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Sample records for solubility equilibrium concept

  1. Students’ misconceptions on solubility equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setiowati, H.; Utomo, S. B.; Ashadi

    2018-05-01

    This study investigated the students’ misconceptions of the solubility equilibrium. The participants of the study consisted of 164 students who were in the science class of second year high school. Instrument used is two-tier diagnostic test consisting of 15 items. Responses were marked and coded into four categories: understanding, misconception, understand little without misconception, and not understanding. Semi-structured interviews were carried out with 45 students according to their written responses which reflected different perspectives, to obtain a more elaborated source of data. Data collected from multiple methods were analyzed qualitatively and quantitatively. Based on the data analysis showed that the students misconceptions in all areas in solubility equilibrium. They had more misconceptions such as in the relation of solubility and solubility product, common-ion effect and pH in solubility, and precipitation concept.

  2. Intertextual learning strategy with guided inquiry on solubility equilibrium concept to improve the student’s scientific processing skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardani, K. U.; Mulyani, S.; Wiji

    2018-04-01

    The aim of this study was to develop intertextual learning strategy with guided inquiry on solubility equilibrium concept to enhance student’s scientific processing skills. This study was conducted with consideration of some various studies which found that lack of student’s process skills in learning chemistry was caused by learning chemistry is just a concept. The method used in this study is a Research and Development to generate the intertextual learning strategy with guided inquiry. The instruments used in the form of sheets validation are used to determine the congruence of learning activities by step guided inquiry learning and scientific processing skills with aspects of learning activities. Validation results obtained that the learning activities conducted in line with aspects of indicators of the scientific processing skills.

  3. Equilibrium Solubility of CO2 in Alkanolamines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waseem Arshad, Muhammad; Fosbøl, Philip Loldrup; von Solms, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Equilibrium solubility of CO2 were measured in aqueous solutions of Monoethanolamine (MEA) and N,N-diethylethanolamine(DEEA). Equilibrium cells are generally used for these measurements. In this study, the equilibrium data were measured from the calorimetry. For this purpose a reaction calorimeter...... (model CPA 122 from ChemiSens AB, Sweden) was used. The advantage of this method is being the measurement of both heats of absorption and equilibrium solubility data of CO2 at the same time. The measurements were performed for 30 mass % MEA and 5M DEEA solutions as a function of CO2 loading at three...... different temperatures 40, 80 and 120 ºC. The measured 30 mass % MEA and 5M DEEA data were compared with the literature data obtained from different equilibrium cells which validated the use of calorimeters for equilibrium solubility measurements....

  4. The concept of equilibrium in organization theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gazendam, H.W.M.

    1998-01-01

    Many organization theories consist of an interpretation frame and an idea about the ideal equilibrium state. This article explains how the equilibrium concept is used in four organization theories: the theories of Fayol, Mintzberg, Morgan, and Volberda. Equilibrium can be defined as balance, fit or

  5. The concept of equilibrium in organization theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gazendam, Henk W.M.

    1997-01-01

    Many organization theories consist of an interpretation frame and an idea about the ideal equilibrium state. This article explains how the equilibrium concept is used in four organization theories: the theories of Fayol, Mintzberg, Morgan, and Volberda. Equilibrium can be defined as balance, fit or

  6. Connecting Solubility, Equilibrium, and Periodicity in a Green, Inquiry Experiment for the General Chemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacciatore, Kristen L.; Amado, Jose; Evans, Jason J.; Sevian, Hannah

    2008-01-01

    We present a novel first-year chemistry laboratory experiment that connects solubility, equilibrium, and chemical periodicity concepts. It employs a unique format that asks students to replicate experiments described in different sample lab reports, each lacking some essential information, rather than follow a scripted procedure. This structure is…

  7. Nanostructured energy devices equilibrium concepts and kinetics

    CERN Document Server

    Bisquert, Juan

    2014-01-01

    Due to the pressing needs of society, low cost materials for energy devices have experienced an outstanding development in recent times. In this highly multidisciplinary area, chemistry, material science, physics, and electrochemistry meet to develop new materials and devices that perform required energy conversion and storage processes with high efficiency, adequate capabilities for required applications, and low production cost. Nanostructured Energy Devices: Equilibrium Concepts and Kinetics introduces the main physicochemical principles that govern the operation of energy devices. It inclu

  8. On the Concept "Chemical Equilibrium": The Associative Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gussarsky, Esther; Gorodetsky, Malka

    1990-01-01

    Word associations were used to map high school students' concepts of "chemical equilibrium" and "equilibrium." It was found that the preconception of the two concepts was differentiated on noncritical dimensions. (Author/CW)

  9. Are the Concepts of Dynamic Equilibrium and the Thermodynamic Criteria for Spontaneity, Nonspontaneity, and Equilibrium Compatible?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverberg, Lee J.; Raff, Lionel M.

    2015-01-01

    Thermodynamic spontaneity-equilibrium criteria require that in a single-reaction system, reactions in either the forward or reverse direction at equilibrium be nonspontaneous. Conversely, the concept of dynamic equilibrium holds that forward and reverse reactions both occur at equal rates at equilibrium to the extent allowed by kinetic…

  10. Random walk to a nonergodic equilibrium concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bel, G.; Barkai, E.

    2006-01-01

    Random walk models, such as the trap model, continuous time random walks, and comb models, exhibit weak ergodicity breaking, when the average waiting time is infinite. The open question is, what statistical mechanical theory replaces the canonical Boltzmann-Gibbs theory for such systems? In this paper a nonergodic equilibrium concept is investigated, for a continuous time random walk model in a potential field. In particular we show that in the nonergodic phase the distribution of the occupation time of the particle in a finite region of space approaches U- or W-shaped distributions related to the arcsine law. We show that when conditions of detailed balance are applied, these distributions depend on the partition function of the problem, thus establishing a relation between the nonergodic dynamics and canonical statistical mechanics. In the ergodic phase the distribution function of the occupation times approaches a δ function centered on the value predicted based on standard Boltzmann-Gibbs statistics. The relation of our work to single-molecule experiments is briefly discussed.

  11. An analysis of the concept of equilibrium in organization theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gazendam, H.W.M.; Simons, John L.

    1998-01-01

    This article analyzes how the equilibrium concept is used in four organization theories: the theories of Fayol, Mintzberg, Morgan, and Volberda. Equilibrium can be defined as balance, fit or requisite variety. Equilibrium is related to observables dependent on the definition of organization as work

  12. Investigating High School Students' Understanding of Chemical Equilibrium Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpudewan, Mageswary; Treagust, David F.; Mocerino, Mauro; Won, Mihye; Chandrasegaran, A. L.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the year 12 students' (N = 56) understanding of chemical equilibrium concepts after instruction using two conceptual tests, the "Chemical Equilibrium Conceptual Test 1" ("CECT-1") consisting of nine two-tier multiple-choice items and the "Chemical Equilibrium Conceptual Test 2"…

  13. College Physical Chemistry Students' Conceptions of Equilibrium and Fundamental Thermodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Peter L.; Schwenz, Richard W.

    1998-01-01

    Focuses on many alternative conceptions and nonconceptions about material related to equilibrium and thermodynamics. Uses interviews and compares the concepts from these with those expressed by experts in textbooks. (DDR)

  14. Equilibrium field coil concepts for INTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strickler, D.J.; Peng, Y.K.M.; Brown, T.G.

    1981-08-01

    Methods are presented for reducing ampere-turn requirements in the EF coil system. It is shown that coil currents in an EF coil system external to the toroidal field coils can be substantially reduced by relaxing the triangularity of a D-shaped plasma. Further reductions are realized through a hybrid EF coil system using both internal and external coils. Equilibrium field coils for a poloidally asymmetric, single-null INTOR configuration are presented. It is shown that the shape of field lines in the plasma scrapeoff region and divertor channel improves as triangularity is reduced, but it does so at the possible expense of achievable stable beta values

  15. [Determination of equilibrium solubility and n-octanol/water partition coefficient of pulchinenosiden D by HPLC].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Xiao-Yong; Yin, Shan; Zhang, Guo-Song; Luo, Xiao-Jian; Jian, Hui; Feng, Yu-Lin; Yang, Shi-Lin

    2014-05-01

    To determine the equilibrium solubility of pulchinenosiden D in different solvents and its n-octanol/water partition coefficients. Combining shaking flask method and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) to detect the n-octanol/water partition coefficients of pulchinenosiden D, the equilibrium solubility of pulchinenosiden D in six organic solvents and different pH buffer solution were determined by HPLC analysis. n-Octanol/water partition coefficients of pulchinenosiden D in different pH were greater than zero, the equilibrium solubility of pulchinenosiden D was increased with increase the pH of the buffer solution. The maximum equilibrium solubility of pulchinenosiden D was 255.89 g x L(-1) in methanol, and minimum equilibrium solubility of pulchinenosiden D was 0.20 g x L(-1) in acetonitrile. Under gastrointestinal physiological conditions, pulchinenosiden D exists in molecular state and it has good absorption but poor water-solubility, so increasing the dissolution rate of pulchinenosiden D may enhance its bioavailability.

  16. Equilibrium solubility versus intrinsic dissolution: characterization of lamivudine, stavudine and zidovudine for BCS classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Bersani Dezani

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Solubility and dissolution rate of drugs are of major importance in pre-formulation studies of pharmaceutical dosage forms. The solubility improvement allows the drugs to be potential biowaiver candidates and may be a good way to develop more dose-efficient formulations. Solubility behaviour of lamivudine, stavudine and zidovudine in individual solvents (under pH range of 1.2 to 7.5 was studied by equilibrium solubility and intrinsic dissolution methods. In solubility study by equilibrium method (shake-flask technique, known amounts of drug were added in each media until to reach saturation and the mixture was subjected to agitation of 150 rpm for 72 hours at 37 ºC. In intrinsic dissolution test, known amount of each drug was compressed in the matrix of Wood's apparatus and subjected to dissolution in each media with agitation of 50 rpm at 37 ºC. In solubility by equilibrium method, lamivudine and zidovudine can be considered as highly soluble drugs. Although stavudine present high solubility in pH 4.5, 6.8, 7.5 and water, the solubility determination in pH 1.2 was not possible due stability problems. Regarding to intrinsic dissolution, lamivudine and stavudine present high speed of dissolution. Considering a boundary value presented by Yu and colleagues (2004, all drugs studied present high solubility characteristics in intrinsic dissolution method. Based on the obtained results, intrinsic dissolution seems to be superior for solubility studies as an alternative method for biopharmaceutical classification purposes.

  17. HIGH PRESSURE PHASE EQUILIBRIUM: PREDICTION OF ESSENTIAL OIL SOLUBILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lúcio CARDOZO-FILHO

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available This work describes a method to predict the solubility of essential oils in supercritical carbon dioxide. The method is based on the formulation proposed in 1979 by Asselineau, Bogdanic and Vidal. The Peng-Robinson and Soave-Redlich-Kwong cubic equations of state were used with the van der Waals mixing rules with two interaction parameters. Method validation was accomplished calculating orange essential oil solubility in pressurized carbon dioxide. The solubility of orange essential oil in carbon dioxide calculated at 308.15 K for pressures of 50 to 70 bar varied from 1.7± 0.1 to 3.6± 0.1 mg/g. For same the range of conditions, experimental solubility varied from 1.7± 0.1 to 3.6± 0.1 mg/g. Predicted values were not very sensitive to initial oil composition.Este trabalho descreve uma metodologia para o cálculo da solubilidade de óleos essenciais em dióxido de carbono a altas pressões baseada na formulação proposta em 1979 por Asselineau, Bogdanic e Vidal. Foram utilizadas as equações cúbicas de estado de Peng-Robinson e Soave-Redlich-Kwong com regras de mistura de van der Waals com dois parâmetros de interação. O cálculo da solubilidade do óleo essencial de laranja em dióxido de carbono pressurizado foi usado para validação do método. A solubilidade calculada a 308,15 K para pressões entre 50 e 70 bar variou entre 1,5 e 4,1 mg/g. Valores experimentais para as mesmas condições variam entre 1,7± 0.1 a 3,6± 0.1 mg/g. Os valores preditos não são muito sensíveis à composição inicial do óleo essencial.

  18. Equilibrium solubility of carbon dioxide in the amine solvent system of (triethanolamine + piperazine + water)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, P.-Y.; Soriano, Allan N.; Leron, Rhoda B.; Li, M.-H.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, a new set of data for the equilibrium solubility of carbon dioxide in the amine solvent system that consists of triethanolamine (TEA), piperazine (PZ), and water is presented. Equilibrium solubility values were obtained at T = (313.2, 333.2, and 353.2) K and pressures up to 153 kPa using the vapour-recirculation equilibrium cell. The TEA concentrations in the considered ternary (solvent) mixture were (2 and 3) kmol . m -3 and those of PZ's were (0.5, 1.0, and 1.5) kmol . m -3 . The solubility data (CO 2 loading in the amine solution) obtained were correlated as a function of CO 2 partial pressure, system temperature, and amine composition via the modified Kent-Eisenberg model. Results showed that the model applied is generally satisfactory in representing the CO 2 absorption into mixed aqueous solutions of TEA and PZ.

  19. Validity of Scientific Based Chemistry Android Module to Empower Science Process Skills (SPS) in Solubility Equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antrakusuma, B.; Masykuri, M.; Ulfa, M.

    2018-04-01

    Evolution of Android technology can be applied to chemistry learning, one of the complex chemistry concept was solubility equilibrium. this concept required the science process skills (SPS). This study aims to: 1) Characteristic scientific based chemistry Android module to empowering SPS, and 2) Validity of the module based on content validity and feasibility test. This research uses a Research and Development approach (RnD). Research subjects were 135 s1tudents and three teachers at three high schools in Boyolali, Central of Java. Content validity of the module was tested by seven experts using Aiken’s V technique, and the module feasibility was tested to students and teachers in each school. Characteristics of chemistry module can be accessed using the Android device. The result of validation of the module contents got V = 0.89 (Valid), and the results of the feasibility test Obtained 81.63% (by the student) and 73.98% (by the teacher) indicates this module got good criteria.

  20. Evaluation of Systematic and Random Error in the Measurement of Equilibrium Solubility and Diffusion Coefficient for Liquids in Polymers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shuely, Wendel

    2001-01-01

    A standardized thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) desorption method for measuring the equilibrium solubility and diffusion coefficient of toxic contaminants with polymers was further developed and evaluated...

  1. Metastable equilibrium solubility behavior of carbonated apatite in the presence of solution strontium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heslop, D D; Bi, Y; Baig, A A; Higuchi, W I

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to use the concept of metastable equilibrium solubility (MES) to describe the anomalous solubility behavior of carbonated apatite (CAP) in the presence of solution strontium. A CAP sample (4.8 wt% CO(3), synthesized at 70 degrees C) was prepared by precipitation. Baseline MES distributions were determined in a series of 0.1 M acetate buffers containing only calcium and phosphate (no strontium) over a broad range of solution conditions. In order to assess the influence of strontium, MES profiles were then determined in a similar fashion with 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, and 80% of the solution calcium being replaced on an equal molar basis by solution strontium. From the compositions of the equilibrating buffer solutions, ion activity products (IAPs) of the form Ca(10-n)Sr(n)(PO(4))(6)(OH)(2) (n = 0-10) were calculated in an attempt to determine the correct function governing the dissolution of the CAP preparation. The results demonstrate the following important findings: (a) at high solution strontium/calcium ratios (i.e., when 60% or more of the solution calcium was replaced by strontium), the MES profiles in all the experiments were found to be essentially superimposable when the solution IAPs were calculated using the stoichiometry of Ca(6)Sr(4)(PO(4))(6)(OH)(2), and (b), at low solution strontium/calcium ratios (i.e., when 40% or less of the solution calcium was replaced by strontium), the stoichiometry yielding MES data superpositioning was found to be that of hydroxyapatite. When other stoichiometries were assumed, good superpositioning of the data was not possible.

  2. Thermodynamic equilibrium solubility measurements in simulated fluids by 96-well plate method in early drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharate, Sonali S; Vishwakarma, Ram A

    2015-04-01

    An early prediction of solubility in physiological media (PBS, SGF and SIF) is useful to predict qualitatively bioavailability and absorption of lead candidates. Despite of the availability of multiple solubility estimation methods, none of the reported method involves simplified fixed protocol for diverse set of compounds. Therefore, a simple and medium-throughput solubility estimation protocol is highly desirable during lead optimization stage. The present work introduces a rapid method for assessment of thermodynamic equilibrium solubility of compounds in aqueous media using 96-well microplate. The developed protocol is straightforward to set up and takes advantage of the sensitivity of UV spectroscopy. The compound, in stock solution in methanol, is introduced in microgram quantities into microplate wells followed by drying at an ambient temperature. Microplates were shaken upon addition of test media and the supernatant was analyzed by UV method. A plot of absorbance versus concentration of a sample provides saturation point, which is thermodynamic equilibrium solubility of a sample. The established protocol was validated using a large panel of commercially available drugs and with conventional miniaturized shake flask method (r(2)>0.84). Additionally, the statistically significant QSPR models were established using experimental solubility values of 52 compounds. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The entropy concept for non-equilibrium states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieb, Elliott H; Yngvason, Jakob

    2013-10-08

    In earlier work, we presented a foundation for the second law of classical thermodynamics in terms of the entropy principle. More precisely, we provided an empirically accessible axiomatic derivation of an entropy function defined on all equilibrium states of all systems that has the appropriate additivity and scaling properties, and whose increase is a necessary and sufficient condition for an adiabatic process between two states to be possible. Here, after a brief review of this approach, we address the question of defining entropy for non-equilibrium states. Our conclusion is that it is generally not possible to find a unique entropy that has all relevant physical properties. We do show, however, that one can define two entropy functions, called S - and S + , which, taken together, delimit the range of adiabatic processes that can occur between non-equilibrium states. The concept of comparability of states with respect to adiabatic changes plays an important role in our reasoning.

  4. Is local equilibrium a useful concept in hadronic interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carruthers, P.

    1984-01-01

    Aspects of multiparticle production phenomena are reviewed, which bear on the existence of local equilibrium in all or part of a collision event. Several universal features of purely hadronic events, such as the p/sub perpendicular/ distribution of secondaries, the independence of multiplicities and multiplicity distributions on the quantum numbers of the colliding particles are easily interpreted by postulating the existence of local thermodynamic equilibrium for the dominant nondiffractive events. Except in the case of the multiplicity distribution, other interpretations often do not exist. Equilibration mechanisms which might establish local equilibrium are examined. We point out that several mechanisms besides the usual kinetic relaxation have not been seriously studied. These include collective instabilities, turbulence and chaos, which could be more effective in establishing equilibrium. Developments in the use of the hydrodynamic model are reviewed, with particular attention to the initial conditions appropriate to hadronic and nuclear collisions. We conclude that local equilibrium is indeed a useful concept but that much effort is needed to assess its accuracy and domain of applicability

  5. Equilibrium solubility measurement of ionizable drugs – consensus recommendations for improving data quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Avdeef

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This commentary addresses data quality in equilibrium solubility measurement in aqueous solution. Broadly discussed is the “gold standard” shake-flask (SF method used to measure equilibrium solubility of ionizable drug-like molecules as a function of pH. Many factors affecting the quality of the measurement are recognized. Case studies illustrating the analysis of both solution and solid state aspects of solubility measurement are presented. Coverage includes drug aggregation in solution (sub-micellar, micellar, complexation, use of mass spectrometry to assess aggregation in saturated solutions, solid state characterization (salts, polymorphs, cocrystals, polymorph creation by potentiometric method, solubility type (water, buffer, intrinsic, temperature, ionic strength, pH measurement, buffer issues, critical knowledge of the pKa, equilibration time (stirring and sedimentation, separating solid from saturated solution, solution handling and adsorption to untreated surfaces, solubility units, and tabulation/graphic presentation of reported data. The goal is to present cohesive recommendations that could lead to better assay design, to result in improved quality of measurements, and to impart a deeper understanding of the underlying solution chemistry in suspensions of drug solids.

  6. Senior high school students’ need analysis of Three-Tier Multiple Choice (3TMC) diagnostic test about acid-base and solubility equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardiansah; Masykuri, M.; Rahardjo, S. B.

    2018-05-01

    Students’ conceptual understanding is the most important comprehension to obtain related comprehension. However, they held their own conception. With this need analysis, we will elicit student need of 3TMC diagnostic test to measure students’ conception about acid-base and solubility equilibrium. The research done by a mixed method using questionnaire analysis based on descriptive of quantitative and qualitative. The research subject was 96 students from 4 senior high schools and 4 chemistry teachers chosen by random sampling technique. Data gathering used a questionnaire with 10 questions for student and 28 questions for teachers. The results showed that 97% of students stated that the development this instrument is needed. In addition, there were several problems obtained in this questionnaire include learning activity, teacher’s test and guessing. In conclusion, this is necessary to develop the 3TMC instrument that can diagnose and measure the student’s conception in acid-base and solubility equilibrium.

  7. Metastable Equilibrium Solubility Distribution of Carbonated Apatite as a Function of Solution Composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhettry; Wang; Hsu; Fox; Baig; Barry; Zhuang; Otsuka; Higuchi

    1999-10-01

    Previous studies have shown that carbonated apatites (CAPs) exhibit the phenomenon of metastable equilibrium solubility (MES) in weak acid media. The purpose of the present investigation was to examine two questions: first, whether the MES concept is applicable to a broader range of solution conditions and, second, whether a driving force function associated with a surface complex having a constant stoichiometry governs the dissolution of CAP and, if so, what is this stoichiometry. CAP preparations with carbonate contents of 1.8-5.7 wt% (synthesized by hydrolysis of dicalcium phosphate anhydrate in solutions of varying bicarbonate levels or by direct precipitation from supersaturated calcium/phosphate/carbonate solutions) were studied as follows. MES distributions for each of the CAP preparations were determined by equilibrating the CAP under stirred conditions in a series of acetate buffers (0.10 M) containing various levels of calcium and phosphate in the pH range 4.5-6.5 and a solution calcium/phosphate ratio in the range 0.1-10. The amount dissolved in each instance was regarded as the fraction of the CAP possessing an MES value greater than that corresponding to the ion activity product (IAP) of the equilibrating solution. The solution IAPs were calculated from the solution compositions using plausible calcium phosphate stoichiometries, viz., dicalcium phosphate dihydrate, octacalcium phosphate, tricalcium phosphate, hydroxyapatite, carbonated apatite (based on the bulk composition of the particular CAP involved in the experiment), and tetracalcium phosphate. The fraction of CAP dissolved was plotted against the solution IAPs for each experimental set using each of the six assumed stoichiometries for the surface complex. The results demonstrated that the MES concept was applicable to all of the CAP preparations in media of various solution compositions and different pH levels. The most important new outcome of this study was that MES profiles for each of the

  8. Actinide solubility in deep groundwaters - estimates for upper limits based on chemical equilibrium calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schweingruber, M.

    1983-12-01

    A chemical equilibrium model is used to estimate maximum upper concentration limits for some actinides (Th, U, Np, Pu, Am) in groundwaters. Eh/pH diagrams for solubility isopleths, dominant dissolved species and limiting solids are constructed for fixed parameter sets including temperature, thermodynamic database, ionic strength and total concentrations of most important inorganic ligands (carbonate, fluoride, phosphate, sulphate, chloride). In order to assess conservative conditions, a reference water is defined with high ligand content and ionic strength, but without competing cations. In addition, actinide oxides and hydroxides are the only solid phases considered. Recommendations for 'safe' upper actinide solubility limits for deep groundwaters are derived from such diagrams, based on the predicted Eh/pH domain. The model results are validated as far as the scarce experimental data permit. (Auth.)

  9. Chasing equilibrium: measuring the intrinsic solubility of weak acids and bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Martin; Box, Karl

    2005-02-15

    A novel procedure is described for rapid (20-80 min) measurement of intrinsic solubility values of organic acids, bases, and ampholytes. In this procedure, a quantity of substance was first dissolved at a pH where it exists predominantly in its ionized form, and then a precipitate of the neutral (un-ionized) species was formed by changing the pH. Subsequently, the rate of change of pH due to precipitation or dissolution was monitored and strong acid and base titrant were added to adjust the pH to discover its equilibrium conditions, and the intrinsic solubility of the neutral form of the compound could then be determined. The procedure was applied to a variety of monoprotic and diprotic pharmaceutical compounds. The results were highly repeatable and had a good correlation to available published values. Data collected during the procedure provided good diagnostic information. Kinetic solubility data were also collected but provided a poor guide to the intrinsic solubility.

  10. Analysis Science Process Skills Content in Chemistry Textbooks Grade XI at Solubility and Solubility Product Concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bayu Antrakusuma

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to determine the analysis of science process skills in textbooks of chemistry grade XI in SMA N 1 Teras, Boyolali. This research used the descriptive method. The instruments were developed based on 10 indicators of science process skills (observing, classifying, finding a conclusion, predicting, raising the question, hypothesizing, planning an experiment, manipulating materials, and equipment, Applying, and communicating. We analyzed 3 different chemistry textbooks that often used by teachers in teaching. The material analyzed in the book was solubility and solubility product concept in terms of concept explanation and student activity. The results of this research showed different science process skill criteria in 3 different chemistry textbooks. Book A appeared 50% of all aspects of science process skills, in Book B appeared 80% of all aspects of science process skills, and in Book C there was 40% of all aspects of the science process skills. The most common indicator in all books was observing (33.3%, followed by prediction (19.05%, classifying (11.90%, Applying (11.90% , planning experiments (9.52%, manipulating materials and equipment (7.14%, finding conclusion (4.76%, communicating (2.38%. Asking the question and hypothesizing did not appear in textbooks.

  11. Minimizing the Free Energy: A Computer Method for Teaching Chemical Equilibrium Concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heald, Emerson F.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a computer method for teaching chemical equilibrium concepts using material balance conditions and the minimization of the free energy. Method for the calculation of chemical equilibrium, the computer program used to solve equilibrium problems and applications of the method are also included. (HM)

  12. Identification and Analysis of Student Conceptions Used To Solve Chemical Equilibrium Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voska, Kirk W.; Heikkinen, Henry W.

    2000-01-01

    Identifies and quantifies the chemistry conceptions used by students when solving chemical equilibrium problems requiring application of LeChatelier's Principle, and explores the feasibility of designing a paper and pencil test to accomplish these purposes. Eleven prevalent incorrect student conceptions about chemical equilibrium were identified…

  13. Effectiveness of Instruction Based on the Constructivist Approach on Understanding Chemical Equilibrium Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akkus, Huseyin; Kadayifci, Hakki; Atasoy, Basri; Geban, Omer

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify misconceptions concerning chemical equilibrium concepts and to investigate the effectiveness of instruction based on the constructivist approach over traditional instruction on 10th grade students' understanding of chemical equilibrium concepts. The subjects of this study consisted of 71 10th grade…

  14. Problems with the concept of plasma equilibrium in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carreras, B.A.

    1992-01-01

    The equilibrium condition for a magnetically confined plasma in normally formulated in terms of macroscopic equations. In these equations, the plasma pressure is assumed to be a function of the magnetic flux with continuous derivatives. However, in three- dimensional systems this is not necessarily the case. Here, we look at the case of an intrinsically three-dimensional realistic tokamak, and we discuss the possible interconnection between the equilibrium and anomalous transport

  15. Multi-Phase Equilibrium and Solubilities of Aromatic Compounds and Inorganic Compounds in Sub- and Supercritical Water: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qinli; Ding, Xin; Du, Bowen; Fang, Tao

    2017-11-02

    Supercritical water oxidation (SCWO), as a novel and efficient technology, has been applied to wastewater treatment processes. The use of phase equilibrium data to optimize process parameters can offer a theoretical guidance for designing SCWO processes and reducing the equipment and operating costs. In this work, high-pressure phase equilibrium data for aromatic compounds+water systems and inorganic compounds+water systems are given. Moreover, thermodynamic models, equations of state (EOS) and empirical and semi-empirical approaches are summarized and evaluated. This paper also lists the existing problems of multi-phase equilibria and solubility studies on aromatic compounds and inorganic compounds in sub- and supercritical water.

  16. Analysis of chemical concepts as the basic of virtual laboratory development and process science skills in solubility and solubility product subject

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syafrina, R.; Rohman, I.; Yuliani, G.

    2018-05-01

    This study aims to analyze the concept characteristics of solubility and solubility products that will serve as the basis for the development of virtual laboratory and students' science process skills. Characteristics of the analyzed concepts include concept definitions, concept attributes, and types of concepts. The concept analysis method uses concept analysis according to Herron. The results of the concept analysis show that there are twelve chemical concepts that become the prerequisite concept before studying the solubility and solubility and five core concepts that students must understand in the solubility and Solubility product. As many as 58.3% of the definitions of the concepts contained in high school textbooks support students' science process skills, the rest of the definition of the concept is memorized. Concept attributes that meet three levels of chemical representation and can be poured into a virtual laboratory have a percentage of 66.6%. Type of concept, 83.3% is a concept based on principle; and 16.6% concepts that state the process. Meanwhile, the science process skills that can be developed based on concept analysis are the ability to observe, calculate, measure, predict, interpret, hypothesize, apply, classify, and inference.

  17. A Teaching Sequence for Learning the Concept of Chemical Equilibrium in Secondary School Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghirardi, Marco; Marchetti, Fabio; Pettinari, Claudio; Regis, Alberto; Roletto, Ezio

    2014-01-01

    A novel didactic sequence is proposed for the teaching of chemical equilibrium. This teaching sequence takes into account the historical and epistemological evolution of the concept, the alternative conceptions and learning difficulties highlighted by teaching science and research in education, and the need to focus on both the students'…

  18. Resilience in ecotoxicology: Toward a multiple equilibrium concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bundschuh, Mirco; Schulz, Ralf; Schäfer, Ralf B; Allen, Craig R; Angeler, David G

    2017-10-01

    The term resilience describes stress-response patterns across scientific disciplines. In ecology, advances have been made to clearly define resilience based on underlying mechanistic assumptions. Engineering resilience (rebound) is used to describe the ability of organisms to recover from adverse conditions (disturbances), which is termed the rate of recovery. By contrast, the ecological resilience definition considers a systemic change, that is, when ecosystems reorganize into a new regime following disturbance. Under this new regime, structural and functional aspects change considerably relative to the previous regime, without recovery. In this context, resilience is an emergent property of complex systems. In the present study, we argue that both definitions and uses are appropriate in ecotoxicology, and although the differences are subtle, the implications and uses are profoundly different. We discuss resilience concepts in ecotoxicology, where the prevailing view of resilience is engineering resilience from chemical stress. Ecological resilience may also be useful for describing systemic ecological changes because of chemical stress. We present quantitative methods that allow ecotoxicologists and risk managers to assess whether an ecosystem faces an impending regime shift or whether it has already undergone such a shift. We contend that engineering and ecological resilience help to distinguish ecotoxicological responses to chemical stressors mechanistically and thus have implications for theory, policy, and application. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:2574-2580. © 2017 SETAC. © 2017 SETAC.

  19. Possibilities of application of perfect solution model to calculation of equilibrium composition of complex carbonitrides and their solubility in steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gol'dshtejn, M.I.; Popov, V.V.; Cheremnykh, V.G.

    1980-01-01

    Using the Fe-Nb-V-C-N and Fe-Ti-V-C-N systems' low carbon steels, the earlier suggested model of perfect solid solutions has been experimentally researched. Also studied has been the feasibility to calculate the composition of carbonitrides in steels by the derived equations, that comprise, as parameters, products of respective compounds' solubility and coefficients of components interaction in iron-based solid solutions. A conclusion is drawn that perfect solutions models may be used adequately for complex carbonitrides like Nbsub(p)Vsub(1-p)Csub(q)Nsub(1-q) and Tisub(p)Vsub(1-p)Csub(q)Nsub(1-q) during the calculations of their equilibrium composition and solubility in steels

  20. Strategies Reported Used by Instructors to Address Student Alternate Conceptions in Chemical Equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piquette, Jeff S.; Heikkinen, Henry W.

    2005-01-01

    This study explores general-chemistry instructors' awareness of and ability to identify and address common student learning obstacles in chemical equilibrium. Reported instructor strategies directed at remediating student alternate conceptions were investigated and compared with successful, literature-based conceptual change methods. Fifty-two…

  1. The Effectiveness of Conceptual Change Texts in Remediating High School Students' Alternative Conceptions Concerning Chemical Equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozmen, Haluk

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of conceptual change texts in remediating high school students' alternative conceptions concerning chemical equilibrium. A quasi-experimental design was used in this study. The subjects for this study consisted of a total 78 tenth-grade students, 38 of them in the experimental group and 40 of them in the…

  2. A thermodynamic data base for Tc to calculate equilibrium solubilities at temperatures up to 300 deg C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puigdomenech, I.; Bruno, J.

    1995-04-01

    Thermodynamic data has been selected for solids and aqueous species of technetium. Equilibrium constants have been calculated in the temperature range 0 to 300 deg C at a pressure of 1 bar for T r Cdeg pm values for mononuclear hydrolysis reactions. The formation constants for chloro complexes of Tc(V) and Tc(IV), whose existence is well established, have been estimated. The majority of entropy and heat capacity values in the data base have also been estimated, and therefore temperature extrapolations are largely based on estimations. The uncertainties derived from these calculations are described. Using the data base developed in this work, technetium solubilities have been calculated as a function of temperature for different chemical conditions. The implications for the mobility of Tc under nuclear repository conditions are discussed. 70 refs

  3. Solubility of oxygen in a seawater medium in equilibrium with a high-pressure oxy-helium atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, C D

    1979-06-01

    The molar oxygen concentration in a seawater medium in equilibrium with a high-pressure oxygen-helium atmosphere was measured directly in pressurized subsamples, using a modified version of the Winkler oxygen analysis. At a partial pressure of oxygen of 1 atm or less, its concentration in the aqueous phase was adequately described by Henry's Law at total pressures up to 600 atm. This phenomenon, which permits a straightforward determination of dissolved oxygen within hyperbaric systems, resulted from pressure-induced compensatory alterations in the Henry's Law variables rather than from a true obedience to the Ideal Gas Law. If the partial pressure of a gas contributes significantly to the hydrostatic pressure, Henry's Law is no longer adequate for determining its solubility within the compressed medium.

  4. Predicting the equilibrium solubility of solid polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and dibenzothiophene using a combination of MOSCED plus molecular simulation or electronic structure calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phifer, Jeremy R.; Cox, Courtney E.; da Silva, Larissa Ferreira; Nogueira, Gabriel Gonçalves; Barbosa, Ana Karolyne Pereira; Ley, Ryan T.; Bozada, Samantha M.; O'Loughlin, Elizabeth J.; Paluch, Andrew S.

    2017-06-01

    Methods to predict the equilibrium solubility of non-electrolyte solids are important for the design of novel separation processes. Here we demonstrate how conventional molecular simulation free energy calculations or electronic structure calculations in a continuum solvent, here SMD or SM8, can be used to predict parameters for the MOdified Separation of Cohesive Energy Density (MOSCED) method. The method is applied to the solutes naphthalene, anthracene, phenanthrene, pyrene and dibenzothiophene, compounds of interested to the petroleum industry and for environmental remediation. Adopting the melting point temperature and enthalpy of fusion of these compounds from experiment, we are able to predict equilibrium solubilities. Comparing to a total of 422 non-aqueous and 193 aqueous experimental solubilities, we find the proposed method is able to well correlate the data. The use of MOSCED is additionally advantageous as it is a solubility parameter-based method useful for intuitive solvent selection and formulation.

  5. Implementation of equilibrium aqueous speciation and solubility (EQ3 type) calculations into Cantera for electrolyte solutions.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moffat, Harry K.; Jove-Colon, Carlos F.

    2009-06-01

    In this report, we summarize our work on developing a production level capability for modeling brine thermodynamic properties using the open-source code Cantera. This implementation into Cantera allows for the application of chemical thermodynamics to describe the interactions between a solid and an electrolyte solution at chemical equilibrium. The formulations to evaluate the thermodynamic properties of electrolytes are based on Pitzer's model to calculate molality-based activity coefficients using a real equation-of-state (EoS) for water. In addition, the thermodynamic properties of solutes at elevated temperature and pressures are computed using the revised Helgeson-Kirkham-Flowers (HKF) EoS for ionic and neutral aqueous species. The thermodynamic data parameters for the Pitzer formulation and HKF EoS are from the thermodynamic database compilation developed for the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) used with the computer code EQ3/6. We describe the adopted equations and their implementation within Cantera and also provide several validated examples relevant to the calculations of extensive properties of electrolyte solutions.

  6. Temperature in and out of equilibrium: A review of concepts, tools and attempts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puglisi, A.; Sarracino, A.; Vulpiani, A.

    2017-11-01

    We review the general aspects of the concept of temperature in equilibrium and non-equilibrium statistical mechanics. Although temperature is an old and well-established notion, it still presents controversial facets. After a short historical survey of the key role of temperature in thermodynamics and statistical mechanics, we tackle a series of issues which have been recently reconsidered. In particular, we discuss different definitions and their relevance for energy fluctuations. The interest in such a topic has been triggered by the recent observation of negative temperatures in condensed matter experiments. Moreover, the ability to manipulate systems at the micro and nano-scale urges to understand and clarify some aspects related to the statistical properties of small systems (as the issue of temperature's ;fluctuations;). We also discuss the notion of temperature in a dynamical context, within the theory of linear response for Hamiltonian systems at equilibrium and stochastic models with detailed balance, and the generalized fluctuation-response relations, which provide a hint for an extension of the definition of temperature in far-from-equilibrium systems. To conclude we consider non-Hamiltonian systems, such as granular materials, turbulence and active matter, where a general theoretical framework is still lacking.

  7. Determination of Students' Alternative Conceptions about Chemical Equilibrium: A Review of Research and the Case of Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozmen, Haluk

    2008-01-01

    This study aims to determine prospective science student teachers' alternative conceptions of the chemical equilibrium concept. A 13-item pencil and paper, two-tier multiple choice diagnostic instrument, the Test to Identify Students' Alternative Conceptions (TISAC), was developed and administered to 90 second-semester science student teachers…

  8. Nanocrystals of medium soluble actives--novel concept for improved dermal delivery and production strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Xuezhen; Lademann, Jürgen; Keck, Cornelia M; Müller, Rainer H

    2014-08-15

    After use in oral pharmaceutical products, nanocrystals are meanwhile applied to improve the dermal penetration of cosmetic actives (e.g. rutin, hesperidin) and of drugs. By now, nanocrystals are only dermally applied made from poorly soluble actives. The novel concept is to formulate nanocrystals also from medium soluble actives, and to apply a dermal formulation containing additionally nanocrystals. The nanocrystals should act as fast dissolving depot, increase saturation solubility and especially accumulate in the hair follicles, to further increase skin penetration. Caffeine was used as model compound with relevance to market products, and a particular process was developed for the production of caffeine nanocrystals to overcome the supersaturation related effect of crystal growth and fiber formation - typical with medium soluble compounds. It is based on low energy milling (pearl milling) in combination with low dielectric constant dispersion media (water-ethanol or ethanol-propylene glycol mixtures) and optimal stabilizers. Most successful was Carbopol(®) 981 (e.g. 20% caffeine in ethanol-propylene glycol 3:7 with 2% Carbopol, w/w). Nanocrystals with varied sizes can now be produced in a controlled process e.g. 660 nm (optimal for hair follicle accumulation) to 250 nm (optimal for fast dissolution). The short term test proved stability over 2 months of the present formulation being sufficient to perform in vivo testing of the novel concept. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Student certainty answering misconception question: study of Three-Tier Multiple-Choice Diagnostic Test in Acid-Base and Solubility Equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardiansah; Masykuri, M.; Rahardjo, S. B.

    2018-04-01

    Students’ concept comprehension in three-tier multiple-choice diagnostic test related to student confidence level. The confidence level related to certainty and student’s self-efficacy. The purpose of this research was to find out students’ certainty in misconception test. This research was quantitative-qualitative research method counting students’ confidence level. The research participants were 484 students that were studying acid-base and equilibrium solubility subject. Data was collected using three-tier multiple-choice (3TMC) with thirty questions and students’ questionnaire. The findings showed that #6 item gives the highest misconception percentage and high student confidence about the counting of ultra-dilute solution’s pH. Other findings were that 1) the student tendency chosen the misconception answer is to increase over item number, 2) student certainty decreased in terms of answering the 3TMC, and 3) student self-efficacy and achievement were related each other in the research. The findings suggest some implications and limitations for further research.

  10. A thermodynamic data base for Tc to calculate equilibrium solubilities at temperatures up to 300 deg C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puigdomenech, I [Studsvik AB, Nykoeping (Sweden); Bruno, J [Intera Information Technologies SL, Cerdanyola (Spain)

    1995-04-01

    Thermodynamic data has been selected for solids and aqueous species of technetium. Equilibrium constants have been calculated in the temperature range 0 to 300 deg C at a pressure of 1 bar for T<100 deg C and at the steam saturated pressure at higher temperatures. For aqueous species, the revised Helgeson-Kirkham-Flowers model is used for temperature extrapolations. The data base contains a large amount of estimated data, and the methods used for these estimations are described in detail. A new equation is presented that allows the estimation of {Delta}{sub r}Cdeg{sub pm} values for mononuclear hydrolysis reactions. The formation constants for chloro complexes of Tc(V) and Tc(IV), whose existence is well established, have been estimated. The majority of entropy and heat capacity values in the data base have also been estimated, and therefore temperature extrapolations are largely based on estimations. The uncertainties derived from these calculations are described. Using the data base developed in this work, technetium solubilities have been calculated as a function of temperature for different chemical conditions. The implications for the mobility of Tc under nuclear repository conditions are discussed. 70 refs.

  11. Identification and analysis of student conceptions used to solve chemical equilibrium problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voska, Kirk William

    This study identified and quantified chemistry conceptions students use when solving chemical equilibrium problems requiring the application of Le Chatelier's principle, and explored the feasibility of designing a paper and pencil test for this purpose. It also demonstrated the utility of conditional probabilities to assess test quality. A 10-item pencil-and-paper, two-tier diagnostic instrument, the Test to Identify Student Conceptualizations (TISC) was developed and administered to 95 second-semester university general chemistry students after they received regular course instruction concerning equilibrium in homogeneous aqueous, heterogeneous aqueous, and homogeneous gaseous systems. The content validity of TISC was established through a review of TISC by a panel of experts; construct validity was established through semi-structured interviews and conditional probabilities. Nine students were then selected from a stratified random sample for interviews to validate TISC. The probability that TISC correctly identified an answer given by a student in an interview was p = .64, while the probability that TISC correctly identified a reason given by a student in an interview was p=.49. Each TISC item contained two parts. In the first part the student selected the correct answer to a problem from a set of four choices. In the second part students wrote reasons for their answer to the first part. TISC questions were designed to identify students' conceptions concerning the application of Le Chatelier's principle, the constancy of the equilibrium constant, K, and the effect of a catalyst. Eleven prevalent incorrect conceptions were identified. This study found students consistently selected correct answers more frequently (53% of the time) than they provided correct reasons (33% of the time). The association between student answers and respective reasons on each TISC item was quantified using conditional probabilities calculated from logistic regression coefficients. The

  12. Phase equilibrium of (CO2 + 1-aminopropyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide + water) electrolyte system and effects of aqueous medium on CO2 solubility: Experiment and modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Ying; Guo, Kaihua; Bi, Yin; Zhou, Lan

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Phase and chemical equilibrium data for (CO 2 + [APMIm]Br + H 2 O) electrolyte system. • A modified eNRTL model for CO 2 solubility in the amino-based IL aqueous solution. • Effects of aqueous medium on both chemical and physical dissolution of CO 2 . • The correlative coefficient, R s ∗ , for the Henry’s constant of the solution. • New parameters for the segments interaction and the chemical equilibrium constants. - Abstract: New experimental data for solubility of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) in the aqueous solution of 1-aminopropyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide ([APMIm]Br) with four different water mass fractions (0.559, 0.645, 0.765 and 0.858) at T = (278.15–348.15) K with an interval of T = 10 K and p = (0.1237–6.9143) MPa were presented. The electrolyte nonrandom two-liquid (eNRTL) model was modified to be applicable for an ionic liquid (IL) aqueous solution system, by introducing an idle factor β to illustrate the association effect of IL molecules. A solution Henry’s constant for CO 2 solubility in the IL aqueous solution was defined by introducing a correlative coefficient R s ∗ . The vapor-liquid phase equilibrium of the [APMIm]Br-H 2 O-CO 2 ternary system was successfully calculated with the modified eNRTL model. The chemical and physical mechanisms for the ionized CO 2 formation and the molecular CO 2 dissolved in the solution were identified. The effects of aqueous medium on both chemical and physical dissolution of CO 2 in the [APMIm]Br aqueous solution were studied, and a considerable enhancement of the solubility of CO 2 with increase of the water content in the solution was observed.

  13. The Effect of Cooperative Learning Approach Based on Conceptual Change Condition on Students' Understanding of Chemical Equilibrium Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgin, Ibrahim; Geban, Omer

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of the cooperative learning approach based on conceptual change conditions over traditional instruction on 10th grade students' conceptual understanding and achievement of computational problems related to chemical equilibrium concepts. The subjects of this study consisted of 87 tenth grade…

  14. Water-Soluble Dried Blood Spot in Protein Analysis: A Proof-of-Concept Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosting, Cecilie; Gjelstad, Astrid; Halvorsen, Trine Grønhaug

    2015-08-04

    In the present work human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) was used as a model protein in a proof-of-concept study combining water-soluble dried blood spot (DBS) material in liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS)-based protein analysis. A water-soluble material consisting of commercially available carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) was evaluated as sampling material for this purpose. The material dissolved readily at physiological pH. Different sample preparation methods were evaluated, and in the final method, 15 μL of whole blood was deposited and dried on CMC before the whole spot was dissolved prior to cleanup by immunoaffinity extraction, tryptic digest, and preconcentration by solid-phase extraction (SPE). The results indicated complete dissolution of hCG from the spots, acceptable limit of detection (LOD) (0.1 IU/mL), linearity (R(2) = 0.959), accuracy (16%), and precision (≤22%). Long-term stability (45 days) of hCG in dried spots at reduced temperatures (≤8 °C) was also demonstrated. The analyte recovery was comparable to the commercially available nonsolvable cellulose material (FTA DMPK-C card).

  15. Facilitating Conceptual Change in Understanding State of Matter and Solubility Concepts by Using 5E Learning Cycle Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceylan, Eren; Geban, Omer

    2009-01-01

    The main purpose of the study was to compare the effectiveness of 5E learning cycle model based instruction and traditionally designed chemistry instruction on 10th grade students' understanding of state of matter and solubility concepts. In this study, 119 tenth grade students from chemistry courses instructed by same teacher from an Anatolian…

  16. The Extended Generalized Cost Concept and its Application in Freight Transport and General Equilibrium Modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tavasszy, L.; Davydenko, I.; Ruijgrok, K.

    2009-01-01

    The integration of Spatial Equilibrium models and Freight transport network models is important to produce consistent scenarios for future freight transport demand. At various spatial scales, we see the changes in production, trade, logistics networking and transportation, being driven by

  17. Should Political Scientists Use the Self-Confirming Equilibrium Concept? Explaining the Choices of Cognitively Limited Actors

    OpenAIRE

    Lupia, Arthur; Zharinova, Natasha; Levine, Adam Seth

    2007-01-01

    Many claims about political behavior are based on implicit assumptions about human reasoning. One such assumption, that political actors think in complex and similar ways when assessing strategies, is nested within widely used game theoretic equilibrium concepts. Empirical research casts doubt on the validity of these assumptions in important cases. For example, the finding that some citizens expend limited cognitive energy to social concerns runs counter to the assumption that citizens (e.g....

  18. Study on Mixed Solvency Concept in Formulation Development of Aqueous Injection of Poorly Water Soluble Drug

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shailendra Singh Solanki

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present investigation, mixed-solvency approach has been applied for the enhancement of aqueous solubility of a poorly water- soluble drug, zaltoprofen (selected as a model drug, by making blends (keeping total concentrations 40% w/v, constant of selected water-soluble substances from among the hydrotropes (urea, sodium benzoate, sodium citrate, nicotinamide; water-soluble solids (PEG-4000, PEG-6000; and co-solvents (propylene glycol, glycerine, PEG-200, PEG-400, PEG-600. Aqueous solubility of drug in case of selected blends (12 blends ranged from 9.091 ± 0.011 mg/ml–43.055 ± 0.14 mg/ml (as compared to the solubility in distilled water 0.072 ± 0.012 mg/ml. The enhancement in the solubility of drug in a mixed solvent containing 10% sodium citrate, 5% sodium benzoate and 25 % S cosolvent (25% S cosolvent contains PEG200, PEG 400, PEG600, Glycerine and Propylene glycol was more than 600 fold. This proved a synergistic enhancement in solubility of a poorly water-soluble drug due to mixed cosolvent effect. Each solubilized product was characterized by ultraviolet and infrared techniques. Various properties of solution such as pH, viscosity, specific gravity and surface tension were studied. The developed formulation was studied for physical and chemical stability. This mixed solvency shall prove definitely a boon for pharmaceutical industries for the development of dosage form of poorly water soluble drugs.

  19. The Effect of a Conceptual Change Approach on Understanding of Students' Chemical Equilibrium Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atasoy, Basri; Akkus, Huseyin; Kadayifci, Hakki

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of a conceptual change approach over traditional instruction on tenth-grade students' conceptual achievement in understanding chemical equilibrium. The study was conducted in two classes of the same teacher with participation of a total of 44 tenth-grade students. In this study, a…

  20. Teaching the Concept of Gibbs Energy Minimization through Its Application to Phase-Equilibrium Calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Privat, Romain; Jaubert, Jean-Noe¨l; Berger, Etienne; Coniglio, Lucie; Lemaitre, Ce´cile; Meimaroglou, Dimitrios; Warth, Vale´rie

    2016-01-01

    Robust and fast methods for chemical or multiphase equilibrium calculation are routinely needed by chemical-process engineers working on sizing or simulation aspects. Yet, while industrial applications essentially require calculation tools capable of discriminating between stable and nonstable states and converging to nontrivial solutions,…

  1. Plutonium solubilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puigdomnech, I.; Bruno, J.

    1991-02-01

    Thermochemical data has been selected for plutonium oxide, hydroxide, carbonate and phosphate equilibria. Equilibrium constants have been evaluated in the temperature range 0 to 300 degrees C at a pressure of 1 bar to T≤100 degrees C and at the steam saturated pressure at higher temperatures. Measured solubilities of plutonium that are reported in the literature for laboratory experiments have been collected. Solubility data on oxides, hydroxides, carbonates and phosphates have been selected. No solubility data were found at temperatures higher than 60 degrees C. The literature solubility data have been compared with plutonium solubilities calculated with the EQ3/6 geochemical modelling programs, using the selected thermodynamic data for plutonium. (authors)

  2. Long-Chain Metabolites of Vitamin E: Metabolic Activation as a General Concept for Lipid-Soluble Vitamins?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Martin; Kluge, Stefan; Schmölz, Lisa; Wallert, Maria; Galli, Francesco; Birringer, Marc; Lorkowski, Stefan

    2018-01-12

    Vitamins E, A, D and K comprise the class of lipid-soluble vitamins. For vitamins A and D, a metabolic conversion of precursors to active metabolites has already been described. During the metabolism of vitamin E, the long-chain metabolites (LCMs) 13'-hydroxychromanol (13'-OH) and 13'-carboxychromanol (13'-COOH) are formed by oxidative modification of the side-chain. The occurrence of these metabolites in human serum indicates a physiological relevance. Indeed, effects of the LCMs on lipid metabolism, apoptosis, proliferation and inflammatory actions as well as tocopherol and xenobiotic metabolism have been shown. Interestingly, there are several parallels between the actions of the LCMs of vitamin E and the active metabolites of vitamin A and D. The recent findings that the LCMs exert effects different from that of their precursors support their putative role as regulatory metabolites. Hence, it could be proposed that the mode of action of the LCMs might be mediated by a mechanism similar to vitamin A and D metabolites. If the physiological relevance and this concept of action of the LCMs can be confirmed, a general concept of activation of lipid-soluble vitamins via their metabolites might be deduced.

