WorldWideScience

Sample records for solid uranium compound

  1. Molecular dynamics simulation of uranium compound adsorption on solid surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omori, Yuki; Takizawa, Yuji; Okamoto, Tsuyoshi

    2010-01-01

    Particles mixed in the UF6 gas have the property of accumulating on the inside of piping or units. This type of accumulation will cause material unaccounted for (MUF) in the UF6 gas processing facilities. Development of a calculation model for estimating the accumulation rate of uranium compounds has been expected. And predicting possible part of the units where uranium compounds adsorb will contribute to design an effective detection system. The purpose of this study is to take the basic knowledge of the particle's adsorption mechanism from the microscopic point of view. In simulation analysis, UF5 model particle is produced, then two types of solid surfaces are prepared; one is a solid surface at rest and the other is a moving solid surface. The result obtained by the code 'PABS' showed that when the solid surface moves at a lower velocity, the particle's adsorption process dominates over the particle's breakup one. Besides the velocity of the solid surface, other principal factors affecting an adsorption ratio were also discussed. (author)

  2. Benchmarking the DFT+U method for thermochemical calculations of uranium molecular compounds and solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beridze, George; Kowalski, Piotr M

    2014-12-18

    Ability to perform a feasible and reliable computation of thermochemical properties of chemically complex actinide-bearing materials would be of great importance for nuclear engineering. Unfortunately, density functional theory (DFT), which on many instances is the only affordable ab initio method, often fails for actinides. Among various shortcomings, it leads to the wrong estimate of enthalpies of reactions between actinide-bearing compounds, putting the applicability of the DFT approach to the modeling of thermochemical properties of actinide-bearing materials into question. Here we test the performance of DFT+U method--a computationally affordable extension of DFT that explicitly accounts for the correlations between f-electrons - for prediction of the thermochemical properties of simple uranium-bearing molecular compounds and solids. We demonstrate that the DFT+U approach significantly improves the description of reaction enthalpies for the uranium-bearing gas-phase molecular compounds and solids and the deviations from the experimental values are comparable to those obtained with much more computationally demanding methods. Good results are obtained with the Hubbard U parameter values derived using the linear response method of Cococcioni and de Gironcoli. We found that the value of Coulomb on-site repulsion, represented by the Hubbard U parameter, strongly depends on the oxidation state of uranium atom. Last, but not least, we demonstrate that the thermochemistry data can be successfully used to estimate the value of the Hubbard U parameter needed for DFT+U calculations.

  3. METHOD OF RECOVERING URANIUM COMPOUNDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirier, R.H.

    1957-10-29

    S>The recovery of uranium compounds which have been adsorbed on anion exchange resins is discussed. The uranium and thorium-containing residues from monazite processed by alkali hydroxide are separated from solution, and leached with an alkali metal carbonate solution, whereby the uranium and thorium hydrorides are dissolved. The carbonate solution is then passed over an anion exchange resin causing the uranium to be adsorbed while the thorium remains in solution. The uranium may be recovered by contacting the uranium-holding resin with an aqueous ammonium carbonate solution whereby the uranium values are eluted from the resin and then heating the eluate whereby carbon dioxide and ammonia are given off, the pH value of the solution is lowered, and the uranium is precipitated.

  4. The toxicology of uranium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brickner, D.

    1988-11-01

    This review of literature presents and criticises the current knowledge relevant to risk assessment in cases of human exposure to natural uranium compounds due to industrial accidents. The major risk of high uranium exposure is renal-tubular damage which may lead to acute renal insufficiency and death. Radiation damage is not expected in these circumstances. In this review the metabolism of uranium in the body, the health effects and the possible medical treatment are discussed, with an emphasis on relatively large exposure of short duration. The current ICRP lung model does not represent all the factors affecting the kinetics of uranium oxides in the respiratory tract. The significance of these factors, not represented by the model, for risk assessment in such exposures, is not known. The current recommendations for treatment are not scientifically based. Further investigations are urgently needed to enable a rational medical preparadness

  5. Process for uranium recovery in phosphorus compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demarthe, J.M.; Solar, Serge.

    1980-01-01

    Process for uranium recovery in phosphorus compounds with an organic phase containing a dialkylphosphoric acid. A solubilizing agent constituted of an heavy alcohol or a phosphoric acid ester or a tertiary phosphine oxide or octanol-2, is added to the organic phase for solubilization of the uranium and ammonium dialkyl pyrophosphate [fr

  6. Effects of uranium compounds on skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rey, B.M. de

    1982-12-01

    The following uranium compounds were topically applied to the dorsal skin of 35 day-old Wistar rats (60 g, male): uranium dioxide, uranyl nitrate, uranyl acetate, ammonium uranyl tricarbonate and ammonium diuranate. Percutaneous absorption was mediated with the aid of a vehicle and known quantities of various particle-sized batches of uranium compounds were directly implanted in the subcutaneous tissue. Animals were sacrificed 3, 6, 24 and 48 hours after implantation. Subcutaneous tissue and muscle underneath the implantation site were anlaysed by light and electron microscopy. A Cameca 322 X-ray microanalyzer was used to analyze uranium traces in calcified tissue (bones and teeth) and kidneys. A steady loss in body weight was observed in animals given high concentration of uranyl nitrate and ammonium uranyl tricarbonate. All animals died five days after the onset of the experiment due to renal failure. Slightly soluble compounds, ammonium diuranate and uranyl acetate, caused only a slight decrease in body weight. Uranium dioxide, the most insoluble compound used, induced only a transitory slight body weight decrease. Histopathological study revealed damages to the tissues of topicated skin, hair follicles and adnexal glands. High concentration of uranium was indicated in bone, teeth and kidneys by X-ray scanning

  7. Precise coulometric titration of uranium in a high-purity uranium metal and in uranium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Tatsuhiko; Yoshimori, Takayoshi

    1975-01-01

    Uranium in uranyl nitrate, uranium trioxide and a high-purity uranium metal was assayed by the coulometric titration with biamperometric end-point detection. Uranium (VI) was reduced to uranium (IV) by solid bismuth amalgam in 5M sulfuric acid solution. The reduced uranium was reoxidized to uranium (VI) with a large excess of ferric ion at a room temperature, and the ferrous ion produced was titrated with the electrogenerated manganese(III) fluoride. In the analyses of uranium nitrate and uranium trioxide, the results were precise enough when the error from uncertainty in water content in the samples was considered. The standard sample of pure uranium metal (JAERI-U4) was assayed by the proposed method. The sample was cut into small chips of about 0.2g. Oxides on the metal surface were removed by the procedure shown by National Bureau of Standards just before weighing. The mean assay value of eleven determinations corrected for 3ppm of iron was (99.998+-0.012) % (the 95% confidence interval for the mean), with a standard deviation of 0.018%. The proposed coulometric method is simple and permits accurate and precise determination of uranium which is matrix constituent in a sample. (auth.)

  8. Thermogravimetric control of intermediate compounds in uranium metallurgy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasco Sanchez, L.; Fernandez Cellini, R.

    1959-01-01

    The thermal decomposition of some intermediate compounds in the metallurgy of the uranium as uranium peroxide, ammonium uranate, uranium and ammonium penta-fluoride, uranium tetrafluoride and uranous oxide has been study by means of the Chevenard's thermo balance. Some data on pyrolysis of synthetic mixtures of intermediate compounds which may occasionally appear during the industrial process, are given. Thermogravimetric methods of control are suggested, usable in interesting products in the uranium metallurgy. (Author) 20 refs

  9. Redox behaviour of uranium with iron compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ithurbide, A.

    2009-10-01

    An option investigated for the management of long-term nuclear waste is a repository in deep geological formations. It is generally admitted that the release of radionuclides from the spent fuel in the geosphere could occur several thousand years after the beginning of the storage. Therefore, to assess the safety of the long-term disposal, it is important to consider the phenomena that can reduce the migration, and in particular the migration of uranium. The aim of this work is to study if siderite, an iron compound present both in the near - and far -field, can limit this migration as well as the role played by the redox process. Siderite thin layers have been obtained by electrochemistry. The layers are adherent and homogeneous. Their thickness is about 1 μm and they are composed of spherical grains. Analytical characterizations performed show that siderite is free of any impurity and does not exhibit any trace of oxidation. The interactions between siderite and uranium (VI) have been carried out in solutions considered as representative of environmental waters, in terms of pH and carbonate concentration. The retention of uranium on the thin layer is important since, after 24 hours of interaction, it corresponds to retention capacities of several hundreds of uranium micro-moles per gram of siderite. XPS analysis show that, in any studied condition, part of uranium present on the thin layer is reduced into an over stoichiometric uranium dioxide. The process of interaction differs depending on the considered environment, specially on the stability of siderite. (author)

  10. Carbon determination in uranium and its compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva Queiroz, C.A. da; Abrao, A.

    1982-01-01

    Carbon content in uranium and its compounds, especially ceramic grade UO 2 , must be controlled rigorously. A method for the determination of carbon with the aid of commercial equipment which uses platinum as a catalyst for the oxidation of CO, and infrared cells for CO 2 measurement is described. The detection limit is 5μg C/g U and the determination range is 0.0005 to 5% C/U. The method is being used routinely to control the carbon content in nuclear fuel materials. (Author) [pt

  11. On the technical development to minimize the quantity of solid wastes in a uranium conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otomura, Keiichiro; Ogura, Yoshikazu; Fujisaki, Sakae

    1987-01-01

    We have developed the new process of treating the waste liquor from a uranium conversion at Ningyo Toge Works PNC, Japan. This process consists of neutralizing precipitation, solid liquid separation, distillation and adsorption. At a neutralizing precipitation step a magnesium oxide is added in the waste liquor containing uranium and fluorine. Most of the uranium and fluorine in the waste liquor precipitate as magnesium compounds. A sulfuric acid is added to the precipitate separated by a filter to dissolve. The resulting solution is then distilled to recover a hydrofluoric acid as a distillate. Uranium is recovered from a residue by an anion exchange method. The recoverd fluorine and uranium are recycled to the main process of conversion. The filtrate separated at the precipitation step is then passed through adsorbing columns. The residual fluorine and uranium in the filtrate were adsorbed and removed by the chelating resine which selectively adsorb the uranium and fluorine. After that the treated waste liquor is discharged out of the plant. This process has merits of being able to minimize the quantity of solid waste in comparison with the conventional process and to recover uranium and fluorine. This process can also be applied to uranium reconversion process from uranium hexafluoride to uranium oxide and to uranium metal production process, which produce the same kind of waste liquor. (author)

  12. Methodology for uranium compounds characterization applied to biomedical monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ansoborlo, E.; Chalabreysse, J.; Henge-Napoli, M.H.; Pujol, E.

    1991-01-01

    Chronic exposure and accidental contamination to uranium compounds in the nuclear industry, led the authors to develop a methodology in order to characterize those compounds applied to biomedical monitoring. Such a methodology, based on the recommendation of the ICRP and the assessment of Annual Limit on Intake (ALI) values, involves two main steps: (1) The characterization of the industrial compound, i.e. its physico-chemical properties like density (g cm -3 ), specific area (m 2 g -1 ), x-ray spectrum (crystalline form), solid infrared spectrum (wavelength and bounds), mass spectrometry (isotopic composition), and particle size distribution including measurement of the Activity Median Aerodynamic Diameter (AMAD). They'll specially study aging and hydration state of some compounds. (2) The study of in vitro solubility in several biochemical medium like bicarbonates, Basal Medium Eagle (BME) used in cellular culture, Gamble solvent, which is a serum simulant, with oxygen bubbling, and Gamble added with superoxide anions O2 - . Those different mediums allow one to understand the dissolution mechanisms (oxidation, chelating effects...) and to give ICRP classification D, W, or Y. Those two steps are essential to assess a biomedical monitoring either in routine or accidental exposure, and to calculate the ALI. Results on UO3, UF4 and U02 in the French uranium industry are given

  13. Study on growth of highly pure uranium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shikama, Tatsuo; Ochiai, Akira; Suzuki, Kenji.

    1992-01-01

    We developed the systems for growing highly pure uranium compounds to study their intrinsic physical properties. Uranium metal was zone refined under low contamination conditions as far as possible. Chemical analysis of the purified uranium was performed using the inductive coupled plasma emission spectrometry (ICP). The problem that emission spectra of the uranium conceal those of analyzed impurities was settled by extraction of the uranium using tri-n-butyl-phosphate (TBP). The result shows that some metallic impurities such as Pb, Mn, Cu etc. evaporated by the r.f. heating and other usual metallic impurities moved to the end of rod with molten zone. Therefore, we conclude that the zone refining technique is much effective to the removal of metallic impurities and we obtained highly purified uranium metal of 99.99 % up with regard to metallic impurities. Using the purified uranium, we attempted to grow a highly pure uranium-titanium single crystals. (author)

  14. Use of an ion mobility spectrometer for detecting uranium compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLain, Derek R; Steeb, Jennifer L; Smith, Nicholas A

    2018-07-01

    The safeguards community currently lacks a method to rapidly determine the chemical form of radioactive and non-radioactive compounds in real time during inspection activities. Chemical speciation identification can provide important information on both the types of materials that are collected during environmental sampling and can inform inspectors as to where to focus efforts during inspections or complementary access visits. Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) is an established field technique for the detection of explosives, narcotics, and other organic compounds. More recently, electrospray ionization (ESI) has been used to introduce inorganic compounds to IMS instruments for analysis. These techniques have shown the ability to supply chemical information on the compounds analyzed. Although these laboratory based instruments use a liquid-based injection system, there is evidence in the literature of unaltered and intact pharmaceutical tablets being volatilized and ionized in open atmosphere using heat and a Ni-63 source. This work determined that a commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) IMS could be used for the identification of solid uranium compounds directly after sampling using a COTS sample swipe. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. New uranium compounds preparation and use as catalyst for hydrogenation of non-saturated organic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnaudet, L.; Folcher, G.

    1985-01-01

    Preparation of new organic uranium compounds and their use as catalysts for hydrogenation of non-saturated organic compounds are described. These compounds include Uranium III, a cyclopentadienic group, an alkyl group and an acetylenic derivative C 6 H 5 C triple bonds CR fixed by a π bond. Catalysts can be prepared with depleted uanium for hydrogenation of olefins for example [fr

  16. Determination of chlorine in nuclear-grade uranium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Chunqing; Liu Fuyun; Huang Dianfan

    1988-01-01

    The determination of chlorine in nuclear-grade uranium compounds is discribed. Chlorine is separated from uranium oxide pyrohydrolytically with stream of wet oxygen in a furnace at 800 ∼ 900 deg C. Chlorine is volatilized as hydrochloric acid, absorbed in a dilute alkaline solution and measured with chlorine-selective electrode. This method covers the concentration range of 10 ∼ 500 pm chlorine in uranium oxide. Precision of at least ± 10% and recovery of 85 ∼ 108% have been reported

  17. Analysis of uranium and its compounds. Ruthenium spectrographic determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    Ruthenium determination in uranium and its compounds, suitable for content greater than 0.1 ppm with respect to uranium, by dissolution in sulfuric acid and addition of palladium as an internal standard, separation of the precipitated ruthenium, in the presence of gold, by reduction with zinc, the precipitate is calcined and ruthenium is determined by spectrography [fr

  18. Characterization of Uranium Solids Precipitated with Aluminosilicates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DUFF, MC

    2004-01-01

    At the Savannah River Site (SRS), the High-Level Waste (HLW) Tank Farms store and process high-level liquid radioactive wastes from the Canyons and recycle water from the Defense Waste Processing Facility. The waste is concentrated using evaporators to minimize the volume of space required for HLW storage. Recently, the 2H Evaporator was shutdown due to the crystallization of sodium aluminosilicate (NAS) solids (such as cancrinite and sodalite) that contained close to 10 weight percent of elementally-enriched uranium (U). Prior to extensive cleaning,the evaporator deposits resided on the evaporator walls and other exposed internal surfaces within the evaporator pot. Our goal is to support the basis for the continued safe operation of SRS evaporators and to gain more information that could be used to help mitigate U accumulation during evaporator operation. To learn more about the interaction between U(VI) and NAS in HLW salt solutions, we performed several fundamental studies to examine the mechanisms of U accumulation with NAS in highly caustic solutions. This larger group of studies focused on the following processes: co-precipitation/structural incorporation, sorption, and precipitation (with or without NAS), which will be reviewed in this presentation. We will present and discuss local atomic structural characterization data about U that has been co-precipitated with NAS solids (such as amorphous zeolite precursor material and sodalite) using X-ray absorption fine-structure (XAFS) spectroscopic techniques

  19. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamdoun, N.A.

    2007-01-01

    The article includes a historical preface about uranium, discovery of portability of sequential fission of uranium, uranium existence, basic raw materials, secondary raw materials, uranium's physical and chemical properties, uranium extraction, nuclear fuel cycle, logistics and estimation of the amount of uranium reserves, producing countries of concentrated uranium oxides and percentage of the world's total production, civilian and military uses of uranium. The use of depleted uranium in the Gulf War, the Balkans and Iraq has caused political and environmental effects which are complex, raising problems and questions about the effects that nuclear compounds left on human health and environment.

  20. Physicochemical aspects of extraction of uranium concentrate from the wastes and thermodynamic characteristics of thorium-uranium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khamidov, F.A.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of present work is elaboration of physicochemical aspects of extraction of uranium concentrate from the wastes and study of thermodynamic characteristics of thorium-uranium compounds. Therefore, the radiological monitoring of tailing dumps of Tajikistan has been conducted; the obtaining of uranium concentrate from the tailing dumps of uranium production has been studied; the obtaining of uranium concentrate from the tailing dumps of uranium production with application of local sorbents has been studied as well; thermal stability and thermodynamic characteristics of uranium-thorium compounds has been investigated; the flowsheets of extraction of uranium concentrate from the wastes have been elaborated.

  1. Contribution to study of effects consecutive to alpha decay of uranium 238 in some uranium compounds and uranium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ordonez-Regil, E.

    1985-06-01

    The consequences of alpha decay of 238 U in uranium compounds and in uranium bearing ores have been examined in two ways: leaching of 234 Th and determination of the activity ratio of 234 U and 238 U. The results have been interpreted mainly in terms of the ''hot'' character of the nascent 234 Th atoms [fr

  2. French experience with Uranium compounds: conclusions of medical working group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berard, P.; Mazeyrat, C.; Auriol, B.; Montegue, A.; Estrabaud, M.; Grappin, L.; Giraud, J.M.

    2002-01-01

    The authors who represent several organisations and industrial firms, present observations conducted for some thirty years in France, including routine monitoring or special measurements following contamination by uranium compounds. They propose recommendations for radio toxicological monitoring of workers exposed to industrial uranium compounds and they comment on urine and faecal collections in relation to specific exposures. Our working group, set up by the CEA Medical Adviser in 1975, consists of French specialists in uranium radio toxicology. Their role is to propose recommendations for the monitoring of working conditions and exposed workers. The different plants process chemically and metallurgically, and machine large quantities of uranium with various 235U enrichments. Radio toxicological monitoring of workers exposed to uranium compounds requires examinations prescribed according to the kind of product manipulated and the industrial risk of the workplace. The range of examinations that are useful for this kind of monitoring includes lung monitoring, urine analyses and faecal sampling. The authors present the frequency of the monitoring for routine or special conditions according to industrial exposure, time and duration of collection of excreta (urine and faeces), the necessity of a work break, precautions for preservation of the samples and the ways in interpreting excretion analysis according to natural food intakes

  3. Metabolism and toxicology of the uranium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salomon, A.P.

    1976-01-01

    Three important points to be considered in the metabolic behaviour of uranium are: 1) ionic behaviour which depends only on its chemical characteristics; 2) behaves in the organism as a unique element and has no metabolism similar to others like for example Sr-90 and Ba-140 which are akin to Ca; and 3) metabolism is identical for the three isotopes of uranium and has no isotopic effect. The metabolic decomposition undergoes three phases namely: 1) absorption of the components up to the blood streams; 2) distribution through the blood into the organs; and 3) elimination. The mode of entry in the organism is through inhalation, ingestion, wounds, absorption through the skin, and entry by the eyes. Uranium decomposes in the blood after its entry, disperses in the extracellular medium and deposits in the different organs of the body. However, it has no definite fixation and the different compartments are always in equilibrium with each other. Elimination of contamination is through the feces and urine. In case of massive absorption, that is either acute or sub-acute toxicity, the following are the subsequent effects: a) clinical effects major lesion in the kidneys whatever the mode of entry may be and feebleness of the muscles, apathy and nausea are noted; b) lesions in the renal region-yellowish gray in the medular and critical region; c) biological effects-appearance of proteinuria and catalysuria, cellular wastes in the urine and a change in the capacity to reabsorb Na + , Cl - , and glucose. The lethal dose is 1 mg U-nat/kg.wt. The dose provoking renal lesion is 0.1mg U/kg.wt. The maximum permissible dose is: a) annual dose 40 mg U-nat/yr; b) Inhalation 2.5 mg/day; c) Ingestion 150 mg/2 days consecutive (soluble = 4.7x10 -1 μCi, insoluble = 3.4x10 -2 μCi

  4. Assessing the Renal Toxicity of Capstone Depleted Uranium Oxides and Other Uranium Compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roszell, Laurie E.; Hahn, Fletcher; Lee, Robyn B.; Parkhurst, MaryAnn

    2009-01-01

    The primary target for uranium toxicity is the kidney. The most frequently used guideline for uranium kidney burdens is the International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP) value of 3 (micro)g U/g kidney, a value that is based largely upon chronic studies in animals. In the present effort, we have developed a risk model equation to assess potential outcomes of acute uranium exposure. Twenty-seven previously published case studies in which workers were acutely exposed to soluble compounds of uranium (as a result of workplace accidents) were analyzed. Kidney burdens of uranium for these individuals were determined based on uranium in the urine, and correlated with health effects observed over a period of up to 38 years. Based upon the severity of health effects, each individual was assigned a score (- to +++) and then placed into an Effect Group. A discriminant analysis was used to build a model equation to predict the Effect Group based on the amount of uranium in the kidneys. The model equation was able to predict the Effect Group with 85% accuracy. The risk model was used to predict the Effect Group for Soldiers exposed to DU as a result of friendly fire incidents during the 1991 Gulf War. This model equation can also be used to predict the Effect Group of new cases in which acute exposures to uranium have occurred

  5. Lattice anisotropy in uranium ternary compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maskova, S.; Adamska, A.M.; Havela, L.

    2012-01-01

    Several U-based intermetallic compounds (UCoGe, UNiGe with the TiNiSi structure type and UNiAl with the ZrNiAl structure type) and their hydrides were studied from the point of view of compressibility and thermal expansion. Confronted with existing data for the compounds with the ZrNiAl structure...

  6. Simulation of uranium and plutonium oxides compounds obtained in plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novoselov, Ivan Yu.; Karengin, Alexander G.; Babaev, Renat G.

    2018-03-01

    The aim of this paper is to carry out thermodynamic simulation of mixed plutonium and uranium oxides compounds obtained after plasma treatment of plutonium and uranium nitrates and to determine optimal water-salt-organic mixture composition as well as conditions for their plasma treatment (temperature, air mass fraction). Authors conclude that it needs to complete the treatment of nitric solutions in form of water-salt-organic mixtures to guarantee energy saving obtainment of oxide compounds for mixed-oxide fuel and explain the choice of chemical composition of water-salt-organic mixture. It has been confirmed that temperature of 1200 °C is optimal to practice the process. Authors have demonstrated that condensed products after plasma treatment of water-salt-organic mixture contains targeted products (uranium and plutonium oxides) and gaseous products are environmental friendly. In conclusion basic operational modes for practicing the process are showed.

  7. Study of the interactions between uranium and organic compounds in the hydrothermal systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salze, David

    2008-01-01

    Formers studies on the relations between organic matter and uranium have shown that these interactions go since the complexation and the transport of uranium in organics fluids until its reduction by the organic matter leading to the uranium-bearing mineral precipitation. An experimental study of these reactions to 200 deg. C and 500 bars between experimental compounds (pure organic compounds) such as the n-alkanes (n-pentane, n-hexane, n-heptane, n-octane, n-nonane, n-decane, n-dodecane, n-tetradecane and n-hexadecane), an n-alkene hydrocarbon (n-dec-1-ene), cycles (butyl-cyclohexane and cyclo-hexane) and the aromatic ones (butyl-benzene and naphthalene), and hexavalent uranium oxides was undertaken. These experiments allowed to show a progressive oxidation of n-alkanes starting from made up C6. The increasing size of the aliphatic chains and the increase in the time of setting in interaction are major factors of the increase in the environment oxidizing capacity in interaction with uranium on the organic compound. The determination of the oxidation step of uranium oxides after experiment made it possible to determine that in aqueous environment the aliphatic model compounds are reducers more powerful than the aromatic compounds. An organic matter from lake or marine origin generally has an aliphatic fraction larger than the organic matter of continental origin and thus will be more likely to reduce uranium. A natural example, the uranium deposits in the sandstones from Arlit, the tectono-lithologic type, was selected in order to apply the results obtained in the experimental part. They are located in fluviatile sandstones rich in organic matter of continental origin (type III) deposited in the paleo-channels. Former authors considered that only this organic matter of type III was responsible for the reduction of U (VI) in U (IV). Work which was undertaken in the present study shows that migrated oils of probable marine origin strongly contributed to the genesis

  8. Determination of oxygen in uranium compounds using sulfur monochloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baudin, G.; Besson, J.; Blum, P.L.; Tran-Van, Danh

    1964-01-01

    The authors have described in an other paper (Anal. Chim. Acta, in press) a method for oxygen determination in uranium compounds, in which the sample is attacked by sulfur monochloride. The present paper is concerned with the experimental aspects of the method: apparatus procedure. (authors) [fr

  9. Limits for the release of uranium compounds to the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, F.; Ferruz, P.; Aguayo, A.

    1987-01-01

    A conservative criteria to be be followed by a Regulatory Body, in order to provide the limits of radioactive material release in the environment, When all the parameters are not available for the optimization of radiation protection is presented. This criteria can be applied to stablishment of radioactive release limits for uranium compounds from the nuclear fuel cycle facilities. (author)

  10. Tris(bis(trimethylsilyl)amido)uranium: Compounds with tri-, tetra-, and penta-valent uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, J.L.

    1988-04-01

    This trivalent uranium compound, serves as a precursor to new tri-, tetra-, and penta-valent uranium species. The geometry about the U atom is pyramidal. Lewis-base coordination compounds of U(N(SiMe/sub 3/)/sub 2/)/sub 3/ with a one-to-one- ratio of Lewis base to uranium were isolated with pyridine, 4-dimethylamino-pyridine, 2,6-Me/sub 2/-C/sub 6/H/sub 3/NC, and TPO. Two-to-one coordination compounds were obtained with t-butylnitrile and t-butylisocyanide. Compounds with more sterically demanding bases could not be isolated. The expected decrease in U-N(SiMe/sub 3/)/sub 2/ bond length with increase in oxidation state is not observed. Reaction of ClU(N(SiMe/sub 3/)/sub 2/)/sub 3/and Li(NH(p-tolyl)) yields the uranium (IV) dimer, U/sub 2/(N(SiMe/sub 3/)/sub 2/)/sub 4/(..mu..-N(p-tolyl))/sub 2/. Reaction with 2,4,6-triemethylaniline produces a dimer. Analogous substitution products could not be obtained with aniline or p-toluidine. t-Bu/sub 3/CO/sup /minus//, t-Bu/sub 2/CHO/sup /minus//, and t-Bu/sub 3/SiO/sup /minus// are used to synthesize new tetravalent, mononuclear uranium compounds. Reaction of ClU(tritox)/sub 3/ with alkyllithium reagents leads to isolation of RU(tritox)/sub 3/. The reaction of U(ditox)/sub 4/ with MeLi affords the addition product U(ditox)/sub 4/(Me)Li, whose crystal structure is described. Preparation of uranium silox compounds is reported. 97 refs., 26 figs., 39 tabs.

  11. Tris[bis(trimethylsilyl)amido]uranium: Compounds with tri-, tetra-, and penta-valent uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, J.L.

    1988-04-01

    This trivalent uranium compound, serves as a precursor to new tri-, tetra-, and penta-valent uranium species. The geometry about the U atom is pyramidal. Lewis-base coordination compounds of U[N(SiMe 3 ) 2 ] 3 with a one-to-one- ratio of Lewis base to uranium were isolated with pyridine, 4-dimethylamino-pyridine, 2,6-Me 2 -C 6 H 3 NC, and TPO. Two-to-one coordination compounds were obtained with t-butylnitrile and t-butylisocyanide. Compounds with more sterically demanding bases could not be isolated. The expected decrease in U-N(SiMe 3 ) 2 bond length with increase in oxidation state is not observed. Reaction of ClU[N(SiMe 3 ) 2 ] 3 and Li[NH(p-tolyl)] yields the uranium (IV) dimer, U 2 [N(SiMe 3 ) 2 ] 4 [μ-N(p-tolyl)] 2 . Reaction with 2,4,6-triemethylaniline produces a dimer. Analogous substitution products could not be obtained with aniline or p-toluidine. t-Bu 3 CO/sup /minus//, t-Bu 2 CHO/sup /minus//, and t-Bu 3 SiO/sup /minus// are used to synthesize new tetravalent, mononuclear uranium compounds. Reaction of ClU(tritox) 3 with alkyllithium reagents leads to isolation of RU(tritox) 3 . The reaction of U(ditox) 4 with MeLi affords the addition product U(ditox) 4 (Me)Li, whose crystal structure is described. Preparation of uranium silox compounds is reported. 97 refs., 26 figs., 39 tabs

  12. Feasibility study of the dissolution rates of uranium ore dust, uranium concentrates and uranium compounds in simulated lung fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, R.

    1986-01-01

    A flow-through apparatus has been devised to study the dissolution in simulated lung fluid of aerosol materials associated with the Canadian uranium industry. The apparatus has been experimentally applied over 16 day extraction periods to approximately 2g samples of < 38um and 53-75um particle-size fractions of both Elliot Lake and Mid-Western uranium ores. The extraction of uranium-238 was in the range 24-60% for these samples. The corresponding range for radium-226 was 8-26%. Thorium-230, lead-210, polonium-210, and thorium-232 were not significantly extracted. It was incidentally found that the elemental composition of the ores studied varies significantly with particle size, the radionuclide-containing minerals and several extractable stable elements being concentrated in the smaller size fraction. Samples of the refined compounds uranium dioxide and uranium trioxide were submitted to similar 16 day extraction experiments. Approximately 0.5% of the uranium was extracted from a 0.258g sample of unsintered (fluid bed) uranium dioxide of particle size < 38um. The corresponding figure for a 0.292g sample of uranium trioxide was 97%. Two aerosol samples on filters were also studied. Of the 88ug uranium initially measured on stage 2 of a cascade impactor sample collected from the yellow cake packing area of an Elliot Lake mill, essentially 100% was extracted over a 16 day period. The corresponding figure for an open face filter sample collected in a fuel fabrication plant and initially measured at 288ug uranium was approximately 3%. Recommendations are made with regard to further work of a research nature which would be useful in this area. Recommendations are also made on sampling methods, analytical methods and extraction conditions for various aerosols of interest which are to be studied in a work of broader scope designed to yield meaningful data in connection with lung dosimetry calculations

  13. Thermodynamic data for uranium and thorium intermetallic compounds: A historical perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcock, C.B.

    1989-01-01

    The development of quantitative information concerning the stabilities of uranium and thorium intermetallic compounds since the publication of Rough and Bauer's phase diagram compilation are reviewed. During this era a number of high temperature measurement techniques have been developed, from gas/solid equilibration to mass spectrometry and from high temperature calorimetry to solid state electrochemistry, and the growth of quantitative information has run parallel to this evolution. The amount of experimental effort now appears to be declining, and the task presently of major importance is to integrate and rationalize the quantitative information, an effort which will undoubtedly lead to new experimental initiatives. (orig.)

  14. Minimization of radioactive solid wastes from uranium mining and metallurgy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xueli; Xu Lechang; Wei Guangzhi; Gao Jie; Wang Erqi

    2010-01-01

    The concept and contents of radioactive waste minimization are introduced. The principle of radioactive waste minimization involving administration optimization, source reduction, recycling and reuse as well as volume reduction are discussed. The strategies and methods to minimize radioactive solid wastes from uranium mining and metallurgy are summarized. In addition, the benefit from its application of radioactive waste minimization is analyzed. Prospects for the research on radioactive so-lid waste minimization are made in the end. (authors)

  15. Photon attenuation properties of some thorium, uranium and plutonium compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, V. P.; Badiger, N. M. [Karnatak University, Department of Physics, Dharwad-580003, Karnataka (India); Vega C, H. R., E-mail: kudphyvps@rediffmail.com [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas, Zac. (Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    Mass attenuation coefficients, effective atomic numbers, effective electron densities for nuclear materials; thorium, uranium and plutonium compounds have been studied. The photon attenuation properties for the compounds have been investigated for partial photon interaction processes by photoelectric effect, Compton scattering and pair production. The values of these parameters have been found to change with photon energy and interaction process. The variations of mass attenuation coefficients, effective atomic number and electron density with energy are shown graphically. Moreover, results have shown that these compounds are better shielding and suggesting smaller dimensions. The study would be useful for applications of these materials for gamma ray shielding requirement. (Author)

  16. Lattice anisotropy in uranium ternary compounds: UTX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mašková, S.; Adamska, A.M.; Havela, L.; Kim-Ngan, N.-T.H.; Przewoźnik, J.; Daniš, S.; Kothapalli, K.; Kolomiets, A.V.; Heathman, S.; Nakotte, H.; Bordallo, H.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Compressibility and thermal expansion of several U-based compounds were established. ► The direction of the U–U bonds is the “soft” crystallographic direction. ► Highest coefficient of linear thermal expansion is in the direction of the U–U bonds. ► The closer the U atoms are together the better they can be compressed together. - Abstract: Several U-based intermetallic compounds (UCoGe, UNiGe with the TiNiSi structure type and UNiAl with the ZrNiAl structure type) and their hydrides were studied from the point of view of compressibility and thermal expansion. Confronted with existing data for the compounds with the ZrNiAl structure type a common pattern emerges. The direction of the U–U bonds with participation of the 5f states is distinctly the “soft” crystallographic direction, exhibiting also the highest coefficient of linear thermal expansion. The finding leads to an apparent paradox: the closer the U atoms are together in a particular direction the better they can be additionally compressed together by applied hydrostatic pressure.

  17. Measurement of fission track of uranium particle by solid state nuclear track detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Son, S. C.; Pyo, H. W.; Ji, K. Y.; Kim, W. H.

    2002-01-01

    In this study, we discussed results of the measurement of fission tracks for the uranium containing particles by solid state nuclear track detector. Uranium containing silica and uranium oxide particles were prepared by uranium sorption onto silica powder in weak acidic medium and laser ablation on uranium pellet, respectively. Fission tracks for the uranium containing silica and uranium oxide particles were detected on Lexan plastic detector. It was found that the fission track size and shapes depend on the particle size uranium content in particles. Correlation of uranium particle diameter with fission track radius was also discussed

  18. Disorder effects in strongly correlated uranium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suellow, S.; Maple, M.B.; Tomuta, D.; Nieuwenhuys, G.J.; Menovsky, A.A.; Mydosh, J.A.; Chau, R.

    2001-01-01

    Moderate levels of crystallographic disorder can dramatically affect the ground-state properties of heavy fermion compounds. In particular, the role of disorder close to a quantum critical point has been investigated in detail. However, crystallographic disorder is equally effective in altering the properties of magnetically ordered heavy fermion compounds like URh 2 Ge 2 , where disorder-induced spin-glass behavior has been observed. In this system, moreover, the magnetic ground state can be tuned from a spin-glass to a long-range ordered antiferromagnetic one by means of an annealing treatment. The transformation of the magnetic state is accompanied by a transition in the transport properties from 'quasi-insulating' (dρ/dT 2 Ge 2 will be discussed. Of particular interest is the resistivity of as-grown URh 2 Ge 2 , which resembles the Non-Fermi-liquid system UCu 4 Pd, suggesting that a common mechanism - the crystallographic disorder - controls the transport properties of these materials

  19. Synthesis and studies of some organometallic compounds of uranium IV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marquet-Ellis, Hubert; Folcher, Gerard.

    1975-06-01

    The organometallic compounds of uranium IV have been well known for a long-time but some difficulties in the synthese subsist. The procedures and the apparatus allowing to obtain these compounds with good yields are described. The cyclopenta dienyl compounds U(C 5 H 5 ) 3 Cl, U(C 5 H 5 ) 4 are prepared by reaction of UCl 4 with Na(C 5 H 5 ) in tetrahydrofurane. The cyclooctatetraene compound U(C 8 H 8 ) 2 ''Uranocene'' is obtained by reaction of K 2 (C 8 H 8 ) on UCl 4 in tetrahydrofurane. The NMR spectrum of the solution during the reaction shows the appearance of the product. These compounds have been identified by chemical analysis and X rays. The visible spectra of U(C 5 H 5 ) 2 Cl and U(C 8 H 8 ) 2 in gaseous phase have been obtained [fr

  20. Polynuclear compounds of uranium: structure, reactivity and properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mougel, V.

    2012-01-01

    The study and comprehension of actinide's fundamental chemistry have important implications both for the development of new nuclear fuel and for the nuclear fuel reprocessing. One of the major issues in these processes is the ease of uranium to undergo redox reactions and to form polynuclear assemblies, which largely perturb these processes. However, despite their relevance, only few synthetic routes towards polynuclear uranium assemblies are described in the literature, and most of the polynuclear complexes reported are formed by serendipity rather than by rational design. Moreover, polynuclear uranium compounds are highly promising for the design of magnetic materials with improved properties and for reactivity studies. The aim of this work is the synthesis of polynuclear uranium complexes and the study of their reactivity and coordination properties. New synthetic routes to uranium polynuclear assemblies were developed and the study of their physico-chemical properties was carried out. The first approach investigated was based on pentavalent uranyl chemistry. Uranyl(V) is known to form aggregates via an interaction between uranyl moieties often named cation-cation interaction, but the isolation of uranyl(V) complexes had been largely limited by its ease of disproportionation. We isolated the first stable uranyl(V) polynuclear assembly using Salen-type Schiff base ligand. Based on this result, a fine tuning of the ligand and counter-ion properties resulted in the isolation of a large family of uranyl(V) polynuclear assemblies and in a better understanding of the parameters ruling their stability. Moreover, rare examples of clear antiferromagnetic couplings were observed with these complexes. In addition, this synthetic path was used to build the first 5f-3d cluster presenting single molecule magnet properties. The second approach used in this thesis consisted in the synthesis of oxo/hydroxo uranium clusters. The controlled hydrolysis of trivalent uranium in

  1. Vibrational spectroscopy and structural analysis of complex uranium compounds (review)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umreiko, D.S.; Nikanovich, M.V.

    1985-01-01

    The paper reports on the combined application of experimental and theoretical methods of vibrational spectroscopy together with low-temperature luminescence data to determine the characteristic features of the formation and structure of complex systems, not only containing ligands directly coordinated to the CA uranium, but also associated with the extraspherical polyatomic electrically charged particles: organic cations. These include uranyl complexes and heterocyclical amines. Studied here were compounds of tetra-halouranylates with pyridine and its derivates, as well as dipyridyl, quinoline and phenanthroline. Structural schemes are also proposed for other uranyl complexes with protonated heterocyclical amines with a more complicated composition, which correctly reflect their spectroscopic properties

  2. Study on the solid state chemistry of ternary uranium oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, Toshiyuki

    1988-03-01

    With the increase of burnup of uranium oxide fuels, various kinds of fission products are formed, and the oxygen atoms combined with the consumed heavy atoms are freed. The solid state chemical and/or thermodynamic properties of these elements at high temperatures are complex, and have not been well clarified. In the present report, an approach was taken that the chemical interactions between UO 2 and these fission products can be regarded as causing overlapped effects of composing ternary uranium oxides, and formation reactions and phase behavior were studied for several ternary uranium oxides with typical fission product elements such as alkaline earth metals and rare earth elements. Precise determination methods for the composition of ternary uranium oxides were developed. The estimated accuracies for x and y values in M y U 1-y O 2+x were ± 0.006 and ± 0.004, respectively. The thermodynamic properties and the lattice parameters of the phases in the Ca-U-O and Pr-U-O systems were discussed in relation to the composition determined by the methods. Crystal structure analyses of cadmium monouranates were made with X-ray diffraction method. (author) 197 refs

  3. Compound Nucleus Reactions in LENR, Analogy to Uranium Fission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hora, Heinrich; Miley, George; Philberth, Karl

    2008-03-01

    The discovery of nuclear fission by Hahn and Strassmann was based on a very rare microanalytical result that could not initially indicate the very complicated details of this most important process. A similarity is discussed for the low energy nuclear reactions (LENRs) with analogies to the yield structure found in measurements of uranium fission. The LENR product distribution measured earlier in a reproducible way in experiments with thin film electrodes and a high density deuteron concentration in palladium has several striking similarities with the uranium fission fragment yield curve.ootnotetextG.H. Miley and J.A. Patterson, J. New Energy 1, 11 (1996); G.H. Miley et al, Proc ICCF6, p. 629 (1997).This comparison is specifically focussed to the Maruhn-Greiner local maximum of the distribution within the large-scale minimum when the fission nuclei are excited. Implications for uranium fission are discussed in comparison with LENR relative to the identification of fission a hypothetical compound nuclear reaction via a element ^306X126 with double magic numbers.

  4. Feasibility studies on electrochemical recovery of uranium from solid wastes contaminated with uranium using 1-butyl-3-methylimidazorium chloride as an electrolyte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohashi, Yusuke, E-mail: ohhashi.yusuke@jaea.go.jp [Ningyo-toge Environmental Engineering center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1550 Kamisaibara, Kagamino-cho, Tomata-gun, Okayama 708-0698 (Japan); Harada, Masayuki [Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1-N1-34 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Asanuma, Noriko [Department of Nuclear Engineering, School of Engineering, Tokai University, 4-1-1 Kitakaname, Hiratsuka-shi, Kanagawa 259-1292 (Japan); Ikeda, Yasuhisa [Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1-N1-34 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • The uranium component of steel wastes and spent NaF adsorbent are easily dissolved into BMICl. • The uranyl(VI) species in BMICl are reduced to U(V) irreversibly around −0.8 to −1.3 V. • The dissolved uranium species in BMICl are recovered as black deposits electrolytically. • The deposit is the mixtures of U(IV) and U(VI) compounds containing O, F, Cl, and N elements. - Abstract: In order to examine feasibility of the electrochemical deposition method for recovering uranium from the solid wastes contaminated with uranium using ionic liquid as electrolyte, we have studied the electrochemical behavior of each solution prepared by soaking the spent NaF adsorbents and the steel waste contaminated with uranium in BMICl (1-butyl-3-methyl- imidazolium chloride). The uranyl(VI) species in BMICl solutions were found to be reduced to U(V) irreversibly around −0.8 to −1.3 V vs. Ag/AgCl. The resulting U(V) species is followed by disproportionation to U(VI) and U(IV). Based on the electrochemical data, we have performed potential controlled electrolysis of each solution prepared by soaking the spent NaF adsorbents and steel wastes in BMICl at −1.5 V vs. Ag/AgCl. Black deposit was obtained, and their composition analyses suggest that the deposit is the mixtures of U(IV) and U(VI) compounds containing O, F, Cl, and N elements. From the present study, it is expected that the solid wastes contaminated with uranium can be decontaminated by treating them in BMICl and the dissolved uranium species are recovered electrolytically.

  5. Coordination compounds of titanium, zirconium, tin, thorium and uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deshpande, S.G.; Jain, S.C.

    1990-01-01

    Reactions of isatin, furoic acid and picolinic acid have been carried out with titanium tetrachloride, tin tetrachloride, thorium tetrachloride, zirconyl chloride and uranyl nitrate. While 2:3(metal:ligand) type compounds of isatin have been obtained with Ti(IV) and Sn(IV), zirconium(IV), thorium(IV), and uranium(VI) do not react with the ligand under similar experimental conditions. Furoic acid (FAH) and picolinic acid(PicH) form various chloro furoates and picolinates when reacted with TiCl 4 , ZrOCl 2 and ThCl 4 , but do not react with SnCl 4 . The various compounds synthesised have been characterised on the basis of elemental analysis, infrared studies, conductivity and thermogravimetric measurements. (author). 1 tab., 10 refs

  6. Uranium magnetism in UGa2 and U(Gasub(1-x)Alsub(x))2 compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballou, R.

    1983-01-01

    Magnetism of intermetallic compounds of uranium is studied. A monocrystal of the highly anisotropic ferromagnetic material UGa 2 is studied by polarized neutron diffraction. Localisation of 5f electrons is evidenced. Magnetic structure of uranium in UGa 2 is determined. The pseudobinary compound U(Gasub(1-x)Alsub(x)) 2 is studied for crystal structure, ferromagnetism, paramagnetism, specific heat and resistivity [fr

  7. Studies on supercritical fluid extraction of uranium and thorium from liquid and solid matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Pradeep; Pal, Ankita; Saxena, M.K.; Ramakumar, K.L.

    2006-05-01

    Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) is being widely used in pharmaceutical and food industry. Because of its simplicity, ease of operation and more importantly the reduction in the analytical waste generation, this technique is being viewed as a potential application technique in nuclear industry also. CO 2 is employed as supercritical fluid (SCF) as it is easily recyclable, non-toxic, chemically inert, radiochemically stable and inexpensive. Radioanalytical chemistry section (Radiochemistry and Isotope group) has recently procured a supercritical fluid extraction/chromatography system. The present report describes the work carried out on the system. Detailed study on uranium and thorium extraction from highly acidic medium and tissue paper matrix has been carried out. Direct dissolution and extraction of uranium compounds employing SCF has been carried out. CO 2 was employed as supercritical fluid along with very small amount of Tri n-butyl phosphate (TBP) and Tri n-octyl phosphine oxide (TOPO) as co-solvents. The effect of various operating parameters like CO 2 flow rate, co-solvent percentage, temperature and pressure on extraction was investigated and parameters for maximum extraction were optimized. For comparison, the modes of extraction viz. static and dynamic and modes of complexation viz. in-situ and online were studied. Uranium extraction of ∼98% has been achieved from nitric acid medium employing TBP as co-solvent in 30 minutes extraction time, whereas with TOPO ∼99% uranium extraction could be achieved. Uranium from tissue paper matrix could be extracted upto the extent of 98% with TOPO as co-solvent whereas with TBP extraction of (66.83± 9.80)% was achievable. Direct dissolution of UO 2 , U 3 O 8 , U metal, U-Al alloy solids into SCF CO 2 was carried out employing TBP-HNO 3 complex and SFE of uranium was performed using TBP as co-solvent. UO 2 and U 3 O 8 solids could be dissolved within 20 minutes and extraction of ∼98% was achieved. For U

  8. Mortality (1968-2008) in a French cohort of uranium enrichment workers potentially exposed to rapidly soluble uranium compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhivin, Sergey; Guseva Canu, Irina; Samson, Eric; Laurent, Olivier; Grellier, James; Collomb, Philippe; Zablotska, Lydia B; Laurier, Dominique

    2016-03-01

    Until recently, enrichment of uranium for civil and military purposes in France was carried out by gaseous diffusion using rapidly soluble uranium compounds. We analysed the relationship between exposure to soluble uranium compounds and exposure to external γ-radiation and mortality in a cohort of 4688 French uranium enrichment workers who were employed between 1964 and 2006. Data on individual annual exposure to radiological and non-radiological hazards were collected for workers of the AREVA NC, CEA and Eurodif uranium enrichment plants from job-exposure matrixes and external dosimetry records, differentiating between natural, enriched and depleted uranium. Cause-specific mortality was compared with the French general population via standardised mortality ratios (SMR), and was analysed via Poisson regression using log-linear and linear excess relative risk models. Over the period of follow-up, 131 161 person-years at risk were accrued and 21% of the subjects had died. A strong healthy worker effect was observed: all causes SMR=0.69, 95% CI 0.65 to 0.74. SMR for pleural cancer was significantly increased (2.3, 95% CI 1.06 to 4.4), but was only based on nine cases. Internal uranium and external γ-radiation exposures were not significantly associated with any cause of mortality. This is the first study of French uranium enrichment workers. Although limited in statistical power, further follow-up of this cohort, estimation of internal uranium doses and pooling with similar cohorts should elucidate potential risks associated with exposure to soluble uranium compounds. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  9. Method of removing uranium and its compounds from mine wastewaters and from aqueous solutions discharged in hydrometallurgical uranium ore treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jilek, R.; Prochazka, H.; Kuhr, I.; Fuska, J.; Nemec, P.; Katzer, J.

    1974-01-01

    The separation of uranium and its compounds from mine wastewaters and from water solutions discharged from uranium ore hydrometallurgical treatment, and its eventual simultaneous concentration in the biomass during uranium ore technological processing are described. The solutions are replenished with nutrients necessary for the growth of microorganisms, mainly with nitrogen, carbon and phosphorus and inoculated with fungi. During submersion cultivation, uranium incorporates in the mycelium, or is bound physico-chemically to the mycelium components. Together with these components, uranium is mechanically separated, i.e., by filtration, centrifugation or sedimentation. Organisms of the Fungi imperfecti class, mainly the Aspergillus and Penicillium genera are used for cultivation which may be continuous or semicontinuous. (B.S.)

  10. Thermogravimetric control of intermediate compounds in uranium metallurgy; Control termogravimetrico de productos intermedios de la metalurgia del uranio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gasco Sanchez, L; Fernandez Cellini, R

    1959-07-01

    The thermal decomposition of some intermediate compounds in the metallurgy of the uranium as uranium peroxide, ammonium uranate, uranium and ammonium penta-fluoride, uranium tetrafluoride and uranous oxide has been study by means of the Chevenard's thermo balance. Some data on pyrolysis of synthetic mixtures of intermediate compounds which may occasionally appear during the industrial process, are given. Thermogravimetric methods of control are suggested, usable in interesting products in the uranium metallurgy. (Author) 20 refs.

  11. Thermogravimetric control of intermediate compounds in uranium metallurgy; Control termogravimetrico de productos intermedios de la metalurgia del uranio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gasco Sanchez, L.; Fernandez Cellini, R.

    1959-07-01

    The thermal decomposition of some intermediate compounds in the metallurgy of the uranium as uranium peroxide, ammonium uranate, uranium and ammonium penta-fluoride, uranium tetrafluoride and uranous oxide has been study by means of the Chevenard's thermo balance. Some data on pyrolysis of synthetic mixtures of intermediate compounds which may occasionally appear during the industrial process, are given. Thermogravimetric methods of control are suggested, usable in interesting products in the uranium metallurgy. (Author) 20 refs.

  12. Use of electrothermal atomization for determining metallic impurities in nuclearly pure uranium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franco, M.B.

    1986-01-01

    Atomic absorption spectrometry with electrothermal atomization was used for the determination of Al, Cd, Cr, Fe, Mn, Mo and Ni as impurities in uranium oxide samples. The determinations were performed in solubilized samples both with and without uranium separation as well as in solid samples. (Author) [pt

  13. Use of electrothermal atomization for determining metallic impurities in nuclearly pure uranium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franco, M.B.

    1985-01-01

    Atomic absorption spectrometry with electrothermal atomization was used for the determination of Al, Cd, Cr, Fe, Mn, Mo and Ni as impurities in uranium oxide samples. The determinations were performed in solubilized samples both with and without uranium separation as well as in solid samples. (Author) [pt

  14. Semi-automatic version of the potentiometric titration method for characterization of uranium compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristiano, Bárbara F G; Delgado, José Ubiratan; da Silva, José Wanderley S; de Barros, Pedro D; de Araújo, Radier M S; Dias, Fábio C; Lopes, Ricardo T

    2012-09-01

    The potentiometric titration method was used for characterization of uranium compounds to be applied in intercomparison programs. The method is applied with traceability assured using a potassium dichromate primary standard. A semi-automatic version was developed to reduce the analysis time and the operator variation. The standard uncertainty in determining the total concentration of uranium was around 0.01%, which is suitable for uranium characterization and compatible with those obtained by manual techniques. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Rare earths in uranium compounds and important evidences for nuclear forensic purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosa, Daniele S.; Sarkis, Jorge E.S.

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear forensics mainly focuses on the nuclear or radioactive material and aims to providing indication on the intended use, the history and even the origin of the material. Uranium compounds have isotopic or chemical characteristics that provide unambiguous information concerning their origin and production process. Rare earths elements (REE) are a set of sixteen chemical elements in the periodic table, specifically the fourteen Lanthanides in addition scandium and yttrium. These elements are often found together but in widely variable concentrations in uncommon varieties of igneous rocks. A large amount of uranium is in rare earths deposits, and may be extracted as a by-product. Accordingly, REE in uranium compounds can be used as an evidence of uranium origin. In this study, REE was determined in uranium compounds from different origin. Measurements were carried out using a High resolution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (HR-ICP-MS) Element 2, in low resolution mode (R-300). (author)

  16. Identifying anthropogenic uranium compounds using soft X-ray near-edge absorption spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, Jesse D.; Bowden, Mark; Tom Resch, C.; Eiden, Gregory C.; Pemmaraju, C. D.; Prendergast, David; Duffin, Andrew M.

    2017-01-01

    Uranium ores mined for industrial use are typically acid-leached to produce yellowcake and then converted into uranium halides for enrichment and purification. These anthropogenic chemical forms of uranium are distinct from their mineral counterparts. The purpose of this study is to use soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy to characterize several common anthropogenic uranium compounds important to the nuclear fuel cycle. Non-destructive chemical analyses of these compounds is important for process and environmental monitoring and X-ray absorption techniques have several advantages in this regard, including element-specificity, chemical sensitivity, and high spectral resolution. Oxygen K-edge spectra were collected for uranyl nitrate, uranyl fluoride, and uranyl chloride, and fluorine K-edge spectra were collected for uranyl fluoride and uranium tetrafluoride. Interpretation of the data is aided by comparisons to calculated spectra. These compounds have unique spectral signatures that can be used to identify unknown samples.

  17. Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction and magnetic anisotropies in Uranium compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandratskii, L. M.

    2018-05-01

    We report on the first-principles study of complex noncollinear magnetic structures in Uranium compounds. We contrast two cases. The first is the periodic magnetic structure of U2Pd2In with exactly orthogonal atomic moments, the second is an incommensurate plane spiral structure of UPtGe where the angle between atomic moments of nearest neighbors is also close to 90°. We demonstrate that the hierarchy of magnetic interactions leading to the formation of the magnetic structure is opposite in the two cases. In U2Pd2In, the magnetic anisotropy plays the leading role, followed by the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI) interaction specifying the chirality of the structure. Here, the interatomic exchange interaction does not play important role. In UPtGe the hierarchy of the interactions is opposite. The leading interaction is the interatomic exchange interaction responsible for the formation of the incommensurate spiral structure followed by the DMI responsible for the selected chirality of the helix. The magnetic anisotropy is very weak that is a prerequisite for keeping the distortion of the helical structure weak.

  18. Crystal growth of uranium compounds and study of UGe2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taufour, V.

    2011-01-01

    In this thesis, the study on the superconducting ferromagnet UGe 2 is presented. Crystal growth of UGe 2 single crystals was realized in a tetra-arc furnace using the Czochralski technique. This technique was also used to obtain high quality single crystals of other uranium compounds, notably UCoGe and URu 2 Si 2 . The Curie temperature of UGe 2 (T(Curie) = 53 K) decreases with pressure and is suppressed at p c = 1.5 GPa. Before being suppressed, the ferromagnetic transition changes from second to first order at a tricritical point. Precise resistivity and Hall resistivity measurements under pressure and magnetic field revealed the position of the tricritical point as well as its evolution under magnetic field which draw a wing structure phase diagram. Despite the theoretical prediction that this diagram is general for a ferromagnet, here we present the first experimental observation. Other measurements focus on the superconductivity (T sc = 0.75 K) which coexists with ferromagnetism under pressure. The bulk nature of the superconductivity is investigated by AC calorimetry measurements under pressure. The attention is turned to the interesting phenomenon of field enhanced superconductivity. (author) [fr

  19. Microporous Silico-Alumino Phosphate (SAPO) Compound For Uranium Sorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siti-Amini

    1998-01-01

    The zeotype novel materials I.e. SAPO structures have been prepared to have particular property such as sorption or cations exchanger which can accommodate the uranyl ions. The SAPO's model was built from certain mole ratio of SiO 2 +AIO 2 +PO 2 using various template compounds of tetra(alkyl)s aminium hydroxide viz. Tetra-methyl, tetra-ethyl and tetra-propyl aminium. Those formed materials have been analyzed using x-ray diffraction spectrometer , then the data have been complied using the supporting software videozeo package Ver.3.1. The result have shown that crystalline structures of microporous SAPO materials formed are SAPO-20, SAPO-34, and SAPO-40. The exchanger capacities of some zeolites, SAPOs and ASP(1:3) have been studied and their selectivity to uranyl ions in acid solution (ph<3.5) has been determined by static isotherm exchanger process. The result have revealed various selectivity factors and occurrence of absorption mechanism in SAPO-n materials. This promises that uranium separation could be more effective using SAPO-n than that using other zeolites . The chloride ions have slightly decreased the ion-exchange capacity, while that of fluoride ions increased the ion-exchange capacity of ASP(1:3) for the uranyl ions

  20. Insertion compounds of transition-metal and uranium oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chippindale, A.M.; Dickens, P.G.; Powell, A.V.

    1991-01-01

    Several transition-metal and actinide oxides, in which the metal occurs in a high oxidation state, have open covalent structures and are capable of incorporating alkali and other electropositive metals under mild conditions to form insertion compounds A x MO n . These are solids which have several features in common: Over a range of compositions, A x MO n exists as one or more stable or metastable phases in which the structure of the parent oxide MO n is largely retained and the insertion element A is accommodated interstitially. Insertion is accompanied by a redox process A=A i . + e - M in which M is reduced and the electronic properties of the parent oxide change to those typical of a mixed-valence compound. The insertion process xA + MO n = A x MO n can be reversed, at least to some extent, by chemical or electrochemical reaction, with retention of structure (topotactic reaction). This review concentrates on methods of synthesis, characterisation, crystal structure and thermochemistry of these insertion compounds. It updates and extends previous work. (author)

  1. Rays Emitted by Compounds of Uranium and of Thorium

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    I examined a large number of metals, salts, oxides, and minerals [2]. The following table gives, for each substance, the magnitude of the current i in amperes (order of magnitude,. 10-11. ). The substances which I studied but omitted from the table are at least 100 times less active than uranium. Uranium containing some ...

  2. Determination of carbon in uranium and its compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez-Garcia, M. M.

    1972-01-01

    This paper collects the analytical methods used our laboratories for the determination of carbon in uranium metal, uranate salts and the oxides, fluorides and carbides of uranium. The carbon is usually burned off in a induction or resistance oven under oxygen flow. The CO 2 is collected in barite solution. Where it is backtitrated with potassium biphthalate. (Author)

  3. Separation of chloride and fluoride from uranium compounds and their determination by ion selective electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pires, M.A.F.; Abrao, A.

    1982-01-01

    Fluoride and chloride must be rigorously controlled in uranium compounds, especially in ceramic grade UO 2 . Their determination is very difficult without previous uranium separation, particularly when both are at a low concentration. A simple procedure is described for this separation using a strong cationic resin to retain the uranyl ion. Both anions are determined in the effluent solution. Uranium compounds of nuclear fuel cycle, especially ammonium diuranate, ammonium uranyl tricarbonate, sodium diuranate, uranium trioxide and dioxide and uranium peroxide are dissolved in nitric acid and the solutions are percolated through the resin column. Chloride and fluoride are determined in the effluent by selective electrodes, the detection limits being 0.02 μg F - /ml and 1.0 μg Cl - /ml. The dissolution of the sample, the acidity of the solution, the measurement conditions and the sensitivity of the method are discussed. (Author) [pt

  4. Uranium isotope separation in the solid state. Final report for period ending September 30, 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernstein, E.R.

    1978-09-01

    The final results of an investigation on the isotope separation of uranium in the solid state are presented in this report. The feasibility of separating uranium isotopes using the proposed system based on uranium borohydride (borodeuteride) in a low temperature mixed crystal has been determined. The first section of the report summarizes the background material relating to this work which includes: a calculation of isotope shifts (borodeuteride), details on the two-step, two-photon spectroscopic isotope separation technique, and a brief overview of the method and equipment used for separating uranium isotopes in the solid state. The second section concerns the experimental details of the present work performed in the laboratory. Representative spectroscopic data obtained in this investigation are presented and discussed in the third section. Finally, the report is concluded with recommendations for further investigations on the uranium borohydride (borodeuteride) system for isotope separation

  5. Epidemiological study of workers employed in the French nuclear fuel industry and analysis of the health effects of uranium compounds according to their solubility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhivin, Sergey

    2015-01-01

    External γ-radiation exposure has been shown to be associated with mortality risk due to leukemia, solid cancer, and, possibly, circulatory diseases (CSD). By contrast, little information is available on health risks following the internal contamination, especially the inhalation of uranium compounds with respect to their physicochemical properties (PCP), such as solubility, isotopic composition and others. The aim of this PhD thesis was to estimate mortality risk of cancer and non-cancer diseases in French nuclear fuel cycle workers and comprises three objectives: (1) evaluation of the impact of uranium on mortality through a critical literature review, (2) analysis of cancer and non-cancer mortality in a cohort of uranium enrichment workers, (3) analysis of the relationship between CSD mortality and internal uranium dose in AREVA NC Pierrelatte workers. Existing epidemiological data on uranium PCP and associated health outcomes are scarce. Studies of nuclear fuel cycle workers by sub-groups within the specific stage of the cycle (e.g., uranium enrichment and fuel fabrication) are considered the most promising to shed light on the possible associations, given that such sub-groups present the advantage of a more homogenous uranium exposure. To study the mortality risk associated with exposure to rapidly soluble uranium compounds, we set up a cohort of 4,688 uranium enrichment workers with follow-up between 1968 and 2008. Individual annual exposure to uranium, external γ-radiation, and other non-radiological hazards (trichloroethylene, heat, and noise) were reconstructed from job-exposure matrixes (JEM) and dosimetry records. Over the follow-up period, 131,161 person-years at risk were accrued and 21% of the subjects had die. Analysis of Standardized Mortality Ratios (SMR) showed a strong healthy worker effect (SMR all deaths 0.69, 95% confidence intervals (CI) 0.65 to 0.74; n=1,010). Exposures to uranium and external γ-radiation were not significantly associated

  6. Chemical thermodynamics of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grenthe, I.; Fuger, J.; Lemire, R.J.; Muller, A.B.; Nguyen-Trung Cregu, C.; Wanner, H.

    1992-01-01

    A comprehensive overview on the chemical thermodynamics of those elements that are of particular importance in the safety assessment of radioactive waste disposal systems is provided. This is the first volume in a series of critical reviews to be published on this subject. The book provides an extensive compilation of chemical thermodynamic data for uranium. A description of procedures for activity corrections and uncertainty estimates is given. A critical discussion of data needed for nuclear waste management assessments, including areas where significant gaps of knowledge exist is presented. A detailed inventory of chemical thermodynamic data for inorganic compounds and complexes of uranium is listed. Data and their uncertainty limits are recommended for 74 aqueous complexes and 199 solid and 31 gaseous compounds containing uranium, and on 52 aqueous and 17 solid auxiliary species containing no uranium. The data are internally consistent and compatible with the CODATA Key Values. The book contains a detailed discussion of procedures used for activity factor corrections in aqueous solution, as well as including methods for making uncertainty estimates. The recommended data have been prepared for use in environmental geochemistry. Containing contributions written by experts the chapters cover various subject areas such a s: oxide and hydroxide compounds and complexes, the uranium nitrides, the solid uranium nitrates and the arsenic-containing uranium compounds, uranates, procedures for consistent estimation of entropies, gaseous and solid uranium halides, gaseous uranium oxides, solid phosphorous-containing uranium compounds, alkali metal uranates, uncertainties, standards and conventions, aqueous complexes, uranium minerals dealing with solubility products and ionic strength corrections. The book is intended for nuclear research establishments and consulting firms dealing with uranium mining and nuclear waste disposal, as well as academic and research institutes

  7. Determination of 17 impurity elements in nuclear quality uranium compounds by atomic absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andonie, O.; Smith, L.A.; Cornejo, S.

    1985-01-01

    A method is described for the determination of 17 elements (Al, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, Li, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, Ni, Pb, V and Zn) in the ppm level, in nuclearly pure uranium compounds by flame atomic absorption spectroscopy. The analysis is performed by first dissolving the uranium sample in nitric acid and then extracting the uranium with tributyl phosphate solution. The aqueous phase, free of uranium, which contains the elements to analyze is inspirated into the flame of an atomic absorption spectrophotometer using air-acetylene or nitrous oxide-acetylene flame according to the element in study. This method allows to extract the uranium selectively in more than 99.0% and the recovery of the elements sudied was larger 90% (for K) to 100% (for Cr). The sensitivity of the method vary from 0.096 μg/g U (for Cd) to 5.5 μg/g U (for Na). (Author)

  8. Kinetic study of the fluorination by fluorine of some uranium and plutonium compounds; Etude cinetique de la fluoration par le fluor de quelques composes de l'uranium et du plutonium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandenbussche, G [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-12-15

    The study of fluorination reactions of uranium and plutonium compounds with elementary fluorine, has been carried out using a thermogravimetric method. These reactions are heterogeneous ones, and of the following type: S(solid) + G{sub 1}(gas) - G{sub 2}(gas). The kinetics of these reactions correspond to a uniform attack of the entire surface of the sample. {alpha}: being the degree of completion of the reaction, k(rel): being the relative rate of penetration of the reaction interface, t: being the time, one have the relation: (1-{alpha}){sup 1/3} = 1 - k(rel)*t. The mechanism of the reaction varies according to the nature of the compound: 1) with uranium tetrafluoride and plutonium tetrafluoride, the reaction proceeds in a single step; 2) with uranium oxides, the reaction proceeds in two steps, uranium oxyfluoride being the intermediate compound; 3) with plutonium oxide, the reaction proceeds in two steps, plutonium tetrafluoride being the intermediate compound; and 4) with uranium trichloride, the mechanism is complex: chlorine trifluoride is formed. (author) [French] L'etude des reactions de fluoration par le fluor, de composes de l'uranium et du plutonium a ete faite par thermogravimetrie. Ce sont des reactions heterogenes du type: S(solide) + G{sub 1}(gaz) - G{sub 2}(gaz). La cinetique de ces reactions est celle correspondant a une attaque uniforme de toute la surface de l'echantillon. Si {alpha}: est le degre d'avancement de la reaction, k(rel): est la vitesse relative d'avancement d'un interface reactionnel, t: le temps. On a la relation: (1-{alpha}){sup 1/3} = 1-k(rel)*t. Le mecanisme de la reaction varie selon la nature du compose: 1) tetrafluorure d'uranium et tetrafluorure de plutonium, la reaction s'effectue en un seul stade; 2) Oxydes d'uranium: la reaction s'effectue en deux stades, l'oxyfluorure d'uranium est le compose intermediaire; 3) oxyde de plutonium, la reaction s'effectue en deux stades, la tetrafluorure de plutonium est le compose

  9. Recent progress of soft X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies of uranium compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujimori, Shin-ichi; Takeda, Yukiharu; Okane, Tetsuo; Saitoh, Yuji [Condensed Matter Science Divisions, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Sayo, Hyogo (Japan); Fujimori, Atsushi [Condensed Matter Science Divisions, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Sayo, Hyogo (Japan); Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, Hongo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Yamagami, Hiroshi [Condensed Matter Science Divisions, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Sayo, Hyogo (Japan); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Kyoto Sangyo University, Kyoto 603-8555 (Japan); Yamamoto, Etsuji; Haga, Yoshinori [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Ōnuki, Yoshichika [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Faculty of Science, University of the Ryukyus, Nishihara, Okinawa 903-0213 (Japan)

    2016-04-15

    Recent progresses in the soft X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) studies (hν ≳ 100 eV) for uranium compounds are briefly reviewed. The soft X-ray PES has enhanced sensitivities for the bulk U 5f electronic structure, which is essential to understand the unique physical properties of uranium compounds. In particular, the recent remarkable improvement in energy resolutions from an order of 1 eV to 100 meV made it possible to observe fine structures in U 5f density of states. Furthermore, soft X-ray ARPES becomes available due to the increase of photon flux at beamlines in third generation synchrotron radiation facilities.The technique made it possible to observe bulk band structures and Fermi surfaces of uranium compounds and therefore, the results can be directly compared with theoretical models such as band-structure calculations. The core-level spectra of uranium compounds show a systematic behavior depending on their electronic structures, suggesting that they can be utilized to determine basic physical parameters such as the U 5f-ligand hybridizations or Comlomb interaction between U 5f electrons. It is shown that soft X-ray PES provides unique opportunities to understand the electronic structures of uranium compounds.

