WorldWideScience

Sample records for solidified glass layer

  1. On confirmation of abandonment of imported waste (glass solidified bodies) outside business places

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    Electric power companies entrust the reprocessing of spent fuel generated from nuclear power stations to COGEMA in France, and in April, 1995, 28 high level radioactive wastes (glass solidified bodies) generated by the reprocessing were returned. When these glass solidified wastes are abandoned in the waste management facility of Japan Nuclear Fuel Service Co., it was decided to receive the confirmation of the prime minister on the measures based on the relevant law. Four electric power companies submitted the application and the explanation paper. As to the contents of the glass solidified wastes, the technical inspection was carried out by Bureau Veritas. Considering that this import of glass solidified wastes is the first in Japan, Science and Technology Agency carried out the measurement of all 28 wastes. The results are reported. It was confirmed that the measures for the abandonment taken by four electric power companies conform to the stipulation. The contents of the confirmation are reported in the order of the stipulation. These wastes were solidified with borosilicate glass in 5 mm thick stainless steel vessels, and the welding was done properly. (K.I.)

  2. The development of basic glass formulations for solidifying HLW from nuclear fuel reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Yaozhong; Tang Baolong; Zhang Baoshan; Zhou Hui

    1995-01-01

    Basic glass formulations 90U/19, 90U/20, 90Nd/7 and 90Nd/10 applied in electric melting process are developed by using the mathematical model of the viscosity and electric resistance of waste glass. The yellow phase does not occur for basic glass formulations 90U/19 and 90U/20 solidifying HLW from nuclear fuel reprocessing plant when the waste loading is 20%. Under the waste loading is 16%, the process and product properties of glass 90U/19 and 90U/20 come up to or surpass the properties of the same kind of foreign waste glasses, and other properties are about the same to them of foreign waste glasses. The process and product properties of basic glass formulations 90Nd/7 and 90Nd/10 used for the solidification of 'U replaced by Nd' liquid waste are almost similar to them of 90U/19 and 90U/20. These properties fairly meet the requirements of 'joint test' (performed at KfK-INE, Germany). Among these formulations, 90Nd/7 is applied in cold engineering scale electric melting test performed at KfK-INE in Germany. The main process properties of cold test is similar to laboratory results

  3. Surface layer effects on waste glass corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, X.

    1993-01-01

    Water contact subjects waste glass to chemical attack that results in the formation of surface alteration layers. Two principal hypotheses have been advanced concerning the effect of surface alteration layers on continued glass corrosion: (1) they act as a mass transport barrier and (2) they influence the chemical affinity of the glass reaction. In general, transport barrier effects have been found to be less important than affinity effects in the corrosion of most high-level nuclear waste glasses. However, they can be important under some circumstances, for example, in a very alkaline solution, in leachants containing Mg ions, or under conditions where the matrix dissolution rate is very low. The latter suggests that physical barrier effect may affect the long-term glass dissolution rate. Surface layers influence glass reaction affinity through the effects of the altered glass and secondary phases on the solution chemistry. The reaction affinity may be controlled by various precipitates and crystalline phases, amorphous silica phases, gel layer, or all the components of the glass. The surface alteration layers influence radionuclide release mainly through colloid formation, crystalline phase incorporation, and gel layer retention. This paper reviews current understanding and uncertainties

  4. In situ study of glasses decomposition layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zarembowitch-Deruelle, O.

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this work is to understand the involved mechanisms during the decomposition of glasses by water and the consequences on the morphology of the decomposition layer, in particular in the case of a nuclear glass: the R 7 T 7 . The chemical composition of this glass being very complicated, it is difficult to know the influence of the different elements on the decomposition kinetics and on the resulting morphology because several atoms have a same behaviour. Glasses with simplified composition (only 5 elements) have then been synthesized. The morphological and structural characteristics of these glasses have been given. They have then been decomposed by water. The leaching curves do not reflect the decomposition kinetics but the solubility of the different elements at every moment. The three steps of the leaching are: 1) de-alkalinization 2) lattice rearrangement 3) heavy elements solubilization. Two decomposition layer types have also been revealed according to the glass heavy elements rate. (O.M.)

  5. Process for obtaining luminescent glass layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heindi, R.; Robert, A.

    1984-01-01

    Process for obtaining luminescent glass layers, application to the production of devices provided with said layers and to the construction of photoscintillators. The process comprises projecting onto a support, by cathodic sputtering, the material of at least one target, each target including silica and at least one chemical compound able to give luminescent centers, such as a cerium oxide, so as to form at least one luminescent glass layer of the said support. The layer or layers formed preferably undergo a heat treatment such as annealing in order to increase the luminous efficiency thereof. It is in this way possible to form a scintillating glass layer on the previously frosted entrance window of a photomultiplier in order to obtain an integrated photoscintillator

  6. Engineering Glass Passivation Layers -Model Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skorski, Daniel C.; Ryan, Joseph V.; Strachan, Denis M.; Lepry, William C.

    2011-08-08

    The immobilization of radioactive waste into glass waste forms is a baseline process of nuclear waste management not only in the United States, but worldwide. The rate of radionuclide release from these glasses is a critical measure of the quality of the waste form. Over long-term tests and using extrapolations of ancient analogues, it has been shown that well designed glasses exhibit a dissolution rate that quickly decreases to a slow residual rate for the lifetime of the glass. The mechanistic cause of this decreased corrosion rate is a subject of debate, with one of the major theories suggesting that the decrease is caused by the formation of corrosion products in such a manner as to present a diffusion barrier on the surface of the glass. Although there is much evidence of this type of mechanism, there has been no attempt to engineer the effect to maximize the passivating qualities of the corrosion products. This study represents the first attempt to engineer the creation of passivating phases on the surface of glasses. Our approach utilizes interactions between the dissolving glass and elements from the disposal environment to create impermeable capping layers. By drawing from other corrosion studies in areas where passivation layers have been successfully engineered to protect the bulk material, we present here a report on mineral phases that are likely have a morphological tendency to encrust the surface of the glass. Our modeling has focused on using the AFCI glass system in a carbonate, sulfate, and phosphate rich environment. We evaluate the minerals predicted to form to determine the likelihood of the formation of a protective layer on the surface of the glass. We have also modeled individual ions in solutions vs. pH and the addition of aluminum and silicon. These results allow us to understand the pH and ion concentration dependence of mineral formation. We have determined that iron minerals are likely to form a complete incrustation layer and we plan

  7. Joining Dental Ceramic Layers With Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saied, MA; Lloyd, IK; Haller, WK; Lawn, BR

    2011-01-01

    Objective Test the hypothesis that glass-bonding of free-form veneer and core ceramic layers can produce robust interfaces, chemically durable and aesthetic in appearance and, above all, resistant to delamination. Methods Layers of independently produced porcelains (NobelRondo™ Press porcelain, Nobel BioCare AB and Sagkura Interaction porcelain, Elephant Dental) and matching alumina or zirconia core ceramics (Procera alumina, Nobel BioCare AB, BioZyram yttria stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystal, Cyrtina Dental) were joined with designed glasses, tailored to match thermal expansion coefficients of the components and free of toxic elements. Scanning electron microprobe analysis was used to characterize the chemistry of the joined interfaces, specifically to confirm interdiffusion of ions. Vickers indentations were used to drive controlled corner cracks into the glass interlayers to evaluate the toughness of the interfaces. Results The glass-bonded interfaces were found to have robust integrity relative to interfaces fused without glass, or those fused with a resin-based adhesive. Significance The structural integrity of the interfaces between porcelain veneers and alumina or zirconia cores is a critical factor in the longevity of all-ceramic dental crowns and fixed dental prostheses. PMID:21802131

  8. Method for solidifying powdery radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasumura, Keijiro; Matsuura, Hiroyuki; Tomita, Toshihide.

    1978-01-01

    Purpose: To solidify powdery radioactive wastes through polymerization in a vessel at a high impregnation speed with no cloggings in pipes. Method: A drum can is lined with an inner liner layer of a predetermined thickness made of inflammable material such as glass fiber. A plurality of pipes for supplying liquid plastic monomer are provided in adjacent to the upper end face of the inflammable material or inserted between the vessel and the inflammable material. Then powdery radioactive wastes are filled in the vessel and the liquid plastic monomer dissolving therein a polymerization initiator is supplied through the pipes. The liquid plastic monomer impregnates through the inflammable material layer into the radioactive wastes and the plastic monomer is polymerized by the aid of the polymerization initiator after a predetermined of time to produce solidified plastic products of radioactive wastes. (Seki, T.)

  9. Heat Transfer Model of a Small-Scale Waste Glass Melter with Cold Cap Layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abboud, Alexander; Guillen, Donna Post; Pokorny, Richard

    2016-09-01

    At the Hanford site in the state of Washington, more than 56 million gallons of radioactive waste is stored in underground tanks. The cleanup plan for this waste is vitrification at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP), currently under construction. At the WTP, the waste will be blended with glass-forming materials and heated to 1423K, then poured into stainless steel canisters to cool and solidify. A fundamental understanding of the glass batch melting process is needed to optimize the process to reduce cost and decrease the life cycle of the cleanup effort. The cold cap layer that floats on the surface of the glass melt is the primary reaction zone for the feed-to-glass conversion. The conversion reactions include water release, melting of salts, evolution of batch gases, dissolution of quartz and the formation of molten glass. Obtaining efficient heat transfer to this region is crucial to achieving high rates of glass conversion. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling is being used to understand the heat transfer dynamics of the system and provide insight to optimize the process. A CFD model was developed to simulate the DM1200, a pilot-scale melter that has been extensively tested by the Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL). Electrodes are built into the melter to provide Joule heating to the molten glass. To promote heat transfer from the molten glass into the reactive cold cap layer, bubbling of the molten glass is used to stimulate forced convection within the melt pool. A three-phase volume of fluid approach is utilized to model the system, wherein the molten glass and cold cap regions are modeled as separate liquid phases, and the bubbling gas and plenum regions are modeled as one lumped gas phase. The modeling of the entire system with a volume of fluid model allows for the prescription of physical properties on a per-phase basis. The molten glass phase and the gas phase physical properties are obtained from previous experimental work. Finding representative

  10. Surface modification induced phase transformation and structure variation on the rapidly solidified recast layer of titanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, Ming-Hung [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Graduate Institute of Mechanical and Precision Engineering, National Kaoshiung University of Applied Sciences, Kaoshiung 807, Taiwan (China); School of Dentistry, College of Oral Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Haung, Chiung-Fang [School of Dental Technology, College of Oral Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Division of Family and Operative Dentistry, Department of Dentistry, Taipei Medical University Hospital, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Research Center for Biomedical Devices and Prototyping Production, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Shyu, Shih-Shiun [Department of Dentistry, Taipei Tzu Chi Hospital, Buddhist Tzu Chi Medical Foundation, New Taipei City 231, Taiwan (China); Chou, Yen-Ru [Research Center for Biomedical Devices and Prototyping Production, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Biomedical Materials and Tissue Engineering, College of Oral Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Research Center for Biomedical Implants and Microsurgery Devices, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Lin, Ming-Hong [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Graduate Institute of Mechanical and Precision Engineering, National Kaoshiung University of Applied Sciences, Kaoshiung 807, Taiwan (China); Peng, Pei-Wen, E-mail: apon@tmu.edu.tw [School of Dental Technology, College of Oral Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); and others

    2015-08-15

    In this study, neodymium-doped yttrium orthovanadate (Nd:YVO{sub 4}) as a laser source with different scanning speeds was used on biomedical Ti surface. The microstructural and biological properties of laser-modified samples were investigated by means of optical microscope, electron microscope, X-ray diffraction, surface roughness instrument, contact angle and cell cytotoxicity assay. After laser modification, the rough volcano-like recast layer with micro-/nanoporous structure and wave-like recast layer with nanoporous structure were generated on the surfaces of laser-modified samples, respectively. It was also found out that, an α → (α + rutile-TiO{sub 2}) phase transition occurred on the recast layers of laser-modified samples. The Ti surface becomes hydrophilic at a high speed laser scanning. Moreover, the cell cytotoxicity assay demonstrated that laser-modified samples did not influence the cell adhesion and proliferation behaviors of osteoblast (MG-63) cell. The laser with 50 mm/s scanning speed induced formation of rough volcano-like recast layer accompanied with micro-/nanoporous structure, which can promote cell adhesion and proliferation of MG-63 cell on Ti surface. The results indicated that the laser treatment was a potential technology to enhance the biocompatibility for titanium. - Highlights: • Laser induced the formation of recast layer with micro-/nanoporous structure on Ti. • An α → (α + rutile-TiO{sub 2}) phase transition was observed within the recast layer. • The Ti surface becomes hydrophilic at a high speed laser scanning. • Laser-modified samples exhibit good biocompatibility to osteoblast (MG-63) cell.

  11. Characterization of paint layers and stained glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biagi Maino, D.; Ciancabilla, L.; Gandolfi, G.; Maino, G.; Bruni, S.; Ferriani, S.; Visparelli, D.

    2000-01-01

    Due to the higher magnification with respect to traditional optical microscopes, the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) has been extensively applied in recent years to the investigation of elemental composition of many different types of artistic objects. The back-scattered and secondary electrons produced when the SEM electron beam hits the sample can be detected and converted in electronic signals which give rise to images of the scanned area. These images can be recorded in digital format and stored on a computer for subsequent processing. Moreover, in addition to the back-scattered and secondary electrons, the impact of the electron beam on the sample produces a X-ray spectrum, which can be further processed and analysed using an X-ray spectrometer coupled to the SEM. Therefore, it is possible to yield the chemical composition of the sample, analogously to the X-ray fluorescence analysis. Moreover, the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) can be applied to the characterization of paint layers, making ultra-thin sections in which the paint and ground layers are preserved intact. In comparison with usual SEM measurements, the TEM technique is more precise, because of the higher spatial resolution in both the microanalysis and diffraction modes, of the order of 10-20 nm. This precision allows unique identification of each component in the layer and determination of the crystallographic structure, thus characterizing even the smallest particles of each pigment and pointing out minor components. It is then possible to establish whether a pigment is natural, manufactured, its origin as well as approximate datations. In this work, we describe the research activities performed in the laboratory recently established at the ENEA (Italian National Agency for New Technology, Energy and Environment) Applied Physics Division, where dedicated SEM and TEM are connected by a suitable imaging system to a powerful computing system for image acquisition and processing. Use has

  12. Hydrogen speciation in hydrated layers on nuclear waste glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aines, R.D.; Weed, H.C.; Bates, J.K.

    1987-01-01

    The hydration of an outer layer on nuclear waste glasses is known to occur during leaching, but the actual speciation of hydrogen (as water or hydroxyl groups) in these layers has not been determined. As part of the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations Project, we have used infrared spectroscopy to determine hydrogen speciations in three nuclear waste glass compositions (SRL-131 and 165, and PNL 76-68), which were leached at 90 0 C (all glasses) or hydrated in a vapor-saturated atmosphere at 202 0 C (SRL-131 only). Hydroxyl groups were found in the surface layers of all the glasses. Molecular water was found in the surface of SRL-131 and PNL 76-68 glasses that had been leached for several months in deionized water, and in the vapor-hydrated sample. The water/hydroxyl ratio increases with increasing reaction time; molecular water makes up most of the hydrogen in the thick reaction layers on vapor-phase hydrated glass while only hydroxyl occurs in the least reacted samples. Using the known molar absorptivities of water and hydroxyl in silica-rich glass the vapor-phase layer contained 4.8 moles/liter of molecular water, and 0.6 moles water in the form hydroxyl. A 15 μm layer on SRL-131 glass formed by leaching at 90 0 C contained a total of 4.9 moles/liter of water, 2/3 of which was as hydroxyl. The unreacted bulk glass contains about 0.018 moles/liter water, all as hydroxyl. The amount of hydrogen added to the SRL-131 glass was about 70% of the original Na + Li content, not the 300% that would result from alkali=hydronium ion interdiffusion. If all the hydrogen is then assumed to be added as the result of alkali-H + interdiffusion, the molecular water observed may have formed from condensation of the original hydroxyl groups

  13. Silicate glasses corrosion. Texture analysis of the corrosion layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Portal, Sabine

    2001-01-01

    We have studied the kinetic and the texture evolution of the corroded layer that forms on glass surfaces exposed to acidic solutions. The corroded layer is depleted in alkali cations and is produced by an ion exchange mechanism. It is porous and shows a lower refractive index than the one of the bulk glass. Spectroscopic ellipsometry allows determining the thickness of the layer and its refractive index. Several other techniques have been developed for characterizing the corrosion behaviour of glass surfaces: porosity is thus investigated by adsorption-desorption of nitrogen; the thickness and the composition of the layer are studied by secondary ion mass spectroscopy (S.I.M.S.); sodium concentration in the solution has been analyzed by atomic absorption. This study shows the importance of leaching conditions and glass preparation. The type of drying employed is susceptible to modify the texture and the structure of the layer. The layers produced in the early stages of the leaching process are not easily detectable. The different results lead however to the same conclusion: after a strong increase of porosity, a densification of the layer is observed with increasing time. The evolution of the layer texture could therefore modify the kinetic of the glass corrosion. (author) [fr

  14. Mechanical behavior of a bi-layer glass ionomer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonifácio, C.C.; de Jager, N.; Kleverlaan, C.J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective A high-viscosity consistency of the glass-ionomer cement (GIC) may lead to poor adaptation into the cavity. The use of a flowable GIC layer seemed to improve its adaptation in approximal restorations in vitro. In this study we assessed the flexural strength of a two-layered GIC, using a

  15. Atomic layer deposition of alternative glass microchannel plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Mahony, Aileen, E-mail: aom@incomusa.com; Craven, Christopher A.; Minot, Michael J.; Popecki, Mark A.; Renaud, Joseph M.; Bennis, Daniel C.; Bond, Justin L.; Stochaj, Michael E.; Foley, Michael R.; Adams, Bernhard W. [Incom, Inc., 294 Southbridge Road, Charlton, Massachusetts 01507 (United States); Mane, Anil U.; Elam, Jeffrey W. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave., Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Ertley, Camden; Siegmund, Oswald H. W. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, 7 Gauss Way, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    The technique of atomic layer deposition (ALD) has enabled the development of alternative glass microchannel plates (MCPs) with independently tunable resistive and emissive layers, resulting in excellent thickness uniformity across the large area (20 × 20 cm), high aspect ratio (60:1 L/d) glass substrates. Furthermore, the use of ALD to deposit functional layers allows the optimal substrate material to be selected, such as borosilicate glass, which has many benefits compared to the lead-oxide glass used in conventional MCPs, including increased stability and lifetime, low background noise, mechanical robustness, and larger area (at present up to 400 cm{sup 2}). Resistively stable, high gain MCPs are demonstrated due to the deposition of uniform ALD resistive and emissive layers on alternative glass microcapillary substrates. The MCP performance characteristics reported include increased stability and lifetime, low background noise (0.04 events cm{sup −2} s{sup −1}), and low gain variation (±5%)

  16. Numerical modelling of glass dissolution: gel layer morphology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devreux, F. E-mail: fd@pmc.polytechnique.fr; Barboux, P

    2001-09-01

    Numerical simulations of glass dissolution are presented. The glass is modelized as a random binary mixture composed of two species representing silica and soluble oxides, such as boron and alkali oxides. The soluble species are dissolved immediately when they are in contact with the solution. For the species which represents silica, one introduces dissolution and condensation probabilities. It is shown that the morphology and the thickness of the surface hydration layer (the gel) are highly dependent on the dissolution model, especially on the parameter which controls the surface tension. Simulations with different glass surface area to solution volume ratio (S/V) show that this experimental parameter has important effects on both the shrinkage and the gel layer thickness.

  17. Growth of hydrated gel layers in nuclear waste glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sullivan, T.M.; Machiels, A.J.

    1984-01-01

    The hydration kinetics of waste glasses in contact with an aqueous solution has been studied by using three different approaches. Emphasis has been placed on modeling processes in the transition zone defined as the region in which the nature of the glass changes from the original dry glass to an open hydrated structure. The first model relies on concentration-dependent diffusion coefficients to obtain a transition zone in which the ions mobility is extremely low compared to that in the gel layer. In the second model, the transition zone and hydrated layer are treated as distinct phases and it is assumed that ion exchange at their common boundary is the rate-controlling process. The third model treats the transition zone as a thin film of constant thickness and low diffusivity. In the absence of appreciable network dissolution, all three models indicate that growth of the gel layer becomes eventually proportional to the square root of time; however, as long as processes in the transition zone are rate controlling, growth is linearly proportional to time

  18. Texture of altered layers issued from glass corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phalippou, J.; Woignier, Th.; Ayral, A.

    1997-01-01

    The layers which develop at the glass surface subjected to water corrosion depend on a collection of interacting parameters. Such a material can be studied using techniques which have been previously demonstrated as suitable for gels. A detailed description of the behaviour of gels under measurements is given. Investigations show that to really know the texture both mechanical properties and permeability must be known. Different experiments are reported. They give a rough estimate of the altered layer texture. Results coming from different techniques are compared and in a few cases are used to estimate additional textural information. Finally we put an insight into the nature and consequently to the texture evolution of the layer as the corrosion proceeds. (authors)

  19. Energy loss from internal reflection off metal layers on glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell, M. W.; Bezuidenhout, D. F.; Klee, H. W.; Theron, E.

    1983-12-01

    The reflection characteristics of metal layers are considered for the situation where the electromagnetic radiation is incident from the glass side. Theoretical and measured reflectance values are presented which indicate that for some metals the reflection has a strong dependence on the refractive index of the incident medium. Some examples are given of recent cases where the above results were an important consideration in the choice of the metallic reflecting material. These results indicate that aluminium should not be automatically considered the best choice for the visible region nor gold for the infra-red.

  20. Effect of permeable flow on cyclic layering in solidifying magma bodies: Insights from an analog experiment of diffusion-precipitation systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toramaru, A.; Yamauchi, S.

    2012-04-01

    Characteristic structures such as rhythmic layering, cress cumulate, cross bedding, perpendicular feldspar rock etc, are commonly observed in layered intrusion or shallow magmatic intrusions. These structures result from complex processes including thermal and compositional diffusions, crystallization, crystal settling, convection and interaction among three phases (crystals, bubble, melt). In order to understand how the differentiation proceeds in solidifying magma bodies from each characteristic structure together with chemical signatures, it is necessary to evaluate the relative importance among these elemental processes on structures. As an attempt to evaluate the effect of advection on a diffusion-related structure, we carried out an analog experiment of Liesegang system using lead-iodide (PbI2) crystallization in agar media which have been normally used to prohibit convection. In the ordinary Liesegang band formation experiments including only diffusion and crystallization kinetics without any advection and convection, the precipitation bands develop with regular spacing following a geometric progression due to two-component diffusion and reaction with supersaturation. This type of banding structure has been advocated as the same type of cyclic layering or vesicle layering (a sort of rhythmic layering) in dykes or sills. In order to see the effect of one-directional advection on Liesegang band, we apply the electric field (5 V to 25 V for a distance 15 cm) along the concentration gradient in agar media, thereby counteracting flows of lead anion Pb2+ and iodide ion I- are driven at constant velocities. The flows of anions and ions are equivalent to the permeable flows in porous media of crystal mush. The resultant precipitation structures exhibit very curious banding structure in which band spacings do not change with distance, are nearly constant and quite narrow, depending on the voltage, unlike those in ordinary Liesegang bands in which band spacings

  1. A literature review of surface alteration layer effects on waste glass behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, X.; Cunnane, J.C.; Bates, J.K.

    1993-01-01

    When in contact with an aqueous solution, nuclear waste glass is subject to a chemical attack that results in progressive alteration. During tills alteration, constituent elements of the glass pass into the solution; elements initially in solution diffuse into, or are adsorbed onto, the solid; and new phases appear. This results in the formation of surface layers on the reacted glass. The glass corrosion and radionuclide release can be better understood by investigating these surface layer effects. In the past decade, there have been numerous studies regarding the effects of surface layers on glass reactions. This paper presents a systematic analysis and summary of the past knowledge regarding the effects of surface layers on glass-water interaction. This paper describes the major formation mechanisms of surface layers; reviews the role of surface layers in controlling mass transport and glass reaction affinity (through crystalline phases, an amorphous silica, a gel layer, or all the components in the glass); and discusses how the surface layers contribute to the retention of radionuclides during glass dissolution

  2. Vessel for solidifying water-impermeable radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiuchi, Yoshimasa; Tamada, Shin; Suzuki, Yasushi.

    1993-01-01

    A blend prepared by admixing silica sand, alumina powder or glass fiber, as aggregates, to epoxy resin elastic adhesives is coated on an inner surface of a steel drum can or an inner surface of a concrete vessel at a thickness of greater than 1mm followed by hardening. The addition amount of the silica sand, alumina powder or glass fiber is determined as 20 to 40% by weight, 30 to 60% by weight or 5 to 15% by weight respectively. A lid having a hole for injecting fillers is previously bonded to a container for use in solidifying radioactive materials. The strength of the coating layer is increased and a coating performance and an adhesion force are improved by admixing the aggregates, to provide a satisfactory water-impermeability. The container for use in solidifying radioactive wastes having a coating layer with an advantage of the elastic resin adhesives, strong strength and adhesion and being excellent in the water-impermeability can be obtained relatively economically. (N.H.)

  3. The use of positrons to survey alteration layers on synthetic nuclear waste glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiser, Joelle T.; Parruzot, Benjamin; Weber, Marc H.; Ryan, Joseph V.; McCloy, John S.; Wall, Nathalie A.

    2017-01-01

    In order to safeguard society and the environment, understanding radioactive waste glass alteration mechanisms in interactions with solutions and near-field materials, such as Fe, is essential to nuclear waste repository performance assessments. Alteration products are formed at the surface of glasses after reaction with solution. In this study, glass altered in the presence of Fe 0 in aqueous solution formed two alteration layers: one embedded with Fe closer to the surface and one without Fe found deeper in the sample. Both layers were found to be thinner than the alteration layer found in glass altered in aqueous solution only. For the first time, Doppler Broadening Positron Annihilation Spectroscopy (DB-PAS) is used to non-destructively characterize the pore structures of glass altered in the presence of Fe 0 . Advantages and disadvantages of DB-PAS compared to other techniques used to analyze pore structures for altered glass samples are discussed. Ultimately, DB-PAS has shown to be an excellent choice for pore structure characterization for glasses with multiple alteration layers. Monte Carlo modeling predicted positron trajectories through the layers, and helped explain DB-PAS data, which showed that the deeper alteration layer without Fe had a similar composition and pore structure to layers on glass altered in water only.

  4. The use of positrons to survey alteration layers on synthetic nuclear waste glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiser, Joelle T.; Parruzot, Benjamin; Weber, Marc H.; Ryan, Joseph V.; McCloy, John S.; Wall, Nathalie A.

    2017-07-01

    In order to safeguard society and the environment, understanding radioactive waste glass alteration mechanisms in interactions with solutions and near-field materials, such as Fe, is essential to nuclear waste repository performance assessments. Alteration products are formed at the surface of glasses after reaction with solution. In this study, glass altered in the presence of Fe0 in aqueous solution formed two alteration layers: one embedded with Fe closer to the surface and one without Fe found deeper in the sample. Both layers were found to be thinner than the alteration layer found in glass altered in aqueous solution only. For the first time, Doppler Broadening Positron Annihilation Spectroscopy (DB-PAS) is used to non-destructively characterize the pore structures of glass altered in the presence of Fe0. Advantages and disadvantages of DB-PAS compared to other techniques used to analyze pore structures for altered glass samples are discussed. Ultimately, DB-PAS has shown to be an excellent choice for pore structure characterization for glasses with multiple alteration layers. Monte Carlo modeling predicted positron trajectories through the layers, and helped explain DB-PAS data, which showed that the deeper alteration layer without Fe had a similar composition and pore structure to layers on glass altered in water only.

  5. The use of positrons to survey alteration layers on synthetic nuclear waste glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiser, Joelle T. [Washington State University, Chemistry Department, Pullman, WA 99164 (United States); Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Energy and Environment Directorate, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Parruzot, Benjamin [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Energy and Environment Directorate, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Weber, Marc H. [Washington State University, Center for Materials Research, Pullman, WA 99164 (United States); Ryan, Joseph V., E-mail: joe.ryan@pnnl.gov [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Energy and Environment Directorate, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); McCloy, John S. [Washington State University, Chemistry Department, Pullman, WA 99164 (United States); Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Energy and Environment Directorate, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Washington State University, School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Pullman, WA 99164 (United States); Wall, Nathalie A., E-mail: nawall@wsu.edu [Washington State University, Chemistry Department, Pullman, WA 99164 (United States)

    2017-07-15

    In order to safeguard society and the environment, understanding radioactive waste glass alteration mechanisms in interactions with solutions and near-field materials, such as Fe, is essential to nuclear waste repository performance assessments. Alteration products are formed at the surface of glasses after reaction with solution. In this study, glass altered in the presence of Fe{sup 0} in aqueous solution formed two alteration layers: one embedded with Fe closer to the surface and one without Fe found deeper in the sample. Both layers were found to be thinner than the alteration layer found in glass altered in aqueous solution only. For the first time, Doppler Broadening Positron Annihilation Spectroscopy (DB-PAS) is used to non-destructively characterize the pore structures of glass altered in the presence of Fe{sup 0}. Advantages and disadvantages of DB-PAS compared to other techniques used to analyze pore structures for altered glass samples are discussed. Ultimately, DB-PAS has shown to be an excellent choice for pore structure characterization for glasses with multiple alteration layers. Monte Carlo modeling predicted positron trajectories through the layers, and helped explain DB-PAS data, which showed that the deeper alteration layer without Fe had a similar composition and pore structure to layers on glass altered in water only.

  6. Aqueous corrosion of borosilicate glasses. Nature and properties of alteration layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trotignon, Laurent

    1990-01-01

    This research thesis addresses physical and chemical processes which occur during aqueous corrosion of silicates, and the study of the properties of their interfaces with solutions, and thus issues related to the fate of high activity nuclear wastes which are embedded in a vitreous matrix as the potential release of radionuclides towards the environment then depends on the glass parcel behaviour submitted to chemical attacks which could alter it, notably by aqueous corrosion. The objective is then to model the dissolution of nuclear glass over long periods of time, and to predict the behaviour of radionuclides. The author compared the corrosion and alteration layers of gradually more complex borosilicate glasses, from a ternary sodium borosilicate glass to a simulated nuclear glass (the French reference glass R7T7). Complexity is increased by adding oxides. After some theoretical recalls on the structure and corrosion of borosilicate glasses, the author presents the studied materials, the corrosion experiments, and analytical techniques used to study alteration layers. The mechanism of formation of altered layers is studied based on corrosion experiments performed at 90 C on the whole set of glasses. Alteration layers formed on corroded glasses are studied and compared by using various techniques: electronic microscopy, high energy ion beams, spectroscopy, infrared, photo-electron spectroscopy. Implications for underground storage of nuclear glasses are discussed

  7. Red layered medieval stained glass window characterization by means of micro-PIXE technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortega-Feliu, I., E-mail: iofeliu@us.es [Centro Nacional de Aceleradores, Universidad de Sevilla, Avda. Thomas A. Edison 7, 41092 Sevilla (Spain); Gomez-Tubio, B. [Centro Nacional de Aceleradores, Universidad de Sevilla, Avda. Thomas A. Edison 7, 41092 Sevilla (Spain); Departamento de Fisica Aplicada III, Universidad de Sevilla (Spain); Respaldiza, M.A. [Centro Nacional de Aceleradores, Universidad de Sevilla, Avda. Thomas A. Edison 7, 41092 Sevilla (Spain); Departamento de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad de Sevilla (Spain); Capel, F. [Instituto de Ceramica y Vidrio, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (Spain)

    2011-10-15

    Red layered medieval stained glass windows on a transparent greenish substrate are characteristic of European medieval cathedrals, but few compositional analyses have been performed on the coloured layers. The PIXE technique has been performed on a red layered stained glass window obtained during the restoration works carried out in Las Huelgas Monastery in Burgos (Spain). Protons of 3 MeV with a beam of 4 x 5 {mu}m{sup 2} were used to acquire elemental maps of a cross section of the sample, in order to observe the homogeneity of the layered structure and its substrate. In our work, copper was detected as in other layered glasses but a correspondence with lower amounts of zinc has also been determined. Both elements appear enriched in the red coloured layers, while the other quantified elements have the same relative composition along the sample. Corrosion layers, due to the lead supporting structure of the window, were also found.

  8. Effect of low dose electron beam irradiation on the alteration layer formed during nuclear glass leaching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mougnaud, S., E-mail: sarah.mougnaud@gmail.com [CEA Marcoule, DEN, DTCD, SECM, BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze cedex (France); Tribet, M. [CEA Marcoule, DEN, DTCD, SECM, BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze cedex (France); Renault, J.-P. [NIMBE, CNRS, CEA, Université Paris Saclay, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette cedex (France); Jollivet, P. [CEA Marcoule, DEN, DTCD, SECM, BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze cedex (France); Panczer, G. [Institut Lumière Matière, UMR 5306, Université Lyon 1-CNRS, Université de Lyon, 69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Charpentier, T. [NIMBE, CNRS, CEA, Université Paris Saclay, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette cedex (France); Jégou, C. [CEA Marcoule, DEN, DTCD, SECM, BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze cedex (France)

    2016-12-15

    This investigation concerns borosilicate glass leaching mechanisms and the evolution of alteration layer under electron beam irradiation. A simple glass doped with rare earth elements was selected in order to access mechanistic and structural information and better evaluate the effects of irradiation. It was fully leached in initially pure water at 90 °C and at high glass surface area to solution volume ratio (S/V = 20 000 m{sup −1}) in static conditions. Under these conditions, the system quickly reaches the residual alteration rate regime. A small particle size fraction (2–5 μm) was sampled in order to obtain a fairly homogeneous altered material enabling the use of bulk characterization methods. External irradiations with 10 MeV electrons up to a dose of 10 MGy were performed either before or after leaching, to investigate respectively the effect of initial glass irradiation on its alteration behavior and the irradiation stability of the alteration layer. Glass dissolution rate was analyzed by regular leachate samplings and the alteration layer structure was characterized by Raman, luminescence (continuous or time-resolved), and {sup 29}Si MAS NMR and EPR spectroscopy. It was shown that the small initial glass evolutions under irradiation did not induce any modification of the leaching kinetic nor of the structure of the alteration layer. The alteration process seemed to “smooth over” the created defects. Otherwise, the alteration layer and initial glass appeared to have different behaviors under irradiation. No Eu{sup 3+} reduction was detected in the alteration layer after irradiation and the defect creation efficiency was much lower than for initial glass. This can possibly be explained by the protective role of pore water contained in the altered material (∼20%). Moreover, a slight depolymerization of the silicon network of the altered glass under irradiation with electrons was evidenced, whereas in the initial glass it typically

  9. Relationship between reaction layer thickness and leach rate for nuclear waste glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chick, L.A.; Pederson, L.R.

    1984-02-01

    Three leaching tests, devised to distinguish among several proposed nuclear waste glass leaching mechanisms, were carried out for four different waste glasses. In the first test, the influence of a pre-formed reaction layer on elemental release was evaluated. In the second test, glass specimens were replaced with fresh samples halfway through the leaching experiment, to evaluate the influence of the concentration of glass components in leaching. Finally, regular replacement of the leachant at fixed time intervals essentially removed the variable changing solution concentration, and allowed an assessment of the influence of reaction layer thickness on the leaching rate. Results for all glasses tested indicated that the reaction layer presented little or no barrier to leaching, and that most of the retardation on leaching rates generally observed are attributable to saturation effects. 20 references, 6 figures, 1 table

  10. High-temperature oxidation of tungsten covered by layer of glass-enamel melt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasnetsova, V.B.; Shardakov, N.T.; Kudyakov, V.Ya.; Deryabin, V.A.

    1997-01-01

    Corrosion losses of tungsten covered by the layer of glass-enamel melt were determined at 800, 850, 900, 950 deg C. It is shown that the rate of high-temperature oxidation of tungsten decreases after application of glass-enamel melt on its surface. This is probably conditioned by reduction of area of metal interaction with oxidizing atmosphere

  11. Nanoscale imaging of alteration layers of corroded international simple glass particles using ToF-SIMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jiandong; Neeway, James J.; Zhang, Yanyan; Ryan, Joseph V.; Yuan, Wei; Wang, Tieshan; Zhu, Zihua

    2017-08-01

    Glass particles with dimensions typically ranging from tens to hundreds of microns are often used in glass corrosion research in order to accelerate testing. Two-dimensional and three-dimensional nanoscale imaging techniques are badly needed to characterize the alteration layers at the surfaces of these corroded glass particles. Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) can provide a lateral resolution as low as ~100 nm, and, compared to other imaging techniques, is sensitive to elements lighter than carbon. In this work, we used ToF-SIMS to characterize the alteration layers of corroded international simple glass (ISG) particles. At most particle surfaces, inhomogeneous or no alteration layers were observed, indicating that the thickness of the alterations layers may be too thin to be observable by ToF-SIMS imaging. Relatively thick (e.g., 1-10 microns) alteration layers were inhomogeneously distributed at a small portion of surfaces. More interestingly, some large-size (tens of microns) glass particles were fully altered. Above observations suggest that weak attachment and the defects on ISG particle surfaces play an important role in ISG glass corrosion.

  12. Glass and nuclear wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sombret, C.

    1982-10-01

    Glass shows interesting technical and economical properties for long term storage of solidified radioactive wastes by vitrification or embedding. Glass composition, vitrification processes, stability under irradiation, thermal stability and aqueous corrosion are studied [fr

  13. Thermally induced self-healing epoxy/glass laminates with porous layers containing crystallized healing agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Szmechtyk

    2018-07-01

    Full Text Available Porous glass fiber and paper layers were tested for application in thermally induced self healing epoxy laminates as healing porous layers. Both types of layers were impregnated using high purity bisphenol A diglycidyl ether (BADGE epoxy with ability to crystallize during storage under 25 °C. Absorption capacity of porous layers was evaluated. Differential scanning calorimetry was used to investigate BADGE healing agent recrystallization process. Healing porous glass layers (HPGL were selected for further tests. Liquid chromatography and Fourier transform infrared (FT IR spectroscopy provided information about average molecular mass of embedded healing agent and functional groups in HPGL layers. Self-healing efficiency of three different laminates with HPGL layers was calculated based on the results of three-point bending test and Charpy impact test. Also, flexural properties and impact strength of laminates were evaluated. The obtained results confirm competitive self healing ability of composites with HPGL.

  14. The time development of the plasma-glass boundary layer in a T-tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavlov, M.; Djurovic, S.

    1982-01-01

    The refraction of a laser beam by a flat boundary layer between the plasma and the glass plate is analysed. A boundary layer with a constant gradient electron density is assumed. Results of the analysis for plasmas produced in a small T-tube show that the boundary layer thickness increases with time faster than linearly. This means that a relatively fast collapse due to cooling through the boundary layer happens at the second half of the reflected plasma life time, while the boundary layer is negligible thin during the first 2μs after the reflected shock front has passed the point of observation. (author)

  15. Electrochemical study of the tarnish layer of silver deposited on glass

    OpenAIRE

    Ben Amor , Yasser; Sutter , Eliane; Takenouti , Hisasi; Tribollet , Bernard; Boinet , M.; Faure , R.; Balencie , J.; Durieu , G.

    2014-01-01

    International audience; Cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were used to characterize the tarnished thin layer of silver deposited on glass. Instead of natural tarnishing in air environment, an acceleration of tarnishing process was realized by immersion of Ag covered glass in 10 μM K2S medium. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) shows that tarnishing product formed on the silver surface consisted of Ag2S and Ag2O. As electrochemical characterizatio...

  16. Exoelectron emission from surface layer of Li2B4O7 glass ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamoto, Takamichi; Katsube, Shizuko; Yanagisawa, Hideo; Kikuchi, Riichi; Kawanishi, Masaharu.

    1984-01-01

    The thermally stimulated exoelectron emission (TESS) of Li 2 B 4 O 7 glass ceramics was investigated for its application to the dosimetric use. It has been found the TSEE glow patterns of Li 2 B 4 O 7 glass ceramics and of the thin layer of LiF evaporated on Li 2 B 4 O 7 glass ceramics depend on the kind of radiations irradiated. The TSEE glow pattern of the duplicated structure sample indicated a possibility of determining the dose of each kind of radiation separately in the mixed radiation field. (author)

  17. Effect of irradiation on the evolution of alteration layer formed during nuclear glass leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mougnaud, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    High-level radioactive waste (HLW) remaining after spent nuclear fuel reprocessing is immobilized within a glass matrix, eventually destined for geological disposal. Water intrusion into the repository is expected after several thousand years. The alteration of a non-radioactive surrogate for nuclear glass has been extensively studied and it has been determined that successive leaching mechanisms lead to the formation of a 'passivating' alteration layer and to the establishment of a residual rate regime in the long term. However, glass packages are submitted to the radioactivity of confined radioelements. This work focuses on the influence of irradiation on the alteration layer formed during the residual rate regime, in a structural and mechanistic point of view. Three focal areas have been selected. Non-radioactive simple glasses have been leached and externally irradiated in order to determine modifications induced by electronic effects (irradiations with electrons and alpha particles). The same type of glass samples have been previously irradiated with heavy ions and their leaching behavior have been studied in order to assess the impact of ballistic dose cumulated by the glass before water intrusion. Leaching behavior of a complex radioactive glass, doped with an alpha-emitter, has been studied to consider a more realistic situation. (author) [fr

  18. Radioactive substance solidifying device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakoda, Kotaro.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To easily solidify radioactive substances adhering to the surfaces of solid wastes without scattering in the circumference by paints, and further to reduce surface contamination concentrations. Constitution: Solid wastes are placed on a hanging plate, and dipped in paints within a paint dipping treatment tank installed at the lower part of a treatment tank by means of a monorail hoist, and the surfaces of said solid wastes are coated with paints, thereby to solidify the radioactivity on the surfaces of the solid wastes. After dipping, the solid wastes are suspended up to a paint spraying tank to dry the paints. After drying, non-contaminated paints are atomized to apply through an atomizing tube onto the solid wastes. After drying the atomized paints, the solid wastes are carried outside the treatment tank by means of the monorail hoist. (Yoshino, Y.)

  19. Dissolution model for a glass having an adherent insoluble surface layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harvey, K.B.; Larocque, C.A.B.

    1990-01-01

    Waste form glasses that contain substantial quantities of iron, manganese, and aluminum oxides, such as the Savannah River SRL TDS-131 glass, form a thick, hydrated surface layer when placed in contact with water. The dissolution of such a glass has been modeled with the Savannah River Model. The authors showed previously that the equations of the Savannah River Model could be fitted to published experimental data if a time-dependent diffusion coefficient was assumed for species of diffusing through the surface layer. The Savannah River Model assumes that all of the material dissolved from the glass enters solution, whereas it was observed that substantial quantities of material were retained in the surface layer. An alternative model, presented contains a mass balance equation that allows material either to enter solution or to be retained in the surface layer. It is shown that the equations derived using this model can be fitted to the published experimental data assuming a constant diffusion coefficient for species diffusing through the surface layer

  20. UV and plasma treatment of thin silver layers and glass surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hluschi, J.H. [University of Applied Sciences and Arts, Von-Ossietzky-Str. 99, D-37085 Goettingen (Germany); Helmke, A. [University of Applied Sciences and Arts, Von-Ossietzky-Str. 99, D-37085 Goettingen (Germany); Roth, P. [University of Applied Sciences and Arts, Von-Ossietzky-Str. 99, D-37085 Goettingen (Germany); Boewer, R. [Interpane Glasbeschichtungsgesellschaft mbH and Co KG, Sohnreystr. 21, D-37697 Lauenfoerde (Germany); Herlitze, L. [Interpane Glasbeschichtungsgesellschaft mbH and Co KG, Sohnreystr. 21, D-37697 Lauenfoerde (Germany); Vioel, W. [University of Applied Sciences and Arts, Von-Ossietzky-Str. 99, D-37085 Goettingen (Germany)]. E-mail: vioel@hawk-hhg.de

    2006-11-10

    Thin silver layers can be modified by treatment with UV radiation or a plasma discharge. UV treatment at a wavelength of {lambda}=308 -bar nm improves the layer properties, thus leading to an enhancement of the layers IR reflectivity. For the purpose of in situ-measurement the sheet resistance is recorded during the process. Due to the Hagen-Rubens-Relation [E. Hagen, H. Rubens, Ann. Phys. 11 (1903) 873]-bar the sheet resistance is linked to the IR reflectivity of thin metal-films. A pretreatment of uncoated glass using a dielectric barrier discharge activates and cleans its surface, thus leading to an increase in adhesion of thin layers.

  1. UV and plasma treatment of thin silver layers and glass surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hluschi, J.H.; Helmke, A.; Roth, P.; Boewer, R.; Herlitze, L.; Vioel, W.

    2006-01-01

    Thin silver layers can be modified by treatment with UV radiation or a plasma discharge. UV treatment at a wavelength of λ=308 -bar nm improves the layer properties, thus leading to an enhancement of the layers IR reflectivity. For the purpose of in situ-measurement the sheet resistance is recorded during the process. Due to the Hagen-Rubens-Relation [E. Hagen, H. Rubens, Ann. Phys. 11 (1903) 873]-bar the sheet resistance is linked to the IR reflectivity of thin metal-films. A pretreatment of uncoated glass using a dielectric barrier discharge activates and cleans its surface, thus leading to an increase in adhesion of thin layers

  2. Contribution of electron microscopy to the study of alteration layers formed on the surface of glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crovisier, J.L.; Eberhart, J.P.

    1985-01-01

    In order to understand the whole process of glass corrosion in aqueous solutions, the analysis of the reagent must be completed by a study of the actual alteration layers on the glass surface. Transmission electron microscopy on ultramicrotomic thin sections turns out to be a most suitable tool to achieve this. It enables to supplement the conventional methods of surface investigation, such as A.E.S., ESCA, IRRS, SIMS. Two examples are given. The first deals with a (SiO 2 -CaO-Na 2 O-P 2 O 5 )- glass leached in a buffer solution of tris-hydromethyl-aminomethane at 40 0 C. The major feature is ion exchange within a residual porous glass, followed by the precipitation of hydroxyapatite. In the second example, a basaltic glass is altered in sea-water at 50 0 C. The glass constituents are dissolved simultaneously and the alteration layer is a precipitate of crystalline and amorphous phases which have reached their saturation level [fr

  3. Characterization of leached surface layers on simulated high-level waste glasses by sputter-induced optical emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houser, C.; Tsong, I.S.T.; White, W.B.

    1979-01-01

    The leaching process in simulated waste encapsulant glasses was studied by measuring the compositional depth-profiles of H (from water), the glass framework formers Si and B, the alkalis Na and Cs, the alkaline earths Ca and Sr, the transition metals Mo and Fe, the rare-earths La, Ce, and Nd, using the technique of sputter-induced optical emission. The leaching process of these glasses is highly complex. In addition to alkali/hydrogen exchange, there is breakdown of the glass framework, build-up of barrier layers on the surface, and formation of layered reaction zones of distinctly different chemistry all within the outer micrometer of the glass

  4. Steady-state solution growth of microcrystalline silicon on nanocrystalline seed layers on glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansen, R.; Ehlers, C.; Teubner, Th.; Boeck, T.

    2016-09-01

    The growth of polycrystalline silicon layers on glass from tin solutions at low temperatures is presented. This approach is based on the steady-state solution growth of Si crystallites on nanocrystalline seed layers, which are prepared in a preceding process step. Scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy investigations reveal details about the seed layer surfaces, which consist of small hillocks, as well as about Sn inclusions and gaps along the glass substrate after solution growth. The successful growth of continuous microcrystalline Si layers with grain sizes up to several ten micrometers shows the feasibility of the process and makes it interesting for photovoltaics. Project supported by the German Research Foundation (DFG) (No. BO 1129/5-1).

  5. Scratch test induced shear banding in high power laser remelted metallic glass layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matthews, D. T. A.; Ocelik, V.; de Hosson, J. Th. M.

    Laser remelted surface layers of a Cu-based metallic glass forming alloy have been produced with fully amorphous depths up to 350 mu m for single track widths of around 1.3 mm and have been checked by transmission of synchrotron radiation. They have been subjected to indentation hardness and scratch

  6. First-order dissolution rate law and the role of surface layers in glass performance assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grambow, B.; Müller, R.

    2001-09-01

    The first-order dissolution rate law is used for nuclear waste glass performance predictions since 1984. A first discussion of the role of saturation effects was initiated at the MRS conference that year. In paper (1) it was stated that "For glass dissolution A* (the reaction affinity) cannot become zero since saturation only involves the reacting surface while soluble elements still might be extracted from the glass" [B. Grambow, J. Mater. Res. Soc. Symp. Proc. 44 (1985) 15]. Saturation of silica at the surface and condensation of surface silanol groups was considered as being responsible for the slow down of reaction rates by as much as a factor of 1000. Precipitation of Si containing secondary phases such as quartz was invoked as a mechanism for keeping final dissolution affinities higher than zero. Another (2) paper [A.B. Barkatt, P.B. Macedo, B.C. Gibson, C.J. Montrose, J. Mater. Res. Soc. Symp. Proc. 44 (1985) 3] stated that "… under repository conditions the extent of glass dissolution will be moderate due to saturation with respect to certain major elements (in particular, Si, Al and Ca). Consequently, the concentration levels of the more soluble glass constituents in the aqueous medium are expected to fall appreciable below their solubility limit." The formation of dense surface layers was considered responsible for explaining the saturation effect. The mathematical model assumed stop of reaction in closed systems, once solubility limits were achieved. For more than 15 years the question of the correctness of one or the other concept has seldom been posed and has not yet been resolved. The need of repository performance assessment for validated rate laws demands a solution, particularly since the consequences of the two concepts and research requirements for the long-term glass behavior are quite different. In concept (1) the stability of the `equilibrium surface region' is not relevant because, by definition, this region is stable chemically and after a

  7. Durability of simulated waste glass: effects of pressure and formation of surface layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wicks, G.G.; Mosley, W.C.; Whitkop, P.G.; Saturday, K.A.

    1981-01-01

    The leaching behavior of simulated Savannah River Plant (SRP) waste glass was studied at elevated pressures and anticipated storage temperatures. An integrated approach, which combined leachate solution analyses with both bulk and surface studies, was used to study the corrosion process. Compositions of leachates were evaluated by colorimetry and atomic absorption. Used in the bulk and surface analyses were optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, x-ray energy spectroscopy, wide-angle x-ray, diffraction, electron microprobe analysis, infrared reflectance spectroscopy, electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis, and Auger electron spectroscopy. Results from this study show that there is no significant adverse effect of pressure, up to 1500 psi and 90 0 C, on the chemical durability of simulated SPR waste glass leached for one month in deionized water. In addition, the leached glass surface layer was characterized by an adsorbed film rich in minor constituents from the glass. This film remained on the glass surface even after leaching in relatively alkaline solutions at elevated pressures at 90 0 C for one month. The sample surface area to volume of leachant ratios (SA/V) was 10:1 cm -1 and 1:10 cm -1 . The corrosion mechanisms and surface and subsurface layers produced will be discussed along with the potential importance of these results to repository storage

  8. Structure and nano-mechanical characteristics of surface oxide layers on a metallic glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caron, A; Qin, C L; Gu, L; González, S; Shluger, A; Fecht, H-J; Louzguine-Luzgin, D V; Inoue, A

    2011-03-04

    Owing to their low elastic moduli, high specific strength and excellent processing characteristics in the undercooled liquid state, metallic glasses are promising materials for applications in micromechanical systems. With miniaturization of metallic mechanical components down to the micrometer scale, the importance of a native oxide layer on a glass surface is increasing. In this work we use TEM and XPS to characterize the structure and properties of the native oxide layer grown on Ni(62)Nb(38) metallic glass and their evolution after annealing in air. The thickness of the oxide layer almost doubled after annealing. In both cases the oxide layer is amorphous and consists predominantly of Nb oxide. We investigate the friction behavior at low loads and in ambient conditions (i.e. at T = 295 K and 60% air humidity) of both as-cast and annealed samples by friction force microscopy. After annealing the friction coefficient is found to have significantly increased. We attribute this effect to the increase of the mechanical stability of the oxide layer upon annealing.

  9. Investigation of structural transformations in surface layer of phosphate glasses incorporating radiactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aloj, A.S.; Kolycheva, T.I.; Trofimenko, A.V.; Shashukov, E.A.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of the paper was to clarify possibilities of detection of structural transformations initial stages on the surface of phosphate glasses using the method of infrared reflection spectroscopy. Phase composition of crystalline compounds formed in surface glass layer is determined by the method of X-ray diffraction. All experiments were performed using sodium alumophosphate glass comprising the model mixture of fission product of the following compostion (mass%): Na 2 O-22.0, Al 2 O 3 -14.0, P 2 O 5 -50.0, Fe 2 O 3 -3.5, Cs 2 O-3.5, SrO-3.0, Ln 2 O 3 -4.0, where Ln 2 O 3 is a mixture of cerium, lanthanum and europium oxides. Sample preparation were carried out by molten glass deposition on platinum forms 15mm in diameter and 4mm thick. Glasses were treated within the 600-400deg.C temperature range. Fixing of processes accompanied by structural transformations was accomplished the method of rapid cooling. It has been shown that phase transformations, taking place in investigated phosphate glasses under the action of heat, result in deterioration of chemical properties. Analysis of IR spectra has revealed that emergence of structural transformations in surface layer of investigated glasses results in variation of a ratio of 1060 and 1140cm - 1 reflection band intensities. Experimental dependences of the time of beginning of variation of 1060 and 1140cm - 1 bands relative intensity on temperature are presented. Insemilogarithmic coordinates this dependence has a straight line form within the 600-400 deg C temperature range and is desc ribed by the following formular: lg r=-7.41+5.70x10 3 x1/T, where r is the time of process beginning, h. Extrapolation of established to the region of low temperature is shown. Competence of such extrapolation may be confirmed in the course of further experiments

  10. A kinetic model for borosilicate glass dissolution based on the dissolution affinity of a surface alteration layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourcier, W.L.; Peiffer, D.W.; Knauss, K.G.; McKeegan, K.D.; Smith, D.K.

    1989-11-01

    A kinetic model for the dissolution of borosilicate glass is used to predict the dissolution rate of a nuclear waste glass. In the model, the glass dissolution rate is controlled by the rate of dissolution of an alkali-depleted amorphous surface (gel) layer. Our model predicts that all components concentrated in the surface layer, affect glass dissolution rates. The good agreement between predicted and observed elemental dissolution rates suggests that the dissolution rate of the gel layer limits the overall rate of glass dissolution. The model predicts that the long-term rate of glass dissolution will depend mainly on ion concentrations in solution, and therefore on the secondary phases which precipitate and control ion concentrations. 10 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  11. Toward an understanding of surface layer formation, growth, and transformation at the glass-fluid interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopf, J.; Eskelsen, J. R.; Chiu, M.; Ievlev, A. V.; Ovchinnikova, O. S.; Leonard, D.; Pierce, E. M.

    2018-05-01

    Silicate glass is a metastable and durable solid that has application to a number of energy and environmental challenges (e.g., microelectronics, fiber optics, and nuclear waste storage). If allowed to react with water over time silicate glass develops an altered layer at the solid-fluid interface. In this study, we used borosilicate glass (LAWB45) as a model material to develop a robust understanding of altered layer formation (i.e., amorphous hydrated surface layer and crystalline reaction products). Experiments were conducted at high surface area-to-volume ratio (∼200,000 m-1) and 90 °C in the pressurized unsaturated flow (PUF) apparatus for 1.5-years to facilitate the formation of thick altered layers and allow for the effluent solution chemistry to be monitored continuously. A variety of microscopy techniques were used to characterize reacted grains and suggest the average altered layer thickness is 13.2 ± 8.3 μm with the hydrated and clay layer representing 74.8% and 25.2% of the total altered layer, respectively. The estimate of hydrated layer thickness is within the experimental error of the value estimated from the B release rate data (∼10 ± 1 μm/yr) over the 1.5-year duration. PeakForce® quantitative nanomechanical mapping results suggest the hydrated layer has a modulus that ranges between ∼20 and 40 GPa, which is in the range of porous silica that contains from ∼20 to ∼50% porosity, yet significantly lower than dense silica (∼70-80 GPa). Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) images confirm the presence of pores and an analysis of a higher resolution image provides a qualitative estimate of ≥22% porosity in the hydrated layer with variations in void volume with increasing distance from the unaltered glass. Chemical composition analyses, based on a combination of time-of-flight secondary-ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS), scanning electron microscopy with X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and STEM-EDS, clearly show

  12. Experimental Study on Layered Ice Bonded Abrasive Polishing of Glass-ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuli SUN

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Layered ice bonded abrasive tools (LIBAT is a new kind of one which not only has the ability of lapping and polishing but also has the effect of self-dressing. In this paper, two kinds of layered ice bonded abrasive tools were designed and manufactured. Experimental studies on layered ice bonded abrasive (LIBA polishing of glass-ceramics were conducted. The results show that the surface topography of glass-ceramics polished by micro α-Al2O3-nano α-Al2O3 LIBAT is better than that of polished by micro α-Al2O3-nano SiO2 LIBAT. The surface roughness Sa of glass-ceramics polished by the two kinds of LIBAT is at the nanometer scale. The reasons of this phenomenon were analyzed. The experimental results illustrate that the LIBAT shows good effect and can be used in production practice. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.20.4.6149

  13. Optical characteristics of silicon nanowires grown from tin catalyst layers on silicon coated glass

    KAUST Repository

    Ball, Jeremy

    2012-08-20

    The optical characteristics of silicon nanowires grown on Si layers on glass have been modeled using the FDTD (Finite Difference Time Domain) technique and compared with experimental results. The wires were grown by the VLS (vapour-liquid-solid) method using Sn catalyst layers and exhibit a conical shape. The resulting measured and modeled absorption, reflectance and transmittance spectra have been investigated as a function of the thickness of the underlying Si layer and the initial catalyst layer, the latter having a strong influence on wire density. High levels of absorption (>90% in the visible wavelength range) and good agreement between the modeling and experiment have been observed when the nanowires have a relatively high density of ∼4 wires/μ m2. The experimental and modeled results diverge for samples with a lower density of wire growth. The results are discussed along with some implications for solar cell fabrication. © 2012 Optical Society of America.

  14. Optical characteristics of silicon nanowires grown from tin catalyst layers on silicon coated glass

    KAUST Repository

    Ball, Jeremy; Centeno, Anthony; Mendis, Budhika G.; Reehal, H. S.; Alford, Neil

    2012-01-01

    The optical characteristics of silicon nanowires grown on Si layers on glass have been modeled using the FDTD (Finite Difference Time Domain) technique and compared with experimental results. The wires were grown by the VLS (vapour-liquid-solid) method using Sn catalyst layers and exhibit a conical shape. The resulting measured and modeled absorption, reflectance and transmittance spectra have been investigated as a function of the thickness of the underlying Si layer and the initial catalyst layer, the latter having a strong influence on wire density. High levels of absorption (>90% in the visible wavelength range) and good agreement between the modeling and experiment have been observed when the nanowires have a relatively high density of ∼4 wires/μ m2. The experimental and modeled results diverge for samples with a lower density of wire growth. The results are discussed along with some implications for solar cell fabrication. © 2012 Optical Society of America.

  15. Microstructural and Wear Behavior Characterization of Porous Layers Produced by Pulsed Laser Irradiation in Glass-Ceramics Substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sola, Daniel; Conde, Ana; García, Iñaki; Gracia-Escosa, Elena; de Damborenea, Juan J; Peña, Jose I

    2013-09-09

    In this work, wear behavior and microstructural characterization of porous layers produced in glass-ceramic substrates by pulsed laser irradiation in the nanosecond range are studied under unidirectional sliding conditions against AISI316 and corundum counterbodies. Depending on the optical configuration of the laser beam and on the working parameters, the local temperature and pressure applied over the interaction zone can generate a porous glass-ceramic layer. Material transference from the ball to the porous glass-ceramic layer was observed in the wear tests carried out against the AISI316 ball counterface whereas, in the case of the corundum ball, the wear volume loss was concentrated in the porous layer. Wear rate and friction coefficient presented higher values than expected for dense glass-ceramics.

  16. Microstructural and Wear Behavior Characterization of Porous Layers Produced by Pulsed Laser Irradiation in Glass-Ceramics Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose I. Peña

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work, wear behavior and microstructural characterization of porous layers produced in glass-ceramic substrates by pulsed laser irradiation in the nanosecond range are studied under unidirectional sliding conditions against AISI316 and corundum counterbodies. Depending on the optical configuration of the laser beam and on the working parameters, the local temperature and pressure applied over the interaction zone can generate a porous glass-ceramic layer. Material transference from the ball to the porous glass-ceramic layer was observed in the wear tests carried out against the AISI316 ball counterface whereas, in the case of the corundum ball, the wear volume loss was concentrated in the porous layer. Wear rate and friction coefficient presented higher values than expected for dense glass-ceramics.

  17. Radioactive waste solidifying material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, Keiichi; Sakai, Etsuro.

    1989-01-01

    The solidifying material according to this invention comprises cement material, superfine powder, highly water reducing agent, Al-containing rapid curing material and coagulation controller. As the cement material, various kinds of quickly hardening, super quickly hardening and white portland cement, etc. are usually used. As the superfine powder, those having average grain size smaller by one order than that of the cement material are desirable and silica dusts, etc. by-produced upon preparing silicon, etc. are used. As the highly water reducing agent, surface active agents of high decomposing performance and comprising naphthalene sulfonate, etc. as the main ingredient are used. As the Al-containing rapidly curing material, calcium aluminate, etc. is used in an amount of less than 10 parts by weight based on 100 parts by weight of the powdery body. As the coagulation controller, boric acid etc. usually employed as a retarder is used. This can prevent dissolution or collaption of pellets and reduce the leaching of radioactive material. (T.M.)

  18. Radioactive liquid waste solidifying device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchiyama, Yoshio.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To eliminate the requirement for discharge gas processing and avoid powder clogging in a facility suitable to the volume-reducing solidification of regenerated liquid wastes containing sodium sulfate. Constitution: Liquid wastes supplied to a liquid waste preheater are heated under a pressure higher than the atmospheric pressure at a level below the saturation temperature for that pressure. The heated liquid wastes are sprayed from a spray nozzle from the inside of an evaporator into the super-heated state and subjected to flash distillation. They are further heated to deposit and solidify the solidification components in the solidifying evaporation steams. The solidified powder is fallen downwardly and heated for removing water content. The recovered powder is vibrated so as not to be solidified and then reclaimed in a solidification storage vessel. Steams after flash distillation are separated into gas, liquid and solids by buffles. (Horiuchi, T.)