  3. Neptunium (IV) oxalate solubility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luerkens, D.W.

    1983-07-01

    The equilibrium solubility of neptunium (IV) oxalate in nitric/oxalic acid solutions was determined at 22 0 C, 45 0 C, and 60 0 C. The concentrations of nitric/oxalic acid solutions represented a wide range of free oxalate ion concentration. A mathematical solubility model was developed which is based on the formation of the known complexes of neptunium (IV) oxalate. the solubility model uses a simplified concentration parameter which is proportional to the free oxalate ion concentration. The solubility model can be used to estimate the equilibrium solubility of neptunium (IV) oxalate over a wide range of oxalic and nitric acid concentrations at each temperature

  4. Strategic Equilibrium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Damme, E.E.C.

    2000-01-01

    An outcome in a noncooperative game is said to be self-enforcing, or a strategic equilibrium, if, whenever it is recommended to the players, no player has an incentive to deviate from it.This paper gives an overview of the concepts that have been proposed as formalizations of this requirement and of

  5. Maximin equilibrium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ismail, M.S.

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a new concept which extends von Neumann and Morgenstern's maximin strategy solution by incorporating `individual rationality' of the players. Maximin equilibrium, extending Nash's value approach, is based on the evaluation of the strategic uncertainty of the whole game. We show that

  6. Thin-layer voltammetry of soluble species on screen-printed electrodes: proof of concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botasini, S; Martí, A C; Méndez, E

    2016-10-17

    Thin-layer diffusion conditions were accomplished on screen-printed electrodes by placing a controlled-weight onto the cast solution and allowing for its natural spreading. The restricted diffusive conditions were assessed by cyclic voltammetry at low voltage scan rates and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The relationship between the weight exerted over the drop and the thin-layer thickness achieved was determined, in such a way that the simple experimental set-up designed for this work could be developed into a commercial device with variable control of the thin-layer conditions. The experimental results obtained resemble those reported for the voltammetric features of electroactive soluble species employing electrodes modified with carbon nanotubes or graphene layers, suggesting that the attainment of the benefits reported for these nanomaterials could be done simply by forcing the solution to spread over the screen-printed electrodic system to form a thin layer solution. The advantages of thin-layer voltammetry in the kinetic characterization of quasi-reversible and irreversible processes are highlighted.

  7. Definitions and Basic Concepts of Supply and Demand Analysis Used to Determine Market Equilibrium. Principles of Economics II (Microeconomics), Lesson Plan No. 6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu-Irion, Vicky

    Developed as part of a 37.5-hour microeconomics course, this lesson plan focuses on the concepts of supply and demand analysis used to determine market equilibrium. The objectives of the 50-minute lesson are to enable the student to: (1) explain how a demand schedule is derived from raw data; (2) graph a demand curve from the demand schedule; (3)…

  8. Equilibrium solubility of CO{sub 2} in aqueous solutions of 1-amino-2-propanol as function of concentration, temperature, and pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebolledo-Morales, Miguel Angel; Rebolledo-Libreros, Maria Esther [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Direccion de Investigacion y Posgrado, Programa de Ingenieria Molecular, Area de Investigacion de Termofisica, Eje Central Lazaro Cardenas Norte 152, 07730 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Trejo, Arturo, E-mail: atrejo@imp.m [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Direccion de Investigacion y Posgrado, Programa de Ingenieria Molecular, Area de Investigacion de Termofisica, Eje Central Lazaro Cardenas Norte 152, 07730 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2011-05-15

    Research highlights: Gas solubility of CO{sub 2} in aqueous solutions of 1-amino-2-propanol was measured. Solubility increases as pressure and concentration of 1-amino-2-propanol increase. The Kent-Eisenberg model was used to correlate all the experimental results. Aqueous solutions of MIPA are an excellent alternative to use in gas purification. - Abstract: Using a dynamic method with recirculation of the vapour phase, experimental values for the gas solubility of carbon dioxide in aqueous solutions of 1-amino-2-propanol (MIPA) were measured at T = (313.15 and 393.15) K, over the pressure range of (0.2 to 2436.4) kPa. The concentrations of the studied aqueous MIPA solutions were (0.20, 0.30, 0.40, and 0.50) mass fraction. The results of gas solubility are given as the partial pressure of CO{sub 2}, p{sub CO{sub 2}}, against its mole ratio, {alpha}{sub CO{sub 2}} (mol CO{sub 2} {center_dot} mol{sup -1} MIPA), and its mole fraction, x{sub CO{sub 2}}. It is observed that the solubility of CO{sub 2} increases as the concentration of MIPA in solution increases, at a given temperature throughout the pressure range considered; also the solubility values increase, under constant temperature, as the pressure increases in the studied concentration range of MIPA. The physicochemical model of Kent and Eisenberg was used to correlate simultaneously all the experimental results of the solubility of CO{sub 2} in the studied aqueous solutions of MIPA. The model correlates satisfactorily the experimental results. The deviation for pressure was 96.9 kPa using 62 experimental solubility points. The solubility results of carbon dioxide presented in this work are compared with those reported in the literature for aqueous solutions of monoethanolamine (MEA), diethanolamine (DEA), diisopropanolamine (DIPA), and N-methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) and it is possible to conclude that the aqueous solutions of MIPA are an excellent alternative to use in gas purification processes, since the

  9. Reviewing Some Crucial Concepts of Gibbs Energy in Chemical Equilibrium Using a Computer-Assisted, Guided-Problem-Solving Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borge, Javier

    2015-01-01

    G, G°, [delta][subscript r]G, [delta][subscript r]G°, [delta]G, and [delta]G° are essential quantities to master the chemical equilibrium. Although the number of publications devoted to explaining these items is extremely high, it seems that they do not produce the desired effect because some articles and textbooks are still being written with…

  10. Equilibrium Total Pressure and CO2 Solubility in Binary and Ternary Aqueous Solutions of 2-(Diethylamino)ethanol (DEEA) and 3-(Methylamino)propylamine (MAPA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waseem Arshad, Muhammad; Svendsen, Hallvard Fjøsne; Fosbøl, Philip Loldrup

    2014-01-01

    Equilibrium total pressures were measured and equilibrium CO2 partial pressures were calculated from the measured total pressure data in binary and ternary aqueous solutions of 2-(diethylamino)ethanol (DEEA) and 3-(methylamino)propylamine (MAPA). The measurements were carried out in a commercially...... available calorimeter used as an equilibrium cell. The examined systems were the binary aqueous solutions of 5 M DEEA, 2 M MAPA, and 1 M MAPA and the ternary aqueous mixtures of 5 M DEEA + 2 M MAPA (5D2M) and 5 M DEEA + 1 M MAPA (5D1M), which gave liquid–liquid phase split upon CO2 absorption. The total...... pressures were measured and the CO2 partial pressures were calculated as a function of CO2 loading at three different temperatures 40 °C, 80 °C, and 120 °C. All experiments were reproduced with good repeatability. The measurements were carried out for 30 mass % MEA solutions to validate the experimental...

  11. Fall Back Equilibrium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleppe, J.; Borm, P.E.M.; Hendrickx, R.L.P.

    2008-01-01

    Fall back equilibrium is a refinement of the Nash equilibrium concept. In the underly- ing thought experiment each player faces the possibility that, after all players decided on their action, his chosen action turns out to be blocked. Therefore, each player has to decide beforehand on a back-up

  12. MO-E-17A-06: Organ Dose in Abdomen-Pelvis CT: Does TG 111 Equilibrium Dose Concept Better Accounts for KVp Dependence Than Conventional CTDI?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, X; Morgan, A; Davros, W; Dong, F; Primak, A; Segars, W

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: In CT imaging, a desirable quality assurance (QA) dose quantity should account for the dose variability across scan parameters and scanner models. Recently, AAPM TG 111 proposed to use equilibrium dose-pitch product, in place of CT dose index (CTDI100), for scan modes involving table translation. The purpose of this work is to investigate whether this new concept better accounts for the kVp dependence of organ dose than the conventional CTDI concept. Methods: The adult reference female extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) phantom was used for this study. A Monte Carlo program developed and validated for a 128-slice CT system (Definition Flash, Siemens Healthcare) was used to simulate organ dose for abdomenpelvis scans at five tube voltages (70, 80, 100, 120, 140 kVp) with a pitch of 0.8 and a detector configuration of 2x64x0.6 mm. The same Monte Carlo program was used to simulate CTDI100 and equilibrium dose-pitch product. For both metrics, the central and peripheral values were used together with helical pitch to calculate a volume-weighted average, i.e., CTDIvol and (Deq)vol, respectively. Results: While other scan parameters were kept constant, organ dose depended strongly on kVp; the coefficient of variation (COV) across the five kVp values ranged between 70–75% for liver, spleen, stomach, pancreas, kidneys, colon, small intestine, bladder, and ovaries, all of which were inside the primary radiation beam. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) for the effect of kVp was highly significant (p=3e−30). When organ dose was normalized by CTDIvol, the COV across the five kVp values reduced to 7–16%. The effect of kVp was still highly significant (p=4e−4). When organ dose was normalized by (Deq)vol, the COV further reduced to 4−12%. The effect of kVp was borderline significant (p=0.04). Conclusion: In abdomen-pelvis CT, TG 111 equilibrium dose concept better accounts for kVp dependence than the conventional CTDI. This work is supported by a faculty startup

  13. MO-E-17A-06: Organ Dose in Abdomen-Pelvis CT: Does TG 111 Equilibrium Dose Concept Better Accounts for KVp Dependence Than Conventional CTDI?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, X [Cleveland State University, Cleveland, OH (United States); Morgan, A; Davros, W [Cleveland State University, Cleveland, OH (United States); Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Dong, F [Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Primak, A [Siemens Medical Solutions USA, Inc. (United States); Segars, W [Duke University, Durham, NC (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: In CT imaging, a desirable quality assurance (QA) dose quantity should account for the dose variability across scan parameters and scanner models. Recently, AAPM TG 111 proposed to use equilibrium dose-pitch product, in place of CT dose index (CTDI100), for scan modes involving table translation. The purpose of this work is to investigate whether this new concept better accounts for the kVp dependence of organ dose than the conventional CTDI concept. Methods: The adult reference female extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) phantom was used for this study. A Monte Carlo program developed and validated for a 128-slice CT system (Definition Flash, Siemens Healthcare) was used to simulate organ dose for abdomenpelvis scans at five tube voltages (70, 80, 100, 120, 140 kVp) with a pitch of 0.8 and a detector configuration of 2x64x0.6 mm. The same Monte Carlo program was used to simulate CTDI100 and equilibrium dose-pitch product. For both metrics, the central and peripheral values were used together with helical pitch to calculate a volume-weighted average, i.e., CTDIvol and (Deq)vol, respectively. Results: While other scan parameters were kept constant, organ dose depended strongly on kVp; the coefficient of variation (COV) across the five kVp values ranged between 70–75% for liver, spleen, stomach, pancreas, kidneys, colon, small intestine, bladder, and ovaries, all of which were inside the primary radiation beam. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) for the effect of kVp was highly significant (p=3e−30). When organ dose was normalized by CTDIvol, the COV across the five kVp values reduced to 7–16%. The effect of kVp was still highly significant (p=4e−4). When organ dose was normalized by (Deq)vol, the COV further reduced to 4−12%. The effect of kVp was borderline significant (p=0.04). Conclusion: In abdomen-pelvis CT, TG 111 equilibrium dose concept better accounts for kVp dependence than the conventional CTDI. This work is supported by a faculty startup

  14. Experimental determination of magnesia and silica solubilities in graphite-saturated and redox-buffered high-pressure COH fluids in equilibrium with forsterite + enstatite and magnesite + enstatite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiraboschi, Carla; Tumiati, Simone; Sverjensky, Dimitri; Pettke, Thomas; Ulmer, Peter; Poli, Stefano

    2018-01-01

    We experimentally investigated the dissolution of forsterite, enstatite and magnesite in graphite-saturated COH fluids, synthesized using a rocking piston cylinder apparatus at pressures from 1.0 to 2.1 GPa and temperatures from 700 to 1200 °C. Synthetic forsterite, enstatite, and nearly pure natural magnesite were used as starting materials. Redox conditions were buffered by Ni-NiO-H2O (ΔFMQ = - 0.21 to - 1.01), employing a double-capsule setting. Fluids, binary H2O-CO2 mixtures at the P, T, and fO2 conditions investigated, were generated from graphite, oxalic acid anhydrous (H2C2O4) and water. Their dissolved solute loads were analyzed through an improved version of the cryogenic technique, which takes into account the complexities associated with the presence of CO2-bearing fluids. The experimental data show that forsterite + enstatite solubility in H2O-CO2 fluids is higher compared to pure water, both in terms of dissolved silica ( mSiO2 = 1.24 mol/kgH2O versus mSiO2 = 0.22 mol/kgH2O at P = 1 GPa, T = 800 °C) and magnesia ( mMgO = 1.08 mol/kgH2O versus mMgO = 0.28 mol/kgH2O) probably due to the formation of organic C-Mg-Si complexes. Our experimental results show that at low temperature conditions, a graphite-saturated H2O-CO2 fluid interacting with a simplified model mantle composition, characterized by low MgO/SiO2 ratios, would lead to the formation of significant amounts of enstatite if solute concentrations are equal, while at higher temperatures these fluid, characterized by MgO/SiO2 ratios comparable with that of olivine, would be less effective in metasomatizing the surrounding rocks. However, the molality of COH fluids increases with pressure and temperature, and quintuplicates with respect to the carbon-free aqueous fluids. Therefore, the amount of fluid required to metasomatize the mantle decreases in the presence of carbon at high P- T conditions. COH fluids are thus effective carriers of C, Mg and Si in the mantle wedge up to the shallowest

  15. Equilibrium models and variational inequalities

    CERN Document Server

    Konnov, Igor

    2007-01-01

    The concept of equilibrium plays a central role in various applied sciences, such as physics (especially, mechanics), economics, engineering, transportation, sociology, chemistry, biology and other fields. If one can formulate the equilibrium problem in the form of a mathematical model, solutions of the corresponding problem can be used for forecasting the future behavior of very complex systems and, also, for correcting the the current state of the system under control. This book presents a unifying look on different equilibrium concepts in economics, including several models from related sciences.- Presents a unifying look on different equilibrium concepts and also the present state of investigations in this field- Describes static and dynamic input-output models, Walras, Cassel-Wald, spatial price, auction market, oligopolistic equilibrium models, transportation and migration equilibrium models- Covers the basics of theory and solution methods both for the complementarity and variational inequality probl...

  16. A comparative study of the metastable equilibrium solubility behavior of high-crystallinity and low-crystallinity carbonated apatites using pH and solution strontium as independent variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heslop, D D; Bi, Y; Baig, A A; Otsuka, M; Higuchi, W I

    2005-09-01

    Using solution strontium and pH as independent variables, the metastable equilibrium solubility (MES) behavior of two carbonated apatite (CAP) samples has been examined, a high-crystallinity CAP (properties expected to be similar to dental enamel) and a low-crystallinity CAP (properties expected to be similar to bone mineral). CAP samples were prepared by precipitation/digestion: (CAP A: high-crystallinity, 1.3 wt% CO3, synthesized at 85 degrees C; CAP B: low-crystallinity, 6.4 wt% CO3, synthesized at 50 degrees C). Baseline MES distributions were determined in a series of 0.1 M acetate buffers containing only calcium and phosphate (no strontium) over a broad range of solution conditions. To assess the influence of strontium, MES profiles were determined in a similar fashion with 20, 40, 60, and 80% of the solution calcium being replaced on an equal molar basis by solution strontium. To determine the correct function governing CAP dissolution, ion activity products (IAPs) were calculated from the compositions of buffer solutions based on the hydroxyapatite template (Ca(10-n)Sr(n)(PO4)6(OH)2 (n = 0-10)) and the calcium/hydroxide deficient hydroxyapatite template (Ca(9-n)Sr(n)(HPO4)(PO4)5OH (n = 0-9)). (a) for CAP A, at high solution strontium/calcium ratios, the MES profiles were essentially superimposable when the solution IAPs were calculated using the stoichiometry of Ca6Sr4(PO4)6(OH)2 and for CAP B by a stoichiometry of Ca7Sr2(HPO4)(PO4)5OH; (b) for CAP A, at low strontium/calcium ratios, the stoichiometry yielding MES data superpositioning was found to be that of hydroxyapatite and for CAP B, that of calcium/hydroxide deficient hydroxyapatite. When other stoichiometries were assumed, good superpositioning of the data was not possible.

  17. Mental Equilibrium and Rational Emotions

    OpenAIRE

    Eyal Winter; Ignacio Garcia-Jurado; Jose Mendez-Naya; Luciano Mendez-Naya

    2009-01-01

    We introduce emotions into an equilibrium notion. In a mental equilibrium each player "selects" an emotional state which determines the player's preferences over the outcomes of the game. These preferences typically differ from the players' material preferences. The emotional states interact to play a Nash equilibrium and in addition each player's emotional state must be a best response (with respect to material preferences) to the emotional states of the others. We discuss the concept behind...

  18. Solubility of Carbon in Nanocrystalline -Iron

    OpenAIRE

    Alexander Kirchner; Bernd Kieback

    2012-01-01

    A thermodynamic model for nanocrystalline interstitial alloys is presented. The equilibrium solid solubility of carbon in -iron is calculated for given grain size. Inside the strained nanograins local variation of the carbon content is predicted. Due to the nonlinear relation between strain and solubility, the averaged solubility in the grain interior increases with decreasing grain size. The majority of the global solubility enhancement is due to grain boundary enrichment however. Therefor...

  19. Local equilibrium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1984-12-15

    From 3-6 September the First International Workshop on Local Equilibrium in Strong Interaction Physics took place in Bad-Honnef at the Physics Centre of the German Physical Society. A number of talks covered the experimental and theoretical investigation of the 'hotspots' effect, both in high energy particle physics and in intermediate energy nuclear physics.

  20. Equilibrium Dialysis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    context of antimicrobial therapy in malnutrition. Dialysis has in the past presented technical problems, being complicated and time-consuming. A new dialysis system based on the equilibrium technique has now become available, and it is the principles and practical application of this apparatus (Kontron Diapack; Kontron.

  1. The Conceptual Change Approach to Teaching Chemical Equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canpolat, Nurtac; Pinarbasi, Tacettin; Bayrakceken, Samih; Geban, Omer

    2006-01-01

    This study investigates the effect of a conceptual change approach over traditional instruction on students' understanding of chemical equilibrium concepts (e.g. dynamic nature of equilibrium, definition of equilibrium constant, heterogeneous equilibrium, qualitative interpreting of equilibrium constant, changing the reaction conditions). This…

  2. Sweatshop equilibrium

    OpenAIRE

    Chau, Nancy H.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a capability-augmented model of on the job search, in which sweatshop conditions stifle the capability of the working poor to search for a job while on the job. The augmented setting unveils a sweatshop equilibrium in an otherwise archetypal Burdett-Mortensen economy, and reconciles a number of oft noted yet perplexing features of sweatshop economies. We demonstrate existence of multiple rational expectation equilibria, graduation pathways out of sweatshops in complete abs...

  3. Understanding Thermal Equilibrium through Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathare, Shirish; Huli, Saurabhee; Nachane, Madhura; Ladage, Savita; Pradhan, Hemachandra

    2015-01-01

    Thermal equilibrium is a basic concept in thermodynamics. In India, this concept is generally introduced at the first year of undergraduate education in physics and chemistry. In our earlier studies (Pathare and Pradhan 2011 "Proc. episteme-4 Int. Conf. to Review Research on Science Technology and Mathematics Education" pp 169-72) we…

  4. Theoretical Studies of Aqueous Systems above 25 deg C. 1. Fundamental Concepts for Equilibrium Diagrams and some General Features of the Water System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Derek

    1971-09-15

    The illustration of thermodynamic data on aqueous systems is discussed and diagrams are described that are useful for bringing together the large numbers of data that are relevant to technological problems such as corrosion, mass-transport and deposition. Two kinds of logarithmic equilibrium diagram are particularly useful, namely, diagrams depicting the variation with pH or pe of the concentrations of ionic species relative to that of a chosen reference ion and diagrams depicting the fields of conditions of pH and pe in which the various species in any given system predominate or are stable. Such diagrams clearly and concisely illustrate the data and greatly simplify the comparison of the states of a system at different temperatures. Estimates of the equilibrium constants for the redox and the acid-base dissociation of water up to 375 C are reported and some general features of aqueous systems at elevated temperatures are discussed

  5. Equilibrium Trust

    OpenAIRE

    Luca Anderlini; Daniele Terlizzese

    2009-01-01

    We build a simple model of trust as an equilibrium phenomenon, departing from standard "selfish" preferences in a minimal way. Agents who are on the receiving end of an other to transact can choose whether to cheat and take away the entire surplus, taking into account a "cost of cheating." The latter has an idiosyncratic component (an agent's type), and a socially determined one. The smaller the mass of agents who cheat, the larger the cost of cheating suffered by those who cheat. Depending o...

  6. An introduction to equilibrium thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Morrill, Bernard; Hartnett, James P; Hughes, William F

    1973-01-01

    An Introduction to Equilibrium Thermodynamics discusses classical thermodynamics and irreversible thermodynamics. It introduces the laws of thermodynamics and the connection between statistical concepts and observable macroscopic properties of a thermodynamic system. Chapter 1 discusses the first law of thermodynamics while Chapters 2 through 4 deal with statistical concepts. The succeeding chapters describe the link between entropy and the reversible heat process concept of entropy; the second law of thermodynamics; Legendre transformations and Jacobian algebra. Finally, Chapter 10 provides a

  7. Non-equilibrium phase transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Henkel, Malte; Lübeck, Sven

    2009-01-01

    This book describes two main classes of non-equilibrium phase-transitions: (a) static and dynamics of transitions into an absorbing state, and (b) dynamical scaling in far-from-equilibrium relaxation behaviour and ageing. The first volume begins with an introductory chapter which recalls the main concepts of phase-transitions, set for the convenience of the reader in an equilibrium context. The extension to non-equilibrium systems is made by using directed percolation as the main paradigm of absorbing phase transitions and in view of the richness of the known results an entire chapter is devoted to it, including a discussion of recent experimental results. Scaling theories and a large set of both numerical and analytical methods for the study of non-equilibrium phase transitions are thoroughly discussed. The techniques used for directed percolation are then extended to other universality classes and many important results on model parameters are provided for easy reference.

  8. Equilibrium thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    de Oliveira, Mário J

    2017-01-01

    This textbook provides an exposition of equilibrium thermodynamics and its applications to several areas of physics with particular attention to phase transitions and critical phenomena. The applications include several areas of condensed matter physics and include also a chapter on thermochemistry. Phase transitions and critical phenomena are treated according to the modern development of the field, based on the ideas of universality and on the Widom scaling theory. For each topic, a mean-field or Landau theory is presented to describe qualitatively the phase transitions. These theories include the van der Waals theory of the liquid-vapor transition, the Hildebrand-Heitler theory of regular mixtures, the Griffiths-Landau theory for multicritical points in multicomponent systems, the Bragg-Williams theory of order-disorder in alloys, the Weiss theory of ferromagnetism, the Néel theory of antiferromagnetism, the Devonshire theory for ferroelectrics and Landau-de Gennes theory of liquid crystals. This new edit...

  9. Fundamental Research in Engineering Education. Development of Concept Questions and Inquiry-Based Activities in Thermodynamics and Heat Transfer: An Example for Equilibrium vs. Steady-State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigeant, Margot; Prince, Michael; Nottis, Katharyn

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the use of inquiry-based instruction to promote the understanding of critical concepts in thermodynamics and heat transfer. Significant research shows that students frequently enter our courses with tightly held misconceptions about the physical world that are not effectively addressed through traditional instruction. Students'…

  10. Breaking the Double-Edged Sword of Effort/Trying Hard: Developmental Equilibrium and Longitudinal Relations among Effort, Achievement, and Academic Self-Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Herbert W.; Pekrun, Reinhard; Lichtenfeld, Stephanie; Guo, Jiesi; Arens, A. Katrin; Murayama, Kou

    2016-01-01

    Ever since the classic research of Nicholls (1976) and others, effort has been recognized as a double-edged sword: while it might enhance achievement, it undermines academic self-concept (ASC). However, there has not been a thorough evaluation of the longitudinal reciprocal effects of effort, ASC, and achievement, in the context of modern…

  11. Non-equilibrium thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    De Groot, Sybren Ruurds

    1984-01-01

    The study of thermodynamics is especially timely today, as its concepts are being applied to problems in biology, biochemistry, electrochemistry, and engineering. This book treats irreversible processes and phenomena - non-equilibrium thermodynamics.S. R. de Groot and P. Mazur, Professors of Theoretical Physics, present a comprehensive and insightful survey of the foundations of the field, providing the only complete discussion of the fluctuating linear theory of irreversible thermodynamics. The application covers a wide range of topics: the theory of diffusion and heat conduction, fluid dyn

  12. Reaction paths and equilibrium end-points in solid-solution aqueous-solution systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glynn, P.D.; Reardon, E.J.; Plummer, Niel; Busenberg, E.

    1990-01-01

    Equations are presented describing equilibrium in binary solid-solution aqueous-solution (SSAS) systems after a dissolution, precipitation, or recrystallization process, as a function of the composition and relative proportion of the initial phases. Equilibrium phase diagrams incorporating the concept of stoichiometric saturation are used to interpret possible reaction paths and to demonstrate relations between stoichiometric saturation, primary saturation, and thermodynamic equilibrium states. The concept of stoichiometric saturation is found useful in interpreting and putting limits on dissolution pathways, but there currently is no basis for possible application of this concept to the prediction and/ or understanding of precipitation processes. Previously published dissolution experiments for (Ba, Sr)SO4 and (Sr, Ca)C??O3orth. solids are interpreted using equilibrium phase diagrams. These studies show that stoichiometric saturation can control, or at least influence, initial congruent dissolution pathways. The results for (Sr, Ca)CO3orth. solids reveal that stoichiometric saturation can also control the initial stages of incongruent dissolution, despite the intrinsic instability of some of the initial solids. In contrast, recrystallisation experiments in the highly soluble KCl-KBr-H2O system demonstrate equilibrium. The excess free energy of mixing calculated for K(Cl, Br) solids is closely modeled by the relation GE = ??KBr??KClRT[a0 + a1(2??KBr-1)], where a0 is 1.40 ?? 0.02, a1, is -0.08 ?? 0.03 at 25??C, and ??KBr and ??KCl are the mole fractions of KBr and KCl in the solids. The phase diagram constructed using this fit reveals an alyotropic maximum located at ??KBr = 0.676 and at a total solubility product, ???? = [K+]([Cl-] + [Br-]) = 15.35. ?? 1990.

  13. On the local equilibrium condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hessling, H.

    1994-11-01

    A physical system is in local equilibrium if it cannot be distinguished from a global equilibrium by ''infinitesimally localized measurements''. This should be a natural characterization of local equilibrium, but the problem is to give a precise meaning to the qualitative phrase ''infinitesimally localized measurements''. A solution is suggested in form of a Local Equilibrium Condition (LEC), which can be applied to linear relativistic quantum field theories but not directly to selfinteracting quantum fields. The concept of local temperature resulting from LEC is compared to an old approach to local temperature based on the principle of maximal entropy. It is shown that the principle of maximal entropy does not always lead to physical states if it is applied to relativistic quantum field theories. (orig.)

  14. Nash equilibrium with lower probabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groes, Ebbe; Jacobsen, Hans Jørgen; Sloth, Birgitte

    1998-01-01

    We generalize the concept of Nash equilibrium in mixed strategies for strategic form games to allow for ambiguity in the players' expectations. In contrast to other contributions, we model ambiguity by means of so-called lower probability measures or belief functions, which makes it possible...

  15. Uranyl Oxalate Solubility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leturcq, G.; Costenoble, S.; Grandjean, S. [CEA Marcoule DEN/DRCP/SCPS/LCA - BP17171 - 30207 Bagnols sur Ceze cedex (France)

    2008-07-01

    The solubility of uranyl oxalate was determined at ambient temperature by precipitation in oxalic-nitric solutions, using an initial uranyl concentration of 0.1 mol/L. Oxalic concentration varied from 0.075 to 0.3 mol/L while nitric concentration ranged between 0.75 and 3 mol/L. Dissolution tests, using complementary oxalic-nitric media, were carried out for 550 hours in order to study the kinetic to reach thermodynamic equilibrium. Similar solubility values were reached by dissolution and precipitation. Using the results, it was possible to draw the solubility surface versus oxalic and nitric concentrations and to determine both the apparent solubility constant of UO{sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4}, 3H{sub 2}O (Ks) and the apparent formation constant of the first uranyl-oxalate complex UO{sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4} (log {beta}1), for ionic strengths varying between 1 and 3 mol/L. Ks and log {beta}1 values were found to vary from 1.9 10{sup -8} to 9.2 10{sup -9} and from 5.95 to 6.06, respectively, when ionic strength varied from 1 to 3 mol/L. A second model may fit our data obtained at an ionic strength of 3 mol/L suggesting as reported by Moskvin et al. (1959) that no complexes are formed for [H{sup +}] at 3 M. The Ks value would then be 1.3 10{sup -8}. (authors)

  16. Six-dimensional muon beam cooling using a homogeneous absorber: Concepts, beam dynamics, cooling decrements, and equilibrium emittances in a helical dipole channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaroslav Derbenev

    2005-04-01

    describing six-dimensional cooling in this channel are also derived, including explicit expressions for cooling decrements and equilibrium emittances.

  17. Accelerating Multiagent Reinforcement Learning by Equilibrium Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yujing; Gao, Yang; An, Bo

    2015-07-01

    An important approach in multiagent reinforcement learning (MARL) is equilibrium-based MARL, which adopts equilibrium solution concepts in game theory and requires agents to play equilibrium strategies at each state. However, most existing equilibrium-based MARL algorithms cannot scale due to a large number of computationally expensive equilibrium computations (e.g., computing Nash equilibria is PPAD-hard) during learning. For the first time, this paper finds that during the learning process of equilibrium-based MARL, the one-shot games corresponding to each state's successive visits often have the same or similar equilibria (for some states more than 90% of games corresponding to successive visits have similar equilibria). Inspired by this observation, this paper proposes to use equilibrium transfer to accelerate equilibrium-based MARL. The key idea of equilibrium transfer is to reuse previously computed equilibria when each agent has a small incentive to deviate. By introducing transfer loss and transfer condition, a novel framework called equilibrium transfer-based MARL is proposed. We prove that although equilibrium transfer brings transfer loss, equilibrium-based MARL algorithms can still converge to an equilibrium policy under certain assumptions. Experimental results in widely used benchmarks (e.g., grid world game, soccer game, and wall game) show that the proposed framework: 1) not only significantly accelerates equilibrium-based MARL (up to 96.7% reduction in learning time), but also achieves higher average rewards than algorithms without equilibrium transfer and 2) scales significantly better than algorithms without equilibrium transfer when the state/action space grows and the number of agents increases.

  18. Correlation of Helium Solubility in Liquid Nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanDresar, Neil T.; Zimmerli, Gregory A.

    2012-01-01

    A correlation has been developed for the equilibrium mole fraction of soluble gaseous helium in liquid nitrogen as a function of temperature and pressure. Experimental solubility data was compiled and provided by National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). Data from six sources was used to develop a correlation within the range of 0.5 to 9.9 MPa and 72.0 to 119.6 K. The relative standard deviation of the correlation is 6.9 percent.

  19. Conceptual Integration of Chemical Equilibrium by Prospective Physical Sciences Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganaras, Kostas; Dumon, Alain; Larcher, Claudine

    2008-01-01

    This article describes an empirical study concerning the mastering of the chemical equilibrium concept by prospective physical sciences teachers. The main objective was to check whether the concept of chemical equilibrium had become an integrating and unifying concept for them, that is to say an operational and functional knowledge to explain and…

  20. Equilibrium Droplets on Deformable Substrates: Equilibrium Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koursari, Nektaria; Ahmed, Gulraiz; Starov, Victor M

    2018-05-15

    Equilibrium conditions of droplets on deformable substrates are investigated, and it is proven using Jacobi's sufficient condition that the obtained solutions really provide equilibrium profiles of both the droplet and the deformed support. At the equilibrium, the excess free energy of the system should have a minimum value, which means that both necessary and sufficient conditions of the minimum should be fulfilled. Only in this case, the obtained profiles provide the minimum of the excess free energy. The necessary condition of the equilibrium means that the first variation of the excess free energy should vanish, and the second variation should be positive. Unfortunately, the mentioned two conditions are not the proof that the obtained profiles correspond to the minimum of the excess free energy and they could not be. It is necessary to check whether the sufficient condition of the equilibrium (Jacobi's condition) is satisfied. To the best of our knowledge Jacobi's condition has never been verified for any already published equilibrium profiles of both the droplet and the deformable substrate. A simple model of the equilibrium droplet on the deformable substrate is considered, and it is shown that the deduced profiles of the equilibrium droplet and deformable substrate satisfy the Jacobi's condition, that is, really provide the minimum to the excess free energy of the system. To simplify calculations, a simplified linear disjoining/conjoining pressure isotherm is adopted for the calculations. It is shown that both necessary and sufficient conditions for equilibrium are satisfied. For the first time, validity of the Jacobi's condition is verified. The latter proves that the developed model really provides (i) the minimum of the excess free energy of the system droplet/deformable substrate and (ii) equilibrium profiles of both the droplet and the deformable substrate.

  1. A Colorful Solubility Exercise for Organic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shugrue, Christopher R.; Mentzen, Hans H., II; Linton, Brian R.

    2015-01-01

    A discovery chemistry laboratory has been developed for the introductory organic chemistry student to investigate the concepts of polarity, miscibility, solubility, and density. The simple procedure takes advantage of the solubility of two colored dyes in a series of solvents or solvent mixtures, and the diffusion of colors can be easily…

  2. Pure Phase Solubility Limits: LANL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    C. Stockman

    2001-01-01

    concentration in the aqueous phase is controlled by the radionuclide-bearing solid phase and by the complexation reactions with ligands present in solution. Meaningful and acceptable thermodynamic data resulting from solubility and speciation data should meet the following criteria: (1) Approach to equilibrium from both under- and over-saturation; (2) Accurate determinations of solution concentrations; (3) Well-characterized solubility controlling solid phase; and (4) Knowledge of the nature (oxidation state, coordination environment) of the species involved in the equilibrium reactions under consideration

  3. Pure Phase Solubility Limits: LANL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. Stockman

    2001-01-26

    concentration in the aqueous phase is controlled by the radionuclide-bearing solid phase and by the complexation reactions with ligands present in solution. Meaningful and acceptable thermodynamic data resulting from solubility and speciation data should meet the following criteria: (1) Approach to equilibrium from both under- and over-saturation; (2) Accurate determinations of solution concentrations; (3) Well-characterized solubility controlling solid phase; and (4) Knowledge of the nature (oxidation state, coordination environment) of the species involved in the equilibrium reactions under consideration.

  4. Ion exchange equilibrium constants

    CERN Document Server

    Marcus, Y

    2013-01-01

    Ion Exchange Equilibrium Constants focuses on the test-compilation of equilibrium constants for ion exchange reactions. The book first underscores the scope of the compilation, equilibrium constants, symbols used, and arrangement of the table. The manuscript then presents the table of equilibrium constants, including polystyrene sulfonate cation exchanger, polyacrylate cation exchanger, polymethacrylate cation exchanger, polysterene phosphate cation exchanger, and zirconium phosphate cation exchanger. The text highlights zirconium oxide anion exchanger, zeolite type 13Y cation exchanger, and

  5. Quantity Constrained General Equilibrium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Babenko, R.; Talman, A.J.J.

    2006-01-01

    In a standard general equilibrium model it is assumed that there are no price restrictions and that prices adjust infinitely fast to their equilibrium values.In case of price restrictions a general equilibrium may not exist and rationing on net demands or supplies is needed to clear the markets.In

  6. Solubility of Nd in brine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalili, F.I.; Symeopoulos, V.; Chen, J.F.; Choppin, G.R.

    1994-01-01

    The solubility of Nd(III) has been measured at 23±3 C in a synthetic brine at pcH 6.4, 8.4, 10.4 and 12.4. The brine consisted predominantly of (Na+K)Cl and MgCl 2 with an ionic strength of 7.8 M (9.4 m) a solid compound of Nd(III) at each pcH was assigned from X-ray diffraction patterns. The log values of the experimental solubilities decrease fomr -3 at pcH 6.4 to -5.8 at pcH 8.4; at pcH 10.4 and 12.4 the solubility was below the detection limit of -7.5. The experimental solubility does not follow closely the variation with pcH estimated from modeling of the species in solution in equilibrium with the Nd solid using S.I.T. (orig.)

  7. Thermodynamic theory of equilibrium fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishin, Y.

    2015-01-01

    The postulational basis of classical thermodynamics has been expanded to incorporate equilibrium fluctuations. The main additional elements of the proposed thermodynamic theory are the concept of quasi-equilibrium states, a definition of non-equilibrium entropy, a fundamental equation of state in the entropy representation, and a fluctuation postulate describing the probability distribution of macroscopic parameters of an isolated system. Although these elements introduce a statistical component that does not exist in classical thermodynamics, the logical structure of the theory is different from that of statistical mechanics and represents an expanded version of thermodynamics. Based on this theory, we present a regular procedure for calculations of equilibrium fluctuations of extensive parameters, intensive parameters and densities in systems with any number of fluctuating parameters. The proposed fluctuation formalism is demonstrated by four applications: (1) derivation of the complete set of fluctuation relations for a simple fluid in three different ensembles; (2) fluctuations in finite-reservoir systems interpolating between the canonical and micro-canonical ensembles; (3) derivation of fluctuation relations for excess properties of grain boundaries in binary solid solutions, and (4) derivation of the grain boundary width distribution for pre-melted grain boundaries in alloys. The last two applications offer an efficient fluctuation-based approach to calculations of interface excess properties and extraction of the disjoining potential in pre-melted grain boundaries. Possible future extensions of the theory are outlined.

  8. Quasi-equilibrium interpretation of aging dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franz, S.; Virasoro, M.A.

    2000-04-01

    We develop an interpretation of the off-equilibrium dynamical solution of mean-field glassy models in terms of quasi-equilibrium concepts. We show that the relaxation of the 'thermoremanent magnetization' follows a generalized version of the Onsager regression postulate of induced fluctuations. We then find the rationale for the equality between the fluctuation-dissipation ratio and the rate of growth of the configurational entropy close to the asymptotic state, found empirically in mean-field solutions. (author)

  9. Review on theoretical calculation of the magnetite solubility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Myongjin; Kim, Hongpyo

    2013-01-01

    FAC is influenced by many factors such as water chemistry (temperature, pH, dissolved oxygen (D. O.) in a solution, and etc.), chemical composition of carbon steel, and fluid dynamics. Magnetite is formed at the inner surface of carbon steel, and protects the integrity of pipes from the damage. The magnetite has a stable state at each equilibrium condition, so that it can be dissolved into the fluid under conditions that satisfy the equilibrium state. The iron solubility can be calculated by considering the reaction equilibrium constants for prediction of a change in the magnetite layer. In the present work, studies on the magnetite solubility were reviewed for the theoretical calculation of magnetite, and iron solubility data were compared to find the proper solubility values of each study

  10. Phase equilibrium engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Brignole, Esteban Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Traditionally, the teaching of phase equilibria emphasizes the relationships between the thermodynamic variables of each phase in equilibrium rather than its engineering applications. This book changes the focus from the use of thermodynamics relationships to compute phase equilibria to the design and control of the phase conditions that a process needs. Phase Equilibrium Engineering presents a systematic study and application of phase equilibrium tools to the development of chemical processes. The thermodynamic modeling of mixtures for process development, synthesis, simulation, design and

  11. Equilibrium and generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balter, H.S.

    1994-01-01

    This work studies the behaviour of radionuclides when it produce a desintegration activity,decay and the isotopes stable creation. It gives definitions about the equilibrium between activity of parent and activity of the daughter, radioactive decay,isotope stable and transient equilibrium and maxim activity time. Some considerations had been given to generators that permit a disgregation of two radioisotopes in equilibrium and its good performance. Tabs

  12. Solubility of sparingly soluble drug derivatives of anthranilic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domańska, Urszula; Pobudkowska, Aneta; Pelczarska, Aleksandra

    2011-03-24

    This work is a continuation of our systematic study of the solubility of pharmaceuticals (Pharms). All substances here are derivatives of anthranilic acid, and have an anti-inflammatory direction of action (niflumic acid, flufenamic acid, and diclofenac sodium). The basic thermal properties of pure Pharms, i.e., melting and glass-transition temperatures as well as the enthalpy of melting, have been measured with the differential scanning microcalorimetry technique (DSC). Molar volumes have been calculated with the Barton group contribution method. The equilibrium mole fraction solubilities of three pharmaceuticals were measured in a range of temperatures from 285 to 355 K in three important solvents for Pharm investigations: water, ethanol, and 1-octanol using a dynamic method and spectroscopic UV-vis method. The experimental solubility data have been correlated by means of the commonly known G(E) equation: the NRTL, with the assumption that the systems studied here have revealed simple eutectic mixtures. pK(a) precise measurement values have been investigated with the Bates-Schwarzenbach spectrophotometric method. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  13. Solubility of hydrogen in bio-oil compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qureshi, Muhammad Saad; Touronen, Jouni; Uusi-Kyyny, Petri; Richon, Dominique; Alopaeus, Ville

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Solubility of Hydrogen was measured in bio-oil compounds in the at temperatures from 342 to 473 K and pressures up to 16 MPa. • Phase equilibrium data were acquired using a visualization enabled continuous flow synthetic apparatus. • The measured solubility is modeled with Peng-Robinson EoS. - Abstract: The knowledge of accurate hydrogen solubility values in bio-oil compounds is essential for the design and optimization of hydroprocesses relevant to biofuel industry. This work reports the solubility of hydrogen in three industrially relevant bio-oil compounds (allyl alcohol, furan, and eugenol) at temperatures from 342 to 473 K and pressures up to 16 MPa. Phase equilibrium data were acquired using a continuous flow synthetic method. The method is based on the visual observation of the bubble point using a high resolution camera. The measured solubility is modeled with Peng-Robinson EoS with classical van der Waals one fluid mixing rules.

  14. Gas solubilities widespread applications

    CERN Document Server

    Gerrard, William

    1980-01-01

    Gas Solubilities: Widespread Applications discusses several topics concerning the various applications of gas solubilities. The first chapter of the book reviews Henr's law, while the second chapter covers the effect of temperature on gas solubility. The third chapter discusses the various gases used by Horiuti, and the following chapters evaluate the data on sulfur dioxide, chlorine data, and solubility data for hydrogen sulfide. Chapter 7 concerns itself with solubility of radon, thoron, and actinon. Chapter 8 tackles the solubilities of diborane and the gaseous hydrides of groups IV, V, and

  15. Tetraphenylborate Solubility in High Ionic Strength Salt Solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serkiz, S.M.; Ginn, J.D.; Jurgensen, A.R.

    1998-04-01

    Solubility of sodium and potassium salts of the tetraphenylborate ion (TPB) in simulated Savannah River Site High Level Waste was investigated. Data generated from this study allow more accurate predictions of TPB solubility at the In-Tank Precipitation (ITP) facility. Because previous research showed large deviations in the observed solubility of TPB salts when compared with model predictions, additional data were generated to better understand the solubility of TPB in more complex systems of high ionic strength and those containing both potassium and sodium. These data allow evaluation of the ability of current models to accurately predict equilibrium TPB concentrations over the range of experimental conditions investigated in this study

  16. Equilibrium and non equilibrium in fragmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorso, C.O.; Chernomoretz, A.; Lopez, J.A.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: In this communication we present recent results regarding the interplay of equilibrium and non equilibrium in the process of fragmentation of excited finite Lennard Jones drops. Because the general features of such a potential resemble the ones of the nuclear interaction (fact that is reinforced by the similarity between the EOS of both systems) these studies are not only relevant from a fundamental point of view but also shed light on the problem of nuclear multifragmentation. We focus on the microscopic analysis of the state of the fragmenting system at fragmentation time. We show that the Caloric Curve (i e. the functional relationship between the temperature of the system and the excitation energy) is of the type rise plateau with no vapor branch. The usual rise plateau rise pattern is only recovered when equilibrium is artificially imposed. This result puts a serious question on the validity of the freeze out hypothesis. This feature is independent of the dimensionality or excitation mechanism. Moreover we explore the behavior of magnitudes which can help us determine the degree of the assumed phase transition. It is found that no clear cut criteria is presently available. (Author)

  17. Chemical Principles Revisited: Chemical Equilibrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickey, Charles D.

    1980-01-01

    Describes: (1) Law of Mass Action; (2) equilibrium constant and ideal behavior; (3) general form of the equilibrium constant; (4) forward and reverse reactions; (5) factors influencing equilibrium; (6) Le Chatelier's principle; (7) effects of temperature, changing concentration, and pressure on equilibrium; and (8) catalysts and equilibrium. (JN)

  18. Equilibrium and non-equilibrium phenomena in arcs and torches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mullen, van der J.J.A.M.

    2000-01-01

    A general treatment of non-equilibrium plasma aspects is obtained by relating transport fluxes to equilibrium restoring processes in so-called disturbed Bilateral Relations. The (non) equilibrium stage of a small microwave induced plasma serves as case study.

  19. Non-equilibrium Economics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katalin Martinás

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available A microeconomic, agent based framework to dynamic economics is formulated in a materialist approach. An axiomatic foundation of a non-equilibrium microeconomics is outlined. Economic activity is modelled as transformation and transport of commodities (materials owned by the agents. Rate of transformations (production intensity, and the rate of transport (trade are defined by the agents. Economic decision rules are derived from the observed economic behaviour. The non-linear equations are solved numerically for a model economy. Numerical solutions for simple model economies suggest that the some of the results of general equilibrium economics are consequences only of the equilibrium hypothesis. We show that perfect competition of selfish agents does not guarantee the stability of economic equilibrium, but cooperativity is needed, too.

  20. DIAGNOSIS OF FINANCIAL EQUILIBRIUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SUCIU GHEORGHE

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The analysis based on the balance sheet tries to identify the state of equilibrium (disequilibrium that exists in a company. The easiest way to determine the state of equilibrium is by looking at the balance sheet and at the information it offers. Because in the balance sheet there are elements that do not reflect their real value, the one established on the market, they must be readjusted, and those elements which are not related to the ordinary operating activities must be eliminated. The diagnosis of financial equilibrium takes into account 2 components: financing sources (ownership equity, loaned, temporarily attracted. An efficient financial equilibrium must respect 2 fundamental requirements: permanent sources represented by ownership equity and loans for more than 1 year should finance permanent needs, and temporary resources should finance the operating cycle.

  1. Sediment Equilibrium and Diffusive Fluxes in Relation to Phosphorus Dynamics in the Turbid Minnesota River

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    James, William F

    2009-01-01

    ...) concentration in large river systems. However, in-stream processes such as equilibrium P flux from suspended sediment and diffusive P flux from deposited sediment stored in river channels may also play a role in soluble P control...

  2. Equilibrium statistical mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Mayer, J E

    1968-01-01

    The International Encyclopedia of Physical Chemistry and Chemical Physics, Volume 1: Equilibrium Statistical Mechanics covers the fundamental principles and the development of theoretical aspects of equilibrium statistical mechanics. Statistical mechanical is the study of the connection between the macroscopic behavior of bulk matter and the microscopic properties of its constituent atoms and molecules. This book contains eight chapters, and begins with a presentation of the master equation used for the calculation of the fundamental thermodynamic functions. The succeeding chapters highlight t

  3. Computing Equilibrium Chemical Compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcbride, Bonnie J.; Gordon, Sanford

    1995-01-01

    Chemical Equilibrium With Transport Properties, 1993 (CET93) computer program provides data on chemical-equilibrium compositions. Aids calculation of thermodynamic properties of chemical systems. Information essential in design and analysis of such equipment as compressors, turbines, nozzles, engines, shock tubes, heat exchangers, and chemical-processing equipment. CET93/PC is version of CET93 specifically designed to run within 640K memory limit of MS-DOS operating system. CET93/PC written in FORTRAN.

  4. SITE-94. Radionuclide solubilities for SITE-94

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arthur, R.; Apted, M. [QuantiSci, Denver, CO (United States)

    1996-12-01

    In this report, solubility constraints are evaluated on radioelement source-term concentrations supporting the SITE-94 performance assessment. Solubility models are based on heterogeneous-equilibrium, mass- and charge-balance constraints incorporated into the EQ3/6 geochemical software package, which is used to calculate the aqueous speciation behavior and solubilities of U, Th, Pu, Np, Am, Ni, Ra, Se, Sn, Sr, Tc and Zr in site groundwaters and near-field solutions. The chemical evolution of the near field is approximated using EQ3/6 in terms of limiting conditions at equilibrium, or steady state, in three closed systems representing fully saturated bentonite, Fe{sup o} corrosion products of the canister, and spent fuel. The calculations consider both low-temperature (15 deg C) and high-temperature (80 deg C) conditions in the near field, and the existence of either reducing or strongly oxidizing conditions in each of the bentonite, canister, and spent-fuel barriers. Heterogeneities in site characteristics are evaluated through consideration of a range of initial groundwaters and their interactions with engineered barriers. Aqueous speciation models for many radioelements are constrained by thermodynamic data that are estimated with varying degrees of accuracy. An important question, however, is how accurate do these models need to be for purposes of estimating source-term concentrations? For example, it is unrealistic to expect a high degree of accuracy in speciation models if such models predict solubilities that are below the analytical detection limit for a given radioelement. From a practical standpoint, such models are irrelevant if calculated solubilities cannot be tested by direct comparison to experimental data. In the absence of models that are both accurate and relevant for conditions of interest, the detection limit could define a pragmatic upper limit on radioelement solubility 56 refs, 25 tabs, 10 figs

  5. SITE-94. Radionuclide solubilities for SITE-94

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arthur, R.; Apted, M.

    1996-12-01

    In this report, solubility constraints are evaluated on radioelement source-term concentrations supporting the SITE-94 performance assessment. Solubility models are based on heterogeneous-equilibrium, mass- and charge-balance constraints incorporated into the EQ3/6 geochemical software package, which is used to calculate the aqueous speciation behavior and solubilities of U, Th, Pu, Np, Am, Ni, Ra, Se, Sn, Sr, Tc and Zr in site groundwaters and near-field solutions. The chemical evolution of the near field is approximated using EQ3/6 in terms of limiting conditions at equilibrium, or steady state, in three closed systems representing fully saturated bentonite, Fe o corrosion products of the canister, and spent fuel. The calculations consider both low-temperature (15 deg C) and high-temperature (80 deg C) conditions in the near field, and the existence of either reducing or strongly oxidizing conditions in each of the bentonite, canister, and spent-fuel barriers. Heterogeneities in site characteristics are evaluated through consideration of a range of initial groundwaters and their interactions with engineered barriers. Aqueous speciation models for many radioelements are constrained by thermodynamic data that are estimated with varying degrees of accuracy. An important question, however, is how accurate do these models need to be for purposes of estimating source-term concentrations? For example, it is unrealistic to expect a high degree of accuracy in speciation models if such models predict solubilities that are below the analytical detection limit for a given radioelement. From a practical standpoint, such models are irrelevant if calculated solubilities cannot be tested by direct comparison to experimental data. In the absence of models that are both accurate and relevant for conditions of interest, the detection limit could define a pragmatic upper limit on radioelement solubility

  6. Understanding Chemical Reaction Kinetics and Equilibrium with Interlocking Building Blocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloonan, Carrie A.; Nichol, Carolyn A.; Hutchinson, John S.

    2011-01-01

    Chemical reaction kinetics and equilibrium are essential core concepts of chemistry but are challenging topics for many students, both at the high school and undergraduate university level. Visualization at the molecular level is valuable to aid understanding of reaction kinetics and equilibrium. This activity provides a discovery-based method to…

  7. Radionuclide solubilities to be used in SKB 91

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruno, J.; Sellin, P.

    1992-06-01

    We have performed thermodynamic calculations in order to assess the solubility limits (source term) for selected radionuclides. Equilibrium solubilities for U, Pu, Np, Am, Th, Ra, Sn, Tc, Zr, Sn, Ni, Sm, Pa, Nb and Pd have been calculated in four waters, representing average fresh and saline granitic groundwaters under oxidizing and reducing conditions, respectively. The results from the calculations have been compared with the measured radionuclide concentrations in natural waters as well as in spent fuel leaching tests. (26 refs.)

  8. Immunity by equilibrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberl, Gérard

    2016-08-01

    The classical model of immunity posits that the immune system reacts to pathogens and injury and restores homeostasis. Indeed, a century of research has uncovered the means and mechanisms by which the immune system recognizes danger and regulates its own activity. However, this classical model does not fully explain complex phenomena, such as tolerance, allergy, the increased prevalence of inflammatory pathologies in industrialized nations and immunity to multiple infections. In this Essay, I propose a model of immunity that is based on equilibrium, in which the healthy immune system is always active and in a state of dynamic equilibrium between antagonistic types of response. This equilibrium is regulated both by the internal milieu and by the microbial environment. As a result, alteration of the internal milieu or microbial environment leads to immune disequilibrium, which determines tolerance, protective immunity and inflammatory pathology.

  9. Equilibrium shoreface profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Troels; Hughes, Michael G

    2017-01-01

    Large-scale coastal behaviour models use the shoreface profile of equilibrium as a fundamental morphological unit that is translated in space to simulate coastal response to, for example, sea level oscillations and variability in sediment supply. Despite a longstanding focus on the shoreface...... profile and its relevance to predicting coastal response to changing environmental conditions, the processes and dynamics involved in shoreface equilibrium are still not fully understood. Here, we apply a process-based empirical sediment transport model, combined with morphodynamic principles to provide......; there is no tuning or calibration and computation times are short. It is therefore easily implemented with repeated iterations to manage uncertainty....

  10. Microeconomics : Equilibrium and Efficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ten Raa, T.

    2013-01-01

    Microeconomics: Equilibrium and Efficiency teaches how to apply microeconomic theory in an innovative, intuitive and concise way. Using real-world, empirical examples, this book not only covers the building blocks of the subject, but helps gain a broad understanding of microeconomic theory and

  11. Differential Equation of Equilibrium

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    ABSTRACT. Analysis of underground circular cylindrical shell is carried out in this work. The forth order differential equation of equilibrium, comparable to that of beam on elastic foundation, was derived from static principles on the assumptions of P. L Pasternak. Laplace transformation was used to solve the governing ...

