WorldWideScience

Sample records for solubility pore fluid

  1. Phase transitions of fluids in heterogeneous pores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Malijevský

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We study phase behaviour of a model fluid confined between two unlike parallel walls in the presence of long range (dispersion forces. Predictions obtained from macroscopic (geometric and mesoscopic arguments are compared with numerical solutions of a non-local density functional theory. Two capillary models are considered. For a capillary comprising two (differently adsorbing walls we show that simple geometric arguments lead to the generalized Kelvin equation locating very accurately capillary condensation, provided both walls are only partially wet. If at least one of the walls is in complete wetting regime, the Kelvin equation should be modified by capturing the effect of thick wetting films by including Derjaguin's correction. Within the second model, we consider a capillary formed of two competing walls, so that one tends to be wet and the other dry. In this case, an interface localized-delocalized transition occurs at bulk two-phase coexistence and a temperature T*(L depending on the pore width L. A mean-field analysis shows that for walls exhibiting first-order wetting transition at a temperature T_{w}, T_{s} > T*(L > T_{w}, where the spinodal temperature Ts can be associated with the prewetting critical temperature, which also determines a critical pore width below which the interface localized-delocalized transition does not occur. If the walls exhibit critical wetting, the transition is shifted below Tw and for a model with the binding potential W(l=A(Tl-2+B(Tl-3+..., where l is the location of the liquid-gas interface, the transition can be characterized by a dimensionless parameter κ=B/(AL, so that the fluid configuration with delocalized interface is stable in the interval between κ=-2/3 and κ ~ -0.23.

  2. Porous media fluid transport and pore structure

    CERN Document Server

    Dullien, F A L

    1992-01-01

    This book examines the relationship between transport properties and pore structure of porous material. Models of pore structure are presented with a discussion of how such models can be used to predict the transport properties of porous media. Portions of the book are devoted to interpretations of experimental results in this area and directions for future research. Practical applications are given where applicable, and are expected to be useful for a large number of different fields, including reservoir engineering, geology, hydrogeology, soil science, chemical process engineering, biomedica

  3. Fines Classification Based on Sensitivity to Pore-Fluid Chemistry

    KAUST Repository

    Jang, Junbong

    2015-12-28

    The 75-μm particle size is used to discriminate between fine and coarse grains. Further analysis of fine grains is typically based on the plasticity chart. Whereas pore-fluid-chemistry-dependent soil response is a salient and distinguishing characteristic of fine grains, pore-fluid chemistry is not addressed in current classification systems. Liquid limits obtained with electrically contrasting pore fluids (deionized water, 2-M NaCl brine, and kerosene) are combined to define the soil "electrical sensitivity." Liquid limit and electrical sensitivity can be effectively used to classify fine grains according to their fluid-soil response into no-, low-, intermediate-, or high-plasticity fine grains of low, intermediate, or high electrical sensitivity. The proposed methodology benefits from the accumulated experience with liquid limit in the field and addresses the needs of a broader range of geotechnical engineering problems. © ASCE.

  4. Fines classification based on sensitivity to pore-fluid chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Junbong; Santamarina, J. Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The 75-μm particle size is used to discriminate between fine and coarse grains. Further analysis of fine grains is typically based on the plasticity chart. Whereas pore-fluid-chemistry-dependent soil response is a salient and distinguishing characteristic of fine grains, pore-fluid chemistry is not addressed in current classification systems. Liquid limits obtained with electrically contrasting pore fluids (deionized water, 2-M NaCl brine, and kerosene) are combined to define the soil “electrical sensitivity.” Liquid limit and electrical sensitivity can be effectively used to classify fine grains according to their fluid-soil response into no-, low-, intermediate-, or high-plasticity fine grains of low, intermediate, or high electrical sensitivity. The proposed methodology benefits from the accumulated experience with liquid limit in the field and addresses the needs of a broader range of geotechnical engineering problems.

  5. Fluids in micropores. II. Self-diffusion in a simple classical fluid in a slit pore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoen, M.; Cushman, J.H.; Diestler, D.J.; Rhykerd, C.L. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Self-diffusion coefficients D are computed for a model slit pore consisting of a rare-gas fluid confined between two parallel face-centered cubic (100) planes (walls) of rigidly fixed rare-gas atoms. By means of an optimally vectorized molecular-dynamics program for the CYBER 205, the dependence of D on the thermodynamic state (specified by the chemical potential μ, temperature T, and the pore width h) of the pore fluid has been explored. Diffusion is governed by Fick's law, even in pores as narrow as 2 or 3 atomic diameters. The diffusion coefficient oscillates as a function of h with fixed μ and T, vanishing at critical values of h, where fluid--solid phase transitions occur. A shift of the pore walls relative to one another in directions parallel with the walls can radically alter the structure of the pore fluid and consequently the magnitude of D. Since the pore fluid forms distinct layers parallel to the walls, a local diffusion coefficient D/sup (//sup i//sup )//sub parallel/ associated with a given layer i can be defined. D/sup (//sup i//sup )//sub parallel/ is least for the contact layer, even for pores as wide as 30 atomic diameters (∼100 A). Moreover, D/sup (//sup i//sup )//sub parallel/ increases with increasing distance of the fluid layer from the wall and, for pore widths between 16 and 30 atomic diameters, D/sup (//sup i//sup )//sub parallel/ is larger in the center of the pore than in the bulk fluid that is in equilibrium with the pore fluid. The opposite behavior is observed in corresponding smooth-wall pores, in which the discrete fluid--wall interactions have been averaged by smearing the wall atoms over the plane of the wall

  6. Fines Classification Based on Sensitivity to Pore-Fluid Chemistry

    KAUST Repository

    Jang, Junbong; Santamarina, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    The 75-μm particle size is used to discriminate between fine and coarse grains. Further analysis of fine grains is typically based on the plasticity chart. Whereas pore-fluid-chemistry-dependent soil response is a salient and distinguishing

  7. Fluid flow behaviour of gas-condensate and near-miscible fluids at the pore scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dawe, Richard A. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of West Indies, St. Augustine (Trinidad and Tobago); Grattoni, Carlos A. [Department of Earth Science and Engineering, Imperial College, London, SW7 2BP (United Kingdom)

    2007-02-15

    Retrograde condensate reservoir behaviour is complex with much of the detailed mechanisms of the multiphase fluid transport and mass transfer between the phases within the porous matrix still speculative. Visual modelling of selected processes occurring at the pore level under known and controlled boundary conditions can give an insight to fluid displacements at the core scale and help the interpretation of production behaviour at reservoir scale. Visualisation of the pore scale two-phase flow mechanisms has been studied experimentally at low interfacial tensions, < 0.5 mN/m, using a partially miscible fluid system in glass visual micro models. As the interfacial tension decreases the balance between fluid-fluid forces (interfacial, spreading and viscous) and fluid-solid interactions (wettability and viscous interactions) changes. Data measurements in the laboratory, particularly relative permeability, will therefore always be difficult especially for condensate fluids just below their dew point. What is certain is that gas production from a gas-condensate leads to condensate dropout when pressure falls below the dew point, either within the wellbore or, more importantly, in the reservoir. This paper illustrates some pore scale physics, particularly interfacial phenomena at low interfacial tension, which has relevance to appreciating the flow of condensate fluids close to their dew point either near the wellbore (which affects well productivity) or deep inside the reservoir (which affects condensate recovery). (author)

  8. Movement of fossil pore fluids in granite basement, Illinois

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Couture, R.A.; Seitz, M.G.

    1986-01-01

    The compositions of pore fluids in granite cores from the Precambrian basement in northern Illinois were determined. The estimated chloride concentration in the aqueous phase increases from near zero at the upper contact with sandstone to 2.7 M at 624 m below the contact. Traces of aliphatic oil are present in the overlying sandstone and the upper 516 m of granite, and oil occupies most of the pore space in one sample of unaltered granite 176 m below the contact. The oil has a Δ 13 C of -25%, about the same as average petroleum. The high concentrations of salt more than 500 m below the contact imply that little or no fresh water has reached these levels of the granite by flow. Lower concentrations near the contact are consistent with replacement of brine in the sandstone by fresh water at least 11 m.y. ago and subsequent upward diffusion of salt from the granite. Geologic data suggest that the time of replacement was about 130 Ma. The purpose of the investigation is to study the record of movement of intergranular fluids within a granite pluton. The composition and movement of ground waters can determine the extent that hazardous or radioactive wastes disposed in igneous rock will remain isolated

  9. Effect of pore fluid on the cyclic behavior of laterally loaded offshore piles modelled in centrifuge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Askarinejad, A.; Philia Boru Sitanggang, Anggi; Schenkeveld, Ferry; Lee, W.; Lee, J-S.; Kim, H-K.; kim, D-S.

    The common practice in centrifuge modelling of dynamic processes is to use high-viscosity pore fluids to unify the time scaling factors for the generation and dissipation of pore pressures. This paper focuses on the effects of the density and viscosity of the pore fluid on the behaviour of an

  10. Dietary fiber content influences soluble carbohydrate levels in ruminal fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinder, R S; Patterson, J A; O'Bryan, C A; Crandall, P G; Ricke, S C

    2012-01-01

    The soluble carbohydrate concentration of ruminal fluid, as affected by dietary forage content (DFC) and/or ruminally undegradable intake protein content (UIPC), was determined. Four ruminally cannulated steers, in a 4 × 4 Latin square design, were offered diets containing high (75 % of DM) or low (25 % of DM) DFC and high (6 % of DM) or low (5 % of DM) UIPC, in a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement. Zinc-treated SBM was the primary UIP source. Soluble hexose concentration (145.1 μM) in ruminal fluid (RF) of steers fed low DFC diets exhibited a higher trend (P = 0.08) than that (124.5 μM) of steers fed high DFC diets. UIPC did not modulate (P = 0.54) ruminal soluble hexose concentrations. Regardless of diet, soluble hexose concentration declined immediately after feeding and did not rise until 3 h after feeding (P ruminal fluid could not be determined. However, unsubstituted xylose and arabinose were excluded. These data indicate that: (i) soluble carbohydrate concentrations remain in ruminal fluid during digestion and fermentation; (ii) slight diurnal changes began after feeding; (iii) DFC influences the soluble carbohydrate concentration in RF; and (iv) UIPC of these diets does not affect the soluble carbohydrate concentration of RF.

  11. Influence of pore fluid and frequency on elastic properties of greensand as interpreted using NMR data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hossain, Zakir; Mukerj, Tapan; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2011-01-01

    dispersion. However, Biot’s theory does not fully explain the frequency dispersion of sedimentary rocks. Greensands are composed of a mixture of quartz and micro-porous glauconite grains. In greensand, it is possible that the contrast between flow in macro-pores and micro-pores within glauconites gives rise....... Biot’s critical frequency and NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) T2 spectrum were combined to describe the differences in fluid flow within macro-pores and within micro-pores. NMR data show that Biot’s flow should occur only in large pores in the greensand while, Biot’s flow should not occur in micro-pores....... Differences of fluid flow in macro-pores and micro-pores pores are described as high frequency squirt flow in greensand....

  12. Lennard-Jones fluids in two-dimensional nano-pores. Multi-phase coexistence and fluid structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yatsyshin, Petr; Savva, Nikos; Kalliadasis, Serafim

    2014-03-01

    We present a number of fundamental findings on the wetting behaviour of nano-pores. A popular model for fluid confinement is a one-dimensional (1D) slit pore formed by two parallel planar walls and it exhibits capillary condensation (CC): a first-order phase transition from vapour to capillary-liquid (Kelvin shift). Capping such a pore at one end by a third orthogonal wall forms a prototypical two-dimensional (2D) pore. We show that 2D pores possess a wetting temperature such that below this temperature CC remains of first order, above it becomes a continuous phase transition manifested by a slab of capillary-liquid filling the pore from the capping wall. Continuous CC exhibits hysteresis and can be preceded by a first-order capillary prewetting transition. Additionally, liquid drops can form in the corners of the 2D pore (remnant of 2D wedge prewetting). The three fluid phases, vapour, capillary-liquid slab and corner drops, can coexist at the pore triple point. Our model is based on the statistical mechanics of fluids in the density functional formulation. The fluid-fluid and fluid-substrate interactions are dispersive. We analyze in detail the microscopic fluid structure, isotherms and full phase diagrams. Our findings also suggest novel ways to control wetting of nano-pores. We are grateful to the European Research Council via Advanced Grant No. 247031 for support.

  13. Effect of pore geometry on the compressibility of a confined simple fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrzanski, Christopher D.; Maximov, Max A.; Gor, Gennady Y.

    2018-02-01

    Fluids confined in nanopores exhibit properties different from the properties of the same fluids in bulk; among these properties is the isothermal compressibility or elastic modulus. The modulus of a fluid in nanopores can be extracted from ultrasonic experiments or calculated from molecular simulations. Using Monte Carlo simulations in the grand canonical ensemble, we calculated the modulus for liquid argon at its normal boiling point (87.3 K) adsorbed in model silica pores of two different morphologies and various sizes. For spherical pores, for all the pore sizes (diameters) exceeding 2 nm, we obtained a logarithmic dependence of fluid modulus on the vapor pressure. Calculation of the modulus at saturation showed that the modulus of the fluid in spherical pores is a linear function of the reciprocal pore size. The calculation of the modulus of the fluid in cylindrical pores appeared too scattered to make quantitative conclusions. We performed additional simulations at higher temperature (119.6 K), at which Monte Carlo insertions and removals become more efficient. The results of the simulations at higher temperature confirmed both regularities for cylindrical pores and showed quantitative difference between the fluid moduli in pores of different geometries. Both of the observed regularities for the modulus stem from the Tait-Murnaghan equation applied to the confined fluid. Our results, along with the development of the effective medium theories for nanoporous media, set the groundwork for analysis of the experimentally measured elastic properties of fluid-saturated nanoporous materials.

  14. Validation of model predictions of pore-scale fluid distributions during two-phase flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bultreys, Tom; Lin, Qingyang; Gao, Ying; Raeini, Ali Q.; AlRatrout, Ahmed; Bijeljic, Branko; Blunt, Martin J.

    2018-05-01

    Pore-scale two-phase flow modeling is an important technology to study a rock's relative permeability behavior. To investigate if these models are predictive, the calculated pore-scale fluid distributions which determine the relative permeability need to be validated. In this work, we introduce a methodology to quantitatively compare models to experimental fluid distributions in flow experiments visualized with microcomputed tomography. First, we analyzed five repeated drainage-imbibition experiments on a single sample. In these experiments, the exact fluid distributions were not fully repeatable on a pore-by-pore basis, while the global properties of the fluid distribution were. Then two fractional flow experiments were used to validate a quasistatic pore network model. The model correctly predicted the fluid present in more than 75% of pores and throats in drainage and imbibition. To quantify what this means for the relevant global properties of the fluid distribution, we compare the main flow paths and the connectivity across the different pore sizes in the modeled and experimental fluid distributions. These essential topology characteristics matched well for drainage simulations, but not for imbibition. This suggests that the pore-filling rules in the network model we used need to be improved to make reliable predictions of imbibition. The presented analysis illustrates the potential of our methodology to systematically and robustly test two-phase flow models to aid in model development and calibration.

  15. Pore fluids from the argillaceous rocks of the Harwell region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brightman, M.A.; Bath, A.H.; Cave, M.R.; Darling, W.G.

    1985-06-01

    The aim of this work was to obtain samples of pore water from argillaceous formations in the Harwell area for chemical analysis to provide a background for radionuclide migration studies and regional groundwater flow pattern. This report describes the samples, development of a pore-water squeezing cell and its operation. Chemical and analytical studies are summarized. (UK)

  16. Pore-scale simulation of fluid flow and solute dispersion in three-dimensional porous media

    KAUST Repository

    Icardi, Matteo; Boccardo, Gianluca; Marchisio, Daniele L.; Tosco, Tiziana; Sethi, Rajandrea

    2014-01-01

    In the present work fluid flow and solute transport through porous media are described by solving the governing equations at the pore scale with finite-volume discretization. Instead of solving the simplified Stokes equation (very often employed

  17. Solubility of Aragonite in Subduction Water-Rich Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, I.; Facq, S.; Petitgirard, S.; Cardon, H.; Sverjensky, D. A.

    2017-12-01

    Carbonate dissolution in subduction zone fluids is critical to the carbon budget in subduction zones. Depending on the solubility of carbonate minerals in aqueous fluids, the subducting lithosphere may be either strongly depleted and the mantle metasomatized if the solubility is high, as recently suggested by natural samples or transport carbon deeper into the Earth's mantle if the solubility is low enough [1, 2]. Dissolution of carbonate minerals strongly depends on pressure and temperature as well as on the chemistry of the fluid, leading to a highly variable speciation of aqueous carbon. Thanks to recent advances in theoretical aqueous geochemistry [3, 4], combined experimental and theoretical efforts now allow the investigation of speciation and solubility of carbonate minerals in aqueous fluids at PT conditions higher than previously feasible [4, 5]. In this study, we present new in situ X-ray fluorescence measurements of aragonite dissolution up to 5 GPa and 500°C and the subsequent thermodynamic model of aragonite solubility in aqueous fluids thanks to the Deep Earth Water model. The amount of dissolved aragonite in the fluid was calculated from challenging and unprecedented measurements of the Ca fluorescence K-lines at low-energy. Experiments were performed at the ESRF, beamline ID27 using a dedicated design of an externally-heated diamond anvil cell and an incident high-flux and highly focused monochromatic X-Ray beam at 20 keV. The results show a spectacularly high solubility of aragonite at HP-HT in water, further enhanced in presence of NaCl and silica in the solution. [1] Frezzotti, M. L. et al. (2011) doi:10.1038/ngeo1246. [2] Ague, J. J. and Nicolescu, S. (2014) doi:10.1038/ngeo2143. [3] Pan, D. et al. (2013) doi: 10.1073/pnas.1221581110. [4] Sverjensky, D. A et al. (2014) doi: 10.1016/j.gca.2013.12.019. [5] Facq, S. et al. (2014) doi: 10.1016/j.gca.2014.01.030.

  18. The solubility of uranium trioxide simulated lung fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kravchiks, T.; Kol, R.; Prager, A.; German, U.; Oved, S.; Laichter, Y.

    1997-01-01

    Uranium trioxide is an important intermediate compound in the uranium production process. Inhalation of UO 3 aerosols can occur during this process. To assess the radiation dose from the intake of this compound it is necessary to know its transportability class, based on its dissolution rate in lung fluid. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has assigned UO 3 to Inhalation Class W (lung retention half-time of 10 to 100 days). A solubility study of UO 3 in a simulated lung fluid has been carried out using a batch/filter replacement method. Two tests were conducted over a 100-days period, during which 17 samples were collected and analyzed for their dissolved uranium content. The results show that about 40% of the total uranium was dissolved during the first days and nearly all was dissolved during 100 days. Expressed as the fraction of the total uranium remaining undissolved as a function of time, using a non-linear least squares regression fit, it was found that the solubility of UO 3 in simulated lung fluid could be expressed as a combination of two Inactions: about 25% of the UO 3 could be classified as type D (with lung retention half-time of several hours) and about 75% as type W (with half-time of 10-20 days). This classification is in agreement with recent investigations and indicates that UO 3 is more soluble than considered by ICRP. (authors)

  19. Microtomography and pore-scale modeling of two-phase Fluid Distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silin, D.; Tomutsa, L.; Benson, S.; Patzek, T.

    2010-10-19

    Synchrotron-based X-ray microtomography (micro CT) at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) line 8.3.2 at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory produces three-dimensional micron-scale-resolution digital images of the pore space of the reservoir rock along with the spacial distribution of the fluids. Pore-scale visualization of carbon dioxide flooding experiments performed at a reservoir pressure demonstrates that the injected gas fills some pores and pore clusters, and entirely bypasses the others. Using 3D digital images of the pore space as input data, the method of maximal inscribed spheres (MIS) predicts two-phase fluid distribution in capillary equilibrium. Verification against the tomography images shows a good agreement between the computed fluid distribution in the pores and the experimental data. The model-predicted capillary pressure curves and tomography-based porosimetry distributions compared favorably with the mercury injection data. Thus, micro CT in combination with modeling based on the MIS is a viable approach to study the pore-scale mechanisms of CO{sub 2} injection into an aquifer, as well as more general multi-phase flows.

  20. Nanoscale Pore Features and Associated Fluid Behavior in Shale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, D. R.; Striolo, A.

    2017-12-01

    Unconventional hydrocarbons occurring in economic abundance require greater than industry-standard levels of technology or investment to exploit. Geological formations that host unconventional oil and gas are extraordinarily heterogeneous and exhibit a wide range of physical and chemical features that can vary over many orders of magnitude in length scale. The size, distribution and connectivity of these confined geometries, the chemistry of the solid, the chemistry of the fluids and their physical properties collectively dictate how fluids migrate into and through these micro- and nano-environments, wet and ultimately react with the solid surfaces. Our current understanding of the rates and mechanisms of fluid and mass transport and interaction within these multiporosity systems at the molecular scale is far less robust than we would like. This presentation will take a two-fold approach to this topic area. First, a brief overview is provided that highlights the use of advanced electron microscopy and neutrons scattering methods to quantify the nature of the nanopore system that hosts hydrocarbons in representative gas shale formations such as the Utica, Marcellus and Eagle Ford. Second, results will be presented that leverage the application of state-of-the-art experimental, analytical and computational tools to assess key features of the fluid-matrix interaction relevant to shale settings. The multidisciplinary approaches highlighted will include neutron scattering and NMR experiments, thermodynamic measurements and molecular-level simulations to quantitatively assess molecular properties of C-O-H fluids confined to well-characterized porous media, subjected to temperatures and pressures relevant to subsurface energy systems. These studies conducted in concert are beginning to provide a fundamental understanding at the molecular level of how intrinsically different hydrocarbon-bearing fluids behave in confined geometries compared to bulk systems, and shed light

  1. Geochemical and geological constraints on the composition of marine sediment pore fluid: Possible link to gas hydrate deposits

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mazumdar, A.; Joao, H.M.; Peketi, A.; Dewangan, P.; Kocherla, M.; Joshi, R.K.; Ramprasad, T.

    Pore water sulfate consumption in marine sediments is controlled by microbially driven sulfate reduction via organo-clastic and methane oxidation processes. In this work, we present sediment pore fluid compositions of 10 long sediment cores and high...

  2. Solubility of hydrogen in metals and its effect of pore-formation and embrittlement. Ph.D. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahani, H. R.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of alloying elements on hydrogen solubility were determined by evaluating solubility equations and interaction coefficients. The solubility of dry hydrogen at one atmosphere was investigated in liquid aluminum, Al-Ti, Al-Si, Al-Fe, liquid gold, Au-Cu, and Au-Pd. The design of rapid heating and high pressure casting furnaces used in meta foam experiments is discussed as well as the mechanism of precipitation of pores in melts, and the effect of hydrogen on the shrinkage porosity of Al-Cu and Al-Si alloys. Hydrogen embrittlement in iron base alloys is also examined.

  3. Connection Between Thermodynamics and Dynamics of Simple Fluids in Pores: Impact of Fluid-Fluid Interaction Range and Fluid-Solid Interaction Strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krekelberg, William P; Siderius, Daniel W; Shen, Vincent K; Truskett, Thomas M; Errington, Jeffrey R

    2017-08-03

    Using molecular simulations, we investigate how the range of fluid-fluid (adsorbate-adsorbate) interactions and the strength of fluid-solid (adsorbate-adsorbent) interactions impact the strong connection between distinct adsorptive regimes and distinct self-diffusivity regimes reported in [Krekelberg, W. P.; Siderius, D. W.; Shen, V. K.; Truskett, T. M.; Errington, J. R. Langmuir 2013 , 29 , 14527-14535]. Although increasing the fluid-fluid interaction range changes both the thermodynamics and the dynamic properties of adsorbed fluids, the previously reported connection between adsorptive filling regimes and self-diffusivity regimes remains. Increasing the fluid-fluid interaction range leads to enhanced layering and decreased self-diffusivity in the multilayer-formation regime but has little effect on the properties within film-formation and pore-filling regimes. We also find that weakly attractive adsorbents, which do not display distinct multilayer formation, are hard-sphere-like at super- and subcritical temperatures. In this case, the self-diffusivity of the confined and bulk fluid has a nearly identical scaling-relationship with effective density.

  4. Lattice Boltzmann simulation of immiscible fluid displacement in porous media: Homogeneous versus heterogeneous pore network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Haihu; Zhang, Yonghao; Valocchi, Albert J.

    2015-01-01

    Injection of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) into geological formations is a promising approach to reduce greenhouse gas emissions into the atmosphere. Predicting the amount of CO 2 that can be captured and its long-term storage stability in subsurface requires a fundamental understanding of multiphase displacement phenomena at the pore scale. In this paper, the lattice Boltzmann method is employed to simulate the immiscible displacement of a wetting fluid by a non-wetting one in two microfluidic flow cells, one with a homogeneous pore network and the other with a randomly heterogeneous pore network. We have identified three different displacement patterns, namely, stable displacement, capillary fingering, and viscous fingering, all of which are strongly dependent upon the capillary number (Ca), viscosity ratio (M), and the media heterogeneity. The non-wetting fluid saturation (S nw ) is found to increase nearly linearly with logCa for each constant M. Increasing M (viscosity ratio of non-wetting fluid to wetting fluid) or decreasing the media heterogeneity can enhance the stability of the displacement process, resulting in an increase in S nw . In either pore networks, the specific interfacial length is linearly proportional to S nw during drainage with equal proportionality constant for all cases excluding those revealing considerable viscous fingering. Our numerical results confirm the previous experimental finding that the steady state specific interfacial length exhibits a linear dependence on S nw for either favorable (M ≥ 1) or unfavorable (M < 1) displacement, and the slope is slightly higher for the unfavorable displacement

  5. Pore Fluid Effects on Shear Modulus for Sandstones with Soft Anisotropy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berryman, J G

    2004-01-01

    A general analysis of poroelasticity for vertical transverse isotropy (VTI) shows that four eigenvectors are pure shear modes with no coupling to the pore-fluidmechanics. The remaining two eigenvectors are linear combinations of pure compression and uniaxial shear, both of which are coupled to the fluid mechanics. After reducing the problem to a 2x2 system, the analysis shows in a relatively elementary fashion how a poroelastic system with isotropic solid elastic frame, but with anisotropy introduced through the poroelastic coefficients, interacts with the mechanics of the pore fluid and produces shear dependence on fluid properties in the overall mechanical system. The analysis shows, for example, that this effect is always present (though sometimes small in magnitude) in the systems studied, and can be quite large (up to a definite maximum increase of 20 per cent) in some rocks--including Spirit River sandstone and Schuler-Cotton Valley sandstone

  6. Biot Critical Frequency Applied as Common Friction Factor for Chalk with Different Pore Fluids and Temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, Katrine Alling; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2010-01-01

    Injection of water into chalk hydrocarbon reservoirs has lead to mechanical yield and failure. Laboratory experiments on chalk samples correspondingly show that the mechanical properties of porous chalk depend on pore fluid and temperature. Water has a significant softening effect on elastic...... and we propose that the fluid effect on mechanical properties of highly porous chalk may be the result of liquid‐solid friction. Applying a different strain or stress rate is influencing the rock strength and needs to be included. The resulting function is shown to relate to the material dependent...... and rate independent b-factor used when describing the time dependent mechanical properties of soft rock or soils. As a consequence it is then possible to further characterize the material constant from the porosity and permeability of the rock as well as from pore fluid density and viscosity which...

  7. Pore Structure Model for Predicting Elastic Wavespeeds in Fluid-Saturated Sandstones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, R. W.; David, E. C.

    2011-12-01

    During hydrostatic compression, in the elastic regime, ultrasonic P and S wave velocities measured on rock cores generally increase with pressure, and reach asymptotic values at high pressures. The pressure dependence of seismic velocities is generally thought to be due to the closure of compliant cracks, in which case the high-pressure velocities must reflect only the influence of the non-closable, equant "pores". Assuming that pores can be represented by spheroids, we can relate the elastic properties to the pore structure using an effective medium theory. Moreover, the closure pressure of a thin crack-like pore is directly proportional to its aspect ratio. Hence, our first aim is to use the pressure dependence of seismic velocities to invert the aspect ratio distribution. We use a simple analytical algorithm developed by Zimmerman (Compressibility of Sandstones, 1991), which can be used for any effective medium theory. Previous works have used overly restrictive assumptions, such as assuming that the stiff pores are spherical, or that the interactions between pores can be neglected. Here, we assume that the rock contains an exponential distribution of crack aspect ratios, and one family of stiff pores having an aspect ratio lying somewhere between 0.01 and 1. We develop our model in two versions, using the Differential Scheme, and the Mori-Tanaka scheme. The inversion is done using data obtained in dry experiments, since pore fluids have a strong effect on velocities and tend to mask the effect of the pore geometry. This avoids complicated joint inversion of dry and wet data, such as done by Cheng and Toksoz (JGR, 1979). Our results show that for many sets of data on sandstones, we can fit very well the dry velocities. Our second aim is to predict the saturated velocities from our pore structure model, noting that at a given differential stress, the pore structure should be the same as for a dry test. Our results show that the Biot-Gassmann predictions always

  8. The effect of the pore-fluid factor on strength and failure mechanism of Wilkeson sandstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kätker, A. K.; Rempe, M.; Renner, J.

    2016-12-01

    The effective stress law, σn,eff = σn - αpf, is a central tool in analysing phenomena related to hydromechanical coupling, such as fluid-induced seismicity or aftershock activity. The effective-stress coefficient α assumes different values for specific physical properties and may deviate from 1. The limited number of studies suggest that brittle compressive strength obeys an effective-stress law when effective drainage is achieved. Yet, open questions remain regarding, e.g., the role of the loading path. We performed suites of triaxial compression tests on samples of Wilkeson sandstone at a range of pore-fluid pressures but identical effective confining pressure (60, 100, and 120 MPa) maintaining the pore-fluid factor λ = pf / pc constant (0.05, 0.2, 0.4, 0.55) during the isostatic loading stage to ensure uniform loading paths. Samples were shortened with a strain rate of 4×10-7 s-1 yielding drained conditions. All tests were terminated at a total axial strain of 4.5% for comparability of microstructures. The tests also included continuous permeability determination and ultrasonic p-wave-velocity measurements to monitor microstructural evolution. Results from experiments conducted at peff = 100 MPa show that dry samples exhibit a higher peak strength and brittle failure while water-saturated samples tend to deform at lower stress by cataclastic flow indicating physico-chemical weakening. Regardless of pore-fluid factor, the saturated experiments exhibit similar peak and residual strength. Differences in failure mechanism (degree of macroscopic localization) and volumetric strain evolution are however noticed, albeit without systematic relation to pore-fluid factor. Microstructure analyses by optical and scanning electron microscopy revealed an evolution from localized shear zones in dry experiments and experiments with a low pore-fluid factor to rather distributed cataclastic flow for experiments with high pore fluid factors. Yet, mechanical and structural

  9. An inverse-source problem for maximization of pore-fluid oscillation within poroelastic formations

    KAUST Repository

    Jeong, C.; Kallivokas, L. F.

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses a mathematical and numerical modeling approach for identification of an unknown optimal loading time signal of a wave source, atop the ground surface, that can maximize the relative wave motion of a single-phase pore fluid within fluid-saturated porous permeable (poroelastic) rock formations, surrounded by non-permeable semi-infinite elastic solid rock formations, in a one-dimensional setting. The motivation stems from a set of field observations, following seismic events and vibrational tests, suggesting that shaking an oil reservoir is likely to improve oil production rates. This maximization problem is cast into an inverse-source problem, seeking an optimal loading signal that minimizes an objective functional – the reciprocal of kinetic energy in terms of relative pore-fluid wave motion within target poroelastic layers. We use the finite element method to obtain the solution of the governing wave physics of a multi-layered system, where the wave equations for the target poroelastic layers and the elastic wave equation for the surrounding non-permeable layers are coupled with each other. We use a partial-differential-equation-constrained-optimization framework (a state-adjoint-control problem approach) to tackle the minimization problem. The numerical results show that the numerical optimizer recovers optimal loading signals, whose dominant frequencies correspond to amplification frequencies, which can also be obtained by a frequency sweep, leading to larger amplitudes of relative pore-fluid wave motion within the target hydrocarbon formation than other signals.

  10. An inverse-source problem for maximization of pore-fluid oscillation within poroelastic formations

    KAUST Repository

    Jeong, C.

    2016-07-04

    This paper discusses a mathematical and numerical modeling approach for identification of an unknown optimal loading time signal of a wave source, atop the ground surface, that can maximize the relative wave motion of a single-phase pore fluid within fluid-saturated porous permeable (poroelastic) rock formations, surrounded by non-permeable semi-infinite elastic solid rock formations, in a one-dimensional setting. The motivation stems from a set of field observations, following seismic events and vibrational tests, suggesting that shaking an oil reservoir is likely to improve oil production rates. This maximization problem is cast into an inverse-source problem, seeking an optimal loading signal that minimizes an objective functional – the reciprocal of kinetic energy in terms of relative pore-fluid wave motion within target poroelastic layers. We use the finite element method to obtain the solution of the governing wave physics of a multi-layered system, where the wave equations for the target poroelastic layers and the elastic wave equation for the surrounding non-permeable layers are coupled with each other. We use a partial-differential-equation-constrained-optimization framework (a state-adjoint-control problem approach) to tackle the minimization problem. The numerical results show that the numerical optimizer recovers optimal loading signals, whose dominant frequencies correspond to amplification frequencies, which can also be obtained by a frequency sweep, leading to larger amplitudes of relative pore-fluid wave motion within the target hydrocarbon formation than other signals.

  11. Separating attoliter-sized compartments using fluid pore-spanning lipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzara, Thomas D; Carnarius, Christian; Kocun, Marta; Janshoff, Andreas; Steinem, Claudia

    2011-09-27

    Anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) is a porous material having aligned cylindrical compartments with 55-60 nm diameter pores, and being several micrometers deep. A protocol was developed to generate pore-spanning fluid lipid bilayers separating the attoliter-sized compartments of the nanoporous material from the bulk solution, while preserving the optical transparency of the AAO. The AAO was selectively functionalized by silane chemistry to spread giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) resulting in large continuous membrane patches covering the pores. Formation of fluid single lipid bilayers through GUV rupture could be readily observed by fluorescence microscopy and further supported by conservation of membrane surface area, before and after GUV rupture. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching gave low immobile fractions (5-15%) and lipid diffusion coefficients similar to those found for bilayers on silica. The entrapment of molecules within the porous underlying cylindrical compartments, as well as the exclusion of macromolecules from the nanopores, demonstrate the barrier function of the pore-spanning membranes and could be investigated in three-dimensions using confocal laser scanning fluorescence imaging. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  12. Lattice Boltzmann simulation of immiscible fluid displacement in porous media: Homogeneous versus heterogeneous pore network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Haihu, E-mail: haihu.liu@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [School of Energy and Power Engineering, Xi’an Jiaotong University, 28 West Xianning Road, Xi’an 710049 (China); James Weir Fluids Laboratory, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G1 1XJ (United Kingdom); Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Zhang, Yonghao [James Weir Fluids Laboratory, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G1 1XJ (United Kingdom); Valocchi, Albert J. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    Injection of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) into geological formations is a promising approach to reduce greenhouse gas emissions into the atmosphere. Predicting the amount of CO{sub 2} that can be captured and its long-term storage stability in subsurface requires a fundamental understanding of multiphase displacement phenomena at the pore scale. In this paper, the lattice Boltzmann method is employed to simulate the immiscible displacement of a wetting fluid by a non-wetting one in two microfluidic flow cells, one with a homogeneous pore network and the other with a randomly heterogeneous pore network. We have identified three different displacement patterns, namely, stable displacement, capillary fingering, and viscous fingering, all of which are strongly dependent upon the capillary number (Ca), viscosity ratio (M), and the media heterogeneity. The non-wetting fluid saturation (S{sub nw}) is found to increase nearly linearly with logCa for each constant M. Increasing M (viscosity ratio of non-wetting fluid to wetting fluid) or decreasing the media heterogeneity can enhance the stability of the displacement process, resulting in an increase in S{sub nw}. In either pore networks, the specific interfacial length is linearly proportional to S{sub nw} during drainage with equal proportionality constant for all cases excluding those revealing considerable viscous fingering. Our numerical results confirm the previous experimental finding that the steady state specific interfacial length exhibits a linear dependence on S{sub nw} for either favorable (M ≥ 1) or unfavorable (M < 1) displacement, and the slope is slightly higher for the unfavorable displacement.

  13. Fast intraslab fluid-flow events linked to pulses of high pore fluid pressure at the subducted plate interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taetz, Stephan; John, Timm; Bröcker, Michael; Spandler, Carl; Stracke, Andreas

    2018-01-01

    A better understanding of the subduction zone fluid cycle and its chemical-mechanical feedback requires in-depth knowledge about how fluids flow within and out of descending slabs. Relicts of fluid-flow systems in exhumed rocks of fossil subduction zones allow for identification of the general relationships between dehydration reactions, fluid pathway formation, the dimensions and timescales of distinct fluid flow events; all of which are required for quantitative models for fluid-induced subduction zone processes. Two types of garnet-quartz-phengite veins can be distinguished in an eclogite-facies mélange block from the Pouébo Eclogite Mélange, New Caledonia. These veins record synmetamorphic internal fluid release by mineral breakdown reactions (type I veins), and infiltration of an external fluid (type II veins) with the associated formation of a reaction selvage. The dehydration and fluid migration documented by the type I veins likely occurred on a timescale of 105-106 years, based on average subduction rates and metamorphic conditions required for mineral dehydration and fluid flow. The timeframe of fluid-rock interaction between the external fluid and the wall-rock of the type II veins is quantified using a continuous bulk-rock Li-diffusion profile perpendicular to a vein and its metasomatic selvage. Differences in Li concentration between the internal and external fluid reservoirs resulted in a distinct diffusion profile (decreasing Li concentration and increasing δ7 Li) as the reaction front propagated into the host rock. Li-chronometric constraints indicate that the timescales of fluid-rock interaction associated with type II vein formation are on the order of 1 to 4 months (0.150-0.08+0.14 years). The short-lived, pulse-like character of this process is consistent with the notion that fluid flow caused by oceanic crust dehydration at the blueschist-to-eclogite transition contributes to or even dominates episodic pore fluid pressure increases at the

  14. Adsorption of fluids in slitlike pores containing a small amount of mobile ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borówko, M; Bucior, K; Sokołowski, S; Staszewski, T

    2005-11-01

    We apply density functional theory to investigate changes in the phase behavior of a fluid caused by the presence of mobile ions inside the pore. The approach has been based on the fundamental measure density functional theory and on the theory of nonuniform electrolytes developed recently by O. Pizio, A. Patrykiejew, S. Sokołowski [J. Chem. Phys. 121 (2005) 11,957]. We have evaluated capillary condensation phase diagrams for pores of different widths and for different concentrations of confined ions. The calculations have demonstrated that the presence of ions leads to lowering the critical temperature and to an increase of the value of the chemical potential at the capillary condensation point.

  15. Pore scale simulations for the extension of the Darcy-Forchheimer law to shear thinning fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosco, Tiziana; Marchisio, Daniele; Lince, Federica; Boccardo, Gianluca; Sethi, Rajandrea

    2014-05-01

    Flow of non-Newtonian fluids through porous media at high Reynolds numbers is often encountered in chemical, pharmaceutical and food as well as petroleum and groundwater engineering and in many other industrial applications (1 - 2). In particular, the use of shear thinning polymeric solutions has been recently proposed to improve colloidal stability of micro- and nanoscale zerovalent iron particles (MZVI and NZVI) for groundwater remediation. In all abovementioned applications, it is of paramount importance to correctly predict the pressure drop resulting from non-Newtonian fluid flow through the porous medium. For small Reynolds numbers, usually up to 1, typical of laboratory column tests, the extended Darcy law is known to be applicable also to non Newtonian fluids, provided that all non-Newtonian effects are lumped together into a proper viscosity parameter (1,3). For higher Reynolds numbers (eg. close to the injection wells) non linearities between pressure drop and flow rate arise, and the Darcy-Forchheimer law holds for Newtonian fluids, while for non-Newtonian fluids, it has been demonstrated that, at least for simple rheological models (eg. power law fluids) a generalized Forchheimer law can be applied, even if the determination of the flow parameters (permeability K, inertial coefficient β, and equivalent viscosity) is not straightforward. This work (co-funded by European Union project AQUAREHAB FP7 - Grant Agreement Nr. 226565) aims at proposing an extended formulation of the Darcy-Forchheimer law also for shear-thinning fluids, and validating it against results of pore-scale simulations via computational fluid dynamics (4). Flow simulations were performed using Fluent 12.0 on four different 2D porous domains for Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids (Cross, Ellis and Carreau models). The micro-scale flow simulation results are analyzed in terms of 'macroscale' pressure drop between inlet and outlet of the model domain as a function of flow rate. The

  16. Diagenesis in tephra-rich sediments from the Lesser Antilles Volcanic Arc: Pore fluid constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Natalie A.; McManus, James; Palmer, Martin R.; Haley, Brian; Manners, Hayley

    2018-05-01

    We present sediment pore fluid and sediment solid phase results obtained during IODP Expedition 340 from seven sites located within the Grenada Basin of the southern Lesser Antilles Volcanic Arc region. These sites are generally characterized as being low in organic carbon content and rich in calcium carbonate and volcanogenic material. In addition to the typical reactions related to organic matter diagenesis, pore fluid chemistry indicates that the diagenetic reactions fall within two broad categories; (1) reactions related to chemical exchange with volcanogenic material and (2) reactions related to carbonate dissolution, precipitation, or recrystallization. For locations dominated by reaction with volcanogenic material, these sites exhibit increases in dissolved Ca with coeval decreases in Mg. We interpret this behavior as being driven by sediment-water exchange reactions from the alteration of volcanic material that is dispersed throughout the sediment package, which likely result in formation of Mg-rich secondary authigenic clays. In contrast to this behavior, sediment sequences that exhibit decreases in Ca, Mg, Mn, and Sr with depth suggest that carbonate precipitation is an active diagenetic process affecting solute distributions. The distributions of pore fluid 87Sr/86Sr reflect these competitive diagenetic reactions between volcanic material and carbonate, which are inferred by the major cation distributions. From one site where we have solid phase 87Sr/86Sr (site U1396), the carbonate fraction is found to be generally consistent with the contemporaneous seawater isotope values. However, the 87Sr/86Sr of the non-carbonate fraction ranges from 0.7074 to 0.7052, and these values likely represent a mixture of local arc volcanic sources and trans-Atlantic eolian sources. Even at this site where there is clear evidence for diagenesis of volcanogenic material, carbonate diagenesis appears to buffer pore fluid 87Sr/86Sr from the larger changes that might be

  17. Systematics of Alkali Metals in Pore Fluids from Serpentinite Mud Volcanoes: IODP Expedition 366

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheat, C. G.; Ryan, J.; Menzies, C. D.; Price, R. E.; Sissmann, O.

    2017-12-01

    IODP Expedition 366 focused, in part, on the study of geo­chemical cycling, matrix alteration, material and fluid transport, and deep biosphere processes within the subduction channel in the Mariana forearc. This was accomplished through integrated sampling of summit and flank regions of three active serpentinite mud volcanoes (Yinazao (Blue Moon), Asùt Tesoro (Big Blue), and Fantangisña (Celestial) Seamounts). These edifices present a transect of depths to the Pacific Plate, allowing one to characterize thermal, pressure and compositional effects on processes that are associated with the formation of serpentinite mud volcanoes and continued activity below and within them. Previous coring on ODP Legs 125 and 195 at two other serpentinite mud volcanoes (Conical and South Chamorro Seamounts) and piston, gravity, and push cores from several other Mariana serpentinite mud volcanoes add to this transect of sites where deep-sourced material is discharged at the seafloor. Pore waters (149 samples) were squeezed from serpentinite materials to determine the composition of deep-sourced fluid and to assess the character, extent, and effect of diagenetic reactions and mixing with seawater on the flanks of the seamounts as the serpentinite matrix weathers. In addition two Water Sampler Temperature Tool (WSTP) fluid samples were collected within two of the cased boreholes, each with at least 30 m of screened casing that allows formations fluids to discharge into the borehole. Shipboard results for Na and K record marked seamount-to-seamount differences in upwelling summit fluids, and complex systematics in fluids obtained from flank sites. Here we report new shore-based Rb and Cs measurements, two elements that have been used to constrain the temperature of the deep-sourced fluid. Data are consistent with earlier coring and drilling expeditions, resulting in systematic changes with depth (and by inference temperature) to the subduction channel.

  18. Effect of pore size of three-dimensionally ordered macroporous chitosan-silica matrix on solubility, drug release, and oral bioavailability of loaded-nimodipine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yikun; Xie, Yuling; Sun, Hongrui; Zhao, Qinfu; Zheng, Xin; Wang, Siling; Jiang, Tongying

    2016-01-01

    To explore the effect of the pore size of three-dimensionally ordered macroporous chitosan-silica (3D-CS) matrix on the solubility, drug release, and oral bioavailability of the loaded drug. 3D-CS matrices with pore sizes of 180 nm, 470 nm, and 930 nm were prepared. Nimodipine (NMDP) was used as the drug model. The morphology, specific surface area, and chitosan mass ratio of the 3D-CS matrices were characterized before the effect of the pore size on drug crystallinity, solubility, release, and in vivo pharmacokinetics were investigated. With the pore size of 3D-CS matrix decreasing, the drug crystallinity decreased and the aqueous solubility increased. The drug release was synthetically controlled by the pore size and chitosan content of 3D-CS matrix in a pH 6.8 medium, while in a pH 1.2 medium the erosion of the 3D-CS matrix played an important role in the decreased drug release rate. The area under the curve of the drug-loaded 3D-CS matrices with pore sizes of 930 nm, 470 nm, and 180 nm was 7.46-fold, 5.85-fold, and 3.75-fold larger than that of raw NMDP respectively. Our findings suggest that the oral bioavailability decreased with a decrease in the pore size of the matrix.

  19. A thermodynamically consistent model for granular-fluid mixtures considering pore pressure evolution and hypoplastic behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Julian; Wang, Yongqi

    2016-11-01

    A new mixture model for granular-fluid flows, which is thermodynamically consistent with the entropy principle, is presented. The extra pore pressure described by a pressure diffusion equation and the hypoplastic material behavior obeying a transport equation are taken into account. The model is applied to granular-fluid flows, using a closing assumption in conjunction with the dynamic fluid pressure to describe the pressure-like residual unknowns, hereby overcoming previous uncertainties in the modeling process. Besides the thermodynamically consistent modeling, numerical simulations are carried out and demonstrate physically reasonable results, including simple shear flow in order to investigate the vertical distribution of the physical quantities, and a mixture flow down an inclined plane by means of the depth-integrated model. Results presented give insight in the ability of the deduced model to capture the key characteristics of granular-fluid flows. We acknowledge the support of the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) for this work within the Project Number WA 2610/3-1.

  20. Dynamics of snap-off and pore-filling events during two-phase fluid flow in permeable media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Kamaljit; Menke, Hannah; Andrew, Matthew; Lin, Qingyang; Rau, Christoph; Blunt, Martin J; Bijeljic, Branko

    2017-07-12

    Understanding the pore-scale dynamics of two-phase fluid flow in permeable media is important in many processes such as water infiltration in soils, oil recovery, and geo-sequestration of CO 2 . The two most important processes that compete during the displacement of a non-wetting fluid by a wetting fluid are pore-filling or piston-like displacement and snap-off; this latter process can lead to trapping of the non-wetting phase. We present a three-dimensional dynamic visualization study using fast synchrotron X-ray micro-tomography to provide new insights into these processes by conducting a time-resolved pore-by-pore analysis of the local curvature and capillary pressure. We show that the time-scales of interface movement and brine layer swelling leading to snap-off are several minutes, orders of magnitude slower than observed for Haines jumps in drainage. The local capillary pressure increases rapidly after snap-off as the trapped phase finds a position that is a new local energy minimum. However, the pressure change is less dramatic than that observed during drainage. We also show that the brine-oil interface jumps from pore-to-pore during imbibition at an approximately constant local capillary pressure, with an event size of the order of an average pore size, again much smaller than the large bursts seen during drainage.

  1. The use of paleo-thermo-barometers and coupled thermal, fluid flow and pore fluid pressure modelling for hydrocarbon and reservoir prediction in fold and thrust belts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roure, F.; Andriessen, P.A.M.; Callot, J.P.; Ferket, H.; Gonzales, E.; Guilhaumou, N.; Hardebol, N.J.; Lacombe, O.; Malandain, J.; Mougin, P.; Muska, K.; Ortuno, S.; Sassi, W.; Swennen, R.; Vilasi, N.

    2010-01-01

    Basin modelling tools are now more efficient to reconstruct palinspastic structural cross sections and compute the history of temperature, pore-fluid pressure and fluid flow circulations in complex structural settings. In many cases and especially in areas where limited erosion occurred, the use of

  2. Post-processing of polymer foam tissue scaffolds with high power ultrasound: A route to increased pore interconnectivity, pore size and fluid transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, N.J.; Johal, R.K.; Glover, Z.; Reinwald, Y.; White, L.J.; Ghaemmaghami, A.M.; Morgan, S.P.; Rose, F.R.A.J.; Povey, M.J.W.; Parker, N.G.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this work is to demonstrate that the structural and fluidic properties of polymer foam tissue scaffolds, post-fabrication but prior to the introduction of cells, can be engineered via exposure to high power ultrasound. Our analysis is supported by measurements of fluid uptake during insonification and imaging of the scaffold microstructure via X-ray computed tomography, scanning electron microscopy and acoustic microscopy. The ultrasonic treatment is performed with a frequency of 30 kHz, average intensities up to 80,000 Wm −2 and exposure times up to 20 h. The treatment is found to increase the mean pore size by over 10%. More striking is the improvement in fluid uptake: for scaffolds with only 40% water uptake via standard immersion techniques, we can routinely achieve full saturation of the scaffold over approximately one hour of exposure. These desirable modifications occur with negligible loss of scaffold integrity and mass, and are optimized when the ultrasound treatment is coupled to a pre-wetting stage with ethanol. Our findings suggest that high power ultrasound is highly targeted towards flow obstructions in the scaffold architecture, thereby providing an efficient means to promote pore interconnectivity and fluid transport in thick foam tissue scaffolds. - Highlights: • We expose thick PLA foam tissue scaffolds to high power ultrasound. • This treatment both accelerates and enhances the uptake of fluid into the scaffold. • It leads to significant increases in the mean pore size, pore interconnectivity and porosity. • The ultrasonic treatment is most effective when the scaffold is pre-wet with ethanol. • We demonstrate the use of acoustic microscopy to characterize the scaffold microstructure

  3. Pore-fluid effects on seismic waves in vertically fractured earth with orthotropic symmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berryman, J.G.

    2010-05-15

    For elastically noninteracting vertical-fracture sets at arbitrary orientation angles to each other, a detailed model is presented in which the resulting anisotropic fractured medium generally has orthorhombic symmetry overall. Some of the analysis methods and ideas of Schoenberg are emphasized, together with their connections to other similarly motivated and conceptually related methods by Sayers and Kachanov, among others. Examples show how parallel vertical-fracture sets having HTI (horizontal transversely isotropic) symmetry transform into orthotropic fractured media if some subsets of the vertical fractures are misaligned with the others, and then the fractured system can have VTI (vertical transversely isotropic) symmetry if all of the fractures are aligned randomly or half parallel and half perpendicular to a given vertical plane. An orthotropic example having vertical fractures in an otherwise VTI earth system (studied previously by Schoenberg and Helbig) is compared with the other examples treated and it is finally shown how fluids in the fractures affect the orthotropic poroelastic system response to seismic waves. The key result is that fracture-influence parameters are multiplied by a factor of (1-B), where 0 {le} B < 1 is Skempton's second coefficient for poroelastic media. Skempton's B coefficient is itself a measurable characteristic of fluid-saturated porous rocks, depending on porosity, solid moduli, and the pore-fluid bulk modulus. For heterogeneous porous media, connections between the present work and earlier related results of Brown and Korringa are also established.

  4. Small fractures in deep sea sediments: indicators of pore fluid migration along compaction faults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckley, D.E.

    1989-01-01

    A long piston core taken from the Southern Nares Abyssal Plain, intersected four fractures in plastic sediments between 17 and 25 m below the sea floor. Faults have been identified from seismic reflection surveys of sediments in this area. The sampled fractures all occurred in oxidized brown clays. Each fracture consisted of a simple plane having apparent dips ranging from 52-63 0 . One fracture had a well developed pale brown alteration halo extending out to 1.5 cm along this plane. Two fractures had no apparent alteration halo, but one fracture appeared to have fine-scale anastomosing features surrounding the main slip plane. Selective chemical tests for labile metal content in sediments surrounding the fractures revealed that about 70% of the reducible manganese, and 40% of the reducible iron had been leached from the sediments in the alteration halo surrounding the fracture plane. These results suggest that reducing pore fluids had migrated along the fracture plane to cause the observed effects. Implications of this study are that compaction faults may act as episodic conduits for vertical advection of pore water during dewatering of unconsolidated sediments. This may be a significant factor to be considered in assessing the effectiveness of deep sea sediment barriers for radioactive waste disposal. (author)

  5. Pore-Scale Investigation on Stress-Dependent Characteristics of Granular Packs and Their Impact on Multiphase Fluid Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrealba, V.; Karpyn, Z.; Yoon, H.; Hart, D. B.; Klise, K. A.

    2013-12-01

    The pore-scale dynamics that govern multiphase flow under variable stress conditions are not well understood. This lack of fundamental understanding limits our ability to quantitatively predict multiphase flow and fluid distributions in natural geologic systems. In this research, we focus on pore-scale, single and multiphase flow properties that impact displacement mechanisms and residual trapping of non-wetting phase under varying stress conditions. X-ray micro-tomography is used to image pore structures and distribution of wetting and non-wetting fluids in water-wet synthetic granular packs, under dynamic load. Micro-tomography images are also used to determine structural features such as medial axis, surface area, and pore body and throat distribution; while the corresponding transport properties are determined from Lattice-Boltzmann simulations performed on lattice replicas of the imaged specimens. Results are used to investigate how inter-granular deformation mechanisms affect fluid displacement and residual trapping at the pore-scale. This will improve our understanding of the dynamic interaction of mechanical deformation and fluid flow during enhanced oil recovery and geologic CO2 sequestration. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  6. Exploitation of 3D face-centered cubic mesoporous silica as a carrier for a poorly water soluble drug: influence of pore size on release rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wenquan; Wan, Long; Zhang, Chen; Gao, Yikun; Zheng, Xin; Jiang, Tongying; Wang, Siling

    2014-01-01

    The purposes of the present work were to explore the potential application of 3D face-centered cubic mesoporous silica (FMS) with pore size of 16.0nm as a delivery system for poorly soluble drugs and investigate the effect of pore size on the dissolution rate. FMS with different pore sizes (16.0, 6.9 and 3.7nm) was successfully synthesized by using Pluronic block co-polymer F127 as a template and adjusting the reaction temperatures. Celecoxib (CEL), which is a BCS class II drug, was used as a model drug and loaded into FMS with different pore sizes by the solvent deposition method at a drug-silica ratio of 1:4. Characterization using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), nitrogen adsorption, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) was used to systematically investigate the drug loading process. The results obtained showed that CEL was in a non-crystalline state after incorporation of CEL into the pores of FMS-15 with pore size of 16.0nm. In vitro dissolution was carried out to demonstrate the effects of FMS with different pore sizes on the release of CEL. The results obtained indicated that the dissolution rate of CEL from FMS-15 was significantly enhanced compared with pure CEL. This could be explained by supposing that CEL encountered less diffusion resistance and its crystallinity decreased due to the large pore size of 16.0nm and the nanopore channels of FMS-15. Moreover, drug loading and pore size both play an important role in enhancing the dissolution properties for the poorly water-soluble drugs. As the pore size between 3.7 and 16.0nm increased, the dissolution rate of CEL from FMS gradually increased. © 2013.

  7. Biot Critical Frequency Applied to Description of Failure and Yield of Highly Porous Chalk with Different Pore Fluids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, Katrine Alling; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2010-01-01

    Injection of water into chalk hydrocarbon reservoirs has led to mechanical yield and failure. Laboratory experiments on chalk samples correspondingly show that the mechanical properties of porous chalk depend on pore fluid and temperature. In case of water-saturated samples, the concentration...... is controlled by solid-fluid friction. The reference frequency is thus a measure of this friction, and we propose that the fluid effect on mechanical properties of chalk may be the result of liquid-solid friction. We reviewed 622 published experiments on mechanical properties of porous chalk. The data include...... chalk samples that were tested at temperatures from 20 °C to 130 °C with the following pore fluids: fresh water, synthetic seawater, glycol, and oil of varying viscosity. The critical frequency is calculated for each experiment. For each specimen, we calculate the thickness to the slipping plane outside...

  8. Research on the porous flow of the mechanism of viscous-elastic fluids displacing residual oil droplets in micro pores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Guanyu

    2018-03-01

    In order to analyze the microscopic stress field acting on residual oil droplets in micro pores, calculate its deformation, and explore the hydrodynamic mechanism of viscous-elastic fluids displacing oil droplets, the viscous-elastic fluid flow equations in micro pores are established by choosing the Upper Convected Maxwell constitutive equation; the numerical solutions of the flow field are obtained by volume control and Alternate Direction Implicit methods. From the above, the velocity field and microscopic stress field; the forces acting on residual oil droplets; the deformations of residual oil droplets by various viscous-elastic displacing fluids and at various Wiesenberg numbers are calculated and analyzed. The result demonstrated that both the normal stress and horizontal force acting on the residual oil droplets by viscous-elastic fluids are much larger compared to that of inelastic fluid; the distribution of normal stress changes abruptly; under the condition of the same pressure gradient in the system under investigation, the ratio of the horizontal forces acting on the residual oil droplets by different displacing fluids is about 1:8:20, which means that under the above conditions, the driving force on a oil droplet is 20 times higher for a viscous-elastic fluid compared to that of a Newtonian Fluid. The conclusions are supportive of the mechanism that viscous-elastic driving fluids can increase the Displacement Efficiency. This should be of help in designing new chemicals and selecting Enhanced Oil Recovery systems.

  9. Interaction between Proppant Packing, Reservoir Depletion, and Fluid Flow in Pore Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, M.; McClure, J. E.; Han, Y.; Chen, C.

    2016-12-01

    In the oil and gas industry, the performance of proppant pack in hydraulically created fractures has a significant influence on fracture conductivity. A better understanding of proppant transport and deposition pattern in a hydraulic fracture is vital for effective and economical production within oil and gas reservoirs. In this research, a numerical modeling approach, combining Particle Flow Code (PFC) and GPU-enhanced lattice Boltzmann simulator (GELBS), is adopted to advance the understanding of the interaction between proppant particle packing, depletion of reservoir formation, and transport of reservoir flow through the pore space. In this numerical work flow, PFC is used to simulate effective stress increase and proppant particle movement and rearrangement under increasing mechanical loading. The pore structure of the proppant pack evolves subsequently and the geometrical data are output for lattice Boltzmann (LB) simulation of proppant pack permeability. Three different proppant packs with fixed particle concentration and 12/18, 16/30, and 20/40 mesh sizes are generated. These proppant packs are compressed with specified loading stress and their subsequent geometries are used for fluid flow simulations. The simulation results are in good agreement with experimental observations, e.g., the conductivity of proppant packs decreases with increasing effective stress. Three proppant packs with the same average diameter were generated using different coefficients of variation (COVs) for the proppant diameter (namely cov5%, cov20%, and cov30%). By using the coupled PFC-LBM work flow, the proppant pack permeability as functions of effective stress and porosity is investigated. The results show that the proppant pack with a higher proppant diameter COV has lower permeability and porosity under the same effective stress, because smaller particles fill in the pore space between bigger particles. The relationship between porosity and permeability is also consistent with

  10. Exploitation of 3D face-centered cubic mesoporous silica as a carrier for a poorly water soluble drug: Influence of pore size on release rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Wenquan; Wan, Long; Zhang, Chen; Gao, Yikun; Zheng, Xin; Jiang, Tongying; Wang, Siling, E-mail: silingwang@syphu.edu.cn

    2014-01-01

    The purposes of the present work were to explore the potential application of 3D face-centered cubic mesoporous silica (FMS) with pore size of 16.0 nm as a delivery system for poorly soluble drugs and investigate the effect of pore size on the dissolution rate. FMS with different pore sizes (16.0, 6.9 and 3.7 nm) was successfully synthesized by using Pluronic block co-polymer F127 as a template and adjusting the reaction temperatures. Celecoxib (CEL), which is a BCS class II drug, was used as a model drug and loaded into FMS with different pore sizes by the solvent deposition method at a drug–silica ratio of 1:4. Characterization using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), nitrogen adsorption, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) was used to systematically investigate the drug loading process. The results obtained showed that CEL was in a non-crystalline state after incorporation of CEL into the pores of FMS-15 with pore size of 16.0 nm. In vitro dissolution was carried out to demonstrate the effects of FMS with different pore sizes on the release of CEL. The results obtained indicated that the dissolution rate of CEL from FMS-15 was significantly enhanced compared with pure CEL. This could be explained by supposing that CEL encountered less diffusion resistance and its crystallinity decreased due to the large pore size of 16.0 nm and the nanopore channels of FMS-15. Moreover, drug loading and pore size both play an important role in enhancing the dissolution properties for the poorly water-soluble drugs. As the pore size between 3.7 and 16.0 nm increased, the dissolution rate of CEL from FMS gradually increased. - Highlights: • Exploitation of 3D cubic mesoporous silica (16 nm) as a carrier was completed. • The release rate of CEL increased on increasing the pore size of carriers. • The crystallinity

  11. Pore-scale simulation of fluid flow and solute dispersion in three-dimensional porous media

    KAUST Repository

    Icardi, Matteo

    2014-07-31

    In the present work fluid flow and solute transport through porous media are described by solving the governing equations at the pore scale with finite-volume discretization. Instead of solving the simplified Stokes equation (very often employed in this context) the full Navier-Stokes equation is used here. The realistic three-dimensional porous medium is created in this work by packing together, with standard ballistic physics, irregular and polydisperse objects. Emphasis is placed on numerical issues related to mesh generation and spatial discretization, which play an important role in determining the final accuracy of the finite-volume scheme and are often overlooked. The simulations performed are then analyzed in terms of velocity distributions and dispersion rates in a wider range of operating conditions, when compared with other works carried out by solving the Stokes equation. Results show that dispersion within the analyzed porous medium is adequately described by classical power laws obtained by analytic homogenization. Eventually the validity of Fickian diffusion to treat dispersion in porous media is also assessed. © 2014 American Physical Society.

  12. Helium measurements of pore fluids obtained from the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD, USA) drill cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, S.; Stute, M.; Torgersen, T.; Winckler, G.; Kennedy, B. M.

    2011-02-01

    4He accumulated in fluids is a well established geochemical tracer used to study crustal fluid dynamics. Direct fluid samples are not always collectable; therefore, a method to extract rare gases from matrix fluids of whole rocks by diffusion has been adapted. Helium was measured on matrix fluids extracted from sandstones and mudstones recovered during the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) drilling in California, USA. Samples were typically collected as subcores or from drillcore fragments. Helium concentration and isotope ratios were measured 4-6 times on each sample, and indicate a bulk 4He diffusion coefficient of 3.5 ± 1.3 × 10-8 cm2 s-1 at 21°C, compared to previously published diffusion coefficients of 1.2 × 10-18 cm2 s-1 (21°C) to 3.0 × 10-15 cm2 s-1 (150°C) in the sands and clays. Correcting the diffusion coefficient of 4Hewater for matrix porosity (˜3%) and tortuosity (˜6-13) produces effective diffusion coefficients of 1 × 10-8 cm2 s-1 (21°C) and 1 × 10-7 (120°C), effectively isolating pore fluid 4He from the 4He contained in the rock matrix. Model calculations indicate that <6% of helium initially dissolved in pore fluids was lost during the sampling process. Complete and quantitative extraction of the pore fluids provide minimum in situ porosity values for sandstones 2.8 ± 0.4% (SD, n = 4) and mudstones 3.1 ± 0.8% (SD, n = 4).

  13. A Fluid Membrane-Based Soluble Ligand Display System for Live CellAssays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Jwa-Min; Nair, Pradeep N.; Neve, Richard M.; Gray, Joe W.; Groves, Jay T.

    2005-10-14

    Cell communication modulates numerous biological processes including proliferation, apoptosis, motility, invasion and differentiation. Correspondingly, there has been significant interest in the development of surface display strategies for the presentation of signaling molecules to living cells. This effort has primarily focused on naturally surface-bound ligands, such as extracellular matrix components and cell membranes. Soluble ligands (e.g. growth factors and cytokines) play an important role in intercellular communications, and their display in a surface-bound format would be of great utility in the design of array-based live cell assays. Recently, several cell microarray systems that display cDNA, RNAi, or small molecules in a surface array format were proven to be useful in accelerating high-throughput functional genetic studies and screening therapeutic agents. These surface display methods provide a flexible platform for the systematic, combinatorial investigation of genes and small molecules affecting cellular processes and phenotypes of interest. In an analogous sense, it would be an important advance if one could display soluble signaling ligands in a surface assay format that allows for systematic, patterned presentation of soluble ligands to live cells. Such a technique would make it possible to examine cellular phenotypes of interest in a parallel format with soluble signaling ligands as one of the display parameters. Herein we report a ligand-modified fluid supported lipid bilayer (SLB) assay system that can be used to functionally display soluble ligands to cells in situ (Figure 1A). By displaying soluble ligands on a SLB surface, both solution behavior (the ability to become locally enriched by reaction-diffusion processes) and solid behavior (the ability to control the spatial location of the ligands in an open system) could be combined. The method reported herein benefits from the naturally fluid state of the supported membrane, which allows

  14. Human Intestinal Fluid Layer Separation: The Effect On Colloidal Structures & Solubility Of Lipophilic Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danny, Riethorst; Amitava, Mitra; Filippos, Kesisoglou; Wei, Xu; Jan, Tack; Joachim, Brouwers; Patrick, Augustijns

    2018-05-23

    In addition to individual intestinal fluid components, colloidal structures are responsible for enhancing the solubility of lipophilic compounds. The present study investigated the link between as well as the variability in the ultrastructure of fed state human intestinal fluids (FeHIF) and their solubilizing capacity for lipophilic compounds. For this purpose, FeHIF samples from 10 healthy volunteers with known composition and ultrastructure were used to determine the solubility of four lipophilic compounds. In light of the focus on solubility and ultrastructure, the study carefully considered the methodology of solubility determination in relation to colloid composition and solubilizing capacity of FeHIF. To determine the solubilizing capacity of human and simulated intestinal fluids, the samples were saturated with the compound of interest, shaken for 24 h, and centrifuged. When using FeHIF, solubilities were determined in the micellar layer of FeHIF, i.e. after removing the upper (lipid) layer (standard procedure), as well as in 'full' FeHIF (without removal of the upper layer). Compound concentrations were determined using HPLC-UV/fluorescence. To link the solubilizing capacity with the ultrastructure, all human and simulated fluids were imaged using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) before and after centrifugation and top layer (lipid) removal. Comparing the ultrastructure and solubilizing capacity of individual FeHIF samples demonstrated a high intersubject variability in postprandial intestinal conditions. Imaging of FeHIF after removal of the upper layer clearly showed that only micellar structures remain in the lower layer. This observation suggests that larger colloids such as vesicles and lipid droplets are contained in the upper, lipid layer. The solubilizing capacity of most FeHIF samples substantially increased with inclusion of this lipid layer. The relative increase in solubilizing capacity upon inclusion of the lipid layer was most pronounced

  15. Influence of Pore-Fluid Pressure on Elastic Wave Velocity and Electrical Conductivity in Water-Saturated Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuchi, A.; Watanabe, T.

    2013-12-01

    Pore-fluid pressure in seismogenic zones can play a key role in the occurrence of earthquakes (e.g., Sibson, 2009). Its evaluation via geophysical observations can lead to a good understanding of seismic activities. The evaluation requires a thorough understanding of the influence of the pore-fluid pressure on geophysical observables like seismic velocity and electrical conductivity. We have studied the influence of pore-fluid pressure on elastic wave velocity and electrical conductivity in water-saturated rocks. Fine grained (100-500μm) biotite granite (Aji, Kagawa pref., Japan) was used as rock samples. The density is 2.658-2.668 g/cm3, and the porosity 0.68-0.87%. The sample is composed of 52.8% plagioclase, 36.0% Quartz, 3.0% K-feldspar, 8.2% biotite. SEM images show that a lot of grain boundaries are open. Few intracrystalline cracks were observed. Following the method proposed by David and Zimmerman (2012), the distribution function of crack aspect ratio was evaluated from the pressure dependence of compressional and shear wave velocities in a dry sample. Cylindrical sample has dimensions of 25 mm in diameter and 30 mm in length, and saturated with 0.01 mol/l KCl aqueous solution. Compressional and shear wave velocities were measured with the pulse transmission technique (PZT transducers, f=2 MHz), and electrical conductivity the two-electrode method (Ag-AgCl electrodes, f=1 Hz-100 kHz). Simultaneous measurements of velocities and conductivity were made using a 200 MPa hydrostatic pressure vessel, in which confining and pore-fluid pressures can be separately controlled. The pore-fluid is electrically insulated from the metal work of the pressure vessel by using a newly designed plastic device (Watanabe and Higuchi, 2013). The confining pressure was progressively increased up to 25 MPa, while the pore-fluid pressure was kept at 0.1 MPa. It took five days or longer for the electrical conductivity to become stationary after increasing the confining pressure

  16. Theory of vibratory mobilization and break-up of non-wetting fluids entrapped in pore constrictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beresnev, I.; Li, W.; Vigil, D.

