WorldWideScience

Sample records for solid-solid diffusion reaction

  1. The reductive decomposition of calcium sulphate I. Kinetics of the apparent solid-solid reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamphuis, B.; Potma, A.W.; Prins, W.; van Swaaij, Willibrordus Petrus Maria

    1992-01-01

    The reductive decomposition of calcium sulphate by hydrogen is used for the regeneration of calcium-based atmospheric fluidized bed combustion (AFBC) SO2 sorbents. The apparent solid¿solid reaction between CaS and CaSO4, one of the steps involved in the reaction mechanism of the reductive

  2. Turing instability in reaction-diffusion systems with nonlinear diffusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zemskov, E. P., E-mail: zemskov@ccas.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Dorodnicyn Computing Center (Russian Federation)

    2013-10-15

    The Turing instability is studied in two-component reaction-diffusion systems with nonlinear diffusion terms, and the regions in parametric space where Turing patterns can form are determined. The boundaries between super- and subcritical bifurcations are found. Calculations are performed for one-dimensional brusselator and oregonator models.

  3. Diffusive instabilities in hyperbolic reaction-diffusion equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemskov, Evgeny P.; Horsthemke, Werner

    2016-03-01

    We investigate two-variable reaction-diffusion systems of the hyperbolic type. A linear stability analysis is performed, and the conditions for diffusion-driven instabilities are derived. Two basic types of eigenvalues, real and complex, are described. Dispersion curves for both types of eigenvalues are plotted and their behavior is analyzed. The real case is related to the Turing instability, and the complex one corresponds to the wave instability. We emphasize the interesting feature that the wave instability in the hyperbolic equations occurs in two-variable systems, whereas in the parabolic case one needs three reaction-diffusion equations.

  4. Inertial effects in diffusion-limited reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorsaz, N; Foffi, G; De Michele, C; Piazza, F

    2010-01-01

    Diffusion-limited reactions are commonly found in biochemical processes such as enzyme catalysis, colloid and protein aggregation and binding between different macromolecules in cells. Usually, such reactions are modeled within the Smoluchowski framework by considering purely diffusive boundary problems. However, inertial effects are not always negligible in real biological or physical media on typical observation time frames. This is all the more so for non-bulk phenomena involving physical boundaries, that introduce additional time and space constraints. In this paper, we present and test a novel numerical scheme, based on event-driven Brownian dynamics, that allows us to explore a wide range of velocity relaxation times, from the purely diffusive case to the underdamped regime. We show that our algorithm perfectly reproduces the solution of the Fokker-Planck problem with absorbing boundary conditions in all the regimes considered and is thus a good tool for studying diffusion-guided reactions in complex biological environments.

  5. Reaction-Diffusion Automata Phenomenology, Localisations, Computation

    CERN Document Server

    Adamatzky, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Reaction-diffusion and excitable media are amongst most intriguing substrates. Despite apparent simplicity of the physical processes involved the media exhibit a wide range of amazing patterns: from target and spiral waves to travelling localisations and stationary breathing patterns. These media are at the heart of most natural processes, including morphogenesis of living beings, geological formations, nervous and muscular activity, and socio-economic developments.   This book explores a minimalist paradigm of studying reaction-diffusion and excitable media using locally-connected networks of finite-state machines: cellular automata and automata on proximity graphs. Cellular automata are marvellous objects per se because they show us how to generate and manage complexity using very simple rules of dynamical transitions. When combined with the reaction-diffusion paradigm the cellular automata become an essential user-friendly tool for modelling natural systems and designing future and emergent computing arch...

  6. Laser spot detection based on reaction diffusion

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vázquez-Otero, Alejandro; Khikhlukha, Danila; Solano-Altamirano, J. M.; Dormido, R.; Duro, N.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 16, č. 3 (2016), s. 1-11, č. článku 315. ISSN 1424-8220 R&D Projects: GA MŠk EF15_008/0000162 Grant - others:ELI Beamlines(XE) CZ.02.1.01/0.0/0.0/15_008/0000162 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : laser spot detection * laser beam detection * reaction diffusion models * Fitzhugh-Nagumo model * reaction diffusion computation * Turing patterns Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics OBOR OECD: Fluids and plasma physics (including surface physics) Impact factor: 2.677, year: 2016

  7. Permanganate diffusion and reaction in sedimentary rocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qiuyuan; Dong, Hailiang; Towne, Rachael M; Fischer, Timothy B; Schaefer, Charles E

    2014-04-01

    In situ chemical oxidation using permanganate has frequently been used to treat chlorinated solvents in fractured bedrock aquifers. However, in systems where matrix back-diffusion is an important process, the ability of the oxidant to migrate and treat target contaminants within the rock matrix will likely determine the overall effectiveness of this remedial approach. In this study, a series of diffusion experiments were performed to measure the permanganate diffusion and reaction in four different types of sedimentary rocks (dark gray mudstone, light gray mudstone, red sandstone, and tan sandstone). Results showed that, within the experimental time frame (~2 months), oxidant migration into the rock was limited to distances less than 500 μm. The observed diffusivities for permanganate into the rock matrices ranged from 5.3 × 10(-13) to 1.3 × 10(-11) cm(2)/s. These values were reasonably predicted by accounting for both the rock oxidant demand and the effective diffusivity of the rock. Various Mn minerals formed as surface coatings from reduction of permanganate coupled with oxidation of total organic carbon (TOC), and the nature of the formed Mn minerals was dependent upon the rock type. Post-treatment tracer testing showed that these Mn mineral coatings had a negligible impact on diffusion through the rock. Overall, our results showed that the extent of permanganate diffusion and reaction depended on rock properties, including porosity, mineralogy, and organic carbon. These results have important implications for our understanding of long-term organic contaminant remediation in sedimentary rocks using permanganate. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Reaction-diffusion pulses: a combustion model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos, Daniel; Llebot, Josep Enric; Fort, Joaquim

    2004-01-01

    We focus on a reaction-diffusion approach proposed recently for experiments on combustion processes, where the heat released by combustion follows first-order reaction kinetics. This case allows us to perform an exhaustive analytical study. Specifically, we obtain the exact expressions for the speed of the thermal pulses, their maximum temperature and the condition of self-sustenance. Finally, we propose two generalizations of the model, namely, the case of several reactants burning together, and that of time-delayed heat conduction. We find an excellent agreement between our analytical results and simulations

  9. Reaction-diffusion pulses: a combustion model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campos, Daniel [Grup de FIsica EstadIstica, Dept. de FIsica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Bellaterrra (Spain); Llebot, Josep Enric [Grup de FIsica EstadIstica, Dept. de FIsica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Bellaterrra (Spain); Fort, Joaquim [Dept. de FIsica, Univ. de Girona, Campus de Montilivi, 17071 Girona, Catalonia (Spain)

    2004-07-02

    We focus on a reaction-diffusion approach proposed recently for experiments on combustion processes, where the heat released by combustion follows first-order reaction kinetics. This case allows us to perform an exhaustive analytical study. Specifically, we obtain the exact expressions for the speed of the thermal pulses, their maximum temperature and the condition of self-sustenance. Finally, we propose two generalizations of the model, namely, the case of several reactants burning together, and that of time-delayed heat conduction. We find an excellent agreement between our analytical results and simulations.

  10. Laser Spot Detection Based on Reaction Diffusion

    OpenAIRE

    Alejandro Vázquez-Otero; Danila Khikhlukha; J. M. Solano-Altamirano; Raquel Dormido; Natividad Duro

    2016-01-01

    Center-location of a laser spot is a problem of interest when the laser is used for processing and performing measurements. Measurement quality depends on correctly determining the location of the laser spot. Hence, improving and proposing algorithms for the correct location of the spots are fundamental issues in laser-based measurements. In this paper we introduce a Reaction Diffusion (RD) system as the main computational framework for robustly finding laser spot centers. The method presente...

  11. Reaction diffusion equations with boundary degeneracy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huashui Zhan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we consider the reaction diffusion equation $$ \\frac{\\partial u}{\\partial t} = \\Delta A(u,\\quad (x,t\\in \\Omega \\times (0,T, $$ with the homogeneous boundary condition. Inspired by the Fichera-Oleinik theory, if the equation is not only strongly degenerate in the interior of $\\Omega$, but also degenerate on the boundary, we show that the solution of the equation is free from any limitation of the boundary condition.

  12. Reaction effects in diffusive shock acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drury, L.Oc.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of the reaction of accelerated particles back on the shock wave in the diffusive-shock-acceleration model of cosmic-ray generation are investigated theoretically. Effects examined include changes in the shock structure, modifications of the input and output spectra, scattering effects, and possible instabilities in the small-scale structure. It is pointed out that the latter two effects are applicable to any spatially localized acceleration mechanism. 14 references

  13. Diffusion limited reactions in crystalline solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fastenau, R.

    1982-01-01

    Diffusion limited reactions in crystal lattices are studied with diffusion and random walk theory. First the random walk on a crystal lattice is studied. These results are used in a formal study of diffusion limited reactions in which the following simplified traps are discussed: planes, cylinders, spheres, disks and rings. The traps are either present at the start of the process (annealing) or fed into the crystal at a constant rate (continuous production). For the study of trapping processes occurring in real crystals it was necessary to investigate the interaction of the reacting species on the atomic level. Using lattice relaxation calculations, several reactions were studied. These calculations result in a model for the potential energy of the crystal versus the separation of the reaction partners. This model is used in Monte Carlo simulations of the trapping process, which are made at a high trap density, since the extrapolation to the low density regime can be made using the formal part of this work. The following reactions were studied: the trapping of interstitial helium atoms by vacancies, self interstitial vacancy recombination, the trapping of vacancies by immobile, helium filled, vacancies and the capture of self interstitials and vacancies by dislocations. A part of these results is used in two models for the low temperature nucleation and growth of bubbles due to helium bombardment. The models described give the right bubble density versus helium dose, but differ widely in the fraction of helium present in the bubbles found. A mechanism of blistering based on a percolation effect is also discussed. (Auth.)

  14. Mixed, Nonsplit, Extended Stability, Stiff Integration of Reaction Diffusion Equations

    KAUST Repository

    Alzahrani, Hasnaa H.

    2016-01-01

    A tailored integration scheme is developed to treat stiff reaction-diffusion prob- lems. The construction adapts a stiff solver, namely VODE, to treat reaction im- plicitly together with explicit treatment of diffusion. The second-order Runge

  15. Distribution in flowing reaction-diffusion systems

    KAUST Repository

    Kamimura, Atsushi; Herrmann, Hans J.; Ito, Nobuyasu

    2009-01-01

    A power-law distribution is found in the density profile of reacting systems A+B→C+D and 2A→2C under a flow in two and three dimensions. Different densities of reactants A and B are fixed at both ends. For the reaction A+B, the concentration of reactants asymptotically decay in space as x-1/2 and x-3/4 in two dimensions and three dimensions, respectively. For 2A, it decays as log (x) /x in two dimensions. The decay of A+B is explained considering the effect of segregation of reactants in the isotropic case. The decay for 2A is explained by the marginal behavior of two-dimensional diffusion. A logarithmic divergence of the diffusion constant with system size is found in two dimensions. © 2009 The American Physical Society.

  16. Distribution in flowing reaction-diffusion systems

    KAUST Repository

    Kamimura, Atsushi

    2009-12-28

    A power-law distribution is found in the density profile of reacting systems A+B→C+D and 2A→2C under a flow in two and three dimensions. Different densities of reactants A and B are fixed at both ends. For the reaction A+B, the concentration of reactants asymptotically decay in space as x-1/2 and x-3/4 in two dimensions and three dimensions, respectively. For 2A, it decays as log (x) /x in two dimensions. The decay of A+B is explained considering the effect of segregation of reactants in the isotropic case. The decay for 2A is explained by the marginal behavior of two-dimensional diffusion. A logarithmic divergence of the diffusion constant with system size is found in two dimensions. © 2009 The American Physical Society.

  17. Modeling of Reaction Processes Controlled by Diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Revelli, Jorge

    2003-01-01

    Stochastic modeling is quite powerful in science and technology.The technics derived from this process have been used with great success in laser theory, biological systems and chemical reactions.Besides, they provide a theoretical framework for the analysis of experimental results on the field of particle's diffusion in ordered and disordered materials.In this work we analyze transport processes in one-dimensional fluctuating media, which are media that change their state in time.This fact induces changes in the movements of the particles giving rise to different phenomena and dynamics that will be described and analyzed in this work.We present some random walk models to describe these fluctuating media.These models include state transitions governed by different dynamical processes.We also analyze the trapping problem in a lattice by means of a simple model which predicts a resonance-like phenomenon.Also we study effective diffusion processes over surfaces due to random walks in the bulk.We consider different boundary conditions and transitions movements.We derive expressions that describe diffusion behaviors constrained to bulk restrictions and the dynamic of the particles.Finally it is important to mention that the theoretical results obtained from the models proposed in this work are compared with Monte Carlo simulations.We find, in general, excellent agreements between the theory and the simulations

  18. Amplitude equations for a sub-diffusive reaction-diffusion system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nec, Y; Nepomnyashchy, A A

    2008-01-01

    A sub-diffusive reaction-diffusion system with a positive definite memory operator and a nonlinear reaction term is analysed. Amplitude equations (Ginzburg-Landau type) are derived for short wave (Turing) and long wave (Hopf) bifurcation points

  19. Nonlinear analysis of a reaction-diffusion system: Amplitude equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zemskov, E. P., E-mail: zemskov@ccas.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Dorodnicyn Computing Center (Russian Federation)

    2012-10-15

    A reaction-diffusion system with a nonlinear diffusion term is considered. Based on nonlinear analysis, the amplitude equations are obtained in the cases of the Hopf and Turing instabilities in the system. Turing pattern-forming regions in the parameter space are determined for supercritical and subcritical instabilities in a two-component reaction-diffusion system.

  20. Laser Spot Detection Based on Reaction Diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Otero, Alejandro; Khikhlukha, Danila; Solano-Altamirano, J M; Dormido, Raquel; Duro, Natividad

    2016-03-01

    Center-location of a laser spot is a problem of interest when the laser is used for processing and performing measurements. Measurement quality depends on correctly determining the location of the laser spot. Hence, improving and proposing algorithms for the correct location of the spots are fundamental issues in laser-based measurements. In this paper we introduce a Reaction Diffusion (RD) system as the main computational framework for robustly finding laser spot centers. The method presented is compared with a conventional approach for locating laser spots, and the experimental results indicate that RD-based computation generates reliable and precise solutions. These results confirm the flexibility of the new computational paradigm based on RD systems for addressing problems that can be reduced to a set of geometric operations.

  1. Laser Spot Detection Based on Reaction Diffusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Vázquez-Otero

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Center-location of a laser spot is a problem of interest when the laser is used for processing and performing measurements. Measurement quality depends on correctly determining the location of the laser spot. Hence, improving and proposing algorithms for the correct location of the spots are fundamental issues in laser-based measurements. In this paper we introduce a Reaction Diffusion (RD system as the main computational framework for robustly finding laser spot centers. The method presented is compared with a conventional approach for locating laser spots, and the experimental results indicate that RD-based computation generates reliable and precise solutions. These results confirm the flexibility of the new computational paradigm based on RD systems for addressing problems that can be reduced to a set of geometric operations.

  2. Reaction and diffusion in turbulent combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pope, S.B. [Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Ithaca, NY (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The motivation for this project is the need to obtain a better quantitative understanding of the technologically-important phenomenon of turbulent combustion. In nearly all applications in which fuel is burned-for example, fossil-fuel power plants, furnaces, gas-turbines and internal-combustion engines-the combustion takes place in a turbulent flow. Designers continually demand more quantitative information about this phenomenon-in the form of turbulent combustion models-so that they can design equipment with increased efficiency and decreased environmental impact. For some time the PI has been developing a class of turbulent combustion models known as PDF methods. These methods have the important virtue that both convection and reaction can be treated without turbulence-modelling assumptions. However, a mixing model is required to account for the effects of molecular diffusion. Currently, the available mixing models are known to have some significant defects. The major motivation of the project is to seek a better understanding of molecular diffusion in turbulent reactive flows, and hence to develop a better mixing model.

  3. Study of ODE limit problems for reaction-diffusion equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacson Simsen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work we study ODE limit problems for reaction-diffusion equations for large diffusion and we study the sensitivity of nonlinear ODEs with respect to initial conditions and exponent parameters. Moreover, we prove continuity of the flow and weak upper semicontinuity of a family of global attractors for reaction-diffusion equations with spatially variable exponents when the exponents go to 2 in \\(L^{\\infty}(\\Omega\\ and the diffusion coefficients go to infinity.

  4. RKC time-stepping for advection-diffusion-reaction problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verwer, J.G.; Sommeijer, B.P.; Hundsdorfer, W.

    2004-01-01

    The original explicit Runge-Kutta-Chebyshev (RKC) method is a stabilized second-order integration method for pure diffusion problems. Recently, it has been extended in an implicit-explicit manner to also incorporate highly stiff reaction terms. This implicit-explicit RKC method thus treats diffusion terms explicitly and the highly stiff reaction terms implicitly. The current paper deals with the incorporation of advection terms for the explicit method, thus aiming at the implicit-explicit RKC integration of advection-diffusion-reaction equations in a manner that advection and diffusion terms are treated simultaneously and explicitly and the highly stiff reaction terms implicitly

  5. Nonlinear variational models for reaction and diffusion systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanyi, G.E.

    1983-08-01

    There exists a natural metric w.r.t. which the density dependent diffusion operator is harmonic in the sense of Eells and Sampson. A physical corollary of this statement is the property that any two regular points on the orbit of a reaction or diffusion operator can be connected by a path along which the reaction rate is constant. (author)

  6. Exact analytical solutions for nonlinear reaction-diffusion equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Chunping

    2003-01-01

    By using a direct method via the computer algebraic system of Mathematica, some exact analytical solutions to a class of nonlinear reaction-diffusion equations are presented in closed form. Subsequently, the hyperbolic function solutions and the triangular function solutions of the coupled nonlinear reaction-diffusion equations are obtained in a unified way

  7. Speed ot travelling waves in reaction-diffusion equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benguria, R.D.; Depassier, M.C.; Mendez, V.

    2002-01-01

    Reaction diffusion equations arise in several problems of population dynamics, flame propagation and others. In one dimensional cases the systems may evolve into travelling fronts. Here we concentrate on a reaction diffusion equation which arises as a simple model for chemotaxis and present results for the speed of the travelling fronts. (Author)

  8. Reaction time for trimolecular reactions in compartment-based reaction-diffusion models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fei; Chen, Minghan; Erban, Radek; Cao, Yang

    2018-05-01

    Trimolecular reaction models are investigated in the compartment-based (lattice-based) framework for stochastic reaction-diffusion modeling. The formulae for the first collision time and the mean reaction time are derived for the case where three molecules are present in the solution under periodic boundary conditions. For the case of reflecting boundary conditions, similar formulae are obtained using a computer-assisted approach. The accuracy of these formulae is further verified through comparison with numerical results. The presented derivation is based on the first passage time analysis of Montroll [J. Math. Phys. 10, 753 (1969)]. Montroll's results for two-dimensional lattice-based random walks are adapted and applied to compartment-based models of trimolecular reactions, which are studied in one-dimensional or pseudo one-dimensional domains.

  9. Reaction diffusion in chromium-zircaloy-2 system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiang Wenxin; Ying Shihao

    2001-01-01

    Reaction diffusion in the chromium-zircaloy-2 diffusion couples is investigated in the temperature range of 1023 - 1123 K. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) and energy dispersive spectrum (EDS) were used to measure the thickness of the reaction layer and to determine the Zr, Fe and Cr concentration penetrate profile in reaction layer, respectively. The growth kinetics of reaction layer has been studied and the results show that the growth of intermetallic compound is controlled by the process of volume diffusion as the layer growth approximately obeys the parabolic law. Interdiffusion coefficients were calculated using Boltzmann-Matano-Heumann model. Calculated interdiffusion coefficients were compared with those obtained on the condition that Cr dissolves in Zr and merely forms dilute solid solution. The comparison indicates that Cr diffuses in dilute solid solution is five orders of magnitude faster than in Zr(Fe, Cr) 2 intermetallic compound

  10. Field theory of propagating reaction-diffusion fronts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escudero, C.

    2004-01-01

    The problem of velocity selection of reaction-diffusion fronts has been widely investigated. While the mean-field limit results are well known theoretically, there is a lack of analytic progress in those cases in which fluctuations are to be taken into account. Here, we construct an analytic theory connecting the first principles of the reaction-diffusion process to an effective equation of motion via field-theoretic arguments, and we arrive at results already confirmed by numerical simulations

  11. Splitting Schemes & Segregation In Reaction-(Cross-)Diffusion Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Carrillo, José A.; Fagioli, Simone; Santambrogio, Filippo; Schmidtchen, Markus

    2017-01-01

    One of the most fascinating phenomena observed in reaction-diffusion systems is the emergence of segregated solutions, i.e. population densities with disjoint supports. We analyse such a reaction cross-diffusion system. In order to prove existence of weak solutions for a wide class of initial data without restriction about their supports or their positivity, we propose a variational splitting scheme combining ODEs with methods from optimal transport. In addition, this approach allows us to pr...

  12. Coupled diffusion systems with localized nonlinear reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, M.; Lin, Zhigui

    2001-01-01

    This paper deals with the blowup rate and profile near the blowup time for the system of diffusion equations uit - δui = ui+1Pi(x0, t), (i = 1,...,k, uk+1 := uu) in Ω × (0, T) with boundary conditions ui = 0 on ∂Ω × [0, T). We show that the solution has a global blowup. The exact rate...

  13. Distributed order reaction-diffusion systems associated with Caputo derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, R. K.; Mathai, A. M.; Haubold, H. J.

    2014-08-01

    This paper deals with the investigation of the solution of an unified fractional reaction-diffusion equation of distributed order associated with the Caputo derivatives as the time-derivative and Riesz-Feller fractional derivative as the space-derivative. The solution is derived by the application of the joint Laplace and Fourier transforms in compact and closed form in terms of the H-function. The results derived are of general nature and include the results investigated earlier by other authors, notably by Mainardi et al. ["The fundamental solution of the space-time fractional diffusion equation," Fractional Calculus Appl. Anal. 4, 153-202 (2001); Mainardi et al. "Fox H-functions in fractional diffusion," J. Comput. Appl. Math. 178, 321-331 (2005)] for the fundamental solution of the space-time fractional equation, including Haubold et al. ["Solutions of reaction-diffusion equations in terms of the H-function," Bull. Astron. Soc. India 35, 681-689 (2007)] and Saxena et al. ["Fractional reaction-diffusion equations," Astrophys. Space Sci. 305, 289-296 (2006a)] for fractional reaction-diffusion equations. The advantage of using the Riesz-Feller derivative lies in the fact that the solution of the fractional reaction-diffusion equation, containing this derivative, includes the fundamental solution for space-time fractional diffusion, which itself is a generalization of fractional diffusion, space-time fraction diffusion, and time-fractional diffusion, see Schneider and Wyss ["Fractional diffusion and wave equations," J. Math. Phys. 30, 134-144 (1989)]. These specialized types of diffusion can be interpreted as spatial probability density functions evolving in time and are expressible in terms of the H-function in compact forms. The convergence conditions for the double series occurring in the solutions are investigated. It is interesting to observe that the double series comes out to be a special case of the Srivastava-Daoust hypergeometric function of two variables

  14. Pattern formation in reaction diffusion systems with finite geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borzi, C.; Wio, H.

    1990-04-01

    We analyze the one-component, one-dimensional, reaction-diffusion equation through a simple inverse method. We confine the system and fix the boundary conditions as to induce pattern formation. We analyze the stability of those patterns. Our goal is to get information about the reaction term out of the preknowledgment of the pattern. (author). 5 refs

  15. Analytically solvable models of reaction-diffusion systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zemskov, E P; Kassner, K [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Otto-von-Guericke-Universitaet, Universitaetsplatz 2, 39106 Magdeburg (Germany)

    2004-05-01

    We consider a class of analytically solvable models of reaction-diffusion systems. An analytical treatment is possible because the nonlinear reaction term is approximated by a piecewise linear function. As particular examples we choose front and pulse solutions to illustrate the matching procedure in the one-dimensional case.

  16. Feynman-Kac equations for reaction and diffusion processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Ru; Deng, Weihua

    2018-04-01

    This paper provides a theoretical framework for deriving the forward and backward Feynman-Kac equations for the distribution of functionals of the path of a particle undergoing both diffusion and reaction processes. Once given the diffusion type and reaction rate, a specific forward or backward Feynman-Kac equation can be obtained. The results in this paper include those for normal/anomalous diffusions and reactions with linear/nonlinear rates. Using the derived equations, we apply our findings to compute some physical (experimentally measurable) statistics, including the occupation time in half-space, the first passage time, and the occupation time in half-interval with an absorbing or reflecting boundary, for the physical system with anomalous diffusion and spontaneous evanescence.

  17. Reaction-diffusion models of decontamination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Poul G.

    A contaminant, which also contains a polymer is in the form of droplets on a solid surface. It is to be removed by the action of a decontaminant, which is applied in aqueous solution. The contaminant is only sparingly soluble in water, so the reaction mechanism is that it slowly dissolves...

  18. Restrictive liquid-phase diffusion and reaction in bidispersed catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.Y.; Seader, J.D.; Tsai, C.H.; Massoth, F.E.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper, the effect of bidispersed pore-size distribution on liquid-phase diffusion and reaction in NiMo/Al 2 O 3 catalysts is investigated by applying two bidispersed-pore-structure models, the random-pore model and a globular-structure model, to extensive experimental data, which were obtained from sorptive diffusion measurements at ambient conditions and catalytic reaction rate measurements on nitrogen-containing compounds. Transport of the molecules in the catalysts was found to be controlled by micropore diffusion, in accordance with the random-pore model, rather than macropore diffusion as predicted by the globular-structure model. A qualitative criterion for micropore-diffusion control is proposed: relatively small macroporosity and high catalyst pellet density. Since most hydrotreating catalysts have high density, diffusion in these types of catalysts may be controlled by micropore diffusion. Accordingly, it is believed in this case that increasing the size of micropores may be more effective to reduce intraparticle diffusion resistance than incorporating macropores alone

  19. Reaction-diffusion systems in intracellular molecular transport and control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soh, Siowling; Byrska, Marta; Kandere-Grzybowska, Kristiana; Grzybowski, Bartosz A

    2010-06-07

    Chemical reactions make cells work only if the participating chemicals are delivered to desired locations in a timely and precise fashion. Most research to date has focused on active-transport mechanisms, although passive diffusion is often equally rapid and energetically less costly. Capitalizing on these advantages, cells have developed sophisticated reaction-diffusion (RD) systems that control a wide range of cellular functions-from chemotaxis and cell division, through signaling cascades and oscillations, to cell motility. These apparently diverse systems share many common features and are "wired" according to "generic" motifs such as nonlinear kinetics, autocatalysis, and feedback loops. Understanding the operation of these complex (bio)chemical systems requires the analysis of pertinent transport-kinetic equations or, at least on a qualitative level, of the characteristic times of the constituent subprocesses. Therefore, in reviewing the manifestations of cellular RD, we also describe basic theory of reaction-diffusion phenomena.

  20. Stochastic reaction-diffusion algorithms for macromolecular crowding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturrock, Marc

    2016-06-01

    Compartment-based (lattice-based) reaction-diffusion algorithms are often used for studying complex stochastic spatio-temporal processes inside cells. In this paper the influence of macromolecular crowding on stochastic reaction-diffusion simulations is investigated. Reaction-diffusion processes are considered on two different kinds of compartmental lattice, a cubic lattice and a hexagonal close packed lattice, and solved using two different algorithms, the stochastic simulation algorithm and the spatiocyte algorithm (Arjunan and Tomita 2010 Syst. Synth. Biol. 4, 35-53). Obstacles (modelling macromolecular crowding) are shown to have substantial effects on the mean squared displacement and average number of molecules in the domain but the nature of these effects is dependent on the choice of lattice, with the cubic lattice being more susceptible to the effects of the obstacles. Finally, improvements for both algorithms are presented.

  1. Turing Patterns in a Reaction-Diffusion System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Yanning; Wang Pingjian; Hou Chunju; Liu Changsong; Zhu Zhengang

    2006-01-01

    We have further investigated Turing patterns in a reaction-diffusion system by theoretical analysis and numerical simulations. Simple Turing patterns and complex superlattice structures are observed. We find that the shape and type of Turing patterns depend on dynamical parameters and external periodic forcing, and is independent of effective diffusivity rate σ in the Lengyel-Epstein model. Our numerical results provide additional insight into understanding the mechanism of development of Turing patterns and predicting new pattern formations.

  2. Explosive instabilities of reaction-diffusion equations including pinch effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilhelmsson, H.

    1992-01-01

    Particular solutions of reaction-diffusion equations for temperature are obtained for explosively unstable situations. As a result of the interplay between inertial, diffusion, pinch and source processes certain 'bell-shaped' distributions may grow explosively in time with preserved shape of the spatial distribution. The effect of the pinch, which requires a density inhomogeneity, is found to diminish the effect of diffusion, or inversely to support the inertial and source processes in creating the explosion. The results may be described in terms of elliptic integrals or. more simply, by means of expansions in the spatial coordinate. An application is the temperature evolution of a burning fusion plasma. (au) (18 refs.)

  3. Liquid Film Diffusion on Reaction Rate in Submerged Biofilters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Pia; Hollesen, Line; Harremoës, Poul

    1995-01-01

    Experiments were carried out in order to investigate the influence of liquid film diffusion on reaction rate in a submerged biofilter with denitrification and in order to compare with a theoretical study of the mass transfer coefficient. The experiments were carried out with varied flow, identified...... by the empty bed velocity of inflow and recirculation, respectively 1.3, 2.8, 5.6 and 10.9 m/h. The filter material consisted of 3 mm biostyren spheres. The results indicate that the influence of liquid film diffusion on reaction rate can be ignored....

  4. Chaotic advection, diffusion, and reactions in open flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tel, Tamas; Karolyi, Gyoergy; Pentek, Aron; Scheuring, Istvan; Toroczkai, Zoltan; Grebogi, Celso; Kadtke, James

    2000-01-01

    We review and generalize recent results on advection of particles in open time-periodic hydrodynamical flows. First, the problem of passive advection is considered, and its fractal and chaotic nature is pointed out. Next, we study the effect of weak molecular diffusion or randomness of the flow. Finally, we investigate the influence of passive advection on chemical or biological activity superimposed on open flows. The nondiffusive approach is shown to carry some features of a weak diffusion, due to the finiteness of the reaction range or reaction velocity. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics

  5. Diffusion-controlled reaction. V. Effect of concentration-dependent diffusion coefficient on reaction rate in graft polymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imre, K.; Odian, G.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of diffusion on radiation-initiated graft polymerization has been studied with emphasis on the single- and two-penetrant cases. When the physical properties of the penetrants are similar, the two-penetrant problems can be reduced to the single-penetrant problem by redefining the characteristic parameters of the system. The diffusion-free graft polymerization rate is assumed to be proportional to the upsilon power of the monomer concentration respectively, and, in which the proportionality constant a = k/sub p/R/sub i//sup w//k/sub t//sup z/, where k/sub p/ and k/sub t/ are the propagation and termination rate constants, respectively, and R/sub i/ is the initiation rate. The values of upsilon, w, and z depend on the particular reaction system. The results of earlier work were generalized by allowing a non-Fickian diffusion rate which predicts an essentially exponential dependence on the monomer concentration of the diffusion coefficient, D = D 0 [exp(deltaC/M)], where M is the saturation concentration. A reaction system is characterized by the three dimensionless parameters, upsilon, delta, and A = (L/2)[aM/sup (upsilon--1)//D 0 ]/sup 1/2/, where L is the polymer film thickness. Graft polymerization tends to become diffusion controlled as A increases. Larger values of delta and ν cause a reaction system to behave closer to the diffusion-free regime. Transition from diffusion-free to diffusion-controlled reaction involves changes in the dependence of the reaction rate on film thickness, initiation rate, and monomer concentration. Although the diffusion-free rate is w order in initiation rate, upsilon order in monomer, and independent of film thickness, the diffusion-controlled rate is w/2 order in initiator rate and inverse first-order in film thickness. Dependence of the diffusion-controlled rate on monomer is dependent in a complex manner on the diffusional characteristics of the reaction system. 11 figures, 4 tables

  6. Exact solutions of some coupled nonlinear diffusion-reaction ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    certain coupled diffusion-reaction (D-R) equations of very general nature. In recent years, various direct methods have been proposed to find the exact solu- tions not only of nonlinear partial differential equations but also of their coupled versions. These methods include unified ansatz approach [3], extended hyperbolic func ...

  7. Solitary wave solutions of selective nonlinear diffusion-reaction ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    An auto-Bäcklund transformation derived in the homogeneous balance method is employed to obtain several new exact solutions of certain kinds of nonlin- ear diffusion-reaction (D-R) equations. These equations arise in a variety of problems in physical, chemical, biological, social and ecological sciences. Keywords.

  8. Reaction Diffusion and Chemotaxis for Decentralized Gathering on FPGAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard Girau

    2009-01-01

    and rapid simulations of the complex dynamics of this reaction-diffusion model. Then we describe the FPGA implementation of the environment together with the agents, to study the major challenges that must be solved when designing a fast embedded implementation of the decentralized gathering model. We analyze the results according to the different goals of these hardware implementations.

  9. Exact solutions of certain nonlinear chemotaxis diffusion reaction ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    constructed coupled differential equations. The results obtained ... Nonlinear diffusion reaction equation; chemotaxis; auxiliary equation method; solitary wave solutions. ..... fact limits the scope of applications of the derived results. ... Research Fellowship and AP acknowledges DU and DST for PURSE grant for financial.

  10. Multi-scale simulation of reaction-diffusion systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vijaykumar, A.

    2017-01-01

    In many reaction-diffusion processes, ranging from biochemical networks, catalysis, to complex self-assembly, the spatial distribution of the reactants and the stochastic character of their interactions are crucial for the macroscopic behavior. The recently developed mesoscopic Green’s Function

  11. Flow-Injection Responses of Diffusion Processes and Chemical Reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov

    2000-01-01

    tool of automated analytical chemistry. The need for an even lower consumption of chemicals and for computer analysis has motivated a study of the FIA peak itself, that is, a theoretical model was developed, that provides detailed knowledge of the FIA profile. It was shown that the flow in a FIA...... manifold may be characterised by a diffusion coefficient that depends on flow rate, denoted as the kinematic diffusion coefficient. The description was applied to systems involving species of chromium, both in the case of simple diffusion and in the case of chemical reactions. It is suggested that it may...... be used in the resolution of FIA profiles to obtain information about the content of interference’s, in the study of chemical reaction kinetics and to measure absolute concentrations within the FIA-detector cell....

  12. Mixed, Nonsplit, Extended Stability, Stiff Integration of Reaction Diffusion Equations

    KAUST Repository

    Alzahrani, Hasnaa H.

    2016-07-26

    A tailored integration scheme is developed to treat stiff reaction-diffusion prob- lems. The construction adapts a stiff solver, namely VODE, to treat reaction im- plicitly together with explicit treatment of diffusion. The second-order Runge-Kutta- Chebyshev (RKC) scheme is adjusted to integrate diffusion. Spatial operator is de- scretised by second-order finite differences on a uniform grid. The overall solution is advanced over S fractional stiff integrations, where S corresponds to the number of RKC stages. The behavior of the scheme is analyzed by applying it to three simple problems. The results show that it achieves second-order accuracy, thus, preserving the formal accuracy of the original RKC. The presented development sets the stage for future extensions, particularly, to multidimensional reacting flows with detailed chemistry.

  13. Internal Diffusion-Controlled Enzyme Reaction: The Acetylcholinesterase Kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sangyun; Kim, Ji-Hyun; Lee, Sangyoub

    2012-02-14

    Acetylcholinesterase is an enzyme with a very high turnover rate; it quenches the neurotransmitter, acetylcholine, at the synapse. We have investigated the kinetics of the enzyme reaction by calculating the diffusion rate of the substrate molecule along an active site channel inside the enzyme from atomic-level molecular dynamics simulations. In contrast to the previous works, we have found that the internal substrate diffusion is the determinant of the acetylcholinesterase kinetics in the low substrate concentration limit. Our estimate of the overall bimolecular reaction rate constant for the enzyme is in good agreement with the experimental data. In addition, the present calculation provides a reasonable explanation for the effects of the ionic strength of solution and the mutation of surface residues of the enzyme. The study suggests that internal diffusion of the substrate could be a key factor in understanding the kinetics of enzymes of similar characteristics.

  14. Solid-solid phase change thermal storage application to space-suit battery pack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Chang H.; Morehouse, Jeffrey H.

    1989-01-01

    High cell temperatures are seen as the primary safety problem in the Li-BCX space battery. The exothermic heat from the chemical reactions could raise the temperature of the lithium electrode above the melting temperature. Also, high temperature causes the cell efficiency to decrease. Solid-solid phase-change materials were used as a thermal storage medium to lower this battery cell temperature by utilizing their phase-change (latent heat storage) characteristics. Solid-solid phase-change materials focused on in this study are neopentyl glycol and pentaglycerine. Because of their favorable phase-change characteristics, these materials appear appropriate for space-suit battery pack use. The results of testing various materials are reported as thermophysical property values, and the space-suit battery operating temperature is discussed in terms of these property results.

  15. Resonant elastic scattering, inelastic scattering and astrophysical reactions; Diffusion elastique resonante, diffusion inelastique et reactions astrophysiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Oliveira Santos, F. [Grand Accelerateur National d' Ions Lourds, UMR 6415, 14 - Caen (France)

    2007-07-01

    Nuclear reactions can occur at low kinetic energy. Low-energy reactions are characterized by a strong dependence on the structure of the compound nucleus. It turns out that it is possible to study the nuclear structure by measuring these reactions. In this course, three types of reactions are treated: Resonant Elastic Scattering (such as N{sup 14}(p,p)N{sup 14}), Inelastic Scattering (such as N{sup 14}(p,p')N{sup 14*}) and Astrophysical reactions (such as N{sup 14}(p,{gamma})O{sup 15}). (author)

  16. Numerical solution of a reaction-diffusion equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moyano, Edgardo A.; Scarpettini, Alberto F.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of the present work to continue the observations and the numerical experiences on a reaction-diffusion model, that is a simplified form of the neutronic flux equation. The model is parabolic, nonlinear, with Dirichlet boundary conditions. The purpose is to approximate non trivial solutions, asymptotically stables for t → ∞, that is solutions that tend to the elliptic problem, in the Lyapunov sense. It belongs to the so-called reaction-diffusion equations of semi linear kind, that is, linear equations in the heat operator and they have a nonlinear reaction function, in this case f (u, a, b) = u (a - b u), being u concentration, a and b parameters. The study of the incidence of these parameters take an interest to the neutronic flux physics. So that we search non trivial, positive and bounded solutions. The used algorithm is based on the concept of monotone and ordered sequences, and on the existence theorem of Amann and Sattinger. (author)

  17. Maximum Principles for Discrete and Semidiscrete Reaction-Diffusion Equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Stehlík

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We study reaction-diffusion equations with a general reaction function f on one-dimensional lattices with continuous or discrete time ux′  (or  Δtux=k(ux-1-2ux+ux+1+f(ux, x∈Z. We prove weak and strong maximum and minimum principles for corresponding initial-boundary value problems. Whereas the maximum principles in the semidiscrete case (continuous time exhibit similar features to those of fully continuous reaction-diffusion model, in the discrete case the weak maximum principle holds for a smaller class of functions and the strong maximum principle is valid in a weaker sense. We describe in detail how the validity of maximum principles depends on the nonlinearity and the time step. We illustrate our results on the Nagumo equation with the bistable nonlinearity.

  18. Parametric spatiotemporal oscillation in reaction-diffusion systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Shyamolina; Ray, Deb Shankar

    2016-03-01

    We consider a reaction-diffusion system in a homogeneous stable steady state. On perturbation by a time-dependent sinusoidal forcing of a suitable scaling parameter the system exhibits parametric spatiotemporal instability beyond a critical threshold frequency. We have formulated a general scheme to calculate the threshold condition for oscillation and the range of unstable spatial modes lying within a V-shaped region reminiscent of Arnold's tongue. Full numerical simulations show that depending on the specificity of nonlinearity of the models, the instability may result in time-periodic stationary patterns in the form of standing clusters or spatially localized breathing patterns with characteristic wavelengths. Our theoretical analysis of the parametric oscillation in reaction-diffusion system is corroborated by full numerical simulation of two well-known chemical dynamical models: chlorite-iodine-malonic acid and Briggs-Rauscher reactions.

  19. Oscillatory pulses and wave trains in a bistable reaction-diffusion system with cross diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemskov, Evgeny P; Tsyganov, Mikhail A; Horsthemke, Werner

    2017-01-01

    We study waves with exponentially decaying oscillatory tails in a reaction-diffusion system with linear cross diffusion. To be specific, we consider a piecewise linear approximation of the FitzHugh-Nagumo model, also known as the Bonhoeffer-van der Pol model. We focus on two types of traveling waves, namely solitary pulses that correspond to a homoclinic solution, and sequences of pulses or wave trains, i.e., a periodic solution. The effect of cross diffusion on wave profiles and speed of propagation is analyzed. We find the intriguing result that both pulses and wave trains occur in the bistable cross-diffusive FitzHugh-Nagumo system, whereas only fronts exist in the standard bistable system without cross diffusion.

  20. Analysis of discrete reaction-diffusion equations for autocatalysis and continuum diffusion equations for transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Chi-Jen [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis, we analyze both the spatiotemporal behavior of: (A) non-linear “reaction” models utilizing (discrete) reaction-diffusion equations; and (B) spatial transport problems on surfaces and in nanopores utilizing the relevant (continuum) diffusion or Fokker-Planck equations. Thus, there are some common themes in these studies, as they all involve partial differential equations or their discrete analogues which incorporate a description of diffusion-type processes. However, there are also some qualitative differences, as shall be discussed below.

  1. External boundary effects on simultaneous diffusion and reaction processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Roux, M.N.; Wilhelmsson, H.

    1989-01-01

    External boundaries influence the spatial and temporal structure of evolution of dynamic systems governed by reaction-diffusion equations. Critical limits, i.e. thresholds for explosive growth or onset of diffusion dominated decay, are found to be caused by the presence of the boundary and to depend on: the position of the boundary, where the density is assumed to be zero at any instant of time: the mutual weights (coefficients) and powers of the nonlinear reaction and diffusion processes; and the initial spatial distribution. However, for particular relations between the nonlinear powers of the reaction and diffusion terms the critical limits do not depend on the initial conditions. The results are obtained by simulation experiment for one, two and three dimensions. Trends in the dynamic evolution of the system with an external boundary imposed are compared with the corresponding analytic results obtained for free boundary. Interesting applications are found in various areas, e.g. in the field of high temperature fusion plasma where the evolution of the temperature profile for the so-called H-mode (constant plasma density) is described

  2. A Weak Comparison Principle for Reaction-Diffusion Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Valero

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We prove a weak comparison principle for a reaction-diffusion system without uniqueness of solutions. We apply the abstract results to the Lotka-Volterra system with diffusion, a generalized logistic equation, and to a model of fractional-order chemical autocatalysis with decay. Moreover, in the case of the Lotka-Volterra system a weak maximum principle is given, and a suitable estimate in the space of essentially bounded functions L∞ is proved for at least one solution of the problem.

  3. Signatures of a quantum diffusion limited hydrogen atom tunneling reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balabanoff, Morgan E; Ruzi, Mahmut; Anderson, David T

    2017-12-20

    We are studying the details of hydrogen atom (H atom) quantum diffusion in highly enriched parahydrogen (pH 2 ) quantum solids doped with chemical species in an effort to better understand H atom transport and reactivity under these conditions. In this work we present kinetic studies of the 193 nm photo-induced chemistry of methanol (CH 3 OH) isolated in solid pH 2 . Short-term irradiation of CH 3 OH at 1.8 K readily produces CH 2 O and CO which we detect using FTIR spectroscopy. The in situ photochemistry also produces CH 3 O and H atoms which we can infer from the post-photolysis reaction kinetics that display significant CH 2 OH growth. The CH 2 OH growth kinetics indicate at least three separate tunneling reactions contribute; (i) reactions of photoproduced CH 3 O with the pH 2 host, (ii) H atom reactions with the CH 2 O photofragment, and (iii) long-range migration of H atoms and reaction with CH 3 OH. We assign the rapid CH 2 OH growth to the following CH 3 O + H 2 → CH 3 OH + H → CH 2 OH + H 2 two-step sequential tunneling mechanism by conducting analogous kinetic measurements using deuterated methanol (CD 3 OD). By performing photolysis experiments at 1.8 and 4.3 K, we show the post-photolysis reaction kinetics change qualitatively over this small temperature range. We use this qualitative change in the reaction kinetics with temperature to identify reactions that are quantum diffusion limited. While these results are specific to the conditions that exist in pH 2 quantum solids, they have direct implications on the analogous low temperature H atom tunneling reactions that occur on metal surfaces and on interstellar grains.

  4. Reaction-diffusion fronts with inhomogeneous initial conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bena, I [Departement de Physique Theorique, Universite de Geneve, CH-1211 Geneva 4 (Switzerland); Droz, M [Departement de Physique Theorique, Universite de Geneve, CH-1211 Geneva 4 (Switzerland); Martens, K [Departement de Physique Theorique, Universite de Geneve, CH-1211 Geneva 4 (Switzerland); Racz, Z [Institute for Theoretical Physics, Eoetvoes University, 1117 Budapest (Hungary)

    2007-02-14

    Properties of reaction zones resulting from A+B {yields} C type reaction-diffusion processes are investigated by analytical and numerical methods. The reagents A and B are separated initially and, in addition, there is an initial macroscopic inhomogeneity in the distribution of the B species. For simple two-dimensional geometries, exact analytical results are presented for the time evolution of the geometric shape of the front. We also show using cellular automata simulations that the fluctuations can be neglected both in the shape and in the width of the front.

  5. Control of transversal instabilities in reaction-diffusion systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Totz, Sonja; Löber, Jakob; Totz, Jan Frederik; Engel, Harald

    2018-05-01

    In two-dimensional reaction-diffusion systems, local curvature perturbations on traveling waves are typically damped out and vanish. However, if the inhibitor diffuses much faster than the activator, transversal instabilities can arise, leading from flat to folded, spatio-temporally modulated waves and to spreading spiral turbulence. Here, we propose a scheme to induce or inhibit these instabilities via a spatio-temporal feedback loop. In a piecewise-linear version of the FitzHugh–Nagumo model, transversal instabilities and spiral turbulence in the uncontrolled system are shown to be suppressed in the presence of control, thereby stabilizing plane wave propagation. Conversely, in numerical simulations with the modified Oregonator model for the photosensitive Belousov–Zhabotinsky reaction, which does not exhibit transversal instabilities on its own, we demonstrate the feasibility of inducing transversal instabilities and study the emerging wave patterns in a well-controlled manner.

  6. An Application of Equivalence Transformations to Reaction Diffusion Equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariano Torrisi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we consider a quite general class of advection reaction diffusion systems. By using an equivalence generator, derived in a previous paper, the authors apply a projection theorem to determine some special forms of the constitutive functions that allow the extension by one of the two-dimensional principal Lie algebra. As an example, a special case is discussed at the end of the paper.

  7. Attractor of reaction-diffusion equations in Banach spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Valero

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we prove first some abstract theorems on existence of global attractors for differential inclusions generated by w-dissipative operators. Then these results are applied to reaction-diffusion equations in which the Babach space Lp is used as phase space. Finally, new results concerning the fractal dimension of the global attractor in the space L2 are obtained.

  8. Multiple Scale Reaction-Diffusion-Advection Problems with Moving Fronts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nefedov, Nikolay

    2016-06-01

    In this work we discuss the further development of the general scheme of the asymptotic method of differential inequalities to investigate stability and motion of sharp internal layers (fronts) for nonlinear singularly perturbed parabolic equations, which are called in applications reaction-diffusion-advection equations. Our approach is illustrated for some new important cases of initial boundary value problems. We present results on stability and on the motion of the fronts.

  9. Reaction diffusion voronoi diagrams: from sensors data to computing

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vázquez-Otero, Alejandro (ed.); Faigl, J.; Dormido, R.; Duro, N.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 6 (2015), s. 12736-12764 ISSN 1424-8220 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED1.1.00/02.0061 Grant - others:ELI Beamlines(XE) CZ.1.05/1.1.00/02.0061 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : reaction diffusion * FitzHugh–Nagumo * path planning * navigation * exploration Subject RIV: BD - Theory of Information Impact factor: 2.033, year: 2015

  10. Decay to Equilibrium for Energy-Reaction-Diffusion Systems

    KAUST Repository

    Haskovec, Jan

    2018-02-06

    We derive thermodynamically consistent models of reaction-diffusion equations coupled to a heat equation. While the total energy is conserved, the total entropy serves as a driving functional such that the full coupled system is a gradient flow. The novelty of the approach is the Onsager structure, which is the dual form of a gradient system, and the formulation in terms of the densities and the internal energy. In these variables it is possible to assume that the entropy density is strictly concave such that there is a unique maximizer (thermodynamical equilibrium) given linear constraints on the total energy and suitable density constraints. We consider two particular systems of this type, namely, a diffusion-reaction bipolar energy transport system, and a drift-diffusion-reaction energy transport system with confining potential. We prove corresponding entropy-entropy production inequalities with explicitly calculable constants and establish the convergence to thermodynamical equilibrium, first in entropy and later in L norm using Cziszár–Kullback–Pinsker type inequalities.

  11. Decay to Equilibrium for Energy-Reaction-Diffusion Systems

    KAUST Repository

    Haskovec, Jan; Hittmeir, Sabine; Markowich, Peter A.; Mielke, Alexander

    2018-01-01

    We derive thermodynamically consistent models of reaction-diffusion equations coupled to a heat equation. While the total energy is conserved, the total entropy serves as a driving functional such that the full coupled system is a gradient flow. The novelty of the approach is the Onsager structure, which is the dual form of a gradient system, and the formulation in terms of the densities and the internal energy. In these variables it is possible to assume that the entropy density is strictly concave such that there is a unique maximizer (thermodynamical equilibrium) given linear constraints on the total energy and suitable density constraints. We consider two particular systems of this type, namely, a diffusion-reaction bipolar energy transport system, and a drift-diffusion-reaction energy transport system with confining potential. We prove corresponding entropy-entropy production inequalities with explicitly calculable constants and establish the convergence to thermodynamical equilibrium, first in entropy and later in L norm using Cziszár–Kullback–Pinsker type inequalities.

  12. Heat Diffusion in Gases, Including Effects of Chemical Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, C. Frederick

    1960-01-01

    The diffusion of heat through gases is treated where the coefficients of thermal conductivity and diffusivity are functions of temperature. The diffusivity is taken proportional to the integral of thermal conductivity, where the gas is ideal, and is considered constant over the temperature interval in which a chemical reaction occurs. The heat diffusion equation is then solved numerically for a semi-infinite gas medium with constant initial and boundary conditions. These solutions are in a dimensionless form applicable to gases in general, and they are used, along with measured shock velocity and heat flux through a shock reflecting surface, to evaluate the integral of thermal conductivity for air up to 5000 degrees Kelvin. This integral has the properties of a heat flux potential and replaces temperature as the dependent variable for problems of heat diffusion in media with variable coefficients. Examples are given in which the heat flux at the stagnation region of blunt hypersonic bodies is expressed in terms of this potential.

  13. Evolution of density profiles for reaction-diffusion processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ondarza-Rovira, R.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to study the reaction diffusion equations for the concentration of one species in one spatial dimension. Nonlinear diffusion equations paly an important role in several fields: Physics, Kinetic Chemistry, Poblational Biology, Neurophysics, etc. The study of the behavior of solutions, with nonlinear diffusion coefficient, and monomial creation and annihilation terms, is considered. It is found, that when the exponent of the annihilation term is smaller than the one of the creation term, unstable equilibrium solutions may exist, for which solutions above it explode in finite time, but solutions below it decay exponentially. By means of the reduction to quadratures technique, it is found that is possible to obtain travelling wave solution in those cases when the annihilation term is greater than the creation term. This method of solution always permits to know the propagation velocity of the front, even if the concentration cannot be written in closed form. The portraits of the solutions in phase space show the existence of solutions which velocities may be smaller or greater than the ones found analytically. Linear and nonlinear diffusion equations, differ significantly in that the former are of change of solutions are considered. This is reminiscent of the fact that linear diffusion yields infinite propagation speed, even though the speed of the front is finite. When the strength of the annihilation term increases, as compared with that of the creation term, arbitrary initial conditions (studied numerically) relax to stable platforms that move indefinitly with constant speed. (Author)

  14. Variational methods applied to problems of diffusion and reaction

    CERN Document Server

    Strieder, William

    1973-01-01

    This monograph is an account of some problems involving diffusion or diffusion with simultaneous reaction that can be illuminated by the use of variational principles. It was written during a period that included sabbatical leaves of one of us (W. S. ) at the University of Minnesota and the other (R. A. ) at the University of Cambridge and we are grateful to the Petroleum Research Fund for helping to support the former and the Guggenheim Foundation for making possible the latter. We would also like to thank Stephen Prager for getting us together in the first place and for showing how interesting and useful these methods can be. We have also benefitted from correspondence with Dr. A. M. Arthurs of the University of York and from the counsel of Dr. B. D. Coleman the general editor of this series. Table of Contents Chapter 1. Introduction and Preliminaries . 1. 1. General Survey 1 1. 2. Phenomenological Descriptions of Diffusion and Reaction 2 1. 3. Correlation Functions for Random Suspensions 4 1. 4. Mean Free ...

  15. Similarity solutions of reaction–diffusion equation with space- and time-dependent diffusion and reaction terms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, C.-L. [Department of Physics, Tamkang University, Tamsui 25137, Taiwan (China); Lee, C.-C., E-mail: chieh.no27@gmail.com [Center of General Education, Aletheia University, Tamsui 25103, Taiwan (China)

    2016-01-15

    We consider solvability of the generalized reaction–diffusion equation with both space- and time-dependent diffusion and reaction terms by means of the similarity method. By introducing the similarity variable, the reaction–diffusion equation is reduced to an ordinary differential equation. Matching the resulting ordinary differential equation with known exactly solvable equations, one can obtain corresponding exactly solvable reaction–diffusion systems. Several representative examples of exactly solvable reaction–diffusion equations are presented.

  16. A fractional reaction-diffusion description of supply and demand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzaquen, Michael; Bouchaud, Jean-Philippe

    2018-02-01

    We suggest that the broad distribution of time scales in financial markets could be a crucial ingredient to reproduce realistic price dynamics in stylised Agent-Based Models. We propose a fractional reaction-diffusion model for the dynamics of latent liquidity in financial markets, where agents are very heterogeneous in terms of their characteristic frequencies. Several features of our model are amenable to an exact analytical treatment. We find in particular that the impact is a concave function of the transacted volume (aka the "square-root impact law"), as in the normal diffusion limit. However, the impact kernel decays as t-β with β = 1/2 in the diffusive case, which is inconsistent with market efficiency. In the sub-diffusive case the decay exponent β takes any value in [0, 1/2], and can be tuned to match the empirical value β ≈ 1/4. Numerical simulations confirm our theoretical results. Several extensions of the model are suggested. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Continuous Time Random Walk Still Trendy: Fifty-year History, Current State and Outlook", edited by Ryszard Kutner and Jaume Masoliver.

  17. Reaction-diffusion controlled growth of complex structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noorduin, Willem; Mahadevan, L.; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2013-03-01

    Understanding how the emergence of complex forms and shapes in biominerals came about is both of fundamental and practical interest. Although biomineralization processes and organization strategies to give higher order architectures have been studied extensively, synthetic approaches to mimic these self-assembled structures are highly complex and have been difficult to emulate, let alone replicate. The emergence of solution patterns has been found in reaction-diffusion systems such as Turing patterns and the BZ reaction. Intrigued by this spontaneous formation of complexity we explored if similar processes can lead to patterns in the solid state. We here identify a reaction-diffusion system in which the shape of the solidified products is a direct readout of the environmental conditions. Based on insights in the underlying mechanism, we developed a toolbox of engineering strategies to deterministically sculpt patterns and shapes, and combine different morphologies to create a landscape of hierarchical multi scale-complex tectonic architectures with unprecedented levels of complexity. These findings may hold profound implications for understanding, mimicking and ultimately expanding upon nature's morphogenesis strategies, allowing the synthesis of advanced highly complex microscale materials and devices. WLN acknowledges the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research for financial support

  18. Traveling wavefront solutions to nonlinear reaction-diffusion-convection equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indekeu, Joseph O; Smets, Ruben

    2017-01-01

    Physically motivated modified Fisher equations are studied in which nonlinear convection and nonlinear diffusion is allowed for besides the usual growth and spread of a population. It is pointed out that in a large variety of cases separable functions in the form of exponentially decaying sharp wavefronts solve the differential equation exactly provided a co-moving point source or sink is active at the wavefront. The velocity dispersion and front steepness may differ from those of some previously studied exact smooth traveling wave solutions. For an extension of the reaction-diffusion-convection equation, featuring a memory effect in the form of a maturity delay for growth and spread, also smooth exact wavefront solutions are obtained. The stability of the solutions is verified analytically and numerically. (paper)

  19. Traveling wavefront solutions to nonlinear reaction-diffusion-convection equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indekeu, Joseph O.; Smets, Ruben

    2017-08-01

    Physically motivated modified Fisher equations are studied in which nonlinear convection and nonlinear diffusion is allowed for besides the usual growth and spread of a population. It is pointed out that in a large variety of cases separable functions in the form of exponentially decaying sharp wavefronts solve the differential equation exactly provided a co-moving point source or sink is active at the wavefront. The velocity dispersion and front steepness may differ from those of some previously studied exact smooth traveling wave solutions. For an extension of the reaction-diffusion-convection equation, featuring a memory effect in the form of a maturity delay for growth and spread, also smooth exact wavefront solutions are obtained. The stability of the solutions is verified analytically and numerically.

  20. Pattern dynamics of the reaction-diffusion immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Qianqian; Shen, Jianwei; Wang, Zhijie

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we will investigate the effect of diffusion, which is ubiquitous in nature, on the immune system using a reaction-diffusion model in order to understand the dynamical behavior of complex patterns and control the dynamics of different patterns. Through control theory and linear stability analysis of local equilibrium, we obtain the optimal condition under which the system loses stability and a Turing pattern occurs. By combining mathematical analysis and numerical simulation, we show the possible patterns and how these patterns evolve. In addition, we establish a bridge between the complex patterns and the biological mechanism using the results from a previous study in Nature Cell Biology. The results in this paper can help us better understand the biological significance of the immune system.