  12. Comments on equilibrium, transient equilibrium, and secular equilibrium in serial radioactive decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prince, J.R.

    1979-01-01

    Equations describing serial radioactive decay are reviewed along with published descriptions or transient and secular equilibrium. It is shown that terms describing equilibrium are not used in the same way by various authors. Specific definitions are proposed; they suggest that secular equilibrium is a subset of transient equilibrium

  13. Universality in equilibrium and away from it: A personal perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munoz, Miguel A.

    2011-01-01

    In this talk/paper I discuss the concept of universality in phase transitions and the question of whether universality classes are more robust in equilibrium than away from it. In both of these situations, the main ingredients determining universality are symmetries, conservation laws, the dimension of the space and of the order-parameter and the presence of long-range interactions or quenched disorder. The existence of detailed-balance and fluctuation-dissipation theorems imposes severe constraints on equilibrium systems, allowing to define universality classes in a very robust way; instead, non-equilibrium allows for more variability. Still, quite robust non-equilibrium universality classes have been identified in the last decades. Here, I discuss some examples in which (i) non-equilibrium phase transitions are simply controlled by equilibrium critical points, i.e. non-equilibrium ingredients turn out to be irrelevant in the renormalization group sense and (ii) non-equilibrium situations in which equilibrium seems to come out of the blue, generating an adequate effective description of intrinsically non-equilibrium problems. Afterwards, I shall describe different genuinely non-equilibrium phase transitions in which introducing small, apparently innocuous changes (namely: presence or absence of an underlying lattice, parity conservation in the overall number of particles, existence of an un-accessible vacuum state, deterministic versus stochastic microscopic rules, presence or absence of a Fermionic constraint), the critical behavior is altered, making the case for lack of robustness. However, it will be argued that in all these examples, there is an underlying good reason (in terms of general principles) for universality to be altered. The final conclusions are that: (i) robust universality classes exist both in equilibrium and non-equilibrium; (ii) symmetry and conservation principles are crucial in both, (iii) non-equilibrium allows for more variability (i

  14. Applications of SSAFT EOS for determination of the solubilities of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Applications of SSAFT EOS for determination of the solubilities of solid compounds in supercritical CO 2 . ... Using statistical thermodynamics such as Simplified SAFT equation of state (SSAFTEoS) for estimating phase equilibrium and fluid properties of different materials have been used widely. SSAFT EoS has been ...

  15. Concept - or no concept

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsteinsson, Uffe

    1999-01-01

    Discussion about concept in industrial companies. A method for mapping of managerial concept in specific area is shown......Discussion about concept in industrial companies. A method for mapping of managerial concept in specific area is shown...

  16. Equilibrium and pre-equilibrium emissions in proton-induced ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    necessary for the domain of fission-reactor technology for the calculation of nuclear transmutation ... tions occur in three stages: INC, pre-equilibrium and equilibrium (or compound. 344. Pramana ... In the evaporation phase of the reaction, the.

  17. Calculation of amorphous silica solubilities at 25° to 300°C and apparent cation hydration numbers in aqueous salt solutions using the concept of effective density of water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, Robert O.; Williams, Marshall L.

    1983-01-01

    The solubility of amorphous silica in aqueous salt solutions at 25° to 300°C can be calculated using information on its solubility in pure water and a model in which the activity of water in the salt solution is defined to equal the effective density. pe, of “free” water in that solution. At temperatures of 100°C and above, pe closely equals the product of the density of the solution times the weight fraction of water in the solution. At 25°C, a correction parameter must be applied to pe that incorporates a term called the apparent cation hydration number, h. Because of the many assumptions and other uncertainties involved in determining values of h, by the model used here, the reported numbers are not necessarily real hydration numbers even though they do agree with some published values determined by activity and diffusion methods. Whether or not h is a real hydration number, it would appear to be useful in its inclusion within a more extensive activity coefficient term that describes the departure of silica solubilities in concentrated salt solutions from expected behavior according to the model presented here. Values of h can be calculated from measured amorphous silica solubilities in salt solutions at 25°C provided there is no complexing of dissolved silica with the dissolved salt, or if the degree of complexing is known. The previously postulated aqueous silica-sulfate complexing in aqueous Na2SO4 solutions is supported by results of the present effective density of water model

  18. Gated equilibrium bloodpool scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinders Folmer, S.C.C.

    1981-01-01

    This thesis deals with the clinical applications of gated equilibrium bloodpool scintigraphy, performed with either a gamma camera or a portable detector system, the nuclear stethoscope. The main goal has been to define the value and limitations of noninvasive measurements of left ventricular ejection fraction as a parameter of cardiac performance in various disease states, both for diagnostic purposes as well as during follow-up after medical or surgical intervention. Secondly, it was attempted to extend the use of the equilibrium bloodpool techniques beyond the calculation of ejection fraction alone by considering the feasibility to determine ventricular volumes and by including the possibility of quantifying valvular regurgitation. In both cases, it has been tried to broaden the perspective of the observations by comparing them with results of other, invasive and non-invasive, procedures, in particular cardiac catheterization, M-mode echocardiography and myocardial perfusion scintigraphy. (Auth.)

  19. Problems in equilibrium theory

    CERN Document Server

    Aliprantis, Charalambos D

    1996-01-01

    In studying General Equilibrium Theory the student must master first the theory and then apply it to solve problems. At the graduate level there is no book devoted exclusively to teaching problem solving. This book teaches for the first time the basic methods of proof and problem solving in General Equilibrium Theory. The problems cover the entire spectrum of difficulty; some are routine, some require a good grasp of the material involved, and some are exceptionally challenging. The book presents complete solutions to two hundred problems. In searching for the basic required techniques, the student will find a wealth of new material incorporated into the solutions. The student is challenged to produce solutions which are different from the ones presented in the book.

  20. Solubilities of some gases in four immidazolium-based ionic liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afzal, Waheed; Liu, Xiangyang; Prausnitz, John M.

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Experimental apparatus based on the synthetic-volumetric method for measuring solubilities of gases in liquids. Highlights: • We constructed an apparatus for measuring solubilities of sparingly-soluble gases. • We measured solubilities of five gases in four immidazolium-based ionic liquids. • We calculated Henry’s constants for gases in the ionic liquids studied in this work. -- Abstract: The synthetic-volumetric method is used for rapidly measuring solubilities of sparingly-soluble gases in monoethylene glycol and in four ionic liquids. Known molar quantities of solute and solvent are charged into an equilibrium vessel. Measured quantities at equilibrium include: temperature, pressure, quantities of fluids, and volumes of the gas and liquid phases in the equilibrium vessel. These measurements enable calculation of equilibrium compositions using material balances. No sampling or chemical analyses are required. Solubilities are reported for carbon dioxide, krypton, oxygen, and hydrogen in monoethylene glycol, l-n-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate [BMIM][BF4], l-n-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate [BMIM][PF6], 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide [EMIM][Tf 2 N], or 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate [EMIM][AC]. Solubilities were measured over the temperature range (298 to 355) K and for pressures up to about 7 MPa using two different pieces of equipment, both based on the volumetric method: a low-pressure glass apparatus and a high-pressure stainless-steel apparatus. Special emphasis is given to experimental reliability to assure consistent data

  1. The solubility of carbon dioxide in aqueous N-methyldiethanolamine solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huttenhuis, P. J. G.; Agrawal, N. J.; Solbraa, E.; Versteeg, G. F.

    2008-01-01

    In this study the electrolyte equation of state as proposed by Solbraa [E. Solbraa, Equilibrium and non-equilibrium thermodynamics of natural gas processing, Ph.D. thesis Norwegian University of Science and Technology, 2002] was systematically studied and improved to describe the solubility of

  2. Solubility behavior and biopharmaceutical classification of novel high-solubility ciprofloxacin and norfloxacin pharmaceutical derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breda, Susana A; Jimenez-Kairuz, Alvaro F; Manzo, Ruben H; Olivera, María E

    2009-04-17

    The hydrochlorides of the 1:3 aluminum:norfloxacin and aluminum:ciprofloxacin complexes were characterized according to the Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS) premises in comparison with their parent compounds. The pH-solubility profiles of the complexes were experimentally determined at 25 and 37 degrees C in the range of pH 1-8 and compared to that of uncomplexed norfloxacin and ciprofloxacin. Both complexes are clearly more soluble than the antibiotics themselves, even at the lowest solubility pHs. The increase in solubility was ascribed to the species controlling solubility, which were analyzed in the solid phases at equilibrium at selected pHs. Additionally, permeability was set as low, based on data reported in the scientific literature regarding oral bioavailability, intestinal and cell cultures permeabilities and also considering the influence of stoichiometric amounts of aluminum. The complexes fulfill the BCS criterion to be classified as class 3 compounds (high solubility/low permeability). Instead, the active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) currently used in solid dosage forms, norfloxacin and ciprofloxacin hydrochloride, proved to be BCS class 4 (low solubility/low permeability). The solubility improvement turns the complexes as potential biowaiver candidates from the scientific point of view and may be a good way for developing more dose-efficient formulations. An immediate release tablet showing very rapid dissolution was obtained. Its dissolution profile was compared to that of the commercial ciprofloxacin hydrochloride tablets allowing to dissolution of the complete dose at a critical pH such as 6.8.

  3. Equilibrium statistical mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Jackson, E Atlee

    2000-01-01

    Ideal as an elementary introduction to equilibrium statistical mechanics, this volume covers both classical and quantum methodology for open and closed systems. Introductory chapters familiarize readers with probability and microscopic models of systems, while additional chapters describe the general derivation of the fundamental statistical mechanics relationships. The final chapter contains 16 sections, each dealing with a different application, ordered according to complexity, from classical through degenerate quantum statistical mechanics. Key features include an elementary introduction t

  4. Volatility in Equilibrium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bollerslev, Tim; Sizova, Natalia; Tauchen, George

    Stock market volatility clusters in time, carries a risk premium, is fractionally inte- grated, and exhibits asymmetric leverage effects relative to returns. This paper develops a first internally consistent equilibrium based explanation for these longstanding empirical facts. The model is cast i......, and the dynamic cross-correlations of the volatility measures with the returns calculated from actual high-frequency intra-day data on the S&P 500 aggregate market and VIX volatility indexes....

  5. Molecular equilibrium with condensation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharp, C.M.; Huebner, W.F.

    1990-01-01

    Minimization of the Gibbs energy of formation for species of chemical elements and compounds in their gas and condensed phases determines their relative abundances in a mixture in chemical equilibrium. The procedure is more general and more powerful than previous abundance determinations in multiphase astrophysical mixtures. Some results for astrophysical equations of state are presented, and the effects of condensation on opacity are briefly indicated. 18 refs

  6. Equilibrium calculations, ch. 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deursen, A.P.J. van

    1976-01-01

    A calculation is presented of dimer intensities obtained in supersonic expansions. There are two possible limiting considerations; the dimers observed are already present in the source, in thermodynamic equilibrium, and are accelerated in the expansion. Destruction during acceleration is neglected, as are processes leading to newly formed dimers. On the other hand one can apply a kinetic approach, where formation and destruction processes are followed throughout the expansion. The difficulty of this approach stems from the fact that the density, temperature and rate constants have to be known at all distances from the nozzle. The simple point of view has been adopted and the measured dimer intensities are compared with the equilibrium concentration in the source. The comparison is performed under the assumption that the detection efficiency for dimers is twice the detection efficiency for monomers. The experimental evidence against the simple point of view that the dimers of the onset region are formed in the source already, under equilibrium conditions, is discussed. (Auth.)

  7. Solubility of cobalt in primary circuit solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, I.; Joyer, F.

    1992-01-01

    The solubility of cobalt ferrite (CoFe 2 O 4 ) was measured in PWR primary circuit conditions, in the temperature range 250-350 deg C, and the results were compared with the ones obtained on magnetite and nickel ferrite. As in the former cases, it was found that, in the prevailing primary circuit conditions, the solubility of the cobalt ferrite was minimum at temperatures around 300 deg C, for cobalt as well as for iron. The equilibrium iron concentration is significantly lower than in the case of magnetite. The results are discussed in relation with the POTHY code, based only on thermodynamic laws and data, used for the prediction of the primary circuit chemistry

  8. Influence of substitutional atoms on the solubility limit of carbon in bcc iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saitoh, Hajime; Ushioda, Kohsaku; Yoshinaga, Naoki; Yamada, Wataru

    2011-01-01

    The influence of substitutional atoms (Mn, Cr, Si, P, and Al) on the solubility limit of C in body-centered cubic iron in equilibrium with cementite was investigated in low-carbon steels at a temperature of 700 o C. The C solubility limit was determined from internal friction measurements combined with infrared analysis of C using a high-frequency combustion technique. Experiments clarified that Mn, Cr and Al hardly change the C solubility limit, whereas P and Si increase it.

  9. Noncompact Equilibrium Points and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Al-Rumaih

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We prove an equilibrium existence result for vector functions defined on noncompact domain and we give some applications in optimization and Nash equilibrium in noncooperative game.

  10. Equilibrium thermodynamics - Callen's postulational approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongschaap, R.J.J.; Öttinger, Hans Christian

    2001-01-01

    In order to provide the background for nonequilibrium thermodynamics, we outline the fundamentals of equilibrium thermodynamics. Equilibrium thermodynamics must not only be obtained as a special case of any acceptable nonequilibrium generalization but, through its shining example, it also elucidates

  11. MHD equilibrium with toroidal rotation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, J.

    1987-03-01

    The present work attempts to formulate the equilibrium of axisymmetric plasma with purely toroidal flow within ideal MHD theory. In general, the inertial term Rho(v.Del)v caused by plasma flow is so complicated that the equilibrium equation is completely different from the Grad-Shafranov equation. However, in the case of purely toroidal flow the equilibrium equation can be simplified so that it resembles the Grad-Shafranov equation. Generally one arbitrary two-variable functions and two arbitrary single variable functions, instead of only four single-variable functions, are allowed in the new equilibrium equations. Also, the boundary conditions of the rotating (with purely toroidal fluid flow, static - without any fluid flow) equilibrium are the same as those of the static equilibrium. So numerically one can calculate the rotating equilibrium as a static equilibrium. (author)

  12. Some Examples of Formation of Shells and Their Role in Establishment of Equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutandos, Spyridon

    2012-01-01

    In this article we discuss the concept of equilibrium establishment in four most usual instances as is electrostriction and vaporization as related to the concept of equilibrium shell formation. Two more cases are then studied which are of relevance. One is the Brownian movement, the study of which is essential for pedagogical reasons as to…

  13. Students' Understanding of Equilibrium and Stability: The Case of Dynamic Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canu, Michaël; de Hosson, Cécile; Duque, Mauricio

    2016-01-01

    Engineering students in control courses have been observed to lack an understanding of equilibrium and stability, both of which are crucial concepts in this discipline. The introduction of these concepts is generally based on the study of classical examples from Newtonian mechanics supplemented with a control system. Equilibrium and stability are…

  14. Entropy equilibrium equation and dynamic entropy production in environment liquid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The entropy equilibrium equation is the basis of the nonequilibrium state thermodynamics. But the internal energy implies the kinetic energy of the fluid micelle relative to mass center in the classical entropy equilibrium equation at present. This internal energy is not the mean kinetic energy of molecular movement in thermodynamics. Here a modified entropy equilibrium equation is deduced, based on the concept that the internal energy is just the mean kinetic energy of the molecular movement. A dynamic entropy production is introduced into the entropy equilibrium equation to describe the dynamic process distinctly. This modified entropy equilibrium equation can describe not only the entropy variation of the irreversible processes but also the reversible processes in a thermodynamic system. It is more reasonable and suitable for wider applications.

  15. Thermal equilibrium of goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia, Alex S C; Nascimento, Sheila T; Nascimento, Carolina C N; Gebremedhin, Kifle G

    2016-05-01

    The effects of air temperature and relative humidity on thermal equilibrium of goats in a tropical region was evaluated. Nine non-pregnant Anglo Nubian nanny goats were used in the study. An indirect calorimeter was designed and developed to measure oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production, methane production and water vapour pressure of the air exhaled from goats. Physiological parameters: rectal temperature, skin temperature, hair-coat temperature, expired air temperature and respiratory rate and volume as well as environmental parameters: air temperature, relative humidity and mean radiant temperature were measured. The results show that respiratory and volume rates and latent heat loss did not change significantly for air temperature between 22 and 26°C. In this temperature range, metabolic heat was lost mainly by convection and long-wave radiation. For temperature greater than 30°C, the goats maintained thermal equilibrium mainly by evaporative heat loss. At the higher air temperature, the respiratory and ventilation rates as well as body temperatures were significantly elevated. It can be concluded that for Anglo Nubian goats, the upper limit of air temperature for comfort is around 26°C when the goats are protected from direct solar radiation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Soluble Molecularly Imprinted Nanorods for Homogeneous Molecular Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongning Liang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, it is still difficult for molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs to achieve homogeneous recognition since they cannot be easily dissolved in organic or aqueous phase. To address this issue, soluble molecularly imprinted nanorods have been synthesized by using soluble polyaniline doped with a functionalized organic protonic acid as the polymer matrix. By employing 1-naphthoic acid as a model, the proposed imprinted nanorods exhibit an excellent solubility and good homogeneous recognition ability. The imprinting factor for the soluble imprinted nanoroads is 6.8. The equilibrium dissociation constant and the apparent maximum number of the proposed imprinted nanorods are 248.5 μM and 22.1 μmol/g, respectively. We believe that such imprinted nanorods may provide an appealing substitute for natural receptors in homogeneous recognition related fields.

  17. Soluble Molecularly Imprinted Nanorods for Homogeneous Molecular Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Rongning; Wang, Tiantian; Zhang, Huan; Yao, Ruiqing; Qin, Wei

    2018-03-01

    Nowadays, it is still difficult for molecularly imprinted polymer (MIPs) to achieve homogeneous recognition since they cannot be easily dissolved in organic or aqueous phase. To address this issue, soluble molecularly imprinted nanorods have been synthesized by using soluble polyaniline doped with a functionalized organic protonic acid as the polymer matrix. By employing 1-naphthoic acid as a model, the proposed imprinted nanorods exhibit an excellent solubility and good homogeneous recognition ability. The imprinting factor for the soluble imprinted nanoroads is 6.8. The equilibrium dissociation constant and the apparent maximum number of the proposed imprinted nanorods are 248.5 μM and 22.1 μmol/g, respectively. We believe that such imprinted nanorods may provide an appealing substitute for natural receptors in homogeneous recognition related fields.

  18. Estimating the equilibrium real exchange rate in Venezuela

    OpenAIRE

    Hilde Bjørnland

    2004-01-01

    To determine whether the real exchange rate is misaligned with respect to its long-run equilibrium is an important issue for policy makers. This paper clarifies and calculates the concept of the equilibrium real exchange rate, using a structural vector autoregression (VAR) model. By imposing long-run restrictions on a VAR model for Venezuela, four structural shocks are identified: Nominal demand, real demand, supply and oil price shocks. The identified shocks and their impulse responses are c...

  19. Sharp Efficiency for Vector Equilibrium Problems on Banach Spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Si-Huan Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The concept of sharp efficient solution for vector equilibrium problems on Banach spaces is proposed. Moreover, the Fermat rules for local efficient solutions of vector equilibrium problems are extended to the sharp efficient solutions by means of the Clarke generalized differentiation and the normal cone. As applications, some necessary optimality conditions and sufficient optimality conditions for local sharp efficient solutions of a vector optimization problem with an abstract constraint and a vector variational inequality are obtained, respectively.

  20. From Chemical Forces to Chemical Rates: A Historical/Philosophical Foundation for the Teaching of Chemical Equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quilez, Juan

    2009-01-01

    With this paper, our main aim is to contribute to the realisation of the chemical reactivity concept, tracing the historical evolution of the concept of chemical affinity that eventually supported the concept of chemical equilibrium. We will concentrate on searching for the theoretical grounds of three key chemical equilibrium ideas: "incomplete…

  1. Identifying apparent local stable isotope equilibrium in a complex non-equilibrium system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yuyang; Cao, Xiaobin; Wang, Jianwei; Bao, Huiming

    2018-02-28

    Although being out of equilibrium, biomolecules in organisms have the potential to approach isotope equilibrium locally because enzymatic reactions are intrinsically reversible. A rigorous approach that can describe isotope distribution among biomolecules and their apparent deviation from equilibrium state is lacking, however. Applying the concept of distance matrix in graph theory, we propose that apparent local isotope equilibrium among a subset of biomolecules can be assessed using an apparent fractionation difference (|Δα|) matrix, in which the differences between the observed isotope composition (δ') and the calculated equilibrium fractionation factor (1000lnβ) can be more rigorously evaluated than by using a previous approach for multiple biomolecules. We tested our |Δα| matrix approach by re-analyzing published data of different amino acids (AAs) in potato and in green alga. Our re-analysis shows that biosynthesis pathways could be the reason for an apparently close-to-equilibrium relationship inside AA families in potato leaves. Different biosynthesis/degradation pathways in tubers may have led to the observed isotope distribution difference between potato leaves and tubers. The analysis of data from green algae does not support the conclusion that AAs are further from equilibrium in glucose-cultured green algae than in the autotrophic ones. Application of the |Δα| matrix can help us to locate potential reversible reactions or reaction networks in a complex system such as a metabolic system. The same approach can be broadly applied to all complex systems that have multiple components, e.g. geochemical or atmospheric systems of early Earth or other planets. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Multi-period equilibrium/near-equilibrium in electricity markets based on locational marginal prices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia Bertrand, Raquel

    decisions, i.e., on/off status for the units, and therefore optimality conditions cannot be directly applied. To avoid limitations provoked by binary variables, while retaining the advantages of using optimality conditions, we define the multi-period market equilibrium using Benders decomposition, which allows computing binary variables through the master problem and continuous variables through the subproblem. Finally, we illustrate these market equilibrium concepts through several case studies.

  3. Soluble CD163

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Holger J

    2012-01-01

    CD163 is an endocytic receptor for haptoglobin-hemoglobin complexes and is expressed solely on macrophages and monocytes. As a result of ectodomain shedding, the extracellular portion of CD163 circulates in blood as a soluble protein (sCD163) at 0.7-3.9 mg/l in healthy individuals. The function o...

  4. Solubility Part 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tantra, Ratna; Bolea, Eduardo; Bouwmeester, H.; Rey-Castro, Carlos; David, C.A.A.; Dogné, Jean Michel; Laborda, Francisco; Laloy, Julie; Robinson, Kenneth N.; Undas, A.K.; Zande, van der M.

    2016-01-01

    This chapter gives an overview of different methods that can potentially be used to determine the solubility of nanomaterials. In general, the methods presented can be broadly divided into four categories: separation methods, methods to quantify free ions, methods to quantify total dissolved

  5. Solubility of simulated PWR primary circuit corrosion products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunig, R.H.; Sandler, Y.L.

    1986-08-01

    The solubility behavior of non-stoichiometric nickel ferrites, nickel-cobalt ferrites, and magnetite, as model substances for the corrosion products (''crud'') formed in nuclear pressurized water reactors, was studied in a flow system in aqueous solutions of lithium hydroxide, boric acid, and hydrogen with pH, temperature, and hydrogen concentrations as parameters. Below the temperature region of 300 to 330 0 C, at hydrogen concentrations of 25 to 40 cm 3 /kg H 2 O as used during reactor operation, the solubility of nickel-cobalt ferrite is the same as that of Ni and Co/sub x/Fe/sub 3-x/O 4 (x 3 /kg of hydrogen, the equilibrium iron and nickel solubilities increase congruently down to about 100 0 C, in a manner consistent with the solubility of Fe 3 O 4 , but sharply decline at lower temperatures, apparently due to formation of a borated layer. A cooldown experiment on a time scale of a typical Westinghouse reactor shutdown, as well as static experiments carried out on various ferrite samples at 60 0 C show that after addition of oxygen or peroxide evolution of nickel (and possibly cobalt) above the equilibrium solubility in hydrogen depends on the presence of dissociation products prior to oxidation. Thermodynamic calculations of various reduction and oxidative decomposition reactions for stoichiometric and non-stoichiometric nickel ferrite and cobalt ferrite are presented. Their significance to evolutions of nickel and cobalt on reactor shutdown is discussed. 30 refs., 38 figs., 34 tabs

  6. Leaching from MSWI bottom ash: Evaluation of non-equilibrium in column percolation experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyks, Jiri; Astrup, Thomas; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    2009-01-01

    -equilibrium-induced changes in the solubility control. Despite both physical and chemical non-equilibrium, the Columns were found to provide adequate information for readily soluble compounds (i.e., Na, Cl-, and K) and solubility-controlled elements (i.e., Ca, SO42-, Ba, Si, Al, Zn, and Pb). The leaching Of Cu and Ni...... was shown to depend strongly on DOC leaching, which was likely affected by physical non-equilibrium during flow interruptions. Consequently, the leaching of Cu and Ni in the undisturbed Columns Was shown to be by about one order of magnitude lower compared with the interrupted column. The results indicate...... in turn appeared to be controlled by diffusion from the stagnant zone: no Mo controlling minerals were predicted by the geochemical modeling....

  7. Thermophysical properties of biodiesel and related systems: (Liquid + liquid) equilibrium data for castor oil biodiesel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazutti, Marcio A.; Voll, Fernando A.P.; Cardozo-Filho, Lúcio; Corazza, Marcos L.; Lanza, Marcelo; Priamo, Wagner L.; Oliveira, J. Vladimir

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► (Liquid + liquid) equilibrium data for multicomponent castor oil FAME and FAEE castor oil. ► Tie-lines and solubility curves (binodal) by cloud-point method for FAME and FAEE systems. ► Experimental data correlated using the UNIQUAC model. -- Abstract: This work reports new liquid–liquid solubility values (binodal curves) as well as (liquid + liquid) equilibrium data for, ternary and quaternary systems containing fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) and fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEE) from castor oil, water, glycerol, methanol and anhydrous ethanol at T = (303.15, 318.15, and 333.15) K. Solubility curves (binodal) were also obtained by the cloud-point method for binary systems containing FAME, FAEE, water, or glycerol. All results obtained can be considered of good quality. The experimental values were correlated using the UNIQUAC model, whose results presented good performance and satisfactory fitting of equilibrium values

  8. Grinding kinetics and equilibrium states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opoczky, L.; Farnady, F.

    1984-01-01

    The temporary and permanent equilibrium occurring during the initial stage of cement grinding does not indicate the end of comminution, but rather an increased energy consumption during grinding. The constant dynamic equilibrium occurs after a long grinding period indicating the end of comminution for a given particle size. Grinding equilibrium curves can be constructed to show the stages of comminution and agglomeration for certain particle sizes.

  9. Para-equilibrium phase diagrams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelton, Arthur D.; Koukkari, Pertti; Pajarre, Risto; Eriksson, Gunnar

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A rapidly cooled system may attain a state of para-equilibrium. • In this state rapidly diffusing elements reach equilibrium but others are immobile. • Application of the Phase Rule to para-equilibrium phase diagrams is discussed. • A general algorithm to calculate para-equilibrium phase diagrams is described. - Abstract: If an initially homogeneous system at high temperature is rapidly cooled, a temporary para-equilibrium state may result in which rapidly diffusing elements have reached equilibrium but more slowly diffusing elements have remained essentially immobile. The best known example occurs when homogeneous austenite is quenched. A para-equilibrium phase assemblage may be calculated thermodynamically by Gibbs free energy minimization under the constraint that the ratios of the slowly diffusing elements are the same in all phases. Several examples of calculated para-equilibrium phase diagram sections are presented and the application of the Phase Rule is discussed. Although the rules governing the geometry of these diagrams may appear at first to be somewhat different from those for full equilibrium phase diagrams, it is shown that in fact they obey exactly the same rules with the following provision. Since the molar ratios of non-diffusing elements are the same in all phases at para-equilibrium, these ratios act, as far as the geometry of the diagram is concerned, like “potential” variables (such as T, pressure or chemical potentials) rather than like “normal” composition variables which need not be the same in all phases. A general algorithm to calculate para-equilibrium phase diagrams is presented. In the limit, if a para-equilibrium calculation is performed under the constraint that no elements diffuse, then the resultant phase diagram shows the single phase with the minimum Gibbs free energy at any point on the diagram; such calculations are of interest in physical vapor deposition when deposition is so rapid that phase

  10. pH-Dependent solubility and permeability criteria for provisional biopharmaceutics classification (BCS and BDDCS) in early drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varma, Manthena V; Gardner, Iain; Steyn, Stefanus J; Nkansah, Paul; Rotter, Charles J; Whitney-Pickett, Carrie; Zhang, Hui; Di, Li; Cram, Michael; Fenner, Katherine S; El-Kattan, Ayman F

    2012-05-07

    The Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS) is a scientific framework that provides a basis for predicting the oral absorption of drugs. These concepts have been extended in the Biopharmaceutics Drug Disposition Classification System (BDDCS) to explain the potential mechanism of drug clearance and understand the effects of uptake and efflux transporters on absorption, distribution, metabolism, and elimination. The objective of present work is to establish criteria for provisional biopharmaceutics classification using pH-dependent passive permeability and aqueous solubility data generated from high throughput screening methodologies in drug discovery settings. The apparent permeability across monolayers of clonal cell line of Madin-Darby canine kidney cells, selected for low endogenous efflux transporter expression, was measured for a set of 105 drugs, with known BCS and BDDCS class. The permeability at apical pH 6.5 for acidic drugs and at pH 7.4 for nonacidic drugs showed a good correlation with the fraction absorbed in human (Fa). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was utilized to define the permeability class boundary. At permeability ≥ 5 × 10(-6) cm/s, the accuracy of predicting Fa of ≥ 0.90 was 87%. Also, this cutoff showed more than 80% sensitivity and specificity in predicting the literature permeability classes (BCS), and the metabolism classes (BDDCS). The equilibrium solubility of a subset of 49 drugs was measured in pH 1.2 medium, pH 6.5 phosphate buffer, and in FaSSIF medium (pH 6.5). Although dose was not considered, good concordance of the measured solubility with BCS and BDDCS solubility class was achieved, when solubility at pH 1.2 was used for acidic compounds and FaSSIF solubility was used for basic, neutral, and zwitterionic compounds. Using a cutoff of 200 μg/mL, the data set suggested a 93% sensitivity and 86% specificity in predicting both the BCS and BDDCS solubility classes. In conclusion, this study identified

  11. Thermodynamic chemical energy transfer mechanisms of non-equilibrium, quasi-equilibrium, and equilibrium chemical reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roh, Heui-Seol

    2015-01-01

    Chemical energy transfer mechanisms at finite temperature are explored by a chemical energy transfer theory which is capable of investigating various chemical mechanisms of non-equilibrium, quasi-equilibrium, and equilibrium. Gibbs energy fluxes are obtained as a function of chemical potential, time, and displacement. Diffusion, convection, internal convection, and internal equilibrium chemical energy fluxes are demonstrated. The theory reveals that there are chemical energy flux gaps and broken discrete symmetries at the activation chemical potential, time, and displacement. The statistical, thermodynamic theory is the unification of diffusion and internal convection chemical reactions which reduces to the non-equilibrium generalization beyond the quasi-equilibrium theories of migration and diffusion processes. The relationship between kinetic theories of chemical and electrochemical reactions is also explored. The theory is applied to explore non-equilibrium chemical reactions as an illustration. Three variable separation constants indicate particle number constants and play key roles in describing the distinct chemical reaction mechanisms. The kinetics of chemical energy transfer accounts for the four control mechanisms of chemical reactions such as activation, concentration, transition, and film chemical reactions. - Highlights: • Chemical energy transfer theory is proposed for non-, quasi-, and equilibrium. • Gibbs energy fluxes are expressed by chemical potential, time, and displacement. • Relationship between chemical and electrochemical reactions is discussed. • Theory is applied to explore nonequilibrium energy transfer in chemical reactions. • Kinetics of non-equilibrium chemical reactions shows the four control mechanisms

  12. Molecular model for solubility of gases in flexible polymers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neergaard, Jesper; Hassager, Ole; Szabo, Peter

    1999-01-01

    We propose a model for a priori prediction of the solubility of gases in flexible polymers. The model is based on the concept of ideal solubility of gases in liquids. According to this concept, the mole fraction of gases in liquids is given by Raoult's law with the total pressure and the vapor...... pressure of the gas, where the latter may have to be extrapolated. However, instead of considering each polymer molecule as a rigid structure, we estimate the effective number of degrees of freedom from an equivalent freely jointed bead-rod model for the flexible polymer. In this model, we associate...... the length of the rods with the molecular weight corresponding to a Kuhn step. The model provides a tool for crude estimation of the gas solubility on the basis of only the monomer unit of the polymer and properties of the gas. A comparison with the solubility data for several gases in poly...

  13. Fundamental functions in equilibrium thermodynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horst, H.J. ter

    In the standard presentations of the principles of Gibbsian equilibrium thermodynamics one can find several gaps in the logic. For a subject that is as widely used as equilibrium thermodynamics, it is of interest to clear up such questions of mathematical rigor. In this paper it is shown that using

  14. A Multiperiod Equilibrium Pricing Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minsuk Kwak

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose an equilibrium pricing model in a dynamic multiperiod stochastic framework with uncertain income. There are one tradable risky asset (stock/commodity, one nontradable underlying (temperature, and also a contingent claim (weather derivative written on the tradable risky asset and the nontradable underlying in the market. The price of the contingent claim is priced in equilibrium by optimal strategies of representative agent and market clearing condition. The risk preferences are of exponential type with a stochastic coefficient of risk aversion. Both subgame perfect strategy and naive strategy are considered and the corresponding equilibrium prices are derived. From the numerical result we examine how the equilibrium prices vary in response to changes in model parameters and highlight the importance of our equilibrium pricing principle.

  15. Argon solubility in liquid steel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boom, R; Dankert, O; Van Veen, A; Kamperman, AA

    2000-01-01

    Experiments have been performed to establish the solubility of argon in liquid interstitial-free steel. The solubility appears to be lower than 0.1 at ppb, The results are in line with argon solubilities reported in the literature on liquid iron. Semiempirical theories and calculations based on the

  16. Solubility is the most important mass transfer factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slobodov, A.A.; Zarembo, V.I.

    1992-01-01

    The existence of the quantitative correlation between mass transfer and equilibrium solubility of corrosion products of construction materials in water circuits of power plants is shown. Thermodynamic and mathematical methods of modeling and calculating for these processes are developed. The results for iron based materials - aqueous solution systems in a wide range of temperature, pH, oxygen-hydrogen concentrations are presented. The optimization conditions for mass transfer, sedimentation of corrosion products for BWR, PWR reactors, etc. have been obtained

  17. Determination of vapor-liquid equilibrium data and decontamination factors needed for the development of evaporator technology for use in volume reduction of radioactive waste streams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Betts, S.E.

    1993-01-01

    A program is currently in progress at Argonne National Laboratory to evaluate and develop evaporator technology for concentrating radioactive waste streams. By concentrating radioactive waste streams, disposal costs can be significantly reduced. To effectively reduce the volume of waste, the evaporator must achieve high decontamination factors so that the distillate is sufficiently free of radioactive material. One technology that shows a great deal of potential for this application is being developed by LICON, Inc. In this program, Argonne plans to apply LICON's evaporator designs to the processing of radioactive solutions. Concepts that need to be incorporated into the design of the evaporator include, criticality safety, remote operation and maintenance, and materials of construction. To design an effective process for concentrating waste streams, both solubility and vapor-liquid equilibrium data are needed. The key issue, however, is the high decontamination factors that have been demonstrated by this equipment. Two major contributions were made to this project. First, a literature survey was completed to obtain available solubility and vapor-liquid equilibrium data. Some vapor-liquid data necessary for the project but not available in the literature was obtained experimentally. Second, the decontamination factor for the evaporator was determined using neutron activation analysis (NAA)

  18. Radionuclide solubility control by solid solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandt, F.; Klinkenberg, M.; Rozov, K.; Bosbach, D. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Inst. of Energy and Climate Research - Nuclear Waste Management and Reactor Safety (IEK-6); Vinograd, V. [Frankfurt Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Geosciences

    2015-07-01

    The migration of radionuclides in the geosphere is to a large extend controlled by sorption processes onto minerals and colloids. On a molecular level, sorption phenomena involve surface complexation, ion exchange as well as solid solution formation. The formation of solid solutions leads to the structural incorporation of radionuclides in a host structure. Such solid solutions are ubiquitous in natural systems - most minerals in nature are atomistic mixtures of elements rather than pure compounds because their formation leads to a thermodynamically more stable situation compared to the formation of pure compounds. However, due to a lack of reliable data for the expected scenario at close-to equilibrium conditions, solid solution systems have so far not been considered in long-term safety assessments for nuclear waste repositories. In recent years, various solid-solution aqueous solution systems have been studied. Here we present state-of-the art results regarding the formation of (Ra,Ba)SO{sub 4} solid solutions. In some scenarios describing a waste repository system for spent nuclear fuel in crystalline rocks {sup 226}Ra dominates the radiological impact to the environment associated with the potential release of radionuclides from the repository in the future. The solubility of Ra in equilibrium with (Ra,Ba)SO{sub 4} is much lower than the one calculated with RaSO{sub 4} as solubility limiting phase. Especially, the available literature data for the interaction parameter W{sub BaRa}, which describes the non-ideality of the solid solution, vary by about one order of magnitude (Zhu, 2004; Curti et al., 2010). The final {sup 226}Ra concentration in this system is extremely sensitive to the amount of barite, the difference in the solubility products of the end-member phases, and the degree of non-ideality of the solid solution phase. Here, we have enhanced the fundamental understanding regarding (1) the thermodynamics of (Ra,Ba)SO{sub 4} solid solutions and (2) the

  19. Sensitivity analysis of uranium solubility under strongly oxidizing conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, L.; Neretnieks, I.

    1999-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of geochemical conditions in the repository on the solubility of uranium under strongly oxidizing conditions, a mathematical model has been developed to determine the solubility, by utilizing a set of nonlinear algebraic equations to describe the chemical equilibria in the groundwater environment. The model takes into account the predominant precipitation-dissolution reactions, hydrolysis reactions and complexation reactions that may occur under strongly oxidizing conditions. The model also includes the solubility-limiting solids induced by the presence of carbonate, phosphate, silicate, calcium, and sodium in the groundwater. The thermodynamic equilibrium constants used in the solubility calculations are essentially taken from the NEA Thermochemical Data Base of Uranium, with some modification and some uranium minerals added, such as soddyite, rutherfordite, uranophane, uranyl orthophosphate, and becquerelite. By applying this model, the sensitivities of uranium solubility to variations in the concentrations of various groundwater component species are systematically investigated. The results show that the total analytical concentrations of carbonate, phosphate, silicate, and calcium in deep groundwater play the most important role in determining the solubility of uranium under strongly oxidizing conditions

  20. Thermodynamic Study of Solid-Liquid Equilibrium in NaCl-NaBr-H2O System at 288.15 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dan; Meng, Ling-zong; Deng, Tian-long; Guo, Ya-fei; Fu, Qing-Tao

    2018-06-01

    The solubility data, composition of the solid solution and refractive indices of the NaCl-NaBr-H2O system at 288.15 K were studied with the isothermal equilibrium dissolution method. The solubility diagram and refractive index diagram of this system were plotted at 288.15 K. The solubility diagram consists of two crystallization zones for solid solution Na(Cl,Br) · 2H2O and Na(Cl,Br), one invariant points cosaturated with two solid solution and two univariant solubility isothermal curves. On the basis of Pitzer and Harvie-Weare (HW) chemical models, the composition equations and solubility equilibrium constant equations of the solid solutions at 288.15 K were acquired using the solubility data, the composition of solid solutions, and binary Pitzer parameters. The solubilities calculated using the new method combining the equations are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  1. Non-equilibrium supramolecular polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorrenti, Alessandro; Leira-Iglesias, Jorge; Markvoort, Albert J; de Greef, Tom F A; Hermans, Thomas M

    2017-09-18

    Supramolecular polymerization has been traditionally focused on the thermodynamic equilibrium state, where one-dimensional assemblies reside at the global minimum of the Gibbs free energy. The pathway and rate to reach the equilibrium state are irrelevant, and the resulting assemblies remain unchanged over time. In the past decade, the focus has shifted to kinetically trapped (non-dissipative non-equilibrium) structures that heavily depend on the method of preparation (i.e., pathway complexity), and where the assembly rates are of key importance. Kinetic models have greatly improved our understanding of competing pathways, and shown how to steer supramolecular polymerization in the desired direction (i.e., pathway selection). The most recent innovation in the field relies on energy or mass input that is dissipated to keep the system away from the thermodynamic equilibrium (or from other non-dissipative states). This tutorial review aims to provide the reader with a set of tools to identify different types of self-assembled states that have been explored so far. In particular, we aim to clarify the often unclear use of the term "non-equilibrium self-assembly" by subdividing systems into dissipative, and non-dissipative non-equilibrium states. Examples are given for each of the states, with a focus on non-dissipative non-equilibrium states found in one-dimensional supramolecular polymerization.

  2. Spontaneity and Equilibrium: Why "?G Equilibrium" Are Incorrect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raff, Lionel M.

    2014-01-01

    The fundamental criteria for chemical reactions to be spontaneous in a given direction are generally incorrectly stated as ?G equilibrium are also misstated as being ?G = 0 or ?A = 0. Following a brief review of the…

  3. Helical axis stellarator equilibrium model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koniges, A.E.; Johnson, J.L.

    1985-02-01

    An asymptotic model is developed to study MHD equilibria in toroidal systems with a helical magnetic axis. Using a characteristic coordinate system based on the vacuum field lines, the equilibrium problem is reduced to a two-dimensional generalized partial differential equation of the Grad-Shafranov type. A stellarator-expansion free-boundary equilibrium code is modified to solve the helical-axis equations. The expansion model is used to predict the equilibrium properties of Asperators NP-3 and NP-4. Numerically determined flux surfaces, magnetic well, transform, and shear are presented. The equilibria show a toroidal Shafranov shift

  4. Soluble porphyrin polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gust, Jr., John Devens; Liddell, Paul Anthony

    2015-07-07

    Porphyrin polymers of Structure 1, where n is an integer (e.g., 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, or greater) ##STR00001## are synthesized by the method shown in FIGS. 2A and 2B. The porphyrin polymers of Structure 1 are soluble in organic solvents such as 2-MeTHF and the like, and can be synthesized in bulk (i.e., in processes other than electropolymerization). These porphyrin polymers have long excited state lifetimes, making the material suitable as an organic semiconductor for organic electronic devices including transistors and memories, as well as solar cells, sensors, light-emitting devices, and other opto-electronic devices.

  5. ALARA in diagnosis and therapy: for an equilibrium medically reasonable

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aurengo, A.; Fraboulet, P.

    1998-01-01

    After a recall about the differences of conceptions in radiation protection in the medical field it is shown how it is possible to make with efficiency an optimization approach and to lead towards an equilibrium medically acceptable between the therapeutic necessity and the protection of medical personnel. The problem of the patients radiation protection is out of this frame. (N.C.)

  6. Solubility behavior of narcotic analgesics in aqueous media: solubilities and dissociation constants of morphine, fentanyl, and sufentanil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, S D; Flynn, G L

    1989-02-01

    The pH dependence of the aqueous solubility of morphine, fentanyl, and sufentanil was investigated at 35 degrees C. Dissociation constants and corresponding pKa' values of the drugs were obtained from measured free-base solubilities (determined at high pH's) and the concentrations of saturated solutions at intermediate pH's. Morphine, fentanyl, and sufentanil exhibited pKa' values of 8.08, 8.99, and 8.51, respectively. Over the pH range of 5 to 12.5 the apparent solubilities are determined by the intrinsic solubility of the free base plus the concentration of ionized drug necessary to satisfy the dissociation equilibrium at a given pH. Consequently, the drug concentrations of saturated aqueous solutions fall off precipitously as the pH is raised and ionization is suppressed. Further, at low pH's the aqueous solubility of morphine increased in a linear fashion with increases in the molar strength of citric acid which was added to acidify the medium, suggesting the formation of a soluble morphine-citrate complex.

  7. On the solubility of plutonium in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naegele, G.

    1977-12-01

    In a theoretical study, the chemical equilibrium state of saturated Pu solutions in water was determined and the effect of the addition of EDTA on the solubility of Pu estimated. Concentrations of Plutonium in true solution in the range of grams/litre seem to be achievable, at least in principle. The amount of EDTA necessary is not larger than the total amount of Pu. It is however questionable, specially after taking into account all possible effects of reaction kinetics, whether such high concentrations can be achieved at all under normal environmental conditions. Only experiments under real world conditions can give an answer to this question. (orig./HK) 891 HK 892 AP [de

  8. Surface properties, solubility and dissolution kinetics of bamboo phytoliths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraysse, Fabrice; Pokrovsky, Oleg S.; Schott, Jacques; Meunier, Jean-Dominique

    2006-04-01

    Although phytoliths, constituted mainly by micrometric opal, exhibit an important control on silicon cycle in superficial continental environments, their thermodynamic properties and reactivity in aqueous solution are still poorly known. In this work, we determined the solubility and dissolution rates of bamboo phytoliths collected in the Réunion Island and characterized their surface properties via electrophoretic measurements and potentiometric titrations in a wide range of pH. The solubility product of "soil" phytoliths ( pKsp0=2.74 at 25 °C) is equal to that of vitreous silica and is 17 times higher than that of quartz. Similarly, the enthalpy of phytoliths dissolution reaction (ΔHr25-80°C=10.85kJ/mol) is close to that of amorphous silica but is significantly lower than the enthalpy of quartz dissolution. Electrophoretic measurements yield isoelectric point pH IEP = 1.2 ± 0.1 and 2.5 ± 0.2 for "soil" (native) and "heated" (450 °C heating to remove organic matter) phytoliths, respectively. Surface acid-base titrations allowed generation of a 2-p K surface complexation model. Phytoliths dissolution rates, measured in mixed-flow reactors at far from equilibrium conditions at 2 ⩽ pH ⩽ 12, were found to be intermediate between those of quartz and vitreous silica. The dissolution rate dependence on pH was modeled within the concept of surface coordination theory using the equation: R=k1·{>SiOH2+}n+k2·{>SiOH0}+k3·{>SiO-}m, where {> i} stands for the concentration of the surface species present at the SiO 2-H 2O interface, ki are the rate constants of the three parallel reactions and n and m represent the order of the proton- and hydroxy-promoted reactions, respectively. It follows from the results of this study that phytoliths dissolution rates exhibit a minimum at pH ˜ 3. This can explain their good preservation in the acidic soil horizons of Réunion Island. In terms of silicon biogeochemical cycle, phytoliths represent a large buffering reservoir

  9. Numerical Verification Of Equilibrium Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piro, Markus; Lewis, Brent; Thompson, William T.; Simunovic, Srdjan; Besmann, Theodore M.

    2010-01-01

    A numerical tool is in an advanced state of development to compute the equilibrium compositions of phases and their proportions in multi-component systems of importance to the nuclear industry. The resulting software is being conceived for direct integration into large multi-physics fuel performance codes, particularly for providing boundary conditions in heat and mass transport modules. However, any numerical errors produced in equilibrium chemistry computations will be propagated in subsequent heat and mass transport calculations, thus falsely predicting nuclear fuel behaviour. The necessity for a reliable method to numerically verify chemical equilibrium computations is emphasized by the requirement to handle the very large number of elements necessary to capture the entire fission product inventory. A simple, reliable and comprehensive numerical verification method is presented which can be invoked by any equilibrium chemistry solver for quality assurance purposes.

  10. Equilibrium ignition for ICF capsules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lackner, K.S.; Colgate, S.A.; Johnson, N.L.; Kirkpatrick, R.C.; Menikoff, R.; Petschek, A.G.

    1993-01-01

    There are two fundamentally different approaches to igniting DT fuel in an ICF capsule which can be described as equilibrium and hot spot ignition. In both cases, a capsule which can be thought of as a pusher containing the DT fuel is imploded until the fuel reaches ignition conditions. In comparing high-gain ICF targets using cryogenic DT for a pusher with equilibrium ignition targets using high-Z pushers which contain the radiation. The authors point to the intrinsic advantages of the latter. Equilibrium or volume ignition sacrifices high gain for lower losses, lower ignition temperature, lower implosion velocity and lower sensitivity of the more robust capsule to small fluctuations and asymmetries in the drive system. The reduction in gain is about a factor of 2.5, which is small enough to make the more robust equilibrium ignition an attractive alternative

  11. A Strategic-Equilibrium Based

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel J. Turbay

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The strategic equilibrium of an N-person cooperative game with transferable utility is a system composed of a cover collection of subsets of N and a set of extended imputations attainable through such equilibrium cover. The system describes a state of coalitional bargaining stability where every player has a bargaining alternative against any other player to support his corresponding equilibrium claim. Any coalition in the sable system may form and divide the characteristic value function of the coalition as prescribed by the equilibrium payoffs. If syndicates are allowed to form, a formed coalition may become a syndicate using the equilibrium payoffs as disagreement values in bargaining for a part of the complementary coalition incremental value to the grand coalition when formed. The emergent well known-constant sum derived game in partition function is described in terms of parameters that result from incumbent binding agreements. The strategic-equilibrium corresponding to the derived game gives an equal value claim to all players.  This surprising result is alternatively explained in terms of strategic-equilibrium based possible outcomes by a sequence of bargaining stages that when the binding agreements are in the right sequential order, von Neumann and Morgenstern (vN-M non-discriminatory solutions emerge. In these solutions a preferred branch by a sufficient number of players is identified: the weaker players syndicate against the stronger player. This condition is referred to as the stronger player paradox.  A strategic alternative available to the stronger players to overcome the anticipated not desirable results is to voluntarily lower his bargaining equilibrium claim. In doing the original strategic equilibrium is modified and vN-M discriminatory solutions may occur, but also a different stronger player may emerge that has eventually will have to lower his equilibrium claim. A sequence of such measures converges to the equal

  12. Scoring function to predict solubility mutagenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deutsch Christopher

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mutagenesis is commonly used to engineer proteins with desirable properties not present in the wild type (WT protein, such as increased or decreased stability, reactivity, or solubility. Experimentalists often have to choose a small subset of mutations from a large number of candidates to obtain the desired change, and computational techniques are invaluable to make the choices. While several such methods have been proposed to predict stability and reactivity mutagenesis, solubility has not received much attention. Results We use concepts from computational geometry to define a three body scoring function that predicts the change in protein solubility due to mutations. The scoring function captures both sequence and structure information. By exploring the literature, we have assembled a substantial database of 137 single- and multiple-point solubility mutations. Our database is the largest such collection with structural information known so far. We optimize the scoring function using linear programming (LP methods to derive its weights based on training. Starting with default values of 1, we find weights in the range [0,2] so that predictions of increase or decrease in solubility are optimized. We compare the LP method to the standard machine learning techniques of support vector machines (SVM and the Lasso. Using statistics for leave-one-out (LOO, 10-fold, and 3-fold cross validations (CV for training and prediction, we demonstrate that the LP method performs the best overall. For the LOOCV, the LP method has an overall accuracy of 81%. Availability Executables of programs, tables of weights, and datasets of mutants are available from the following web page: http://www.wsu.edu/~kbala/OptSolMut.html.

  13. Thermodynamic evolution far from equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khantuleva, Tatiana A.

    2018-05-01

    The presented model of thermodynamic evolution of an open system far from equilibrium is based on the modern results of nonequilibrium statistical mechanics, the nonlocal theory of nonequilibrium transport developed by the author and the Speed Gradient principle introduced in the theory of adaptive control. Transition to a description of the system internal structure evolution at the mesoscopic level allows a new insight at the stability problem of non-equilibrium processes. The new model is used in a number of specific tasks.

  14. Spectroscopy, modeling and computation of metal chelate solubility in supercritical CO2. 1998 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brennecke, J.F.; Chateauneuf, J.E.; Stadtherr, M.A.

    1998-01-01

    'This report summarizes work after 1 year and 8 months (9/15/96-5/14/98) of a 3 year project. Thus far, progress has been made in: (1) the measurement of the solubility of metal chelates in SC CO 2 with and without added cosolvents, (2) the spectroscopic determination of preferential solvation of metal chelates by cosolvents in SC CO 2 solutions, and (3) the development of a totally reliable computational technique for phase equilibrium computations. An important factor in the removal of metals from solid matrices with CO 2 /chelate mixtures is the equilibrium solubility of the metal chelate complex in the CO 2 .'

  15. Relevance of equilibrium in multifragmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuta, Takuya; Ono, Akira

    2009-01-01

    The relevance of equilibrium in a multifragmentation reaction of very central 40 Ca + 40 Ca collisions at 35 MeV/nucleon is investigated by using simulations of antisymmetrized molecular dynamics (AMD). Two types of ensembles are compared. One is the reaction ensemble of the states at each reaction time t in collision events simulated by AMD, and the other is the equilibrium ensemble prepared by solving the AMD equation of motion for a many-nucleon system confined in a container for a long time. The comparison of the ensembles is performed for the fragment charge distribution and the excitation energies. Our calculations show that there exists an equilibrium ensemble that well reproduces the reaction ensemble at each reaction time t for the investigated period 80≤t≤300 fm/c. However, there are some other observables that show discrepancies between the reaction and equilibrium ensembles. These may be interpreted as dynamical effects in the reaction. The usual static equilibrium at each instant is not realized since any equilibrium ensemble with the same volume as that of the reaction system cannot reproduce the fragment observables

  16. Structural-design considerations for the FED 50-kA equilibrium field coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchanan, G.; Bennett, J.G.