  10. The use of voltammetry for determining uranium and associated elements in compounds of nuclear interest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, F.M.S. de.

    1988-01-01

    The determination of uranium and some trace elements found as impurities in nuclear materials by the voltammetric technique using the hanging mercury drop electrode is presented. Emphasis is given to the determination of uranium, of major interest. Europium and ytterbium are simultaneously determined in fractions of individual lanthanides. A procedure for the simultaneous determination of copper, cadmium, nickel and zinc in water, industrial effluents and uranium compounds is discussed. The advantage of the procedure is its simplicity and easiness of execution, with excellent precision and accuracy. (author) [pt

  11. Flame photometric determination of Na, K and Li in uranium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabato, S.F.; Lordello, A.R.

    1985-01-01

    A flame photometric method for the determination of Na, K and Li in uranium compounds is described. The uranium is separated by solvent extraction from hydrochloric acid medium with tri-butyl phosphate. Amounts of uranium in order of 20 μg/ml don't cause any interference in the photometric results. The element Na presents a residual concentration due to the contamination of the reagents. The relative standard deviation is about 10% for the three elements. The relative error varies with the concentration of the element and it is between 1 and 24% for Na, between O and 12% for K and between O and 33% for Li. (Author) [pt

  12. Determination of chlorine in nuclear-grade uranium compounds by ion-selective electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Chunqing; Liu Fuyun; Huang Dianfan.

    1989-01-01

    The determination of microamount chlorine in nuclear-grade uranium compounds is described. Chlorine is separated from uranium oxide pyrohydrolytically with stream of wet oxygen in a furnace at 800-900 deg C. Chlorine is volatilized as hydrochloric acid, which then is absorbed in a dilute alkaline solution and measured with chlorine selective electrode. This method covers the concentration range of 10-500 ppm chlorine in uranium oxide. The relative standard diviation is better than 10% and recovery of 85-108% has been reported

  13. Solid state speciation of uranium and its local structure in Sr2CeO4 using photoluminescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, M.; Gupta, Santosh K.; Jain, D.; Saxena, M. K.; Kadam, R. M.

    2018-04-01

    An effort was taken to carry our speciation study of uranium ion in technologically important cerate host Sr2CeO4 using time resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy. Such studies are not relevant only to nuclear industry but can give rich insight into fundamentals of 5f electron chemistry in solid state systems. In this work both undoped and varied amount of uranium doped Sr2CeO4 compound is synthesized using complex polymerization method and is characterized systematically using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, photoluminescence spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Both XRD and Raman spectroscopy confirmed the formation of pure Sr2CeO4 which has tendency to decompose peritectically to SrCeO3 and SrO at higher temperature. Uranium doping is confirmed by XRD. Uranium exhibits a rich chemistry owing to its variable oxidation state from +3 to +6. Each of them exhibits distinct luminescence properties either due to f-f transitions or ligand to metal charge transfer (LMCT). We have taken Sr2CeO4 as a model host lattice to understand the photophysical characteristics of uranium ion in it. Emission spectroscopy revealed the stabilization of uranium as U (VI) in the form of UO66- (octahedral uranate) in Sr2CeO4. Emission kinetics study reflects that uranate ions are not homogeneously distributed in Sr2CeO4 and it has two different environments due to its stabilization at both Sr2+ as well as Ce4+ site. The lifetime population analysis interestingly pinpointed that majority of uranate ion resided at Ce4+ site. The critical energy-transfer distance between the uranate ion was determined based on which the concentration quenching mechanism was attributed to electric multipolar interaction. These studies are very important in designing Sr2CeO4 based optoelectronic material as well exploring it for actinides studies.

  14. Study on the vibrational scraping of uranium product from a solid cathode of electrorefiner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sung Bin; Kang, Young Ho; Hwang, Sung Chan; Lee, Han Soo; Paek, Seung Woo; Ahn, Do Hee [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    A high-throughput electrorefiner has been developed for commercialization use by enhancing the uranium recovery from the reduced metal which is produced from the oxide reduction process. It is necessary to scrap and effectively collect uranium dendrites from the surface of the solid cathode for high yield. When a steel electrode is used as the cathode in the electrorefining process, uranium is deposited and regularly stuck to the steel cathode during electrorefining. The sticking coefficient of a steel cathode is very high. In order to decrease the sticking coefficient of the steel cathode effectively, vibration mode was applied to the electrode in this study. Uranium dendrites were scraped and fell apart from the steel cathode by a vibration force. The vibrational scraping of the steel cathode was compared to the self-scraping of the graphite cathode. Effects of the applied current density and the vibration stroke on the scraping of the uranium dendrites were also investigated.

  15. Uranium analysis by neutron induced fissionography method using solid state nuclear track detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akyuez, T.; Tretyakova, S. P.; Guezel, T.; Akyuz, S.

    1999-01-01

    In this study total twenty samples (eight reference materials and twelve sediment samples) were analysed for their uranium content which is in the range of 1-17 μg/g, by neutron induced fissionography (NIF) method using solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTDs) in comparison with the results of neutron activation analysis (NAA), delayed neutron counting (DNC) technique or fluorometric method. It is found that NIF method using SSNTDs is very sensitive for analysis of uranium

  16. Uranium analysis by neutron induced fissionography method using solid state nuclear track detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Akyuez, T; Guezel, T; Akyuz, S

    1999-01-01

    In this study total twenty samples (eight reference materials and twelve sediment samples) were analysed for their uranium content which is in the range of 1-17 mu g/g, by neutron induced fissionography (NIF) method using solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTDs) in comparison with the results of neutron activation analysis (NAA), delayed neutron counting (DNC) technique or fluorometric method. It is found that NIF method using SSNTDs is very sensitive for analysis of uranium.

  17. Separation of halogens from uranium compounds by means of pyrohydrolysis and their determination by ion chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pires, M.A.F.; Brandao Filho, D.; Abrao, A.

    1987-07-01

    This paper describs the determination of fluorine in nuclear grade uranium compounds by means of phyrohydrolysis. A stream of wet oxygem at a temperature of 900 to 1000 0 C is passed through a quartz tube where the powdered samples is put. The halogens are volatilized as their respective acids that are absorbed in a buffer solution or water. The measurements are made with ion-seletive eletrodes or by ion chromatography. The sensitivity is of 1μg F - /g and 5μg Cl - /g. The separation of fluorine from uranium compounds by diferent methods is discussed. (Author) [pt

  18. Solid phase extraction of uranium from phosphoric acid. Kinetic and thermodynamic study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdel-Magied, Ahmed Fawzy [Nuclear Materials Authority, Cairo (Egypt); Stockholm Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Organic Chemistry

    2017-07-01

    There is a high interest to develop suitable solid phase extractants for uranium separation from aqueous solutions in order to reduce cost and enhance the efficiency. This paper describes solid phase extraction of uranium(VI) from aqueous phosphoric acid solution using MCM-41 based D2HEPA-TOPO organophosphorous extractants. The mixture of D2HEPA (di-2-ethyl-hexylphosphoric acid) and TOPO (tri-n-octylphosphine oxide) was impregnated into the pores of MCM-41 and the synthesized sorbent was fully characterized. The influences of different factors such as synergistic mixture ratio, phosphoric acid concentration, mixing time and temperature were investigated. The results showed that 90% of uranium(VI) extraction can be achieved within 5 min, using D2HEPA-TOPO rate at MCM-41 (mass ratio 2:1 w/w) from 1 M phosphoric acid containing 64 ppm of uranium at room temperature. High adsorption capacity of uranium(VI) have been achieved at the mentioned conditions. The rate constant for the chemical adsorption of uranium(VI) was 0.988 g mg{sup -1} min{sup -1} calculated by the pseudo-second order rate equation. The obtained thermodynamics parameters showed that uranium(VI) adsorption from H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} is an exothermic and spontaneous process.

  19. Ion exchange separation of nitrate from uranium compounds and its determination by spectrophotometry and ion chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pires, M.A.F.; Atalla, L.T.; Abrao, A.

    1985-11-01

    A procedure for the separation of nitrate from uranium compounds by retaintion of uranyl ion on a cationic ion exchanger and its determination in the effluent is described. Nitrate is analysed by the spectrometric method with 1-phenol-2,4-dissulphonic acid. This determination covers the 1 to 10 μg NO - 3 /mL range and requires an amount of 10 to 100 μg NO - 3 . The main interference is uranium (VI) due its own intense yellow color. This difficulty is overcome by the complete separation of UO 2 ++ with the cationic resin. Alternatively, the ion chromatography technique is used for the determination of nitrate in the effluent of the cationic resin. The determination was easily made by the comparison of the nitrate peak hights of the analyte and the standard solutions. The ion chromatography method is very sensitive (0,3 μg NO - 3 /mL), reproducible and suitable for routine analysis and permits the determination of fraction of part per million of nitrate in uranium. The results of nitrate determination using both spectrophotometric and ion chromatography techniques are compared. The method is being routinely applied for the quality control of uranium compounds in the fuel cycle, specially uranium oxide, ammonium diuranate, uranium peroxide and ammonium uranyl tricarbonate. (Author) [pt

  20. Recovery of uranium from an irradiated solid target after removal of molybdenum-99 produced from the irradiated target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Sean Douglas; May, Iain; Copping, Roy; Dale, Gregory Edward

    2017-10-17

    A process for minimizing waste and maximizing utilization of uranium involves recovering uranium from an irradiated solid target after separating the medical isotope product, molybdenum-99, produced from the irradiated target. The process includes irradiating a solid target comprising uranium to produce fission products comprising molybdenum-99, and thereafter dissolving the target and conditioning the solution to prepare an aqueous nitric acid solution containing irradiated uranium. The acidic solution is then contacted with a solid sorbent whereby molybdenum-99 remains adsorbed to the sorbent for subsequent recovery. The uranium passes through the sorbent. The concentrations of acid and uranium are then adjusted to concentrations suitable for crystallization of uranyl nitrate hydrates. After inducing the crystallization, the uranyl nitrate hydrates are separated from a supernatant. The process results in the purification of uranyl nitrate hydrates from fission products and other contaminants. The uranium is therefore available for reuse, storage, or disposal.

  1. Magnetic anisotropy in intermetallic compounds containing both uranium and 3d-metal

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Andreev, Alexander V.; Tereshina, Evgeniya; Gorbunov, Denis; Šantavá, Eva; Šebek, Josef; Žáček, Martin; Homma, Y.; Shiokawa, Y.; Satoh, I.; Yamamura, Y.; Komatsubara, T.; Watanabe, K.; Koyama, K.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 114, č. 9 (2013), s. 727-733 ISSN 0031-918X R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP204/12/0150 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : uranium intermetallics * magnetic anisotropy * ferromagnetism Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.605, year: 2013

  2. Determination of trace lithium in uranium compounds by adsorption on activated alumina using a micro-column method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Ming-Biao; Li, Bo-Ping; Yang, Zhi; Liu, Wei; Sun, Yu-Zhen

    2008-08-01

    A novel method using a micro-column packed with active alumina as solid phase was proposed for separation of trace lithium from uranium compounds prior to determination. The method is based on a preliminary chromatographic separation of the total amount of uranium. This separation involves passing the solution containing sodium carbonate through active alumina and then eluting the trace lithium retained by the solid phase with a solution of sulfuric acid. Two modes, off-line and on-line micro-column preconcentration, were performed. In conjunction with atomic absorption spectrometry, this on-line preconcentration technique allows a determination of lithium at 10(-9) level. Both off-line and on-line mode operation conditions were investigated in separation and determination of trace lithium by micro-column method (length of column bed, flow rate, etc.). The adsorption capacity of activated alumina was found to be 343 microg g(-1) for lithium. Under the optimal operation condition, the detection limit (DL) of on-line preconcentration corresponding to three times the standard deviation of the blank (S/N = 3) was found to be 1.3 ng mL(-1) and the RSD of this method is 3.32% (n = 5). The on-line calibration graph was linear over the range 20 - 200 ng mL(-1). A good preconcentration factor 820 was achieved by experiment under the on-line mode. The developed method was applied to the analysis of trace lithium in nuclear grade uranium compounds.

  3. No fluorinated compounds in the uranium conversion process: risk analysis and proposition of pictograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeronimo, Adroaldo Clovis; Oliveira, Wagner dos Santos

    2012-01-01

    The plants comprising the chemical conversion of uranium, which are part of the nuclear fuel cycle, present some risks, among others, because are associated with the non-fluorinated compounds handled in these processes. This study is the analysis of the risks associated with these compounds, i e, the non-fluorinated reactants and products, handled in different chemical processing plants, which include the production of uranium hexafluoride, while emphasizing the responsibilities and actions that fit to the chemical engineer with regard to minimizing risks during the various stages. The work is based on the experience gained during the development and mastery of the technology of production of uranium hexafluoride, the IPEN/ CNEN-SP, during the '80s, with the support of COPESP -Navy of Brazil. (author)

  4. Thorium-d-metals compounds and solid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chachkhiani, Z.B.; Chechernikov, V.I.; Chachkhiani, L.G.

    1986-01-01

    Thorium compounds with Fe, Co, Ni dependence of their magnetic properties on temperature, pressure and concentration of the second element are considered. Anomalous magnetic behaviour of alloys in the Th-Fe system is noted. Special attention is paid to compounds with CaCu 5 type hexagonal structure and their solid solutions. Th-Co-Ni specimens containing up to 25% Ni are ferromagnetics and the rest are paramagnetics. Specimens with 60% cobalt content do not display ferromagnetic properties up to 4.2 K. Hydrides of Th 7 M 3 H 30 type (M - Fe, Co, Ni) are also considered. Highly hydrogenized specimens (under high pressure) appear to be stronger ferromagnetics

  5. Method and apparatus for separating uranium isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernstein, E.R.

    1977-01-01

    A uranium compound in the solid phase (uranium borohydride four) is subjected to radiation of a first predetermined frequency that excites the uranium-235 isotope-bearing molecules but not the uranium-238 isotope-bearing molecules. The compound is simultaneously subjected to radiation of a second predetermined frequency which causes the excited uranium-235 isotope-bearing molecules to chemically decompose but which does not affect the uranium-238 isotope-bearing molecules. Sufficient heat is then applied to the irradiated compound in the solid phase to vaporize the non-decomposed uranium-238 isotope-bearing molecules but not the decomposed uranium-235 isotope-bearing molecules, thereby physically separating the uranium-235 isotope-bearing molecules from the uranium-238 isotope-bearing molecules. The uranium compound sample in the solid phase is deposited or grown in an elongated tube supported within a dewar vessel having a clear optical path tail section surrounded by a coolant. Two sources of radiation are focused on the uranium compound sample. A heating element is attached to the elongated tube to vaporize the irradiated compound

  6. Hexavalent uranium reduction from solid phase by thermophilic bacterium Thermoterrabacterium ferrireducens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khijniak, T.V.; Slobodkin, A.I.; Bonch-Osmolovskaya, E.A.; Medvedeva-Lyalikova, N.N.; Coker, V.; Lloyd, J.R.; Birkeland, N.K.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: It has been reported that in uranium-contaminated sites, solid-phase U(VI) present in sediments is resistant to microbial reduction. Also, it was demonstrated that mesophilic iron and sulfate-reducing bacteria can reduce hexavalent uranium and sulphate-reducing bacteria were able to grow via uranium reduction. Among thermophilic microorganisms reduction of hexavalent uranium has been demonstrated only for cell suspensions of two genera: Pyrobaculum and Thermus. In the present study, Thermoterrabacterium ferrireducens was tested for reduction of U(VI), a thermophilic, gram-positive anaerobic bacterium capable for growth with the reduction of various electron acceptors including Fe(III). Kinetic of bacterial growth, uranium reduction and influence of different uranium concentrations were investigated at 65 deg. C. Due to presence of phosphate in the basal medium yellow uranium phosphate precipitate was formed after addition of uranyl acetate. After 68 h of incubation control tubes without bacteria were contained yellow precipitate whereas in presence of bacteria precipitate turned to the grey color. In the control tubes uranium phosphates and other elements formed a uniform mixture of crystals, but in presence of bacteria the round shape particles, containing uranium, were found by Environmental Scan Electron Microscopy of air-dried or frozen samples. To determine valent state speciation spectroscopic investigations were performed also. Initial yellow uranium phosphate precipitate was separated and identified as uramphite - (NH 4 )(UO 2 )(PO 4 )*3H 2 O by X-Ray Powder Diffraction. Grey precipitate, which was formed by bacterial reduction, was identified as ningyoite - CaU(PO 4 ) 2 *H 2 O. The fact that final grey precipitate contain U(IV) was also confirmed by EXAFS investigation. High concentration of uranium has toxic effect. 1 and 2.5 mM of uranium (VI) support bacterial growth and bacterial biomass was accumulated, but if 5 or 10

  7. Harnessing redox activity for the formation of uranium tris(imido) compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Nickolas H.; Odoh, Samuel O.; Yao, Yiyi; Williams, Ursula J.; Schaefer, Brian A.; Kiernicki, John J.; Lewis, Andrew J.; Goshert, Mitchell D.; Fanwick, Phillip E.; Schelter, Eric J.; Walensky, Justin R.; Gagliardi, Laura; Bart, Suzanne C.

    2014-10-01

    Classically, late transition-metal organometallic compounds promote multielectron processes solely through the change in oxidation state of the metal centre. In contrast, uranium typically undergoes single-electron chemistry. However, using redox-active ligands can engage multielectron reactivity at this metal in analogy to transition metals. Here we show that a redox-flexible pyridine(diimine) ligand can stabilize a series of highly reduced uranium coordination complexes by storing one, two or three electrons in the ligand. These species reduce organoazides easily to form uranium-nitrogen multiple bonds with the release of dinitrogen. The extent of ligand reduction dictates the formation of uranium mono-, bis- and tris(imido) products. Spectroscopic and structural characterization of these compounds supports the idea that electrons are stored in the ligand framework and used in subsequent reactivity. Computational analyses of the uranium imido products probed their molecular and electronic structures, which facilitated a comparison between the bonding in the tris(imido) structure and its tris(oxo) analogue.

  8. Reaction of Tris(cyclopentadienyl)uranium compounds with amines, azides, and related ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, R.K.

    1989-12-01

    The trivalent uranium compound, (MeC 5 H 4 ) 3 U(thf), serves as a one- or two-electron reducing agent towards azides, RN 3 . These reactions produce either the uranium(IV) azide, (MeC 5 H 4 ) 3 UN 3 , or uranium(V) imides, (MeC 5 H 4 ) 3 UNR. The role of steric and electronic effects upon this reaction has been investigated using several series of azides. For Me 3 XN 3 , the imides are produced when X = C or Si, both products are formed when X = Ge, and the azide is produced when X = Sn. For Ph 3 XN 3 , the azide is produced when X = C or Sn. For Ph 3-x CH 3 N 3 , the imide is produced when x = 2 and both compounds are produced when x = 1. For substituted phenylazides, RC 6 H 4 N 3 , only the imides are produced. The magnetic properties of uranium diimides, [(MeC 5 H 4 ) 3 U] 2 (μ-NRN), were investigated. Several uranium(III) amines, (MeC 5 H 4 ) 3 U(NH 2 R), were produced from (MeC 5 H 4 ) 3 U(thf) and RNH 2 , and NH 3 was found to be a better ligand towards (MeC 5 H 4 ) 3 U than is PMe 3

  9. Magnetic study of solid uranium-fluorine complexes; Contribution a l'etude magnetique de composes fluores solides de l'uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dianoux, A J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1969-06-01

    A study of the magnetic susceptibility of uranium V fluorine complexes and of the magnetic resonance of fluorine atoms in uranium VI fluorine complexes has made it possible to put forward a structural model for these compounds for which it is impossible, because of the lack of suitable single crystals for X-ray diffraction work, to deduce the exact position of the fluorine atoms. It is shown that it is difficult to interpret the paramagnetism of uranium fluorides, because the uranium ions are in low-symmetry sites. A theoretical study of the magnetism of the U{sup V} ion in complex fluorides of the type M{sub 3}UF{sub 8} (M = NH{sub 4}, Na, Rb, Cs) leads to an interpretation based on a trigonal deformation of the eight fluorine atom structure surrounding the uranium atom. By applying a Hamiltonian spin formalism and making a systematic use of group theory, it is possible to present the susceptibility calculations very concisely. Study of the resonance and of the relaxation of the fluorine atoms in powdered uranium VI complex fluorides suggests a structural model in the case of NaUF{sub 7}. It is shown that the shape of the magnetic resonance absorption lines is strongly affected by the presence of large anisotropic chemical shifts. In the model proposed here, six fluorine atoms are linked to the uranium, atom by strongly covalent bonds in a deformed UF{sub 6} octahedral structure; the seventh fluorine atom remains ionic. The occurrence of a rotational movement of the octahedron is confirmed by a study of the longitudinal relaxation of the fluorine atoms, the activation energy being 0.46 eV. (author) [French] L'etude de la susceptibilite magnetique de complexes fluores d'uranium V et la resonance magnetique des fluors dans des complexes fluores d'uranium VI permettent de proposer un modele structural pour ces composes, ou la diffraction des rayons X, en l'absence de monocristaux convenables, est incapable de preciser la position des atomes de fluor. Nous montrons

  10. Magnetic study of solid uranium-fluorine complexes; Contribution a l'etude magnetique de composes fluores solides de l'uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dianoux, A.J. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1969-06-01

    A study of the magnetic susceptibility of uranium V fluorine complexes and of the magnetic resonance of fluorine atoms in uranium VI fluorine complexes has made it possible to put forward a structural model for these compounds for which it is impossible, because of the lack of suitable single crystals for X-ray diffraction work, to deduce the exact position of the fluorine atoms. It is shown that it is difficult to interpret the paramagnetism of uranium fluorides, because the uranium ions are in low-symmetry sites. A theoretical study of the magnetism of the U{sup V} ion in complex fluorides of the type M{sub 3}UF{sub 8} (M = NH{sub 4}, Na, Rb, Cs) leads to an interpretation based on a trigonal deformation of the eight fluorine atom structure surrounding the uranium atom. By applying a Hamiltonian spin formalism and making a systematic use of group theory, it is possible to present the susceptibility calculations very concisely. Study of the resonance and of the relaxation of the fluorine atoms in powdered uranium VI complex fluorides suggests a structural model in the case of NaUF{sub 7}. It is shown that the shape of the magnetic resonance absorption lines is strongly affected by the presence of large anisotropic chemical shifts. In the model proposed here, six fluorine atoms are linked to the uranium, atom by strongly covalent bonds in a deformed UF{sub 6} octahedral structure; the seventh fluorine atom remains ionic. The occurrence of a rotational movement of the octahedron is confirmed by a study of the longitudinal relaxation of the fluorine atoms, the activation energy being 0.46 eV. (author) [French] L'etude de la susceptibilite magnetique de complexes fluores d'uranium V et la resonance magnetique des fluors dans des complexes fluores d'uranium VI permettent de proposer un modele structural pour ces composes, ou la diffraction des rayons X, en l'absence de monocristaux convenables, est incapable de preciser la position des atomes de

  11. Aspects and application of etch-pit technique in the distribution detection of uranium in solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sachett, I.A.

    1973-01-01

    Some aspects related to the use of standard glass microscope slide as solid state track detector are presented, as well as studies of measurement of distribution of uranium in various solids determined by means of this technique. The behavior of the various parameters related to the properties of the detector and the results of their measurements are treated. Results obtained on the determination of distribution of uranium in samples of fuel elements of the 'ARGONAUTA' research reactor of Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear - Rio de Janeiro, are included. The samples were taken from the fuel-cladding interface. Finally, some data on levels of contamination of the laboratory equipment in use by uranium during the course of this work are presented [pt

  12. Thermal expansion studies on uranium-neodymium mixed oxide solid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panneerselvam, G.; Venkata Krishnan, R.; Antony, M.P.; Nagarajan, K.

    2012-01-01

    Uranium-Neodymium mixed oxides solid solutions (U 1-y Nd y ) O 2 (y=0.2-0.95) were prepared by combustion synthesis using citric acid as fuel. Structural characterization and computation of lattice parameter was carried out from room temperature X-ray diffraction measurements. Single-phase fluorite structure was observed up to y=0.80. For solid solutions with y>0.80 additional Nd 2 O 3 lines were visible

  13. Supercritical fluid extraction of uranium and thorium from nitric acid medium using organophosphorous compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitchaiah, K.C.; Sujatha, K.; Rao, C.V.S. Brahmmananda; Subramaniam, S.; Sivaraman, N.; Rao, P.R. Vasudeva [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India). Chemistry Group

    2015-06-01

    In recent years, Supercritical Fluid Extraction (SFE) technique has been widely used for the extraction of metal ions. In the present study, extraction of uranium from nitric acid medium was investigated using supercritical carbon dioxide (Sc-CO{sub 2}) containing various organophosphorous compounds such as trialkyl phosphates e.g. tri-iso-amyl phosphate (TiAP), tri-sec-butyl phosphate (TsBP) and tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP), dialkylalkyl phosphonates, e.g. diamylamyl phosphonate (DAAP) and dibutyl butyl phosphonate (DBBP), dialkyl hydrogen phosphonates, e.g. dioctyl hydrogen phosphonate (DOHP), dioctylphosphineoxide (DOPO), trioctyl phosphine oxide (TOPO), n-octylphenyl N,N-diisobutyl carbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (CMPO) and di-2-ethyl-hexyl phosphoric acid (HDEHP). Some of these ligands have been investigated for the first time in the supercritical phase for the extraction of uranium. The extraction efficiency of uranium was studied with TiAP, DAAP and DBBP as a function of nitric acid concentration; the kinetics of the equilibration period (static extraction) and transportation of the metal complex (dynamic extraction) was investigated. The influence of pressure and temperature on the extraction behaviour of uranium with DAAP was studied from 4 N HNO{sub 3}. The extraction efficiency of uranium from 4 N nitric acid medium was found to increase in the order of phosphates < phosphonates < HDEHP < TOPO < CMPO. In the case of phosphates and phosphonates, the maximum extraction of uranium was found to be from 4 N HNO{sub 3} medium. The acidic extractants, HDEHP and DOHP showed relatively higher extraction at lower acidities. The relative extraction of uranium and thorium from their mixture was also examined using Sc-CO{sub 2} containing phosphates, phosphonates and TOPO. The ligand, TsBP provided better fractionation between uranium and thorium compared to trialkyl phosphates, dialkyl alkyl phosphonates and TOPO.

  14. Study of internal exposure to uranium compounds in fuel fabrication plants in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Maristela Souza

    2006-01-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 66 and Supporting Guidance 3) strongly recommends that specific information on lung retention parameters should be used in preference to default values wherever appropriate, for the derivation of effective doses and for bioassay interpretation of monitoring data. A group of 81 workers exposed to UO 2 at the fuel fabrication facility in Brazil was selected to evaluate the committed effective dose. The workers were monitored for determination of uranium content in the urinary and faecal excretion. The contribution of intakes by ingestion and inhalation were assessed on the basis of the ratios of urinary to fecal excretion. For the selected workers it was concluded that inhalation dominated intake. According to ICRP 66, uranium oxide is classified as insoluble Type S compound. The ICRP Supporting Guidance 3 and some recent studies have recommended specific lung retention parameters to UO 2 . The solubility parameters of the uranium oxide compound handled by the workers at the fuel fabrication facility in Brazil was evaluated on the basis of the ratios of urinary to fecal excretion. Excretion data were corrected for dietary intakes. This paper will discuss the application of lung retention parameters recommended by the ICRP models to these data and also the dependence of the effective committed dose on the lung retention parameters. It will also discuss the problems in the interpretation of monitoring results, when the worker is exposed to several uranium compounds of different solubilities. (author)

  15. Method of semi-automatic high precision potentiometric titration for characterization of uranium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cristiano, Barbara Fernandes G.; Dias, Fabio C.; Barros, Pedro D. de; Araujo, Radier Mario S. de; Delgado, Jose Ubiratan; Silva, Jose Wanderley S. da; Lopes, Ricardo T.

    2011-01-01

    The method of high precision potentiometric titration is widely used in the certification and characterization of uranium compounds. In order to reduce the analysis and diminish the influence if the annalist, a semi-automatic version of the method was developed at the safeguards laboratory of the CNEN-RJ, Brazil. The method was applied with traceability guaranteed by use of primary standard of potassium dichromate. The standard uncertainty combined in the determination of concentration of total uranium was of the order of 0.01%, which is better related to traditionally methods used by the nuclear installations which is of the order of 0.1%

  16. Review of experience gained in fabricating nuclear grade uranium and thorium compounds and their analytical quality control at the Instituto de Energia Atomica, Sao Paulo, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrao, A.; Franca Junior, J.M.; Ikuta, A.

    1977-01-01

    The main activities developed at 'Instituto de Energia Atomica' Sao Paulo, Brazil, on the recovery of uranium from ores, the purification of uranium and thorium raw concentrates and their transformation in nuclear grade compounds, are reviewed. The design and assemble of pilot facilities for ammonium diuranate (ADV) uranium tetrafluoride, uranium trioxide, uranium oxide microspheres, uranyl nitrate denitration, uranim hexafluoride and thorium compounds are discussed. The establishment of analytical procedures are emphasized [pt

  17. Synthesis and properties of uranium compounds: pt.1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, C.W.; So, H.S.

    1982-01-01

    A guanidinium salt of [U(PW 11 O 39 ) 2 ]sup(10-), the solubility of which is adequate for crystal growing, has been synthesized. Using this salt or potassium salt, we have measured the stability of [U(PW 11 O 39 ) 2 ]sup(10-) as a function of pH of the solution and found that the anion is stable for the pH range 3-7. We have developed a colorimetric method for determining the concentration of U 4+ . In this method PW 11 O 39 sup(7-) is added to U 4+ in such a quantity that the mole ratio PWsub(11)Osub(39)sup(7-)/Usup(4+) exceeds 2 and the intensity of the 22.7 kK band (epsilon 1030 M -1 cm -1 ) is measured. In order to develop a continuous method to recover uranium, we have determined the amount of recovered PWsub(11)Osub(39)sup(7-) after decomposing [U(PW 11 O 39 ) 2 ]sup(10-) by adding either a base or an oxidizing agent. The percentage of PWsub(11)Osub(39)sup(7-) recovered was approximately 70% when a base was used and approximately 80% when K 2 S 2 O 8 was used. A colorimetric method for determining PW 11 O 39 sup(7-) has also been developed. (Author)

  18. Semi-automatic version of the potentiometric titration method for characterization of uranium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cristiano, Bárbara F.G.; Delgado, José Ubiratan; Wanderley S da Silva, José; Barros, Pedro D. de; Araújo, Radier M.S. de; Dias, Fábio C.; Lopes, Ricardo T.

    2012-01-01

    The potentiometric titration method was used for characterization of uranium compounds to be applied in intercomparison programs. The method is applied with traceability assured using a potassium dichromate primary standard. A semi-automatic version was developed to reduce the analysis time and the operator variation. The standard uncertainty in determining the total concentration of uranium was around 0.01%, which is suitable for uranium characterization and compatible with those obtained by manual techniques. - Highlights: ► A semi-automatic potentiometric titration method was developed for U charaterization. ► K 2 Cr 2 O 7 was the only certified reference material used. ► Values obtained for U 3 O 8 samples were consistent with certified. ► Uncertainty of 0.01% was useful for characterization and intercomparison program.

  19. Contribution to the monitoring of workers exposed to non-transferable uranium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camarasa, J.; Chalabreysse, J.

    1980-01-01

    After a short review of the present knowledge on uranium (metabolism, toxicity, principles of radiotoxicological monitoring), the authors' experience in the surveillance of workers exposed to natural non-transferable uranium compounds (oxides, tetrafluorides) is presented. When setting up urinary controls in a workers' population, a number of difficulties were met in the way of collecting urine samples, obtaining samples free of exogen contribution, interpreting results. The working environment was also studied: three types of pollution measurements were carried out: on the atmosphere at fixed places by measuring the radioactivity of air sample, on work-places and workers by chemical analysis and counting of uranium. Original graphs on work-place monitoring are up-dated regularly. Workers' surveillance by urinary and working condition controls are now well codified. However, further studies will be carried out on man, on working atmospheres, and on the substances handled. The surveillance will then cover working conditions from all points of view [fr

  20. Lattice and magnetic anisotropies in uranium intermetallic compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Havela, L.; Mašková, S.; Adamska, A.

    2013-01-01

    Examples of UNiAlD and UCoGe illustrate that the soft crystallographic direction coincides quite generally with the shortest U-U links in U intermetallics. Added to existing experimental evidence on U compounds it leads to a simple rule, that the easy magnetization direction and the soft crystall...... crystallographic direction (in the sense of highest compressibility under hydrostatic pressure) must be mutually orthogonal....

  1. Comprehensive uranium thiophosphate chemistry: Framework compounds based on pseudotetrahedrally coordinated central metal atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neuhausen, Christine; Panthoefer, Martin; Tremel, Wolfgang; Hatscher, Stephan T.; Urland, Werner

    2013-01-01

    The new ternary compounds UP 2 S 6 , UP 2 S 7 , U(P 2 S 6 ) 2 , and U 3 (PS 4 ) 4 were prepared from uranium metal, phosphorus pentasulfide, and sulfur at 700 C. The crystal structures were determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction methods. UP 2 S 6 (I) crystallizes in the ZrP 2 S 6 structure type [tetragonal, P4 2 /m, a = 6.8058(7) Aa, c = 9.7597(14) Aa, Z = 2], which consists of central uranium(IV) atoms coordinated by P 2 S 6 4- anions (staggered conformation). The anions are two-dimensional connectors for four uranium cations arranged in one plane. The structure of UP 2 S 7 (II) [orthorhombic, Fddd, a = 8.9966(15) Aa, b = 15.2869(2) Aa, c = 30.3195(5) Aa, Z = 16] is closely related to the monoclinic ZrP 2 S 7 structure type. It consists of U 4+ cations linked by P 2 S 7 4- ligands, the resulting 3D network contains large pores (diameter approx. 3.5 x 16.7 Aa). In the previously reported compound U(P 2 S 6 ) 2 (III) [I4 1 /a, a = 12.8776(9) Aa, c = 9.8367(10) Aa, Z = 2], the metal atoms are coordinated by four bidentate P 2 S 6 2- ligands. This arrangement can be considered as a pseudotetrahedral coordination of the uranium atoms by the linear ligands. Three of the resulting diamondoid frameworks are inseparably interwoven in order to optimize space filling. U 3 (PS 4 ) 4 (IV) [I4 1 /acd, a = 10.7440(9) Aa, c = 19.0969(2) Aa, Z = 2] crystallizes in a defect variant of the PrPS 4 structure type, with 50 % of the U2 sites statistically occupied with uranium atoms. The resulting stoichiometry is U 3 (PS 4 ) 4 with tetravalent uranium atoms. The structure of U 3 (PS 4 ) 4 consists of uranium atoms connected by PS 4 3- groups, each PS 4 group linking four central uranium atoms. Vibrational spectra, which were recorded for I-III, show good agreement between the obtained results and the expected values for the anionic units, while magnetic measurements confirm the presence of tetravalent uranium. (Copyright copyright 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGa

  2. The contribution of radioisotopes in secular equilibrium in the transport index of fissile uranium compounds in different enrichments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Teresinha de Moraes da; Sordi, Gian M.A.A.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: This work shows the contribution of radioisotopes in secular equilibrium in the transport index (TI) of some fissile uranium compounds: uranium oxides UO 2 , U 3 O 8 and uranium silicide U 3 Si 2 , taking into account the different enrichment grades.The range of enrichment (E%) studied was 3,4,5,7,10,20,30,40,50,93 and 100. Initially, the cell of optimum moderation ratio was built, since it represents the most reactive of the system (consisting of uranium), with maximum infinitive multiplication factor k∞, in certain concentration of uranium for each enrichment. This was made using the computer program Gamtec II. The critical radius of a sphere was calculated for a cell of optimum moderation ratio, in order to calculate the critical mass of the uranium compound or of the uranium element for each specific enrichment. For this the program Citation was used. In this study it was calculated the smallest critical mass of the uranium compound or the smallest critical mass of the uranium element. The objective was to match the largest mass of the uranium with each specific enrichment. The largest safety mass corresponds to 45% the critical mass the compound uranium or uranium element. Then, we calculated the uranium element safety mass, which it related to a fifth of this mass to the value 50, which corresponds to criticality safety index (CSI). That is, 20% of the safety mass is the value where the transport is carried out with subcritical mass, going in favor of the security. From the uranium element safety mass (USM) was determined for each enrichment , and it was calculated the mass of 235 U, activity 235 U and dose rate of 235 U, the same items were calculated for the isotope 238 U. The total dose rate was calculated for two isotopes, and applying the transport index definition as the gamma dose rate for the distance of 1 m from the packed, it was determined the TI for 20% of the safety mass for each enrichment of the compound studied. The study of

  3. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuney, M.; Pagel, M.; Leroy, J.

    1992-01-01

    First, this book presents the physico-chemical properties of Uranium and the consequences which can be deduced from the study of numerous geological process. The authors describe natural distribution of Uranium at different scales and on different supports, and main Uranium minerals. A great place in the book is assigned to description and classification of uranium deposits. The book gives also notions on prospection and exploitation of uranium deposits. Historical aspects of Uranium economical development (Uranium resources, production, supply and demand, operating costs) are given in the last chapter. 7 refs., 17 figs

  4. Uranium transport to solid electrodes in pyrochemical reprocessing of nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomczuk, Z.; Ackerman, J.P.; Wolson, R.D.; Miller, W.E.

    1992-01-01

    A unique pyrochemical process developed for the separation of metallic nuclear fuel from fission products by electrotransport through molten LiCl-KCl eutectic salt to solid and liquid metal cathodes. The process allow for recovery and reuse of essentially all of the actinides in spent fuel from the integral fast reactor (IFR) and disposal of wastes in satisfactory forms. Electrotransport is used to minimize reagent consumption and, consequently, waste volume. In particular, electrotransport to solid cathodes is used for recovery of an essentially pure uranium product in the presence of other actinides; removal of pure uranium is used to adjust the electrolyte composition in preparation for recovery of a plutonium-rich mixture with uranium in liquid cadmium cathodes. This paper presents experiments that delineate the behavior of key actinide and rare-earth elements during electrotransport to a solid electrode over a useful range of PuCl 3 /UCl 3 ratios in the electrolyte, a thermodynamic basis for that behavior, and a comparison of the observed behavior with that calculated from a thermodynamic model. This work clearly established that recovery of nearly pure uranium can be a key step in the overall pyrochemical-fuel-processing strategy for the IFR

  5. Interaction of erythrocytes and hexavalent uranium compounds -an autoanalytical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuart, W.I.; Shying, M.E.

    1980-05-01

    An automated analytical system was devised to measure the kinetics of hemolysis by uranyl compounds. Accurate plots of percentage hemolysis v. time were obtained; these, together with the corresponding differential curves, show that hemolysis of plasma-free erythrocytes is a two-stage process. The first stage of hemolysis is particularly affected by pH and anion content of uranyl solutions, and also by incubation of cell suspensions at 37 deg. before mixing with lysing solution. Complementary studies involving Coulter counting and microscopic observation established the general pattern of hemolysis and showed that cell agglutination is a prominent feature of the interaction of cells with uranyl solutions

  6. LIQUID METAL COMPOSITIONS CONTAINING URANIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teitel, R.J.

    1959-04-21

    Liquid metal compositions containing a solid uranium compound dispersed therein is described. Uranium combines with tin to form the intermetallic compound USn/sub 3/. It has been found that this compound may be incorporated into a liquid bath containing bismuth and lead-bismuth components, if a relatively small percentage of tin is also included in the bath. The composition has a low thermal neutron cross section which makes it suitable for use in a liquid metal fueled nuclear reactor.

  7. Synthesis of graphite intercalation compound of group VI metals and uranium hexafluorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukui, Toshihiro; Hagiwara, Rika; Ema, Keiko; Ito, Yasuhiko

    1993-01-01

    Systematic investigations were made on the synthesis of graphite intercalation compounds of group VI transition metals (W and Mo) and uranium hexafluorides. The reactions were performed by interacting liquid or gaseous metal hexafluorides with or without elemental fluorine at ambient temperature. The degree of intercalation of these metal fluorides depends on the formation enthalpy of fluorometallate anion from the original metal hexafluoride, as has been found for other intercalation reactions of metal fluorides. (author)

  8. Reaction of Tris(cyclopentadienyl)uranium compounds with amines, azides, and related ligands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosen, R.K.

    1989-12-01

    The trivalent uranium compound, (MeC{sub 5}H{sub 4}){sub 3}U(thf), serves as a one- or two-electron reducing agent towards azides, RN{sub 3}. These reactions produce either the uranium(IV) azide, (MeC{sub 5}H{sub 4}){sub 3}UN{sub 3}, or uranium(V) imides, (MeC{sub 5}H{sub 4}){sub 3}UNR. The role of steric and electronic effects upon this reaction has been investigated using several series of azides. For Me{sub 3}XN{sub 3}, the imides are produced when X = C or Si, both products are formed when X = Ge, and the azide is produced when X = Sn. For Ph{sub 3}XN{sub 3}, the azide is produced when X = C or Sn. For Ph{sub 3-x}CH{sub 3}N{sub 3}, the imide is produced when x = 2 and both compounds are produced when x = 1. For substituted phenylazides, RC{sub 6}H{sub 4}N{sub 3}, only the imides are produced. The magnetic properties of uranium diimides, ((MeC{sub 5}H{sub 4}){sub 3}U){sub 2}({mu}-NRN), were investigated. Several uranium(III) amines, (MeC{sub 5}H{sub 4}){sub 3}U(NH{sub 2}R), were produced from (MeC{sub 5}H{sub 4}){sub 3}U(thf) and RNH{sub 2}, and NH{sub 3} was found to be a better ligand towards (MeC{sub 5}H{sub 4}){sub 3}U than is PMe{sub 3}.

  9. Nuclear fuel technology - Determination of uranium in solutions, uranium hexafluoride and solids - Part 2: Iron(II) reduction/cerium(IV) oxidation titrimetric method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    This first edition of ISO 7097-1 together with ISO 7097-2:2004 cancels and replaces ISO 7097:1983, which has been technically revised, and ISO 9989:1996. ISO 7097 consists of the following parts, under the general title Nuclear fuel technology - Determination of uranium in solutions, uranium hexafluoride and solids: Part 1: Iron(II) reduction/potassium dichromate oxidation titrimetric method; Part 2: Iron(II) reduction/cerium(IV) oxidation titrimetric method. This part 2. of ISO 7097 describes procedures for determination of uranium in solutions, uranium hexafluoride and solids. The procedures described in the two independent parts of this International Standard are similar: this part uses a titration with cerium(IV) and ISO 7097-1 uses a titration with potassium dichromate

  10. Nuclear fuel technology - Determination of uranium in solutions, uranium hexafluoride and solids - Part 1: Iron(II) reduction/potassium dichromate oxidation titrimetric method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    This first edition of ISO 7097-1 together with ISO 7097-2:2004 cancels and replaces ISO 7097:1983, which has been technically revised, and ISO 9989:1996. ISO 7097 consists of the following parts, under the general title Nuclear fuel technology - Determination of uranium in solutions, uranium hexafluoride and solids: Part 1: Iron(II) reduction/potassium dichromate oxidation titrimetric method; Part 2: Iron(II) reduction/cerium(IV) oxidation titrimetric method. This part 1. of ISO 7097 describes procedures for the determination of uranium in solutions, uranium hexafluoride and solids. The procedures described in the two independent parts of this International Standard are similar: this part uses a titration with potassium dichromate and ISO 7097-2 uses a titration with cerium(IV)

  11. Solid phase extraction of uranium(VI) onto benzoylthiourea-anchored activated carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Yongsheng; Liu Chunxia; Feng Miao; Chen Zhen; Li Shuqiong; Tian Gan; Wang Li; Huang Jingbo; Li Shoujian

    2010-01-01

    A new solid phase extractant selective for uranium(VI) based on benzoylthiourea anchored to activated carbon was developed via hydroxylation, amidation and reaction with benzoyl isothiocyanate in sequence. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and total element analysis proved that benzoylthiourea had been successfully grafted to the surface of the activated carbon, with a loading capacity of 1.2 mmol benzoylthiourea per gram of activated carbon. The parameters that affect the uranium(VI) sorption, such as contact time, solution pH, initial uranium(VI) concentration, adsorbent dose and temperature, have been investigated. Results have been analyzed by Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm; the former was more suitable to describe the sorption process. The maximum sorption capacity (82 mg/g) for uranium(VI) was obtained at experimental conditions. The rate constant for the uranium sorption by the as-synthesized extractant was 0.441 min -1 from the first order rate equation. Thermodynamic parameters (ΔH 0 = -46.2 kJ/mol; ΔS 0 = -98.0 J/mol K; ΔG 0 = -17.5 kJ/mol) showed the adsorption of an exothermic process and spontaneous nature, respectively. Additional studies indicated that the benzoylthiourea-anchored activated carbon (BT-AC) selectively sorbed uranyl ions in the presence of competing ions, Na + , Co 2+ , Sr 2+ , Cs + and La 3+ .

  12. Solid phase extraction of uranium(VI) onto benzoylthiourea-anchored activated carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao Yongsheng; Liu Chunxia; Feng Miao; Chen Zhen; Li Shuqiong; Tian Gan; Wang Li; Huang Jingbo [College of Chemistry, Sichuan University, 29 Wangjiang Lu, Chengdu, 610064, Sichuan (China); Li Shoujian, E-mail: sjli000616@scu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry, Sichuan University, 29 Wangjiang Lu, Chengdu, 610064, Sichuan (China)

    2010-04-15

    A new solid phase extractant selective for uranium(VI) based on benzoylthiourea anchored to activated carbon was developed via hydroxylation, amidation and reaction with benzoyl isothiocyanate in sequence. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and total element analysis proved that benzoylthiourea had been successfully grafted to the surface of the activated carbon, with a loading capacity of 1.2 mmol benzoylthiourea per gram of activated carbon. The parameters that affect the uranium(VI) sorption, such as contact time, solution pH, initial uranium(VI) concentration, adsorbent dose and temperature, have been investigated. Results have been analyzed by Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm; the former was more suitable to describe the sorption process. The maximum sorption capacity (82 mg/g) for uranium(VI) was obtained at experimental conditions. The rate constant for the uranium sorption by the as-synthesized extractant was 0.441 min{sup -1} from the first order rate equation. Thermodynamic parameters ({Delta}H{sup 0} = -46.2 kJ/mol; {Delta}S{sup 0} = -98.0 J/mol K; {Delta}G{sup 0} = -17.5 kJ/mol) showed the adsorption of an exothermic process and spontaneous nature, respectively. Additional studies indicated that the benzoylthiourea-anchored activated carbon (BT-AC) selectively sorbed uranyl ions in the presence of competing ions, Na{sup +}, Co{sup 2+}, Sr{sup 2+}, Cs{sup +} and La{sup 3+}.

  13. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    The article briefly discusses the Australian government policy and the attitude of political party factions towards the mining and exporting of the uranium resources in Australia. Australia has a third of the Western World's low-cost uranium resources

  14. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poty, B.; Cuney, M.; Bruneton, P.; Virlogeux, D.; Capus, G.

    2010-01-01

    With the worldwide revival of nuclear energy comes the question of uranium reserves. For more than 20 years, nuclear energy has been neglected and uranium prospecting has been practically abandoned. Therefore, present day production covers only 70% of needs and stocks are decreasing. Production is to double by 2030 which represents a huge industrial challenge. The FBR-type reactors technology, which allows to consume the whole uranium content of the fuel, is developing in several countries and will ensure the long-term development of nuclear fission. However, the implementation of these reactors (the generation 4) will be progressive during the second half of the 21. century. For this reason an active search for uranium ores will be necessary during the whole 21. century to ensure the fueling of light water reactors which are huge uranium consumers. This dossier covers all the aspects of natural uranium production: mineralogy, geochemistry, types of deposits, world distribution of deposits with a particular attention given to French deposits, the exploitation of which is abandoned today. Finally, exploitation, ore processing and the economical aspects are presented. Contents: 1 - the uranium element and its minerals: from uranium discovery to its industrial utilization, the main uranium minerals (minerals with tetravalent uranium, minerals with hexavalent uranium); 2 - uranium in the Earth's crust and its geochemical properties: distribution (in sedimentary rocks, in magmatic rocks, in metamorphic rocks, in soils and vegetation), geochemistry (uranium solubility and valence in magmas, uranium speciation in aqueous solution, solubility of the main uranium minerals in aqueous solution, uranium mobilization and precipitation); 3 - geology of the main types of uranium deposits: economical criteria for a deposit, structural diversity of deposits, classification, world distribution of deposits, distribution of deposits with time, superficial deposits, uranium

  15. High-temperature, Knudsen cell-mass spectroscopic studies on lanthanum oxide/uranium dioxide solid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sunder, S.; McEachern, R.; LeBlanc, J.C.

    2001-01-01

    Knudsen cell-mass spectroscopic experiments were carried out with lanthanum oxide/uranium oxide solid solutions (1%, 2% and 5% (metal at.% basis)) to assess the volatilization characteristics of rare earths present in irradiated nuclear fuel. The oxidation state of each sample used was conditioned to the 'uranium dioxide stage' by heating in the Knudsen cell under an atmosphere of 10% CO 2 in CO. The mass spectra were analyzed to obtain the vapour pressures of the lanthanum and uranium species. It was found that the vapour pressure of lanthanum oxide follows Henry's law, i.e., its value is directly proportional to its concentration in the solid phase. Also, the vapour pressure of lanthanum oxide over the solid solution, after correction for its concentration in the solid phase, is similar to that of uranium dioxide. (authors)

  16. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackay, G.A.

    1978-01-01

    The author discusses the contribution made by various energy sources in the production of electricity. Estimates are made of the future nuclear contribution, the future demand for uranium and future sales of Australian uranium. Nuclear power growth in the United States, Japan and Western Europe is discussed. The present status of the six major Australian uranium deposits (Ranger, Jabiluka, Nabarlek, Koongarra, Yeelerrie and Beverley) is given. Australian legislation relevant to the uranium mining industry is also outlined

  17. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    The development, prospecting, research, processing and marketing of South Africa's uranium industry and the national policies surrounding this industry form the headlines of this work. The geology of South Africa's uranium occurences and their positions, the processes used in the extraction of South Africa's uranium and the utilisation of uranium for power production as represented by the Koeberg nuclear power station near Cape Town are included in this publication

  18. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, E.D.J.

    1974-01-01

    A discussion is given of uranium as an energy source in The Australian economy. Figures and predictions are presented on the world supply-demand position and also figures are given on the added value that can be achieved by the processing of uranium. Conclusions are drawn about Australia's future policy with regard to uranium (R.L.)

  19. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toens, P.D.

    1981-03-01

    The geological setting of uranium resources in the world can be divided in two basic categories of resources and are defined as reasonably assured resources, estimated additional resources and speculative resources. Tables are given to illustrate these definitions. The increasing world production of uranium despite the cutback in the nuclear industry and the uranium requirements of the future concluded these lecture notes

  20. Study of resolution enhancement methods for impurities quantitative analysis in uranium compounds by XRF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Clayton P.; Salvador, Vera L.R.; Cotrim, Marycel E.B.; Pires, Maria Ap. F.; Scapin, Marcos A., E-mail: clayton.pereira.silva@usp.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (CQMA/IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Quimica e Meio Ambiente

    2011-07-01

    X-ray fluorescence analysis is a technique widely used for the determination of both major and trace elements related to interaction between the sample and radiation, allowing direct and nondestructive analysis. However, in uranium matrices these devices are inefficient because the characteristic emission lines of elements like S, Cl, Zn, Zr, Mo and other overlap characteristic emission lines of uranium. Thus, chemical procedures to separation of uranium are needed to perform this sort of analysis. In this paper the deconvolution method was used to increase spectra resolution and correct the overlaps. The methodology was tested according to NBR ISO 17025 using a set of seven certified reference materials for impurities present in U3O8 (New Brunswick Laboratory - NBL). The results showed that this methodology allows quantitative determination of impurities such as Zn, Zr, Mo and others, in uranium compounds. The detection limits were shorter than 50{mu}g. g{sup -1} and uncertainty was shorter than 10% for the determined elements. (author)

  1. Study of resolution enhancement methods for impurities quantitative analysis in uranium compounds by XRF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Clayton P.; Salvador, Vera L.R.; Cotrim, Marycel E.B.; Pires, Maria Ap. F.; Scapin, Marcos A.

    2011-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence analysis is a technique widely used for the determination of both major and trace elements related to interaction between the sample and radiation, allowing direct and nondestructive analysis. However, in uranium matrices these devices are inefficient because the characteristic emission lines of elements like S, Cl, Zn, Zr, Mo and other overlap characteristic emission lines of uranium. Thus, chemical procedures to separation of uranium are needed to perform this sort of analysis. In this paper the deconvolution method was used to increase spectra resolution and correct the overlaps. The methodology was tested according to NBR ISO 17025 using a set of seven certified reference materials for impurities present in U3O8 (New Brunswick Laboratory - NBL). The results showed that this methodology allows quantitative determination of impurities such as Zn, Zr, Mo and others, in uranium compounds. The detection limits were shorter than 50μg. g -1 and uncertainty was shorter than 10% for the determined elements. (author)

  2. Rejection thresholds in solid chocolate-flavored compound coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harwood, Meriel L; Ziegler, Gregory R; Hayes, John E

    2012-10-01

    Classical detection thresholds do not predict liking, as they focus on the presence or absence of a sensation. Recently however, Prescott and colleagues described a new method, the rejection threshold, where a series of forced choice preference tasks are used to generate a dose-response function to determine hedonically acceptable concentrations. That is, how much is too much? To date, this approach has been used exclusively in liquid foods. Here, we determined group rejection thresholds in solid chocolate-flavored compound coating for bitterness. The influences of self-identified preferences for milk or dark chocolate, as well as eating style (chewers compared to melters) on rejection thresholds were investigated. Stimuli included milk chocolate-flavored compound coating spiked with increasing amounts of sucrose octaacetate, a bitter and generally recognized as safe additive. Paired preference tests (blank compared to spike) were used to determine the proportion of the group that preferred the blank. Across pairs, spiked samples were presented in ascending concentration. We were able to quantify and compare differences between 2 self-identified market segments. The rejection threshold for the dark chocolate preferring group was significantly higher than the milk chocolate preferring group (P= 0.01). Conversely, eating style did not affect group rejection thresholds (P= 0.14), although this may reflect the amount of chocolate given to participants. Additionally, there was no association between chocolate preference and eating style (P= 0.36). Present work supports the contention that this method can be used to examine preferences within specific market segments and potentially individual differences as they relate to ingestive behavior. This work makes use of the rejection threshold method to study market segmentation, extending its use to solid foods. We believe this method has broad applicability to the sensory specialist and product developer by providing a

  3. Water Solubility of Plutonium and Uranium Compounds and Residues at TA-55

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reilly, Sean Douglas; Smith, Paul Herrick; Jarvinen, Gordon D.; Prochnow, David Adrian; Schulte, Louis D.; DeBurgomaster, Paul Christopher; Fife, Keith William; Rubin, Jim; Worl, Laura Ann

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the water solubility of plutonium and uranium compounds and residues at TA-55 is necessary to provide a technical basis for appropriate criticality safety, safety basis and accountability controls. Individual compound solubility was determined using published solubility data and solution thermodynamic modeling. Residue solubility was estimated using a combination of published technical reports and process knowledge of constituent compounds. The scope of materials considered includes all compounds and residues at TA-55 as of March 2016 that contain Pu-239 or U-235 where any single item in the facility has more than 500 g of nuclear material. This analysis indicates that the following materials are not appreciably soluble in water: plutonium dioxide (IDC=C21), plutonium phosphate (IDC=C66), plutonium tetrafluoride (IDC=C80), plutonium filter residue (IDC=R26), plutonium hydroxide precipitate (IDC=R41), plutonium DOR salt (IDC=R42), plutonium incinerator ash (IDC=R47), uranium carbide (IDC=C13), uranium dioxide (IDC=C21), U 3 O 8 (IDC=C88), and uranium filter residue (IDC=R26). This analysis also indicates that the following materials are soluble in water: plutonium chloride (IDC=C19) and uranium nitrate (IDC=C52). Equilibrium calculations suggest that PuOCl is water soluble under certain conditions, but some plutonium processing reports indicate that it is insoluble when present in electrorefining residues (R65). Plutonium molten salt extraction residues (IDC=R83) contain significant quantities of PuCl 3 , and are expected to be soluble in water. The solubility of the following plutonium residues is indeterminate due to conflicting reports, insufficient process knowledge or process-dependent composition: calcium salt (IDC=R09), electrorefining salt (IDC=R65), salt (IDC=R71), silica (IDC=R73) and sweepings/screenings (IDC=R78). Solution thermodynamic modeling also indicates that fire suppression water buffered with a commercially-available phosphate

  4. Water Solubility of Plutonium and Uranium Compounds and Residues at TA-55

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reilly, Sean Douglas [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States; Smith, Paul Herrick [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States; Jarvinen, Gordon D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States; Prochnow, David Adrian [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States; Schulte, Louis D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States; DeBurgomaster, Paul Christopher [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States; Fife, Keith William [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States; Rubin, Jim [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States; Worl, Laura Ann [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States

    2016-06-13

    Understanding the water solubility of plutonium and uranium compounds and residues at TA-55 is necessary to provide a technical basis for appropriate criticality safety, safety basis and accountability controls. Individual compound solubility was determined using published solubility data and solution thermodynamic modeling. Residue solubility was estimated using a combination of published technical reports and process knowledge of constituent compounds. The scope of materials considered includes all compounds and residues at TA-55 as of March 2016 that contain Pu-239 or U-235 where any single item in the facility has more than 500 g of nuclear material. This analysis indicates that the following materials are not appreciably soluble in water: plutonium dioxide (IDC=C21), plutonium phosphate (IDC=C66), plutonium tetrafluoride (IDC=C80), plutonium filter residue (IDC=R26), plutonium hydroxide precipitate (IDC=R41), plutonium DOR salt (IDC=R42), plutonium incinerator ash (IDC=R47), uranium carbide (IDC=C13), uranium dioxide (IDC=C21), U3O8 (IDC=C88), and uranium filter residue (IDC=R26). This analysis also indicates that the following materials are soluble in water: plutonium chloride (IDC=C19) and uranium nitrate (IDC=C52). Equilibrium calculations suggest that PuOCl is water soluble under certain conditions, but some plutonium processing reports indicate that it is insoluble when present in electrorefining residues (R65). Plutonium molten salt extraction residues (IDC=R83) contain significant quantities of PuCl3, and are expected to be soluble in water. The solubility of the following plutonium residues is indeterminate due to conflicting reports, insufficient process knowledge or process-dependent composition: calcium salt (IDC=R09), electrorefining salt (IDC=R65), salt (IDC=R71), silica (IDC=R73) and sweepings/screenings (IDC=R78). Solution thermodynamic modeling also indicates that fire suppression water buffered with a

  5. Demonstration and evaluation of solid state photomultiplier tube for uranium exploration instrumentation. National uranium resources evaluation. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polichar, R.M.

    1982-06-01

    The purpose of this program has been to evaluate the recently developed solid state photomultiplier tube (SSPMT) technology as a potential improvment to future uranium exploration instrumentation. To this end, six SSPMTs have been constructed and evaluated in a manner similar to that of conventional phototubes. Special regard has been placed on the measurement of pulse height resolution and the factors that affect it in tube design and manufacture. The tubes were subjected to a number of tests similar to those performed on conventional photomultiplier tubes. The results indicate that good, high-resolution spectra can be obtained from the tubes and that they behave generally in a predictable manner. They exhibited a linear gain increase with applied potential. They show only slight dependence of performance with applied potential. Their sensitivity is, for the most part, uniform and predictable. However, several characteristics were found that were not predictable. These include a general drop in measured quantum efficiency, a worsening resolution with operation, and a bump in the sensitivity curve corresponding to the shape of the projected dimension of the anode. The SSPMT remains an attractive new technology in gamma-ray spectroscopy, and promises to make significant improvements in the area of uranium exploration instrumentation. 16 figures, 5 tables

  6. Several experimental applications of gamma ray spectrometry on the analysis of uranium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korob, Ricardo O.; Blasiyh Nuno, Guillermo A.

    2002-01-01

    Several experimental applications of gamma ray spectrometry on the analysis of uranium compounds and materials containing it are studied. Special attention is devoted to the correlation between experimental spectra and the decay chains of 235 U and 238 U contained in the analyzed samples. The following applications are discussed: enrichment determination without using calibration standards, determination of uranium concentration, intensities of the gamma rays emitted by the nuclides present in the decay chains of study and the activity of such nuclides. Because of its importance, detailed discussion about the former one is shown. In addition, preliminary results regarding the emission probabilities of the most important gamma rays of 234m Pa are also informed. (author)

  7. Uranium analysis in water flowing by the nuclear track detection method on solid dielectric materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arambula, H.

    1981-01-01

    The objective of this experiment was threefold: to study the content of uranium in tap and spring water, to establish a technique for the quantitative analysis for the presence of uranium in liquids, and to test the qualities as detector fission fragments of three solid insulator materials using the nuclear tracks register method. The latter allows for the measurement of concentrations of fissile elements up to 10 -12 gr/gm employing (n, f.f.) reactions. The test samples were of tap water and of water from six fresh water springs located in San Luis Potosi and Guanajuato. Glass, lexan polycarbonate and muscovite mica were the detector materials used. The technique consisted in evaporating the water from the test samples, which had been previously placed upon the detector materials, and in doing the same for the standard control sample solutions having known concentrations of uranium. All the samples were then irradiated with thermal neutrons, and the 235 U, present in the samples, fissioned. The fission fragments produced permanent damage on the detectors, known as latent tracks. A specific corroding chemical was then applied to each detector which caused the latent tracks to dissolve into grooves. Known as etching tracks, these grooves were microscopically visible and could be measured for track density (tracks/mm 2 ). The concentrations of uranium present in the test samples were measured by comparing the track densities of the test samples with those of the standard control samples. The concentration of uranium found in the spring water samples ranged from 0.09 to 0.89 μqr.U/1, and those of tap water, from 0.18 to 0.19 μqr U/1. Lexan polycarbonate and muscovite mica proved to be better, as detectors, than glass. Glass for quantitative analysis, we found not recommendable as a detector material because of its alterable composition in the presence of uranium. (author)

  8. A gravimetric method for the determination of oxygen in uranium oxides and ternary uranium oxides by addition of alkaline earth compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujino, Takeo; Tagawa, Hiroaki; Adachi, Takeo; Hashitani, Hiroshi

    1978-01-01

    A simple gravimetric determination of oxygen in uranium oxides and ternary uranium oxides is described. In alkaline earth uranates which are formed by heating in air at 800-1100 0 C, uranium is in the hexavalent state over certain continuous ranges of alkaline earth-to-uranium ratios. Thus, if an alkaline earth uranate or a compound containing an alkaline earth element, e.g. MgO, is mixed with the oxide sample and heated in air under suitable conditions, oxygen can be determined from the weight change before and after the reaction. The standard deviation of the O:U ratio for a UOsub(2+x) test sample is +-0.0008-0.001, if a correction is applied for atmospheric moisture absorbed during mixing. (Auth.)

  9. Solid-state quantum chemistry and materials science: Solid compounds of the d and f elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gubanov, V.A.

    1989-01-01

    Methods have been developed for calculating electron structures for solid compounds of d and f elements and for simulating physicochemical properties of materials based on them. Cluster and band calculations are considered for refractory compounds of d metals formed with light elements. There are bond and property regularities in doping by meals and metalloids, and defects and impurities have certain effects, where studies have been made on the electron structures for disordered phases and solid solutions in relation to sublattice compositions. Quantum-chemical simulation methods have been developed for optically active and fluorescent materials based on d and f metal oxides, fluorides, and chalcogenides, and compositions have been proposed for new optically active composites and protective coatings. New approaches have been defined to the magnetic parameters of metals, alloys, and compounds; these can be applied in simulating new magnetic materials. Calculations are given on energy spectra for high-temperature oxide superconductors. There is interesting scope for quantum-chemical methods in application to many topics in materials science

  10. Selective arsenical purification of substances during an alkaline treatment process of an uranium and/or molybdenum bearing ore by means of a magnesium compound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maurel, Pierre; Lamerant, J.M.; Pallez, Francois.

    1983-01-01

    The ores is digested by means of an aqueous liquor of sodium or potassium carbonate and/or bicarbonate, the digestion being carried out under conditions of concentrations, temperatures and pressures bringing about the solubilization of the uranium and/or molybdenum and the arsenic present in the core. A solid phase suspension is lifted from a liquid phase and the phases are separated. The arsenic solubilized during the digestion is extracted as magnesium arsenate by treatment of the medium containing the arsenic by means of a magnesium compound [fr

  11. Electrodeposition of uranium and transuranic metals (Pu) on solid cathode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laplace, A. F.; Lacquement, J.; Willitt, J. L.; Finch, R. A.; Fletcher, G. A.; Williamson, M. A.

    2008-01-01

    The results from a study of U and Pu metal electrodeposition from molten eutectic LiCl-KCl on a solid inert cathode are presented. This study has been conducted using ∼ to 50 g of U-Pu together with rare earths (mostly Nd) and 1.5 kg of salt. The introduction of a three-electrode probe with an Ag/AgCl reference electrode has allowed voltammetric measurement during electrolysis and control of the cathode potential versus the reference. Cyclic and square-wave voltammetric measurements proved to be very useful tools for monitoring the electrolysis as well as selecting the cathode versus reference potential to maximize the separation between actinides and rare earths. The voltammetric data also highlighted the occurrence of back reactions between the cathode deposit and oxidizing equivalents formed at the anode that remained in the molten salt electrolyte. Any further electrolysis test needs to be conducted continuously and followed by immediate removal of the cathode to minimize those back reactions. (authors)

  12. Reaction of hydrogen peroxide with uranium zirconium oxide solid solution - Zirconium hinders oxidative uranium dissolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai, Yuta; Takano, Masahide; Watanabe, Masayuki

    2017-12-01

    We studied oxidative dissolution of uranium and zirconium oxide [(U,Zr)O2] in aqueous H2O2 solution to estimate (U,Zr)O2 stability to interfacial reactions with H2O2. Studies on the interfacial reactions are essential for anticipating how a (U,Zr)O2-based molten fuel may chemically degrade after a severe accident. The fuel's high radioactivity induces water radiolysis and continuous H2O2 generation. Subsequent reaction of the fuel with H2O2 may oxidize the fuel surface and facilitate U dissolution. We conducted our experiments with (U,Zr)O2 powder (comprising Zr:U mole ratios of 25:75, 40:60, and 50:50) and quantitated the H2O2 reaction via dissolved U and H2O2 concentrations. Although (U,Zr)O2 reacted more quickly than UO2, the dissolution yield relative to H2O2 consumption was far less for (U,Zr)O2 compared to that of UO2. The reaction kinetics indicates that most of the H2O2 catalytically decomposed to O2 at the surface of (U,Zr)O2. We confirmed the H2O2 catalytic decomposition via O2 production (quantitative stoichiometric agreement). In addition, post-reaction Raman scattering spectra of the undissolved (U,Zr)O2 showed no additional peaks (indicating a lack of secondary phase formation). The (U,Zr)O2 matrix is much more stable than UO2 against H2O2-induced oxidative dissolution. Our findings will improve understanding on the molten fuels and provide an insight into decommissioning activities after a severe accident.