  1. Instability induced by cross-diffusion in reaction-diffusion systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tian, Canrong; Lin, Zhigui; Pedersen, Michael

    2010-01-01

    In this paper the instability of the uniform equilibrium of a general strongly coupled reaction–diffusion is discussed. In unbounded domain and bounded domain the sufficient conditions for the instability are obtained respectively. The conclusion is applied to the ecosystem, it is shown that cros...... can induce the instability of an equilibrium which is stable for the kinetic system and for the self-diffusion–reaction system.......In this paper the instability of the uniform equilibrium of a general strongly coupled reaction–diffusion is discussed. In unbounded domain and bounded domain the sufficient conditions for the instability are obtained respectively. The conclusion is applied to the ecosystem, it is shown that cross-diffusion...

  2. Solid - solid and solid - liquid phase transitions of iron and iron alloys under laser shock compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmand, M.; Krygier, A.; Appel, K.; Galtier, E.; Hartley, N.; Konopkova, Z.; Lee, H. J.; McBride, E. E.; Miyanishi, K.; Nagler, B.; Nemausat, R.; Vinci, T.; Zhu, D.; Ozaki, N.; Fiquet, G.

    2017-12-01

    An accurate knowledge of the properties of iron and iron alloys at high pressures and temperatures is crucial for understanding and modelling planetary interiors. While Earth-size and Super-Earth Exoplanets are being discovered in increasingly large numbers, access to detailed information on liquid properties, melting curves and even solid phases of iron and iron at the pressures and temperatures of their interiors is still strongly limited. In this context, XFEL sources coupled with high-energy lasers afford unique opportunities to measure microscopic structural properties at far extreme conditions. Also the achievable time resolution allows the shock history and phase transition mechanisms to be followed during laser compression, improving our understanding of the high pressure and high strain experiments. Here we present recent studies devoted to investigate the solid-solid and solid-liquid transition in laser-shocked iron and iron alloys (Fe-Si, Fe-C and Fe-O alloys) using X-ray diffraction and X-ray diffuse scattering. Experiment were performed at the MEC end-station of the LCLS facility at SLAC (USA). Detection of the diffuse scattering allowed the identification of the first liquid peak position along the Hugoniot, up to 4 Mbar. The time resolution shows ultrafast (between several tens and several hundreds of picoseconds) solid-solid and solid-liquid phase transitions. Future developments at XFEL facilities will enable detailed studies of the solid and liquid structures of iron and iron alloys as well as out-of-Hugoniot studies.

  3. Reaction diffusion and solid state chemical kinetics handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Dybkov, V I

    2010-01-01

    This monograph deals with a physico-chemical approach to the problem of the solid-state growth of chemical compound layers and reaction-diffusion in binary heterogeneous systems formed by two solids; as well as a solid with a liquid or a gas. It is explained why the number of compound layers growing at the interface between the original phases is usually much lower than the number of chemical compounds in the phase diagram of a given binary system. For example, of the eight intermetallic compounds which exist in the aluminium-zirconium binary system, only ZrAl3 was found to grow as a separate

  4. Global dynamics of a reaction-diffusion system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuncheng You

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available In this work the existence of a global attractor for the semiflow of weak solutions of a two-cell Brusselator system is proved. The method of grouping estimation is exploited to deal with the challenge in proving the absorbing property and the asymptotic compactness of this type of coupled reaction-diffusion systems with cubic autocatalytic nonlinearity and linear coupling. It is proved that the Hausdorff dimension and the fractal dimension of the global attractor are finite. Moreover, the existence of an exponential attractor for this solution semiflow is shown.

  5. On the solutions of fractional reaction-diffusion equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagdev Singh

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we obtain the solution of a fractional reaction-diffusion equation associated with the generalized Riemann-Liouville fractional derivative as the time derivative and Riesz-Feller fractional derivative as the space-derivative. The results are derived by the application of the Laplace and Fourier transforms in compact and elegant form in terms of Mittag-Leffler function and H-function. The results obtained here are of general nature and include the results investigated earlier by many authors.

  6. Remodelling of cellular excitation (reaction) and intercellular coupling (diffusion) by chronic atrial fibrillation represented by a reaction-diffusion system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Henggui; Garratt, Clifford J.; Kharche, Sanjay; Holden, Arun V.

    2009-06-01

    Human atrial tissue is an excitable system, in which myocytes are excitable elements, and cell-to-cell electrotonic interactions are via diffusive interactions of cell membrane potentials. We developed a family of excitable system models for human atrium at cellular, tissue and anatomical levels for both normal and chronic atrial fibrillation (AF) conditions. The effects of AF-induced remodelling of cell membrane ionic channels (reaction kinetics) and intercellular gap junctional coupling (diffusion) on atrial excitability, conduction of excitation waves and dynamics of re-entrant excitation waves are quantified. Both ionic channel and gap junctional coupling remodelling have rate dependent effects on atrial propagation. Membrane channel conductance remodelling allows the propagation of activity at higher rates than those sustained in normal tissue or in tissue with gap junctional remodelling alone. Membrane channel conductance remodelling is essential for the propagation of activity at rates higher than 300/min as seen in AF. Spatially heterogeneous gap junction coupling remodelling increased the risk of conduction block, an essential factor for the genesis of re-entry. In 2D and 3D anatomical models, the dynamical behaviours of re-entrant excitation waves are also altered by membrane channel modelling. This study provides insights to understand the pro-arrhythmic effects of AF-induced reaction and diffusion remodelling in atrial tissue.

  7. Solid-solid and gas-solid interactions induced during high-energy milling to produce PbTe nanopowders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rojas-Chavez, H., E-mail: rojas_hugo@ittlahuac2.edu.mx [Instituto Tecnologico de Tlahuac - II (Mexico); Reyes-Carmona, F. [Facultad de Quimica - UNAM (Mexico); Garibay-Febles, V. [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Laboratorio de Microscopia Electronica de Ultra Alta Resolucion (Mexico); Jaramillo-Vigueras, D. [Centro de Investigacion e Innovacion Tecnologica - IPN (Mexico)

    2013-05-15

    Transformations from precursors to nanoparticles by high-energy milling are promoted by two major driving forces, namely physical and/or chemical. While the former has been difficult to trace since stress, strain and recovery may occur almost simultaneously during milling, the latter has been sequentially followed as an evolution from precursors to intermediate phases and thereof to high purity nanocrystals. The specific objective of this work is to discern how solid-solid and partially solid-gas reactions manifest themselves correspondingly as a short-range diffusion through an interface or how vapor species, as a subliming phenomenon, grows as a different phase on an active local surface. These series of changes were traced by sub-cooling the as-milled powders extracted during a milling cycle. Through this experimental technique, samples were electron microscopically analyzed and where it was required, selected area electron diffraction images were obtained. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy results, unambiguously, confirm that nanocrystals in the last stage show a cubic morphology which average size distributions are around 17 nm.

  8. Parabolic equations in biology growth, reaction, movement and diffusion

    CERN Document Server

    Perthame, Benoît

    2015-01-01

    This book presents several fundamental questions in mathematical biology such as Turing instability, pattern formation, reaction-diffusion systems, invasion waves and Fokker-Planck equations. These are classical modeling tools for mathematical biology with applications to ecology and population dynamics, the neurosciences, enzymatic reactions, chemotaxis, invasion waves etc. The book presents these aspects from a mathematical perspective, with the aim of identifying those qualitative properties of the models that are relevant for biological applications. To do so, it uncovers the mechanisms at work behind Turing instability, pattern formation and invasion waves. This involves several mathematical tools, such as stability and instability analysis, blow-up in finite time, asymptotic methods and relative entropy properties. Given the content presented, the book is well suited as a textbook for master-level coursework.

  9. Reaction-diffusion modeling of hydrogen in beryllium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wensing, Mirko; Matveev, Dmitry; Linsmeier, Christian [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Institut fuer Energie- und Klimaforschung - Plasmaphysik (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Beryllium will be used as first-wall material for the future fusion reactor ITER as well as in the breeding blanket of DEMO. In both cases it is important to understand the mechanisms of hydrogen retention in beryllium. In earlier experiments with beryllium low-energy binding states of hydrogen were observed by thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) which are not yet well understood. Two candidates for these states are considered: beryllium-hydride phases within the bulk and surface effects. The retention of deuterium in beryllium is studied by a reaction rate approach using a coupled reaction diffusion system (CRDS)-model relying on ab initio data from density functional theory calculations (DFT). In this contribution we try to assess the influence of surface recombination.

  10. Dynamic phase transition in diffusion-limited reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tauber, U.C.

    2002-01-01

    Many non-equilibrium systems display dynamic phase transitions from active to absorbing states, where fluctuations cease entirely. Based on a field theory representation of the master equation, the critical behavior can be analyzed by means of the renormalization group. The resulting universality classes for single-species systems are reviewed here. Generically, the critical exponents are those of directed percolation (Reggeon field theory), with critical dimension d c = 4. Yet local particle number parity conservation in even-offspring branching and annihilating random walks implies an inactive phase (emerging below d c = 4/3) that is characterized by the power laws of the pair annihilation reaction, and leads to different critical exponents at the transition. For local processes without memory, the pair contact process with diffusion represents the only other non-trivial universality class. The consistent treatment of restricted site occupations and quenched random reaction rates are important open issues (Author)

  11. Rethinking pattern formation in reaction-diffusion systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halatek, J.; Frey, E.

    2018-05-01

    The present theoretical framework for the analysis of pattern formation in complex systems is mostly limited to the vicinity of fixed (global) equilibria. Here we present a new theoretical approach to characterize dynamical states arbitrarily far from (global) equilibrium. We show that reaction-diffusion systems that are driven by locally mass-conserving interactions can be understood in terms of local equilibria of diffusively coupled compartments. Diffusive coupling generically induces lateral redistribution of the globally conserved quantities, and the variable local amounts of these quantities determine the local equilibria in each compartment. We find that, even far from global equilibrium, the system is well characterized by its moving local equilibria. We apply this framework to in vitro Min protein pattern formation, a paradigmatic model for biological pattern formation. Within our framework we can predict and explain transitions between chemical turbulence and order arbitrarily far from global equilibrium. Our results reveal conceptually new principles of self-organized pattern formation that may well govern diverse dynamical systems.

  12. A discrete model to study reaction-diffusion-mechanics systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weise, Louis D; Nash, Martyn P; Panfilov, Alexander V

    2011-01-01

    This article introduces a discrete reaction-diffusion-mechanics (dRDM) model to study the effects of deformation on reaction-diffusion (RD) processes. The dRDM framework employs a FitzHugh-Nagumo type RD model coupled to a mass-lattice model, that undergoes finite deformations. The dRDM model describes a material whose elastic properties are described by a generalized Hooke's law for finite deformations (Seth material). Numerically, the dRDM approach combines a finite difference approach for the RD equations with a Verlet integration scheme for the equations of the mass-lattice system. Using this framework results were reproduced on self-organized pacemaking activity that have been previously found with a continuous RD mechanics model. Mechanisms that determine the period of pacemakers and its dependency on the medium size are identified. Finally it is shown how the drift direction of pacemakers in RDM systems is related to the spatial distribution of deformation and curvature effects.

  13. A discrete model to study reaction-diffusion-mechanics systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis D Weise

    Full Text Available This article introduces a discrete reaction-diffusion-mechanics (dRDM model to study the effects of deformation on reaction-diffusion (RD processes. The dRDM framework employs a FitzHugh-Nagumo type RD model coupled to a mass-lattice model, that undergoes finite deformations. The dRDM model describes a material whose elastic properties are described by a generalized Hooke's law for finite deformations (Seth material. Numerically, the dRDM approach combines a finite difference approach for the RD equations with a Verlet integration scheme for the equations of the mass-lattice system. Using this framework results were reproduced on self-organized pacemaking activity that have been previously found with a continuous RD mechanics model. Mechanisms that determine the period of pacemakers and its dependency on the medium size are identified. Finally it is shown how the drift direction of pacemakers in RDM systems is related to the spatial distribution of deformation and curvature effects.

  14. Cross-diffusional effect in a telegraph reaction diffusion Lotka-Volterra two competitive system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdusalam, H.A; Fahmy, E.S.

    2003-01-01

    It is known now that, telegraph equation is more suitable than ordinary diffusion equation in modelling reaction diffusion in several branches of sciences. Telegraph reaction diffusion Lotka-Volterra two competitive system is considered. We observed that this system can give rise to diffusive instability only in the presence of cross-diffusion. Local and global stability analysis in the cross-diffusional effect are studied by considering suitable Lyapunov functional

  15. Flexible single molecule simulation of reaction-diffusion processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hellander, Stefan; Loetstedt, Per

    2011-01-01

    An algorithm is developed for simulation of the motion and reactions of single molecules at a microscopic level. The molecules diffuse in a solvent and react with each other or a polymer and molecules can dissociate. Such simulations are of interest e.g. in molecular biology. The algorithm is similar to the Green's function reaction dynamics (GFRD) algorithm by van Zon and ten Wolde where longer time steps can be taken by computing the probability density functions (PDFs) and then sample from the distribution functions. Our computation of the PDFs is much less complicated than GFRD and more flexible. The solution of the partial differential equation for the PDF is split into two steps to simplify the calculations. The sampling is without splitting error in two of the coordinate directions for a pair of molecules and a molecule-polymer interaction and is approximate in the third direction. The PDF is obtained either from an analytical solution or a numerical discretization. The errors due to the operator splitting, the partitioning of the system, and the numerical approximations are analyzed. The method is applied to three different systems involving up to four reactions. Comparisons with other mesoscopic and macroscopic models show excellent agreement.

  16. Multiscale Reaction-Diffusion Algorithms: PDE-Assisted Brownian Dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Franz, Benjamin

    2013-06-19

    Two algorithms that combine Brownian dynami cs (BD) simulations with mean-field partial differential equations (PDEs) are presented. This PDE-assisted Brownian dynamics (PBD) methodology provides exact particle tracking data in parts of the domain, whilst making use of a mean-field reaction-diffusion PDE description elsewhere. The first PBD algorithm couples BD simulations with PDEs by randomly creating new particles close to the interface, which partitions the domain, and by reincorporating particles into the continuum PDE-description when they cross the interface. The second PBD algorithm introduces an overlap region, where both descriptions exist in parallel. It is shown that the overlap region is required to accurately compute variances using PBD simulations. Advantages of both PBD approaches are discussed and illustrative numerical examples are presented. © 2013 Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics.

  17. Guiding brine shrimp through mazes by solving reaction diffusion equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singal, Krishma; Fenton, Flavio

    Excitable systems driven by reaction diffusion equations have been shown to not only find solutions to mazes but to also to find the shortest path between the beginning and the end of the maze. In this talk we describe how we can use the Fitzhugh-Nagumo model, a generic model for excitable media, to solve a maze by varying the basin of attraction of its two fixed points. We demonstrate how two dimensional mazes are solved numerically using a Java Applet and then accelerated to run in real time by using graphic processors (GPUs). An application of this work is shown by guiding phototactic brine shrimp through a maze solved by the algorithm. Once the path is obtained, an Arduino directs the shrimp through the maze using lights from LEDs placed at the floor of the Maze. This method running in real time could be eventually used for guiding robots and cars through traffic.

  18. Pattern formation in three-dimensional reaction-diffusion systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, T. K.; Knobloch, E.

    1999-08-01

    Existing group theoretic analysis of pattern formation in three dimensions [T.K. Callahan, E. Knobloch, Symmetry-breaking bifurcations on cubic lattices, Nonlinearity 10 (1997) 1179-1216] is used to make specific predictions about the formation of three-dimensional patterns in two models of the Turing instability, the Brusselator model and the Lengyel-Epstein model. Spatially periodic patterns having the periodicity of the simple cubic (SC), face-centered cubic (FCC) or body-centered cubic (BCC) lattices are considered. An efficient center manifold reduction is described and used to identify parameter regimes permitting stable lamellæ, SC, FCC, double-diamond, hexagonal prism, BCC and BCCI states. Both models possess a special wavenumber k* at which the normal form coefficients take on fixed model-independent ratios and both are described by identical bifurcation diagrams. This property is generic for two-species chemical reaction-diffusion models with a single activator and inhibitor.

  19. Diffusion-controlled reactions modeling in Geant4-DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karamitros, M., E-mail: matkara@gmail.com [CNRS, IN2P3, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); CNRS, INCIA, UMR 5287, F-33400 Talence (France); Luan, S. [University of New Mexico, Department of Computer Science, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bernal, M.A. [Instituto de Física Gleb Wataghin, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil); Allison, J. [Geant4 Associates International Ltd (United Kingdom); Baldacchino, G. [CEA Saclay, IRAMIS, LIDYL, Radiation Physical Chemistry Group, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France); CNRS, UMR3299, SIS2M, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France); Davidkova, M. [Nuclear Physics Institute of the ASCR, Prague (Czech Republic); Francis, Z. [Saint Joseph University, Faculty of Sciences, Department of Physics, Mkalles, Beirut (Lebanon); Friedland, W. [Helmholtz Zentrum München, German Research Center for Environmental Health, Institute of Radiation Protection, Ingolstädter Landstr. 1, 85764 Neuherberg (Germany); Ivantchenko, V. [Ecoanalytica, 119899 Moscow (Russian Federation); Geant4 Associates International Ltd (United Kingdom); Ivantchenko, A. [Geant4 Associates International Ltd (United Kingdom); Mantero, A. [SwHaRD s.r.l., via Buccari 9, 16153 Genova (Italy); Nieminem, P.; Santin, G. [ESA-ESTEC, 2200 AG Noordwijk (Netherlands); Tran, H.N. [Division of Nuclear Physics and Faculty of Applied Sciences, Ton Duc Thang University, Tan Phong Ward, District 7, Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam); Stepan, V. [CNRS, IN2P3, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); Nuclear Physics Institute of the ASCR, Prague (Czech Republic); Incerti, S., E-mail: incerti@cenbg.in2p3.fr [CNRS, IN2P3, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France)

    2014-10-01

    Context Under irradiation, a biological system undergoes a cascade of chemical reactions that can lead to an alteration of its normal operation. There are different types of radiation and many competing reactions. As a result the kinetics of chemical species is extremely complex. The simulation becomes then a powerful tool which, by describing the basic principles of chemical reactions, can reveal the dynamics of the macroscopic system. To understand the dynamics of biological systems under radiation, since the 80s there have been on-going efforts carried out by several research groups to establish a mechanistic model that consists in describing all the physical, chemical and biological phenomena following the irradiation of single cells. This approach is generally divided into a succession of stages that follow each other in time: (1) the physical stage, where the ionizing particles interact directly with the biological material; (2) the physico-chemical stage, where the targeted molecules release their energy by dissociating, creating new chemical species; (3) the chemical stage, where the new chemical species interact with each other or with the biomolecules; (4) the biological stage, where the repairing mechanisms of the cell come into play. This article focuses on the modeling of the chemical stage. Method This article presents a general method of speeding-up chemical reaction simulations in fluids based on the Smoluchowski equation and Monte-Carlo methods, where all molecules are explicitly simulated and the solvent is treated as a continuum. The model describes diffusion-controlled reactions. This method has been implemented in Geant4-DNA. The keys to the new algorithm include: (1) the combination of a method to compute time steps dynamically with a Brownian bridge process to account for chemical reactions, which avoids costly fixed time step simulations; (2) a k–d tree data structure for quickly locating, for a given molecule, its closest reactants. The

  20. Isostructural solid-solid transition of (colloidal) simple fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tejero, C.F.; Daanoun, A.; Lakkerkerker, H.N.W.; Baus, M.

    1995-01-01

    A variational approach based on the Gibbs-Bogoliubov inequality is used in order to evaluate the free energy of simple fluids described by a double-Yukawa pair potential. A hard-sphere reference fluid is used to describe the fluid phases, and an Einstein reference crystal to describe the solid phases. Apart from the usual type of phase diagram, typical of atomic simple fluids with long-ranged attractions, we find two types of phase diagrams, specific to colloidal systems with intermediate and short-ranged attractions. One of the latter phase diagrams exhibits an isostructural solid-solid transition, which has not yet been observed experimentally

  1. 1D to 3D diffusion-reaction kinetics of defects in crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trinkaus, H.; Heinisch, H.L.; Barashev, A.V.

    2002-01-01

    Microstructural features evolving in crystalline solids from diffusion-reaction kinetics of mobile components depend crucially on the dimension of the underlying diffusion process which is commonly assumed to be three-dimensional (3D). In metals, irradiation-induced displacement cascades produce...... clusters of self-interstitials performing 1D diffusion. Changes between equivalent 1D diffusion paths and transversal diffusion result in diffusion-reaction kinetics between one and three dimensions. An analytical approach suggests a single-variable function (master curve) interpolating between the 1D...

  2. Growth and solid/solid transformation in a Ni-Si eutectic alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutra, A.T. [Department of Materials Engineering, State University of Campinas, P.O. Box 6122, Campinas 13083-970, SP (Brazil); Ferrandini, P.L. [Department of Materials Engineering, State University of Campinas, P.O. Box 6122, Campinas 13083-970, SP (Brazil); Costa, C.A.R. [Institute of Chemistry, State University of Campinas, P.O. Box 6154, Campinas 13083-970, SP (Brazil); Goncalves, M.C. [Institute of Chemistry, State University of Campinas, P.O. Box 6154, Campinas 13083-970, SP (Brazil); Caram, R. [Department of Materials Engineering, State University of Campinas, P.O. Box 6122, Campinas 13083-970, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: rcaram@fem.unicamp.br

    2005-08-16

    High temperature structural components demand materials that maintain satisfactory mechanical and chemical characteristics. These needs may be met by applying some eutectic alloys, including Ni-Ni{sub 3}Si. This paper deals with the directional solidification of Ni-Ni{sub 3}Si grown under several growth rates. The analysis of the eutectic microstructure was carried out using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). The results obtained provided a precise analysis of the Ni{sub 3}Si phase. It could be noticed that the solid/solid transformations by which Ni{sub 3}Si phase goes through, deeply affects its morphology. In addition, quantitative information on the eutectic structure was obtained. It was confirmed that the growth rate variation deeply affects the final microstructure as it influences the efficiency of atomic diffusion along the solid/liquid interface.

  3. Growth and solid/solid transformation in a Ni-Si eutectic alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutra, A.T.; Ferrandini, P.L.; Costa, C.A.R.; Goncalves, M.C.; Caram, R.

    2005-01-01

    High temperature structural components demand materials that maintain satisfactory mechanical and chemical characteristics. These needs may be met by applying some eutectic alloys, including Ni-Ni 3 Si. This paper deals with the directional solidification of Ni-Ni 3 Si grown under several growth rates. The analysis of the eutectic microstructure was carried out using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). The results obtained provided a precise analysis of the Ni 3 Si phase. It could be noticed that the solid/solid transformations by which Ni 3 Si phase goes through, deeply affects its morphology. In addition, quantitative information on the eutectic structure was obtained. It was confirmed that the growth rate variation deeply affects the final microstructure as it influences the efficiency of atomic diffusion along the solid/liquid interface

  4. Reaction Diffusion Voronoi Diagrams: From Sensors Data to Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Vázquez-Otero

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a new method to solve computational problems using reaction diffusion (RD systems is presented. The novelty relies on the use of a model configuration that tailors its spatiotemporal dynamics to develop Voronoi diagrams (VD as a part of the system’s natural evolution. The proposed framework is deployed in a solution of related robotic problems, where the generalized VD are used to identify topological places in a grid map of the environment that is created from sensor measurements. The ability of the RD-based computation to integrate external information, like a grid map representing the environment in the model computational grid, permits a direct integration of sensor data into the model dynamics. The experimental results indicate that this method exhibits significantly less sensitivity to noisy data than the standard algorithms for determining VD in a grid. In addition, previous drawbacks of the computational algorithms based on RD models, like the generation of volatile solutions by means of excitable waves, are now overcome by final stable states.

  5. Stochastic flows, reaction-diffusion processes, and morphogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozak, J.J.; Hatlee, M.D.; Musho, M.K.; Politowicz, P.A.; Walsh, C.A.

    1983-01-01

    Recently, an exact procedure has been introduced [C. A. Walsh and J. J. Kozak, Phys. Rev. Lett.. 47: 1500 (1981)] for calculating the expected walk length for a walker undergoing random displacements on a finite or infinite (periodic) d-dimensional lattice with traps (reactive sites). The method (which is based on a classification of the symmetry of the sites surrounding the central deep trap and a coding of the fate of the random walker as it encounters a site of given symmetry) is applied here to several problems in lattice statistics for each of which exact results are presented. First, we assess the importance of lattice geometry in influencing the efficiency of reaction-diffusion processs in simple and multiple trap systems by reporting values of for square (cubic) versus hexagonal lattices in d = 2,3. We then show how the method may be applied to variable-step (distance-dependent) walks for a single walker on a given lattice and also demonstrate the calculation of the expected walk length for the case of multiple walkers. Finally, we make contact with recent discussions of ''mixing'' by showing that the degree of chaos associated with flows in certain lattice-systems can be calibrated by monitoring the lattice walks induced by the Poincare map of a certain parabolic function

  6. Large-time behavior of solutions to a reaction-diffusion system with distributed microstructure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muntean, A.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract We study the large-time behavior of a class of reaction-diffusion systems with constant distributed microstructure arising when modeling diffusion and reaction in structured porous media. The main result of this Note is the following: As t ¿ 8 the macroscopic concentration vanishes, while

  7. Estimation and prediction of convection-diffusion-reaction systems from point measurement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, D.

    2008-01-01

    Different procedures with respect to estimation and prediction of systems characterized by convection, diffusion and reactions on the basis of point measurement data, have been studied. Two applications of these convection-diffusion-reaction (CDR) systems have been used as a case study of the

  8. Study on monostable and bistable reaction-diffusion equations by iteration of travelling wave maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Taishan; Chen, Yuming

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, based on the iterative properties of travelling wave maps, we develop a new method to obtain spreading speeds and asymptotic propagation for monostable and bistable reaction-diffusion equations. Precisely, for Dirichlet problems of monostable reaction-diffusion equations on the half line, by making links between travelling wave maps and integral operators associated with the Dirichlet diffusion kernel (the latter is NOT invariant under translation), we obtain some iteration properties of the Dirichlet diffusion and some a priori estimates on nontrivial solutions of Dirichlet problems under travelling wave transformation. We then provide the asymptotic behavior of nontrivial solutions in the space-time region for Dirichlet problems. These enable us to develop a unified method to obtain results on heterogeneous steady states, travelling waves, spreading speeds, and asymptotic spreading behavior for Dirichlet problem of monostable reaction-diffusion equations on R+ as well as of monostable/bistable reaction-diffusion equations on R.

  9. Synchronization criteria for generalized reaction-diffusion neural networks via periodically intermittent control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Qintao; Lv, Tianshi; Fu, Zhenhua

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, the synchronization problem for a class of generalized neural networks with time-varying delays and reaction-diffusion terms is investigated concerning Neumann boundary conditions in terms of p-norm. The proposed generalized neural networks model includes reaction-diffusion local field neural networks and reaction-diffusion static neural networks as its special cases. By establishing a new inequality, some simple and useful conditions are obtained analytically to guarantee the global exponential synchronization of the addressed neural networks under the periodically intermittent control. According to the theoretical results, the influences of diffusion coefficients, diffusion space, and control rate on synchronization are analyzed. Finally, the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed methods are shown by simulation examples, and by choosing different diffusion coefficients, diffusion spaces, and control rates, different controlled synchronization states can be obtained.

  10. Heterogeneity induces spatiotemporal oscillations in reaction-diffusion systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Andrew L.; Klika, Václav; Woolley, Thomas E.; Gaffney, Eamonn A.

    2018-05-01

    We report on an instability arising in activator-inhibitor reaction-diffusion (RD) systems with a simple spatial heterogeneity. This instability gives rise to periodic creation, translation, and destruction of spike solutions that are commonly formed due to Turing instabilities. While this behavior is oscillatory in nature, it occurs purely within the Turing space such that no region of the domain would give rise to a Hopf bifurcation for the homogeneous equilibrium. We use the shadow limit of the Gierer-Meinhardt system to show that the speed of spike movement can be predicted from well-known asymptotic theory, but that this theory is unable to explain the emergence of these spatiotemporal oscillations. Instead, we numerically explore this system and show that the oscillatory behavior is caused by the destabilization of a steady spike pattern due to the creation of a new spike arising from endogeneous activator production. We demonstrate that on the edge of this instability, the period of the oscillations goes to infinity, although it does not fit the profile of any well-known bifurcation of a limit cycle. We show that nearby stationary states are either Turing unstable or undergo saddle-node bifurcations near the onset of the oscillatory instability, suggesting that the periodic motion does not emerge from a local equilibrium. We demonstrate the robustness of this spatiotemporal oscillation by exploring small localized heterogeneity and showing that this behavior also occurs in the Schnakenberg RD model. Our results suggest that this phenomenon is ubiquitous in spatially heterogeneous RD systems, but that current tools, such as stability of spike solutions and shadow-limit asymptotics, do not elucidate understanding. This opens several avenues for further mathematical analysis and highlights difficulties in explaining how robust patterning emerges from Turing's mechanism in the presence of even small spatial heterogeneity.

  11. Trace diffusion of different nuclear reactions products in polycrystalline tantalum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beyer, G.J.; Fromm, W.D.; Novgorodov, A.F.

    1976-07-01

    Measurements of the lattice diffusion coefficients for carrier free isotopes of Hf, Lu, Yb, Tm, Tb, Gd, Eu, Ba, Cs, Y, Sr, Rb and As in polycrystalline tantalum were made over the temperature range 1700 Fsub(As)>Fsub(lanthanides)>Fsub(Sr)>Fsub(Ba)>Fsub(Hf)>Fsub(Rb)>Fsub(Cs). The data indicate, that the Arrhenius relation was obeyed over the entire temperature range. Within the lanthanide-group no differences in the diffusion velocities could be detected, this fact points to a diffusion mechanism of Me 3+ -ions of lanthanides, Me 2+ -ions of earth alkaline elements and Me + -ions of alkaline elements. (author)

  12. A numerical study of one-dimensional replicating patterns in reaction-diffusion systems with non-linear diffusion coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreri, J. C.; Carmen, A. del

    1998-01-01

    A numerical study of the dynamics of pattern evolution in reaction-diffusion systems is performed, although limited to one spatial dimension. The diffusion coefficients are nonlinear, based on powers of the scalar variables. The system keeps the dynamics of previous studies in the literature, but the presence of nonlinear diffusion generates a field of strong nonlinear interactions due to the presence of receding travelling waves. This field is limited by the plane of symmetry of the space domain and the last born outgoing travelling wave. These effects are discussed. (author). 10 refs., 7 figs

  13. Glider-based computing in reaction-diffusion hexagonal cellular automata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamatzky, Andrew; Wuensche, Andrew; De Lacy Costello, Benjamin

    2006-01-01

    A three-state hexagonal cellular automaton, discovered in [Wuensche A. Glider dynamics in 3-value hexagonal cellular automata: the beehive rule. Int J Unconvention Comput, in press], presents a conceptual discrete model of a reaction-diffusion system with inhibitor and activator reagents. The automaton model of reaction-diffusion exhibits mobile localized patterns (gliders) in its space-time dynamics. We show how to implement the basic computational operations with these mobile localizations, and thus demonstrate collision-based logical universality of the hexagonal reaction-diffusion cellular automaton

  14. Synchronization of Reaction-Diffusion Neural Networks With Dirichlet Boundary Conditions and Infinite Delays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Yin; Zhang, Hao; Zeng, Zhigang

    2017-10-01

    This paper is concerned with synchronization for a class of reaction-diffusion neural networks with Dirichlet boundary conditions and infinite discrete time-varying delays. By utilizing theories of partial differential equations, Green's formula, inequality techniques, and the concept of comparison, algebraic criteria are presented to guarantee master-slave synchronization of the underlying reaction-diffusion neural networks via a designed controller. Additionally, sufficient conditions on exponential synchronization of reaction-diffusion neural networks with finite time-varying delays are established. The proposed criteria herein enhance and generalize some published ones. Three numerical examples are presented to substantiate the validity and merits of the obtained theoretical results.

  15. Wong-Zakai approximations and attractors for stochastic reaction-diffusion equations on unbounded domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaohu; Lu, Kening; Wang, Bixiang

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we study the Wong-Zakai approximations given by a stationary process via the Wiener shift and their associated long term behavior of the stochastic reaction-diffusion equation driven by a white noise. We first prove the existence and uniqueness of tempered pullback attractors for the Wong-Zakai approximations of stochastic reaction-diffusion equation. Then, we show that the attractors of Wong-Zakai approximations converges to the attractor of the stochastic reaction-diffusion equation for both additive and multiplicative noise.

  16. Effective reaction rates in diffusion-limited phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymańska, Paulina; Kochańczyk, Marek; Miekisz, Jacek; Lipniacki, Tomasz

    2015-02-01

    We investigate the kinetics of the ubiquitous phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cycle on biological membranes by means of kinetic Monte Carlo simulations on the triangular lattice. We establish the dependence of effective macroscopic reaction rate coefficients as well as the steady-state phosphorylated substrate fraction on the diffusion coefficient and concentrations of opposing enzymes: kinases and phosphatases. In the limits of zero and infinite diffusion, the numerical results agree with analytical predictions; these two limits give the lower and the upper bound for the macroscopic rate coefficients, respectively. In the zero-diffusion limit, which is important in the analysis of dense systems, phosphorylation and dephosphorylation reactions can convert only these substrates which remain in contact with opposing enzymes. In the most studied regime of nonzero but small diffusion, a contribution linearly proportional to the diffusion coefficient appears in the reaction rate. In this regime, the presence of opposing enzymes creates inhomogeneities in the (de)phosphorylated substrate distributions: The spatial correlation function shows that enzymes are surrounded by clouds of converted substrates. This effect becomes important at low enzyme concentrations, substantially lowering effective reaction rates. Effective reaction rates decrease with decreasing diffusion and this dependence is more pronounced for the less-abundant enzyme. Consequently, the steady-state fraction of phosphorylated substrates can increase or decrease with diffusion, depending on relative concentrations of both enzymes. Additionally, steady states are controlled by molecular crowders which, mostly by lowering the effective diffusion of reactants, favor the more abundant enzyme.

  17. Stochastic modeling and simulation of reaction-diffusion system with Hill function dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Minghan; Li, Fei; Wang, Shuo; Cao, Young

    2017-03-14

    Stochastic simulation of reaction-diffusion systems presents great challenges for spatiotemporal biological modeling and simulation. One widely used framework for stochastic simulation of reaction-diffusion systems is reaction diffusion master equation (RDME). Previous studies have discovered that for the RDME, when discretization size approaches zero, reaction time for bimolecular reactions in high dimensional domains tends to infinity. In this paper, we demonstrate that in the 1D domain, highly nonlinear reaction dynamics given by Hill function may also have dramatic change when discretization size is smaller than a critical value. Moreover, we discuss methods to avoid this problem: smoothing over space, fixed length smoothing over space and a hybrid method. Our analysis reveals that the switch-like Hill dynamics reduces to a linear function of discretization size when the discretization size is small enough. The three proposed methods could correctly (under certain precision) simulate Hill function dynamics in the microscopic RDME system.

  18. On Medium Chemical Reaction in Diffusion-Based Molecular Communication: a Two-Way Relaying Example

    OpenAIRE

    Farahnak-Ghazani, Maryam; Aminian, Gholamali; Mirmohseni, Mahtab; Gohari, Amin; Nasiri-Kenari, Masoumeh

    2016-01-01

    Chemical reactions are a prominent feature of molecular communication (MC) systems, with no direct parallels in wireless communications. While chemical reactions may be used inside the transmitter nodes, receiver nodes or the communication medium, we focus on its utility in the medium in this paper. Such chemical reactions can be used to perform computation over the medium as molecules diffuse and react with each other (physical-layer computation). We propose the use of chemical reactions for...

  19. Solutes and cells - aspects of advection-diffusion-reaction phenomena in biochips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vedel, Søren

    2012-01-01

    the dependencies on density. This shows that the varied single-cell behavior including the overall modulations imposed by density arise as a natural consequence of pseudopod-driven motility in a social context. The final subproject concerns the combined effects of advection, diffusion and reaction of several......Cell’), and the overall title of the project is Solutes and cells — aspects of advection-diffusion-reaction phenomena in biochips. The work has consisted of several projects focusing on theory, and to some extend analysis of experimental data, with advection-diffusion-reaction phenomena of solutes as the recurring theme...... quantitatively interpret the proximal concentration of specific solutes, and integrate this to achieve biological functions. In three specific examples, the author and co-workers have investigated different aspects of the influence of advection, diffusion and reaction on solute distributions, as well...

  20. Global exponential stability of reaction-diffusion recurrent neural networks with time-varying delays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Jinling; Cao Jinde

    2003-01-01

    Employing general Halanay inequality, we analyze the global exponential stability of a class of reaction-diffusion recurrent neural networks with time-varying delays. Several new sufficient conditions are obtained to ensure existence, uniqueness and global exponential stability of the equilibrium point of delayed reaction-diffusion recurrent neural networks. The results extend and improve the earlier publications. In addition, an example is given to show the effectiveness of the obtained result

  1. A minimally-resolved immersed boundary model for reaction-diffusion problems

    OpenAIRE

    Pal Singh Bhalla, A; Griffith, BE; Patankar, NA; Donev, A

    2013-01-01

    We develop an immersed boundary approach to modeling reaction-diffusion processes in dispersions of reactive spherical particles, from the diffusion-limited to the reaction-limited setting. We represent each reactive particle with a minimally-resolved "blob" using many fewer degrees of freedom per particle than standard discretization approaches. More complicated or more highly resolved particle shapes can be built out of a collection of reactive blobs. We demonstrate numerically that the blo...

  2. Diffusion-controlled reactions modeling in Geant4-DNA

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Karamitros, M.; Luan, S.; Bernal, M. A.; Allison, J.; Baldacchino, G.; Davídková, Marie; Francis, Z.; Friedland, W.; Ivanchenko, A.; Ivanchenko, V.; Mantero, A.; Nieminen, P.; Santin, G.; Tran, H. N.; Stepan, V.; Incerti, S.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 274, OCT (2014), s. 841-882 ISSN 0021-9991 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : chemical kinetics simulation * radiation chemistry * Fokker-Planck equation * Smoluchowski diffusion equation * Brownian bridge * dynamical time steps * k-d tree * radiolysis * radiobiology * Geant4-DNA * Brownian dynamics Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.434, year: 2014

  3. Nonlinear reaction-diffusion systems conditional symmetry, exact solutions and their applications in biology

    CERN Document Server

    Cherniha, Roman

    2017-01-01

    This book presents several fundamental results in solving nonlinear reaction-diffusion equations and systems using symmetry-based methods. Reaction-diffusion systems are fundamental modeling tools for mathematical biology with applications to ecology, population dynamics, pattern formation, morphogenesis, enzymatic reactions and chemotaxis. The book discusses the properties of nonlinear reaction-diffusion systems, which are relevant for biological applications, from the symmetry point of view, providing rigorous definitions and constructive algorithms to search for conditional symmetry (a nontrivial generalization of the well-known Lie symmetry) of nonlinear reaction-diffusion systems. In order to present applications to population dynamics, it focuses mainly on two- and three-component diffusive Lotka-Volterra systems. While it is primarily a valuable guide for researchers working with reaction-diffusion systems  and those developing the theoretical aspects of conditional symmetry conception,...

  4. Stability Analysis of a Reaction-Diffusion System Modeling Atherogenesis

    KAUST Repository

    Ibragimov, Akif; Ritter, Laura; Walton, Jay R.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a linear, asymptotic stability analysis for a reaction-diffusionconvection system modeling atherogenesis, the initiation of atherosclerosis, as an inflammatory instability. Motivated by the disease paradigm articulated by Ross

  5. Modeling of the interplay between single-file diffusion and conversion reaction in mesoporous systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jing [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2013-01-11

    We analyze the spatiotemporal behavior of species concentrations in a diffusion-mediated conversion reaction which occurs at catalytic sites within linear pores of nanometer diameter. A strict single-file (no passing) constraint occurs in the diffusion within such narrow pores. Both transient and steady-state behavior is precisely characterized by kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of a spatially discrete lattice–gas model for this reaction–diffusion process considering various distributions of catalytic sites. Exact hierarchical master equations can also be developed for this model. Their analysis, after application of mean-field type truncation approximations, produces discrete reaction–diffusion type equations (mf-RDE). For slowly varying concentrations, we further develop coarse-grained continuum hydrodynamic reaction–diffusion equations (h-RDE) incorporating a precise treatment of single-file diffusion (SFD) in this multispecies system. Noting the shortcomings of mf-RDE and h-RDE, we then develop a generalized hydrodynamic (GH) formulation of appropriate gh-RDE which incorporates an unconventional description of chemical diffusion in mixed-component quasi-single-file systems based on a refined picture of tracer diffusion for finite-length pores. The gh-RDE elucidate the non-exponential decay of the steady-state reactant concentration into the pore and the non-mean-field scaling of the reactant penetration depth. Then an extended model of a catalytic conversion reaction within a functionalized nanoporous material is developed to assess the effect of varying the reaction product – pore interior interaction from attractive to repulsive. The analysis is performed utilizing the generalized hydrodynamic formulation of the reaction-diffusion equations which can reliably capture the complex interplay between reaction and restricted transport for both irreversible and reversible reactions.

  6. Existence and Asymptotic Stability of Periodic Solutions of the Reaction-Diffusion Equations in the Case of a Rapid Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nefedov, N. N.; Nikulin, E. I.

    2018-01-01

    A singularly perturbed periodic in time problem for a parabolic reaction-diffusion equation in a two-dimensional domain is studied. The case of existence of an internal transition layer under the conditions of balanced and unbalanced rapid reaction is considered. An asymptotic expansion of a solution is constructed. To justify the asymptotic expansion thus constructed, the asymptotic method of differential inequalities is used. The Lyapunov asymptotic stability of a periodic solution is investigated.

  7. Kinetics of diffusion-controlled and ballistically-controlled reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redner, S.

    1995-01-01

    The kinetics of diffusion-controlled two-species annihilation, A+B → O and single-species ballistically-controlled annihilation, A+A → O are investigated. For two-species annihilation, we describe the basic mechanism that leads to the formation of a coarsening mosaic of A- and B-domains. The implications of this picture on the distribution of reactants is discussed. For ballistic annihilation, dimensional analysis shows that the concentration and rms velocity decay as c∼t -α and v∼t -β , respectively, with α+β = 1 in any spatial dimension. Analysis of the Boltzmann equation for the evolution of the velocity distribution yields accurate predictions for the kinetics. New phenomena associated with discrete initial velocity distributions and with mixed ballistic and diffusive reactant motion are also discussed. (author)

  8. Accurate numerical simulation of reaction-diffusion processes for heavy oil recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Govind, P.A.; Srinivasan, S. [Society of Petroleum Engineers, Richardson, TX (United States)]|[Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States)

    2008-10-15

    This study evaluated a reaction-diffusion simulation tool designed to analyze the displacement of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) in a simultaneous injection of carbon dioxide and elemental sodium in a heavy oil reservoir. Sodium was used due to the exothermic reaction of sodium with in situ that occurs when heat is used to reduce oil viscosity. The process also results in the formation of sodium hydroxide that reduces interfacial tension at the bitumen interface. A commercial simulation tool was used to model the sodium transport mechanism to the reaction interface through diffusion as well as the reaction zone's subsequent displacement. The aim of the study was to verify if the in situ reaction was able to generate sufficient heat to reduce oil viscosity and improve the displacement of the heavy oil. The study also assessed the accuracy of the reaction front simulation tool, in which an alternate method was used to model the propagation front as a moving heat source. The sensitivity of the simulation results were then evaluated in relation to the diffusion coefficient in order to understand the scaling characteristics of the reaction-diffusion zone. A pore-scale simulation was then up-scaled to grid blocks. Results of the study showed that when sodium suspended in liquid CO{sub 2} is injected into reservoirs, it diffuses through the carrier phase and interacts with water. A random walk diffusion algorithm with reactive dissipation was implemented to more accurately characterize reaction and diffusion processes. It was concluded that the algorithm modelled physical dispersion while neglecting the effect of numerical dispersion. 10 refs., 3 tabs., 24 figs.

  9. Delay-induced wave instabilities in single-species reaction-diffusion systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Andereas; Wang, Jian; Radons, Günter

    2017-11-01

    The Turing (wave) instability is only possible in reaction-diffusion systems with more than one (two) components. Motivated by the fact that a time delay increases the dimension of a system, we investigate the presence of diffusion-driven instabilities in single-species reaction-diffusion systems with delay. The stability of arbitrary one-component systems with a single discrete delay, with distributed delay, or with a variable delay is systematically analyzed. We show that a wave instability can appear from an equilibrium of single-species reaction-diffusion systems with fluctuating or distributed delay, which is not possible in similar systems with constant discrete delay or without delay. More precisely, we show by basic analytic arguments and by numerical simulations that fast asymmetric delay fluctuations or asymmetrically distributed delays can lead to wave instabilities in these systems. Examples, for the resulting traveling waves are shown for a Fisher-KPP equation with distributed delay in the reaction term. In addition, we have studied diffusion-induced instabilities from homogeneous periodic orbits in the same systems with variable delay, where the homogeneous periodic orbits are attracting resonant periodic solutions of the system without diffusion, i.e., periodic orbits of the Hutchinson equation with time-varying delay. If diffusion is introduced, standing waves can emerge whose temporal period is equal to the period of the variable delay.

  10. Existence of global solutions to reaction-diffusion systems via a Lyapunov functional

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Said Kouachi

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to construct polynomial functionals (according to solutions of the coupled reaction-diffusion equations which give $L^{p}$-bounds for solutions. When the reaction terms are sufficiently regular, using the well known regularizing effect, we deduce the existence of global solutions. These functionals are obtained independently of work done by Malham and Xin [11].

  11. Concentration fluctuations in non-isothermal reaction-diffusion systems. II. The nonlinear case

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bedeaux, D.; Ortiz de Zárate, J.M.; Pagonabarraga, I.; Sengers, J.V.; Kjelstrup, S.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we consider a simple reaction-diffusion system, namely, a binary fluid mixture with an association-dissociation reaction between two species. We study fluctuations at hydrodynamic spatiotemporal scales when this mixture is driven out of equilibrium by the presence of a temperature

  12. The entropy dissipation method for spatially inhomogeneous reaction-diffusion-type systems

    KAUST Repository

    Di Francesco, M.; Fellner, K.; Markowich, P. A

    2008-01-01

    and reaction terms and admit fewer conservation laws than the size of the system. In particular, we successfully apply the entropy approach to general linear systems and to a nonlinear example of a reaction-diffusion-convection system arising in solid

  13. Continuous Dependence in Front Propagation for Convective Reaction-Diffusion Models with Aggregative Movements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Malaguti

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with a degenerate reaction-diffusion equation, including aggregative movements and convective terms. The model also incorporates a real parameter causing the change from a purely diffusive to a diffusive-aggregative and to a purely aggregative regime. Existence and qualitative properties of traveling wave solutions are investigated, and estimates of their threshold speeds are furnished. Further, the continuous dependence of the threshold wave speed and of the wave profiles on a real parameter is studied, both when the process maintains its diffusion-aggregation nature and when it switches from it to another regime.

  14. An adaptive algorithm for simulation of stochastic reaction-diffusion processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferm, Lars; Hellander, Andreas; Loetstedt, Per

    2010-01-01

    We propose an adaptive hybrid method suitable for stochastic simulation of diffusion dominated reaction-diffusion processes. For such systems, simulation of the diffusion requires the predominant part of the computing time. In order to reduce the computational work, the diffusion in parts of the domain is treated macroscopically, in other parts with the tau-leap method and in the remaining parts with Gillespie's stochastic simulation algorithm (SSA) as implemented in the next subvolume method (NSM). The chemical reactions are handled by SSA everywhere in the computational domain. A trajectory of the process is advanced in time by an operator splitting technique and the timesteps are chosen adaptively. The spatial adaptation is based on estimates of the errors in the tau-leap method and the macroscopic diffusion. The accuracy and efficiency of the method are demonstrated in examples from molecular biology where the domain is discretized by unstructured meshes.

  15. Waste dissolution with chemical reaction, diffusion and advection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chambre, P.L.; Kang, C.H.; Lee, W.W.L.; Pigford, T.H.

    1987-06-01

    This paper extends the mass-transfer analysis to include the effect of advective transport in predicting the steady-state dissolution rate, with a chemical-reaction-rate boundary condition at the surface of a waste form of arbitrary shape. This new theory provides an analytic means of predicting the ground-water velocities at which dissolution rate in a geologic environment will be governed entirely to the chemical reaction rate. As an illustration, we consider the steady-state potential flow of ground water in porous rock surrounding a spherical waste solid. 3 refs., 2 figs

  16. Analysis of diffusivity of the oscillating reaction components in a microreactor system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Šafranko

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available When performing oscillating reactions, periodical changes in the concentrations of reactants, intermediaries, and products take place. Due to the mentioned periodical changes of the concentrations, the information about the diffusivity of the components included into oscillating reactions is very important for the control of the oscillating reactions. Non-linear dynamics makes oscillating reactions very interesting for analysis in different reactor systems. In this paper, the analysis of diffusivity of the oscillating reaction components was performed in a microreactor, with the aim of identifying the limiting component. The geometry of the microreactor microchannel and a well defined flow profile ensure optimal conditions for the diffusion phenomena analysis, because diffusion profiles in a microreactor depend only on the residence time. In this paper, the analysis of diffusivity of the oscillating reaction components was performed in a microreactor equipped with 2 Y-shape inlets and 2 Y-shape outlets, with active volume of V = 4 μL at different residence times.

  17. Effects on nuclear fusion reaction on diffusion and thermal conduction in a magnetoplasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, Kazuo; Aono, Osamu.

    1976-12-01

    In spite of the well spread belief in the field of irreversible thermodynamics, vectorial phenomena couple thermodynamically with the scalar phenomena. Transport coefficients concerning the diffusion and the thermal conduction across a strong magnetic field are calculated in the presence of the deuteron-triton fusion reaction on the basis of the gas kinetic theory. When the reaction takes place, the diffusion increases and the thermal conduction decreases. Effects of the reaction exceed those of the Coulomb collision as the temperature is high enough. (auth.)

  18. Diffuse charge and Faradaic reactions in porous electrodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biesheuvel, P.M.; Yu, F.; Bazant, M.Z.

    2011-01-01

    Porous electrodes instead of flat electrodes are widely used in electrochemical systems to boost storage capacities for ions and electrons, to improve the transport of mass and charge, and to enhance reaction rates. Existing porous electrode theories make a number of simplifying assumptions: (i) The

  19. Fluorine atom subsurface diffusion and reaction in photoresist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greer, Frank; Fraser, D.; Coburn, J.W.; Graves, David B.

    2003-01-01

    Kinetic studies of fluorine and deuterium atoms interacting with an OiR 897 10i i-line photoresist (PR) are reported. All experiments were conducted at room temperature. Films of this PR were coated on quartz-crystal microbalance (QCM) substrates and exposed to alternating fluxes of these atoms in a high vacuum apparatus. Mass changes of the PR were observed in situ and in real time during the atom beam exposures using the QCM. A molecular-beam sampled differentially pumped quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) was used to measure the species desorbing from the PR surface during the F and D atom exposures. During the D atom exposures, hydrogen abstraction and etching of the PR was observed, but no DF formation was detected. However, during the F atom exposures, the major species observed to desorb from the surface was DF, formed from fluorine abstraction of deuterium from the photoresist. No evidence of film etching or fluorine self-abstraction was observed. The film mass increased during F atom exposure, evidently due to the replacement of D by F in the film. The rate of DF formation and mass uptake were both characterized by the same kinetics: An initially rapid step declining exponentially with time (e -t/τ ), followed by a much slower step following inverse square root of time (t -1/2 ) kinetics. The initially rapid step was interpreted as surface abstraction of D by F to form DF, which desorbs, with subsequent F impacting the surface inserted into surface C dangling bonds. The slower step was interpreted as F atoms diffusing into the fluorinated photoresist, forming DF at the boundary of the fluorinated carbon layer. The t -1/2 kinetics of this step are interpreted to indicate that F diffusion through the fluorinated carbon layer is much slower than the rate of F abstraction of D to form DF, or the rate of F insertion into the carbon dangling bonds left behind after DF formation. A diffusion-limited growth model was formulated, and the model parameters are

  20. Traveling wave solutions for reaction-diffusion systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lin, Zhigui; Pedersen, Michael; Tian, Canrong

    2010-01-01

    This paper is concerned with traveling waves of reaction–diffusion systems. The definition of coupled quasi-upper and quasi-lower solutions is introduced for systems with mixed quasimonotone functions, and the definition of ordered quasi-upper and quasi-lower solutions is also given for systems...... with quasimonotone nondecreasing functions. By the monotone iteration method, it is shown that if the system has a pair of coupled quasi-upper and quasi-lower solutions, then there exists at least a traveling wave solution. Moreover, if the system has a pair of ordered quasi-upper and quasi-lower solutions...

  1. Thermally activated reaction–diffusion-controlled chemical bulk reactions of gases and solids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Möller

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The chemical kinetics of the reaction of thin films with reactive gases is investigated. The removal of thin films using thermally activated solid–gas to gas reactions is a method to in-situ control deposition inventory in vacuum and plasma vessels. Significant scatter of experimental deposit removal rates at apparently similar conditions was observed in the past, highlighting the need for understanding the underlying processes. A model based on the presence of reactive gas in the films bulk and chemical kinetics is presented. The model describes the diffusion of reactive gas into the film and its chemical interaction with film constituents in the bulk using a stationary reaction–diffusion equation. This yields the reactive gas concentration and reaction rates. Diffusion and reaction rate limitations are depicted in parameter studies. Comparison with literature data on tokamak co-deposit removal results in good agreement of removal rates as a function of pressure, film thickness and temperature.

  2. Competitive autocatalytic reactions in chaotic flows with diffusion: Prediction using finite-time Lyapunov exponents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlick, Conor P.; Umbanhowar, Paul B.; Ottino, Julio M.; Lueptow, Richard M.

    2014-01-01

    We investigate chaotic advection and diffusion in autocatalytic reactions for time-periodic sine flow computationally using a mapping method with operator splitting. We specifically consider three different autocatalytic reaction schemes: a single autocatalytic reaction, competitive autocatalytic reactions, which can provide insight into problems of chiral symmetry breaking and homochirality, and competitive autocatalytic reactions with recycling. In competitive autocatalytic reactions, species B and C both undergo an autocatalytic reaction with species A such that A+B→2B and A+C→2C. Small amounts of initially spatially localized B and C and a large amount of spatially homogeneous A are advected by the velocity field, diffuse, and react until A is completely consumed and only B and C remain. We find that local finite-time Lyapunov exponents (FTLEs) can accurately predict the final average concentrations of B and C after the reaction completes. The species that starts in the region with the larger FTLE has, with high probability, the larger average concentration at the end of the reaction. If B and C start in regions with similar FTLEs, their average concentrations at the end of the reaction will also be similar. When a recycling reaction is added, the system evolves towards a single species state, with the FTLE often being useful in predicting which species fills the entire domain and which is depleted. The FTLE approach is also demonstrated for competitive autocatalytic reactions in journal bearing flow, an experimentally realizable flow that generates chaotic dynamics

  3. Diffusion and reaction within porous packing media: a phenomenological model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, W L; Dockery, J D; Vogel, C R; Sturman, P J

    1993-04-25

    A phenomenological model has been developed to describe biomass distribution and substrate depletion in porous diatomaceous earth (DE) pellets colonized by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The essential features of the model are diffusion, attachment and detachment to/from pore walls of the biomass, diffusion of substrate within the pellet, and external mass transfer of both substrate and biomass in the bulk fluid of a packed bed containing the pellets. A bench-scale reactor filled with DE pellets was inoculated with P. aeruginosa and operated in plug flow without recycle using a feed containing glucose as the limiting nutrient. Steady-state effluent glucose concentrations were measured at various residence times, and biomass distribution within the pellet was measured at the lowest residence time. In the model, microorganism/substrate kinetics and mass transfer characteristics were predicted from the literature. Only the attachment and detachment parameters were treated as unknowns, and were determined by fitting biomass distribution data within the pellets to the mathematical model. The rate-limiting step in substrate conversion was determined to be internal mass transfer resistance; external mass transfer resistance and microbial kinetic limitations were found to be nearly negligible. Only the outer 5% of the pellets contributed to substrate conversion.

  4. Contribution to an effective design method for stationary reaction-diffusion patterns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szalai, István; Horváth, Judit [Laboratory of Nonlinear Chemical Dynamics, Institute of Chemistry, Eötvös Loránd University, P.O. Box 32, H-1518 Budapest 112 (Hungary); De Kepper, Patrick [Centre de Recherche Paul Pascal, CNRS, University of Bordeaux, 115, Avenue Schweitzer, F-33600 Pessac (France)

    2015-06-15

    The British mathematician Alan Turing predicted, in his seminal 1952 publication, that stationary reaction-diffusion patterns could spontaneously develop in reacting chemical or biochemical solutions. The first two clear experimental demonstrations of such a phenomenon were not made before the early 1990s when the design of new chemical oscillatory reactions and appropriate open spatial chemical reactors had been invented. Yet, the number of pattern producing reactions had not grown until 2009 when we developed an operational design method, which takes into account the feeding conditions and other specificities of real open spatial reactors. Since then, on the basis of this method, five additional reactions were shown to produce stationary reaction-diffusion patterns. To gain a clearer view on where our methodical approach on the patterning capacity of a reaction stands, numerical studies in conditions that mimic true open spatial reactors were made. In these numerical experiments, we explored the patterning capacity of Rabai's model for pH driven Landolt type reactions as a function of experimentally attainable parameters that control the main time and length scales. Because of the straightforward reversible binding of protons to carboxylate carrying polymer chains, this class of reaction is at the base of the chemistry leading to most of the stationary reaction-diffusion patterns presently observed. We compare our model predictions with experimental observations and comment on agreements and differences.