    2006-12-01

    Quantitative dynamics of a non-wetting (e. g., NAPL) ganglion entrapped in a pore constriction and subjected to vibrations can be approximated by the equation of motion of an oscillator moving under the effect of the external pressure gradient, inertial oscillatory force, and restoring capillary force. The solution of the equation provides the conditions under which the droplet experiences forced oscillations without being mobilized or is liberated upon the acceleration of the wall exceeding an "unplugging" threshold. This solution provides a quantitative tool for the estimation of the parameters of vibratory fields needed to liberate entrapped non-wetting fluids. For typical pore sizes encountered in reservoirs and aquifers, wall accelerations must exceed at least several m/sec2 and even higher levels to mobilize the droplets of NAPL; however, in the populations of ganglia entrapped in natural porous environments, many may reside very near their mobilization thresholds and may be mobilized by extremely low accelerations as well. For given acceleration, lower seismic frequencies are more efficient. The ganglia may also break up into smaller pieces when passing through pore constrictions. The snap-off is governed by the geometry only; for constrictions with sinusoidal profile (spatial wavelength of L and maximum and minimum radii of rmax and rmin, the break-up occurs if L > 2π(rmin rmax)1/2. Computational fluid dynamics shows the details of the break-up process.

  17. Preparations and properties of anti-corrosion additives of water-soluble metal working fluids for aluminum alloy materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Shoji

    2008-01-01

    This short review describes various types of anti-corrosion additives of water-soluble metal working fluids for aluminum alloy materials. It is concerned with synthetic additives classified according to their functional groups; silicone compounds, carboxylic acids and dibasic acids, esters, Diels-Alder adducts, various polymers, nitrogen compounds, phosphoric esters, phosphonic acids, and others. Testing methods for water-soluble metal working fluids for aluminum alloy materials are described for a practical application in a laboratory.

  18. Levels of soluble delta-like ligand 1 in the serum and cerebrospinal fluid of tuberculous meningitis patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinghong Li; Jinyi Li; Yanjie Jia

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the levels of soluble delta-like ligand 1 in cerebrospinal fluid and serum of 50 patients with tuberculous meningitis, 30 patients with viral meningitis, 20 patients with purulent meningitis and 40 subjects without central nervous system disease were determined using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The mean levels of soluble delta-like ligand 1 in both cerebrospinal fluid and serum from patients with tuberculous meningitis were significantly higher compared with those from patients with viral meningitis or purulent meningitis or from subjects without central nervous system disease. Meanwhile, the level of soluble delta-like ligand 1 gradually decreased as tuberculous meningitis patients recovered. If patients deteriorated after treatment, the level of soluble delta-like ligand 1 in cerebrospinal fluid gradually increased. There was no correlation between the level of soluble delta-like ligand 1 and the protein level/cell number in cerebrospinal fluid. Our findings in-dicate that the levels of soluble delta-like ligand 1 in cerebrospinal fluid and serum are reliable markers for the diagnosis of tuberculous meningitis and for monitoring treatment progress. At the same time, this index is not influenced by protein levels or cell numbers in cerebrospinal fluid.

  19. Determination of fat- and water-soluble vitamins by supercritical fluid chromatography: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyśkiewicz, Katarzyna; Dębczak, Agnieszka; Gieysztor, Roman; Szymczak, Tomasz; Rój, Edward

    2018-01-01

    Vitamins are compounds that take part in all basic functions of an organism but also are subject of number of studies performed by different researchers. Two groups of vitamins are distinguished taking into consideration their solubility. Chromatography with supercritical CO 2 has found application in the determination, separation, and quantitative analyses of both fat- and water-soluble vitamins. The methods of vitamins separation have developed and improved throughout the years. Both groups of compounds were separated using supercritical fluid chromatography with different detection on different stationary phases. The main aim of this review is to provide an overview of the studies of vitamins separation that have been determined so far. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Composition of COH fluids at 1 GPa: an experimental study on speciation and solubility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiraboschi, Carla; Tumiati, Simone; Recchia, Sandro; Ulmer, Peter; Pettke, Thomas; Fumagalli, Patrizia; Poli, Stefano

    2014-05-01

    convoying evolved gases to a QMS through a heated line to avoid the condensation of water. This type of analyzer ensures superior performances in terms of selectivity of molecules to be detected, high acquisition rates and extended linear response range. The influence of dissolved solutes on fluid speciation has been evaluated by comparing experiments in the pure COH system and in the COH+forsterite system. To determine the solubility of forsterite in COH fluids we performed a second set of experiments at the same P , T and fO2 conditions above. Fluids trapped in a diamond layer were analysed by the cryogenic LA-ICP-MS technique described by Aerts et al. (2010). With this method the aqueous part of the COH fluid is frozen prior the opening and maintained frozen during the analysis to avoid any precipitation of solutes. The results will highlight the importance of fluids for the mass transport in subduction zones. Comparison between experimental data and thermodynamic calculation will also be shown. References: Aerts, M., Hack, A.C., Reusser, E., Ulmer, P. (2010) Am. Mineral. 95, 1523-1526. Newton, R.C., Manning, C.E. (2002) Geochim. Cosmochim. Ac. 66, 4165-4176.

  1. Influence of the pore fluid on the phase velocity in bovine trabecular bone In Vitro: Prediction of the biot model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kang Il

    2013-01-01

    The present study aims to investigate the influence of the pore fluid on the phase velocity in bovine trabecular bone in vitro. The frequency-dependent phase velocity was measured in 20 marrow-filled and water-filled bovine femoral trabecular bone samples. The mean phase velocities at frequencies between 0.6 and 1.2 MHz exhibited significant negative dispersions for both the marrow-filled and the water-filled samples. The magnitudes of the dispersions showed no significant differences between the marrow-filled and the water-filled samples. In contrast, replacement of marrow by water led to a mean increase in the phase velocity of 27 m/s at frequencies from 0.6 to 1.2 MHz. The theoretical phase velocities of the fast wave predicted by using the Biot model for elastic wave propagation in fluid-saturated porous media showed good agreements with the measurements.

  2. Solubility of indium-tin oxide in simulated lung and gastric fluids: Pathways for human intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Jens Christian Østergård; Cropp, Alastair; Paradise, Diane Caroline

    2017-02-01

    From being a metal with very limited natural distribution, indium (In) has recently become disseminated throughout the human society. Little is known of how In compounds behave in the natural environment, but recent medical studies link exposure to In compounds to elevated risk of respiratory disorders. Animal tests suggest that exposure may lead to more widespread damage in the body, notably the liver, kidneys and spleen. In this paper, we investigate the solubility of the most widely used In compound, indium-tin oxide (ITO) in simulated lung and gastric fluids in order to better understand the potential pathways for metals to be introduced into the bloodstream. Our results show significant potential for release of In and tin (Sn) in the deep parts of the lungs (artificial lysosomal fluid) and digestive tract, while the solubility in the upper parts of the lungs (the respiratory tract or tracheobronchial tree) is very low. Our study confirms that ITO is likely to remain as solid particles in the upper parts of the lungs, but that particles are likely to slowly dissolve in the deep lungs. Considering the prolonged residence time of inhaled particles in the deep lung, this environment is likely to provide the major route for uptake of In and Sn from inhaled ITO nano- and microparticles. Although dissolution through digestion may also lead to some uptake, the much shorter residence time is likely to lead to much lower risk of uptake. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Heat flow, morphology, pore fluids and hydrothermal circulation in a typical Mid-Atlantic Ridge flank near Oceanographer Fracture Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Gal, V.; Lucazeau, F.; Cannat, M.; Poort, J.; Monnin, C.; Battani, A.; Fontaine, F.; Goutorbe, B.; Rolandone, F.; Poitou, C.; Blanc-Valleron, M.-M.; Piedade, A.; Hipólito, A.

    2018-01-01

    Hydrothermal circulation affects heat and mass transfers in the oceanic lithosphere, not only at the ridge axis but also on their flanks, where the magnitude of this process has been related to sediment blanket and seamounts density. This was documented in several areas of the Pacific Ocean by heat flow measurements and pore water analysis. However, as the morphology of Atlantic and Indian ridge flanks is generally rougher than in the Pacific, these regions of slow and ultra-slow accretion may be affected by hydrothermal processes of different regimes. We carried out a survey of two regions on the eastern and western flanks of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge between Oceanographer and Hayes fracture zones. Two hundred and eight new heat flow measurements were obtained along six seismic profiles, on 5 to 14 Ma old seafloor. Thirty sediment cores (from which porewaters have been extracted) have been collected with a Kullenberg corer equipped with thermistors thus allowing simultaneous heat flow measurement. Most heat flow values are lower than those predicted by purely conductive cooling models, with some local variations and exceptions: heat flow values on the eastern flank of the study area are more variable than on the western flank, where they tend to increase westward as the sedimentary cover in the basins becomes thicker and more continuous. Heat flow is also higher, on average, on the northern sides of both the western and eastern field regions and includes values close to conductive predictions near the Oceanographer Fracture Zone. All the sediment porewaters have a chemical composition similar to that of bottom seawater (no anomaly linked to fluid circulation has been detected). Heat flow values and pore fluid compositions are consistent with fluid circulation in volcanic rocks below the sediment. The short distances between seamounts and short fluid pathways explain that fluids flowing in the basaltic aquifer below the sediment have remained cool and unaltered

  4. Mutual Solubility of MEG, Water and Reservoir Fluid: Experimental Measurements and Modeling using the CPA Equation of State

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riaz, Muhammad; Kontogeorgis, Georgios; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    2011-01-01

    This work presents new experimental phase equilibrium data of binary MEG-reservoir fluid and ternary MEG-water-reservoir fluid systems at temperatures 275-326 K and at atmospheric pressure. The reservoir fluid consists of a natural gas condensate from a Statoil operated gas field in the North Sea...... compounds. It has also been extended to reservoir fluids in presence of water and polar chemicals using a Pedersen like characterization method with modified correlations for critical temperature, pressure and acentric factor. In this work CPA is applied to the prediction of mutual solubility of reservoir...

  5. SU-E-J-61: Electrodynamics and Nano-Scale Fluid Dynamics in Protein Localization of Nuclear Pore Complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunningham, J; Gatenby, R

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a simulation to catalyze a reevaluation of common assumptions about 3 dimensional diffusive processes and help cell biologists gain a more nuanced, intuitive understanding of the true physical hurdles of protein signaling cascades. Furthermore, to discuss the possibility of intracellular electrodynamics as a critical, unrecognized component of cellular biology and protein dynamics that is necessary for optimal information flow from the cell membrane to the nucleus. Methods: The Unity 3D gaming physics engine was used to build an accurate virtual scale model of the cytoplasm within a few hundred nanometers of the nuclear membrane. A cloud of simulated pERK proteins is controlled by the physics simulation, where diffusion is based on experimentally measured values and the electrodynamics are based on theoretical nano-fluid dynamics. The trajectories of pERK within the cytoplasm and through the 1250 nuclear pores on the nuclear surface is recorded and analyzed. Results: The simulation quickly demonstrates that pERKs moving solely by diffusion will rarely locate and come within capture distance of a nuclear pore. The addition of intracellular electrodynamics between charges on the nuclear pore complexes and on pERKs increases the number of successful translocations by allowing the electro-physical attractive effects to draw in pERKs from the cytoplasm. The effects of changes in intracellular shielding ion concentrations allowed for estimation of the “capture radius” under varying conditions. Conclusion: The simulation allows a shift in perspective that is paramount in attempting to communicate the scale and dynamics of intracellular protein cascade mechanics. This work has allowed researchers to more fully understand the parameters involved in intracellular electrodynamics, such as shielding anion concentration and protein charge. As these effects are still far below the spatial resolution of currently available measurement technology this

  6. SU-E-J-61: Electrodynamics and Nano-Scale Fluid Dynamics in Protein Localization of Nuclear Pore Complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunningham, J; Gatenby, R [Moffitt Cancer Research Institute, Tampa, FL (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To develop a simulation to catalyze a reevaluation of common assumptions about 3 dimensional diffusive processes and help cell biologists gain a more nuanced, intuitive understanding of the true physical hurdles of protein signaling cascades. Furthermore, to discuss the possibility of intracellular electrodynamics as a critical, unrecognized component of cellular biology and protein dynamics that is necessary for optimal information flow from the cell membrane to the nucleus. Methods: The Unity 3D gaming physics engine was used to build an accurate virtual scale model of the cytoplasm within a few hundred nanometers of the nuclear membrane. A cloud of simulated pERK proteins is controlled by the physics simulation, where diffusion is based on experimentally measured values and the electrodynamics are based on theoretical nano-fluid dynamics. The trajectories of pERK within the cytoplasm and through the 1250 nuclear pores on the nuclear surface is recorded and analyzed. Results: The simulation quickly demonstrates that pERKs moving solely by diffusion will rarely locate and come within capture distance of a nuclear pore. The addition of intracellular electrodynamics between charges on the nuclear pore complexes and on pERKs increases the number of successful translocations by allowing the electro-physical attractive effects to draw in pERKs from the cytoplasm. The effects of changes in intracellular shielding ion concentrations allowed for estimation of the “capture radius” under varying conditions. Conclusion: The simulation allows a shift in perspective that is paramount in attempting to communicate the scale and dynamics of intracellular protein cascade mechanics. This work has allowed researchers to more fully understand the parameters involved in intracellular electrodynamics, such as shielding anion concentration and protein charge. As these effects are still far below the spatial resolution of currently available measurement technology this

  7. Laboratory triggering of stick-slip events by oscillatory loading in the presence of pore fluid with implications for physics of tectonic tremor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlow, Noel M.; Lockner, David A.; Beeler, Nicholas M.

    2012-01-01

    The physical mechanism by which the low-frequency earthquakes (LFEs) that make up portions of tectonic (also called non-volcanic) tremor are created is poorly understood. In many areas of the world, tectonic tremor and LFEs appear to be strongly tidally modulated, whereas ordinary earthquakes are not. Anomalous seismic wave speeds, interpreted as high pore fluid pressure, have been observed in regions that generate tremor. Here we build upon previous laboratory studies that investigated the response of stick-slip on artificial faults to oscillatory, tide-like loading. These previous experiments were carried out using room-dry samples of Westerly granite, at one effective stress. Here we augment these results with new experiments on Westerly granite, with the addition of varying effective stress using pore fluid at two pressures. We find that raising pore pressure, thereby lowering effective stress can significantly increase the degree of correlation of stick-slip to oscillatory loading. We also find other pore fluid effects that become important at higher frequencies, when the period of oscillation is comparable to the diffusion time of pore fluid into the fault. These results help constrain the conditions at depth that give rise to tidally modulated LFEs, providing confirmation of the effective pressure law for triggering and insights into why tremor is tidally modulated while earthquakes are at best only weakly modulated.

  8. Evaluation of the solubility of the HPMC: PVA blends in biological fluids in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Elis Bianchi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Polymers are often used to coat tablets for controlled drug release. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the solubility of the HPMC and PVA blend compared to isolated polymers in solutions with a pH of biological fluids (6 and 1.2 and the dissolution of capsules obtained using theophylline granules produced with the HPMC/PVA 25/75 blend as a matrix and as coating. HPMC is completely solubilized in the medium that simulates the pH of the stomach and intestine, and PVA is the polymer that allows controlling the solubility of the blend in the medium, with a differents pH. The dissolution time was monitored by UV absorbance with maximum theophylline at 269 nm. The theophylline was released immediately in the granules, and in the capsules 78.4% after 30 minutes and 97.4%, after 120 minutes. Thus, PVA can potentially control the drug solubilization, contributing to obtaining modified release systems.

  9. Development of an accurate pH measurement methodology for the pore fluids of low pH cementitious materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonso, M. C.; Garcia Calvo, J. L. [The Spanish National Research Council (CSIC), Madrid (Spain); Walker, C. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Ibaraki (Japan)] [and others

    2012-08-15

    The main objective of this project has been the development of an agreed set of protocols for the pH measurement of the pore fluid of a low pH cementitious material. Three protocols have been developed (Chapter 2), a reference method, based on pore fluid expression (PFE), and two routine methods with and without filtering, based on Ex Situ Leaching (ESL) procedures. Templates have been designed on which to record details of the pH measurement for the reference (PFE) method (Appendix C) and the routine (ESL) methods without and with filtering (Appendix D). Preliminary protocols were based on a broad review of the literature (Appendix A) and refined through a series of test experiments of the more critical parameters (Appendix B). After definition of the preliminary protocols, two phases of interlaboratory tests were performed. The first phase (Chapter 3) used the same low pH cement paste and enabled the nine participating laboratories to use, become familiar with and to identify any problems/uncertainties in the preliminary protocols. The reported pH values were subjected to a statistical analysis of the (within laboratory) repeatability and (between-laboratory) reproducibility and so provided a reliability test of the preliminary protocols. The second phase (Chapter 4) of interlaboratory tests used four different candidate low pH cementitious materials in the same nine laboratories, which allowed testing, validation and comparison of the reported pH values, which were obtained using the final protocols for the reference (PFE) and routine (ESL) methods by statistical analysis. The proposed final protocols (Chapter 2) have resulted in the reported pH values having low deviation and high reproducibility and repeatability. This will allow confidence in the pH value when selecting a candidate low pH cementitious material to be used in the engineered component of a high-level nuclear waste repository.

  10. Development of an accurate pH measurement methodology for the pore fluids of low pH cementitious materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, M. C.; Garcia Calvo, J. L.; Walker, C.

    2012-08-01

    The main objective of this project has been the development of an agreed set of protocols for the pH measurement of the pore fluid of a low pH cementitious material. Three protocols have been developed (Chapter 2), a reference method, based on pore fluid expression (PFE), and two routine methods with and without filtering, based on Ex Situ Leaching (ESL) procedures. Templates have been designed on which to record details of the pH measurement for the reference (PFE) method (Appendix C) and the routine (ESL) methods without and with filtering (Appendix D). Preliminary protocols were based on a broad review of the literature (Appendix A) and refined through a series of test experiments of the more critical parameters (Appendix B). After definition of the preliminary protocols, two phases of interlaboratory tests were performed. The first phase (Chapter 3) used the same low pH cement paste and enabled the nine participating laboratories to use, become familiar with and to identify any problems/uncertainties in the preliminary protocols. The reported pH values were subjected to a statistical analysis of the (within laboratory) repeatability and (between-laboratory) reproducibility and so provided a reliability test of the preliminary protocols. The second phase (Chapter 4) of interlaboratory tests used four different candidate low pH cementitious materials in the same nine laboratories, which allowed testing, validation and comparison of the reported pH values, which were obtained using the final protocols for the reference (PFE) and routine (ESL) methods by statistical analysis. The proposed final protocols (Chapter 2) have resulted in the reported pH values having low deviation and high reproducibility and repeatability. This will allow confidence in the pH value when selecting a candidate low pH cementitious material to be used in the engineered component of a high-level nuclear waste repository

  11. Pore Characterization of Shale Rock and Shale Interaction with Fluids at Reservoir Pressure-Temperature Conditions Using Small-Angle Neutron Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, M.; Hjelm, R.; Watkins, E.; Xu, H.; Pawar, R.

    2015-12-01

    Oil/gas produced from unconventional reservoirs has become strategically important for the US domestic energy independence. In unconventional realm, hydrocarbons are generated and stored in nanopores media ranging from a few to hundreds of nanometers. Fundamental knowledge of coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical-chemical (THMC) processes that control fluid flow and propagation within nano-pore confinement is critical for maximizing unconventional oil/gas production. The size and confinement of the nanometer pores creates many complex rock-fluid interface interactions. It is imperative to promote innovative experimental studies to decipher physical and chemical processes at the nanopore scale that govern hydrocarbon generation and mass transport of hydrocarbon mixtures in tight shale and other low permeability formations at reservoir pressure-temperature conditions. We have carried out laboratory investigations exploring quantitative relationship between pore characteristics of the Wolfcamp shale from Western Texas and the shale interaction with fluids at reservoir P-T conditions using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). We have performed SANS measurements of the shale rock in single fluid (e.g., H2O and D2O) and multifluid (CH4/(30% H2O+70% D2O)) systems at various pressures up to 20000 psi and temperature up to 150 oF. Figure 1 shows our SANS data at different pressures with H2O as the pressure medium. Our data analysis using IRENA software suggests that the principal changes of pore volume in the shale occurred on smaller than 50 nm pores and pressure at 5000 psi (Figure 2). Our results also suggest that with increasing P, more water flows into pores; with decreasing P, water is retained in the pores.

  12. AqSo_NaCl: Computer program to calculate p-T-V-x properties in the H2O-NaCl fluid system applied to fluid inclusion research and pore fluid calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, Ronald J.

    2018-06-01

    The program AqSo_NaCl has been developed to calculate pressure - molar volume - temperature - composition (p-V-T-x) properties, enthalpy, and heat capacity of the binary H2O-NaCl system. The algorithms are designed in BASIC within the Xojo programming environment, and can be operated as stand-alone project with Macintosh-, Windows-, and Unix-based operating systems. A series of ten self-instructive interfaces (modules) are developed to calculate fluid inclusion properties and pore fluid properties. The modules may be used to calculate properties of pure NaCl, the halite-liquidus, the halite-vapourus, dew-point and bubble-point curves (liquid-vapour), critical point, and SLV solid-liquid-vapour curves at temperatures above 0.1 °C (with halite) and below 0.1 °C (with ice or hydrohalite). Isochores of homogeneous fluids and unmixed fluids in a closed system can be calculated and exported to a.txt file. Isochores calculated for fluid inclusions can be corrected according to the volumetric properties of quartz. Microthermometric data, i.e. dissolution temperatures and homogenization temperatures, can be used to calculated bulk fluid properties of fluid inclusions. Alternatively, in the absence of total homogenization temperature the volume fraction of the liquid phase in fluid inclusions can be used to obtain bulk properties.

  13. A study to investigate viscous coupling effects on the hydraulic conductance of fluid layers in two-phase flow at the pore level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shams, Mosayeb; Raeini, Ali Q; Blunt, Martin J; Bijeljic, Branko

    2018-07-15

    This paper examines the role of momentum transfer across fluid-fluid interfaces in two-phase flow. A volume-of-fluid finite-volume numerical method is used to solve the Navier-Stokes equations for two-phase flow at the micro-scale. The model is applied to investigate viscous coupling effects as a function of the viscosity ratio, the wetting phase saturation and the wettability, for different fluid configurations in simple pore geometries. It is shown that viscous coupling effects can be significant for certain pore geometries such as oil layers sandwiched between water in the corner of mixed wettability capillaries. A simple parametric model is then presented to estimate general mobility terms as a function of geometric properties and viscosity ratio. Finally, the model is validated by comparison with the mobilities computed using direct numerical simulation. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Localization and Instability in Sheared Granular Materials: Role of Pore Fluids and Non-monotonic Rate Dependent Rheology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, X.; Elbanna, A. E.; Kothari, K.

    2017-12-01

    Fault zone dynamics hold the key to resolving many outstanding geophysical problems including the heat flow paradox, discrepancy between fault static and dynamic strength, and energy partitioning. Most fault zones that generate tectonic events are gouge filled and fluid saturated posing the need for formulating gouge-specific constitutive models that capture spatially heterogeneous compaction and dilation, non-monotonic rate dependence, and transition between localized and distributed deformation. In this presentation, we focus primarily on elucidating microscopic underpinnings for shear banding and stick-slip instabilities in sheared saturated granular materials and explore their implications for earthquake dynamics. We use a non-equilibrium thermodynamics model, the Shear Transformation Zone theory, to investigate the dynamics of strain localization and its connection to stability of sliding in the presence and absence of pore fluids. We also consider the possible influence of self-induced mechanical vibrations as well as the role of external acoustic vibrations as analogue for triggering by a distant event. For the dry case, our results suggest that at low and intermediate strain rates, persistent shear bands develop only in the absence of vibrations. Vibrations tend to fluidize the granular network and de-localize slip at these rates. Stick-slip is only observed for rough grains and it is confined to the shear band. At high strain rates, stick-slip disappears and the different systems exhibit similar stress-slip response. Changing the vibration intensity, duration or time of application alters the system response and may cause long-lasting rheological changes. The presence of pore fluids modifies the stick slip pattern and may lead to both loss and development of slip instability depending on the value of the confining pressure, imposed strain rate and hydraulic parameters. We analyze these observations in terms of possible transitions between rate

  15. Thermodynamic perturbation theory for associating fluids confined in a one-dimensional pore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, Bennett D. [ExxonMobil Research and Engineering, 22777 Springwoods Village Parkway, Spring, Texas 77389 (United States)

    2015-06-21

    In this paper, a new theory is developed for the self-assembly of associating molecules confined to a single spatial dimension, but allowed to explore all orientation angles. The interplay of the anisotropy of the pair potential and the low dimensional space results in orientationally ordered associated clusters. This local order enhances association due to a decrease in orientational entropy. Unlike bulk 3D fluids which are orientationally homogeneous, association in 1D necessitates the self-consistent calculation of the orientational distribution function. To test the new theory, Monte Carlo simulations are performed and the theory is found to be accurate. It is also shown that the traditional treatment in first order perturbation theory fails to accurately describe this system. The theory developed in this paper may be used as a tool to study hydrogen bonding of molecules in 1D zeolites as well as the hydrogen bonding of molecules in carbon nanotubes.

  16. A two-phase debris-flow model that includes coupled evolution of volume fractions, granular dilatancy, and pore-fluid pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, David L.; Iverson, Richard M.

    2011-01-01

    Pore-fluid pressure plays a crucial role in debris flows because it counteracts normal stresses at grain contacts and thereby reduces intergranular friction. Pore-pressure feedback accompanying debris deformation is particularly important during the onset of debrisflow motion, when it can dramatically influence the balance of forces governing downslope acceleration. We consider further effects of this feedback by formulating a new, depth-averaged mathematical model that simulates coupled evolution of granular dilatancy, solid and fluid volume fractions, pore-fluid pressure, and flow depth and velocity during all stages of debris-flow motion. To illustrate implications of the model, we use a finite-volume method to compute one-dimensional motion of a debris flow descending a rigid, uniformly inclined slope, and we compare model predictions with data obtained in large-scale experiments at the USGS debris-flow flume. Predictions for the first 1 s of motion show that increasing pore pressures (due to debris contraction) cause liquefaction that enhances flow acceleration. As acceleration continues, however, debris dilation causes dissipation of pore pressures, and this dissipation helps stabilize debris-flow motion. Our numerical predictions of this process match experimental data reasonably well, but predictions might be improved by accounting for the effects of grain-size segregation.

  17. Soluble L-selectin concentration in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid obtained from infants who develop chronic lung disease of prematurity

    OpenAIRE

    Kotecha, S; Silverman, M; Shaw, R; Klein, N

    1998-01-01

    AIMS—To explore the changes in neutrophil adhesion molecule expression and release into bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BAL) obtained from infants who developed chronic lung disease (CLD).
METHODS—BAL fluid was obtained from 37 infants: 18 (median gestation 26 weeks, birthweight 835 g) who developed CLD, 12 (29 weeks, 1345 g) with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) and seven control infants (33 weeks, 2190g).
RESULTS—Soluble L-selectin (sL-selectin) in BAL fluid from the CLD and no...

  18. Biogeochemical cycles at the sulfate-methane transition zone (SMTZ) and geochemical characteristics of the pore fluids offshore southwestern Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ching-Yi; Frank Yang, Tsanyao; Burr, George S.; Chuang, Pei-Chuan; Chen, Hsuan-Wen; Walia, Monika; Chen, Nai-Chen; Huang, Yu-Chun; Lin, Saulwood; Wang, Yunshuen; Chung, San-Hsiung; Huang, Chin-Da; Chen, Cheng-Hong

    2017-11-01

    In this study, we used pore water dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), SO42-, Ca2+ and Mg2+ gradients at the sulfate-methane transition zone (SMTZ) to estimate biogeochemical fluxes for cored sediments collected offshore SW Taiwan. Net DIC flux changes (ΔDIC-Prod) were applied to determine the proportion of sulfate consumption by organic matter oxidation (heterotrophic sulfate reduction) and anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM), and to determine reliable CH4 fluxes at the SMTZ. Our results show that SO42- profiles are mainly controlled by AOM rather than heterotrophic sulfate reduction. Refinement of CH4 flux estimates enhance our understanding of methane abundance from deep carbon reservoirs to the SMTZ. Concentrations of chloride (Cl-), bromide (Br-) and iodide (I-) dissolved in pore water were used to identify potential sources that control fluid compositions and the behavior of dissolved ions. Constant Cl- concentrations throughout ∼30 m sediment suggest no influence of gas hydrates for the compositions within the core. Bromide (Br-) and Iodine (I-) concentrations increase with sediment depth. The I-/Br- ratio appears to reflect organic matter degradation. SO42- concentrations decrease with sediment depth at a constant rate, and sediment depth profiles of Br- and I- concentrations suggests diffusion as the main transport mechanism. Therefore diffusive flux calculations are reasonable. Coring sites with high CH4 fluxes are more common in the accretionary wedge, amongst thrust faults and fractures, than in the passive continental margin offshore southwestern Taiwan. AOM reactions are a major sink for CH4 passing upward through the SMTZ and prevent high methane fluxes in the water column and to the atmosphere.

  19. How Pore-Fluid Pressure due to Heavy Rainfall Influences Volcanic Eruptions, Example of 1998 and 2008 Eruptions of Cerro Azul (Galapagos)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albino, F.; Amelung, F.; Gregg, P. M.

    2016-12-01

    About 30 worldwide seismic studies have shown a strong correlation between rainfall and earthquakes in the past 22 years (e.g. Costain and Bollinger, 2010). Such correlation has been explained by the phenomenon of hydro-seismicity via pore pressure diffusion: an increase of pore-fluid in the upper crust reduces the normal stress on faults, which can trigger shear failure. Although this pore pressure effect is widely known for earthquakes, this phenomenon and more broadly poro-elasticity process are not widely studied on volcanoes. However, we know from our previous works that tensile failures that open to propagate magma through the surface are also pore pressure dependent. We have demonstrated that an increase of pore pressure largely reduces the overpressure required to rupture the magma reservoir. We have shown that the pore pressure has more influence on reservoir stability than other parameters such as the reservoir depth or the edifice loading. Here, we investigate how small pore-fluid changes due to hydrothermal or aquifer refill during heavy rainfall may perturb the conditions of failure around magma reservoirs and, what is more, if these perturbations are enough to trigger magma intrusions. We quantify the pore pressure effect on magmatic system by combining 1) 1D pore pressure diffusion model to quantify how pore pressure changes from surface to depth after heavy rainfall events and 2) 2D poro-elastic numerical model to provide the evolution of failure conditions of the reservoir as a consequence of these pore pressure changes. Sensitivity analysis is also performed to characterize the influence on our results of the poro-elastic parameters (hydraulic diffusivity, permeability and porosity) and the geometry of the magma reservoir and the aquifer (depth, size, shape). Finally, we apply our methodology to Cerro Azul volcano (Galapagos) where both last eruptions (1998 and 2008) occurred just after heavy rainfall events, without any pre-eruptive inflation. In

  20. Solubility of 238U radionuclide from various types of soil in synthetic gastrointestinal fluids using "US in vitro" digestion method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Nur Shahidah Abdul; Sarmani, Sukiman; Majid, Amran Ab.; Mohamed, Faizal; Siong, Khoo Kok

    2015-04-01

    238U radionuclide is a naturally occuring radioactive material that can be found in soil. In this study, the solubility of 238U radionuclide obtained from various types of soil in synthetic gastrointestinal fluids was analysed by "US P in vitro" digestion method. The synthetic gastrointestinal fluids were added to the samples with well-ordered, mixed throughly and incubated according to the human physiology digestive system. The concentration of 238U radionuclide in the solutions extracted from the soil was measured using Induced Coupling Plasma Mass Spectrometer (ICP-MS). The concentration of 238U radionuclide from the soil samples in synthetic gastrointestinal fluids showed different values due to different homogenity of soil types and chemical reaction of 238U radionuclide. In general, the solubility of 238U radionuclide in gastric fluid was higher (0.050 - 0.209 ppm) than gastrointestinal fluids (0.024 - 0.050 ppm). It could be concluded that the US P in vitro digestion method is practicle for estimating the solubility of 238U radionuclide from soil materials and could be useful for monitoring and risk assessment purposes applying to environmental, health and contaminated soil samples.

  1. Simulated rat intestinal fluid improves oral exposure prediction for poorly soluble compounds over a wide dose range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joerg Berghausen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Solubility can be the absorption limiting factor for drug candidates and is therefore a very important input parameter for oral exposure prediction of compounds with limited solubility. Biorelevant media of the fasted and fed state have been published for humans, as well as for dogs in the fasted state. In a drug discovery environment, rodents are the most common animal model to assess the oral exposure of drug candidates. In this study a rat simulated intestinal fluid (rSIF is proposed as a more physiologically relevant media to describe drug solubility in rats. Equilibrium solubility in this medium was tested as input parameter for physiologically-based pharmacokinetics (PBPK simulations of oral pharmacokinetics in the rat. Simulations were compared to those obtained using other solubility values as input parameters, like buffer at pH 6.8, human simulated intestinal fluid and a comprehensive dissolution assay based on rSIF. Our study on nine different compounds demonstrates that the incorporation of rSIF equilibrium solubility values into PBPK models of oral drug exposure can significantly improve the reliability of simulations in rats for doses up to 300 mg/kg compared to other media. The comprehensive dissolution assay may help to improve further simulation outcome, but the greater experimental effort as compared to equilibrium solubility may limit its use in a drug discovery environment. Overall, PBPK simulations based on solubility in the proposed rSIF medium can improve prioritizing compounds in drug discovery as well as planning dose escalation studies, e.g. during toxicological investigations.

  2. The solubility of thorium and uranium from respirable monazite bearing dust in simulated lung and gut fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twining, J.; McGlinn, P.; Hart, K.

    1993-01-01

    The accurate assessment of the radiological dose to workers in the mineral sands industry requires information on the human bio-availability of thorium and uranium from monazite bearing respirable dust. The results of a short-term test to determine some of the solubility characteristics of these radionuclides are presented, together with a discussion on the optimum methods which may be applied to longer term studies. The solubility of thorium and uranium were found to be generally less than that of the parent monazite bearing dust in simulated lung and gut fluids over the one month extraction period. In particular, thorium was up to two orders of magnitude less soluble than its host mineral matrix. Assuming that the conservative nature of these radioactive constituents can be extrapolated to longer term exposures, these results imply that radiological dose estimates to the lung should be increased. Solubility of both elements was proportional to particle size. An exponential increase in solubility with decreasing diameter was observed, which implies a time variable solubility. There was also some indication of preferential solubility of radium progeny in both decay series. These factors may have to be accounted for in model estimates of committed dose. 16 refs., 4 tabs., 2 figs

  3. Lanthanides in geological fluids: experimental study of standard thermodynamic properties and of solubilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pourtier, E.

    2006-11-01

    Standard thermodynamic properties (STP) of lanthanides (Ln 3+ ) are necessary to predict their transport in hydrothermal fluids. New STP (apparent molal volumes and heat capacities) of Ln 3+ are determined with dilute (La 3+ , Nd 3+ , Gd 3+ , Yb 3+ ) triflates solutions, up to 300 deg. C and 300 bars, using a vibrating tube flow densimeter and a differential heat flow calorimeter. The triflate anion (CF 3 SO 3 ), stable at high temperature, does not form complexes with Ln 3+ . The STP of HCF 3 SO 3 and NaCF 3 SO 3 are measured in order to get the STP of CF 3 SO 3 . The solubility of the Nd-pure pole of monazite (NdPO 4 ) studied between 300 and 800 deg. C at 2 kbars in H 2 O and H 2 O+NaCl using weight loss and isotope dilution methods, is prograde for neutral pH. The study of Nd 3+ speciation at 650 deg. C and 300 deg. C, 2 kbars, shows that only hydroxylated species are present. These data allow the revision of Ln 3+ parameters in the HKF model. (author)

  4. The effects of inserting a tiny sphere in the center of a nanospherical pore on the structure, adsorption, and capillary condensation of a confined fluid (a DFT study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshavarzi, Ezat; Helmi, Abbas

    2015-02-26

    The modified fundamental measure theory (MFMT) has been employed to investigate the effects of inserting a tiny sphere in the center of a nanospherical pore on the structure, adsorption, and capillary condensation of fluids confined in it. In the first part of this Article, we have solved the weighted density integrals for all pores with spherical symmetries, including spherical and bispherical pores. In the second part, we show that the structure, amount of adsorption, and position of the fluid's capillary condensation change drastically when even a very thin sphere, R(s) = 0.01σ, is inserted into the center of a spherical pore (SP). In fact, the existence of a forbidden region around the inner sphere for the case of bispherical pores, even when R(s) = 0.01σ, causes a remarkable shift in both the amount of adsorption and the bulk density at which the capillary condensation occurs. Moreover, the insertion causes a sudden increase in the value of the contact density of the liquid, or the liquid in equilibrium with its vapor, at the wall of the outer sphere compared to that for an SP. In other words, the insertion of a tiny sphere in an SP causes the liquid droplet, which is formed in the center of the SP, to sprinkle throughout the whole nanopore. Also, we have demonstrated that the critical temperature and densities decrease with decreasing radius of the inner sphere.

  5. Round robin test for define an accurate protocol to measure the pore fluid pH of low-pH cementitious materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, M.C.; Garcia Calvo, J.L.; Pettersson, S.; Puigdomenech, I.; Cunado, M.A.; Vuorio, M.; Weber, H.; Ueda, H.; Naito, M.; Walker, C.; Takeshi, Y.; Cau Dit Coumes, C.

    2012-01-01

    The present research belongs to an international project where several of the main nuclear waste management agencies have been involved. The main objective is the development of agreed procedures or protocols for measuring the pH value using low-pH cementitious products (LopHC). The Pore Fluid Expression (PFE) has been identified as reference method and Ex-situ Leaching methods (ELS) with two variants (filtering and without filtering the obtained suspension) have been identified as routine methods. Both methodologies are based on the extraction of the pore solution of the concrete before pH determination. The protocols employed were based on a broad literature review and in fitting the more critical parameters, such as the sample size, the carbonation affection, the leaching of cement hydrates during the measurement, etc. Moreover, the routine methods were validated with respect to the pore fluid expression results. It appears that the repeatability of the 3 pH measurement protocols is very good and that the results obtained with both ESL procedures agree well with the results given by the PFE technique in the case of low-pH cementitious materials and are acceptable in the case of cementitious materials with high pore fluid pH values, in that case some corrections considering the Ca content of the solution may be needed

  6. Material Exchange and Migration between Pore Fluids and Sandstones during Diagenetic Processes in Rift Basins: A Case Study Based on Analysis of Diagenetic Products in Dongying Sag, Bohai Bay Basin, East China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Meng

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The exchange and migration of basin materials that are carried by pore fluids are the essence of diagenesis, which can alter physical properties of clastic rocks as well as control formation and distribution of favorable reservoirs of petroliferous basins. Diagenetic products and pore fluids, resulting from migration and exchange of basin materials, can be used to deduce those processes. In this study, 300 core samples from 46 wells were collected for preparation of casting thin sections, SEM, BSE, EDS, inclusion analysis, and isotope analysis in Dongying Sag, Bohai Bay Basin, East China. Combined with geochemical characteristics of pore fluids and geological background of the study area, the source and exchange mechanisms of materials in the pore fluids of rift basins were discussed. It was revealed that the material exchange of pore fluids could be divided into five stages. The first stage was the evaporation concentration stage during which mainly Ca2+, Mg2+, and CO32- precipitated as high-Mg calcites. Then came the shale compaction stage, when mainly Ca2+ and CO32- from shale compaction water precipitated as calcites. The third stage was the carboxylic acid dissolution stage featured by predominant dissolution of plagioclases, during which Ca2+ and Na+ entered pore fluids, and Si and Al also entered pore fluids and then migrated as clathrates, ultimately precipitating as kaolinites. The fourth stage was the organic CO2 stage, mainly characterized by the kaolinization of K-feldspar as well as dissolution of metamorphic lithic fragments and carbon cements. During this stage, K+, Fe2+, Mg2+, Ca2+, HCO3-, and CO32- entered pore fluids. The fifth stage was the alkaline fluid stage, during which the cementation of ferro-carbonates and ankerites as well as illitization or chloritization of kaolinites prevailed, leading to the precipitation of K+, Fe2+, Mg2+, Ca2+, and CO32- from pore fluids.

  7. The Controls of Pore-Throat Structure on Fluid Performance in Tight Clastic Rock Reservoir: A Case from the Upper Triassic of Chang 7 Member, Ordos Basin, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunlong Zhang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The characteristics of porosity and permeability in tight clastic rock reservoir have significant difference from those in conventional reservoir. The increased exploitation of tight gas and oil requests further understanding of fluid performance in the nanoscale pore-throat network of the tight reservoir. Typical tight sandstone and siltstone samples from Ordos Basin were investigated, and rate-controlled mercury injection capillary pressure (RMICP and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR were employed in this paper, combined with helium porosity and air permeability data, to analyze the impact of pore-throat structure on the storage and seepage capacity of these tight oil reservoirs, revealing the control factors of economic petroleum production. The researches indicate that, in the tight clastic rock reservoir, largest throat is the key control on the permeability and potentially dominates the movable water saturation in the reservoir. The storage capacity of the reservoir consists of effective throat and pore space. Although it has a relatively steady and significant proportion that resulted from the throats, its variation is still dominated by the effective pores. A combination parameter (ε that was established to be as an integrated characteristic of pore-throat structure shows effectively prediction of physical capability for hydrocarbon resource of the tight clastic rock reservoir.

  8. On the Peculiar Molecular Shape and Size Dependence of the Dynamics of Fluids confined in a Small-Pore Metal-Organic Framework

    KAUST Repository

    Skarmoutsos, Ioannis

    2018-05-15

    Force field based-Molecular dynamics simulations were deployed to systematically explore the dynamics of confined molecules of different shapes and sizes, i.e. linear (CO2 and N2) and spherical (CH4) fluids, in a model small pore system, i.e. the Metal-Organic Framework SIFSIX-2-Cu-i. These computations unveil an unprecedented molecular symmetry dependence of the translational and rotational dynamics of fluids confined in channel-like nanoporous materials. In particular this peculiar behaviour is reflected by the extremely slow decay of the Legendre reorientational correlation functions of even-parity order for the linear fluids which is associated to jump-like orientation flips, while the spherical fluid shows a very fast decay taking place in a sub-picosecond time scale. Such a fundamental understanding is relevant to diverse disciplines such as in chemistry, physics, biology and materials science where diatomic or polyatomic molecules of different shapes/sizes diffuse through nanopores.

  9. Refractive index and solubility control of para-cymene solutions for index-matched fluid-structure interaction studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fort, Charles; Fu, Christopher D.; Weichselbaum, Noah A.; Bardet, Philippe M.

    2015-12-01

    To deploy optical diagnostics such as particle image velocimetry or planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) in complex geometries, it is beneficial to use index-matched facilities. A binary mixture of para-cymene and cinnamaldehyde provides a viable option for matching the refractive index of acrylic, a common material for scaled models and test sections. This fluid is particularly appropriate for large-scale facilities and when a low-density and low-viscosity fluid is sought, such as in fluid-structure interaction studies. This binary solution has relatively low kinematic viscosity and density; its use enables the experimentalist to select operating temperature and to increase fluorescence signal in PLIF experiments. Measurements of spectral and temperature dependence of refractive index, density, and kinematic viscosity are reported. The effect of the binary mixture on solubility control of Rhodamine 6G is also characterized.

  10. Solubility of plutonium from rumen contents of cattle grazing on plutonium-contaminated desert vegetation in in vitro bovine gastrointestinal fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barth, J.

    1975-01-01

    Rumen contents of cattle grazing on plutonium-contaminated desert vegetation at the Nevada Test Site were incubated in simulated bovine gastrointestinal fluids to study the alimentary solubility of plutonium. Trials were run during November 1973, and during February, May, July and August 1974. During the May and July trials, a large increase in plutonium solubility accompanied by a marked reduction in plutonium concentration of the rumen contents was observed concurrently with a reduction in intake of Eurotia lanata and an increase in the intake of Oryzopsis hymenoides or Sitanion jubatum. However, during the November, February, and August trials, comparatively high concentration of plutonium, but low plutonium solubility, was associated with high levels of Eurotia lanata in the rumen contents. Plutonium-238 was generally more soluble than plutonium-239 in these fluids. Ratios of the percentage of soluble plutonium-238 to the percentage of soluble plutonium-239 varied fro []1:1 to 18:1 on a radioactivity basis. (auth)

  11. Thermodynamic equilibrium solubility measurements in simulated fluids by 96-well plate method in early drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharate, Sonali S; Vishwakarma, Ram A

    2015-04-01

    An early prediction of solubility in physiological media (PBS, SGF and SIF) is useful to predict qualitatively bioavailability and absorption of lead candidates. Despite of the availability of multiple solubility estimation methods, none of the reported method involves simplified fixed protocol for diverse set of compounds. Therefore, a simple and medium-throughput solubility estimation protocol is highly desirable during lead optimization stage. The present work introduces a rapid method for assessment of thermodynamic equilibrium solubility of compounds in aqueous media using 96-well microplate. The developed protocol is straightforward to set up and takes advantage of the sensitivity of UV spectroscopy. The compound, in stock solution in methanol, is introduced in microgram quantities into microplate wells followed by drying at an ambient temperature. Microplates were shaken upon addition of test media and the supernatant was analyzed by UV method. A plot of absorbance versus concentration of a sample provides saturation point, which is thermodynamic equilibrium solubility of a sample. The established protocol was validated using a large panel of commercially available drugs and with conventional miniaturized shake flask method (r(2)>0.84). Additionally, the statistically significant QSPR models were established using experimental solubility values of 52 compounds. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Modeling seismic stimulation: Enhanced non-aqueous fluid extraction from saturated porous media under pore-pressure pulsing at low frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Wei-Cheng; Sposito, Garrison; Huang, Yu-Han

    2012-03-01

    Seismic stimulation, the application of low-frequency stress-pulsing to the boundary of a porous medium containing water and a non-aqueous fluid to enhance the removal of the latter, shows great promise for both contaminated groundwater remediation and enhanced oil recovery, but theory to elucidate the underlying mechanisms lag significantly behind the progress achieved in experimental research. We address this conceptual lacuna by formulating a boundary-value problem to describe pore-pressure pulsing at seismic frequencies that is based on the continuum theory of poroelasticity for an elastic porous medium permeated by two immiscible fluids. An exact analytical solution is presented that is applied numerically using elasticity parameters and hydraulic data relevant to recent proof-of-principle laboratory experiments investigating the stimulation-induced mobilization of trichloroethene (TCE) in water flowing through a compressed sand core. The numerical results indicated that significant stimulation-induced increases of the TCE concentration in effluent can be expected from pore-pressure pulsing in the frequency range of 25-100 Hz, which is in good agreement with what was observed in the laboratory experiments. Sensitivity analysis of our numerical results revealed that the TCE concentration in the effluent increases with the porous medium framework compressibility and the pulsing pressure. Increasing compressibility also leads to an optimal stimulation response at lower frequencies, whereas changing the pulsing pressure does not affect the optimal stimulation frequency. Within the context of our model, the dominant physical cause for enhancement of non-aqueous fluid mobility by seismic stimulation is the dilatory motion of the porous medium in which the solid and fluid phases undergo opposite displacements, resulting in stress-induced changes of the pore volume.

  13. Temperature and pressure effects on solubility in supercritical carbon dioxide and retention in supercritical fluid chromatography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lou, X.W.; Janssen, J.G.M.; Cramers, C.A.M.G.

    1997-01-01

    Solubilities of some polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in supercritical carbon dioxide were measured with a procedure based on a direct on-line combination of a saturation cell to a flame ionization detector. Acenaphthene, anthrance and chrysene were selected as the test solutes. A method was

  14. Soluble CD163 levels are elevated in cerebrospinal fluid and serum in people with Type 2 diabetes mellitus and are associated with impaired peripheral nerve function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kallestrup, M; Møller, Holger Jon; Tankisi, H

    2015-01-01

    and serum in participants with neuropathy than in those without neuropathy [cerebrospinal fluid: median (range) 131 (86-173) vs 101 (70-190) μg/l, P = 0.08 and serum: 3725 (920-7060) vs 2220 (1130-4780), P = 0.06). CONCLUSIONS: Cerebrospinal fluid soluble CD163 level is associated with impaired peripheral......AIMS: To measure soluble CD163 levels in the cerebrospinal fluid and serum of people with Type 2 diabetes, with and without polyneuropathy, and to relate the findings to peripheral nerve function. METHODS: A total of 22 people with Type 2 diabetes and 12 control subjects without diabetes were...... included in this case-control study. Participants with diabetes were divided into those with neuropathy (n = 8) and those without neuropathy (n = 14) based on clinical examination, vibratory perception thresholds and nerve conduction studies. Serum and cerebrospinal fluid soluble CD163 levels were analysed...

  15. Isolating the effect of pore size distribution on electrochemical double-layer capacitance using activated fluid coke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuliani, Jocelyn E.; Tong, Shitang; Kirk, Donald W.; Jia, Charles Q.

    2015-12-01

    Electrochemical double-layer capacitors (EDLCs) use physical ion adsorption in the capacitive electrical double layer of high specific surface area (SSA) materials to store electrical energy. Previous work shows that the SSA-normalized capacitance increases when pore diameters are less than 1 nm. However, there still remains uncertainty about the charge storage mechanism since the enhanced SSA-normalized capacitance is not observed in all microporous materials. In previous studies, the total specific surface area and the chemical composition of the electrode materials were not controlled. The current work is the first reported study that systematically compares the performance of activated carbon prepared from the same raw material, with similar chemical composition and specific surface area, but different pore size distributions. Preparing samples with similar SSAs, but different pores sizes is not straightforward since increasing pore diameters results in decreasing the SSA. This study observes that the microporous activated carbon has a higher SSA-normalized capacitance, 14.1 μF cm-2, compared to the mesoporous material, 12.4 μF cm-2. However, this enhanced SSA-normalized capacitance is only observed above a threshold operating voltage. Therefore, it can be concluded that a minimum applied voltage is required to induce ion adsorption in these sub-nanometer micropores, which increases the capacitance.

  16. The contribution of free water transport and small pore transport to the total fluid removal in peritoneal dialysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Parikova, Alena; Smit, Watske; Struijk, Dirk G.; Zweers, Machteld M.; Krediet, Raymond T.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Water transport in peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients is across the small pores and water channels, the latter allowing free water transport. The objective of the study was to investigate the contribution of each transport route on transcapillary ultrafiltration (TCUF). METHODS: Standard

  17. 3-D pore-scale resolved model for coupled species/charge/fluid transport in a vanadium redox flow battery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu Gang; Joshi, Abhijit S.; Dennison, C.R.; Knehr, K.W.; Kumbur, E.C.; Sun Ying

    2012-01-01

    The vanadium redox flow battery (VRFB) has emerged as a viable grid-scale energy storage technology that offers cost-effective energy storage solutions for renewable energy applications. In this paper, a novel methodology is introduced for modeling of the transport mechanisms of electrolyte flow, species and charge in the VRFB at the pore scale of the electrodes; that is, at the level where individual carbon fiber geometry and electrolyte flow are directly resolved. The detailed geometry of the electrode is obtained using X-ray computed tomography (XCT) and calibrated against experimentally determined pore-scale characteristics (e.g., pore and fiber diameter, porosity, and surface area). The processed XCT data is then used as geometry input for modeling of the electrochemical processes in the VRFB. The flow of electrolyte through the pore space is modeled using the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) while the finite volume method (FVM) is used to solve the coupled species and charge transport and predict the performance of the VRFB under various conditions. An electrochemical model using the Butler–Volmer equations is used to provide species and charge coupling at the surfaces of the carbon fibers. Results are obtained for the cell potential distribution, as well as local concentration, overpotential and current density profiles under galvanostatic discharge conditions. The cell performance is investigated as a function of the electrolyte flow rate and external drawing current. The model developed here provides a useful tool for building the structure–property–performance relationship of VRFB electrodes.

  18. A model of sulphur solubility for hydrous mafic melts: application to the determination of magmatic fluid compositions of Italian volcanoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Pichavant

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available We present an empirical model of sulphur solubility that allows us to calculate f S2 if P, T, fO2 and the melt composition, including H2O and S, are known. The model is calibrated against three main experimental data bases consisting in both dry and hydrous silicate melts. Its prime goal is to calculate the f S2 of hydrous basalts that currently lack experimental constraints of their sulphur solubility behaviour. Application of the model to Stromboli, Vesuvius, Vulcano and Etna eruptive products shows that the primitive magmas found at these volcanoes record f S2 in the range 0.1-1 bar. In contrast, at all volcanoes the magmatic evolution is marked by dramatic variations in f S2 that spreads over up to 9 orders of magnitude. The f S2 can either increase during differentiation or decrease during decompression to shallow reservoirs, and seems to be related to closed versus open conduit conditions, respectively. The calculated f S2 shows that the Italian magmas are undersaturated in a FeS melt, except during closed conduit conditions, in which case differentiation may eventually reach conditions of sulphide melt saturation. The knowledge of f S2, fO2 and fH2O allows us to calculate the fluid phase composition coexisting with magmas at depth in the C-O-H-S system. Calculated fluids show a wide range in composition, with CO2 mole fractions of up to 0.97. Except at shallow levels, the fluid phase is generally dominated by CO2 and H2O species, the mole fractions of SO2 and H2S rarely exceeding 0.05 each. The comparison between calculated fluid compositions and volcanic gases shows that such an approach should provide constraints on both the depth and mode of degassing, as well as on the amount of free fluid in magma reservoirs. Under the assumption of a single step separation of the gas phase in a closed-system condition, the application to Stromboli and Etna suggests that the main reservoirs feeding the eruptions and persistent

  19. Pore Fluid Evolution Influenced by Volcanic Activities and Related Diagenetic Processes in a Rift Basin: Evidence from the Paleogene Medium-Deep Reservoirs of Huanghekou Sag, Bohai Bay Basin, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongheng Sun

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Volcanic activities exert a significant influence on pore fluid property and related diagenetic processes that substantially controlled reservoirs quality. Analysis of Paleogene medium-deep sandstones on the Huanghekou Sag provides insight into relating the diagenetic processes to pore fluid property evolution influenced by volcanic activities. Three distinct types of pore fluids were identified on the basis of an integrated and systematic analysis including core and thin section observation, XRD, SEM, CL, and trace element. Alkaline aqueous medium environment occurred in E2s1+2 where volcanic activities have insignificant influence on pore fluids, evidenced by typical alkaline diagenetic events such as K-feldspar albitization, quartz dissolution, feldspar dissolution, and carbonate cementation. During the deposition of E3d3, influx of terrestrial freshwater and alteration of ferromagnesian-rich pore water result in the formation of mixing aqueous medium environment through volcanic eruption dormancy causing zeolite dissolution, clay mineral transformation, and K-feldspar albitization. Ferromagnesian-rich aqueous medium environment developed resulting from the intensive hydrolysis of the unstable ferromagnesian minerals formed due to intense volcanic activities during E3d1+2 and corresponding predominant diagenetic processes were characterized by the precipitation and dissolution of low-silica zeolites. Therefore, the differential properties of pore fluids caused various diagenetic processes controlling reservoir quality.

  20. The Effect of Heat Transfer and Polymer Concentration on Non-Newtonian Fluid from Pore-Scale Simulation of Rock X-ray Micro-CT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moussa Tembely

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Most of the pore-scale imaging and simulations of non-Newtonian fluid are based on the simplifying geometry of network modeling and overlook the fluid rheology and heat transfer. In the present paper, we developed a non-isothermal and non-Newtonian numerical model of the flow properties at pore-scale by simulation of the 3D micro-CT images using a Finite Volume Method (FVM. The numerical model is based on the resolution of the momentum and energy conservation equations. Owing to an adaptive mesh generation technique and appropriate boundary conditions, rock permeability and mobility are accurately computed. A temperature and concentration-dependent power-law viscosity model in line with the experimental measurement of the fluid rheology is adopted. The model is first applied at isothermal condition to 2 benchmark samples, namely Fontainebleau sandstone and Grosmont carbonate, and is found to be in good agreement with the Lattice Boltzmann method (LBM. Finally, at non-isothermal conditions, an effective mobility is introduced that enables to perform a numerical sensitivity study to fluid rheology, heat transfer, and operating conditions. While the mobility seems to evolve linearly with polymer concentration in agreement with a derived theoretical model, the effect of the temperature seems negligible by comparison. However, a sharp contrast is found between carbonate and sandstone under the effect of a constant temperature gradient. Besides concerning the flow index and consistency factor, a master curve is derived when normalizing the mobility for both the carbonate and the sandstone.

  1. Soluble Model Fluids with Complete Scaling and Yang-Yang Features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerdeiriña, Claudio A.; Orkoulas, Gerassimos; Fisher, Michael E.

    2016-01-01

    Yang-Yang (YY) and singular diameter critical anomalies arise in exactly soluble compressible cell gas (CCG) models that obey complete scaling with pressure mixing. Thus, on the critical isochore ρ =ρc , C˜ μ≔-T d2μ /d T2 diverges as |t |-α when t ∝T -Tc→0- while ρd-ρc˜|t |2β where ρd(T )=1/2 [ρliq+ρgas] . When the discrete local CCG cell volumes fluctuate freely, the YY ratio Rμ=C˜μ/CV may take any value -∞ 0 . More general decorated CCGs, including "hydrogen bonding" water models, illuminate energy-volume coupling as relevant to Rμ.

  2. Decreased concentrations of soluble interleukin-1 receptor accessory protein levels in the peritoneal fluid of women with endometriosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaud, Nadège; Al-Akoum, Mahéra; Gagnon, Geneviève; Girard, Karine; Blanchet, Pierre; Rousseau, Julie Anne; Akoum, Ali

    2011-12-01

    Interleukin 1 (IL1) may play an important role in endometriosis-associated pelvic inflammation, and natural specific inhibitors, including soluble IL1 receptor accessory protein (sIL1RAcP) and soluble IL1 receptor type 2 (sIL1R2), are critical for counterbalancing the pleiotropic effects of IL1. The objective of this study was to evaluate the levels of sIL1RAcP, together with those of sIL1R2 and IL1β, in the peritoneal fluid of women with and without endometriosis. Peritoneal fluid samples were obtained at laparoscopy and assessed by ELISA. sIL1RAcP concentrations were reduced in endometriosis stages I-II and III-IV. sIL1R2 concentrations were decreased, and those of IL1β were significantly increased in endometriosis stages I-II. sIL1RAcP and sIL1R2 concentrations were significantly decreased in the secretory phase of the menstrual cycle, and IL1β concentrations were elevated in the proliferative and the secretory phases. sIL1RAcP and sIL1R2 concentrations were reduced in women with endometriosis who were infertile, fertile, suffering from pelvic pain or pain-free. However, IL1β concentrations were significantly reduced in women with endometriosis who were infertile or had pelvic pain. These changes may exacerbate the local peritoneal inflammatory reaction observed in women with endometriosis and contribute to endometriosis pathophysiology and the major symptoms of this disease. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Temporal Patterns of Soluble Adhesion Molecules in Cerebrospinal Fluid and Plasma in Patients with the Acute Brain Infraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vesna Selakovic

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to define concentration changes of soluble adhesion molecules (sICAM-1, sVCAM-1 and sE-Selectin in cerebrospinal fluid and plasma, as well as, number of peripheral blood leukocytes and the albumin coefficient in the patients with the acute brain infarction. We also, analyzed the correlation between the measured levels, the infarct volume and the degree of neurological and the functional deficit. The study included 50 patients with the acute cerebral infarction and the control group consisted of 16 patients, age and sex matched. Obtained results showed significant increase in number of leukocytes, the albumin coefficient and the level of soluble adhesion molecules within the first seven days in patients. The highest values of measured parameters were noted within the third and the fourth day after the insult, which is the suggested period of maximal intensity of inflammatory reactions. Significant correlation was found between measured parameters and the infarct volume, the degree of neurological and the functional deficit. The results suggest that investigated parameters in CSF and blood represent a dynamic index of inflammatory events as one of the fundametal mechanisms responsible for neuron damage during acute phase of brain infarction.

  4. Release of a Poorly Soluble Drug from Hydrophobically Modified Poly (Acrylic Acid in Simulated Intestinal Fluids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrik Knöös

    Full Text Available A large part of new pharmaceutical substances are characterized by a poor solubility and high hydrophobicity, which might lead to a difference in drug adsorption between fasted and fed patients. We have previously evaluated the release of hydrophobic drugs from tablets based on Pemulen TR2 and showed that the release can be manipulated by adding surfactants. Here we further evaluate the possibility to use Pemulen TR2 in controlled release tablet formulations containing a poorly soluble substance, griseofulvin. The release is evaluated in simulated intestinal media that model the fasted state (FaSSIF medium or fed state (FeSSIF. The rheology of polymer gels is studied in separate experiments, in order to gain more information on possible interactions. The release of griseofulvin in tablets without surfactant varied greatly and the slowest release were observed in FeSSIF. Addition of SDS to the tablets eliminated the differences and all tablets showed a slow linear release, which is of obvious relevance for robust drug delivery. Comparing the data from the release studies and the rheology experiment showed that the effects on the release from the different media could to a large extent be rationalised as a consequence of the interactions between the polymer and the surfactants in the media. The study shows that Pemulen TR2 is a candidate for controlled release formulations in which addition of surfactant provides a way to eliminate food effects on the release profile. However, the formulation used needs to be designed to give a faster release rate than the tablets currently investigated.

  5. Mineral transformation controls speciation and pore-fluid transmission of contaminants in waste-weathered Hanford sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdrial, Nicolas; Thompson, Aaron; O'Day, Peggy A.; Steefel, Carl I.; Chorover, Jon

    2014-09-01

    Portions of the Hanford Site (WA, USA) vadose zone were subjected to weathering by caustic solutions during documented releases of high level radioactive waste (containing Sr, Cs and I) from leaking underground storage tanks. Previous studies have shown that waste-sediment interactions can promote variable incorporation of contaminants into neo-formed mineral products (including feldspathoids and zeolites), but processes regulating the subsequent contaminant release from these phases into infiltrating background pore waters remain poorly known. In this paper, reactive transport experiments were conducted with Hanford sediments previously weathered for one year in simulated hyper-alkaline waste solutions containing high or low 88Sr, 127I, and 133Cs concentrations, with or without CO2(aq). These waste-weathered sediments were leached in flow-through column experiments with simulated background pore water (characteristic of meteoric recharge) to measure contaminant release from solids formed during waste-sediment interaction. Contaminant sorption-desorption kinetics and mineral transformation reactions were both monitored using continuous-flow and wet-dry cycling regimes for ca. 300 pore volumes. Less than 20% of contaminant 133Cs and 88Sr mass and less than 40% 127I mass were released over the course of the experiment. To elucidate molecular processes limiting contaminant release, reacted sediments were studied with micro- (TEM and XRD) and molecular- (Sr K-edge EXAFS) scale methods. Contaminant dynamics in column experiments were principally controlled by rapid dissolution of labile solids and competitive exchange reactions. In initially feldspathoidic systems, time-dependent changes in the local zeolitic bonding environment observed with X-ray diffraction and EXAFS are responsible for limiting contaminant release. Linear combination fits and shell-by-shell analysis of Sr K-edge EXAFS data revealed modification in Sr-Si/Al distances within the zeolite cage. Wet

  6. Changes on the mineralogical and physico-chemical properties of a compacted bentonite in contact with hyperalkaline pore fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, A.M.; Melon, A.; Sanchez, D.M.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. In high-level radioactive waste disposal (HLW) concepts, compacted bentonites are being considered in many countries as a sealing material because of their low permeability, high swelling capacity and high plasticity. In the case of the geological disposal of nuclear wastes in argillaceous host formations, concrete will be also used as support of tunnels and galleries and as waste containment material. Therefore, the bentonite barrier will become saturated with the water resulting from the host-rock/concrete interaction. An understanding of the rate and nature of the bentonite alteration, as well as the evolution of the bentonite pore water in the long-term is important for performance assessment. In this work the behaviour of the bentonite has been simulated in a laboratory test. A concrete-bentonite interaction experiment has been performed at a high solid to liquid ratio with FEBEX bentonite. The aim of the experiment was to analyse the buffering capacity of the bentonite and the clay mineral stability in a high-pH environment over a long contact period. The rate of pH buffering capacity of the bentonite is related to its surface hydroxyl sites (≡SOH) located along the edges of the clay platelets (fast reaction), and the montmorillonite crystal lattice itself (governed by reaction kinetics). Two infiltration tests with hyper-alkaline water were performed with FEBEX bentonite compacted at a dry density of 1.65 g/cm 3 with a hygroscopic water content (w.c.) of 13.4% in small-scale hermetic cells (50- mm diameter and 25-mm high). The experiments were running for 1.65 years under anoxic conditions inside an anoxic glove (< 1 ppm O 2 ) box and at temperature of 30-35 deg. C. The type of alkaline solution was a Na-K-OH water in equilibrium with portlandite, Ca(OH) 2 , at pH 13.5. This water is representative of an average pore water of a mortar made with CEM-I-SR type Portland cement (sulphate-resistant) at a 0

  7. Soluble CD44 concentration in the serum and peritoneal fluid samples of patients with different stages of endometriosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashayekhi, Farhad; Aryaee, Hadis; Mirzajani, Ebrahim; Yasin, Ashraf Ale; Fathi, Abdolsatar

    2015-09-01

    Endometriosis is a gynecological disease defined by the histological presence of endometrial glands and stroma outside the uterine cavity, most commonly implanted over visceral and peritoneal surface within the female pelvis. CD44 is a membrane protein expressed by human endometrial cells, and it has been shown to promote the adhesion of endometrial cells. The aim of this study was to determine the levels of soluble CD44 (sCD44) in the serum and peritoneal fluid (PF) samples of patients with different stages of endometriosis. 39 PF and serum samples from normal healthy and 130 samples from different stages of patients with endometriosis (33 cases of stage I, 38 stage II, 30 stage III and 29 stage IV) were included in this study. Total protein concentration (TPC) and the level of s-cMet in the serum were determined by Bio-Rad protein assay based on the Bradford dye procedure and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, respectively. No significant change in the TPC was seen in the serum of patients with endometriosis when compared to normal controls. Results obtained demonstrated that all serum and peritoneal fluid samples, presented sCD44 expression, whereas, starting from stages I to IV endometriosis, a significant increase of sCD44 expression was observed as compared to control group. The results of this study show that a high expression of sCD44 is correlated with advanced stages of endometriosis. It is also concluded that the detection of serum and/or peritoneal fluid sCD44 may be useful in classifying endometriosis.

  8. Soluble Receptor for Advanced Glycation End-Products Predicts Impaired Alveolar Fluid Clearance in Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabaudon, Matthieu; Blondonnet, Raiko; Roszyk, Laurence; Bouvier, Damien; Audard, Jules; Clairefond, Gael; Fournier, Mathilde; Marceau, Geoffroy; Déchelotte, Pierre; Pereira, Bruno; Sapin, Vincent; Constantin, Jean-Michel

    2015-07-15

    Levels of the soluble form of the receptor for advanced glycation end-products (sRAGE) are elevated during acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and correlate with severity and prognosis. Alveolar fluid clearance (AFC) is necessary for the resolution of lung edema but is impaired in most patients with ARDS. No reliable marker of this process has been investigated to date. To verify whether sRAGE could predict AFC during ARDS. Anesthetized CD-1 mice underwent orotracheal instillation of hydrochloric acid. At specified time points, lung injury was assessed by analysis of blood gases, alveolar permeability, lung histology, AFC, and plasma/bronchoalveolar fluid measurements of proinflammatory cytokines and sRAGE. Plasma sRAGE and AFC rates were also prospectively assessed in 30 patients with ARDS. The rate of AFC was inversely correlated with sRAGE levels in the plasma and the bronchoalveolar fluid of acid-injured mice (Spearman's ρ = -0.73 and -0.69, respectively; P < 10(-3)), and plasma sRAGE correlated with AFC in patients with ARDS (Spearman's ρ = -0.59; P < 10(-3)). Similarly, sRAGE levels were significantly associated with lung injury severity, and decreased over time in mice, whereas AFC was restored and lung injury resolved. Our results indicate that sRAGE levels could be a reliable predictor of impaired AFC during ARDS, and should stimulate further studies on the pathophysiologic implications of RAGE axis in the mechanisms leading to edema resolution. Clinical trial registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT 00811629).

  9. Closure to “Fines Classification Based on Sensitivity to Pore-Fluid Chemistry” by Junbong Jang and J. Carlos Santamarina

    KAUST Repository

    Jang, Junbong

    2017-03-16

    The proposed new fines classification system is an attempt to address the demands of geotechnical engineers who require a methodology that systematically characterizes fines for diverse geotechnical applications. We received six official discussions, three direct contributions, and several other personal communications regarding procedures and data analysis. Overall, contributors welcomed the proposed methodology for its repeatability, its enhanced discrimination and clustering capabilities, and its ability to identify differences in particle-particle interaction associated with pore-fluid changes. This closure benefits from the input provided by all of these contributions, and is organized in three sections: data, test procedure, and interpretation. - See more at: http://ascelibrary.org/doi/10.1061/%28ASCE%29GT.1943-5606.0001694#sthash.IMgJt2FU.dpuf

  10. Hydrogen solubility in pore water of partially saturated argillites: Application to Callovo-Oxfordian clay-rock in the context of a nuclear waste geological disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lassin, A.; Dymitrowska, M.; Azaroual, M.