  13. Modern x-ray spectral methods in the study of the electronic structure of actinide compounds: Uranium oxide UO2 as an example

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teterin Yury A.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Fine X-ray photo electron spectral (XPS structure of uranium dioxide UO2 in the binding energy (BE range 0-~č40 eV was associated mostly with the electrons of the outer (OVMO (0-15 eV BE and inner (IVMO (15-40 eV BE valence molecular orbitals formed from the incompletely U5f,6d,7s and O2p and completely filled U6p and O2s shells of neighboring uranium and oxygen ions. It agrees with the relativistic calculation results of the electronic structure for the UO812–(Oh cluster reflecting uranium close environment in UO2, and was confirmed by the X-ray (conversion electron, non-resonance and resonance O4,5(U emission, near O4,5(U edge absorption, resonance photoelectron, Auger spectroscopy data. The fine OVMO and IVMO related XPS structure was established to yield conclusions on the degree of participation of the U6p,5f electrons in the chemical bond, uranium close environment structure and interatomic distances in oxides. Total contribution of the IVMO electrons to the covalent part of the chemical bond can be comparable with that of the OVMO electrons. It has to be noted that the IVMO formation can take place in compounds of any elements from the periodic table. It is a novel scientific fact in solid-state chemistry and physics.

  14. Spectrographic determination of zirconium, niobium, rhodium, ruthenium, tantalum, and tungsten in uranium and its compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alduan, F.A.; Capdevila, C.

    1976-01-01

    The determination of Nb, Rh, Ru, Ta, W and Zr in uranium and its compounds has been studied, using the carrier distillation method with either AgCl or AgCl-SrF 2 (4:3) as carrier. In order to get the best sensitivity, the influence of the carrier concentration, the dc arc intensity and several controlled atmospheres on the variation of the line to background ratio of intensities has been considered. With the most suitable conditions, the sensitivities achieved for the considered elements are in the range 1-10 ppm. (author)

  15. Uranium isotope separation in the solid state. Progress report, December 1, 1976--June 1, 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernstein, E.R.

    1977-06-01

    Since we were actively able to work on this project, we have been engaged in three separate lines of research. Each of these has been related to laser-induced isotope separation of uranium in the solid state. The three areas are: (a) improved reaction chemistry for both host materials Zr(BH 4 ) 4 and Hf(BH 4 ) 4 and U(BH 4 ) 4 itself; (b) improved spectroscopic techniques in order to obtain sharper spectra; and (c) solid state photochemical investigations to study U(BH 4 ) 4 photodecomposition mechanism and yield as a function of wave length. These are all integral parts of the solid state isotope separation procedure and are discussed in terms of the overall process proposed

  16. Liquid-solid extraction of uranium (VI) with TOPO - molten naphthalene and determination by laser fluorimetry in geological samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Sanjay; Krishnakumar, M.; Patwardhan, A.A.

    2007-01-01

    A simple, rapid, sensitive, cost-effective and efficient method for separation of uranium using tri-n-octylphosphine oxide (TOPO)-molten naphthalene as solid phase extractant and its determination by laser fluorimetry in geological samples (rock, soil, sediment) was developed. Under optimum conditions, using 50 mg TOPO and 100 mg naphthalene, 50 - 5000 ng of uranium in 10 ml sample solution (3% (v/v) HNO 3 ) could be extracted quantitatively. The extracted uranium was stripped using tetra sodium pyrophosphate (5% (v/v) solution, pH adjusted to 7.0 with H 3 PO 4 ) and determined by laser fluorimetry. The influence of different acid concentrations, the amount of solid phase extractant, sample volumes, different stripping reagents, their volumes and effect of foreign ions on the extraction and determination of uranium (VI) were investigated. Synthetic samples of varying concentration as regards uranium were prepared and analysed. Recoveries ranging from 90% to 105% were obtained. The method was validated by analyzing four certified reference materials namely, BL-5, DH-1a, SY-2, SY-3 and the values obtained for uranium agreed well with the certified values. The method was also applied to the determination of uranium in geological samples (rock, soil and sediment) by laser fluorimetry and the results obtained compared favorably with those obtained from the pellet fluorimetry method. Following the proposed method, determination limit for uranium was found to be 1 μg/g with RSD ± 10%. (author)

  17. Electrotransport of Uranium from a Liquid Cadmium Anode to a Solid Cathode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahluwalia, Rajesh K.; Hua, Thanh Q.

    2002-01-01

    During anodic dissolution of irradiated binary Experimental Breeder Reactor-II fuel, a portion of the electrorefined uranium collects in the underlying cadmium pool. It is periodically recovered by setting up a cell configuration in which the pool is made the anode and uranium is electrodeposited on a solid cathode mandrel. A theoretical model is used to determine the current structure of the liquid cadmium anode. The model is validated by comparing against the measured composition of the cathode deposits. Multinodal simulations are conducted to explain the bell shape of deposits observed with this mode of electrotransport. The simulations also determine the dependence of collection efficiency on the electrical charge passed that is functionally consistent with the experimental data. Finally, a simplified operating map of the electrorefiner is presented that can be used to determine the conditions for growing cathode deposits of target composition

  18. Thermodynamic analysis and experimental study on the chlorination of uranium oxide by gas-solid reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Y.J.; Kim, I.S.; Shin, H.S.; Ro, S.G.; Park, H.S.

    1998-01-01

    In order to determine the operating condition of an uranium chlorination process with U 3 O 8 -C-Cl 2 system, the experimental conditions have been evaluated preliminarily by the thermochemical analysis and experimentally confirmed in this study. The dry-type chlorination of U 3 O 8 occurs as irreversible and exothermic reaction and produces many kinds of chloride compounds such as UCl 3 , UCl 4 , UCl 5 , and UCl 6 in the air and humidity controlled argon environment. Taking account of Gibbs free energy and vapor pressure for various chloride compounds, the proper temperature range of chlorination appears to be 863 to 953 K in aspects of increasing reaction rate and the yield of nonvolatile product. In the course of the experimental confirmation the powder of U 3 O 8 is perfectly converted into uranium chlorides within 4 hours above 863 K, and then the maximum fraction of uranium chloride remaining in the reactor is about 30% of total conversion mass. (author)

  19. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whillans, R.T.

    1981-01-01

    Events in the Canadian uranium industry during 1980 are reviewed. Mine and mill expansions and exploration activity are described, as well as changes in governmental policy. Although demand for uranium is weak at the moment, the industry feels optimistic about the future. (LL)

  20. Spectrographic determination of lanthanides in high-purity uranium compounds, after chromatographic separation by alumina-hydrofluoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lordello, A.R.; Abrao, A.

    1979-01-01

    A method is presented for the determination of fourteen rare earth elements in high-purity uranium compounds by emission spectrography. The rare earths are chromatographically separated from uranium by using alumina-hydrofluoric acid. Lanthanum is used both as collector and internal standard. The technique of excitation involves a total consumption of the sample in a 17 ampere direct current arc. The range of determination is about 0.005 to 0.5 μg/g uranium. The coefficient of variation for Pr, Ho, Dy, Er, Tm, Lu, Gd and Tb amounts to 10%. (Author) [pt

  1. Reference values and their application to the monitoring of occupational exposure to natural uranium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-09-01

    Natural uranium compounds, which enter the oxide fuel cycle offer physico-chemical characteristics dependent on their structure and their production process. These characteristics govern their biological behaviour and the degree of their radioactive and chemical toxicity. The monitoring of workers occupationnally exposed to these compounds is carried out by bioassays; in order to get the best interpretation, the resulting data must be compared to reference values. These values must be closely related to the type of contaminant and the real exposure conditions. In this report, the occupational medicine services working group has examined the possibilities of obtaining such reference values and suggests recommendations and operational values covering most situations found in routine monitoring [fr

  2. Overview of toxicity data and risk assessment methods for evaluating the chemical effects of depleted uranium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartmann, H.M.; Monette, F.A.; Avci, H.I.

    2000-01-01

    In the United States, depleted uranium is handled or used in several chemical forms by both governmental agencies and private industry (primarily companies producing and machining depleted uranium metal for military applications). Human exposure can occur as a result of handling these compounds, routine low-level effluent releases to the environment from processing facilities, or materials being accidentally released from storage locations or during processing or transportation. Exposure to uranium can result in both chemical and radiological toxicity, but in most instances chemical toxicity is of greater concern. This article discusses the chemical toxic effects from human exposure to depleted uranium compounds that are likely to be handled during the long-term management and use of depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ) inventories in the United States. It also reviews representative publications in the toxicological literature to establish appropriate reference values for risk assessments. Methods are described for evaluating chemical toxicity caused by chronic low-level exposure and acute exposure. Example risk evaluations are provided for illustration. Preliminary results indicate that chemical effects of chronic exposure to uranium compounds under normal operating conditions would be negligibly small. Results also show that acute exposures under certain accident conditions could cause adverse chemical effects among the populations exposed.

  3. Fluorination of uranium compounds by gaseous bromine trifluoride and a bromine-fluorine mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, Tsutomu

    1976-03-01

    This report summarizes the studies of fluorination of uranium compounds by gaseous BrF 3 and a Br 2 -F 2 mixture, which were carried out in Fluorine Chemistry Laboratory of JAERI in connection with the reprocessing method of nuclear fuels. Although thermodynamically more stable than F 2 , BrF 3 has higher reactivity at relatively low temperatures: fluorination of uranium compounds can be carried out at 100 0 -- 200 0 C by using gaseous BrF 3 . This fluorination temperature is lower than those of F 2 , BrF 5 , ClF and SF 4 , and close to that of ClF 3 . The usage of BrF 3 has however the drawbacks that it requires additional devices to heat the corrosive liquid and to remove Br 2 produced as a byproduct. In order to eliminate the difficulties indicated, a new method of fluorination was developed - the use of a Br 2 -F 2 mixture. Addition of small amounts of Br 2 to the fluorine flow (about 6% in relation to the fluorine concentration) gives marked effects on the rate of fluorination. (auth.)

  4. Separation of uranium and common impurities from solid analytical waste containing plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pathak, Nimai; Kumar, Mithlesh; Thulasidas, S.K.; Hon, N.S.; Kulkarni, M.J.; Mhatre, Amol; Natarajan, V.

    2014-07-01

    The report describes separation of uranium (U) and common impurities from solid analytical waste containing plutonium (Pu). This will be useful in recovery of Pu from nuclear waste. This is an important activity of any nuclear program in view of the strategic importance of Pu. In Radiochemistry Division, the trace metal analysis of Pu bearing fuel materials such as PuO 2 , (U,Pu)O 2 and (U,Pu)C are being carried out using the DC arc-Carrier Distillation technique. During these analyses, solid analytical waste containing Pu and 241 Am is generated. This comprises of left-over of samples and prepared charges. The main constituents of this waste are uranium oxide, plutonium oxide and silver chloride used as carrier. This report describes the entire work carried out to separate gram quantities of Pu from large amounts of U and mg quantities of 241 Am and the effect of leaching of the waste with nitric acid as a function of batch size. The effect of leaching the solid analytical waste of (U,Pu)O 2 and AgCl with concentrated nitric acid for different time intervals was also studied. Later keeping the time constant, the effect of nitric acid molarity on the leaching of U and Pu was investigated. Four different lots of the waste having different amounts were subjected to multiple leaching with 8 M nitric acid, each for 15 minutes duration. In all the experiments the amount of Uranium, Plutonium and other impurities leached were determined using ICP as an excitation source. The results are discussed in this report. (author)

  5. Reactions of uranium (III) and (IV) compounds with ketones, nitriles and acid chlorides. Towards a use of uranium complexes in organic synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, Raymond

    1993-01-01

    In this research thesis, the author shows that various organic molecules can be interestingly transformed into uranium complexes with degrees of oxidation of +3 or +4. In a first part, the author describes reactions of carbonyl compounds with the UCl 4 -Na(Hg) reducing system. Then, he addresses reductions of ketones, nitriles and acid chlorides by a uranium (III) complex: Cp 3 U(THF). The third part reports a detailed study of the reduction of ketones by U(BH 4 ) 4 [fr

  6. Determination of oxygen in uranium compounds using sulfur monochloride; Dosage de l'oxygene dans les composes de l'uranium par la methode au monochlorure de soufre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baudin, G; Besson, J; Blum, P L; Tran-Van, Danh [Commisariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-07-01

    The authors have described in an other paper (Anal. Chim. Acta, in press) a method for oxygen determination in uranium compounds, in which the sample is attacked by sulfur monochloride. The present paper is concerned with the experimental aspects of the method: apparatus procedure. (authors) [French] Les auteurs ont decrit dans une autre publication (Anal. Chim. Acta) a paraitre, une methode de dosage de l'oxygene dans les composes de l'uranium par attaque par le monochlorure de soufre, La presente note a pour but d'en preciser les techniques experimentale: appareillage, mode operatoire. (auteurs)

  7. Incidence of non-lung solid cancers in Czech uranium miners: A case-cohort study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulich, M.; Rericha, V.; Rericha, R.; Shore, D.L.; Sandler, D.P.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: Uranium miners are chronically exposed to radon and its progeny, which are known to cause lung cancer and may be associated with leukemia. This study was undertaken to evaluate risk of non-lung solid cancers among uranium miners in Pribram region, Czech Republic. Methods: A retrospective stratified case-cohort study in a cohort of 22,816 underground miners who were employed between 1949 and 1975. All incident non-lung solid cancers were ascertained among miners who worked underground for at least 12 months (n=1020). A subcohort of 1707 subjects was randomly drawn from the same population by random sampling stratified on age. The follow-up period lasted from 1977 to 1996. Results: Relative risks comparing 180 WLM (90th percentile) of cumulative lifetime radon exposure to 3 WLM (10th percentile) were 0.88 for all non-lung solid cancers combined (95% CI 0.73-1.04, n=1020), 0.87 for all digestive cancers (95% CI 0.69-1.09, n=561), 2.39 for gallbladder cancer (95% CI 0.52-10.98, n=13), 0.79 for larynx cancer (95% CI 0.38-1.64, n=62), 2.92 for malignant melanoma (95% CI 0.91-9.42, n=23), 0.84 for bladder cancer (95% CI 0.43-1.65, n=73), and 1.13 for kidney cancer (95% CI 0.62-2.04, n=66). No cancer type was significantly associated with radon exposure; only malignant melanoma and gallbladder cancer showed elevated but non-significant association with radon. Conclusions: Radon was not significantly associated with incidence of any cancer of interest, although a positive association of radon with malignant melanoma and gallbladder cancer cannot be entirely ruled out. - Research highlights: → Uranium miners are chronically exposed to radon. → We evaluate risk of non-lung solid cancers among uranium miners. → No cancer type was significantly associated with radon exposure. → Malignant melanoma and gallbladder cancer showed non-significant elevated risk.

  8. A new method for determining the uranium and thorium distribution in volcanic rock samples using solid state nuclear track detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misdaq, M.A.; Bakhchi, A.; Ktata, A.; Koutit, A.; Lamine, J.; Ait nouh, F.; Oufni, L.

    2000-01-01

    A method based on using solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTD) CR- 39 and LR-115 type II and calculating the probabilities for the alpha particles emitted by the uranium and thorium series to reach and be registered on these films was utilized for uranium and thorium contents determination in various geological samples. The distribution of uranium and thorium in different volcanic rocks has been investigated using the track fission method. In this work, the uranium and thorium contents have been determined in different volcanic rock samples by using CR-39 and LR-115 type II solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTD). The mean critical angles of etching of the solid state nuclear track detectors utilized have been calculated. A petrographical study of the volcanic rock thin layers studied has been conducted. The uranium and thorium distribution inside different rock thin layers has been studied. The mechanism of inclusion of the uranium and thorium nuclei inside the volcanic rock samples studied has been investigated. (author)

  9. Uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, R M

    1976-01-01

    Evidence of expanding markets, improved prices and the short supply of uranium became abundantly clear in 1975, providing the much needed impetus for widespread activity in all phases of uranium operations. Exploration activity that had been at low levels in recent years in Canada was evident in most provinces as well as the Northwest Territories. All producers were in the process of expanding their uranium-producing facilities. Canada's Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) by year-end had authorized the export of over 73,000 tons of U/sub 3/0/sub 8/ all since September 1974, when the federal government announced its new uranium export guidelines. World production, which had been in the order of 25,000 tons of U/sub 3/0/sub 8/ annually, was expected to reach about 28,000 tons in 1975, principally from increased output in the United States.

  10. Direct electrochemical reduction of solid uranium oxide in molten fluoride salts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibilaro, Mathieu; Cassayre, Laurent; Lemoine, Olivier; Massot, Laurent; Dugne, Olivier; Malmbeck, Rikard; Chamelot, Pierre

    2011-07-01

    The direct electrochemical reduction of UO 2 solid pellets was carried out in LiF-CaF 2 (+2 mass.% Li 2O) at 850 °C. An inert gold anode was used instead of the usual reactive sacrificial carbon anode. In this case, oxidation of oxide ions present in the melt yields O 2 gas evolution on the anode. Electrochemical characterisations of UO 2 pellets were performed by linear sweep voltammetry at 10 mV/s and reduction waves associated to oxide direct reduction were observed at a potential 150 mV more positive in comparison to the solvent reduction. Subsequent, galvanostatic electrolyses runs were carried out and products were characterised by SEM-EDX, EPMA/WDS, XRD and microhardness measurements. In one of the runs, uranium oxide was partially reduced and three phases were observed: nonreduced UO 2 in the centre, pure metallic uranium on the external layer and an intermediate phase representing the initial stage of reduction taking place at the grain boundaries. In another run, the UO 2 sample was fully reduced. Due to oxygen removal, the U matrix had a typical coral-like structure which is characteristic of the pattern observed after the electroreduction of solid oxides.

  11. Characterization of past and present solid waste streams from the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pottmeyer, J.A.; Weyns, M.I.; Lorenzo, D.S.; Vejvoda, E.J.; Duncan, D.R.

    1993-04-01

    During the next two decades the transuranic wastes, now stored in the burial trenches and storage facilities at the Hanford Site, are to be retrieved, processed at the Waste Receiving and Processing Facility, and shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant near Carlsbad, New Mexico for final disposal. Over 7% of the transuranic waste to be retrieved for shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant has been generated at the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Plant. The purpose of this report is to characterize the radioactive solid wastes generated by PUREX using process knowledge, existing records, and oral history interviews. The PUREX Plant is currently operated by the Westinghouse Hanford Company for the US Department of Energy and is now in standby status while being prepared for permanent shutdown. The PUREX Plant is a collection of facilities that has been used primarily to separate plutonium for nuclear weapons from spent fuel that had been irradiated in the Hanford Site's defense reactors. Originally designed to reprocess aluminum-clad uranium fuel, the plant was modified to reprocess zirconium alloy clad fuel elements from the Hanford Site's N Reactor. PUREX has provided plutonium for research reactor development, safety programs, and defense. In addition, the PUREX was used to recover slightly enriched uranium for recycling into fuel for use in reactors that generate electricity and plutonium. Section 2.0 provides further details of the PUREX's physical plant and its operations. The PUREX Plant functions that generate solid waste are as follows: processing operations, laboratory analyses and supporting activities. The types and estimated quantities of waste resulting from these activities are discussed in detail

  12. Flavor and taste compounds analysis in Chinese solid fermented ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A total of 82 kinds of volatile compounds were identified, including alcohols, acids, esters, aldehydes, ketones, phenols, heterocyclic compounds, alkynes and benzenes. The subtle aroma of the soy sauce seemed to depend not only on particular key compounds but also on a “critical balance” or a “weighted concentration

  13. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkin, D.J.

    1982-01-01

    Developments in the Australian uranium industry during 1980 are reviewed. Mine production increased markedly to 1841 t U 3 O 8 because of output from the new concentrator at Nabarlek and 1131 t of U 3 O 8 were exported at a nominal value of $37.19/lb. Several new contracts were signed for the sale of yellowcake from Ranger and Nabarlek Mines. Other developments include the decision by the joint venturers in the Olympic Dam Project to sink an exploration shaft and the release of an environmental impact statement for the Honeymoon deposit. Uranium exploration expenditure increased in 1980 and additions were made to Australia's demonstrated economic uranium resources. A world review is included

  14. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabelman, J.W.; Chenoweth, W.L.; Ingerson, E.

    1981-01-01

    The uranium production industry is well into its third recession during the nuclear era (since 1945). Exploration is drastically curtailed, and many staffs are being reduced. Historical market price production trends are discussed. A total of 3.07 million acres of land was acquired for exploration; drastic decrease. Surface drilling footage was reduced sharply; an estimated 250 drill rigs were used by the uranium industry during 1980. Land acquisition costs increased 8%. The domestic reserve changes are detailed by cause: exploration, re-evaluation, or production. Two significant discoveries of deposits were made in Mohave County, Arizona. Uranium production during 1980 was 21,850 short tons U 3 O 8 ; an increase of 17% from 1979. Domestic and foreign exploration highlights were given. Major producing areas for the US are San Juan basin, Wyoming basins, Texas coastal plain, Paradox basin, northeastern Washington, Henry Mountains, Utah, central Colorado, and the McDermitt caldera in Nevada and Oregon. 3 figures, 8 tables

  15. Evaluation of Solid Geologic Reference Materials for Uranium-Series Measurements via LA-ICPMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, K. A.; Goldstein, S. J.; Norman, D. E.; Nunn, A. J.; Murrell, M. T.

    2008-12-01

    Uranium-series geochemistry and geochronology have a wide range of applications in paleoclimatology, volcanology and other disciplines. To further explore these fields, the geoanalytical community has now begun to exploit recent advances in in situ, micron-scale sampling via laser ablation-ICPMS. Unfortunately, improvements in instrumentation have generally outpaced development of the appropriate geologic reference materials required for in situ U-series work. We will report results for uranium and thorium isotopic ratios and elemental concentrations measured in a suite of solid standards from the USGS (e.g., BCR-2G, BHVO-2G, GSD-1G, MACS-1, NKT-2G), as well as those from the MPI-DING series (e.g., ATHO-G, T1-G, StHs6/80-G). Specifically created for microanalysis, two of these standards are synthetic (GSD-1G, MACS-1) and the remainder are naturally-sourced glasses. They cover a range of compositions, ages (± secular equilibrium), elemental concentrations and expected isotopic ratios. The U-series isotopics of some powdered source materials have been characterized (e.g., BCR-2, BHVO-2), although there is no confirmation of the same ratios in the glass. Bulk measurement of these solid standards via TIMS and solution multicollector-ICPMS can then be used to assess the performance of LA-ICPMS techniques which require matrix-matched solid standards for correction of U-series elemental and isotopic ratios. These results from existing, widely-available reference materials will also facilitate quantification and comparison of U-series data among laboratories in the broader geoscience community.

  16. Incidence of non-lung solid cancers in Czech uranium miners: a case-cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulich, M; Reřicha, V; Reřicha, R; Shore, D L; Sandler, D P

    2011-04-01

    Uranium miners are chronically exposed to radon and its progeny, which are known to cause lung cancer and may be associated with leukemia. This study was undertaken to evaluate risk of non-lung solid cancers among uranium miners in Příbram region, Czech Republic. A retrospective stratified case-cohort study in a cohort of 22,816 underground miners who were employed between 1949 and 1975. All incident non-lung solid cancers were ascertained among miners who worked underground for at least 12 months (n=1020). A subcohort of 1707 subjects was randomly drawn from the same population by random sampling stratified on age. The follow-up period lasted from 1977 to 1996. Relative risks comparing 180 WLM (90th percentile) of cumulative lifetime radon exposure to 3 WLM (10th percentile) were 0.88 for all non-lung solid cancers combined (95% CI 0.73-1.04, n=1020), 0.87 for all digestive cancers (95% CI 0.69-1.09, n=561), 2.39 for gallbladder cancer (95% CI 0.52-10.98, n=13), 0.79 for larynx cancer (95% CI 0.38-1.64, n=62), 2.92 for malignant melanoma (95% CI 0.91-9.42, n=23), 0.84 for bladder cancer (95% CI 0.43-1.65, n=73), and 1.13 for kidney cancer (95% CI 0.62-2.04, n=66). No cancer type was significantly associated with radon exposure; only malignant melanoma and gallbladder cancer showed elevated but non-significant association with radon. Radon was not significantly associated with incidence of any cancer of interest, although a positive association of radon with malignant melanoma and gallbladder cancer cannot be entirely ruled out. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Standard test method for determination of impurities in nuclear grade uranium compounds by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of 67 elements in uranium dioxide samples and nuclear grade uranium compounds and solutions without matrix separation by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The elements are listed in Table 1. These elements can also be determined in uranyl nitrate hexahydrate (UNH), uranium hexafluoride (UF6), triuranium octoxide (U3O8) and uranium trioxide (UO3) if these compounds are treated and converted to the same uranium concentration solution. 1.2 The elements boron, sodium, silicon, phosphorus, potassium, calcium and iron can be determined using different techniques. The analyst's instrumentation will determine which procedure is chosen for the analysis. 1.3 The test method for technetium-99 is given in Annex A1. 1.4 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. 1.5 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish ...

  18. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1983-01-01

    Recent decisions by the Australian Government will ensure a significant expansion of the uranium industry. Development at Roxby Downs may proceed and Ranger may fulfil two new contracts but the decision specifies that apart from Roxby Downs, no new mines should be approved. The ACTU maintains an anti-uranium policy but reaction to the decision from the trade union movement has been muted. The Australian Science and Technology Council (ASTEC) has been asked by the Government to conduct an inquiry into a number of issues relating to Australia's role in the nuclear fuel cycle. The inquiry will examine in particular Australia's nuclear safeguards arrangements and the adequacy of existing waste management technology. In two additional decisions the Government has dissociated itself from a study into the feasibility of establishing an enrichment operation and has abolished the Uranium Advisory Council. Although Australian reserves account for 20% of the total in the Western World, Australia accounts for a relatively minor proportion of the world's uranium production

  19. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    The French Government has decided to freeze a substantial part of its nuclear power programme. Work has been halted on 18 reactors. This power programme is discussed, as well as the effect it has on the supply of uranium by South Africa

  20. Development of a portable mass spectrometric system for determination of isotopic composition of solid uranium samples using fluorine volatilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loge, G.

    1994-09-01

    Using hardware and materials supplied by LANL, a prototype quadrupole mass spectrometer system designed for portable field analysis of isotopic composition of solid uranium samples was assembled and tested. The system contained the capability for fluorine volatilization of solid uranium samples with gas introduction, which was successfully tested and demonstrated using 100 mg samples of U3O8. Determination of precision and accuracy for measuring isotopic composition was performed using isotopic standards. Use with soil samples containing uranium were also attempted. Silicates in the soil forming SiF4 were found to be a kinetic bottleneck to the formation of UF6. This could be avoided by performing some sort of chemical separation as a pre-treatment step, which was demonstrated using nitric acid.

  1. The utilization of uranium industry technology and relevant chemistry to leach uranium from mixed-waste solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattus, A.J.; Farr, L.L.

    1991-01-01

    Methods for the chemical extraction of uranium from a number of refractory uranium-containing minerals found in nature have been in place and employed by the uranium mining and milling industry for nearly half a century. These same methods, in conjunction with the principles of relevant uranium chemistry, have been employed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to chemically leach depleted uranium from mixed-waste sludge and soil. The removal of uranium from what is now classified as mixed waste may result in the reclassification of the waste as hazardous, which may then be delisted. The delisted waste might eventually be disposed of in commercial landfill sites. This paper generally discusses the application of chemical extractive methods to remove depleted uranium from a biodenitrification sludge and a storm sewer soil sediment from the Y-12 weapons plant in Oak Ridge. Some select data obtained from scoping leach tests on these materials are presented along with associated limitations and observations which might be useful to others performing such test work. 6 refs., 2 tabs

  2. The utilization of uranium industry technology and relevant chemistry to leach uranium from mixed-waste solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattus, A.J.; Farr, L.L.

    1991-01-01

    Methods for the chemical extraction of uranium from a number of refractory uranium-containing minerals found in nature have been in place and employed by the uranium mining and milling industry for nearly half a century. These same methods, in conjunction with the principles of relevant uranium chemistry, have been employed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to chemically leach depleted uranium from mixed-waste sludge and soil. The removal of uranium from what is now classified as mixed waste may result in the reclassification of the waste as hazardous, which may then be delisted. The delisted waste might eventually be disposed of in commercial landfill sites. This paper generally discusses the application of chemical extractive methods to remove depleted uranium from a biodenitrification sludge and a storm sewer soil sediment from the Y-12 weapons plant in Oak Ridge. Some select data obtained from scoping leach tests on these materials are presented along with associated limitations and observations which might be useful to others performing such test work. 6 refs., 2 tabs.

  3. An experimental study of molten salt electrorefining of uranium using solid iron cathode and liquid cadmium cathode for development of pyrometallurgical reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koyama, Tadafumi; Iizuka, Masatoshi; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Tokiwai, Moriyasu; Shoji, Yuichi; Fujita, Reiko; Kobayashi, Tsuguyuki.

    1997-01-01

    Electrorefining of uranium was studied for developing pyrometallurgical reprocessing technology of metal fuel cycle. After concentration dependence of polarization curve was measured, uranium was electrodeposited either on solid iron cathode or in liquid cadmium cathode. Design and operational conditions of the cathode were improved for obtaining much greater quantity of deposit, resulting in recovery of 732g of dendritic uranium on a single solid cathode, and of 232g of uranium in 2,344g of a liquid cadmium cathode. The behaviors of electro-codeposition of rare earth elements with uranium were observed for liquid cadmium cathode, and were found to follow the local equilibrium between salt electrolyte and cathode. The decontamination factors of FP simulating elements from uranium were tentatively determined as >2,000 for deposition to solid cathode and as >7 for deposition to liquid cadmium cathode, respectively. (author)

  4. Uranium conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliver, Lena; Peterson, Jenny; Wilhelmsen, Katarina

    2006-03-01

    FOI, has performed a study on uranium conversion processes that are of importance in the production of different uranium compounds in the nuclear industry. The same conversion processes are of interest both when production of nuclear fuel and production of fissile material for nuclear weapons are considered. Countries that have nuclear weapons ambitions, with the intention to produce highly enriched uranium for weapons purposes, need some degree of uranium conversion capability depending on the uranium feed material available. This report describes the processes that are needed from uranium mining and milling to the different conversion processes for converting uranium ore concentrate to uranium hexafluoride. Uranium hexafluoride is the uranium compound used in most enrichment facilities. The processes needed to produce uranium dioxide for use in nuclear fuel and the processes needed to convert different uranium compounds to uranium metal - the form of uranium that is used in a nuclear weapon - are also presented. The production of uranium ore concentrate from uranium ore is included since uranium ore concentrate is the feed material required for a uranium conversion facility. Both the chemistry and principles or the different uranium conversion processes and the equipment needed in the processes are described. Since most of the equipment that is used in a uranium conversion facility is similar to that used in conventional chemical industry, it is difficult to determine if certain equipment is considered for uranium conversion or not. However, the chemical conversion processes where UF 6 and UF 4 are present require equipment that is made of corrosion resistant material

  5. Uranium isotope exchange between gaseous UF6 and solid UF5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yato, Yumio; Kishimoto, Yoichiro; Sasao, Nobuyuki; Suto, Osamu; Funasaka, Hideyuki

    1996-01-01

    Based on a collision model, a new rate equation is derived for uranium isotope exchange between gaseous UF 6 and solid UF 5 by considering the number of UF 5 molecules on the solid surface to be dependent on time. The reaction parameters included in the equation are determined from the experimental data and compared with the previous ones. A remarkable agreement is found between the particle sizes of UF 5 estimated from the reaction parameter and from the direct observation with an electron microscope. The rate equation given in this work fully satisfies the related mass conservation and furthermore includes explicitly the terms related to the UF 6 density and the mean size of UF 5 particles, both of which are considered to cause an important effect on the reaction. This remarkable feature facilitates the simulation studies on this reaction under various conditions. The long term behavior of a simulated exchange reaction is studied under the condition considered to be close to that in a recovery zone of the MLIS process. The result indicates that the reaction is virtually limited to the solid surface under this conditions and thus the depletion of 235 UF 5 concentration averaged over the whole UF 5 particles is not significant even after 200 h of the exchange reaction

  6. Mapping of uranium and thorium in radioactive rocks using nuclear track solid detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouch, C.M.

    1982-01-01

    α-Autoradiography and studies of induced fission in a research nuclear reactor (IEA-R1, IPEN, Sao Paulo) were done, employing Solid-State Nuclear Track detectors, in order to study the distribution of α-emitters, U and Th in rocks. Polished sections of rocks were prepared and photographed. Etching conditions were studied in order to adapt the detectors to the studies of microdistribution and macrodistribution of tracks. Polycarbonate foils (Bayer, Makrofol) were chosen as fission-fragments detectors and the technique of fission induced with reactor neutrons to obtain the distribution of U and Th were studied. Uranium and thorium standards evaporated on the surface of the detectors, as well as thorite and uraninite grains, were irradiated in order to measure the integrated flux of neutrons, the effective cross sections for fission with reactor neutrons for 232 Th(0,05b) and 238 U(0,30b) and to study the contribution of 238 U fission in thorium mapping. A technique for determination of uranium and thorium in minerals was studied and applied to Mica, for which were determined the contents of 4,2 ppb U e 58 ppb Th. (Author) [pt

  7. Determination of metallic impurities in nuclearly pure uranium compounds by electrothermal spectrophotometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franco, M.B.

    1986-01-01

    Atomic absorption spectrometry, with electrothermal atomization, has been used for the determination of Al, Cd, Cr, Fe, Mn and Ni in uranium oxide standards. The analysis were performed without sample dissolution and without uranium chemical separation. This technique is adequate for the qualification of nuclearly pure uranium, according to the standard specifications. (Author) [pt

  8. Solid phase extraction of hydroxyaromatic compounds from aquatic environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. T. Sukhanov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The dependence of extraction parameters of hydroxyaromatic compounds on sort of polyurethane foam, nature and composition of solution deposited on a polymer foam, content of inorganic salt in solution.

  9. Separation of uranium from (Th,U)O2 solid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiotti, P.; Jha, M.C.

    1976-01-01

    Uranium is separated from mixed oxides of thorium and uranium by a pyrometallurgical process in which the oxides are mixed with a molten chloride salt containing thorium tetrachloride and thorium metal which reduces the uranium oxide to uranium metal which can then be recovered from the molten salt. The process is particularly useful for the recovery of uranium from generally insoluble high-density sol-gel thoria-urania nuclear reactor fuel pellets. 7 claims

  10. Self-association and infrared spectres of some heterocyclic compounds based on pyrrol in solid state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulloev, N.; Nurulloev, M.; Narziev, B.N.

    1993-01-01

    Present article is devoted to self-association and infrared spectres of some heterocyclic compounds based on pyrrol in solid state. The study results of self-association specified by molecular hydrogen bonds of some heterocyclic compounds based on pyrrol on spectres of infrared absorption of stretching vibrations of N-H group were considered.

  11. Solid fat content as a substitute for total polar compound analysis in edible oils

    Science.gov (United States)

    The solid fat contents (SFC) of heated edible oil samples were measured and found to correlate positively with total polar compounds (TPC) and inversely with triglyceride concentration. Traditional methods for determination of total polar compounds require a laboratory setting and are time intensiv...

  12. X-ray absorption experiments on rare earth and uranium compounds under high pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmiester, G.

    1987-01-01

    After an introduction into the phenomenon of the mixed valency and the method of measuring the microstructures by X-ray absorption spectroscopy in the area of the L edges under pressure, the results of investigations at selected substitutes of the chalcogenides and puictides of the rare earths and the uranium were given. Thus, pressure-induced valency transitions in YbS and YbTe, instabilities in valency and structural phase transitions in EUS and SmTe as well as the change in the electron structure in USb under pressure were investigated in order to answer questions of solid state physics (e.g. semiconductor-metal transitions, correlation between valency and structural phase transitions). Hybridization effects in L III spectra of formally tetravalent Ca are analyzed at CeF 4 and CeO 2 (insulators) and the role of final state effects in the L III spectra are analyzed at EuP 2 P 2 and TmSe-TmTe (semiconductor systems). (RB) [de

  13. Numerically robust geometry engine for compound solid geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlachoudis, V.; Sinuela-Pastor, D.

    2013-01-01

    Monte Carlo programs heavily rely on a fast and numerically robust solid geometry engines. However the success of solid modeling, depends on facilities for specifying and editing parameterized models through a user-friendly graphical front-end. Such a user interface has to be fast enough in order to be interactive for 2D and/or 3D displays, but at the same time numerically robust in order to display possible modeling errors at real time that could be critical for the simulation. The graphical user interface Flair for FLUKA currently employs such an engine where special emphasis has been given on being fast and numerically robust. The numerically robustness is achieved by a novel method of estimating the floating precision of the operations, which dynamically adapts all the decision operations accordingly. Moreover a predictive caching mechanism is ensuring that logical errors in the geometry description are found online, without compromising the processing time by checking all regions. (authors)

  14. Study on the characterization and thermal decomposition of uranium compounds by thermogravimetry (TG) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dantas, J.M.; Abrao, A.

    1981-04-01

    A contribution to the characterization of several uranium compounds obtained at the IPEN' Uranium Pilot Plant is given. Particularly, samples of ammonium diuranate (ADU) and uranium oxides were studied. The main objective was to know the stoichiometry of the ADU and the oxides resulting from its thermal transformation. ADU samples were prepared by batchwise precipitation, stationary dewatering into stove and batchwise thermal decomposition, or, alternatively, continuous precipitation, continuous filtration, continuous drying and continuous thermal decomposition inside a temperature gradient electrical furnace. All ADU were precipitated using NH 3 gas from uranul sulfate or uranyl nitrate solutions. The thermal decomposition of ADU and uranium oxides were studied in an air atmosphere by thermogravimetry (TG) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Any correlation between the parameters of precipitation, drying, calcination and the hystory of the obtaintion of the several uraniumm compounds and their initial and final composition was looked for. Heating program was established to have the U 3 O 8 oxide as the final product. Intermediary phases were tentatively identified. Temperatures at which occurred the absorption water elimination, crystallization water elimination, evolution or oxidation of NH 3 , decomposition of NO -3 ion and oxygen evolution and the exo- and endothermic process for each sample were identified. (Author) [pt

  15. Investigation of the uranium-molybdenum diffusion in body centered {gamma} solid solutions; Etude de la diffusion uranium-molybdene dans la solution solide {gamma} cubique centree

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adda, Y; Mairy, C; Bouchet, P [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires; Philibert, J [IRSID, 78 - Saint-Germain-en-Laye (France)

    1958-07-01

    The body centered {gamma} phase uranium-molybdenum intermetallic diffusion has been studied by different technical methods: micrography, electronic microanalyser, microhardness. The values of several numbers of penetration coefficients are given, and their physical significations has been discussed. The diffusion coefficients, the frequency factor and activation energies has been determined for each concentration. After determination of the Kirkendall effect in this system, we calculated the intrinsic diffusion coefficient of uranium and molybdenum. (author) [French] La dilution intermetallique uranium-molybdene, en phase {gamma} cubique centree, a ete etudiee au moyen de differentes techniques: micrographie, microsonde electronique, microdurete. Les valeurs d'un certain nombre de coefficients de penetration sont donnees et leur signification physique discutee. Les coefficients de diffusion, les facteurs de frequence et les energies d'activation ont ete determines pour chaque concentration. Apres avoir mis en evidence un effet Kirkendall dans ce systeme, on a calcule les coefficients de diffusion intrinseques de l'uranium et du molybdene. (auteur)

  16. Changes in volatile compound composition of Antrodia camphorata during solid state fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yongjun; Zhang, Baorong; Li, Weijiang; Xu, Ganrong

    2011-10-01

    Although the volatiles present in mushrooms and fungi have been investigated by many researchers, including Antrodia camphorata in submerged fermentation, there are few data available regarding changes in volatile compounds during fermentation. Our research has revealed that solid state fermentation of A. camphorata is highly odiferous compared with submerged cultures and the odor changed with increasing culture time. Therefore the aim of this study was to investigate the changes in volatile compound composition of A. camphorata during solid state fermentation. Altogether, 124 major volatile compounds were identified. The volatile compounds produced by A. camphorata during growth in solid state fermentation were quite different. Oct-1-en-3-ol, octan-3-one and methyl 2-phenylacetate were predominant in exponential growth phase production, while the dominant volatiles produced in stationary phase were octan-3-one and methyl 2-phenylacetate. In stationary phase, lactone compounds in A. camphorata, such as 5-butyloxolan-2-one, 5-heptyloxolan-2-one, 6-heptyloxan-2-one, contributed greatly to peach and fruit-like flavor. Terpene and terpene alcohol compounds, such as 1-terpineol, L-linalool, T-cadinol, (E, E)-farnesol, β-elemene, cis-α-bisabolene and α-muurolene, made different contributions to herbal fresh aroma in A. camphorata. Nineteen volatile sesquiterpenes were detected from solid state fermentation of A. camphorata. The compounds 5-n-butyl-5H-furan-2-one, β-ionone, (-)-caryophyllene oxide, aromadendrene oxide, diepi-α-cedrene epoxide, β-elemene, α-selinene, α-muurolene, azulene, germacrene D, γ-cadinene and 2-methylpyrazine have not hitherto been reported in A. camphorata. The preliminary results suggest that the aroma-active compounds produced by A camphorata in solid state fermentation might serve as an important source of natural aroma compounds for the food and cosmetic industries or antibiotic activity compounds. The sesquiterpenes could be

  17. Uranium-oxide-based catalysts for the destruction of volatile chloro-organic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutchings, G.; Heneghan, C.S.; Taylor, S.H.

    1996-01-01

    The industrial release of hydrocarbons and chlorine-containing organic molecules into the environment continues to attract considerable public concern, which in turn has led to governmental attempts to control such emissions. The challenge is to reduce pollution without stifling economic growth. Chlorine-containing pollutants are known to be particularly stable, and at present the main industrial process for their destruction involves thermal oxidation at 1,000 o C, an expensive process that can lead to the formation of highly toxic by-products such as dioxins and dibenzofurans. Catalytic combustion at lower temperatures could potentially destroy pollutants more efficiently (in terms of energy requirements) and without forming toxic by-products. Current industrial catalysts are based on precious metals that are deactivated rapidly by organochlorine compounds. Here we report that catalysts based on uranium oxide efficiently destroy a range of hydrocarbon and chlorine-containing pollutants, and that these catalysts are resistant to deactivation. We show that benzene, toluene, chlorobutane and chlorobenzene can be destroyed at moderate temperatures ( o C) and industrially relevant flow rates. (Author)

  18. Isotopic exchange in mixed valence compounds in the solid state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez Valverde, S.M.

    1986-01-01

    This work aims at the determination of isotopic exchange kinetics and mechanism in two mixed valence compounds: Cs 10 (Sbsup(V)Cl 6 ) (Sbsup(III)Cl 6 ) 3 and Tl 3 sup(I)(Tlsup(III)Cl 6 ). The synthesis of the first compound is very difficult because in most of the cases mixtures of chloroantimoniates are obtained. Exchange in Tl 4 Cl 6 labelled on Tlsup(III) is studied in detail by radiochemical analysis and physical techniques: ionic conductivity and positon annihilation. Cation vacancies are easily created in the lattice with formation enthalpy of 0.35 eV and migration enthalpy of 0.52 eV. Isochronic and isothermal exchange curves are described by a kinetic based on species diffusion. Models are given. Exchange is increased by grinding probably because extrinseque defects are introduced [fr

  19. Uranium compounds in ceramic enamels-radioactivity analysis and use hazards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cucchi, G.; Amadesi, P.

    1980-01-01

    An analysis was made of the radioactivity of enamel samples, containing depleted Uranium and Uranium ore, such as employed by the ceramic industry to produce paving and lining tiles. An investigation was also made of various types of tiles with depleted Uranium containing enamels, in order to evaluate the use hazard for dwelling houses, in particular in regard to the wear of tiled floors by children as a critical group. The risk to the population due to the use of tiles dyed with enamel containing depleted Uranium was considered an undue risk and as such not permissible. (U.K.)

  20. Measurement methods and optimization of radiation protection: the case of internal exposure by inhalation to natural uranium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degrange, J.P.; Gibert, B.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this presentation is to discuss the ability of different measurement methods (air sampling and biological examinations) to answer to demands in the particular case of internal exposure by inhalation to natural uranium compounds. The realism and the sensitivity of each method are studied, on the base of new dosimetric models of the ICRP. The ability of analysis of these methods in order to optimize radiation protection are then discussed. (N.C.)

  1. Purification of the Drain Water and Distillation Residues from Organic Compounds, Transuranic Elements and Uranium at the Chernobyl NPP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudenko, L.I.

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Article examines the purification of drain water and distillation residue from organic (polymeric compounds, tran suranic elements and uranium. We propose the pretreatment method with the use of a type «Sizol» coagulant-flocculant and catalytic oxidation with hydrogen peroxide and ultrafiltration. This method prevents evaporator coking by dustsuppression and other organic substances, which are vulcanized by heating. Removing alpha-emitting radionuclides increases safety level at the nuclear power plant.

  2. The electrochemical reduction processes of solid compounds in high temperature molten salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Wei; Wang, Dihua

    2014-05-21

    Solid electrode processes fall in the central focus of electrochemistry due to their broad-based applications in electrochemical energy storage/conversion devices, sensors and electrochemical preparation. The electrolytic production of metals, alloys, semiconductors and oxides via the electrochemical reduction of solid compounds (especially solid oxides) in high temperature molten salts has been well demonstrated to be an effective and environmentally friendly process for refractory metal extraction, functional materials preparation as well as spent fuel reprocessing. The (electro)chemical reduction of solid compounds under cathodic polarizations generally accompanies a variety of changes at the cathode/melt electrochemical interface which result in diverse electrolytic products with different compositions, morphologies and microstructures. This report summarizes various (electro)chemical reactions taking place at the compound cathode/melt interface during the electrochemical reduction of solid compounds in molten salts, which mainly include: (1) the direct electro-deoxidation of solid oxides; (2) the deposition of the active metal together with the electrochemical reduction of solid oxides; (3) the electro-inclusion of cations from molten salts; (4) the dissolution-electrodeposition process, and (5) the electron hopping process and carbon deposition with the utilization of carbon-based anodes. The implications of the forenamed cathodic reactions on the energy efficiency, chemical compositions and microstructures of the electrolytic products are also discussed. We hope that a comprehensive understanding of the cathodic processes during the electrochemical reduction of solid compounds in molten salts could form a basis for developing a clean, energy efficient and affordable production process for advanced/engineering materials.

  3. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battey, G.C.; McKay, A.D.

    1988-01-01

    Production for 1986 was 4899 t U 3 O 8 (4154 t U), 30% greater than in 1985, mainly because of a 39% increase in production at Ranger. Exports for 1986 were 4166 t U 3 O 8 at an average f.o.b. unit value of $40.57/lb U 3 O 8 . Private exploration expenditure for uranium in Australia during the 1985-86 fiscal year was $50.2 million. Plans were announced to increase the nominal capacity of the processing plant at Ranger from 3000 t/year U 3 O 8 to 4500 t and later to 6000 t/year. Construction and initial mine development at Olympic Dam began in March. Production is planned for mid 1988 at an annual rate of 2000 t U 3 O 8 , 30 000 t Cu, and 90 000 oz (2800 kg) Au. The first long-term sales agreement was concluded in September 1986. At the Manyingee deposit, testing of the alkaline solution mining method was completed, and the treatment plant was dismantled. Spot market prices (in US$/lb U 3 O 8 ) quoted by Nuexco were generally stable. From January-October the exchange value fluctuated from US$17.00-US$17.25; for November and December it was US$16.75. Australia's Reasonably Assured Resources of uranium recoverable at less than US$80/kg U at December 1986 were estimated as 462 000 t U, 3000 t U less than in 1985. This represents 30% of the total low-cost RAR in the WOCA (World Outside the Centrally Planned Economy Areas) countries. Australia also has 257 000 t U in the low-cost Estimated Additional Resources Category I, 29% of the WOCA countries' total resources in this category

  4. Solubility of airborne uranium compounds at the Fernald Environmental Management Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heffernan, T.E.; Lodwick, J.C.; Spitz, H.; Neton, J.; Soldano, M.

    2000-01-01

    The in vitro volubility of airborne uranium dusts collected at a former uranium processing facility now undergoing safe shutdown, decontamination and dismantling was evaluated by immersing air filters from high volume samplers in simulated lung fluid and measuring the 238 U in sequential dissolution fractions using specific radiochemical analysis for uranium. X rays and photons from the decay of uranium and thorium remaining on the filter after each dissolution period were also directly measured using a planar germanium detector as a means for rapidly evaluating the volubility of the uranium bearing dusts. Results of these analyses demonstrate that two -distinct types of uranium bearing dusts were collected on the filters depending upon the location of the air samplers. The first material exhibited a dissolution half-time much less than one day and was most likely UO 3 . The dissolution rate of the second material, which was most likely U 3 O 8 , exhibited two components. Approximately one-third of this material dissolved with a halftime much less than one day. The remaining two-thirds of the material dissolved with half times between 230 ± 16 d and 1350 ± 202 d. The dissolution rates for uranium determined by radiochemical analysis and by gamma spectrometry were similar. However, gamma spectrometry analysis suggested a difference between the half times of 238 U and its daughter 234 Th which may have important implications for in vivo monitoring of uranium

  5. Metal electrodeposition and electron transfer studies of uranium compounds in room temperature ionic liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoll, M.E.; Oldham, W.J.; Costa, D.A.

    2004-01-01

    Room temperature ionic liquids (RTIL's) comprised of 1,3-dialkylimidazolium or quaternary ammonium cations and one of several anions such as PF 6 - , BF 4 - , or - N(SO 2 CF 3 ) 2 , represent a class of solvents that possess great potential for use in applications employing electrochemical procedures. Part of the intrigue with RTIL's stems from some of their inherent solvent properties including negligible vapor pressure, good conductivity, high chemical and thermal stability, and non-flammability. Additionally, a substantial number of RTIL's can be envisioned simply by combining different cation and anion pairs, thereby making them attractive for specific application needs. We are interested in learning more about the possible use of RTIL's within the nuclear industry. In this regard our research team has been exploring the electron transfer behavior of simple metal ions in addition to coordination and organometallic complexes in these novel solvents. Results from our research have also provided us with insight into the bonding interactions between our current anion of choice, bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide = NTf 2 , and open coordination sites on actinide and transition metal fragments. This presentation will focus on recent results in two areas: the electrodeposition of electropositive metal ions from RTIL solutions and the electron transfer behavior for several uranium complexes. Details concerning the cathodic electrodeposition and anodic stripping of alkali metals (Na, K) from various working electrode surfaces (Pt, Au, W, Glassy Carbon) will be discussed. Figure 1 displays typical behavior for the electrodeposition of potassium metal from an RTIL containing potassium ions produced through the reaction of KH with H[NTf 2 ]. Our efforts with other metal ions, including our results to date with uranium electrodeposition, will be covered during the presentation. The electron transfer behavior for a number of uranium complexes have been studied with various

  6. The determination of the crystal structures of some uranium compounds by means of x-ray and neutron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adrian, H.W.W.

    1977-10-01

    In industrial uranium processing or reprocessing procedures, aqueous uranyl nitrate solutions are an intermediate product. The compounds, whose structures are reported, might prove valuable as alternative crystallization products to existing methods of extracting the uranium from solution. The compounds are obtained by the addition of hydroxylammonium to the uranyl nitrate solution and are of the general formula UO 2 (NH 2 0) 2 .xH 2 0, where x can take the values zero, two, three and four. In addition a compound of the formula UO 2 (NH 2 0) 2 .2(NH 2 CH).2H 2 0 was obtained. The UO 2 (NH 2 0) compound crystallized in a monoclinic crystal form. Crystals large enough for neutron diffraction were not obtained. The structure of the UO 2 (NH 2 0) 2 .2H 2 0 could not be solved because only disordered crystalline material was available. The structure of UO 2 (NH 2 0) 2 .3H 2 0 was solved by means of room- and low-temperature neutron diffraction. The unit cell is orthorhombic. The structure of α-UO 2 (NH 2 0) 2 .4H 2 0 was investigated by means of room-temperature x-ray and room- and low-temperature neutron diffraction. The unit cell is triclinic. This compound strongly resembles the trihydrate. The UO 2 (NH 2 0) 2 .2(NH 2 0H).2H 2 0 compound gave crystals large enough for single crystal x-ray but not neutron diffraction. The unit cell is orthorhombic. The characteristic powder patterns (indexed except for the dihydrate compound) of the above compounds are reported [af

  7. The effect of crystal structure stability on the mobility of gas bubbles in intermetallic uranium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rest, J.; Hofman, G.L.; Birtcher, R.C.

    1988-01-01

    Irradiation experiments with certain low-enrichment, high-density, uranium-base intermetallic alloys that are candidate reactor fuel materials, such as U 3 Si and U 6 Fe, have revealed extraordinarily large voids at low and medium fuel burnup. This phenomenon of breakaway swelling does not occur in other fuel types, such as U 3 Si 2 and UAl 3 , where a distribution of relatively small and stable fission gas bubbles forms. In situ transmission electron microscope observations of ion radiation-induced rapid swelling of intermetallic materials are consistent with growth by plastic flow. Large radiation enhancement of plastic flow in amorphous materials has been observed in several independent experiments and is thought to be a general materials phenomenon. The basis for a microscopic theory of fission gas bubble behavior in irradiated amorphous compounds has been formulated. The assumption underlying the overall theory is that the evolution of the porosity from that observed in the crystalline material to that observed in irradiated amorphous U 3 Si as a function of fluence is due to a softening of the irradiated amorphous material. Bubble growth in the low-viscosity material has been approximated by an effective enhanced diffusivity. Mechanisms are included for the radiation-induced softening of the amorphous material, and for a relation between gas atom mobilities and radiation-induced (defect-generated) changes in the material. Results of the analysis indicate that the observed rapid swelling in U 3 Si arises directly from enhanced bubble migration and coalescence due to plastic flow. 34 refs., 11 figs

  8. Stationary and protable instruments for assay of HEU [highly enriched uranium] solids holdup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russo, P.A.; Sprinkle, J.K. Jr.; Stephens, M.M.; Brumfield, T.L.; Gunn, C.S.; Watson, D.R.

    1987-01-01

    Two NaI(Tl)-based instruments, one stationary and one portable, designed for automated assay of highly enriched uranium (HEU) solids holdup, are being evaluated at the scrap recovery facility of the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. The stationary instrument, a continuous monitor of HEU within the filters of the chip burner exhaust system, measures the HEU deposits that accumulate erratically and rapidly during chip burner operation. The portable system was built to assay HEU in over 100 m of elevated piping used to transfer UO 3 , UO 2 , and UF 4 powder to, from, and between the fluid bed conversion furnances and the powder storage hoods. Both instruments use two detector heads. Both provide immediate automatic readout of accumulated HEU mass. The 186-keV 235 U gamma ray is the assay signature, and the 60-keV gamma ray from an 241 Am source attached to each detector is used to normalize the 186-keV rate. The measurement geometries were selected for compatibility with simple calibration models. The assay calibrations were calculated from these models and were verified and normalized with measurements of HEU standards built to match geometries of uniform accumulations on the surfaces of the process equipment. This instrumentation effort demonstrates that simple calibration models can often be applied to unique measurement geometries, minimizing the otherwise unreasonable requirements for calibration standards and allowing extension of the measurements to other process locations

  9. Improvements made in the methods of purifying uranium compounds and in the production of uranium metal at the Bouchet plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decrop, J.; Delange, M.; Holder, J.; Huet, H.; Sauteron, J.; Vertes, P.

    1958-01-01

    We intend to chart the development of the techniques used at the Bouchet plant since the First International Conference held in Geneva in 1955. During that Conference, the methods adopted at that time were described by B. GOLDSCHMIDT and P. VERTES. Generally speaking, the development since that time has been governed by the following factors: 1- Conversion to a mass-production scale: The metal output, which amounted to approximately 10 tons in 1952, practically doubled each year, reaching successive figures of 80 tons in 1955, 160 tons in 1956 and 300 tons in 1957. At this very moment the output capacity of the plant is approaching its maximum, set at 500 tons/year, which it will reach at the end of the year. Beyond this output figure, the work will be carried on by the second French uranium production plant, which is now being erected at Narbonne. 2- Gradual abandoning of ore treatment, resulting from the decentralization of the duties performed by the CEA; The Bouchet Plant had, as a matter of fact, the first French treatment facilities, operating on the basis of 10 to 20 tons of ore per day. This ore, first concentrated at the production site proper by means of physical or physico-chemical methods to at least a 2 per cent uranium content, was sufficiently valuable to warrant quite well the cost involved in shipping it. However, the increase in the production schedules led to the treatment of ores of lower and lower grades, and it became more profitable to proceed with the chemical treating of these low-grade ores at the site after more or less thorough grading and, if necessary, preconcentration. As a result, the Bouchet plant scarcely ever receives uranium ores; on the contrary, the mining companies send their chemical concentrates, uranous phosphate and then sodium uranate from the Gueugnon Works in Saone-et-Loire since 1955; magnesium uranate from the Ecarpiere Works in Vendee since the beginning of 1957 and, very soon, products from the works which are now

  10. Compared biokinetic and biological studies of chronic and acute inhalations of uranium compounds in the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monleau, M.

    2005-12-01

    Uranium is a natural, radioactive heavy metal, widely used in the nuclear industry in various chemical and isotopic forms. Its use in the fuel cycle involves the risk of radiological exposure for the workers, mainly via the inhalation of uranium particles. According to the workplace configuration, uranium contaminations can be acute or repeated, involve various chemical forms and different levels of enrichment, as well as involving one or several components. The dosimetric concepts and models available for workers' radiological protection, as well as most of the studies of the biological effects, correspond to acute exposure situations. Moreover the processes leading to pathological effects are little known in vivo. In this context, the main question is to know whether exposures due to repeated inhalation by rats induce the element kinetics and toxicity, which may be different from those observed after an acute exposure. In this study, comparison of the experimental and theoretical biokinetics of an insoluble uranium repeatedly inhaled over three weeks shows that a chronic contamination is correctly modelled, except for bone retention, by the sum of acute, successive and independent incorporations. Moreover, the kinetics of a soluble uranium inhaled irregularly can be modified by previous repeated exposure to an insoluble uranium. In certain cases therefore, exposure to uranium could modify its biokinetics during later exposures. At a toxicological level, the study demonstrates that the uranium particles inhaled repeatedly induce behavioural disruptions and genotoxic effects resulting in various sorts of DNA damage, in several cell types and certainly depending on the quantity inhaled. Exposures involving several uraniferous components produce a synergy effect. Moreover, repeated inhalations worsen the genotoxic effects in comparison to an acute exposure. This work demonstrates the importance of not ignoring the effects of the repetition of uranium exposure. It

  11. Gas-Solid Reaction Properties of Fluorine Compounds and Solid Adsorbents for Off-Gas Treatment from Semiconductor Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinji Yasui

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We have been developing a new dry-type off-gas treatment system for recycling fluorine from perfluoro compounds present in off-gases from the semiconductor industry. The feature of this system is to adsorb the fluorine compounds in the exhaust gases from the decomposition furnace by using two types of solid adsorbents: the calcium carbonate in the upper layer adsorbs HF and converts it to CaF2, and the sodium bicarbonate in the lower layer adsorbs HF and SiF4 and converts them to Na2SiF6. This paper describes the fluorine compound adsorption properties of both the solid adsorbents—calcium carbonate and the sodium compound—for the optimal design of the fixation furnace. An analysis of the gas-solid reaction rate was performed from the experimental results of the breakthrough curve by using a fixed-bed reaction model, and the reaction rate constants and adsorption capacity were obtained for achieving an optimal process design.

  12. Analysis of uranium and of some of its compounds and alloys. Copper spectrophotometric determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copper determination in uranium, uranium oxides (UO 2 , UO 3 , U 3 O 8 ), ammonium diuranate, U-Al-Fe alloy (700 ppm Al and 300 ppm Fe) and U-Mo alloy (1.1 percent Mo) by acid dissolution reduction of copper by hydroxylamine hydrochloride and formation of a complex with diquinolyle-2,2' amyl alcohol (pH value 6 to 7) and spectrophotometry at 550 nm. The method is applicable for copper content between 5 to 40 ppm in respect of uranium contained in the material [fr

  13. Recovery of uranium from the Syrian phosphate by solid-liquid method using alkaline solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shlewit, H.; Alibrahim, M.

    2007-01-01

    Uranium concentrations were analyzed in the Syrian phosphate deposits. Mean concentrations were found between 50 and 110 ppm. As a consequence, an average phosphate dressing of 22 kg/ha phosphate would charge the soil with 5-20 g/ha uranium when added as a mineral fertilizer. Fine grinding phosphate produced at the Syrian mines was used for uranium recovery by carbonate leaching. The formation of the soluble uranyl tricarbonate anion UO 2 (CO 3 ) 3 4- permits use of alkali solutions of sodium carbonate and sodium bicarbonate salts for the nearly selective dissolution of uranium from phosphate. Separation of iron, aluminum, titanium, etc., from the uranium during leaching was carried out. Formation of some small amounts of molybdates, vanadates, phosphates, aluminates, and some complexes metal was investigated. This process could be used before the manufacture of TSP fertilizer, and the final products would contain smaller uranium quantities. (author)

  14. Spectroscopy and chemistry of uranium IV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Folcher, G.; Rigny, P.

    1980-06-01

    Different fundamental research papers on uranium IV are presented, some were never edited. Molecular spectroscopy was used for identification and structural study of uranium IV in aqueous or organic solutions. The fields studied are: coordination, stereochemistry, electronic structure and chemical properties. For interpretation of results some studies were made with solid compounds or with thorium compounds or thorium complexes. Knowledge of actinides chemistry is improved, uranium and thorium being models for 5 f ions, extractive chemistry is better understood and new applications are possible [fr

  15. On magnetic properties of thorium and uranium borides and Usub(1-x)Thsub(x)Bsub(4) solid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chachkhiani, Z.B.; Chachkhiani, L.G.; Chechernikov, V.I.; Slovyanskikh, V.K.

    1982-01-01

    The dependence of magnetic susceptibility on temperature of UB 4 compound and Usub(1-x)Thsub(x)Bsub(4) alloy system in the 140-1300 K temperature range is investigated. It has been found that paramagnetic susceptibility does not obeys the Curie-Weiss law. The interpretation of experimental results is performed on the basis of Stoner model of collectivized electrons which permits also to explain the magnetic properites of other thorium and uranium borides

  16. Quantum chemistry of solids and materials technology: solid-phase compounds of d- and f-elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gubanov, V.A.

    1988-01-01

    The results of studies aimed at the development of methods of theoretical calculations of the electronic structure of solid phase compounds of α- and f-elements and the modelling of physicochemical properties of materials developed on their basis, are presented. The possibilities of cluster and zone calculations of the electronic structure of refractory compounds of d-metals with light elements are considered. The regularities of changes in the chemical bond and properties during crystal lattice alloying with metals, metalloids are found. The methods of quantum chemical modeling of optically active and luminescent materials on the base of oxides, fluorides, chalcogenides of d- and f-metals are developed. The compositions of new optically active compositions and protective coatings are suggested. New approaches to the study of magnetic properties of metals, alloys and compounds are developed. The results of calculations of the energy spectra of high-temperature oxide superconductors are given

  17. Preconcentration of trace uranium from seawater with solid phase extraction followed by differential pulse polarographic determination in chloroform eluate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dojozan, Dj.; Pournaghi-Azar, M.H.; Toutounchi-Asr, J.

    1998-01-01

    In the present study, an effective method is presented for the separation and preconcentration of uranium (VI) by solid phase extraction (SPE). For this purpose, U(VI) oxinate is formed by the reaction of U(VI) with 8-hydroxyquinoline and adsorbed onto the octylsilane (C-8) SPE cartridge. The analyte is completely eluted with chloroform and determined by differential pulse polarography. The SPE conditions were optimized by evaluating the effective factors such as pH, oxine concentration, type and concentration of buffer and masking agent. By the proposed method a preconcentration factor of more than 100 was achieved. The average recovery of uranium (VI) oxinate (0.1 mg l -1 ) was 99.8%. The relative standard deviation was 1.6% for seven replicate determinations of uranyl ion in the solution with a concentration 20 μg l -1 . Some concomitant ions such as Ca +2 , Mg +2 and Fe +3 which interfere in extraction or determination process of uranium were masked with EDTA in aqueous phase during the extraction process. The proposed method was successfully used for the determination of uranium in Caspian Sea and Persian Gulf water samples

  18. Chloride pyrometallurgy of uranium ore. 1. Chlorination of phosphate ore using solid or gas chlorinating agent and carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taki, Tomihiro; Komoto, Shigetoshi; Otomura, Keiichiro; Takenaka, Toshihide; Sato, Nobuaki; Fujino, Takeo.

    1995-01-01

    A thermodynamical and pyrometallurgical study to recover uranium from the phosphate ores was undertaken using the chloride volatilization method. Iron was chlorinated with solid chlorinating agents such as NaCl and CaCl 2 in combination with activated carbon, which will be used for removing this element from the ore, but uranium was not. On the other hand, the chlorination using Cl 2 gas and activated carbon gave a good result at 1,223 K. Not only uranium but also iron, phosphorus, aluminum and silicon were found to form volatile chlorides which vaporized out of the ore, while calcium remained in the ore as non-volatile CaCl 2 . The chlorination condition was studied as functions of temperature, reaction time and carbon content. The volatilization ratio of uranium around 95% was obtained by heating the mixture of the ore and activated carbon (35 wt%) in a mixed gas flow of Cl 2 (200 ml/min) and N 2 (200 ml/min) at 1,223 K for 120 min. (author)

  19. Volatile compounds emission and health risk assessment during composting of organic fraction of municipal solid waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mustafa, Muhammad Farooq; Liu, Yanjun; Duan, Zhenhan

    2017-01-01

    Degradation of mechanically sorted organic fraction (MSOF) of municipal solid waste in composting facilities is among the major contributors of volatile compounds (VCs) generation and emission, causes nuisance problems and health risks on site as well as in the vicinages. The aim of current study...

