambient atmospheric aerosol mass, although typically ˜1% appears realistic. Field observations also showed the occurrence of N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), a potent carcinogen, in fogs and clouds (100-340 ng•L -1). Laboratory studies were conducted to investigate the formation of NDMA from nitrous acid and dimethylamine in the homogeneous aqueous phase within cloud droplets. While NDMA was produced in the cloud droplets, the low yields (<1%) observed could not explain observational concentrations

  18. Methods and systems for chemoautotrophic production of organic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Curt R.; Che, Austin J.; Shetty, Reshma P.; Kelly, Jason R.

    2018-02-27

    The present disclosure identifies pathways, mechanisms, systems and methods to confer chemoautotrophic production of carbon-based products of interest, such as sugars, alcohols, chemicals, amino acids, polymers, fatty acids and their derivatives, hydrocarbons, isoprenoids, and intermediates thereof, in organisms such that these organisms efficiently convert inorganic carbon to organic carbon-based products of interest using inorganic energy, such as formate, and in particular the use of organisms for the commercial production of various carbon-based products of interest.

  19. Effects of Organic and Conventional Cropping Systems on Technological Properties and Phenolic Compounds of Freshly Harvested and Stored Rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Gabriela Hörnke; Paraginski, Ricardo Tadeu; Lamas, Nelisa de Souza; Hoffmann, Jessica Fernanda; Vanier, Nathan Levien; de Oliveira, Maurício

    2017-10-01

    This study compared the physicochemical and technological properties of the IRGA 410 rice cultivar, obtained from organic and conventional cropping systems, and showed its susceptibility to changes during storage at 0, 6, and 12 mo. The rice conventional cropping system exhibited greater protein, lipids, and ash levels, and a head rice yield. However, organic rice presented greater total carbohydrates, soluble protein, amylose content, 33% greater free phenolics, and phenolic acids, but exhibited a greater percentage of stained grains during the storage period. The free phenolic content of cooked rice was lower than the free phenolic content of the raw rice. By Liquid chromatography with mass spectrometer (LC-MS) were identified p-coumaric and ferulic acids in both fractions (free and bound). The content of p-coumaric acid and ferulic acid in bound fraction was higher in organic brown rice than in conventional brown rice. At 6 and 12 mo of storage, the main fungi found were Aspergillus sp. and Penicillium sp. Prior to storage, the Bipolaris sp. fungi was identified only in organic rice. For conventional rice, the infestation level by Aspergillus sp. increased from 3% to 70% at the 6th mo of storage. In addition to the advantage of organic rice being free of agrochemicals, this study revealed that natural plant defense compounds could be produced when the rice was subjected to more biotic and abiotic stresses. However, some disadvantages were observed, such as lower protein content and a greater percentage of soluble protein, which favored the breaking of rice in processing, and a greater percentage of grain stained before and during storage. The organic and conventional cropping systems affect the physicochemical and technological properties of rice grains, which is one of the main cereals grown and consumed in the world. This study shows the advantages and disadvantages of the cropping system in grain properties that are in the interest of both consumers and

  20. Case study of water-soluble metal containing organic constituents of biomass burning aerosol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandra L. Chang-Graham; Luisa T. M. Profeta; Timothy J. Johnson; Robert J. Yokelson; Alexander Laskin; Julia Laskin

    2011-01-01

    Natural and prescribed biomass fires are a major source of aerosols that may persist in the atmosphere for several weeks. Biomass burning aerosols (BBA) can be associated with long-range transport of water-soluble N-, S-, P-, and metal-containing species. In this study, BBA samples were collected using a particle-into-liquid sampler (PILS) from laboratory burns of...

  1. Photocatalytic transformations of organic sulfur compounds and H2S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorontsov, A. V.

    2008-10-01

    Modern views on the products, pathways and kinetic features of liquid- and gas-phase photocatalytic reactions of sulfur compounds in the presence of heterogeneous and homogeneous photocatalysts are generalised. Attention is focussed on the aliphatic and aromatic reduced sulfur compounds and pesticides. The reaction rate in the liquid and gas phases are analysed as function of solution pH, temperature, catalyst content, substrate concentration, solvent type, air moisture and added oxidants. Photocatalyst deactivation and the ways for recovery of its activity are considered.

  2. The dynamics of acid-soluble phosphorus compounds in the course of winter and spring wheat germination under various thermic conditions. Part I. Fractionation of wheat germs extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Barbaro

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Results of investigations are reported on the role of acid-soluble phosphorus compounds in the process of winter wheat vernalization. Fractionation of germ extracts by the precipitation method revealed the dynamics of phosphorylated glycolysis metabolites during germination. The variability curves for spring wheat germinated at 1.5° and 22° and for winter wheat at 1.5° had a similar course, only that for winter wheat germinated at 22° showed differences. It is concluded that glycolysis is essential in the process of vernalization.

  3. The dynamics of acid-soluble phosphorus compounds in the course of winter and spring wheat germination under various thermic conditions. Part I. Fractionation of wheat germs extracts

    OpenAIRE

    A. Barbaro

    2015-01-01

    Results of investigations are reported on the role of acid-soluble phosphorus compounds in the process of winter wheat vernalization. Fractionation of germ extracts by the precipitation method revealed the dynamics of phosphorylated glycolysis metabolites during germination. The variability curves for spring wheat germinated at 1.5° and 22° and for winter wheat at 1.5° had a similar course, only that for winter wheat germinated at 22° showed differences. It is concluded that glycolysis is ess...

  4. Effects of airborne volatile organic compounds on plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cape, J.N.

    2003-01-01

    Possible adverse effects of VOCs on vegetation in urban areas cannot be rejected. - Routine measurements of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in air have shown that average concentrations are very much smaller than those used in laboratory experiments designed to study the effects of VOCs on plants. However, maximum hourly concentrations of some VOCs can be 100 times larger than the average, even in rural air. Experimental studies have rarely extended for longer than a few days, so there is little information on potential long-term effects of exposure to small concentrations. This review considers the available evidence for long-term effects, based on laboratory and field data. Previous reviews of the literature from Germany and the USA are cited, prior to an assessment of the effects of individual VOCs. Although hydrocarbons from vehicle exhausts have been implicated in the observed effects on roadside vegetation, the evidence suggests that it is the nitrogen oxides in the exhaust gases that are mostly responsible. There is evidence that aromatic hydrocarbons can be metabolised in plants, although the fate of the metabolites is not known. There is a large literature on the effects of ethylene, because of its role as a plant hormone. Effects have been reported in the field, in response to industrial emissions, and dose-response experiments over several weeks in laboratory studies have clearly identified the potential for effects at ambient concentrations. The main responses are morphological (e.g. epinasty), which may be reversible, and on the development of flowers and fruit. Effects on seed production may be positive or negative, depending on the exposure concentration. Chlorinated hydrocarbons have been identified as potentially harmful to vegetation, but only one long-term experiment has studied dose-response relationships. As for ethylene, the most sensitive indication of effect was on seed production, although long-term accumulation of trichloroacetic acid in

  5. Efficacy of three organic Compounds as Antimould Agents in Bread ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    These results suggest that SA is an effective anti-mould agent in bread, but its efficacy was not enhanced by combination with AA. AA functioned more as a flour improver than as an anti-mould agent. The decrease in loaf volume observed when SA or CA was used singly was considerably improved when this compound ...

  6. Molar extinction coefficients of solutions of some organic compounds

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    efficients of these compounds have been used to calculate effective atomic numbers and electron densities. The additivity ... Molar extinction coefficients; effective atomic numbers; electron density. PACS Nos 29.30. ... the radiation path and is linearly dependent on the concentration of the absorbing species. This is most ...

  7. The composition of the primitive atmosphere and the synthesis of organic compounds on the early Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bada, J. L.; Miller, S. L.

    1985-01-01

    The generally accepted theory for the origin of life on the Earth requires that a large variety of organic compounds be present to form the first living organisms and to provide the energy sources for primitive life either directly or through various fermentation reactions. This can provide a strong constraint on discussions of the formation of the Earth and on the composition of the primitive atmosphere. In order for substantial amounts of organic compounds to have been present on the prebiological Earth, certain conditions must have existed. There is a large body of literature on the prebiotic synthesis of organic compounds in various postulated atmospheres. In this mixture of abiotically synthesized organic compounds, the amino acids are of special interest since they are utilized by modern organisms to synthesize structural materials and a large array of catalytic peptides.

  8. Identification of compounds from the water soluble extract of Cinnamomum cassia barks and their inhibitory effects against high-glucose-induced mesangial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Qi; Wang, Shu-Mei; Lu, Qing; Luo, Jie; Cheng, Yong-Xian

    2013-09-05

    The difficulty of diabetic nephropathy (DN) treatment makes prevention the best choice. Cinnamomum cassia barks, known as Chinese cinnamon or Chinese cassia, is one of the most popular natural spices and flavoring agents in many parts of the World. Since previous reports indicated that Chinese cinnamon extract could be used for the treatment of diabetes, we proposed that this spice may be beneficial for the prevention of DN. However, the responsible compounds need to be further identified. In this study, we isolated three new phenolic glycosides, cinnacassosides A-C (1-3), together with fifteen known compounds from the water soluble extract of Chinese cinnamon. The structures of the new compounds were identified by comprehensive spectroscopic evidence. Eleven compounds (6-9, 11, 13-18) were isolated from this spice for the first time, despite extensive research on this species in the past, which added new facets for the chemical profiling of this spice. These isolates were purposely evaluated for their inhibitory effects on IL-6 and extracellular matrix production in mesangial cells which are definitely implicated in DN. The results showed that compounds 4-8 could inhibit over secretion of IL-6, collagen IV and fibronectin against high-glucose-induced mesangial cells at 10 mM, suggesting that Chinese cinnamon could be used as a functional food against DN.

  9. Modeling of RO/NF membrane rejections of PhACs and organic compounds : A statistical analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yangali-Quintanilla, V.; Kim, T.U.; Kennedy, M.; Amy, G.