  19. High-performance organic light-emitting diodes comprising ultrastable glass layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Viejo, Javier

    2018-01-01

    Organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) are one of the key solid-state light sources for various applications including small and large displays, automotive lighting, solid-state lighting, and signage. For any given commercial application, OLEDs need to perform at their best, which is judged by their device efficiency and operational stability. We present OLEDs that comprise functional layers fabricated as ultrastable glasses, which represent the thermodynamically most favorable and, thus, stable molecular conformation achievable nowadays in disordered solids. For both external quantum efficiencies and LT70 lifetimes, OLEDs with four different phosphorescent emitters show >15% enhancements over their respective reference devices. The only difference to the latter is the growth condition used for ultrastable glass layers that is optimal at about 85% of the materials’ glass transition temperature. These improvements are achieved through neither material refinements nor device architecture optimization, suggesting a general applicability of this concept to maximize the OLED performance, no matter which specific materials are used. PMID:29806029

  20. Changes in wetting and energetic properties of glass caused by deposition of different lipid layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golabek, Monika [Department of Physical Chemistry - Interfacial Phenomena, Faculty of Chemistry, Maria-Curie Sklodowska University, 20-031 Lublin (Poland); Holysz, Lucyna, E-mail: lucyna.holysz@poczta.umcs.lublin.pl [Department of Physical Chemistry - Interfacial Phenomena, Faculty of Chemistry, Maria-Curie Sklodowska University, 20-031 Lublin (Poland)

    2010-06-15

    An investigation of wetting and energetic properties of different lipid layers deposited on the glass surface was carried out by contact angles measurements and determination of the apparent surface free energy. The topography of the lipid layers was also determined with the help of atomic force microscopy (AFM). Two synthetic phospholipids were chosen for these studies, having the same phosphatidylcholine headgroup bound to the apolar part composed either by two saturated chains (1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospshocholine - DPPC) or two unsaturated chains (1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine - DOPC) and one lipid (1,2,3-trihexadecanoyl-sn-glycerol - tripalmitoylglycerol - TPG). The lipid layers, from the 1st to the 5th statistical monolayer, were deposited on the glass surface from chloroform solutions by spreading. The apparent surface free energy of the deposited layers was determined by contact angles measurements (advancing and receding) for three probe liquids (diiodomethane, water, and formamide), and then two concepts of interfacial interactions were applied. In the contact angle hysteresis approach (CAH) the apparent total surface free energy was calculated from the advancing and receding contact angles and surface tension of probe liquids. In the Lifshitz-van der Waals/acid-base approach (LWAB) the total surface free energy was calculated from the determined components of the energy, which were obtained from the advancing contact angles of the probe liquids only. Comparison of the results obtained by two approaches provided more information about the changes in the hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity of the layers depending on the number of monolayers and kind of the lipid deposited on the glass surface. It was found that the most visible changes in the surface free energy took place for the first two statistical monolayers irrespectively of the kind of the lipid used. Additionally, in all cases periodic oscillations from layer-to-layer in the lipid

  1. Glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyre, Jeppe

    2004-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the viscosity of most glassforming liquids is known to depart significantly from the classical Arrhenius behaviour of simple fluids. The discovery of an unexpected correlation between the extent of this departure and the Poisson ratio of the resulting glass could lead...... to new understanding of glass ageing and viscous liquid dynamics....

  2. Topography and surface free energy of DPPC layers deposited on a glass, mica, or PMMA support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurak, Malgorzata; Chibowski, Emil

    2006-08-15

    An investigation of energetic properties of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) layers deposited on glass, mica, and PMMA (poly(methyl methacrylate)) surfaces was carried out by means of contact angles measurements (advancing and receding) for three probe liquids (diiodomethane, water, and formamide). DPPC was deposited on the surfaces from water (on glass and mica) or methanol (on PMMA) solutions. The topography of the tested surfaces was determined with a help of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Using the measured contact angles, the total apparent surface free energy and its components of the studied layers were determined from van Oss et al.'s (Lifshitz-van der Waals and acid-base components, LWAB) and contact angle hysteresis (CAH) approaches. It allowed us to learn about changes in the surface free energy of the layers (hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity) depending on their number and kind of support. It was found that the changes in the energy greatly depended on the surface properties of the substrate as well as the statistical number of monolayers of DPPC. However, principal changes took place for first three monolayers.

  3. Gamma-ray mass attenuation coefficient and half value layer factor of some oxide glass shielding materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waly, El-Sayed A.; Fusco, Michael A.; Bourham, Mohamed A.

    2016-01-01

    The variation in dosimetric parameters such as mass attenuation coefficient, half value layer factor, exposure buildup factor, and the photon mean free path for different oxide glasses for the incident gamma energy range 0.015–15 MeV has been studied using MicroShield code. It has been inferred that the addition of PbO and Bi 2 O 3 improves the gamma ray shielding properties. Thus, the effect of chemical composition on these parameters is investigated in the form of six different glass compositions, which are compared with specialty concrete for nuclear radiation shielding. The composition termed ‘Glass 6’ in this paper has the highest mass attenuation and the smallest half value layer and may have potential applications in radiation shielding. An example dry storage cask utilizing an additional layer of Glass 6 as an intermediate shielding layer, simulated in MicroShield, is capable of reducing the exposure rate at the cask surface by over 20 orders of magnitude compared to the case without a glass layer. Based on this study, Glass 6 shows promise as a gamma-ray shielding material, particularly for dry cask storage.

  4. Formation of apatite layers on modified canasite glass-ceramics in simulated body fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, C A; Kokubo, T; Reaney, I M; Hatton, P V; James, P F

    2002-03-05

    Canasite glass-ceramics were modified by either increasing the concentration of calcium in the glass, or by the addition of P2O5. Samples of these novel materials were placed in simulated body fluid (SBF), along with a control material (commercial canasite), for periods ranging from 12 h to 28 days. After immersion, surface analysis was performed using thin film X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared reflection spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy dispersive X-ray detectors. The concentrations of sodium, potassium, calcium, silicon, and phosphorus in the SBF solution were measured using inductively coupled plasma emission spectroscopy. No apatite was detected on the surface of commercial canasite, even after 28 days of immersion in SBF. A crystalline apatite layer was formed on the surface of a P2O5-containing canasite after 5 days, and after 3 days for calcium-enriched canasite. Ion release data suggested that the mechanism for apatite deposition was different for P2O5 and non-P2O5-containing glass-ceramics. Copyright 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  5. Study on the formation of heterogeneous structures in leached layers during the corrosion process of glass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willemien Anaf

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Le verre, corrodé dans des conditions naturelles, montre souvent des hétérogénéités dans la couche lixiviée, comme une structure lamellaire ou des inclusions de MnO2 ou Ca3(PO42. La formation de ces hétérogénéités n’est pas encore bien comprise. Des structures de ce type ont été produites artificiellement en laboratoire en immergeant des échantillons de verre dans des solutions riches en métaux. Les résultats expérimentaux ont été comparés avec des théories décrivant la corrosion du verre.Glass that corrodes under natural conditions often shows heterogeneities in the leached layer, such as a lamellar structure or inclusions of MnO2 or Ca3(PO42. The formation of these heterogeneities is still not well understood. By means of experiments under laboratory conditions, our aim was to artificially generate specific structures. Therefore, glass samples were immersed in metal-rich solutions. The experimental results were compared with theories describing glass corrosion from a molecular point of view.

  6. Method of solidifying radioactive liquid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uetake, Naoto; Kawamura, Fumio; Kikuchi, Makoto; Fukazawa, Tetsuo.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To enable to confine the volatiling ingredients such as cesium in liquid wastes safely in glass solidification products while suppressing the volatilization thereof. Method: Acid salt of tetravalent metal such as titanium phosphate has an intense selective adsorption property to cesium. So liquid wastes stored in a high level liquid wastes tank is mixed with titanium phosphate gels stored in an adsorbent tank, then supplied to a mixer and mixed with a sodium silicate solution stored in a sodium silicate storage tank and boric acid stored in an additive tank, into gel-like state. The gel-like material thus formed is supplied to a drier. After being dried at a temperature of 200sup(o)C - 300sup(o)C, the material is melted under heating at a temperature of 1000sup(o)C - 1100sup(o)C, and then cooled to solidify. (Horiuchi, T.)

  7. A Two-Stage Layered Mixture Experiment Design for a Nuclear Waste Glass Application-Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooley, Scott K.; Piepel, Gregory F.; Gan, Hao; Kot, Wing; Pegg, Ian L.

    2003-01-01

    A layered experimental design involving mixture variables was generated to support developing property-composition models for high-level waste (HLW) glasses. The design was generated in two stages, each having unique characteristics. Each stage used a layered design having an outer layer, an inner layer, a center point, and some replicates. The layers were defined by single- and multi-variable constraints. The first stage involved 15 glass components treated as mixture variables. For each layer, vertices were generated and optimal design software was used to select alternative subsets of vertices and calculate design optimality measures. Two partial quadratic mixture models, containing 25 terms for the outer layer and 30 terms for the inner layer, were the basis for the optimal design calculations. Distributions of predicted glass property values were plotted and evaluated for the alternative subsets of vertices. Based on the optimality measures and the predicted property distributions, a ''best'' subset of vertices was selected for each layer to form a layered design for the first stage. The design for the second stage was selected to augment the first-stage design. The discussion of the second-stage design begins in this Part 1 and is continued in Part 2 (Cooley and Piepel, 2003b)

  8. Solidified package-storage device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takakura, Masahide

    1998-01-01

    Vitrification products such as high level radioactive liquid wastes are contained in a solidification package. A containing tube for vertically containing the solidification packages in multi-stages is disposed such that it passes through a ceiling slab. A shielding plug for preventing leakage of radiation from the solidification packages is fitted to an upper opening thereof. A lid of the containing tube is fitted above the plug. The lid is a carbon steel plate having a thickness of 10cm or more. A heat insulation layer comprising glass wool or rock wool is formed on the lower surface of the ceiling slab. A radiation shielding layer comprising such as an iron plate is formed on the lower surface of the heat insulation layer. Then, deterioration of the ceiling slug by heat can be prevented by the heat insulation layer even if high temperature cooling air flown from the upper opening of a ventilation tube should reach the lower surface of the ceiling slab. (I.N.)

  9. Electrochemical study of the tarnish layer of silver deposited on glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amor, Y. Ben; Sutter, E.; Takenouti, H.; Tribollet, B.; Boinet, M.; Faure, R.; Balencie, J.; Durieu, G.

    2014-01-01

    Cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were used to characterize the tarnished thin layer of silver deposited on glass. Instead of natural tarnishing in air environment, an acceleration of tarnishing process was realized by immersion of Ag covered glass in 10 μM K 2 S medium. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) shows that tarnishing product formed on the silver surface consisted of Ag 2 S and Ag 2 O. As electrochemical characterization, the measurements were carried out in aerated 0.5 M Na 2 SO 4 solution adjusted at pH 10. The impedance spectra collected in sulphate medium at the open-circuit potential show one capacitive loop in parallel with a high resistance, which reflects a blocking electrode behaviour. However, the equivalent electrical circuit, R s -(CPE//R) is insufficient to reproduce the experimental results correctly. To minimize the dispersion between the experimental and fitted data, the CPE contribution is replaced by two normal power-law distributions of the local resistivity to interpret the tarnishing process in K 2 S medium with respect to the immersion time. These distributions are associated with the Ag 2 S and Ag 2 O layers

  10. Study on dissolution behavior of molten solidified waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizuno, Tsuyoshi; Maeda, Toshikatsu

    2005-01-01

    Radioactive molten solidified waste (slag) has been generated by melting non-metallic low-level radioactive wastes (LLW). Slag is expected to immobilize radionuclides in the waste repository. The chemical durability of slag is an important factor for the safety assessment of the disposal in that the durability provides the source term in the assessment. Since a chemical characteristic of slag is similar to that of glass, the general information on the chemical durability of slag might be provided from previous studies on nuclear waste glass. We have investigated effects of chemical compositions of slag and alkaline environments of repository on the chemical durability of slag. (author)

  11. Solidifier effectiveness : variation due to oil composition, oil thickness and temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fieldhouse, B.; Fingas, M.

    2009-01-01

    This paper provided an overview of solidifier types and composition. Solidifiers are a class of spill treating agents that offer an effective means to convert a liquid oil into a solid material. They are used as a treatment option for oil spills on water. This paper also reported on recent laboratory studies that consist of 4 components: (1) a qualitative examination of the characteristics of the interaction of a broad range of solidifier products with a standard oil to evaluate reaction rate, states of solidification, and the impact of dosage, (2) a comparison of a smaller subset of solidifiers on the standard oil at lower temperatures, (3) solidifier treatment on a range of oils of varying physical properties and composition to assess the potential scope of application, and (4) the treatment of a series of small-scale oil layers of varying thickness to determine the significance of oil thickness on solidifier effectiveness and recovery. This paper also reviewed solidifier chemistry with particular reference to polymer sorbents; cross-linking agents; and cross-linking agents and polymeric sorbents combined. Toxicity is also an important issue regarding solidifiers. The aquatic toxicity of solidifiers is low and not measurable as the products are not water-soluble. There have not been any studies on the effects of the solidifier or the treated oil on surface feeders and shoreline wildlife that may come into contact with the products. It was concluded that oil composition may play a major role in solidifier effectiveness. The effectiveness of solidifiers is also inhibited at reduced temperatures, increased viscosity and density of the oil. 25 refs., 5 tabs., 2 figs., 1 appendix

  12. Method of solidifying radioactive waste by plastics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasumura, Keijiro; Tomita, Toshihide.

    1976-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent leakage of radioactivity by providing corrosion-resistant layer on the inner surface of a waste container for radioactive waste. Constitution: The inner periphery and bottom of a drum can is lined with an non-flammable cloth of such material as asbestos. This drum is filled with a radioactive waste in the form of powder or pellets. Then, a mixture of a liquid plastic monomer and a polymerization starting agent is poured at a normal temperature, and the surface is covered with a non-flammable cloth. The plastic monomer and radioactive waste are permitted to impregnate the non-flammable cloth and are solidified there. Thus, even if the drum can is corroded at the sea bottom after disposal it in the ocean, it is possible to prevent the waste from permeating into the outer sea water because of the presence of the plastic layer on the inside. Styrene is used as the monomer. (Aizawa, K.)

  13. Magnetic properties of Pr-Fe-B thick-film magnets deposited on Si substrates with glass buffer layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, M.; Kurosaki, A.; Kondo, H.; Shimizu, D.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamashita, A.; Yanai, T.; Fukunaga, H.

    2018-05-01

    In order to improve the magnetic properties of PLD-made Pr-Fe-B thick-film magnets deposited on Si substrates, an adoption of a glass buffer layer was carried out. The glass layer could be fabricated under the deposition rate of approximately 70 μm/h on a Si substrate using a Nd-YAG pulse laser in the vacuum atmosphere. The use of the layer enabled us to reduce the Pr content without a mechanical destruction and enhance (BH)max value by approximately 20 kJ/m3 compared with the average value of non-buffer layered Pr-Fe-B films with almost the same thickness. It is also considered that the layer is also effective to apply a micro magnetization to the films deposited on Si ones.

  14. Wettability of modified silica layers deposited on glass support activated by plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terpiłowski, Konrad, E-mail: terpil@umcs.pl [Department of Physical Chemistry – Interfacial Phenomena, Faculty of Chemistry, Maria Curie-Sklodowska University, Lublin (Poland); Rymuszka, Diana [Department of Physical Chemistry – Interfacial Phenomena, Faculty of Chemistry, Maria Curie-Sklodowska University, Lublin (Poland); Goncharuk, Olena V.; Sulym, Iryna Ya.; Gun’ko, Vladimir M. [Chuiko Institute of Surface Chemistry, National Academy of Science of Ukraine, Kiev (Ukraine)

    2015-10-30

    Highlights: • New modified silica materials synthesis. • Support surface plasma activation. • Apparent surface free energy determination. • Equilibrium contact angle calculation. - Abstract: Fumed silica modified by hexamethyldisilazane [HDMS] and polydimethylsiloxane [PDMS] was dispersed in a polystyrene/chloroform solution. To increase adhesion between deposited silica layers and a glass surface, the latter was pretreated with air plasma for 30 s. The silica/polystyrene dispersion was deposited on the glass support using a spin coater. After deposition, the plates were dried in a desiccator for 24 h. Water advancing and receding contact angles were measured using the tilted plate method. The apparent surface free energy (γ{sub S}) was evaluated using the contact angle hysteresis approach. The surface topography was determined using the optical profilometry method. Contact angles changed from 59.7° ± 4.4 (at surface coverage with trimethylsilyl groups Θ = 0.14) to 155° ± 3.1 at Θ = 1. The value of γ{sub S} decreased from 51.3 ± 2.8 mJ/m{sup 2} (for the sample at the lowest value of Θ) to 1.0 ± 0.4 mJ/m{sup 2} for the most hydrophobic sample. Thus, some systems with a high degree of modification by HDMS showed superhydrophobicity, and the sliding angle amounted to about 16° ± 2.1.

  15. Operation of microstrip gas chambers manufactured on glass coated with high resistivity diamond-like layers

    CERN Document Server

    Boimska, B; Dominik, Wojciech; Hoch, M; Million, Gilbert; Ropelewski, Leszek; Sauli, Fabio; Sharma, A

    1997-01-01

    We describe recent observations and measurements realized with micro-strip gas chambers (MSGCs) manufactured on boro-silicate glass coated with a thin layer of diamond-like carbon (DLC) having a surface resistivity around 4.10$^{16}\\Omega/\\Box$. The role of the back-pla electrode configuration and potential in the detector performance has been studied. Even for this very high resistivity of the coatings, MSGCs operate differently from those manufactured on bare boro-silicate glass; the charge gain increases with the radiation flux for counting rates above 103 Hz/mm2, reaching a value 60% higher for 105 Hz/mm2. This behavior does not depend on the presence and potential of the back plane electrode; however, both maximum gain and rate capability are influenced by the drift field. From this study, compared with measurements realized previously with other detectors, we deduce that for stable high rate operation of MSGCs the resistivity of the coating should not exceed ~10$^{15}\\Omega/\\Box$.

  16. An enriched finite element model with q-refinement for radiative boundary layers in glass cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohamed, M. Shadi [Institute for Infrastructure and Environment, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh EH14 4AS (United Kingdom); Seaid, Mohammed; Trevelyan, Jon [School of Engineering and Computing Sciences, University of Durham, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Laghrouche, Omar [Institute for Infrastructure and Environment, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh EH14 4AS (United Kingdom)

    2014-02-01

    Radiative cooling in glass manufacturing is simulated using the partition of unity finite element method. The governing equations consist of a semi-linear transient heat equation for the temperature field and a stationary simplified P{sub 1} approximation for the radiation in non-grey semitransparent media. To integrate the coupled equations in time we consider a linearly implicit scheme in the finite element framework. A class of hyperbolic enrichment functions is proposed to resolve boundary layers near the enclosure walls. Using an industrial electromagnetic spectrum, the proposed method shows an immense reduction in the number of degrees of freedom required to achieve a certain accuracy compared to the conventional h-version finite element method. Furthermore the method shows a stable behaviour in treating the boundary layers which is shown by studying the solution close to the domain boundaries. The time integration choice is essential to implement a q-refinement procedure introduced in the current study. The enrichment is refined with respect to the steepness of the solution gradient near the domain boundary in the first few time steps and is shown to lead to a further significant reduction on top of what is already achieved with the enrichment. The performance of the proposed method is analysed for glass annealing in two enclosures where the simplified P{sub 1} approximation solution with the partition of unity method, the conventional finite element method and the finite difference method are compared to each other and to the full radiative heat transfer as well as the canonical Rosseland model.

  17. In situ study of glasses decomposition layer; Etude in situ de la couche d`alteration de verres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zarembowitch-Deruelle, O

    1997-10-21

    The aim of this work is to understand the involved mechanisms during the decomposition of glasses by water and the consequences on the morphology of the decomposition layer, in particular in the case of a nuclear glass: the R{sub 7} T{sub 7}. The chemical composition of this glass being very complicated, it is difficult to know the influence of the different elements on the decomposition kinetics and on the resulting morphology because several atoms have a same behaviour. Glasses with simplified composition (only 5 elements) have then been synthesized. The morphological and structural characteristics of these glasses have been given. They have then been decomposed by water. The leaching curves do not reflect the decomposition kinetics but the solubility of the different elements at every moment. The three steps of the leaching are: 1) de-alkalinization 2) lattice rearrangement 3) heavy elements solubilization. Two decomposition layer types have also been revealed according to the glass heavy elements rate. (O.M.) 59 refs.

  18. Method of solidifying radioactive laundry wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasumura, Keijiro

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To enable to solidify radioactive laundry wastes containing non-ionic liquid detergents less solidifiable by plastic solidification process in liquid laundry wastes for cloths or the likes discharged from a nuclear power plant. Method: Radioactive laundry wastes are solidified by using plastic solidifying agent comprising, as a main ingredient, unsaturated polyester resins and methylmethacrylate monomers. The plastic solidifying agents usable herein include, for example, unsaturated polyester resins prepared by condensating maleic anhydride and phthalic anhydride with propylene glycol and incorporated with methylmethacrylate monomers. The mixing ratio of the methylmethacrylate monomers is preferably 30 % by weight based on the unsaturated polyester resins. (Aizawa, K.)

  19. Effect of barrier layers on the properties of indium tin oxide thin films on soda lime glass substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jung-Min; Choi, Byung-Hyun; Ji, Mi-Jung; An, Yong-Tae; Park, Jung-Ho; Kwon, Jae-Hong; Ju, Byeong-Kwon

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, the electrical, structural and optical properties of indium tin oxide (ITO) films deposited on soda lime glass (SLG) haven been investigated, along with high strain point glass (HSPG) substrate, through radio frequency magnetron sputtering using a ceramic target (In 2 O 3 :SnO 2 , 90:10 wt.%). The ITO films deposited on the SLG show a high electrical resistivity and structural defects compared with those deposited on HSPG due to the Na ions from the SLG diffusing to the ITO film by annealing. However, these properties can be improved by intercalating a barrier layer of SiO 2 or Al 2 O 3 between the ITO film and the SLG substrate. SIMS analysis has confirmed that the barrier layer inhibits the Na ion's diffusion from the SLG. In particular, the ITO films deposited on the Al 2 O 3 barrier layer, show better properties than those deposited on the SiO 2 barrier layer.

  20. Method of solidifying radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukazawa, Tetsuo; Ootsuka, Masaharu; Uetake, Naoto; Ozawa, Yoshihiro.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To prepare radioactive solidified wastes excellent in strength, heat resistance, weather-proof, water resistance, dampproof and low-leaching property. Method: A hardening material reactive with alkali silicates to form less soluble salts is used as a hardener for alkali silicates which are solidification filler for the radioactive wastes, and mixed with cement as a water absorbent and water to solidify the radioactive wastes. The hardening agent includes, for example, CaCO 3 , Ca(ClO 4 ) 2 , CaSiF 6 and CaSiO 3 . Further, in order to reduce the water content in the wastes and reduce the gap ratio in the solidification products, the hardener adding rate, cement adding rate and water content are selected adequately. As the result, solidification products can be prepared with no deposition of easily soluble salts to the surface thereof, with extremely low leaching of radioactive nucleides. (Kamimura, M.)

  1. Experimental Study of Weepage in Multi-layer Glass Reinforced Piping

    KAUST Repository

    Al Sinan, Hussain

    2014-05-01

    Glass Reinforced Polymer pipes, commonly used in water transport applications, are prone to long term weepage. Weepage is defined as the transfer of fluid through the pipe and is considered a functional failure. An experimental investigation of weepage in multi-layered GRP pipes was carried out in two parts aiming to understand the phenomenon to help enhance the weepage resistance of manufactured pipes. First, liner surface profilometry investigation was carried out to identify microscopic features that might serve in initiating weepage. Second, MRI and x-ray tomography and SEM imaging of pipe samples aged with water and dye penetrant was carried out to capture weepage development through the pipe thickness. Diffusion through liner fiber/resin interface, propagation in the direction of poorly wetted hoop fibers and transverse cracks were found to be the likely causes of accelerating weepage in the samples. Fiber rich zones in the liner were considered weak spots that water can use for fast penetration of the liner. Finally, polyester netting used to hold core layer was found to help in water accumulation and transport through the pipe increasing the chances of failure.

  2. Experimental Study of Weepage in Multi-layer Glass Reinforced Piping

    KAUST Repository

    Al Sinan, Hussain

    2014-01-01

    Glass Reinforced Polymer pipes, commonly used in water transport applications, are prone to long term weepage. Weepage is defined as the transfer of fluid through the pipe and is considered a functional failure. An experimental investigation of weepage in multi-layered GRP pipes was carried out in two parts aiming to understand the phenomenon to help enhance the weepage resistance of manufactured pipes. First, liner surface profilometry investigation was carried out to identify microscopic features that might serve in initiating weepage. Second, MRI and x-ray tomography and SEM imaging of pipe samples aged with water and dye penetrant was carried out to capture weepage development through the pipe thickness. Diffusion through liner fiber/resin interface, propagation in the direction of poorly wetted hoop fibers and transverse cracks were found to be the likely causes of accelerating weepage in the samples. Fiber rich zones in the liner were considered weak spots that water can use for fast penetration of the liner. Finally, polyester netting used to hold core layer was found to help in water accumulation and transport through the pipe increasing the chances of failure.

  3. Production and properties of solidified high-level waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodersen, K.

    1980-08-01

    Available information on production and properties of solidified high-level waste are presented. The review includes literature up to the end of 1979. The feasibility of production of various types of solidified high-level wast is investigated. The main emphasis is on borosilicate glass but other options are also mentioned. The expected long-term behaviour of the materials are discussed on the basis of available results from laboratory experiments. Examples of the use of the information in safety analysis of disposal in salt formations are given. The work has been made on behalf of the Danish utilities investigation of the possibilities of disposal of high-level waste in salt domes in Jutland. (author)

  4. Method of solidifying powderous wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakimoto, Akira; Miyake, Takashi; Sato, Shuichi; Inagaki, Yuzo.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the properties of solidification products, in the case of solidifying powderous wastes with thermosetting resins. Method. A solvent for the solution of the thermosetting resin is admixed with the powderous wastes into a paste-like form prior to adding the resin to the wastes, which are then mixed with the resin solution. As the result, those solidification products having the specific gravity and the compression strength more excellent than those of the conventional ones, and much higher than the reference values can be obtained. (Kamimura, M.)

  5. A Two-Stage Layered Mixture Experiment Design for a Nuclear Waste Glass Application-Part 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooley, Scott K.; Piepel, Gregory F.; Gan, Hao; Kot, Wing; Pegg, Ian L.

    2003-01-01

    Part 1 (Cooley and Piepel, 2003a) describes the first stage of a two-stage experimental design to support property-composition modeling for high-level waste (HLW) glass to be produced at the Hanford Site in Washington state. Each stage used a layered design having an outer layer, an inner layer, a center point, and some replicates. However, the design variables and constraints defining the layers of the experimental glass composition region (EGCR) were defined differently for the second stage than for the first. The first-stage initial design involved 15 components, all treated as mixture variables. The second-stage augmentation design involved 19 components, with 14 treated as mixture variables and 5 treated as non-mixture variables. For each second-stage layer, vertices were generated and optimal design software was used to select alternative subsets of vertices for the design and calculate design optimality measures. A model containing 29 partial quadratic mixture terms plus 5 linear terms for the non-mixture variables was the basis for the optimal design calculations. Predicted property values were plotted for the alternative subsets of second-stage vertices and the first-stage design points. Based on the optimality measures and the predicted property distributions, a ''best'' subset of vertices was selected for each layer of the second-stage to augment the first-stage design

  6. Effects of Cr-N-ZrO 2 seed layer formed on glass substrates for longitudinal recording media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Djayaprawira, David D.; Takahashi, Yoshio; Ishikawa, Akira; Ono, Toshinori; Yahisa, Yotsuo

    1999-03-01

    Effects of Cr-N-ZrO 2 seed layer deposited on glass substrates before the deposition of C/Co-Cr-Pt/Cr-Ti layers for longitudinal recording media have been investigated. The product of v and Is, the activation volume and the saturation magnetization per unit volume, media noise Nd and S0/ Nd, which is the half value of peak-to-peak output voltage of an isolated pulse over Nd at 11.8 kFC/mm, are evaluated. We find that vIs is decreased by adding N and ZrO 2 to Cr seed layer. Nd is reduced as vIs decreases by adding nitrogen to the Cr seed layer. This is mainly due to the decreased grain sizes of both Cr-Ti underlayer and Co-Cr-Pt magnetic layer. The Nd is further reduced by the addition of ZrO 2 to the Cr-N seed layer. Highest S0/ Nd is achieved for the media with Cr-N-ZrO 2 seed layer. On the other hand, the media with Cr-ZrO 2 seed layer deposited without nitrogen show the higher Nd. Therefore the decrease of the grain size by addition of nitrogen into Ar is essential to reduce Nd, and the ZrO 2 addition to the Cr-N seed layer seems to enhance the effect of grain size reduction by nitrogen addition.

  7. Experimental study of a depth-encoding PET detector inserting horizontal-striped glass between crystal layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, J.; Kim, K. B.; Choi, Y.; Kang, J.

    2018-04-01

    A depth-encoding positron emission tomography (PET) detector inserting a horizontal-striped glass between pixilated scintillation crystal layers was developed and experimentally evaluated. The detector consists of 2-layers of 4×4 LYSO array arranged with a 3.37 mm pitch. Horizontal-striped glasses with 1×4 array with different thickness of 3, 4 and 5 mm were inserted between top- and bottom-crystal layers. Bottom surface of bottom-layer was optically coupled to a 4×4 GAPD array. Sixteen output signals from DOI-PET detector were multiplexed by modified resistive charge division (RCD) networks and multiplexed signals were fed into custom-made charge-sensitive preamplifiers. The four amplified signals were digitized and recorded by the custom-made DAQ system based on FPGA. The four digitized outputs were post-processed and converted to flood histograms for each interaction event. Experimental results revealed that all crystal pixels were clearly identified on the 2D flood histogram without overlapping. Patterns of the 2D flood histogram were constituted with arrangements of [bottom–top–bottom–top–\\ldots–top–bottom–top–bottom] crystal responses in X-direction. These could be achieved by employing horizontal-striped glass that controlled the extent of light dispersion towards the X-direction in crystal layers for generation of a different position mapping for each layer and the modified RCD network that controls degree of charge sharing in readout electronics for reduction of identification error. This study demonstrated the proposed DOI-PET detector can extract the 3D γ-ray interaction position without considerable performance degradation of PET detector from the 2D flood histogram.

  8. Few-Layer MoS2-Organic Thin-Film Hybrid Complementary Inverter Pixel Fabricated on a Glass Substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hee Sung; Shin, Jae Min; Jeon, Pyo Jin; Lee, Junyeong; Kim, Jin Sung; Hwang, Hyun Chul; Park, Eunyoung; Yoon, Woojin; Ju, Sang-Yong; Im, Seongil

    2015-05-13

    Few-layer MoS2-organic thin-film hybrid complementary inverters demonstrate a great deal of device performance with a decent voltage gain of ≈12, a few hundred pW power consumption, and 480 Hz switching speed. As fabricated on glass, this hybrid CMOS inverter operates as a light-detecting pixel as well, using a thin MoS2 channel. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Natural and gamma radiation-induced conduction of silica and metaphosphate glass layers deposed by radiofrequency cathode sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serra, Andre

    1977-01-01

    We present a study of natural and 60 Co induced conductions in radiofrequency sputtering deposed layers. Capacimetry and electronic microscopy observations permit a knowledge of the physical characteristics, mainly: homogeneity and thickness of these layers. A study of the natural current permit to characterise electrically the deposited films, the electrode and bulk insulator effects. In induced conduction, the behaviour of currents as a function of dose rate is interpreted in terms of ROSE'S and FOWLER'S photoconductivity theories. Induced currents versus applied fields are observed and compared with these obtained in the case of dielectric liquids and glasses. (author) [fr

  10. Comparison of the layer structure of vapor phase and leached SRL glass by use of AEM [analytical electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biwer, B.M.; Bates, J.K.; Abrajano, T.A. Jr.; Bradley, J.P.

    1989-01-01

    Test samples of 131 type glass that have been reacted for extended time periods in water vapor atmospheres of different relative humidities and in static leaching solution have been examined to characterize the reaction products. Analytical electron microscopy (AEM) was used to characterize the leached samples, and a complicated layer structure was revealed, consisting of phases that precipitate from solution and also form within the residual glass layer. The precipitated phases include birnes-site, saponite, and an iron species, while the intralayer phases include the U-Ti containing phase brannerite distributed within a matrix consisting of bands of an Fe rich montmorillonite clay. Comparison is made between samples leached at 40 degrees C for 4 years with those leached at 90 degrees C for 3-1/2 years. The samples reacted in water vapor were examined with scanning electron microscopy and show increasing reaction as both the relative humidity and time of reaction increases. These samples also contain a layered structure with reaction products on the glass surface. 15 refs., 5 figs

  11. Solidifying processing device for radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sueto, Kumiko; Toyohara, Naomi; Tomita, Toshihide; Sato, Tatsuaki

    1990-01-01

    The present invention concerns a solidifying device for radioactive wastes. Solidifying materials and mixing water are mixed by a mixer and then charged as solidifying and filling materials to a wastes processing container containing wastes. Then, cleaning water is sent from a cleaning water hopper to a mixer to remove the solidifying and filling materials deposited in the mixer. The cleaning liquid wastes are sent to a separator to separate aggregate components from cleaning water components. Then, the cleaning water components are sent to the cleaning water hopper and then mixed with dispersing materials and water, to be used again as the mixing water upon next solidifying operation. On the other hand, the aggregate components are sent to a processing mechanism as radioactive wastes. With such procedures, since the discharged wastes are only composed of the aggregates components, and the amount of the wastes are reduced, facilities and labors for the processing of cleaning liquid wastes can be decreased. (I.N.)

  12. Characterization of glass and glass ceramic nuclear waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutze, W.; Borchardt, J.; De, A.K.

    1979-01-01

    Characteristics of solidified nuclear waste forms, glass and glass ceramic compositions and the properties (composition, thermal stability, crystallization, phase behavior, chemical stability, mechanical stability, and radiation effects) of glasses and glass ceramics are discussed. The preparation of glass ceramics may be an optional step for proposed vitrification plants if tailored glasses are used. Glass ceramics exhibit some improved properties with respect to glasses. The overall leach resistance is similar to that of glasses. An increased leach resistance may become effective for single radionuclides being hosted in highly insoluble crystal phases mainly when higher melting temperatures are applicable in order to get more leach resistant residual glass phases. The development of glass ceramic is going on. The technological feasibility is still to be demonstrated. The potential gain of stability when using glass ceramics qualifies the material as an alternative nuclear waste form

  13. Method of solidifying radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Akira; Mihara, Shigeru; Yamashita, Koji; Sauda, Kenzo.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To obtain satisfactory plastic solidification products rapidly and more conveniently from radioactive wastes. Method: liquid wastes contain, in addition to sodium sulfate as the main ingredient, nitrates hindering the polymerizing curing reactions and various other unknown ingredients, while spent resins contain residual cationic exchange groups hindering the polymerizing reaction. Generally, as the acid value of unsaturated liquid polyester resins is lower, the number of terminal alkyd resins is small, formation of nitrates is reduced and the polymerizing curing reaction is taken place more smoothly. In view of the above, radioactive wastes obtained by dry powderization or dehydration of radioactive liquid wastes or spent resins are polymerized with unsaturated liquid polyester resins with the acid value of less than 13 to obtain plastic solidification. Thus, if the radioactive wastes contain a great amount of polymerization hindering material such as NaNO 2 , they can be solidified rapidly and conveniently with no requirement for pre-treatment. (Kamimura, Y.)

  14. Method of solidifying radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Masahiko; Kira, Satoshi; Watanabe, Naotoshi; Nagaoka, Takeshi; Akane, Junta.

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To obtain solidification products of radioactive wastes having sufficient monoaxial compression strength and excellent in water durability upon ocean disposal of the wastes. Method: Solidification products having sufficient strength and filled with a great amount of radioactive wastes are obtained by filling and solidifying 100 parts by weight of chlorinated polyethylene resin and 100 - 500 parts by weight of particular or powderous spent ion exchange resin as radioactive wastes. The chlorinated polyethylene resin preferably used herein is prepared by chlorinating powderous or particulate polyethylene resin in an aqueous suspending medium or by chlorinating polyethylene resin dissolved in an organic solvent capable of dissolving the polyethylene resin, and it is crystalline or non-crystalline chlorinated polyethylene resin comprising 20 - 50% by weight of chlorine, non-crystalline resin with 25 - 40% by weight of chlorine being particularly preferred. (Horiuchi, T.)

  15. Microstructure of rapidly solidified materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, H.

    1984-07-01

    The basic features of rapidly solidified microstructures are described and differences arising from alternative processing strategies are discussed. The possibility of achieving substantial undercooling prior to solidification in processes such as quench atomization and chill block melt spinning can give rise to striking microstructural transitions even when external heat extraction is nominally Newtonian. The increased opportunity in laser and electron beam surface melting for epitaxial growth on the parent solid at an accelerating rate, however, does not exclude the formation of nonequilibrium phases since the required undercooling can be locally attained at the solidification front which is itself advancing at a sufficiently high velocity. The effects of fluid flow indicated particularly in melt spinning and surface melting are additional to the transformational and heat flow considerations that form the present basis for interpretation of such microstructural effects.

  16. Sulfur Solubility Testing and Characterization of Hanford LAW Phase 2, Inner Layer Matrix Glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Edwards, T. B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Caldwell, M. E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Riley, W. T. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-11-27

    In this report, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) provides chemical analyses and Product Consistency Test (PCT) results for a series of simulated low activity waste (LAW) glass compositions. A procedure developed at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for producing sulfur saturated melts (SSMs) was carried out at both SRNL and PNNL to fabricate the glasses characterized in this report. This method includes triplicate melting steps with excess sodium sulfate, followed by grinding and washing to remove unincorporated sulfur salts. The wash solutions were also analyzed as part of this study. These data will be used in the development of improved sulfur solubility models for LAW glass.

  17. Characterization of surface layers formed under natural environmental conditions on medieval glass from Siponto (Southern Italy)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genga, Alessandra; Siciliano, Maria; Fama, Lia; Filippo, Emanuela; Siciliano, Tiziana; Mangone, Annarosa; Traini, Angela; Laganara, Caterina

    2008-01-01

    In this paper a low-vacuum scanning electron microscope (SEM) coupled with an energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDX) was used to investigate the alteration processes that occur on silica-soda-lime glass exposed to soil materials and dated from XI to second half of XIII sec. The chemical data were collected for altered glass gel and fresh glass. In order to study the influence of chemical composition on weathering process, 16 glasses have been selected on the basis of the chemical characterization and on the basis of the different corrosion processes present on the fragments. Six selected samples had been produced with the use of natron as fluxer and 10 samples with the use of plant ash as fluxer. The analysed pieces come from Siponto excavations (Foggia, Italy) and they include feet and rims of chalices, fragments of lamps and of globular bottles

  18. Simulation study of a depth-encoding positron emission tomography detector inserting horizontal-striped glass between crystal layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyu Bom; Choi, Yong; Kang, Jihoon

    2017-10-01

    This study introduces a depth-encoding positron emission tomography (PET) detector inserting a horizontal-striped glass between the pixilated scintillation crystal layers. This design allows light spreading so that scintillation photons can travel only through the X direction and allows alteration in the light distribution so that it can generate a unique pattern diagram of the two-dimensional (2-D) flood histogram that identifies depth position as well as X-Y position of γ-ray interaction. A Monte Carlo simulation was conducted for the assessment of the depth of interaction (DOI)-PET detector. The traced light distribution for each event was converted into the 2-D flood histogram. Light loss caused by inserting the horizontal-striped glass between the crystal layers was estimated. Applicable weighting factors were examined for each DOI-PET detector. No considerable degradation of light loss was observed. The flood histogram, without overlapping of each crystal position, can be generated for the DOI detector based on each crystal block by inserting the horizontal-striped glass with a thickness of >1 mm and the modified resistive charge division networks with applicable weighting factors. This study demonstrated that the proposed DOI-PET detector can extract the three-dimensional γ-ray interaction position without considerable performance degradations of the PET detector from the 2-D flood histogram.

  19. Method of solidifying radioactive solid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukazawa, Tetsuo; Kawamura, Fumio; Kikuchi, Makoto.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To obtain solidification products of radioactive wastes satisfactorily and safely with no destruction even under a high pressure atmosphere by preventing the stress concentration by considering the relationships of the elastic module between the solidifying material and radioactive solid wastes. Method: Solidification products of radioactive wastes with safety and securing an aimed safety ratio are produced by conditioning the modules of elasticity of the solidifying material equal to or less than that of the radioactive wastes in a case where the elastic module of radioactive solid wastes to be solidified is smaller than that of the solidifying material (the elastic module of wastes having the minimum elastic module among various wastes). The method of decreasing the elastic module of the solidifying material usable herein includes the use of such a resin having a long distance between cross-linking points of a polymer in the case of plastic solidifying materials, and addition of rubber-like binders in the case of cement or like other inorganic solidifying materials. (Yoshihara, H.)

  20. The applicability of the vortex glass model in the layered superconductor Cu0.03TaS2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Junchao; Zhu Xiangde; Pi Li; Qu Zhe; Tan Shun; Zhang Yuheng

    2011-01-01

    The vortex glass theory has been successfully employed to describe the vortex phase state of high T C superconductors (HTSCs). Its validity can be examined by scaling the current-voltage isotherms with appropriate exponents and a universal scaling function. However, this second order phase transition model is not applicable for the layered superconductor Cu 0.03 TaS 2 due to its weak pinning, which could be proved by the peak effect in the M-H loop. Finally, we give the different pinning mechanisms with H||ab and H||c. Vortex strings and pancake vortices are formed under parallel and perpendicular magnetic fields, respectively. The vortex strings are pinned by normal layers in layered superconductors, while the pancake vortices are connected by Josephson coupling.

  1. Analysis of borophosphosilicate glass layers on silicon wafers by X-ray emission from photon and electron excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elgersma, O.; Borstrok, J.J.M.

    1989-01-01

    Phosphorus and oxygen concentrations in the homogeneous layer of borosilicate glass (BPSG) deposited on Si-integrated circuits are determined by X-ray fluorescence from photon excitation. The X-ray emission from electron excitation in an open X-ray tube instrument yields a sufficiently precise determination of the boron content. The thickness of the layer can be derived from silicon Kα-fluorescence. A calibration model is proposed for photon as well as for electron excitation. The experimentally determined parameters in this model well agree with those derived from fundamental parameters for X-ray absorption and emission. The chemical surrounding of silicon affects strongly the peak profile of the silicon Kβ-emission. This enables to distinguish emission from the silicon atoms in the wafer and from the silicon atoms in the silicon oxide complexes of the BPSG-layer. (author)

  2. Long-term leach testing of solidified radioactive waste forms (International Standard Publication ISO 6961:1982)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanik, J.

    2001-01-01

    Processes are developed for the immobilization of radionuclides by solidification of radioactive wastes. The resulting solidification products are characterized by strong resistance to leaching aimed at low release rates of the radionuclides to the environment. To measure this resistance to leaching of the solidified materials: glass, glass-ceramics, bitumen, cement, concrete, plastics, a long-term leach test is presented. The long-term leach test is aimed at: a) the comparison of different kinds or compositions of solidified waste forms; b) the intercomparison between leach test results from different laboratories on one product; c) the intercomparison between leach test results on products from different processes

  3. Poling effect of a charge-trapping layer in glass waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ren, Yitao; Marckmann, Carl Johan; Jacobsen, Rune Shim

    2004-01-01

    Germanium-doped multi-layer waveguides containing a silicon oxy-nitride layer as a charge trapper are thermally poled in an air environment. Compared to the waveguides without the trapping layer, the induced linear electro-optic coefficient increases more than 20%. A comparable rise in the intern...

  4. Liquid wastes concentrating and solidifying device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamiyoshi, Hideki; Ninokata, Yoshihide.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a device for concentrating to solidify radioactive liquid wastes at large solidifying speed and with high decontaminating coefficient, without requirement for automatic control. Constitution: An asphalt solidifying device is disposed below a centrifugal thin film drier, and powder resulted from the drier is directly solidified with asphalt by utilizing the rotation of the drier for the mixing operation in the asphalt vessel. If abnormality should occur in the operation of the drier, resulting liquid wastes can be received and solidified in the asphalt vessel. The liquid wastes are heated to dry in a vessel main body having the heating surface at the circumferential surface. The vessel main body provided with a nozzle for supplying liquid to be treated disposed slantwise at the upper portion of the heating face, scrapers which rotate and slidingly contact the heating face and nozzles which jet out chemicals to the heating face behind the scrapers. Below the vessel main body, are disposed a funnel-like hopper for receiving falling scales, rotary vanes, and the likes by which the scales are introduced into the asphalt solidifying vessel. (Moriyama, K.)

  5. Cold-crucible fabrication of nuclear glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boen, R.

    2010-01-01

    Vitrification has stood the nuclear industry in good stead, for many years now, as a safe long-term conditioning technology for high-level waste. Major advances are nonetheless still being made, with the development of the cold-crucible technology, affording as it does new possibilities, in terms of volume reduction, and of extending the range of waste products amenable to incorporation. Indeed, by allowing higher melting temperatures to be achieved (1200 - 1400 C degrees), this process opens the way to a considerable increase in glass production capacities, and the fabrication of novel matrices, involving higher incorporation rates than current glasses. In the cold-crucible technology, materials put into the crucible are heated directly through induction. The crucible made of metal is cooled by water circulation. Where the glass comes into contact with the cold wall, a thin layer of solidified glass forms, with a thickness of 5-10 mm preventing the metal forming the crucible from coming into contact with the molten glass. A full scale pilot of the cold crucible was constructed at the La Hague vitrification workshop

  6. Observation of spin-glass behavior in nickel adsorbed few layer graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitra, Sreemanta [MLS Professor of Physics' Unit, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Kolkata-700032 (India); Department of Physics, University of Calcutta, Kolkata-700009 (India); Mondal, Oindrila [Department of Physics, M.U.C. Woman' s College, Burdwan (India); Banerjee, Sourish [Department of Physics, University of Calcutta, Kolkata-700009 (India); Chakravorty, Dipankar [MLS Professor of Physics' Unit, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Kolkata-700032 (India)

    2013-01-14

    Nickel-adsorbed graphene was prepared by first synthesizing graphite oxide (GO) by modified Hummers' method and then reducing a solution containing both GO and Ni{sup 2+}. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis showed 31 at. % nickel was present. Magnetization measurements under both dc and ac magnetic fields were carried out in the temperature range 2 K to 300 K. The zero field cooled and field cooled magnetization data showed a pronounced irreversibility at a temperature around 20 K. The analysis of the ac susceptibility data was carried out by both Vogel-Fulcher as well as power law. From dynamic scaling analysis, the microscopic flipping time {tau}{sub 0}{approx}10{sup -13}s and critical exponent z{nu}=5.9{+-}0.1 were found, indicating the presence of conventional spin glass in the system. The spin glass transition temperature was estimated as 19.5 K. Decay of thermoremanent magnetization was explained by stretched exponential function with a value of the exponent as 0.6. From the results, it is concluded that nickel adsorbed graphene behaves like a spin-glass.

  7. Observation of spin-glass behavior in nickel adsorbed few layer graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitra, Sreemanta; Mondal, Oindrila; Banerjee, Sourish; Chakravorty, Dipankar

    2013-01-01

    Nickel-adsorbed graphene was prepared by first synthesizing graphite oxide (GO) by modified Hummers' method and then reducing a solution containing both GO and Ni 2+ . Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis showed 31 at. % nickel was present. Magnetization measurements under both dc and ac magnetic fields were carried out in the temperature range 2 K to 300 K. The zero field cooled and field cooled magnetization data showed a pronounced irreversibility at a temperature around 20 K. The analysis of the ac susceptibility data was carried out by both Vogel-Fulcher as well as power law. From dynamic scaling analysis, the microscopic flipping time τ 0 ∼10 −13 s and critical exponent zν=5.9±0.1 were found, indicating the presence of conventional spin glass in the system. The spin glass transition temperature was estimated as 19.5 K. Decay of thermoremanent magnetization was explained by stretched exponential function with a value of the exponent as 0.6. From the results, it is concluded that nickel adsorbed graphene behaves like a spin-glass.

  8. Wrinkling of solidifying polymeric coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Soumendra Kumar

    2005-07-01

    In coatings, wrinkles are viewed as defects or as desired features for low gloss, and texture. In either case, discovering the origin of wrinkles and the conditions that lead to their formation is important. This research examines what wrinkling requires and proposes a mechanism to explain the observations. All curing wrinkling coatings contain multi-functional reactants. Upon curing, all develop a depth-wise gradient in solidification that result in a cross-linked elastic skin atop a viscous bottom layer. It is hypothesized that compressive stress develops in the skin when liquid below diffuses up into the skin. High enough compressive stress buckles the skin to produce wrinkles. The hypothesis is substantiated by experimental and theoretical evidences. Effects of various application and compositional parameters on wrinkle size in a liquid-applied acrylic coating and a powder-applied epoxy coating were examined. All three components, namely resin, cross-linker and catalyst blocked with at least equimolar volatile blocker, proved to be required for wrinkling. The wrinkling phenomenon was modeled with a theory that accounts for gradient generation, cross-linking reaction and skinning; predictions compared well with observations. Two-layer non-curing coatings that have a stiff elastic layer atop a complaint elastic bottom layer wrinkled when the top layer is compressed. The top layer was compressed by either moisture absorption or differential thermal expansion. Experimental observations compared well with predictions from a theory based on force balance in multilayer systems subjected to differential contraction or expansion. A model based on the Flory-Rehner free energy of a constrained cross-linked gel was constructed that predicts the compressive stress generated in a coating when it absorbs solvent. Linear stability analysis predicts that when a compressed elastic layer is attached atop a viscous layer, it is always unstable to buckles whose wavelength exceeds a

  9. Improved patterning of ITO coated with gold masking layer on glass substrate using nanosecond fiber laser and etching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, Nguyen Ngoc; Hung, Duong Thanh; Anh, Vo Tran; BongChul, Kang; HyunChul, Kim

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A new patterning method for ITO thin film is introduced. • Gold thin film is important in decrease spikes formed in ITO patterning process. • The laser pulse width occupies a significant effect the patterning surface quality. • Etching process is the effective method to remove the spikes at rims of pattern. • A considerable improvement over patterning quality is obtained by proposed method. - Abstract: In this paper, an indium–tin oxide (ITO) thin-film patterning method for higher pattern quality and productivity compared to the short-pulsed laser direct writing method is presented. We sputtered a thin ITO layer on a glass substrate, and then, plated a thin gold layer onto the ITO layer. The combined structure of the three layers (glass–ITO–gold) was patterned using laser-induced plasma generated by an ytterbium pulsed fiber laser (λ = 1064 nm). The results showed that the process parameters of 50 mm/s in scanning speed, 14 ns pulse duration, and a repetition rate of 7.5 kHz represented optimum conditions for the fabrication of ITO channels. Under these conditions, a channel 23.4 μm wide and 20 nm deep was obtained. However, built-up spikes (∼15 nm in height) resulted in a decrease in channel quality, and consequently, short circuit occurred at some patterned positions. These built-up spikes were completely removed by dipping the ITO layer into an etchant (18 wt.% HCl). A gold masking layer on the ITO surface was found to increase the channel surface quality without any decrease in ITO thickness. Moreover, the effects of repetition rate, scanning speed, and etching characteristics on surface quality were investigated

  10. Improved patterning of ITO coated with gold masking layer on glass substrate using nanosecond fiber laser and etching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Nguyen Ngoc; Hung, Duong Thanh; Anh, Vo Tran [High Safety Vehicle Core Technology Research Center, Department of Mechanical & Automotive Engineering, Inje University, Gimhae (Korea, Republic of); BongChul, Kang, E-mail: kbc@kumoh.ac.kr [Department of Inteligent Mechanical Engineering, Kumoh National Institute of Technology, Gumi (Korea, Republic of); HyunChul, Kim, E-mail: mechkhc@inje.ac.kr [High Safety Vehicle Core Technology Research Center, Department of Mechanical & Automotive Engineering, Inje University, Gimhae (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-01

    Highlights: • A new patterning method for ITO thin film is introduced. • Gold thin film is important in decrease spikes formed in ITO patterning process. • The laser pulse width occupies a significant effect the patterning surface quality. • Etching process is the effective method to remove the spikes at rims of pattern. • A considerable improvement over patterning quality is obtained by proposed method. - Abstract: In this paper, an indium–tin oxide (ITO) thin-film patterning method for higher pattern quality and productivity compared to the short-pulsed laser direct writing method is presented. We sputtered a thin ITO layer on a glass substrate, and then, plated a thin gold layer onto the ITO layer. The combined structure of the three layers (glass–ITO–gold) was patterned using laser-induced plasma generated by an ytterbium pulsed fiber laser (λ = 1064 nm). The results showed that the process parameters of 50 mm/s in scanning speed, 14 ns pulse duration, and a repetition rate of 7.5 kHz represented optimum conditions for the fabrication of ITO channels. Under these conditions, a channel 23.4 μm wide and 20 nm deep was obtained. However, built-up spikes (∼15 nm in height) resulted in a decrease in channel quality, and consequently, short circuit occurred at some patterned positions. These built-up spikes were completely removed by dipping the ITO layer into an etchant (18 wt.% HCl). A gold masking layer on the ITO surface was found to increase the channel surface quality without any decrease in ITO thickness. Moreover, the effects of repetition rate, scanning speed, and etching characteristics on surface quality were investigated.

  11. Glass as a matrix for SRP high-level defense waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiley, J.R.; Bibler, N.E.; Dukes, M.D.; Plodinec, M.J.

    1980-01-01

    Work done at Savannah River Laboratory and elsewhere that has led to development of glass as a candidate for solidifying Savannah River Plant waste is summarized. Areas of development described are glass formulation and fabrication, and leaching and radiation effects

  12. Method of solidifying radioactive wastes with plastics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuura, Hiroyuki; Yasumura, Keijiro; Minami, Yuji; Tomita, Toshihide

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent solidification of solidifying agents in the mixer by conducting the mixing process for the solidifying agents and the radioactive wastes at a temperature below the initiation point for the solidification of the agents thereby separating the mixing process from the solidification-integration process. Method: Catalyst such as cobalt naphthenate is charged into an unsaturated polyester resin in a mixer previously cooled, for example, to -10 0 C. They are well mixed with radioactive wastes and the mixture in the mixer is charged in a radioactive waste storage container. The temperature of the mixture, although kept at a low temperature initially, gradually increases to an ambient temperature whereby curing reaction is promoted and the reaction is completed about one day after to provide firm plastic solidification products. This can prevent the solidification of the solidifying agents in the mixer to thereby improve the circumstance's safety. (Kawakami, Y.)

  13. Biaxially oriented CdTe films on glass substrate through nanostructured Ge/CaF2 buffer layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lord, R. J.; Su, P.-Y.; Bhat, I.; Zhang, S. B.; Lu, T.-M.; Wang, G.-C.

    2015-09-01

    Heteroepitaxial CdTe films were grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition on glass substrates through nanostructured Ge/CaF2 buffer layers which were biaxially oriented. It allows us to explore the structural properties of multilayer biaxial semiconductor films which possess small angle grain boundaries and to test the principle of a solar cell made of such low-cost, low-growth-temperature semiconductor films. Through the x-ray diffraction and x-ray pole figure analysis, the heteroepitaxial relationships of the mutilayered films are determined as [111] in the out-of-plane direction and CdTe//Ge//{ }{{{CaF}}2} in the in-plane direction. The I-V curves measured from an ITO/CdS/CdTe/Ge/CaF2/glass solar cell test structure shows a power conversion efficiency of ˜η = 1.26%, illustrating the initial success of such an approach. The observed non-ideal efficiency is believed to be due to a low shunt resistance and high series resistance as well as some residual large-angle grain boundary effects, leaving room for significant further improvement.

  14. Hydrophobic ZnO nanostructured thin films on glass substrate by simple successive ionic layer absorption and reaction (SILAR) method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, P. Suresh; Raj, A. Dhayal [Thin Film and Nanomaterials Laboratory, Department of Physics, Bharathiar University, Coimbatore-641046 (India); Mangalaraj, D., E-mail: dmraj800@yahoo.co [Department of Nanoscience and Technology, Bharathiar University, Coimbatore-641046 (India); Nataraj, D. [Thin Film and Nanomaterials Laboratory, Department of Physics, Bharathiar University, Coimbatore-641046 (India)

    2010-10-01

    In the present work, ZnO nanostructured thin films were grown on glass substrates by a simple successive ionic layer absorption and reaction method (SILAR) process at relatively low temperature for its self cleaning application. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and Photoluminescence (PL) spectra were used to characterize the prepared ZnO nanostructured film. XRD pattern clearly reviles that the grown ZnO nanostructure film reflect (002) orientation with c-direction. SEM image clearly shows the surface morphology with cluster of spindle and flower-like nanostructured with diameter various around 350 nm. Photoluminescence (PL) spectra of ZnO nanostructures film exhibit a UV emission around 385nm and visible emission in the range around 420-500 nm. Good water repellent behavior were observed for ZnO nanostructured film without any surface modification.

  15. Hydrophobic ZnO nanostructured thin films on glass substrate by simple successive ionic layer absorption and reaction (SILAR) method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, P. Suresh; Raj, A. Dhayal; Mangalaraj, D.; Nataraj, D.

    2010-01-01

    In the present work, ZnO nanostructured thin films were grown on glass substrates by a simple successive ionic layer absorption and reaction method (SILAR) process at relatively low temperature for its self cleaning application. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and Photoluminescence (PL) spectra were used to characterize the prepared ZnO nanostructured film. XRD pattern clearly reviles that the grown ZnO nanostructure film reflect (002) orientation with c-direction. SEM image clearly shows the surface morphology with cluster of spindle and flower-like nanostructured with diameter various around 350 nm. Photoluminescence (PL) spectra of ZnO nanostructures film exhibit a UV emission around 385nm and visible emission in the range around 420-500 nm. Good water repellent behavior were observed for ZnO nanostructured film without any surface modification.

  16. Chemical composition analysis and product consistency tests to support enhanced Hanford waste glass models. Results for the third set of high alumina outer layer matrix glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Edwards, T. B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States)

    2015-12-01

    In this report, the Savannah River National Laboratory provides chemical analyses and Product Consistency Test (PCT) results for 14 simulated high level waste glasses fabricated by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The results of these analyses will be used as part of efforts to revise or extend the validation regions of the current Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant glass property models to cover a broader span of waste compositions. The measured chemical composition data are reported and compared with the targeted values for each component for each glass. All of the measured sums of oxides for the study glasses fell within the interval of 96.9 to 100.8 wt %, indicating recovery of all components. Comparisons of the targeted and measured chemical compositions showed that the measured values for the glasses met the targeted concentrations within 10% for those components present at more than 5 wt %. The PCT results were normalized to both the targeted and measured compositions of the study glasses. Several of the glasses exhibited increases in normalized concentrations (NCi) after the canister centerline cooled (CCC) heat treatment. Five of the glasses, after the CCC heat treatment, had NCB values that exceeded that of the Environmental Assessment (EA) benchmark glass. These results can be combined with additional characterization, including X-ray diffraction, to determine the cause of the higher release rates.

  17. Rapidly solidified aluminium for optical applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gubbels, G.P.H.; Venrooy, B.W.H. van; Bosch, A.J.; Senden, R.

    2008-01-01

    This paper present the results of a diamond turning study of a rapidly solidified aluminium 6061 alloy grade, known as RSA6061. It is shown that this small grain material can be diamond turned to smaller roughness values than standard AA6061 aluminium grades. Also, the results are nearly as good as

  18. Study of the layer developed at the surface of a nuclear glass during alteration by water. Comparison between solution analysis data and electron microscopy data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomassin, J.H.; Touray, J.C.; Nogues, J.L.

    1983-01-01

    The alteration of a nuclear glass by boiling water leads to the formation of a layer whose thickness is 7 μm after 27 days and 15 μm after 52 days. This layer is composed of two parts: the outer one, widely crystallised, in which one finds a silico-phosphatic zone bearing rare-earth elements, and an inner part widely amorphous whose thickness is time dependent [fr

  19. Controlling Piezoelectric Responses in Pb(Zr0.52Ti0.48)O3 Films through Deposition Conditions and Nanosheet Buffer Layers on Glass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen, Minh D.; Houwman, Evert P.; Yuan, Huiyu; Wylie- Van Eerd, Benjamin; Dekkers, Matthijn; Koster, Gertjan; Ten Elshof, Johan E.; Rijnders, Guus

    2017-01-01

    Nanosheet Ca2Nb3O10 (CNOns) layers were deposited on ultralow expansion glass substrates by the Langmuir-Blodgett method to obtain preferential (001)-oriented growth of Pb(Zr0.52Ti0.48)O3 (PZT) thin films using pulsed laser deposition (PLD) to enhance the ferroelectric and piezoelectric properties

  20. Controlling the Release of Indomethacin from Glass Solutions Layered with a Rate Controlling Membrane Using Fluid-Bed Processing. Part 1: Surface and Cross-Sectional Chemical Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dereymaker, Aswin; Scurr, David J; Steer, Elisabeth D; Roberts, Clive J; Van den Mooter, Guy

    2017-04-03

    Fluid bed coating has been shown to be a suitable manufacturing technique to formulate poorly soluble drugs in glass solutions. Layering inert carriers with a drug-polymer mixture enables these beads to be immediately filled into capsules, thus avoiding additional, potentially destabilizing, downstream processing. In this study, fluid bed coating is proposed for the production of controlled release dosage forms of glass solutions by applying a second, rate controlling membrane on top of the glass solution. Adding a second coating layer adds to the physical and chemical complexity of the drug delivery system, so a thorough understanding of the physical structure and phase behavior of the different coating layers is needed. This study aimed to investigate the surface and cross-sectional characteristics (employing scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS)) of an indomethacin-polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) glass solution, top-coated with a release rate controlling membrane consisting of either ethyl cellulose or Eudragit RL. The implications of the addition of a pore former (PVP) and the coating medium (ethanol or water) were also considered. In addition, polymer miscibility and the phase analysis of the underlying glass solution were investigated. Significant differences in surface and cross-sectional topography of the different rate controlling membranes or the way they are applied (solution vs dispersion) were observed. These observations can be linked to the polymer miscibility differences. The presence of PVP was observed in all rate controlling membranes, even if it is not part of the coating solution. This could be attributed to residual powder presence in the coating chamber. The distribution of PVP among the sample surfaces depends on the concentration and the rate controlling polymer used. Differences can again be linked to polymer miscibility. Finally, it was shown that the underlying glass solution layer

  1. Development and characterization of solidified forms for high-level wastes: 1978. Annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, W.A.; Mendel, J.E.

    1979-12-01

    Development and characterization of solidified high-level waste forms are directed at determining both process properties and long-term behaviors of various solidified high-level waste forms in aqueous, thermal, and radiation environments. Waste glass properties measured as a function of composition were melt viscosity, melt electrical conductivity, devitrification, and chemical durability. The alkali metals were found to have the greatest effect upon glass properties. Titanium caused a slight decrease in viscosity and a significant increase in chemical durability in acidic solutions (pH-4). Aluminum, nickel and iron were all found to increase the formation of nickel-ferrite spinel crystals in the glass. Four multibarrier advanced waste forms were produced on a one-liter scale with simulated waste and characterized. Glass marbles encapsulated in a vacuum-cast lead alloy provided improved inertness with a minimal increase in technological complexity. Supercalcine spheres exhibited excellent inertness when coated with pyrolytic carbon and alumina and put in a metal matrix, but the processing requirements are quite complex. Tests on simulated and actual high-level waste glasses continue to suggest that thermal devitrification has a relatively small effect upon mechanical and chemical durabilities. Tests on the effects radiation has upon waste forms also continue to show changes to be relatively insignificant. Effects caused by decay of actinides can be estimated to saturate at near 10 19 alpha-events/cm 3 in homogeneous solids. Actually, in solidified waste forms the effects are usually observed around certain crystals as radiation causes amorphization and swelling of th crystals

  2. Annual report on the development and characterization of solidified forms for nuclear wastes, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chick, L.A.; McVay, G.L.; Mellinger, G.B.; Roberts, F.P.

    1980-12-01

    Development and characterization of solidified nuclear waste forms is a major continuing effort at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. Contributions from seven programs directed at understanding chemical composition, process conditions, and long-term behaviors of various nuclear waste forms are included in this report. The major findings of the report are included in extended figure captions that can be read as brief technical summaries of the research, with additional information included in a traditional narrative format. Waste form development proceeded on crystalline and glass materials for high-level and transuranic (TRU) wastes. Leaching studies emphasized new areas of research aimed at more basic understanding of waste form/aqueous solution interactions. Phase behavior and thermal effects research included studies on crystal phases in defense and TRU waste glasses and on liquid-liquid phase separation in borosilicate waste glasses. Radiation damage effects in crystals and glasses from alpha decay and from transmutation are reported

  3. Designs of infrared nonpolarizing beam splitters with a Ag layer in a glass cube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jin Hui; Wang, Zheng Ping

    2008-05-10

    A novel design of a nonpolarizing beam splitter with a Ag layer in a cube was proposed and optimized, based on the needle optimization. The digital simulations of the reflectance and reflection-induced retardance were presented. The simulation results showed that both the amplitude and the phase characteristics of the nonpolarizing beam splitter could realize the design targets. The difference between the simulated and the target reflectance of 50% is less than 0.4% and the simulated and the reflection-induced retardance is less than 0.62 degrees in the 1260 -1360 nm range for both p and s components.