  20. Synthesis, sintering and dissolution of thorium and uranium (IV) mixed oxide solid solutions: influence of the method of precursor preparation; Synthese, frittage et caracterisation de solutions solides d'oxydes mixtes de thorium et d'uranium (IV): influence de la methode de preparation du precurseur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hingant, N

    2008-12-15

    Mixed actinide dioxides are currently considered as potential fuels for the third and fourth generations of nuclear reactors. In this context, thorium-uranium (IV) dioxide solid solutions were studied as model compounds to underline the influence of the method of preparation on their physico-chemical properties. Two methods of synthesis, both based on the initial precipitation of oxalate precursors have been developed. The first consisted in the direct precipitation ('open' system) while the second involved hydrothermal conditions ('closed' system). The second method led to a significant improvement in the crystallization of the samples especially in the field of the increase of the grain size. In these conditions, the formation of a complete solid solution Th{sub 1-x}U{sub x}(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 2}.2H{sub 2}O was prepared between both end-members. Its crystal structure was also resolved. Whatever the initial method considered, these compounds led to the final dioxides after heating above 400 C. The various steps associated to this transformation, involving the dehydration of precursors then the decomposition of oxalate groups have been clarified. Moreover, the use of wet chemistry methods allowed to reduce the sintering temperature of the final thorium-uranium (IV) dioxide solid solutions. Whatever the method of preparation considered, dense samples (95% to 97% of the calculated value) were obtained after only 3 hours of heating at 1500 C. Additionally, the use of hydrothermal conditions significantly increased the grain size, leading to the reduction of the occurrence of the grain boundaries and of the global residual porosity. The significant improvement in the homogeneity of cations distribution in the samples was also highlighted. Finally, the chemical durability of thorium-uranium (IV) dioxide solid solutions was evaluated through the development of leaching tests in nitric acid. The optimized homogeneity especially in terms of the

  1. Understanding the solid phase chemical fractionation of uranium in soil and effect of ageing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rout, Sabyasachi, E-mail: srout.barc@gmail.com [Health Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India); Kumar, Ajay [Health Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India); Ravi, P.M.; Tripathi, R.M. [Homi Bhabha National Institute Anushaktinagar, Mumbai (India)

    2016-11-05

    Highlights: • Apart of U(VI) converted to U(IV) during adsorption to soil. • Ageing leads to rearrangement of chemical fractionation of U in soil. • Organic matter and carbonate minerals responsible for Surface enrichment of U. • There occurs Occlusion of U-Fe-Oxides (Hydroxide) in to silica. - Abstract: The aim of the present work is to understand the solid phase chemical fractionation of Uranium (U) in soil and the mechanism involved. This study integrated batch experiments of U(VI) adsorption to soil, study of U in different soil fractions, ageing impact on fractionation of U and spectroscopic investigation of adsorbed U(VI) using X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). For the study three soils, pedogenically different (S1: Igneous, S2: Sedimentary and S3: Metamorphic) were amended with U(VI) and chemical fractionation of U was studied by sequential extraction after an interval of one month and 12 months. It was found that there occurs a significant rearrangement of U in different fractions with ageing and no correlation was observed between the U content in different fractions and the adsorbents of respective fractions such as soil organic matter (SOM), Fe/Mn oxides (hydroxides) carbonates, soil cation exchange capacity (CEC). XPS study revealed that surface enrichment of U mainly governed by the carbonate minerals and SOM, whereas bulk concentration was controlled by the oxides (hydroxides) of Si and Al. Occlusion of U-Fe-oxides (hydroxides) on silica was identified as an important mechanism for bulk enrichment (Increase in residual fraction) and depletion of U concentration in reducible fraction.

  2. Understanding the solid phase chemical fractionation of uranium in soil and effect of ageing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rout, Sabyasachi; Kumar, Ajay; Ravi, P.M.; Tripathi, R.M.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Apart of U(VI) converted to U(IV) during adsorption to soil. • Ageing leads to rearrangement of chemical fractionation of U in soil. • Organic matter and carbonate minerals responsible for Surface enrichment of U. • There occurs Occlusion of U-Fe-Oxides (Hydroxide) in to silica. - Abstract: The aim of the present work is to understand the solid phase chemical fractionation of Uranium (U) in soil and the mechanism involved. This study integrated batch experiments of U(VI) adsorption to soil, study of U in different soil fractions, ageing impact on fractionation of U and spectroscopic investigation of adsorbed U(VI) using X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). For the study three soils, pedogenically different (S1: Igneous, S2: Sedimentary and S3: Metamorphic) were amended with U(VI) and chemical fractionation of U was studied by sequential extraction after an interval of one month and 12 months. It was found that there occurs a significant rearrangement of U in different fractions with ageing and no correlation was observed between the U content in different fractions and the adsorbents of respective fractions such as soil organic matter (SOM), Fe/Mn oxides (hydroxides) carbonates, soil cation exchange capacity (CEC). XPS study revealed that surface enrichment of U mainly governed by the carbonate minerals and SOM, whereas bulk concentration was controlled by the oxides (hydroxides) of Si and Al. Occlusion of U-Fe-oxides (hydroxides) on silica was identified as an important mechanism for bulk enrichment (Increase in residual fraction) and depletion of U concentration in reducible fraction.

  3. Acute and chronic toxicity of uranium compounds to Ceriodaphnia-Daphnia dubia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pickett, J.B.; Specht, W.L.; Keyes, J.L.

    1993-01-01

    A study to determine the acute and chronic toxicity of uranyl nitrate, hydrogen uranyl phosphate, and uranium dioxide to the organism Ceriodaphnia dubia was conducted. The toxicity tests were conducted by two independent environmental consulting laboratories. Part of the emphasis for this determination was based on concerns expressed by SCDHEC, which was concerned that a safety factor of 100 must be applied to the previous 1986 acute toxicity result of 0.22 mg/L for Daphnia pulex, This would have resulted in the LETF release limits being based on an instream concentration of 0.0022 mg/L uranium. The NPDES Permit renewal application to SCDHEC utilized the results of this study and recommended that the LETF release limit for uranium be based an instream concentration of 0.004 mg/L uranium. This is based on the fact that the uranium releases from the M-Area LETF will be in the hydrogen uranyl phosphate form, or a uranyl phosphate complex at the pH (6--10) of the Liquid Effluent Treatment Facility effluent stream, and at the pH of the receiving stream (5.5 to 7.0). Based on the chronic toxicity of hydrogen uranyl phosphate, a lower uranium concentration limit for the Liquid Effluent Treatment Facility outfall vs. the existing NPDES permit was recommended: The current NPDES permit ''Guideline'' for uranium at outfall M-004 is 0.500 mg/L average and 1.0 mg/L maximum, at a design flowrate of 60 gpm. It was recommended that the uranium concentration at the M-004 outfall be reduced to 0.28 mg/L average, and 0.56 mg/L, maximum, and to reduce the design flowrate to 30 gpm. The 0.28 mg/L concentration will provide an instream concentration of 0.004 mg/L uranium. The 0.28 mg/L concentration at M-004 is based on the combined flows from A-014, A-015, and A-011 outfalls (since 1985) of 1840 gpm (2.65 MGD) and was the flow rate which was utilized in the 1988 NPDES permit renewal application

  4. Preparation of 1-(2-pyridylazo)-2-naphthol functionalized benzophenone/naphthalene and their uses in solid phase extractive preconcentration/separation of uranium(VI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preetha, C.R.; Prasada Rao, T.

    2003-01-01

    The preparation of solid reagent 1-(2-pyridylazo)-2-naphthol functionalized benzophenone/naphthalene for preconcentration/separation of uranium(VI) is described. These reagents enriches uranium(VI) quantitatively from dilute aqueous solutions in the pH range 10.5-11.0. The solid mixture consisting of the enriched metal ion along with solid phase extractant were dissolved in 2 ml of acetone and uranium(VI) content was established spectrophotometrically by using Arsenazo III procedure. Calibration graphs were rectilinear over the uranium(VI) concentration in the range 0.002-0.1 μg cm -3 . Five replicate determinations of 40 μg of uranium present in 1 dm 3 of sample solution gave a mean absorbance of 0.185 with a relative standard deviation of 1.4%. The detection limit (corresponding to 3 times the standard deviation of the blank) and the enrichment factor were found to be 2 μg dm -3 and 500 respectively. Further the possible separation of uranium(VI) from several bivalent, trivalent and tetravalent elements was also established. In addition to validating the developed method by successfully analysing marine sediment reference material (MESS-3), uranium content was established in soil, river and marine sediment samples by the developed method and compared with standard inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) values. (orig.)

  5. Study on the applicability of structural and morphological parameters of selected uranium compounds for nuclear forensic purposes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho Mer Lin, Doris

    2015-03-13

    Nuclear forensic science or nuclear forensics, is a relatively young discipline which evolved due to the need of analysing interdicted nuclear or radioactive material, necessary for determining its origin. Fundamentally, nuclear forensic science makes use of measurable material properties, referred to as ''signatures'', which provide hints on the history of the material. As part of the advancement in this multi-faceted field, new signatures are constantly sought after and as well as analytical techniques to efficiently and accurately determine the signatures. The work carried out in this study is part of this fulfilment to investigate new structural and morphological parameters as possible new nuclear forensic signatures for selected uranium compounds. The scientific goals have been oriented into three parts for investigations in this study. Firstly, five different compositions of uranium ore concentrates (UOCs) were prepared in the laboratory under well-defined conditions. These materials were subsequently characterized by several techniques such as X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetry/differential thermal analysis, Infrared and Raman spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, scanning electron microscopy etc. Such materials were pivotal for comparison with the industrial samples. Secondly, several uranium compounds, mainly UOCs were measured using Raman spectroscopy. At least three different Raman spectrometers were used and a comparison made in their performance and suitability for nuclear forensics. Raman spectra of industrial uranium materials were interpreted with regard to compound identification and to determination of (anionic) impurities. Anionic impurities that were present were identified and they could provide clues to the processing history of the samples. Statistical techniques such as principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least square-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) were applied to several Raman spectra. The analysis showed that

  6. Study on the applicability of structural and morphological parameters of selected uranium compounds for nuclear forensic purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho Mer Lin, Doris

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear forensic science or nuclear forensics, is a relatively young discipline which evolved due to the need of analysing interdicted nuclear or radioactive material, necessary for determining its origin. Fundamentally, nuclear forensic science makes use of measurable material properties, referred to as ''signatures'', which provide hints on the history of the material. As part of the advancement in this multi-faceted field, new signatures are constantly sought after and as well as analytical techniques to efficiently and accurately determine the signatures. The work carried out in this study is part of this fulfilment to investigate new structural and morphological parameters as possible new nuclear forensic signatures for selected uranium compounds. The scientific goals have been oriented into three parts for investigations in this study. Firstly, five different compositions of uranium ore concentrates (UOCs) were prepared in the laboratory under well-defined conditions. These materials were subsequently characterized by several techniques such as X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetry/differential thermal analysis, Infrared and Raman spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, scanning electron microscopy etc. Such materials were pivotal for comparison with the industrial samples. Secondly, several uranium compounds, mainly UOCs were measured using Raman spectroscopy. At least three different Raman spectrometers were used and a comparison made in their performance and suitability for nuclear forensics. Raman spectra of industrial uranium materials were interpreted with regard to compound identification and to determination of (anionic) impurities. Anionic impurities that were present were identified and they could provide clues to the processing history of the samples. Statistical techniques such as principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least square-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) were applied to several Raman spectra. The analysis showed that

  7. The crystal chemistry of novel thorium and uranium compounds with oxo-anions from group VI of periodic table (S, Se, Te, Cr, Mo and W)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Bin

    2016-01-26

    This dissertation focus on the synthesis, phase studies and physicochemical properties of novel thorium and uranium compounds with the Group VI (S, Se, Te, Cr, Mo, W) of the Periodic Table. All the studied compounds are listed in Table 2.2 from the page 15. I subdivided all the newly synthesized compounds into several chapters according to their structural and topological differences. First, for thorium molybdates and tungstates, almost all of these compounds are based on corner-sharing of ThO{sub x} (x = 6, 8 and 9) and MoO{sub 4} or WO{sub x} (x = 4, 5, 6) polyhedra. Interestingly, all these compounds can be seen as derived from a pure thorium molybdate compound (ThMo{sub 2}O{sub 8}) which was isolated from high-temperature solid-state synthesis method. Therefore, the polymorphs of this most basic ThMo{sub 2}O{sub 8} compound is firstly introduced (see Chapter 3.1 from page 18). The thermodynamic, electronic and vibrational properties of all investigated ThMo{sub 2}O{sub 8} polymorphs were studied using ab initio calculations. Then, two subfamilies of thorium molybdates, that is, rubidium thorium molybdate and cesium thorium molybdate and their thermal and vibrational behaviors were discussed in details in Chapter 4.1 from page 37 and Chapter 4.2 from page 50, respectively. Moreover, some new insights about the complexity of thorium tungstates were also discussed (Chapter 4.3 from page 59). Some novel thorium molybdate and chromate compounds synthesized from aqueous condition are discussed in Chapter 5 from page 71. In the Chapter 8.2.4, the stereochemistry for thorium and uranium compounds are introduced, especially thorium selinites and uranyl tellurites (see Chapter 6.1 from page 82), thorium tellurites (Chapter 6.2 from page 93), and uranyl tellurites (Chapter 6.3 from page 99 for sodium uranyl tellurium and Chapter 6.4 from page 110 for potassium uranyl tellurium, respectively). In the actinide tellurium systems, additional MoO{sub 3}/WO{sub 3} were also

  8. Production and Recovery of Aroma Compounds Produced by Solid-State Fermentation Using Different Adsorbents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriane B. P. Medeiros

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Volatile compounds with fruity characteristics were produced by Ceratocystis fimbriata in two different bioreactors: columns (laboratory scale and horizontal drum (semi-pilot scale. Coffee husk was used as substrate for the production of volatile compounds by solid-state fermentation. The production of volatile compounds was significantly higher when horizontal drum bioreactor was used than when column bioreactors were used. These results showed that this model of bioreactor presents good perspectives for scale-up and application in an industrial production. Headspace analysis of the solid-state culture detected twelve compounds, among them: ethanol, acetaldehyde, ethyl acetate, ethyl propionate, and isoamyl acetate. Ethyl acetate was the predominant product in the headspace (28.55 µmol/L/g of initial dry matter. Activated carbon, Tenax-TA, and Amberlite XAD-2 were tested to perform the recovery of the compounds. The adsorbent columns were connected to the column-type bioreactor. All compounds present in the headspace of the columns were adsorbed in Amberlite XAD-2. With Tenax-TA, acetaldehyde was adsorbed in higher concentrations. However, the recovery found by using the activated carbon was very low.

  9. Solid-state syntheses and single-crystal characterizations of three tetravalent thorium and uranium silicates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Geng Bang; Soderholm, L.

    2015-01-01

    Colorless crystals of ThSiO 4 (huttonite) (1) and (Ca 0.5 Na 0.5 ) 2 NaThSi 8 O 20 (2) have been synthesized by the solid-state reactions of ThO 2 , CaSiO 3 , and Na 2 WO 4 at 1073 K. Green crystals of (Ca 0.5 Na 0.5 ) 2 NaUSi 8 O 20 (3) have been synthesized by the solid-state reactions of UO 2 , CaSiO 3 , and Na 2 WO 4 at 1003 K. All three compounds have been characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Compound 1 adopts a monazite-type three-dimensional condensed structure, which is built from edge- and corner-shared ThO 9 polyhedra and SiO 4 tetrahedra. Compounds 2 and 3 are isostructural and they crystallize in a steacyite-type structure. The structure consists of discrete pseudocubic [Si 8 O 20 ] 8− polyanions, which are connected by An 4+ cations into a three-dimensional framework. Each An atom coordinates to eight monodentate [Si 8 O 20 ] 8− moieties in a square antiprismatic geometry. Na + and Ca 2+ ions reside in the void within the framework. Raman spectra of 1, 2, and 3 were collected on single crystal samples. 1 displays more complex vibrational bands than thorite. Raman spectra of 2 and 3 are analogous with most of vibrational bands located at almost the same regions. - Graphical abstract: A Raman spectrum and crystal structures of (Ca 0.5 Na 0.5 ) 2 NaAnSi 8 O 20 (An=Th, U), which contain pseudocubic [Si 8 O 20 ] 8− polyanions and eight-coordinate An 4+ cations. - Highlights: • Single crystal growth of three tetravalent actinide silicates from melts. • Single-crystal structures and Raman spectra of (Ca 0.5 Na 0.5 ) 2 NaAnSi 8 O 20 (An=Th, U). • First report of Raman spectrum of huttonite on single crystal samples

  10. Uranium recovery from phosphate fertilizer in the form of a high purity compound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunus, F.; Coroianu, T.; Filip, G.; Filip, D.

    2001-01-01

    Uranium recovery from phosphate fertilizer industry is based on a one cycle extraction-stripping process. The process was experimented on both sulfuric and nitric acid attack of phosphate rock when uranium is dissolved in phosphoric acid (WPA) or phosphonitric (PN) solution respectively. The WPA and PN solution must be clarified. In the first alternative by ageing and settling and in the second by settling in the presence of flocculant. The organic components must be removed on active carbon for WPA only since in the case of nitric attack calcined phosphates are used. In both alternatives uranium is extracted from aqueous acidic solutions in the same time with the rare earths (REE), by di(2-ethylhexyl) phosphate (DEPA) as basic extractants, eventually in the presence of octylphosphine oxide (TOPO) as synergic agent. The stripping process is carried out in two stages: in the first stage REE are stripped and precipitated by HF or NH 4 F + H 2 S0 4 and in the second stage uranium as U(VI) is stripped by the same reagents but in the presence of Fe(II) as reductant for U(VI) to U(IV) inextractible species. Tetravalent uranium is also precipitated as green cake either UF 4 xH 2 0 or (NH 4 ) 7 U 6 F 31 as dependent on reagents HF or NH 4 F + H 2 S0 4 . Uranium stripping is possible for PN solution only if HNO 3 partially extracted is previously washed out by a urea solution. The green cake washed and filtered is dissolved in nitric acid in presence of Al(OH)3 as complexant for F. The filtered nitric solution is adjusted to 3-5 mol/L HNO 3 and extracted by 20% TBP when uranium is transferred to the organic phase which after scrubbing is stripped in the classic way with acidulated (HN0 3 ) demineralized water. Uranium is precipitated as diuranate of high purity. Rare earths left in the aqueous raffinate are extracted by pure TBP from 8-10 mol/L HNO 3 medium. The stripping process takes place with acidulated water. Rare earths are precipitated as hydroxides. (author)

  11. Uranium estimation in toothpastes and fruit juices using solid state nuclear track detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, S.; Virk, H.S.

    1984-01-01

    A fission track analysis has been used to estimate the uranium concentration in some toothpastes manufactured in India and fruit juices derived from the fruits available in the local market of Amritsar. The uranium content in these toothpastes has been found to vary from 0.91 to 3.56 ppm. The uranium content in fruit juices has been found to vary from 0.25 to 1.69 ppb. The present investigations have been carried out with an aim to estimate the level of U content in these materials for the studies of radiation health hazards. (author)

  12. Radiological analyses of solids in the area of the old uranium mine of Rosglas (Morbihan)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-07-01

    After a brief presentation of the different uranium sites previously exploited in Brittany, this document reports measurements performed on one of them, the old uranium mine of Rosglas. In situ radiation measurements and sampling (surface soil, rocks, and sediments) were performed. Samples were then analysed (gamma radiation measurements) in order to asses the contamination by Uranium 238 and 235. The authors outline that some radioactive wastes are still accessible and therefore expose public to health risks. They discuss how to take these risks into account and discuss the required restructuring works to be done

  13. Uranium dioxide calcining apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cole, E.A.; Peterson, R.S.

    1978-01-01

    This invention relates to an improved continuous calcining apparatus for consistently and controllably producing from calcinable reactive solid compounds of uranium, such as ammonium diuranate, uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) having an oxygen to uranium ratio of less than 2.2. The apparatus comprises means at the outlet end of a calciner kiln for receiving hot UO 2 , means for cooling the UO 2 to a temperature of below 100 deg C and conveying the cooled UO 2 to storage or to subsequent UO 2 processing apparatus where it finally comes into contact with air, the means for receiving cooling and conveying being sealed to the outlet end of the calciner and being maintained full of UO 2 and so operable as to exclude atmospheric oxygen from coming into contact with any UO 2 which is at elevated temperatures where it would readily oxidize, without the use of extra hydrogen gas in said means. (author)

  14. Enthalpies of vaporization of organometallic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuznetsov, N.T.; Sevast'yanov, V.G.; Mitin, V.A.; Krasnodubskaya, S.V.; Zakharov, L.N.; Domrachev, G.A.; AN SSSR, Gor'kij. Inst. Khimii)

    1987-01-01

    A possibility to use the method of additive schemes for the calculation of vaporizaton enthalpies of uranium organometallic compounds is discussed while comparing the values obtained using the method with experimental data. The possibility of apriori evaluation of evaporation enthalpy values of different uranium compounds using the method of additive schemes and structural characteristics of molecules, such as the sum of ligand solid angles, is shown

  15. Homogeneity and fissure determination in uranium bars with solid state nuclear track detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castillo, F. (Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico City. Facultad de Ciencias); Gamboa, I.; Espinosa, G.; Tapia, A. (Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico City. Inst. de Fisica); Somogyi, G. (Magyar Tudomanyos Akademia, Debrecen. Atommag Kutato Intezete)

    1984-01-01

    A simple and efficient method for determining fissure and concentration inhomogeneity in uranium bars is the alpha-radiographic technique. In our present work uranium bars made by ININ (Mexico) were studied by using CR-39 track detectors. The space inhomogeneity in track density was measured by an optical densitometer. The presence of fissure is determined by a microfiche reader. Such a study takes only few hours and does not require sophisticated instrumentation.

  16. Distribution of uranium and radium radionuclides in the 'solid phase-interstitial soil solution' system and their migratory properties in ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolik, G.A.; Ovsyannikova, S.V.; Vojnikova, E.V.; Popenya, M.V.

    2008-01-01

    The background content of the main alpha-emitting radionuclides of uranium and radium in the soils of the south-east territory of the Republic of Belarus has been established. The reserve of migratory active species of uranium and radium in the soils has been determined using the data on the content of the radionuclides in the interstitial soil solutions, which are the most important chain of geochemical and biological migration of the chemical elements in ecosystems. The values of radionuclides distribution coefficients in the 'solid phase - interstitial solution of soil' system were estimated. It was shown that the migratory ability of uranium in the investigated soils is higher than that of radium. A direct correlation between the contents of organic components and uranium in the soil solution has been revealed. The used approach to the investigation of the uranium and radium behavior allows comparing their abilities to the migration in dependence of the soil medium peculiarities. (authors)

  17. Results of solid state nuclear track detector technique application in radon detection, by alpha particles tracks, for uranium prospecting in Caetite (BA-Brazil)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moraes, M.A.P.V. de; Khouri, M.T.F.C.

    1988-11-01

    The solid state nuclear track detector technique has been used in radon detection, by alpha particles tracks for uranium prospecting on the ground in Caetite city (Bahia-Brazil). The sensitive film to alpha particles used were CA 8015 exposed during 15 days and the results of three anomalies of this region are showed in a form of maps, made with the density of tracks obtained, and were compared with scintillation counter measurements. The technique showed to be simple and an effective auxiliary for the prospection of uranium ore bodies. The initial uranium exploration costs can be reduced by using this technique. (author) [pt

  18. Solid-state ionics: Studies of lithium-conducting sulfide glasses and a superconducting oxide compound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Byung Tae.

    1989-01-01

    The first part of this work studies lithium-conducting sulfide glasses for battery applications, while the second part studies the thermodynamic properties of a superconducting oxide compound by using an oxide electrolyte. Lithium conducting glasses based on the SiS 2 -Li 2 S system are possible solid electrolytes for high-energy-density lithium batteries. The foremost requirement for solid electrolytes is that they should have high ionic conductivities. Unfortunately, most crystalline lithium conductors have low ionic conductivities at room temperature. However, glass ionic conductors show higher ionic conductivities than do crystalline forms of the same material. In addition to higher ionic conductivities, glasses appear to have several advantages over crystalline materials. These advantages include isotropic conductivity, absence of grain boundary effects, ease of glass forming, and the potential for a wide range of stability to oxidizing and reducing conditions. Using pyrolitic graphite-coated quartz ampoules, new ternary compounds and glasses in the SiS 2 -Li 2 S system were prepared. Several techniques were used to characterize the materials: powder x-ray diffraction, differential thermal analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, and AC impedance spectroscopy. The measured lithium conductivity of the sulfide glasses was one of the highest among the known solid lithium conductors. Measuring the equilibrium open circuit voltages assisted in determining the electrochemical stabilities of the ternary compounds and glasses with respect to pure Li. A solid-state ionic technique called oxygen coulometric titration was used to measure the thermodynamic stability, the oxygen stoichiometry, and the effects of the oxygen stoichiometry, and the effects of the oxygen stoichiometry and the cooling rate on superconductivity of the YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-x compound were investigated

  19. Solid state processing of massive uranium mononitride, using uranium and uranium higher nitride powders as starting materials (1962); Preparation a l'etat solide de mononitrure d'uranium massif a partir de poudres d'uranium et de nitrures superieurs d'uranium (1962)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molinari, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1960-12-15

    The mechanism and the optimum conditions for preparing uranium mononitride have been studied. The results have been used for hot pressing (250 kg/cm{sup 2}, 1000 deg. C, under vacuum) a mixture of powders of uranium and uranium higher nitrides. The products obtained have been identified by X-ray measurements and may be - at will and depending upon the stoichiometry - either UN, or a cermet a U{sub {alpha}}-UN. As revealed by the curved shape of grain boundaries, the sinters obtained here do not easily evolve towards physico-chemical equilibrium when submitted to heat treatment. This behaviour is quite different from the one observed with uranium monocarbide prepared by a similar method. This fact may be ascribed to the insolubility in the matrix UN of particles of UO{sub 2} being present as impurities. The density, hardness and thermal conductivity of these products are higher than those measured on uranium nitride or cermets U-UN obtained by other methods. (author) [French] Apres une etude prealable du mecanisme et des conditions optimales de nitruration de l'uranium, on a montre qu'il est possible de preparer par frittage sous charge (250 kg/cm{sup 2}, 1000 deg. C sous vide) d'un melange de poudres d'uranium et de nitrures superieurs d'uranium, un produit qui a ete identifie par diffraction de rayons X. On peut ainsi obtenir a volonte, soit le monocarbure UN, soit un cermet U{sub {alpha}}-UN dans le cas de compositions sous-stoechiometriques. Au contraire du monocarbure d'uranium prepare dans des conditions analogues, les produits obtenus ici, soumis a un traitement thermique, n'evoluent pas facilement vers un etat d'equilibre physico-chimique caracterise par l'existence de joints de grains rectilignes. On attribue ce phenomene a l'insolubilite de l'impurete UO{sub 2} dans UN. La densite, la durete, la conductibilite thermique de ces produits se revelent superieures a celles des nitrures d'uranium ou des cermets U-UN obtenus par les autres methodes. (auteur)

  20. Chemical shift of U L3 edges in different uranium compounds obtained by X-ray absorption spectroscopy with synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joseph, D.; Jha, S.N.; Nayak, C.; Bhattacharyya, D.; Babu, P. Venu

    2014-01-01

    Uranium L 3 X-ray absorption edge was measured in various compounds containing uranium in U 4+ , U 5+ and U 5+ oxidation states. The measurements have been carried out at the Energy Dispersive EXAFS beamline (BL-08) at INDUS-2 synchrotron radiation source at RRCAT, Indore. Energy shifts of ∼ 2-3 eV were observed for U L 3 edge in the U-compounds compared to their value in elemental U. The different chemical shifts observed for the compounds having the same oxidation state of the cation but different anions or ligands show the effect of different chemical environments surrounding the cations in determining their X-ray absorption edges in the above compounds. The above chemical effect has been quantitatively described by determining the effective charges on U cation in the above compounds. (author)

  1. Fluorinated compounds in the uranium conversion process: risk analysis and proposition of pictograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeronimo, Adroaldo Clovis; Oliveira, Wagner dos Santos

    2012-01-01

    In the process of uranium hexafluoride production there are risks that must be taken into account since the time of completing the project chemist, in its conceptual stage, until to the stage of detailed design and are associated with the handling of chemicals, especially fluoride hydrogen and fluorine. This paper aims to address issues related to the prevention of risks related to industrial safety and health and the environment, considering the different stages of the uranium conversion. Take into account the safety warnings of the plant and, accordingly, make the proposition of pictograms adequate to alert operators of care to be taken during the proposition of pictograms adequate to alert operators of care to be taken during the conduct of these chemical processes. (author)

  2. Iron based superconductors and related compounds synthesized by solid state metathesis and high temperature reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frankovsky, Rainer

    2013-01-01

    The results of this thesis can be divided into three major topics, which can also be seen as different approaches of solid state chemistry to reveal interesting features of known and unknown compounds and to develop alternative synthesis routes. Firstly, known compounds with related structural motifs to the superconducting iron-arsenides were investigated regarding their structural and physical properties. In case of La 3 Pd 4 Ge 4 the influence of Fe doping on the properties was studied, whereas in the series ZrMAs (M=Ti,V) the physical properties have not yet been reported at all and were investigated for the first time. Secondly, an alternative synthesis route has been developed for the synthesis of superconducting LaFeAsO 1-x F x . This solid state metathesis reaction distinctly increased the quality of the samples compared to conventionally prepared products. Furthermore, the reaction pathway was investigated and clarified, which helps to understand the processes during high temperature solid state metathesis reactions in general. Thirdly, this alternative synthesis route was expanded to other systems and new compounds like co-substituted LaFe 1-x Mn x AsO 1-y F y were prepared and thoroughly investigated. This led to a complex study of the interplay of magnetism, electronic and structural conditions and the occurrence of superconducting properties. The investigation and understanding of such complex coherences will probably be decisive for the further understanding of the superconducting mechanism in iron based superconductors.

  3. Determination of volatile compounds in grape distillates by solid-phase extraction and gas chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukić, Igor; Banović, Mara; Persurić, Dordano; Radeka, Sanja; Sladonja, Barbara

    2006-01-06

    Solid-phase extraction (SPE) procedure on octadecylsilica (C18) was developed for accumulation of volatile compounds from grape distillates. The procedure was optimised for final analysis by capillary gas chromatography. At mass concentrations in model solutions ranging from 0.1 to 50 mg/l solid-phase extraction recoveries of all analytes ranged from 69% for 2-phenylethanol to 102% for capric acid, with RSD values from 2 to 9%. SPE recoveries of internal standards to be added in the sample solution prior to extraction, higher alcohols 2-ethyl-1-hexanol and 1-undecanol, were 97 and 93%, respectively, with RSD values of 3%. Detection limits of analyzed compounds in model solutions ranged from 0.011 mg/l for isoamyl acetate to 0.037 mg/l for caproic acid. Method efficiency was tested in relation to acetic acid content, volume fraction of ethanol and possible matrix effects. A significant influence of matrix on SPE efficiency for geraniol, cis-2-hexen-1-ol and cis-3-hexen-1-ol was detected. For the same reason, 2-phenylethanol could not be determined by developed SPE method in samples of grape distillates. The developed solid-phase extraction method was successfully applied to determine the differences in volatile compound content in different grape distillates produced by the distillation of crushed, pressed and fermented grapes.

  4. Determination of uranium and thorium isotopes by solid phase extraction and alpha spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuruc, J.; Kovacova, M.; Strisovska, J.; Galanda, D.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this work was to test the modified method suitable for the separation of isotopes of uranium and thorium samples of rocks, including gold ore and gold concentrate using of extraction chromatography method, after digestion of the sample, concentrating, separate the isotopes of uranium and thorium isotopes to prepare sources for the measurement of alpha spectra. Samples of rocks, gold ore and gold concentrate were digered in microwave decomposition in the environment of hydrogen peroxide and concentrated nitric acid. For the separation of uranium and thorium the vacuum box with cartridges DGA Resin and Resin(R) UTEVA (Triskem International, France) was used. Both sorbents allow separation of uranium from thorium. The results confirmed that the both sorbents give the same results within expanded uncertainty. The mass activity of monitored uranium and thorium radioisotopes was determined by alpha spectrometry method. The yields of separation were determined using uranium-232 as a tracer radionuclide; the activity of 232 U was 0.1438 Bq. Alpha spectra were measured on the Alpha spectrometer EG and G ORTEC 576A with the software MAESTRO, MCA Emulator and Gamma Vision-32 for Windows, USA. Mass activities of radionuclides were converted to mass concentration of isotopes 238 U, 234 U, 232 Th, 230 Th and 228 Th. The highest concentration of 238 U was sampled in granodiorite (Tunnel S-XIV-2, southwards, mining of Cu ore, not working there since 1990), where m( 238 U) = (0.81 ± 0.09) mg kg -1 (DGA Resin) and m( 238 U) = (0.90 ± 0.09) mg kg -1 (UTEVA(R) Resin), as well as m( 232 Th) = (18.8 ± 1.7) mg kg -1 (DGA Resin) and m( 232 Th) = (17.8 ± 1.5) mg kg -1 (UTEVA(R) Resin). In other samples of rocks, gold ore and gold concentrates have specific masses of isotopes of uranium and thorium two-to ten-folds lower. It can be concluded that the rocks, gold ores and concentrates of gold from the 'Rozalia' mine contain lower concentrations of uranium several times against

  5. Plasmachemical synthesis and evaluation of the thermal conductivity of metal-oxide compounds "Molybdenum-uranium dioxide"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotelnikova, Alexandra A.; Karengin, Alexander G.; Mendoza, Orlando

    2018-03-01

    The article represents possibility to apply oxidative and reducing plasma for plasma-chemical synthesis of metal-oxide compounds «Mo‒UO2» from water-salt mixtures «molybdic acid‒uranyl nitrate» and «molybdic acid‒ uranyl acetate». The composition of water-salt mixture was calculated and the conditions ensuring plasma-chemical synthesis of «Mo‒UO2» compounds were determined. Calculations were carried out at atmospheric pressure over a wide range of temperatures (300-4000 K), with the use of various plasma coolants (air, hydrogen). The heat conductivity coefficients of metal-oxide compounds «Mo‒UO2» consisting of continuous component (molybdenum matrix) are calculated. Inclusions from ceramics in the form of uranium dioxide were ordered in the matrix. Particular attention is paid to methods for calculating the coefficients of thermal conductivity of these compounds with the use of different models. Calculated results were compared with the experimental data.

  6. Ferromagnetic quantum criticality in the uranium-based ternary compounds URhSi, URhAl, and UCoAl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Combier, Tristan

    2014-01-01

    In this thesis we explore the ferromagnetic quantum criticality in three uranium-based ternary compounds, by means of thermodynamical and transport measurements on single crystal samples, at low temperature and high pressure. URhSi and URhAl are itinerant ferromagnets, while UCoAl is a paramagnet being close to a ferromagnetic instability. All of them have Ising-type magnetic ordering. In the orthorhombic compound URhSi, we show that the Curie temperature decreases upon applying a magnetic field perpendicular to the easy magnetization axis, and a quantum phase transition is expected around 40 T. In the hexagonal system URhAl, we establish the pressure-temperature phase diagram for the first time, indicating a quantum phase transition around 5 GPa. In the isostructural compound UCoAl, we investigate the metamagnetic transition with measurements of magnetization, Hall effect, resistivity and X-ray magnetic circular dichroism. Some intriguing magnetic relaxation phenomena are observed, with step-like features. Hall effect and resistivity have been measured at dilution temperatures, under hydrostatic pressure up to 2.2 GPa and magnetic field up to 16 T. The metamagnetic transition terminates under pressure and magnetic field at a quantum critical endpoint. In this region, a strong effective mass enhancement occurs, and an intriguing difference between up and down field sweeps appears in transverse resistivity. This may be the signature of a new phase, supposedly linked to the relaxation phenomena observed in magnetic measurements, arising from frustration on the quasi-Kagome lattice of uranium atoms in this crystal structure. (author) [fr

  7. Thin film-XRF determination of uranium following thin-film solid phase extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassan, Jalal, E-mail: jalalhassan@ut.ac.ir [Department of Toxicology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hosseini, Seyed M.; Mozaffari, Shahla [Department of Chemistry, Payame Noor University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Jahanparast, Babak; Karbasi, Mohammad H. [Iranian Mineral Processing Research Center, Ministry of Industry and Mineral, Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-07-01

    A sensitive method based on the preconcentration of uranium on modified filter paper (thin film) has been developed to determinate this element in water and soil samples by wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence. Uranium (VI) extraction from nitric acid medium by trioctyl phosphine (TOPO) from 100 mL of sample was carried out. The effects of nitric acid concentration, TOPO concentration and sample breakthrough on uranium extraction were investigated in this study. The proposed method provided good linearity from 7 to 1000 μg and the limit of detection (LOD), based on a signal-to noise ratio (S/N) of 3, was 2.5 μg. (author)

  8. Review of experience gained in fabricating nuclear grade uranium and thorium compounds and their analytical quality control at the Instituto de Energia Atomica, Sao Paulo, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrao, A.; Franca, J.M. Jr.; Ikuta, A.; Pueschel, C.R.; Federgruen, L.; Lordello, A.R.; Tomida, E.K.; Moraes, S.; Brito, J. de; Gomes, R.P.; Araujo, J.A.; Floh, B.; Matsuda, H.T.

    1977-01-01

    This paper summarizes the main activities dealing with the fabrication of nuclear grade uranium and thorium compounds at the Instituto de Energia Atomica, Sao Paulo. Identification of problems and their resolutions, the experience gained in plant operation, the performance characteristics of an ion-exchange facility and a solvent extraction unit (a demonstration plant based on pulsed columns for purification of uranium and production of ammonium diuranate) are described. A moving-bed facility for UF 4 preparation and its operation is discussed. A pilot plant for uranium and thorium oxide microsphere preparation based on internal gelation for HTGR fuel type is also described. A solvent extraction pilot plant for thorium purification based on a compound extraction-scrubbing column and a mixer-settler battery and the involved technology for thorium purification are commented. The main products, namely ammonium diuranate, uranyl amonium tricarbonate, uranium trioxide, uranium tetrafluoride, thorium nitrate and thorium oxalate and their quality are commented. The development of necessary analytical procedures for the quality control of the mentioned nuclear grade products is summarized. A great majority of such procedures was particularly suitable for analyzing traces impurities. Designed for installation are the units for denitration of uranyl nitrate solutions and pilot plants for elemental fluorine and UF 6 . The installation of a laboratory-scale plant designed for reprocessing irradiated uranium and an experimental unit for the recovery of protactinium from irradiated thorium is in progress

  9. The use of solid sorbents for direct accumulation of organic compounds from water matrices : a review of solid-phase extraction techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liska, I.; Krupcik, J.; Leclercq, P.A.

    1989-01-01

    The main principles of solid-phase extraction techniques are reviewed in this paper. Various solid sorbents can be used as a suitable trap for direct accumulation of organic compounds from aqueous solutions. The trapped analytes can be desorbed by elution with suitably chosen liquid phases. These

  10. NF ISO 7097-1. Nuclear fuel technology - Uranium dosimetry in solutions, in uranium hexafluoride and in solids - Part 1: reduction with iron (II) / oxidation with potassium bi-chromate / titration method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-04-01

    This standard document describes the mode of operation of three different methods for the quantitative dosimetry of uranium in solutions, in UF 6 and in solids: reduction by iron (II), oxidation by potassium bi-chromate and titration. (J.S.)

  11. Chronic exposure to uranium compounds: medical surveillance problems related to their physico-chemical properties and their solubility: actual data and future prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ansoborlo, E.; Chalabreysse, J.C.

    1988-01-01

    A method was developped to assess uranium exposure hazards at work stations based on industrial experience acquired in Comurhex Malvesi at Narbonne. Applied to uranium tetrafluoride (UF4), the method involves five steps: 1/ Characterization of the industrial compound, including physico-chemical properties (density, surface area, X-ray spectrum and uranium enrichment). 2/ In vitro biological solubility with different synthetic fluids like Gamble solution added with differents gaz or compounds (Oxygen or hydrogen peroxyde), in order to determine the solubility class D, W or Y. 3/ Assessment of work station concentration in Bq m -3 and particle size distribution (AMAD). 4/ Monitoring workers by routine urinary excretion completed, if necessary, by fecal excretion and γ spectrometry. 5/ Use of individual protection filters or masks. Results and actual data on UF4 are presented and future prospects of studies on calcinated uranates are dealed with [fr

  12. 226Ra and 210Pb relationship in solid wastes and plants at Uranium mill tailing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madruga, M.J.; Faria, I.; Brogueira, A.

    2002-01-01

    After the uranium extraction from the ore, the waste residues (tailings) contain several radionuclides in elevated levels comparing to normal soils. Nearly all of the uranium progenies (2 30T h, 2 26R a, 2 10P b and 2 10P o) and the unextracted uranium fraction are present in tailings. These large quantities of tailings may provide a significant source of environmental and food chain contamination. The transfer of radioisotopes between different ecological compartments is frequently evaluated using ratios which relate the radionuclide content in one ecosystem compartment to that of another. For instance, the concentration ratio (CR), i.e., the ratio between radionuclide concentrations in tailings and plants can be evaluated. Radium-226, a long-lived alfa emitter, is a chemical analog of calcium. The 2 26R a uptake is similar to calcium in biological and ecological systems. The uptake of 2 10P b will follow the same pattern as natural lead. Plants do not require lead but in contrast they require the Ra/Ca group elements. The uptake of lead is mainly a function of the lead tolerance of the plant and the hydrogen ion concentration of the soil. Kalin and Sharma (1982) reported that 2 26R a and 2 10P b uptake by indigenous species from inactive uranium mill tailings in Canada differ from the uptake of the elements by the same plants growing in soil. Ibrahim and Whicker (1992) reported that tailing acidity tends to enhance radionuclide availability for plant uptake. The transport of radionuclides to foliage and subsequent retention and absorption may play a role in plant contamination. The main goal of this study is to evaluate the 2 26R a and 2 10P b relationship in tailings and plants growing at uranium mill tailings

  13. Solid phase microextraction and stir bar sorptive extraction for organotin compounds - a comparison (P9)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mothes, S.; Wennrich, R.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Organotin compounds have been largely used in agricultural and industrial applications. Hyphenated techniques were developed for the sensitive and selective determination of such species. For this task GC has been coupled with atomic emission detection. Derivatization to transform the Sn-compounds into sufficiently volatile compounds was necessary and carried out using sodium tetrapropylborate. For sample preparation the application of solid phase microextraction (SPME) give recent advances in comparison to classical liquid-liquid extraction (LEE). A problem in the usage of SPME exists however in the small volume of the PDMS coating for enrichment the analytes. For improvement of both sample enrichment and extraction of the organotin compounds stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) was applied. It base on the application of stir bars coated with PDMS. Here the extraction yield is substantially higher. Aim of this study was to compare the capabilities of GC-AED in combination with SPME and SBSE. After optimization of the experimental parameters it was possible to reach detection limits in the pg / 1 - level. A comparison of both methods shows the expected results. By application of SBSE it was possible to increase the detection limits one order of magnitude. With SPME the reproducibility of the analytical results (in the 1 ng / 1 concentration range) was found to be between 10 and 15 %, it could be enhanced to 5-8 % by application of SBSE. These low limits of detection and the good reproducibility allowed the determination of organotin compounds according required regulations. Ref. 1 (author)

  14. Solid lipid nanoparticles as oral delivery systems of phenolic compounds: Overcoming pharmacokinetic limitations for nutraceutical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Sara; Madureira, Ana Raquel; Campos, Débora; Sarmento, Bruno; Gomes, Ana Maria; Pintado, Manuela; Reis, Flávio

    2017-06-13

    Drug delivery systems, accompanied by nanoparticle technology, have recently emerged as prominent solutions to improve the pharmacokinetic properties, namely bioavailability, of therapeutic and nutraceutical agents. Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) have received much attention from researchers due to their potential to protect or improve drug properties. SLNs have been reported to be an alternative system to traditional carriers, such as emulsions, liposomes, and polymeric nanoparticles. Phenolic compounds are widespread in plant-derived foodstuffs and therefore abundant in our diet. Over the last decades, phenolic compounds have received considerable attention due to several health promoting properties, mostly related to their antioxidant activity, which can have important implications for health. However, most of these compounds have been associated with poor bioavailability being poorly absorbed, rapidly metabolized and eliminated, which compromises its biological and pharmacological benefits. This paper provides a systematic review of the use of SLNs as oral delivery systems of phenolic compounds, in order to overcome pharmacokinetic limitations of these compounds and improved nutraceutical potential. In vitro studies, as well as works describing topical and oral treatments will be revisited and discussed. The classification, synthesis, and clinical application of these nanomaterials will be also considered in this review article.

  15. [Corrected Title: Solid-Phase Extraction of Polar Compounds from Water] Automated Electrostatics Environmental Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, Richard; Rutz, Jeffrey; Schultz, John

    2005-01-01

    A solid-phase extraction (SPE) process has been developed for removing alcohols, carboxylic acids, aldehydes, ketones, amines, and other polar organic compounds from water. This process can be either a subprocess of a water-reclamation process or a means of extracting organic compounds from water samples for gas-chromatographic analysis. This SPE process is an attractive alternative to an Environmental Protection Administration liquid-liquid extraction process that generates some pollution and does not work in a microgravitational environment. In this SPE process, one forces a water sample through a resin bed by use of positive pressure on the upstream side and/or suction on the downstream side, thereby causing organic compounds from the water to be adsorbed onto the resin. If gas-chromatographic analysis is to be done, the resin is dried by use of a suitable gas, then the adsorbed compounds are extracted from the resin by use of a solvent. Unlike the liquid-liquid process, the SPE process works in both microgravity and Earth gravity. In comparison with the liquid-liquid process, the SPE process is more efficient, extracts a wider range of organic compounds, generates less pollution, and costs less.

  16. NF ISO 7097-1. Nuclear fuel technology - Uranium dosimetry in solutions, in uranium hexafluoride and in solids - Part 1: reduction with iron (II) / oxidation with potassium bi-chromate / titration method; NF ISO 7097-1. Technologie du combustible nucleaire. Dosage de l'uranium dans des solutions, l'hexafluorure d'uranium et des solides. Partie 1: reduction par fer (II) / oxydation par bichromate de potassium / methode par titrage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-04-01

    This standard document describes the mode of operation of three different methods for the quantitative dosimetry of uranium in solutions, in UF{sub 6} and in solids: reduction by iron (II), oxidation by potassium bi-chromate and titration. (J.S.)

  17. Solid-to-solid oxidation of a vanadium(IV) to a vanadium(V) compound: chemisty of a sulfur-containing siderophore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Pabitra B; Crans, Debbie C

    2012-09-03

    Visible light facilitates a solid-to-solid photochemical aerobic oxidation of a hunter-green microcrystalline oxidovanadium(IV) compound (1) to form a black powder of cis-dioxidovanadium(V) (2) at ambient temperature. The siderophore ligand pyridine-2,6-bis(thiocarboxylic acid), H(2)L, is secreted by a microorganism from the Pseudomonas genus. This irreversible transformation of a metal monooxo to a metal dioxo complex in the solid state in the absence of solvent is unprecedented. It serves as a proof-of-concept reaction for green chemistry occurring in solid matrixes.

  18. Development of a portable mass spectrometric system for determination of isotopic composition of solid uranium samples using fluorine volatilization. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loge, G.

    1994-01-01

    Using hardware and materials supplied by LANL, a prototype quadrupole mass spectrometer system designed for portable field analysis of isotopic composition of solid uranium samples was assembled and tested. The system contained the capability for fluorine volatilization of solid uranium samples with gas introduction, which was successfully tested and demonstrated using 100 mg samples of U 3 O 8 . Determination of precision and accuracy for measuring isotopic composition was performed using isotopic standards. Use with soil samples containing uranium were also attempted. Silicates in the soil forming SiF 4 were found to be a kinetic bottleneck to the formation of UF 6 . This could be avoided by performing some sort of chemical separation as a pre-treatment step, which was demonstrated using nitric acid

  19. Stoichiometry of the U3O8 phase formed during calcination of some uranium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Fekey, S.A.; Farah, M.Y.; Rofail, N.H.

    1981-01-01

    Although recent work has shown U 3 O 8 phase to be the decomposition product obtained after calcining uranyl nitrate, sulphate or ammonium uranate, neither the necessary conditions for obtaining stoichiometric U 3 O 8 nor the details of the reaction have been established. Presence of sulphate or nitrate ions during preparation greatly affects the O/U of the obtained oxides and the physico-chemical properties of uranium tetrafluoride prepared afterwards from it (1-3). The aim of the present investigation was to study the effect of calcination regimes on the stoichiometry of the U 3 O 8 phase produced by the thermal decomposition of uranyl nitrate, sulphate, and ammonium uranate, which was prepared by precipitation from nuclear-pure uranyl sulphate. Stoichiometry of the U 3 O 8 phase formed during calcination of ammonium uranate precipitated from nuclear pure uranyl nitrate solution was reported before (1)

  20. Red blood cells sensitivity to oxidative stress in the presence of low concentrations of uranium compound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shevchenko, O.G. [Institute of Biology, Komi Scientific Centre, Ural Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, 167982, Syktyvkar (Russian Federation)

    2014-07-01

    Uranium is a natural radioactive element widespread in biosphere. There are a few works that examined cellular and molecular mechanisms of uranium toxicity. Red blood cells are classical model to investigate toxicity mechanisms on cell membrane system. The aim of present work is to study the effect of uranyl ion in nano-molar concentrations on erythrocytes sensitivity (in vitro) to factors provoking acute oxidative stress. Uranyl ions were added to suspension of mice red blood cells in PBS as UO{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} solution. Samples were incubated in a thermostatic shaker at 37 deg. C during 3-5 hours. Than acute oxidative stress was induced by H{sub 2}O{sub 2} (0.9 mM) or AAPH (5 mM) solutions. Destabilization of the membrane was induced by nonionic detergent Triton X-100. The hemolysis degree and the content of LPO secondary products reacting with 2-thiobarbituric acid in the incubation mixture were determined spectrophotometrically. The ratio of hemoglobin various forms (oxyHb, metHb and ferrylHb) was calculated taking into account extinction coefficients. It was shown that uranyl chloride enhances cell sensitivity to nonionic detergent Triton X-100 effects, indicating alterations of membrane acyl chain order due to contact with the radionuclide ions. Uranium exposure also caused an increase in the cell sensitivity to the AAPH effects, resulted in a decrease in red cell survival rate, a sharp increase in accumulation of hemoglobin oxidation products and a slight increase in the concentration of LPO secondary products. Thus, uranyl ions change physicochemical properties of the erythrocyte membranes that resulted in increased sensitivity to effects of peroxyl radicals formed by thermal decomposition of AAPH. On the contrary, use of another source of free radicals - H{sub 2}O{sub 2} - after uranyl ions exposure resulted in marked decrease of oxidative hemolysis, inhibition of LPO and hemoglobin oxidation. Since the uranium chemical properties similar to properties of

  1. Vacuum ultra-violet and electron energy loss spectroscopy of gaseous and solid organic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, E.E.; Otto, A.

    1976-01-01

    The experimental arrangements used by the authors for the study of optical vacuum ultra-violet and electron energy loss spectra of organic compounds are described and some theoretical aspects of studies of higher excited states are considered. Results for alkanes, benzene, naphthalene, anthracene and some more complex hydrocarbons are reviewed. Recent results obtained by reflection and electron energy loss spectroscopy for single crystals of anthracene are included and their relevance for gas phase work as well as for the understanding of exciton effects in organic solids is described. (author)

  2. VOLATILE COMPOUNDS OF LITHRAEA CAUSTICA (LITRE) DETERMINATED BY SOLID PHASE MICRO-EXTRACTION (SPME)

    OpenAIRE

    GARBARINO, JUAN A; SALVATORE, GIUSEPPE; PIVANOVO, MARISA; CHAMY, MARÍA CRISTINA; NICOLETTI, MARCELLO; DE IOANNES, ALFREDO

    2002-01-01

    The head space of the aerial parts of Lithraea caustica was analyzed by Solid Phase Micro-Extraction (SPME) technique, obtaining as main volatile compounds the monoterpenes, myrcene, a -pinene, , p-cymene and limonene, as well as the sesquiterpene caryophylene. De las partes áereas de Lithraea caustica y usando la técnica de Micro-Extracción en Fase Sólida (MEFS), fueron identificados y cuantificados los principales compuestos volátiles: los monoterpenos, mirceno, a -pineno, p-cimeno y lim...

  3. High loading uranium plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiencek, T.C.; Domagala, R.F.; Thresh, H.R.

    1990-01-01

    Two embodiments of a high uranium fuel plate are disclosed which contain a meat comprising structured uranium compound confined between a pari of diffusion bonded ductile metal cladding plates uniformly covering the meat, the meat hiving a uniform high fuel loading comprising a content of uranium compound greater than about 45 Vol. % at a porosity not greater than about 10 Vol. %. In a first embodiment, the meat is a plurality of parallel wires of uranium compound. In a second embodiment, the meat is a dispersion compact containing uranium compound. The fuel plates are fabricated by a hot isostatic pressing process

  4. Solid-state studies and antioxidant properties of the γ-cyclodextrin·fisetin inclusion compound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pais, Joana M; Barroca, Maria João; Marques, Maria Paula M; Almeida Paz, Filipe A; Braga, Susana S

    2017-01-01

    Fisetin is a natural antioxidant with a wide range of nutraceutical properties, including antidiabetic, neuroprotecting, and suppression or prevention of tumors. The present work describes the preparation of a water-soluble, solid inclusion compound of fisetin with gamma-cyclodextrin (γ-CD), a cyclic oligosaccharide approved for human consumption. A detailed physicochemical analysis of the product is carried out using elemental analysis, powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), Raman, infrared and 13 C{ 1 H} CP-MAS NMR spectroscopies, and thermal analysis (TGA) to verify fisetin inclusion and to present a hypothetical structural arrangement for the host-guest units. The antioxidant activity of the γ-CD·fisetin inclusion compound is evaluated by the DPPH assay.

  5. Solid-state studies and antioxidant properties of the γ-cyclodextrin·fisetin inclusion compound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana M. Pais

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Fisetin is a natural antioxidant with a wide range of nutraceutical properties, including antidiabetic, neuroprotecting, and suppression or prevention of tumors. The present work describes the preparation of a water-soluble, solid inclusion compound of fisetin with gamma-cyclodextrin (γ-CD, a cyclic oligosaccharide approved for human consumption. A detailed physicochemical analysis of the product is carried out using elemental analysis, powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD, Raman, infrared and 13C{1H} CP-MAS NMR spectroscopies, and thermal analysis (TGA to verify fisetin inclusion and to present a hypothetical structural arrangement for the host–guest units. The antioxidant activity of the γ-CD·fisetin inclusion compound is evaluated by the DPPH assay.

  6. Comparison of sodium iodide and solid-state detectors for the measurement of lung-stored uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, A.; Scott, L.M.; Disney, J.L.

    1978-01-01

    A series of measurement of uranium sources were made, using a solid state detector consisting of 4 high-purity germanium detectors, and compared with measurements made with a single NaI detector. The comparative efficiencies at various energies are shown. As energy increases the differences in efficiencies increase in favour of NaI. A estimate of detection sensitivity gave the limit of error on the net count of a subject with one maximum permissible lung burden as 27 +- 7.2 counts/min for NaI and 3.73 +- 1.04 counts/min for the solid state detector. On a microgram basis the respective limits of error are +- 66 and +- 67 μg. It is concluded that solid state detectors can give 17 times better resolution compared with NaI while maintaining the same detection sensitivity. Sensitivity is related to the scatter of higher energy gammas into a fairly wide energy range. This 17-fold improvement in resolution results in a narrower energy range in which the scattered radiation can fall. Thus gamma analysis with such a system would be less subject to background errors. (author)

  7. Emission of volatile sulfur compounds during composting of municipal solid waste (MSW)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Hongyu; Schuchardt, Frank; Li, Guoxue; Yang, Jinbing; Yang, Qingyuan

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► We compare the volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) emissions during three types of municipal solid wastes (MSWs) composting. ► The VSCs released from the kitchen waste composting was significantly higher than that from 15–80 mm fraction of MSW. ► Among the five VSCs, H 2 S was the most abundant compound with 39.0–43.0% of total VSCs released. ► Addition of 20% cornstalks could significantly reduce the VSCs emissions during kitchen waste composting. - Abstract: Volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) are the main source for malodor from composting plants. In this study, the VSCs generated from composting of 15–80 mm municipal solid waste (T0), kitchen waste (T1) and kitchen waste mixed dry cornstalks (T2) were measured in 60 L reactors with forced aeration for a period of 30 days. The VSCs detected in all treatments were hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S), methyl mercaptan (MM), dimethyl sulfide (DMS), carbon bisulfide (CS 2 ) and dimethyl disulfide (DMDS). Over 90% of the VSCs emissions occurred during the first 15 days, and reached their peak values at days 4–7. The emission profiles of five VSCs species were significantly correlated with internal materials temperature and outlet O 2 concentration (p −1 (dry matter) for T0, T1 and T2, respectively. Among the five VSCs, H 2 S was the most abundant compound with 39.0–43.0% of total VSCs released. Composting of kitchen waste from separate collection posed a negative influence on the VSC and leachate production because of its high moisture content. An addition of dry cornstalks at a mixing ratio of 4:1 (wet weight) could significantly reduce the VSCs emissions and avoid leachate. Compared to pure kitchen waste, VSCs were reduced 66.8%

  8. Solid phase microextraction: measurement of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in Dhaka City air pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussam, A; Alauddin, M; Khan, A H; Chowdhury, D; Bibi, H; Bhattacharjee, M; Sultana, S

    2002-08-01

    A solid phase microextraction (SPME) technique was applied for the sampling of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in ambient air polluted by two stroke autorickshaw engines and automobile exhausts in Dhaka city, Bangladesh. Analysis was carried out by capillary gas chromatography (GC) and GC-mass spectrometry (MS). The methodology was tested by insitu sampling of an aromatic hydrocarbon mixture gas standard with a precision of +/-5% and an average accuracy of 1-20%. The accuracy for total VOCs concentration measurement was about 7%. VOC's in ambient air were collected by exposing the SPME fiber at four locations in Dhaka city. The chromatograms showed signature similar to that of unburned gasoline (petrol) and weathered diesel containing more than 200 organic compounds; some of these compounds were positively identified. These are normal hydrocarbons pentane (n-C5H2) through nonacosane (n-C29H60), aromatic hydrocarbons: benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, n-propylbenzene, n-butylbenzene, 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene, xylenes, and 1-isocyanato-3-methoxybenzene. Two samples collected near an autorickshaw station contained 783000 and 1479000 microg/m3 of VOCs. In particular, the concentration of toluene was 50-100 times higher than the threshold limiting value of 2000 microg/m3. Two other samples collected on street median showed 135000 microg/m3 and 180000 microg/m3 of total VOCs. The method detection limit of the technique for most semi-volatile organic compounds was 1 microg/m3.

  9. [Optimization of solid-phase extraction for enrichment of toxic organic compounds in water samples].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ming-quan; Li, Feng-min; Wu, Qian-yuan; Hu, Hong-ying

    2013-05-01

    A concentration method for enrichment of toxic organic compounds in water samples has been developed based on combined solid-phase extraction (SPE) to reduce impurities and improve recoveries of target compounds. This SPE method was evaluated in every stage to identify the source of impurities. Based on the analysis of Waters Oasis HLB without water samples, the eluent of SPE sorbent after dichloromethane and acetone contributed 85% of impurities during SPE process. In order to reduce the impurities from SPE sorbent, soxhlet extraction of dichloromethane followed by acetone and lastly methanol was applied to the sorbents for 24 hours and the results had proven that impurities were reduced significantly. In addition to soxhlet extraction, six types of prevalent SPE sorbents were used to absorb 40 target compounds, the lgK(ow) values of which were within the range of 1.46 and 8.1, and recovery rates were compared. It was noticed and confirmed that Waters Oasis HLB had shown the best recovery results for most of the common testing samples among all three styrenedivinylbenzene (SDB) polymer sorbents, which were 77% on average. Furthermore, Waters SepPak AC-2 provided good recovery results for pesticides among three types of activated carbon sorbents and the average recovery rates reached 74%. Therefore, Waters Oasis HLB and Waters SepPak AC-2 were combined to obtain a better recovery and the average recovery rate for the tested 40 compounds of this new SPE method was 87%.

  10. Uranium conversion; Urankonvertering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliver, Lena; Peterson, Jenny; Wilhelmsen, Katarina [Swedish Defence Research Agency (FOI), Stockholm (Sweden)

    2006-03-15

    FOI, has performed a study on uranium conversion processes that are of importance in the production of different uranium compounds in the nuclear industry. The same conversion processes are of interest both when production of nuclear fuel and production of fissile material for nuclear weapons are considered. Countries that have nuclear weapons ambitions, with the intention to produce highly enriched uranium for weapons purposes, need some degree of uranium conversion capability depending on the uranium feed material available. This report describes the processes that are needed from uranium mining and milling to the different conversion processes for converting uranium ore concentrate to uranium hexafluoride. Uranium hexafluoride is the uranium compound used in most enrichment facilities. The processes needed to produce uranium dioxide for use in nuclear fuel and the processes needed to convert different uranium compounds to uranium metal - the form of uranium that is used in a nuclear weapon - are also presented. The production of uranium ore concentrate from uranium ore is included since uranium ore concentrate is the feed material required for a uranium conversion facility. Both the chemistry and principles or the different uranium conversion processes and the equipment needed in the processes are described. Since most of the equipment that is used in a uranium conversion facility is similar to that used in conventional chemical industry, it is difficult to determine if certain equipment is considered for uranium conversion or not. However, the chemical conversion processes where UF{sub 6} and UF{sub 4} are present require equipment that is made of corrosion resistant material.

  11. Investigation of the synergic effect of some neutral organophosphoric compounds on the extraction of uranium from phosphoric acid solutions by D1-(2-Ethyl Hexyl) phosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stas, J.; Khorfan, S.; Koudsi, Y.

    1998-05-01

    The extraction of uranium (VI) from pure phosphoric acid media by D2EHPA/Kerosene has been studied. The mechanism of the extraction was found as follows: The logarithm of the equilibrium constant of the extraction (LogKex) was found (3.06), (3.32), (3.24), (3.3) for the following phosphoric acid concentrations respectively (1), (2), (3), (4) Mol/1, and the enthalpy change DELTA H was found (-100.68 kj/mol). (-76 kj/mol) for (1), (2) mol/1 phosphoric acid concentrations. The synergic effect of TOPO, TBP, and TBPI with DEHPA have been studied during the extraction of uranium from pure phosphoric acid and Syrian commercial phosphoric acid. The synergic effect increases as follows: TBP< TBPI<< TOPO (In pure phosphoric acid), TBPI approx TBP<< TOPO (In Syrian commercial phosphoric acid). The difficulty of extracting uranium (VI) from Syrian commercial phosphoric acid in comparison with pure phosphoric acid is due to the presence of several impurities capable of complexing uranium, and a small amounts of solid and organic matters, all these are factors which reduce the distribution coefficient of uranium. (Author)

  12. Solid-phase data from cores at the proposed Dewey Burdock uranium in-situ recovery mine, near Edgemont, South Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Raymond H.; Diehl, Sharon F.; Benzel, William M.

    2013-01-01

    This report releases solid-phase data from cores at the proposed Dewey Burdock uranium in-situ recovery site near Edgemont, South Dakota. These cores were collected by Powertech Uranium Corporation, and material not used for their analyses were given to the U.S. Geological Survey for additional sampling and analyses. These additional analyses included total carbon and sulfur, whole rock acid digestion for major and trace elements, 234U/238U activity ratios, X-ray diffraction, thin sections, scanning electron microscopy analyses, and cathodoluminescence. This report provides the methods and data results from these analyses along with a short summary of observations.

  13. Box-Behnken design in modeling of solid-phase tea waste extraction for the removal of uranium from water samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khajeh, Mostafa; Jahanbin, Elham; Ghaffari-Moghaddam, Mansour; Moghaddam, Zahra Safaei; Bohlooli, Mousa

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the solid-phase tea waste procedure was used for separation, preconcentration and determination of uranium from water samples by UV-Vis spectrophotometer. In addition, Box-Behnken experimental design was employed to investigated the influence of six variables including pH, mass of adsorbent, eluent volume, amount of 1-(2-pyridylazo)-2-naphthol (PAN); and sample and eluent flow rates on the extraction of analyte. High determination coefficient (R 2 ) of 0.972 and adjusted-R 2 of 0.943 showed the satisfactory adjustment of the polynomial regression model. This method was used for the extraction of uranium from real water samples.

  14. Detection and classification of gaseous sulfur compounds by solid electrolyte cyclic voltammetry of cermet sensor array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Kirsten E; Rose-Pehrsson, Susan L; Hammond, Mark H; Tillett, Duane; Streckert, Holger H

    2007-02-12

    Electrochemical sensors composed of a ceramic-metallic (cermet) solid electrolyte are used for the detection of gaseous sulfur compounds SO(2), H(2)S, and CS(2) in a study involving 11 toxic industrial chemical (TIC) compounds. The study examines a sensor array containing four cermet sensors varying in electrode-electrolyte composition, designed to offer selectivity for multiple compounds. The sensors are driven by cyclic voltammetry to produce a current-voltage profile for each analyte. Raw voltammograms are processed by background subtraction of clean air, and the four sensor signals are concatenated to form one vector of points. The high-resolution signal is compressed by wavelet transformation and a probabilistic neural network is used for classification. In this study, training data from one sensor array was used to formulate models which were validated with data from a second sensor array. Of the 11 gases studied, 3 that contained sulfur produced the strongest responses and were successfully analyzed when the remaining compounds were treated as interferents. Analytes were measured from 10 to 200% of their threshold-limited value (TLV) according to the 8-h time weighted average (TWA) exposure limits defined by the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). True positive classification rates of 93.3, 96.7, and 76.7% for SO(2), H(2)S, and CS(2), respectively, were achieved for prediction of one sensor unit when a second sensor was used for modeling. True positive rates of 83.3, 90.0, and 90.0% for SO(2), H(2)S, and CS(2), respectively, were achieved for the second sensor unit when the first sensor unit was used for modeling. Most of the misclassifications were for low concentration levels (such 10-25% TLV) in which case the compound was classified as clean air. Between the two sensors, the false positive rates were 2.2% or lower for the three sulfur compounds, 0.9% or lower for the interferents (eight remaining analytes), and 5.8% or lower for

  15. Detection and classification of gaseous sulfur compounds by solid electrolyte cyclic voltammetry of cermet sensor array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, Kirsten E.; Rose-Pehrsson, Susan L.; Hammond, Mark H.; Tillett, Duane; Streckert, Holger H.

    2007-01-01

    Electrochemical sensors composed of a ceramic-metallic (cermet) solid electrolyte are used for the detection of gaseous sulfur compounds SO 2 , H 2 S, and CS 2 in a study involving 11 toxic industrial chemical (TIC) compounds. The study examines a sensor array containing four cermet sensors varying in electrode-electrolyte composition, designed to offer selectivity for multiple compounds. The sensors are driven by cyclic voltammetry to produce a current-voltage profile for each analyte. Raw voltammograms are processed by background subtraction of clean air, and the four sensor signals are concatenated to form one vector of points. The high-resolution signal is compressed by wavelet transformation and a probabilistic neural network is used for classification. In this study, training data from one sensor array was used to formulate models which were validated with data from a second sensor array. Of the 11 gases studied, 3 that contained sulfur produced the strongest responses and were successfully analyzed when the remaining compounds were treated as interferents. Analytes were measured from 10 to 200% of their threshold-limited value (TLV) according to the 8-h time weighted average (TWA) exposure limits defined by the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). True positive classification rates of 93.3, 96.7, and 76.7% for SO 2 , H 2 S, and CS 2 , respectively, were achieved for prediction of one sensor unit when a second sensor was used for modeling. True positive rates of 83.3, 90.0, and 90.0% for SO 2 , H 2 S, and CS 2 , respectively, were achieved for the second sensor unit when the first sensor unit was used for modeling. Most of the misclassifications were for low concentration levels (such 10-25% TLV) in which case the compound was classified as clean air. Between the two sensors, the false positive rates were 2.2% or lower for the three sulfur compounds, 0.9% or lower for the interferents (eight remaining analytes), and 5.8% or lower for

  16. Measurement of uranium and plutonium in solid waste by passive photon or neutron counting and isotopic neutron source interrogation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crane, T.W.