  5. Contribution to an effective design method for stationary reaction-diffusion patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szalai, István; Horváth, Judit; De Kepper, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    The British mathematician Alan Turing predicted, in his seminal 1952 publication, that stationary reaction-diffusion patterns could spontaneously develop in reacting chemical or biochemical solutions. The first two clear experimental demonstrations of such a phenomenon were not made before the early 1990s when the design of new chemical oscillatory reactions and appropriate open spatial chemical reactors had been invented. Yet, the number of pattern producing reactions had not grown until 2009 when we developed an operational design method, which takes into account the feeding conditions and other specificities of real open spatial reactors. Since then, on the basis of this method, five additional reactions were shown to produce stationary reaction-diffusion patterns. To gain a clearer view on where our methodical approach on the patterning capacity of a reaction stands, numerical studies in conditions that mimic true open spatial reactors were made. In these numerical experiments, we explored the patterning capacity of Rabai's model for pH driven Landolt type reactions as a function of experimentally attainable parameters that control the main time and length scales. Because of the straightforward reversible binding of protons to carboxylate carrying polymer chains, this class of reaction is at the base of the chemistry leading to most of the stationary reaction-diffusion patterns presently observed. We compare our model predictions with experimental observations and comment on agreements and differences

  6. Preparation and characterization of a novel polymeric based solid-solid phase change heat storage material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xi Peng; Gu Xiaohua; Cheng Bowen; Wang Yufei

    2009-01-01

    Here we reported a two-step procedure for preparing a novel polymeric based solid-solid phase change heat storage material. Firstly, a copolymer monomer containing a polyethylene glycol monomethyl ether (MPEG) phase change unit and a vinyl unit was synthesized via the modification of hydrogen group of MPEG. Secondly, by copolymerization of the copolymer monomer and phenyl ethylene, a novel polymeric based solid-solid phase change heat storage material was prepared. The composition, structure and properties of the novel polymeric based solid-solid phase change material were characterized by IR, 1 H NMR, DSC, WAXD, and POM, respectively. The results show that the novel polymeric based solid-solid phase change material possesses of excellent crystal properties and high phase change enthalpy.

  7. Solid-Solid Vacuum Regolith Heat-Exchanger for Oxygen Production, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase-1 project will demonstrate the feasibility of using a novel coaxial counterflow solid-solid heat exchanger to recover heat energy from spent regolith...

  8. Catalytic conversion reactions mediated by single-file diffusion in linear nanopores: hydrodynamic versus stochastic behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, David M; Wang, Jing; Wendel, Joseph H; Liu, Da-Jiang; Pruski, Marek; Evans, James W

    2011-03-21

    We analyze the spatiotemporal behavior of species concentrations in a diffusion-mediated conversion reaction which occurs at catalytic sites within linear pores of nanometer diameter. Diffusion within the pores is subject to a strict single-file (no passing) constraint. Both transient and steady-state behavior is precisely characterized by kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of a spatially discrete lattice-gas model for this reaction-diffusion process considering various distributions of catalytic sites. Exact hierarchical master equations can also be developed for this model. Their analysis, after application of mean-field type truncation approximations, produces discrete reaction-diffusion type equations (mf-RDE). For slowly varying concentrations, we further develop coarse-grained continuum hydrodynamic reaction-diffusion equations (h-RDE) incorporating a precise treatment of single-file diffusion in this multispecies system. The h-RDE successfully describe nontrivial aspects of transient behavior, in contrast to the mf-RDE, and also correctly capture unreactive steady-state behavior in the pore interior. However, steady-state reactivity, which is localized near the pore ends when those regions are catalytic, is controlled by fluctuations not incorporated into the hydrodynamic treatment. The mf-RDE partly capture these fluctuation effects, but cannot describe scaling behavior of the reactivity.

  9. An incomplete assembly with thresholding algorithm for systems of reaction-diffusion equations in three space dimensions IAT for reaction-diffusion systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, Peter K.

    2003-01-01

    Solving systems of reaction-diffusion equations in three space dimensions can be prohibitively expensive both in terms of storage and CPU time. Herein, I present a new incomplete assembly procedure that is designed to reduce storage requirements. Incomplete assembly is analogous to incomplete factorization in that only a fixed number of nonzero entries are stored per row and a drop tolerance is used to discard small values. The algorithm is incorporated in a finite element method-of-lines code and tested on a set of reaction-diffusion systems. The effect of incomplete assembly on CPU time and storage and on the performance of the temporal integrator DASPK, algebraic solver GMRES and preconditioner ILUT is studied

  10. Solid-solid synthesis and structural phase transition process of SmF3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Qi-Cao; Guo, Xing-Min

    2018-04-01

    Mazes of contradictory conclusions have been obtained by previous researches about structural phase transition process of SmF3. In this paper, the single crystals of SmF3 (hexagonal and orthorhombic) were prepared by solid-solid synthesis, which have shown gradual changes in crystal growth modes with the increase temperature and holding time. Furthermore, we propose the phase transition process of in SmF3. Hexagonal symmetry of SmF3 (space group Pnma) was prepared firstly by heating Sm2O3 and NH4HF2 over 40 min at 270 °C. And then orthorhombic symmetry of SmF3 (space group P63mc) was obtained by heating hexagonal symmetry over 10 h at 650 °C. The reaction of SmF3 (hexagonal) = SmF3 (orthorhombic) is extremely sluggish at a low temperature (less than 650 °C), which was seen as a Mixed Grown Region.

  11. Stability analysis of non-autonomous reaction-diffusion systems: the effects of growing domains

    KAUST Repository

    Madzvamuse, Anotida; Gaffney, Eamonn A.; Maini, Philip K.

    2009-01-01

    By using asymptotic theory, we generalise the Turing diffusively-driven instability conditions for reaction-diffusion systems with slow, isotropic domain growth. There are two fundamental biological differences between the Turing conditions on fixed and growing domains, namely: (i) we need not enforce cross nor pure kinetic conditions and (ii) the restriction to activator-inhibitor kinetics to induce pattern formation on a growing biological system is no longer a requirement. Our theoretical findings are confirmed and reinforced by numerical simulations for the special cases of isotropic linear, exponential and logistic growth profiles. In particular we illustrate an example of a reaction-diffusion system which cannot exhibit a diffusively-driven instability on a fixed domain but is unstable in the presence of slow growth. © Springer-Verlag 2009.

  12. Stability analysis of non-autonomous reaction-diffusion systems: the effects of growing domains

    KAUST Repository

    Madzvamuse, Anotida

    2009-08-29

    By using asymptotic theory, we generalise the Turing diffusively-driven instability conditions for reaction-diffusion systems with slow, isotropic domain growth. There are two fundamental biological differences between the Turing conditions on fixed and growing domains, namely: (i) we need not enforce cross nor pure kinetic conditions and (ii) the restriction to activator-inhibitor kinetics to induce pattern formation on a growing biological system is no longer a requirement. Our theoretical findings are confirmed and reinforced by numerical simulations for the special cases of isotropic linear, exponential and logistic growth profiles. In particular we illustrate an example of a reaction-diffusion system which cannot exhibit a diffusively-driven instability on a fixed domain but is unstable in the presence of slow growth. © Springer-Verlag 2009.

  13. Event-triggered synchronization for reaction-diffusion complex networks via random sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Tao; Wang, Aijuan; Zhu, Huiyun; Liao, Xiaofeng

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, the synchronization problem of the reaction-diffusion complex networks (RDCNs) with Dirichlet boundary conditions is considered, where the data is sampled randomly. An event-triggered controller based on the sampled data is proposed, which can reduce the number of controller and the communication load. Under this strategy, the synchronization problem of the diffusion complex network is equivalently converted to the stability of a of reaction-diffusion complex dynamical systems with time delay. By using the matrix inequality technique and Lyapunov method, the synchronization conditions of the RDCNs are derived, which are dependent on the diffusion term. Moreover, it is found the proposed control strategy can get rid of the Zeno behavior naturally. Finally, a numerical example is given to verify the obtained results.

  14. Mass transfer rate through liquid membranes: interfacial chemical reactions and diffusion as simultaneous permeability controlling factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danesi, P.R.; Horwitz, E.P.; Vandegrift, G.F.; Chiarizia, R.

    1981-01-01

    Equations describing the permeability of a liquid membrane to metal cations have been derived taking into account aqueous diffusion, membrane diffusion, and interfacial chemical reactions as simultaneous permeability controlling factors. Diffusion and chemical reactions have been coupled by a simple model analogous to the one previously described by us to represent liquid-liquid extraction kinetics. The derived equations, which make use of experimentally determined interfacial reaction mechanisms, qualitatively fit unexplained literature data regarding Cu 2+ transfer through liquid membranes. Their use to predict and optimize membrane permeability in practical separation processes by setting the appropriate concentration of the membrane carrier [LIX 64 (General Mills), a commercial β-hydroxy-oxime] and the pH of the aqueous copper feed solution is briefly discussed. 4 figures

  15. Numerical Solutions of Singularly Perturbed Reaction Diffusion Equation with Sobolev Gradients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nauman Raza

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Critical points related to the singular perturbed reaction diffusion models are calculated using weighted Sobolev gradient method in finite element setting. Performance of different Sobolev gradients has been discussed for varying diffusion coefficient values. A comparison is shown between the weighted and unweighted Sobolev gradients in two and three dimensions. The superiority of the method is also demonstrated by showing comparison with Newton's method.

  16. A strongly nonlinear reaction-diffusion model for a deterministic diffusive epidemic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirane, M.; Kouachi, S.

    1992-10-01

    In the present paper the mathematical validity of a model on the spread of an infectious disease is proved. This model was proposed by Bailey. The mathematical validity is proved by means of a positivity, uniqueness and existence theorem. In spite of the apparent simplicity of the problem, the solution requires a delicate set of techniques. It seems very difficult to extend these techniques to a model in more than one dimension without imposing conditions on the diffusivities. (author). 7 refs

  17. The entropy dissipation method for spatially inhomogeneous reaction-diffusion-type systems

    KAUST Repository

    Di Francesco, M.

    2008-12-08

    We study the long-time asymptotics of reaction-diffusion-type systems that feature a monotone decaying entropy (Lyapunov, free energy) functional. We consider both bounded domains and confining potentials on the whole space for arbitrary space dimensions. Our aim is to derive quantitative expressions for (or estimates of) the rates of convergence towards an (entropy minimizing) equilibrium state in terms of the constants of diffusion and reaction and with respect to conserved quantities. Our method, the so-called entropy approach, seeks to quantify convergence to equilibrium by using functional inequalities, which relate quantitatively the entropy and its dissipation in time. The entropy approach is well suited to nonlinear problems and known to be quite robust with respect to model variations. It has already been widely applied to scalar diffusion-convection equations, and the main goal of this paper is to study its generalization to systems of partial differential equations that contain diffusion and reaction terms and admit fewer conservation laws than the size of the system. In particular, we successfully apply the entropy approach to general linear systems and to a nonlinear example of a reaction-diffusion-convection system arising in solid-state physics as a paradigm for general nonlinear systems. © 2008 The Royal Society.

  18. Hopf bifurcation in a delayed reaction-diffusion-advection population model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shanshan; Lou, Yuan; Wei, Junjie

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, we investigate a reaction-diffusion-advection model with time delay effect. The stability/instability of the spatially nonhomogeneous positive steady state and the associated Hopf bifurcation are investigated when the given parameter of the model is near the principle eigenvalue of an elliptic operator. Our results imply that time delay can make the spatially nonhomogeneous positive steady state unstable for a reaction-diffusion-advection model, and the model can exhibit oscillatory pattern through Hopf bifurcation. The effect of advection on Hopf bifurcation values is also considered, and our results suggest that Hopf bifurcation is more likely to occur when the advection rate increases.

  19. Stability analysis of impulsive fuzzy cellular neural networks with distributed delays and reaction-diffusion terms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Zuoan; Li Kelin

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate a class of impulsive fuzzy cellular neural networks with distributed delays and reaction-diffusion terms. By employing the delay differential inequality with impulsive initial conditions and M-matrix theory, we find some sufficient conditions ensuring the existence, uniqueness and global exponential stability of equilibrium point for impulsive fuzzy cellular neural networks with distributed delays and reaction-diffusion terms. In particular, the estimate of the exponential converging index is also provided, which depends on the system parameters. An example is given to show the effectiveness of the results obtained here.

  20. Global exponential stability of fuzzy cellular neural networks with delays and reaction-diffusion terms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jian; Lu Junguo

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we study the global exponential stability of fuzzy cellular neural networks with delays and reaction-diffusion terms. By constructing a suitable Lyapunov functional and utilizing some inequality techniques, we obtain a sufficient condition for the uniqueness and global exponential stability of the equilibrium solution for a class of fuzzy cellular neural networks with delays and reaction-diffusion terms. The result imposes constraint conditions on the network parameters independently of the delay parameter. The result is also easy to check and plays an important role in the design and application of globally exponentially stable fuzzy neural circuits

  1. WNT and DKK Determine Hair Follicle Spacing Through a Reaction-Diffusion Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sick, Stefanie; Reinker, Stefan; Timmer, Jens; Schlake, Thomas

    2006-12-01

    Mathematical reaction-diffusion models have been suggested to describe formation of animal pigmentation patterns and distribution of epidermal appendages. However, the crucial signals and in vivo mechanisms are still elusive. Here we identify WNT and its inhibitor DKK as primary determinants of murine hair follicle spacing, using a combined experimental and computational modeling approach. Transgenic DKK overexpression reduces overall appendage density. Moderate suppression of endogenous WNT signaling forces follicles to form clusters during an otherwise normal morphogenetic program. These results confirm predictions of a WNT/DKK-specific mathematical model and provide in vivo corroboration of the reaction-diffusion mechanism for epidermal appendage formation.

  2. Nonlinear reaction-diffusion equations with delay: some theorems, test problems, exact and numerical solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polyanin, A. D.; Sorokin, V. G.

    2017-12-01

    The paper deals with nonlinear reaction-diffusion equations with one or several delays. We formulate theorems that allow constructing exact solutions for some classes of these equations, which depend on several arbitrary functions. Examples of application of these theorems for obtaining new exact solutions in elementary functions are provided. We state basic principles of construction, selection, and use of test problems for nonlinear partial differential equations with delay. Some test problems which can be suitable for estimating accuracy of approximate analytical and numerical methods of solving reaction-diffusion equations with delay are presented. Some examples of numerical solutions of nonlinear test problems with delay are considered.

  3. Stability Analysis of a Reaction-Diffusion System Modeling Atherogenesis

    KAUST Repository

    Ibragimov, Akif

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a linear, asymptotic stability analysis for a reaction-diffusionconvection system modeling atherogenesis, the initiation of atherosclerosis, as an inflammatory instability. Motivated by the disease paradigm articulated by Ross, atherogenesis is viewed as an inflammatory spiral with a positive feedback loop involving key cellular and chemical species interacting and reacting within the intimal layer of muscular arteries. The inflammatory spiral is initiated as an instability from a healthy state which is defined to be an equilibrium state devoid of certain key inflammatory markers. Disease initiation is studied through a linear, asymptotic stability analysis of a healthy equilibrium state. Various theorems are proved, giving conditions on system parameters guaranteeing stability of the health state, and a general framework is developed for constructing perturbations from a healthy state that exhibit blow-up, which are interpreted as corresponding to disease initiation. The analysis reveals key features that arterial geometry, antioxidant levels, and the source of inflammatory components (through coupled third-kind boundary conditions or through body sources) play in disease initiation. © 2010 Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics.

  4. An analytic algorithm for the space-time fractional reaction-diffusion equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. G. Brikaa

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we solve the space-time fractional reaction-diffusion equation by the fractional homotopy analysis method. Solutions of different examples of the reaction term will be computed and investigated. The approximation solutions of the studied models will be put in the form of convergent series to be easily computed and simulated. Comparison with the approximation solution of the classical case of the studied modeled with their approximation errors will also be studied.

  5. Existence and Stability of Traveling Waves for Degenerate Reaction-Diffusion Equation with Time Delay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Rui; Jin, Chunhua; Mei, Ming; Yin, Jingxue

    2018-01-01

    This paper deals with the existence and stability of traveling wave solutions for a degenerate reaction-diffusion equation with time delay. The degeneracy of spatial diffusion together with the effect of time delay causes us the essential difficulty for the existence of the traveling waves and their stabilities. In order to treat this case, we first show the existence of smooth- and sharp-type traveling wave solutions in the case of c≥c^* for the degenerate reaction-diffusion equation without delay, where c^*>0 is the critical wave speed of smooth traveling waves. Then, as a small perturbation, we obtain the existence of the smooth non-critical traveling waves for the degenerate diffusion equation with small time delay τ >0 . Furthermore, we prove the global existence and uniqueness of C^{α ,β } -solution to the time-delayed degenerate reaction-diffusion equation via compactness analysis. Finally, by the weighted energy method, we prove that the smooth non-critical traveling wave is globally stable in the weighted L^1 -space. The exponential convergence rate is also derived.

  6. Existence and Stability of Traveling Waves for Degenerate Reaction-Diffusion Equation with Time Delay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Rui; Jin, Chunhua; Mei, Ming; Yin, Jingxue

    2018-06-01

    This paper deals with the existence and stability of traveling wave solutions for a degenerate reaction-diffusion equation with time delay. The degeneracy of spatial diffusion together with the effect of time delay causes us the essential difficulty for the existence of the traveling waves and their stabilities. In order to treat this case, we first show the existence of smooth- and sharp-type traveling wave solutions in the case of c≥c^* for the degenerate reaction-diffusion equation without delay, where c^*>0 is the critical wave speed of smooth traveling waves. Then, as a small perturbation, we obtain the existence of the smooth non-critical traveling waves for the degenerate diffusion equation with small time delay τ >0. Furthermore, we prove the global existence and uniqueness of C^{α ,β }-solution to the time-delayed degenerate reaction-diffusion equation via compactness analysis. Finally, by the weighted energy method, we prove that the smooth non-critical traveling wave is globally stable in the weighted L^1-space. The exponential convergence rate is also derived.

  7. Evans functions and bifurcations of nonlinear waves of some nonlinear reaction diffusion equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Linghai

    2017-10-01

    The main purposes of this paper are to accomplish the existence, stability, instability and bifurcation of the nonlinear waves of the nonlinear system of reaction diffusion equations ut =uxx + α [ βH (u - θ) - u ] - w, wt = ε (u - γw) and to establish the existence, stability, instability and bifurcation of the nonlinear waves of the nonlinear scalar reaction diffusion equation ut =uxx + α [ βH (u - θ) - u ], under different conditions on the model constants. To establish the bifurcation for the system, we will study the existence and instability of a standing pulse solution if 0 1; the existence and instability of two standing wave fronts if 2 (1 + αγ) θ = αβγ and 0 traveling wave front as well as the existence and instability of a standing pulse solution if 0 traveling wave front as well as the existence and instability of an upside down standing pulse solution if 0 traveling wave back of the nonlinear scalar reaction diffusion equation ut =uxx + α [ βH (u - θ) - u ] -w0, where w0 = α (β - 2 θ) > 0 is a positive constant, if 0 motivation to study the existence, stability, instability and bifurcations of the nonlinear waves is to study the existence and stability/instability of infinitely many fast/slow multiple traveling pulse solutions of the nonlinear system of reaction diffusion equations. The existence and stability of infinitely many fast multiple traveling pulse solutions are of great interests in mathematical neuroscience.

  8. Soft tissue deformation modelling through neural dynamics-based reaction-diffusion mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jinao; Zhong, Yongmin; Gu, Chengfan

    2018-05-30

    Soft tissue deformation modelling forms the basis of development of surgical simulation, surgical planning and robotic-assisted minimally invasive surgery. This paper presents a new methodology for modelling of soft tissue deformation based on reaction-diffusion mechanics via neural dynamics. The potential energy stored in soft tissues due to a mechanical load to deform tissues away from their rest state is treated as the equivalent transmembrane potential energy, and it is distributed in the tissue masses in the manner of reaction-diffusion propagation of nonlinear electrical waves. The reaction-diffusion propagation of mechanical potential energy and nonrigid mechanics of motion are combined to model soft tissue deformation and its dynamics, both of which are further formulated as the dynamics of cellular neural networks to achieve real-time computational performance. The proposed methodology is implemented with a haptic device for interactive soft tissue deformation with force feedback. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed methodology exhibits nonlinear force-displacement relationship for nonlinear soft tissue deformation. Homogeneous, anisotropic and heterogeneous soft tissue material properties can be modelled through the inherent physical properties of mass points. Graphical abstract Soft tissue deformation modelling with haptic feedback via neural dynamics-based reaction-diffusion mechanics.

  9. Bifurcation Analysis of Gene Propagation Model Governed by Reaction-Diffusion Equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guichen Lu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a theoretical analysis of the attractor bifurcation for gene propagation model governed by reaction-diffusion equations. We investigate the dynamical transition problems of the model under the homogeneous boundary conditions. By using the dynamical transition theory, we give a complete characterization of the bifurcated objects in terms of the biological parameters of the problem.

  10. Degree, instability and bifurcation of reaction-diffusion systems with obstacles near certain hyperbolas

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Eisner, J.; Väth, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 135, April (2016), s. 158-193 ISSN 0362-546X Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : reaction-diffusion system * turing instability * global bifurcation Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 1.192, year: 2016 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0362546X16000146

  11. Passing to the limit in a Wasserstein gradient flow : from diffusion to reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arnrich, S.; Mielke, A.; Peletier, M.A.; Savaré, G.; Veneroni, M.

    2012-01-01

    We study a singular-limit problem arising in the modelling of chemical reactions. At finite e > 0, the system is described by a Fokker-Planck convection-diffusion equation with a double-well convection potential. This potential is scaled by 1 / e and in the limit e --> 0, the solution concentrates

  12. Discrete maximum principle for FE solutions of the diffusion-reaction problem on prismatic meshes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hannukainen, A.; Korotov, S.; Vejchodský, Tomáš

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 226, č. 2 (2009), s. 275-287 ISSN 0377-0427 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100760702 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10190503 Keywords : diffusion-reaction problem * maximum principle * prismatic finite elements Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 1.292, year: 2009

  13. Boundedness for a system of reaction-diffusion equations with more general Arrhenius term. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okoya, S.S.

    1992-11-01

    In this paper, we consider an extended model of a coupled nonlinear reaction-diffusion equation with Neumann-Neumann boundary conditions. We obtain upper linear growth bound for one of the components. We also find the corresponding bound for the case of Dirichlet-Dirichlet boundary conditions. (author). 12 refs

  14. Dynamical Behaviors of Stochastic Reaction-Diffusion Cohen-Grossberg Neural Networks with Delays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Wan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates dynamical behaviors of stochastic Cohen-Grossberg neural network with delays and reaction diffusion. By employing Lyapunov method, Poincaré inequality and matrix technique, some sufficient criteria on ultimate boundedness, weak attractor, and asymptotic stability are obtained. Finally, a numerical example is given to illustrate the correctness and effectiveness of our theoretical results.

  15. Allergic Contact Dermatitis with Diffuse Erythematous Reaction from Diisopropanolamine in a Compress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoko Rind

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Compresses containing a nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug (NSAID are commonly used in Japan. However, this treatment may induce both allergic and photoallergic contact dermatitis from the NSAIDs and their ingredients. Here, we describe a case of allergic contact dermatitis with diffuse erythematous reaction due to diisopropanolamine in the applied compress. The absorption of diisopropanolamine might have been enhanced by the occlusive condition.

  16. Brownian motion in a field of force and the diffusion theory of chemical reactions. II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brinkman, H.C.

    1956-01-01

    H. A. Kramers has studied the rate of chemical reactions in view of the Brownian forces caused by a surrounding medium in temperature equilibrium. In a previous paper 3) the author gave a solution of Kramers' diffusion equation in phase space by systematic development. In this paper the general

  17. The Induced Dimension Reduction method applied to convection-diffusion-reaction problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Astudillo, R.; Van Gijzen, M.B.

    2016-01-01

    Discretization of (linearized) convection-diffusion-reaction problems yields a large and sparse non symmetric linear system of equations, Ax = b. (1) In this work, we compare the computational behavior of the Induced Dimension Reduction method (IDR(s)) [10], with other short-recurrences Krylov

  18. Relativistic thermodynamics of irreversible processes I. Heat conduction, diffusion, viscous flow and chemical reactions; formal part

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kluitenberg, G.A.; Groot, S.R. de; Mazur, P.

    1953-01-01

    The relativistic thermodynamics of irreversible processes is developed for an isotropic mixture in which heat conduction, diffusion, viscous flow, chemical reactions and their cross-phenomena may occur. The four-vectors, representing the relative flows of matter, are defined in such a way that, in

  19. An Efficient Implicit FEM Scheme for Fractional-in-Space Reaction-Diffusion Equations

    KAUST Repository

    Burrage, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    Fractional differential equations are becoming increasingly used as a modelling tool for processes associated with anomalous diffusion or spatial heterogeneity. However, the presence of a fractional differential operator causes memory (time fractional) or nonlocality (space fractional) issues that impose a number of computational constraints. In this paper we develop efficient, scalable techniques for solving fractional-in-space reaction diffusion equations using the finite element method on both structured and unstructured grids via robust techniques for computing the fractional power of a matrix times a vector. Our approach is show-cased by solving the fractional Fisher and fractional Allen-Cahn reaction-diffusion equations in two and three spatial dimensions, and analyzing the speed of the traveling wave and size of the interface in terms of the fractional power of the underlying Laplacian operator. © 2012 Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics.

  20. Mix and Inject: Reaction Initiation by Diffusion for Time-Resolved Macromolecular Crystallography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Schmidt

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Time-resolved macromolecular crystallography unifies structure determination with chemical kinetics, since the structures of transient states and chemical and kinetic mechanisms can be determined simultaneously from the same data. To start a reaction in an enzyme, typically, an initially inactive substrate present in the crystal is activated. This has particular disadvantages that are circumvented when active substrate is directly provided by diffusion. However, then it is prohibitive to use macroscopic crystals because diffusion times become too long. With small micro- and nanocrystals diffusion times are adequately short for most enzymes and the reaction can be swiftly initiated. We demonstrate here that a time-resolved crystallographic experiment becomes feasible by mixing substrate with enzyme nanocrystals which are subsequently injected into the X-ray beam of a pulsed X-ray source.

  1. Efficient kinetic Monte Carlo method for reaction-diffusion problems with spatially varying annihilation rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Karsten; Rieger, Heiko

    2013-03-01

    We present an efficient Monte Carlo method to simulate reaction-diffusion processes with spatially varying particle annihilation or transformation rates as it occurs for instance in the context of motor-driven intracellular transport. Like Green's function reaction dynamics and first-passage time methods, our algorithm avoids small diffusive hops by propagating sufficiently distant particles in large hops to the boundaries of protective domains. Since for spatially varying annihilation or transformation rates the single particle diffusion propagator is not known analytically, we present an algorithm that generates efficiently either particle displacements or annihilations with the correct statistics, as we prove rigorously. The numerical efficiency of the algorithm is demonstrated with an illustrative example.

  2. Effects of chemical reaction on moving isothermal vertical plate with variable mass diffusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muthucumaraswamy R.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available An exact solution to the problem of flow past an impulsively started infinite vertical isothermal plate with variable mass diffusion is presented here, taking into account of the homogeneous chemical reaction of first-order. The dimensionless governing equations are solved by using the Laplace - transform technique. The velocity and skin-friction are studied for different parameters like chemical reaction parameter, Schmidt number and buoyancy ratio parameter. It is observed that the veloc­ity increases with decreasing chemical reaction parameter and increases with increasing buoyancy ratio parameter.

  3. Global dynamics of a nonlocal delayed reaction-diffusion equation on a half plane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wenjie; Duan, Yueliang

    2018-04-01

    We consider a delayed reaction-diffusion equation with spatial nonlocality on a half plane that describes population dynamics of a two-stage species living in a semi-infinite environment. A Neumann boundary condition is imposed accounting for an isolated domain. To describe the global dynamics, we first establish some a priori estimate for nontrivial solutions after investigating asymptotic properties of the nonlocal delayed effect and the diffusion operator, which enables us to show the permanence of the equation with respect to the compact open topology. We then employ standard dynamical system arguments to establish the global attractivity of the nontrivial equilibrium. The main results are illustrated by the diffusive Nicholson's blowfly equation and the diffusive Mackey-Glass equation.

  4. Critical regimes driven by recurrent mobility patterns of reaction-diffusion processes in networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Gardeñes, J.; Soriano-Paños, D.; Arenas, A.

    2018-04-01

    Reaction-diffusion processes1 have been widely used to study dynamical processes in epidemics2-4 and ecology5 in networked metapopulations. In the context of epidemics6, reaction processes are understood as contagions within each subpopulation (patch), while diffusion represents the mobility of individuals between patches. Recently, the characteristics of human mobility7, such as its recurrent nature, have been proven crucial to understand the phase transition to endemic epidemic states8,9. Here, by developing a framework able to cope with the elementary epidemic processes, the spatial distribution of populations and the commuting mobility patterns, we discover three different critical regimes of the epidemic incidence as a function of these parameters. Interestingly, we reveal a regime of the reaction-diffussion process in which, counter-intuitively, mobility is detrimental to the spread of disease. We analytically determine the precise conditions for the emergence of any of the three possible critical regimes in real and synthetic networks.

  5. Reaction probability derived from an interpolation formula for diffusion processes with an absorptive boundary condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misawa, T.; Itakura, H.

    1995-01-01

    The present article focuses on a dynamical simulation of molecular motion in liquids. In the simulation involving diffusion-controlled reaction with discrete time steps, lack of information regarding the trajectory within the time step may result in a failure to count the number of reactions of the particles within the step. In order to rectify this, an interpolated diffusion process is used. The process is derived from a stochastic interpolation formula recently developed by the first author [J. Math. Phys. 34, 775 (1993)]. In this method, the probability that reaction has occurred during the time step given the initial and final positions of the particles is calculated. Some numerical examples confirm that the theoretical result corresponds to an improvement over the Clifford-Green work [Mol. Phys. 57, 123 (1986)] on the same matter

  6. The role of solid-solid phase transitions in mantle convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faccenda, Manuele; Dal Zilio, Luca

    2017-01-01

    With changing pressure and temperature conditions, downwelling and upwelling crustal and mantle rocks experience several solid-solid phase transitions that affect the mineral physical properties owing to structural changes in the crystal lattice and to the absorption or release of latent heat. Variations in density, together with phase boundary deflections related to the non-null reaction slope, generate important buoyancy forces that add to those induced by thermal perturbations. These buoyancy forces are proportional to the density contrast between reactant and product phases, their volume fraction, the slope and the sharpness of the reaction, and affect the style of mantle convection depending on the system composition. In a homogeneous pyrolitic mantle there is little tendency for layered convection, with slabs that may stagnate in the transition zone because of the positive buoyancy caused by post-spinel and post-ilmenite reactions, and hot plumes that are accelerated by phase transformations in the 600-800 km depth range. By adding chemical and mineralogical heterogeneities as on Earth, phase transitions introduce bulk rock and volatiles filtering effects that generate a compositional gradient throughout the entire mantle, with levels that are enriched or depleted in one or more of these components. Phase transitions often lead to mechanical softening or hardening that can be related to a different intrinsic mechanical behaviour and volatile solubility of the product phases, the heating or cooling associated with latent heat, and the transient grain size reduction in downwelling cold material. Strong variations in viscosity would enhance layered mantle convection, causing slab stagnation and plume ponding. At low temperatures and relatively dry conditions, reactions are delayed due to the sluggish kinetics, so that non-equilibrium phase aggregates can persist metastably beyond the equilibrium phase boundary. Survival of low-density metastable olivine

  7. Convection and reaction in a diffusive boundary layer in a porous medium: nonlinear dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andres, Jeanne Therese H; Cardoso, Silvana S S

    2012-09-01

    We study numerically the nonlinear interactions between chemical reaction and convective fingering in a diffusive boundary layer in a porous medium. The reaction enhances stability by consuming a solute that is unstably distributed in a gravitational field. We show that chemical reaction profoundly changes the dynamics of the system, by introducing a steady state, shortening the evolution time, and altering the spatial patterns of velocity and concentration of solute. In the presence of weak reaction, finger growth and merger occur effectively, driving strong convective currents in a thick layer of solute. However, as the reaction becomes stronger, finger growth is inhibited, tip-splitting is enhanced and the layer of solute becomes much thinner. Convection enhances the mass flux of solute consumed by reaction in the boundary layer but has a diminishing effect as reaction strength increases. This nonlinear behavior has striking differences to the density fingering of traveling reaction fronts, for which stronger chemical kinetics result in more effective finger merger owing to an increase in the speed of the front. In a boundary layer, a strong stabilizing effect of reaction can maintain a long-term state of convection in isolated fingers of wavelength comparable to that at onset of instability.

  8. Meredys, a multi-compartment reaction-diffusion simulator using multistate realistic molecular complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Novère Nicolas

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most cellular signal transduction mechanisms depend on a few molecular partners whose roles depend on their position and movement in relation to the input signal. This movement can follow various rules and take place in different compartments. Additionally, the molecules can form transient complexes. Complexation and signal transduction depend on the specific states partners and complexes adopt. Several spatial simulator have been developed to date, but none are able to model reaction-diffusion of realistic multi-state transient complexes. Results Meredys allows for the simulation of multi-component, multi-feature state molecular species in two and three dimensions. Several compartments can be defined with different diffusion and boundary properties. The software employs a Brownian dynamics engine to simulate reaction-diffusion systems at the reactive particle level, based on compartment properties, complex structure, and hydro-dynamic radii. Zeroth-, first-, and second order reactions are supported. The molecular complexes have realistic geometries. Reactive species can contain user-defined feature states which can modify reaction rates and outcome. Models are defined in a versatile NeuroML input file. The simulation volume can be split in subvolumes to speed up run-time. Conclusions Meredys provides a powerful and versatile way to run accurate simulations of molecular and sub-cellular systems, that complement existing multi-agent simulation systems. Meredys is a Free Software and the source code is available at http://meredys.sourceforge.net/.

  9. Exact substitute processes for diffusion-reaction systems with local complete exclusion rules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, Michael; Reineker, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Lattice systems with one species diffusion-reaction processes under local complete exclusion rules are studied analytically starting from the usual master equations with discrete variables and their corresponding representation in a Fock space. On this basis, a formulation of the transition probability as a Grassmann path integral is derived in a straightforward manner. It will be demonstrated that this Grassmann path integral is equivalent to a set of Ito stochastic differential equations. Averages of arbitrary variables and correlation functions of the underlying diffusion-reaction system can be expressed as weighted averages over all solutions of the system of stochastic differential equations. Furthermore, these differential equations are equivalent to a Fokker-Planck equation describing the probability distribution of the actual Ito solutions. This probability distribution depends on continuous variables in contrast to the original master equation, and their stochastic dynamics may be interpreted as a substitute process which is completely equivalent to the original lattice dynamics. Especially, averages and correlation functions of the continuous variables are connected to the corresponding lattice quantities by simple relations. Although the substitute process for diffusion-reaction systems with exclusion rules has some similarities to the well-known substitute process for the same system without exclusion rules, there exists a set of remarkable differences. The given approach is not only valid for the discussed single-species processes. We give sufficient arguments to show that arbitrary combinations of unimolecular and bimolecular lattice reactions under complete local exclusions may be described in terms of our approach

  10. Diffuse Urticarial Reaction Associated with Titanium Dioxide Following Laser Tattoo Removal Treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willardson, Hal Bret; Kobayashi, Todd T; Arnold, Jason G; Hivnor, Chad M; Bowen, Casey D

    2017-03-01

    Local and generalized allergic reactions following laser tattoo removal have been documented, but are rare. To our knowledge, this is the fourth documented case of widespread urticarial eruptions following laser tattoo removal treatment. Unlike previously documented cases, this patient's reaction was found to be associated with titanium dioxide within the tattoo and her symptoms were recalcitrant to medical therapy. A 46-year-old female experienced diffuse urticarial plaques, erythema, and pruritis following multiple laser tattoo removal treatments with an Nd:YAG laser. The systemic allergic reaction was recalcitrant to increasing doses of antihistamines and corticosteroids. The tattoo was finally surgically excised. The excised tissue was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis and contained high levels of titanium dioxide. Two weeks following the excision, and without the use of medical therapy, the patient had complete resolution of her generalized urticaria. Ours is the first documented case of a diffuse urticarial reaction following laser tattoo removal treatments that shows a strong association to titanium dioxide within the tattoo pigment. Herein, we describe a novel surgical approach to treat recalcitrant generalized allergic reaction to tattoo pigment.

  11. Step-by-Step Simulation of Radiation Chemistry Using Green Functions for Diffusion-Influenced Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plante, Ianik; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2011-01-01

    Radiolytic species are formed approximately 1 ps after the passage of ionizing radiation through matter. After their formation, they diffuse and chemically react with other radiolytic species and neighboring biological molecules, leading to various oxidative damage. Therefore, the simulation of radiation chemistry is of considerable importance to understand how radiolytic species damage biological molecules [1]. The step-by-step simulation of chemical reactions is difficult, because the radiolytic species are distributed non-homogeneously in the medium. Consequently, computational approaches based on Green functions for diffusion-influenced reactions should be used [2]. Recently, Green functions for more complex type of reactions have been published [3-4]. We have developed exact random variate generators of these Green functions [5], which will allow us to use them in radiation chemistry codes. Moreover, simulating chemistry using the Green functions is which is computationally very demanding, because the probabilities of reactions between each pair of particles should be evaluated at each timestep [2]. This kind of problem is well adapted for General Purpose Graphic Processing Units (GPGPU), which can handle a large number of similar calculations simultaneously. These new developments will allow us to include more complex reactions in chemistry codes, and to improve the calculation time. This code should be of importance to link radiation track structure simulations and DNA damage models.

  12. Convergence to Equilibrium in Energy-Reaction-Diffusion Systems Using Vector-Valued Functional Inequalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielke, Alexander; Mittnenzweig, Markus

    2018-04-01

    We discuss how the recently developed energy dissipation methods for reaction diffusion systems can be generalized to the non-isothermal case. For this, we use concave entropies in terms of the densities of the species and the internal energy, where the importance is that the equilibrium densities may depend on the internal energy. Using the log-Sobolev estimate and variants for lower-order entropies as well as estimates for the entropy production of the nonlinear reactions, we give two methods to estimate the relative entropy by the total entropy production, namely a somewhat restrictive convexity method, which provides explicit decay rates, and a very general, but weaker compactness method.

  13. Asymptotic analysis of reaction-diffusion-advection problems: Fronts with periodic motion and blow-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nefedov, Nikolay

    2017-02-01

    This is an extended variant of the paper presented at MURPHYS-HSFS 2016 conference in Barcelona. We discuss further development of the asymptotic method of differential inequalities to investigate existence and stability of sharp internal layers (fronts) for nonlinear singularly perturbed periodic parabolic problems and initial boundary value problems with blow-up of fronts for reaction-diffusion-advection equations. In particular, we consider periodic solutions with internal layer in the case of balanced reaction. For the initial boundary value problems we prove the existence of fronts and give their asymptotic approximation including the new case of blowing-up fronts. This case we illustrate by the generalised Burgers equation.

  14. Reaction layer in U-7WT%MO/Al diffusion couples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirandou, M.I.; Balart, S.N.; Ortiz, M.; Granovsky, M.S.

    2003-01-01

    New results of the reaction layer characterization between γ (U-7wt%Mo) alloy and Al, in chemical diffusion couples, are presented. The analysis was performed using optical and scanning electron microscopy with EDAX and X-ray diffraction techniques. Besides the main components (U, Mo)Al 3 and (U, Mo)Al 4 , already reported, two ternary compounds of high Al content have been identified in the reaction layer when it grew in retained or decomposed γ (U, Mo) phase, respectively. The drastic consequence on the interdiffusion behavior due to the thermal instability of the retained γ (U, Mo) phase is discussed. (author)

  15. Externally controlled anisotropy in pattern-forming reaction-diffusion systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escala, Dario M; Guiu-Souto, Jacobo; Muñuzuri, Alberto P

    2015-06-01

    The effect of centrifugal forces is analyzed in a pattern-forming reaction-diffusion system. Numerical simulations conducted on the appropriate extension of the Oregonator model for the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction show a great variety of dynamical behaviors in such a system. In general, the system exhibits an anisotropy that results in new types of patterns or in a global displacement of the previous one. We consider the effect of both constant and periodically modulated centrifugal forces on the different types of patterns that the system may exhibit. A detailed analysis of the patterns and behaviors observed for the different parameter values considered is presented here.

  16. Emergent structures in reaction-advection-diffusion systems on a sphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Andrew L.; Burton, Abigail M.; Fadai, Nabil T.; Van Gorder, Robert A.

    2018-04-01

    We demonstrate unusual effects due to the addition of advection into a two-species reaction-diffusion system on the sphere. We find that advection introduces emergent behavior due to an interplay of the traditional Turing patterning mechanisms with the compact geometry of the sphere. Unidirectional advection within the Turing space of the reaction-diffusion system causes patterns to be generated at one point of the sphere, and transported to the antipodal point where they are destroyed. We illustrate these effects numerically and deduce conditions for Turing instabilities on local projections to understand the mechanisms behind these behaviors. We compare this behavior to planar advection which is shown to only transport patterns across the domain. Analogous transport results seem to hold for the sphere under azimuthal transport or away from the antipodal points in unidirectional flow regimes.

  17. Entropy methods for reaction-diffusion equations: slowly growing a-priori bounds

    KAUST Repository

    Desvillettes, Laurent; Fellner, Klemens

    2008-01-01

    In the continuation of [Desvillettes, L., Fellner, K.: Exponential Decay toward Equilibrium via Entropy Methods for Reaction-Diffusion Equations. J. Math. Anal. Appl. 319 (2006), no. 1, 157-176], we study reversible reaction-diffusion equations via entropy methods (based on the free energy functional) for a 1D system of four species. We improve the existing theory by getting 1) almost exponential convergence in L1 to the steady state via a precise entropy-entropy dissipation estimate, 2) an explicit global L∞ bound via interpolation of a polynomially growing H1 bound with the almost exponential L1 convergence, and 3), finally, explicit exponential convergence to the steady state in all Sobolev norms.

  18. Numerical simulation of reaction-diffusion systems by modified cubic B-spline differential quadrature method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mittal, R.C.; Rohila, Rajni

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we have applied modified cubic B-spline based differential quadrature method to get numerical solutions of one dimensional reaction-diffusion systems such as linear reaction-diffusion system, Brusselator system, Isothermal system and Gray-Scott system. The models represented by these systems have important applications in different areas of science and engineering. The most striking and interesting part of the work is the solution patterns obtained for Gray Scott model, reminiscent of which are often seen in nature. We have used cubic B-spline functions for space discretization to get a system of ordinary differential equations. This system of ODE’s is solved by highly stable SSP-RK43 method to get solution at the knots. The computed results are very accurate and shown to be better than those available in the literature. Method is easy and simple to apply and gives solutions with less computational efforts.

  19. Identification of the population density of a species model with nonlocal diffusion and nonlinear reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuan, Nguyen Huy; Van Au, Vo; Khoa, Vo Anh; Lesnic, Daniel

    2017-05-01

    The identification of the population density of a logistic equation backwards in time associated with nonlocal diffusion and nonlinear reaction, motivated by biology and ecology fields, is investigated. The diffusion depends on an integral average of the population density whilst the reaction term is a global or local Lipschitz function of the population density. After discussing the ill-posedness of the problem, we apply the quasi-reversibility method to construct stable approximation problems. It is shown that the regularized solutions stemming from such method not only depend continuously on the final data, but also strongly converge to the exact solution in L 2-norm. New error estimates together with stability results are obtained. Furthermore, numerical examples are provided to illustrate the theoretical results.

  20. Dichotomous-noise-induced pattern formation in a reaction-diffusion system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Debojyoti; Ray, Deb Shankar

    2013-06-01

    We consider a generic reaction-diffusion system in which one of the parameters is subjected to dichotomous noise by controlling the flow of one of the reacting species in a continuous-flow-stirred-tank reactor (CSTR) -membrane reactor. The linear stability analysis in an extended phase space is carried out by invoking Furutzu-Novikov procedure for exponentially correlated multiplicative noise to derive the instability condition in the plane of the noise parameters (correlation time and strength of the noise). We demonstrate that depending on the correlation time an optimal strength of noise governs the self-organization. Our theoretical analysis is corroborated by numerical simulations on pattern formation in a chlorine-dioxide-iodine-malonic acid reaction-diffusion system.

  1. Anomalous dimension in a two-species reaction-diffusion system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmayr-Lee, Benjamin; Hanson, Jack; McIsaac, R. Scott; Hellerick, Joshua D.

    2018-01-01

    We study a two-species reaction-diffusion system with the reactions A+A\\to (0, A) and A+B\\to A , with general diffusion constants D A and D B . Previous studies showed that for dimensions d≤slant 2 the B particle density decays with a nontrivial, universal exponent that includes an anomalous dimension resulting from field renormalization. We demonstrate via renormalization group methods that the scaled B particle correlation function has a distinct anomalous dimension resulting in the asymptotic scaling \\tilde CBB(r, t) ˜ tφf(r/\\sqrt{t}) , where the exponent ϕ results from the renormalization of the square of the field associated with the B particles. We compute this exponent to first order in \

  2. A reaction-diffusion model of ROS-induced ROS release in a mitochondrial network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lufang Zhou

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Loss of mitochondrial function is a fundamental determinant of cell injury and death. In heart cells under metabolic stress, we have previously described how the abrupt collapse or oscillation of the mitochondrial energy state is synchronized across the mitochondrial network by local interactions dependent upon reactive oxygen species (ROS. Here, we develop a mathematical model of ROS-induced ROS release (RIRR based on reaction-diffusion (RD-RIRR in one- and two-dimensional mitochondrial networks. The nodes of the RD-RIRR network are comprised of models of individual mitochondria that include a mechanism of ROS-dependent oscillation based on the interplay between ROS production, transport, and scavenging; and incorporating the tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle, oxidative phosphorylation, and Ca(2+ handling. Local mitochondrial interaction is mediated by superoxide (O2.- diffusion and the O2.(--dependent activation of an inner membrane anion channel (IMAC. In a 2D network composed of 500 mitochondria, model simulations reveal DeltaPsi(m depolarization waves similar to those observed when isolated guinea pig cardiomyocytes are subjected to a localized laser-flash or antioxidant depletion. The sensitivity of the propagation rate of the depolarization wave to O(2.- diffusion, production, and scavenging in the reaction-diffusion model is similar to that observed experimentally. In addition, we present novel experimental evidence, obtained in permeabilized cardiomyocytes, confirming that DeltaPsi(m depolarization is mediated specifically by O2.-. The present work demonstrates that the observed emergent macroscopic properties of the mitochondrial network can be reproduced in a reaction-diffusion model of RIRR. Moreover, the findings have uncovered a novel aspect of the synchronization mechanism, which is that clusters of mitochondria that are oscillating can entrain mitochondria that would otherwise display stable dynamics. The work identifies the

  3. Methanol synthesis in a countercurrent gas-solid-solid trickle flow reactor. An experimental study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuczynski, M.; Oyevaar, M.H.; Pieters, R.T.; Westerterp, K.R.

    1987-01-01

    The synthesis of methanol from CO and H2 was executed in a gas-solid-solid trickle flow reactor. The reactor consisted of three tubular reactor sections with cooling sections in between. The catalyst was Cu on alumina, the adsorbent was a silica-alumina powder and the experimental range 498–523 K,

  4. Asymptotic properties of blow-up solutions in reaction-diffusion equations with nonlocal boundary flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bingchen; Dong, Mengzhen; Li, Fengjie

    2018-04-01

    This paper deals with a reaction-diffusion problem with coupled nonlinear inner sources and nonlocal boundary flux. Firstly, we propose the critical exponents on nonsimultaneous blow-up under some conditions on the initial data. Secondly, we combine the scaling technique and the Green's identity method to determine four kinds of simultaneous blow-up rates. Thirdly, the lower and the upper bounds of blow-up time are derived by using Sobolev-type differential inequalities.

  5. Coupled Diffusion and Reaction Processes in Rock Matrices: Impact on Dilute Groundwater Plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-28

    35    3.6.3-Diffusion-Reaction Cell Construction using 40 mL Vials Gas tight extraction cells were designed and constructed to serve as a means to...ground surface GC gas chromatograph HPLC high-performance liquid chromatography ISCO in situ chemical oxidation MNA monitored natural attenuation...fracture-matrix interface. Mazurek et al. (1996) showed that fractures within shales were coated with birnessite and gypsum. Thus, the impacts of

  6. Reaction-diffusion processes in zero transverse dimensions as toy models for high-energy QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armesto, Nestor; Bondarenko, Sergey; Quiroga-Arias, Paloma; Milhano, Jose Guilherme

    2008-01-01

    We examine numerically different zero-dimensional reaction-diffusion processes as candidate toy models for high-energy QCD evolution. Of the models examined-Reggeon Field Theory, Directed Percolation and Reversible Processes-only the latter shows the behaviour commonly expected, namely an increase of the scattering amplitude with increasing rapidity. Further, we find that increasing recombination terms, quantum loops and the heuristic inclusion of a running of the couplings, generically slow down the evolution.

  7. Periodic precipitation a microcomputer analysis of transport and reaction processes in diffusion media, with software development

    CERN Document Server

    Henisch, H K

    1991-01-01

    Containing illustrations, worked examples, graphs and tables, this book deals with periodic precipitation (also known as Liesegang Ring formation) in terms of mathematical models and their logical consequences, and is entirely concerned with microcomputer analysis and software development. Three distinctive periodic precipitation mechanisms are included: binary diffusion-reaction; solubility modulation, and competitive particle growth. The book provides didactic illustrations of a valuable investigational procedure, in the form of hypothetical experimentation by microcomputer. The development

  8. Conditional symmetries for systems of PDEs: new definitions and their application for reaction-diffusion systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cherniha, Roman

    2010-01-01

    New definitions of Q-conditional symmetry for systems of PDEs are presented, which generalize the standard notation of non-classical (conditional) symmetry. It is shown that different types of Q-conditional symmetry of a system generate a hierarchy of conditional symmetry operators. A class of two-component nonlinear reaction-diffusion systems is examined to demonstrate the applicability of the definitions proposed and it is shown when different definitions of Q-conditional symmetry lead to the same operators.

  9. Traveling Wave Solutions of Reaction-Diffusion Equations Arising in Atherosclerosis Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narcisa Apreutesei

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In this short review article, two atherosclerosis models are presented, one as a scalar equation and the other one as a system of two equations. They are given in terms of reaction-diffusion equations in an infinite strip with nonlinear boundary conditions. The existence of traveling wave solutions is studied for these models. The monostable and bistable cases are introduced and analyzed.

  10. Bifurcation of positive solutions to scalar reaction-diffusion equations with nonlinear boundary condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ping; Shi, Junping

    2018-01-01

    The bifurcation of non-trivial steady state solutions of a scalar reaction-diffusion equation with nonlinear boundary conditions is considered using several new abstract bifurcation theorems. The existence and stability of positive steady state solutions are proved using a unified approach. The general results are applied to a Laplace equation with nonlinear boundary condition and bistable nonlinearity, and an elliptic equation with superlinear nonlinearity and sublinear boundary conditions.

  11. Passivity analysis for uncertain BAM neural networks with time delays and reaction-diffusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jianping; Xu, Shengyuan; Shen, Hao; Zhang, Baoyong

    2013-08-01

    This article deals with the problem of passivity analysis for delayed reaction-diffusion bidirectional associative memory (BAM) neural networks with weight uncertainties. By using a new integral inequality, we first present a passivity condition for the nominal networks, and then extend the result to the case with linear fractional weight uncertainties. The proposed conditions are expressed in terms of linear matrix inequalities, and thus can be checked easily. Examples are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed results.

  12. Solid state diffusion and reaction in ZnO/SiO{sub 2} in thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jakob, A; Stucki, S; Schnyder, B; Koetz, R [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-06-01

    Detoxification of fly ash from waste incineration by evaporating harmful heavy metals is limited by the formation of stable heavy metal-matrix compounds. To study the rate of these heavy metal-matrix reactions, experiments were performed with the diffusion couple ZnO (heavy metal)-SiO{sub 2} (matrix). The atomic concentration profiles after different annealing treatments were analysed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). (author) 3 figs., 4 refs.

  13. Global exponential stability for reaction-diffusion recurrent neural networks with multiple time varying delays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lou, X.; Cui, B.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we consider the problem of exponential stability for recurrent neural networks with multiple time varying delays and reaction-diffusion terms. The activation functions are supposed to be bounded and globally Lipschitz continuous. By means of Lyapunov functional, sufficient conditions are derived, which guarantee global exponential stability of the delayed neural network. Finally, a numerical example is given to show the correctness of our analysis. (author)

  14. Mathematical analysis and numerical simulation of patterns in fractional and classical reaction-diffusion systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owolabi, Kolade M.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to examine pattern formation in the sub— and super-diffusive scenarios and compare it with that of classical or standard diffusive processes in two-component fractional reaction-diffusion systems that modeled a predator-prey dynamics. The focus of the work concentrates on the use of two separate mathematical techniques, we formulate a Fourier spectral discretization method as an efficient alternative technique to solve fractional reaction-diffusion problems in higher-dimensional space, and later advance the resulting systems of ODEs in time with the adaptive exponential time-differencing solver. Obviously, the fractional Fourier approach is able to achieve spectral convergence up to machine precision regardless of the fractional order α, owing to the fact that our approach is able to give full diagonal representation of the fractional operator. The complexity of the dynamics in this system is theoretically discussed and graphically displayed with some examples and numerical simulations in one, two and three dimensions.

  15. Convergence to a pulsating travelling wave for an epidemic reaction-diffusion system with non-diffusive susceptible population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducrot, Arnaud; Giletti, Thomas

    2014-09-01

    In this work we study the asymptotic behaviour of the Kermack-McKendrick reaction-diffusion system in a periodic environment with non-diffusive susceptible population. This problem was proposed by Kallen et al. as a model for the spatial spread for epidemics, where it can be reasonable to assume that the susceptible population is motionless. For arbitrary dimensional space we prove that large classes of solutions of such a system have an asymptotic spreading speed in large time, and that the infected population has some pulse-like asymptotic shape. The analysis of the one-dimensional problem is more developed, as we are able to uncover a much more accurate description of the profile of solutions. Indeed, we will see that, for some initially compactly supported infected population, the profile of the solution converges to some pulsating travelling wave with minimal speed, that is to some entire solution moving at a constant positive speed and whose profile's shape is periodic in time.

  16. Modeling Studies of Inhomogeneity Effects during Laser Flash Photolysis Experiments: A Reaction-Diffusion Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dóka, Éva; Lente, Gábor

    2017-04-13

    This work presents a rigorous mathematical study of the effect of unavoidable inhomogeneities in laser flash photolysis experiments. There are two different kinds of inhomegenities: the first arises from diffusion, whereas the second one has geometric origins (the shapes of the excitation and detection light beams). Both of these are taken into account in our reported model, which gives rise to a set of reaction-diffusion type partial differential equations. These equations are solved by a specially developed finite volume method. As an example, the aqueous reaction between the sulfate ion radical and iodide ion is used, for which sufficiently detailed experimental data are available from an earlier publication. The results showed that diffusion itself is in general too slow to influence the kinetic curves on the usual time scales of laser flash photolysis experiments. However, the use of the absorbances measured (e.g., to calculate the molar absorption coefficients of transient species) requires very detailed mathematical consideration and full knowledge of the geometrical shapes of the excitation laser beam and the separate detection light beam. It is also noted that the usual pseudo-first-order approach to evaluating the kinetic traces can be used successfully even if the usual large excess condition is not rigorously met in the reaction cell locally.

  17. A reaction-diffusion model of CO2 influx into an oocyte

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somersalo, Erkki; Occhipinti, Rossana; Boron, Walter F.; Calvetti, Daniela

    2012-01-01

    We have developed and implemented a novel mathematical model for simulating transients in surface pH (pHS) and intracellular pH (pHi) caused by the influx of carbon dioxide (CO2) into a Xenopus oocyte. These transients are important tools for studying gas channels. We assume that the oocyte is a sphere surrounded by a thin layer of unstirred fluid, the extracellular unconvected fluid (EUF), which is in turn surrounded by the well-stirred bulk extracellular fluid (BECF) that represents an infinite reservoir for all solutes. Here, we assume that the oocyte plasma membrane is permeable only to CO2. In both the EUF and intracellular space, solute concentrations can change because of diffusion and reactions. The reactions are the slow equilibration of the CO2 hydration-dehydration reactions and competing equilibria among carbonic acid (H2CO3)/bicarbonate ( HCO3-) and a multitude of non-CO2/HCO3- buffers. Mathematically, the model is described by a coupled system of reaction-diffusion equations that—assuming spherical radial symmetry—we solved using the method of lines with appropriate stiff solvers. In agreement with experimental data (Musa-Aziz et al, PNAS 2009, 106:5406–5411), the model predicts that exposing the cell to extracellular 1.5% CO2/10 mM HCO3- (pH 7.50) causes pHi to fall and pHS to rise rapidly to a peak and then decay. Moreover, the model provides insights into the competition between diffusion and reaction processes when we change the width of the EUF, membrane permeability to CO2, native extra-and intracellular carbonic anhydrase-like activities, the non-CO2/HCO3- (intrinsic) intracellular buffering power, or mobility of intrinsic intracellular buffers. PMID:22728674

  18. Unified path integral approach to theories of diffusion-influenced reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prüstel, Thorsten; Meier-Schellersheim, Martin

    2017-08-01

    Building on mathematical similarities between quantum mechanics and theories of diffusion-influenced reactions, we develop a general approach for computational modeling of diffusion-influenced reactions that is capable of capturing not only the classical Smoluchowski picture but also alternative theories, as is here exemplified by a volume reactivity model. In particular, we prove the path decomposition expansion of various Green's functions describing the irreversible and reversible reaction of an isolated pair of molecules. To this end, we exploit a connection between boundary value and interaction potential problems with δ - and δ'-function perturbation. We employ a known path-integral-based summation of a perturbation series to derive a number of exact identities relating propagators and survival probabilities satisfying different boundary conditions in a unified and systematic manner. Furthermore, we show how the path decomposition expansion represents the propagator as a product of three factors in the Laplace domain that correspond to quantities figuring prominently in stochastic spatially resolved simulation algorithms. This analysis will thus be useful for the interpretation of current and the design of future algorithms. Finally, we discuss the relation between the general approach and the theory of Brownian functionals and calculate the mean residence time for the case of irreversible and reversible reactions.