    2011-01-01

    In nuclear waste geological disposals, large amounts of hydrogen (H 2 ) are expected to be produced by different (bio-)geochemical processes. Depending on the pressure generated by such a process, H 2 could be produced as a gas phase and displace the neighbouring pore water. As a consequence, a water-unsaturated zone could be created around the waste and possibly affect the physical and physic-chemical properties of the disposal and the excavation disturbed zone around it. The present study is the first part of an ongoing research program aimed at evaluating the possible chemical evolution of the pore water-minerals-gas system in such a context. The goal of this study was to evaluate, in terms of thermodynamic equilibrium conditions, the geochemical disturbance of the pore water due to variations in hydrogen pressure, temperature and relative humidity. No heterogeneous reactions involving mineral phases of the clay-rock or reactive surface sites were taken into account in the thermodynamic analysis. In the case sulphate reduction reaction is allowed, geochemical modelling results indicate that the main disturbance is the increase in pH (from around 7 up to more than 10) and an important decrease in the redox potential (Eh) related to hydrogen dissolution. This occurs from relatively low H 2 partial pressures (∼1 bar and above). Then, temperature and relative humidity (expressed in terms of capillary pressure) further displace the thermodynamic equilibrium conditions, namely the pH and the aqueous speciation as well as saturation indices of mineral phases. Finally, the results suggest that the generation of hydrogen, combined with an increase in temperature (between 30 deg. C and 80 deg. C) and a decrease in relative humidity (from 100% to 30%), should increase the chemical reactivity of the pore water-rock-gas system. (authors)

  11. Predicting permeability of regular tissue engineering scaffolds: scaling analysis of pore architecture, scaffold length, and fluid flow rate effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahbari, A; Montazerian, H; Davoodi, E; Homayoonfar, S

    2017-02-01

    The main aim of this research is to numerically obtain the permeability coefficient in the cylindrical scaffolds. For this purpose, a mathematical analysis was performed to derive an equation for desired porosity in terms of morphological parameters. Then, the considered cylindrical geometries were modeled and the permeability coefficient was calculated according to the velocity and pressure drop values based on the Darcy's law. In order to validate the accuracy of the present numerical solution, the obtained permeability coefficient was compared with the published experimental data. It was observed that this model can predict permeability with the utmost accuracy. Then, the effect of geometrical parameters including porosity, scaffold pore structure, unit cell size, and length of the scaffolds as well as entrance mass flow rate on the permeability of porous structures was studied. Furthermore, a parametric study with scaling laws analysis of sample length and mass flow rate effects on the permeability showed good fit to the obtained data. It can be concluded that the sensitivity of permeability is more noticeable at higher porosities. The present approach can be used to characterize and optimize the scaffold microstructure due to the necessity of cell growth and transferring considerations.

  12. Solubility of 238U radionuclide from various types of soil in synthetic gastrointestinal fluids using “US in vitro” digestion method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rashid, Nur Shahidah Abdul; Sarmani, Sukiman; Majid, Amran Ab.; Mohamed, Faizal; Siong, Khoo Kok

    2015-01-01

    238U radionuclide is a naturally occuring radioactive material that can be found in soil. In this study, the solubility of 238U radionuclide obtained from various types of soil in synthetic gastrointestinal fluids was analysed by “US P in vitro” digestion method. The synthetic gastrointestinal fluids were added to the samples with well-ordered, mixed throughly and incubated according to the human physiology digestive system. The concentration of 238U radionuclide in the solutions extracted from the soil was measured using Induced Coupling Plasma Mass Spectrometer (ICP-MS). The concentration of 238U radionuclide from the soil samples in synthetic gastrointestinal fluids showed different values due to different homogenity of soil types and chemical reaction of 238U radionuclide. In general, the solubility of 238U radionuclide in gastric fluid was higher (0.050 – 0.209 ppm) than gastrointestinal fluids (0.024 – 0.050 ppm). It could be concluded that the US P in vitro digestion method is practicle for estimating the solubility of 238U radionuclide from soil materials and could be useful for monitoring and risk assessment purposes applying to environmental, health and contaminated soil samples

  13. Solubility of {sup 238}U radionuclide from various types of soil in synthetic gastrointestinal fluids using “US in vitro” digestion method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rashid, Nur Shahidah Abdul; Sarmani, Sukiman; Majid, Amran Ab.; Mohamed, Faizal; Siong, Khoo Kok, E-mail: khoo@ukm.edu.my [School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM), 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2015-04-29

    238U radionuclide is a naturally occuring radioactive material that can be found in soil. In this study, the solubility of 238U radionuclide obtained from various types of soil in synthetic gastrointestinal fluids was analysed by “US P in vitro” digestion method. The synthetic gastrointestinal fluids were added to the samples with well-ordered, mixed throughly and incubated according to the human physiology digestive system. The concentration of 238U radionuclide in the solutions extracted from the soil was measured using Induced Coupling Plasma Mass Spectrometer (ICP-MS). The concentration of 238U radionuclide from the soil samples in synthetic gastrointestinal fluids showed different values due to different homogenity of soil types and chemical reaction of 238U radionuclide. In general, the solubility of 238U radionuclide in gastric fluid was higher (0.050 – 0.209 ppm) than gastrointestinal fluids (0.024 – 0.050 ppm). It could be concluded that the US P in vitro digestion method is practicle for estimating the solubility of 238U radionuclide from soil materials and could be useful for monitoring and risk assessment purposes applying to environmental, health and contaminated soil samples.

  14. Lanthanides in geological fluids: experimental study of standard thermodynamic properties and of solubilities; Les lanthanides dans les fluides geologiques: etude experimentale des proprietes thermodynamiques standard et des solubilites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pourtier, E

    2006-11-15

    Standard thermodynamic properties (STP) of lanthanides (Ln{sup 3+}) are necessary to predict their transport in hydrothermal fluids. New STP (apparent molal volumes and heat capacities) of Ln{sup 3+} are determined with dilute (La{sup 3+}, Nd{sup 3+}, Gd{sup 3+}, Yb{sup 3+}) triflates solutions, up to 300 deg. C and 300 bars, using a vibrating tube flow densimeter and a differential heat flow calorimeter. The triflate anion (CF{sub 3}SO{sub 3}), stable at high temperature, does not form complexes with Ln{sup 3+}. The STP of HCF{sub 3}SO{sub 3} and NaCF{sub 3}SO{sub 3} are measured in order to get the STP of CF{sub 3}SO{sub 3}. The solubility of the Nd-pure pole of monazite (NdPO{sub 4}) studied between 300 and 800 deg. C at 2 kbars in H{sub 2}O and H{sub 2}O+NaCl using weight loss and isotope dilution methods, is prograde for neutral pH. The study of Nd{sup 3+} speciation at 650 deg. C and 300 deg. C, 2 kbars, shows that only hydroxylated species are present. These data allow the revision of Ln{sup 3+} parameters in the HKF model. (author)

  15. Mega-solubility of quartz resulting from highly alkaline fluids produced by dissolved albite in H2O at deep crustal conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhluf, A. R.; Manning, C. E.

    2017-12-01

    Models of H2O-rich fluids equilibrated with rocks at high P and T fail to predict the high solubilities observed experimentally, chiefly because thermodynamic data for the most abundant solutes is lacking. We investigated the effects of dissolved albite (Ab) on the solubility of quartz (Qz) at 1.0 GPa and 675-900 °C using a piston-cylinder apparatus to quantify possible mineral buffering or enhancement effects. We found a very large enhancement effect on the solubility of Qz when dissolved in dilute aqueous Ab solutions. SiO2 concentrations are similar to Qz solubility in strongly alkaline KOH solutions. At the highest temperature of 900 °C, we found that the solubility of Qz in 1.0 molal Ab solution increases by of factor of 4.5 over that in pure H2O, which corresponds to 10.7 molal SiO2. The nearly identical solubility of Qz in KOH(aq) and Ab solutions of the same concentration, P, and T, strongly suggest that NaOH(aq) liberated from NaAlSi3O8 in H2O fluids effects SiO2 solubility in a similar manner to that of KOH(aq). The deprotonated silica dimer was found to be a key species responsible for the high solubility of Qz in KOH(aq) and is likely responsible for the high solubility of Qz in Ab solutions. While the binaries Qz-H2O, Ab-H2O, and Qz-Ab are well known at 1.0 GPa, little data exists on the ternary system. The new results help quantify the ternary relations in the Ab-Qz-H2O system, which can be used as a simple model for liquid-vapor immiscibility granitic magmas. In addition, these highly alkaline solute-rich aqueous fluids suggest a mechanism for Ab-Qz metasomatism in subduction zones, such as in the Catalina schist (Bebout and Barton 1993), which provides an alternative to high P-T magmas. Our results show that subduction zone and metasomatic fluids may be much more alkaline and have significantly higher dissolving power than previously thought.

  16. Evaluating Soluble EMMPRIN as a Marker of Disease Activity in Multiple Sclerosis: Studies of Serum and Cerebrospinal Fluid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak K Kaushik

    Full Text Available Extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN, CD147 is an inducer of matrix metalloproteinases and has roles in leukocyte activation and migration. We reported previously that in MS and its animal model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, cell surface-associated EMMPRIN was significantly elevated in leukocytes around inflammatory perivascular cuffs in the CNS. In this study we report that activated T-cells can secrete soluble form of EMMPRIN (sEMMPRIN upon activation. As sEMMPRIN is also present in biological fluids, we determined whether sEMMPRIN is altered in the CSF and sera of MS subjects. Sera from individuals without neurological conditions served as controls, while CSFs collected from subjects undergoing discectomy, and without evidence of CNS pathology, were used as a comparator group. We found that serum levels of sEMMPRIN from clinically stable MS patients or other inflammatory conditions did not differ from control subjects. Paired serum and CSF samples demonstrated poor correlation of sEMMPRIN. Interestingly, sEMMPRIN levels were approximately 60% higher in CSFs compared to sera. sEMMPRIN CSF levels were significantly higher in secondary progressive compared to primary progressive subjects. Thus we conclude that measurement of sEMMPRIN in serum is not informative for disease activity in MS. The differential expression of sEMMPRIN in the CSF of primary and secondary progressive MS invites hypotheses of the still undefined roles of EMMPRIN in the CNS.

  17. Evaluating Soluble EMMPRIN as a Marker of Disease Activity in Multiple Sclerosis: Studies of Serum and Cerebrospinal Fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, Deepak K; Yong, Heather Y F; Hahn, Jennifer N; Silva, Claudia; Casha, Steven; Hurlbert, R John; Jacques, Francois H; Lisak, Robert; Khan, Omar; Ionete, Carolina; Larochelle, Catherine; Prat, Alex; Bar-Or, Amit; Yong, V Wee

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN, CD147) is an inducer of matrix metalloproteinases and has roles in leukocyte activation and migration. We reported previously that in MS and its animal model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, cell surface-associated EMMPRIN was significantly elevated in leukocytes around inflammatory perivascular cuffs in the CNS. In this study we report that activated T-cells can secrete soluble form of EMMPRIN (sEMMPRIN) upon activation. As sEMMPRIN is also present in biological fluids, we determined whether sEMMPRIN is altered in the CSF and sera of MS subjects. Sera from individuals without neurological conditions served as controls, while CSFs collected from subjects undergoing discectomy, and without evidence of CNS pathology, were used as a comparator group. We found that serum levels of sEMMPRIN from clinically stable MS patients or other inflammatory conditions did not differ from control subjects. Paired serum and CSF samples demonstrated poor correlation of sEMMPRIN. Interestingly, sEMMPRIN levels were approximately 60% higher in CSFs compared to sera. sEMMPRIN CSF levels were significantly higher in secondary progressive compared to primary progressive subjects. Thus we conclude that measurement of sEMMPRIN in serum is not informative for disease activity in MS. The differential expression of sEMMPRIN in the CSF of primary and secondary progressive MS invites hypotheses of the still undefined roles of EMMPRIN in the CNS.

  18. Positive and negative feedback in the earthquake cycIe: the role of pore fluids on states of criticality in the crust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. R. Sammonds

    1994-06-01

    Full Text Available Fluids exert a strong physical and chemical control on local processes of rock fracture and friction. For example they may accelerate fracture by stress corrosion reactions or the development of overpressure (a form of positive feedback, or retard fracture by time-dependent stress relaxation or dilatant hardening (negative feed-back, thereby introducing a variable degree of local force conservation into the process. In particular the valve action of dynamic faulting may be important in tuning the Earth to a metastable state of incipient failure on all scales over several cycles, similar to current models of Self-Organised Criticality (SOC as a paradigm for eartiquakes However laboratory results suggest that ordered fluctuations about this state may occur in a single cycle due to non conservative processes involving fluids which have the potential to be recognised, at least in the short term, in the scaling properties of earthquake statistics. Here we describe a 2-D cellular automaton which uses local rules of positive and negative feedback to model the effect of fluids on failure in a heterogeneous medium in a single earthquake cycle. The model successfully predicts the observed fractal distribution of fractures, with a negative correlation between the predicted seismic b-value and the local crack extension force G. Such a negative correlation is found in laboratory tests involving (a fluid-assisted crack growth in tension (b water-saturated compressional deformation, and (c in field results on an intermediate scale from hydraulic mining-induced seismicity all cases where G can be determined independently, and where the physical and chemical action of pore fluids is to varying degrees a controlled variable. For a finite local hardening mechanism (negative feedback, the model exhibits a systematic increase followed by a decrease in the seismic b-value as macroscopic failure is approached, similar to that found in water-saturated laboratory tests

  19. Correlation between pore fluid pressures and DInSAR post-seismic deformation of the May 20, 2012 Emilia-Romagna (Italy) earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moro, M.; Stramondo, S.; Albano, M.; Barba, S.; Solaro, G.; Saroli, M.; Bignami, C.

    2015-12-01

    The present work focuses on the detection and analysis of the postseismic surface deformations following the two earthquakes that hit the Emilia Romagna region (Italy) on May 20 and 29, 2012. The 2012 Emilia earthquake sequence struck the central sector of the Ferrara arc, which represents the external fold-and-thrust system of the Northern Apennines thrust belt buried below the Po plain. The May 20 event occurred on the Ferrara basal thrust at depth, at about 6-7 km, while, during the May 29 event, the rupture jumped on an inner splay of the Ferrara system. The analysis of the postseismic displacements was carried out thanks to a dataset of SAR COSMO­ SkyMed images covering a time span of about one year (May 20, 2012 - May 11, 2013) after the May 20 event. The DInSAR results revealed the presence of two deformation patches: the first one is located in the area that experienced the coseismic uplift. Here the postseismic displacements point out a further ground uplift occurring along the first three months after the 20 May event. The second deformation patch is located in the villages of San Carlo and Mirabello, where ground subsidence lasting about four months was detected. We hypothesized that both the observed phenomena are related to the pore pressure perturbation caused by the coseismic deformation. In particular, the ground uplift is due to the deep crustal deformations caused by the pore fluid diffusion at depth to re-establish the initial hydrostatic stresses. Instead, the ground subsidence is related to the compaction of the shallow sandy layers caused by the liquefaction phenomena, which widely affected the San Carlo and Mirabello area. Preliminary numerical analyses performed with the Finite Element Method and empirical relations confirmed our hypothesis.

  20. Lateral Fluid Percussion Injury Impairs Hippocampal Synaptic Soluble N-Ethylmaleimide Sensitive Factor Attachment Protein Receptor Complex Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaun W. Carlson

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI and the activation of secondary injury mechanisms have been linked to impaired cognitive function, which, as observed in TBI patients and animal models, can persist for months and years following the initial injury. Impairments in neurotransmission have been well documented in experimental models of TBI, but the mechanisms underlying this dysfunction are poorly understood. Formation of the soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE complex facilitates vesicular docking and neurotransmitter release in the synaptic cleft. Published studies highlight a direct link between reduced SNARE complex formation and impairments in neurotransmitter release. While alterations in the SNARE complex have been described following severe focal TBI, it is not known if deficits in SNARE complex formation manifest in a model with reduced severity. We hypothesized that lateral fluid percussion injury (lFPI reduces the abundance of SNARE proteins, impairs SNARE complex formation, and contributes to impaired neurobehavioral function. To this end, rats were subjected to lFPI or sham injury and tested for acute motor performance and cognitive function at 3 weeks post-injury. lFPI resulted in motor impairment between 1 and 5 days post-injury. Spatial acquisition and spatial memory, as assessed by the Morris water maze, were significantly impaired at 3 weeks after lFPI. To examine the effect of lFPI on synaptic SNARE complex formation in the injured hippocampus, a separate cohort of rats was generated and brains processed to evaluate hippocampal synaptosomal-enriched lysates at 1 week post-injury. lFPI resulted in a significant reduction in multiple monomeric SNARE proteins, including VAMP2, and α-synuclein, and SNARE complex abundance. The findings in this study are consistent with our previously published observations suggesting that impairments in hippocampal SNARE complex formation may contribute to

  1. Single-step preparation of selected biological fluids for the high performance liquid chromatographic analysis of fat-soluble vitamins and antioxidants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzarino, Giacomo; Longo, Salvatore; Amorini, Angela Maria; Di Pietro, Valentina; D'Urso, Serafina; Lazzarino, Giuseppe; Belli, Antonio; Tavazzi, Barbara

    2017-12-08

    Fat-soluble vitamins and antioxidants are of relevance in health and disease. Current methods to extract these compounds from biological fluids mainly need use of multi-steps and multi organic solvents. They are time-consuming and difficult to apply to treat simultaneously large sample number. We here describe a single-step, one solvent extraction of fat-soluble vitamins and antioxidants from biological fluids, and the chromatographic separation of all-trans-retinoic acid, 25-hydroxycholecalciferol, all-trans-retinol, astaxanthin, lutein, zeaxanthin, trans-β-apo-8'-carotenal, γ-tocopherol, β-cryptoxanthin, α-tocopherol, phylloquinone, lycopene, α-carotene, β-carotene and coenzyme Q 10 . Extraction is obtained by adding one volume of biological fluid to two acetonitrile volumes, vortexing for 60s and incubating for 60min at 37°C under agitation. HPLC separation occurs in 30min using Hypersil C18, 100×4.6mm, 5μm particle size column, gradient from 70% methanol+30% H 2 O to 100% acetonitrile, flow rate of 1.0ml/min and 37°C column temperature. Compounds are revealed using highly sensitive UV-VIS diode array detector. The HPLC method suitability was assessed in terms of sensitivity, reproducibility and recovery. Using the present extraction and chromatographic conditions we obtained values of the fat-soluble vitamins and antioxidants in serum from 50 healthy controls similar to those found in literature. Additionally, the profile of these compounds was also measured in seminal plasma from 20 healthy fertile donors. Results indicate that this simple, rapid and low cost sample processing is suitable to extract fat-soluble vitamins and antioxidants from biological fluids and can be applied in clinical and nutritional studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Salt precipitation and dissolution in the late Quaternary Dead Sea: Evidence from chemical and δ37Cl composition of pore fluids and halites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Elan J.; Yechieli, Yoseph; Gavrieli, Ittai; Lazar, Boaz; Kiro, Yael; Stein, Mordechai; Sivan, Orit

    2018-04-01

    The chemical composition and δ37Cl of pore fluids from the ICDP core drilled in the deepest floor of the terminal and hypersaline Dead Sea, and halites from the adjacent Mount Sedom salt diapir, are used to establish the dynamics of halite precipitation and dissolution during the last interglacial and glacial periods. Between ∼132 and 116 thousand years ago (ka) halites precipitated in the lake resulting in the expulsion of Na+ and Cl- from the residual solution. Over 50% of the Cl- reservoir was removed, resulting in a decrease in the Na/Cl ratio from 0.57 to 0.19. This process was accompanied by a decrease in δ37Cl values in the precipitating halites and the associated residual Cl- in the lake. The observed decrease fits a Rayleigh distillation curve with a fractionation factor of Δ(NaCl-Dead Sea solution) = +0.32‰ (±0.12) determined in the present study. This behavior implies negligible contribution of external sources of Cl- to the lake during the main peak of the last interglacial, MIS5e. Subsequently, during the last glacial (ca. 117 to 17 ka) dissolution of halite took place, the Na+ and Cl- inventory were replenished, accompanied by an increase in Na/Cl from 0.21 to 0.55 and in the δ37Cl values from -0.46‰ to -0.12‰. While the lake underwent significant dilution during that time, the decrease in salinity was somewhat suppressed by the dissolution of the halite which was mostly derived from Mount Sedom salt diapir.

  3. Active stress from earthquake focal mechanisms along the Padan-Adriatic side of the Northern Apennines (Italy), with considerations on stress magnitudes and pore-fluid pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boncio, Paolo; Bracone, Vito

    2009-10-01

    The active tectonic regime along the outer Northern Apennines (Padan-Adriatic area) is a matter of debate. We analyse the active tectonic regime by systematically inverting earthquake focal mechanisms in terms of their driving stress field, comparing two different stress inversion methods. Earthquakes within the area often deviate from Andersonian conditions, being characterized by reverse or transpressional slip on high-angle faults even if the regime is almost purely thrust faulting (e.g. Reggio Emilia 1996 and Faenza 2000 earthquakes). We analyse the stress conditions at faulting for the Reggio Emilia and Faenza earthquakes in order to infer the stress magnitudes and the possible role of fluid pressures. The stress analysis defines a consistent pattern of sub-horizontal active deviatoric compression arranged nearly perpendicular to the eastern front of the Padan-Adriatic fold-and-thrust system, independent of the stress inversion method used. The results are consistent with active compression operating within the Padan-Adriatic belt. The stress field is thrust faulting (sub-vertical σ3), except for the Cesena-Forlì and Ancona areas, where a strike-slip regime (sub-vertical or steeply-plunging σ2) operates. The strike-slip regimes are interpreted as being caused by the superposition of local tensional stresses due to oroclinal bending (i.e. rotations of the belt about vertical axes) on the regional compressional stress field. Kinematic complexities characterize the 1996 Reggio Emilia seismic sequence. The distribution of these complexities is not random, suggesting that they are due to local variations of the regional stress field within the unfaulted rocks surrounding the coseismic rupture. The stress conditions at faulting for the Reggio Emilia 1996 and Faenza 2000 earthquakes, coupled with the observation that seismicity in the Padan-Adriatic area often occurs in swarms, suggest that high pore-fluid pressures (Pf ≥ 70% of the lithostatic load) operate

  4. Study of methane solubility in oil base used in oil base drilling fluid; Estudo da solubilidade de metano em base oleo utilizada em fluido de perfuracao base oleo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Carolina Teixeira da; Mariolani, Jose Ricardo Lenzi [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil); Ribeiro, Paulo Roberto; Lomba, Rosana Fatima Teixeira; Bonet, Euclides Jose

    2004-07-01

    During drilling a well, it is necessary to prevent and control high pressurized zones because while drilling on those zones, could occur a kick if the formation pressure were higher then downhole pressure, allowing the entering of undesirables fluids from the formation to the wellbore. If the well is not controlled this kick could became a blowout, generating damages to the environment, to the equipment and the human life. When drilling using oil-based mud, the concern related to the well control would be higher due the gas solubility in the mud, which could make it hard to detect the kick, especially in deep and ultra deep waters. In this work we have studied the interaction between methane and organic liquids used in drilling fluids, and the measurement and analysis of the thermodynamic properties of those gas liquid mixtures. There have been measured parameters like the oil formation volume factor (FVF{sub o}), bubble pressure, solubility (Rs) and the density of the saturated liquid in function of methane mole fraction and temperature. The results have shown that the gas solubility, at downhole conditions and during kick circulation, is a factor very important to the safety during well drilling in deep and ultra deep waters. (author)

  5. Evaluation of solubility in simulated lung fluid of metals present in the slag from a metallurgical industry to produce metallic zinc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Rosilda M G; Carneiro, Luana G; Afonso, Júlio C; Cunha, Kenya M D

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the solubility parameters (rapid and slow dissolution rates, rapid and slow dissolution fractions) for nickel, cadmium, zinc and manganese compounds present in a pile of slag accumulated under exposure to weathering. This slag was generated by a metallurgical industry that produced zinc and zinc alloys from hemimorphite (Zn(4)(OH)(2)Si(2)O(7).H(2)O) and willemite (Zn(2)SiO(4)) minerals. A static dissolution test in vitro was used to determine the solubility parameters and Gamble's solution was used as the simulated lung fluid (SLF), on a time basis ranging from 10 min to 1 year. The metal concentrations in the slag samples and in the SLF were determined using Particle Induced X-rays Emission (PIXE). There are significant differences in terms of solubility parameters among the metals. The results indicated that the zinc, nickel, cadmium and manganese compounds present in the slag were moderately soluble in the SLF. The rapid dissolution fractions of these metals are associated with their sulfates. In conclusion, this study confirms the harmful effects on the neighboring population of the airborne particles containing these metals that came from the slag.

  6. Experimental determination of magnesia and silica solubilities in graphite-saturated and redox-buffered high-pressure COH fluids in equilibrium with forsterite + enstatite and magnesite + enstatite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiraboschi, Carla; Tumiati, Simone; Sverjensky, Dimitri; Pettke, Thomas; Ulmer, Peter; Poli, Stefano

    2018-01-01

    We experimentally investigated the dissolution of forsterite, enstatite and magnesite in graphite-saturated COH fluids, synthesized using a rocking piston cylinder apparatus at pressures from 1.0 to 2.1 GPa and temperatures from 700 to 1200 °C. Synthetic forsterite, enstatite, and nearly pure natural magnesite were used as starting materials. Redox conditions were buffered by Ni-NiO-H2O (ΔFMQ = - 0.21 to - 1.01), employing a double-capsule setting. Fluids, binary H2O-CO2 mixtures at the P, T, and fO2 conditions investigated, were generated from graphite, oxalic acid anhydrous (H2C2O4) and water. Their dissolved solute loads were analyzed through an improved version of the cryogenic technique, which takes into account the complexities associated with the presence of CO2-bearing fluids. The experimental data show that forsterite + enstatite solubility in H2O-CO2 fluids is higher compared to pure water, both in terms of dissolved silica ( mSiO2 = 1.24 mol/kgH2O versus mSiO2 = 0.22 mol/kgH2O at P = 1 GPa, T = 800 °C) and magnesia ( mMgO = 1.08 mol/kgH2O versus mMgO = 0.28 mol/kgH2O) probably due to the formation of organic C-Mg-Si complexes. Our experimental results show that at low temperature conditions, a graphite-saturated H2O-CO2 fluid interacting with a simplified model mantle composition, characterized by low MgO/SiO2 ratios, would lead to the formation of significant amounts of enstatite if solute concentrations are equal, while at higher temperatures these fluid, characterized by MgO/SiO2 ratios comparable with that of olivine, would be less effective in metasomatizing the surrounding rocks. However, the molality of COH fluids increases with pressure and temperature, and quintuplicates with respect to the carbon-free aqueous fluids. Therefore, the amount of fluid required to metasomatize the mantle decreases in the presence of carbon at high P- T conditions. COH fluids are thus effective carriers of C, Mg and Si in the mantle wedge up to the shallowest

  7. Relation of soluble RANKL and osteoprotegerin levels in blood and gingival crevicular fluid to the degree of root resorption after orthodontic tooth movement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyrovola, J.B.; Halazonetis, D.J.; Makou, M.; Perrea, D.; Dontas, I.; Vlachos, I.S.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study was the determination of the levels of osteoprotegerin and soluble receptor activator of nuclear factor-(KB) ligand (RANKL) in blood serum and in gingival crevicular fluid relative to the degree of orthodontic root resorption in a rat model. Blood samples and gingival crevicular fluid were collected from fourteen 6-month-old male Wistar rats weighing 350-500 g. A 25-g closed orthodontic coil spring was inserted between each upper right first molar and the upper incisors. After 21 days of loading, both upper first molars (treated and control) were extracted and studied under microcomputed tomography scanning. Statistical analysis demonstrated a positive linear correlation between the initial concentration of RANKL in blood serum and the degree of root resorption. The ratio of the initial concentrations of osteoprotegerin to RANKL in blood serum proved to be an independent prognostic factor of the degree of root resorption. The initial concentration of RANKL in gingival crevicular fluid showed a negative correlation to the initial concentration of RANKL in blood serum and for a finite range of initial concentrations of osteoprotegerin in gingival crevicular fluid, the dental root seemed protected against extreme external root resorption. Finally, the concentration of osteoprotegerin in blood serum decreased significantly in cases of severe root resorption. (author)

  8. Dissolution enhancement of a poorly water-soluble antimalarial drug by means of a modified multi-fluid nozzle pilot spray drier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahoo, Nanda Gopal; Kakran, Mitali; Li Lin; Judeh, Zaher; Mueller, Rainer H.

    2011-01-01

    A spray drier with a modified multi-fluid nozzle was used to prepare microparticles of a poorly water-soluble antimalarial drug, artemisinin (ART), with the aim of improving its dissolution in water. ART was co-spray dried with a hydrophilic polymer, polyethylene glycol (PEG). The differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction studies showed that the crystallinity of ART decreased after spray drying. Compared to the physical mixture of ART and PEG, the amorphous phase of ART in the spray dried ART-PEG composites increased, which depended on the weight ratio of drug to polymer. The phase-solubility studies revealed that the aqueous solubility of ART was improved by the presence of PEG. The dissolution of ART from the spray dried ART-PEG composites was more rapid than that from their respective physical mixture and the original ART powder. For example, the dissolution of ART from the spray dried ART-PEG composite (1:6) was 6.5 times higher than that from the original ART powder in the first 30 min. In the mathematical modeling, the Weibull and Korsemeyer-Peppas models were found to best fit to the in vitro dissolution data and then the drug release mechanism was considered as the Fickian diffusion.

  9. Mutual Solubility Study in Supercritical Fluid Extraction of Tocopherols from Crude Palm Oil Using CO2 Solvent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhairi A. Sata

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available In this article, the mutual solubility of tocopherols from crude palm oil was studied using carbon dioxide as a solvent at the temperatures of 80, 100 and 120 ºC. Each sample from the phase equilibrium unit contained two parts. The liquid part was analyzed by gas chromatography (GC in order to measure the tocopherol composition and, on the other hand, the vapor phase was conducted in an expansion vessel in order to measure the pressure increment during the expansion process. Two phase equilibrium data was calculated using the liquid phase composition and pressure increments during the expansion process. Results showed that the maximum solubility of tocopherols was around 2.27% at a temperature of 120 ºC and at pressure of 5.44 MPa.

  10. Assessment of the solubility of thorium and uranium from black sand of Camargue in both simulated lung and gut fluids for dose calculation after internal exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frelon, S.; Chazel, V.; Tourlonias, E.; Paquet, F. [IRSN/ DRPH/ SRBE, LRTOX, BP 166, 26702 Pierrelatte Cedex (France); Blanchardon, E. [IRSN/ DRPH/ SDI, LEDI, BP 17, 92262 Fontenay Aux Roses Cedex (France); Bouisset, P. [IRSN/ DEI/ STEME, LMRE, Bois des rames, 91400 Orsay (France); Pourcelot, L. [IRSN/ DEI/ SESURE, LERCM, BP3, 13 115 St Paul lez Durance Cedex (France)

    2006-07-01

    In the south of France, some beaches of Camargue present a high rate of natural radioactivity due to thorium and uranium from zircon and apatite heavy minerals present in the so-called black sand. These radionuclides may lead to internal exposure consecutive to inhalation or ingestion of this sand. The accurate assessment of radiological risk after internal exposure of public frequenting these beaches requires some information on the human bioavailability of U and Th from the sand. Both routes of intake were studied in this work and the consecutive dose delivered was calculated under two different scenarios for each type of exposure. As far as inhalation is concerned, the first important conclusion is that the inhalable fraction, i.e. particles with aerodynamic diameters below 50 {mu}m, was tiny (0.002%) in this sample of sand. Moreover in vitro assays of solubility were performed for this fraction and showed that U and Th as well as their progeny presented moderate solubility. Then effective doses under several scenarios were calculated and seem to demonstrate a very poor risk of exposure after inhalation. Indeed, a dose of 1 mSv would be received by a babies after inhalation of about 40 Kg of sand, that is impossible, whereas a more realistic scenario of chronic exposure only reached 31 {mu} Sv. In case of ingestion, the solubility of Th and U in the gastrointestinal fluids was found to be very low with a maximum solubility of 0.5% of the initial mass of radioelement in the sample of sand. Then the worst hypothesis studied yields an effective dose of 0.018 mSv./(g-swallowed sand) that is roughly 50 times less than the legal annual dose limit for members of the public. as a conclusion, the possible internal dose after exposure by inhalation or ingestion of black sand of Camargue seems to be very low under the conditions of this study. (N.C.)

  11. Assessment of the solubility of thorium and uranium from black sand of Camargue in both simulated lung and gut fluids for dose calculation after internal exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frelon, S.; Chazel, V.; Tourlonias, E.; Paquet, F.; Blanchardon, E.; Bouisset, P.; Pourcelot, L.

    2006-01-01

    In the south of France, some beaches of Camargue present a high rate of natural radioactivity due to thorium and uranium from zircon and apatite heavy minerals present in the so-called black sand. These radionuclides may lead to internal exposure consecutive to inhalation or ingestion of this sand. The accurate assessment of radiological risk after internal exposure of public frequenting these beaches requires some information on the human bioavailability of U and Th from the sand. Both routes of intake were studied in this work and the consecutive dose delivered was calculated under two different scenarios for each type of exposure. As far as inhalation is concerned, the first important conclusion is that the inhalable fraction, i.e. particles with aerodynamic diameters below 50 μm, was tiny (0.002%) in this sample of sand. Moreover in vitro assays of solubility were performed for this fraction and showed that U and Th as well as their progeny presented moderate solubility. Then effective doses under several scenarios were calculated and seem to demonstrate a very poor risk of exposure after inhalation. Indeed, a dose of 1 mSv would be received by a babies after inhalation of about 40 Kg of sand, that is impossible, whereas a more realistic scenario of chronic exposure only reached 31 μ Sv. In case of ingestion, the solubility of Th and U in the gastrointestinal fluids was found to be very low with a maximum solubility of 0.5% of the initial mass of radioelement in the sample of sand. Then the worst hypothesis studied yields an effective dose of 0.018 mSv./(g-swallowed sand) that is roughly 50 times less than the legal annual dose limit for members of the public. as a conclusion, the possible internal dose after exposure by inhalation or ingestion of black sand of Camargue seems to be very low under the conditions of this study. (N.C.)

  12. A soluble, high-affinity, interleukin-4-binding protein is present in the biological fluids of mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez-Botran, R.; Vitetta, E.S.

    1990-01-01

    Cytokines such as interleukin 4 (IL-4) play a key role in the regulation of immune responses, but little is known about how their multiple activities are regulated in vivo. In this report, we demonstrate that an IL-4-binding protein (IL-4BP) is constitutively present in the biological fluids of mice (serum, ascites fluid, and urine). Binding of 125 I-labeled IL-4 to the IL-4BP is specific and saturable and can be inhibited by an excess of unlabeled IL-4 but not IL-2. The IL-4BP binds IL-4 with an affinity similar to that reported for the cellular IL-4 with an affinity similar to that reported for the cellular IL-4 receptor (K d ∼7 x 10 -11 M) and has a molecular mass of 30-40 kDa and pI values of 3.6-4.8. IL-4BP-containing biological fluids or purified IL-4BP competitively inhibit the binding of 125 I-labeled IL-4 to mouse T or B cells and inhibit the biological activity of IL-4 but not IL-2. The serum levels of IL-4BP in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice are lower than those of normal mice. The above findings suggest that IL-4BP plays an important immunoregulatory role in vivo

  13. A review of chromatographic methods for the determination of water- and fat-soluble vitamins in biological fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaźniewicz-Łada, Marta; Główka, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Vitamins are an essential element of nutrition and thus contribute to human health. Vitamins catalyze many biochemical reactions and their lack or excess can cause health problems. Therefore, monitoring vitamin concentrations in plasma or other biological fluids may be useful in the diagnosis of various disorders as well as in the treatment process. Several chromatographic methods have been developed for the determination of these compounds in biological samples, including high-performance liquid chromatography with UV and fluorescence detection. Recently, high-performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry methods have been widely used for the determination of vitamins in complex matrices because of their high sensitivity and selectivity. This method requires preconditioning of samples for analysis, including protein precipitation and/or various extraction techniques. The choice of method may depend on the desired cost, convenience, turnaround time, specificity, and accuracy of the information to be obtained. This article reviews the recently reported chromatographic methods used for determination of vitamins in biological fluids. Relevant papers published mostly during the last 5 years were identified by an extensive PubMed search using appropriate keywords. Particular attention was given to the preparation steps and extraction techniques. This report may be helpful in the selection of procedures that are appropriate for certain types of biological materials and analytes. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Water-soluble proteinase activity of gastric fluids in the European whip snake, Hierophis viridiflavus: an experimental preliminary survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Felicioli

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the mechanism of metabolic digestion and of food assimilation in wild snake species is of fundamental importance to compare trophic niches, their adaptive significance and evolutionary patterns of diet selection for different snake species. From two adult Hierophis viridiflavus males in fasting condition, we sampled gastric fluids using fiberoptic endoscopy. We analyzed the proteolytic activities (optimal pH and temperature, response to inhibitors of snake samples by zymography techniques. The two major protease activity bands were always detected at every tested pH. Activity bands were also detectable over 37 °C; in particular both bands showed the highest activity ranging from 55 °C to 60 °C. Ranging from 65 °C to 85 °C, one band remained visible while the other band disappeared over 60 °C. The pattern of proteolytic enzymes activity of sampled gastric fluids highlighted a scenario composed of few active proteases, reflecting the feeding status (e.g., fasting of studied snakes. Detection of proteolytic activity until 85 °C, as in prokaryotic organisms, supported the hypothesis about the presence of proteases of exogenous source.

  15. On the Peculiar Molecular Shape and Size Dependence of the Dynamics of Fluids confined in a Small-Pore Metal-Organic Framework

    KAUST Repository

    Skarmoutsos, Ioannis; Eddaoudi, Mohamed; Maurin, Guillaume

    2018-01-01

    .e. the Metal-Organic Framework SIFSIX-2-Cu-i. These computations unveil an unprecedented molecular symmetry dependence of the translational and rotational dynamics of fluids confined in channel-like nanoporous materials. In particular this peculiar behaviour

  16. Soluble CD14 in cerebrospinal fluid is associated with markers of inflammation and axonal damage in untreated HIV-infected patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Sofie; Pedersen, Karin Kæreby; Anesten, Birgitta

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: HIV-associated cognitive impairment has declined since the introduction of combination antiretroviral treatment (cART). However, milder forms of cognitive impairment persist. Inflammation in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) has been associated with cognitive impairment, and CSF neurofila......BACKGROUND: HIV-associated cognitive impairment has declined since the introduction of combination antiretroviral treatment (cART). However, milder forms of cognitive impairment persist. Inflammation in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) has been associated with cognitive impairment, and CSF...... neurofilament light chain protein (NFL) and CSF neopterin concentrations are increased in those patients. Microbial translocation in HIV infection has been suggested to contribute to chronic inflammation, and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and soluble CD14 (sCD14) are markers of microbial translocation...... and the resulting monocyte activation, respectively. We hypothesised that microbial translocation contributes to inflammation and axonal damage in the central nervous system (CNS) in untreated HIV infection. METHODS: We analyzed paired samples of plasma and CSF from 62 HIV-infected, untreated patients without...

  17. Simultaneous analysis for water- and fat-soluble vitamins by a novel single chromatography technique unifying supercritical fluid chromatography and liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguchi, Kaori; Fukusaki, Eiichiro; Bamba, Takeshi

    2014-10-03

    Chromatography techniques usually use a single state in the mobile phase, such as liquid, gas, or supercritical fluid. Chromatographers manage one of these techniques for their purpose but are sometimes required to use multiple methods, or even worse, multiple techniques when the target compounds have a wide range of chemical properties. To overcome this challenge, we developed a single method covering a diverse compound range by means of a "unified" chromatography which completely bridges supercritical fluid chromatography and liquid chromatography. In our method, the phase state was continuously changed in the following order; supercritical, subcritical and liquid. Moreover, the gradient of the mobile phase starting at almost 100% CO2 was replaced with 100% methanol at the end completely. As a result, this approach achieved further extension of the polarity range of the mobile phase in a single run, and successfully enabled the simultaneous analysis of fat- and water-soluble vitamins with a wide logP range of -2.11 to 10.12. Furthermore, the 17 vitamins were exceptionally separated in 4min. Our results indicated that the use of dense CO2 and the replacement of CO2 by methanol are practical approaches in unified chromatography covering diverse compounds. Additionally, this is a first report to apply the novel approach to unified chromatography, and can open another door for diverse compound analysis in a single chromatographic technique with single injection, single column and single system. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Cerebrospinal fluid and plasma concentration of soluble intercellular adhesion molecule1, vascular cell adhesion molecule1 and endothelial leukocyte adhesion molecule in patients with acute ischemic b

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selaković Vesna M.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Leukocyte migration into the ischemic area is a complex process controlled by adhesion molecules (AM in leukocytes and endothelium, by migratory capacity of leukocytes and the presence of hemotaxic agents in the tissue. In this research it was supposed that in the blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF of patients in the acute phase of ischemic brain disease (IBD there were relevant changes in the concentration of soluble AM (sICAM-1 sVCAM-1 and sE-selectin, that could have been the indicators of the intensity of damaging processes in central nervous system (CNS. Methods. The study included 45 IBD patients, 15 with transient ischemic attack (TIA 15 with reversible ischemic attack (RIA, and 15 with brain infarction (BI of both sexes, mean age 66±7. Control group consisted of 15 patients with radicular lesions of discal origin, subjected to diagnostic radiculography without the signs of interruption in the passage of CSF. Changes of selected biochemical parameters were determined in all patients in frame 72 hours since the occurence of an ischemic episode. Concentrations of soluble AM were determined in plasma and CSF by ELISA. Total number of leukocytes (TNL in peripheral blood was determined by hematological analyzer. Results. The results showed that during the first 72 hrs of IBD significant increases occured in TNL and that the increase was progressive compared to the severeness of the disease. Significant increase of soluble AM concentration was shown in plasma of IBD patients. The increase was highest in BI somewhat lower in RIA and the lowest in TIA patients compared to the control. In CSF concentrations of sICAM-1, sVCAM-1 and sE-selectin demonstrated similar increasing trend as in plasma. Conclusion. TNL, as well as the soluble AM concentrations in plasma and CSF, were increased during the acute IBD phase and progressive in relation to the severeness of the disease, so that they might have been the indicators of CNS inflammatory

  19. Evaluation of solubility in simulated lung fluid of metals present in the sludge from a metallurgical industry to produce metallic zinc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, Rosilda Maria Gomes de

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the solubility parameters (rapid and slow dissolution rates, rapid and slow dissolution fractions) metal particles present in a pile of sludge accumulated under exposure to weathering from the Cia Mercantil Inga, located at the Ilha da Madeira, Sepetiba Bay, Rio de Janeiro. Plant samples collected in the neighboring of the pile and bioindicators placed in the region and collected after some months indicated that the inhabitants of Ilha da Madeira have been exposed to trace elements such zinc, cadmium, mercury and lead, produced during the processing of zinc minerals (hemimorphite - Zn 4 (OH) 2 Si 2 O 7 .H 2 O, and willemite - Zn 2 SiO 4 ). A static dissolution test in vitro was used to determine the solubility parameters using a simulated lung fluid (SLF), on a time basis ranging from 10 min to 1 year. The metal concentrations in the sludge samples and in the SLF were determined using Particle Induced X-rays Emission (PIXE). In conclusion, this study confirms the harmful effects on the neighboring population of the airborne particles containing these metals that came from the sludge. The solubility parameters obtained for Zn, Cd, Cr, Ni and Mn present in the rapid dissolution fraction in SLF were 0.945; 0.473; 0.226; 0.300 and 0.497, respectively, and the corresponding times for half life of dissolution of the rapid fraction were f r = 2.082 days; f r = 0.09 days; f r = 0.37 days; f r = 0.332 days ad f r = 0.99 days; for the slow dissolution fraction times were f r = 146.95 days; f r = 63 days; f r = 86.64 days; f r = 79.66 days and f r = 59.84 days. These values indicate that these metals present a moderate absorption level in SLF, and may be classified as M type, according to the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). The use of solubility parameters allowed a better description of the kinetic behaviour of the sludge in the human body and, therefore, a better evaluation of the worker’s risk to

  20. Permselectivity of the liver blood-lymph (ascitic fluid) barrier to macromolecules in decompensated cirrhosis: relation to calculated pore-size

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl

    1983-01-01

    in plasma and ascitic fluid from 13 cirrhotic patients. As previously substantiated in patients with cirrhosis, the ascitic fluid/plasma concentration ratio (R) of a protein is proportional to the transport rate from blood to lymph (ascitic fluid). Mean Ralb = 0.28 and RIgG = 0.29 were identical......, but significantly higher than, RIgM = 0.18 (P less than 0.01). Ralb was directly correlated to RIgG (r = 0.97, P less than 0.001) and to RIgM (r = 0.78, P less than 0.005). Mean RIgG/Ralb = 1.03, which expresses the relative flux rates between IgG and albumin, was significantly above the ratio between the free...... diffusion coefficients (DIgG/Dalb = 0.64, P less than 0.01). Mean RIgM/Ralb = 0.61 was significantly above DIgM/Dalb = 0.39 (P less than 0.05) and significantly below unity (P less than 0.01). The results are best explained by filtration as the dominant mechanism of the liver blood-lymph (ascitic fluid...

  1. Supercritical fluid chromatographic resolution of water soluble isomeric carboxyl/amine terminated peptides facilitated via mobile phase water and ion pair formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, M A; Riley, F; Ashraf-Khorassani, M; Taylor, L T

    2012-04-13

    Both analytical scale and preparative scale packed column supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) have found widespread applicability for chiral separations of multiple polar pharmaceutical candidates. However, SFC is rapidly becoming an achiral technique. More specifically, ion pair SFC is finding greater utility for separation of ionic analytes such as amine salts and organic sulfonates. The key to this success is, in part, the incorporation of additives such as trifluoroacetic acid and ammonium acetate into the mobile phase in association with a wide variety of both bonded silica stationary phases and high purity bare silica. Ion pairing SFC coupled with evaporative light scattering detection and mass spectrometric detection is presented here for the separation of water soluble, uncapped, isomeric peptide pairs that differ in amino acid arrangement. The separation is best achieved on either diol-bonded silica or bare silica with 1-5% (w/w) water as a significant ingredient in the mobile phase. Nitrogenous stationary phases such as 2-ethylpyridine, which had been very successful for the separation of capped peptides failed to yield the desired separation regardless of the mobile phase composition. A HILIC type retention mechanism is postulated for the separation of both isomeric uncapped peptide pairs. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Application of supercritical fluid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry to the determination of fat-soluble vitamins in selected food products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberson, Jean-Marie; Campos-Giménez, Esther; Rivière, Johann; Martin, Frédéric

    2018-06-01

    In the present manuscript, we describe a fully optimized and validated method suitable to analyse nine compounds (retinyl acetate, retinyl palmitate, retinol, α-tocopherol, α-tocopheryl acetate, cholecalciferol, ergocalciferol, phylloquinone, menaquinone-4) representing the major contributors to the fat-soluble vitamin activity of selected food products (infant formulas, adult nutritionals, infant cereals and mixed meals). Sample preparation involves direct solvent extraction using enzyme-assisted matrix disintegration and methanolic protein precipitation. Direct injection of the extract allows quantification of vitamins A, E and K in only 7 min, while vitamin D is determined after fast derivatization of the extract. Separation is achieved by supercritical fluid chromatography and detection performed by tandem mass spectrometry in positive Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization mode. Results on a Standard Reference Material (SRM 1849a Infant/Adult Nutritional) were not statistically different from reference values. Full validation of the method showed excellent overall performance. Average recovery rate was between 90 and 110% for all vitamins and matrixes. The methodology shows enhanced safety and reduced cost as compared with previously published methods, together with potential for application to more complex matrixes. The full procedure can be easily applied in control laboratories dramatically increasing sample throughput and reducing solvent consumption. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Supercritical Fluid Chromatography with Photodiode Array Detection in the Determination of Fat-Soluble Vitamins in Hemp Seed Oil and Waste Fish Oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Tyśkiewicz

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available In the presented study for the first time a new, optimized, fast SFC (supercritical fluid chromatography method was applied to separate in one run fat-soluble vitamins from waste fish oil, including cis-and trans-retinyl palmitate, cis- and trans-retinyl acetate, retinol, α-tocopherol, β-tocopherol, γ‑tocopherol, δ-tocopherol, ergocalciferol (D2, cholecalciferol (D3, cis- and trans-phylloquinone (K1 and menaquinone-4 (K2-MK4. Vitamins were baseline separated on an Acquity UPC2 (ultra performance convergence chromatography HSS C18 SB (highly strength chemically modified silica column within 13 min. The influence of the stationary phase, such as Torus 1-AA (1-aminoanthracene, Torus Diol (high density diol, Torus DEA (diethylamine, BEH (silica with no bonding, BEH-2EP (2-ethylpirydine, CSH Fluoro-Phenyl (silica with fluoro-phenyl groups, column temperature, flow rate and back pressure on the separation of the compounds was described. The application of the modified saponification procedure allowed us to increase concentration in the sample prepared for the analysis of γ‑tocopherol from less than 1% (wt % to 14% for the first time. In addition, α‑tocopherol, γ‑tocopherol, δ‑tocopherol and retinol were identified in waste fish oil. Vitamin purification and analysis in waste fish oil are reported for the first time here. Due to the short time and effectiveness of the proposed method, it can be easily applied in industrial processes.

  4. The Effect of the Pore Entrance on Particle Motion in Slit Pores: Implications for Ultrathin Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delavari, Armin; Baltus, Ruth

    2017-08-10

    Membrane rejection models generally neglect the effect of the pore entrance on intrapore particle transport. However, entrance effects are expected to be particularly important with ultrathin membranes, where membrane thickness is typically comparable to pore size. In this work, a 2D model was developed to simulate particle motion for spherical particles moving at small Re and infinite Pe from the reservoir outside the pore into a slit pore. Using a finite element method, particles were tracked as they accelerated across the pore entrance until they reached a steady velocity in the pore. The axial position in the pore where particle motion becomes steady is defined as the particle entrance length (PEL). PELs were found to be comparable to the fluid entrance length, larger than the pore size and larger than the thickness typical of many ultrathin membranes. Results also show that, in the absence of particle diffusion, hydrodynamic particle-membrane interactions at the pore mouth result in particle "funneling" in the pore, yielding cross-pore particle concentration profiles focused at the pore centerline. The implications of these phenomena on rejection from ultrathin membranes are examined.

  5. Amniotic Fluid Soluble Myeloid Differentiation-2 (sMD-2) as Regulator of Intra-amniotic Inflammation in Infection-induced Preterm Birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulay, Antonette T; Buhimschi, Catalin S; Zhao, Guomao; Oliver, Emily A; Abdel-Razeq, Sonya S; Shook, Lydia L; Bahtiyar, Mert O; Buhimschi, Irina A

    2015-06-01

    TLR4 mediates host responses to pathogens through a mechanism that involves protein myeloid differentiation-2 (MD-2) and its soluble form sMD-2. The role of sMD2 in intra-amniotic inflammation-induced preterm birth has not been previously explored. Human amniotic fluid (AF) sMD-2 was studied by Western blotting in 152 AF samples of patients who had an amniocentesis to rule-out infection (yes infection, n = 50; no infection, n = 50) or women with normal pregnancy outcome (second trimester genetic karyotyping, n = 26; third trimester lung maturity testing, n = 26). Histological localization and mRNA expression of MD2 in fetal membranes were studied by immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR. The ability of fetal membrane to release sMD-2 and inflammatory cytokines was studied in vitro. Human AF contains three sMD-2 proteoforms whose levels of expression were lower at term. Intra-amniotic infection upregulated sMD-2. MD-2 mRNA and immunohistochemistry findings concurred. In vitro, LPS and monensin increased, while cycloheximide decreased sMD-2 production. Recombinant sMD-2 modulated TNF-α and IL-6 levels in a dose- and time-dependent fashion. sMD2 proteoforms are constitutively present in human AF. The intensity of the intra-amniotic inflammatory response to bacteria or perhaps to other TLR4 ligands may be facilitated through synthesis and release of sMD2 by the amniochorion. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Modelling aqueous solubility of sodium chloride in clays at thermodynamic conditions of hydraulic fracturing by molecular simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moučka, Filip; Svoboda, Martin; Lísal, Martin

    2017-06-28

    To address the high salinity of flow-back water during hydraulic fracturing, we have studied the equilibrium partitioning of NaCl and water between the bulk phase and clay pores. In shale rocks, such a partitioning can occur between fractures with a bulk-like phase and clay pores. We use an advanced Grand Canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) technique based on fractional exchanges of dissolved ions and water molecules. We consider a typical shale gas reservoir condition of a temperature of 365 K and pressure of 275 bar, and we represent clay pores by pyrophyllite and Na-montmorillonite slits of a width ranging from about 7 to 28 Å, covering clay pores from dry clay to clay pores with a bulk-like layer in the middle of the pore. We employ the Joung-Cheatham model for ions, SPC/E model for water and CLAYFF for the clay pores. We first determine the chemical potentials for NaCl and water in the bulk phase using Osmotic Ensemble Monte Carlo simulations. The chemical potentials are then used in GCMC to simulate the adsorption of ions and water molecules in the clay pores, and in turn to predict the salt solubility in confined solutions. Besides the thermodynamic properties, we evaluate the structure and in-plane diffusion of the adsorbed fluids, and ion conductivities.

  7. Solubility of plutonium and americium-241 from rumen contents of cattle grazing on plutonium-contaminated desert vegetation in in vitro bovine gastrointestinal fluids - August 1975 to January 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barth, J.; Giles, K.R.; Brown, K.W.

    1985-01-01

    The alimentary solubility of plutonium and americium-241 ingested by cattle grazing at Area 13 of the Nevada Test Site and the Clean Slate II site on the Tonopah Test Range in Nevada was studied in a series of experiments. For each experiment, or trial, rumen contents collected from a fistulated steer or a normal animals at the time of sacrifice were incubated in simulated bovine gastrointestinal fluids, and the solubility of plutonium and americium was analyzed following the abomasal, duodenal, jejunal, and lower intestinal digestive states. For Area 13, the peak plutonium-238 solubilities ranged from 1.09 to 9.60 percent for animals grazing in the inner enclosure that surrounds ground zero (GZ); for animals grazing in the outer enclosure, the peaks ranged from 1.86 to 18.46%. The peak plutonium-239 solubilities ranged from 0.71 to 4.81% for animals from the inner enclosure and from 0.71 to 3.61% for animals from the outer enclosure. Plutonium-238 was generally more soluble than plutonium-239. Plutonium ingested by cattle grazing in the outer enclosure was usually more soluble than plutonium ingested by cattle grazing in the inner enclosure. The highest concentrations of plutonium in the rumen contents of cattle grazing in the inner enclosure were found in trials conducted during August and November 1975 and January 1976. These concentrations decreased during the February, May, and July 1976 trials. The decrease was followed by an increase in plutonium concentration during the November 1976 trial. The concentration of americium-241 followed the same trend. 13 references, 13 tables

  8. Evolution of chemical conditions and estimated solubility controls on radionuclides in the residual waste layer during post-closure aging of high-level waste tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denham, M. E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Millings, M. R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2012-08-28

    This document provides information specific to H-Area waste tanks that enables a flow and transport model with limited chemical capabilities to account for varying waste release from the tanks through time. The basis for varying waste release is solubilities of radionuclides that change as pore fluids passing through the waste change in composition. Pore fluid compositions in various stages were generated by simulations of tank grout degradation. The first part of the document describes simulations of the degradation of the reducing grout in post-closure tanks. These simulations assume flow is predominantly through a water saturated porous medium. The infiltrating fluid that reacts with the grout is assumed to be fluid that has passed through the closure cap and into the tank. The results are three stages of degradation referred to as Reduced Region II, Oxidized Region II, and Oxidized Region III. A reaction path model was used so that the transitions between each stage are noted by numbers of pore volumes of infiltrating fluid reacted. The number of pore volumes to each transition can then be converted to time within a flow and transport model. The bottoms of some tanks in H-Area are below the water table requiring a different conceptual model for grout degradation. For these simulations the reacting fluid was assumed to be 10% infiltrate through the closure cap and 90% groundwater. These simulations produce an additional four pore fluid compositions referred to as Conditions A through D and were intended to simulate varying degrees of groundwater influence. The most probable degradation path for the submerged tanks is Condition C to Condition D to Oxidized Region III and eventually to Condition A. Solubilities for Condition A are estimated in the text for use in sensitivity analyses if needed. However, the grout degradation simulations did not include sufficient pore volumes of infiltrating fluid for the grout to evolve to Condition A. Solubility controls for use

  9. Nuclear pore complex tethers to the cytoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Martin W

    2017-08-01

    The nuclear envelope is tethered to the cytoskeleton. The best known attachments of all elements of the cytoskeleton are via the so-called LINC complex. However, the nuclear pore complexes, which mediate the transport of soluble and membrane bound molecules, are also linked to the microtubule network, primarily via motor proteins (dynein and kinesins) which are linked, most importantly, to the cytoplasmic filament protein of the nuclear pore complex, Nup358, by the adaptor BicD2. The evidence for such linkages and possible roles in nuclear migration, cell cycle control, nuclear transport and cell architecture are discussed. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Phase Transitions of Fluids in Heterogeneous Pores.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Malijevský, Alexandr

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 1 (2016), s. 13604 ISSN 1607-324X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-09914S Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : capillary condensation * wetting * Kelvin equation Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 0.882, year: 2016

  11. Estimation of adsorption-induced pore pressure and confinement in a nanoscopic slit pore by a density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grégoire, David; Malheiro, Carine; Miqueu, Christelle

    2018-03-01

    This study aims at characterising the adsorption-induced pore pressure and confinement in nanoscopic pores by molecular non-local density functional theory (DFT). Considering its important potential industrial applications, the adsorption of methane in graphitic slit pores has been selected as the test case. While retaining the accuracy of molecular simulations at pore scale, DFT has a very low computational cost that allows obtaining highly resolved pore pressure maps as a function of both pore width and thermodynamic conditions. The dependency of pore pressure on these parameters (pore width, pressure and temperature) is carefully analysed in order to highlight the effect of each parameter on the confined fluid properties that impact the solid matrix.

  12. Enhancement of plasma generation in catalyst pores with different shapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu-Ru; Neyts, Erik C.; Bogaerts, Annemie

    2018-05-01

    Plasma generation inside catalyst pores is of utmost importance for plasma catalysis, as the existence of plasma species inside the pores affects the active surface area of the catalyst available to the plasma species for catalytic reactions. In this paper, the electric field enhancement, and thus the plasma production inside catalyst pores with different pore shapes is studied with a two-dimensional fluid model. The results indicate that the electric field will be significantly enhanced near tip-like structures. In a conical pore with small opening, the strongest electric field appears at the opening and bottom corners of the pore, giving rise to a prominent ionization rate throughout the pore. For a cylindrical pore, the electric field is only enhanced at the bottom corners of the pore, with lower absolute value, and thus the ionization rate inside the pore is only slightly enhanced. Finally, in a conical pore with large opening, the electric field is characterized by a maximum at the bottom of the pore, yielding a similar behavior for the ionization rate. These results demonstrate that the shape of the pore has a significantly influence on the electric field enhancement, and thus modifies the plasma properties.

  13. Drilling fluids formulation with cationic hydro-soluble polymers as inhibitors reactive shales; Formulacao de fluidos de perfuracao contendo polimeros cationicos hidrossoluveis como inibidores de formacoes reativas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Carlos Eduardo C. de; Nascimento, Regina Sandra V. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica; Sa, Carlos Henrique [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas (CENPES)

    2004-07-01

    Poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride), having different molecular weight, and a copolymer with acrylamide were evaluated as shale inhibitor additive for water based drilling fluid, as well as the compatibility of these polycations with others additives present in the drilling fluid and the testing results for these fluids were compared with those for formulations with commercial cationic polymers from drilling fluids additives suppliers. The ability of the polymers and KCl systems in inhibiting the clay's dispersion were evaluated with hot rolling tests. The others additives, like viscosifier and fluid loss control agent, had their added amount systematically optimized by rheological and filtration tests. All cationic polymers and the electrolyte were able to inhibit the swelling and dispersion of clay and the results showed a synergistic increase in clay inhibition for the combination of polymer and KCl over either additive alone. The results suggested that greater polymer adsorption, implies in lower content of water in clays and better inhibition of swelling and dispersion of the clay. The polycations were compatible with the other additives in drilling fluids and the fluids formulated with these polymers were able to inhibit efficiently the dispersion and disintegration of clay and to keep the cuttings and barite in suspension. (author)

  14. Plutonium solubilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puigdomnech, I.; Bruno, J.

    1991-02-01

    Thermochemical data has been selected for plutonium oxide, hydroxide, carbonate and phosphate equilibria. Equilibrium constants have been evaluated in the temperature range 0 to 300 degrees C at a pressure of 1 bar to T≤100 degrees C and at the steam saturated pressure at higher temperatures. Measured solubilities of plutonium that are reported in the literature for laboratory experiments have been collected. Solubility data on oxides, hydroxides, carbonates and phosphates have been selected. No solubility data were found at temperatures higher than 60 degrees C. The literature solubility data have been compared with plutonium solubilities calculated with the EQ3/6 geochemical modelling programs, using the selected thermodynamic data for plutonium. (authors)

  15. The soluble transcobalamin receptor (sCD320) is present in cerebrospinal fluid and correlates to dementia-related biomarkers tau proteins and amyloid-beta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abuyaman, Omar; Nexo, Ebba

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cellular uptake of vitamin B12 (B12) demands binding of the vitamin to transcobalamin (TC) and recognition of TC-B12 (holoTC) by the receptor CD320. Recently, we identified a soluble form of CD320 (sCD320) in human plasma. Here we present data on the occurrence of this soluble receptor...... phospho-tau (181P) (p-tau), total tau (t-tau) and amyloid-beta 1-42 (Aβ) (n = 177) employing commercial ELISA kits (Innogenetics Company). Size exclusion chromatography was performed on a Superdex 200 column. RESULTS: The median sCD320 concentration in CSF (14 pmol/L) is around five times lower than...

  16. Using BIB-SEM to determine pore morphology and pore size distributions in coal macerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giffin, S.; Littke, R. [RWTH Aachen Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Geology and Geochemistry of Petroleum and Coal; Klaver, J.; Urai, J.L. [RWTH Aachen Univ. (Germany). Structural Geology, Tectonics and Geomechanics

    2013-08-01

    The composition of coalbeds is considerably heterogeneous, affecting the transport pathways for fluids within the coal. Transport pathways include cleats and larger pores. However, only a few clues exist as the nature of these pores. This study examines the morphology and distribution of macro- and mesopores in coal samples, using broad ion beam (BIB) milling to prepare relief- and damage-free polished surfaces of coal samples for high-resolution SEM imaging. Broad ion beam milling is advantageous to focused ion beam milling in that a larger surface area can be milled. Combining that with SEM imaging results in a useful tool to study pore morphology and distributions in the size range between 10 nm and 10 {mu}m. Since BIB-sections of a few square millimeters are not large enough to be statistically representative, results cannot be easily interpreted from a coal seam standpoint. Therefore, porosity was investigated as a function of maceral type to characterize pore morphologies. Macerals from the vitrinite and inertinite groups were selected with a known relationship to bedding. BIB-sections were milled parallel to bedding and perpendicular to bedding, and the pores were evaluated in each section. The goal of this study is to (1) qualitatively describe pore morphology with respect to maceral type and (2) quantitatively characterize pore size distributions with respect to maceral and in relationship to bedding. Our results lead to a better understanding of bulk coal porosity due to the visual, spatial representation and quantification of pores in individual macerals. (orig.)

  17. TIG Dressing Effects on Weld Pores and Pore Cracking of Titanium Weldments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Jun Yi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Weld pores redistribution, the effectiveness of using tungsten inert gas (TIG dressing to remove weld pores, and changes in the mechanical properties due to the TIG dressing of Ti-3Al-2.5V weldments were studied. Moreover, weld cracks due to pores were investigated. The results show that weld pores less than 300 μm in size are redistributed or removed via remelting due to TIG dressing. Regardless of the temperature condition, TIG dressing welding showed ductility, and there was a loss of 7% tensile strength of the weldments. Additionally, it was considered that porosity redistribution by TIG dressing was due to fluid flow during the remelting of the weld pool. Weld cracks in titanium weldment create branch cracks around pores that propagate via the intragranular fracture, and oxygen is dispersed around the pores. It is suggested that the pore locations around the LBZ (local brittle zone and stress concentration due to the pores have significant effects on crack initiation and propagation.

  18. An Evaluation of Models of Bentonite Pore Water Evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savage, David; Watson, Claire; Wilson, James (Quintessa Ltd, Henley-on-Thames (United Kingdom)); Arthur, Randy (Monitor Scientific LLC, Denver, CO (United States))

    2010-01-15

    The determination of a bentonite pore water composition and understanding its evolution of with time underpins many radioactive waste disposal issues, such as buffer erosion, canister corrosion, and radionuclide solubility, sorption, and diffusion, inter alia. The usual approach to modelling clay pore fluids is based primarily around assumed chemical equilibrium between Na+, K+, Ca2+, and Mg2+ aqueous species and ion exchange sites on montmorillonite, but also includes protonation- deprotonation of clay edge surface sites, and dissolution-precipitation of the trace mineral constituents, calcite and gypsum. An essential feature of this modelling approach is that clay hydrolysis reactions (i.e. dissolution of the aluminosilicate octahedral and tetrahedral sheets of montmorillonite) are ignored. A consequence of the omission of clay hydrolysis reactions from bentonite pore fluid models is that montmorillonite is preserved indefinitely in the near-field system, even over million-year timescales. Here, we investigate the applicability of an alternative clay pore fluid model, one that incorporates clay hydrolysis reactions as an integral component and test it against well-characterised laboratory experimental data, where key geochemical parameters, Eh and pH, have been measured directly in compacted bentonite. Simulations have been conducted using a range of computer codes to test the applicability of this alternative model. Thermodynamic data for MX-80 smectite used in the calculations were estimated using two different methods. Simulations of 'end-point' pH measurements in batch bentonite-water slurry experiments showed different pH values according to the complexity of the system studied. The most complete system investigated revealed pH values were a strong function of partial pressure of carbon dioxide, with pH increasing with decreasing PCO{sub 2} (log PCO{sub 2} values ranging from -3.5 to -7.5 bars produced pH values ranging from 7.9 to 9.6). A second

  19. Evolution Of Chemical Conditions And Estimated Plutonium Solubility In The Residual Waste Layer During Post-Closure Aging Of Tank 18

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denham, M.

    2012-01-01

    This document updates the Eh-pH transitions from grout aging simulations and the plutonium waste release model of Denham (2007, Rev. 1) based on new data. New thermodynamic data for cementitious minerals are used for the grout simulations. Newer thermodynamic data, recommended by plutonium experts (Plutonium Solubility Peer Review Report, LA-UR-12-00079), are used to estimate solubilities of plutonium at various pore water compositions expected during grout aging. In addition, a new grout formula is used in the grout aging simulations and apparent solubilities of coprecipitated plutonium are estimated using data from analysis of Tank 18 residual waste. The conceptual model of waste release and the grout aging simulations are done in a manner similar to that of Denham (2007, Rev. 1). It is assumed that the pore fluid composition passing from the tank grout into the residual waste layer controls the solubility, and hence the waste release concentration of plutonium. Pore volumes of infiltrating fluid of an assumed composition are reacted with a hypothetical grout block using The Geochemist's Workbench(reg s ign) and changes in pore fluid chemistry correspond to the number of pore fluid volumes reacted. As in the earlier document, this results in three states of grout pore fluid composition throughout the simulation period that are termed Reduced Region II, Oxidized Region II, and Oxidized Region III. The one major difference from the earlier document is that pyrite is used to account for reducing capacity of the tank grout rather than pyrrhotite. This poises Eh at -0.47 volts during Reduced Region II. The major transitions in pore fluid composition are shown. Plutonium solubilities are estimated for discrete PuO2(am,hyd) particles and for plutonium coprecipitated with iron phases in the residual waste. Thermodynamic data for plutonium from the Nuclear Energy Agency are used to estimate the solubilities of the discrete particles for the three stages of pore fluid

  20. Numerical simulation of pore size dependent anhydrite precipitation in geothermal reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mürmann, Mario; Kühn, Michael; Pape, Hansgeorg; Clauser, Christoph

    2013-04-01

    cementation in a 2D hypothetical core flooding experiment. With this new approach cementation patterns observed in the Allermöhe core samples can be explained now. The obtained results show that the variation of fluid supersaturation within a pore governs spatially heterogeneous anhydrite cementation. This variation and the fluid velocity determine the precipitation. Our numerical simulation results clearly emphasize the necessity to consider the spatial variation of supersaturation on the pore scale. References Baermann A., Kroeger J., Taugs R., Wuestenhagen K., Zarth M. (2000) Anhydrite cementation in Rhaetian Sandstone in Hamburg - Morphology and Structures, Zeitschrift für Angewandte Geologie, 46(3), 138-143 (in German). Clauser C. (2003) Numerical Simulation of Reactive Flow in Hot Aquifers. SHEMAT and processing SHEMAT, Springer Publishers, Heidelberg. Emmanuel S., Berkowitz B. (2007) Effects of pore size controlled solubility on reactive transport in heterogeneous rock, Geophysical Research Letters, 34, L06404. Putnis A., Mauthe G. (2001) The effect of pore size on cementation in porous rocks, Geofluids, 1, 37-41. Wagner R., Kühn M., Meyn V., Pape H., Vath U., Clauser C. (2005) Numerical simulation of pore space clogging in geothermal reservoirs by precipitation of anhydrite. International Journal of Rock Mechanics and Mining Sciences 42, 1070-1081, doi: 10.1016/ j.ijrmms.2005.05.008.