    1980-03-01

    A summary of the status and applicability of nondestructive assay (NDA) techniques for the measurement of uranium and plutonium in 55-gal barrels of solid waste is reported. The NDA techniques reviewed include passive gamma-ray and x-ray counting with scintillator, solid state, and proportional gas photon detectors, passive neutron counting, and active neutron interrogation with neutron and gamma-ray counting. The active neutron interrogation methods are limited to those employing isotopic neutron sources. Three generic neutron sources (alpha-n, photoneutron, and /sup 252/Cf) are considered. The neutron detectors reviewed for both prompt and delayed fission neutron detection with the above sources include thermal (/sup 3/He, /sup 10/BF/sub 3/) and recoil (/sup 4/He, CH/sub 4/) proportional gas detectors and liquid and plastic scintillator detectors. The instrument found to be best suited for low-level measurements (< 10 nCi/g) is the /sup 252/Cf Shuffler. The measurement technique consists of passive neutron counting followed by cyclic activation using a /sup 252/Cf source and delayed neutron counting with the source withdrawn. It is recommended that a waste assay station composed of a /sup 252/Cf Shuffler, a gamma-ray scanner, and a screening station be tested and evaluated at a nuclear waste site. 34 figures, 15 tables.

  17. Synthesis and characterization of a new uranium(V) compound: H3O+UF6-

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masson, J.P.; Desmoulin, J.P.; Charpin, P.; Bougon, R.

    1976-01-01

    The reaction of equimolar amounts of UF 5 and H 2 O in hydrogen fluoride results in the partial dissolution of UF 5 , yielding a blue-green solution from which the new salt oxonium hexafluorouranate(V)(H 3 O + UF 6 - ) could be isolated as a green crystalline solid. Calorimetric measurements showed H 3 O + UF 6 - to decompose at about 68 0 C and its heat of formation to be equal to -628 +- 2 kcal mol. Its ionic nature in the solid state and in HF solutions was demonstrated from vibrational and electronic spectra. The electronic spectrum is closely similar to those of LiUF 6 , NaUF 6 , and CsUF 6 and differs from those of RbUF 6 and KUF 6 . This adduct shows a strong ESR signal, with g = -0.78 +- 0.10, characteristic of UF 6 - salts. Based on its x-ray powder diffraction pattern, H 3 O + UF 6 - is cubic with a = 5.2229 +- 0.0005 A

  18. URANIUM LEACHING AND RECOVERY PROCESS

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClaine, L.A.

    1959-08-18

    A process is described for recovering uranium from carbonate leach solutions by precipitating uranium as a mixed oxidation state compound. Uranium is recovered by adding a quadrivalent uranium carbon;te solution to the carbonate solution, adjusting the pH to 13 or greater, and precipitating the uranium as a filterable mixed oxidation state compound. In the event vanadium occurs with the uranium, the vanadium is unaffected by the uranium precipitation step and remains in the carbonate solution. The uranium-free solution is electrolyzed in the cathode compartment of a mercury cathode diaphragm cell to reduce and precipitate the vanadium.

  19. Synthesis and characterisation of thorium and uranium cyanoacetates and their coordination compounds (Preprint No. AL.14)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deshpande, S.G.; Vaidya, M.A.; Jain, S.C.

    1989-01-01

    Tetracyanoacetates, M(NCCH 2 COO) 4 (where M=Th or U) and UO 2 (NCCH 2 COO) 2 .H 2 O and their coordination complexes with (CH 3 ) 2 S=0 (DMSO), HCOON(CH 3 ) 2 , (DMF), 1,10-Phenenthrolene (Phen) and 2,2'Bipyridine (Bipy), have been synthesised and characterised by elemental analysis, molecular weight determination, molar conductance measurements, X-ray diffraction and infrared (IR) spectroscopic studies (4000 - 200 cm -1 ). Thermogravimetric analysis of the compounds have been carried out to study the thermal decomposition mode. (author)

  20. Laboratory-scale catalysis studies of uranium and plutonium fluorination reactions by solid metal-fluorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hochel, R.C.

    1984-03-01

    Various catalysts were evaluated for their effect on the rate of fluorination of the tetrafluorides of uranium and plutonium to produce the hexafluorides. Results of this work show that CoF 3 and AgF 2 are more effective than NiF 2 for UF 4 fluorination, producing rate increases in the range of 150 to 300 compared to UF 4 and fluorine alone. The use of these three catalysts was also found effective in the fluorinations of PuO 2 /PuF 4 and pure PuF 4 . However, enhancements were less. NiF 2 produced the best increases which were 8.1 for PuO 2 /PuF 4 and 3.6 for PuF 4 . Experiments were conducted in a simple flow-loop. Even larger enhancements might be obtained with fluidized beds. Details of the apparatus, experiments, methods, and a discussion of results are presented

  1. Impact of aging on the solid phase chemical fractionation of uranium in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rout, Sabyasachi; Ajay Kumar; Ravi, P.M.; Tripathi, R.M.

    2015-01-01

    A distinction should be made between persistence of total uranium (U) in soil and persistence of its bioavailable forms. As U age in soil, there is a change in bioavailability. The aging process is partially reversible if environmental parameters change, although a portion of the U ion will be securely entrapped in the soil particle lattice and not available to be re-solubilized. A study was carried out to reveals the impact of aging on chemical fractionation of U in amended soils from three different origin (Soil A: Metamorphic; Soil B: Sedimentary and Soil C: Ingenious basalt). For the study, 5g from each soil were amended with the 50 ml of water containing 100.0 mg/L of U in a falcon tube. After 7 days the supernatant was removed by centrifugation and the soil was allowed to air dry at room temperature

  2. Crystal field and site deformation in spinels and pentavalent uranium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drifford, M.; Soulie, E.

    1976-01-01

    Magnesium aluminates with different alumina contents have the spinel structure. The optical absorption spectra of doped spinel compounds (Cr 3+ , Ni 2+ , Co 2+ ) or E.S.R. spectra (Cr 3+ , Mn 2+ ) are used for the investigation of the position of the doping materials and the deformation of the crystal sites, and give information on the structural disorders. The local structural information given by the doping materials are compared with the mean structure parameters obtained from X-ray diffraction. The optical absorption spectrum and the principal components of the g tensor for UF 6 Cs and the thermal variation in the magnetic susceptibility for UF 8 Cs 3 and UF 8 (NH 4 ) are used for determining the parameters of the electron Hamiltonian for the f 1 configuration. A rather significant covalent aspect is evidenced for UF 6 Cs, in the framework of the model of Eisenstein and Pryce, this property being weaker for the other two complex compounds. The three parameters giving the crystal field at a deformed cubic site with Dsub(3d) symmetry in the Newman superposition model are noticeably weaker for the 8-coordination than for the 6-coordination. As for UF 8 Cs 3 and UF 8 (NH 4 ) 3 a calculation predicts an electronic levels with a very low excitation, at about 110 and 70cm -1 respectively [fr

  3. Emission of volatile sulfur compounds during composting of municipal solid waste (MSW)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Hongyu [Beijing Building Materials Academy of Science Research/State Key Laboratory of Solid Waste Reuse for Building Material, Beijing 100041 (China); College of Resources and Environment Sciences, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100094 (China); Schuchardt, Frank [Johann Heinrich von Thuenen-Institute, Institute of Agricultural Technology and Biosystems Engineering, Bundesallee 50, 38116 Braunschweig (Germany); Li, Guoxue, E-mail: ligx@cau.edu.cn [College of Resources and Environment Sciences, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100094 (China); Yang, Jinbing; Yang, Qingyuan [College of Resources and Environment Sciences, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100094 (China)

    2013-04-15

    Highlights: ► We compare the volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) emissions during three types of municipal solid wastes (MSWs) composting. ► The VSCs released from the kitchen waste composting was significantly higher than that from 15–80 mm fraction of MSW. ► Among the five VSCs, H{sub 2}S was the most abundant compound with 39.0–43.0% of total VSCs released. ► Addition of 20% cornstalks could significantly reduce the VSCs emissions during kitchen waste composting. - Abstract: Volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) are the main source for malodor from composting plants. In this study, the VSCs generated from composting of 15–80 mm municipal solid waste (T0), kitchen waste (T1) and kitchen waste mixed dry cornstalks (T2) were measured in 60 L reactors with forced aeration for a period of 30 days. The VSCs detected in all treatments were hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S), methyl mercaptan (MM), dimethyl sulfide (DMS), carbon bisulfide (CS{sub 2}) and dimethyl disulfide (DMDS). Over 90% of the VSCs emissions occurred during the first 15 days, and reached their peak values at days 4–7. The emission profiles of five VSCs species were significantly correlated with internal materials temperature and outlet O{sub 2} concentration (p < 0.05). Total emissions of the VSCs were 216.1, 379.3 and 126.0 mg kg{sup −1} (dry matter) for T0, T1 and T2, respectively. Among the five VSCs, H{sub 2}S was the most abundant compound with 39.0–43.0% of total VSCs released. Composting of kitchen waste from separate collection posed a negative influence on the VSC and leachate production because of its high moisture content. An addition of dry cornstalks at a mixing ratio of 4:1 (wet weight) could significantly reduce the VSCs emissions and avoid leachate. Compared to pure kitchen waste, VSCs were reduced 66.8%.

  4. Solid-phase synthesis of compounds of europium and terbium with nitrogen-containing heterocyclic compounds under mechanical activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalinovskaya, I.V.; Karasev, V.E.

    2000-01-01

    Effect of solvents and parameters of mechanical treatment on basic regularities of synthesis of rare earth compounds with nitrogen-containing heterocyclic compounds is studied. It is shown that interaction on europium (3) and terbium (3) nitrates with nitrogen-containing heterocyclic compounds leads to formation of compounds of Ln(NO 3 )·2D composition, where Ln=Eu, Tb; D=2,2-dipyridyl, 1,10-phenanthroline, diphenylguanidine. Effect of conditions of mechanical treatment and different additions on process and yield of products is studied. Compounds prepared are characterized by the methods of chemical element analysis, IR spectroscopy and luminescent spectroscopy [ru

  5. A coupled transport and solid mechanics formulation with improved reaction kinetics parameters for modeling oxidation and decomposition in a uranium hydride bed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salloum, Maher N.; Shugard, Andrew D.; Kanouff, Michael P.; Gharagozloo, Patricia E.

    2013-03-01

    Modeling of reacting flows in porous media has become particularly important with the increased interest in hydrogen solid-storage beds. An advanced type of storage bed has been proposed that utilizes oxidation of uranium hydride to heat and decompose the hydride, releasing the hydrogen. To reduce the cost and time required to develop these systems experimentally, a valid computational model is required that simulates the reaction of uranium hydride and oxygen gas in a hydrogen storage bed using multiphysics finite element modeling. This SAND report discusses the advancements made in FY12 (since our last SAND report SAND2011-6939) to the model developed as a part of an ASC-P&EM project to address the shortcomings of the previous model. The model considers chemical reactions, heat transport, and mass transport within a hydride bed. Previously, the time-varying permeability and porosity were considered uniform. This led to discrepancies between the simulated results and experimental measurements. In this work, the effects of non-uniform changes in permeability and porosity due to phase and thermal expansion are accounted for. These expansions result in mechanical stresses that lead to bed deformation. To describe this, a simplified solid mechanics model for the local variation of permeability and porosity as a function of the local bed deformation is developed. By using this solid mechanics model, the agreement between our reacting bed model and the experimental data is improved. Additionally, more accurate uranium hydride oxidation kinetics parameters are obtained by fitting the experimental results from a pure uranium hydride oxidation measurement to the ones obtained from the coupled transport-solid mechanics model. Finally, the coupled transport-solid mechanics model governing equations and boundary conditions are summarized and recommendations are made for further development of ARIA and other Sandia codes in order for them to sufficiently implement the model.

  6. Influence of Calcium on Microbial Reduction of Solid Phase Uranium (VI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Chongxuan; Jeon, Byong-Hun; Zachara, John M.; Wang, Zheming

    2007-01-01

    The effect of calcium on microbial reduction of a solid phase U(VI), sodium boltwoodite (NaUO2SiO3OH · 1.5H2O), was evaluated in a culture of a dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium (DMRB), Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1. Batch experiments were performed in a non-growth bicarbonate medium with lactate as electron donor at pH 7 buffered with PIPES. Calcium increased both the rate and extent of Na-boltwoodite dissolution by increasing its solubility through the formation of a ternary aqueous calcium-uranyl-carbonate species. The ternary species, however, decreased the rates of microbial reduction of aqueous U(VI). Laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIFS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed that microbial reduction of solid phase U(VI) is a sequentially coupled process of Na-boltwoodite dissolution, U(VI) aqueous speciation, and microbial reduction of dissolved U(VI) to U(IV) that accumulated on bacterial surfaces/periplasm. The overall rates of microbial reduction of solid phase U(VI) can be described by the coupled rates of dissolution and microbial reduction that were both influenced by calcium. The results demonstrated that dissolved U(VI) concentration during microbial reduction was a complex function of solid phase U(VI) dissolution kinetics, aqueous U(VI) speciation, and microbial activity

  7. Organic compound emissions from a landfarm used for oil and gas solid waste disposal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyman, Seth N; Mansfield, Marc L

    2018-04-13

    Solid or sludgy hydrocarbon waste is a by-product of oil and gas exploration and production. One commonly used method of disposing of this waste is landfarming. Landfarming involves spreading hydrocarbon waste on soils, tilling it into the soil, and allowing it to biodegrade. We used a dynamic flux chamber to measure fluxes of methane, a suite of 54 nonmethane hydrocarbons, and light alcohols from an active and a remediated landfarm in eastern Utah. Fluxes from the remediated landfarm were not different from a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) sheet or from undisturbed soils in the region. Fluxes of methane, total nonmethane hydrocarbons, and alcohols from the landfarm in active use were 1.41 (0.37, 4.19) (mean and 95% confidence limits), 197.90 (114.72, 370.46), and 4.17 (0.03, 15.89) mg m -2  hr -1 , respectively. Hydrocarbon fluxes were dominated by alkanes, especially those with six or more carbons. A 2-ha landfarm with fluxes of the magnitude we observed in this study would emit 95.3 (54.3, 179.7) kg day -1 of total hydrocarbons, including 11.2 (4.3, 33.9) kg day -1 of BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes). Solid and sludgy hydrocarbon waste from the oil and gas industry is often disposed of by landfarming, in which wastes are tilled into soil and allowed to decompose. We show that a land farm in Utah emitted a variety of organic compounds into the atmosphere, including hazardous air pollutants and compounds that form ozone. We calculate that a 2-ha landfarm facility would emit 95.0 ± 66.0 kg day -1 of total hydrocarbons, including 11.1 ± 1.5 kg day -1 of BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes).

  8. Study of thermal decomposition and characterization of uranium compounds by thermogravimetry and differential calorimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dantas, J M; Abrao, A [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, Sao Paulo (Brazil). Centro de Engenharia Quimica

    1980-01-01

    The thermal behaviour of different types of ammonium diuranates, produced in the pilot plants of Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (Sao Paulo, Brazil), is studied. It was observed that: the contents of absorption and crystallization waters, as well as the content of absorption ammonia vary as a function of drying conditions; the contents of occluded ammonium nitrate vary according to the washing step; ammonia contents vary as a function of pH and of the original solution - greater ammonia concentrations are observed when diuranates are precipitate in uranyl nitrate solutions at higher pH's (9.0). Thermal instability of the intermediate compound varies as a function of the type of the occluded ion, NO/sup -//sub 3/ or SO sup(=)/sub 4/. The thermoanalytical curves show that the diuranates obtained by continuous precipitation have a more reproducible chemical composition than those obtained by batch precipitation.

  9. Systematic study of the lattice dynamics of the uranium rocksalt-structure compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackman, J.A.; Holden, T.M.; Buyers, W.J.L.; DuPlessis, P. de V.; Vogt, O.; Genossar, J.

    1986-01-01

    The phonon-dispersion relations of USe and UTe have been determined by the inelastic scattering of thermal neutrons. All existing phonon measurements for the UX series, viz., UC, UN, UAs, USb, US, USe, and UTe, have been fitted to the rigid-ion and shell models and dispersion relations have been predicted for UP. The U-X force constants dominate the lattice dynamics and are nearly constant for the series, whereas the U-U force constants vary systematically from being large and positive for the compounds with the smallest lattice parameter to being negative for the chalcogenide series. The negative U-U force constant is identified with destabilizing f-d interactions. Elastic constants, derived from the slopes of the dispersion relations and from ultrasound velocity measurements, have been determined. The bulk modulus decreases unusually rapidly as the lattice parameter increases and is in fair agreement with band-structure calculations

  10. NMR shielding calculations across the periodic table: diamagnetic uranium compounds. 2. Ligand and metal NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreckenbach, Georg

    2002-12-16

    In this and a previous article (J. Phys. Chem. A 2000, 104, 8244), the range of application for relativistic density functional theory (DFT) is extended to the calculation of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) shieldings and chemical shifts in diamagnetic actinide compounds. Two relativistic DFT methods are used, ZORA ("zeroth-order regular approximation") and the quasirelativistic (QR) method. In the given second paper, NMR shieldings and chemical shifts are calculated and discussed for a wide range of compounds. The molecules studied comprise uranyl complexes, [UO(2)L(n)](+/-)(q); UF(6); inorganic UF(6) derivatives, UF(6-n)Cl(n), n = 0-6; and organometallic UF(6) derivatives, UF(6-n)(OCH(3))(n), n = 0-5. Uranyl complexes include [UO(2)F(4)](2-), [UO(2)Cl(4)](2-), [UO(2)(OH)(4)](2-), [UO(2)(CO(3))(3)](4-), and [UO(2)(H(2)O)(5)](2+). For the ligand NMR, moderate (e.g., (19)F NMR chemical shifts in UF(6-n)Cl(n)) to excellent agreement [e.g., (19)F chemical shift tensor in UF(6) or (1)H NMR in UF(6-n)(OCH(3))(n)] has been found between theory and experiment. The methods have been used to calculate the experimentally unknown (235)U NMR chemical shifts. A large chemical shift range of at least 21,000 ppm has been predicted for the (235)U nucleus. ZORA spin-orbit appears to be the most accurate method for predicting actinide metal chemical shifts. Trends in the (235)U NMR chemical shifts of UF(6-n)L(n) molecules are analyzed and explained in terms of the calculated electronic structure. It is argued that the energy separation and interaction between occupied and virtual orbitals with f-character are the determining factors.

  11. [Determination of flavor compounds in foxtail millet wine by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry coupled with headspace solid phase microextraction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jingke; Zhang, Aixia; Li, Shaohui; Zhao, Wei; Zhang, Yuzong; Xing, Guosheng

    2017-11-08

    To comprehensively understand flavor compounds and aroma characteristics of foxtail millet wine, extraction conditions were optimized with 85 μm polyacrylate (PA), 100 μm polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), 75 μm carboxen (CAR)/PDMS and 50/30 μm divinylbenzene (DVB)/CAR/PDMS fibers. The flavor compounds in foxtail millet wine were investigated by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) coupled with headspace solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME), and the odor characteristics and intensity were analyzed by odor active values (OAVs). The samples of 8 mL were placed in headspace vials with 1.5 g NaCl, then the headspace vials were heated at 60℃ for 40 min. Using HS-SPME with different fibers, a total of 55 flavor compounds were identified from the samples, including alcohols, esters, benzene derivatives, hydrocarbons, acids, aldehydes, ketones, terpenes, phenols and heterocycle compounds. The main flavor compounds were alcohols compounds. According to their OAVs, phenylethyl alcohol, styrene, 1-methyl-naphthalene, 2-methyl-naphthalene, benzaldehyde, benzeneacetaldehyde and 2-methoxy-phenol were established to be odor-active compounds. Phenylethyl alcohol and benzeneacetaldehyde were the most prominent odor-active compounds. PA and PDMS fibers had good extraction effect for polar and nonpolar compounds, respectively. CAR/PDMS and DVB/CAR/PDMS provided a similar compounds profile for moderate polar compounds. This research comprehensively determined flavor compounds of foxtail millet wine, and provided theoretical basis for product development and quality control.

  12. Some laws governing the electrosynthesis of organic compounds with a solid polymetric electrolyte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodionova, N.A.; Avrutskaya, I.A.; Fioshin, M. Ya.; Khrizolitova, M.A.

    1986-01-01

    The electrosynthesis of organic compounds with a solid polymetric electrolyte (SPE) makes it possible to carry out the process in the absence of a supporting electrolyte. This facilitates the recovery of the desired product, eliminates the inorganic waste products, and allows a small interelectrode distance, and the absence of the accumulation of gases lowers the voltage in the cell. Some laws governing syntheses of SPE were studied in the example cases of the electrochemical reduction of 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-oxopiperidine to 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-hydroxy-piperidine, the reduction of triacetonamine oxime and triacetonamine azine to 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4- aminopiperidine and the oxidation of isobutanol to isobutyric acid. The electrolysis with an SPE was carried out under galvanostatic conditions in an electrolyzer of the filter-press type with forced circulation of the catholyte and anolyte. Low reaction rates are found to be characteristic of all the compounds investigated when the electrolysis is carried out with an SPE.

  13. Release of non-methane organic compounds during simulated landfilling of aerobically pretreated municipal solid waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuanyuan; Yue, Dongbei; Liu, Jianguo; Lu, Peng; Wang, Ying; Liu, Jing; Nie, Yongfeng

    2012-06-30

    Characteristics of non-methane organic compounds (NMOCs) emissions during the anaerobic decomposition of untreated (APD-0) and four aerobically pretreated (APD-20, APD-39, APD-49, and APD-63) samples of municipal solid waste (MSW) were investigated in laboratory. The cumulative mass of the NMOCs of APD-20, APD-39, APD-49, and APD-63 accounted for 15%, 9%, 16%, and 15% of that of APD-0, respectively. The intensities of the NMOC emissions calculated by dividing the cumulative NMOC emissions by the quantities of organic matter removed (Q(VS)) decreased from 4.1 mg/kg Q(VS) for APD-0 to 0.8-3.4 mg/kg Q(VS) for aerobically pretreated MSW. The lipid and starch contents might have significant impact on the intensity of the NMOC emissions. Alkanes dominated the NMOCs released from the aerobically pretreated MSW, while oxygenated compounds were the chief component of the NMOCs generated from untreated MSW. Aerobic pretreatment of MSW prior to landfilling reduces the organic content of the waste and the intensity of the NMOC emissions, and increases the odor threshold, thereby reducing the environmental impact of landfills. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Solid state speciation and potential bioavailability of depleted uranium particles from Kosovo and Kuwait

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lind, O.C. [Isotope Laboratory, Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, P.O. Box 5003, N-1432 As (Norway)], E-mail: ole-christian.lind@umb.no; Salbu, B.; Skipperud, L. [Isotope Laboratory, Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, P.O. Box 5003, N-1432 As (Norway); Janssens, K.; Jaroszewicz, J.; De Nolf, W. [Department of Chemistry, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, Antwerp (Belgium)

    2009-04-15

    A combination of synchrotron radiation based X-ray microscopic techniques ({mu}-XRF, {mu}-XANES, {mu}-XRD) applied on single depleted uranium (DU) particles and semi-bulk leaching experiments has been employed to link the potential bioavailability of DU particles to site-specific particle characteristics. The oxidation states and crystallographic forms of U in DU particles have been determined for individual particles isolated from selected samples collected at different sites in Kosovo and Kuwait that were contaminated by DU ammunition during the 1999 Balkan conflict and the 1991 Gulf war. Furthermore, small soil or sand samples heavily contaminated with DU particles were subjected to simulated gastrointestinal fluid (0.16 M HCl) extractions. Characteristics of DU particles in Kosovo soils collected in 2000 and in Kuwait soils collected in 2002 varied significantly depending on the release scenario and to some extent on weathering conditions. Oxidized U (+6) was determined in large, fragile and bright yellow DU particles released during fire at a DU ammunition storage facility and crystalline phases such as schoepite (UO{sub 3}.2.25H{sub 2}O), dehydrated schoepite (UO{sub 3}.0.75H{sub 2}O) and metaschoepite (UO{sub 3}.2.0H{sub 2}O) were identified. As expected, these DU particles were rapidly dissolved in 0.16 M HCl (84 {+-} 3% extracted after 2 h) indicating a high degree of potential mobility and bioavailability. In contrast, the 2 h extraction of samples contaminated with DU particles originating either from corrosion of unspent DU penetrators or from impacted DU ammunition appeared to be much slower (20-30%) as uranium was less oxidized (+4 to +6). Crystalline phases such as UO{sub 2}, UC and metallic U or U-Ti alloy were determined in impacted DU particles from Kosovo and Kuwait, while the UO{sub 2,34} phase, only determined in particles from Kosovo, could reflect a more corrosive environment. Although the results are based on a limited number of DU particles

  15. Solid-Liquid Extraction Kinetics of Total Phenolic Compounds (TPC from Red Dates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bee Lin Chua

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Red dates are one of the most famous herbal plants in making traditional Chinese medicine. They contain large amount of bioactive compounds. The objectives of this research were to optimise the crude extract yield and total phenolic compounds (TPC yield from red dates using response surface methodology (RSM and model the extraction kinetics of TPC yield from red dates. Date fruits were dried in an oven under temperatures 50°C, 60°C, 70°C and 80°C until a constant weight was obtained. The optimum drying temperature was 60°C as it gave the highest crude extract yield and TPC yield. Besides that, single factor experiments were used to determine the optimum range of four extraction parameters which were: liquid-solid ratio (10-30 ml/g; ultrasonic power (70-90%; extraction temperature (50-70°C; and extraction time (40-60min. The optimum range of the four parameters were further optimised using the Box-Behken Design (BBD of RSM. The extraction conditions that gave the highest crude extract yield and TPC yield were chosen. The optimum value for liquid-solid ratio, ultrasonic power, extraction temperature and extraction time were 30ml/g, 70%, 60°C and 60 min respectively. The two equations generated from RSM were reliable and can be used to predict the crude extract yield and TPC yield. The higher the extraction temperature, liquid-solid ratio, and extraction time and lower ultrasonic power, the higher the crude extract and TPC yield. Finally, the results of TPC yield versus time based on the optimum extraction parameters from RSM optimisation were fitted into three extraction kinetic models (Peleg’s model, Page’s model and Ponomaryov’s model. It was found that the most suitable kinetic model to represent the extraction process of TPC from red dates was Page’s model due to its coefficient of determination (R2 was the closest to unity, 0.9663 while its root mean square error (RMSE was the closest to zero, 0.001534.

  16. Fluorine nuclear magnetic resonance study of enrichment effects in gaseous, liquid and solid uranium hexafluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ursu, I.; Demco, D.E.; Simplaceanu, V.; Valcu, N.

    1977-01-01

    The nuclear magnetic resonance method is able to provide information concerning the isotopic content of 235 U in UF 6 by means of measuring the nuclear magnetic transverse relaxation time (T,L2) of 19 F nuclei in liquid UF 6 . In this work, the sources of errors in the T 2 measurements have been analysed and methods for reducing them are dicussed. Typical errors in T 2 determinations are below 2%. The enrichment estimations made by using the linear calibration curves had a deviation of less than 2% with some exceptions. It was found that the chemical impurities may significantly affect the enrichment estimations. 19 F NMR spectra of liquid and gaseous UF 6 at low pressures did not reveal any structure or enrichment effect. The longitudinal nuclear magnetic relaxation of 19 F nuclei in low pressure, gaseous and solid UF 6 showed no enrichment dependence, nor the dipolar relaxation time in solid UF 6 did. (author)

  17. The possibility of the mixed valence state in the uranium intermetallic compounds: UCoGa5, U2Ru2Sn and U2RuGa8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Troc, Robert

    2007-01-01

    The mixed valence (MV) phenomenon has been observed so far in a large number of various compounds but containing only lanthanides. These properties are usually associated with the mixing of the localised f-state and the band states. The usual valence state for magnetic uranium intermetallics is the trivalent state 5f 3 or hybridised 5f 2 6d 1 , both are nearly degenerate in energy and can compete for a stability of the compound. In some cases a gain in an energy minimum may be achieved by very fast fluctuating between these two states with a time of 10 -14 s, which does not allow to yield the ordered state even if the exchange interactions (favourite the U-U distances) would be able for that. The latter cases seem to concern the described here intermetallics: one ternary compound based on Co, UCoGa 5 , and the two uranium ternary compounds based on Ru, namely U 2 Ru 2 Sn and U 2 RuGa 8 which all crystallize in a tetragonal unit cell. All these compounds show a maximum in their temperature dependences of the magnetic susceptibility measured along and perpendicular to the c-axis. Such a behaviour, which is reminiscent of a number of Ce (Sm, Eu) and Yb compounds for which χ(T) has in the past been considered by Sales and Wohlleben (SW) by applying their ICF model or by Lawrance et al. following their scaling procedure. It turned out that these phenomenological models can also be applied to the considered here two Ru-based uranium ternaries from which some reliable energy parameters could be found. In order to further support the mixing valence scenario for the first such cases in uranium compounds presented here, the transport and thermodynamic properties are also discussed. However, some of the most important results confirming the MV state, e.g., in U 2 RuGa 8 , has recently been achieved from the inelastic neutron scattering performed in the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory on the ISIS facility. From these measurements a characteristic gap of 60 meV has been

  18. Determination of carbon in uranium and its compounds; Determinacion de carbono en uranio metal y sus compuestos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez-Garcia, M M

    1972-07-01

    This paper collects the analytical methods used our laboratories for the determination of carbon in uranium metal, uranate salts and the oxides, fluorides and carbides of uranium. The carbon is usually burned off in a induction or resistance oven under oxygen flow. The CO{sub 2} is collected in barite solution. Where it is backtitrated with potassium biphthalate. (Author)

  19. Determination of thermodynamic properties and stability limit from fluorite phase of uranium and lanthanide mixed oxides, using galvanic cells with solid electrolytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santiago, T.N.

    1980-10-01

    A method for thermodynamic properties determination for oxygen solubility in oxide systems at temperature interval 973 ≤ T [K] ≤ 1773 is described. A galvanic cell using as solid electrolytes zircon dioxide doped with 15% of calcium oxide is presented. This method was used for determining the phase change, temperature dependent, of uranium-lanthanides-oxygen Ln U O 4 stoichiometric system. (C.G.C.)

  20. Recovery or removal of uranium contained in small quantity in waste water by tannic-group adsorbent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komoto, Shigetoshi [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Kamisaibara, Okayama (Japan). Ningyo Toge Works

    1991-12-01

    It was found that tannic compounds have a very strong affinity for uranium and thorium which are nuclear fuel materials, and the new uranium adsorbents composed mainly by tannic-group compounds were made. The solid-state refractory persimmon tannins in those compounds has the most superior capacity for uranium as high as 1.7 g of uranium on 1 g of the adsorbent. The tests adsorbing uranium on the adsorbent are carried out practically by using dam water of Ningyo-toge Works, PNC. Adsorption tests changed the pH or temperature of dam water, elution test, and adsorption-elution repeating test were performed, and it was found that uranium in dam water contained from ppb-level to ppm-level was recovered or removed with very excellent efficiency. (author).

  1. Magnetic moment densities in selected UTX compounds

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Javorský, P.; Schweizer, J.; Givord, F.; Boucherle, J.-X.; Andreev, Alexander V.; Diviš, M.; Lelievre-Berna, E.; Sechovský, V.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 350, - (2004), e131-e134 ISSN 0921-4526 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/03/0550 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : uranium compound * polarized neutron scattering * magnetic moment Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.679, year: 2004

  2. Characterization of organic compounds in biochars derived from municipal solid waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taherymoosavi, Sarasadat; Verheyen, Vince; Munroe, Paul; Joseph, Stephen; Reynolds, Alicia

    2017-09-01

    Municipal solid waste (MSW) generation has been growing in many countries, which has led to numerous environmental problems. Converting MSW into a valuable biochar-based by-product can manage waste and, possibly, improve soil fertility, depending on the soil properties. In this study, MSW-based biochars, collected from domestic waste materials and kerbsides in two Sydney's regions, were composted and pyrolysed at 450°C, 550°C and 650°C. The characteristics of the organic components and their interactions with mineral phases were investigated using a range of analytical techniques, with special attention given to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and heavy metal concentrations. The MSW biochar prepared at 450°C contained the most complex organic compounds. The highest concentration of fixed C, indicating the stability of biochar, was detected in the high-temperature-biochar. Microscopic analysis showed development of pores and migration of mineral phases, mainly Ca/P/O-rich phases, into the micro-pores and Si/Al/O-rich phases on the surface of the biochar in the MSW biochar produced at 550°C. Amalgamation of organic phases with mineral compounds was observed, at higher pyrolysis temperatures, indicating chemical reactions between these two phases at 650°C. XPS analysis showed the main changes occurred in C and N bonds. During heat treatment, N-C/C=N functionalities decomposed and oxidized N configurations, mainly pyridine-N-oxide groups, were formed. The majority of the dissolved organic carbon fraction in both MSW biochar produced at 450°C and 550°C was in the form of building blocks, whereas LMW acids was the main fraction in high-temperature-biochar (59.9%). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Thermal expansion and thermal diffusivity properties of Co-Si solid solutions and intermetallic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruan, Ying; Li, Liuhui; Gu, Qianqian; Zhou, Kai; Yan, Na; Wei, Bingbo

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Length change difference between rapidly and slowly solidified Co-Si alloy occurs at high temperature. • Generally CTE increases with an increasing Si content. • The thermal diffusion abilities are CoSi 2 > Co 95 Si 5 > Co 90 Si 10 > Co 2 Si > CoSi if T exceeds 565 K. • All the CTE and thermal diffusivity variations with T satisfy linear or polynomial relations. - Abstract: The thermal expansion of Co-Si solid solutions and intermetallic compounds was measured via dilatometric method, compared with the results of first-principles calculations, and their thermal diffusivities were investigated using laser flash method. The length changes of rapidly solidified Co-Si alloys are larger than those of slowly solidified alloys when temperature increases to around 1000 K due to the more competitive atom motion. The coefficient of thermal expansion (α) of Co-Si alloy increases with an increasing Si content, except that the coefficient of thermal expansion of Co 95 Si 5 influenced by both metastable structure and allotropic transformation is lower than that of Co 90 Si 10 at a higher temperature. The thermal expansion abilities of Co-Si intermetallic compounds satisfy the relationship of Co 2 Si > CoSi > CoSi 2 , and the differences of the coefficients of thermal expansion between them increase with the rise of temperature. The thermal diffusivity of CoSi 2 is evidently larger than the values of other Co-Si alloys. If temperature exceeds 565 K, their thermal diffusion abilities are CoSi 2 > Co 95 Si 5 > Co 90 Si 10 > Co 2 Si > CoSi. All the coefficient of thermal expansion and thermal diffusivity variations with temperature satisfy linear or polynomial relations.

  4. Radiological analysis of solids around the old uranium mine of Rosglas (Morbihan). CRIIRAD N.08-119 note

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    As uranium mines present significant radiological contaminations years after their exploitation, this document reports preliminary investigations performed around old uranium mines in Brittany. This preliminary work showed significant radiological anomalies, with gamma radiation fluxes between ten and twenty times higher than the natural level. Measurement procedures and results are presented. Sampling has been performed on surface soil, stones and waters. Sample processing is briefly described. Results are commented in terms of contamination by uranium 238 and 235

  5. Measurement test on creep strain rate of uranium-zirconium solid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogata, Takanari; Akabori, Mitsuo; Ogawa, Toru

    1996-11-01

    In order to measure creep strain rate of a small specimen of U-Zr solid solution, authors proposed an estimation method which was based upon the stress relaxation after compression. It was applied to measurement test on creep strain rate of the U-10wt%Zr specimen in the temperature range of 757 to 911degC. It may be concluded that the proposed method is valid, provided that the strain is within the appropriate range and that sufficient amount of the load decrement is observed. The obtained creep rate of U-10wt%Zr alloy indicated significantly smaller value, compared to the experimental data for pure U metal and evaluated data for U-Pu-Zr alloy. However, more careful measurement is desired in future since the present data are thought to be influenced by the precipitations included in the specimen. (author)

  6. Manhattan Project Technical Series: The Chemistry of Uranium (I)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabinowitch, E. I.; Katz, J. J.

    1947-01-01

    This constitutes Chapters 11 through 16, inclusive, of the Survey Volume on Uranium Chemistry prepared for the Manhattan Project Technical Series. Chapters are titled: Uranium Oxides, Sulfides, Selenides, and Tellurides; The Non-Volatile Fluorides of Uranium; Uranium Hexafluoride; Uranium-Chlorine Compounds; Bromides, Iodides, and Pseudo-Halides of Uranium; and Oxyhalides of Uranium.

  7. Manhattan Project Technical Series: The Chemistry of Uranium (I)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabinowitch, E. I. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Katz, J. J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    1947-03-10

    This constitutes Chapters 11 through 16, inclusive, of the Survey Volume on Uranium Chemistry prepared for the Manhattan Project Technical Series. Chapters are titled: Uranium Oxides, Sulfides, Selenides, and Tellurides; The Non-Volatile Fluorides of Uranium; Uranium Hexafluoride; Uranium-Chlorine Compounds; Bromides, Iodides, and Pseudo-Halides of Uranium; and Oxyhalides of Uranium.

  8. Manhattan Project Technical Series The Chemistry of Uranium (I) Chapters 1-10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabinowitch, E. I.; Katz, J. J.

    1946-01-01

    This constitutes Chapters 1 through 10. inclusive, of The Survey Volume on Uranium Chemistry prepared for the Manhattan Project Technical Series. Chapters are titled: Nuclear Properties of Uranium; Properties of the Uranium Atom; Uranium in Nature; Extraction of Uranium from Ores and Preparation of Uranium Metal; Physical Properties of Uranium Metal; Chemical Properties of Uranium Metal; Intermetallic Compounds and Alloy systems of Uranium; the Uranium-Hydrogen System; Uranium Borides, Carbides, and Silicides; Uranium Nitrides, Phosphides, Arsenides, and Antimonides.

  9. Using 238U/235U ratios to understand the formation and oxidation of reduced uranium solids in naturally reduced zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jemison, N.; Johnson, T. M.; Druhan, J. L.; Davis, J. A.

    2016-12-01

    Uranium occurs in groundwater primarily as soluble and mobile U(VI), which can be reduced to immobile U(IV), often observed in sediments as uraninite. Numerous U(VI)-contaminated sites, such as the DOE field site in Rifle, CO, contain naturally reduced zones (NRZ's) that have relatively high concentrations of organic matter. Reduction of heavy metals occurs within NRZ's, producing elevated concentrations of iron sulfides and U(IV). Slow, natural oxidation of U(IV) from NRZ's may prolong U(VI) contamination of groundwater. The reduction of U(VI) produces U(IV) with a higher 238U/235U ratio. Samples from two NRZ sediment cores recovered from the Rifle site revealed that the outer fringes of the NRZ contain U(IV) with a high 238U/235U ratio, while lower values are observed in the center . We suggest that as aqueous U(VI) was reduced in the NRZ, it was driven to lower 238U/235U values, such that U(IV) formed in the core of the NRZ reflects a lower 238U/235U. Two oxidation experiments were conducted by injecting groundwater containing between 14.9 and 21.2 mg/L dissolved O2 as an oxidant into the NRZ. The oxidation of U(IV) from this NRZ increased aqueous U(VI) concentrations and caused a shift to higher 238U/235U in groundwater as U(IV) was oxidized primarily on the outer fringes of the NRZ. In total these observations suggest that the stability of solid phase uranium is governed by coupled reaction and transport processes. To better understand various reactive transport scenarios we developed a model for the formation and oxidation of NRZ's utilizing the reactive transport software CrunchTope. These simulations suggest that the development of isotopically heterogeneous U(IV) within NRZ's is largely controlled by permeability of the NRZ and the U(VI) reduction rate. Oxidation of U(IV) from the NRZ's is constrained by the oxidation rate of U(IV) as well as iron sulfides, which can prevent oxidation of U(IV) by scavenging dissolved oxygen.

  10. On the formation of molecules and solid-state compounds from the AGB to the PN phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Hernández, D. A.; Manchado, A.

    2016-07-01

    During the asymptoyic giant branch (AGB) phase, different elements are dredge- up to the stellar surface depending on progenitor mass and metallicity. When the mass loss increases at the end of the AGB, a circumstellar dust shell is formed, where different (C-rich or O-rich) molecules and solid-state compounds are formed. These are further processed in the transition phase between AGB stars and planetary nebulae (PNe) to create more complex organic molecules and inorganic solid-state compounds (e.g., polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, fullerenes, and graphene precursors in C-rich environments and oxides and crystalline silicates in O-rich ones). We present an observational review of the different molecules and solid-state materials that are formed from the AGB to the PN phases. We focus on the formation routes of complex fullerene (and fullerene-based) molecules as well as on the level of dust processing depending on metallicity.

  11. Field measurements of biogenic volatile organic compounds in the atmosphere using solid-phase microextraction Arrow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feijó Barreira, Luís Miguel; Duporté, Geoffroy; Rönkkö, Tuukka; Parshintsev, Jevgeni; Hartonen, Kari; Hyrsky, Lydia; Heikkinen, Enna; Jussila, Matti; Kulmala, Markku; Riekkola, Marja-Liisa

    2018-02-01

    Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) emitted by terrestrial vegetation participate in a diversity of natural processes. These compounds impact both short-range processes, such as on plant protection and communication, and long-range processes, for example by participating in aerosol particle formation and growth. The biodiversity of plant species around the Earth, the vast assortment of emitted BVOCs, and their trace atmospheric concentrations contribute to the substantial remaining uncertainties about the effects of these compounds on atmospheric chemistry and physics, and call for the development of novel collection devices that can offer portability with improved selectivity and capacity. In this study, a novel solid-phase microextraction (SPME) Arrow sampling system was used for the static and dynamic collection of BVOCs from a boreal forest, and samples were subsequently analyzed on site by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). This system offers higher sampling capacity and improved robustness when compared to traditional equilibrium-based SPME techniques, such as SPME fibers. Field measurements were performed in summer 2017 at the Station for Measuring Ecosystem-Atmosphere Relations (SMEAR II) in Hyytiälä, Finland. Complementary laboratory tests were also performed to compare the SPME-based techniques under controlled experimental conditions and to evaluate the effect of temperature and relative humidity on their extraction performance. The most abundant monoterpenes and aldehydes were successfully collected. A significant improvement on sampling capacity was observed with the new SPME Arrow system over SPME fibers, with collected amounts being approximately 2 × higher for monoterpenes and 7-8 × higher for aldehydes. BVOC species exhibited different affinities for the type of sorbent materials used (polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-carbon wide range (WR) vs. PDMS-divinylbenzene (DVB)). Higher extraction efficiencies were obtained with dynamic

  12. Enhanced extraction of phenolic compounds from coffee industry’s residues through solid state fermentation by Penicillium purpurogenum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lady Rossana PALOMINO García

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The use of agroindustrial residues is an economical solution to industrial biotechnology. Coffee husk and pulp are abounding residues from coffee industry which can be used as substrates in solid state fermentation process, thus allowing a liberation and increase in the phenolic compound content with high added value. By employing statistical design, initial moisture content, pH value in the medium, and the incubation temperature were evaluated, in order to increase the polyphenol content in a process of solid state fermentation by Penicillium purpurogenum. The main phenolic compounds identified through HPLC in fermented coffee residue were chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid, and rutin. Data obtained through HPLC with the radical absorbance capacity assay suggest the fermented coffee husk and pulp extracts potential as a source of phenolic acids and flavonoids. Results showed good perspectives when using P. purpurogenum strain to enhance the liberation of phenolic compounds in coffee residues.

  13. Sampling gaseous compounds from essential oils evaporation by solid phase microextraction devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Wen-Hsi; Lai, Chin-Hsing

    2014-12-01

    Needle trap samplers (NTS) are packed with 80-100 mesh divinylbenzene (DVB) particles to extract indoor volatile organic compounds (VOCs). This study compared extraction efficiency between an NTS and a commercially available 100 μm polydimethylsiloxane-solid phase microextration (PDMS-SPME) fiber sampler used to sample gaseous products in heated tea tree essential oil in different evaporation modes, which were evaporated respectively by free convection inside a glass evaporation dish at 27 °C, by evaporation diffuser at 60 °C, and by thermal ceramic wicks at 100 °C. The experimental results indicated that the NTS performed better than the SPME fiber samplers and that the NTS primarily adsorbed 5.7 ng ethylbenzene, 5.8 ng m/p-xylenes, 11.1 ng 1,2,3-trimethylbenzene, 12.4 ng 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene and 9.99 ng 1,4-diethylbenzene when thermal ceramic wicks were used to evaporate the tea tree essential oil during a 1-hr evaporation period. The experiment also indicated that the temperature used to heat the essential oils should be as low as possible to minimize irritant VOC by-products. If the evaporation temperature does not exceed 100 °C, the concentrations of main by-products trimethylbenzene and diethylbenzene are much lower than the threshold limit values recommended by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH).

  14. Fluidized-bed design for ICF reactor blankets using solid-lithium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sucov, E.W.; Malick, F.S.; Green, L.; Hall, B.O.

    1983-01-01

    A fluidized-bed concept for blankets of dry or wetted first-wall ICF reactors using solid-lithium compounds is described. The reaction chamber is a right cylinder, 32 m high and 20 m in diameter; the blanket is composed of 36 steel tanks, 32 m high, which carry the sintered Li 2 O particles in the fluidizing helium gas. Each tank has a radial thickness of 2 m which generates a tritium breeding ration (TBR) of 1.27 and absorbs over 98% of the neutron energy; reducing the thickness to 1.2 m produces a TBR of 1.2 and energy absorption of 97% which satisfy the design goals. Calculations of tritium diffusion through the grains and heat removal from the grains showed that neither could be removed by the carrier gas; tritium and heat are therefore removed by removing the grains themselves by varying the helium flow rate. The particles are continuously fed into the bottom of the tanks at 300 0 C and removed at the top at 475 0 C. Tritium and heat extraction are easily and conveniently done outside the reactor

  15. Solid-state laser pumping with a planar compound parabolic concentrator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panteli, D V; Pani, B M; Beli, L Z

    1997-10-20

    A novel solid-state laser-pumping scheme is proposed that combines a reflective lamp chamber and a compound parabolic concentrator (CPC) as a light guide. The CPC is made of a transparent material of high refractive index, and light is guided by the total internal reflection, with drastically reduced reflection losses. Material is chosen so that the absorption losses are minimized in the pumping wavelength range. The lamp chamber is designed with the principles of nonimaging optics, which ensures that the radiation is efficiently transferred from the lamp to the input aperture of the CPC. The pumping efficiency was first estimated theoretically, which gave us enough justification for the more accurate calculations with ray tracing. Single as well as multiple pumping cavities are discussed. New pumping geometry results in significantly increased pumping efficiency compared with conventional geometries. Also the lamp and the laser rod are separated, leading to reduced thermal load. We found that the proposed pumping method is also applicable to diode-pumped lasers.

  16. Uranium and lanthanide complexes with the 2-mercapto benzothiazolate ligand: Evidence for a specific covalent binding site in the differentiation of isostructural lanthanide(III) and actinide(III) compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roger, M.; Arliguie, T.; Thuery, P.; Ephritikhine, M. [CEA Saclay, DSM, DRECAM, Serv Chim Mol, CNRS URA 331, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette, (France); Belkhiri, L. [Univ Mentouri Constantine, Fac Sci, Dept Chim, Lab Chim Mol LACMOM, Constantine 25017, (Algeria); Boucekkine, A. [Univ Rennes 1, CNRS, UMR Sci Chim Rennes 6226, F-35042 Rennes, (France)

    2008-07-01

    Treatment Of [U(Cp*){sub 2}Cl{sub 2}] with KSBT in THF gave [U(Cp*){sub 2}(SBT){sub 2}], which exhibits the usual bent sandwich configuration in the solid state with the two SBT ligands adopting the bidentate ligation mode. The mono-cyclopentadienyl compound [U(Cp*)(SBT){sub 3}] was synthesized by reaction of [U(Cp*)(BH{sub 4}){sub 3}] with KSBT in THF, and its reduction with potassium amalgam in the presence of 18-crown-6 afforded the corresponding anionic complex [K(18-crown-6)(THF){sub 2}][U(Cp*)(SBT){sub 3}]. The lanthanide analogues [K(THF){sub 2}Ln(Cp*)(SBT){sub 3}] were obtained by treating [Ln(BH{sub 4}){sub 3}(THF){sub 3}] with KSBT and KCp*; isomorphous crystals of [K(15-crown-5){sub 2}] [Ln(Cp*)(SBT){sub 3}].THF [Ln = La, Ce, Nd] were formed upon addition of 15-crown-5. Comparison of the crystal structures of the pentagonal bipyramidal complexes [M(Cp*)(SBT){sub 3}]{sup -} reveals that the M-Nax distances are shorter than the M-Neq distances, whatever the metal, the phenomenon being enhanced in the U(III) compound versus the Ln(III) analogues. The structural data obtained by relativistic density functional theory (DFT) calculations reproduce experimental trends. Electronic population and molecular orbital analyses show that the structural differences in the series of [M(Cp*)(SBT){sub 3}]{sup -} anions are related to the uranium 5f orbital-ligand mixing, which is greater than the lanthanide 4f orbital-ligand mixing. Moreover, the consideration of the corresponding bond orders and the analysis of the bonding energy bring to light a strong and specific interaction between the uranium and apical nitrogen atoms. (authors)

  17. Study of in vitro toxicity and ex vivo and in vivo efficiency of calixarene galenic forms developed for the treatment of cutaneous contamination due to uranium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grives, Sophie

    2015-01-01

    In case of radiological skin contamination by uranium compounds, the only treatments currently available consist in rinsing the contaminated skin area with water and detergent, or with a calcium salt of diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (Ca-DTPA) solution. However, these procedures are not specific and no efficient treatment for cutaneous contamination due to uranium exists. In the absence of such treatments, uranium diffusion through the skin is fast, inducing an internal exposure after its distribution inside the body through the bloodstream. One part of the bioavailable uranium is up-taken in target organs which are the kidneys and the skeleton, where its toxic effects occur. Therefore a topical formulation consisting of an oil-in-water nano-emulsion incorporating a tricarboxylic calixarene molecule, as a specific chelating agent for uranium, was previously developed. The work achieved in this thesis aimed at evaluating the ex vivo and in vivo decontamination efficiency of this new emergency treatment on intact and superficially wounded skin. For this purpose, skin excoriation model was used. Reproducible models of superficial wounds consisting of micro-cuts and micro-punctures were also developed in order to evaluate the efficiency of the nano-emulsion on physical wounds such as incisions. These studies showed that the calixarene nano-emulsion could be an efficient decontaminating treatment, less aggressive than using the current treatment: soaped water. Its potential cutaneous toxicity was evaluated on in vitro reconstructed human epidermis using three different toxicity tests (MTT, LDH and IL-1-α). These studies demonstrated that the calixarene nano-emulsion did not induce skin toxicity even after 24 h of exposure time. (author)

  18. Uranium. Suppl. Vol. C7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keim, R.; Keller, C.

    1982-01-01

    In this supplement volume C7 the nitrogen compounds of uranium-anides, imides, nitrides, nitrites, nitrates are dealt with. Whereas amides, imides and nitrates have only been of scientific interest up to now, uranium nitride and uranylnitrate are of great technological importance. Therefore the description of the chemical and physical characteristics of UN as a potential fuel for future reactors already comprises about 1/4 of this volume. Also the description of uranyl nitrate - as one of the most important commercial forms of uranium and because of its importance in the chemistry of nuclear fuel element reprocessing - comprises many pages. This is supplemented by further uranium nitrides, ternary and polynary nitrides, oxide nitrides, double nitrides of the various valence steps as well as nitrate complexes and ternary and quarternary systems containing uranyl nitrate. The radiation behaviour of UN, and its distribution (liquid/liquid, liquid solid) as well as the complex formation of the uranyl ion with nitrate are described in other volumes of the uranium series. (RB) [de

  19. Analytical method development and validation for quantification of uranium in compounds of the nuclear fuel cycle by Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, Elaine

    2016-01-01

    This work presents a low cost, simple and new methodology for direct quantification of uranium in compounds of the nuclear fuel cycle, based on Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy using KBr pressed discs technique. Uranium in different matrices were used to development and validation: UO 2 (NO 3 )2.2TBP complex (TBP uranyl nitrate complex) in organic phase and uranyl nitrate (UO 2 (NO 3 ) 2 ) in aqueous phase. The parameters used in the validation process were: linearity, selectivity, accuracy, limits of detection (LD) and quantitation (LQ), precision (repeatability and intermediate precision) and robustness. The method for uranium in organic phase (UO 2 (NO 3 )2.2TBP complex in hexane/embedded in KBr) was linear (r = 0.9980) over the range of 0.20% 2.85% U/ KBr disc, LD 0.02% and LQ 0.03%, accurate (recoveries were over 101.0%), robust and precise (RSD < 1.6%). The method for uranium aqueous phase (UO 2 (NO 3 ) 2 /embedded in KBr) was linear (r = 0.9900) over the range of 0.14% 1.29% U/KBr disc, LD 0.01% and LQ 0.02%, accurate (recoveries were over 99.4%), robust and precise (RSD < 1.6%). Some process samples were analyzed in FTIR and compared with gravimetric and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analyses showing similar results in all three methods. The statistical tests (t-Student and Fischer) showed that the techniques are equivalent. The validated method can be successfully employed for routine quality control analysis for nuclear compounds. (author)

  20. Scaling properties for the first RE-like mixed valence examples in uranium compounds: U2Ru2Sn and U2RuGa8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Troc, Robert

    2006-01-01

    The present study was motivated by the scaling characterization of the first example of mixed valence (MV) RE-like behaviour found recently among intermetallic ternary uranium compounds. The χ(T) function for both title compounds has been fitted to the interconfigurational fluctuation (ICF) model of Sales and Wohlleben in order to determine the characteristic fluctuation temperatures T sf and interconfigurational excitation energies E ex . A good scaling, with similar values of T sf like from those derived from the ICF model, has been achieved for both these ternaries by plotting Tχ(T)/C against the reduced T/T sf . Moreover, this scaling follows almost exactly those found earlier in a number of MV- RE compounds

  1. Crystal field effect in the uranium compounds - model calculations for CsUF/sub 6/, Cs/sub 2/UCl/sub 6/ and UCl/sub 4/

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gajek, Z.; Mulak, J.; Faucher, M.

    1987-01-01

    A practical crystal field model allowing one to estimate the crystal field parameters from first principles is presented and applied to the actinide compounds. The model results directly from the renormalization (and reduction) procedure of the true Schroedinger equation for an effective Hamiltonian acting on the 5f spin-orbitals only. In practice this approach becomes convergent with the ab initio model of Newman. Three ionic uranium compounds: CsUF/sub 6/, Cs/sub 2/UCl/sub 6/ and UCl/sub 4/ have served as examples of the application. The results obtained, particularly for the first two compounds, are in good agreement with the experimental data. The contributions of different mechanisms responsible for the crystal field effect are discussed.

  2. Crystal field effect in the uranium compounds - model calculations for CsUF6, Cs2UCl6 and UCl4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gajek, Z.; Mulak, J.

    1987-01-01

    A practical crystal field model allowing one to estimate the crystal field parameters from first principles is presented and applied to the actinide compounds. The model results directly from the renormalization (and reduction) procedure of the true Schroedinger equation for an effective Hamiltonian acting on the 5f spin-orbitals only. In practice this approach becomes convergent with the ab initio model of Newman. Three ionic uranium compounds: CsUF 6 , Cs 2 UCl 6 and UCl 4 have served as examples of the application. The results obtained, particularly for the first two compounds, are in good agreement with the experimental data. The contributions of different mechanisms responsible for the crystal field effect are discussed. (author)

  3. On-line solid phase extraction using ion-pair microparticles combined with ICP-OES for the simultaneous preconcentration and determination of uranium and thorium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yousefi, Seyed Reza; Zolfonoun, Ehsan [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). NFCRS

    2016-07-01

    In this work, after on-line and in-situ solid phase extraction technique was used for the extraction and preconcentration of uranium and thorium from aqueous samples prior to inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) determination. In this method, sodium hexafluorophosphate (as an ion-pairing agent) was added to the sample solution containing the cationic surfactant (dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide) and the complexing agent (dibenzoylmethane). A cloudy solution was formed as a result of formation of an ion pair between surfactant and hexafluorophosphate. The solid microparticles were passed through a microcolumn filter and the adsorbed microparticles were subsequently eluted with acid, which was directly introduced into the ICP-OES nebulizer. The main variables affecting the pre-concentration and determination steps of uranium and thorium were studied and optimized. Under the optimum conditions, the enhancement factors of 97 and 95 and the detection limits of 0.52 and 0.21 μg L{sup -1} were obtained for uranium and thorium, respectively.

  4. Effluents from a waste rock deposit of a former uranium mine in Saxony/Germany - Mass flow balance of water and dissolved solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biehler, D.

    2002-01-01

    Soon after uranium mining had ceased in eastern Germany in 1990, work for remediation of several mining sites began. The Wismut GmbH, owner of the Mine of Dresden-Gittersee's waste rock dump, introduced the concept of reducing the impact to the environment via water and air paths by implementing a multi-layer soil cover. The deposit consists mainly of waste rock (clastic sediments of Doehlener Becken, deep metamorphic rocks) but also of low-grade ore (U-rich coal) and tailing materials. At the time when remediation started, the effluents completely infiltrated the underground. Because of previous surface exfiltration activities, they were already known to be very rich in dissolved solids, especially in sulphate and uranium. As demanded by the state authorities, the owner funded a vast hydrogeological study of the site. In testing the efficiency of surface sealing, the study indicated a mass flow balance of water and dissolved solids for the current situation, and predicted emissions into the water path which would occur after realisation of the proposed soil cover. The field investigation program consisted of: measurements of flow, of concentrations of dissolved solids (esp. U and Ra-226) and of contents of environmental isotopes in precipitation, surface runoff, seepage water and groundwater in the current condition of the dump; the study of waste rock material (geochemistry, mineralogy); waste rock material elution tests; underground investigation by drilling boreholes up to 270 m in depth. The resulting data allowed for: a hydrogeological conceptual model of the site; a consistent mass flow balance for the current condition of the dump; a prediction of concentrations in groundwater resulting after the realisation of a soil cover. The predictions show that the concentrations of dissolved solids in the contaminated groundwater would be significantly decreased. Furthermore it would be possible to reach the standards for drinking water with respect to uranium

  5. Determination of some volatile compounds in alcoholic beverage by headspace solid-phase microextraction gas chromatography - mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmutzer, G.; Avram, V.; Feher, I.; David, L.; Moldovan, Z.

    2012-02-01

    The volatile composition of alcoholic beverage was studied by headspace solid-phase microextraction (HSSPME) method and gas chromatography - mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Some volatile compounds, such as alcohols, esters, terpenes and other are mainly responsible for the flavor of fortified wines and their amounts specify the quality of the alcoholic beverages. From this perspective it is interesting to develop a rapid, selective and sensitive analytical method suitable for simultaneous quantification of the main molecules being responsible for the organoleptic characteristic of alcoholic beverages. Vermouth fortified drink was analyzed in order to characterize the volatile profile. Using the HS-SPME/GC-MS a number of twenty-six volatile compounds from a commercial market alcoholic beverage were identified. The most abundant compounds were m-thymol, o-thymol and eugenol, alongside of the ethyl ester compounds.

  6. Box-Behnken design in modeling of solid-phase tea waste extraction for the removal of uranium from water samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khajeh, Mostafa; Jahanbin, Elham; Ghaffari-Moghaddam, Mansour; Moghaddam, Zahra Safaei [Zabol Univ. (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Chemistry; Bohlooli, Mousa [Zabol Univ. (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Biology

    2015-07-01

    In this study, the solid-phase tea waste procedure was used for separation, preconcentration and determination of uranium from water samples by UV-Vis spectrophotometer. In addition, Box-Behnken experimental design was employed to investigated the influence of six variables including pH, mass of adsorbent, eluent volume, amount of 1-(2-pyridylazo)-2-naphthol (PAN); and sample and eluent flow rates on the extraction of analyte. High determination coefficient (R{sup 2}) of 0.972 and adjusted-R{sup 2} of 0.943 showed the satisfactory adjustment of the polynomial regression model. This method was used for the extraction of uranium from real water samples.

  7. Identifying a compound modifying a cellular response, comprises attaching cells having a reporter system onto solid supports, releasing a library member, screening and identifying target cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    The present invention relates to methods for identifying compounds capable of modulating a cellular response. The methods involve attaching living cells to solid supports comprising a library of test compounds. Test compounds modulating a cellular response, for example via a cell surface molecule...... may be identified by selecting solid supports comprising cells, wherein the cellular response of interest has been modulated. The cellular response may for example be changes in signal transduction pathways modulated by a cell surface molecule....

  8. The determination of small amounts of fluoride in uranium compounds by use of an ion-selective electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shelton, B.M.

    1975-01-01

    A method is presented for the determination of fluoride in uranium metal and oxide at levels from 16 p.p.m. upwards. Uranium is separated from fluoride by extraction into a solution of di(2-ethylhexyl)-phosphoric acid (HDEHP) in carbon tetrachloride. The fluoride remaining in the aqueous phase is determined by potentiometric measurement with an ion-selective electrode. A correction is made for the fluoride lost during the dissolution or extraction step, or both, which is based on a determination of the apparent loss of fluoride on spiked samples that are taken through the whole procedure [af

  9. Aromatic C-Nitroso Compounds and Their Dimers: A Model for Probing the Reaction Mechanisms in Crystalline Molecular Solids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Biljan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This review is focused on the dimerization and dissociation of aromatic C-nitroso compounds and their dimers, the reactions that could be used as a convenient model for studying the thermal organic solid-state reaction mechanisms. This molecular model is simple because it includes formation or breaking of only one covalent bond between two nitrogen atoms. The crystalline molecular solids of nitroso dimers (azodioxides dissociate by photolysis under the cryogenic conditions, and re-dimerize by slow warming. The thermal re-dimerization reaction is examined under the different topotactic conditions in crystals: disordering, surface defects, and phase transformations. Depending on the conditions, and on the molecular structure, aromatic C-nitroso compounds can associate to form one-dimensional polymeric structures and are able to self-assemble on gold surfaces.

  10. Effect of pH on Separation of Solid Content from Paint Contained Wastewater by a Coagulant-flocculant Compound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojtaba Semnani Rahbar

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Chemical wastewater treatment is one of the attracting and common methods for wastewater treatment among the currently employed chemical unit processes. The use of coagulant-flocculant compound is one of the efficient methods for separating of paint and recovery of water. In this research, it was introduced and the effect of pH on removal of solid content from solution was studied experimentally. For this purpose, sludge and suspended solid content of the solution were determined in a jar test by measurement of UV absorption of treated solution and solid separation percentage. The results showed that in pH range 9.5-10.5, maximum efficiency of solid content removal was up to 95%. Consequently, maximum paint removal was obtained in this range of pH. The separation of solid content of the solution was due to formation of aluminum hydroxide. As shown by the results, the reduction of potassium hydroxide as pH adjuster caused decrease of pH and consequently decreases of aluminum hydroxide and solid content removal.  

  11. Solid-phase/supercritical-fluid extraction for liquid chromatography of phenolic compounds in freshwater microalgae and selected cyanobacterial species

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klejdus, B.; Kopecký, Jiří; Benešová, L.; Vacek, J.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 1216, č. 5 (2009), s. 763-771 ISSN 0021-9673 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA525/07/0338 Grant - others:CZ(CZ) GP525/08/P540 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : methanol * solid-phase extraction * phenolic compounds Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 4.101, year: 2009

  12. Reduced weight decontamination formulation utilizing a solid peracid compound for neutralization of chemical and biological warfare agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Mark D [Albuquerque, NM

    2011-09-20

    A reduced weight decontamination formulation that utilizes a solid peracid compound (sodium borate peracetate) and a cationic surfactant (dodecyltrimethylammonium chloride) that can be packaged with all water removed. This reduces the packaged weight of the decontamination formulation by .about.80% (as compared to the "all-liquid" DF-200 formulation) and significantly lowers the logistics burden on the warfighter. Water (freshwater or saltwater) is added to the new decontamination formulation at the time of use from a local source.

  13. Solid Amalgam Composite Electrode as a New Sensor for the Determination of Biologically Active Compounds

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Josypčuk, Bohdan; Navrátil, Tomáš; Lukina, A.; Pecková, K.; Barek, J.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 52, č. 6 (2007), s. 897-910 ISSN 0009-2223 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/07/1195; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06035 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : solid composite electrode * solid amalgam electrodes * solid amalgam composite electrode * voltammetry Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 0.529, year: 2007

  14. Solid phase extraction of uranium and thorium on octadecyl bonded silica modified with Cyanex 302 from aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilchi, A.; Shariati Dehaghan, T.; Rasouli Garmarodi, S.

    2013-01-01

    A simple and reliable method for rapid extraction and determination of uranium and thorium using octadecyl-bonded silica modified with Cyanex 302 is presented. Extraction efficiency and the influence of various parameters such as aqueous phase pH, flow rate of sample solution and amount of extractant has been investigated. The study showed that the extraction of uranium and thorium increase with increasing pH value and was found to be quantitative at pH 6; and the retention of ions was not affected significantly by the flow rate of sample solution. The extraction percent were found to be 89.55 and 86.27 % for uranium and thorium, respectively. The maximal capacity of the cartridges modified by 30 mg of Cyanex 302 was found to be 20 mg of uranium and thorium. The method was successfully applied to the extraction and determination of uranium and thorium in aqueous solutions. The percentage recovery of uranium and thorium in a number of natural as well as seawater samples of Iran were also investigated and found to be in the range of 85-95%. (author)

  15. Recovery of uranium from crude uranium tetrafluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, S.K.; Bellary, M.P.; Keni, V.S.