    2008-01-01

    Rejections of pharmaceutical compounds (Ibuprofen, Diclofenac, Clofibric acid, Naproxen, Primidone, Phenacetin) and organic compounds (Dichloroacetic acid, Trichloroacetic acid, Chloroform, Bromoform, Trichloroethene, Perchloroethene, Carbontetrachloride, Carbontetrabromide) by NF (Filmtec, Saehan)

  10. Comparison of the neurotoxicities between volatile organic compounds and fragrant organic compounds on human neuroblastoma SK-N-SH cells and primary cultured rat neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasue Yamada

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available These are many volatile organic compounds (VOCs that are synthesized, produced from petroleum or derived from natural compounds, mostly plants. Fragrant and volatile organic compounds from plants have been used as food additives, medicines and aromatherapy. Several clinical and pathological studies have shown that chronic abuse of VOCs, mainly toluene, causes several neuropsychiatric disorders. Little is known about the mechanisms of neurotoxicity of the solvents. n-Octanal, nonanal, and 2-ethyl-1-hexanol, which are used catalyzers or intermediates of chemical reactions, are released into the environment. Essential oils have the functions of self-defense, sterilization, and antibiosis in plants. When volatile organic compounds enter the body, there is the possibility that they will pass through the blood–brain barrier (BBB and affect the central nervous system (CNS. However, the direct effects of volatile organic compounds on neural function and their toxicities are still unclear. We compared the toxicities of n-octanal, nonanal and 2-ethyl-1-hexanol with those of five naturally derived fragrant organic compounds (FOCs, linalool, cis-3-hexen-1-ol, isoamyl alcohol, n-propyl alcohol and n-phenethyl alcohol. MTT assay of human neuroblastoma SK-N-SH cells showed that the IC50 values of linalool, cis-3-hexen-1-ol, isoamyl alcohol, n-propyl alcohol and phenethyl alcohol were 1.33, 2.3, >5, >5, and 2.39 mM, respectively, and the IC50 values of toluene, n-octanal, nonanal and 2-ethyl-1-hexanol were 850, 37.2, 8.31 and 15.1 μM, respectively. FOCs showed lower toxicities than those of VOCs. These results indicate that FOCs are safer than other compounds.

  11. Incremental Reactivity Effects of Anthropogenic and Biogenic Volatile Organic Compounds on Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kacarab, M.; Li, L.; Carter, W. P. L.; Cocker, D. R., III

    2015-12-01

    Two surrogate reactive organic gas (ROG) mixtures were developed to create a controlled reactivity environment simulating different urban atmospheres with varying levels of anthropogenic (e.g. Los Angeles reactivity) and biogenic (e.g. Atlanta reactivity) influences. Traditional chamber experiments focus on the oxidation of one or two volatile organic compound (VOC) precursors, allowing the reactivity of the system to be dictated by those compounds. Surrogate ROG mixtures control the overall reactivity of the system, allowing for the incremental aerosol formation from an added VOC to be observed. The surrogate ROG mixtures were developed based on that used to determine maximum incremental reactivity (MIR) scales for O3 formation from VOC precursors in a Los Angeles smog environment. Environmental chamber experiments were designed to highlight the incremental aerosol formation in the simulated environment due to the addition of an added anthropogenic (aromatic) or biogenic (terpene) VOC. All experiments were conducted in the UC Riverside/CE-CERT dual 90m3 environmental chambers. It was found that the aerosol precursors behaved differently under the two altered reactivity conditions, with more incremental aerosol being formed in the anthropogenic ROG system than in the biogenic ROG system. Further, the biogenic reactivity condition inhibited the oxidation of added anthropogenic aerosol precursors, such as m-xylene. Data will be presented on aerosol properties (density, volatility, hygroscopicity) and bulk chemical composition in the gas and particle phases (from a SYFT Technologies selected ion flow tube mass spectrometer, SIFT-MS, and Aerodyne high resolution time of flight aerosol mass spectrometer, HR-ToF-AMS, respectively) comparing the two controlled reactivity systems and single precursor VOC/NOx studies. Incremental aerosol yield data at different controlled reactivities provide a novel and valuable insight in the attempt to extrapolate environmental chamber

  12. Thin films of metal-organic compounds and metal nanoparticle ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Thin films based on two very different metal-organic systems are developed and some nonlinear optical applications are explored. A family of zinc complexes which form perfectly polar assemblies in their crystalline state are found to organize as uniaxially oriented crystallites in vapor deposited thin films on glass substrate.

  13. Thermal degradation of the vapours of organic nitrogen compounds in the presence of the air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brault, A.; Chevalier, G.; Kerfanto, M.; Loyer, H.

    1983-04-01

    Following a quick survey of the literature on the products originated during the thermal degradation of some organic nitrogen compounds, the experimental results obtained by applying a technique previously used for other organic compounds are presented. The compounds investigated include: methyl and ethylamines at the origin of the bad smells of many gaseous wastes, trilaurylamine and tetraethylenediamine sometimes used in nuclear facilities. Attention is brought on the emission of noxious products during thermal degradation in the presence of the air, at various temperatures, viz. either usual combustion gases such as carbon monoxide, or nitro-derivatives such as hydrogen cyanide present whatever the compound investigated when temperatures are below 850 0 C [fr

  14. Bibliography about silicon non-organic fluorine compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carles, M.

    1963-01-01

    This bibliography is made from Professor I.G. Ryss' book published in Moscow in 1956, translated in English under the title 'The chemistry of fluorine and its inorganic compounds' (Translation series. AEC tr 3927, Pt 1 and 2), and completed with the data found in the 'Chemical Abstracts' of the years 1946 to 1962 [fr

  15. Environmental Risk Limits for alcohols, glycols, and some other relatively soluble and/or volatile compounds 1. Ecotoxicological evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbruggen EMJ; Rila JP; Traas TP; Posthuma-Doodeman CJAM; Posthumus R; SEC

    2006-01-01

    In this report, maximum permissible concentrations (MPC), negligible concentrations (NC) and serious risk concentrations (SRCeco) are derived for the following compounds: 1-butanol, 2-butanol, n-butyl acetate, cyclohexylamine, diethylene glycol, ethyl acetate, ethylene glycol, methanol, methyl ethyl

  16. Evaluation of proline, chlorophyll, soluble sugar content and uptake of nutrients in the German chamomile (Matricaria chamomilla L. under drought stress and organic fertilizer treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin Salehi

    2016-10-01

    Conclusions: Totally, organic fertilization by vermicompost could partly alleviate the effect of drought stress on chamomile by increasing N, P and K uptake and leaf soluble sugar, especially in stressed treatments.

  17. Soluble phenolic compounds in fresh and ensiled orchard grass (Dactylis glomerata L.), a common species in permanent pastures with potential as a biomass feedstock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauck, Barbara; Gallagher, Joe A; Morris, S Michael; Leemans, David; Winters, Ana L

    2014-01-15

    High-value coproducts can greatly improve the feasibility of utilizing plant feedstocks for biorefining and biofuel production. Plant polyphenolics have potential application in the pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries. Orchard grass varieties have been noted for accumulation of polyphenolic compounds, and the current study determined the soluble phenol profile and content in the orchard grass variety 'Abertop'. Hydroxycinnamates and flavonoids were monitored during the transition from vegetative to flowering stage at maximum crop yield. Caffeic acid derivatives, related to bioactives in the Asian medicinal herb Salvia miltiorrhiza , and novel hydroxycinnamate-flavone conjugates were also identified in extracts. Harvest yields of hydroxycinnamates and flavonoids ranged from 2.6 to 4.0 kg/ha and from 2.1 to 5.1 kg/ha, respectively. Abundant compounds showed high levels of antioxidant activity comparable with that of trolox. Minimal changes in soluble phenol content and composition were observed after ensiling with the exception of increases in caffeic acid, a caffeic acid derivative, and a caffeic acid breakdown product, dihydroxystyrene.

  18. Prediction of Partition Coefficients of Organic Compounds for SPME/PDMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liao Hsuan-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The partition coefficients of 51 organic compounds between SPME/PDMS and gas were compiled from the literature sources in this study. The effect of physicochemical properties and descriptors on the partitioning process of partition coefficients was explicated by the correlation analysis. The PDMS-gas partition coefficients were well correlated to the molecular weight of organic compounds (r = 0.832, p < 0.05. An empirical model, consisting of the molecular weight and the polarizability, was developed to appropriately predict the partition coefficients of organic compounds. The empirical model for estimating the PDMS-gas partition coefficient will contribute to the practical applications of the SPME technique.

  19. Development of the colorimetric sensor array for detection of explosives and volatile organic compounds in air

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kostesha, Natalie; Alstrøm, Tommy Sonne; Johnsen, C

    2010-01-01

    In the framework of the research project 'Xsense' at the Technical University of Denmark (DTU) we are developing a simple colorimetric sensor array which can be useful in detection of explosives like DNT and TNT, and identification of volatile organic compounds in the presence of water vapor in air...... a color difference map which gives a unique fingerprint for each explosive and volatile organic compound. Such sensing technology can be used to screen for relevant explosives in a complex background as well as to distinguish mixtures of volatile organic compounds distributed in gas phase. This sensor...

  20. Laboratory assessment of the antifouling potential of a soluble-matrix paint laced with the natural compound polygodial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahill, Patrick Louis; Heasman, Kevin; Jeffs, Andrew; Kuhajek, Jeanne

    2013-09-01

    Polygodial is a potent and selective inhibitor of ascidian metamorphosis that shows promise for controlling fouling by ascidians in bivalve aquaculture. The current study examined the potency of, and associated effects of seawater exposure on, a rosin-based soluble-matrix paint laced with 0.08-160 ng polygodial g(-1) wet paint matrix. Paint-coated surfaces were soaked in seawater for 0, 2, 4 or 12 weeks prior to screening for antifouling activity using a bioassay based on the nuisance ascidian Ciona savignyi Herdman. Mortality was greater (mean 50% lethal concentration: 5 ± 2 ng g(-1); mean 75% lethal concentration: 17 ± 4 ng g(-1)) and metamorphosis was inhibited (mean 50% anti-metamorphic concentration: 2 ± 0.4 ng g(-1); mean 75% anti-metamorphic concentration: 15 ± 10 ng g(-1)) in C. savignyi larvae exposed to polygodial-laced soluble-matrix paints, relative to control paints without polygodial. Soaking in seawater prior to testing reduced the efficacy of the formulation up to nearly 12-fold, but even after soaking for 12 weeks paints laced with polygodial at 160 ng g(-1) wet paint matrix prevented ⩾90% of the larvae of C. savignyi from completing metamorphosis. The outcome of this experiment provides a positive first step in evaluating the suitability of polygodial-laced soluble-matrix paints for use in aquaculture.