  1. A Novel HPLC Method for the Concurrent Analysis and Quantitation of Seven Water-Soluble Vitamins in Biological Fluids (Plasma and Urine: A Validation Study and Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margherita Grotzkyj Giorgi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An HPLC method was developed and validated for the concurrent detection and quantitation of seven water-soluble vitamins (C, B1, B2, B5, B6, B9, B12 in biological matrices (plasma and urine. Separation was achieved at 30°C on a reversed-phase C18-A column using combined isocratic and linear gradient elution with a mobile phase consisting of 0.01% TFA aqueous and 100% methanol. Total run time was 35 minutes. Detection was performed with diode array set at 280 nm. Each vitamin was quantitatively determined at its maximum wavelength. Spectral comparison was used for peak identification in real samples (24 plasma and urine samples from abstinent alcohol-dependent males. Interday and intraday precision were <4% and <7%, respectively, for all vitamins. Recovery percentages ranged from 93% to 100%.

  2. A novel HPLC method for the concurrent analysis and quantitation of seven water-soluble vitamins in biological fluids (plasma and urine): a validation study and application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giorgi, Margherita Grotzkyj; Howland, Kevin; Martin, Colin; Bonner, Adrian B

    2012-01-01

    An HPLC method was developed and validated for the concurrent detection and quantitation of seven water-soluble vitamins (C, B(1), B(2), B(5), B(6), B(9), B(12)) in biological matrices (plasma and urine). Separation was achieved at 30°C on a reversed-phase C18-A column using combined isocratic and linear gradient elution with a mobile phase consisting of 0.01% TFA aqueous and 100% methanol. Total run time was 35 minutes. Detection was performed with diode array set at 280 nm. Each vitamin was quantitatively determined at its maximum wavelength. Spectral comparison was used for peak identification in real samples (24 plasma and urine samples from abstinent alcohol-dependent males). Interday and intraday precision were vitamins. Recovery percentages ranged from 93% to 100%.

  3. HYDROXYETHYL METHACRYLATE BASED NANOCOMPOSITE HYDROGELS WITH TUNABLE PORE ARCHITECTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erhan Bat

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA based hydrogels have found increasing number of applications in areas such as chromatographic separations, controlled drug release, biosensing, and membrane separations. In all these applications, the pore size and pore interconnectivity are crucial for successful application of these materials as they determine the rate of diffusion through the matrix. 2-Hydroxyethyl methacrylate is a water soluble monomer but its polymer, polyHEMA, is not soluble in water. Therefore, during polymerization of HEMA in aqueous media, a porous structure is obtained as a result of phase separation. Pore size and interconnectivity in these hydrogels is a function of several variables such as monomer concentration, cross-linker concentration, temperature etc. In this study, we investigated the effect of monomer concentration, graphene oxide addition or clay addition on hydrogel pore size, pore interconnectivity, water uptake, and thermal properties. PolyHEMA hydrogels have been prepared by redox initiated free radical polymerization of the monomer using ethylene glycol dimethacrylate as a cross-linker. As a nanofiller, a synthetic hectorite Laponite® XLG and graphene oxide were used. Graphene oxide was prepared by the Tour Method. Pore morphology of the pristine HEMA based hydrogels and nanocomposite hydrogels were studied by scanning electron microscopy. The formed hydrogels were found to be highly elastic and flexible. A dramatic change in the pore structure and size was observed in the range between 22 to 24 wt/vol monomer at 0.5 % of cross-linker. In this range, the hydrogel morphology changes from typical cauliflower architecture to continuous hydrogel with dispersed water droplets forming the pores where the pores are submicron in size and show an interconnected structure. Such controlled pore structure is highly important when these hydrogels are used for solute diffusion or when there’s flow through monolithic hydrogels

  4. Multiple Approaches to Characterizing Pore Structure in Natural Rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Q.; Dultz, S.; Hamamoto, S.; Ewing, R. P.

    2012-12-01

    Microscopic characteristics of porous media - pore shape, pore-size distribution, and pore connectivity - control fluid flow and chemical transport, and are important in hydrogeological studies of rock formations in the context of energy, environmental, and water resources management. This presentation discusses various approaches to investigating pore structure of rock, with a particular focus on the Barnett Shale in north Texas used for natural gas production. Approaches include imbibition, tracer diffusion, porosimetry (MIP, vapor adsorption/desorption isotherms, NMR cyroporometry), and imaging (μ-tomography, Wood's metal impregnation, FIB/SEM). Results show that the Barnett Shale pores are predominantly in the nm size range, with a measured median pore-throat diameter of 6.5 nm. But small pore size is not the major contributor to low gas recovery; rather, the low gas diffusivity appears to be caused by low pore connectivity. Chemical diffusion in sparsely-connected pore spaces is not well described by classical Fickian behavior; anomalous behavior is suggested by percolation theory, and confirmed by results of imbibition tests. Our evolving complementary approaches, with their several advantages and disadvantages, provide a rich toolbox for tackling the pore structure characteristics in the Barnett Shale and other natural rocks.

  5. Evaluation of solubility in simulated lung fluid of metals present in the sludge from a metallurgical industry to produce metallic zinc; Avaliacao da solubilidade em liquido pulmonar simulado dos metais presentes no rejeito gerado por uma industria metalurgica de zinco

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, Rosilda Maria Gomes de

    2012-07-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the solubility parameters (rapid and slow dissolution rates, rapid and slow dissolution fractions) metal particles present in a pile of sludge accumulated under exposure to weathering from the Cia Mercantil Inga, located at the Ilha da Madeira, Sepetiba Bay, Rio de Janeiro. Plant samples collected in the neighboring of the pile and bioindicators placed in the region and collected after some months indicated that the inhabitants of Ilha da Madeira have been exposed to trace elements such zinc, cadmium, mercury and lead, produced during the processing of zinc minerals (hemimorphite - Zn{sub 4}(OH){sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 7}.H{sub 2}O, and willemite - Zn{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}). A static dissolution test in vitro was used to determine the solubility parameters using a simulated lung fluid (SLF), on a time basis ranging from 10 min to 1 year. The metal concentrations in the sludge samples and in the SLF were determined using Particle Induced X-rays Emission (PIXE). In conclusion, this study confirms the harmful effects on the neighboring population of the airborne particles containing these metals that came from the sludge. The solubility parameters obtained for Zn, Cd, Cr, Ni and Mn present in the rapid dissolution fraction in SLF were 0.945; 0.473; 0.226; 0.300 and 0.497, respectively, and the corresponding times for half life of dissolution of the rapid fraction were f{sub r} = 2.082 days; f{sub r} = 0.09 days; f{sub r} = 0.37 days; f{sub r} = 0.332 days ad f{sub r} = 0.99 days; for the slow dissolution fraction times were f{sub r} = 146.95 days; f{sub r} = 63 days; f{sub r} = 86.64 days; f{sub r} = 79.66 days and f{sub r} = 59.84 days. These values indicate that these metals present a moderate absorption level in SLF, and may be classified as M type, according to the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). The use of solubility parameters allowed a better description of the kinetic behaviour of the sludge in

  6. Effect of composition of simulated intestinal media on the solubility of poorly soluble compounds investigated by design of experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Cecilie Maria; Feng, Kung-I; Leithead, Andrew

    2018-01-01

    The composition of the human intestinal fluids varies both intra- and inter-individually. This will influence the solubility of orally administered drug compounds, and hence, the absorption and efficacy of compounds displaying solubility limited absorption. The purpose of this study was to assess...... studies feasible compared to single SIF solubility studies. Applying this DoE approach will lead to a better understanding of the impact of intestinal fluid composition on the solubility of a given drug compound....

  7. effect of post-precipitation treatment on the pore-structure stability of sol-gel derived lanthanum zirconate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nair, Jalajakumari; Kumar, K.N.P.; Nair, P.; van Ommen, J.G.; Ross, J.R.H.; Ross, Julian R.H.; Burggraaf, Anthonie J.; Burggraaf, Anthonie

    1998-01-01

    The importance of post-precipitation treatments (pore-fluid exchange and its removal) on the evolution of the texture of coprecipitated lanthanum zirconate has been investigated. The nature of the pore fluid and the type of fluid-removal (drying) process have shown a profound effect on the aggregate

  8. Permeabilization assay for antimicrobial peptides based on pore-spanning lipid membranes on nanoporous alumina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubacher, Henrik; Mey, Ingo; Carnarius, Christian; Lazzara, Thomas D; Steinem, Claudia

    2014-04-29

    Screening tools to study antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) with the aim to optimize therapeutic delivery vectors require automated and parallelized sampling based on chip technology. Here, we present the development of a chip-based assay that allows for the investigation of the action of AMPs on planar lipid membranes in a time-resolved manner by fluorescence readout. Anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) composed of cylindrical pores with a diameter of 70 nm and a thickness of up to 10 μm was used as a support to generate pore-spanning lipid bilayers from giant unilamellar vesicle spreading, which resulted in large continuous membrane patches sealing the pores. Because AAO is optically transparent, fluid single lipid bilayers and the underlying pore cavities can be readily observed by three-dimensional confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). To assay the membrane permeabilizing activity of the AMPs, the translocation of the water-soluble dyes into the AAO cavities and the fluorescence of the sulforhodamine 101 1,2-dihexadecanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanol-l-amine triethylammonium salt (Texas Red DHPE)-labeled lipid membrane were observed by CLSM in a time-resolved manner as a function of the AMP concentration. The effect of two different AMPs, magainin-2 and melittin, was investigated, showing that the concentrations required for membrane permeabilization and the kinetics of the dye entrance differ significantly. Our results are discussed in light of the proposed permeabilization models of the two AMPs. The presented data demonstrate the potential of this setup for the development of an on-chip screening platform for AMPs.

  9. Position-Dependent Dynamics Explain Pore-Averaged Diffusion in Strongly Attractive Adsorptive Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krekelberg, William P; Siderius, Daniel W; Shen, Vincent K; Truskett, Thomas M; Errington, Jeffrey R

    2017-12-12

    Using molecular simulations, we investigate the relationship between the pore-averaged and position-dependent self-diffusivity of a fluid adsorbed in a strongly attractive pore as a function of loading. Previous work (Krekelberg, W. P.; Siderius, D. W.; Shen, V. K.; Truskett, T. M.; Errington, J. R. Connection between thermodynamics and dynamics of simple fluids in highly attractive pores. Langmuir 2013, 29, 14527-14535, doi: 10.1021/la4037327) established that pore-averaged self-diffusivity in the multilayer adsorption regime, where the fluid exhibits a dense film at the pore surface and a lower density interior pore region, is nearly constant as a function of loading. Here we show that this puzzling behavior can be understood in terms of how loading affects the fraction of particles that reside in the film and interior pore regions as well as their distinct dynamics. Specifically, the insensitivity of pore-averaged diffusivity to loading arises from the approximate cancellation of two factors: an increase in the fraction of particles in the higher diffusivity interior pore region with loading and a corresponding decrease in the particle diffusivity in that region. We also find that the position-dependent self-diffusivities scale with the position-dependent density. We present a model for predicting the pore-average self-diffusivity based on the position-dependent self-diffusivity, which captures the unusual characteristics of pore-averaged self-diffusivity in strongly attractive pores over several orders of magnitude.

  10. Disposing of fluid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradley, J.S.

    1984-01-01

    Toxic liquid waste, eg liquid radioactive waste, is disposed of by locating a sub-surface stratum which, before removal of any fluid, has a fluid pressure in the pores thereof which is less than the hydrostatic pressure which is normal for a stratum at that depth in the chosen area, and then feeding the toxic liquid into the stratum at a rate such that the fluid pressure in the stratum never exceeds the said normal hydrostatic pressure. (author)

  11. Direct Numerical Simulation of Low Capillary Number Pore Scale Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmaeilzadeh, S.; Soulaine, C.; Tchelepi, H.

    2017-12-01

    The arrangement of void spaces and the granular structure of a porous medium determines multiple macroscopic properties of the rock such as porosity, capillary pressure, and relative permeability. Therefore, it is important to study the microscopic structure of the reservoir pores and understand the dynamics of fluid displacements through them. One approach for doing this, is direct numerical simulation of pore-scale flow that requires a robust numerical tool for prediction of fluid dynamics and a detailed understanding of the physical processes occurring at the pore-scale. In pore scale flows with a low capillary number, Eulerian multiphase methods are well-known to produce additional vorticity close to the interface. This is mainly due to discretization errors which lead to an imbalance of capillary pressure and surface tension forces that causes unphysical spurious currents. At the pore scale, these spurious currents can become significantly stronger than the average velocity in the phases, and lead to unphysical displacement of the interface. In this work, we first investigate the capability of the algebraic Volume of Fluid (VOF) method in OpenFOAM for low capillary number pore scale flow simulations. Afterward, we compare VOF results with a Coupled Level-Set Volume of Fluid (CLSVOF) method and Iso-Advector method. It has been shown that the former one reduces the VOF's unphysical spurious currents in some cases, and both are known to capture interfaces sharper than VOF. As the conclusion, we will investigate that whether the use of CLSVOF or Iso-Advector will lead to less spurious velocities and more accurate results for capillary driven pore-scale multiphase flows or not. Keywords: Pore-scale multiphase flow, Capillary driven flows, Spurious currents, OpenFOAM

  12. The pore space scramble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gormally, Alexandra; Bentham, Michelle; Vermeylen, Saskia; Markusson, Nils

    2015-04-01

    Climate change and energy security continue to be the context of the transition to a secure, affordable and low carbon energy future, both in the UK and beyond. This is reflected in for example, binding climate policy targets at the EU level, the introduction of renewable energy targets, and has also led to an increasing interest in Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) technology with its potential to help mitigate against the effects of CO2 emissions from fossil fuel burning. The UK has proposed a three phase strategy to integrate CCS into its energy system in the long term focussing on off-shore subsurface storage (DECC, 2014). The potential of CCS therefore, raises a number of challenging questions and issues surrounding the long-term storage of CO2 captured and injected into underground spaces and, alongside other novel uses of the subsurface, contributes to opening a new field for discussion on the governance of the subsurface. Such 'novel' uses of the subsurface have lead to it becoming an increasingly contested space in terms of its governance, with issues emerging around the role of ownership, liability and property rights of subsurface pore space. For instance, questions over the legal ownership of pore space have arisen with ambiguity over the legal standpoint of the surface owner and those wanting to utilise the pore space for gas storage, and suggestions of whether there are depths at which legal 'ownership' becomes obsolete (Barton, 2014). Here we propose to discuss this 'pore space scramble' and provide examples of the competing trajectories of different stakeholders, particularly in the off-shore context given its priority in the UK. We also propose to highlight the current ambiguity around property law of pore space in the UK with reference to approaches currently taken in different national contexts. Ultimately we delineate contrasting models of governance to illustrate the choices we face and consider the ethics of these models for the common good

  13. Tumor interstitial fluid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gromov, Pavel; Gromova, Irina; Olsen, Charlotta J.

    2013-01-01

    Tumor interstitial fluid (TIF) is a proximal fluid that, in addition to the set of blood soluble phase-borne proteins, holds a subset of aberrantly externalized components, mainly proteins, released by tumor cells and tumor microenvironment through various mechanisms, which include classical...

  14. Formation of the bottom-simulating reflector and its link to vertical fluid flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haacke, R.R.; Hyndman, R.D. [Natural Resources Canada, Sidney, BC (Canada). Geological Survey of Canada, Pacific Geoscience Centre; Westbrook, G.K. [Birmingham Univ., Edgbaston (United Kingdom). Dept. of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences

    2008-07-01

    Natural gas hydrates typically occur with a bottom-simulating reflector (BSR) marking the base of its hydrate stability field. This paper outlined the 2 most important mechanisms that produce free gas beneath the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ), consequently producing the BSR. It discussed the importance of hydrate recycling and the solubility-curvature mechanisms in different tectonic environments. It also explained why some areas, such as the Mackenzie Delta in the Canadian Arctic or the northern Gulf of Mexico, have natural gas hydrates without an underlying free-gas zone (FGZ) and associated BSR. The BSR is created primarily by the presence of low-velocity free gas in the pore space under the stability field. This paper focused on the widespread, diffuse distribution of natural gas hydrate in relatively low concentrations that is produced by the vertical migration of gas-rich fluids. The FGZ that occurs under the BSR achieves a steady-state thickness that depends on the diffuse, vertical fluid flux in the system. The opposite is also true, notably if the steady-state thickness of the FGZ can be measured, then the diffuse vertical fluid flux can be estimated. The presence of free gas is easier to detect than gas hydrate because of its very low seismic velocity. This enables the measurement of vertical fluid flux using geophysical methods. The regional hydrate concentration can then be predicted. This study showed that if the gas-water solubility decreases downward beneath the GHSZ, low rates of upward fluid flow enable pore water to become saturated in a thick layer beneath the GHSZ. The FGZ that this produces achieves a steady-state thickness that is sensitive to the rate of upward fluid flow. Geophysical observations that constrain the thickness of sub-BSR FGZs can therefore be used to estimate the regional, diffuse, upward fluid flux through natural gas-hydrate systems. 23 refs., 6 figs.

  15. A pore water conductivity sensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilhorst, M.A.

    2001-01-01

    The electrical permittivity and conductivity of the bulk soil are a function of the permittivity and conductivity of the pore water. For soil water contents higher than 0.10 both functions are equal, facilitating in situ conductivity measurements of the pore water. A novel method is described, based

  16. Combined use of rheometry and microscopy to understand pore structure development during coal carbonisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John J. Duffy; Miguel Castro Diaz; Colin E. Snape; Merrick R. Mahoney; Karen M. Steel [University of Nottingham, Nottingham (United Kingdom). Nottingham Fuel and Energy Centre

    2007-07-01

    The viscoelastic behaviour of coal during carbonisation plays a role in the formation, growth and coalescence of pores. While viscosity is considered to govern pore formation and growth, the coalescence of pores or stabilisation of pores is considered to be governed by elasticity, and these two factors need to be considered in tandem when investigating pore network formation. The properties of the pore network, such as the connectivity of the pores, is hypothesised to be a factor controlling the degree of pressure that the carbonising mass exerts on its surrounding walls, called oven wall pressure (OWP). When volatiles are unable to pass out through the newly formed semi-coke due to low permeability, they travel instead to the centre of the charge, possibly condense as it is cooler, and build-up to high levels, causing high OWPs. Possible causes for low permeability on the semi-coke side could include poor connectivity between pores in the resolidifying material due to lack of connections, tortuous flow paths or narrow necks between pores. Low OWPs are thought to be largely due to a reduction in the elasticity of the fluid phase which allows a greater degree of pore coalescence and ultimately pore connectivity. This paper presents viscoelastic measurements for coals exhibiting different OWPs and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of the coal, quenched at various temperatures during carbonisation to show the development of their pore networks. 12 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Laboratory characterization of shale pores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nur Listiyowati, Lina

    2018-02-01

    To estimate the potential of shale gas reservoir, one needs to understand the characteristics of pore structures. Characterization of shale gas reservoir microstructure is still a challenge due to ultra-fine grained micro-fabric and micro level heterogeneity of these sedimentary rocks. The sample used in the analysis is a small portion of any reservoir. Thus, each measurement technique has a different result. It raises the question which methods are suitable for characterizing pore shale. The goal of this paper is to summarize some of the microstructure analysis tools of shale rock to get near-real results. The two analyzing pore structure methods are indirect measurement (MIP, He, NMR, LTNA) and direct observation (SEM, TEM, Xray CT). Shale rocks have a high heterogeneity; thus, it needs multiscale quantification techniques to understand their pore structures. To describe the complex pore system of shale, several measurement techniques are needed to characterize the surface area and pore size distribution (LTNA, MIP), shapes, size and distribution of pore (FIB-SEM, TEM, Xray CT), and total porosity (He pycnometer, NMR). The choice of techniques and methods should take into account the purpose of the analysis and also the time and budget.

  18. An investigation into the effects of pore connectivity on T2 NMR relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghomeshi, Shahin; Kryuchkov, Sergey; Kantzas, Apostolos

    2018-04-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is a powerful technique used to characterize fluids and flow in porous media. The NMR relaxation curves are closely related to pore geometry, and the inversion of the NMR relaxometry data is known to give useful information with regards to pore size distribution (PSD) through the relative amplitudes of the fluids stored in the small and large pores. While this information is crucial, the main challenge for the successful use of the NMR measurements is the proper interpretation of the measured signals. Natural porous media patterns consist of complex pore structures with many interconnected or "coupled" regions, as well as isolated pores. This connectivity along the throats changes the relaxation distribution and in order to properly interpret this data, a thorough understanding of the effects of pore connectivity on the NMR relaxation distribution is warranted. In this paper we address two main points. The first pertains to the fact that there is a discrepancy between the relaxation distribution obtained from experiments, and the ones obtained from solving the mathematical models of diffusion process in the digitized images of the pore space. There are several reasons that may attribute to this such as the lack of a proper incorporation of surface roughness into the model. However, here we are more interested in the effects of pore connectivity and to understand why the typical NMR relaxation distribution obtained from experiments are wider, while the numerical simulations predict that a wider NMR relaxation distribution may indicate poor connectivity. Secondly, by not taking into account the pore coupling effects, from our experience in interpreting the data, we tend to underestimate the pore volume of small pores and overestimate the amplitudes in the large pores. The role of pore coupling becomes even more prominent in rocks with small pore sizes such as for example in shales, clay in sandstones, and in the microstructures of

  19. Dynamics of phase ordering of nematics in a pore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharya, A.; Chakrabarti, A.

    1994-06-01

    We study the kinetics of phase ordering of a nematic liquid crystal, modeled by a spin-rotor Hamiltonian, confined within a parallel piped pore. The dynamics of the rotor obeys the time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau equation. We study the generation and evolution of a variety of defect structures, and the growth of domains, with different anchoring conditions at the pore surface. Unlike in binary fluids, mere confinement with no anchoring field, does not result in slow dynamics. Homeotropic anchoring, however, leads to slow logarithmic growth. Interestingly, homogeneous anchoring dynamically generates wall defects, resulting in an Ising like structure factor at late times. (author). 27 refs, 4 figs

  20. Gas solubilities widespread applications

    CERN Document Server

    Gerrard, William

    1980-01-01

    Gas Solubilities: Widespread Applications discusses several topics concerning the various applications of gas solubilities. The first chapter of the book reviews Henr's law, while the second chapter covers the effect of temperature on gas solubility. The third chapter discusses the various gases used by Horiuti, and the following chapters evaluate the data on sulfur dioxide, chlorine data, and solubility data for hydrogen sulfide. Chapter 7 concerns itself with solubility of radon, thoron, and actinon. Chapter 8 tackles the solubilities of diborane and the gaseous hydrides of groups IV, V, and

  1. Two sides of a fault: Grain-scale analysis of pore pressure control on fault slip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhibing; Juanes, Ruben

    2018-02-01

    Pore fluid pressure in a fault zone can be altered by natural processes (e.g., mineral dehydration and thermal pressurization) and industrial operations involving subsurface fluid injection and extraction for the development of energy and water resources. However, the effect of pore pressure change on the stability and slip motion of a preexisting geologic fault remains poorly understood; yet, it is critical for the assessment of seismic hazard. Here, we develop a micromechanical model to investigate the effect of pore pressure on fault slip behavior. The model couples fluid flow on the network of pores with mechanical deformation of the skeleton of solid grains. Pore fluid exerts pressure force onto the grains, the motion of which is solved using the discrete element method. We conceptualize the fault zone as a gouge layer sandwiched between two blocks. We study fault stability in the presence of a pressure discontinuity across the gouge layer and compare it with the case of continuous (homogeneous) pore pressure. We focus on the onset of shear failure in the gouge layer and reproduce conditions where the failure plane is parallel to the fault. We show that when the pressure is discontinuous across the fault, the onset of slip occurs on the side with the higher pore pressure, and that this onset is controlled by the maximum pressure on both sides of the fault. The results shed new light on the use of the effective stress principle and the Coulomb failure criterion in evaluating the stability of a complex fault zone.

  2. Two sides of a fault: Grain-scale analysis of pore pressure control on fault slip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhibing; Juanes, Ruben

    2018-02-01

    Pore fluid pressure in a fault zone can be altered by natural processes (e.g., mineral dehydration and thermal pressurization) and industrial operations involving subsurface fluid injection and extraction for the development of energy and water resources. However, the effect of pore pressure change on the stability and slip motion of a preexisting geologic fault remains poorly understood; yet, it is critical for the assessment of seismic hazard. Here, we develop a micromechanical model to investigate the effect of pore pressure on fault slip behavior. The model couples fluid flow on the network of pores with mechanical deformation of the skeleton of solid grains. Pore fluid exerts pressure force onto the grains, the motion of which is solved using the discrete element method. We conceptualize the fault zone as a gouge layer sandwiched between two blocks. We study fault stability in the presence of a pressure discontinuity across the gouge layer and compare it with the case of continuous (homogeneous) pore pressure. We focus on the onset of shear failure in the gouge layer and reproduce conditions where the failure plane is parallel to the fault. We show that when the pressure is discontinuous across the fault, the onset of slip occurs on the side with the higher pore pressure, and that this onset is controlled by the maximum pressure on both sides of the fault. The results shed new light on the use of the effective stress principle and the Coulomb failure criterion in evaluating the stability of a complex fault zone.

  3. Can ash clog soil pores?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoof, Cathelijne; Stoof, Cathelijne; Gevaert, Anouk; Gevaert, Anouk; Baver, Christine; Baver, Christine; Hassanpour, Bahareh; Hassanpour, Bahareh; Morales, Veronica; Morales, Veronica; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Wei; Martin, Deborah; Martin, Deborah; Steenhuis, Tammo; Steenhuis, Tammo

    2015-04-01

    Wildfire can greatly increase a landscape's vulnerability to flooding and erosion events, and ash is thought to play a large role in controlling runoff and erosion processes after wildfire. Although ash can store rainfall and thereby reduce runoff and erosion for a limited period after wildfires, it has also been hypothesized to clog soil pores and reduce infiltration. Several researchers have attributed the commonly observed increase in runoff and erosion after fire to the potential pore-clogging effect of ash. Evidence is however incomplete, as to date, research has solely focused on identifying the presence of ash in the soil, with the actual flow processes associated with the infiltration and pore-clogging of ash remaining a major unknown. In several laboratory experiments, we tested the hypothesis that ash causes pore clogging to the point that infiltration is hampered and ponding occurs. We first visualized and quantified pore-scale infiltration of water and ash in sand of a range of textures and at various infiltration rates, using a digital bright field microscope capturing both photo and video. While these visualization experiments confirm field and lab observation of ash washing into soil pores, we did not observe any clogging of pores, and have not been able to create conditions for which this does occur. Additional electrochemical analysis and measurement of saturated hydraulic conductivity indicate that pore clogging by ash is not plausible. Electrochemical analysis showed that ash and sand are both negatively charged, showing that attachment of ash to sand and any resulting clogging is unlikely. Ash also had quite high saturated conductivity, and systems where ash was mixed in or lying on top of sand had similarly high hydraulic conductivity. Based on these various experiments, we cannot confirm the hypothesis that pore clogging by ash contributes to the frequently observed increase in post-fire runoff, at least for the medium to coarse sands

  4. Study of pore pressure reaction on hydraulic fracturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimonova, Mariia; Baryshnikov, Nikolay; Turuntaev, Sergey; Zenchenko, Evgeniy; Zenchenko, Petr

    2017-04-01

    We represent the results of the experimental study of the hydraulic fracture propagation influence on the fluid pore pressure. Initial pore pressure was induced by injection and production wells. The experiments were carried out according to scaling analysis based on the radial model of the fracture. All required geomechanical and hydrodynamical properties of a sample were derived from the scaling laws. So, gypsum was chosen as a sample material and vacuum oil as a fracturing fluid. The laboratory setup allows us to investigate the samples of cylindrical shape. It can be considered as an advantage in comparison with standard cubic samples, because we shouldn't consider the stress field inhomogeneity induced by the corners. Moreover, we can set 3D-loading by this setting. Also the sample diameter is big enough (43cm) for placing several wells: the fracturing well in the center and injection and production wells on two opposite sides of the central well. The experiment consisted of several stages: a) applying the horizontal pressure; b) applying the vertical pressure; c) water solution injection in the injection well with a constant pressure; d) the steady state obtaining; e) the oil injection in the central well with a constant rate. The pore pressure was recorded in the 15 points along bottom side of the sample during the whole experiment. We observe the pore pressure change during all the time of the experiment. First, the pore pressure changed due to water injection. Then we began to inject oil in the central well. We compared the obtained experimental data on the pore pressure changes with the solution of the 2D single-phase equation of pore-elasticity, and we found significant difference. The variation of the equation parameters couldn't help to resolve the discrepancy. After the experiment, we found that oil penetrated into the sample before and after the fracture initiation. This fact encouraged us to consider another physical process - the oil

  5. Capillary pressure across a pore throat in the presence of surfactants

    KAUST Repository

    Jang, Junbong

    2016-11-22

    Capillarity controls the distribution and transport of multiphase and immiscible fluids in soils and fractured rocks; therefore, capillarity affects the migration of nonaqueous contaminants and remediation strategies for both LNAPLs and DNAPLs, constrains gas and oil recovery, and regulates CO2 injection and geological storage. Surfactants alter interfacial tension and modify the invasion of pores by immiscible fluids. Experiments are conducted to explore the propagation of fluid interfaces along cylindrical capillary tubes and across pore constrictions in the presence of surfactants. Measured pressure signatures reflect the interaction between surface tension, contact angle, and the pore geometry. Various instabilities occur as the interface traverses the pore constriction, consequently, measured pressure signatures differ from theoretical trends predicted from geometry, lower capillary pressures are generated in advancing wetting fronts, and jumps are prone to under-sampling. Contact angle and instabilities are responsible for pronounced differences between pressure signatures recorded during advancing and receding tests. Pressure signatures gathered with surfactant solutions suggest changes in interfacial tension at the constriction; the transient surface tension is significantly lower than the value measured in quasi-static conditions. Interface stiffening is observed during receding fronts for solutions near the critical micelle concentration. Wetting liquids tend to form plugs at pore constrictions after the invasion of a nonwetting fluid; plugs split the nonwetting fluid into isolated globules and add resistance against fluid flow.

  6. Neptunium (IV) oxalate solubility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luerkens, D.W.

    1983-07-01

    The equilibrium solubility of neptunium (IV) oxalate in nitric/oxalic acid solutions was determined at 22 0 C, 45 0 C, and 60 0 C. The concentrations of nitric/oxalic acid solutions represented a wide range of free oxalate ion concentration. A mathematical solubility model was developed which is based on the formation of the known complexes of neptunium (IV) oxalate. the solubility model uses a simplified concentration parameter which is proportional to the free oxalate ion concentration. The solubility model can be used to estimate the equilibrium solubility of neptunium (IV) oxalate over a wide range of oxalic and nitric acid concentrations at each temperature

  7. Effect of Pore Geometry on Gas Adsorption: Grand Canonical Monte Carlo Simulation Studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Eon Ji; Chang, Rak Woo; Han, Ji Hyung; Chung, Taek Dong

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the pure geometrical effect of porous materials in gas adsorption using the grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations of primitive gas-pore models with various pore geometries such as planar, cylindrical, and random pore geometries. Although the model does not possess atomistic level details of porous materials, our simulation results provided many insightful information in the effect of pore geometry on the adsorption behavior of gas molecules. First, the surface curvature of porous materials plays a significant role in the amount of adsorbed gas molecules: the concave surface such as in cylindrical pores induces more attraction between gas molecules and pore, which results in the enhanced gas adsorption. On the contrary, the convex surface of random pores gives the opposite effect. Second, this geometrical effect shows a nonmonotonic dependence on the gas-pore interaction strength and length. Third, as the external gas pressure is increased, the change in the gas adsorption due to pore geometry is reduced. Finally, the pore geometry also affects the collision dynamics of gas molecules. Since our model is based on primitive description of fluid molecules, our conclusion can be applied to any fluidic systems including reactant-electrode systems

  8. Simulations of skin barrier function: free energies of hydrophobic and hydrophilic transmembrane pores in ceramide bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notman, Rebecca; Anwar, Jamshed; Briels, W J; Noro, Massimo G; den Otter, Wouter K

    2008-11-15

    Transmembrane pore formation is central to many biological processes such as ion transport, cell fusion, and viral infection. Furthermore, pore formation in the ceramide bilayers of the stratum corneum may be an important mechanism by which penetration enhancers such as dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) weaken the barrier function of the skin. We have used the potential of mean constraint force (PMCF) method to calculate the free energy of pore formation in ceramide bilayers in both the innate gel phase and in the DMSO-induced fluidized state. Our simulations show that the fluid phase bilayers form archetypal water-filled hydrophilic pores similar to those observed in phospholipid bilayers. In contrast, the rigid gel-phase bilayers develop hydrophobic pores. At the relatively small pore diameters studied here, the hydrophobic pores are empty rather than filled with bulk water, suggesting that they do not compromise the barrier function of ceramide membranes. A phenomenological analysis suggests that these vapor pores are stable, below a critical radius, because the penalty of creating water-vapor and tail-vapor interfaces is lower than that of directly exposing the strongly hydrophobic tails to water. The PMCF free energy profile of the vapor pore supports this analysis. The simulations indicate that high DMSO concentrations drastically impair the barrier function of the skin by strongly reducing the free energy required for pore opening.

  9. The influence of soluble organic matter on shale reservoir characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Pan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Shale with a maturity within the “oil window” contains a certain amount of residual soluble organic matter (SOM. This SOM have an important influence on characterization of shale reservoir. In this study, two shale samples were collected from the Upper Permian Dalong Formation in the northwestern boundary of Sichuan Basin. Their geochemistry, mineral composition, and pore structure (surface area and pore volume were investigated before and after removing the SOM by means of extraction via dichloromethane or trichloromethane. The results show that the TOC, S1, S2, and IH of the extracted samples decrease significantly, but the mineral composition has no evident change as compared with their raw samples. Thus, we can infer that the original pore structure is thought to be unaffected from the extraction. The SOM occupies pore volume and hinders pores connectivity. The extraction greatly increases the surface area and pore volume of the samples. The residual SOM in the shale samples occur mainly in the micropores and smaller mesopores, and their occupied pore size range seems being constrained by the maturity. For the lower mature shale samples, the SOM is mainly hosted in organic pores that are less than 5 nm in size. For the middle mature shale samples, the micropores and some mesopores ranging between 2 and 20 nm in size are the main storage space for the SOM.

  10. Fast Laplace solver approach to pore-scale permeability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arns, C. H.; Adler, P. M.

    2018-02-01

    We introduce a powerful and easily implemented method to calculate the permeability of porous media at the pore scale using an approximation based on the Poiseulle equation to calculate permeability to fluid flow with a Laplace solver. The method consists of calculating the Euclidean distance map of the fluid phase to assign local conductivities and lends itself naturally to the treatment of multiscale problems. We compare with analytical solutions as well as experimental measurements and lattice Boltzmann calculations of permeability for Fontainebleau sandstone. The solver is significantly more stable than the lattice Boltzmann approach, uses less memory, and is significantly faster. Permeabilities are in excellent agreement over a wide range of porosities.

  11. Unusual mechanism of capillary condensation in pores modified with chains forming pillars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borówko, M; Patrykiejew, A; Sokołowski, S

    2011-08-07

    Density functional approach is applied to study the phase behavior of Lennard-Jones(12,6) fluid in pillared slit-like pores. Our focus is in the evaluation of phase transitions in fluid adsorbed in the pore of a fixed width. If the length of pillars is sufficiently large, we observe additional phase transitions of the first and second order due to the symmetry breaking of the distribution of chain segments and fluid species with respect to the slit-like pore center. Re-entrant symmetry changes and additional critical, critical end points and tricritical points then are observed. The scenario of phase changes is sensitive to the energy of fluid-solid interaction, the amount, and the length of the pillars. Quantitative trends and qualitative changes of the phase diagrams topology are examined depending on the values of these parameters.

  12. Antera 3D capabilities for pore measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messaraa, C; Metois, A; Walsh, M; Flynn, J; Doyle, L; Robertson, N; Mansfield, A; O'Connor, C; Mavon, A

    2018-04-29

    The cause of enlarged pores remains obscure but still remains of concern for women. To complement subjective methods, bioengineered methods are needed for quantification of pores visibility following treatments. The study objective was to demonstrate the suitability of pore measurements from the Antera 3D. Pore measurements were collected on 22 female volunteers aged 18-65 years with the Antera 3D, the DermaTOP and image analysis on photographs. Additionally, 4 raters graded pore size on photographs on a scale 0-5. Repeatability of Antera 3D parameters was ascertained and the benefit of a pore minimizer product on the cheek was assessed on a sub panel of seven female volunteers. Pore parameters using the Antera were shown to depict pore severity similar to raters on photographs, except for Max Depth. Mean pore volume, mean pore area and count were moderately correlated with DermaTOP parameters (up to r = .50). No relationship was seen between the Antera 3D and pore visibility analysis on photographs. The most repeatable parameters were found to be mean pore volume, mean pore area and max depth, especially for the small and medium filters. The benefits of a pore minimizer product were the most striking for mean pore volume and mean pore area when using the small filter for analysis, rather than the medium/large ones. Pore measurements with the Antera 3D represent a reliable tool for efficacy and field studies, with an emphasis of the small filter for analysis for the mean pore volume/mean pore area parameters. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Condensation pressures in small pores: An analytical model based on density functional theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. H. Nilson; S. K. Griffiths

    1999-02-01

    Adsorption and condensation are critical to many applications of porous materials including filtration, separation, and the storage of gases. Integral methods are used to derive an analytical expression describing fluid condensation pressures in slit pores bounded by parallel plane walls. To obtain this result, the governing equations of Density Functional Theory (DFT) are integrated across the pore width assuming that fluid densities within adsorbed layers are spatially uniform. The thickness, density, and energy of these layers are expressed as composite functions constructed from asymptotic limits applicable to small and large pores. By equating the total energy of the adsorbed layers to that of a liquid-full pore, the authors arrive at a closed-form expression for the condensation pressure in terms of the pore size, surface tension, and Lennard-Jones parameters of the adsorbent and adsorbate molecules. The resulting equation reduces to the Kelvin equation in the large-pore limit. It further reproduces the condensation pressures computed by means of the full DFT equations for all pore sizes in which phase transitions are abrupt. Finally, in the limit of extremely small pores, for which phase transitions may be smooth and continuous, this simple analytical expression provides a good approximation to the apparent condensation pressure indicated by the steepest portion of the adsorption isotherm computed via DFT.

  14. Charge effects on hindrance factors for diffusion and convection of solute in pores I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O-tani, Hideyuki [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Kansai University, Yamate-cho, Suita, Osaka 564-8680 (Japan); Akinaga, Takeshi; Sugihara-Seki, Masako, E-mail: ga8d002@kansai-u.ac.jp [Department of Pure and Applied Physics, Kansai University, Yamate-cho, Suita, Osaka 564-8680 (Japan)

    2011-12-01

    The transport of a spherical solute through a long circular cylindrical pore filled with an electrolyte solution is studied numerically, in the presence of constant surface charge on the solute and the pore wall. Fluid dynamic analyses were carried out to calculate the flow field around the solute in the pore to evaluate the drag coefficients exerted on the solute. Electrical potentials around the solute in the electrolyte solution were computed based on a mean-field theory to provide the interaction energy between the charged solute and the pore wall. Combining the results of the fluid dynamic and electrostatic analyses, we estimated the rate of the diffusive and convective transport of the solute across the pore. Although the present estimates of the drag coefficients on the solute suggest more than 10% difference from existing studies, depending on the radius ratio of the solute relative to the pore and the radial position of the solute center in the pore, this difference leads to a minor effect on the hindrance factors. It was found that even at rather large ion concentrations, the repulsive electrostatic interaction between the charged solute and the pore wall of like charge could significantly reduce the transport rate of the solute.

  15. Capillary condensation hysteresis in overlapping spherical pores: a Monte Carlo simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gor, Gennady Yu; Rasmussen, Christopher J; Neimark, Alexander V

    2012-08-21

    The mechanisms of hysteretic phase transformations in fluids confined to porous bodies depend on the size and shape of pores, as well as their connectivity. We present a Monte Carlo simulation study of capillary condensation and evaporation cycles in the course of Lennard-Jones fluid adsorption in the system of overlapping spherical pores. This model system mimics pore shape and connectivity in some mesoporous materials obtained by templating cubic surfactant mesophases or colloidal crystals. We show different mechanisms of capillary hysteresis depending on the size of the window between the pores. For the system with a small window, the hysteresis cycle is similar to that in a single spherical pore: capillary condensation takes place upon achieving the limit of stability of adsorption film and evaporation is triggered by cavitation. When the window is large enough, the capillary condensation shifts to a pressure higher than that of the isolated pore, and the possibility for the equilibrium mechanism of desorption is revealed. These finding may have important implications for practical problems of assessment of the pore size distributions in mesoporous materials with cagelike pore networks.

  16. Condensation pressures in small pores: An analytical model based on density functional theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilson, R.H.; Griffiths, S.K.

    1999-01-01

    Integral methods are used to derive an analytical expression describing fluid condensation pressures in slit pores bounded by parallel plane walls. To obtain this result, the governing equations of density functional theory (DFT) are integrated across the pore width assuming that fluid densities within adsorbed layers are spatially uniform. The thickness, density, and free energy of these layers are expressed as composite functions constructed from asymptotic limits applicable to small and large pores. By equating the total free energy of the adsorbed layers to that of a liquid-full pore, we arrive at a closed-form expression for the condensation pressure in terms of the pore size, surface tension, and Lennard-Jones parameters of the adsorbent and adsorbate molecules. The resulting equation reduces to the Kelvin equation in the large-pore limit. It further reproduces the condensation pressures computed by means of the full DFT equations for all pore sizes in which phase transitions are abrupt. Finally, in the limit of extremely small pores, for which phase transitions may be smooth and continuous, this simple analytical expression provides a good approximation to the apparent condensation pressure indicated by the steepest portion of the adsorption isotherm computed via DFT. copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  17. b-GALACTOSIDASE IMMOBILIZATION ON CONTROLLED PORE SILICA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. C. Trevisan

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available The immobilization of b -galactosidase from Kluyveromyces fragilis on controlled pore silica was investigated. Immobilization was performed on amino silica activated with glutaraldehyde and the product was applied to the hydrolysis of lactose of whey. The behaviors of the soluble and immobilized enzyme were compared by using whey and a lactose solution as the substrate. With the aim of optimizing the method, parameters such as the amount of glutaraldehyde and the size of the particles were evaluated by comparing activities and stabilities on batch and continuously fluidized bed reactors

  18. Regulation of Exocytotic Fusion Pores by SNARE Protein Transmembrane Domains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenyong Wu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Calcium-triggered exocytotic release of neurotransmitters and hormones from neurons and neuroendocrine cells underlies neuronal communication, motor activity and endocrine functions. The core of the neuronal exocytotic machinery is composed of soluble N-ethyl maleimide sensitive factor attachment protein receptors (SNAREs. Formation of complexes between vesicle-attached v- and plasma-membrane anchored t-SNAREs in a highly regulated fashion brings the membranes into close apposition. Small, soluble proteins called Complexins (Cpx and calcium-sensing Synaptotagmins cooperate to block fusion at low resting calcium concentrations, but trigger release upon calcium increase. A growing body of evidence suggests that the transmembrane domains (TMDs of SNARE proteins play important roles in regulating the processes of fusion and release, but the mechanisms involved are only starting to be uncovered. Here we review recent evidence that SNARE TMDs exert influence by regulating the dynamics of the fusion pore, the initial aqueous connection between the vesicular lumen and the extracellular space. Even after the fusion pore is established, hormone release by neuroendocrine cells is tightly controlled, and the same may be true of neurotransmitter release by neurons. The dynamics of the fusion pore can regulate the kinetics of cargo release and the net amount released, and can determine the mode of vesicle recycling. Manipulations of SNARE TMDs were found to affect fusion pore properties profoundly, both during exocytosis and in biochemical reconstitutions. To explain these effects, TMD flexibility, and interactions among TMDs or between TMDs and lipids have been invoked. Exocytosis has provided the best setting in which to unravel the underlying mechanisms, being unique among membrane fusion reactions in that single fusion pores can be probed using high-resolution methods. An important role will likely be played by methods that can probe single fusion pores

  19. Analysis of the effect of pore geometry in the physical properties of rocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Alberto Oliveira Lima Roque

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Pore geometry is one of the main factors influencing the flow of reservoir fluids under pressure. Pores with narrower formats are more easily compressed when subject to pressure. Pressure modifies pore geometry by opening or closing cracks, causing increase or decrease in the elastic modulus, porosity, permeability, and other parameters. Rock physical properties depend on the size and shape of pores. Thus, in order to analyze changes on the physical properties behavior according to the pores geometry, it is necessary to study and improve mathematical models of the porous media by taking into account the pore shape factor for estimating rock elastic properties. Differential effective medium model (DEM, Hertz-Mindlin theory and coherent potential approximation (CPA are some of the theoretical paradigms that take into account pore geometry in changes in elastic moduli. Given the importance of the pore structure effect on the behavior of physical parameters, this article proposes an analysis of some mathematical models that consider the influence of pore shapes in the physical properties of rocks.

  20. Effect of pore structure on capillary condensation in a porous medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deinert, M R; Parlange, J-Y

    2009-02-01

    The Kelvin equation relates the equilibrium vapor pressure of a fluid to the curvature of the fluid-vapor interface and predicts that vapor condensation will occur in pores or irregularities that are sufficiently small. Past analyses of capillary condensation in porous systems with fractal structure have related the phenomenon to the fractal dimension of the pore volume distribution. Recent work, however, suggests that porous systems can exhibit distinct fractal dimensions that are characteristic of both their pore volume and the surfaces of the pores themselves. We show that both fractal dimensions have an effect on the thermodynamics that governs capillary condensation and that previous analyses can be obtained as limiting cases of a more general formulation.

  1. Pore system characteristics of the Permian transitional shale reservoir in the Lower Yangtze Region, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taotao Cao

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The Permian shale, a set of transitional shale reservoir, is considered to be an important shale gas exploration target in the Lower Yangtze region. Due to little research conducted on the pore system characteristic and its controlling factors of the shale gas reservoir, SEM, FE-SEM, low-pressure N2 adsorption, and mercury intrusion tests were carried out on the Permian shales from the outcrop and HC well in the southern Anhui. The results show that the Permian shales mainly consist of organic matter, quartz, illite, calcite, and pyrite, of which pyrite occurs as framboids coexisting with organic matter and the organic matter is distributed in shales in stripped, interstitial, thin film and shell shapes. The basic pore types are inorganic mineral pore (intercrystalline pore, intergranular edge pore, intergranular pore, and interlayer pore in clay minerals and the organic pore and microfracture, of which organic pore and microfracture are the dominating pore types. In shale, organic pores are not developed at all in some organic grains but are well developed in others, which may be related to the types of and maceral compositions of kerogen. Under tectonic stress, shale rocks could develop mylonitization phenomenon exhibiting organic grains well blend with clay minerals, and produce a mass of microfractures and nanopores between organic matter grains and clay minerals. Mercury intrusion tests show that the shale is mainly composed of micropore and transition pore with high porosity, good pore connectivity and high efficiency of mercury withdraw, while the shale that mainly dominated by mesopore and macropore has a low porosity, poor pore connectivity, and low efficiency of the mercury withdraw. The volume percentage of mesopore and marcopore is increasing with the increase of quartz, and that of micropore and transition pore has a decreased tendency along with the increase of soluble organic matter (S1. Organic matter is the main contributor to

  2. Direct encapsulation of water-soluble drug into silica microcapsules for sustained release applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jiexin; Wang Zhihui; Chen Jianfeng; Yun, Jimmy

    2008-01-01

    Direct encapsulation of water-soluble drug into silica microcapsules was facilely achieved by a sol-gel process of tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) in W/O emulsion with hydrochloric acid (HCl) aqueous solution containing Tween 80 and drug as well as cyclohexane solution containing Span 80. Two water-soluble drugs of gentamicin sulphate (GS) and salbutamol sulphate (SS) were chosen as model drugs. The characterization of drug encapsulated silica microcapsules by scanning electronic microscopy (SEM), FTIR, thermogravimetry (TG) and N 2 adsorption-desorption analyses indicated that drug was successfully entrapped into silica microcapsules. The as-prepared silica microcapsules were uniform spherical particles with hollow structure, good dispersion and a size of 5-10 μm, and had a specific surface area of about 306 m 2 /g. UV-vis and thermogravimetry (TG) analyses were performed to determine the amount of drug encapsulated in the microcapsules. The BJH pore size distribution (PSD) of silica microcapsules before and after removing drug was examined. In vitro release behavior of drug in simulated body fluid (SBF) revealed that such system exhibited excellent sustained release properties

  3. Coating of silicon pore optics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cooper-Jensen, Carsten P.; Ackermann, M.; Christensen, Finn Erland

    2009-01-01

    For the International X-ray observatory (IXO), a mirror module with an effective area of 3 m2 at 1.25 keV and at least 0.65 m2 at 6 keV has to be realized. To achieve this goal, coated silicon pore optics has been developed over the last years. One of the challenges is to coat the Si plates...

  4. Pore volume is most highly correlated with the visual assessment of skin pores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S J; Shin, M K; Back, J H; Koh, J S

    2014-11-01

    Many studies have been focused on evaluating assessment techniques for facial pores amid growing attention on skin care. Ubiquitous techniques used to assess the size of facial pores include visual assessment, cross-section images of the skin surface, and profilometric analysis of silicone replica of the facial skin. In addition, there are indirect assessment methods, including observation of pores based on confocal laser scanning microscopy and the analysis of sebum secretion and skin elasticity. The aim of this study was to identify parameters useful in estimating pore of surface in normal skin. The severity of pores on the cheek area by frontal optical images was divided on a 0-6 scale with '0' being faint and small pore and '6' being obvious and large pore. After the photos of the frontal cheek of 32 women aged between 35 and 49 were taken, the size of their pores was measured on a 0-6 scale; and the correlation between visual grading of pore and various evaluations (pore volume by 3-D image, pore area and number by Optical Image Analyzer) contributing to pore severity investigated using direct, objective, and noninvasive evaluations. The visual score revealed that the size of pores was graded on a 1-6 scale. Visual grading of pore was highly correlated with pore volume measured from 3-D images and pore area measured from 2-D optical images in the order (P pore was also slightly correlated with the number of pores in size of over 0.04 mm(2) (P pore score and pore volume can be explained by 3-D structural characteristics of pores. It is concluded that pore volume and area serve as useful parameters in estimating pore of skin surface. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Protein crystal nucleation in pores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanev, Christo N; Saridakis, Emmanuel; Chayen, Naomi E

    2017-01-16

    The most powerful method for protein structure determination is X-ray crystallography which relies on the availability of high quality crystals. Obtaining protein crystals is a major bottleneck, and inducing their nucleation is of crucial importance in this field. An effective method to form crystals is to introduce nucleation-inducing heterologous materials into the crystallization solution. Porous materials are exceptionally effective at inducing nucleation. It is shown here that a combined diffusion-adsorption effect can increase protein concentration inside pores, which enables crystal nucleation even under conditions where heterogeneous nucleation on flat surfaces is absent. Provided the pore is sufficiently narrow, protein molecules approach its walls and adsorb more frequently than they can escape. The decrease in the nucleation energy barrier is calculated, exhibiting its quantitative dependence on the confinement space and the energy of interaction with the pore walls. These results provide a detailed explanation of the effectiveness of porous materials for nucleation of protein crystals, and will be useful for optimal design of such materials.

  6. Impact of pore-water freshening on clays and the compressibility of hydrate-bearing reservoirs during production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Junbong [U.S. Geological Survey, Woods Hole, MA; Cao, Shuang [Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA; Waite, William [U.S. Geological Survey, Woods Hole, MA; Jung, Jongwon [Chungbuk National University, Cheongju-si, Chungbuk, South Korea

    2017-06-25

    Gas production efficiency from natural hydrate-bearing sediments depends in part on geotechnical properties of fine-grained materials, which are ubiquitous even in sandy hydrate-bearing sediments. The responses of fine-grained material to pore fluid chemistry changes due to freshening during hydrate dissociation could alter critical sediment characteristics during gas production activities. We investigate the electrical sensitivity of fine grains to pore fluid freshening and the implications of freshening on sediment compression and recompression parameters.

  7. Lattice density functional theory investigation of pore shape effects. I. Adsorption in single nonperiodic pores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malanoski, A P; van Swol, Frank

    2002-10-01

    A fully explicit in three dimensions lattice density functional theory is used to investigate adsorption in single nonperiodic pores. The effect of varying pore shape from the slits and cylinders that are normally simulated was our primary interest. A secondary concern was the results for pores with very large diameters. The shapes investigated were square pores with or without surface roughness, cylinders, right triangle pores, and trapezoidal pores. It was found that pores with very similar shape factors gave similar results but that the introduction of acute angled corners or very large side ratio lengths in rectangular pores gave results that were significantly different. Further, a rectangular pore going towards the limit of infinite side ratio does not approach the results of a slit pore. In all of these cases, the importance of features that are present for only a small portion of the pore is demonstrated.

  8. Numerical investigations of the fluid flows at deep oceanic and arctic permafrost-associated gas hydrate deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederick, Jennifer Mary

    Methane hydrate is an ice-like solid which sequesters large quantities of methane gas within its crystal structure. The source of methane is typically derived from organic matter broken down by thermogenic or biogenic activity. Methane hydrate (or more simply, hydrate) is found around the globe within marine sediments along most continental margins where thermodynamic conditions and methane gas (in excess of local solubility) permit its formation. Hydrate deposits are quite possibly the largest reservoir of fossil fuel on Earth, however, their formation and evolution in response to changing thermodynamic conditions, such as global warming, are poorly understood. Upward fluid flow (relative to the seafloor) is thought to be important for the formation of methane hydrate deposits, which are typically found beneath topographic features on the seafloor. However, one-dimensional models predict downward flow relative to the seafloor in compacting marine sediments. The presence of upward flow in a passive margin setting can be explained by fluid focusing beneath topography when sediments have anisotropic permeability due to sediment bedding layers. Even small slopes (10 degrees) in bedding planes produce upward fluid velocity, with focusing becoming more effective as slopes increase. Additionally, focusing causes high excess pore pressure to develop below topographic highs, promoting high-angle fracturing at the ridge axis. Magnitudes of upward pore fluid velocity are much larger in fractured zones, particularly when the surrounding sediment matrix is anisotropic in permeability. Enhanced flow of methane-bearing fluids from depth provides a simple explanation for preferential accumulation of hydrate under topographic highs. Models of fluid flow at large hydrate provinces can be constrained by measurements of naturally-occurring radioactive tracers. Concentrations of cosmogenic iodine, 129-I, in the pore fluid of marine sediments often indicate that the pore fluid is much

  9. The Arabidopsis Nuclear Pore and Nuclear Envelope

    OpenAIRE

    Meier, Iris; Brkljacic, Jelena

    2010-01-01

    The nuclear envelope is a double membrane structure that separates the eukaryotic cytoplasm from the nucleoplasm. The nuclear pores embedded in the nuclear envelope are the sole gateways for macromolecular trafficking in and out of the nucleus. The nuclear pore complexes assembled at the nuclear pores are large protein conglomerates composed of multiple units of about 30 different nucleoporins. Proteins and RNAs traffic through the nuclear pore complexes, enabled by the interacting activities...

  10. Rock Physics of Reservoir Rocks with Varying Pore Water Saturation and Pore Water Salinity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katika, Konstantina

    experiments, the rock is subjected to high external stresses that resemble the reservoir stresses; 2) the fluid distribution within the pore space changes during the flow through experiments and wettability alterations may occur; 3) different ions, present in the salt water injected in the core, interact......Advanced waterflooding (injection of water with selective ions in reservoirs) is a method of enhanced oil recovery (EOR) that has attracted the interest of oil and gas companies that exploit the Danish oil and gas reservoirs. This method has been applied successfully in oil reservoirs...... and in the Smart Water project performed in a laboratory scale in order to evaluate the EOR processes in selected core plugs. A major step towards this evaluation is to identify the composition of the injected water that leads to increased oil recovery in reservoirs and to define changes in the petrophysical...

  11. Relationship between pore structure and compressive strength

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Properties of concrete are strongly dependent on its pore structure features, porosity being an important one among them. This study deals with developing an understanding of the pore structure-compressive strength relationship in concrete. Several concrete mixtures with different pore structures are proportioned and ...

  12. Facial Pores: Definition, Causes, and Treatment Options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Ju; Seok, Joon; Jeong, Se Yeong; Park, Kui Young; Li, Kapsok; Seo, Seong Jun

    2016-03-01

    Enlarged skin pores refer to conditions that present with visible topographic changes of skin surfaces. Although not a medical concern, enlarged pores are a cosmetic concern for a large number of individuals. Moreover, clear definition and possible causes of enlarged pores have not been elucidated. To review the possible causes and treatment options for skin pores. This article is based on a review of the medical literature and the authors' clinical experience in investigating and treating skin pores. There are 3 major clinical causes of enlarged facial pores, namely high sebum excretion, decreased elasticity around pores, and increased hair follicle volume. In addition, chronic recurrent acne, sex hormones, and skin care regimen can affect pore size. Given the different possible causes for enlarged pores, therapeutic modalities must be individualized for each patient. Potential factors that contribute to enlarged skin pores include excessive sebum, decreased elasticity around pores, and increased hair follicle volume. Because various factors cause enlarged facial pores, it might be useful to identify the underlying causes to be able to select the appropriate treatment.

  13. Pore-scale studies of multiphase flow and reaction involving CO2 sequestration in geologic formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Q.; Wang, M.; Lichtner, P. C.

    2008-12-01

    In geologic CO2 sequestration, pore-scale interfacial phenomena ultimately govern the key processes of fluid mobility, chemical transport, adsorption, and reaction. However, spatial heterogeneity at the pore scale cannot be resolved at the continuum scale, where averaging occurs over length scales much larger than typical pore sizes. Natural porous media, such as sedimentary rocks and other geological media encountered in subsurface formations, are inherently heterogeneous. This pore-scale heterogeneity can produce variabilities in flow, transport, and reaction processes that take place within a porous medium, and can result in spatial variations in fluid velocity, aqueous concentrations, and reaction rates. Consequently, the unresolved spatial heterogeneity at the pore scale may be important for reactive transport modeling at the larger scale. In addition, current continuum models of surface complexation reactions ignore a fundamental property of physical systems, namely conservation of charge. Therefore, to better understand multiphase flow and reaction involving CO2 sequestration in geologic formations, it is necessary to quantitatively investigate the influence of the pore-scale heterogeneity on the emergent behavior at the field scale. We have applied the lattice Boltzmann method to simulating the injection of CO2 saturated brine or supercritical CO2 into geological formations at the pore scale. Multiple pore-scale processes, including advection, diffusion, homogeneous reactions among multiple aqueous species, heterogeneous reactions between the aqueous solution and minerals, ion exchange and surface complexation, as well as changes in solid and pore geometry are all taken into account. The rich pore scale information will provide a basis for upscaling to the continuum scale.

  14. Fabrication of porous aluminium with directional pores through thermal decomposition method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, H; Kim, S Y; Park, J S

    2009-01-01

    Lotus-type porous metals were fabricated by unidirectional solidification in pressurized gas atmosphere. The elongated pres are evolved by insoluble gas resulted from the solubility gap between liquid and solid when the melt is solidified. Recently we developed a novel fabrication technique, in which gas compounds are used as a source of dissolving gas instead of the high pressure. In the present work this gas compound method was applied to fabrication of lotus aluminium. Hydrogen decomposed from calcium hydroxide, sodium bicarbonate and titanium hydride evolves cylindrical pores in aluminium. The porosity is about 20%. The pore size decreases and the pore number density increases with increasing amount of calcium hydroxide, which is explained by increase in pore nucleation sites.

  15. Stepwise visualization of membrane pore formation by suilysin, a bacterial cholesterol-dependent cytolysin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Carl; Dudkina, Natalya V; Lukoyanova, Natalya; Hodel, Adrian W; Farabella, Irene; Pandurangan, Arun P; Jahan, Nasrin; Pires Damaso, Mafalda; Osmanović, Dino; Reboul, Cyril F; Dunstone, Michelle A; Andrew, Peter W; Lonnen, Rana; Topf, Maya; Saibil, Helen R; Hoogenboom, Bart W

    2014-12-02

    Membrane attack complex/perforin/cholesterol-dependent cytolysin (MACPF/CDC) proteins constitute a major superfamily of pore-forming proteins that act as bacterial virulence factors and effectors in immune defence. Upon binding to the membrane, they convert from the soluble monomeric form to oligomeric, membrane-inserted pores. Using real-time atomic force microscopy (AFM), electron microscopy (EM), and atomic structure fitting, we have mapped the structure and assembly pathways of a bacterial CDC in unprecedented detail and accuracy, focussing on suilysin from Streptococcus suis. We show that suilysin assembly is a noncooperative process that is terminated before the protein inserts into the membrane. The resulting ring-shaped pores and kinetically trapped arc-shaped assemblies are all seen to perforate the membrane, as also visible by the ejection of its lipids. Membrane insertion requires a concerted conformational change of the monomeric subunits, with a marked expansion in pore diameter due to large changes in subunit structure and packing.

  16. Pore-scale uncertainty quantification with multilevel Monte Carlo

    KAUST Repository

    Icardi, Matteo

    2014-01-06

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of pore-scale transport processes in porous media have recently gained large popularity. However the geometrical details of the pore structures can be known only in a very low number of samples and the detailed flow computations can be carried out only on a limited number of cases. The explicit introduction of randomness in the geometry and in other setup parameters can be crucial for the optimization of pore-scale investigations for random homogenization. Since there are no generic ways to parametrize the randomness in the porescale structures, Monte Carlo techniques are the most accessible to compute statistics. We propose a multilevel Monte Carlo (MLMC) technique to reduce the computational cost of estimating quantities of interest within a prescribed accuracy constraint. Random samples of pore geometries with a hierarchy of geometrical complexities and grid refinements, are synthetically generated and used to propagate the uncertainties in the flow simulations and compute statistics of macro-scale effective parameters.

  17. Effect of Pore Size and Pore Connectivity on Unidirectional Capillary Penetration Kinetics in 3-D Porous Media using Direct Numerical Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, An; Palakurthi, Nikhil; Konangi, Santosh; Comer, Ken; Jog, Milind

    2017-11-01

    The physics of capillary flow is used widely in multiple fields. Lucas-Washburn equation is developed by using a single pore-sized capillary tube with continuous pore connection. Although this equation has been extended to describe the penetration kinetics into porous medium, multiple studies have indicated L-W does not accurately predict flow patterns in real porous media. In this study, the penetration kinetics including the effect of pore size and pore connectivity will be closely examined since they are expected to be the key factors effecting the penetration process. The Liquid wicking process is studied from a converging and diverging capillary tube to the complex virtual 3-D porous structures with Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) using the Volume-Of-Fluid (VOF) method within the OpenFOAM CFD Solver. Additionally Porous Medium properties such as Permeability (k) , Tortuosity (τ) will be also analyzed.

  18. Prediction of the low-velocity distribution from the pore structure in simple porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Anna, Pietro; Quaife, Bryan; Biros, George; Juanes, Ruben

    2017-12-01

    The macroscopic properties of fluid flow and transport through porous media are a direct consequence of the underlying pore structure. However, precise relations that characterize flow and transport from the statistics of pore-scale disorder have remained elusive. Here we investigate the relationship between pore structure and the resulting fluid flow and asymptotic transport behavior in two-dimensional geometries of nonoverlapping circular posts. We derive an analytical relationship between the pore throat size distribution fλ˜λ-β and the distribution of the low fluid velocities fu˜u-β /2 , based on a conceptual model of porelets (the flow established within each pore throat, here a Hagen-Poiseuille flow). Our model allows us to make predictions, within a continuous-time random-walk framework, for the asymptotic statistics of the spreading of fluid particles along their own trajectories. These predictions are confirmed by high-fidelity simulations of Stokes flow and advective transport. The proposed framework can be extended to other configurations which can be represented as a collection of known flow distributions.

  19. Solubility and stability of dalcetrapib in vehicles and biological media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Günter; Tardio, Joseph; Kuhlmann, Olaf

    2012-11-01

    Dalcetrapib solubility was determined in aqueous and in non-aqueous vehicles and in biorelevant media. In a pure aqueous environment the solubility was low but could be increased by addition of surfactants or complexing agents. This was also reflected in the solubility seen in simulated gastrointestinal (GI) fluids, with almost no solubility in simulated gastric fluid, but reasonable solubilisation in simulated intestinal fluids containing lecithin and bile salt. Additionally, the stability of dalcetrapib was determined in simulated GI fluids with and without pancreatic lipase. In solutions without lipase, dalcetrapib was slowly hydrolysed, but in the presence of lipase the hydrolysis rate was significantly faster depending on pH and enzyme activity. In biological fluids, dissolved dalcetrapib appeared to behave similarly being rapidly hydrolysed in human intestinal fluids with a half-life below 20s with no degradation observed in human gastric fluids at low pH. The results provide supportive evidence that absorption is higher under fed conditions and indicate lipase inhibitors might interfere with oral absorption of dalcetrapib. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Pore-scale modeling of capillary trapping in water-wet porous media: A new cooperative pore-body filling model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruspini, L. C.; Farokhpoor, R.; Øren, P. E.

    2017-10-01

    We present a pore-network model study of capillary trapping in water-wet porous media. The amount and distribution of trapped non-wetting phase is determined by the competition between two trapping mechanisms - snap-off and cooperative pore-body filling. We develop a new model to describe the pore-body filling mechanism in geologically realistic pore-networks. The model accounts for the geometrical characteristics of the pore, the spatial location of the connecting throats and the local fluid topology at the time of the displacement. We validate the model by comparing computed capillary trapping curves with published data for four different water-wet rocks. Computations are performed on pore-networks extracted from micro-CT images and process-based reconstructions of the actual rocks used in the experiments. Compared with commonly used stochastic models, the new model describes more accurately the experimental measurements, especially for well connected porous systems where trapping is controlled by subtleties of the pore structure. The new model successfully predicts relative permeabilities and residual saturation for Bentheimer sandstone using in-situ measured contact angles as input to the simulations. The simulated trapped cluster size distributions are compared with predictions from percolation theory.

  1. Pore Scale Dynamics of Microemulsion Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unsal, Evren; Broens, Marc; Armstrong, Ryan T

    2016-07-19

    Experiments in various porous media have shown that multiple parameters come into play when an oleic phase is displaced by an aqueous solution of surfactant. In general, the displacement efficiency is improved when the fluids become quasi-miscible. Understanding the phase behavior oil/water/surfactant systems is important because microemulsion has the ability to generate ultralow interfacial tension (microemulsion formation and the resulting properties under equilibrium conditions. However, the majority of applications where microemulsion is present also involve flow, which has received relatively less attention. It is commonly assumed that the characteristics of an oil/water/surfactant system under flowing conditions are identical to the one under equilibrium conditions. Here, we show that this is not necessarily the case. We studied the equilibrium phase behavior of a model system consisting of n-decane and an aqueous solution of olefin sulfonate surfactant, which has practical applications for enhanced oil recovery. The salt content of the aqueous solution was varied to provide a range of different microemulsion compositions and oil-water interfacial tensions. We then performed microfluidic flow experiments to study the dynamic in situ formation of microemulsion by coinjecting bulk fluids of n-decane and surfactant solution into a T-junction capillary geometry. A solvatochromatic fluorescent dye was used to obtain spatially resolved compositional information. In this way, we visualized the microemulsion formation and the flow of it along with the excess phases. A complex interaction between the flow patterns and the microemulsion properties was observed. The formation of microemulsion influenced the flow regimes, and the flow regimes affected the characteristics of the microemulsion formation. In particular, at low flow rates, slug flow was observed, which had profound consequences on the pore scale mixing behavior and resulting microemulsion properties.

  2. Chemical modelling of pore water composition from PFBC residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karlsson, L.G.