    1994-01-01

    An innovative process has been developed for recovery of uranium from crude uranium tetrafluoride cake. The process is based on direct dissolution of uranium tetrafluoride in nitric acid in presence of aluminium hydroxide and use of solvent extraction for removal of fluorides and other bulk impurities to make uranium amenable for refining. It is a simple process requiring minimum process step and has advantage of lesser plant corrosion. This process can be applied for processing of uranium tetrafluoride generated from various sources like uranium by-product during thorium recovery from thorium concentrate, first stage product of uranium recovery from phosphoric acid by OPPA process and off grade uranium tetrafluoride material. The paper describes the details of the process developed and demonstrated on bench and pilot scale and its subsequent modification arising out of bulky solid waste generation. The modified process uses a lower quantity of aluminium hydroxide by allowing a lower dissolution of uranium per cycle and recycles the undissolved material to the next cycle, maintaining the overall recovery at high level. This innovation has reduced the solid waste generated by a factor of four at the cost of a slightly larger dissolution vessel and its increased corrosion rate. (author)

  16. Recovery of uranium from crude uranium tetrafluoride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, S K; Bellary, M P; Keni, V S [Chemical Engineering Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

    1994-06-01

    An innovative process has been developed for recovery of uranium from crude uranium tetrafluoride cake. The process is based on direct dissolution of uranium tetrafluoride in nitric acid in presence of aluminium hydroxide and use of solvent extraction for removal of fluorides and other bulk impurities to make uranium amenable for refining. It is a simple process requiring minimum process step and has advantage of lesser plant corrosion. This process can be applied for processing of uranium tetrafluoride generated from various sources like uranium by-product during thorium recovery from thorium concentrate, first stage product of uranium recovery from phosphoric acid by OPPA process and off grade uranium tetrafluoride material. The paper describes the details of the process developed and demonstrated on bench and pilot scale and its subsequent modification arising out of bulky solid waste generation. The modified process uses a lower quantity of aluminium hydroxide by allowing a lower dissolution of uranium per cycle and recycles the undissolved material to the next cycle, maintaining the overall recovery at high level. This innovation has reduced the solid waste generated by a factor of four at the cost of a slightly larger dissolution vessel and its increased corrosion rate. (author). 4 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  17. Volatile trace compounds released from municipal solid waste at the transfer stage: Evaluation of environmental impacts and odour pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yan; Lu, Wenjing; Wang, Hongtao

    2015-12-30

    Odour pollution caused by municipal solid waste is a public concern. This study quantitatively evaluated the concentration, environmental impacts, and olfaction of volatile trace compounds released from a waste transfer station. Seventy-six compounds were detected, and ethanol presented the highest releasing rate and ratio of 14.76 kg/d and 12.30 g/t of waste, respectively. Life cycle assessment showed that trichlorofluoromethane and dichlorodifluoromethane accounted for more than 99% of impact potentials to global warming and approximately 70% to human toxicity (non-carcinogenic). The major contributor for both photochemical ozone formation and ecotoxicity was ethanol. A detection threshold method was also used to evaluate odour pollution. Five compounds including methane thiol, hydrogen sulphide, ethanol, dimethyl disulphide, and dimethyl sulphide, with dilution multiples above one, were considered the critical compounds. Methane thiol showed the highest contribution to odour pollution of more than 90%, as indicated by its low threshold. Comparison of the contributions of the compounds to different environmental aspects indicated that typical pollutants varied based on specific evaluation targets and therefore should be comprehensively considered. This study provides important information and scientific methodology to elucidate the impacts of odourant compounds to the environment and odour pollution. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Chapter 3. Determination of semivolatile organic compounds and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in solids by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaugg, Steven D.; Burkhardt, Mark R.; Burbank, Teresa L.; Olson, Mary C.; Iverson, Jana L.; Schroeder, Michael P.

    2006-01-01

    A method for the determination of 38 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and semivolatile organic compounds in solid samples is described. Samples are extracted using a pressurized solvent extraction system. The compounds of interest are extracted from the solid sample twice at 13,800 kilopascals; first at 120 degrees Celsius using a water/isopropyl alcohol mixture (50:50, volume-to-volume ratio), and then the sample is extracted at 200 degrees Celsius using a water/isopropyl alcohol mixture (80:20, volume-to-volume ratio). The compounds are isolated using disposable solid-phase extraction (SPE) cartridges containing divinylbenzene-vinylpyrrolidone copolymer resin. The cartridges are dried with nitrogen gas, and then sorbed compounds are eluted from the SPE material using a dichloromethane/diethyl ether mixture (80:20, volume-to-volume ratio) and passed through a sodium sulfate/Florisil SPE cartridge to remove residual water and to further clean up the extract. The concentrated extract is solvent exchanged into ethyl acetate and the solvent volume reduced to 0.5 milliliter. Internal standard compounds are added prior to analysis by capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Comparisons of PAH data for 28 sediment samples extracted by Soxhlet and the accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) method described in this report produced similar results. Extraction of PAH compounds from standard reference material using this method also compared favorably with Soxhlet extraction. The recoveries of PAHs less than molecular weight 202 (pyrene or fluoranthene) are higher by up to 20 percent using this ASE method, whereas the recoveries of PAHs greater than or equal to molecular weight 202 are equivalent. This ASE method of sample extraction of solids has advantages over conventional Soxhlet extraction by increasing automation of the extraction process, reducing extraction time, and using less solvent. Extract cleanup also is greatly simplified because SPE replaces

  19. Crystal chemical analysis of formation of solid solutions on the basis of compounds with garnet structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuz'micheva, G.M.; Kozlikin, S.N.

    1989-01-01

    Crystal chemical formulas permitting to evaluate the character of changes in interatomic distances during isomorphous substitution and, hence, the probability of formation of internal solid solutions and successive isomorphous substitution, are presented. The possibility of formation of introduction solid solutions is considered, using as an example Sc, Y oxides, rare earths with garnet structure

  20. High-Resolution Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy: Characterization of Polymorphism in Cimetidine, a Pharmaceutical Compound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacilio, Julia E.; Tokarski, John T.; Quiñones, Rosalynn; Iuliucci, Robbie J.

    2014-01-01

    High-resolution solid-state NMR (SSNMR) spectroscopy has many advantages as a tool to characterize solid-phase material that finds applications in polymer chemistry, nanotechnology, materials science, biomolecular structure determination, and others, including the pharmaceutical industry. The technology associated with achieving high resolution…

  1. PRODUCTION OF URANIUM METAL BY CARBON REDUCTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, R.B.; Powers, R.M.; Blaber, O.J.

    1959-09-22

    The preparation of uranium metal by the carbon reduction of an oxide of uranium is described. In a preferred embodiment of the invention a charge composed of carbon and uranium oxide is heated to a solid mass after which it is further heated under vacuum to a temperature of about 2000 deg C to produce a fused uranium metal. Slowly ccoling the fused mass produces a dendritic structure of uranium carbide in uranium metal. Reacting the solidified charge with deionized water hydrolyzes the uranium carbide to finely divide uranium dioxide which can be separated from the coarser uranium metal by ordinary filtration methods.

  2. Groundwater and surface-water interaction, water quality, and processes affecting loads of dissolved solids, selenium, and uranium in Fountain Creek near Pueblo, Colorado, 2012–2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, L. Rick; Ortiz, Roderick F.; Brown, Christopher R.; Watts, Kenneth R.

    2016-11-28

    In 2012, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Arkansas River Basin Regional Resource Planning Group, initiated a study of groundwater and surface-water interaction, water quality, and loading of dissolved solids, selenium, and uranium to Fountain Creek near Pueblo, Colorado, to improve understanding of sources and processes affecting loading of these constituents to streams in the Arkansas River Basin. Fourteen monitoring wells were installed in a series of three transects across Fountain Creek near Pueblo, and temporary streamgages were established at each transect to facilitate data collection for the study. Groundwater and surface-water interaction was characterized by using hydrogeologic mapping, groundwater and stream-surface levels, groundwater and stream temperatures, vertical hydraulic-head gradients and ratios of oxygen and hydrogen isotopes in the hyporheic zone, and streamflow mass-balance measurements. Water quality was characterized by collecting periodic samples from groundwater, surface water, and the hyporheic zone for analysis of dissolved solids, selenium, uranium, and other selected constituents and by evaluating the oxidation-reduction condition for each groundwater sample under different hydrologic conditions throughout the study period. Groundwater loads to Fountain Creek and in-stream loads were computed for the study area, and processes affecting loads of dissolved solids, selenium, and uranium were evaluated on the basis of geology, geochemical conditions, land and water use, and evapoconcentration.During the study period, the groundwater-flow system generally contributed flow to Fountain Creek and its hyporheic zone (as a single system) except for the reach between the north and middle transects. However, the direction of flow between the stream, the hyporheic zone, and the near-stream aquifer was variable in response to streamflow and stage. During periods of low streamflow, Fountain Creek generally gained flow from

  3. Effects of solid fission products forming dissolved oxide (Nd) and metallic precipitate (Ru) on the thermal conductivity of uranium base oxide fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong-Joo; Yang, Jae-Ho; Kim, Jong-Hun; Rhee, Young-Woo; Kang, Ki-Won; Kim, Keon-Sik; Song, Kun-Woo

    2007-01-01

    The effects of solid fission products on the thermal conductivity of uranium base oxide nuclear fuel were experimentally investigated. Neodymium (Nd) and ruthenium (Ru) were added to represent the physical states of solid fission products such as 'dissolved oxide' and 'metallic precipitate', respectively. Thermal conductivity was determined on the basis of the thermal diffusivity, density and specific heat values. The effects of the additives on the thermal conductivity were quantified in the form of the thermal resistivity equation - the reciprocal of the phonon conduction equation - which was determined from the measured data. It is concluded that the thermal conductivity of the irradiated nuclear fuel is affected by both the 'dissolved oxide' and the 'metallic precipitate', however, the effects are in the opposite direction and the 'dissolved oxide' influences the thermal conductivity more significantly than that of the 'metallic precipitate'

  4. Uranium dioxide calcining apparatus and method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cole, E.A.; Peterson, R.S.

    1978-01-01

    This invention relates to an improved continuous calcining apparatus for consistently and controllably producing from calcinable reactive solid compounds of uranium, such as ammonium diuranate, uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) having an oxygen to uranium ratio of less than 2.2. The apparatus comprises means at the outlet end of a calciner kiln for receiving hot UO 2 , means for cooling the UO 2 to a temperature of below 100 0 C and conveying the cooled UO 2 to storage or to subsequent UO 2 processing apparatus where it finally comes into contact with air, the means for receiving, cooling and conveying being sealed to the outlet end of the calciner and being maintained full of UO 2 and so operable as to exclude atmospheric oxygen from coming into contact with any UO 2 which is at elevated temperatures where it would readily oxidize, without the use of extra hydrogen gas in said means

  5. Room Temperature Hard Radiation Detectors Based on Solid State Compound Semiconductors: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzaei, Ali; Huh, Jeung-Soo; Kim, Sang Sub; Kim, Hyoun Woo

    2018-05-01

    Si and Ge single crystals are the most common semiconductor radiation detectors. However, they need to work at cryogenic temperatures to decrease their noise levels. In contrast, compound semiconductors can be operated at room temperature due to their ability to grow compound materials with tunable densities, band gaps and atomic numbers. Highly efficient room temperature hard radiation detectors can be utilized in biomedical diagnostics, nuclear safety and homeland security applications. In this review, we discuss room temperature compound semiconductors. Since the field of radiation detection is broad and a discussion of all compound materials for radiation sensing is impossible, we discuss the most important materials for the detection of hard radiation with a focus on binary heavy metal semiconductors and ternary and quaternary chalcogenide compounds.

  6. Room Temperature Hard Radiation Detectors Based on Solid State Compound Semiconductors: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzaei, Ali; Huh, Jeung-Soo; Kim, Sang Sub; Kim, Hyoun Woo

    2018-03-01

    Si and Ge single crystals are the most common semiconductor radiation detectors. However, they need to work at cryogenic temperatures to decrease their noise levels. In contrast, compound semiconductors can be operated at room temperature due to their ability to grow compound materials with tunable densities, band gaps and atomic numbers. Highly efficient room temperature hard radiation detectors can be utilized in biomedical diagnostics, nuclear safety and homeland security applications. In this review, we discuss room temperature compound semiconductors. Since the field of radiation detection is broad and a discussion of all compound materials for radiation sensing is impossible, we discuss the most important materials for the detection of hard radiation with a focus on binary heavy metal semiconductors and ternary and quaternary chalcogenide compounds.

  7. Analysis of solid-state transformations of pharmaceutical compounds using vibrational spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinz, Andrea; Strachan, Clare J; Gordon, Keith C

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Solid-state transformations may occur during any stage of pharmaceutical processing and upon storage of a solid dosage form. Early detection and quantification of these transformations during the manufacture of solid dosage forms is important since the physical form of an active...... pharmaceutical ingredient can significantly influence its processing behaviour, including powder flow and compressibility, and biopharmaceutical properties such as solubility, dissolution rate and bioavailability. KEY FINDINGS: Vibrational spectroscopic techniques such as infrared, near-infrared, Raman and, most...... multivariate approaches where even overlapping spectral bands can be analysed. SUMMARY: This review discusses the applications of different vibrational spectroscopic techniques to detect and monitor solid-state transformations possible for crystalline polymorphs, hydrates and amorphous forms of pharmaceutical...

  8. Assessment of the health risks and odor concentration of volatile compounds from a municipal solid waste landfill in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chuandong; Liu, Jiemin; Liu, Shihua; Li, Wenhui; Yan, Luchun; Shu, Mushui; Zhao, Peng; Zhou, Peng; Cao, Wenbin

    2018-07-01

    Municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills are a source of odorous and toxic compounds. In this work, we present an integrated assessment of the odor concentration and human health risks of volatile compounds to evaluate the environmental quality at a MSW landfill. Air samples were collected seasonally from six areas of the landfill with different functions. The total concentrations of the compounds ranged from 204.0 to 7426.7 μg m -3 , and the concentrations in temporarily and permanently capped areas were 50.3 and 83.4% lower than those in the tipping area, respectively. The odor concentration was greatest at the leachate collection tank (1732-6254 ou E m -3 ) and tipping area (1573-4113 ou E m -3 ) and was mainly caused by hydrogen sulfide (57.9 and 49.1%, respectively). Moreover, the odor concentration was positively correlated with the temperature (r = 0.500, p waste areas exceeded acceptable levels. Moreover, the cumulative HI (2.5-5.7) and R (1.0E-04 to 3.4E-04) in the waste areas should receive special attention since they were above acceptable levels during all of the seasons. Aromatic and halogenated compounds dominated the cumulative R, accounting for 79 and 21% of the total, on average, while for the cumulative HI, sulfur compounds contributed the most (67%). Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Development of Solid Ceramic Dosimeters for the Time-Integrative Passive Sampling of Volatile Organic Compounds in Waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonifacio, Riza Gabriela; Nam, Go-Un; Eom, In-Yong; Hong, Yong-Seok

    2017-11-07

    Time-integrative passive sampling of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in water can now be accomplished using a solid ceramic dosimeter. A nonporous ceramic, which excludes the permeation of water, allowing only gas-phase diffusion of VOCs into the resin inside the dosimeter, effectively captured the VOCs. The mass accumulation of 11 VOCs linearly increased with time over a wide range of aqueous-phase concentrations (16.9 to 1100 μg L -1 ), and the linearity was dependent upon the Henry's constant (H). The average diffusivity of the VOCs in the solid ceramic was 1.46 × 10 -10 m 2 s -1 at 25 °C, which was 4 orders of magnitude lower than that in air (8.09 × 10 -6 m 2 s -1 ). This value was 60% greater than that in the water-permeable porous ceramic (0.92 × 10 -10 m 2 s -1 ), suggesting that its mass accumulation could be more effective than that of porous ceramic dosimeters. The mass accumulation of the VOCs in the solid ceramic dosimeter increased in the presence of salt (≥0.1 M) and with increasing temperature (4 to 40 °C) but varied only slightly with dissolved organic matter concentration. The solid ceramic dosimeter was suitable for the field testing and measurement of time-weighted average concentrations of VOC-contaminated waters.

  10. Optimized Solid Phase-Assisted Synthesis of Dendrons Applicable as Scaffolds for Radiolabeled Bioactive Multivalent Compounds Intended for Molecular Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Fischer

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic structures, being highly homogeneous and symmetric, represent ideal scaffolds for the multimerization of bioactive molecules and thus enable the synthesis of compounds of high valency which are e.g., applicable in radiolabeled form as multivalent radiotracers for in vivo imaging. As the commonly applied solution phase synthesis of dendritic scaffolds is cumbersome and time-consuming, a synthesis strategy was developed that allows for the efficient assembly of acid amide bond-based highly modular dendrons on solid support via standard Fmoc solid phase peptide synthesis protocols. The obtained dendritic structures comprised up to 16 maleimide functionalities and were derivatized on solid support with the chelating agent DOTA. The functionalized dendrons furthermore could be efficiently reacted with structurally variable model thiol-bearing bioactive molecules via click chemistry and finally radiolabeled with 68Ga. Thus, this solid phase-assisted dendron synthesis approach enables the fast and straightforward assembly of bioactive multivalent constructs for example applicable as radiotracers for in vivo imaging with Positron Emission Tomography (PET.

  11. Study of uranium plating measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Jufang; Wen Zhongwei; Wang Mei; Wang Dalun; Liu Rong; Jiang Li; Lu Xinxin

    2007-06-01

    In neutron physics experiments, the measurement for plate-thickness of uranium can directly affect uncertainties of experiment results. To measure the plate-thickness of transform target (enriched uranium plating and depleted uranium plating), the back to back ionization chamber, small solid angle device and Au-Si surface barrier semi-conductor, were used in the experiment study. Also, the uncertainties in the experiment were analyzed. Because the inhomo-geneous of uranium lay of plate can quantitively affect the result, the homogeneity of uranium lay is checked, the experiment result reflects the homogeneity of uranium lay is good. (authors)

  12. No fluorinated compounds in the uranium conversion process: risk analysis and proposition of pictograms; Os compostos nao fluorados nos processos da conversao do uranio: analise de riscos e proposicao de pictogramas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeronimo, Adroaldo Clovis; Oliveira, Wagner dos Santos, E-mail: acejota18@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: oliveira@feq.unicamp.br [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Fac. de Engenharia Quimica; Aquino, Afonso Rodrigues de, E-mail: araquino@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2012-03-15

    The plants comprising the chemical conversion of uranium, which are part of the nuclear fuel cycle, present some risks, among others, because are associated with the non-fluorinated compounds handled in these processes. This study is the analysis of the risks associated with these compounds, i e, the non-fluorinated reactants and products, handled in different chemical processing plants, which include the production of uranium hexafluoride, while emphasizing the responsibilities and actions that fit to the chemical engineer with regard to minimizing risks during the various stages. The work is based on the experience gained during the development and mastery of the technology of production of uranium hexafluoride, the IPEN/ CNEN-SP, during the '80s, with the support of COPESP -Navy of Brazil. (author)

  13. Solid-phase extraction element based on epoxy polymer monolith for determination of polar organic compounds in aqueous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Tadashi; Odagiri, Kayo; Watanabe, Atsushi; Watanabe, Chuichi; Kubo, Takuya; Hosoya, Ken

    2011-10-01

    A solid-phase extraction element based on epoxy polymer monolith was fabricated for sorptive enrichment of polar compounds from liquid and gaseous samples. After ultrasonication of the element in an aqueous solution for a given period of time, the thermal desorption (TD) using a pyrolyzer with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), in which TD temperature was programmed from 50 to 250 °C for the analytes absorbed in the element, was used to evaluate the element for basic extraction performance using the aqueous standard mixtures consisting of compounds having varied polarities such as hexanol, isoamyl acetate, linalool, furfural and decanoic acid, in concentrations ranging from 10 μg/L to 1 mg/L. Excellent linear relationships were observed for all compounds in the standard mixture, except decanoic acid. In the extraction of beverages such as red wine, the extraction element showed stronger adsorption characteristics for polar compounds such as alcohols and acids than a non-polar polydimethylsiloxane-based element. This feature is derived from the main polymer structure along with hydroxyl and amino groups present in the epoxy-based monolith polymer matrix. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Electronic structure of elements and compounds and electronic phases of solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nadykto, B.A.

    2000-01-01

    The paper reviews technique and computed energies for various electronic states of many-electron multiply charged ions, molecular ions, and electronic phases of solids. The model used allows computation of the state energy for free many-electron multiply charged ions with relative accuracy ∼10 -4 suitable for analysis of spectroscopy data

  15. Process for the restoration of solids contaminated with hydrocarbons and heavy organic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bala, G.A.; Thomas, C.P.; Jackson, J.D.; McMillin, R.A.

    1994-01-01

    Processes have been developed for the restoration of environments contaminated with hydrocarbons and heavy organics. The intended product is a field deployable materials handling system and phase separation process ranging in size from 1 yd 3 /hr to 50 yd 3 /hr for commercial application to environmental problems associated with the exploration, production, refining and transport of petroleum, petroleum products and organic chemicals. Effluents from contaminated sites will be clean solids (classified by size if appropriate), and the concentrated contaminant. The technology is based on biochemical solvation, liquid/liquid and liquid/solid extractions, materials classification, mechanical and hydraulic scrubbing, and phase separation of organic and aqueous phases. Fluid use is minimized through utilization of closed-loop (recycle) systems. Contaminants that are removed from the solid materials may be destroyed, disposed of using existing technologies, or used on-site for cogeneration of /power for plant operations. Additionally, if the contaminant is a valued product, the material may be recovered for application or sale. Clean solid material is not sterilized and may be returned to normal agricultural, commercial, residential or recreational use in most instances

  16. Compound-specific nitrogen and carbon isotope analysis of nitroaromatic compounds in aqueous samples using solid-phase microextraction coupled to GC/IRMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Michael; Bolotin, Jakov; Hofstetter, Thomas B

    2007-03-15

    Solid-phase microextraction (SPME) coupled to gas chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry was used to determine the delta15N and delta13C signatures of selected nitroaromatic contaminants such as the explosive 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) for derivation of isotopic enrichment factors of contaminant transformation. Parameters for efficient extraction of nitroaromatic compounds (NACs) and substituted anilines from water samples were evaluated by SPME-GC/MS. delta13C signatures determined by SPME-GC/IRMS and elemental analyzer IRMS (EA-IRMS) were in good agreement, generally within +/-0.7 per thousand, except for 2,4-dinitrotoluene (2,4-DNT) and TNT, which showed slight deviations (IRMS were between 73 and 780 microg L-1 and correlated with the extraction efficiencies of the compounds determined by SPME-GC/MS. Nitrogen isotope measurements by SPME-GC/IRMS were of similar precision (standard deviations IRMS within +/-1.3 per thousand (+2.5 per thousand for TNT), but no systematic trend was found for the deviations. LODs of delta15N measurements ranged from 1.6 to 9.6 mg L-1 for nitrotoluenes, chlorinated NACs and DNTs (22 mg L-1 for TNT). The SPME-GC/IRMS method is well suited for the determination of isotopic enrichment factors of various NAC transformation processes and provides so far unexplored possibilities to elucidate behavior and degradation mechanisms of nitroaromatic contaminants in soils and groundwaters.

  17. Raman Investigation of The Uranium Compounds U3O8, UF4, UH3 and UO3 under Pressure at Room Temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipp, M.J.; Jenei, Z.; Park-Klepeis, J.; Evans, W.J.

    2011-01-01

    Our current state-of-the-art X-ray diffraction experiments are primarily sensitive to the position of the uranium atom. While the uranium - low-Z element bond (such as U-H or U-F) changes under pressure and temperature the X-ray diffraction investigations do not reveal information about the bonding or the stoichiometry. Questions that can be answered by Raman spectroscopy are (i) whether the bonding strength changes under pressure, as observed by either blue- or red-shifted peaks of the Raman active bands in the spectrum and (ii) whether the low-Z element will eventually be liberated and leave the host lattice, i.e. do the fluorine, oxygen, or hydrogen atoms form dimers after breaking the bond to the uranium atom. Therefore Raman spectra were also collected in the range where those decomposition products would appear. Raman is particularly well suited to these types of investigations due to its sensitivity to trace amounts of materials. One challenge for Raman investigations of the uranium compounds is that they are opaque to visible light. They absorb the incoming radiation and quickly heat up to the point of decomposition. This has been dealt with in the past by keeping the incoming laser power to very low levels on the tens of milliWatt range consequently affecting signal to noise. Recent modern investigations also used very small laser spot sizes (micrometer range) but ran again into the problem of heating and chemical sensitivity to the environment. In the studies presented here (in contrast to all other studies that were performed at ambient conditions only) we employ micro-Raman spectroscopy of samples situated in a diamond anvil cell. This increases the trustworthiness of the obtained data in several key-aspects: (a) We surrounded the samples in the DAC with neon as a pressure transmitting medium, a noble gas that is absolutely chemically inert. (b) Through the medium the sample is thermally heat sunk to the diamond anvils, diamond of course possessing the

  18. Mechanism of forming interfacial intermetallic compounds at interface for solid state diffusion bonding of dissimilar materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, P.; Liu, D.

    2006-01-01

    The formation of brittle intermetallic compounds at the interfaces of diffusion bonds is the main cause which leads to poor bond strength. Therefore, it is very important to study and establish the formation and growth model of intermetallic compounds at the interfaces for the control process of diffusion bonding. In this paper, according to the diffusion kinetics and the thermodynamics, the principle of formation of intermetallic compounds at interfaces in the multi-component diffusion couple, the flux-energy principle, is put forward. In the light of diffusion theory, the formation capacity of the phase at the interfaces is determined by specific properties of the composition in the diffusion couple and the composition ratio of the formed phase is in agreement with the diffusion flux. In accordance with the flux-energy principle, the microstructure of the Ni/TC4 interface is Ni/TiNi 3 /TiNi/Ti 2 Ni/TC4, the microstructure of the TC4/00Cr18Ni9Ti interface is 00Cr18Ni9Ti/TiFe 2 /TiFe/Ti 2 Fe/TC4, and the microstructure of the TiAl/40Cr interface is 40Cr/TiC/Ti 3 Al + FeAl + FeAl 2 /TiAl. Multi-intermetallic compounds with the equivalent flux-energy can be formed at the interfaces at the same time

  19. 8. International conference of solid compounds of transition elements. Extended abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komarek, K.; Boller, H.; Neckel, A.

    1985-03-01

    32 oral contributions and 126 posters on transition elements compounds and alloys are presented by Extended Abstracts; 86 thereof are of INIS relevance. Topics treated are mainly phase diagrams, crystal structure, structural chemistry and physical properties, e.g. conductivity, magnetism and superconductivity. (G.Q.)

  20. Phospholyl-uranium complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gradoz, Philippe

    1993-01-01

    After having reported a bibliographical study on penta-methylcyclopentadienyl uranium complexes, and a description of the synthesis and radioactivity of uranium (III) and (IV) boron hydrides compounds, this research thesis reports the study of mono and bis-tetramethyl-phospholyl uranium complexes comprising chloride, boron hydride, alkyl and alkoxide ligands. The third part reports the comparison of structures, stabilities and reactions of homologue complexes in penta-methylcyclopentadienyl and tetramethyl-phospholyl series. The last part addresses the synthesis of tris-phospholyl uranium (III) and (IV) complexes. [fr

  1. Liquid-Mercury Free Silver Solid Amalgam Electrode - Tool for Electroanalysis of Organic Compounds

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šelešovská-Fadrná, R.; Navrátil, Tomáš; Vlček, Milan

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 52, č. 6 (2007), s. 911-929 ISSN 0009-2223 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/07/1195; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06035 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503; CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : ascorbic acid * solid silver amalgam electrodes * cysteine * voltammetry Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 0.529, year: 2007

  2. Measurements of continuum lowering in solid-density plasmas created from elements and compounds

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ciricosta, O.; Vinko, S.M.; Barbrel, B.; Rackstraw, D.S.; Preston, T.R.; Burian, Tomáš; Chalupský, Jaromír; Cho, B.I.; Chung, H.-K.; Dakovski, G.L.; Engelhorn, K.; Hájková, Věra; Heimann, P.; Holmes, M.; Juha, Libor; Krzywinski, J.; Lee, R. W.; Toleikis, S.; Turner, J.J.; Zastrau, U.; Wark, J.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 7, May (2016), 1-7, č. článku 11713. ISSN 2041-1723 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP205/11/0571 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : solid-density plasmas * X-ray * Linac Coherent Light Source * ionization potential depression (IPD) * equation of state (EOS) Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 12.124, year: 2016

  3. Separation of uranium isotopes by accelerated isotope exchange reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seko, M.; Miyake, T.; Inada, K.; Ochi, K.; Sakamoto, T.

    1977-01-01

    A novel catalyst for isotope exchange reaction between uranium(IV) and uranium(VI) compounds enables acceleration of the reaction rate as much as 3000 times to make industrial separation of uranium isotopes economically possible

  4. Determination of Volatile Compounds in Four Commercial Samples of Japanese Green Algae Using Solid Phase Microextraction Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masayoshi Yamamoto

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Green algae are of great economic importance. Seaweed is consumed fresh or as seasoning in Japan. The commercial value is determined by quality, color, and flavor and is also strongly influenced by the production area. Our research, based on solid phase microextraction gas chromatography mass spectrometry (SPME-GC-MS, has revealed that volatile compounds differ intensely in the four varieties of commercial green algae. Accordingly, 41 major volatile compounds were identified. Heptadecene was the most abundant compound from Okayama (Ulva prolifera, Tokushima (Ulva prolifera, and Ehime prefecture (Ulva linza. Apocarotenoids, such as ionones, and their derivatives were prominent volatiles in algae from Okayama (Ulva prolifera and Tokushima prefecture (Ulva prolifera. Volatile, short chained apocarotenoids are among the most potent flavor components and contribute to the flavor of fresh, processed algae, and algae-based products. Benzaldehyde was predominant in seaweed from Shizuoka prefecture (Monostroma nitidum. Multivariant statistical analysis (PCA enabled simple discrimination of the samples based on their volatile profiles. This work shows the potential of SPME-GC-MS coupled with multivariant analysis to discriminate between samples of different geographical and botanical origins and form the basis for development of authentication methods of green algae products, including seasonings.

  5. Determination of volatile compounds in four commercial samples of Japanese green algae using solid phase microextraction gas chromatography mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Masayoshi; Baldermann, Susanne; Yoshikawa, Keisuke; Fujita, Akira; Mase, Nobuyuki; Watanabe, Naoharu

    2014-01-01

    Green algae are of great economic importance. Seaweed is consumed fresh or as seasoning in Japan. The commercial value is determined by quality, color, and flavor and is also strongly influenced by the production area. Our research, based on solid phase microextraction gas chromatography mass spectrometry (SPME-GC-MS), has revealed that volatile compounds differ intensely in the four varieties of commercial green algae. Accordingly, 41 major volatile compounds were identified. Heptadecene was the most abundant compound from Okayama (Ulva prolifera), Tokushima (Ulva prolifera), and Ehime prefecture (Ulva linza). Apocarotenoids, such as ionones, and their derivatives were prominent volatiles in algae from Okayama (Ulva prolifera) and Tokushima prefecture (Ulva prolifera). Volatile, short chained apocarotenoids are among the most potent flavor components and contribute to the flavor of fresh, processed algae, and algae-based products. Benzaldehyde was predominant in seaweed from Shizuoka prefecture (Monostroma nitidum). Multivariant statistical analysis (PCA) enabled simple discrimination of the samples based on their volatile profiles. This work shows the potential of SPME-GC-MS coupled with multivariant analysis to discriminate between samples of different geographical and botanical origins and form the basis for development of authentication methods of green algae products, including seasonings.

  6. Titrimetric determination of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Florence, T.M.

    1989-01-01

    Titrimetric methods are almost invariably used for the high precision assay of uranium compounds, because gravimetric methods are nonselective, and not as reliable. Although precipitation titrations have been used, for example with cupferron and ferrocyanide, and chelate titrations with EDTA and oxine give reasonable results, in practice only redox titrations find routine use. With all redox titration methods for uranium a precision of 01 to 02 percent can be achieved, and precisions as high as 0.003 percent have been claimed for the more refined techniques. There are two types of redox titrations for uranium in common use. The first involves the direct titration of uranium (VI) to uranium (IV) with a standard solution of a strong reductant, such as chromous chloride or titanous chloride, and the second requires a preliminary reduction of uranium to the (IV) or (III) state, followed by titration back to the (VI) state with a standard oxidant. Both types of redox titrations are discussed. 4 figs

  7. A New Class of Ternary Compound for Lithium-Ion Battery: from Composite to Solid Solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiali; Wu, Hailong; Cui, Yanhua; Liu, Shengzhou; Tian, Xiaoqing; Cui, Yixiu; Liu, Xiaojiang; Yang, Yin

    2018-02-14

    Searching for high-performance cathode materials is a crucial task to develop advanced lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) with high-energy densities for electrical vehicles (EVs). As a promising lithium-rich material, Li 2 MnO 3 delivers high capacity over 200 mAh g -1 but suffers from poor structural stability and electronic conductivity. Replacing Mn 4+ ions by relatively larger Sn 4+ ions is regarded as a possible strategy to improve structural stability and thus cycling performance of Li 2 MnO 3 material. However, large difference in ionic radii of Mn 4+ and Sn 4+ ions leads to phase separation of Li 2 MnO 3 and Li 2 SnO 3 during high-temperature synthesis. To prepare solid-solution phase of Li 2 MnO 3 -Li 2 SnO 3 , a buffer agent of Ru 4+ , whose ionic radius is in between that of Mn 4+ and Sn 4+ ions, is introduced to assist the formation of a single solid-solution phase. The results show that the Li 2 RuO 3 -Li 2 MnO 3 -Li 2 SnO 3 ternary system evolves from mixed composite phases into a single solid-solution phase with increasing Ru content. Meanwhile, discharge capacity of this ternary system shows significantly increase at the transformation point which is ascribed to the improvement of Li + /e - transportation kinetics and anionic redox chemistry for solid-solution phase. The role of Mn/Sn molar ratio of Li 2 RuO 3 -Li 2 MnO 3 -Li 2 SnO 3 ternary system has also been studied. It is revealed that higher Sn content benefits cycling stability of the system because Sn 4+ ions with larger sizes could partially block the migration of Mn 4+ and Ru 4+ from transition metal layer to Li layer, thus suppressing structural transformation of the system from layered-to-spinel phase. These findings may enable a new route for exploring ternary or even quaternary lithium-rich cathode materials for LIBs.

  8. Study of internal exposure to uranium compounds in fuel fabrication plants in Brazil; Estudo da exposicao interna a compostos de uranio na fabricacao do elemento combustivel nuclear no Brasil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Maristela Souza

    2006-07-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 66 and Supporting Guidance 3) strongly recommends that specific information on lung retention parameters should be used in preference to default values wherever appropriate, for the derivation of effective doses and for bioassay interpretation of monitoring data. A group of 81 workers exposed to UO{sub 2} at the fuel fabrication facility in Brazil was selected to evaluate the committed effective dose. The workers were monitored for determination of uranium content in the urinary and faecal excretion. The contribution of intakes by ingestion and inhalation were assessed on the basis of the ratios of urinary to fecal excretion. For the selected workers it was concluded that inhalation dominated intake. According to ICRP 66, uranium oxide is classified as insoluble Type S compound. The ICRP Supporting Guidance 3 and some recent studies have recommended specific lung retention parameters to UO{sub 2}. The solubility parameters of the uranium oxide compound handled by the workers at the fuel fabrication facility in Brazil was evaluated on the basis of the ratios of urinary to fecal excretion. Excretion data were corrected for dietary intakes. This paper will discuss the application of lung retention parameters recommended by the ICRP models to these data and also the dependence of the effective committed dose on the lung retention parameters. It will also discuss the problems in the interpretation of monitoring results, when the worker is exposed to several uranium compounds of different solubilities. (author)

  9. Method of semi-automatic high precision potentiometric titration for characterization of uranium compounds; Metodo de titulacao potenciometrica de alta precisao semi-automatizado para a caracterizacao de compostos de uranio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cristiano, Barbara Fernandes G.; Dias, Fabio C.; Barros, Pedro D. de; Araujo, Radier Mario S. de; Delgado, Jose Ubiratan; Silva, Jose Wanderley S. da, E-mail: barbara@ird.gov.b, E-mail: fabio@ird.gov.b, E-mail: pedrodio@ird.gov.b, E-mail: radier@ird.gov.b, E-mail: delgado@ird.gov.b, E-mail: wanderley@ird.gov.b [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Lopes, Ricardo T., E-mail: ricardo@lin.ufrj.b [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (LIN/COPPE/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia. Lab. de Instrumentacao Nuclear

    2011-10-26

    The method of high precision potentiometric titration is widely used in the certification and characterization of uranium compounds. In order to reduce the analysis and diminish the influence if the annalist, a semi-automatic version of the method was developed at the safeguards laboratory of the CNEN-RJ, Brazil. The method was applied with traceability guaranteed by use of primary standard of potassium dichromate. The standard uncertainty combined in the determination of concentration of total uranium was of the order of 0.01%, which is better related to traditionally methods used by the nuclear installations which is of the order of 0.1%

  10. Solid and liquid thermal expansion and structural observations in the quasicrystalline Cd84Yb16 compound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, M.J.; Lograsso, T.A.; Sordelet, D.J.

    2010-01-01

    The structure of single-grain Cd 84 Yb 16 samples aligned along the twofold and fivefold axes has been followed from 300 to 1050 K using high-energy synchrotron X-rays. The quasicrystal phase is stable up to its melting temperature of 914 K and has a large linear thermal expansion of 37.1 ppm K -1 over this temperature range. The samples melt congruently over a temperature range of less than 1 K. The liquid is 7% less dense than the solid and, upon cooling from the melt, the quasicrystal phase directly solidifies within a 1 K interval. The amount of undercooling achieved, about 5-25 K, was dependent on the cooling rate. The total scattering function of the liquid is consistent with a dilute liquid Cd structure. These results agree with suggestions that the structure of the liquid must undergo reordering in order to form the solid phases. However, there is no compelling evidence for icosahedral short-range order in the liquid prior to the formation of the quasicrystalline structure.

  11. Literature survey on solid and aqueous species of importance for nuclear waste repositories: The elements uranium, neptunium and cesium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bucher, J.J.

    1987-01-01

    This document contains extensive tables listing all possible chemical compounds of species that might occur in a proposed nuclear waste repository. Most are listed as unlikely to occur under conditions predicted for the repository. Extensive data tables and reference sources are provided for those compounds that might occur on form

  12. Separation of uranium(VI) by liquid-solid extraction with tri-n-octylphosphine oxide diluted with naphthalene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shigetomi, Y.; Kojima, T.; Kamba, H.; Yamamoto, Y.

    1980-01-01

    Liquid-liquid distribution with tri-n-octylphosphine oxide (TOPO) and molten naphthalene has been investigated for the extraction of 20 metals from nitric acid and hydrochloric acid solutions. Uranium is quantitatively extracted from 1 M nitric acid or hydrochloric acid by using 100 mg of TOPO and 200 mg of naphthalene and shaking for 5 min at 80 0 C, and separated from transition metals, alkaline earth metals and rare earth metals (except scandium). Addition of naphthalene increases the extraction efficiency. (Auth.)

  13. Use of solid phase microextraction to identify volatile organic compounds in brazilian wines from different grape varieties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natália Cristina Morais Fernandes

    Full Text Available Abstract The Brazilian wine industry has shown significant growth in recent years and the insertion of new concepts, such as geographical indications as signs of quality, has placed Brazil in tune with the tendencies of world wine production. The aim of this work was to apply the Solid Phase Microextraction technique in combination with Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry to study Brazilian wines made from different grape varieties, in order to separate and identify their volatile organic compounds. These substances were identified by comparisons between the spectra obtained with those presented in the NIST library database, and by comparisons with linear retention indices and literature data. The amounts of the compounds were calculated based on the total peak areas of the chromatograms. Forty-seven volatile compounds were identified and grouped into alcohols, aldehydes, fatty acids, esters, hydrocarbons, ketones and terpenes. Most of them belonged to the ester function, conferring a fruity aroma on the wines. The alcohols may have originated from the yeast metabolism, contributing to the alcoholic and floral aromas. Ethyl lactate, 1-hexanol and diethyl maleate were identified in all the varieties, except Merlot. Decanal, methyl citronellate, (E-2-hexenyl-3-methylbutyrate were only found in Merlot, while 2,3-butanediol was only present in the Tannat wines. 2-Phenylethanol was present in all varieties and is recognized as giving pleasant rose and honey attributes to wines. This study showed that the volatile profile of red wines is mainly characterized by esters and higher alcohols. The statistical analysis of the comparison of averages showed a greater amount of averages significantly different in the relative areas of Merlot wine. The Principal Component Analysis showed one grouping composed only of the Merlot wine samples, and this was probably related to the existence of the volatile organic compounds that were specifically identified in

  14. Head Space Solid Phase Micro-Extraction (HS - SPME of volatile organic compounds produced by Sporidiobolus salmonicolor (CBS 2636

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eunice Valduga

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was the assessment of volatile organic compounds produced by Sporidiobolus salmonicolor (CBS 2636 using methyl and ethyl ricinoleate, ricinoleic acid and castor oil as precursors. The analysis of the volatile organic compounds was carried out using Head Space Solid Phase Micro-Extraction (HS - SPME. Factorial experimental design was used for investigating extraction conditions, verifying stirring rate (0-400 rpm, temperature (25-60 ºC, extraction time (10-30 minutes, and sample volume (2-3 mL. The identification of volatile organic compounds was carried out by Gas Chromatography with Mass Spectrum Detector (GC/MSD. The conditions that resulted in maximum extraction were: 60 ºC, 10 minutes extraction, no stirring, sample volume of 2.0 mL, and addition of saturated KCl (1:10 v/v. In the bio-production of volatile organic compounds the effect of stirring rate (120-200 rpm, temperature (23-33 ºC, pH (4.0-8.0, precursor concentration (0.02-0.1%, mannitol (0-6%, and asparagine concentration (0-0.2% was investigated. The bio-production at 28 ºC, 160 rpm, pH 6,0 and with the addition of 0.02% ricinoleic acid to the medium yielded the highest production of VOCs, identified as 1,4-butanediol, 1,2,2-trimethylciclopropilamine, beta-ionone; 2,3-butanodione, pentanal, tetradecane, 2-isononenal, 4-octen-3-one, propanoic acid, and octadecane.

  15. Mechanistic investigation of food effect on disintegration and dissolution of BCS class III compound solid formulations: the importance of viscosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radwan, Asma; Amidon, Gordon L; Langguth, Peter

    2012-10-01

    A negative food effect, i.e. a decrease in bioavailability upon the co-administration of compounds together with food, has been attributed particularly with high solubility/low permeability compounds (BCS class III). Different mechanisms have been proposed including intestinal dilution leading to a lower concentration gradient across the intestinal wall as well as binding of the active pharmaceutical ingredient to food components in the intestine and thereby decreasing the fraction of the dose available for absorption. These mechanisms refer primarily to the compound and not to the dosage form. An increase in viscosity of the dissolution fluid will in particular affect the absorption of BCS type III compounds with preferential absorption in the upper small intestine if the API release is delayed from the dosage form. The present study demonstrated that the increase in viscosity of the dissolution medium, following ingestion of a solid meal, may drastically reduce disintegration and dissolution. For that purpose the viscosity of the standard FDA meal was determined and simulated by solutions of HPMC in buffer. As model formulations, three commercially available tablets containing trospium chloride, a BCS class III m-cholinoreceptor antagonist was used. Trospium chloride drug products have been described to undergo a negative food effect of more than 80% following ingestion with food. The tablets showed prolonged disintegration times and reduced dissolution rates in viscous media, which could be attributed to changes in the liquid penetration rates. The effect was particularly significant for film-coated tablets relative to uncoated dosage forms. The results show the necessity of considering media viscosity when designing in vitro models of drug release for BCS type III drug formulations. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Extended Fenske-Hall LCAO MO calculations of core-level shifts in solid P compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke, R.; Chassé, T.; Reinhold, J.; Streubel, P.; Szargan, R.

    1997-08-01

    Extended Fenske-Hall LCAO-MO ΔSCF calculations on solids modelled as H-pseudoatom saturated clusters are reported. The computational results verify the experimentally obtained initial-state (effective atomic charges, Madelung potential) and relaxation-energy contributions to the XPS phosphorus core-level binding energy shifts measured in Na 3PO 3S, Na 3PO 4, Na 2PO 3F and NH 4PF 6 in reference to red phosphorus. It is shown that the different initial-state contributions observed in the studied phosphates are determined by local and nonlocal terms while the relaxation-energy contributions are mainly dependent on the nature of the nearest neighbors of the phosphorus atom.

  17. Use of molecular beams for the analysis of liquid and solid organic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devienne, F.M.; Giroud, Josiane.

    1975-01-01

    The chemical composition of every solid can be determined by the M.B.S.A. method (Molecular Beam Surface Analysis). The method was used to analyze deposits on a filter paper, obtained by evaporation of a liquid solution, as well a liquid films with very low evaporation rate (dioctyl-azelate for instance). The S.C.I.C. method (Separation of Ions by Collision) was used to know exactly the composition of ions of fixed mass, separated by an electromagnet. The separated ions collide a target gas (helium or argon); apart of them are dissociated and the composition and structure of the primary ions can be deduced from the kinetic energy of the dissociated ions. Results obtained from such analysis of a thin film of baryum acetate on a platinum substrate are given [fr

  18. Occupational hygiene in terms of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and bioaerosols at two solid waste management plants in Finland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehtinen, Jenni, E-mail: jenni.k.lehtinen@jyu.fi [University of Jyväskylä, Department of Biological and Environmental Science, P.O. Box 35, 40014 Jyväskylä (Finland); Tolvanen, Outi; Nivukoski, Ulla; Veijanen, Anja; Hänninen, Kari [University of Jyväskylä, Department of Biological and Environmental Science, P.O. Box 35, 40014 Jyväskylä (Finland)

    2013-04-15

    Highlights: ► Odorous VOCs: acetic acid, 2,3-butanedione, ethyl acetate, alpha-pinene and limonene. ► VOC concentrations did not exceed occupational exposure limit concentrations. ► 2,3-Butanedione as the health effecting compound is discussed. ► Endotoxin concentrations may cause health problems in waste treatment. - Abstract: Factors affecting occupational hygiene were measured at the solid waste transferring plant at Hyvinkää and at the optic separation plant in Hämeenlinna. Measurements consisted of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and bioaerosols including microbes, dust and endotoxins. The most abundant compounds in both of the plants were aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, esters of carboxylic acids, ketones and terpenes. In terms of odour generation, the most important emissions were acetic acid, 2,3-butanedione, ethyl acetate, alpha-pinene and limonene due to their low threshold odour concentrations. At the optic waste separation plant, limonene occurred at the highest concentration of all single compounds of identified VOCs. The concentration of any single volatile organic compound did not exceed the occupational exposure limit (OEL) concentration. However, 2,3-butanedione as a health risk compound is discussed based on recent scientific findings linking it to lung disease. Microbe and dust concentrations were low at the waste transferring plant. Only endotoxin concentrations may cause health problems; the average concentration inside the plant was 425 EU/m{sup 3} which clearly exceeded the threshold value of 90 EU/m{sup 3}. In the wheel loader cabin the endotoxin concentrations were below 1 EU/m{sup 3}. High microbial and endotoxin concentrations were measured in the processing hall at the optic waste separation plant. The average concentration of endotoxins was found to be 10,980 EU/m{sup 3}, a concentration which may cause health risks. Concentrations of viable fungi were quite high in few measurements in the control room. The most

  19. Occupational hygiene in terms of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and bioaerosols at two solid waste management plants in Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehtinen, Jenni; Tolvanen, Outi; Nivukoski, Ulla; Veijanen, Anja; Hänninen, Kari

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Odorous VOCs: acetic acid, 2,3-butanedione, ethyl acetate, alpha-pinene and limonene. ► VOC concentrations did not exceed occupational exposure limit concentrations. ► 2,3-Butanedione as the health effecting compound is discussed. ► Endotoxin concentrations may cause health problems in waste treatment. - Abstract: Factors affecting occupational hygiene were measured at the solid waste transferring plant at Hyvinkää and at the optic separation plant in Hämeenlinna. Measurements consisted of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and bioaerosols including microbes, dust and endotoxins. The most abundant compounds in both of the plants were aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, esters of carboxylic acids, ketones and terpenes. In terms of odour generation, the most important emissions were acetic acid, 2,3-butanedione, ethyl acetate, alpha-pinene and limonene due to their low threshold odour concentrations. At the optic waste separation plant, limonene occurred at the highest concentration of all single compounds of identified VOCs. The concentration of any single volatile organic compound did not exceed the occupational exposure limit (OEL) concentration. However, 2,3-butanedione as a health risk compound is discussed based on recent scientific findings linking it to lung disease. Microbe and dust concentrations were low at the waste transferring plant. Only endotoxin concentrations may cause health problems; the average concentration inside the plant was 425 EU/m 3 which clearly exceeded the threshold value of 90 EU/m 3 . In the wheel loader cabin the endotoxin concentrations were below 1 EU/m 3 . High microbial and endotoxin concentrations were measured in the processing hall at the optic waste separation plant. The average concentration of endotoxins was found to be 10,980 EU/m 3 , a concentration which may cause health risks. Concentrations of viable fungi were quite high in few measurements in the control room. The most problematic factor was

  20. Influence of composition of the raw materials on phase formation in solid compounds based on slag and clay minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galkin, A.V.; Tolebaev, T.; Omarova, V.I.; Burkitbaev, M.; Blynskiy, A.P.; Bachilova, N.V.; Matsynina, V.I.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Activation of solidification processes in a compound formed on the basis of slag and clay minerals using sodium hydroxide - the output product from processing the BN-350 sodium coolant it is expedient to form the final product with a phase composition representing (in terms of long term storage) hydro-alumino-silicates incorporating Na-22 and Cs-137 radionuclides, which isomorphly replace other atoms in the crystal lattice sites. Combination of mineral phases, such as alkaline and alkaline-earth hydro-alumino-silicates with zeolite-like structure, providing sorptive properties, and the tobermorite like low-base hydro silicates of calcium defining the physico-mechanical properties of compound is the necessary condition for the compound stability. Investigations of phase formation in the mixtures of Kazakhstan clay, slag materials and alkali have been conducted targeted to control the physico-chemical properties of solid compound. The mixtures of alkali, thermal power plant ashes and clays of various mineralogical genesis (kaolinite, bentonite, Ca-Na-smectite montmorillonite) have been studied. The ashes and phosphorous slag while interacting with alkali are determined to form the non-alkaline hydro-silicates of stavrolite and indianite (anortite) type with free alkali being found in an unbound state. Both alkaline and alkaline-alkaline-earth hydro-silicates of Na 2 Ca 2 Si 2 O 7 H 2 O type are only formed in a compounds containing metallurgical slag. Formation of alkaline hydro-alumino-silicates of NaAlSiO 4 H 2 0 type as well as tomsonite (Na 4 Ca 8 [Al 20S i 20 O 80 ] 24H 2 O) - the zeolite like mineral have been detected in a two-component alkali-clay mixtures. Besides the quantity of tomsonite was determined to be not only dependent on Al 2 O 3 content in clay component but is also defined by stoichiometric composition of the mixture, because zeolite synthesis takes place under conditions of gels co-deposition and high pH value. Maximum quantity of

  1. Preparation of solid-state samples of a transition metal coordination compound for synchrotron radiation photoemission studies

    CERN Document Server

    Crotti, C; Celestino, T; Fontana, S

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this research was to identify a sample preparation method suitable for the study of transition metal complexes by photoemission spectroscopy with synchrotron radiation as the X-ray source, even in the case where the compound is not evaporable. Solid-phase samples of W(CO) sub 4 (dppe) [dppe=1,2-bis(diphenylphosphino)ethane] were prepared according to different methods and their synchrotron radiation XPS spectra measured. The spectra acquired from samples prepared by spin coating show core level peaks only slightly broader than the spectrum recorded from UHV evaporated samples. Moreover, for these samples the reproducibility of the binding energy values is excellent. The dependence of the spin coating technique on parameters such as solvent and solution concentration, spinning speed and support material was studied. The same preparation method also allowed the acquisition of valence band spectra, the main peaks of which were clearly resolved. The results suggest that use of the spin coating techniqu...

  2. Determination of quaternary ammonium compounds in seawater samples by solid-phase extraction and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassarab, P; Williams, D; Dean, J R; Ludkin, E; Perry, J J

    2011-02-04

    A method for the simultaneous determination of two biocidal quaternary ammonium compounds; didecyldimethylammonium chloride (didecyldimethyl quat) and dodecylbenzyldimethylammonium chloride (benzyl quat), in seawater by solid phase extraction (SPE) followed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) was developed. The optimised procedure utilised off-line extraction of the analytes from seawater using polymeric (Strata-X) SPE cartridges. Recoveries ranged from 80 to 105%, with detection limits at the low parts-per-trillion (ng/l) level for both analytes. To demonstrate sensitivity, environmental concentrations were measured at three different locations along the North East coast of England with measured values in the range 120-270ng/l. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Micelle assisted thin-film solid phase microextraction: a new approach for determination of quaternary ammonium compounds in environmental samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyacı, Ezel; Pawliszyn, Janusz

    2014-09-16

    Determination of quaternary ammonium compounds (QACs) often is considered to be a challenging undertaking owing to secondary interactions of the analytes' permanently charged quaternary ammonium head or hydrophobic tail with the utilized labware. Here, for the first time, a micelle assisted thin-film solid phase microextraction (TF-SPME) using a zwitterionic detergent 3-[(3-cholamidopropyl)dimethylammonio]-1-propanesulfonate (CHAPS) as a matrix modifier is introduced as a novel approach for in-laboratory sample preparation of the challenging compounds. The proposed micelle assisted TF-SPME method offers suppression/enhancement free electrospray ionization of analytes in mass spectrometric detection, minimal interaction of the micelles with the TF-SPME coating, and chromatographic stationary phase and analysis free of secondary interactions. Moreover, it was found that the matrix modifier has multiple functions; when its concentration is found below the critical micelle concentration (CMC), the matrix modifier primarily acts as a surface deactivator; above its CMC, it acts as a stabilizer for QACs. Additionally, shorter equilibrium extraction times in the presence of the modifier demonstrated that micelles also assist in the transfer of analytes from the bulk of the sample to the surface of the coating. The developed micelle assisted TF-SPME protocol using the 96-blade system requires only 30 min of extraction and 15 min of desorption. Together with a conditioning step (15 min), the entire method is 60 min; considering the advantage of using the 96-blade system, if all the blades in the brush are used, the sample preparation time per sample is 0.63 min. Moreover, the recoveries for all analytes with the developed method were found to range within 80.2-97.3%; as such, this method can be considered an open bed solid phase extraction. The proposed method was successfully validated using real samples.

  4. Effect of different uranium compounds on the properties of U-Pt-Y-Ba-O double-perovskite pinning centres in textured Y-Ba-Cu-O superconductor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawh, Ravi-Persad; Weinstein, Roy; Parks, Drew; Gandini, Alberto [Beam Particle Dynamics Laboratories, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204-5005 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204-5005 (United States); Texas Center for Superconductivity and Advanced Materials, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204-5005 (United States)

    2005-02-01

    An experiment was performed to test the effect of different uranium compounds on the properties of chemical pinning centres. UO{sub 2}, UO{sub 3}, and UO{sub 4}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O wereadmixed to Y 123+Pt, and textured. Tests of J{sub c} via measurements of trapped field (B{sub trap}) indicate a clear dependence of B{sub trap} on the U compound admixed to create the pinning centres. In all three cases there is a monotonic increase in B{sub trap} as the mass (M{sub U}) of U is increased. However, the magnitude of the increase in B{sub trap} depends on the admixed U compound. The highest increase in B{sub trap} is measured in samples doped with UO{sub 4}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O, and the lowest is obtained in samples doped with UO{sub 2}. Microstructure studies indicate that the composition of the U-rich pinning deposits is the same in all three cases, i.e. all are the previously identified (U{sub 0.6}Pt{sub 0.4})Y Ba{sub 2}O{sub 6} compound. The primary difference among the three types of samples is that the size of the U-Pt-Y-Ba-O pinning deposits depends on the admixed U compound. While all are in the nanometre domain, the diameter of these deposits was markedly larger in UO{sub 2} doped samples than in UO{sub 3} doped samples, and smallest in UO{sub 4}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O doped samples. Because some form of poisoning limits the amount of U that can be added to create pinning centres, to M{sub U} {approx}1 wt%, smaller deposits result in a greater number of pinning centres. We conclude that UO{sub 4}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O is more effective than either UO{sub 3} or UO{sub 2} in the formation of U-Pt-Y-Ba-O pinning centres because of diminished pinning centre size, and consequent increase in pinning centre density.

  5. In situ characterization of uranium and americium oxide solid solution formation for CRMP process: first combination of in situ XRD and XANES measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caisso, Marie; Picart, Sébastien; Belin, Renaud C; Lebreton, Florent; Martin, Philippe M; Dardenne, Kathy; Rothe, Jörg; Neuville, Daniel R; Delahaye, Thibaud; Ayral, André

    2015-04-14

    Transmutation of americium in heterogeneous mode through the use of U1-xAmxO2±δ ceramic pellets, also known as Americium Bearing Blankets (AmBB), has become a major research axis. Nevertheless, in order to consider future large-scale deployment, the processes involved in AmBB fabrication have to minimize fine particle dissemination, due to the presence of americium, which considerably increases the risk of contamination. New synthesis routes avoiding the use of pulverulent precursors are thus currently under development, such as the Calcined Resin Microsphere Pelletization (CRMP) process. It is based on the use of weak-acid resin (WAR) microspheres as precursors, loaded with actinide cations. After two specific calcinations under controlled atmospheres, resin microspheres are converted into oxide microspheres composed of a monophasic U1-xAmxO2±δ phase. Understanding the different mechanisms during thermal conversion, that lead to the release of organic matter and the formation of a solid solution, appear essential. By combining in situ techniques such as XRD and XAS, it has become possible to identify the key temperatures for oxide formation, and the corresponding oxidation states taken by uranium and americium during mineralization. This paper thus presents the first results on the mineralization of (U,Am) loaded resin microspheres into a solid solution, through in situ XAS analysis correlated with HT-XRD.

  6. Safety criteria of uranium enrichment plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nardocci, A.C.; Oliveira Neto, J.M. de

    1994-01-01

    The applicability of nuclear reactor safety criteria applied to uranium enrichment plants is discussed, and a new criterion based on the soluble uranium compounds and hexafluoride chemical toxicities is presented. (L.C.J.A.). 21 refs, 4 tabs

  7. Effect of flavin compounds on uranium(VI) reduction- kinetic study using electrochemical methods with UV-vis spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamasaki, Shinya; Tanaka, Kazuya; Kozai, Naofumi; Ohnuki, Toshihiko

    2017-01-01

    The reduction of uranium hexavalent (U(VI)) to tetravalent (U(IV)) is an important reaction because of the change in its mobility in the natural environment. Although the flavin mononucleotide (FMN) has acted as an electron shuttle for the U(VI) reduction in vivo system, which is called an electron mediator, only the rate constant for the electron transfer from FMN to U(VI) has been determined. This study examined the rate constant for the U(VI) reduction process by three flavin analogues (riboflavin, flavin mononucleotide, flavin adenine dinucleotide) to elucidate their substituent group effect on the U(VI) reduction rate by electrochemical methods. The formation of the U(IV) was monitored by UV-vis spectrometry at 660 nm during the constant potential electrolysis of the U(VI) solution in the presence of the mediator. The cyclic voltammograms indicated that the three flavin analogues behaved as electron mediator to reduce U(VI). The logarithmic rate constant for the U(VI) reduction was related to the standard redox potential of the mediators. This linear relationship indicated that the redox-active group of the mediator and the substituent group of the mediator dominate capability of the U(VI) reduction and its rate, respectively. The apparent reduction potential of U(VI) increased about 0.2 V in the presence of the mediators, which strongly suggests that the biological electron mediator makes the U(VI) reduction possible even under more oxidative conditions. - Highlights: • The rate constant for the U(VI) reduction by flavin analogues was determined. • The flavins showed a mediator effect on the U(VI) reduction. • The logarithmic rate constants for the U(VI) reduction was proportional to redox potential of the mediator. • The presence of the mediator increased about 0.2 V apparent redox potential of U(VI) to U(IV).

  8. Solid/liquid extraction equilibria of phenolic compounds with trioctylphosphine oxide impregnated in polymeric membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praveen, Prashant; Loh, Kai-Chee

    2016-06-01

    Trioctylphosphine oxide based extractant impregnated membranes (EIM) were used for extraction of phenol and its methyl, hydroxyl and chloride substituted derivatives. The distribution coefficients of the phenols varied from 2 to 234, in the order of 1-napthol > p-chlorophenol > m-cresol > p-cresol > o-cresol > phenol > catechol > pyrogallol > hydroquinone, when initial phenols loadings was varied in 100-2000 mg/L. An extraction model, based on the law of mass action, was formulated to predict the equilibrium distribution of the phenols. The model was in excellent agreement (R(2) > 0.97) with the experimental results at low phenols concentrations ( 0.95), which signified high mass transfer resistance in the EIMs. Examination of the effects of ring substitution on equilibrium, and bivariate statistical analysis between the amounts of phenols extracted into the EIMs and factors affecting phenols interaction with TOPO, indicated the dominant role of hydrophobicity in equilibrium determination. These results improve understanding of the solid/liquid equilibrium process between phenols and the EIMs, and these will be useful in designing phenol recovery process from wastewater. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Solid phase extraction for sample preparation in trace analysis of ionogenic compounds by capillary isotachophoresis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutta, M.; Kaniansky, D.; Simunicova, E.; Zelenska, V.; Madajova, V.; Siskova, A.

    1992-01-01

    Various sorbents recommended for solid phase extraction (SPE) in sample preparation procedures were studied for use in combination with capillary isotachophoresis (ITP). They were very efficient in achieving trace concentration levels (low ppb, i.e., low parts per 10 9 ) for different types of ITP analytes present in environmental and biological matrices. A macroporous carbon sorbent was convenient for sample preparation in ITP analysis of short chain fatty acids (C 4 -C 9 ) in drinking water. Chelating sorbents based on hydroxyalkyl methacrylate matrix with salicylate, thioglycolate and 8-hydroxyquinolinate functionalities were found to be very suitable for preconcentration of heavy metals with an inherent sample clean-up. An octadecyl-bonded silica sorbent enabled in ITP a photometric detection of γ-aminobutyrate (labeled with a 2,4,6-trinitrophenyl group) at concentrations considerably lower than required for the determination of this amino acid in cerebrospinal fluid (∼5*10 -8 mol/l). (author) 34 refs.; 3 figs.; 1 tab

  10. Increase of content and bioactivity of total phenolic compounds from spent coffee grounds through solid state fermentation by Bacillus clausii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochín-Medina, Jesús J; Ramírez, Karina; Rangel-Peraza, Jesús G; Bustos-Terrones, Yaneth A

    2018-03-01

    Spent coffee grounds are waste material generated during coffee beverage preparation. This by-product disposal causes a negative environmental impact, in addition to the loss of a rich source of nutrients and bioactive compounds. A rotating central composition design was used to determine the optimal conditions for the bioactivity of phenolic compounds obtained after the solid state fermentation of spent coffee grounds by Bacillus clausii . To achieve this, temperature and fermentation time were varied according to the experimental design and the total phenolic and flavonoid content, antioxidant activity and antimicrobial activity were determined. Surface response methodology showed that optimum bioprocessing conditions were a temperature of 37 °C and a fermentation time of 39 h. Under these conditions, total phenolic and flavonoid contents increased by 36 and 13%, respectively, in fermented extracts as compared to non-fermented. In addition, the antioxidant activity was increased by 15% and higher antimicrobial activity was observed against Gram positive and negative bacteria. These data demonstrated that bioprocessing optimization of spent coffee grounds using the surface response methodology was an important tool to improve phenolic extraction, which could be used as an antioxidant and antimicrobial agents incorporated into different types of food products.

  11. ELECTRICAL RESISTIVITY AND SEEBECK COEFFICIENT IN Ca(LaMnO COMPOUNDS PREPARED BY SOLID STATE REACTION METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge I. Villa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available By using the solid state reaction method samples of  Ca1-xLaxMnO3 (0 ≤ x ≥ 0.15 were prepared. Their transport properties were studied by electrical resistivity rho(T and Seebeck coefficient S(T measurements as a function of temperature and lanthanum content, in the temperature range between 100 and 290K. The structural and morphological properties were studied by X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD and scanning electron microscopy (SEM, respectively. The Seebeck coefficient is negative throughout the studied temperature range indicating a conduction given by negative charge carriers, its magnitude decreases with the lanthanum content from |-261| mV/K to |-120| mV/K. The electrical resistivity shows a semiconducting behavior, it was interpreted in terms of small polaron hopping model. Thermoelectric properties of the obtained compounds were studied by the thermoelectric power factor PF, which reaches maximum values around 2mW/K2cm, these values become this kind of ceramics promising thermoelectric compound, to be used in technological applications.

  12. Characteristics and Classification of Solid Radioactive Waste From the Front-End of the Uranium Fuel Cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xinhua; Wei, Fangxin; Xu, Chunyan; Liao, Yunxuan; Jiang, Jing

    2015-09-01

    The proper classification of radioactive waste is the basis upon which to define its disposal method. In view of differences between waste containing artificial radionuclides and waste with naturally occurring radionuclides, the scientific definition of the properties of waste arising from the front end of the uranium fuel cycle (UF Waste) is the key to dispose of such waste. This paper is intended to introduce briefly the policy and practice to dispose of such waste in China and some foreign countries, explore how to solve the dilemma facing such waste, analyze in detail the compositions and properties of such waste, and finally put forward a new concept of classifying such waste as waste with naturally occurring radionuclides.

  13. Development and underground testing of the α dosimeter: a solid state electronic personal radiation dosimeter for uranium miners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parkinson, R.N.; Roze, V.; Shepherd, R.

    1981-01-01

    The αDOSIMETER is a complete, integrated system designed to monitor the immediate worksite of underground miners where the disintegration for radon daughters is a risk to the health of mining personnel. The dosimeter weighing little more than one pound is worn by each miner throughout the entire shift and is powered by the miner's cap lamp battery. After this integration period, the unit is connected to a reading network whereupon the day's data is dumped, calculated and stored. Beginning in July 1980, prototype units were subjected to vigorous underground testing in uranium mines in Canada and the United States and in tin mines in Cornwall, UK. The testing results are summarized and proposals advanced for a typical mine monitoring system utilizing the αDOSIMETER

  14. Tritium recovery from fusion blankets using solid lithium compounds. I. Design and minimization of tritium inventory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, J.R.

    1975-01-01

    Tritium blanket inventories of 100 curies/MW(e) are readily achievable, and inventories as low as 10 curies/MW(e) are possible for blankets with small lithium compound particulates (less than or equal to 50μ) at T greater than or equal to 800 0 C. Of the three release modes [A - to the main coolant (e.g., He) stream; B - to a separate processing circuit; and C - to the plasma region], mode A appears optimum for blankets using gas-cooled metallic structures (e.g., Al, stainless), while mode C appears optimum for high temperature refractory (e.g., C, SiC) structures. The greater structural complexity of mode B makes it less attractive than modes A and C. No recovery method is required for mode C release. With mode A release, tritium inventory in the coolant circuits ranges from 1 to 10 curies/MW(e), depending on processing parameters. Tritium leak rates to the environment during normal operation can be kept to less than or equal to 10 -3 curies/MW(e) per day with low permeability barriers. In general, a mixture of T 2 and T 2 O is present in the coolant stream. Three methods of tritium recovery are examined: (1) Conversion to T 2 followed by absorption in a metal hydride bed. (2) Conversion to T 2 followed by condensation at approximately 6 0 K. (3) Conversion to T 2 O followed by condensation at approximately 100 0 K

  15. Characterization of the Key Aroma Compounds in Proso Millet Wine Using Headspace Solid-Phase Microextraction and Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingke Liu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The volatile compounds in proso millet wine were extracted by headspace solid-phase microextraction (85 μm polyacrylate (PA, 100 μm polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS, 75 μm Carboxen (CAR/PDMS, and 50/30 μm divinylbenzene (DVB/CAR/PDMS fibers, and analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry; the odor characteristics and intensities were analyzed by the odor activity value (OAV. Different sample preparation factors were used to optimize this method: sample amount, extraction time, extraction temperature, and content of NaCl. A total of 64 volatile compounds were identified from the wine sample, including 14 esters, seven alcohols, five aldehydes, five ketones, 12 benzene derivatives, 12 hydrocarbons, two terpenes, three phenols, two acids, and two heterocycles. Ethyl benzeneacetate, phenylethyl alcohol, and benzaldehyde were the main volatile compounds found in the samples. According to their OAVs, 14 volatile compounds were determined to be odor-active compounds (OAV > 1, and benzaldehyde, benzeneacetaldehyde, 1-methyl-naphthalene, 2-methyl-naphthalene, and biphenyl were the prominent odor-active compounds (OAV > 50, having a high OAV. Principal component analysis (PCA showed the difference of distribution of the 64 volatile compounds and 14 odor-active compounds with four solid-phase microextraction (SPME fibers.