  1. Chains, clusters, inclusion compounds, paramagnetic labels, and organic rings

    CERN Document Server

    Zanello, P

    1994-01-01

    The role of stereochemistry to elucidate reaction patterns and physico-chemical properties in topical subjects ranging from inorganic to organic chemistry are treated in the fifth and final volume of this series. Detailed accounts are given to study: chaining in polyphosphates, electron-transfers in carbonyl clusters, inclusion of organometallic molecules in cyclodextrins, stereochemistry of paramagnetic metal complexes by labeling with nitroxyl radicals, stereocontrol in organic syntheses assisted by inorganic complexes.

  2. Characterization and Analysis of Paper Spray Ionization of Organic Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliaga-Aguilar, Hugo

    2018-01-01

    Paper spray ionization has arisen relatively recently as a complement and alternative to electro- and nanospray ionization with silica capillaries. A majority of the work in the present literature focuses on the chemical aspect of paper spray. In order to study the physical and phenomenological facet of its implementation, we measured current and voltage distributions of Taylor cones. To study transport phenomena on filter paper, we addressed the behavior of large, sparingly soluble tetraalkylammonium ions, which are usually used as mobility standards, in paper spray. The variation of intensity with time of monomers and dimers of these ions was measured with a differential mobility analyzer and compared with that produced by contamination in the paper. At the same time, we evaluated the proficiency of different paper spray techniques for protein analysis using nano spray as a reference. Experiments suggest that Taylor cones in paper spray are subject to hysteresis, whereas transport phenomena in the porous substrate notably affects the ionization of the sample. Additionally, we observed that paper spray tends to favor lower charge states in proteins. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  3. Acidic organic compounds in beverage, food, and feed production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quitmann, Hendrich; Fan, Rong; Czermak, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Organic acids and their derivatives are frequently used in beverage, food, and feed production. Acidic additives may act as buffers to regulate acidity, antioxidants, preservatives, flavor enhancers, and sequestrants. Beneficial effects on animal health and growth performance have been observed when using acidic substances as feed additives. Organic acids could be classified in groups according to their chemical structure. Each group of organic acids has its own specific properties and is used for different applications. Organic acids with low molecular weight (e.g. acetic acid, lactic acid, and citric acid), which are part of the primary metabolism, are often produced by fermentation. Others are produced more economically by chemical synthesis based on petrochemical raw materials on an industrial scale (e.g. formic acid, propionic and benzoic acid). Biotechnology-based production is of interest due to legislation, consumer demand for natural ingredients, and increasing environmental awareness. In the United States, for example, biocatalytically produced esters for food applications can be labeled as "natural," whereas identical conventional acid catalyst-based molecules cannot. Natural esters command a price several times that of non-natural esters. Biotechnological routes need to be optimized regarding raw materials and yield, microorganisms, and recovery methods. New bioprocesses are being developed for organic acids, which are at this time commercially produced by chemical synthesis. Moreover, new organic acids that could be produced with biotechnological methods are under investigation for food applications.

  4. Capillary electrophoretic separation of inorganic and organic arsenic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greschonig, H. [Institute of Analytical Chemistry, Karl Franzens University Graz (Austria); Schmid, M.G.; Guebitz, G. [Institute of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Karl Franzens University Graz (Austria)

    1998-09-01

    Capillary zone electrophoresis was used to separate arsenite, arsenate, dimethylarsinic and diphenylarsinic acid, methanearsonic acid, phenyl- and p-aminophenyl arsonic acid, phenylarsineoxide and phenarsazinic acid. Anionic and uncharged species were separated in a fused silica capillary with on-column UV detection at 200 nm. A 15 mM phosphate solution adjusted to pH 6.5 containing 10 mM sodium dodecylsulfonate served as background electrolyte. The influence of pH and applied voltage on separation efficiency, as well as the feasibility of identification of arsenic compounds in spiked urine, were investigated. (orig.) With 7 figs., 1 tab., 22 refs.

  5. Organic compounds and suspended matter in the White Sea snow-ice cover

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemirovskaya, I.; Shevchenko, V.

    2008-01-01

    The pollution of the White Sea snow-ice cover was estimated by examining the distribution of organic compounds, including oil and pyrogenic hydrocarbons. Ice and snow cores were taken from Chupa Bay and the Kandalaksha Gulf in the Cape Kartesh area in the spring of 2004 and from the mouth of the Severnaya Dvina River in the spring of 2005, 2006, and 2007. This paper presented data on the lipid content, aliphatic hydrocarbons (AHC), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and suspended particulate matter in snow, ice and under-ice water. This paper focused on organic compounds and suspended matter (SM) concentrations in the sea snow-ice cover and described the ice forming conditions and interactions of the substances with ice, snow and sub-ice water. The amount of particulate matter and organic compounds in the snow increased sharply near industrial centres. The concentration of compounds decreased further away from these centres, suggesting that most pollutants are deposited locally. The study revealed that organic compounds concentrate in barrier zones, such as snow-ice and water-ice, depending on the source of pollution. There was no obvious evidence of petrogenic sources of PAHs in particulate matter from the White Sea snow-ice cover. The SM and organic compounds accumulated in layers characterized by local depositional processes. The zones remained biogeochemically active even under low temperature conditions, but the accumulation of both SM and organic compounds was at its highest during the initial stage of ice formation. 16 refs., 2 tabs., 4 figs

  6. Solubilization and preformulation of poorly water soluble and hydrolysis susceptible N-epoxymethyl-1,8-naphthalimide (ENA) compound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yuancai; Ng, Wai Kiong; Surana, Uttam; Tan, Reginald B H

    2008-05-22

    N-Epoxymethyl-1,8-naphthalimide (ENA) is a novel antiproliferative drug candidate with potent anticancer and antifungal activity. It has an aqueous solubility of 0.0116mg/mL and also exhibits hydrolytic instability with a first-order hydrolysis rate of 0.051 h(-1). The present preformulation study aimed to characterize the physicochemical properties of ENA and develop an early injectable solution formulation for preclinical studies. To minimize hydrolysis, ENA is proposed to be formulated as either lyophilized powders or nonaqueous solutions followed by solubilization/reconstitution prior to administration. ENA solubilization was investigated in both aqueous media (by cosolvency, micellization and complexation) and nonaqueous solutions (mixture of Cremophor EL and ethanol). It is found that none of the solubilization techniques in aqueous media could increase ENA solubility to a desired level of several hundreds microg/mL at pharmaceutically acceptable excipient concentrations (studies, which can be reconstituted, prior to administration, by the 5-20 times infusion fluids (saline, 5% dextrose, etc.) to the desired drug dosing concentration at the acceptable excipient level. The approach used in this work could serve as a useful reference in formulating nonpolar drugs with hydrolytic instability.

  7. Dissolved organic carbon enhances the mass transfer of hydrophobic organic compounds from Nonaqueous Phase Liquids (NAPLs) into the aqueous phase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smith, K.E.C.; Thullner, M.; Wick, L.Y.; Harms, H.

    2011-01-01

    The hypothesis that dissolved organic carbon (DOC) enhances the mass transfer of hydrophobic organic compounds from nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) into the aqueous phase above that attributable to dissolved molecular diffusion alone was tested. In controlled experiments, mass transfer rates of

  8. Interactions of the Calcite {10.4} Surface with Organic Compounds: Structure and Behaviour at Mineral – Organic Interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hakim, S. S.; Olsson, M. H. M.; Sørensen, H. O.

    2017-01-01

    The structure and the strength of organic compound adsorption on mineral surfaces are of interest for a number of industrial and environmental applications, oil recovery, CO2 storage and contamination remediation. Biomineralised calcite plays an essential role in the function of many organisms...

  9. 75 FR 57390 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Alabama: Volatile Organic Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-21

    ... Environmental Management (ADEM) on March 3, 2010. The revision modifies the definition of ``volatile organic... the VOC definition on the basis that these compounds make a negligible contribution to tropospheric..., 2009, which excludes these compounds from the regulatory VOC definition. This action is being taken...

  10. Volatile organic compounds and Photobacterium phosphoreum associated with spoilage of modified-atmosphere-packaged raw pork

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nieminen, Timo T.; Dalgaard, Paw; Björkroth, Johanna

    2016-01-01

    Accumulation of volatile organic compounds was monitored in association with sensory quality, bacterial concentrations and culture-independent microbial community analyses in raw pork loin and pork collar during storage under high-oxygen modified atmosphere at +4°C. Of the 48 volatile compounds d...

  11. The formation of light absorbing insoluble organic compounds from the reaction of biomass burning precursors and Fe(III)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavi, Avi; Lin, Peng; Bhaduri, Bhaskar; Laskin, Alexander; Rudich, Yinon

    2017-04-01

    Dust particles and volatile organic compounds from fuel or biomass burning are two major components that affect air quality in urban polluted areas. We characterized the products from the reaction of soluble Fe(III), a reactive transition metal originating from dust particles dissolution processes, with phenolic compounds , namely, guaiacol, syringol, catechol, o- and p- cresol that are known products of incomplete fuel and biomass combustion but also from other natural sources such as humic compounds degradation. We found that under acidic conditions comparable to those expected on a dust particle surface, phenolic compounds readily react with dissolved Fe(III), leading to the formation of insoluble polymeric compounds. We characterized the insoluble products by x-ray photoelectron microscopy, UV-Vis spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, elemental analysis and thermo-gravimetric analysis. We found that the major chromophores formed are oligomers (from dimers to pentamers) of the reaction precursors that efficiently absorb light between 300nm and 500nm. High variability of the mass absorption coefficient of the reaction products was observed with catechol and guaiacol showing high absorption at the 300-500nm range that is comparable to that of brown carbon (BrC) from biomass burning studies. The studied reaction is a potential source for the in-situ production of secondary BrC material under dark conditions. Our results suggest a reaction path for the formation of bio-available iron in coastal polluted areas where dust particles mix with biomass burning pollution plumes. Such mixing can occur, for instance in the coast of West Africa or North Africa during dust and biomass burning seasons

  12. Thin films of metal-organic compounds and metal nanoparticle ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Thin films based on two very different metal-organic systems are developed and some nonlinear optical ... capability of the nanoparticle-embedded polymer film is demonstrated. Keywords. Polar crystal; uniaxial ... systems promising candidates for a wide range of electronic, magnetic and optical applications. However ...