    1991-01-01

    The concentration of trace elements varies depending on the source of the coal and also due to the combustion process used. Mercury is one important element among the trace elements in the coal residues, generally recognised as potentially harmful to the biological system. To predict the pore water concentrations of mercury and other important constituents leached from coal combustion residues disposal sites, mechanistic data on chemical reactions are required. The present study is an application of a basially thermodynamical approach using the geochemical code EQ3NR. The presence of discrete solid phases that control the aqueous concentrations of major elements such as aluminium, calcium and silicon are identified. Solid phases are modelled in equilibrium with a hypothetical pore water at a pH range of 7-11. In this study the thermodynamic database of EQ3NR has been complemented with data for cadmium, mercury and lead taken from the OECD/NEA Thermodynamic Database and from a compilation made by Lindsay. Possible solubility limiting phases for the important trace elements arsenic, cadmium, chromium, copper, mercury, nickel and lead have been identified. Concentrations of these trace elements as a function of pH in the hypothetical pore water were calculated using mechanistic thermodynamial data. The thermodynamical approach in this study seems justified because most solid residues that are either present or expected to form during weathering have relatively fast precipitation/dissolution kinetics. (21 refs., 18 figs., 5 tabs.)

  3. Measuring kinetic drivers of pneumolysin pore structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Robert J C; Sonnen, Andreas F-P

    2016-05-01

    Most membrane attack complex-perforin/cholesterol-dependent cytolysin (MACPF/CDC) proteins are thought to form pores in target membranes by assembling into pre-pore oligomers before undergoing a pre-pore to pore transition. Assembly during pore formation is into both full rings of subunits and incomplete rings (arcs). The balance between arcs and full rings is determined by a mechanism dependent on protein concentration in which arc pores arise due to kinetic trapping of the pre-pore forms by the depletion of free protein subunits during oligomerization. Here we describe the use of a kinetic assay to study pore formation in red blood cells by the MACPF/CDC pneumolysin from Streptococcus pneumoniae. We show that cell lysis displays two kinds of dependence on protein concentration. At lower concentrations, it is dependent on the pre-pore to pore transition of arc oligomers, which we show to be a cooperative process. At higher concentrations, it is dependent on the amount of pneumolysin bound to the membrane and reflects the affinity of the protein for its receptor, cholesterol. A lag occurs before cell lysis begins; this is dependent on oligomerization of pneumolysin. Kinetic dissection of cell lysis by pneumolysin demonstrates the capacity of MACPF/CDCs to generate pore-forming oligomeric structures of variable size with, most likely, different functional roles in biology.

  4. Pore-scale observation and 3D simulation of wettability effects on supercritical CO2 - brine immiscible displacement in drainage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, R.; Wan, J.; Chen, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Wettability is a factor controlling the fluid-fluid displacement pattern in porous media and significantly affects the flow and transport of supercritical (sc) CO2 in geologic carbon sequestration. Using a high-pressure micromodel-microscopy system, we performed drainage experiments of scCO2 invasion into brine-saturated water-wet and intermediate-wet micromodels; we visualized the scCO2 invasion morphology at pore-scale under reservoir conditions. We also performed pore-scale numerical simulations of the Navier-Stokes equations to obtain 3D details of fluid-fluid displacement processes. Simulation results are qualitatively consistent with the experiments, showing wider scCO2 fingering, higher percentage of scCO2 and more compact displacement pattern in intermediate-wet micromodel. Through quantitative analysis based on pore-scale simulation, we found that the reduced wettability reduces the displacement front velocity, promotes the pore-filling events in the longitudinal direction, delays the breakthrough time of invading fluid, and then increases the displacement efficiency. Simulated results also show that the fluid-fluid interface area follows a unified power-law relation with scCO2 saturation, and show smaller interface area in intermediate-wet case which suppresses the mass transfer between the phases. These pore-scale results provide insights for the wettability effects on CO2 - brine immiscible displacement in geologic carbon sequestration.

  5. Pore scale study of multiphase multicomponent reactive transport during CO2 dissolution trapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li; Wang, Mengyi; Kang, Qinjun; Tao, Wenquan

    2018-06-01

    Solubility trapping is crucial for permanent CO2 sequestration in deep saline aquifers. For the first time, a pore-scale numerical method is developed to investigate coupled scCO2-water two-phase flow, multicomponent (CO2(aq), H+, HCO3-, CO32- and OH-) mass transport, heterogeneous interfacial dissolution reaction, and homogeneous dissociation reactions. Pore-scale details of evolutions of multiphase distributions and concentration fields are presented and discussed. Time evolutions of several variables including averaged CO2(aq) concentration, scCO2 saturation, and pH value are analyzed. Specific interfacial length, an important variable which cannot be determined but is required by continuum models, is investigated in detail. Mass transport coefficient or efficient dissolution rate is also evaluated. The pore-scale results show strong non-equilibrium characteristics during solubility trapping due to non-uniform distributions of multiphase as well as slow mass transport process. Complicated coupling mechanisms between multiphase flow, mass transport and chemical reactions are also revealed. Finally, effects of wettability are also studied. The pore-scale studies provide deep understanding of non-linear non-equilibrium multiple physicochemical processes during CO2 solubility trapping processes, and also allow to quantitatively predict some important empirical relationships, such as saturation-interfacial surface area, for continuum models.

  6. Silver Nanoparticle Transport Through Soil: Illuminating the Pore-Scale Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnar, I. L.; Willson, C. S.; Gerhard, J.; O'Carroll, D. M.

    2015-12-01

    For nanoparticle transport through soil, the pore-scale (i.e., tens to hundreds of grains and pores) is a crucial intermediate scale which links nanoparticle-surface interactions with field-scale transport behaviour. However, very little information exists on how nanoparticles behave within real three-dimensional pore spaces. As a result, pore-scale processes are poorly characterized for nanoparticle systems and, subsequently, continuum-scale transport models struggle to describe commonly observed 'anomalous' behaviour such as extended tailing. This knowledge gap is due to two primary factors: an inability to experimentally observe nanoparticles within real pore spaces, and the computationally expensive models required to simulate nanoparticle movement. However, due to recent advances in Synchrotron X-Ray Computed Microtomography (SXCMT), it is now possible to quantify in-situ pore-scale nanoparticle concentrations during transport through real 3-dimensional porous media [1]. Employing this SXCMT quantification method to examine real nanoparticle/soil transport experiments has yielded new insights into the pore-scale processes governing nanoparticle transport. By coupling SXCMT nanoparticle quantification method with Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations we are able to construct a better picture of how nanoparticles flow through real pore spaces. This talk presents SXCMT/CFD analyses of three silver nanoparticle transport experiments. Silver nanoparticles were flushed through three different sands to characterize the influence of grain distribution and retention rates on pore-scale flow and transport processes. These CFD/SXCMT analyses illuminate how processes such as temporary hydraulic retention govern nanoparticle transport. In addition, the observed distributions of pore water velocities and nanoparticle mass flow rates challenge the standard conceptual model of nanoparticle transport, suggesting that pore-scale processes require explicit consideration

  7. Pore Pressure Distribution and Flank Instability in Hydrothermally Altered Stratovolcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, J. L.; Taron, J.; Hurwitz, S.; Reid, M. E.

    2015-12-01

    Field and geophysical investigations of stratovolcanoes with long-lived hydrothermal systems commonly reveal that initially permeable regions (such as brecciated layers of pyroclastic material) can become both altered and water-bearing. Hydrothermal alteration in these regions, including clay formation, can turn them into low-permeability barriers to fluid flow, which could increase pore fluid pressures resulting in flank slope instability. We examined elevated pore pressure conditions using numerical models of hydrothermal flow in stratovolcanoes, informed by geophysical data about internal structures and deposits. Idealized radially symmetric meshes were developed based on cross-sectional profiles and alteration/permeability structures of Cascade Range stratovolcanoes. We used the OpenGeoSys model to simulate variably saturated conditions in volcanoes heated only by regional heat fluxes, as well as 650°C intrusions at two km depth below the surface. Meteoric recharge was estimated from precipitation rates in the Cascade Range. Preliminary results indicate zones of elevated pore pressures form: 1) where slopes are underlain by continuous low-permeability altered layers, or 2) when the edifice has an altered core with saturated, less permeable limbs. The first scenario might control shallow collapses on the slopes above the altered layers. The second could promote deeper flank collapses that are initially limited to the summit and upper slopes, but could progress to the core of an edifice. In both scenarios, pore pressures can be further elevated by shallow intrusions, or evolve over longer time scales under forcing from regional heat flux. Geometries without confining low-permeability layers do not show these pressure effects. Our initial scenarios use radially symmetric models, but we are also simulating hydrothermal flow under real 3D geometries with asymmetric subsurface structures (Mount Adams). Simulation results will be used to inform 3D slope

  8. Pore pressure control on faulting behavior in a block-gouge system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Z.; Juanes, R.

    2016-12-01

    Pore fluid pressure in a fault zone can be altered by natural processes (e.g., mineral dehydration and thermal pressurization) and industrial operations involving subsurface fluid injection/extraction for the development of energy and water resources. However, the effect of pore pressure change on the stability and slip motion of a preexisting geologic fault remain poorly understood; yet they are critical for the assessment of seismic risk. In this work, we develop a micromechanical model to investigate the effect of pore pressure on faulting behavior. The model couples pore network fluid flow and mechanics of the solid grains. We conceptualize the fault zone as a gouge layer sandwiched between two blocks; the block material is represented by a group of contact-bonded grains and the gouge is composed of unbonded grains. A pore network is extracted from the particulate pack of the block-gouge system with pore body volumes and pore throat conductivities calculated rigorously based on the geometry of the local pore space. Pore fluid exerts pressure force onto the grains, the motion of which is solved using the discrete element method (DEM). The model updates the pore network regularly in response to deformation of the solid matrix. We study the fault stability in the presence of a pressure inhomogeneity (gradient) across the gouge layer, and compare it with the case of homogeneous pore pressure. We consider both normal and thrust faulting scenarios with a focus on the onset of shear failure along the block-gouge interfaces. Numerical simulations show that the slip behavior is characterized by intermittent dynamics, which is evident in the number of slipping contacts at the block-gouge interfaces and the total kinetic energy of the gouge particles. Numerical results also show that, for the case of pressure inhomogeneity, the onset of slip occurs earlier for the side with higher pressure, and that this onset appears to be controlled by the maximum pressure of both sides

  9. Effects of the soil pore network architecture on the soil's physical functionalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smet, Sarah; Beckers, Eléonore; Léonard, Angélique; Degré, Aurore

    2017-04-01

    The soil fluid movement's prediction is of major interest within an agricultural or environmental scope because many processes depend ultimately on the soil fluids dynamic. It is common knowledge that the soil microscopic pore network structure governs the inner-soil convective fluids flow. There isn't, however, a general methodthat consider the pore network structure as a variable in the prediction of thecore scale soil's physical functionalities. There are various possible representations of the microscopic pore network: sample scale averaged structural parameters, extrapolation of theoretic pore network, or use of all the information available by modeling within the observed pore network. Different representations implydifferent analyzing methodologies. To our knowledge, few studies have compared the micro-and macroscopic soil's characteristics for the same soil core sample. The objective of our study is to explore the relationship between macroscopic physical properties and microscopic pore network structure. The saturated hydraulic conductivity, the air permeability, the retention curve, and others classical physical parameters were measured for ten soil samples from an agricultural field. The pore network characteristics were quantified through the analyses of X-ray micro-computed tomographic images(micro-CT system Skyscan-1172) with a voxel size of 22 µm3. Some of the first results confirmed what others studies had reported. Then, the comparison between macroscopic properties and microscopic parameters suggested that the air movements depended mostly on the pore connectivity and tortuosity than on the total porosity volume. We have also found that the fractal dimension calculated from the X-ray images and the fractal dimension calculated from the retention curve were significantly different. Our communication will detailthose results and discuss the methodology: would the results be similar with a different voxel size? What are the calculated and measured

  10. Predicting Reactive Transport Dynamics in Carbonates using Initial Pore Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menke, H. P.; Nunes, J. P. P.; Blunt, M. J.

    2017-12-01

    Understanding rock-fluid interaction at the pore-scale is imperative for accurate predictive modelling of carbon storage permanence. However, coupled reactive transport models are computationally expensive, requiring either a sacrifice of resolution or high performance computing to solve relatively simple geometries. Many recent studies indicate that initial pore structure many be the dominant mechanism in determining the dissolution regime. Here we investigate how well the initial pore structure is predictive of distribution and amount of dissolution during reactive flow using particle tracking on the initial image. Two samples of carbonate rock with varying initial pore space heterogeneity were reacted with reservoir condition CO2-saturated brine and scanned dynamically during reactive flow at a 4-μm resolution between 4 and 40 times using 4D X-ray micro-tomography over the course of 1.5 hours using μ-CT. Flow was modelled on the initial binarized image using a Navier-Stokes solver. Particle tracking was then run on the velocity fields, the streamlines were traced, and the streamline density was calculated both on a voxel-by-voxel and a channel-by-channel basis. The density of streamlines was then compared to the amount of dissolution in subsequent time steps during reaction. It was found that for the flow and transport regimes studied, the streamline density distribution in the initial image accurately predicted the dominant pathways of dissolution and gave good indicators of the type of dissolution regime that would later develop. This work suggests that the eventual reaction-induced changes in pore structure are deterministic rather than stochastic and can be predicted with high resolution imaging of unreacted rock.

  11. Understanding chemical-potential-related transient pore-pressure response to improve real-time borehole (in)stability predictions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tare, U. A.; Mody, F. K.; Mese, A. I. [Haliburton Energy Services, TX (United States)

    2002-07-01

    In order to develop a real-time wellbore (in)stability modelling capability, experimental work was carried out to investigate the role of the chemical potential of drilling fluids on transient pore pressure and time-dependent rock property alterations of shale formations. Time-dependent alterations in the pore pressure, acoustic and rock properties of formations subjected to compressive tri-axial test were recorded during the experiments involving the Pore Pressure Transmission (PPT) test. Based on the transient pore pressure of shale exposed to the test fluid presented here, the 20 per cent calcium chloride showed a very low membrane efficiency of 4.45 per cent. The need for a thorough understanding of the drilling fluid/shale interaction prior to applying any chemical potential wellbore (in)stability model to real-time drilling operations was emphasized. 9 refs., 5 figs.

  12. Syncrude`s highway berm: part 3 of 5 - Soil parameters (pore pressure parameters and settlement from inundation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cameron, R.; Fong, V.; Ashton, C.; Strueby, B. [Syncrude Canada Ltd., Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    1995-12-31

    Difficulties in predicting pore fluid pressures in the fills composing the highway berm were discussed. The pore water pressures in the in-situ clay foundation units were expected to be very sensitive to water content. Over 200 piezometer tips were installed into fill and in situ soil units, and results of the measurements were reported. The in situ basal foundation clays and sands were found to have a similar pore pressure ratio of typically less than 0.25. Fill pore fluid pressure ratios determined in the field varied according to density when loose fills were compared to very dense fills. To illustrate, when the fill was 86% to 91% of maximum Standard Proctor Density, the pore pressure ratio value was not dependent on fluid content. When the fill was densely compacted to 98% Standard Proctor Density, the pore pressure ratio was largely dependent on the fluid content as it related to the optimum fluid content determined from Standard Proctor testing. Significant first-time wetting settlement was observed to occur with fills at initial densities of around 90% of maximum Standard Proctor dry density. Settlements for fills placed initially above 97% Standard Proctor Density generally had inundation settlements of less than 0.3% of fill thickness predicted from laboratory testing. 4 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Effect of Pore Pressure on Slip Failure of an Impermeable Fault: A Coupled Micro Hydro-Geomechanical Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Z.; Juanes, R.

    2015-12-01

    The geomechanical processes associated with subsurface fluid injection/extraction is of central importance for many industrial operations related to energy and water resources. However, the mechanisms controlling the stability and slip motion of a preexisting geologic fault remain poorly understood and are critical for the assessment of seismic risk. In this work, we develop a coupled hydro-geomechanical model to investigate the effect of fluid injection induced pressure perturbation on the slip behavior of a sealing fault. The model couples single-phase flow in the pores and mechanics of the solid phase. Granular packs (see example in Fig. 1a) are numerically generated where the grains can be either bonded or not, depending on the degree of cementation. A pore network is extracted for each granular pack with pore body volumes and pore throat conductivities calculated rigorously based on geometry of the local pore space. The pore fluid pressure is solved via an explicit scheme, taking into account the effect of deformation of the solid matrix. The mechanics part of the model is solved using the discrete element method (DEM). We first test the validity of the model with regard to the classical one-dimensional consolidation problem where an analytical solution exists. We then demonstrate the ability of the coupled model to reproduce rock deformation behavior measured in triaxial laboratory tests under the influence of pore pressure. We proceed to study the fault stability in presence of a pressure discontinuity across the impermeable fault which is implemented as a plane with its intersected pore throats being deactivated and thus obstructing fluid flow (Fig. 1b, c). We focus on the onset of shear failure along preexisting faults. We discuss the fault stability criterion in light of the numerical results obtained from the DEM simulations coupled with pore fluid flow. The implication on how should faults be treated in a large-scale continuum model is also presented.

  14. Thermostating highly confined fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardi, Stefano; Todd, B D; Searles, Debra J

    2010-06-28

    In this work we show how different use of thermostating devices and modeling of walls influence the mechanical and dynamical properties of confined nanofluids. We consider a two dimensional fluid undergoing Couette flow using nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. Because the system is highly inhomogeneous, the density shows strong fluctuations across the channel. We compare the dynamics produced by applying a thermostating device directly to the fluid with that obtained when the wall is thermostated, considering also the effects of using rigid walls. This comparison involves an analysis of the chaoticity of the fluid and evaluation of mechanical properties across the channel. We look at two thermostating devices with either rigid or vibrating atomic walls and compare them with a system only thermostated by conduction through vibrating atomic walls. Sensitive changes are observed in the xy component of the pressure tensor, streaming velocity, and density across the pore and the Lyapunov localization of the fluid. We also find that the fluid slip can be significantly reduced by rigid walls. Our results suggest caution in interpreting the results of systems in which fluid atoms are thermostated and/or wall atoms are constrained to be rigid, such as, for example, water inside carbon nanotubes.

  15. Understanding the microscopic moisture migration in pore space using DEM simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Guo

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The deformation of soil skeleton and migration of pore fluid are the major factors relevant to the triggering of and damages by liquefaction. The influence of pore fluid migration during earthquake has been demonstrated from recent model experiments and field case studies. Most of the current liquefaction assessment models are based on testing of isotropic liquefiable materials. However the recent New Zealand earthquake shows much severer damages than those predicted by existing models. A fundamental cause has been contributed to the embedded layers of low permeability silts. The existence of these silt layers inhibits water migration under seismic loads, which accelerated liquefaction and caused a much larger settlement than that predicted by existing theories. This study intends to understand the process of moisture migration in the pore space of sand using discrete element method (DEM simulation. Simulations were conducted on consolidated undrained triaxial testing of sand where a cylinder sample of sand was built and subjected to a constant confining pressure and axial loading. The porosity distribution was monitored during the axial loading process. The spatial distribution of porosity change was determined, which had a direct relationship with the distribution of excess pore water pressure. The non-uniform distribution of excess pore water pressure causes moisture migration. From this, the migration of pore water during the loading process can be estimated. The results of DEM simulation show a few important observations: (1 External forces are mainly carried and transmitted by the particle chains of the soil sample; (2 Porosity distribution during loading is not uniform due to non-homogeneous soil fabric (i.e. the initial particle arrangement and existence of particle chains; (3 Excess pore water pressure develops differently at different loading stages. At the early stage of loading, zones with a high initial porosity feature higher

  16. Review on theoretical calculation of the magnetite solubility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Myongjin; Kim, Hongpyo

    2013-01-01

    FAC is influenced by many factors such as water chemistry (temperature, pH, dissolved oxygen (D. O.) in a solution, and etc.), chemical composition of carbon steel, and fluid dynamics. Magnetite is formed at the inner surface of carbon steel, and protects the integrity of pipes from the damage. The magnetite has a stable state at each equilibrium condition, so that it can be dissolved into the fluid under conditions that satisfy the equilibrium state. The iron solubility can be calculated by considering the reaction equilibrium constants for prediction of a change in the magnetite layer. In the present work, studies on the magnetite solubility were reviewed for the theoretical calculation of magnetite, and iron solubility data were compared to find the proper solubility values of each study

  17. Mechanisms for oral absorption of poorly water-soluble compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lind, Marianne Ladegaard

    Abstract A large part of the new drug candidates discovered by the pharmaceutical industry have poor solubility in aqueous media. The preferred route of drug administration is the oral route, but for these poorly water-soluble drug candidates the oral bioavailability can be low and variable. Often......, phospholipids) and exogenous surfactants used in pharmaceutical formulations on the oral absorption of poorly water-soluble drug substances. Three different models were used for this purpose. The first model was the in vitro Caco-2 cell model. Simulated intestinal fluids which did not decrease cellular...... products are important for the solubilization of poorly water-soluble drug substances and thus absorption. The second model used was the lipoprotein secreting Caco-2 cell model, which was used to simulate intestinal lymphatic transport in vitro. Various simulated intestinal fluids were composed...

  18. Pore surface engineering in covalent organic frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Atsushi; Guo, Zhaoqi; Feng, Xiao; Jin, Shangbin; Chen, Xiong; Ding, Xuesong; Jiang, Donglin

    2011-11-15

    Covalent organic frameworks (COFs) are a class of important porous materials that allow atomically precise integration of building blocks to achieve pre-designable pore size and geometry; however, pore surface engineering in COFs remains challenging. Here we introduce pore surface engineering to COF chemistry, which allows the controlled functionalization of COF pore walls with organic groups. This functionalization is made possible by the use of azide-appended building blocks for the synthesis of COFs with walls to which a designable content of azide units is anchored. The azide units can then undergo a quantitative click reaction with alkynes to produce pore surfaces with desired groups and preferred densities. The diversity of click reactions performed shows that the protocol is compatible with the development of various specific surfaces in COFs. Therefore, this methodology constitutes a step in the pore surface engineering of COFs to realize pre-designed compositions, components and functions.

  19. A computational geometry approach to pore network construction for granular packings

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Linden, Joost H.; Sufian, Adnan; Narsilio, Guillermo A.; Russell, Adrian R.; Tordesillas, Antoinette

    2018-03-01

    Pore network construction provides the ability to characterize and study the pore space of inhomogeneous and geometrically complex granular media in a range of scientific and engineering applications. Various approaches to the construction have been proposed, however subtle implementational details are frequently omitted, open access to source code is limited, and few studies compare multiple algorithms in the context of a specific application. This study presents, in detail, a new pore network construction algorithm, and provides a comprehensive comparison with two other, well-established Delaunay triangulation-based pore network construction methods. Source code is provided to encourage further development. The proposed algorithm avoids the expensive non-linear optimization procedure in existing Delaunay approaches, and is robust in the presence of polydispersity. Algorithms are compared in terms of structural, geometrical and advanced connectivity parameters, focusing on the application of fluid flow characteristics. Sensitivity of the various networks to permeability is assessed through network (Stokes) simulations and finite-element (Navier-Stokes) simulations. Results highlight strong dependencies of pore volume, pore connectivity, throat geometry and fluid conductance on the degree of tetrahedra merging and the specific characteristics of the throats targeted by the merging algorithm. The paper concludes with practical recommendations on the applicability of the three investigated algorithms.

  20. Effects of fractal pore on coal devolatilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yongli; He, Rong [Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China). Dept. of Thermal Engineering; Wang, Xiaoliang; Cao, Liyong [Dongfang Electric Corporation, Chengdu (China). Centre New Energy Inst.

    2013-07-01

    Coal devolatilization is numerically investigated by drop tube furnace and a coal pyrolysis model (Fragmentation and Diffusion Model). The fractal characteristics of coal and char pores are investigated. Gas diffusion and secondary reactions in fractal pores are considered in the numerical simulations of coal devolatilization, and the results show that the fractal dimension is increased firstly and then decreased later with increased coal conversions during devolatilization. The mechanisms of effects of fractal pores on coal devolatilization are analyzed.

  1. Chemical modelling of trace elements in pore water from PFBC residues containing ammonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karlsson, L.G.; Brandberg, F.

    1993-01-01

    Ammonia is added to the PFBC process with the purpose to reduce the emissions of NO x in the stack gases. The design of the system for cleaning the stack gases will lead to an increased adsorption of ammonia and an accumulation of soluble ammonium salts in the cyclone ash from PFBC processes. This can be an environmental problem since the amounts will increase over the coming years and there will be a need to dispose the residues. When infiltrating rainwater penetrates the disposed residues ammonia and ammonium salts result in a contamination of the pore water with ammonia in the disposed residues. This entail the solubility of several trace elements in the residues that form soluble complexes with ammonia will increase and cause an increased contamination of groundwater and surface water. In this study the increased solubilities is calculated for the trace elements cadmium, cobalt, copper, mercury, nickel, silver and zinc in the residues using thermodynamical data. The calculations have been performed with probable solid phases of the trace elements at oxidizing and reducing conditions as a function of pH and at varying concentration of ammonia in the pore water. The thermodynamic calculations have been performed with the geochemical code EQ3NR. The results from the calculations show that as a concentration of 17 mg NH 3 /l in the pore water of the residues increases the solubilities for copper and silver. If the concentration of ammonia increases to 170 mg NH 3 /l will the solubilities increase also for cadmium, nickel and zinc. (12 refs., 39 figs.)

  2. Electroosmotic pore transport in human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uitto, Olivia D; White, Henry S

    2003-04-01

    To determine the pathways and origin of electroosmotic flow in human skin. Iontophoretic transport of acetaminophen in full thickness human cadaver skin was visualized and quantified by scanning electrochemical microscopy. Electroosmotic flow in the shunt pathways of full thickness skin was compared to flow in the pores of excised stratum corneum and a synthetic membrane pore. The penetration of rhodamine 6G into pore structures was investigated by laser scanning confocal microscopy. Electroosmotic transport is observed in shunt pathways in full thickness human skin (e.g., hair follicles and sweat glands), but not in pore openings of freestanding stratum corneum. Absolute values of the diffusive and iontophoretic pore fluxes of acetaminophen in full thickness human skin are also reported. Rhodamine 6G is observed to penetrate to significant depths (approximately 200 microm) along pore pathways. Iontophoresis in human cadaver skin induces localized electroosmotic flow along pore shunt paths. Electroosmotic forces arise from the passage of current through negatively charged mesoor nanoscale pores (e.g., gap functions) within cellular regions that define the pore structure beneath the stratum corneum.

  3. Micro-CT Pore Scale Study Of Flow In Porous Media: Effect Of Voxel Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, S.; Gray, F.; Crawshaw, J.; Boek, E.

    2014-12-01

    In the last few years, pore scale studies have become the key to understanding the complex fluid flow processes in the fields of groundwater remediation, hydrocarbon recovery and environmental issues related to carbon storage and capture. A pore scale study is often comprised of two key procedures: 3D pore scale imaging and numerical modelling techniques. The essence of a pore scale study is to test the physics implemented in a model of complicated fluid flow processes at one scale (microscopic) and then apply the model to solve the problems associated with water resources and oil recovery at other scales (macroscopic and field). However, the process of up-scaling from the pore scale to the macroscopic scale has encountered many challenges due to both pore scale imaging and modelling techniques. Due to the technical limitations in the imaging method, there is always a compromise between the spatial (voxel) resolution and the physical volume of the sample (field of view, FOV) to be scanned by the imaging methods, specifically X-ray micro-CT (XMT) in our case In this study, a careful analysis was done to understand the effect of voxel size, using XMT to image the 3D pore space of a variety of porous media from sandstones to carbonates scanned at different voxel resolution (4.5 μm, 6.2 μm, 8.3 μm and 10.2 μm) but keeping the scanned FOV constant for all the samples. We systematically segment the micro-CT images into three phases, the macro-pore phase, an intermediate phase (unresolved micro-pores + grains) and the grain phase and then study the effect of voxel size on the structure of the macro-pore and the intermediate phases and the fluid flow properties using lattice-Boltzmann (LB) and pore network (PN) modelling methods. We have also applied a numerical coarsening algorithm (up-scale method) to reduce the computational power and time required to accurately predict the flow properties using the LB and PN method.

  4. In vitro dynamic solubility test: influence of various parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thélohan, S; de Meringo, A

    1994-10-01

    This article discusses the dissolution of mineral fibers in simulated physiological fluids (SPF), and the parameters that affect the solubility measurement in a dynamic test where an SPF runs through a cell containing fibers (Scholze and Conradt test). Solutions simulate either the extracellular fluid (pH 7.6) or the intracellular fluid (pH 4.5). The fibers have various chemical compositions and are either continuously drawn or processed as wool. The fiber solubility is determined by the amount of SiO2 (and occasionally other ions) released in the solution. Results are stated as percentage of the initial silica content released or as dissolution rate v in nm/day. The reproducibility of the test is higher with the less soluble fibers (10% solubility), than with highly soluble fibers (20% solubility). The influence of test parameters, including SPF, test duration, and surface area/volume (SA/V), has been studied. The pH and the inorganic buffer salts have a major influence: industrial glasswool composition is soluble at pH 7.6 but not at pH 4.5. The opposite is true for rock- (basalt) wool composition. For slightly soluble fibers, the dissolution rate v remains constant with time, whereas for highly soluble fibers, the dissolution rate decreases rapidly. The dissolution rates believed to occur are v1, initial dissolution rate, and v2, dissolution rate of the residual fibers. The SA of fibers varies with the mass of the fibers tested, or with the fiber diameter at equal mass. Volume, V, is the chosen flow rate. An increase in the SA/V ratio leads to a decrease in the dissolution rate.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Matrix fluid chemistry experiment. Final report June 1998 - March 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smellie, John A.T.; Waber, H. Niklaus; Frape, Shaun K.

    2003-06-01

    The Matrix Fluid Chemistry Experiment set out to determine the composition and evolution of matrix pore fluids/waters in low permeable rock located at repository depths in the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL). Matrix pore fluids/waters can be highly saline in composition and, if accessible, may influence the near-field groundwater chemistry of a repository system. Characterising pore fluids/waters involved in-situ borehole sampling and analysis integrated with laboratory studies and experiments on rock matrix drill core material. Relating the rate of in-situ pore water accumulation during sampling to the measured rock porosity indicated a hydraulic conductivity of 10 -14 -10 -13 m/s for the rock matrix. This was in accordance with earlier estimated predictions. The sampled matrix pore water, brackish in type, mostly represents older palaeo- groundwater mixtures preserved in the rock matrix and dating back to at least the last glaciation. A component of matrix pore 'fluid' is also present. One borehole section suggests a younger groundwater component which has accessed the rock matrix during the experiment. There is little evidence that the salinity of the matrix pore waters has been influenced significantly by fluid inclusion populations hosted by quartz. Crush/leach, cation exchange, pore water diffusion and pore water displacement laboratory experiments were carried out to compare extracted/calculated matrix pore fluids/waters with in-situ sampling. Of these the pore water diffusion experiments appear to be the most promising approach and a recommended site characterisation protocol has been formulated. The main conclusions from the Matrix Fluid Chemistry Experiment are: Groundwater movement within the bedrock hosting the experimental site has been enhanced by increased hydraulic gradients generated by the presence of the tunnel, and to a much lesser extent by the borehole itself. Over experimental timescales ∼4 years) solute transport through the rock matrix

  6. Matrix fluid chemistry experiment. Final report June 1998 - March 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smellie, John A.T. [Conterra AB, Luleaa (Sweden); Waber, H. Niklaus [Univ. of Bern (Switzerland). Inst. of Geology; Frape, Shaun K. [Univ. of Waterloo (Canada). Dept. of Earth Sciences

    2003-06-01

    The Matrix Fluid Chemistry Experiment set out to determine the composition and evolution of matrix pore fluids/waters in low permeable rock located at repository depths in the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL). Matrix pore fluids/waters can be highly saline in composition and, if accessible, may influence the near-field groundwater chemistry of a repository system. Characterising pore fluids/waters involved in-situ borehole sampling and analysis integrated with laboratory studies and experiments on rock matrix drill core material. Relating the rate of in-situ pore water accumulation during sampling to the measured rock porosity indicated a hydraulic conductivity of 10{sup -14}-10{sup -13} m/s for the rock matrix. This was in accordance with earlier estimated predictions. The sampled matrix pore water, brackish in type, mostly represents older palaeo- groundwater mixtures preserved in the rock matrix and dating back to at least the last glaciation. A component of matrix pore 'fluid' is also present. One borehole section suggests a younger groundwater component which has accessed the rock matrix during the experiment. There is little evidence that the salinity of the matrix pore waters has been influenced significantly by fluid inclusion populations hosted by quartz. Crush/leach, cation exchange, pore water diffusion and pore water displacement laboratory experiments were carried out to compare extracted/calculated matrix pore fluids/waters with in-situ sampling. Of these the pore water diffusion experiments appear to be the most promising approach and a recommended site characterisation protocol has been formulated. The main conclusions from the Matrix Fluid Chemistry Experiment are: Groundwater movement within the bedrock hosting the experimental site has been enhanced by increased hydraulic gradients generated by the presence of the tunnel, and to a much lesser extent by the borehole itself. Over experimental timescales {approx}4 years) solute transport

  7. Solubility of hydrogen in bio-oil compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qureshi, Muhammad Saad; Touronen, Jouni; Uusi-Kyyny, Petri; Richon, Dominique; Alopaeus, Ville

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Solubility of Hydrogen was measured in bio-oil compounds in the at temperatures from 342 to 473 K and pressures up to 16 MPa. • Phase equilibrium data were acquired using a visualization enabled continuous flow synthetic apparatus. • The measured solubility is modeled with Peng-Robinson EoS. - Abstract: The knowledge of accurate hydrogen solubility values in bio-oil compounds is essential for the design and optimization of hydroprocesses relevant to biofuel industry. This work reports the solubility of hydrogen in three industrially relevant bio-oil compounds (allyl alcohol, furan, and eugenol) at temperatures from 342 to 473 K and pressures up to 16 MPa. Phase equilibrium data were acquired using a continuous flow synthetic method. The method is based on the visual observation of the bubble point using a high resolution camera. The measured solubility is modeled with Peng-Robinson EoS with classical van der Waals one fluid mixing rules.

  8. Towards the design of new and improved drilling fluid additives using molecular dynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, Richard L.; Greenwel, H. Christopher; Suter, James L.; Coveney, Peter V.; Jarvis, Rebecca M.

    2010-01-01

    During exploration for oil and gas, a technical drilling fluid is used to lubricate the drill bit, maintain hydrostatic pressure, transmit sensor readings, remove rock cuttings and inhibit swelling of unstable clay based reactive shale formations. Increasing environmental awareness and resulting legislation has led to the search for new, improved biodegradable drilling fluid components. In the case of additives for clay swelling inhibition, an understanding of how existing effective additives interact with clays must be gained to allow the design of improved molecules. Owing to the disordered nature and nano scope dimension of the interlayer pores of clay minerals, computer simulations have become an increasingly useful tool for studying clay-swelling inhibitor interactions. In this work we briefly review the history of the development of technical drilling fluids, the environmental impact of drilling fluids and the use of computer simulations to study the interactions between clay minerals and swelling inhibitors. We report on results from some recent large-scale molecular dynamics simulation studies on low molecular weight water-soluble macromolecular inhibitor molecules. The structure and interactions of poly(propylene oxide)-diamine, poly(ethylene glycol) and poly(ethylene oxide)-diacrylate inhibitor molecules with montmorillonite clay are studied. (author)

  9. Flow rate through microfilters: Influence of the pore size distribution, hydrodynamic interactions, wall slip, and inertia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kaare Hartvig; Valente, Andre X. C. N.; Stone, Howard A.

    2014-01-01

    We examine the fluid mechanics of viscous flow through filters consisting of perforated thin plates. We classify the effects that contribute to the hydraulic resistance of the filter. Classical analyses assume a single pore size and account only for filter thickness. We extend these results to ob...

  10. Solubility and dissolution improvement of ketoprofen by emulsification ionic gelation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachmaniar, Revika; Tristiyanti, Deby; Hamdani, Syarif; Afifah

    2018-02-01

    Ketoprofen or [2-(3-benzoylphenyl) propionic acid] is non-steroidal anti-inflammatory (NSAID) and an analgesic which has high permeability and low solubility. The purpose of this work was to improve the solubility and dissolution of poorly water-soluble ketoprofen prepared by emulsification ionic gelation method and utilizing polymer (chitosan) and cross linker (tripolyphosphate, TPP) for particles formulation. The results show that increasing pH value of TPP, higher solubility and dissolution of as-prepared ketoprofen-chitosan was obtained. The solubility in water of ketoprofen-chitosan with pH 6 for TPP increased 2.71-fold compared to untreated ketoprofen. While the dissolution of ketoprofen-chitosan with pH 6 of TPP in simulated gastric fluid without enzyme (0.1 N HCl), pH 4.5 buffer and simulated intestinal fluid without enzyme (phosphate buffer pH 6.8) was increased 1.9-fold, 1.6-fold and 1.2-fold compared to untreated ketoprofen for dissolution time of 30 minutes, respectively. It could be concluded that chitosan and TPP in the emulsification ionic gelation method for ketoprofen preparation effectively increases solubility and dissolution of poorly water-soluble ketoprofen.

  11. Monitoring the kinetics of the pH-driven transition of the anthrax toxin prepore to the pore by biolayer interferometry and surface plasmon resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Subhashchandra; Brock, Susan; Akkaladevi, Narahari; Tally, Jon; McGinn-Straub, Wesley; Zhang, Na; Gao, Phillip; Gogol, E P; Pentelute, B L; Collier, R John; Fisher, Mark T

    2013-09-17

    Domain 2 of the anthrax protective antigen (PA) prepore heptamer unfolds and refolds during endosome acidification to generate an extended 100 Å β barrel pore that inserts into the endosomal membrane. The PA pore facilitates the pH-dependent unfolding and translocation of bound toxin enzymic components, lethal factor (LF) and/or edema factor, from the endosome to the cytoplasm. We constructed immobilized complexes of the prepore with the PA-binding domain of LF (LFN) to monitor the real-time prepore to pore kinetic transition using surface plasmon resonance and biolayer interferometry (BLI). The kinetics of this transition increased as the solution pH was decreased from 7.5 to 5.0, mirroring acidification of the endosome. Once it had undergone the transition, the LFN-PA pore complex was removed from the BLI biosensor tip and deposited onto electron microscopy grids, where PA pore formation was confirmed by negative stain electron microscopy. When the soluble receptor domain (ANTRX2/CMG2) binds the immobilized PA prepore, the transition to the pore state was observed only after the pH was lowered to early (pH 5.5) or late (pH 5.0) endosomal pH conditions. Once the pore formed, the soluble receptor readily dissociated from the PA pore. Separate binding experiments with immobilized PA pores and the soluble receptor indicate that the receptor has a weakened propensity to bind to the transitioned pore. This immobilized anthrax toxin platform can be used to identify or validate potential antimicrobial lead compounds capable of regulating and/or inhibiting anthrax toxin complex formation or pore transitions.

  12. Monitoring the kinetics of the pH driven transition of the anthrax toxin prepore to the pore by biolayer interferometry and surface plasmon resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Subhashchandra; Brock, Susan; Akkaladevi, Narahari; Tally, Jon; Mcginn-Straub, Wesley; Zhang, Na; Gao, Phillip; Gogol, E. P.; Pentelute, B. L.; Collier, R. John; Fisher, Mark T.

    2013-01-01

    Domain 2 of the anthrax protective antigen (PA) prepore heptamer unfolds and refolds during endosome acidification to generate an extended 100 Å beta barrel pore that inserts into the endosomal membrane. The PA pore facilitates the pH dependent unfolding and translocation of bound toxin enzymic components, lethal factor (LF) and/or edema factor (EF), from the endosome into the cytoplasm. We constructed immobilized complexes of the prepore with the PA-binding domain of LF (LFN) to monitor the real-time prepore to pore kinetic transition using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and bio-layer interferometry (BLI). The kinetics of this transition increased as the solution pH was decreased from pH 7.5 to pH 5.0, mirroring acidification of the endosome. Once transitioned, the LFN-PA pore complex was removed from the BLI biosensor tip and deposited onto EM grids, where the PA pore formation was confirmed by negative stain electron microscopy. When the soluble receptor domain (ANTRX2/CMG2) binds the immobilized PA prepore, the transition to the pore state was observed only after the pH was lowered to early or late endosomal pH conditions (5.5 to 5.0 respectively). Once the pore formed, the soluble receptor readily dissociated from the PA pore. Separate binding experiments with immobilized PA pores and soluble receptor indicate that the receptor has a weakened propensity to bind to the transitioned pore. This immobilized anthrax toxin platform can be used to identify or validate potential antimicrobial lead compounds capable of regulating and/or inhibiting anthrax toxin complex formation or pore transitions. PMID:23964683

  13. Surface wave propagation in a fluid-saturated incompressible ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    dilatational and one rotational elastic waves in fluid-saturated porous solids. Biot theory ..... If the pore liquid is absent or gas is filled in the pores, then ρF ..... Biot M A (1962) Mechanics of deformation and acoustic propagation in porous media.

  14. The Impact of Solid Surface Features on Fluid-Fluid Interface Configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo, J. B.; Brusseau, M. L. L.

    2017-12-01

    Pore-scale fluid processes in geological media are critical for a broad range of applications such as radioactive waste disposal, carbon sequestration, soil moisture distribution, subsurface pollution, land stability, and oil and gas recovery. The continued improvement of high-resolution image acquisition and processing have provided a means to test the usefulness of theoretical models developed to simulate pore-scale fluid processes, through the direct quantification of interfaces. High-resolution synchrotron X-ray microtomography is used in combination with advanced visualization tools to characterize fluid distributions in natural geologic media. The studies revealed the presence of fluid-fluid interface associated with macroscopic features on the surfaces of the solids such as pits and crevices. These features and respective fluid interfaces, which are not included in current theoretical or computational models, may have a significant impact on accurate simulation and understanding of multi-phase flow, energy, heat and mass transfer processes.

  15. Multiscale Pore Throat Network Reconstruction of Tight Porous Media Constrained by Mercury Intrusion Capillary Pressure and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, R.; Prodanovic, M.

    2017-12-01

    Due to the low porosity and permeability of tight porous media, hydrocarbon productivity strongly depends on the pore structure. Effective characterization of pore/throat sizes and reconstruction of their connectivity in tight porous media remains challenging. Having a representative pore throat network, however, is valuable for calculation of other petrophysical properties such as permeability, which is time-consuming and costly to obtain by experimental measurements. Due to a wide range of length scales encountered, a combination of experimental methods is usually required to obtain a comprehensive picture of the pore-body and pore-throat size distributions. In this work, we combine mercury intrusion capillary pressure (MICP) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements by percolation theory to derive pore-body size distribution, following the work by Daigle et al. (2015). However, in their work, the actual pore-throat sizes and the distribution of coordination numbers are not well-defined. To compensate for that, we build a 3D unstructured two-scale pore throat network model initialized by the measured porosity and the calculated pore-body size distributions, with a tunable pore-throat size and coordination number distribution, which we further determine by matching the capillary pressure vs. saturation curve from MICP measurement, based on the fact that the mercury intrusion process is controlled by both the pore/throat size distributions and the connectivity of the pore system. We validate our model by characterizing several core samples from tight Middle East carbonate, and use the network model to predict the apparent permeability of the samples under single phase fluid flow condition. Results show that the permeability we get is in reasonable agreement with the Coreval experimental measurements. The pore throat network we get can be used to further calculate relative permeability curves and simulate multiphase flow behavior, which will provide valuable

  16. Automatic facial pore analysis system using multi-scale pore detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, J Y; Kim, S W; Lee, S H; Choi, J E; Ko, S J

    2017-08-01

    As facial pore widening and its treatments have become common concerns in the beauty care field, the necessity for an objective pore-analyzing system has been increased. Conventional apparatuses lack in usability requiring strong light sources and a cumbersome photographing process, and they often yield unsatisfactory analysis results. This study was conducted to develop an image processing technique for automatic facial pore analysis. The proposed method detects facial pores using multi-scale detection and optimal scale selection scheme and then extracts pore-related features such as total area, average size, depth, and the number of pores. Facial photographs of 50 subjects were graded by two expert dermatologists, and correlation analyses between the features and clinical grading were conducted. We also compared our analysis result with those of conventional pore-analyzing devices. The number of large pores and the average pore size were highly correlated with the severity of pore enlargement. In comparison with the conventional devices, the proposed analysis system achieved better performance showing stronger correlation with the clinical grading. The proposed system is highly accurate and reliable for measuring the severity of skin pore enlargement. It can be suitably used for objective assessment of the pore tightening treatments. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Radiative magnetohydrodynamic simulations of solar pores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cameron, R.; Schuessler, M.; Vögler, A.; Zakharov, V.

    2007-01-01

    Context. Solar pores represent a class of magnetic structures intermediate between small-scale magnetic flux concentrations in intergranular lanes and fully developed sunspots with penumbrae. Aims. We study the structure, energetics, and internal dynamics of pore-like magnetic structures by means of

  18. Cavitation and pore blocking in nanoporous glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichenbach, C; Kalies, G; Enke, D; Klank, D

    2011-09-06

    In gas adsorption studies, porous glasses are frequently referred to as model materials for highly disordered mesopore systems. Numerous works suggest that an accurate interpretation of physisorption isotherms requires a complete understanding of network effects upon adsorption and desorption, respectively. The present article deals with nitrogen and argon adsorption at different temperatures (77 and 87 K) performed on a series of novel nanoporous glasses (NPG) with different mean pore widths. NPG samples contain smaller mesopores and significantly higher microporosity than porous Vycor glass or controlled pore glass. Since the mean pore width of NPG can be tuned sensitively, the evolution of adsorption characteristics with respect to a broadening pore network can be investigated starting from the narrowest nanopore width. With an increasing mean pore width, a H2-type hysteresis develops gradually which finally transforms into a H1-type. In this connection, a transition from a cavitation-induced desorption toward desorption controlled by pore blocking can be observed. Furthermore, we find concrete hints for a pore size dependence of the relative pressure of cavitation in highly disordered pore systems. By comparing nitrogen and argon adsorption, a comprehensive insight into adsorption mechanisms in novel disordered materials is provided. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  19. In-situ, real time micro-CT imaging of pore scale processes, the next frontier for laboratory based micro-CT scanning

    OpenAIRE

    Boone, Marijn; Bultreys, Tom; Masschaele, Bert; Van Loo, Denis; Van Hoorebeke, Luc; Cnudde, Veerle

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decade, laboratory based X-ray computed micro-tomography (micro-CT) has given unique insights in the internal structure of complex reservoir rocks, improving the understanding of pore scale processes and providing crucial information for pore scale modelling. Especially in-situ imaging using X-ray optimized Hassler type cells has enabled the direct visualization of fluid distributions at the pore scale under reservoir conditions. While sub-micrometre spatial resolutions are achi...

  20. Unstable Pore-Water Flow in Intertidal Wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, D. A.; Shen, C.; Li, L.

    2014-12-01

    Salt marshes are important intertidal wetlands strongly influenced by interactions between surface water and groundwater. Bordered by coastal water, the marsh system undergoes cycles of inundation and exposure driven by the tide. This leads to dynamic, complex pore-water flow and solute transport in the marsh soil. Pore-water circulations occur over vastly different spatial and temporal scales with strong link to the marsh topography. These circulations control solute transport between the marsh soil and the tidal creek, and ultimately affect the overall nutrient exchange between the marsh and coastal water. The pore-water flows also dictate the soil condition, particularly aeration, which influences the marsh plant growth. Numerous studies have been carried out to examine the pore-water flow process in the marsh soil driven by tides, focusing on stable flow with the assumption of homogeneity in soil and fluid properties. This assumption, however, is questionable given the actual inhomogeneous conditions in the field. For example, the salinity of surface water in the tidal creek varies temporally and spatially due to the influence of rainfall and evapotranspiration as well as the freshwater input from upland areas to the estuary, creating density gradients across the marsh surface and within the marsh soil. Many marshes possess soil stratigraphy with low-permeability mud typically overlying high-permeability sandy deposits. Macropores such as crab burrows are commonly distributed in salt marsh sediments. All these conditions are prone to the development of non-uniform, unstable preferential pore-water flow in the marsh soil, for example, funnelling and fingering. Here we present results from laboratory experiments and numerical simulations to explore such unstable flow. In particular, the analysis aims to address how the unstable flow modifies patterns of local pore-water movement and solute transport, as well as the overall exchange between the marsh soil and

  1. Blood and interstitial flow in the hierarchical pore space architecture of bone tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowin, Stephen C; Cardoso, Luis

    2015-03-18

    There are two main types of fluid in bone tissue, blood and interstitial fluid. The chemical composition of these fluids varies with time and location in bone. Blood arrives through the arterial system containing oxygen and other nutrients and the blood components depart via the venous system containing less oxygen and reduced nutrition. Within the bone, as within other tissues, substances pass from the blood through the arterial walls into the interstitial fluid. The movement of the interstitial fluid carries these substances to the cells within the bone and, at the same time, carries off the waste materials from the cells. Bone tissue would not live without these fluid movements. The development of a model for poroelastic materials with hierarchical pore space architecture for the description of blood flow and interstitial fluid flow in living bone tissue is reviewed. The model is applied to the problem of determining the exchange of pore fluid between the vascular porosity and the lacunar-canalicular porosity in bone tissue due to cyclic mechanical loading and blood pressure. These results are basic to the understanding of interstitial flow in bone tissue that, in turn, is basic to understanding of nutrient transport from the vasculature to the bone cells buried in the bone tissue and to the process of mechanotransduction by these cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. FINGERPRINT MATCHING BASED ON PORE CENTROIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Malathi

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available In recent years there has been exponential growth in the use of bio- metrics for user authentication applications. Automated Fingerprint Identification systems have become popular tool in many security and law enforcement applications. Most of these systems rely on minutiae (ridge ending and bifurcation features. With the advancement in sensor technology, high resolution fingerprint images (1000 dpi pro- vide micro level of features (pores that have proven to be useful fea- tures for identification. In this paper, we propose a new strategy for fingerprint matching based on pores by reliably extracting the pore features The extraction of pores is done by Marker Controlled Wa- tershed segmentation method and the centroids of each pore are con- sidered as feature vectors for matching of two fingerprint images. Experimental results shows that the proposed method has better per- formance with lower false rates and higher accuracy.

  3. Soluble CD163

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Holger J

    2012-01-01

    CD163 is an endocytic receptor for haptoglobin-hemoglobin complexes and is expressed solely on macrophages and monocytes. As a result of ectodomain shedding, the extracellular portion of CD163 circulates in blood as a soluble protein (sCD163) at 0.7-3.9 mg/l in healthy individuals. The function o...

  4. Solubility Part 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tantra, Ratna; Bolea, Eduardo; Bouwmeester, H.; Rey-Castro, Carlos; David, C.A.A.; Dogné, Jean Michel; Laborda, Francisco; Laloy, Julie; Robinson, Kenneth N.; Undas, A.K.; Zande, van der M.

    2016-01-01

    This chapter gives an overview of different methods that can potentially be used to determine the solubility of nanomaterials. In general, the methods presented can be broadly divided into four categories: separation methods, methods to quantify free ions, methods to quantify total dissolved

  5. Understanding the mechanisms behind coking pressure: Relationship to pore structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John J. Duffy; M. Castro Diaz; Colin E. Snape; Karen M. Steel; Merrick R. Mahoney [University of Nottingham, Nottingham (United Kingdom). Nottingham Fuel and Energy Centre, School of Chemical, Environmental and Mining Engineering

    2007-09-15

    Three low volatile coals A, B and C with oven wall pressures of 100 kPa, 60 kPa and 20 kPa respectively were investigated using high-temperature rheometry, {sup 1}H NMR, thermogravimetric analysis and SEM, with the primary aim to better understand the mechanisms behind the coking pressure phenomenon. Rheometer plate displacement measurements ({Delta}L) have shown differences in the expansion and contraction behaviour of the three coals, which seem to correlate with changes in rheological properties; while SEM images have shown that the expansion process coincides with development of pore structure. It is considered that the point of maximum plate height ({Delta}L{sub max}) prior to contraction may be indicative of a cell opening or pore network forming process, based on analogies with other foam systems. Such a process may be considered important for coking pressure since it provides a potential mechanism for volatile escape, relieving internal gas pressure and inducing charge contraction. For coal C, which has the highest fluidity {delta}L{sub max} occurs quite early in the softening process and consequently a large degree of contraction is observed; while for the lower fluidity coal B, the process is delayed since pore development and consequently wall thinning progress at a slower rate. When {Delta}L{sub max} is attained, a lower degree of contraction is observed because the event occurs closer to resolidification where the increasing viscosity/elasticity can stabilise the expanded pore structure. For coal A which is relatively high fluidity, but also high coking pressure, a greater degree of swelling is observed prior to cell rupture, which may be due to greater fluid elasticity during the expansion process. This excessive expansion is considered to be a potential reason for its high coking pressure. 58 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Uranium in pore waters from North Atlantic (GME and Southern Nares Abyssal Plain) sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santschi, P.H.; Bajo, C.; Mantovani, M.; Orciuolo, D.; Cranston, R.E.; Bruno, J.

    1988-01-01

    Here we report the measurement of low uranium concentrations in composite pore-water samples from the uppermost 20-30 m of deep-sea abyssal plain sediments from the Great Meteor East and Southern Nares Abyssal Plains Area. Many values are the lowest uranium concentrations ever measured in the pore waters of deep-sea sediments. Our lowest value, 0.05 ± 0.01 p.p.b., is orders of magnitude lower than the predicted solubility of U0 2 or U 4 0 9 . The uranium concentrations obtained from both sites correlate closely with measured redox potentials in the sediments. The low mobility of uranium in pore waters from turbiditic deep-sea abyssal plain sediments, which can be deduced from these measurements, has important implications for the sub-seabed disposal of high-level radioactive waste, and for marine geochemistry of uranium. (author)

  7. Pore-Water Carbonate and Phosphate As Predictors of Arsenate Toxicity in Soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Dane T; Kader, Mohammed; Wang, Liang; Choppala, Girish; Rahman, Mohammad Mahmudur; Megharaj, Mallavarapu; Naidu, Ravi

    2016-12-06

    Phytotoxicity of inorganic contaminants is influenced by the presence of competing ions at the site of uptake. In this study, interaction of soil pore-water constituents with arsenate toxicity was investigated in cucumber (Cucumis sativa L) using 10 contrasting soils. Arsenate phytotoxicity was shown to be related to soluble carbonate and phosphate. The data indicated that dissolved phosphate and carbonate had an antagonistic impact on arsenate toxicity to cucumber. To predict arsenate phytotoxicity in soils with a diverse range of soil solution properties, both carbonate and phosphate were required. The relationship between arsenic and pore-water toxicity parameters was established initially using multiple regression. In addition, based on the relationship with carbonate and phosphate we successively applied a terrestrial biotic ligand-like model (BLM) including carbonate and phosphate. Estimated effective concentrations from the BLM-like parametrization were strongly correlated to measured arsenate values in pore-water (R 2 = 0.76, P soils.

  8. Effects of incubation on solubility and mobility of trace metals in two contaminated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Lena Q.; Dong Yan

    2004-01-01

    Much research has focused on changes in solubility and mobility of trace metals in soils under incubation. In this experiment, changes in solubility and mobility of trace metals (Pb, Cu and As) and Fe in two contaminated soils from Tampa, Florida and Montreal, Canada were examined. Soils of 30 g were packed in columns and were incubated for 3-80 days under water-flooding incubation. Following incubation, metal concentrations in pore water (water soluble) and in 0.01 M CaCl 2 leachates (exchangeable+water soluble) were determined. While both soils were contaminated with Pb (1600-2500 mg kg -1 ), Tampa soil was also contaminated with As (230 mg kg -1 ). Contrast to the low pH (3.8) of Tampa soil, Montreal soil had an alkaline pH of 7.7 and high Ca of 1.6%. Concentrations of Fe(II) increased with incubation time in the Tampa soil mainly due to reductive Fe dissolution, but decreased in the Montreal soil possibly due to formation of FeCO 3 . The inverse relationship between concentrations of Pb and Fe(II) in pore water coupled with the fact that Fe(II) concentrations were much greater than those of Pb in pore water may suggest the importance of Fe(II) in controlling Pb solubility in soils. However, changes in concentrations of Fe(II), Pb, Cu and As in pore water with incubation time were similar to those in leachate, i.e. water soluble metals were positively related to exchangeable metals in the two contaminated soils. This research suggests the importance of Fe in controlling metal solubility and mobility in soils under water-flooded incubation. - Iron is important in controlling metal solubility and mobility in flooded soils

  9. Determination of Pore Pressure from Sonic Log: a Case Study on One of Iran Carbonate Reservoir Rocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morteza Azadpour

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Pore pressureis defined as the pressure of the fluid inside the pore space of the formation, which is also known as the formation pressure. When the pore pressure is higher than hydrostatic pressure, it is referred to as overpressure. Knowledge of this pressure is essential for cost-effective drilling, safe well planning, and efficient reservoir modeling. The main objective of this study is to estimate the formation pore pressure as a reliable mud weight pressure using well log data at one of oil fields in the south of Iran. To obtain this goal, the formation pore pressure is estimated from well logging data by applying Eaton’s prediction method with some modifications. In this way, sonic transient time trend line is separated by lithology changes and recalibrated by Weakley’s approach. The created sonic transient time is used to create an overlay pore pressure based on Eaton’s method and is led to pore pressure determination. The results are compared with the pore pressure estimated from commonly used methods such as Eaton’s and Bowers’s methods. The determined pore pressure from Weakley’s approach shows some improvements in comparison with Eaton’s method. However, the results of Bowers’s method, in comparison with the other two methods, show relatively better agreement with the mud weight pressure values.

  10. Angiogenesis mediated by soluble forms of E-selectin and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Alisa E.; Halloran, Margaret M.; Haskell, Catherine J.; Shah, Manisha R.; Polverini, Peter J.

    1995-08-01

    ENDOTHELIAL adhesion molecules facilitate the entry of leukocytes into inflamed tissues. This in turn promotes neovascularization, a process central to the progression of rheumatoid arthritis, tumour growth and wound repair1. Here we test the hypothesis that soluble endothelial adhesion molecules promote angiogenesis2á¤-4. Human recombinant soluble E-selectin and soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 induced chemotaxis of human endothelial cells in vitro and were angiogenic in rat cornea. Soluble E-selectin acted on endothelial cells in part through a sialyl Lewis-X-dependent mechanism, while soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 acted on endothelial cells in part through a very late antigen (VLA)-4 dependent mechanism. The chemotactic activity of rheumatoid synovial fluid for endothelial cells, and also its angiogenic activity, were blocked by antibodies to either soluble E-selectin or soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1. These results suggest a novel function for soluble endothelial adhesion molecules as mediators of angiogenesis.

  11. Electrokinetic effects and fluid permeability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berryman, J.G.

    2003-01-01

    Fluid permeability of porous media depends mainly on connectivity of the pore space and two physical parameters: porosity and a pertinent length-scale parameter. Electrical imaging methods typically establish connectivity and directly measure electrical conductivity, which can then often be related to porosity by Archie's law. When electrical phase measurements are made in addition to the amplitude measurements, information about the pertinent length scale can then be obtained. Since fluid permeability controls the ability to flush unwanted fluid contaminants from the subsurface, inexpensive maps of permeability could improve planning strategies for remediation efforts. Detailed knowledge of fluid permeability is also important for oil field exploitation, where knowledge of permeability distribution in three dimensions is a common requirement for petroleum reservoir simulation and analysis, as well as for estimates on the economics of recovery

  12. Enlarged facial pores: an update on treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Joanna; Lanoue, Julien; Goldenberg, Gary

    2016-07-01

    Enlarged facial pores remain a common dermatologic and cosmetic concern from acne and rosacea, among other conditions, that is difficult to treat due to the multifactorial nature of their pathogenesis and negative impact on patients' quality of life. Enlarged facial pores are primarily treated through addressing associative factors, such as increased sebum production and cutaneous aging. We review the current treatment modalities for enlarged or dense facial pores, including topical retinoids, chemical peels, oral antiandrogens, and lasers and devices, with a focus on newer therapies.

  13. Control of pore size in epoxy systems.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawyer, Patricia Sue; Lenhart, Joseph Ludlow (North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND); Lee, Elizabeth (North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND); Kallam, Alekhya (North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND); Majumdar, Partha (North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND); Dirk, Shawn M.; Gubbins, Nathan; Chisholm, Bret J. (North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND); Celina, Mathias C.; Bahr, James (North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND); Klein, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    Both conventional and combinatorial approaches were used to study the pore formation process in epoxy based polymer systems. Sandia National Laboratories conducted the initial work and collaborated with North Dakota State University (NDSU) using a combinatorial research approach to produce a library of novel monomers and crosslinkers capable of forming porous polymers. The library was screened to determine the physical factors that control porosity, such as porogen loading, polymer-porogen interactions, and polymer crosslink density. We have identified the physical and chemical factors that control the average porosity, pore size, and pore size distribution within epoxy based systems.

  14. Uranyl Oxalate Solubility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leturcq, G.; Costenoble, S.; Grandjean, S. [CEA Marcoule DEN/DRCP/SCPS/LCA - BP17171 - 30207 Bagnols sur Ceze cedex (France)

    2008-07-01

    The solubility of uranyl oxalate was determined at ambient temperature by precipitation in oxalic-nitric solutions, using an initial uranyl concentration of 0.1 mol/L. Oxalic concentration varied from 0.075 to 0.3 mol/L while nitric concentration ranged between 0.75 and 3 mol/L. Dissolution tests, using complementary oxalic-nitric media, were carried out for 550 hours in order to study the kinetic to reach thermodynamic equilibrium. Similar solubility values were reached by dissolution and precipitation. Using the results, it was possible to draw the solubility surface versus oxalic and nitric concentrations and to determine both the apparent solubility constant of UO{sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4}, 3H{sub 2}O (Ks) and the apparent formation constant of the first uranyl-oxalate complex UO{sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4} (log {beta}1), for ionic strengths varying between 1 and 3 mol/L. Ks and log {beta}1 values were found to vary from 1.9 10{sup -8} to 9.2 10{sup -9} and from 5.95 to 6.06, respectively, when ionic strength varied from 1 to 3 mol/L. A second model may fit our data obtained at an ionic strength of 3 mol/L suggesting as reported by Moskvin et al. (1959) that no complexes are formed for [H{sup +}] at 3 M. The Ks value would then be 1.3 10{sup -8}. (authors)

  15. Cold seeps in Monterey Bay, California: Geochemistry of pore waters and relationship to benthic foraminiferal calcite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gieskes, Joris, E-mail: jgieskes@ucsd.edu [Scripps Institution of Oceanography, IOD-0208, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093-0208 (United States); Rathburn, Anthony E. [Scripps Institution of Oceanography, IOD-0208, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093-0208 (United States)] [Indiana State University, Department of Earth and Environmental Systems, Terre Haute, IN 47809 (United States); Martin, Jonathan B. [University of Florida, Department of Geological Sciences, Gainesville, FL 32611-2120 (United States); Perez, M. Elena [Indiana State University, Department of Earth and Environmental Systems, Terre Haute, IN 47809 (United States)] [The Natural History Museum, Department of Palaeontology, Cromwell Road, London SW7 5BD (United Kingdom); Mahn, Chris [Scripps Institution of Oceanography, IOD-0208, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093-0208 (United States); Bernhard, Joan M. [Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Geology and Geophysics Department, MS52, Woods Hole, MA 02543 (United States); Day, Shelley [University of Florida, Department of Geological Sciences, Gainesville, FL 32611-2120 (United States)

    2011-05-15

    Highlights: > We describe the geochemistry of pore waters in the Clam Flats area of Monterey Bay. > The geochemical data are compared with the {delta}{sup 13}C chemistry of benthic foraminifera. > Living foraminifera indicate little effects of pore water low {delta}{sup 13}C (DIC) in the clam bed. > This phenomenon and its implications are discussed in detail. > Implications with regards to paleo-methane seepage are discussed. - Abstract: An extensive geochemical and biogeochemical examination of CH{sub 4} seeps in the Clam Flats area of Monterey Bay provides insight into the character of relationships between seep geochemistry and benthic foraminiferal geochemistry. The area is characterized by sulfide-rich fluids. Sulfide increases are associated with large increases in alkalinity, as well as small decreases in dissolved Ca and Mg. In addition, only small increases in NH{sub 4} are observed, but values of {delta}{sup 13}C of dissolved inorganic C are as low as -60 per mille at shallow depths (<3 cm). These observations indicate that all these processes are related to the bacterial oxidation of CH{sub 4}, which is transported upward by slow seepage of pore fluids. The geochemistry of the pore fluids should be relevant to the geochemistry of the carbonate tests of living and dead foraminifera. However, a profound disequilibrium of approximately an order of magnitude occurs between the {delta}{sup 13}C values of stained (cytoplasm-containing) foraminiferal carbonate and the C isotope values of ambient pore water dissolved inorganic C. Reasons are unclear for this isotopic disequilibrium, but have important implications for interpretations of foraminiferal carbonate as a paleoenvironmental proxy. Much fine scale work is needed to fully understand the relationships between the biogeochemistry of benthic foraminifera and the geochemistry of the pore waters where they live.

  16. Cold seeps in Monterey Bay, California: Geochemistry of pore waters and relationship to benthic foraminiferal calcite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gieskes, Joris; Rathburn, Anthony E.; Martin, Jonathan B.; Perez, M. Elena; Mahn, Chris; Bernhard, Joan M.; Day, Shelley

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → We describe the geochemistry of pore waters in the Clam Flats area of Monterey Bay. → The geochemical data are compared with the δ 13 C chemistry of benthic foraminifera. → Living foraminifera indicate little effects of pore water low δ 13 C (DIC) in the clam bed. → This phenomenon and its implications are discussed in detail. → Implications with regards to paleo-methane seepage are discussed. - Abstract: An extensive geochemical and biogeochemical examination of CH 4 seeps in the Clam Flats area of Monterey Bay provides insight into the character of relationships between seep geochemistry and benthic foraminiferal geochemistry. The area is characterized by sulfide-rich fluids. Sulfide increases are associated with large increases in alkalinity, as well as small decreases in dissolved Ca and Mg. In addition, only small increases in NH 4 are observed, but values of δ 13 C of dissolved inorganic C are as low as -60 per mille at shallow depths ( 4 , which is transported upward by slow seepage of pore fluids. The geochemistry of the pore fluids should be relevant to the geochemistry of the carbonate tests of living and dead foraminifera. However, a profound disequilibrium of approximately an order of magnitude occurs between the δ 13 C values of stained (cytoplasm-containing) foraminiferal carbonate and the C isotope values of ambient pore water dissolved inorganic C. Reasons are unclear for this isotopic disequilibrium, but have important implications for interpretations of foraminiferal carbonate as a paleoenvironmental proxy. Much fine scale work is needed to fully understand the relationships between the biogeochemistry of benthic foraminifera and the geochemistry of the pore waters where they live.

  17. Applications of SSAFT EOS for determination of the solubilities of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Applications of SSAFT EOS for determination of the solubilities of solid compounds in supercritical CO 2 . ... Using statistical thermodynamics such as Simplified SAFT equation of state (SSAFTEoS) for estimating phase equilibrium and fluid properties of different materials have been used widely. SSAFT EoS has been ...

  18. Process for radiation cocrosslinking water soluble polymers and products thereof

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assarsson, P.G.; King, P.A.

    1976-01-01

    Poly(ethylene oxide) and at least one other water soluble polymer are conveniently cocrosslinked by exposing aqueous systems of the polymers to high energy irradiation. The resulting products are insoluble hydrophilic gels which can contain or when dried absorb large quantities of aqueous fluids and hence are useful as absorbing media for disposable absorbent articles, agricultural applications and the like

  19. Capillary filling rules and displacement mechanisms for spontaneous imbibition of CO2 for carbon storage and EOR using micro-model experiments and pore scale simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, E.; Yang, J.; Crawshaw, J.; Boek, E. S.

    2012-04-01

    In the 1980s, Lenormand et al. carried out their pioneering work on displacement mechanisms of fluids in etched networks [1]. Here we further examine displacement mechanisms in relation to capillary filling rules for spontaneous imbibition. Understanding the role of spontaneous imbibition in fluid displacement is essential for refining pore network models. Generally, pore network models use simple capillary filling rules and here we examine the validity of these rules for spontaneous imbibition. Improvement of pore network models is vital for the process of 'up-scaling' to the field scale for both enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and carbon sequestration. In this work, we present our experimental microfluidic research into the displacement of both supercritical CO2/deionised water (DI) systems and analogous n-decane/air - where supercritical CO2 and n-decane are the respective wetting fluids - controlled by imbibition at the pore scale. We conducted our experiments in etched PMMA and silicon/glass micro-fluidic hydrophobic chips. We first investigate displacement in single etched pore junctions, followed by displacement in complex network designs representing actual rock thin sections, i.e. Berea sandstone and Sucrosic dolomite. The n-decane/air experiments were conducted under ambient conditions, whereas the supercritical CO2/DI water experiments were conducted under high temperature and pressure in order to replicate reservoir conditions. Fluid displacement in all experiments was captured via a high speed video microscope. The direction and type of displacement the imbibing fluid takes when it enters a junction is dependent on the number of possible channels in which the wetting fluid can imbibe, i.e. I1, I2 and I3 [1]. Depending on the experiment conducted, the micro-models were initially filled with either DI water or air before the wetting fluid was injected. We found that the imbibition of the wetting fluid through a single pore is primarily controlled by the

  20. Argon solubility in liquid steel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boom, R; Dankert, O; Van Veen, A; Kamperman, AA

    2000-01-01

    Experiments have been performed to establish the solubility of argon in liquid interstitial-free steel. The solubility appears to be lower than 0.1 at ppb, The results are in line with argon solubilities reported in the literature on liquid iron. Semiempirical theories and calculations based on the

  1. Modeling of carbonate reservoir variable secondary pore space based on CT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, X.; Nie, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, Z.