  4. Correlation of tephra layers by trace elements abundances in glass shards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuoka, Takaaki

    1988-10-01

    For identifying volcanic ash layer, a method was explained by analyzing minor elements contained in glassy material of volcanic ash. Based upon the understanding that glassy material in volcanic ash was formed by the quenching of magma and that composition of it reflected the composition of magma at the time of deposition, identification of volcanic ash layer was conducted by applying such consideration that minor elements were concentrated in the magma during the deposition process and that distribution coefficient was characteristic of every minor element. For the analysis, apparatus of irradiated neutron was applied. As the result of analysis, variation of the data was approximately 5% among the ashes belong to the same volcano. distribution map of volcanic ash in Japan was prepared by using the result. By this, it was understood that the ashes obtained from the volcanos in the middle part of Japan were different from other but those from Kyushu district were mostly identical among them. For further study of volcano, necessity of such analysis of volcanic ash in the sea bottom mud was explained. 3 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

  5. Structure and transformation behaviour of a rapidly solidified Al-Y-Ni-Co-Pd alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Louzguine-Luzgin, D.V.; Inoue, A.

    2005-01-01

    An as-solidified structure and transformation behaviour on heating of the rapidly solidified Al-Y-Ni-Co-Pd alloy was studied by X-ray diffractometry (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), differential scanning and isothermal calorimetries. The Al-Y-Ni-Co-Pd ribbon samples have been produced by the melt spinning technique and heat treated using a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC). The addition of Pd to Al-Y-Ni-Co alloys caused disappearance of the supercooled liquid region as well as the formation of the highly dispersed primary α-Al nanoparticles about 3-7 nm in size homogeneously embedded in the glassy matrix upon solidification. An extremely high density of precipitates of the order of 10 24 m -3 is obtained. These particles start growing at the temperature below a glass-transition temperature. The results presented in this paper indicate that some of so-called 'marginal' glass-formers in as-solidified state are actually not glassy alloys with pre-existed nuclei but crystal-glassy nanocomposites

  6. Secondary phase formation and the microstructural evolution of surface layers during vapor phase alteration of the French SON 68 nuclear waste glass at 200 degrees C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong, W.L.; Ewing, R.C.; Wang, L.M.

    1995-01-01

    The SON 68 inactive open-quotes R7T7close quotes composition is the French reference glass for the LWR nuclear waste glass. Vapor phase alteration was used to accelerate the reaction progress of glass corrosion and to develop the characteristic suite of secondary, alteration phases. Extensive solid-state characterization (AEM/SEM/HRTEM) was completed on six inactive R7T7 waste glasses which were altered in the presence of saturated water vapor (200 degrees C) for 91, 241, 908, 1000, 1013, and 1021 days. The AEM samples were examined in cross-section (lattice-fringe imaging, micro-diffraction, and quantitative thin-film EDS analysis). The glass monoliths were invariably covered with a thin altered rind. The layer became thicker with time: 0.5 μm for 22 days; 4 μm for 91 days; 6 μm for 241 days; 10 μm for 908 days; 26 μm for 1013 days; and 2 TeO 3 and (Ca,Sr)Mo 3 O 9 (OH) 2 , were found within the inner zones of surface layers, and they must have nucleated in situ, indicating that Ag, Te, Sr, and Mo can be retained within the surface layer. The majority of the surface layer volume is composed of two morphologically and chemically different structures: one consists of well-crystallized fibrous smectite aggregates occurring along with cavities, the A-domain; and the other consists of poorly-crystallized regions containing needle-like smectite (montmorillonite) crystallites, a silica-rich amorphous matrix, and possibly ZrO 2 particles, the B-domain

  7. Leaching behavior of solidified plastics radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yook, Chong Chul; Lee, Byung Hun; Jae, Won Mok; Kim, Kyung Eung

    1986-01-01

    It is highly needed to develope the solidification process to dispose safely the radioactive wastes increasing with the growth of the nuclear industry. The leaching mechanisms of the solidified plastic wastes were investigated and the leaching rates of the plastic wastes were also measured among the many solidification processes. In addition, the transport equation based on the diffusion or the diffusion-dissolution was compared with the empirical equation derived from the experimental data by graphical method. Consequently, leaching process of the solidified plastic wastes is quite well agreed with the mass transport theory, but it may be difficult to simulate leaching process by diffusion dissolution mechanism. But the theoretical equation could be applicable to the cumulative amount of radionuclides leached form the plastic wastes disposed into the environment. (Author)

  8. Characterization of aluminium alloys rapidly solidified

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monteiro, W.A.

    1988-01-01

    This paper discussed the investigation of the microstructural and mechanical properties of the aluminium alloys (3003; 7050; Al-9% Mg) rapidly solidified by melt spinning process (cooling rate 10 4 - 10 6 K/s). The rapidly solidification process of the studied aluminium alloys brought a microcrystallinity, a minimum presence of coarse precipitation and, also, better mechanical properties of them comparing to the same alloys using ingot process. (author) [pt

  9. Multi-layered metal nanocrystals in a sol-gel spin-on-glass matrix for flash memory applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Meiyu Stella [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, National University of Singapore, Block E5, 4 Engineering Drive 4, 117576 (Singapore); Globalfoundries Singapore Pte Ltd, 60 Woodlands Industrial Park D, 738406 (Singapore); Suresh, Vignesh [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, National University of Singapore, Block E5, 4 Engineering Drive 4, 117576 (Singapore); Agency for Science, Technology and Research - A*Star, Institute of Materials Research and Engineering (IMRE), #08-03, 2 Fusionopolis Way, Innovis, 138634 (Singapore); Chan, Mei Yin [School of Materials Science and Engineering (MSE), Nanyang Technological University (NTU), 50 Nanyang Avenue, 639798 (Singapore); Ma, Yu Wei [Globalfoundries Singapore Pte Ltd, 60 Woodlands Industrial Park D, 738406 (Singapore); Lee, Pooi See [School of Materials Science and Engineering (MSE), Nanyang Technological University (NTU), 50 Nanyang Avenue, 639798 (Singapore); Krishnamoorthy, Sivashankar [Agency for Science, Technology and Research - A*Star, Institute of Materials Research and Engineering (IMRE), #08-03, 2 Fusionopolis Way, Innovis, 138634 (Singapore); Science et Analyse des Materiaux Unit (SAM), Centre de Recherche Public-Gabriel Lippmann, 41, rue du Brill, Belvaux, 4422 (Luxembourg); Srinivasan, M.P., E-mail: srinivasan.madapusi@rmit.edu.au [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, National University of Singapore, Block E5, 4 Engineering Drive 4, 117576 (Singapore); School of Engineering, RMIT University, Building 10, Level 11, Room 14, 376-392 Swanston Street, Melbourne, Victoria, 3001 (Australia)

    2017-01-15

    A simple and low-cost process of embedding metal nanocrystals as charge storage centers within a dielectric is demonstrated to address leakage issues associated with the scaling of the tunnelling oxide in flash memories. Metal nanocrystals with high work functions (nickel, platinum and palladium) were prepared as embedded species in methyl siloxane spin-on-glass (SOG) films on silicon substrates. Sub-10 nm-sized, well-isolated, uniformly distributed, multi-layered nanocrystals with high particle densities (10{sup 11}–10{sup 12} cm{sup −2}) were formed in the films by thermal curing of the spin-coated SOG films containing the metal precursors. Capacitance-Voltage measurements performed on metal-insulator-semiconductor capacitors with the SOG films show that the presence of metal nanocrystals enhanced the memory window of the films to 2.32 V at low operating voltages of ±5 V. These SOG films demonstrated the ability to store both holes and electrons. Capacitance-time measurements show good charge retention of more than 75% after 10{sup 4} s of discharging. This work demonstrates the applicability of the low-cost in-situ sol-gel preparation in contrast to conventional methods that involve multiple and expensive processing steps. - Highlights: • Sub-10 nm sized, well-isolated, uniformly distributed nanoparticle based charge trap memories. • Preparation of multi-layer high work function metal nanocrystals at low cost. • Large memory window of 2.32 V at low operating voltages of ±5 V. • Good charge retention of more than 90% and 75% after 10{sup 3} and 10{sup 4} s of discharging respectively. • Use of a 3 nm thick tunnelling oxide in compliance with ITRS specifications.

  10. Multi-layered metal nanocrystals in a sol-gel spin-on-glass matrix for flash memory applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Meiyu Stella; Suresh, Vignesh; Chan, Mei Yin; Ma, Yu Wei; Lee, Pooi See; Krishnamoorthy, Sivashankar; Srinivasan, M.P.

    2017-01-01

    A simple and low-cost process of embedding metal nanocrystals as charge storage centers within a dielectric is demonstrated to address leakage issues associated with the scaling of the tunnelling oxide in flash memories. Metal nanocrystals with high work functions (nickel, platinum and palladium) were prepared as embedded species in methyl siloxane spin-on-glass (SOG) films on silicon substrates. Sub-10 nm-sized, well-isolated, uniformly distributed, multi-layered nanocrystals with high particle densities (10"1"1–10"1"2 cm"−"2) were formed in the films by thermal curing of the spin-coated SOG films containing the metal precursors. Capacitance-Voltage measurements performed on metal-insulator-semiconductor capacitors with the SOG films show that the presence of metal nanocrystals enhanced the memory window of the films to 2.32 V at low operating voltages of ±5 V. These SOG films demonstrated the ability to store both holes and electrons. Capacitance-time measurements show good charge retention of more than 75% after 10"4 s of discharging. This work demonstrates the applicability of the low-cost in-situ sol-gel preparation in contrast to conventional methods that involve multiple and expensive processing steps. - Highlights: • Sub-10 nm sized, well-isolated, uniformly distributed nanoparticle based charge trap memories. • Preparation of multi-layer high work function metal nanocrystals at low cost. • Large memory window of 2.32 V at low operating voltages of ±5 V. • Good charge retention of more than 90% and 75% after 10"3 and 10"4 s of discharging respectively. • Use of a 3 nm thick tunnelling oxide in compliance with ITRS specifications.

  11. The borosilicate glass for 'PAMELA'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiewer, E.

    1986-01-01

    The low enriched waste concentrate (LEWC) stored at Mol, Belgium, will be solidified in the vitrification plant 'PAMELA'. An alkali-borosilicate glass was developed by the Hahn-Meitner-Institut, Berlin, which dissolves (11 +- 3)wt% waste oxides while providing sufficient flexibility for changes in the process parameters. The development of the glass labelled SM513LW11 is described. Important properties of the glass melt (viscosity, resistivity, formation of yellow phase) and of the glass (corrosion in aqueous solutions, crystallization) are reported. The corrosion data of this glass are similar to those of other HLW-glasses. Less than five wt% of crystalline material are produced upon cooling of large glass blocks. Crystallization does not affect the chemical durability. (Auth.)

  12. Porous glass matrix method for encapsulating high-level nuclear wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macedo, P.B.; Tran, D.C.; Simmons, J.H.; Saleh, M.; Barkatt, A.; Simmons, C.J.; Lagakos, N.; DeWitt, E.

    1979-01-01

    A novel process which uses solidified porous high-silica glass powder to fixate radioactive high-level wastes is described. The process yields cylinders consisting of a core of high-silica glass containing the waste elements in its structure and a protective layer also of high-silica glass completely free of waste elements. The process can be applied to waste streams containing 0 to 100% solids. The core region exhibits a higher coefficient of thermal expansion and a lower glass transition temperature than the outer protective layer. This leads to mechanical strengthening of the glass and good resistance to stress corrosion by the development of a high residual compressive stress on the surface of the sample. Both the core and the protective layer exhibit extremely high chemical durability and offer an effective fixation of the radioactive waste elements, including 239 Pu and 99 Tc which have long half-lives, for calculated periods of more than 1 million years, when temperatures are not allowed to rise above 100 0 C

  13. Multi-layer porous fiber-reinforced composites for implants: in vitro calcium phosphate formation in the presence of bioactive glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nganga, Sara; Zhang, Di; Moritz, Niko; Vallittu, Pekka K; Hupa, Leena

    2012-11-01

    Glass-fiber-reinforced composites (FRCs), based on bifunctional methacrylate resin, have recently shown their potential for use as durable cranioplasty, orthopedic and oral implants. In this study we suggest a multi-component sandwich implant structure with (i) outer layers out of porous FRC, which interface the cortical bone, and (ii) inner layers encompassing bioactive glass granules, which interface with the cancellous bone. The capability of Bioglass(®) 45S5 granules (100-250μm) to induce calcium phosphate formation on the surface of the FRC was explored by immersing the porous FRC-Bioglass laminates in simulated body fluid (SBF) for up to 28d. In both static (agitated) and dynamic conditions, bioactive glass granules induced precipitation of calcium phosphate at the laminate surfaces as confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. The proposed dynamic flow system is useful for the in vitro simulation of bone-like apatite formation on various new porous implant designs containing bioactive glass and implant material degradation. Copyright © 2012 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Catalyst-free growth of ZnO nanowires on ITO seed/glass by thermal evaporation method: Effects of ITO seed layer thickness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alsultany, Forat H., E-mail: foratusm@gmail.com; Ahmed, Naser M. [School of Physics, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 USM, Penang (Malaysia); Hassan, Z. [Institute of Nano-Optoelectronics Research and Technology Laboratory (INOR), Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 USM, Penang (Malaysia)

    2016-07-19

    A seed/catalyst-free growth of ZnO nanowires (ZnO-NWs) on a glass substrate were successfully fabricated using thermal evaporation technique. These nanowires were grown on ITO seed layers of different thicknesses of 25 and 75 nm, which were deposited on glass substrates by radio frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering. Prior to synthesized ITO nanowires, the sputtered ITO seeds were annealed using the continuous wave (CW) CO2 laser at 450 °C in air for 15 min. The effect of seed layer thickness on the morphological, structural, and optical properties of ZnO-NWs were systematically investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), and UV-Vis spectrophotometer.

  15. Influence of Short-time Oxidation on Corrosion Properties of Directionally Solidified Superalloys with Different Orientations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MA Luo-ning

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In order to investigate the corrosion performance on intersecting and longitudinal surfaces of unoxidized and oxidized directionally solidified superalloys, Ni-base directionally solidified superalloy DZ125 and Co-base directionally solidified superalloy DZ40M were selected. Oxidation behavior on both alloys with different orientations was investigated at 1050℃ at different times, simulating the oxidation process of vanes or blades in service; subsequent electrochemical performance in 3.5%NaCl aqueous solution was studied on two orientations of unoxidized and oxidized alloys, simulating the corrosion process of superalloy during downtime. The results show that grain boundaries and sub-boundaries of directionally solidified superalloys are susceptible to corrosion and thus longitudinal surface with lower area fraction of grain boundaries has higher corrosion resistance. Compared to intersecting surface of alloys, the structure of grain boundaries of longitudinal surface is less conducive to diffusion and thus the oxidation rate on longitudinal surface is lower. Formation of oxide layers on alloys after short-time oxidation provides protective effect and enhances the corrosion resistance.

  16. Comparative X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study of plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition and micro pressure chemical vapor deposition of phosphorus silicate glass layers after rapid thermal annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beshkov, G.; Krastev, V.; Gogova, D.; Talik, E.; Adamies, M.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper the bonding state of Phosphorus Silicate Glass (PSG) layers obtained by two different technological approaches, i.e. in two types of reactors: Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PECVD) and Micro Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition (MPCVD) are investigated employing XPS and AES. The PSG layers are deposited at 380 0 C and 420 0 C in corresponding reactors. XPS and AES analyses show that Si2p peak recorded from PECVD layers are not as expected at their position characteristics of silicon dioxide but instead they are at the characteristic of elemental silicon. Plasma enhancement during deposition leads to less oxidized and more inhomogeneous layer. After rapid thermal annealing the Si2p peak is situated at position characteristic of silicon dioxide. (authors)

  17. Cation distributions on rapidly solidified cobalt ferrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Guire, Mark R.; Kalonji, Gretchen; O'Handley, Robert C.

    1990-01-01

    The cation distributions in two rapidly solidified cobalt ferrites have been determined using Moessbauer spectroscopy at 4.2 K in an 8-T magnetic field. The samples were obtained by gas atomization of a Co0-Fe2O3-P2O5 melt. The degree of cation disorder in both cases was greater than is obtainable by cooling unmelted cobalt ferrite. The more rapidly cooled sample exhibited a smaller departure from the equilibrium cation distribution than did the more slowly cooled sample. This result is explained on the basis of two competing effects of rapid solidification: high cooling rate of the solid, and large undercooling.

  18. Testing the efficacy and the potential effect on indoor air quality of a transparent self-cleaning TiO{sub 2}-coated glass through the degradation of a fluoranthene layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romeas, V.; Pichat, P.; Guillard, C.; Chopin, T.; Lehaut, C.

    1999-10-01

    Self-cleaning glass can be obtained by coating glass with a transparent, thin layer of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles. To test the self-cleaning properties, fluoranthene--the most abundant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon in the atmospheric particulate matter--was sprayed over the glass. Under solar-like UV light, not only was fluoranthene removed at a rate of ca. 0.73 nmol/h per cm{sup 2} of glass but also all fluoranthene degradation products were, and thus the coated-glass transparency was recovered, which did not occur with noncoated glass. The fluoranthene percentage converted to volatile carbonyl products released into ambient air was lower with than without TiO{sub 2} coating; i.e., the self-cleaning glass could have a positive influence on indoor air quality. Mechanisms are discussed to account for the main primary products among the 40 fluoranthene photocatalytic degradation intermediate products which the authors identified.

  19. Analytical electron microscopy study of surface layers formed on the French SON68 nuclear waste glass during vapor hydration at 200 C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong, W.L.; Wang, L.M.; Ewing, R.C.; Bates, J.K.; Ebert, W.L.

    1998-01-01

    Extensive solid-state characterization (AEM/SEM/HRTEM) was completed on six SON68 (inactive R7T7) waste glasses which were altered in the presence of saturated water vapor (200 C) for 22, 91, 241, 908, 1000, 1013, and 1021 days. The samples were examined by AEM in cross-section (lattice-fringe imaging, micro-diffraction, and quantitative thin-film EDS analysis). The glass monoliths were invariably covered by a thin altered rind, and the surface layer thickness increased with increasing time of reaction, ranging from 0.5 to 30 μm in thickness. Six distinctive zones, based on phase chemistry and microstructure, were distinguished within the well-developed surface layers. Numerous crystalline phases such as analcime, gyrolite, tobermorite, apatite, and weeksite were identified on the surfaces of the reacted glasses as precipitates. The majority of the surface layer volume was composed of two basic structures that are morphologically and chemically distinct: The A-domain consisted of well-crystallized fibrous smectite aggregates; and the B-domain consisted of poorly-crystallized regions containing smectite, possibly montmorillonite, crystallites and a ZrO 2 -rich amorphous silica matrix. The retention of the rare-earth elements, Mo, and Zr mostly occurred within the B-domain; while transition metal elements, such as Zn, Cr, Ni, Mn, and Fe, were retained in the A-domain. The element partitioning among A-domains and B-domains and recrystallization of the earlier-formed B-domains into the A-domain smectites were the basic processes which have controlled the chemical and structural evolution of the surface layer. The mechanism of surface layer formation during vapor hydration are discussed based on these cross-sectional AEM results. (orig.)

  20. Characteristics of solidified products containing radioactive molten salt waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hwan-Seo; Kim, In-Tae; Cho, Yong-Zun; Eun, Hee-Chul; Kim, Joon-Hyung

    2007-11-01

    The molten salt waste from a pyroprocess to recover uranium and transuranic elements is one of the problematic radioactive wastes to be solidified into a durable wasteform for its final disposal. By using a novel method, named as the GRSS (gel-route stabilization/solidification) method, a molten salt waste was treated to produce a unique wasteform. A borosilicate glass as a chemical binder dissolves the silicate compounds in the gel products to produce one amorphous phase while most of the phosphates are encapsulated by the vitrified phase. Also, Cs in the gel product is preferentially situated in the silicate phase, and it is vitrified into a glassy phase after a heat treatment. The Sr-containing phase is mainly phosphate compounds and encapsulated by the glassy phase. These phenomena could be identified by the static and dynamic leaching test that revealed a high leach resistance of radionuclides. The leach rates were about 10(-3) - 10(-2) g/m2 x day for Cs and 10(-4) - 10(-3) g/m2 x day for Sr, and the leached fractions of them were predicted to be 0.89% and 0.39% at 900 days, respectively. This paper describes the characteristics of a unique wasteform containing a molten salt waste and provides important information on a newly developed immobilization technology for salt wastes, the GRSS method.

  1. Site Simulation of Solidified Peat: Lab Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durahim, N. H. Ab; Rahman, J. Abd; Tajuddin, S. F. Mohd; Mohamed, R. M. S. R.; Al-Gheethi, A. A.; Kassim, A. H. Mohd

    2018-04-01

    In the present research, the solidified peat on site simulation is conducted to obtain soil leaching from soil column study. Few raw materials used in testing such as Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC), Fly ash (FA) and bottom ash (BA) which containing in solidified peat (SP), fertilizer (F), and rainwater (RW) are also admixed in soil column in order to assess their effects. This research was conducted in two conditions which dry and wet condition. Distilled water used to represent rainfall during flushing process while rainwater used to gain leaching during dry and wet condition. The first testing made after leaching process done was Moisture Content (MC). Secondly, Unconfined Compressive Strength (UCS) will be conducted on SP to know the ability of SP strength. These MC and UCS were made before and after SP were applied in soil column. Hence, the both results were compared to see the reliability occur on SP. All leachate samples were tested using Absorption Atomic Spectroscopy (AAS), Ion Chromatography (IC) and Inductively-Coupled Plasma Spectrophotometry (ICP-MS) testing to know the anion and cation present in it.

  2. Method and apparatus for solidifying radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadota, Hiroko; Kikuchi, Makoto; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki; Tamada, Shin.

    1989-01-01

    The present invention concerns a method of solidifying radioactive wastes that generate heat with water curing solidifying material and the object there of is suppress the effect of heat generation of the wastes given on the solidification material. That is, it is a feature of the invention to inject water content contained in the water curable solidification material in the form of ice into the wastes. Thus, since the water content in the water curable solidification material is ice, the solidification products can be obtained by way of the following three steps: (1) ice is dissolved into water, (2) solid content of the solidification material is dissolved into water, and(3) curing reaction of the solidification material is started. Acccordingly, since the heat generated from the wastes contributes as heat of reaction when ice is dissolved into water till the solidification material has been completely filled, promotion for the curing reaction causing problems so far can be suppressed to enable easy filling. Then, after the completion of the filling of the solidification material, the heat of the wastes has an effect of promoting the second and the third steps described above to accelerate the curing reaction. (K.M.)

  3. Method and device for solidifying radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Tadamasa.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To solidify radioactive waste without producing radioactive dusts by always heating and evaporating the water from liquid radioactive waste in a mixture of liquid plastic and exhausting the molten mixture of the waste residue and the plastic material. Constitution: Liquid plastic material in a tank cooled to prevent polymerization or changes of its properties is continuously supplied to the top of a heating and mixing evaporator by a constant supply pump. After the heat transfer surface of the evaporator is covered with the plastic material, radioactive waste in the tank is supplied to the evaporator via the constant supply pump. The waste is abruptly mixed with the plastic material by an agitating rotor, heated by a heater, and the evaporated water is fed to a condenser. An anhydrous molten mixture is continuously exhausted from the bottom of the evaporator into a mixture cooler, a polymerizing agent and catalyst are introduced thereinto from a polymerizing agent tank and a catalyst tank, inhibitor is introduced thereinto from a polymerization inhibitor tank as required, and is filled with the mixture a solidifying container while it is cooled for its polymerization and solidification. (Yoshino, Y.)

  4. A simple technique for direct growth of Au into a nanoporous alumina layer on conductive glass as a reusable SERS substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Jiajie [Chemicobiology and Functional Materials Institute, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China); Shen, Muzhong [School of Engineering, AnHui Agricultural University, Hefei 230036 (China); Liu, Siyu; Li, Feng [Chemicobiology and Functional Materials Institute, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China); Sun, Dongping, E-mail: sundpe301@163.com [School of Engineering, AnHui Agricultural University, Hefei 230036 (China); Wang, Tianhe, E-mail: thwang56@126.com [Chemicobiology and Functional Materials Institute, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China)

    2017-06-01

    Graphical abstract: A simple technique for direct growth of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) into a nanostructured porous alumina layer on conductive glass slide (PAOCG). Gold was uniformly distributed in porous alumina layer. Au/PAOCG can serve as a portable, durable and reusable SERS substrate. - Highlights: • A simple method of producing nanoporous alumina layer on conductive glasses. • A facile technique for direct growth of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) into PAOCG. • It presents a general protocol for preparation of (MNPs) on conductive glasses. • Au/PAOCG exhibits high SERS sensitivity and excellent reusability. - Abstract: In this paper, we describe a simple technique for direct growth of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) into a nanostructured porous alumina layer on conductive glass slide (PAOCG). PAOCG was attached firmly with a small piece of steel and was then immersed in a HAuCl{sub 4} solution. Electro-induced electrons from steel were employed to reduce AuCl{sub 4}{sup −} on PAOCG. The galvanic replacement reaction (GRR) was adopted as the fundamental mechanism for reducing metal precursors. This mechanism was further studied by open circuit potential-time (OCP-t) experiment and the result demonstrated that steel induced the continuous proceeding of this reaction. This strategy presents a simple and general protocol for preparation of metal nanoparticles (MNPs) on conductive glass substrates. The SERS properties of Au/PAOCG were investigated using aqueous crystal violet (CV) and 4-mercaptopyridine (4-Mpy) as probe molecules. Au/PAOCG allowed as low as 10{sup −9} M CV and 10{sup −8} M 4-Mpy to be detected. The reusability of this substrate was achieved by measuring the SERS spectrum of the probe molecules followed with a 400 °C heat treatment for 10 min to remove the residuals. This substrate could be reused for at least ten cycles without any significantly reduced SERS performance. Therefore, this surface can serve as a portable, durable and reusable SERS

  5. Charge recombination reduction in dye-sensitized solar cells by means of an electron beam-deposited TiO2 buffer layer between conductive glass and photoelectrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manca, Michele; Malara, Francesco; Martiradonna, Luigi; De Marco, Luisa; Giannuzzi, Roberto; Cingolani, Roberto; Gigli, Giuseppe

    2010-01-01

    A thin anatase titanium dioxide compact film was deposited by electron beam evaporation as buffer layer between the conductive transparent electrode and the porous TiO 2 -based photoelectrode in dye-sensitized solar cells. The effect of such a buffer layer on the back transfer reaction of electrons to tri-iodide ions in liquid electrolyte-based cells has been studied by means of both electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and open circuit photovoltage decay analysis. The influence of the thickness has been also investigated and an increment in overall quantum conversion efficiency η as high as + 31% with respect to the standard cell - fabricated onto an uncoated conductive glass - has been revealed in the case of a 120 nm thick buffer layer.

  6. The use of Nb in rapid solidified Al alloys and composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Audebert, F., E-mail: metal@fi.uba.ar [Advanced Materials Group, Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Paseo Colón 850, Ciudad de Buenos Aires 1063 (Argentina); Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, OX1 3PH Oxford (United Kingdom); Department of Mechanical Engineering and Mathematical Sciences, Oxford Brookes University, Wheatley Campus, OX33 1HX Oxford (United Kingdom); Galano, M. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, OX1 3PH Oxford (United Kingdom); Saporiti, F. [Advanced Materials Group, Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Paseo Colón 850, Ciudad de Buenos Aires 1063 (Argentina)

    2014-12-05

    Highlights: • The use of Nb in RS Al alloys and composites has been reviewed. • Nb was found to improve the GFA of rapid solidified Al–Fe and Al–Ni alloys. • Nb has higher effect in increasing the corrosion resistance than RE in Al–Fe alloys. • Nb improves the stability of the Al–Fe–Cr icosahedral phase. • Nb improves strength, ductility and toughness of nanoquasicrystalline Al matrix composites. - Abstract: The worldwide requirements for reducing the energy consumption and pollution have increased the demand of new and high performance lightweight materials. The development of nanostructured Al-based alloys and composites is a key direction towards solving this demand. High energy prices and decreased availability of some alloying elements open up the opportunity to use non-conventional elements in Al alloys and composites. In this work the application of Nb in rapid solidified Al-based alloys and Al alloys matrix composites is reviewed. New results that clarify the effect of Nb on rapid solidified Al alloys and composites are also presented. It is observed that Nb stabilises the icosahedral Al–Fe/Cr clusters, enhances the glass forming ability and shifts the icosahedral phase decomposition towards higher temperatures. Nb provides higher corrosion resistance with respect to the pure Al and Al–Fe–RE (RE: rare earth) alloys in the amorphous and crystalline states. The use of Nb as a reinforcement to produce new Al alloy matrix composites is explored. It is observed that Nb provides higher strength, ductility and toughness to the nanoquasicrystalline matrix composite. Nb appears as a new key element that can improve several properties in rapid solidified Al alloys and composites.

  7. Optical, Electrical, and Crystal Properties of TiO2 Thin Films Grown by Atomic Layer Deposition on Silicon and Glass Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupa, I.; Unal, Y.; Cetin, S. S.; Durna, L.; Topalli, K.; Okyay, A. K.; Ates, H.

    2018-05-01

    TiO2 thin films have been deposited on glass and Si(100) by atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique using tetrakis(diethylamido)titanium(IV) and water vapor as reactants. Thorough investigation of the properties of the TiO2/glass and TiO2/Si thin films was carried out, varying the deposition temperature in the range from 100°C to 250°C while keeping the number of reaction cycles fixed at 1000. Physical and material property analyses were performed to investigate optical and electrical properties, composition, structure, and morphology. TiO2 films grown by ALD may represent promising materials for future applications in optoelectronic devices.

  8. Mechanically reinforced glass beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Henrik; Olesen, John Forbes

    2007-01-01

    laminated float glass beam is constructed and tested in four-point bending. The beam consist of 4 layers of glass laminated together with a slack steel band glued onto the bottom face of the beam. The glass parts of the tested beams are \\SI{1700}{mm} long and \\SI{100}{mm} high, and the total width of one...

  9. PLZT capacitor on glass substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairchild, M. Ray; Taylor, Ralph S.; Berlin, Carl W.; Wong, Celine W. K.; Ma, Beihai; Balachandran, Uthamalingam

    2016-01-05

    A lead-lanthanum-zirconium-titanate (PLZT) capacitor on a substrate formed of glass. The first metallization layer is deposited on a top side of the substrate to form a first electrode. The dielectric layer of PLZT is deposited over the first metallization layer. The second metallization layer deposited over the dielectric layer to form a second electrode. The glass substrate is advantageous as glass is compatible with an annealing process used to form the capacitor.

  10. Hydrothermal metallurgy for recycling of slag and glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Toshihiro; Yoshikawa, Takeshi; Hirai, Nobumitsu; Katsuyama, Shigeru

    2009-01-01

    The authors have applied hydrothermal reactions to develop recycling processing of slag or glass. As an example, under hydrothermal conditions such as 200 300 deg. C and 30 40MPa with H 2 O, powders made of glass can be sintered to become solidified glass materials containing about 10mass% H 2 O. When the glass containing H 2 O is heated again under normal pressure, the glass expands releasing H 2 O to make porous microstructure. H 2 O starts to emit just above the glass transition temperature. Therefore, when we have a glass with low glass transition temperature, we can make low temperature foaming glass. The SiO 2 -Na 2 O-B 2 O 3 glass is a candidate to be such a foaming glass. In this paper, we describe our recent trial on the fabrication of the low temperature foaming glass by using hydrothermal reaction.

  11. A process for solidifying radioactive liquid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mergan, L.M.; Cordier, J.-P.

    1981-01-01

    In a process for solidifying radioactive liquid waste, its pH is adjusted, solids precipitated and then it is concentrated to about 50% solids content using a thin film evaporator, the concentrate then being dried to powder in a heated mixer. The mixer has a heated wall and working means, e.g. a rotor and helical screw, to shear the dried concentrate from the internal walls, subdivide it into a dry particulate powder, and advance the powder to the mixer outlet. The dried particles are then encapsulated in a suitable matrix. Vapour from the mixer and evaporator is condensed and recycled after any particles have been removed from it. The mixer may both dry the concentrate and mix the dry particles with the encapsulating matrix, and possibly, part of the mixer may be used for pH adjustment and precipitation. (author)

  12. Fabrication of highly conductive Ta-doped SnO2 polycrystalline films on glass using seed-layer technique by pulse laser deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakao, Shoichiro; Yamada, Naoomi; Hitosugi, Taro; Hirose, Yasushi; Shimada, Toshihiro; Hasegawa, Tetsuya

    2010-01-01

    We discuss the fabrication of highly conductive Ta-doped SnO 2 (Sn 1-x Ta x O 2 ; TTO) thin films on glass by pulse laser deposition. On the basis of the comparison of X-ray diffraction patterns and resistivity (ρ) values between epitaxial films and polycrystalline films deposited on bare glass, we proposed the use of seed-layers for improving the conductivity of the TTO polycrystalline films. We investigated the use of rutile TiO 2 and NbO 2 as seed-layers; these are isostructural materials of SnO 2, which are expected to promote epitaxial-like growth of the TTO films. The films prepared on the 10-nm-thick seed-layers exhibited preferential growth of the TTO (110) plane. The TTO film with x = 0.05 on rutile TiO 2 exhibited ρ = 3.5 x 10 -4 Ω cm, which is similar to those of the epitaxial films grown on Al 2 O 3 (0001).

  13. Fabrication of highly conductive Ta-doped SnO{sub 2} polycrystalline films on glass using seed-layer technique by pulse laser deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakao, Shoichiro, E-mail: tg-s-nakao@newkast.or.j [Kanagawa Academy of Science and Technology (KAST), Kawasaki 213-0012 (Japan); Department of Chemistry, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Yamada, Naoomi [Kanagawa Academy of Science and Technology (KAST), Kawasaki 213-0012 (Japan); Hitosugi, Taro [Kanagawa Academy of Science and Technology (KAST), Kawasaki 213-0012 (Japan); Advanced Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Hirose, Yasushi; Shimada, Toshihiro; Hasegawa, Tetsuya [Kanagawa Academy of Science and Technology (KAST), Kawasaki 213-0012 (Japan); Department of Chemistry, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2010-03-31

    We discuss the fabrication of highly conductive Ta-doped SnO{sub 2} (Sn{sub 1-x}Ta{sub x}O{sub 2}; TTO) thin films on glass by pulse laser deposition. On the basis of the comparison of X-ray diffraction patterns and resistivity ({rho}) values between epitaxial films and polycrystalline films deposited on bare glass, we proposed the use of seed-layers for improving the conductivity of the TTO polycrystalline films. We investigated the use of rutile TiO{sub 2} and NbO{sub 2} as seed-layers; these are isostructural materials of SnO{sub 2,} which are expected to promote epitaxial-like growth of the TTO films. The films prepared on the 10-nm-thick seed-layers exhibited preferential growth of the TTO (110) plane. The TTO film with x = 0.05 on rutile TiO{sub 2} exhibited {rho} = 3.5 x 10{sup -4} {Omega} cm, which is similar to those of the epitaxial films grown on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (0001).

  14. Application of XPS and nuclear technique to the study of the gel layers formed under different redex conditions on leached glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manara, A.; Lanza, F.; Ceccone, G.; Della Mea, G.; Salvagno, G.

    1984-01-01

    Surface analysis has been conducted on samples leached in a Soxhlet apparatus at 100 0 C in presence and in absence of air. The XPS and RBS techniques were applied to analyse the content of the silicon, iron and uranium while the nuclear reaction method was utilized to analyse the hydrogen content. The anoxic environment favors the release of iron while decreasing the dissolution of uranium. Hydrogen content is always higher in samples leached in presence of air. Silicon depletion is evident in all cases. The diffusion process seems to regulate the growth of the layer on the glass surface. After long leaching time a detachment, at least partial, of this layer is observed. 14 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab

  15. Solidified structure of Al-Pb-Cu alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Tetsuyuki; Nishi, Seiki; Kumeuchi, Hiroyuki; Tatsuta, Yoshinori.

    1986-01-01

    Al-Pb-Cu alloys were cast into bars or plates in different two metal mold casting processes in order to suppress gravity segregation of Pb and to achieve homogeneous dispersion of Pb phase in the alloys. Solidified structures were analyzed by a video-pattern-analyzer. Plate castings 15 to 20 mm in thickness of Al-Pb-1 % Cu alloy containing Pb up to 5 % in which Pb phase particles up to 10 μm disperse are achieved through water cooled metal mold casting. The plates up to 5 mm in thickness containing Pb as much as 8 to 10 % cast in this process have dispersed Pb particles up to 5 μm in diameter in the surface layer. Al-8 % Pb-1 % Cu alloy bars 40 mm in diameter and 180 mm in height in which gravity segregation of Pb is prevented can be cast by movable and water sprayed metal mold casting at casting temperature 920 deg C and mold moving speed 1.0 mm/s. Pb phase particles 10 μm in mean size are dispersed in the bars. (author)

  16. Effect of resin-modified glass-ionomer cement lining and composite layering technique on the adhesive interface of lateral wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa Marinho AZEVEDO

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Interface integrity can be maintained by setting the composite in a layering technique and using liners. Objective The aim of this in vitro study was to verify the effect of resin-modified glass-ionomer cement (RMGIC lining and composite layering technique on the bond strength of the dentin/resin adhesive interface of lateral walls of occlusal restorations. Material and Methods Occlusal cavities were prepared in 52 extracted sound human molars, randomly assigned into 4 groups: Group 2H (control – no lining + two horizontal layers; Group 4O: no lining + four oblique layers; Group V-2H: RMGIC lining (Vitrebond + two horizontal layers; and Group V-4O: RMGIC lining (Vitrebond + four oblique layers. Resin composite (Filtek Z250, 3M ESPE was placed after application of an adhesive system (Adper™ Single Bond 2, 3M ESPE dyed with a fluorescent reagent (Rhodamine B to allow confocal microscopy analysis. The teeth were stored in deionized water at 37oC for 24 hours before being sectioned into 0.8 mm slices. One slice of each tooth was randomly selected for Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy (CLSM analysis. The other slices were sectioned into 0.8 mm x 0.8 mm sticks to microtensile bond strength test (MPa. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Fisher's test. Results There was no statistical difference on bond strength among groups (p>0.05. CLSM analysis showed no significant statistical difference regarding the presence of gap at the interface dentin/resin among groups. Conclusions RMGIC lining and composite layering techniques showed no effect on the microtensile bond strength and gap formation at the adhesive interface of lateral walls of high C-factor occlusal restorations.

  17. Testing and evaluation of solidified high-level waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engelmann, C.

    1984-01-01

    The report describes research by several laboratories on the behaviour, in aqueous and salt environments, of borosilicate glass ceramics proposed for the solidification of nuclear wastes by the European Community. Results were obtained on inactive simulates, doped materials, and on borosilicate glass containing real radioactive waste. The influence of many important parameters were studied: leaching mode, nature of the leachant, pH, pressure, temperature, duration of the treatment, etc. The results of tests lasting for as little as a few hours or for as long as several hundred days, at temperatures up to 200 0 C or under pressures up to 200 bars, are presented. Numerous analytical techniques (ESCA, EMP, IRR, SEM, etc.) were used to determine the structure and the chemical composition of the altered layer developed by hydration at the glass surface. Information is also given on physical properties of the borosilicate glass: crystallization phase separation, alpha-irradiation stability, mechanical and thermal stability, etc. Finally, preliminary results on the structure and composition of hollandite ceramics are given

  18. Method for accelerated leaching of solidified waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuhrmann, M.; Heiser, J.H.; Pietrzak, R.F.; Franz, E.M.; Colombo, P.

    1990-11-01

    An accelerated leach test method has been developed to determine the maximum leachability of solidified waste. The approach we have taken is to use a semi-dynamic leach test; that is, the leachant is sampled and replaced periodically. Parameters such as temperature, leachant volume, and specimen size are used to obtain releases that are accelerated relative to other standard leach tests and to the leaching of full-scale waste forms. The data obtained with this test can be used to model releases from waste forms, or to extrapolate from laboratory-scale to full-scale waste forms if diffusion is the dominant leaching mechanism. Diffusion can be confirmed as the leaching mechanism by using a computerized mathematical model for diffusion from a finite cylinder. We have written a computer program containing several models including diffusion to accompany this test. The program and a Users' Guide that gives screen-by-screen instructions on the use of the program are available from the authors. 14 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  19. Leaching behavior of cement solidified materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-03-01

    An immersion test of mortar was carried out in order to solidify waste with uranium. The sample consists of 2000g cement, 950g ion exchange water, 1600g sound and 1g water reducing agent. The solid sample and ion exchange water (100 of immersion liquid/original sample) was put into polystyrene closed vessel in globe box and kept four weeks, and then it was separated to the immersion liquid and the solid phase. New ion exchange water was added to the solid and kept four weeks and then separated. Its ratio showed 200. The analysis was done at 100, 200 and 300 ratio of immersion liquid/sample. The solid phase was studied by the powder X-ray diffraction analysis, thermo gravimetric analysis and chemical analysis. The liquid phase was determined by pH values and composition analysis. The results showed Ca(OH) 2 , cement hydrate, was flowed out and it was not found in the solid phase at 200 ratio. (S.Y.)

  20. Leaching studies of radionuclides from solidified wastes with thermosetting resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, K.; Kuribayashi, H.; Morimitsu, W.; Ono, I.

    1982-01-01

    This paper reports on studies of the leachability of Co-60 and Cs-137 from simulated LWR radwastes solidified with thermosetting resin and evaluates the effects of chemical fixation on leachability. It is concluded that insolubilization by a nickel-ferrocyanide compound offers an effective chemical fixation of these radionuclides and is a recommended pretreating method for radwastes that are to be solidified. 2 figures

  1. Biodegradation testing of solidified low-level waste streams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piciulo, P.L.; Shea, C.E.; Barletta, R.E.

    1985-05-01

    The NRC Technical Position on Waste Form (TP) specifies that waste should be resistant to biodegradation. The methods recommended in the TP for testing resistance to fungi, ASTM G21, and for testing resistance to bacteria, ASTM G22, were carried out on several types of solidified simulated wastes, and the effect of microbial activity on the mechanical strength of the materials tested was examined. The tests are believed to be sufficient for distinguishing between materials that are susceptible to biodegradation and those that are not. It is concluded that failure of these tests should not be regarded of itself as an indication that the waste form will biodegrade to an extent that the form does not meet the stability requirements of 10 CFR Part 61. In the case of failure of ASTM G21 or ASTM G22 or both, it is recommended that additional data be supplied by the waste generator to demonstrate the resistance of the waste form to microbial degradation. To produce a data base on the applicability of the biodegradation tests, the following simulated laboratory-scale waste forms were prepared and tested: boric acid and sodium sulfate evaporator bottoms, mixed-bed bead resins and powdered resins each solidified in asphalt, cement, and vinyl ester-styrene. Cement solidified wastes supported neither fungal nor bacterial growth. Of the asphalt solidified wastes, only the forms of boric acid evaporator bottoms did not support fungal growth. Bacteria grew on all of the asphalt solidified wastes. Cleaning the surface of these waste forms did not affect bacterial growth and had a limited effect on the fungal growth. Only vinyl esterstyrene solidified sodium sulfate evaporator bottoms showed viable fungi cultures, but surface cleaning with solvents eliminated fungal growth in subsequent testing. Some forms of all the waste streams solidified in vinyl ester-styrene showed viable bacteria cultures. 13 refs., 12 tabs

  2. Detection of free liquid in cement-solidified radioactive waste drums using computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steude, J.S.; Tonner, P.D.

    1991-01-01

    Acceptance criteria for disposal of radioactive waste drums require that the cement-solidified material in the drum contain minimal free liquid after the cement has hardened. Free liquid is to be avoided because it may corrode the drum, escape and cause environmental contamination. The DOE has requested that a nondestructive evaluation method be developed to detect free liquid in quantities in excess of 0.5% by volume. This corresponds to about 1 liter in a standard 208 liter (55 gallon) drum. In this study, the detection of volumes of free liquid in a 57 cm (2 ft.) diameter cement-solidified drum is demonstrated using high-energy X-ray computed tomography (CT0. In this paper it is shown that liquid concentrations of simulated radioactive waste inside glass tubes imbedded in cement can easily be detected, even for tubes with inner diameters less than 2 mm (0.08 in.). Furthermore, it is demonstrated that tubes containing water and liquid concentrations of simulated radioactive waste can be distinguished from tubes of the same size containing air. The CT images were obtained at a rate of about 6 minutes per slice on a commercially available CT system using a 9 MeV linear accelerator source

  3. Alternative solidified forms for nuclear wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McElroy, J.L.; Ross, W.A.

    1976-01-01

    Radioactive wastes will occur in various parts of the nuclear fuel cycle. These wastes have been classified in this paper as high-level waste, intermediate and low-level waste, cladding hulls, and residues. Solidification methods for each type of waste are discussed in a multiple barrier context of primary waste form, applicable coatings or films, matrix encapsulation, canister, engineered structures, and geological storage. The four major primary forms which have been most highly developed are glass for HLW, cement for ILW, organics for LLW, and metals for hulls

  4. Parameters of Solidifying Mixtures Transporting at Underground Ore Mining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golik Vladimir

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the problem of providing mining enterprises with solidifying filling mixtures at underground mining. The results of analytical studies using the data of foreign and domestic practice of solidifying mixtures delivery to stopes are given. On the basis of experimental practice the parameters of transportation of solidifying filling mixtures are given with an increase in their quality due to the effect of vibration in the pipeline. The mechanism of the delivery process and the procedure for determining the parameters of the forced oscillations of the pipeline, the characteristics of the transporting processes, the rigidity of the elastic elements of pipeline section supports and the magnitude of vibrator’ driving force are detailed. It is determined that the quality of solidifying filling mixtures can be increased due to the rational use of technical resources during the transportation of mixtures, and as a result the mixtures are characterized by a more even distribution of the aggregate. The algorithm for calculating the parameters of the pipe vibro-transport of solidifying filling mixtures can be in demand in the design of mineral deposits underground mining technology.

  5. Parameters of Solidifying Mixtures Transporting at Underground Ore Mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golik, Vladimir; Dmitrak, Yury

    2017-11-01

    The article is devoted to the problem of providing mining enterprises with solidifying filling mixtures at underground mining. The results of analytical studies using the data of foreign and domestic practice of solidifying mixtures delivery to stopes are given. On the basis of experimental practice the parameters of transportation of solidifying filling mixtures are given with an increase in their quality due to the effect of vibration in the pipeline. The mechanism of the delivery process and the procedure for determining the parameters of the forced oscillations of the pipeline, the characteristics of the transporting processes, the rigidity of the elastic elements of pipeline section supports and the magnitude of vibrator' driving force are detailed. It is determined that the quality of solidifying filling mixtures can be increased due to the rational use of technical resources during the transportation of mixtures, and as a result the mixtures are characterized by a more even distribution of the aggregate. The algorithm for calculating the parameters of the pipe vibro-transport of solidifying filling mixtures can be in demand in the design of mineral deposits underground mining technology.

  6. Energy asymmetry in melting and solidifying processes of PCM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Xing; Hu, Huoyan; Shi, Xing; Zhang, Xiaosong

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The melting process and the solidifying process of PCM were asymmetrical. • The enthalpy and state of PCM were affected by its previous state. • The main reason for energy asymmetry of PCM was supercooling. - Abstract: The solidifying process of phase change material (PCM) was usually recognized as the exact inverse process of its melting process, especially when building the heat transfer model of PCM. To figure out that whether the melting process and the solidifying process of PCM were symmetrical, several kinds of PCMs were tested by a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) in this paper. The experimental results showed that no matter using the DSC dynamic measurement method or the DSC step measurement method, the melting process and the solidifying process of PCM were asymmetrical. Because of the energy asymmetry in the melting and solidifying processes of PCM, it was also found that the enthalpy and the state of PCM were not only dependent on its temperature, but also affected by its “previous state”.

  7. Review of metal-matrix encapsulation of solidified radioactive high-level waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jardine, L.J.; Steindler, M.J.

    1978-05-01

    Literature describing previous and current work on the encapsulation of solidified high-level waste forms in a metal matrix was reviewed. Encapsulation of either stabilized calcine pellets or glass beads in alloys by casting techniques was concluded to be the most developed and direct approach to fabricating solid metal-matrix waste forms. Further characterizations of the physical and chemical properties of metal-matrix waste forms are still needed to assess the net attributes of metal-encapsulation alternatives. Steady-state heat transfer properties of waste canisters in air and water environments were calculated for four reference waste forms: (1) calcine, (2) glass monoliths, (3) metal-encapsulated calcine, and (4) metal-encapsulated glass beads. A set of criteria for the maximum allowable canister centerline and surface temperatures and heat generation rates per canister at the time of shipment to a Federal repository was assumed, and comparisons were made between canisters of these reference waste forms of the shortest time after reactor discharge that canisters could be filled and the subsequent ''interim'' storage times prior to shipment to a Federal repository for various canister diameters and waste ages. A reference conceptual flowsheet based on existing or developing technology for encapsulation of stabilized calcine pellets is discussed. Conclusions and recommendations are presented

  8. Precipitation in as-solidified undercooled Ni-Si hypoeutectic alloy: Effect of non-equilibrium solidification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Kai; Liu Feng; Yang Gencang; Zhou Yaohe

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → The solid solubility of Si atom in α-Ni matrix increased with undercooling in the as-solidified sample. → The effect of non-equilibrium solidification on precipitation has been theoretically described. → The nucleation density, the real-time particle size and the precipitation rate are all increased upon annealing. → The precipitate process can be artificially controlled by modifying the initial melt undercooling and the annealing time. - Abstract: Applying glass fluxing and cyclic superheating, high undercooling up to ∼350 K was achieved for Ni-Si hypoeutectic alloy melt. By isothermally annealing the as-solidified alloy subjected to different undercoolings, precipitation behavior of Ni 3 Si particle, at 973 K, was systematically studied. It was found that, the nucleation density and the real-time particle size, as well as the precipitation rate, were all increased, provided the sample was solidified subjected to higher undercooling. This was ascribed mainly to the increased solid solubility of Si atom in α-Ni matrix upon non-equilibrium solidification. On this basis, the non-equilibrium dendrite growth upon solidification and the soft impingement prevailing upon solid-state precipitation have been quantitatively connected. As such, the effect of liquid/solid transformation on subsequent precipitation was described.

  9. Precipitation in as-solidified undercooled Ni-Si hypoeutectic alloy: Effect of non-equilibrium solidification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan Kai [State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710072 (China); Liu Feng, E-mail: liufeng@nwpu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710072 (China); Yang Gencang; Zhou Yaohe [State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710072 (China)

    2011-08-25

    Highlights: {yields} The solid solubility of Si atom in {alpha}-Ni matrix increased with undercooling in the as-solidified sample. {yields} The effect of non-equilibrium solidification on precipitation has been theoretically described. {yields} The nucleation density, the real-time particle size and the precipitation rate are all increased upon annealing. {yields} The precipitate process can be artificially controlled by modifying the initial melt undercooling and the annealing time. - Abstract: Applying glass fluxing and cyclic superheating, high undercooling up to {approx}350 K was achieved for Ni-Si hypoeutectic alloy melt. By isothermally annealing the as-solidified alloy subjected to different undercoolings, precipitation behavior of Ni{sub 3}Si particle, at 973 K, was systematically studied. It was found that, the nucleation density and the real-time particle size, as well as the precipitation rate, were all increased, provided the sample was solidified subjected to higher undercooling. This was ascribed mainly to the increased solid solubility of Si atom in {alpha}-Ni matrix upon non-equilibrium solidification. On this basis, the non-equilibrium dendrite growth upon solidification and the soft impingement prevailing upon solid-state precipitation have been quantitatively connected. As such, the effect of liquid/solid transformation on subsequent precipitation was described.

  10. Surface free energy of polypropylene and polycarbonate solidifying at different solid surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chibowski, Emil; Terpilowski, Konrad

    2009-01-01

    Advancing and receding contact angles of water, formamide, glycerol and diiodomethane were measured on polypropylene (PP) and polycarbonate (PC) sample surfaces which solidified at Teflon, glass or stainless steel as matrix surfaces. Then from the contact angle hystereses (CAH) the apparent free energies γ s tot of the surfaces were evaluated. The original PP surface is practically nonpolar, possessing small electron donor interaction (γ s - =1.91mJ/m 2 ), as determined from the advancing contact angles of these liquids. It may result from impurities of the polymerization process. However, it increases up to 8-10 mJ/m 2 for PP surfaces contacted with the solids. The PC surfaces both original and modified show practically the same γ s - =6.56.7mJ/m 2 . No electron acceptor interaction is found on the surfaces. The γ s tot of modified PP and PC surfaces depend on the kind of probe liquid and contacted solid surface. The modified PP γ s tot values determined from CAH of polar liquids are greater than that of original surface and they increase in the sequence: Teflon, glass, stainless steel surface, at which they solidified. No clear dependence is observed between γ s tot and dielectric constant or dipole moment of the polar probe liquids. The changes in γ s tot of the polymer surfaces are due to the polymer nature and changes in its surface structure caused by the structure and force field of the contacting solid. It has been confirmed by AFM images.

  11. Method of solidifying and disposing radioactive waste plastic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuura, Hiroyuki; Yasumura, Keijiro

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To solidify radioactive waste as it is with plastic by forming a W/O (Water-in-Oil) emulsion with the radioactive waste and a plastic solidifier, and treating it with a polymerization starting agent, an accelerator, and the like. Method: A predetermined amount of alkaline substance such as sodium hydroxide, triethanol, or the like is added quantitatively to radioactive waste and it is mixed by an agitator. A predetermined amount of solidifier such as unsaturated polyester or the like is added to the mixture and it is further mixed by the agitator to form a stable W/O emulsion. Subsequently, predetermined amounts of polymerization starting agent such as methyl ethyl ketone peroxide and polymerization accelerator such as cobalt naphthenate or the like are added thereto, the mixture is mixed, and is then allowed to stand for at room temperature for the plastic solidification thereof. No reaction occurs after the solidification. (Sekiya, K.)

  12. Influences of Indium Tin Oxide Layer on the Properties of RF Magnetron-Sputtered (BaSr)TiO3 Thin Films on Indium Tin Oxide-Coated Glass Substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Song; Oh, Myung Hwan; Kim, Chong Hee

    1993-06-01

    Nearly stoichiometric ((Ba+Sr)/Ti=1.08-1.09) and optically transparent (BaSr)TiO3 thin films were deposited on an indium tin oxide (ITO)-coated glass substrate by means of rf magnetron sputtering for their application to the insulating layer of an electroluminescent flat panel display. The influence of the ITO layer on the properties of (BaSr)TiO3 thin films deposited on the ITO-coated substrate was investigated. The ITO layer did not affect the crystallographic orientation of (BaSr)TiO3 thin film, but enhanced the grain growth. Another effect of the ITO layer on (BaSr)TiO3 thin films was the interdiffusion phenomenon, which was studied by means of secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). As the substrate temperature increased, interdiffusion intensified at the interface not only between the grown film and ITO layer but also between the ITO layer and base glass substrate. The refractive index (nf) of (BaSr)TiO3 thin film deposited on a bare glass substrate was 2.138-2.286, as a function of substrate temperature.

  13. Detection of free liquid in containers of solidified radioactive waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhalgh, Wilbur O.

    1985-01-01

    A method of nondestructively detecting the presence of free liquid within a sealed enclosure containing solidified waste by measuring the levels of waste at two diametrically opposite locations while slowly tilting the enclosure toward one of said locations. When the measured level remains constant at the other location, the measured level at said one location is noted and any measured difference of levels indicates the presence of liquid on the surface of the solidified waste. The absence of liquid in the enclosure is verified when the measured levels at both locations are equal.

  14. Evaluation of solidified high-level waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    One of the objectives of the IAEA waste management programme is to coordinate and promote development of improved technology for the safe management of radioactive wastes. The Agency accomplished this objective specifically through sponsoring Coordinated Research Programmes on the ''Evaluation of Solidified High Level Waste Products'' in 1977. The primary objectives of this programme are to review and disseminate information on the properties of solidified high-level waste forms, to provide a mechanism for analysis and comparison of results from different institutes, and to help coordinate future plans and actions. This report is a summary compilation of the key information disseminated at the second meeting of this programme

  15. Influence of substrate temperature and Zn-precursors on atomic layer deposition of polycrystalline ZnO films on glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makino, Hisao; Miyake, Aki; Yamada, Takahiro; Yamamoto, Naoki; Yamamoto, Tetsuya

    2009-01-01

    Influence of substrate temperature and Zn-precursors on growth rate, crystal structure, and electrical property of undoped ZnO thin films grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD) have been studied. Differences between dimethylzinc (DMeZn) and diethylzinc (DEtZn) used as Zn-precursors were examined. The ZnO films grown using DMeZn showed higher electrical resistivity compared to that grown using DEtZn. However, the higher resistivity in the case of DMeZn was owing to much amount of residual impurities incorporated during the ALD growth

  16. Site suitability criteria for solidified high level waste repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heckman, R.A.; Holdsworth, T.; Towse, D.F.

    1979-01-01

    Activities devoted to development of regulations, criteria, and standards for storage of solidified high-level radioactive wastes are reported. The work is summarized in sections on site suitability regulations, risk calculations, geological models, aquifer models, human usage model, climatology model, and repository characteristics. Proposed additional analytical work is also summarized

  17. Characteristics of solidified high-level waste products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    The object of the report is to contribute to the establishment of a data bank for future preparation of codes of practice and standards for the management of high-level wastes. The work currently in progress on measuring the properties of solidified high-level wastes is being studied

  18. Thermal Predictions of the Cooling of Waste Glass Canisters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donna Post Guillen

    2014-11-01

    Radioactive liquid waste from five decades of weapons production is slated for vitrification at the Hanford site. The waste will be mixed with glass forming additives and heated to a high temperature, then poured into canisters within a pour cave where the glass will cool and solidify into a stable waste form for disposal. Computer simulations were performed to predict the heat rejected from the canisters and the temperatures within the glass during cooling. Four different waste glass compositions with different thermophysical properties were evaluated. Canister centerline temperatures and the total amount of heat transfer from the canisters to the surrounding air are reported.

  19. Testing and evaluation of solidified high-level waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Batist Al, R.

    1983-01-01

    In addition to the preceding programme of the European Atomic Energy Community two new borosilicate glass compositions have been introduced. The chemical stability of these waste forms, in particular with respect to geological disposal conditions, is examined as well as effects of alpha-radiation and of devitrification. Leaching studies include theoretical and experimental investigations of the basic leaching mechanisms, the measurement of the leach rates of a number of critical radioisotopes and the influence on the leach rate of various parameters such as temperature, pressure pH and duration. Of particular interest is the simulation of repository conditions. Prelimimary results are described related to various mineral waters, granite and salt solutions. The surface layers generated on the waste forms during corrosion are investigated in detail using various experimental techniques such as scanning electron microscopy, X-ray analysis and alpha particle energy loss spectra measurements. The radiation stability was further tested by continuing investigations of the samples doped with 238 Pu in the course of the previous programme; density and leach rate variations were measured. Effects on the leach rate of devitrification resulting from various heat treatments of active glass samples were also investigated

  20. Experimental Investigation of Closed Porosity of Inorganic Solidified Foam Designed to Prevent Coal Fires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Lu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to overcome the deficiency of the existing fire control technology and control coal spontaneous combustion by sealing air leakages in coal mines, inorganic solidified foam (ISF with high closed porosity was developed. The effect of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS concentration on the porosity of the foams was investigated. The results showed that the optimized closed porosity of the solidified foam was 38.65 wt.% for an SDS concentration of approximately 7.4×10-3 mol/L. Based on observations of the microstructure of the pore walls after solidification, it was inferred that an equilibrium between the hydration process and the drainage process existed. Therefore, the ISF was improved using three different systems. Gelatin can increase the viscosity of the continuous phase to form a viscoelastic film around the air cells, and the SDS + gelatin system can create a mixed surfactant layer at gas/liquid interfaces. The accelerator (AC accelerates the hydration process and coagulation of the pore walls before the end of drainage. The mixed SDS + gelatin + AC systems produced an ISF with a total porosity of 79.89% and a closed porosity of 66.89%, which verified the proposed stabilization mechanism.

  1. Fabrication of High Transparency Diamond-Like Carbon Film Coating on D263T Glass at Room Temperature as an Antireflection Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chii-Ruey Lin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study intends to deposit high transmittance diamond-like carbon (DLC thin films on D263T glass substrate at room temperature via a diamond powder target using the radio frequency (RF magnetron sputtering technique. Moreover, various process parameters were used to tune the properties of the thin films by using the Taguchi method. Experimental results show that the content of sp3 bonded carbon decreases in accordance with the effect of the substrate temperature. In addition, the hardness of all as-deposited single-layer DLC films ranges from 13.2 to 22.5 GPa, and the RMS surface roughness was improved significantly with the decrease in sputtering pressure. The water repellent of the deposited DLC films improved significantly with the increase of the sp3 content, and its contact angle was larger than that of the noncoated one by 1.45 times. Furthermore, the refraction index (n of all as-deposited DLC films ranges from 1.95 to 2.1 at λ = 600 nm. These results demonstrate that the thickness increased as the reflectance increased. DLC film under an RF power of 150 W possesses high transmissive ability (>81% and low average reflectance ability (<9.5% in the visible wavelengths (at λ = 400–700 nm.

  2. (110)-Textured Ca-doped BiFeO_3 film on refined Pt(111) electrode layer on glass substrate at reduced temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, H.W.; Shen, C.Y.; Yuan, F.T.; Tien, S.H.; Lin, S.Y.; Chen, W.A.; Wang, C.R.; Tu, C.S.; Jen, S.U.

    2016-01-01

    Multiferroic and photovoltaic properties of polycrystalline Bi_0_._8_5Ca_0_._1_5FeO_3 (BCFO) film on refined Pt(111) electrode buffered glass substrate have been studied. Optimized Pt(111) electrode layer having large grain size and smooth morphology enables the development of highly (110)-textured BCFO film at a temperature as low as 450 °C. The prepared BCFO film has dense microstructure, fine grain size, and smooth surface morphology. Good ferroelectric properties with the remanent polarization (2P_r) of 108 μC/cm"2 and electrical coercive field of 405 kV/cm are achieved. Improved ferromagnetic properties with magnetization of 9.2 emu/cm"3 and coercivity of 1250 Oe are also attained. Significant PV properties with open-circuit photovoltage of 0.49 V and the short-circuit photocurrent of 67.4 μA/cm"2 at illumination intensity of 228 mW/cm"2 are observed, which are comparable to BCFO ceramics or BFO epitaxial films. - Highlights: • BCFO polycrystalline film with (110) texture is formed on Pt(111) electrode. • Pt(111) underlayer induces BCFO(110) film with fine grain and flat surface. • Good multiferroic and photovoltaic properties are achieved simultaneously. • Improved multiferroic and photovoltaic properties makes BCFO film a multifunctional material for advanced applications.

  3. Organic semiconductor rubrene thin films deposited by pulsed laser evaporation of solidified solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majewska, N.; Gazda, M.; Jendrzejewski, R.; Majumdar, S.; Sawczak, M.; Śliwiński, G.

    2017-08-01

    Organic semiconductor rubrene (C42H28) belongs to most preferred spintronic materials because of the high charge carrier mobility up to 40 cm2(V·s)-1. However, the fabrication of a defect-free, polycrystalline rubrene for spintronic applications represents a difficult task. We report preparation and properties of rubrene thin films deposited by pulsed laser evaporation of solidified solutions. Samples of rubrene dissolved in aromatic solvents toluene, xylene, dichloromethane and 1,1-dichloroethane (0.23-1% wt) were cooled to temperatures in the range of 16.5-163 K and served as targets. The target ablation was provided by a pulsed 1064 nm or 266 nm laser. For films of thickness up to 100 nm deposited on Si, glass and ITO glass substrates, the Raman and AFM data show presence of the mixed crystalline and amorphous rubrene phases. Agglomerates of rubrene crystals are revealed by SEM observation too, and presence of oxide/peroxide (C42H28O2) in the films is concluded from matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight spectroscopic analysis.