  13. Volatile organic compound emissions from engineered wood products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steve Zylkowski; Charles Frihart

    2017-01-01

    Thirteen bonded engineered wood products representing those commonly used in building construction were evaluated for volatile organic chemicals using methods developed for interior bonded wood products. Although formaldehyde and acetaldehyde were emitted from all samples, they were not the dominant volatiles, which greatly depended on wood species and bonding...

  14. Copper inorganic-organic hybrid coordination compound as a novel ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    coordinates to a Cu(II) ion in a meridional fashion and defines the basal plane of the complex. The fourth equatorial coordination ... the final structures of demanded crystalline products is a great challenge. The self-assembly process of crys- talline products is influenced by various factors, such as metal salt, organic ligands, ...

  15. Promotion of plant growth by Pseudomonas fluorescens strain SS101 via novel volatile organic compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Park, Yong-Soon; Dutta, Swarnalee; Ann, Mina; Raaijmakers, Jos M.; Park, Kyungseok

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) play key roles in modulating plant growth and induced systemic resistance (ISR) to pathogens. Despite their significance, the physiological functions of the specific VOCs produced by Pseudomonas fluorescens

  16. VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS INHIBIT HUMAN AND RAT NEURONAL NICOTINIC ACETYLCHOLINE RECEPTORS EXPRESSED IN XENOPUS OOCYTES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    This manuscript provides evidence to indicate that rats and humans are equally sensitive at the pharmacodynamic level to effects of volatile organic compounds.? This manuscript also presents novel data that provides a plausible mechanism, disruption of ion channel functi...

  17. Detection, Composition and Treatment of Volatile Organic Compounds from Waste Treatment Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoni Sánchez

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Environmental policies at the European and global level support the diversion of wastes from landfills for their treatment in different facilities. Organic waste is mainly treated or valorized through composting, anaerobic digestion or a combination of both treatments. Thus, there are an increasing number of waste treatment plants using this type of biological treatment. During waste handling and biological decomposition steps a number of gaseous compounds are generated or removed from the organic matrix and emitted. Different families of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC can be found in these emissions. Many of these compounds are also sources of odor nuisance. In fact, odors are the main source of complaints and social impacts of any waste treatment plant. This work presents a summary of the main types of VOC emitted in organic waste treatment facilities and the methods used to detect and quantify these compounds, together with the treatment methods applied to gaseous emissions commonly used in composting and anaerobic digestion facilities.

  18. PATTERN RECOGNITION STUDIES OF HALOGENATED ORGANIC COMPOUNDS USING CONDUCTING POLYMER SENSOR ARRAYS. (R825323)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Direct measurement of volatile and semivolatile halogenated organic compounds of environmental interest was carried out using arrays of conducting polymer sensors. Mathematical expressions of the sensor arrays using microscopic polymer network model is described. A classical, non...

  19. 40 CFR 60.542a - Alternate standard for volatile organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Rubber Tire Manufacturing Industry § 60.542a Alternate standard for volatile organic compounds. (a) On... tire processed for each month if the operation uses 25 grams (0.055 lb) or less of VOC per tire...

  20. Factors that influence the volatile organic compound content in human breath

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blanchet, L.; Smolinska, Agnieszka; Baranska, Agnieszka; Tigchelaar-Feenstra, E.; Swertz, M.; Zhernakova, A.; Dallinga, J. W.; Wijmenga, C.; van Schooten, Frederik J.

    Background. Thousands of endogenous and exogenous volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are excreted in each breath. Inflammatory and deviant metabolic processes affect the level of endogeneous VOCs, which can serve as specific biomarkers for clinical diagnosis and disease monitoring. Important issues

  1. Plant-associated bacterial degradation of toxic organic compounds in soil.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McGuinness, Martina

    2009-08-01

    A number of toxic synthetic organic compounds can contaminate environmental soil through either local (e.g., industrial) or diffuse (e.g., agricultural) contamination. Increased levels of these toxic organic compounds in the environment have been associated with human health risks including cancer. Plant-associated bacteria, such as endophytic bacteria (non-pathogenic bacteria that occur naturally in plants) and rhizospheric bacteria (bacteria that live on and near the roots of plants), have been shown to contribute to biodegradation of toxic organic compounds in contaminated soil and could have potential for improving phytoremediation. Endophytic and rhizospheric bacterial degradation of toxic organic compounds (either naturally occurring or genetically enhanced) in contaminated soil in the environment could have positive implications for human health worldwide and is the subject of this review.

  2. Studies on the biological effects of deuteriated organic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinh-Nguyen, Nguyen; Vincent, J.

    1976-01-01

    The antifungal activity of some perdeuterated fatty acids with a normal chain of 11 to 18 carbon atoms was investigated on common dermatophytes Epidermophyton floccosum, Microsporum canis, Trichophyton mentagrophytes and T. rubrum under in vitro conditions. A perdeuterated compound is one in which most of the hydrogen atoms in the molecule are replaced by deuterium. These studies were performed by the dilution technique with respiratory measurements. Perdeuteration of of some fatty acids increases their inhibitory effect on the dermatophyte growth. Perdeuterated n-hendecanoic acid proved to be the most active of the substances tested. Possible mechanisms behind the enhanced antifungal activity due to the perdeuteration of fatty acids are discussed. The present study investigates the antifungal properties of some perdeuterated fatty acids on dermatophytes in vitro

  3. Maximizing Information from Residential Measurements of Volatile Organic Compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maddalena, Randy [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Li, Na [Berkeley Analytical Associates, Richmond, CA (United States); Hodgson, Alfred [Berkeley Analytical Associates, Richmond, CA (United States); Offermann, Francis [Indoor Environmental Engineering, San Francisco, CA (United States); Singer, Brett [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2013-02-01

    Continually changing materials used in home construction and finishing can introduce new chemicals or changes in the VOC profile in residential air and the trend towards tighter homes can lead to higher exposure concentrations for many indoor sources. However, the complex mixture of VOCs in residential air makes it difficult to discover emerging contaminants and/or trends in pollutant profiles. The purpose of this study is to prepare a comprehensive library of chemicals found in homes, along with a semi-quantitative approach to maximize the information gained from VOC measurements. We carefully reviewed data from 108 new California homes and identified 238 individual compounds. The majority of the identified VOCs originated indoors. Only 31% were found to have relevant health based exposure guidelines and less than 10% had a chronic reference exposure level (CREL). The finding highlights the importance of extending IAQ studies to include a wider range of VOCs

  4. Compound

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A: in CDCl3, B: in DMSO, a) keto-amine, b) phenol-imine form. * Solubility in CDCl3 and/ or DMSO is not enough for recording 13C NMR spectrum. Table S3. 1H and 13C NMR spectral data of Schiff bases (9 and 13).

  5. Volatile Organic Compounds in the Breath of Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma Patients: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwig, Stefan; Raguse, Jan D; Pfitzner, Dorothee; Preissner, Robert; Paris, Sebastian; Preissner, Saskia

    2017-12-01

    Objective To assess the feasibility of detecting signature volatile organic compounds in the breath of patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma. Study Design Prospective cohort pilot study. Setting University hospital. Subjects and Methods Using gas chromatography and mass spectrometry, emitted volatile organic compounds in the breath of patients before and after curative surgery (n = 10) were compared with those of healthy subjects (n = 4). It was hypothesized that certain volatile organic compounds disappear after surgical therapy. A characteristic signature of these compounds for diseased patients was compiled and validated. Results Breath analyses revealed 125 volatile organic compounds in patients with oral cancer. A signature of 8 compounds that were characteristic for patients with oral cancer could be detected: 3 from this group presented were absent after surgery. Conclusion The presented results confirmed the hypothesis of an absence of cancer-associated volatile organic compounds in the breath after therapy. In this pilot study, we proved the feasibility of this test approach. Further studies should be initiated to establish protocols for usage in a clinical setting.

  6. Full evaporation headspace gas chromatography for sensitive determination of high boiling point volatile organic compounds in low boiling matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mana Kialengila, Didi; Wolfs, Kris; Bugalama, John; Van Schepdael, Ann; Adams, Erwin

    2013-11-08

    Determination of volatile organic components (VOC's) is often done by static headspace gas chromatography as this technique is very robust and combines easy sample preparation with good selectivity and low detection limits. This technique is used nowadays in different applications which have in common that they have a dirty matrix which would be problematic in direct injection approaches. Headspace by nature favors the most volatile compounds, avoiding the less volatile to reach the injector and column. As a consequence, determination of a high boiling solvent in a lower boiling matrix becomes challenging. Determination of VOCs like: xylenes, cumene, N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF), dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), N,N-dimethylacetamide (DMA), N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP), 1,3-dimethyl-2-imidazolidinone (DMI), benzyl alcohol (BA) and anisole in water or water soluble products are an interesting example of the arising problems. In this work, a headspace variant called full evaporation technique is worked out and validated for the mentioned solvents. Detection limits below 0.1 μg/vial are reached with RSD values below 10%. Mean recovery values ranged from 92.5 to 110%. The optimized method was applied to determine residual DMSO in a water based cell culture and DMSO and DMA in tetracycline hydrochloride (a water soluble sample). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Biogenic, urban, and wildfire influences on the molecular composition of dissolved organic compounds in cloud water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. D. Cook