    1983-01-01

    The structural support system for two equilibrium field coil conductor concepts is considered for the fusion energy design (FED) 8/10T baseline magnetic-fusion system. Both conductor concepts are discussed. Results indicate that regardless of the conductor concept employed, an external support beam/frame structural system is required to equilibrate the accumulative loadings

  17. Equilibrium and non-equilibrium concepts in forest genetic modelling: population- and individually-based approaches

    OpenAIRE

    Kramer, Koen; van der Werf, D. C.

    2010-01-01

    The environment is changing and so are forests, in their functioning, in species composition, and in the species’ genetic composition. Many empirical and process-based models exist to support forest management. However, most of these models do not consider the impact of environmental changes and forest management on genetic diversity nor on the rate of adaptation of critical plant processes. How genetic diversity and rates of adaptation depend on management actions is a crucial next step in m...

  18. Aqueous solubility, dispersibility and toxicity of biodiesels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollebone, B.P.; Fieldhouse, B.; Lumley, T.C.; Landriault, M.; Doe, K.; Jackman, P.

    2007-01-01

    The renewed interest in the use of biological fuels can be attributed to that fact that feedstocks for fatty-acid ester biodiesels are renewable and can be reclaimed from waste. Although there are significant benefits to using biodiesels, their increased use leaves potential for accidental release to the environment. Therefore, their environmental behaviours and impacts must be evaluated along with the risk associated with their use. Biodiesel fuels may be made from soy oil, canola oil, reclaimed restaurant grease, fish oil and animal fat. The toxicological fate of biofuel depends on the variability of its chemical composition. This study provided an initial assessment of the aqueous fate and effects of biodiesel from a broad range of commonly available feedstocks and their blends with petroleum diesels. The study focused primarily on the fate and impact of these fuels in fresh-water. The use of chemical dispersion as a countermeasure for saltwater was also investigated. The exposure of aquatic ecosystems to biodiesels and petroleum diesel occurs via the transfer of material from the non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) into the aqueous phase, as both soluble and dispersed components. The aqueous solubilities of the fuels were determined from the equilibrium water-accommodated fraction concentrations. The acute toxicities of many biodiesels were reported for 3 test species used by Environment Canada for toxicological evaluation, namely rainbow trout, the water flea and a luminescent bacterium. This study also evaluated the natural potential for dispersion of the fuels in the water column in both low and high-energy wave conditions. Chemical dispersion as a potential countermeasure for biodiesel spills was also evaluated using solubility testing, acute toxicity testing, and dispersibility testing. It was shown that biodiesels have much different fates and impacts from petroleum diesels. The compounds partitioning into the water column are also very different for each

  19. pH-metric solubility. 3. Dissolution titration template method for solubility determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avdeef, A; Berger, C M

    2001-12-01

    The main objective of this study was to develop an effective potentiometric saturation titration protocol for determining the aqueous intrinsic solubility and the solubility-pH profile of ionizable molecules, with the specific aim of overcoming incomplete dissolution conditions, while attempting to shorten the data collection time. A modern theory of dissolution kinetics (an extension of the Noyes-Whitney approach) was applied to acid-base titration experiments. A thermodynamic method was developed, based on a three-component model, to calculate interfacial, diffusion-layer, and bulk-water reactant concentrations in saturated solutions of ionizable compounds perturbed by additions of acid/base titrant, leading to partial dissolution of the solid material. Ten commercial drugs (cimetidine, diltiazem hydrochloride, enalapril maleate, metoprolol tartrate, nadolol, propoxyphene hydrochloride, quinine hydrochloride, terfenadine, trovafloxacin mesylate, and benzoic acid) were chosen to illustrate the new titration methodology. It was shown that the new method is about 10 times faster in determining equilibrium solubility constants, compared to the traditional saturation shake-flask methods.

  20. Shape characteristics of equilibrium and non-equilibrium fractal clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansfield, Marc L; Douglas, Jack F

    2013-07-28

    It is often difficult in practice to discriminate between equilibrium and non-equilibrium nanoparticle or colloidal-particle clusters that form through aggregation in gas or solution phases. Scattering studies often permit the determination of an apparent fractal dimension, but both equilibrium and non-equilibrium clusters in three dimensions frequently have fractal dimensions near 2, so that it is often not possible to discriminate on the basis of this geometrical property. A survey of the anisotropy of a wide variety of polymeric structures (linear and ring random and self-avoiding random walks, percolation clusters, lattice animals, diffusion-limited aggregates, and Eden clusters) based on the principal components of both the radius of gyration and electric polarizability tensor indicates, perhaps counter-intuitively, that self-similar equilibrium clusters tend to be intrinsically anisotropic at all sizes, while non-equilibrium processes such as diffusion-limited aggregation or Eden growth tend to be isotropic in the large-mass limit, providing a potential means of discriminating these clusters experimentally if anisotropy could be determined along with the fractal dimension. Equilibrium polymer structures, such as flexible polymer chains, are normally self-similar due to the existence of only a single relevant length scale, and are thus anisotropic at all length scales, while non-equilibrium polymer structures that grow irreversibly in time eventually become isotropic if there is no difference in the average growth rates in different directions. There is apparently no proof of these general trends and little theoretical insight into what controls the universal anisotropy in equilibrium polymer structures of various kinds. This is an obvious topic of theoretical investigation, as well as a matter of practical interest. To address this general problem, we consider two experimentally accessible ratios, one between the hydrodynamic and gyration radii, the other

  1. Optimal Dispatching of Active Distribution Networks Based on Load Equilibrium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Han

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the optimal intraday scheduling of a distribution system that includes renewable energy (RE generation, energy storage systems (ESSs, and thermostatically controlled loads (TCLs. This system also provides time-of-use pricing to customers. Unlike previous studies, this study attempts to examine how to optimize the allocation of electric energy and to improve the equilibrium of the load curve. Accordingly, we propose a concept of load equilibrium entropy to quantify the overall equilibrium of the load curve and reflect the allocation optimization of electric energy. Based on this entropy, we built a novel multi-objective optimal dispatching model to minimize the operational cost and maximize the load curve equilibrium. To aggregate TCLs into the optimization objective, we introduced the concept of a virtual power plant (VPP and proposed a calculation method for VPP operating characteristics based on the equivalent thermal parameter model and the state-queue control method. The Particle Swarm Optimization algorithm was employed to solve the optimization problems. The simulation results illustrated that the proposed dispatching model can achieve cost reductions of system operations, peak load curtailment, and efficiency improvements, and also verified that the load equilibrium entropy can be used as a novel index of load characteristics.

  2. Phase equilibrium of North Sea oils with polar chemicals: Experiments and CPA modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frost, Michael Grynnerup; Kontogeorgis, Georgios M.; von Solms, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    This work consists of a combined experimental and modeling study for oil - MEG - water systems, of relevance to petroleum applications. We present new experimental liquid-liquid equilibrium data for the mutual solubility of two North Sea oils + MEG and North Sea oils + MEG + water systems...

  3. The Adverse Effects of Le Chatelier's Principle on Teacher Understanding of Chemical Equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Derek

    2009-01-01

    Although the scientific inadequacy of Le Chatelier's principle has long been documented in the literature, the principle is still treated as a central concept of chemical equilibrium by textbook writers and teachers in many countries. In the past, researchers' interest has focused on student misconceptions about chemical equilibrium and has…

  4. Promoting Pre-Service Elementary Students' Understanding of Chemical Equilibrium through Discussions in Small Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgin, Ibrahim

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of small group discussion on students' conceptual understanding of chemical equilibrium. Students' understanding of chemical equilibrium concepts was measured using the Misconception Identification Test. The test consisted of 30 items and administered as pre-posttests to a total of 81…

  5. Response to Contradiction: Conflict Resolution Strategies Used by Students in Solving Problems of Chemical Equilibrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niaz, Mansoor

    2001-01-01

    Illustrates how a novel problem of chemical equilibrium based on a closely related sequence of items can facilitate students' conceptual understanding. Students were presented with a chemical reaction in equilibrium to which a reactant was added as an external effect. Three studies were conducted to assess alternative conceptions. (Author/SAH)

  6. Chemical oceanography of the Arabian Sea: Part II - Equilibrium of inorganic nitrogen system

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naik, S.; SenGupta, R.

    observed are found to be close to the equilibrium values calculated from theoretical relations and are nearer to the more recent concept of the normal value for sea water.It is inferred that the system approaches equilibrium conditions in the deeper waters...

  7. Solubility of metallic elements in LBE under extra low oxygen potential. JFY2003 joint research report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sano, Hiroyuki; Fujisawa, Toshiharu; Furukawa, Tomohiro; Aoto, Kazumi

    2004-03-01

    Lead-Bismuth eutectic alloy (LBE) has been considered as a prospective coolant for a fast-breeder reactor. However a corrosion of cooling pipe is anticipated when it is used at the similar temperature as sodium coolant. In this study, solubility of major metallic elements in LBE was measured under extra low oxygen potential. The interactive effect of those elements on the solubility was also to be examined. (1) The solubility of oxygen in LBE was measured by the gas equilibrium method (1223 k-1323 K). The standard Gibbs free energy change of oxygen solution reaction and the self-interaction parameter of oxygen in LBE were calculated, respectively. (2) The solubility of iron in LBE was measured by both the gas equilibrium method and the oxide equilibrium method (873 K-1323 K). The standard Gibbs free energy change of iron solution reaction, interaction parameter of oxygen on iron and self-interaction parameter of iron in LBE were calculated, respectively. (3) The interactive effect of iron and oxygen on the solubility in LBE was considered thermodynamically. (4) The solubility of chromium and nickel in LBE were measured under Ar-H 2 atmosphere. (author)

  8. Local Equilibrium and Retardation Revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Scott K; Vesselinov, Velimir V

    2018-01-01

    In modeling solute transport with mobile-immobile mass transfer (MIMT), it is common to use an advection-dispersion equation (ADE) with a retardation factor, or retarded ADE. This is commonly referred to as making the local equilibrium assumption (LEA). Assuming local equilibrium, Eulerian textbook treatments derive the retarded ADE, ostensibly exactly. However, other authors have presented rigorous mathematical derivations of the dispersive effect of MIMT, applicable even in the case of arbitrarily fast mass transfer. We resolve the apparent contradiction between these seemingly exact derivations by adopting a Lagrangian point of view. We show that local equilibrium constrains the expected time immobile, whereas the retarded ADE actually embeds a stronger, nonphysical, constraint: that all particles spend the same amount of every time increment immobile. Eulerian derivations of the retarded ADE thus silently commit the gambler's fallacy, leading them to ignore dispersion due to mass transfer that is correctly modeled by other approaches. We then present a particle tracking simulation illustrating how poor an approximation the retarded ADE may be, even when mobile and immobile plumes are continually near local equilibrium. We note that classic "LEA" (actually, retarded ADE validity) criteria test for insignificance of MIMT-driven dispersion relative to hydrodynamic dispersion, rather than for local equilibrium. Published 2017. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  9. Equilibrium concentration of radionuclides in cement/groundwater/carbon steel system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keum, D. K.; Cho, W. J.; Hahn, P. S.

    1997-01-01

    Equilibrium concentration of major elements in an underground repository with a capacity of 100,000 drums have been simulated using the geochemical computer code (EQMOD). The simulation has been carried out at the conditions of pH 12 to 13.5, and Eh 520 and -520 mV. Solubilities of magnesium and calcium decrease with the increase of pH. The solubility of iron increases with pH at Eh -520 mV of reducing environment, while it almost entirely exists as the precipitate of Fe(OH) 3 (s) at Eh 520 mV of oxidizing environment. All of cobalt and nickel are predicted to be dissolved in the liquid phase regardless of pH since the solubility limit is greater than the total concentration. In the case of cesium and strontium, all forms of both ions are present in the liquid phase because they have negligible sorption capacity on cement and large solubility under disposal atmosphere. And thus the total concentration determines the equilibrium concentration. Adsorbed amounts of iodide and carbonate are dependent on adsorption capacity and adsorption equilibrium constant. Especially, the calcite turns out to be a solubility-limiting phase on the carbonate system. In order to validate the model, the equilibrium concentrations measured for a number of systems which consist of iron, cement, synthetic groundwater and radionuclides are compared with those predicted by the model. The concentrations between the model and the experiment of nonadsorptive elements - cesium, strontium, cobalt, nickel and iron, are well agreed. It indicates that the assumptions and the thermodynamic data in this work are valid. Using the adsorption equilibrium constant as a free parameter, the experimental data of iodide and carbonate have been fitted to the model. The model is in a good agreement with the experimental data of the iodide system. (author)

  10. Solubility Measurements and Modeling of Zinc, Lead and Iron Sulfides at High Temperatures and High Pressures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carolina Figueroa Murcia, Diana; Fosbøl, Philip Loldrup; Thomsen, Kaj

    Solubility measurements of sulfides in aqueous solutions are necessary to understand the behaviour of these scaling minerals in geothermal and oil reservoirs. The low solubility levels of Zinc Sulfide (ZnS), Lead Sulfide (PbS) and Iron Sulfide (FeS) make the solubility measurements a challenging...... oxygen atmosphere to avoid the risk of oxidation of sulfide minerals. The solution is kept in an equilibrium cell at constant temperature and pressure with continuous stirring. The concentration of Zn2+, Pb2+, Fe2+ and S2- are measured using Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission spectrometry (ICP...

  11. Water-soluble vitamins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konings, Erik J M

    2006-01-01

    Simultaneous Determination of Vitamins.--Klejdus et al. described a simultaneous determination of 10 water- and 10 fat-soluble vitamins in pharmaceutical preparations by liquid chromatography-diode-array detection (LC-DAD). A combined isocratic and linear gradient allowed separation of vitamins in 3 distinct groups: polar, low-polar, and nonpolar. The method was applied to pharmaceutical preparations, fortified powdered drinks, and food samples, for which results were in good agreement with values claimed. Heudi et al. described a separation of 9 water-soluble vitamins by LC-UV. The method was applied for the quantification of vitamins in polyvitaminated premixes used for the fortification of infant nutrition products. The repeatability of the method was evaluated at different concentration levels and coefficients of variation were based on, for example, LC. Koontz et al. showed results of total folate concentrations measured by microbiological assay in a variety of foods. Samples were submitted in a routine manner to experienced laboratories that regularly perform folate analysis fee-for-service basis in the United States. Each laboratory reported the use of a microbiological method similar to the AOAC Official Method for the determination of folic acid. Striking was, the use of 3 different pH extraction conditions by 4 laboratories. Only one laboratory reported using a tri-enzyme extraction. Results were evaluated. Results for folic acid fortified foods had considerably lower between-laboratory variation, 9-11%, versus >45% for other foods. Mean total folate ranged from 14 to 279 microg/100 g for a mixed vegetable reference material, from 5 to 70 microg/100 g for strawberries, and from 28 to 81 microg/100 g for wholemeal flour. One should realize a large variation in results, which might be caused by slight modifications in the microbiological analysis of total folate in foods or the analysis in various (unfortified) food matrixes. Furthermore, optimal

  12. Equilibrium Arrival Times to Queues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breinbjerg, Jesper; Østerdal, Lars Peter

    We consider a non-cooperative queueing environment where a finite number of customers independently choose when to arrive at a queueing system that opens at a given point in time and serves customers on a last-come first-serve preemptive-resume (LCFS-PR) basis. Each customer has a service time...... requirement which is identically and independently distributed according to some general probability distribution, and they want to complete service as early as possible while minimizing the time spent in the queue. In this setting, we establish the existence of an arrival time strategy that constitutes...... a symmetric (mixed) Nash equilibrium, and show that there is at most one symmetric equilibrium. We provide a numerical method to compute this equilibrium and demonstrate by a numerical example that the social effciency can be lower than the effciency induced by a similar queueing system that serves customers...

  13. Solubility of hydrogen isotopes in stressed hydride-forming metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coleman, C.E.; Ambler, J.F.R.

    1983-01-01

    Components made from hydride-forming metals can be brittle when particles of hydride are present. The solid solubility limit of hydrogen in these metals needs to be known so that fracture resistance can be properly assessed. Stress affects the solubility of hydrogen in metals. As hydrogen dissolves the metal volume increases, an applied hydrostatic tensile stress supplies work to increase the solubility. Precipitation of hydrides increases the volume further. A hydrostatic tensile stress promotes the formation of hydrides and tends to reduce the terminal solubility. For materials containing hydrogen in solution in equilibrium with hydrides, the effect of stress on the terminal solubility is given. Hydrogen migrates up tensile stress gradients because of the effect of stress on the solubility and solubility limit. Consequently, hydrogen concentrates at flaws. When hydrides are present in the metal matrix, those remote from the flaw tip will preferentially dissolve in favor of those precipitated at the flaw. If the stress is large enough, at some critical condition the hydrides at the flaw will crack. This is delayed hydrogen cracking. Notched and fatigue-cracked cantilever beam specimens (6) (38 x 4 x 3 mm) were machined from the circumferential direction of several cold-worked Zr-2.5 at. % Nb pressure tubes. The chemical compositions had the ranges (in atomic %) Nb - 2.5 to 2.7; O - 0.58 to 0.71; H - 0.018 to 0.18. The effect of test temperature is for a specimen containing 0.13 at. % protium and 0.29 at .% deuterium. Between 505 K and 530 K was less than 1 hr, between 530 K and 537 K it increased to 25.8 h, while at 538 K no cracking was observed up to the 54 h

  14. Spontaneity and Equilibrium: Why "?G Equilibrium" Are Incorrect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raff, Lionel M.

    2014-01-01

    The fundamental criteria for chemical reactions to be spontaneous in a given direction are generally incorrectly stated as ?G chemistry textbooks and even in some more advanced texts. Similarly, the criteria for equilibrium are also misstated as being ?G = 0 or ?A = 0. Following a brief review of the…

  15. Equilibrium problems for Raney densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrester, Peter J.; Liu, Dang-Zheng; Zinn-Justin, Paul

    2015-07-01

    The Raney numbers are a class of combinatorial numbers generalising the Fuss-Catalan numbers. They are indexed by a pair of positive real numbers (p, r) with p > 1 and 0 0 and similarly use both methods to identify the equilibrium problem for (p, r) = (θ/q + 1, 1/q), θ > 0 and q \\in Z+ . The Wiener-Hopf method is used to extend the latter to parameters (p, r) = (θ/q + 1, m + 1/q) for m a non-negative integer, and also to identify the equilibrium problem for a family of densities with moments given by certain binomial coefficients.

  16. Equilibrium in a Production Economy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiarolla, Maria B., E-mail: maria.chiarolla@uniroma1.it [Universita di Roma ' La Sapienza' , Dipartimento di Metodi e Modelli per l' Economia, il Territorio e la Finanza, Facolta di Economia (Italy); Haussmann, Ulrich G., E-mail: uhaus@math.ubc.ca [University of British Columbia, Department of Mathematics (Canada)

    2011-06-15

    Consider a closed production-consumption economy with multiple agents and multiple resources. The resources are used to produce the consumption good. The agents derive utility from holding resources as well as consuming the good produced. They aim to maximize their utility while the manager of the production facility aims to maximize profits. With the aid of a representative agent (who has a multivariable utility function) it is shown that an Arrow-Debreu equilibrium exists. In so doing we establish technical results that will be used to solve the stochastic dynamic problem (a case with infinite dimensional commodity space so the General Equilibrium Theory does not apply) elsewhere.

  17. Incentives in Supply Function Equilibrium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vetter, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    The author analyses delegation in homogenous duopoly under the assumption that the firm-managers compete in supply functions. In supply function equilibrium, managers’ decisions are strategic complements. This reverses earlier findings in that the author finds that owners give managers incentives...... to act in an accommodating way. As a result, optimal delegation reduces per-firm output and increases profits to above-Cournot profits. Moreover, in supply function equilibrium the mode of competition is endogenous. This means that the author avoids results that are sensitive with respect to assuming...

  18. Equilibrium in a Production Economy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiarolla, Maria B.; Haussmann, Ulrich G.

    2011-01-01

    Consider a closed production-consumption economy with multiple agents and multiple resources. The resources are used to produce the consumption good. The agents derive utility from holding resources as well as consuming the good produced. They aim to maximize their utility while the manager of the production facility aims to maximize profits. With the aid of a representative agent (who has a multivariable utility function) it is shown that an Arrow-Debreu equilibrium exists. In so doing we establish technical results that will be used to solve the stochastic dynamic problem (a case with infinite dimensional commodity space so the General Equilibrium Theory does not apply) elsewhere.

  19. The Equilibrium Rule--A Personal Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, Paul G.

    2016-01-01

    Examples of equilibrium are evident everywhere and the equilibrium rule provides a reasoned way to view all things, whether in static (balancing rocks, steel beams in building construction) or dynamic (airplanes, bowling balls) equilibrium. Interestingly, the equilibrium rule applies not just to objects at rest but whenever any object or system of…

  20. Non equilibrium atomic processes and plasma spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Takako

    2003-01-01

    Along with the technical progress in plasma spectroscopy, non equilibrium ionization processes have been recently observed. We study non local thermodynamic equilibrium and non ionization equilibrium for various kinds of plasmas. Specifically we discuss non equilibrium atomic processes in magnetically confined plasmas, solar flares and laser produced plasmas using a collisional radiative model based on plasma spectroscopic data. (author)

  1. Equilibrium econophysics: A unified formalism for neoclassical economics and equilibrium thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Tânia; Domingos, Tiago

    2006-11-01

    We develop a unified conceptual and mathematical structure for equilibrium econophysics, i.e., the use of concepts and tools of equilibrium thermodynamics in neoclassical microeconomics and vice versa. Within this conceptual structure the results obtained in microeconomic theory are: (1) the definition of irreversibility in economic behavior; (2) the clarification that the Engel curve and the offer curve are not descriptions of real processes dictated by the maximization of utility at constant endowment; (3) the derivation of a relation between elasticities proving that economic elasticities are not all independent; (4) the proof that Giffen goods do not exist in a stable equilibrium; (5) the derivation that ‘economic integrability’ is equivalent to the generalized Le Chatelier principle and (6) the definition of a first order phase transition, i.e., a transition between separate points in the utility function. In thermodynamics the results obtained are: (1) a relation between the non-dimensional isothermal and adiabatic compressibilities and the increase or decrease in the thermodynamic potentials; (2) the distinction between mathematical integrability and optimization behavior and (3) the generalization of the Clapeyron equation.

  2. On the americium oxalate solubility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakolupin, S.A.; Korablin, Eh.V.

    1977-01-01

    The americium oxalate solubility at different nitric (0.0-1 M) and oxalic (0.0-0.4 M) acid concentrations was investigated in the temperature range from 14 to 60 deg C. The dependence of americium oxalate solubility on the oxalic acid concentration was determined. Increasing oxalic acid concentration was found to reduce the americium oxalate solubility. The dependence of americium oxalate solubility on the oxalic acid concentration was noted to be a minimum at low acidity (0.1-0.3 M nitric acid). This is most likely due to Am(C 2 O 4 ) + , Am(C 2 O 4 ) 2 - and Am(C 2 O 4 ) 3 3- complex ion formation which have different unstability constants. On the basis of the data obtained, a preliminary estimate was carried out for the product of americium oxalate solubility in nitric acid medium (10 -29 -10 -31 ) and of the one in water (6.4x10 -20 )

  3. Assessment of solubility and speciation of U, Pu, Np, and Th in natural groundwaters: theory, thermodynamic data, and primary applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schweingruber, M

    1981-11-01

    The computer code MINEQL was adapted and extended to assess the solubility and speciation of radioactive waste nuclides in groundwaters under conditions which are expected to exist in the surroundings of planned underground repositories. By means of an additional data base including standard reaction enthalpies and heat capacities at 25/sup 0/C, the relevant equilibrium constants at 25/sup 0/C can be converted to other temperatures using Ulich's formulae. The activitiy coefficients for dissolved species are modelled with a temperature dependent function of the Davies' approximation type. The report is segmented in three main parts: (1) a review of the MINEQL fundamentals and a summary of the theory needed for the extensions; (2) an outline of the general program structure and of criteria applied to the selection of thermodynamic data; (3) a discussion of the results from first model applications to evaluate the solubility and speciation of U, Pu, Np and Th in two Swiss groundwaters, based either on the approach of negligible chemical disturbance or on a solid/solution titration concept. All thermodynamic data involved in this study are collected in an appendix, together with a compilation of references.

  4. Solubility effects in waste-glass/demineralized-water systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fullam, H.T.

    1981-06-01

    Aqueous systems involving demineralized water and four glass compositions (including standins for actinides and fission products) at temperatures of up to 150 0 C were studied. Two methods were used to measure the solubility of glass components in demineralized water. One method involved approaching equilibrium from subsaturation, while the second method involved approaching equilibrium from supersaturation. The aqueous solutions were analyzed by induction-coupled plasma spectrometry (ICP). Uranium was determined using a Scintrex U-A3 uranium analyzer and zinc and cesium were determined by atomic absorption. The system that results when a waste glass is contacted with demineralized water is a complex one. The two methods used to determine the solubility limits gave very different results, with the supersaturation method yielding much higher solution concentrations than the subsaturation method for most of the elements present in the waste glasses. The results show that it is impossible to assign solubility limits to the various glass components without thoroughly describing the glass-water systems. This includes not only defining the glass type and solution temperature, but also the glass surface area-to-water volume ratio (S/V) of the system and the complete thermal history of the system. 21 figures, 22 tables

  5. Deviations from thermal equilibrium in plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burm, K.T.A.L.

    2004-01-01

    A plasma system in local thermal equilibrium can usually be described with only two parameters. To describe deviations from equilibrium two extra parameters are needed. However, it will be shown that deviations from temperature equilibrium and deviations from Saha equilibrium depend on one another. As a result, non-equilibrium plasmas can be described with three parameters. This reduction in parameter space will ease the plasma describing effort enormously

  6. Non-equilibrium fluctuation-induced interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dean, David S

    2012-01-01

    We discuss non-equilibrium aspects of fluctuation-induced interactions. While the equilibrium behavior of such interactions has been extensively studied and is relatively well understood, the study of these interactions out of equilibrium is relatively new. We discuss recent results on the non-equilibrium behavior of systems whose dynamics is of the dissipative stochastic type and identify a number of outstanding problems concerning non-equilibrium fluctuation-induced interactions.

  7. Equilibrium theory : A salient approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schalk, S.

    1999-01-01

    Whereas the neoclassical models in General Equilibrium Theory focus on the existence of separate commodities, this thesis regards 'bundles of trade' as the unit objects of exchange. Apart from commodities and commodity bundles in the neoclassical sense, the term `bundle of trade' includes, for

  8. Essays in general equilibrium theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Konovalov, A.

    2001-01-01

    The thesis focuses on various issues of general equilibrium theory and can approximately be divided into three parts. The first part of the thesis studies generalized equilibria in the Arrow-Debreu model in the situation where the strong survival assumption is not satisfied. Chapter four deals with

  9. Financial equilibrium with career concerns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amil Dasgupta

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available What are the equilibrium features of a financial market where a sizeable proportion of traders face reputational concerns? This question is central to our understanding of financial markets, which are increasingly dominated by institutional investors. We construct a model of delegated portfolio management that captures key features of the US mutual fund industry and embed it in an asset pricing framework. We thus provide a formal model of financial equilibrium with career concerned agents. Fund managers differ in their ability to understand market fundamentals, and in every period investors choose a fund. In equilibrium, the presence of career concerns induces uninformed fund managers to churn, i.e., to engage in trading even when they face a negative expected return. Churners act as noise traders and enhance the level of trading volume. The equilibrium relationship between fund return and net fund flows displays a skewed shape that is consistent with stylized facts. The robustness of our core results is probed from several angles.

  10. Equilibrium with arbitrary market structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grodal, Birgit; Vind, Karl

    2005-01-01

    . The complete market predicted by this theory is clearly unrealistic, and Radner [10] formulated and proved existence of equilibrium in a multiperiod model with incomplete markets. In this paper the Radner result is extended. Radner assumed a specific structure of markets, independence of preferences...

  11. Effect of heat treatment and rotor steels composition on hydrogen solubility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, A.I.; Samojlenko, L.V.; Gorovaya, O.N.; Najdovskij, A.G.; Bilik, I.; Kret, Ya.

    1988-01-01

    Measurements of equilibrium hydrogen adsorption in samples of 27KhN3MFA and 25Kh2NMFA steels were conducted. Carbide inclusions and doping additions, typical for rotor steels, don't produce noticeable effect on hydrogen solubility in

  12. The effect of water solubles on Kelvin effects of the Maritime Polluted ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this work microphysical properties of Maritime Polluted aerosols wereextracted from Optical Properties of Aerosols and Clouds (OPAC) after varying the concentrations of water soluble at five different levels. The analytical expressions for the changes in the equilibrium relative humidity (RH), effective radii, effective ...

  13. The solubility of hydrogen sulfide in aqueous N-methyldiethanolamine solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huttenhuis, P.J.G.; Agrawal, N.J.; Versteeg, G.F.

    2008-01-01

    In this work the electrolyte equation of state as developed previously for the system MDEA-H2O-CO2-CH4 was further developed for the system MDEA-H2O-H2S-CH4. With this thermodynamic equilibrium model the total solubility of hydrogen sulfide and the speciation in aqueous solutions of

  14. Uranium solubility and solubility controls in selected Needle's Eye groundwaters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falck, W.E.; Hooker, P.J.

    1991-01-01

    The solubility control of uranium in selected groundwater samples from the cliff and sediments at the Needle's Eye natural analogue site is investigated using the speciation code PHREEQE and the CHEMVAL thermodynamic database (release 3). Alkali-earth bearing uranyl carbonate secondary minerals are likely to exert influence on the solubility . Other candidates are UO 2 and arsenates, depending on the prevailing redox conditions. In the absence of literature data, solubility products for important arsenates have been estimated from analogy with other arsenates and phosphates. Phosphates themselves are unlikely to exert control owing to their comparatively high solubilities. The influence of seawater flooding into the sediments is also discussed. The importance of uranyl arsenates in the retardation of uranium in shallow sediments has been demonstrated in theory, but there are some significant gaps in the thermodynamic databases used. (author)

  15. Effect of fluoride pretreatment on the solubility of synthetic carbonated apatite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, A B; Zhuang, H; Baig, A A; Higuchi, W I

    2003-03-01

    The purpose of this research was to address the following question: How is the solubility of fluoride-pretreated carbonated apatite (CAP) in aqueous acidic media related to the equilibrium solution fluoride and/or the CAP adsorbed fluoride levels? A CAP sample prepared by a precipitation method at 70 degrees C containing approximately 6% carbonate was fluoride-treated (F adsorption from neutral aqueous solutions) to yield a approximately 1000 ppm F CAP and a approximately 3300 ppm F CAP. Metastable equilibrium solubility distributions were determined in acetate buffers at pH 5.0. Solution fluoride, calcium, phosphate, and pH were determined from the equilibrated solutions. The equilibrium solution fluoride levels were extremely low, e.g., as low as approximately 0.10 ppb to approximately 0.30 ppb at 50% dissolved for the two CAP preparations. The approximately 3300 ppm F CAP yielded a lower solubility than the approximately 1000 ppm F CAP (shift in the mean pKHAP value of 1.5-2 units). This can be attributed to the lower solution F(-) for the sample containing approximately 1000 ppm fluoride compared with the approximately 3300 ppm fluoride-containing CAP. These important findings suggest that a fluoride treatment simply may provide an adsorption fluoride depot for subsequent release, providing a solution fluoride effect upon the CAP solubility and not necessarily any intrinsic alteration of the mineral solubility.

  16. Noble gases solubility in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crovetto, Rosa; Fernandez Prini, Roberto.

    1980-07-01

    The available experimental data of solubility of noble gases in water for temperatures smaller than 330 0 C have been critically surveyed. Due to the unique structure of the solvent, the solubility of noble gases in water decreases with temperature passing through a temperature of minimum solubility which is different for each gas, and then increases at higher temperatures. As aresult of the analysis of the experimental data and of the features of the solute-solvent interaction, a generalized equation is proposed which enables thecalculation of Henry's coefficient at different temperatures for all noble gases. (author) [es

  17. Gas-liquid equilibrium in mixtures of methane + m-xylene, and methane + m-cresol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simnick, J J; Sebastian, H M; Lin, H M; Chao, K C

    1979-01-01

    Compositions of saturated equilibrium liquid and vapor phases as determined in a flow apparatus for methane + m-xylene mixtures at 370/sup 0/, 450/sup 0/, 520/sup 0/, and 600/sup 0/F (190/sup 0/, 230/sup 0/, 270/sup 0/, and 310/sup 0/C) and up to 200 atm, and for methane + m-cresol at 370/sup 0/, 520/sup 0/, 660/sup 0/, and 730/sup 0/F (190/sup 0/, 270/sup 0/, 350/sup 0/, and 390/sup 0/C) and up to 250 atm. Compared with published data on its solubility in benzene, methane appears to be more soluble in m-xylene at similar conditions but substantially less soluble in m-cresol. This difference indicates that the functional groups CH/sub 3/ and OH play different roles in determining the solubility of methane.

  18. On generalized operator quasi-equilibrium problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kum, Sangho; Kim, Won Kyu

    2008-09-01

    In this paper, we will introduce the generalized operator equilibrium problem and generalized operator quasi-equilibrium problem which generalize the operator equilibrium problem due to Kazmi and Raouf [K.R. Kazmi, A. Raouf, A class of operator equilibrium problems, J. Math. Anal. Appl. 308 (2005) 554-564] into multi-valued and quasi-equilibrium problems. Using a Fan-Browder type fixed point theorem in [S. Park, Foundations of the KKM theory via coincidences of composites of upper semicontinuous maps, J. Korean Math. Soc. 31 (1994) 493-519] and an existence theorem of equilibrium for 1-person game in [X.-P. Ding, W.K. Kim, K.-K. Tan, Equilibria of non-compact generalized games with L*-majorized preferences, J. Math. Anal. Appl. 164 (1992) 508-517] as basic tools, we prove new existence theorems on generalized operator equilibrium problem and generalized operator quasi-equilibrium problem which includes operator equilibrium problems.

  19. Non-Equilibrium Properties from Equilibrium Free Energy Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohorille, Andrew; Wilson, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    Calculating free energy in computer simulations is of central importance in statistical mechanics of condensed media and its applications to chemistry and biology not only because it is the most comprehensive and informative quantity that characterizes the eqUilibrium state, but also because it often provides an efficient route to access dynamic and kinetic properties of a system. Most of applications of equilibrium free energy calculations to non-equilibrium processes rely on a description in which a molecule or an ion diffuses in the potential of mean force. In general case this description is a simplification, but it might be satisfactorily accurate in many instances of practical interest. This hypothesis has been tested in the example of the electrodiffusion equation . Conductance of model ion channels has been calculated directly through counting the number of ion crossing events observed during long molecular dynamics simulations and has been compared with the conductance obtained from solving the generalized Nernst-Plank equation. It has been shown that under relatively modest conditions the agreement between these two approaches is excellent, thus demonstrating the assumptions underlying the diffusion equation are fulfilled. Under these conditions the electrodiffusion equation provides an efficient approach to calculating the full voltage-current dependence routinely measured in electrophysiological experiments.

  20. Equilibrium studies of helical axis stellarators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hender, T.C.; Carreras, B.A.; Garcia, L.; Harris, J.H.; Rome, J.A.; Cantrell, J.L.; Lynch, V.E.

    1984-01-01

    The equilibrium properties of helical axis stellarators are studied with a 3-D equilibrium code and with an average method (2-D). The helical axis ATF is shown to have a toroidally dominated equilibrium shift and good equilibria up to at least 10% peak beta. Low aspect ratio heliacs, with relatively large toroidal shifts, are shown to have low equilibrium beta limits (approx. 5%). Increasing the aspect ratio and number of field periods proportionally is found to improve the equilibrium beta limit. Alternatively, increasing the number of field periods at fixed aspect ratio which raises and lowers the toroidal shift improves the equilibrium beta limit

  1. Relation between absorbed dose, charged particle equilibrium and nuclear transformations: A non-equilibrium thermodynamics point of view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez-Romero, J. T.

    2006-01-01

    We present a discussion to show that the absorbed dose D is a time-dependent function. This time dependence is demonstrated based on the concepts of charged particle equilibrium and on radiation equilibrium within the context of thermodynamic non-equilibrium. In the latter, the time dependence is due to changes of the rest mass energy of the nuclei and elementary particles involved in the terms ΣQ and Q that appear in the definitions of energy imparted ε and energy deposit ε i , respectively. In fact, nothing is said about the averaging operation of the non-stochastic quantity mean energy imparted ε-bar, which is used in the definition of D according to ICRU 60. It is shown in this research that the averaging operation necessary to define the ε-bar employed to get D cannot be performed with an equilibrium statistical operator ρ(r) as could be expected. Rather, the operation has to be defined with a time-dependent non-equilibrium statistical operator (r, t) therefore, D is a time-dependent function D(r, t). (authors)

  2. Estimation of the effective distribution coefficient from the solubility constant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yug-Yea; Yu, C.

    1994-01-01

    An updated version of RESRAD has been developed by Argonne National Laboratory for the US Department of Energy to derive site-specific soil guidelines for residual radioactive material. In this updated version, many new features have been added to the, RESRAD code. One of the options is that a user can input a solubility constant to limit the leaching of contaminants. The leaching model used in the code requires the input of an empirical distribution coefficient, K d , which represents the ratio of the solute concentration in soil to that in solution under equilibrium conditions. This paper describes the methodology developed to estimate an effective distribution coefficient, Kd, from the user-input solubility constant and the use of the effective K d for predicting the leaching of contaminants

  3. Solubility of salicylic acid in pure alcohols at different temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Junhyuk; Jang, Sunghyun; Cho, Hye Kyoung; Shin, Moon Sam; Kim, Hwayong

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Solubility data of salicylic acid in pure alkanols were measured. ► The experimental data were correlated with NRTL, UNIQUAC and Wilson models. ► The data are fit well with all three models for the six pure alcohols studied. ► Adjustable interaction parameters were suggested. - Abstract: This work focused on the experimental measurements and the numerical calculations of the solubility of salicylic acid in various alcohols. The solubility of salicylic acid in pure alcohols was determined using a (solid + liquid) equilibrium measurement apparatus at temperatures ranging from (278.15 to 318.15) K. Also, the melting temperature and fusion enthalpy of salicylic acid were determined by a differential scanning calorimeter (TA instrument Q100). The experimental results were correlated with the equation for solubility of a solid in a liquid with the nonrandom two liquid (NRTL), universal quasi-chemical (UNIQUAC) and Wilson models for liquid phase activity coefficients to validate the quality of the data taken. Adjustable interaction parameters were also provided. The experimental data fit appropriately with all three models for the pure alcohols studied.

  4. Money Inventories in Search Equilibrium

    OpenAIRE

    Berentsen, Aleksander

    1998-01-01

    The paper relaxes the one unit storage capacity imposed in the basic search-theoretic model of fiat money with indivisible real commodities and indivisible money. Agents can accumulate as much money as they want. It characterizes the stationary distributions of money and shows that for reasonable parameter values (e.g. production cost, discounting, degree of specialization) a monetary equilibrium exists. There are multiple stationary distributions of a given amount of money, which differ in t...

  5. Local equilibrium in bird flocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, Thierry; Walczak, Aleksandra M.; Del Castello, Lorenzo; Ginelli, Francesco; Melillo, Stefania; Parisi, Leonardo; Viale, Massimiliano; Cavagna, Andrea; Giardina, Irene

    2016-12-01

    The correlated motion of flocks is an example of global order emerging from local interactions. An essential difference with respect to analogous ferromagnetic systems is that flocks are active: animals move relative to each other, dynamically rearranging their interaction network. This non-equilibrium characteristic has been studied theoretically, but its impact on actual animal groups remains to be fully explored experimentally. Here, we introduce a novel dynamical inference technique, based on the principle of maximum entropy, which accommodates network rearrangements and overcomes the problem of slow experimental sampling rates. We use this method to infer the strength and range of alignment forces from data of starling flocks. We find that local bird alignment occurs on a much faster timescale than neighbour rearrangement. Accordingly, equilibrium inference, which assumes a fixed interaction network, gives results consistent with dynamical inference. We conclude that bird orientations are in a state of local quasi-equilibrium over the interaction length scale, providing firm ground for the applicability of statistical physics in certain active systems.

  6. Effect of Phosphate, Fluoride, and Nitrate on Gibbsite Dissolution Rate and Solubility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herting, Daniel L.

    2014-01-01

    Laboratory tests have been completed with simulated tank waste samples to investigate the effects of phosphate, fluoride, and nitrate on the dissolution rate and equilibrium solubility of gibbsite in sodium hydroxide solution at 22 and 40 deg C. Results are compared to relevant literature data and to computer model predictions. The presence of sodium nitrate (3 M) caused a reduction in the rate of gibbsite dissolution in NaOH, but a modest increase in the equilibrium solubility of aluminum. The increase in solubility was not as large, though, as the increase predicted by the computer model. The presence of phosphate, either as sodium phosphate or sodium fluoride phosphate, had a negligible effect on the rate of gibbsite dissolution, but caused a slight increase in aluminum solubility. The magnitude of the increased solubility, relative to the increase caused by sodium nitrate, suggests that the increase is due to ionic strength (or water activity) effects, rather than being associated with the specific ion involved. The computer model predicted that phosphate would cause a slight decrease in aluminum solubility, suggesting some Al-PO4 interaction. No evidence was found of such an interaction

  7. Temperature in non-equilibrium states: a review of open problems and current proposals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casas-Vazquez, J; Jou, D

    2003-01-01

    The conceptual problems arising in the definition and measurement of temperature in non-equilibrium states are discussed in this paper in situations where the local-equilibrium hypothesis is no longer satisfactory. This is a necessary and urgent discussion because of the increasing interest in thermodynamic theories beyond local equilibrium, in computer simulations, in non-linear statistical mechanics, in new experiments, and in technological applications of nanoscale systems and material sciences. First, we briefly review the concept of temperature from the perspectives of equilibrium thermodynamics and statistical mechanics. Afterwards, we explore which of the equilibrium concepts may be extrapolated beyond local equilibrium and which of them should be modified, then we review several attempts to define temperature in non-equilibrium situations from macroscopic and microscopic bases. A wide review of proposals is offered on effective non-equilibrium temperatures and their application to ideal and real gases, electromagnetic radiation, nuclear collisions, granular systems, glasses, sheared fluids, amorphous semiconductors and turbulent fluids. The consistency between the different relativistic transformation laws for temperature is discussed in the new light gained from this perspective. A wide bibliography is provided in order to foster further research in this field

  8. Quantum dynamical semigroups and approach to equilibrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frigerio, A.

    1977-01-01

    For a quantum dynamical semigroup possessing a faithful normal stationary state, some conditions are discussed, which ensure the uniqueness of the equilibrium state and/or the approach to equilibrium for arbitrary initial condition. (Auth.)

  9. Determination of calcium salt solubility with changes in pH and P(CO(2)), simulating varying gastrointestinal environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goss, Sandra L; Lemons, Karen A; Kerstetter, Jane E; Bogner, Robin H

    2007-11-01

    The amount of calcium available for absorption is dependent, in part, on its sustained solubility in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Many calcium salts, which are the calcium sources in supplements and food, have pH-dependent solubility and may have limited availability in the small intestine, the major site of absorption. The equilibrium solubility of four calcium salts (calcium oxalate hydrate, calcium citrate tetrahydrate, calcium phosphate, calcium glycerophosphate) were determined at controlled pH values (7.5, 6.0, 4.5 and solubility of calcium carbonate was also measured at pH 7.5, 6.0 and 4.5 with two CO(2) environments (0.3 and 152 mmHg) above the solution. The precipitation profile of CaCO(3) was calculated using in-vivo data for bicarbonate and pH from literature and equilibrium calculations. As pH increased, the solubility of each calcium salt increased. However, in distilled water each salt produced a different pH, affecting its solubility value. Although calcium citrate does have a higher solubility than CaCO(3) in water, there is little difference when the pH is controlled at pH 7.5. The partial pressure of CO(2) also played a role in calcium carbonate solubility, depressing the solubility at pH 7.5. The calculations of soluble calcium resulted in profiles of available calcium, which agreed with previously published in-vivo data on absorbed calcium. The experimental data illustrate the impact of pH and CO(2) on the solubility of many calcium salts in the presence of bicarbonate secretions in the intestine. Calculated profiles using in-vivo calcium and bicarbonate concentrations demonstrate that large calcium doses may not further increase intestinal calcium absorption once the calcium carbonate solubility product has been reached.

  10. The geometry of finite equilibrium sets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balasko, Yves; Tvede, Mich

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the geometry of finite datasets defined by equilibrium prices, income distributions, and total resources. We show that the equilibrium condition imposes no restrictions if total resources are collinear, a property that is robust to small perturbations. We also show that the set...... of equilibrium datasets is pathconnected when the equilibrium condition does impose restrictions on datasets, as for example when total resources are widely noncollinear....

  11. The Geometry of Finite Equilibrium Datasets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balasko, Yves; Tvede, Mich

    We investigate the geometry of finite datasets defined by equilibrium prices, income distributions, and total resources. We show that the equilibrium condition imposes no restrictions if total resources are collinear, a property that is robust to small perturbations. We also show that the set...... of equilibrium datasets is pathconnected when the equilibrium condition does impose restrictions on datasets, as for example when total resources are widely non collinear....

  12. Open problems in non-equilibrium physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusnezov, D.

    1997-01-01

    The report contains viewgraphs on the following: approaches to non-equilibrium statistical mechanics; classical and quantum processes in chaotic environments; classical fields in non-equilibrium situations: real time dynamics at finite temperature; and phase transitions in non-equilibrium conditions

  13. Open problems in non-equilibrium physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusnezov, D.

    1997-09-22

    The report contains viewgraphs on the following: approaches to non-equilibrium statistical mechanics; classical and quantum processes in chaotic environments; classical fields in non-equilibrium situations: real time dynamics at finite temperature; and phase transitions in non-equilibrium conditions.

  14. Stochastic thermodynamics of quantum maps with and without equilibrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barra, Felipe; Lledó, Cristóbal

    2017-11-01

    We study stochastic thermodynamics for a quantum system of interest whose dynamics is described by a completely positive trace-preserving (CPTP) map as a result of its interaction with a thermal bath. We define CPTP maps with equilibrium as CPTP maps with an invariant state such that the entropy production due to the action of the map on the invariant state vanishes. Thermal maps are a subgroup of CPTP maps with equilibrium. In general, for CPTP maps, the thermodynamic quantities, such as the entropy production or work performed on the system, depend on the combined state of the system plus its environment. We show that these quantities can be written in terms of system properties for maps with equilibrium. The relations that we obtain are valid for arbitrary coupling strengths between the system and the thermal bath. The fluctuations of thermodynamic quantities are considered in the framework of a two-point measurement scheme. We derive the entropy production fluctuation theorem for general maps and a fluctuation relation for the stochastic work on a system that starts in the Gibbs state. Some simplifications for the probability distributions in the case of maps with equilibrium are presented. We illustrate our results by considering spin 1/2 systems under thermal maps, nonthermal maps with equilibrium, maps with nonequilibrium steady states, and concatenations of them. Finally, and as an important application, we consider a particular limit in which the concatenation of maps generates a continuous time evolution in Lindblad form for the system of interest, and we show that the concept of maps with and without equilibrium translates into Lindblad equations with and without quantum detailed balance, respectively. The consequences for the thermodynamic quantities in this limit are discussed.

  15. Equilibrium and non-equilibrium metal-ceramic interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Y.; Merkle, K.L.

    1992-01-01

    Metal-ceramic interfaces in thermodynamic equilibrium (Au/ZrO 2 ) and non-equilibrium (Au/MgO) have been studied by TEM and HREM. In the Au/ZrO 2 system, ZrO 2 precipitates formed by internal oxidation of a 7%Zr-Au alloy show a cubic ZrO 2 phase. It appears that formation of the cubic ZrO 2 is facilitated by alignment with the Au matrix. Most of the ZrO 2 precipitates have a perfect cube-on-cube orientation relationship with the Au matrix. The large number of interfacial steps observed in a short-time annealing experiment indicate that the precipitates are formed by the ledge growth mechanism. The lowest interfacial energy is indicated by the dominance of closed-packed [111] Au/ZrO 2 interfaces. In the Au/MgO system, composite films with small MgO smoke particles embedded in a Au matrix were prepared by a thin film technique. HREM observations show that most of the Au/MgO interfaces have a strong tendency to maintain a dense lattice structure across the interfaces irrespective of whether the interfaces are incoherent or semi-coherent. This paper reports that this indicates that there may be a relatively strong bond between MgO and Au

  16. The standard genetic code and its relation to mutational pressure: robustness and equilibrium criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez Caceres, Jose Luis; Hong, Rolando; Martinez Ortiz, Carlos; Sautie Castellanos, Miguel; Valdes, Kiria; Guevara Erra, Ramon

    2004-10-01

    Under the assumption of even point mutation pressure on the DNA strand, rates for transitions from one amino acid into another were assessed. Nearly 25% of all mutations were silent. About 48% of the mutations from a given amino acid stream either into the same amino acid or into an amino acid of the same class. These results suggest a great stability of the Standard Genetic Code respect to mutation load. Concepts from chemical equilibrium theory are applicable into this case provided that mutation rate constants are given. It was obtained that unequal synonymic codon usage may lead to changes in the equilibrium concentrations. Data from real biological species showed that several amino acids are close to the respective equilibrium concentration. However in all the cases the concentration of leucine nearly doubled its equilibrium concentration, whereas for the stop command (Term) it was about 10 times lower. The overall distance from equilibrium for a set of species suggests that eukaryotes are closer to equilibrium than prokaryotes, and the HIV virus was closest to equilibrium among 15 species. We obtained that contemporary species are closer to the equilibrium than the Last Universal Common Ancestor (LUCA) was. Similarly, nonpreserved regions in proteins are closer to equilibrium than the preserved ones. We suggest that this approach can be useful for exploring some aspects of biological evolution in the framework of Standard Genetic Code properties. (author)

  17. Sodium tetraphenylborate solubility and dissolution rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, M.J.; Peterson, R.A.; Swingle, R.F.; Reeves, C.T.

    1995-01-01

    The rate of solid sodium tetraphenylborate (NaTPB) dissolution in In-Tank Precipitation salt solutions has been experimentally determined. The data indicates that the dissolution rate of solid NaTPB is a minor contributor the lag time experienced in the 1983 Salt Decontamination Demonstration Test and should not be considered as the rate determining step. Current analytical models for predicting the time to reach the composite lower flammability limit assume that the lag time is not more than 6 hours, and the data supports this assumption (i.e., dissolution by itself requires much less than 6 hours). The data suggests that another step--such as mass transport, the reaction of a benzene precursor or the mixing behavior--is the rate determining factor for benzene release to the vapor space in Tank 48H. In addition, preliminary results from this program show that the degree of agitation employed is not a significant parameter in determining the rate of NaTPB dissolution. As a result of this study, an improved equation for predicting equilibrium tetraphenylborate solubility with respect to temperature and sodium ion concentration has been determined

  18. Synthesis gas solubility in Fischer-Tropsch slurry: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chao, K.C.; Lin, H.M.

    1988-01-01

    The objective is to investigate the phase equilibrium behavior of synthesis gases and products in a Fischer-Tropsch slurry reactor. A semi-flow apparatus has been designed and constructed for this purpose. Measurements have been made for hydrogen, cabon monoxide, methane, ethane, ethylene, and carbon dioxide in a heavy n-paraffin at temperatures from 100 to 300)degree)C and pressures 10 to 50 atm. Three n-paraffin waxes: n-eicosane (n-C/sub 20/), n-octacosane )n-C/sub 28/), and n-hexatriacontane (n-C/sub 36/), were studied to model the industrial wax. Solubility of synthesis gas mixtures of H/sub 2/ and CO in n-C/sub 28/ was also determined at two temperatures (200 and 300)degree)C) for each of three gas compositions (40.01, 50.01, and 66.64 mol%) of hydrogen). Measurements were extended to investigate the gas solubility in two industrial Fischer-Tropsch waxes: Mobilwax and SASOL wax. Observed solubility increases in the order: H/sub 2/, CO, CH/sub 4/, CO/sub 2/, C/sub 2/H/sub 4/, C/sub 2/H/sub 6/, at a given temperature pressure, and in the same solvent. Solubility increases with increasing pressure for all the gases. Lighter gases H/sub 2/ and CO show increased solubility with increasing temperature, while the heavier gases CO/sub 2/, ethane, and ethylene show decreased solubility with increasing temperature. The solubility of methane, the intermediate gas, changes little with temperature, and shows a shallow minimum at about 200)degrees)C or somewhat above. Henry's constant and partial molal volume of the gas solute at infinite dilution are determinedfrom the gas solubility data. A correlation is developed from the experimental data in the form on an equation of state. A computer program has been prepared to implement the correlation. 19 refs., 66 figs., 39 tabs.