  4. Compositional effects on the formation of a calcium phosphate layer and the response of osteoblast-like cells on polymer-bioactive glass composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Helen H; Tang, Amy; Oh, Seong Cheol; Spalazzi, Jeffrey P; Dionisio, Kathie

    2005-11-01

    Biodegradable polymer-ceramic composites are attractive systems for bone tissue engineering applications. These composites have the combined advantages of the component phases, as well as the inherent ease in optimization where desired material properties can be tailored in a well-controlled manner. This study focuses on the optimization of a polylactide-co-glycolide (PLAGA) and 45S5 bioactive glass (BG) composite for bone tissue engineering. The first objective is to examine the effects of composition or overall BG content on the formation of a Ca-P layer on the PLAGA-BG composite. It is expected that with increasing BG content (0%, 10%, 25%, 50% by weight), the required incubation time in a simulated body fluid (SBF) for the composite to form a detectable surface Ca-P layer will decrease. Both the kinetics and the chemistry will be determined using SEM+EDAX, FTIR, and mu-CT methods. Solution phosphorous and calcium concentrations will also be measured. The second objective of the study is to determine the effects of BG content on the maturation of osteoblast-like cells on the PLAGA-BG composite. It is hypothesized that mineralization will increase with increasing BG content, and the composite will support the proliferation and differentiation of osteoblasts. Specifically, cell proliferation, alkaline phosphatase activity and mineralization will be monitored as a function of BG content (0%, 10%, 50% by weight) and culturing time. It was found that the kinetics of Ca-P layer formation and the resulting Ca-P chemistry were dependent on BG content. The response of human osteoblast-like cells to the PLAGA-BG composite was also a function of BG content. The 10% and 25% BG composite supported greater osteoblast growth and differentiation compared to the 50% BG group. The results of this study suggest that there is a threshold BG content which is optimal for osteoblast growth, and the interactions between PLAGA and BG may modulate the kinetics of Ca-P formation and the

  5. Propertis of solidified radioactive wastes from commercial LWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neilson, R.M. Jr.; Colombo, P.

    1978-01-01

    A study has been performed to characterize the properties of solidified radioactive wastes generated in the liquid radwaste treatment systems at LWRs. The properties which have been studied are those which are pertinent in defining the relative potential for the release of radionuclides to the environment as well as others relating to the evaluation of various solidification agents on an economic and feasibility basis. The use of standard testing procedures in measuring these properties allows an intercomparison of respective properties between various types of solidified waste forms. The leachability, mechanical properties, thermal stability, radiation stability, and thermal properties of hydraulic cement, ureaformaldehyde, bitumen, and addition type polymer waste forms have been measured. In addition, the chemical sensitivity, volumetric efficiency and radiation shielding characteristics of these waste forms have been studied. Emphasis in this paper is placed on the results of studies concerning chemical compatibility of solidification agents with specific waste streams, volumetric efficiency, free standing water, and leachability

  6. Characterization of rapidly solidified powder of high-speed steel

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Miglierini, M.; Lančok, Adriana; Kusý, M.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 190, 1-3 (2009), s. 51-57 ISSN 0304-3843 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP203/07/P011 Grant - others:GA(SK) VEGA1/3190/06 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : Rapidly solidified powder * Tool steel * Mössbauer spectroscopy Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 0.209, year: 2007

  7. Rapidly solidified prealloyed powders by laser spin atomization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konitzer, D. G.; Walters, K. W.; Heiser, E. L.; Fraser, H. L.

    1984-01-01

    A new technique, termed laser spin atomization, for the production of rapidly solidified prealloyed powders is described. The results of experiments involving the production of powders of two alloys, one based on Ni, the other on Ti, are presented. The powders have been characterized using light optical metallography, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and Auger elec-tron spectroscopy, and these various observations are described.

  8. Electric melting furnace of solidifying radioactive waste by utilizing magnetic field and melting method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igarashi, Hiroshi.

    1990-01-01

    An electric melting furnace for solidification of radioactive wastes utilizing magnetic fields in accordance with the present invention comprises a plurality of electrodes supplying AC current to molten glass in a glass melting furnace and a plurality of magnetic poles for generating AC magnetic fields. Interactions between the current and the magnetic field, generated forces in the identical direction in view of time in the molten glass. That is, forces for promoting the flow of molten glass in the melting furnace are resulted due to the Fleming's left-hand rule. As a result, the following effects can be obtained. (1) The amount of heat ransferred from the molten glass to the starting material layer on the molten surface is increased to improve the melting performance. (2) For an identical melting performance, the size and the weight of the melting furnace can be reduced to decrease the amount of secondary wastes when the apparatus-life is exhausted. (3) Bottom deposits can be suppressed and prevented from settling and depositing to the reactor bottom by the promoted flow in the layer. (4) Further, the size of auxiliary electrodes for directly supplying electric current to heat the molten glass near the reactor bottom can be decreased. (I.S.)

  9. High-level radioactive waste glass and storage canister design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slate, S.C.; Ross, W.A.

    1979-01-01

    Management of high-level radioactive wastes is a primary concern in nuclear operations today. The main objective in managing these wastes is to convert them into a solid, durable form which is then isolated from man. A description is given of the design and evaluation of this waste form. The waste form has two main components: the solidified waste and the storage canister. The solid waste form discussed in this study is glass. Waste glasses have been designed to be inert to water attack, physically rugged, low in volatility, and stable over time. Two glass-making processes are under development at PNL. The storage canister is being designed to provide high-integrity containment for solidified wastes from processing to terminal storage. An outline is given of the steps in canister design: material selection, stress and thermal analyses, quality verification, and postfill processing. Examples are given of results obtained from actual nonradioactive demonstration tests. 14 refs

  10. Glass sealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brow, R.K.; Kovacic, L.; Chambers, R.S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Hernetic glass sealing technologies developed for weapons component applications can be utilized for the design and manufacture of fuel cells. Design and processing of of a seal are optimized through an integrated approach based on glass composition research, finite element analysis, and sealing process definition. Glass sealing procedures are selected to accommodate the limits imposed by glass composition and predicted calculations.

  11. Electrochromic Glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-07-31

    this glass and that dipole-dipole correlations contribute to the "ferroelectric-like" character of this amorphous system. The TeO2 -W03 glasses can only...shows the dielectric constant and Fig. I(b) glass from pure TeO2 ot pure WO. In addition, glass the tan 8 of the WO glass as a function of temperature... glasses containing WO, in various glass forming nitworks of LifO-B1O0, Na:O-BzO,, and TeO2 were prepared from reagent grade oxides at 800 C - 9SO C in

  12. Micro and Macro Segregation in Alloys Solidifying with Equiaxed Morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanescu, Doru M.; Curreri, Peter A.; Leon-Torres, Jose; Sen, Subhayu

    1996-01-01

    To understand macro segregation formation in Al-Cu alloys, experiments were run under terrestrial gravity (1g) and under low gravity during parabolic flights (10(exp -2) g). Alloys of two different compositions (2% and 5% Cu) were solidified at two different cooling rates. Systematic microscopic and SEM observations produced microstructural and segregation maps for all samples. These maps may be used as benchmark experiments for validation of microstructure evolution and segregation models. As expected, the macro segregation maps are very complex. When segregation was measured along the central axis of the sample, the highest macro segregation for samples solidified at 1g was obtained for the lowest cooling rate. This behavior is attributed to the longer time available for natural convection and shrinkage flow to affect solute redistribution. In samples solidified under low-g, the highest macro-segregation was obtained at the highest cooling rate. In general, low-gravity solidification resulted in less segregation. To explain the experimental findings, an analytical (Flemings-Nereo) and a numerical model were used. For the numerical model, the continuum formulation was employed to describe the macroscopic transports of mass, energy, and momentum, associated with the microscopic transport phenomena, for a two-phase system. The model proposed considers that liquid flow is driven by thermal and solutal buoyancy, and by solidification shrinkage. The Flemings-Nereo model explains well macro segregation in the initial stages of low-gravity segregation. The numerical model can describe the complex macro segregation pattern and the differences between low- and high-gravity solidification.

  13. Nickel speciation in cement-stabilized/solidified metal treatment filtercakes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, Amitava, E-mail: reroy@lsu.edu [J. Bennett Johnston, Sr., Center for Advanced Microstructures and Devices, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70806, USA (United States); Stegemann, Julia A., E-mail: j.stegemann@ucl.ac.uk [Centre for Resource Efficiency & the Environment, Department of Civil, Environmental & Geomatic Engineering, University College London, Chadwick Building, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, UK (United Kingdom)

    2017-01-05

    Highlights: • XAS shows the same Ni speciation in untreated and stabilized/solidified filtercake. • Ni solubility is the same for untreated and stabilized/solidified filtercake. • Leaching is controlled by pH and physical encapsulation for all binders. - Abstract: Cement-based stabilization/solidification (S/S) is used to decrease environmental leaching of contaminants from industrial wastes. In this study, two industrial metal treatment filtercakes were characterized by X-ray diffractometry (XRD), thermogravimetric and differential thermogravimetric analysis (TG/DTG) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR); speciation of nickel was examined by X-ray absorption (XAS) spectroscopy. Although the degree of carbonation and crystallinity of the two untreated filtercakes differed, α-nickel hydroxide was identified as the primary nickel-containing phase by XRD and nickel K edge XAS. XAS showed that the speciation of nickel in the filtercake was unaltered by treatment with any of five different S/S binder systems. Nickel leaching from the untreated filtercakes and all their stabilized/solidified products, as a function of pH in the acid neutralization capacity test, was essentially complete below pH ∼5, but was 3–4 orders of magnitude lower at pH 8–12. S/S does not respeciate nickel from metal treatment filtercakes and any reduction of nickel leaching by S/S is attributable to pH control and physical mechanisms only. pH-dependent leaching of Cr, Cu and Ni is similar for the wastes and s/s products, except that availability of Cr, Cu and Zn at decreased pH is reduced in matrices containing ground granulated blast furnace slag.

  14. Glass formation and unusual hygroscopic growth of iodic acid solution droplets with relevance for iodine mediated particle formation in the marine boundary layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. J. Murray

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Iodine oxide particles are known to nucleate in the marine boundary layer where gas phase molecular iodine and organoiodine species are produced by macroalgae. These ultra-fine particles may then grow through the condensation of other materials to sizes where they may serve as cloud condensation nuclei. There has been some debate over the chemical identity of the initially nucleated particles. In laboratory simulations, hygroscopic measurements have been used to infer that they are composed of insoluble I2O4, while elemental analysis of laboratory generated particles suggests soluble I2O5 or its hydrated form iodic acid, HIO3 (I2O5·H2O. In this paper we explore the response of super-micron sized aqueous iodic acid solution droplets to varying humidity using both Raman microscopy and single particle electrodynamic traps. These measurements reveal that the propensity of an iodic acid solution droplet to crystallise is negligible on drying to ~0% relative humidity (RH. On applying mechanical pressure to these droplets they shatter in a manner consistent with an ultra-viscous liquid or a brittle glass. Water retention in amorphous material at low RH is important for understanding the hygroscopic growth of aerosol particles and uptake of other condensable material. Subsequent water uptake between 10 and 20% RH causes their viscosity to reduce sufficiently that the cracked droplets flow and merge. The persistence of iodic acid solution in an amorphous state, rather than a crystalline state, suggests they will more readily accommodate other condensable material and are therefore more likely to grow to sizes where they may serve as cloud condensation nuclei. On increasing the humidity to ~90% the mass of the droplets only increases by ~20% with a corresponding increase in radius of only 6%, which is remarkably small for a highly soluble material. We suggest that the

  15. Detection of free liquid in containers of solidified radioactive waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhalgh, W.O.

    Nondestructive detection of the presence of free liquid within a sealed enclosure containing solidified waste is accomplished by measuring the levels of waste at two diametrically opposite locations while slowly tilting the enclosure toward one of said locations. When the measured level remains constant at the other location, the measured level at said one location is noted and any measured difference of levels indicates the presence of liquid on the surface of the solifified waste. The absence of liquid in the enclosure is verified when the measured levels at both locations are equal.

  16. Undercooling and demixing in rapidly solidified Cu-Co alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Battezzati, L.; Curiotto, S.; Johnson, Erik

    2007-01-01

    The Cu–Co system displays a metastable miscibility gap in the liquid state. A considerable amount of work has been performed to study phase separation and related microstructures showing that demixing of the liquid is followed by coagulation before dendritic solidification. Due to kinetic...... competition of transformation phenomena, the mechanisms have not been fully disclosed. This contribution reviews such findings with the help of a computer calculation of the phase diagram and extends the present knowledge by presenting new results obtained by rapidly solidifying various Cu–Co compositions...... using a wide range of cooling rates achieved by forcing the liquid into cylindric and conic moulds and by melt spinning....

  17. Filling of recovered mining areas using solidifying backfill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeman Róbert

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to explore the possibilities for filling recovered mining areas using solidifying backfill .The article describes the preparation of the backfill (backfill formulation with an eventual application using low quality sands, wastes from treatment plants and ash from power plants etc now to transport it as well as its application in practice. Advantageous and disadvantageous of this method are also mentioned.Several factors must be taken info consideration during the preparation process of the backfill mixture. Firstly, the quantities of each individual component must be constantly regulated. Secondly, the properties of each component must be respected. In addition, the needs of the pipeline transport system and the specific conditions of the recovered area to be filled must also be considered.Hydraulic transport and pneumo-hydraulic pipeline transport are used for handling the backfill. Pumps for transporting the solidifying backfill have to carry out demanding tasks.Due to the physical-mechanical properties of the backfill, only highly powerful pumps can be considered. Piston type pumps such as Abel Simplex and Duplex pumps with capacities of up to 100 m3.h-1 and operating pressures of up to 16 MPa would be suitable.This method has been applied abroad for different purposes. For example, solid backfill was used in the Hamr mine during exploitation of uranium using the room-and-pillar system mining method.In the Ostrava–Karvina Coal field, backfill was used in decontamination work, filling areas in a zone of dangerous deformations and for creating a dividing stratum during thick seam mining.Research info the use of solidifying backfill was also done in the Walsum mine in Germany. The aim of this research was:- to investigate the possibilities of filling a collapsing area in a working face using a solidifying mixture of power plant ash and water,- to verify whether towing pipelines proposed by the DMT corporation would be

  18. Testing and evaluation of solidified high-level waste forms. Joint annual progress report 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malow, G.

    1985-01-01

    A second joint programme of the European Atomic Community was started in 1981 under the indirect action programme (1980-84), Action No 5 'Testing and evaluation of the properties of various potential materials for immobilizing high activity waste'. The overall objective of the research is to test various European potential solidified high-level radioactive waste forms so as to predict their behaviour after disposal. The most important aspect is to produce data to calculate the activity release from the waste products under the attack of various aqueous solutions. The experiments were partly performed under waste repository relevant conditions and partly under simplified conditions for investigating basic activity release mechanisms. The topics of the programme were: (i) studies of basic leaching mechanisms; (ii) studies of hydrothermal leaching and surface attack of waste glasses; (iii) leach test carried out in contact with granite at low water flow rates; (iv) static leach tests with specimen surrounded by canister and backfill materials; (v) specific isotope leach tests in slowly flowing water; (vi) leach test of actinide spiked samples; (vii) leach tests of highly radioactive samples; (viii) leach tests of alpha radiation stability; (ix) studies of mechanical stability; (x) studies of mineral phases as model compounds and phase relations

  19. Solidified ceramics of radioactive wastes and method of producing it

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oota, Takao; Matake, Shigeru; Ooka, Kazuo.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To provide solidified ceramics which have low leaching properties to water of radioactive substance, excellent heat dissipating and resistive properties and high mechanical strength by mixing and sintering limited amounts of titanium and aluminum compounds with calcined radioactive wastes containing special compound. Method: More than 20% by weight of titanium compound (as TiO 2 ) and more than 5% by weight of aluminum compound (as Al 2 O 3 ) are mixed with the calcined radioactive wasted containing, as converted by oxide, 5 to 40% by weight of Na 2 O, 5 to 20% by weight of Fe 2 O 3 , 5 to 15% by weight of MoO 3 , 5 to 15% by weight of ZrO 2 , 2 to 10% by weight of CeO 2 , 2 to 10% by weight of Cs 2 O, 1 to 5% by weight of BaO, 1 to 5% by weight of SrO, 0.2 to 2% by weight of Rb 2 O, 0.2% by weight of Y 2 O 3 , 0.2 to 2% by weight of NiO, 5 to 20% by weight of rare earth metal oxide, and 0.2 to 2% by weight of Cr 2 O 3 . The mixture is molded, sintered, and solidified to ceramics which contains no Mo phase, Na 2 O, MoO 3 , K 2 O, MoO 3 and Cs 2 O, MoO 3 phases and the like. (Yoshino, Y.)

  20. Leaching experiment of cement solidified waste form under unsaturated condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhiming; Yao Laigen; Li Shushen; Zhao Yingjie; Cai Yun; Li Dan; Han Xinsheng; An Yongfeng

    2003-01-01

    A device for unsaturated leaching experiments was designed and built up. 8 different sizes, ranging from 40.2 cm 3 to 16945.5 cm 3 , of solidified waste form were tested in the experiment. 5 different water contents, from 0.15 to 0.40, were used for the experiment. The results show that the cumulative leaching fraction increases with water content when the sizes of the forms are equal to and less than 4586.7 cm 3 , for example, the ratios of the cumulative leaching fractions are between 1.24-1.41 under water content of 0.35 and 0.15 on 360 day of Teaching. It can also be seen that the cumulative leaching fraction under higher water content is close to that under saturated condition. The cumulative leaching fraction decreases with size of the form. Maximum leached depth of the solidified waste forms is about 2.25 cm after one year Teaching. Moreover, it has no clear effect on cumulative leaching fraction that sampling or non-sampling during the experiment

  1. Glass consistency and glass performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plodinec, M.J.; Ramsey, W.G.

    1994-01-01

    Glass produced by the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will have to consistently be more durable than a benchmark glass (evaluated using a short-term leach test), with high confidence. The DWPF has developed a Glass Product Control Program to comply with this specification. However, it is not clear what relevance product consistency has on long-term glass performance. In this report, the authors show that DWPF glass, produced in compliance with this specification, can be expected to effectively limit the release of soluble radionuclides to natural environments. However, the release of insoluble radionuclides to the environment will be limited by their solubility, and not glass durability

  2. Cold Heat Release Characteristics of Solidified Oil Droplet-Water Solution Latent Heat Emulsion by Air Bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaba, Hideo; Morita, Shin-Ichi

    The present work investigates the cold heat-release characteristics of the solidified oil droplets (tetradecane, C14H30, freezing point 278.9 K)/water solution emulsion as a latent heat-storage material having a low melting point. An air bubbles-emulsion direct-contact heat exchange method is selected for the cold heat-results from the solidified oil droplet-emulsion layer. This type of direct-contact method results in the high thermal efficiency. The diameter of air bubbles in the emulsion increases as compared with that in the pure water. The air bubbles blown from a nozzle show a strong mixing behavior during rising in the emulsion. The temperature effectiveness, the sensible heat release time and the latent heat release time have been measured as experimental parameters. The useful nondimensional emulsion level equations for these parameters have been derived in terms of the nondimensional emalsion level expressed the emulsion layer dimensions, Reynolds number for air flow, Stefan number and heat capacity ratio.

  3. Prediction of waste glass melt rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, L.

    1987-01-01

    Under contract to the Department of Energy, the Du Pont Company has begun construction of a Defense Waste Processing Facility to immobilize radioactive wastes now stored as liquids at the Department of Energy's Savannah River Plant. The immobilization process solidifies waste sludge by vitrification into a leach-resistant borosilicate glass. Development of this process has been the responsibility of the Savannah River Laboratory. As part of the development, a simple model was developed to predict the melt rates for the waste glass melter. This model is based on an energy balance for the cold cap and gives very good agreement with melt rate data obtained from experimental campaigns in smaller scale waste glass melters

  4. Process for solidifying high-level nuclear waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Wayne A.

    1978-01-01

    The addition of a small amount of reducing agent to a mixture of a high-level radioactive waste calcine and glass frit before the mixture is melted will produce a more homogeneous glass which is leach-resistant and suitable for long-term storage of high-level radioactive waste products.

  5. Colloidal glasses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Colloidal glasses. Glassy state is attained when system fails to reach equilibrium due to crowding of constituent particles. In molecular glasses, glassy state is reached by rapidly lowering the temperature. In colloidal glasses, glassy state is reached by increasing the ...

  6. Durable Glass For Thousands Of Years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jantzen, C.

    2009-01-01

    The durability of natural glasses on geological time scales and ancient glasses for thousands of years is well documented. The necessity to predict the durability of high level nuclear waste (HLW) glasses on extended time scales has led to various thermodynamic and kinetic approaches. Advances in the measurement of medium range order (MRO) in glasses has led to the understanding that the molecular structure of a glass, and thus the glass composition, controls the glass durability by establishing the distribution of ion exchange sites, hydrolysis sites, and the access of water to those sites. During the early stages of glass dissolution, a 'gel' layer resembling a membrane forms through which ions exchange between the glass and the leachant. The hydrated gel layer exhibits acid/base properties which are manifested as the pH dependence of the thickness and nature of the gel layer. The gel layer ages into clay or zeolite minerals by Ostwald ripening. Zeolite mineral assemblages (higher pH and Al 3+ rich glasses) may cause the dissolution rate to increase which is undesirable for long-term performance of glass in the environment. Thermodynamic and structural approaches to the prediction of glass durability are compared versus Ostwald ripening.

  7. Aging in chalcohalide glasses: Origin and consequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Martin; Smedskjær, Morten Mattrup; Wang, W.

    2012-01-01

    the elemental concentration depth profiles in the surface layer of the glasses by using secondary neutral mass spectroscopy. The results show that anionic diffusion processes occur in the glasses during aging. The aging process leads to a decrease in microhardness of the studied glasses, which is attributed...

  8. DURABLE GLASS FOR THOUSANDS OF YEARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jantzen, C.

    2009-12-04

    The durability of natural glasses on geological time scales and ancient glasses for thousands of years is well documented. The necessity to predict the durability of high level nuclear waste (HLW) glasses on extended time scales has led to various thermodynamic and kinetic approaches. Advances in the measurement of medium range order (MRO) in glasses has led to the understanding that the molecular structure of a glass, and thus the glass composition, controls the glass durability by establishing the distribution of ion exchange sites, hydrolysis sites, and the access of water to those sites. During the early stages of glass dissolution, a 'gel' layer resembling a membrane forms through which ions exchange between the glass and the leachant. The hydrated gel layer exhibits acid/base properties which are manifested as the pH dependence of the thickness and nature of the gel layer. The gel layer ages into clay or zeolite minerals by Ostwald ripening. Zeolite mineral assemblages (higher pH and Al{sup 3+} rich glasses) may cause the dissolution rate to increase which is undesirable for long-term performance of glass in the environment. Thermodynamic and structural approaches to the prediction of glass durability are compared versus Ostwald ripening.

  9. The corrosion behavior of DWPF glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebert, W.L.; Bates, J.K.

    1995-01-01

    The authors analyzed the corroded surfaces of reference glasses developed for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) to characterize their corrosion behavior. The corrosion mechanism of nuclear waste glasses must be known in order to provide source terms describing radionuclide release for performance assessment calculations. Different DWPF reference glasses were corroded under conditions that highlighted various aspects of the corrosion process and led to different extents of corrosion. The glasses corroded by similar mechanisms, and a phenomenological description of their corrosion behavior is presented here. The initial leaching of soluble glass components results in the formation of an amorphous gel layer on the glass surface. The gel layer is a transient phase that transforms into a layer of clay crystallites, which equilibrates with the solution as corrosion continues. The clay layer does not act as a barrier to either water penetration or glass dissolution, which continues beneath it, and may eventually separate from the glass. Solubility limits for glass components may be established by the eventual precipitation of secondary phases; thus, corrosion of the glass becomes controlled by the chemical equilibrium between the solution and the assemblage of secondary phases. In effect, the solution is an intermediate phase through which the glass transforms to an energetically more favorable assemblage of phases. Implications regarding the prediction of long-term glass corrosion behavior are discussed

  10. Conceptual process for conversion of high level waste to glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    During a ten-year period highly radioactive wastes amounting to 22 million gallons of salt cake and 5 million gallons of wet sludge are to be converted to 1.2 million gallons of glass and 24 million gallons of decontaminated salt cake and placed in the new storage facilities which will provide high assurance of containment with minimal reliance on maintenance and surveillance. The glass will contain nearly all of the radioactivity in a form that is highly resistant to leaching and dispersion. The salt cake will contain a small amount of residual radioactivity. The process is shown in Figure 1 and the facilities may be arranged in seven modules to accomplish seven tasks, (1) remove wastes from tanks, (2) separate sludge and salt, (3) decontaminate salt, (4) solidify and package sludge and 137 Cs, (5) solidify and package decontaminated salt, (6) store high level waste, and (7) store decontaminated salt cake

  11. Effects of leachate concentration on the integrity of solidified clay liners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Qiang; Zhang, Qian

    2014-03-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the impact of landfill leachate concentration on the degradation behaviour of solidified clay liners and to propose a viable mechanism for the observed degradation. The results indicated that the unconfined compressive strength of the solidified clay decreased significantly, while the hydraulic conductivity increased with the leachate concentration. The large pore proportion in the solidified clay increased and the sum of medium and micro pore proportions decreased, demonstrating that the effect on the solidified clay was evident after the degradation caused by exposure to landfill leachate. The unconfined compressive strength of the solidified clay decreased with increasing leachate concentration as the leachate changed the compact structure of the solidified clay, which are prone to deformation and fracture. The hydraulic conductivity and the large pore proportion of the solidified clay increased with the increase in leachate concentration. In contrast, the sum of medium and micro pore proportions showed an opposite trend in relation to leachate concentration, because the leachate gradually caused the medium and micro pores to form larger pores. Notably, higher leachate concentrations resulted in a much more distinctive variation in pore proportions. The hydraulic conductivity of the solidified clay was closely related to the size, distribution, and connection of pores. The proportion of the large pores showed a positive correlation with the increase of hydraulic conductivity, while the sum of the proportions of medium and micro pores showed a negative correlation.

  12. Chemical leaching of rapidly solidified Al-Si binary alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamauchi, I.; Takahara, K.; Tanaka, T.; Matsubara, K.

    2005-01-01

    Various particulate precursors of Al 100-x Si x (x = 5-12) alloys were prepared by a rapid solidification process. The rapidly solidified structures of the precursors were examined by XRD, DSC and SEM. Most of Si atoms were dissolved into the α-Al(fcc) phase by rapid solidification though the solubility of Si in the α-Al phase is negligibly small in conventional solidification. In the case of 5 at.% Si alloy, a single α-Al phase was only formed. The amount of the primary Si phase increased with increase of Si content for the alloys beyond 8 at.% Si. Rapid solidification was effective to form super-saturated α-Al precursors. These precursors were chemically leached by using a basic solution (NaOH) or a hydrochloric acid (HCl) solution. All Al atoms were removed by a HCl solution as well as a NaOH solution. Granules of the Si phase were newly formed during leaching. The specific surface area was about 50-70 m 2 /g independent of Si content. The leaching behavior in both solutions was slightly different. In the case of a NaOH solution, the shape of the precursor often degenerated after leaching. On the other hand, it was retained after leaching by a HCl solution. Fine Si particles precipitated in the α-Al phase by annealing of as-rapidly solidified precursors at 773 K for 7.2 x 10 3 s. In this case, it was difficult to obtain any products by NaOH leaching, but a few of Si particles were obtained by HCl leaching. Precipitated Si particles were dissolved by the NaOH solution. The X-ray diffraction patterns of leached specimens showed broad lines of the Si phase and its lattice constant was slightly larger than that of the pure Si phase. The microstructures of the leached specimens were examined by transmission electron microscopy. It showed that the leached specimens had a skeletal structure composed of slightly elongated particles of the Si phase and quite fine pores. The particle size was about 30-50 nm. It was of comparable order with that evaluated by Scherer

  13. Silicate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutze, W.

    1988-01-01

    Vitrification of liquid high-level radioactive wastes has received the greatest attention, world-wide, compared to any other HLW solidification process. The waste form is a borosilicate-based glass. The production of phosphate-based glass has been abandoned in the western world. Only in the Soviet Union are phosphate-based glasses still being developed. Vitrification techniques, equipment and processes and their remote operation have been developed and studied for almost thirty years and have reached a high degree of technical maturity. Industrial demonstration of the vitrification process has been in progress since 1978. This chapter is a survey of world-wide research and development efforts in nuclear waste glasses and its production technology. The principal glasses considered are silicate glasses which contain boron, i.e., borosilicate glasses

  14. Introduction to the crystallization phenomenon in nuclear glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacquet Francillon, N.

    1997-01-01

    Crystallization is a subject for concern because of its potentially detrimental effects on the technological feasibility of high-temperature melting, and on the chemical durability of the material at intermediate and low temperatures during interim storage or after disposal. The tendency of glass to crystallize depends to a large extent on the composition of the frit and/or of the waste to be solidified. It depends too of the thermal history of the glass generally, the knowledge is mainly upon determination of the time-temperature-transition (TTT) curves, crystal identification and quantification techniques, and their effects on the durability of the glass matrix. French experience is presented. Only a few authors addressed the long-term development of crystalline phases, notably at temperatures below the vitreous transition temperature Tg. Some recommendations for glass crystallization studies are made but glass crystallization after disposal is acceptable provided some conditions are met. (author)

  15. Experiment of solidifying photo sensitive polymer by using UV LED

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Byoung Hun; Shin, Sung Yeol

    2008-11-01

    The development of Nano/Micro manufacturing technologies is growing rapidly and in the same manner, the investments in these areas are increasing. The applications of Nano/Micro technologies are spreading out to semiconductor production technology, biotechnology, environmental engineering, chemical engineering and aerospace. Especially, SLA is one of the most popular applications which is to manufacture 3D shaped microstructure by using UV laser and photo sensitive polymer. To make a high accuracy and precision shape of microstructures that are required from the diverse industrial fields, the information of interaction relationship between the photo resin and the light source is necessary for further research. Experiment of solidifying photo sensitive polymer by using UV LED is the topic of this paper and the purpose of this study is to find out what relationships do the reaction of the resin have in various wavelength, power of the light and time.

  16. Effective hydrogen diffusion coefficient for solidifying aluminium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Felberbaum, M.; Landry-Desy, E.; Weber, L.; Rappaz, M.

    2011-01-01

    An effective hydrogen diffusion coefficient has been calculated for two solidifying Al - 4.5 wt.% Cu and Al - 10 wt.% Cu alloys as a function of the volume fraction of solid. For this purpose, in situ X-ray tomography was performed on these alloys. For each volume fraction of solid between 0.6 and 0.9, a representative volume element of the microstructure was extracted. Solid and liquid voxels were assimilated to solid and liquid nodes in order to solve the hydrogen diffusion equation based on the chemical potential and using a finite volume formulation. An effective hydrogen diffusion coefficient based on the volume fraction of solid only could be deduced from the results of the numerical model at steady state. The results are compared with various effective medium theories.

  17. Microstructural Quantification of Rapidly Solidified Undercooled D2 Tool Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valloton, J.; Herlach, D. M.; Henein, H.; Sediako, D.

    2017-10-01

    Rapid solidification of D2 tool steel is investigated experimentally using electromagnetic levitation (EML) under terrestrial and reduced gravity conditions and impulse atomization (IA), a drop tube type of apparatus. IA produces powders 300 to 1400 μm in size. This allows the investigation of a large range of cooling rates ( 100 to 10,000 K/s) with a single experiment. On the other hand, EML allows direct measurements of the thermal history, including primary and eutectic nucleation undercoolings, for samples 6 to 7 mm in diameter. The final microstructures at room temperature consist of retained supersaturated austenite surrounded by eutectic of austenite and M7C3 carbides. Rapid solidification effectively suppresses the formation of ferrite in IA, while a small amount of ferrite is detected in EML samples. High primary phase undercoolings and high cooling rates tend to refine the microstructure, which results in a better dispersion of the eutectic carbides. Evaluation of the cell spacing in EML and IA samples shows that the scale of the final microstructure is mainly governed by coarsening. Electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) analysis of IA samples reveals that IA powders are polycrystalline, regardless of the solidification conditions. EBSD on EML samples reveals strong differences between the microstructure of droplets solidified on the ground and in microgravity conditions. While the former ones are polycrystalline with many different grains, the EML sample solidified in microgravity shows a strong texture with few much larger grains having twinning relationships. This indicates that fluid flow has a strong influence on grain refinement in this system.

  18. Structure fields in the solidifying cast iron roll

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.S. Wołczyński

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Some properties of the rolls depend on the ratio of columnar structure area to equiaxed structure area created during roll solidification. The transition is fundamental phenomenon that can be apply to characterize massive cast iron rolls produced by the casting house. As the first step of simulation, a temperature field for solidifying cast iron roll was created. The convection in the liquid is not comprised since in the first approximation, the convection does not influence the studied occurrence of the (columnar to equiaxed grains transition in the roll. The obtained temperature field allows to study the dynamics of its behavior observed in the middle of the mould thickness. This midpoint of the mould thickness was treated as an operating point for the transition. A full accumulation of the heat in the mould was postulated for the transition. Thus, a plateau at the curve was observed at the midpoint. The range of the plateau existence corresponded to the incubation period , that appeared before fully equiaxed grains formation. At the second step of simulation, behavior of the thermal gradients field was studied. Three ranges within the filed were visible: EC→EC→EC→EC→(tTECtt↔RERCtt↔a/ for the formation of columnar structure (the C – zone: ( and 0>>T&0>>=−>−=REREttGttG.The columnar structure formation was significantly slowed down during incubation period. It resulted from a competition between columnar growth and equiaxed growth expected at that period of time. The 0≈=−=RERCttGttG relationship was postulated to correspond well with the critical thermal gradient, known in the Hunt’s theory. A simulation was performed for the cast iron rolls solidifying as if in industrial condition. Since the incubation divides the roll into two zones: C and E; (the first with columnar structure and the second with fully equiaxed structure some experiments dealing with solidification were made on semi-industrial scale.

  19. Embedded adhesive connection for laminated glass plates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jens Zangenberg; Poulsen, S.H.; Bagger, A.

    2012-01-01

    The structural behavior of a new connection design, the embedded adhesive connection, used for laminated glass plates is investigated. The connection consists of an aluminum plate encapsulated in-between two adjacent triple layered laminated glass plates. Fastening between glass and aluminum...... usage in a design situation. The embedded connection shows promising potential as a future fastening system for load-carrying laminated glass plates....

  20. Comparison of three and four point bending evaluation of two adhesive bonding systems for glass-ceramic zirconia bi-layered ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee, C; Weddell, J N; Swain, M V

    2017-09-01

    To quantify the adhesion of two bonding approaches of zirconia to more aesthetic glass-ceramic materials using the Schwickerath (ISO 9693-2:2016) three point bend (3PB) [1] test to determine the fracture initiation strength and strain energy release rate associated with stable crack extension with this test and the Charalamabides et al. (1989) [2] four point bend (4PB) test. Two glass-ceramic materials (VITABLOCS Triluxe forte, Vita Zahnfabrik, Germany and IPS.emax CAD, Ivoclar Vivadent, Liechtenstein) were bonded to sintered zirconia (VITA InCeram YZ). The former was resin bonded using a dual-cure composite resin (Panavia F 2.0, Kuraray Medical Inc., Osaka, Japan) following etching and silane conditioning, while the IPS.emax CAD was glass bonded (IPS e.max CAD Crystall/Connect) during crystallization of the IPS.emax CAD. Specimens (30) of the appropriate dimensions were fabricated for the Schwickerath 3PB and 4PB tests. Strength values were determined from crack initiation while strain energy release rate values were determined from the minima in the force-displacement curves with the 3PB test (Schneider and Swain, 2015) [3] and for 4PB test from the plateau region of stable crack extension. Strength values for the resin and glass bonded glass ceramics to zirconia were 22.20±6.72MPa and 27.02±3.49MPa respectively. The strain energy release rates for the two methods used were very similar and for the glass bonding, (4PB) 15.14±5.06N/m (or J/m 2 ) and (3PB) 16.83±3.91N/m and resin bonding (4PB) 8.34±1.93N/m and (3PB) 8.44±2.81N/m respectively. The differences in strength and strain energy release rate for the two bonding approaches were statistically significant (pceramics to zirconia. Copyright © 2017 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Multi-layered pallet and production method and device therefor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudo, Shigeru.

    1995-01-01

    The present invention concerns the production of a solid tritium pellet for use in a thermonuclear reactor. A first pellet constituent material constituting an outer layer of the pellet is solidified under cooling to form a solidification product for the pellet. A cave is formed on one end face of the pellet solidification product. A second pellet constituent material constituting an inner layer of the pellet is supplied and solidified under cooling. After scraping a predetermined amount of the other end face of the pellet solidification material, the first pellet constituent material is additionally supplied and solidified under cooling. The size and the relative position of each of layers can be determined definitely and the inner layer can be formed reliably while fuels can be accurately supplied with no loss to a required portion in plasma. (N.H.)

  2. Quantification of elemental area densities in multiple metal layers (Au/Ni/Cu) on a Cr-coated quartz glass substrate for certification of NMIJ CRM 5208-a.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariga, Tomoko; Zhu, Yanbei; Ito, Mika; Takatsuka, Toshiko; Terauchi, Shinya; Kurokawa, Akira; Inagaki, Kazumi

    2018-04-01

    Area densities of Au/Ni/Cu layers on a Cr-coated quartz substrate were characterized to certify a multiple-metal-layer certified reference material (NMIJ CRM5208-a) that is intended for use in the analysis of the layer area density and the thickness by an X-ray fluorescence spectrometer. The area densities of Au/Ni/Cu layers were calculated from layer mass amounts and area. The layer mass amounts were determined by using wet chemical analyses, namely inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), isotope-dilution (ID-) ICP-MS, and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) after dissolving the layers with diluted mixture of HCl and HNO 3 (1:1, v/v). Analytical results of the layer mass amounts obtained by the methods agreed well with each another within their uncertainty ranges. The area of the layer was determined by using a high-resolution optical scanner calibrated by Japan Calibration Service System (JCSS) standard scales. The property values of area density were 1.84 ± 0.05 μg/mm 2 for Au, 8.69 ± 0.17 μg/mm 2 for Ni, and 8.80 ± 0.14 μg/mm 2 for Cu (mean ± expanded uncertainty, coverage factor k = 2). In order to assess the reliability of these values, the density of each metal layer calculated from the property values of the area density and layer thickness measured by using a scanning electron microscope were compared with available literature values and good agreement between the observed values and values obtained in previous studies.

  3. Neutron Diffraction from the Second Layer of 4He on Graphite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    da Costa Carneiro, Kim; Passell, L.; Thomlinson, W.

    1981-01-01

    Neutron diffraction has been used to study the second atomic layer of **4He adsorbed on graphite. As the **4He-coverage exceeds the first layer, the second initially forms a fluid phase. But when there is enough **4He in the third layer to compress the second, this layer solidifies. The structure...

  4. Glass produced by underground nuclear explosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, L.; Piwinskii, A.; Ryerson, F.; Tewes, H.; Beiriger, W.

    1983-01-01

    Detonation of an underground nuclear explosive produces a strong shock wave which propagates spherically outward, vaporizing the explosive and nearby rock and melting, the surrounding rock. The vaporized material expands adiabatically, forming a cavity. As the energy is dissipated during the cavity formation process, the explosive and rock debris condense and mix with the melted rock. The melt flows to the bottom of the cavity where it is quenched by fractured rock fragments falling from above as the cavity collapses. Measurements indicate that about 740 tonnes of rock and/or soil are melted for every kiloton (10 12 calories) of explosive energy, or about 25% of the explosive energy goes to melting rock. The resulting glass composition reflects the composition of the unaltered rock with explosive debris. The appearance ranges from white pumice to dense, dark lava. The bulk composition and color vary with the amount of explosive iron incorporated into the glass. The refractory explosion products are mixed with the solidified melt, although the degree of mixing is variable. Electron microprobe studies of glasses produced by Rainier in welded tuff have produced the following results: glasses are dehydrated relative to the host media, glasses are extremely heterogeneous on a 20 μm scale, a ubiquitous feature is the presence of dark marble-cake regions in the glass, which were locally enriched in iron and may be related to the debris, optically amorphous regions provide evidence of shock melting, only limited major element redistribution and homogenization occur within the cavity

  5. Modelling aqueous corrosion of nuclear waste phosphate glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poluektov, Pavel P.; Schmidt, Olga V.; Kascheev, Vladimir A. [Bochvar All-Russian Scientific Research Institute for Inorganic Materials (VNIINM), Moscow (Russian Federation); Ojovan, Michael I., E-mail: m.ojovan@sheffield.ac.uk [Immobilisation Science Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Sheffield, Mappin Street, Sheffield, S1 3JD (United Kingdom)

    2017-02-15

    A model is presented on nuclear sodium alumina phosphate (NAP) glass aqueous corrosion accounting for dissolution of radioactive glass and formation of corrosion products surface layer on the glass contacting ground water of a disposal environment. Modelling is used to process available experimental data demonstrating the generic inhibiting role of corrosion products on the NAP glass surface. - Highlights: • The radionuclides yield is determined by the transport from the glass through the surface corrosion layer. • Formation of the surface layer is due to the dissolution of the glass network and the formation of insoluble compounds. • The model proposed accounts for glass dissolution, formation of corrosion layer, specie diffusion and chemical reactions. • Analytical solutions are found for corrosion layer growth rate and glass components component leaching rates.

  6. Recycle Glass in Foam Glass Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; König, Jakob; Yue, Yuanzheng

    The foam glass industry turn recycle glass into heat insulating building materials. The foaming process is relative insensitive to impurities in the recycle glass. It is therefore considered to play an important role in future glass recycling. We show and discuss trends of use of recycled glasses...... in foam glass industry and the supply sources and capacity of recycle glass....

  7. Glass Durability Modeling, Activated Complex Theory (ACT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CAROL, JANTZEN

    2005-01-01

    The most important requirement for high-level waste glass acceptance for disposal in a geological repository is the chemical durability, expressed as a glass dissolution rate. During the early stages of glass dissolution in near static conditions that represent a repository disposal environment, a gel layer resembling a membrane forms on the glass surface through which ions exchange between the glass and the leachant. The hydrated gel layer exhibits acid/base properties which are manifested as the pH dependence of the thickness and nature of the gel layer. The gel layer has been found to age into either clay mineral assemblages or zeolite mineral assemblages. The formation of one phase preferentially over the other has been experimentally related to changes in the pH of the leachant and related to the relative amounts of Al +3 and Fe +3 in a glass. The formation of clay mineral assemblages on the leached glass surface layers ,lower pH and Fe +3 rich glasses, causes the dissolution rate to slow to a long-term steady state rate. The formation of zeolite mineral assemblages ,higher pH and Al +3 rich glasses, on leached glass surface layers causes the dissolution rate to increase and return to the initial high forward rate. The return to the forward dissolution rate is undesirable for long-term performance of glass in a disposal environment. An investigation into the role of glass stoichiometry, in terms of the quasi-crystalline mineral species in a glass, has shown that the chemistry and structure in the parent glass appear to control the activated surface complexes that form in the leached layers, and these mineral complexes ,some Fe +3 rich and some Al +3 rich, play a role in whether or not clays or zeolites are the dominant species formed on the leached glass surface. The chemistry and structure, in terms of Q distributions of the parent glass, are well represented by the atomic ratios of the glass forming components. Thus, glass dissolution modeling using simple

  8. Synthesis of laser beam rapidly solidified novel surfaces on D2 tool steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, B.A.; Rizwan, K.F.; Minhas, J.A.; Waheed-ul-Haq, S.; Shahid, M.

    2011-01-01

    Surface layer of D2 tool steel was subjected to laser surface melting using continuous wave 2.5 kW CO/sub 2/ laser in point source melting mode. The processing parameters were varied to achieve a uniform depth of around 2 mm. Microstructural study revealed epitaxial growth of fine dendritic structure with secondary dendrite arm spacing in the range of 20-25 mu m. The phases in the parent annealed sample were BCC ferrite and chromium rich M7C3 carbide. The major phase after laser treatment was austenite and M7C3. The average hardness of annealed sample was 195 HV which increased to 410 HV after laser melting. Corrosion studies in 2% HCl solution exhibited a drastic improvement in corrosion resistance in laser treated samples. Improvement in properties is attributed to the refinement and uniformity of microstructure in the rapidly solidified surface. The case of a moving heat source was subjected to computer aided simulation to predict the melt depth at different processing conditions in point source melting mode. The calculated depths using the model, in ABAQUS software was found in good agreement with the experimental data. (author)

  9. Cosmos & Glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beim, Anne

    1996-01-01

    The article unfolds the architectural visions of glass by Bruno Taut. It refers to inspirations by Paul Sheerbart and litterature and the Crystal Chain, also it analyses the tectonic univers that can be found in the glass pavillion for the Werkbund exposition in Cologne....

  10. Glass Glimpsed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lock, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Glass in poetry as it reflects the viewer and as its power of reflection are both reduced and enhanced by technology.......Glass in poetry as it reflects the viewer and as its power of reflection are both reduced and enhanced by technology....

  11. Spin glasses

    CERN Document Server

    Bovier, Anton

    2007-01-01

    Spin glass theory is going through a stunning period of progress while finding exciting new applications in areas beyond theoretical physics, in particular in combinatorics and computer science. This collection of state-of-the-art review papers written by leading experts in the field covers the topic from a wide variety of angles. The topics covered are mean field spin glasses, including a pedagogical account of Talagrand's proof of the Parisi solution, short range spin glasses, emphasizing the open problem of the relevance of the mean-field theory for lattice models, and the dynamics of spin glasses, in particular the problem of ageing in mean field models. The book will serve as a concise introduction to the state of the art of spin glass theory, usefull to both graduate students and young researchers, as well as to anyone curious to know what is going on in this exciting area of mathematical physics.

  12. Crystallization of copper metaphosphate glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Byeong-Soo; Weinberg, Michael C.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of the valence state of copper in copper metaphosphate glass on the crystallization behavior and glass transition temperature has been investigated. The crystallization of copper metaphosphate is initiated from the surface and its main crystalline phase is copper metaphosphate (Cu(PO)3),independent of the (Cu sup 2+)/(Cu(total)). However, the crystal morphology, the relative crystallization rates, and their temperature dependences are affected by the (Cu sup 2+)/(Cu (total)) ratio in the glass. On the other hand, the totally oxidized glass crystallizes from all over the surface. The relative crystallization rate of the reduced glass to the totally oxidized glass is large at low temperature, but small at high temperature. The glass transition temperature of the glass increases as the (Cu sup 2+)/(Cu(total)) ratio is raised. It is also found that the atmosphere used during heat treatment does not influence the crystallization of the reduced glass, except for the formation of a very thin CuO surface layer when heated in air.

  13. Site suitability criteria for solidified high level waste repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heckman, R.A.; Holdsworth, T.; Isherwood, D.; Towse, D.F.; Dayem, N.L.

    1979-01-01

    The NRC is developing a framework of regulations, criteria, and standards. Lawrence Livermore Laboratory provides broad technical support to the NRC for developing this regulatory framework, part of which involves site suitability criteria for solidified high-level wastes (SHLW). Both the regulatory framework and the technical base on which it rests have evolved in time. This document is the second report of the technical support project. It was issued as a draft working paper for a programmatic review held at LLL from August 16 to 18, 1977. It was printed and distributed solely as a briefing document on preliminary methodology and initial findings for the purpose of critical review by those in attendance. These briefing documents are being reprinted now in their original formats as UCID-series reports for the sake of the historical record. Analysis results have evolved as both the models and data base have changed. As a result, the methodology, models, and data base in this document are severely outmoded

  14. A new technology for concentrating and solidifying liquid LLRW

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newell, N. [TMC, Inc., Portland, OR (United States); Osborn, M.W.; Carey, C.C. [Oregon Health Sciences Univ., Portland, OR (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    One of the unsolved problem areas of low level radioactive waste management is the radiolabeled material generated by life sciences research and clinical diagnostics. In hundreds of academic, biotechnology, and pharmaceutical institutions, there exists large amounts of both aqueous and organic solutions containing radioactively labeled nucleic acids, proteins, peptides, and their monomeric components. We have invented a generic slurry capable of binding all these compounds, thus making it possible to concentrate and solidify the radioactive molecules into a very small and lightweight material. The slurry can be contained in both large and small disposal plastic devices designed for the size of any particular operation. The savings in disposal costs and convenience of this procedure is a very attractive alternative to the present methods of long and short term storage. Additionally, the slurry can remove radiolabeled biological compounds from organic solvents, thus solving the major problem of {open_quotes}mixed{close_quotes} waste. We are now proceeding with the field application stage for the testing of these devices and anticipate widespread use of the process. We also are exploring the use of the slurry on other types of liquid low level radioactive waste.

  15. High Tech Art: Chameleon Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    Dichroic Glass is a technology wherein extremely thin films of metal are vacuum deposited on a glass surface. The coated glass shields spacecraft instruments from cosmic radiation and protects human vision from unfiltered sunlight in space. Because the coating process allows some wavelengths of light and color to reflect and others to pass through, a chameleon effect is produced. Murray Schwartz, a former aerospace engineer, has based his business KROMA on this NASA optical technology. He produces dichroic stained glass windows, mobiles and jewelry. The technique involves deposition of super thin layers of metal oxides applied one layer at a time in a specific order and thickness for the desired effect. His product line is unique and has been very successful.

  16. Glass-solidification method for high level radioactive liquid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, Kazuhiro; Kometani, Masayuki; Sasage, Ken-ichi.

    1996-01-01

    High level liquid wastes are removed with precipitates mainly comprising Mo and Zr, thereafter, the high level liquid wastes are mixed with a glass raw material comprising a composition having a B 2 O 3 /SiO 2 ratio of not less than 0.41, a ZnO/Li 2 O ratio of not less than 1.00, and an Al 2 O 3 /Li 2 O ratio of not less than 2.58, and they are melted and solidified into glass-solidification products. The liquid waste content in the glass-solidification products can be increased up to about 45% by using the glass raw material having such a predetermined composition. In addition, deposition of a yellow phase does not occur, and a leaching rate identical with that in a conventional case can be maintained. (T.M.)

  17. Solidified self-nanoemulsifying formulation for oral delivery of combinatorial therapeutic regimen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jain, Amit K; Thanki, Kaushik; Jain, Sanyog

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: The present work reports rationalized development and characterization of solidified self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery system for oral delivery of combinatorial (tamoxifen and quercetin) therapeutic regimen. METHODS: Suitable oil for the preparation of liquid SNEDDS was selected based...

  18. Solidification of glass powder by a hydrothermal hot-pressing technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishioka, Mamoru; Yanagisawa, Kazumichi; Yamasaki, Nakamichi

    1986-01-01

    A borosilicate glass powder was solidified with a NaOH solution or distilled water by the hydrothermal hot-pressing technique. The effect of hydrothermal conditions on the compressive strength was investigated, and the densification mechanism of the glass powder during the hydrothermal hot-pressing was discussed in terms of isothermal shrinkage. The glass powder was successfully solidified by hydrothermal hot-pressing at a reaction temperature lower than that of an ordinary pressure sintering. The solidified body obtained in the presence of distilled water (10 wt%) at 280 deg C had a high compressive strength of about 2300 kg/cm 2 . The analysis of initial densification process of the glass powder in hydrothermal hot-pressing with Murray's rate equation revealed that the densification proceeds both by viscous flow and by rearrangement process. Analysis of the shrinkage rates with a rate equation of hydrothermal reaction suggested that the dissolution of particles into solution controlled the initial densification of the glass powder, and that the alkaline metal acted as a catalyst. (author)

  19. Welding and Weldability of Directionally Solidified Single Crystal Nickel-Base Superalloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vitek, J M; David, S A; Reed, R W; Burke, M A; Fitzgerald, T J

    1997-09-01

    Nickel-base superalloys are used extensively in high-temperature service applications, and in particular, in components of turbine engines. To improve high-temperature creep properties, these alloys are often used in the directionally-solidified or single-crystal form. The objective of this CRADA project was to investigate the weldability of both experimental and commercial nickel-base superalloys in polycrystalline, directionally-solidified, and single-crystal forms.

  20. Assessment of water/glass interactions in waste glass melter operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Postma, A.K.; Chapman, C.C.; Buelt, J.L.

    1980-04-01

    A study was made to assess the possibility of a vapor explosion in a liquid-fed glass melter and during off-standard conditions for other vitrification processes. The glass melter considered is one designed for the vitrification of high-level nuclear wastes and is comprised of a ceramic-lined cavity with electrodes for joule heating and processing equipment required to add feed and withdraw glass. Vapor explosions needed to be considered because experience in other industrial processes has shown that violent interactions can occur if a hot liquid is mixed with a cooler, vaporizable liquid. Available experimental evidence and theoretical analyses indicate that destructive glass/water interactions are low probability events, if they are possible at all. Under standard conditions, aspects of liquid-fed melter operation which work against explosive interactions include: (1) the aqueous feed is near its boiling point; (2) the feed contains high concentrations of suspended particles; (3) molten glass has high viscosity (greater than 20 poise); and (4) the glass solidifies before film boiling can collapse. While it was concluded that vapor explosions are not expected in a liquid-fed melter, available information does not allow them to be ruled out altogether. Several precautionary measures which are easily incorporated into melter operation procedures were identified and additional experiments were recommended

  1. Behaviour of rare earth elements, as natural analogues of transuranium elements, during weathering of basaltic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daux, V.; Crovisier, J.L.; Petit, J.C.

    1991-01-01

    Subglacial basaltic glasses from Iceland have been studied in order to investigate REE behaviour low-temperature weathering. Just as actinides accumulate in the hydrated superficial corrosion layer of borosilicate glasses, REEs are found to be enriched in the natural corrosion layer of basaltic glasses (palagonite). However, this enrichment is only relative for basaltic glasses [fr

  2. GLASS BOX

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Curtis, Laura

    2008-01-01

    The goals of this effort were to develop Glass Box capabilities to allow for the capturing of analyst activities and the associated data resources, track and log the results of automated processing...

  3. Containment of solidified liquid hazardous waste in domal salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domenico, P.A.; Lerman, A.

    1992-01-01

    In recent years, the solidification of hazardous liquid waste has become a viable option in waste management. The solidification process results in an increased volume but more stable waste form that must be disposed of or stored in a dry environment. An environment of choice in south central Texas is domal salt. The salt dome currently under investigation has a water content of 0.002 percent by weight and a permeability less than one nanodarcy. A question that must be addressed is whether a salt dome has a particular set of attributes that will prevent the release of contaminants to the environment. From a regulatory perspective, a ''no migration'' petition must be approved by the U.S.E.P.A. for the containment facility. By ''no migration'' it is implied that the waste must be contained for 10,000 years. A demonstration that this condition will be met will require model calculations and such models must be based on the physical and chemical characteristics of the waste form and the geologic environment. In particular, the models must address the rate of brine infiltration into the caverns, providing information on how fast an immobile solid waste form could convert to a more mobile liquid state. Additionally, the potential for migration by both diffusion and advection is of concern. Lastly, given a partially saturated cavern, the question of how far gaseous waste will be transported over the 10,000 year containment period must also be addressed. Results indicate that the containment capabilities of domal salt are exceptional. A nominal volume of brine will seep into the cavern and most voids between the injected solidified waste pellets will remain unsaturated. Very small quantities of hazardous constituents will be leached from the waste pellets

  4. Measurements of Mercury Released from Solidified/Stabilized Waste Forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattus, C.H.

    2001-01-01

    This report covers work performed during FY 1999-2000 in support of treatment demonstrations conducted for the Mercury Working Group of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Mixed Waste Focus Area. In order to comply with the requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, as implemented by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), DOE must use one of these procedures for wastes containing mercury at levels above 260 ppm: a retorting/roasting treatment or an incineration treatment (if the wastes also contain organics). The recovered radioactively contaminated mercury must then be treated by an amalgamation process prior to disposal. The DOE Mixed Waste Focus Area and Mercury Working Group are working with the EPA to determine if some alternative processes could treat these types of waste directly, thereby avoiding for DOE the costly recovery step. They sponsored a demonstration in which commercial vendors applied their technologies for the treatment of two contaminated waste soils from Brookhaven National Laboratory. Each soil was contaminated with ∼4500 ppm mercury; however, one soil had as a major radioelement americium-241, while the other contained mostly europium-152. The project described in this report addressed the need for data on the mercury vapor released by the solidified/stabilized mixed low-level mercury wastes generated during these demonstrations as well as the comparison between the untreated and treated soils. A related work began in FY 1998, with the measurement of the mercury released by amalgamated mercury, and the results were reported in ORNL/TM-13728. Four treatments were performed on these soils. The baseline was obtained by thermal treatment performed by SepraDyne Corp., and three forms of solidification/stabilization were employed: one using sulfur polymer cement (Brookhaven National Laboratory), one using portland cement [Allied Technology Group (ATG)], and a third using proprietary additives (Nuclear Fuel Services)

  5. Systems and Methods for Fabricating Structures Including Metallic Glass-Based Materials Using Low Pressure Casting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Douglas C. (Inventor); Kennett, Andrew (Inventor)

    2018-01-01

    Systems and methods to fabricate objects including metallic glass-based materials using low-pressure casting techniques are described. In one embodiment, a method of fabricating an object that includes a metallic glass-based material includes: introducing molten alloy into a mold cavity defined by a mold using a low enough pressure such that the molten alloy does not conform to features of the mold cavity that are smaller than 100 microns; and cooling the molten alloy such that it solidifies, the solid including a metallic glass-based material.

  6. Using process instrumentation to obviate destructive examination of canisters of HLW glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuhn, W.L.; Slate, S.C.

    1983-01-01

    An important concern of a manufacturer of packages of solidified high-level waste (HLW) is quality assurance of the waste form. The vitrification of HLW as a borosilicate glass is considered, and, based on a reference vitrification process, it is proposed that information from process instrumentation may be used to assure quality without the need for additional information obtained by destructive examining (core drilling) canisters of glass. This follows mainly because models of product performance and process behavior must be previously established in order to confidently select the desired glass formulation, and to have confidence that the process is well enough developed to be installed and operated in a nuclear facility

  7. Effect of alkali earth oxides on hydroxy-carbonated apatite nano layer formation for SiO2-BaO-CaO-Na2O-P2O5 glass system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiran, P.; Ramakrishna, V.; Shashikala, H. D.; Udayashankar, N. K.

    2017-11-01

    Barium soda lime phosphosilicate [(58SiO2-(32 - x)BaO- xCao-6Na2O-4P2O5 (where x = 15, 20, 25 and 30 mol%)] samples were synthesised using conventional sol-gel method at 700 °C sintering temperature. Thermal, structural properties were studied using thermo gravimetric analysis and differential thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, fourier transform infrared and Raman spectroscopy. Using Raman spectra non-bridging oxygen concentrations were estimated. The hydroxy-carbonated apatite (HCA) layer formation on samples was analysed for 7 days using simulated body fluid (SBF) soaked samples. The growth of HCA layers self-assembled on the sample surface was discussed as a function of NBO/BO ratio. Results indicated that the number of Ca2+ ions released into SBF solution in dissolution process and weight loss of SB-treated samples vary with NBO/BO ratio. The changes in NBO/BO ratios were observed to be proportional to HCA forming ability of barium soda lime phosphosilicate glasses.

  8. Role of pH Changes on Transforming Growth Factor-β1 Release and on the Fibrin Architecture of Platelet-rich Fibrin When Layered with Biodentine, Glass Ionomer Cement, and Intermediate Restorative Material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullaguri, Harish; Suresh, Nandini; Surendran, Smitha; Velmurugan, Natanasabapathy; Chitra, Selvarajan

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of pH that is due to setting reaction of Biodentine, glass ionomer cement (GIC), and intermediate restorative material (IRM) on transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) release and on the fibrin architecture of platelet-rich fibrin (PRF). PRF was obtained from 8 volunteers and layered over the freshly prepared GIC, IRM, and Biodentine mixtures. TGF-β1 release was estimated by using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and fibrin structure of PRF was analyzed by using scanning electron microscope at 1 and 5 hours. Biodentine, GIC, and IRM increased the TGF-β1 release in comparison with that of control group (PRF alone) at both 1 and 5 hours. Biodentine released significantly more TGF-β1 than GIC and IRM at 1 hour. At 5 hours both GIC and Biodentine released significantly more TGF-β1 than IRM. The fibrin architecture of the Biodentine group was similar to that of control group at both 1 and 5 hours. In GIC and IRM groups the fibrillar structure of fibrin was collapsed, ill-defined, and cloudy with very thick fibers and irregularly reduced porosities. Biodentine induces larger amount of TGF-β1 release and also maintains the integrity of fibrin structure when compared with GIC and IRM when layered over PRF. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Production of three-dimensional quantum dot lattice of Ge/Si core-shell quantum dots and Si/Ge layers in an alumina glass matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buljan, M; Radić, N; Sancho-Paramon, J; Janicki, V; Grenzer, J; Bogdanović-Radović, I; Siketić, Z; Ivanda, M; Utrobičić, A; Hübner, R; Weidauer, R; Valeš, V; Endres, J; Car, T; Jerčinović, M; Roško, J; Bernstorff, S; Holy, V

    2015-02-13

    We report on the formation of Ge/Si quantum dots with core/shell structure that are arranged in a three-dimensional body centered tetragonal quantum dot lattice in an amorphous alumina matrix. The material is prepared by magnetron sputtering deposition of Al2O3/Ge/Si multilayer. The inversion of Ge and Si in the deposition sequence results in the formation of thin Si/Ge layers instead of the dots. Both materials show an atomically sharp interface between the Ge and Si parts of the dots and layers. They have an amorphous internal structure that can be crystallized by an annealing treatment. The light absorption properties of these complex materials are significantly different compared to films that form quantum dot lattices of the pure Ge, Si or a solid solution of GeSi. They show a strong narrow absorption peak that characterizes a type II confinement in accordance with theoretical predictions. The prepared materials are promising for application in quantum dot solar cells.

  10. Analysis of cement solidified product and ash samples and preparation of a reference material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishimori, Ken-ichiro; Haraga, Tomoko; Shimada, Asako; Kameo, Yutaka; Takahashi, Kuniaki

    2010-08-01

    Simple and rapid analytical methods for radionuclides in low-level radioactive waste have been developed by the present authors. The methods were applied to simulated solidified products and actual metal wastes to confirm their usefulness. The results were summarized as analytical guide lines. In the present work, cement solidified product and ash waste were analyzed followed by the analytical guide lines and subjects were picked up and solved for the application of the analytical guide lines to these wastes. Pulverization and homogenization method for ash waste was improved to prevent a contamination since the radioactivity concentrations of the ash samples were relatively high. Pre-treatment method was altered for the cement solidified product and ash samples taking account for their high concentration of Ca. Newly, an analytical method was also developed to measure 129 I with a dynamic reaction cell inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer. In the analytical test based on the improved guide lines, gamma-ray emitting nuclides, 60 Co and 137 Cs, were measured to estimate the radioactivity of the other alpha and beta-ray emitting nuclides. The radionuclides assumed detectable, 3 H, 14 C, 36 Cl, 63 Ni, 90 Sr, and alpha-ray emitting nuclides, were analyzed with the improved analytical guide lines and their applicability for cement solidified product and ash samples were confirmed. Additionally a cement solidified product sample was evaluated in terms of the homogeneity and the radioactivity concentrations in order to prepare a reference material for radiochemical analysis. (author)

  11. Glass compositions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    France, P W

    1985-05-30

    A fluoride glass for use in the production of optical fibres has an enhanced D/H ratio, preferably such that OD:OH is at least 9:1. In the example, such a glass is prepared by treating with D/sub 2/O a melt comprising 51.53 mole per cent ZrF/sub 4/, 20.47 mole per cent BaF/sub 2/, 5.27 mole per cent LaF/sub 3/, 3.24 mole per cent AlF/sub 3/, and 19.49 mole per cent LiF.