  19. Simulations of pattern dynamics for reaction-diffusion systems via SIMULINK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kaier; Steyn-Ross, Moira L; Steyn-Ross, D Alistair; Wilson, Marcus T; Sleigh, Jamie W; Shiraishi, Yoichi

    2014-04-11

    Investigation of the nonlinear pattern dynamics of a reaction-diffusion system almost always requires numerical solution of the system's set of defining differential equations. Traditionally, this would be done by selecting an appropriate differential equation solver from a library of such solvers, then writing computer codes (in a programming language such as C or Matlab) to access the selected solver and display the integrated results as a function of space and time. This "code-based" approach is flexible and powerful, but requires a certain level of programming sophistication. A modern alternative is to use a graphical programming interface such as Simulink to construct a data-flow diagram by assembling and linking appropriate code blocks drawn from a library. The result is a visual representation of the inter-relationships between the state variables whose output can be made completely equivalent to the code-based solution. As a tutorial introduction, we first demonstrate application of the Simulink data-flow technique to the classical van der Pol nonlinear oscillator, and compare Matlab and Simulink coding approaches to solving the van der Pol ordinary differential equations. We then show how to introduce space (in one and two dimensions) by solving numerically the partial differential equations for two different reaction-diffusion systems: the well-known Brusselator chemical reactor, and a continuum model for a two-dimensional sheet of human cortex whose neurons are linked by both chemical and electrical (diffusive) synapses. We compare the relative performances of the Matlab and Simulink implementations. The pattern simulations by Simulink are in good agreement with theoretical predictions. Compared with traditional coding approaches, the Simulink block-diagram paradigm reduces the time and programming burden required to implement a solution for reaction-diffusion systems of equations. Construction of the block-diagram does not require high-level programming

  20. Implicit coupling of turbulent diffusion with chemical reaction mechanisms for prognostic atmospheric dispersion models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berlowitz, D.R.

    1996-11-01

    In the last few decades the negative impact by humans on the thin atmospheric layer enveloping the earth, the basis for life on this planet, has increased steadily. In order to halt, or at least slow down this development, the knowledge and study of these anthropogenic influence has to be increased and possible remedies have to be suggested. An important tool for these studies are computer models. With their help the atmospheric system can be approximated and the various processes, which have led to the current situation can be quantified. They also serve as an instrument to assess short or medium term strategies to reduce this human impact. However, to assure efficiency as well as accuracy, a careful analysis of the numerous processes involved in the dispersion of pollutants in the atmosphere is called for. This should help to concentrate on the essentials and also prevent excessive usage of sometimes scarce computing resources. The basis of the presented work is the EUMAC Zooming Model (ETM), and particularly the component calculating the dispersion of pollutants in the atmosphere, the model MARS. The model has two main parts: an explicit solver, where the advection and the horizontal diffusion of pollutants are calculated, and an implicit solution mechanism, allowing the joint computation of the change of concentration due to chemical reactions, coupled with the respective influence of the vertical diffusion of the species. The aim of this thesis is to determine particularly the influence of the horizontal components of the turbulent diffusion on the existing implicit solver of the model. Suggestions for a more comprehensive inclusion of the full three dimensional diffusion operator in the implicit solver are made. This is achieved by an appropriate operator splitting. A selection of numerical approaches to tighten the coupling of the diffusion processes with the calculation of the applied chemical reaction mechanisms are examined. (author) figs., tabs., refs.

  1. Existence of weak solutions to a nonlinear reaction-diffusion system with singular sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ida de Bonis

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the existence of a class of weak solutions to a nonlinear parabolic system of reaction-diffusion type endowed with singular production terms by reaction. The singularity is due to a potential occurrence of quenching localized to the domain boundary. The kind of quenching we have in mind is due to a twofold contribution: (i the choice of boundary conditions, modeling in our case the contact with an infinite reservoir filled with ready-to-react chemicals and (ii the use of a particular nonlinear, non-Lipschitz structure of the reaction kinetics. Our working techniques use fine energy estimates for approximating non-singular problems and uniform control on the set where singularities are localizing.

  2. Diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubaschewski, O.

    1983-01-01

    The diffusion rate values of titanium, its compounds and alloys are summarized and tabulated. The individual chemical diffusion coefficients and self-diffusion coefficients of certain isotopes are given. Experimental methods are listed which were used for the determination of diffusion coefficients. Some values have been taken over from other studies. Also given are graphs showing the temperature dependences of diffusion and changes in the diffusion coefficient with concentration changes

  3. Rigorous Multicomponent Reactive Separations Modelling: Complete Consideration of Reaction-Diffusion Phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmadi, A.; Meyer, M.; Rouzineau, D.; Prevost, M.; Alix, P.; Laloue, N.

    2010-01-01

    This paper gives the first step of the development of a rigorous multicomponent reactive separation model. Such a model is highly essential to further the optimization of acid gases removal plants (CO 2 capture, gas treating, etc.) in terms of size and energy consumption, since chemical solvents are conventionally used. Firstly, two main modelling approaches are presented: the equilibrium-based and the rate-based approaches. Secondly, an extended rate-based model with rigorous modelling methodology for diffusion-reaction phenomena is proposed. The film theory and the generalized Maxwell-Stefan equations are used in order to characterize multicomponent interactions. The complete chain of chemical reactions is taken into account. The reactions can be kinetically controlled or at chemical equilibrium, and they are considered for both liquid film and liquid bulk. Thirdly, the method of numerical resolution is described. Coupling the generalized Maxwell-Stefan equations with chemical equilibrium equations leads to a highly non-linear Differential-Algebraic Equations system known as DAE index 3. The set of equations is discretized with finite-differences as its integration by Gear method is complex. The resulting algebraic system is resolved by the Newton- Raphson method. Finally, the present model and the associated methods of numerical resolution are validated for the example of esterification of methanol. This archetype non-electrolytic system permits an interesting analysis of reaction impact on mass transfer, especially near the phase interface. The numerical resolution of the model by Newton-Raphson method gives good results in terms of calculation time and convergence. The simulations show that the impact of reactions at chemical equilibrium and that of kinetically controlled reactions with high kinetics on mass transfer is relatively similar. Moreover, the Fick's law is less adapted for multicomponent mixtures where some abnormalities such as counter-diffusion

  4. Towards reaction-diffusion computing devices based on minority-carrier transport in semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asai, Tetsuya; Adamatzky, Andrew; Amemiya, Yoshihito

    2004-01-01

    Reaction-diffusion (RD) chemical systems are known to realize sensible computation when both data and results of the computation are encoded in concentration profiles of chemical species; the computation is implemented via spreading and interaction of either diffusive or phase waves. Thin-layer chemical systems are thought of therefore as massively-parallel locally-connected computing devices, where micro-volume of the medium is analogous to an elementary processor. Practical applications of the RD chemical systems are reduced however due to very low speed of traveling waves which makes real-time computation senseless. To overcome the speed-limitations while preserving unique features of RD computers we propose a semiconductor RD computing device where minority carriers diffuse as chemical species and reaction elements are represented by p-n-p-n diodes. We offer blue-prints of the RD semiconductor devices, and study in computer simulation propagation phenomena of the density wave of minority carriers. We then demonstrate what computational problems can be solved in RD semiconductor devices and evaluate space-time complexity of computation in the devices

  5. Multi-scale modeling of diffusion-controlled reactions in polymers: renormalisation of reactivity parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everaers, Ralf; Rosa, Angelo

    2012-01-07

    The quantitative description of polymeric systems requires hierarchical modeling schemes, which bridge the gap between the atomic scale, relevant to chemical or biomolecular reactions, and the macromolecular scale, where the longest relaxation modes occur. Here, we use the formalism for diffusion-controlled reactions in polymers developed by Wilemski, Fixman, and Doi to discuss the renormalisation of the reactivity parameters in polymer models with varying spatial resolution. In particular, we show that the adjustments are independent of chain length. As a consequence, it is possible to match reactions times between descriptions with different resolution for relatively short reference chains and to use the coarse-grained model to make quantitative predictions for longer chains. We illustrate our results by a detailed discussion of the classical problem of chain cyclization in the Rouse model, which offers the simplest example of a multi-scale descriptions, if we consider differently discretized Rouse models for the same physical system. Moreover, we are able to explore different combinations of compact and non-compact diffusion in the local and large-scale dynamics by varying the embedding dimension.

  6. A reaction-diffusion model for market fluctuations - A relation between price change and traded volumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuvan, Steven; Bier, Martin

    2018-02-01

    Two decades ago Bak et al. (1997) [3] proposed a reaction-diffusion model to describe market fluctuations. In the model buyers and sellers diffuse from opposite ends of a 1D interval that represents a price range. Trades occur when buyers and sellers meet. We show analytically and numerically that the model well reproduces the square-root relation between traded volumes and price changes that is observed in real-life markets. The result is remarkable as this relation has commonly been explained in terms of more elaborate trader strategies. We furthermore explain why the square-root relation is robust under model modifications and we show how real-life bond market data exhibit the square-root relation.

  7. Critical behavior in reaction-diffusion systems exhibiting absorbing phase transition

    CERN Document Server

    Ódor, G

    2003-01-01

    Phase transitions of reaction-diffusion systems with site occupation restriction and with particle creation that requires n>1 parents and where explicit diffusion of single particles (A) exists are reviewed. Arguments based on mean-field approximation and simulations are given which support novel kind of non-equilibrium criticality. These are in contradiction with the implications of a suggested phenomenological, multiplicative noise Langevin equation approach and with some of recent numerical analysis. Simulation results for the one and two dimensional binary spreading 2A -> 4A, 4A -> 2A model display a new type of mean-field criticality characterized by alpha=1/3 and beta=1/2 critical exponents suggested in cond-mat/0210615.

  8. Asymptotic behavior of equilibrium states of reaction-diffusion systems with mass conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chern, Jann-Long; Morita, Yoshihisa; Shieh, Tien-Tsan

    2018-01-01

    We deal with a stationary problem of a reaction-diffusion system with a conservation law under the Neumann boundary condition. It is shown that the stationary problem turns to be the Euler-Lagrange equation of an energy functional with a mass constraint. When the domain is the finite interval (0 , 1), we investigate the asymptotic profile of a strictly monotone minimizer of the energy as d, the ratio of the diffusion coefficient of the system, tends to zero. In view of a logarithmic function in the leading term of the potential, we get to a scaling parameter κ satisfying the relation ε : =√{ d } =√{ log ⁡ κ } /κ2. The main result shows that a sequence of minimizers converges to a Dirac mass multiplied by the total mass and that by a scaling with κ the asymptotic profile exhibits a parabola in the nonvanishing region. We also prove the existence of an unstable monotone solution when the mass is small.

  9. Accurate reaction-diffusion operator splitting on tetrahedral meshes for parallel stochastic molecular simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hepburn, I.; De Schutter, E., E-mail: erik@oist.jp [Computational Neuroscience Unit, Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University, Onna, Okinawa 904 0495 (Japan); Theoretical Neurobiology & Neuroengineering, University of Antwerp, Antwerp 2610 (Belgium); Chen, W. [Computational Neuroscience Unit, Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University, Onna, Okinawa 904 0495 (Japan)

    2016-08-07

    Spatial stochastic molecular simulations in biology are limited by the intense computation required to track molecules in space either in a discrete time or discrete space framework, which has led to the development of parallel methods that can take advantage of the power of modern supercomputers in recent years. We systematically test suggested components of stochastic reaction-diffusion operator splitting in the literature and discuss their effects on accuracy. We introduce an operator splitting implementation for irregular meshes that enhances accuracy with minimal performance cost. We test a range of models in small-scale MPI simulations from simple diffusion models to realistic biological models and find that multi-dimensional geometry partitioning is an important consideration for optimum performance. We demonstrate performance gains of 1-3 orders of magnitude in the parallel implementation, with peak performance strongly dependent on model specification.

  10. Poisson-Nernst-Planck Equations for Simulating Biomolecular Diffusion-Reaction Processes II: Size Effects on Ionic Distributions and Diffusion-Reaction Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Benzhuo; Zhou, Y.C.

    2011-01-01

    The effects of finite particle size on electrostatics, density profiles, and diffusion have been a long existing topic in the study of ionic solution. The previous size-modified Poisson-Boltzmann and Poisson-Nernst-Planck models are revisited in this article. In contrast to many previous works that can only treat particle species with a single uniform size or two sizes, we generalize the Borukhov model to obtain a size-modified Poisson-Nernst-Planck (SMPNP) model that is able to treat nonuniform particle sizes. The numerical tractability of the model is demonstrated as well. The main contributions of this study are as follows. 1), We show that an (arbitrarily) size-modified PB model is indeed implied by the SMPNP equations under certain boundary/interface conditions, and can be reproduced through numerical solutions of the SMPNP. 2), The size effects in the SMPNP effectively reduce the densities of highly concentrated counterions around the biomolecule. 3), The SMPNP is applied to the diffusion-reaction process for the first time, to our knowledge. In the case of low substrate density near the enzyme reactive site, it is observed that the rate coefficients predicted by SMPNP model are considerably larger than those by the PNP model, suggesting both ions and substrates are subject to finite size effects. 4), An accurate finite element method and a convergent Gummel iteration are developed for the numerical solution of the completely coupled nonlinear system of SMPNP equations. PMID:21575582

  11. Simultaneous fingering, double-diffusive convection, and thermal plumes derived from autocatalytic exothermic reaction fronts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskew, Matthew W.; Harrison, Jason; Simoyi, Reuben H.

    2016-11-01

    Oxidation reactions of thiourea by chlorite in a Hele-Shaw cell are excitable, autocatalytic, exothermic, and generate a lateral instability upon being triggered by the autocatalyst. Reagent concentrations used to develop convective instabilities delivered a temperature jump at the wave front of 2.1 K. The reaction zone was 2 mm and due to normal cooling after the wave front, this generated a spike rather than the standard well-studied front propagation. The reaction front has solutal and thermal contributions to density changes that act in opposite directions due to the existence of a positive isothermal density change in the reaction. The competition between these effects generates thermal plumes. The fascinating feature of this system is the coexistence of plumes and fingering in the same solution which alternate in frequency as the front propagates, generating hot and cold spots within the Hele-Shaw cell, and subsequently spatiotemporal inhomogeneities. The small ΔT at the wave front generated thermocapillary convection which competed effectively with thermogravitational forces at low Eötvös Numbers. A simplified reaction-diffusion-convection model was derived for the system. Plume formation is heavily dependent on boundary effects from the cell dimensions. This work was supported by Grant No. CHE-1056366 from the NSF and a Research Professor Grant from the University of KwaZulu-Natal.

  12. Solid-solid phase transitions in Fe nanowires induced by axial strain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandoval, Luis; Urbassek, Herbert M

    2009-01-01

    By means of classical molecular-dynamics simulations we investigate the solid-solid phase transition from a bcc to a close-packed crystal structure in cylindrical iron nanowires, induced by axial strain. The interatomic potential employed has been shown to be capable of describing the martensite-austenite phase transition in iron. We study the stress versus strain curves for different temperatures and show that for a range of temperatures it is possible to induce a solid-solid phase transition by axial strain before the elasticity is lost; these transition temperatures are below the bulk transition temperature. The two phases have different (non-linear) elastic behavior: the bcc phase softens, while the close-packed phase stiffens with temperature. We also consider the reversibility of the transformation in the elastic regimes, and the role of the strain rate on the critical strain necessary for phase transition.

  13. Role of anisotropy in determining stability of electrodeposition at solid-solid interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Zeeshan; Viswanathan, Venkatasubramanian

    2017-10-01

    We investigate the stability of electrodeposition at solid-solid interfaces for materials exhibiting an anisotropic mechanical response. The stability of electrodeposition or resistance to the formation of dendrites is studied within a linear stability analysis. The deformation and stress equations are solved using the Stroh formalism and faithfully recover the boundary conditions at the interface. The stability parameter is used to quantify the stability of different solid-solid interfaces incorporating the full anisotropy of the elastic tensor of the two materials. Results show a high degree of variability in the stability parameter depending on the crystallographic orientation of the solids in contact, and point to opportunities for exploiting this effect in developing Li metal anodes.

  14. Nonlinear waves in reaction-diffusion systems: The effect of transport memory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manne, K. K.; Hurd, A. J.; Kenkre, V. M.

    2000-01-01

    Motivated by the problem of determining stress distributions in granular materials, we study the effect of finite transport correlation times on the propagation of nonlinear wave fronts in reaction-diffusion systems. We obtain results such as the possibility of spatial oscillations in the wave-front shape for certain values of the system parameters and high enough wave-front speeds. We also generalize earlier known results concerning the minimum wave-front speed and shape-speed relationships stemming from the finiteness of the correlation times. Analytic investigations are made possible by a piecewise linear representation of the nonlinearity. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  15. Square Turing patterns in reaction-diffusion systems with coupled layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jing [State Key Laboratory for Mesoscopic Physics and School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Wang, Hongli, E-mail: hlwang@pku.edu.cn, E-mail: qi@pku.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Mesoscopic Physics and School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Center for Quantitative Biology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Ouyang, Qi, E-mail: hlwang@pku.edu.cn, E-mail: qi@pku.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Mesoscopic Physics and School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Center for Quantitative Biology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); The Peking-Tsinghua Center for Life Sciences, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2014-06-15

    Square Turing patterns are usually unstable in reaction-diffusion systems and are rarely observed in corresponding experiments and simulations. We report here an example of spontaneous formation of square Turing patterns with the Lengyel-Epstein model of two coupled layers. The squares are found to be a result of the resonance between two supercritical Turing modes with an appropriate ratio. Besides, the spatiotemporal resonance of Turing modes resembles to the mode-locking phenomenon. Analysis of the general amplitude equations for square patterns reveals that the fixed point corresponding to square Turing patterns is stationary when the parameters adopt appropriate values.

  16. Spatiotemporal chaos of self-replicating spots in reaction-diffusion systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongli; Ouyang, Qi

    2007-11-23

    The statistical properties of self-replicating spots in the reaction-diffusion Gray-Scott model are analyzed. In the chaotic regime of the system, the spots that dominate the spatiotemporal chaos grow and divide in two or decay into the background randomly and continuously. The rates at which the spots are created and decay are observed to be linearly dependent on the number of spots in the system. We derive a probabilistic description of the spot dynamics based on the statistical independence of spots and thus propose a characterization of the spatiotemporal chaos dominated by replicating spots.

  17. On one model problem for the reaction-diffusion-advection equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davydova, M. A.; Zakharova, S. A.; Levashova, N. T.

    2017-09-01

    The asymptotic behavior of the solution with boundary layers in the time-independent mathematical model of reaction-diffusion-advection arising when describing the distribution of greenhouse gases in the surface atmospheric layer is studied. On the basis of the asymptotic method of differential inequalities, the existence of a boundary-layer solution and its asymptotic Lyapunov stability as a steady-state solution of the corresponding parabolic problem is proven. One of the results of this work is the determination of the local domain of the attraction of a boundary-layer solution.

  18. Curved fronts in the Belousov-Zhabotinskii reaction-diffusion systems in R2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Hong-Tao; Wang, Zhi-Cheng; Bu, Zhen-Hui

    2018-05-01

    In this paper we consider a diffusion system with the Belousov-Zhabotinskii (BZ for short) chemical reaction. Following Brazhnik and Tyson [4] and Pérez-Muñuzuri et al. [45], who predicted V-shaped fronts theoretically and discovered V-shaped fronts by experiments respectively, we give a rigorous mathematical proof of their results. We establish the existence of V-shaped traveling fronts in R2 by constructing a proper supersolution and a subsolution. Furthermore, we establish the stability of the V-shaped front in R2.

  19. Existence and exponential stability of traveling waves for delayed reaction-diffusion systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Cheng-Hsiung; Yang, Tzi-Sheng; Yu, Zhixian

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of this work is to investigate the existence and exponential stability of traveling wave solutions for general delayed multi-component reaction-diffusion systems. Following the monotone iteration scheme via an explicit construction of a pair of upper and lower solutions, we first obtain the existence of monostable traveling wave solutions connecting two different equilibria. Then, applying the techniques of weighted energy method and comparison principle, we show that all solutions of the Cauchy problem for the considered systems converge exponentially to traveling wave solutions provided that the initial perturbations around the traveling wave fronts belong to a suitable weighted Sobolev space.

  20. Stochastic exponential stability of the delayed reaction-diffusion recurrent neural networks with Markovian jumping parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Linshan; Zhang Zhe; Wang Yangfan

    2008-01-01

    Some criteria for the global stochastic exponential stability of the delayed reaction-diffusion recurrent neural networks with Markovian jumping parameters are presented. The jumping parameters considered here are generated from a continuous-time discrete-state homogeneous Markov process, which are governed by a Markov process with discrete and finite state space. By employing a new Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional, a linear matrix inequality (LMI) approach is developed to establish some easy-to-test criteria of global exponential stability in the mean square for the stochastic neural networks. The criteria are computationally efficient, since they are in the forms of some linear matrix inequalities

  1. Nonlinear waves in reaction-diffusion systems: The effect of transport memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manne, K. K.; Hurd, A. J.; Kenkre, V. M.

    2000-04-01

    Motivated by the problem of determining stress distributions in granular materials, we study the effect of finite transport correlation times on the propagation of nonlinear wave fronts in reaction-diffusion systems. We obtain results such as the possibility of spatial oscillations in the wave-front shape for certain values of the system parameters and high enough wave-front speeds. We also generalize earlier known results concerning the minimum wave-front speed and shape-speed relationships stemming from the finiteness of the correlation times. Analytic investigations are made possible by a piecewise linear representation of the nonlinearity.

  2. Density-Dependent Conformable Space-time Fractional Diffusion-Reaction Equation and Its Exact Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Kamyar; Mayeli, Peyman; Bekir, Ahmet; Guner, Ozkan

    2018-01-01

    In this article, a special type of fractional differential equations (FDEs) named the density-dependent conformable fractional diffusion-reaction (DDCFDR) equation is studied. Aforementioned equation has a significant role in the modelling of some phenomena arising in the applied science. The well-organized methods, including the \\exp (-φ (\\varepsilon )) -expansion and modified Kudryashov methods are exerted to generate the exact solutions of this equation such that some of the solutions are new and have been reported for the first time. Results illustrate that both methods have a great performance in handling the DDCFDR equation.

  3. Adaptive exponential synchronization of delayed neural networks with reaction-diffusion terms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheng Li; Yang Huizhong; Lou Xuyang

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents an exponential synchronization scheme for a class of neural networks with time-varying and distributed delays and reaction-diffusion terms. An adaptive synchronization controller is derived to achieve the exponential synchronization of the drive-response structure of neural networks by using the Lyapunov stability theory. At the same time, the update laws of parameters are proposed to guarantee the synchronization of delayed neural networks with all parameters unknown. It is shown that the approaches developed here extend and improve the ideas presented in recent literatures.

  4. Numerical solution of the unsteady diffusion-convection-reaction equation based on improved spectral Galerkin method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Jiaqi; Zeng, Cheng; Yuan, Yupeng; Zhang, Yuzhe; Zhang, Ye

    2018-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to present an explicit numerical algorithm based on improved spectral Galerkin method for solving the unsteady diffusion-convection-reaction equation. The principal characteristics of this approach give the explicit eigenvalues and eigenvectors based on the time-space separation method and boundary condition analysis. With the help of Fourier series and Galerkin truncation, we can obtain the finite-dimensional ordinary differential equations which facilitate the system analysis and controller design. By comparing with the finite element method, the numerical solutions are demonstrated via two examples. It is shown that the proposed method is effective.

  5. The synthesis and properties of the phases obtained by solid-solid reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blonska-Tabero A.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The presented work encompasses the subject of the studies and the results obtained over the last years by the research workers of the Department of Inorganic Chemistry. They include mainly the studies on the reactivity of metal oxides, searching for new phases in binary and ternary systems of metal oxides as well as describing phase relations establishing in such systems. They also encompass works on the extensive characteristics of physico-chemical properties of the newly obtained compounds.

  6. Asymptotic stability of a coupled advection-diffusion-reaction system arising in bioreactor processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Crespo

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we present an asymptotic analysis of a coupled system of two advection-diffusion-reaction equations with Danckwerts boundary conditions, which models the interaction between a microbial population (e.g., bacteria, called biomass, and a diluted organic contaminant (e.g., nitrates, called substrate, in a continuous flow bioreactor. This system exhibits, under suitable conditions, two stable equilibrium states: one steady state in which the biomass becomes extinct and no reaction is produced, called washout, and another steady state, which corresponds to the partial elimination of the substrate. We use the linearization method to give sufficient conditions for the linear asymptotic stability of the two stable equilibrium configurations. Finally, we compare our asymptotic analysis with the usual asymptotic analysis associated to the continuous bioreactor when it is modeled with ordinary differential equations.

  7. Cluster geometry and survival probability in systems driven by reaction-diffusion dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Windus, Alastair; Jensen, Henrik J

    2008-01-01

    We consider a reaction-diffusion model incorporating the reactions A→φ, A→2A and 2A→3A. Depending on the relative rates for sexual and asexual reproduction of the quantity A, the model exhibits either a continuous or first-order absorbing phase transition to an extinct state. A tricritical point separates the two phase lines. While we comment on this critical behaviour, the main focus of the paper is on the geometry of the population clusters that form. We observe the different cluster structures that arise at criticality for the three different types of critical behaviour and show that there exists a linear relationship for the survival probability against initial cluster size at the tricritical point only.

  8. Cluster geometry and survival probability in systems driven by reaction-diffusion dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Windus, Alastair; Jensen, Henrik J [The Institute for Mathematical Sciences, 53 Prince' s Gate, South Kensington, London SW7 2PG (United Kingdom)], E-mail: h.jensen@imperial.ac.uk

    2008-11-15

    We consider a reaction-diffusion model incorporating the reactions A{yields}{phi}, A{yields}2A and 2A{yields}3A. Depending on the relative rates for sexual and asexual reproduction of the quantity A, the model exhibits either a continuous or first-order absorbing phase transition to an extinct state. A tricritical point separates the two phase lines. While we comment on this critical behaviour, the main focus of the paper is on the geometry of the population clusters that form. We observe the different cluster structures that arise at criticality for the three different types of critical behaviour and show that there exists a linear relationship for the survival probability against initial cluster size at the tricritical point only.

  9. Mode-locking in advection-reaction-diffusion systems: An invariant manifold perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locke, Rory A.; Mahoney, John R.; Mitchell, Kevin A.

    2018-01-01

    Fronts propagating in two-dimensional advection-reaction-diffusion systems exhibit a rich topological structure. When the underlying fluid flow is periodic in space and time, the reaction front can lock to the driving frequency. We explain this mode-locking phenomenon using the so-called burning invariant manifolds (BIMs). In fact, the mode-locked profile is delineated by a BIM attached to a relative periodic orbit (RPO) of the front element dynamics. Changes in the type (and loss) of mode-locking can be understood in terms of local and global bifurcations of the RPOs and their BIMs. We illustrate these concepts numerically using a chain of alternating vortices in a channel geometry.

  10. Towards an accurate and precise determination of the solid-solid transition temperature of enantiotropic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herman, Christelle, E-mail: christelle.herman@ulb.ac.b [Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Transfers, Interfaces and Processes Department, Chemical Engineering Unit, 50 Avenue Franklin D-Roosevelt, CP 165/67, 1050 Bruxelles (Belgium); Leyssens, Tom [Universite Catholique de Louvain, Institute of Condensed Matter and Nanosciences, 1 Place Louis Pasteur, 1348 Louvain-La-Neuve (Belgium); Vermylen, Valerie [UCB Pharma, 60 Allee de la Recherche, 1070 Braine l' Alleud (Belgium); Halloin, Veronique; Haut, Benoit [Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Transfers, Interfaces and Processes Department, Chemical Engineering Unit, 50 Avenue Franklin D-Roosevelt, CP 165/67, 1050 Bruxelles (Belgium)

    2011-05-15

    Research highlights: We test two methods to obtain the solid-solid transition temperature of Etiracetam system, showing two enantiotropically related polymorphs. The first method, based on a thermodynamic development, is sensitive to the correctness of the data required. The second method is an experimental study of the stability thermal range of each morph. We identify the nature of crystals in suspension at equilibrium through Raman analysis. The solid-solid transition temperature is found equal to 303.65 K {+-} 0.5 K. - Abstract: This paper presents two distinct methods for the determination of the solid-solid transition temperature (T{sub tr}) separating the temperature ranges of stability of two crystallographic forms, hereafter called morphs, of a same substance. The first method, based on thermodynamic calculations, consists in determining T{sub tr} as the temperature at which the Gibbs free energies of the two morphs are equal to each other. For this purpose, some thermodynamic characteristics of both morphs are required, such as the specific heat capacities, the melting temperatures and the melting enthalpies. These are obtained using the Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC). In the second method, T{sub tr} is determined directly by an experimental study of the temperature ranges of stability of each morph. The three main originalities of the method developed are (i) to prepare samples composed by an isomassic mixture of crystals of both morphs, (ii) to set them in a thermostated and agitated suspension, and (iii) to use an in situ Raman spectroscopic probe for the determination of the crystallographic form of the crystals in suspension at equilibrium. Both methods are applied to determine the solid-solid transition temperature of the enantiotropic system of Etiracetam, and both of its two crystallographic forms so far identified, named morph I and morph II. The first method is shown to be very sensitive to the experimental data obtained by DSC while

  11. Towards an accurate and precise determination of the solid-solid transition temperature of enantiotropic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herman, Christelle; Leyssens, Tom; Vermylen, Valerie; Halloin, Veronique; Haut, Benoit

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → We test two methods to obtain the solid-solid transition temperature of Etiracetam system, showing two enantiotropically related polymorphs. → The first method, based on a thermodynamic development, is sensitive to the correctness of the data required. → The second method is an experimental study of the stability thermal range of each morph. → We identify the nature of crystals in suspension at equilibrium through Raman analysis. → The solid-solid transition temperature is found equal to 303.65 K ± 0.5 K. - Abstract: This paper presents two distinct methods for the determination of the solid-solid transition temperature (T tr ) separating the temperature ranges of stability of two crystallographic forms, hereafter called morphs, of a same substance. The first method, based on thermodynamic calculations, consists in determining T tr as the temperature at which the Gibbs free energies of the two morphs are equal to each other. For this purpose, some thermodynamic characteristics of both morphs are required, such as the specific heat capacities, the melting temperatures and the melting enthalpies. These are obtained using the Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC). In the second method, T tr is determined directly by an experimental study of the temperature ranges of stability of each morph. The three main originalities of the method developed are (i) to prepare samples composed by an isomassic mixture of crystals of both morphs, (ii) to set them in a thermostated and agitated suspension, and (iii) to use an in situ Raman spectroscopic probe for the determination of the crystallographic form of the crystals in suspension at equilibrium. Both methods are applied to determine the solid-solid transition temperature of the enantiotropic system of Etiracetam, and both of its two crystallographic forms so far identified, named morph I and morph II. The first method is shown to be very sensitive to the experimental data obtained by DSC

  12. A continuum treatment of sliding in Eulerian simulations of solid-solid and solid-fluid interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Akshay; Ghaisas, Niranjan; Lele, Sanjiva

    2017-11-01

    A novel treatment of sliding is developed for use in an Eulerian framework for simulating elastic-plastic deformations of solids coupled with fluids. In this method, embedded interfacial boundary conditions for perfect sliding are imposed by enforcing the interface normal to be a principal direction of the Cauchy stress and appropriate consistency conditions ensure correct transmission and reflection of waves at the interface. This sliding treatment may be used either to simulate a solid-solid sliding interface or to incorporate an internal slip boundary condition at a solid-fluid interface. Sliding laws like the Coulomb friction law can also be incorporated with relative ease into this framework. Simulations of sliding interfaces are conducted using a 10th order compact finite difference scheme and a Localized Artificial Diffusivity (LAD) scheme for shock and interface capturing. 1D and 2D simulations are used to assess the accuracy of the sliding treatment. The Richmyer-Meshkov instability between copper and aluminum is simulated with this sliding treatment as a demonstration test case. Support for this work was provided through Grant B612155 from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, US Department of Energy.

  13. Non-affine fields in solid-solid transformations: the structure and stability of a product droplet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Arya; Sengupta, Surajit; Rao, Madan

    2014-01-08

    We describe the microstructure, morphology, and dynamics of growth of a droplet of martensite nucleating in a parent austenite during a solid-solid transformation, using a Landau theory written in terms of both conventional affine elastic deformations and non-affine deformations. Non-affineness, φ, serves as a source of strain incompatibility and screens long-ranged elastic interactions. It is produced wherever the local stress exceeds a threshold and anneals diffusively thereafter. Using a variational calculation, we find three types of stable solution (labeled I, II, and III) for the structure of the product droplet, depending on the stress threshold and the scaled mobilities of φ parallel and perpendicular to the parent-product interface. The profile of the non-affine field φ is different in these three solutions: I is characterized by a vanishingly small φ, II admits large values of φ localized in regions of high stress within the parent-product interface, and III is a structure in which φ completely wets the parent-product interface. The width l and size W of the twins follow the relation l is proportional to √W in solution I; this relation does not hold for II or III. We obtain a dynamical phase diagram featuring these solutions, and argue that they represent specific solid-state microstructures.

  14. Image-Based Measurement of H2O2 Reaction-Diffusion in Wounded Zebrafish Larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelcic, Mark; Enyedi, Balázs; Xavier, João B; Niethammer, Philipp

    2017-05-09

    Epithelial injury induces rapid recruitment of antimicrobial leukocytes to the wound site. In zebrafish larvae, activation of the epithelial NADPH oxidase Duox at the wound margin is required early during this response. Before injury, leukocytes are near the vascular region, that is, ∼100-300 μm away from the injury site. How Duox establishes long-range signaling to leukocytes is unclear. We conceived that extracellular hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) generated by Duox diffuses through the tissue to directly regulate chemotactic signaling in these cells. But before it can oxidize cellular proteins, H 2 O 2 must get past the antioxidant barriers that protect the cellular proteome. To test whether, or on which length scales this occurs during physiological wound signaling, we developed a computational method based on reaction-diffusion principles that infers H 2 O 2 degradation rates from intravital H 2 O 2 -biosensor imaging data. Our results indicate that at high tissue H 2 O 2 levels the peroxiredoxin-thioredoxin antioxidant chain becomes overwhelmed, and H 2 O 2 degradation stalls or ceases. Although the wound H 2 O 2 gradient reaches deep into the tissue, it likely overcomes antioxidant barriers only within ∼30 μm of the wound margin. Thus, Duox-mediated long-range signaling may require other spatial relay mechanisms besides extracellular H 2 O 2 diffusion. Copyright © 2017 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Synchronous parallel kinetic Monte Carlo for continuum diffusion-reaction systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, E.; Marian, J.; Kalos, M.H.; Perlado, J.M.

    2008-01-01

    A novel parallel kinetic Monte Carlo (kMC) algorithm formulated on the basis of perfect time synchronicity is presented. The algorithm is intended as a generalization of the standard n-fold kMC method, and is trivially implemented in parallel architectures. In its present form, the algorithm is not rigorous in the sense that boundary conflicts are ignored. We demonstrate, however, that, in their absence, or if they were correctly accounted for, our algorithm solves the same master equation as the serial method. We test the validity and parallel performance of the method by solving several pure diffusion problems (i.e. with no particle interactions) with known analytical solution. We also study diffusion-reaction systems with known asymptotic behavior and find that, for large systems with interaction radii smaller than the typical diffusion length, boundary conflicts are negligible and do not affect the global kinetic evolution, which is seen to agree with the expected analytical behavior. Our method is a controlled approximation in the sense that the error incurred by ignoring boundary conflicts can be quantified intrinsically, during the course of a simulation, and decreased arbitrarily (controlled) by modifying a few problem-dependent simulation parameters

  16. Characterization of the reaction layer in U-7wt%Mo/Al diffusion couples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirandou, M.I.; Balart, S.N.; Ortiz, M.; Granovsky, M.S. E-mail: granovsk@cnea.gov.ar

    2003-11-15

    The reaction layer in chemical diffusion couples U-7wt%Mo/Al was investigated using optical and scanning electron microscopy, electron probe microanalysis and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques. When the U-7wt%Mo alloy was previously homogenized and the {gamma}(U, Mo) phase was retained, the formation of (U, Mo)Al{sub 3} and (U, Mo)Al{sub 4} was observed at 580 deg. C. Also a very thin band was detected close to the Al side, the structure of the ternary compound Al{sub 20}UMo{sub 2} might be assigned to it. When the decomposition of the {gamma}(U, Mo) took place, a drastic change in the diffusion behavior was observed. In this case, XRD indicated the presence of phases with the structures of (U, Mo)Al{sub 3}, Al{sub 43}U{sub 6}Mo{sub 4}, {gamma}(U, Mo) and {alpha}(U) in the reaction layer.

  17. Quantitative modeling of the reaction/diffusion kinetics of two-chemistry photopolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, Benjamin Andrew

    Optically driven diffusion in photopolymers is an appealing material platform for a broad range of applications, in which the recorded refractive index patterns serve either as images (e.g. data storage, display holography) or as optical elements (e.g. custom GRIN components, integrated optical devices). A quantitative understanding of the reaction/diffusion kinetics is difficult to obtain directly, but is nevertheless necessary in order to fully exploit the wide array of design freedoms in these materials. A general strategy for characterizing these kinetics is proposed, in which key processes are decoupled and independently measured. This strategy enables prediction of a material's potential refractive index change, solely on the basis of its chemical components. The degree to which a material does not reach this potential reveals the fraction of monomer that has participated in unwanted reactions, reducing spatial resolution and dynamic range. This approach is demonstrated for a model material similar to commercial media, achieving quantitative predictions of index response over three orders of exposure dose (~1 to ~103 mJ cm-2) and three orders of feature size (0.35 to 500 microns). The resulting insights enable guided, rational design of new material formulations with demonstrated performance improvement.

  18. On the influence of hydronium and hydroxide ion diffusion on the hydrogen and oxygen evolution reactions in aqueous media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiberg, Gustav Karl Henrik; Arenz, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    We present a study concerning the influence of the diffusion of H+ and OH- ions on the hydrogen and oxygen evolution reactions (HER and OER) in aqueous electrolyte solutions. Using a rotating disk electrode (RDE), it is shown that at certain conditions the observed current, i.e., the reaction rate...

  19. Reaction-assisted diffusion bonding of TiAl alloy to steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simões, S., E-mail: ssimoes@fe.up.pt [CEMUC, Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, University of Porto, R. Dr. Roberto Frias, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal); Viana, F. [CEMUC, Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, University of Porto, R. Dr. Roberto Frias, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal); Ramos, A.S.; Vieira, M.T. [CEMUC, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Coimbra, R. Luís Reis Santos, 3030-788 Coimbra (Portugal); Vieira, M.F. [CEMUC, Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, University of Porto, R. Dr. Roberto Frias, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal)

    2016-03-01

    The dissimilar joining of TiAl to AISI 310 stainless steel by a reaction-assisted diffusion bonding process, using Ni/Al nanolayers as an interlayer, was investigated in the present work. The Ni and Al alternated nanolayers were deposited by d.c. magnetron sputtering onto the base materials, with a bilayer thickness of 14 nm. Joining experiments were performed at 800 °C for 60 min with compressive stress of 25 and 50 MPa. The effectiveness of the interlayer on the bonding process was assessed by microstructural characterization of the interface and by mechanical tests. Diffusion bonded joints were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and analyzed by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) in SEM and TEM and Fast Fourier Transform (FFT). The thickness of the interface region, together with its microstructural and mechanical characteristics, is affected by the use of Ni/Al multilayers; which promote joints with lower hardness values, closer to the values of the base materials, and exhibit higher shear strength. - Highlights: • Dissimilar joining by a reaction-assisted diffusion bonding were studied. • Ni/Al nanolayers allows join TiAl to steel in less demanding processing conditions. • The microstructural and mechanical characterization of the joints were investigated. • The fracture occurring in the TiAl base material attests to the sound joining. • Shear strength value decreases for joints with base materials without nanolayers.

  20. Solid state reaction studies in Fe3O4–TiO2 system by diffusion couple method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren, Zhongshan; Hu, Xiaojun; Xue, Xiangxin; Chou, Kuochih

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •The solid state reactions of Fe2O3-TiO2 system was studied by the diffusion couple method. •Different products were formed by diffusion, and the FeTiO3 was more stable phase. •The inter-diffusion coefficients and diffusion activation energy were estimated. -- Abstract: The solid state reactions in Fe 3 O 4 –TiO 2 system has been studied by diffusion couple experiments at 1323–1473 K, in which the oxygen partial pressure was controlled by the CO–CO 2 gas mixture. The XRD analysis was used to confirm the phases of the inter-compound, and the concentration profiles were determined by electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). Based on the concentration profile of Ti, the inter-diffusion coefficients in Fe 3 O 4 phase, which were both temperature and concentration of Ti ions dependent, were calculated by the modified Boltzmann–Matano method. According to the relation between the thickness of diffusion layer and temperature, the diffusion coefficient of the Fe 3 O 4 –TiO 2 system was obtained. According to the Arrhenius equation, the estimated diffusion activation energy was about 282.1 ± 18.8 kJ mol −1

  1. Global asymptotic stability of bistable traveling fronts in reaction-diffusion systems and their applications to biological models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Shiliang; Li Wantong

    2009-01-01

    This paper deals with the global asymptotic stability and uniqueness (up to translation) of bistable traveling fronts in a class of reaction-diffusion systems. The known results do not apply in solving these problems because the reaction terms do not satisfy the required monotone condition. To overcome the difficulty, a weak monotone condition is proposed for the reaction terms, which is called interval monotone condition. Under such a weak monotone condition, the existence and comparison theorem of solutions is first established for reaction-diffusion systems on R by appealing to the theory of abstract differential equations. The global asymptotic stability and uniqueness (up to translation) of bistable traveling fronts are then proved by the elementary super- and sub-solution comparison and squeezing methods for nonlinear evolution equations. Finally, these abstract results are applied to a two species competition-diffusion model and a system modeling man-environment-man epidemics.

  2. Diffusion induced nuclear reactions in metals: a possible source of heat in the core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamza, V.M.; Iyer, S.S.S.

    1989-01-01

    It has recently been proposed that diffusion of light nuclei in metals can give rise to unusual electrical charge distributions in their lattice structures, inducing thereby certain nuclear reactions that are otherwise uncommon. In the light of these results we advance the hypothesis that such nuclear reactions take place in the metal rich core of the earth, based on following observations: 1 - The solubility of hydrogen in metals is relatively high compared to that in silicates. 2 - Studies of rare gas samples in intraplate volcanos and diamonds show that 3 He/ He ratio increases with depth in the mantle. 3 - There are indications that He is positively correlated with enrichment of metals in lavas. We propose that hydrogen incorporated into metallic phases at the time of planetary accretion was carried to the core by downward migration of metal rich melts during the early states of proto-earth. Preliminary estimates suggest that cold fusion reactions can give rise to an average rate of heat generation of 8.2x10 12 W and may thus serve as a supplementary source of energy for the geomagnetic dynamo. (author)

  3. Global exponential stability and periodicity of reaction-diffusion delayed recurrent neural networks with Dirichlet boundary conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Junguo

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, the global exponential stability and periodicity for a class of reaction-diffusion delayed recurrent neural networks with Dirichlet boundary conditions are addressed by constructing suitable Lyapunov functionals and utilizing some inequality techniques. We first prove global exponential converge to 0 of the difference between any two solutions of the original reaction-diffusion delayed recurrent neural networks with Dirichlet boundary conditions, the existence and uniqueness of equilibrium is the direct results of this procedure. This approach is different from the usually used one where the existence, uniqueness of equilibrium and stability are proved in two separate steps. Furthermore, we prove periodicity of the reaction-diffusion delayed recurrent neural networks with Dirichlet boundary conditions. Sufficient conditions ensuring the global exponential stability and the existence of periodic oscillatory solutions for the reaction-diffusion delayed recurrent neural networks with Dirichlet boundary conditions are given. These conditions are easy to check and have important leading significance in the design and application of reaction-diffusion recurrent neural networks with delays. Finally, two numerical examples are given to show the effectiveness of the obtained results

  4. Semi-analytical solutions of the Schnakenberg model of a reaction-diffusion cell with feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Noufaey, K. S.

    2018-06-01

    This paper considers the application of a semi-analytical method to the Schnakenberg model of a reaction-diffusion cell. The semi-analytical method is based on the Galerkin method which approximates the original governing partial differential equations as a system of ordinary differential equations. Steady-state curves, bifurcation diagrams and the region of parameter space in which Hopf bifurcations occur are presented for semi-analytical solutions and the numerical solution. The effect of feedback control, via altering various concentrations in the boundary reservoirs in response to concentrations in the cell centre, is examined. It is shown that increasing the magnitude of feedback leads to destabilization of the system, whereas decreasing this parameter to negative values of large magnitude stabilizes the system. The semi-analytical solutions agree well with numerical solutions of the governing equations.

  5. Vorticity field, helicity integral and persistence of entanglement in reaction-diffusion systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trueba, J L; Arrayas, M

    2009-01-01

    We show that a global description of the stability of entangled structures in reaction-diffusion systems can be made by means of a helicity integral. A vorticity vector field is defined for these systems, as in electromagnetism or fluid dynamics. We have found under which conditions the helicity is conserved or lost through the boundaries of the medium, so the entanglement of structures observed is preserved or disappears during time evolution. We illustrate the theory with an example of knotted entanglement in a FitzHugh-Nagumo model. For this model, we introduce new non-trivial initial conditions using the Hopf fibration and follow the time evolution of the entanglement. (fast track communication)

  6. Vorticity field, helicity integral and persistence of entanglement in reaction-diffusion systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trueba, J L; Arrayas, M [Area de Electromagnetismo, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Camino del Molino s/n, 28943 Fuenlabrada, Madrid (Spain)

    2009-07-17

    We show that a global description of the stability of entangled structures in reaction-diffusion systems can be made by means of a helicity integral. A vorticity vector field is defined for these systems, as in electromagnetism or fluid dynamics. We have found under which conditions the helicity is conserved or lost through the boundaries of the medium, so the entanglement of structures observed is preserved or disappears during time evolution. We illustrate the theory with an example of knotted entanglement in a FitzHugh-Nagumo model. For this model, we introduce new non-trivial initial conditions using the Hopf fibration and follow the time evolution of the entanglement. (fast track communication)

  7. Reaction-diffusion-like formalism for plastic neural networks reveals dissipative solitons at criticality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grytskyy, Dmytro; Diesmann, Markus; Helias, Moritz

    2016-06-01

    Self-organized structures in networks with spike-timing dependent synaptic plasticity (STDP) are likely to play a central role for information processing in the brain. In the present study we derive a reaction-diffusion-like formalism for plastic feed-forward networks of nonlinear rate-based model neurons with a correlation sensitive learning rule inspired by and being qualitatively similar to STDP. After obtaining equations that describe the change of the spatial shape of the signal from layer to layer, we derive a criterion for the nonlinearity necessary to obtain stable dynamics for arbitrary input. We classify the possible scenarios of signal evolution and find that close to the transition to the unstable regime metastable solutions appear. The form of these dissipative solitons is determined analytically and the evolution and interaction of several such coexistent objects is investigated.

  8. Regularity of random attractors for fractional stochastic reaction-diffusion equations on Rn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Anhui; Li, Dingshi; Wang, Bixiang; Yang, Han

    2018-06-01

    We investigate the regularity of random attractors for the non-autonomous non-local fractional stochastic reaction-diffusion equations in Hs (Rn) with s ∈ (0 , 1). We prove the existence and uniqueness of the tempered random attractor that is compact in Hs (Rn) and attracts all tempered random subsets of L2 (Rn) with respect to the norm of Hs (Rn). The main difficulty is to show the pullback asymptotic compactness of solutions in Hs (Rn) due to the noncompactness of Sobolev embeddings on unbounded domains and the almost sure nondifferentiability of the sample paths of the Wiener process. We establish such compactness by the ideas of uniform tail-estimates and the spectral decomposition of solutions in bounded domains.

  9. Stability and Hopf Bifurcation of a Reaction-Diffusion Neutral Neuron System with Time Delay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Tao; Xia, Linmao

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, a type of reaction-diffusion neutral neuron system with time delay under homogeneous Neumann boundary conditions is considered. By constructing a basis of phase space based on the eigenvectors of the corresponding Laplace operator, the characteristic equation of this system is obtained. Then, by selecting time delay and self-feedback strength as the bifurcating parameters respectively, the dynamic behaviors including local stability and Hopf bifurcation near the zero equilibrium point are investigated when the time delay and self-feedback strength vary. Furthermore, the direction of the Hopf bifurcation and the stability of bifurcating periodic solutions are obtained by using the normal form and the center manifold theorem for the corresponding partial differential equation. Finally, two simulation examples are given to verify the theory.

  10. A Reaction-Diffusion-Based Coding Rate Control Mechanism for Camera Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki Wakamiya

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available A wireless camera sensor network is useful for surveillance and monitoring for its visibility and easy deployment. However, it suffers from the limited capacity of wireless communication and a network is easily overflown with a considerable amount of video traffic. In this paper, we propose an autonomous video coding rate control mechanism where each camera sensor node can autonomously determine its coding rate in accordance with the location and velocity of target objects. For this purpose, we adopted a biological model, i.e., reaction-diffusion model, inspired by the similarity of biological spatial patterns and the spatial distribution of video coding rate. Through simulation and practical experiments, we verify the effectiveness of our proposal.

  11. A reaction-diffusion-based coding rate control mechanism for camera sensor networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Hyodo, Katsuya; Wakamiya, Naoki; Murata, Masayuki

    2010-01-01

    A wireless camera sensor network is useful for surveillance and monitoring for its visibility and easy deployment. However, it suffers from the limited capacity of wireless communication and a network is easily overflown with a considerable amount of video traffic. In this paper, we propose an autonomous video coding rate control mechanism where each camera sensor node can autonomously determine its coding rate in accordance with the location and velocity of target objects. For this purpose, we adopted a biological model, i.e., reaction-diffusion model, inspired by the similarity of biological spatial patterns and the spatial distribution of video coding rate. Through simulation and practical experiments, we verify the effectiveness of our proposal.

  12. Dynamics of interface in three-dimensional anisotropic bistable reaction-diffusion system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Zhizhu; Liu, Jing

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a theoretical investigation of dynamics of interface (wave front) in three-dimensional (3D) reaction-diffusion (RD) system for bistable media with anisotropy constructed by means of anisotropic surface tension. An equation of motion for the wave front is derived to carry out stability analysis of transverse perturbations, which discloses mechanism of pattern formation such as labyrinthine in 3D bistable media. Particularly, the effects of anisotropy on wave propagation are studied. It was found that, sufficiently strong anisotropy can induce dynamical instabilities and lead to breakup of the wave front. With the fast-inhibitor limit, the bistable system can further be described by a variational dynamics so that the boundary integral method is adopted to study the dynamics of wave fronts.

  13. Automatic simplification of systems of reaction-diffusion equations by a posteriori analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maybank, Philip J; Whiteley, Jonathan P

    2014-02-01

    Many mathematical models in biology and physiology are represented by systems of nonlinear differential equations. In recent years these models have become increasingly complex in order to explain the enormous volume of data now available. A key role of modellers is to determine which components of the model have the greatest effect on a given observed behaviour. An approach for automatically fulfilling this role, based on a posteriori analysis, has recently been developed for nonlinear initial value ordinary differential equations [J.P. Whiteley, Model reduction using a posteriori analysis, Math. Biosci. 225 (2010) 44-52]. In this paper we extend this model reduction technique for application to both steady-state and time-dependent nonlinear reaction-diffusion systems. Exemplar problems drawn from biology are used to demonstrate the applicability of the technique. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Diffusion-limited reactions of hard-core particles in one dimension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bares, P.-A.; Mobilia, M.

    1999-02-01

    We investigate three different methods to tackle the problem of diffusion-limited reactions (annihilation) of hard-core classical particles in one dimension. We first extend an approach devised by Lushnikov [Sov. Phys. JETP 64, 811 (1986)] and calculate for a single species the asymptotic long-time and/or large-distance behavior of the two-point correlation function. Based on a work by Grynberg and Stinchcombe [Phys. Rev. E 50, 957 (1994); Phys. Rev. Lett. 74, 1242 (1995); 76, 851 (1996)], which was developed to treat stochastic adsorption-desorption models, we provide in a second step the exact two-point (one- and two-time) correlation functions of Lushnikov's model. We then propose a formulation of the problem in terms of path integrals for pseudo- fermions. This formalism can be used to advantage in the multispecies case, especially when applying perturbative renormalization group techniques.

  15. Travelling wave and convergence in stage-structured reaction-diffusion competitive models with nonlocal delays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Rui; Chaplain, M.A.J.; Davidson, F.A.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we first investigate a stage-structured competitive model with time delays, harvesting, and nonlocal spatial effect. By using an iterative technique recently developed by Wu and Zou (Wu J, Zou X. Travelling wave fronts of reaction-diffusion systems with delay. J Dynam Differen Equat 2001;13:651-87), sufficient conditions are established for the existence of travelling front solution connecting the two boundary equilibria in the case when there is no positive equilibrium. The travelling wave front corresponds to an invasion by a stronger species which drives the weaker species to extinction. Secondly, we consider a stage-structured competitive model with time delays and nonlocal spatial effect when the domain is finite. We prove the global stability of each of the nonnegative equilibria and demonstrate that the more complex model studied here admits three possible long term behaviors: coexistence, bistability and dominance as is the case for the standard Lotka-Voltera competitive model

  16. Monostable traveling waves for a time-periodic and delayed nonlocal reaction-diffusion equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Panxiao; Wu, Shi-Liang

    2018-04-01

    This paper is concerned with a time-periodic and delayed nonlocal reaction-diffusion population model with monostable nonlinearity. Under quasi-monotone or non-quasi-monotone assumptions, it is known that there exists a critical wave speed c_*>0 such that a periodic traveling wave exists if and only if the wave speed is above c_*. In this paper, we first prove the uniqueness of non-critical periodic traveling waves regardless of whether the model is quasi-monotone or not. Further, in the quasi-monotone case, we establish the exponential stability of non-critical periodic traveling fronts. Finally, we illustrate the main results by discussing two types of death and birth functions arising from population biology.

  17. Scalable implicit methods for reaction-diffusion equations in two and three space dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veronese, S.V.; Othmer, H.G. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    1996-12-31

    This paper describes the implementation of a solver for systems of semi-linear parabolic partial differential equations in two and three space dimensions. The solver is based on a parallel implementation of a non-linear Alternating Direction Implicit (ADI) scheme which uses a Cartesian grid in space and an implicit time-stepping algorithm. Various reordering strategies for the linearized equations are used to reduce the stride and improve the overall effectiveness of the parallel implementation. We have successfully used this solver for large-scale reaction-diffusion problems in computational biology and medicine in which the desired solution is a traveling wave that may contain rapid transitions. A number of examples that illustrate the efficiency and accuracy of the method are given here; the theoretical analysis will be presented.

  18. Stability of Electrodeposition at Solid-Solid Interfaces and Implications for Metal Anodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Zeeshan; Viswanathan, Venkatasubramanian

    2017-08-01

    We generalize the conditions for stable electrodeposition at isotropic solid-solid interfaces using a kinetic model which incorporates the effects of stresses and surface tension at the interface. We develop a stability diagram that shows two regimes of stability: a previously known pressure-driven mechanism and a new density-driven stability mechanism that is governed by the relative density of metal in the two phases. We show that inorganic solids and solid polymers generally do not lead to stable electrodeposition, and provide design guidelines for achieving stable electrodeposition.

  19. Hopf bifurcation in a reaction-diffusive two-species model with nonlocal delay effect and general functional response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Renji; Dai, Binxiang

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • We model general two-dimensional reaction-diffusion with nonlocal delay. • The existence of unique positive steady state is studied. • The bilinear form for the proposed system is given. • The existence, direction of Hopf bifurcation are given by symmetry method. - Abstract: A nonlocal delayed reaction-diffusive two-species model with Dirichlet boundary condition and general functional response is investigated in this paper. Based on the Lyapunov–Schmidt reduction, the existence, bifurcation direction and stability of Hopf bifurcating periodic orbits near the positive spatially nonhomogeneous steady-state solution are obtained, where the time delay is taken as the bifurcation parameter. Moreover, the general results are applied to a diffusive Lotka–Volterra type food-limited population model with nonlocal delay effect, and it is found that diffusion and nonlocal delay can also affect the other dynamic behavior of the system by numerical experiments.

  20. Hybrid approaches for multiple-species stochastic reaction-diffusion models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spill, Fabian; Guerrero, Pilar; Alarcon, Tomas; Maini, Philip K.; Byrne, Helen

    2015-10-01

    Reaction-diffusion models are used to describe systems in fields as diverse as physics, chemistry, ecology and biology. The fundamental quantities in such models are individual entities such as atoms and molecules, bacteria, cells or animals, which move and/or react in a stochastic manner. If the number of entities is large, accounting for each individual is inefficient, and often partial differential equation (PDE) models are used in which the stochastic behaviour of individuals is replaced by a description of the averaged, or mean behaviour of the system. In some situations the number of individuals is large in certain regions and small in others. In such cases, a stochastic model may be inefficient in one region, and a PDE model inaccurate in another. To overcome this problem, we develop a scheme which couples a stochastic reaction-diffusion system in one part of the domain with its mean field analogue, i.e. a discretised PDE model, in the other part of the domain. The interface in between the two domains occupies exactly one lattice site and is chosen such that the mean field description is still accurate there. In this way errors due to the flux between the domains are small. Our scheme can account for multiple dynamic interfaces separating multiple stochastic and deterministic domains, and the coupling between the domains conserves the total number of particles. The method preserves stochastic features such as extinction not observable in the mean field description, and is significantly faster to simulate on a computer than the pure stochastic model.

  1. Hybrid approaches for multiple-species stochastic reaction-diffusion models.

    KAUST Repository

    Spill, Fabian

    2015-10-01

    Reaction-diffusion models are used to describe systems in fields as diverse as physics, chemistry, ecology and biology. The fundamental quantities in such models are individual entities such as atoms and molecules, bacteria, cells or animals, which move and/or react in a stochastic manner. If the number of entities is large, accounting for each individual is inefficient, and often partial differential equation (PDE) models are used in which the stochastic behaviour of individuals is replaced by a description of the averaged, or mean behaviour of the system. In some situations the number of individuals is large in certain regions and small in others. In such cases, a stochastic model may be inefficient in one region, and a PDE model inaccurate in another. To overcome this problem, we develop a scheme which couples a stochastic reaction-diffusion system in one part of the domain with its mean field analogue, i.e. a discretised PDE model, in the other part of the domain. The interface in between the two domains occupies exactly one lattice site and is chosen such that the mean field description is still accurate there. In this way errors due to the flux between the domains are small. Our scheme can account for multiple dynamic interfaces separating multiple stochastic and deterministic domains, and the coupling between the domains conserves the total number of particles. The method preserves stochastic features such as extinction not observable in the mean field description, and is significantly faster to simulate on a computer than the pure stochastic model.