  19. Thermal equilibrium in Einstein's elevator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Rey, Bernardo; Chacón-Acosta, Guillermo; Dagdug, Leonardo; Cubero, David

    2013-05-01

    We report fully relativistic molecular-dynamics simulations that verify the appearance of thermal equilibrium of a classical gas inside a uniformly accelerated container. The numerical experiments confirm that the local momentum distribution in this system is very well approximated by the Jüttner function-originally derived for a flat spacetime-via the Tolman-Ehrenfest effect. Moreover, it is shown that when the acceleration or the container size is large enough, the global momentum distribution can be described by the so-called modified Jüttner function, which was initially proposed as an alternative to the Jüttner function.

  20. Using Beads and Divided Containers to Study Kinetic and Equilibrium Isotope Effects in the Laboratory and in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Dean J.; Brewer, Emily R.; Martinez, Keri A.; Fitzjarrald, Tamara J.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this laboratory experiment is to study fundamental concepts of kinetics and equilibria and the isotope effects associated with both of these concepts. The concepts of isotopes in introductory and general chemistry courses are typically used within the contexts of atomic weights and radioactivity. Kinetic and equilibrium isotope…

  1. Calculated solubility isotherm of a system of alkaline earth sulfates and hydroxides in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MOshinskii, A.S.; TIkomirova, K.A.

    1986-01-01

    Tis paper examines the calculation of the isothermal solubility diagram of a system of alkaline earth sulfates and hydroxides in water which makes it possible to substantiate, to a considerable extent, the natural physicochemical mineralization of natural waters, in particular water from geochemical sources. The present paper investigates the solubility of the equilibrium solid phases of a system of alkaline earth sulfates and hydroxides in water. A projection is shown of the composition prism of the quinary reciprocal system with demarcation of the crystallization areas of each sulfate and hydroxide of the component subsystems. The computational formulas for calculating solubility were derived from the solubility product principle, with allowance for ion activity coefficients in saturated hydroxide solutions

  2. Approach to transverse equilibrium in axial channeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fearick, R.W.

    2000-01-01

    Analytical treatments of channeling rely on the assumption of equilibrium on the transverse energy shell. The approach to equilibrium, and the nature of the equilibrium achieved, is examined using solutions of the equations of motion in the continuum multi-string model. The results show that the motion is chaotic in the absence of dissipative processes, and a complicated structure develops in phase space which prevent the development of the simple equilibrium usually assumed. The role of multiple scattering in smoothing out the equilibrium distribution is investigated

  3. The Analysis of Pricing Power of Preponderant Metal Mineral Resources under the Perspective of Intergenerational Equity and Social Preferences: An Analytical Framework Based on Cournot Equilibrium Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meirui Zhong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper combines intergenerational equity equilibrium and social preferences equilibrium with Cournot equilibrium solving the technological problem of intergenerational equity and strategic value compensation confirmation, achieving the effective combination between sustainable development concept and value evaluation, thinking and expanding the theoretical framework for the lack of pricing power of mineral resources. The conclusion of the theoretical model and the numerical simulation shows that intergenerational equity equilibrium and social preferences equilibrium enhance international trade market power of preponderant metal mineral resources owing to the production of intergenerational equity compensation value and strategic value. However, the impact exerted on Cournot market power by social preferences is inconsistent: that is, changes of altruistic Cournot equilibrium and reciprocal inequity Cournot equilibrium are consistent, while inequity aversion Cournot equilibrium has the characteristic of loss aversion, namely, under the consideration of inequity aversion Cournot competition, Counot-Nash equilibrium transforms monotonically with sympathy and jealousy of inequity aversion.

  4. Thermophysical properties of biodiesel and related systems: (Liquid + liquid) equilibrium data for Jatropha curcas biodiesel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Juliana R.F.; Mazutti, Marcio A.; Voll, Fernando A.P.; Cardozo-Filho, Lúcio; Corazza, Marcos L.; Lanza, Marcelo; Priamo, Wagner L.; Vladimir Oliveira, J.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► (Liquid + liquid) equilibrium data for multicomponent Jatropha curcas FAME and FAEE. ► Tie-lines, solubility curves (binodal curves) with low deviations from mass balance. ► Experimental data correlated with the UNIQUAC model. -- Abstract: Reported in this study are (liquid + liquid) equilibrium data for binary, ternary, and quaternary systems formed by fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) and fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEE) of Jatropha curcas oil, water, glycerol, methanol, and ethanol at temperatures of (303.15, 318.15, and 333.15) K. In general, all the systems investigated resulted in good agreement between phase compositions of crunodes of tie-lines, solubility curves (binodal curves) and overall compositions, hence indicating low deviations from mass balance. Experimental results were correlated with the UNIQUAC model, showing low deviations among experimental and calculated values

  5. On nitrogen solubility in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalajda, Yu.A.; Katkov, Yu.D.; Kuznetsov, V.A.; Lastovtsev, A.Yu.; Lastochkin, A.P.; Susoev, V.S.

    1980-01-01

    Presented are the results of experimental investigations on nitrogen solubility in water under 0-15 MPa pressure, at the temperature of 100-340 deg C and nitrogen concentration of 0-5000 n.ml. N 2 /kg H 2 O. Empiric equations are derived and a diagram of nitrogen solubility in water is developed on the basis of the experimental data, as well as critically evaluated published data. The investigation results can be used in analyzing water-gas regime of a primary heat carrier in stream-generating plants with water-water reactors

  6. Preliminary considerations concerning actinide solubilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newton, T.W.; Bayhurst, B.P.; Daniels, W.R.; Erdal, B.R.; Ogard, A.E.

    1980-01-01

    Work at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory on the fundamental solution chemistry of the actinides has thus far been confined to preliminary considerations of the problems involved in developing an understanding of the precipitation and dissolution behavior of actinide compounds under environmental conditions. Attempts have been made to calculate solubility as a function of Eh and pH using the appropriate thermodynamic data; results have been presented in terms of contour maps showing lines of constant solubility as a function of Eh and pH. Possible methods of control of the redox potential of rock-groundwater systems by the use of Eh buffers (redox couples) is presented

  7. Thorium oxalate solubility and morphology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monson, P.R. Jr.; Hall, R.

    1981-10-01

    Thorium was used as a stand-in for studying the solubility and precipitation of neptunium and plutonium oxalates. Thorium oxalate solubility was determined over a range of 0.001 to 10.0 in the concentration parameter [H 2 C 2 O 4 ]/[HNO 3 ] 2 . Morphology of thorium oxide made from the oxalate precipitates was characterized by scanning electron microscopy. The different morphologies found for oxalate-lean and oxalate-rich precipitations were in agreement with predictions based on precipitation theory

  8. Solubility database for TILA-99

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vuorinen, U.; Carlsson, T. [VTT Chemical Technology, Espoo (Finland); Kulmala, S.; Hakanen, M. [Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Lab. of Radiochemistry; Ahonen, L. [Geological Survey of Finland, Espoo (Finland)

    1998-11-01

    The safety assessment of spent fuel disposal requires solubility values for several elements estimated in Finnish disposal conditions. In Finland four sites (Haestholmen, Kivetty, Olkiluoto and Romuvaara) are investigated for the disposal of spent fuel. Haestholmen and OLkiluoto are onshore sites, while Kivetty and Romuvaara are inland sites. Based on groundwater analysis and classification according to salinity at the planned disposal depth mainly fresh groundwater is encountered at Kivetty and Romuvaara, while brackish and saline water-types are met at Haestholmen and Olkiluoto. Very saline, almost brine-type water ({approx}70 g/l) has been found in the deepest parts of the investigated bedrock at one of the sites (Olkiluoto). The reference waters and conditions were chosen according to the water-types. The considered reference conditions incorporated both the near- and far-field, and both oxidizing and reducing conditions were considered. In the reference conditions, the changes in solubilities were also estimated as caused by possible variations in the pH, carbonate content and redox conditions. Uranium, which is the main component of spent fuel is dealt with in a separate report presenting the solubility of uranium and spent fuel dissolution. In this work the solubilities of all the other elements of concern (Am, Cu, Nb, Np, Pa, Pd, Pu, Ra, Se, Sn, Tc, Zr, Cm, Ni, Sr, Th, C, Cl, Cs, Fe, Ho, I, and Sm) in the safety assessment are considered. Some discussion on the corrosion of the spent fuel canister is also presented. For the estimation of solubilities of the elements in question, literature data was collected that mainly comprised experimentally measured concentrations. The sources used were spent fuel experiments, concentrations measured in solubility measurements, natural concentrations and concentrations from natural analogue sites (especially Palmottu and Hyrkkoelae in Finland) as well as the concentrations measured at the Finnish investigation sites

  9. Solubility database for TILA-99

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vuorinen, U.; Carlsson, T.; Kulmala, S.; Hakanen, M.

    1998-11-01

    The safety assessment of spent fuel disposal requires solubility values for several elements estimated in Finnish disposal conditions. In Finland four sites (Haestholmen, Kivetty, Olkiluoto and Romuvaara) are investigated for the disposal of spent fuel. Haestholmen and OLkiluoto are onshore sites, while Kivetty and Romuvaara are inland sites. Based on groundwater analysis and classification according to salinity at the planned disposal depth mainly fresh groundwater is encountered at Kivetty and Romuvaara, while brackish and saline water-types are met at Haestholmen and Olkiluoto. Very saline, almost brine-type water (∼70 g/l) has been found in the deepest parts of the investigated bedrock at one of the sites (Olkiluoto). The reference waters and conditions were chosen according to the water-types. The considered reference conditions incorporated both the near- and far-field, and both oxidizing and reducing conditions were considered. In the reference conditions, the changes in solubilities were also estimated as caused by possible variations in the pH, carbonate content and redox conditions. Uranium, which is the main component of spent fuel is dealt with in a separate report presenting the solubility of uranium and spent fuel dissolution. In this work the solubilities of all the other elements of concern (Am, Cu, Nb, Np, Pa, Pd, Pu, Ra, Se, Sn, Tc, Zr, Cm, Ni, Sr, Th, C, Cl, Cs, Fe, Ho, I, and Sm) in the safety assessment are considered. Some discussion on the corrosion of the spent fuel canister is also presented. For the estimation of solubilities of the elements in question, literature data was collected that mainly comprised experimentally measured concentrations. The sources used were spent fuel experiments, concentrations measured in solubility measurements, natural concentrations and concentrations from natural analogue sites (especially Palmottu and Hyrkkoelae in Finland) as well as the concentrations measured at the Finnish investigation sites. The

  10. Understanding Chemical Equilibrium: The Role of Gas Phases and Mixing Contributions in the Minimum of Free Energy Plots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomba, J. Pablo

    2017-01-01

    The use of free energy plots to understand the concept of thermodynamic equilibrium has been shown to be of great pedagogical value in materials science. Although chemical equilibrium is also amenable to this kind of analysis, it is not part of the agenda of materials science textbooks. Something similar is found in chemistry branches, where free…

  11. Active Learning Session Based on Didactical Engineering Framework for Conceptual Change in Students' Equilibrium and Stability Understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canu, Michael; Duque, Mauricio; de Hosson, Cécile

    2017-01-01

    Engineering students on control courses lack a deep understanding of equilibrium and stability that are crucial concepts in this discipline. Several studies have shown that students find it difficult to understand simple familiar or academic static equilibrium cases as well as dynamic ones from mechanics even if they know the discipline's criteria…

  12. Geometrical Description of Chemical Equilibrium and Le Cha^telier's Principle: Two-Component Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Igor

    2018-01-01

    Chemical equilibrium is one of the most important concepts in chemistry. The changes in properties of the chemical system at equilibrium induced by variations in pressure, volume, temperature, and concentration are always included in classroom teaching and discussions. This work introduces a novel, geometrical approach to understanding the…

  13. Influence of arc current and pressure on non-chemical equilibrium air arc behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, WU; Yufei, CUI; Jiawei, DUAN; Hao, SUN; Chunlin, WANG; Chunping, NIU

    2018-01-01

    The influence of arc current and pressure on the non-chemical equilibrium (non-CE) air arc behavior of a nozzle structure was investigated based on the self-consistent non-chemical equilibrium model. The arc behavior during both the arc burning and arc decay phases were discussed at different currents and different pressures. We also devised the concept of a non-equilibrium parameter for a better understanding of non-CE effects. During the arc burning phase, the increasing current leads to a decrease of the non-equilibrium parameter of the particles in the arc core, while the increasing pressure leads to an increase of the non-equilibrium parameter of the particles in the arc core. During the arc decay phase, the non-CE effect will decrease by increasing the arc burning current and the nozzle pressure. Three factors together—convection, diffusion and chemical reactions—influence non-CE behavior.

  14. Solid dispersions enhance solubility, dissolution, and permeability of thalidomide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barea, Silvana A; Mattos, Cristiane B; Cruz, Ariadne C C; Chaves, Vitor C; Pereira, Rafael N; Simões, Claudia M O; Kratz, Jadel M; Koester, Letícia S

    2017-03-01

    Thalidomide (THD) is a BCS class II drug with renewed and growing therapeutic applicability. Along with the low aqueous solubility, additional poor biopharmaceutical properties of the drug, i.e. chemical instability, high crystallinity, and polymorphism, lead to a slow and variable oral absorption. In this view, we developed solid dispersions (SDs) containing THD dispersed in different self-emulsifying carriers aiming at an enhanced absorption profile for the drug. THD was dispersed in lauroyl macrogol-32 glycerides (Gelucire ® 44/14) and α-tocopherol polyethylene glycol succinate (Kolliphor ® TPGS), in the presence or absence of the precipitation inhibitor polyvinylpyrrolidone K30 (PVP K30), by means of the solvent method. Physicochemical analysis revealed the formation of semicrystalline SDs. X-ray diffraction and infrared spectroscopy analyses suggest that the remaining crystalline fraction of the drug in the SDs did not undergo polymorphic transition. The impact of the solubility-enhancing formulations on the THD biopharmaceutical properties was evaluated by several in vitro techniques. The developed SDs were able to increase the apparent solubility of the drug (up to 2-3x the equilibrium solubility) for a least 4 h. Dissolution experiments (paddle method, 75 rpm) in different pHs showed that around 80% of drug dissolved after 120 min (versus 40% of pure crystalline drug). Additionally, we demonstrated the enhanced solubility obtained via SDs could be translated into increased flux in a parallel artificial membrane permeability assay (PAMPA). In summary, the results demonstrate that SDs could be considered an interesting and unexplored strategy to improve the biopharmaceutical properties of THD, since SDs of this important drug have yet to be reported.

  15. Pre-equilibrium plasma dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinz, U.

    1986-01-01

    Approaches towards understanding and describing the pre-equilibrium stage of quark-gluon plasma formation in heavy-ion collisions are reviewed. Focus is on a kinetic theory approach to non-equilibrium dynamics, its extension to include the dynamics of color degrees of freedom when applied to the quark-gluon plasma, its quantum field theoretical foundations, and its relationship to both the particle formation stage at the very beginning of the nuclear collision and the hydrodynamic stage at late collision times. The usefulness of this approach to obtain the transport coefficients in the quark-gluon plasma and to derive the collective mode spectrum and damping rates in this phase are discussed. Comments are made on the general difficulty to find appropriated initial conditions to get the kinetic theory started, and a specific model is given that demonstrates that, once given such initial conditions, the system can be followed all the way through into the hydrodynamical regime. 39 refs., 7 figs. (LEW)

  16. Non-equilibrium phase transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mottola, E.; Cooper, F.M.; Bishop, A.R.; Habib, S.; Kluger, Y.; Jensen, N.G.

    1998-01-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Non-equilibrium phase transitions play a central role in a very broad range of scientific areas, ranging from nuclear, particle, and astrophysics to condensed matter physics and the material and biological sciences. The aim of this project was to explore the path to a deeper and more fundamental understanding of the common physical principles underlying the complex real time dynamics of phase transitions. The main emphasis was on the development of general theoretical tools to deal with non-equilibrium processes, and of numerical methods robust enough to capture the time-evolving structures that occur in actual experimental situations. Specific applications to Laboratory multidivisional efforts in relativistic heavy-ion physics (transition to a new phase of nuclear matter consisting of a quark-gluon plasma) and layered high-temperature superconductors (critical currents and flux flow at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory) were undertaken

  17. Pre-equilibrium plasma dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinz, U.

    1986-01-01

    Approaches towards understanding and describing the pre-equilibrium stage of quark-gluon plasma formation in heavy-ion collisions are reviewed. Focus is on a kinetic theory approach to non-equilibrium dynamics, its extension to include the dynamics of color degrees of freedom when applied to the quark-gluon plasma, its quantum field theoretical foundations, and its relationship to both the particle formation stage at the very beginning of the nuclear collision and the hydrodynamic stage at late collision times. The usefulness of this approach to obtain the transport coefficients in the quark-gluon plasma and to derive the collective mode spectrum and damping rates in this phase are discussed. Comments are made on the general difficulty to find appropriated initial conditions to get the kinetic theory started, and a specific model is given that demonstrates that, once given such initial conditions, the system can be followed all the way through into the hydrodynamical regime. 39 refs., 7 figs

  18. Equilibrium: two-dimensional configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1987-01-01

    In Chapter 6, the problem of toroidal force balance is addressed in the simplest, nontrivial two-dimensional geometry, that of an axisymmetric torus. A derivation is presented of the Grad-Shafranov equation, the basic equation describing axisymmetric toroidal equilibrium. The solutions to equations provide a complete description of ideal MHD equilibria: radial pressure balance, toroidal force balance, equilibrium Beta limits, rotational transform, shear, magnetic wall, etc. A wide number of configurations are accurately modeled by the Grad-Shafranov equation. Among them are all types of tokamaks, the spheromak, the reversed field pinch, and toroidal multipoles. An important aspect of the analysis is the use of asymptotic expansions, with an inverse aspect ratio serving as the expansion parameter. In addition, an equation similar to the Grad-Shafranov equation, but for helically symmetric equilibria, is presented. This equation represents the leading-order description low-Beta and high-Beta stellarators, heliacs, and the Elmo bumpy torus. The solutions all correspond to infinitely long straight helices. Bending such a configuration into a torus requires a full three-dimensional calculation and is discussed in Chapter 7

  19. The role equilibrium leach testing in understanding the behaviour of nuclear wastes under disposal conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biddle, P.; Rees, J.H.

    1988-01-01

    Results from the equilibrium leach testing of a range of intermediate level nuclear wastes have been modelled successfully using sorption and solubility data obtained in experiments with individual radionuclides. The wastes involved included fuel cladding (after removal of irradiated fuel for reprocessing), combustible plutonium-contaminated materials and ferric/aluminium hydroxide flocs. The test has an important role in validating nearfield models, and helps to build confidence in disposal assessments. (orig.)

  20. The role of equilibrium leach testing in understanding the behaviour of nuclear wastes under disposal conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biddle, P.; Rees, J.H.

    1988-01-01

    Results from the equilibrium leach testing of a range of intermediate level nuclear wastes have been modelled using sorption and solubility data obtained in experiments with individual radionuclides. The wastes involved were AGR hulls, Magnox cladding wastes, combustible plutonium-contaminated materials and ferric/aluminium hydroxide flocs. The test has an important role in validating near-field models, and helps to build confidence in disposal assessments. (author)

  1. Concepts of formal concept analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Žáček, Martin; Homola, Dan; Miarka, Rostislav

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this article is apply of Formal Concept Analysis on concept of world. Formal concept analysis (FCA) as a methodology of data analysis, information management and knowledge representation has potential to be applied to a verity of linguistic problems. FCA is mathematical theory for concepts and concept hierarchies that reflects an understanding of concept. Formal concept analysis explicitly formalizes extension and intension of a concept, their mutual relationships. A distinguishing feature of FCA is an inherent integration of three components of conceptual processing of data and knowledge, namely, the discovery and reasoning with concepts in data, discovery and reasoning with dependencies in data, and visualization of data, concepts, and dependencies with folding/unfolding capabilities.

  2. One-loop calculation in time-dependent non-equilibrium thermo field dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umezawa, H.; Yamanaka, Y.

    1989-01-01

    This paper is a review on the structure of thermo field dynamics (TFD) in which the basic concepts such as the thermal doublets, the quasi-particles and the self-consistent renormalization are presented in detail. A strong emphasis is put on the computational scheme. A detailed structure of this scheme is illustrated by the one-loop calculation in a non-equilibrium time-dependent process. A detailed account of the one-loop calculation has never been reported anywhere. The role of the self-consistent renormalization is explained. The equilibrium TFD is obtained as the long-time limit of non-equilibrium TFD. (author)

  3. Solubility limits on radionuclide dissolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerrisk, J.F.

    1984-12-31

    This paper examines the effects of solubility in limiting dissolution rates of a number of important radionuclides from spent fuel and high-level waste. Two simple dissolution models were used for calculations that would be characteristics of a Yucca Mountain repository. A saturation-limited dissolution model, in which the water flowing through the repository is assumed to be saturated with each waste element, is very conservative in that it overestimates dissolution rates. A diffusion-limited dissolution model, in which element-dissolution rates are limited by diffusion of waste elements into water flowing past the waste, is more realistic, but it is subject to some uncertainty at this time. Dissolution rates of some elements (Pu, Am, Sn, Th, Zr, Sm) are always limited by solubility. Dissolution rates of other elements (Cs, Tc, Np, Sr, C, I) are never solubility limited; their release would be limited by dissolution of the bulk waste form. Still other elements (U, Cm, Ni, Ra) show solubility-limited dissolution under some conditions. 9 references, 3 tables.

  4. Multimodal Network Equilibrium with Stochastic Travel Times

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Meng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The private car, unlike public traffic modes (e.g., subway, trolley running along dedicated track-ways, is invariably subject to various uncertainties resulting in travel time variation. A multimodal network equilibrium model is formulated that explicitly considers stochastic link capacity variability in the road network. The travel time of combined-mode trips is accumulated based on the concept of the mean excess travel time (METT which is a summation of estimated buffer time and tardy time. The problem is characterized by an equivalent VI (variational inequality formulation where the mode choice is expressed in a hierarchical logit structure. Specifically, the supernetwork theory and expansion technique are used herein to represent the multimodal transportation network, which completely represents the combined-mode trips as constituting multiple modes within a trip. The method of successive weighted average is adopted for problem solutions. The model and solution method are further applied to study the trip distribution and METT variations caused by the different levels of the road conditions. Results of numerical examples show that travelers prefer to choose the combined travel mode as road capacity decreases. Travelers with different attitudes towards risk are shown to exhibit significant differences when making travel choice decisions.

  5. Classical or equilibrium thermodynamics: basic conceptual aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Augusto Calvo Tiritan

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The Classical or Equilibrium Thermodynamics is one of the most consolidated fields of Physics. It is synthesized by a well-known and self coherent knowledge structure. The essence of the Classical Thermodynamics theoretical structure consists of a set of natural laws that rule the macroscopic physical systems behavior. These laws were formulated based on observations generalizations and are mostly independent of any hypotheses concerning the microscopic nature of the matter. In general, the approaches established for the Classical Thermodynamics follow one of the following alternatives: the historical approach that describes chronologically the evolution of ideas, concepts and facts, and the postulational approach in which postulates are formulated but are not demonstrated a priori but can be confirmed a posteriori. In this work, a brief review of the pre-classical historical approach conceptual evolution is elaborated, from the beginning of the seventeenth century to the middle of the nineteenth century. As for this, the following themes are dealt with in an evolutionary and phenomenological way: heat nature, thermometry, calorimetry, Carnot’s heat engine, heat mechanical equivalent and the first and second laws. The Zeroth law that was formulated afterwards is included in the discussion.

  6. Solubility of nicotinic acid in water, ethanol, acetone, diethyl ether, acetonitrile, and dimethyl sulfoxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonçalves, Elsa M.; Minas da Piedade, Manuel E.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We determined the solubility of nicotinic acid in six solvents by the gravimetric method. ► We found that, regardless of the solvent, the same monoclinic solid phase was in equilibrium with the solution. ► We determined the activity coefficients of nicotinic acid in the six solvents. ► We found that the solubility trends seem to be determined by the polarity and polarizability of the solvent. - Abstract: The mole fraction equilibrium solubility of nicotinic acid in six solvents (water, ethanol, dimethyl sulfoxide, acetone, acetonitrile and diethyl ether) differing in polarity, polarizability, and hydrogen-bonding ability, was determined over the temperature range (283 to 333) K, using the gravimetric method. The results obtained led to the solubility order dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) ≫ ethanol > water > acetone > diethyl ether > acetonitrile. An analysis based on various solvent descriptors, indicated that this trend seems to be mainly determined by the polarity and polarizability of the solvent. The activity coefficients of nicotinic acid in the different solvents, under saturation conditions, were determined as a function of the temperature and it was found that DMSO exhibits enhanced solubility relative to an ideal solution while the opposite is observed for all other solvents. Both the solvent and the fact that nicotinic acid is primarily zwitterionic in aqueous solution and non-zwitterionic in non-aqueous media, did not affect the nature of the solid phases in equilibrium with the different solutions. Indeed, X-ray powder diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and differential scanning calorimetry analysis indicated that, despite some differences in particle size and morphology, the starting material and the solid products obtained at the end of the solubility studies in the six solvents used in this work were all crystalline and corresponded to the same monoclinic phase.

  7. Equilibrium calculations and mode analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrnegger, F.

    1987-01-01

    The STEP asymptotic stellarator expansion procedure was used to study the MHD equilibrium and stability properties of stellarator configurations without longitudinal net-current, which also apply to advanced stellarators. The effects of toroidal curvature and magnetic well, and the Shafranov shift were investigated. A classification of unstable modes in toroidal stellarators is given. For WVII-A coil-field configurations having a β value of 1% and a parabolic pressure profile, no free-boundary modes are found. This agrees with the experimental fact that unstable behavior of the plasma column is not observed for this parameter range. So a theoretical β-limit for stability against ideal MHD modes can be estimated by mode analysis for the WVII-A device

  8. Stellar Equilibrium in Semiclassical Gravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carballo-Rubio, Raúl

    2018-02-09

    The phenomenon of quantum vacuum polarization in the presence of a gravitational field is well understood and is expected to have a physical reality, but studies of its backreaction on the dynamics of spacetime are practically nonexistent outside of the specific context of homogeneous cosmologies. Building on previous results of quantum field theory in curved spacetimes, in this Letter we first derive the semiclassical equations of stellar equilibrium in the s-wave Polyakov approximation. It is highlighted that incorporating the polarization of the quantum vacuum leads to a generalization of the classical Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkoff equation. Despite the complexity of the resulting field equations, it is possible to find exact solutions. Aside from being the first known exact solutions that describe relativistic stars including the nonperturbative backreaction of semiclassical effects, these are identified as a nontrivial combination of the black star and gravastar proposals.

  9. Risk premia in general equilibrium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Posch, Olaf

    This paper shows that non-linearities can generate time-varying and asymmetric risk premia over the business cycle. These (empirical) key features become relevant and asset market implications improve substantially when we allow for non-normalities in the form of rare disasters. We employ explici......'s effective risk aversion.......This paper shows that non-linearities can generate time-varying and asymmetric risk premia over the business cycle. These (empirical) key features become relevant and asset market implications improve substantially when we allow for non-normalities in the form of rare disasters. We employ explicit...... solutions of dynamic stochastic general equilibrium models, including a novel solution with endogenous labor supply, to obtain closed-form expressions for the risk premium in production economies. We find that the curvature of the policy functions affects the risk premium through controlling the individual...

  10. Neoclassical equilibrium in gyrokinetic simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garbet, X.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Nguyen, C.; Sarazin, Y.; Grandgirard, V.; Ghendrih, Ph.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a set of model collision operators, which reproduce the neoclassical equilibrium and comply with the constraints of a full-f global gyrokinetic code. The assessment of these operators is based on an entropy variational principle, which allows one to perform a fast calculation of the neoclassical diffusivity and poloidal velocity. It is shown that the force balance equation is recovered at lowest order in the expansion parameter, the normalized gyroradius, hence allowing one to calculate correctly the radial electric field. Also, the conventional neoclassical transport and the poloidal velocity are reproduced in the plateau and banana regimes. The advantages and drawbacks of the various model operators are discussed in view of the requirements for neoclassical and turbulent transport.

  11. QUIL: a chemical equilibrium code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lunsford, J.L.

    1977-02-01

    A chemical equilibrium code QUIL is described, along with two support codes FENG and SURF. QUIL is designed to allow calculations on a wide range of chemical environments, which may include surface phases. QUIL was written specifically to calculate distributions associated with complex equilibria involving fission products in the primary coolant loop of the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor. QUIL depends upon an energy-data library called ELIB. This library is maintained by FENG and SURF. FENG enters into the library all reactions having standard free energies of reaction that are independent of concentration. SURF enters all surface reactions into ELIB. All three codes are interactive codes written to be used from a remote terminal, with paging control provided. Plotted output is also available

  12. Pre-equilibrium gamma emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, Sudip

    1993-01-01

    Together with the direct reaction and the compound nuclear emissions the pre-equilibrium (PEQ) or pre-compound processes give a fairly complete picture of nuclear reactions induced by light ions at energies of some tens of MeV. PEQ particle emissions covering the higher energy continuum spectra have been investigated in detail both experimentally and theoretically. In contrast, very little work has been done on PEQ γ- emissions. The reason is that in spite of extensive work done on PEQ particle emissions, the mechanism is not yet fully understood. Also, the PEQ γ-emission cross-sections (∼ micro barns) are very small compared to the PEQ particle emission cross-sections (∼ milli barns). Yet apart from the academic interest the understanding of PEQ γ-emissions is important for applied fusion research etc. In this paper the PEQ γ-emissions is discussed and the work done in this field is reviewed. (author). 14 refs

  13. Equilibrium Analysis in Cake Cutting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Branzei, Simina; Miltersen, Peter Bro

    2013-01-01

    Cake cutting is a fundamental model in fair division; it represents the problem of fairly allocating a heterogeneous divisible good among agents with different preferences. The central criteria of fairness are proportionality and envy-freeness, and many of the existing protocols are designed...... to guarantee proportional or envy-free allocations, when the participating agents follow the protocol. However, typically, all agents following the protocol is not guaranteed to result in a Nash equilibrium. In this paper, we initiate the study of equilibria of classical cake cutting protocols. We consider one...... of the simplest and most elegant continuous algorithms -- the Dubins-Spanier procedure, which guarantees a proportional allocation of the cake -- and study its equilibria when the agents use simple threshold strategies. We show that given a cake cutting instance with strictly positive value density functions...

  14. Knowledge Management through the Equilibrium Pattern Model for Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarirete, Akila; Noble, Elizabeth; Chikh, Azeddine

    Contemporary students are characterized by having very applied learning styles and methods of acquiring knowledge. This behavior is consistent with the constructivist models where students are co-partners in the learning process. In the present work the authors developed a new model of learning based on the constructivist theory coupled with the cognitive development theory of Piaget. The model considers the level of learning based on several stages and the move from one stage to another requires learners' challenge. At each time a new concept is introduced creates a disequilibrium that needs to be worked out to return back to its equilibrium stage. This process of "disequilibrium/equilibrium" has been analyzed and validated using a course in computer networking as part of Cisco Networking Academy Program at Effat College, a women college in Saudi Arabia. The model provides a theoretical foundation for teaching especially in a complex knowledge domain such as engineering and can be used in a knowledge economy.

  15. Non-equilibrium Dynamics, Thermalization and Entropy Production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinrichsen, Haye; Janotta, Peter; Gogolin, Christian

    2011-01-01

    This paper addresses fundamental aspects of statistical mechanics such as the motivation of a classical state space with spontaneous transitions, the meaning of non-equilibrium in the context of thermalization, and the justification of these concepts from the quantum-mechanical point of view. After an introductory part we focus on the problem of entropy production in non-equilibrium systems. In particular, the generally accepted formula for entropy production in the environment is analyzed from a critical perspective. It is shown that this formula is only valid in the limit of separated time scales of the system's and the environmental degrees of freedom. Finally, we present an alternative simple proof of the fluctuation theorem.

  16. Non-equilibrium statistical physics with application to disordered systems

    CERN Document Server

    Cáceres, Manuel Osvaldo

    2017-01-01

    This textbook is the result of the enhancement of several courses on non-equilibrium statistics, stochastic processes, stochastic differential equations, anomalous diffusion and disorder. The target audience includes students of physics, mathematics, biology, chemistry, and engineering at undergraduate and graduate level with a grasp of the basic elements of mathematics and physics of the fourth year of a typical undergraduate course. The little-known physical and mathematical concepts are described in sections and specific exercises throughout the text, as well as in appendices. Physical-mathematical motivation is the main driving force for the development of this text. It presents the academic topics of probability theory and stochastic processes as well as new educational aspects in the presentation of non-equilibrium statistical theory and stochastic differential equations.. In particular it discusses the problem of irreversibility in that context and the dynamics of Fokker-Planck. An introduction on fluc...

  17. Equilibrium sampling for a thermodynamic assessment of contaminated sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    ) govern diffusive uptake and partitioning. Equilibrium sampling of sediment was introduced 15 years ago to measure Cfree, and it has since developed into a straightforward, precise and sensitive approach for determining Cfree and other exposure parameters that allow for thermodynamic assessment...... of polluted sediments. Glass jars with µm-thin silicone coatings on the inner walls can be used for ex situ equilibration while a device housing several silicone-coated fibers can be used for in situ equilibration. In both cases, parallel sampling with varying silicone thicknesses can be applied to confirm...... will focus at the latest developments in equilibrium sampling concepts and methods. Further, we will explain how these approaches can provide a new basis for a thermodynamic assessment of polluted sediments....

  18. The addition zirconium effect on the solubility and activity of sulfur in liquid iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burylev, B.P.; Mojsov, L.P.

    1994-01-01

    Critical analysis of reference data on thermodynamic properties of zirconium sulfides is conducted for evaluation of zirconium desulfonation ability in liquid steel. Sulfur solubility dependence on zirconium concentration in liquid iron is presented. Curves of sulfur solubility in liquid iron in the presence of other elements, including titanium, manganese, vanadium and chromium are presented for comparison. It is shown that equilibrium concentration of sulfur is much lower than standard sulfur concentrations in steel, therefore zirconium appears to be the best desulfonator among the metals considered

  19. Adsorption of hydrogen isotopes by metals in non-equilibrium conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Livshits, A.I.; Notkin, M.E.; Pustovojt, Yu.M.

    1982-01-01

    To study the interaction of thermonuclear plasma and additions with metallic walls, nonequilibrium system of thermal atomary hydrogen - ''cold'' (300-1100 K) metal is experimentally investigated. Atomary hydrogen was feeded to samples of Ni and Pd in the shape of atomic beam, coming into vacuum from high-frequency gaseous discharge. It is shown that hydrogen solubility under nonequilibrium conditions increases with surface passivation (contamination); in this case it surpasses equilibrium solubility by value orders. Nickel and iron dissolve more hydrogen than palladium at a certain state of surface ( passivation) and gas (atomary hydrogen). The sign of the temperature dependence of hydrogen solubility in passivated N 1 and Fe changes when alterating molecular hydrogen by atomary hydrogen

  20. Mathematical models and equilibrium in irreversible microeconomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anatoly M. Tsirlin

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available A set of equilibrium states in a system consisting of economic agents, economic reservoirs, and firms is considered. Methods of irreversible microeconomics are used. We show that direct sale/purchase leads to an equilibrium state which depends upon the coefficients of supply/demand functions. To reach the unique equilibrium state it is necessary to add either monetary exchange or an intermediate firm.

  1. Collapse and equilibrium of rotating, adiabatic clouds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boss, A.P.

    1980-01-01

    A numerical hydrodynamics computer code has been used to follow the collapse and establishment of equilibrium of adiabatic gas clouds restricted to axial symmetry. The clouds are initially uniform in density and rotation, with adiabatic exponents γ=5/3 and 7/5. The numerical technique allows, for the first time, a direct comparison to be made between the dynamic collapse and approach to equilibrium of unconstrained clouds on the one hand, and the results for incompressible, uniformly rotating equilibrium clouds, and the equilibrium structures of differentially rotating polytropes, on the other hand

  2. Equilibrium sampling by reweighting nonequilibrium simulation trajectories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Cheng; Wan, Biao; Xu, Shun; Wang, Yanting; Zhou, Xin

    2016-03-01

    Based on equilibrium molecular simulations, it is usually difficult to efficiently visit the whole conformational space of complex systems, which are separated into some metastable regions by high free energy barriers. Nonequilibrium simulations could enhance transitions among these metastable regions and then be applied to sample equilibrium distributions in complex systems, since the associated nonequilibrium effects can be removed by employing the Jarzynski equality (JE). Here we present such a systematical method, named reweighted nonequilibrium ensemble dynamics (RNED), to efficiently sample equilibrium conformations. The RNED is a combination of the JE and our previous reweighted ensemble dynamics (RED) method. The original JE reproduces equilibrium from lots of nonequilibrium trajectories but requires that the initial distribution of these trajectories is equilibrium. The RED reweights many equilibrium trajectories from an arbitrary initial distribution to get the equilibrium distribution, whereas the RNED has both advantages of the two methods, reproducing equilibrium from lots of nonequilibrium simulation trajectories with an arbitrary initial conformational distribution. We illustrated the application of the RNED in a toy model and in a Lennard-Jones fluid to detect its liquid-solid phase coexistence. The results indicate that the RNED sufficiently extends the application of both the original JE and the RED in equilibrium sampling of complex systems.

  3. Static Equilibrium Configurations of Charged Metallic Bodies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Key words: Static equilibrium, charged metallic body, potential energy, projected gradient method. ... television, radio, internet, microwave ovens, mobile telephones, satellite communication systems, radar systems, electrical motors, electrical.

  4. Some Examples of Formation of Shells and Their Role in Establishment of Equilibrium

    OpenAIRE

    Koutandos, Spyridon

    2011-01-01

    In this article we discuss the concept of equilibrium establishment in four most usual instances as is electrostriction and vaporization as related to the concept of equilibrium shell formation. Two more cases are then studied which are of relevance. One is the Brownian movement , the study of which is essential for pedagogical reasons as to exclusion of basic facts from statistics in a simple manner. The last one case studied is the very passage of current in a conductor. What is new in all ...

  5. Some Examples of Formation of Shells and Their Role in Establishment of Equilibrium

    OpenAIRE

    Koutandos, Spyridon

    2012-01-01

    In this article we discuss the concept of equilibrium establishment in four most usual instances as is electrostriction and vaporization as related to the concept of equilibrium shell formation. Two more cases are then studied which are of relevance. One is the Brownian movement , the study of which is essential for pedagogical reasons as to exclusion of basic facts from statistics in a simple manner. The last one case studied is the very passage of current in a conductor. What is new in all ...

  6. Effect of triolein addition on the solubility of capsanthin in supercritical carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araus, Karina A.; Valle, José M. del; Robert, Paz S.; Fuente, Juan C. de la

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We isolated capsanthin from red pepper (Capsicum annuum L.). ► We measured its solubility in pure CO 2 and with triolein as cosolvent. ► We model the solubility of capsanthin in pure CO 2 and with triolein. ► Solubility of triolein in mixtures CO 2 + capsanthin was similar to pure CO 2 . ► Triolein has cosolvent effect over solubility of capsanthin in CO 2 . - Abstract: This manuscript presents new phase equilibrium data for capsanthin in pure and triolein-entrained Supercritical (SC) carbon dioxide (CO 2 ). The aim of the work was to determine the cosolvent effect of triolein on capsanthin by comparing solubility results in a ternary (CO 2 + triolein + capsanthin) system and binary (CO 2 + capsanthin) system at (313 or 333) K and (19 to 34) MPa. For this, authors isolated capsanthin from red pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) and tested it using a dynamic-analytical method in an apparatus with recirculation and online analysis of the CO 2 -rich phase. Within the experimental region, the solubility of capsanthin in pure SC–CO 2 increased with system temperature at isobaric conditions and also increased with pressure at isothermal conditions. Solubilities ranged from a minimal of 0.65 μmol/mol at 313 K and 19 MPa to a maximal of 1.97 μmol/mol at 333 K and 32 MPa. The concentration of triolein in the ternary system was equivalent to that its solubility in pure SC–CO 2 depending on system temperature and pressure conditions. Crossover pressure was determined experimentally at 29.6 MPa, below which solubility of triolein decreased with temperature (effect of density). Above the crossover pressure, solubility of triolein increased with temperature (vapor pressure effect). Values of solubility within this range were 0.16 mmol/mol at 19 MPa and 313 K to 0.41 mmol/mol at 33 MPa and 333 K. Independent of system temperature and pressure, capsanthin solubility in triolein-entrained SC–CO 2 increased by a factor of about 3 (triolein-induced enhancement

  7. From rationality to cooperativeness: The totally mixed Nash equilibrium in Markov strategies in the iterated Prisoner's Dilemma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan S Menshikov

    Full Text Available In this research, the social behavior of the participants in a Prisoner's Dilemma laboratory game is explained on the basis of the quantal response equilibrium concept and the representation of the game in Markov strategies. In previous research, we demonstrated that social interaction during the experiment has a positive influence on cooperation, trust, and gratefulness. This research shows that the quantal response equilibrium concept agrees only with the results of experiments on cooperation in Prisoner's Dilemma prior to social interaction. However, quantal response equilibrium does not explain of participants' behavior after social interaction. As an alternative theoretical approach, an examination was conducted of iterated Prisoner's Dilemma game in Markov strategies. We built a totally mixed Nash equilibrium in this game; the equilibrium agrees with the results of the experiments both before and after social interaction.

  8. Extended solid solubility of a Co–Cr system by mechanical alloying

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Betancourt-Cantera, J.A.; Sánchez-De Jesús, F.; Torres-Villaseñor, G.; Bolarín-Miró, A.M.; Cortés-Escobedo, C.A.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Solubility of the Co–Cr system is modified by means of Mechanical Alloying (MA). ► MA induces the formation of new solid solutions of Co–Cr system in non-equilibrium. ► MA promote the formation of metastable Co–Cr phases with greater solubility. - Abstract: Mechanical alloying, MA, has been successfully used to extend the limits of solid solubility in many commercially important metallic systems. The aim of this work is to demonstrate that MA modifies the solid solubility of the Co–Cr system. Co and Cr elemental powders were used as precursors and mixed in an adequate weight ratio to obtain Co 100−x Cr x (0 ≤ x ≤ 100, Δx = 10) to study the effect of mechanical processing in the solubility of the Co–Cr system. Processing was carried out at room temperature in a shaker mixer mill using vials and balls of hardened steel as milling media with a ball:powder weight ratio of 10:1. Crystalline structure characterization of the milled powders was conducted using X-ray diffraction, and phase transformations as a function of composition were analyzed. Thermal analysis confirmed structural changes occurred in the mechanically alloyed powders. The evolution of the phase transformations with composition is reported for each composition. The results showed that after high energy ball milling for 7 h, the solid solubility between Co and Cr could be evidently extended, despite the low solid solubility at the equilibrium conditions of this system. Additionally, the micrographs of the milled powders showed that increasing composition of chromium changes the shape and size of the particles while simultaneously reducing their agglomeration; this effect is possibly attributed to the brittleness of elemental chrome.

  9. The calculated solubilities of hematite, magnetite and lepidocrocite in steam generator feedtrains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jobe, D.

    1997-05-01

    The solubility of three iron oxides [hematite (α-Fe 2 O 3 (s)), magnetite (Fe 3 O 4 (s)) and lepidocrocite (γ-FeOOH(s))] under representative steam generator feedtrain conditions were calculated using a thermodynamic database for these oxides and the associated aqueous species. Using this database, we calculated the solubility of iron for both Fe 3 O 4 (s) in equilibrium with other iron oxides and for the individual oxides in the presence of various oxygen partial pressures. The results indicate that the solubility of iron is strongly dependent on redox conditions, represented either by dissolved H 2 or O 2 concentration, or by the presence of other iron oxides (stable or metastable). The solubility behaviour of these oxides can be explained by changes in the aqueous-phase speciation of iron with temperature and pH. Similar calculations for the individual oxides in the presence Of O 2 (g) are also presented and were used to construct temperature-dependent phase diagrams for these oxides in equilibrium (including metastable conditions) with 1 ppb (ppb - μg·kg -1 ) of soluble iron. Calculations were also performed for feedtrain solutions containing 5 ppb of dissolved oxygen and pH buffered using mixtures of amines. From these calculations it was concluded that, relative to the oxidation potential and temperature of the feedtrain solution, changing the pH-buffer has only a minor effect on iron solubility. The effect of the variation in iron solubility along the feedtrain with solution pH, temperature and redox potential on corrosion-product transport to the boiler is also discussed. (author)

  10. Extended solid solubility of a Co-Cr system by mechanical alloying

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Betancourt-Cantera, J.A. [Area Academica de Ciencias de la Tierra y Materiales, UAEH Carr. Pachuca-Tulancingo Km. 4.5, Pachuca, Hidalgo 42184 (Mexico); Sanchez-De Jesus, F., E-mail: fsanchez@uaeh.edu.mx [Area Academica de Ciencias de la Tierra y Materiales, UAEH Carr. Pachuca-Tulancingo Km. 4.5, Pachuca, Hidalgo 42184 (Mexico); Torres-Villasenor, G. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales-UNAM, Apdo. Postal 70-360, 04510 Mexico, DF (Mexico); Bolarin-Miro, A.M. [Area Academica de Ciencias de la Tierra y Materiales, UAEH Carr. Pachuca-Tulancingo Km. 4.5, Pachuca, Hidalgo 42184 (Mexico); Cortes-Escobedo, C.A. [Centro de Investigacion e Innovacion Tecnologica del IPN Cda. CECATI S/N, Col. Sta. Catarina, Azcapotzalco, 02250 Mexico, DF (Mexico)

    2012-07-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Solubility of the Co-Cr system is modified by means of Mechanical Alloying (MA). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MA induces the formation of new solid solutions of Co-Cr system in non-equilibrium. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MA promote the formation of metastable Co-Cr phases with greater solubility. - Abstract: Mechanical alloying, MA, has been successfully used to extend the limits of solid solubility in many commercially important metallic systems. The aim of this work is to demonstrate that MA modifies the solid solubility of the Co-Cr system. Co and Cr elemental powders were used as precursors and mixed in an adequate weight ratio to obtain Co{sub 100-x}Cr{sub x} (0 {<=} x {<=} 100, {Delta}x = 10) to study the effect of mechanical processing in the solubility of the Co-Cr system. Processing was carried out at room temperature in a shaker mixer mill using vials and balls of hardened steel as milling media with a ball:powder weight ratio of 10:1. Crystalline structure characterization of the milled powders was conducted using X-ray diffraction, and phase transformations as a function of composition were analyzed. Thermal analysis confirmed structural changes occurred in the mechanically alloyed powders. The evolution of the phase transformations with composition is reported for each composition. The results showed that after high energy ball milling for 7 h, the solid solubility between Co and Cr could be evidently extended, despite the low solid solubility at the equilibrium conditions of this system. Additionally, the micrographs of the milled powders showed that increasing composition of chromium changes the shape and size of the particles while simultaneously reducing their agglomeration; this effect is possibly attributed to the brittleness of elemental chrome.

  11. Near-field solubility studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomason, H.P.; Williams, S.J.

    1992-02-01

    Experimental determinations of the solubilities of americium, plutonium, neptunium, protactinium, thorium, radium, lead, tin, palladium and zirconium are reported. These elements have radioactive isotopes of concern in assessments of radioactive waste disposal. All measurements were made under the highly alkaline conditions typical of the near field of a radioactive waste repository which uses cementitious materials for many of the immobilisation matrices, the backfill and the engineered structures. Low redox potentials, typical of those resulting from the corrosion of iron and steel, were simulated for those elements having more than one accessible oxidation state. The dissolved concentrations of the elements were defined using ultrafiltration. In addition, the corrosion of iron and stainless steel was shown to generate low redox potentials in solution and the solubility of iron(II) at high pH was measured and found to be sufficient for it to act as a redox buffer with respect to neptunium and plutonium. (author)

  12. Thermodynamic Approach to Boron Nitride Nanotube Solubility and Dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiano, A. L.; Gibbons, L.; Tsui, M.; Applin, S. I.; Silva, R.; Park, C.; Fay, C. C.

    2016-01-01

    Inadequate dispersion of nanomaterials is a critical issue that significantly limits the potential properties of nanocomposites and when overcome, will enable further enhancement of material properties. The most common methods used to improve dispersion include surface functionalization, surfactants, polymer wrapping, and sonication. Although these approaches have proven effective, they often achieve dispersion by altering the surface or structure of the nanomaterial and ultimately, their intrinsic properties. Co-solvents are commonly utilized in the polymer, paint, and art conservation industries to selectively dissolve materials. These co-solvents are utilized based on thermodynamic interaction parameters and are chosen so that the original materials are not affected. The same concept was applied to enhance the dispersion of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) to facilitate the fabrication of BNNT nanocomposites. Of the solvents tested, dimethylacetamide (DMAc) exhibited the most stable, uniform dispersion of BNNTs, followed by N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF), acetone, and N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP). Utilizing the known Hansen solubility parameters of these solvents in comparison to the BNNT dispersion state, a region of good solubility was proposed. This solubility region was used to identify co-solvent systems that led to improved BNNT dispersion in poor solvents such as toluene, hexane, and ethanol. Incorporating the data from the co-solvent studies further refined the proposed solubility region. From this region, the Hansen solubility parameters for BNNTs are thought to lie at the midpoint of the solubility sphere: 16.8, 10.7, and 9.0 MPa(exp 1/2) for delta d, delta p, and delta h, respectively, with a calculated Hildebrand parameter of 21.8 MPa)exp 1/2).

  13. Simulated rat intestinal fluid improves oral exposure prediction for poorly soluble compounds over a wide dose range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joerg Berghausen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Solubility can be the absorption limiting factor for drug candidates and is therefore a very important input parameter for oral exposure prediction of compounds with limited solubility. Biorelevant media of the fasted and fed state have been published for humans, as well as for dogs in the fasted state. In a drug discovery environment, rodents are the most common animal model to assess the oral exposure of drug candidates. In this study a rat simulated intestinal fluid (rSIF is proposed as a more physiologically relevant media to describe drug solubility in rats. Equilibrium solubility in this medium was tested as input parameter for physiologically-based pharmacokinetics (PBPK simulations of oral pharmacokinetics in the rat. Simulations were compared to those obtained using other solubility values as input parameters, like buffer at pH 6.8, human simulated intestinal fluid and a comprehensive dissolution assay based on rSIF. Our study on nine different compounds demonstrates that the incorporation of rSIF equilibrium solubility values into PBPK models of oral drug exposure can significantly improve the reliability of simulations in rats for doses up to 300 mg/kg compared to other media. The comprehensive dissolution assay may help to improve further simulation outcome, but the greater experimental effort as compared to equilibrium solubility may limit its use in a drug discovery environment. Overall, PBPK simulations based on solubility in the proposed rSIF medium can improve prioritizing compounds in drug discovery as well as planning dose escalation studies, e.g. during toxicological investigations.

  14. Consequences of chirality on the dynamics of a water-soluble supramolecular polymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Matthew B; Albertazzi, Lorenzo; Voets, Ilja K; Leenders, Christianus M A; Palmans, Anja R A; Pavan, Giovanni M; Meijer, E W

    2015-02-20

    The rational design of supramolecular polymers in water is imperative for their widespread use, but the design principles for these systems are not well understood. Herein, we employ a multi-scale (spatial and temporal) approach to differentiate two analogous water-soluble supramolecular polymers: one with and one without a stereogenic methyl. Initially aiming simply to understand the molecular behaviour of these systems in water, we find that while the fibres may look identical, the introduction of homochirality imparts a higher level of internal order to the supramolecular polymer. Although this increased order does not seem to affect the basic dimensions of the supramolecular fibres, the equilibrium dynamics of the polymers differ by almost an order of magnitude. This report represents the first observation of a structure/property relationship with regard to equilibrium dynamics in water-soluble supramolecular polymers.

  15. Consequences of chirality on the dynamics of a water-soluble supramolecular polymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Matthew B.; Albertazzi, Lorenzo; Voets, Ilja K.; Leenders, Christianus M. A.; Palmans, Anja R. A.; Pavan, Giovanni M.; Meijer, E. W.

    2015-02-01

    The rational design of supramolecular polymers in water is imperative for their widespread use, but the design principles for these systems are not well understood. Herein, we employ a multi-scale (spatial and temporal) approach to differentiate two analogous water-soluble supramolecular polymers: one with and one without a stereogenic methyl. Initially aiming simply to understand the molecular behaviour of these systems in water, we find that while the fibres may look identical, the introduction of homochirality imparts a higher level of internal order to the supramolecular polymer. Although this increased order does not seem to affect the basic dimensions of the supramolecular fibres, the equilibrium dynamics of the polymers differ by almost an order of magnitude. This report represents the first observation of a structure/property relationship with regard to equilibrium dynamics in water-soluble supramolecular polymers.