  12. Surface preparation of gold nanostructures on glass by ultraviolet ozone and oxygen plasma for thermal atomic layer deposition of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lancaster, Cady A., E-mail: lancaster@chem.utah.edu; Shumaker-Parry, Jennifer S., E-mail: shumaker-parry@chem.utah.edu

    2016-08-01

    Thin film deposition to create robust plasmonic nanomaterials is a growing area of research. Plasmonic nanomaterials have tunable optical properties and can be used as substrates for surface-enhanced spectroscopies. Due to the surface sensitivity and the dependence of the near-field behavior on structural details, degradation from cleaning or spectroscopic interrogation causes plasmonic nanostructures to lose distinctive localized surface plasmon resonances or exhibit diminished optical near-field enhancements over time. To decrease degradation, conformal thin films of alumina are deposited on nanostructured substrates using atomic layer deposition. While film growth on homogenous surfaces has been studied extensively, atomic layer deposition-based film growth on heterogeneous nanostructured surfaces is not well characterized. In this report, we have evaluated the impact of oxygen plasma and ultraviolet ozone pre-treatments on Au nanoparticle substrates for thin film growth by monitoring changes in plasmonic response and nanostructure morphology. We have found that ultraviolet ozone is more effective than oxygen plasma for cleaning gold nanostructured surfaces, which is in contrast to bulk films of the same material. Our results show that oxygen plasma treatment negatively impacts the nanostructure and alumina coating based on both scanning electron microscopy analysis of morphology and changes in the plasmonic response. - Highlights: • Plasmonic response indicates oxygen plasma damages Au structures and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films. • Ultraviolet ozone (UVO) re-activates aged Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-coated Au nanostructures. • UVO treatments do not damage Au or Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-coated nanostructures.

  13. A Glass-Ceramic Waste Forms for the Immobilization of Rare Earth Oxides from the Pyroprocessing Waste salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Byung-Gil; Park, Hwan-Seo; Kim, Hwan-Young; Kim, In-Tae

    2008-01-01

    The fission product of rare earth (RE) oxide wastes are generates during the pyroprocess . Borosilicate glass or some ceramic materials such as monazite, apatite or sodium zirconium phosphate (NZP) have been a prospective host matrix through lots of experimental results. Silicate glasses have long been the preferred waste form for the immobilization of HLW. In immobilization of the RE oxides, the developed process on an industrial scale involves their incorporation into a glass matrix, by melting under 1200 ∼ 1300 .deg. C. Instead of the melting process, glass powder sintering is lower temperature (∼ 900 .deg. C) required for the process which implies less demanding conditions for the equipment and a less evaporation of volatile radionuclides. This study reports the behaviors, direct vitrification of RE oxides with glass frit, glass powder sintering of REceramic with glass frit, formation of RE-apatite (or REmonazite) ceramic according to reaction temperature, and the leach resistance of the solidified waste forms

  14. Nanoscale microstructure effects on hydrogen behavior in rapidly solidified aluminum alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tashlykova-Bushkevich, Iya I. [Belarusian State University of Informatics and Radioelectronics, Minsk (Belarus)

    2015-12-31

    The present work summarizes recent progress in the investigation of nanoscale microstructure effects on hydrogen behavior in rapidly solidified aluminum alloys foils produced at exceptionally high cooling rates. We focus here on the potential of modification of hydrogen desorption kinetics in respect to weak and strong trapping sites that could serve as hydrogen sinks in Al materials. It is shown that it is important to elucidate the surface microstructure of the Al alloy foils at the submicrometer scale because rapidly solidified microstructural features affect hydrogen trapping at nanostructured defects. We discuss the profound influence of solute atoms on hydrogen−lattice defect interactions in the alloys. with emphasis on role of vacancies in hydrogen evolution; both rapidly solidified pure Al and conventionally processed aluminum samples are considered.

  15. Primary Dendrite Arm Spacings in Al-7Si Alloy Directionally Solidified on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angart, Samuel; Lauer, Mark; Poirier, David; Tewari, Surendra; Rajamure, Ravi; Grugel, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Samples from directionally solidified Al- 7 wt. % Si have been analyzed for primary dendrite arm spacing (lambda) and radial macrosegregation. The alloy was directionally solidified (DS) aboard the ISS to determine the effect of mitigating convection on lambda and macrosegregation. Samples from terrestrial DS-experiments thermal histories are discussed for comparison. In some experiments, lambda was measured in microstructures that developed during the transition from one speed to another. To represent DS in the presence of no convection, the Hunt-Lu model was used to represent diffusion controlled growth under steady-state conditions. By sectioning cross-sections throughout the entire length of a solidified sample, lambda was measured and calculated using the model. During steady-state, there was reasonable agreement between the measured and calculated lambda's in the space-grown samples. In terrestrial samples, the differences between measured and calculated lambda's indicated that the dendritic growth was influenced by convection.

  16. A Study on Factors Affecting Strength of Solidified Peat through XRD and FESEM Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, J. A.; Napia, A. M. A.; Nazri, M. A. A.; Mohamed, R. M. S. R.; Al-Geethi, A. S.

    2018-04-01

    Peat is soft soil that often causes multiple problems to construction. Peat has low shear strength and high deformation characteristics. Thus, peat soil needs to be stabilized or treated. Study on peat stabilization has been conducted for decades with various admixtures and mixing formulations. This project intends to provide an overview of the solidification of peat soil and the factors that affecting the strength of solidified peat soil. Three types of peats which are fabric, hemic and sapric were used in this study to understand the differences on the effect. The understanding of the factors affecting strength of solidified peat in this study is limited to XRD and FESEM analysis only. Peat samples were collected at Pontian, Johor and Parit Raja, Johor. Peat soil was solidified using fly ash, bottom ash and Portland cement with two mixing formulation following literature review. The solidified peat were cured for 7 days, 14 days, 28 days and 56 days. All samples were tested using Unconfined Compressive Strength Test (UCS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM). The compressive strength test of solidified peat had shown consistently increase of sheer strength, qu for Mixing 1 while decrease of its compressive strength value for Mixing 2. All samples were tested and compared for each curing days. Through XRD, it is found that all solidified peat are dominated with pargasite and richterite. The highest qu is Fabric Mixing 1(FM1) with the value of 105.94 kPa. This sample were proven contain pargasite. Samples with high qu were observed to be having fly ash and bottom ash bound together with the help of pargasite. Sample with decreasing strength showed less amount of pargasite in it. In can be concluded that XRD and FESEM findings are in line with UCS values.

  17. Microstructure and mechanical properties of an Al–Mg alloy solidified under high pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jie, J.C.; Zou, C.M.; Brosh, E.; Wang, H.W.; Wei, Z.J.; Li, T.J.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Al–42.2Mg alloy was solidified under pressures of 1, 2, and 3 GPa and the microstructure analyzed. •A thermodynamic calculation of the Al–Mg phase diagram at high pressures was performed. •The phase content changes from predominantly γ-Al 12 Mg 17 at 1 GPa to FCC solid solution at 3 GPa. •The β-Al 3 Mg 2 is predicted to remain stable at low temperatures but is not observed. •The alloy solidified at high pressure has remarkably enhanced ultimate tensile strength. -- Abstract: Phase formation, the microstructure and its evolution, and the mechanical properties of an Al–42.2 at.% Mg alloy solidified under high pressures were investigated. After solidification at pressures of 1 GPa and 2 GPa, the main phase is the γ phase, richer in Al than in equilibrium condition. When the pressure is further increased to 3 GPa, the main phase is the supersaturated Al(Mg) solid solution with Mg solubility up to 41.6 at.%. Unlike in similar alloys solidified at ambient pressure, the β phase does not appear. Calculated high-pressure phase diagrams of the Al–Mg system show that although the stability range of the β phase is diminished with pressure, it is still thermodynamically stable at room temperature. Hence, the disappearance of the β phase is interpreted as kinetic suppression, due to the slow diffusion rate at high pressures, which inhibits solid–solid reactions. The Al–42.2 at.% Mg alloy solidified under 3 GPa has remarkably enhanced ultimate tensile strength compared to the alloy solidified under normal atmospheric pressure

  18. Bioactive Glasses in Dentistry: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbasi Z

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Bioactive glasses are silicate-based and can form a strong chemical bond with the tissues. These biomaterials are highly biocompatible and can form a hydroxyapatite layer when implanted in the body or soaked in the simulated body fluid. Due to several disadvantages, conventional glass processing method including melting of glass components, is replaced by sol-gel method with a large number of benefits such as low processing temperature, higher purity and homogeneity and therefore better control of bioactivity. Bioactive glasses have a wide range of applications, particularly in dentistry. These glasses can be used as particulates or monolithic shapes and porous or dense constructs in different applications such as remineralization or hypersensitivity treatment. Some properties of bioactive glasses such as antibacterial properties can be promoted by adding different elements into the glass. Bioactive glasses can also be used to modify different biocompatible materials that need to be bioactive. This study reviews the significant developments of bioactive glasses in clinical application, especially dentistry. Furthermore, we will discuss the field of bioactive glasses from beginning to the current developments, which includes processing methods, applications, and properties of these glasses.

  19. Procedure for conditioning high-level solidified wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hild, W; Krause, H; Scheffler, K

    1974-05-30

    The molds of glass, ceramic or basalt-similar mass in which highly radioactive wastes are incorporated are used for the conditioning of waste waters and/or of sewage or precipitating sludge or of natural water to obtain drinking water, prior to the end storage. By means of the gamma-radiation they emit, the viruses and bacteria and worm eggs are killed off as well as the poisonous, and organic substances such as, e.g., chlorated aromatics are destroyed. Furthermore, the filtration power is increased by coagulation, and the sludge is drained. Natural water is degermed. In particular, fission product mixtures of light water reactors can be incorporated in the molds. The molds are immersed in the media.

  20. Microstructure of amorphous and crystalline zirconium alloys rapiddly solidified

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monteiro, W.A.; Bezerra, G.H

    1986-01-01

    In this work we report microstructural studies of rapidly solification of Zr-30% at Cu alloy. This composition was chosen because it is the Zr rich limit of glass formation range. The ribbons were prepared by melt spinning system (cooling rate is estimated in 10 6 K/s) and the average thickness of the microscopy were prepared by double jet electropolishing to investigate the microstructure of the ribbon. It was observed amorphos and crystalline regions. In the crystalline regions occured a radial growth morphology with stress contrats. The beginning of solidification is a polimorphous reaction and the shape of the micrograins is similar to spherulitic form. The average diameter of the grains are 0,5 μm or less. (Author) [pt

  1. Evaluating Primary Dendrite Trunk Diameters in Directionally Solidified Al-Si Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grugel, R. N.; Tewari, S. N.; Poirier, D. R.

    2014-01-01

    The primary dendrite trunk diameters of Al-Si alloys that were directionally solidified over a range of processing conditions have been measured. These data are analyzed with a model based primarily on an assessment of secondary dendrite arm dissolution in the mushy zone. Good fit with the experimental data is seen and it is suggested that the primary dendrite trunk diameter is a useful metric that correlates well with the actual solidification processing parameters. These results are placed in context with the limited results from the aluminium - 7 wt. % silicon samples directionally solidified aboard the International Space Station as part of the MICAST project.

  2. Degradation of glass in the soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romich, H.; Gerlach, S.; Mottner, P. [Fraunhofer-Institut fur Silicatforschung (ISC), Wertheim-Bronnbach (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Glass has been produced and used in Europe for over 2000 years. Glass objects from the Roman period onwards have been excavated during the last centuries. In general, Roman glass is chemically quite stable, and often the only sign of chemical alteration is an iridescent surface, caused by the leaching of cations, which leads to the formation of a hydrated silica-rich layer. Medieval potash glasses are much less durable, and their surfaces are often found deeply leached, sometimes to a point that no unaltered glass remains. These surfaces may be coherent, though fragile, or they are laminar, with no cohesion between the layers at all. In this study an analytical examination of a series of fragments of archaeological glass retrieved from different sites near Cologne and Stuttgart (Germany) has been carried out. Samples of corroded glasses were analysed by optical microscopy and SEM/EDX (surface and cross sections) in order to obtain information about the chemical composition of the bulk glass and the weathered layers. Since the environmental parameters have constantly varied for archaeological objects, mechanistic studies have to rely on laboratory experiments under controlled conditions. For an extensive exposure programme standardised soil or natural garden earth was used, for which the pH was modified. Several corrosion sensitive potash-lime silicate glasses have been designed to study the effect of glass composition. A model glass consisting of SiO{sub 2} (54.2), CaO (28.8) and K{sub 2}O (17.0 weight-%) mostly lead to the formation of a crust on the leached layer, with a total thickness of 100 micrometer (for soil with pH 7 to 8, 12 months exposure). Model glasses also containing Al, Mg and P have built up preferably laminated structures (total thickness up to 200 micrometer). This presentation will give an overview about the variety of degradation phenomena observed on originals and compare the results with controlled laboratory

  3. Glass: Rotary Electric Glass Furnace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Recca, L.

    1999-01-29

    Compared to conventional gas-fired furnaces, the new rotary electric furnace will increase energy efficiency while significantly reducing air emissions, product turnaround time, and labor costs. As this informative new fact sheet explains, the thousand different types of glass optical blanks produced for the photonics industry are used for lasers, telescopes, cameras, lights, and many other products.

  4. Natural analogue study of volcanic glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arai, T.; Yusa, Y.; Sasaki, N.; Tsunoda, N.; Takano, H.

    1989-02-01

    A considerable range in alteration rates of basaltic glasses in various environments has been reported in previous studies. However, these studies paid only cursory attention to the environmental conditions under which the glass had been altered. In this study, the alteration of basaltic glasses was investigated and the environmental conditions and the alteration rate were discussed. Two sample ages were represented: 280 years and 2800 years. Basaltic glasses and their alteration layers were analyzed by electron probe microanalyzer (EMPA) and the thickness of the alteration layers were measured by scanning electron microscope (SEM). The ground water collected near the sampling point of Zunazawa Scoria (2800 years) and the pore water of both samples were analyzed. The alteration temperature and flow rate of water are estimated to be about 13degC and 0.2 l/cm 2 /y respectively on the basis of meteorological data. The alteration layers of young aged basaltic glasses in freshwater conditions are similar to those of leached borosilicate glasses. The alteration rates of these basaltic glasses are estimated to be several μm/1000y. The elemental concentrations in the ground water can be roughly explained as the result of leaching of the glasses. (author)

  5. Nitrate glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirilenko, I.A.; Vinogradov, E.E.

    1977-01-01

    Experimental evidence on behaviour of nitrate glasses is reviewed in terms of relationships between the presence of water in vitrescent nitrate systems and the properties of the systems. The glasses considered belong to systems of Mg(NO 3 ) 2 - Nd(NO 3 ) 3 ; Hg(NO 3 ) 2 -Nd(NO 3 ) 3 ; NaNO 3 -Mg(NO 3 ) 2 -Nd(NO 3 ) 3 ; M-Zn(NO 3 ) 3 , where M is a mixture of 20% mass NaNO 3 and 80% mass Mg(NO 3 ) 2 , and Zn is a rare earth ion. Nitrate glass is shown to be a product of dehydration. Vitrification may be regarded as a resusl of formation of molecular complexes in the chain due to hydrogen bonds of two types, i.e. water-water, or water-nicrate group. Chain formation, along with low melting points of the nitrates, hinder crystallization of nitrate melts. Provided there is enough water, this results in vitrification

  6. Radiochemical analysis of homogeneously solidified low level radioactive waste from nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Kaneaki; Ikeuchi, Yoshihiro; Higuchi, Hideo

    1995-01-01

    As mentioned above, we have reliable radioanalytical methods for all kinds of homogeneously solidified wastes. We are now under studying an analytical method for pellets which are made from evaporator concentrates or resin. And we are going to study to establish new analytical method for the rad-waste including metal, cloths and so on in near future. (J.P.N.)

  7. Evaluation of Carbonation Effects on Cement-Solidified Contaminated Soil Used in Road Subgrade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yundong Zhou

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Cement solidification/stabilization is widely used towards contaminated soil since it has a low price and significant improvement for the structural capacity of soil. To increase the usage of the solidified matrix, cement-solidified contaminated soil was used as road subgrade material. In this study, carbonation effect that reflected the durability on strength characteristics of cement-solidified contaminated soil and the settlement of pavement were evaluated through experimental and numerical analysis, respectively. According to results, compressive strengths of specimens with 1% Pb(II under carbonation and standard curing range from 0.44 MPa to 1.17 MPa and 0.14 MPa to 2.67 MPa, respectively. The relatively low strengths were attributed to immobilization of heavy metal, which consumed part of SiO2, Al2O3, and CaO components in the cement or kaolin and reduced the hydration and pozzolanic reaction materials. This phenomenon further decreased the strength of solidified soils. The carbonation depth of 1% Cu(II or Zn(II contaminated soils was 18 mm, which significantly increased with the increase of curing time and contamination concentration. Furthermore, the finite element calculation results showed that surface settlements decreased with the increase of modulus of subgrade and the distance away from the center. At the center, the pavement settlement was proportional to the level of traffic load.

  8. Elution behavior of heavy metals from cement solidified products of incinerated ash waste - 59102

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meguro, Yoshihiro; Kawato, Yoshimi; Nakayama, Takuya; Tomioka, Osamu; Mitsuda, Motoyuki

    2012-01-01

    A method, in which incinerated ash is solidified with a cement material, has been developed to dispose radioactive incinerated ash waste. In order to bury the solidified product, it is required that elution of hazardous heavy metals included in the ash from the solidified products is inhibited. In this study, the elution behavior of the heavy metals from the synthetic solidified products, which included Pb(II), Cd(II), and Cr(VI) and were prepared using ordinary portland cement (OPC), blast furnace slag cement (BFS), or a cement material that showed low alkalinity (LA-Cement), was investigated. Several chemicals and materials were added as additive agents to prevent the elution of the heavy metals. When OPC was used, Cd elution was inhibited, but Pb and Cr were not enough even using the additive agent examined. FeSO 4 and Na 2 S additive agents worked effective to inhibit elution of Cr. When BFS was used, the elution of Pb, Cd and Cr was inhibited for the all products prepared. In the case of LA-Cement, the elution of Pb and Cd was inhibited for the all products, but only the product that was added FeSO 4 showed good result of the elution of Cr. (authors)

  9. IAEA coordinated research program on the evaluation of solidified high-level radioactive waste products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grover, J.R.; Schneider, K.J.

    1979-01-01

    A coordinated research program on the evaluation of solidified high-level radioactive waste products has been active with the IAEA since 1976. The program's objectives are to integrate research and to provide a data bank on an international basis in this subject area. Results and considerations to date are presented

  10. Effect of drying-wetting cycles on leaching behavior of cement solidified lead-contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiang-Shan; Xue, Qiang; Wang, Ping; Li, Zhen-Ze; Liu, Lei

    2014-12-01

    Lead contaminated soil was treated by different concentration of ordinary Portland cement (OPC). Solidified cylindrical samples were dried at 40°C in oven for 48 h subsequent to 24h of immersing in different solution for one drying-wetting. 10 cycles were conducted on specimens. The changes in mass loss of specimens, as well as leaching concentration and pH of filtered leachates were studied after each cycle. Results indicated that drying-wetting cycles could accelerate the leaching and deterioration of solidified specimens. The cumulative leached lead with acetic acid (pH=2.88) in this study was 109, 83 and 71 mg respectively for solidified specimens of cement-to-dry soil (C/Sd) ratios 0.2, 0.3 and 0.4, compared to 37, 30, and 25mg for a semi-dynamic leaching test. With the increase of cycle times, the cumulative mass loss of specimens increased linearly, but pH of filtered leachates decreased. The leachability and deterioration of solidified specimens increased with acidity of solution. Increases of C/Sd clearly reduced the leachability and deterioration behavior. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Performance criteria for solidified high-level radioactive wastes. Environmental impact statement. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-09-01

    This draft Environmental Impact Statement on performance criteria for solidified high-level radioactive wastes (PCSHLW) covers: considerations for PCSHLW development, the proposed rulemaking, characteristics of the PCSHLW, environmental impacts of the proposed PCSHLW, alternatives to the PCSHLW criteria, and cost/benefit/risk evaluation. Five appendices are included to support the technical data required in the Environmental Impact Statement

  12. Wafer-scale fabrication of glass-FEP-glass microfluidic devices for lipid bilayer experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bomer, Johan G.; Prokofyev, A.V.; van den Berg, Albert; le Gac, Severine

    2014-01-01

    We report a wafer-scale fabrication process for the production of glass-FEP-glass microdevices using UV-curable adhesive (NOA81) as gluing material, which is applied using a novel "spin & roll" approach. Devices are characterized for the uniformity of the gluing layer, presence of glue in the

  13. Ceramic and glass radioactive waste forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Readey, D.W.; Cooley, C.R. (comps.)

    1977-01-01

    This report contains 14 individual presentations and 6 group reports on the subject of glass and polycrystalline ceramic radioactive waste forms. It was the general consensus that the information available on glass as a waste form provided a good basis for planning on the use of glass as an initial waste form, that crystalline ceramic forms could also be good waste forms if much more development work were completed, and that prediction of the chemical and physical stability of the waste form far into the future would be much improved if the basic synergistic effects of low temperature, radiation and long times were better understood. Continuing development of the polycrystalline ceramic forms was recommended. It was concluded that the leach rate of radioactive species from the waste form is an important criterion for evaluating its suitability, particularly for the time period before solidified waste is permanently placed in the geologic isolation of a Federal repository. Separate abstracts were prepared for 12 of the individual papers; the remaining two were previously abstracted.

  14. The evaluation of solidifying performance of heavy metal waste using cementitious materials (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, Hideki; Harasawa, Shuichi

    2005-02-01

    Some of radioactive waste generated from JNC's facilities contain the poisonous substances such as lead, cadmium and mercury. In order to establish an appropriate method of the treatment of these heavy metals, solidification performance was evaluated using cementitious materials. In this report, the solidification performance of lead and mercury, which accounts for relatively high ratio in total wastes, was evaluated. The results are summarized below: 1. The test of stabilization process of mercury. The conversion process from mercury to the powdery mercury sulfide (red) was examined on the beaker scale. As a result, it was confirmed that the conversion was possible using the liquid phase reaction at 80deg C by the addition of sulfur powder with the NaOH solution. After the process, the mercury concentration in the filtrate was relatively high (0.6 mass%), so it was judged that the reuse of the recovered mercury waste fluid was indispensable. 2. The fabrication and evaluation of solidified wastes. The solidified waste were fabricated with cementitious material, and were evaluated by the measurement of one-axis compressive strength, the elution ratio of lead, mercury and so on. Powdery lead sulfide and the mercury sulfide of reagent were used as model waste. (1) solidification test of the lead waste. It was confirmed one-axis compressive strength for all solidified waste to pass the technical standards 15 kg/cm 2 (1.5 Mpa) for homogeneously solidified waste as the Low-level Radioactive Waste Disposal Center in Aomori Prefecture, and as for the elution ratio of lead, it had obtained the better result (0.06 mg/L) at the case of solidification of sulfide lead 30 mass% packed in the total solidified waste by using Highly Fly-ash contained Silica fume Cement (HFSC) than standard value (0.3 mg/L) at Regulations of Waste Management and Public Cleansing Law. Additionally, it was confirmed the using admixture of the inorganic reducing agent such as the Iron (II) chloride

  15. Fabrication and evaluation of hybrid materials from A-zeolite and ground glass powders for vitrified radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamitani, Masataka; Kondo, Mitsunori; Hiki, Tomonori; Tagami, Toru; Nakahira, Atsushi; Wakihara, Toru

    2014-01-01

    The samples from A-type zeolite and ground soda-lime glass powders were solidified by calcinations at 600 to 800°C in air atmosphere. These hybrid zeolite/glass samples at 700°C were in part insufficiently densified and hybrid samples were fully densified at 800°C, although the densification was not generated at 600°C. A-zeolites were still stable in glass melt at 800°C for hybrid zeolite/glass samples. These hybrid zeolite/glass samples had the ion exchange ability of 20% against Sr 2+ and the high ability over 80% against Cs + as well as A-zeolite. Microstructures of obtained hybrid zeolite/glass samples were evaluated. (author)

  16. Improvement in mechanical properties of hypereutectic Al-Si-Cu alloys through sono-solidified

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiki Tsunekawa

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available For the wider applications, it is necessary to improve the ductility as well as the strength and wear-resistance of hypereutectic Al-Si-Cu alloys, which are typical light-weight wear-resistant materials. An increase in the amounts of primary silicon particles causes the modified wear-resistance of hypereutectic Al-Si-Cu alloys, but leads to the poor strength and ductility. It is known that dual phase steels composed of hetero-structure have succeeded in bringing contradictory mechanical properties of high strength and ductility concurrently. In order to apply the idea of hetero-structure to hypereutectic Al-Si-Cu alloys for the achievement of high strength and ductility along with wear resistance, ultrasonic irradiation of the molten metal during the solidification, which is called sono-solidification, was carried out from its molten state to just above the eutectic temperature. The sono-solidified Al-17Si-4Cu alloy is composed of hetero-structure, which are, hard primary silicon particles, soft non-equilibrium a -Al phase and the eutectic region. Rheo-casting was performed at just above the eutectic temperature with sono-solidified slurry to shape a disk specimen. After the rheo-casting with modified sonosolidified slurry held for 45 s at 570 篊, the quantitative optical microscope observation exhibits that the microstructure is composed of 18area% of hard primary silicon particles and 57area% of soft a -Al phase. In contrast, there exist only 5 area% of primary silicon particles and no a -Al phase in rheo-cast specimen with normally solidified slurry. Hence the tensile tests of T6 treated rheo-cast specimens with modified sono-solidified slurry exhibit improved strength and 5% of elongation, regardless of having more than 3 times higher amounts of primary silicon particles compared to that of rheo-cast specimen with normally solidified slurry.

  17. Superconducting Metallic Glass Transition-Edge-Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hays, Charles C. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A superconducting metallic glass transition-edge sensor (MGTES) and a method for fabricating the MGTES are provided. A single-layer superconducting amorphous metal alloy is deposited on a substrate. The single-layer superconducting amorphous metal alloy is an absorber for the MGTES and is electrically connected to a circuit configured for readout and biasing to sense electromagnetic radiation.

  18. Numerical Research on Magnetic Field, Temperature Field and Flow Field During Melting and Directionally Solidifying TiAl Alloys by Electromagnetic Cold Crucible

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ruirun; Yang, Yaohua; Gong, Xue; Guo, Jingjie; Su, Yanqing; Ding, Hongsheng; Fu, Hengzhi

    2017-12-01

    The electromagnetic cold crucible (EMCC) technique is an effective method to melt and directionally solidify reactive and high-temperature materials without contamination. The temperature field and fluid flow induced by the electromagnetic field are very important for melting and controlling the microstructure. In this article, a 3D EMCC model for calculating the magnetic field in the charges (TiAl alloys) using the T-Ω finite element method was established and verified. Magnetic fields in the charge under different electrical parameters, positions and dimensions of the charge were calculated and analyzed. The calculated results show that the magnetic field concentrates in the skin layer, and the magnetic flux density ( B) increases with increasing of the frequency, charge diameter and current. The maximum B in the charge is affected by the position of the charge in EMCC ( h 1) and the charge height ( h 2), which emerges at the middle of coils ( h c) when the relationship of h c < h 1 + h 2 < h c + δ is satisfied. Lower frequency and smaller charge diameter can improve the uniformity of the magnetic field in the charge. Consequently, the induced uniform electromagnetic stirring weakens the turbulence and improves temperature uniformity in the vicinity of the solid/liquid (S/L) interface, which is beneficial to forming a planar S/L interface during directional solidification. Based on the above conclusions, the TiAlNb alloy was successfully melted with lower power consumption and directionally solidified by the square EMCC.

  19. Toward Molecular Engineering of Polymer Glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freed, Karl F. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Xu, Wen-Sheng [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Dudowicz, Jacek B. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Douglas, Jack F. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology (NIST), Boulder, CO (United States)

    2017-04-05

    Glass formation has been central to fabrication technologies since the dawn of civilization. Glasses not only encompass window panes, the insulation in our homes, the optical fibers supplying our cable TV, and vessels for eating and drinking, but they also include a vast array of ‘‘plastic’’ polymeric materials. Glasses find applications in high technology (e.g., producing microelectronic materials, etc., amorphous semiconductors), and recent advances have created ‘‘plastic metallic glasses’’ that are promising for fabricating everyday structural materials. Many commercially relevant systems, such as microemulsions and colloidal suspensions, have complex molecular structures and thus solidify by glass formation. Despite the importance of understanding the fundamental nature of glass formation for the synthesis of new materials, a predictive molecular theory has been lacking. Much of our understanding of glass formation derives from the analysis of experimental data, a process that has uncovered a number of interesting universal behaviors, namely, relations between properties that are independent of molecular details. However, these empirically derived relations and their limitations remain to be understood on the basis of theories, and, more importantly, there is strong need for theories of the explicit variation with molecular system to enable the rational design and tailoring of new materials. We have recently developed the generalized entropy theory, the only analytic, theory that enables describing the dependence of the properties of glass-formation on monomer molecular structures. These properties include the two central quantities of glass formation, the glass transition temperature and the glass fragility parameter, material dependent properties that govern how a material may be processed (e.g., by extrusion, ink jet, molding, etc.) Our recent works, which are further described below, extend the studies of glass formation in polymer systems

  20. The evaluation of solidifying performance of heavy metal waste using cementitious materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takei, Akihiko; Fujita, Hideki; Harasawa, Shuichi

    2004-02-01

    Some of radioactive waste generated form JNC's facilities contain the poisonous substances such as lead, cadmium and mercury. In order to establish an appropriate method of the treatment of these heavy metals, solidification performance was evaluated using cementitious materials. In this report, the solidification performance of lead, which accounts for relatively high ratio in total wastes, was evaluated. The results are summarized below: 1. The test of stabilization process of lead: The conversion process from block lead to the powdery lead sulfide was examined on the beaker scale. As a result, it was confirmed that the conversion was possible using the liquid phase reaction by the addition of thiourea after block lead had been dissolved by the acetic acid with bubbling air. After the process, the lead concentration in the filtrate was extremely low (0.02 mg/L), so it was judged that almost all of the lead was converted and recovered as lead sulfide. 2. The fabrication and evaluation of solidified wastes: Five types of solidified waste were fabricated with different binder, and were evaluated by the measurement of one-axis compressive strength, porosity, the elution ratio of lead, and so on. Powdery lead and sulfide lead reagent were used as model waste. As a result of the test, it was confirmed one-axis compressive strength for all solidified waste to pass the technical standards 15 kg/cm 2 (1.5 MPa) for homogeneously solidified waste as the Low-level Radioactive Waste Disposal Center in Aomori Prefecture, and as for the elution ratio of lead, it had obtained the better result (0.27 mg/L) at the case of solidification of sulfide lead 20 mass% packed in the total solidified waste by using low alkaline cement (including Hauyne mineral) than standard value (0.3 mg/L) at Regulations of Waste Management and Public Cleansing Law. Moreover, it was understood that the elution of lead had high relationship with not only the character of the binder but also the physical

  1. CRYSTALLIZATION IN MULTICOMPONENT GLASSES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KRUGER AA; HRMA PR

    2009-10-08

    In glass processing situations involving glass crystallization, various crystalline forms nucleate, grow, and dissolve, typically in a nonuniform temperature field of molten glass subjected to convection. Nuclear waste glasses are remarkable examples of multicomponent vitrified mixtures involving partial crystallization. In the glass melter, crystals form and dissolve during batch-to-glass conversion, melter processing, and product cooling. Crystals often agglomerate and sink, and they may settle at the melter bottom. Within the body of cooling glass, multiple phases crystallize in a non-uniform time-dependent temperature field. Self-organizing periodic distribution (the Liesegnang effect) is common. Various crystallization phenomena that occur in glass making are reviewed.

  2. Crystallization In Multicomponent Glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruger, A.A.; Hrma, P.R.

    2009-01-01

    In glass processing situations involving glass crystallization, various crystalline forms nucleate, grow, and dissolve, typically in a nonuniform temperature field of molten glass subjected to convection. Nuclear waste glasses are remarkable examples of multicomponent vitrified mixtures involving partial crystallization. In the glass melter, crystals form and dissolve during batch-to-glass conversion, melter processing, and product cooling. Crystals often agglomerate and sink, and they may settle at the melter bottom. Within the body of cooling glass, multiple phases crystallize in a non-uniform time-dependent temperature field. Self-organizing periodic distribution (the Liesegnang effect) is common. Various crystallization phenomena that occur in glass making are reviewed.

  3. Electrical resistivities of glass melts containing simulated SRP waste sludges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiley, J.R.

    1978-08-01

    One option for the long-term management of radioactive waste at the Savannah River Plant is to solidify the waste in borosilicate glass by using a continuous, joule-heated, ceramic melter. Electrical resistivities that are needed for melter design were measured for melts of two borosilicate, glass-forming mixtures, each of which was combined with various amounts of several simulated-waste sludges. The simulated sludge spanned the composition range of actual sludges sampled from SRP waste tanks. Resistivities ranged from 6 to 10 ohm-cm at 500 0 C. Melt composition and temperature were correlated with resistivity. Resistivity was not a simple function of viscosity. 15 figures, 4 tables

  4. IBA of iridescent Art Nouveau glass - comparative studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeder, M.; Jembrih-Simbuerger, D.; Neelmeijer, C.; Schreiner, Manfred

    2005-01-01

    Simultaneous PIXE, PIGE, and RBS in air were employed to characterise the surface structure of iridescent Art Nouveau glass artefacts produced around 1900 by Tiffany, USA and Loetz, Austria. Using PIXE and PIGE, the chemical composition of the bulk glass and the overlays was determined in a non-destructive manner. Furthermore, the combination of PIXE and RBS enabled the layer structure of the analysed glasses (bulk, overlays, and iridescent layers) and the thicknesses of the thin layers in the near-surface domain to be determined. The measurement and evaluation procedure is demonstrated on blue iridescent glass fragments of Tiffany and Loetz by way of example. The initial results showing similarities but also differences in the layered glass structure of Tiffany and Loetz objects are presented

  5. Positron annihilation study of structural subnanovoids and irradiation damages in silica-based glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, K.

    2004-01-01

    Structural subnanovoids in glass solidified with radioactive waste disposal were studied by positron annihilation 2-dimensional angular correlation and positron life time measurements. Positroniums in crystalline SiO 2 were in a delocalized state, but in glass SiO 2 were in a localized state. Pick-off annihilation (pair annihilation between an ortho-positroniums and a spin antiparallel electron) rate was shortened with decreasing molarity of glass network formers and consequently radii of structural subnanovoids were reduced. The sizes of structural subnanovoids determined from the pick-off annihilation were good agreement with those measured by momentum distribution of para-positroniums. In waste disposal model glass, no presence of positronims indicated that radioactive substances occupied almost all subnanovoids, and therefore voids with large size enough to localize positroniums (above 0.1 nm radius) could not be present. (Y. Kazumata)

  6. Validation of the solidifying soil process using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zhao-Xiang; Liu, Lin-Mei; Liu, Lu-Wen

    2016-09-01

    Although an Ionic Soil Stabilizer (ISS) has been widely used in landslide control, it is desirable to effectively monitor the stabilization process. With the application of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), the ion contents of K, Ca, Na, Mg, Al, and Si in the permeable fluid are detected after the solidified soil samples have been permeated. The processes of the Ca ion exchange are analyzed at pressures of 2 and 3 atm, and it was determined that the cation exchanged faster as the pressure increased. The Ca ion exchanges were monitored for different stabilizer mixtures, and it was found that a ratio of 1:200 of ISS to soil is most effective. The investigated plasticity and liquidity indexes also showed that the 1:200 ratio delivers the best performance. The research work indicates that it is possible to evaluate the engineering performances of soil solidified by ISS in real time and online by LIBS.

  7. Accelerated leach testing of radionuclides from solidified low-level waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pietrzak, R.F.; Fuhrmann, M.; Franz, E.M.; Heiser, J. III; Colombo, P.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes some of the work performed to develop an accelerated leach test designed to provide data that show long-term leaching behavior of solidified waste in a relatively short period of testing (1,2). The need for an accelerated leach test stems from the fact that the response of an effectively solidified waste form to the leaching process is so slow that a very long time is required to complete a test which shows the long-term leaching behavior of a waste form. Because of time limitations, as well as economic considerations, most studies have been limited to the early stages of the leaching process which is predominantly controlled by diffusion, although acknowledged to be due to also dissolution, corrosion or ion-exchange

  8. Modeling Macrosegregation in Directionally Solidified Aluminum Alloys under Gravitational and Microgravitational Conditions.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauer, Mark A.; Poirier, David R.; Erdmann, Robert G.; Tewari, Surendra N.; Madison, Jonathan D

    2014-09-01

    This report covers the modeling of seven directionally solidified samples, five under normal gravitational conditions and two in microgravity. A model is presented to predict macrosegregation during the melting phases of samples solidified under microgravitational conditions. The results of this model are compared against two samples processed in microgravity and good agreement is found. A second model is presented that captures thermosolutal convection during directional solidification. Results for this model are compared across several experiments and quantitative comparisons are made between the model and the experimentally obtained radial macrosegregation profiles with good agreement being found. Changes in cross section were present in some samples and micrographs of these are qualitatively compared with the results of the simulations. It is found that macrosegregation patterns can be affected by changing the mold material.

  9. Functions and requirements document for interim store solidified high-level and transuranic waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith-Fewell, M.A., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-05-17

    The functions, requirements, interfaces, and architectures contained within the Functions and Requirements (F{ampersand}R) Document are based on the information currently contained within the TWRS Functions and Requirements database. The database also documents the set of technically defensible functions and requirements associated with the solidified waste interim storage mission.The F{ampersand}R Document provides a snapshot in time of the technical baseline for the project. The F{ampersand}R document is the product of functional analysis, requirements allocation and architectural structure definition. The technical baseline described in this document is traceable to the TWRS function 4.2.4.1, Interim Store Solidified Waste, and its related requirements, architecture, and interfaces.

  10. Microstructure of directionally solidified Ti-Fe eutectic alloy with low interstitial and high mechanical strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contieri, R. J.; Lopes, E. S. N.; Taquire de La Cruz, M.; Costa, A. M.; Afonso, C. R. M.; Caram, R.

    2011-10-01

    The performance of Ti alloys can be considerably enhanced by combining Ti and other elements, causing an eutectic transformation and thereby producing composites in situ from the liquid phase. This paper reports on the processing and characterization of a directionally solidified Ti-Fe eutectic alloy. Directional solidification at different growth rates was carried out in a setup that employs a water-cooled copper crucible combined with a voltaic electric arc moving through the sample. The results obtained show that a regular fiber-like eutectic structure was produced and the interphase spacing was found to be a function of the growth rate. Mechanical properties were measured using compression, microindentation and nanoindentation tests to determine the Vickers hardness, compressive strength and elastic modulus. Directionally solidified eutectic samples presented high values of compressive strength in the range of 1844-3000 MPa and ductility between 21.6 and 25.2%.

  11. Research on the compressive strength of basic magnesium salts and cyanide slag solidified body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Yubo; Han, Peiwei; Ye, Shufeng; Wei, Lianqi; Zhang, Xiaomeng; Fu, Guoyan; Yu, Bo

    2018-02-01

    The solidification of cyanide slag by using basic magnesium salts could reduce pollution and protect the environment. Experiments were carried out to investigate the effects of age, mixing amount of cyanide slag, water cement ratio and molar ratio of MgO to MgSO4 on the compressive strength of basic magnesium salts and cyanide slag solidified body in the present paper. It was found that compressive strength of solidified body increased with the increase of age, and decreased with the increase of mixing amount of cyanide slag and water cement ratio. The molar ratio of MgO to MgSO4 should be controlled in the range from 9 to 11 when the mixing amount of cyanide slag was larger than 80 mass%.

  12. Recycling of Glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Damgaard, Anders

    2011-01-01

    Glass is used for many purposes, but in the waste system glass is predominantly found in terms of beverage and food containers with a relatively short lifetime before ending up in the waste. Furthermore there is a large amount of flat glass used in building materials which also ends up in the waste...... system; this glass though has a long lifetime before ending up in the waste. Altogether these product types add up to 82% of the production of the European glass industry (IPCC, 2001). Recycling of glass in terms of cleaning and refilling of bottles as well as the use of broken glass in the production...... of new glass containers is well established in the glass industry. This chapter describes briefly howglass is produced and howwaste glass is recycled in the industry. Quality requirements and use of recycled products are discussed, as are the resource and environmental issues of glass recycling....

  13. Bioactive glass coatings for orthopedic metallic implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Esteban, Sonia; Saiz, Eduardo; Fujino, Sigheru; Oku, Takeo; Suganuma, Katsuaki; Tomsia, Antoni P.

    2003-06-30

    The objective of this work is to develop bioactive glass coatings for metallic orthopedic implants. A new family of glasses in the SiO2-Na2O-K2O-CaO-MgO-P2O5 system has been synthesized and characterized. The glass properties (thermal expansion, softening and transformation temperatures, density and hardness) are in line with the predictions of established empirical models. The optimized firing conditions to fabricate coatings on Ti-based and Co-Cr alloys have been determined and related to the glass properties and the interfacial reactions. Excellent adhesion to alloys has been achieved through the formation of 100-200 nm thick interfacial layers (Ti5Si3 on Ti-based alloys and CrOx on Co-Cr). Finally, glass coatings, approximately 100 mu m thick, have been fabricated onto commercial Ti alloy-based dental implants.

  14. Corrosion of simulated nuclear waste glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Music, S.; Ristic, M.; Gotic, M.; Foric, J.

    1988-01-01

    In this study the preparation and characterization of borosilicate glasses of different chemical composition were investigated. Borosilicate glasses were doped with simulated nuclear waste oxides. The chemical corrosion in water of these glasses was followed by measuring the leach rates as a function of time. It was found that a simulated nuclear waste glass with the chemical composition (weight %), 15.61% Na 2 O, 10.39% B 2 O 3 , 45.31% SiO 2 , 13.42% ZnO, 6.61% TiO 2 and 8.66% waste oxides, is characterized by low melting temperature and with good corrosion resistance in water. Influence of passive layers on the leaching behaviour of nuclear waste glasses is discussed. (author) 20 refs.; 7 figs.; 4 tabs

  15. Chemical durability of simulated nuclear glasses containing water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, H.; Tomozawa, M.

    1995-04-01

    The chemical durability of simulated nuclear waste glasses having different water contents was studied. Results from the product consistency test (PCT) showed that glass dissolution increased with water content in the glass. This trend was not observed during MCC-1 testing. This difference was attributed to the differences in reactions between glass and water. In the PCT, the glass network dissolution controlled the elemental releases, and water in the glass accelerated the reaction rate. On the other hand, alkali ion exchange with hydronium played an important role in the MCC-1. For the latter, the amount of water introduced into a leached layer from ion-exchange was found to be much greater than that of initially incorporated water in the glass. Hence, the initial water content has no effect on glass dissolution as measured by the MCC-1 test

  16. Modifying glass surfaces via internal diffusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smedskjaer, M.M.; Yue, Y.Z.; Deubener, J.

    2010-01-01

    leads to outward diffusion (OD) of divalent cations (primarily Mg2+), i.e., diffusion from the interior of the glass to the surface, and thereby, to formation of an oxide surface nano-layer. in contrast, when the glasses are heat-treated in H-2/N-2 gas containing 10 vol.% H-2, reduction of Fe3+ to Fe2...... on some properties such as hardness, chemical durability, and surface wettability....

  17. Comparative analysis of mechanical characteristics of solidified concentrates from BWR system using Yugoslav and Italian cements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plecas, I.; Peric, A.; Drljaca, J.; Kostadinovic, A.

    1987-01-01

    In this paper, properties of Italian and Yugoslav cement mixture with BWR evaporation concentrates were compared, research was held upon fifteen samples, according to the adequate formulations. Samples were made in standard cube form, side 10 cm. Functional relationship between decreasing the compressive strength and amount of incorporated BWR concentrate cement mixture was developed. The results of research showed nearly the same mechanical properties of solidified BWR concentrate with Italian and Yugoslav cements. (author)

  18. Fabrication and tensile properties of rapidly solidified Cu-10wt. %Ni alloy. [Cu-10Ni

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baril, D; Angers, R; Baril, J [Dept. of Mining and Metallurgy, Laval Univ., Ste-Foy, Quebec (Canada)

    1992-10-15

    Cu-10wt.%Ni ribbons were produced by melt spinning and cut into small particles with a blade cutter mill. The powders were then hot consolidated to full density by hot pressing followed by hot extrusion. Tensile properties of the resulting pieces were measured. Cu-10wt.%Ni cast ingots were also hot extruded and mechanically tested to compare with the rapidly solidified alloy and to evaluate the possible benefits brought by the rapid solidification process.

  19. Leach testing of simulated ion-exchange resin waste solidified in cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muurinen, A.K.; Uotila, P.I.; Ovaskainen, R.M.

    Leach tests were carried out on ion-exchange resins solidified in cement. Three product mixtures, two isotopes and four leachants at two temperatures, were tested. The increase of resin content increased the leaching of Cs-137; the effect of silix admixture was negligible. The type of the leachant has a stronger influence on Co-60 than on Cs-137. The increase of temperature usually also increased leaching. (author)

  20. Effect of tensile mean stress on fatigue behavior of single-crystal and directionally solidified superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalluri, Sreeramesh; Mcgaw, Michael A.

    1990-01-01

    Two nickel base superalloys, single crystal PWA 1480 and directionally solidified MAR-M 246 + Hf, were studied in view of the potential usage of the former and usage of the latter as blade materials for the turbomachinery of the space shuttle main engine. The baseline zero mean stress (ZMS) fatigue life (FL) behavior of these superalloys was established, and then the effect of tensile mean stress (TMS) on their FL behavior was characterized. At room temperature these superalloys have lower ductilities and higher strengths than most polycrystalline engineering alloys. The cycle stress-strain response was thus nominally elastic in most of the fatigue tests. Therefore, a stress range based FL prediction approach was used to characterize both the ZMS and TMS fatigue data. In the past, several researchers have developed methods to account for the detrimental effect of tensile mean stress on the FL for polycrystalline engineering alloys. However, the applicability of these methods to single crystal and directionally solidified superalloys has not been established. In this study, these methods were applied to characterize the TMS fatigue data of single crystal PWA 1480 and directionally solidified MAR-M 246 + Hf and were found to be unsatisfactory. Therefore, a method of accounting for the TMS effect on FL, that is based on a technique proposed by Heidmann and Manson was developed to characterize the TMS fatigue data of these superalloys. Details of this method and its relationship to the conventionally used mean stress methods in FL prediction are discussed.

  1. Microstructure and orientation evolution in unidirectional solidified Al–Zn alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Zhongwei, E-mail: chzw@nwpu.edu.cn; Wang, Enyuan; Hao, Xiaolei

    2016-06-14

    Morphological instability and growth orientation evolution during unidirectional solidification of Al–Zn alloys with different pulling speeds were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and electron back-scatter diffraction (EBSD) in scanning electron microscope (SEM). The experimental results show that, as the pulling speed increases, the primary dendrite spacing becomes smaller gradually and dendrite trunks incline to the heat flow direction perfectly in unidirectional solidified Al–9.8 wt%Zn and Al–89 wt%Zn alloys. However, regardless of the pulling speed in unidirectional solidified Al–Zn alloys under fixed thermal gradient, the regular dendrites with <100> directions of primary trunks and secondary arms in 9.8 wt% Zn composition are replaced by <110> dendrites of primary trunks and secondary arms in 89 wt% Zn composition. In unidirectional solidified Al–32 wt% Zn alloy, cellular, fractal seaweed, and stabilized seaweed structures were observed at high pulling speeds. At a high pulling speed of 1000 µm/s, seaweed structures transform to the columnar dendrites with <110> trunks and <100> arms. The above orientation evolution can be attributed to low anisotropy of solid-liquid interface energy and the seaweed structure is responsible for isotropy of {111} planes.

  2. Bonding silicon nitride using glass-ceramic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobedoe, R.S.

    1995-01-01

    Silicon nitride has been successfully bonded to itself using magnesium-aluminosilicate glass and glass-ceramic. For some samples, bonding was achieved using a diffusion bonder, but in other instances, following an initial degassing hold, higher temperatures were used in a nitrogen atmosphere with no applied load. For diffusion bonding, a small applied pressure at a temperature below which crystallisation occurs resulted in intimate contact. At slightly higher temperatures, the extent of the reaction at the interface and the microstructure of the glass-ceramic joint was highly sensitive to the bonding temperature. Bonding in a nitrogen atmosphere resulted in a solution-reprecipitation reaction. A thin layer of glass produced a ''dry'', glass-free joint, whilst a thicker layer resulted in a continuous glassy join across the interface. The chromium silicide impurities within the silicon nitride react with the nucleating agent in the glass ceramic, which may lead to difficulty in producing a fine glass-ceramic microstructure. Slightly lower temperatures in nitrogen resulted in a polycrystalline join but the interfacial contact was poor. It is hoped that one of the bonds produced may be developed to eventually form part of a graded joint between silicon nitride and a high temperature nickel alloy. (orig.)

  3. Durability, mechanical, and thermal properties of experimental glass-ceramic forms for immobilizing ICPP high level waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinjamuri, K.

    1990-01-01

    The high-level liquid waste generated at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) is routinely solidified into granular calcined high-level waste (HLW) and stored onsite. Research is being conducted at the ICPP on methods of immobilizing the HLW, including developing a durable glass-ceramic form which has the potential to significantly reduce the final waste volume by up to 60% compared to a glass form. Simulated, pilot plant, non-radioactive, calcines similar to the composition of the calcined HLW and glass forming additives are used to produce experimental glass-ceramic forms. The objective of the research reported in this paper is to study the impact of ground calcine particle size on durability and mechanical and thermal properties of experimental glass-ceramic forms

  4. Spin glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mookerjee, Abhijit

    1976-01-01

    ''Spin glasses'', are entire class of magnetic alloys of moderate dilution, in which the magnetic atoms are far enough apart to be unlike the pure metal, but close enough so that the indirect exchange energy between them (mediated by the s-d interaction between local moments and conduction electrons) dominates all other energies. Characteristic critical phenomena displayed such as freezing of spin orientation at 'Tsub(c)' and spreading of magnetic ordering, are pointed out. Anomalous behaviour, associated with these critical phenomena, as reflected in : (i) Moessbauer spectroscopy giving hyperfine splitting at Tsub(c), (ii) maxima in susceptibility and remanent magnetism, (iii) thermopower maxima and change in slope, (iv) Characteristic cusp in susceptibility and its removal by very small magnetic fields, and (v) conductivity-resistivity measurements, are discussed. Theoretical developments aimed at explaining these phenomena, in particular, the ideas from percolation and localisation theories, and the approach based on the gellations of polymers, are discussed. Finally, a new approach based on renormalisation group in disordered systems is also briefly mentioned. (K.B.)

  5. Basaltic glasses from Iceland and the deep sea: Natural analogues to borosilicate nuclear waste-form glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jercinovic, M.J.; Ewing, R.C.

    1987-12-01

    The report provides a detailed analysis of the alteration process and products for natural basaltic glasses. Information of specific applicability to the JSS project include: * The identification of typical alteration products which should be expected during the long-term corrosion process of low-silica glasses. The leached layers contain a relatively high proportion of crystalline phases, mostly in the form of smectite-type clays. Channels through the layer provide immediate access of solutions to the fresh glass/alteration layer interface. Thus, glasses are not 'protected' from further corrosion by the surface layer. * Corrosion proceeds with two rates - an initial rate in silica-undersaturated environments and a long-term rate in silica-saturated environments. This demonstrates that there is no unexpected change in corrosion rate over long periods of time. The long-term corrosion rate is consistent with that of borosilicate glasses. * Precipitation of silica-containing phases can result in increased alteration of the glass as manifested by greater alteration layer thicknesses. This emphasizes the importance of being able to predict which phases form during the reaction sequence. * For natural basaltic glasses the flow rate of water and surface area of exposed glass are critical parameters in minimizing glass alteration over long periods of time. The long-term stability of basalt glasses is enhanced when silica concentrations in solution are increased. In summary, there is considerable agreement between corrosion phenomena observed for borosilicate glasses in the laboratory and those observed for natural basalt glasses of great age. (With 121 refs.) (authors)

  6. Mechanistic interpretation of glass reaction: Input to kinetic model development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bates, J.K.; Ebert, W.L.; Bradley, J.P.; Bourcier, W.L.

    1991-05-01

    Actinide-doped SRL 165 type glass was reacted in J-13 groundwater at 90 degree C for times up to 278 days. The reaction was characterized by both solution and solid analyses. The glass was seen to react nonstoichiometrically with preferred leaching of alkali metals and boron. High resolution electron microscopy revealed the formation of a complex layer structure which became separated from the underlying glass as the reaction progressed. The formation of the layer and its effect on continued glass reaction are discussed with respect to the current model for glass reaction used in the EQ3/6 computer simulation. It is concluded that the layer formed after 278 days is not protective and may eventually become fractured and generate particulates that may be transported by liquid water. 5 refs., 5 figs. , 3 tabs

  7. High-Purity Glasses Based on Arsenic Chalcogenides

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-06-01

    Chemical interaction of chalcogenides and some impurities (CS 2, TeO2 ) with the quartz glass at high temperature leads to the thin layers formation...UNCLASSIFIED Defense Technical Information Center Compilation Part Notice ADPO1 1523 TITLE: High-Purity Glasses Based on Arsenic Chalcogenides...Materials Vol. 3, No. 2, June 2001, p. 341 - 349 HIGH-PURITY GLASSES BASED ON ARSENIC CHALCOGENIDES M. F. Churbanov, I. V. Scripachev, G. E. Snopatin, V. S

  8. Broad beam X-rays attenuation in silicum glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Risticj, Dj.; Vukovicj, S.; Markovicj, P.

    1987-01-01

    Using broad beam geometry the attenuation for domestic silicum glass have been studied for constant X-ray potentials from 50 to 150 kV. The density of the silicium glass was 2,5x10 3 kg/m 3 . From the attenuation curves the half value layers were obtained. The use of this glass as the biological shield is pointed out. (author). 2 refs.; 2 tabs.; 2 figs

  9. Polymer brushes: a controllable system with adjustable glass transition temperature of fragile glass formers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Shi-Jie; Qian, Hu-Jun; Lu, Zhong-Yuan

    2014-01-28

    We present results of molecular dynamics simulations for coarse-grained polymer brushes in a wide temperature range to investigate the factors that affect the glass transition in these systems. We focus on the influences of free surface, polymer-substrate interaction strength, grafting density, and chain length not only on the change of glass transition temperature Tg, but also the fragility D of the glass former. It is found that the confinement can enhance the dependence of the Tg on the cooling rate as compared to the bulk melt. Our layer-resolved analysis demonstrates that it is possible to control the glass transition temperature Tg of polymer brushes by tuning the polymer-substrate interaction strength, the grafting density, and the chain length. Moreover, we find quantitative differences in the influence range of the substrate and the free surface on the density and dynamics. This stresses the importance of long range cooperative motion in glass formers near the glass transition temperature. Furthermore, the string-like cooperative motion analysis demonstrates that there exists a close relation among glass transition temperature Tg, fragility D, and string length ⟨S⟩. The polymer brushes that possess larger string length ⟨S⟩ tend to have relatively higher Tg and smaller D. Our results suggest that confining a fragile glass former through forming polymer brushes changes not only the glass transition temperature Tg, but also the very nature of relaxation process.

  10. Basaltic glass alteration in confined media: analogy with nuclear glass in geological disposal conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parruzot, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    This dissertation concerns basaltic glass alteration mechanisms and rates. Through a better understanding of the processes controlling the basaltic glass durability, this thesis attempts to establish a link between laboratory studies and volcanic glass alteration in natural environment. The methodology used here is similar to the one used for nuclear glasses. Thus, we measured for the first time the residual alteration rate of basaltic glasses. Protective effect of the alteration film is clearly established. Moreover, synthetic glass representativeness is evaluated through a study focused on the effect of iron oxidation degree on the glass structure and leaching properties. A minor effect of Fe II on the forward rate and a negligible effect on the residual rate are shown. The residual rate is extrapolated at 5 C and compared to the mean alteration rate of natural samples of ages ranging from 1900 to 10 7 years. Non-zeolitized natural glasses follow this linear tendency, suggesting a control of the long-term rate by clayey secondary phase precipitation. Natural environments are open environments: a parametric study was performed in order to quantify the water flow rate effect on chemical composition of the alteration layer. When applied to two natural samples, the obtained laws provide coherent results. It seems possible to unify the descriptive approach from the study of natural environments to the mechanistic approach developed at the laboratory. The next step will consist in developing a model to transpose these results to nuclear glasses. (author) [fr

  11. Moessbauerspectroscopy on Gold Ruby Glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haslbeck, S.

    2005-01-01

    In this thesis, the chemical states of gold and the physical mechanisms of the growing process of the particles under the influence of additional ingredients like tin, lead, antimony and selenium before, during and after the colouring process are investigated by using the Moessbauer spectroscopy on 197 Au, 119 Sn and 121 Sb, optical spectroscopy and X-ray-diffraction. Gold in an unnealed, colourless state of the glasses consists of monovalent forming linear bonds to two neighbouring oxygen atoms. The Lamb-Moessbauer factor of these gold oxide bondings is observed as 0.095 at 4.2 K. The gold in it's oxide state transforms to gold particles with a diameter of 3 nm to 60 nm. The size of the gold particles is quite definable within the optical spectra and certain sizes are also discernable within the Moessbauer spectra. One component of the Moessbauer spectra is assigned to the surface layer of the gold particles. By comparing this surface component with the amount of the bulk metallic core, one can calculate the size of the gold particles. In the Moessbauer spectra of the colourless glass one also can find parts of bulk metallic gold. Investigations with X-ray diffraction show that these are gold particles with a diameter of 100 nm to 300 nm and therefore have no additional colouring effect within the visible spectrum. The Moessbauer spectra on gold of the remelt glasses are similar to those which have been measured on the initial colourless glasses

  12. lead glass brick

    CERN Multimedia

    When you look through the glass at a picture behind, the picture appears raised up because light is slowed down in the dense glass. It is this density (4.06 gcm-3) that makes lead glass attractive to physicists. The refractive index of the glass is 1.708 at 400nm (violet light), meaning that light travels in the glass at about 58% its normal speed. At CERN, the OPAL detector uses some 12000 blocks of glass like this to measure particle energies.

  13. FY 1998 report on the results of the development for an advanced application system for glass waste with CO2 emission reduction; 1998 nendo CO{sub 2} haishutsu yokuseigata hai glass kodo riyo system no kenkyu kaihatsu seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    For the realization of the cycling recycle society, it is important to promote recycling using glass waste for CO2 reduction and effective use of resources. The paper described the FY 1998 results of the development. It included the classification by which the composition of the particle sizes required for recycled products will be made possible, basic studies for low-cost pulverization/separation of foreign substances, and tests on heightening of process accuracy. Relating to the artificial synthesis of feldspar/pottery stone using glass waste/alumina waste as starting materials, vitrification behavior was studied to find out the optimum synthesis conditions. Glass waste of 60% and aluminum hydroxide of 40% were mixed at calcination temperature of 1,100 degrees C for more than 1 hour. Properties of the artificial feldspar/pottery stone were similar to those of the natural one. As to the utilization of glass waste to hydrothermally solidified materials, high-strength solidified matter without crack was obtained in the three-component system of G powder/hydrated lime/gypsum. Concerning the production of eco-glass block, a study was made on the size and mixing ratio of the cullet waste which is very soluble and has no effects on performance. The paper touched also on the R and D of the environmentally friendly type system using multi-functional hybrid materials. (NEDO)

  14. Hardness and microstructural characteristics of rapidly solidified Al-8-16 wt.%Si alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uzun, O.; Karaaslan, T.; Gogebakan, M.; Keskin, M.

    2004-01-01

    Al-Si alloys with nominal composition of Al-8 wt.%Si, Al-12 wt.%Si, and Al-16 wt.%Si were rapidly solidified by using melt-spinning technique to examine the influence of the cooling rate/conditions on microstructure and mechanical properties. The microstructures of the rapidly solidified ribbons and ingot samples were investigated by the optical microscopy, electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques. The results showed that the structures of all melt-spun ribbons were completely composed of finely dispersed α-Al and eutectic Si phase, and primary silicon was not observed. The XRD analysis indicated that the solubility of Si in the α-Al matrix was greatly increased with rapid solidification. Additionally, mechanical properties of both conventionally cast (ingot) and melt-spun ribbons were examined by using Vickers indenter for one applied load (0.098 N). The hardness values of the melt-spun ribbons were about three times higher than those of ingot counterparts. The high hardness of the rapidly solidified state can be attributed to the supersaturated solid solutions. Besides, hardness values with different applied loads were measured for melt-spun ribbons. The results indicated that Vickers hardness values (H v ) of the ribbons depended on the applied load. Applying the concept of Hays-Kendall, the load independent hardness values were calculated as 694.0, 982.8 and 1186.8 MN/m 2 for Al-8 wt.%Si, Al-12 wt.%Si and Al-16 wt.%Si, respectively

  15. Chemical characterization, leach, and adsorption studies of solidified low-level wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walter, M.B.; Serne, R.J.; Jones, T.L.; McLaurine, S.B.

    1986-12-01

    Laboratory and field leaching experiments are beig conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to investigate the performance of solidified low-level nuclear waste in a typical, arid, near-surface disposal site. Under PNL's Special Waste Form Lysimeters-Arid Program, a field test facility was constructed to monitor the leaching of commercial solidified waste. Laboratory experiments were conducted to investigate the leaching and adsorption characteristics of the waste forms in contact with soil. Liquid radioactive wastes solidified in cement, vinyl ester-styrene, and bitumen were obtained from commercial boiling water and pressurized water reactors, and buried in a field leaching facility on the Hanford site in southeastern Washington State. Batch leaching, soil column adsorption, and soil/waste form column experiments were conducted in the laboratory, using small-scale cement waste forms and Hanford site ground water. The purpose of these experiments is to evaluate the ability of laboratory leaching tests to predict leaching under actual field conditions and to determine which mechanisms (i.e., diffusion, solubility, adsorption) actually control the concentration of radionuclides in the soil surrounding the waste form. Chemical and radionuclide analyses performed on samples collected from the field and laboratory experiments indicate strong adsorption of /sup 134,137/Cs and 85 Sr onto the Hanford site sediment. Small amounts of 60 Co are leached from the waste forms as very mobile species. Some 60 Co migrated through the soil at the same rate as water. Chemical constituents present in the reactor waste streams also found at elevated levels in the field and laboratory leachates include sodium, sulfate, magnesium, and nitrate. Plausible solid phases that could be controlling some of the chemical and radionuclide concentrations in the leachate were identified using the MINTEQ geochemical computer code

  16. Electrochemical properties of rapidly solidified Si-Ti-Ni(-Cu) base anode for Li-ion rechargeable batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Hye Jin; Sohn, Keun Yong; Park, Won-Wook

    2013-11-01

    In this study, rapidly solidified Si-Ti-Ni-Cu alloys have been investigated as high capacity anodes for Li-ion secondary batteries. To obtain nano-sized Si particles dispersed in the inactive matrix, the alloy ribbons were fabricated using the melt spinning process. The thin ribbons were pulverized using ball-milling to make a fine powder of ˜ 4 µm average size. Coin-cell assembly was carried out under an argon gas in a glove box, in which pure lithium was used as a counter-electrode. The cells were cycled using the galvanostatic method in the potential range of 0.01 V and 1.5 V vs. Li/Li+. The microstructure and morphology were examined using an x-ray diffractometer, Field-Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy and High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy. Among the anode alloys, the Si70Ti15Ni15 electrodes had the highest discharge capacity (974.1 mAh/g) after the 50th cycle, and the Si60Ti16Ni16Cu8 electrode showed the best coulombic efficiency of ˜95.9% in cyclic behavior. It was revealed that the Si7Ni4Ti4 crystal phase coexisting with an amorphous phase, could more efficiently act as a buffer layer than the fully crystallized Si7Ni4Ti4 phase. Consequently, the electrochemical properties of the anode materials pronouncedly improved when the nano-sized primary Si particle was dispersed in the inactive Si7Ni4Ti4-based matrix mixed with an amorphous structure.