  2. Hybrid approaches for multiple-species stochastic reaction-diffusion models.

    KAUST Repository

    Spill, Fabian; Guerrero, Pilar; Alarcon, Tomas; Maini, Philip K; Byrne, Helen

    2015-01-01

    Reaction-diffusion models are used to describe systems in fields as diverse as physics, chemistry, ecology and biology. The fundamental quantities in such models are individual entities such as atoms and molecules, bacteria, cells or animals, which move and/or react in a stochastic manner. If the number of entities is large, accounting for each individual is inefficient, and often partial differential equation (PDE) models are used in which the stochastic behaviour of individuals is replaced by a description of the averaged, or mean behaviour of the system. In some situations the number of individuals is large in certain regions and small in others. In such cases, a stochastic model may be inefficient in one region, and a PDE model inaccurate in another. To overcome this problem, we develop a scheme which couples a stochastic reaction-diffusion system in one part of the domain with its mean field analogue, i.e. a discretised PDE model, in the other part of the domain. The interface in between the two domains occupies exactly one lattice site and is chosen such that the mean field description is still accurate there. In this way errors due to the flux between the domains are small. Our scheme can account for multiple dynamic interfaces separating multiple stochastic and deterministic domains, and the coupling between the domains conserves the total number of particles. The method preserves stochastic features such as extinction not observable in the mean field description, and is significantly faster to simulate on a computer than the pure stochastic model.

  3. Characteristics of the probability function for three random-walk models of reaction--diffusion processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musho, M.K.; Kozak, J.J.

    1984-01-01

    A method is presented for calculating exactly the relative width (sigma 2 )/sup 1/2// , the skewness γ 1 , and the kurtosis γ 2 characterizing the probability distribution function for three random-walk models of diffusion-controlled processes. For processes in which a diffusing coreactant A reacts irreversibly with a target molecule B situated at a reaction center, three models are considered. The first is the traditional one of an unbiased, nearest-neighbor random walk on a d-dimensional periodic/confining lattice with traps; the second involves the consideration of unbiased, non-nearest-neigh bor (i.e., variable-step length) walks on the same d-dimensional lattice; and, the third deals with the case of a biased, nearest-neighbor walk on a d-dimensional lattice (wherein a walker experiences a potential centered at the deep trap site of the lattice). Our method, which has been described in detail elsewhere [P.A. Politowicz and J. J. Kozak, Phys. Rev. B 28, 5549 (1983)] is based on the use of group theoretic arguments within the framework of the theory of finite Markov processes

  4. A Reaction-Diffusion Model for Synapse Growth and Long-Term Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kang; Lisman, John; Hagan, Michael

    Memory storage involves strengthening of synaptic transmission known as long-term potentiation (LTP). The late phase of LTP is associated with structural processes that enlarge the synapse. Yet, synapses must be stable, despite continual subunit turnover, over the lifetime of an encoded memory. These considerations suggest that synapses are variable-size stable structure (VSSS), meaning they can switch between multiple metastable structures with different sizes. The mechanisms underlying VSSS are poorly understood. While experiments and theory have suggested that the interplay between diffusion and receptor-scaffold interactions can lead to a preferred stable size for synaptic domains, such a mechanism cannot explain how synapses adopt widely different sizes. Here we develop a minimal reaction-diffusion model of VSSS for synapse growth, incorporating the recent observation from super-resolution microscopy that neural activity can build compositional heterogeneities within synaptic domains. We find that introducing such heterogeneities can change the stable domain size in a controlled manner. We discuss a potential connection between this model and experimental data on synapse sizes, and how it provides a possible mechanism to structurally encode graded long-term memory. We acknowledge the support from NSF INSPIRE Award number IOS-1526941 (KL, MFH, JL) and the Brandeis Center for Bioinspired Soft Materials, an NSF MRSEC, DMR- 1420382 (MFH).

  5. Traveling and Pinned Fronts in Bistable Reaction-Diffusion Systems on Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouvaris, Nikos E.; Kori, Hiroshi; Mikhailov, Alexander S.

    2012-01-01

    Traveling fronts and stationary localized patterns in bistable reaction-diffusion systems have been broadly studied for classical continuous media and regular lattices. Analogs of such non-equilibrium patterns are also possible in networks. Here, we consider traveling and stationary patterns in bistable one-component systems on random Erdös-Rényi, scale-free and hierarchical tree networks. As revealed through numerical simulations, traveling fronts exist in network-organized systems. They represent waves of transition from one stable state into another, spreading over the entire network. The fronts can furthermore be pinned, thus forming stationary structures. While pinning of fronts has previously been considered for chains of diffusively coupled bistable elements, the network architecture brings about significant differences. An important role is played by the degree (the number of connections) of a node. For regular trees with a fixed branching factor, the pinning conditions are analytically determined. For large Erdös-Rényi and scale-free networks, the mean-field theory for stationary patterns is constructed. PMID:23028746

  6. A nonlocal and periodic reaction-diffusion-advection model of a single phytoplankton species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Rui; Zhao, Xiao-Qiang

    2016-02-01

    In this article, we are concerned with a nonlocal reaction-diffusion-advection model which describes the evolution of a single phytoplankton species in a eutrophic vertical water column where the species relies solely on light for its metabolism. The new feature of our modeling equation lies in that the incident light intensity and the death rate are assumed to be time periodic with a common period. We first establish a threshold type result on the global dynamics of this model in terms of the basic reproduction number R0. Then we derive various characterizations of R0 with respect to the vertical turbulent diffusion rate, the sinking or buoyant rate and the water column depth, respectively, which in turn give rather precise conditions to determine whether the phytoplankton persist or become extinct. Our theoretical results not only extend the existing ones for the time-independent case, but also reveal new interesting effects of the modeling parameters and the time-periodic heterogeneous environment on persistence and extinction of the phytoplankton species, and thereby suggest important implications for phytoplankton growth control.

  7. Development of silver-gas diffusion electrodes for the oxygen reduction reaction by electrodeposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salomé, Sónia; Rego, Rosa; Oliveira, M. Cristina, E-mail: mcris@utad.pt

    2013-12-16

    Silver-gas diffusion electrodes (Ag-GDE) were prepared by direct deposition of the catalyst onto a carbon paper support by electrodeposition. This deposition technique, under potentiostatic and galvanostatic mode, allows the production of well dispersed ultra-low Ag loading levels. The catalytic activity of the prepared materials towards the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) was investigated in the alkaline solution and its tolerance to methanol was evaluated. Based on an Ag-ink prepared from the electrodeposit material and RDE experiments, it was concluded that the ORR occurs via a four-electron pathway on the Ag electrodeposit. The combination of reasonably high catalytic activity, efficiency, low price, facile and green synthesis makes the electrodeposited Ag-GDE attractive for the ORR in alkaline fuel cells. - Highlights: • A facile and simple way to successfully prepare catalyzed gas diffusion electrodes. • Ultra-low loadings of Ag-GDEs can be achieved. • Good tolerance to methanol and a high mass activity (3.14 mA{sub Ag} mg{sup −1}). • ORR occurs via a four-electron pathway.

  8. Assessment of sorption properties and kinetic reaction of phosphorus reactive material to limit diffuse pollution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bus Agnieszka

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Assessment of sorption properties and kinetic reaction of phosphorus reactive material to limit diffuse pollution. Polonite® is an effective reactive material (manufactured from opoka rock for removing phosphorus from aqueous solutions. In conducted experiments, Polonite® of grain size of 2–5 mm was used as a potential reactive material which can be used as a filter fulfillment to reduce phosphorus diffuse pollution from agriculture areas. Kinetic and equilibrium studies (performed as a batch experiment were carried out as a function of time to evaluate the sorption properties of the material. The obtained results show that Polonite® effectively removes such contamination. All tested concentrations (0.998, 5.213, 10.965 mg P-PO4·L−1 are characterized by a better fit to pseudo-second kinetic order. The Langmuir isotherm the best reflects the mechanism of adsorption process in case of Polonite® and based on the isotherm, calculated maximum adsorption capacity equals 96.58 mg P-PO4·g−1.

  9. Fourth order Douglas implicit scheme for solving three dimension reaction diffusion equation with non-linear source term

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahid Hasnain

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This research paper represents a numerical approximation to non-linear three dimension reaction diffusion equation with non-linear source term from population genetics. Since various initial and boundary value problems exist in three dimension reaction diffusion phenomena, which are studied numerically by different numerical methods, here we use finite difference schemes (Alternating Direction Implicit and Fourth Order Douglas Implicit to approximate the solution. Accuracy is studied in term of L2, L∞ and relative error norms by random selected grids along time levels for comparison with analytical results. The test example demonstrates the accuracy, efficiency and versatility of the proposed schemes. Numerical results showed that Fourth Order Douglas Implicit scheme is very efficient and reliable for solving 3-D non-linear reaction diffusion equation.

  10. Fourth order Douglas implicit scheme for solving three dimension reaction diffusion equation with non-linear source term

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasnain, Shahid; Saqib, Muhammad; Mashat, Daoud Suleiman

    2017-07-01

    This research paper represents a numerical approximation to non-linear three dimension reaction diffusion equation with non-linear source term from population genetics. Since various initial and boundary value problems exist in three dimension reaction diffusion phenomena, which are studied numerically by different numerical methods, here we use finite difference schemes (Alternating Direction Implicit and Fourth Order Douglas Implicit) to approximate the solution. Accuracy is studied in term of L2, L∞ and relative error norms by random selected grids along time levels for comparison with analytical results. The test example demonstrates the accuracy, efficiency and versatility of the proposed schemes. Numerical results showed that Fourth Order Douglas Implicit scheme is very efficient and reliable for solving 3-D non-linear reaction diffusion equation.

  11. On some limitations of reaction-diffusion chemical computers in relation to Voronoi diagram and its inversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamatzky, Andrew; Lacy Costello, Benjamin de

    2003-01-01

    A reaction-diffusion chemical computer in this context is a planar uniform chemical reactor, where data and results of a computation are represented by concentration profiles of reactants and the computation itself is implemented via the spreading and interaction of diffusive and phase waves. This class of chemical computers are efficient at solving problems with a 'natural' parallelism where data sets are decomposable onto a large number of geographically neighboring domains which are then processed in parallel. Typical problems of this type include image processing, geometrical transformations and optimisation. When chemical based devices are used to solve such problems questions regarding their reproducible, efficiency and the accuracy of their computations arise. In addition to these questions what are the limitations of reaction-diffusion chemical processors--what type of problems cannot currently and are unlikely ever to be solved? To answer the questions we study how a Voronoi diagram is constructed and how it is inverted in a planar chemical processor. We demonstrate that a Voronoi diagram is computed only partially in the chemical processor. We also prove that given a specific Voronoi diagram it is impossible to reconstruct the planar set (from which diagram was computed) in the reaction-diffusion chemical processor. In the Letter we open the first ever line of enquiry into the computational inability of reaction-diffusion chemical computers

  12. Global exponential stability of impulsive fuzzy cellular neural networks with mixed delays and reaction-diffusion terms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xiaohu; Xu Daoyi

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, the global exponential stability of impulsive fuzzy cellular neural networks with mixed delays and reaction-diffusion terms is considered. By establishing an integro-differential inequality with impulsive initial condition and using the properties of M-cone and eigenspace of the spectral radius of nonnegative matrices, several new sufficient conditions are obtained to ensure the global exponential stability of the equilibrium point for fuzzy cellular neural networks with delays and reaction-diffusion terms. These results extend and improve the earlier publications. Two examples are given to illustrate the efficiency of the obtained results.

  13. Nonequilibrium transition and pattern formation in a linear reaction-diffusion system with self-regulated kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Shibashis; Ghosh, Shyamolina; Ray, Deb Shankar

    2018-02-01

    We consider a reaction-diffusion system with linear, stochastic activator-inhibitor kinetics where the time evolution of concentration of a species at any spatial location depends on the relative average concentration of its neighbors. This self-regulating nature of kinetics brings in spatial correlation between the activator and the inhibitor. An interplay of this correlation in kinetics and disparity of diffusivities of the two species leads to symmetry breaking non-equilibrium transition resulting in stationary pattern formation. The role of initial noise strength and the linear reaction terms has been analyzed for pattern selection.

  14. Exact solutions of linear reaction-diffusion processes on a uniformly growing domain: criteria for successful colonization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J Simpson

    Full Text Available Many processes during embryonic development involve transport and reaction of molecules, or transport and proliferation of cells, within growing tissues. Mathematical models of such processes usually take the form of a reaction-diffusion partial differential equation (PDE on a growing domain. Previous analyses of such models have mainly involved solving the PDEs numerically. Here, we present a framework for calculating the exact solution of a linear reaction-diffusion PDE on a growing domain. We derive an exact solution for a general class of one-dimensional linear reaction-diffusion process on 0diffusivity associated with the spreading density profile, (iii the reaction rate, and (iv the initial condition. Altering the balance between these four features leads to different outcomes in terms of whether an initial profile, located near x = 0, eventually overcomes the domain growth and colonizes the entire length of the domain by reaching the boundary where x = L(t.

  15. Exact solutions of linear reaction-diffusion processes on a uniformly growing domain: criteria for successful colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Matthew J

    2015-01-01

    Many processes during embryonic development involve transport and reaction of molecules, or transport and proliferation of cells, within growing tissues. Mathematical models of such processes usually take the form of a reaction-diffusion partial differential equation (PDE) on a growing domain. Previous analyses of such models have mainly involved solving the PDEs numerically. Here, we present a framework for calculating the exact solution of a linear reaction-diffusion PDE on a growing domain. We derive an exact solution for a general class of one-dimensional linear reaction-diffusion process on 0exact solutions with numerical approximations confirms the veracity of the method. Furthermore, our examples illustrate a delicate interplay between: (i) the rate at which the domain elongates, (ii) the diffusivity associated with the spreading density profile, (iii) the reaction rate, and (iv) the initial condition. Altering the balance between these four features leads to different outcomes in terms of whether an initial profile, located near x = 0, eventually overcomes the domain growth and colonizes the entire length of the domain by reaching the boundary where x = L(t).

  16. A fully coupled diffusion-reaction scheme for moisture sorption-desorption in an anhydride-cured epoxy resin

    KAUST Repository

    El Yagoubi, Jalal; Lubineau, Gilles; Roger, Frederic; Verdu, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    Thermoset materials frequently display non-classical moisture sorption behaviors. In this paper, we investigated this issue from an experimental point of view as well as in terms of modeling the water transport. We used the gravimetric technique to monitor water uptake by epoxy samples, with several thicknesses exposed to different levels of humidity during absorption and desorption tests. Our results revealed that the polymer displays a two-stage behavior with a residual amount of water that is desorbed progressively. We proposed a phenomenological reaction-diffusion scheme to describe this behavior. The model describes water transport as a competition between diffusion and the reaction, during which the local diffusivity and solubility depend on the local advancement of the reaction. We then implemented our model using COMSOL Multiphysics and identified it using a MATLAB-COMSOL optimization tool and the experimental data. We discussed the relation between the hydrophilicity of the product of the reaction and the diffusion behavior. We examined the reaction-induced modification of the water concentration field. It is worth noting that part of the phenomenology can be explained by the presence of hydrolyzable groups. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. A fully coupled diffusion-reaction scheme for moisture sorption-desorption in an anhydride-cured epoxy resin

    KAUST Repository

    El Yagoubi, Jalal

    2012-11-01

    Thermoset materials frequently display non-classical moisture sorption behaviors. In this paper, we investigated this issue from an experimental point of view as well as in terms of modeling the water transport. We used the gravimetric technique to monitor water uptake by epoxy samples, with several thicknesses exposed to different levels of humidity during absorption and desorption tests. Our results revealed that the polymer displays a two-stage behavior with a residual amount of water that is desorbed progressively. We proposed a phenomenological reaction-diffusion scheme to describe this behavior. The model describes water transport as a competition between diffusion and the reaction, during which the local diffusivity and solubility depend on the local advancement of the reaction. We then implemented our model using COMSOL Multiphysics and identified it using a MATLAB-COMSOL optimization tool and the experimental data. We discussed the relation between the hydrophilicity of the product of the reaction and the diffusion behavior. We examined the reaction-induced modification of the water concentration field. It is worth noting that part of the phenomenology can be explained by the presence of hydrolyzable groups. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Rigorous Derivation of a Nonlinear Diffusion Equation as Fast-Reaction Limit of a Continuous Coagulation-Fragmentation Model with Diffusion

    KAUST Repository

    Carrillo, J. A.; Desvillettes, L.; Fellner, K.

    2009-01-01

    Weak solutions of the spatially inhomogeneous (diffusive) Aizenmann-Bak model of coagulation-breakup within a bounded domain with homogeneous Neumann boundary conditions are shown to converge, in the fast reaction limit, towards local equilibria determined by their mass. Moreover, this mass is the solution of a nonlinear diffusion equation whose nonlinearity depends on the (size-dependent) diffusion coefficient. Initial data are assumed to have integrable zero order moment and square integrable first order moment in size, and finite entropy. In contrast to our previous result [5], we are able to show the convergence without assuming uniform bounds from above and below on the number density of clusters. © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

  19. Rigorous Derivation of a Nonlinear Diffusion Equation as Fast-Reaction Limit of a Continuous Coagulation-Fragmentation Model with Diffusion

    KAUST Repository

    Carrillo, J. A.

    2009-10-30

    Weak solutions of the spatially inhomogeneous (diffusive) Aizenmann-Bak model of coagulation-breakup within a bounded domain with homogeneous Neumann boundary conditions are shown to converge, in the fast reaction limit, towards local equilibria determined by their mass. Moreover, this mass is the solution of a nonlinear diffusion equation whose nonlinearity depends on the (size-dependent) diffusion coefficient. Initial data are assumed to have integrable zero order moment and square integrable first order moment in size, and finite entropy. In contrast to our previous result [5], we are able to show the convergence without assuming uniform bounds from above and below on the number density of clusters. © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

  20. Traveling wave solutions of a biological reaction-convection-diffusion equation model by using $(G'/G$ expansion method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahnam Javadi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the $(G'/G$-expansion method is applied to solve a biological reaction-convection-diffusion model arising in mathematical biology. Exact traveling wave solutions are obtained by this method. This scheme can be applied to a wide class of nonlinear partial differential equations.

  1. The Influence of Receptor-Mediated Interactions on Reaction-Diffusion Mechanisms of Cellular Self-organisation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klika, Václav; Baker, R. E.; Headon, D.; Gaffney, E. A.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 74, č. 4 (2012), s. 935-957 ISSN 0092-8240 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : reaction-diffusion * receptor-mediated patterning * turing models Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.023, year: 2012 http://www.springerlink.com/content/9713544x6871w4n6/?MUD=MP

  2. A variational approach to bifurcation points of a reaction-diffusion system with obstacles and neumann boundary conditions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Eisner, Jan; Kučera, Milan; Väth, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 61, č. 1 (2016), s. 1-25 ISSN 0862-7940 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-12580S Institutional support: RVO:67985904 ; RVO:67985840 Keywords : reaction-diffusion system * unlateral condition * variational inequality Subject RIV: EG - Zoology; BA - General Mathematics (MU-W) Impact factor: 0.618, year: 2016

  3. Experimental evidence of a diffusion process associated with the mass asymmetry degree of freedom in heavy ion reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moretto, L.G.; Babinet, R.P.; Galin, J.; Thompson, S.G.

    1975-01-01

    Dramatic changes of fragment angular distributions over a large range of atomic numbers in the reactions induced by 14 N, 20 Ne, and 40 Ar on natural Ag targets are interpreted as evidence of a diffusion-controlled evolution of an intermediate complex along the mass asymmetry degree of freedom. (Auth.)

  4. Real-time nonlinear feedback control of pattern formation in (bio)chemical reaction-diffusion processes: a model study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt-Pollmann, U; Lebiedz, D; Diehl, M; Sager, S; Schlöder, J

    2005-09-01

    Theoretical and experimental studies related to manipulation of pattern formation in self-organizing reaction-diffusion processes by appropriate control stimuli become increasingly important both in chemical engineering and cellular biochemistry. In a model study, we demonstrate here exemplarily the application of an efficient nonlinear model predictive control (NMPC) algorithm to real-time optimal feedback control of pattern formation in a bacterial chemotaxis system modeled by nonlinear partial differential equations. The corresponding drift-diffusion model type is representative for many (bio)chemical systems involving nonlinear reaction dynamics and nonlinear diffusion. We show how the computed optimal feedback control strategy exploits the system inherent physical property of wave propagation to achieve desired control aims. We discuss various applications of our approach to optimal control of spatiotemporal dynamics.

  5. Effects of intrinsic stochasticity on delayed reaction-diffusion patterning systems

    KAUST Repository

    Woolley, Thomas E.; Baker, Ruth E.; Gaffney, Eamonn A.; Maini, Philip K.; Seirin-Lee, Sungrim

    2012-01-01

    Cellular gene expression is a complex process involving many steps, including the transcription of DNA and translation of mRNA; hence the synthesis of proteins requires a considerable amount of time, from ten minutes to several hours. Since diffusion-driven instability has been observed to be sensitive to perturbations in kinetic delays, the application of Turing patterning mechanisms to the problem of producing spatially heterogeneous differential gene expression has been questioned. In deterministic systems a small delay in the reactions can cause a large increase in the time it takes a system to pattern. Recently, it has been observed that in undelayed systems intrinsic stochasticity can cause pattern initiation to occur earlier than in the analogous deterministic simulations. Here we are interested in adding both stochasticity and delays to Turing systems in order to assess whether stochasticity can reduce the patterning time scale in delayed Turing systems. As analytical insights to this problem are difficult to attain and often limited in their use, we focus on stochastically simulating delayed systems. We consider four different Turing systems and two different forms of delay. Our results are mixed and lead to the conclusion that, although the sensitivity to delays in the Turing mechanism is not completely removed by the addition of intrinsic noise, the effects of the delays are clearly ameliorated in certain specific cases. © 2012 American Physical Society.

  6. Spatiotemporal Patterns in a Ratio-Dependent Food Chain Model with Reaction-Diffusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Predator-prey models describe biological phenomena of pursuit-evasion interaction. And this interaction exists widely in the world for the necessary energy supplement of species. In this paper, we have investigated a ratio-dependent spatially extended food chain model. Based on the bifurcation analysis (Hopf and Turing, we give the spatial pattern formation via numerical simulation, that is, the evolution process of the system near the coexistence equilibrium point (u2*,v2*,w2*, and find that the model dynamics exhibits complex pattern replication. For fixed parameters, on increasing the control parameter c1, the sequence “holes → holes-stripe mixtures → stripes → spots-stripe mixtures → spots” pattern is observed. And in the case of pure Hopf instability, the model exhibits chaotic wave pattern replication. Furthermore, we consider the pattern formation in the case of which the top predator is extinct, that is, the evolution process of the system near the equilibrium point (u1*,v1*,0, and find that the model dynamics exhibits stripes-spots pattern replication. Our results show that reaction-diffusion model is an appropriate tool for investigating fundamental mechanism of complex spatiotemporal dynamics. It will be useful for studying the dynamic complexity of ecosystems.

  7. Effects of intrinsic stochasticity on delayed reaction-diffusion patterning systems

    KAUST Repository

    Woolley, Thomas E.

    2012-05-22

    Cellular gene expression is a complex process involving many steps, including the transcription of DNA and translation of mRNA; hence the synthesis of proteins requires a considerable amount of time, from ten minutes to several hours. Since diffusion-driven instability has been observed to be sensitive to perturbations in kinetic delays, the application of Turing patterning mechanisms to the problem of producing spatially heterogeneous differential gene expression has been questioned. In deterministic systems a small delay in the reactions can cause a large increase in the time it takes a system to pattern. Recently, it has been observed that in undelayed systems intrinsic stochasticity can cause pattern initiation to occur earlier than in the analogous deterministic simulations. Here we are interested in adding both stochasticity and delays to Turing systems in order to assess whether stochasticity can reduce the patterning time scale in delayed Turing systems. As analytical insights to this problem are difficult to attain and often limited in their use, we focus on stochastically simulating delayed systems. We consider four different Turing systems and two different forms of delay. Our results are mixed and lead to the conclusion that, although the sensitivity to delays in the Turing mechanism is not completely removed by the addition of intrinsic noise, the effects of the delays are clearly ameliorated in certain specific cases. © 2012 American Physical Society.

  8. Fourier spectral methods for fractional-in-space reaction-diffusion equations

    KAUST Repository

    Bueno-Orovio, Alfonso

    2014-04-01

    © 2014, Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht. Fractional differential equations are becoming increasingly used as a powerful modelling approach for understanding the many aspects of nonlocality and spatial heterogeneity. However, the numerical approximation of these models is demanding and imposes a number of computational constraints. In this paper, we introduce Fourier spectral methods as an attractive and easy-to-code alternative for the integration of fractional-in-space reaction-diffusion equations described by the fractional Laplacian in bounded rectangular domains of ℝ. The main advantages of the proposed schemes is that they yield a fully diagonal representation of the fractional operator, with increased accuracy and efficiency when compared to low-order counterparts, and a completely straightforward extension to two and three spatial dimensions. Our approach is illustrated by solving several problems of practical interest, including the fractional Allen–Cahn, FitzHugh–Nagumo and Gray–Scott models, together with an analysis of the properties of these systems in terms of the fractional power of the underlying Laplacian operator.

  9. Bifurcation analysis of a delay reaction-diffusion malware propagation model with feedback control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Linhe; Zhao, Hongyong; Wang, Xiaoming

    2015-05-01

    With the rapid development of network information technology, information networks security has become a very critical issue in our work and daily life. This paper attempts to develop a delay reaction-diffusion model with a state feedback controller to describe the process of malware propagation in mobile wireless sensor networks (MWSNs). By analyzing the stability and Hopf bifurcation, we show that the state feedback method can successfully be used to control unstable steady states or periodic oscillations. Moreover, formulas for determining the properties of the bifurcating periodic oscillations are derived by applying the normal form method and center manifold theorem. Finally, we conduct extensive simulations on large-scale MWSNs to evaluate the proposed model. Numerical evidences show that the linear term of the controller is enough to delay the onset of the Hopf bifurcation and the properties of the bifurcation can be regulated to achieve some desirable behaviors by choosing the appropriate higher terms of the controller. Furthermore, we obtain that the spatial-temporal dynamic characteristics of malware propagation are closely related to the rate constant for nodes leaving the infective class for recovered class and the mobile behavior of nodes.

  10. A reaction-diffusion model for radiation-induced bystander effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olobatuyi, Oluwole; de Vries, Gerda; Hillen, Thomas

    2017-08-01

    We develop and analyze a reaction-diffusion model to investigate the dynamics of the lifespan of a bystander signal emitted when cells are exposed to radiation. Experimental studies by Mothersill and Seymour 1997, using malignant epithelial cell lines, found that an emitted bystander signal can still cause bystander effects in cells even 60 h after its emission. Several other experiments have also shown that the signal can persist for months and even years. Also, bystander effects have been hypothesized as one of the factors responsible for the phenomenon of low-dose hyper-radiosensitivity and increased radioresistance (HRS/IRR). Here, we confirm this hypothesis with a mathematical model, which we fit to Joiner's data on HRS/IRR in a T98G glioma cell line. Furthermore, we use phase plane analysis to understand the full dynamics of the signal's lifespan. We find that both single and multiple radiation exposure can lead to bystander signals that either persist temporarily or permanently. We also found that, in an heterogeneous environment, the size of the domain exposed to radiation and the number of radiation exposures can determine whether a signal will persist temporarily or permanently. Finally, we use sensitivity analysis to identify those cell parameters that affect the signal's lifespan and the signal-induced cell death the most.

  11. Mean field effects for counterpropagating traveling wave solutions of reaction-diffusion systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernoff, A.J.; Kuske, R.; Matkowsky, B.J.; Volpert, V.

    1995-01-01

    In many problems, one observes traveling waves that propagate with constant velocity and shape in the χ direction, say, are independent of y, and z and describe transitions between two equilibrium states. As parameters of the system are varied, these traveling waves can become unstable and give rise to waves having additional structure, such as traveling waves in the y and z directions, which can themselves be subject to instabilities as parameters are further varied. To investigate this scenario the authors consider a system of reaction-diffusion equations with a traveling wave solution as a basic state. They determine solutions bifurcating from the basic state that describe counterpropagating traveling wave in directions orthogonal to the direction of propagation of the basic state and determine their stability. Specifically, they derive long wave modulation equations for the amplitudes of the counterpropagating traveling waves that are coupled to an equation for a mean field, generated by the translation of the basic state in the direction of its propagation. The modulation equations are then employed to determine stability boundaries to long wave perturbations for both unidirectional and counterpropagating traveling waves. The stability analysis is delicate because the results depend on the order in which transverse and longitudinal perturbation wavenumbers are taken to zero. For the unidirectional wave they demonstrate that it is sufficient to consider the cases of (1) purely transverse perturbations, (2) purely longitudinal perturbations, and (3) longitudinal perturbations with a small transverse component. These yield Eckhaus type, zigzag type, and skew type instabilities, respectively

  12. The two-regime method for optimizing stochastic reaction-diffusion simulations

    KAUST Repository

    Flegg, M. B.

    2011-10-19

    Spatial organization and noise play an important role in molecular systems biology. In recent years, a number of software packages have been developed for stochastic spatio-temporal simulation, ranging from detailed molecular-based approaches to less detailed compartment-based simulations. Compartment-based approaches yield quick and accurate mesoscopic results, but lack the level of detail that is characteristic of the computationally intensive molecular-based models. Often microscopic detail is only required in a small region (e.g. close to the cell membrane). Currently, the best way to achieve microscopic detail is to use a resource-intensive simulation over the whole domain. We develop the two-regime method (TRM) in which a molecular-based algorithm is used where desired and a compartment-based approach is used elsewhere. We present easy-to-implement coupling conditions which ensure that the TRM results have the same accuracy as a detailed molecular-based model in the whole simulation domain. Therefore, the TRM combines strengths of previously developed stochastic reaction-diffusion software to efficiently explore the behaviour of biological models. Illustrative examples and the mathematical justification of the TRM are also presented.

  13. A New Approach and Solution Technique to Solve Time Fractional Nonlinear Reaction-Diffusion Equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inci Cilingir Sungu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A new application of the hybrid generalized differential transform and finite difference method is proposed by solving time fractional nonlinear reaction-diffusion equations. This method is a combination of the multi-time-stepping temporal generalized differential transform and the spatial finite difference methods. The procedure first converts the time-evolutionary equations into Poisson equations which are then solved using the central difference method. The temporal differential transform method as used in the paper takes care of stability and the finite difference method on the resulting equation results in a system of diagonally dominant linear algebraic equations. The Gauss-Seidel iterative procedure then used to solve the linear system thus has assured convergence. To have optimized convergence rate, numerical experiments were done by using a combination of factors involving multi-time-stepping, spatial step size, and degree of the polynomial fit in time. It is shown that the hybrid technique is reliable, accurate, and easy to apply.

  14. Diffusion processes in the relaxed cross sections for the reaction 107109Ag+20Ne

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babinet, R.; Moretto, L.G.; Galin, J.; Jared, R.; Moulton, J.; Thompson, S.G.

    1976-01-01

    The fragments emitted in the reaction 107 109 Ag+ 20 Ne at 175 and 252 MeV bombarding energy have been identified in charge up to Z=32. Kinetic energy distributions, cross sections and angular distributions have been measured for each Z. The kinetic energy spectra show the two usual components: the quasielastic component and the relaxed component. The Z-distribution of the latter is fairly flat, slowly decreasing up to Z approximately 15 and then rising again up to Z=30. The variations in the Z-distribution are more pronounced at the lower bombarding energy. The angular distributions associated with the relaxed component are forward peaked for Z-values close to that of the projectile and behave like 1/sintheta for larger Z-values. The forward peaking is very substantial for Z 10 the forward peaking in excess of 1/sintheta disappears around Z=15. These features are interpreted in terms of a diffusion process along the asymmetry coordinate of a short-lived intermediate complex. (Auth.)

  15. Ionic Diffusion and Kinetic Homogeneous Chemical Reactions in the Pore Solution of Porous Materials with Moisture Transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannesson, Björn

    2009-01-01

    Results from a systematic continuum mixture theory will be used to establish the governing equations for ionic diffusion and chemical reactions in the pore solution of a porous material subjected to moisture transport. The theory in use is the hybrid mixture theory (HMT), which in its general form......’s law of diffusion and the generalized Darcy’s law will be used together with derived constitutive equations for chemical reactions within phases. The mass balance equations for the constituents and the phases together with the constitutive equations gives the coupled set of non-linear differential...... general description of chemical reactions among constituents is described. The Petrov – Galerkin approach are used in favour of the standard Galerkin weighting in order to improve the solution when the convective part of the problem is dominant. A modified type of Newton – Raphson scheme is derived...

  16. On the study of the solid-solid phase transformation of TlBiTe2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chrissafis, K.; Vinga, E.S.; Paraskevopoulos, K.M.; Polychroniadis, E.K.

    2003-01-01

    The narrow gap semiconductor TlBiTe 2 undergoes a solid-solid phase transformation from the rhombohedral (D 3d ) to the cubic (O h ) phase. The present paper deals with the study of this phase transformation combining the results of Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). It has been found that during heating the transformation is an athermal activated process, which can be described only by a combination of more than one processes while during cooling it exhibits an expectable thermal hysteresis due to the volume difference. The results of the kinetic analysis combined with the electron microscopy findings, supported also by the Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy ones, lead to the conclusion that TlBiTe 2 undergoes a multiple-step, displacive, martensitic type transformation. (Abstract Copyright [2003], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  17. Vapor-solid-solid grown Ge nanowires at integrated circuit compatible temperature by molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhongyunshen; Song, Yuxin; Zhang, Zhenpu; Sun, Hao; Han, Yi; Li, Yaoyao; Zhang, Liyao; Xue, Zhongying; Di, Zengfeng; Wang, Shumin

    2017-09-01

    We demonstrate Au-assisted vapor-solid-solid (VSS) growth of Ge nanowires (NWs) by molecular beam epitaxy at the substrate temperature of ˜180 °C, which is compatible with the temperature window for Si-based integrated circuit. Low temperature grown Ge NWs hold a smaller size, similar uniformity, and better fit with Au tips in diameter, in contrast to Ge NWs grown at around or above the eutectic temperature of Au-Ge alloy in the vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) growth. Six ⟨110⟩ growth orientations were observed on Ge (110) by the VSS growth at ˜180 °C, differing from only one vertical growth direction of Ge NWs by the VLS growth at a high temperature. The evolution of NWs dimension and morphology from the VLS growth to the VSS growth is qualitatively explained by analyzing the mechanism of the two growth modes.

  18. Density-functional theory for fluid-solid and solid-solid phase transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharadwaj, Atul S; Singh, Yashwant

    2017-03-01

    We develop a theory to describe solid-solid phase transitions. The density functional formalism of classical statistical mechanics is used to find an exact expression for the difference in the grand thermodynamic potentials of the two coexisting phases. The expression involves both the symmetry conserving and the symmetry broken parts of the direct pair correlation function. The theory is used to calculate phase diagram of systems of soft spheres interacting via inverse power potentials u(r)=ε(σ/r)^{n}, where parameter n measures softness of the potential. We find that for 1/nfcc) structure while for 1/n≥0.154 the body-centred-cubic (bcc) structure is preferred. The bcc structure transforms into the fcc structure upon increasing the density. The calculated phase diagram is in good agreement with the one found from molecular simulations.

  19. Time behaviour of the reaction front in the catalytic A + B → B + C reaction-diffusion processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolini, F.G.; Rodriguez, M.A.; Wio, H.S.

    1994-07-01

    The problem of the time evolution of the position and width of a reaction front between initially separated reactants for the catalytic reaction A + B → B + C (C inert) is treated within a recently introduced Galanin-like scheme. (author). 6 refs

  20. New mechanism of spiral wave initiation in a reaction-diffusion-mechanics system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis D Weise

    Full Text Available Spiral wave initiation in the heart muscle is a mechanism for the onset of dangerous cardiac arrhythmias. A standard protocol for spiral wave initiation is the application of a stimulus in the refractory tail of a propagating excitation wave, a region that we call the "classical vulnerable zone." Previous studies of vulnerability to spiral wave initiation did not take the influence of deformation into account, which has been shown to have a substantial effect on the excitation process of cardiomyocytes via the mechano-electrical feedback phenomenon. In this work we study the effect of deformation on the vulnerability of excitable media in a discrete reaction-diffusion-mechanics (dRDM model. The dRDM model combines FitzHugh-Nagumo type equations for cardiac excitation with a discrete mechanical description of a finite-elastic isotropic material (Seth material to model cardiac excitation-contraction coupling and stretch activated depolarizing current. We show that deformation alters the "classical," and forms a new vulnerable zone at longer coupling intervals. This mechanically caused vulnerable zone results in a new mechanism of spiral wave initiation, where unidirectional conduction block and rotation directions of the consequently initiated spiral waves are opposite compared to the mechanism of spiral wave initiation due to the "classical vulnerable zone." We show that this new mechanism of spiral wave initiation can naturally occur in situations that involve wave fronts with curvature, and discuss its relation to supernormal excitability of cardiac tissue. The concept of mechanically induced vulnerability may lead to a better understanding about the onset of dangerous heart arrhythmias via mechano-electrical feedback.

  1. A reaction-diffusion model to capture disparity selectivity in primary visual cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Sultan Mohiuddin Siddiqui

    Full Text Available Decades of experimental studies are available on disparity selective cells in visual cortex of macaque and cat. Recently, local disparity map for iso-orientation sites for near-vertical edge preference is reported in area 18 of cat visual cortex. No experiment is yet reported on complete disparity map in V1. Disparity map for layer IV in V1 can provide insight into how disparity selective complex cell receptive field is organized from simple cell subunits. Though substantial amounts of experimental data on disparity selective cells is available, no model on receptive field development of such cells or disparity map development exists in literature. We model disparity selectivity in layer IV of cat V1 using a reaction-diffusion two-eye paradigm. In this model, the wiring between LGN and cortical layer IV is determined by resource an LGN cell has for supporting connections to cortical cells and competition for target space in layer IV. While competing for target space, the same type of LGN cells, irrespective of whether it belongs to left-eye-specific or right-eye-specific LGN layer, cooperate with each other while trying to push off the other type. Our model captures realistic 2D disparity selective simple cell receptive fields, their response properties and disparity map along with orientation and ocular dominance maps. There is lack of correlation between ocular dominance and disparity selectivity at the cell population level. At the map level, disparity selectivity topography is not random but weakly clustered for similar preferred disparities. This is similar to the experimental result reported for macaque. The details of weakly clustered disparity selectivity map in V1 indicate two types of complex cell receptive field organization.

  2. New mechanism of spiral wave initiation in a reaction-diffusion-mechanics system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weise, Louis D; Panfilov, Alexander V

    2011-01-01

    Spiral wave initiation in the heart muscle is a mechanism for the onset of dangerous cardiac arrhythmias. A standard protocol for spiral wave initiation is the application of a stimulus in the refractory tail of a propagating excitation wave, a region that we call the "classical vulnerable zone." Previous studies of vulnerability to spiral wave initiation did not take the influence of deformation into account, which has been shown to have a substantial effect on the excitation process of cardiomyocytes via the mechano-electrical feedback phenomenon. In this work we study the effect of deformation on the vulnerability of excitable media in a discrete reaction-diffusion-mechanics (dRDM) model. The dRDM model combines FitzHugh-Nagumo type equations for cardiac excitation with a discrete mechanical description of a finite-elastic isotropic material (Seth material) to model cardiac excitation-contraction coupling and stretch activated depolarizing current. We show that deformation alters the "classical," and forms a new vulnerable zone at longer coupling intervals. This mechanically caused vulnerable zone results in a new mechanism of spiral wave initiation, where unidirectional conduction block and rotation directions of the consequently initiated spiral waves are opposite compared to the mechanism of spiral wave initiation due to the "classical vulnerable zone." We show that this new mechanism of spiral wave initiation can naturally occur in situations that involve wave fronts with curvature, and discuss its relation to supernormal excitability of cardiac tissue. The concept of mechanically induced vulnerability may lead to a better understanding about the onset of dangerous heart arrhythmias via mechano-electrical feedback.

  3. Rate kernel theory for pseudo-first-order kinetics of diffusion-influenced reactions and application to fluorescence quenching kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Mino

    2007-06-07

    Theoretical foundation of rate kernel equation approaches for diffusion-influenced chemical reactions is presented and applied to explain the kinetics of fluorescence quenching reactions. A many-body master equation is constructed by introducing stochastic terms, which characterize the rates of chemical reactions, into the many-body Smoluchowski equation. A Langevin-type of memory equation for the density fields of reactants evolving under the influence of time-independent perturbation is derived. This equation should be useful in predicting the time evolution of reactant concentrations approaching the steady state attained by the perturbation as well as the steady-state concentrations. The dynamics of fluctuation occurring in equilibrium state can be predicted by the memory equation by turning the perturbation off and consequently may be useful in obtaining the linear response to a time-dependent perturbation. It is found that unimolecular decay processes including the time-independent perturbation can be incorporated into bimolecular reaction kinetics as a Laplace transform variable. As a result, a theory for bimolecular reactions along with the unimolecular process turned off is sufficient to predict overall reaction kinetics including the effects of unimolecular reactions and perturbation. As the present formulation is applied to steady-state kinetics of fluorescence quenching reactions, the exact relation between fluorophore concentrations and the intensity of excitation light is derived.

  4. On the Green's function of the partially diffusion-controlled reversible ABCD reaction for radiation chemistry codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plante, Ianik; Devroye, Luc

    2015-01-01

    Several computer codes simulating chemical reactions in particles systems are based on the Green's functions of the diffusion equation (GFDE). Indeed, many types of chemical systems have been simulated using the exact GFDE, which has also become the gold standard for validating other theoretical models. In this work, a simulation algorithm is presented to sample the interparticle distance for partially diffusion-controlled reversible ABCD reaction. This algorithm is considered exact for 2-particles systems, is faster than conventional look-up tables and uses only a few kilobytes of memory. The simulation results obtained with this method are compared with those obtained with the independent reaction times (IRT) method. This work is part of our effort in developing models to understand the role of chemical reactions in the radiation effects on cells and tissues and may eventually be included in event-based models of space radiation risks. However, as many reactions are of this type in biological systems, this algorithm might play a pivotal role in future simulation programs not only in radiation chemistry, but also in the simulation of biochemical networks in time and space as well

  5. On the Green's function of the partially diffusion-controlled reversible ABCD reaction for radiation chemistry codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plante, Ianik, E-mail: ianik.plante-1@nasa.gov [Wyle Science, Technology & Engineering, 1290 Hercules, Houston, TX 77058 (United States); Devroye, Luc, E-mail: lucdevroye@gmail.com [School of Computer Science, McGill University, 3480 University Street, Montreal H3A 0E9 (Canada)

    2015-09-15

    Several computer codes simulating chemical reactions in particles systems are based on the Green's functions of the diffusion equation (GFDE). Indeed, many types of chemical systems have been simulated using the exact GFDE, which has also become the gold standard for validating other theoretical models. In this work, a simulation algorithm is presented to sample the interparticle distance for partially diffusion-controlled reversible ABCD reaction. This algorithm is considered exact for 2-particles systems, is faster than conventional look-up tables and uses only a few kilobytes of memory. The simulation results obtained with this method are compared with those obtained with the independent reaction times (IRT) method. This work is part of our effort in developing models to understand the role of chemical reactions in the radiation effects on cells and tissues and may eventually be included in event-based models of space radiation risks. However, as many reactions are of this type in biological systems, this algorithm might play a pivotal role in future simulation programs not only in radiation chemistry, but also in the simulation of biochemical networks in time and space as well.

  6. A numerical scheme for singularly perturbed reaction-diffusion problems with a negative shift via numerov method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinesh Kumar, S.; Nageshwar Rao, R.; Pramod Chakravarthy, P.

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, we consider a boundary value problem for a singularly perturbed delay differential equation of reaction-diffusion type. We construct an exponentially fitted numerical method using Numerov finite difference scheme, which resolves not only the boundary layers but also the interior layers arising from the delay term. An extensive amount of computational work has been carried out to demonstrate the applicability of the proposed method.

  7. Coupled reaction-diffusion equations to model the fission gas release in the irradiation of the uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moyano, Edgardo A.; Scarpettini, Alberto F.

    2003-01-01

    A semi linear model of weakly coupled parabolic p.d.e. with reaction-diffusion is investigated. The system describes fission gas transfer from grain interior of UO 2 to grain boundaries. The problem is studied in a bounded domain. Using the upper-lower solutions method, two monotone sequences for the finite differences equations are constructed. Reasons are mentioned that allow to affirm that in the proposed functional sector the algorithm converges to the unique solution of the differential system. (author)

  8. Theoretical description of spin-selective reactions of radical pairs diffusing in spherical 2D and 3D microreactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, Konstantin L.; Lukzen, Nikita N.; Sadovsky, Vladimir M.

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we treat spin-selective recombination of a geminate radical pair (RP) in a spherical “microreactor,” i.e., of a RP confined in a micelle, vesicle, or liposome. We consider the microreactor model proposed earlier, in which one of the radicals is located at the center of the micelle and the other one undergoes three-dimensional diffusion inside the micelle. In addition, we suggest a two-dimensional model, in which one of the radicals is located at the “pole” of the sphere, while the other one diffuses on the spherical surface. For this model, we have obtained a general analytical expression for the RP recombination yield in terms of the free Green function of two-dimensional diffusion motion. In turn, this Green function is expressed via the Legendre functions and thus takes account of diffusion over a restricted spherical surface and its curvature. The obtained expression allows one to calculate the RP recombination efficiency at an arbitrary magnetic field strength. We performed a comparison of the two models taking the same geometric parameters (i.e., the microreactor radius and the closest approach distance of the radicals), chemical reactivity, magnetic interactions in the RP and diffusion coefficient. Significant difference between the predictions of the two models is found, which is thus originating solely from the dimensionality effect: for different dimensionality of space, the statistics of diffusional contacts of radicals becomes different altering the reaction yield. We have calculated the magnetic field dependence of the RP reaction yield and chemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization of the reaction products at different sizes of the microreactor, exchange interaction, and spin relaxation rates. Interestingly, due to the intricate interplay of diffusional contacts of reactants and spin dynamics, the dependence of the reaction yield on the microreactor radius is non-monotonous. Our results are of importance for (i) interpreting

  9. Impulsive Synchronization of Reaction-Diffusion Neural Networks With Mixed Delays and Its Application to Image Encryption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wu-Hua; Luo, Shixian; Zheng, Wei Xing

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents a new impulsive synchronization criterion of two identical reaction-diffusion neural networks with discrete and unbounded distributed delays. The new criterion is established by applying an impulse-time-dependent Lyapunov functional combined with the use of a new type of integral inequality for treating the reaction-diffusion terms. The impulse-time-dependent feature of the proposed Lyapunov functional can capture more hybrid dynamical behaviors of the impulsive reaction-diffusion neural networks than the conventional impulse-time-independent Lyapunov functions/functionals, while the new integral inequality, which is derived from Wirtinger's inequality, overcomes the conservatism introduced by the integral inequality used in the previous results. Numerical examples demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method. Later, the developed impulsive synchronization method is applied to build a spatiotemporal chaotic cryptosystem that can transmit an encrypted image. The experimental results verify that the proposed image-encrypting cryptosystem has the advantages of large key space and high security against some traditional attacks.

  10. Optimal control of an invasive species using a reaction-diffusion model and linear programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonneau, Mathieu; Johnson, Fred A.; Smith, Brian J.; Romagosa, Christina M.; Martin, Julien; Mazzotti, Frank J.

    2017-01-01

    Managing an invasive species is particularly challenging as little is generally known about the species’ biological characteristics in its new habitat. In practice, removal of individuals often starts before the species is studied to provide the information that will later improve control. Therefore, the locations and the amount of control have to be determined in the face of great uncertainty about the species characteristics and with a limited amount of resources. We propose framing spatial control as a linear programming optimization problem. This formulation, paired with a discrete reaction-diffusion model, permits calculation of an optimal control strategy that minimizes the remaining number of invaders for a fixed cost or that minimizes the control cost for containment or protecting specific areas from invasion. We propose computing the optimal strategy for a range of possible model parameters, representing current uncertainty on the possible invasion scenarios. Then, a best strategy can be identified depending on the risk attitude of the decision-maker. We use this framework to study the spatial control of the Argentine black and white tegus (Salvator merianae) in South Florida. There is uncertainty about tegu demography and we considered several combinations of model parameters, exhibiting various dynamics of invasion. For a fixed one-year budget, we show that the risk-averse strategy, which optimizes the worst-case scenario of tegus’ dynamics, and the risk-neutral strategy, which optimizes the expected scenario, both concentrated control close to the point of introduction. A risk-seeking strategy, which optimizes the best-case scenario, focuses more on models where eradication of the species in a cell is possible and consists of spreading control as much as possible. For the establishment of a containment area, assuming an exponential growth we show that with current control methods it might not be possible to implement such a strategy for some of the

  11. Molecular-Level Simulations of Chemical Reaction Equilibrium and Diffusion in Slit and Cylindrical Nanopores: Model Dimerisation Reactions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lísal, Martin; Předota, Milan; Brennan, J.K.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 39, č. 13 (2013), s. 1103-1120 ISSN 0892-7022 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-09914S Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GA13-08651S Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : molecular dynamics * reaction ensemble Monte Carlo * slit and cylindrical nanopores Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.119, year: 2013

  12. Using reweighting and free energy surface interpolation to predict solid-solid phase diagrams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schieber, Natalie P.; Dybeck, Eric C.; Shirts, Michael R.

    2018-04-01

    Many physical properties of small organic molecules are dependent on the current crystal packing, or polymorph, of the material, including bioavailability of pharmaceuticals, optical properties of dyes, and charge transport properties of semiconductors. Predicting the most stable crystalline form at a given temperature and pressure requires determining the crystalline form with the lowest relative Gibbs free energy. Effective computational prediction of the most stable polymorph could save significant time and effort in the design of novel molecular crystalline solids or predict their behavior under new conditions. In this study, we introduce a new approach using multistate reweighting to address the problem of determining solid-solid phase diagrams and apply this approach to the phase diagram of solid benzene. For this approach, we perform sampling at a selection of temperature and pressure states in the region of interest. We use multistate reweighting methods to determine the reduced free energy differences between T and P states within a given polymorph and validate this phase diagram using several measures. The relative stability of the polymorphs at the sampled states can be successively interpolated from these points to create the phase diagram by combining these reduced free energy differences with a reference Gibbs free energy difference between polymorphs. The method also allows for straightforward estimation of uncertainties in the phase boundary. We also find that when properly implemented, multistate reweighting for phase diagram determination scales better with the size of the system than previously estimated.

  13. Microencapsulated Comb-Like Polymeric Solid-Solid Phase Change Materials via In-Situ Polymerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Li

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available To enhance the thermal stability and permeability resistance, a comb-like polymer with crystallizable side chains was fabricated as solid-solid phase change materials (PCMs inside the cores of microcapsules and nanocapsules prepared via in-situ polymerization. In this study, the effects on the surface morphology and microstructure of micro/nanocapsules caused by microencapsulating different types of core materials (i.e., n-hexadecane, ethyl hexadecanoate, hexadecyl acrylate and poly(hexadecyl acrylate were systematically studied via field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM and transmission electron microscope (TEM. The confined crystallization behavior of comb-like polymer PCMs cores was investigated via differential scanning calorimeter (DSC. Comparing with low molecular organic PCMs cores, the thermal stability of PCMs microencapsulated comb-like polymer enhanced significantly, and the permeability resistance improved obviously as well. Based on these resultant analysis, the microencapsulated comb-like polymeric PCMs with excellent thermal stability and permeability resistance showed promising foreground in the field of organic solution spun, melt processing and organic coating.

  14. An Efficient Implicit FEM Scheme for Fractional-in-Space Reaction-Diffusion Equations

    KAUST Repository

    Burrage, Kevin; Hale, Nicholas; Kay, David

    2012-01-01

    Fractional differential equations are becoming increasingly used as a modelling tool for processes associated with anomalous diffusion or spatial heterogeneity. However, the presence of a fractional differential operator causes memory (time

  15. ReaDDy--a software for particle-based reaction-diffusion dynamics in crowded cellular environments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Schöneberg

    Full Text Available We introduce the software package ReaDDy for simulation of detailed spatiotemporal mechanisms of dynamical processes in the cell, based on reaction-diffusion dynamics with particle resolution. In contrast to other particle-based reaction kinetics programs, ReaDDy supports particle interaction potentials. This permits effects such as space exclusion, molecular crowding and aggregation to be modeled. The biomolecules simulated can be represented as a sphere, or as a more complex geometry such as a domain structure or polymer chain. ReaDDy bridges the gap between small-scale but highly detailed molecular dynamics or Brownian dynamics simulations and large-scale but little-detailed reaction kinetics simulations. ReaDDy has a modular design that enables the exchange of the computing core by efficient platform-specific implementations or dynamical models that are different from Brownian dynamics.

  16. Kinetics of intercalation of fluorescent probes in magnesium-aluminium layered double hydroxide within a multiscale reaction-diffusion framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saliba, Daniel; Al-Ghoul, Mazen

    2016-11-01

    We report the synthesis of magnesium-aluminium layered double hydroxide (LDH) using a reaction-diffusion framework (RDF) that exploits the multiscale coupling of molecular diffusion with chemical reactions, nucleation and growth of crystals. In an RDF, the hydroxide anions are allowed to diffuse into an organic gel matrix containing the salt mixture needed for the precipitation of the LDH. The chemical structure and composition of the synthesized magnesium-aluminium LDHs are determined using powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), thermo-gravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (SSNMR), Fourier transform infrared and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. This novel technique also allows the investigation of the mechanism of intercalation of some fluorescent probes, such as the neutral three-dimensional rhodamine B (RhB) and the negatively charged two-dimensional 8-hydroxypyrene-1,3,6-trisulfonic acid (HPTS), using in situ steady-state fluorescence spectroscopy. The incorporation of these organic dyes inside the interlayer region of the LDH is confirmed via fluorescence microscopy, solid-state lifetime, SSNMR and PXRD. The activation energies of intercalation of the corresponding molecules (RhB and HPTS) are computed and exhibit dependence on the geometry of the involved probe (two or three dimensions), the charge of the fluorescent molecule (anionic, cationic or neutral) and the cationic ratio of the corresponding LDH. This article is part of the themed issue 'Multiscale modelling at the physics-chemistry-biology interface'.

  17. Liquid phase formation due to solid/solid chemical interaction and its modelling: applications to zircaloy/stainless steel system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, E.A.; Piotrkowski, R.; Denis, A.; Kovacs, J.

    1992-01-01

    The chemical interaction at high temperatures between Zircaloy (Zry) and stainless steel (SS) and the liquid phase formation due to eutectic reactions were studied. In a previous work the Zry/Inconel system was modelled assuming that the kinetics of phase growth is controlled by diffusion. The same model and the obtained Zr diffusion coefficient in the liquid phase were applied in the present work. In order to obtain an adequate description of the Zry/SS the major component of both alloys and also Cr and Ni had to be considered. (author)

  18. A drift-diffusion-reaction model for excitonic photovoltaic bilayers: Photovoltaic bilayers: Asymptotic analysis and a 2D hdg finite element scheme

    KAUST Repository

    Brinkman, Daniel; Fellner, Klemens J.; Markowich, Peter A.; Wolfram, Marie Therese

    2013-01-01

    We present and discuss a mathematical model for the operation of bilayer organic photovoltaic devices. Our model couples drift-diffusion-recombination equations for the charge carriers (specifically, electrons and holes) with a reaction

  19. Isospin diffusion in 58Ni-induced reactions at intermediate energies. I. Experimental results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galichet, E.; Rivet, M. F.; Borderie, B.; Colonna, M.; Bougault, R.; Durand, D.; Lopez, O.; Manduci, L.; Tamain, B.; Vient, E.; Chbihi, A.; Frankland, J. D.; Wieleczko, J. P.; Dayras, R.; Volant, C.; Guinet, D. C. R.; Lautesse, P.; Neindre, N. Le; Parlog, M.; Rosato, E.

    2009-01-01

    Isospin diffusion in semiperipheral collisions is probed as a function of the dissipated energy by studying two systems 58 Ni+ 58 Ni and 58 Ni+ 197 Au, over the incident energy range 52A-74A MeV. A close examination of the multiplicities of light products in the forward part of the phase space clearly shows an influence of the isospin of the target on the neutron richness of these products. A progressive isospin diffusion is observed when collisions become more central, in connection with the interaction time.

  20. Parametric study on vapor-solid-solid growth mechanism of multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shukrullah, S., E-mail: zshukrullah@gmail.com [Center of Innovative Nanostructures and Nanodevices, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, 32610, Bandar Seri Iskandar, Perak (Malaysia); Mohamed, N.M. [Center of Innovative Nanostructures and Nanodevices, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, 32610, Bandar Seri Iskandar, Perak (Malaysia); Shaharun, M.S. [Department of Fundamental and Applied Sciences, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, 32610, Bandar Seri Iskandar, Perak (Malaysia); Naz, M.Y. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, 32610, Bandar Seri Iskandar, Perak (Malaysia)

    2016-06-15

    This study aimed at investigating the effect of the fluidized bed chemical vapor deposition (FBCVD) process parameters on growth mechanism, morphology and purity of the multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). Nanotubes were produced in a vertical FBCVD reactor by catalytic decomposition of ethylene over Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} supported nano-iron catalyst buds at different flow rates. FESEM, TEM, Raman spectroscopy and TGA thermograms were used to elaborate the growth parameters of the as grown MWCNTs. As the growth process was driven by the process temperatures well below the iron-carbon eutectic temperature (1147 °C), the appearance of graphite platelets from the crystallographic faces of the catalyst particles suggested a solid form of the catalyst during CNT nucleation. A vapor-solid-solid (VSS) growth mechanism was predicted for nucleation of MWCNTs with very low activation energy. The nanotubes grown at optimized temperature and ethylene flow rate posed high graphitic symmetry, purity, narrow diameter distribution and shorter inter-layer spacing. In Raman and TGA analyses, small I{sub D}/I{sub G} ratio and residual mass revealed negligible ratios of structural defects and amorphous carbon in the product. However, several structural defects and impurity elements were spotted in the nanotubes grown under unoptimized process parameters. - Graphical abstract: Arrhenius plot of relatively pure MWCNTs grown over Al2O3 supported nano-iron buds. - Highlights: • Vapor–solid–solid growth mechanism of MWCNTs was studied in a vertical FBCVD reactor. • MWCNTs were grown over Al2O3 supported nano-iron buds at very low activation energy. • FBCVD reactor was operated at temperatures well below the iron-carbon eutectic point. • Ideally graphitized structures were obtained at a process temperature of 800 °C. • Tube diameter revealed a narrow distribution of 20–25 nm at the optimum temperature.