  16. The Solubility Parameters of Ionic Liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marciniak, Andrzej

    2010-01-01

    The Hildebrand’s solubility parameters have been calculated for 18 ionic liquids from the inverse gas chromatography measurements of the activity coefficients at infinite dilution. Retention data were used for the calculation. The solubility parameters are helpful for the prediction of the solubility in the binary solvent mixtures. From the solubility parameters, the standard enthalpies of vaporization of ionic liquids were estimated. PMID:20559495

  17. The Solubility Parameters of Ionic Liquids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Marciniak

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The Hildebrand’s solubility parameters have been calculated for 18 ionic liquids from the inverse gas chromatography measurements of the activity coefficients at infinite dilution. Retention data were used for the calculation. The solubility parameters are helpful for the prediction of the solubility in the binary solvent mixtures. From the solubility parameters, the standard enthalpies of vaporization of ionic liquids were estimated.

  18. Brand Loyalty and Market Equilibrium

    OpenAIRE

    Birger Wernerfelt

    1991-01-01

    Two concepts of brand loyalty are defined, “inertial” brand loyalty resulting from time lags in awareness, and “cost-based” brand loyalty resulting from intertemporal utility effects. Their market level implications are formally derived in a continuous time model. It is found that inertial brand loyalty leads to equilibria with price dispersion, while cost-based brand loyalty also may allow single price equilibria. In all cases, as brand loyalty vanishes, so does the difference between the av...

  19. Helium solubility and bubble growth in metals under high pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laakmann, J.

    1985-07-01

    Helium solubility and bubble growth in metals under high pressure polycrystals and single crystals of gold were heated in helium at temperatures between 475 K and 1250 K in a pressure regime of 200 to 2700 bar to measure the solubility of helium in gold. After quenching to room temperature the helium content, measured by mass spectrometry, showed the following properties: 1) A linear dependence of the He solubility on pressure. 2) Thinning of the specimen reduces the helium content by a factor 10 to 100 but does not change the linear pressure dependence. 3) The thermal release of He from thinned polycrystals and single crystals occurs mainly in a single peak at 500 K. 4) The He concentration of the thinned single crystals was lower by a factor of 10 to 50 than that of the thinned polycrystals. 5) The He solubility in single crystals can be described by an enthalpy of solution Hsub(s)sup(f) = 0.85 +- 0.7 eV and a non-configurational entropy of Ssub(s)sup(f) between 0 k and 1 k (k: Boltzmann-constant). In order to measure the pressure dependence of helium bubble growth in nickel polycrystal Ni-foils were α-implanted to a helium content of 130 appm. The evaluation of the size distribution of the helium bubbles after heat treatments shows 1) The helium content of the observable bubbles - assumed to be in equilibrium - equals the amount of helium implanted into the specimen. 2) The activation energy for the growth of helium bubbles is 1.25 +- 0.3 eV. The comparison of specimen which had been heated at low pressures up to 10 bar with others heated at 2500-2700 bar does not show an unequivocal pressure dependence for helium bubble growth. (orig./IHOE) [de

  20. Solubility measurement of uranium in uranium-contaminated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.Y.; Elless, M.; Hoffman, F.

    1993-08-01

    A short-term equilibration study involving two uranium-contaminated soils at the Fernald site was conducted as part of the In Situ Remediation Integrated Program. The goal of this study is to predict the behavior of uranium during on-site remediation of these soils. Geochemical modeling was performed on the aqueous species dissolved from these soils following the equilibration study to predict the on-site uranium leaching and transport processes. The soluble levels of total uranium, calcium, magnesium, and carbonate increased continually for the first four weeks. After the first four weeks, these components either reached a steady-state equilibrium or continued linearity throughout the study. Aluminum, potassium, and iron, reached a steady-state concentration within three days. Silica levels approximated the predicted solubility of quartz throughout the study. A much higher level of dissolved uranium was observed in the soil contaminated from spillage of uranium-laden solvents and process effluents than in the soil contaminated from settling of airborne uranium particles ejected from the nearby incinerator. The high levels observed for soluble calcium, magnesium, and bicarbonate are probably the result of magnesium and/or calcium carbonate minerals dissolving in these soils. Geochemical modeling confirms that the uranyl-carbonate complexes are the most stable and dominant in these solutions. The use of carbonate minerals on these soils for erosion control and road construction activities contributes to the leaching of uranium from contaminated soil particles. Dissolved carbonates promote uranium solubility, forming highly mobile anionic species. Mobile uranium species are contaminating the groundwater underlying these soils. The development of a site-specific remediation technology is urgently needed for the FEMP site

  1. Thermal equilibrium and statistical thermometers in special relativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubero, David; Casado-Pascual, Jesús; Dunkel, Jörn; Talkner, Peter; Hänggi, Peter

    2007-10-26

    There is an intense debate in the recent literature about the correct generalization of Maxwell's velocity distribution in special relativity. The most frequently discussed candidate distributions include the Jüttner function as well as modifications thereof. Here we report results from fully relativistic one-dimensional molecular dynamics simulations that resolve the ambiguity. The numerical evidence unequivocally favors the Jüttner distribution. Moreover, our simulations illustrate that the concept of "thermal equilibrium" extends naturally to special relativity only if a many-particle system is spatially confined. They make evident that "temperature" can be statistically defined and measured in an observer frame independent way.

  2. Extended irreversible thermodynamics and non-equilibrium temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casas-Vazquez, Jose'

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available We briefly review the concept of non-equilibrium temperature from the perspectives of extended irreversible thermodynamics, fluctuation theory, and statistical mechanics. The relations between different proposals are explicitly examined in two especially simple systems: an ideal gas in steady shear flow and a forced harmonic oscillator in a thermal bath. We examine with special detail temperatures related to the average molecular kinetic energy along different spatial directions, to the average configurational energy, to the derivative of the entropy with respect to internal energy, to fluctuation-dissipation relation and discuss their measurement.

  3. RINGED ACCRETION DISKS: EQUILIBRIUM CONFIGURATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pugliese, D.; Stuchlík, Z., E-mail: d.pugliese.physics@gmail.com, E-mail: zdenek.stuchlik@physics.cz [Institute of Physics and Research Centre of Theoretical Physics and Astrophysics, Faculty of Philosophy and Science, Silesian University in Opava, Bezručovo náměstí 13, CZ-74601 Opava (Czech Republic)

    2015-12-15

    We investigate a model of a ringed accretion disk, made up by several rings rotating around a supermassive Kerr black hole attractor. Each toroid of the ringed disk is governed by the general relativity hydrodynamic Boyer condition of equilibrium configurations of rotating perfect fluids. Properties of the tori can then be determined by an appropriately defined effective potential reflecting the background Kerr geometry and the centrifugal effects. The ringed disks could be created in various regimes during the evolution of matter configurations around supermassive black holes. Therefore, both corotating and counterrotating rings have to be considered as being a constituent of the ringed disk. We provide constraints on the model parameters for the existence and stability of various ringed configurations and discuss occurrence of accretion onto the Kerr black hole and possible launching of jets from the ringed disk. We demonstrate that various ringed disks can be characterized by a maximum number of rings. We present also a perturbation analysis based on evolution of the oscillating components of the ringed disk. The dynamics of the unstable phases of the ringed disk evolution seems to be promising in relation to high-energy phenomena demonstrated in active galactic nuclei.

  4. Solubility of ferrocyanide compounds. Ferrocyanide Safety Project, Interim report FY1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rai, D.; Felmy, A.R.; Smith, S.C.; Ryan, J.L.

    1994-10-01

    The solubility of Cs 2 NiFe(CN) 6 (c) [1] as a function of NaOH and temperature was determined to ascertain whether [1] shows retrograde solubility (i.e., decreasing solubility with increasing temperature), which would have bearing on the possible formation of ''hot spots'' in the tanks and thus the safety of the ferrocyanide tanks. The results show that the aqueous concentrations of Cs in equilibrium with [1] at 25, 60, 75 and 90 C are similar (within the limits of experimental error), indicating that [1] does not show retrograde solubility. To understand general solubility relationships of Ni 2 Fe(CN) 6 (c) [2] and to determine the influence on solubility of high electrolyte concentrations (e.g., NaNO 3 ) that are commonly encountered in the ferrocyanide tanks, the solubility of [2] as a function of CsNO 3 , NiCl 2 , and NaNO 3 was determined. In general, [2] is fairly insoluble and shows slightly increased solubility at high electrolyte concentrations only. For [2] in NiCl 2 , the aqueous Fe concentrations show first a decrease and then an increase with the increase in NiCl 2 concentrations. The increase in Fe concentrations at high Ni concentrations appears to be the result of replacement of Fe by Ni in the [2] structure. For [2] in CsNO 3 and at 0.001 M Na 4 Fe(CN) 6 , the Cs is quantitatively removed from solution at low added Cs concentrations and appears to approach the final solid composition of [1]. The solubility of [2] in NaNO 3 and at 0.001 M Na 4 Fe(CN) 6 shows an increase in Ni concentrations to about 0.5 mg/l at NaNO 3 concentrations > 1.0 M. These increased Ni concentrations may be the result of substitution of Na for Ni in the solid phase

  5. Effect of abnormal high solubility of impurity in nanocrystalls and its metrological aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oksengendler, B L; Turaeva, N N; Nikiforov, V N; Sredin, V G; Maksimov, S E

    2011-01-01

    The problem of doping impurity intrusion into nanoparticles is analyzed. Thermodynamical model of the effect is developed, taking into account specific properties of nanoparticles: quantum confinement of elementary excitations and the impact of nanoparticle surface states compared with bulk ones. We obtained the size dependence of impact equilibrium solubility in nanoparticles. Magnetometric experiments, carried out on nanoparticle ensemble of iron oxide doped with gadolinium and other impurities, show lack of contradictions and good qualitative accordance between the model and the experiment.

  6. Substitution of the soluble boron reactivity control system of a pressurized water reactor by gadolinium burnable poisons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galperin, A.; Segev, M.; Radkowsky, A.

    1986-01-01

    The results are presented of a research project that is aimed at designing a gadolinium burnable poison (BP) system for complete reactivity control of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) core during the ''equilibrium'' cycle, resulting in the elimination of the soluble boron system, which represents a considerable saving in both capital and operating costs. A flat and strong negative moderator temperature coefficient is assured for a poison-free moderator. The design analysis of a core, heavily loaded with gadolinium BP rods, was based on a BGUCORE neutronic package and cluster model of a fuel assembly. The project objective was achieved by a novel lumped BP rod, designed as an annulus of gadolinium, clad by zirconium, and inserted into vacant guide thimbles of fresh-fuel assemblies. Specific combinations were found for the inner/outer radii of the poison ring, gadolinium densities, and number of rods per assembly, resulting in an almost flat criticality curve during the cycle. A reactivity swing of ≅1% ΔK can be easily controlled by an existing system of control rods. Comparison of the fuel cycle length of a gadolinium-controlled core with that of the reference, soluble, boron-controlled core indicated that there is no penalty due to residual poison at end of life. Unique guidelines for the fuel loading strategy were applied to find a practical fuel-shuffling scheme by which the design and operational constraints of a typical PWR core of current design were satisfied. Several problems should be solved for a practical implementation of the presented design relative to operational and safety requirements of the existing control rod system. Adequate movement of the regulating rods should be determined and shutdown margins of the safety rods should be ascertained. Final judgment of the feasibility of the concept may be made following the solution of these and other regulatory-related issues

  7. Equilibrium figures in geodesy and geophysics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moritz, H.

    There is an enormous literature on geodetic equilibrium figures, but the various works have not always been interrelated, also for linguistic reasons (English, French, German, Italian, Russian). The author attempts to systematize the various approaches and to use the standard second-order theory for a study of the deviation of the actual earth and of the equipotential reference ellipsoid from an equilibrium figure.

  8. Equilibrium theory of island biogeography: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angela D. Yu; Simon A. Lei

    2001-01-01

    The topography, climatic pattern, location, and origin of islands generate unique patterns of species distribution. The equilibrium theory of island biogeography creates a general framework in which the study of taxon distribution and broad island trends may be conducted. Critical components of the equilibrium theory include the species-area relationship, island-...

  9. Gibbs equilibrium averages and Bogolyubov measure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sankovich, D.P.

    2011-01-01

    Application of the functional integration methods in equilibrium statistical mechanics of quantum Bose-systems is considered. We show that Gibbs equilibrium averages of Bose-operators can be represented as path integrals over a special Gauss measure defined in the corresponding space of continuous functions. We consider some problems related to integration with respect to this measure

  10. Do intertidal flats ever reach equilibrium?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maan, D.C.; van Prooijen, B.C.; Wang, Z.B.; de Vriend, H.J.

    2015-01-01

    Various studies have identified a strong relation between the hydrodynamic forces and the equilibrium profile for intertidal flats. A thorough understanding of the interplay between the hydrodynamic forces and the morphology, however, concerns more than the equilibrium state alone. We study the

  11. Vertical field and equilibrium calculation in ETE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montes, Antonio; Shibata, Carlos Shinya.

    1996-01-01

    The free-boundary MHD equilibrium code HEQ is used to study the plasma behaviour in the tokamak ETE, with optimized compensations coils and vertical field coils. The changes on the equilibrium parameters for different plasma current values are also investigated. (author). 5 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  12. Statistical thermodynamics of equilibrium polymers at interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gucht, van der J.; Besseling, N.A.M.

    2002-01-01

    The behavior of a solution of equilibrium polymers (or living polymers) at an interface is studied, using a Bethe-Guggenheim lattice model for molecules with orientation dependent interactions. The density profile of polymers and the chain length distribution are calculated. For equilibrium polymers

  13. Non-equilibrium modelling of distillation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wesselingh, JA; Darton, R

    1997-01-01

    There are nasty conceptual problems in the classical way of describing distillation columns via equilibrium stages, and efficiencies or HETP's. We can nowadays avoid these problems by simulating the behaviour of a complete column in one go using a non-equilibrium model. Such a model has phase

  14. Implementing an Equilibrium Law Teaching Sequence for Secondary School Students to Learn Chemical Equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghirardi, Marco; Marchetti, Fabio; Pettinari, Claudio; Regis, Alberto; Roletto, Ezio

    2015-01-01

    A didactic sequence is proposed for the teaching of chemical equilibrium law. In this approach, we have avoided the kinetic derivation and the thermodynamic justification of the equilibrium constant. The equilibrium constant expression is established empirically by a trial-and-error approach. Additionally, students learn to use the criterion of…

  15. On the definition of equilibrium and non-equilibrium states in dynamical systems

    OpenAIRE

    Akimoto, Takuma

    2008-01-01

    We propose a definition of equilibrium and non-equilibrium states in dynamical systems on the basis of the time average. We show numerically that there exists a non-equilibrium non-stationary state in the coupled modified Bernoulli map lattice.

  16. Students' and teachers' misapplication of le chatelier's principle: Implications for the teaching of chemical equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quílez-Pardo, Juan; Solaz-Portolés, Joan Josep

    The aim of this article was to study the reasons, strategies, and procedures that both students and teachers use to solve some chemical equilibrium questions and problems. Inappropriate conceptions on teaching and a lack of knowledge regarding the limited usefulness of Le Chatelier's principle, with its vague and ambiguous formulation and textbook presentation, may be some of the sources of misconceptions about the prediction of the effect of changing conditions on chemical equilibrium. To diagnose misconceptions and their possible sources, a written test was developed and administered to 170 1st-year university chemistry students. A chemical equilibrium problem, relating to the students' test, was solved by 40 chemistry teachers. First, we ascertained that teacher's conceptions might influence the problem-solving strategies of the learner. Based on this first aspect, our discussion also concerns students' and teachers' misconceptions related to the Le Chatelier's principle. Misconceptions emerged through: (a) misapplication and misunderstanding of Le Chatelier's principle; (b) use of rote-learning recall and algorithmic procedures; (c) incorrect control of the variables involved; (d) limited use of the chemical equilibrium law; (e) a lack of mastery of chemical equilibrium principles and difficulty in transferring such principles to new situations. To avoid chemical equilibrium misconceptions, a specific pattern of conceptual and methodological change may be considered.Received: 16 November 1993; Revised: 21 September 1994;

  17. Information-theoretic equilibrium and observable thermalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anzà, F.; Vedral, V.

    2017-03-01

    A crucial point in statistical mechanics is the definition of the notion of thermal equilibrium, which can be given as the state that maximises the von Neumann entropy, under the validity of some constraints. Arguing that such a notion can never be experimentally probed, in this paper we propose a new notion of thermal equilibrium, focused on observables rather than on the full state of the quantum system. We characterise such notion of thermal equilibrium for an arbitrary observable via the maximisation of its Shannon entropy and we bring to light the thermal properties that it heralds. The relation with Gibbs ensembles is studied and understood. We apply such a notion of equilibrium to a closed quantum system and show that there is always a class of observables which exhibits thermal equilibrium properties and we give a recipe to explicitly construct them. Eventually, an intimate connection with the Eigenstate Thermalisation Hypothesis is brought to light.

  18. Disturbances in equilibrium function after major earthquake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honma, Motoyasu; Endo, Nobutaka; Osada, Yoshihisa; Kim, Yoshiharu; Kuriyama, Kenichi

    2012-01-01

    Major earthquakes were followed by a large number of aftershocks and significant outbreaks of dizziness occurred over a large area. However it is unclear why major earthquake causes dizziness. We conducted an intergroup trial on equilibrium dysfunction and psychological states associated with equilibrium dysfunction in individuals exposed to repetitive aftershocks versus those who were rarely exposed. Greater equilibrium dysfunction was observed in the aftershock-exposed group under conditions without visual compensation. Equilibrium dysfunction in the aftershock-exposed group appears to have arisen from disturbance of the inner ear, as well as individual vulnerability to state anxiety enhanced by repetitive exposure to aftershocks. We indicate potential effects of autonomic stress on equilibrium function after major earthquake. Our findings may contribute to risk management of psychological and physical health after major earthquakes with aftershocks, and allow development of a new empirical approach to disaster care after such events.

  19. Failure of Local Thermal Equilibrium in Quantum Friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intravaia, F.; Behunin, R. O.; Henkel, C.; Busch, K.; Dalvit, D. A. R.

    2016-09-01

    Recent progress in manipulating atomic and condensed matter systems has instigated a surge of interest in nonequilibrium physics, including many-body dynamics of trapped ultracold atoms and ions, near-field radiative heat transfer, and quantum friction. Under most circumstances the complexity of such nonequilibrium systems requires a number of approximations to make theoretical descriptions tractable. In particular, it is often assumed that spatially separated components of a system thermalize with their immediate surroundings, although the global state of the system is out of equilibrium. This powerful assumption reduces the complexity of nonequilibrium systems to the local application of well-founded equilibrium concepts. While this technique appears to be consistent for the description of some phenomena, we show that it fails for quantum friction by underestimating by approximately 80% the magnitude of the drag force. Our results show that the correlations among the components of driven, but steady-state, quantum systems invalidate the assumption of local thermal equilibrium, calling for a critical reexamination of this approach for describing the physics of nonequilibrium systems.

  20. Solubility of Stevioside and Rebaudioside A in water, ethanol and their binary mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana S. Celaya

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to investigate the solubility of Stevioside and Rebaudioside A in different solvents (ethanol, water, ethanol:water 30:70 and ethanol:water 70:30, supersaturated solutions of pre-crystalized steviol glycosides were maintained at different temperatures (from 5 °C to 50 °C to reach equilibrium. Under these conditions significant differences were found in the extent of solubility. Rebaudioside A was poorly soluble in ethanol and water, and Stevioside was poorly soluble in water. Solvent mixtures more effectively promoted solubilisation, and a significant effect of temperature on solubility was observed. The two steviol glycosides showed higher solubilities and this behavior was promoted by the presence of the other sweetener. The polarity indices of the solvents were determined, and helped to explain the observed behavior. Several solute-solvent and solute-solute interactions can occur, along with the incidence of a strong affinity between solvents. The obtained results are in accordance with technological applications of ethanol, water and their binary mixtures for Stevioside and Rebaudioside A separations.

  1. Partition Function and Configurational Entropy in Non-Equilibrium States: A New Theoretical Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira Takada

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available A new model of non-equilibrium thermodynamic states has been investigated on the basis of the fact that all thermodynamic variables can be derived from partition functions. We have thus attempted to define partition functions for non-equilibrium conditions by introducing the concept of pseudo-temperature distributions. These pseudo-temperatures are configurational in origin and distinct from kinetic (phonon temperatures because they refer to the particular fragments of the system with specific energies. This definition allows thermodynamic states to be described either for equilibrium or non-equilibrium conditions. In addition; a new formulation of an extended canonical partition function; internal energy and entropy are derived from this new temperature definition. With this new model; computational experiments are performed on simple non-interacting systems to investigate cooling and two distinct relaxational effects in terms of the time profiles of the partition function; internal energy and configurational entropy.

  2. Formation and healing of n = 1 magnetic islands in LHD equilibrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanno, Ryutaro; Hayashi, Takaya; Okamoto, Masao

    2005-01-01

    Magnetic islands with the toroidal mode number n = 1, e.g. m/n = 1/1 and 2/1 islands, in a Large Helical Device (LHD) equilibrium are studied using the three-dimensional MHD equilibrium code, HINT. In order to accomplish this purpose, the HINT code has been improved. The equilibrium analysis, in particular an analysis of the LHD equilibrium with an m/n = 1/1 island, is required for the local island divertor experiment, in order to understand the magnetic structures of field lines, i.e. flux surfaces, islands and ergodic field lines. We find that the m/n = 2/1 island can be healed for a finite equilibrium beta, while the m/n = 1/1 island is not healed and is surrounded with ergodic field lines for finite-β. From the latter result, we can conjecture that the island divertor concept is effective even for finite equilibrium beta-values, but the performance of the island divertor is deteriorated for finite-β because of the existence of the ergodic zone between the closed surfaces (i.e. the core region) and the m/n = 1/1 island. We also find that the width of the m/n = 1/1 island depends on the equilibrium beta value and that the island located at the inside of the torus has the advantage of retaining its width

  3. Effect of carbon and silicon on nitrogen solubility in liquid chromium and iron-chromium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khyakkinen, V.I.; Bezobrazov, S.V.

    1986-01-01

    The study is aimed at specifying the role of carbon and silicon in high-chromium melts nitridation processes. It is shown that in high-chromium melts of the Cr-Fe-C system the nitrogen solubility is reduced with the growth of carbon content and in the chromium concentration range of 70-100% at 1873 K and P N 2 =0.1 MPa it is described by the lg[%N] Cr-Fe-C =lg[%N] cr-fe -0.098[%C] equation. While decreasing the temperature the nitrogen solubility in alloys is increased. Silicon essentially decreases the nitrogen solubility in liquid chromium. For the 0-10% silicon concentration range the relation between the equilibrium content of nitrogen and silicon at 1873 K and P N 2 =0.1 MPa is described by the straight line equation [%N] Cr-Si =6.1-0.338 [%Si

  4. Solubility measurement of iron-selenium compounds under reducing conditions. Research document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitamura, Akira; Shibata, Masahiro

    2003-03-01

    Chemical behavior of selenium (Se), which was one of the important elements for performance assessment of geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste, was investigated under reducing and iron-containing conditions. A washing method for an iron diselenide (FeSe 2 (cr)) reagent with acidic and basic solutions (0.1 and 1 M HCl and 1 M NaOH) was carried out for the purification of FeSe 2 reagent, which was considered to be a solubility limiting solid for Se under the geological disposal conditions. Furthermore, solubility of FeSe 2 (cr) was measured in alkaline solution (pH: 11 - 13) under reducing conditions (E h vs SHE: -0.4 - 0 V), and thermodynamic data on equilibrium reactions between Se in solution and Se precipitate were obtained. The dependencies of solubility values on pH and redox potential (E h : vs. standard hydrogen electrode) were best interpreted that the solubility limiting solid was not FeSe 2 (cr) but Se(cr) and the aqueous species was SeO 3 2- in the present experimental conditions. The equilibrium constant between Se(cr) and SeO 3 2- at zero ionic strength was determined and compared with literature values. The chemical behavior of Se under geological disposal conditions was discussed. (author)

  5. COMET concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alsmeyer, H.; Tromm, W.

    1995-01-01

    Studies of the COMET core catcher concept developed for a future PWR have been continued. The concept is based on the spreading of a core melt on a sacrificial layer and its erosion, until a subsequent addition of water from below causes a fragmentation of the melt. A porous solidification of the melt would then admit a complete flooding within a short period. (orig.)

  6. Concept Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Technology & Learning, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Concept maps are graphical ways of working with ideas and presenting information. They reveal patterns and relationships and help students to clarify their thinking, and to process, organize and prioritize. Displaying information visually--in concept maps, word webs, or diagrams--stimulates creativity. Being able to think logically teaches…

  7. Management concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittner, Rhonda

    2006-01-01

    Management concepts evolve through time. Health care managers can learn new concepts by evaluating classical management strategies, as well as modern-day strategies. Focusing on quality improvement and team building can help managers align the goals of their departments with the goals of the organization, consequently improving patient care.

  8. Isospin equilibrium and non-equilibrium in heavy-ion collisions at intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Liewen; Ge Lingxiao; Zhang Xiaodong; Zhang Fengshou

    1997-01-01

    The equilibrium and non-equilibrium of the isospin degree of freedom are studied in terms of an isospin-dependent QMD model, which includes isospin-dependent symmetry energy, Coulomb energy, N-N cross sections and Pauli blocking. It is shown that there exists a transition from the isospin equilibrium to non-equilibrium as the incident energy from below to above a threshold energy in central, asymmetric heavy-ion collisions. Meanwhile, it is found that the phenomenon results from the co-existence and competition of different reaction mechanisms, namely, the isospin degree of freedom reaches an equilibrium if the incomplete fusion (ICF) component is dominant and does not reach equilibrium if the fragmentation component is dominant. Moreover, it is also found that the isospin-dependent N-N cross sections and symmetry energy are crucial for the equilibrium of the isospin degree of freedom in heavy-ion collisions around the Fermi energy. (author)

  9. Lateral Concepts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gad, Christopher; Bruun Jensen, casper

    2016-01-01

    This essay discusses the complex relation between the knowledges and practices of the researcher and his/her informants in terms of lateral concepts. The starting point is that it is not the prerogative of the (STS) scholar to conceptualize the world; all our “informants” do it too. This creates...... the possibility of enriching our own conceptual repertoires by letting them be inflected by the concepts of those we study. In a broad sense, the lateral means that there is a many-to-many relation between domains of knowledge and practice. However, each specific case of the lateral is necessarily immanent...... to a particular empirical setting and form of inquiry. In this sense lateral concepts are radically empirical since it locates concepts within the field. To clarify the meaning and stakes of lateral concepts, we first make a contrast between lateral anthropology and Latour’s notion of infra-reflexivity. We end...

  10. Concept theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjørland, Birger

    2009-01-01

      Concept theory is an extremely broad, interdisciplinary and complex field of research related to many deep fields with very long historical traditions without much consensus. However, information science and knowledge organization cannot avoid relating to theories of concepts. Knowledge...... organizing systems (e.g. classification systems, thesauri and ontologies) should be understood as systems basically organizing concepts and their semantic relations. The same is the case with information retrieval systems. Different theories of concepts have different implications for how to construe......, evaluate and use such systems. Based on "a post-Kuhnian view" of paradigms this paper put forward arguments that the best understanding and classification of theories of concepts is to view and classify them in accordance with epistemological theories (empiricism, rationalism, historicism and pragmatism...

  11. Local Nash equilibrium in social networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yichao; Aziz-Alaoui, M A; Bertelle, Cyrille; Guan, Jihong

    2014-08-29

    Nash equilibrium is widely present in various social disputes. As of now, in structured static populations, such as social networks, regular, and random graphs, the discussions on Nash equilibrium are quite limited. In a relatively stable static gaming network, a rational individual has to comprehensively consider all his/her opponents' strategies before they adopt a unified strategy. In this scenario, a new strategy equilibrium emerges in the system. We define this equilibrium as a local Nash equilibrium. In this paper, we present an explicit definition of the local Nash equilibrium for the two-strategy games in structured populations. Based on the definition, we investigate the condition that a system reaches the evolutionary stable state when the individuals play the Prisoner's dilemma and snow-drift game. The local Nash equilibrium provides a way to judge whether a gaming structured population reaches the evolutionary stable state on one hand. On the other hand, it can be used to predict whether cooperators can survive in a system long before the system reaches its evolutionary stable state for the Prisoner's dilemma game. Our work therefore provides a theoretical framework for understanding the evolutionary stable state in the gaming populations with static structures.

  12. Teaching Chemical Equilibrium with the Jigsaw Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doymus, Kemal

    2008-03-01

    This study investigates the effect of cooperative learning (jigsaw) versus individual learning methods on students’ understanding of chemical equilibrium in a first-year general chemistry course. This study was carried out in two different classes in the department of primary science education during the 2005-2006 academic year. One of the classes was randomly assigned as the non-jigsaw group (control) and other as the jigsaw group (cooperative). Students participating in the jigsaw group were divided into four “home groups” since the topic chemical equilibrium is divided into four subtopics (Modules A, B, C and D). Each of these home groups contained four students. The groups were as follows: (1) Home Group A (HGA), representin g the equilibrium state and quantitative aspects of equilibrium (Module A), (2) Home Group B (HGB), representing the equilibrium constant and relationships involving equilibrium constants (Module B), (3) Home Group C (HGC), representing Altering Equilibrium Conditions: Le Chatelier’s principle (Module C), and (4) Home Group D (HGD), representing calculations with equilibrium constants (Module D). The home groups then broke apart, like pieces of a jigsaw puzzle, and the students moved into jigsaw groups consisting of members from the other home groups who were assigned the same portion of the material. The jigsaw groups were then in charge of teaching their specific subtopic to the rest of the students in their learning group. The main data collection tool was a Chemical Equilibrium Achievement Test (CEAT), which was applied to both the jigsaw and non-jigsaw groups The results indicated that the jigsaw group was more successful than the non-jigsaw group (individual learning method).

  13. Thermodynamic models for determination of solid–liquid equilibrium of the 6-benzyladenine in pure and binary organic solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Tao; Deng, Renlun; Wu, Gang; Gu, Pengfei; Hu, Yonghong; Yang, Wenge; Yu, Yemin; Zhang, Yuhao; Yang, Chen

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • The solubility increased with increasing temperature. • Data were fitted using the modified Apelblat equation and other models in pure solvents. • Data were fitted using the modified Apelblat equation and other models in binary solvent mixture. - Abstract: Data on corresponding solid–liquid equilibrium of 6-benzyladenine in different solvents are essential for a preliminary study of industrial applications. In this paper, the solid–liquid equilibrium of 6-benzyladenine in methanol, ethanol, 1-butanol, acetone, acetonitrile, ethyl acetate, dimethyl formamide and tetrahydrofuran pure solvents and (dimethyl formamide + actone) mixture solvents was explored within the temperature range from (278.15 to 333.15) K under 0.1 MPa. For the temperature range investigated, the solubility of 6-benzyladenine in the solvents increased with increasing temperature. The solubility of 6-benzyladenine in dimethyl formamide is superior to other selected pure solvents. The modified Apelblat model, the Buchowski-Ksiazaczak λh model, and the ideal model were adopted to describe and predict the change tendency of solubility. Computational results showed that the modified Apelblat model has more advantages than the other two models. The solubility results were fitted using a modified Apelblat equation, a variant of the combined nearly ideal binary solvent/Redich-Kister (CNIBS/R-K) model, Jouyban-Acree model and Ma model in (dimethyl formamide + acetone) binary solvent mixture. Computational results showed that the modified Apelblat model is superior to the other equations.

  14. Determination and correlation thermodynamic models for solid–liquid equilibrium of the Nifedipine in pure and mixture organic solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Gang; Hu, Yonghong; Gu, Pengfei; Yang, Wenge; Wang, Chunxiao; Ding, Zhiwen; Deng, Renlun; Li, Tao; Hong, Housheng

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The solubility increased with increasing temperature. • The data were fitted using the modified Apelblat equation in pure solvents. • The data were fitted using the CNIBS/R-K model in binary solvent mixture. - Abstract: Knowledge of thermodynamic parameters on corresponding solid-liquid equilibrium of nifedipine in different solvents is essential for a preliminary study of pharmaceutical engineering and industrial applications. In this paper, a gravimetric method was used to correct the solid-liquid equilibrium of nifedipine in methanol, ethanol, 1-butanol, acetone, acetonitrile, ethyl acetate and tetrahydrofuran pure solvents as well as in the (tetrahydrofuran + acetonitrile) mixture solvents at temperatures from 278.15 K to 328.15 K under 0.1 MPa. For the temperature range investigation, the solubility of nifedipine in the solvents increased with increasing temperature. The solubility of nifedipine in tetrahydrofuran is superior to other selected pure solvents. The modified Apelblat model, the Buchowski-Ksiazaczak λh model, and the ideal model were adopted to describe and predict the change tendency of solubility. Computational results showed that the modified Apelblat model stood out to be more suitable with the higher accuracy. The solubility values were fitted using a modified Apelblat model, a variant of the combined nearly ideal binary solvent/Redich-Kister (CNIBS/R-K) model and Jouyban-Acree model in (tetrahydrofuran + acetonitrile) binary solvent mixture. Computational results showed that the CNIBS/R-K model had more advantages than other models.

  15. Nonideal plasmas as non-equilibrium media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morozov, I V; Norman, G E; Valuev, A A; Valuev, I A

    2003-01-01

    Various aspects of the collective behaviour of non-equilibrium nonideal plasmas are studied. The relaxation of kinetic energy to the equilibrium state is simulated by the molecular dynamics (MD) method for two-component non-degenerate strongly non-equilibrium plasmas. The initial non-exponential stage, its duration and the subsequent exponential stage of the relaxation process are studied for a wide range of ion charge, nonideality parameter and ion mass. A simulation model of the nonideal plasma excited by an electron beam is proposed. An approach is developed to calculate the dynamic structure factor in non-stationary conditions. Instability increment is obtained from MD simulations

  16. MHD equilibrium identification on ASDEX-Upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarthy, P.J.; Schneider, W.; Lakner, K.; Zehrfeld, H.P.; Buechl, K.; Gernhardt, J.; Gruber, O.; Kallenbach, A.; Lieder, G.; Wunderlich, R.

    1992-01-01

    A central activity accompanying the ASDEX-Upgrade experiment is the analysis of MHD equilibria. There are two different numerical methods available, both using magnetic measurements which reflect equilibrium states of the plasma. The first method proceeds via a function parameterization (FP) technique, which uses in-vessel magnetic measurements to calculate up to 66 equilibrium parameters. The second method applies an interpretative equilibrium code (DIVA) for a best fit to a different set of magnetic measurements. Cross-checks with the measured particle influxes from the inner heat shield and the divertor region and with visible camera images of the scrape-off layer are made. (author) 3 refs., 3 figs

  17. Numerical method for partial equilibrium flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramshaw, J.D.; Cloutman, L.D.; Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545)

    1981-01-01

    A numerical method is presented for chemically reactive fluid flow in which equilibrium and nonequilibrium reactions occur simultaneously. The equilibrium constraints on the species concentrations are established by a quadratic iterative procedure. If the equilibrium reactions are uncoupled and of second or lower order, the procedure converges in a single step. In general, convergence is most rapid when the reactions are weakly coupled. This can frequently be achieved by a judicious choice of the independent reactions. In typical transient calculations, satisfactory accuracy has been achieved with about five iterations per time step

  18. A Simple System for Observing Dynamic Phase Equilibrium via an Inquiry-Based Laboratory or Demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloonan, Carrie A.; Andrew, Julie A.; Nichol, Carolyn A.; Hutchinson, John S.

    2011-01-01

    This article describes an activity that can be used as an inquiry-based laboratory or demonstration for either high school or undergraduate chemistry students to provide a basis for understanding both vapor pressure and the concept of dynamic phase equilibrium. The activity includes a simple setup to create a closed system of only water liquid and…

  19. Does the Addition of Inert Gases at Constant Volume and Temperature Affect Chemical Equilibrium?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paiva, Joao C. M.; Goncalves, Jorge; Fonseca, Susana

    2008-01-01

    In this article we examine three approaches, leading to different conclusions, for answering the question "Does the addition of inert gases at constant volume and temperature modify the state of equilibrium?" In the first approach, the answer is yes as a result of a common students' alternative conception; the second approach, valid only for ideal…

  20. Predicting long-term and short-term tidal flat morphodynamics using a dynamic equilibrium theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hu, Z.; Wang, Z.B.; Zitman, T.J.; Stive, M.J.F.; Bouma, T.J.

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic equilibrium theory is a fruitful concept, which we use to systematically explain the tidal flat morphodynamic response to tidal currents, wind waves, sediment supply, and other sedimentological drivers. This theory stems from a simple analytical model that derives the tide- or wave-dominated

  1. Adolescents' Body Image Trajectories: A Further Test of the Self-Equilibrium Hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Alexandre J. S.; Maïano, Christophe; Scalas, L. Francesca; Janosz, Michel; Litalien, David

    2017-01-01

    The self-equilibrium hypothesis underlines the importance of having a strong core self, which is defined as a high and developmentally stable self-concept. This study tested this hypothesis in relation to body image (BI) trajectories in a sample of 1,006 adolescents (M[subscript age] = 12.6, including 541 males and 465 females) across a 4-year…

  2. The amorphous solid dispersion of the poorly soluble ABT-102 forms nano/microparticulate structures in aqueous medium: impact on solubility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank KJ

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Kerstin J Frank,1,3 Ulrich Westedt,2 Karin M Rosenblatt,2 Peter Hölig,2 Jörg Rosenberg,2 Markus Mägerlein,2 Gert Fricker,3 Martin Brandl11Department of Physics, Chemistry and Pharmacy, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark; 2Abbott GmbH and Co. KG, Ludwigshafen, Germany; 3Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, GermanyAbstract: Amorphous solid dispersions (ASDs are a promising formulation approach for poorly soluble active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs, because they ideally enhance both dissolution rate and solubility. However, the mechanism behind this is not understood in detail. In the present study, we investigated the supramolecular and the nano/microparticulate structures that emerge spontaneously upon dispersion of an ASD in aqueous medium and elucidated their influence on solubility. The ASD, prepared by hot melt extrusion, contained the poorly soluble ABT-102 (solubility in buffer, 0.05 µg/mL, a hydrophilic polymer, and three surfactants. The apparent solubility of ABT-102 from the ASD-formulation was enhanced up to 200 times in comparison to crystalline ABT-102. At the same time, the molecular solubility, as assessed by inverse equilibrium dialysis, was enhanced two times. Asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation in combination with a multiangle light-scattering detector, an ultraviolet detector, and a refractometer enabled us to separate and identify the various supramolecular assemblies that were present in the aqueous dispersions of the API-free ASD (placebo and of binary/ternary blends of the ingredients. Thus, the supramolecular assemblies with a molar mass between 20,000 and 90,000 could be assigned to the polyvinylpyrrolidone/vinyl acetate 64, while two other kinds of assemblies were assigned to different surfactant assemblies (micelles. The amount of ABT-102 remaining associated with each of the assemblies upon fractionation was quantified offline with high

  3. Investigation of Equilibrium Core by recycling MA and LLFP in fast reactor cycle (I)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizutani, Akihiko; Shono, Akira; Ishikawa, Makoto

    1999-05-01

    Feasibility study on a self-consistent fuel cycle system is performed in the nuclear fuel recycle system with fast reactors. In this system, the self-generated MAs (Minor Actinides) and LLFPs (Long Lived Fission Products) are confined and incinerated in the fast reactor. Analyses of the nuclear properties for an 'Equilibrium Core', in which the self-generated MAs and LLFPs are confined, are investigated. A conventional sodium cooled oxide fuel fast reactor is selected as the core specifications for the 'Equilibrium Core'. This 600 MWe fast reactor does not have a radial blanket. In this study, the nuclear characteristics of the 'Equilibrium Core' are compared with those of a 'Standard Core' and '5 w/oMA Core'. The 'Standard Core' does not confine MAs and LLFPs in the core, and a 5 w/o-MA Rom LWR is loaded in the '5 w/oMA Core'. Through this comparison between 'Equilibrium Core' and the others, the specific characters of the 'Equilibrium Core' are investigated. In order to realize the 'Equilibrium Core' in the viewpoint of nuclear properties, whether the conventional design concept of fast reactors must be changed or not is also evaluated. The analyses for the nitride and metallic fuel cores are also performed because of their different nuclear characteristics compared with the oxide fuel core. Assuming the separation of REs (Rare Earth elements) from MAs and the isotope separation of LLFPs, most of the nuclear properties for the 'Equilibrium Core' are not beyond those for the '5 w/oMA Core'. It is, therefore, possible to bring the 'Equilibrium Core' into existence without any drastic modification for the design concept of the typical oxide fuel fast reactors. Although the 15.1[w/o] LLFPs are loading in the core of the oxide fuel 'Equilibrium Core', a breeding ratio is more than 1.0 and the difference in a amount of plutonium between a charging and discharging is only 0.04 [ton/year]. Without any drastic change for the design concept of the conventional oxide fuel

  4. Dissipation and the relaxation to equilibrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, Denis J; Williams, Stephen R; Searles, Debra J

    2009-01-01

    Using the recently derived dissipation theorem and a corollary of the transient fluctuation theorem (TFT), namely the second-law inequality, we derive the unique time independent, equilibrium phase space distribution function for an ergodic Hamiltonian system in contact with a remote heat bath. We prove under very general conditions that any deviation from this equilibrium distribution breaks the time independence of the distribution. Provided temporal correlations decay, we show that any nonequilibrium distribution that is an even function of the momenta eventually relaxes (not necessarily monotonically) to the equilibrium distribution. Finally we prove that the negative logarithm of the microscopic partition function is equal to the thermodynamic Helmholtz free energy divided by the thermodynamic temperature and Boltzmann's constant. Our results complement and extend the findings of modern ergodic theory and show the importance of dissipation in the process of relaxation towards equilibrium

  5. Computation of Phase Equilibrium and Phase Envelopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ritschel, Tobias Kasper Skovborg; Jørgensen, John Bagterp

    formulate the involved equations in terms of the fugacity coefficients. We present expressions for the first-order derivatives. Such derivatives are necessary in computationally efficient gradient-based methods for solving the vapor-liquid equilibrium equations and for computing phase envelopes. Finally, we......In this technical report, we describe the computation of phase equilibrium and phase envelopes based on expressions for the fugacity coefficients. We derive those expressions from the residual Gibbs energy. We consider 1) ideal gases and liquids modeled with correlations from the DIPPR database...... and 2) nonideal gases and liquids modeled with cubic equations of state. Next, we derive the equilibrium conditions for an isothermal-isobaric (constant temperature, constant pressure) vapor-liquid equilibrium process (PT flash), and we present a method for the computation of phase envelopes. We...

  6. Intermittent many-body dynamics at equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danieli, C.; Campbell, D. K.; Flach, S.

    2017-06-01

    The equilibrium value of an observable defines a manifold in the phase space of an ergodic and equipartitioned many-body system. A typical trajectory pierces that manifold infinitely often as time goes to infinity. We use these piercings to measure both the relaxation time of the lowest frequency eigenmode of the Fermi-Pasta-Ulam chain, as well as the fluctuations of the subsequent dynamics in equilibrium. The dynamics in equilibrium is characterized by a power-law distribution of excursion times far off equilibrium, with diverging variance. Long excursions arise from sticky dynamics close to q -breathers localized in normal mode space. Measuring the exponent allows one to predict the transition into nonergodic dynamics. We generalize our method to Klein-Gordon lattices where the sticky dynamics is due to discrete breathers localized in real space.

  7. Moisture transport and equilibrium in organic coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wel, van der G.K.; Adan, O.C.G.

    2000-01-01

    Improving coating performance in regard of protection of substrates and structures against moisturerelated degradation requires detailed knowledge of underlying transport mechanisms. In this paper a review is given on transport and equilibrium sorption of moisture in polymer films and organic

  8. Non-equilibrium entropy in excited nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Betak, E.

    1991-06-01

    The time-dependent behaviour of entropy in excited nuclei is investigated. In distinction to recent claims, it is shown that no self-organization is involved in pre-equilibrium nuclear reactions. (author). 9 refs.; 4 figs

  9. Plasma equilibrium and instabilities in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caldas, I.L.; Vannucci, A.

    1985-01-01

    A phenomenological introduction of some of the main theoretical and experimental features on equilibrium and instabilities in tokamaks is presented. In general only macroscopic effects are considered, being the plasma described as a fluid. (L.C.) [pt

  10. "Secrets" of High Pressure Phase Equilibrium Experiment.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wichterle, Ivan

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 54, č. 11 (2005), s. 477-479 ISSN 0022-9830 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : vapour-liquid equilibrium * experimental work Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  11. Averaged description of 3D MHD equilibrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medvedev, S.Yu.; Drozdov, V.V.; Ivanov, A.A.; Martynov, A.A.; Pashekhonov, Yu.Yu.; Mikhailov, M.I.

    2001-01-01

    A general approach by S.A.Galkin et al. in 1991 to 2D description of MHD equilibrium and stability in 3D systems was proposed. The method requires a background 3D equilibrium with nested flux surfaces to generate the metric of a Riemannian space in which the background equilibrium is described by the 2D equation of Grad-Shafranov type. The equation can be solved then varying plasma profiles and shape to get approximate 3D equilibria. In the framework of the method both planar axis conventional stellarators and configurations with spatial magnetic axis can be studied. In the present report the formulation and numerical realization of the equilibrium problem for stellarators with planar axis is reviewed. The input background equilibria with nested flux surfaces are taken from vacuum magnetic field approximately described by analytic scalar potential

  12. Equilibrium-torus bifurcation in nonsmooth systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhusubahyev, Z.T.; Mosekilde, Erik

    2008-01-01

    Considering a set of two coupled nonautonomous differential equations with discontinuous right-hand sides describing the behavior of a DC/DC power converter, we discuss a border-collision bifurcation that can lead to the birth of a two-dimensional invariant torus from a stable node equilibrium...... point. We obtain the chart of dynamic modes and show that there is a region of parameter space in which the system has a single stable node equilibrium point. Under variation of the parameters, this equilibrium may disappear as it collides with a discontinuity boundary between two smooth regions...... in the phase space. The disappearance of the equilibrium point is accompanied by the soft appearance of an unstable focus period-1 orbit surrounded by a resonant or ergodic torus. Detailed numerical calculations are supported by a theoretical investigation of the normal form map that represents the piecewise...

  13. Stochastic approach to equilibrium and nonequilibrium thermodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomé, Tânia; de Oliveira, Mário J

    2015-04-01

    We develop the stochastic approach to thermodynamics based on stochastic dynamics, which can be discrete (master equation) and continuous (Fokker-Planck equation), and on two assumptions concerning entropy. The first is the definition of entropy itself and the second the definition of entropy production rate, which is non-negative and vanishes in thermodynamic equilibrium. Based on these assumptions, we study interacting systems with many degrees of freedom in equilibrium or out of thermodynamic equilibrium and how the macroscopic laws are derived from the stochastic dynamics. These studies include the quasiequilibrium processes; the convexity of the equilibrium surface; the monotonic time behavior of thermodynamic potentials, including entropy; the bilinear form of the entropy production rate; the Onsager coefficients and reciprocal relations; and the nonequilibrium steady states of chemical reactions.

  14. Actinide Solubility and Speciation in the WIPP [PowerPoint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, Donald T. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-11-02

    The presentation begins with the role and need for nuclear repositories (overall concept, international updates (Sweden, Finland, France, China), US approach and current status), then moves on to the WIPP TRU repository concept (design, current status--safety incidents of February 5 and 14, 2014, path forward), and finally considers the WIPP safety case: dissolved actinide concentrations (overall approach, oxidation state distribution and redox control, solubility of actinides, colloidal contribution and microbial effects). The following conclusions are set forth: (1) International programs are moving forward, but at a very slow and somewhat sporadic pace. (2) In the United States, the Salt repository concept, from the perspective of the long-term safety case, remains a viable option for nuclear waste management despite the current operational issues/concerns. (3) Current model/PA prediction (WIPP example) are built on redundant conservatisms. These conservatisms are being addressed in the ongoing and future research to fill existing data gaps--redox control of plutonium by Fe(0, II), thorium (analog) solubility studies in simulated brine, contribution of intrinsic and biocolloids to the mobile concentration, and clarification of microbial ecology and effects.

  15. Actinide Solubility and Speciation in the WIPP [PowerPoint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, Donald T.

    2015-01-01

    The presentation begins with the role and need for nuclear repositories (overall concept, international updates (Sweden, Finland, France, China), US approach and current status), then moves on to the WIPP TRU repository concept (design, current status--safety incidents of February 5 and 14, 2014, path forward), and finally considers the WIPP safety case: dissolved actinide concentrations (overall approach, oxidation state distribution and redox control, solubility of actinides, colloidal contribution and microbial effects). The following conclusions are set forth: (1) International programs are moving forward, but at a very slow and somewhat sporadic pace. (2) In the United States, the Salt repository concept, from the perspective of the long-term safety case, remains a viable option for nuclear waste management despite the current operational issues/concerns. (3) Current model/PA prediction (WIPP example) are built on redundant conservatisms. These conservatisms are being addressed in the ongoing and future research to fill existing data gaps--redox control of plutonium by Fe(0, II), thorium (analog) solubility studies in simulated brine, contribution of intrinsic and biocolloids to the mobile concentration, and clarification of microbial ecology and effects.

  16. Thermal and Mechanical Non-Equilibrium Effects on Turbulent Flows: Fundamental Studies of Energy Exchanges Through Direct Numerical Simulations, Molecular Simulations and Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-26

    photochemical TNE generation, and chemistry of non- equilibrium phenomena. We have investigated a new concept to generate turbulence using photo-initiated...AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2016-0104 Thermal and mechanical non- equilibrium effects on turbulent flows:fundamental studies of energy exchanges through direct...Performance 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 15-09-2012 to 14-11-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Thermal and mechanical non- equilibrium effects on turbulent

  17. The Theory of Variances in Equilibrium Reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakharov, Leonid E.; Lewandowski, Jerome; Foley, Elizabeth L.; Levinton, Fred M.; Yuh, Howard Y.; Drozdov, Vladimir; McDonald, Darren

    2008-01-01

    The theory of variances of equilibrium reconstruction is presented. It complements existing practices with information regarding what kind of plasma profiles can be reconstructed, how accurately, and what remains beyond the abilities of diagnostic systems. The σ-curves, introduced by the present theory, give a quantitative assessment of quality of effectiveness of diagnostic systems in constraining equilibrium reconstructions. The theory also suggests a method for aligning the accuracy of measurements of different physical nature

  18. Equivalence of Equilibrium Propagation and Recurrent Backpropagation

    OpenAIRE

    Scellier, Benjamin; Bengio, Yoshua

    2017-01-01

    Recurrent Backpropagation and Equilibrium Propagation are algorithms for fixed point recurrent neural networks which differ in their second phase. In the first phase, both algorithms converge to a fixed point which corresponds to the configuration where the prediction is made. In the second phase, Recurrent Backpropagation computes error derivatives whereas Equilibrium Propagation relaxes to another nearby fixed point. In this work we establish a close connection between these two algorithms....

  19. Non-equilibrium dog-flea model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerson, Bruce J.

    2017-11-01

    We develop the open dog-flea model to serve as a check of proposed non-equilibrium theories of statistical mechanics. The model is developed in detail. Then it is applied to four recent models for non-equilibrium statistical mechanics. Comparison of the dog-flea solution with these different models allows checking claims and giving a concrete example of the theoretical models.

  20. Internal equilibrium layer growth over forest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dellwik, E.; Jensen, N.O.

    2000-01-01

    the magnitude of the scatter. Different theoretical friction velocity profiles for the Internal Boundary Layer (IBL) are tested against the forest data. The results yield information on the Internal Equilibrium Layer (IEL) growth and an equation for the IEL height fur neutral conditions is derived. For stable...... conditions the results indicate that very long fetches are required in order to measure parameters in equilibrium with the actual surface....

  1. Equilibrium fluctuation energy of gyrokinetic plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krommes, J.A.; Lee, W.W.; Oberman, C.

    1985-11-01

    The thermal equilibrium electric field fluctuation energy of the gyrokinetic model of magnetized plasma is computed, and found to be smaller than the well-known result (k)/8π = 1/2T/[1 + (klambda/sub D/) 2 ] valid for arbitrarily magnetized plasmas. It is shown that, in a certain sense, the equilibrium electric field energy is minimum in the gyrokinetic regime. 13 refs., 2 figs

  2. Travelling Concepts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Karen-Margrethe

    2013-01-01

    Review of "Travelling Concepts, Metaphors, and Narratives: Literary and Cultural Studies in an Age of Interdisciplinary Research" ed. by Sibylle Baumgarten, Beatrice Michaelis and Ansagar Nünning, Trier; Wissenschaftlicher Verlag Trier, 2012......Review of "Travelling Concepts, Metaphors, and Narratives: Literary and Cultural Studies in an Age of Interdisciplinary Research" ed. by Sibylle Baumgarten, Beatrice Michaelis and Ansagar Nünning, Trier; Wissenschaftlicher Verlag Trier, 2012...