  17. Gold nano-particles fixed on glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Worsch, Christian; Wisniewski, Wolfgang; Kracker, Michael; Rüssel, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We produced wear resistant gold–ruby coatings on amorphous substrates. ► Thin sputtered gold layers were covered by or embedded in silica coatings. ► Annealing above T g of the substrate glass led to the formation of gold nano particles. ► A 1 1 1-texture of the gold particles is observed via XRD and EBSD. ► EBSD-patterns can be acquired from crystals covered by a thin layer of glass. - Abstract: A simple process for producing wear resistant gold nano-particle coatings on transparent substrates is proposed. Soda-lime-silica glasses were sputtered with gold and subsequently coated with SiO 2 using a combustion chemical vapor deposition technique. Some samples were first coated with silica, sputtered with gold and then coated with a second layer of silica. The samples were annealed for 20 min at either 550 or 600 °C. This resulted in the formation of round, well separated gold nano-particles with sizes from 15 to 200 nm. The color of the coated glass was equivalent to that of gold–ruby glasses. Silica/gold/silica coatings annealed at 600 °C for 20 min were strongly adherent and scratch resistant. X-ray diffraction and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) were used to describe the crystal orientations of the embedded particles. The gold particles are preferably oriented with their (1 1 1) planes perpendicular to the surface.

  18. Wafer-scale fabrication of glass-FEP-glass microfluidic devices for lipid bilayer experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bomer, Johan G; Prokofyev, Alexander V; van den Berg, Albert; Le Gac, Séverine

    2014-12-07

    We report a wafer-scale fabrication process for the production of glass-FEP-glass microdevices using UV-curable adhesive (NOA81) as gluing material, which is applied using a novel "spin & roll" approach. Devices are characterized for the uniformity of the gluing layer, presence of glue in the microchannels, and alignment precision. Experiments on lipid bilayers with electrophysiological recordings using a model pore-forming polypeptide are demonstrated.

  19. Solidification structure and dispersoids in rapidly solidified Ti-Al-Sn-Zr-Er-B alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowe, R.G.; Broderick, T.F.; Koch, E.F.; Froes, F.H.

    1986-01-01

    The microstructure of melt extracted and melt spun titanium alloys containing erbium and boron revealed a duplex solidification structure of columnar grains leading to equiaxed and dendritic structures near the free surface of melt extracted and melt spun alloys. The solidification structure was revealed by apparent boride segregation to cellular, interdendritic and grain boundaries. Precipitation of needle or lath-like TiB particles occurred adjacent to Er/sub 2/O/sub 3/ dispesoid particles in as-rapidly solidified ribbon

  20. Determination of performance criteria for high-level solidified nuclear waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heckman, R.A.; Holdsworth, T.

    1979-05-07

    To minimize radiological risk from the operation of a waste management system, performance limits on volatilization, particulate dispersion, and dissolution characteristics of solidified high level waste must be specified. The results show clearly that the pre-emplacement environs are more limiting in establishing the waste form performance criteria than the post-emplacement environs. Absolute values of expected risk are very sensitive to modeling assumptions. The transportation and interim storage operations appear to be most limiting in determining the performance characteristics required. The expected values of risk do not rely upon the repositories remaining intact over the potentially hazardous lifetime of the waste.

  1. The influence of interfacial energies and gravitational levels on the directionally solidified structures in hypermonotectic alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, J. B.; Curreri, P. A.; Sandlin, A. C.

    1988-01-01

    Various Cu-Pb-Al alloys were directionally solidified under 1-g conditions and alternating high-g/low-g conditions (achieved using NSAS's KC-135 aircraft) as a means of studying the influence of interfacial energies and gravitational levels on the resulting microstructures. Directional solidification of low Al content alloys was found to result in samples with coarser more irregular microstructures than in alloys with high Al contents under all the gravity conditions considered. Structures are correlated with interfacial energies, growth rates, and gravitational levels.

  2. Determination of performance criteria for high-level solidified nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heckman, R.A.; Holdsworth, T.

    1979-01-01

    To minimize radiological risk from the operation of a waste management system, performance limits on volatilization, particulate dispersion, and dissolution characteristics of solidified high level waste must be specified. The results show clearly that the pre-emplacement environs are more limiting in establishing the waste form performance criteria than the post-emplacement environs. Absolute values of expected risk are very sensitive to modeling assumptions. The transportation and interim storage operations appear to be most limiting in determining the performance characteristics required. The expected values of risk do not rely upon the repositories remaining intact over the potentially hazardous lifetime of the waste

  3. Directionally Solidified Aluminum - 7 wt% Silicon Alloys: Comparison of Earth and International Space Station Processed Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grugel, Richard N,; Tewari, Surendra; Rajamure, R. S.; Erdman, Robert; Poirier, David

    2012-01-01

    Primary dendrite arm spacings of Al-7 wt% Si alloy directionally solidified in low gravity environment of space (MICAST-6 and MICAST-7: Thermal gradient approx. 19 to 26 K/cm, Growth speeds varying from 5 to 50 microns/s show good agreement with the Hunt-Lu model. Primary dendrite trunk diameters of the ISS processed samples show a good fit with a simple analytical model based on Kirkwood s approach, proposed here. Natural convection, a) decreases primary dendrite arm spacing. b) appears to increase primary dendrite trunk diameter.

  4. Interfacial reactions between titanium and borate glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brow, R.K. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Saha, S.K.; Goldstein, J.I. [Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, PA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science

    1992-12-31

    Interfacial reactions between melts of several borate glasses and titanium have been investigated by analytical scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). A thin titanium boride interfacial layer is detected by XPS after short (30 minutes) thermal treatments. ASEM analyses after longer thermal treatments (8--120 hours) reveal boron-rich interfacial layers and boride precipitates in the Ti side of the interface.

  5. Microstructuring of glasses

    CERN Document Server

    Hülsenberg, Dagmar; Bismarck, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    As microstructured glass becomes increasingly important for microsystems technology, the main application fields include micro-fluidic systems, micro-analysis systems, sensors, micro-actuators and implants. And, because glass has quite distinct properties from silicon, PMMA and metals, applications exist where only glass devices meet the requirements. The main advantages of glass derive from its amorphous nature, the precondition for its - theoretically - direction-independent geometric structurability. Microstructuring of Glasses deals with the amorphous state, various glass compositions and their properties, the interactions between glasses and the electromagnetic waves used to modify it. Also treated in detail are methods for influencing the geometrical microstructure of glasses by mechanical, chemical, thermal, optical, and electrical treatment, and the methods and equipment required to produce actual microdevices.

  6. Insight into silicate-glass corrosion mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cailleteau, C; Angeli, F; Gin, S; Jollivet, P [CEA VALRHO, DEN, Lab Etude Comportement Long Terme, F-30207 Bagnols Sur Ceze, (France); Devreux, F [Ecole Polytech, CNRS, Lab Phys Mat Condensee, F-91128 Palaiseau, (France); Jestin, J [CEA, CNRS, Lab Leon Brillouin, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette, (France); Spalla, O [CEA, DSM, Lab Interdisciplinaire Org Nanometr et Supramol, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette, (France)

    2008-07-01

    The remarkable chemical durability of silicate glass makes it suitable for a wide range of applications. The slowdown of the aqueous glass corrosion kinetics that is frequently observed at long time is generally attributed to chemical affinity effects (saturation of the solution with respect to silica). Here, we demonstrate a new mechanism and highlight the impact of morphological transformations in the alteration layer on the leaching kinetics. A direct correlation between structure and reactivity is revealed by coupling the results of several structure-sensitive experiments with numerical simulations at mesoscopic scale. The sharp drop in the corrosion rate is shown to arise from densification of the outer layers of the alteration film, leading to pore closure. The presence of insoluble elements in the glass can inhibit the film restructuring responsible for this effect. This mechanism may be more broadly applicable to silicate minerals. (authors)

  7. Measurement of optical glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolau-Rebigan, S.

    1978-11-01

    The possibilities of measurement of the optical glasses parameters needed in building optical devices especially in lasers devices are presented. In the first chapter the general features of the main optical glasses as well as the modalities of obtaining them are given. Chapter two defines the optical glass parameters, and the third chapter describes the measuring methods of the optical glass parameters. Finally, the conclusions which point out the utilization of this paper are presented. (author)

  8. Dynamics of liquid solidification thermal resistance of contact layer

    CERN Document Server

    Lipnicki, Zygmunt

    2017-01-01

    This monograph comprehensively describes phenomena of heat flow during phase change as well as the dynamics of liquid solidification, i.e. the development of a solidified layer. The book provides the reader with basic knowledge for practical designs, as well as with equations which describe processes of energy transformation. The target audience primarily comprises researchers and experts in the field of heat flow, but the book may also be beneficial for both practicing engineers and graduate students.

  9. Research on fabrication technology for thin film solar cells for practical use. Research on low-cost fabrication technology for large-area modules (Over-layered TCO on tempered glass for solar cell); Usumaku taiyo denchi seizo gijutsu no jitsuyoka kenkyu. Daimenseki module no tei cost seizo gijutsu (kyoka class fukugo tomei doden kiban seizo no gijutsu kaihatsu)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tatsuta, M [New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization, Tokyo (Japan)

    1994-12-01

    This paper reports the study results on the fabrication technology of over-layered TCO on tempered glass in fiscal 1994. (1) On the fabrication technology of heat-resistant over-layered TCO, thermal deformation of TCO substrates was studied by both experiment and numerical computation. The thermal deformation increased with carrier concentration. As the observation result on change in lattice strain of heated TCO films by high-temperature X-ray diffraction, lattice strain was largely affected by thermal expansion. (2) On development of the low-temperature heat treatment method of TCO films, a technological prospect was obtained for fabrication of low-resistance TCO films by heat treatment without strength deterioration of tempered TCO substrates. (3) On development of cost reduction technology, the large-area CVD equipment was devised on the basis of the inline tempering method which tempers substrate glass by air cooling after formation of SnO2 film as fabrication method of tempered TCO. The TCO substrate tempered by air cooling could endure the drop test of 227g and 1.5m. 5 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Size effect model for the edge strength of glass with cut and ground edge finishing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vandebroek, M.; Louter, C.; Caspeele, R.; Ensslen, F.; Belis, J.L.I.F.

    2014-01-01

    The edge strength of glass is influenced by the size of the surface (near the edge) which is subjected to tensile stresses. To quantify this size effect, 8 series of single layer annealed glass beam specimens (as-received glass) were subjected to in-plane four-point bending with linearly increased

  11. Performance demonstration program plan for RCRA constituent analysis of solidified wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-06-01

    Performance Demonstration Programs (PDPS) are designed to help ensure compliance with the Quality Assurance Objectives (QAOs) for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The PDPs are intended for use by the Department of Energy (DOE) Carlsbad Area Office (CAO) to assess and approve the laboratories and other measurement facilities supplying services for the characterization of WIPP TRU waste. The PDPs may also be used by CAO in qualifying laboratories proposing to supply additional analytical services that are required for other than waste characterization, such as WIPP site operations. The purpose of this PDP is to test laboratory performance for the analysis of solidified waste samples for TRU waste characterization. This performance will be demonstrated by the successful analysis of blind audit samples of simulated, solidified TRU waste according to the criteria established in this plan. Blind audit samples (hereinafter referred to as PDP samples) will be used as an independent means to assess laboratory performance regarding compliance with the QAOs. The concentration of analytes in the PDP samples will address levels of regulatory concern and will encompass the range of concentrations anticipated in actual waste characterization samples. Analyses that are required by the WIPP to demonstrate compliance with various regulatory requirements and which are included in the PDP must be performed by laboratories that demonstrate acceptable performance in the PDP. These analyses are referred to as WIPP analyses and the samples on which they are performed are referred to as WIPP samples for the balance of this document

  12. Cryogenic EBSD reveals structure of directionally solidified ice–polymer composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donius, Amalie E.; Obbard, Rachel W.; Burger, Joan N.; Hunger, Philipp M.; Baker, Ian; Doherty, Roger D.; Wegst, Ulrike G.K.

    2014-01-01

    Despite considerable research efforts on directionally solidified or freeze-cast materials in recent years, little fundamental knowledge has been gained that links model with experiment. In this contribution, the cryogenic characterization of directionally solidified polymer solutions illustrates, how powerful cryo-scanning electron microscopy combined with electron backscatter diffraction is for the structural characterization of ice–polymer composite materials. Under controlled sublimation, the freeze-cast polymer scaffold structure is revealed and imaged with secondary electrons. Electron backscatter diffraction fabric analysis shows that the ice crystals, which template the polymer scaffold and create the lamellar structure, have a-axes oriented parallel to the direction of solidification and the c-axes perpendicular to it. These results indicate the great potential of both cryo-scanning electron microscopy and cryo-electron backscatter diffraction in gaining fundamental knowledge of structure–property–processing correlations. - Highlights: • Cryo-SEM of freeze-cast polymer solution reveals an ice-templated structure. • Cryo-EBSD reveals the ice crystal a-axis to parallel the solidification direction. • The honeycomb-like polymer phase favors columnar ridges only on one side. • Combining cryo-SEM with EBSD links solidification theory with experiment

  13. EPICOR-II: a field leaching test of solidified radioactively loaded ion exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, E.C.; Marshall, D.S.; Todd, R.A.; Craig, P.M.

    1986-08-01

    As part of an ongoing research program investigating the disposal of radioactive solid wastes in the environment' the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is participating with Argonne National Laboratory, the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission in a study of the leachability of solidified EPICOR-II ion-exchange resin under simulated disposal conditions. To simulate disposal, a group of five 2-m 3 soil lysimeters has been installed in Solid Waste Storage Area Six at ORNL, with each lysimeter containing a small sample of solidified resin at its center. Two solidification techniques are being investigated: a Portland cement and a vinyl ester-styrene treatment. During construction, soil moisture temperature cells were placed in each lysimeter, along with five porous ceramic tubes for sampling water near the waste source. A meteorological station was set up at the study site to monitor climatic conditions (primarily precipitation and air temperature), and a data acquisition system was installed to keep daily records of these meteorological parameters as well as lysimeter soil moisture and temperature conditions. This report documents the first year of the long-term field study and includes discussions of lysimeter installation, calibration of soil moisture probes, installation of the site meteorological station, and the results of the first-quarter sampling for radionuclides in lysimeter leachate. In addition, the data collection and processing system developed for this study is documented, and the results of the first three months of data collection are summarized in Appendix D

  14. Study on metal material corrosion behavior of packaging of cement solidified form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Zhouguo; Lin Meiqiong; Fan Xianhua

    1997-01-01

    The corrosion behavior of A3 carbon steel is studied by the specimens that are exposed to atmosphere, embedded in cement solidified form or immersed in corrosion liquid. The corrosion rate is determined by mass change of the specimens. In order to compare the corrosion resistant performance of various coatings, the specimens painted with various material such as epoxide resin, propionic acid resin, propane ether resin and Ti-white paint are tested. The results of the tests show that corrosion rate of A3 carbon steel is less than 10 -3 mm·a -1 in the atmosphere and the cement solidified from, less than 0.1 mm·a -1 in the corrosion liquids, and pH value in the corrosion liquids also affect the corrosion rate of A3 carbon steel. The corrosion resistant performance of Ti-white paint is better than that of other paints. So, A3 carbon steel as packaging material can meet the requirements during storage

  15. Microstructural development in a rapidly solidified Al-Fe-V-Si alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, W.J.; Baek, E.R.; Lee, Sunghak; Kim, N.J.

    1991-01-01

    TEM is used to investigate microstructural development in a rapidly solidified Al-Fe-V-Si alloy. The as-cast microstructure of a rapidly solidified Al-Fe-V-Si alloy was found to vary depending on casting conditions and also through the thickness of ribbon. For completely Zone A ribbon, intercellular phase consists of a microquasi-crystalline phase, while for the Zone A and Zone B mixed ribbon, it consists of a silicide phase. In either case, formation of globular particles of a cluster microquasi-crystalline phase is observed near the air side of the ribbon. Annealing study shows significant differences in the final microstructure depending on the initial status of the ribbon. Completely Zone A ribbon, whose microstructure is composed of a microquasi-crystalline phase, results in a very coarse microstructure after annealing as compared to the Zone A and Zone B mixed ribbon. This result has important implications for the development of high-performance elevated-temperature Al alloys. 12 refs

  16. Directionally solidified Al2O3/GAP eutectic ceramics by micro-pulling-down method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xue; Su, Haijun; Guo, Fengwei; Tan, Xi; Cao, Lamei

    2016-11-01

    We reported a novel route to prepare directionally solidified (DS) Al2O3/GAP eutectic ceramics by micro-pulling-down (μ-PD) method. The eutectic crystallizations, microstructure characters and evolutions, and their mechanical properties were investigated in detail. The results showed that the Al2O3/GAP eutectic composites can be successfully fabricated through μ-PD method, possessed smooth surface, full density and large crystal size (the maximal size: φ90 mm × 20 mm). At the process of Diameter, the as-solidified Al2O3/GAP eutectic presented a combination of "Chinese script" and elongated colony microstructure with complex regular structure. Inside the colonies, the rod-type or lamellar-type eutectic microstructures with ultra-fine GAP surrounded by the Al2O3 matrix were observed. At an appropriate solidificational rate, the binary eutectic exhibited a typical DS irregular eutectic structure of "chinese script" consisting of interpenetrating network of α-Al2O3 and GAP phases without any other phases. Therefore, the interphase spacing was refined to 1-2 µm and the irregular microstructure led to an outstanding vickers hardness of 17.04 GPa and fracture toughness of 6.3 MPa × m1/2 at room temperature.

  17. Study on the barrier performance of molten solidified waste (I). Review of the performance assessment research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maeda, Toshikatsu; Sakamoto, Yoshiaki; Nakayama, Shinichi; Yamaguchi, Tetsuji; Ogawa, Hiromichi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-02-01

    Application of melting technique is thought as one of the effective methods to treatment of the waste from the view point of its homogeneity and waste volume reduction. Solidified products by melting are expected as potential candidates of engineered barrier in a repository due to the good properties for their stabilization of radionuclides and hazardous elements. However, the methodology of performance evaluation has not been estimated so far. In this report, a literature survey on the properties of molten solidified waste was performed. It is clarified that the leachability of waste elements such as Co or Sr in molten waste form would be controlled by the corrosion behaviors of iron or silica which are the matrix elements of the waste form. While, no investigations into the durability of waste form have performed so far. Also noticed that the research items on performance evaluation such as the leachability for long-lived radionuclides and durability of waste form would be necessary for the long-term barrier assessment on the disposal. (author)

  18. Testing of variables which affect stablity of cement solidified low-level waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boris, G.F.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes the test program undertaken to investigate variables which could affect the stability of cement solidified low-level waste and to evaluate the effect of these variables on certain tests prescribed in the Technical Position on Waste Form. The majority of the testing was performed on solidified undepleted bead resin, however, six additional waste types, suggested by the NRC, were tested. The tested variables included waste loading, immersion duration, depletion level, ambient cure duration, curing environment, immersion medium and waste type. Of these, lower waste loadings, longer ambient cures prior to testing and immersion in demineralized water versus simulated sea water and potable water resulted in higher compressive strengths for bead resin samples. Immersion times longer than 90 days did not affect the resin samples. Compressive strengths for other waste types varied depending upon the waste. The strengths of all waste types exceeded the minimum criterion by at least a factor of four, up to a factor of forty. The higher waste loadings exhibit strengths less than the lower waste loadings

  19. Cryogenic EBSD reveals structure of directionally solidified ice–polymer composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donius, Amalie E., E-mail: amalie.donius@gmail.com [Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth College, 14 Engineering Drive, Hanover, NH 03755 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Drexel University, 3141 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Obbard, Rachel W., E-mail: Rachel.W.Obbard@dartmouth.edu [Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth College, 14 Engineering Drive, Hanover, NH 03755 (United States); Burger, Joan N., E-mail: ridge.of.the.ancients@gmail.com [Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth College, 14 Engineering Drive, Hanover, NH 03755 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Drexel University, 3141 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Hunger, Philipp M., E-mail: philipp.m.hunger@gmail.com [Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth College, 14 Engineering Drive, Hanover, NH 03755 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Drexel University, 3141 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Baker, Ian, E-mail: Ian.Baker@dartmouth.edu [Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth College, 14 Engineering Drive, Hanover, NH 03755 (United States); Doherty, Roger D., E-mail: dohertrd@drexel.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Drexel University, 3141 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Wegst, Ulrike G.K., E-mail: ulrike.wegst@dartmouth.edu [Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth College, 14 Engineering Drive, Hanover, NH 03755 (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Despite considerable research efforts on directionally solidified or freeze-cast materials in recent years, little fundamental knowledge has been gained that links model with experiment. In this contribution, the cryogenic characterization of directionally solidified polymer solutions illustrates, how powerful cryo-scanning electron microscopy combined with electron backscatter diffraction is for the structural characterization of ice–polymer composite materials. Under controlled sublimation, the freeze-cast polymer scaffold structure is revealed and imaged with secondary electrons. Electron backscatter diffraction fabric analysis shows that the ice crystals, which template the polymer scaffold and create the lamellar structure, have a-axes oriented parallel to the direction of solidification and the c-axes perpendicular to it. These results indicate the great potential of both cryo-scanning electron microscopy and cryo-electron backscatter diffraction in gaining fundamental knowledge of structure–property–processing correlations. - Highlights: • Cryo-SEM of freeze-cast polymer solution reveals an ice-templated structure. • Cryo-EBSD reveals the ice crystal a-axis to parallel the solidification direction. • The honeycomb-like polymer phase favors columnar ridges only on one side. • Combining cryo-SEM with EBSD links solidification theory with experiment.

  20. Experimental Study and Application of Inorganic Solidified Foam Filling Material for Coal Mines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Wen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous combustion of residual coal in a gob due to air leakage poses a major risk to mining safety. Building an airtight wall is an effective measure for controlling air leakage. A new type of inorganic solidified foam-filled material was developed and its physical and chemical properties were analyzed experimentally. The compressive strength of this material increased with the amount of sulphoaluminate cement. With an increasing water–cement ratio, the initial setting time was gradually extended while the final setting time firstly shortened and then extended. The change in compressive strength had the opposite tendency. Additionally, as the foam expansion ratio increased, the solidification time tended to decrease but the compressive strength remained approximately constant. With an increase in foam production, the solidification time increased and the compressive strength decreased exponentially. The results can be used to determine the optimal material ratios of inorganic solidified foam-filled material for coal mines, and filling technology for an airtight wall was designed. A field application of the new material demonstrated that it seals crossheadings tightly, leaves no fissures, suppresses air leakage to the gob, and narrows the width of the spontaneous combustion and heat accumulation zone.

  1. A study on the microstructural characteristics of rapidly solidified Al-Fe alloys(I)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, D.H.; Lee, H.I.

    1991-01-01

    Solidification microstructures and phases in rapidly solidified Al-5, 10wt% Fe alloys have been investigated by TEM bright field and dark field imaging techniques and electron and x-ray diffraction techniques. Rapid solidification of Al-5, 10wt%Fe alloys produces various metastable and stable phases, such as Al m Fe, Al 6 Fe and Al 13 Fe 4 . In addition to these phases, clusters of randomly oriented few nm scale particles exist in the form of fine cellular network with α-Al or primary spherical particles. Solidification microstructures of the rapidly solidified Al-5, 10wt%Fe alloys consist of various combination of primary phases such as Al 13 Fe 4 , Al m Fe and cluster of nm scale particles, and cellular/dendritic structures such as fine cellular network structure of nm scale particle clusters and α-Al and cellular structure of Al m Fe and α-Al, depending upon alloy compositions and local cooling rates. (Author)

  2. The effect of grain size and cement content on index properties of weakly solidified artificial sandstones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atapour, Hadi; Mortazavi, Ali

    2018-04-01

    The effects of textural characteristics, especially grain size, on index properties of weakly solidified artificial sandstones are studied. For this purpose, a relatively large number of laboratory tests were carried out on artificial sandstones that were produced in the laboratory. The prepared samples represent fifteen sandstone types consisting of five different median grain sizes and three different cement contents. Indices rock properties including effective porosity, bulk density, point load strength index, and Schmidt hammer values (SHVs) were determined. Experimental results showed that the grain size has significant effects on index properties of weakly solidified sandstones. The porosity of samples is inversely related to the grain size and decreases linearly as grain size increases. While a direct relationship was observed between grain size and dry bulk density, as bulk density increased with increasing median grain size. Furthermore, it was observed that the point load strength index and SHV of samples increased as a result of grain size increase. These observations are indirectly related to the porosity decrease as a function of median grain size.

  3. Microbially influenced degradation of cement-solidified low-level radioactive waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, R.D.; Hamilton, M.A.; Veeh, R.H.; McConnell, J.W. Jr.

    1996-01-01

    Because of its apparent structural integrity, cement has been widely used in the United States as a binder to solidify Class B and C low-level radioactive waste (LLW). However, the resulting cement preparations are susceptible to failure due to the actions of stress and environment. This paper contains information on three groups of microoganisms that are associated with the degradation of cement materials: sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (Thiobacillus), nitrifying bacteria (Nitrosomonas and Nitrobacter), and heterotrophic bacteria, which produce organic acids. Preliminary work using laboratory- and vendor-manufactured, simulated waste forms exposed to thiobacilli has shown that microbiologically influenced degradation has the potential to severely compromise the structural integrity of ion-exchange resin and evaporator-bottoms waste that is solidified with cement. In addition, it was found that a significant percentage of calcium was leached from the treated waste forms. Also, the surface pH of the treated specimens was decreased to below 2. These conditions apparently contributed to the physical deterioration of simulated waste forms after 30 to 60 days of exposure

  4. Leaching test of bituminized waste and waste solidified by epoxy resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshinaka, Kazuyuki; Sugaya, Atsushi; Onizawa, Toshikazu; Takano, Yugo; Kimura, Yukihiko

    2008-10-01

    About 30,000 bituminized waste drums and about 1800 drums of waste solidified by epoxy resin, generated from Tokai Reprocessing Plant, were stored in storage facilities. And study for disposal of these waste is performed. It was considered that radioactive nuclides and chemical components were released from these waste by contact of underground water, when disposed there waste. This paper is reported that result of leaching tests for these waste, done from 2003 to 2006. We've get precious knowledge and data, as follows. (1) In leaching tests for bituminized waste, it has detected iodine-129 peak, considered difficult too low energy gamma to detect. We've get data and knowledge of iodine-129 behavior first. Leached radioactivity for 50 days calculated by peak area was equal for about 40% and 100% of including radioactivity in bituminized waste sample. And we've get data of behavior of nitric acid ion and so on, important to study for disposal, in various condition of sample shape or leaching liquid temperature. (2) In leaching test for waste solidified by epoxy resin, we've get data of behavior of TBP, radionuclides and so on, important to study for disposal. Leached TBP was equal about 1% of including of sample. And we've get data of iodine-129 behavior, too. It was confirmed that leached iodine-129 was equal for about 60% and 100% of including sample, for 90 days. (author)

  5. Freckle Defect Formation near the Casting Interfaces of Directionally Solidified Superalloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jianping; Ma, Dexin; Wang, Jun; Wang, Fu; Sun, Baode; Dong, Anping; Li, Fei; Bührig-Polaczek, Andreas

    2016-11-16

    Freckle defects usually appear on the surface of castings and industrial ingots during the directional solidification process and most of them are located near the interface between the shell mold and superalloys. Ceramic cores create more interfaces in the directionally solidified (DS) and single crystal (SX) hollow turbine blades. In order to investigate the location of freckle occurrence in superalloys, superalloy CM247 LC was directionally solidified in an industrial-sized Bridgman furnace. Instead of ceramic cores, Alumina tubes were used inside of the casting specimens. It was found that freckles occur not only on the casting external surfaces, but also appear near the internal interfaces between the ceramic core and superalloys. Meanwhile, the size, initial position, and area of freckle were investigated in various diameters of the specimens. The initial position of the freckle chain reduces when the diameter of the rods increase. Freckle area follows a linear relationship in various diameters and the average freckle fraction is 1.1% of cross sectional area of casting specimens. The flow of liquid metal near the interfaces was stronger than that in the interdendritic region in the mushy zone, and explained why freckle tends to occur on the outer or inner surfaces of castings. This new phenomenon suggests that freckles are more likely to occur on the outer or inner surfaces of the hollow turbine blades.

  6. Freckle Defect Formation near the Casting Interfaces of Directionally Solidified Superalloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianping Hong

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Freckle defects usually appear on the surface of castings and industrial ingots during the directional solidification process and most of them are located near the interface between the shell mold and superalloys. Ceramic cores create more interfaces in the directionally solidified (DS and single crystal (SX hollow turbine blades. In order to investigate the location of freckle occurrence in superalloys, superalloy CM247 LC was directionally solidified in an industrial-sized Bridgman furnace. Instead of ceramic cores, Alumina tubes were used inside of the casting specimens. It was found that freckles occur not only on the casting external surfaces, but also appear near the internal interfaces between the ceramic core and superalloys. Meanwhile, the size, initial position, and area of freckle were investigated in various diameters of the specimens. The initial position of the freckle chain reduces when the diameter of the rods increase. Freckle area follows a linear relationship in various diameters and the average freckle fraction is 1.1% of cross sectional area of casting specimens. The flow of liquid metal near the interfaces was stronger than that in the interdendritic region in the mushy zone, and explained why freckle tends to occur on the outer or inner surfaces of castings. This new phenomenon suggests that freckles are more likely to occur on the outer or inner surfaces of the hollow turbine blades.

  7. Leachability of radionuclides from cement solidified waste forms produced at operating nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Croney, S.T.

    1985-03-01

    This study determined the leachability indexes of radionuclides contained in solidified liquid wastes from operating nuclear power plants. Different sizes of samples of cement-solidified liquid wastes were collected from two nuclear power plants - a pressurized water reactor and a boiling water reactor - to correlate radionuclide leaching from small- and full-sized (55-gallon) waste forms. Diffusion-based model analysis (ANS 16.1) of measured radionuclide leach data from both small- and full-sized samples was performed and indicate that leach data from small samples can be used to determine leachability indexes for full-sizes waste forms. The leachability indexes for cesium, strontium, and cobalt isotopes were determined for waste samples from both plants according to the models used for ANS 16.1. The leachability indexes for the pressurized water reactor samples were 6.4 for cesium, 7.1 for strontium, and 10.4 for cobalt. Leachability indexes for the boiling water reactor samples were 6.5 for cesium, 8.6 for strontium, and 11.1 for cobalt

  8. معالجة ظاهرة تكتل طبقة الزجاج على السطح الخزفي واطئ الحرارة Processing the phenomenon of conglomerate the glass layer on the ceramic surface at low temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabab Salman Kazim رباب سلمان كاظم

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This study were carried out by a oxides that cause the phenomenon of agglomeration on a layer of glass and methods of treatment through control by adding these oxides and temperature setting through formulation mixture of glass by the base Seker, has included this treatment three sections, the first section includes the basic components of the glass, which is made up of oxides acidic RO2 and basal R2O and neutral R2O3 Valhaamadah consisted of silica SiO2 and coups silica, which is changing the secondary in building the web of silica, and the neutral consisted of alumina (Al2O3 oxide and boric (B2O3, the oxides basal, which are compounds modified network glaze monovalent be on two bases and alkali earth Valgulwaat consisted of sodium oxide (Na2O and lead oxide (PbO.

  9. Fluoride glass fiber optics

    CERN Document Server

    Aggarwal, Ishwar D

    1991-01-01

    Fluoride Glass Fiber Optics reviews the fundamental aspects of fluoride glasses. This book is divided into nine chapters. Chapter 1 discusses the wide range of fluoride glasses with an emphasis on fluorozirconate-based compositions. The structure of simple fluoride systems, such as BaF2 binary glass is elaborated in Chapter 2. The third chapter covers the intrinsic transparency of fluoride glasses from the UV to the IR, with particular emphasis on the multiphonon edge and electronic edge. The next three chapters are devoted to ultra-low loss optical fibers, reviewing methods for purifying and

  10. Multiple Glass Ceilings

    OpenAIRE

    Russo, Giovanni; Hassink, Wolter

    2011-01-01

    Both vertical (between job levels) and horizontal (within job levels) mobility can be sources of wage growth. We find that the glass ceiling operates at both margins. The unexplained part of the wage gap grows across job levels (glass ceiling at the vertical margin) and across the deciles of the intra-job-level wage distribution (glass ceiling at the horizontal margin). This implies that women face many glass ceilings, one for each job level above the second, and that the glass ceiling is a p...

  11. Homogeneity of Inorganic Glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Martin; Zhang, L.; Keding, Ralf

    2011-01-01

    Homogeneity of glasses is a key factor determining their physical and chemical properties and overall quality. However, quantification of the homogeneity of a variety of glasses is still a challenge for glass scientists and technologists. Here, we show a simple approach by which the homogeneity...... of different glass products can be quantified and ranked. This approach is based on determination of both the optical intensity and dimension of the striations in glasses. These two characteristic values areobtained using the image processing method established recently. The logarithmic ratio between...

  12. Evaluating the freeze-thaw durability of portland cement-stabilized-solidified heavy metal waste using acoustic measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Korchi, T.; Gress, D.; Baldwin, K.; Bishop, P.

    1989-01-01

    The use of stress wave propagation to assess freeze-thaw resistance of portland cement solidified/stabilized waste is presented. The stress wave technique is sensitive to the internal structure of the specimens and would detect structural deterioration independent of weight loss or visual observations. The freeze-thaw resistance of a cement-solidified cadmium waste and a control was evaluated. The control and cadmium wastes both showed poor freeze-thaw resistance. However, the addition of cadmium and seawater curing increased the resistance to more cycles of freezing and thawing. This is attributed to microstructural changes

  13. Dissolution of basaltic glass in seawater: Mechanism and rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crovisier, J.L.; Honnorez, J.; Eberhart, J.P.

    1987-01-01

    Basaltic glasses are considered as natural analogues for nuclear waste glasses. Thermodynamic computer codes used to evaluate long term behavior of both nuclear waste and basaltic glasses require the knowledge of the dissolution mechanism of the glass network. The paper presents the results of a series of experiments designed to study the structure and chemical composition of alteration layers formed on the surface of artificial tholeiitic glass altered in artificial seawater. Experiments were performed at 60 degree C, 1 bar and 350 bars in non-renewed conditions. A natural sample from Palagonia (Sicily) has been studied by electron microscopy and comparison between natural and experimental palagonitic layers is made. The behavior of dissolved silica during experiments, and both the structure and the chemical composition of the palagonitic layers, indicate that they form by precipitation of secondary minerals from solution after a total breakdown of the glassy network, i.e., congruent dissolution of the glass. Hence the dissolution equation necessary for thermodynamic modelling of basaltic glass dissolution in seawater at low temperature must be written as a simple stoichiometric process. These experiments indicate that the transformation of glass to palagonitic material is not isovolumetric. Hence it is preferable to use Fe or Ti as conservative elements for chemical budget calculations

  14. Leaching of glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hench, L.L.

    1977-01-01

    Understanding surface compositional profiles of glasses over a range of 0-2000 A with a variety of analytical instruments shows that five general types of glass surfaces exist. The surface character of a glass article depends upon bulk composition and environmental history during which surface dealkalization, film formation, and network dissolution can occur. Environmental-surface interactions generally result in complex compositional profiles of all the constituents in a glass. Durable glasses almost always develop a stable surface film which has a higher concentration of network formers than the bulk composition. Compositional effects that are used to improve glass durability usually improve the stability of the surface films. Durability tests or service conditions that lead to film destruction are especially severe for the most silicate glasses. 43 references

  15. Study of glass alteration mechanisms in cement waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Depierre, S.

    2012-01-01

    In the French deep geological repository concept, intermediate-level vitrified waste packages could be disposed of concrete medium. Chemical composition and pH of the interstitial leaching water are expected to influence the chemical durability of glass. Investigations have thus been carried out to study glass dissolution mechanisms and kinetics in contact with cement waters. Three cement pore waters were studied: the first two correspond to two stages of the Portland cement aging and the third corresponds to equilibrium with a low pH concrete. The S/V ratio (glass-surface-area-to-solution-volume ratio) and the chemistry of cement waters are the two main parameters that control glass alteration mechanisms. If the leaching flow from the glass allows a degree of supersaturation to be reached and maintained which leads to nucleation of secondary phases, then precipitation of these phases drives glass dissolution. At a very low S/V ratio, the calcium uptake into the alteration layer increases its passivating properties. Conversely, at a high S/V ratio, the calcium precipitates as cementitious phases consuming elements which form the alteration layer. The glass dissolution is maintained at a high rate. This study contributes to highlighting the beneficial role of low pH cement in glass alteration, and is a first step towards understanding the mechanisms between the glass and the cement medium. (author) [fr

  16. In-plane spectroscopy with optical fibers and liquid-filled APEX™ glass microcuvettes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaillard, William R; Tantawi, Khalid Hasan; Williams, John D; Waddell, Emanuel; Fedorov, Vladimir

    2013-01-01

    Chemical etching and laser drilling of microstructural glass results in opaque or translucent sidewalls, limiting the optical analysis of glass microfluidic devices to top down or non-planar topologies. These non-planar observation topologies prevent each layer of a multilayered device from being independently optically addressed. However, novel photosensitive glass processing techniques in APEX™ have resulted in microfabricated glass structures with transparent sidewalls. Toward the goal of a transparent multilayered glass microfluidic device, this study demonstrates the ability to perform spectroscopy with optical fibers and microcuvettes fabricated in photosensitive APEX™ glass. (technical note)

  17. Predictive modeling of crystal accumulation in high-level waste glass melters processing radioactive waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matyáš, Josef; Gervasio, Vivianaluxa; Sannoh, Sulaiman E.; Kruger, Albert A.

    2017-11-01

    The effectiveness of HLW vitrification is limited by precipitation/accumulation of spinel crystals [(Fe, Ni, Mn, Zn)(Fe, Cr)2O4] in the glass discharge riser of Joule-heated ceramic melters during idling. These crystals do not affect glass durability; however, if accumulated in thick layer, they can clog the melter and prevent discharge of molten glass into canisters. To address this problem, an empirical model was developed that can predict thicknesses of accumulated layers as a function of glass composition. This model predicts well the accumulation of single crystals and/or small-scale agglomerates, but, excessive agglomeration observed in high-Ni-Fe glass resulted in an under-prediction of accumulated layers, which gradually worsen over time as an increased number of agglomerates formed. Accumulation rate of ~53.8 ± 3.7 µm/h determined for this glass will result in ~26 mm thick layer in 20 days of melter idling.

  18. On the study of oil paint adhesion on optically transparent glass: Conservation of reverse paintings on glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayle, M.; Waugh, D.G.; Colston, B.J.; Lawrence, J.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Adhesion characteristics analysed with respect to reverse paintings on glass. • Physical properties of surfaces and pigments found to affect cohesion and adhesion. • Environmental effects on pigment adhesion to glass have been documented. • Vermillion pigment hardest compared to other pigments, especially with adhesives. • Wettability used to assess adhesion properties relating to reverse paintings on glass. - Abstract: Reverse painting on glass is a technique which consists of applying a cold paint layer on the reverse-side of glass. The main challenge facing these artworks is the fragile adhesion of the pictorial layer – a simple movement can modify the appearance of the painting. This paper details a study into the adhesion parameters of pigments on glass and the comparison between different pigments. The relationships between the binder (linseed oil) with pigments and the glass with or without the use of an adhesive are studied. Physical analyses by surface characterisation have been carried out to better understand the influence of the pigment. The use of a sessile drop device, optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), a surface 3D profiler and a pencil hardness scratch tester were necessary to establish a comparison of the pictorial layer adhesion. A comparison of the effect of two adhesives, namely ox gall and gum arabic, has shown that the adhesion is not only linked to the physical parameters but that possible chemical reactions can influence the results. Finally, a treatment based on humidity-extreme storage has shown the weakness of some pictorial layers.

  19. On the study of oil paint adhesion on optically transparent glass: Conservation of reverse paintings on glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayle, M. [Historic and Ancient Materials Group, School of Chemistry, University of Lincoln, Brayford Pool, Lincoln LN6 7TS (United Kingdom); Waugh, D.G., E-mail: d.waugh@chester.ac.uk [Laser Engineering and Manufacturing Research Centre, Faculty of Science and Engineering, University of Chester, Thornton Science Park, Ince, Chester CH2 4NU (United Kingdom); Colston, B.J. [Historic and Ancient Materials Group, School of Chemistry, University of Lincoln, Brayford Pool, Lincoln LN6 7TS (United Kingdom); Lawrence, J. [Laser Engineering and Manufacturing Research Centre, Faculty of Science and Engineering, University of Chester, Thornton Science Park, Ince, Chester CH2 4NU (United Kingdom)

    2015-12-01

    Highlights: • Adhesion characteristics analysed with respect to reverse paintings on glass. • Physical properties of surfaces and pigments found to affect cohesion and adhesion. • Environmental effects on pigment adhesion to glass have been documented. • Vermillion pigment hardest compared to other pigments, especially with adhesives. • Wettability used to assess adhesion properties relating to reverse paintings on glass. - Abstract: Reverse painting on glass is a technique which consists of applying a cold paint layer on the reverse-side of glass. The main challenge facing these artworks is the fragile adhesion of the pictorial layer – a simple movement can modify the appearance of the painting. This paper details a study into the adhesion parameters of pigments on glass and the comparison between different pigments. The relationships between the binder (linseed oil) with pigments and the glass with or without the use of an adhesive are studied. Physical analyses by surface characterisation have been carried out to better understand the influence of the pigment. The use of a sessile drop device, optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), a surface 3D profiler and a pencil hardness scratch tester were necessary to establish a comparison of the pictorial layer adhesion. A comparison of the effect of two adhesives, namely ox gall and gum arabic, has shown that the adhesion is not only linked to the physical parameters but that possible chemical reactions can influence the results. Finally, a treatment based on humidity-extreme storage has shown the weakness of some pictorial layers.

  20. Surface analysis of Borkron glass for neutron optics applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farnoux, B.; Maaza, M.; Maaza, M.; Samuel, F.; Sella, C.

    1991-01-01

    Grazing Angle Neutron Reflectometry, Optical and Mechanical Roughness Profilometry techniques have been used to study the effects of the polishing operations on the surface of Borkron Schott glass (special borosilicate glass for neutron optics applications) as the polishing tool pressure P and the mean grain size of the polishing powder Φ. The neutron reflectivity investigations have shown that there is formation of a layer at the surface glass substrate. This layer is less dense than the bulk substrate and its thickness is around 60A. The optical and mechanical profilometry measurements have shown that both roughness and waviness decrease with P and Φ. All the experimental results show a good correlation between the neutron refractive index, the thickness and the roughness of the surface layer and the waviness of the glass surface with the two mechanical polishing parameters. The previous techniques have been completed by Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy measurements

  1. Structure and Degradation Behaviour of Calcium Phosphate Glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, A M B; Correia, R N; Fernandes, M H V; Oliveira, J M M

    2011-01-01

    Some studies have shown a relationship between glass structure and in vitro mineralization, generally associated with the rate of glass degradation, nature of released ions and subsequent Ca-P precipitation on glass surfaces when immersed in a Simulated Body Fluid (SBF). The knowledge of the ionic species distribution in glasses and of the involved bond strengths can be used to assess the in vitro behaviour of a glass. The role of ions such as silicon or titanium is of major importance for the development of new compositions and also for the control of glass degradation behaviour. A comparative study with two calcium phosphate glasses series was performed: Both glasses series - one with Si and another with Ti - include P 2 O 5 and alkaline earth ions in their compositions. Surface reactivity of glasses from the SiO 2 -containing system have been studied in SBF showing the precipitation of a Ca-P surface layer that increases with increasing MgO/CaO ratio. In glasses from the TiO 2 -containing series it is shown that the increase of TiO 2 contributes for the stabilization of the glass network thus allowing the control of their degradation rate when immersed in SBF. The relationship between structural features of these calcium-phosphate glasses and their degradation behaviour in SBF is discussed in terms of the structural role of Si and Ti ions. It is concluded that glasses with less interconnected species favour the Ca-P surface precipitation. The understanding of this relationship in synthetic physiological fluids is expected to allow the tailoring of glass degradation rates in complex biological systems.

  2. High-level waste solidification: why we chose glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grover, J.R.

    1980-01-01

    This paper considers the desirable properties and factors to be assessed in the selection of a solidified waste product, surveys the possible product options and then analyzes in detail their suitability in meeting the criteria. It concludes that glasses are currently the preferred choice for the following reasons: their ability to fix the full spectrum of elements contained in the waste; their tolerance of the composition variations that will occur on a day to day basis in practice; their relatively low formation temperatures that lead to simpler and hence safer processing; their radiation stability; and their adequate leach rates. Suitable compositions are available for the wastes that will arise in the UK and techniques are available for manufacture on a production scale. Lower leach rates might be obtained by choosing glasses with higher formation temperatures or ceramics. However, these latter generally also have higher formation temperatures, have less tolerance for composition variations and their radiation stability is unproven. Supercalcines and synthetic rocks (SYNROC) may eventually be demonstrated to have some advantageous properties, but present indications are that these could be major disadvantages which more than offset any gains. Other advanced concepts (for example, the dispersion of glass beads in a metal matrix) have lower leach rates, but lead to additional complexity in manufacture

  3. Glass melter assembly for the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, A.E.; Russell, A.; Shah, K.R.; Kalia, J.

    1993-01-01

    The Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) is designed to solidify high level radioactive waste by converting it into stable borosilicate after mixing with glass frit and water. The heart of this conversion process takes place in the glass melter. The life span of the existing melter is limited by the possible premature failure of the heater assembly, which is not remotely replaceable, in the riser and pour spout. A goal of HWVP Project is to design remotely replaceable riser and pour spout heaters so that the useful life of the melter can be prolonged. The riser pour spout area is accessible only by the canyon crane and impact wrench. It is also congested with supporting frame members, service piping, electrode terminals, canister positioning arm and other various melter components. The visibility is low and the accessibility is limited. The problem is further compounded by the extreme high temperature in the riser core and the electrical conductive nature of the molten glass that flows through it

  4. Immobilization of radioactive wastes in glasses and ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zanotto, E.D.

    1983-01-01

    A large amount of radioactive liquid wastes arises from the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuels to recover uranium and plutonium. Immobilization of such wastes in solid form and disposal of the solidified wastes in safe places, to prevent contamination of the human environment, are topics of considerable interest for both the scientific community and the public in general. The great majority of materials candidate for the encapsulation of radioactive wastes are inorganic non-metalic, such as glasses, glass-ceramics, special cements, calcined ceramics and few more. Among these materials, certain glasses have received special attention, and are being studied for over twenty years. It is estimated that about US$2 billion have already been spent in these studies. The disposal (long term storage) of these solid wastes may be possible in deep geological formations, salt mines, the ocean bed, by evacuation to the outer space, etc. A brief review on the several options avaiable for encapsulation and disposal of high level radioactive liquid wastes is presented, along with the relative merits and disadvantages of the candidate materials for encapsulation. A few suggestions for the solution of the Brazilian problem are advanced. (Author) [pt

  5. Transistors using crystalline silicon devices on glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Anthony M.

    1995-01-01

    A method for fabricating transistors using single-crystal silicon devices on glass. This method overcomes the potential damage that may be caused to the device during high voltage bonding and employs a metal layer which may be incorporated as part of the transistor. This is accomplished such that when the bonding of the silicon wafer or substrate to the glass substrate is performed, the voltage and current pass through areas where transistors will not be fabricated. After removal of the silicon substrate, further metal may be deposited to form electrical contact or add functionality to the devices. By this method both single and gate-all-around devices may be formed.

  6. Evaluation of leaching behavior and immobilization of zinc in cement-based solidified products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krolo Petar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study has examined leaching behavior of monolithic stabilized/solidified products contaminated with zinc by performing modified dynamic leaching test. The effectiveness of cement-based stabilization/solidification treatment was evaluated by determining the cumulative release of Zn and diffusion coefficients, De. The experimental results indicated that the cumulative release of Zn decreases as the addition of binder increases. The values of the Zn diffusion coefficients for all samples ranged from 1.210-8 to 1.1610-12 cm2 s-1. The samples with higher amounts of binder had lower De values. The test results showed that cement-based stabilization/solidification treatment was effective in immobilization of electroplating sludge and waste zeolite. A model developed by de Groot and van der Sloot was used to clarify the controlling mechanisms. The controlling leaching mechanism was found to be diffusion for samples with small amounts of waste material, and dissolution for higher waste contents.

  7. Processing method of radiation concrete waste and manufacturing method for radioactive waste solidifying filling mortar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sukekiyo, Mitsuaki; Okamoto, Masamichi

    1998-01-01

    Radioactive concrete wastes are crushed and pulverized. Fine solid granular materials caused by the pulverization are classified and the grain size is controlled so that the maximum grain size is 2.5mm, with the grains having a grain size of up to 0.15mm being up to 30% by weight to form fine aggregates. Separated and recovered fine concrete powders are classified and the size of the powder is controlled within a range of from 3,000 to 15,000cm 2 /g which is smaller than cement particles to form fine powders having a stable quality suitable as a mixing agent. The fine aggregates and the mixing agent are mixed to form a filling mortar (filler) for solidifying radioactive wastes. The filling mortar is filled together with other radioactive wastes in a drum to form a waste body in a drum. With such a constitution, crushed radioactive concrete wastes can be reutilized completely. (I.N.)

  8. Retrievable surface storage: interim storage of solidified high-level waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LaRiviere, J.R.; Nelson, D.C.

    1976-01-01

    Studies have been conducted on retrievable-surface-storage concepts for the interim storage of solidified high-level wastes. These studies have been reviewed by the Panel on Engineered Storage, convened by the Committee on Radioactive Waste Management of the National Research Council-National Academy of Sciences. The Panel has concluded that ''retrievable surface storage is an acceptable interim stage in a comprehensive system for managing high-level radioactive wastes.'' The scaled storage cask concept, which was recommended by the Panel on Engineered Storage, consists of placing a canister of waste inside a carbon-steel cask, which in turn is placed inside a thick concrete cylinder. The waste is cooled by natural convection air flow through an annulus between the cask and the inner wall of the concrete cylinder. The complete assembly is placed above ground in an outdoor storage area

  9. Solidified structure of thin-walled titanium parts by vertical centrifugal casting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Shiping

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The solidified structure of the thin-walled and complicated Ti-6Al-4V castings produced by the vertical centrifugal casting process was studied in the present work. The results show that the wall thickness of the section is featured with homogeneously distributed fine equiaxial grains, compared with the microstructure of the thick-walled section. The grain size of the castings has a tendency to decrease gradually with the increasing of the centrifugal radius. The inter-lamellar space in thick-walled casting parts is bigger than that of the thin-walled parts, and the profile of inter-lamellar space is not susceptible to the centrifugal radius.

  10. On oscillatory microstructure during cellular growth of directionally solidified Sn-36at.%Ni peritectic alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Peng; Li, Xinzhong; Li, Jiangong; Su, Yanqing; Guo, Jingjie

    2016-04-12

    An oscillatory microstructure has been observed during deep-cellular growth of directionally solidified Sn-36at.%Ni hyperperitectic alloy containing intermetallic compounds with narrow solubility range. This oscillatory microstructure with a dimension of tens of micrometers has been observed for the first time. The morphology of this wave-like oscillatory structure is similar to secondary dendrite arms, and can be observed only in some local positions of the sample. Through analysis such as successive sectioning of the sample, it can be concluded that this oscillatory microstructure is caused by oscillatory convection of the mushy zone during solidification. And the influence of convection on this oscillatory microstructure was characterized through comparison between experimental and calculations results on the wavelength. Besides, the change in morphology of this oscillatory microstructure has been proved to be caused by peritectic transformation during solidification. Furthermore, the melt concentration increases continuously during solidification of intermetallic compounds with narrow solubility range, which helps formation of this oscillatory microstructure.

  11. Experimental study of directionally solidified ferromagnetic shape memory alloy under multi-field coupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Yuping, E-mail: zhuyuping@126.com [Institute of Geophysics, China Earthquake Administration, Beijing 100081 (China); Chen, Tao; Teng, Yao [Faculty of Civil Engineering and Mechanics, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Liu, Bingfei [Airport College, Civil Aviation University of China, Tianjin 300300 (China); Xue, Lijun [Tianjin Key Laboratory of the Design and Intelligent Control of the Advanced Mechatronical System, School of Mechanical Engineering, Tianjin University of Technology, Tianjin 300384 (China)

    2016-11-01

    Directionally solidified, polycrystalline Ni–Mn–Ga is studied in this paper. The polycrystalline Ni–Mn–Ga samples were cut at different angles to solidification direction. The magnetic field induced strain under constant stress and the temperature-induced strain under constant magnetic field during the loading–unloading cycle were measured. The experimental results show that the mechanical behavior during the loading–unloading cycle of the material is nonlinear and anisotropic. Based on the experimental results, the effects of multi-field coupling factors, such as stress, magnetic field, temperature and cutting angle on the mechanical behaviors were analyzed. Some useful conclusions were obtained, which will provide guidance for practical applications. - Highlights: • The magnetic-induced strains in different directions are tested. • The temperature-induced strains in different directions are tested. • The effects of coupling factors on directional solidification samples are studied.

  12. The Characterization of Filtration Waste Solidified Product from Baghouse Filter of the Incineration Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutoto

    2000-01-01

    To increase of the safety, quality and to easy maintenance of the incinerator media of bag house filter, coating of the surface filter media by CaCO 3 powder were done. In the incinerator process, the CaCO 3 powder will scrub of fly ash as secondary waste. And finally, both of the secondary waste and CaCO 3 will immobilized by cement matrix. The research has an objective to study and characterizing of the CaCO 3 as secondary waste on their cemented product. The research were done on block samples with content of CaCO 3 and the properties characterized by compressive strength and density. From this research known that on their solidified, each quantity of CaCO 3 will be impact to decreasing of the quality cementation product. The optimum formula for solidification of bag house filter scrubbed is CaCO 3 : cement: water is 3 : 10 : 7. (author)

  13. Relationship between critical current properties and microstructure in cylindrical RE123 melt-solidified bulks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakashima, T.; Shimoyama, J.; Honzumi, M.; Tazaki, Y.; Horii, S.; Kishio, K.

    2005-01-01

    We report the synthesis of cylindrical melt-solidified bulks in REBa 2 Cu 3 O y (RE = Sm, Gd, Dy, Ho, Y and Er), and their critical current properties and microstructures of the a- and the c-growth regions. It was found from the microstructure analysis that the volume fractions of RE211 particles in the c-growth region were always lower than those in the a-growth region. Moreover, those in the c-growth region were increased with distance from the seed crystal. Interestingly, the second peak effects in J c -B curves were prominently enhanced for the c-growth region. J c values at zero field for the c-growth region through the appropriate oxygen post-annealing reached approximately 95 kA cm -2 for RE = Ho, Dy and Y

  14. Structure and mechanical properties of Al-3Fe rapidly solidified alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karakoese, Ercan; Keskin, Mustafa

    2011-01-01

    The Al based Al-3 wt%Fe alloy was prepared by conventionally casting (ingot) and further processed the melt-spinning technique and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) together with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and the Vickers microhardness tester. The rapidly solidified (RS) binary alloys were composed of supersaturated α-Al solid solution and finely dispersed intermetallic phases. Experimental results showed that the mechanical properties of RS alloys were enhanced, which can be attributed to significant changes in the microstructure. The dependence of microhardness H V on the solidification rate (V) was analysed. These results showed that with the increasing values of V, the values of H V increased.

  15. Phase composition of rapidly solidified Ag-Sn-Cu dental alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lecong Dzuong; Do Minh Nghiep; Nguyen van Dzan; Cao the Ha

    1996-01-01

    The phase composition of some rapidly solidified Ag-Sn-Cu dental alloys with different copper contents (6.22 wtpct) has been studied by XRD, EMPA and optical microscopy. The samples were prepared from melt-spun ribbons. The microstructure of the as-quenched ribbons was microcrystalline and consisted of the Ag sub 3 Sn, Ag sub 4 Sn, Cu sub 3 Sn and Cu sub 3 Sn sub 8 phases. Mixing with mercury (amalgamation) led to formation of the Ag sub 2 Hg sub 3, Sn sub 7 Hg and Cu sub 6 Sn sub 5 phases. The amount of copper atoms in the alloys played an important role in phase formation in the amalgams

  16. Solute redistribution and Rayleigh number in the mushy zone during directional solidifi cation of Inconel 718

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Ling

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The interdendritic segregation along the mushy zone of directionally solidifi ed superalloy Inconel 718 has been measured by scanning electron microscope (SEM and energy dispersion analysis spectrometry (EDAXtechniques and the corresponding liquid composition profile was presented. The liquid density and Rayleigh number (Ra profi les along the mushy zone were calculated as well. It was found that the liquid density difference increased from top to bottom in the mushy zone and there was no density inversion due to the segregation of Nb and Mo. However carbide formation in the freezing range and the preferred angle of the orientated dendrite array could prompt the fl uid fl ow in the mushy zone although there was no liquid density inversion. The largest relative Rayleigh number appeared at 1,326 篊 for Inconel 718 where the fl uid fl ow most easily occurred.

  17. Microstructure and property of directionally solidified Ni-Si hypereutectic alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Chunjuan; Tian, Lulu; Zhang, Jun; Yu, Shengnan; Liu, Lin; Fu, Hengzhi

    2016-03-01

    This paper investigates the influence of the solidification rate on the microstructure, solid/liquid interface, and micro-hardness of the directionally solidified Ni-Si hypereutectic alloy. Microstructure of the Ni-Si hypereutectic alloy is refined with the increase of the solidification rate. The Ni-Si hypereutectic composite is mainly composed of α-Ni matrix, Ni-Ni3Si eutectic phase, and metastable Ni31Si12 phase. The solid/liquid interface always keeps planar interface no matter how high the solidification rate is increased. This is proved by the calculation in terms of M-S interface stability criterion. Moreover, the Ni-Si hypereutectic composites present higher micro-hardness as compared with that of the pure Ni3Si compound. This is caused by the formation of the metastable Ni31Si12 phase and NiSi phase during the directional solidification process.

  18. Importance of microscopy in durability studies of solidified and stabilized contaminated soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klich, I.; Wilding, L.P.; Drees, L.R.; Landa, E.R.

    1999-01-01

    Solidification/stabilization (S/S) is recognized by the U.S. EPA as a best demonstrated available technology for the containment of contaminated soils and other hazardous wastes that cannot be destroyed by chemical, thermal, or biological means. Despite the increased use of S/S technologies, little research has been conducted on the weathering and degradation of solidified and stabilized wastes once the treated materials have been buried. Published data to verify the performance and durability of landfilled treated wastes over time are rare. In this preliminary study, optical and electron microscopy (scanning electron microscopy [SEM], transmission electron microscopy [TEM] and electron probe microanalyses [EPMA]) were used to evaluate weathering features associated with metal-bearing contaminated soil that had been solidified and stabilized with Portland cement and subsequently buried on site, stored outdoors aboveground, or achieved in a laboratory warehouse for up to 6 yr. Physical and chemical alteration processes identified include: freeze-thaw cracking, cracking caused by the formation of expansive minerals such as ettringite, carbonation, and the movement of metals from waste aggregates into the cement micromass. Although the extent of degradation after 6 yr is considered slight to moderate, results of this study show that the same environmental concerns that affect the durability of concrete must be considered when evaluating the durability and permanence of the solidification and stabilization of contaminated soils with cement. In addition, such evaluations cannot be based on leaching and chemical analyses alone. The use of all levels of microscopic analyses must be incorporated into studies of the long-term performance of S/S technologies.Solidification/stabilization (S/S) is recognized by the U.S. EPA as a best demonstrated available technology for the containment of contaminated soils and other hazardous wastes that cannot be destroyed by chemical

  19. 3D observation of the solidified structures by x-ray micro computerized tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasuda, Hideyuki; Ohnaka, Itsuo; Tsuchiyama, Akira; Nakano, Tsukasa; Uesugi, Kentaro

    2003-01-01

    The high flux density of the monochromatized and well-collimated X-ray and the high-resolution detector provide a new 3D observation tool for microstructures of metallic alloys and ceramics. The X-ray micro computerized tomography in BL47XU of SPring-8 (SP-μCT) was applied to observe microstructures produced through the eutectic reaction for Sn-based alloys and an Al 2 O 3 -Y 2 O 3 oxide system. The constituent phases in the eutectic structures were three-dimensionally identified, in which the lamellar spacing ranged from several to 10 μm. Since the 3D structure of the unidirectionally solidified specimens contains history of the eutectic structure formation, the 3D structure obtained by SP-μCT gives useful information to consider the microstructure evolution. (author)

  20. Radial macrosegregation and dendrite clustering in directionally solidified Al-7Si and Al-19Cu alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghods, M.; Johnson, L.; Lauer, M.; Grugel, R. N.; Tewari, S. N.; Poirier, D. R.

    2016-05-01

    Hypoeutectic Al-7 wt% Si and Al-19 wt% Cu alloys were directionally solidified upward in a Bridgman furnace through a range of constant growth speeds and thermal gradients. Though processing is thermo-solutally stable, flow initiated by gravity-independent advection at, slightly leading, central dendrites moves rejected solute out ahead and across the advancing interface. Here any lagging dendrites are further suppressed which promotes a curved solid-liquid interface and the eventual dendrite "clustering" seen in transverse sections (dendrite "steepling" in longitudinal orientations) as well as extensive radial macrosegregation. Both aluminum alloys showed considerable macrosegregation at the low growth speeds (10 and 30 μm s-1) but not at higher speed (72 μm s-1). Distribution of the fraction eutectic-constituent on transverse sections was determined in order to quantitatively describe radial macrosegregation. The convective mechanisms leading to dendrite-steepling were elucidated with numerical simulations, and their results compared with the experimental observations.

  1. Microstructure of rapidly solidified Al2O3-dispersion-strengthened Type 316 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Megusar, J.; Arnberg, L.; Vander Sande, J.B.; Grant, N.J.

    1981-01-01

    An aluminum oxide dispersion strengthened 316 stainless steel was developed by surface oxidation. Surface oxidation was chosen as a preferred method in order to minimize formation of less stable chromium oxides. Ultra low C+N 316 stainless steel was alloyed with 1 wt % Al, rapidly solidified to produce fine powders and attrited to approximately 0.5 μm thick flakes to provide for surface oxidation. Oxide particles in the extruded material were identified mostly as Al oxides. In the preirradiated condition, oxide dispersion retarded crystallization and grain growth and had an effect on room temperature tensile properties. These structural modifications are expected to have an effect on the swelling resistance, structure stability and high temperature strength of austenitic stainless steels

  2. Experimental study on the leaching of radioactive materials from radioactive wastes solidified in cement into sea water. Part 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatta, H.; Ono, H.; Nagakura, T.; Machida, T.; Seki, T.; Maki, Y.

    Results are presented from the study on leachability of 60 Co and 137 Cs from BWR concentrated wastes that had been solidified in cement. The leachability of 60 Co is very small compared to that of 137 Cs and varies greatly with the type of leaching medium. The effect of duration of immersion on leachability is comparatively large

  3. A Laboratory Screening Study On The Use Of Solidifiers As A Response Tool To Remove Crude Oil Slicks On Seawater

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effectiveness of five solidifiers to remove Prudhoe Bay crude oil from artificial seawater in the laboratory was determined by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-VIS) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The performance of the solidifers was determined by US-V...

  4. Formation of metastable phases and nanocomposite structures in rapidly solidified Al-Fe alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nayak, S.S.; Chang, H.J.; Kim, D.H.; Pabi, S.K.; Murty, B.S.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Structures of nanocomposites in rapidly solidified Al-Fe alloys were investigated. → Nanoquasicrystalline, amorphous and intermetallics phases coexist with α-Al. → Nanoquasicrystalline phase was observed for the first time in the dilute Al alloys. → Thermodynamic driving force plays dominant role in precipitation of Fe-rich phases. → High hardness (3.57 GPa) was observed for nanocomposite of Al-10Fe alloy. - Abstract: In the present work the structure and morphology of the phases of nanocomposites formed in rapidly solidified Al-Fe alloys were investigated in details using analytical transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Nanoquasicrystalline phases, amorphous phase and intermetallics like Al 5 Fe 2 , Al 13 F 4 coexisted with α-Al in nanocomposites of the melt spun alloys. It was seen that the Fe supersaturation in α-Al diminished with the increase in Fe content and wheel speed indicating the dominant role of the thermodynamic driving force in the precipitation of Fe-rich phases. Nanoquasicrystalline phases were observed for the first time in the dilute Al alloys like Al-2.5Fe and Al-5Fe as confirmed by high resolution TEM. High hardness (3.57 GPa) was measured in nanocomposite of Al-10Fe alloy, which was attributed to synergistic effect of solid solution strengthening due to high solute content (9.17 at.% Fe), dispersion strengthening by high volume fraction of nanoquasicrystalline phase; and Hall-Petch strengthening from finer cell size (20-30 nm) of α-Al matrix.