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Organic aerosol formation and transformation occurs within aqueous aerosol and cloud droplets, yet little is known about the composition of high molecular weight organic compounds in cloud water. Cloud water samples collected at Whiteface Mountain, New York, during August–September 2014 were analyzed by ultra-high-resolution mass spectrometry to investigate the molecular composition of dissolved organic carbon, with a focus on sulfur- and nitrogen-containing compounds. Organic molecular composition was evaluated in the context of cloud water inorganic ion concentrations, pH, and total organic carbon concentrations to gain insights into the sources and aqueous-phase processes of the observed high molecular weight organic compounds. Cloud water acidity was positively correlated with the average oxygen : carbon ratio of the organic constituents, suggesting the possibility for aqueous acid-catalyzed (prior to cloud droplet activation or during/after cloud droplet evaporation and/or radical (within cloud droplets oxidation processes. Many tracer compounds recently identified in laboratory studies of bulk aqueous-phase reactions were identified in the cloud water. Organosulfate compounds, with both biogenic and anthropogenic volatile organic compound precursors, were detected for cloud water samples influenced by air masses that had traveled over forested and populated areas. Oxidation products of long-chain (C10−12 alkane precursors were detected during urban influence. Influence of Canadian wildfires resulted in increased numbers of identified sulfur-containing compounds and oligomeric species, including those formed through aqueous-phase reactions involving methylglyoxal. Light-absorbing aqueous-phase products of syringol and guaiacol oxidation were observed in the wildfire-influenced samples, and dinitroaromatic compounds were observed in all cloud water samples (wildfire, biogenic, and urban-influenced. Overall, the cloud water molecular

  8. Butyltin compounds in biofilm and marine organisms from the Dona Paula Bay, west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bhosle, N.B.

    aliquot of sea water sample (750 ml [millilitres]) was transferred to a clean teflon separatory funnel and 20 ml of dichloromethane, 15 ml of six per cent (w/v (weight/volume)) aqueous sodium borohydride and 100 ?l (microlitres) containing 129 ng... (nanograms) of the internal standard TPrT (tripropyltin Butylin compounds in biofilm and marine organisms 435 chloride) were added and the organotin compounds extracted. The organic lay ers were collected, dried using anhydrous sodium sulphate, filtered...

  9. Biogenic, urban, and wildfire influences on the molecular composition of dissolved organic compounds in cloud water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Ryan D.; Lin, Ying-Hsuan; Peng, Zhuoyu; Boone, Eric; Chu, Rosalie K.; Dukett, James E.; Gunsch, Matthew J.; Zhang, Wuliang; Tolic, Nikola; Laskin, Alexander; Pratt, Kerri A.

    2017-12-01

    Organic aerosol formation and transformation occurs within aqueous aerosol and cloud droplets, yet little is known about the composition of high molecular weight organic compounds in cloud water. Cloud water samples collected at Whiteface Mountain, New York, during August-September 2014 were analyzed by ultra-high-resolution mass spectrometry to investigate the molecular composition of dissolved organic carbon, with a focus on sulfur- and nitrogen-containing compounds. Organic molecular composition was evaluated in the context of cloud water inorganic ion concentrations, pH, and total organic carbon concentrations to gain insights into the sources and aqueous-phase processes of the observed high molecular weight organic compounds. Cloud water acidity was positively correlated with the average oxygen : carbon ratio of the organic constituents, suggesting the possibility for aqueous acid-catalyzed (prior to cloud droplet activation or during/after cloud droplet evaporation) and/or radical (within cloud droplets) oxidation processes. Many tracer compounds recently identified in laboratory studies of bulk aqueous-phase reactions were identified in the cloud water. Organosulfate compounds, with both biogenic and anthropogenic volatile organic compound precursors, were detected for cloud water samples influenced by air masses that had traveled over forested and populated areas. Oxidation products of long-chain (C10-12) alkane precursors were detected during urban influence. Influence of Canadian wildfires resulted in increased numbers of identified sulfur-containing compounds and oligomeric species, including those formed through aqueous-phase reactions involving methylglyoxal. Light-absorbing aqueous-phase products of syringol and guaiacol oxidation were observed in the wildfire-influenced samples, and dinitroaromatic compounds were observed in all cloud water samples (wildfire, biogenic, and urban-influenced). Overall, the cloud water molecular composition depended on

  10. Photo and thermochemical evolution of astrophysical ice analogues as a source for soluble and insoluble organic materials in Solar system minor bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Marcellus, Pierre; Fresneau, Aurelien; Brunetto, Rosario; Danger, Gregoire; Duvernay, Fabrice; Meinert, Cornelia; Meierhenrich, Uwe J.; Borondics, Ferenc; Chiavassa, Thierry; Le Sergeant d'Hendecourt, Louis

    2017-01-01

    Soluble and insoluble organic matter (IOM) is a key feature of primitive carbonaceous chondrites. We observe the formation of organic materials in the photothermochemical treatment of astrophysical ices in the laboratory. Starting from a low vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) irradiation dose on templates of astrophysical ices at 77 K, we obtain first a totally soluble form of organic matter at room temperature. Once this organic residue is formed, irradiating it further in vacuum results in the production of a thin altered dark crust on top of the initial soluble one. The whole residue is studied here by non-destructive methods inducing no alteration of samples, visible microscopy and mid-infrared (micro-)spectroscopy. After water extraction of the soluble part, an insoluble fraction remains on the sample holder which provides a largely different infrared spectrum when compared to the one of the soluble sample. Therefore, from the same VUV and thermal processing of initial simple ices, we produce first a soluble material from which a much larger irradiation dose leads to an insoluble one. Interestingly, this insoluble fraction shows some spectral similarities with natural samples of IOM extracted from two meteorites (Tagish Lake and Murchison), selected as examples of primitive materials. It suggests that the organic molecular diversity observed in meteorites may partly originate from the photo and thermal processing of interstellar/circum-stellar ices at the final stages of molecular cloud evolution towards the build-up of our Solar system.

  11. Organic acid compounds in root exudation of Moso Bamboo (Phyllostachys pubescens) and its bioactivity as affected by heavy metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Junren; Shafi, Mohammad; Wang, Ying; Wu, Jiasen; Ye, Zhengqian; Liu, Chen; Zhong, Bin; Guo, Hua; He, Lizhi; Liu, Dan

    2016-10-01

    Moso bamboo (Phyllostachys pubescens) has great potential as phytoremediation material in soil contaminated by heavy metals. A hydroponics experiment was conducted to determine organic acid compounds of root exudates of lead- (Pb), zinc- (Zn), copper- (Cu), and cadmium (Cd)-tolerant of Moso bamboo. Plants were grown in nutrients solution which included Pb, Zn, Cu, and Cd applied as Pb(NO 3 ) 2 (200 μM), ZnSO 4 ·7H 2 O (100 μM), CuSO 4 ·5H 2 O (25 μM), and CdCl 2 (10 μM), respectively. Oxalic acid and malic acid were detected in all treatments. Lactic acid was observed in Cu, Cd, and control treatments. The oxalic was the main organic acid exudated by Moso bamboo. In the sand culture experiment, the Moso bamboo significantly activated carbonate heavy metals under activation of roots. The concentration of water-soluble metals (except Pb) in sand were significantly increased as compared with control. Organic acids (1 mM mixed) were used due to its effect on the soil adsorption of heavy metals. After adding mixed organic acids, the Cu and Zn sorption capacity in soils was decreased markedly compared with enhanced Pb and Cd sorption capacity in soils. The sorption was analyzed using Langmuir and Freundlich equations with R 2 values that ranged from 0.956 to 0.999 and 0.919 to 0.997, respectively.

  12. Adsorption and reaction of trace gas-phase organic compounds on atmospheric water film surfaces: a critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, D J; Valsaraj, Kalliat T

    2010-02-01

    The air-water interface in atmospheric water films of aerosols and hydrometeors (fog, mist, ice, rain, and snow) presents an important surface for the adsorption and reaction of many organic trace gases and gaseous reactive oxidants (hydroxyl radical (OH(.)), ozone (O(3)), singlet oxygen (O(2)((1)Delta(g))), nitrate radicals (NO(3)(.)), and peroxy radicals (RO(2)(.)). Knowledge of the air-water interface partition constant of hydrophobic organic species is necessary for elucidating the significance of the interface in atmospheric fate and transport. Various methods of assessing both experimental and theoretical values of the thermodynamic partition constant and adsorption isotherm are described in this review. Further, the reactivity of trace gases with gas-phase oxidants (ozone and singlet oxygen) at the interface is summarized. Oxidation products are likely to be more water-soluble and precursors for secondary organic aerosols in hydrometeors. Estimation of characteristic times shows that heterogeneous photooxidation in water films can compete effectively with homogeneous gas-phase reactions for molecules in the atmosphere. This provides further support to the existing thesis that reactions of organic compounds at the air-water interface should be considered in gas-phase tropospheric chemistry.

  13. Adsorption of volatile organic compounds by polytetra-fluor ethylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinet, J.M.

    1958-01-01

    The sorption of organic vapours by microporous polytetra-fluor ethylene has been studied gravimetrically using a Mc Bain-Baker type sorption balance. The amount of sorption, the peculiarities observed on the isotherm curves, the small influence of temperature, and smallness of hysteresis suggests that mainly physical adsorption occurs when the temperature is around 25 deg. C. The values of the surface areas obtained from the adsorption isotherms using organic vapours differ greatly from those derived from N 2 adsorption measurements. This discrepancy cannot be completely attributed to differences in the structure and chemical function of the adsorbate molecules, or to the porous structure of the adsorbent. On the contrary, the surface area values obtained by sorbing high volatile freons conform with those measured by nitrogen adsorption, which seems to imply a connection between the area of sorbed monolayers and volatility of the adsorbate. (author) [fr

  14. Sensing of volatile organic compounds by copper phthalocyanine thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridhi, R.; Saini, G. S. S.; Tripathi, S. K.