  3. Zinc-arsenic interactions in soil: Solubility, toxicity and uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kader, Mohammed; Lamb, Dane T; Wang, Liang; Megharaj, Mallavarapu; Naidu, Ravi

    2017-11-01

    Arsenic (As) and zinc (Zn) are common co-contaminants in mining impacted soils. Their interaction on solubility and toxicity when present concurrently is not well understood in natural systems. The aim of this study was to observe their interaction in solubility (soil-solution), bioaccumulation (shoot uptake) and toxicity to cucumber (Cucumis sativa L) conducting 4 weeks pot study in 5 different soils spiked with As (0, 2, 4, 8 to 1024 mg kg -1 ) individually and with Zn at two phytotoxic doses. The As pore-water concentration was significantly reduced (df = 289, Adjusted R 2  = 0.84, p soils. This outcome may be due to adsorption/surface precipitation or tertiary bridging complexation. No homogenous precipitation of zinc arsenate could be established using electron microscopy, XRD or even equilibrium calculations. For bioaccumulation phase, no significant effect of Zn on As uptake was observed except acidic MG soil whereas, Zn uptake was significantly reduced (p soil. The synergistic response (more than additive) was predominant in this soil for a wide range of inhibition concentration (0-80%) at both Zn EC10 and EC50 levels. Since additive response is mostly considered in risk assessment for mixtures, precautions should be implemented for assessment of toxicity for As-Zn mixture in acidic soil due to their synergistic response in some soils. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Solubility data and modeling for sugar alcohols in ionic liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuniewski, Marcin; Ramjugernath, Deresh; Naidoo, Paramespri; Domańska, Urszula

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Solubility of D-sorbitol and xylitol in six ILs. • The (liquid + liquid) phase equilibrium of (SA + IL) with UCST. • Interesting properties of [BMIM][TDI] IL. • The correlation with NRTL model. - Abstract: Ionic liquids (ILs) are novel media characterized by strong interactions with different organic substances which leads to a wide spectrum of applications involving extraction. Ionic liquids have been used as a solvent for sugar alcohols, sugars and hydrates. This work demonstrates the experimental and theoretical study of (liquid + liquid) phase equilibria for two sugar alcohols, D-sorbitol and xylitol in a few ILs based on different cations and anions (namely, 1-ethyl-1-methylpiperidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide [EMPIP][NTf 2 ], 1-hexyl-1-methylpiperidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide [HMPIP][NTf 2 ], N-hexylquinolinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide [HQuin][NTf 2 ], N-hexylisoquinolinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide [HiQuin][NTf 2 ], 1-butyl-1-methylimidazolium 4,5-dicyano-2-(trifluoromethyl)-imidazolide [BMIM][TDI] and 1-(cyanomethyl)-3-methylimidazolium 4,5-dicyano-2-(trifluoromethyl)-imidazolide [CCNMIM][TDI]). This study was conducted to assess the applicability of the studied ILs for dissolution of these biomass-related materials. (Liquid + liquid) phase equilibrium diagrams (LLE) in binary systems (sugar alcohol + ionic liquid) were measured using the dynamic technique. The influence of the chemical structure of both the ionic liquids and sugar alcohols were established and is discussed

  5. Support of the extremal measure in a vector equilibrium problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lapik, M A

    2006-01-01

    A generalization of the Mhaskar-Saff functional is obtained for a vector equilibrium problem with an external field. As an application, the supports of the equilibrium measures are found in a special vector equilibrium problem with Nikishin matrix.

  6. Nanosuspension Technology for Solubilizing Poorly Soluble Drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Deoli Mukesh

    2012-01-01

    Poor water solubility for many drugs and drug candidates remains a major obstacle to their development and clinical application. It is estimated that around 40% of drugs in the pipeline cannot be delivered through the preferred route or in some cases, at all owing to poor water solubility. Conventional formulations to improve solubility suffer from low bioavailability and poor pharmacokinetics, with some carriers rendering systemic toxicities (e.g. Cremophor1 EL). To date, nanoscale systems f...

  7. Soluble theory with massive ghosts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pisarski, R.D.

    1983-01-01

    To investigate the unitarity of asymptotically free, higher-derivative theories, like certain models of quantum gravity, I study a prototype in two space-time dimensions. The prototype is a kind of higher-derivative nonlinear sigma model; it is asymptotically free, exhibits dimensional transmutation, and is soluble in a large-N expansion. The S-matrix elements, constructed from the analytic continuation of the Euclidean Green's functions, conserve probability to approx.O(N -1 ), but violate unitarity at approx.O(N -2 ). The model demonstrates that in higher-derivative theories unitarity, or the lack thereof, cannot be decided without explicit control over the infrared limit. Even so, the results suggest that there may exist some (rather special) asymptotically free, higher-derivative theories which are unitary

  8. Issues concerning the determination of solubility products of sparingly soluble crystalline solids. Solubility of HfO2(cr)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rai, Dhanpat; Kitamura, Akira; Rosso, Kevin M.; Sasaki, Takayuki; Kobayashi, Taishi

    2016-01-01

    Solubility studies were conducted with HfO 2 (cr) solid as a function HCl and ionic strength ranging from 2.0 to 0.004 mol kg -1 . These studies involved (1) using two different amounts of the solid phase, (2) acid washing the bulk solid phase, (3) preheating the solid phase to 1400 C, and (4) heating amorphous HfO 2 (am) suspensions to 90 C to ascertain whether the HfO 2 (am) converts to HfO 2 (cr) and to determine the solubility from the oversaturation direction. Based on the results of these treatments it is concluded that the HfO 2 (cr) contains a small fraction of less crystalline, but not amorphous, material [HfO 2 (lcr)] and this, rather than the HfO 2 (cr), is the solubility-controlling phase in the range of experimental variables investigated in this study. The solubility data are interpreted using both the Pitzer and SIT models and they provide log 10 K 0 values of -(59.75±0.35) and -(59.48±0.41), respectively, for the solubility product of HfO 2 (lcr)[HfO 2 (lcr) + 2H 2 O ↔ Hf 4+ + 4OH - ]. The log 10 of the solubility product of HfO 2 (cr) is estimated to be < -63. The observation of a small fraction of less crystalline higher solubility material is consistent with the general picture that mineral surfaces are often structurally and/or compositionally imperfect leading to a higher solubility than the bulk crystalline solid. This study stresses the urgent need, during interpretation of solubility data, of taking precautions to make certain that the observed solubility behavior for sparingly-soluble solids is assigned to the proper solid phase.

  9. Issues concerning the determination of solubility products of sparingly soluble crystalline solids. Solubility of HfO{sub 2}(cr)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rai, Dhanpat [Rai Enviro-Chem, LLC, Yachats, OR (United States); Kitamura, Akira [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki (Japan); Rosso, Kevin M. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States); Sasaki, Takayuki; Kobayashi, Taishi [Kyoto Univ. (Japan)

    2016-11-01

    Solubility studies were conducted with HfO{sub 2}(cr) solid as a function HCl and ionic strength ranging from 2.0 to 0.004 mol kg{sup -1}. These studies involved (1) using two different amounts of the solid phase, (2) acid washing the bulk solid phase, (3) preheating the solid phase to 1400 C, and (4) heating amorphous HfO{sub 2}(am) suspensions to 90 C to ascertain whether the HfO{sub 2}(am) converts to HfO{sub 2}(cr) and to determine the solubility from the oversaturation direction. Based on the results of these treatments it is concluded that the HfO{sub 2}(cr) contains a small fraction of less crystalline, but not amorphous, material [HfO{sub 2}(lcr)] and this, rather than the HfO{sub 2}(cr), is the solubility-controlling phase in the range of experimental variables investigated in this study. The solubility data are interpreted using both the Pitzer and SIT models and they provide log{sub 10} K{sup 0} values of -(59.75±0.35) and -(59.48±0.41), respectively, for the solubility product of HfO{sub 2}(lcr)[HfO{sub 2}(lcr) + 2H{sub 2}O ↔ Hf{sup 4+} + 4OH{sup -}]. The log{sub 10} of the solubility product of HfO{sub 2}(cr) is estimated to be < -63. The observation of a small fraction of less crystalline higher solubility material is consistent with the general picture that mineral surfaces are often structurally and/or compositionally imperfect leading to a higher solubility than the bulk crystalline solid. This study stresses the urgent need, during interpretation of solubility data, of taking precautions to make certain that the observed solubility behavior for sparingly-soluble solids is assigned to the proper solid phase.

  10. Retrograde curves of solidus and solubility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasil'ev, M.V.

    1979-01-01

    The investigation was concerned with the constitutional diagrams of the eutectic type with ''retrograde solidus'' and ''retrograde solubility curve'' which must be considered as diagrams with degenerate monotectic transformation. The solidus and the solubility curves form a retrograde curve with a common retrograde point representing the solubility maximum. The two branches of the Aetrograde curve can be described with the aid of two similar equations. Presented are corresponding equations for the Cd-Zn system and shown is the possibility of predicting the run of the solubility curve

  11. Solubility limits of importance to leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogard, A.; Bentley, G.; Bryant, E.; Duffy, C.; Grisham, J.; Norris, E.; Orth, C.; Thomas, K.

    1981-01-01

    The solubilities of some radionuclides, especially rare earths and actinides, may be an important and controlling factor in leaching of waste forms. These solubilities should be measured accurately as a function of pH and not as a part of a multicomponent system. Individual solubilities should be measured as a function of temperature to determine if a kinetic effect is being observed in the data. A negative temperature coefficient of solubility for actinides and rare earths in water would have important consequences for nuclear reactor safety and for the management of nuclear wastes

  12. Terminal solid solubility of hydrogen in titanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giroldi, J.P.; Vizcaino, Pablo; Banchik, Abraham David

    2003-01-01

    A Research and Development program to build a data base is currently under progress to support the local titanium fabrication. In the present work the temperature of the Terminal Solid Solubility on dissolution (TSSd) and precipitation (TSSp) of titanium hydrides in the Ti α-phase were both measured in the same thermal cycle with a Differential Scanning Calorimeter (DSC). The local titanium producer (FAESA) provided ASTM grade 1 pure Ti bars of about 2,5 cm in diameter. Samples weighting between 50 to 200 mg were cut with a diamond disc and the parallelepiped faces were all carefully ground with SiC papers, then picked in a HNO 3 plus HF aqueous solution and finally dried out with ethanol and hot air. Pairs of (TSSd, TSSp) values for α + δ → α and α → α + δ transformation temperatures in titanium were determined with the same calorimetric procedure already used to calculate the TSS values in zirconium. Data were taken from the same sample during the heating up and cooling down cycle of the second calorimeter run made with the same rate of 20 C degrees / minute. The Cathodic Charging technique was used to charge the samples at different hydrogen concentrations between the 'as fabricated' value and the concentration corresponding to the eutectoid temperature. A mixture of glycerin and phosphoric acid in a 2:1 ratio and a current density of 0,05 to 0,1 Amp/cm 2 were applied to different samples during 24 to 96 hours to get a wide range of hydrogen concentrations. A homogenization heat treatment at 400 C degrees for 45 minutes -made at open air in an electric furnace- was applied to each sample to dissolve the massive hydrides at the sample surfaces and diffuse them into the bulk of the sample. The hydrogen concentration of each sample was measured after the final calorimetric run using the Extraction Method in Liquid State under an inert atmosphere using a Leco RH-404 model Hydrogen Determinator. The experimental data follows a linear relationship -with a

  13. IUPAC-NIST Solubility Data Series. 100. Rare Earth Metal Fluorides in Water and Aqueous Systems. Part 3. Heavy Lanthanides (Gd–Lu)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mioduski, Tomasz [Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, 03195 Warszawa (Poland); Gumiński, Cezary, E-mail: cegie@chem.uw.edu.pl [Department of Chemistry, University of Warsaw, 02093 Warszawa (Poland); Zeng, Dewen, E-mail: dewen-zeng@hotmail.com [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China)

    2015-06-15

    This is the third part of the volume devoted to solubility data for the rare earth metal (REM) fluorides in water and in aqueous ternary and multicomponent systems. It covers experimental results of trivalent fluorides of Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, and Lu (so-called heavy lanthanides), since no quantitative data on solubilities of TbF{sub 4} and YbF{sub 2} (the most stable compounds at these valencies) are available. The related literature has been covered through the end of 2014. Compilations of all available papers with the solubility data are introduced for each REM fluoride with a corresponding critical evaluation. Every such assessment contains a collection of all solubility results in aqueous solution, a selection of suggested solubility data, a solubility equation, and a brief discussion of the multicomponent systems. Only simple fluorides (no complexes or double salts) are treated as the input substances in this report. General features of the systems, such as nature of the equilibrium solid phases, solubility as a function of temperature, influence of ionic strength, solution pH, mixed solvent medium on the solubility, quality of the solubility results, and the solubility as a function of REM atomic number, have already been presented in Part 1 of the volume.

  14. Solubility of chromium (III) oxide and metal chromates: development of MULTEQ models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickinson, Shirley; Henshaw, Jim; Bachet Martin; Hussey, Dennis; Marks, Chuck; Tremaine, Peter; Eaker, Richard

    2012-09-01

    High-temperature solubility predictions for metal oxide systems are important for the understanding of corrosion processes, corrosion product behaviour and activity transport in PWR coolant systems. In the current work, literature data on chromium oxide and iron chromium solubility measurement have been used to derive equilibrium constant expressions for dissolution and hydrolysis reactions which have been incorporated in the latest revision of the EPRI MULTEQ database. Predicting the stable chromium phases in a PWR is important as these constitute the compact inner oxide layer that forms on most ex-core alloys used in this system. Likewise understanding the chromium chemistry is necessary for rationalising high chromium content crud that has been observed on several plant fuel pins. Chromium (III) oxide solubility measurements have shown that the equilibrium solid phase under hydrothermal conditions is CrOOH rather than Cr 2 O 3 . Expressions for the solubility product of this solid and the equilibrium constant for the 4. Cr (III) hydrolysis reaction Cr (OH) 3 (aq) + H 2 O = Cr (OH) 4 - + H + have been derived by fitting to the experimental solubility data in neutral to alkaline solution. The equilibrium constant for the 3rd hydrolysis reaction Cr (OH) 2 + +H 2 O = Cr (OH) 3 (aq) + H + has been revised for consistency with literature estimates of the hydrolysis constants at 298 K. There are insufficient high-quality solubility data at low pH to derive the lower hydrolysis constants so the existing MULTEQ entries, based on thermodynamic estimations, have been retained. This revised model gave reasonable agreement with the available data in acidic solution. A revised expression for the Cr 2 O 3 solubility product was derived from measurements of Fe concentrations produced from FeCr 2 O 4 dissolution, and this was used to obtain a consistent solubility product expression for FeCr 2 O 4 . The resulting model predicts that FeCr 2 O 4 would be unstable at temperatures

  15. Solubility of oxygen in liquid sodium: effect on interpretation of corrosion data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claxton, K.T.

    1976-01-01

    No solubility correlation relating the equilibrium oxygen concentration with the sodium saturation temperature has yet been derived which has gained general acceptance. A statistical analysis of all the available data which directly or indirectly may be taken as representing a measurement of solubility has been made. The results indicate that a real and seemingly permanent difference is apparent between the assumed equilibrium levels of oxygen measured at different saturation temperatures as reported by UK and US workers. Data analysis procedures producing sub-sets of culled data which are then used to derive a compromise solubility function are considered less than adequate. It is considered preferable and more realistic to distinguish data sub-sets by the analytical technique employed. The established vacuum distillation method is shown to yield results differing among themselves by up to a factor of four at cold trap temperatures of relevance to fast reactor operation. The vanadium wire and electrochemical cell techniques are shown to give the lowest solubility values. Appropriate factors relating UK oxygen levels to values derived from alternative methods are presented. The divergent positions prevailing for oxygen-in-sodium analysis can lead to apparent anomalies when comparisons of corrosion rates from different sources have to be made. It is shown that this situation is, in part, apparently resolved by effecting comparisons at the equivalent cold trap temperature instead of the equivalent oxygen level. It is recognised that the approach presumes equilibrium of the oxygen in the sodium with the cold trap and reference is made to alternative ''sinks'' for oxygen. It is demonstrated, by comparison of a number of recommended and observed corrosion rates from US and European sources, that, in spite of the above and other qualifications, the approach is reasonable

  16. LP Well-Posedness for Bilevel Vector Equilibrium and Optimization Problems with Equilibrium Constraints

    OpenAIRE

    Khanh, Phan Quoc; Plubtieng, Somyot; Sombut, Kamonrat

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is introduce several types of Levitin-Polyak well-posedness for bilevel vector equilibrium and optimization problems with equilibrium constraints. Base on criterion and characterizations for these types of Levitin-Polyak well-posedness we argue on diameters and Kuratowski’s, Hausdorff’s, or Istrǎtescus measures of noncompactness of approximate solution sets under suitable conditions, and we prove the Levitin-Polyak well-posedness for bilevel vector equilibrium and op...

  17. Effect of pressure on the metastable phase formation of equilibrium immiscible Ti-Mg system studied by ab initio technique and mechanical milling

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Phasha, MJ

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available of view. Therefore, the only possible route so far to achieve alloying of Ti and Mg, is by employing a non-equilibrium process. As a result, many attempts to extend the solid solubility have been made in the past decade using non-equilibruim processes....

  18. Investigation of equilibrium core by recycling MA and LLFP in fast reactor cycle. 2. Investigation of LLFP confined in Equilibrium Core with element separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizutani, Akihiko; Shono, Akira; Ishikawa, Makoto

    2000-02-01

    A feasibility study has been performed on a self-consistent fuel cycle system in the nuclear fuel recycle system with fast reactors. In this system, the self-generated MAs (Minor Actinides) and LLFPs (Long-Lived Fission Products) are confined and incinerated in the fast reactor, which is called the 'Equilibrium Core' concept. However, as the isotope separations for selected LLFPs have been assumed in this cycle system, it seems that this assumption is far from realistic one from the viewpoint of economy with respect to the fuel cycle system. In this study, the possibility for realization of the 'Equilibrium Core' concept is evaluated for three fuel types such as oxide, nitride and metallic fuels, provided that the isotopic separation of LLFPs is changed to the element one. This study provides, that is to say, how many LLFP elements can be confined in the 'Equilibrium Core' with element separation. This report examines the nuclear properties of the Equilibrium Core' for various combinations of LLFP incineration schemes from the viewpoints of the risk of geological disposal and the limit in confinable quantity of LLFPs. From the viewpoint of the risk of geological disposal estimated by the retardation factor, it is possible to confine with element separation for Tc, I and Se even in the oxide fueled core. From the standpoint of the limit of confinable amounts of LLFPs, on the other hand, Tc, I, Se, Sn and Cs can be confined with element separate only in case that the nitride fuel is chosen. (author)

  19. The automated design of materials far from equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miskin, Marc Z.

    Automated design is emerging as a powerful concept in materials science. By combining computer algorithms, simulations, and experimental data, new techniques are being developed that start with high level functional requirements and identify the ideal materials that achieve them. This represents a radically different picture of how materials become functional in which technological demand drives material discovery, rather than the other way around. At the frontiers of this field, materials systems previously considered too complicated can start to be controlled and understood. Particularly promising are materials far from equilibrium. Material robustness, high strength, self-healing and memory are properties displayed by several materials systems that are intrinsically out of equilibrium. These and other properties could be revolutionary, provided they can first be controlled. This thesis conceptualizes and implements a framework for designing materials that are far from equilibrium. We show how, even in the absence of a complete physical theory, design from the top down is possible and lends itself to producing physical insight. As a prototype system, we work with granular materials: collections of athermal, macroscopic identical objects, since these materials function both as an essential component of industrial processes as well as a model system for many non-equilibrium states of matter. We show that by placing granular materials in the context of design, benefits emerge simultaneously for fundamental and applied interests. As first steps, we use our framework to design granular aggregates with extreme properties like high stiffness, and softness. We demonstrate control over nonlinear effects by producing exotic aggregates that stiffen under compression. Expanding on our framework, we conceptualize new ways of thinking about material design when automatic discovery is possible. We show how to build rules that link particle shapes to arbitrary granular packing

  20. Non-equilibrium synthesis of alloys using lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazumder, J.; Choi, J.; Ribaudo, C.; Wang, A.; Kar, A.

    1993-01-01

    This paper discusses microstructure and properties of alloys, produced by laser alloying and cladding technique, for various applications. These include Fe-Cr-W-C alloys for wear resistance, Ni-Cr-Al-Hf alloys for high temperature oxidation resistance and Mg-Al alloys for corrosion resistance. Also a mathematical model will be presented for the prediction of the composition of the metastable phases produced by laser synthesis. Microstructure was characterized using various electron optical techniques such as Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES) and Energy Dispersive X-Ray Analysis (EDAX). Wear properties were characterized by a line contact Block on Cylinder method. High temperature oxidation properties were characterized by using Perkin-Elmer Thermo-Gravimetric Analyzer (TGA) where dynamic weight change were monitored at 1,200 C. Corrosion properties were evaluated by a potentio-dynamic method using a computer controlled Potentiostat manufactured by EG ampersand G. A non-equilibrium M 6 C type carbide was found to be responsible for the improved wear resistance. Increased solid-solubility of Hf was found to be a major factor in improving the high temperature oxidation resistance of the Ni-Cr-Al-Hf alloys. Micro-Crystalline phases were observed in Mg-Al alloys. The rapid solidification was modeled using heat transfer in the liquid pool and the solid substrate and mass transfer in the liquid pool. Non-equilibrium partition coefficient was introduced through the boundary condition at the liquid-solid interface. A good correlation was observed between the prediction and the experimental data. 54 refs

  1. Determination and correlation of the solubility for diosgenin in alcohol solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Feixiong; Zhao Mingrui; Liu Chuochuo; Peng Feifei; Ren Baozeng

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The solubilities of diosgenin in different alcohols solvents have been obtained. ► The solubility decreases with the increase of the polarity of the alcohols solvents. ► The results show that the three models agree well with the experimental data. - Abstract: Using a laser monitoring technique, the solubility of diosgenin in ethanol, 1-propanol, 1-butanol, isobutyl alcohol, tert-butanol, 1-pentanol, and iso-octyl alcohol was measured over the temperature range from (290.15 to 330.15) K at atmospheric pressure. Its corresponding (solid + liquid) equilibrium data will provide essential support for industrial design and further theoretical studies. From the experimental results, the solubility of diosgenin in ethanol, 1-propanol, 1-butanol, isobutyl alcohol, tert-butanol, 1-pentanol, and iso-octyl alcohol was found to increase with increasing temperature and decrease with the increase of the polarity of the alcohols solvents. The Apelblat equation, the ideal model and the λh equation were used to correlate the solubility values. The results showed that the three models mentioned above agreed well with the experimental data.

  2. Dissolution and solubility behavior of fenofibrate in sodium lauryl sulfate solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granero, Gladys E; Ramachandran, Chandrasekharan; Amidon, Gordon L

    2005-10-01

    The solubility of fenofibrate in pH 6.8 McIlvaine buffers containing varying concentrations of sodium lauryl sulfate was determined. The dissolution behavior of fenofibrate was also examined in the same solutions with rotating disk experiments. It was observed that the enhancement in intrinsic dissolution rate was approximately 500-fold and the enhancement in solubility was approximately 2000-fold in a pH 6.8 buffer containing 2% (w/v) sodium lauryl sulfate compared to that in buffer alone. The micellar solubilization equilibrium coefficient (k*) was estimated from the solubility data and found to be 30884+/-213 L/mol. The diffusivity for the free solute, 7.15x10(-6) cm2/s, was calculated using Schroeder's additive molal volume estimates and Hayduk-Laurie correlation. The diffusivity of the drug-loaded micelle, estimated from the experimental solubility and dissolution data and the calculated value for free solute diffusivity, was 0.86x10(-6) cm2/s. Thus, the much lower enhancement in dissolution of fenofibrate compared to its enhancement in solubility in surfactant solutions appears to be consistent with the contribution to the total transport due to enhanced micellar solubilization as well as a large decrease (approximately 8-fold) in the diffusivity of the drug-loaded micelle.

  3. The "high solubility" definition of the current FDA Guidance on Biopharmaceutical Classification System may be too strict for acidic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdanian, Mehran; Briggs, Katherine; Jankovsky, Corinne; Hawi, Amale

    2004-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess if the definition of high solubility as proposed in the FDA Guidance on Biopharmaceutical Classification System (BCS) is too strict for highly permeable acidic drugs. The solubility and permeability values of 20 (18 acidic and 2 non-acidic) nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) were determined. The NSAIDs were grouped into three different sets having acetic acid, propionic acid, or other acidic moieties such as fenamate, oxicam, and salicylate. Two nonacidic NSAIDs (celecoxib and rofecoxib) were also included for comparison purposes. Equilibrium solubility values were determined at pH 1.2, 5.0, 7.4, and in biorelevant media simulating fed intestinal fluid at pH 5.0. For a select number of acids, we also measured solubility values in media simulating gastric and fasted intestinal fluids. Permeability classification was established relative to that of reference drugs in the Caco-2 cell permeability model. Permeability coefficients for all drugs were measured at concentrations corresponding to the lowest and highest marketed dose strengths dissolved in 250 ml volume, and their potential interaction with cellular efflux pumps was investigated. All NSAIDs with different acidic functional groups were classified as highly permeable based on their Caco-2 cell permeability. Only ketorolac appeared to have a potential for interaction with cellular efflux pumps. Solubility classification was based on comparison of equilibrium solubility at pH 1.2, 5.0. and 7.4 relative to marketed dose strengths in 250 ml. The pKa values for the acidic NSAIDs studied were between 3.5 and 5.1. and, as expected, their solubility increased dramatically at pH 7.4 compared to pH 1.2. Only three NSAIDs, ketorolac, ketoprofen. and acetyl salicylic acid, meet the current criteria for high solubility over the entire pH range. However, with the exception of ibuprofen, oxaprozin, and mefenamic acid, the remaining compounds can be classified as Class I drugs

  4. Hydrogen solubility in FLiNaK mixed with titanium powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yagi, Juro; Sagara, Akio; Watanabe, Takashi; Tanaka, Teruya; Takayama, Sadatsugu; Muroga, Takeo

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The hydrogen solubility in a FLiNaK mixed with Ti powder was investigated. • A significant increase in hydrogen solubility was observed. • Controlling the purity of the molten salt was found to be one of the key issues. • A vanadium alloy would be compatible with the Ti powder/molten salt mixture. - Abstract: The hydrogen solubility in a FLiNaK molten salt mixed with Ti powder was investigated. A hydrogen-soluble metal powder mixed with a molten salt can increase the effective hydrogen solubility of the molten salt, which is currently a major disadvantage of molten salts. A significant increase in hydrogen solubility was observed, even with a mass fraction of Ti powder of only 0.1 wt%. The increase of hydrogen solubility was so large that a vanadium alloy would be compatible with the Ti powder/molten salt mixture, unlike typical molten salts that result in an unacceptably large tritium inventory in the vanadium alloy. In addition, contamination of the Ti powder by oxidation suppressed the hydrogen uptake and release capability. Controlling the purity of the molten salt was found to be one of the key issues for the metal powder mixture concept.

  5. The phenotypic equilibrium of cancer cells: From average-level stability to path-wise convergence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Yuanling; Wang, Yue; Zhou, Da

    2015-12-07

    The phenotypic equilibrium, i.e. heterogeneous population of cancer cells tending to a fixed equilibrium of phenotypic proportions, has received much attention in cancer biology very recently. In the previous literature, some theoretical models were used to predict the experimental phenomena of the phenotypic equilibrium, which were often explained by different concepts of stabilities of the models. Here we present a stochastic multi-phenotype branching model by integrating conventional cellular hierarchy with phenotypic plasticity mechanisms of cancer cells. Based on our model, it is shown that: (i) our model can serve as a framework to unify the previous models for the phenotypic equilibrium, and then harmonizes the different kinds of average-level stabilities proposed in these models; and (ii) path-wise convergence of our model provides a deeper understanding to the phenotypic equilibrium from stochastic point of view. That is, the emergence of the phenotypic equilibrium is rooted in the stochastic nature of (almost) every sample path, the average-level stability just follows from it by averaging stochastic samples. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. A Novel Derivation of the Time Evolution of the Entropy for Macroscopic Systems in Thermal Non-Equilibrium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico Sciubba

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses how the two thermodynamic properties, energy (U and exergy (E, can be used to solve the problem of quantifying the entropy of non-equilibrium systems. Both energy and exergy are a priori concepts, and their formal dependence on thermodynamic state variables at equilibrium is known. Exploiting the results of a previous study, we first calculate the non-equilibrium exergy En-eq can be calculated for an arbitrary temperature distributions across a macroscopic body with an accuracy that depends only on the available information about the initial distribution: the analytical results confirm that En-eq exponentially relaxes to its equilibrium value. Using the Gyftopoulos-Beretta formalism, a non-equilibrium entropy Sn-eq(x,t is then derived from En-eq(x,t and U(x,t. It is finally shown that the non-equilibrium entropy generation between two states is always larger than its equilibrium (herein referred to as “classical” counterpart. We conclude that every iso-energetic non-equilibrium state corresponds to an infinite set of non-equivalent states that can be ranked in terms of increasing entropy. Therefore, each point of the Gibbs plane corresponds therefore to a set of possible initial distributions: the non-equilibrium entropy is a multi-valued function that depends on the initial mass and energy distribution within the body. Though the concept cannot be directly extended to microscopic systems, it is argued that the present formulation is compatible with a possible reinterpretation of the existing non-equilibrium formulations, namely those of Tsallis and Grmela, and answers at least in part one of the objections set forth by Lieb and Yngvason. A systematic application of this paradigm is very convenient from a theoretical point of view and may be beneficial for meaningful future applications in the fields of nano-engineering and biological sciences.

  7. pH-metric solubility. 2: correlation between the acid-base titration and the saturation shake-flask solubility-pH methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avdeef, A; Berger, C M; Brownell, C

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the results of a normal saturation shake-flask method to a new potentiometric acid-base titration method for determining the intrinsic solubility and the solubility-pH profiles of ionizable molecules, and to report the solubility constants determined by the latter technique. The solubility-pH profiles of twelve generic drugs (atenolol, diclofenac.Na, famotidine, flurbiprofen, furosemide, hydrochlorothiazide, ibuprofen, ketoprofen, labetolol.HCl, naproxen, phenytoin, and propranolol.HCl), with solubilities spanning over six orders of magnitude, were determined both by the new pH-metric method and by a traditional approach (24 hr shaking of saturated solutions, followed by filtration, then HPLC assaying with UV detection). The 212 separate saturation shake-flask solubility measurements and those derived from 65 potentiometric titrations agreed well. The analysis produced the correlation equation: log(1/S)titration = -0.063(+/- 0.032) + 1.025(+/- 0.011) log(1/S)shake-flask, s = 0.20, r2 = 0.978. The potentiometrically-derived intrinsic solubilities of the drugs were: atenolol 13.5 mg/mL, diclofenac.Na 0.82 microg/mL, famotidine 1.1 mg/ mL, flurbiprofen 10.6 microg/mL, furosemide 5.9 microg/mL, hydrochlorothiazide 0.70 mg/mL, ibuprofen 49 microg/mL, ketoprofen 118 microg/mL, labetolol.HCl 128 microg/mL, naproxen 14 microg/mL, phenytoin 19 microg/mL, and propranolol.HCl 70 microg/mL. The new potentiometric method was shown to be reliable for determining the solubility-pH profiles of uncharged ionizable drug substances. Its speed compared to conventional equilibrium measurements, its sound theoretical basis, its ability to generate the full solubility-pH profile from a single titration, and its dynamic range (currently estimated to be seven orders of magnitude) make the new pH-metric method an attractive addition to traditional approaches used by preformulation and development scientists. It may be useful even to discovery

  8. High temperature defect equilibrium in ZnS:Cu single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lott, K.; Shinkarenko, S.; Tuern, L.; Nirk, T.; Oepik, A. [Department of Materials Science, Tallinn University of Technology, Tallinn (Estonia); Kallavus, U. [Centre for Materials Research, Tallinn University of Technology, Tallinn (Estonia); Gorokhova, E. [Scientific Research and Technological Institute of Optical Material Science, S. I. Vavilov State Optical Institute, All-Russia Science Center, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Grebennik, A.; Vishnjakov, A. [Department of Physical Chemistry, D. Mendelejev University of Chemical Technology of Russia, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2010-07-15

    High temperature investigations in ZnS:Cu crystals were performed under defined conditions. High temperature electrical conductivity and copper solubility data were obtained under different component vapour pressures and under different sample temperatures. The experimental data at sulphur vapour pressure can be explained by the inclusion of abnormal site occupation i.e. by antistructural disorder. Compensating association of copper with this antistructure defect may occur. Antistructure disorder disappears with increasing of zinc vapour pressure and with increasing role of holes in bipolar conductivity. The method for solving the system of quasichemical reactions without approximation was used to model high temperature defect equilibrium. This model contains antistructure disorder and copper solubility limitation. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  9. Computing multi-species chemical equilibrium with an algorithm based on the reaction extents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paz-Garcia, Juan Manuel; Johannesson, Björn; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.

    2013-01-01

    -negative constrains. The residual function, representing the distance to the equilibrium, is defined from the chemical potential (or Gibbs energy) of the chemical system. Local minimums are potentially avoided by the prioritization of the aqueous reactions with respect to the heterogeneous reactions. The formation......A mathematical model for the solution of a set of chemical equilibrium equations in a multi-species and multiphase chemical system is described. The computer-aid solution of model is achieved by means of a Newton-Raphson method enhanced with a line-search scheme, which deals with the non...... and release of gas bubbles is taken into account in the model, limiting the concentration of volatile aqueous species to a maximum value, given by the gas solubility constant.The reaction extents are used as state variables for the numerical method. As a result, the accepted solution satisfies the charge...

  10. Spatial equilibrium energy prices: a proposal for trade in electric power under deregulation and privatization of the generation sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukherjee, S.

    1992-01-01

    The concept of spatial equilibrium prices for electricity is presented based on incremental generating costs and transmission costs between major generating and load centers, which may be individual generators, utilities or countries. The equilibrium price changes in time and space, with the important property that these prices, if used for trading of electricity, results in all loads being served at minimal total cost. A network modeling approach for determining optimal operation of an interconnected system of utilities and independent generators simultaneously calculates these equilibrium prices. The methodology determines optimal generation by each utility, transactions between them, and the flows in the transmission network. 11 refs., 3 figs

  11. Equilibrium vapor-liquid-crystal in Sn-In-P system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ermilin, V.N.; Selin, A.A.; Khukhryanskij, Yu.P.

    1991-01-01

    Using flow method the dependence of phosphorus vapor pressure was investigated on the composition of equilibrium with indium phosphide crystal of Sn-In-P system melt (x P l ≤x In l ) and temperature (in the range 918 to 978 K). Its multiplicative character conditioned by change in phosphorus solubility in liquid phase and reconstruction of internal structure of the melt was established. It is revealed that in the considered melts phosphorus is in atomic form (possible as In n P complexes)

  12. A study of complex particle emission in the pre-equilibrium statistical model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miao Rongzhi; Wu Guohua

    1986-01-01

    A concept of the quasi-composite system in the process of the pre-equilibrium emission is presented in this paper. On the basis of the principle of detailed balance, the existence of the factor, [γ β ω(π β , 0, ν β , 0, E-U)g π,ν ], has been proved with an account of the distinguishabllity between protons and neutrons. A formula for the rate of the complex particle emission in the pre-equilibrium process can be obtained. The theoretical calculation results fit the experimental data quite well, especially in the high energy part of the energy spectrum the agreement are much better than ever before

  13. Determination of soluble protein contents from RVNRL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan Manshol Wan Zin; Nurulhuda Othman

    1996-01-01

    This project was carried out to determine the soluble protein contents on RVNRL film vulcanisates, with respect to the RVNRL storage time, gamma irradiation dose absorbed by the latex and the effect of different leaching time and leaching conditions. These three factors are important in the hope to determine the best possible mean of minimizing the soluble protein contents in products made from RVNRL. Within the nine months storage period employed in the study, the results show that, the longer the storage period the less the soluble protein extracted from the film samples. Gamma irradiation dose absorbed by the samples, between 5.3 kGy to 25.2 kGy seems to influence the soluble protein contents of the RVNRL films vulcanisates. The higher the dose the more was the soluble protein extracted from the film samples. At an absorbed dose of 5.3 kGy and 25.2 kGy, the soluble contents were 0. 198 mg/ml and 0.247 mg/ml respectively. At a fixed leaching temperature, the soluble proteins increases with leaching time and at a fixed leaching time, the soluble proteins increases with leaching temperature. ne highest extractable protein contents was determined at a leaching time of 10 minutes and leaching temperature of 90'C The protein analysis were done by using Modified Lowry Method

  14. Solubility Study of Curatives in Various Rubbers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guo, R.; Talma, Auke; Datta, Rabin; Dierkes, Wilma K.; Noordermeer, Jacobus W.M.

    2008-01-01

    The previous works on solubility of curatives in rubbers were mainly carried out in natural rubber. Not too much information available on dissimilar rubbers and this is important because most of the compounds today are blends of dissimilar rubbers. Although solubility can be expected to certain

  15. Solubility Products of M(II) - Carbonates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grauer, Rolf; Berner, Urs

    1999-01-01

    Many solubility data for M(II) carbonates commonly compiled in tables are contradictory and sometimes obviously wrong. The quality of such data has been evaluated based on the original publications and reliable solubility constants have been selected for the carbonates of Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd and Pb with the help of cross-comparisons. (author)

  16. Hansen Solubility Parameters for Octahedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-28

    1997, 80, 386-&. 5. Hansen, C. M. The three-dimensional solubility parameter -- key to paint component affinities I. J. Paint Technol. 1967, 39, 104...Chai, J.; Zhang, Q. X.; Han, D. X.; Niu, L. Synthesis and Application of Widely Soluble Graphene Sheets. Langmuir 2010, 26, 12314-12320. 12. Hansen, C

  17. Equilibrium 𝛽-limits in classical stellarators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loizu, J.; Hudson, S. R.; Nührenberg, C.; Geiger, J.; Helander, P.

    2017-12-01

    A numerical investigation is carried out to understand the equilibrium -limit in a classical stellarator. The stepped-pressure equilibrium code (Hudson et al., Phys. Plasmas, vol. 19 (11), 2012) is used in order to assess whether or not magnetic islands and stochastic field-lines can emerge at high . Two modes of operation are considered: a zero-net-current stellarator and a fixed-iota stellarator. Despite the fact that relaxation is allowed (Taylor, Rev. Mod. Phys., vol. 58 (3), 1986, pp. 741-763), the former is shown to maintain good flux surfaces up to the equilibrium -limit predicted by ideal-magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), above which a separatrix forms. The latter, which has no ideal equilibrium -limit, is shown to develop regions of magnetic islands and chaos at sufficiently high , thereby providing a `non-ideal -limit'. Perhaps surprisingly, however, the value of at which the Shafranov shift of the axis reaches a fraction of the minor radius follows in all cases the scaling laws predicted by ideal-MHD. We compare our results to the High-Beta-Stellarator theory of Freidberg (Ideal MHD, 2014, Cambridge University Press) and derive a new prediction for the non-ideal equilibrium -limit above which chaos emerges.

  18. Aerospace Applications of Non-Equilibrium Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blankson, Isaiah M.

    2016-01-01

    Nonequilibrium plasma/non-thermal plasma/cold plasmas are being used in a wide range of new applications in aeronautics, active flow control, heat transfer reduction, plasma-assisted ignition and combustion, noise suppression, and power generation. Industrial applications may be found in pollution control, materials surface treatment, and water purification. In order for these plasma processes to become practical, efficient means of ionization are necessary. A primary challenge for these applications is to create a desired non-equilibrium plasma in air by preventing the discharge from transitioning into an arc. Of particular interest is the impact on simulations and experimental data with and without detailed consideration of non-equilibrium effects, and the consequences of neglecting non-equilibrium. This presentation will provide an assessment of the presence and influence of non-equilibrium phenomena for various aerospace needs and applications. Specific examples to be considered will include the forward energy deposition of laser-induced non-equilibrium plasmoids for sonic boom mitigation, weakly ionized flows obtained from pulsed nanosecond discharges for an annular Hall type MHD generator duct for turbojet energy bypass, and fundamental mechanisms affecting the design and operation of novel plasma-assisted reactive systems in dielectric liquids (water purification, in-pipe modification of fuels, etc.).

  19. Development of a Thermal Equilibrium Prediction Algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aviles-Ramos, Cuauhtemoc

    2002-01-01

    A thermal equilibrium prediction algorithm is developed and tested using a heat conduction model and data sets from calorimetric measurements. The physical model used in this study is the exact solution of a system of two partial differential equations that govern the heat conduction in the calorimeter. A multi-parameter estimation technique is developed and implemented to estimate the effective volumetric heat generation and thermal diffusivity in the calorimeter measurement chamber, and the effective thermal diffusivity of the heat flux sensor. These effective properties and the exact solution are used to predict the heat flux sensor voltage readings at thermal equilibrium. Thermal equilibrium predictions are carried out considering only 20% of the total measurement time required for thermal equilibrium. A comparison of the predicted and experimental thermal equilibrium voltages shows that the average percentage error from 330 data sets is only 0.1%. The data sets used in this study come from calorimeters of different sizes that use different kinds of heat flux sensors. Furthermore, different nuclear material matrices were assayed in the process of generating these data sets. This study shows that the integration of this algorithm into the calorimeter data acquisition software will result in an 80% reduction of measurement time. This reduction results in a significant cutback in operational costs for the calorimetric assay of nuclear materials. (authors)

  20. Partial chemical equilibrium in fluid dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramshaw, J.D.

    1980-01-01

    An analysis is given for the flow of a multicomponent fluid in which an arbitrary number of chemical reactions may occur, some of which are in equilibrium while the others proceed kinetically. The primitive equations describing this situation are inconvenient to use because the progress rates omega-dot/sub s/ for the equilibrium reactions are determined implicitly by the associated equilibrium constraint conditions. Two alternative equivalent equation systems that are more pleasant to deal with are derived. In the first system, the omega-dot/sub s/ are eliminated by replacing the transport equations for the chemical species involved in the equilibrium reactions with transport equations for the basic components of which these species are composed. The second system retains the usual species transport equations, but eliminates the nonlinear algebraic equilibrium constraint conditions by deriving an explicit expression for the omega-dot/sub s/. Both systems are specialized to the case of an ideal gas mixture. Considerations involved in solving these equation systems numerically are discussed briefly

  1. The EXTRAP concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehnert, D.

    1976-11-01

    A review is given of a recently suggested axially symmetric, quasi-steady, closed, high-beta confinement system. A toroidal pinch of non-circular cross section is supposed to be immersed in the strong, inhomogenous poloidal vacuum field from a set of ring-shaped conductors, all carrying currents in the opposite direction of the plasma current. Preliminary experiments are reported. This 'EXTRAP' concept is expected to have some important advantages, as compared to magnetic bottles based on a main toroidal field component. Concerning plasma equilibrium, there are closed local and average guiding center orbits, beta values of order unity should become available, there is no magnetic surface splitting limit, cyclotron radiation should be kept at an acceptably low level, and bootstrap operation may become possible. Concerning plasma stability, the system should not become sensitive to magnetic island formation and asymmetries, and the short magnetic connection lengths as well as the strong vacuum field gradients should favour stabilization of flute-type, kink, and other magnetohydrodynamic modes. Concerning reactor technology, high power densities are expected to be reached, superconducting coils should not become necessary, the coil stresses are moderate, and repair and replacement are facilitated by the coil geometry. Before a final judgement can be made on this concept, however, extensive experiments and further theoretical analysis are ndeeded. (Auth.)

  2. Linear correlation of interfacial tension at water-solvent interface, solubility of water in organic solvents, and SE* scale parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mezhov, E.A.; Khananashvili, N.L.; Shmidt, V.S.

    1988-01-01

    A linear correlation has been established between the solubility of water in water-immiscible organic solvents and the interfacial tension at the water-solvent interface on the one hand and the parameters of the SE* and π* scales for these solvents on the other hand. This allows us, using the known tabulated SE* or π* parameters for each solvent, to predict the values of the interfacial tension and the solubility of water for the corresponding systems. We have shown that the SE* scale allows us to predict these values more accurately than other known solvent scales, since in contrast to other scales it characterizes solvents found in equilibrium with water

  3. Temperature dependence on mutual solubility of binary (methanol + limonene) mixture and (liquid + liquid) equilibria of ternary (methanol + ethanol + limonene) mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamura, Kazuhiro; Li Xiaoli; Li Hengde

    2009-01-01

    Mutual solubility data of the binary (methanol + limonene) mixture at the temperatures ranging from 288.15 K close to upper critical solution temperature, and ternary (liquid + liquid) equilibrium (tie-lines) of the (methanol + ethanol + limonene) mixture at the temperatures (288.15, 298.15, and 308.15) K have been obtained. The experimental results have been represented accurately in terms of the extended and modified UNIQUAC models with binary parameters, compared with the UNIQUAC model. The temperature dependence of binary and ternary (liquid + liquid) equilibrium for the binary (methanol + limonene) and ternary (methanol + ethanol + limonene) mixtures could be calculated successfully using the extended and modified UNIQUAC model

  4. Basic concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorner, B.

    1999-01-01

    The basic concepts of neutron scattering as a tool for studying the structure and the dynamics of condensed matter. Theoretical aspects are outlined, the two different cases of coherent and incoherent scattering are presented. The issue of resolution, coherence volume and the role of monochromators are also discussed. (K.A.)

  5. Simple Concepts

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Materna, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 28, č. 3 (2013), s. 295-319 ISSN 0353-5150 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP401/10/0792 Institutional support: RVO:67985955 Keywords : concept * constructions * set-theoretical paradigm Subject RIV: AA - Philosophy ; Religion

  6. Solubility and speciation calculation for uranium, plutonium, neptunium and thorium in natural groundwaters. Theory, thermodynamic data bases and first applications. Loeslichkeits- und Speziationsberechnungen fuer U, Pu, Np und Th in natuerlichen Grundwaessern. Theorie, thermodynamische Dateien und erste Anwendungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schweingruber, M

    1981-11-01

    The computer code MINEQL was adapted and extended to assess the solubility and speciation of radioactive waste nuclides in groundwaters under conditions which are expected to exist in the surroundings of planned underground repositories. By means of an additional data base including standard reaction enthalpies and heat capacities at 25 degrees C, the relevant equilibrium constants at 25 degrees C can be converted to other temperatures using Ulich's formulae. The activity coefficients for dissolved species are modelled with a temperature dependent function of the Davies' approximation type. The report is segmented in three main parts: (1) a review of the MINEQL fundamentals and a summary of the theory needed for the extensions; (2) an outline of the general programme structure and of criteria applied to the selection of thermodynamic data; (3) a discussion of the results from first model applications to evaluate the solubility and speciation of U, Pu, Np and Th in two Swiss groundwaters, based either on the approach of negligible chemical disturbance or on a solid/solution titration concept. All thermodynamic data involved in this study are collected in an appendix, together with a compilation of references.

  7. Influence of collective excitations on pre-equilibrium and equilibrium processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ignatyuk, A.V.; Lunev, V.P.

    1990-01-01

    The influence of the collective states excitations on equilibrium and preequilibrium processes in reaction is discussed. It is shown that for a consistent description of the contribution of preequilibrium and equilibrium compound processes collective states should be taken into account in the level density calculations. The microscopic and phenomenological approaches for the level density calculations are discussed. 13 refs.; 8 figs

  8. A note on existence of mixed solutions to equilibrium problems with equilibrium constraints

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Červinka, Michal

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 2007, č. 24 (2007), s. 27-44 ISSN 1212-074X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA1030405 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : equilibrium problems with equilibrium constraints * variational analysis * mixed strategy Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics

  9. Phase Equilibrium, Chemical Equilibrium, and a Test of the Third Law: Experiments for Physical Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dannhauser, Walter

    1980-01-01

    Described is an experiment designed to provide an experimental basis for a unifying point of view (utilizing theoretical framework and chemistry laboratory experiments) for physical chemistry students. Three experiments are described: phase equilibrium, chemical equilibrium, and a test of the third law of thermodynamics. (Author/DS)

  10. Approach to equilibrium in high energy heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epelbaum, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    This thesis deals with the theory of the early stages of a heavy ion collision. Just after such a collision, the matter produced - called the Quark-Gluon-Plasma (QGP) - has been shown to be far out of thermal equilibrium. One would like to know whether the QGP thermalizes, and what is the typical time scale for this. Proving that the QGP thermalizes would also justify from first principles the hydrodynamical treatment of the subsequent evolution of a heavy ion collision. After having recalled some essential theoretical concepts, the manuscript addresses these questions in two different theories. In a first part, we study a scalar field theory. Starting from an out of equilibrium initial condition, one studies the approach to equilibrium in a fixed volume or in a one-dimensional expanding system. In both cases, clear signs of thermalization are obtained: an equation of state is formed, the pressure tensor becomes isotropic and the occupation number approaches a classical thermal distribution. These results are obtained thanks to the classical statistical approximation (CSA), that includes contributions beyond the Leading Order perturbative calculation. In a second part, the Color Glass Condensate - a quantum chromodynamics (QCD) effective theory well suited to describe the early life of the QGP - is used to treat more realistically the approach to thermalization in heavy ion collisions. After having derived some analytical prerequisites for the application of the CSA, the numerical simulations performed with the Yang-Mills equations show evidences of an early onset of hydrodynamical behavior of the QGP: the system becomes isotropic on short time scales, while the shear viscosity over entropy ratio is very small, which is characteristic of a quasi perfect fluid. (author) [fr

  11. Solubility of methane and carbon dioxide in ethylene glycol at pressures up to 14 MPa and temperatures ranging from (303 to 423) K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galvao, A.C.; Francesconi, A.Z.

    2010-01-01

    This work reports solubility data of methane and carbon dioxide in ethylene glycol and the Henry's law constant of each solute in the studied solvent at saturation pressure. The measurements were performed at (303, 323, 373, 398, and 423.15) K and pressures up to 6.3 MPa for mixtures containing carbon dioxide and pressures up to 13.7 MPa for mixtures containing methane. The experiments were performed in an autoclave type phase equilibrium apparatus using the total pressure method (synthetic method). All investigated systems show an increase of gas solubility with the increase of pressure. A decrease of carbon dioxide solubility with the increase of temperature and an increase of methane solubility with the increase of temperature was observed. From the variation of solubility with temperature, the partial molar enthalpy, and entropy change are calculated.

  12. Fluctuation-dissipation relation and stationary distribution of an exactly solvable many-particle model for active biomatter far from equilibrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netz, Roland R

    2018-05-14

    An exactly solvable, Hamiltonian-based model of many massive particles that are coupled by harmonic potentials and driven by stochastic non-equilibrium forces is introduced. The stationary distribution and the fluctuation-dissipation relation are derived in closed form for the general non-equilibrium case. Deviations from equilibrium are on one hand characterized by the difference of the obtained stationary distribution from the Boltzmann distribution; this is possible because the model derives from a particle Hamiltonian. On the other hand, the difference between the obtained non-equilibrium fluctuation-dissipation relation and the standard equilibrium fluctuation-dissipation theorem allows us to quantify non-equilibrium in an alternative fashion. Both indicators of non-equilibrium behavior, i.e., deviations from the Boltzmann distribution and deviations from the equilibrium fluctuation-dissipation theorem, can be expressed in terms of a single non-equilibrium parameter α that involves the ratio of friction coefficients and random force strengths. The concept of a non-equilibrium effective temperature, which can be defined by the relation between fluctuations and the dissipation, is by comparison with the exactly derived stationary distribution shown not to hold, even if the effective temperature is made frequency dependent. The analysis is not confined to close-to-equilibrium situations but rather is exact and thus holds for arbitrarily large deviations from equilibrium. Also, the suggested harmonic model can be obtained from non-linear mechanical network systems by an expansion in terms of suitably chosen deviatory coordinates; the obtained results should thus be quite general. This is demonstrated by comparison of the derived non-equilibrium fluctuation dissipation relation with experimental data on actin networks that are driven out of equilibrium by energy-consuming protein motors. The comparison is excellent and allows us to extract the non-equilibrium

  13. Fluctuation-dissipation relation and stationary distribution of an exactly solvable many-particle model for active biomatter far from equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netz, Roland R.