  16. Uranium (IV) carboxylates - I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satpathy, K C; Patnaik, A K [Sambalpur Univ. (India). Dept. of Chemistry

    1975-11-01

    A few uranium(IV) carboxylates with monochloro and trichloro acetic acid, glycine, malic, citric, adipic, o-toluic, anthranilic and salicylic acids have been prepared by photolytic methods. The I.R. spectra of these compounds are recorded and basing on the spectral data, structure of the compounds have been suggested.

  17. Literature information applicable to the reaction of uranium oxides with chlorine to prepare uranium tetrachloride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haas, P.A.

    1992-02-01

    The reaction of uranium oxides and chlorine to prepare anhydrous uranium tetrachloride (UCl{sub 4}) are important to more economical preparation of uranium metal. The most practical reactions require carbon or carbon monoxide (CO) to give CO or carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) as waste gases. The chemistry of U-O-Cl compounds is very complex with valances of 3, 4, 5, and 6 and with stable oxychlorides. Literature was reviewed to collect thermochemical data, phase equilibrium information, and results of experimental studies. Calculations using thermodynamic data can identify the probable reactions, but the results are uncertain. All the U-O-Cl compounds have large free energies of formation and the calculations give uncertain small differences of large numbers. The phase diagram for UCl{sub 4}-UO{sub 2} shows a reaction to form uranium oxychloride (UOCl{sub 2}) that has a good solubility in molten UCl{sub 4}. This appears more favorable to good rates of reaction than reaction of solids and gases. There is limited information on U-O-Cl salt properties. Information on the preparation of titanium, zirconium, silicon, and thorium tetrachlorides (TiCl{sub 4}, ZrCl{sub 4}, SiCl{sub 4}, ThCl{sub 4}) by reaction of oxides with chlorine (Cl{sub 2}) and carbon has application to the preparation of UCl{sub 4}.

  18. Literature information applicable to the reaction of uranium oxides with chlorine to prepare uranium tetrachloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haas, P.A.

    1992-02-01

    The reaction of uranium oxides and chlorine to prepare anhydrous uranium tetrachloride (UCl 4 ) are important to more economical preparation of uranium metal. The most practical reactions require carbon or carbon monoxide (CO) to give CO or carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) as waste gases. The chemistry of U-O-Cl compounds is very complex with valances of 3, 4, 5, and 6 and with stable oxychlorides. Literature was reviewed to collect thermochemical data, phase equilibrium information, and results of experimental studies. Calculations using thermodynamic data can identify the probable reactions, but the results are uncertain. All the U-O-Cl compounds have large free energies of formation and the calculations give uncertain small differences of large numbers. The phase diagram for UCl 4 -UO 2 shows a reaction to form uranium oxychloride (UOCl 2 ) that has a good solubility in molten UCl 4 . This appears more favorable to good rates of reaction than reaction of solids and gases. There is limited information on U-O-Cl salt properties. Information on the preparation of titanium, zirconium, silicon, and thorium tetrachlorides (TiCl 4 , ZrCl 4 , SiCl 4 , ThCl 4 ) by reaction of oxides with chlorine (Cl 2 ) and carbon has application to the preparation of UCl 4

  19. Maruhn-Greiner Maximum of Uranium Fission for Confirmation of Low Energy Nuclear Reactions LENR via a Compound Nucleus with Double Magic Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hora, H.; Miley, G. H.

    2007-12-01

    One of the most convincing facts about LENR due to deuterons of very high concentration in host metals as palladium is the measurement of the large scale minimum of the reaction probability depending on the nucleon number A of generated elements at A = 153 where a local maximum was measured. This is similar to the fission of uranium at A = 119 where the local maximum follows from the Maruhn-Greiner theory if the splitting nuclei are excited to about MeV energy. The LENR generated elements can be documented any time after the reaction by SIMS or K-shell X-ray excitation to show the very unique distribution with the local maximum. An explanation is based on the strong Debye screening of the Maxwellian deuterons within the degenerate rigid electron background especially within the swimming electron layer at the metal surface or at interfaces. The deuterons behave like neutrals at distances of about 2 picometers. They may form clusters due to soft attraction in the range above thermal energy. Clusters of 10 pm diameter may react over long time probabilities (megaseconds) with Pd nuclei leading to a double magic number compound nucleus which splits like in fission to the A = 153 element distribution.

  20. Comparison and analysis of the existing methods of the uranium and its compounds extraction from the materials of the nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neklyudov, I.M.; Azarenkov, N.A.; Borts, B.V.; Odejchuk, N.P.; Skoromnaya, S.F.; Tkachenko, V.I.

    2008-01-01

    The brief review of the existing methods of the uranium isotope separation as well as for natural uranium enrichment, as for regeneration of the spent nuclear fuel, and also the description of a new intensively developed separation method is given last time - the supercritical fluid extraction in the carbonic acid medium is shown. The comparison of the basic technological indicators of the uranium enrichment by the traditional methods in the supercritical carbonic acid medium is shown. 27 refs.; 18 figs.; 16 tab

  1. Production of uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hart, J.E.; Shuck, D.L.; Lyon, W.L.

    1977-01-01

    A continuous, four stage fluidized bed process for converting uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ) to ceramic-grade uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) powder suitable for use in the manufacture of fuel pellets for nuclear reactors is disclosed. The process comprises the steps of first reacting UF 6 with steam in a first fluidized bed, preferably at about 550 0 C, to form solid intermediate reaction products UO 2 F 2 , U 3 O 8 and an off-gas including hydrogen fluoride (HF). The solid intermediate reaction products are conveyed to a second fluidized bed reactor at which the mol fraction of HF is controlled at low levels in order to prevent the formation of uranium tetrafluoride (UF 4 ). The first intermediate reaction products are reacted in the second fluidized bed with steam and hydrogen at a temperature of about 630 0 C. The second intermediate reaction product including uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) is conveyed to a third fluidized bed reactor and reacted with additional steam and hydrogen at a temperature of about 650 0 C producing a reaction product consisting essentially of uranium dioxide having an oxygen-uranium ratio of about 2 and a low residual fluoride content. This product is then conveyed to a fourth fluidized bed wherein a mixture of air and preheated nitrogen is introduced in order to further reduce the fluoride content of the UO 2 and increase the oxygen-uranium ratio to about 2.25

  2. Uranium chemistry research unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1978-01-01

    The initial field of research of this Unit, established in 1973, was the basic co-ordination chemistry of uranium, thorium, copper, cobalt and nickel. Subsequently the interest of the Unit extended to extractive metallurgy relating to these metals. Under the term 'co-ordination chemistry' is understood the interaction of the central transition metal ion with surrounding atoms in its immediate vicinity (within bonding distance) and the influence they have on each other - for example, structural studies for determining the number and arrangement of co-ordinated atoms and spectrophotometric studies to establish how the f electron energy levels of uranium are influenced by the environment. New types of uranium compounds have been synthesized and studied, and the behaviour of uranium ions in non-aqueous systems has also received attention. This work can be applied to the development and study of extractants and new extractive processes for uranium

  3. Method for producing uranium atomic beam source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krikorian, O.H.

    1976-01-01

    A method is described for producing a beam of neutral uranium atoms by vaporizing uranium from a compound UM/sub x/ heated to produce U vapor from an M boat or from some other suitable refractory container such as a tungsten boat, where M is a metal whose vapor pressure is negligible compared with that of uranium at the vaporization temperature. The compound, for example, may be the uranium-rhenium compound, URe 2 . An evaporation rate in excess of about 10 times that of conventional uranium beam sources is produced

  4. Study of physical, chemical and electronic properties of binaries and ternaries uranium compounds in the U-Si-B and U-Pt-Si systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brisset, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Two main research axes were defined for this Ph-D work: (i) studying the effect of light elements (B, C) on the stability of U-Si compounds, and (ii) identifying and physically characterizing new phases in the U-Pt-Si system. Minor additions of carbon and boron in U-Si samples revealed that the formation of U 5 Si 4 would be correlated to the presence of these light elements, questioning its existence in the U-Si system. To evaluate the boron potential as a stimulant for non-metallic light elements of the second period (C, N, O), the isothermal section of the ternary phase diagram U-Si-B has been drawn at 927 C, disclosing solid equilibrium mainly between the UB and U-Si binary axes and the existence of the novel compound U 20 Si 16 B 3 , isostructural to the carbon equivalent one. These results suggest a specific behavior for a given light element on the U-Si phase relations. The isothermal section at 900 C of the U-Pt-Si ternary system was experimentally determined, leading to the discovery of 14 new phases, among which U 3 Pt 4 Si 6 , U 3 Pt 6 Si 4 and U 3 Pt 7 Si crystallized in their own structural type. As a prerequisite for this study, the phase relations in the U-Pt binary phase diagram were re-examined for the composition range 30 at.% and 70 at.% Pt, leading to a new assessment of the phase diagram which comprises the new U 3 Pt 4 compound. The temperature of the transformations has been measured by DTA. By coupling our experimental results to the literature data, a modeling of the phase diagram by the Calphad method was performed. Physical characterizations of the new U 3 Pt 4 compound revealed a moderate heavy fermion behavior, with ferromagnetic ordering below Tc = 7(1) K. As a side project, a study of the U 3 TGe 5 family with the anti-Hf 5 CuSn 3 structural type lead to the discovery of nine new compounds for T = V, Cr, Mn, Zr, Nb, Mo, Hf, Ta and W in addition to the previously reported U 3 TiGe 5 . Their magnetic and electronic properties were

  5. Depleted uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huffer, E.; Nifenecker, H.

    2001-02-01

    This document deals with the physical, chemical and radiological properties of the depleted uranium. What is the depleted uranium? Why do the military use depleted uranium and what are the risk for the health? (A.L.B.)

  6. Effect of solid-state fermentation with Rhizopus oligosporus on bioactive compounds and antioxidant capacity of raw and roasted buckwheat groats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wronkowska Małgorzata

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of solid-state fermentation with Rhizopus oligosporus on the changes in the total phenolic compounds, rutin, vitamin B and C, tocopherol, phytic acid and antioxidant capacity of raw and roasted buckwheat groats was studied. The roasted groats contained reduced level of studied bioactive compounds as compared to raw groats. In this study was evidenced that the solidstate fermentation with Rhizopus oligosporus enhanced water soluble vitamins (thiamine, pyridoxine and L-ascorbic acid as well as tocopherols contents. In contrast the decrease of the inositol hexaphosphate, phenolic compounds, the rutin content and antioxidant capacity determined by ACL and ABTS methods was noticed.

  7. Uranium(VI) transport modeling: geochemical data and submodels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tripathi, V.S.

    1984-01-01

    Understanding the geochemical mobility of U(VI) and modeling its transport is important in several contexts including ore genesis, uranium exploration, nuclear and mill-tailings waste management, and solution mining of uranium ores. Adsorption is a major control on partitioning of solutes at the mineral/solution interface. The effect of carbonate, fluoride, and phosphate complexing on adsorption of uranium was investigated. A critical compilation of stability constants of inorganic complexes and solid compounds of U(VI) necessary for proper design of experiment and for modeling transport of uranium was prepared. The general features of U(VI) adsorption in ligand-free systems are similar to those characteristic of other hydrolyzable metal ions. The adsorption processes studied were found to be reversible. The adsorption model developed in ligand-free systems, when solution complexing is taken into account, proved remarkably successful in describing adsorption of uranium in the presence of carbonate and fluoride. The presence of phosphate caused a much smaller decrease in the extent of adsorption than expected; however, a critical reassessment of the stability of UO 2 2+ .HPO 4 2- complexes, showed that phosphato complexes, if any, are extremely weak under experimental conditions. Removal of uranium may have occurred due to precipitation of sodium uranyl phosphates in addition to adsorption

  8. Nanostructured polypyrrole for automated and electrochemically controlled in-tube solid-phase microextraction of cationic nitrogen compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asiabi, Hamid; Yamini, Yadollah; Rezaei, Fatemeh; Seidi, Shahram

    2015-01-01

    The authors describe an efficient method for microextraction and preconcentration of trace quantities of cationic nitrogen compounds, specifically of anilines. It relies on a combination of electrochemically controlled solid-phase microextraction and on-line in-tube solid-phase microextraction (SPME) using polypyrrole-coated capillaries. Nanostructured polypyrrole was electrically deposited on the inner surface of a stainless steel tube and used as the extraction phase. It also acts as a polypyrrole electrode that was used as a cation exchanger, and a platinum electrode that was used as the anode. The solution to be extracted is passed over the inner surface of the polypyrrole electrode, upon which cations are extracted by applying a negative potential under flow conditions. This method represents an ideal technique for SPME of protonated anilines because it is fast, easily automated, solvent-free, and inexpensive. Under optimal conditions, the limits of detection are in the 0.10–0.30 μg L -1 range. The method works in the 0.10 to 300 μg L -1 concentration range. The inter- and intra-assay precisions (RSD%; for n = 3) range from 5.1 to 7.5 % and from 4.7 to 6.0 % at the concentration levels of 2, 10 and 20 μg L -1 , respectively. The EC-in-tube SPME method was successfully applied to the analysis of methyl-, 4-chloro-, 3-chloro and 3,4-dichloroanilines in (spiked) water samples. (author)

  9. Uranium industry annual 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    Uranium production in the United States has declined dramatically from a peak of 43.7 million pounds U 3 O 8 (16.8 thousand metric tons uranium (U)) in 1980 to 3.1 million pounds U 3 O 8 (1.2 thousand metric tons U) in 1993. This decline is attributed to the world uranium market experiencing oversupply and intense competition. Large inventories of uranium accumulated when optimistic forecasts for growth in nuclear power generation were not realized. The other factor which is affecting U.S. uranium production is that some other countries, notably Australia and Canada, possess higher quality uranium reserves that can be mined at lower costs than those of the United States. Realizing its competitive advantage, Canada was the world's largest producer in 1993 with an output of 23.9 million pounds U 3 O 8 (9.2 thousand metric tons U). The U.S. uranium industry, responding to over a decade of declining market prices, has downsized and adopted less costly and more efficient production methods. The main result has been a suspension of production from conventional mines and mills. Since mid-1992, only nonconventional production facilities, chiefly in situ leach (ISL) mining and byproduct recovery, have operated in the United States. In contrast, nonconventional sources provided only 13 percent of the uranium produced in 1980. ISL mining has developed into the most cost efficient and environmentally acceptable method for producing uranium in the United States. The process, also known as solution mining, differs from conventional mining in that solutions are used to recover uranium from the ground without excavating the ore and generating associated solid waste. This article describes the current ISL Yang technology and its regulatory approval process, and provides an analysis of the factors favoring ISL mining over conventional methods in a declining uranium market

  10. Uranium industry annual 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-09-01

    Uranium production in the United States has declined dramatically from a peak of 43.7 million pounds U{sub 3}O{sub 8} (16.8 thousand metric tons uranium (U)) in 1980 to 3.1 million pounds U{sub 3}O{sub 8} (1.2 thousand metric tons U) in 1993. This decline is attributed to the world uranium market experiencing oversupply and intense competition. Large inventories of uranium accumulated when optimistic forecasts for growth in nuclear power generation were not realized. The other factor which is affecting U.S. uranium production is that some other countries, notably Australia and Canada, possess higher quality uranium reserves that can be mined at lower costs than those of the United States. Realizing its competitive advantage, Canada was the world`s largest producer in 1993 with an output of 23.9 million pounds U{sub 3}O{sub 8} (9.2 thousand metric tons U). The U.S. uranium industry, responding to over a decade of declining market prices, has downsized and adopted less costly and more efficient production methods. The main result has been a suspension of production from conventional mines and mills. Since mid-1992, only nonconventional production facilities, chiefly in situ leach (ISL) mining and byproduct recovery, have operated in the United States. In contrast, nonconventional sources provided only 13 percent of the uranium produced in 1980. ISL mining has developed into the most cost efficient and environmentally acceptable method for producing uranium in the United States. The process, also known as solution mining, differs from conventional mining in that solutions are used to recover uranium from the ground without excavating the ore and generating associated solid waste. This article describes the current ISL Yang technology and its regulatory approval process, and provides an analysis of the factors favoring ISL mining over conventional methods in a declining uranium market.

  11. Studies of layered uranium(VI) compounds. I. High proton conductivity in polycrystalline hydrogen uranyl phosphate tetrahydrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howe, A.T.; Shilton, M.G.

    1979-01-01

    Hydrogen uranyl phosphate tetrahydrate HUO 2 PO 4 .4H 2 O has a high proton conductivity. The ac conductivity was 0.4 ohm -1 m -1 at 290 0 K measured parallel to the faces of sintered disks of the compound. The activation energy was found to be 31 +- 3 kJ mole -1 . The values of conductivity were between 3 and 10 times lower when measured perpendicular to the disk faces due to preferred orientation of the plate-like crystals. Both the powder and sintered disks are stable in air and insoluble in phosphoric acid solution of pH 2.5. Experiments are described which enable possible grain boundary contributions to the conductivity to be determined in such hydrates. The extrinsic grain boundary contribution to the conductivity was found to be small from experiments in which the pH in a solution cell was varied. The abnormally high bulk H + conductivity thus inferred is attributed primarily to the high concentration of H + , which exists as H 3 O + in the interlamellar hydrogen-bounded network. A Grotthus-type mechanism of conduction is proposed which involves intermolecular transfer steps (hopping) and intramolecular transfer steps, in comparable numbers, the former facilitated by the high concentration of H 3 O + ions in the structure, and the latter most likely facilitated by the high concentration of H-bond vacancies. 8 figures, 1 table

  12. Trace-level determination of polar flavour compounds in butter by solid-phase extraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adahchour, M.; Vreuls, J.J.; van der Heijden, A.; Brinkman, U.A.T.

    1999-01-01

    Volatile compounds are responsible for the aromas of butter. A simple technique for the determination of these components is described which is based on solid-phase extraction (SPE) after melting of the butter and separation of the aqueous phase from the fat. Volatile flavours present in the water

  13. Uranium chemistry: significant advances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazzanti, M.

    2011-01-01

    The author reviews recent progress in uranium chemistry achieved in CEA laboratories. Like its neighbors in the Mendeleev chart uranium undergoes hydrolysis, oxidation and disproportionation reactions which make the chemistry of these species in water highly complex. The study of the chemistry of uranium in an anhydrous medium has led to correlate the structural and electronic differences observed in the interaction of uranium(III) and the lanthanides(III) with nitrogen or sulfur molecules and the effectiveness of these molecules in An(III)/Ln(III) separation via liquid-liquid extraction. Recent work on the redox reactivity of trivalent uranium U(III) in an organic medium with molecules such as water or an azide ion (N 3 - ) in stoichiometric quantities, led to extremely interesting uranium aggregates particular those involved in actinide migration in the environment or in aggregation problems in the fuel processing cycle. Another significant advance was the discovery of a compound containing the uranyl ion with a degree of oxidation (V) UO 2 + , obtained by oxidation of uranium(III). Recently chemists have succeeded in blocking the disproportionation reaction of uranyl(V) and in stabilizing polymetallic complexes of uranyl(V), opening the way to to a systematic study of the reactivity and the electronic and magnetic properties of uranyl(V) compounds. (A.C.)

  14. Purification of uranium metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Kenji; Shikama, Tatsuo; Ochiai, Akira.

    1993-01-01

    We developed the system for purifying uranium metal and its metallic compounds and for growing highly pure uranium compounds to study their intrinsic physical properties. Uranium metal was zone refined under low contamination conditions as far as possible. The degree of the purity of uranium metal was examined by the conventional electrical resistivity measurement and by the chemical analysis using the inductive coupled plasma emission spectrometry (ICP). The results show that some metallic impurities evaporated by the r.f. heating and other usual metallic impurities moved to the end of a rod with a molten zone. Therefore, we conclude that the zone refining technique is much effective to the removal of metallic impurities and we obtained high purified uranium metal of 99.99% up with regarding to metallic impurities. The maximum residual resistivity ratio, the r.r.r., so far obtained was about 17-20. Using the purified uranium, we are attempting to grow a highly pure uranium-titanium single crystals. (author)

  15. Assessing bioavailability of DDT and metabolites in marine sediments using solid-phase microextraction with performance reference compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Lian-Jun; Jia, Fang; Crago, J; Zeng, Eddy Y; Schlenk, D; Gan, Jay

    2013-09-01

    Solid-phase microextraction (SPME) has often been used to estimate the freely dissolved concentration (Cfree ) of organic contaminants in sediments. A significant limitation in the application of SPME for Cfree measurement is the requirement for attaining equilibrium partition, which is often difficult for strongly hydrophobic compounds such as DDT. A method was developed using SPME with stable isotope-labeled analogues as performance reference compounds (PRCs) to measure Cfree of DDT and metabolites (DDTs) in marine sediments. Six (13) C-labeled or deuterated PRCs were impregnated into polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) fiber before use. Desorption of PRCs from PDMS fibers and absorption of DDTs from sediment were isotropic in a range of sediments evaluated ex situ under well-mixed conditions. When applied to a historically contaminated marine sediment from a Superfund site, the PRC-SPME method yielded Cfree values identical to those found by using a conventional equilibrium SPME approach (Eq-SPME), whereas the time for mixing was reduced from 9 d to only 9 h. The PRC-SPME method was further evaluated against bioaccumulation of DDTs by Neanthes arenaceodentata in the contaminated sediment with or without amendment of activated carbon or sand. Strong correlations were consistently found between the derived equilibrium concentrations on the fiber and lipid-normalized tissue residues for DDTs in the worms. Results from the present study clearly demonstrated the feasibility of coupling PRCs with SPME sampling to greatly shorten sampling time, thus affording much improved flexibility in the use of SPME for bioavailability evaluation. Copyright © 2013 SETAC.

  16. Uranium thiolate complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leverd, Pascal C.

    1994-01-01

    This research thesis proposes a new approach to the chemistry of uranium thiolate complexes as these compounds are very promising for various uses (in bio-inorganic chemistry, in some industrial processes like oil desulphurization). It more particularly addresses the U-S bond or more generally bonds between polarizable materials and hard metals. The author thus reports the study of uranium organometallic thiolates (tricyclo-penta-dienic and mono-cyclo-octa-tetraenylic complexes), and of uranium homoleptic thiolates (tetra-thiolate complexes, hexa-thiolate complexes, reactivity of homoleptic thiolate complexes) [fr

  17. Applications of Solid-Phase Microextraction and Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry (SPME-GC/MS in the Study of Grape and Wine Volatile Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annarita Panighel

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Volatile compounds are responsible for the wine “bouquet”, which is perceived by sniffing the headspace of a glass, and of the aroma component (palate-aroma of the overall flavor, which is perceived on drinking. Grape aroma compounds are transferred to the wine and undergo minimal alteration during fermentation (e.g., monoterpenes and methoxypyrazines; others are precursors of aroma compounds which form in winemaking and during wine aging (e.g., glycosidically-bound volatile compounds and C13-norisoprenoids. Headspace solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME is a fast and simple technique which was developed for analysis of volatile compounds. This review describes some SPME methods coupled with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS used to study the grape and wine volatiles.

  18. Laser based analytical spectroscopy of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Argekar, A.A.; Kulkarni, M.J.; Godbole, S.V.; Page, A.G.; Samuel, J.K.; Paranjape, D.B.; Singh Mudher, K.D.

    1992-01-01

    Analytical spectroscopy of uranium has been studied using a XeCl excimer laser, using the fluorescence emission of U(VI) ions doped in a solid solution of sodium fluoride (NaF) and sodium chloride (NaCl) in 3:2 proportion. An electronic circuitry involving time-gating of the photomultiplier tube and facility to integrate the analytical signal over ten laser pulses has been developed to enable laser operation and signal detection with high S/N ratio. The matrix enhanced U(VI) fluorescence emission is free from chemical and spectral interferences due to the concomitant presence of ten metallic elements generally associated with uranium. The digital signal output is highly precise and does not saturate upto 5 ppm uranium concentration. X-ray diffraction patterns obtained for uranium doped compounds at 2.5% and 10% dopant concentrations are broadly similar to that of Na 2 U 2 O 7 . The detailed studies have, however, revealed fine structure for individual peaks, thereby, revealing the formation of sodium fluoro-uranate complex which is responsible for the enhanced intensity of fluorescence emission. (author). 10 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  19. Protection of uranium by metallic coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baque, P.; Koch, P.; Dominget, R.; Darras, R.

    1968-01-01

    A study is made of the possibilities of inhibiting or limiting, by means of protective metallic coatings, the oxidation of uranium by carbon dioxide at high temperature. In general, surface films containing intermetallic compounds or solid solutions of uranium with aluminium, zirconium, copper, niobium, nickel or chromium are formed, according to the techniques employed which are described here. The processes most to be recommended are those of direct diffusion starting from a thin sheet or tube, of vacuum deposition, or of immersion in a molten bath of suitable composition. The conditions for preparing these coatings have been optimized as a function of the protective effect obtained in carbon dioxide at 450 or at 500 C. Only the aluminium and zirconium based coatings are really satisfactory since they can lead to a reduction by a factor of 5 to 10 in the oxidation rate of uranium in the conditions considered; they make it possible in particular to avoid or to reduce to a very large extent the liberation of powdered oxide. Furthermore, the coatings produced generally give the uranium good protection against atmospheric corrosion. (author) [fr

  20. Thermodynamic data for uranium fluorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leitnaker, J.M.

    1983-03-01

    Self-consistent thermodynamic data have been tabulated for uranium fluorides between UF 4 and UF 6 , including UF 4 (solid and gas), U 4 F 17 (solid), U 2 F 9 (solid), UF 5 (solid and gas), U 2 F 10 (gas), and UF 6 (solid, liquid, and gas). Included are thermal function - the heat capacity, enthalpy, and free energy function, heats of formation, and vaporization behavior

  1. Thermodynamic behavior of very stable binary compounds with a wide homogeneity range: Their influence in the liquid phase in ternary and higher component systems in the solid state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoch, M.

    1988-01-01

    The Hoch-Arpshofen model is combined with the Schottky-Wagner disorder model to describe first binary liquid systems, where a very stable solid protrudes into the liquid. We analyze the systems K-I 2 , Cs-I 2 , U-UO 3 , Ag-S and Al-Sb. The system Al-Sb can be described as Al-Sb and as Al-AlSb-Sb. Then we examine the Al-Co, Al-Ni, and Al-Fe systems to describe the stable compounds CoAl, NiAl, and FeAl, which all have a wide homogeneity range in the solid state. Here the Schottky-Wagner model is sufficient. Finally we describe a model which treats the influence of these stable binary compounds in ternary and larger systems such as Al-Cr-Ni and Al-Cr-Fe, again in the solid state. (orig./IHOE) [de

  2. X-ray magnetic circular dichroism experiments and theory of transuranium Laves phase compounds

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wilhelm, F.; Eloirdi, R.; Rusz, Ján; Springell, R.; Colineau, E.; Griveau, J.C.; Oppeneer, P. M.; Caciuffo, R.; Rogalev, A.; Lander, G.H.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 88, č. 2 (2013), "024424-1"-"024424-14" ISSN 1098-0121 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : electronic-structure * uranium-compounds * self -absorption * moments Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.664, year: 2013

  3. Study of gamma irradiation effects on the etching and optical properties of CR-39 solid state nuclear track detector and its application to uranium assay in soil samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amol Mhatre; Kalsi, P.C.

    2011-01-01

    The gamma irradiation effects in the dose range of 2.5-43.0 Mrad on the etching and optical characteristics of CR-39 solid state nuclear track detector (SSNTD) have been studied by using etching and UV-Visible spectroscopic techniques. From the measured bulk etch rates at different temperatures, the activation energies for bulk etching at different doses have also been determined. It is seen that the bulk etch rates increase and the activation energies for bulk etching decrease with the increase in gamma dose. The optical band gaps of the unirradiated and the gamma -irradiated detectors determined from the UV-Visible spectra were found to decrease with the increase in gamma dose. These results have been explained on the basis of scission of the detector due to gamma irradiation. The present studies can be used for the estimation of gamma dose in the range of 2.5-43.0 Mrad and can also be used for estimating track registration efficiency in the presence of gamma dose. The CR-39 detector has also been applied for the assay of uranium in some soil samples of Jammu city. (author)

  4. Quantitative determination of solid-state forms of a pharmaceutical development compound in drug substance and tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yong; Tao, Wenle; Morrison, Henry; Chiu, Rick; Jona, Janan; Fang, Jan; Cauchon, Nina

    2008-10-01

    Common analytical techniques including Raman, NIR, and XRD were evaluated for quantitative determination of three solid-state forms (amorphous, Form B and Form C) of a development compound. Raman spectroscopy was selected as the primary analytical technique with sufficient sensitivity to monitor and quantify the neat drug substance alone and in the drug product. A reliable multivariate curve resolution (MCR) method based on the second derivative Raman measurements of the three pure physical forms was developed and validated with 3.5% root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) for Form B, which was selected as the preferred form for further development. A partial least squares (PLS) algorithm was also used for the multivariate calibration of both the NIR and Raman measurements. The long-term stability of Form B as a neat active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) and in a tablet formulation was quantitatively monitored under various stress conditions of temperature and moisture. Moisture, temperature, excipients and compression were found to have significant effects on the phase transition behavior of Form B.

  5. Antioxidative activity of red wine with the in-creased share of phenolic compounds from solid parts of grape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VESNA TUMBAS

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The structure and amount of phenolic compounds in the wine depend on the grapevine variety, agroecologic conditions and a way of vinification. The influence of pomace enrichment with solid parts of grape (stem and grape seeds during maceration on the antioxidative activity of red wines was investigated. The antioxidative activity of red wines towards DPPH• and hydroxyl (•OH radicals was determined by the electron spin resonance (ESR spectroscopy. The addition of stem to the pomace had no significant influence on the antioxidative wine activity increase, whereas enriching of pomace with 120 g seeds/kg of pomace resulted in the increase of antioxidative capacity of a wine. In the wine enriched with tannins and flavan-3-ols from the seeds, the antioxidative activity towards DPPH• (AADPPH• was 100%. None of the applied clarifiers showed a significant influence on the antioxidative activity of these wine samples. The antioxidative activity, measured as DPPH• scavenging activity, of the wine supplemented by seeds remained unchanged, showing 100% efficiency after the treatment by all tested fining agents. A significant difference in antioxidative activities towards hydroxyl radicals (AA•OH between the two wines was found. The antioxidative activity of the wine Merlot was higher than the antioxidative activity of the wine Cabernet sauvignon.

  6. Pollution characteristics and health risk assessment of volatile organic compounds emitted from different plastic solid waste recycling workshops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhigui; Li, Guiying; Chen, Jiangyao; Huang, Yong; An, Taicheng; Zhang, Chaosheng

    2015-04-01

    The pollution profiles of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from different recycling workshops processing different types of plastic solid waste (PSW) and their health risks were investigated. A total of 64 VOCs including alkanes, alkenes, monoaromatics, oxygenated VOCs (OVOCs), chlorinated VOCs (ClVOCs) and acrylonitrile during the melting extrusion procedure were identified and quantified. The highest concentration of total VOCs (TVOC) occurred in the poly(acrylonitrile-butadiene styrene) (ABS) recycling workshop, followed by the polystyrene (PS), polypropylene (PP), polyamide (PA), polyvinyl chloride (PVC), polyethylene (PE) and polycarbonate (PC) workshops. Monoaromatics were found as the major component emitted from the ABS and PS recycling workshops, while alkanes were mainly emitted from the PE and PP recycling processes, and OVOCs from the PVC and PA recycling workshops. According to the occupational exposure limits' (OEL) assessment, the workers suffered acute and chronic health risks in the ABS and PS recycling workshops. Meanwhile, it was found that most VOCs in the indoor microenvironments were originated from the melting extrusion process, while the highest TVOC concentration was observed in the PS rather than in the ABS recycling workshop. Non-cancer hazard indices (HIs) of all individual VOCs were <1.0, whereas the total HI in the PS recycling workshop was 1.9, posing an adverse chronic health threat. Lifetime cancer risk assessment suggested that the residents also suffered from definite cancer risk in the PS, PA, ABS and PVC recycling workshops. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Electrolytic recovery of uranium oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurr, W.R.

    1979-01-01

    A method is described for extracting uranium oxide from a solution of one or more uranium compounds, e.g. leach liquors, comprising subjecting the solution to electrolysis utilizing a high current density, e.g. 500 to 4000 amp/m 2 , whereby uranium oxide is formed at the cathode and is recovered. The method is particularly suited to a continuous process using a rotating cathode cell. (author)

  8. The Uranium Chemistry Research Unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1983-01-01

    The article discusses the research work done at the Uranium Chemistry Research Unit of the University of Port Elizabeth. The initial research programme dealt with fundamental aspects of uranium chemistry. New uranium compounds were synthesized and their chemical properties were studied. Research was also done to assist the mining industry, as well as on nuclear medicine. Special mentioning is made of the use of technetium for medical diagnosis and therapy

  9. Standard test method for the analysis of refrigerant 114, plus other carbon-containing and fluorine-containing compounds in uranium hexafluoride via fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2004-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers determining the concentrations of refrigerant-114, other carbon-containing and fluorine-containing compounds, hydrocarbons, and partially or completely substituted halohydrocarbons that may be impurities in uranium hexafluoride. The two options are outlined for this test method. They are designated as Part A and Part B. 1.1.1 To provide instructions for performing Fourier-Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic analysis for the possible presence of Refrigerant-114 impurity in a gaseous sample of uranium hexafluoride, collected in a "2S" container or equivalent at room temperature. The all gas procedure applies to the analysis of possible Refrigerant-114 impurity in uranium hexafluoride, and to the gas manifold system used for FTIR applications. The pressure and temperatures must be controlled to maintain a gaseous sample. The concentration units are in mole percent. This is Part A. 1.2 Part B involves a high pressure liquid sample of uranium hexafluoride. This method can be appli...

  10. Analysis of volatile organic compounds in pleural effusions by headspace solid-phase microextraction coupled with cryotrap gas chromatography and mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhongping; Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Peipei; Wang, Hong; Pan, Zaifa; Wang, Lili

    2016-07-01

    Headspace solid-phase microextraction coupled with cryotrap gas chromatography and mass spectrometry was applied to the analysis of volatile organic compounds in pleural effusions. The highly volatile organic compounds were separated successfully with high sensitivity by the employment of a cryotrap device, with the construction of a cold column head by freezing a segment of metal capillary with liquid nitrogen. A total of 76 volatile organic compounds were identified in 50 pleural effusion samples (20 malignant effusions and 30 benign effusions). Among them, 34 more volatile organic compounds were detected with the retention time less than 8 min, by comparing with the normal headspace solid-phase microextraction coupled with gas chromatography and mass spectrometry method. Furthermore, 24 volatile organic compounds with high occurrence frequency in pleural effusion samples, 18 of which with the retention time less than 8 min, were selected for the comparative analysis. The results of average peak area comparison and box-plot analysis showed that except for cyclohexanone, 2-ethyl-1-hexanol, and tetramethylbenzene, which have been reported as potential cancer biomarkers, cyclohexanol, dichloromethane, ethyl acetate, n-heptane, ethylbenzene, and xylene also had differential expression between malignant and benign effusions. Therefore, the proposed approach was valuable for the comprehensive characterization of volatile organic compounds in pleural effusions. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. A strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae evolved for fermentation of lignocellulosic biomass displays improved growth and fermentative ability in high solids concentrations and in the presence of inhibitory compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hawkins Gary M

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Softwoods are the dominant source of lignocellulosic biomass in the northern hemisphere, and have been investigated worldwide as a renewable substrate for cellulosic ethanol production. One challenge to using softwoods, which is particularly acute with pine, is that the pretreatment process produces inhibitory compounds detrimental to the growth and metabolic activity of fermenting organisms. To overcome the challenge of bioconversion in the presence of inhibitory compounds, especially at high solids loading, a strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was subjected to evolutionary engineering and adaptation for fermentation of pretreated pine wood (Pinus taeda. Results An industrial strain of Saccharomyces, XR122N, was evolved using pretreated pine; the resulting daughter strain, AJP50, produced ethanol much more rapidly than its parent in fermentations of pretreated pine. Adaptation, by preculturing of the industrial yeast XR122N and the evolved strains in 7% dry weight per volume (w/v pretreated pine solids prior to inoculation into higher solids concentrations, improved fermentation performance of all strains compared with direct inoculation into high solids. Growth comparisons between XR122N and AJP50 in model hydrolysate media containing inhibitory compounds found in pretreated biomass showed that AJP50 exited lag phase faster under all conditions tested. This was due, in part, to the ability of AJP50 to rapidly convert furfural and hydroxymethylfurfural to their less toxic alcohol derivatives, and to recover from reactive oxygen species damage more quickly than XR122N. Under industrially relevant conditions of 17.5% w/v pretreated pine solids loading, additional evolutionary engineering was required to decrease the pronounced lag phase. Using a combination of adaptation by inoculation first into a solids loading of 7% w/v for 24 hours, followed by a 10% v/v inoculum (approximately equivalent to 1 g/L dry cell weight into 17

  12. Uranium exploration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Voto, R.H.

    1984-01-01

    This paper is a review of the methodology and technology that are currently being used in varying degrees in uranium exploration activities worldwide. Since uranium is ubiquitous and occurs in trace amounts (0.2 to 5 ppm) in virtually all rocks of the crust of the earth, exploration for uranium is essentially the search of geologic environments in which geologic processes have produced unusual concentrations of uranium. Since the level of concentration of uranium of economic interest is dependent on the present and future price of uranium, it is appropriate here to review briefly the economic realities of uranium-fueled power generation. (author)

  13. Applicability of solid-phase microextraction combined with gas chromatography atomic emission detection (GC-MIP AED) for the determination of butyltin compounds in sediment samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpinteiro, J.; Rodriguez, I.; Cela, R. [Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia, Instituto de Investigacion y Analisis Alimentario, Santiago de Compostela 15782 (Spain)

    2004-11-01

    The performance of solid-phase microextraction (SPME) applied to the determination of butyltin compounds in sediment samples is systematically evaluated. Matrix effects and influence of blank signals on the detection limits of the method are studied in detail. The interval of linear response is also evaluated in order to assess the applicability of the method to sediments polluted with butyltin compounds over a large range of concentrations. Advantages and drawbacks of including an SPME step, instead of the classic liquid-liquid extraction of the derivatized analytes, in the determination of butyltin compounds in sediment samples are considered in terms of achieved detection limits and experimental effort. Analytes were extracted from the samples by sonication using glacial acetic acid. An aliquot of the centrifuged extract was placed on a vial where compounds were ethylated and concentrated on a PDMS fiber using the headspace mode. Determinations were carried out using GC-MIP AED. (orig.)

  14. Gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric determination of hydrophilic compounds in environmental water by solid-phase extraction with activated carbon fiber felt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawata, K; Ibaraki, T; Tanabe, A; Yagoh, H; Shinoda, A; Suzuki, H; Yasuhara, A

    2001-03-09

    Simple gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric determination of hydrophilic organic compounds in environmental water was developed. A cartridge containing activated carbon fiber felt was made by way of trial and was evaluated for solid-phase extraction of the compounds in water. The hydrophilic compounds investigated were acrylamide, N,N-dimethylacetamide, N,N-dimethylformamide, 1,4-dioxane, furfural, furfuryl alcohol, N-nitrosodiethylamine and N-nitrosodimethylamine. Overall recoveries were good (80-100%) from groundwater and river water. The relative standard deviations ranged from 4.5 to 16% for the target compounds. The minimum detectable concentrations were 0.02 to 0.03 microg/l. This method was successfully applied to several river water samples.

  15. Polymeric ionic liquid coatings versus commercial solid-phase microextraction coatings for the determination of volatile compounds in cheeses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillo-Rodríguez, María J; Yu, Honglian; Cole, William T S; Ho, Tien D; Pino, Verónica; Anderson, Jared L; Afonso, Ana M

    2014-04-01

    The extraction performance of four polymeric ionic liquid (PIL)-based solid-phase microextraction (SPME) coatings has been studied and compared to that of commercial SPME coatings for the extraction of 16 volatile compounds in cheeses. The analytes include 2 free fatty acids, 2 aldehydes, 2 ketones and 10 phenols and were determined by headspace (HS)-SPME coupled to gas chromatography (GC) with flame-ionization detection (FID). The PIL-based coatings produced by UV co-polymerization were more efficient than PIL-based coatings produced by thermal AIBN polymerization. Partition coefficients of analytes between the sample and the coating (Kfs) were estimated for all PIL-based coatings and the commercial SPME fiber showing the best performance among the commercial fibers tested: carboxen-polydimethylsyloxane (CAR-PDMS). For the PIL-based fibers, the highest K(fs) value (1.96 ± 0.03) was obtained for eugenol. The normalized calibration slope, which takes into account the SPME coating thickness, was also used as a simpler approximate tool to compare the nature of the coating within the determinations, with results entirely comparable to those obtained with estimated K(fs) values. The PIL-based materials obtained by UV co-polymerization containing the 1-vinyl-3-hexylimidazolium chloride IL monomer and 1,12-di(3-vinylimiazolium)dodecane dibromide IL crosslinker exhibited the best performance in the extraction of the select analytes from cheeses. Despite a coating thickness of only 7 µm, this copolymeric sorbent coating was capable of quantitating analytes in HS-SPME in a 30 to 2000 µg L(-1) concentration range, with correlation coefficient (R) values higher than 0.9938, inter-day precision values (as relative standard deviation in %) varying from 6.1 to 20%, and detection limits down to 1.6 µg L(-1). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Uranium ore processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritcey, G.M.; Haque, K.E.; Lucas, B.H.; Skeaff, J.M.

    1983-01-01

    The authors have developed a complete method of recovering separately uranium, thorium and radium from impure solids such as ores, concentrates, calcines or tailings containing these metals. The technique involves leaching, in at least one stage. The impure solids in finely divided form with an aqueous leachant containing HCl and/or Cl 2 until acceptable amounts of uranium, thorium and radium are dissolved. Uranium is recovered from the solution by solvent extraction and precipitation. Thorium may also be recovered in the same manner. Radium may be recovered by at least one ion exchange, absorption and precipitation. This amount of iron in the solution must be controlled before the acid solution may be recycled for the leaching process. The calcine leached in the first step is prepared in a two stage roast in the presence of both Cl 2 and a metal sulfide. The first stage is at 350-450 0 and the second at 550-700 0

  17. Determination of organotin compounds by headspace solid-phase microextraction-gas chromatography-pulsed flame-photometric detection (HS-SPME-GC-PFPD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bravo, Manuel [Universite de Pau et des Pays de L' Adour, Laboratoire de Chimie Analytique, LCABIE, UMR CNRS 5034, Pau (France); Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Valparaiso, Laboratorio de Quimica Analitica y Ambiental, Instituto de Quimica, Valparaiso (Chile); Lespes, Gaetane; Gautier, Martine Potin [Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Valparaiso, Laboratorio de Quimica Analitica y Ambiental, Instituto de Quimica, Valparaiso (Chile); Gregori, Ida de; Pinochet, Hugo [Universite de Pau et des Pays de L' Adour, Laboratoire de Chimie Analytique, LCABIE, UMR CNRS 5034, Pau (France)

    2005-12-01

    A method based on Headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME, with a 100 {mu}m PDMS-fiber) in combination with gas-chromatography and pulsed flame-photometric detection (GC-PFPD) has been investigated for simultaneous determination of eight organotin compounds. Monobutyltin (MBT), dibutyltin (DBT), tributyltin (TBT), monophenyltin (MPhT), and the semi-volatile diphenyltin (DPhT), triphenyltin (TPhT), monooctyltin (MOcT), and dioctyltin (DOcT) were determined after derivatization with sodium tetraethylborate. The conditions used for the extraction and preconcentration step were optimised by experimental design methodology. Tripropyltin (TPrT) and diheptyltin (DHepT) were used as internal standards for quantification of volatile and semi-volatile organotin compounds, respectively. The analytical precision (RSD) for ten successive injections of a standard mixture containing all the organic tin compounds ranged between 2 and 11%. The limits of detection for all the organotin compounds were sub ng (Sn) L{sup -1} in water and close to ng (Sn) kg{sup -1} in sediments. The accuracy of the method was evaluated by analysis of two certified reference material (CRM) sediment samples. The HS-SPME-GC-PFPD was then applied to the analysis of three harbour sediment samples. The results showed that headspace SPME is an attractive tool for analysis of organotin compounds in solid environmental matrices. (orig.)

  18. Combination of solid phase extraction and dispersive liquid–liquid microextraction for separation/preconcentration of ultra trace amounts of uranium prior to its fiber optic-linear array spectrophotometry determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dadfarnia, Shayessteh; Shabani, Ali Mohammad Haji; Shakerian, Farid; Shiralian Esfahani, Golnaz

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Pass the sample through the basic alumina column ⇒ elute retained uranium along with the cations ⇒ convert the uranium to its anionic benzoate complex ⇒ extract its ion pair with malachite green into small volume of chloroform by DLLME ⇒ measure its absorption at 621 nm using fiber optic-linear array detection spectrophotometry. -- Highlights: • By combination of SPE and DDLME a high preconcentration factor of 2500 was obtained. • Development of SPE-DDLME-Spectrophotometric method for det. of trace amounts of uranium. • Ultra trace amount of uranium in water samples was det. by the proposed method. • The detection limit of the proposed method is comparable to the most sensitive method. • The proposed method is a free interference spectrophotometric method for uranium det. -- Abstract: A simple and sensitive method for the separation and preconcentration of the ultra trace amounts of uranium and its determination by spectrophotometry was developed. The method is based on the combination of solid phase extraction and dispersive liquid–liquid microextraction. Thus, by passing the sample through the basic alumina column, the uranyl ion and some cations are separated from the sample matrix. The retained uranyl ion along with the cations are eluted with 5 mL of nitric acid (2 mol L −1 ) and after neutralization of the eluent, the extracted uranyl ion is converted to its anionic benzoate complex and is separated from other cations by extraction of its ion pair with malachite green into small volume of chloroform using dispersive liquid–liquid microextraction. The amount of uranium is then determined by the absorption measurement of the extracted ion pair at 621 nm using flow injection spectrophotometry. Under the optimum conditions, with 500 mL of the sample, a preconcentration factor of 1980, a detection limit of 40 ng L −1 , and a relative standard deviation of 4.1% (n = 6) at 400 ng L −1 were obtained. The method was

  19. Yellowcake processing in uranium recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, J.M.

    1981-01-01

    This information relates to the recovery of uranium from uranium peroxide yellowcake produced by precipitation with hydrogen peroxide. The yellowcake is calcined at an elevated temperature to effect decomposition of the yellowcake to uranium oxide with the attendant evolution of free oxygen. The calcination step is carried out in the presence of a reducing agent which reacts with the free oxygen, thus retarding the evolution of chlorine gas from sodium chloride in the yellowcake. Suitable reducing agents include ammonia producing compounds such as ammonium carbonate and ammonium bicarbonate. Ammonium carbonate and/or ammonium bicarbonate may be provided in the eluant used to desorb the uranium from an ion exchange column

  20. Yellowcake processing in uranium recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul, J.M.

    1981-10-06

    This information relates to the recovery of uranium from uranium peroxide yellowcake produced by precipitation with hydrogen peroxide. The yellowcake is calcined at an elevated temperature to effect decomposition of the yellowcake to uranium oxide with the attendant evolution of free oxygen. The calcination step is carried out in the presence of a reducing agent which reacts with the free oxygen, thus retarding the evolution of chlorine gas from sodium chloride in the yellowcake. Suitable reducing agents include ammonia producing compounds such as ammonium carbonate and ammonium bicarbonate. Ammonium carbonate and/or ammonium bicarbonate may be provided in the eluant used to desorb the uranium from an ion exchange column.

  1. CHEMICAL DIFFERENCES BETWEEN SLUDGE SOLIDS AT THE F AND H AREA TANK FARMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reboul, S.

    2012-08-29

    The primary source of waste solids received into the F Area Tank Farm (FTF) was from PUREX processing performed to recover uranium and plutonium from irradiated depleted uranium targets. In contrast, two primary sources of waste solids were received into the H Area Tank Farm (HTF): a) waste from PUREX processing; and b) waste from H-modified (HM) processing performed to recover uranium and neptunium from burned enriched uranium fuel. Due to the differences between the irradiated depleted uranium targets and the burned enriched uranium fuel, the average compositions of the F and H Area wastes are markedly different from one another. Both F and H Area wastes contain significant amounts of iron and aluminum compounds. However, because the iron content of PUREX waste is higher than that of HM waste, and the aluminum content of PUREX waste is lower than that of HM waste, the iron to aluminum ratios of typical FTF waste solids are appreciably higher than those of typical HTF waste solids. Other constituents present at significantly higher concentrations in the typical FTF waste solids include uranium, nickel, ruthenium, zinc, silver, cobalt and copper. In contrast, constituents present at significantly higher concentrations in the typical HTF waste solids include mercury, thorium, oxalate, and radionuclides U-233, U-234, U-235, U-236, Pu-238, Pu-242, Cm-244, and Cm-245. Because of the higher concentrations of Pu-238 in HTF, the long-term concentrations of Th-230 and Ra-226 (from Pu-238 decay) will also be higher in HTF. The uranium and plutonium distributions of the average FTF waste were found to be consistent with depleted uranium and weapons grade plutonium, respectively (U-235 comprised 0.3 wt% of the FTF uranium, and Pu-240 comprised 6 wt% of the FTF plutonium). In contrast, at HTF, U-235 comprised 5 wt% of the uranium, and Pu-240 comprised 17 wt% of the plutonium, consistent with enriched uranium and high burn-up plutonium. X-ray diffraction analyses of various FTF

  2. URANIUM BISMUTHIDE DISPERSION IN MOLTEN METAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teitel, R.J.

    1959-10-27

    The formation of intermetallic bismuth compounds of thorium or uranium dispersed in a liquid media containing bismuth and lead is described. A bismuthide of uranium dispersed in a liquid metal medium is formed by dissolving uranium in composition of lead and bismuth containing less than 80% lead and lowering the temperature of the composition to a temperature below the point at which the solubility of uranium is exceeded and above the melting point of the composition.

  3. Critical Amounts of Uranium Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konopinski, E.; Metropolis, N.; Teller, E.; Woods, L.

    1943-03-19

    The method of calculation of critical masses of oxides and fluorides of U is given. The geometry assumed is a sphere and the calculations hold only in the absence of hydrogenous materials. Calculations are carried out which are applicable to materials containing form 20 to 100% U{sup 235}. (T.R.H.)

  4. Characterization of Compounds with Tumor-Cell Proliferation Inhibition Activity from Mushroom (Phellinus baumii) Mycelia Produced by Solid-State Fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Henan; Shao, Qian; Wang, Wenhan; Zhang, Jingsong; Zhang, Zhong; Liu, Yanfang; Yang, Yan

    2017-04-27

    The inhibition of tumor-cell proliferationbyan organicsolvent extract from the solid-state fermentation of Phellinus baumii mycelia inoculated in rice medium was investigated in vitro. The active compounds inhibiting tumor-cell proliferation were characterized. Results revealed that all (petroleum ether, chloroform, ethyl acetate, and butanol) fractions inhibited tumor-cell proliferation in a dose-dependent fashion. The ethyl acetate extract had the highest inhibitory effecton tumor-cell proliferation, and the butanol fraction had the lowest. Six compounds were isolated and purified from the ethyl acetate extract of P. baumii mycelia by the tandem application of silica-gel column chromatography (SGCC), high-speed countercurrent chromatography (HSCCC), and preparative HPLC. These compounds were identified by NMR and electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) spectroscopic methods as ergosterol (RF1), ergosta-7,22-dien-3β-yl pentadecanoate (RF3), 3,4-dihydroxy benzaldehyde(RF6), inoscavinA (RF7), baicalein(RF10), and 24-ethylcholesta-5,22-dien-3β-ol (RF13). To further clarify the activity of these compounds, the cell-proliferation-inhibition tests of these compounds on various tumor cells were carried out and evaluatedin vitro. Results suggested that compounds RF6, RF7, and RF10 had potent inhibition effects on the proliferation of a series of tumor cell lines, including K562, L1210, SW620, HepG2, LNCaP, and MCF-7cells. These findings indicated that P. baumii mycelia produced by solid-state fermentation in rice canbe used to obtain active compounds with the ability to inhibittumor-cell proliferation.

  5. Characterization of Compounds with Tumor–Cell Proliferation Inhibition Activity from Mushroom (Phellinus baumii Mycelia Produced by Solid-State Fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henan Zhang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The inhibition of tumor-cell proliferationbyan organicsolvent extract from the solid-state fermentation of Phellinus baumii mycelia inoculated in rice medium was investigated in vitro. The active compounds inhibiting tumor-cell proliferation were characterized. Results revealed that all (petroleum ether, chloroform, ethyl acetate, and butanol fractions inhibited tumor-cell proliferation in a dose-dependent fashion. The ethyl acetate extract had the highest inhibitory effecton tumor-cell proliferation, and the butanol fraction had the lowest. Six compounds were isolated and purified from the ethyl acetate extract of P. baumii mycelia by the tandem application of silica-gel column chromatography (SGCC, high-speed countercurrent chromatography (HSCCC, and preparative HPLC. These compounds were identified by NMR and electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS spectroscopic methods as ergosterol (RF1, ergosta-7,22-dien-3β-yl pentadecanoate (RF3, 3,4-dihydroxy benzaldehyde(RF6, inoscavinA (RF7, baicalein(RF10, and 24-ethylcholesta-5,22-dien-3β-ol (RF13. To further clarify the activity of these compounds, the cell-proliferation-inhibition tests of these compounds on various tumor cells were carried out and evaluatedin vitro. Results suggested that compounds RF6, RF7, and RF10 had potent inhibition effects on the proliferation of a series of tumor cell lines, including K562, L1210, SW620, HepG2, LNCaP, and MCF-7cells. These findings indicated that P. baumii mycelia produced by solid-state fermentation in rice canbe used to obtain active compounds with the ability to inhibittumor-cell proliferation.

  6. Effect of kind of solid fuel onto noxious compound emissions in the firing up process of a low output water boiler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilk, R.; Szymczyk, J.; Zielinski, Z.; Wystemp, E.

    1992-01-01

    NO x , SO 2 , CO and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon emission tests were carried out during the firing up process of a low output boiler for three kinds of smokeless solid fuels and boiler coal. It has been stated that the use of low emissive fuels in low output boilers did not protect against noxious compound emissions during firing up the boiler. (author). 13 refs, 8 figs, 4 tabs

  7. Uniform deposition of uranium hexafluoride (UF6): Standardized mass deposits and controlled isotopic ratios using a thermal fluorination method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNamara, Bruce K.; O’Hara, Matthew J.; Casella, Andrew M.; Carter, Jennifer C.; Addleman, R. Shane; MacFarlan, Paul J.

    2016-07-01

    Abstract: We report a convenient method for the generation of volatile uranium hexafluoride (UF6) from solid uranium oxides and other uranium compounds, followed by uniform deposition of low levels of UF6 onto sampling coupons. Under laminar flow conditions, UF6 is shown to interact with surfaces within the chamber to a highly predictable degree. We demonstrate the preparation of uranium deposits that range between ~0.01 and 470±34 ng∙cm-2. The data suggest the method can be extended to creating depositions at the sub-picogram∙cm-2 level. Additionally, the isotopic composition of the deposits can be customized by selection of the uranium source materials. We demonstrate a layering technique whereby two uranium solids, each with a different isotopic composition, are employed to form successive layers of UF6 on a surface. The result is an ultra-thin deposit of UF6 that bears an isotopic signature that is a composite of the two uranium sources. The reported deposition method has direct application to the development of unique analytical standards for nuclear safeguards and forensics.

  8. Simulation of effects of redox and precipitation on diffusion of uranium solution species in backfill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carnahan, C.L.

    1987-12-01

    This investigation addresses the problem of prediction of the rate of migration of redox-sensitive solution species within packing and backfill materials under conditions of variable oxidation potential. Effects of changes of oxidation potential and precipitation of stable uranium compounds during diffusion of uranium from a region of high oxidation potential into a region of low oxidation potential were simulated numerically. Questions of particular interest addressed in the investigation were the existence of a moving ''redox front'' and the influence of precipitation-dissolution processes on uranium migration. The simulations showed that no expanding redox fronts existed at any simulated time up to 3.2 x 10 5 years (10 13 s). In simulations where precipitation of stable solids was not allowed, variations of oxidation potential did not affect total uranium concentrations in solution. Concentration profiles could be predicted simply by diffusion of the (constant) source concentrations. In simulations where precipitation of stable solids was allowed, uraninite and calcium uranate accumulated at the source-transport domain interface, while coffinite penetrated further into the transport domain. Total uranium concentrations in regions of precipitation were determined by solubilities of the precipitated solids, and were six to seven orders of magnitude lower than those in the simulations without precipitation, throughout the domain of transport. 14 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  9. Simultaneous determination of phenolic compounds in Equisetum palustre L. by ultra high performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry combined with matrix solid-phase dispersion extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Zuofu; Pan, Youzhi; Li, Lu; Huang, Yuyang; Qi, Xiaolin; Luo, Meng; Zu, Yuangang; Fu, Yujie

    2014-11-01

    A method based on matrix solid-phase dispersion extraction followed by ultra high performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry is presented for the extraction and determination of phenolic compounds in Equisetum palustre. This method combines the high efficiency of matrix solid-phase dispersion extraction and the rapidity, sensitivity, and accuracy of ultra high performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry. The influential parameters of the matrix solid-phase dispersion extraction were investigated and optimized. The optimized conditions were as follows: silica gel was selected as dispersing sorbent, the ratio of silica gel to sample was selected to be 2:1 (400/200 mg), and 8 mL of 80% methanol was used as elution solvent. Furthermore, a fast and sensitive ultra high performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry method was developed for the determination of nine phenolic compounds in E. palustre. This method was carried out within <6 min, and exhibited satisfactory linearity, precision, and recovery. Compared with ultrasound-assisted extraction, the proposed matrix solid-phase dispersion procedure possessed higher extraction efficiency, and was more convenient and time saving with reduced requirements on sample and solvent amounts. All these results suggest that the developed method represents an excellent alternative for the extraction and determination of active components in plant matrices. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. pH-Induced precipitation behavior of weakly basic compounds: determination of extent and duration of supersaturation using potentiometric titration and correlation to solid state properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Yi-Ling; Ilevbare, Grace A; Van Eerdenbrugh, Bernard; Box, Karl J; Sanchez-Felix, Manuel Vincente; Taylor, Lynne S

    2012-10-01

    To examine the precipitation and supersaturation behavior of ten weak bases in terms of the relationship between pH-concentration-time profiles and the solid state properties of the precipitated material. Initially the compound was dissolved at low pH, followed by titration with base to induce precipitation. Upon precipitation, small aliquots of acid or base were added to induce slight subsaturation and supersaturation respectively and the resultant pH gradient was determined. The concentration of the unionized species was calculated as a function of time and pH using mass and charge balance equations. Two patterns of behavior were observed in terms of the extent and duration of supersaturation arising following an increase in pH and this behavior could be rationalized based on the crystallization tendency of the compound. For compounds that did not readily crystallize, an amorphous precipitate was formed and a prolonged duration of supersaturation was observed. For compounds that precipitated to crystalline forms, the observed supersaturation was short-lived. This study showed that supersaturation behavior has significant correlation with the solid-state properties of the precipitate and that pH-metric titration methods can be utilized to evaluate the supersaturation behavior.

  11. Pressurized liquid extraction using water/isopropanol coupled with solid-phase extraction cleanup for industrial and anthropogenic waste-indicator compounds in sediment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhardt, M.R.; ReVello, R.C.; Smith, S.G.; Zaugg, S.D.

    2005-01-01

    A broad range of organic compounds is recognized as environmentally relevant for their potential adverse effects on human and ecosystem health. This method was developed to better determine the distribution of 61 compounds that are typically associated with industrial and household waste as well as some that are toxic and known (or suspected) for endocrine-disrupting potential extracted from environmental sediment samples. Pressurized liquid extraction (PLE) coupled with solid-phase extraction (SPE) was used to reduce sample preparation time, reduce solvent consumption to one-fifth of that required using dichloromethane-based Soxhlet extraction, and to minimize background interferences for full scan GC/MS analysis. Recoveries from spiked Ottawa sand, commercially available topsoil, and environmental stream sediment, fortified at 4-720 ??g per compound, averaged 76 ?? 13%. Initial method detection limits for single-component compounds ranged from 12.5 to 520 ??g/kg, based on 25 g samples. Results from 103 environmental sediment samples show that 36 out of 61 compounds (59%) were detected in at least one sample with concentrations ranging from 20 to 100,000 ??g/kg. The most frequently detected compound, beta-sitosterol, a plant sterol, was detected in 87 of the 103 (84.5%) environmental samples with a concentration range 360-100,000 ??g/kg. Results for a standard reference material using dichloromethane Soxhlet-based extraction are also compared. ?? 2004 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Spatially resolved analyses of uranium species using a coupled system made up of confocal laser-scanning microscopy (CLSM) and laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIFS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brockmann, S.; Grossmann, K.; Arnold, T.

    2014-01-01

    The fluorescent properties of uranium when excited by UV light are used increasingly for spectroscope analyses of uranium species within watery samples. Here, alongside the fluorescent properties of the hexavalent oxidation phases, the tetra and pentavalent oxidation phases also play an increasingly important role. The detection of fluorescent emission spectrums on solid and biological samples using (time-resolved) laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS or LIFS respectively) has, however, the disadvantage that no statements regarding the spatial localisation of the uranium can be made. However, particularly in complex, biological samples, such statements on the localisation of the uranium enrichment in the sample are desired, in order to e.g. be able to distinguish between intra and extra-cellular uranium bonds. The fluorescent properties of uranium (VI) compounds and minerals can also be used to detect their localisation within complex samples. So the application of fluorescent microscopic methods represents one possibility to localise and visualise uranium precipitates and enrichments in biological samples, such as biofilms or cells. The confocal laser-scanning microscopy (CLSM) is especially well suited to this purpose. Coupling confocal laser-scanning microscopy (CLSM) with laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIFS) makes it possible to localise and visualise fluorescent signals spatially and three-dimensionally, while at the same time being able to detect spatially resolved, fluorescent-spectroscopic data. This technology is characterised by relatively low detection limits from up to 1.10 -6 M for uranium (VI) compounds within the confocal volume. (orig.)

  13. Analytical method of uranium (IV) and uranium (VI) in uranium ores and uranium-bearing rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Zhuqin; Zheng Yongfeng; Li Qingzhen; Zhong Miaolan; Gu Dingxiang

    1995-11-01

    The best conditions for keeping the original valences of uranium during the dissolution and separation procedure of geological samples (especially those micro uranium-bearing rock) were studied. With the exist of high concentration protectants, the sample was decomposed with concentration HF at 40 +- 5 degree C. The U(VI) was dissolved completely and formed stable complex UO 2 F 2 , the U(IV) was precipitated rapidly and carried by carrier. Quantitative separation was carried out immediately with suction. The decomposition of sample and separation of solid/liquid phases was completed within two minutes. After separation, the U(IV) and U(VI) were determined quantitatively with laser fluorescence or voltametry respectively according to the uranium content. The limit of detection for this method is 0.7 μg/g, RSD is 10.5%, the determinate range of uranium is 2 x 10 -6 ∼10 -1 g/g. The uranium contents and their valence state ratio were measured for more than one hundred samples of sand stone and granite, the accuracy and precision of these results are satisfactory for uranium geological research. (12 tabs.; 11 refs.)

  14. Mathematical simulation of the amplification of 1790-nm laser radiation in a nuclear-excited He - Ar plasma containing nanoclusters of uranium compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosarev, V. A.; Kuznetsova, E. E.

    2014-02-01

    The possibility of applying dusty active media in nuclearpumped lasers has been considered. The amplification of 1790-nm radiation in a nuclear-excited dusty He - Ar plasma is studied by mathematical simulation. The influence of nanoclusters on the component composition of the medium and the kinetics of the processes occurring in it is analysed using a specially developed kinetic model, including 72 components and more than 400 reactions. An analysis of the results indicates that amplification can in principle be implemented in an active laser He - Ar medium containing 10-nm nanoclusters of metallic uranium and uranium dioxide.

  15. METHOD OF PURIFYING URANIUM METAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, R.E.; Morrison, B.H.

    1958-12-23

    The removal of lmpurities from uranlum metal can be done by a process conslstlng of contacting the metal with liquid mercury at 300 icient laborato C, separating the impunitycontalnlng slag formed, cooling the slag-free liquld substantlally below the point at which uranlum mercurlde sollds form, removlng the mercury from the solids, and recovering metallic uranium by heating the solids.

  16. Oxidation state analyses of uranium with emphasis on chemical speciation in geological media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ervanne, H.

    2004-01-01

    This thesis focuses on chemical methods suitable for the determination of uranium redox species in geological materials. Nd-coprecipitation method was studied for the determination of uranium oxidation states in ground waters. This method is ideally suited for the separation of uranium oxidation states in the field, which means that problems associated with the instability of U(IV) during transport are avoided. An alternative method, such as ion exchange, is recommended for the analysis of high saline and calcium- and iron-rich ground waters. U(IV)/Utot was 2.8-7.2% in ground waters in oxidizing conditions and 60-93% in anoxic conditions. From thermodynamic model calculations applied to results from anoxic ground waters it was concluded that uranium can act as redox buffer in granitic ground waters. An ion exchange method was developed for the analysis of uranium oxidation states in different solid materials of geological origin. These included uranium minerals, uraniumbearing minerals, fracture coatings and bulk rock. U(IV)/Utot was 50-70% in uraninites, 5.8-8.7% in secondary uranium minerals, 15-49% in different fracture coatings and 64- 77% in samples from deep bedrock. In the uranium-bearing minerals, U(IV)/Utot was 33-43% (allanites), 5.9% (fergusonite) and 93% (monazite). Although the ion exchange method gave reliable results, there is a risk for the conversion of uranium oxidation states during analysis of heterogeneous samples due to the redox reactions that take place in the presence of some iron compounds. This risk was investigated in a study of several common iron-bearing minerals. The risk for conversion of uranium oxidation states can be screened by sample selection and minimized with use of a redox buffer compound such as polyacrylic acid (PAA). In studies of several carboxylic acids, PAA was found to be the most suitable for extending the application of the method. The stability of uranium oxidation states during analysis and the selectivity

  17. Preparation of an aminopropyl imidazole-modified silica gel as a sorbent for solid-phase extraction of carboxylic acid compounds and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Na; Guo, Yong; Wang, Licheng; Liang, Xiaojing; Liu, Shujuan; Jiang, Shengxiang

    2014-05-21

    In this paper, a kind of aminopropyl imidazole-modified silica sorbent was synthesized and used as a solid-phase extraction (SPE) sorbent for the determination of carboxylic acid compounds and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The resultant aminopropyl imidazole-modified silica sorbent was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and elemental analysis (EA) to ensure the successful binding of aminopropyl imidazole on the surface of silica gel. Then the aminopropyl imidazole-modified silica sorbent served as a SPE sorbent for the enrichment of carboxylic acid compounds and PAHs. The new sorbent exhibited high extraction efficiency towards the tested compounds and the results show that such a sorbent can offer multiple intermolecular interactions: electrostatic, π-π, and hydrophobic interactions. Several parameters affecting the extraction recovery, such as the pH of sample solution, the pH of eluent, the solubility of eluent, the volume of eluent, and sample loading, were also investigated. Under the optimized conditions, the proposed method was applied to the analysis of four carboxylic acid compounds and four PAHs in environmental water samples. Good linearities were obtained for all the tested compounds with R(2) larger than 0.9903. The limits of detection were found to be in the range of 0.0065-0.5 μg L(-1). The recovery values of spiked river water samples were from 63.2% to 112.3% with relative standard deviations (RSDs) less than 10.1% (n = 4).