  1. Parametric study on vapor-solid-solid growth mechanism of multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shukrullah, S.; Mohamed, N.M.; Shaharun, M.S.; Naz, M.Y.

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed at investigating the effect of the fluidized bed chemical vapor deposition (FBCVD) process parameters on growth mechanism, morphology and purity of the multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). Nanotubes were produced in a vertical FBCVD reactor by catalytic decomposition of ethylene over Al_2O_3 supported nano-iron catalyst buds at different flow rates. FESEM, TEM, Raman spectroscopy and TGA thermograms were used to elaborate the growth parameters of the as grown MWCNTs. As the growth process was driven by the process temperatures well below the iron-carbon eutectic temperature (1147 °C), the appearance of graphite platelets from the crystallographic faces of the catalyst particles suggested a solid form of the catalyst during CNT nucleation. A vapor-solid-solid (VSS) growth mechanism was predicted for nucleation of MWCNTs with very low activation energy. The nanotubes grown at optimized temperature and ethylene flow rate posed high graphitic symmetry, purity, narrow diameter distribution and shorter inter-layer spacing. In Raman and TGA analyses, small I_D/I_G ratio and residual mass revealed negligible ratios of structural defects and amorphous carbon in the product. However, several structural defects and impurity elements were spotted in the nanotubes grown under unoptimized process parameters. - Graphical abstract: Arrhenius plot of relatively pure MWCNTs grown over Al2O3 supported nano-iron buds. - Highlights: • Vapor–solid–solid growth mechanism of MWCNTs was studied in a vertical FBCVD reactor. • MWCNTs were grown over Al2O3 supported nano-iron buds at very low activation energy. • FBCVD reactor was operated at temperatures well below the iron-carbon eutectic point. • Ideally graphitized structures were obtained at a process temperature of 800 °C. • Tube diameter revealed a narrow distribution of 20–25 nm at the optimum temperature.

  2. Delay-induced Turing-like waves for one-species reaction-diffusion model on a network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, Julien; Carletti, Timoteo; Asllani, Malbor; Fanelli, Duccio

    2015-09-01

    A one-species time-delay reaction-diffusion system defined on a complex network is studied. Traveling waves are predicted to occur following a symmetry-breaking instability of a homogeneous stationary stable solution, subject to an external nonhomogeneous perturbation. These are generalized Turing-like waves that materialize in a single-species populations dynamics model, as the unexpected byproduct of the imposed delay in the diffusion part. Sufficient conditions for the onset of the instability are mathematically provided by performing a linear stability analysis adapted to time-delayed differential equations. The method here developed exploits the properties of the Lambert W-function. The prediction of the theory are confirmed by direct numerical simulation carried out for a modified version of the classical Fisher model, defined on a Watts-Strogatz network and with the inclusion of the delay.

  3. Study of the solid-solid surface adsorption of Eu2O3 on various Al2O3 supports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Rongchuan; Yu Zhi; Zhou Yuan; Yoshitake Yamazaki

    1997-12-01

    Solid-solid surface interactions of Eu 2 O 3 on various oxide substrates are investigated with X-ray and Moessbauer experiments. The results indicate that the interaction of Eu 2 O 3 on the complex support differs from that having simple support. An incorporation model is used to explain how Eu 2 O 3 disperses onto the surface of γ-alumina or η-alumina

  4. A diffusion-limited reaction model for self-propagating Al/Pt multilayers with quench limits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittell, D. E.; Yarrington, C. D.; Hobbs, M. L.; Abere, M. J.; Adams, D. P.

    2018-04-01

    A diffusion-limited reaction model was calibrated for Al/Pt multilayers ignited on oxidized silicon, sapphire, and tungsten substrates, as well as for some Al/Pt multilayers ignited as free-standing foils. The model was implemented in a finite element analysis code and used to match experimental burn front velocity data collected from several years of testing at Sandia National Laboratories. Moreover, both the simulations and experiments reveal well-defined quench limits in the total Al + Pt layer (i.e., bilayer) thickness. At these limits, the heat generated from atomic diffusion is insufficient to support a self-propagating wave front on top of the substrates. Quench limits for reactive multilayers are seldom reported and are found to depend on the thermal properties of the individual layers. Here, the diffusion-limited reaction model is generalized to allow for temperature- and composition-dependent material properties, phase change, and anisotropic thermal conductivity. Utilizing this increase in model fidelity, excellent overall agreement is shown between the simulations and experimental results with a single calibrated parameter set. However, the burn front velocities of Al/Pt multilayers ignited on tungsten substrates are over-predicted. Possible sources of error are discussed and a higher activation energy (from 41.9 kJ/mol.at. to 47.5 kJ/mol.at.) is shown to bring the simulations into agreement with the velocity data observed on tungsten substrates. This higher activation energy suggests an inhibited diffusion mechanism present at lower heating rates.

  5. Localization of (photorespiration and CO2 re-assimilation in tomato leaves investigated with a reaction-diffusion model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herman N C Berghuijs

    Full Text Available The rate of photosynthesis depends on the CO2 partial pressure near Rubisco, Cc, which is commonly calculated by models using the overall mesophyll resistance. Such models do not explain the difference between the CO2 level in the intercellular air space and Cc mechanistically. This problem can be overcome by reaction-diffusion models for CO2 transport, production and fixation in leaves. However, most reaction-diffusion models are complex and unattractive for procedures that require a large number of runs, like parameter optimisation. This study provides a simpler reaction-diffusion model. It is parameterized by both leaf physiological and leaf anatomical data. The anatomical data consisted of the thickness of the cell wall, cytosol and stroma, and the area ratios of mesophyll exposed to the intercellular air space to leaf surfaces and exposed chloroplast to exposed mesophyll surfaces. The model was used directly to estimate photosynthetic parameters from a subset of the measured light and CO2 response curves; the remaining data were used for validation. The model predicted light and CO2 response curves reasonably well for 15 days old tomato (cv. Admiro leaves, if (photorespiratory CO2 release was assumed to take place in the inner cytosol or in the gaps between the chloroplasts. The model was also used to calculate the fraction of CO2 produced by (photorespiration that is re-assimilated in the stroma, and this fraction ranged from 56 to 76%. In future research, the model should be further validated to better understand how the re-assimilation of (photorespired CO2 is affected by environmental conditions and physiological parameters.

  6. Catching gas with droplets : modelling and simulation of a diffusion-reaction process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mourik, van S.; Gennip, van Y.; Peletier, M.A.; Hlod, A.V.; Shcherbakov, V.; Panhuis, in 't P.H.M.W.; Vondenhoff, E.; Eendebak, P.; Berg, van den J.B.; Fledderus, E.R.; Hofstad, van der R.W.; Jochemsz, E.; Molenaar, J.; Mussche, T.J.J.; Peletier, M.A.; Prokert, G.

    2006-01-01

    The packaging industry wants to produce a foil for food packaging purposes, which is transparent and lets very little oxygen pass. To accomplish this they add a scavenger material to the foil which reacts with the oxygen that diffuses through the foil. We model this process by a system of partial

  7. Step-by-Step Simulation of Radiation of Radiation Chemistry Using Green Functions for Diffusion-Influenced Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plante, Ianik; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2011-01-01

    The irradiation of biological systems leads to the formation of radiolytic species such as H(raised dot), (raised dot)OH, H2, H2O2, e(sup -)(sub aq), etc.[1]. These species react with neighboring molecules, which result in damage in biological molecules such as DNA. Radiation chemistry is there for every important to understand the radiobiological consequences of radiation[2]. In this work, we discuss an approach based on the exact Green Functions for diffusion-influenced reactions which may be used to simulate radiation chemistry and eventually extended to study more complex systems, including DNA.

  8. Exponential Stability for Impulsive BAM Neural Networks with Time-Varying Delays and Reaction-Diffusion Terms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiankun Song

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Impulsive bidirectional associative memory neural network model with time-varying delays and reaction-diffusion terms is considered. Several sufficient conditions ensuring the existence, uniqueness, and global exponential stability of equilibrium point for the addressed neural network are derived by M-matrix theory, analytic methods, and inequality techniques. Moreover, the exponential convergence rate index is estimated, which depends on the system parameters. The obtained results in this paper are less restrictive than previously known criteria. Two examples are given to show the effectiveness of the obtained results.

  9. Exponential Stability for Impulsive BAM Neural Networks with Time-Varying Delays and Reaction-Diffusion Terms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cao Jinde

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Impulsive bidirectional associative memory neural network model with time-varying delays and reaction-diffusion terms is considered. Several sufficient conditions ensuring the existence, uniqueness, and global exponential stability of equilibrium point for the addressed neural network are derived by M-matrix theory, analytic methods, and inequality techniques. Moreover, the exponential convergence rate index is estimated, which depends on the system parameters. The obtained results in this paper are less restrictive than previously known criteria. Two examples are given to show the effectiveness of the obtained results.

  10. One-dimensional isothermal multicomponent diffusion-reaction model and its application to methanol synthesis over commercial Cu-based catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Kun

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The present work was a study on global reaction rate of methanol synthesis. We measured experimentally the global reaction rate in the internal recycle gradientless reactor over catalyst SC309. The diffusion-reaction model of methanol synthesis was suggested. For model we chose the hydrogenation of CO and CO2 as key reaction. CO and CO2 were key components in our model. The internal diffusion effectiveness factors of CO and CO2 in the catalyst were calculated by the numerical integration. A comparison with the experiment showed that all the absolute values of the relative error were less than 10%. The simulation results showed that decreasing reaction temperature and catalyst diameter were conducive to reduce the influence of the internal diffusion on the methanol synthesis.

  11. Fourier spectral methods for fractional-in-space reaction-diffusion equations

    KAUST Repository

    Bueno-Orovio, Alfonso; Kay, David; Burrage, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    approximation of these models is demanding and imposes a number of computational constraints. In this paper, we introduce Fourier spectral methods as an attractive and easy-to-code alternative for the integration of fractional-in-space reaction

  12. Vapor-solid-solid growth mechanism driven by an epitaxial match between solid Au Zn alloy catalyst particle and Zn O nano wire at low temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos, Leonardo C.; Tonezzer, Matteo; Ferlauto, Andre S.; Magalhaes-Paniago, Rogerio; Oliveira, Sergio; Ladeira, Luiz O.; Lacerda, Rodrigo G.

    2008-01-01

    Nowadays, the growth of nano materials, like nano wires and nano tubes, is one of the key research areas of nano technology. However, a full picture of the growth mechanism of these quasi-one dimensional systems still needs to be achieved if these materials are to be applied electronics, biology and medicinal fields. Nevertheless, in spite of considerable advances on the growth of numerous nano wires, a clear understanding of the growth mechanism is still controversial and highly discussed. The present work provides a comprehensive picture of the precise mechanism of Zn O vapor-solid-solid (VSS) nano wire growth at low temperatures and gives the fundamental reasons responsible. We demonstrate by using a combination of synchrotron XRD and high resolution TEM that the growth dynamics at low temperatures is not governed by the well-known vapor-liquid solid (VLS) mechanisms. A critical new insight on the driving factor of VSS growth is proposed in which the VSS process occurs by a solid diffusion mechanism that is driven by a preferential oxidation process of the Zn inside the alloy catalyst induced by an epitaxial match between the Zn O(10-10) plane and the γ-Au Zn(222) plane. We believe that these results are not only important for the understanding of Zn O nano wire growth but could also have significant impact on the understanding of growth mechanisms of other nano wire systems. (author)

  13. Trojan War displayed as a full annihilation-diffusion-reaction model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, J. C.

    2017-02-01

    The diffusive pair annihilation model with embedded topological domains and archaeological data is applied in an analysis of the hypothetical Trojan-Greek war during the late Bronze Age. Estimations of parameter are explicitly made for critical dynamics of the model. In particular, the 8-metre walls of Troy could be viewed as the effective shield that provided the technological difference between the two armies. Suggestively, the numbers in The Iliad are quite sound, being in accord with Lanchester's laws of warfare.

  14. Reaction layer between U-7WT%Mo and Al alloys in chemical diffusion couples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirandou, M.; Granovsky, M.; Ortiz, M.; Balart, S.; Arico, S.; Gribaudo, L.

    2005-01-01

    Several failures in U-Mo dispersion fuel plates like pillowing and large porosities have been reported during irradiation experiments. These failures have been assigned to the formation of a large (U-Mo)/Al interaction product under high operating conditions. The modification of the matrix by alloying Al to change the interaction layer and improve its irradiation behavior, has been proposed. This paper reports diffusion experiments performed between U-7wt%Mo and various Al alloys containing Mg and / or Si. By the use of Optical Microscopy, SEM and X-Ray diffraction, it was found that with a concentration of 5.2wt% or 7.1 wt%Si the interaction layer is constituted mainly by (U,Mo)(Si,Al) 3 and no (U,Mo)Al 4 is detected. As part of the studies of properties of the U-Mo alloys the time for isothermal transformation start at different temperatures of the γ phase is being evaluated for the present U-7wt%Mo alloy. These results are used to plan the future diffusion program that will include diffusion under irradiation at CNEA RA3 reactor. (author)

  15. Modeling the Influence of Diffusion-Controlled Reactions and Residual Termination and Deactivation on the Rate and Control of Bulk ATRP at High Conversions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Mohammad Rabea

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In high-conversion atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP, all the reactions, such as radical termination, radical deactivation, dormant chain activation, monomer propagation, etc. could become diffusion controlled sooner or later, depending on relative diffusivities of the involved reacting species. These diffusion-controlled reactions directly affect the rate of polymerization and the control of polymer molecular weight. A model is developed to investigate the influence of diffusion-controlled reactions on the high conversion ATRP kinetics. Model simulation reveals that diffusion-controlled termination slightly increases the rate, but it is the diffusion-controlled deactivation that causes auto-acceleration in the rate (“gel effect” and loss of control. At high conversions, radical chains are “trapped” because of high molecular weight. However, radical centers can still migrate through (1 radical deactivation–activation cycles and (2 monomer propagation, which introduce “residual termination” reactions. It is found that the “residual termination” does not have much influence on the polymerization kinetics. The migration of radical centers through propagation can however facilitate catalytic deactivation of radicals, which improves the control of polymer molecular weight to some extent. Dormant chain activation and monomer propagation also become diffusion controlled and finally stop the polymerization when the system approaches its glass state.

  16. Influence of cold work on the diffusion of ion-implanted nitrogen in D9 steel using nuclear reaction analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arunkumar, J.; David, C.; Panigrahi, B.K.; Nair, K.G.M.

    2014-01-01

    D9 steels and their modified versions are envisaged for use as fuel cladding and wrapper materials in the Indian fast breeder reactor (FBR) programme. The role played by interstitially dissolved nitrogen in steel matrices for the stabilization of austenitic phase, increase of strength and corrosion resistance is well known. Various factors: the role of grain boundaries and the their orientation, stress mediation, grain fragmentation and production of short circuit paths as a result of compressive stress are known to affect the diffusion of nitrogen. Basically, cold working produces plethora of defects throughout the sample as compared to its solution annealed state. Our earlier studies on 1 x10"1"5 and 5x10"1"5 N"1"5 implanted Solution Annealed D9 (SAD9) showed significant vacancy-nitrogen complexes for higher fluence. Hence, thermal diffusion behaviour of nitrogen was studied in 5 x10"1"5 -N"1"5 implanted samples in solution annealed state. In the present study, to understand the influence of cold work, similar thermal diffusion behaviour of nitrogen has been studied in Cold Worked D9 steel (CWD9) using nuclear reaction analysis

  17. 4D Biofabrication of Branching Multicellular Structures: A Morphogenesis Simulation Based on Turing’s Reaction-Diffusion Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaolu; Yang, Hao

    2017-12-01

    The recently emerged four-dimensional (4D) biofabrication technique aims to create dynamic three-dimensional (3D) biological structures that can transform their shapes or functionalities with time when an external stimulus is imposed or when cell postprinting self-assembly occurs. The evolution of 3D pattern of branching geometry via self-assembly of cells is critical for 4D biofabrication of artificial organs or tissues with branched geometry. However, it is still unclear that how the formation and evolution of these branching pattern are biologically encoded. We study the 4D fabrication of lung branching structures utilizing a simulation model on the reaction-diffusion mechanism, which is established using partial differential equations of four variables, describing the reaction and diffusion process of morphogens with time during the development process of lung branching. The simulation results present the forming process of 3D branching pattern, and also interpret the behaviors of side branching and tip splitting as the stalk growing, through 3D visualization of numerical simulation.

  18. The induced dimension reduction method applied to convection-diffusion-reaction problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Astudillo Rengifo, R.A.; van Gijzen, M.B.

    2016-01-01

    Discretization of (linearized) convection-diusion-reaction problems yields
    a large and sparse non symmetric linear system of equations,
    Ax = b: (1)
    In this work, we compare the computational behavior of the Induced Dimension
    Reduction method (IDR(s)) [10], with other

  19. Modeling and simulation of diffusion-convection-reaction in heterogeneous nanochannels using OpenFOAM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pimpalgaonkar, H.G.; van Steijn, V.; Kreutzer, M.T.; Kleijn, C.R.; Simos, Theodore; Tsitouras, Charalambos

    2016-01-01

    We present a finite volume implementation of a phase field method in OpenFOAM as a tool to simulate reactive multiphase flows on heterogeneous surfaces. Using this tool, we simulate the formation and growth of a droplet due to a chemical reaction on a hydrophilic catalytic patch surrounded by a

  20. Reactions and Diffusion During Annealing-Induced H(+) Generation in SOI Buried Oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devine, R.A.B.; Fleetwood, D.M.; Vanheusden, K; Warren, W.L.

    1999-01-01

    We report experimental results suggesting that mobile protons are generated at strained Si-O-Si bonds near the Si/SiO 2 interface during annealing in forming gas. Our data further suggest that the presence of the top Si layer plays a crucial role in the mobile H + generation process. Finally, we show that the diffusion of the reactive species (presumably H 2 or H 0 ) towards the H + generation sites occurs laterally along the buried oxide layer, and can be impeded significantly due to the presence of trapping sites in the buried oxide

  1. Terrestrial Fe-oxide Concretions and Mars Blueberries: Comparisons of Similar Advective and Diffusive Chemical Infiltration Reaction Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, A. J.; Chan, M. A.

    2006-12-01

    Abundant iron oxide concretions occurring in Navajo Sandstone of southern Utah and those discovered at Meridiani Planum, Mars share many common observable physical traits such as their spheriodal shapes, occurrence, and distribution patterns in sediments. Terrestrial concretions are products of interaction between oxygen-rich aquifer water and basin-derived reducing (iron-rich) water. Water-rock interaction simulations show that diffusion of oxygen and iron supplied by slow-moving water is a reasonable mechanism for producing observed concretion patterns. In short, southern Utah iron oxide concretions are results of Liesegang-type diffusive infiltration reactions in sediments. We propose that the formation of blueberry hematite concretions in Mars sediments followed a similar diagenetic mechanism where iron was derived from the alteration of volcanic substrate and oxygen was provided by the early Martian atmosphere. Although the terrestrial analog differs in the original host rock composition, both the terrestrial and Mars iron-oxide precipitation mechanisms utilize iron and oxygen interactions in sedimentary host rock with diffusive infiltration of solutes from two opposite sources. For the terrestrial model, slow advection of iron-rich water is an important factor that allowed pervasive and in places massive precipitation of iron-oxide concretions. In Mars, evaporative flux of water at the top of the sediment column may have produced a slow advective mass-transfer mechanism that provided a steady source and the right quantity of iron. The similarities of the terrestrial and Martian systems are demonstrated using a water-rock interaction simulator Sym.8, initially in one-dimensional systems. Boundary conditions such as oxygen content of water, partial pressure of oxygen, and supply rate of iron were varied. The results demonstrate the importance of slow advection of water and diffusive processes for producing diagenetic iron oxide concretions.

  2. Solid state reaction studies in Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}–TiO{sub 2} system by diffusion couple method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Zhongshan [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Metallurgy, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); School of Metallurgical and Ecological Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Hu, Xiaojun, E-mail: huxiaojun@ustb.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Metallurgy, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); School of Metallurgical and Ecological Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Xue, Xiangxin [School of Materials and Metallurgy, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110006 (China); Chou, Kuochih [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Metallurgy, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); School of Metallurgical and Ecological Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: •The solid state reactions of Fe2O3-TiO2 system was studied by the diffusion couple method. •Different products were formed by diffusion, and the FeTiO3 was more stable phase. •The inter-diffusion coefficients and diffusion activation energy were estimated. -- Abstract: The solid state reactions in Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}–TiO{sub 2} system has been studied by diffusion couple experiments at 1323–1473 K, in which the oxygen partial pressure was controlled by the CO–CO{sub 2} gas mixture. The XRD analysis was used to confirm the phases of the inter-compound, and the concentration profiles were determined by electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). Based on the concentration profile of Ti, the inter-diffusion coefficients in Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} phase, which were both temperature and concentration of Ti ions dependent, were calculated by the modified Boltzmann–Matano method. According to the relation between the thickness of diffusion layer and temperature, the diffusion coefficient of the Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}–TiO{sub 2} system was obtained. According to the Arrhenius equation, the estimated diffusion activation energy was about 282.1 ± 18.8 kJ mol{sup −1}.

  3. Reaction phases and diffusion paths in SiC/metal systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naka, M.; Fukai, T. [Osaka Univ., Osaka (Japan); Schuster, J.C. [Vienna Univ., Vienna (Austria)

    2004-07-01

    The interface structures between SiC and metal are reviewed at SiC/metal systems. Metal groups are divided to carbide forming metals and non-carbide forming metals. Carbide forming metals form metal carbide granular or zone at metal side, and metal silicide zone at SiC side. The further diffusion of Si and C from SiC causes the formation of T ternary phase depending metal. Non-carbide forming metals form silicide zone containing graphite or the layered structure of metal silicide and metal silicide containing graphite. The diffusion path between SiC and metal are formed along tie-lines connecting SiC and metal on the corresponding ternary Si-C-M system. The reactivity of metals is dominated by the forming ability of carbide or silicide. Te reactivity tendency of elements are discussed on the periodical table of elements, and Ti among elements shows the highest reactivity among carbide forming metals. For non-carbide forming metals the reactivity sequence of metals is Fe>Ni>Co. (orig.)

  4. Reaction-diffusion path planning in a hybrid chemical and cellular-automaton processor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamatzky, Andrew; Lacy Costello, Benjamin de

    2003-01-01

    To find the shortest collision-free path in a room containing obstacles we designed a chemical processor and coupled it with a cellular-automaton processor. In the chemical processor obstacles are represented by sites of high concentration of potassium iodide and a planar substrate is saturated with palladium chloride. Potassium iodide diffuses into the substrate and reacts with palladium chloride. A dark coloured precipitate of palladium iodide is formed almost everywhere except sites where two or more diffusion wavefronts collide. The less coloured sites are situated at the furthest distance from obstacles. Thus, the chemical processor develops a repulsive field, generated by obstacles. A snapshot of the chemical processor is inputted to a cellular automaton. The automaton behaves like a discrete excitable media; also, every cell of the automaton is supplied with a pointer that shows an origin of the cell's excitation. The excitation spreads along the cells corresponding to precipitate depleted sites of the chemical processor. When the destination-site is excited, waves travel on the lattice and update the orientations of the pointers. Thus, the automaton constructs a spanning tree, made of pointers, that guides a traveler towards the destination point. Thus, the automaton medium generates an attractive field and combination of this attractive field with the repulsive field, generated by the chemical processor, provides us with a solution of the collision-free path problem

  5. Confinement and diffusion modulate bistability and stochastic switching in a reaction network with positive feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mlynarczyk, Paul J.; Pullen, Robert H.; Abel, Steven M.

    2016-01-01

    Positive feedback is a common feature in signal transduction networks and can lead to phenomena such as bistability and signal propagation by domain growth. Physical features of the cellular environment, such as spatial confinement and the mobility of proteins, play important but inadequately understood roles in shaping the behavior of signaling networks. Here, we use stochastic, spatially resolved kinetic Monte Carlo simulations to explore a positive feedback network as a function of system size, system shape, and mobility of molecules. We show that these physical properties can markedly alter characteristics of bistability and stochastic switching when compared with well-mixed simulations. Notably, systems of equal volume but different shapes can exhibit qualitatively different behaviors under otherwise identical conditions. We show that stochastic switching to a state maintained by positive feedback occurs by cluster formation and growth. Additionally, the frequency at which switching occurs depends nontrivially on the diffusion coefficient, which can promote or suppress switching relative to the well-mixed limit. Taken together, the results provide a framework for understanding how confinement and protein mobility influence emergent features of the positive feedback network by modulating molecular concentrations, diffusion-influenced rate parameters, and spatiotemporal correlations between molecules

  6. On the Existence of a Free Boundary for a Class of Reaction-Diffusion Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-02-01

    I. Diaz. "Soluciones con soporte compacto para alguno. problemas semilineales". Collect. Math. 30 (1979), 141-179. -26- [121 J. I. Diaz. Tecnica de ...supersoluciones locales para problemas estacionarios no lineales: applicacion al estudio de flujoe subsonicos. Memory of the Real Academia de Ciencias...nonlinearity, nonlinear boundary conditions, dead core set, chemical reactions Work Unit Number I - Applied Analysis (1) Seccion de Matematicas

  7. Effect of noise on defect chaos in a reaction-diffusion model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongli; Ouyang, Qi

    2005-06-01

    The influence of noise on defect chaos due to breakup of spiral waves through Doppler and Eckhaus instabilities is investigated numerically with a modified Fitzhugh-Nagumo model. By numerical simulations we show that the noise can drastically enhance the creation and annihilation rates of topological defects. The noise-free probability distribution function for defects in this model is found not to fit with the previously reported squared-Poisson distribution. Under the influence of noise, the distributions are flattened, and can fit with the squared-Poisson or the modified-Poisson distribution. The defect lifetime and diffusive property of defects under the influence of noise are also checked in this model.

  8. Reaction-diffusion on the fully-connected lattice: A+A\\rightarrow A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turban, Loïc; Fortin, Jean-Yves

    2018-04-01

    Diffusion-coagulation can be simply described by a dynamic where particles perform a random walk on a lattice and coalesce with probability unity when meeting on the same site. Such processes display non-equilibrium properties with strong fluctuations in low dimensions. In this work we study this problem on the fully-connected lattice, an infinite-dimensional system in the thermodynamic limit, for which mean-field behaviour is expected. Exact expressions for the particle density distribution at a given time and survival time distribution for a given number of particles are obtained. In particular, we show that the time needed to reach a finite number of surviving particles (vanishing density in the scaling limit) displays strong fluctuations and extreme value statistics, characterized by a universal class of non-Gaussian distributions with singular behaviour.

  9. Method for calculating solid-solid phase transitions at high temperature: An application to N2O

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuchta, B.; Etters, R.D.

    1992-01-01

    Two similar techniques for calculating solid-solid phase transitions at high temperatures are developed, where the contribution of the entropy may be a decisive factor. They utilize an artificial reversible path from one phase to another by application of a control parameter. Thermodynamic averages are calculated using constant-volume and constant-pressure Monte Carlo techniques. An application to N 2 O at room temperature shows that the cubic Pa3 to orthorhombic Cmca transition occurs near 4.9-GPa pressure, very close to the value calculated at very low temperatures. These results support experimental evidence that the transition pressure is virtually independent of temperature

  10. Global exponential stability and periodicity of reaction-diffusion recurrent neural networks with distributed delays and Dirichlet boundary conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Junguo; Lu Linji

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, global exponential stability and periodicity of a class of reaction-diffusion recurrent neural networks with distributed delays and Dirichlet boundary conditions are studied by constructing suitable Lyapunov functionals and utilizing some inequality techniques. We first prove global exponential convergence to 0 of the difference between any two solutions of the original neural networks, the existence and uniqueness of equilibrium is the direct results of this procedure. This approach is different from the usually used one where the existence, uniqueness of equilibrium and stability are proved in two separate steps. Secondly, we prove periodicity. Sufficient conditions ensuring the existence, uniqueness, and global exponential stability of the equilibrium and periodic solution are given. These conditions are easy to verify and our results play an important role in the design and application of globally exponentially stable neural circuits and periodic oscillatory neural circuits.

  11. Parameter estimation in IMEX-trigonometrically fitted methods for the numerical solution of reaction-diffusion problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Ambrosio, Raffaele; Moccaldi, Martina; Paternoster, Beatrice

    2018-05-01

    In this paper, an adapted numerical scheme for reaction-diffusion problems generating periodic wavefronts is introduced. Adapted numerical methods for such evolutionary problems are specially tuned to follow prescribed qualitative behaviors of the solutions, making the numerical scheme more accurate and efficient as compared with traditional schemes already known in the literature. Adaptation through the so-called exponential fitting technique leads to methods whose coefficients depend on unknown parameters related to the dynamics and aimed to be numerically computed. Here we propose a strategy for a cheap and accurate estimation of such parameters, which consists essentially in minimizing the leading term of the local truncation error whose expression is provided in a rigorous accuracy analysis. In particular, the presented estimation technique has been applied to a numerical scheme based on combining an adapted finite difference discretization in space with an implicit-explicit time discretization. Numerical experiments confirming the effectiveness of the approach are also provided.

  12. Fitted Fourier-pseudospectral methods for solving a delayed reaction-diffusion partial differential equation in biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, A. M. A.; Bashier, E. B. M.; Hashim, M. H. A.; Patidar, K. C.

    2017-07-01

    In this work, we design and analyze a fitted numerical method to solve a reaction-diffusion model with time delay, namely, a delayed version of a population model which is an extension of the logistic growth (LG) equation for a food-limited population proposed by Smith [F.E. Smith, Population dynamics in Daphnia magna and a new model for population growth, Ecology 44 (1963) 651-663]. Seeing that the analytical solution (in closed form) is hard to obtain, we seek for a robust numerical method. The method consists of a Fourier-pseudospectral semi-discretization in space and a fitted operator implicit-explicit scheme in temporal direction. The proposed method is analyzed for convergence and we found that it is unconditionally stable. Illustrative numerical results will be presented at the conference.

  13. Diffuse x-ray scattering studies of defect reactions in electron-irradiated dilute nickel alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Averback, R.S.; Ehrhart, P.

    1984-01-01

    Huang diffuse scattering was employed to study defect properties in dilute Ni-Si alloys. Ni alloys containing 1 at.% and 0.05 at.% Si were irradiated with electrons at 4.2 K and were subsequently isochronally annealed. It was found that, prior to annealing, the Frenkel-pair resistivities and self-interstitial atom configurations were the same in the alloys as in pure Ni. The independence of the Frenkel-pair resistivity to Si concentration indicates that the resistivities arising from Frenkel pairs and Si solute are linearly additive in Ni. After annealing through stage I to 85 K, the defect cluster size grew to 1.5, 2.3 and 3.0 interstitial atoms for the 1 at.% Si, 0.05 at.% Si and pure Ni specimens, respectively. These results demonstrate that self-interstitial atoms are not immobilised by single Si atoms in Ni, but rather complexes involving several Si atoms and/or two interstitial atoms are the stable defects at the end of annealing stage I. It was also observed that Si solute in Ni strongly suppresses the growth of interstitial clusters in stage II. In the 1 at.% Si alloys di-interstitials were immobilised up to temperatures between 200 and 300 K. There was no indication that Si solute reduced vacancy mobility in annealing stage III. The consequences of these results for the understanding of high-temperature radiation effects in alloys are discussed. (author)

  14. Crossover properties of a one-dimensional reaction-diffusion process with a transport current

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fortin, Jean-Yves

    2014-01-01

    1D non-equilibrium models of particles subjected to a coagulation-diffusion process are important in understanding non-equilibrium dynamics, and fluctuation-dissipation relations. We consider in this paper transport properties in finite and semi-infinite one-dimensional chains. A set of particles freely hop between nearest-neighbor sites, with the additional condition that, when two particles meet, they merge instantaneously into one particle. A localized source of particle-current is imposed at the origin as well as a non-symmetric hopping rate between the left and right directions (particle drift). This model was previously studied with exact results for the particle density by Hinrichsen et al [1] in the long-time limit. We are interested here in the crossover process between a scaling regime and long-time behavior, starting with a chain filled with particles. As in the previous reference [1], we employ the empty-interval-particle method, where the probability of finding an empty interval between two given sites is considered. However a different method is developed here to treat the boundary conditions by imposing the continuity and differentiability of the interval probability, which allows for a closed and unique solution, especially for any given initial particle configuration. In the finite size case, we find a crossover between the scaling regime and two different exponential decays for the particle density as a function of the input current. Precise asymptotic expressions for the particle density and coagulation rate are given. (paper)

  15. The effects of retrograde reactions and of diffusion on 39Ar-40Ar ages of micas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allaz, Julien; Engi, Martin; Berger, Alfons

    2011-01-01

    Effects of metamorphic reactions occurring during decompression were explored to understand their influence on 39Ar-40Ar ages of micas. Monometamorphic metasediments from the Lepontine Alps (Switzerland) were studied. Collected samples reached lower amphibolite facies during the Barrovian....... XRD-data indicated that some mineral separates prepared for Ar-Ar stepwise heating analysis were monomineralic, whereas others were composed of two white micas (muscovite with paragonite or margarite), or biotite and chlorite. In monomineralic samples 37Ar/39Ar and 38Ar/39Ar (proportional to Ca....../K and Cl/K ratios) did not change and the resulting ages can be interpreted unambiguously. In mineral separates containing two white micas, Ca/K and Cl/K ratios were variable, reflecting non-simultaneous laboratory degassing of the two heterochemical Ar-reservoirs. These ratios were used to identify each...

  16. Simulation of reaction diffusion processes over biologically relevant size and time scales using multi-GPU workstations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallock, Michael J; Stone, John E; Roberts, Elijah; Fry, Corey; Luthey-Schulten, Zaida

    2014-05-01

    Simulation of in vivo cellular processes with the reaction-diffusion master equation (RDME) is a computationally expensive task. Our previous software enabled simulation of inhomogeneous biochemical systems for small bacteria over long time scales using the MPD-RDME method on a single GPU. Simulations of larger eukaryotic systems exceed the on-board memory capacity of individual GPUs, and long time simulations of modest-sized cells such as yeast are impractical on a single GPU. We present a new multi-GPU parallel implementation of the MPD-RDME method based on a spatial decomposition approach that supports dynamic load balancing for workstations containing GPUs of varying performance and memory capacity. We take advantage of high-performance features of CUDA for peer-to-peer GPU memory transfers and evaluate the performance of our algorithms on state-of-the-art GPU devices. We present parallel e ciency and performance results for simulations using multiple GPUs as system size, particle counts, and number of reactions grow. We also demonstrate multi-GPU performance in simulations of the Min protein system in E. coli . Moreover, our multi-GPU decomposition and load balancing approach can be generalized to other lattice-based problems.

  17. Distance-dependent diffusion-controlled reaction of •NO and O2•- at chemical equilibrium with ONOO-.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botti, Horacio; Möller, Matías N; Steinmann, Daniel; Nauser, Thomas; Koppenol, Willem H; Denicola, Ana; Radi, Rafael

    2010-12-16

    The fast reaction of (•)NO and O(2)(•-) to give ONOO(-) has been extensively studied at irreversible conditions, but the reasons for the wide variations in observed forward rate constants (3.8 ≤ k(f) ≤ 20 × 10(9) M(-1) s(-1)) remain unexplained. We characterized the diffusion-dependent aqueous (pH > 12) chemical equilibrium of the form (•)NO + O(2)(•-) = ONOO(-) with respect to its dependence on temperature, viscosity, and [ONOO(-)](eq) by determining [ONOO(-)](eq) and [(•)NO](eq). The equilibrium forward reaction rate constant (k(f)(eq)) has negative activation energy, in contrast to that found under irreversible conditions. In contradiction to the law of mass action, we demonstrate that the equilibrium constant depends on ONOO(-) concentration. Therefore, a wide range of k(f)(eq) values could be derived (7.5-21 × 10(9) M(-1) s(-1)). Of general interest, the variations in k(f) can thus be explained by its dependence on the distance between ONOO(-) particles (sites of generation of (•)NO and O(2)(•-)).

  18. Spirals in a reaction-diffusion system: Dependence of wave dynamics on excitability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahanta, Dhriti; Das, Nirmali Prabha; Dutta, Sumana

    2018-02-01

    A detailed study of the effects of excitability of the Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) reaction on spiral wave properties has been carried out. Using the Oregonator model, we explore the various regimes of wave activity, from sustained oscillations to wave damping, as the system undergoes a Hopf bifurcation, that is achieved by varying the excitability parameter, ɛ . We also discover a short range of parameter values where random oscillations are observed. With an increase in the value of ɛ , the frequency of the wave decreases exponentially, as the dimension of the spiral core expands. These numerical results are confirmed by carrying out experiments in thin layers of the BZ system, where the excitability is changed by varying the concentrations of the reactant species. Effect of reactant concentrations on wave properties like time period and wavelength are also explored in detail. Drifting and meandering spirals are found in the parameter space under investigation, with the excitability affecting the tip trajectory in a way predicted by the numerical studies. This study acts as a quantitative evidence of the relationship between the excitability parameter, ɛ , and the substrate concentrations.

  19. Spirals in a reaction-diffusion system: Dependence of wave dynamics on excitability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahanta, Dhriti; Das, Nirmali Prabha; Dutta, Sumana

    2018-02-01

    A detailed study of the effects of excitability of the Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) reaction on spiral wave properties has been carried out. Using the Oregonator model, we explore the various regimes of wave activity, from sustained oscillations to wave damping, as the system undergoes a Hopf bifurcation, that is achieved by varying the excitability parameter, ε. We also discover a short range of parameter values where random oscillations are observed. With an increase in the value of ε, the frequency of the wave decreases exponentially, as the dimension of the spiral core expands. These numerical results are confirmed by carrying out experiments in thin layers of the BZ system, where the excitability is changed by varying the concentrations of the reactant species. Effect of reactant concentrations on wave properties like time period and wavelength are also explored in detail. Drifting and meandering spirals are found in the parameter space under investigation, with the excitability affecting the tip trajectory in a way predicted by the numerical studies. This study acts as a quantitative evidence of the relationship between the excitability parameter, ε, and the substrate concentrations.

  20. Microtubule self-organisation by reaction-diffusion processes causes collective transport and organisation of cellular particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demongeot Jacques

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The transport of intra-cellular particles by microtubules is a major biological function. Under appropriate in vitro conditions, microtubule preparations behave as a 'complex' system and show 'emergent' phenomena. In particular, they form dissipative structures that self-organise over macroscopic distances by a combination of reaction and diffusion. Results Here, we show that self-organisation also gives rise to a collective transport of colloidal particles along a specific direction. Particles, such as polystyrene beads, chromosomes, nuclei, and vesicles are carried at speeds of several microns per minute. The process also results in the macroscopic self-organisation of these particles. After self-organisation is completed, they show the same pattern of organisation as the microtubules. Numerical simulations of a population of growing and shrinking microtubules, incorporating experimentally realistic reaction dynamics, predict self-organisation. They forecast that during self-organisation, macroscopic parallel arrays of oriented microtubules form which cross the reaction space in successive waves. Such travelling waves are capable of transporting colloidal particles. The fact that in the simulations, the aligned arrays move along the same direction and at the same speed as the particles move, suggest that this process forms the underlying mechanism for the observed transport properties. Conclusions This process constitutes a novel physical chemical mechanism by which chemical energy is converted into collective transport of colloidal particles along a given direction. Self-organisation of this type provides a new mechanism by which intra cellular particles such as chromosomes and vesicles can be displaced and simultaneously organised by microtubules. It is plausible that processes of this type occur in vivo.

  1. Microtubule self-organisation by reaction-diffusion processes causes collective transport and organisation of cellular particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glade, Nicolas; Demongeot, Jacques; Tabony, James

    2004-01-01

    Background The transport of intra-cellular particles by microtubules is a major biological function. Under appropriate in vitro conditions, microtubule preparations behave as a 'complex' system and show 'emergent' phenomena. In particular, they form dissipative structures that self-organise over macroscopic distances by a combination of reaction and diffusion. Results Here, we show that self-organisation also gives rise to a collective transport of colloidal particles along a specific direction. Particles, such as polystyrene beads, chromosomes, nuclei, and vesicles are carried at speeds of several microns per minute. The process also results in the macroscopic self-organisation of these particles. After self-organisation is completed, they show the same pattern of organisation as the microtubules. Numerical simulations of a population of growing and shrinking microtubules, incorporating experimentally realistic reaction dynamics, predict self-organisation. They forecast that during self-organisation, macroscopic parallel arrays of oriented microtubules form which cross the reaction space in successive waves. Such travelling waves are capable of transporting colloidal particles. The fact that in the simulations, the aligned arrays move along the same direction and at the same speed as the particles move, suggest that this process forms the underlying mechanism for the observed transport properties. Conclusions This process constitutes a novel physical chemical mechanism by which chemical energy is converted into collective transport of colloidal particles along a given direction. Self-organisation of this type provides a new mechanism by which intra cellular particles such as chromosomes and vesicles can be displaced and simultaneously organised by microtubules. It is plausible that processes of this type occur in vivo. PMID:15176973

  2. Simulating Solid-Solid Phase Transition in Shape-Memory Alloy Microstructure by Face-Offsetting Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellur Ramaswamy, Ravi S.; Tortorelli, Daniel A.; Fried, Eliot; Jiao Xiangmin

    2008-01-01

    Advances in the understanding of martensitic transformations (diffusionless, solid-solid phase transformations) have been instrumental to the recent discovery of new low hysteresis alloys. However, some key fundamental issues must be better understood to design still better alloys. Restricting attention to antiplane shear, we use finite element analysis to model the shape-memory alloy microstructure within the Abeyaratne-Knowles continuum thermomechanical framework and use an interface kinetic relation of the kind proposed by Rosakis and Tsai. Geometric singularities and topological changes associated with microstructural evolution pose significant numerical challenges. We address such challenges with a recently developed front-tracking scheme called the face-offsetting method (FOM) to explicitly model phase interfaces. Initial results demonstrate the effectiveness of FOM in resolving needle-like twinned microstructures

  3. Dynamically Adapted Mesh Construction for the Efficient Numerical Solution of a Singular Perturbed Reaction-diffusion-advection Equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry V. Lukyanenko

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This  work develops  a theory  of the  asymptotic-numerical investigation of the  moving fronts  in reaction-diffusion-advection models.  By considering  the  numerical  solution  of the  singularly perturbed Burgers’s  equation  we discuss a method  of dynamically  adapted mesh  construction that is able to significantly  improve  the  numerical  solution  of this  type of equations.  For  the  construction we use a priori information that is based  on the  asymptotic analysis  of the  problem.  In  particular, we take  into account the information about  the speed of the transition layer, its width  and structure. Our algorithms  are able to reduce significantly complexity and enhance stability of the numerical  calculations in comparison  with classical approaches for solving this class of problems.  The numerical  experiment is presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed  method.The article  is published  in the authors’  wording. 

  4. Reaction

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    19 oct. 2017 ... Reaction to Mohamed Said Nakhli et al. concerning the article: "When the axillary block remains the only alternative in a 5 year old child". .... Bertini L1, Savoia G, De Nicola A, Ivani G, Gravino E, Albani A et al ... 2010;7(2):101-.

  5. Passive sampling of DDT, DDE and DDD in sediments: accounting for degradation processes with reaction-diffusion modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tcaciuc, A Patricia; Borrelli, Raffaella; Zaninetta, Luciano M; Gschwend, Philip M

    2018-01-24

    Passive sampling is becoming a widely used tool for assessing freely dissolved concentrations of hydrophobic organic contaminants in environmental media. For certain media and target analytes, the time to reach equilibrium exceeds the deployment time, and in such cases, the loss of performance reference compounds (PRCs), loaded in the sampler before deployment, is one of the common ways used to assess the fractional equilibration of target analytes. The key assumption behind the use of PRCs is that their release is solely diffusion driven. But in this work, we show that PRC transformations in the sediment can have a measurable impact on the PRC releases and even allow estimation of that compound's transformation rate in the environment of interest. We found that in both field and lab incubations, the loss of the 13 C 2,4'-DDT PRC from a polyethylene (PE) passive sampler deployed at the sediment-water interface was accelerated compared to the loss of other PRCs ( 13 C-labeled PCBs, 13 C-labeled DDE and DDD). The DDT PRC loss was also accompanied by accumulation in the PE of its degradation product, 13 C 2,4'-DDD. Using a 1D reaction-diffusion model, we deduced the in situ degradation rates of DDT from the measured PRC loss. The in situ degradation rates increased with depth into the sediment bed (0.14 d -1 at 0-10 cm and 1.4 d -1 at 30-40 cm) and although they could not be independently validated, these rates compared favorably with literature values. This work shows that passive sampling users should be cautious when choosing PRCs, as degradation processes can affect some PRC's releases from the passive sampler. More importantly, this work opens up the opportunity for novel applications of passive samplers, particularly with regard to investigating in situ degradation rates, pathways, and products for both legacy and emerging contaminants. However, further work is needed to confirm that the rates deduced from model fitting of PRC loss are a true reflection of DDT

  6. Numerical Analysis of the Reaction-diffusion Equation for Soluble Starch and Dextrin as Substrates of Immobilized Amyloglucosidase in a Porous Support by Using Least Square Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Izadi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study, substrates concentration profile has been studied in a porous matrix containing immobilized amyloglucosidase for glucose production. This analysis has been performed by using of an analytical method called Least Square Method and results have been compared with numerical solution. Effects of effective diffusivity (, Michael's constant (, maximum reaction rate ( and initial substrate concentration ( are studied on Soluble Starch and Dextrin concentration in the spherical support. Outcomes reveal that Least Square Method has an excellent agreement with numerical solution and in the center of support, substrate concentration is minimum and increasing of effective diffusivity and Michael's constant reduce the Soluble Starch and Dextrin profile gradient.

  7. Modelling non-homogeneous stochastic reaction-diffusion systems: the case study of gemcitabine-treated non-small cell lung cancer growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecca, Paola; Morpurgo, Daniele

    2012-01-01

    Reaction-diffusion based models have been widely used in the literature for modeling the growth of solid tumors. Many of the current models treat both diffusion/consumption of nutrients and cell proliferation. The majority of these models use classical transport/mass conservation equations for describing the distribution of molecular species in tumor spheroids, and the Fick's law for describing the flux of uncharged molecules (i.e oxygen, glucose). Commonly, the equations for the cell movement and proliferation are first order differential equations describing the rate of change of the velocity of the cells with respect to the spatial coordinates as a function of the nutrient's gradient. Several modifications of these equations have been developed in the last decade to explicitly indicate that the tumor includes cells, interstitial fluids and extracellular matrix: these variants provided a model of tumor as a multiphase material with these as the different phases. Most of the current reaction-diffusion tumor models are deterministic and do not model the diffusion as a local state-dependent process in a non-homogeneous medium at the micro- and meso-scale of the intra- and inter-cellular processes, respectively. Furthermore, a stochastic reaction-diffusion model in which diffusive transport of the molecular species of nutrients and chemotherapy drugs as well as the interactions of the tumor cells with these species is a novel approach. The application of this approach to he scase of non-small cell lung cancer treated with gemcitabine is also novel. We present a stochastic reaction-diffusion model of non-small cell lung cancer growth in the specification formalism of the tool Redi, we recently developed for simulating reaction-diffusion systems. We also describe how a spatial gradient of nutrients and oncological drugs affects the tumor progression. Our model is based on a generalization of the Fick's first diffusion law that allows to model diffusive transport in non

  8. A general treatment of one- to three-dimensional diffusion reaction kinetics of interstitial clusters: Implications for the evolution of voids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trinkaus, H.; Singh, B.N.; Golubov, S.I.

    2008-05-01

    In recent years, it has been shown that a number of striking features in the microstructural evolution occurring in metals under cascade damage generating irradiation (e.g. enhanced swelling near grain boundaries, decoration of dislocations with SIA loops, saturation of void growth and void lattice formation) can be rationalised in terms of intra-cascade clustering of vacancies and self-interstitial atoms (SIAs), differences in the thermal stability and mobility of the resulting clusters and one-dimensional (1D) glide diffusion of SIA clusters ('production bias model'). The 1D diffusion of SIA clusters is generally disturbed by changes between equivalent 1D diffusion paths and by transversal diffusion by self-climb, resulting in diffusion reaction kinetics between the 1D and 3D limiting cases. In this paper, a general treatment of such kinetics operating in systems containing random distributions of sinks is presented. The complicated partial sink strengths of different components of the system for the annihilation of SIA clusters are expressed by those for the simple 1D and 3D limiting cases. The effects of direction changes and transversal diffusion are first considered separately and are then combined. The significance of the present treatment for damage accumulation under cascade damage conditions is illustrated by applying it to the discussion of void growth characteristics, particularly of the conditions for saturation of void growth. (au)

  9. A general treatment of one- to three-dimensional diffusion reaction kinetics of interstitial clusters: Implications for the evolution of voids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trinkaus, H. (Inst. Festkoerperforschung, Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany)); Singh, B.N. (Risoe DTU, Roskilde (Denmark)); Golubov, S.I. (Oak Ridge National Lab., Materials Science and Technology Div., TN (United States))

    2008-05-15

    In recent years, it has been shown that a number of striking features in the microstructural evolution occurring in metals under cascade damage generating irradiation (e.g. enhanced swelling near grain boundaries, decoration of dislocations with SIA loops, saturation of void growth and void lattice formation) can be rationalised in terms of intra-cascade clustering of vacancies and self-interstitial atoms (SIAs), differences in the thermal stability and mobility of the resulting clusters and one-dimensional (1D) glide diffusion of SIA clusters ('production bias model'). The 1D diffusion of SIA clusters is generally disturbed by changes between equivalent 1D diffusion paths and by transversal diffusion by self-climb, resulting in diffusion reaction kinetics between the 1D and 3D limiting cases. In this paper, a general treatment of such kinetics operating in systems containing random distributions of sinks is presented. The complicated partial sink strengths of different components of the system for the annihilation of SIA clusters are expressed by those for the simple 1D and 3D limiting cases. The effects of direction changes and transversal diffusion are first considered separately and are then combined. The significance of the present treatment for damage accumulation under cascade damage conditions is illustrated by applying it to the discussion of void growth characteristics, particularly of the conditions for saturation of void growth. (au)

  10. Fast ion transport at solid-solid interfaces in hybrid battery anodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Zhengyuan; Choudhury, Snehashis; Zachman, Michael J.; Wei, Shuya; Zhang, Kaihang; Kourkoutis, Lena F.; Archer, Lynden A.

    2018-04-01

    Carefully designed solid-electrolyte interphases are required for stable, reversible and efficient electrochemical energy storage in batteries. We report that hybrid battery anodes created by depositing an electrochemically active metal (for example, Sn, In or Si) on a reactive alkali metal electrode by a facile ion-exchange chemistry lead to very high exchange currents and stable long-term performance of electrochemical cells based on Li and Na electrodes. By means of direct visualization and ex situ electrodeposition studies, Sn-Li anodes are shown to be stable at 3 mA cm-2 and 3 mAh cm-2. Prototype full cells in which the hybrid anodes are paired with high-loading LiNi0.8Co0.15Al0.05O2(NCA) cathodes are also reported. As a second demonstration, we create and study Sn-Na hybrid anodes and show that they can be cycled stably for more than 1,700 hours with minimal voltage divergence. Charge storage at the hybrid anodes is reported to involve a combination of alloying and electrodeposition reactions.

  11. Mittag-Leffler synchronization of fractional neural networks with time-varying delays and reaction-diffusion terms using impulsive and linear controllers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamova, Ivanka; Stamov, Gani

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, we propose a fractional-order neural network system with time-varying delays and reaction-diffusion terms. We first develop a new Mittag-Leffler synchronization strategy for the controlled nodes via impulsive controllers. Using the fractional Lyapunov method sufficient conditions are given. We also study the global Mittag-Leffler synchronization of two identical fractional impulsive reaction-diffusion neural networks using linear controllers, which was an open problem even for integer-order models. Since the Mittag-Leffler stability notion is a generalization of the exponential stability concept for fractional-order systems, our results extend and improve the exponential impulsive control theory of neural network system with time-varying delays and reaction-diffusion terms to the fractional-order case. The fractional-order derivatives allow us to model the long-term memory in the neural networks, and thus the present research provides with a conceptually straightforward mathematical representation of rather complex processes. Illustrative examples are presented to show the validity of the obtained results. We show that by means of appropriate impulsive controllers we can realize the stability goal and to control the qualitative behavior of the states. An image encryption scheme is extended using fractional derivatives. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Lie and Q-Conditional Symmetries of Reaction-Diffusion-Convection Equations with Exponential Nonlinearities and Their Application for Finding Exact Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Cherniha

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available This review is devoted to search for Lie and Q-conditional (nonclassical symmetries and exact solutions of a class of reaction-diffusion-convection equations with exponential nonlinearities. A complete Lie symmetry classification of the class is derived via two different algorithms in order to show that the result depends essentially on the type of equivalence transformations used for the classification. Moreover, a complete description of Q-conditional symmetries for PDEs from the class in question is also presented. It is shown that all the well-known results for reaction-diffusion equations with exponential nonlinearities follow as particular cases from the results derived for this class of reaction-diffusion-convection equations. The symmetries obtained for constructing exact solutions of the relevant equations are successfully applied. The exact solutions are compared with those found by means of different techniques. Finally, an application of the exact solutions for solving boundary-value problems arising in population dynamics is presented.

  13. Efficient numerical simulation of non-integer-order space-fractional reaction-diffusion equation via the Riemann-Liouville operator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owolabi, Kolade M.

    2018-03-01

    In this work, we are concerned with the solution of non-integer space-fractional reaction-diffusion equations with the Riemann-Liouville space-fractional derivative in high dimensions. We approximate the Riemann-Liouville derivative with the Fourier transform method and advance the resulting system in time with any time-stepping solver. In the numerical experiments, we expect the travelling wave to arise from the given initial condition on the computational domain (-∞, ∞), which we terminate in the numerical experiments with a large but truncated value of L. It is necessary to choose L large enough to allow the waves to have enough space to distribute. Experimental results in high dimensions on the space-fractional reaction-diffusion models with applications to biological models (Fisher and Allen-Cahn equations) are considered. Simulation results reveal that fractional reaction-diffusion equations can give rise to a range of physical phenomena when compared to non-integer-order cases. As a result, most meaningful and practical situations are found to be modelled with the concept of fractional calculus.

  14. Isostructural solid-solid phase transition in monolayers of soft core-shell particles at fluid interfaces: structure and mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Marcel; Fernández-Rodríguez, Miguel Ángel; Steinacher, Mathias; Scheidegger, Laura; Geisel, Karen; Richtering, Walter; Squires, Todd M; Isa, Lucio

    2016-04-21

    We have studied the complete two-dimensional phase diagram of a core-shell microgel-laden fluid interface by synchronizing its compression with the deposition of the interfacial monolayer. Applying a new protocol, different positions on the substrate correspond to different values of the monolayer surface pressure and specific area. Analyzing the microstructure of the deposited monolayers, we discovered an isostructural solid-solid phase transition between two crystalline phases with the same hexagonal symmetry, but with two different lattice constants. The two phases corresponded to shell-shell and core-core inter-particle contacts, respectively; with increasing surface pressure the former mechanically failed enabling the particle cores to come into contact. In the phase-transition region, clusters of particles in core-core contacts nucleate, melting the surrounding shell-shell crystal, until the whole monolayer moves into the second phase. We furthermore measured the interfacial rheology of the monolayers as a function of the surface pressure using an interfacial microdisk rheometer. The interfaces always showed a strong elastic response, with a dip in the shear elastic modulus in correspondence with the melting of the shell-shell phase, followed by a steep increase upon the formation of a percolating network of the core-core contacts. These results demonstrate that the core-shell nature of the particles leads to a rich mechanical and structural behavior that can be externally tuned by compressing the interface, indicating new routes for applications, e.g. in surface patterning or emulsion stabilization.

  15. Experimental investigation of attrition resistance of zeolite catalysts in two particle gas-solid-solid fluidization system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nawaz, Z.; Ziaoping, T.; Shu, Q.; Wei, F.; Naveed, S.

    2010-01-01

    In the study of mechanical degradation of 34 ZSM-5 and SAPO catalysts, using the gas jet attrition - ASTM standard fluidized bed test (D-5757), the effect of particle size and its quantitative analysis in co-fluidization environment was investigated on the air jet index (AJI) basis. In gas-solid-solid fluidized bed reactors (GSS-FBR), two different sized particles were fluidized under isothermal conditions. In case of ZSM-5 and SAPO-34, significant attrition resistance was observed, which was attributed to small pore size and specific structural strength of the mobile framework image (MFI) and chabasite (CHA) structures, respectively. The optimum AJI for SAPO-34 and ZSM-5 (of particle size 0.2 mm) in GSS-fluidization system was observed to be 0.0118 and 0.0062, respectively. In co-fluidization, deviations from Gwyn relationship were observed due to change in impact of collision. Therefore, zeolites are recommended as suitable catalysts or catalytic supports (for doping of expensive metals) and for commercial use in GSS-FBR. (author)

  16. Finite element modeling for integrated solid-solid PCM-building material with varying phase change temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, D.; Fung, A.S.; Siddiqui, O. [Ryerson Polytechnic Univ., Toronto, ON (Canada). Dept. of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering

    2008-08-15

    Solid-solid phase change materials (SSPCMs) are used to enhance thermal storage performance and reduce indoor temperature fluctuations in buildings. In this study, a finite element model (FEM) was used to investigate the thermal properties of different types of SSPCMs. An effective heat capacity method was used to develop the model. An integrated PCM-building material was analyzed in relation to temperature and heat flux profiles. Governing equations for the heat transfer process were composed of Navier-Stokes momentum equations; a mass conservation equation; and an energy conservation equation. Effective heat capacity was described as a linear function of the latent heat of fusion on both the heating and cooling processes. Data from the simulation were then compared with an experiment suing drywall, concrete and gypcrete samples. Heat flux across the surfaces and temperatures on the surfaces of the materials were measured. Data were used to validate the finite element model (FEM). Results of the study suggested that heat flux profiles are an effective means of understanding phase change processes. It was concluded that PCMs with lower phase change temperatures lengthened energy releases and improved thermal comfort in the building. 12 refs., 2 tabs., 14 figs.