    2017-12-01

    Digital core technology has brought convenience to us, and X-ray CT scanning is one of the most common way to obtain 3D digital cores. However, it can only provide the original information of the only samples being scanned, and we can't modify the porosity of the scanned cores. For numerical rock physical simulations, a series of cores with variable porosities are needed to determine the relationship between the physical properties and porosity. In carbonate rocks, the secondary pore space including dissolution pores, caves and natural fractures is the key reservoir space, which makes the study of carbonate secondary porosity very important. To achieve the variation of porosities in one rock sample, based on CT scanned digital cores, according to the physical and chemical properties of carbonate rocks, several mathematical methods are chosen to simulate the variation of secondary pore space. We use the erosion and dilation operations of mathematical morphology method to simulate the pore space changes of dissolution pores and caves. We also use the Fractional Brownian Motion model to generate natural fractures with different widths and angles in digital cores to simulate fractured carbonate rocks. The morphological opening-and-closing operations in mathematical morphology method are used to simulate distribution of fluid in the pore space. The established 3D digital core models with different secondary porosities and water saturation status can be used in the study of the physical property numerical simulations of carbonate reservoir rocks.

  2. Capillary condensation in porous materials. Hysteresis and interaction mechanism without pore blocking/percolation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosman, Annie; Ortega, Camille

    2008-04-15

    We have performed measurements of boundary hysteresis loops, reversal curves, and subloops in p+-type porous silicon, a porous material composed of straight non-interconnected pores. These data show that a strong interaction mechanism exists between the pores. The pores of porous silicon are non-independent, whereas they are not interconnected. This hysteretic behavior is very similar to that observed in porous glass, which consists of cavities connected to each other by constrictions. This questions the so-called pore blocking/percolation model developed to explain the behavior of fluid in porous glass. More generally, if we disregard the shape of the boundary hysteresis loops which depends on the porous material (H1 for MCM-41 and SBA-15, H2 for porous glass and p+-type porous silicon), the hysteretic features inside the main loop are qualitatively the same for all these porous systems. This shows that none of these systems are composed of independent pores. A coupling between the pores is always present whether they are interconnected or not and whatever the shape of the main loop is.

  3. Effect of pore size distribution and flow segregation on dispersion in porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbonell, R.G.

    1978-11-01

    In order to study the effect of the pore size distribution and flow segregation on dispersion in a porous media, the dispersion of solute in an array of parallel pores is considered. Equations are obtained for the dispersion coefficient in laminar and turbulent flow, as a function of the particle Peclet number. The theory fits quite well cumulative experimental data from various researchers in the Peclet number range from 10 -3 to 10 6 . The model also predicts some trends, backed by experimental data, regarding the effect of particle size, particle size distribution and fluid velocity on dispersion

  4. Fluid Mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drazin, Philip

    1987-01-01

    Outlines the contents of Volume II of "Principia" by Sir Isaac Newton. Reviews the contributions of subsequent scientists to the physics of fluid dynamics. Discusses the treatment of fluid mechanics in physics curricula. Highlights a few of the problems of modern research in fluid dynamics. Shows that problems still remain. (CW)

  5. Valve seat pores sealed with thermosetting monomer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmore, A. B.

    1966-01-01

    Hard anodic coating provides a smooth wear resistant value seating surface on a cast aluminum alloy valve body. Vacuum impregnation with a thermosetting monomer, diallyl phthalate, seals the pores on the coating to prevent galvanic corrosion.

  6. Estimation of pore pressure from seismic velocities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, Zayra; Ojeda, German Y; Mateus, Darwin

    2009-01-01

    On pore pressure calculations it is common to obtain a profile in a well bore, which is then extrapolated toward offset wells. This practice might generate mistakes on pore pressure measurements, since geological conditions may change from a well bore to another, even into the same basin. Therefore, it is important to use other tools which allow engineers not only to detect and estimate in an indirect way overpressure zones, but also to keep a lateral tracking of possible changes that may affect those values in the different formations. Taking into account this situation, we applied a methodology that estimates formation pressure from 3D seismic velocities by using the Eaton method. First, we estimated formation pore pressure; then, we identified possible overpressure zones. Finally, those results obtained from seismic information were analyzed involving well logs and pore pressure tests, in order to compare real data with prediction based on seismic information from the Colombian foothill.

  7. OBSERVATIONS OF SAUSAGE MODES IN MAGNETIC PORES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morton, R. J.; Erdelyi, R.; Jess, D. B.; Mathioudakis, M.

    2011-01-01

    We present here evidence for the observation of the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) sausage modes in magnetic pores in the solar photosphere. Further evidence for the omnipresent nature of acoustic global modes is also found. The empirical decomposition method of wave analysis is used to identify the oscillations detected through a 4170 A 'blue continuum' filter observed with the Rapid Oscillations in the Solar Atmosphere (ROSA) instrument. Out of phase, periodic behavior in pore size and intensity is used as an indicator of the presence of magnetoacoustic sausage oscillations. Multiple signatures of the magnetoacoustic sausage mode are found in a number of pores. The periods range from as short as 30 s up to 450 s. A number of the magnetoacoustic sausage mode oscillations found have periods of 3 and 5 minutes, similar to the acoustic global modes of the solar interior. It is proposed that these global oscillations could be the driver of the sausage-type magnetoacoustic MHD wave modes in pores.

  8. Visualization of enzyme activities inside earthworm pores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Duyen; Razavi, Bahar S.

    2015-04-01

    In extremely dynamic microhabitats as bio-pores made by earthworm, the in situ enzyme activities are assumed as a footprint of complex biotic interactions. Our study focused on the effect of earthworm on the enzyme activities inside bio-pores and visualizing the differences between bio-pores and earthworm-free soil by zymography technique (Spohn and Kuzyakov, 2013). For the first time, we aimed at quantitative imaging of enzyme activities in bio-pores. Lumbricus terrestris L. was placed into transparent box (15×20×15cm). After two weeks when bio-pore systems were formed by earthworms, we visualized in situ enzyme activities of five hydrolytic enzymes (β-glucosidase, cellobiohydrolase, chitinase, xylanase, leucine-aminopeptidase, and phosphatase. Zymography showed higher activity of β-glucosidase, chitinase, xylanase and phosphatase in biopores comparing to bulk soil. However, the differences in activity of cellobiohydrolase and leucine aminopeptidase between bio-pore and bulk soil were less pronounced. This demonstrated an applicability of zymography approach to monitor and to distinguish the in situ activity of hydrolytic enzymes in soil biopores.

  9. Modelling bentonite pore waters for the Swiss high-level radioactive waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curti, E.

    1993-11-01

    The main objective of this investigation is to contribute to definition of representative compositions of bentonite pore waters in the near-field of the Swiss repository for high-level radioactive waste. Such compositions are necessary for determining the solubility limits of radionuclides for the safety analysis KRISTALLIN I. The model developed here is based on the premise, supported by experimental data, that the composition of bentonite pore waters is largely controlled by the dissolution or precipitation of reactive trace solids in bentonite. Selectivity constants for the exchange equilibria among Na-K, Na-Ca, and Ca-Mg were derived from water-bentonite interaction experiments performed for NAGRA by the British Geological Survey (BGS). An important parameter for the prediction of radionuclide solubilities is the oxidation potential of the bentonite water. Since the BGS experiments yielded no information on this, the oxidation potential had to be estimated from model assumptions. Bentonite pore waters were defined by computer simulation with the geochemical code MINEQL. They have been modelled in a closed system, i.e. assuming the bentonite, once it has reacted with a fixed volume of groundwater, does not exchange further chemical species with an external reservoir. No attempt was made to model the evolution of the pore water by simulating diffusive exchange processes. It can be anticipated that uncertainties in the concentrations of some major elements (e.g. Al, Si) will not significantly affect the calculated radionuclide solubilities. The latter will depend primarily on the concentrations of a few major ligands (OH - , Cl - and CO 3 -2 ) and, for multivalent elements, also on the oxidation potential of the solution. (author) 10 figs., 22 tabs., 40 refs

  10. Pore Network Modeling: Alternative Methods to Account for Trapping and Spatial Correlation

    KAUST Repository

    De La Garza Martinez, Pablo

    2016-05-01

    Pore network models have served as a predictive tool for soil and rock properties with a broad range of applications, particularly in oil recovery, geothermal energy from underground reservoirs, and pollutant transport in soils and aquifers [39]. They rely on the representation of the void space within porous materials as a network of interconnected pores with idealised geometries. Typically, a two-phase flow simulation of a drainage (or imbibition) process is employed, and by averaging the physical properties at the pore scale, macroscopic parameters such as capillary pressure and relative permeability can be estimated. One of the most demanding tasks in these models is to include the possibility of fluids to remain trapped inside the pore space. In this work I proposed a trapping rule which uses the information of neighboring pores instead of a search algorithm. This approximation reduces the simulation time significantly and does not perturb the accuracy of results. Additionally, I included spatial correlation to generate the pore sizes using a matrix decomposition method. Results show higher relative permeabilities and smaller values for irreducible saturation, which emphasizes the effects of ignoring the intrinsic correlation seen in pore sizes from actual porous media. Finally, I implemented the algorithm from Raoof et al. (2010) [38] to generate the topology of a Fontainebleau sandstone by solving an optimization problem using the steepest descent algorithm with a stochastic approximation for the gradient. A drainage simulation is performed on this representative network and relative permeability is compared with published results. The limitations of this algorithm are discussed and other methods are suggested to create a more faithful representation of the pore space.

  11. Pore Network Modeling: Alternative Methods to Account for Trapping and Spatial Correlation

    KAUST Repository

    De La Garza Martinez, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Pore network models have served as a predictive tool for soil and rock properties with a broad range of applications, particularly in oil recovery, geothermal energy from underground reservoirs, and pollutant transport in soils and aquifers [39]. They rely on the representation of the void space within porous materials as a network of interconnected pores with idealised geometries. Typically, a two-phase flow simulation of a drainage (or imbibition) process is employed, and by averaging the physical properties at the pore scale, macroscopic parameters such as capillary pressure and relative permeability can be estimated. One of the most demanding tasks in these models is to include the possibility of fluids to remain trapped inside the pore space. In this work I proposed a trapping rule which uses the information of neighboring pores instead of a search algorithm. This approximation reduces the simulation time significantly and does not perturb the accuracy of results. Additionally, I included spatial correlation to generate the pore sizes using a matrix decomposition method. Results show higher relative permeabilities and smaller values for irreducible saturation, which emphasizes the effects of ignoring the intrinsic correlation seen in pore sizes from actual porous media. Finally, I implemented the algorithm from Raoof et al. (2010) [38] to generate the topology of a Fontainebleau sandstone by solving an optimization problem using the steepest descent algorithm with a stochastic approximation for the gradient. A drainage simulation is performed on this representative network and relative permeability is compared with published results. The limitations of this algorithm are discussed and other methods are suggested to create a more faithful representation of the pore space.

  12. Pore-scale and Continuum Simulations of Solute Transport Micromodel Benchmark Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oostrom, Martinus; Mehmani, Yashar; Romero Gomez, Pedro DJ; Tang, Y.; Liu, H.; Yoon, Hongkyu; Kang, Qinjun; Joekar Niasar, Vahid; Balhoff, Matthew; Dewers, T.; Tartakovsky, Guzel D.; Leist, Emily AE; Hess, Nancy J.; Perkins, William A.; Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Serkowski, John A.; Werth, Charles J.; Valocchi, Albert J.; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Zhang, Changyong

    2016-08-01

    Four sets of micromodel nonreactive solute transport experiments were conducted with flow velocity, grain diameter, pore-aspect ratio, and flow focusing heterogeneity as the variables. The data sets were offered to pore-scale modeling groups to test their simulators. Each set consisted of two learning experiments, for which all results was made available, and a challenge experiment, for which only the experimental description and base input parameters were provided. The experimental results showed a nonlinear dependence of the dispersion coefficient on the Peclet number, a negligible effect of the pore-aspect ratio on transverse mixing, and considerably enhanced mixing due to flow focusing. Five pore-scale models and one continuum-scale model were used to simulate the experiments. Of the pore-scale models, two used a pore-network (PN) method, two others are based on a lattice-Boltzmann (LB) approach, and one employed a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) technique. The learning experiments were used by the PN models to modify the standard perfect mixing approach in pore bodies into approaches to simulate the observed incomplete mixing. The LB and CFD models used these experiments to appropriately discretize the grid representations. The continuum model use published non-linear relations between transverse dispersion coefficients and Peclet numbers to compute the required dispersivity input values. Comparisons between experimental and numerical results for the four challenge experiments show that all pore-scale models were all able to satisfactorily simulate the experiments. The continuum model underestimated the required dispersivity values and, resulting in less dispersion. The PN models were able to complete the simulations in a few minutes, whereas the direct models needed up to several days on supercomputers to resolve the more complex problems.

  13. Investigating Multiphase Flow Phenomena in Fine-Grained Reservoir Rocks: Insights from Using Ethane Permeability Measurements over a Range of Pore Pressures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Aidan Letham

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The ability to quantify effective permeability at the various fluid saturations and stress states experienced during production from shale oil and shale gas reservoirs is required for efficient exploitation of the resources, but to date experimental challenges prevent measurement of the effective permeability of these materials over a range of fluid saturations. To work towards overcoming these challenges, we measured effective permeability of a suite of gas shales to gaseous ethane over a range of pore pressures up to the saturated vapour pressure. Liquid/semiliquid ethane saturation increases due to adsorption and capillary condensation with increasing pore pressure resulting in decreasing effective permeability to ethane gas. By how much effective permeability to ethane gas decreases with adsorption and capillary condensation depends on the pore size distribution of each sample and the stress state that effective permeability is measured at. Effective permeability decreases more at higher stress states because the pores are smaller at higher stress states. The largest effective permeability drops occur in samples with dominant pore sizes in the mesopore range. These pores are completely blocked due to capillary condensation at pore pressures near the saturated vapour pressure of ethane. Blockage of these pores cuts off the main fluid flow pathways in the rock, thereby drastically decreasing effective permeability to ethane gas.

  14. The Pore-scale modeling of multiphase flows in reservoir rocks using the lattice Boltzmann method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Y.; Baldwin, C. H.; Toelke, J.; Grader, A.

    2011-12-01

    Digital rock physics (DRP) is a new technology to compute the physical and fluid flow properties of reservoir rocks. In this approach, pore scale images of the porous rock are obtained and processed to create highly accurate 3D digital rock sample, and then the rock properties are evaluated by advanced numerical methods at the pore scale. Ingrain's DRP technology is a breakthrough for oil and gas companies that need large volumes of accurate results faster than the current special core analysis (SCAL) laboratories can normally deliver. In this work, we compute the multiphase fluid flow properties of 3D digital rocks using D3Q19 immiscible LBM with two relaxation times (TRT). For efficient implementation on GPU, we improved and reformulated color-gradient model proposed by Gunstensen and Rothmann. Furthermore, we only use one-lattice with the sparse data structure: only allocate memory for pore nodes on GPU. We achieved more than 100 million fluid lattice updates per second (MFLUPS) for two-phase LBM on single Fermi-GPU and high parallel efficiency on Multi-GPUs. We present and discuss our simulation results of important two-phase fluid flow properties, such as capillary pressure and relative permeabilities. We also investigate the effects of resolution and wettability on multiphase flows. Comparison of direct measurement results with the LBM-based simulations shows practical ability of DRP to predict two-phase flow properties of reservoir rock.

  15. Pore REconstruction and Segmentation (PORES) method for improved porosity quantification of nanoporous materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Eyndhoven, G., E-mail: geert.vaneyndhoven@uantwerpen.be [iMinds-Vision Lab, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, B-2610 Wilrijk (Belgium); Kurttepeli, M. [EMAT, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Van Oers, C.J.; Cool, P. [Laboratory of Adsorption and Catalysis, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, B-2610 Wilrijk (Belgium); Bals, S. [EMAT, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Batenburg, K.J. [iMinds-Vision Lab, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, B-2610 Wilrijk (Belgium); Centrum Wiskunde and Informatica, Science Park 123, NL-1090 GB Amsterdam (Netherlands); Mathematical Institute, Universiteit Leiden, Niels Bohrweg 1, NL-2333 CA Leiden (Netherlands); Sijbers, J. [iMinds-Vision Lab, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, B-2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)

    2015-01-15

    Electron tomography is currently a versatile tool to investigate the connection between the structure and properties of nanomaterials. However, a quantitative interpretation of electron tomography results is still far from straightforward. Especially accurate quantification of pore-space is hampered by artifacts introduced in all steps of the processing chain, i.e., acquisition, reconstruction, segmentation and quantification. Furthermore, most common approaches require subjective manual user input. In this paper, the PORES algorithm “POre REconstruction and Segmentation” is introduced; it is a tailor-made, integral approach, for the reconstruction, segmentation, and quantification of porous nanomaterials. The PORES processing chain starts by calculating a reconstruction with a nanoporous-specific reconstruction algorithm: the Simultaneous Update of Pore Pixels by iterative REconstruction and Simple Segmentation algorithm (SUPPRESS). It classifies the interior region to the pores during reconstruction, while reconstructing the remaining region by reducing the error with respect to the acquired electron microscopy data. The SUPPRESS reconstruction can be directly plugged into the remaining processing chain of the PORES algorithm, resulting in accurate individual pore quantification and full sample pore statistics. The proposed approach was extensively validated on both simulated and experimental data, indicating its ability to generate accurate statistics of nanoporous materials. - Highlights: • An electron tomography reconstruction/segmentation method for nanoporous materials. • The method exploits the porous nature of the scanned material. • Validated extensively on both simulation and real data experiments. • Results in increased image resolution and improved porosity quantification.

  16. Active pore space utilization in nanoporous carbon-based supercapacitors: Effects of conductivity and pore accessibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seredych, Mykola; Koscinski, Mikolaj; Sliwinska-Bartkowiak, Malgorzata; Bandosz, Teresa J.

    2012-12-01

    Composites of commercial graphene and nanoporous sodium-salt-polymer-derived carbons were prepared with 5 or 20 weight% graphene. The materials were characterized using the adsorption of nitrogen, SEM/EDX, thermal analysis, Raman spectroscopy and potentiometric titration. The samples' conductivity was also measured. The performance of the carbon composites in energy storage was linked to their porosity and electronic conductivity. The small pores (<0.7) were found as very active for double layer capacitance. It was demonstrated that when double layer capacitance is a predominant mechanism of charge storage, the degree of the pore space utilization for that storage can be increased by increasing the conductivity of the carbons. That active pore space utilization is defined as gravimetric capacitance per unit pore volume in pores smaller than 0.7 nm. Its magnitude is affected by conductivity of the carbon materials. The functional groups, besides pseudocapacitive contribution, increased the wettability and thus the degree of the pore space utilization. Graphene phase, owing to its conductivity, also took part in an insitu increase of the small pore accessibility and thus the capacitance of the composites via enhancing an electron transfer to small pores and thus imposing the reduction of groups blocking the pores for electrolyte ions.

  17. Soluble porphyrin polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gust, Jr., John Devens; Liddell, Paul Anthony

    2015-07-07

    Porphyrin polymers of Structure 1, where n is an integer (e.g., 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, or greater) ##STR00001## are synthesized by the method shown in FIGS. 2A and 2B. The porphyrin polymers of Structure 1 are soluble in organic solvents such as 2-MeTHF and the like, and can be synthesized in bulk (i.e., in processes other than electropolymerization). These porphyrin polymers have long excited state lifetimes, making the material suitable as an organic semiconductor for organic electronic devices including transistors and memories, as well as solar cells, sensors, light-emitting devices, and other opto-electronic devices.

  18. Cyclic deformation-induced solute transport in tissue scaffolds with computer designed, interconnected, pore networks: experiments and simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Den Buijs, Jorn Op; Dragomir-Daescu, Dan; Ritman, Erik L

    2009-08-01

    Nutrient supply and waste removal in porous tissue engineering scaffolds decrease from the periphery to the center, leading to limited depth of ingrowth of new tissue into the scaffold. However, as many tissues experience cyclic physiological strains, this may provide a mechanism to enhance solute transport in vivo before vascularization of the scaffold. The hypothesis of this study was that pore cross-sectional geometry and interconnectivity are of major importance for the effectiveness of cyclic deformation-induced solute transport. Transparent elastic polyurethane scaffolds, with computer-programmed design of pore networks in the form of interconnected channels, were fabricated using a 3D printing and injection molding technique. The scaffold pores were loaded with a colored tracer for optical contrast, cyclically compressed with deformations of 10 and 15% of the original undeformed height at 1.0 Hz. Digital imaging was used to quantify the spatial distribution of the tracer concentration within the pores. Numerical simulations of a fluid-structure interaction model of deformation-induced solute transport were compared to the experimental data. The results of experiments and modeling agreed well and showed that pore interconnectivity heavily influences deformation-induced solute transport. Pore cross-sectional geometry appears to be of less relative importance in interconnected pore networks. Validated computer models of solute transport can be used to design optimal scaffold pore geometries that will enhance the convective transport of nutrients inside the scaffold and the removal of waste, thus improving the cell survivability deep inside the scaffold.

  19. QUASI-ONE DIMENSIONAL CLASSICAL FLUIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.K.Percus

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the equilibrium statistical mechanics of simple fluids in narrow pores. A systematic expansion is made about a one-dimensional limit of this system. It starts with a density functional, constructed from projected densities, which depends upon projected one and two-body potentials. The nature of higher order corrections is discussed.

  20. Transmembrane helical interactions in the CFTR channel pore.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jhuma Das

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR gene affect CFTR protein biogenesis or its function as a chloride channel, resulting in dysregulation of epithelial fluid transport in the lung, pancreas and other organs in cystic fibrosis (CF. Development of pharmaceutical strategies to treat CF requires understanding of the mechanisms underlying channel function. However, incomplete 3D structural information on the unique ABC ion channel, CFTR, hinders elucidation of its functional mechanism and correction of cystic fibrosis causing mutants. Several CFTR homology models have been developed using bacterial ABC transporters as templates but these have low sequence similarity to CFTR and are not ion channels. Here, we refine an earlier model in an outward (OWF and develop an inward (IWF facing model employing an integrated experimental-molecular dynamics simulation (200 ns approach. Our IWF structure agrees well with a recently solved cryo-EM structure of a CFTR IWF state. We utilize cysteine cross-linking to verify positions and orientations of residues within trans-membrane helices (TMHs of the OWF conformation and to reconstruct a physiologically relevant pore structure. Comparison of pore profiles of the two conformations reveal a radius sufficient to permit passage of hydrated Cl- ions in the OWF but not the IWF model. To identify structural determinants that distinguish the two conformations and possible rearrangements of TMHs within them responsible for channel gating, we perform cross-linking by bifunctional reagents of multiple predicted pairs of cysteines in TMH 6 and 12 and 6 and 9. To determine whether the effects of cross-linking on gating observed are the result of switching of the channel from open to close state, we also treat the same residue pairs with monofunctional reagents in separate experiments. Both types of reagents prevent ion currents indicating that pore blockage is primarily responsible.

  1. Some aspects of the role of intergranular fluids in the compositional ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    fluid, solubility in the fluid and mass balance between the various reservoirs. The model ... It is shown that a coupling of thermodynamics and kinetics controls the evolution of the system and the ...... systems. AGU Fall Meeting; EOS 78 F833.

  2. Seismic attributes and advanced computer algorithm to predict formation pore pressure: Qalibah formation of Northwest Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nour, Abdoulshakour M.

    Oil and gas exploration professionals have long recognized the importance of predicting pore pressure before drilling wells. Pre-drill pore pressure estimation not only helps with drilling wells safely but also aids in the determination of formation fluids migration and seal integrity. With respect to the hydrocarbon reservoirs, the appropriate drilling mud weight is directly related to the estimated pore pressure in the formation. If the mud weight is lower than the formation pressure, a blowout may occur, and conversely, if it is higher than the formation pressure, the formation may suffer irreparable damage due to the invasion of drilling fluids into the formation. A simple definition of pore pressure is the pressure of the pore fluids in excess of the hydrostatic pressure. In this thesis, I investigated the utility of advance computer algorithm called Support Vector Machine (SVM) to learn the pattern of high pore pressure regime, using seismic attributes such as Instantaneous phase, t*Attenuation, Cosine of Phase, Vp/Vs ratio, P-Impedance, Reflection Acoustic Impedance, Dominant frequency and one well attribute (Mud-Weigh) as the learning dataset. I applied this technique to the over pressured Qalibah formation of Northwest Saudi Arabia. The results of my research revealed that in the Qalibah formation of Northwest Saudi Arabia, the pore pressure trend can be predicted using SVM with seismic and well attributes as the learning dataset. I was able to show the pore pressure trend at any given point within the geographical extent of the 3D seismic data from which the seismic attributes were derived. In addition, my results surprisingly showed the subtle variation of pressure within the thick succession of shale units of the Qalibah formation.

  3. Facial skin pores: a multiethnic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flament, Frederic; Francois, Ghislain; Qiu, Huixia; Ye, Chengda; Hanaya, Tomoo; Batisse, Dominique; Cointereau-Chardon, Suzy; Seixas, Mirela Donato Gianeti; Dal Belo, Susi Elaine; Bazin, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Skin pores (SP), as they are called by laymen, are common and benign features mostly located on the face (nose, cheeks, etc) that generate many aesthetic concerns or complaints. Despite the prevalence of skin pores, related literature is scarce. With the aim of describing the prevalence of skin pores and anatomic features among ethnic groups, a dermatoscopic instrument, using polarized lighting, coupled to a digital camera recorded the major features of skin pores (size, density, coverage) on the cheeks of 2,585 women in different countries and continents. A detection threshold of 250 μm, correlated to clinical scorings by experts, was input into a specific software to further allow for automatic counting of the SP density (N/cm(2)) and determination of their respective sizes in mm(2). Integrating both criteria also led to establishing the relative part of the skin surface (as a percentage) that is actually covered by SP on cheeks. The results showed that the values of respective sizes, densities, and skin coverage: 1) were recorded in all studied subjects; 2) varied greatly with ethnicity; 3) plateaued with age in most cases; and 4) globally refected self-assessment by subjects, in particular those who self-declare having "enlarged pores" like Brazilian women. Inversely, Chinese women were clearly distinct from other ethnicities in having very low density and sizes. Analyzing the present results suggests that facial skin pore's morphology as perceived by human eye less result from functional criteria of associated appendages such as sebaceous glands. To what extent skin pores may be viewed as additional criteria of a photo-altered skin is an issue to be further addressed.

  4. Fluids engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    Fluids engineering has played an important role in many applications, from ancient flood control to the design of high-speed compact turbomachinery. New applications of fluids engineering, such as in high-technology materials processing, biotechnology, and advanced combustion systems, have kept up unwaining interest in the subject. More accurate and sophisticated computational and measurement techniques are also constantly being developed and refined. On a more fundamental level, nonlinear dynamics and chaotic behavior of fluid flow are no longer an intellectual curiosity and fluid engineers are increasingly interested in finding practical applications for these emerging sciences. Applications of fluid technology to new areas, as well as the need to improve the design and to enhance the flexibility and reliability of flow-related machines and devices will continue to spur interest in fluids engineering. The objectives of the present seminar were: to exchange current information on arts, science, and technology of fluids engineering; to promote scientific cooperation between the fluids engineering communities of both nations, and to provide an opportunity for the participants and their colleagues to explore possible joint research programs in topics of high priority and mutual interest to both countries. The Seminar provided an excellent forum for reviewing the current state and future needs of fluids engineering for the two nations. With the Seminar ear-marking the first formal scientific exchange between Korea and the United States in the area of fluids engineering, the scope was deliberately left broad and general

  5. Solubility of plutonium dioxide aerosols, in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newton, G.J.; Kanapilly, G.M.

    1976-01-01

    Solubility of plutonium aerosols is an important parameter in establishing risk estimates for industrial workers who might accidentally inhale these materials and in evaluating environmental health impacts associated with Pu. In vitro solubility of industrial plutonium aerosols in a simulated lung fluid is compared to similar studies with ultrafine aerosols from laser ignition of delta phase plutonium metal and laboratory-produced spherical particles of 238 PuO 2 and 239 PuO 2 . Although relatively insoluble, industrial plutonium-mixed oxide aerosols were much more soluble than laboratory-produced plutonium dioxide particles. Chain agglomerate aerosols from laser ignition of metallic Pu indicated in vitro dissolution half-times of 10 and 50 days for activity median aerodynamic diameter (AMAD) of 0.7 and 2.3 μm, respectively. Plutonium-containing mixed oxide aerosols indicated dissolution half-times of 40 to 500 days for particles formed by industrial powder comminution and blending. Centerless grinding of fuel pellets yielded plutonium-containing aerosols with dissolution half-times of 1200 to 8000 days. All mixed oxide particles were in the size range 1.0 μm to 2.5 μm AMAD

  6. Mixed Fluid Conditions: Capillary Phenomena

    KAUST Repository

    Santamarina, Carlos

    2017-07-06

    Mixed fluid phenomena in porous media have profound implications on soil-atmosphere interaction, energy geotechnology, environmental engineering and infrastructure design. Surface tension varies with pressure, temperature, solute concentration, and surfactant concentration; on the other hand, the contact angle responds to interfacial tensions, surface topography, invasion velocity, and chemical interactions. Interfaces are not isolated but interact through the fluid pressure and respond to external fields. Jumps, snap-offs and percolating wetting liquids along edges and crevices are ubiquitous in real, non-cylindrical porous networks. Pore- and macroscale instabilities together with pore structure variability-and-correlation favor fluid trapping and hinder recovery efficiency. The saturation-pressure characteristic curve is affected by the saturation-history, flow-rate, the mechanical response of the porous medium, and time-dependent reactive and diffusive processes; in addition, there are salient differences between unsaturation by internal gas nucleation and gas invasion. Capillary forces add to other skeletal forces in the porous medium and can generate open-mode discontinuities when the capillary entry pressure is high relative to the effective stress. Time emerges as an important variable in mixed-fluid conditions and common quasi-static analyses may fail to capture the system response.

  7. Discrimination of reservoir fluid contacts using compressional and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Improved fluid detection and lithology discrimination using rock properties and attributes cross plots have been attempted using well log data in an Onshore Niger Delta field. Rock properties and attributes were extracted using empirical rock physics models on well logs and used to validate their potentials as pore fluid ...

  8. Proinflammatory tissue response and recovery of adipokines during 4 days of subcutaneous large-pore microdialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Trine Schnedler; Kaastrup, Peter; Stallknecht, Bente

    2009-01-01

    was originally designed for sampling of small molecules but recently the availability of catheters with large-pore membranes has made it possible to recover larger molecules such as adipokines. The present study investigated tissue response towards large-pore microdialysis catheters inserted into human SAT for 4......INTRODUCTION: Subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) is increasingly being recognized as a highly active tissue secreting adipokines involved in many physiological and pathophysiological processes. Microdialysis is a technique used for in vivo sampling of interstitial fluid from e.g. SAT. The technique......: Insertion of a large-pore microdialysis catheter into human SAT results in tissue trauma leading to changes in the interstitial concentrations of IL-1beta, IL-6, IL-8, MCP-1, TNF-alpha and adiponectin....

  9. Numerical investigation of micro-pore formation during substrate impact of molten droplets in spraying processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, H.; Lavernia, E.J.; Rangel, R.H.; Muehlberger, E.; Sickinger, A.

    1994-01-01

    The porosity that is commonly associated with discrete droplet processes, such as plasma spraying and spray deposition, effectively degrades the quality of the sprayed material. In the present study, micro-pore formation during the deformation and interaction of molten tungsten droplets impinging onto a flat substrate in spraying processes is numerically investigated. The numerical simulation is accomplished on the basis of the full Navier-Stokes equations and the Volume Of Fluid (VOF) function by using a 2-domain method for the thermal field and solidification problem and a two-phase flow continuum model for the flow problem with a growing solid layer. The possible mechanisms governing the formation of micro-pores are discussed. The effects of important processing parameters, such as droplet impact velocity, droplet temperature, substrate temperature, and droplet viscosity, on the micro-pore formation are addressed

  10. Pore water chemistry of Rokle Bentonite (Czech Republic)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cervinka, R.; Vejsada, J.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. With inflowing the groundwater to Deep Geological Repository (DGR), the interaction of this water with engineering barrier materials will alter both, barrier materials and also the groundwater. One of the most important alterations represents the formation of bentonite pore water that will affect a number of important processes, e.g. corrosion of waste package materials, solubility of radionuclides, diffusion and sorption of radionuclides. The composition of bentonite pore water is influenced primarily by the composition of solid phase (bentonite), liquid phase (inflowing groundwater), the gaseous phase (partial pressure of CO 2 ), bentonite compaction and the rate of groundwater species diffusion through bentonite. Also following processes have to be taken into account: dissolution of admixtures present in the bentonite (particularly well soluble salts, e.g. KCl, NaCl, gypsum), ion exchange process and protonation and deprotonation of surface hydroxyl groups on clay minerals. Long-term stability of mineral phases and possible mineral transformation should not be neglected as well. In the Czech Republic, DGR concept takes local bentonite into account as material for both buffer and backfill. The candidate bentonite comes from the Rokle deposit (NW Bohemia) and represents complex mixture of (Ca,Mg)-Fe-rich montmorillonite, micas, kaolinite and other mineral admixtures (mainly Ca, Mg, Fe carbonates, feldspars and iron oxides). The mineralogical and chemical characteristics were published previously. This bentonite is different in composition and properties from worldwide studied Na-bentonite (e.g. MX-80, Volclay) or Na-Ca bentonite (e.g. Febex). This fact leads to the need of investigation of Rokle bentonite in greater detail to verify its suitability as a buffer and backfill in DGR. Presented task is focused on the study of pore water evolution. Our approach for this study consists in modeling the pore water using

  11. Enhancing the solubility and bioavailability of poorly water-soluble drugs using supercritical antisolvent (SAS) process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuzar, Sharif Md; Hyun, Sang-Min; Kim, Jun-Hee; Park, Hee Jun; Kim, Min-Soo; Park, Jeong-Sook; Hwang, Sung-Joo

    2018-03-01

    Poor water solubility and poor bioavailability are problems with many pharmaceuticals. Increasing surface area by micronization is an effective strategy to overcome these problems, but conventional techniques often utilize solvents and harsh processing, which restricts their use. Newer, green technologies, such as supercritical fluid (SCF)-assisted particle formation, can produce solvent-free products under relatively mild conditions, offering many advantages over conventional methods. The antisolvent properties of the SCFs used for microparticle and nanoparticle formation have generated great interest in recent years, because the kinetics of the precipitation process and morphologies of the particles can be accurately controlled. The characteristics of the supercritical antisolvent (SAS) technique make it an ideal tool for enhancing the solubility and bioavailability of poorly water-soluble drugs. This review article focuses on SCFs and their properties, as well as the fundamentals of overcoming poorly water-soluble drug properties by micronization, crystal morphology control, and formation of composite solid dispersion nanoparticles with polymers and/or surfactants. This article also presents an overview of the main aspects of the SAS-assisted particle precipitation process, its mechanism, and parameters, as well as our own experiences, recent advances, and trends in development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Buffer fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirzadzhanzade, A Kh; Dedusanko, G Ya; Dinaburg, L S; Markov, Yu M; Rasizade, Ya N; Rozov, V N; Sherstnev, N M

    1979-08-30

    A drilling fluid is suggested for separating the drilling and plugging fluids which contains as the base increased solution of polyacrylamide and additive. In order to increase the viscoelastic properties of the liquid with simultaneous decrease in the periods of its fabrication, the solution contains as an additive dry bentonite clay. In cases of the use of a buffer fluid under conditions of negative temperatures, it is necessary to add to it table salt or ethylene glycol.

  13. Fluid Behavior and Fluid-Solid Interactions in Nanoporous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, H.

    2015-12-01

    Although shale oil/gas production in the US has increased exponentially, the low energy recovery is a daunting problem needed to be solved for its sustainability and continued growth, especially in light of the recent oil/gas price decline. This is apparently related to the small porosity (a few to a few hundred nm) and low permeability (10-16-10-20 m2) of tight shale formations. The fundamental question lies in the anomalous behavior of fluids in nanopores due to confinement effects, which, however, remains poorly understood. In this study, we combined experimental characterization and observations, particularly using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), with pore-scale modeling using lattice Boltzmann method (LBM), to examine the fluid behavior and fluid-solid interactions in nanopores at reservoir conditions. Experimentally, we characterized the compositions and microstructures of a shale sample from Wolfcamp, Texas, using a variety of analytical techniques. Our analyses reveal that the shale sample is made of organic-matter (OM)-lean and OM-rich layers that exhibit different chemical and mineral compositions, and microstructural characteristics. Using the hydrostatic pressure system and gas-mixing setup we developed, in-situ SANS measurements were conducted at pressures up to 20 kpsi on shale samples imbibed with water or water-methane solutions. The obtained results indicate that capillary effect plays a significant role in fluid-nanopore interactions and the associated changes in nanopore structures vary with pore size and pressure. Computationally, we performed LBM modeling to simulate the flow behavior of methane in kerogen nanoporous structure. The correction factor, which is the ratio of apparent permeability to intrinsic permeability, was calculated. Our results show that the correction factor is always greater than one (non-continuum/non-Darcy effects) and increases with decreasing nanopore size, intrinsic permeability and pressure. Hence, the

  14. Micro-computed tomography pore-scale study of flow in porous media: Effect of voxel resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, S. M.; Gray, F.; Crawshaw, J. P.; Boek, E. S.

    2016-09-01

    A fundamental understanding of flow in porous media at the pore-scale is necessary to be able to upscale average displacement processes from core to reservoir scale. The study of fluid flow in porous media at the pore-scale consists of two key procedures: Imaging - reconstruction of three-dimensional (3D) pore space images; and modelling such as with single and two-phase flow simulations with Lattice-Boltzmann (LB) or Pore-Network (PN) Modelling. Here we analyse pore-scale results to predict petrophysical properties such as porosity, single-phase permeability and multi-phase properties at different length scales. The fundamental issue is to understand the image resolution dependency of transport properties, in order to up-scale the flow physics from pore to core scale. In this work, we use a high resolution micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) scanner to image and reconstruct three dimensional pore-scale images of five sandstones (Bentheimer, Berea, Clashach, Doddington and Stainton) and five complex carbonates (Ketton, Estaillades, Middle Eastern sample 3, Middle Eastern sample 5 and Indiana Limestone 1) at four different voxel resolutions (4.4 μm, 6.2 μm, 8.3 μm and 10.2 μm), scanning the same physical field of view. Implementing three phase segmentation (macro-pore phase, intermediate phase and grain phase) on pore-scale images helps to understand the importance of connected macro-porosity in the fluid flow for the samples studied. We then compute the petrophysical properties for all the samples using PN and LB simulations in order to study the influence of voxel resolution on petrophysical properties. We then introduce a numerical coarsening scheme which is used to coarsen a high voxel resolution image (4.4 μm) to lower resolutions (6.2 μm, 8.3 μm and 10.2 μm) and study the impact of coarsening data on macroscopic and multi-phase properties. Numerical coarsening of high resolution data is found to be superior to using a lower resolution scan because it

  15. Moving Magnetic Features Around a Pore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaithakkal, A. J.; Riethmüller, T. L.; Solanki, S. K.; Lagg, A.; Barthol, P.; Gandorfer, A.; Gizon, L.; Hirzberger, J.; VanNoort, M. [Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research, Justus-von-Liebig-Weg 3, Göttingen D-37077 (Germany); Rodríguez, J. Blanco [Grupo de Astronomía y Ciencias del Espacio, Universidad de Valencia, E-46980 Paterna, Valencia (Spain); Iniesta, J. C. Del Toro; Suárez, D. Orozco [Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (CSIC), Apartado de Correos 3004, E-18080 Granada (Spain); Schmidt, W. [Kiepenheuer-Institut für Sonnenphysik, Schöneckstr. 6, D-79104 Freiburg (Germany); Pillet, V. Martínez [National Solar Observatory, 3665 Discovery Drive, Boulder, CO 80303 (United States); Knölker, M., E-mail: anjali@mps.mpg.de [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307-3000 (United States)

    2017-03-01

    Spectropolarimetric observations from Sunrise/IMaX, obtained in 2013 June, are used for a statistical analysis to determine the physical properties of moving magnetic features (MMFs) observed near a pore. MMFs of the same and opposite polarity, with respect to the pore, are found to stream from its border at an average speed of 1.3 km s{sup −1} and 1.2 km s{sup −1}, respectively, with mainly same-polarity MMFs found further away from the pore. MMFs of both polarities are found to harbor rather weak, inclined magnetic fields. Opposite-polarity MMFs are blueshifted, whereas same-polarity MMFs do not show any preference for up- or downflows. Most of the MMFs are found to be of sub-arcsecond size and carry a mean flux of ∼1.2 × 10{sup 17} Mx.

  16. Gas transport and subsoil pore characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berisso, Feto Esimo; Schjønning, Per; Keller, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Arrangements of elementary soil particles during soil deposition and subsequent biological and physical processes in long-term pedogenesis are expected to lead to anisotropy of the non-tilled subsoil pore system. Soil compaction by agricultural machinery is known to affect soil pore characteristics...... were sampled in vertical and horizontal directions from 0.3, 0.5, 0.7 and 0.9 m depth (the two lower depths only in Sweden). In the laboratory, water retention, air permeability (ka) and gas diffusivity (Ds/D0) were determined. For the sandy clay loam, morphological characteristics of pores (effective......). In the sandy clay loam soil, dB and nB displayed significant anisotropy (FAcharacteristics because of its origin...

  17. The solubility and stabilization of ikaite (CaCO3.6H2O) from 0° to 25°C: environmental and paleoclimatic implications for thinolite tufa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischoff, James L.; Fitzpatrick, John A.; Rosenbauer, Robert J.

    1993-01-01

    We determined the solubility of ikaite from 0?? to 25??C to model its saturation state in natural waters and test the hypothesis that it is the precursor of the calcite pseudomorphs in thinolite tufa of Quaternary Lake Lahonta. Its precipitation in near-freezing marine sediments requires large additions of HCO3 to pore fluids from the diagenetic decomposition of organic matter. Its crystallization in tufas of alkaline lakes, however, requires only small additions of Ca from springs. Ikaite is stabilized in natural environments by orthophosphate. The presence of ikaite or its pseudomorphs is an indicator of near-freezing comditions in environments with high concentrations of orthophosphate. If ikaite is the precursor of thinolite tufa, then the thinolite likely grew below the sediment-water interface at the site of sublacustrine springs during prolonged cold periods. -from Authors

  18. Uncertainties in pore water chemistry of compacted bentonite from Rokle deposit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cervinka, R.; Vejsadu, J.; Vokal, A.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. The composition of compacted bentonite pore water influences a number of important processes occurring in a deep geological repository (DGR), e.g. corrosion of waste package materials, solubility of radionuclides, or diffusion and sorption of radionuclides. Its determination is not straightforward, because it is difficult to obtain (e.g. squeeze) the pore water from compacted bentonite without changing its properties. It is therefore necessary to combine experimentally obtained parameters and geochemical modelling to approach it compositions. This article describes the results achieved in investigation the composition of pore water of compacted Ca-Mg bentonite from Czech deposits, proposed in Czech DGR concept. Ca-Mg bentonite from the largest operating deposit Rokle (Tertiary neo-volcanic area, NW Bohemia) represents complex mixture of (Ca,Mg)-Fe-rich montmorillonite, micas, kaolinite and other mineral admixtures (mainly Ca, Mg, Fe carbonates, feldspars and iron oxides). For experimental investigations the homogenized and grind raw bentonite material obtained directly from the deposit and commercial product (partly Na-activated) from supplier were used. Geochemical characterization of Rokle bentonite included mineralogical composition analyzed by Xray diffraction, cation exchange capacity determined using Cu-trien method, surface complexation parameters determined by acid-base titrations and 'geochemical' porosity derived from diffusion experiments with tracers ( 3 H and 36 Cl). Soluble salts inventory was calculated on the base of results from aqueous extracts of bentonite in deionized water at different solid to liquid ratios (from 18.6 to 125 g/l) and high pressure squeezing of water saturated bentonite at different solid to liquid ratios (from 1:1 to 4:1 w/w). The geochemical model contained cation exchange in the interlayer space and protonization and de-protonization of surface hydroxyl groups on clay

  19. The charge effect on the hindrance factors for diffusion and convection of a solute in pores: II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akinaga, Takeshi; O-tani, Hideyuki; Sugihara-Seki, Masako, E-mail: r091077@kansai-u.ac.jp [Department of Pure and Applied Physics, Kansai University, Yamate-cho, Suita, Osaka 564-8680 (Japan)

    2012-10-15

    The diffusion and convection of a solute suspended in a fluid across porous membranes are known to be reduced compared to those in a bulk solution, owing to the fluid mechanical interaction between the solute and the pore wall as well as steric restriction. If the solute and the pore wall are electrically charged, the electrostatic interaction between them could affect the hindrance to diffusion and convection. In this study, the transport of charged spherical solutes through charged circular cylindrical pores filled with an electrolyte solution containing small ions was studied numerically by using a fluid mechanical and electrostatic model. Based on a mean field theory, the electrostatic interaction energy between the solute and the pore wall was estimated from the Poisson-Boltzmann equation, and the charge effect on the solute transport was examined for the solute and pore wall of like charge. The results were compared with those obtained from the linearized form of the Poisson-Boltzmann equation, i.e. the Debye-Hueckel equation. (paper)

  20. Mesoscale Simulations of Pore Migration in a Nuclear Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radhakrishnan, Balasubramaniam; Gorti, Sarma B.

    2010-01-01

    The evolution of pore and grain structure in a nuclear fuel environment is strongly influenced by the local temperature, and the temperature gradient. The evolution of pore and grain structure in an externally imposed temperature gradient is simulated for a hypothetical material using a Potts model approach that allows for porosity migration by mechanisms similar to surface, grain boundary and volume diffusion, as well as the interaction of migrating pores with stationary grain boundaries. First, the migration of a single pore in a single crystal in the presence of the temperature gradient is simulated. Next, the interaction of a pore moving in a temperature gradient with a grain boundary that is perpendicular to the pore migration direction is simulated in order to capture the force exerted by the pore on the grain boundary. The simulations reproduce the expected variation of pore velocity with pore size as well as the variation of the grain boundary force with pore size.

  1. Dissolution at porous interfaces VI: Multiple pore systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grijseels, H; Crommelin, D J; De Blaey, C J

    1984-12-01

    With the aid of rapidly dissolving sodium chloride particles, cubic pores were made in the surface of a theophylline tablet. The influence of the pores on the dissolution rate of the surface was investigated in a rotating disk apparatus. Like the drilled pores used in earlier studies, downstream on the surface they caused a turbulent flow regimen with the development of a trough due to enhanced erosion. The phenomenon of a critical pore diameter, discovered with single, drilled pores, seems to be applicable to the cubic pores investigated in this study, although a higher degree of surface coverage with pores caused complications, probably due to particles bordering one another and forming larger pores. The behavior of the porous surfaces at different rotation speeds was studied. Due to the presence of pores the laminar character of the boundary layer flow changes to turbulent, which induces locally an increased dissolution flux in the wake of a pore.

  2. Multiscale modeling of fluid flow and mass transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuoka, K.; Yamamoto, H.; Bijeljic, B.; Lin, Q.; Blunt, M. J.

    2017-12-01

    In recent years, there are some reports on a simulation of fluid flow in pore spaces of rocks using Navier-Stokes equations. These studies mostly adopt a X-ray CT to create 3-D numerical grids of the pores in micro-scale. However, results may be of low accuracy when the rock has a large pore size distribution, because pores, whose size is smaller than resolution of the X-ray CT may be neglected. We recently found out by tracer tests in a laboratory using a brine saturated Ryukyu limestone and inject fresh water that a decrease of chloride concentration took longer time. This phenomenon can be explained due to weak connectivity of the porous networks. Therefore, it is important to simulate entire pore spaces even those of very small sizes in which diffusion is dominant. We have developed a new methodology for multi-level modeling for pore scale fluid flow in porous media. The approach is to combine pore-scale analysis with Darcy-flow analysis using two types of X-ray CT images in different resolutions. Results of the numerical simulations showed a close match with the experimental results. The proposed methodology is an enhancement for analyzing mass transport and flow phenomena in rocks with complicated pore structure.

  3. Fluid and mass transfer at subduction interfaces-The field metamorphic record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bebout, Gray E.; Penniston-Dorland, Sarah C.

    2016-01-01

    The interface between subducting oceanic slabs and the hanging wall is a structurally and lithologically complex region. Chemically disparate lithologies (sedimentary, mafic and ultramafic rocks) and mechanical mixtures thereof show heterogeneous deformation. These lithologies are tectonically juxtaposed at mm to km scales, particularly in more intensely sheared regions (mélange zones, which act as fluid channelways). This juxtaposition, commonly in the presence of a mobile fluid phase, offers up huge potential for mass transfer and related metasomatic alteration. Fluids in this setting appear capable of transporting mass over scales of kms, along flow paths with widely varying geometries and P-T trajectories. Current models of arc magmatism require km-scale migration of fluids from the interface into mantle wedge magma source regions and implicit in these models is the transport of any fluids generated in the subducting slab along and ultimately through the subduction interface. Field and geochemical studies of high- and ultrahigh-pressure metamorphic rocks elucidate the sources and compositions of fluids in subduction interfaces and the interplay between deformation and fluid and mass transfer in this region. Recent geophysical studies of the subduction interface - its thickness, mineralogy, density, and H2O content - indicate that its rheology greatly influences the ways in which the subducting plate is coupled with the hanging wall. Field investigation of the magnitude and styles of fluid-rock interaction in metamorphic rocks representing "seismogenic zone" depths (and greater) yields insight regarding the roles of fluids and elevated fluid pore pressure in the weakening of plate interface rocks and the deformation leading to seismic events. From a geochemical perspective, the plate interface contributes to shaping the "slab signature" observed in studies of the composition of arc volcanic rocks. Understanding the production of fluids with hybridized chemical

  4. Schroedinger fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kan, K.K.

    1983-01-01

    The relationship of nuclear internal flow and collective inertia, the difference of this flow from that of a classical fluid, and the approach of this flow to rigid flow in independent-particle model rotation are elucidated by reviewing the theory of Schroedinger fluid and its implications for collective vibration and rotation. (author)

  5. Review: kinetics of water-soluble contrast media in the central nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sage, M.R.

    1983-01-01

    In neuroradiology, intraarterial, intravenous, and intrathecal injections of water-soluble contrast media are made. With the growing importance of water-soluble myelography, interventional angiography, and enhanced computed tomography (CT), it is essential to have a clear understanding of the response of the nervous system to such procedures. The blood, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and extracellular fluid of the parenchyma form the fluid compartments of the brain with three interfaces between, namely, the blood-brain interface, the CSF-brain interface, and the blood-CSF interface. One of more of these interfaces are exposed to water-soluble contrast media after intraarterial, intravenous, or intrathecal administration. The behavior of water-soluble contrast media at these interfaces is discussed on the basis of local experience and a review of the literature

  6. Thermodynamics phase changes of nanopore fluids

    KAUST Repository

    Islam, Akand W.; Patzek, Tadeusz; Sun, Alexander Y.

    2015-01-01

    The van der Waals (vdW) equation (Eq.) is modified to describe thermodynamic of phase behavior of fluids confined in nanopore. Our aim is to compute pressures exerted by the fluid molecules and to investigate how they change due to pore proximity by assuming the pore wall is inert. No additional scaling of model parameters is imposed and original volume and energy parameters are used in the calculations. Our results clearly show the phase changes due to confinement. The critical shifts of temperatures and pressures are in good agreement compared to the laboratory data and molecular simulation. Peng-Robinson (PR) equation-of-state (EOS) has resulted in different effect than the vdW. This work delivers insights into the nature of fluid behavior in extremely low-permeability nanoporous media, especially in the tight shale reservoirs, below the critical temperatures. © 2015 Elsevier B.V.

  7. Thermodynamics phase changes of nanopore fluids

    KAUST Repository

    Islam, Akand W.

    2015-07-01

    The van der Waals (vdW) equation (Eq.) is modified to describe thermodynamic of phase behavior of fluids confined in nanopore. Our aim is to compute pressures exerted by the fluid molecules and to investigate how they change due to pore proximity by assuming the pore wall is inert. No additional scaling of model parameters is imposed and original volume and energy parameters are used in the calculations. Our results clearly show the phase changes due to confinement. The critical shifts of temperatures and pressures are in good agreement compared to the laboratory data and molecular simulation. Peng-Robinson (PR) equation-of-state (EOS) has resulted in different effect than the vdW. This work delivers insights into the nature of fluid behavior in extremely low-permeability nanoporous media, especially in the tight shale reservoirs, below the critical temperatures. © 2015 Elsevier B.V.

  8. Interactions between bedforms, turbulence and pore flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blois, G.; Best, J.; Sambrook Smith, G.; Hardy, R. J.; Lead, J.

    2010-12-01

    A widespread occurrence of flow-form interaction in rivers is represented by subaqueous bedforms such as dunes. Many models have been proposed to explain how bedform generation and evolution are driven by turbulent flow structures that control the incipient motion of cohesionless sediments and later bedform development. However, most of these models have assumed such bedforms to be migrating over an impermeable bed, and that any surface-subsurface flow interaction is negligible. However, for some gravel-bed rivers the porosity can be high, up to 43%, which may result in significant flow both through the permeable bed (hyporheic flow) and across the surface-subsurface interface. The mass and momentum exchange occurring at the interface may have a strong impact on the structure of turbulent flow in the near-bed region. In the case of a dune, its topography induces a local pressure gradient that enhances flow across the interface. This results in a flow structure that may be radically different from that commonly proposed by past work. This paper presents results from a simplified laboratory model akin to a fine-grained bedform generated on top of a coarser sediment bed. Particle imaging velocimetry (PIV) measurements were conducted in order to characterise flow both over and underneath an idealised 2-dimensional dune (0.41 m long, 0.056 m high and having a leeside angle of 27°) overlaying a packed bed of uniform size spheres (D = 0.04 m diameter). Experiments were conducted in free surface flow conditions (Froude number = 0.1; Reynolds number = 25,000) for one bedform height: flow depth ratio (0.31). The flow above the dune was measured using a standard PIV technique while a novel endoscopic PIV (EPIV) system allowed collection of flow data within the pore spaces beneath the dune. The results show that topographically-induced subsurface flow significantly modifies the structure of flow in the leeside of the dune, resulting in a flow field that is radically different

  9. Capillary condensation and orientational ordering of confined polar fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gramzow, Matthias; Klapp, Sabine H L

    2007-01-01

    The phase behavior and the orientational structure of polar model fluids confined to slit pores is investigated by means of density functional theory in a modified mean-field approximation. We focus on fluid states and further assume a uniform number density throughout the pore. Our results for spherical dipolar particles with additional van der Waals-like interactions (Stockmayer fluids) reveal complex fluid-fluid phase behavior involving condensation and first- and second-order isotropic-to-ferroelectric phase transitions, where the ferroelectric ordering occurs parallel to the confining walls. The relative importance of these phase transitions depends on two "tuning" parameters, that is the strength of the dipolar interactions (relative to the isotropic attractive ones) between fluid particles, and on the pore width. In particular, in narrow pores the condensation transition seen in bulk Stockmayer fluids is entirely suppressed. For dipolar hard spheres, on the other hand, the impact of confinement consists in a decrease of the isotropic-to-ferroelectric transition temperatures. We also demonstrate that the local orientational structure is inhomogeneous and anisotropic even in globally isotropic systems, in agreement with computer simulation results.

  10. Creating transient cell membrane pores using a standard inkjet printer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owczarczak, Alexander B; Shuford, Stephen O; Wood, Scott T; Deitch, Sandra; Dean, Delphine

    2012-03-16

    Bioprinting has a wide range of applications and significance, including tissue engineering, direct cell application therapies, and biosensor microfabrication. Recently, thermal inkjet printing has also been used for gene transfection. The thermal inkjet printing process was shown to temporarily disrupt the cell membranes without affecting cell viability. The transient pores in the membrane can be used to introduce molecules, which would otherwise be too large to pass through the membrane, into the cell cytoplasm. The application being demonstrated here is the use of thermal inkjet printing for the incorporation of fluorescently labeled g-actin monomers into cells. The advantage of using thermal ink-jet printing to inject molecules into cells is that the technique is relatively benign to cells. Cell viability after printing has been shown to be similar to standard cell plating methods. In addition, inkjet printing can process thousands of cells in minutes, which is much faster than manual microinjection. The pores created by printing have been shown to close within about two hours. However, there is a limit to the size of the pore created (~10 nm) with this printing technique, which limits the technique to injecting cells with small proteins and/or particles. A standard HP DeskJet 500 printer was modified to allow for cell printing. The cover of the printer was removed and the paper feed mechanism was bypassed using a mechanical lever. A stage was created to allow for placement of microscope slides and coverslips directly under the print head. Ink cartridges were opened, the ink was removed and they were cleaned prior to use with cells. The printing pattern was created using standard drawing software, which then controlled the printer through a simple print command. 3T3 fibroblasts were grown to confluence, trypsinized, and then resuspended into phosphate buffered saline with soluble fluorescently labeled g-actin monomers. The cell suspension was pipetted into the

  11. Distinction between Pore Assembly by Staphylococcal α-Toxin versus Leukotoxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Joubert

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The staphylococcal bipartite leukotoxins and the homoheptameric α-toxin belong to the same family of β-barrel pore-forming toxins despite slight differences. In the α-toxin pore, the N-terminal extremity of each protomer interacts as a deployed latch with two consecutive protomers in the vicinity of the pore lumen. N-terminal extremities of leukotoxins as seen in their three-dimensional structures are heterogeneous in length and take part in the β-sandwich core of soluble monomers. Hence, the interaction of these N-terminal extremities within structures of adjacent monomers is questionable. We show here that modifications of their N-termini by two different processes, using fusion with glutathione S-transferase (GST and bridging of the N-terminal extremity to the adjacent β-sheet via disulphide bridges, are not deleterious for biological activity. Therefore, bipartite leukotoxins do not need a large extension of their N-terminal extremities to form functional pores, thus illustrating a microheterogeneity of the structural organizations between bipartite leukotoxins and α-toxin.

  12. A new model for pore formation by cholesterol-dependent cytolysins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyril F Reboul

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Cholesterol Dependent Cytolysins (CDCs are important bacterial virulence factors that form large (200-300 Å membrane embedded pores in target cells. Currently, insights from X-ray crystallography, biophysical and single particle cryo-Electron Microscopy (cryo-EM experiments suggest that soluble monomers first interact with the membrane surface via a C-terminal Immunoglobulin-like domain (Ig; Domain 4. Membrane bound oligomers then assemble into a prepore oligomeric form, following which the prepore assembly collapses towards the membrane surface, with concomitant release and insertion of the membrane spanning subunits. During this rearrangement it is proposed that Domain 2, a region comprising three β-strands that links the pore forming region (Domains 1 and 3 and the Ig domain, must undergo a significant yet currently undetermined, conformational change. Here we address this problem through a systematic molecular modeling and structural bioinformatics approach. Our work shows that simple rigid body rotations may account for the observed collapse of the prepore towards the membrane surface. Support for this idea comes from analysis of published cryo-EM maps of the pneumolysin pore, available crystal structures and molecular dynamics simulations. The latter data in particular reveal that Domains 1, 2 and 4 are able to undergo significant rotational movements with respect to each other. Together, our data provide new and testable insights into the mechanism of pore formation by CDCs.

  13. Biomechanics of the transport barrier in the nuclear pore complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, George J; Fassati, Ariberto; Hoogenboom, Bart W

    2017-08-01

    The nuclear pore complex (NPC) is the selective gateway through which all molecules must pass when entering or exiting the nucleus. It is a cog in the gene expression pathway, an entrance to the nucleus exploited by viruses, and a highly-tuned nanoscale filter. The NPC is a large proteinaceous assembly with a central lumen occluded by natively disordered proteins, known as FG-nucleoporins (or FG-nups). These FG-nups, along with a family of soluble proteins known as nuclear transport receptors (NTRs), form the selective transport barrier. Although much is known about the transport cycle and the necessity of NTRs for chaperoning cargo molecules through the NPC, the mechanism by which NTRs and NTR•cargo complexes translocate the selective transport barrier is not well understood. How can disordered FG-nups and soluble NTRs form a transport barrier that is selective, ATP-free, and fast? In this work, we review various mechanical approaches - both experimental and theoretical/computational - employed to better understand the morphology of the FG-nups, and their role in nucleocytoplasmic transport. Recent experiments on FG-nups tethered to planar surfaces, coupled with quantitative modelling work suggests that FG-nup morphologies are the result of a finely balanced system with significant contributions from FG-nup cohesiveness and entropic repulsion, and from NTR•FG-nup binding avidity; whilst AFM experiments on intact NPCs suggest that the FG-nups are sufficiently cohesive to form condensates in the centre of the NPC lumen, which may transiently dissolve to facilitate the transport of larger cargoes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Some thermodynamic aspects of the solubility of iron in sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Awasthi, S.P.; Sundaresan, M.

    1984-01-01

    Because of the use of liquid sodium as a heat transfer fluid in fast breeder reactors, its interaction with Fe and some alloying elements, has assumed great importance. Solubility is an important manifestation of this interaction, but there exists in literature a wide divergence in the data on the solubility of iron, which is known to have an intimate relationship with temperature and the concentration of available oxygen in sodium. An attempt has been made, here, to arrive at the mechanism of the observed enhanced solubility of iron in presence of oxygen by analysing the available experimental isothermal and athermal data on solubilities in literature by computing the relevant thermodynamic parameters for various probable interactions in the Na-O-Fe system. From comparison of these with the sign and magnitude of the theoretically calculated thermodynamic values, it has been shown that the predominant iron species existing in liquid sodium in presence of higher concentrations of oxygen is the soluble compound Na 4 FeO 3 . The most probable mechanism of the enhanced solubility of iron can be explained in terms of a sequence involving the initial formation of iron oxide (FeO) in liquid sodium, followed by its conversion to the compound Na 4 FeO 3 . (author)

  15. Water-soluble vitamins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konings, Erik J M

    2006-01-01

    Simultaneous Determination of Vitamins.--Klejdus et al. described a simultaneous determination of 10 water- and 10 fat-soluble vitamins in pharmaceutical preparations by liquid chromatography-diode-array detection (LC-DAD). A combined isocratic and linear gradient allowed separation of vitamins in 3 distinct groups: polar, low-polar, and nonpolar. The method was applied to pharmaceutical preparations, fortified powdered drinks, and food samples, for which results were in good agreement with values claimed. Heudi et al. described a separation of 9 water-soluble vitamins by LC-UV. The method was applied for the quantification of vitamins in polyvitaminated premixes used for the fortification of infant nutrition products. The repeatability of the method was evaluated at different concentration levels and coefficients of variation were based on, for example, LC. Koontz et al. showed results of total folate concentrations measured by microbiological assay in a variety of foods. Samples were submitted in a routine manner to experienced laboratories that regularly perform folate analysis fee-for-service basis in the United States. Each laboratory reported the use of a microbiological method similar to the AOAC Official Method for the determination of folic acid. Striking was, the use of 3 different pH extraction conditions by 4 laboratories. Only one laboratory reported using a tri-enzyme extraction. Results were evaluated. Results for folic acid fortified foods had considerably lower between-laboratory variation, 9-11%, versus >45% for other foods. Mean total folate ranged from 14 to 279 microg/100 g for a mixed vegetable reference material, from 5 to 70 microg/100 g for strawberries, and from 28 to 81 microg/100 g for wholemeal flour. One should realize a large variation in results, which might be caused by slight modifications in the microbiological analysis of total folate in foods or the analysis in various (unfortified) food matrixes. Furthermore, optimal

  16. Two-Stage Crystallizer Design for High Loading of Poorly Water-Soluble Pharmaceuticals in Porous Silica Matrices

    OpenAIRE

    Leia Dwyer; Samir Kulkarni; Luzdary Ruelas; Allan Myerson

    2017-01-01

    While porous silica supports have been previously studied as carriers for nanocrystalline forms of poorly water-soluble active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs), increasing the loading of API in these matrices is of great importance if these carriers are to be used in drug formulations. A dual-stage mixed-suspension, mixed-product removal (MSMPR) crystallizer was designed in which the poorly soluble API fenofibrate was loaded into the porous matrices of pore sizes 35 nm-300 nm in the first st...

  17. Capillary Condensation in Pores with Rough Walls:

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bryk, P.; Rżysko, W.; Malijevský, Alexandr; Sokołowski, S.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 313, č. 1 (2007), s. 41-52 ISSN 0021-9797 Grant - others:TOK(XE) 509249 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Source of funding: R - rámcový projekt EK Keywords : adsorption * pore * capillary condensation Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.309, year: 2007

  18. Mimicking the nuclear pore complex using nanopores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ananth, A.N.

    2018-01-01

    Nuclear pore complexes acts as a gatekeeper for molecular transport between the nucleus and the cytoplasm in eukaryotic cells. The central NPC channel is filled with intrinsically disordered FG domains (phenylalanine (F), glycine (G)) that are responsible for the fascinating selectivity of NPCs, for

  19. Induction of nano pore in Agrobacterial hemoglobin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojtaba Tousheh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: A variety of oxygen-transport and -binding proteins exist in organisms including bacteria, protozoans, and fungi all have hemoglobin-like proteins. In addition to dealing with transport and sensing of oxygen, they may also deal with NO2, CO2, sulfide compounds, and even O2 scavenging in environments. Also they detoxified chlorinated materials like P450 enzymes and peroxidases and use as a detector of nitrate and hydrogen peroxide. Pore-forming bacterial globins are interested for filtration. Materials and methods: Although there are data for bacterial toxin as a filter, here we used Agrobacterial hem to induce nano pore in the heme structure using point mutation. Results: Investigations showed that three amino acids leucine 76, alanine 83 and histidine 80 are important for pore formation in Agrobacterium hemoglobin. A point mutation on leucine 76 to glycine, histidine 80 to asparagine and alanine 83 to lysine step by step led to create the nano pore 0.7- 0.8 nm in the globin. Discussion and conclusion: These mutations in bacterial hemoglobin increase the stability when mutation is with it’s at pH7. This mutation decreases the aliphatic index however increase the stability index.

  20. Climate-driven flushing of pore water in peatlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, D. I.; Reeve, A. S.; Glaser, P. H.; Romanowicz, E. A.

    1995-04-01

    NORTHERN peatlands can act as either important sources or sinks for atmospheric carbon1,2. It is therefore important to understand how carbon cycling in these regions will respond to a changing climate. Existing carbon balance models for peatlands assume that fluid flow and advective mass transport are negligible at depth3,4, and that the effects of climate change should be essentially limited to the near-surface. Here we report the response of groundwater flow and porewater chemistry in the Glacial Lake Agassiz peat-lands of northern Minnesota to the regional drought cycle. Comparison of field observations and numerical simulations indicates that climate fluctuations of short duration may temporarily reverse the vertical direction of fluid flow through the peat, although this has little effect on water chemistry5. On the other hand, periods of drought persisting for at least 3-5 years produce striking changes in the chemistry of the pore water. These longer-term changes in hydrology influence the flux of nutrients and dissolved organic matter through the deeper peat, and therefore affect directly the rates of fermentation and methanogenesis, and the export of dissolved carbon compounds from the peatland.

  1. Pore-scale modeling of phase change in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juanes, Ruben; Cueto-Felgueroso, Luis; Fu, Xiaojing

    2017-11-01

    One of the main open challenges in pore-scale modeling is the direct simulation of flows involving multicomponent mixtures with complex phase behavior. Reservoir fluid mixtures are often described through cubic equations of state, which makes diffuse interface, or phase field theories, particularly appealing as a modeling framework. What is still unclear is whether equation-of-state-driven diffuse-interface models can adequately describe processes where surface tension and wetting phenomena play an important role. Here we present a diffuse interface model of single-component, two-phase flow (a van der Waals fluid) in a porous medium under different wetting conditions. We propose a simplified Darcy-Korteweg model that is appropriate to describe flow in a Hele-Shaw cell or a micromodel, with a gap-averaged velocity. We study the ability of the diffuse-interface model to capture capillary pressure and the dynamics of vaporization/condensation fronts, and show that the model reproduces pressure fluctuations that emerge from abrupt interface displacements (Haines jumps) and from the break-up of wetting films.

  2. Pore network properties of sandstones in a fault damage zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossennec, Claire; Géraud, Yves; Moretti, Isabelle; Mattioni, Luca; Stemmelen, Didier

    2018-05-01

    The understanding of fluid flow in faulted sandstones is based on a wide range of techniques. These depend on the multi-method determination of petrological and structural features, porous network properties and both spatial and temporal variations and interactions of these features. The question of the multi-parameter analysis on fluid flow controlling properties is addressed for an outcrop damage zone in the hanging wall of a normal fault zone on the western border of the Upper Rhine Graben, affecting the Buntsandstein Group (Early Triassic). Diagenetic processes may alter the original pore type and geometry in fractured and faulted sandstones. Therefore, these may control the ultimate porosity and permeability of the damage zone. The classical model of evolution of hydraulic properties with distance from the major fault core is nuanced here. The hydraulic behavior of the rock media is better described by a pluri-scale model including: 1) The grain scale, where the hydraulic properties are controlled by sedimentary features, the distance from the fracture, and the impact of diagenetic processes. These result in the ultimate porous network characteristics observed. 2) A larger scale, where the structural position and characteristics (density, connectivity) of the fracture corridors are strongly correlated with both geo-mechanical and hydraulic properties within the damage zone.