  18. Effects of dissolved organic matter (DOM) sources and nature of solid extraction sorbent on recoverable DOM composition: Implication into potential lability of different compound groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Meilian; Kim, Sunghwan; Park, Jae-Eun; Kim, Hyun Sik; Hur, Jin

    2016-07-01

    Noting the source-dependent properties of dissolved organic matter (DOM), this study explored the recoverable compounds by solid phase extraction (SPE) of two common sorbents (C18 and PPL) eluted with methanol solvent for contrasting DOM sources via fluorescence excitation-emission matrix coupled with parallel factor analysis (EEM-PARAFAC) and Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS). Fresh algae and leaf litter extracts DOM, one riverine DOM, and one upstream lacustrine DOM were selected for the comparison. C18 sorbent was generally found to extract more diverse molecular formula, relatively higher molecular weight, and more heteroatomic DOM compounds within the studied mass range than PPL sorbent except for the leaf litter extract. Even with the same sorbent, the main molecular features of the two end member DOM were distributed on different sides of the axes of a multivariate ordination, indicating the source-dependent characteristics of the recoverable compounds by the sorbents. In addition, further examination of the molecular formula uniquely present in the two end members and the upstream lake DOM suggested that proteinaceous, tannin-like, and heteroatomic DOM constituents might be potential compound groups which are labile and easily degraded during their mobilization into downstream watershed. This study provides new insights into the sorbent selectivity of DOM from diverse sources and potential lability of various compound groups.

  19. Multivariate analysis of volatile compounds detected by headspace solid-phase microextraction/gas chromatography: A tool for sensory classification of cork stoppers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prat, Chantal; Besalú, Emili; Bañeras, Lluís; Anticó, Enriqueta

    2011-06-15

    The volatile fraction of aqueous cork macerates of tainted and non-tainted agglomerate cork stoppers was analysed by headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME)/gas chromatography. Twenty compounds containing terpenoids, aliphatic alcohols, lignin-related compounds and others were selected and analysed in individual corks. Cork stoppers were previously classified in six different classes according to sensory descriptions including, 2,4,6-trichloroanisole taint and other frequent, non-characteristic odours found in cork. A multivariate analysis of the chromatographic data of 20 selected chemical compounds using linear discriminant analysis models helped in the differentiation of the a priori made groups. The discriminant model selected five compounds as the best combination. Selected compounds appear in the model in the following order; 2,4,6 TCA, fenchyl alcohol, 1-octen-3-ol, benzyl alcohol and benzothiazole. Unfortunately, not all six a priori differentiated sensory classes were clearly discriminated in the model, probably indicating that no measurable differences exist in the chromatographic data for some categories. The predictive analyses of a refined model in which two sensory classes were fused together resulted in a good classification. Prediction rates of control (non-tainted), TCA, musty-earthy-vegetative, vegetative and chemical descriptions were 100%, 100%, 85%, 67.3% and 100%, respectively, when the modified model was used. The multivariate analysis of chromatographic data will help in the classification of stoppers and provide a perfect complement to sensory analyses. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Combination of solid phase extraction and dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction for separation/preconcentration of ultra trace amounts of uranium prior to its fiber optic-linear array spectrophotometry determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadfarnia, Shayessteh; Shabani, Ali Mohammad Haji; Shakerian, Farid; Shiralian Esfahani, Golnaz

    2013-12-15

    A simple and sensitive method for the separation and preconcentration of the ultra trace amounts of uranium and its determination by spectrophotometry was developed. The method is based on the combination of solid phase extraction and dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction. Thus, by passing the sample through the basic alumina column, the uranyl ion and some cations are separated from the sample matrix. The retained uranyl ion along with the cations are eluted with 5 mL of nitric acid (2 mol L(-1)) and after neutralization of the eluent, the extracted uranyl ion is converted to its anionic benzoate complex and is separated from other cations by extraction of its ion pair with malachite green into small volume of chloroform using dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction. The amount of uranium is then determined by the absorption measurement of the extracted ion pair at 621 nm using flow injection spectrophotometry. Under the optimum conditions, with 500 mL of the sample, a preconcentration factor of 1980, a detection limit of 40 ng L(-1), and a relative standard deviation of 4.1% (n=6) at 400 ng L(-1) were obtained. The method was successfully applied to the determination of uranium in mineral water, river water, well water, spring water and sea water samples. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Medical effects of internal contamination with uranium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duraković, A

    1999-03-01

    The purpose of this work is to present an outline of the metabolic pathways of uranium isotopes and compounds, medical consequences of uranium poisoning, and an evaluation of the therapeutic alternatives in uranium internal contamination. The chemical toxicity of uranium has been recognized for more than two centuries. Animal experiments and human studies are conclusive about metabolic adverse affects and nephro- toxicity of uranium compounds. Radiation toxicity of uranium isotopes has been recognized since the beginning of the nuclear era, with well documented evidence of reproductive and developmental toxicity, as well as mutagenic and carcinogenic consequences of uranium internal contamination. Natural uranium (238U), an alpha emitter with a half-life of 4.5x10(9) years, is one of the primordial substances of the universe. It is found in the earth's crust, combined with 235U and 234U, alpha, beta, and gamma emitters with respective half-lives of 7.1x10(8) and 2.5x10(5) years. A special emphasis of this paper concerns depleted uranium. The legacy of radioactive waste, environmental and health hazards in the nuclear industry, and, more recently, the military use of depleted uranium in the tactical battlefield necessitates further insight into the toxicology of depleted uranium. The present controversy over the radiological and chemical toxicity of depleted uranium used in the Gulf War warrants further experimental and clinical investigations of its effects on the biosphere and human organisms.

  2. Chapter 1. General information about uranium. 1.3. Uranium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khakimov, N.; Nazarov, Kh.M.; Mirsaidov, I.U.

    2012-01-01

    The uranium ores were described. It was found that uranium ores and natural mineral formations containing uranium and its compounds, can be found in concentrations that are technically possible for industrial utilization and which are economically profitable. It was defined that oxidation levels of uranium minerals have an impact on their reprocessing technology and behavior in hydrometallurgical re partition. It was found that the chemical composition of ores has a decisive importance during selection of their reprocessing method.

  3. Separation of uranium from aqueous solutions using calix[6]arenes in liquid-liquid extraction as well as solid phase extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmeide, K.; Geipel, G.; Bernhard, G.

    2004-11-01

    The suitability of different calyx[n] arene types for uranyl extraction from liquid solutions was examined by means of liquid-liquid extraction using aqueous phases and organic solvents of varying compositions. It was found that COOH-derivatised calyx[6] arenes have good extraction properties and can even be used in the acid pH range. The use of calixarene-modified fleeces for the separation of uranyl from aqueous phases was examined in batch experiments with pH and uranyl concentration as variables and in the presence or absence of competing ions. The results showed that calixarene-modified fleeces can be used for uranium separation starting from pH 4. At pH 5, up to a maximum of 7.6 x 10 -7 mol uranium can be bound per 1 g of calixarene-modified fleece. The separation of uranyl from synthetic pit waters was examined as a means of testing the separation capacity of calixarene-modified fleeces in environmentally sensitive waters. Studies on the reversibility of uranium bonding to calixarene-treated polyester fleeces have shown that under environmentally realistic conditions (neutral pH range) the uranium is firmly bound to the calixarene-modified fleeces and cannot be mobilised. By contrast, in acidic environments calixarene-modified fleeces are capable of near-complete regeneration. Such regenerated textile filter materials can then be used for further uranium separation cycles [de

  4. Synthesis, characterization, and thermochemistry of the solid state coordination compound Zn(Nic){sub 2} . H{sub 2}O(s) (Nic = nicotinic acid)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Youying [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Liaocheng University, Liaocheng 252059, Shandong (China)], E-mail: yydi@lcu.edu.cn; Hong Yuanping; Kong Yuxia; Yang Weiwei [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Liaocheng University, Liaocheng 252059, Shandong (China); Tan Zhicheng [Thermochemistry Laboratory, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023 (China)

    2009-01-15

    A novel compound, viz. zinc nicotinate monohydrate, was synthesized by the method of room temperature solid phase synthesis. The techniques of FT-IR chemical and elemental analyses and X-ray powder diffraction were applied to characterise the structure and composition of the complex. In accordance with Hess' law, a thermochemical cycle was designed and the enthalpy change of the solid phase reaction of nicotinic acid with hydrated zinc acetate was determined to be {delta}{sub r}H{sub m}{sup 0}=(46.71{+-}0.21)kJ.mol{sup -1} by use of an isoperibol solution-reaction calorimeter. The standard molar enthalpy of formation of the title complex Zn(Nic){sub 2} . H{sub 2}O(s) was calculated as -(1062.3 {+-} 2.0) kJ . mol{sup -1} by use of the enthalpies of dissolution and other auxiliary thermodynamic data.

  5. Concentration of organic compounds in natural waters with solid-phase dispersion based on advesicle modified silica prior to liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parisis, Nikolaos A; Giokas, Dimosthenis L; Vlessidis, Athanasios G; Evmiridis, Nicholaos P

    2005-12-02

    The ability of vesicle-coated silica to aid the extraction of organic compounds from water prior to liquid chromatographic analysis is presented for the first time. The method is based on the formation of silica supported cationic multi-lamellar vesicles of gemini surfactants inherently ensuring the presence of hydrophilic and hydrophobic sites for the partitioning of analytes bearing different properties. Method development is illustrated by studying the adsolubilization of UV absorbing chemicals from swimming pool water. Due to the requirement for external energy input (intense shearing) a method based on solid-phase dispersion (SPD) was applied producing better results than off-line solid-phase extraction (SPE). Meticulous investigation of the experimental parameters was conducted in order to elucidate the mechanisms behind the proposed extraction pattern. Analyte recoveries were quantitative under the optimum experimental conditions offering recoveries higher than 96% with RSD values below 5%.

  6. Czechoslovak uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pluskal, O.

    1992-01-01

    Data and knowledge related to the prospecting, mining, processing and export of uranium ores in Czechoslovakia are presented. In the years between 1945 and January 1, 1991, 98,461.1 t of uranium were extracted. In the period 1965-1990 the uranium industry was subsidized from the state budget to a total of 38.5 billion CSK. The subsidies were put into extraction, investments and geologic prospecting; the latter was at first, ie. till 1960 financed by the former USSR, later on the two parties shared costs on a 1:1 basis. Since 1981 the prospecting has been entirely financed from the Czechoslovak state budget. On Czechoslovak territory uranium has been extracted from deposits which may be classified as vein-type deposits, deposits in uranium-bearing sandstones and deposits connected with weathering processes. The future of mining, however, is almost exclusively being connected with deposits in uranium-bearing sandstones. A brief description and characteristic is given of all uranium deposits on Czechoslovak territory, and the organization of uranium mining in Czechoslovakia is described as is the approach used in the world to evaluate uranium deposits; uranium prices and actual resources are also given. (Z.S.) 3 figs

  7. Structural and magnetic properties of some pseudo-binary and ternary compounds at high curie temperature prepared in the systems: -) rare earth (Nd, Sm) iron hydrogen, -) gadolinium iron aluminium, and -) uranium iron or cobalt silicon or germanium; Proprietes structurales et magnetiques de quelques composes pseudobinaires et ternaires ferromagnetiques a temperature de curie elevee prepares dans les systemes: -) terres rares Nd Sm fer hydrogene, -) gadolinium fer aluminium, and -) uranium fer ou cobalt silicium ou germanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berlureau, T

    1991-07-15

    This work highlights the importance of crystal and chemical studies for understanding the magnetic properties of systems as complex as inter-metallic compounds involving rare-earth elements, uranium, silicon or germanium. With a view of finding new compounds with high Curie temperature and strong magneto-crystal anisotropy, it appears that uranium compounds such as UFe{sub 10}Si{sub 2}, UCo{sub 10}Si{sub 2}, U(Fe{sub 10-x}Co{sub x})Si{sub 2} and U{sub 2}M{sub 17-y}X{sub y} where M is Fe or Co and Y is Si or Ge, are interesting because of the 5f orbital that can form bands through direct overlapping and can link itself very strongly with orbitals of nearby atoms.

  8. Characteristics of volatile compound emission and odor pollution from municipal solid waste treating/disposal facilities of a city in Eastern China

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Hanwen; Duan, Zhenhan; Zhao, Yan

    2017-01-01

    Transfer station, incineration plant, and landfill site made up the major parts of municipal solid waste disposal system of S city in Eastern China. Characteristics of volatile compounds (VCs) and odor pollution of each facility were investigated from a systematic perspective. Also major index...... in the waste tipping port of the incineration plant. A positive correlation between the olfactory and chemical odor concentrations was found with R2 = 0.918 (n = 15, P technology to deal...... with the non-source-separated waste. Strong attention thus needs to be paid on the enclosed systems in incineration plant to avoid any accidental odor emission....

  9. Radiation protection program applied to occupationally exposed individuals at the IPEN/CNEN-SP pilot plant in the 1980s for natural uranium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Teresinha de Moraes da; Sordi, Gian Maria A.A.; Vasques, Francisco Mário Feijó

    2017-01-01

    The work evidences the chemical processing of natural uranium from the yellowcake phase to the production of UF 6 natural uranium hexafluoride, a process carried out at the IPEN/CNEN-SP pilot plant. Radiation protection management was intended to monitor occupationally exposed individuals - IOEs, the workplace and the environment. An individual monitoring program for IOEs was developed for both external irradiation and incorporation of radioactive material. The IOEs were monitored externally with film-type dosimeters and the in vitro method was applied internally for urine analysis. For the workplace the monitoring program for equipment and floors was developed, determining the exposure rate from the process equipment, surface contamination expressed in Bq.cm -2 in equipment and floors, complemented by the air monitoring program both for the worker as well as for the workplace. Cellulose filters with aerodynamic diameter of 0.3 micron to 8.0 micron were used

  10. Uranium - the element: its occurrence and uses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Awan, I. Z.

    2015-01-01

    Uranium metal and its compounds have been of great interest to physicists and chemists due to its use for both civil and military applications, e.g. production of electricity, use in the medical field and for making nuclear weapons. This review paper describes the occurrence, chemistry and metallurgy of the element 'uranium', its conversion to stable compounds such as yellow cake, uranium tetrafluoride and uranium hexafluoride and the enrichment technologies and uses for both civil and military purposes. The paper is meant for ready reference for students and teachers in connection with the recent spate of interest shown in nuclear power generation in Pakistan and abroad. (author)

  11. Analysis of air-, moisture- and solvent-sensitive chemical compounds by mass spectrometry using an inert atmospheric pressure solids analysis probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosely, Jackie A; Stokes, Peter; Parker, David; Dyer, Philip W; Messinis, Antonis M

    2018-02-01

    A novel method has been developed that enables chemical compounds to be transferred from an inert atmosphere glove box and into the atmospheric pressure ion source of a mass spectrometer whilst retaining a controlled chemical environment. This innovative method is simple and cheap to implement on some commercially available mass spectrometers. We have termed this approach inert atmospheric pressure solids analysis probe ( iASAP) and demonstrate the benefit of this methodology for two air-/moisture-sensitive chemical compounds whose characterisation by mass spectrometry is now possible and easily achieved. The simplicity of the design means that moving between iASAP and standard ASAP is straightforward and quick, providing a highly flexible platform with rapid sample turnaround.

  12. Solid-Phase Microextraction Coupled to Capillary Atmospheric Pressure Photoionization-Mass Spectrometry for Direct Analysis of Polar and Nonpolar Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirabelli, Mario F; Zenobi, Renato

    2018-04-17

    A novel capillary ionization source based on atmospheric pressure photoionization (cAPPI) was developed and used for the direct interfacing between solid-phase microextraction (SPME) and mass spectrometry (MS). The efficiency of the source was evaluated for direct and dopant-assisted photoionization, analyzing both polar (e.g., triazines and organophosphorus pesticides) and nonpolar (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, PAHs) compounds. The results show that the range of compound polarity, which can be addressed by direct SPME-MS can be substantially extended by using cAPPI, compared to other sensitive techniques like direct analysis in real time (DART) and dielectric barrier discharge ionization (DBDI). The new source delivers a very high sensitivity, down to sub parts-per-trillion (ppt), making it a viable alternative when compared to previously reported and less comprehensive direct approaches.

  13. Solid-phase reduction of silico-12-molybdic acid H4SiMo12O40 by some organic oxygen containing compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chuvaev, V.F.; Pinchuk, I.N.; Spitsyn, V.I.

    1982-01-01

    A study is made on reduction reactions of anhydrous silico-12-molybdic acid by vapors of organic oxygen-containing compounds at 170 deg C: alcohols, simple carbonyl compounds. Methods of thermal analysis, electron paramagnetic resonance, paramagnetic resonance were used to established that depending on the nature of organic reagent and temperature, H 6 SiMo 2 5 Mo 10 6 O 40 two-electron or H 8 SiMo 4 5 Mo 8 6 O 40 four-electron flues form. It is shown that the increase of heterogeneous reduction temperature can lead to formation of anhydrous phases of SiMo 12 O 38 -(n/2), able to attach water reversibly with formation of corresponding blue. Characteristics of blues, prepared during solid-phase reduction of silico-12-molybdic acid and mixed valent forms with corresponding reduction degree, separated from water solutions, were compared

  14. Applied internal dosimetry staff exposed to Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trotta, Marisa V.; Arguelles, Maria G.

    2009-01-01

    Dosimetric calculations are performed in order to estimate the quantity of a radionuclide that is incorporated by a worker. Urine determinations of activity and mass of uranium are made in the laboratory of Personal and Area Dosimetry. The paper presents reference values concerning the activity excreted in urine due to the incorporation of uranium compounds. The compounds analyzed are natural uranium and uranium enriched to 20 %, both soluble and insoluble. According to the limits allowed for the incorporation of uranium compounds of Type F and M, we verify that the times of monitoring and the detection limits of the equipment used to determine the activity are appropriate. On the other hand, the S-type compounds determination in urine is useful in cases of accidental incorporations (above the ALI) as a first and quick estimate; MDA (0.017 Bq / L) does not allow detection in routine monitoring; measurement in lungs, and faeces should be included. (author)

  15. Variation in Scent Compounds of Oil-Bearing Rose (Rosa damascena Mill. Produced by Headspace Solid Phase Microextraction, Hydrodistillation and Solvent Extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabri Erbaş

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this research, rose oil and rose water were hydro-distilled from the fresh oil-bearing rose flowers (Rosa damascena Mill. using Clevenger-type apparatus. Rose concretes were extracted from the fresh rose flowers by using non-polar solvents, e.g. diethyl ether, petroleum ether, cyclo-hexane, chloroform and n-hexane, and subsequently by evaporation of the solvents under vacuum. Absolutes were produced from the concretes with ethyl alcohol extraction at -20°C, leaving behind the wax and other paraffinic substances. Scent compounds of all these products detected by gas chromatography (GC-FID/GC-MS were compared with the natural scent compounds of fresh rose flower detected by using headspace solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME with carboxen/polydimethylsiloxane (CAR/PDMS fiber. A total of 46 compounds analysis were identified by HS-SPME-GC-MS in the fresh flower, and a total of 15 compounds were identified by GC-MS in the hydrodistilled rose oil. While main compounds in rose oil were geraniol (35.4%, citronellol (31.6%, and nerol (15.3%, major compound in fresh rose flower, rose water and residue water was phenylethyl alcohol (43.2, 35.6 and 98.2%, respectively. While the highest concrete yield (0.7% was obtained from diethyl ether extraction, the highest absolute yield (70.9% was obtained from the n-hexane concrete. The diethyl ether concrete gave the highest productivity of absolute, as 249.7 kg of fresh rose flowers was needed to produce 1 kg of absolute.

  16. Determination of pharmaceutical compounds in surface- and ground-water samples by solid-phase extraction and high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahill, J.D.; Furlong, E.T.; Burkhardt, M.R.; Kolpin, D.; Anderson, L.G.

    2004-01-01

    Commonly used prescription and over-the-counter pharmaceuticals are possibly present in surface- and ground-water samples at ambient concentrations less than 1 μg/L. In this report, the performance characteristics of a combined solid-phase extraction isolation and high-performance liquid chromatography–electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HPLC–ESI-MS) analytical procedure for routine determination of the presence and concentration of human-health pharmaceuticals are described. This method was developed and used in a recent national reconnaissance of pharmaceuticals in USA surface waters. The selection of pharmaceuticals evaluated for this method was based on usage estimates, resulting in a method that contains compounds from diverse chemical classes, which presents challenges and compromises when applied as a single routine analysis. The method performed well for the majority of the 22 pharmaceuticals evaluated, with recoveries greater than 60% for 12 pharmaceuticals. The recoveries of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, a histamine (H2) receptor antagonist, and antihypoglycemic compound classes were less than 50%, but were retained in the method to provide information describing the potential presence of these compounds in environmental samples and to indicate evidence of possible matrix enhancing effects. Long-term recoveries, evaluated from reagent-water fortifications processed over 2 years, were similar to initial method performance. Method detection limits averaged 0.022 μg/L, sufficient for expected ambient concentrations. Compound-dependent matrix effects on HPLC/ESI-MS analysis, including enhancement and suppression of ionization, were observed as a 20–30% increase in measured concentrations for three compounds and greater than 50% increase for two compounds. Changing internal standard and more frequent ESI source maintenance minimized matrix effects. Application of the method in the national survey demonstrates that several

  17. Analyses of Indole Compounds in Sugar Cane (Saccharum officinarum L. Juice by High Performance Liquid Chromatography and Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry after Solid-Phase Extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Wan Hong Yong

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Simultaneous quantitative analysis of 10 indole compounds, including indole-3-acetic acid (IAA, one of the most important naturally occurring auxins and some of its metabolites, by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS after solid-phase extraction (SPE was reported for the first time. The analysis was carried out using a reverse phase HPLC gradient elution, with an aqueous mobile phase (containing 0.1% formic acid modified by methanol. Furthermore, a novel SPE procedure was developed for the pre-concentration and purification of indole compounds using C18 SPE cartridges. The combination of SPE, HPLC, and LC-MS was applied to screen for the indole compounds present in sugar cane (Saccharum officinarum L. juice, a refreshing beverage with various health benefits. Finally, four indole compounds were successfully detected and quantified in sugar cane juice by HPLC, which were further unequivocally confirmed by LC-MS/MS experiments operating in the multiple reaction monitoring (MRM mode.

  18. Uranium tailings sampling manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feenstra, S.; Reades, D.W.; Cherry, J.A.; Chambers, D.B.; Case, G.G.; Ibbotson, B.G.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this manual is to describe the requisite sampling procedures for the application of uniform high-quality standards to detailed geotechnical, hydrogeological, geochemical and air quality measurements at Canadian uranium tailings disposal sites. The selection and implementation of applicable sampling procedures for such measurements at uranium tailings disposal sites are complicated by two primary factors. Firstly, the physical and chemical nature of uranium mine tailings and effluent is considerably different from natural soil materials and natural waters. Consequently, many conventional methods for the collection and analysis of natural soils and waters are not directly applicable to tailings. Secondly, there is a wide range in the physical and chemical nature of uranium tailings. The composition of the ore, the milling process, the nature of tailings depositon, and effluent treatment vary considerably and are highly site-specific. Therefore, the definition and implementation of sampling programs for uranium tailings disposal sites require considerable evaluation, and often innovation, to ensure that appropriate sampling and analysis methods are used which provide the flexibility to take into account site-specific considerations. The following chapters describe the objective and scope of a sampling program, preliminary data collection, and the procedures for sampling of tailings solids, surface water and seepage, tailings pore-water, and wind-blown dust and radon

  19. Sorption behavior of charged and neutral polar organic compounds on solid phase extraction materials: which functional group governs sorption?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bäuerlein, P.S.; Mansell, J.E.; ter Laak, T.L.; de Voogt, P.

    2012-01-01

    Numerous polar anthropogenic organic chemicals have been found in the aqueous environment. Solid phase extraction (SPE) has been applied for the isolation of these from aqueous matrices, employing various materials. Nevertheless, little is known about the influence of functional groups on the

  20. Synthesis and reactivity of triscyclopentadienyl uranium (III) and (IV) complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berthet, J.C.

    1992-01-01

    The reactions of (RC 5 H 4 ) 3 U with R=trimethylsilylcyclopentadienyl or tertiobutylcyclopentadienyl are studied for the synthesis of new uranium organometallic compounds. Reactions with sodium hydride are first described uranium (III) anionic hydrides obtained are oxidized for synthesis of stable uranium (IV) organometallic hydrides. Stability of these compounds is discussed. Reactivity of these uranium (III) and (IV) hydrides are studied. Formation of new binuclear compounds with strong U-O and U-N bonds is examined and crystal structure are presented. Monocyclooctatetraenylic uranium complexes are also investigated

  1. Determination of Wastewater Compounds in Sediment and Soil by Pressurized Solvent Extraction, Solid-Phase Extraction, and Capillary-Column Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhardt, Mark R.; Zaugg, Steven D.; Smith, Steven G.; ReVello, Rhiannon C.

    2006-01-01

    A method for the determination of 61 compounds in environmental sediment and soil samples is described. The method was developed in response to increasing concern over the effects of endocrine-disrupting chemicals in wastewater and wastewater-impacted sediment on aquatic organisms. This method also may be used to evaluate the effects of combined sanitary and storm-sewer overflow on the water and sediment quality of urban streams. Method development focused on the determination of compounds that were chosen on the basis of their endocrine-disrupting potential or toxicity. These compounds include the alkylphenol ethoxylate nonionic surfactants and their degradates, food additives, fragrances, antioxidants, flame retardants, plasticizers, industrial solvents, disinfectants, fecal sterols, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and high-use domestic pesticides. Sediment and soil samples are extracted using a pressurized solvent extraction system. The compounds of interest are extracted from interfering matrix components by high-pressure water/isopropyl alcohol extraction. The compounds were isolated using disposable solid-phase extraction (SPE) cartridges containing chemically modified polystyrene-divinylbenzene resin. The cartridges were dried with nitrogen gas, and then sorbed compounds were eluted with methylene chloride (80 percent)-diethyl ether (20 percent) through Florisil/sodium sulfate SPE cartridge, and then determined by capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Recoveries in reagent-sand samples fortified at 4 to 72 micrograms averaged 76 percent ?13 percent relative standard deviation for all method compounds. Initial method reporting levels for single-component compounds ranged from 50 to 500 micrograms per kilogram. The concentrations of 20 out of 61 compounds initially will be reported as estimated with the 'E' remark code for one of three reasons: (1) unacceptably low-biased recovery (less than 60 percent) or highly variable method performance

  2. Thermodynamic data for uranium fluorides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leitnaker, J.M.

    1983-03-01

    Self-consistent thermodynamic data have been tabulated for uranium fluorides between UF/sub 4/ and UF/sub 6/, including UF/sub 4/ (solid and gas), U/sub 4/F/sub 17/ (solid), U/sub 2/F/sub 9/ (solid), UF/sub 5/ (solid and gas), U/sub 2/F/sub 10/ (gas), and UF/sub 6/ (solid, liquid, and gas). Included are thermal function - the heat capacity, enthalpy, and free energy function, heats of formation, and vaporization behavior.

  3. Distribution of Organic Compounds from Municipal Solid Waste in the Groundwater Downgradient of a Landfill (Grindsted, Denmark)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rügge, Kirsten; Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    1995-01-01

    , and xylenes as dominating. No pesticides were identified, but some phenoxy acids, which could be metabolites of known pesticides, were found. In a distance of approximately 60 m from the landfill, most of the specific organic compounds were no longer detectable. Since dilution and sorption apparently cannot......The distribution of organic compounds in the leachate plume downgradient of the Grindsted Landfill was mapped along two 300 m long transects (285 groundwater samples). At the border of the landfill, elevated concentrations of dissolved organic matter 30-1 10 mg of C L-' (measured as nonvolatile...... organic carbon, NVOC) were found. In a distance of 130 m downgradient of the landfill, the NVOC had decreased to background level, which is 1-3 mg of C L-l. More than 15 organic compounds were identified in the groundwater at the downgradient border of the landfill with benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene...

  4. Mobilization of uranium isotopes in Brazilian aquifers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonotto, Daniel Marcos

    1994-01-01

    The uranium isotopes 234 U and 238 U have been extensively used to study geochemical problems, mainly related to the hydrological medium. Active dissolution of these isotopes is occurring in groundwaters from several aquifers at southeastern region of Brazil. The dissolved uranium concentration showed variability related to the rainwater infiltration with the U content of groundwaters increasing during wet periods. The amount of uranium mobilized during rainwater infiltration showed an inverse correlation with the thickness of unsaturated silty clay at Morro do Ferro area. The experimental data favour the possibility of formation of soluble complexes of U and dissolved organic compounds at Morro do Ferro area, and also some absorption of U by clays during rainwater infiltration. Enhanced 234 U/ 238 U activity ratios for dissolved uranium have been found and explained in terms of combined chemical etch and leach processes for groundwaters of the Pocos de Caldas alkaline complex. These processes are considered responsible for the bulk dissolution of rock matrix rather then alpha-recoil effects. Several direct correlations have been found for groundwaters of Agua da Prata, which supported the effectiveness of etch/lead mechanisms, for example, between 234 U/ 238 U activity ratio and dissolved solids, ionic strength, C O 2 partial pressure, 'traditional' index of base exchange and 'new' index of base exchange (involving the anion fluoride). A higher 234 U/ 238 U activity ratio was found to be directly related to a higher value of dissolution rate and a higher value of 222 Rn content was found to be related with a higher value of specific surface area. These relationships explained a good inverse logarithmic correlation between 234 U/ 238 U activity ratio and 222 Rn content of the spring waters of Aguas da Prata. (author)

  5. Recent developments in the dissolution and automated analysis of plutonium and uranium for safeguards measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, D.D.; Marsh, S.F.; Rein, J.E.; Waterbury, G.R.

    1975-01-01

    The status of a program to develop assay methods for plutonium and uranium for safeguards purposes is presented. The current effort is directed more toward analyses of scrap-type material with an end goal of precise automated methods that also will be applicable to product materials. A guiding philosophy for the analysis of scrap-type materials, characterized by heterogeneity and difficult dissolution, is relatively fast dissolution treatment to effect 90 percent or more solubilization of the uranium and plutonium, analysis of the soluble fraction by precise automated methods, and gamma-counting assay of any residue fraction using simple techniques. A Teflon-container metal-shell apparatus provides acid dissolutions of typical fuel cycle materials at temperatures to 275 0 C and pressures to 340 atm. Gas--solid reactions at elevated temperatures separate uranium from refractory materials by the formation of volatile uranium compounds. The condensed compounds then are dissolved in acid for subsequent analysis. An automated spectrophotometer is used for the determination of uranium and plutonium. The measurement range is 1 to 14 mg of either element with a relative standard deviation of 0.5 percent over most of the range. The throughput rate is 5 min per sample. A second-generation automated instrument is being developed for the determination of plutonium. A precise and specific electroanalytical method is used as its operational basis. (auth)

  6. X-ray spectroscopic studies of microbial transformations of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodge, C.J.; Francis, A.J.; Clayton, C.R.

    1995-10-01

    Several uranium compounds U-metal (α-phase), UO 2 , U 3 O 8 , γ-UO 3 , uranyl acetate, uranyl nitrate, uranyl sulfate, aqueous and solid forms of 1:1 U:citric acid and 1:1:2 U:Fe:citric acid mixed-metal complexes, and a precipitate obtained by photodegradation of the U-citrate complex were characterized by X-ray spectroscopy using XPS, XANES, and EXAFS. XPS and XANES were used to determine U oxidation states. Spectral shifts were obtained at the U 4f 7/2 and U 4f 5/2 binding energies using XPS, and at the uranium M V absorption edge using XANES. The magnitude of the energy shift with oxidation state, and the ability to detect mixed-valent forms make these ideal techniques for determining uranium speciation in wastes subjected to bacterial action. The structure of 1:1 U:citric acid complex in both the aqueous and solid state was determined by EXAFS analysis of hexavalent uranium at the L M absorption edge and suggests the presence of a binuclear complex with a (UO 2 ) 2 (μ,η 2 -citrato) 2 core with a U-U distance of 5.2 angstrom. The influence of Fe on the structure of U-citrate complex was determined by EXAFS and the presence of a binuclear mixed-metal citrate complex with a U-Fe distance of 4.8 angstrom was confirmed. The precipitate resulting from photodegradation of U-citrate complex was identified as an amorphous form of uranium trioxide by XPS and EXAS

  7. Uranium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poty, B.; Roux, J.

    1998-01-01

    The processing of uranium ores for uranium extraction and concentration is not much different than the processing of other metallic ores. However, thanks to its radioactive property, the prospecting of uranium ores can be performed using geophysical methods. Surface and sub-surface detection methods are a combination of radioactive measurement methods (radium, radon etc..) and classical mining and petroleum prospecting methods. Worldwide uranium prospecting has been more or less active during the last 50 years, but the rise of raw material and energy prices between 1970 and 1980 has incited several countries to develop their nuclear industry in order to diversify their resources and improve their energy independence. The result is a considerable increase of nuclear fuels demand between 1980 and 1990. This paper describes successively: the uranium prospecting methods (direct, indirect and methodology), the uranium deposits (economical definition, uranium ores, and deposits), the exploitation of uranium ores (use of radioactivity, radioprotection, effluents), the worldwide uranium resources (definition of the different categories and present day state of worldwide resources). (J.S.)

  8. Uranium market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubini, L.A.; Asem, M.A.D.

    1990-01-01

    The historical development of the uranium market is present in two periods: The initial period 1947-1970 and from 1970 onwards, with the establishment of a commercial market. The world uranium requirements are derived from the corresponding forecast of nuclear generating capacity, with, particular emphasis to the brazilian requirements. The forecast of uranium production until the year 2000 is presented considering existing inventories and the already committed demand. The balance between production and requirements is analysed. Finally the types of contracts currently being used and the development of uranium prices in the world market are considered. (author)

  9. Uranium enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This report looks at the following issues: How much Soviet uranium ore and enriched uranium are imported into the United States and what is the extent to which utilities flag swap to disguise these purchases? What are the U.S.S.R.'s enriched uranium trading practices? To what extent are utilities required to return used fuel to the Soviet Union as part of the enriched uranium sales agreement? Why have U.S. utilities ended their contracts to buy enrichment services from DOE?

  10. The solubility of solid fission products in carbides and nitrides of uranium and plutonium. Part I: literature review on experimental results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benedict, U.

    1977-01-01

    This review compiles the available data on the solubility of the most important non-volatile fission products in the carbides, nitrides, and carbonitrides of uranium and plutonium. It includes some elements which are not fission products, but belong to a group of the Periodic Table which contains one or more fission products elements

  11. Improvements made in the methods of purifying uranium compounds and in the production of uranium metal at the Bouchet plant; Ameliorations apportees aux procedes de purification des composes d'uranium et a la fabrication de l'uranium metal a l'usine du Bouchet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Decrop, J; Delange, M; Holder, J; Huet, H; Sauteron, J; Vertes, P [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1958-07-01

    We intend to chart the development of the techniques used at the Bouchet plant since the First International Conference held in Geneva in 1955. During that Conference, the methods adopted at that time were described by B. GOLDSCHMIDT and P. VERTES. Generally speaking, the development since that time has been governed by the following factors: 1- Conversion to a mass-production scale: The metal output, which amounted to approximately 10 tons in 1952, practically doubled each year, reaching successive figures of 80 tons in 1955, 160 tons in 1956 and 300 tons in 1957. At this very moment the output capacity of the plant is approaching its maximum, set at 500 tons/year, which it will reach at the end of the year. Beyond this output figure, the work will be carried on by the second French uranium production plant, which is now being erected at Narbonne. 2- Gradual abandoning of ore treatment, resulting from the decentralization of the duties performed by the CEA; The Bouchet Plant had, as a matter of fact, the first French treatment facilities, operating on the basis of 10 to 20 tons of ore per day. This ore, first concentrated at the production site proper by means of physical or physico-chemical methods to at least a 2 per cent uranium content, was sufficiently valuable to warrant quite well the cost involved in shipping it. However, the increase in the production schedules led to the treatment of ores of lower and lower grades, and it became more profitable to proceed with the chemicalating of these low-grade ores at the site after more or less thorough grading and, if necessary, preconcentration. As a result, the Bouchet plant scarcely ever receives uranium ores; on the contrary, the mining companies send their chemical concentrates, uranous phosphate and then sodium uranate from the Gueugnon Works in Saone-et-Loire since 1955; magnesium uranate from the Ecarpiere Works in Vendee since the beginning of 1957 and, very soon, products from the works which are now being

  12. Airborne uranium, its concentration and toxicity in uranium enrichment facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, J.; Mauro, J.; Ryniker, J.; Fellman, R.

    1979-02-01

    The release of uranium hexafluoride and its hydrolysis products into the work environment of a plant for enriching uranium by means of gas centrifuges is discussed. The maximum permissible mass and curie concentration of airborne uranium (U) is identified as a function of the enrichment level (i.e., U-235/total U), and chemical and physical form. A discussion of the chemical and radiological toxicity of uranium as a function of enrichment and chemical form is included. The toxicity of products of UF 6 hydrolysis in the atmosphere, namely, UO 2 F 2 and HF, the particle size of toxic particulate material produced from this hydrolysis, and the toxic effects of HF and other potential fluoride compounds are also discussed. Results of an investigation of known effects of humidity and temperature on particle size of UO 2 F 2 produced by the reaction of UF 6 with water vapor in the air are reported. The relationship of the solubility of uranium compounds to their toxic effects was studied. Identification and discussion of the standards potentially applicable to airborne uranium compounds in the working environment are presented. The effectiveness of High Efficiency Particulate (HEPA) filters subjected to the corrosive environment imposed by the presence of hydrogen fluoride is discussed

  13. Anticorrosion protection of uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goncharov, Ivan D.; Kazakovskaya, Tatiana; Tukmakov, Victor; Shapovalov, Vyacheslav [Russian Federal Nuclear Center-VNIIEF, 37, Mira Ave., RU-607190 Sarov (Nizhnii Gorod), 010450 (Russian Federation)

    2004-07-01

    Uranium in atmospheric conditions is non-stable. Sloughing products are being generated on its surface during storage or use. These corrosion products make many difficulties because of necessity to provide personnel safety. Besides, uranium corrosion may cause damage in parts. The first works devoted to uranium corrosion were performed in the framework of the USA Manhattan Project in the early forties of last century. Various methods of uranium protection were investigated, among them the galvanic one was the most studied. Later on the galvanic technology was patented. The works on this problem remains urgent up to the present time. In Russia, many methods of uranium corrosion protection, mainly against atmospheric corrosion, were tried on. In particular, such methods as diffusion zinc and paint coating were investigated. In the first case, a complex intermetallic U-Zn compound was formed but its protection was not reliable enough, this protection system was inconvenient and uncertain and that is why an additional paint coating was necessary. In the case of paint coatings another problem appeared. It was necessary to find such a coating where gas-permeability would prevail over water-permeability. Otherwise significant uranium corrosion occurs. This circumstance together with low mechanical resistance of paint coatings does not allow to use paint coating for long-term protection of uranium. Currently, there are following methods of uranium protection: ion-plasma, galvanic and thermo-vacuum annealing. These are described in this paper. In the end the issue of corrosion protection in reactor core zones is addressed. Here the greatest difficulties are caused when enriched uranium heated up to 500 deg. C needs anticorrosion protection. In this case various metal coatings are not reliable because of brittle inter-metallide formation. The reliable protection may be provided only up to the temperature plus 400 - 500 deg. C with the help of galvanic copper coating since

  14. Anticorrosion protection of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncharov, Ivan D.; Kazakovskaya, Tatiana; Tukmakov, Victor; Shapovalov, Vyacheslav

    2004-01-01

    Uranium in atmospheric conditions is non-stable. Sloughing products are being generated on its surface during storage or use. These corrosion products make many difficulties because of necessity to provide personnel safety. Besides, uranium corrosion may cause damage in parts. The first works devoted to uranium corrosion were performed in the framework of the USA Manhattan Project in the early forties of last century. Various methods of uranium protection were investigated, among them the galvanic one was the most studied. Later on the galvanic technology was patented. The works on this problem remains urgent up to the present time. In Russia, many methods of uranium corrosion protection, mainly against atmospheric corrosion, were tried on. In particular, such methods as diffusion zinc and paint coating were investigated. In the first case, a complex intermetallic U-Zn compound was formed but its protection was not reliable enough, this protection system was inconvenient and uncertain and that is why an additional paint coating was necessary. In the case of paint coatings another problem appeared. It was necessary to find such a coating where gas-permeability would prevail over water-permeability. Otherwise significant uranium corrosion occurs. This circumstance together with low mechanical resistance of paint coatings does not allow to use paint coating for long-term protection of uranium. Currently, there are following methods of uranium protection: ion-plasma, galvanic and thermo-vacuum annealing. These are described in this paper. In the end the issue of corrosion protection in reactor core zones is addressed. Here the greatest difficulties are caused when enriched uranium heated up to 500 deg. C needs anticorrosion protection. In this case various metal coatings are not reliable because of brittle inter-metallide formation. The reliable protection may be provided only up to the temperature plus 400 - 500 deg. C with the help of galvanic copper coating since

  15. Synthesis of UN coatings on uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mar, R.W.; Hastings, J.C.

    1975-04-01

    A single-displacement reaction approach was used to form uranium mononitride as a protective coating for uranium; the source of the nitrogen was a solid nitride, and magnesium nitride was chosen as the most attractive candidate for the experiment. While the goal of synthesizing a single-phase uranium mononitride coating at temperatures lower than 1405 K was met, a number of problems inherent in the process were identified. 6 figures, 2 tables

  16. In vitro biomonitoring in polar extracts of solid phase matrices reveals the presence of unknown compounds with estrogenic activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Legler, J.; Leonards, P.E.G.; Spenkelink, A.; Murk, A.J.

    2003-01-01

    Determination of estrogenic activity has so far mainly concentrated on the assessment of compounds in surface water and effluent. This study is one of the first to biomonitor (xeno-)estrogens in sediment, suspended particulate matter and aquatic organisms. The relatively polar acetone extracts from

  17. Nanoscale formation of new solid-state compounds by topochemical effects: The interfacial reactions ZnO with Al2O3 as a model system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pin, Sonia; Ghigna, Paolo; Spinolo, Giorgio; Quartarone, Eliana; Mustarelli, Piercarlo; D'Acapito, Francesco; Migliori, Andrea; Calestani, Gianluca

    2009-01-01

    The chemical reactivity of thin layers (ca. 10 nm thick) of ZnO deposited onto differently oriented Al 2 O 3 single crystals has been investigated by means of atomic force microscopy inspections and X-ray absorption spectroscopy at the Zn-K edge. The (0001) ZnO -parallel (112-bar0) sapphire interface yields the ZnAl 2 O 4 spinel and a quite stable film morphology. Instead, the (112-bar0) ZnO -parallel (11-bar02) sapphire and (0001) ZnO -parallel (0001) sapphire interfaces give origin to a new compound (or, possibly, even two new compounds), whose chemical nature is most likely that of a ZnO/Al 2 O 3 phase, with still unknown composition and crystal structure. In addition, in the last two cases, films collapse into prismatic twins of ca. 1 μm in dimension. These experimental findings demonstrate that in a solid-state reaction, the topotactical relationships between the reacting solids are of crucial importance not only in determining the kinetic and mechanisms of the process in its early stages, but even the chemical nature of the product. - Graphical abstract: EXAFS Fourier transforms and morphology of different reactive interfaces between ZnO and Al 2 O 3 .

  18. A Quantitative Property-Property Relationship for the Internal Diffusion Coefficients of Organic Compounds in Solid Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Lei; Fantke, Peter; Jolliet, Olivier

    2017-01-01

    of chemical-material combinations. This paper develops and evaluates a quantitative property-property relationship (QPPR) to predict diffusion coefficients for a wide range of organic chemicals and materials. We first compiled a training dataset of 1103 measured diffusion coefficients for 158 chemicals in 32......Indoor releases of organic chemicals encapsulated in solid materials are major contributors to human exposures and are directly related to the internal diffusion coefficient in solid materials. Existing correlations to estimate the diffusion coefficient are only valid for a limited number...... consolidated material types. Following a detailed analysis of the temperature influence, we developed a multiple linear regression model to predict diffusion coefficients as a function of chemical molecular weight (MW), temperature, and material type (adjusted R2 of 0.93). The internal validations showed...

  19. MCX based solid phase extraction combined with liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry for the simultaneous determination of 31 endocrine-disrupting compounds in surface water of Shanghai.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong-Chang; Yu, Xue-jun; Yang, Wen-chao; Peng, Jin-feng; Xu, Ting; Yin, Da-Qiang; Hu, Xia-lin

    2011-10-15

    A novel analytical method employing MCX (mixed-mode cationic exchange) based solid phase extraction (SPE) coupled with liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was developed to detect 31 endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDCs) in surface water samples simultaneously. The target EDCs belong to five classes, including seven estrogens, eight androgens, six progesterones, five adrenocortical hormones and five industrial compounds. In order to simultaneously concentrate the target EDCs and eliminate matrix interferences in the water samples, MCX SPE cartridges were employed for SPE, and then followed by a simple and highly efficient three-step sequential elution procedure. Two electrospray ionization (ESI) detection modes, positive (ESI+) and (ESI-), were optimized for HPLC-MS/MS analysis to obtain the highest sensitivity for all the EDCs. The limits of detection (LODs) were 0.02-1.9 ng L(-1), which are lower than or comparable to these reported in references. Wide linear ranges (LOD-100 ng L(-1) for ESI+ mode, and LOD-200 ng L(-1) for ESI- mode) were obtained with determination coefficients (R(2)) higher than 0.99 for all the compounds. With five internal standards, good recoveries (84.4-103.0%) of all the target compounds were obtained in selected surface water samples. The developed method was successfully applied to investigate the EDCs occurrence in the surface water of Shanghai by analyzing surface water samples from 11 sites. The results showed that nearly all the target compounds (30 in 31) were present in the surface water samples of Shanghai, of which three industrial compounds (4-t-OP, BPA, and BPF) showed the highest concentrations (median concentrations were 11.88-23.50 ng L(-1)), suggesting that industrial compounds were the dominating EDCs in the surface water of Shanghai, and much more attention should be paid on these compounds. Our present research demonstrated that SPE with MCX cartridges combined with HPLC-MS/MS was convenient

  20. Effects of fining on phenolic compounds and colour of red wine obtained with addition of increased amounts of grape solid phase in pomace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puškaš Vladimir S.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this work is to study the effect of grape pomace enrichment in solid phase (stems and seeds on phenolic compounds and colour stability of obtained red wines, before and after use of different fining agents. Results have shown increase in total phenols and flavan-3-ols content after grape solid phase addition. On the other hand, decrease in anthocyanins content has generally been recorded in all wine samples except in wines obtained with addition of 40 g/l of seeds during maceration. Stems addition caused decrease in colour intensity while addition of seeds has increased this colour parameter. The use of four fining agents (albumin, gelatine, bentonite and PVPP has been investigated and compared, especially in terms of their influence on potential stabilization effect of grape solid phase on wine colour. Fined wines tended to have considerably lower anthocyanin and flavan-3-ol levels, especially in the case of gelatine and PVPP treatment (decrease up to 60 and 70%, respectively. In the case of chromatic parameters, used fining agents caused colour intensity decrease but it is important to emphasize that their values, after fining, are still as high as expected from red wine. This can be explained by the stabilization effect of increased flavan-3-ols content.

  1. Optimization of the quantitative direct solid total-reflection X-ray fluorescence analysis of glass microspheres functionalized with Zr organometallic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez-Ruiz, Ramon, E-mail: ramon.fernandez@uam.e [Servicio Interdepartamental de Investigacion, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, E-28049, Madrid (Spain); Andres, Roman; Jesus, Ernesto de [Departamento de Quimica Inorganica, Universidad de Alcala, Campus Universitario, 28871, Alcala de Henares, Madrid (Spain); Terreros, Pilar [Instituto de Catalisis y Petroleo-Quimica, CSIC, Cantoblanco, 28049, Madrid (Spain)

    2010-06-15

    Quantitative determination of Zr in the system constituted by quartz microspheres functionalized with two kinds of organometallic compounds has been studied due to the importance of the correct quantization of the Zr from a catalytic point of view. Two parallel approximations were done, i.e. acid leaching and direct solid quantization. To validate the acid leaching TXRF measures, ICP-MS analysis were carried out. The results obtained by means of the optimization of the quantitative direct solid procedure show that, with a previous particle size distribution modification, TXRF obtain the same analytical results as ICP-MS and TXRF by acid leaching way but without previous chemical acid manipulation. This fact implies an important improvement for the analysis time, reagents costs and analysis facility and it proves again the versatility of TXRF to solve analytical problems in an easy, quick and accurate way. Additionally and for the direct solid TXRF measurements, a deeper study was done to evaluate the intrinsic analytical parameters of the Zr TXRF analysis of this material. So, the influence of the particle size distributions (modified by means of a high power ultrasound probe) with respect to uncertainty and detection limits for Zr were developed. The main analytical conclusion was the strong correlation between the average particle sizes and the TXRF analytical parameters of Zr measurements, i.e. concentration, accuracy, uncertainty and detection limits.

  2. Uranium mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lange, G.

    1975-01-01

    The winning of uranium ore is the first stage of the fuel cycle. The whole complex of questions to be considered when evaluating the profitability of an ore mine is shortly outlined, and the possible mining techniques are described. Some data on uranium mining in the western world are also given. (RB) [de

  3. [UO{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}(phen){sub 2}], a simple uranium(VI) compound with a significantly bent uranyl unit (phen=1,10-phenanthroline)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoene, Sebastian; Radoske, Thomas; Maerz, Juliane; Stumpf, Thorsten; Patzschke, Michael; Ikeda-Ohno, Atsushi [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), Institute of Resource Ecology, Dresden (Germany)

    2017-10-04

    A simple synthesis based on UO{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}.n H{sub 2}O and 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) resulted in the formation of a new uranyl(VI) complex [UO{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}(phen){sub 2}] (1), revealing a unique dodecadeltahedron coordination geometry around the uranium center with significant bending of the robust linear arrangement of the uranyl (O-U-O) unit. Quantum chemical calculations on complex 1 indicated that the weak but distinct interactions between the uranyl oxygens and the adjacent hydrogens of phen molecules play an important role in forming the dodecadeltahedron geometry that fits to the crystal structure of 1, resulting in the bending the uranyl unit. The uranyl oxygens in 1 are anticipated to be activated as compared with those in other linear uranyl(VI) compounds. (copyright 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  4. Solid-solution stability and preferential site-occupancy in (R-R′)2Fe14B compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colin, C. V.; Dempsey, N. M.; Ito, M.; Yano, M.; Suard, E.; Givord, D.

    2016-01-01

    The rare-earth (R) uniaxial anisotropy of R 2 Fe 14 B compounds with magnetic R atoms (e.g., Nd or Pr) is at the origin of the exceptional hard magnetic properties achieved in magnets based on these compounds. The uniaxial anisotropy found in Ce 2 Fe 14 B is attributed mainly to the magnetism of Fe. Ce is the most abundant R element and there has been much recent effort to fabricate magnets in which Ce is partially substituted for Nd. In the present neutron study of (R 1−x Ce x ) 2 Fe 14 B (R = La or Nd), Ce is found to enter the R 2 Fe 14 B phase over the entire composition range. The crystallographic parameters decrease with increasing Ce content and the Ce atoms preferentially occupy the smaller 4f sites. It is concluded that Ce in these (RR′) 2 Fe 14 B compounds essentially maintains the intermediate valence character found in Ce 2 Fe 14 B. It is proposed that, in this intermediate valence state, Ce weakly contributes to uniaxial anisotropy, thus making a link with the fact that significant coercivity is preserved in Ce-substituted NdFeB magnets.

  5. Solid-solution stability and preferential site-occupancy in (R-R')2Fe14B compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colin, C. V.; Ito, M.; Yano, M.; Dempsey, N. M.; Suard, E.; Givord, D.

    2016-06-01

    The rare-earth (R) uniaxial anisotropy of R2Fe14B compounds with magnetic R atoms (e.g., Nd or Pr) is at the origin of the exceptional hard magnetic properties achieved in magnets based on these compounds. The uniaxial anisotropy found in Ce2Fe14B is attributed mainly to the magnetism of Fe. Ce is the most abundant R element and there has been much recent effort to fabricate magnets in which Ce is partially substituted for Nd. In the present neutron study of (R1-xCex)2Fe14B (R = La or Nd), Ce is found to enter the R2Fe14B phase over the entire composition range. The crystallographic parameters decrease with increasing Ce content and the Ce atoms preferentially occupy the smaller 4f sites. It is concluded that Ce in these (RR')2Fe14B compounds essentially maintains the intermediate valence character found in Ce2Fe14B. It is proposed that, in this intermediate valence state, Ce weakly contributes to uniaxial anisotropy, thus making a link with the fact that significant coercivity is preserved in Ce-substituted NdFeB magnets.

  6. Headspace solid-phase microextraction for the determination of volatile organic sulphur and selenium compounds in beers, wines and spirits using gas chromatography and atomic emission detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campillo, Natalia; Peñalver, Rosa; López-García, Ignacio; Hernández-Córdoba, Manuel

    2009-09-25

    A rapid and solvent-free method for the determination of eight volatile organic sulphur and two selenium compounds in different beverage samples using headspace solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography with atomic emission detection has been developed. The bonded carboxen/polydimethylsiloxane fiber was the most suitable for preconcentrating the analytes from the headspace of the sample solution. Volumes of 20 mL of undiluted beer were used while, in the case of wines and spirits, sample:water ratios of 5:15 and 2:18, respectively, were used, in order to obtain the maximum sensitivity. Quantitation was carried out by using synthetic matrices of beer and wine, and a spiked sample for spirits, and using ethyl methyl sulphide and isopropyl disulphide as internal standards. Detection limits ranged from 8 ng L(-1) to 40 ng mL(-1), depending on the compound and the beverage sample analyzed, with a fiber time exposure of 20 min at ambient temperature. The optimized method was successfully applied to different samples, some of the studied compounds being detected at concentration levels in the 0.04-152 ng mL(-1) range.

  7. Trace-level determination of polar flavour compounds in butter by solid-phase extraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adahchour, M; Vreuls, R J; van der Heijden, A; Brinkman, U A

    1999-06-04

    Volatile compounds are responsible for the aromas of butter. A simple technique for the determination of these components is described which is based on solid-phase extraction (SPE) after melting of the butter and separation of the aqueous phase from the fat. Volatile flavours present in the water fraction are collected by off-line SPE on cartidges packed with a copolymer sorbent. After desorption with 500 microliters of methyl acetate, 1-microliter aliquots are quantified and/or identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The procedure was tested with respect to recovery, linearity and limit of detection in real-life samples using five polar model analytes. It allows the characterisation of polar flavour compounds in butter prior to and after heat treatment at 170 degrees C. From the five model compounds, vanillin, traces of diacetyl and maltol were found to be present in the butter samples. After heat treatment 500-1000-fold increased concentration of maltol, and substantial amounts of furaneol were detected.

  8. Catalytic Upgrading of Bio-Oil by Reacting with Olefins and Alcohols over Solid Acids: Reaction Paths via Model Compound Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingwen Wang

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Catalytic refining of bio-oil by reacting with olefin/alcohol over solid acids can convert bio-oil to oxygen-containing fuels. Reactivities of groups of compounds typically present in bio-oil with 1-octene (or 1-butanol were studied at 120 °C/3 h over Dowex50WX2, Amberlyst15, Amberlyst36, silica sulfuric acid (SSA and Cs2.5H0.5PW12O40 supported on K10 clay (Cs2.5/K10, 30 wt. %. These compounds include phenol, water, acetic acid, acetaldehyde, hydroxyacetone, d-glucose and 2-hydroxymethylfuran. Mechanisms for the overall conversions were proposed. Other olefins (1,7-octadiene, cyclohexene, and 2,4,4-trimethylpentene and alcohols (iso-butanol with different activities were also investigated. All the olefins and alcohols used were effective but produced varying product selectivities. A complex model bio-oil, synthesized by mixing all the above-stated model compounds, was refined under similar conditions to test the catalyst’s activity. SSA shows the highest hydrothermal stability. Cs2.5/K10 lost most of its activity. A global reaction pathway is outlined. Simultaneous and competing esterification, etherfication, acetal formation, hydration, isomerization and other equilibria were involved. Synergistic interactions among reactants and products were determined. Acid-catalyzed olefin hydration removed water and drove the esterification and acetal formation equilibria toward ester and acetal products.

  9. U uranium. Suppl. Vol. D3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haug, H.O.

    1982-01-01

    This volume of the uranium series of the Gmelin handbook deals with the anion exchange of uranium. Compounds of the valence states of III, IV, V and VI of uranium in halide, nitrate, sulfate, phosphate, and carbonate media as well as in media containing organic complexing agents are treated. The literature cited covers the period from about 1947 to the end of 1980. (RB) [de

  10. Molybdenum from uranium solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardner, H.E.

    1981-01-01

    A method of removing molybdenum from a uranium bearing solution is claimed. It comprises adding sufficient reactive lead compound to supply at least 90 percent of the stoichiometric quantity of lead ion required to fully react with the molybdenum present to form insoluble lead molybdate and continuing the reaction with agitation until the desired percentage of the molybdenum present has reacted with the lead ion

  11. Uranium enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    GAO was asked to address several questions concerning a number of proposed uranium enrichment bills introduced during the 100th Congress. The bill would have restructured the Department of Energy's uranium enrichment program as a government corporation to allow it to compete more effectively in the domestic and international markets. Some of GAO's findings discussed are: uranium market experts believe and existing market models show that the proposed DOE purchase of a $750 million of uranium from domestic producers may not significantly increase production because of large producer-held inventories; excess uranium enrichment production capacity exists throughout the world; therefore, foreign producers are expected to compete heavily in the United States throughout the 1990s as utilities' contracts with DOE expire; and according to a 1988 agreement between DOE's Offices of Nuclear Energy and Defense Programs, enrichment decommissioning costs, estimated to total $3.6 billion for planning purposes, will be shared by the commercial enrichment program and the government

  12. Uranium resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    This is a press release issued by the OECD on 9th March 1976. It is stated that the steep increases in demand for uranium foreseen in and beyond the 1980's, with doubling times of the order of six to seven years, will inevitably create formidable problems for the industry. Further substantial efforts will be needed in prospecting for new uranium reserves. Information is given in tabular or graphical form on the following: reasonably assured resources, country by country; uranium production capacities, country by country; world nuclear power growth; world annual uranium requirements; world annual separative requirements; world annual light water reactor fuel reprocessing requirements; distribution of reactor types (LWR, SGHWR, AGR, HWR, HJR, GG, FBR); and world fuel cycle capital requirements. The information is based on the latest report on Uranium Resources Production and Demand, jointly issued by the OECD's Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) and the International Atomic Energy Agency. (U.K.)

  13. Simultaneous determination of Ra-226, natural uranium and natural thorium by gamma-ray spectrometry INa(Ti), in solid samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvador, S.; Navarro, T.; Alvarez, A.

    1991-01-01

    A method has been developed to determine activities of Ra-226, natural uranium and natural thorium by gamma-ray spectrometry. The measurement system has been calibrated using standards specially prepared at the laboratory. It is necessary to assume secular equilibrium in the samples, between Ra-226 and Th-232 and its daughters nuclides, and between U-238 and its immediate daughter Th-234, as the photo peaks measured are those of the daughters. The results obtained indicate that this method can of ter replace the radiochemical techniques used to measure activities in this type of sample. The method has been successfully used to determine these natural isotopes in samples from uranium mills. (Author) 9 refs

  14. Uranium supply and demand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spriggs, M J

    1976-01-01

    Papers were presented on the pattern of uranium production in South Africa; Australian uranium--will it ever become available; North American uranium resources, policies, prospects, and pricing; economic and political environment of the uranium mining industry; alternative sources of uranium supply; whither North American demand for uranium; and uranium demand and security of supply--a consumer's point of view. (LK)

  15. Multi-column bioleaching of a uranium ore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng Yunsheng; Zheng Ying; Liu Hui; Cheng Hao

    2014-01-01

    The technology of bioleaching uranium ore can increase the uranium leaching rate and shorten the leaching uranium period, save consumption of acid and oxidant, lower production costs. An experiment on multi-column bioleaching of a uranium ore was done using mesophilic bacteria, the average uranium recovery of 90% was achieved in 39 days. Compared with traditional process, leaching period was shortened to 39 d from 59 d, acid consumption and liquid-solid ratio were also reduced. The results showed it is suitable to bioleach the uranium ore. (authors)

  16. Rapid method for the simultaneous detection of boar taint compounds by means of solid phase microextraction coupled to gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verplanken, Kaat; Wauters, Jella; Van Durme, Jim; Claus, Dirk; Vercammen, Joeri; De Saeger, Sarah; Vanhaecke, Lynn

    2016-09-02

    Because of animal welfare issues, the voluntary ban on surgical castration of male piglets, starting January 2018 was announced in a European Treaty. One viable alternative is the fattening of entire male pigs. However, this can cause negative consumer reactions due to the occurrence of boar taint and possibly lead to severe economic losses in pig husbandry. In this study, headspace solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME) coupled to GC-MS was used in the development and optimization of a candidate method for fast and accurate detection of the boar taint compounds. Remarkably fast extraction (45s) of the boar taint compounds from adipose tissue was achieved by singeing the fat with a soldering iron while released volatiles were extracted in-situ using HS-SPME. The obtained method showed good performance characteristics after validation according to CD 2002/657/EC and ISO/IEC 17025 guidelines. Moreover, cross-validation with an in-house UHPLC-HR-Orbitrap-MS method showed good agreement between an in-laboratory method and the new candidate method for the fast extraction and detection of skatole and androstenone, which emphasizes the accuracy of this new SPME-GC-MS method. Threshold detection of the boar taint compounds on a portable GC-MS could not be achieved. However, despite the lack of sensitivity obtained on the latter instrument, a very fast method with run-to-run time of 3.5min for the detection of the boar taint compounds was developed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Uranium from seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregg, D.; Folkendt, M.

    1982-01-01

    A novel process for recovering uranium from seawater is proposed and some of the critical technical parameters are evaluated. The process, in summary, consists of two different options for contacting adsorbant pellets with seawater without pumping the seawater. It is expected that this will reduce the mass handling requirements, compared to pumped seawater systems, by a factor of approximately 10 5 , which should also result in a large reduction in initial capital investment. Activated carbon, possibly in combination with a small amount of dissolved titanium hydroxide, is expected to be the preferred adsorbant material instead of the commonly assumed titanium hydroxide alone. The activated carbon, after exposure to seawater, can be stripped of uranium with an appropriate eluant (probably an acid) or can be burned for its heating value (possible in a power plant) leaving the uranium further enriched in its ash. The uranium, representing about 1% of the ash, is then a rich ore and would be recovered in a conventional manner. Experimental results have indicated that activated carbon, acting alone, is not adequately effective in adsorbing the uranium from seawater. We measured partition coefficients (concentration ratios) of approximately 10 3 in seawater instead of the reported values of 10 5 . However, preliminary tests carried out in fresh water show considerable promise for an extraction system that uses a combination of dissolved titanium hydroxide (in minute amounts) which forms an insoluble compound with the uranyl ion, and the insoluble compound then being sorbed out on activated carbon. Such a system showed partition coefficients in excess of 10 5 in fresh water. However, the system was not tested in seawater

  18. US uranium reserves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, M.V.

    1981-01-01

    The current low level of demand, compounded by rapidly rising costs and low prices, has caused a significant reduction in drilling for uranium in the United States, and the trend is likely to continue for a few more years. The effect on uranium reserves will be fewer additions to reserves because less exploration is being done. Further reductions will occur, especially in low-cost reserves, because of increasing costs, continuing depletion through production, and erosion through the high grading of deposits to fulfill previous contractual commitments. During the past several years, it has been necessary to increase the upper reserve cost level twice to compensate for rising costs. Rising costs are reducing the $15 reserves, the cost category corresponding most closely to the present market price, to an insignificant level. An encouraging factor related to US uranium reserves is that the US position internationally, as far as quantity is concerned, is not bad for the longer term. Also, there is a general opinion that US consumers would rather contract for domestic uranium than for foreign because of greater assurance of supply. Still another factor, nearly impossible to assess, is what effect rising costs in other countries will have on their uranium reserves. The annual conferences between the Grand Junction Area Office staff and major uranium companies provide a broad overview of the industry's perception of the future. It is not optimistic for the short term. Many companies are reducing their exploration and mining programs; some are switching to other more marketable mineral commodities, and a few are investing more heavily in foreign ventures. However, there is general optimism for the long term, and many predict a growth in demand in the mid-1980s. If the industry can survive the few lean years ahead, rising prices may restore its viability to former levels

  19. Three-dimensional thermal simulations of thin solid carbon foils for charge stripping of high current uranium ion beams at a proposed new heavy-ion linac at GSI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Tahir

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an extensive numerical study of heating of thin solid carbon foils by 1.4  MeV/u uranium ion beams to explore the possibility of using such a target as a charge stripper at the proposed new Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung high energy heavy–ion linac. These simulations have been carried out using a sophisticated 3D computer code that accounts for physical phenomena that are important in this problem. A variety of beam and target parameters have been considered. The results suggest that within the considered parameter range, the target will be severely damaged by the beam. Thus, a carbon foil stripper does not seem to be a reliable option for the future Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung high energy heavy–ion linac, in particular, at FAIR design beam intensities.

  20. Determination of volatile organic compounds in water by headspace solid-phase microextraction gas chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry with triple quadrupole analyzer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cervera, M.I.; Beltran, J.; Lopez, F.J.; Hernandez, F.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Employing a statistical optimization improves results reducing experiments. → Use of MS (QqQ) allows high sensitivity determination and improves identification capabilities. → Using Q/q intensity ratios is a powerful tool to ensure compound identification. → HS SPME GC-MS/MS method allows determination of VOCs in complex matrix water samples. - Abstract: In the present work, a rapid method with little sample handling has been developed for determination of 23 selected volatile organic compounds in environmental and wastewater samples. The method is based on headspace solid-phase microextraction (SPME) followed by gas chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS) determination using triple quadrupole analyzer (QqQ) in electron ionization mode. The best conditions for extraction were optimised with a factorial design taking into account the interaction between different parameters and not only individual effects of variables. In the optimized procedure, 4 mL of water sample were extracted using a 10 mL vial and adding 0.4 g NaCl (final NaCl content of 10%). An SPME extraction with carboxen/polydimethylsiloxane 75 μm fiber for 30 min at 50 deg. C (with 5 min of previous equilibration time) with magnetic stirring was applied. Chromatographic determination was carried out by GC-MS/MS working in Selected Reaction Monitoring (SRM) mode. For most analytes, two MS/MS transitions were acquired, although for a few compounds it was difficult to obtain characteristic abundant fragments. In those cases, a pseudo selected reaction monitoring (pseudo-SRM) with three ions was used instead. The intensity ratio between quantitation (Q) and confirmation (q) signals was used as a confirmatory parameter. The method was validated by means of recovery experiments (n = 6) spiking mineral water samples at three concentration levels (0.1, 5 and 50 μg L -1 ). Recoveries between 70% and 120% were generally obtained with relative standard deviations (RSDs