  17. Solid-solid interactions in Co3O4-MoO3/MgO system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radwan, Nagi R.E.; Ghozza, Ahmed M.; El-Shobaky, Gamil A.

    2003-01-01

    Cobalt/magnesium mixed oxide solids and cobalt-molybdenum/magnesium mixed oxide solids were prepared by thermal decomposition of basic magnesium carbonate pretreated with different proportions of cobalt nitrate and then with calculated amounts of ammonium molybdate. The proportions of cobalt expressed as Co 3 O 4 were 0.1, 0.2 and 0.3 mol while the concentrations of molybdenum expressed as mol% MoO 3 were 2.5 and 5.0. The prepared mixed solid specimens were calcined in air at 400-1000 deg. C. The solid-solid interactions in Co 3 O 4 -MoO 3 were investigated using DTA, TG and X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) techniques. The results obtained revealed that MgO dissolved cobalt oxide in its lattice forming CoO-MgO solid solution. The amount of cobalt dissolved increases by increasing the temperature in the range 800-1000 deg. C. This finding was confirmed by X-ray diffractograms in which all the diffraction lines of cobalt oxide disappeared at 1000 deg. C. MoO 3 present interacted readily with MgO and cobalt oxide by heat treatment at temperature starting from 400 deg. C producing MgMoO 4 and CoMoO 4 which remained stable by heating at 1000 deg. C. The impregnation of basic magnesium carbonate with cobalt nitrate much enhanced its thermal decomposition yielding MgO, which decomposed completely at 395.5 deg. C instead of 525 deg. C. The formation of magnesium cobaltite (MgCo 2 O 4 ) has been ruled out via XRD investigation at relatively high diffraction angles

  18. Predicting in vivo glioma growth with the reaction diffusion equation constrained by quantitative magnetic resonance imaging data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hormuth II, David A; Weis, Jared A; Barnes, Stephanie L; Miga, Michael I; Yankeelov, Thomas E; Rericha, Erin C; Quaranta, Vito

    2015-01-01

    Reaction–diffusion models have been widely used to model glioma growth. However, it has not been shown how accurately this model can predict future tumor status using model parameters (i.e., tumor cell diffusion and proliferation) estimated from quantitative in vivo imaging data. To this end, we used in silico studies to develop the methods needed to accurately estimate tumor specific reaction–diffusion model parameters, and then tested the accuracy with which these parameters can predict future growth. The analogous study was then performed in a murine model of glioma growth. The parameter estimation approach was tested using an in silico tumor ‘grown’ for ten days as dictated by the reaction–diffusion equation. Parameters were estimated from early time points and used to predict subsequent growth. Prediction accuracy was assessed at global (total volume and Dice value) and local (concordance correlation coefficient, CCC) levels. Guided by the in silico study, rats (n = 9) with C6 gliomas, imaged with diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging, were used to evaluate the model’s accuracy for predicting in vivo tumor growth. The in silico study resulted in low global (tumor volume error 0.92) and local (CCC values >0.80) level errors for predictions up to six days into the future. The in vivo study showed higher global (tumor volume error >11.7%, Dice <0.81) and higher local (CCC <0.33) level errors over the same time period. The in silico study shows that model parameters can be accurately estimated and used to accurately predict future tumor growth at both the global and local scale. However, the poor predictive accuracy in the experimental study suggests the reaction–diffusion equation is an incomplete description of in vivo C6 glioma biology and may require further modeling of intra-tumor interactions including segmentation of (for example) proliferative and necrotic regions. (paper)

  19. A new multicompartmental reaction-diffusion modeling method links transient membrane attachment of E. coli MinE to E-ring formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjunan, Satya Nanda Vel; Tomita, Masaru

    2010-03-01

    Many important cellular processes are regulated by reaction-diffusion (RD) of molecules that takes place both in the cytoplasm and on the membrane. To model and analyze such multicompartmental processes, we developed a lattice-based Monte Carlo method, Spatiocyte that supports RD in volume and surface compartments at single molecule resolution. Stochasticity in RD and the excluded volume effect brought by intracellular molecular crowding, both of which can significantly affect RD and thus, cellular processes, are also supported. We verified the method by comparing simulation results of diffusion, irreversible and reversible reactions with the predicted analytical and best available numerical solutions. Moreover, to directly compare the localization patterns of molecules in fluorescence microscopy images with simulation, we devised a visualization method that mimics the microphotography process by showing the trajectory of simulated molecules averaged according to the camera exposure time. In the rod-shaped bacterium Escherichia coli, the division site is suppressed at the cell poles by periodic pole-to-pole oscillations of the Min proteins (MinC, MinD and MinE) arising from carefully orchestrated RD in both cytoplasm and membrane compartments. Using Spatiocyte we could model and reproduce the in vivo MinDE localization dynamics by accounting for the previously reported properties of MinE. Our results suggest that the MinE ring, which is essential in preventing polar septation, is largely composed of MinE that is transiently attached to the membrane independently after recruited by MinD. Overall, Spatiocyte allows simulation and visualization of complex spatial and reaction-diffusion mediated cellular processes in volumes and surfaces. As we showed, it can potentially provide mechanistic insights otherwise difficult to obtain experimentally. The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s11693-009-9047-2) contains supplementary material, which is available to

  20. Role of back diffusion and biodegradation reactions in sustaining an MTBE/TBA plume in alluvial media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasa, Ehsan; Chapman, Steven W; Bekins, Barbara A; Fogg, Graham E; Scow, Kate M; Mackay, Douglas M

    2011-11-01

    A methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) / tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) plume originating from a gasoline spill in late 1994 at Vandenberg Air Force Base (VAFB) persisted for over 15 years within 200 feet of the original spill source. The plume persisted until 2010 despite excavation of the tanks and piping within months after the spill and excavations of additional contaminated sediments from the source area in 2007 and 2008. The probable history of MTBE concentrations along the plume centerline at its source was estimated using a wide variety of available information, including published details about the original spill, excavations and monitoring by VAFB consultants, and our own research data. Two-dimensional reactive transport simulations of MTBE along the plume centerline were conducted for a 20-year period following the spill. These analyses suggest that MTBE diffused from the thin anaerobic aquifer into the adjacent anaerobic silts and transformed to TBA in both aquifer and silt layers. The model reproduces the observation that after 2004 TBA was the dominant solute, diffusing back out of the silts into the aquifer and sustaining plume concentrations much longer than would have been the case in the absence of such diffusive exchange. Simulations also suggest that aerobic degradation of MTBE or TBA at the water table in the overlying silt layer significantly affected concentrations of MTBE and TBA by limiting the chemical mass available for back diffusion to the aquifer. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Solid-solid phase transformation via internal stress-induced virtual melting, significantly below the melting temperature. Application to HMX energetic crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitas, Valery I; Henson, Bryan F; Smilowitz, Laura B; Asay, Blaine W

    2006-05-25

    We theoretically predict a new phenomenon, namely, that a solid-solid phase transformation (PT) with a large transformation strain can occur via internal stress-induced virtual melting along the interface at temperatures significantly (more than 100 K) below the melting temperature. We show that the energy of elastic stresses, induced by transformation strain, increases the driving force for melting and reduces the melting temperature. Immediately after melting, stresses relax and the unstable melt solidifies. Fast solidification in a thin layer leads to nanoscale cracking which does not affect the thermodynamics or kinetics of the solid-solid transformation. Thus, virtual melting represents a new mechanism of solid-solid PT, stress relaxation, and loss of coherence at a moving solid-solid interface. It also removes the athermal interface friction and deletes the thermomechanical memory of preceding cycles of the direct-reverse transformation. It is also found that nonhydrostatic compressive internal stresses promote melting in contrast to hydrostatic pressure. Sixteen theoretical predictions are in qualitative and quantitative agreement with experiments conducted on the PTs in the energetic crystal HMX. In particular, (a) the energy of internal stresses is sufficient to reduce the melting temperature from 551 to 430 K for the delta phase during the beta --> delta PT and from 520 to 400 K for the beta phase during the delta --> beta PT; (b) predicted activation energies for direct and reverse PTs coincide with corresponding melting energies of the beta and delta phases and with the experimental values; (c) the temperature dependence of the rate constant is determined by the heat of fusion, for both direct and reverse PTs; results b and c are obtained both for overall kinetics and for interface propagation; (d) considerable nanocracking, homogeneously distributed in the transformed material, accompanies the PT, as predicted by theory; (e) the nanocracking does not

  2. Gas sensing properties and in situ diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy study of trichloroethylene adsorption and reactions on SnO2 films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhenxin; Huang, Kaijin; Yuan, Fangli; Xie, Changsheng

    2014-05-01

    The detection of trichloroethylene has attracted much attention because it has an important effect on human health. The sensitivity of the SnO2 flat-type coplanar gas sensor arrays to 100 ppm trichloroethylene in air was investigated. The adsorption and surface reactions of trichloroethylene were investigated at 100-200 °C by in-situ diffuse reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (DIRFTS) on SnO2 films. Molecularly adsorbed trichloroethylene, dichloroacetyl chloride (DCAC), phosgene, HCl, CO, H2O, CHCl3, Cl2 and CO2 surface species are formed during trichloroethylene adsorption at 100-200 °C. A possible mechanism of the reaction process is discussed.

  3. Proof of existence of global solutions for m-component reaction-diffusion systems with mixed boundary conditions via the Lyapunov functional method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdelmalek, Salem; Kouachi, Said

    2007-01-01

    To prove global existence for solutions of m-component reaction-diffusion systems presents fundamental difficulties in the case in which some components of the system satisfy Neumann boundary conditions while others satisfy nonhomogeneous Dirichlet boundary conditions and nonhomogeneous Robin boundary conditions. The purpose of this paper is to prove the existence of a global solution using a single inequality for the polynomial growth condition of the reaction terms. Our technique is based on the construction of polynomial functionals. This result generalizes those obtained recently by Kouachi et al (at press), Kouachi (2002 Electron. J. Diff. Eqns 2002 1), Kouachi (2001 Electron. J. Diff. Eqns 2001 1) and independently by Malham and Xin (1998 Commun. Math. Phys. 193 287)

  4. Unequal diffusivities case of homogeneous–heterogeneous reactions within viscoelastic fluid flow in the presence of induced magnetic-field and nonlinear thermal radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.L. Animasaun

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the effects of nonlinear thermal radiation and induced magnetic field on viscoelastic fluid flow toward a stagnation point. It is assumed that there exists a kind of chemical reaction between chemical species A and B. The diffusion coefficients of the two chemical species in the viscoelastic fluid flow are unequal. Since chemical species B is a catalyst at the horizontal surface, hence homogeneous and heterogeneous schemes are of the isothermal cubic autocatalytic reaction and first order reaction respectively. The transformed governing equations are solved numerically using Runge–Kutta integration scheme along with Newton’s method. Good agreement is obtained between present and published numerical results for a limiting case. The influence of some pertinent parameters on skin friction coefficient, local heat transfer rate, together with velocity, induced magnetic field, temperature, and concentration profiles is illustrated graphically and discussed. Based on all of these assumptions, results indicate that the effects of induced magnetic and viscoelastic parameters on velocity, transverse velocity and velocity of induced magnetic field are almost the same but opposite in nature. The strength of heterogeneous reaction parameter is very helpful to reduce the concentration of bulk fluid and increase the concentration of catalyst at the surface.

  5. A drift-diffusion-reaction model for excitonic photovoltaic bilayers: Photovoltaic bilayers: Asymptotic analysis and a 2D hdg finite element scheme

    KAUST Repository

    Brinkman, Daniel

    2013-05-01

    We present and discuss a mathematical model for the operation of bilayer organic photovoltaic devices. Our model couples drift-diffusion-recombination equations for the charge carriers (specifically, electrons and holes) with a reaction-diffusion equation for the excitons/polaron pairs and Poisson\\'s equation for the self-consistent electrostatic potential. The material difference (i.e. the HOMO/LUMO gap) of the two organic substrates forming the bilayer device is included as a work-function potential. Firstly, we perform an asymptotic analysis of the scaled one-dimensional stationary state system: (i) with focus on the dynamics on the interface and (ii) with the goal of simplifying the bulk dynamics away from the interface. Secondly, we present a two-dimensional hybrid discontinuous Galerkin finite element numerical scheme which is very well suited to resolve: (i) the material changes, (ii) the resulting strong variation over the interface, and (iii) the necessary upwinding in the discretization of drift-diffusion equations. Finally, we compare the numerical results with the approximating asymptotics. © 2013 World Scientific Publishing Company.

  6. Adsorption and diffusion of H and NH{sub x} as key steps of the NH{sub x} dehydrogenation reaction at the V{sub 2}O{sub 5} (010) surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruber, Mathis; Hermann, Klaus [Fritz-Haber-Institut der MPG, und Sfb 546, Berlin (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    Various selective oxidation reactions as the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO{sub x} or the ammoxidation of propane/propene to acrylonitrile are processed on vanadium based metal-oxide catalysts in the presence of ammonia. In the reactions the intermediates NH{sub 2}, NH{sub 3}, and NH{sub 4} are involved indicating that the adsorption and dehydrogenation of NH{sub x}, x < 4, are important steps. We have performed theoretical studies of corresponding reaction steps where the catalyst is simulated by a finite section of the V{sub 2}O{sub 5} (010) surface. The calculations apply density-functional theory combined with clusters modeling the adsorbate system. The substrate lowers corresponding dehydrogenation energies considerably compared with values for the gas phase reaction. However, the lowering is too small to make dehydrogenation of NH{sub 3} likely to happen. Our results on the role of oxygen vacancies for the dehydrogenation indicate that such surface defects become important for the reaction. Besides the energetics also the diffusion at the surface influences the reaction. A nudged elastic band (NEB) routine has been implemented to evaluate diffusion paths and barriers. Hydrogen diffusion on the surface will be discussed and additional examples for NH{sub x} diffusion will be shown. Based on these results possible reaction scenarios for the dehydrogenation reaction will be presented.

  7. Atypical profiles and modulations of heme-enzymes catalyzed outcomes by low amounts of diverse additives suggest diffusible radicals' obligatory involvement in such redox reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoj, Kelath Murali; Parashar, Abhinav; Venkatachalam, Avanthika; Goyal, Sahil; Satyalipsu; Singh, Preeti Gunjan; Gade, Sudeep K; Periyasami, Kalaiselvi; Jacob, Reeba Susan; Sardar, Debosmita; Singh, Shanikant; Kumar, Rajan; Gideon, Daniel A

    2016-06-01

    Peroxidations mediated by heme-enzymes have been traditionally studied under a single-site (heme distal pocket), non-sequential (ping-pong), two-substrates binding scheme of Michaelis-Menten paradigm. We had reported unusual modulations of peroxidase and P450 reaction outcomes and explained it invoking diffusible reactive species [Manoj, 2006; Manoj et al., 2010; Andrew et al., 2011, Parashar et al., 2014 & Venkatachalam et al., 2016]. A systematic investigation of specific product formation rates was undertaken to probe the hypothesis that involvement of diffusible reactive species could explain undefined substrate specificities and maverick modulations (sponsored by additives) of heme-enzymes. When the rate of specific product formation was studied as a function of reactants' concentration or environmental conditions, we noted marked deviations from normal profiles. We report that heme-enzyme mediated peroxidations of various substrates are inhibited (or activated) by sub-equivalent concentrations of diverse redox-active additives and this is owing to multiple redox equilibriums in the milieu. At low enzyme and peroxide concentrations, the enzyme is seen to recycle via a one-electron (oxidase) cycle, which does not require the substrate to access the heme centre. Schemes are provided that explain the complex mechanistic cycle, kinetics & stoichiometry. It is not obligatory for an inhibitor or substrate to interact with the heme centre for influencing overall catalysis. Roles of diffusible reactive species explain catalytic outcomes at low enzyme and reactant concentrations. The current work highlights the scope/importance of redox enzyme reactions that could occur "out of the active site" in biological or in situ systems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and Société française de biochimie et biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  8. Kinetic Monte Carlo studies of the reaction kinetics of crystal defects that diffuse one-dimensionally with occasional transverse migration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinisch, H.L.; Trinkaus, H.; Singh, Bachu Narain

    2007-01-01

    The reaction kinetics of the various species of mobile defects in irradiated materials are crucially dependent on the dimensionality of their migration. Sink strengths for one-dimensionally (1D) gliding interstitial loops undergoing occasional direction changes have been described analytically...

  9. Physics of Fresh Produce Safety: Role of Diffusion and Tissue Reaction in Sanitization of Leafy Green Vegetables with Liquid and Gaseous Ozone-Based Sanitizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shynkaryk, Mykola V; Pyatkovskyy, Taras; Mohamed, Hussein M; Yousef, Ahmed E; Sastry, Sudhir K

    2015-12-01

    Produce safety has received much recent attention, with the emphasis being largely on discovery of how microbes invade produce. However, the sanitization operation deserves more attention than it has received. The ability of a sanitizer to reach the site of pathogens is a fundamental prerequisite for efficacy. This work addresses the transport processes of ozone (gaseous and liquid) sanitizer for decontamination of leafy greens. The liquid sanitizer was ineffective against Escherichia coli K-12 in situations where air bubbles may be trapped within cavities. A model was developed for diffusion of sanitizer into the interior of produce. The reaction rate of ozone with the surface of a lettuce leaf was determined experimentally and was used in a numerical simulation to evaluate ozone concentrations within the produce and to determine the time required to reach different locations. For aqueous ozone, the penetration depth was limited to several millimeters by ozone self-decomposition due to the significant time required for diffusion. In contrast, gaseous sanitizer was able to reach a depth of 100 mm in several minutes without depletion in the absence of reaction with surfaces. However, when the ozone gas reacted with the produce surface, gas concentration was significantly affected. Simulation data were validated experimentally by measuring ozone concentrations at the bottom of a cylinder made of lettuce leaf. The microbiological test confirmed the relationship between ozone transport, its self-decomposition, reaction with surrounding materials, and the degree of inactivation of E. coli K-12. Our study shows that decontamination of fresh produce, through direct contact with the sanitizer, is more feasible with gaseous than with aqueous sanitizers. Therefore, sanitization during a high-speed washing process is effective only for decontaminating the wash water.

  10. Microstructure of Reaction Zone Formed During Diffusion Bonding of TiAl with Ni/Al Multilayer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simões, Sónia; Viana, Filomena; Koçak, Mustafa; Ramos, A. Sofia; Vieira, M. Teresa; Vieira, Manuel F.

    2012-05-01

    In this article, the characterization of the interfacial structure of diffusion bonding a TiAl alloy is presented. The joining surfaces were modified by Ni/Al reactive multilayer deposition as an alternative approach to conventional diffusion bonding. TiAl substrates were coated with alternated Ni and Al nanolayers. The nanolayers were deposited by dc magnetron sputtering with 14 nm of period (bilayer thickness). Joining experiments were performed at 900 °C for 30 and 60 min with a pressure of 5 MPa. Cross sections of the joints were prepared for characterization of their interfaces by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), high resolution TEM (HRTEM), energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). Several intermetallic compounds form at the interface, assuring the bonding of the TiAl. The interface can be divided into three distinct zones: zone 1 exhibits elongated nanograins, very small equiaxed grains are observed in zone 2, while zone 3 has larger equiaxed grains. EBSD analysis reveals that zone 1 corresponds to the intermetallic Al2NiTi and AlNiTi, and zones 2 and 3 to NiAl.

  11. Pattern formation and control of spatiotemporal chaos in a reaction diffusion prey–predator system supplying additional food

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghorai, Santu; Poria, Swarup

    2016-01-01

    Spatiotemporal dynamics of a predator–prey system in presence of spatial diffusion is investigated in presence of additional food exists for predators. Conditions for stability of Hopf as well as Turing patterns in a spatial domain are determined by making use of the linear stability analysis. Impact of additional food is clear from these conditions. Numerical simulation results are presented in order to validate the analytical findings. Finally numerical simulations are carried out around the steady state under zero flux boundary conditions. With the help of numerical simulations, the different types of spatial patterns (including stationary spatial pattern, oscillatory pattern, and spatiotemporal chaos) are identified in this diffusive predator–prey system in presence of additional food, depending on the quantity, quality of the additional food and the spatial domain and other parameters of the model. The key observation is that spatiotemporal chaos can be controlled supplying suitable additional food to predator. These investigations may be useful to understand complex spatiotemporal dynamics of population dynamical models in presence of additional food.

  12. A Finite Strain Model of Stress, Diffusion, Plastic Flow and Electrochemical Reactions in a Lithium-ion Half-cell

    OpenAIRE

    Bower, Allan F.; Guduru, Pradeep R.; Sethuraman, Vijay A.

    2011-01-01

    We formulate the continuum field equations and constitutive equations that govern deformation, stress, and electric current flow in a Li-ion half-cell. The model considers mass transport through the system, deformation and stress in the anode and cathode, electrostatic fields, as well as the electrochemical reactions at the electrode/electrolyte interfaces. It extends existing analyses by accounting for the effects of finite strains and plastic flow in the electrodes, and by exploring in deta...

  13. Study on density distribution and diffusion of deuterons in mono- and polycrystalline Ni absorbers using the nuclear reaction method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heintze, V.

    1976-01-01

    Irradiation experiments with cooled poly- and monocrystalline Ni absorbers are reported on. A very complex irradiation apparatus was set up, and a nuclear physics method was tested which enables an alignment of low-index crystal directions of monocrystalline absorbers in the target chamber with an exactness of at least 0.1 0 with regard to the ion beam. The nuclear reaction technique for the D(d,p)T reaction was developed far enough to enable a non-destructive determination of deuteron density distributions by analyzing proton spectra of this reaction. At low incorporation doses, there was no dose dependence of density distributions in monocrystalline Ni samples. Profile changes interpreted by a 'blurring' of the incident angle α due to an arching of the surface were only observed at doses Qsub(w) approximately > 3 x 10 18 deuterons/cm 2 . Furthermore, in polycrystalline Ni absorbers, there was a dependence of deuteron distributions on the angle between the beam and the absorber surface, which may be interpreted as a picture of a certain deposition, probability of single ions. In monocrystalline absorbers, range distributions for each of the low-index crystal directions were measured and compared with similar profiles of the polycrystalline absorber which had been measured at the same incident angle α. (orig.) [de

  14. Theoretical study of coupling mechanisms between oxygen diffusion, chemical reaction, mechanical stresses in a solid-gas reactive system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Creton, N.; Optasanu, V.; Montesin, T.; Garruchet, S.

    2008-01-01

    This paper offers a study of oxygen dissolution into a solid, and its consequences on the mechanical behaviour of the material. In fact, mechanical strains strongly influence the oxidation processes and may be, in some materials, responsible for cracking. To realize this study, mechanical considerations are introduced into the classical diffusion laws. Simulations were made for the particular case of uranium dioxide, which undergoes the chemical fragmentation. According to our simulations, the hypothesis of a compression stress field into the oxidised UO 2 compound near the internal interface is consistent with some oxidation mechanisms of oxidation experimentally observed. More generally, this work will be extended to the simulation to an oxide layer growth on a metallic substrate. (authors)

  15. Carbon isotope exchange between gaseous CO2 and thin solution films: Artificial cave experiments and a complete diffusion-reaction model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Maximilian; Scholz, Denis; Froeschmann, Marie-Louise; Schöne, Bernd R.; Spötl, Christoph

    2017-08-01

    Speleothem stable carbon isotope (δ13C) records provide important paleoclimate and paleo-environmental information. However, the interpretation of these records in terms of past climate or environmental change remains challenging because of various processes affecting the δ13C signals. A process that has only been sparsely discussed so far is carbon isotope exchange between the gaseous CO2 of the cave atmosphere and the dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) contained in the thin solution film on the speleothem, which may be particularly important for strongly ventilated caves. Here we present a novel, complete reaction diffusion model describing carbon isotope exchange between gaseous CO2 and the DIC in thin solution films. The model considers all parameters affecting carbon isotope exchange, such as diffusion into, out of and within the film, the chemical reactions occurring within the film as well as the dependence of diffusion and the reaction rates on isotopic mass and temperature. To verify the model, we conducted laboratory experiments under completely controlled, cave-analogue conditions at three different temperatures (10, 20, 30 °C). We exposed thin (≈0.1 mm) films of a NaHCO3 solution with four different concentrations (1, 2, 5 and 10 mmol/l, respectively) to a nitrogen atmosphere containing a specific amount of CO2 (1000 and 3000 ppmV). The experimentally observed temporal evolution of the pH and δ13C values of the DIC is in good agreement with the model predictions. The carbon isotope exchange times in our experiments range from ca. 200 to ca. 16,000 s and strongly depend on temperature, film thickness, atmospheric pCO2 and the concentration of DIC. For low pCO2 (between 500 and 1000 ppmV, as for strongly ventilated caves), our time constants are substantially lower than those derived in a previous study, suggesting a potentially stronger influence of carbon isotope exchange on speleothem δ13C values. However, this process should only have an

  16. The Drift Diffusion Model can account for the accuracy and reaction time of value-based choices under high and low time pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milica Milosavljevic

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available An important open problem is how values are compared to make simple choices. A natural hypothesis is that the brain carries out the computations associated with the value comparisons in a manner consistent with the Drift Diffusion Model (DDM, since this model has been able to account for a large amount of data in other domains. We investigated the ability of four different versions of the DDM to explain the data in a real binary food choice task under conditions of high and low time pressure. We found that a seven-parameter version of the DDM can account for the choice and reaction time data with high-accuracy, in both the high and low time pressure conditions. The changes associated with the introduction of time pressure could be traced to changes in two key model parameters: the barrier height and the noise in the slope of the drift process.

  17. New process of the preparation of catalyzed gas diffusion electrode for PEM fuel cells based on ultrasonic direct solution spray reaction method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oishi, K.; Savadogo, O. [Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, Montreal, PQ (Canada). Laboratoire de nouveaux materiaux pour l' energie et l' electrochimie

    2008-07-01

    This paper reported on a newly developed process for in-situ catalyst deposition on gas diffusion electrodes (GDE) for polymer electrolyte fuel cells. This process has the potential to reduce the number of steps for catalyzed GDE fabrication. In addition, the process offers economic advantages for the fuel cell commercialization. In this study, a home-made catalyst maker with ultrasonic spray method was used to prepare a solution of the carbon supported platinum catalyst on the GDL. The sprayed catalyst powder consisted of carbon support. The catalyst particles did not prevent gas flow channels on the GDL. The catalyst layer was shown to be located only on the top surface of the GDL and was not packed into its flow channel. Results of Cross-section SEM image, crystallization, micro structure and electro-catalytic activity for the oxygen reduction reaction were also discussed. 1 ref., 1 fig.

  18. Design requirements for ERD in diffusion-dominated media: how do injection interval, bioactive zones and reaction kinetics affect remediation performance?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chambon, Julie Claire Claudia; Lemming, Gitte; Manoli, Gabriele

    is to get contact between the injected bacteria and electron donor and the contaminants trapped in the low-permeability matrix. Sampling of intact cores from the low-permeability matrix has shown that the bioactive zones (where degradation occurs) are limited in the matrix, due to the slow diffusion...... is developed to simulate ERD at a contaminated site, where the source area (mainly TCE) is located in a clayey till with fractures and interbedded sand lenses. Such contaminated sites are common in North America and Europe. Hydro-geological characterization provided information on geological heterogeneities...... experiments. The influence of the reaction kinetics on remediation efficiency is assessed by varying the biomass concentration of the specific degraders. The injected reactants (donor and bacteria) are assumed to spread in horizontal injection zones of various widths, depending on the development of bioactive...

  19. A computational method for the coupled solution of reaction-diffusion equations on evolving domains and manifolds: Application to a model of cell migration and chemotaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, G; Mackenzie, J A; Nolan, M; Insall, R H

    2016-03-15

    In this paper, we devise a moving mesh finite element method for the approximate solution of coupled bulk-surface reaction-diffusion equations on an evolving two dimensional domain. Fundamental to the success of the method is the robust generation of bulk and surface meshes. For this purpose, we use a novel moving mesh partial differential equation (MMPDE) approach. The developed method is applied to model problems with known analytical solutions; these experiments indicate second-order spatial and temporal accuracy. Coupled bulk-surface problems occur frequently in many areas; in particular, in the modelling of eukaryotic cell migration and chemotaxis. We apply the method to a model of the two-way interaction of a migrating cell in a chemotactic field, where the bulk region corresponds to the extracellular region and the surface to the cell membrane.

  20. Dynamic disorder in single-molecule Michaelis-Menten kinetics: The reaction-diffusion formalism in the Wilemski-Fixman approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhury, Srabanti; Cherayil, Binny J.

    2007-09-01

    Single-molecule equations for the Michaelis-Menten [Biochem. Z. 49, 333 (1913)] mechanism of enzyme action are analyzed within the Wilemski-Fixman [J. Chem. Phys. 58, 4009 (1973); 60, 866 (1974)] approximation after the effects of dynamic disorder—modeled by the anomalous diffusion of a particle in a harmonic well—are incorporated into the catalytic step of the reaction. The solution of the Michaelis-Menten equations is used to calculate the distribution of waiting times between successive catalytic turnovers in the enzyme β-galactosidase. The calculated distribution is found to agree qualitatively with experimental results on this enzyme obtained at four different substrate concentrations. The calculations are also consistent with measurements of correlations in the fluctuations of the fluorescent light emitted during the course of catalysis, and with measurements of the concentration dependence of the randomness parameter.

  1. Aberrant Behaviours of Reaction Diffusion Self-organisation Models on Growing Domains in the Presence of Gene Expression Time Delays

    KAUST Repository

    Seirin Lee, S.

    2010-03-23

    Turing\\'s pattern formation mechanism exhibits sensitivity to the details of the initial conditions suggesting that, in isolation, it cannot robustly generate pattern within noisy biological environments. Nonetheless, secondary aspects of developmental self-organisation, such as a growing domain, have been shown to ameliorate this aberrant model behaviour. Furthermore, while in-situ hybridisation reveals the presence of gene expression in developmental processes, the influence of such dynamics on Turing\\'s model has received limited attention. Here, we novelly focus on the Gierer-Meinhardt reaction diffusion system considering delays due the time taken for gene expression, while incorporating a number of different domain growth profiles to further explore the influence and interplay of domain growth and gene expression on Turing\\'s mechanism. We find extensive pathological model behaviour, exhibiting one or more of the following: temporal oscillations with no spatial structure, a failure of the Turing instability and an extreme sensitivity to the initial conditions, the growth profile and the duration of gene expression. This deviant behaviour is even more severe than observed in previous studies of Schnakenberg kinetics on exponentially growing domains in the presence of gene expression (Gaffney and Monk in Bull. Math. Biol. 68:99-130, 2006). Our results emphasise that gene expression dynamics induce unrealistic behaviour in Turing\\'s model for multiple choices of kinetics and thus such aberrant modelling predictions are likely to be generic. They also highlight that domain growth can no longer ameliorate the excessive sensitivity of Turing\\'s mechanism in the presence of gene expression time delays. The above, extensive, pathologies suggest that, in the presence of gene expression, Turing\\'s mechanism would generally require a novel and extensive secondary mechanism to control reaction diffusion patterning. © 2010 Society for Mathematical Biology.

  2. Modeling convection-diffusion-reaction systems for microfluidic molecular communications with surface-based receivers in Internet of Bio-Nano Things.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Kuscu

    Full Text Available We consider a microfluidic molecular communication (MC system, where the concentration-encoded molecular messages are transported via fluid flow-induced convection and diffusion, and detected by a surface-based MC receiver with ligand receptors placed at the bottom of the microfluidic channel. The overall system is a convection-diffusion-reaction system that can only be solved by numerical methods, e.g., finite element analysis (FEA. However, analytical models are key for the information and communication technology (ICT, as they enable an optimisation framework to develop advanced communication techniques, such as optimum detection methods and reliable transmission schemes. In this direction, we develop an analytical model to approximate the expected time course of bound receptor concentration, i.e., the received signal used to decode the transmitted messages. The model obviates the need for computationally expensive numerical methods by capturing the nonlinearities caused by laminar flow resulting in parabolic velocity profile, and finite number of ligand receptors leading to receiver saturation. The model also captures the effects of reactive surface depletion layer resulting from the mass transport limitations and moving reaction boundary originated from the passage of finite-duration molecular concentration pulse over the receiver surface. Based on the proposed model, we derive closed form analytical expressions that approximate the received pulse width, pulse delay and pulse amplitude, which can be used to optimize the system from an ICT perspective. We evaluate the accuracy of the proposed model by comparing model-based analytical results to the numerical results obtained by solving the exact system model with COMSOL Multiphysics.

  3. Modeling convection-diffusion-reaction systems for microfluidic molecular communications with surface-based receivers in Internet of Bio-Nano Things.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuscu, Murat; Akan, Ozgur B

    2018-01-01

    We consider a microfluidic molecular communication (MC) system, where the concentration-encoded molecular messages are transported via fluid flow-induced convection and diffusion, and detected by a surface-based MC receiver with ligand receptors placed at the bottom of the microfluidic channel. The overall system is a convection-diffusion-reaction system that can only be solved by numerical methods, e.g., finite element analysis (FEA). However, analytical models are key for the information and communication technology (ICT), as they enable an optimisation framework to develop advanced communication techniques, such as optimum detection methods and reliable transmission schemes. In this direction, we develop an analytical model to approximate the expected time course of bound receptor concentration, i.e., the received signal used to decode the transmitted messages. The model obviates the need for computationally expensive numerical methods by capturing the nonlinearities caused by laminar flow resulting in parabolic velocity profile, and finite number of ligand receptors leading to receiver saturation. The model also captures the effects of reactive surface depletion layer resulting from the mass transport limitations and moving reaction boundary originated from the passage of finite-duration molecular concentration pulse over the receiver surface. Based on the proposed model, we derive closed form analytical expressions that approximate the received pulse width, pulse delay and pulse amplitude, which can be used to optimize the system from an ICT perspective. We evaluate the accuracy of the proposed model by comparing model-based analytical results to the numerical results obtained by solving the exact system model with COMSOL Multiphysics.

  4. Matching the reaction-diffusion simulation to dynamic [18F]FMISO PET measurements in tumors: extension to a flow-limited oxygen-dependent model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Kuangyu; Bayer, Christine; Gaertner, Florian C; Astner, Sabrina T; Wilkens, Jan J; Nüsslin, Fridtjof; Vaupel, Peter; Ziegler, Sibylle I

    2017-02-01

    Positron-emission tomography (PET) with hypoxia specific tracers provides a noninvasive method to assess the tumor oxygenation status. Reaction-diffusion models have advantages in revealing the quantitative relation between in vivo imaging and the tumor microenvironment. However, there is no quantitative comparison of the simulation results with the real PET measurements yet. The lack of experimental support hampers further applications of computational simulation models. This study aims to compare the simulation results with a preclinical [ 18 F]FMISO PET study and to optimize the reaction-diffusion model accordingly. Nude mice with xenografted human squamous cell carcinomas (CAL33) were investigated with a 2 h dynamic [ 18 F]FMISO PET followed by immunofluorescence staining using the hypoxia marker pimonidazole and the endothelium marker CD 31. A large data pool of tumor time-activity curves (TAC) was simulated for each mouse by feeding the arterial input function (AIF) extracted from experiments into the model with different configurations of the tumor microenvironment. A measured TAC was considered to match a simulated TAC when the difference metric was below a certain, noise-dependent threshold. As an extension to the well-established Kelly model, a flow-limited oxygen-dependent (FLOD) model was developed to improve the matching between measurements and simulations. The matching rate between the simulated TACs of the Kelly model and the mouse PET data ranged from 0 to 28.1% (on average 9.8%). By modifying the Kelly model to an FLOD model, the matching rate between the simulation and the PET measurements could be improved to 41.2-84.8% (on average 64.4%). Using a simulation data pool and a matching strategy, we were able to compare the simulated temporal course of dynamic PET with in vivo measurements. By modifying the Kelly model to a FLOD model, the computational simulation was able to approach the dynamic [ 18 F]FMISO measurements in the investigated

  5. Atoms diffusion-induced phase engineering of platinum-gold alloy nanocrystals with high electrocatalytic performance for the formic acid oxidation reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fu-Min; Kang, Yong-Qiang; Liu, Hui-Min; Zhai, Ya-Nan; Hu, Man-Cheng; Chen, Yu

    2018-03-15

    Bimetallic noble metal nanocrystals have been widely applied in many fields, which generally are synthesized by the wet-chemistry reduction method. This work presents a purposely designed atoms diffusion induced phase engineering of PtAu alloy nanocrystals on platy Au substrate (PtAu-on-Au nanostructures) through simple hydrothermal treatment. Benefitting from the synergistic effects of component and structure, PtAu-on-Au nanostructures remarkably enhance the dehydrogenation pathway of the formic acid oxidation reaction (FAOR), and thus exhibit much higher FAOR activity and durability compared with Pt nanocrystals on platy Au substrate (Pt-on-Au nanostructures) and commercial Pd black due to an excellent stability of platy Au substrate and a high oxidation resistance of PtAu alloy nanocrystals. The atoms diffusion-induced phase engineering demonstrated in this work builds a bridge between the traditional metallurgy and modern nanotechnologies, which also provides some useful insights in developing noble metals based alloyed nanostructures for the energy and environmental applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The Influence of Receptor-Mediated Interactions on Reaction-Diffusion Mechanisms of Cellular Self-organisation

    KAUST Repository

    Klika, Václav

    2011-11-10

    Understanding the mechanisms governing and regulating self-organisation in the developing embryo is a key challenge that has puzzled and fascinated scientists for decades. Since its conception in 1952 the Turing model has been a paradigm for pattern formation, motivating numerous theoretical and experimental studies, though its verification at the molecular level in biological systems has remained elusive. In this work, we consider the influence of receptor-mediated dynamics within the framework of Turing models, showing how non-diffusing species impact the conditions for the emergence of self-organisation. We illustrate our results within the framework of hair follicle pre-patterning, showing how receptor interaction structures can be constrained by the requirement for patterning, without the need for detailed knowledge of the network dynamics. Finally, in the light of our results, we discuss the ability of such systems to pattern outside the classical limits of the Turing model, and the inherent dangers involved in model reduction. © 2011 Society for Mathematical Biology.

  7. Computational fluid dynamics tracking of UF6 reaction products release into a gaseous diffusion plant cell housing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wendel, M.W.; Chen, N.C.J.; Kim, S.H.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Keith, K.D.; Schmidt, R.W.

    1996-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3-D) computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model has been developed using CFDS-FLOW3D Version 3.3 to model the transport of aerosol products formed during a release of uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ) into a gaseous diffusion plant (GDP) process building. As part of a facility-wide safety evaluation, a one-dimensional (1-D) analysis of aerosol/vapor transport following such an hypothesized severe accident is being performed. The objective of this study is to supplement the 1-D analysis with more detailed 3-D results. Specifically, the goal is to quantify the distribution of aerosol passing out of the process building during the hypothetical accident. This work demonstrates a useful role for CFD in large 3-D problems, where some experimental data are available for calibrating key parameters and the desired results are global (total time-integrated aerosol flow rates across a few boundary surfaces) as opposed to local velocities, temperatures, or heat transfer coefficients

  8. A new model to predict diffusive self-heating during composting incorporating the reaction engineering approach (REA) framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putranto, Aditya; Chen, Xiao Dong

    2017-05-01

    During composting, self-heating may occur due to the exothermicities of the chemical and biological reactions. An accurate model for predicting maximum temperature is useful in predicting whether the phenomena would occur and to what extent it would have undergone. Elevated temperatures would lead to undesirable situations such as the release of large amount of toxic gases or sometimes would even lead to spontaneous combustion. In this paper, we report a new model for predicting the profiles of temperature, concentration of oxygen, moisture content and concentration of water vapor during composting. The model, which consists of a set of equations of conservation of heat and mass transfer as well as biological heating term, employs the reaction engineering approach (REA) framework to describe the local evaporation/condensation rate quantitatively. A good agreement between the predicted and experimental data of temperature during composting of sewage sludge is observed. The modeling indicates that the maximum temperature is achieved after some 46weeks of composting. Following this period, the temperature decreases in line with a significant decrease in moisture content and a tremendous increase in concentration of water vapor, indicating the massive cooling effect due to water evaporation. The spatial profiles indicate that the maximum temperature is approximately located at the middle-bottom of the compost piles. Towards the upper surface of the piles, the moisture content and concentration of water vapor decreases due to the moisture transfer to the surrounding. The newly proposed model can be used as reliable simulation tool to explore several geometry configurations and operating conditions for avoiding elevated temperature build-up and self-heating during industrial composting. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Nuclear relaxation phenomena, diffusion and orbiting in the reaction 107109Ag + 8486Kr at 7.2 MeV/nucleon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitt, R.P.; Russo, P.; Babinet, R.; Jared, R.; Moretto, L.G.

    1977-01-01

    Charged particles produced from the interaction of a 7.2 MeV/nucleon Kr beam and a natural Ag target have been studied. Fragments up to Z = 50 have been identified by means of a ΔE, E telescope. Kinetic energy distributions, charge distributions and angular distributions have been measured for the individual atomic numbers. The kinetic energy distributions show two components: a high energy 'quasi-elastic' component, and a low energy or 'relaxed' component close to the Coulomb energy for touching spheres. The charge distribution for this system is very broad and appears to peak at symmetry rather than at the Z of the projectile. The angular distributions for the relaxed component increase monotonically with decreasing angle and are all forward peaked in excess of 1/sintheta. These results are dramatically different from those obtained in Kr bombardments of heavier targets where rather narrow charge distributions and side peaked angular distributions have been observed. The behavior of the reaction Ag+Kr is strongly reminiscent of reactions induced by lighter projectiles. An interpretation of these data in terms of a diffusion process along the mass asymmetry coordinate is presented. (Auth.)

  10. Potential energy effects and diffusion in the relaxed components of the reaction 197Au + 40Ar at 288 and 340 MeV bombarding energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moretto, L.G.; Galin, J.; Babinet, R.; Fraenkel, Z.; Schmitt, R.; Jared, R.; Thompson, S.G.

    1976-01-01

    The fragments emitted in the reaction between 197 Au and 40 Ar at 288 and 340 MeV bombarding energies have been studied. The fragments have been identified in atomic number up to Z = 32 by means of an E-ΔE telescope. The kinetic energy distributions, the cross sections and the angular distributions have been measured for each Z. The kinetic energy distributions show the typical quasielastic and relaxed components; the Z-distributions show a smooth increase in the cross section with increasing Z, interrupted at relatively forward angles by a fairly sharp peak close to Z = 18. The angular distributions are forward peaked in excess of 1/sin theta for atomic numbers as large as Z approximately 30, as far as twelve atomic number units above the projectile; this is at variance with other reactions like Ag+ 20 Ne, where the angular distributions become 1/sin(theta) four or five atomic number units above the projectile. This is interpreted in terms of an enhanced diffusion towards symmetry, possibly promoted by the potential energy in the intermediate complex corresponding to two fragments in contact. (Auth.)

  11. GRIZZLY Model of Multi-Reactive Species Diffusion, Moisture/Heat Transfer and Alkali-Silica Reaction for Simulating Concrete Aging and Degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Hai [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Spencer, Benjamin W. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Cai, Guowei [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Concrete is widely used in the construction of nuclear facilities because of its structural strength and its ability to shield radiation. The use of concrete in nuclear power plants for containment and shielding of radiation and radioactive materials has made its performance crucial for the safe operation of the facility. As such, when life extension is considered for nuclear power plants, it is critical to have accurate and reliable predictive tools to address concerns related to various aging processes of concrete structures and the capacity of structures subjected to age-related degradation. The goal of this report is to document the progress of the development and implementation of a fully coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical-chemical model in GRIZZLY code with the ultimate goal to reliably simulate and predict long-term performance and response of aged NPP concrete structures subjected to a number of aging mechanisms including external chemical attacks and volume-changing chemical reactions within concrete structures induced by alkali-silica reactions and long-term exposure to irradiation. Based on a number of survey reports of concrete aging mechanisms relevant to nuclear power plants and recommendations from researchers in concrete community, we’ve implemented three modules during FY15 in GRIZZLY code, (1) multi-species reactive diffusion model within cement materials; (2) coupled moisture and heat transfer model in concrete; and (3) anisotropic, stress-dependent, alkali-silica reaction induced swelling model. The multi-species reactive diffusion model was implemented with the objective to model aging of concrete structures subjected to aggressive external chemical attacks (e.g., chloride attack, sulfate attack, etc.). It considers multiple processes relevant to external chemical attacks such as diffusion of ions in aqueous phase within pore spaces, equilibrium chemical speciation reactions and kinetic mineral dissolution/precipitation. The moisture

  12. Development of neutron diffuse scattering analysis code by thin film and multilayer film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soyama, Kazuhiko

    2004-01-01

    To research surface structure of thin film and multilayer film by neutron, a neutron diffuse scattering analysis code using DWBA (Distorted-Wave Bron Approximation) principle was developed. Subjects using this code contain the surface and interface properties of solid/solid, solid/liquid, liquid/liquid and gas/liquid, and metal, magnetism and polymer thin film and biomembran. The roughness of surface and interface of substance shows fractal self-similarity and its analytical model is based on DWBA theory by Sinha. The surface and interface properties by diffuse scattering are investigated on the basis of the theoretical model. The calculation values are proved to be agreed with the experimental values. On neutron diffuse scattering by thin film, roughness of surface of thin film, correlation function, neutron propagation by thin film, diffuse scattering by DWBA theory, measurement model, SDIFFF (neutron diffuse scattering analysis program by thin film) and simulation results are explained. On neutron diffuse scattering by multilayer film, roughness of multilayer film, principle of diffuse scattering, measurement method and simulation examples by MDIFF (neutron diffuse scattering analysis program by multilayer film) are explained. (S.Y.)To research surface structure of thin film and multilayer film by neutron, a neutron diffuse scattering analysis code using DWBA (Distorted-Wave Bron Approximation) principle was developed. Subjects using this code contain the surface and interface properties of solid/solid, solid/liquid, liquid/liquid and gas/liquid, and metal, magnetism and polymer thin film and biomembran. The roughness of surface and interface of substance shows fractal self-similarity and its analytical model is based on DWBA theory by Sinha. The surface and interface properties by diffuse scattering are investigated on the basis of the theoretical model. The calculation values are proved to be agreed with the experimental values. On neutron diffuse scattering

  13. Design requirements for ERD in diffusion-dominated media: how do injection interval, bioactive zones and reaction kinetics affect remediation performance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambon, J.; Lemming, G.; Manoli, G.; Broholm, M. M.; Bjerg, P.; Binning, P. J.

    2011-12-01

    Enhanced Reductive Dechlorination (ERD) has been successfully used in high permeability media, such as sand aquifers, and is considered to be a promising technology for low permeability settings. Pilot and full-scale applications of ERD at several sites in Denmark have shown that the main challenge is to get contact between the injected bacteria and electron donor and the contaminants trapped in the low-permeability matrix. Sampling of intact cores from the low-permeability matrix has shown that the bioactive zones (where degradation occurs) are limited in the matrix, due to the slow diffusion transport processes, and this affects the timeframes for the remediation. Due to the limited ERD applications and the complex transport and reactive processes occurring in low-permeability media, design guidelines are currently not available for ERD in such settings, and remediation performance assessments are limited. The objective of this study is to combine existing knowledge from several sites with numerical modeling to assess the effect of the injection interval, development of bioactive zones and reaction kinetics on the remediation efficiency for ERD in diffusion-dominated media. A numerical model is developed to simulate ERD at a contaminated site, where the source area (mainly TCE) is located in a clayey till with fractures and interbedded sand lenses. Such contaminated sites are common in North America and Europe. Hydro-geological characterization provided information on geological heterogeneities and hydraulic parameters, which are relevant for clay till sites in general. The numerical model couples flow and transport in the fracture network and low-permeability matrix. Sequential degradation of TCE to ethene is modeled using Monod kinetics, and the kinetic parameters are obtained from laboratory experiments. The influence of the reaction kinetics on remediation efficiency is assessed by varying the biomass concentration of the specific degraders. The injected

  14. Novel thin/tunable gas diffusion electrodes with ultra-low catalyst loading for hydrogen evolution reactions in proton exchange membrane electrolyzer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Zhenye; Yang, Gaoqiang; Mo, Jingke; Li, Yifan; Yu, Shule; Cullen, David A.; Retterer, Scott T.; Toops, Todd J.; Bender, Guido; Pivovar, Bryan S.; Green, Johney B.; Zhang, Feng-Yuan

    2018-05-01

    Proton exchange membrane electrolyzer cells (PEMECs) have received great attention for hydrogen/oxygen production due to their high efficiencies even at low-temperature operation. Because of the high cost of noble platinum-group metal (PGM) catalysts (Ir, Ru, Pt, etc.) that are widely used in water splitting, a PEMEC with low catalyst loadings and high catalyst utilizations is strongly desired for its wide commercialization. In this study, the ultrafast and multiscale hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) phenomena in an operating PEMEC is in-situ observed for the first time. The visualization results reveal that the HER and hydrogen bubble nucleation mainly occur on catalyst layers at the rim of the pores of the thin/tunable liquid/gas diffusion layers (TT-LGDLs). This indicates that the catalyst material of the conventional catalyst-coated membrane (CCM) that is located in the middle area of the LGDL pore is underutilized/inactive. Based on this discovery, a novel thin and tunable gas diffusion electrode (GDE) with a Pt catalyst thickness of 15 nm and a total thickness of about 25 um has been proposed and developed by taking advantage of advanced micro/nano manufacturing. The novel thin GDEs are comprehensively characterized both ex-situ and in-situ, and exhibit excellent PEMEC performance. More importantly, they achieve catalyst mass activity of up to 58 times higher than conventional CCM at 1.6 V under the operating conditions of 80 degrees C and 1 atm. This study demonstrates a promising concept for PEMEC electrode development, and provides a direction of future catalyst designs and fabrications for electrochemical devices.

  15. Perspectives of advanced thermal management in solar thermochemical syngas production using a counter-flow solid-solid heat exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falter, Christoph; Sizmann, Andreas; Pitz-Paal, Robert

    2017-06-01

    A modular reactor model is presented for the description of solar thermochemical syngas production involving counter-flow heat exchangers that recuperate heat from the solid phase. The development of the model is described including heat diffusion within the reactive material as it travels through the heat exchanger, which was previously identified to be a possibly limiting factor in heat exchanger design. Heat transfer within the reactive medium is described by conduction and radiation, where the former is modeled with the three-resistor model and the latter with the Rosseland diffusion approximation. The applicability of the model is shown by the analysis of heat exchanger efficiency for different material thicknesses and porosities in a system with 8 chambers and oxidation and reduction temperatures of 1000 K and 1800 K, respectively. Heat exchanger efficiency is found to rise strongly for a reduction of material thickness, as the element mass is reduced and a larger part of the elements takes part in the heat exchange process. An increase of porosity enhances radiation heat exchange but deteriorates conduction. The overall heat exchange in the material is improved for high temperatures in the heat exchanger, as radiation dominates the energy transfer. The model is shown to be a valuable tool for the development and analysis of solar thermochemical reactor concepts involving heat exchange from the solid phase.

  16. Study of liquid phase formation kinetics due to solid/solid chemical interaction and its model. Application to the Zircaloy/Inconel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, E.A.; Denis, A.

    1990-01-01

    A description is made of the chemical interaction between Inconel spacing grids and the Zircaloy of the sheaths. Experiments performed at 1000, 1100 and 1200 deg C with base Zircaloy and with a previously formed layer of ZrO 2 , show that the kinetics is parabolic. The difference between both types of experiments is that the oxide layer delays the initiation of the Inconel-Zry interaction. A model is presented, for the description of the solid/solid interaction, which leads to the formation of eutectic that is liquid at the experiment temperature. Also a model, which represents the oxide layer dissolution and predicts the instant in which it disappears completely, is presented. (Author) [es

  17. Geometric and mechanical properties evaluation of scaffolds for bone tissue applications designing by a reaction-diffusion models and manufactured with a material jetting system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco A. Velasco

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Scaffolds are essential in bone tissue engineering, as they provide support to cells and growth factors necessary to regenerate tissue. In addition, they meet the mechanical function of the bone while it regenerates. Currently, the multiple methods for designing and manufacturing scaffolds are based on regular structures from a unit cell that repeats in a given domain. However, these methods do not resemble the actual structure of the trabecular bone which may work against osseous tissue regeneration. To explore the design of porous structures with similar mechanical properties to native bone, a geometric generation scheme from a reaction-diffusion model and its manufacturing via a material jetting system is proposed. This article presents the methodology used, the geometric characteristics and the modulus of elasticity of the scaffolds designed and manufactured. The method proposed shows its potential to generate structures that allow to control the basic scaffold properties for bone tissue engineering such as the width of the channels and porosity. The mechanical properties of our scaffolds are similar to trabecular tissue present in vertebrae and tibia bones. Tests on the manufactured scaffolds show that it is necessary to consider the orientation of the object relative to the printing system because the channel geometry, mechanical properties and roughness are heavily influenced by the position of the surface analyzed with respect to the printing axis. A possible line for future work may be the establishment of a set of guidelines to consider the effects of manufacturing processes in designing stages.

  18. A Numerical Handling of the Boundary Conditions Imposed by the Skull on an Inhomogeneous Diffusion-Reaction Model of Glioblastoma Invasion Into the Brain: Clinical Validation Aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgios S Stamatakos

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel explicit triscale reaction-diffusion numerical model of glioblastoma multiforme tumor growth is presented. The model incorporates the handling of Neumann boundary conditions imposed by the cranium and takes into account both the inhomogeneous nature of human brain and the complexity of the skull geometry. The finite-difference time-domain method is adopted. To demonstrate the workflow of a possible clinical validation procedure, a clinical case/scenario is addressed. A good agreement of the in silico calculated value of the doubling time (ie, the time for tumor volume to double with the value of the same quantity based on tomographic imaging data has been observed. A theoretical exploration suggests that a rough but still quite informative value of the doubling time may be calculated based on a homogeneous brain model. The model could serve as the main component of a continuous mathematics-based glioblastoma oncosimulator aiming at supporting the clinician in the optimal patient-individualized design of treatment using the patient’s multiscale data and experimenting in silico (ie, on the computer.

  19. Multiplex polymerase chain reaction-based prognostic models in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma patients treated with R-CHOP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Green, Tina M; Jensen, Andreas K; Holst, René

    2016-01-01

    We present a multiplex analysis for genes known to have prognostic value in an attempt to design a clinically useful classification model in patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). Real-time polymerase chain reaction was used to measure transcript levels of 28 relevant genes in 194 de...... models. The best model was validated in data from an online available R-CHOP treated cohort. With progression-free survival (PFS) as primary endpoint, the best performing IPI independent model incorporated the LMO2 and HLADQA1 as well as gene interactions for GCSAMxMIB1, GCSAMxCTGF and FOXP1xPDE4B....... This model assigned 33% of patients (n = 60) to poor outcome with an estimated 3-year PFS of 40% vs. 87% for low risk (n = 61) and intermediate (n = 60) risk groups (P model incorporated LMO2 and BCL2 and assigned 33% of the patients with a 3-year PFS of 35% vs...

  20. Determination of diffusion coefficients of hydrogen in fused silica between 296 and 523 K by Raman spectroscopy and application of fused silica capillaries in studying redox reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, L.; Chou, I-Ming; Lu, W.; Burruss, Robert; Zhang, Y.

    2009-01-01

    Diffusion coefficients (D) of hydrogen in fused silica capillaries (FSC) were determined between 296 and 523 K by Raman spectroscopy using CO2 as an internal standard. FSC capsules (3.25 × 10−4 m OD, 9.9 × 10−5 m ID, and ∼0.01 m long) containing CO2 and H2were prepared and the initial relative concentrations of hydrogen in these capsules were derived from the Raman peak-height ratios between H2 (near 587 cm−1) and CO2 (near 1387 cm−1). The sample capsules were then heated at a fixed temperature (T) at one atmosphere to let H2 diffuse out of the capsule, and the changes of hydrogen concentration were monitored by Raman spectroscopy after quench. This process was repeated using different heating durations at 296 (room T), 323, 375, 430, 473, and 523 K; the same sample capsule was used repeatedly at each temperature. The values of D (in m2 s−1) in FSC were obtained by fitting the observed changes of hydrogen concentration in the FSC capsule to an equation based on Fick’s law. Our D values are in good agreement with the more recent of the two previously reported experimental data sets, and both can be represented by:lnD=-(16.471±0.035)-44589±139RT(R2=0.99991)">lnD=-(16.471±0.035)-44589±139RT(R2=0.99991)where R is the gas constant (8.3145 J/mol K), T in Kelvin, and errors at 1σ level. The slope corresponds to an activation energy of 44.59 ± 0.14 kJ/mol.The D in FSC determined at 296 K is about an order of magnitude higher than that in platinum at 723 K, indicating that FSC is a suitable membrane for hydrogen at temperature between 673 K and room temperature, and has a great potential for studying redox reactions at these temperatures, especially for systems containing organic material and/or sulphur.

  1. Diffusivities and atomic mobilities in Cu-rich fcc Al-Cu-Mn alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin, Ming; Du, Yong; Cui, Senlin; Xu, Honghui; Liu, Shuhong [Central South Univ., Changsha (China). State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy; Zhang, Lijun [Bochum Univ. (DE). Interdisciplinary Centre for Advanced Materials Simulation (ICAMS)

    2012-07-15

    Via solid-solid diffusion couples, electron probe microanalysis and the Whittle and Green method, interdiffusivities in fcc Al-Cu-Mn alloys at 1 123 K were measured. The reliability of the obtained diffusivities is validated by comparing the computed diffusivities with literature data plus constraints among the diffusivities. Through assessments of experimentally determined diffusion coefficients by means of a diffusion-controlled transformations simulation package, the atomic mobilities of Al, Cu, and Mn in fcc Al-Cu-Mn alloys are obtained. Comprehensive comparisons between the model-predicted and the experimental data indicate that the presently obtained atomic mobilities can reproduce most of the diffusivities, concentration profiles, and diffusion paths reasonably. (orig.)