    2018-05-01

    An exactly solvable, Hamiltonian-based model of many massive particles that are coupled by harmonic potentials and driven by stochastic non-equilibrium forces is introduced. The stationary distribution and the fluctuation-dissipation relation are derived in closed form for the general non-equilibrium case. Deviations from equilibrium are on one hand characterized by the difference of the obtained stationary distribution from the Boltzmann distribution; this is possible because the model derives from a particle Hamiltonian. On the other hand, the difference between the obtained non-equilibrium fluctuation-dissipation relation and the standard equilibrium fluctuation-dissipation theorem allows us to quantify non-equilibrium in an alternative fashion. Both indicators of non-equilibrium behavior, i.e., deviations from the Boltzmann distribution and deviations from the equilibrium fluctuation-dissipation theorem, can be expressed in terms of a single non-equilibrium parameter α that involves the ratio of friction coefficients and random force strengths. The concept of a non-equilibrium effective temperature, which can be defined by the relation between fluctuations and the dissipation, is by comparison with the exactly derived stationary distribution shown not to hold, even if the effective temperature is made frequency dependent. The analysis is not confined to close-to-equilibrium situations but rather is exact and thus holds for arbitrarily large deviations from equilibrium. Also, the suggested harmonic model can be obtained from non-linear mechanical network systems by an expansion in terms of suitably chosen deviatory coordinates; the obtained results should thus be quite general. This is demonstrated by comparison of the derived non-equilibrium fluctuation dissipation relation with experimental data on actin networks that are driven out of equilibrium by energy-consuming protein motors. The comparison is excellent and allows us to extract the non-equilibrium

  14. Non-Equilibrium Thermodynamics in Multiphase Flows

    CERN Document Server

    Mauri, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Non-equilibrium thermodynamics is a general framework that allows the macroscopic description of irreversible processes. This book introduces non-equilibrium thermodynamics and its applications to the rheology of multiphase flows. The subject is relevant to graduate students in chemical and mechanical engineering, physics and material science. This book is divided into two parts. The first part presents the theory of non-equilibrium thermodynamics, reviewing its essential features and showing, when possible, some applications. The second part of this book deals with how the general theory can be applied to model multiphase flows and, in particular, how to determine their constitutive relations. Each chapter contains problems at the end, the solutions of which are given at the end of the book. No prior knowledge of statistical mechanics is required; the necessary prerequisites are elements of transport phenomena and on thermodynamics. “The style of the book is mathematical, but nonetheless it remains very re...

  15. Module description of TOKAMAK equilibrium code MEUDAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Masaei; Hayashi, Nobuhiko; Matsumoto, Taro; Ozeki, Takahisa [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment

    2002-01-01

    The analysis of an axisymmetric MHD equilibrium serves as a foundation of TOKAMAK researches, such as a design of devices and theoretical research, the analysis of experiment result. For this reason, also in JAERI, an efficient MHD analysis code has been developed from start of TOKAMAK research. The free boundary equilibrium code ''MEUDAS'' which uses both the DCR method (Double-Cyclic-Reduction Method) and a Green's function can specify the pressure and the current distribution arbitrarily, and has been applied to the analysis of a broad physical subject as a code having rapidity and high precision. Also the MHD convergence calculation technique in ''MEUDAS'' has been built into various newly developed codes. This report explains in detail each module in ''MEUDAS'' for performing convergence calculation in solving the MHD equilibrium. (author)

  16. Computational studies in tokamak equilibrium and transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braams, B.J.

    1986-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with some problems arising in the magnetic confinement approach to controlled thermonuclear fusion. The work address the numerical modelling of equilibrium and transport properties of a confined plasma and the interpretation of experimental data. The thesis is divided in two parts. Part 1 is devoted to some aspects of the MHD equilibrium problem, both in the 'direct' formulation (given an equation for the plasma current, the corresponding equilibrium is to be determined) and in the 'inverse' formulation (the interpretation of measurements at the plasma edge). Part 2 is devoted to numerical studies of the edge plasma. The appropriate Navier-Stokes system of fluid equations is solved in a two-dimensional geometry. The main interest of this work is to develop an understanding of particle and energy transport in the scrape-off layer and onto material boundaries, and also to contribute to the conceptual design of the NET/INTOR tokamak reactor experiment. (Auth.)

  17. Scaling studies of spheromak formation and equilibrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geddes, C.G.; Kornack, T.W.; Brown, M.R.

    1998-01-01

    Formation and equilibrium studies have been performed on the Swarthmore Spheromak Experiment (SSX). Spheromaks are formed with a magnetized coaxial plasma gun and equilibrium is established in both small (d small =0.16 m) and large (d large =3d small =0.50 m) copper flux conservers. Using magnetic probe arrays it has been verified that spheromak formation is governed solely by gun physics (in particular the ratio of gun current to flux, μ 0 I gun /Φ gun ) and is independent of the flux conserver dimensions. It has also been verified that equilibrium is well described by the force free condition ∇xB=λB (λ=constant), particularly early in decay. Departures from the force-free state are due to current profile effects described by a quadratic function λ=λ(ψ). Force-free SSX spheromaks will be merged to study magnetic reconnection in simple magnetofluid structures. copyright 1998 American Institute of Physics

  18. Regret Theory and Equilibrium Asset Prices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiliang Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Regret theory is a behavioral approach to decision making under uncertainty. In this paper we assume that there are two representative investors in a frictionless market, a representative active investor who selects his optimal portfolio based on regret theory and a representative passive investor who invests only in the benchmark portfolio. In a partial equilibrium setting, the objective of the representative active investor is modeled as minimization of the regret about final wealth relative to the benchmark portfolio. In equilibrium this optimal strategy gives rise to a behavioral asset priciting model. We show that the market beta and the benchmark beta that is related to the investor’s regret are the determinants of equilibrium asset prices. We also extend our model to a market with multibenchmark portfolios. Empirical tests using stock price data from Shanghai Stock Exchange show strong support to the asset pricing model based on regret theory.

  19. Non-equilibrium quantum heat machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alicki, Robert; Gelbwaser-Klimovsky, David

    2015-11-01

    Standard heat machines (engine, heat pump, refrigerator) are composed of a system (working fluid) coupled to at least two equilibrium baths at different temperatures and periodically driven by an external device (piston or rotor) sometimes called the work reservoir. The aim of this paper is to go beyond this scheme by considering environments which are stationary but cannot be decomposed into a few baths at thermal equilibrium. Such situations are important, for example in solar cells, chemical machines in biology, various realizations of laser cooling or nanoscopic machines driven by laser radiation. We classify non-equilibrium baths depending on their thermodynamic behavior and show that the efficiency of heat machines powered by them is limited by the generalized Carnot bound.

  20. Relativistic Fluid Dynamics Far From Local Equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romatschke, Paul

    2018-01-01

    Fluid dynamics is traditionally thought to apply only to systems near local equilibrium. In this case, the effective theory of fluid dynamics can be constructed as a gradient series. Recent applications of resurgence suggest that this gradient series diverges, but can be Borel resummed, giving rise to a hydrodynamic attractor solution which is well defined even for large gradients. Arbitrary initial data quickly approaches this attractor via nonhydrodynamic mode decay. This suggests the existence of a new theory of far-from-equilibrium fluid dynamics. In this Letter, the framework of fluid dynamics far from local equilibrium for a conformal system is introduced, and the hydrodynamic attractor solutions for resummed Baier-Romatschke-Son-Starinets-Stephanov theory, kinetic theory in the relaxation time approximation, and strongly coupled N =4 super Yang-Mills theory are identified for a system undergoing Bjorken flow.

  1. Answer Sets in a Fuzzy Equilibrium Logic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schockaert, Steven; Janssen, Jeroen; Vermeir, Dirk; de Cock, Martine

    Since its introduction, answer set programming has been generalized in many directions, to cater to the needs of real-world applications. As one of the most general “classical” approaches, answer sets of arbitrary propositional theories can be defined as models in the equilibrium logic of Pearce. Fuzzy answer set programming, on the other hand, extends answer set programming with the capability of modeling continuous systems. In this paper, we combine the expressiveness of both approaches, and define answer sets of arbitrary fuzzy propositional theories as models in a fuzzification of equilibrium logic. We show that the resulting notion of answer set is compatible with existing definitions, when the syntactic restrictions of the corresponding approaches are met. We furthermore locate the complexity of the main reasoning tasks at the second level of the polynomial hierarchy. Finally, as an illustration of its modeling power, we show how fuzzy equilibrium logic can be used to find strong Nash equilibria.

  2. Module description of TOKAMAK equilibrium code MEUDAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Masaei; Hayashi, Nobuhiko; Matsumoto, Taro; Ozeki, Takahisa

    2002-01-01

    The analysis of an axisymmetric MHD equilibrium serves as a foundation of TOKAMAK researches, such as a design of devices and theoretical research, the analysis of experiment result. For this reason, also in JAERI, an efficient MHD analysis code has been developed from start of TOKAMAK research. The free boundary equilibrium code ''MEUDAS'' which uses both the DCR method (Double-Cyclic-Reduction Method) and a Green's function can specify the pressure and the current distribution arbitrarily, and has been applied to the analysis of a broad physical subject as a code having rapidity and high precision. Also the MHD convergence calculation technique in ''MEUDAS'' has been built into various newly developed codes. This report explains in detail each module in ''MEUDAS'' for performing convergence calculation in solving the MHD equilibrium. (author)

  3. Non-equilibrium quantum heat machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alicki, Robert; Gelbwaser-Klimovsky, David

    2015-01-01

    Standard heat machines (engine, heat pump, refrigerator) are composed of a system (working fluid) coupled to at least two equilibrium baths at different temperatures and periodically driven by an external device (piston or rotor) sometimes called the work reservoir. The aim of this paper is to go beyond this scheme by considering environments which are stationary but cannot be decomposed into a few baths at thermal equilibrium. Such situations are important, for example in solar cells, chemical machines in biology, various realizations of laser cooling or nanoscopic machines driven by laser radiation. We classify non-equilibrium baths depending on their thermodynamic behavior and show that the efficiency of heat machines powered by them is limited by the generalized Carnot bound. (paper)

  4. Interfaces at equilibrium: A guide to fundamentals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmur, Abraham

    2017-06-01

    The fundamentals of the thermodynamics of interfaces are reviewed and concisely presented. The discussion starts with a short review of the elements of bulk thermodynamics that are also relevant to interfaces. It continues with the interfacial thermodynamics of two-phase systems, including the definition of interfacial tension and adsorption. Finally, the interfacial thermodynamics of three-phase (wetting) systems is discussed, including the topic of non-wettable surfaces. A clear distinction is made between equilibrium conditions, in terms of minimizing energies (internal, Gibbs or Helmholtz), and equilibrium indicators, in terms of measurable, intrinsic properties (temperature, chemical potential, pressure). It is emphasized that the equilibrium indicators are the same whatever energy is minimized, if the boundary conditions are properly chosen. Also, to avoid a common confusion, a distinction is made between systems of constant volume and systems with drops of constant volume. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Approach to chemical equilibrium in thermal models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boal, D.H.

    1984-01-01

    The experimentally measured (μ - , charged particle)/(μ - ,n) and (p,n/p,p') ratios for the emission of energetic nucleons are used to estimate the time evolution of a system of secondary nucleons produced in a direct interaction of a projectile or captured muon. The values of these ratios indicate that chemical equilibrium is not achieved among the secondary nucleons in noncomposite induced reactions, and this restricts the time scale for the emission of energetic nucleons to be about 0.7 x 10 -23 sec. It is shown that the reason why thermal equilibrium can be reached so rapidly for a particular nucleon species is that the sum of the particle spectra produced in multiple direct reactions looks surprisingly thermal. The rate equations used to estimate the reaction times for muon and nucleon induced reactions are then applied to heavy ion collisions, and it is shown that chemical equilibrium can be reached more rapidly, as one would expect

  6. Indomethacin solubility estimation in 1,4-dioxane + water mixtures by the extended hildebrand solubility approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miller A Ruidiaz

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Extended Hildebrand Solubility Approach (EHSA was successfully applied to evaluate the solubility of Indomethacin in 1,4-dioxane + water mixtures at 298.15 K. An acceptable correlation-performance of EHSA was found by using a regular polynomial model in order four of the W interaction parameter vs. solubility parameter of the mixtures (overall deviation was 8.9%. Although the mean deviation obtained was similar to that obtained directly by means of an empiric regression of the experimental solubility vs. mixtures solubility parameters, the advantages of EHSA are evident because it requires physicochemical properties easily available for drugs.

  7. Isotope effects in the equilibrium and non-equilibrium vaporization of tritiated water and ice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumgaertner, F.; Kim, M.-A.

    1990-01-01

    The vaporization isotope effect of the HTO/H 2 O system has been measured at various temperatures and pressures under equilibrium as well as non-equilibrium conditions. The isotope effect values measured in equilibrium sublimation or distillation are in good agreement with the theoretical values based on the harmonic oscillator model. In non-equilibrium vaporization at low temperatures ( 0 C), the isotope effect decreases rapidly with decreasing system pressure and becomes negligible when the system pressure is lowered more than one tenth of the equilibrium vapor pressure. At higher temperatures, the isotope effect decreases very slowly with decreasing system pressure. Discussion is extended for the application of the present results to the study of biological enrichment of tritium. (author)

  8. A sorption model for alkalis in cement-based materials - Correlations with solubility and electrokinetic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henocq, Pierre

    2017-06-01

    In cement-based materials, radionuclide uptake is mainly controlled by calcium silicate hydrates (C-S-H). This work presents an approach for defining a unique set of parameters of a surface complexation model describing the sorption behavior of alkali ions on the C-S-H surface. Alkali sorption processes are modeled using the CD-MUSIC function integrated in the Phreeqc V.3.0.6 geochemical code. Parameterization of the model was performed based on (1) retention, (2) zeta potential, and (3) solubility experimental data from the literature. This paper shows an application of this model to sodium ions. It was shown that retention, i.e. surface interactions, and solubility are closely related, and a consistent sorption model for radionuclides in cement-based materials requires a coupled surface interaction/chemical equilibrium model. In case of C-S-H with low calcium-to-silicon ratios, sorption of sodium ions on the C-S-H surface strongly influences the chemical equilibrium of the C-S-H + NaCl system by significantly increasing the aqueous calcium concentration. The close relationship between sorption and chemical equilibrium was successfully illustrated by modeling the effect of the solid-to-liquid ratio on the calcium content in solution in the case of C-S-H + NaCl systems.

  9. Thermodynamic model of Ni(II) solubility, hydrolysis and complex formation with ISA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez-Siso, Maria Rosa; Duro, Lara; Bruno, Jordi [Amphos21, Barcelona (Spain); Gaona, Xavier; Altmaier, Marcus [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany). Inst. for Nuclear Waste Disposal

    2018-04-01

    The solubility of β-Ni(OH){sub 2}(cr) was investigated at T=(22±2) C in the absence and presence of α-isosaccharinic acid (ISA), the main degradation product of cellulose under alkaline pH conditions. Batch solubility experiments were performed from undersaturation conditions under inert gas (Ar) atmosphere. Solubility experiments in the absence of ISA were conducted in 0.5 and 3.0 M NaCl-NaOH solutions at 7.5 ≤ pH{sub m} ≤ 13 (with pH{sub m} = -log{sub 10}[H{sup +}]). XRD analyses of selected solid phases collected after completing the solubility experiments (∼300 days) confirmed that β-Ni(OH){sub 2}(cr) remains as solid phase controlling the solubility of Ni(II) in all investigated conditions. Based on the slope analysis (log{sub 10}[Ni] vs. pH{sub m}) of the solubility data and solid phase characterization, the equilibrium reactions β-Ni(OH){sub 2}(cr)+2 H{sup +} <=> Ni{sup 2+}+2 H{sub 2}O(l) and β-Ni(OH){sub 2}(cr) <=> Ni(OH){sub 2}(aq) were identified as controlling the solubility of Ni(II) within the investigated pH{sub m} region. The conditional equilibrium constants determined from the solubility experiments at different ionic strengths were evaluated with the specific ion interaction theory (SIT). In contrast to the current thermodynamic selection in the NEA-TDB, solubility data collected in the present work does not support the formation of the anionic hydrolysis species Ni(OH){sub 3}{sup -} up to pH{sub m} ≤ 13.0. Solubility experiments in the presence of ISA were conducted in 0.5 M NaCl-NaOH-NaISA solutions with 0.01 M ≤ [NaISA] ≤ 0.2 M and 9 ≤ pH{sub m} ≤ 13. XRD analyses confirmed that β-Ni(OH){sub 2}(cr) is also the solid phase controlling the solubility of Ni(II) in the presence of ISA. Solubility data of all investigated systems can be properly explained with chemical and thermodynamic models including the formation of the complexes NiOHISA(aq), Ni(OH){sub 2}ISA{sup -} and Ni(OH){sub 3}ISA{sup 2-}. The reported data confirm

  10. Generalized Information Equilibrium Approaches to EEG Sleep Stage Discrimination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd Zorick

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in neuroscience have raised the hypothesis that the underlying pattern of neuronal activation which results in electroencephalography (EEG signals is via power-law distributed neuronal avalanches, while EEG signals are nonstationary. Therefore, spectral analysis of EEG may miss many properties inherent in such signals. A complete understanding of such dynamical systems requires knowledge of the underlying nonequilibrium thermodynamics. In recent work by Fielitz and Borchardt (2011, 2014, the concept of information equilibrium (IE in information transfer processes has successfully characterized many different systems far from thermodynamic equilibrium. We utilized a publicly available database of polysomnogram EEG data from fourteen subjects with eight different one-minute tracings of sleep stage 2 and waking and an overlapping set of eleven subjects with eight different one-minute tracings of sleep stage 3. We applied principles of IE to model EEG as a system that transfers (equilibrates information from the time domain to scalp-recorded voltages. We find that waking consciousness is readily distinguished from sleep stages 2 and 3 by several differences in mean information transfer constants. Principles of IE applied to EEG may therefore prove to be useful in the study of changes in brain function more generally.

  11. Equilibrium structure of rare earth trihalides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oezgueven, Y.

    2004-01-01

    In this work, we have calculate the equilibrium structure of the yttrium tribromide (YBr 3 ) and its dimer using the interionic force model . In the determination of the model parameters of Y monomer and dimer we use the measured value of the breathing mode of molecular dimer in the pure molecular liquid. We compare our results for the equilibrium structure of molecular dimer namely, the bond lengths and bond angles, with measured values from electron diffraction and with the results of other theoretical calculations. The agreement between calculated and measured spectra frequencies of vibrational modes can be considered as very reasonable

  12. Quantum gambling based on Nash-equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Pei; Zhou, Xiao-Qi; Wang, Yun-Long; Liu, Bi-Heng; Shadbolt, Pete; Zhang, Yong-Sheng; Gao, Hong; Li, Fu-Li; O'Brien, Jeremy L.

    2017-06-01

    The problem of establishing a fair bet between spatially separated gambler and casino can only be solved in the classical regime by relying on a trusted third party. By combining Nash-equilibrium theory with quantum game theory, we show that a secure, remote, two-party game can be played using a quantum gambling machine which has no classical counterpart. Specifically, by modifying the Nash-equilibrium point we can construct games with arbitrary amount of bias, including a game that is demonstrably fair to both parties. We also report a proof-of-principle experimental demonstration using linear optics.

  13. Asymptotic stability estimates near an equilibrium point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas, H. Scott; Meyer, Kenneth R.; Palacián, Jesús F.; Yanguas, Patricia

    2017-07-01

    We use the error bounds for adiabatic invariants found in the work of Chartier, Murua and Sanz-Serna [3] to bound the solutions of a Hamiltonian system near an equilibrium over exponentially long times. Our estimates depend only on the linearized system and not on the higher order terms as in KAM theory, nor do we require any steepness or convexity conditions as in Nekhoroshev theory. We require that the equilibrium point where our estimate applies satisfy a type of formal stability called Lie stability.

  14. Entropy and equilibrium via games of complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topsøe, Flemming

    2004-09-01

    It is suggested that thermodynamical equilibrium equals game theoretical equilibrium. Aspects of this thesis are discussed. The philosophy is consistent with maximum entropy thinking of Jaynes, but goes one step deeper by deriving the maximum entropy principle from an underlying game theoretical principle. The games introduced are based on measures of complexity. Entropy is viewed as minimal complexity. It is demonstrated that Tsallis entropy ( q-entropy) and Kaniadakis entropy ( κ-entropy) can be obtained in this way, based on suitable complexity measures. A certain unifying effect is obtained by embedding these measures in a two-parameter family of entropy functions.

  15. Equilibrium calculations for helical axis stellarators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hender, T.C.; Carreras, B.A.

    1984-04-01

    An average method based on a vacuum flux coordinate system is presented. This average method permits the study of helical axis stellarators with toroidally dominated shifts. An ordering is introduced, and to lowest order the toroidally averaged equilibrium equations are reduced to a Grad-Shafranov equation. Also, to lowest order, a Poisson-type equation is obtained for the toroidally varying corrections to the equilibium. By including these corrections, systems that are toroidally dominated, but with significant helical distortion to the equilibrium, may be studied. Numerical solutions of the average method equations are shown to agree well with three-dimensional calculations

  16. Equilibrium distribution function in collisionless systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pergamenshchik, V.M.

    1988-01-01

    Collisionless systems of a large number of N particles interacting by Coulomb forces are widely spread in cosmic and laboratory plasma. A statistical theory of equilibrium state of collisionless Coulomb systems which evolution obeys Vlasov equation is proposed. The developed formalism permits a sequential consideration of such distributed in one-particle six-dimensional phase space of a system and to obtain a simple result: equilibrium distribution function has the form of Fermi-Dirac distribution and doesn't depend on initial state factors

  17. Micro Data and General Equilibrium Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Browning, Martin; Hansen, Lars Peter; Heckman, James J.

    1999-01-01

    Dynamic general equilibrium models are required to evaluate policies applied at the national level. To use these models to make quantitative forecasts requires knowledge of an extensive array of parameter values for the economy at large. This essay describes the parameters required for different...... economic models, assesses the discordance between the macromodels used in policy evaluation and the microeconomic models used to generate the empirical evidence. For concreteness, we focus on two general equilibrium models: the stochastic growth model extended to include some forms of heterogeneity...

  18. Thermodynamic equilibrium in relativistic rotating systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suen, W.M.; Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO; Young, K.

    1988-01-01

    The thermodynamic equilibrium configurations of relativistic rotating stars are studied using the maximum entropy principle. It is shown that the heuristic arguments for the equilibrium conditions can be developed into a maximum entropy principle in which the variations are carried out in a fixed background spacetime. This maximum principle with the fixed background assumption is technically simpler than, but has to be justified by, a maximum entropy principle without the assumption. Such a maximum entropy principle is formulated in this paper, showing that the general relativistic system can be treated on the same footing as other long-range force systems. (author)

  19. The empirical equilibrium structure of diacetylene

    OpenAIRE

    Thorwirth, S.; Harding, M. E.; Muders, D.; Gauss, J.

    2008-01-01

    High-level quantum-chemical calculations are reported at the MP2 and CCSD(T) levels of theory for the equilibrium structure and the harmonic and anharmonic force fields of diacetylene, HCCCCH. The calculations were performed employing Dunning's hierarchy of correlation-consistent basis sets cc-pVXZ, cc-pCVXZ, and cc-pwCVXZ, as well as the ANO2 basis set of Almloef and Taylor. An empirical equilibrium structure based on experimental rotational constants for thirteen isotopic species of diacety...

  20. MHD equilibrium of heliotron J plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Nakamura, Yuji; Kondo, Katsumi; Nakajima, Noriyoshi; Hayashi, Takaya

    2004-01-01

    MHD equilibria of Heliotron J plasma are investigated by using HINT code. By assuming some profiles of the current density, effects of the net toroidal currents on the magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) equilibrium are investigated. If the rotational transform can be controlled by the currents, the generation of good flux surfaces is expected. In order to study equilibria with self-consistent bootstrap current, the boozer coordinates are constructed by converged HINT equilibrium as a preliminary study. Obtained spectra are compared with ones of VMEC code and both results are consistent. (author)

  1. Current control necessary for toroidal plasma equilibrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagao, S.

    1987-01-01

    It is shown that a significant amount of dipole current is necessary for the plasma equilibrium of toroidal configurations in general. Through the vector product with the poloidal field, this dipole current force has to balance with the hoop force of plasma pressure itself of the annular shape. The measurement of such a current of dipole type may be interesting for the confirmation of the plasma equilibrium in the toroidal system. Moreover it is certained that there is a new mode of a tokamak operation with such a dipole current component and with smaller vertical field than that based on the classical tokamak theory. (author) [pt

  2. Algorithm For Hypersonic Flow In Chemical Equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Grant

    1989-01-01

    Implicit, finite-difference, shock-capturing algorithm calculates inviscid, hypersonic flows in chemical equilibrium. Implicit formulation chosen because overcomes limitation on mathematical stability encountered in explicit formulations. For dynamical portion of problem, Euler equations written in conservation-law form in Cartesian coordinate system for two-dimensional or axisymmetric flow. For chemical portion of problem, equilibrium state of gas at each point in computational grid determined by minimizing local Gibbs free energy, subject to local conservation of molecules, atoms, ions, and total enthalpy. Major advantage: resulting algorithm naturally stable and captures strong shocks without help of artificial-dissipation terms to damp out spurious numerical oscillations.

  3. Computing Properties Of Chemical Mixtures At Equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcbride, B. J.; Gordon, S.

    1995-01-01

    Scientists and engineers need data on chemical equilibrium compositions to calculate theoretical thermodynamic properties of chemical systems. Information essential in design and analysis of such equipment as compressors, turbines, nozzles, engines, shock tubes, heat exchangers, and chemical-processing equipment. CET93 is general program that calculates chemical equilibrium compositions and properties of mixtures for any chemical system for which thermodynamic data are available. Includes thermodynamic data for more than 1,300 gaseous and condensed species and thermal-transport data for 151 gases. Written in FORTRAN 77.

  4. On financial equilibrium with intermediation costs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markeprand, Tobias Ejnar

    2008-01-01

    This paper studies the set of competitive equilibria in financial economies with intermediation costs. We consider an arbitrary dividend structure, which includes options and equity with limited liabilities.We show a general existence result and upper-hemi continuity of the equilibrium correspond......This paper studies the set of competitive equilibria in financial economies with intermediation costs. We consider an arbitrary dividend structure, which includes options and equity with limited liabilities.We show a general existence result and upper-hemi continuity of the equilibrium...

  5. 14 CFR 67.205 - Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. 67.205..., nose, throat, and equilibrium. Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium standards for a second-class airman..., vertigo or a disturbance of equilibrium. ...

  6. 14 CFR 67.105 - Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. 67.105..., nose, throat, and equilibrium. Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium standards for a first-class airman... may reasonably be expected to be manifested by, vertigo or a disturbance of equilibrium. ...

  7. 14 CFR 67.305 - Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. 67.305..., nose, throat, and equilibrium. Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium standards for a third-class airman... by, or that may reasonably be expected to be manifested by, vertigo or a disturbance of equilibrium. ...

  8. 46 CFR 42.20-12 - Conditions of equilibrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Conditions of equilibrium. 42.20-12 Section 42.20-12... BY SEA Freeboards § 42.20-12 Conditions of equilibrium. The following conditions of equilibrium are... stability. Through an angle of 20 degrees beyond its position of equilibrium, the vessel must meet the...

  9. Statistical equilibrium equations for trace elements in stellar atmospheres

    OpenAIRE

    Kubat, Jiri

    2010-01-01

    The conditions of thermodynamic equilibrium, local thermodynamic equilibrium, and statistical equilibrium are discussed in detail. The equations of statistical equilibrium and the supplementary equations are shown together with the expressions for radiative and collisional rates with the emphasize on the solution for trace elements.

  10. [The concept of health and disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruíz, R H

    1976-12-01

    1. The author reviews some current concepts concerning the definitions and uses of the concepts of health and illness. Starting from the definitions in Psychiatry, "normality" is considered from the statistic, the normative and the clinical standpoints, and as a part of a continuum stretching from health to illness. Several approaches are analyzed, among which Wittaker's, who sets forth the following indicators of normality: a) self-knowledge; b) self-esteem; c) self-security; d) capacity for giving and receiving affection; e) satisfaction of corporal needs; f) productivity and capacity for happiness; g) lack of tensions and of hipersensitivity. 2. The concept of illness as an operative concept is also analyzed, leading to the following statements: a) it is inexistent in non-biological sciences; b) it appears in social sciences only through extrapolation; c) in medicine it means the breacking of homeosthasis; d) in psychology and dynamic psychiatry it means the abnormal stressing of normal mechanisms, common to all persons. 3. The concept of health as equilibrium is also analyzed, with the following precisions: a) equilibrium is defined within a system as affecting the whole of it, and implying transformation and self-regulation; b) homeosthasis is a case of equilibrium for steady complex systems; c) adaptation is the maintenance of equilibrium when there are exchanges with the evironment. 4. Finally, those concepts are applied to mental illness and its limits, and the following criteria are set forth: a) amount of anguish; b) depression related to its motives, intensity, persistence and frequency; c) regression to previous development stages; d) use of defense mechanisms in an inadequate or stereotyped way.

  11. Water Solubility of Plutonium and Uranium Compounds and Residues at TA-55

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reilly, Sean Douglas; Smith, Paul Herrick; Jarvinen, Gordon D.; Prochnow, David Adrian; Schulte, Louis D.; DeBurgomaster, Paul Christopher; Fife, Keith William; Rubin, Jim; Worl, Laura Ann

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the water solubility of plutonium and uranium compounds and residues at TA-55 is necessary to provide a technical basis for appropriate criticality safety, safety basis and accountability controls. Individual compound solubility was determined using published solubility data and solution thermodynamic modeling. Residue solubility was estimated using a combination of published technical reports and process knowledge of constituent compounds. The scope of materials considered includes all compounds and residues at TA-55 as of March 2016 that contain Pu-239 or U-235 where any single item in the facility has more than 500 g of nuclear material. This analysis indicates that the following materials are not appreciably soluble in water: plutonium dioxide (IDC=C21), plutonium phosphate (IDC=C66), plutonium tetrafluoride (IDC=C80), plutonium filter residue (IDC=R26), plutonium hydroxide precipitate (IDC=R41), plutonium DOR salt (IDC=R42), plutonium incinerator ash (IDC=R47), uranium carbide (IDC=C13), uranium dioxide (IDC=C21), U 3 O 8 (IDC=C88), and uranium filter residue (IDC=R26). This analysis also indicates that the following materials are soluble in water: plutonium chloride (IDC=C19) and uranium nitrate (IDC=C52). Equilibrium calculations suggest that PuOCl is water soluble under certain conditions, but some plutonium processing reports indicate that it is insoluble when present in electrorefining residues (R65). Plutonium molten salt extraction residues (IDC=R83) contain significant quantities of PuCl 3 , and are expected to be soluble in water. The solubility of the following plutonium residues is indeterminate due to conflicting reports, insufficient process knowledge or process-dependent composition: calcium salt (IDC=R09), electrorefining salt (IDC=R65), salt (IDC=R71), silica (IDC=R73) and sweepings/screenings (IDC=R78). Solution thermodynamic modeling also indicates that fire suppression water buffered with a commercially-available phosphate

  12. Water Solubility of Plutonium and Uranium Compounds and Residues at TA-55

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reilly, Sean Douglas [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States; Smith, Paul Herrick [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States; Jarvinen, Gordon D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States; Prochnow, David Adrian [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States; Schulte, Louis D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States; DeBurgomaster, Paul Christopher [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States; Fife, Keith William [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States; Rubin, Jim [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States; Worl, Laura Ann [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States

    2016-06-13

    Understanding the water solubility of plutonium and uranium compounds and residues at TA-55 is necessary to provide a technical basis for appropriate criticality safety, safety basis and accountability controls. Individual compound solubility was determined using published solubility data and solution thermodynamic modeling. Residue solubility was estimated using a combination of published technical reports and process knowledge of constituent compounds. The scope of materials considered includes all compounds and residues at TA-55 as of March 2016 that contain Pu-239 or U-235 where any single item in the facility has more than 500 g of nuclear material. This analysis indicates that the following materials are not appreciably soluble in water: plutonium dioxide (IDC=C21), plutonium phosphate (IDC=C66), plutonium tetrafluoride (IDC=C80), plutonium filter residue (IDC=R26), plutonium hydroxide precipitate (IDC=R41), plutonium DOR salt (IDC=R42), plutonium incinerator ash (IDC=R47), uranium carbide (IDC=C13), uranium dioxide (IDC=C21), U3O8 (IDC=C88), and uranium filter residue (IDC=R26). This analysis also indicates that the following materials are soluble in water: plutonium chloride (IDC=C19) and uranium nitrate (IDC=C52). Equilibrium calculations suggest that PuOCl is water soluble under certain conditions, but some plutonium processing reports indicate that it is insoluble when present in electrorefining residues (R65). Plutonium molten salt extraction residues (IDC=R83) contain significant quantities of PuCl3, and are expected to be soluble in water. The solubility of the following plutonium residues is indeterminate due to conflicting reports, insufficient process knowledge or process-dependent composition: calcium salt (IDC=R09), electrorefining salt (IDC=R65), salt (IDC=R71), silica (IDC=R73) and sweepings/screenings (IDC=R78). Solution thermodynamic modeling also indicates that fire suppression water buffered with a

  13. Hybrid equilibrium field coils for the ORNL TNS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, Y.K.M.; Strickler, D.J; Dory, R.A.

    1977-01-01

    In this study, we make a comparative study of the power supplies required by interior and exterior [to the toroidal field (TF) coils] equilibrium field coils that are separately appropriate for high-β, D-shaped plasmas in TNS. It is shown that the interior coils need power supplies that are an order of magnitude below those required by the exterior coils (while the latter case is much less difficult to build than the former). A hybrid EF coil concept is proposed that combines the interior and the exterior coils to retain their advantages in avoiding large interior coils while lowering the power supplied to the exterior coils by an order of magnitude

  14. Motor synergies and the equilibrium-point hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latash, Mark L

    2010-07-01

    The article offers a way to unite three recent developments in the field of motor control and coordination: (1) The notion of synergies is introduced based on the principle of motor abundance; (2) The uncontrolled manifold hypothesis is described as offering a computational framework to identify and quantify synergies; and (3) The equilibrium-point hypothesis is described for a single muscle, single joint, and multijoint systems. Merging these concepts into a single coherent scheme requires focusing on control variables rather than performance variables. The principle of minimal final action is formulated as the guiding principle within the referent configuration hypothesis. Motor actions are associated with setting two types of variables by a controller, those that ultimately define average performance patterns and those that define associated synergies. Predictions of the suggested scheme are reviewed, such as the phenomenon of anticipatory synergy adjustments, quick actions without changes in synergies, atypical synergies, and changes in synergies with practice. A few models are briefly reviewed.

  15. Equilibrium in benefits and hazard risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The chapter briefly discussed the following subjects: benefits of nuclear activities, the concept of operation optimization, concept of risks, hazards index, comparison in production costs of nuclear power generation and others sources of power generation

  16. Measurement and modeling of CO2 solubility in NaCl brine and CO2–saturated NaCl brine density

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yan, Wei; Huang, Shengli; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    2011-01-01

    over climate change and energy security. This work is an experimental and modeling study of two fundamental properties in high pressure CO2–NaCl brine equilibrium, i.e., CO2 solubility in NaCl brine and CO2–saturated NaCl brine density. A literature review of the available data was presented first...

  17. Aqueous Solubility of Piperazine and 2-Amino-2-methyl-1-propanol plus Their Mixtures Using an Improved Freezing-Point Depression Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fosbøl, Philip Loldrup; Neerup, Randi; Waseem Arshad, Muhammad

    2011-01-01

    In this work the solid–liquid equilibrium (SLE) and freezing-point depression (FPD) in the electrolytic binary aqueous systems piperazine (PZ, CAS No. 110-85-0) and aqueous 2-amino-2-methyl-1-propanol (AMP, CAS No. 124-68-5) were measured. The FPD and solubility were also determined in the ternary...

  18. Serum Soluble Corin is Decreased in Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Hao; Zhu, Fangfang; Shi, Jijun; Han, Xiujie; Zhou, Dan; Liu, Yan; Zhi, Zhongwen; Zhang, Fuding; Shen, Yun; Ma, Juanjuan; Song, Yulin; Hu, Weidong

    2015-07-01

    Soluble corin was decreased in coronary heart disease. Given the connections between cardiac dysfunction and stroke, circulating corin might be a candidate marker of stroke risk. However, the association between circulating corin and stroke has not yet been studied in humans. Here, we aimed to examine the association in patients wtith stroke and community-based healthy controls. Four hundred eighty-one patients with ischemic stroke, 116 patients with hemorrhagic stroke, and 2498 healthy controls were studied. Serum soluble corin and some conventional risk factors of stroke were examined. Because circulating corin was reported to be varied between men and women, the association between serum soluble corin and stroke was evaluated in men and women, respectively. Patients with ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke had a significantly lower level of serum soluble corin than healthy controls in men and women (all P values, stroke than men in the highest quartile. Women in the lowest quartile of serum soluble corin were also more likely to have ischemic (OR, 3.10; 95% confidence interval, 1.76-5.44) and hemorrhagic (OR, 8.54; 95% confidence interval, 2.35-31.02) stroke than women in the highest quartile. ORs of ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke were significantly increased with the decreasing levels of serum soluble corin in men and women (all P values for trend, stroke compared with healthy controls. Our findings raise the possibility that serum soluble corin may have a pathogenic role in stroke. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. Astrophysical Concepts

    CERN Document Server

    Harwit, Martin

    2006-01-01

    This classic text, aimed at senior undergraduates and beginning graduate students in physics and astronomy, presents a wide range of astrophysical concepts in sufficient depth to give the reader a quantitative understanding of the subject. Emphasizing physical concepts, the book outlines cosmic events but does not portray them in detail: it provides a series of astrophysical sketches. For this fourth edition, nearly every part of the text has been reconsidered and rewritten, new sections have been added to cover recent developments, and others have been extensively revised and brought up to date. The book begins with an outline of the scope of modern astrophysics and enumerates some of the outstanding problems faced in the field today. The basic physics needed to tackle these questions are developed in the next few chapters using specific astronomical processes as examples. The second half of the book enlarges on these topics and shows how we can obtain quantitative insight into the structure and evolution of...

  20. Non-equilibrium effects upon the non-Markovian Caldeira-Leggett quantum master equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolivar, A.O.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Classical Brownian motion described by a non-Markovian Fokker-Planck equation. → Quantization process. → Quantum Brownian motion described by a non-Markovian Caldeira-Leggett equation. → A non-equilibrium quantum thermal force is predicted. - Abstract: We obtain a non-Markovian quantum master equation directly from the quantization of a non-Markovian Fokker-Planck equation describing the Brownian motion of a particle immersed in a generic environment (e.g. a non-thermal fluid). As far as the especial case of a heat bath comprising of quantum harmonic oscillators is concerned, we derive a non-Markovian Caldeira-Leggett master equation on the basis of which we work out the concept of non-equilibrium quantum thermal force exerted by the harmonic heat bath upon the Brownian motion of a free particle. The classical limit (or dequantization process) of this sort of non-equilibrium quantum effect is scrutinized, as well.

  1. Beyond the second law entropy production and non-equilibrium systems

    CERN Document Server

    Lineweaver, Charles; Niven, Robert; Regenauer-Lieb, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    The Second Law, a cornerstone of thermodynamics, governs the average direction of dissipative, non-equilibrium processes. But it says nothing about their actual rates or the probability of fluctuations about the average. This interdisciplinary book, written and peer-reviewed by international experts, presents recent advances in the search for new non-equilibrium principles beyond the Second Law, and their applications to a wide range of systems across physics, chemistry and biology. Beyond The Second Law brings together traditionally isolated areas of non-equilibrium research and highlights potentially fruitful connections between them, with entropy production playing the unifying role. Key theoretical concepts include the Maximum Entropy Production principle, the Fluctuation Theorem, and the Maximum Entropy method of statistical inference. Applications of these principles are illustrated in such diverse fields as climatology, cosmology, crystal growth morphology, Earth system science, environmental physics, ...

  2. Solubilities of uranium for TILA-99

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ollila, K.; Ahonen, L.

    1998-11-01

    This report presents the evaluation of the uranium solubilities in the reference waters of TILA-99. The behaviour of uranium has been discussed separately in the near-field and far-field conditions. The bentonite/groundwater interactions have been considered in the compositions of the fresh and saline near-field reference waters. The far-field groundwaters' compositions include fresh, brackish, saline and very saline, almost brine-type compositions. The pH and redox conditions, as the main parameters affecting the solubilities, are considered. A literature study was made in order to obtain information on the recent dissolution and leaching experiments of UO 2 and spent fuel. The latest literature includes studies on UO 2 solubility under anoxic conditions, in which the methods for simulating the reducing conditions of deep groundwater have been improved. Studies on natural uraninite and its alteration products give a valuable insight into the long-term behaviour of spent fuel. Also the solubility equilibria for some relevant poorly known uranium minerals have been determined. The solubilities of the selected solubility-limiting phases were calculated using the geochemical code, EQ3/6. The NEA database for uranium was the basis for the modelling. The recently extended and updated SR '97 database was used for comparison. The solubility products for uranophane were taken from the latest literature. The recommended values for solubilities were given after a comparison between the calculated solubilities, experimental information and measured concentrations in natural groundwaters. The experiments include several UO 2 dissolution studies in synthetic groundwaters with compositions close to the reference groundwaters. (author)

  3. Solubilities of uranium for TILA-99

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ollila, K. [VTT Chemical Technology, Espoo (Finland); Ahonen, L. [Geological Survey of Finland, Espoo (Finland)

    1998-11-01

    This report presents the evaluation of the uranium solubilities in the reference waters of TILA-99. The behaviour of uranium has been discussed separately in the near-field and far-field conditions. The bentonite/groundwater interactions have been considered in the compositions of the fresh and saline near-field reference waters. The far-field groundwaters` compositions include fresh, brackish, saline and very saline, almost brine-type compositions. The pH and redox conditions, as the main parameters affecting the solubilities, are considered. A literature study was made in order to obtain information on the recent dissolution and leaching experiments of UO{sub 2} and spent fuel. The latest literature includes studies on UO{sub 2} solubility under anoxic conditions, in which the methods for simulating the reducing conditions of deep groundwater have been improved. Studies on natural uraninite and its alteration products give a valuable insight into the long-term behaviour of spent fuel. Also the solubility equilibria for some relevant poorly known uranium minerals have been determined. The solubilities of the selected solubility-limiting phases were calculated using the geochemical code, EQ3/6. The NEA database for uranium was the basis for the modelling. The recently extended and updated SR `97 database was used for comparison. The solubility products for uranophane were taken from the latest literature. The recommended values for solubilities were given after a comparison between the calculated solubilities, experimental information and measured concentrations in natural groundwaters. The experiments include several UO{sub 2} dissolution studies in synthetic groundwaters with compositions close to the reference groundwaters. (author) 81 refs.

  4. Introductory concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, W.E.

    1983-01-01

    Physical theories are commonly classified as being either ''classical'' or ''modern''. The reasons for this distinction are both historical and substantive. Limited in the sophistication of their measuring instruments, early scientists proposed theories appropriate for the description of the simplest and most accessible physical phenomena, e.g., the trajectories of the planets. Because of the class of phenomena observed, certain beliefs came to underlie all classical theories with regard to the nature of time, space, matter, etc. For example, the idea was undisputed that an object has at all times both a definite position and velocity. Not until the interior of the atom and the nature of electromagnetic radiation were explored was it discovered that the concepts of classical physics are inadequate to deal with many phenomena. A reassessment of fundamental postulates led to the formulation of modern physics which, it is believed, successfully treats the behavior of all physical systems. To gain an understanding of the rudiments of modern physics, one proceeds as the early scientists did by first mastering the classical concepts that emerge from their intuitive picture of the world. Modifications of these concepts are subsequently introduced which allow a more accurate treatment of physical phenomena, particularly atomic and nuclear systems

  5. Mutual Solubility Study in Supercritical Fluid Extraction of Tocopherols from Crude Palm Oil Using CO2 Solvent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhairi A. Sata

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available In this article, the mutual solubility of tocopherols from crude palm oil was studied using carbon dioxide as a solvent at the temperatures of 80, 100 and 120 ºC. Each sample from the phase equilibrium unit contained two parts. The liquid part was analyzed by gas chromatography (GC in order to measure the tocopherol composition and, on the other hand, the vapor phase was conducted in an expansion vessel in order to measure the pressure increment during the expansion process. Two phase equilibrium data was calculated using the liquid phase composition and pressure increments during the expansion process. Results showed that the maximum solubility of tocopherols was around 2.27% at a temperature of 120 ºC and at pressure of 5.44 MPa.

  6. HINT computation of LHD equilibrium with zero rotational transform surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanno, Ryutaro; Toi, Kazuo; Watanabe, Kiyomasa; Hayashi, Takaya; Miura, Hideaki; Nakajima, Noriyoshi; Okamoto Masao

    2004-01-01

    A Large Helical Device equilibrium having a zero rotational transform surface is studied by using the three dimensional MHD equilibrium code, HINT. We find existence of the equilibrium but with formation of the two or three n=0 islands composing a homoclinic-type structure near the center, where n is a toroidal mode number. The LHD equilibrium maintains the structure, when the equilibrium beta increases. (author)

  7. Solubility limited radionuclide transport through geologic media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muraoka, Susumu; Iwamoto, Fumio; Pigford, T.H.

    1980-11-01

    Prior analyses for the migration of radionuclides neglect solubility limits of resolved radionuclide in geologic media. But actually some of the actinides may appear in chemical forms of very low solubility. In the present report we have proposed the migration model with no decay parents in which concentration of radionuclide is limited in concentration of solubility in ground water. In addition, the analytical solutions of the space-time-dependent concentration are presented in the case of step release, band release and exponential release. (author)

  8. Residual nilpotence and residual solubility of groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikhailov, R V

    2005-01-01

    The properties of the residual nilpotence and the residual solubility of groups are studied. The main objects under investigation are the class of residually nilpotent groups such that each central extension of these groups is also residually nilpotent and the class of residually soluble groups such that each Abelian extension of these groups is residually soluble. Various examples of groups not belonging to these classes are constructed by homological methods and methods of the theory of modules over group rings. Several applications of the theory under consideration are presented and problems concerning the residual nilpotence of one-relator groups are considered.

  9. Water Soluble Polymers for Pharmaceutical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veeran Gowda Kadajji

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Advances in polymer science have led to the development of novel drug delivery systems. Some polymers are obtained from natural resources and then chemically modified for various applications, while others are chemically synthesized and used. A large number of natural and synthetic polymers are available. In the present paper, only water soluble polymers are described. They have been explained in two categories (1 synthetic and (2 natural. Drug polymer conjugates, block copolymers, hydrogels and other water soluble drug polymer complexes have also been explained. The general properties and applications of different water soluble polymers in the formulation of different dosage forms, novel delivery systems and biomedical applications will be discussed.

  10. Molecular Thermodynamic Modeling of Mixed Solvent Solubility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellegaard, Martin Dela; Abildskov, Jens; O’Connell, John P.

    2010-01-01

    A method based on statistical mechanical fluctuation solution theory for composition derivatives of activity coefficients is employed for estimating dilute solubilities of 11 solid pharmaceutical solutes in nearly 70 mixed aqueous and nonaqueous solvent systems. The solvent mixtures range from...... nearly ideal to strongly nonideal. The database covers a temperature range from 293 to 323 K. Comparisons with available data and other existing solubility methods show that the method successfully describes a variety of observed mixed solvent solubility behaviors using solute−solvent parameters from...

  11. Equilibrium and off-equilibrium trap-size scaling in one-dimensional ultracold bosonic gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campostrini, Massimo; Vicari, Ettore

    2010-01-01

    We study some aspects of equilibrium and off-equilibrium quantum dynamics of dilute bosonic gases in the presence of a trapping potential. We consider systems with a fixed number of particles and study their scaling behavior with increasing the trap size. We focus on one-dimensional bosonic systems, such as gases described by the Lieb-Liniger model and its Tonks-Girardeau limit of impenetrable bosons, and gases constrained in optical lattices as described by the Bose-Hubbard model. We study their quantum (zero-temperature) behavior at equilibrium and off equilibrium during the unitary time evolution arising from changes of the trapping potential, which may be instantaneous or described by a power-law time dependence, starting from the equilibrium ground state for an initial trap size. Renormalization-group scaling arguments and analytical and numerical calculations show that the trap-size dependence of the equilibrium and off-equilibrium dynamics can be cast in the form of a trap-size scaling in the low-density regime, characterized by universal power laws of the trap size, in dilute gases with repulsive contact interactions and lattice systems described by the Bose-Hubbard model. The scaling functions corresponding to several physically interesting observables are computed. Our results are of experimental relevance for systems of cold atomic gases trapped by tunable confining potentials.

  12. Equilibrium-constant expressions for aqueous plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silver, G.L.

    2010-01-01

    Equilibrium-constant expressions for Pu disproportionation reactions traditionally contain three or four terms representing the concentrations or fractions of the oxidation states. The expressions can be rewritten so that one of the oxidation states is replaced by a term containing the oxidation number of the plutonium. Experimental estimations of the numerical values of the constants can then be checked in several ways. (author)

  13. On the Existence of Evolutionary Learning Equilibriums

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masudul Alam Choudhury

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The usual kinds of Fixed-Point Theorems formalized on the existence of competitive equilibrium that explain much of economic theory at the core of economics can operate only on bounded and closed sets with convex mappings. But these conditions are hardly true of the real world of economic and financial complexities and perturbations. The category of learning sets explained by continuous fields of interactive, integrative and evolutionary behaviour caused by dynamic preferences at the individual and institutional and social levels cannot maintain the assumption of closed, bounded and convex sets. Thus learning sets and multi-system inter-temporal relations explained by pervasive complementarities and  participation between variables and entities, and evolution by learning, have evolutionary equilibriums. Such a study requires a new methodological approach. This paper formalizes such a methodology for evolutionary equilibriums in learning spaces. It briefly points out the universality of learning equilibriums in all mathematical structures. For a particular case though, the inter-systemic interdependence between sustainable development and ethics and economics in the specific understanding of learning domain is pointed out.

  14. Conditions for the Existence of Market Equilibrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, William D. A.

    1997-01-01

    Maintains that most graduate-level economics textbooks rarely mention the need for consumers to be above their minimum wealth position as a condition for market equilibrium. Argues that this omission leaves students with a mistaken sense about the range of circumstances under which market equilibria can exist. (MJP)

  15. General Equilibrium Models: Improving the Microeconomics Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Walter; Westhoff, Frank

    2009-01-01

    General equilibrium models now play important roles in many fields of economics including tax policy, environmental regulation, international trade, and economic development. The intermediate microeconomics classroom has not kept pace with these trends, however. Microeconomics textbooks primarily focus on the insights that can be drawn from the…

  16. Equilibrium thermodynamics in modified gravitational theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bamba, Kazuharu; Geng, C.-Q.; Tsujikawa, Shinji

    2010-01-01

    We show that it is possible to obtain a picture of equilibrium thermodynamics on the apparent horizon in the expanding cosmological background for a wide class of modified gravity theories with the Lagrangian density f(R,φ,X), where R is the Ricci scalar and X is the kinetic energy of a scalar field φ. This comes from a suitable definition of an energy-momentum tensor of the 'dark' component that respects to a local energy conservation in the Jordan frame. In this framework the horizon entropy S corresponding to equilibrium thermodynamics is equal to a quarter of the horizon area A in units of gravitational constant G, as in Einstein gravity. For a flat cosmological background with a decreasing Hubble parameter, S globally increases with time, as it happens for viable f(R) inflation and dark energy models. We also show that the equilibrium description in terms of the horizon entropy S is convenient because it takes into account the contribution of both the horizon entropy S in non-equilibrium thermodynamics and an entropy production term.

  17. Non-equilibrium thermodynamics and physical kinetics

    CERN Document Server

    Bikkin, Halid

    2014-01-01

    This graduate textbook covers contemporary directions of non-equilibrium statistical mechanics as well as classical methods of kinetics. With one of the main propositions being to avoid terms such as "obviously" and "it is easy to show", this treatise is an easy-to-read introduction into this traditional, yet vibrant field.

  18. Pre-equilibrium complex particle emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bĕták, E.

    2002-01-01

    Semi-classical (phenomenological) pre-equilibrium emission of clusters of nucleons (complex particles) such as deuterons, tritons, helions and α particles from reactions induced by light projectiles (nucleons to α’s) is addressed. The main attention is given to the hard components in the emission energetic spectra, which play an increasing role at incident energies above 20 MeV, and are currently attributed to a presence of some kind of pre-equilibrium processes. In addition, the mechanisms of cluster reactions show special features such as the competition between pickup and knockout processes and the contributions of several successive steps in the reaction. The main frame used here to illustrate the processes and interplays of the competing mechanisms of pre-equilibrium cluster formation and emission, namely the coalescence, pick-up and knock-out, is the pre-equilibrium exciton model. It obviously contains the process of clusterization itself as its organic part. The most important case of complex particles with the largest amount of experimental data is that of alpha emission, which therefore naturally attracts most of the attention and where the widest range of possible mechanisms is available on the market. The loosely bound ejectiles, on the other side, are usually not able to demonstrate all features of the whole spectrum of contributing mechanisms, but they are nevertheless an important link between the nucleon emission and the cluster one.

  19. Economic Equilibrium and Soviet Economic Reform

    OpenAIRE

    Herbert E. Scarf

    1991-01-01

    The paper, prepared for a Roundtable on Major Economic Problems in the U.S. and the U.S.S.R., discusses some aspects of price theory ñ in particular, the theory of general equilibrium -ñ which may offer some theoretical insights about the economic problems to be encountered during the transition from Socialism to private markets in the Soviet Union.

  20. Tenancy and Soil Conservation in Market Equilibrium

    OpenAIRE

    Lichtenberg, Erik

    2001-01-01

    A theoretical analysis of equilibrium contracts between risk neutral landlords and tenants when tenants' soil exploitation is non-contractible indicates that landlords will overinvest in conservation structures. An empirical model using farm-level data provides evidence that investment in contractible soil conservation measures is greater on rental land.