    2017-02-01

    Thin films of copper phthalocyanine have been deposited by thermal evaporation technique. We have subsequently exposed these films to the vapours of methanol, ethanol and propanol. Optical absorption, infrared spectra and electrical conductivities of these films before and after exposure to chemical vapours have been recorded in order to study their sensing mechanisms towards organic vapours. These films exhibit maximum sensing response to methanol while low sensitivities of the films towards ethanol and propanol have been observed. The changes in sensitivities have been correlated with presence of carbon groups in the chemical vapours. The effect of different types of electrodes on response-recovery times of the thin film with organic vapours has been studied and compared. The electrodes gap distance affects the sensitivity as well as response-recovery time values of the thin films.

  15. Hot-atom synthesis of organic compounds on Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, J. S.; Fegley, B., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Results of recent laboratory 'simulations' of photochemical processes on Jupiter are combined with available data on mixing rates and exposure times in the Jovian atmosphere to give quantitative predictions of the rate at which hot-atom reactions produce organic molecules. It is shown that abstraction reactions on methane by hot H atoms from solar UV photolysis of H2S will produce no more than 4 times 10 to the -17th power g/sq cm/sec for a steady-state mole fraction of total organics of approximately 10 to the -16th power. This is roughly 10 to the 7th power times less than the limit of detection of the most sensitive gas analysis experiments ever flown on a spacecraft. By far the most common organic molecule produced by this mechanism is CH3SH, methyl mercaptan, which is produced at a rate at least 600 times smaller than the rate of production of ethane by direct photolysis of CH4 at high altitudes.

  16. Speciation and source identification of organic compounds in PM₁₀ over Seoul, South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Na Rae; Lee, Se Pyo; Lee, Ji Yi; Jung, Chang Hoon; Kim, Yong Pyo

    2016-02-01

    Seventy three individual organic compounds in the atmospheric particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter of less than or equal to a nominal 10 μm (PM10) over Seoul were identified and quantified from April 2010 to April 2011 using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). These organic compounds were classified into five groups, n-alkanes, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), mono-carboxylic acids, di-carboxylic acids (DCAs), and sugars based on their chemical structures and properties. The organic compounds showed higher seasonal average concentrations from fall to winter than from spring to summer due to source strength, except some organic compounds among mono-carboxylic acids, DCAs, sugars such as undecanoic acid, methylmalonic acid, and fructose. Through qualitative data analysis using seasonal concentration variations and relevant diagnostic parameters, it was found that (1) anthropogenic sources such as combustion of fossil fuel and biomass burning attributed more to the formation of the organic aerosols than biogenic sources, and (2) the ambient level of n-alkanes, PAHs, and some compounds of DCAs and sugars was elevated in winter due to the increased primary emissions and larger transport from outside of the organic compounds in winter. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Effect of Mineral and Organic Soil Constituents on Microbial Mineralization of Organic Compounds in a Natural Soil †

    OpenAIRE

    Knaebel, David B.; Federle, Thomas W.; McAvoy, Drew C.; Vestal, J. Robie

    1994-01-01

    This research addressed the effect of mineral and organic soil constituents on the fate of organic compounds in soils. Specifically, it sought to determine how the associations between organic chemicals and different soil constituents affect their subsequent biodegradation in soil. Four 14C-labeled surfactants were aseptically adsorbed to montmorillonite, kaolinite, illite, sand, and humic acids. These complexes were mixed with a woodlot soil, and 14CO2 production was measured over time. The ...

  18. Solubilities of some organic solutes in 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate. Chromatographic measurements and predictions from COSMO-RS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenboom, Jan-Georg; Afzal, Waheed; Prausnitz, John M.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► New solubility data are reported. ► Two experimental procedures for measuring solubilities are used. ► The experimental results from both procedures are compared. ► Experiments are compared with the theoretical calculations. - Abstract: Infinite-dilution activity coefficients and Henry’s constants for several organic solutes in 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate [EMIM][Ac] were measured from T = 313 K to T = 413 K using two types of gas–liquid chromatography columns: packed columns and an open tubular wall-coated (OTWC) column. The organic solutes include n-hexane, 1-hexene, cyclohexane, heptane, benzene, toluene, ethyl acetate, tetrahydrofuran, 1,4-dioxane, acetonitrile, nitromethane, 1,2-methoxyethane, 1-propanol, 2-propanol, t-butanol and t-amyl alcohol. Results using packed columns are in good agreement with those using the OTWC column. However, there is a useful advantage associated with an OTWC column: for solutes such as alcohols, that have strong interactions with the stationary phase, measurements are faster due to their shorter retention time compared to those in packed columns.

  19. Bis[(lprolinate-N,O]Zn: A water-soluble and recycle catalyst for various organic transformations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roona Poddar

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Under the green chemistry perspective, bis[(lprolinate-N,O]Zn (also called zinc–proline or Zn[(l-pro]2 has proven its competence as a promising alternative in a plethora of applications such as catalyst or promoter. Owing to its biodegradable and non-toxic nature of bis[(lprolinate-N,O]Zn, it is being actively investigated as a water soluble green catalyst for synthetic chemistry. Bis[(lprolinate-N,O]Zn are readily utilized under mild conditions and have high selectivity and reactivity with broad range of substrate acceptance to make it better reaction medium for a wide variety of organic transformations. This Review summarizes the till date literature on its synthesis, characterization, and its catalytic role in various organic reactions.

  20. Sorption of Tannin and Related Phenolic Compounds and Effects on Extraction of Soluble-N in Soil Amended with Several Carbon Sources

    OpenAIRE

    Jonathan J. Halvorson; Hero T. Gollany; Ann C. Kennedy; Ann E. Hagerman; Javier M. Gonzalez; Stewart B. Wuest

    2012-01-01

    Some tannins sorb to soil and reduce soluble-N. However, we know little about how they interact with organic amendments in soil. Soil (0–5 cm) from plots, which were amended annually with various carbon substances, was treated with water (control) or solutions containing tannins or related phenolic subunits. Treatments included a proanthocyanidin, catechin, tannic acid, β-1,2,3,4,6-penta- O -galloyl-D-glucose (PGG), gallic acid, and methyl gallate. We applied solutions of each of these materi...

  1. Acid-base properties of water-soluble organic matter of forest soils, studied by the pK-spectroscopy method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamrikova, E V; Ryazanov, M A; Vanchikova, E V

    2006-11-01

    Using the potentiometric titration and pK spectroscopy method, acid-base properties of water-soluble organic matter of forest soils have been studied. Five acidic classes composed of different substances with pK(a) values around 3.6; 4.8; 6.7; 8.7 and 9.7 have been identified. Testing the properties of soluble soil fraction, it is to be taken into account that when it is isolated from non-soluble soil matter, some water-soluble substances remain in soil and do not pass into the solution. Most firmly adsorbed in soil are water-soluble components with pK(a) 9.6-9.8.

  2. Non-classical structures of organic compounds: unusual stereochemistry and hypercoordination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minkin, Vladimir I; Minyaev, Ruslan M; Hoffmann, Roald

    2002-01-01

    Non-classical structures of organic compounds are defined as molecules containing non-tetrahedral tetracoordinate and/or hypercoordinate carbon atoms. The evolution of the views on this subject is considered and the accumulated theoretical and experimental data on the structures and dynamic transformations of non-classical organic compounds are systematised. It is shown that computational analysis using the methods and the software potential of modern quantum chemistry has now acquired high predictive capacity and is the most important source of data on the structures of non-classical compounds. The bibliography includes 227 references.

  3. Graphene and graphene nanocomposites for the removal of aromatic organic compounds from the water: systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsores Paixão, Monique; Tadeu Gomes Vianna, Marco; Marques, Marcia

    2018-01-01

    Aromatic organic pollutants are highly toxic to the human and environmental health and are considered as priority pollutants by regulatory agencies. Managing contaminated sites with organic pollutants is one of the major environmental challenges today. Of all technologies that have been proposed to remove contaminants, adsorption is recognized worldwide as an attractive option due to its versatility, wide applicability and economic viability. Recent studies report the use of graphene (GN), a recently carbon nanomaterial, and its derivatives in sorption processes for the removal of aromatic organic compounds. The present review has shown that GN structures are a promising alternative to traditional adsorbent materials, with excellent results in the removal of organic compounds from water, due to their unique structural characteristics and great adsorption capacity for organic compounds. Although, there is still a long way to go until that practical applications can be implemented.

  4. Remove volatile organic compounds (VOCs) with membrane separation techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lin; Weng, Huan-xin; Chen, Huan-lin; Gao, Cong-jie

    2002-04-01

    Membrane separation, a new technology for removing VOCs including pervaporation, vapor permeation, membrane contactor, and membrane bioreactor was presented. Comparing with traditional techniques, these special techniques are an efficient and energy-saving technology. Vapor permeation can be applied to recovery of organic solvents from exhaust streams. Membrane contactor could be used for removing or recovering VOCs from air or wastewater. Pervaporation and vapor permeation are viable methods for removing VOCs from wastewater to yield a VOC concentrate which could either be destroyed by conventional means, or be recycled for reuse.