  2. Homogeneous synthesis of cellulose acrylate-g-poly (n-alkyl acrylate) solid-solid phase change materials via free radical polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Yong-Qiang; Han, Na; Bo, Yi-Wen; Tan, Lin-Li; Zhang, Long-Fei; Zhang, Xing-Xiang

    2018-08-01

    A novel solid-solid phase change materials, namely, cellulose acrylate-g-poly (n-alkyl acrylate) (CA-g-PAn) (n = 14, 16 and 18) were successfully synthesized by free radical polymerization in N, N-dimethylacetamide (DMAc). The successful grafting was confirmed by fourier transform infrared spectra (FT-IR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The properties of the CA-g-PAn copolymers were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The phase change temperatures and the melting enthalpies of CA-g-PAn copolymers are in the range of 10.1-53.2 °C and 15-95 J/g, respectively. It can be adjusted by the contents of poly (n-alkyl acrylate) and the length of alkyl side-chain. The thermal resistant temperatures of CA-g-PA14, 16 and 18 copolymers are 308 °C, 292 °C and 273 °C, respectively. It show that all of grafting materials exhibit good thermal stability and shape stability. Therefore, it is expected to be applied in the cellulose-based thermos-regulating field. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Kinetics of the (solid + solid) transformations for the piracetam trimorphic system: Incidence on the construction of the p–T equilibrium phase diagram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corvis, Yohann; Spasojević-de Biré, Anne; Alzina, Camille

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Thermal analyses and X-ray diffraction experiments are performed. • Scan-rate dependence of the transition points is highlighted. • A new phase diagram of piracetam is proposed. • The new hierarchy of polymorphs stability is now coherent with all published data. - Abstract: The three common polymorphs of piracetam have been characterized by associating thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction and densimetry. DSC experiments showed that the (solid + solid) transition temperature between Forms II and I and between Forms III and I is scan-rate dependent. The transition temperatures decrease when the DSC scan rate decreases and the thermodynamic temperatures were confirmed by isothermal X-ray diffraction. These new results in terms of temperature and enthalpy of transition allow us to propose a new equilibrium phase diagram establishing the relative thermodynamic stability of the three common polymorphs of piracetam as a function of the temperature and the pressure. The diagram suggests that Form II presents a small stability domain located just above the stability domain of Form I. As a consequence, Form I should transform into Form II, which itself can turn into Form III when placed under pressure.

  4. Probing buried solid-solid interfaces in magnetic multilayer structures and other nanostructures using spectroscopy excited by soft x-ray standing waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, S.-H.; Mun, B.S.; Mannella, N.; Sell, B.; Ritchey, S.B.; Fadley, C.S.; Pham, L.; Nambu, A.; Watanabe, M.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Buried solid-solid interfaces are becoming increasingly more important in all aspects of nanoscience, and we here dis- cuss the st applications of a new method for selectively studying them with the vuv/soft x-ray spectroscopies. As specific examples, magnetic multilayer structures represent key elements of current developments in spintronics, including giant magnetoresistance, exchange bias, and magnetic tunnel resistance. The buried interfaces in such structures are of key importance to their performance, but have up to now been difficult to study selectively with these spectroscopies. This novel method involves excitation of photoelectrons or fluorescent x-rays with soft x-ray standing waves created by Bragg reflection from a multilayer mirror substrate on which the sample is grown. We will discuss core and valence photoemission, as well soft x-ray emission, results from applying this method to multilayer structures relevant to both giant magnetoresistance (Fe/Cr-[2]) and magnetic tunnel junctions (Al 2 O 3 /FeCo) , including magnetic dichroism measurements. Work supported by the Director, Of e of Science, Of e of Basic Energy Sciences, Materials Science and Engineering Division, U.S. Department of Energy, Contract No. DE-AC03-76SF000

  5. Insights into thermal diffusion of germanium and oxygen atoms in HfO2/GeO2/Ge gate stacks and their suppressed reaction with atomically thin AlOx interlayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Shingo; Asahara, Ryohei; Minoura, Yuya; Hosoi, Takuji; Shimura, Takayoshi; Watanabe, Heiji; Sako, Hideki; Kawasaki, Naohiko; Yamada, Ichiko; Miyamoto, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The thermal diffusion of germanium and oxygen atoms in HfO 2 /GeO 2 /Ge gate stacks was comprehensively evaluated by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry combined with an isotopic labeling technique. It was found that 18 O-tracers composing the GeO 2 underlayers diffuse within the HfO 2 overlayers based on Fick's law with the low activation energy of about 0.5 eV. Although out-diffusion of the germanium atoms through HfO 2 also proceeded at the low temperatures of around 200 °C, the diffusing germanium atoms preferentially segregated on the HfO 2 surfaces, and the reaction was further enhanced at high temperatures with the assistance of GeO desorption. A technique to insert atomically thin AlO x interlayers between the HfO 2 and GeO 2 layers was proven to effectively suppress both of these independent germanium and oxygen intermixing reactions in the gate stacks

  6. Insights into thermal diffusion of germanium and oxygen atoms in HfO{sub 2}/GeO{sub 2}/Ge gate stacks and their suppressed reaction with atomically thin AlO{sub x} interlayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, Shingo, E-mail: Shingo-Ogawa@trc.toray.co.jp [Toray Research Center, Inc., 3-3-7 Sonoyama, Otsu, Shiga 520-8567 (Japan); Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Asahara, Ryohei; Minoura, Yuya; Hosoi, Takuji, E-mail: hosoi@mls.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp; Shimura, Takayoshi; Watanabe, Heiji [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Sako, Hideki; Kawasaki, Naohiko; Yamada, Ichiko; Miyamoto, Takashi [Toray Research Center, Inc., 3-3-7 Sonoyama, Otsu, Shiga 520-8567 (Japan)

    2015-12-21

    The thermal diffusion of germanium and oxygen atoms in HfO{sub 2}/GeO{sub 2}/Ge gate stacks was comprehensively evaluated by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry combined with an isotopic labeling technique. It was found that {sup 18}O-tracers composing the GeO{sub 2} underlayers diffuse within the HfO{sub 2} overlayers based on Fick's law with the low activation energy of about 0.5 eV. Although out-diffusion of the germanium atoms through HfO{sub 2} also proceeded at the low temperatures of around 200 °C, the diffusing germanium atoms preferentially segregated on the HfO{sub 2} surfaces, and the reaction was further enhanced at high temperatures with the assistance of GeO desorption. A technique to insert atomically thin AlO{sub x} interlayers between the HfO{sub 2} and GeO{sub 2} layers was proven to effectively suppress both of these independent germanium and oxygen intermixing reactions in the gate stacks.

  7. The coupling of ω-transaminase and Oppenauer oxidation reactions via intra-membrane multicomponent diffusion – A process model for the synthesis of chiral amines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esparza-Isunza, T.; González-Brambila, M.; Gani, Rafiqul

    2015-01-01

    amine product. Using 2-propylamine as the amine donor of the ω-transaminase reaction, gives acetone as a by-product, which in turn allows the coupling of the ω-transaminase reaction with the Oppenauer oxidation. The Oppenauer reaction converts secondary alcohols into ketones, and these can subsequently......In this study we consider the theoretical coupling of an otherwise thermodynamically limited ω-transaminase reaction to an Oppenauer oxidation, in order to shift the equilibria of both reactions, with the aim of achieving a significant (and important) increase in the yield of the desired chiral...... of this paper is to report the development of a mathematical model as a tool for the simulation and potential design of such a process for the production of a range of chiral amines. The mathematical model developed considers that each reaction is performed in a single ideally mixed isothermal reactor operating...

  8. TEMPO/viologen electrochemical heterojunction for diffusion-controlled redox mediation: a highly rectifying bilayer-sandwiched device based on cross-reaction at the interface between dissimilar redox polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokue, Hiroshi; Oyaizu, Kenichi; Sukegawa, Takashi; Nishide, Hiroyuki

    2014-03-26

    A couple of totally reversible redox-active molecules, which are different in redox potentials, 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidin-1-oxyl (TEMPO) and viologen (V(2+)), were employed to give rise to a rectified redox conduction effect. Single-layer and bilayer devices were fabricated using polymers containing these sites as pendant groups per repeating unit. The devices were obtained by sandwiching the redox polymer layer(s) with indium tin oxide (ITO)/glass and Pt foil electrodes. Electrochemical measurements of the single-layer device composed of polynorbornene-bearing TEMPO (PTNB) exhibited a diffusion-limited current-voltage response based on the TEMPO(+)/TEMPO exchange reaction, which was almost equivalent to a redox gradient through the PTNB layer depending upon the thickness. The bilayer device gave rise to the current rectification because of the thermodynamically favored cross-reaction between TEMPO(+) and V(+) at the polymer/polymer interface. A current-voltage response obtained for the bilayer device demonstrated a two-step diffusion-limited current behavior as a result of the concurrent V(2+)/V(+) and V(+)/V(0) exchange reactions according to the voltage and suggested that the charge transport process through the device was most likely to be rate-determined by a redox gradient in the polymer layer. Current collection experiments revealed a charge transport balance throughout the device, as a result of the electrochemical stability and robustness of the polymers in both redox states.

  9. Instabilities in fluid layers and in reaction-diffusion systems: Steady states, time-periodic solutions, non-periodic attractors, and related convective and otherwise non-linear phenomena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia Velarde, M

    1977-07-01

    Thermo convective instabilities in horizontal fluid layers are discussed with emphasis on the Rayleigh-Bernard model problem. Steady solutions and time-dependent phenomena (relaxation oscillations and transition to turbulence) are studied within the nonlinear Boussinesq-Oberbeck approximation. Homogeneous steady solutions, limit cycles, and inhomogeneous (ordered) spatial structures are also studied in simple reaction-diffusion systems. Lastly, the non-periodic attractor that appears at large Rayleigh numbers in the truncated Boussinesq-Oberbeck model of Lorenz, is constructed, and a discussion of turbulent behavior is given. (Author) 105 refs.

  10. Instabilities in fluid layers and in reaction-diffusion systems: Steady states, time-periodic solutions, non-periodic attractors, and related convective and otherwise non-linear phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia Velarde, M.

    1977-01-01

    Thermoconvective instabilities in horizontal fluid layers are discussed with emphasis on the Rayleigh-Benard model problem. Steady solutions and time-dependent phenomena (relaxation oscillations and transition to turbulence) are studied within the nonlinear Boussinesq-Oberbeck approximation. Homogeneous steady solutions, limit cycles, and inhomogeneous (ordered) spatial structures are also studied in simple reaction-diffusion systems. Lastly, the non-periodic attractor that appears at large Rayleigh numbers in the truncated Boussinesq-Oberbeck model of Lorenz, is constructed, and a discussion of turbulent behavior is given. (author) [es

  11. Instabilities in fluid layers and in reaction-diffusion systems: Steady states, time-periodic solutions, non-periodic attractors, and related convective and otherwise non-linear phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia Velarde, M.

    1977-01-01

    Thermo convective instabilities in horizontal fluid layers are discussed with emphasis on the Rayleigh-Bernard model problem. Steady solutions and time-dependent phenomena (relaxation oscillations and transition to turbulence) are studied within the nonlinear Boussinesq-Oberbeck approximation. Homogeneous steady solutions, limit cycles, and inhomogeneous (ordered) spatial structures are also studied in simple reaction-diffusion systems. Lastly, the non-periodic attractor that appears at large Rayleigh numbers in the truncated Boussinesq-Oberbeck model of Lorenz, is constructed, and a discussion of turbulent behavior is given. (Author) 105 refs

  12. Baby-Led Introduction to SolidS (BLISS) study: a randomised controlled trial of a baby-led approach to complementary feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Lisa; Heath, Anne-Louise M; Williams, Sheila M; Cameron, Sonya L; Fleming, Elizabeth A; Taylor, Barry J; Wheeler, Ben J; Gibson, Rosalind S; Taylor, Rachael W

    2015-11-12

    In 2002, the World Health Organization recommended that the age for starting complementary feeding should be changed from 4 to 6 months of age to 6 months. Although this change in age has generated substantial debate, surprisingly little attention has been paid to whether advice on how to introduce complementary foods should also be changed. It has been proposed that by 6 months of age most infants will have developed sufficient motor skills to be able to feed themselves rather than needing to be spoon-fed by an adult. This has the potential to predispose infants to better growth by fostering better energy self-regulation, however no randomised controlled trials have been conducted to determine the benefits and risks of such a "baby-led" approach to complementary feeding. This is of particular interest given the widespread use of "Baby-Led Weaning" by parents internationally. The Baby-Led Introduction to SolidS (BLISS) study aims to assess the efficacy and acceptability of a modified version of Baby-Led Weaning that has been altered to address potential concerns with iron status, choking and growth faltering. The BLISS study will recruit 200 families from Dunedin, New Zealand, who book into the region's only maternity hospital. Parents will be randomised into an intervention (BLISS) or control group for a 12-month intervention with further follow-up at 24 months of age. Both groups will receive the standard Well Child care provided to all parents in New Zealand. The intervention group will receive additional parent contacts (n = 8) for support and education on BLISS from before birth to 12 months of age. Outcomes of interest include body mass index at 12 months of age (primary outcome), energy self-regulation, iron and zinc intake and status, diet quality, choking, growth faltering and acceptability to parents. This study is expected to provide insight into the feasibility of a baby-led approach to complementary feeding and the extent to which this method of feeding affects infant body weight, diet quality and iron and zinc status. Results of this study will provide important information for health care professionals, parents and health policy makers. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12612001133820 .

  13. Modeling methanol transfer in the mesoporous catalyst for the methanol-to-olefins reaction by the time-fractional diffusion equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhokh, Alexey A.; Strizhak, Peter E.

    2018-04-01

    The solutions of the time-fractional diffusion equation for the short and long times are obtained via an application of the asymptotic Green's functions. The derived solutions are applied to analysis of the methanol mass transfer through H-ZSM-5/alumina catalyst grain. It is demonstrated that the methanol transport in the catalysts pores may be described by the obtained solutions in a fairly good manner. The measured fractional exponent is equal to 1.20 ± 0.02 and reveals the super-diffusive regime of the methanol mass transfer. The presence of the anomalous transport may be caused by geometrical restrictions and the adsorption process on the internal surface of the catalyst grain's pores.

  14. Simultaneous diffusion, reaction and radiative loss processes in plasmas: Numerical analysis with application to the dynamics of a fusion reactor plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilhelmsson, H.; Le Roux, M.N.

    1991-01-01

    Results are presented accounting for a selection of extensive numerical calculations of the evolution in space and time for a dynamic system, governed by a nonlinear diffusion equation with source and loss terms (which could also be nonlinear). The system is assumed to be circularly symmetric and limited by an external boundary where the value of the depending variable (e.g. temperature) is supposed to be zero. (au)

  15. Thickness engineering of atomic layer deposited Al2O3 films to suppress interfacial reaction and diffusion of Ni/Au gate metal in AlGaN/GaN HEMTs up to 600 °C in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suria, Ateeq J.; Yalamarthy, Ananth Saran; Heuser, Thomas A.; Bruefach, Alexandra; Chapin, Caitlin A.; So, Hongyun; Senesky, Debbie G.

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, we describe the use of 50 nm atomic layer deposited (ALD) Al2O3 to suppress the interfacial reaction and inter-diffusion between the gate metal and semiconductor interface, to extend the operation limit up to 600 °C in air. Suppression of diffusion is verified through Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) depth profiling and X-ray diffraction (XRD) and is further supported with electrical characterization. An ALD Al2O3 thin film (10 nm and 50 nm), which functions as a dielectric layer, was inserted between the gate metal (Ni/Au) and heterostructure-based semiconductor material (AlGaN/GaN) to form a metal-insulator-semiconductor high electron mobility transistor (MIS-HEMT). This extended the 50 nm ALD Al2O3 MIS-HEMT (50-MIS) current-voltage (Ids-Vds) and gate leakage (Ig,leakage) characteristics up to 600 °C. Both, the 10 nm ALD Al2O3 MIS-HEMT (10-MIS) and HEMT, failed above 350 °C, as evidenced by a sudden increase of approximately 50 times and 5.3 × 106 times in Ig,leakage, respectively. AES on the HEMT revealed the formation of a Ni-Au alloy and Ni present in the active region. Additionally, XRD showed existence of metal gallides in the HEMT. The 50-MIS enables the operation of AlGaN/GaN based electronics in oxidizing high-temperature environments, by suppressing interfacial reaction and inter-diffusion of the gate metal with the semiconductor.

  16. Diffusive transport and reaction in clay rocks: A storage (nuclear waste, CO2, H2), energy (shale gas) and water quality issue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlet, Laurent; Alt-Epping, Peter; Wersin, Paul; Gilbert, Benjamin

    2017-08-01

    Clay rocks are low permeability sedimentary formations that provide records of Earth history, influence the quality of water resources, and that are increasingly used for the extraction or storage of energy resources and the sequestration of waste materials. Informed use of clay rock formations to achieve low-carbon or carbon-free energy goals requires the ability to predict the rates of diffusive transport processes for chemically diverse dissolved and gaseous species over periods up to thousands of years. We survey the composition, properties and uses of clay rock and summarize fundamental science challenges in developing confident conceptual and quantitative gas and solute transport models.

  17. Oxygen diffusion in monazite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherniak, D. J.; Zhang, X. Y.; Nakamura, M.; Watson, E. B.

    2004-09-01

    We report measurements of oxygen diffusion in natural monazites under both dry, 1-atm conditions and hydrothermal conditions. For dry experiments, 18O-enriched CePO4 powder and monazite crystals were sealed in Ag-Pd capsules with a solid buffer (to buffer at NNO) and annealed in 1-atm furnaces. Hydrothermal runs were conducted in cold-seal pressure vessels, where monazite grains were encapsulated with 18O-enriched water. Following the diffusion anneals, oxygen concentration profiles were measured with Nuclear Reaction Analysis (NRA) using the reaction 18O(p,α)15N. Over the temperature range 850-1100 °C, the Arrhenius relation determined for dry diffusion experiments on monazite is given by: Under wet conditions at 100 MPa water pressure, over the temperature range 700-880 °C, oxygen diffusion can be described by the Arrhenius relationship: Oxygen diffusion under hydrothermal conditions has a significantly lower activation energy for diffusion than under dry conditions, as has been found the case for many other minerals, both silicate and nonsilicate. Given these differences in activation energies, the differences between dry and wet diffusion rates increase with lower temperatures; for example, at 600 °C, dry diffusion will be more than 4 orders of magnitude slower than diffusion under hydrothermal conditions. These disparate diffusivities will result in pronounced differences in the degree of retentivity of oxygen isotope signatures. For instance, under dry conditions (presumably rare in the crust) and high lower-crustal temperatures (∼800 °C), monazite cores of 70-μm radii will preserve O isotope ratios for about 500,000 years; by comparison, they would be retained at this temperature under wet conditions for about 15,000 years.

  18. Resonant elastic scattering of {sup 15}O and a new reaction path in the CNO cycle; Spectroscopie par diffusion elastique resonante d' {sup 15}O et nouveau chemin de reaction dans le cycle CNO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stefan, Gheorghe Iulian [Ecole doctorale SIMEM, U.F.R. Sciences, Universite de Caen Basse-Normandie, 14032 Caen Cedex (France)

    2006-12-15

    This work presents a very accurate experimental method based on radioactive beams for the study of the spectroscopical properties of unbound states. It makes use of inverse kinematical elastic scattering of the ions of an radioactive beam from a target of stable nuclei. An application of the method for the study of radioactive nuclei of astrophysical interests is given, namely of {sup 19}Ne and {sup 16}F nuclei. It is shown that on the basis of the properties of proton-emitting unbound levels of {sup 19}Ne one can develop a method of experimental study of nova explosions. It is based on observation of gamma emissions following the gamma decays of the radionuclides generated in the explosion. The most interesting radioactive nucleus involved in this process is {sup 18}F the yield of which depends strongly on the rate of {sup 18}F(p,{alpha}){sup 15}O reaction. This yield depends in turn of the properties of the states of the ({sup 18}F + p) compound nucleus, i.e. the {sup 19}Ne nucleus. In addition it was studied the unbound {sup 16}F nucleus also of astrophysical significance in {sup 15}O rich environment. Since {sup 16}F is an unbound nucleus the reaction of {sup 15}O with protons, although abundant in most astrophysical media, appears to be negligible. Thus the question that was posed was whether the exotic {sup 15}O(p,{beta}{sup +}){sup 16}O resonant reaction acquires some importance in various astrophysical media. In this work one describes a novel approach to study the reaction mechanisms which could change drastically the role of non-bound nuclei in stellar processes. One implies this mechanism to the processes (p,{gamma})({beta}){sup +} and (p,{gamma}) (p,{gamma}) within {sup 15}O rich media. The experimental studies of the {sup 19}Ne and {sup 16}F were carried out with a radioactive beam of {sup 15}O ions of very low energy produced by SPIRAL at GANIL. To improve the energy resolution thin targets were used with a 0 angle of observation relative to the beam

  19. Mass transport in a PEMFC fuel battery using combinations of monopolar plates and reaction-diffusion medium; Transporte de masa en una pila a combustible tipo PEMFC utilizando combinaciones de platos monopolares y medios de difusion de reactivos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosas Paleta, M. G. Araceli [Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Puebla, Puebla (Mexico); Bautista Rodriguez, C. Moises [Alter-Energias Puebla, Puebla (Mexico)] email: celso.bautista@thyssenkrupp.com; Rivera Marquez, J. Antonio; Tepale Ochoa, Nancy [Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Puebla, Puebla (Mexico)

    2009-09-15

    The efficiency of a PEMFC fuel battery is limited due to a variety of mass transport-related phenomena that take place while it is operating. The electromotive force of the PEM fuel battery is related to the generation of concentration gradients resulting from the distribution of the reactants on the active sites of the electrode. The reactant gases supplied to the PEMFC are distributed over the diffusion layer of the electrodes through the channels of the polar plates. They then spread toward the active layer where the semi-reactions take place. Another important aspect is the presence of water molecules, a product of the reaction. When they accumulate, they cover the porosity of the electrodes, involving the reduction in the flow of reactants, even at high current density values and, combined with the diffusion phenomena involved, cause the PEMFC to complete cease functioning. The critical parameters for the transport phenomena are porosity, the diameter of the pore in the diffusion layer and the characteristics of the distribution of the reactants. The present works includes an experimental design of two distribution media and two diffusion media of the reactant gases in a PEMFC, involving three case studies. The results show significantly notable interactions between the diameter of the pore, the type of diffusion layer applied and the type of distributor applied. The combination in the second case significantly reduces the ohmic resistance and moderately reduces the diffusion resistances. While the combination in case three notably increases the ohmic resistance, diffusion resistance is significantly reduced. [Spanish] La eficiencia de una pila a combustible tipo PEMFC es limitada por diversos fenomenos de transporte de masa presentes durante su funcionamiento. La fuerza electromotriz de la pila a combustible tipo PEM esta relacionada con la generacion de gradientes de concentracion los cuales se dan como resultado de la distribucion de los reactivos sobre los

  20. Lattice dynamical investigations on Zn diffusion in zinc oxide

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    diffusion and that too by single vacancy mechanism. The results are compared with the .... Instantaneous relative displacement of the diffusing atom with respect to the neigh- bours in the diffusion ring is given as a reaction coordinate,. X =.

  1. Enthesopathic reactions at the wrist in psoriatic arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis. Results of low-kV radiographs in three views

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, E.

    1989-01-01

    Twenty-six sites of muscle and ligament attachment around the wrist were evaluated for enthesopathic proliferative bone changes in psoriatic arthritis (PA), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH). Proliferations were found to be most frequent, most irregular, and largest in PA, followed in declining order by RA and DISH. In PA only, the bony proliferations and the underlying bone often had the appearance of mineralized woven bone, though smooth proliferations with a regular bone structure do occur in PA as well as in RA. The entheses of the trapezium, scaphoid and the radial styloid process are most frequently affected, followed by the bases of the first and fifth metacarpals and the pisiform. It is exceptional for huge bony proliferations to be observed at the entheses in DISH. (orig.) [de

  2. Introduction to chemical reaction engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yeong Geol

    1990-10-01

    This deals with chemical reaction engineering with thirteen chapters. The contents of this book are introduction on reaction engineering, chemical kinetics, thermodynamics and chemical reaction, abnormal reactor, non-isothermal reactor, nonideal reactor, catalysis in nonuniform system, diffusion and reaction in porosity catalyst, design catalyst heterogeneous reactor in solid bed, a high molecule polymerization, bio reaction engineering, reaction engineering in material process, control multi-variable reactor process using digital computer.

  3. Dynamics and structure of light nuclei through (e,e'p) reactions with high momentum; Dynamique et structure des noyaux legers en diffusion (e,e'p) a grandes impulsions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voutier, E

    2005-09-15

    The (e,e'p) reaction is an efficient and accurate means to probe nuclear structure because of its simplicity (in the case of light nuclei exact calculations can be made) and because the entire nuclear volume is probed. Now high energy electron beams are available which allows nuclear matter to be investigated on distances shorter than the nucleon diameter, and as a consequence the measurement of effects linked to the internal structure of the nucleon appears reachable. Recent experiments performed at the Jefferson Laboratory on deuterium and helium targets have shown that the cross-section (e,e'p) with high momentum missing is dominated by many-body processes involving the propagation of a nucleon in the nuclear matter. The importance of these re-diffusion mechanisms can be amplified or minimized by acting on the value of the missing momentum or on the angle of the recoil particle. These experiments highlight the sensitivity of the He{sup 3}(e,e'p)pn reactions to nucleon-nucleon correlations and their importance at high momentum missing. Theoretical results predict a very narrow window in anti-parallel kinematics through which an important reduction of the many-body mechanism is expected. The study of the color transparency effect through quasi-elastic scattering in light nuclei uses the re-diffusion features to show the existence of a small spatial extension of the nucleon's wave function. Recent development in the formalism of generalized parton distributions open the way for a systematic and complete study of the internal structure of the nucleon. (A.C.)

  4. Conservative diffusions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlen, E.A.

    1984-01-01

    In Nelson's stochastic mechanics, quantum phenomena are described in terms of diffusions instead of wave functions. These diffusions are formally given by stochastic differential equations with extremely singular coefficients. Using PDE methods, we prove the existence of solutions. This reult provides a rigorous basis for stochastic mechanics. (orig.)

  5. Diffusion and mass transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Vrentas, James S

    2013-01-01

    The book first covers the five elements necessary to formulate and solve mass transfer problems, that is, conservation laws and field equations, boundary conditions, constitutive equations, parameters in constitutive equations, and mathematical methods that can be used to solve the partial differential equations commonly encountered in mass transfer problems. Jump balances, Green’s function solution methods, and the free-volume theory for the prediction of self-diffusion coefficients for polymer–solvent systems are among the topics covered. The authors then use those elements to analyze a wide variety of mass transfer problems, including bubble dissolution, polymer sorption and desorption, dispersion, impurity migration in plastic containers, and utilization of polymers in drug delivery. The text offers detailed solutions, along with some theoretical aspects, for numerous processes including viscoelastic diffusion, moving boundary problems, diffusion and reaction, membrane transport, wave behavior, sedime...

  6. Diffusion Influenced Adsorption Kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Toshiaki; Seki, Kazuhiko

    2015-08-27

    When the kinetics of adsorption is influenced by the diffusive flow of solutes, the solute concentration at the surface is influenced by the surface coverage of solutes, which is given by the Langmuir-Hinshelwood adsorption equation. The diffusion equation with the boundary condition given by the Langmuir-Hinshelwood adsorption equation leads to the nonlinear integro-differential equation for the surface coverage. In this paper, we solved the nonlinear integro-differential equation using the Grünwald-Letnikov formula developed to solve fractional kinetics. Guided by the numerical results, analytical expressions for the upper and lower bounds of the exact numerical results were obtained. The upper and lower bounds were close to the exact numerical results in the diffusion- and reaction-controlled limits, respectively. We examined the validity of the two simple analytical expressions obtained in the diffusion-controlled limit. The results were generalized to include the effect of dispersive diffusion. We also investigated the effect of molecular rearrangement of anisotropic molecules on surface coverage.

  7. Diffusion and reaction in microbead agglomerates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes Kirchner, Carolina; Träuble, Markus; Wittstock, Gunther

    2010-04-01

    Scanning electrochemical microscopy has been used to analyze the flux of p-aminonophenol (PAP) produced by agglomerates of polymeric microbeads modified with galactosidase as a model system for the bead-based heterogeneous immunoassays. With the use of mixtures of enzyme-modified and bare beads in defined ratio, agglomerates with different saturation levels of the enzyme modification were produced. The PAP flux depends on the intrinsic kinetics of the galactosidase, the local availability of the substrate p-aminophenyl-beta-D-galactopyranoside (PAPG), and the external mass transport conditions in the surrounding of the agglomerate and the internal mass transport within the bead agglomerate. The internal mass transport is influenced by the diffusional shielding of the modified beads by unmodified beads. SECM in combination with optical microscopy was used to determine experimentally the external flux. These data are in quantitative agreement with boundary element simulation considering the SECM microelectrode as an interacting probe and treating the Michaelis-Menten kinetics of the enzyme as nonlinear boundary conditions with two independent concentration variables [PAP] and [PAPG]. The PAPG concentration at the surface of the bead agglomerate was taken as a boundary condition for the analysis of the internal mass transport condition as a function of the enzyme saturation in the bead agglomerate. The results of this analysis are represented as PAP flux per contributing modified bead and the flux from freely suspended galactosidase-modified beads. These numbers are compared to the same number from the SECM experiments. It is shown that depending on the enzyme saturation level a different situation can arise where either beads located at the outer surface of the agglomerate dominate the contribution to the measured external flux or where the contribution of buried beads cannot be neglected for explaining the measured external flux.

  8. Incorporating drug delivery into an imaging-driven, mechanics-coupled reaction diffusion model for predicting the response of breast cancer to neoadjuvant chemotherapy: theory and preliminary clinical results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrett, Angela M.; Hormuth, David A.; Barnes, Stephanie L.; Feng, Xinzeng; Huang, Wei; Yankeelov, Thomas E.

    2018-05-01

    Clinical methods for assessing tumor response to therapy are largely rudimentary, monitoring only temporal changes in tumor size. Our goal is to predict the response of breast tumors to therapy using a mathematical model that utilizes magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data obtained non-invasively from individual patients. We extended a previously established, mechanically coupled, reaction-diffusion model for predicting tumor response initialized with patient-specific diffusion weighted MRI (DW-MRI) data by including the effects of chemotherapy drug delivery, which is estimated using dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE-) MRI data. The extended, drug incorporated, model is initialized using patient-specific DW-MRI and DCE-MRI data. Data sets from five breast cancer patients were used—obtained before, after one cycle, and at mid-point of neoadjuvant chemotherapy. The DCE-MRI data was used to estimate spatiotemporal variations in tumor perfusion with the extended Kety–Tofts model. The physiological parameters derived from DCE-MRI were used to model changes in delivery of therapy drugs within the tumor for incorporation in the extended model. We simulated the original model and the extended model in both 2D and 3D and compare the results for this five-patient cohort. Preliminary results show reductions in the error of model predicted tumor cellularity and size compared to the experimentally-measured results for the third MRI scan when therapy was incorporated. Comparing the two models for agreement between the predicted total cellularity and the calculated total cellularity (from the DW-MRI data) reveals an increased concordance correlation coefficient from 0.81 to 0.98 for the 2D analysis and 0.85 to 0.99 for the 3D analysis (p  <  0.01 for each) when the extended model was used in place of the original model. This study demonstrates the plausibility of using DCE-MRI data as a means to estimate drug delivery on a patient-specific basis in predictive models and

  9. Fractional Diffusion Equations and Anomalous Diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evangelista, Luiz Roberto; Kaminski Lenzi, Ervin

    2018-01-01

    Preface; 1. Mathematical preliminaries; 2. A survey of the fractional calculus; 3. From normal to anomalous diffusion; 4. Fractional diffusion equations: elementary applications; 5. Fractional diffusion equations: surface effects; 6. Fractional nonlinear diffusion equation; 7. Anomalous diffusion: anisotropic case; 8. Fractional Schrödinger equations; 9. Anomalous diffusion and impedance spectroscopy; 10. The Poisson–Nernst–Planck anomalous (PNPA) models; References; Index.

  10. Application of polycrystalline diffusion barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsymbal, V.A.; Kolupaev, I.N.

    2010-01-01

    Degradation of contacts of the electronic equipment at the raised temperatures is connected with active diffusion redistribution of components contact - metalized systems (CMS) and phase production on interphase borders. One of systems diffusion barriers (DB) are polycrystalline silicide a film, in particular silicides of the titan. Reception disilicide the titan (TiSi 2 ) which on the parameters is demanded for conditions of microelectronics from known silicides of system Ti-Si, is possible as a result of direct reaction of a film of the titan and a substrate of silicon, and at sedimentation of layer Ti-Si demanded stoichiometric structure. Simultaneously there is specific problem polycrystalline diffusion a barrier (PDB): the polycrystalline provides structural balance and metastability film disilicide, but leaves in it borders of grains - easy local ways of diffusion. In clause the analysis diffusion permeability polycrystalline and polyphase DB is made and recommendations for practical methods of increase of blocking properties PDB are made.

  11. Kinetics and mechanism of ionic intercalation/de-intercalation during the formation of α-cobalt hydroxide and its polymorphic transition to β-cobalt hydroxide: Reaction-diffusion framework

    KAUST Repository

    Rahbani, Janane; Khashab, Niveen M.; Patra, Digambara; Al-Ghoul, Mazen

    2012-01-01

    We study the kinetics and mechanism of intercalation and de-intercalation of small anions during the formation of crystalline α-Co(OH) 2 and its transformation to β-Co(OH) 2 within a reaction-diffusion framework. We therein use fluorescence spectroscopy with Rhodamine 6G (Rh6G) as a probe as well as other spectroscopic and imaging techniques. The method is based on the reaction and diffusion of hydroxide ions into a gel matrix containing the Co(ii) ions, the conjugate anions to be intercalated and Rh6G. The advantage of this simple method is that it allows us to separate throughout space the various stages during the formation of α-Co(OH) 2 and its transformation to β-Co(OH) 2, thus enabling fluorescence measurements of the those stages by simply focusing on different areas of the tube. It also permits us to extract with ease the solids for characterization and image analysis. The macroscopic evolution of the system, which consists of a leading blue front designating the formation of α-Co(OH) 2 followed by a sharp blue/pink interface designating the transformation to the pink β-Co(OH) 2, exhibits different dynamics depending on the anion present in the gel. At a certain stage, the blue/pink interface stops its propagation and only the blue front continues. This represents clear evidence of the dependence of the kinetics of intercalation and de-intercalation on the nature of the anion. The coexisting polymorphs were collected and characterized using XRD, FTIR, Raman and UV-Vis. The fluorescence images of the α-Co(OH) 2 reveal clearly the presence of Rh6G between its layers, whereas images from the β polymorph indicate the opposite. Moreover, the fluorescence of Rh6G is monitored during the formation of α-Co(OH) 2 and its conversion to β-Co(OH) 2. During the formation, the fluorescence intensity and lifetime are significantly increased whereas the opposite happens during the transformation to the β phase. We are able to calculate the activation energies

  12. Diffusion in ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    Pelleg, Joshua

    2016-01-01

    This textbook provides an introduction to changes that occur in solids such as ceramics, mainly at high temperatures, which are diffusion controlled, as well as presenting research data. Such changes are related to the kinetics of various reactions such as precipitation, oxidation and phase transformations, but are also related to some mechanical changes, such as creep. The book is composed of two parts, beginning with a look at the basics of diffusion according to Fick's Laws. Solutions of Fick’s second law for constant D, diffusion in grain boundaries and dislocations are presented along with a look at the atomistic approach for the random motion of atoms. In the second part, the author discusses diffusion in several technologically important ceramics. The ceramics selected are monolithic single phase ones, including: A12O3, SiC, MgO, ZrO2 and Si3N4. Of these, three refer to oxide ceramics (alumina, magnesia and zirconia). Carbide based ceramics are represented by the technologically very important Si-ca...

  13. Urban diffusion problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanna, S.R.

    1976-01-01

    It is hoped that urban diffusion models of air pollutants can eventually confidently be used to make major decisions, such as in planning the layout of a new industrial park, determining the effects of a new highway on air quality, or estimating the results of a new automobile emissions exhaust system. The urban diffusion model itself should be able to account for point, line, and area sources, and the local aerodynamic effects of street canyons and building wakes. Removal or transformations due to dry or wet deposition and chemical reactions are often important. It would be best if the model included meteorological parameters such as wind speed and temperature as dependent variables, since these parameters vary significantly when air passes from rural surfaces over urban surfaces

  14. Ignition in Convective-Diffusive Systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Law, Chung

    1999-01-01

    ... efficiency as well as the knock and emission characteristics. The ignition event is clearly controlled by the chemical reactions of fuel oxidation and the fluid mechanics of convective and diffusive transport...

  15. Diffusion bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, R.C.

    1976-01-01

    A method is described for joining beryllium to beryllium by diffusion bonding. At least one surface portion of at least two beryllium pieces is coated with nickel. A coated surface portion is positioned in a contiguous relationship with another surface portion and subjected to an environment having an atmosphere at a pressure lower than ambient pressure. A force is applied on the beryllium pieces for causing the contiguous surface portions to abut against each other. The contiguous surface portions are heated to a maximum temperature less than the melting temperature of the beryllium, and the applied force is decreased while increasing the temperature after attaining a temperature substantially above room temperature. A portion of the applied force is maintained at a temperature corresponding to about maximum temperature for a duration sufficient to effect the diffusion bond between the contiguous surface portions

  16. Multipassage diffuser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lalis, A.; Rouviere, R.; Simon, G.

    1976-01-01

    A multipassage diffuser having 2p passages comprises a leak-tight cylindrical enclosure closed by a top cover and a bottom end-wall, parallel porous tubes which are rigidly assembled in sectors between tube plates and through which the gas mixture flows, the tube sectors being disposed at uniform intervals on the periphery of the enclosure. The top tube plates are rigidly fixed to an annular header having the shape of a half-torus and adapted to communicate with the tubes of the corresponding sector. Each passage is constituted by a plurality of juxtaposed sectors in which the mixture circulates in the same direction, the header being divided into p portions limited by radial partition-walls and each constituting two adjacent passages. The diffuser is provided beneath the bottom end-wall with p-1 leak-tight chambers each adapted to open into two different portions of the header, and with two collector-chambers each fitted with a nozzle for introducing the gas mixture and discharging the fraction of the undiffused mixture. By means of a central orifice formed in the bottom end-wall the enclosure communicates with a shaft for discharging the diffused fraction of the gas mixture

  17. CHEMICAL REACTIONS ON ADSORBING SURFACE: KINETIC LEVEL OF DESCRIPTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.P.Kostrobii

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the effective Hubbard model we suggest a statistical description of reaction-diffusion processes for bimolecular chemical reactions of gas particles adsorbed on the metallic surface. The system of transport equations for description of particles diffusion as well as reactions is obtained. We carry out the analysis of the contributions of all physical processes to the formation of diffusion coefficients and chemical reactions constants.

  18. Diffusion from cylindrical waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, G.F.

    1985-05-01

    The diffusion of a single component material from a finite cylindrical waste form, initially containing a uniform concentration of the material, is investigated. Under the condition that the cylinder is maintained in a well-stirred bath, expressions for the fractional inventory leached and the leach rate are derived with allowance for the possible permanent immobilization of the diffusant through its decay to a stable product and/or its irreversible reaction with the waste form matrix. The usefulness of the reported results in nuclear waste disposal applications is emphasized. The results reported herein are related to those previously derived at Oak Ridge National Laboratory by Bell and Nestor. A numerical scheme involving the partial decoupling of nested infinite summations and the use of rapidly converging rational approximants is recommended for the efficient implementation of the expressions derived to obtain reliable estimates of the bulk diffusion constant and the rate constant describing the diffusant-waste form interaction from laboratory data

  19. Solid-state reactions to synthesize nanostructured lead selenide semiconductor powders by high-energy milling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rojas-Chavez, H., E-mail: uu_gg_oo@yahoo.com.mx [Centro de Investigacion e Innovacion Tecnologica - IPN, Cerrada de CECATI s/n, Col. Santa Catarina, Del. Azcapotzalco (Mexico) and Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada - IPN, Legaria 694, Col. Irrigacion, Del. Miguel Hidalgo (Mexico); Reyes-Carmona, F. [Facultad de Quimica - UNAM, Circuito de la Investigacion Cientifica s/n, C.U. Del. Coyoacan (Mexico); Jaramillo-Vigueras, D. [Centro de Investigacion e Innovacion Tecnologica - IPN, Cerrada de CECATI s/n, Col. Santa Catarina, Del. Azcapotzalco (Mexico)

    2011-10-15

    Highlights: {yields} PbSe synthesized from PbO instead of Pb powder do not require an inert atmosphere. {yields} During high-energy milling oxygen has to be chemically reduced from the lead oxide. {yields} Solid-state and solid-gas chemical reactions promote both solid and gaseous products. -- Abstract: Both solid-solid and gas-solid reactions have been traced during high-energy milling of Se and PbO powders under vial (P, T) conditions in order to synthesize the PbSe phase. Chemical and thermodynamic arguments are postulated to discern the high-energy milling mechanism to transform PbO-Se micropowders onto PbSe-nanocrystals. A set of reactions were evaluated at around room temperature. Therefore an experimental campaign was designed to test the nature of reactions in the PbO-Se system during high-energy milling.

  20. Solid-state reactions to synthesize nanostructured lead selenide semiconductor powders by high-energy milling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojas-Chavez, H.; Reyes-Carmona, F.; Jaramillo-Vigueras, D.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → PbSe synthesized from PbO instead of Pb powder do not require an inert atmosphere. → During high-energy milling oxygen has to be chemically reduced from the lead oxide. → Solid-state and solid-gas chemical reactions promote both solid and gaseous products. -- Abstract: Both solid-solid and gas-solid reactions have been traced during high-energy milling of Se and PbO powders under vial (P, T) conditions in order to synthesize the PbSe phase. Chemical and thermodynamic arguments are postulated to discern the high-energy milling mechanism to transform PbO-Se micropowders onto PbSe-nanocrystals. A set of reactions were evaluated at around room temperature. Therefore an experimental campaign was designed to test the nature of reactions in the PbO-Se system during high-energy milling.

  1. Quantum diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habib, S.

    1994-01-01

    We consider a simple quantum system subjected to a classical random force. Under certain conditions it is shown that the noise-averaged Wigner function of the system follows an integro-differential stochastic Liouville equation. In the simple case of polynomial noise-couplings this equation reduces to a generalized Fokker-Planck form. With nonlinear noise injection new ''quantum diffusion'' terms rise that have no counterpart in the classical case. Two special examples that are not of a Fokker-Planck form are discussed: the first with a localized noise source and the other with a spatially modulated noise source

  2. Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer Request Permissions Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , 10/2017 What is hereditary diffuse gastric cancer? Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC) is a rare ...

  3. State-of-the-Art of Extreme Pressure Lubrication Realized with the High Thermal Diffusivity of Liquid Metal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haijiang; Tian, Pengyi; Lu, Hongyu; Jia, Wenpeng; Du, Haodong; Zhang, Xiangjun; Li, Qunyang; Tian, Yu

    2017-02-15

    Sliding between two objects under very high load generally involves direct solid-solid contact at molecular/atomic level, the mechanism of which is far from clearly disclosed yet. Those microscopic solid-solid contacts could easily lead to local melting of rough surfaces. At extreme conditions, this local melting could propagate to the seizure and welding of the entire interface. Traditionally, the microscopic solid-solid contact is alleviated by various lubricants and additives based on their improved mechanical properties. In this work, we realized the state-of-the-art of extreme pressure lubrication by utilizing the high thermal diffusivity of liquid metal, 2 orders of magnitude higher than general organic lubricants. The extreme pressure lubrication property of gallium based liquid metal (GBLM) was compared with gear oil and poly-α-olefin in a four-ball test. The liquid metal lubricates very well at an extremely high load (10 kN, the maximum capability of a four-ball tester) at a rotation speed of 1800 rpm for a duration of several minutes, much better than traditional organic lubricants which typically break down within seconds at a load of a few kN. Our comparative experiments and analysis showed that this superextreme pressure lubrication capability of GBLM was attributed to the synergetic effect of the ultrafast heat dissipation of GBLM and the low friction coefficient of FeGa 3 tribo-film. The present work demonstrated a novel way of improving lubrication capability by enhancing the lubricant thermal properties, which might lead to mechanical systems with much higher reliability.

  4. Oxygen diffusion in zircon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, E. B.; Cherniak, D. J.

    1997-05-01

    Oxygen diffusion in natural, non-metamict zircon was characterized under both dry and water-present conditions at temperatures ranging from 765°C to 1500°C. Dry experiments were performed at atmospheric pressure by encapsulating polished zircon samples with a fine powder of 18O-enriched quartz and annealing the sealed capsules in air. Hydrothermal runs were conducted in cold-seal pressure vessels (7-70 MPa) or a piston cylinder apparatus (400-1000 MPa) on zircon samples encapsulated with both 18O-enriched quartz and 18O water. Diffusive-uptake profiles of 18O were measured in all samples with a particle accelerator, using the 18O(p, α) 15N reaction. For dry experimental conditions at 1100-1500°C, the resulting oxygen diffusivities (24 in all) are well described by: D dry (m 2/s) = 1.33 × 10 -4exp(-53920/T) There is no suggestion of diffusive anisotropy. Under wet conditions at 925°C, oxygen diffusion shows little or no dependence upon P H 2O in the range 7-1000 MPa, and is insensitive to total pressure as well. The results of 27 wet experiments at 767-1160°C and 7-1000 MPa can be described a single Arrhenius relationship: D wet (m 2/s) = 5.5 × 10 -12exp(-25280/T) The insensitivity of oxygen diffusion to P H 2O means that applications to geologic problems can be pursued knowing only whether the system of interest was 'wet' (i.e., P H 2O > 7MPa ) or 'dry'. Under dry conditions (presumably rare in the crust), zircons are extremely retentive of their oxygen isotopic signatures, to the extent that δ 18O would be perturbed at the center of a 200 μm zircon only during an extraordinarily hot and protracted event (e.g., 65 Ma at 900°C). Under wet conditions, δ 18O may or may not be retained in the central regions of individual crystals, cores or overgrowth rims, depending upon the specific thermal history of the system.

  5. Indications of quantum diffusion of H in Pd

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behar, M; Weiser, M.; Kalbitzer, S.

    1989-01-01

    Low temperature diffusion measurements of hydrogen in palladium using the nuclear reaction technique have shown indications of H quantum diffusion behaviour. For temperatures higher than 100 K the experimental diffusion coefficients follow an Arrhenius type behaviour. However, for lower temperatures (30 K 2 behaviour. (Author) [es

  6. Determination of the diffusion coefficient of hydrogen ion in hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuszter, Gábor; Gehér-Herczegh, Tünde; Szűcs, Árpád; Tóth, Ágota; Horváth, Dezső

    2017-05-17

    The role of diffusion in chemical pattern formation has been widely studied due to the great diversity of patterns emerging in reaction-diffusion systems, particularly in H + -autocatalytic reactions where hydrogels are applied to avoid convection. A custom-made conductometric cell is designed to measure the effective diffusion coefficient of a pair of strong electrolytes containing sodium ions or hydrogen ions with a common anion. This together with the individual diffusion coefficient for sodium ions, obtained from PFGSE-NMR spectroscopy, allows the determination of the diffusion coefficient of hydrogen ions in hydrogels. Numerical calculations are also performed to study the behavior of a diffusion-migration model describing ionic diffusion in our system. The method we present for one particular case may be extended for various hydrogels and diffusing ions (such as hydroxide) which are relevant e.g. for the development of pH-regulated self-healing mechanisms and hydrogels used for drug delivery.

  7. Molecules in motion: influences of diffusion on metabolic structure and function in skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinsey, Stephen T; Locke, Bruce R; Dillaman, Richard M

    2011-01-15

    Metabolic processes are often represented as a group of metabolites that interact through enzymatic reactions, thus forming a network of linked biochemical pathways. Implicit in this view is that diffusion of metabolites to and from enzymes is very fast compared with reaction rates, and metabolic fluxes are therefore almost exclusively dictated by catalytic properties. However, diffusion may exert greater control over the rates of reactions through: (1) an increase in reaction rates; (2) an increase in diffusion distances; or (3) a decrease in the relevant diffusion coefficients. It is therefore not surprising that skeletal muscle fibers have long been the focus of reaction-diffusion analyses because they have high and variable rates of ATP turnover, long diffusion distances, and hindered metabolite diffusion due to an abundance of intracellular barriers. Examination of the diversity of skeletal muscle fiber designs found in animals provides insights into the role that diffusion plays in governing both rates of metabolic fluxes and cellular organization. Experimental measurements of metabolic fluxes, diffusion distances and diffusion coefficients, coupled with reaction-diffusion mathematical models in a range of muscle types has started to reveal some general principles guiding muscle structure and metabolic function. Foremost among these is that metabolic processes in muscles do, in fact, appear to be largely reaction controlled and are not greatly limited by diffusion. However, the influence of diffusion is apparent in patterns of fiber growth and metabolic organization that appear to result from selective pressure to maintain reaction control of metabolism in muscle.

  8. Diffusion archeology for diffusion progression history reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sefer, Emre; Kingsford, Carl

    2016-11-01

    Diffusion through graphs can be used to model many real-world processes, such as the spread of diseases, social network memes, computer viruses, or water contaminants. Often, a real-world diffusion cannot be directly observed while it is occurring - perhaps it is not noticed until some time has passed, continuous monitoring is too costly, or privacy concerns limit data access. This leads to the need to reconstruct how the present state of the diffusion came to be from partial diffusion data. Here, we tackle the problem of reconstructing a diffusion history from one or more snapshots of the diffusion state. This ability can be invaluable to learn when certain computer nodes are infected or which people are the initial disease spreaders to control future diffusions. We formulate this problem over discrete-time SEIRS-type diffusion models in terms of maximum likelihood. We design methods that are based on submodularity and a novel prize-collecting dominating-set vertex cover (PCDSVC) relaxation that can identify likely diffusion steps with some provable performance guarantees. Our methods are the first to be able to reconstruct complete diffusion histories accurately in real and simulated situations. As a special case, they can also identify the initial spreaders better than the existing methods for that problem. Our results for both meme and contaminant diffusion show that the partial diffusion data problem can be overcome with proper modeling and methods, and that hidden temporal characteristics of diffusion can be predicted from limited data.

  9. Diffusion processes in dyed detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lferde, M.; Seidel, J.-L.; Monnin, M.

    1982-01-01

    In order to get a better understanding of the dyed and fluorescent track detectors, the diffusion speed of the swelling agent, the sensitization molecules and the dye have been measured under various conditions. It is shown that the sensitization affects the entire detector while dyeing is restricted to the upper and lower layers of the detector. By combining the optimal values of the reactions parameters a higher contrast and sensitivity may be achieved. (author)

  10. Excess Entropy and Diffusivity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Graphics. Excess Entropy and Diffusivity. Excess entropy scaling of diffusivity (Rosenfeld,1977). Analogous relationships also exist for viscosity and thermal conductivity.

  11. Nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lane, A.M.

    1980-01-01

    In reviewing work at Harwell over the past 25 years on nuclear reactions it is stated that a balance has to be struck in both experiment and theory between work on cross-sections of direct practical relevance to reactors and on those relevant to an overall understanding of reaction processes. The compound nucleus and direct process reactions are described. Having listed the contributions from AERE, Harwell to developments in nuclear reaction research in the period, work on the optical model, neutron capture theory, reactions at doorway states with fine structure, and sum-rules for spectroscopic factors are considered in more detail. (UK)

  12. A computer model for one-dimensional mass and energy transport in and around chemically reacting particles, including complex gas-phase chemistry, multicomponent molecular diffusion, surface evaporation, and heterogeneous reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, S. Y.; Yetter, R. A.; Dryer, F. L.

    1992-01-01

    Various chemically reacting flow problems highlighting chemical and physical fundamentals rather than flow geometry are presently investigated by means of a comprehensive mathematical model that incorporates multicomponent molecular diffusion, complex chemistry, and heterogeneous processes, in the interest of obtaining sensitivity-related information. The sensitivity equations were decoupled from those of the model, and then integrated one time-step behind the integration of the model equations, and analytical Jacobian matrices were applied to improve the accuracy of sensitivity coefficients that are calculated together with model solutions.

  13. Diffusing diffusivity: Rotational diffusion in two and three dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Rohit; Sebastian, K. L.

    2017-06-01

    We consider the problem of calculating the probability distribution function (pdf) of angular displacement for rotational diffusion in a crowded, rearranging medium. We use the diffusing diffusivity model and following our previous work on translational diffusion [R. Jain and K. L. Sebastian, J. Phys. Chem. B 120, 3988 (2016)], we show that the problem can be reduced to that of calculating the survival probability of a particle undergoing Brownian motion, in the presence of a sink. We use the approach to calculate the pdf for the rotational motion in two and three dimensions. We also propose new dimensionless, time dependent parameters, αr o t ,2 D and αr o t ,3 D, which can be used to analyze the experimental/simulation data to find the extent of deviation from the normal behavior, i.e., constant diffusivity, and obtain explicit analytical expressions for them, within our model.

  14. Diffusion in solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiwari, G.P.; Kale, G.B.; Patil, R.V.

    1999-01-01

    The article presents a brief survey of process of diffusion in solids. It is emphasised that the essence of diffusion is the mass transfer through the atomic jumps. To begin with formal equations for diffusion coefficient are presented. This is followed by discussions on mechanisms of diffusion. Except for solutes which form interstitial solid solution, diffusion in majority of cases is mediated through exchange of sites between an atom and its neighbouring vacancy. Various vacancy parameters such as activation volume, correlation factor, mass effect etc are discussed and their role in establishing the mode of diffusion is delineated. The contribution of dislocations and grain boundaries in diffusion process is brought out. The experimental determination of different types of diffusion coefficients are described. Finally, the pervasive nature of diffusion process in number of commercial processes is outlined to show the importance of diffusion studies in materials science and technology. (author)

  15. Diffusion archeology for diffusion progression history reconstruction

    OpenAIRE

    Sefer, Emre; Kingsford, Carl

    2015-01-01

    Diffusion through graphs can be used to model many real-world processes, such as the spread of diseases, social network memes, computer viruses, or water contaminants. Often, a real-world diffusion cannot be directly observed while it is occurring — perhaps it is not noticed until some time has passed, continuous monitoring is too costly, or privacy concerns limit data access. This leads to the need to reconstruct how the present state of the diffusion came to be from partial d...

  16. Study of the reaction {pi}{sup -}p {yields} {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} p at 2.77 GeV/c for low momentum transfer of the proton. Application to the Chew-Low extrapolation method for the {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} elastic scattering; Etude de la reaction {pi}{sup -}p {yields} {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} p a 2.77 GeV/c pour de faibles impulsions du proton diffuse. Application de la methode d'extrapolation de Chew et Low a la diffusion elastiques {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baton, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1968-05-01

    Study of the reaction {pi}{sup -}p {yields} {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} p at 2.77 GeV/c carried out in the CERN 2 meter large liquid hydrogen bubble chamber at the proton synchrotron, shows that 70 per cent of this reaction goes through {pi}{sup -}p {yields} {rho}{sup -}p channel. The high statistics allow us to specify the mass and the width of the {rho}{sup -} resonance. In other hand, if the {rho}{sup -} production parameters are independent of the {rho}{sup -} width, it is not the same case for the decay parameters. In the second part, the Chew-Low extrapolation method allows us to determine the {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} elastic cross section to the pole, and the phase shifts of the P waves in the isospin 1 state and S waves in the isospin 2 state. (author) [French] L'etude de la reaction {pi}{sup -}p {yields} {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} p a 2.77 GeV/c, effectuee a l'aide de la chambre a bulles a hydrogene liquide de 2 metres du CERN, exposee aupres du synchrotron a protons, montre que 70 pour cent de cette reaction passe par la voie {pi}{sup -}p {yields} {rho}{sup -}p. L'abondance de la statistique a permis de preciser la masse et la largeur de la resonance {rho}{sup -}. D'autre part, si les parametres de la production du {rho}{sup -} sont independants de la largeur de la resonance, il n'en est pas de meme des parametres de la desintegration. Dans la deuxieme partie, la methode d'extrapolation de Chew et Low permet de determiner la section efficace de diffusion elastique {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} au pole, ainsi que les dephasages des ondes P dans l'etat d'isospin 1 et S dans l'etat d'isospin 2. (auteur)

  17. Product ion diffusion in flowing afterglows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaw, M J; Stock, H M.P. [University Coll. of Wales, Aberystwyth (UK). Dept. of Physics

    1975-11-11

    An analysis of the variation of product ion signals in flowing after-glow experiments is presented. It is shown that under certain conditions the relative variation of a single product ion yields not only the total reaction rate coefficients but also the ambipolar diffusion coefficient of the product ion in the buffer gas. Theory is compared with experiment for a number of ion-molecule and Penning reactions.

  18. Spin-diffusions and diffusive molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Brittan; Luskin, Mitchell; Plecháč, Petr; Simpson, Gideon

    2017-12-01

    Metastable configurations in condensed matter typically fluctuate about local energy minima at the femtosecond time scale before transitioning between local minima after nanoseconds or microseconds. This vast scale separation limits the applicability of classical molecular dynamics (MD) methods and has spurned the development of a host of approximate algorithms. One recently proposed method is diffusive MD which aims at integrating a system of ordinary differential equations describing the likelihood of occupancy by one of two species, in the case of a binary alloy, while quasistatically evolving the locations of the atoms. While diffusive MD has shown itself to be efficient and provide agreement with observations, it is fundamentally a model, with unclear connections to classical MD. In this work, we formulate a spin-diffusion stochastic process and show how it can be connected to diffusive MD. The spin-diffusion model couples a classical overdamped Langevin equation to a kinetic Monte Carlo model for exchange amongst the species of a binary alloy. Under suitable assumptions and approximations, spin-diffusion can be shown to lead to diffusive MD type models. The key assumptions and approximations include a well-defined time scale separation, a choice of spin-exchange rates, a low temperature approximation, and a mean field type approximation. We derive several models from different assumptions and show their relationship to diffusive MD. Differences and similarities amongst the models are explored in a simple test problem.

  19. Quasielastic reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henning, W.

    1979-01-01

    Quasielastic reaction studies, because of their capability to microscopically probe nuclear structure, are still of considerable interest in heavy-ion reactions. The recent progress in understanding various aspects of the reaction mechanism make this aim appear closer. The relation between microscopic and macroscopic behavior, as suggested, for example, by the single proton transfer data to individual final states or averaged excitation energy intervals, needs to be explored. It seems particularly useful to extend measurements to higher incident energies, to explore and understand nuclear structure aspects up to the limit of the energy range where they are important

  20. cycloaddition reactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Molecular Modeling Group, Organic Chemical Sciences, Indian Institute of Chemical Technology,. Hyderabad ... thus obtained are helpful to model the regioselectivity ... compromise to model Diels–Alder reactions involving ...... acceptance.