  5. Leachability and heavy metal speciation of 17-year old stabilised/solidified contaminated site soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Fei, E-mail: fwtiffany@gmail.com [Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge, Trumpington Street, Cambridge CB2 1PZ (United Kingdom); Wang, Hailing, E-mail: wanghailing@njtech.edu.cn [College of Environment, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing 210009 (China); Al-Tabbaa, Abir, E-mail: aa22@cam.ac.uk [Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge, Trumpington Street, Cambridge CB2 1PZ (United Kingdom)

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • The effectiveness of the cement-based S/S at 17 years in West Drayton site is still satisfactory. • Major leaching of Cu, Zn, Ni, Cd and Pb in all mixes took place in the Fe/Mn oxides phase. • The hydration process has been fully completed and further carbonation took place at 17 years. • Microstructure analyses show that unreacted PFA exists. - Abstract: The long-term leachability, heavy metal speciation transformation and binding mechanisms in a field stabilised/solidified contaminated soil (made ground) from West Drayton site were recently investigated following in situ auger mixing treatment with a number of cement-based binders back in 1996. Two batch leaching tests (TCLP and BS EN 12457) and a modified five step sequential extraction procedure along with X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analyses were employed for the testing of the 17-year-old field soil. The results of batch leaching tests show that the treatment employed remained effective at 17 years of service time, with all BS EN 12457 test samples and most of TCLP test samples satisfied drinking water standards. Sequential extraction results illustrate that the leaching of Cu, Ni, Zn, Pb and Cd in all mixes mainly occurred at the Fe/Mn phase, ranging from 43% to 83%. Amongst the five metals tested, Ni was the most stable with around 40% remained in the residual phase for all the different cement-based binder stabilised/solidified samples. XRD and SEM analyses show that the hydration process has been fully completed and further carbonation took place. In summary, this study confirms that such cement-based stabilisation/solidification (S/S) treatment can achieve satisfactory durability and thus is a reliable technique for long-term remediation of heavy metal contaminated soil.

  6. Study on Magnesium in Rainwater and Fertilizer Infiltration to Solidified Peat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajuddin, S. A. M.; Rahman, J. A.; Mohamed, R. M. S. R.

    2018-04-01

    Magnesium is a component of several primary and secondary minerals in the soil which are essentially insoluble for agricultural purpose. The presence of water infiltrate in the soil allows magnesium to dissolve together into the groundwater. In fertilizers, magnesium is categorized as secondary macronutrient which supplies food and encouraging for plants growth. The main objective of this study was to determine the concentration of magnesium in fibric peat when applied the solidification under different conditions. Physical model was used as a mechanism for the analysis of the experimental data using a soil column as an equipment to produce water leaching. In this investigation, there were four outlets in the soil column which were prepared from the top of the column to the bottom with the purpose of identifying the concentration of magnesium for each soil level. The water leaching of each outlet was tested using atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS). The results obtained showed that the highest concentrations of magnesium for flush and control condition at outlet 4 was 12.50 ppm and 1.29 ppm respectively. Similarly, fibric with solidified peat under rainwater recorded the highest value of 3.16 at outlet 1 for wet condition while for dry condition at outlet 4 of 1.33 ppm. However, the difference in fibric with solidified peat under rainwater and fertilizer condition showed that the highest value for the wet condition was achieved at outlet 1 with 5.43 ppm while highest value of 1.26 ppm was obtained for the dry condition at the outlet 4. It was concluded that the outlets in the soil column gave a detailed analysis of the concentration of magnesium in the soil which was influenced by the environmental conditions.

  7. Electrical switching in Sb doped Al23Te77 glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pumlianmunga; Ramesh, K.

    2017-08-01

    Bulk glasses (Al23Te77)Sbx (0≤ x≤10) prepared by melt quenching method show a change in switching type from threshold to memory for x≥5. An increase in threshold current (Ith) and a concomitant decrease in threshold voltage (Vth) and resisitivity(ρ) have been observed with the increase of Sb content. Raman spectra of the switched region in memory switching compositions show a red shift with respect to the as prepared glasses whereas in threshold switching compositions no such shift is observed. The magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR) of 27Al atom shows three different environments for Al ([4]Al, [5]Al and [6]Al). The samples annealed at their respective crystallization temperatures show rapid increase in [4]Al sites by annihilating [5]Al sites. The melts of threshold switching glasses (x≤2.5) quenched in water at room temperature (27 °C) show amorphous structure whereas, the melt of memory switching glasses (x>2.5) solidify into crystalline structure. The higher coordination of Al increases the cross-linking and rigidity. The addition of Sb increases the glass transition(Tg) and decreases the crystallization temperature(Tc). The decrease in the interval between the Tg and Tc eases the transition between the amorphous and crystalline states and improves the memory properties. The temperature rise at the time of switching can be as high as its melting temperature and the material in between the electrodes may melt to form a filament. The filament may consists of temporary (high resistive amorphous) and permanent (high conducting crystalline) units. The ratio between the temporary and the permanent units may decide the switching type. The filament is dominated by the permanent units in memory switching compositions and by the temporary units in threshold switching compositions. The present study suggests that both the threshold and memory switching can be understood by the thermal model and filament formation.

  8. Fractography of glass

    CERN Document Server

    Tressler, Richard

    1994-01-01

    As the first major reference on glass fractography, contributors to this volume offer a comprehensive account of the fracture of glass as well as various fracture surface topography Contributors discuss optical fibers, glass containers, and flatglass fractography In addition, papers explore fracture origins; the growth of the original flaws of defects; and macroscopic fracture patterns from which fracture patterns evolve This volume is complete with photographs and schematics

  9. Diamond turning of glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blackley, W.S.; Scattergood, R.O.

    1988-12-01

    A new research initiative will be undertaken to investigate the critical cutting depth concepts for single point diamond turning of brittle, amorphous materials. Inorganic glasses and a brittle, thermoset polymer (organic glass) are the principal candidate materials. Interrupted cutting tests similar to those done in earlier research are Ge and Si crystals will be made to obtain critical depth values as a function of machining parameters. The results will provide systematic data with which to assess machining performance on glasses and amorphous materials

  10. Glass to contain wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moncouyoux, M.; Jacquet-Francillon, M.

    1994-01-01

    Here are the tables and figures presented during the conference on the glass to confine high level radioactive wastes: definition, fabrication, storage and disposal. The composition of glasses are detailed, their properties and the vitrification proceeding. The behaviour of these glasses in front of water, irradiation and heat are shown. The characteristics of parcels are given according to the radiation protection rule, ALARA principle, the concept of multi-barriers and the geological stability

  11. Glass microspheres for brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prado, Miguel O.; Prastalo, Simon; Blaumann, Herman; Longhino, Juan M.; Repetto Llamazares, A.H.V.

    2007-01-01

    We developed the capacity to produce glass microspheres containing in their structure one or more radioactive isotopes useful for brachytherapy. We studied the various facts related with their production: (Rare earth) alumino silicate glass making, glass characterization, microspheres production, nuclear activation through (n,γ) nuclear reactions, mechanical characterization before and after irradiation. Corrosion tests in simulated human plasma and mechanical properties characterization were done before and after irradiation. (author) [es

  12. SEM and XPS study of layer-by-layer deposited polypyrrole thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pigois-Landureau, E.; Nicolau, Y. F.; Delamar, M.

    1996-01-01

    Layer-by-layer deposition of thin films (a few nm) of polypyrrole was carried out on various substrates such as silver, platinum, electrochemically oxidized aluminum and pretreated glass. SEM micrographs showed that the deposited layers nucleate by an island-type mechanism on hydrated alumina and KOH-pretreated (hydrophilic) glass before forming a continuous film. However, continuous thin films are obtained on chromic acid pretreated (hydrophobic) glass and sputtered Ag or Pt on glass after only 3-4 deposition cycles. The mean deposition rate evaluated by XPS for the first deposition cycles on Ag and Pt is 3 and 4 nm/cycle, respectively, in agreement with previous gravimetric determinations on thicker films, proving the constancy of the deposition rate. The XPS study of the very thin films obtained by a few deposition cycles shows that the first polypyrrole layers are dedoped by hydroxydic (basic) substrate surfaces.

  13. SEM and XPS study of layer-by-layer deposited polypyrrole thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pigois-Landureau, E.; Nicolau, Y.F.; Delamar, M.

    1996-01-01

    Layer-by-layer deposition of thin films (a few nm) of polypyrrole was carried out on various substrates such as silver, platinum, electrochemically oxidized aluminum and pretreated glass. SEM micrographs showed that the deposited layers nucleate by an island-type mechanism on hydrated alumina and KOH-pretreated (hydrophilic) glass before forming a continuous film. However, continuous thin films are obtained on chromic acid pretreated (hydrophobic) glass and sputtered Ag or Pt on glass after only 3 endash 4 deposition cycles. The mean deposition rate evaluated by XPS for the first deposition cycles on Ag and Pt is 3 and 4 nm/cycle, respectively, in agreement with previous gravimetric determinations on thicker films, proving the constancy of the deposition rate. The XPS study of the very thin films obtained by a few deposition cycles shows that the first polypyrrole layers are dedoped by hydroxydic (basic) substrate surfaces. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  14. Silicate glasses. Chapter 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutze, W.

    1988-01-01

    This chapter is a survey of world-wide research and development efforts in nuclear waste glasses and its production technology. The principal glasses considered are silicate glasses which contain boron, i.e. borosilicate glass. A historical overview of waste form development programs in nine countries is followed by a summary of the design criteria for borosilicate glass compositions glass compositions. In the sections on glass properties the waste form is characterized in terms of potential alterations under the influence of heat, thermal gradients, radiation, aqueous solutions and combinations thereof. The topics are phase transformations, mechanical properties, radiation effects and chemical durability. The results from studies of volcanic glasses, as natural analogues for borosilicate nuclear waste glasses in order to verify predictions obtained from short-term tests in the laboratory, have been compiled in a special section on natural analogues. A special section on advanced vitrification techniques summarizes the various actual and potential processing schemes and describes the facilities. The literature has been considered until 1985. (author). 430 refs.; 68 figs.; 29 tabs

  15. Glass and vitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barton, J.L.; Vacher, R.; Moncouyoux, J.P.; Vernaz, E.

    1997-01-01

    Most glasses used as materials are oxides glasses that are produced by a quick quench of a liquid. Glasses are characterized by the absence of periodicity in the atomic arrangements, they do not have symmetries and do not present order over a long distance. This series of 4 short articles present: 1) the properties of glass and its industrial story, 2) the glass structure, 3) a forty years long story of glass as dies used to confine wastes and 4) the methodology used to study the behaviour of glass over very long periods of time. This methodology is based on 5 steps: 1) define and specify the material to study (the prediction of long term alteration of a material is nonsense unless you know well its initial properties), 2) identify all the alteration processes that are likely to happen, determine their kinetics and the influence of environmental parameters, 3) develop mathematical models in order to simulate long-term behaviour of glasses, 4) determine the release rates of the radionuclides confined in the glass, and 5) validate data and models, it is not possible to expect a complete validation of a model that will be extrapolated over tens of thousands of years, nevertheless some ways of validation can lead to a satisfactory level of confidence taking into account reasonable uncertainties. (A.C.)

  16. Alkali-free bioactive glasses for bone regeneration =

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapoor, Saurabh

    Bioactive glasses and glass-ceramics are a class of third generation biomaterials which elicit a special response on their surface when in contact with biological fluids, leading to strong bonding to living tissues. The purpose of the present study was to develop diopside based alkali-free bioactive glasses in order to achieve good sintering behaviour, high bioactivity, and a dissolution/ degradation rates compatible with the target applications in bone regeneration and tissue engineering. Another aim was to understand the structure-property relationships in the investigated bioactive glasses. In this quest, various glass compositions within the Diopside (CaMgSi2O6) - Fluorapatite (Ca5(PO4)3F) - Tricalcium phosphate (3CaO•P2O5) system have been investigated. All the glasses were prepared by melt-quenching technique and characterized by a wide array of complementary characterization techniques. The glass-ceramics were produced by sintering of glass powders compacts followed by a suitable heat treatment to promote the nucleation and crystallization phenomena. Furthermore, selected parent glass compositions were doped with several functional ions and an attempt to understand their effects on the glass structure, sintering ability and on the in vitro bio-degradation and biomineralization behaviours of the glasses was made. The effects of the same variables on the devitrification (nucleation and crystallization) behaviour of glasses to form bioactive glass-ceramics were also investigated. Some of the glasses exhibited high bio-mineralization rates, expressed by the formation of a surface hydroxyapatite layer within 1-12 h of immersion in a simulated body fluid (SBF) solution. All the glasses showed relatively lower degradation rates in comparison to that of 45S5 Bioglass. Some of the glasses showed very good in vitro behaviour and the glasses co-doped with zinc and strontium showed an in vitro dose dependent behaviour. The as-designed bioactive glasses and glass

  17. Effect of lead species on the durability of simulated nuclear waste glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuchinski, F.A.

    1987-01-01

    It has been shown that the incorporation of lead metal into the corrosion environment reduces the leaching rate of nuclear waste glasses. The present study evaluated the effects of lead metal, oxides, alloys, glasses and soluble species on the corrosion rate of a waste glass. The inherent durability of nuclear waste glasses comes from the about due to the insoluble surface film developed during corrosion. This surface film, enriched with iron, aluminum and calcium acts as a diffusion barrier to further corrosion. Except for PbO 2 , all lead species inhibited glass corrosion due to the formation of a surface film enriched in lead. No corroded glass layer was observed below the lead surface layer. Also, no glass corrosion products were found on the lead surface, except for small amounts of silicon. The transport and deposition of lead on the glass surface appears to be the key factors in preventing glass corrosion. At high glass surface area to volume ratios, the glass corroded considerably at short times since the dissolved lead source could not coat the entire glass surface rapidly enough to prevent continued corrosion. Also, experimental solution values did not agree with thermodynamics model predictions. This suggests that kinetic factors, namely diffusion barriers, are controlling the glass corrosion rate

  18. Leaching of actinides from simulated nuclear waste glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pickering, S.; Walker, C.T.; Offermann, P.

    1982-01-01

    Two types of simulated nuclear waste glass doped with actinides were leached at 200 0 C in distilled water and salt solutions. Am, Np, Pu and U were all preferentially retained in the surface layer on the glass. Leaching ratios of 0.1 to 0.2 for Np and approx. 0.02 for Am were measured. The losses of Am and Np to the leachant were proportional to the total weight loss of the glass and were larger at 10 ml leachant/cm 2 glass than at 5 ml/cm 2 . Weight loss from the glass occurred only at the start of the experiments for periods ranging from 10 h to 10 days according to leachant composition and volume. Wt losses from the C31-3-EC glass were much greater in saturated NaCl solution than in distilled water. Enrichment in the outer surface layer of Al or Ca according to glass type could be correlated with leachant pH, glass composition and weight loss measurements

  19. Wetting of metals and glasses on Mo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saiz, Eduardo; Tomsia, Antoni P.; Saiz, Eduardo; Lopez-Esteban, Sonia; Benhassine, Mehdi; de Coninck, Joel; Rauch, Nicole; Ruehle, Manfred

    2008-01-08

    The wetting of low melting point metals and Si-Ca-Al-Ti-O glasses on molybdenum has been investigated. The selected metals (Au, Cu, Ag) form a simple eutectic with Mo. Metal spreading occurs under nonreactive conditions without interdiffusion or ridge formation. The metals exhibit low (non-zero) contact angles on Mo but this requires temperatures higher than 1100 C in reducing atmospheres in order to eliminate a layer of adsorbed impurities on the molybdenum surface. By controlling the oxygen activity in the furnace, glass spreading can take place under reactive or nonreactive conditions. We have found that in the glass/Mo system the contact angle does not decrease under reactive conditions. In all cases, adsorption from the liquid seems to accelerate the diffusivity on the free molybdenum surface.

  20. On-site Raman analysis of ancient glasses and stained-glass windows: modeling, procedure, lixiviation and characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tournie, Aurelie

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is to estimate the possibilities of Raman spectrometry to identify on site old glasses (objects, stained-glass windows...) whatever been their preserving state. The efficiency of Raman analysis depends strongly of the structural organization of glasses and then of their technological history. In order to differentiate the great silicate family compounds from their Raman analysis, a methodology has been developed: data acquisition and spectrum processing, Raman parameters extraction and classification of these glasses. This approach has then been extended to crystalline phosphates and silicates. Beforehand, correlations between crystallo-chemical parameters and vibrational signatures have been considered. The old glasses are often recovered by a corrosion layer which induces important changes on the Raman signature. Four layers have been identified and characterized by a multi-scale study: leached porous layer, transition zone, cracked zone and sound glass. The results show that only an analytical chemistry approach (databases of Raman signatures) is not sufficient and that a solid chemistry and physics approach is required to explain the spectral answers and extract the relevant parameters from glasses preserving [fr

  1. Relaxations in spin glasses: Similarities and differences from ordinary glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ngai, K.L.; Rajagopal, A.K.; Huang, C.Y.

    1984-01-01

    Relaxation phenomena have become a major concern in the physics of spin glasses. There are certain resemblances of these relaxation properties to those of ordinary glasses. In this work, we compare the relaxation properties of spin glasses near the freezing temperature with those of glasses near the glass transition temperature. There are similarities between the two types of glasses. Moreover, the relaxation properties of many glasses and spin glasses are in conformity with two coupled ''universality'' relations predicted by a recent model of relaxations in condensed matter

  2. Evaluation of Structural Cellular Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, M. A.; Zwissler, J. G.

    1984-01-01

    Preliminary design information presented. First report discusses state of structural-cellular-glass programs as of June 1979. Second report gives further details of program to develop improved cellular glasses and to characterize properties of glasses and commercially available materials.

  3. Electric glass capturing markets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wikman, K.; Wikstroem, T.

    1996-11-01

    Electric glass has found its place on the construction market. In public buildings, electrically heatable windows are becoming the leading option for large glass walls. Studies on detached houses, both new and renovated, show that floor heating combined with electrically heatable windowpanes is the best choice with respect to resident`s comfort. (orig.)

  4. Radioresistance of inorganic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vorob'ev, A.A.; Zavadovskaya, E.K.; Fedorov, B.V.; Starodubtsev, V.A.

    1977-01-01

    Regularities are considered in the variation of properties of glass due to irradiations. On the basis of previous theoretical statements and experimental investigations, it is inferred that the irradiation resistance of glasses of the same type, synthesis conditions, content of impurities and amount of imperfections, is a function of the ''element-oxygen'' bond energy. The irradiation resistance depends on the number and the nature of glass structure imperfections. The averaged level of bonding forces is indicative of the glass formation temperature; the imperfections in glasses are formed in structure elements whose amount predominates as compared to the others. Electric charges which accumulate on the crack surface tend to increase its size, thus lessening even further the electric strength of the dielectric. The greater the irradiation time, the greater the number of irradiation imperfections causing a drop in the electric strength of glass. When choosing a glass for service in a radiation field, it is necessary to select those of a highest temperature of glass formation and with a least amount of imperfections

  5. Nucleation in ZBLAN glasses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Leede, G.L.A.; Waal, de H.

    1989-01-01

    Nucleation rates were detd. in a ZrF4-BaF2-NaF-LaF3-AlF3 glass (ZBLAN) using an optical method. The results were compared with a similar glass having a slightly different compn. The difference in the nucleation rate is explained by classical nucleation theory using calcd. free-energy differences

  6. Mechanical relaxation in glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiki, Y.

    2004-01-01

    The basic properties of glasses and the characteristics of mechanical relaxation in glasses were briefly reviewed, and then our studies concerned were presented. Experimental methods adopted were viscosity, internal friction, ultrasonic attenuation, and Brillouin scattering measurements. The specimens used were several kinds of inorganic, organic, and metallic glasses. The measurements were mainly carried out from the room temperature up to the glass transition temperature, and the relaxation time was determined as a function of temperature. The 'double relaxation' composed of two Arrhenius-type relaxations was observed in many materials. In both relaxations, the 'compensation effect' showing a correlation of the pre-exponential factor and the activation energy was observed. These results were explained by considering the 'complex relaxation' due to cooperative motions of atoms or group of atoms. Values of activation energy near the glass transition determined by the various experimental methods were compared with each other

  7. Polymorphism in glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landa, L.M.; Nikolaeva, I.N.

    1979-01-01

    To defect phase interfaces and spasmodic properties change, the inhomogeneity and the second radiation effects in quartz glass, metamict phase and intermediate states have been investigated. When irradiating with fast neutrons the transformation of quartz glass - metamict phase occurs completely. The transformation is completed at 2x10 20 part./cm 2 dose. Thermal treatment not only increases the number of inhomogeneities but also results in increasing quartz glass density. Annealing transforms the metamict phase into common quartz glass at 1400 K. The fact, that thermal treatment results in the complete transformation of metamict phase into quartz glass, and the inverse transformation occurs only partially, is quite regular, as the metamict phase has a lesser entropy and is a more ordered state. It is shown that different amorphous phases of a chemical composition have different structures and properties, that there are interfaces between them, and the transformation from one state to another in microvolumes is realized spasmodically and requires expenditure of energy

  8. Glass leaching performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chick, L.A.; Turcotte, R.P.

    1983-05-01

    Current understanding of the leaching performance of high-level nuclear waste (HLW) glass is summarized. The empirical model of waste glass leaching behavior developed shows that at high water flow rates the glass leach rate is kinetically limited to a maximum value. At intermediate water flow rates, leaching is limited by the solution concentration of silica and decreases with decreasing water flow rates. Release of soluble elements is controlled by silica dissolution because silica forms the binding network of the glass. At low water flow rates, mass loss rates reach values controlled by formation rates of alteration minerals, or by diffusion of dissolution products through essentially stagnant water. The parameters reviewed with respect to their quantifiable influence on leaching behavior include temperature, pH, leachant composition, glass composition, thermal history, and radiation. Of these, temperature is most important since the rate of mass loss approximately doubles with each 10 0 C increase in dilute solutions. The pH has small effects within the 4 to 10 range. The chemical composition of the leachant is most important with regard to its influence on alteration product formation. Glass composition exhibits the largest effects at high flow rates where improved glasses leach from ten to thirty times slower than glass 76 to 68. The effects of the thermal history (devitrification) of the glass are not likely to be significant. Radiation effects are important primarily in that radiolysis can potentially drive pH values to less than 4. Radiation damage to the glass causes insignificant changes in leaching performance

  9. A Review of Glass-Ionomer Cements for Clinical Dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharanbir K. Sidhu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This article is an updated review of the published literature on glass-ionomer cements and covers their structure, properties and clinical uses within dentistry, with an emphasis on findings from the last five years or so. Glass-ionomers are shown to set by an acid-base reaction within 2–3 min and to form hard, reasonably strong materials with acceptable appearance. They release fluoride and are bioactive, so that they gradually develop a strong, durable interfacial ion-exchange layer at the interface with the tooth, which is responsible for their adhesion. Modified forms of glass-ionomers, namely resin-modified glass-ionomers and glass carbomer, are also described and their properties and applications covered. Physical properties of the resin-modified glass-ionomers are shown to be good, and comparable with those of conventional glass-ionomers, but biocompatibility is somewhat compromised by the presence of the resin component, 2 hydroxyethyl methacrylate. Properties of glass carbomer appear to be slightly inferior to those of the best modern conventional glass-ionomers, and there is not yet sufficient information to determine how their bioactivity compares, although they have been formulated to enhance this particular feature.

  10. Air-assisted liquid–liquid microextraction by solidifying the floating organic droplets for the rapid determination of seven fungicide residues in juice samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You, Xiangwei [Tobacco Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Qingdao 266101 (China); College of Science, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100193 (China); Xing, Zhuokan [College of Science, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100193 (China); Liu, Fengmao, E-mail: liufengmao@cau.edu.cn [College of Science, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100193 (China); Zhang, Xu [College of Science, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100193 (China)

    2015-05-22

    Highlights: • A novel AALLME-SFO method was firstly reported for pesticide residue analysis. • Solvent with low density and proper melting point was used as extraction solvent. • The formation of “cloudy solvent” with a syringe only. • The new method avoided the use of organic dispersive solvent. - Abstract: A novel air assisted liquid–liquid microextraction using the solidification of a floating organic droplet method (AALLME-SFO) was developed for the rapid and simple determination of seven fungicide residues in juice samples, using the gas chromatography with electron capture detector (GC-ECD). This method combines the advantages of AALLME and dispersive liquid–liquid microextraction based on the solidification of floating organic droplets (DLLME-SFO) for the first time. In this method, a low-density solvent with a melting point near room temperature was used as the extraction solvent, and the emulsion was rapidly formed by pulling in and pushing out the mixture of aqueous sample solution and extraction solvent for ten times repeatedly using a 10-mL glass syringe. After centrifugation, the extractant droplet could be easily collected from the top of the aqueous samples by solidifying it at a temperature lower than the melting point. Under the optimized conditions, good linearities with the correlation coefficients (γ) higher than 0.9959 were obtained and the limits of detection (LOD) varied between 0.02 and 0.25 μg L{sup −1}. The proposed method was applied to determine the target fungicides in juice samples and acceptable recoveries ranged from 72.6% to 114.0% with the relative standard deviations (RSDs) of 2.3–13.0% were achieved. Compared with the conventional DLLME method, the newly proposed method will neither require a highly toxic chlorinated solvent for extraction nor an organic dispersive solvent in the application process; hence, it is more environmentally friendly.

  11. Air-assisted liquid–liquid microextraction by solidifying the floating organic droplets for the rapid determination of seven fungicide residues in juice samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    You, Xiangwei; Xing, Zhuokan; Liu, Fengmao; Zhang, Xu

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A novel AALLME-SFO method was firstly reported for pesticide residue analysis. • Solvent with low density and proper melting point was used as extraction solvent. • The formation of “cloudy solvent” with a syringe only. • The new method avoided the use of organic dispersive solvent. - Abstract: A novel air assisted liquid–liquid microextraction using the solidification of a floating organic droplet method (AALLME-SFO) was developed for the rapid and simple determination of seven fungicide residues in juice samples, using the gas chromatography with electron capture detector (GC-ECD). This method combines the advantages of AALLME and dispersive liquid–liquid microextraction based on the solidification of floating organic droplets (DLLME-SFO) for the first time. In this method, a low-density solvent with a melting point near room temperature was used as the extraction solvent, and the emulsion was rapidly formed by pulling in and pushing out the mixture of aqueous sample solution and extraction solvent for ten times repeatedly using a 10-mL glass syringe. After centrifugation, the extractant droplet could be easily collected from the top of the aqueous samples by solidifying it at a temperature lower than the melting point. Under the optimized conditions, good linearities with the correlation coefficients (γ) higher than 0.9959 were obtained and the limits of detection (LOD) varied between 0.02 and 0.25 μg L −1 . The proposed method was applied to determine the target fungicides in juice samples and acceptable recoveries ranged from 72.6% to 114.0% with the relative standard deviations (RSDs) of 2.3–13.0% were achieved. Compared with the conventional DLLME method, the newly proposed method will neither require a highly toxic chlorinated solvent for extraction nor an organic dispersive solvent in the application process; hence, it is more environmentally friendly

  12. Formation and growth of crystal defects in directionally solidified multicrystalline silicon for solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryningen, Birgit

    2008-07-01

    Included in this thesis are five publications and one report. The common theme is characterisation of directionally solidified multicrystalline silicon for solar cells. Material characterisation of solar cell silicon is naturally closely linked to both the casting process and to the solar cell processing: Many of the material properties are determined by the casting process, and the solar cell processing will to some extend determine which properties will influence the solar cell performance. Solar grade silicon (SoG-Si) made by metallurgical refining route and supplied by Elkem Solar was directionally solidified and subsequently characterised, and a simple solar cell process was applied. Except from some metallic co-precipitates in the top of the ingot, no abnormalities were found, and it is suggested that within the limits of the tests performed in this thesis, the casting and the solar cell processing, rather than the assumed higher impurity content, was the limiting factor. It is suggested in this thesis that the main quality problem in multicrystalline silicon wafers is the existence of dislocation clusters covering large wafer areas. The clusters will reduce the effect of gettering and even if gettering could be performed successfully, the clusters will still reduce the minority carrier mobility and hence the solar cell performance. It has further been pointed out that ingots solidified under seemingly equal conditions might have a pronounced difference in minority carrier lifetime. Ingots with low minority carrier lifetime have high dislocation densities. The ingots with the substantially higher lifetime seem all to be dominated by twins. It is also found a link between a higher undercooling and the ingots dominated by twins. It is suggested that the two types of ingots are subject to different nucleation and crystal growth mechanisms: For the ingots dominated by dislocations, which are over represented, the crystal growth is randomly nucleated at the

  13. Microstructure investigation of NiAl-Cr(Mo) interface in a directionally solidified NiAl-Cr(Mo) eutectic alloyed with refractory metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Y.X.; Cui, C.Y.; Guo, J.T.; Li, D.X.

    2004-01-01

    The microstructure of a directionally solidified NiAl-Cr(Mo) eutectic alloyed with refractory metal in as-processed and heat-treated states has been studied by means of scanning electron microscopy and high resolution electron microscopy (HREM). The microstructure of the NiAl-Cr(Mo) eutectic was characterized by lamellar Cr(Mo) phases embedded within NiAl matrix with common growth direction of . The interface between NiAl and lamellar Cr(Mo) did not have any transition layers. Misfit dislocations were observed at the NiAl-Cr(Mo) interface. In addition to lamellar Cr(Mo) phases, coherent Cr(Mo, Ni, Al) precipitates and NiAl precipitates were also observed in the NiAl matrix and lamellar Cr(Mo) phases, respectively. After hot isostatic pressing and heat treatment, the NiAl-Cr(Mo) interfaces became smooth and straight. Square array of misfit dislocations was directly observed at the (0 0 1) interface between NiAl and Cr(Mo, Ni, Al) precipitate. The configuration of misfit dislocation network showed a generally good agreement with prediction based on the geometric O-lattice model

  14. Corrosion of inconel in high-temperature borosilicate glass melts containing simulant nuclear waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Xianhe; Yuan, Xiaoning; Brigden, Clive T.; Tao, Jun; Hyatt, Neil C.; Miekina, Michal

    2017-10-01

    The corrosion behaviors of Inconel 601 in the borosilicate glass (MW glass) containing 25 wt.% of simulant Magnox waste, and in ZnO, Mn2O3 and Fe2O3 modified Mg/Ca borosilicate glasses (MZMF and CZMF glasses) containing 15 wt.% of simulant POCO waste, were evaluated by dimensional changes, the formation of internal defects and changes in alloy composition near corrosion surfaces. In all three kinds of glass melts, Cr at the inconel surface forms a protective Cr2O3 scale between the metal surface and the glass, and alumina precipitates penetrate from the metal surface or formed in-situ. The corrosion depths of inconel 601 in MW waste glass melt are greater than those in the other two glass melts. In MW glass, the Cr2O3 layer between inconel and glass is fragmented because of the reaction between MgO and Cr2O3, which forms the crystal phase MgCr2O4. In MZMF and CZMF waste glasses the layers are continuous and a thin (Zn, Fe, Ni, B)-containing layer forms on the surface of the chromium oxide layer and prevents Cr2O3 from reacting with MgO or other constituents. MgCr2O4 was observed in the XRD analysis of the bulk MW waste glass after the corrosion test, and ZrSiO4 in the MZMF waste glass, and ZrSiO4 and CaMoO4 in the CZMF waste glass.

  15. Aging near the wall in colloidal glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Cong; Huang, Xinru; Weeks, Eric

    In a colloidal glass system, particles move slower as sample ages. In addition, their motions may be affected by their local structure, and this structure will be different near a wall. We examine how the aging process near a wall differs from that in the bulk of the sample. In particular, we use a confocal microscope to observe 3D motion in a bidisperse colloidal glass sample. We find that flat walls induce the particles to organize into layers. The aging process behaves differently near the boundary, especially within the first three layers. Particle motion near the wall is noticeably slower but also changes less dramatically with age. We compare and contrast aging seen in samples with flat and rough walls.

  16. Sorption of streptococcus faecium to glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oerstavik, D.

    1977-01-01

    A method has been developed by which to study the sorption of Streptococcus faecium to soda-lime cover glasses. Conditions were chosen to minimize the influence on sorption of bacterial polymer production, passive sorption being studied rather than attachment mediated by metabolic activities. Sorption of S. faecium increased with increasing temperature (to 50degC), time, and cell concentration, but equilibrium apparently was not reached even after incubation for 8 hours or at a cell concentration of 3 x 10 10 per ml. Sorption increased with solute molarity up to 0.1 M concentration of NaCl and KCl, indicating an effect of the electrical double layers on the apposition of cells to the glass surface. Desorption of bacteria could be obtained after multiple washings of the glasses in buffer or by the action of Tween 80, but not if sorbed bacteria were left in distilled water, various salt solutions, urea, or in suspensions of unlabelled bacteria. It was concluded that sorption occurred as a result of chemical interactions between the glass and the cell surface. Tween 80 at a concentration of 1 per cent inhibited sorption to 26 per cent of buffer controls, 2 M urea was less effective, and 1 M NaCl was without effect. It is suggested that hydrophobic interactions may be of importance in the binding of S. faecium to glass. (author)

  17. Glass melter materials technical options for the French vitrification process and operations experience authors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonniaud, R.; Roznad, L.; Demay, R.

    1986-09-01

    The French vitrification process for solidifying high-level radioactive waste which has been under industrial application since 1978, is mentioned briefly. This technique involves glass melting at 1,150 deg.C, using an induction heated metallic vessel. The molten glass pouring is controlled by a thermal gate, which is also heated by induction. Two types of vessel are in use. Both are remotely removable and disposable to permit replacement at regular intervals. The technical criteria (the materials used have to meet) are described. The behaviour of the materials has been investigated using the industrial experience gained in the AVM facility during 8 years of operation, as well as with operation of a prototype for the new vitrification facilities under construction at La Hague. A short description of the use of these materials is also presented

  18. Interplay between temperature gradients field and C - E transformation in solidifying rolls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Wołczyński

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available At first step of simulation a temperature field for solidifying cast steel and cast iron roll has been performed. The calculation does not take into account the convection in the liquid since convection has no influence on the proposed model for the localization of the C-E (columnar to equiaxed grains transformation. However, it allows to study the dynamics of temperature field temporal behavior in the middle of a mould. It is postulated that for the C-E transition a full accumulation of the heat in the mould has been observed (plateau at the T(t curve. The temporal range of plateau existence corresponds to the incubation time for the full equiaxed grains formation. At the second step of simulation temporal behavior of the temperature gradient field has been studied. Three ranges within temperature gradients field have been distinguished for the operating point situated at the middle of mould: a/ for the formation of columnar grains zone, ( and high temperature gradient 0>>T&0//>>∂∂−∂∂∂∂−∂∂>EttEtrTrT. T - temperature, r - roll radius. It is evident that the heat transfer across the mould decides on the temporal appearance of incubation during which the solidification is significantly arrested and competition between columnar and equiaxed growth occurs. Moreover solidification with positive temperature gradient transforms into solidification with negative temperature gradient (locally after the incubation. A simulation has been performed for the cast steel and cast iron rolls solidifying as in industry condition. Since the incubation divides the roll into to parts (first with columnar structure, second with equiaxed structure some experiments dealing with solidification have been made in laboratory scale. Finally, observations of the macrosegregation or microsegregation and phase or structure appearance in the cast iron ingot / roll (made in laboratory has also been done in order to confront them with theoretical predictions

  19. Role of SrO on the bioactivity behavior of some ternary borate glasses and their glass ceramic derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelghany, A. M.; Ouis, M. A.; Azooz, M. A.; ElBatal, H. A.; El-Bassyouni, G. T.

    2016-01-01

    Borate glasses containing SrO substituting both CaO and NaO were prepared and characterized for their bioactivity or bone bonding ability. Glass ceramic derivatives were prepared by thermal heat treatment process. FTIR, XRD and SEM measurements for the prepared glass and glass-ceramics before and after immersion in sodium phosphate solution for one and two weeks were carried out. The appearance of two IR peaks within the range 550-680 cm-1 after immersion in phosphate solution indicates the formation of hydroxyapatite or equivalent Sr phosphate layer. X-ray diffraction data agree with the FTIR spectral analysis. The solubility test was carried out for both glasses and glass ceramics derivatives in the same phosphate solution. The introduction of SrO increases the solubility for both glasses and glass ceramics and this is assumed to be due to the formation of Sr phosphate which is more soluble than calcium phosphate (hydroxyapatite). SEM images reveal varying changes in the surfaces of glass ceramics after immersion according to the SrO content.

  20. Role of SrO on the bioactivity behavior of some ternary borate glasses and their glass ceramic derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelghany, A M; Ouis, M A; Azooz, M A; ElBatal, H A; El-Bassyouni, G T

    2016-01-05

    Borate glasses containing SrO substituting both CaO and NaO were prepared and characterized for their bioactivity or bone bonding ability. Glass ceramic derivatives were prepared by thermal heat treatment process. FTIR, XRD and SEM measurements for the prepared glass and glass-ceramics before and after immersion in sodium phosphate solution for one and two weeks were carried out. The appearance of two IR peaks within the range 550-680cm(-1) after immersion in phosphate solution indicates the formation of hydroxyapatite or equivalent Sr phosphate layer. X-ray diffraction data agree with the FTIR spectral analysis. The solubility test was carried out for both glasses and glass ceramics derivatives in the same phosphate solution. The introduction of SrO increases the solubility for both glasses and glass ceramics and this is assumed to be due to the formation of Sr phosphate which is more soluble than calcium phosphate (hydroxyapatite). SEM images reveal varying changes in the surfaces of glass ceramics after immersion according to the SrO content. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Microdrilled cartilage defects treated with thrombin-solidified chitosan/blood implant regenerate a more hyaline, stable, and structurally integrated osteochondral unit compared to drilled controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchand, Catherine; Chen, Gaoping; Tran-Khanh, Nicolas; Sun, Jun; Chen, Hongmei; Buschmann, Michael D; Hoemann, Caroline D

    2012-03-01

    This study analyzed the long-term cartilage and subchondral bone repair of microdrilled defects treated with chitosan glycerol-phosphate/blood implant, using thrombin (Factor IIa) to accelerate in situ solidification. We also evaluated the cartilage repair response to six smaller microdrill holes compared with two larger holes. Bilateral knee trochlear cartilage defects were created in n=8 skeletally mature rabbits, drilled with six proximal 0.5 mm and two distal 0.9 mm holes, then covered with in situ-solidified IIa-implants (treated) or with IIa-alone (control). After 6.5 months of repair, cartilage repair tissues were analyzed by histological scoring and histomorphometry for hyaline matrix characteristics and osseous integration. Subchondral repair bone was analyzed by 3D microcomputed tomography and compared to acute defects (n=6) and intact trochlea (n=8). Implant-treated cartilage repair tissues had higher structural integrity through the entire defect (p=0.02), twofold higher percent staining for glycosaminoglycan (p=0.0004), and ~24% more collagen type II staining over the smaller drill holes (p=0.008) compared with controls. Otherwise, hole diameter had no specific effect on cartilage repair. The subchondral bone plate was partially restored in treated and control defects but less dense than intact trochlea, with evidence of incomplete regeneration of the calcified cartilage layer. More residual drill holes (p=0.054) were detected in control versus treated defects, and control defects with more than 40% residual holes presented abnormally thicker trabeculae compared with treated defects. Low osteoclast numbers after 6.5 months repair suggested that bone was no longer remodeling. The subchondral bone plate surrounding the defects exhibited a significant thickening compared with age-matched intact trochlea. These data suggest that debridement and drilling can lead to long-term subchondral bone changes outside the cartilage defect. Compared with drilled

  2. Thermal Conductivity of Foam Glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; König, Jakob; Yue, Yuanzheng

    Due to the increased focus on energy savings and waste recycling foam glass materials have gained increased attention. The production process of foam glass is a potential low-cost recycle option for challenging waste, e.g. CRT glass and industrial waste (fly ash and slags). Foam glass is used...... as thermal insulating material in building and chemical industry. The large volume of gas (porosity 90 – 95%) is the main reason of the low thermal conductivity of the foam glass. If gases with lower thermal conductivity compared to air are entrapped in the glass melt, the derived foam glass will contain...... only closed pores and its overall thermal conductivity will be much lower than that of the foam glass with open pores. In this work we have prepared foam glass using different types of recycled glasses and different kinds of foaming agents. This enabled the formation of foam glasses having gas cells...

  3. Alkali depletion and ion-beam mixing in glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, G.W.

    1983-01-01

    Ion-implantation-induced alkali depletion in simple alkali-silicate glasses (12M 2 O.88SiO 2 ) has been studied for implantations at room temperature and near 77K. Results are consistent with a mechanism for alkali removal, by heavy ion bombardment, based on radiation-enhanced migration and preferential removal of alkali from the outermost layers. Similar results were obtained for mixed-alkali glasses ((12-x)Cs 2 .O.xM 2 O.88SiO 2 ) where, in addition, a mixed-alkali effect may also be operative. Some preliminary experiments with ion implantation through thin Al films on SiO 2 glass and on a phosphate glass show that inter-diffusion takes place and suggest that this ion-mixing technique may be a useful method for altering the physical properties of glass surfaces

  4. Direct Electrospray Printing of Gradient Refractive Index Chalcogenide Glass Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Spencer; Lin, Pao Tai; Li, Cheng; Lumdee, Chatdanai; Hu, Juejun; Agarwal, Anuradha; Kik, Pieter G; Deng, Weiwei; Richardson, Kathleen

    2017-08-16

    A spatially varying effective refractive index gradient using chalcogenide glass layers is printed on a silicon wafer using an optimized electrospray (ES) deposition process. Using solution-derived glass precursors, IR-transparent Ge 23 Sb 7 S 70 and As 40 S 60 glass films of programmed thickness are fabricated to yield a bilayer structure, resulting in an effective gradient refractive index (GRIN) film. Optical and compositional analysis tools confirm the optical and physical nature of the gradient in the resulting high-optical-quality films, demonstrating the power of direct printing of multimaterial structures compatible with planar photonic fabrication protocols. The potential application of such tailorable materials and structures as they relate to the enhancement of sensitivity in chalcogenide glass based planar chemical sensor device design is presented. This method, applicable to a broad cross section of glass compositions, shows promise in directly depositing GRIN films with tunable refractive index profiles for bulk and planar optical components and devices.

  5. Construction of a 21-Component Layered Mixture Experiment Design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piepel, Gregory F.; Cooley, Scott K.; Jones, Bradley

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the solution to a unique and challenging mixture experiment design problem involving: (1) 19 and 21 components for two different parts of the design, (2) many single-component and multi-component constraints, (3) augmentation of existing data, (4) a layered design developed in stages, and (5) a no-candidate-point optimal design approach. The problem involved studying the liquidus temperature of spinel crystals as a function of nuclear waste glass composition. The statistical objective was to develop an experimental design by augmenting existing glasses with new nonradioactive and radioactive glasses chosen to cover the designated nonradioactive and radioactive experimental regions. The existing 144 glasses were expressed as 19-component nonradioactive compositions and then augmented with 40 new nonradioactive glasses. These included 8 glasses on the outer layer of the region, 27 glasses on an inner layer, 2 replicate glasses at the centroid, and one replicate each of three existing glasses. Then, the 144 + 40 = 184 glasses were expressed as 21-component radioactive compositions and augmented with 5 radioactive glasses. A D-optimal design algorithm was used to select the new outer layer, inner layer, and radioactive glasses. Several statistical software packages can generate D-optimal experimental designs, but nearly all require a set of candidate points (e.g., vertices) from which to select design points. The large number of components (19 or 21) and many constraints made it impossible to generate the huge number of vertices and other typical candidate points. JMP(R) was used to select design points without candidate points. JMP uses a coordinate-exchange algorithm modified for mixture experiments, which is discussed in the paper

  6. Corrosion mechanisms of containment glasses for fission products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nogues, J.L.

    1984-01-01

    After a review of nuclear energy production and waste vitrification principles, the aqueous corrosion mechanisms of the containment glasses and the various parameters affecting the corrosion are studied: effects of glass composition, temperature, lixiviation agent pH, lixiviation duration and mode. Conventional mass loss measurement and solution analyses are coupled to sophisticated surface analysis techniques. The hydrolyzed layer formation and the solubility limits are discussed. 87 figs., 30 tabs., 144 refs

  7. Effect of different glasses in glass bonded zeolite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, M.A.; Ackerman, J.P.; Verma, S.

    1995-01-01

    A mineral waste form has been developed for chloride waste salt generated during the pyrochemical treatment of spent nuclear fuel. The waste form consists of salt-occluded zeolite powders bound within a glass matrix. The zeolite contains the salt and immobilizes the fission products. The zeolite powders are hot pressed to form a mechanically stable, durable glass bonded zeolite. Further development of glass bonded zeolite as a waste form requires an understanding of the interaction between the glass and the zeolite. Properties of the glass that enhance binding and durability of the glass bonded zeolite need to be identified. Three types of glass, boroaluminosilicate, soda-lime silicate, and high silica glasses, have a range of properties and are now being investigated. Each glass was hot pressed by itself and with an equal amount of zeolite. MCC-1 leach tests were run on both. Soda-lime silicate and high silica glasses did not give a durable glass bonded zeolite. Boroaluminosilicate glasses rich in alkaline earths did bind the zeolite and gave a durable glass bonded zeolite. Scanning electron micrographs suggest that the boroaluminosilicate glasses wetted the zeolite powders better than the other glasses. Development of the glass bonded zeolite as a waste form for chloride waste salt is continuing

  8. Oxynitride glasses: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, A.R.; Clausell, C.; Barba, A.

    2016-07-01

    Oxynitride glasses are special types of silicates or silicoaluminates which have been the object of many studies over the last forty years. They can be prepared by means of various complex methods, leading to variable levels of nitrogen incorporation, though in all cases giving limited transparency in the visible range. More recently, a new family of oxynitride glasses incorporating fluorine has been investigated. This paper outlines the effect of composition, in particular nitrogen and fluorine content, on properties such as glass transition temperature, hardness, Young's modulus, compactness and molar volume. (Author)

  9. Orbital glass in HTSC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusmartsev, F.V.

    1992-10-01

    The physical reasons why the orbital glass may exist in granular high-temperature superconductors and the existing experimental data appeared recently are discussed. The orbital glass is characterized by the coexistence of the orbital paramagnetic state with the superconducting state and occurs at small magnetic fields H c0 c1 . The transition in orbital glass arises at the critical field H c0 which is inversely proportional to the surface cross-area S of an average grain. In connection with theoretical predictions the possible experiments are proposed. (author). 10 refs

  10. Bioactive glasses and glass-ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Aza, P. N.

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Since the late 1960´s, a great interest in the use of bioceramic materials for biomedical applications has been developed. In a previous paper, the authors reviewed crystalline bioceramic materials “sensus stricto”, it is to say, those ceramic materials, constituted for non-metallic inorganic compounds, crystallines and consolidates by thermal treatment of powders at high temperature. In the present review, the authors deal with those called bioactive glasses and glassceramics. Although all of them are also obtained by thermal treatment at high temperature, the first are amorphous and the second are obtained by devitrification of a glass, although the vitreous phase normally prevails on the crystalline phases. After an introduction to the concept of bioactive materials, a short historical review of the bioactive glasses development is made. Its preparation, reactivity in physiological media, mechanism of bonding to living tissues and mechanical strength of the bone-implant interface is also reported. Next, the concept of glass-ceramic and the way of its preparation are exposed. The composition, physicochemical properties and biological behaviour of the principal types of bioactive glasses and glass-ceramic materials: Bioglass®, Ceravital®, Cerabone®, Ilmaplant® and Bioverit® are also reviewed. Finally, a short review on the bioactive-glass coatings and bioactive-composites and most common uses of bioactive-glasses and glass-ceramics are carried out too.

    Desde finales de los años sesenta, se ha despertado un gran interés por el uso de los materiales biocerámicos para aplicaciones biomédicas. En un trabajo previo, los autores hicieron una revisión de los denominados materiales biocerámicos cristalinos en sentido estricto, es decir, de aquellos materiales, constituidos por compuestos inorgánicos no metálicos, cristalinos y consolidados mediante tratamientos térmicos a altas temperaturas. En el presente trabajo, los autores

  11. Properties of rapidly solidified Fe-Cr-Al ribbons for the use as automotive exhaust gas catalyst substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emmerich, K.

    1993-01-01

    Metallic honeycomb structures are used as catalyst substrates in automotive exhaust gas systems. This application requires an outstanding corrosion resistance at elevated temperatures of the substrate material. Technical improvements can be achieved by the use of rapid solidification technology for the production of the Fe-Cr-Al ribbons since the Al content can be substantially increased from about 5% Al in the conventionally rolled material to about 12% Al in the rapid solidified ribbon. As a result the lifetime of the ribbon in a higher-temperature corrosion environment is drastically increased. In addition the scale/metal adherance is improved. The impediment of recrystallization in the rapidly solidified ribbons prevents an embrittlement even in carbonizing atmospheres. (orig.)

  12. Study of the alteration of the Vatnajokull volcanic glasses (Iceland). Mechanisms and situation at low temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Gal, X.

    1999-01-01

    Volcanic glasses have been considered for several years to be good analogues of nuclear glasses. The main objective of this study is to look at the long term behaviour of natural glasses subjected to meteoric alteration. Basaltic hyalo-clasts, essentially from Hengill, Husafell and Vatnajokull, in Iceland, were studied. These glasses, ranging from 0.09 to 4 My in age, and altered by meteoric water, are surrounded by alteration layers. In the youngest samples ( 18 O measurements indicate, major modification of the initial glass structure during gel formation. Chemical budgets show that elements are not completely retained by alteration products in such geological environments. (author)

  13. Thermal and physicochemical properties important for the long term behavior of nuclear waste glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vernaz, E.; Matzke, H.J.

    1992-01-01

    High level nuclear waste from reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel has to be solidified in a stable matrix for safe long-time storage. Vitrification in borosilicate glasses is the technique accepted worldwide. A number of different glasses was developed in different national programs. The criteria and the reasons for selecting the final compositions are briefly described. Emphasis is placed on the French product R7T7 and on thermal and physicochemical properties though glasses developed in other national projects (e.g. the German product GP 98/12 etc.) are also treated. The basic physical and mechanical properties and the chemical durability of the glass in contact with water or other aqueous solutions are described. The basic mechanisms of aqueous corrosion are discussed and the evolving modelling of the leaching process is dealt with, as well as effects of container material, backfill, etc. The thermal behavior has also been studied and extensive data exist on diffusion of glass constituents (Na) and of interesting elements of the waste such as the alkalis Rb and Cs or the actinides U and Pu, as well as on crystallization processes in the glass during storage at elevated temperatures. Emphasis is placed on the radiation stability of the glasses, based on extensive studies using short-lived actinides (e.g. Cm-244) or ion-implantation to produce the damage expected during long storage at an accelerated rate. The radiation stability is shown to be very good, if realistic damage conditions are used. The knowledge accumulated in the past years is used to evaluate and predict the long-term evolution of the glass under storage conditions

  14. Evaluation of the performance of solidified commercial low-level wastes in an arid climate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, M.J.; Walter, M.B.

    1984-01-01

    Shallow land burial is being used as a disposal method for commercial low-level waste at waste disposal sites in arid (Hanford, Washington) and humid (Barnwell, South Carolina) climatic regions. A field lysimeter facility has been established at Hanford in which to conduct waste-form leaching tests. The primary objective of this research is to determine typical source terms generated by commercial solidified low-level wastes. The field lysimeter facility consists of 10, 3 M deep by 1.8 M diameter, closed-bottomed lysimeters around a central 4 M deep by 4 M diameter instrument caisson. Commercial cement and dow polymer waste samples were removed from 210 L drums and placed in the 1.8 M diameter lysimeters. Two bitumen samples are planned to be emplaced in the facility this year. The central caisson provides access to the instrumentation in the individual lysimeters and allows selective sampling of the soil and waste forms. Suction candles (ceramic cups) placed around the waste will be used to periodically collect soil water samples for chemical analysis. Meteorological data, moisture content, and soil temperature are being automatically monitored at the facility. Characterization of the soils and waste forms have been partially completed. These data consist of moisture release characteristics, particle size distribution, concentrations and distributions of radionuclides in the waste streams, and concentrations of hydrophilic organic species in one of the waste streams

  15. Disposal and long-term storage in geological formations of solidified radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shischits, I.

    1996-01-01

    The special depository near Krasnoyarsk contains temporarily about 1,100 tons of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) from WWR- should be solidified and for the most part buried in geological formations. Solid wastes and SNF from RBMK reactors are assumed to be buried as well. For this purpose special technologies and underground constructions are required. They are to be created in the geological plots within the territory of Russian Federation and adjacent areas of CIS, meeting the developed list of requirements. The burial structures will vary greatly depending on the geological formation, the amount of wastes and their isotope composition. The well-known constructions such as deep wells, shafts, mines and cavities can be mentioned. There is a need to design constructions, which have no analog in the world practice. In the course of the Project fulfillment the following work will be conducted: -theoretical work followed by code creation for mathematical simulation of processes; - modelling on the base of prototypes made from equivalent materials with the help of simulators; - bench study; - experiments in real conditions; - examination of massif properties in particular plots using achievements of geophysics, including gamma-gamma density detectors and geo locators. Finally, ecological-economical model will be given for designing burial sites

  16. Evaluation of the performance of solidified commercial low-level wastes in an arid climate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, M.J.; Walter, M.B.

    1984-09-01

    Shallow land burial is being used as a disposal method for commercial low-level waste at waste disposal sites in arid (Hanford site near Richland, Washington) and humid (Barnwell, South Carolina) climatic regions. A field lysimeter facility has been established at the Hanford site in which to conduct waste-form leaching tests. The primary objective of this research is to determine typical source terms generated by commercial solidified low-level wastes. The field lysimeter facility consists of ten 3-m-deep by 1.8-m-diameter, closed-bottom lysimeters around a central instrument caisson, 4 m in diameter. Commercial cement and vinyl ester-styrene waste samples were removed from 210-L drums and placed in the 1.8-m-diameter lysimeters. Two bitumen samples are planned to be emplaced in the facility in 1984. The central caisson provides access to the instrumentation in the individual lysimeters and allows selective sampling of the soil and waste forms. Suction candles (ceramic cups) placed around the waste will be used to periodically collect soil water samples for chemical analysis. Meteorological data, moisture content, and soil temperature are automatically monitored at the facility. Characterization of the soils and waste forms have been partially completed. These data consist of moisture release characteristics, particle size distribution, concentrations and distributions of radionuclides in the waste forms, concentrations of radionuclides in the waste streams, and concentrations of hydrophilic organic species in one of the waste steams. 8 references, 3 figures, 5 tables

  17. On oscillatory microstructure during cellular growth of directionally solidified Sn–36at.%Ni peritectic alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Peng; Li, Xinzhong; Li, Jiangong; Su, Yanqing; Guo, Jingjie

    2016-01-01

    An oscillatory microstructure has been observed during deep-cellular growth of directionally solidified Sn–36at.%Ni hyperperitectic alloy containing intermetallic compounds with narrow solubility range. This oscillatory microstructure with a dimension of tens of micrometers has been observed for the first time. The morphology of this wave-like oscillatory structure is similar to secondary dendrite arms, and can be observed only in some local positions of the sample. Through analysis such as successive sectioning of the sample, it can be concluded that this oscillatory microstructure is caused by oscillatory convection of the mushy zone during solidification. And the influence of convection on this oscillatory microstructure was characterized through comparison between experimental and calculations results on the wavelength. Besides, the change in morphology of this oscillatory microstructure has been proved to be caused by peritectic transformation during solidification. Furthermore, the melt concentration increases continuously during solidification of intermetallic compounds with narrow solubility range, which helps formation of this oscillatory microstructure. PMID:27066761

  18. Preparation and Stability of Inorganic Solidified Foam for Preventing Coal Fires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Botao Qin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Inorganic solidified foam (ISF is a novel material for preventing coal fires. This paper presents the preparation process and working principle of main installations. Besides, aqueous foam with expansion ratio of 28 and 30 min drainage rate of 13% was prepared. Stability of foam fluid was studied in terms of stability coefficient, by varying water-slurry ratio, fly ash replacement ratio of cement, and aqueous foam volume alternatively. Light microscope was utilized to analyze the dynamic change of bubble wall of foam fluid and stability principle was proposed. In order to further enhance the stability of ISF, different dosage of calcium fluoroaluminate was added to ISF specimens whose stability coefficient was tested and change of hydration products was detected by scanning electron microscope (SEM. The outcomes indicated that calcium fluoroaluminate could enhance the stability coefficient of ISF and compact hydration products formed in cell wall of ISF; naturally, the stability principle of ISF was proved right. Based on above-mentioned experimental contents, ISF with stability coefficient of 95% and foam expansion ratio of 5 was prepared, which could sufficiently satisfy field process requirements on plugging air leakage and thermal insulation.

  19. High temperature low cycle fatigue behavior of a directionally solidified Ni-base superalloy DZ951

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu Zhaokuang; Yu Jinjiang; Sun Xiaofeng; Guan Hengrong; Hu Zhuangqi

    2008-01-01

    Total strain-controlled low cycle fatigue (LCF) tests were performed at a temperature range from 700 to 900 deg. C in ambient air condition on a directionally solidified Ni-base superalloy DZ951. The fatigue life of DZ951 alloy does not monotonously decrease with increasing temperature, but exhibits a strong dependence on the total strain range. The dislocation characteristics and failed surface observation were evaluated through transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The alloy exhibits cyclic hardening, softening or cyclic stability as a whole, which is dependent on the testing temperature and total strain range. At 700 deg. C, the cyclic plastic deformation process is the main cause of fatigue failure. At 900 deg. C, the failure mostly results from combined fatigue and creep damage under total strain range from 0.6 to 1.2% and the reduction in fatigue life can be taken as the cause of oxidation, creep and cyclic plastic deformation under total strain range of 0.5%

  20. Structural investigations of mechanical properties of Al based rapidly solidified alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karakoese, Ercan; Keskin, Mustafa

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Rapid solidification processing (RSP) involves exceptionally high cooling rates. → We correlate the microstructure of the intermetallic Al 3 Fe, Al 2 Cu and Al 3 Ni phases with the cooling rate. → The solidification rate is high enough to retain most of alloying elements in the Al matrix. → The rapid solidification has effect on the phase constitution. -- Abstract: In this study, Al based Al-3 wt.%Fe, Al-3 wt.%Cu and Al-3 wt.%Ni alloys were prepared by conventional casting. They were further processed using the melt-spinning technique and characterized by the X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) together with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), transmission electron microscope (TEM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and the Vickers microhardness tester. The rapidly solidified (RS) binary alloys were composed of supersaturated α-Al solid solution and finely dispersed intermetallic phases. Experimental results showed that the mechanical properties of RS alloys were enhanced, which can be attributed to significant changes in the microstructure. RS samples were measured using a microhardness test device. The dependence of microhardness H V on the solidification rate (V) was analysed. These results showed that with the increasing values of V, the values of H V increased. The enthalpies of fusion for the same alloys were determined by DSC.

  1. Comparison of ice particle morphology crushed from ice chunk and directly solidified from droplet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, J.H.; Yoon, Y.S.; Bang, S.Y. [Dongguk Univ., Pil-dong, Chung-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2008-07-01

    In order to investigate the transition kinetics of ice to hydrate and to produce standard specimens of hydrate pellet from prepared hydrate powders, fine ice beads with uniform diameters must be fabricated. This paper discussed the construction of several experimental setups for the fabrication of fine ice particle generation. The ultrasonic nozzle was used to produce fine mist which solidified near the free surface of liquid nitrogen bath. The shape and population distribution of ice bead diameters was analyzed. The study also compared ice particles produced by crushing. The surface morphology of ice particles produced with a ball mill was also examined. Experimental results were obtained for an ice shaver, ball mill, bowl for grinding medicine, and ultrasonic nozzle. It was concluded that the information generated from the study was useful in estimating the macroscopic flow characteristics such as permeability of bulk powder and in determining mean effective diameter of irregular shaped particles. Future work was also noted as being underway with different experiments for other cases with different operating conditions. 5 refs., 5 figs.

  2. Electron microscopy investigations of rapidly solidified Fe-Zr-B-Cu alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majumdar, B.; Arvindha Babu, D.; Akhtar, D.

    2010-01-01

    Rapidly solidified Fe-based nanocrystalline soft magnetic materials possess a unique combination of properties i,e high permeability, saturation and Curie temperature and very low coercivity which are otherwise not attainable in conventional soft magnetic materials. The alloys are processed by producing amorphous phase through melt spinning route followed by a partial devitrification for incorporation of nanocrystalline phase in the amorphous matrix. In this paper, detailed electron microscopic investigations of melt spun Fe-Zr-B-Cu alloys are presented. Melt spun ribbons of Fe 99-x-y Zr x BCu 1 alloys with x+y = 11 and x+y = 13 were prepared under different wheel speed conditions and then vacuum annealed for 1 h at different temperatures. The microstructure changes from completely amorphous to a cellular/dendritic bcc solid solution coexisting with the amorphous phase at intercellular/dendritic regions when Zr/B ratio or the process parameters are varied. Annealing leads to the precipitation of nanocrystalline bcc-Fe phase from both amorphous phase and already existing bcc solid solution. (author)

  3. Particle Engulfment and Pushing by Solidifying Interfaces. Pt. 2; Micro-Gravity Experiments and Theoretical Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanescu, Doru M.; Juretzko, Frank R.; Dhindaw, Brij K.; Catalina, Adrian; Sen, Subhayu; Curreri, Peter A.

    1998-01-01

    Results of the directional solidification experiments on Particle Engulfment and Pushing by Solidifying Interfaces (PEP) conducted on the space shuttle Columbia during the Life and Microgravity Science Mission are reported. Two pure aluminum (99.999%) 9 mm cylindrical rods, loaded with about 2 vol.% 500 micrometers diameter zirconia particles were melted and resolidified in the microgravity (microg) environment of the shuttle. One sample was processed at step-wise increased solidification velocity, while the other at step-wise decreased velocity. It was found that a pushing-to-engulfment transition (PET) occurred in the velocity range of 0.5 to 1 micrometers. This is smaller than the ground PET velocity of 1.9 to 2.4 micrometers. This demonstrates that natural convection increases the critical velocity. A previously proposed analytical model for PEP was further developed. A major effort to identify and produce data for the surface energy of various interfaces required for calculation was undertaken. The predicted critical velocity for PET was of 0.775 micrometers/s.

  4. Evaluating Local Primary Dendrite Arm Spacing Characterization Techniques Using Synthetic Directionally Solidified Dendritic Microstructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschopp, Mark A.; Miller, Jonathan D.; Oppedal, Andrew L.; Solanki, Kiran N.

    2015-10-01

    Microstructure characterization continues to play an important bridge to understanding why particular processing routes or parameters affect the properties of materials. This statement certainly holds true in the case of directionally solidified dendritic microstructures, where characterizing the primary dendrite arm spacing is vital to developing the process-structure-property relationships that can lead to the design and optimization of processing routes for defined properties. In this work, four series of simulations were used to examine the capability of a few Voronoi-based techniques to capture local microstructure statistics (primary dendrite arm spacing and coordination number) in controlled (synthetically generated) microstructures. These simulations used both cubic and hexagonal microstructures with varying degrees of disorder (noise) to study the effects of length scale, base microstructure, microstructure variability, and technique parameters on the local PDAS distribution, local coordination number distribution, bulk PDAS, and bulk coordination number. The Voronoi tesselation technique with a polygon-side-length criterion correctly characterized the known synthetic microstructures. By systematically studying the different techniques for quantifying local primary dendrite arm spacings, we have evaluated their capability to capture this important microstructure feature in different dendritic microstructures, which can be an important step for experimentally correlating with both processing and properties in single crystal nickel-based superalloys.