  3. Multiscale pore networks and their effect on deformation and transport property alteration associated with hydraulic fracturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daigle, Hugh; Hayman, Nicholas; Jiang, Han; Tian, Xiao; Jiang, Chunbi

    2017-04-01

    clusters of organic-hosted pores prevents the overpressure from dissipating, resulting in localized overpressure at the micron scale. When the rock is subjected to a hydraulic fracture stimulation, the rock surrounding the main induced fracture experiences shear deformation. Those parts of the rock that contain overpressured fluids in the organic-hosted pores will be more likely to experience dilatancy in the form of brittle deformation; the portions of the rock lacking in organic-hosted pores will tend to experience compactive shear failure since the effective normal stresses are larger. The microcrack networks that propagate into the regions of organic-hosted porosity allow the hydrocarbons resident in those pores to migrate to the main induced tensile fractures. The disconnected nature of the microcrack networks causes only a slight increase in permeability, which is consistent with other observations. Our work illustrates how multiscale pore networks in shale interact with in situ stresses to affect the bulk shale rheology.

  4. Evaluating the hydraulic and transport properties of peat soil using pore network modeling and X-ray micro computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharedaghloo, Behrad; Price, Jonathan S.; Rezanezhad, Fereidoun; Quinton, William L.

    2018-06-01

    Micro-scale properties of peat pore space and their influence on hydraulic and transport properties of peat soils have been given little attention so far. Characterizing the variation of these properties in a peat profile can increase our knowledge on the processes controlling contaminant transport through peatlands. As opposed to the common macro-scale (or bulk) representation of groundwater flow and transport processes, a pore network model (PNM) simulates flow and transport processes within individual pores. Here, a pore network modeling code capable of simulating advective and diffusive transport processes through a 3D unstructured pore network was developed; its predictive performance was evaluated by comparing its results to empirical values and to the results of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations. This is the first time that peat pore networks have been extracted from X-ray micro-computed tomography (μCT) images of peat deposits and peat pore characteristics evaluated in a 3D approach. Water flow and solute transport were modeled in the unstructured pore networks mapped directly from μCT images. The modeling results were processed to determine the bulk properties of peat deposits. Results portray the commonly observed decrease in hydraulic conductivity with depth, which was attributed to the reduction of pore radius and increase in pore tortuosity. The increase in pore tortuosity with depth was associated with more decomposed peat soil and decreasing pore coordination number with depth, which extended the flow path of fluid particles. Results also revealed that hydraulic conductivity is isotropic locally, but becomes anisotropic after upscaling to core-scale; this suggests the anisotropy of peat hydraulic conductivity observed in core-scale and field-scale is due to the strong heterogeneity in the vertical dimension that is imposed by the layered structure of peat soils. Transport simulations revealed that for a given solute, the effective

  5. Students’ misconceptions on solubility equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setiowati, H.; Utomo, S. B.; Ashadi

    2018-05-01

    This study investigated the students’ misconceptions of the solubility equilibrium. The participants of the study consisted of 164 students who were in the science class of second year high school. Instrument used is two-tier diagnostic test consisting of 15 items. Responses were marked and coded into four categories: understanding, misconception, understand little without misconception, and not understanding. Semi-structured interviews were carried out with 45 students according to their written responses which reflected different perspectives, to obtain a more elaborated source of data. Data collected from multiple methods were analyzed qualitatively and quantitatively. Based on the data analysis showed that the students misconceptions in all areas in solubility equilibrium. They had more misconceptions such as in the relation of solubility and solubility product, common-ion effect and pH in solubility, and precipitation concept.

  6. On the americium oxalate solubility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakolupin, S.A.; Korablin, Eh.V.

    1977-01-01

    The americium oxalate solubility at different nitric (0.0-1 M) and oxalic (0.0-0.4 M) acid concentrations was investigated in the temperature range from 14 to 60 deg C. The dependence of americium oxalate solubility on the oxalic acid concentration was determined. Increasing oxalic acid concentration was found to reduce the americium oxalate solubility. The dependence of americium oxalate solubility on the oxalic acid concentration was noted to be a minimum at low acidity (0.1-0.3 M nitric acid). This is most likely due to Am(C 2 O 4 ) + , Am(C 2 O 4 ) 2 - and Am(C 2 O 4 ) 3 3- complex ion formation which have different unstability constants. On the basis of the data obtained, a preliminary estimate was carried out for the product of americium oxalate solubility in nitric acid medium (10 -29 -10 -31 ) and of the one in water (6.4x10 -20 )

  7. X-ray pore optic developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Kotska; Bavdaz, Marcos; Collon, Maximilien; Beijersbergen, Marco; Kraft, Stefan; Fairbend, Ray; Séguy, Julien; Blanquer, Pascal; Graue, Roland; Kampf, Dirk

    2017-11-01

    In support of future x-ray telescopes ESA is developing new optics for the x-ray regime. To date, mass and volume have made x-ray imaging technology prohibitive to planetary remote sensing imaging missions. And although highly successful, the mirror technology used on ESA's XMM-Newton is not sufficient for future, large, x-ray observatories, since physical limits on the mirror packing density mean that aperture size becomes prohibitive. To reduce telescope mass and volume the packing density of mirror shells must be reduced, whilst maintaining alignment and rigidity. Structures can also benefit from a modular optic arrangement. Pore optics are shown to meet these requirements. This paper will discuss two pore optic technologies under development, with examples of results from measurement campaigns on samples. One activity has centred on the use of coated, silicon wafers, patterned with ribs, that are integrated onto a mandrel whose form has been polished to the required shape. The wafers follow the shape precisely, forming pore sizes in the sub-mm region. Individual stacks of mirrors can be manufactured without risk to, or dependency on, each other and aligned in a structure from which they can also be removed without hazard. A breadboard is currently being built to demonstrate this technology. A second activity centres on glass pore optics. However an adaptation of micro channel plate technology to form square pores has resulted in a monolithic material that can be slumped into an optic form. Alignment and coating of two such plates produces an x-ray focusing optic. A breadboard 20cm aperture optic is currently being built.

  8. High-flux membrane separation using fluid skimming dominated convective fluid flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dinther, van A.M.C.; Schroën, C.G.P.H.; Boom, R.M.

    2011-01-01

    We here report on the separation of yeast cells, with micro-engineered membranes having pores that are typically five times larger than the cells. The separation is due to neither shear-induced diffusion, nor initial lift, but to an effect similar to fluid skimming. The separation performance is

  9. Solubility of chromate in a hydrated OPC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leisinger, Sabine M.; Bhatnagar, Amit; Lothenbach, Barbara; Johnson, C. Annette

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Solid solutions exist between gypsum and calcium chromate. • The cementitious matrix can bind chromate concentrations up to 0.1 mol/kg. • The chromate binding phase in the cementitious matrix is CrO 4 -ettringite. - Abstract: The knowledge of the chromate binding mechanisms is essential for the prediction of the long-term leachability of cement-based solidified waste containing increased chromate concentrations because of its toxicity and high mobility. In this paper pore water concentrations from OPC doped with varying CaCrO 4 concentrations (0.01–0.8 mol/kg), equilibrated for 28 days were reported. It could be shown that the cementitious matrix can bind chromate concentrations up to 0.1 mol/kg and that the chromate solubility limiting phase was CrO 4 -ettringite, while chromate containing AFm (monochromate) was unstable. Comparison with thermodynamic modelling indicated that at lower chromate dosages chromate was mainly bound by CrO 4 -ettringite while at very high dosages also a mixed CaCrO 4 –CaSO 4 ·2H 2 O phase precipitated. Additional experiments indicated a solubility product of 10 −3.66 for CaCrO 4 and verified the solid solution formation with CaSO 4 ·2H 2 O. Leaching tests indicated a strong chromate binding mainly in the pH range 10.5–13.5, while at pH < 10 very little chromate was bound as ettringite, monocarbonate and C–S–H phases were destabilized. Generally the thermodynamic modeling underestimated chromate uptake indicating that an additional chromate binding possibly on C–S–H or on mixed chromate–carbonate–hydroxide AFm phases

  10. Fluid dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Bernard, Peter S

    2015-01-01

    This book presents a focused, readable account of the principal physical and mathematical ideas at the heart of fluid dynamics. Graduate students in engineering, applied math, and physics who are taking their first graduate course in fluids will find this book invaluable in providing the background in physics and mathematics necessary to pursue advanced study. The book includes a detailed derivation of the Navier-Stokes and energy equations, followed by many examples of their use in studying the dynamics of fluid flows. Modern tensor analysis is used to simplify the mathematical derivations, thus allowing a clearer view of the physics. Peter Bernard also covers the motivation behind many fundamental concepts such as Bernoulli's equation and the stream function. Many exercises are designed with a view toward using MATLAB or its equivalent to simplify and extend the analysis of fluid motion including developing flow simulations based on techniques described in the book.

  11. The equivalent pore aspect ratio as a tool for pore type prediction in carbonate reservoirs

    OpenAIRE

    FOURNIER , François; Pellerin , Matthieu; Villeneuve , Quentin; Teillet , Thomas; Hong , Fei; Poli , Emmanuelle; Borgomano , Jean; Léonide , Philippe; Hairabian , Alex

    2018-01-01

    International audience; The equivalent pore aspect ratios (EPAR) provide a tool to detect pore types by combining P-and S-wave velocities, porosity, bulk density and mineralogical composition of carbonate rocks. The integration of laboratory measurements, well log data and petrographic analysis of 468 carbonate samples from various depositional and diagenetic settings (Lower Cretaceous pre-salt non-marine carbonates from offshore Brazil, Lower Cretaceous shallow-water platform carbonates from...

  12. Uranium solubility and solubility controls in selected Needle's Eye groundwaters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falck, W.E.; Hooker, P.J.

    1991-01-01

    The solubility control of uranium in selected groundwater samples from the cliff and sediments at the Needle's Eye natural analogue site is investigated using the speciation code PHREEQE and the CHEMVAL thermodynamic database (release 3). Alkali-earth bearing uranyl carbonate secondary minerals are likely to exert influence on the solubility . Other candidates are UO 2 and arsenates, depending on the prevailing redox conditions. In the absence of literature data, solubility products for important arsenates have been estimated from analogy with other arsenates and phosphates. Phosphates themselves are unlikely to exert control owing to their comparatively high solubilities. The influence of seawater flooding into the sediments is also discussed. The importance of uranyl arsenates in the retardation of uranium in shallow sediments has been demonstrated in theory, but there are some significant gaps in the thermodynamic databases used. (author)

  13. Concomitant intake of alcohol may increase the absorption of poorly soluble drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagerberg, Jonas H; Sjögren, Erik; Bergström, Christel A S

    2015-01-25

    Ethanol can increase the solubility of poorly soluble and hence present a higher drug concentration in the gastrointestinal tract. This may produce a faster and more effective absorption resulting in variable and/or high drug plasma concentrations, both of which can lead to adverse drug reactions. In this work we therefore studied the solubility and absorption effects of nine diverse compounds when ethanol was present. The apparent solubility was measured using the μDiss Profiler Plus (pION, MA) in four media representing gastric conditions with and without ethanol. The solubility results were combined with in-house data on solubility in intestinal fluids (with and without ethanol) and pharmacokinetic parameters extracted from the literature and used as input in compartmental absorption simulations using the software GI-Sim. Apparent solubility increased more than 7-fold for non-ionized compounds in simulated gastric fluid containing 20% ethanol. Compounds with weak base functions (cinnarizine, dipyridamole and terfenadine) were completely ionized at the studied gastric pH and their solubility was therefore unaffected by ethanol. Compounds with low solubility in intestinal media and a pronounced solubility increase due to ethanol in the upper gastric compartments showed an increased absorption in the simulations. The rate of absorption of the acidic compounds indomethacin and indoprofen was slightly increased but the extent of absorption was unaffected as the complete doses were readily absorbed even without ethanol. This was likely due to a high apparent solubility in the intestinal compartment where the weak acids are ionized. The absorption of the studied non-ionizable compounds increased when ethanol was present in the gastric and intestinal media. These results indicate that concomitant intake of alcohol may significantly increase the solubility and hence, the plasma concentration for non-ionizable, lipophilic compounds with the potential of adverse drug

  14. Pore-scale simulation of wettability and interfacial tension effects on flooding process for enhanced oil recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jin; Wen, Dongsheng

    2017-08-27

    For enhanced oil recovery (EOR) applications, the oil/water flow characteristics during the flooding process was numerically investigated with the volume-of-fluid method at the pore scale. A two-dimensional pore throat-body connecting structure was established, and four scenarios were simulated in this paper. For oil-saturated pores, the wettability effect on the flooding process was studied; for oil-unsaturated pores, three effects were modelled to investigate the oil/water phase flow behaviors, namely the wettability effect, the interfacial tension (IFT) effect, and the combined wettability/IFT effect. The results show that oil saturated pores with the water-wet state can lead to 25-40% more oil recovery than with the oil-wet state, and the remaining oil mainly stays in the near wall region of the pore bodies for oil-wet saturated pores. For oil-unsaturated pores, the wettability effects on the flooding process can help oil to detach from the pore walls. By decreasing the oil/water interfacial tension and altering the wettability from oil-wet to water-wet state, the remaining oil recovery rate can be enhanced successfully. The wettability-IFT combined effect shows better EOR potential compared with decreasing the interfacial tension alone under the oil-wet condition. The simulation results in this work are consistent with previous experimental and molecular dynamics simulation conclusions. The combination effect of the IFT reducation and wettability alteration can become an important recovery mechanism in future studies for nanoparticles, surfactant, and nanoparticle-surfactant hybrid flooding process.

  15. Noble gases solubility in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crovetto, Rosa; Fernandez Prini, Roberto.

    1980-07-01

    The available experimental data of solubility of noble gases in water for temperatures smaller than 330 0 C have been critically surveyed. Due to the unique structure of the solvent, the solubility of noble gases in water decreases with temperature passing through a temperature of minimum solubility which is different for each gas, and then increases at higher temperatures. As aresult of the analysis of the experimental data and of the features of the solute-solvent interaction, a generalized equation is proposed which enables thecalculation of Henry's coefficient at different temperatures for all noble gases. (author) [es

  16. Localized fluid discharge in subduction zones: Insights from tension veins around an ancient megasplay fault (Nobeoka Thrust, SW Japan)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsubo, M.; Hardebeck, J.; Miyakawa, A.; Yamaguchi, A.; Kimura, G.

    2017-12-01

    Fluid-rock interactions along seismogenic faults are of great importance to understand fault mechanics. The fluid loss by the formation of mode I cracks (tension cracks) increases the fault strength and creates drainage asperities along the plate interface (Sibson, 2013, Tectonophysics). The Nobeoka Thrust, in southwestern Japan, is an on-land example of an ancient megasplay fault and provides an excellent record of deformation and fluid flow at seismogenic depths of a subduction zone (Kondo et al., 2005, Tectonics). We focus on (1) Pore fluid pressure loss, (2) Amount of fault strength recovery, and (3) Fluid circulation by the formation of mode I cracks in the post-seismic period around the fault zone of the Nobeoka Thrust. Many quartz veins that filled mode I crack at the coastal outcrops suggest a normal faulting stress regime after faulting of the Nobeoka Thrust (Otsubo et al., 2016, Island Arc). We estimated the decrease of the pore fluid pressure by the formation of the mode I cracks around the Nobeoka Thrust in the post-seismic period. When the pore fluid pressure exceeds σ3, veins filling mode I cracks are constructed (Jolly and Sanderson, 1997, Jour. Struct. Geol.). We call the pore fluid pressure that exceeds σ3 "pore fluid over pressure". The differential stress in the post-seismic period and the driving pore fluid pressure ratio P* (P* = (Pf - σ3) / (σ1 - σ3), Pf: pore fluid pressure) are parameters to estimate the pore fluid over pressure. In the case of the Nobeoka Thrust (P* = 0.4, Otsubo et al., 2016, Island Arc), the pore fluid over pressure is up to 20 MPa (assuming tensile strength = 10 MPa). 20 MPa is equivalent to fluid pressure around the Nobeoka Thrust (depth = 10 km, density = 2.7 kg/m3). When the pore fluid pressure decreases by 4%, the normalized pore pressure ratio λ* (λ* = (Pf - Ph) / (Pl - Ph), Pl: lithostatic pressure; Ph: hydrostatic pressure) changes from 0.95 to 0.86. In the case of the Nobeoka Thrust, the fault strength can

  17. Enhancing tablet disintegration characteristics of a highly water-soluble high-drug-loading formulation by granulation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Preetanshu; Levins, Christopher; Pafiakis, Steve; Zacour, Brian; Bindra, Dilbir S; Trinh, Jade; Buckley, David; Gour, Shruti; Sharif, Shasad; Stamato, Howard

    2018-07-01

    The objective of this study was to improve the disintegration and dissolution characteristics of a highly water-soluble tablet matrix by altering the manufacturing process. A high disintegration time along with high dependence of the disintegration time on tablet hardness was observed for a high drug loading (70% w/w) API when formulated using a high-shear wet granulation (HSWG) process. Keeping the formulation composition mostly constant, a fluid-bed granulation (FBG) process was explored as an alternate granulation method using a 2 (4-1) fractional factorial design with two center points. FBG batches (10 batches) were manufactured using varying disingtegrant amount, spray rate, inlet temperature (T) and atomization air pressure. The resultant final blend particle size was affected significantly by spray rate (p = .0009), inlet T (p = .0062), atomization air pressure (p = .0134) and the interaction effect between inlet T*spray rate (p = .0241). The compactibility of the final blend was affected significantly by disintegrant amount (p disintegration times than the HSWG batches, and mercury intrusion porosimetry data revealed that this was caused by the higher internal pore structure of tablets manufactured using the FBG batches.

  18. Pores and Void in Asclepiades’ Physical Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leith, David

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines a fundamental, though relatively understudied, aspect of the physical theory of the physician Asclepiades of Bithynia, namely his doctrine of pores. My principal thesis is that this doctrine is dependent on a conception of void taken directly from Epicurean physics. The paper falls into two parts: the first half addresses the evidence for the presence of void in Asclepiades’ theory, and concludes that his conception of void was basically that of Epicurus; the second half focuses on the precise nature of Asclepiadean pores, and seeks to show that they represent void interstices between the primary particles of matter which are the constituents of the human body, and are thus exactly analogous to the void interstices between atoms within solid objects in Epicurus’ theory. PMID:22984299

  19. Active Pore Volume in Danish Peat Soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forsmann, Ditte M.; Kjærgaard, Charlotte

    2012-01-01

    Phosphorus release within the soil matrix caused by the changed redox conditions due to re-establishment of a riparian wetland can be critical for the aquatic environment. However, phosphorous released in the soil will not always result in an immediate contribution to this loss to the aquatic...... environment. Lowland soils are primarily peat soils, and only a minor part of the total soil volume of peat soils is occupied by macropores (>30 µm). Since water primarily flows in these macropores, the majority of the soil matrix is bypassed (the immobile domain). Phosphorus released in the immobile domain...... is not actively transported out of the system, but is only transported via diffusion, which is a very slow process. Thus it is interesting to investigate the size of the active pore volume in peat soils. The hypothesis of this study is that the active pores volume of a peat soil can be expressed using bulk...

  20. Understanding chemical-potential-related transient pore-pressure response to improve real-time borehole (in)stability predictions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tare, U.A.; Mody, F.K.; Mese, A.I. [Halliburton Energy Services, Cairo (Egypt)

    2000-11-01

    Experimental studies were conducted to explain the concept of a real-time wellbore (in)stability logging methodology. The role of the chemical potential of drilling fluids on transient pore pressure and time-dependent rock property alterations of shale formations was examined by providing details about a pore pressure transmission (PPT) test. The PPT experiments exposed formation (shale) cores under simulated downhole conditions to various salt solutions and drilling fluids. The main objective was to translate the results of the PPT tests to actual drilling conditions. A 20 per cent w/w calcium chloride solution was exposed to a Pierre II shale under high pressure in the PPT apparatus. The PPT test was used to estimate the impact of a drilling fluid on shale pore pressure. The efficiency of the salt solution/shale system was also estimated. Estimates of the dynamic rock properties were made based on the obtained acoustic data. It was determined that in order to accurately model time-dependent wellbore (in)stability in the field, it is important to calibrate representative shale core response to drilling fluids under realistic in-situ conditions. The 20 per cent w/w calcium chloride solution showed very low membrane efficiency of 4.45 per cent. It was concluded that changes in the shale dynamic rock properties as a function of test fluid exposure can be obtained from the simultaneous acquisition of sonic compression and shear wave velocity data. 12 refs., 5 figs.

  1. Soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1) and soluble interleukin-2 receptors (sIL-2R) in scleroderma skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Klaus; Deleuran, Mette; Heickendorff, Lene

    1998-01-01

    In order to investigate whether soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1) and soluble interleukin-2 receptors (sIL-2R) were present in scleroderma skin, and to compare their levels to concentrations measured in plasma and clinical parameters, we examined suction blister fluid and plasma...... from 13 patients with systemic sclerosis and 11 healthy volunteers. Suction blisters and biopsies were from the transition zone between normal skin and scleroderma, and uninvolved abdominal skin. The levels of sICAM-1 and sIL-2R were significantly increased in both plasma and suction blister fluid from...

  2. Percolation properties of 3-D multiscale pore networks: how connectivity controls soil filtration processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrier, E. M. A.; Bird, N. R. A.; Rieutord, T. B.

    2010-10-01

    Quantifying the connectivity of pore networks is a key issue not only for modelling fluid flow and solute transport in porous media but also for assessing the ability of soil ecosystems to filter bacteria, viruses and any type of living microorganisms as well inert particles which pose a contamination risk. Straining is the main mechanical component of filtration processes: it is due to size effects, when a given soil retains a conveyed entity larger than the pores through which it is attempting to pass. We postulate that the range of sizes of entities which can be trapped inside soils has to be associated with the large range of scales involved in natural soil structures and that information on the pore size distribution has to be complemented by information on a critical filtration size (CFS) delimiting the transition between percolating and non percolating regimes in multiscale pore networks. We show that the mass fractal dimensions which are classically used in soil science to quantify scaling laws in observed pore size distributions can also be used to build 3-D multiscale models of pore networks exhibiting such a critical transition. We extend to the 3-D case a new theoretical approach recently developed to address the connectivity of 2-D fractal networks (Bird and Perrier, 2009). Theoretical arguments based on renormalisation functions provide insight into multi-scale connectivity and a first estimation of CFS. Numerical experiments on 3-D prefractal media confirm the qualitative theory. These results open the way towards a new methodology to estimate soil filtration efficiency from the construction of soil structural models to be calibrated on available multiscale data.

  3. Percolation properties of 3-D multiscale pore networks: how connectivity controls soil filtration processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. M. A. Perrier

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Quantifying the connectivity of pore networks is a key issue not only for modelling fluid flow and solute transport in porous media but also for assessing the ability of soil ecosystems to filter bacteria, viruses and any type of living microorganisms as well inert particles which pose a contamination risk. Straining is the main mechanical component of filtration processes: it is due to size effects, when a given soil retains a conveyed entity larger than the pores through which it is attempting to pass. We postulate that the range of sizes of entities which can be trapped inside soils has to be associated with the large range of scales involved in natural soil structures and that information on the pore size distribution has to be complemented by information on a critical filtration size (CFS delimiting the transition between percolating and non percolating regimes in multiscale pore networks. We show that the mass fractal dimensions which are classically used in soil science to quantify scaling laws in observed pore size distributions can also be used to build 3-D multiscale models of pore networks exhibiting such a critical transition. We extend to the 3-D case a new theoretical approach recently developed to address the connectivity of 2-D fractal networks (Bird and Perrier, 2009. Theoretical arguments based on renormalisation functions provide insight into multi-scale connectivity and a first estimation of CFS. Numerical experiments on 3-D prefractal media confirm the qualitative theory. These results open the way towards a new methodology to estimate soil filtration efficiency from the construction of soil structural models to be calibrated on available multiscale data.

  4. Nucleation of frictional instability caused by fluid pressurization in subducted blueschist

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sawai, M.; Niemeijer, A.R.; Plümper, O.; Hirose, T.; Spiers, C.J.

    2016-01-01

    Pore pressure is an important factor in controlling the slip instability of faults and thus the generation of earthquakes. Particularly slow earthquakes are widespread in subduction zones and usually linked to the occurrence of high pore pressure. Yet the influence of fluid pressure and effective

  5. Pore-scale mechanisms of gas flow in tight sand reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silin, D.; Kneafsey, T.J.; Ajo-Franklin, J.B.; Nico, P.

    2010-11-30

    Tight gas sands are unconventional hydrocarbon energy resource storing large volume of natural gas. Microscopy and 3D imaging of reservoir samples at different scales and resolutions provide insights into the coaredo not significantly smaller in size than conventional sandstones, the extremely dense grain packing makes the pore space tortuous, and the porosity is small. In some cases the inter-granular void space is presented by micron-scale slits, whose geometry requires imaging at submicron resolutions. Maximal Inscribed Spheres computations simulate different scenarios of capillary-equilibrium two-phase fluid displacement. For tight sands, the simulations predict an unusually low wetting fluid saturation threshold, at which the non-wetting phase becomes disconnected. Flow simulations in combination with Maximal Inscribed Spheres computations evaluate relative permeability curves. The computations show that at the threshold saturation, when the nonwetting fluid becomes disconnected, the flow of both fluids is practically blocked. The nonwetting phase is immobile due to the disconnectedness, while the permeability to the wetting phase remains essentially equal to zero due to the pore space geometry. This observation explains the Permeability Jail, which was defined earlier by others. The gas is trapped by capillarity, and the brine is immobile due to the dynamic effects. At the same time, in drainage, simulations predict that the mobility of at least one of the fluids is greater than zero at all saturations. A pore-scale model of gas condensate dropout predicts the rate to be proportional to the scalar product of the fluid velocity and pressure gradient. The narrowest constriction in the flow path is subject to the highest rate of condensation. The pore-scale model naturally upscales to the Panfilov's Darcy-scale model, which implies that the condensate dropout rate is proportional to the pressure gradient squared. Pressure gradient is the greatest near the

  6. Methods of conveying fluids and methods of sublimating solid particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Terry D; Wilding, Bruce M

    2013-10-01

    A heat exchanger and associated methods for sublimating solid particles therein, for conveying fluids therethrough, or both. The heat exchanger includes a chamber and a porous member having a porous wall having pores in communication with the chamber and with an interior of the porous member. A first fluid is conveyed into the porous member while a second fluid is conveyed into the porous member through the porous wall. The second fluid may form a positive flow boundary layer along the porous wall to reduce or eliminate substantial contact between the first fluid and the interior of the porous wall. The combined first and second fluids are conveyed out of the porous member. Additionally, the first fluid and the second fluid may each be conveyed into the porous member at different temperatures and may exit the porous member at substantially the same temperature.

  7. Facial skin pores: a multiethnic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flament F

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Frederic Flament,1 Ghislain Francois,1 Huixia Qiu,2 Chengda Ye,2 Tomoo Hanaya,3 Dominique Batisse,3 Suzy Cointereau-Chardon,1 Mirela Donato Gianeti Seixas,4 Susi Elaine Dal Belo,4 Roland Bazin5 1Department of Applied Research and Development, L’Oreal Research and Innovation, Paris, France; 2Department of Applied Research and Development, L’Oreal Research and Innovation, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China; 3Department of Applied Research and Development, L’Oreal Research and Innovation, Tokyo, Japan; 4Department of Applied Research and Development, L’Oreal Research and Innovation, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; 5RB Consult, Bievres, France Abstract: Skin pores (SP, as they are called by laymen, are common and benign features mostly located on the face (nose, cheeks, etc that generate many aesthetic concerns or complaints. Despite the prevalence of skin pores, related literature is scarce. With the aim of describing the prevalence of skin pores and anatomic features among ethnic groups, a dermatoscopic instrument, using polarized lighting, coupled to a digital camera recorded the major features of skin pores (size, density, coverage on the cheeks of 2,585 women in different countries and continents. A detection threshold of 250 µm, correlated to clinical scorings by experts, was input into a specific software to further allow for automatic counting of the SP density (N/cm2 and determination of their respective sizes in mm2. Integrating both criteria also led to establishing the relative part of the skin surface (as a percentage that is actually covered by SP on cheeks. The results showed that the values of respective sizes, densities, and skin coverage: 1 were recorded in all studied subjects; 2 varied greatly with ethnicity; 3 plateaued with age in most cases; and 4 globally reflected self-assessment by subjects, in particular those who self-declare having “enlarged pores” like Brazilian women. Inversely, Chinese women were clearly

  8. Pressure Enhancement in Confined Fluids: Effect of Molecular Shape and Fluid-Wall Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Deepti; Santiso, Erik E; Gubbins, Keith E

    2017-10-24

    Recently, several experimental and simulation studies have found that phenomena that normally occur at extremely high pressures in a bulk phase can occur in nanophases confined within porous materials at much lower bulk phase pressures, thus providing an alternative route to study high-pressure phenomena. In this work, we examine the effect on the tangential pressure of varying the molecular shape, strength of the fluid-wall interactions, and pore width, for carbon slit-shaped pores. We find that, for multisite molecules, the presence of additional rotational degrees of freedom leads to unique changes in the shape of the tangential pressure profile, especially in larger pores. We show that, due to the direct relationship between the molecular density and the fluid-wall interactions, the latter have a large impact on the pressure tensor. The molecular shape and pore size have a notable impact on the layering of molecules in the pore, greatly influencing both the shape and scale of the tangential pressure profile.

  9. Buoyancy-driven chaotic regimes during solute dispersion in pore networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsakiroglou, C.D.; Theodoropoulou, M.A.; Karoutsos, V.

    2005-01-01

    In an attempt to investigate gravity effects on solute dispersion at the scale of a pore network, single source-solute transport visualization experiments are performed on glass-etched pore networks of varying morphology and degree of pore-scale heterogeneities. The (lighter) low solute concentration aqueous solution flows steadily through the porous medium and the (heavier) high solute concentration solution is injected at a very low and constant flow rate through an inner port. The transient evolution of the solute concentration distribution over various regions of the pore network is determined at different scales by capturing and video-recording snapshots of the dispersion on PC, measuring automatically the spatial variation of the color intensity of the solution, and transforming the color intensities to solute concentrations. Without the action of gravity, the steady-state dispersion regime changes with Peclet (Pe) number, and the longitudinal and transverse dispersivities are estimated by fitting the experimental datasets to approximate analytic solutions of the advection-dispersion equation. Under the action of gravity, multiple of steady-state solute dispersion regimes is developed at each Pe value, and lobe-shaped instabilities of the solute concentration are observed across the pore network, as the downward flow of the denser (higher solute concentration) fluid is counterbalanced by the upward flow of the less dense (lower solute concentration) fluid. The steady-state dispersion regimes may be periodic, quasi-periodic or chaotic depending on the system parameters. The nature of the transient fluctuations of the average solute concentration is analyzed by identifying the periodicity of the fluctuations, determining the autocorrelation function and the statistical moments of the time series, and inspecting the FFT (fast Fourier transform) power spectra. It is found that the mixing zone tends to be stabilized at higher values of the Peclet (Pe) number

  10. Capillary condensation in cylindrical pores: Monte Carlo study of the interplay of surface and finite size effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, A; Wilms, D; Virnau, P; Binder, K

    2010-10-28

    When a fluid that undergoes a vapor to liquid transition in the bulk is confined to a long cylindrical pore, the phase transition is shifted (mostly due to surface effects at the walls of the pore) and rounded (due to finite size effects). The nature of the phase coexistence at the transition depends on the length of the pore: for very long pores, the system is axially homogeneous at low temperatures. At the chemical potential where the transition takes place, fluctuations occur between vapor- and liquidlike states of the cylinder as a whole. At somewhat higher temperatures (but still far below bulk criticality), the system at phase coexistence is in an axially inhomogeneous multidomain state, where long cylindrical liquid- and vaporlike domains alternate. Using Monte Carlo simulations for the Ising/lattice gas model and the Asakura-Oosawa model of colloid-polymer mixtures, the transition between these two different scenarios is characterized. It is shown that the density distribution changes gradually from a double-peak structure to a triple-peak shape, and the correlation length in the axial direction (measuring the equilibrium domain length) becomes much smaller than the cylinder length. The (rounded) transition to the disordered phase of the fluid occurs when the axial correlation length has decreased to a value comparable to the cylinder diameter. It is also suggested that adsorption hysteresis vanishes when the transition from the simple domain state to the multidomain state of the cylindrical pore occurs. We predict that the difference between the pore critical temperature and the hysteresis critical temperature should increase logarithmically with the length of the pore.

  11. Radial distribution of ions in pores with a surface charge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stegen, J.H.G. van der; Görtzen, J.; Kuipers, J.A.M.; Hogendoorn, J.A.; Versteeg, G.F.

    2001-01-01

    A sorption model applicable to calculate the radial equilibrium concentrations of ions in the pores of ion-selective membranes with a pore structure is developed. The model is called the radial uptake model. Because the model is applied to a Nafion sulfonic layer with very small pores and the radial

  12. The mobility of U and Th in subduction zone fluids: an indicator of oxygen fugacity and fluid salinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bali, Enikő; Audétat, Andreas; Keppler, Hans

    2011-04-01

    The solubility of U and Th in aqueous solutions at P-T-conditions relevant for subduction zones was studied by trapping uraninite or thorite saturated fluids as synthetic fluid inclusions in quartz and analyzing their composition by Laser Ablation-ICPMS. Uranium is virtually insoluble in aqueous fluids at Fe-FeO buffer conditions, whereas its solubility increases both with oxygen fugacity and with salinity to 960 ppm at 26.1 kbar, Re-ReO2 buffer conditions and 14.1 wt% NaCl in the fluid. At 26.1 kbar and 800°C, uranium solubility can be reproduced by the equation: log {{U}} = 2.681 + 0.1433log f{{O}}2 + 0.594{{Cl,}} where fO2 is the oxygen fugacity, and Cl is the chlorine content of the fluid in molality. In contrast, Th solubility is generally low (uranium increases strongly both with oxygen fugacity and with salinity. We show that reducing or NaCl-free fluids cannot produce primitive arc magmas with U/Th ratio higher than MORB. However, the dissolution of several wt% of oxidized, saline fluids in arc melts can produce U/Th ratios several times higher than in MORB. We suggest that observed U/Th ratios in arc magmas provide tight constraints on both the salinity and the oxidation state of subduction zone fluids.

  13. Pure Phase Solubility Limits: LANL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    C. Stockman

    2001-01-01

    The natural and engineered system at Yucca Mountain (YM) defines the site-specific conditions under which one must determine to what extent the engineered and the natural geochemical barriers will prevent the release of radioactive material from the repository. Most important mechanisms for retention or enhancement of radionuclide transport include precipitation or co-precipitation of radionuclide-bearing solid phases (solubility limits), complexation in solution, sorption onto surfaces, colloid formation, and diffusion. There may be many scenarios that could affect the near-field environment, creating chemical conditions more aggressive than the conditions presented by the unperturbed system (such as pH changes beyond the range of 6 to 9 or significant changes in the ionic strength of infiltrated waters). For an extended period of time, the near-field water composition may be quite different and more extreme in pH, ionic strength, and CO 2 partial pressure (or carbonate concentration) than waters at some distance from the repository. Reducing conditions, high pH (up to 11), and low carbonate concentration may be present in the near-field after reaction of infiltrating groundwater with engineered barrier systems, such as cementitious materials. In the far-field, conditions are controlled by the rock-mass buffer providing a near-neutral, oxidizing, low-ionic-strength environment that controls radionuclide solubility limits and sorption capacities. There is the need for characterization of variable chemical conditions that affect solubility, speciation, and sorption reactions. Modeling of the groundwater chemistry is required and leads to an understanding of solubility and speciation of the important radionuclides. Because experimental studies cannot be performed under the numerous potential chemical conditions, solubility limitations must rely on geochemical modeling of the radionuclide's chemistry. Fundamental thermodynamic properties, such as solubility products

  14. Pure Phase Solubility Limits: LANL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. Stockman

    2001-01-26

    The natural and engineered system at Yucca Mountain (YM) defines the site-specific conditions under which one must determine to what extent the engineered and the natural geochemical barriers will prevent the release of radioactive material from the repository. Most important mechanisms for retention or enhancement of radionuclide transport include precipitation or co-precipitation of radionuclide-bearing solid phases (solubility limits), complexation in solution, sorption onto surfaces, colloid formation, and diffusion. There may be many scenarios that could affect the near-field environment, creating chemical conditions more aggressive than the conditions presented by the unperturbed system (such as pH changes beyond the range of 6 to 9 or significant changes in the ionic strength of infiltrated waters). For an extended period of time, the near-field water composition may be quite different and more extreme in pH, ionic strength, and CO{sub 2} partial pressure (or carbonate concentration) than waters at some distance from the repository. Reducing conditions, high pH (up to 11), and low carbonate concentration may be present in the near-field after reaction of infiltrating groundwater with engineered barrier systems, such as cementitious materials. In the far-field, conditions are controlled by the rock-mass buffer providing a near-neutral, oxidizing, low-ionic-strength environment that controls radionuclide solubility limits and sorption capacities. There is the need for characterization of variable chemical conditions that affect solubility, speciation, and sorption reactions. Modeling of the groundwater chemistry is required and leads to an understanding of solubility and speciation of the important radionuclides. Because experimental studies cannot be performed under the numerous potential chemical conditions, solubility limitations must rely on geochemical modeling of the radionuclide's chemistry. Fundamental thermodynamic properties, such as solubility

  15. Mathematical modeling of deformation of a porous medium, considering its strengthening due to pore collapse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadovskii, V. M., E-mail: sadov@icm.krasn.ru; Sadovskaya, O. V., E-mail: o-sadov@icm.krasn.ru [Institute of Computational Modeling, SB RAS, Akademgorodok 50/44, 660036 Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-28

    Based on the generalized rheological method, the mathematical model describing small deformations of a single-phase porous medium without regard to the effects of a fluid or gas in pores is constructed. The change in resistance of a material to the external mechanical impacts at the moment of pore collapse is taken into account by means of the von Mises–Schleicher strength condition. In order to consider irreversible deformations, alongside with the classical yield conditions by von Mises and Tresca– Saint-Venant, the special condition modeling the plastic loss of stability of a porous skeleton is used. The random nature of the pore size distribution is taken into account. It is shown that the proposed mathematical model satisfies the principles of thermodynamics of irreversible processes. Phenomenological parameters of the model are determined on the basis of the approximate calculation of the problem on quasi-static loading of a cubic periodicity cell with spherical voids. In the framework of the obtained model, the process of propagation of plane longitudinal waves of the compression in a homogenous porous medium, accompanied by the plastic deformation of a skeleton and the collapse of pores, is analyzed.

  16. Matrix coatings based on anodic alumina with carbon nanostructures in the pores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorokh, G. G.; Pashechko, M. I.; Borc, J. T.; Lozovenko, A. A.; Kashko, I. A.; Latos, A. I.

    2018-03-01

    The nanoporous anodic alumina matrixes thickness of 1.5 mm and pore sizes of 45, 90 and 145 nm were formed on Si substrates. The tubular carbon nanostructures were synthesized into the matrixes pores by pyrolysis of fluid hydrocarbon xylene with 1% ferrocene. The structure and composition of the matrix coatings were examined by scanning electron microscopy, Auger analysis and Raman spectroscopy. The carbon nanostructures completely filled the pores of templates and uniformly covered the tops. The structure of carbon nanostructures corresponded to the structure of multiwall carbon nanotubes. Investigations of mechanical and tribological properties of nanostructured oxide-carbon composite performed by scratching and nanoindentation showed nonlinear dependencies of the frictional force, penetration depth of the cantilever, hardness and plane strain modulus on the load. It was found that the microhardness of the samples increases with reduced of alumina pore diameter, and the penetration depth of the cantilever into the film grows with carbon nanostructures size. The results showed the high mechanical strength of nanostructured oxide-carbon composite.

  17. Recent advances of pore system construction in zeolite-catalyzed chemical industry processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jing; Wang, Yangdong; Yang, Weimin; Tang, Yi; Xie, Zaiku

    2015-12-21

    The kaleidoscopic applications of zeolite catalysts (zeo-catalysts) in petrochemical processes has been considered as one of the major accomplishments in recent decades. About twenty types of zeolite have been industrially applied so far, and their versatile porous architectures have contributed their most essential features to affect the catalytic efficiency. This review depicts the evolution of pore models in zeolite catalysts accompanied by the increase in industrial and environmental demands. The indispensable roles of modulating pore models are outlined for zeo-catalysts for the enhancement of their catalytic performances in various industrial processes. The zeolites and related industrial processes discussed range from the uni-modal micropore system of zeolite Y (12-ring micropore, 12-R) in fluid catalytic cracking (FCC), zeolite ZSM-5 (10-R) in xylene isomerization and SAPO-34 (8-R) in olefin production to the multi-modal micropore system of MCM-22 (10-R and 12-R pocket) in aromatic alkylation and the hierarchical pores in FCC and catalytic cracking of C4 olefins. The rational construction of pore models, especially hierarchical features, is highlighted with a careful classification from an industrial perspective accompanied by a detailed analysis of the theoretical mechanisms.

  18. Minimum requirements for predictive pore-network modeling of solute transport in micromodels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehmani, Yashar; Tchelepi, Hamdi A.

    2017-10-01

    Pore-scale models are now an integral part of analyzing fluid dynamics in porous materials (e.g., rocks, soils, fuel cells). Pore network models (PNM) are particularly attractive due to their computational efficiency. However, quantitative predictions with PNM have not always been successful. We focus on single-phase transport of a passive tracer under advection-dominated regimes and compare PNM with high-fidelity direct numerical simulations (DNS) for a range of micromodel heterogeneities. We identify the minimum requirements for predictive PNM of transport. They are: (a) flow-based network extraction, i.e., discretizing the pore space based on the underlying velocity field, (b) a Lagrangian (particle tracking) simulation framework, and (c) accurate transfer of particles from one pore throat to the next. We develop novel network extraction and particle tracking PNM methods that meet these requirements. Moreover, we show that certain established PNM practices in the literature can result in first-order errors in modeling advection-dominated transport. They include: all Eulerian PNMs, networks extracted based on geometric metrics only, and flux-based nodal transfer probabilities. Preliminary results for a 3D sphere pack are also presented. The simulation inputs for this work are made public to serve as a benchmark for the research community.

  19. Numerical modeling of pore-scale phenomena during CO2 sequestration in oceanic sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Qinjun; Tsimpanogiannis, Ioannis N.; Zhang, Dongxiao; Lichtner, Peter C.

    2005-01-01

    Direct disposal of liquid CO 2 on the ocean floor is one of the approaches considered for sequestering CO 2 in order to reduce its concentration in the atmosphere. At oceanic depths deeper than approximately 3000 m, liquid CO 2 density is higher than the density of seawater and CO 2 is expected to sink and form a pool at the ocean floor. In addition to chemical reactions between CO 2 and seawater to form hydrate, fluid displacement is also expected to occur within the ocean floor sediments. In this work, we consider two different numerical models for hydrate formation at the pore scale. The first model consists of the Lattice Boltzmann (LB) method applied to a single-phase supersaturated solution in a constructed porous medium. The second model is based on the Invasion Percolation (IP) in pore networks, applied to two-phase immiscible displacement of seawater by liquid CO 2 . The pore-scale results are upscaled to obtain constitutive relations for porosity, both transverse and for the entire domain, and for permeability. We examine deposition and displacement patterns, and changes in porosity and permeability due to hydrate formation, and how these properties depend on various parameters including a parametric study of the effect of hydrate formation kinetics. According to the simulations, the depth of CO 2 invasion in the sediments is controlled by changes in the pore-scale porosity close to the hydrate formation front. (author)

  20. Effect of sub-pore scale morphology of biological deposits on porous media flow properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghezzehei, T. A.

    2012-12-01

    Biological deposits often influence fluid flow by altering the pore space morphology and related hydrologic properties such as porosity, water retention characteristics, and permeability. In most coupled-processes models changes in porosity are inferred from biological process models using mass-balance. The corresponding evolution of permeability is estimated using (semi-) empirical porosity-permeability functions such as the Kozeny-Carman equation or power-law functions. These equations typically do not account for the heterogeneous spatial distribution and morphological irregularities of the deposits. As a result, predictions of permeability evolution are generally unsatisfactory. In this presentation, we demonstrate the significance of pore-scale deposit distribution on porosity-permeability relations using high resolution simulations of fluid flow through a single pore interspersed with deposits of varying morphologies. Based on these simulations, we present a modification to the Kozeny-Carman model that accounts for the shape of the deposits. Limited comparison with published experimental data suggests the plausibility of the proposed conceptual model.

  1. Phase behaviour of symmetric binary mixtures with partially miscible components in slit-like pores. Application of the fundamental measure density functional approach

    CERN Document Server

    Martínez, A; Patrykiejew, A; Sokolowski, S

    2003-01-01

    We investigate adsorption in slit-like pores of model symmetric binary mixtures exhibiting demixing in bulk phase, by using a density functional approach. Our focus is on the evaluation of the first-order phase transitions in adsorbed fluids and the lines separating mixed and demixed phases. The scenario for phase transitions is sensitive to the pore width and to the energy of adsorption. Both these parameters can change the phase diagrams of the confined fluid. In particular, for relatively wide pores and for strong wall-fluid interactions, the demixing line can precede the first-order transition. Moreover, a competition between layering transitions and demixing within particular layers also leads to further enrichment of the phase diagram.

  2. Invasion percolation of single component, multiphase fluids with lattice Boltzmann models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sukop, M.C.; Or, Dani

    2003-01-01

    Application of the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) to invasion percolation of single component multiphase fluids in porous media offers an opportunity for more realistic modeling of the configurations and dynamics of liquid/vapor and liquid/solid interfaces. The complex geometry of connected paths in standard invasion percolation models arises solely from the spatial arrangement of simple elements on a lattice. In reality, fluid interfaces and connectivity in porous media are naturally controlled by the details of the pore geometry, its dynamic interaction with the fluid, and the ambient fluid potential. The multiphase LBM approach admits realistic pore geometry derived from imaging techniques and incorporation of realistic hydrodynamics into invasion percolation models

  3. Synthesis of LiBOB Fine Powder to Increase Solubility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etty Marti Wigayati

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Lithium bis (oxalate borate or LiBOB compound has captured interest of researchers, because it is potentially viable to be used as electrolyte salt in lithium-ion battery system. This compound is easy to synthesize and considered to be more environmentally friendly compared to conventional electrolyte salt because LiBOB does not contain halogen element. This research focused on the synthesis of LiBOB fine powder, which main purpose is improving LiBOB salt solubility in liquid electrolyte solution. This will aid the ion transfer between electrodes which in turn will increase the electrolyte performance. Solid state reaction was employed in this experiment. Synthesis of LiBOB compound was performed by reacting oxalic acid dihydrate, lithium hydroxide monohydrate, and boric acid. The resulting powder was then processed into fine powder using ball milling technique with varying milling time (0, 6, 10, and 13 hour. Microstructure of the sample was then analyzed to obtain information regarding phase formation, functional groups, grain surface morphology, surface area, pore volume, solubility, and ionic conductivity. The analysis shown that LiBOB and LiBOB hydrate phase was formed during the reaction, there was no changed in existing phase during milling process, crystallinity index was shifted to lower value but there was no difference in functional groups. Highest value in surface area was found to be 83.11 m2/g, with pore volume of 1.21311e+02 A at 10 hours milling. Smaller powder size resulted in higher solubility, unfortunately the ionic conductivity was found to be decreased.

  4. Fluid Shifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenger, M. B.; Hargens, A. R.; Dulchavsky, S. A.; Arbeille, P.; Danielson, R. W.; Ebert, D. J.; Garcia, K. M.; Johnston, S. L.; Laurie, S. S.; Lee, S. M. C.; hide

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. NASA's Human Research Program is focused on addressing health risks associated with long-duration missions on the International Space Station (ISS) and future exploration-class missions beyond low Earth orbit. Visual acuity changes observed after short-duration missions were largely transient, but now more than 50 percent of ISS astronauts have experienced more profound, chronic changes with objective structural findings such as optic disc edema, globe flattening and choroidal folds. These structural and functional changes are referred to as the visual impairment and intracranial pressure (VIIP) syndrome. Development of VIIP symptoms may be related to elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) secondary to spaceflight-induced cephalad fluid shifts, but this hypothesis has not been tested. The purpose of this study is to characterize fluid distribution and compartmentalization associated with long-duration spaceflight and to determine if a relation exists with vision changes and other elements of the VIIP syndrome. We also seek to determine whether the magnitude of fluid shifts during spaceflight, as well as any VIIP-related effects of those shifts, are predicted by the crewmember's pre-flight status and responses to acute hemodynamic manipulations, specifically posture changes and lower body negative pressure. Methods. We will examine a variety of physiologic variables in 10 long-duration ISS crewmembers using the test conditions and timeline presented in the figure below. Measures include: (1) fluid compartmentalization (total body water by D2O, extracellular fluid by NaBr, intracellular fluid by calculation, plasma volume by CO rebreathe, interstitial fluid by calculation); (2) forehead/eyelids, tibia, and calcaneus tissue thickness (by ultrasound); (3) vascular dimensions by ultrasound (jugular veins, cerebral and carotid arteries, vertebral arteries and veins, portal vein); (4) vascular dynamics by MRI (head/neck blood flow, cerebrospinal fluid

  5. Pore-Scale Investigation of Micron-Size Polyacrylamide Elastic Microspheres (MPEMs) Transport and Retention in Saturated Porous Media

    KAUST Repository

    Yao, Chuanjin

    2014-05-06

    Knowledge of micrometer-size polyacrylamide elastic microsphere (MPEM) transport and retention mechanisms in porous media is essential for the application of MPEMs as a smart sweep improvement and profile modification agent in improving oil recovery. A transparent micromodel packed with translucent quartz sand was constructed and used to investigate the pore-scale transport, surface deposition-release, and plugging deposition-remigration mechanisms of MPEMs in porous media. The results indicate that the combination of colloidal and hydrodynamic forces controls the deposition and release of MPEMs on pore-surfaces; the reduction of fluid salinity and the increase of Darcy velocity are beneficial to the MPEM release from pore-surfaces; the hydrodynamic forces also influence the remigration of MPEMs in pore-throats. MPEMs can plug pore-throats through the mechanisms of capture-plugging, superposition-plugging, and bridge-plugging, which produces resistance to water flow; the interception with MPEM particulate filters occurring in the interior of porous media can enhance the plugging effect of MPEMs; while the interception with MPEM particulate filters occurring at the surface of low-permeability layer can prevent the low-permeability layer from being damaged by MPEMs. MPEMs can remigrate in pore-throats depending on their elasticity through four steps of capture-plugging, elastic deformation, steady migration, and deformation recovery. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  6. Using Neutron Scattering and Mercury Intrusion Techniques to Characterize Micro- and Nano-Pore Structure of Shale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y.; Barber, T.; Hu, Q.; Bleuel, M.

    2017-12-01

    The micro- and nano-pore structure of oil shale plays a critical role in hydrocarbon storage and migration. This study aims to characterize the pore structure of three Bakken members (i.e., upper organic-rich shale, middle silty/sandy dolomites, and lower organic-rich shale), through small and ultra-small angle neutron scattering (SANS and USANS) techniques, as well as mercury injection capillary pressure (MICP) analyses. SANS/USANS have the capabilities of measuring total porosity (connected and closed porosity) across nm-mm spectrum, not measurable than other fluid-invasion approaches, such as MICP which obtains connected porosity and pore-throat size distribution. Results from both techniques exhibit different features of upper/lower Bakken and middle Bakken, as a result of various mineral composition and organic matter contents. Middle Bakken is primarily dominated by the mineral pores, while in the upper and lower Bakken, organic pores contribute a significant portion of total porosity. A combination of USANS/SANS and MICP techniques gives a comprehensive picture of shale micro- and nano-pore structure.

  7. A physico-chemical characterisation technique for determining the pore-water chemistry in argillaceous rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baeyens, B.; Bradbury, M.H.

    1991-09-01

    A prerequisite for carrying out credible sorption studies is the definition of an aqueous phase composition which is in equilibrium with the solid phase. Experimental methods and data analysis procedures are described which enable an equilibrium water composition to be produced for argillaceous rocks which is not dependent on liquid to solid (L:S) ratios. Since a Valanginian marl formation is under consideration by Nagra as a potential rock for the disposal of low and short-lived medium level radioactive waste in Switzerland, samples of this material were chosen for this investigation. Aqueous phase and nickel ethylenediamine extraction experiments were carried out at different L:S ratios under controlled atmosphere conditions (P CO 2 =10 -2 bar, O 2 ≤ 5 ppm ). The results from these tests and petrographical examinations were combined to define the system in terms of the physico-chemical characteristics of the clay mineral component (CEC and cation occupancies) and the identities of highly soluble and solubility limited phases in the marl. The geochemical code PHREEQE was used in conjunction with the Gapon equations to calculate the pore water composition. This work clearly showed that pore water chemistries obtained from aqueous extracts alone may lead to an arbitrary water chemistry in argillaceous rock systems, particularly with respect to ionic composition and ionic strength, which may have important consequences for radionuclide speciation and sorption studies. (author) 11 figs., 12 tabs., 25 refs

  8. The physicochemical properties and solubility of pharmaceuticals – Methyl xanthines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pobudkowska, Aneta; Domańska, Urszula; Kryska, Justyna A.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Solubility of methyl xanthines in water and alcohols was measured. • Solubility in water, or alcohols was of the order of 10 −4 in mole fraction. • Experimental aqueous pK a ’s values are reported for the selected drugs. • The basic thermodynamic functions were determined. - Abstract: The aim of this study was to evaluate the physio-chemical properties and solubility of three pharmaceuticals (Phs): theophylline, 7-(β-hydroxyethyl) theophylline, and theobromine in binary systems in different solvents. The solvents used were water, ethanol, and 1-octanol. Score of the solubility of these substances is being important for their dissolution effect inside the cell, the transportation by body fluids and the penetration possibility of lipid membranes. The Phs were classified to the group of methyl xanthines, which contain purine in their structure. Although they are mainly obtained via chemical synthesis, they can be also found in natural ingredients such as cocoa beans and tea leaves. These drugs are mainly acting on the central nervous system but are also used in the treatment of asthma or blood vessels. Solubility of 7 (β-hydroxyethyl) theophylline and theophylline were tested using synthetic method. In case of theobromine, which solubility is very small in the solvents noted, the spectrophotometric method has been used to measure its solubility. After designating phase diagrams of each of the solubility in the bipolar system, the experimental points have been correlated with the equations: Wilson, NRTL, UNIQUAC. Results show that theophylline and its derivatives show the best solubility from all tested Phs. Another method also used during this study was the differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), which allowed designation of the thermal properties of Phs. The fusion temperature and the enthalpy of melting were measured. Unfortunately, it was not possible to determine the fusion temperature and enthalpy of melting of theobromine, because of

  9. Fluid mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granger, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    This text offers the most comprehensive approach available to fluid mechanics. The author takes great care to insure a physical understanding of concepts grounded in applied mathematics. The presentation of theory is followed by engineering applications, helping students develop problem-solving skills from the perspective of a professional engineer. Extensive use of detailed examples reinforces the understanding of theoretical concepts

  10. Restricted primitive model for electrolyte solutions in slit-like pores with grafted chains: microscopic structure, thermodynamics of adsorption, and electric properties from a density functional approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizio, Orest; Sokołowski, Stefan

    2013-05-28

    We apply a density functional theory to describe properties of a restricted primitive model of an ionic fluid in slit-like pores. The pore walls are modified by grafted chains. The chains are built of uncharged or charged segments. We study the influence of modification of the pore walls on the structure, adsorption, ion selectivity, and the electric double layer capacitance of ionic fluid under confinement. The brush built of uncharged segments acts as a collection of obstacles in the walls vicinity. Consequently, separation of charges requires higher voltages, in comparison to the models without brushes. At high grafting densities the formation of crowding-type structure is inhibited. The double layer structure becomes more complex in various aspects, if the brushes are built of charged segments. In particular, the evolution of the brush height with the bulk fluid density and with the charge on the walls depends on the length of the blocks of charged spheres as well as on the distribution of charged species along chains. We also investigated how the dependence of the double layer capacitance on the electrostatic potential (or on the charge on the walls) changes with grafting density, the chain length, distribution of charges along the chain, the bulk fluid density, and, finally, with the pore width. The shape of the electric double layer capacitance vs. voltage changes from a camel-like to bell-like shape, if the bulk fluid density changes from low to moderate and high. If the bulk density is appropriately chosen, it is possible to alter the shape of this curve from the double hump to single hump by changing the grafting density. Moreover, in narrow pores one can observe the capacitance curve with even three humps for a certain set of parameters describing brush. This behavior illustrates how strong the influence of brushes on the electric double layer properties can be, particularly for ionic fluids in narrow pores.

  11. Microflow Mechanism of Oil Displacement by Viscoelastic Hydrophobically Associating Water-Soluble Polymers in Enhanced Oil Recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiying Zhong

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Polymer flooding plays an important role in enhanced oil recovery (EOR, particularly in China, where partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamide (HPAM and hydrophobically associating water-soluble polymers (HAWP are used in onshore and offshore reservoirs, respectively. Many researchers have highlighted the elasticity of HPAM, which can be used to improve the sweep efficiency, i.e., the ratio of the area swept by an injected fluid to the oil area. On the other hand, fewer studies exist on the elasticity of HAWP. In this study, we investigate the flow of HAWP and Xanthan solutions with identical viscosities in core experiments in terms of elasticity; results reveal that the HAWP can produce shear thickening in the core. The constitutive equation for the HAWP can be obtained using the simulation results matched with the experimental data. On the basis of these experiments, we established a two-phase flow model of a polymer and oil, including the continuity, momentum, constitutive, and phase equations. The volume-of-fluid (VOF method was used to track the interface between the two phases. A complex pore model was established based on the glass-etched model used in the experiment. We used the OpenFOAM platform to solve the mathematical model. The saturation, pressure, and stress tensor distributions were obtained. The results show that the displacement efficiency increased as the elasticity of the polymer increased; accordingly, the elasticity can enlarge the sweep area and decrease the residual oil saturation. As the elasticity increases, the stresses (the first normal stress, second normal stress, and shear stress increase. Finally, the results obtained in this study can be used as a guideline in polymer design, screening, and optimization in the polymer flooding oilfields.

  12. Soluble Collectin-12 (CL-12) Is a Pattern Recognition Molecule Initiating Complement Activation via the Alternative Pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Ying Jie; Hein, Estrid; Munthe-Fog, Lea

    2015-01-01

    and may recognize certain bacteria and fungi, leading to opsonophagocytosis. However, based on its structural and functional similarities with soluble collectins, we hypothesized the existence of a fluid-phase analog of CL-12 released from cells, which may function as a soluble pattern-recognition...... of the terminal complement complex. These results demonstrate the existence of CL-12 in a soluble form and indicate a novel mechanism by which the alternative pathway of complement may be triggered directly by a soluble pattern-recognition molecule....... nonreducing conditions it presented multimeric assembly forms. Immunoprecipitation and Western blot analysis of human umbilical cord plasma enabled identification of a natural soluble form of CL-12 having an electrophoretic mobility pattern close to that of shed soluble recombinant CL-12. Soluble CL-12 could...

  13. In situ pore-pressure evolution during dynamic CPT measurements in soft sediments of the western Baltic Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Annedore; Stegmann, Sylvia; Mörz, Tobias; Lange, Matthias; Wever, Thomas; Kopf, Achim

    2008-08-01

    We present in situ strength and pore-pressure measurements from 57 dynamic cone penetration tests in sediments of Mecklenburg ( n = 51), Eckernförde ( n = 2) and Gelting ( n = 4) bays, western Baltic Sea, characterised by thick mud layers and partially free microbial gas resulting from the degradation of organic material. In Mecklenburg and Eckernförde bays, sediment sampling by nine gravity cores served sedimentological characterisation, analyses of geotechnical properties, and laboratory shear tests. At selected localities, high-resolution echo-sounder profiles were acquired. Our aim was to deploy a dynamic cone penetrometer (CPT) to infer sediment shear strength and cohesion of the sea bottom as a function of fluid saturation. The results show very variable changes in pore pressure and sediment strength during the CPT deployments. The majority of the CPT measurements ( n = 54) show initially negative pore-pressure values during penetration, and a delayed response towards positive pressures thereafter. This so-called type B pore-pressure signal was recorded in all three bays, and is typically found in soft muds with high water contents and undrained shear strengths of 1.6-6.4 kPa. The type B signal is further affected by displacement of sediment and fluid upon penetration of the lance, skin effects during dynamic profiling, enhanced consolidation and strength of individual horizons, the presence of free gas, and a dilatory response of the sediment. In Mecklenburg Bay, the remaining small number of CPT measurements ( n = 3) show a well-defined peak in both pore pressure and cone resistance during penetration, i.e. an initial marked increase which is followed by exponential pore-pressure decay during dissipation. This so-called type A pore-pressure signal is associated with normally consolidated mud, with indurated clay layers showing significantly higher undrained shear strength (up to 19 kPa). In Eckernförde and Gelting bays pore-pressure response type B is

  14. Energy conversion device with support member having pore channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Routkevitch, Dmitri [Longmont, CO; Wind, Rikard A [Johnstown, CO

    2014-01-07

    Energy devices such as energy conversion devices and energy storage devices and methods for the manufacture of such devices. The devices include a support member having an array of pore channels having a small average pore channel diameter and having a pore channel length. Material layers that may include energy conversion materials and conductive materials are coaxially disposed within the pore channels to form material rods having a relatively small cross-section and a relatively long length. By varying the structure of the materials in the pore channels, various energy devices can be fabricated, such as photovoltaic (PV) devices, radiation detectors, capacitors, batteries and the like.

  15. Industrial applications and current trends in supercritical fluid technologies

    OpenAIRE

    Gamse Thomas

    2005-01-01

    Supercritical fluids have a great potential for wide fields of processes Although CO2 is still one of the most used supercritical gases, for special purposes propane or even fluorinated-chlorinated fluids have also been tested. The specific characteristics of supercritical fluids behaviour were analyzed such as for example the solubilities of different components and the phase equilibria between the solute and solvent. The application at industrial scale (decaffeinating of tea and coffee, hop...

  16. Controlled porosity solubility modulated osmotic pump tablets of gliclazide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Arti; Verma, P R P; Gore, Subhash

    2015-06-01

    A system that can deliver drug at a controlled rate is very important for the treatment of various chronic diseases such as diabetes, asthma, and heart disease. Poorly water-soluble drug with pH-dependent solubility such as gliclazide (GLZ) offers challenges in the controlled-release formulation because of low dissolution rate and poor bioavailability. Solid dispersion (SD) of GLZ consisted of hydroxypropyl cellulose (HPC-SSL) as a polymeric solubilizer was manufactured by hot melt extrusion (HME) technology. Then, controlled porosity osmotic pump (CPOP) tablet of gliclazide was designed to deliver drug in a controlled manner up to 16 h. The developed formulation was optimized for type and level of pore former and coating weight gain. The optimized formulation was found to exhibit zero order kinetics independent of pH and agitation speed but depends on osmotic pressure of dissolution media indicated that mechanism of drug release was osmotic pressure. The in vivo performance prediction of developed formulation using convolution approach revealed that the developed formulation was superior to the existing marketed extended-release formulation in terms of attaining steady state plasma levels and indicated adequate exposure in translating hypoglycemic response. The prototype solubilization method combined with controlled porosity osmotic pump based technique could provide a unique way to increase dissolution rate and bioavailability of many poorly water-soluble, narrow therapeutic index drugs used in diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, etc.

  17. Silicon pore optics developments and status

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bavdaz, Marcos; Wille, Eric; Wallace, Kotska

    2012-01-01

    Silicon Pore Optics (SPO) is a lightweight high performance X-ray optics technology being developed in Europe, driven by applications in observatory class high energy astrophysics missions. An example of such application is the former ESA science mission candidate ATHENA (Advanced Telescope...... for High Energy Astrophysics), which uses the SPO technology for its two telescopes, in order to provide an effective area exceeding 1 m2 at 1 keV, and 0.5 m2 at 6 keV, featuring an angular resolution of 10" or better [1 to 24]. This paper reports on the development activities led by ESA, and the status...

  18. Fluid adsorption in ordered mesoporous solids determined by in situ small-angle X-ray scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findenegg, Gerhard H; Jähnert, Susanne; Müter, Dirk; Prass, Johannes; Paris, Oskar

    2010-07-14

    The adsorption of two organic fluids (n-pentane and perfluoropentane) in a periodic mesoporous silica material (SBA-15) is investigated by in situ small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) using synchrotron radiation. Structural changes are monitored as the ordered and disordered pores in the silica matrix are gradually filled with the fluids. The experiments yield integrated peak intensities from up to ten Bragg reflections from the 2D hexagonal pore lattice, and additionally diffuse scattering contributions arising from disordered (mostly intrawall) porosity. The analysis of the scattering data is based on a separation of these two contributions. Bragg scattering is described by adopting a form factor model for ordered pores of cylindrical symmetry which accounts for the filling of the microporous corona, the formation of a fluid film at the pore walls, and condensation of the fluid in the core. The filling fraction of the disordered intrawall pores is extracted from the diffuse scattering intensity and its dependence on the fluid pressure is analyzed on the basis of a three-phase model. The data analysis introduced here provides an important generalisation of a formalism presented recently (J. Phys. Chem. C, 2009, 13, 15201), which was applicable to contrast-matching fluids only. In this way, the adsorption behaviour of fluids into ordered and disordered pores in periodic mesoporous materials can be analyzed quantitatively irrespective of the fluid density.

  19. Estimating pore-space gas hydrate saturations from well log acoustic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myung W.; Waite, William F.

    2008-07-01

    Relating pore-space gas hydrate saturation to sonic velocity data is important for remotely estimating gas hydrate concentration in sediment. In the present study, sonic velocities of gas hydrate-bearing sands are modeled using a three-phase Biot-type theory in which sand, gas hydrate, and pore fluid form three homogeneous, interwoven frameworks. This theory is developed using well log compressional and shear wave velocity data from the Mallik 5L-38 permafrost gas hydrate research well in Canada and applied to well log data from hydrate-bearing sands in the Alaskan permafrost, Gulf of Mexico, and northern Cascadia margin. Velocity-based gas hydrate saturation estimates are in good agreement with Nuclear Magneto Resonance and resistivity log estimates over the complete range of observed gas hydrate saturations.

  20. Ordering transitions of weakly anisotropic hard rods in narrow slitlike pores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliabadi, Roohollah; Gurin, Péter; Velasco, Enrique; Varga, Szabolcs

    2018-01-01

    The effect of strong confinement on the positional and orientational ordering is examined in a system of hard rectangular rods with length L and diameter D (L>D) using the Parsons-Lee modification of the second virial density-functional theory. The rods are nonmesogenic (L/Dlayers is allowed to form in the pore. In the extreme confinement limit of H≤2D, where only one-layer structures appear, we observe a structural transition from a planar to a homeotropic fluid layer with increasing density, which becomes sharper as L→H. In wider pores (2Dlayers, homeotropic order, and even combined bilayer structures (one layer is homeotropic, while the other is planar) can be stabilized at high densities. Moreover, first-order phase transitions can be seen between different structures. One of them emerges between a monolayer and a bilayer with planar orders at relatively low packing fractions.

  1. Electrohydrodynamic channeling effects in narrow fractures and pores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolet, Asger; Linga, Gaute; Mathiesen, Joachim

    2018-04-01

    In low-permeability rock, fluid and mineral transport occur in pores and fracture apertures at the scale of micrometers and below. At this scale, the presence of surface charge, and a resultant electrical double layer, may considerably alter transport properties. However, due to the inherent nonlinearity of the governing equations, numerical and theoretical studies of the coupling between electric double layers and flow have mostly been limited to two-dimensional or axisymmetric geometries. Here, we present comprehensive three-dimensional simulations of electrohydrodynamic flow in an idealized fracture geometry consisting of a sinusoidally undulated bottom surface and a flat top surface. We investigate the effects of varying the amplitude and the Debye length (relative to the fracture aperture) and quantify their impact on flow channeling. The results indicate that channeling can be significantly increased in the plane of flow. Local flow in the narrow regions can be slowed down by up to 5 % compared to the same geometry without charge, for the highest amplitude considered. This indicates that electrohydrodynamics may have consequences for transport phenomena and surface growth in geophysical systems.

  2. Fluid dynamics of dilatant fluid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nakanishi, Hiizu; Nagahiro, Shin-ichiro; Mitarai, Namiko

    2012-01-01

    of the state variable, we demonstrate that the model can describe basic features of the dilatant fluid such as the stress-shear rate curve that represents discontinuous severe shear thickening, hysteresis upon changing shear rate, and instantaneous hardening upon external impact. An analysis of the model...

  3. Dispersion of extensional waves in fluid-saturated porous cylinders at ultrasonic frequencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berryman, J.G.

    1983-01-01

    Ultrasonic dispersion of extensional waves in fluid-saturated porous cylinders is studied by analyzing generalized Pochhammer equations derived using Biot's theory. Cases with open-pore surface and closed-pore surface boundary conditions are considered. For both cases, the dispersion of the fast extensional wave does not differ much qualitatively from the dispersion expected for extensional waves in isotropic elastic cylinders. A slow extensional wave propagates in the case with a closed-pore surface but not in the case with an open-pore surface. The propagating slow wave has very weak dispersion and its speed is always lower than, but close to, the bulk slow wave speed

  4. Performance characterization of silicon pore optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collon, M. J.; Kraft, S.; Günther, R.; Maddox, E.; Beijersbergen, M.; Bavdaz, M.; Lumb, D.; Wallace, K.; Krumrey, M.; Cibik, L.; Freyberg, M.