  5. The olefin metathesis reaction: reorganization and cyclization of organic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frederico, Daniel; Brocksom, Ursula; Brocksom, Timothy John

    2005-01-01

    The olefin metathesis reaction allows the exchange of complex alkyl units between two olefins, with the formation of a new olefinic link and a sub-product olefin usually ethylene. This reaction has found extensive application in the last ten years with the development of the Grubbs and Schrock catalysts, in total synthesis of complex organic molecules, as opposed to the very important use in the petrochemical industry with relatively simple molecules. This review intends to trace a historical and mechanistic pathway from industry to academy, before illustrating the more recent advances. (author)

  6. Ultralight electrospun cellulose sponge with super-high capacity on absorption of organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tao; Wang, Zhao; Ding, Yichun; Xu, Wenhui; Wu, Weidong; Zhu, Zhengtao; Fong, Hao

    2018-01-01

    Three-dimensional, cost-effective, and renewable/recyclable absorbent materials with high capacities on absorption of organic compounds are urgently in demand. Herein, a facile while innovative approach is reported to develop ultralight electrospun cellulose sponge (UECS). The prepared UECS exhibits super-high absorption capacity (up to 232 times of its own weight) towards absorption of organic compounds due to high porosity (99.57%), low density (6.45mg/cm 3 ), and hydrophobic surface feature (with water contact angle of 141.2°). Furthermore, the UECS is mechanically robust thus can be readily cut into different shapes; and it also possesses excellent stability against various organic compounds. Intriguingly, upon absorption of an organic compound, the shape-stable UECS organic gel can be formed. Hence, the developed UECS would be promising as environmental friendly absorbent on high-performance separation of organic compounds from aqueous systems; while the UECS organic gel could be utilized for the applications such as drug delivery and sensor. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Abiotic synthesis of organic compounds from carbon disulfide under hydrothermal conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushdi, Ahmed I; Simoneit, Bernd R T

    2005-12-01

    Abiotic formation of organic compounds under hydrothermal conditions is of interest to bio, geo-, and cosmochemists. Oceanic sulfur-rich hydrothermal systems have been proposed as settings for the abiotic synthesis of organic compounds. Carbon disulfide is a common component of magmatic and hot spring gases, and is present in marine and terrestrial hydrothermal systems. Thus, its reactivity should be considered as another carbon source in addition to carbon dioxide in reductive aqueous thermosynthesis. We have examined the formation of organic compounds in aqueous solutions of carbon disulfide and oxalic acid at 175 degrees C for 5 and 72 h. The synthesis products from carbon disulfide in acidic aqueous solutions yielded a series of organic sulfur compounds. The major compounds after 5 h of reaction included dimethyl polysulfides (54.5%), methyl perthioacetate (27.6%), dimethyl trithiocarbonate (6.8%), trithianes (2.7%), hexathiepane (1.4%), trithiolanes (0.8%), and trithiacycloheptanes (0.3%). The main compounds after 72 h of reaction consisted of trithiacycloheptanes (39.4%), pentathiepane (11.6%), tetrathiocyclooctanes (11.5%), trithiolanes (10.6%), tetrathianes (4.4%), trithianes (1.2%), dimethyl trisulfide (1.1%), and numerous minor compounds. It is concluded that the abiotic formation of aliphatic straight-chain and cyclic polysulfides is possible under hydrothermal conditions and warrants further studies.

  8. Determination of perfluorinated compounds in aquatic organisms: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valsecchi, Sara; Rusconi, Marianna; Polesello, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    Bioaccumulation of PFAS in aquatic organisms is an environmental problem of growing concern around the world. This problem has been tackled by regulatory bodies by proposing EQS for biota in EU water bodies and tolerable daily intake for food. The introduction of regulatory limits requires the availability of harmonised and validated analytical methods of sufficient sensitivity. This paper reviews recent advances in analytical methods for analysis of PFAS in aquatic organisms. The methods available for biota analysis are mostly based on three extraction procedures: ion-pair extraction, solvent liquid extraction, and alkaline digestion. The resulting extracts are then subjected to different clean-up or enrichment steps on solid adsorbents, for example graphitized carbon black, C(18), and WAX phases. All methods reviewed in this work give reliable results but are partially validated only, because of the lack of certified reference materials and regular interlaboratory exercises. The few interlaboratory exercises performed on real unspiked samples did not afford satisfactory results for PFAS other than PFOS, especially for matrices with high lipid content, for example mussels. The reasons for those partially negative results have been identified, and can mainly be attributed to calibration procedures and availability and purity of standards. The urgent need for certified reference materials for this type of analysis is emphasized.

  9. Short latency compound action potentials from mammalian gravity receptor organs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, T. A.; Jones, S. M.

    1999-01-01

    Gravity receptor function was characterized in four mammalian species using far-field vestibular evoked potentials (VsEPs). VsEPs are compound action potentials of the vestibular nerve and central relays that are elicited by linear acceleration ramps applied to the cranium. Rats, mice, guinea pigs, and gerbils were studied. In all species, response onset occurred within 1.5 ms of the stimulus onset. Responses persisted during intense (116 dBSPL) wide-band (50 to 50 inverted question mark omitted inverted question mark000 Hz) forward masking, whereas auditory responses to intense clicks (112 dBpeSPL) were eliminated under the same conditions. VsEPs remained after cochlear extirpation but were eliminated following bilateral labyrinthectomy. Responses included a series of positive and negative peaks that occurred within 8 ms of stimulus onset (range of means at +6 dBre: 1.0 g/ms: P1=908 to 1062 micros, N1=1342 to 1475 micros, P2=1632 to 1952 micros, N2=2038 to 2387 micros). Mean response amplitudes at +6 dBre: 1.0 g/ms ranged from 0.14 to 0.99 microV. VsEP input/output functions revealed latency slopes that varied across peaks and species ranging from -19 to -51 micros/dB. Amplitude-intensity slopes also varied ranging from 0.04 to 0.08 microV/dB for rats and mice. Latency values were comparable to those of birds although amplitudes were substantially smaller in mammals. VsEP threshold values were considerably higher in mammals compared to birds and ranged from -8.1 to -10.5 dBre 1.0 g/ms across species. These results support the hypothesis that mammalian gravity receptors are less sensitive to dynamic stimuli than are those of birds.

  10. Effects of uncertainties in the thermodynamic properties of aerosol components in an air quality model - Part 1: Treatment of inorganic electrolytes and organic compounds in the condensed phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clegg, S. L.; Kleeman, M. J.; Griffin, R. J.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2008-02-01

    Air quality models that generate the concentrations of semi-volatile and other condensable organic compounds using an explicit reaction mechanism require estimates of the physical and thermodynamic properties of the compounds that affect gas/aerosol partitioning: vapour pressure (as a subcooled liquid), and activity coefficients in the aerosol phase. The model of Griffin, Kleeman and co-workers (e.g., Griffin et al., 2003; Kleeman et al., 1999) assumes that aerosol particles consist of an aqueous phase, containing inorganic electrolytes and soluble organic compounds, and a hydrophobic phase containing mainly primary hydrocarbon material. Thirty eight semi-volatile reaction products are grouped into ten surrogate species which partition between the gas phase and both phases in the aerosol. Activity coefficients of the organic compounds are calculated using UNIFAC. In a companion paper (Clegg et al., 2008) we examine the likely uncertainties in the vapour pressures of the semi-volatile compounds and their effects on partitioning over a range of atmospheric relative humidities. In this work a simulation for the South Coast Air Basin surrounding Los Angeles, using lower vapour pressures of the semi-volatile surrogate compounds consistent with estimated uncertainties in the boiling points on which they are based, yields a doubling of the predicted 24-h average secondary organic aerosol concentrations. The dependency of organic compound partitioning on the treatment of inorganic electrolytes in the air quality model, and the performance of this component of the model, are determined by analysing the results of a trajectory calculation using an extended version of the Aerosol Inorganics Model of Wexler and Clegg (2002). Simplifications are identified where substantial efficiency gains can be made, principally: the omission of dissociation of the organic acid surrogates; restriction of aerosol organic compounds to one of the two phases (aqueous or hydrophobic) where

  11. Effects of uncertainties in the thermodynamic properties of aerosol components in an air quality model - Part I: Treatment of inorganic electrolytes and organic compounds in the condensed phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clegg, S. L.; Kleeman, M. J.; Griffin, R. J.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2007-07-01

    Air quality models that generate the concentrations of semi-volatile and other condensable organic compounds using an explicit reaction mechanism require estimates of the physical and thermodynamic properties of the compounds that affect gas/aerosol partitioning: vapour pressure (as a subcooled liquid), and activity coefficients in the aerosol phase. The model of Griffin, Kleeman and co-workers (e.g., Griffin et al., 1999; Kleeman et al., 1999) assumes that aerosol particles consist of an aqueous phase, containing inorganic electrolytes and soluble organic compounds, and a hydrophobic phase containing mainly primary hydrocarbon material. Thirty eight semi-volatile reaction products are grouped into ten surrogate species which partition between the gas phase and both phases in the aerosol. Activity coefficients of the organic compounds are calculated using UNIFAC. In a companion paper (Clegg et al., 2007) we examine the likely uncertainties in the vapour pressures of the semi-volatile compounds and their effects on partitioning over a range of atmospheric relative humidities. In this work a simulation for the South Coast Air Basin surrounding Los Angeles, using lower vapour pressures of the semi-volatile surrogate compounds consistent with estimated uncertainties in the boiling points on which they are based, yields a doubling of the predicted 24-h average secondary organic aerosol concentrations. The dependency of organic compound partitioning on the treatment of inorganic electrolytes in the air quality model, and the performance of this component of the model, are determined by analysing the results of a trajectory calculation using an extended version of the Aerosol Inorganics Model of Wexler and Clegg (2002). Simplifications are identified where substantial efficiency gains can be made, principally: the omission of dissociation of the organic acid surrogates; restriction of aerosol organic compounds to one of the two phases (aqueous or hydrophobic) where

  12. Sense or no-sense of the sum parameter for water soluble "adsorbable organic halogens" (AOX) and "absorbed organic halogens" (AOX-S18) for the assessment of organohalogens in sludges and sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, German

    2003-07-01

    "AOX" is the abbreviation of the sum parameter for water soluble "adsorbable organic halogens" in which 'A' stands for adsorbable, 'O' for organic and 'X' for the halogens chlorine, bromine and iodine. After the introduction of the AOX in 1976, this parameter has been correctly used for "real" AOX constituents (DDT and its metabolites, PCBs, etc.) but also misused for non-adsorbable adsorbed OX-compounds, mostly high molecular organohalogens in plants and even to inorganic compounds being neither organic nor adsorbable. The question of natural "Adsorbable Organic Halogens" (AOX) formed by living organisms and/or during natural abiogenic processes has been definitively solved by the known existence of already more than 3650 organohalogen compounds, amongst them the highly reactive, cancerogenic vinyl chloride (VC). The extension of the AOX to AOX-S18 for Sludges and Sediments, in which A stands for adsorbed (not for adsorbable) is questionable. It includes the most important water insoluble technical organochlorine product: polyvinyl chloride, PVC. In addition to organic halogens it also includes inorganic, mineralogenic halides, incorporated mainly in the crystal lattice of fine grained phyllosilicates, the typical clay minerals (kaolinite, montmorillonite, illite and chlorite) which are main constituents of sediments and sedimentary rocks representing the major part of the sedimentary cover of the earth. Other phyllosilicates, biotite and muscovite, major constituents of granites and many metamorphic rocks (gneiss and mica schist) will also contribute to the AOX-S18 especially in soils as result of weathering processes. Since chlorine is incorporated into the mineral structure and, as a consequence, not soluble by the nitric acid analytical step (pH 0.5) of the S18 determination, it will account to the AOX-S18 in the final charcoal combustion step at temperatures >950 degrees C. After heavy rainfalls sewage sludge composition is strongly influenced by