  5. Leaching behaviour and mechanical properties of copper flotation waste in stabilized/solidified products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesci, Başak; Coruh, Semra; Ergun, Osman Nuri

    2009-02-01

    This research describes the investigation of a cement-based solidification/stabilization process for the safe disposal of copper flotation waste and the effect on cement properties of the addition of copper flotation waste (CW) and clinoptilolite (C). In addition to the reference mixture, 17 different mixtures were prepared using different proportions of CW and C. Physical properties such as setting time, specific surface area and compressive strength were determined and compared to a reference mixture and Turkish standards (TS). Different mixtures with the copper flotation waste portion ranging from 2.5 to 12.5% by weight of the mixture were tested for copper leachability. The results show that as cement replacement materials especially clinoptilolite had clear effects on the mechanical properties. Substitution of 5% copper flotation waste for Portland cement gave a similar strength performance to the reference mixture. Higher copper flotation waste addition such as 12.5% replacement yielded lower strength values. As a result, copper flotation waste and clinoptilolite can be used as cementitious materials, and copper flotation waste also can be safely stabilized/solidified in a cement-based solidification/stabilization system.

  6. Measurements of Mercury Released From Solidified/Stabilized Waste Forms-FY2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattus, C.H.

    2003-01-01

    This report covers work performed during FY 2002 in support of treatment demonstrations conducted for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA) Mercury Working Group. To comply with the requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, as implemented by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), DOE must use one of the following procedures for mixed low-level radioactive wastes containing mercury at levels above 260 ppm: a retorting/roasting treatment or (if the wastes also contain organics) an incineration treatment. The recovered radioactively contaminated mercury must then be treated by an amalgamation process prior to disposal. The DOE MWFA Mercury Working Group is working with EPA to determine whether some alternative processes could be used to treat these types of waste directly, thereby avoiding a costly recovery step for DOE. In previous years, demonstrations were performed in which commercial vendors applied their technologies for the treatment of radiologically contaminated elemental mercury as well as radiologically contaminated and mercury-contaminated waste soils from Brookhaven National Laboratory. The test results for mercury release in the headspace were reported in two reports, ''Measurements of Mercury Released from Amalgams and Sulfide Compounds'' (ORNL/TM-13728) and ''Measurements of Mercury Released from Solidified/Stabilized Waste Forms'' (ORNL/TM-2001/17). The current work did not use a real waste; a surrogate sludge had been prepared and used in the testing in an effort to understand the consequences of mercury speciation on mercury release

  7. Strength, leachability and microstructure characteristics of cement-based solidified plating sludge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asavapisit, Suwimol; Naksrichum, Siripat; Harnwajanawong, Naraporn

    2005-01-01

    The solidification of the stabilized zinc-cyanide plating sludge was carried out using ordinary Portland cement (OPC) and pulverized fuel ash (PFA) as solidification binders. The plating sludge were used at the level of 0%, 10%, 20% and 30% dry weight, and PFA was used to replace OPC at 0%, 10%, 20% and 30% dry weight, respectively. Experimental results showed that a significant reduction in strength was observed when the plating sludge was added to both the OPC and OPC/PFA binders, but the negative effect was minimized when PFA was used as part substitute for OPC. SEM observation reveals that the deposition of the plating sludge on the surface of the clinkers and PFA could be the cause for hydration retardation. In addition, calcium zinc hydroxide hydrate complex and the unreacted di- and tricalcium silicates were the major phases in X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns of the solidified plating waste hydrated for 28 days, although the retardation effect on hydration reactions but Cr concentration in toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) leachates was lower than the U.S. EPA regulatory limit

  8. Decomposition for the analysis of radionuclides in solidified cement radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jeong Jin; Pyo, Hyung Yeal; Jee, Kwang Yung; Jeon, Jong Seon

    2004-01-01

    Spent ion exchange resins make solid radioactive wastes when mixed with cement as solidifying material that was widely used in securing human environment from radionuclides for at least hundreds years. The cumulative increase of low and medium level radioactive wastes results in capacity problem of temporary storage in some NPPs (Nuclear Power Plants) of Korea around 2008. Radioactive wastes are scheduled to be disposed in a permanent disposal facility in accordance with the Korean Radioactive Wastes Management Program. It is mandatory to identify kinds and concentration of radionuclides immobilized for transporting them from temporary storage in NPPs to disposal facility. Accordingly, the effective sample decomposition prior to radiochemical separation is prerequisite to obtain the analytical data about radionuclides in cement waste forms. The closed-vessel microwave digestion technology among several sample preparation methods is taken into account to decompose cement waste forms. In this study, SRM 1880a (Portland cement) which is known for its certified values was used to optimize decomposition condition of cement waste forms containing nonradioactive ion exchange resins from NPP. With such variables as reagents, time, and power, the variation of the transparency and the color of the solution after closed-vessel microwave digestion can be examine. SRM 1880a is decomposed by suggested digestion procedure and the recoveries of constituents were investigated by ICP-AES and AAS

  9. Giant Enhancement of Magnetostrictive Response in Directionally-Solidified Fe83Ga17Erx Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radhika Barua

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available We report, for the first time, correlations between crystal structure, microstructure and magnetofunctional response in directionally solidified [110]-textured Fe83Ga17Erx (0 < x < 1.2 alloys. The morphology of the doped samples consists of columnar grains, mainly composed of a matrix phase and precipitates of a secondary phase deposited along the grain boundary region. An enhancement of more than ~275% from ~45 to 170 ppm is observed in the saturation magnetostriction value (λs of Fe83Ga17Erx alloys with the introduction of small amounts of Er. Moreover, it was noted that the low field derivative of magnetostriction with respect to an applied magnetic field (i.e., dλs/dHapp for Happ up to 1000 Oe increases by ~230% with Er doping (dλs/dHapp,FeGa= 0.045 ppm/Oe; dλs/dHapp,FeGaEr= 0.15 ppm/Oe. The enhanced magnetostrictive response of the Fe83Ga17Erx alloys is ascribed to an amalgamation of microstructural and electronic factors, namely: (i improved grain orientation and local strain effects due to deposition of Er in the intergranular region; and (ii strong local magnetocrystalline anisotropy, due to the highly anisotropic localized nature of the 4f electronic charge distribution of the Er atom. Overall, this work provides guidelines for further improving galfenol-based materials systems for diverse applications in the power and energy sector.

  10. Short-term thermal response of rapidly solidified Type 304 stainless steel containing helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, D.E.

    1988-06-01

    Type 304 stainless steel was heat treated for short times near its melting point in order to determine its microstructural response to thermal cycles typical of the near heat-affected zones of welding processes. The material was rapidly solidified as a powder by centrifugal atomization in a helium environment and consolidated by hot extrusion. Along with the ingot metallurgy material used for canning the powder prior to hot extrusion, it was heat treated using a Gleeble at temperatures of 1200 and 1300 degree C for times ranging from <1 to 1000 s, and the samples were examined for microstructure and the existence of porosity due to entrapped helium. At higher test temperatures and longer treatment times, the material developed extensive porosity, which was stabilized by the presence of helium and which may also have a role in anchoring grain boundaries and inhibiting grain growth. The powder material. At lower test temperatures and shorter treatment times, grain growth in the γ phase appeared to be restricted in the powder material, possible by the presence of helium. An intermediate temperatures and times, a γ-δ duplex microstructure also restricted grain growth again occurred in the δ microstructure. 9 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs

  11. Comparative study of radiation shielding parameters for bismuth borate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaundal, Rajinder Singh

    2016-01-01

    Melt and quench technique was used for the preparation of glassy samples of the composition x Bi 2 O 3- (1-x) B 2 O 3 where x= .05 to .040. XCOM computer program is used for the evaluation of gamma-ray shielding parameters of the prepared glass samples. Further the values of mass attenuation coefficients, effective atomic number and half value layer for the glassy samples have been calculated in the energy range from 1KeV to 100GeV. Rigidity of the glass samples have been analyzed by molar volume of the prepared glass samples. (author)

  12. Comparative study of radiation shielding parameters for bismuth borate glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaundal, Rajinder Singh, E-mail: rajinder_apd@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, School of Physical Sciences, Lovely Professional University, Phagwara, Punjab (India)

    2016-07-15

    Melt and quench technique was used for the preparation of glassy samples of the composition x Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3-}(1-x) B{sub 2}O{sub 3} where x= .05 to .040. XCOM computer program is used for the evaluation of gamma-ray shielding parameters of the prepared glass samples. Further the values of mass attenuation coefficients, effective atomic number and half value layer for the glassy samples have been calculated in the energy range from 1KeV to 100GeV. Rigidity of the glass samples have been analyzed by molar volume of the prepared glass samples. (author)

  13. The current status of glass leaching studies in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laude, F.

    1983-11-01

    Glass has been selected in France as the material used to confine the activity of fission product solutions, and a continuous vitrification process has been developed at the Marcoule Vitrification Facility (AVM), the first industrial plant. Borosilicate glass was chosen in various compositions for its properties: it is a homogeneous, non-porous material that incorporates appreciable quantities of most of the fission product oxides, and is only alterable at the surface interface layer. Glass thus constitutes the primary radioactivity containment barrier, and it is essential to determine its long-term behavior. Water constitutes the principal hazard during temporary or definitive storage of the glass blocks. Two types of inherent material properties are studied from the standpoint of glass stability under leaching conditions: - chemical durability; - radioactive containability with regard to the various radionuclides, fission products and especially the actinides. Durability tests are carried out in SOXHLET devices and the alteration rates are measured by the weight loss. The containability is measured by the leach rate, i.e. by the rate of activity loss into the water. Leaching tests are conducted for several major objectives: - selection of glass compositions (leach rates); - leaching mechanism studies (hydrolyzed layer characteristics, effects of temperature, pressure, pH, etc.); - long-term behavior studies (glass specimens doped with alpha-emitters); - simulation of geological repository environments [fr

  14. Overview of chemical modeling of nuclear waste glass dissolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourcier, W.L.

    1991-02-01

    Glass dissolution takes place through metal leaching and hydration of the glass surface accompanied by development of alternation layers of varying crystallinity. The reaction which controls the long-term glass dissolution rate appears to be surface layer dissolution. This reaction is reversible because the buildup of dissolved species in solution slows the dissolution rate due to a decreased dissolution affinity. Glass dissolution rates are therefore highly dependent on silica concentrations in solution because silica is the major component of the alteration layer. Chemical modeling of glass dissolution using reaction path computer codes has successfully been applied to short term experimental tests and used to predict long-term repository performance. Current problems and limitations of the models include a poorly defined long-term glass dissolution mechanism, the use of model parameters determined from the same experiments that the model is used to predict, and the lack of sufficient validation of key assumptions in the modeling approach. Work is in progress that addresses these issues. 41 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  15. Rare earth impact on glass structure and alteration kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molieres, E.

    2012-01-01

    This work is related to the question of the geological deep repository of high-level waste glass. These wastes include fission products and minor actinides, elements which can be simulated by rare earths. As new glass compositions could enable increased rare earth concentrations, it is crucial to know and understand rare earth impact on glass structure on the one hand, and on glass alteration kinetics or their incorporation into an altered layer. This work studied simplified borosilicate glasses in order to limit synergetic effects between rare earths and other elements. Various complementary techniques were used to characterize pristine and altered glasses (solid-high resolution NMR, Raman spectroscopy, fluorescence, SIMS, SAXS). Firstly, the structural role of a rare earth is discussed and is compared to a calcium cation. The local environment of rare earths is also probed. Secondly, rare earth (nature and concentration) impact on several alteration regimes was studied (initial rate, rate drop). Then, after alteration, rare earth elements being retained within the altered layer, the structural impact of rare earth elements (and their local environment) in this alteration layer was also investigated. (author) [fr

  16. The microstructure of the surface layer of magnesium laser alloyed with aluminum and silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dziadoń, Andrzej [Faculty of Mechatronics and Mechanical Engineering, Kielce University of Technology, Al. Tysiąclecia P.P. 7, 25-314 Kielce (Poland); Mola, Renata, E-mail: rmola@tu.kielce.pl [Faculty of Mechatronics and Mechanical Engineering, Kielce University of Technology, Al. Tysiąclecia P.P. 7, 25-314 Kielce (Poland); Błaż, Ludwik [Department of Structure and Mechanics of Solids, AGH University of Science and Technology, Al. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Kraków (Poland)

    2016-08-15

    The surface layer under analysis was formed as a result of diffusion bonding of a thin AlSi20 plate to a magnesium substrate followed by laser melting. Depending on the process parameters, the laser beam melted the AlSi20 plate only or the AlSi20 plate and a layer of the magnesium surface adjacent to it. Two types of microstructure of the remelted layer were thus analyzed. If the melting zone was limited to the AlSi20 plate, the microstructure of the surface layer was typical of a rapidly solidified hypereutectic Al–Si alloy. Since, however, the liquid AlSi20 reacted with the magnesium substrate, the following intermetallic phases formed: Al{sub 3}Mg{sub 2}, Mg{sub 17}Al{sub 12} and Mg{sub 2}Si. The microstructure of the modified surface layer of magnesium was examined using optical, scanning electron and transmission electron microscopy. The analysis of the surface properties of the laser modified magnesium revealed that the thin layer has a microstructure of a rapidly solidified Al–Si alloy offering good protection against corrosion. By contrast, the surface layer containing particles of intermetallic phases was more resistant to abrasion but had lower corrosion resistance than the silumin type layer. - Highlights: •A CO{sub 2} laser was used for surface alloying of Mg with AlSi20. •Before alloying, an AlSi20 plate was diffusion bonded with the Mg substrate. •The process parameters affected the alloyed layer microstructure and properties. •With melting limited to AlSi20, the layer had a structure of rapidly solidified AlSi20. •Mg–Al and Mg–Si phases were present when both the substrate and the plate were melted.

  17. The microstructure of the surface layer of magnesium laser alloyed with aluminum and silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dziadoń, Andrzej; Mola, Renata; Błaż, Ludwik

    2016-01-01

    The surface layer under analysis was formed as a result of diffusion bonding of a thin AlSi20 plate to a magnesium substrate followed by laser melting. Depending on the process parameters, the laser beam melted the AlSi20 plate only or the AlSi20 plate and a layer of the magnesium surface adjacent to it. Two types of microstructure of the remelted layer were thus analyzed. If the melting zone was limited to the AlSi20 plate, the microstructure of the surface layer was typical of a rapidly solidified hypereutectic Al–Si alloy. Since, however, the liquid AlSi20 reacted with the magnesium substrate, the following intermetallic phases formed: Al 3 Mg 2 , Mg 17 Al 12 and Mg 2 Si. The microstructure of the modified surface layer of magnesium was examined using optical, scanning electron and transmission electron microscopy. The analysis of the surface properties of the laser modified magnesium revealed that the thin layer has a microstructure of a rapidly solidified Al–Si alloy offering good protection against corrosion. By contrast, the surface layer containing particles of intermetallic phases was more resistant to abrasion but had lower corrosion resistance than the silumin type layer. - Highlights: •A CO 2 laser was used for surface alloying of Mg with AlSi20. •Before alloying, an AlSi20 plate was diffusion bonded with the Mg substrate. •The process parameters affected the alloyed layer microstructure and properties. •With melting limited to AlSi20, the layer had a structure of rapidly solidified AlSi20. •Mg–Al and Mg–Si phases were present when both the substrate and the plate were melted.

  18. Ultrasensitive determination of mercury in human saliva by atomic fluorescence spectrometry based on solidified floating organic drop microextraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, C.-G.; Wang, J.; Jin, Y.

    2012-01-01

    We report on a new, rapid and simple method for the determination of ultra-trace quantities of mercury ion in human saliva. It is based on solidified floating organic drop microextraction and detection by cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectrometry (CV-AFS). Mercury ion was complexed with diethyldithiocarbamate, and the hydrophobic complex was then extracted into fine droplets of 1-undecanol. By cooling in an ice bath after extraction, the droplets in solution solidify to form a single ball floating on the surface of solution. The solidified micro drop containing the mercury complex was then transferred for determination by CV-AFS. The effects of pH value, concentration of chelating reagent, quantity of 1-undecanol, sample volume, equilibration temperature and time were investigated. Under the optimum conditions, the preconcentration of a 25-mL sample is accomplished with an enrichment factor of 182. The limit of detection is 2.5 ng L -1 . The relative standard deviation for seven replicate determinations at 0.1 ng mL -1 level is 4.1%. The method was applied to the determination of mercury in saliva samples collected from four volunteers. Two volunteers having dental amalgam fillings had 0.4 ng mL -1 mercury in their saliva, whereas mercury was not detectable in the saliva of two volunteers who had no dental fillings. (author)

  19. Development of methodology to evaluate microbially influenced degradation of cement-solidified low-level radioactive waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, R.D.; Hamilton, M.A.; Veeh, R.H.; McConnell, J.W.

    1994-01-01

    Because of its apparent structural integrity, cement has been widely used in the United States as a binder to solidify Class B and C low-level radioactive waste (LLW). However, the resulting cement preparations are susceptible to failure due to the actions of stress and environment. An environmentally mediated process that could affect cement stability is the action of naturally occurring microorganisms. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), recognizing this eventuality, stated that the effects of microbial action on waste form integrity must be addressed. This paper provides present results from an ongoing program that addresses the effects of microbially influenced degradation (MID) on cement-solidified LLW. Data are provided on the development of an evaluation method using acid-producing bacteria. Results are from work with one type of these bacteria, the sulfur-oxidizing Thiobacillus. This work involved the use of a system in which laboratory- and vendor-manufactured, simulated waste forms were exposed on an intermittent basis to media containing thiobacilli. Testing demonstrated that MID has the potential to severely compromise the structural integrity of ion-exchange resin and evaporator-bottoms waste that is solidified with cement. In addition, it was found that a significant percentage of calcium and other elements were leached from the treated waste forms. Also, the surface pH of the treated specimens decreased to below 2. These conditions apparently contributed to the physical deterioration of simulated waste forms after 60 days of exposure to the thiobacilli

  20. Evaluation of physical stability and leachability of Portland Pozzolona Cement (PPC) solidified chemical sludge generated from textile wastewater treatment plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, Hema; Pandey, Suneel

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Stabilization/solidification of chemical sludge from textile wastewater treatment plants using Portland Pozzolona Cement (PPC) containing fly ash. ► Physical engineering (compressive strength and block density) indicates that sludge has potential to be reused for construction purpose after stabilization/solidification. ► Leaching of heavy metals from stabilized/solidified materials were within stipulated limits. ► There is a modification of microstructural properties of PPC with sludge addition as indicated by XRD and SEM patterns. - Abstract: The chemical sludge generated from the treatment of textile dyeing wastewater is a hazardous waste as per Indian Hazardous Waste Management rules. In this paper, stabilization/solidification of chemical sludge was carried out to explore its reuse potential in the construction materials. Portland Pozzolona Cement (PPC) was selected as the binder system which is commercially available cement with 10–25% fly ash interground in it. The stabilized/solidified blocks were evaluated in terms of unconfined compressive strength, block density and leaching of heavy metals. The compressive strength (3.62–33.62 MPa) and block density (1222.17–1688.72 kg/m 3 ) values as well as the negligible leaching of heavy metals from the stabilized/solidified blocks indicate that there is a potential of its use for structural and non-structural applications.

  1. Fun with Singing Wine Glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boone, Christine; Galloway, Melodie; Ruiz, Michael J.

    2018-01-01

    A fun activity is presented using singing wine glasses for introductory physics students. Students tune a white wine glass and a red wine glass to as many semitones as possible by filling the glasses with the appropriate amounts of water. A smart phone app is used to measure the frequencies of equal-temperament tones. Then plots of frequency…

  2. Article with buffer layer and method of making the same

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCamy, James W.; Ma, Zhixun; Kabagambe, Benjamin; Koram, Kwaku K.; Hung, Cheng-Hung; Nelis, Gary J.

    2017-11-14

    A method of forming a coating layer on a glass substrate in a glass manufacturing process includes: providing a first coating precursor material for a selected coating layer composition to at least one multislot coater to form a first coating region of the selected coating layer; and providing a second coating precursor material for the selected coating layer composition to the multislot coater to form a second coating region of the selected coating layer over the first region. The first coating precursor material is different than the second precursor coating material.

  3. Waste glass weathering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bates, J.K.; Buck, E.C.

    1994-01-01

    The weathering of glass is reviewed by examining processes that affect the reaction of commercial, historical, natural, and nuclear waste glass under conditions of contact with humid air and slowly dripping water, which may lead to immersion in nearly static solution. Radionuclide release data from weathered glass under conditions that may exist in an unsaturated environment are presented and compared to release under standard leaching conditions. While the comparison between the release under weathering and leaching conditions is not exact, due to variability of reaction in humid air, evidence is presented of radionuclide release under a variety of conditions. These results suggest that both the amount and form of radionuclide release can be affected by the weathering of glass

  4. Super ionic conductive glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susman, S.; Volin, K.J.

    Described is an ionically conducting glass for use as a solid electrolyte in a power or secondary cell containing an alkali metal-containing anode and a cathode separated by an alkali metal ion conducting glass having an ionic transference number of unity and the general formula: A/sub 1 + x/D/sub 2-x/3/Si/sub x/P/sub 3 - x/O/sub 12 - 2x/3/, wherein A is a network modifier for the glass and is an alkali metal of the anode, D is an intermediate for the glass and is selected from the class consisting of Zr, Ti, Ge, Al, Sb, Be, and Zn and X is in the range of from 2.25 to 3.0. Of the alkali metals, Na and Li are preferred and of the intermediate, Zr, Ti and Ge are preferred.

  5. Phosphate glasses, containing nitrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lisitsyna, E.A.; Khalilev, V.D.; Koryavin, A.A.; Goncharova, L.N.

    1987-01-01

    Possibilities of nitrogen-containing glass synthesis by the introduction into the charge of ammonium salts, as well as aluminium nitride, are studied. Zinc alumoyttrium phosphate glass (mol. %) Zn(PO 3 ) 2 - 4O, Al(PO 3 ) 3 - 3O, Y(PO 3 ) 3 -3O is suggested as a matrix. It is shown that the effect of amide and imide groups on the properties of the glass is less noticeable than the effect of nitride groups. Direct introduction of nitride constituent was realized using AlN, but aluminium introduction was taken into account so that the oxide was subtracted. The attempt to introduce more than 2.5 mass % of nitrogen into initial matrix by aluminium nitride has failed due to repeated restoration of glass with amorphous phosphorus isolation

  6. Water penetration mechanisms in nuclear glasses by X-ray and neutron reflectometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebiscoul, D.; Rieutord, F.; Ne, F.; Frugier, P.; Gin, S.; Cubitt, R.

    2007-01-01

    To determine the water diffusion at the early stage of the alteration, X-ray and neutron reflectometry have been performed on altered simplified glasses and the SON68 glass (an inactive R7T7-type French nuclear glass). For the first experiment, the simplified and SON68 glasses were altered at pH 3 and pH 6 and characterized by X-ray reflectometry as a function of the alteration duration. The evolutions of the electron density profile obtained from the reflectivity curves simulations have allowed the determination of the layers compositions. At the beginning of the alteration and for pH 3, the altered surface layer is constituted of a dealkalized zone. Upon alteration progress, the water diffuses inside the layer and hydrolyzes the Si-O-B bonds. For the second experiment, glasses were altered in D 2 O (pD 3) and analyzed in D 2 O saturated cell. After a D 2 O/H 2 O substitution, the samples were characterized one more time in H 2 O saturated cell. The evolution of the scattering length density shows that in the first stage of the alteration, the layer is constituted of two parts: a dealkalized glass and a dealkalized and boron depleted glass where water has diffused. According to the glass composition and after few hours of alteration, this dealkalized glass part can disappear. (authors)

  7. Corrosion phenomena in electron, proton and synchrotron X-ray microprobe analysis of Roman glass from Qumran, Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssens, K.; Aerts, A.; Vincze, L.; Adams, F.; Yang, C.; Utui, R.; Malmqvist, K.; Jones, K. W.; Radtke, M.; Garbe, S.; Lechtenberg, F.; Knöchel, A.; Wouters, H.

    1996-04-01

    A series of 89 glass fragments of Roman glass are studied using electron, proton and synchrotron radiation induced X-ray emission from microscopic areas on the sample surface. The glass originates from Qumran, Jordan and was buried for 1900 years. The weathering layers that result from the extended contact with ground water have been studied, next to the trace composition of the original glass of these pieces. The latter information indicates that at Qumran, large quantities of glass objects were being used in Ancient times. Cross-sectional profiles of the glass show a complex migration behaviour of various groups of major and trace elements.

  8. Baseline LAW Glass Formulation Testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruger, Albert A.; Mooers, Cavin; Bazemore, Gina; Pegg, Ian L.; Hight, Kenneth; Lai, Shan Tao; Buechele, Andrew; Rielley, Elizabeth; Gan, Hao; Muller, Isabelle S.; Cecil, Richard

    2013-01-01

    The major objective of the baseline glass formulation work was to develop and select glass formulations that are compliant with contractual and processing requirements for each of the LAW waste streams. Other objectives of the work included preparation and characterization of glasses with respect to the properties of interest, optimization of sulfate loading in the glasses, evaluation of ability to achieve waste loading limits, testing to demonstrate compatibility of glass melts with melter materials of construction, development of glass formulations to support ILAW qualification activities, and identification of glass formulation issues with respect to contract specifications and processing requirements

  9. Experimental Design for Hanford Low-Activity Waste Glasses with High Waste Loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piepel, Gregory F. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Cooley, Scott K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Vienna, John D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Crum, Jarrod V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-07-24

    This report discusses the development of an experimental design for the initial phase of the Hanford low-activity waste (LAW) enhanced glass study. This report is based on a manuscript written for an applied statistics journal. Appendices A, B, and E include additional information relevant to the LAW enhanced glass experimental design that is not included in the journal manuscript. The glass composition experimental region is defined by single-component constraints (SCCs), linear multiple-component constraints (MCCs), and a nonlinear MCC involving 15 LAW glass components. Traditional methods and software for designing constrained mixture experiments with SCCs and linear MCCs are not directly applicable because of the nonlinear MCC. A modification of existing methodology to account for the nonlinear MCC was developed and is described in this report. One of the glass components, SO3, has a solubility limit in glass that depends on the composition of the balance of the glass. A goal was to design the experiment so that SO3 would not exceed its predicted solubility limit for any of the experimental glasses. The SO3 solubility limit had previously been modeled by a partial quadratic mixture model expressed in the relative proportions of the 14 other components. The partial quadratic mixture model was used to construct a nonlinear MCC in terms of all 15 components. In addition, there were SCCs and linear MCCs. This report describes how a layered design was generated to (i) account for the SCCs, linear MCCs, and nonlinear MCC and (ii) meet the goals of the study. A layered design consists of points on an outer layer, and inner layer, and a center point. There were 18 outer-layer glasses chosen using optimal experimental design software to augment 147 existing glass compositions that were within the LAW glass composition experimental region. Then 13 inner-layer glasses were chosen with the software to augment the existing and outer-layer

  10. Experimental Design for Hanford Low-Activity Waste Glasses with High Waste Loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piepel, Gregory F.; Cooley, Scott K.; Vienna, John D.; Crum, Jarrod V.

    2015-01-01

    This report discusses the development of an experimental design for the initial phase of the Hanford low-activity waste (LAW) enhanced glass study. This report is based on a manuscript written for an applied statistics journal. Appendices A, B, and E include additional information relevant to the LAW enhanced glass experimental design that is not included in the journal manuscript. The glass composition experimental region is defined by single-component constraints (SCCs), linear multiple-component constraints (MCCs), and a nonlinear MCC involving 15 LAW glass components. Traditional methods and software for designing constrained mixture experiments with SCCs and linear MCCs are not directly applicable because of the nonlinear MCC. A modification of existing methodology to account for the nonlinear MCC was developed and is described in this report. One of the glass components, SO 3 , has a solubility limit in glass that depends on the composition of the balance of the glass. A goal was to design the experiment so that SO 3 would not exceed its predicted solubility limit for any of the experimental glasses. The SO 3 solubility limit had previously been modeled by a partial quadratic mixture model expressed in the relative proportions of the 14 other components. The partial quadratic mixture model was used to construct a nonlinear MCC in terms of all 15 components. In addition, there were SCCs and linear MCCs. This report describes how a layered design was generated to (i) account for the SCCs, linear MCCs, and nonlinear MCC and (ii) meet the goals of the study. A layered design consists of points on an outer layer, and inner layer, and a center point. There were 18 outer-layer glasses chosen using optimal experimental design software to augment 147 existing glass compositions that were within the LAW glass composition experimental region. Then 13 inner-layer glasses were chosen with the software to augment the existing and outer-layer glasses. The experimental

  11. Magnetic anisotropy in rapidly quenched amorphous glass-coated nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Óvári, T.-A.; Rotărescu, C.; Atițoaie, A.; Corodeanu, S.; Lupu, N., E-mail: nicole@phys-iasi.ro; Chiriac, H.

    2016-07-15

    Results on the roles played by the magnetoelastic and magnetostatic anisotropy terms in the magnetic behavior of glass-coated magnetostrictive amorphous nanowires prepared by means of rapid solidification are reported. Their contributions have been analyzed both experimentally, through hysteresis loop measurements, and theoretically, using micromagnetic simulations. All the investigated samples exhibit a magnetically bistable behavior, characterized by a single-step magnetization reversal when the applied field reaches a critical threshold value, called switching field. The combined interpretation of the experimental and theoretical data allows one to understand the effect of the magnetoelastic term on the value of the switching field, on one hand, and the effect of the magnetostatic term on the nucleation mechanism on the other, both with an essential impact on the characteristics of the nanowires’ magnetic bistability. The results are crucial for understanding the basic magnetic properties of these novel rapidly solidified ultrathin magnetic wires, as well as for tailoring their properties according to the specific requirements of various sensing applications. - Highlights: • Glass-coated nanowires have been very recently prepared by rapid solidification. • Amorphous wires change their properties as their diameter reaches the nano range. • Here we report on their main anisotropy terms: magnetoelastic and shape. • The results are essential for tailoring their properties for future applications.

  12. Effects of S/V on secondary phase formation on waste glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, X.; Buck, E.C.; Bates, J.K.; Gong, M.; Dietz, N.L.; Pegg, I.L.

    1994-01-01

    Simulated West Valley high-level nuclear waste glass, WV205, was leached with and without buffered media in both deuterated and ordinary water at glass surface area to solution volumes (S/N) of 200--6000 m -1 . Examination of the glass surface after testing for 14 days indicated that the S/V-induced pH change plays a dominant role in the development of the altered surface layer and the secondary phases formed. The changes due to SN-induced pH determine the rate of surface layer formation, the element distribution in the surface layer, and possibly, the identities of the secondary phases. Changes due to SN-induced elemental concentration also influence glass reaction rate in terms of the layer thickness and the elemental distribution in the surface layers

  13. Fatigue crack initiation in hybrid boron/glass/aluminum fiber metal laminates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, P.-Y.; Yeh, P.-C.; Yang, J.-M.

    2008-01-01

    The fatigue crack initiation behavior of a high modulus and hybrid boron/glass/aluminum fiber/metal laminate (FML) was investigated experimentally and analytically. Two types of hybrid boron/glass/aluminum FMLs were fabricated and studied, which consisted of aluminum alloy sheets as the metal layers and a mixture of boron fibers and glass fibers as the composite layers. For the first type, the boron fiber/prepreg and the glass fiber/prepreg were used separately in the composite layers, and for the second type, the boron fibers and the glass fibers were mingled together to form a hybrid boron/glass/prepreg composite layer. These hybrid FMLs were consolidated using an autoclave curing process. The incorporation of the boron fibers improved the Young's modulus of the composite layer in FMLs, which in turn, would improve the fatigue crack initiation life of the Al sheet. The experimental results clearly showed that the fatigue crack initiation lives for both types of hybrid boron/glass/aluminum FMLs were superior to the monolithic aluminum alloy under the same loading condition. An analytical approach was proposed to calculate the fatigue crack initiation lives of hybrid boron/glass/aluminum FMLs based on the classical laminate theory and the small-crack theory. A good correlation was obtained between the predictions and the experimental results

  14. Physical-chemical model for the mechanism of glass corrosion with particular consideration of simulated radioactive waste glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grambow, B.

    1985-01-01

    A physical-chemical model for the mechanism of glass corrosion is described. This model can be used for predicting, interpreting, and extrapolating experimental results. In static leaching tests the rate of corrosion generally decreases with time. Some authors assume that the surface layer, which grows during the course of the reaction, protects the underlying glass from further attack by the aqueous phase. Other authors assume that the saturation effects in solution are responsible for reducing the rate of the reaction. It is demonstrated within the scope of this work that examples can be found for both concepts; however, transport processes in the surface layer and/or in solution can be excluded as rate-determining processes within a majority of the examined cases. The location of the corrosion reaction is the boundary surface between the surface layer and the not yet attacked glass (transition zone)

  15. Evaluation of gamma-ray attenuation properties of bismuth borate glass systems using Monte Carlo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarim, Urkiye Akar; Ozmutlu, Emin N.; Yalcin, Sezai; Gundogdu, Ozcan; Bradley, D.A.; Gurler, Orhan

    2017-01-01

    A Monte Carlo method was developed to investigate radiation shielding properties of bismuth borate glass. The mass attenuation coefficients and half-value layer parameters were determined for different fractional amounts of Bi 2 O 3 in the glass samples for the 356, 662, 1173 and 1332 keV photon energies. A comparison of the theoretical and experimental attenuation coefficients is presented. - Highlights: • Radiation shielding properties of bismuth borate glass systems have been reported. • Mass attenuation coefficients increase linearly with increase in Bi concentration. • Half-value layer decreases with increasing concentration of Bi. • Half-value layer decreases with the increase in the sample density.

  16. Determination of the free enthalpies of formation of borosilicate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linard, Y.

    2000-01-01

    This work contributes to the study of the thermochemical properties of nuclear waste glasses. Results are used to discuss mechanisms and parameters integrated in alteration models of conditioning materials. Glass is a disordered material defined thermodynamically as a non-equilibrium state. Taking into account one order parameter to characterise its configurational state, the metastable equilibrium for the glass was considered and the main thermochemical properties were determined. Calorimetric techniques were used to measure heat capacities and formation enthalpies of borosilicate glasses (from 3 to 8 constitutive oxides). Formation Entropies were measured too, using the entropy theory of relaxation processes proposed by Adam and Gibbs (1965). The configurational entropy contribution were determined from viscosity measurements. This set of data has allowed the calculation of Gibb's free energies of dissolution of glasses in pure water. By comparison with leaching experiments, it has been demonstrated that the decreasing of the dissolution rate at high reaction progress cannot be associated to the approach of an equilibrium between the sound glass and the aqueous solution. The composition changes of the reaction area at the glass surface need to be considered too. To achieve a complete description of the thermodynamic stability, the equilibrium between hydrated de-alkalinized glass and/or the gel layer with the aqueous solution should also be evaluated. (author)

  17. Hydration of high-silica glasses in the deep sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Federman, A.N.

    1986-01-01

    Natural analogs of nuclear waste glasses are important because they provide information of the one variable that is not controllable in the laboratory - long intervals of time in the actual environment of storage. Some natural glasses have persisted for millions of years in deep-sea sediments in the form of disseminated particles and distinct tephra layers, while other apparently similar specimens have been completely altered to clay assemblages relatively quickly. Geologists have reached no firm conclusions as to why these differences exist, and more research is certainly warranted. These glasses vary in age, composition, and in the in-situ conditions they have experienced. They may provide important information for two different aspects of nuclear waste glass research: First, the chemical composition and especially the water content of these glasses as a function of time may give an understanding of the mechanisms and rates of diffusion in glasses in the natural environment. Second, the apparent differing durability of these glasses in different environmental conditions may suggest the optimal characteristics of a nuclear waste glass depository

  18. Antagonist effects of calcium on borosilicate glass alteration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mercado-Depierre, S. [CEA Marcoule, DTCD SPDE LCLT, 30207 Bagnols sur Cèze (France); Angeli, F., E-mail: frederic.angeli@cea.fr [CEA Marcoule, DTCD SPDE LCLT, 30207 Bagnols sur Cèze (France); Frizon, F. [CEA Marcoule, DTCD SECM LP2C, 30207 Bagnols sur Cèze (France); Gin, S. [CEA Marcoule, DTCD SPDE LCLT, 30207 Bagnols sur Cèze (France)

    2013-10-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted -- Highlights: •Kinetic study of glass alteration is investigated in calcium-enriched solutions. •New insights into silicon–calcium interactions in glass/cement systems are proposed. •Glass alteration is controlled by pH, Ca concentration and reaction progress. •Evidence of antagonist effects according to the importance of these parameters. -- Abstract: Numerous studies have been conducted on glass and cement durability in contact with water, but very little work to date has focused directly on interactions between the two materials. These interactions are mostly controlled by silicon–calcium reactivity. However, the physical and chemical processes involved remain insufficiently understood to predict the evolution of coupled glass–cement systems used in several industrial applications. Results are reported from borosilicate glass alteration in calcium-rich solutions. Our data show that four distinct behaviors can be expected according to the relative importance of three key parameters: the pH, the reaction progress (short- or long-term alteration) and the calcium concentration. Glass alteration is thus controlled by specific mechanisms depending on the solution chemistry: calcium complexation at the glass surface, precipitation of calcium silicate hydrates (C–S–H) or calcium incorporation in the altered layer. These findings highlight the impact of silicon–calcium interactions on glass durability and open the way for a better understanding of glass–cement mixing in civil engineering applications as well as in nuclear waste storage.

  19. Antagonist effects of calcium on borosilicate glass alteration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mercado-Depierre, S.; Angeli, F.; Frizon, F.; Gin, S.

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted -- Highlights: •Kinetic study of glass alteration is investigated in calcium-enriched solutions. •New insights into silicon–calcium interactions in glass/cement systems are proposed. •Glass alteration is controlled by pH, Ca concentration and reaction progress. •Evidence of antagonist effects according to the importance of these parameters. -- Abstract: Numerous studies have been conducted on glass and cement durability in contact with water, but very little work to date has focused directly on interactions between the two materials. These interactions are mostly controlled by silicon–calcium reactivity. However, the physical and chemical processes involved remain insufficiently understood to predict the evolution of coupled glass–cement systems used in several industrial applications. Results are reported from borosilicate glass alteration in calcium-rich solutions. Our data show that four distinct behaviors can be expected according to the relative importance of three key parameters: the pH, the reaction progress (short- or long-term alteration) and the calcium concentration. Glass alteration is thus controlled by specific mechanisms depending on the solution chemistry: calcium complexation at the glass surface, precipitation of calcium silicate hydrates (C–S–H) or calcium incorporation in the altered layer. These findings highlight the impact of silicon–calcium interactions on glass durability and open the way for a better understanding of glass–cement mixing in civil engineering applications as well as in nuclear waste storage

  20. Integrated Disposal Facility FY 2012 Glass Testing Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierce, Eric M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kerisit, Sebastien N. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Krogstad, Eirik J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Burton, Sarah D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Bjornstad, Bruce N. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Freedman, Vicky L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Cantrell, Kirk J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Snyder, Michelle MV [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Crum, Jarrod V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Westsik, Joseph H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-03-29

    PNNL is conducting work to provide the technical basis for estimating radionuclide release from the engineered portion of the disposal facility for Hanford immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW). Before the ILAW can be disposed, DOE must conduct a performance assessment (PA) for the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) that describes the long-term impacts of the disposal facility on public health and environmental resources. As part of the ILAW glass testing program, PNNL is implementing a strategy, consisting of experimentation and modeling, to provide the technical basis for estimating radionuclide release from the glass waste form in support of future IDF PAs. Key activities in FY12 include upgrading the STOMP/eSTOMP codes to do near-field modeling, geochemical modeling of PCT tests to determine the reaction network to be used in the STOMP codes, conducting PUF tests on selected glasses to simulate and accelerate glass weathering, developing a Monte Carlo simulation tool to predict the characteristics of the weathered glass reaction layer as a function of glass composition, and characterizing glasses and soil samples exhumed from an 8-year lysimeter test. The purpose of this report is to summarize the progress made in fiscal year (FY) 2012 and the first quarter of FY 2013 toward implementing the strategy with the goal of developing an understanding of the long-term corrosion behavior of LAW glasses.

  1. Extreme wettability of nanostructured glass fabricated by non-lithographic, anisotropic etching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Eusun; Kim, Seul-Cham; Lee, Heon Ju; Oh, Kyu Hwan; Moon, Myoung-Woon

    2015-01-01

    Functional glass surfaces with the properties of superhydrophobicity/or superhydrohydrophilicity, anti-condensation or low reflectance require nano- or micro-scale roughness, which is difficult to fabricate directly on glass surfaces. Here, we report a novel non-lithographic method for the fabrication of nanostructures on glass; this method introduces a sacrificial SiO2 layer for anisotropic plasma etching. The first step was to form nanopillars on SiO2 layer-coated glass by using preferential CF4 plasma etching. With continuous plasma etching, the SiO2 pillars become etch-resistant masks on the glass; thus, the glass regions covered by the SiO2 pillars are etched slowly, and the regions with no SiO2 pillars are etched rapidly, resulting in nanopatterned glass. The glass surface that is etched with CF4 plasma becomes superhydrophilic because of its high surface energy, as well as its nano-scale roughness and high aspect ratio. Upon applying a subsequent hydrophobic coating to the nanostructured glass, a superhydrophobic surface was achieved. The light transmission of the glass was relatively unaffected by the nanostructures, whereas the reflectance was significantly reduced by the increase in nanopattern roughness on the glass. PMID:25791414

  2. Wastes based glasses and glass-ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbieri, L.

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Actually, the inertization, recovery and valorisation of the wastes coming from municipal and industrial processes are the most important goals from the environmental and economical point of view. An alternative technology capable to overcome the problem of the dishomogeneity of the raw material chemical composition is the vitrification process that is able to increase the homogeneity and the constancy of the chemical composition of the system and to modulate the properties in order to address the reutilization of the waste. Moreover, the glasses obtained subjected to different controlled thermal treatments, can be transformed in semy-cristalline material (named glass-ceramics with improved properties with respect to the parent amorphous materials. In this review the tailoring, preparation and characterization of glasses and glass-ceramics obtained starting from municipal incinerator grate ash, coal and steel fly ashes and glass cullet are described.

    Realmente la inertización, recuperación y valorización de residuos que proceden de los procesos de incineración de residuos municipales y de residuos industriales son metas importantes desde el punto de vista ambiental y económico. Una tecnología alternativa capaz de superar el problema de la heterogeneidad de la composición química de los materiales de partida es el proceso de la vitrificación que es capaz de aumentar la homogeneidad y la constancia de la composición química del sistema y modular las propiedades a fin de la reutilización del residuo. En este artículo se presentan los resultados de vitrificación en que los vidrios fueron sometidos a tratamientos térmicos controlados diferentes, de manera que se transforman en materiales semicristalinos (también denominados vitrocerámicos con mejores propiedades respecto a los materiales amorfos originales. En esta revisión se muestra el diseño, preparación y caracterización de vidrios y vitrocerámicos partiendo de

  3. Influence of SrO substitution for CaO on the properties of bioactive glass S53P4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massera, Jonathan; Hupa, Leena

    2014-03-01

    Commercial melt-quenched bioactive glasses consist of the oxides of silicon, phosphorus, calcium and sodium. Doping of the glasses with oxides of some other elements is known to affect their capability to support hydroxyapatite formation and thus bone tissue healing but also to modify their high temperature processing parameters. In the present study, the influence of gradual substitution of SrO for CaO on the properties of the bioactive glass S53P4 was studied. Thermal analysis and hot stage microscopy were utilized to measure the thermal properties of the glasses. The in vitro bioactivity and solubility was measured by immersing the glasses in simulated body fluid for 6 h to 1 week. The formation of silica rich and hydroxyapatite layers was assessed from FTIR spectra analysis and SEM images of the glass surface. Increasing substitution of SrO for CaO decreased all characteristic temperatures and led to a slightly stronger glass network. The initial glass dissolution rate increased with SrO content. Hydroxyapatite layer was formed on all glasses but on the SrO containing glasses the layer was thinner and contained also strontium. The results suggest that substituting SrO for CaO in S53P4 glass retards the bioactivity. However, substitution greater than 10 mol% allow for precipitation of a strontium substituted hydroxyapatite layer.

  4. Fatigue damage propagation in unidirectional glass fibre reinforced composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jens Zangenberg; Alzamora Guzman, Vladimir Joel; Østergaard, R.C.

    2012-01-01

    bundles. The underlying mechanisms are examined using digital microscopy, and it is postulated that fatigue damage initiates due to stress concentrations between the backing (transverse) layer and the unidirectional layer, followed by a cyclic fretting and axial fibre debonding. This fretting mechanism......Damage progression in unidirectional glass fibre reinforced composites exposed to tension fatigue is investigated, and a quantitative explanation is given for the observed stiffness loss. The stiffness degradation during fatigue is directly related to fibre breaks in the load-carrying axial fibre...... needs further attention and understanding in order to improve the fatigue life-time of glass fibre reinforced composites....

  5. DWPF GLASS BEADS AND GLASS FRIT TRANSPORT DEMONSTRATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamson, D; Bradley Pickenheim, B

    2008-11-24

    DWPF is considering replacing irregularly shaped glass frit with spherical glass beads in the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) process to decrease the yield stress of the melter feed (a non-Newtonian Bingham Plastic). Pilot-scale testing was conducted on spherical glass beads and glass frit to determine how well the glass beads would transfer when compared to the glass frit. Process Engineering Development designed and constructed the test apparatus to aid in the understanding and impacts that spherical glass beads may have on the existing DWPF Frit Transfer System. Testing was conducted to determine if the lines would plug with the glass beads and the glass frit slurry and what is required to unplug the lines. The flow loop consisted of vertical and horizontal runs of clear PVC piping, similar in geometry to the existing system. Two different batches of glass slurry were tested: a batch of 50 wt% spherical glass beads and a batch of 50 wt% glass frit in process water. No chemicals such as formic acid was used in slurry, only water and glass formers. The glass beads used for this testing were commercially available borosilicate glass of mesh size -100+200. The glass frit was Frit 418 obtained from DWPF and is nominally -45+200 mesh. The spherical glass beads did not have a negative impact on the frit transfer system. The transferring of the spherical glass beads was much easier than the glass frit. It was difficult to create a plug with glass bead slurry in the pilot transfer system. When a small plug occurred from setting overnight with the spherical glass beads, the plug was easy to displace using only the pump. In the case of creating a man made plug in a vertical line, by filling the line with spherical glass beads and allowing the slurry to settle for days, the plug was easy to remove by using flush water. The glass frit proved to be much more difficult to transfer when compared to the spherical glass beads. The glass frit impacted the transfer system to the point

  6. Optimized Synthesis of Foam Glass from Recycled CRT Panel Glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; König, Jakob; Yue, Yuanzheng

    Most of the panel glass from cathode ray tubes (CRTs) is landfilled today. Instead of landfilling, the panel glass can be turned into new environment-friendly foam glass. Low density foam glass is an effective heat insulating material and can be produced just by using recycle glass and foaming...... additives. In this work we recycle the CRT panel glass to synthesize the foam glass as a crucial component of building and insulating materials. The synthesis conditions such as foaming temperature, duration, glass particle size, type and concentrations of foaming agents, and so on are optimized...... by performing systematic experiments. In particular, the concentration of foaming agents is an important parameter that influences the size of bubbles and the distribution of bubbles throughout the sample. The foam glasses are characterised regarding density and open/closed porosity. Differential scanning...

  7. DWPF GLASS BEADS AND GLASS FRIT TRANSPORT DEMONSTRATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamson, D.; Pickenheim, Bradley

    2008-01-01

    DWPF is considering replacing irregularly shaped glass frit with spherical glass beads in the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) process to decrease the yield stress of the melter feed (a non-Newtonian Bingham Plastic). Pilot-scale testing was conducted on spherical glass beads and glass frit to determine how well the glass beads would transfer when compared to the glass frit. Process Engineering Development designed and constructed the test apparatus to aid in the understanding and impacts that spherical glass beads may have on the existing DWPF Frit Transfer System. Testing was conducted to determine if the lines would plug with the glass beads and the glass frit slurry and what is required to unplug the lines. The flow loop consisted of vertical and horizontal runs of clear PVC piping, similar in geometry to the existing system. Two different batches of glass slurry were tested: a batch of 50 wt% spherical glass beads and a batch of 50 wt% glass frit in process water. No chemicals such as formic acid was used in slurry, only water and glass formers. The glass beads used for this testing were commercially available borosilicate glass of mesh size -100+200. The glass frit was Frit 418 obtained from DWPF and is nominally -45+200 mesh. The spherical glass beads did not have a negative impact on the frit transfer system. The transferring of the spherical glass beads was much easier than the glass frit. It was difficult to create a plug with glass bead slurry in the pilot transfer system. When a small plug occurred from setting overnight with the spherical glass beads, the plug was easy to displace using only the pump. In the case of creating a man made plug in a vertical line, by filling the line with spherical glass beads and allowing the slurry to settle for days, the plug was easy to remove by using flush water. The glass frit proved to be much more difficult to transfer when compared to the spherical glass beads. The glass frit impacted the transfer system to the point

  8. Topography and Mechanical Property Mapping of International Simple Glass Surfaces with Atomic Force Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierce, Eric M [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative Nanomechanical Peak Force (PF-QNM) TappingModeTM atomic force microscopy measurements are presented for the first time on polished glass surfaces. The PF-QNM technique allows for topography and mechanical property information to be measured simultaneously at each pixel. Results for the international simple glass which represents a simplified version of SON68 glass suggests an average Young s modulus of 78.8 15.1 GPa is within the experimental error of the modulus measured for SON68 glass (83.6 2 GPa) with conventional approaches. Application of the PF-QNM technique will be extended to in situ glass corrosion experiments with the goal of gaining atomic-scale insights into altered layer development by exploiting the mechanical property differences that exist between silica gel (e.g., altered layer) and pristine glass surface.

  9. PIXE analysis of western han dynasty ancient glasses unearthed in Yangzhou city

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Qinghui; Gu Donghong; Gan Fuxi; Zhang Bin; Ma Bo; Cheng Huansheng

    2003-01-01

    Chemical composition analysis is one of the most important research aspects to provide scientific proof for the technical origin and development of Chinese ancient glass. Proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE) technique is a kind of multi-element quantitative analysis method with high sensitivity and without destruction of samples. Chemical composition of the Western Han dynasty glass garment flakes, which were excavated from Yangzhou city, was analyzed by PIXE, quantitatively. It was found that these glass flakes were attributed to PbO-BaO-SiO 2 glass originated in China. These flakes all consist of a glass core and a corroded outer layer with different thickness. There are relatively higher PbO, P 2 O 5 and CaO, while much lower BaO and SiO 2 in the corroded layers than in the glass cores. The experimental results were discussed

  10. Modeling of zinc solubility in stabilized/solidified electric arc furnace dust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez-Olmo, Ignacio; Lasa, Cristina; Irabien, Angel

    2007-01-01

    Equilibrium models which attempt for the influence of pH on the solubility of metals can improve the dynamic leaching models developed to describe the long-term behavior of waste-derived forms. In addition, such models can be used to predict the concentration of metals in equilibrium leaching tests at a given pH. The aim of this work is to model the equilibrium concentration of Zn from untreated and stabilized/solidified (S/S) electric arc furnace dust (EAFD) using experimental data obtained from a pH-dependence leaching test (acid neutralization capacity, ANC). EAFD is a hazardous waste generated in electric arc furnace steel factories; it contains significant amounts of heavy metals such as Zn, Pb, Cr or Cd. EAFD from a local factory was characterized by X-ray fluorescence (XRF), acid digestion and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Zn and Fe were the main components while the XRD analysis revealed that zincite, zinc ferrite and hematite were the main crystalline phases. Different cement/EAFD formulations ranging from 7 to 20% dry weight of cement were prepared and subjected to the ANC leaching test. An amphoteric behavior of Zn was found from the pH dependence test. To model this behavior, the geochemical model Visual MINTEQ (VMINTEQ) was used. In addition to the geochemical model, an empirical model based on the dissolution of Zn in the acidic zone and the re-dissolution of zinc compounds in the alkaline zone was considered showing a similar prediction than that obtained with VMINTEQ. This empirical model seems to be more appropriate when the metal speciation is unknown, or when if known, the theoretical solid phases included in the database of VMINTEQ do not allow to describe the experimental data

  11. Solidified structure and leaching properties of metallurgical wastewater treatment sludge after solidification/stabilization process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radovanović, Dragana Đ; Kamberović, Željko J; Korać, Marija S; Rogan, Jelena R

    2016-01-01

    The presented study investigates solidification/stabilization process of hazardous heavy metals/arsenic sludge, generated after the treatment of the wastewater from a primary copper smelter. Fly ash and fly ash with addition of hydrated lime and Portland composite cement were studied as potential binders. The effectiveness of the process was evaluated by unconfined compressive strength (UCS) testing, leaching tests (EN 12457-4 and TCLP) and acid neutralization capacity (ANC) test. It was found that introduction of cement into the systems increased the UCS, led to reduced leaching of Cu, Ni and Zn, but had a negative effect on the ANC. Gradual addition of lime resulted in decreased UCS, significant reduction of metals leaching and high ANC, due to the excess of lime that remained unreacted in pozzolanic reaction. Stabilization of more than 99% of heavy metals and 90% of arsenic has been achieved. All the samples had UCS above required value for safe disposal. In addition to standard leaching tests, solidificates were exposed to atmospheric conditions during one year in order to determine the actual leaching level of metals in real environment. It can be concluded that the EN 12457-4 test is more similar to the real environmental conditions, while the TCLP test highly exaggerates the leaching of metals. The paper also presents results of differential acid neutralization (d-AN) analysis compared with mineralogical study done by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis. The d-AN coupled with Eh-pH (Pourbaix) diagrams were proven to be a new effective method for analysis of amorphous solidified structure.

  12. Recycling stabilised/solidified drill cuttings for forage production in acidic soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogbara, Reginald B; Dumkhana, Bernard B; Ayotamuno, Josiah M; Okparanma, Reuben N

    2017-10-01

    Stabilisation/solidification (S/S), which involves fixation and immobilisation of contaminants using cementitious materials, is one method of treating drill cuttings before final fate. This work considers reuse of stabilised/solidified drill cuttings for forage production in acidic soils. It sought to improve the sustainability of S/S technique through supplementation with the phytoremediation potential of plants, eliminate the need for landfill disposal and reduce soil acidity for better plant growth. Drill cuttings with an initial total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) concentration of 17,125 mg kg -1 and low concentrations of metals were treated with 5%, 10%, and 20% cement dosages. The treated drill cuttings were reused in granular form for growing a forage, elephant grass (Pennisetum purpureum), after mixing with uncontaminated soil. The grasses were also grown in uncontaminated soil. The phytoremediation and growth potential of the plants was assessed over a 12-week period. A mix ratio of one part drill cuttings to three parts uncontaminated soil was required for active plant growth. The phytoremediation ability of elephant grass (alongside abiotic losses) reduced the TPH level (up to 8795 mg kg -1 ) in the soil-treated-drill cuttings mixtures below regulatory (1000 mg kg -1 ) levels. There were also decreased concentrations of metals. The grass showed better heights and leaf lengths in soil containing drill cuttings treated with 5% cement dosage than in uncontaminated soil. The results suggest that recycling S/S treated drill cuttings for forage production may be a potential end use of the treated waste. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Simulation and experiment for oxygen-enriched combustion engine using liquid oxygen to solidify CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yongfeng; Jia, Xiaoshe; Pei, Pucheng; Lu, Yong; Yi, Li; Shi, Yan

    2016-01-01

    For capturing and recycling of CO2 in the internal combustion engine, Rankle cycle engine can reduce the exhaust pollutants effectively under the condition of ensuring the engine thermal efficiency by using the techniques of spraying water in the cylinder and optimizing the ignition advance angle. However, due to the water spray nozzle need to be installed on the cylinder, which increases the cylinder head design difficulty and makes the combustion conditions become more complicated. In this paper, a new method is presented to carry out the closing inlet and exhaust system for internal combustion engines. The proposed new method uses liquid oxygen to solidify part of cooled CO2 from exhaust system into dry ice and the liquid oxygen turns into gas oxygen which is sent to inlet system. The other part of CO2 is sent to inlet system and mixed with oxygen, which can reduce the oxygen-enriched combustion detonation tendency and make combustion stable. Computing grid of the IP52FMI single-cylinder four-stroke gasoline-engine is established according to the actual shape of the combustion chamber using KIVA-3V program. The effects of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) rate are analyzed on the temperatures, the pressures and the instantaneous heat release rates when the EGR rate is more than 8%. The possibility of enclosing intake and exhaust system for engine is verified. The carbon dioxide trapping device is designed and the IP52FMI engine is transformed and the CO2 capture experiment is carried out. The experimental results show that when the EGR rate is 36% for the optimum EGR rate. When the liquid oxygen of 35.80-437.40 g is imported into the device and last 1-20 min, respectively, 21.50-701.30 g dry ice is obtained. This research proposes a new design method which can capture CO2 for vehicular internal combustion engine.

  14. Time-dependent performance of soil mix technology stabilized/solidified contaminated site soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fei; Wang, Hailing; Al-Tabbaa, Abir

    2015-04-09

    This paper presents the strength and leaching performance of stabilized/solidified organic and inorganic contaminated site soil as a function of time and the effectiveness of modified clays applied in this project. Field trials of deep soil mixing application of stabilization/solidification (S/S) were performed at a site in Castleford in 2011. A number of binders and addictives were applied in this project including Portland cement (PC), ground granulated blastfurnace slag (GGBS), pulverised fuel ash (PFA), MgO and modified clays. Field trial samples were subjected to unconfined compressive strength (UCS), BS CN 12457 batch leaching test and the extraction of total organics at 28 days and 1.5 years after treatment. The results of UCS test show that the average strength values of mixes increased from 0-3250 kPa at 28 days to 250-4250 kPa at 1.5 years curing time. The BS EN 12457 leachate concentrations of all metals were well below their drinking water standard, except Ni in some mixes exceed its drinking water standard at 0.02 mg/l, suggesting that due to varied nature of binders, not all of them have the same efficiency in treating contaminated soil. The average leachate concentrations of total organics were in the range of 20-160 mg/l at 28 days after treatment and reduced to 18-140 mg/l at 1.5 years. In addition, organo clay (OC)/inorgano-organo clay (IOC) slurries used in this field trial were found to have a negative effect on the strength development, but were very effective in immobilizing heavy metals. The study also illustrates that the surfactants used to modify bentonite in this field trail were not suitable for the major organic pollutants exist in the site soil in this project. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Analysis of a Rapidly Solidified High-Phosphorus Austenitic Steel Containing an Amorphous Phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-12-01

    electrodeposited nickel by a combination of Jet electro- polishing and ion-beam milling. Specimens were observed in a Vacuum Generators HB-5 scanning...the cell walls in these powders is one of suppressed crystal growth rather than nucleation , since the glass is formed in direct contact with the...Cohen, this Symposium. 5. T. F. Kelly, Ph.D. Thesis , MIT, February 1982. 6. C. V. Thompson, A. L. Greer, and A. J. Drehman, Proc. 4th Intl. Conf

  16. Nuclear waste glass corrosion mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jantzen, C.M.

    1987-04-01

    Dissolution of nuclear waste glass occurs by corrosion mechanisms similar to those of other solids, e.g., metallurgical and mineralogic systems. Metallurgical phenomena such as active corrosion, passivation and immunity have been observed to be a function of the glass composition and the solution pH. Hydration thermodynamics was used to quantify the role of glass composition and its effect on the solution pH during dissolution. A wide compositional range of natural, lunar, medieval, and nuclear waste glasses, as well as some glass-ceramics were investigated. The factors observed to affect dissolution in deionized water are pertinent to the dissolution of glass in natural environments such as the groundwaters anticipated to interact with nuclear waste glass in a geologic repository. The effects of imposed pH and oxidation potential (Eh) conditions existing in natural environments on glass dissolution is described in the context of Pourbaix diagrams, pH potential diagrams, for glass

  17. Electrical properties of phosphate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mogus-Milankovic, A; Santic, A; Reis, S T; Day, D E

    2009-01-01

    Investigation of the electrical properties of phosphate glasses where transition metal oxide such as iron oxide is the network former and network modifier is presented. Phosphate glasses containing iron are electronically conducting glasses where the polaronic conduction is due to the electron hopping from low to high iron valence state. The identification of structural defects caused by ion/polaron migration, the analysis of dipolar states and electrical conductivity in iron phosphate glasses containing various alkali and mixed alkali ions was performed on the basis of the impedance spectroscopy (IS). The changes in electrical conductivity from as-quenched phosphate glass to fully crystallized glass (glass-ceramics) by IS are analyzed. A change in the characteristic features of IS follows the changes in glass and crystallized glass network. Using IS, the contribution of glass matrix, crystallized grains and grain boundary to the total electrical conductivity for iron phosphate glasses was analyzed. It was shown that decrease in conductivity is caused by discontinuities in the conduction pathways as a result of the disruption of crystalline network where two or more crystalline phases are formed. Also, phosphate-based glasses offer a unique range of biomaterials, as they form direct chemical bonding with hard/soft tissue. The surface charges of bioactive glasses are recognized to be the most important factors in determining biological responses. The improved bioactivity of the bioactive glasses as a result of the effects of the surface charges generated by electrical polarization is discussed.

  18. Theory of glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivier, N.

    1985-01-01

    The physical properties of glass are direct consequences of its non-crystalline structure. The structure is described from a topological point of view, since topology is the only geometry surviving non-crystallinity, i.e. absence of metric and trivial space group. This fact has two main consequences: the overall homogeneity of glass is a gauge symmetry, and the only extended, structurally stable constituents are odd lines (or 2π-disclinations in the elastic continuum limit). A gauge theory of glass, based on odd lines as sources of frozen-in strain, can explain those properties of glasses which are both specific to, and universal in amorphous solids: low-temperature excitations, and relaxation at high temperatures. The methods of statistical mechanics can be applied to give a minimal description of amorphous structures in statistical equilibrium. Criteria for statistical equilibrium of the structure and detailed balance are given, together with structural equations of state, which turn out to be well-known empirically among botanists and metallurgists. This review is based on lectures given in 1984 in Niteroi. It contains five parts: I - Structure, from a topological viewpoint; II - gauge invariance; III - Tunneling modes; IV - Supercooled liquid and the glass transitions; V - Statistical crystallography. (Author) [pt

  19. Sol-Gel Glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, S. P.

    1985-01-01

    Multicomponent homogeneous, ultrapure noncrystalline gels/gel derived glasses are promising batch materials for the containerless glass melting experiments in microgravity. Hence, ultrapure, homogeneous gel precursors could be used to: (1) investigate the effect of the container induced nucleation on the glass forming ability of marginally glass forming compositions; and (2) investigate the influence of gravity on the phase separation and coarsening behavior of gel derived glasses in the liquid-liquid immiscibility zone of the nonsilicate systems having a high density phase. The structure and crystallization behavior of gels in the SiO2-GeO2 as a function of gel chemistry and thermal treatment were investigated. As are the chemical principles involved in the distribution of a second network former in silica gel matrix being investigated. The procedures for synthesizing noncrystalline gels/gel-monoliths in the SiO2-GeO2, GeO2-PbO systems were developed. Preliminary investigations on the levitation and thermal treatment of germania silicate gel-monoliths in the Pressure Facility Acoustic Levitator were done.

  20. Yttrium aluminum garnet coating on glass substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Camila M.A.; Freiria, Gabriela S.; Faria, Emerson H. de; Rocha, Lucas A.; Ciuffi, Katia J.; Nassar, Eduardo J., E-mail: eduardo.nassar@unifran.edu.br

    2016-02-15

    Thin luminescent films have seen great technological advances and are applicable in the production of a variety of materials such as sensors, solar cells, photovoltaic devices, optical magnetic readers, waveguides, lasers, and recorders. Systems that contain yttrium aluminum oxide are important hosts for lanthanide ions and serve as light emission devices. This work deals with the deposition of yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) film doped with Eu{sup 3+} onto a glass substrate obtained by the sol–gel methodology. Spray pyrolysis furnished the yttrium aluminum oxide powder. Dip-coating at a withdrawal speed of 10 mm min{sup −1} and evaporation led to deposition of different numbers of layers of the YAG:Eu{sup 3+} film onto the glass substrate from a YAG:Eu{sup 3+} powder suspension containing ethanol, water, and tetraethylorthosilicate. Photoluminescence, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and transparency measurements aided film characterization. The emission spectra revealed that the number of layers influenced film properties. - Highlights: • The spray pyrolysis was used to obtain luminescent YAG:Eu{sup 3+}. • The matrix was deposited as transparent films. • The YAG:Eu{sup 3+} was deposited by sol–gel process onto glass substrate.