    2006-06-01

    The characteristics of the latest generation of assembled silicon pore X-ray optics are discussed in this paper. These very light, stiff and modular high performance pore optics (HPO) have been developed [1] for the next generation of astronomical X-ray telescopes, which require large collecting areas whilst achieving angular resolutions better than 5 arcseconds. The suitability of 12 inch silicon wafers as high quality optical mirrors and the automated assembly process are discussed elsewhere in this conference. HPOs with several tens of ribbed silicon plates are assembled by bending the plates into an accurate cylindrical shape and directly bonding them on top of each other. The achievable figure accuracy is measured during assembly and in test campaigns at X-ray testing facilities like BESSY-II and PANTER. Pencil beam measurements allow gaining information on the quality achieved by the production process with high spatial resolution. In combination with full beam illumination a complete picture of the excellent performance of these optics can be derived. Experimental results are presented and discussed in detail. The results of such campaigns are used to further improve the production process in order to match the challenging XEUS requirements [2] for imaging resolution and mass.

  5. Deformation of volcanic materials by pore pressurization: analog experiments with simplified geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyman, David; Bursik, Marcus

    2018-03-01

    The pressurization of pore fluids plays a significant role in deforming volcanic materials; however, understanding of this process remains incomplete, especially scenarios accompanying phreatic eruptions. Analog experiments presented here use a simple geometry to study the mechanics of this type of deformation. Syrup was injected into the base of a sand medium, simulating the permeable flow of fluids through shallow volcanic systems. The experiments examined surface deformation over many source depths and pressures. Surface deformation was recorded using a Microsoft® Kinect™ sensor, generating high-spatiotemporal resolution lab-scale digital elevation models (DEMs). The behavior of the system is controlled by the ratio of pore pressure to lithostatic loading (λ =p/ρ g D). For λ 10, fluid expulsion from the layer was much faster, vertically fracturing to the surface with larger pressure ratios yielding less deformation. The temporal behavior of deformation followed a characteristic evolution that produced an approximately exponential increase in deformation with time until complete layer penetration. This process is distinguished from magmatic sources in continuous geodetic data by its rapidity and characteristic time evolution. The time evolution of the experiments compares well with tilt records from Mt. Ontake, Japan, in the lead-up to the deadly 2014 phreatic eruption. Improved understanding of this process may guide the evolution of magmatic intrusions such as dikes, cone sheets, and cryptodomes and contribute to caldera resurgence or deformation that destabilizes volcanic flanks.

  6. On nitrogen solubility in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalajda, Yu.A.; Katkov, Yu.D.; Kuznetsov, V.A.; Lastovtsev, A.Yu.; Lastochkin, A.P.; Susoev, V.S.

    1980-01-01

    Presented are the results of experimental investigations on nitrogen solubility in water under 0-15 MPa pressure, at the temperature of 100-340 deg C and nitrogen concentration of 0-5000 n.ml. N 2 /kg H 2 O. Empiric equations are derived and a diagram of nitrogen solubility in water is developed on the basis of the experimental data, as well as critically evaluated published data. The investigation results can be used in analyzing water-gas regime of a primary heat carrier in stream-generating plants with water-water reactors

  7. Preliminary considerations concerning actinide solubilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newton, T.W.; Bayhurst, B.P.; Daniels, W.R.; Erdal, B.R.; Ogard, A.E.

    1980-01-01

    Work at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory on the fundamental solution chemistry of the actinides has thus far been confined to preliminary considerations of the problems involved in developing an understanding of the precipitation and dissolution behavior of actinide compounds under environmental conditions. Attempts have been made to calculate solubility as a function of Eh and pH using the appropriate thermodynamic data; results have been presented in terms of contour maps showing lines of constant solubility as a function of Eh and pH. Possible methods of control of the redox potential of rock-groundwater systems by the use of Eh buffers (redox couples) is presented

  8. Thorium oxalate solubility and morphology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monson, P.R. Jr.; Hall, R.

    1981-10-01

    Thorium was used as a stand-in for studying the solubility and precipitation of neptunium and plutonium oxalates. Thorium oxalate solubility was determined over a range of 0.001 to 10.0 in the concentration parameter [H 2 C 2 O 4 ]/[HNO 3 ] 2 . Morphology of thorium oxide made from the oxalate precipitates was characterized by scanning electron microscopy. The different morphologies found for oxalate-lean and oxalate-rich precipitations were in agreement with predictions based on precipitation theory

  9. Solubility database for TILA-99

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vuorinen, U.; Carlsson, T. [VTT Chemical Technology, Espoo (Finland); Kulmala, S.; Hakanen, M. [Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Lab. of Radiochemistry; Ahonen, L. [Geological Survey of Finland, Espoo (Finland)

    1998-11-01

    The safety assessment of spent fuel disposal requires solubility values for several elements estimated in Finnish disposal conditions. In Finland four sites (Haestholmen, Kivetty, Olkiluoto and Romuvaara) are investigated for the disposal of spent fuel. Haestholmen and OLkiluoto are onshore sites, while Kivetty and Romuvaara are inland sites. Based on groundwater analysis and classification according to salinity at the planned disposal depth mainly fresh groundwater is encountered at Kivetty and Romuvaara, while brackish and saline water-types are met at Haestholmen and Olkiluoto. Very saline, almost brine-type water ({approx}70 g/l) has been found in the deepest parts of the investigated bedrock at one of the sites (Olkiluoto). The reference waters and conditions were chosen according to the water-types. The considered reference conditions incorporated both the near- and far-field, and both oxidizing and reducing conditions were considered. In the reference conditions, the changes in solubilities were also estimated as caused by possible variations in the pH, carbonate content and redox conditions. Uranium, which is the main component of spent fuel is dealt with in a separate report presenting the solubility of uranium and spent fuel dissolution. In this work the solubilities of all the other elements of concern (Am, Cu, Nb, Np, Pa, Pd, Pu, Ra, Se, Sn, Tc, Zr, Cm, Ni, Sr, Th, C, Cl, Cs, Fe, Ho, I, and Sm) in the safety assessment are considered. Some discussion on the corrosion of the spent fuel canister is also presented. For the estimation of solubilities of the elements in question, literature data was collected that mainly comprised experimentally measured concentrations. The sources used were spent fuel experiments, concentrations measured in solubility measurements, natural concentrations and concentrations from natural analogue sites (especially Palmottu and Hyrkkoelae in Finland) as well as the concentrations measured at the Finnish investigation sites

  10. Solubility database for TILA-99

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vuorinen, U.; Carlsson, T.; Kulmala, S.; Hakanen, M.

    1998-11-01

    The safety assessment of spent fuel disposal requires solubility values for several elements estimated in Finnish disposal conditions. In Finland four sites (Haestholmen, Kivetty, Olkiluoto and Romuvaara) are investigated for the disposal of spent fuel. Haestholmen and OLkiluoto are onshore sites, while Kivetty and Romuvaara are inland sites. Based on groundwater analysis and classification according to salinity at the planned disposal depth mainly fresh groundwater is encountered at Kivetty and Romuvaara, while brackish and saline water-types are met at Haestholmen and Olkiluoto. Very saline, almost brine-type water (∼70 g/l) has been found in the deepest parts of the investigated bedrock at one of the sites (Olkiluoto). The reference waters and conditions were chosen according to the water-types. The considered reference conditions incorporated both the near- and far-field, and both oxidizing and reducing conditions were considered. In the reference conditions, the changes in solubilities were also estimated as caused by possible variations in the pH, carbonate content and redox conditions. Uranium, which is the main component of spent fuel is dealt with in a separate report presenting the solubility of uranium and spent fuel dissolution. In this work the solubilities of all the other elements of concern (Am, Cu, Nb, Np, Pa, Pd, Pu, Ra, Se, Sn, Tc, Zr, Cm, Ni, Sr, Th, C, Cl, Cs, Fe, Ho, I, and Sm) in the safety assessment are considered. Some discussion on the corrosion of the spent fuel canister is also presented. For the estimation of solubilities of the elements in question, literature data was collected that mainly comprised experimentally measured concentrations. The sources used were spent fuel experiments, concentrations measured in solubility measurements, natural concentrations and concentrations from natural analogue sites (especially Palmottu and Hyrkkoelae in Finland) as well as the concentrations measured at the Finnish investigation sites. The

  11. Fluid dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Ruban, Anatoly I

    This is the first book in a four-part series designed to give a comprehensive and coherent description of Fluid Dynamics, starting with chapters on classical theory suitable for an introductory undergraduate lecture course, and then progressing through more advanced material up to the level of modern research in the field. The present Part 1 consists of four chapters. Chapter 1 begins with a discussion of Continuum Hypothesis, which is followed by an introduction to macroscopic functions, the velocity vector, pressure, density, and enthalpy. We then analyse the forces acting inside a fluid, and deduce the Navier-Stokes equations for incompressible and compressible fluids in Cartesian and curvilinear coordinates. In Chapter 2 we study the properties of a number of flows that are presented by the so-called exact solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations, including the Couette flow between two parallel plates, Hagen-Poiseuille flow through a pipe, and Karman flow above an infinite rotating disk. Chapter 3 is d...

  12. [A photographic scale for evaluating facial pores and analysis of factors associated with pore widening in Chengdu].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qing; Zhou, Cheng-xia; Meng, Hui-min; Wang, Xi; Li, Li

    2010-09-01

    To develop a photographic scale for grading widening of pores, and to identify the factors associated with pore widening. People with widened pores were recruited, with photographs taken on their nasal tips, nasal alas and cheeks. A questionnaire survey was undertaken by dermatologists to assess the severity of pore widening. A Cumulative Logit Model was established to identify factors that were associated with pore widening. A total of 115 people participated in the study and 562 photographs were taken. The photographic scale was highly consistent with the clinical judgment. Another 1011 residents aged from 18 to 70 years old in Chengdu were surveyed. The logit model revealed that facial pore widening were associated with gender, age, oily skin, sun protection and anti-aging cosmetic. The photographic scale is reliable and easy to use. Gender, age and oily skin are risk factors, and sun protection and anti-aging cosmetic are protective factors with related to pore widening.

  13. Application of x-ray microtomography to environmental fluid flow problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wildenschild, D.; Culligan, K.A.; Christensen, B.S.B.

    2005-01-01

    Many environmental processes are controlled by the micro-scale interaction of water and air with the solid phase (soils, sediments, rock) in pore spaces within the subsurface. The distribution in time and space of fluids in pores ultimately controls subsurface flow and contaminant transport relevant to groundwater resource management, contaminant remediation, and agriculture. Many of these physical processes operative at the pore-scale cannot be directly investigated using conventional hydrologic techniques, however recent developments in synchrotron-based micro-imaging have made it possible to observe and quantify pore-scale processes non-invasively. Micron-scale resolution makes it possible to track fluid flow within individual pores and therefore facilitates previously unattainable measurements. We report on experiments performed at the GSECARS** (Advanced Photon Source) microtomography facility and have measured properties such as porosity, fluid saturation and distribution within the pore space, as well as interfacial characteristics of the fluids involved (air, water, contaminant). Different image processing techniques were applied following mathematical reconstruction to produce accurate measurements of the physical flow properties. These new micron-scale measurements make it possible to test existing and new theory, as well as emerging numerical modeling schemes aimed at the pore scale.

  14. Persistent Homology to describe Solid and Fluid Structures during Multiphase Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herring, A. L.; Robins, V.; Liu, Z.; Armstrong, R. T.; Sheppard, A.

    2017-12-01

    The question of how to accurately and effectively characterize essential fluid and solid distributions and structures is a long-standing topic within the field of porous media and fluid transport. For multiphase flow applications, considerable research effort has been made to describe fluid distributions under a range of conditions; including quantification of saturation levels, fluid-fluid pressure differences and interfacial areas, and fluid connectivity. Recent research has effectively used topological metrics to describe pore space and fluid connectivity, with researchers demonstrating links between pore-scale nonwetting phase topology to fluid mobilization and displacement mechanisms, relative permeability, fluid flow regimes, and thermodynamic models of multiphase flow. While topology is clearly a powerful tool to describe fluid distribution, topological metrics by definition provide information only on the connectivity of a phase, not its geometry (shape or size). Physical flow characteristics, e.g. the permeability of a fluid phase within a porous medium, are dependent on the connectivity of the pore space or fluid phase as well as the size of connections. Persistent homology is a technique which provides a direct link between topology and geometry via measurement of topological features and their persistence from the signed Euclidean distance transform of a segmented digital image (Figure 1). We apply persistent homology analysis to measure the occurrence and size of pore-scale topological features in a variety of sandstones, for both the dry state and the nonwetting phase fluid during two-phase fluid flow (drainage and imbibition) experiments, visualized with 3D X-ray microtomography. The results provide key insights into the dominant topological features and length scales of a media which control relevant field-scale engineering properties such as fluid trapping, absolute permeability, and relative permeability.

  15. Change of microstructure of clays due to the presence of heavy metal ions in pore water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saiyouri N.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The compressibility of engineered barrier clays is, to a large extent, controlled by microstructure change due to the presence of chemical ions in clay-water system. This paper aims to investigate the change of microstructure of clays due to the presence of heavy metal ions in pore water. We use two pure clays (kaolinite and bentonite in the study. One-dimensional consolidation tests were performed on reconstituted samples, which are prepared with distilled water and three types of heavy metal solutions (Pb(NO32, Cu(NO32, Zn(NO32,. In order to better understand the impact of chemical pore fluid on microstructure of the two clays, following the consolidation test, scanning electron microscope (SEM observations and mercury intrusion pore size distribution measurements (MIP were conducted. Due to the measurement range of MIP, which is only allowed to measure the minimal pore size 20 Å, BET method by gas sorption, whose measurement pore size range is from 3.5 Å to 500 Å, is used to measure the micropore size distribution. By this method, specific surface area of the soils can be also determined. It can be employed to demonstrate the difference of creep performance between the soils. Furthermore, a series of batch equilibrium tests were conducted to better understand the physical-chemical interactions between the particles of soils and the heavy metal ions. With the further consideration of the interparticle electrical attractive and repulsive force, an attempt has been made to predict the creep behaviour by using the modified Gouy-Chapman double layer theory. The results of calculation were compared with that of tests. The comparison shows that the prediction of compressibility of the clays according to the modified double diffuse layer theory can be reasonably agreement with the experimental data.

  16. High Fidelity Computational Analysis of CO2 Trapping at Pore Scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Vinod

    2013-07-13

    With an alarming rise in carbon dioxide (CO2) emission from anthropogenic sources, CO2 sequestration has become an attractive choice to mitigate the emission. Some popular storage media for CO{sub 2} are oil reservoirs, deep coal-bed, and deep oceanic-beds. These have been used for the long term CO{sub 2} storage. Due to special lowering viscosity and surface tension property of CO{sub 2}, it has been widely used for enhanced oil recovery. The sites for CO{sub 2} sequestration or enhanced oil recovery mostly consist of porous rocks. Lack of knowledge of molecular mobility under confinement and molecule-surface interactions between CO2 and natural porous media results in generally governed by unpredictable absorption kinetics and total absorption capacity for injected fluids, and therefore, constitutes barriers to the deployment of this technology. Therefore, it is important to understand the flow dynamics of CO{sub 2} through the porous microstructures at the finest scale (pore-scale) to accurately predict the storage potential and long-term dynamics of the sequestered CO{sub 2}. This report discusses about pore-network flow modeling approach using variational method and analyzes simulated results this method simulations at pore-scales for idealized network and using Berea Sandstone CT scanned images. Variational method provides a promising way to study the kinetic behavior and storage potential at the pore scale in the presence of other phases. The current study validates variational solutions for single and two-phase Newtonian and single phase non-Newtonian flow through angular pores for special geometries whose analytical and/or empirical solutions are known. The hydraulic conductance for single phase flow through a triangular duct was also validated against empirical results derived from lubricant theory.

  17. Pore-scale dynamics of salt transport and distribution in drying porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shokri, Nima

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the physics of water evaporation from saline porous media is important in many natural and engineering applications such as durability of building materials and preservation of monuments, water quality, and mineral-fluid interactions. We applied synchrotron x-ray micro-tomography to investigate the pore-scale dynamics of dissolved salt distribution in a three dimensional drying saline porous media using a cylindrical plastic column (15 mm in height and 8 mm in diameter) packed with sand particles saturated with CaI 2 solution (5% concentration by mass) with a spatial and temporal resolution of 12 μm and 30 min, respectively. Every time the drying sand column was set to be imaged, two different images were recorded using distinct synchrotron x-rays energies immediately above and below the K-edge value of Iodine. Taking the difference between pixel gray values enabled us to delineate the spatial and temporal distribution of CaI 2 concentration at pore scale. Results indicate that during early stages of evaporation, air preferentially invades large pores at the surface while finer pores remain saturated and connected to the wet zone at bottom via capillary-induced liquid flow acting as evaporating spots. Consequently, the salt concentration increases preferentially in finer pores where evaporation occurs. Higher salt concentration was observed close to the evaporating surface indicating a convection-driven process. The obtained salt profiles were used to evaluate the numerical solution of the convection-diffusion equation (CDE). Results show that the macro-scale CDE could capture the overall trend of the measured salt profiles but fail to produce the exact slope of the profiles. Our results shed new insight on the physics of salt transport and its complex dynamics in drying porous media and establish synchrotron x-ray tomography as an effective tool to investigate the dynamics of salt transport in porous media at high spatial and temporal resolution

  18. Estimating multi-phase pore-scale characteristics from X-ray tomographic data using cluster analysis-based segmentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wildenschild, D.; Culligan, K.A.; Christensen, Britt Stenhøj Baun

    2006-01-01

    present in grey-scale X-ray tomographic images. The approach is based on a cluster analysis technique, used in combination with various other filtering and skeletonization schemes. We apply this segmentation algorithm to analyze multiphase pore-scale flow subjects such as hysteresis and interfacial...... characterization. The results clearly illustrate the advantage of using X-ray tomography together with cluster analysis-based image processing techniques. We were able to obtain detailed information on pore scale distribution of air and water phases, as well as quantitative measures of air bubble size and air...... of individual pores and interfaces. However, separation of the various phases (fluids and solids) in the grey-scale tomographic images has posed a major problem to quantitative analysis of the data. We present an image processing technique that facilitates identification and separation of the various phases...

  19. Weak bases and formation of a less soluble lauryl sulfate salt/complex in sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) containing media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattachar, Shobha N; Risley, Donald S; Werawatganone, Pornpen; Aburub, Aktham

    2011-06-30

    This work reports on the solubility of two weakly basic model compounds in media containing sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS). Results clearly show that the presence of SLS in the media (e.g. simulated gastric fluid or dissolution media) can result in an underestimation of solubility of some weak bases. We systematically study this phenomenon and provide evidence (chromatography and pXRD) for the first time that the decrease in solubility is likely due to formation of a less soluble salt/complex between the protonated form of the weak base and lauryl sulfate anion. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Effect of Fluid Dynamic Viscosity on the Strength of Chalk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegaard, K.; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    The mechanical strength of high porosity and weakly cemented chalk is affected by the fluid in the pores. In this study, the effect of the dynamic viscosity of non-polar fluids has been measured on outcrop chalk from Sigerslev Quarry, Stevns, Denmark. The outcome is that the measured strength...... of the chalk decreases with increasing dynamic viscosity. The proposed qualitative explanation is that pressure difference supports and enhances the generation of microscopic shear and tensile failures....

  1. A lattice Boltzmann investigation of steady-state fluid distribution, capillary pressure and relative permeability of a porous medium: Effects of fluid and geometrical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zi; Galindo-Torres, Sergio; Yan, Guanxi; Scheuermann, Alexander; Li, Ling

    2018-06-01

    Simulations of simultaneous steady-state two-phase flow in the capillary force-dominated regime were conducted using the state-of-the-art Shan-Chen multi-component lattice Boltzmann model (SCMC-LBM) based on two-dimensional porous media. We focused on analyzing the fluid distribution (i.e., WP fluid-solid, NP fluid-solid and fluid-fluid interfacial areas) as well as the capillary pressure versus saturation curve which was affected by fluid and geometrical properties (i.e., wettability, adhesive strength, pore size distribution and specific surface area). How these properties influenced the relative permeability versus saturation relation through apparent effective permeability and threshold pressure gradient was also explored. The SCMC-LBM simulations showed that, a thin WP fluid film formed around the solid surface due to the adhesive fluid-solid interaction, resulting in discrete WP fluid distributions and reduction of the WP fluid mobility. Also, the adhesive interaction provided another source of capillary pressure in addition to capillary force, which, however, did not affect the mobility of the NP fluid. The film fluid effect could be enhanced by large adhesive strength and fine pores in heterogeneous porous media. In the steady-state infiltration, not only the NP fluid but also the WP fluid were subjected to the capillary resistance. The capillary pressure effect could be alleviated by decreased wettability, large average pore radius and improved fluid connectivity in heterogeneous porous media. The present work based on the SCMC-LBM investigations elucidated the role of film fluid as well as capillary pressure in the two-phase flow system. The findings have implications for ways to improve the macroscopic flow equation based on balance of force for the steady-state infiltration.

  2. Deformation of a Volcanic Edifice by Pore Pressurization: An Analog Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyman, D.; Bursik, M. I.

    2015-12-01

    Volcanic flank destabilization, preceded by pressurization-induced surface deformation or weakening, presents a significant hazard at stratovolcanoes with ample supply of magmatic volatiles or preexisting hydrothermal systems as in Bezymianny- and Bandai-type eruptions, respectively. Deformation is also an important sign of the nature of unrest at large calderas such as Long Valley, USA. Previous studies of volcanic inflation have focused primarily on the role of ascending magma. Relatively few studies have centered on surface deformation caused by pressurization from other volcanic fluids, including exsolved volatiles and pressurized hydrothermal systems. Most investigations of pore-pressurization have focused on numerical modelling of pore pressure transients. In analog experiments presented here, pore-filling fluids are injected into the base of a damp sand medium without exceeding dike propagating pressures, simulating the pressurization and bulk-permeable flow of volatile fluids through volcanic systems. The experiments examine surface deformation from a range of source depths and pressures as well as edifice geometries. 3D imaging is possible through use of the Microsoft® Kinect™ sensor, which allows for the generation of high-resolution, high frame rate, lab-scale Digital Elevation Models (DEMs). After initial processing to increase signal-to-noise ratio, surface deformation is measured using the DEM time-series generated by the Kinect™. Analysis of preliminary experiments suggests that inflation is possible up to approx. 10 % of pressure source depth. We also show that the Kinect™ sensor is useful in analog volcanological studies, an environment to which it is well-suited.

  3. Multi-species Ionic Diffusion in Concrete with Account to Interaction Between Ions in the Pore Solution and the Cement Hydrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannesson, Björn

    2007-01-01

    results concerning the multi-species action during chloride penetration. In the model the chemical interaction between ions in solids and in pore solution is assumed governed by simple ion exchange processes only. The drawback using this approach is that the chemical part is lacking important physical...... relevance in terms of standard solubility thermodynamics. On the other hand the presented model is capable of accurately simulate the well documented peak behavior of the chloride profiles and the measured high content of calcium ions in pore solution under conditions when also chlorides is present...

  4. In vitro solubility of uranium tetrafluoride with oxidizing medium compared with in vivo solubility in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ansoborlo, E.; Chalabreysse, J.; Escallon, S.; Henge-Napoli, M.H.

    1990-01-01

    A simple in vitro solubility test for UF 4 was developed to investigate effects of addition of enzymes, proteins or gases (eg O 2 ) to synthetic biological fluid or Gamble solvent. Tests were made concomitantly with an in vivo inhalation study using male rats. With Gamble solvent alone, UF 4 showed class Y behaviour with dissolution half-time 300-500 days. When O 2 or carbonates were added to Gamble solvent, UF 4 showed class W behaviour (half-time 25-50 days). In the presence of oxygen and pyrogallol, the superoxide ion was formed and UF 4 behaved as class D (half-time 2-3 days). Results correlated with those of the inhalation experiment in which dissolution half-time was 2.5 and 5.2 days. Data also agree with urine monitoring data for workers exposed to UF 4 over 20 years. (author)

  5. Solubility limits on radionuclide dissolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerrisk, J.F.

    1984-12-31

    This paper examines the effects of solubility in limiting dissolution rates of a number of important radionuclides from spent fuel and high-level waste. Two simple dissolution models were used for calculations that would be characteristics of a Yucca Mountain repository. A saturation-limited dissolution model, in which the water flowing through the repository is assumed to be saturated with each waste element, is very conservative in that it overestimates dissolution rates. A diffusion-limited dissolution model, in which element-dissolution rates are limited by diffusion of waste elements into water flowing past the waste, is more realistic, but it is subject to some uncertainty at this time. Dissolution rates of some elements (Pu, Am, Sn, Th, Zr, Sm) are always limited by solubility. Dissolution rates of other elements (Cs, Tc, Np, Sr, C, I) are never solubility limited; their release would be limited by dissolution of the bulk waste form. Still other elements (U, Cm, Ni, Ra) show solubility-limited dissolution under some conditions. 9 references, 3 tables.

  6. Solubility of Nd in brine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalili, F.I.; Symeopoulos, V.; Chen, J.F.; Choppin, G.R.

    1994-01-01

    The solubility of Nd(III) has been measured at 23±3 C in a synthetic brine at pcH 6.4, 8.4, 10.4 and 12.4. The brine consisted predominantly of (Na+K)Cl and MgCl 2 with an ionic strength of 7.8 M (9.4 m) a solid compound of Nd(III) at each pcH was assigned from X-ray diffraction patterns. The log values of the experimental solubilities decrease fomr -3 at pcH 6.4 to -5.8 at pcH 8.4; at pcH 10.4 and 12.4 the solubility was below the detection limit of -7.5. The experimental solubility does not follow closely the variation with pcH estimated from modeling of the species in solution in equilibrium with the Nd solid using S.I.T. (orig.)

  7. Distribution of B, Cl and Their Isotopes in Pore Waters Separated from Gas Hydrate Potential Areas, Offshore Southwestern Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hung-Chun Chao Chen-Feng You

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Boron (B and chlorine (Cl are widely distributed on the Earth’s surface and show distinctive geochemical behaviors. Cl behaves rather conservatively in oceanic environments while B is an excess-volatile and its distribution is sensitive to sediment absorption and organic matter degradation. The distribution of B, Cl and their isotopes in pore waters provide useful information for distinguishing between shallow circulation and deep origin fluid sources. Thirty-six sediment cores 0 - 5 m in length were sampled from a foreland accretionary prism offshore Southwestern Taiwan where strong bottom simulating reflectors (BSRs and an abundance of mud diapirs were discovered. More than 350 pore water samples were separated and analyzed for B, Cl and other major ions. Four long cores were selected for B and Cl isotopic analysis. We found that the Cl in all cores varied less than 10%, suggesting no major hydrate dissolution or formation involvement at shallow depths in the study area. However, the B concentration changed greatly, ranging between 360 and 650 μM, indicating a possible sedimentary contribution during the early diagenesis stage. The B isotopic compositions were relatively depleted (~25 to 37‰ in these pore waters, implying the addition of sedimentary exchangeable B with low δ11B. The Cl isotopes showed rather large variations, more than 8‰, possibly related to the addition of deep situated fluids. In summary, the chemical and isotopic characteristics of pore waters separated from piston cores off Southwestern Taiwan suggest strong influence from organic matter degradation during diagenesis at shallow depths and the possible addition of deep fluids advecting through mud diapir channels at greater depths, causing a minor degree of hydrate dissolution / formation to occur at shallow depths. Further systematic investigation of pore waters δ18O and δD are needed in a future study.

  8. Wettability effect on capillary trapping of supercritical CO2 at pore-scale: micromodel experiment and numerical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, R.; Wan, J.

    2015-12-01

    Wettability of reservoir minerals along pore surfaces plays a controlling role in capillary trapping of supercritical (sc) CO2 in geologic carbon sequestration. The mechanisms controlling scCO2 residual trapping are still not fully understood. We studied the effect of pore surface wettability on CO2 residual saturation at the pore-scale using engineered high pressure and high temperature micromodel (transparent pore networks) experiments and numerical modeling. Through chemical treatment of the micromodel pore surfaces, water-wet, intermediate-wet, and CO2-wet micromodels can be obtained. Both drainage and imbibition experiments were conducted at 8.5 MPa and 45 °C with controlled flow rate. Dynamic images of fluid-fluid displacement processes were recorded using a microscope with a CCD camera. Residual saturations were determined by analysis of late stage imbibition images of flow path structures. We performed direct numerical simulations of the full Navier-Stokes equations using a volume-of-fluid based finite-volume framework for the primary drainage and the followed imbibition for the micromodel experiments with different contact angles. The numerical simulations agreed well with our experimental observations. We found that more scCO2 can be trapped within the CO2-wet micromodel whereas lower residual scCO2 saturation occurred within the water-wet micromodels in both our experiments and the numerical simulations. These results provide direct and consistent evidence of the effect of wettability, and have important implications for scCO2 trapping in geologic carbon sequestration.

  9. Studies of in Situ Pore Pressure Fluctuations At Various Scales Études des fluctuations in situ de la pression de pore à différentes échelles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kümpel H. J.

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Pore pressure fluctuations in fluid saturated geological formations, either of natural or anthropogenic origin, can be observed at different scales. Natural fluctuations, e. g. , due to tidal, barometric or seismogenic forcing, or man-made effects as through use of underground fluid reservoirs, or initial filling and cyclic loading of lake reservoirs may have wavelengths from meters to kilometers. In situ monitoring of processes, in which both rock deformation and pore pressure changes are significant, improves our knowledge on the mechanical behaviour and the role of pore pressure in porous rocks and sedimentary layers. Pressure transducers for continuous recording of fluid level variations in wells, reflecting pore pressure changes at depth, or borehole tiltmeters that are sensitive to ground deformation caused by gradients of pore pressure fluctuations are relatively simple means to trace the dynamics of such rock-fluid interactions. The obtained data series are usually interpreted in two ways: by application of analytical solutions-adopting homogeneous poroelastic conditions or single fracture models in a uniform, elastic medium-and by simulation through numerical calculations allowing for some heterogeneity in the model volume. Field cases presented in this article include tilt measurements in the vicinity of pumped wells (1 to 100 m scale, fluid level monitoring in wells (borehole scale, and studies of pore pressure effects induced by seismic events (1 to 100 km scale. Specific rock parameters that can be constrained are the Skempton ratio, the hydraulic diffusivity, and the type of the effective rheology. In cases of tiltmeter studies, anisotropy of pore fluid flow can also be detected. Keywords: fluids in rocks, pore pressure, poroelasticity, hydrology. Les fluctuations de la pression de pore dans les formations géologiques saturées en fluides, d'origine naturelle ou anthropogéniques, peuvent être observées à différentes

  10. Numerical study of viscoelastic polymer flow in simplified pore structures using stabilised finite element model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi, M.; Wegner, J.; Ganzer, L. [Technische Univ. Clausthal, Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany). ITE

    2013-08-01

    Polymer flooding, as an EOR method, has become one of the most important driving forces after water flooding. The conventional believe is that polymer flooding can only improve sweep efficiency, but it has no contribution to residual oil saturation reduction. However, experimental studies indicated that polymer solution can also improve displacement efficiency and decrease residual oil saturation. To get a better understanding of the mechanism to increase the microscopic sweep efficiency and the displacement efficiency, theoretical studies are required. In this paper, we studied the viscoelasticity effect of polymer by using a numerical simulator, which is based on Finite Element Analysis. Since it is showed experimentally that the first normal stress difference of viscoelastic polymer solution is higher than the second stress difference, the Oldroyd-B model was selected as the constitutive equation in the simulation. Numerical modelling of Oldroyd-B viscoelastic fluids is notoriously difficult. Standard Galerkin finite element methods are prone to numerical oscillations, and there is no convergence as the elasticity of fluid increases. Therefore, we use a stabilised finite element model. In order to verify our model, we first built up a model with the same geometry and fluid properties as presented in literature and compared the results. Then, with the tested model we simulated the effect of viscoelastic polymer fluid on dead pores in three simplified pore structures, which are contraction structure, expansion structure and expansion-contraction structure. Correspondingly, the streamlines and velocity contours of polymer solution, with different Reynolds numbers (Re) and Weissenberg numbers (We), flowing in these three structures are showed. The simulation results indicate that the viscoelasticity of polymer solution is the main contribution to increase the micro-scale sweep efficiency. With higher elasticity, the velocity of polymer solution is getting bigger at

  11. Pore size matters for potassium channel conductance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moldenhauer, Hans; Pincuntureo, Matías

    2016-01-01

    Ion channels are membrane proteins that mediate efficient ion transport across the hydrophobic core of cell membranes, an unlikely process in their absence. K+ channels discriminate K+ over cations with similar radii with extraordinary selectivity and display a wide diversity of ion transport rates, covering differences of two orders of magnitude in unitary conductance. The pore domains of large- and small-conductance K+ channels share a general architectural design comprising a conserved narrow selectivity filter, which forms intimate interactions with permeant ions, flanked by two wider vestibules toward the internal and external openings. In large-conductance K+ channels, the inner vestibule is wide, whereas in small-conductance channels it is narrow. Here we raise the idea that the physical dimensions of the hydrophobic internal vestibule limit ion transport in K+ channels, accounting for their diversity in unitary conductance. PMID:27619418

  12. Pore structure in blended cement pastes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canut, Mariana Moreira Cavalcanti

    Supplementary cementitious materials (SCMs), such as slag and fly ash, are increasingly used as a substitute for Portland cement in the interests of improvement of engineering properties and sustainability of concrete. According to studies improvement of engineering properties can be explained by...... on assumptions of degree of reaction and product densities gave for plain cement pastes results comparable to MIP data.......Supplementary cementitious materials (SCMs), such as slag and fly ash, are increasingly used as a substitute for Portland cement in the interests of improvement of engineering properties and sustainability of concrete. According to studies improvement of engineering properties can be explained...... supplement each other. Cement pastes (w/b=0.4) with and without slag and fly ash cured at two moisture (sealed and saturated) and temperature (20 and 55ºC) conditions were used to investigate the combined impact of SCMs addition and curing on the pore structure of pastes cured up to two years. Also...

  13. Conservation agriculture effects on soil pore characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munkholm, Lars Juhl; Abdollahi, Lotfollah

    ploughing to a depth of 20 cm (MP), harrowing to a depth of 8-10 cm (H) and direct drilling (D). Minimally disturbed core samples were taken at 4-8, 12-16 and 18-27 cm depths 11 years after experimental start. Water retention characteristics were measured for a range of matric potential ranging from -10......Conservation tillage in combination with crop rotation, residue management and cover crops are key components of conservation agriculture. A positive long-term effect of applying all components of conservation agriculture on soil structural quality is expected. However, there is a lack...... of quantitative knowledge to support this statement. This study examines the long-term effects of crop rotations, residue management and tillage on soil pore characteristics of two sandy loam soils in Denmark. Results are reported from a split plot field experiment rotation as main plot factor and tillage...

  14. Preferential flow from pore to landscape scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koestel, J. K.; Jarvis, N.; Larsbo, M.

    2017-12-01

    In this presentation, we give a brief personal overview of some recent progress in quantifying preferential flow in the vadose zone, based on our own work and those of other researchers. One key challenge is to bridge the gap between the scales at which preferential flow occurs (i.e. pore to Darcy scales) and the scales of interest for management (i.e. fields, catchments, regions). We present results of recent studies that exemplify the potential of 3-D non-invasive imaging techniques to visualize and quantify flow processes at the pore scale. These studies should lead to a better understanding of how the topology of macropore networks control key state variables like matric potential and thus the strength of preferential flow under variable initial and boundary conditions. Extrapolation of this process knowledge to larger scales will remain difficult, since measurement technologies to quantify macropore networks at these larger scales are lacking. Recent work suggests that the application of key concepts from percolation theory could be useful in this context. Investigation of the larger Darcy-scale heterogeneities that generate preferential flow patterns at the soil profile, hillslope and field scales has been facilitated by hydro-geophysical measurement techniques that produce highly spatially and temporally resolved data. At larger regional and global scales, improved methods of data-mining and analyses of large datasets (machine learning) may help to parameterize models as well as lead to new insights into the relationships between soil susceptibility to preferential flow and site attributes (climate, land uses, soil types).

  15. Fluid mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paraschivoiu, I.; Prud'homme, M.; Robillard, L.; Vasseur, P.

    2003-01-01

    This book constitutes at the same time theoretical and practical base relating to the phenomena associated with fluid mechanics. The concept of continuum is at the base of the approach developed in this work. The general advance proceeds of simple balances of forces as into hydrostatic to more complex situations or inertias, the internal stresses and the constraints of Reynolds are taken into account. This advance is not only theoretical but contains many applications in the form of solved problems, each chapter ending in a series of suggested problems. The major part of the applications relates to the incompressible flows

  16. Soluble and colloidal iron in the oligotrophic North Atlantic and North Pacific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, J; Boyle, E; Sunda, W; Wen, L S

    2001-08-03

    In the oligotrophic North Atlantic and North Pacific, ultrafiltration studies show that concentrations of soluble iron and soluble iron-binding organic ligands are much lower than previously presumed "dissolved" concentrations, which were operationally defined as that passing through a 0.4-micrometer pore filter. Our studies indicate that substantial portions of the previously presumed "dissolved" iron (and probably also iron-binding ligands) are present in colloidal size range. The soluble iron and iron-binding organic ligands are depleted at the surface and enriched at depth, similar to distributions of major nutrients. By contrast, colloidal iron shows a maximum at the surface and a minimum in the upper nutricline. Our results suggest that "dissolved" iron may be less bioavailable to phytoplankton than previously thought and that iron removal through colloid aggregation and settling should be considered in models of the oceanic iron cycle.

  17. Pore structure of natural and regenerated soil aggregates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naveed, Muhammad; Arthur, Emmanuel; de Jonge, Lis Wollesen

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative characterization of aggregate pore structure can reveal the evolution of aggregates under different land use and management practices and their effects on soil processes and functions. Advances in X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) provide powerful means to conduct such characterization....... This study examined aggregate pore structure of three differently managed same textured Danish soils (mixed forage cropping, MFC; mixed cash cropping, MCC; cereal cash cropping, CCC) for (i) natural aggregates, and (ii) aggregates regenerated after 20 months of incubation. In total, 27 aggregates (8-16 mm...... pore diameter of 200 and 170 Hm, respectively. Pore shape analysis indicated that CCC and MFC aggregates had an abundance of rounded and elongated pores, respectively, and those of MCC were in-between CCC and MFC. Aggregate pore structure development in the lysimeters was nearly similar irrespective...

  18. Characteristics of Pore Structure and Fractal Dimension of Isometamorphic Anthracite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Gao

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The geologic conditions of No. 3 coal seams are similar to Sihe and Zhaozhuang Collieries, however, the gas production is significantly different. To better understand the effect of pores, by means of experimental measurements and quantitative analysis, the pore properties of high-rank isometamorphic anthracite were thoroughly studied. Our study showed that the pore structures were predominantly adsorptive, accounting for more than 88% of the specific surface area. The coal pores showed typical three-stage fractal characteristics at boundary points of 1 nm and 9 nm (7 nm of coal samples from Zhaozhuang Colliery, and the fractal dimension with 1–9 nm (or 1–7 nm, as being significantly larger than those measured outside the given ranges. Pores in samples from Sihe Colliery were mainly open spherical or ellipsoidal pores in shape; conversely, those from Zhaozhuang Colliery were mainly Y-shaped, V-shaped, or ‘ink-bottle’ type.

  19. Preparation of micro-pored silicone elastomer through radiation crosslinking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Xiaoling; Gu Mei; Xie Xubing; Huang Wei

    2013-01-01

    The radiation crosslinking was adopted to prepare the micro-pored silicone elastomer, which was performed by vulcanization and foaming respectively. Radiation crosslinking is a new method to prepare micro-pored material with high performance by use of radiation technology. Silicon dioxide was used as filler, and silicone elastomer was vulcanized by electron beams, then the micro-pored material was made by heating method at a high temperature. The effects of absorbed dose and filler content on the performance and morphology were investigated. The structure and distribution of pores were observed by SEM. The results show that the micro-pored silicon elastomer can be prepared successfully by controlling the absorbed dose and filler content. It has a smooth surface similar to a rubber meanwhile the pores are round and unconnected to each other with the minimum size of 14 μm. And the good mechanical performance can be suitable for further uses. (authors)

  20. Dual pore-connectivity and flow-paths affect shale hydrocarbon production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Q.; Barber, T.; Zhang, Y.; Md Golam, K.

    2017-12-01

    Aided with integrated characterization approaches of droplet contact angle measurement, mercury intrusion capillary pressure, low-pressure gas physisorption, scanning electron microscopy, and small angle neutron scattering, we have systematically studied how pore connectivity and wettability are associated with mineral and organic matter phases of shales (Barnett, Bakken, Eagle Ford), as well as their influence on macroscopic fluid flow and hydrocarbon movement, from the following complementary tests: vacuum saturation with vacuum-pulling on dry shale followed with tracer introduction and high-pressure intrusion, tracer diffusion into fluid-saturated shale, fluid and tracer imbibition into partially-saturated shale, and Wood's metal intrusion followed with imaging and elemental mapping. The first three tests use tracer-bearing fluids (hydrophilic API brine and hydrophobic n-decane) fluids with a suite of wettability tracers of different sizes and reactivities developed in our laboratory. These innovative and integrated approaches indicate a Dalmatian wettability behavior at a scale of microns, limited connectivity (50-100 nm), which is linked to the steep initial decline and low overall recovery because of the limited connection of hydrocarbon molecules in the shale matrix to the stimulated fracture network.

  1. Principles of fluid mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreider, J.F.

    1985-01-01

    This book is an introduction on fluid mechanics incorporating computer applications. Topics covered are as follows: brief history; what is a fluid; two classes of fluids: liquids and gases; the continuum model of a fluid; methods of analyzing fluid flows; important characteristics of fluids; fundamentals and equations of motion; fluid statics; dimensional analysis and the similarity principle; laminar internal flows; ideal flow; external laminar and channel flows; turbulent flow; compressible flow; fluid flow measurements

  2. Coarse and fine root plants affect pore size distributions differently

    OpenAIRE

    Bodner, G.; Leitner, D.; Kaul, H.-P.

    2014-01-01

    Aims Small scale root-pore interactions require validation of their impact on effective hydraulic processes at the field scale. Our objective was to develop an interpretative framework linking root effects on macroscopic pore parameters with knowledge at the rhizosphere scale. Methods A field experiment with twelve species from different families was conducted. Parameters of Kosugi?s pore size distribution (PSD) model were determined inversely from tension infiltrometer data. Measured root tr...

  3. Disappearing fluid?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graney, K.; Chu, J.; Lin, P.C.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: A 78-year old male in end stage renal failure (ESRF) with a background of NIDDM retinopathy, nephropathy, and undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) presented with anorexia, clinically unwell, decreased mobility and right scrotal swelling. There was no difficulty during CAPD exchange except there was a positive fluid balance Peritoneal dialysates remained clear A CAPD peritoneal study was requested. 100Mbq 99mTc Sulphur Colloid was injected into a standard dialysate bag containing dialysate. Anterior dynamic images were acquired over the abdomen pelvis while the dialysate was infused Static images with anatomical markers were performed 20 mins post infusion, before and after patient ambulation and then after drainage. The study demonstrated communication between the peritoneal cavity and the right scrotal sac. Patient underwent right inguinal herniaplasty with a marlex mesh. A repeat CAPD flow study was performed as follow up and no abnormal connection between the peritoneal cavity and the right scrotal sac was demonstrated post operatively. This case study shows that CAPD flow studies can be undertaken as a simple, minimally invasive method to evaluate abnormal peritoneal fluid flow dynamics in patients undergoing CAPD, and have an impact on dialysis management. Copyright (2002) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc

  4. Pore-scale study on flow and heat transfer in 3D reconstructed porous media using micro-tomography images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Zhenyu; Wu, Huiying

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The complex porous domain has been reconstructed with the micro CT scan images. • Pore-scale numerical model based on LB method has been established. • The correlations for flow and heat transfer were derived from the predictions. • The numerical approach developed in this work is suitable for complex porous media. - Abstract: This paper presents the numerical study on fluid flow and heat transfer in reconstructed porous media at the pore-scale with the double-population thermal lattice Boltzmann (LB) method. The porous geometry was reconstructed using micro-tomography images from micro-CT scanner. The thermal LB model was numerically tested before simulation and a good agreement was achieved by compared with the existing results. The detailed distributions of velocity and temperature in complex pore spaces were obtained from the pore-scale simulation. The correlations for flow and heat transfer in the specific porous media sample were derived based on the numerical results. The numerical method established in this work provides a promising approach to predict pore-scale flow and heat transfer characteristics in reconstructed porous domain with real geometrical effect, which can be extended for the continuum modeling of the transport process in porous media at macro-scale.

  5. Auxillary Fluid Flowmeter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    RezaNejad Gatabi, Javad; Forouzbakhsh, Farshid; Ebrahimi Darkhaneh, Hadi

    2010-01-01

    The Auxiliary Fluid Flow meter is proposed to measure the fluid flow of any kind in both pipes and open channels. In this kind of flow measurement, the flow of an auxiliary fluid is measured Instead of direct measurement of the main fluid flow. The auxiliary fluid is injected into the main fluid ...

  6. The effect of scaffold pore size in cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nava, Michele M; Draghi, Lorenza; Giordano, Carmen; Pietrabissa, Riccardo

    2016-07-26

    The effect of scaffold pore size and interconnectivity is undoubtedly a crucial factor for most tissue engineering applications. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of pore size and porosity on cartilage construct development in different scaffolds seeded with articular chondrocytes. We fabricated poly-L-lactide-co-trimethylene carbonate scaffolds with different pore sizes, using a solvent-casting/particulate-leaching technique. We seeded primary bovine articular chondrocytes on these scaffolds, cultured the constructs for 2 weeks and examined cell proliferation, viability and cell-specific production of cartilaginous extracellular matrix proteins, including GAG and collagen. Cell density significantly increased up to 50% with scaffold pore size and porosity, likely facilitated by cell spreading on the internal surface of bigger pores, and by increased mass transport of gases and nutrients to cells, and catabolite removal from cells, allowed by lower diffusion barriers in scaffolds with a higher porosity. However, both the cell metabolic activity and the synthesis of cartilaginous matrix proteins significantly decreased by up to 40% with pore size. We propose that the association of smaller pore diameters, causing 3-dimensional cell aggregation, to a lower oxygenation caused by a lower porosity, could have been the condition that increased the cell-specific synthesis of cartilaginous matrix proteins in the scaffold with the smallest pores and the lowest porosity among those tested. In the initial steps of in vitro cartilage engineering, the combination of small scaffold pores and low porosity is an effective strategy with regard to the promotion of chondrogenesis.

  7. Real-Time Pore Pressure Detection: Indicators and Improved Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jincai Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available High uncertainties may exist in the predrill pore pressure prediction in new prospects and deepwater subsalt wells; therefore, real-time pore pressure detection is highly needed to reduce drilling risks. The methods for pore pressure detection (the resistivity, sonic, and corrected d-exponent methods are improved using the depth-dependent normal compaction equations to adapt to the requirements of the real-time monitoring. A new method is proposed to calculate pore pressure from the connection gas or elevated background gas, which can be used for real-time pore pressure detection. The pore pressure detection using the logging-while-drilling, measurement-while-drilling, and mud logging data is also implemented and evaluated. Abnormal pore pressure indicators from the well logs, mud logs, and wellbore instability events are identified and analyzed to interpret abnormal pore pressures for guiding real-time drilling decisions. The principles for identifying abnormal pressure indicators are proposed to improve real-time pore pressure monitoring.

  8. Fusion Pore Diameter Regulation by Cations Modulating Local Membrane Anisotropy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doron Kabaso

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The fusion pore is an aqueous channel that is formed upon the fusion of the vesicle membrane with the plasma membrane. Once the pore is open, it may close again (transient fusion or widen completely (full fusion to permit vesicle cargo discharge. While repetitive transient fusion pore openings of the vesicle with the plasma membrane have been observed in the absence of stimulation, their frequency can be further increased using a cAMP-increasing agent that drives the opening of nonspecific cation channels. Our model hypothesis is that the openings and closings of the fusion pore are driven by changes in the local concentration of cations in the connected vesicle. The proposed mechanism of fusion pore dynamics is considered as follows: when the fusion pore is closed or is extremely narrow, the accumulation of cations in the vesicle (increased cation concentration likely leads to lipid demixing at the fusion pore. This process may affect local membrane anisotropy, which reduces the spontaneous curvature and thus leads to the opening of the fusion pore. Based on the theory of membrane elasticity, we used a continuum model to explain the rhythmic opening and closing of the fusion pore.

  9. X-ray microtomography application in pore space reservoir rock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, M F S; Lima, I; Borghi, L; Lopes, R T

    2012-07-01

    Characterization of porosity in carbonate rocks is important in the oil and gas industry since a major hydrocarbons field is formed by this lithology and they have a complex media porous. In this context, this research presents a study of the pore space in limestones rocks by x-ray microtomography. Total porosity, type of porosity and pore size distribution were evaluated from 3D high resolution images. Results show that carbonate rocks has a complex pore space system with different pores types at the same facies. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Role of the synaptobrevin C terminus in fusion pore formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ngatchou, Annita N; Kisler, Kassandra; Fang, Qinghua

    2010-01-01

    Neurotransmitter release is mediated by the SNARE proteins synaptobrevin II (sybII, also known as VAMP2), syntaxin, and SNAP-25, generating a force transfer to the membranes and inducing fusion pore formation. However, the molecular mechanism by which this force leads to opening of a fusion pore...... stimulation, the SNARE complex pulls the C terminus of sybII deeper into the vesicle membrane. We propose that this movement disrupts the vesicular membrane continuity leading to fusion pore formation. In contrast to current models, the experiments suggest that fusion pore formation begins with molecular...

  11. Extraction of pores from microtomographic reconstructions of intact soil aggregates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albee, P. B.; Stockman, G. C.; Smucker, A. J. M.

    2000-02-29

    Segmentation of features is often a necessary step in the analysis of volumetric data. The authors have developed a simple technique for extracting voids from irregular volumetric data sets. In this work they look at extracting pores from soil aggregates. First, they identify a threshold that gives good separability of the object from the background. They then segment the object, and perform connected components analysis on the pores within the object. Using their technique pores that break the surface can be segmented along with pores completely contained in the initially segmented object.

  12. Solubility of sparingly soluble drug derivatives of anthranilic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domańska, Urszula; Pobudkowska, Aneta; Pelczarska, Aleksandra

    2011-03-24

    This work is a continuation of our systematic study of the solubility of pharmaceuticals (Pharms). All substances here are derivatives of anthranilic acid, and have an anti-inflammatory direction of action (niflumic acid, flufenamic acid, and diclofenac sodium). The basic thermal properties of pure Pharms, i.e., melting and glass-transition temperatures as well as the enthalpy of melting, have been measured with the differential scanning microcalorimetry technique (DSC). Molar volumes have been calculated with the Barton group contribution method. The equilibrium mole fraction solubilities of three pharmaceuticals were measured in a range of temperatures from 285 to 355 K in three important solvents for Pharm investigations: water, ethanol, and 1-octanol using a dynamic method and spectroscopic UV-vis method. The experimental solubility data have been correlated by means of the commonly known G(E) equation: the NRTL, with the assumption that the systems studied here have revealed simple eutectic mixtures. pK(a) precise measurement values have been investigated with the Bates-Schwarzenbach spectrophotometric method. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  13. Solubilities of some gases in four immidazolium-based ionic liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afzal, Waheed; Liu, Xiangyang; Prausnitz, John M.

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Experimental apparatus based on the synthetic-volumetric method for measuring solubilities of gases in liquids. Highlights: • We constructed an apparatus for measuring solubilities of sparingly-soluble gases. • We measured solubilities of five gases in four immidazolium-based ionic liquids. • We calculated Henry’s constants for gases in the ionic liquids studied in this work. -- Abstract: The synthetic-volumetric method is used for rapidly measuring solubilities of sparingly-soluble gases in monoethylene glycol and in four ionic liquids. Known molar quantities of solute and solvent are charged into an equilibrium vessel. Measured quantities at equilibrium include: temperature, pressure, quantities of fluids, and volumes of the gas and liquid phases in the equilibrium vessel. These measurements enable calculation of equilibrium compositions using material balances. No sampling or chemical analyses are required. Solubilities are reported for carbon dioxide, krypton, oxygen, and hydrogen in monoethylene glycol, l-n-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate [BMIM][BF4], l-n-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate [BMIM][PF6], 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide [EMIM][Tf 2 N], or 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate [EMIM][AC]. Solubilities were measured over the temperature range (298 to 355) K and for pressures up to about 7 MPa using two different pieces of equipment, both based on the volumetric method: a low-pressure glass apparatus and a high-pressure stainless-steel apparatus. Special emphasis is given to experimental reliability to assure consistent data

  14. Pore-size Distributions from Nitrogen Adsorption Revisited: Models Comparison with Controlled-pore Glasses

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šolcová, Olga; Matějová, Lenka; Schneider, Petr

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 313, č. 2 (2006), s. 167-176 ISSN 0926-860X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA104/04/2116; GA ČR GD203/03/H140; GA AV ČR IAA4072404 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : pore size distribution * physical adsorption * standard nitrogen isotherm Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.630, year: 2006

  15. The solubilities and solubility products of zirconium hydroxide and oxide after aging at 278, 313, and 333 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Taishi; Uemura, Takuya; Sasaki, Takayuki; Takagi, Ikuji [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Moriyama, Hirotake [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Research Reactor Inst.

    2016-07-01

    The solubilities of zirconium hydroxide and oxide after aging at 278, 313, and 333 K were measured at 278, 298, 313, and 333 K in the pH{sub c} range of 0.3-7 in a 0.5 M ionic strength solution of NaClO{sub 4} and HClO{sub 4}. Size distributions of the colloidal species were investigated by ultrafiltration using membranes with different pore sizes, and the solid phases were examined by X-ray diffraction. The apparent solubility of zirconium amorphous hydroxide (Zr(OH){sub 4}(am)), prepared by the oversaturation method, decreased with increasing aging temperature (T{sub a}), and the size distributions obtained after aging at elevated temperatures indicated the growth of the colloidal species. We, therefore, suggested that agglomeration of the colloidal species and dehydration and crystallization of Zr(OH){sub 4}(am) as the solubility-limiting solid phase occurred over the course of aging at elevated temperatures. For sample solutions of the crystalline oxide (ZrO{sub 2}(cr)), the aging temperature had no significant effect on the solubility, but the solubility data at lower temperatures were found to be slightly higher than those at higher temperatures, implying a small fraction of the amorphous components. In the analysis of different solid phases (Zr(OH){sub 4}(s,T{sub a}), T{sub a} = 278, 313, and 333 K) depending on the aging temperatures, the solubility products (K{sub sp}, T{sub a}) were determined at different measurement temperatures, and the enthalpy change (Δ{sub r}H {sup circle}) for Zr{sup 4+} 4OH{sup -} <=> Zr(OH){sub 4}(s,T{sub a}) was calculated using the van't Hoff equation. The solid-phase-transformation process at elevated temperatures was also analyzed based on the obtained K{sub sp}, T{sub a} and Δ{sub r}H {sup circle} values.

  16. Transport upscaling from pore- to Darcy-scale: Incorporating pore-scale Berea sandstone Lagrangian velocity statistics into a Darcy-scale transport CTRW model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puyguiraud, Alexandre; Dentz, Marco; Gouze, Philippe

    2017-04-01

    ), Dual control of flow field heterogeneity and immobile porosity on non-Fickian transport in Berea sandstone, Water Resour. Res., 51, 8273-8293, doi:10.1002/2015WR017645. [2] Mostaghimi, P., Bijeljic, B., Blunt, M. (2012). Simulation of Flow and Dispersion on Pore-Space Images. Society of Petroleum Engineers. doi:10.2118/135261-PA. [3] Dentz, M., P. K. Kang, A. Comolli, T. Le Borgne, and D. R. Lester, Continuous time random walks for the evolution of Lagrangian velocities, Phys. Rev. Fluids, 2016. Keywords: Porescale, particle tracking, transport, Lagrangian velocity, ergodicity, Markovianity, continuous time random walks, upscaling.

  17. Near-field solubility studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomason, H.P.; Williams, S.J.

    1992-02-01

    Experimental determinations of the solubilities of americium, plutonium, neptunium, protactinium, thorium, radium, lead, tin, palladium and zirconium are reported. These elements have radioactive isotopes of concern in assessments of radioactive waste disposal. All measurements were made under the highly alkaline conditions typical of the near field of a radioactive waste repository which uses cementitious materials for many of the immobilisation matrices, the backfill and the engineered structures. Low redox potentials, typical of those resulting from the corrosion of iron and steel, were simulated for those elements having more than one accessible oxidation state. The dissolved concentrations of the elements were defined using ultrafiltration. In addition, the corrosion of iron and stainless steel was shown to generate low redox potentials in solution and the solubility of iron(II) at high pH was measured and found to be sufficient for it to act as a redox buffer with respect to neptunium and plutonium. (author)

  18. Bioactive glass-poly (ε-caprolactone) composite scaffolds with 3 dimensionally hierarchical pore networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, Hui-suk; Kim, Seung-eon; Park, Eui Kyun

    2011-01-01

    Hierarchically mesoporous-macroporous-giant-porous bioactive glass/poly ε-caprolactone (PCL) composite scaffolds were prepared using a combination of the sol-gel method, evaporation-induced self-assembly process in the presence of nonionic triblock copolymer, EO 100 PO 65 EO 100 (F127), as template, salt leaching method, and rapid prototyping techniques. F127 acts as a template, inducing the formation of mesopores, NaCl with sizes between 25 and 33 μm provides macro-pores after leaching, and rapid prototyping produces giant-pores. The structure and morphology of the scaffolds were characterized by the field emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and Hg porosimetry. The mechanical properties of the scaffolds were examined by the dynamic mechanical analysis. Their in vitro bioactivities were confirmed by immersing the scaffolds in simulated body fluid. Their biocompatibilities were also evaluated by culturing human bone marrow stromal cells on the scaffolds. The scaffolds show good molding capabilities, mechanical properties, 3 dimensionally well-interconnected pore structures, bioactivities, and biocompatibilities in vitro. Depending on the amount of NaCl, the scaffolds also show unique sponge-like properties, but still retain better mechanical properties than general salt leaching derived PCL scaffolds. All of the data provide good evidence that the obtained scaffolds possess excellent potential for applications in the fields of tissue engineering and drug storage.

  19. Single- and two-phase flow simulation based on equivalent pore network extracted from micro-CT images of sandstone core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Rui; Liu, Jianjun; Cui, Mengmeng

    2016-01-01

    Due to the intricate structure of porous rocks, relationships between porosity or saturation and petrophysical transport properties classically used for reservoir evaluation and recovery strategies are either very complex or nonexistent. Thus, the pore network model extracted from the natural porous media is emphasized as a breakthrough to predict the fluid transport properties in the complex micro pore structure. This paper presents a modified method of extracting the equivalent pore network model from the three-dimensional micro computed tomography images based on the maximum ball algorithm. The partition of pore and throat are improved to avoid tremendous memory usage when extracting the equivalent pore network model. The porosity calculated by the extracted pore network model agrees well with the original sandstone sample. Instead of the Poiseuille's law used in the original work, the Lattice-Boltzmann method is employed to simulate the single- and two- phase flow in the extracted pore network. Good agreements are acquired on relative permeability saturation curves of the simulation against the experiment results.

  20. Viscoelastic gravel-pack carrier fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nehmer, W.L.

    1988-01-01

    The ability of a fluid to flow adequately into the formation during gravel-pack treatments is critical to achieving a good pack. Recent studies have indicated ''fish-eyes'' and/or ''microgels'' present in many polymer gelled carrier fluids will plug pore throats, leading to impaired leakoff and causing formation damage. Intensive manipulation of the polymer gelled fluid using shear and filter devices will help remove the particles, but it adds to the cost of the treatment in terms of equipment and manpower. Excessive shear will degrade the polymer leading to poor gravel suspension, while too little shear will cause filtration problems. A gelled carried fluid using a viscoelastic surfactant system has been found to leak off very efficiently to the formation, and cause no formation damage, without the use of shear/filter devices. Viscoelastic surfactant-base gelled fluids develop viscosity because of the association of surfactant moloecules into large rod-shaped aggregates. There is no hydration of polymer involved, so fish-eyes and microgels will not be formed in the viscoelastic fluid. A surfactant-base system having a yield point allows the gravel carrying properties to be much better than fluids gelled with conventional polymer systems (hydroxyethylcellulose [HEC]). For example, a gravel carried fluid gelled with 80 lb HEC/1,000 gal has a viscosity of about 400 cp at 170 sec/sup -1/; a viscoelastic surfactant-base system having only one-half the viscosity still flows into cores about four times more efficiently than the HEC-base fluid. The rheology, leakoff, formation damage and mixing properties of a viscoelastic, surfactant-base, gravel-pack carrier fluid are discussed

  1. Characterizing the hydraulic properties of a paper coating layer using FIB-SEM tomography and 3D pore-scale modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aslannejad, H.; Hassanizadeh, S.M.; Raoof, A.; de Winter, D.A.M.; Tomozeu, N.; van Genuchten, M.T.

    2017-01-01

    Paper used in the printing industry generally contains a relatively thin porous coating covering a thicker fibrous base layer. The three-dimensional pore structure of coatings has a major effect on fluid flow patterns inside the paper medium. Understanding and quantifying the flow properties of thin

  2. Gyroelastic fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerbel, G.D.

    1981-01-20

    A study is made of a scale model in three dimensions of a guiding center plasma within the purview of gyroelastic (also known as finite gyroradius-near theta pinch) magnetohydrodynamics. The (nonlinear) system sustains a particular symmetry called isorrhopy which permits the decoupling of fluid modes from drift modes. Isorrhopic equilibria are analyzed within the framework of geometrical optics resulting in (local) dispersion relations and ray constants. A general scheme is developed to evolve an arbitrary linear perturbation of a screwpinch equilibrium as an invertible integral transform (over the complete set of generalized eigenfunctions defined naturally by the equilibrium). Details of the structure of the function space and the associated spectra are elucidated. Features of the (global) dispersion relation owing to the presence of gyroelastic stabilization are revealed. An energy principle is developed to study the stability of the tubular screwpinch.

  3. Gyroelastic fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerbel, G.D.

    1981-01-01

    A study is made of a scale model in three dimensions of a guiding center plasma within the purview of gyroelastic (also known as finite gyroradius-near theta pinch) magnetohydrodynamics. The (nonlinear) system sustains a particular symmetry called isorrhopy which permits the decoupling of fluid modes from drift modes. Isorrhopic equilibria are analyzed within the framework of geometrical optics resulting in (local) dispersion relations and ray constants. A general scheme is developed to evolve an arbitrary linear perturbation of a screwpinch equilibrium as an invertible integral transform (over the complete set of generalized eigenfunctions defined naturally by the equilibrium). Details of the structure of the function space and the associated spectra are elucidated. Features of the (global) dispersion relation owing to the presence of gyroelastic stabilization are revealed. An energy principle is developed to study the stability of the tubular screwpinch

  4. Propagation of a plasma streamer in catalyst pores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Quan-Zhi; Bogaerts, Annemie

    2018-03-01

    Although plasma catalysis is gaining increasing interest for various environmental applications, the underlying mechanisms are still far from understood. For instance, it is not yet clear whether and how plasma streamers can propagate in catalyst pores, and what is the minimum pore size to make this happen. As this is crucial information to ensure good plasma-catalyst interaction, we study here the mechanism of plasma streamer propagation in a catalyst pore, by means of a two-dimensional particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo collision model, for various pore diameters in the nm-range to μm-range. The so-called Debye length is an important criterion for plasma penetration into catalyst pores, i.e. a plasma streamer can penetrate into pores when their diameter is larger than the Debye length. The Debye length is typically in the order of a few 100 nm up to 1 μm at the conditions under study, depending on electron density and temperature in the plasma streamer. For pores in the range of ∼50 nm, plasma can thus only penetrate to some extent and at very short times, i.e. at the beginning of a micro-discharge, before the actual plasma streamer reaches the catalyst surface and a sheath is formed in front of the surface. We can make plasma streamers penetrate into smaller pores (down to ca. 500 nm at the conditions under study) by increasing the applied voltage, which yields a higher plasma density, and thus reduces the Debye length. Our simulations also reveal that the plasma streamers induce surface charging of the catalyst pore sidewalls, causing discharge enhancement inside the pore, depending on pore diameter and depth.

  5. Laboratory investigation of the factors impact on bubble size, pore blocking and enhanced oil recovery with aqueous Colloidal Gas Aphron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Shenglong; Wang, Yefei; Li, Zhongpeng; Chen, Qingguo; Zhao, Zenghao

    Colloidal Gas Aphron as a mobility control in enhanced oil recovery is becoming attractive; it is also designed to block porous media with micro-bubbles. In this paper, the effects of surfactant concentration, polymer concentration, temperature and salinity on the bubble size of the Colloidal Gas Aphron were studied. Effects of injection rates, Colloidal Gas Aphron fluid composition, heterogeneity of reservoir on the resistance to the flow of Colloidal Gas Aphron fluid through porous media were investigated. Effects of Colloidal Gas Aphron fluid composition and temperature on residual oil recovery were also studied. The results showed that bubble growth rate decreased with increasing surfactant concentration, polymer concentration, and decreasing temperature, while it decreased and then increased slightly with increasing salinity. The obvious increase of injection pressure was observed as more Colloidal Gas Aphron fluid was injected, indicating that Colloidal Gas Aphron could block the pore media effectively. The effectiveness of the best blend obtained through homogeneous sandpack flood tests was modestly improved in the heterogeneous sandpack. The tertiary oil recovery increased 26.8 % by Colloidal Gas Aphron fluid as compared to 20.3 % by XG solution when chemical solution of 1 PV was injected into the sandpack. The maximum injected pressure of Colloidal Gas Aphron fluid was about three times that of the XG solution. As the temperature increased, the Colloidal Gas Aphron fluid became less stable; the maximum injection pressure and tertiary oil recovery of Colloidal Gas Aphron fluid decreased.

  6. The Solubility Parameters of Ionic Liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marciniak, Andrzej

    2010-01-01

    The Hildebrand’s solubility parameters have been calculated for 18 ionic liquids from the inverse gas chromatography measurements of the activity coefficients at infinite dilution. Retention data were used for the calculation. The solubility parameters are helpful for the prediction of the solubility in the binary solvent mixtures. From the solubility parameters, the standard enthalpies of vaporization of ionic liquids were estimated. PMID:20559495

  7. The Solubility Parameters of Ionic Liquids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Marciniak

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The Hildebrand’s solubility parameters have been calculated for 18 ionic liquids from the inverse gas chromatography measurements of the activity coefficients at infinite dilution. Retention data were used for the calculation. The solubility parameters are helpful for the prediction of the solubility in the binary solvent mixtures. From the solubility parameters, the standard enthalpies of vaporization of ionic liquids were estimated.

  8. Solubility of Carbon in Nanocrystalline -Iron

    OpenAIRE

    Alexander Kirchner; Bernd Kieback

    2012-01-01

    A thermodynamic model for nanocrystalline interstitial alloys is presented. The equilibrium solid solubility of carbon in -iron is calculated for given grain size. Inside the strained nanograins local variation of the carbon content is predicted. Due to the nonlinear relation between strain and solubility, the averaged solubility in the grain interior increases with decreasing grain size. The majority of the global solubility enhancement is due to grain boundary enrichment however. Therefor...

  9. Apparent Solubility of Natural Products Extracted with Near-Critical Carbon Dioxide

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sovová, Helena

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 3, 12A (2012), s. 958-965 ISSN 2156-8251 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TA01010578 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : supercritical fluid extraction * solubility * adsorption isotherm Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering http://www.scirp.org/journal/ajac/

  10. Performance of multilayer coated silicon pore optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, M. D.; Collon, M. J.; Jensen, C. P.; Christensen, F. E.; Krumrey, M.; Cibik, L.; Marggraf, S.; Bavdaz, M.; Lumb, D.; Shortt, B.

    2010-07-01

    The requirements for the IXO (International X-ray Observatory) telescope are very challenging in respect of angular resolution and effective area. Within a clear aperture with 1.7 m > R > 0.25 m that is dictated by the spacecraft envelope, the optics technology must be developed to satisfy simultaneously requirements for effective area of 2.5 m2 at 1.25 keV, 0.65 m2 at 6 keV and 150 cm2 at 30 keV. The reflectivity of the bare mirror substrate materials does not allow these requirements to be met. As such the IXO baseline design contains a coating layout that varies as a function of mirror radius and in accordance with the variation in grazing incidence angle. The higher energy photon response is enhanced through the use of depth-graded multilayer coatings on the inner radii mirror modules. In this paper we report on the first reflectivity measurements of wedged ribbed silicon pore optics mirror plates coated with a depth graded W/Si multilayer. The measurements demonstrate that the deposition and performance of the multilayer coatings is compatible with the SPO production process.

  11. Current concepts in nuclear pore electrophysiology.