  13. Effects of tertiary treatment by fungi on organic compounds in a kraft pulp mill effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha-Santos, Teresa; Ferreira, Filipe; Silva, Lurdes; Freitas, Ana Cristina; Pereira, Ruth; Diniz, Mário; Castro, Luísa; Peres, Isabel; Duarte, Armando Costa

    2010-05-01

    Pulp and paper mills generate a plethora of pollutants depending upon the type of pulping process. Efforts to mitigate the environmental impact of such effluents have been made by developing more effective biological treatment systems in terms of biochemical oxygen demand, chemical oxygen demand, colour and lignin content. This study is the first that reports an evaluation of the effects of a tertiary treatment by fungi (Pleurotus sajor caju, Trametes versicolor and Phanerochaete chrysosporium and Rhizopus oryzae) on individual organic compounds of a Eucalyptus globulus bleached kraft pulp and paper mill final effluent after secondary treatment (final effluent). The tertiary treatment with P. sajor caju, T. versicolor and P. chrysosporium and R. oryzae was performed in batch reactors, which were inoculated with separate fungi species and monitored throughout the incubation period. Samples from effluent after secondary and after tertiary treatment with fungi were analysed for both absorbance and organic compounds. The samples were extracted for organic compounds using solid-phase extraction (SPE) and analysed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The efficiencies of the SPE procedure was evaluated by recovery tests. A total of 38 compounds (carboxylic acids, fatty alcohols, phenolic compounds and sterols) were identified and quantified in the E. globulus bleached kraft pulp mill final effluent after secondary treatment. Recoveries from the extraction procedure were between 98.2% and 99.9%. The four fungi species showed an adequate capacity to remove organic compounds and colour. Tertiary treatment with R. oryzae was able to remove 99% of organic compounds and to reduce absorbance on 47% (270 nm) and 74% (465 nm). P. sajor caju, T. versicolor and P. chrysosporium were able to remove 97%, 92% and 99% of organic compounds, respectively, and reduce 18% (270 nm) to 77% (465 nm), 39% (270 nm) to 58% (465 nm) and 31% (270 nm) to 10% (465 nm) of absorbance

  14. Method of increasing biodegradation of sparingly soluble vapors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, Robert S.

    2000-01-01

    A method for increasing biodegradation of sparingly soluble volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in a bioreactor is disclosed. The method comprises dissolving in the aqueous phase of the bioreactor a water soluble, nontoxic, non-biodegradable polymer having a molecular weight of at least 500 and operable for decreasing the distribution coefficient of the VOCs. Polyoxyalkylene alkanols are preferred polymers. A method of increasing the growth rate of VOC-degrading microorganisms in the bioreactor and a method of increasing the solubility of sparingly soluble VOCs in aqueous solution are also disclosed.

  15. Method for separating water soluble organics from a process stream by aqueous biphasic extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaiko, David J.; Mego, William A.

    1999-01-01

    A method for separating water-miscible organic species from a process stream by aqueous biphasic extraction is provided. An aqueous biphase system is generated by contacting a process stream comprised of water, salt, and organic species with an aqueous polymer solution. The organic species transfer from the salt-rich phase to the polymer-rich phase, and the phases are separated. Next, the polymer is recovered from the loaded polymer phase by selectively extracting the polymer into an organic phase at an elevated temperature, while the organic species remain in a substantially salt-free aqueous solution. Alternatively, the polymer is recovered from the loaded polymer by a temperature induced phase separation (cloud point extraction), whereby the polymer and the organic species separate into two distinct solutions. The method for separating water-miscible organic species is applicable to the treatment of industrial wastewater streams, including the extraction and recovery of complexed metal ions from salt solutions, organic contaminants from mineral processing streams, and colorants from spent dye baths.

  16. Effect of plant diversity on the diversity of soil organic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Moujahid, Lamiae; Michalet, Serge; Bellvert, Florian; Weigelt, Alexandra; Poly, Franck

    2017-01-01

    The effect of plant diversity on aboveground organisms and processes was largely studied but there is still a lack of knowledge regarding the link between plant diversity and soil characteristics. Here, we analyzed the effect of plant identity and diversity on the diversity of extractible soil organic compounds (ESOC) using 87 experimental grassland plots with different levels of plant diversity and based on a pool of over 50 plant species. Two pools of low molecular weight organic compounds, LMW1 and LMW2, were characterized by GC-MS and HPLC-DAD, respectively. These pools include specific organic acids, fatty acids and phenolics, with more organic acids in LMW1 and more phenolics in LMW2. Plant effect on the diversity of LMW1 and LMW2 compounds was strong and weak, respectively. LMW1 richness observed for bare soil was lower than that observed for all planted soils; and the richness of these soil compounds increased twofold when dominant plant species richness increased from 1 to 6. Comparing the richness of LMW1 compounds observed for a range of plant mixtures and for plant monocultures of species present in these mixtures, we showed that plant species richness increases the richness of these ESOC mainly through complementarity effects among plant species associated with contrasted spectra of soil compounds. This could explain previously reported effects of plant diversity on the diversity of soil heterotrophic microorganisms. PMID:28166250

  17. Effect of plant diversity on the diversity of soil organic compounds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lamiae El Moujahid

    Full Text Available The effect of plant diversity on aboveground organisms and processes was largely studied but there is still a lack of knowledge regarding the link between plant diversity and soil characteristics. Here, we analyzed the effect of plant identity and diversity on the diversity of extractible soil organic compounds (ESOC using 87 experimental grassland plots with different levels of plant diversity and based on a pool of over 50 plant species. Two pools of low molecular weight organic compounds, LMW1 and LMW2, were characterized by GC-MS and HPLC-DAD, respectively. These pools include specific organic acids, fatty acids and phenolics, with more organic acids in LMW1 and more phenolics in LMW2. Plant effect on the diversity of LMW1 and LMW2 compounds was strong and weak, respectively. LMW1 richness observed for bare soil was lower than that observed for all planted soils; and the richness of these soil compounds increased twofold when dominant plant species richness increased from 1 to 6. Comparing the richness of LMW1 compounds observed for a range of plant mixtures and for plant monocultures of species present in these mixtures, we showed that plant species richness increases the richness of these ESOC mainly through complementarity effects among plant species associated with contrasted spectra of soil compounds. This could explain previously reported effects of plant diversity on the diversity of soil heterotrophic microorganisms.

  18. Water-soluble Organic Components in Aerosols Associated with Savanna Fires in Southern Africa: Identification, Evolution and Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Song; Hegg, Dean A.; Hobbs, Peter V.; Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Magi, Brian I.; Sadilek, Martin

    2003-01-01

    During the SAFARI 2000 field campaign, both smoke aerosols from savanna fires and haze aerosols in the boundary layer and in the free troposphere were collected from an aircraft in southern Africa. These aerosol samples were analyzed for their water-soluble chemical components, particularly the organic species. A novel technique, electrospray ionization-ion trap mass spectrometry, was used concurrently with an ion chromatography system to analyze for carbohydrate species. Seven carbohydrates, seven organic acids, five metallic elements, and three inorganic anions were identified and quantified. On the average, these 22 species comprised 36% and 27% of the total aerosol mass in haze and smoke aerosols, respectively. For the smoke aerosols, levoglucosan was the most abundant carbohydrate species, while gluconic acid was tentatively identified as the most abundant organic acid. The mass abundance and possible source of each class of identified species are discussed, along with their possible formation pathways. The combustion phase of a fire had an impact on the chemical composition of the emitted aerosols. Secondary formation of sulfate, nitrate, levoglucosan, and several organic acids occurred during the initial aging of smoke aerosols. It is likely that under certain conditions, some carbohydrate species in smoke aerosols, such as levoglucosan, were converted to organic acids during upward transport.

  19. Radioluminescence of organic compounds: specific luminescence of condensed aromatic scintillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopes da Silva, J.

    1978-01-01

    The influence of the nature of ionizing particles on the radioluminescence yield of aromatic scintillators is studied. Both prompt and delayed scintillation components are considered. An expression giving the specific luminescence dS/dx as a function of the charge number z and of the incident particle specific energy loss have been derived, following a track model published before, that is consistent with recent conclusions about the nature, evolution and distribution of the primary excitations created by an ionizing particle in the organic scintillator. The good agreement between the theoretical curves derived in this paper and the experimental ones previously reported provided us with a means of evaluating the different parameters included in the proposed expressions. The numerical values of these parameters included in the proposed expressions. The numerical values of these parameters agree with those of other authors and are theoretically discussed and justified [fr

  20. Two new POMOF compounds constructed from polyoxoanions, metals and organic ligands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Li-Na; Zhang, Hao; Zhang, Ting-Ting; Zhang, Xiao; Cui, Xiao-Bing

    2018-03-01

    Two new POMOF compounds, namely [PMo12V2O42][Cu3(4,4'-bpy)3]·(DABCO) (1) and [PMo10V4O42][Cu2(4,4'-bpy)2][Cu(phen)2]2 (2) (DABCO = triethylenediamine, bpy = bipyridine, phen = 1,10-phenanthroline)), have been synthesized and characterized by IR, UV-Vis, XRD, elemental analysis and X-ray diffraction analysis. Crystal structure analyses reveal that compounds 1 and 2 exhibit novel 2-D layered framework structures constructed from bi-capped Keggin molybdenum-vanadium polyoxoanions, metals and organic ligands, respectively. The main difference of the two compounds is that compound 2 contains both Cu2+ and Cu+ complexes. In addition, we also investigate the catalytic properties of the two compounds, both compound 1 and 2 are excellent catalysts for the epoxidation of styrene.